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Sample records for liver dose estimation

  1. Quantitative simulation of intracellular signaling cascades in a Virtual Liver: estimating dose dependent changes in hepatocellular proliferation and apoptosis

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA Virtual Liver (v-Liver™) is developing an approach to predict dose-dependent hepatotoxicity as an in vivo tissue level response using in vitro data. The v-Liver accomplishes this using an in silico agent-based systems model that dynamically integrates environmental exp...

  2. Radiation dose estimates for radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Stabin, M.G.; Stubbs, J.B.; Toohey, R.E.

    1996-04-01

    Tables of radiation dose estimates based on the Cristy-Eckerman adult male phantom are provided for a number of radiopharmaceuticals commonly used in nuclear medicine. Radiation dose estimates are listed for all major source organs, and several other organs of interest. The dose estimates were calculated using the MIRD Technique as implemented in the MIRDOSE3 computer code, developed by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Radiation Internal Dose Information Center. In this code, residence times for source organs are used with decay data from the MIRD Radionuclide Data and Decay Schemes to produce estimates of radiation dose to organs of standardized phantoms representing individuals of different ages. The adult male phantom of the Cristy-Eckerman phantom series is different from the MIRD 5, or Reference Man phantom in several aspects, the most important of which is the difference in the masses and absorbed fractions for the active (red) marrow. The absorbed fractions for flow energy photons striking the marrow are also different. Other minor differences exist, but are not likely to significantly affect dose estimates calculated with the two phantoms. Assumptions which support each of the dose estimates appears at the bottom of the table of estimates for a given radiopharmaceutical. In most cases, the model kinetics or organ residence times are explicitly given. The results presented here can easily be extended to include other radiopharmaceuticals or phantoms.

  3. Weldon Spring historical dose estimate

    SciTech Connect

    Meshkov, N.; Benioff, P.; Wang, J.; Yuan, Y.

    1986-07-01

    This study was conducted to determine the estimated radiation doses that individuals in five nearby population groups and the general population in the surrounding area may have received as a consequence of activities at a uranium processing plant in Weldon Spring, Missouri. The study is retrospective and encompasses plant operations (1957-1966), cleanup (1967-1969), and maintenance (1969-1982). The dose estimates for members of the nearby population groups are as follows. Of the three periods considered, the largest doses to the general population in the surrounding area would have occurred during the plant operations period (1957-1966). Dose estimates for the cleanup (1967-1969) and maintenance (1969-1982) periods are negligible in comparison. Based on the monitoring data, if there was a person residing continually in a dwelling 1.2 km (0.75 mi) north of the plant, this person is estimated to have received an average of about 96 mrem/yr (ranging from 50 to 160 mrem/yr) above background during plant operations, whereas the dose to a nearby resident during later years is estimated to have been about 0.4 mrem/yr during cleanup and about 0.2 mrem/yr during the maintenance period. These values may be compared with the background dose in Missouri of 120 mrem/yr.

  4. Bayesian estimation of dose thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groer, P. G.; Carnes, B. A.

    2003-01-01

    An example is described of Bayesian estimation of radiation absorbed dose thresholds (subsequently simply referred to as dose thresholds) using a specific parametric model applied to a data set on mice exposed to 60Co gamma rays and fission neutrons. A Weibull based relative risk model with a dose threshold parameter was used to analyse, as an example, lung cancer mortality and determine the posterior density for the threshold dose after single exposures to 60Co gamma rays or fission neutrons from the JANUS reactor at Argonne National Laboratory. The data consisted of survival, censoring times and cause of death information for male B6CF1 unexposed and exposed mice. The 60Co gamma whole-body doses for the two exposed groups were 0.86 and 1.37 Gy. The neutron whole-body doses were 0.19 and 0.38 Gy. Marginal posterior densities for the dose thresholds for neutron and gamma radiation were calculated with numerical integration and found to have quite different shapes. The density of the threshold for 60Co is unimodal with a mode at about 0.50 Gy. The threshold density for fission neutrons declines monotonically from a maximum value at zero with increasing doses. The posterior densities for all other parameters were similar for the two radiation types.

  5. Estimation of the Dose and Dose Rate Effectiveness Factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappell, L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2013-01-01

    Current models to estimate radiation risk use the Life Span Study (LSS) cohort that received high doses and high dose rates of radiation. Transferring risks from these high dose rates to the low doses and dose rates received by astronauts in space is a source of uncertainty in our risk calculations. The solid cancer models recommended by BEIR VII [1], UNSCEAR [2], and Preston et al [3] is fitted adequately by a linear dose response model, which implies that low doses and dose rates would be estimated the same as high doses and dose rates. However animal and cell experiments imply there should be curvature in the dose response curve for tumor induction. Furthermore animal experiments that directly compare acute to chronic exposures show lower increases in tumor induction than acute exposures. A dose and dose rate effectiveness factor (DDREF) has been estimated and applied to transfer risks from the high doses and dose rates of the LSS cohort to low doses and dose rates such as from missions in space. The BEIR VII committee [1] combined DDREF estimates using the LSS cohort and animal experiments using Bayesian methods for their recommendation for a DDREF value of 1.5 with uncertainty. We reexamined the animal data considered by BEIR VII and included more animal data and human chromosome aberration data to improve the estimate for DDREF. Several experiments chosen by BEIR VII were deemed inappropriate for application to human risk models of solid cancer risk. Animal tumor experiments performed by Ullrich et al [4], Alpen et al [5], and Grahn et al [6] were analyzed to estimate the DDREF. Human chromosome aberration experiments performed on a sample of astronauts within NASA were also available to estimate the DDREF. The LSS cohort results reported by BEIR VII were combined with the new radiobiology results using Bayesian methods.

  6. GFR Estimating Equations and Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Beben, Tomasz; Rifkin, Dena E.

    2015-01-01

    It is important to accurately assess the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of patients with liver disease in order to deliver care and allocate organs for transplantation in a way that improves outcomes. The most commonly used methods to estimate GFR in this population are based on creatinine, which is biased by these patients’ low creatinine production and potentially by elevated serum bilirubin and decreased albumin levels. None of the creatinine based estimated GFR (eGFR) equations have been specifically modified for a population with liver disease, and even measurement of a 24 hour creatinine clearance has limitations. In liver disease, all creatinine based estimates of GFR overestimate gold standard measured GFR (mGFR), and the degree of overestimation is highest at lower mGFR values and in more severe liver disease. Cystatin C based eGFR has shown promise in general population studies by demonstrating less bias than creatinine based eGFR and improved association with clinically important outcomes, but results in the liver disease population have been mixed and further studies are necessary. Ultimately, specific eGFR equations for liver disease or novel methods for estimating GFR may be necessary. However, for now, the limitations of currently available methods need to be appreciated to understand renal function in liver disease. PMID:26311594

  7. Developing population estimates for dose reconstruction projects

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, D.M. )

    1991-01-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project was established in 1987 to estimate radiation doses that people received from nuclear operations at the Hanford site since 1944. To achieve this objective, demographic information was developed that describes the study population in enough detail to allow researchers to identify potentially exposed groups and the number of people in each of those groups. This type of information is central to most dose reconstruction projects. The purpose of this paper is to detail how historical population estimates can be reconstructed in a reliable manner by comparing results using three different estimation methods.

  8. Collective dose-practical ways to estimate a dose matrix.

    PubMed

    Simmonds, Jane; Sihra, Kamaljit; Bexon, Antony

    2006-06-01

    It has been suggested that collective doses should be presented in the form of a 'dose matrix' giving information on the breakdown of collective dose in space and time and by population group. This paper is an initial attempt to provide such a breakdown by geographic region and time, and to give an idea of associated individual doses for routine discharges to atmosphere. This is done through the use of representative per-caput individual doses but these need to be supplemented by information on the individual doses received by the critical group for a full radiological impact assessment. The results show that it is important to distinguish between the different population groups for up to a few hundred years following the discharge. However, beyond this time the main contribution is from global circulation and this distinction is less important. The majority of the collective dose was found to be delivered at low levels of individual doses; the estimated per-caput dose rates were significantly less than 10(-5) Sv y(-1), a level of dose felt to give rise to a trivial risk to the exposed individual.

  9. Fetal dose estimates for CT pelvimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, M.M.; Shearer, D.R.

    1989-04-01

    Fetal and maternal dose estimates for computed tomographic pelvimetry have been obtained from phantom measurements. Use of routine abdomen imaging techniques may result in localized fetal doses in excess of 13 mGy (1.3 rad). With the use of a low-exposure (40-mAs) technique, it is possible to obtain images of acceptable quality for the necessary measurements. The resulting dose to the fetus is approximately 2.3 mGy (0.23 rad).

  10. Estimated radiation dose from timepieces containing tritium

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell-Boyer, L M

    1980-01-01

    Luminescent timepieces containing radioactive tritium, either in elemental form or incorporated into paint, are available to the general public. The purpose of this study was to estimate potential radiation dose commitments received by the public annually as a result of exposure to tritium which may escape from the timepieces during their distribution, use, repair, and disposal. Much uncertainty is associated with final dose estimates due to limitations of empirical data from which exposure parameters were derived. Maximum individual dose estimates were generally less than 3 ..mu..Sv/yr, but ranged up to 2 mSv under worst-case conditions postulated. Estimated annual collective (population) doses were less than 5 person/Sv per million timepieces distributed.

  11. EXPOSURE RELATED DOSE ESTIMATING MODEL (ERDEM)

    EPA Science Inventory

    ERDEM is a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model with a graphical user interface (GUI) front end. Such a mathematical model was needed to make reliable estimates of the chemical dose to organs of animals or humans because of uncertainties of making route-to route, lo...

  12. Dose estimates from the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Lange, R.; Dickerson, M.H.; Gudiksen, P.H.

    1987-11-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) responded to the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident in the Soviet Union by utilizing long-range atmospheric dispersion modeling to estimate the amount of radioactivity released (source term) and the radiation dose distribution due to exposure to the radioactive cloud over Europe and the Northern Hemisphere. In later assessments, after the release of data on the accident by the Soviet Union, the ARAC team used their mesoscale to regional scale model to focus in on the radiation dose distribution within the Soviet Union and the vicinity of the Chernobyl plant. 22 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Dose estimation for internal organs during boron neutron capture therapy for body-trunk tumors.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Y; Tanaka, H; Suzuki, M; Masunaga, S; Kinashi, Y; Kondo, N; Ono, K; Maruhashi, A

    2014-06-01

    Radiation doses during boron neutron capture therapy for body-trunk tumors were estimated for various internal organs, using data from patients treated at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute. Dose-volume histograms were constructed for tissues of the lung, liver, kidney, pancreas, and bowel. For pleural mesothelioma, the target total dose to the normal lung tissues on the diseased side is 5Gy-Eq in average for the whole lung. It was confirmed that the dose to the liver should be carefully considered in cases of right lung disease.

  14. Dose to medium versus dose to water as an estimator of dose to sensitive skeletal tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, B. R. B.; Kramer, R.; Kawrakow, I.

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether dose to medium, Dm, or dose to water, Dw, provides a better estimate of the dose to the radiosensitive red bone marrow (RBM) and bone surface cells (BSC) in spongiosa, or cancellous bone. This is addressed in the larger context of the ongoing debate over whether Dm or Dw should be specified in Monte Carlo calculated radiotherapy treatment plans. The study uses voxelized, virtual human phantoms, FAX06/MAX06 (female/male), incorporated into an EGSnrc Monte Carlo code to perform Monte Carlo dose calculations during simulated irradiation by a 6 MV photon beam from an Elekta SL25 accelerator. Head and neck, chest and pelvis irradiations are studied. FAX06/MAX06 include precise modelling of spongiosa based on µCT images, allowing dose to RBM and BSC to be resolved from the dose to bone. Modifications to the FAX06/MAX06 user codes are required to score Dw and Dm in spongiosa. Dose uncertainties of ~1% (BSC, RBM) or ~0.5% (Dm, Dw) are obtained after up to 5 days of simulations on 88 CPUs. Clinically significant differences (>5%) between Dm and Dw are found only in cranial spongiosa, where the volume fraction of trabecular bone (TBVF) is high (55%). However, for spongiosa locations where there is any significant difference between Dm and Dw, comparisons of differential dose volume histograms (DVHs) and average doses show that Dw provides a better overall estimate of dose to RBM and BSC. For example, in cranial spongiosa the average Dm underestimates the average dose to sensitive tissue by at least 5%, while average Dw is within ~1% of the average dose to sensitive tissue. Thus, it is better to specify Dw than Dm in Monte Carlo treatment plans, since Dw provides a better estimate of dose to sensitive tissue in bone, the only location where the difference is likely to be clinically significant.

  15. Dose Estimation in Pediatric Nuclear Medicine.

    PubMed

    Fahey, Frederic H; Goodkind, Alison B; Plyku, Donika; Khamwan, Kitiwat; O'Reilly, Shannon E; Cao, Xinhua; Frey, Eric C; Li, Ye; Bolch, Wesley E; Sgouros, George; Treves, S Ted

    2017-03-01

    The practice of nuclear medicine in children is well established for imaging practically all physiologic systems but particularly in the fields of oncology, neurology, urology, and orthopedics. Pediatric nuclear medicine yields images of physiologic and molecular processes that can provide essential diagnostic information to the clinician. However, nuclear medicine involves the administration of radiopharmaceuticals that expose the patient to ionizing radiation and children are thought to be at a higher risk for adverse effects from radiation exposure than adults. Therefore it may be considered prudent to take extra care to optimize the radiation dose associated with pediatric nuclear medicine. This requires a solid understanding of the dosimetry associated with the administration of radiopharmaceuticals in children. Models for estimating the internal radiation dose from radiopharmaceuticals have been developed by the Medical Internal Radiation Dosimetry Committee of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging and other groups. But to use these models accurately in children, better pharmacokinetic data for the radiopharmaceuticals and anatomical models specifically for children need to be developed. The use of CT in the context of hybrid imaging has also increased significantly in the past 15 years, and thus CT dosimetry as it applies to children needs to be better understood. The concept of effective dose has been used to compare different practices involving radiation on a dosimetric level, but this approach may not be appropriate when applied to a population of children of different ages as the radiosensitivity weights utilized in the calculation of effective dose are not specific to children and may vary as a function of age on an organ-by-organ bias. As these gaps in knowledge of dosimetry and radiation risk as they apply to children are filled, more accurate models can be developed that allow for better approaches to dose optimization. In turn, this

  16. Biologically based dose-response model for liver tumors induced by trichloroethylene.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, C W

    2000-01-01

    The existing extensive laboratory data on trichloroethylene (TCE) and its two metabolites, dichloroacetic (DCA) and trichloroacetic (TCA), are used to explore the relationship among these three compounds. Under the hypothesis that these compounds induce liver tumors in mice through promotion of preexisting initiated cells, it is demonstrated that DCA alone could be responsible for all the response of carcinomas in liver of B6CF(1) mice. The focus of this paper is on how a plausible biological assumption could impact on low-dose risk estimates, rather than on the risk estimate per se. The findings suggest that low-dose risk estimates to humans would be overestimated unless the different background rates between mice and humans are properly accounted for. PMID:10807563

  17. Estimating γ-rays dose using computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Rawi, Anis M.; Muslih, Raad M.; Al-Harithy, Rafila S.

    When gum arabic is exposed to γ-rays, a change in its reflection and absorption ability for the different wave lengths is obtained. This change is used for estimating the absorbed γ-rays directly. In the present work we are not concerned with the type of components that are chemically formed as emphasis will only be put on the physical changes. The physical state is taken as a potential chemical change since a molecular damage is accumulated as a result of the dose absorbed. The fortran IV data General (Nova 3) designed for estimating colour measurements was connected to a spectrophotometer that enables measuring the changes in both absorbing and reflecting or even diffusing of light through irradiated materials.

  18. Low dose exposure of diethylnitrosamine affects mice liver thymidine kinase.

    PubMed

    Pariat, T; Sharan, R N

    1995-11-17

    Swiss albino mice exposed to 5 and 10 mg diethylnitrosamine kg-1 body weight by intravenous route up to four weeks showed cyto- and genotoxic effects. Distortion of cell and nucleus shapes and extensive necrosis were observed. Thymidine kinase activity in the liver declined in diethylnitrosamine dose and duration dependent manners. The adult-form of thymidine kinase isozyme declined continuously during this period. Simultaneously, two isozymic forms of thymidine kinase, with small anodic migrations in an electrophoretic field, were gradually induced. Significance of theses changes in diethylnitrosamine induced precarcinogenic toxicity has been discussed.

  19. Dose estimates of alternative plutonium pyrochemical processes.

    SciTech Connect

    Kornreich, D. E.; Jackson, J. W.; Boerigter, S. T.; Averill, W. A.; Fasel, J. H.

    2002-01-01

    We have coupled our dose calculation tool Pandemonium with a discrete-event, object-oriented, process-modeling system ProMosO to analyze a set of alternatives for plutonium purification operations. The results follow expected trends and indicate, from a dose perspective, that an experimental flowsheet may warrant further research to see if it can be scaled to industrial levels. Flowsheets that include fluoride processes resulted in the largest doses.

  20. Ingestion of Nevada Test Site Fallout: Internal dose estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Whicker, F.W.; Kirchner, T.B.; Anspaugh, L.R.

    1996-10-01

    This paper summarizes individual and collective dose estimates for the internal organs of hypothetical yet representative residents of selected communities that received measurable fallout from nuclear detonations at the Nevada Test Site. The doses, which resulted from ingestion of local and regional food products contaminated with over 20 radionuclides, were estimated with use of the PATHWAY food-chain-transport model to provide estimates of central tendency and uncertainty. The thyroid gland received much higher doses than other internal organs and tissues. In a avery few cases, infants might have received thyroid doses in excess of 1 Gy, depending on location, diet, and timing of fallout. {sup 131}I was the primary thyroid dose contributor, and fresh milk was the main exposure pathway. With the exception of the thyroid, organ doses from the ingestion pathway were much smaller (<3%) than those from external gamma exposure to deposited fallout. Doses to residents living closest to the Nevada Test Site were contributed mainly by a few fallout events; doses to more distantly located people were generally smaller, but a greater number of events provided measurable contributions. The effectiveness of different fallout events in producing internal organ doses through ingestion varied dramatically with seasonal timing of the test, with maximum dose per unit fallout occurring for early summer depositions when milk cows were on pasture and fresh, local vegetables were used. Within specific communities, internal doses differed by age, sex, and lifestyle. Collective internal dose estimates for specific geographic areas are provided.

  1. Normal Liver Tissue Density Dose Response in Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Liver Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, Christopher C.; Stinauer, Michelle A.; Diot, Quentin; Westerly, David C.; Schefter, Tracey E.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Miften, Moyed

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the temporal dose response of normal liver tissue for patients with liver metastases treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Ninety-nine noncontrast follow-up computed tomography (CT) scans of 34 patients who received SBRT between 2004 and 2011 were retrospectively analyzed at a median of 8 months post-SBRT (range, 0.7-36 months). SBRT-induced normal liver tissue density changes in follow-up CT scans were evaluated at 2, 6, 10, 15, and 27 months. The dose distributions from planning CTs were mapped to follow-up CTs to relate the mean Hounsfield unit change ({Delta}HU) to dose received over the range 0-55 Gy in 3-5 fractions. An absolute density change of 7 HU was considered a significant radiographic change in normal liver tissue. Results: Increasing radiation dose was linearly correlated with lower post-SBRT liver tissue density (slope, -0.65 {Delta}HU/5 Gy). The threshold for significant change (-7 {Delta}HU) was observed in the range of 30-35 Gy. This effect did not vary significantly over the time intervals evaluated. Conclusions: SBRT induces a dose-dependent and relatively time-independent hypodense radiation reaction within normal liver tissue that is characterized by a decrease of >7 HU in liver density for doses >30-35 Gy.

  2. A Bayesian Semiparametric Model for Radiation Dose-Response Estimation.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Kyoji; Misumi, Munechika; Cologne, John B; Cullings, Harry M

    2016-06-01

    In evaluating the risk of exposure to health hazards, characterizing the dose-response relationship and estimating acceptable exposure levels are the primary goals. In analyses of health risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiation, while there is a clear agreement that moderate to high radiation doses cause harmful effects in humans, little has been known about the possible biological effects at low doses, for example, below 0.1 Gy, which is the dose range relevant to most radiation exposures of concern today. A conventional approach to radiation dose-response estimation based on simple parametric forms, such as the linear nonthreshold model, can be misleading in evaluating the risk and, in particular, its uncertainty at low doses. As an alternative approach, we consider a Bayesian semiparametric model that has a connected piece-wise-linear dose-response function with prior distributions having an autoregressive structure among the random slope coefficients defined over closely spaced dose categories. With a simulation study and application to analysis of cancer incidence data among Japanese atomic bomb survivors, we show that this approach can produce smooth and flexible dose-response estimation while reasonably handling the risk uncertainty at low doses and elsewhere. With relatively few assumptions and modeling options to be made by the analyst, the method can be particularly useful in assessing risks associated with low-dose radiation exposures.

  3. Methodology for Estimating Ingestion Dose for Emergency Response at SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Simpkins, A.A.

    2003-07-21

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), emergency response computer models are used to estimate dose following releases of radioactive materials to the environment. Downwind air and ground concentrations and their associated doses from inhalation and ground shine pathways are estimated. The emergency response model (PUFF-PLUME) uses real-time data to track either instantaneous (puff) or continuous (plume) releases. A site-specific ingestion dose model was developed for use with PUFF-PLUME that includes the following ingestion dose pathways pertinent to the surrounding SRS area: milk, beef, water, and fish. The model is simplistic and can be used with existing code output.

  4. Lung Dose Calculation With SPECT/CT for {sup 90}Yittrium Radioembolization of Liver Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Naichang; Srinivas, Shaym M.; DiFilippo, Frank P.; Shrikanthan, Sankaran; Levitin, Abraham; McLennan, Gordon; Spain, James; Xia, Ping; Wilkinson, Allan

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To propose a new method to estimate lung mean dose (LMD) using technetium-99m labeled macroaggregated albumin ({sup 99m}Tc-MAA) single photon emission CT (SPECT)/CT for {sup 90}Yttrium radioembolization of liver tumors and to compare the LMD estimated using SPECT/CT with clinical estimates of LMD using planar gamma scintigraphy (PS). Methods and Materials: Images of 71 patients who had SPECT/CT and PS images of {sup 99m}Tc-MAA acquired before TheraSphere radioembolization of liver cancer were analyzed retrospectively. LMD was calculated from the PS-based lung shunt assuming a lung mass of 1 kg and 50 Gy per GBq of injected activity shunted to the lung. For the SPECT/CT-based estimate, the LMD was calculated with the activity concentration and lung volume derived from SPECT/CT. The effect of attenuation correction and the patient's breathing on the calculated LMD was studied with the SPECT/CT. With these effects correctly taken into account in a more rigorous fashion, we compared the LMD calculated with SPECT/CT with the LMD calculated with PS. Results: The mean dose to the central region of the lung leads to a more accurate estimate of LMD. Inclusion of the lung region around the diaphragm in the calculation leads to an overestimate of LMD due to the misregistration of the liver activity to the lung from the patient's breathing. LMD calculated based on PS is a poor predictor of the actual LMD. For the subpopulation with large lung shunt, the mean overestimation from the PS method for the lung shunt was 170%. Conclusions: A new method of calculating the LMD for TheraSphere and SIR-Spheres radioembolization of liver cancer based on {sup 99m}Tc-MAA SPECT/CT is presented. The new method provides a more accurate estimate of radiation risk to the lungs. For patients with a large lung shunt calculated from PS, a recalculation of LMD based on SPECT/CT is recommended.

  5. beta- and gamma-Comparative dose estimates on Enewetak Atoll.

    PubMed

    Crase, K W; Gudiksen, P H; Robison, W L

    1982-05-01

    Enewetak Atoll is one of the Pacific atolls used for atmospheric testing of U.S. nuclear weapons. Beta dose and gamma-ray exposure measurements were made on two islands of the Enewetak Atoll during July-August 1976 to determine the beta and low energy gamma-contribution to the total external radiation doses to the returning Marshallese. Measurements were made at numerous locations with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD), pressurized ionization chambers, portable NaI detectors, and thin-window pancake GM probes. Results of the TLD measurements with and without a beta-attenuator indicate that approx. 29% of the total dose rate at 1 m in air is due to beta- or low energy gamma-contribution. The contribution at any particular site, however, is somewhat dependent on ground cover, since a minimal amount of vegetation will reduce it significantly from that over bare soil, but thick stands of vegetation have little effect on any further reductions. Integral 30-yr external shallow dose estimates for future inhabitants were made and compared with external dose estimates of a previous large scale radiological survey (En73). Integral 30-yr shallow external dose estimates are 25-50% higher than whole body estimates. Due to the low penetrating ability of the beta's or low energy gamma's, however, several remedial actions can be taken to reduce the shallow dose contribution to the total external dose.

  6. Sample Based Unit Liter Dose Estimates

    SciTech Connect

    JENSEN, L.

    2000-04-13

    The Tank Waste Characterization Program has taken many core samples, grab samples, and auger samples from the single-shell and double-shell tanks during the past 10 years. Consequently, the amount of sample data available has increased, both in terms of quantity of sample results and the number of tanks characterized. More and better data is available than when the current radiological and toxicological source terms used in the Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) (FDH 1999a) and the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) (FDH 1999b) were developed. The Nuclear Safety and Licensing (NS and L) organization wants to use the new data to upgrade the radiological and toxicological source terms used in the BIO and FSAR. The NS and L organization requested assistance in producing a statistically based process for developing the source terms. This report describes the statistical techniques used and the assumptions made to support the development of a new radiological source term for liquid and solid wastes stored in single-shell and double-shell tanks. The results given in this report are a revision to similar results given in an earlier version of the document (Jensen and Wilmarth 1999). The main difference between the results in this document and the earlier version is that the dose conversion factors (DCF) for converting {mu}Ci/g or {mu}Ci/L to Sv/L (sieverts per liter) have changed. There are now two DCFs, one based on ICRP-68 and one based on ICW-71 (Brevick 2000).

  7. Effective dose estimation during conventional and CT urography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alzimami, K.; Sulieman, A.; Omer, E.; Suliman, I. I.; Alsafi, K.

    2014-11-01

    Intravenous urography (IVU) and CT urography (CTU) are efficient radiological examinations for the evaluation of the urinary system disorders. However patients are exposed to a significant radiation dose. The objectives of this study are to: (i) measure and compare patient radiation dose by computed tomography urography (CTU) and conventional intravenous urography (IVU) and (ii) evaluate organ equivalent dose and cancer risks from CTU and IVU imaging procedures. A total of 141 patients were investigated. A calibrated CT machine (Siemens-Somatom Emotion duo) was used for CTU, while a Shimadzu X ray machine was used for IVU. Thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD-GR200A) were used to measure patients' entrance surface doses (ESD). TLDs were calibrated under reproducible reference conditions. Patients radiation dose values (DLP) for CTU were 172±61 mGy cm, CTDIvol 4.75±2 mGy and effective dose 2.58±1 mSv. Patient cancer probabilities were estimated to be 1.4 per million per CTU examination. Patients ESDs values for IVU were 21.62±5 mGy, effective dose 1.79±1 mSv. CT involves a higher effective dose than IVU. In this study the radiation dose is considered low compared to previous studies. The effective dose from CTU procedures was 30% higher compared to IVU procedures. Wide dose variation between patient doses suggests that optimization is not fulfilled yet.

  8. Dose-volume histogram prediction using density estimation.

    PubMed

    Skarpman Munter, Johanna; Sjölund, Jens

    2015-09-07

    Knowledge of what dose-volume histograms can be expected for a previously unseen patient could increase consistency and quality in radiotherapy treatment planning. We propose a machine learning method that uses previous treatment plans to predict such dose-volume histograms. The key to the approach is the framing of dose-volume histograms in a probabilistic setting.The training consists of estimating, from the patients in the training set, the joint probability distribution of some predictive features and the dose. The joint distribution immediately provides an estimate of the conditional probability of the dose given the values of the predictive features. The prediction consists of estimating, from the new patient, the distribution of the predictive features and marginalizing the conditional probability from the training over this. Integrating the resulting probability distribution for the dose yields an estimate of the dose-volume histogram.To illustrate how the proposed method relates to previously proposed methods, we use the signed distance to the target boundary as a single predictive feature. As a proof-of-concept, we predicted dose-volume histograms for the brainstems of 22 acoustic schwannoma patients treated with stereotactic radiosurgery, and for the lungs of 9 lung cancer patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy. Comparing with two previous attempts at dose-volume histogram prediction we find that, given the same input data, the predictions are similar.In summary, we propose a method for dose-volume histogram prediction that exploits the intrinsic probabilistic properties of dose-volume histograms. We argue that the proposed method makes up for some deficiencies in previously proposed methods, thereby potentially increasing ease of use, flexibility and ability to perform well with small amounts of training data.

  9. Repeated-dose liver micronucleus test of 4,4'-methylenedianiline using young adult rats.

    PubMed

    Sanada, Hisakazu; Koyama, Naomi; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Hamada, Shuichi

    2015-03-01

    Liver micronucleus (MN) tests using partial hepatectomized rats or juvenile rats have been shown to be useful for the detection of hepatic carcinogens. Moreover, Narumi et al. established the repeated-dose liver MN test using young adult rats for integration into general toxicity. In the present study, in order to examine the usefulness of the repeated-dose liver MN test, we investigated MN induction with a 14 or 28 day treatment protocol using young adult rats treated with 4,4′-methylenedianiline (MDA), a known hepatic carcinogen. MDA dose-dependently induced micronuclei in hepatocytes in 14- and 28-day repeated-dose tests. However, although statistically significant increases in micronuclei were observed in bone marrow cells at two dose levels in the 14-day study, there was no dose response and no increases in micronuclei in the 28-day study. These results indicate that the evaluation of genotoxic effects using hepatocytes is effective in cases where chromosomal aberrations are not clearly detectable in bone marrow cells. Moreover, the repeated-dose liver MN test allows evaluation at a dose below the maximum tolerable dose, which is required for the conventional MN test because micronucleated hepatocytes accumulate. The repeated-dose liver MN test employed in the present study can be integrated into the spectrum of general toxicity tests without further procedural modifications.

  10. Polychlorinated biphenyls as oxidative stress inducers in liver of subacutely exposed rats: implication for dose-dependence toxicity and benchmark dose concept.

    PubMed

    Buha, Aleksandra; Antonijević, Biljana; Milovanović, Vesna; Janković, Saša; Bulat, Zorica; Matović, Vesna

    2015-01-01

    Hepatotoxicity is one of the well-documented adverse health effects of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)-persistent organic pollutants widely present in the environment. Although previous studies suggest possible role of oxidative stress, the precise mechanisms of PCB-induced ROS production in liver still remain to be fully assessed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of different doses of PCBs on the parameters of oxidative stress and to investigate whether these effects are dose dependent. Furthermore, a comparison between calculated benchmark doses (BMD) and estimated NOAEL values for investigated parameters, was made. Six groups of male albino Wistar rats (7 animals per group) were receiving Aroclor 1254 dissolved in corn oil in the doses of 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16 mg PCBs/kg b.w./day by oral gavage during 28 days while control animals were receiving corn oil only. The following parameters of oxidative stress were analyzed in liver homogenates: superoxide dismutase activity, glutathione, malondialdehyde (MDA) and total protein thiol levels. Hepatic enzymes AST, ALT, ALP and protein albumin were also determined in serum as clinical parameters of liver function. Collected data on the investigated parameters were analyzed by the BMD method. The results of this study demonstrate that subacute exposure to PCBs causes induction of oxidative stress in liver with dose-dependent changes of the investigated parameters, although more pronounced adverse effects were observed on enzymatic than on non-enzymatic components of antioxidant protection. The obtained values for BMD and NOAEL support the use of BMD concept in the prediction of health risks associated with PCBs exposure. Furthermore, our results implicate possible use of MDA in PCBs risk assessment, since MDA was the most sensitive investigated parameter with calculated low critical effect dose of 0.07 mg/kg b.w.

  11. Estimation of dose to man from environmental tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Rohwer, P S; Etnier, E L

    1980-01-01

    Factors important for characterization of tritium in environmental pathways leading to exposure of man are reviewed and quantification of those factors is discussed. Parameters characterizing the behavior of tritium in man are also subjected to review. Factors to be discussed include organic binding, bioaccumulation, quality factor and transmutation. A variety of models are presently in use to estimate dose to man from environmental releases of tritium. Results from four representative models are compared and discussed. Site-specific information is always preferable when parameterizing models to estimate dose to man. There may be significant differences in dose potential among geographic regions due to variable factors. An example of one such factor examined is absolute humidity. It is concluded that adequate methodologies exist for estimation of dose to man from environmental tritium although a number of areas are identified where additional tritium research is desirable.

  12. Performance benchmarking of liver CT image segmentation and volume estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Wei; Zhou, Jiayin; Tian, Qi; Liu, Jimmy J.; Qi, Yingyi; Leow, Wee Kheng; Han, Thazin; Wang, Shih-chang

    2008-03-01

    In recent years more and more computer aided diagnosis (CAD) systems are being used routinely in hospitals. Image-based knowledge discovery plays important roles in many CAD applications, which have great potential to be integrated into the next-generation picture archiving and communication systems (PACS). Robust medical image segmentation tools are essentials for such discovery in many CAD applications. In this paper we present a platform with necessary tools for performance benchmarking for algorithms of liver segmentation and volume estimation used for liver transplantation planning. It includes an abdominal computer tomography (CT) image database (DB), annotation tools, a ground truth DB, and performance measure protocols. The proposed architecture is generic and can be used for other organs and imaging modalities. In the current study, approximately 70 sets of abdominal CT images with normal livers have been collected and a user-friendly annotation tool is developed to generate ground truth data for a variety of organs, including 2D contours of liver, two kidneys, spleen, aorta and spinal canal. Abdominal organ segmentation algorithms using 2D atlases and 3D probabilistic atlases can be evaluated on the platform. Preliminary benchmark results from the liver segmentation algorithms which make use of statistical knowledge extracted from the abdominal CT image DB are also reported. We target to increase the CT scans to about 300 sets in the near future and plan to make the DBs built available to medical imaging research community for performance benchmarking of liver segmentation algorithms.

  13. Variability of standard liver volume estimation versus software-assisted total liver volume measurement.

    PubMed

    Pomposelli, James J; Tongyoo, Assanee; Wald, Christoph; Pomfret, Elizabeth A

    2012-09-01

    The estimation of the standard liver volume (SLV) is an important component of the evaluation of potential living liver donors and the surgical planning for resection for tumors. At least 16 different formulas for estimating SLV have been published in the worldwide literature. More recently, several proprietary software-assisted image postprocessing (SAIP) programs have been developed to provide accurate volume measurements based on the actual anatomy of a specific patient. Using SAIP, we measured SLV in 375 healthy potential liver donors and compared the results to SLV values that were estimated with the previously published formulas and each donor's demographic and anthropomorphic data. The percentage errors of the 16 SLV formulas versus SAIP varied by more than 59% (from -21.6% to +37.7%). One formula was not statistically different from SAIP with respect to the percentage error (-1.2%), and another formula was not statistically different with respect to the absolute liver volume (18 mL). More than 75% of the estimated SLV values produced by these 2 formulas had percentage errors within ±15%, and the formulas provided good predictions within acceptable agreement (±15%) on scatter plots. Because of the wide variability, care must be taken when a formula is being chosen for estimating SLV, but the 2 aforementioned formulas provided the most accurate results with our patient demographics.

  14. Estimating thyroid dose in pediatric CT exams from surface dose measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Senan, Rani; Mueller, Deborah L.; Hatab, Mustapha R.

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the possibility of estimating pediatric thyroid doses from CT using surface neck doses. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters were used to measure the neck surface dose of 25 children ranging in ages between one and three years old. The neck circumference for each child was measured. The relationship between obtained surface doses and thyroid dose was studied using acrylic phantoms of various sizes and with holes of different depths. The ratios of hole-to-surface doses were used to convert patients' surface dose to thyroid dose. ImPACT software was utilized to calculate thyroid dose after applying the appropriate age correction factors. A paired t-test was performed to compare thyroid doses from our approach and ImPACT. The ratio of thyroid to surface dose was found to be 1.1. Thyroid doses ranged from 20 to 80 mGy. Comparison showed no statistical significance (p = 0.18). In addition, the average of surface dose variation along the z-axis in helical scans was studied and found to range between 5% (in 10 cm diameter phantom/24 mm collimation/pitch 1.0) and 8% (in 16 cm diameter phantom/12 mm collimation/pitch 0.7). We conclude that surface dose is an acceptable predictor for pediatric thyroid dose from CT. The uncertainty due to surface dose variability may be reduced if narrower collimation is used with a pitch factor close to 1.0. Also, the results did not show any effect of thyroid depth on the measured dose.

  15. Estimation of food consumption. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Callaway, J.M. Jr.

    1992-04-01

    The research reported in this document was conducted as a part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The objective of the HEDR Project is to estimate the radiation doses that people could have received from operations at the Hanford Site. Information required to estimate these doses includes estimates of the amounts of potentially contaminated foods that individuals in the region consumed during the study period. In that general framework, the objective of the Food Consumption Task was to develop a capability to provide information about the parameters of the distribution(s) of daily food consumption for representative groups in the population for selected years during the study period. This report describes the methods and data used to estimate food consumption and presents the results developed for Phase I of the HEDR Project.

  16. Dose-response curve estimation: a semiparametric mixture approach.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ying; Yin, Guosheng

    2011-12-01

    In the estimation of a dose-response curve, parametric models are straightforward and efficient but subject to model misspecifications; nonparametric methods are robust but less efficient. As a compromise, we propose a semiparametric approach that combines the advantages of parametric and nonparametric curve estimates. In a mixture form, our estimator takes a weighted average of the parametric and nonparametric curve estimates, in which a higher weight is assigned to the estimate with a better model fit. When the parametric model assumption holds, the semiparametric curve estimate converges to the parametric estimate and thus achieves high efficiency; when the parametric model is misspecified, the semiparametric estimate converges to the nonparametric estimate and remains consistent. We also consider an adaptive weighting scheme to allow the weight to vary according to the local fit of the models. We conduct extensive simulation studies to investigate the performance of the proposed methods and illustrate them with two real examples.

  17. Estimated ultraviolet radiation doses in wetlands in six national parks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diamond, S.A.; Trenham, P.C.; Adams, Michael J.; Hossack, B.R.; Knapp, R.A.; Stark, L.; Bradford, D.; Corn, P.S.; Czarnowski, K.; Brooks, P.D.; Fagre, D.B.; Breen, B.; Dentenbeck, N.E.; Tonnessen, K.

    2005-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B, 280–320-nm wavelengths) doses were estimated for 1024 wetlands in six national parks: Acadia (Acadia), Glacier (Glacier), Great Smoky Mountains (Smoky), Olympic (Olympic), Rocky Mountain (Rocky), and Sequoia/Kings Canyon (Sequoia). Estimates were made using ground-based UV-B data (Brewer spectrophotometers), solar radiation models, GIS tools, field characterization of vegetative features, and quantification of DOC concentration and spectral absorbance. UV-B dose estimates were made for the summer solstice, at a depth of 1 cm in each wetland. The mean dose across all wetlands and parks was 19.3 W-h m−2 (range of 3.4–32.1 W-h m−2). The mean dose was lowest in Acadia (13.7 W-h m−2) and highest in Rocky (24.4 W-h m−2). Doses were significantly different among all parks. These wetland doses correspond to UV-B flux of 125.0 μW cm−2 (range 21.4–194.7 μW cm−2) based on a day length, averaged among all parks, of 15.5 h. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC), a key determinant of water-column UV-B flux, ranged from 0.6 (analytical detection limit) to 36.7 mg C L−1 over all wetlands and parks, and reduced potential maximal UV-B doses at 1-cm depth by 1%–87 %. DOC concentration, as well as its effect on dose, was lowest in Sequoia and highest in Acadia (DOC was equivalent in Acadia, Glacier, and Rocky). Landscape reduction of potential maximal UV-B doses ranged from zero to 77% and was lowest in Sequoia. These regional differences in UV-B wetland dose illustrate the importance of considering all aspects of exposure in evaluating the potential impact of UV-B on aquatic organisms.

  18. Radiation dose estimates for copper-64 citrate in man

    SciTech Connect

    Crook, J.E.; Carlton, J.E.; Stabin, M.; Watson, E.

    1985-01-01

    Tumor imaging agents suitable for use with positron emission tomographs are constantly sought. We have performed studies with animal-tumor-bearing models that have demonstrated the rapid uptake of copper-64. The radiation dose estimates for man indicate that the intravenous administration of 7.0 mCi would result in radiation doses to the kidney of 9.8 to 10.5 rads with other organs receiving substantially less radiation. 5 refs., 3 tabs.

  19. Bayesian dose-response analysis for epidemiological studies with complex uncertainty in dose estimation.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Deukwoo; Hoffman, F Owen; Moroz, Brian E; Simon, Steven L

    2016-02-10

    Most conventional risk analysis methods rely on a single best estimate of exposure per person, which does not allow for adjustment for exposure-related uncertainty. Here, we propose a Bayesian model averaging method to properly quantify the relationship between radiation dose and disease outcomes by accounting for shared and unshared uncertainty in estimated dose. Our Bayesian risk analysis method utilizes multiple realizations of sets (vectors) of doses generated by a two-dimensional Monte Carlo simulation method that properly separates shared and unshared errors in dose estimation. The exposure model used in this work is taken from a study of the risk of thyroid nodules among a cohort of 2376 subjects who were exposed to fallout from nuclear testing in Kazakhstan. We assessed the performance of our method through an extensive series of simulations and comparisons against conventional regression risk analysis methods. When the estimated doses contain relatively small amounts of uncertainty, the Bayesian method using multiple a priori plausible draws of dose vectors gave similar results to the conventional regression-based methods of dose-response analysis. However, when large and complex mixtures of shared and unshared uncertainties are present, the Bayesian method using multiple dose vectors had significantly lower relative bias than conventional regression-based risk analysis methods and better coverage, that is, a markedly increased capability to include the true risk coefficient within the 95% credible interval of the Bayesian-based risk estimate. An evaluation of the dose-response using our method is presented for an epidemiological study of thyroid disease following radiation exposure.

  20. Estimate of doses to the fetus during commercial flights.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Mares, Vladimir

    2008-10-01

    This study assesses the radiation exposure from cosmic rays to fetuses of pregnant aircrew and air travelers. Combining the particle fluence spectra of various cosmic radiations at aircraft altitudes with the fetal fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients calculated for different cosmic ray radiations, the doses to the fetal body were estimated for three prenatal ages. From the five major particle types present during commercial flights, neutrons contribute about 54% of the total fetal dose, followed by protons 22%, photons 11%, electrons 7%, and muons 6%. The results indicate that the dose to the fetus can exceed a recommended fetal dose limit of 1 mSv after 10 round trips on commercial flights between Toronto and Frankfurt.

  1. Comparison of premortem and postmortem estimates of plutonium deposited in the skeleton and liver of six individuals

    SciTech Connect

    Sula, M.J.; Bihl, D.E.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Kathren, R.L.

    1988-04-01

    Assessment of organ burdens after internal exposures to radionuclides is often necessary to evaluate the health and regulatory implications of the exposure. The assessment of plutonium activity in skeleton and liver is usually estimated from measurements of plutonium excreted via urine. As part of the overall evaluation of internal dose assessment techniques, it is useful to compare the results of organ burden estimates made from evaluation of urinary excretion data with those made at death from tissue samples collected posthumously from the individual. Estimates of plutonium in the skeleton and liver, based on postmortem analysis of tissue samples for six individuals, were obtained from the US Transuranium Registry (USTR). Bioassay data and other radiation exposure information obtained from the individuals' files were used to estimate their skeleton and liver burdens at the times of their deaths, and these estimates were compared to those obtained through tissue analysis. 6 refs., 2 tabs.

  2. Maximum likelihood estimation for cytogenetic dose-response curves

    SciTech Connect

    Frome, E.L.; DuFrain, R.J.

    1986-03-01

    In vitro dose-response curves are used to describe the relation between chromosome aberrations and radiation dose for human lymphocytes. The lymphocytes are exposed to low-LET radiation, and the resulting dicentric chromosome aberrations follow the Poisson distribution. The expected yield depends on both the magnitude and the temporal distribution of the dose. A general dose-response model that describes this relation has been presented by Kellerer and Rossi (1972, Current Topics on Radiation Research Quarterly 8, 85-158; 1978, Radiation Research 75, 471-488) using the theory of dual radiation action. Two special cases of practical interest are split-dose and continuous exposure experiments, and the resulting dose-time-response models are intrinsically nonlinear in the parameters. A general-purpose maximum likelihood estimation procedure is described, and estimation for the nonlinear models is illustrated with numerical examples from both experimental designs. Poisson regression analysis is used for estimation, hypothesis testing, and regression diagnostics. Results are discussed in the context of exposure assessment procedures for both acute and chronic human radiation exposure.

  3. Analytic estimates of secondary neutron dose in proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Anferov, V

    2010-12-21

    Proton beam losses in various components of a treatment nozzle generate secondary neutrons, which bring unwanted out of field dose during treatments. The purpose of this study was to develop an analytic method for estimating neutron dose to a distant organ at risk during proton therapy. Based on radiation shielding calculation methods proposed by Sullivan, we developed an analytical model for converting the proton beam losses in the nozzle components and in the treatment volume into the secondary neutron dose at a point of interest. Using the MCNPx Monte Carlo code, we benchmarked the neutron dose rates generated by the proton beam stopped at various media. The Monte Carlo calculations confirmed the validity of the analytical model for simple beam stop geometry. The analytical model was then applied to neutron dose equivalent measurements performed on double scattering and uniform scanning nozzles at the Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute (MPRI). Good agreement was obtained between the model predictions and the data measured at MPRI. This work provides a method for estimating analytically the neutron dose equivalent to a distant organ at risk. This method can be used as a tool for optimizing dose delivery techniques in proton therapy.

  4. Patient-specific dose estimation for pediatric chest CT

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Frush, Donald P.

    2008-12-15

    Current methods for organ and effective dose estimations in pediatric CT are largely patient generic. Physical phantoms and computer models have only been developed for standard/limited patient sizes at discrete ages (e.g., 0, 1, 5, 10, 15 years old) and do not reflect the variability of patient anatomy and body habitus within the same size/age group. In this investigation, full-body computer models of seven pediatric patients in the same size/protocol group (weight: 11.9-18.2 kg) were created based on the patients' actual multi-detector array CT (MDCT) data. Organs and structures in the scan coverage were individually segmented. Other organs and structures were created by morphing existing adult models (developed from visible human data) to match the framework defined by the segmented organs, referencing the organ volume and anthropometry data in ICRP Publication 89. Organ and effective dose of these patients from a chest MDCT scan protocol (64 slice LightSpeed VCT scanner, 120 kVp, 70 or 75 mA, 0.4 s gantry rotation period, pitch of 1.375, 20 mm beam collimation, and small body scan field-of-view) was calculated using a Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated to simulate radiation transport in the same CT system. The seven patients had normalized effective dose of 3.7-5.3 mSv/100 mAs (coefficient of variation: 10.8%). Normalized lung dose and heart dose were 10.4-12.6 mGy/100 mAs and 11.2-13.3 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. Organ dose variations across the patients were generally small for large organs in the scan coverage (<7%), but large for small organs in the scan coverage (9%-18%) and for partially or indirectly exposed organs (11%-77%). Normalized effective dose correlated weakly with body weight (correlation coefficient: r=-0.80). Normalized lung dose and heart dose correlated strongly with mid-chest equivalent diameter (lung: r=-0.99, heart: r=-0.93); these strong correlation relationships can be used to estimate patient-specific organ dose for

  5. Dose estimates in a loss of lead shielding truck accident.

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, Matthew L.; Osborn, Douglas M.; Weiner, Ruth F.; Heames, Terence John

    2009-08-01

    The radiological transportation risk & consequence program, RADTRAN, has recently added an updated loss of lead shielding (LOS) model to it most recent version, RADTRAN 6.0. The LOS model was used to determine dose estimates to first-responders during a spent nuclear fuel transportation accident. Results varied according to the following: type of accident scenario, percent of lead slump, distance to shipment, and time spent in the area. This document presents a method of creating dose estimates for first-responders using RADTRAN with potential accident scenarios. This may be of particular interest in the event of high speed accidents or fires involving cask punctures.

  6. Patient-specific dose estimation for pediatric abdomen-pelvis CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Frush, Donald P.

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a method for estimating patient-specific dose from abdomen-pelvis CT examinations and to investigate dose variation across patients in the same weight group. Our study consisted of seven pediatric patients in the same weight/protocol group, for whom full-body computer models were previously created based on the patients' CT data obtained for clinical indications. Organ and effective dose of these patients from an abdomen-pelvis scan protocol (LightSpeed VCT scanner, 120-kVp, 85-90 mA, 0.4-s gantry rotation period, 1.375-pitch, 40-mm beam collimation, and small body scan field-of-view) was calculated using a Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated for the same CT system. The seven patients had effective dose of 2.4-2.8 mSv, corresponding to normalized effective dose of 6.6-8.3 mSv/100mAs (coefficient of variation: 7.6%). Dose variations across the patients were small for large organs in the scan coverage (mean: 6.6%; range: 4.9%-9.2%), larger for small organs in the scan coverage (mean: 10.3%; range: 1.4%-15.6%), and the largest for organs partially or completely outside the scan coverage (mean: 14.8%; range: 5.7%-27.7%). Normalized effective dose correlated strongly with body weight (correlation coefficient: r = -0.94). Normalized dose to the kidney and the adrenal gland correlated strongly with mid-liver equivalent diameter (kidney: r = -0.97; adrenal glands: r = -0.98). Normalized dose to the small intestine correlated strongly with mid-intestine equivalent diameter (r = -0.97). These strong correlations suggest that patient-specific dose may be estimated for any other child in the same size group who undergoes the abdomen-pelvis scan.

  7. Low-Dose Cadmium Causes Metabolic and Genetic Dysregulation Associated With Fatty Liver Disease in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Go, Young-Mi; Sutliff, Roy L.; Chandler, Joshua D.; Khalidur, Rahman; Kang, Bum-Yong; Anania, Frank A.; Orr, Michael; Hao, Li; Fowler, Bruce A.; Jones, Dean P.

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is present in food at low levels and accumulates in humans throughout life because it is not effectively excreted. Cd from smoking or occupational exposure shows adverse effects on health, but the mechanistic effect of Cd at low dietary intake levels is poorly studied. Epidemiology studies found that nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), common in U.S. adults, is associated with Cd burden. In cell studies, we found that environmental low-dose Cd oxidized proteins and stimulated inflammatory signaling. However, little is known about low-dose Cd effects on liver function and associated metabolic pathways in vivo. We investigated effects of low-level Cd exposure on liver gene transcripts, metabolites, and associated metabolic pathways and function after challenging mice with Cd (10 mg/l) by drinking water. Results showed liver Cd in treated mice was similar to adult humans without occupational or smoking exposures and 10-fold higher than control mouse values. Pathway analysis of significantly altered liver genes and metabolites mapped to functional pathways of lipid metabolism, cell death and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. These are well-recognized pathways associated with NAFLD. Cd–treated mice had higher liver enzymes in plasma and a trend toward fat accumulation in liver. To verify low-dose Cd-induced stimulation of cell death pathways, phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) was examined in cultured hepatic cells. Consistent with mouse liver data, low-dose Cd stimulated JNK activation. Together, the results show that low-dose Cd exposure causes liver function changes consistent with a role in NAFLD and possibly also nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. PMID:26187450

  8. Developing milk industry estimates for dose reconstruction projects

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, D.M.; Darwin, R.F. )

    1991-01-01

    One of the most important contributors to radiation doses from hanford during the 1944-1947 period was radioactive iodine. Consumption of milk from cows that ate vegetation contaminated with iodine is likely the dominant pathway of human exposure. To estimate the doses people could have received from this pathway, it is necessary to reconstruct the amount of milk consumed by people living near Hanford, the source of the milk, and the type of feed that the milk cows ate. This task is challenging because the dairy industry has undergone radical changes since the end of World War 2, and records that document the impact of these changes on the study area are scarce. Similar problems are faced by researchers on most dose reconstruction efforts. The purpose of this work is to document and evaluate the methods used on the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project to reconstruct the milk industry and to present preliminary results.

  9. Neutron dose estimation in a zero power nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triviño, S.; Vedelago, J.; Cantargi, F.; Keil, W.; Figueroa, R.; Mattea, F.; Chautemps, A.; Santibañez, M.; Valente, M.

    2016-10-01

    This work presents the characterization and contribution of neutron and gamma components to the absorbed dose in a zero power nuclear reactor. A dosimetric method based on Fricke gel was implemented to evaluate the separation between dose components in the mixed field. The validation of this proposed method was performed by means of direct measurements of neutron flux in different positions using Au and Mg-Ni activation foils. Monte Carlo simulations were conversely performed using the MCNP main code with a dedicated subroutine to incorporate the exact complete geometry of the nuclear reactor facility. Once nuclear fuel elements were defined, the simulations computed the different contributions to the absorbed dose in specific positions inside the core. Thermal/epithermal contributions of absorbed dose were assessed by means of Fricke gel dosimetry using different isotopic compositions aimed at modifying the sensitivity of the dosimeter for specific dose components. Clear distinctions between gamma and neutron capture dose were obtained. Both Monte Carlo simulations and experimental results provided reliable estimations about neutron flux rate as well as dose rate during the reactor operation. Simulations and experimental results are in good agreement in every positions measured and simulated in the core.

  10. Estimation of the Warfarin Dose with Clinical and Pharmacogenetic Data

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Genetic variability among patients plays an important role in determining the dose of warfarin that should be used when oral anticoagulation is initiated, but practical methods of using genetic information have not been evaluated in a diverse and large population. We developed and used an algorithm for estimating the appropriate warfarin dose that is based on both clinical and genetic data from a broad population base. METHODS Clinical and genetic data from 4043 patients were used to create a dose algorithm that was based on clinical variables only and an algorithm in which genetic information was added to the clinical variables. In a validation cohort of 1009 subjects, we evaluated the potential clinical value of each algorithm by calculating the percentage of patients whose predicted dose of warfarin was within 20% of the actual stable therapeutic dose; we also evaluated other clinically relevant indicators. RESULTS In the validation cohort, the pharmacogenetic algorithm accurately identified larger proportions of patients who required 21 mg of warfarin or less per week and of those who required 49 mg or more per week to achieve the target international normalized ratio than did the clinical algorithm (49.4% vs. 33.3%, P<0.001, among patients requiring ≤21 mg per week; and 24.8% vs. 7.2%, P<0.001, among those requiring ≥49 mg per week). CONCLUSIONS The use of a pharmacogenetic algorithm for estimating the appropriate initial dose of warfarin produces recommendations that are significantly closer to the required stable therapeutic dose than those derived from a clinical algorithm or a fixed-dose approach. The greatest benefits were observed in the 46.2% of the population that required 21 mg or less of warfarin per week or 49 mg or more per week for therapeutic anticoagulation. PMID:19228618

  11. Radiation absorbed dose estimates for 18F-BPA PET.

    PubMed

    Kono, Yuzuru; Kurihara, Hiroaki; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Yasui, Naoko; Honda, Naoki; Igaki, Hiroshi; Itami, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Background Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a molecular radiation therapy approach based on the (10)B (n, α) (7)Li nuclear reaction in cancer cells. In BNCT, delivery of (10)B in the form of 4-borono-phenylalanine conjugated with fructose (BPA-fr) to the cancer cells is important. The PET tracer 4-borono-2-18F-fluoro-phenylalanine (FBPA) has been used to predict the accumulation of BPA-fr before BNCT. Purpose To determine the biodistribution and dosimetric parameters in 18F-BPA PET/CT studies. Material and Methods Human biokinetic data were obtained during clinical 18F-BPA PET studies between February and June 2015 at one institution. Nine consecutive patients were studied prospectively. The internal radiation dose was calculated on the basis of radioactivity data from blood, urine, and normal tissue of the heart, liver, spleen, kidney, and other parts of the body at each time point using OLINDA/EXM1.1 program. We compared our calculations with published 18F-FDG data. Results Adult patients (3 men, 3 women; age range, 28-68 years) had significantly smaller absorbed doses than pediatric patients (3 patients; age range, 5-12 years) ( P = 0.003). The mean effective dose was 57% lower in adult patients compared with pediatric patients. Mean effective doses for 18F-BPA were 25% lower than those for 18F-FDG presented in International Commission of Radiation Protection (ICRP) publication 106. Conclusion We found significant differences in organ absorbed doses for 18F-BPA against those for 18F-FDG presented in ICRP publication 106. Mean effective doses for 18F-BPA were smaller than those for 18F-FDG in the publication by 0.5-38% (mean difference, 25%).

  12. Risks of circulatory diseases among Mayak PA workers with radiation doses estimated using the improved Mayak Worker Dosimetry System 2008.

    PubMed

    Moseeva, Maria B; Azizova, Tamara V; Grigoryeva, Evgenia S; Haylock, Richard

    2014-05-01

    The new Mayak Worker Dosimetry System 2008 (MWDS-2008) was published in 2013 and supersedes the Doses-2005 dosimetry system for Mayak Production Association (PA) workers. It provides revised external and internal dose estimates based on the updated occupational history data. Using MWDS-2008, a cohort of 18,856 workers first employed at one of the main Mayak PA plants during 1948-1972 and followed up to 2005 was identified. Incidence and mortality risks from ischemic heart disease (IHD) (International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-9 codes 410-414) and from cerebrovascular diseases (CVD) (ICD-9 codes 430-438) were examined in this cohort and compared with previously published risk estimates in the same cohort based on the Doses-2005 dosimetry system. Significant associations were observed between doses from external gamma-rays and IHD and CVD incidence and also between internal doses from alpha-radiation and IHD mortality and CVD incidence. The estimates of excess relative risk (ERR)/Gy were consistent with those estimates from the previous studies based on Doses-2005 system apart from the relationship between CVD incidence and internal liver dose where the ERR/Gy based on MWDS-2008 was just over three times higher than the corresponding estimate based on Doses-2005 system. Adjustment for smoking status did not show any effect on the estimates of risk from internal alpha-particle exposure.

  13. Evaluating cimetidine for GFR estimation in liver transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Tangri, Navdeep; Alam, Ahsan; Edwardes, Michael D; Davidson, Ashley; Deschênes, Marc; Cantarovich, Marcelo

    2010-04-01

    Background. Serum creatinine (Scr)-based equations lack accuracy in predicting glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in patients with liver disease. Cimetidine has been shown to improve the performance of Scr-based GFR formulae. Methods. We evaluated the use of cimetidine on the performance of GFR-estimating equations in 39 liver transplant recipients. The patients received oral cimetidine (800 mg tid) during a 24-h urine collection. The next day, the patients underwent radionucleotide GFR (rGFR) determination and Scr was measured for creatinine clearance (CrCl) and GFR estimation using the Cockcroft-Gault, Nankivell and modified diet in renal disease (MDRD) equations. Data were analysed using the Pearson correlation statistic and Bland-Altman plots. Results. The mean rGFR was 65 +/- 26.4 mL/min. The use of cimetidine increased the bias between rGFR and the Nankivell and MDRD equations. The combined root mean square error for the CrCl, Cockcroft-Gault, Nankivell and MDRD equations without cimetidine were 20.2, 15.6, 17.0 and 15.5 and cimetidine-aided were 28.2, 23.2, 23.7 and 24.3, respectively. Conclusions. All the tested equations without using cimetidine predicted GFR with modest accuracy. The addition of cimetidine decreased the precision and increased the bias of all the GFR-estimating equations. In the absence of accurate GFR-estimating equations, rGFR should be used to monitor kidney function in liver transplant recipients.

  14. Dose Escalated Liver Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy at the Mean Respiratory Position

    SciTech Connect

    Velec, Michael; Moseley, Joanne L.; Dawson, Laura A.; Brock, Kristy K.

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: The dosimetric impact of dose probability based planning target volume (PTV) margins for liver cancer patients receiving stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) was compared with standard PTV based on the internal target volume (ITV). Plan robustness was evaluated by accumulating the treatment dose to ensure delivery of the intended plan. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients planned on exhale CT for 27 to 50 Gy in 6 fractions using an ITV-based PTV and treated free-breathing were retrospectively evaluated. Isotoxic, dose escalated plans were created on midposition computed tomography (CT), representing the mean breathing position, using a dose probability PTV. The delivered doses were accumulated using biomechanical deformable registration of the daily cone beam CT based on liver targeting at the exhale or mean breathing position, for the exhale and midposition CT plans, respectively. Results: The dose probability PTVs were on average 38% smaller than the ITV-based PTV, enabling an average ± standard deviation increase in the planned dose to 95% of the PTV of 4.0 ± 2.8 Gy (9 ± 5%) on the midposition CT (P<.01). For both plans, the delivered minimum gross tumor volume (GTV) doses were greater than the planned nominal prescribed dose in all 20 patients and greater than the planned dose to 95% of the PTV in 18 (90%) patients. Nine patients (45%) had 1 or more GTVs with a delivered minimum dose more than 5 Gy higher with the midposition CT plan using dose probability PTV, compared with the delivered dose with the exhale CT plan using ITV-based PTV. Conclusions: For isotoxic liver SBRT planned and delivered at the mean respiratory, reduced dose probability PTV enables a mean escalation of 4 Gy (9%) in 6 fractions over ITV-based PTV. This may potentially improve local control without increasing the risk of tumor underdosing.

  15. Influence of DTPA Treatment on Internal Dose Estimates.

    PubMed

    Davesne, Estelle; Blanchardon, Eric; Peleau, Bernadette; Correze, Philippe; Bohand, Sandra; Franck, Didier

    2016-06-01

    In case of internal contamination with plutonium materials, a treatment with diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) can be administered in order to reduce plutonium body burden and consequently avoid some radiation dose. DTPA intravenous injections or inhalation can start almost immediately after intake, in parallel with urinary and fecal bioassay sampling for dosimetric follow-up. However, urine and feces excretion will be significantly enhanced by the DTPA treatment. As internal dose is calculated from bioassay results, the DTPA effect on excretion has to be taken into account. A common method to correct bioassay data is to divide it by a factor representing the excretion enhancement under DTPA treatment by intravenous injection. Its value may be based on a nominal reference or observed after a break in the treatment. The aim of this study was to estimate the influence of this factor on internal dose by comparing the dose estimated using default or upper and lower values of the enhancement factor for 11 contamination cases. The observed upper and lower values of the enhancement factor were 18.7 and 63.0 for plutonium and 24.9 and 28.8 for americium. For americium, a default factor of 25 is proposed. This work demonstrates that the use of a default DTPA enhancement factor allows the determination of the magnitude of the contamination because dose estimated could vary by a factor of 2 depending on the value of the individual DTPA enhancement factor. In case of significant intake, an individual enhancement factor should be determined to obtain a more reliable dose assessment.

  16. Dose estimates for the heavy concrete ratchet wall configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Knott, M.J.; Moe, H.J.

    1988-09-01

    The recalculation of the estimated doses due to a beam loss at a single point in the storage-ring system indicates that the redesigned shielding geometry, using heavy concrete for the ratchet walls, is generally adequate for the parameters of no local lead shielding and an operating current of 0.1 A. For operation at 0.3 A, additional local lead shielding of 8 cm of lead will assure that all doses outside the ratchet wall shield from a beam loss at a given point will be {lt} 1 mSv.

  17. Dose estimates for the solid waste performance assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Rittman, P.D.

    1994-08-30

    The Solid Waste Performance Assessment calculations by PNL in 1990 were redone to incorporate changes in methods and parameters since then. The ten scenarios found in their report were reduced to three, the Post-Drilling Resident, the Post-Excavation Resident, and an All Pathways Irrigator. In addition, estimates of population dose to people along the Columbia River are also included. The attached report describes the methods and parameters used in the calculations, and derives dose factors for each scenario. In addition, waste concentrations, ground water concentrations, and river water concentrations needed to reach the performance objectives of 100 mrem/yr and 500 person-rem/yr are computed. Internal dose factors from DOE-0071 were applied when computing internal dose. External dose rate factors came from the GENII Version 1.485 software package. Dose calculations were carried out on a spreadsheet. The calculations are described in detail in the report for 63 nuclides, including 5 not presently in the GENII libraries. The spreadsheet calculations were checked by comparison with GENII, as described in Appendix D.

  18. Estimation of Secondary Neutron Dose during Proton Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Tomas; Klusoň, Jaroslav

    2014-06-01

    During proton radiotherapy, secondary neutrons are produced by nuclear interactions in the material along the beam path, in the treatment nozzle (including the fixed scatterer, range modulator, etc.) and, of course, after entering the patient. The dose equivalent deposited by these neutrons is usually not considered in routine treatment planning. In this study, there has been estimated the neutron dose in patient (in as well as around the target volume) during proton radiotherapy using scattering and scanning techniques. The proton induced neutrons (and photons) have been simulated in the simple geometry of the single scattering and the pencil beam scanning universal nozzles and in geometry of the plastic phantom (made of tissue equivalent material - RW3 - imitate the patient). In simulations of the scattering nozzle, different types of brass collimators have been used as well. Calculated data have been used as an approximation of the radiation field in and around the chosen/potential target volume in the patient (plastic phantom). For the dose equivalent evaluation, fluence-to-dose conversion factors from ICRP report have been employed. The results of calculated dose from neutrons in various distances from the spot for different treatment technique and for different energies of incident protons have been compared and evaluated in the context of the dose deposited in the target volume. This work was supported by RVO: 68407700 and Grant Agency of the CTU in Prague, grant No. SGS12/200/OHK4/3T/14.

  19. Comparison of internal dose estimates obtained using organ-level, voxel S value, and Monte Carlo techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Grimes, Joshua; Celler, Anna

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: The authors’ objective was to compare internal dose estimates obtained using the Organ Level Dose Assessment with Exponential Modeling (OLINDA/EXM) software, the voxel S value technique, and Monte Carlo simulation. Monte Carlo dose estimates were used as the reference standard to assess the impact of patient-specific anatomy on the final dose estimate. Methods: Six patients injected with{sup 99m}Tc-hydrazinonicotinamide-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide were included in this study. A hybrid planar/SPECT imaging protocol was used to estimate {sup 99m}Tc time-integrated activity coefficients (TIACs) for kidneys, liver, spleen, and tumors. Additionally, TIACs were predicted for {sup 131}I, {sup 177}Lu, and {sup 90}Y assuming the same biological half-lives as the {sup 99m}Tc labeled tracer. The TIACs were used as input for OLINDA/EXM for organ-level dose calculation and voxel level dosimetry was performed using the voxel S value method and Monte Carlo simulation. Dose estimates for {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 131}I, {sup 177}Lu, and {sup 90}Y distributions were evaluated by comparing (i) organ-level S values corresponding to each method, (ii) total tumor and organ doses, (iii) differences in right and left kidney doses, and (iv) voxelized dose distributions calculated by Monte Carlo and the voxel S value technique. Results: The S values for all investigated radionuclides used by OLINDA/EXM and the corresponding patient-specific S values calculated by Monte Carlo agreed within 2.3% on average for self-irradiation, and differed by as much as 105% for cross-organ irradiation. Total organ doses calculated by OLINDA/EXM and the voxel S value technique agreed with Monte Carlo results within approximately ±7%. Differences between right and left kidney doses determined by Monte Carlo were as high as 73%. Comparison of the Monte Carlo and voxel S value dose distributions showed that each method produced similar dose volume histograms with a minimum dose covering 90% of the volume (D90

  20. Evaluation of S-values and dose distributions for {sup 90}Y, {sup 131}I, {sup 166}Ho, and {sup 188}Re in seven lobes of the rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Tianwu; Liu Qian; Zaidi, Habib

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Rats have been widely used in radionuclide therapy research for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This has created the need to assess rat liver absorbed radiation dose. In most dose estimation studies, the rat liver is considered as a homogeneous integrated target organ with a tissue composition assumed to be similar to that of human liver tissue. However, the rat liver is composed of several lobes having different anatomical and chemical characteristics. To assess the overall impact on rat liver dose calculation, the authors use a new voxel-based rat model with identified suborgan regions of the liver. Methods: The liver in the original cryosectional color images was manually segmented into seven individual lobes and subsequently integrated into a voxel-based computational rat model. Photon and electron particle transport was simulated using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code to calculate absorbed fractions and S-values for {sup 90}Y, {sup 131}I, {sup 166}Ho, and {sup 188}Re for the seven liver lobes. The effect of chemical composition on organ-specific absorbed dose was investigated by changing the chemical composition of the voxel filling liver material. Radionuclide-specific absorbed doses at the voxel level were further assessed for a small spherical hepatic tumor. Results: The self-absorbed dose for different liver lobes varied depending on their respective masses. A maximum difference of 3.5% was observed for the liver self-absorbed fraction between rat and human tissues for photon energies below 100 keV. {sup 166}Ho and {sup 188}Re produce a uniformly distributed high dose in the tumor and relatively low absorbed dose for surrounding tissues. Conclusions: The authors evaluated rat liver radiation doses from various radionuclides used in HCC treatments using a realistic computational rat model. This work contributes to a better understanding of all aspects influencing radiation transport in organ-specific radiation dose evaluation for

  1. The 14-day repeated dose liver micronucleus test with methapyrilene hydrochloride using young adult rats.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kenji; Ochi, Akimu; Koda, Akira; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Doi, Takaaki

    2015-03-01

    The repeated dose liver micronucleus (RDLMN) assay using young adult rats has the potential to detect genotoxic hepatocarcinogens that can be integrated into a general toxicity study. The assay methods were thoroughly validated by 19 Japanese facilities. Methapyrilene hydrochloride (MP), known to be a non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogen, was examined in the present study. MP was dosed orally at 10, 30 and 100mg/kg/day to 6-week-old male Crl:CD (SD) rats daily for 14 days. Treatment with MP resulted in an increase in micronucleated hepatocytes (MNHEPs) with a dosage of only 100mg/kg/day. At this dose level, cytotoxicity followed by regenerative cell growth was noted in the liver. These findings suggest that MP may induce clastogenic effects indirectly on the liver or hepatotoxicity of MP followed by regeneration may cause increase in spontaneous incidence of MNHEPs.

  2. Threshold doses and prediction of visually apparent liver dysfunction after stereotactic body radiation therapy in cirrhotic and normal livers using magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Hiroshi; Shiomi, Hiroya; Masai, Norihisa; Tatsumi, Daisaku; Igura, Takumi; Imai, Yasuharu; Oh, Ryoong-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the threshold dose for focal liver damage after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in cirrhotic and normal livers using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A total of 64 patients who underwent SBRT for liver tumors, including 54 cirrhotic patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and 10 non-cirrhotic patients with liver metastases, were analyzed. MRI was performed 3−6 months after SBRT, using gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid-enhanced T1-weighted sequences. All MRI datasets were merged with 3D dosimetry data. All dose distributions were corrected to the biologically effective dose using the linear–quadratic model with an assumed α/β ratio of 2 Gy. The development of liver dysfunction was validly correlated with isodose distribution. The median biologically effective dose (BED2) that provoked liver dysfunction was 57.3 (30.0−227.9) and 114.0 (70.4−244.9) Gy in cirrhotic and normal livers, respectively (P = 0.0002). The BED2 associated with a >5% risk of liver dysfunction was 38.5 in cirrhotic livers and 70.4 Gy in normal livers. The threshold BED2 for liver dysfunction was not significantly different between Child−Pugh A and B patients (P = 0.0719). Moreover, the fractionation schedule was not significantly correlated with threshold BED2 for liver dysfunction in the cirrhotic liver (P = 0.1019). In the cirrhotic liver, fractionation regimen and Child−Pugh classification did not significantly influence the threshold BED2 for focal liver damage after SBRT. We suggest that the threshold BED2 for liver dysfunction after SBRT is 40 and 70 Gy in the cirrhotic and normal liver, respectively. PMID:26983986

  3. Dose-dependent difference of nuclear receptors involved in murine liver hypertrophy by piperonyl butoxide.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Yohei; Yoshida, Midori; Tamura, Kei; Takahashi, Miwa; Kodama, Yukio; Inoue, Kaoru

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear receptors play important roles in chemically induced liver hypertrophy in rodents. To clarify the involvement of constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and other nuclear receptors in mouse liver hypertrophy induced by different doses of piperonyl butoxide (PBO), wild-type and CAR-knockout mice were administered PBO (200, 1,000, or 5,000 ppm) in the basal diet for 1 week. Increased liver weight and diffuse hepatocellular hypertrophy were observed at 5,000 ppm for both genotypes, accompanied by increased Cyp3a11 mRNA and CYP3A protein expression, suggesting that CAR-independent pathway, possibly pregnane X receptor (PXR), plays a major role in the induction of hypertrophy. Moreover, wild-type mice at 5,000 ppm showed enhanced hepatocellular hypertrophy and strong positive staining for CYP2B in the centrilobular area, suggesting the localized contribution of CAR. At 1,000 ppm, only wild-type mice showed liver weight increase and centrilobular hepatocellular hypertrophy concurrent with elevated Cyp2b10 mRNA expression and strong CYP2B staining, indicating that CAR was essential at 1,000 ppm. We concluded that high-dose PBO induced hypertrophy via CAR and another pathway, while lower dose of PBO induced a pathway mediated predominantly by CAR. The dose-responsiveness on liver hypertrophy is important for understanding the involvement of nuclear receptors.

  4. Hepatoprotective Effect of Low Doses of Caffeine on CCl4-Induced Liver Damage in Rats.

    PubMed

    Cachón, Andrés Uc; Quintal-Novelo, Carlos; Medina-Escobedo, Gilberto; Castro-Aguilar, Gaspar; Moo-Puc, Rosa E

    2017-03-04

    Several studies have shown the hepatoprotective effect of the consumption of coffee and tea, which is mainly attributed to caffeine. Many experimental studies have demonstrated this effect; however, these studies used high caffeine doses that are not related to human consumption. The aim of this study was to evaluate the hepatoprotective effect of low doses of caffeine on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-treated rats. Low doses of caffeine (CAFF) 5 and 10 mg/kg (CAFF5 and CAFF10) were evaluated in chronic liver damage induced by CCl4 (0.75 mL/kg) in rats. CAFF treatment was administered once a day and CCl4 administration was twice weekly for 10 weeks. Liver function tests (biochemical markers) and functional (sleeping time) and histological (hematoxylin-eosin and Masson trichrome stains) parameters were carried out at the end of damage treatment. Daily treatments of CAFF5 and CAFF10 exhibited a hepatoprotective effect supported by a decrease of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and alkaline phosphatase (AP) serum activities and bilirubin serum levels compared with control and also restored serum albumin levels and liver glutathione (GSH). Moreover, CAFF prevented CCl4-induced prolongation in pentobarbital sleeping time and a decrease of liver fibrosis and cell death. Our results demonstrated that low doses of CAFF exert a hepatoprotective effect against CCl4 -induced liver damage in rats.

  5. Equivalent normalized total dose estimates in cyberknife radiotherapy dose delivery in prostate cancer hypofractionation regimens.

    PubMed

    Sudahar, H; Kurup, P G G; Murali, V; Mahadev, P; Velmurugan, J

    2012-04-01

    As the α/β value of prostate is very small and lower than the surrounding critical organs, hypofractionated radiotherapy became a vital mode of treatment of prostate cancer. Cyberknife (Accuray Inc., Sunnyvale, CA, USA) treatment for localized prostate cancer is performed in hypofractionated dose regimen alone. Effective dose escalation in the hypofractionated regimen can be estimated if the corresponding conventional 2 Gy per fraction equivalent normalized total dose (NTD) distribution is known. The present study aims to analyze the hypofractionated dose distribution of localized prostate cancer in terms of equivalent NTD. Randomly selected 12 localized prostate cases treated in cyberknife with a dose regimen of 36.25 Gy in 5 fractions were considered. The 2 Gy per fraction equivalent NTDs were calculated using the formula derived from the linear quadratic (LQ) model. Dose distributions were analyzed with the corresponding NTDs. The conformity index for the prescribed target dose of 36.25 Gy equivalent to the NTD dose of 90.63 Gy (α/β = 1.5) or 74.31 Gy (α/β = 3) was ranging between 1.15 and 1.73 with a mean value of 1.32 ± 0.15. The D5% of the target was 111.41 ± 8.66 Gy for α/β = 1.5 and 90.15 ± 6.57 Gy for α/β = 3. Similarly, the D95% was 91.98 ± 3.77 Gy for α/β = 1.5 and 75.35 ± 2.88 Gy for α/β = 3. The mean values of bladder and rectal volume receiving the prescribed dose of 36.25 Gy were 0.83 cm3 and 0.086 cm3, respectively. NTD dose analysis shows an escalated dose distribution within the target for low α/β (1.5 Gy) with reasonable sparing of organs at risk. However, the higher α/β of prostate (3 Gy) is not encouraging the fact of dose escalation in cyberknife hypofractionated dose regimen of localized prostate cancer.

  6. SU-D-BRB-07: Lipiodol Impact On Dose Distribution in Liver SBRT After TACE

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahara, D; Ozawa, S; Hioki, K; Suzuki, T; Lin, Y; Okumura, T; Ochi, Y; Nakashima, T; Ohno, Y; Kimura, T; Murakami, Y; Nagata, Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) combining transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) with Lipiodol is expected to improve local control. This study aims to evaluate the impact of Lipiodol on dose distribution by comparing the dosimetric performance of the Acuros XB (AXB) algorithm, anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA), and Monte Carlo (MC) method using a virtual heterogeneous phantom and a treatment plan for liver SBRT after TACE. Methods: The dose distributions calculated using AAA and AXB algorithm, both in Eclipse (ver. 11; Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA), and EGSnrc-MC were compared. First, the inhomogeneity correction accuracy of the AXB algorithm and AAA was evaluated by comparing the percent depth dose (PDD) obtained from the algorithms with that from the MC calculations using a virtual inhomogeneity phantom, which included water and Lipiodol. Second, the dose distribution of a liver SBRT patient treatment plan was compared between the calculation algorithms. Results In the virtual phantom, compared with the MC calculations, AAA underestimated the doses just before and in the Lipiodol region by 5.1% and 9.5%, respectively, and overestimated the doses behind the region by 6.0%. Furthermore, compared with the MC calculations, the AXB algorithm underestimated the doses just before and in the Lipiodol region by 4.5% and 10.5%, respectively, and overestimated the doses behind the region by 4.2%. In the SBRT plan, the AAA and AXB algorithm underestimated the maximum doses in the Lipiodol region by 9.0% in comparison with the MC calculations. In clinical cases, the dose enhancement in the Lipiodol region can approximately 10% increases in tumor dose without increase of dose to normal tissue. Conclusion: The MC method demonstrated a larger increase in the dose in the Lipiodol region than the AAA and AXB algorithm. Notably, dose enhancement were observed in the tumor area; this may lead to a clinical benefit.

  7. Accumulated Dose in Liver Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy: Positioning, Breathing, and Deformation Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Velec, Michael; Moseley, Joanne L.; Craig, Tim; Dawson, Laura A.; Brock, Kristy K.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the accumulated dose deviations to tumors and normal tissues in liver stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) and investigate their geometric causes. Methods and Materials: Thirty previously treated liver cancer patients were retrospectively evaluated. Stereotactic body radiotherapy was planned on the static exhale CT for 27-60 Gy in 6 fractions, and patients were treated in free-breathing with daily cone-beam CT guidance. Biomechanical model-based deformable image registration accumulated dose over both the planning four-dimensional (4D) CT (predicted breathing dose) and also over each fraction's respiratory-correlated cone-beam CT (accumulated treatment dose). The contribution of different geometric errors to changes between the accumulated and predicted breathing dose were quantified. Results: Twenty-one patients (70%) had accumulated dose deviations relative to the planned static prescription dose >5%, ranging from -15% to 5% in tumors and -42% to 8% in normal tissues. Sixteen patients (53%) still had deviations relative to the 4D CT-predicted dose, which were similar in magnitude. Thirty-two tissues in these 16 patients had deviations >5% relative to the 4D CT-predicted dose, and residual setup errors (n = 17) were most often the largest cause of the deviations, followed by deformations (n = 8) and breathing variations (n = 7). Conclusion: The majority of patients had accumulated dose deviations >5% relative to the static plan. Significant deviations relative to the predicted breathing dose still occurred in more than half the patients, commonly owing to residual setup errors. Accumulated SBRT dose may be warranted to pursue further dose escalation, adaptive SBRT, and aid in correlation with clinical outcomes.

  8. Space radiation dose estimates on the surface of Mars.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, L C; Nealy, J E; Townsend, L W; Wilson, J W

    1990-01-01

    A future goal of the U.S. space program is a commitment to the manned exploration and habitation of Mars. An important consideration of such missions is the exposure of crew members to the damaging effects of ionizing radiation from high-energy galactic cosmic ray fluxes and solar proton flares. The crew will encounter the most harmful radiation environment in transit to Mars from which they must be adequately protected. However, once on the planet's surface, the Martian environment should provide a significant amount of protection from free-space radiative fluxes. In current Mars scenario descriptions, the crew flight time to Mars is estimated to be anywhere from 7 months to over a year each way, with stay times on the surface ranging from 20 days to 2 years. To maintain dose levels below established astronaut limits, dose estimates need to be determined for the entire mission length. With extended crew durations on the surface anticipated, the characterization of the Mars radiation environment is important in assessing all radiation protection requirements. This synopsis focuses on the probable doses incurred by surface inhabitants from the transport of galactic cosmic rays and solar protons through the Mars atmosphere.

  9. Radiation environments and absorbed dose estimations on manned space missions.

    PubMed

    Curtis, S B; Atwell, W; Beever, R; Hardy, A

    1986-01-01

    In order to make an assessment of radiation risk during manned missions in space, it is necessary first to have as accurate an estimation as possible of the radiation environment within the spacecraft to which the astronauts will be exposed. Then, with this knowledge and the inclusion of body self-shielding, estimations can be made of absorbed doses for various body organs (skin, eye, blood-forming organs, etc.). A review is presented of our present knowledge of the radiation environments and absorbed doses expected for several space mission scenarios selected for our development of the new radiation protection guidelines. The scenarios selected are a 90-day mission at an altitude (450 km) and orbital inclinations (28.5 degrees, 57 degrees and 90 degrees) appropriate for NASA's Space Station, a 15-day sortie to geosynchronous orbit and a 90-day lunar mission. All scenarios chosen yielded dose equivalents between five and ten rem to the blood forming organs if no large solar particle event were encountered. Such particle events could add considerable exposure particularly to the skin and eye for all scenarios except the one at 28.5 degrees orbital inclination.

  10. Dose reconstruction for real-time patient-specific dose estimation in CT

    SciTech Connect

    De Man, Bruno Yin, Zhye; Wu, Mingye; FitzGerald, Paul; Kalra, Mannudeep

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: Many recent computed tomography (CT) dose reduction approaches belong to one of three categories: statistical reconstruction algorithms, efficient x-ray detectors, and optimized CT acquisition schemes with precise control over the x-ray distribution. The latter category could greatly benefit from fast and accurate methods for dose estimation, which would enable real-time patient-specific protocol optimization. Methods: The authors present a new method for volumetrically reconstructing absorbed dose on a per-voxel basis, directly from the actual CT images. The authors’ specific implementation combines a distance-driven pencil-beam approach to model the first-order x-ray interactions with a set of Gaussian convolution kernels to model the higher-order x-ray interactions. The authors performed a number of 3D simulation experiments comparing the proposed method to a Monte Carlo based ground truth. Results: The authors’ results indicate that the proposed approach offers a good trade-off between accuracy and computational efficiency. The images show a good qualitative correspondence to Monte Carlo estimates. Preliminary quantitative results show errors below 10%, except in bone regions, where the authors see a bigger model mismatch. The computational complexity is similar to that of a low-resolution filtered-backprojection algorithm. Conclusions: The authors present a method for analytic dose reconstruction in CT, similar to the techniques used in radiation therapy planning with megavoltage energies. Future work will include refinements of the proposed method to improve the accuracy as well as a more extensive validation study. The proposed method is not intended to replace methods that track individual x-ray photons, but the authors expect that it may prove useful in applications where real-time patient-specific dose estimation is required.

  11. Radiation dose estimate in small animal SPECT and PET.

    PubMed

    Funk, Tobias; Sun, Mingshan; Hasegawa, Bruce H

    2004-09-01

    Calculations of radiation dose are important in assessing the medical and biological implications of ionizing radiation in medical imaging techniques such as SPECT and PET. In contrast, radiation dose estimates of SPECT and PET imaging of small animals are not very well established. For that reason we have estimated the whole-body radiation dose to mice and rats for isotopes such as 18F, 99mTc, 201Tl, (111)In, 123I, and 125I that are used commonly for small animal imaging. We have approximated mouse and rat bodies with uniform soft tissue equivalent ellipsoids. The mouse and rat sized ellipsoids had a mass of 30 g and 300 g, respectively, and a ratio of the principal axes of 1:1:4 and 0.7:1:4. The absorbed fractions for various photon energies have been calculated using the Monte Carlo software package MCNP. Using these values, we then calculated MIRD S-values for two geometries that model the distribution of activity in the animal body: (a) a central point source and (b) a homogeneously distributed source, and compared these values against S-value calculations for small ellipsoids tabulated in MIRD Pamphlet 8 to validate our results. Finally we calculated the radiation dose taking into account the biological half-life of the radiopharmaceuticals and the amount of activity administered. Our calculations produced S-values between 1.06 x 10(-13) Gy/Bq s and 2.77 x 10(-13) Gy/Bq s for SPECT agents, and 15.0 x 10(-13) Gy/Bq s for the PET agent 18F, assuming mouse sized ellipsoids with uniform source distribution. The S-values for a central point source in an ellipsoid are about 10% higher than the values obtained for the uniform source distribution. Furthermore, the S-values for mouse sized ellipsoids are approximately 10 times higher than for the rat sized ellipsoids reflecting the difference in mass. We reviewed published data to obtain administered radioactivity and residence times for small animal imaging. From these values and our computed S-values we estimated

  12. Measuring radon concentrations and estimating dose in tourist caves.

    PubMed

    Martín Sánchez, A; de la Torre Pérez, J; Ruano Sánchez, A B; Naranjo Correa, F L

    2015-11-01

    Caves and mines are considered to be places of especial risk of exposure to (222)Rn. This is particularly important for guides and workers, but also for visitors. In the Extremadura region (Spain), there are two cave systems in which there are workers carrying out their normal everyday tasks. In one, visits have been reduced to maintain the conditions of temperature and humidity. The other comprises several caves frequently visited by school groups. The caves were radiologically characterised in order to estimate the dose received by workers or possible hazards for visitors.

  13. Radiation Dose Estimation for Pediatric Patients Undergoing Cardiac Catheterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chu

    Patients undergoing cardiac catheterization are potentially at risk of radiation-induced health effects from the interventional fluoroscopic X-ray imaging used throughout the clinical procedure. The amount of radiation exposure is highly dependent on the complexity of the procedure and the level of optimization in imaging parameters applied by the clinician. For cardiac catheterization, patient radiation dosimetry, for key organs as well as whole-body effective, is challenging due to the lack of fixed imaging protocols, unlike other common X-ray based imaging modalities. Pediatric patients are at a greater risk compared to adults due to their greater cellular radio-sensitivities as well as longer remaining life-expectancy following the radiation exposure. In terms of radiation dosimetry, they are often more challenging due to greater variation in body size, which often triggers a wider range of imaging parameters in modern imaging systems with automatic dose rate modulation. The overall objective of this dissertation was to develop a comprehensive method of radiation dose estimation for pediatric patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. In this dissertation, the research is divided into two main parts: the Physics Component and the Clinical Component. A proof-of-principle study focused on two patient age groups (Newborn and Five-year-old), one popular biplane imaging system, and the clinical practice of two pediatric cardiologists at one large academic medical center. The Physics Component includes experiments relevant to the physical measurement of patient organ dose using high-sensitivity MOSFET dosimeters placed in anthropomorphic pediatric phantoms. First, the three-dimensional angular dependence of MOSFET detectors in scatter medium under fluoroscopic irradiation was characterized. A custom-made spherical scatter phantom was used to measure response variations in three-dimensional angular orientations. The results were to be used as angular dependence

  14. Perspectives on radiation dose estimates for A-bomb survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Loewe, W.E.

    1986-12-01

    Four decades after the actual events, quantitative characterization of the radiation fields at Hiroshima and Nagasaki continues to be sought, with high accuracy a goal justified by the unique contribution to radiation protection standards that is represented by the medical records of exposed survivors. The most recent effort is distinguished by its reliance on computer modeling and concomitant detail, and by its decentralized direction, both internationally and internally to the US and Japan, with resultant ongoing peer review and wide scope of inquiry. A new system for individual dose estimation has been agreed upon, and its scientific basis has been elaborated in the literature as well as in a comprehensive treatise to be published in the Spring of 1987. In perspective, this new system appears to be an unusually successful achievement that offers the expectation of reliable estimates with the desired accuracy. Some aspects leading to this expectation, along with a caveat, are discussed here. 4 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. 324 Building life cycle dose estimates for planned work

    SciTech Connect

    Landsman, S.D.; Peterson, C.A.; Thornhill, R.E.

    1995-09-01

    This report describes a tool for use by organizational management teams to plan, manage, and oversee personnel exposures within their organizations. The report encompasses personnel radiation exposures received from activities associated with the B-Cell Cleanout Project, Surveillance and Maintenance Project, the Mk-42 Project, and other minor activities. It is designed to provide verifiable Radiological Performance Reports. The primary area workers receive radiation exposure is the Radiochemical Engineering Complex airlock. Entry to the airlock is necessary for maintenance of cranes and other equipment, and to set up the rail system used to move large pieces of equipment and shipping casks into and out of the airlock. Transfers of equipment and materials from the hot cells in the complex to the airlock are required to allow dose profiles of waste containers, shuffling of waste containers to allow grouting activities to go on, and to allow maintenance of in-cell cranes. Both DOE and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are currently investing in state-of-the-art decontamination equipment. Challenging goals for exposure reduction were established for several broad areas of activity. Exposure estimates and goals developed from these scheduled activities will be compared against actual exposures for scheduled and unscheduled activities that contributed to exposures received by personnel throughout the year. Included in this report are life cycle exposure estimates by calendar year for the B-Cell Cleanout project, a three-year estimate of exposures associated with Surveillance and Maintenance, and known activities for Calendar Year (CY) 1995 associated with several smaller projects. These reports are intended to provide a foundation for future dose estimates, by year, requiring updating as exposure conditions change or new avenues of approach to performing work are developed.

  16. MCNP simulation of the dose distribution in liver cancer treatment for BNC therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krstic, Dragana; Jovanovic, Zoran; Markovic, Vladimir; Nikezic, Dragoslav; Urosevic, Vlade

    2014-10-01

    The Boron Neutron Capture Therapy ( BNCT) is based on selective uptake of boron in tumour tissue compared to the surrounding normal tissue. Infusion of compounds with boron is followed by irradiation with neutrons. Neutron capture on 10B, which gives rise to an alpha particle and recoiled 7Li ion, enables the therapeutic dose to be delivered to tumour tissue while healthy tissue can be spared. Here, therapeutic abilities of BNCT were studied for possible treatment of liver cancer using thermal and epithermal neutron beam. For neutron transport MCNP software was used and doses in organs of interest in ORNL phantom were evaluated. Phantom organs were filled with voxels in order to obtain depth-dose distributions in them. The result suggests that BNCT using an epithermal neutron beam could be applied for liver cancer treatment.

  17. MCNP simulation of the dose distribution in liver cancer treatment for BNC therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krstic, Dragana; Jovanovic, Zoran; Markovic, Vladimir; Nikezic, Dragoslav; Urosevic, Vlade

    2014-10-01

    The Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is based on selective uptake of boron in tumour tissue compared to the surrounding normal tissue. Infusion of compounds with boron is followed by irradiation with neutrons. Neutron capture on 10B, which gives rise to an alpha particle and recoiled 7Li ion, enables the therapeutic dose to be delivered to tumour tissue while healthy tissue can be spared. Here, therapeutic abilities of BNCT were studied for possible treatment of liver cancer using thermal and epithermal neutron beam. For neutron transport MCNP software was used and doses in organs of interest in ORNL phantom were evaluated. Phantom organs were filled with voxels in order to obtain depth-dose distributions in them. The result suggests that BNCT using an epithermal neutron beam could be applied for liver cancer treatment.

  18. Repeated-dose liver micronucleus assay: an investigation with 2-nitropropane, a hepatocarcinogen.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Satoru; Araki, Tetsuro; Nakajima, Mikio; Kusuoka, Osamu; Uchida, Keisuke; Sato, Norihiro; Tanabe, Yoko; Takahashi, Kaori; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Tsurui, Kazuyuki

    2015-03-01

    The utility of the repeated-dose liver micronucleus (RDLMN) assay in the detection of a genotoxic hepatocarcinogen was evaluated. In this paper, a rat hepatocarcinogen, 2-nitropropane (2-NP), was administered orally to young adult rats for 14 and 28 days without a partial hepatectomy or a mitogen, and the micronucleus induction in liver was examined using a simple method to isolate hepatocytes. In addition, a bone marrow micronucleus assay was conducted concomitantly. The frequency of micronucleated hepatocytes induced by 2-NP increased significantly in both the 14- and 28-day repeated-dose studies, while the bone marrow micronucleus assays were negative in each study. These results indicate that the RDLMN assay is useful for detecting a genotoxic hepatocarcinogen that is negative in bone marrow micronucleus assays and is a suitable in vivo genotoxicity test method for integration into a repeated-dose general toxicity study.

  19. Estimating Functional Liver Reserve Following Hepatic Irradiation: Adaptive Normal Tissue Response Models

    PubMed Central

    Stenmark, Matthew H.; Cao, Yue; Wang, Hesheng; Jackson, Andrew; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Feng, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To estimate the limit of functional liver reserve for safe application of hepatic irradiation using changes in indocyanine green, an established assay of liver function. Materials and Methods From 2005–2011, 60 patients undergoing hepatic irradiation were enrolled in a prospective study assessing the plasma retention fraction of indocyanine green at 15-min (ICG-R15) prior to, during (at 60% of planned dose), and after radiotherapy (RT). The limit of functional liver reserve was estimated from the damage fraction of functional liver (DFL) post-RT [1−(ICG-R15pre-RT/ICG-R15post-RT)] where no toxicity was observed using a beta distribution function. Results Of 48 evaluable patients, 3 (6%) developed RILD, all within 2.5 months of completing RT. The mean ICG-R15 for non-RILD patients pre-RT, during-RT and 1-month post-RT was 20.3%(SE 2.6), 22.0%(3.0), and 27.5%(2.8), and for RILD patients was 6.3%(4.3), 10.8%(2.7), and 47.6%(8.8). RILD was observed at post-RT damage fractions of ≥78%. Both DFL assessed by during-RT ICG and MLD predicted for DFL post-RT (p<0.0001). Limiting the post-RT DFL to 50%, predicted a 99% probability of a true complication rate <15%. Conclusion The DFL as assessed by changes in ICG during treatment serves as an early indicator of a patient’s tolerance to hepatic irradiation. PMID:24813090

  20. Low-dose, Chronic Exposure to Silver Nanoparticles Causes Mild Mitochondrial Alterations in the Liver of Sprague-Dawley Rat

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-10

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2014-0032 Low-dose, chronic exposure to silver nanoparticles causes mild mitochondrial alterations in the liver ...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Low-dose, chronic exposure to silver nanoparticles causes mild mitochondrial alterations in the liver of Sprague-Dawley rat 5a...alterations were found in heart and kidney levels, and despite the fact that the alterations found in liver mitochondria did not appear to compromise ATP

  1. 32 CFR 218.4 - Dose estimate reporting standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., and neutron doses, when applicable. In determining the veteran's dose, initial neutron, initial gamma..., doses will be reported as gamma dose, neutron dose, and internal dose. To the extent to which the... of a neutron or internal exposure? What is the reconstruction? Upon request, the participant or...

  2. 32 CFR 218.4 - Dose estimate reporting standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., and neutron doses, when applicable. In determining the veteran's dose, initial neutron, initial gamma..., doses will be reported as gamma dose, neutron dose, and internal dose. To the extent to which the... of a neutron or internal exposure? What is the reconstruction? Upon request, the participant or...

  3. 32 CFR 218.4 - Dose estimate reporting standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., and neutron doses, when applicable. In determining the veteran's dose, initial neutron, initial gamma..., doses will be reported as gamma dose, neutron dose, and internal dose. To the extent to which the... of a neutron or internal exposure? What is the reconstruction? Upon request, the participant or...

  4. 32 CFR 218.4 - Dose estimate reporting standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., and neutron doses, when applicable. In determining the veteran's dose, initial neutron, initial gamma..., doses will be reported as gamma dose, neutron dose, and internal dose. To the extent to which the... of a neutron or internal exposure? What is the reconstruction? Upon request, the participant or...

  5. 32 CFR 218.4 - Dose estimate reporting standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., and neutron doses, when applicable. In determining the veteran's dose, initial neutron, initial gamma..., doses will be reported as gamma dose, neutron dose, and internal dose. To the extent to which the... of a neutron or internal exposure? What is the reconstruction? Upon request, the participant or...

  6. Recent Updates to Radiation Organ Dose Estimation Tool PIMAL

    SciTech Connect

    Akkurt, Hatice; Wiarda, Dorothea; Eckerman, Keith F

    2011-01-01

    A computational phantom with moving arms and legs and an accompanying graphical user interface, PIMAL, was previously developed to enable radiation dose estimation for different postures in a user-friendly manner. This initial version of the software was useful in adjusting the posture, generating the corresponding MCNP input file, and performing the radiation transport simulations for dose calculations using MCNP5 or MCNPX. However, it only included one mathematical phantom model (hermaphrodite) and allowed only isotropic point sources. Recently, the software was enhanced by adding two more mathematical phantom models, a male and female, and the source features were enhanced significantly by adding internal and external source options in a pull-down menu. Although the initial version of the software included only a mathematical hermaphrodite phantom, the features and models in the software are constantly being enhanced by adding more phantoms as well as other options to enable dose assessment for different configurations/cases in a user-friendly manner. In this latest version of the software, ICRP's recently released reference male and female voxel phantoms are included in a pull-down menu. The male and female models are described using 7 and 14 million voxels, respectively. Currently, the software is being modified further to include the International Commission on Radiation Protection's (ICRP) reference male and female voxel phantoms. Additionally, some case studies are being implemented and included in a library of input files. This paper describes recent updates to the software.

  7. Impact of therapeutic and high doses of florfenicol on kidney and liver functional indicators in goat

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Jan Muhammad; Qureshi, Toufique Ahmed; Shah, Tahmina; Shah, Qurban Ali; Arain, Muhammad Asif; Bhutto, Zohaib Ahmed; Saeed, Muhammad; Siyal, Farman Ali

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of therapeutic and high doses of florfenicol on kidney and liver functional indicators in goat species. Materials and Methods: Six mature, healthy goats (combine breed and sex) with average weight 25 kg were selected for this study. The therapeutic (20 mg/kg b.w.) and high doses (40 and 60 mg) of florfenicol were administered for 3 days with 24 h interval. Blood samples were collected at 0, 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 h following the each administered dose. Results: The results showed that the therapeutic dose of florfenicol produced nonsignificant effect on serum urea, creatinine, total protein (TP), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) and bilirubin on all timings, and increased (p<0.05) the serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT) and serum glutamate-pyruvate transaminase (SGPT) levels for 48 h. Whereas the high doses of florfenicol (40 and 60 mg) significantly altered the kidney and liver functional indicators in the blood. In contrast with control, the serum urea level was (p<0.01) increased at all timing points. Creatinine values were altered (p<0.01, <0.05) in increasing manner from 24 to 96 h. The high dose of 40 mg decreased the TP (p<0.05) for 72 h and 60 mg persisted same effect (p<0.01) up to 120 h. The indices of ALP, GGT, SGOT, and SGPT were raised (p<0.01, <0.05) at all timings. The bilirubin indexes also (p<0.05) elevated from 48 to 72. Conclusion: It was concluded that the high doses of florfenicol produced reversible dose-dependent effects on functional indicators of kidney and liver such as urea, creatinine, TP, ALP, SGOT, SGPT, GGT, and bilirubin. PMID:27847425

  8. Longitudinal dose and type of immunosuppression in a national cohort of Australian liver, heart, and lung transplant recipients, 1984-2006.

    PubMed

    Na, Renhua; Laaksonen, Maarit A; Grulich, Andrew E; Webster, Angela C; Meagher, Nicola S; McCaughan, Geoffrey W; Keogh, Anne M; Vajdic, Claire M

    2015-11-01

    Unconfounded comparative data on the type and dose of immunosuppressive agents among solid organ transplant recipients are sparse, as are data on longitudinal immunosuppressive therapy since transplantation. We addressed this issue in a population-based cohort of Australian liver (n = 1895), heart (n = 1220), and lung (n = 1059) transplant recipients, 1984-2006. Data on immunosuppressive therapy were retrospectively collected at discharge, three months, and one, five, 10, and 15 yr after first transplant. We computed unadjusted and adjusted estimates for the association between the type and dose of immunosuppressive therapy and organ type. After adjustment for confounders, use of induction antibody and maintenance corticosteroids was more common in heart and lung compared to liver recipients (p < 0.001), and antibody therapy for rejection more common in liver recipients (p < 0.001). Liver recipients were more likely to receive calcineurin inhibitor monotherapy, with or without corticosteroids, compared to heart and lung recipients (p < 0.001). Liver recipients consistently received lower doses of azathioprine than heart and lung recipients (p < 0.001). These differences in immunosuppression may partly explain variations in immunosuppression-related morbidity by transplanted organ, for example, malignancy risk. Longitudinal changes in the type and the dose of immunosuppressive therapy over time since transplantation also demonstrate the need for time-dependent data in observational research.

  9. Experimental low-level direct current therapy in liver metastases: influence of polarity and current dose.

    PubMed

    Turler, A; Schaefer, H; Schaefer, N; Wagner, M; Maintz, D; Qiao, J C; Hoelscher, A H

    2000-07-01

    Several authors recently reported on the successful local treatment of malignant disease with low-level direct current therapy. However, antitumoral effects in colorectal metastases has not been investigated experimentally. The aim of the present study was to assess the effectiveness of this therapy and the influence of polarity and current dose. Colorectal metastases were established in BD IX rats by the injection of colon cancer cells under the liver capsule. After three weeks, the liver tumor volumes were determined by magnetic resonance imaging of the liver. Low-level direct current therapy was applied via five platinum electrodes. Four different applications were used: 60 C/cm(3), anode at the center; 60 C/cm(3), cathode at the center; 80 C/cm(3), anode at the center; and 80 C/cm(3), cathode at the center. In the control group, five electrodes were placed without applying any direct current. All animals were sacrificed on postoperative day 7. Liver metastases were histologically examined for vital tumor cells. Statistical analysis was performed with chi(2)-test. The mean initial tumor diameter before treatment was 3.6 +/- 1.4 mm (volume: 25.2 +/- 9.7 mm(3)). Histological examination of the removed livers revealed significant destruction of the metastases with localized necroses in all treatment groups; 37% had a complete response rate and 63% a partial response rate. There were no significant necroses in the control group (P < 0.0001). The best treatment results were obtained in the group with an anode at the center and a current dose of 80 C/cm(3). Direct current therapy offers a new and safe method for the local treatment of liver metastases. We were able to observe that tumor damage is related to current dose but not to the polarity of the central electrode.

  10. Reproducibility and variability of very low dose hepatic perfusion CT in metastatic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Topcuoğlu, Osman Melih; Karçaaltıncaba, Muşturay; Akata, Deniz; Özmen, Mustafa Nasuh

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to determine the intra- and interobserver agreement on the software analysis of very low dose hepatic perfusion CT (pCT). METHODS A total of 53 pCT examinations were obtained from 21 patients (16 men, 5 women; mean age, 60.4 years) with proven liver metastasis from various primary cancers. The pCT examinations were analyzed by two readers independently and perfusion parameters were noted for whole liver, whole metastasis, metastasis wall, and normal-looking liver (liver tissue without metastasis) in regions of interest (ROIs). Readers repeated the analysis after an interval of one month. Intra- and interobserver agreements were assessed with intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and Bland-Altman statistics. RESULTS The mean ICCs of all ROIs between readers were 0.91, 0.93, 0.86, 0.45, 0.53, and 0.66 for blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), permeability, arterial liver perfusion (ALP), portal venous perfusion (PVP) and hepatic perfusion index (HPI), respectively. The mean ICCs of all ROIs between readings were 0.86, 0.91, 0.81, 0.53, 0.56, and 0.71 for BF, BV, permeability, ALP, PVP, and HPI, respectively. There was greater agreement on the parameters measured for the whole metastasis than on the parameters measured for the metastasis wall. The effective dose of all perfusion CT studies was 2.9 mSv. CONCLUSION There is greater intra- and interobserver agreement for BF and BV than for permeability, ALP, PVP, and HPI at very low dose hepatic pCT. Permeability, ALP, PVP, and HPI parameters cannot be used in clinical practice for hepatic pCT with an effective dose of 2.9 mSv. PMID:27759566

  11. Dose-Dependent Effect of Deltamethrin in Testis, Liver, and Kidney of Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Poonam; Singh, Rambir; Jan, Mysra

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Deltamethrin is a synthetic pyrethroid insecticide used worldwide in agriculture, household pest control, protection of foodstuff, and disease vector control. Although initially thought to be least toxic, a number of recent reports showed its toxic effects in mammalian and non-mammalian animal species. The current study was performed to assess the dose-dependent deltamethrin toxicity on testes, liver, and kidney of male Wistar rats. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four rats were divided in four groups of 6 each. Group A served as normal control. Group B, C, and D were administered with different doses (2 or 3 or 6 mg/kg corresponding to 1/30th or 1/20th or 1/10th of LD50, respectively) of deltamethrin for 28 days. Results: Deltamethrin exposure caused a significant reduction in weight of reproductive organs, decrease in sperm count, sperm motility, serum testosterone (T), follicle stimulating hormones (FSH), and luteinizing hormones (LH) in testis. Glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione S transferase (GST), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were decreased in testis, liver and kidney of exposed rats. Deltamethrin exposure significantly increased sperm abnormalities in testis. Significant increase in lipid peroxidation (LPO) level was observed in testis, liver and kidney. Deltamethrin also caused histological alterations in testes, liver, and kidney. Conclusions: The results indicated that deltamethrin at a dose of 6 mg/kg exerts significant harmful effects on testes, liver and kidney as compare to 2 mg and 3 mg/kg. The study concluded that the system toxicity induced by deltamethrin was dose dependent. PMID:25253921

  12. Improved dose-volume histogram estimates for radiopharmaceutical therapy by optimizing quantitative SPECT reconstruction parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Lishui; Hobbs, Robert F.; Segars, Paul W.; Sgouros, George; Frey, Eric C.

    2013-06-01

    In radiopharmaceutical therapy, an understanding of the dose distribution in normal and target tissues is important for optimizing treatment. Three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry takes into account patient anatomy and the nonuniform uptake of radiopharmaceuticals in tissues. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) provide a useful summary representation of the 3D dose distribution and have been widely used for external beam treatment planning. Reliable 3D dosimetry requires an accurate 3D radioactivity distribution as the input. However, activity distribution estimates from SPECT are corrupted by noise and partial volume effects (PVEs). In this work, we systematically investigated OS-EM based quantitative SPECT (QSPECT) image reconstruction in terms of its effect on DVHs estimates. A modified 3D NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso (NCAT) phantom that incorporated a non-uniform kidney model and clinically realistic organ activities and biokinetics was used. Projections were generated using a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation; noise effects were studied using 50 noise realizations with clinical count levels. Activity images were reconstructed using QSPECT with compensation for attenuation, scatter and collimator-detector response (CDR). Dose rate distributions were estimated by convolution of the activity image with a voxel S kernel. Cumulative DVHs were calculated from the phantom and QSPECT images and compared both qualitatively and quantitatively. We found that noise, PVEs, and ringing artifacts due to CDR compensation all degraded histogram estimates. Low-pass filtering and early termination of the iterative process were needed to reduce the effects of noise and ringing artifacts on DVHs, but resulted in increased degradations due to PVEs. Large objects with few features, such as the liver, had more accurate histogram estimates and required fewer iterations and more smoothing for optimal results. Smaller objects with fine details, such as the kidneys, required more iterations and less

  13. Radiation signature on exposed cells: Relevance in dose estimation.

    PubMed

    Perumal, Venkatachalam; Gnana Sekaran, Tamizh Selvan; Raavi, Venkateswarlu; Basheerudeen, Safa Abdul Syed; Kanagaraj, Karthik; Chowdhury, Amith Roy; Paul, Solomon Fd

    2015-09-28

    The radiation is considered as a double edged sword, as its beneficial and detrimental effects have been demonstrated. The potential benefits are being exploited to its maximum by adopting safe handling of radionuclide stipulated by the regulatory agencies. While the occupational workers are monitored by personnel monitoring devices, for general publics, it is not a regular practice. However, it can be achieved by using biomarkers with a potential for the radiation triage and medical management. An ideal biomarker to adopt in those situations should be rapid, specific, sensitive, reproducible, and able to categorize the nature of exposure and could provide a reliable dose estimation irrespective of the time of the exposures. Since cytogenetic markers shown to have many advantages relatively than other markers, the origins of various chromosomal abnormalities induced by ionizing radiations along with dose-response curves generated in the laboratory are presented. Current status of the gold standard dicentric chromosome assay, micronucleus assay, translocation measurement by fluorescence in-situ hybridization and an emerging protein marker the γ-H2AX assay are discussed with our laboratory data. With the wide choice of methods, an appropriate assay can be employed based on the net.

  14. Radiation signature on exposed cells: Relevance in dose estimation

    PubMed Central

    Perumal, Venkatachalam; Gnana Sekaran, Tamizh Selvan; Raavi, Venkateswarlu; Basheerudeen, Safa Abdul Syed; Kanagaraj, Karthik; Chowdhury, Amith Roy; Paul, Solomon FD

    2015-01-01

    The radiation is considered as a double edged sword, as its beneficial and detrimental effects have been demonstrated. The potential benefits are being exploited to its maximum by adopting safe handling of radionuclide stipulated by the regulatory agencies. While the occupational workers are monitored by personnel monitoring devices, for general publics, it is not a regular practice. However, it can be achieved by using biomarkers with a potential for the radiation triage and medical management. An ideal biomarker to adopt in those situations should be rapid, specific, sensitive, reproducible, and able to categorize the nature of exposure and could provide a reliable dose estimation irrespective of the time of the exposures. Since cytogenetic markers shown to have many advantages relatively than other markers, the origins of various chromosomal abnormalities induced by ionizing radiations along with dose-response curves generated in the laboratory are presented. Current status of the gold standard dicentric chromosome assay, micronucleus assay, translocation measurement by fluorescence in-situ hybridization and an emerging protein marker the γ-H2AX assay are discussed with our laboratory data. With the wide choice of methods, an appropriate assay can be employed based on the net. PMID:26435777

  15. Medium chain triglycerides dose-dependently prevent liver pathology in a rat model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Ronis, Martin J J; Baumgardner, January N; Sharma, Neha; Vantrease, Jamie; Ferguson, Matthew; Tong, Yudong; Wu, Xianli; Cleves, Mario A; Badger, Thomas M

    2013-02-01

    Metabolic syndrome is often accompanied by development of hepatic steatosis and less frequently by non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) leading to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Replacement of corn oil with medium chain triacylglycerols (MCT) in the diets of alcohol-fed rats has been shown to protect against steatosis and alcoholic liver injury. The current study was designed to determine if a similar beneficial effect of MCT occurs in a rat model of NAFLD. Groups of male rats were isocalorically overfed diets containing 10%, 35% or 70% total energy as corn oil or a 70% fat diet in which corn oil was replaced with increasing concentrations of saturated fat (18:82, beef tallow:MCT oil) from 20% to 65% for 21 days using total enteral nutrition (TEN). As dietary content of corn oil increased, hepatic steatosis and serum alanine amino transferases were elevated (P < 0.05). This was accompanied by greater expression of cytochrome P450 enzyme CYP2E1 (P < 0.05) and higher concentrations of polyunsaturated 18:2 and 20:4 fatty acids (FA) in the hepatic lipid fractions (P < 0.05). Keeping the total dietary fat at 70%, but increasing the proportion of MCT-enriched saturated fat resulted in a dose-dependent reduction in steatosis and necrosis without affecting CYP2E1 induction. There was no incorporation of C8-C10 FAs into liver lipids, but increasing the ratio of MCT to corn oil: reduced liver lipid 18:2 and 20:4 concentrations; reduced membrane susceptibility to radical attack; stimulated FA β- and ω-oxidation as a result of activation of peroxisomal proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)α, and appeared to increase mitochondrial respiration through complex III. These data suggest that replacing unsaturated fats like corn oil with MCT oil in the diet could be utilized as a potential treatment for NAFLD.

  16. Optimizing CT radiation dose based on patient size and image quality: the size-specific dose estimate method.

    PubMed

    Larson, David B

    2014-10-01

    The principle of ALARA (dose as low as reasonably achievable) calls for dose optimization rather than dose reduction, per se. Optimization of CT radiation dose is accomplished by producing images of acceptable diagnostic image quality using the lowest dose method available. Because it is image quality that constrains the dose, CT dose optimization is primarily a problem of image quality rather than radiation dose. Therefore, the primary focus in CT radiation dose optimization should be on image quality. However, no reliable direct measure of image quality has been developed for routine clinical practice. Until such measures become available, size-specific dose estimates (SSDE) can be used as a reasonable image-quality estimate. The SSDE method of radiation dose optimization for CT abdomen and pelvis consists of plotting SSDE for a sample of examinations as a function of patient size, establishing an SSDE threshold curve based on radiologists' assessment of image quality, and modifying protocols to consistently produce doses that are slightly above the threshold SSDE curve. Challenges in operationalizing CT radiation dose optimization include data gathering and monitoring, managing the complexities of the numerous protocols, scanners and operators, and understanding the relationship of the automated tube current modulation (ATCM) parameters to image quality. Because CT manufacturers currently maintain their ATCM algorithms as secret for proprietary reasons, prospective modeling of SSDE for patient populations is not possible without reverse engineering the ATCM algorithm and, hence, optimization by this method requires a trial-and-error approach.

  17. Dose-response approaches for nuclear receptor-mediated modes of action for liver carcinogenicity: Results of a workshop.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Melvin E; Preston, R Julian; Maier, Andrew; Willis, Alison M; Patterson, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    A public workshop, organized by a Steering Committee of scientists from government, industry, universities and research organizations, was held at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) in September, 2010. The workshop explored the dose-response implications of toxicant modes of action (MOA) mediated by nuclear receptors. The dominant paradigm in human health risk assessment has been linear extrapolation without a threshold for cancer, and estimation of sub-threshold doses for non-cancer and (in appropriate cases) cancer endpoints. However, recent publications question the application of dose-response modeling approaches with a threshold. The growing body of molecular toxicology information and computational toxicology tools has allowed for exploration of the presence or absence of sub-threshold doses for a number of receptor-mediated MOAs. The workshop explored the development of dose-response approaches for nuclear receptor-mediated liver cancer, within a MOA Human Relevance Framework (HRF). Case studies addressed activation of the AHR, the CAR and the PPARα. This article describes the workshop process, key issues discussed and conclusions. The value of an interactive workshop approach to apply current MOA/HRF frameworks was demonstrated. The results may help direct research on the MOA and dose-response of receptor-based toxicity, since there are commonalities for many receptors in the basic pathways involved for late steps in the MOA, and similar data gaps in early steps. Three additional papers in this series describe the results and conclusions for each case-study receptor regarding its MOA, relevance of the MOA to humans and the resulting dose-response implications.

  18. Low-dose photons modify liver response to simulated solar particle event protons.

    PubMed

    Gridley, Daila S; Coutrakon, George B; Rizvi, Asma; Bayeta, Erben J M; Luo-Owen, Xian; Makinde, Adeola Y; Baqai, Farnaz; Koss, Peter; Slater, James M; Pecaut, Michael J

    2008-03-01

    The health consequences of exposure to low-dose radiation combined with a solar particle event during space travel remain unresolved. The goal of this study was to determine whether protracted radiation exposure alters gene expression and oxidative burst capacity in the liver, an organ vital in many biological processes. C57BL/6 mice were whole-body irradiated with 2 Gy simulated solar particle event (SPE) protons over 36 h, both with and without pre-exposure to low-dose/low-dose-rate photons ((57)Co, 0.049 Gy total at 0.024 cGy/h). Livers were excised immediately after irradiation (day 0) or on day 21 thereafter for analysis of 84 oxidative stress-related genes using RT-PCR; genes up or down-regulated by more than twofold were noted. On day 0, genes with increased expression were: photons, none; simulated SPE, Id1; photons + simulated SPE, Bax, Id1, Snrp70. Down-regulated genes at this same time were: photons, Igfbp1; simulated SPE, Arnt2, Igfbp1, Il6, Lct, Mybl2, Ptx3. By day 21, a much greater effect was noted than on day 0. Exposure to photons + simulated SPE up-regulated completely different genes than those up-regulated after either photons or the simulated SPE alone (photons, Cstb; simulated SPE, Dctn2, Khsrp, Man2b1, Snrp70; photons + simulated SPE, Casp1, Col1a1, Hspcb, Il6st, Rpl28, Spnb2). There were many down-regulated genes in all irradiated groups on day 21 (photons, 13; simulated SPE, 16; photons + simulated SPE, 16), with very little overlap among groups. Oxygen radical production by liver phagocytes was significantly enhanced by photons on day 21. The results demonstrate that whole-body irradiation with low-dose-rate photons, as well as time after exposure, had a great impact on liver response to a simulated solar particle event.

  19. Ultrastructural changes in the parenchymal liver cells of rats treated with high doses of rifampicin.

    PubMed Central

    Piriou, A.; Maissiat, R.; Jacqueson, A.; Warnet, J. M.; Claude, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    Ultrastructural study of hepatic parenchyma was carried out in female Wistar rats after they had received high doses (400 mg X kg-1) of rifampicin for 1, 2, 4, 6 and 8 days. Morphological changes in the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus and mitochondria were observed as early as day 1 of intoxication. These changes corroborate the biochemical data available regarding RFP-induced fatty liver. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 & 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:3580280

  20. Increased iron deposition in rat liver fibrosis induced by a high-dose injection of dimethylnitrosamine.

    PubMed

    Guo, Limei; Enzan, Hideaki; Hayashi, Yoshihiro; Miyazaki, Eriko; Jin, Yulan; Toi, Makoto; Kuroda, Naoto; Hiroi, Makoto

    2006-12-01

    Using a developed rat model of hepatic necrosis and subsequent fibrosis induced by a high-dose intraperitoneal injection of dimethylnitrosamine (DMN), we studied iron deposition and expression of transforming growth factor-beta(1) (TGF-beta(1)) during the development of persistent liver fibrosis. Rats were sacrificed at several timepoints from 6 h to 10 months post-injection and the livers were examined for iron content and distribution, and for expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin, ED-1, TGF-beta(1), and collagen (alpha(2))I. Morphologic evidence of acute submassive hemorrhagic necrosis peaked at 36 h; on day 3 the residual parenchyma contained activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and necrotic areas contained numerous macrophages; and on day 5, necrotic tissues and erythrocytes had been phagocytosed and macrophages contained abundant iron deposits. From days 7 to 10, iron-laden macrophages and activated HSCs (myofibroblasts) populated the fibrous septa in parallel. From week 2 to month 10, closely arranged macrophages and myofibroblasts were found in central-to-central bridging fibrotic tissue. TGF-beta(1) was strongly detected in both macrophages and HSCs during development of liver fibrosis. Our data suggest that increased iron deposition may be involved in the initiation and perpetuation of rat liver fibrosis. Iron-laden macrophages may influence HSCs through the action of TGF-beta(1) in DMN-induced liver fibrosis.

  1. Estimation of radiation dose to patients from 18FDG whole body PET/CT investigations using dynamic PET scan protocol

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Aruna; Jaimini, Abhinav; Tripathi, Madhavi; D’Souza, Maria; Sharma, Rajnish; Mondal, Anupam; Mishra, Anil K.; Dwarakanath, Bilikere S.

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: There is a growing concern over the radiation exposure of patients from undergoing 18FDG PET/CT (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography) whole body investigations. The aim of the present study was to study the kinetics of 18FDG distributions and estimate the radiation dose received by patients undergoing 18FDG whole body PET/CT investigations. Methods: Dynamic PET scans in different regions of the body were performed in 49 patients so as to measure percentage uptake of 18FDG in brain, liver, spleen, adrenals, kidneys and stomach. The residence time in these organs was calculated and radiation dose was estimated using OLINDA software. The radiation dose from the CT component was computed using the software CT-Expo and measured using computed tomography dose index (CTDI) phantom and ionization chamber. As per the clinical protocol, the patients were refrained from eating and drinking for a minimum period of 4 h prior to the study. Results: The estimated residence time in males was 0.196 h (brain), 0.09 h (liver), 0.007 h (spleen), 0.0006 h (adrenals), 0.013 h (kidneys) and 0.005 h (stomach) whereas it was 0.189 h (brain), 0.11 h (liver), 0.01 h (spleen), 0.0007 h (adrenals), 0.02 h (kidneys) and 0.004 h (stomach) in females. The effective dose was found to be 0.020 mSv/MBq in males and 0.025 mSv/MBq in females from internally administered 18FDG and 6.8 mSv in males and 7.9 mSv in females from the CT component. For an administered activity of 370 MBq of 18FDG, the effective dose from PET/CT investigations was estimated to be 14.2 mSv in males and 17.2 mSv in females. Interpretation & conclusions: The present results did not demonstrate significant difference in the kinetics of 18FDG distribution in male and female patients. The estimated PET/CT doses were found to be higher than many other conventional diagnostic radiology examinations suggesting that all efforts should be made to clinically justify and

  2. Four-dimensional dose evaluation using deformable image registration in radiotherapy for liver cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hoon Jung, Sang; Min Yoon, Sang; Ho Park, Sung; Cho, Byungchul; Won Park, Jae; Jung, Jinhong; Park, Jin-hong; Hoon Kim, Jong; Do Ahn, Seung

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: In order to evaluate the dosimetric impact of respiratory motion on the dose delivered to the target volume and critical organs during free-breathing radiotherapy, a four-dimensional dose was evaluated using deformable image registration (DIR). Methods: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) images were acquired for 11 patients who were treated for liver cancer. Internal target volume-based treatment planning and dose calculation (3D dose) were performed using the end-exhalation phase images. The four-dimensional dose (4D dose) was calculated based on DIR of all phase images from 4DCT to the planned image. Dosimetric parameters from the 4D dose, were calculated and compared with those from the 3D dose. Results: There was no significant change of the dosimetric parameters for gross tumor volume (p > 0.05). The increase D{sub mean} and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) for liver were by 3.1%{+-} 3.3% (p= 0.003) and 2.8%{+-} 3.3% (p= 0.008), respectively, and for duodenum, they were decreased by 15.7%{+-} 11.2% (p= 0.003) and 15.1%{+-} 11.0% (p= 0.003), respectively. The D{sub max} and gEUD for stomach was decreased by 5.3%{+-} 5.8% (p= 0.003) and 9.7%{+-} 8.7% (p= 0.003), respectively. The D{sub max} and gEUD for right kidney was decreased by 11.2%{+-} 16.2% (p= 0.003) and 14.9%{+-} 16.8% (p= 0.005), respectively. For left kidney, D{sub max} and gEUD were decreased by 11.4%{+-} 11.0% (p= 0.003) and 12.8%{+-} 12.1% (p= 0.005), respectively. The NTCP values for duodenum and stomach were decreased by 8.4%{+-} 5.8% (p= 0.003) and 17.2%{+-} 13.7% (p= 0.003), respectively. Conclusions: The four-dimensional dose with a more realistic dose calculation accounting for respiratory motion revealed no significant difference in target coverage and potentially significant change in the physical and biological dosimetric parameters in normal organs during free-breathing treatment.

  3. Effect of intravenous fructose on the P-31 MR spectrum of the liver: dose response in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Terrier, F; Vock, P; Cotting, J; Ladebeck, R; Reichen, J; Hentschel, D

    1989-05-01

    Dynamic phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy of the liver after intravenous administration of fructose has been suggested as a test of liver function. To establish dose-response curves of the phosphorus metabolites in the normal human liver, each of four healthy volunteers was given two to four different fructose doses on separate days: 62.5, 125, 250, 375, or 500 mg per kilogram of body weight. P-31 MR spectra of the liver were acquired with a 2-T whole-body magnetic, both before and after fructose administration, at 2.5-minute intervals over at least 30 minutes. The fructose load caused a significant, linearly dose-dependent accumulation of phosphomonoesters (r = .72, P less than .01) and a decrease in inorganic phosphate (r = .78, P less than .005) and adenosine triphosphate (r = .73, P less than .01). On the basis of these experiments, dynamic P-31 MR spectroscopy seems promising in the assessment of liver function.

  4. Dose-response association between hepatitis B surface antigen levels and liver cancer risk in Chinese men and women.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Gao, Jing; Li, Hong-Lan; Zheng, Wei; Yang, Gong; Zhang, Wei; Ma, Xiao; Tan, Yu-Ting; Rothman, Nathaniel; Gao, Yu-Tang; Chow, Wong-Ho; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Xiang, Yong-Bing

    2016-07-15

    We aimed at evaluating the risk of liver cancer in different levels of HBsAg among Chinese men and women. We carried out a nested case-control study including 363 cases and 3,511 controls in two population-based cohorts in Shanghai. Plasma samples collected at enrollment were quantified for HBsAg levels using the Architect QT assay. Conditional logistic regression was performed to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for liver cancer, with adjustment for potential confounders. HBsAg was detected in 6.29% of control subjects overall (7.02% in men and 4.98% in women). HBsAg levels were positively associated with liver cancer risk in a dose-response manner (ptrend  < 0.001). Such association showed a significant gender disparity. With increasing levels of HBsAg, liver cancer risks rose more steeply in men than in women. In men, the adjusted ORs increased from 7.27 (95% CI: 3.49-15.15) at the lowest detectable level of HBsAg (5-9 IU/ml) to 7.16 (95% CI: 3.21-15.96), 34.30 (95% CI: 16.94-69.44), and 47.33 (95% CI: 23.50-95.34) at the highest level of HBsAg (≥1,000 IU/ml) compared to those negative for HBsAg. The corresponding ORs were much lower for women, from 1.37 (95% CI: 0.25-7.47), 3.81 (95% CI: 1.09-13.28), 7.36 (95% CI: 2.41-22.46) and 16.86 (95% CI: 7.24-39.27), respectively. HBsAg quantification has potential to distinguish individuals at different risks of liver cancer. Men with the lowest detectable level of HBsAg should still pay attention to their liver cancer risks, but those with a higher level may be given a higher priority in future liver cancer surveillance program.

  5. PET-CT in Determining the Radioembolization Dose Delivered to Patients With Liver Metastasis, Primary Liver Cancer, or Biliary Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-24

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Stage D Adult Primary Liver Cancer (BCLC); Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  6. Time-dependent radiation dose estimations during interplanetary space flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobynde, M. I.; Shprits, Y.; Drozdov, A.

    2015-12-01

    Time-dependent radiation dose estimations during interplanetary space flights 1,2Dobynde M.I., 2,3Drozdov A.Y., 2,4Shprits Y.Y.1Skolkovo institute of science and technology, Moscow, Russia 2University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, USA 3Lomonosov Moscow State University Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow, Russia4Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USASpace radiation is the main restriction for long-term interplanetary space missions. It induces degradation of external components and propagates inside providing damage to internal environment. Space radiation particles and induced secondary particle showers can lead to variety of damage to astronauts in short- and long- term perspective. Contribution of two main sources of space radiation- Sun and out-of-heliosphere space varies in time in opposite phase due to the solar activity state. Currently the only habituated mission is the international interplanetary station that flights on the low Earth orbit. Besides station shell astronauts are protected with the Earth magnetosphere- a natural shield that prevents significant damage for all humanity. Current progress in space exploration tends to lead humanity out of magnetosphere bounds. With the current study we make estimations of spacecraft parameters and astronauts damage for long-term interplanetary flights. Applying time dependent model of GCR spectra and data on SEP spectra we show the time dependence of the radiation in a human phantom inside the shielding capsule. We pay attention to the shielding capsule design, looking for an optimal geometry parameters and materials. Different types of particles affect differently on the human providing more or less harm to the tissues. Incident particles provide a large amount of secondary particles while propagating through the shielding capsule. We make an attempt to find an optimal combination of shielding capsule parameters, namely material and thickness, that will effectively decrease

  7. Assessment of individual organ doses in a realistic human phantom from neutron and gamma stimulated spectroscopy of the breast and liver

    SciTech Connect

    Belley, Matthew D.; Segars, William Paul; Kapadia, Anuj J.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Understanding the radiation dose to a patient is essential when considering the use of an ionizing diagnostic imaging test for clinical diagnosis and screening. Using Monte Carlo simulations, the authors estimated the three-dimensional organ-dose distribution from neutron and gamma irradiation of the male liver, female liver, and female breasts for neutron- and gamma-stimulated spectroscopic imaging. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were developed using the Geant4 GATE application and a voxelized XCAT human phantom. A male and a female whole body XCAT phantom was voxelized into 256 × 256 × 600 voxels (3.125 × 3.125 × 3.125 mm{sup 3}). A monoenergetic rectangular beam of 5.0 MeV neutrons or 7.0 MeV photons was made incident on a 2 cm thick slice of the phantom. The beam was rotated at eight different angles around the phantom ranging from 0° to 180°. Absorbed dose was calculated for each individual organ in the body and dose volume histograms were computed to analyze the absolute and relative doses in each organ. Results: The neutron irradiations of the liver showed the highest organ dose absorption in the liver, with appreciably lower doses in other proximal organs. The dose distribution within the irradiated slice exhibited substantial attenuation with increasing depth along the beam path, attenuating to ∼15% of the maximum value at the beam exit side. The gamma irradiation of the liver imparted the highest organ dose to the stomach wall. The dose distribution from the gammas showed a region of dose buildup at the beam entrance, followed by a relatively uniform dose distribution to all of the deep tissue structures, attenuating to ∼75% of the maximum value at the beam exit side. For the breast scans, both the neutron and gamma irradiation registered maximum organ doses in the breasts, with all other organs receiving less than 1% of the breast dose. Effective doses ranged from 0.22 to 0.37 mSv for the neutron scans and 41 to 66 mSv for the gamma

  8. Assessment of individual organ doses in a realistic human phantom from neutron and gamma stimulated spectroscopy of the breast and liver

    PubMed Central

    Belley, Matthew D.; Segars, William Paul; Kapadia, Anuj J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Understanding the radiation dose to a patient is essential when considering the use of an ionizing diagnostic imaging test for clinical diagnosis and screening. Using Monte Carlo simulations, the authors estimated the three-dimensional organ-dose distribution from neutron and gamma irradiation of the male liver, female liver, and female breasts for neutron- and gamma-stimulated spectroscopic imaging. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were developed using the Geant4 GATE application and a voxelized XCAT human phantom. A male and a female whole body XCAT phantom was voxelized into 256 × 256 × 600 voxels (3.125 × 3.125 × 3.125 mm3). A monoenergetic rectangular beam of 5.0 MeV neutrons or 7.0 MeV photons was made incident on a 2 cm thick slice of the phantom. The beam was rotated at eight different angles around the phantom ranging from 0° to 180°. Absorbed dose was calculated for each individual organ in the body and dose volume histograms were computed to analyze the absolute and relative doses in each organ. Results: The neutron irradiations of the liver showed the highest organ dose absorption in the liver, with appreciably lower doses in other proximal organs. The dose distribution within the irradiated slice exhibited substantial attenuation with increasing depth along the beam path, attenuating to ∼15% of the maximum value at the beam exit side. The gamma irradiation of the liver imparted the highest organ dose to the stomach wall. The dose distribution from the gammas showed a region of dose buildup at the beam entrance, followed by a relatively uniform dose distribution to all of the deep tissue structures, attenuating to ∼75% of the maximum value at the beam exit side. For the breast scans, both the neutron and gamma irradiation registered maximum organ doses in the breasts, with all other organs receiving less than 1% of the breast dose. Effective doses ranged from 0.22 to 0.37 mSv for the neutron scans and 41 to 66 mSv for the gamma scans

  9. A Phase I clinical and pharmacology study using amifostine as a radioprotector in dose-escalated whole liver radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Mary; Smith, David E.; Normolle, Daniel P.; Knol, James A.; Pan, Charlie C.; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Lu, Zheng; Feng, Meihua R.; Chen, Jun; Ensminger, William; Lawrence, Theodore S.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE Diffuse intrahepatic tumors are difficult to control. Whole liver radiotherapy has been limited by toxicity, most notably radiation-induced liver disease (RILD). Amifostine is a prodrug free-radical scavenger that selectively protects normal tissues and, in a preclinical model of intrahepatic cancer, systemic amifostine reduced normal liver radiation damage without compromising tumor effect.(1) We hypothesized that amifostine would permit escalation of whole liver radiation dose to potentially control microscopic disease. We also aimed to characterize the pharmacokinetics of amifostine and its active metabolite WR-1065 to optimize timing of radiotherapy. METHODS AND MATERIALS We conducted a radiation dose escalation trial for patients with diffuse, intrahepatic cancer treated with whole liver radiation and intravenous amifostine. Radiation dose was assigned using the Time-to-Event Continual Reassessment Method. A companion pharmacokinetic study was performed. RESULTS 23 patients were treated, with a maximum dose of 40 Gy. Using a logistical regression model, compared to our previously treated patients, amifostine increased liver tolerance by 3.3 ± 1.1 Gy (p=0.007) (approximately 10%) with similar response rates. Peak concentrations of WR-1065 were 25 μM with an elimination half life of 1.5 hours; these levels are consistent with radioprotective effects of amifostine in patients. CONCLUSION These findings demonstrate for the first time that amifostine is a normal liver radioprotector. They further suggest that it may be useful to combine amifostine with fractionated or stereotactic body radiation therapy for patients with focal intrahepatic cancer. PMID:22440042

  10. Adverse effects of high doses of intravenous alpha lipoic Acid on liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Vigil, Michael; Berkson, Burton M; Garcia, Ana Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Alpha lipoic acid (ALA, thioctic acid), among other actions, is an essential coenzyme in the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl co-enzyme A. Therefore, it is necessary for the production of energy for aerobic organisms. Scientists have found that it can be used medically to help regenerate liver tissue, reverse the complications of diabetes mellitus, slow or stop the growth of cancer cells, and chelate heavy metals, among other actions. In this article, the authors describe the cellular mitochondrial damage from excessively high doses of this beneficial agent.

  11. Estimation of Weapon Yield From Inversion of Dose Rate Contours

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    Zucchini .................................................................................... 76 Operation PLUMBBOB—Priscilla...Appendix E: ESS FOM ....................................................................................................112 Appendix F: Zucchini FOM...Relationship of Dose Rate Contour Area, Weather Grid, and AOI ............... 57 23. Zucchini FDC, DNA-EX, and HPAC Dose Rate Contours at 28KT

  12. SU-E-T-86: A Systematic Method for GammaKnife SRS Fetal Dose Estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Geneser, S; Paulsson, A; Sneed, P; Braunstein, S; Ma, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Estimating fetal dose is critical to the decision-making process when radiation treatment is indicated during pregnancy. Fetal doses less than 5cGy confer no measurable non-cancer developmental risks but can produce a threefold increase in developing childhood cancer. In this study, we estimate fetal dose for a patient receiving Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS) treatment and develop a method to estimate dose directly from plan details. Methods: A patient underwent GKSRS on a Perfexion unit for eight brain metastases (two infratentorial and one brainstem). Dose measurements were performed using a CC13, head phantom, and solid water. Superficial doses to the thyroid, sternum, and pelvis were measured using MOSFETs during treatment. Because the fetal dose was too low to accurately measure, we obtained measurements proximally to the isocenter, fitted to an exponential function, and extrapolated dose to the fundus of the uterus, uterine midpoint, and pubic synthesis for both the preliminary and delivered plans. Results: The R-squared fit for the delivered doses was 0.995. The estimated fetal doses for the 72 minute preliminary and 138 minute delivered plans range from 0.0014 to 0.028cGy and 0.07 to 0.38cGy, respectively. MOSFET readings during treatment were just above background for the thyroid and negligible for all inferior positions. The method for estimating fetal dose from plan shot information was within 0.2cGy of the measured values at 14cm cranial to the fetal location. Conclusion: Estimated fetal doses for both the preliminary and delivered plan were well below the 5cGy recommended limit. Due to Pefexion shielding, internal dose is primarily governed by attenuation and drops off exponentially. This is the first work that reports fetal dose for a GK Perfexion unit. Although multiple lesions were treated and the duration of treatment was long, the estimated fetal dose remained very low.

  13. Radiation Leukemogenesis: Applying Basic Science of Epidemiological Estimates of Low Dose Risks and Dose-Rate Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Hoel, D. G.

    1998-11-01

    The next stage of work has been to examine more closely the A-bomb leukemia data which provides the underpinnings of the risk estimation of CML in the above mentioned manuscript. The paper by Hoel and Li (Health Physics 75:241-50) shows how the linear-quadratic model has basic non-linearities at the low dose region for the leukemias including CML. Pierce et. al., (Radiation Research 123:275-84) have developed distributions for the uncertainty in the estimated exposures of the A-bomb cohort. Kellerer, et. al., (Radiation and Environmental Biophysics 36:73-83) has further considered possible errors in the estimated neutron values and with changing RBE values with dose and has hypothesized that the tumor response due to gamma may not be linear. We have incorporated his neutron model and have constricted new A-bomb doses based on his model adjustments. The Hoel and Li dose response analysis has also been applied using the Kellerer neutron dose adjustments for the leukemias. Finally, both Pierce's dose uncertainties and Kellerer neutron adjustments are combined as well as the varying RBE with dose as suggested by Rossi and Zaider and used for leukemia dose-response analysis. First the results of Hoel and Li showing a significantly improved fit of the linear-quadratic dose response by the inclusion of a threshold (i.e. low-dose nonlinearity) persisted. This work has been complete for both solid tumor as well as leukemia for both mortality as well as incidence data. The results are given in the manuscript described below which has been submitted to Health Physics.

  14. Convolution-based estimation of organ dose in tube current modulated CT

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Segars, W Paul; Dixon, Robert L; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Estimating organ dose for clinical patients requires accurate modeling of the patient anatomy and the dose field of the CT exam. The modeling of patient anatomy can be achieved using a library of representative computational phantoms (Samei et al 2014 Pediatr. Radiol. 44 460–7). The modeling of the dose field can be challenging for CT exams performed with a tube current modulation (TCM) technique. The purpose of this work was to effectively model the dose field for TCM exams using a convolution-based method. A framework was further proposed for prospective and retrospective organ dose estimation in clinical practice. The study included 60 adult patients (age range: 18–70 years, weight range: 60–180 kg). Patient-specific computational phantoms were generated based on patient CT image datasets. A previously validated Monte Carlo simulation program was used to model a clinical CT scanner (SOMATOM Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany). A practical strategy was developed to achieve real-time organ dose estimation for a given clinical patient. CTDIvol-normalized organ dose coefficients (hOrgan) under constant tube current were estimated and modeled as a function of patient size. Each clinical patient in the library was optimally matched to another computational phantom to obtain a representation of organ location/distribution. The patient organ distribution was convolved with a dose distribution profile to generate (CTDIvol)organ, convolution values that quantified the regional dose field for each organ. The organ dose was estimated by multiplying (CTDIvol)organ, convolution with the organ dose coefficients (hOrgan). To validate the accuracy of this dose estimation technique, the organ dose of the original clinical patient was estimated using Monte Carlo program with TCM profiles explicitly modeled. The discrepancy between the estimated organ dose and dose simulated using TCM Monte Carlo program was quantified. We further compared the

  15. Convolution-based estimation of organ dose in tube current modulated CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Segars, W. Paul; Dixon, Robert L.; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-05-01

    Estimating organ dose for clinical patients requires accurate modeling of the patient anatomy and the dose field of the CT exam. The modeling of patient anatomy can be achieved using a library of representative computational phantoms (Samei et al 2014 Pediatr. Radiol. 44 460-7). The modeling of the dose field can be challenging for CT exams performed with a tube current modulation (TCM) technique. The purpose of this work was to effectively model the dose field for TCM exams using a convolution-based method. A framework was further proposed for prospective and retrospective organ dose estimation in clinical practice. The study included 60 adult patients (age range: 18-70 years, weight range: 60-180 kg). Patient-specific computational phantoms were generated based on patient CT image datasets. A previously validated Monte Carlo simulation program was used to model a clinical CT scanner (SOMATOM Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany). A practical strategy was developed to achieve real-time organ dose estimation for a given clinical patient. CTDIvol-normalized organ dose coefficients ({{h}\\text{Organ}} ) under constant tube current were estimated and modeled as a function of patient size. Each clinical patient in the library was optimally matched to another computational phantom to obtain a representation of organ location/distribution. The patient organ distribution was convolved with a dose distribution profile to generate {{≤ft(\\text{CTD}{{\\text{I}}\\text{vol}}\\right)}\\text{organ, \\text{convolution}}} values that quantified the regional dose field for each organ. The organ dose was estimated by multiplying {{≤ft(\\text{CTD}{{\\text{I}}\\text{vol}}\\right)}\\text{organ, \\text{convolution}}} with the organ dose coefficients ({{h}\\text{Organ}} ). To validate the accuracy of this dose estimation technique, the organ dose of the original clinical patient was estimated using Monte Carlo program with TCM profiles explicitly modeled. The

  16. Size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) provides a simple method to calculate organ dose for pediatric CT examinations

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Bria M.; Brady, Samuel L. Kaufman, Robert A.; Mirro, Amy E.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the correlation of size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) with absorbed organ dose, and to develop a simple methodology for estimating patient organ dose in a pediatric population (5–55 kg). Methods: Four physical anthropomorphic phantoms representing a range of pediatric body habitus were scanned with metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters placed at 23 organ locations to determine absolute organ dose. Phantom absolute organ dose was divided by phantom SSDE to determine correlation between organ dose and SSDE. Organ dose correlation factors (CF{sub SSDE}{sup organ}) were then multiplied by patient-specific SSDE to estimate patient organ dose. The CF{sub SSDE}{sup organ} were used to retrospectively estimate individual organ doses from 352 chest and 241 abdominopelvic pediatric CT examinations, where mean patient weight was 22 kg ± 15 (range 5–55 kg), and mean patient age was 6 yrs ± 5 (range 4 months to 23 yrs). Patient organ dose estimates were compared to published pediatric Monte Carlo study results. Results: Phantom effective diameters were matched with patient population effective diameters to within 4 cm; thus, showing appropriate scalability of the phantoms across the entire pediatric population in this study. IndividualCF{sub SSDE}{sup organ} were determined for a total of 23 organs in the chest and abdominopelvic region across nine weight subcategories. For organs fully covered by the scan volume, correlation in the chest (average 1.1; range 0.7–1.4) and abdominopelvic region (average 0.9; range 0.7–1.3) was near unity. For organ/tissue that extended beyond the scan volume (i.e., skin, bone marrow, and bone surface), correlation was determined to be poor (average 0.3; range: 0.1–0.4) for both the chest and abdominopelvic regions, respectively. A means to estimate patient organ dose was demonstrated. Calculated patient organ dose, using patient SSDE and CF{sub SSDE}{sup organ}, was compared to

  17. Medium chain triglycerides dose-dependently prevent liver pathology in a rat model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity is often associated with a cluster of increased health risks collectively known as "Metabolic Syndrome" (MS). MS is often accompanied by development of fatty liver. Sometimes fatty liver results in damage leading to reduced liver function, and need for a transplant. This condition is known...

  18. Effectiveness of external respiratory surrogates for in vivo liver motion estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Kai-Hsiang; Ho, Ming-Chih; Yeh, Chi-Chuan; Chen, Yu-Chien; Lian, Feng-Li; Lin, Win-Li; Yen, Jia-Yush; Chen, Yung-Yaw

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: Due to low frame rate of MRI and high radiation damage from fluoroscopy and CT, liver motion estimation using external respiratory surrogate signals seems to be a better approach to track liver motion in real-time for liver tumor treatments in radiotherapy and thermotherapy. This work proposes a liver motion estimation method based on external respiratory surrogate signals. Animal experiments are also conducted to investigate related issues, such as the sensor arrangement, multisensor fusion, and the effective time period. Methods: Liver motion and abdominal motion are both induced by respiration and are proved to be highly correlated. Contrary to the difficult direct measurement of the liver motion, the abdominal motion can be easily accessed. Based on this idea, our study is split into the model-fitting stage and the motion estimation stage. In the first stage, the correlation between the surrogates and the liver motion is studied and established via linear regression method. In the second stage, the liver motion is estimated by the surrogate signals with the correlation model. Animal experiments on cases of single surrogate signal, multisurrogate signals, and long-term surrogate signals are conducted and discussed to verify the practical use of this approach. Results: The results show that the best single sensor location is at the middle of the upper abdomen, while multisurrogate models are generally better than the single ones. The estimation error is reduced from 0.6 mm for the single surrogate models to 0.4 mm for the multisurrogate models. The long-term validity of the estimation models is quite satisfactory within the period of 10 min with the estimation error less than 1.4 mm. Conclusions: External respiratory surrogate signals from the abdomen motion produces good performance for liver motion estimation in real-time. Multisurrogate signals enhance estimation accuracy, and the estimation model can maintain its accuracy for at least 10 min. This

  19. NIRS external dose estimation system for Fukushima residents after the Fukushima Dai-ichi NPP accident

    PubMed Central

    Akahane, Keiichi; Yonai, Shunsuke; Fukuda, Shigekazu; Miyahara, Nobuyuki; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Iwaoka, Kazuki; Matsumoto, Masaki; Fukumura, Akifumi; Akashi, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    The great east Japan earthquake and subsequent tsunamis caused Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident. National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) developed the external dose estimation system for Fukushima residents. The system is being used in the Fukushima health management survey. The doses can be obtained by superimposing the behavior data of the residents on the dose rate maps. For grasping the doses, 18 evacuation patterns of the residents were assumed by considering the actual evacuation information before using the survey data. The doses of the residents from the deliberate evacuation area were relatively higher than those from the area within 20 km radius. The estimated doses varied from around 1 to 6 mSv for the residents evacuated from the representative places in the deliberate evacuation area. The maximum dose in 18 evacuation patterns was estimated to be 19 mSv. PMID:23591638

  20. Computer subroutines for the estimation of nuclear reaction effects in proton-tissue-dose calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Khandelwal, G. S.

    1976-01-01

    Calculational methods for estimation of dose from external proton exposure of arbitrary convex bodies are briefly reviewed. All the necessary information for the estimation of dose in soft tissue is presented. Special emphasis is placed on retaining the effects of nuclear reaction, especially in relation to the dose equivalent. Computer subroutines to evaluate all of the relevant functions are discussed. Nuclear reaction contributions for standard space radiations are in most cases found to be significant. Many of the existing computer programs for estimating dose in which nuclear reaction effects are neglected can be readily converted to include nuclear reaction effects by use of the subroutines described herein.

  1. NEUROTOXIC EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL AGENTS: DATA GAPS THAT CHALLENGE DOSE-RESPONSE ESTIMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurotoxic effects of environmental agents: Data gaps that challenge dose-response estimation
    S Gutter*, P Mendola+, SG Selevan**, D Rice** (*UNC Chapel Hill; +US EPA, NHEERL; **US EPA, NCEA)

    Dose-response estimation is a critical feature of risk assessment. It can be...

  2. Estimating Toxicity Pathway Activating Doses for High Throughput Chemical Risk Assessments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estimating a Toxicity Pathway Activating Dose (TPAD) from in vitro assays as an analog to a reference dose (RfD) derived from in vivo toxicity tests would facilitate high throughput risk assessments of thousands of data-poor environmental chemicals. Estimating a TPAD requires def...

  3. Simple methods for the estimation of dose distributions, organ doses and energy imparted in paediatric radiology.

    PubMed

    Almén, A; Nilsson, M

    1996-07-01

    The energy imparted and the effective dose can both be used to describe the risk to the patient in diagnostic radiology. Simple methods must be employed to determine these quantities in clinical situations. Methods using measured relative depth-dose distributions are presented and evaluated here. Measurements of depth-dose distributions for x-ray beams were performed with an ionization chamber, a diode and a number of TL dosimeters. The energy imparted was calculated from measurements with both phantoms and patients. The method of calculating the mean absorbed dose to organs was applied to pelvis and lumbar spine examinations. TL dosimeters were found to be an appropriate detector for measuring depth-dose distributions. When calculating the energy imparted the entrance beam area must be accurately known. The mean absorbed dose to organs can be derived from measured relative depth-dose curves if accurate information on entrance beam position and area is available for the particular examination technique used. The advantage of these methods is that the dose distribution is measured for the photon beam used for the examination of the patients.

  4. The impact of hepatic pressurization on liver shear wave speed estimates in constrained versus unconstrained conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotemberg, V.; Palmeri, M.; Nightingale, R.; Rouze, N.; Nightingale, K.

    2012-01-01

    Increased hepatic venous pressure can be observed in patients with advanced liver disease and congestive heart failure. This elevated portal pressure also leads to variation in acoustic radiation-force-derived shear wave-based liver stiffness estimates. These changes in stiffness metrics with hepatic interstitial pressure may confound stiffness-based predictions of liver fibrosis stage. The underlying mechanism for this observed stiffening behavior with pressurization is not well understood and is not explained with commonly used linear elastic mechanical models. An experiment was designed to determine whether the stiffness increase exhibited with hepatic pressurization results from a strain-dependent hyperelastic behavior. Six excised canine livers were subjected to variations in interstitial pressure through cannulation of the portal vein and closure of the hepatic artery and hepatic vein under constrained conditions (in which the liver was not free to expand) and unconstrained conditions. Radiation-force-derived shear wave speed estimates were obtained and correlated with pressure. Estimates of hepatic shear stiffness increased with changes in interstitial pressure over a physiologically relevant range of pressures (0-35 mmHg) from 1.5 to 3.5 m s-1. These increases were observed only under conditions in which the liver was free to expand while pressurized. This behavior is consistent with hyperelastic nonlinear material models that could be used in the future to explore methods for estimating hepatic interstitial pressure noninvasively.

  5. Connecting the Dots: Linking Environmental Justice Indicators to Daily Dose Model Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hongtai; Barzyk, Timothy M.

    2016-01-01

    Many different quantitative techniques have been developed to either assess Environmental Justice (EJ) issues or estimate exposure and dose for risk assessment. However, very few approaches have been applied to link EJ factors to exposure dose estimate and identify potential impacts of EJ factors on dose-related variables. The purpose of this study is to identify quantitative approaches that incorporate conventional risk assessment (RA) dose modeling and cumulative risk assessment (CRA) considerations of disproportionate environmental exposure. We apply the Average Daily Dose (ADD) model, which has been commonly used in RA, to better understand impacts of EJ indicators upon exposure dose estimates and dose-related variables, termed the Environmental-Justice-Average-Daily-Dose (EJ-ADD) approach. On the U.S. nationwide census tract-level, we defined and quantified two EJ indicators (poverty and race/ethnicity) using an EJ scoring method to examine their relation to census tract-level multi-chemical exposure dose estimates. Pollutant doses for each tract were calculated using the ADD model, and EJ scores were assigned to each tract based on poverty- or race-related population percentages. Single- and multiple-chemical ADD values were matched to the tract-level EJ scores to analyze disproportionate dose relationships and contributing EJ factors. We found that when both EJ indicators were examined simultaneously, ADD for all pollutants generally increased with larger EJ scores. To demonstrate the utility of using EJ-ADD on the local scale, we approximated ADD levels of lead via soil/dust ingestion for simulated communities with different EJ-related scenarios. The local-level simulation indicates a substantial difference in exposure-dose levels between wealthy and EJ communities. The application of the EJ-ADD approach can link EJ factors to exposure dose estimate and identify potential EJ impacts on dose-related variables. PMID:28036053

  6. The feasibility of a regional CTDI{sub vol} to estimate organ dose from tube current modulated CT exams

    SciTech Connect

    Khatonabadi, Maryam; Kim, Hyun J.; Lu, Peiyun; McMillan, Kyle L.; Cagnon, Chris H.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; DeMarco, John J.

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: In AAPM Task Group 204, the size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) was developed by providing size adjustment factors which are applied to the Computed Tomography (CT) standardized dose metric, CTDI{sub vol}. However, that work focused on fixed tube current scans and did not specifically address tube current modulation (TCM) scans, which are currently the majority of clinical scans performed. The purpose of this study was to extend the SSDE concept to account for TCM by investigating the feasibility of using anatomic and organ specific regions of scanner output to improve accuracy of dose estimates. Methods: Thirty-nine adult abdomen/pelvis and 32 chest scans from clinically indicated CT exams acquired on a multidetector CT using TCM were obtained with Institutional Review Board approval for generating voxelized models. Along with image data, raw projection data were obtained to extract TCM functions for use in Monte Carlo simulations. Patient size was calculated using the effective diameter described in TG 204. In addition, the scanner-reported CTDI{sub vol} (CTDI{sub vol,global}) was obtained for each patient, which is based on the average tube current across the entire scan. For the abdomen/pelvis scans, liver, spleen, and kidneys were manually segmented from the patient datasets; for the chest scans, lungs and for female models only, glandular breast tissue were segmented. For each patient organ doses were estimated using Monte Carlo Methods. To investigate the utility of regional measures of scanner output, regional and organ anatomic boundaries were identified from image data and used to calculate regional and organ-specific average tube current values. From these regional and organ-specific averages, CTDI{sub vol} values, referred to as regional and organ-specific CTDI{sub vol}, were calculated for each patient. Using an approach similar to TG 204, all CTDI{sub vol} values were used to normalize simulated organ doses; and the ability of each normalized

  7. Estimated radiation dose to breast feeding infant following maternal administration of 57Co labelled to vitamin B12.

    PubMed

    Pomeroy, Kay M; Sawyer, Laura J; Evans, Martyn J

    2005-09-01

    Administration of a radiopharmaceutical may result in a radiation dose to an infant due to ingestion of the radiopharmaceutical secreted in the breast milk. Following a maternal administration of Co labelled to vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin) as part of a Schilling test an estimate of the absorbed dose to a breast feeding infant was calculated. Milk samples were collected from every feed in the first 24 h, and at approximately 48 and 72 h post-administration. The absorbed dose to the infant's liver (the organ receiving the highest dose) was calculated to be 0.23 mGy. The effective dose to the infant was calculated to be 0.025 mSv, which is considerably lower than the current regulatory limit of 1 mSv. The Administration of Radioactive Substances Advisory Committee advise that the first feed, at approximately 4 h after administration, be discarded. The data show that this was unwarranted, and that the peak concentration of Co in the breast milk occurred at around 24 h.

  8. RADIANCE: An automated, enterprise-wide solution for archiving and reporting CT radiation dose estimates.

    PubMed

    Cook, Tessa S; Zimmerman, Stefan L; Steingall, Scott R; Maidment, Andrew D A; Kim, Woojin; Boonn, William W

    2011-01-01

    There is growing interest in the ability to monitor, track, and report exposure to radiation from medical imaging. Historically, however, dose information has been stored on an image-based dose sheet, an arrangement that precludes widespread indexing. Although scanner manufacturers are beginning to include dose-related parameters in the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) headers of imaging studies, there remains a vast repository of retrospective computed tomographic (CT) data with image-based dose sheets. Consequently, it is difficult for imaging centers to monitor their dose estimates or participate in the American College of Radiology (ACR) Dose Index Registry. An automated extraction software pipeline known as Radiation Dose Intelligent Analytics for CT Examinations (RADIANCE) has been designed that quickly and accurately parses CT dose sheets to extract and archive dose-related parameters. Optical character recognition of information in the dose sheet leads to creation of a text file, which along with the DICOM study header is parsed to extract dose-related data. The data are then stored in a relational database that can be queried for dose monitoring and report creation. RADIANCE allows efficient dose analysis of CT examinations and more effective education of technologists, radiologists, and referring physicians regarding patient exposure to radiation at CT. RADIANCE also allows compliance with the ACR's dose reporting guidelines and greater awareness of patient radiation dose, ultimately resulting in improved patient care and treatment.

  9. The Fukushima Health Management Survey: estimation of external doses to residents in Fukushima Prefecture

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Yasumura, Seiji; Ozasa, Kotaro; Kobashi, Gen; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Makoto; Akahane, Keiichi; Yonai, Shunsuke; Ohtsuru, Akira; Sakai, Akira; Sakata, Ritsu; Kamiya, Kenji; Abe, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    The Fukushima Health Management Survey (including the Basic Survey for external dose estimation and four detailed surveys) was launched after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. The Basic Survey consists of a questionnaire that asks Fukushima Prefecture residents about their behavior in the first four months after the accident; and responses to the questionnaire have been returned from many residents. The individual external doses are estimated by using digitized behavior data and a computer program that included daily gamma ray dose rate maps drawn after the accident. The individual external doses of 421,394 residents for the first four months (excluding radiation workers) had a distribution as follows: 62.0%, <1 mSv; 94.0%, <2 mSv; 99.4%, <3 mSv. The arithmetic mean and maximum for the individual external doses were 0.8 and 25 mSv, respectively. While most dose estimation studies were based on typical scenarios of evacuation and time spent inside/outside, the Basic Survey estimated doses considering individually different personal behaviors. Thus, doses for some individuals who did not follow typical scenarios could be revealed. Even considering such extreme cases, the estimated external doses were generally low and no discernible increased incidence of radiation-related health effects is expected. PMID:26239643

  10. The Fukushima Health Management Survey: estimation of external doses to residents in Fukushima Prefecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Yasumura, Seiji; Ozasa, Kotaro; Kobashi, Gen; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Makoto; Akahane, Keiichi; Yonai, Shunsuke; Ohtsuru, Akira; Sakai, Akira; Sakata, Ritsu; Kamiya, Kenji; Abe, Masafumi

    2015-08-01

    The Fukushima Health Management Survey (including the Basic Survey for external dose estimation and four detailed surveys) was launched after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. The Basic Survey consists of a questionnaire that asks Fukushima Prefecture residents about their behavior in the first four months after the accident; and responses to the questionnaire have been returned from many residents. The individual external doses are estimated by using digitized behavior data and a computer program that included daily gamma ray dose rate maps drawn after the accident. The individual external doses of 421,394 residents for the first four months (excluding radiation workers) had a distribution as follows: 62.0%, <1 mSv 94.0%, <2 mSv 99.4%, <3 mSv. The arithmetic mean and maximum for the individual external doses were 0.8 and 25 mSv, respectively. While most dose estimation studies were based on typical scenarios of evacuation and time spent inside/outside, the Basic Survey estimated doses considering individually different personal behaviors. Thus, doses for some individuals who did not follow typical scenarios could be revealed. Even considering such extreme cases, the estimated external doses were generally low and no discernible increased incidence of radiation-related health effects is expected.

  11. A bounding estimate of neutron dose based on measured photon dose around single pass reactors at the Hanford site.

    PubMed

    Taulbee, Timothy D; Glover, Samuel E; Macievic, Gregory V; Hunacek, Mickey; Smith, Cheryl; DeBord, Gary W; Morris, Donald; Fix, Jack

    2010-07-01

    Neutron and photon radiation survey records have been used to evaluate and develop a neutron to photon (NP) ratio to reconstruct neutron doses to workers around Hanford's single pass reactors that operated from 1945 to 1972. A total of 5,773 paired neutron and photon measurements extracted from 57 boxes of survey records were used in the development of the NP ratio. The development of the NP ratio enables the use of the recorded dose from an individual's photon dosimeter badge to be used to estimate the unmonitored neutron dose. The Pearson rank correlation between the neutron and photon measurements was 0.71. The NP ratio best fit a lognormal distribution with a geometric mean (GM) of 0.8, a geometric standard deviation (GSD) of 2.95, and the upper 95 th % of this distribution was 4.75. An estimate of the neutron dose based on this NP ratio is considered bounding due to evidence that up to 70% of the total photon exposure received by workers around the single pass reactors occurs during shutdown maintenance and refueling activities when there is no significant neutron exposure. Thus when this NP ratio is applied to the total measured photon dose from an individual film badge dosimeter, the resulting neutron dose is considered bounded.

  12. Comparative toxicity of low dose tributyltin chloride on serum, liver, lung and kidney following subchronic exposure.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Sumonto; Gera, Ruchi; Singh, Vikas; Khandelwal, Shashi

    2014-02-01

    Tributyltin (TBT) pollution is rampant worldwide and is a growing threat due to its bio-accumulative property. Isolated studies of TBT toxicity on different organs are available but consolidated information is greatly lacking. We planned this study to delineate the effect of subchronic (1 month) exposure to low dose TBT-chloride (TBTC) (1 and 5 mg/kg) in male Wistar rats. Total tin concentration was found to be significantly increased in liver, kidney and blood, and marginally in lungs. Organo-somatic indices were seen to be altered with little effect on serum biochemical markers (liver and kidney function, and general parameters). Reactive oxygen species but not lipid peroxidation content was observed to be significantly elevated both in the tissues and serum. TBTC was found to act as a hyperlipidemic agent and it also affected heme biosynthetic pathway. Hematological analysis showed that TBTC exposure resulted in minor alterations in RBC parameters. Histological studies demonstrated marked tissue damage in all the 3 organs. Calcium inhibitors (BAPTA-AM, EGTA) and antioxidants (NAC, C-PC) significantly restored TBTC induced loss in cell viability, under ex-vivo conditions. Antioxidants were evidently more efficient in comparison to the calcium inhibitors, implying major role of oxidative stress pathways in TBTC toxicity.

  13. Stunted growth, increased mortality, and liver tumors in offspring of polybrominated biphenyl (PBB) dosed sherman rats.

    PubMed

    Groce, D F; Kimbrough, R D

    1984-01-01

    Firemaster FF-1, a polybrominated biphenyl (PBB) mixture, was dissolved in corn oil and given as a dose of 200 mg/kg body weight to Sherman rats on d 7 and 14 of pregnancy. Control rats received equivalent doses of corn oil alone. Selected pups and all dams were killed 1 mo after pups were weaned. A total of 50 male and 50 female offspring per group were followed until they were 2 yr old. The livers of offspring killed at the ages of 2 mo and 2 yr had PBB levels of 2,4 (SD 1.2) and 0.8 (SD 0.65) mg/kg for females and 3.0 (SD 1.6) and 0.6 (SD 0.37) mg/kg for males, respectively. The incidence of hepatocellular carcinomas was 3/51 (5.9%) and 4/41 (9.6%) after 2 yr in females and males, respectively. Hepatocellular carcinomas were not observed among the controls. Neoplastic (hyperplastic) nodules of the liver were present in 9/51 (17.6%) and 2/41 (4.9%) of exposed females and males, respectively, whereas only 2/48 (4.2%) of control females and no control males had neoplastic (hyperplastic) nodules. Body weights were lower in PBB-exposed rats at ages 1, 6, 12, and 24 mo. Survival rates from birth to weaning were lower in PBB-exposed pups (89%) than in controls (98%). Mortality was two times higher in PBB-exposed males (64%) than in control males (32%) after 2 yr. Transplacental PBB exposure and exposure through milk resulted in PBB body burdens in the offspring still measurable at the end of their lifespan. These offspring had increased mortality rates and lower body weights than controls, and they developed hepatocellular carcinomas.

  14. Low-dose acetaminophen induces early disruption of cell-cell tight junctions in human hepatic cells and mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Gamal, Wesam; Treskes, Philipp; Samuel, Kay; Sullivan, Gareth J; Siller, Richard; Srsen, Vlastimil; Morgan, Katie; Bryans, Anna; Kozlowska, Ada; Koulovasilopoulos, Andreas; Underwood, Ian; Smith, Stewart; Del-Pozo, Jorge; Moss, Sharon; Thompson, Alexandra Inés; Henderson, Neil C; Hayes, Peter C; Plevris, John N; Bagnaninchi, Pierre-Olivier; Nelson, Leonard J

    2017-01-30

    Dysfunction of cell-cell tight junction (TJ) adhesions is a major feature in the pathogenesis of various diseases. Liver TJs preserve cellular polarity by delimiting functional bile-canalicular structures, forming the blood-biliary barrier. In acetaminophen-hepatotoxicity, the mechanism by which tissue cohesion and polarity are affected remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that acetaminophen, even at low-dose, disrupts the integrity of TJ and cell-matrix adhesions, with indicators of cellular stress with liver injury in the human hepatic HepaRG cell line, and primary hepatocytes. In mouse liver, at human-equivalence (therapeutic) doses, dose-dependent loss of intercellular hepatic TJ-associated ZO-1 protein expression was evident with progressive clinical signs of liver injury. Temporal, dose-dependent and specific disruption of the TJ-associated ZO-1 and cytoskeletal-F-actin proteins, correlated with modulation of hepatic ultrastructure. Real-time impedance biosensing verified in vitro early, dose-dependent quantitative decreases in TJ and cell-substrate adhesions. Whereas treatment with NAPQI, the reactive metabolite of acetaminophen, or the PKCα-activator and TJ-disruptor phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate, similarly reduced TJ integrity, which may implicate oxidative stress and the PKC pathway in TJ destabilization. These findings are relevant to the clinical presentation of acetaminophen-hepatotoxicity and may inform future mechanistic studies to identify specific molecular targets and pathways that may be altered in acetaminophen-induced hepatic depolarization.

  15. Low-dose acetaminophen induces early disruption of cell-cell tight junctions in human hepatic cells and mouse liver

    PubMed Central

    Gamal, Wesam; Treskes, Philipp; Samuel, Kay; Sullivan, Gareth J.; Siller, Richard; Srsen, Vlastimil; Morgan, Katie; Bryans, Anna; Kozlowska, Ada; Koulovasilopoulos, Andreas; Underwood, Ian; Smith, Stewart; del-Pozo, Jorge; Moss, Sharon; Thompson, Alexandra Inés; Henderson, Neil C.; Hayes, Peter C.; Plevris, John N.; Bagnaninchi, Pierre-Olivier; Nelson, Leonard J.

    2017-01-01

    Dysfunction of cell-cell tight junction (TJ) adhesions is a major feature in the pathogenesis of various diseases. Liver TJs preserve cellular polarity by delimiting functional bile-canalicular structures, forming the blood-biliary barrier. In acetaminophen-hepatotoxicity, the mechanism by which tissue cohesion and polarity are affected remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that acetaminophen, even at low-dose, disrupts the integrity of TJ and cell-matrix adhesions, with indicators of cellular stress with liver injury in the human hepatic HepaRG cell line, and primary hepatocytes. In mouse liver, at human-equivalence (therapeutic) doses, dose-dependent loss of intercellular hepatic TJ-associated ZO-1 protein expression was evident with progressive clinical signs of liver injury. Temporal, dose-dependent and specific disruption of the TJ-associated ZO-1 and cytoskeletal-F-actin proteins, correlated with modulation of hepatic ultrastructure. Real-time impedance biosensing verified in vitro early, dose-dependent quantitative decreases in TJ and cell-substrate adhesions. Whereas treatment with NAPQI, the reactive metabolite of acetaminophen, or the PKCα-activator and TJ-disruptor phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate, similarly reduced TJ integrity, which may implicate oxidative stress and the PKC pathway in TJ destabilization. These findings are relevant to the clinical presentation of acetaminophen-hepatotoxicity and may inform future mechanistic studies to identify specific molecular targets and pathways that may be altered in acetaminophen-induced hepatic depolarization. PMID:28134251

  16. Integrated Codes for Estimating Environmental Accumulation and Individual Dose from Past Hanford Atmospheric Releases: Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Ikenberry, T. A.; Burnett, R. A.; Napier, B. A.; Reitz, N. A.; Shipler, D. B.

    1992-02-01

    Preliminary radiation doses were estimated and reported during Phase I of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. As the project has progressed, additional information regarding the magnitude and timing of past radioactive releases has been developed, and the general scope of the required calculations has been enhanced. The overall HEDR computational model for computing doses attributable to atmospheric releases from Hanford Site operations is called HEDRIC (Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Codes). It consists of four interrelated models: source term, atmospheric transport, environmental accumulation, and individual dose. The source term and atmospheric transport models are documented elsewhere. This report describes the initial implementation of the design specifications for the environmental accumulation model and computer code, called DESCARTES (Dynamic EStimates of Concentrations and Accumulated Radionuclides in Terrestrial Environments), and the individual dose model and computer code, called CIDER (Calculation of Individual Doses from Environmental Radionuclides). The computations required of these models and the design specifications for their codes were documented in Napier et al. (1992). Revisions to the original specifications and the basis for modeling decisions are explained. This report is not the final code documentation but gives the status of the model and code development to date. Final code documentation is scheduled to be completed in FY 1994 following additional code upgrades and refinements. The user's guide included in this report describes the operation of the environmental accumulation and individual dose codes and associated pre- and post-processor programs. A programmer's guide describes the logical structure of the programs and their input and output files.

  17. A Phase I Clinical and Pharmacology Study Using Amifostine as a Radioprotector in Dose-escalated Whole Liver Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Mary; Smith, David E.; Normolle, Daniel P.; Knol, James A.; Pan, Charlie C.; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Lu Zheng; Feng, Meihua R.; Chen Jun; Ensminger, William; Lawrence, Theodore S.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Diffuse intrahepatic tumors are difficult to control. Whole-liver radiotherapy has been limited by toxicity, most notably radiation-induced liver disease. Amifostine is a prodrug free-radical scavenger that selectively protects normal tissues and, in a preclinical model of intrahepatic cancer, systemic amifostine reduced normal liver radiation damage without compromising tumor effect. We hypothesized that amifostine would permit escalation of whole-liver radiation dose to potentially control microscopic disease. We also aimed to characterize the pharmacokinetics of amifostine and its active metabolite WR-1065 to optimize timing of radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We conducted a radiation dose-escalation trial for patients with diffuse, intrahepatic cancer treated with whole-liver radiation and intravenous amifostine. Radiation dose was assigned using the time-to-event continual reassessment method. A companion pharmacokinetic study was performed. Results: Twenty-three patients were treated, with a maximum dose of 40 Gy. Using a logistical regression model, compared with our previously treated patients, amifostine increased liver tolerance by 3.3 {+-} 1.1 Gy (p = 0.007) (approximately 10%) with similar response rates. Peak concentrations of WR-1065 were 25 {mu}M with an elimination half-life of 1.5 h; these levels are consistent with radioprotective effects of amifostine in patients. Conclusion: These findings demonstrate for the first time that amifostine is a normal liver radioprotector. They further suggest that it may be useful to combine amifostine with fractionated or stereotactic body radiation therapy for patients with focal intrahepatic cancer.

  18. Optimal dose of gemcitabine for the treatment of biliary tract or pancreatic cancer in patients with liver dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Takashi; Ebata, Tomoki; Fujita, Ken-ichi; Shimokata, Tomoya; Maeda, Osamu; Mitsuma, Ayako; Sasaki, Yasutsuna; Nagino, Masato; Ando, Yuichi

    2016-02-01

    A clear consensus does not exist about whether the initial dose of gemcitabine, an essential anticancer antimetabolite, should be reduced in patients with liver dysfunction. Adult patients with biliary tract or pancreatic cancer were divided into three groups according to whether they had mild, moderate, or severe liver dysfunction, evaluated on the basis of serum bilirubin and liver transaminase levels at baseline. As anticancer treatment, gemcitabine at a dose of 800 or 1000 mg/m(2) was given as an i.v. infusion once weekly for 3 weeks of a 4-week cycle. The patients were prospectively evaluated for adverse events during the first cycle, and the pharmacokinetics of gemcitabine and its inactive metabolite, difluorodeoxyuridine, were studied to determine the optimal initial dose of gemcitabine as monotherapy according to the severity of liver dysfunction. A total of 15 patients were studied. Liver dysfunction was mild in one patient, moderate in six, and severe in eight. All 15 patients had been undergoing biliary drainage for obstructive jaundice when they received gemcitabine. Grade 3 cholangitis developed in one patient with moderate liver dysfunction who received gemcitabine at the dose level of 1000 mg/m(2). No other patients had severe treatment-related adverse events resulting in the omission or discontinuation of gemcitabine treatment. The plasma concentrations of gemcitabine and difluorodeoxyuridine were similar among the groups. An initial dose reduction of gemcitabine as monotherapy for the treatment of biliary tract or pancreatic cancers is not necessary for patients with hyperbilirubinemia, provided that obstructive jaundice is well managed. (Clinical trial registration no. UMIN000005363.)

  19. Radiation dose dependent risk of liver cancer mortality in the German uranium miners cohort 1946-2003.

    PubMed

    Dufey, F; Walsh, L; Sogl, M; Tschense, A; Schnelzer, M; Kreuzer, M

    2013-03-01

    An increased risk of mortality from primary liver cancers among uranium miners has been observed in various studies. An analysis of the data from a German uranium miner cohort (the 'Wismut cohort') was used to assess the relationship with ionising radiation. To that end the absorbed organ dose due to high and low linear energy transfer radiation was calculated for 58 987 miners with complete information on radiation exposure from a detailed job-exposure matrix. 159 deaths from liver cancer were observed in the follow-up period from 1946 to 2003. Relative risk models with either linear or categorical dependence on high and low linear energy transfer radiation liver doses were fitted by Poisson regression, stratified on age and calendar year. The linear trend of excess relative risk in a model with both low and high linear transfer radiation is -0.8 (95% confidence interval (CI): -3.7, 2.1) Gy(-1) and 48.3 (95% CI: -32.0, 128.6) Gy(-1) for low and high linear energy transfer radiation, respectively, and thus not statistically significant for either dose. The increase of excess relative risk with equivalent liver dose is 0.57 (95% CI: -0.69, 1.82) Sv(-1). Adjustment for arsenic only had a negligible effect on the radiation risk. In conclusion, there is only weak evidence for an increase of liver cancer mortality with increasing radiation dose in the German uranium miners cohort considered. However, both a lack of statistical power and potential misclassification of primary liver cancer are issues.

  20. Towards a comprehensive CT image segmentation for thoracic organ radiation dose estimation and reporting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Cristian; Ruppertshofen, Heike; Vik, Torbjörn; Prinsen, Peter; Wiegert, Jens

    2014-03-01

    Administered dose of ionizing radiation during medical imaging is an issue of increasing concern for the patient, for the clinical community, and for respective regulatory bodies. CT radiation dose is currently estimated based on a set of very simplifying assumptions which do not take the actual body geometry and organ specific doses into account. This makes it very difficult to accurately report imaging related administered dose and to track it for different organs over the life of the patient. In this paper this deficit is addressed in a two-fold way. In a first step, the absorbed radiation dose in each image voxel is estimated based on a Monte-Carlo simulation of X-ray absorption and scattering. In a second step, the image is segmented into tissue types with different radio sensitivity. In combination this allows to calculate the effective dose as a weighted sum of the individual organ doses. The main purpose of this paper is to assess the feasibility of automatic organ specific dose estimation. With respect to a commercially applicable solution and respective robustness and efficiency requirements, we investigated the effect of dose sampling rather than integration over the organ volume. We focused on the thoracic anatomy as the exemplary body region, imaged frequently by CT. For image segmentation we applied a set of available approaches which allowed us to cover the main thoracic radio-sensitive tissue types. We applied the dose estimation approach to 10 thoracic CT datasets and evaluated segmentation accuracy and administered dose and could show that organ specific dose estimation can be achieved.

  1. Estimation Of Organ Doses From Solar Particle Events For Future Space Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2006-01-01

    Radiation protection practices define the effective dose as a weighted sum of equivalent dose over major organ sites for radiation cancer risks. Since a crew personnel dosimeter does not make direct measurement of the effective dose, it has been estimated with skin-dose measurements and radiation transport codes for ISS and STS missions. If sufficient protection is not provided near solar maximum, the radiation risk can be significant due to exposure to sporadic solar particle events (SPEs) as well as to the continuous galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) on future exploratory-class and long-duration missions. For accurate estimates of overall fatal cancer risks from SPEs, the specific doses at various blood forming organs (BFOs) were considered, because proton fluences and doses vary considerably across marrow regions. Previous estimates of BFO doses from SPEs have used an average body-shielding distribution for the bone marrow based on the computerized anatomical man model (CAM). With the development of an 82-point body-shielding distribution at BFOs, the mean and variance of SPE doses in the major active marrow regions (head and neck, chest, abdomen, pelvis and thighs) will be presented. Consideration of the detailed distribution of bone marrow sites is one of many requirements to improve the estimation of effective doses for radiation cancer risks.

  2. Estimation of the collective dose in the Portuguese population due to medical procedures in 2010.

    PubMed

    Teles, Pedro; Carmen de Sousa, M; Paulo, Graciano; Santos, Joana; Pascoal, Ana; Cardoso, Gabriela; Lança, Isabel; Matela, Nuno; Janeiro, Luís; Sousa, Patrick; Carvoeiras, Pedro; Parafita, Rui; Santos, Ana Isabel; Simãozinho, Paula; Vaz, Pedro

    2013-05-01

    In a wide range of medical fields, technological advancements have led to an increase in the average collective dose in national populations worldwide. Periodic estimations of the average collective population dose due to medical exposure is, therefore of utmost importance, and is now mandatory in countries within the European Union (article 12 of EURATOM directive 97/43). Presented in this work is a report on the estimation of the collective dose in the Portuguese population due to nuclear medicine diagnostic procedures and the Top 20 diagnostic radiology examinations, which represent the 20 exams that contribute the most to the total collective dose in diagnostic radiology and interventional procedures in Europe. This work involved the collaboration of a multidisciplinary taskforce comprising representatives of all major Portuguese stakeholders (universities, research institutions, public and private healthcare providers, administrative services of the National Healthcare System, scientific and professional associations and private service providers). This allowed us to gather a comprehensive amount of data necessary for a robust estimation of the collective effective dose to the Portuguese population. The methodology used for data collection and dose estimation was based on European Commission recommendations, as this work was performed in the framework of the European wide Dose Datamed II project. This is the first study estimating the collective dose for the population in Portugal, considering such a wide national coverage and range of procedures and consisting of important baseline reference data. The taskforce intends to continue developing periodic collective dose estimations in the future. The estimated annual average effective dose for the Portuguese population was of 0.080±0.017 mSv caput(-1) for nuclear medicine exams and of 0.96±0.68 mSv caput(-1) for the Top 20 diagnostic radiology exams.

  3. Effects of the loss of correlation structure on Phase 1 dose estimates. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.C.

    1991-11-01

    In Phase I of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, a step-by-step (modular) calculational structure was used. This structure was intended (1) to simplify the computational process, (2) to allow storage of intermediate calculations for later analyses, and (3) to guide the collection of data by presenting understandable structures for its use. The implementation of this modular structure resulted in the loss of correlation among inputs and outputs of the code, resulting in less accurate dose estimates than anticipated. The study documented in this report investigated two types of correlations in the Phase I model: temporal and pathway. Temporal correlations occur in the simulation when, in the calculation, data estimated for a previous time are used in a subsequent calculation. If the various portions of the calculation do not use the same realization of the earlier estimate, they are no longer correlated with respect to time. Similarly, spatial correlations occur in a simulation when, in the calculation, data estimated for a particular location are used in estimates for other locations. If the various calculations do not use the same value for the original location, they are no longer correlated with respect to location. The loss of the correlation structure in the Phase I code resulted in dose estimates that are biased. It is recommended that the air pathway dose model be restructured and the intermediate histograms eliminated. While the restructured code may still contain distinct modules, all input parameters to each module and all out put from each module should be retained in a database such that subsequent modules can access all the information necessary to retain the correlation structure.

  4. Radiation dose from MDCT using Monte Carlo simulations: estimating fetal dose due to pulmonary embolism scans accounting for overscan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angel, E.; Wellnitz, C.; Goodsitt, M.; DeMarco, J.; Cagnon, C.; Ghatali, M.; Cody, D.; Stevens, D.; McCollough, C.; Primak, A.; McNitt-Gray, M.

    2007-03-01

    Pregnant women with shortness of breath are increasingly referred for CT Angiography to rule out Pulmonary Embolism (PE). While this exam is typically focused on the lungs, extending scan boundaries and overscan can add to the irradiated volume and have implications on fetal dose. The purpose of this work was to estimate radiation dose to the fetus when various levels of overscan were encountered. Two voxelized models of pregnant patients derived from actual patient anatomy were created based on image data. The models represent an early (< 7 weeks) and late term pregnancy (36 weeks). A previously validated Monte Carlo model of an MDCT scanner was used that takes into account physical details of the scanner. Simulated helical scans used 120 kVp, 4x5 mm beam collimation, pitch 1, and varying beam-off locations (edge of the irradiated volume) were used to represent different protocols plus overscan. Normalized dose (mGy/100mAs) was calculated for each fetus. For the early term and the late term pregnancy models, fetal dose estimates for a standard thoracic PE exam were estimated to be 0.05 and 0.3 mGy/100mAs, respectively, increasing to 9 mGy/100mAs when the beam-off location was extended to encompass the fetus. When performing PE exams to rule out PE in pregnant patients, the beam-off location may have a large effect on fetal dose, especially for late term pregnancies. Careful consideration of ending location of the x-ray beam - and not the end of image data - could result in significant reduction in radiation dose to the fetus.

  5. Dose estimation of animal experiments at the THOR BNCT beam by NCTPlan and Xplan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan-Hao; Lee, Pei-Yi; Lin, Yu-Chuan; Chou, Fong-In; Chen, Wei-Lin; Huang, Yu-Shiang; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2014-06-01

    Dose estimation of animal experiments affects many subsequent derived quantities, such as RBE and CBE values. It is important to ensure the trustiness of calculated dose of the irradiated animals. However, the dose estimation was normally calculated using simplified geometries and tissue compositions, which led to rough results. This paper introduces the use of treatment planning systems NCTplan and Xplan for the dose estimation. A mouse was taken as an example and it was brought to hospital for micro-PET/CT scan. It was found that the critical organ doses of an irradiated mouse calculated by simplified model were unreliable in comparison to Xplan voxel model. The difference could reach the extent of several tenths percent. It is recommended that a treatment planning system should be introduced to future animal experiments to upgrade the data quality.

  6. The cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay: dose-response calibration curve, background frequency in the population and dose estimation.

    PubMed

    Rastkhah, E; Zakeri, F; Ghoranneviss, M; Rajabpour, M R; Farshidpour, M R; Mianji, F; Bayat, M

    2016-03-01

    An in vitro study of the dose responses of human peripheral blood lymphocytes was conducted with the aim of creating calibrated dose-response curves for biodosimetry measuring up to 4 Gy (0.25-4 Gy) of gamma radiation. The cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus (CBMN) assay was employed to obtain the frequencies of micronuclei (MN) per binucleated cell in blood samples from 16 healthy donors (eight males and eight females) in two age ranges of 20-34 and 35-50 years. The data were used to construct the calibration curves for men and women in two age groups, separately. An increase in micronuclei yield with the dose in a linear-quadratic way was observed in all groups. To verify the applicability of the constructed calibration curve, MN yields were measured in peripheral blood lymphocytes of two real overexposed subjects and three irradiated samples with unknown dose, and the results were compared with dose values obtained from measuring dicentric chromosomes. The comparison of the results obtained by the two techniques indicated a good agreement between dose estimates. The average baseline frequency of MN for the 130 healthy non-exposed donors (77 men and 55 women, 20-60 years old divided into four age groups) ranged from 6 to 21 micronuclei per 1000 binucleated cells. Baseline MN frequencies were higher for women and for the older age group. The results presented in this study point out that the CBMN assay is a reliable, easier and valuable alternative method for biological dosimetry.

  7. Estimation of the combined effect of Eleutherococcus senticosus extract and cadmium on liver cells.

    PubMed

    Smalinskiene, Alina; Lesauskaite, Vaiva; Zitkevicius, Virgilijus; Savickiene, Nijole; Savickas, Arunas; Ryselis, Stanislovas; Sadauskiene, Ilona; Ivanov, Leonid

    2009-08-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is an important industrial pollutant, even though its mechanism of toxicity has not been completely clarified. Cd(2+) is toxic to a wide range of organs and tissues. Liver and kidneys are the primary target organs of cadmium toxicity. Cd(2+) induces apoptosis and causes necrotic cell death in certain pathophysiological situations. Eleutherococcus senticosus (Rupr. et Maxim.) Maxim. has many beneficial features. It supports the organism's stress response, immune system, and endocrine system, including the adrenal glands, spleen, and thymus gland. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of the Eleutherococcus senticosus (ES) liquid extract on the accumulation of Cd(2+) in liver and on the mitotic and apoptotic activity of liver cells after chronic intoxication by Cd(2+). Experiments were carried out on white laboratory mice. Laboratory mice were given to drink solutions of different Cd(2+) and ES concentrations for 8 weeks. Cd(2+) concentration in mouse liver was detected using atomic absorption spectroscopy. Mitotic and apoptotic activity of liver cells was expressed as an estimated number of mitotic and apoptotic cells in randomly selected reference areas in a histological slide. ES combined with CdCl(2) leads to a significant decrease of cadmium concentration in the blood and liver of experimental mice. ES decreased the cadmium-induced mitotic and apoptotic activity of liver cells.

  8. A method of estimating conceptus doses resulting from multidetector CT examinations during all stages of gestation

    SciTech Connect

    Damilakis, John; Tzedakis, Antonis; Perisinakis, Kostas; Papadakis, Antonios E.

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: Current methods for the estimation of conceptus dose from multidetector CT (MDCT) examinations performed on the mother provide dose data for typical protocols with a fixed scan length. However, modified low-dose imaging protocols are frequently used during pregnancy. The purpose of the current study was to develop a method for the estimation of conceptus dose from any MDCT examination of the trunk performed during all stages of gestation. Methods: The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code was employed in this study to model the Siemens Sensation 16 and Sensation 64 MDCT scanners. Four mathematical phantoms were used, simulating women at 0, 3, 6, and 9 months of gestation. The contribution to the conceptus dose from single simulated scans was obtained at various positions across the phantoms. To investigate the effect of maternal body size and conceptus depth on conceptus dose, phantoms of different sizes were produced by adding layers of adipose tissue around the trunk of the mathematical phantoms. To verify MCNP results, conceptus dose measurements were carried out by means of three physical anthropomorphic phantoms, simulating pregnancy at 0, 3, and 6 months of gestation and thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) crystals. Results: The results consist of Monte Carlo-generated normalized conceptus dose coefficients for single scans across the four mathematical phantoms. These coefficients were defined as the conceptus dose contribution from a single scan divided by the CTDI free-in-air measured with identical scanning parameters. Data have been produced to take into account the effect of maternal body size and conceptus position variations on conceptus dose. Conceptus doses measured with TLD crystals showed a difference of up to 19% compared to those estimated by mathematical simulations. Conclusions: Estimation of conceptus doses from MDCT examinations of the trunk performed on pregnant patients during all stages of gestation can be made

  9. UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS OF TCE USING THE DOSE EXPOSURE ESTIMATING MODEL (DEEM) IN ACSL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ACSL-based Dose Exposure Estimating Model(DEEM) under development by EPA is used to perform art uncertainty analysis of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PSPK) model of trichloroethylene (TCE). This model involves several circulating metabolites such as trichloroacet...

  10. Anticipated Dose Estimate and Historical Documentation and Excel Files for Project W-460

    SciTech Connect

    LILLY, J.T.

    1999-12-07

    Document provides Excel Spreadsheets which form the basis for estimates of the expected whole body and extremity radiological dose to workers conducting planned plutonium stabilization and packaging operations at Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant.

  11. Estimation of organ dose equivalents from residents of radiation-contaminated buildings with Rando phantom measurements.

    PubMed

    Lee, J S; Dong, S L; Wu, T H

    1999-05-01

    Since August 1996, a dose reconstruction model has been conducted with thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD)-embedded chains, belts and badges for external dose measurements on the residents in radiation-contaminated buildings. The TLD dosimeters, worn on the front of the torso, would not be adequate for dose measurement in cases when the radiation is anisotropic or the incident angles of radiation sources are not directed in the front-to-back direction. The shielding and attenuation by the body would result in the dose equivalent estimation being somewhat skewed. An organ dose estimation method with a Rando phantom under various exposure geometries is proposed. The conversion factors, obtained from the phantom study, may be applicable to organ dose estimations for residents in the contaminated buildings if the incident angles correspond to the phantom simulation results. There is a great demand for developing a mathematical model or Monte Carlo calculation to deal with complicated indoor layout geometry problems involving ionizing radiation. Further research should be directed toward conducting laboratory simulation by investigating the relationship between doses delivered from multiple radiation sources. It is also necessary to collaborate with experimental biological dosimetry, such as chromosome aberration analysis, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and retrospective ESR-dosimetry with teeth, applied to the residents, so that the organ dose equivalent estimations may be more reliable for radio-epidemiological studies.

  12. Simplified estimation method for dose distributions around field junctions in proton craniospinal irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Haruo; Kase, Yuki; Murayama, Shigeyuki

    2017-03-01

    In radiotherapy involving craniospinal irradiation (CSI), field junctions of therapeutic beams are necessary, because a CSI target is generally several times larger than the maximum field size of the beams. The purpose of this study was to develop a simplified method for estimating dose uniformity around the field junctions in proton CSI. We estimated the dose profiles around the field junctions of proton beams using a simplified field-junction model, in which partial lateral dose distributions around the field edge were assumed to be approximated using the error function. We measured the lateral dose distributions of the proton beams planned for the CSI treatment using a two-dimensional (2D) ionization chamber array. Although dose hot spots and cold spots tend to be underestimated by a chamber array because of the partial volume effect of the sensitive volume and discrete chamber positions, the model estimation results were fairly consistent with the measurements obtained using a 2D chamber array subjected to CSI-simulated serial irradiation. The simplified junction model enabled us to estimate the dose distributions and dependence of the setup position gap on the dose uniformity around the field junctions on the basis of the field-by-field dose profiles measured using the 2D chamber array.

  13. Estimation of dose-response models for discrete and continuous data in weed science

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dose-response analysis is widely used in biological sciences and has application to a variety of risk assessment, bioassay, and calibration problems. In weed science, dose-response methodologies have typically relied on least squares estimation under an assumption of normality. Advances in computati...

  14. Dose estimation derived from the exposure to radon, thoron and their progeny in the indoor environment

    PubMed Central

    Ramola, R. C.; Prasad, Mukesh; Kandari, Tushar; Pant, Preeti; Bossew, Peter; Mishra, Rosaline; Tokonami, S.

    2016-01-01

    The annual exposure to indoor radon, thoron and their progeny imparts a major contribution to inhalation doses received by the public. In this study, we report results of time integrated passive measurements of indoor radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations that were carried out in Garhwal Himalaya with the aim of investigating significant health risk to the dwellers in the region. The measurements were performed using recently developed LR-115 detector based techniques. The experimentally determined values of radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations were used to estimate total annual inhalation dose and annual effective doses. The equilibrium factors for radon and thoron were also determined from the observed data. The estimated value of total annual inhalation dose was found to be 1.8 ± 0.7 mSv/y. The estimated values of the annual effective dose were found to be 1.2 ± 0.5 mSv/y and 0.5 ± 0.3 mSv/y, respectively. The estimated values of radiation doses suggest no important health risk due to exposure of radon, thoron and progeny in the study area. The contribution of indoor thoron and its progeny to total inhalation dose ranges between 13–52% with mean value of 30%. Thus thoron cannot be neglected when assessing radiation doses. PMID:27499492

  15. Dose estimation derived from the exposure to radon, thoron and their progeny in the indoor environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramola, R. C.; Prasad, Mukesh; Kandari, Tushar; Pant, Preeti; Bossew, Peter; Mishra, Rosaline; Tokonami, S.

    2016-08-01

    The annual exposure to indoor radon, thoron and their progeny imparts a major contribution to inhalation doses received by the public. In this study, we report results of time integrated passive measurements of indoor radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations that were carried out in Garhwal Himalaya with the aim of investigating significant health risk to the dwellers in the region. The measurements were performed using recently developed LR-115 detector based techniques. The experimentally determined values of radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations were used to estimate total annual inhalation dose and annual effective doses. The equilibrium factors for radon and thoron were also determined from the observed data. The estimated value of total annual inhalation dose was found to be 1.8 ± 0.7 mSv/y. The estimated values of the annual effective dose were found to be 1.2 ± 0.5 mSv/y and 0.5 ± 0.3 mSv/y, respectively. The estimated values of radiation doses suggest no important health risk due to exposure of radon, thoron and progeny in the study area. The contribution of indoor thoron and its progeny to total inhalation dose ranges between 13–52% with mean value of 30%. Thus thoron cannot be neglected when assessing radiation doses.

  16. A new reference point for patient dose estimation in neurovascular interventional radiology.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Kohei; Imazeki, Masaharu; Hasegawa, Ryota; Shiba, Shinichi; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Sato, Kazuhiko; Ota, Jyoji; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Awai, Kazuo; Sakamoto, Hajime; Tajima, Osamu; Tsukamoto, Atsuko; Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Kageyama, Takahiro; Kato, Kyoichi

    2013-07-01

    In interventional radiology, dose estimation using the interventional reference point (IRP) is a practical method for obtaining the real-time skin dose of a patient. However, the IRP is defined in terms of adult cardiovascular radiology and is not suitable for dosimetry of the head. In the present study, we defined a new reference point (neuro-IRP) for neuro-interventional procedures. The neuro-IRP was located on the central ray of the X-ray beam, 9 cm from the isocenter, toward the focal spot. To verify whether the neuro-IRP was accurate in dose estimation, we compared calculated doses at the neuro-IRP and actual measured doses at the surface of the head phantom for various directions of the X-ray projection. The resulting calculated doses were fairly consistent with actual measured doses, with the error in this estimation within approximately 15%. These data suggest that dose estimation using the neuro-IRP for the head is valid.

  17. Estimating the Radiation Dose to the Fetus in Prophylactic Internal Iliac Artery Balloon Occlusion: Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    Kai, Kentaro; Hamada, Tomohiro; Yuge, Akitoshi; Kiyosue, Hiro; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Nasu, Kaei; Narahara, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    Background. Although radiation exposure is of great concern to expecting patients, little information is available on the fetal radiation dose associated with prophylactic internal iliac artery balloon occlusion (IIABO). Here we estimated the fetal radiation dose associated with prophylactic IIABO in Caesarean section (CS). Cases. We report our experience with the IIABO procedure in three consecutive patients with suspected placenta previa/accreta. Fetal radiation dose measurements were conducted prior to each CS by using an anthropomorphic phantom. Based on the simulated value, we calculated the fetal radiation dose as the absorbed dose. We found that the fetal radiation doses ranged from 12.88 to 31.6 mGy. The fetal radiation dose during the prophylactic IIABOs did not exceed 50 mGy. Conclusion. The IIABO procedure could result in a very small increase in the risk of harmful effects to the fetus. PMID:26180648

  18. Sensitivity and uncertainty investigations for Hiroshima dose estimates and the applicability of the Little Boy mockup measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bartine, D.E.; Cacuci, D.G.

    1983-09-13

    This paper describes sources of uncertainty in the data used for calculating dose estimates for the Hiroshima explosion and details a methodology for systematically obtaining best estimates and reduced uncertainties for the radiation doses received. (ACR)

  19. Estimation of staff lens doses during interventional procedures. Comparing cardiology, neuroradiology and interventional radiology.

    PubMed

    Vano, E; Sanchez, R M; Fernandez, J M

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to estimate lens doses using over apron active personal dosemeters in interventional catheterisation laboratories (cardiology IC, neuroradiology IN and radiology IR) and to investigate correlations between occupational lens doses and patient doses. Active electronic personal dosemeters placed over the lead apron were used on a sample of 204 IC procedures, 274 IN and 220 IR (all performed at the same university hospital). Patient dose values (kerma area product) were also recorded to evaluate correlations with occupational doses. Operators used the ceiling-suspended screen in most cases. The median and third quartile values of equivalent dose Hp(10) per procedure measured over the apron for IC, IN and IR resulted, respectively, in 21/67, 19/44 and 24/54 µSv. Patient dose values (median/third quartile) were 75/128, 83/176 and 61/159 Gy cm(2), respectively. The median ratios for dosemeters worn over the apron by operators (protected by the ceiling-suspended screen) and patient doses were 0.36; 0.21 and 0.46 µSv Gy(-1) cm(-2), respectively. With the conservative approach used (lens doses estimated from the over apron chest dosemeter) we came to the conclusion that more than 800 procedures y(-1) and per operator were necessary to reach the new lens dose limit for the three interventional specialties.

  20. Evaluation of the accuracy of fetal dose estimates using TG-36 data

    SciTech Connect

    Kry, Stephen F.; Starkschall, George; Antolak, John A.; Salehpour, Mohammad

    2007-04-15

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine Radiation Therapy Committee Task Group 36 report (TG-36) provides guidelines for managing radiation therapy of pregnant patients. Included in the report are data that can be used to estimate the dose to the fetus. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of these fetal dose estimates as compared to clinically measured values. TG-36 calculations were performed and compared with measurements of the fetal dose made in vivo or in appropriately-designed phantoms. Calculation and measurement data was collected for eight pregnant patients who underwent radiation therapy at the MD Anderson Cancer Center as well as for several fetal dose studies in the literature. The maximum measured unshielded fetal dose was 47 cGy, which was 1.5% of the prescription dose. For all cases, TG-36 calculations and measured fetal doses differed by up to a factor of 3--the ratio of the calculated to measured dose ranged from 0.34 to 2.93. On average, TG-36 calculations underestimated the measured dose by 31%. No significant trends in the relationship between the calculated and measured fetal doses were found based on the distance from, or the size of, the treatment field.

  1. Use of in vivo counting measurements to estimate internal doses from (241)Am in workers from the Mayak production association.

    PubMed

    Sokolova, Alexandra B; Suslova, Klara G; Efimov, Alexander V; Miller, Scott C

    2014-08-01

    Comparisons between results of in vivo counting measurements of americium burden and results from radiochemical analyses of organ samples taken at autopsy of 11 cases of former Mayak workers were made. The in vivo counting measurements were performed 3-8 y before death. The best agreement between in vivo counting measurements for americium and autopsy data was observed for the skull. For lungs and liver, the ratios of burden measured by in vivo counting to those obtained from radiochemical analyses data ranged from 0.7-3.8, while those for the skull were from 1.0-1.1. There was a good correlation between the estimates of americium burden in the entire skeleton obtained from in vivo counting with those obtained from autopsy data. Specifically, the skeletal burden ratio, in vivo counting/autopsy, averaged 0.9 ± 0.1. The prior human americium model, D-Am2010, used in vivo counting measurements for americium in the skeleton to estimate the contents of americium and plutonium at death. The results using this model indicate that in vivo counting measurements of the skull can be used to estimate internal doses from americium in the Mayak workers. Additionally, these measurements may also be used to provide a qualitative assessment of internal doses from plutonium.

  2. Differential modulation of cellular antioxidant status in zebrafish liver and kidney exposed to low dose arsenic trioxide.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Shuvasree; Mukherjee, Sandip; Chattopadhyay, Ansuman; Bhattacharya, Shelley

    2017-01-01

    Zebrafish were exposed to a nonlethal dose (1/350LC50; 50µg/L) of As2O3 and sampled at 7, 15, 30, 60 and 90 days of treatment. The oxidative stress response was assessed in terms of time-dependent histopathological changes, lipid peroxidation, GSH status, activities of detoxification enzymes and expression of antioxidant genes in liver and kidney. As2O3 treatment enhanced lipid peroxidation except at day 90 in liver and day 30 in kidney. Glutathione depleted significantly in the liver except on day 30; whereas in kidney, it increased initially but thereafter depleted significantly. The liver GST activity was high until day 30, low on day 60 and high on day 90. On the other hand, activity of GST in kidney remained high throughout the exposure. GR activity in liver decreased initially but augmented from 30 days onwards whereas in kidney it remained high until 30 days of exposure. Significant increase in GPx and CAT activities in liver and kidney confirmed oxidative stress in zebrafish which correlated with mRNA expression of antioxidant genes. Upregulation in mRNA level of Cu-Zn Sod in liver and kidney was prominent. Gpx1 upregulation was more conspicuous in kidney as compared to liver while the pattern of Cat expression was almost similar in both the organs. Among the mitochondrial genes, expression of Cox1 was significantly high only after 90 days in liver, while in kidney it enhanced at 7, 30 and 60 days of arsenic exposure. Ucp2 was upregulated in liver after 15 days of exposure but significantly downregulated at day 90; in kidney it remained unchanged at other time points except at day 90. An overall increased expression of Bcl2 further confirmed As2O3 induced oxidative stress in zebrafish liver and kidney. The pattern of mRNA expression of Nrf2 was not uniform and was in accordance to its downstream antioxidant genes. Present findings elucidate that low dose of As2O3 exposure induces a time dependent differential modulation of antioxidant status in liver and

  3. Slide Rule for Rapid Response Estimation of Radiological Dose from Criticality Accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Broadhead, B L; Childs, R L; Hopper, C M; Parks, C V

    1999-09-20

    This paper describes a functional slide rule that provides a readily usable "in-hand" method for estimating nuclear criticality accident information from sliding graphs, thereby permitting (1) the rapid estimation of pertinent criticality accident information without laborious or sophisticated calculations in a nuclear criticality emergency situation, (2) the appraisal of potential fission yields and external personnel radiation exposures for facility safety analyses, and (3) a technical basis for emergency preparedness and training programs at nonreactor nuclear facilities. The slide rule permits the estimation of neutron and gamma dose rates and integrated doses based upon estimated fission yields, distance from the fission source, and time-after criticality accidents for five different critical systems. Another sliding graph permits the estimation of critical solution fission yields based upon fissile material concentration, critical vessel geometry, and solution addition rate. Another graph provides neutron and gamma dose-reduction factors for water, steel, and concrete shields.

  4. Non-parametric estimators of a monotonic dose-response curve and bootstrap confidence intervals.

    PubMed

    Dilleen, Maria; Heimann, Günter; Hirsch, Ian

    2003-03-30

    In this paper we consider study designs which include a placebo and an active control group as well as several dose groups of a new drug. A monotonically increasing dose-response function is assumed, and the objective is to estimate a dose with equivalent response to the active control group, including a confidence interval for this dose. We present different non-parametric methods to estimate the monotonic dose-response curve. These are derived from the isotonic regression estimator, a non-negative least squares estimator, and a bias adjusted non-negative least squares estimator using linear interpolation. The different confidence intervals are based upon an approach described by Korn, and upon two different bootstrap approaches. One of these bootstrap approaches is standard, and the second ensures that resampling is done from empiric distributions which comply with the order restrictions imposed. In our simulations we did not find any differences between the two bootstrap methods, and both clearly outperform Korn's confidence intervals. The non-negative least squares estimator yields biased results for moderate sample sizes. The bias adjustment for this estimator works well, even for small and moderate sample sizes, and surprisingly outperforms the isotonic regression method in certain situations.

  5. ESTIMATING CHLOROFORM BIOTRANSFORMATION IN F-344 RAT LIVER USING IN VITRO TECHNIQUES AND PHARMACOKINETIC MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    ESTIMATING CHLOROFORM BIOTRANSFORMATION IN F-344 RAT LIVER USING IN VITRO TECHNIQUES AND PHARMACOKINETIC MODELING

    Linskey, C.F.1, Harrison, R.A.2., Zhao, G.3., Barton, H.A., Lipscomb, J.C4., and Evans, M.V2., 1UNC, ESE, Chapel Hill, NC ; 2USEPA, ORD, NHEERL, RTP, NC; 3 UN...

  6. Assessment of a twice dosing regimen both before and after partial hepatectomy in the rat liver micronucleus test.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Satoru; Igarashi, Miyuki; Nagata, Mayumi; Hattori, Chiharu

    2015-04-01

    The liver micronucleus test is an important method to detect in vivo genotoxicants, especially those that require metabolic activation for their genotoxicity. We have already reported that structural or numerical chromosome aberration inducers have to be given before or after partial hepatectomy, respectively, to detect their genotoxicity in the liver of rats. In the present study, we assessed a twice dosing regimen, in which the genotoxicant is dosed both before and after partial hepatectomy, using the four chromosome aberration inducers used in the previous study. Two structural chromosome aberration inducers (diethylnitrosamine and 1,2-dimethylhydrazine) and two numerical chromosome aberration inducers (colchicine and carbendazim) were used. The genotoxicant was administered to 8-week old male F344 rats one day before and again one day after the partial hepatectomy and hepatocytes were isolated 3 days after second dosing (4 days after the partial hepatectomy). As a result, all genotoxicants (structural or numerical chromosome aberration inducers) caused a dose-dependent statistically significant increase in the incidence of micronucleated hepatocytes when given both before and after partial hepatectomy. No marked difference was observed in general toxicity, relative liver weight and cell classification between single dosing regimens and twice dosing regimen of the genotoxicants. These results confirm that the twice dosing regimen, in which the test compound is dosed both before and after partial hepatectomy, can detect in vivo induction of micronucleated hepatocytes by structural or numerical chromosome aberration inducers qualitatively similar to their appropriate regimen in which the test compound is administered either before or after partial hepatectomy.

  7. Military Participants at U.S. Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing— Methodology for Estimating Dose and Uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Till, John E.; Beck, Harold L.; Aanenson, Jill W.; Grogan, Helen A.; Mohler, H. Justin; Mohler, S. Shawn; Voillequé, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    Methods were developed to calculate individual estimates of exposure and dose with associated uncertainties for a sub-cohort (1,857) of 115,329 military veterans who participated in at least one of seven series of atmospheric nuclear weapons tests or the TRINITY shot carried out by the United States. The tests were conducted at the Pacific Proving Grounds and the Nevada Test Site. Dose estimates to specific organs will be used in an epidemiological study to investigate leukemia and male breast cancer. Previous doses had been estimated for the purpose of compensation and were generally high-sided to favor the veteran's claim for compensation in accordance with public law. Recent efforts by the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) to digitize the historical records supporting the veterans’ compensation assessments make it possible to calculate doses and associated uncertainties. Our approach builds upon available film badge dosimetry and other measurement data recorded at the time of the tests and incorporates detailed scenarios of exposure for each veteran based on personal, unit, and other available historical records. Film badge results were available for approximately 25% of the individuals, and these results assisted greatly in reconstructing doses to unbadged persons and in developing distributions of dose among military units. This article presents the methodology developed to estimate doses for selected cancer cases and a 1% random sample of the total cohort of veterans under study. PMID:24758578

  8. In vivo assessment of the gastric mucosal tolerance dose after single fraction, small volume irradiation of liver malignancies by computed tomography-guided, high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Streitparth, Florian; Pech, Maciej; Boehmig, Michael; Ruehl, Ricarda; Peters, Nils; Wieners, Gero; Steinberg, Johannes; Lopez-Haenninen, Enrique; Felix, Roland; Wust, Peter; Ricke, Jens . E-mail: jens.ricke@medizin.uni-magdeburg.de

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the tolerance dose of gastric mucosa for single-fraction computed tomography (CT)-guided, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy of liver malignancies. Methods and Materials: A total of 33 patients treated by CT-guided HDR brachytherapy of liver malignancies in segments II and/or III were included. Dose planning was performed upon a three-dimensional CT data set acquired after percutaneous applicator positioning. All patients received gastric protection post-treatment. For further analysis, the contours of the gastric wall were defined in every CT slice using Brachyvision Software. Dose-volume histograms were calculated for each treatment and correlated with clinical data derived from questionnaires assessing Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC). All patients presenting symptoms of upper GI toxicity were examined endoscopically. Results: Summarizing all patients the minimum dose applied to 1 ml of the gastric wall (D{sub 1ml}) ranged from 6.3 to 34.2 Gy; median, 14.3 Gy. Toxicity was present in 18 patients (55%). We found nausea in 16 (69%), emesis in 9 (27%), cramping in 13 (39%), weight loss in 12 (36%), gastritis in 4 (12%), and ulceration in 5 patients (15%). We found a threshold dose D{sub 1ml} of 11 Gy for general gastric toxicity and 15.5 Gy for gastric ulceration verified by an univariate analysis (p = 0.01). Conclusions: For a single fraction, small volume irradiation we found in the upper abdomen a threshold dose D{sub 1ml} of 15.5 Gy for the clinical endpoint ulceration of the gastric mucosa. This in vivo assessment is in accordance with previously published tolerance data.

  9. A strategy to model nonmonotonic dose-response curve and estimate IC50.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Holden-Wiltse, Jeanne; Wang, Jiong; Liang, Hua

    2013-01-01

    The half-maximal inhibitory concentration IC[Formula: see text] is an important pharmacodynamic index of drug effectiveness. To estimate this value, the dose response relationship needs to be established, which is generally achieved by fitting monotonic sigmoidal models. However, recent studies on Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) mutants developing resistance to antiviral drugs show that the dose response curve may not be monotonic. Traditional models can fail for nonmonotonic data and ignore observations that may be of biologic significance. Therefore, we propose a nonparametric model to describe the dose response relationship and fit the curve using local polynomial regression. The nonparametric approach is shown to be promising especially for estimating the IC[Formula: see text] of some HIV inhibitory drugs, in which there is a dose-dependent stimulation of response for mutant strains. This model strategy may be applicable to general pharmacologic, toxicologic, or other biomedical data that exhibits a nonmonotonic dose response relationship for which traditional parametric models fail.

  10. Estimation of 1945 to 1957 food consumption. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.M.; Bates, D.J.; Marsh, T.L.

    1993-07-01

    This report details the methods used and the results of the study on the estimated historic levels of food consumption by individuals in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) study area from 1945--1957. This period includes the time of highest releases from Hanford and is the period for which data are being collected in the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study. These estimates provide the food-consumption inputs for the HEDR database of individual diets. This database will be an input file in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Code (HEDRIC) computer model that will be used to calculate the radiation dose. The report focuses on fresh milk, eggs, lettuce, and spinach. These foods were chosen because they have been found to be significant contributors to radiation dose based on the Technical Steering Panel dose decision level.

  11. Estimation of 1945 to 1957 food consumption. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Draft

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.M.; Bates, D.J.; Marsh, T.L.

    1993-03-01

    This report details the methods used and the results of the study on the estimated historic levels of food consumption by individuals in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) study area from 1945--1957. This period includes the time of highest releases from Hanford and is the period for which data are being collected in the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study. These estimates provide the food-consumption inputs for the HEDR database of individual diets. This database will be an input file in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Code (HEDRIC) computer model that will be used to calculate the radiation dose. The report focuses on fresh milk, eggs, lettuce, and spinach. These foods were chosen because they have been found to be significant contributors to radiation dose based on the Technical Steering Panel dose decision level.

  12. Estimate of Dose and Residual Activity in the SNS Ring Collimation Straight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludewig, H.; Simos, N.; Davino, D.; Cousineau, S.; Catalan-Lasheras, N.; Brodowski, J.; Tuozzolo, J.; Longo, C.; Mullany, B.; Raparia, D.

    2003-12-01

    The collimation system in the SNS ring includes a two-stage collimator consisting of a halo scraper and an appropriate fixed aperture collimator. This unit is placed between the first quadru-pole and the first doublet in the collimation straight section of the ring. The entire structure is surrounded by an outer shield structure. The downstream dose to the doublet and the attached corrector magnet will be estimated for normal operating conditions. In addition, the activities of cooling water, tunnel air, and dose to cables will be estimated. The dose at the flange locations will be estimated following machine shutdown. Finally, the implied dose to surroundings during the removal of an exposed collimator will be made.

  13. Estimating the predictive quality of dose-response after model selection.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chuanpu; Dong, Yingwen

    2007-07-20

    Prediction of dose-response is important in dose selection in drug development. As the true dose-response shape is generally unknown, model selection is frequently used, and predictions based on the final selected model. Correctly assessing the quality of the predictions requires accounting for the uncertainties caused by the model selection process, which has been difficult. Recently, a new approach called data perturbation has emerged. It allows important predictive characteristics be computed while taking model selection into consideration. We study, through simulation, the performance of data perturbation in estimating standard error of parameter estimates and prediction errors. Data perturbation was found to give excellent prediction error estimates, although at times large Monte Carlo sizes were needed to obtain good standard error estimates. Overall, it is a useful tool to characterize uncertainties in dose-response predictions, with the potential of allowing more accurate dose selection in drug development. We also look at the influence of model selection on estimation bias. This leads to insights into candidate model choices that enable good dose-response prediction.

  14. Patient dose estimation from CT scans at the Mexican National Neurology and Neurosurgery Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alva-Sánchez, Héctor; Reynoso-Mejía, Alberto; Casares-Cruz, Katiuzka; Taboada-Barajas, Jesús

    2014-11-01

    In the radiology department of the Mexican National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery, a dedicated institute in Mexico City, on average 19.3 computed tomography (CT) examinations are performed daily on hospitalized patients for neurological disease diagnosis, control scans and follow-up imaging. The purpose of this work was to estimate the effective dose received by hospitalized patients who underwent a diagnostic CT scan using typical effective dose values for all CT types and to obtain the estimated effective dose distributions received by surgical and non-surgical patients. Effective patient doses were estimated from values per study type reported in the applications guide provided by the scanner manufacturer. This retrospective study included all hospitalized patients who underwent a diagnostic CT scan between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2012. A total of 8777 CT scans were performed in this two-year period. Simple brain scan was the CT type performed the most (74.3%) followed by contrasted brain scan (6.1%) and head angiotomography (5.7%). The average number of CT scans per patient was 2.83; the average effective dose per patient was 7.9 mSv; the mean estimated radiation dose was significantly higher for surgical (9.1 mSv) than non-surgical patients (6.0 mSv). Three percent of the patients had 10 or more brain CT scans and exceeded the organ radiation dose threshold set by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for deterministic effects of the eye-lens. Although radiation patient doses from CT scans were in general relatively low, 187 patients received a high effective dose (>20 mSv) and 3% might develop cataract from cumulative doses to the eye lens.

  15. Patient dose estimation from CT scans at the Mexican National Neurology and Neurosurgery Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Alva-Sánchez, Héctor

    2014-11-07

    In the radiology department of the Mexican National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery, a dedicated institute in Mexico City, on average 19.3 computed tomography (CT) examinations are performed daily on hospitalized patients for neurological disease diagnosis, control scans and follow-up imaging. The purpose of this work was to estimate the effective dose received by hospitalized patients who underwent a diagnostic CT scan using typical effective dose values for all CT types and to obtain the estimated effective dose distributions received by surgical and non-surgical patients. Effective patient doses were estimated from values per study type reported in the applications guide provided by the scanner manufacturer. This retrospective study included all hospitalized patients who underwent a diagnostic CT scan between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2012. A total of 8777 CT scans were performed in this two-year period. Simple brain scan was the CT type performed the most (74.3%) followed by contrasted brain scan (6.1%) and head angiotomography (5.7%). The average number of CT scans per patient was 2.83; the average effective dose per patient was 7.9 mSv; the mean estimated radiation dose was significantly higher for surgical (9.1 mSv) than non-surgical patients (6.0 mSv). Three percent of the patients had 10 or more brain CT scans and exceeded the organ radiation dose threshold set by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for deterministic effects of the eye-lens. Although radiation patient doses from CT scans were in general relatively low, 187 patients received a high effective dose (>20 mSv) and 3% might develop cataract from cumulative doses to the eye lens.

  16. Estimation of radionuclide ingestion: Lessons from dose reconstruction for fallout from the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Breshears, D.D.; Whicker, F.W.; Kirchner, T.B.; Anspaugh, L.R.

    1994-09-01

    The United States conducted atmospheric testing of nuclear devices at the Nevada Test Site from 1951 through 1963. In 1979 the U.S. Department of Energy established the Off-Site Radiation Exposure Review Project to compile a data base related to health effects from nuclear testing and to reconstruct doses to public residing off of the Nevada Test Site. This project is the most comprehensive dose reconstruction project to date, and, since similar assessments are currently underway at several other locations within and outside the U.S., lessons from ORERP can be valuable. A major component of dose reconstruction is estimation of dose from radionuclide ingestion. The PATHWAY food-chain model was developed to estimate the amount of radionuclides ingested. For agricultural components of the human diet, PATHWAY predicts radionuclide concentrations and quantities ingested. To improve accuracy and model credibility, four components of model analysis were conducted: estimation of uncertainty in model predictions, estimation of sensitivity of model predictions to input parameters, and testing of model predictions against independent data (validation), and comparing predictions from PATHWAY with those from other models. These results identified strengths and weaknesses in the model and aided in establishing the confidence associated with model prediction, which is a critical component risk assessment and dose reconstruction. For fallout from the Nevada Test Site, by far, the largest internal doses were received by the thyroid. However, the predicted number of fatal cancers from ingestion dose was generally much smaller than the number predicted from external dose. The number of fatal cancers predicted from ingestion dose was also orders of magnitude below the normal projected cancer rate. Several lessons were learned during the study that are relevant to other dose reconstruction efforts.

  17. A method for estimating occupational radiation dose to individuals, using weekly dosimetry data

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, T.J.; Ostrouchov, G.; Frome, E.L.; Kerr, G.D.

    1993-12-01

    Statistical analyses of data from epidemiologic studies of workers exposed to radiation have been based on recorded annual radiation doses. It is usually assumed that the annual dose values are known exactly, although it is generally recognized that the data contain uncertainty due to measurement error and bias. We propose the use of a probability distribution to describe an individual`s dose during a specific period of time. Statistical methods for estimating this dose distribution are developed. The methods take into account the ``measurement error`` that is produced by the dosimetry system, and the bias that was introduced by policies that lead to right censoring of small doses as zero. The method is applied to a sample of dose histories obtained from hard copy dosimetry records at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The result of this evaluation raises serious questions about the validity of the historical personnel dosimetry data that is currently being used in low-dose studies of nuclear industry workers. In particular, it appears that there was a systematic underestimation of doses for ORNL workers. This could result in biased estimates of dose-response coefficients and their standard errors.

  18. Estimating Toxicity-Related Biological Pathway Altering Doses for High-Throughput Chemical Risk Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    We describe a framework for estimating the human dose at which a chemical significantly alters a biological pathway in vivo, making use of in vitro assay data and an in vitro derived pharmacokinetic model, coupled with estimates of population variability and uncertainty. The q...

  19. A comprehensive study of the association between drug hepatotoxicity and daily dose, liver metabolism, and lipophilicity using 975 oral medications.

    PubMed

    Weng, Zuquan; Wang, Kejian; Li, Haibo; Shi, Qiang

    2015-07-10

    It was recently suggested that daily dose, liver metabolism and lipophilicity were associated with an oral drug's potential to cause hepatotoxicity, but this has not been widely accepted. A likely reason is that published data lack comprehensiveness, as they were based on only about one third of all FDA approved single-active-ingredient oral prescription drugs. Here the 975 oral drugs used worldwide which have a Defined Daily Dose (DDD) designated in the World Health Organization's Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical classification system and whose hADRs potential and metabolism data are available in the Micromedex Drugdex® compendium were studied, with their lipophilicity calculated by the partition coefficient LogP. Of the 975 drugs examined, 49% (478) have the potential to induce at least one type of hepatic adverse drug reactions (hADRs) such as fatal hepatotoxicity, acute liver failure, significant ALT/AST elevation, hepatitis, and jaundice. By single factor analysis, a higher DDD (≥100 mg) was found to be associated with all types of hADRs, and extensive liver metabolism (≥50%) was associated with a subset of hADRs including fatal hADRs, hepatitis and jaundice, while LogP showed no relation to any types of hADRs. Contrary to previous reports, none of the combination, neither DDD and liver metabolism, nor DDD and LogP, was found to be more predictive of hADRs than using DDD or liver metabolism alone. These data provide convincing evidence that a higher daily dose and extensive liver metabolism, but not lipophilicity, are independent but not synergistic risk factors for oral drugs to induce hepatotoxicity.

  20. A comprehensive study of the association between drug hepatotoxicity and daily dose, liver metabolism, and lipophilicity using 975 oral medications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haibo; Shi, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    It was recently suggested that daily dose, liver metabolism and lipophilicity were associated with an oral drug's potential to cause hepatotoxicity, but this has not been widely accepted. A likely reason is that published data lack comprehensiveness, as they were based on only about one third of all FDA approved single-active-ingredient oral prescription drugs. Here the 975 oral drugs used worldwide which have a Defined Daily Dose (DDD) designated in the World Health Organization's Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical classification system and whose hADRs potential and metabolism data are available in the Micromedex Drugdex® compendium were studied, with their lipophilicity calculated by the partition coefficient LogP. Of the 975 drugs examined, 49% (478) have the potential to induce at least one type of hepatic adverse drug reactions (hADRs) such as fatal hepatotoxicity, acute liver failure, significant ALT/AST elevation, hepatitis, and jaundice. By single factor analysis, a higher DDD (≥100 mg) was found to be associated with all types of hADRs, and extensive liver metabolism (≥50%) was associated with a subset of hADRs including fatal hADRs, hepatitis and jaundice, while LogP showed no relation to any types of hADRs. Contrary to previous reports, none of the combination, neither DDD and liver metabolism, nor DDD and LogP, was found to be more predictive of hADRs than using DDD or liver metabolism alone. These data provide convincing evidence that a higher daily dose and extensive liver metabolism, but not lipophilicity, are independent but not synergistic risk factors for oral drugs to induce hepatotoxicity. PMID:26220713

  1. Sinogram smoothing techniques for myocardial blood flow estimation from dose-reduced dynamic computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Modgil, Dimple; Alessio, Adam M.; Bindschadler, Michael D.; La Rivière, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) could provide an accurate and widely available technique for myocardial blood flow (MBF) estimation to aid in the diagnosis and treatment of coronary artery disease. However, one of its primary limitations is the radiation dose imparted to the patient. We are exploring techniques to reduce the patient dose by either reducing the tube current or by reducing the number of temporal frames in the dynamic CT sequence. Both of these dose reduction techniques result in noisy data. In order to extract the MBF information from the noisy acquisitions, we have explored several data-domain smoothing techniques. In this work, we investigate two specific smoothing techniques: the sinogram restoration technique in both the spatial and temporal domains and the use of the Karhunen–Loeve (KL) transform to provide temporal smoothing in the sinogram domain. The KL transform smoothing technique has been previously applied to dynamic image sequences in positron emission tomography. We apply a quantitative two-compartment blood flow model to estimate MBF from the time-attenuation curves and determine which smoothing method provides the most accurate MBF estimates in a series of simulations of different dose levels, dynamic contrast-enhanced cardiac CT acquisitions. As measured by root mean square percentage error (% RMSE) in MBF estimates, sinogram smoothing generally provides the best MBF estimates except for the cases of the lowest simulated dose levels (tube current=25  mAs, 2 or 3 s temporal spacing), where the KL transform method provides the best MBF estimates. The KL transform technique provides improved MBF estimates compared to conventional processing only at very low doses (<7  mSv). Results suggest that the proposed smoothing techniques could provide high fidelity MBF information and allow for substantial radiation dose savings. PMID:25642441

  2. Adaptive sampling of CT data for myocardial blood flow estimation from dose-reduced dynamic CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modgil, Dimple; Bindschadler, Michael D.; Alessio, Adam M.; La Rivière, Patrick J.

    2015-03-01

    Quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF) can aid in the diagnosis and treatment of coronary artery disease (CAD). However, there are no widely accepted clinical methods for estimating MBF. Dynamic CT holds the promise of providing a quick and easy method to measure MBF quantitatively, however the need for repeated scans has raised concerns about the potential for high radiation dose. In our previous work, we explored techniques to reduce the patient dose by either uniformly reducing the tube current or by uniformly reducing the number of temporal frames in the dynamic CT sequence. These dose reduction techniques result in very noisy data, which can give rise to large errors in MBF estimation. In this work, we seek to investigate whether nonuniformly varying the tube current or sampling intervals can yield more accurate MBF estimates. Specifically, we try to minimize the dose and obtain the most accurate MBF estimate through addressing the following questions: when in the time attenuation curve (TAC) should the CT data be collected and at what tube current(s). We hypothesize that increasing the sampling rate and/or tube current during the time frames when the myocardial CT number is most sensitive to the flow rate, while reducing them elsewhere, can achieve better estimation accuracy for the same dose. We perform simulations of contrast agent kinetics and CT acquisitions to evaluate the relative MBF estimation performance of several clinically viable adaptive acquisition methods. We found that adaptive temporal and tube current sequences can be performed that impart an effective dose of about 5 mSv and allow for reductions in MBF estimation RMSE on the order of 11% compared to uniform acquisition sequences with comparable or higher radiation doses.

  3. Organ doses for reference adult male and female undergoing computed tomography estimated by Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Choonsik; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Long, Daniel; Fisher, Ryan; Tien, Chris; Simon, Steven L.; Bouville, Andre; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To develop a computed tomography (CT) organ dose estimation method designed to readily provide organ doses in a reference adult male and female for different scan ranges to investigate the degree to which existing commercial programs can reasonably match organ doses defined in these more anatomically realistic adult hybrid phantomsMethods: The x-ray fan beam in the SOMATOM Sensation 16 multidetector CT scanner was simulated within the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX2.6. The simulated CT scanner model was validated through comparison with experimentally measured lateral free-in-air dose profiles and computed tomography dose index (CTDI) values. The reference adult male and female hybrid phantoms were coupled with the established CT scanner model following arm removal to simulate clinical head and other body region scans. A set of organ dose matrices were calculated for a series of consecutive axial scans ranging from the top of the head to the bottom of the phantoms with a beam thickness of 10 mm and the tube potentials of 80, 100, and 120 kVp. The organ doses for head, chest, and abdomen/pelvis examinations were calculated based on the organ dose matrices and compared to those obtained from two commercial programs, CT-EXPO and CTDOSIMETRY. Organ dose calculations were repeated for an adult stylized phantom by using the same simulation method used for the adult hybrid phantom. Results: Comparisons of both lateral free-in-air dose profiles and CTDI values through experimental measurement with the Monte Carlo simulations showed good agreement to within 9%. Organ doses for head, chest, and abdomen/pelvis scans reported in the commercial programs exceeded those from the Monte Carlo calculations in both the hybrid and stylized phantoms in this study, sometimes by orders of magnitude. Conclusions: The organ dose estimation method and dose matrices established in this study readily provides organ doses for a reference adult male and female for different

  4. Metabolic interaction between ethanol, high-dose alprazolam and its two main metabolites using human liver microsomes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Einosuke; Nakamura, Takako; Terada, Masaru; Shinozuka, Tatsuo; Honda, Katsuya

    2007-08-01

    Alprazolam is widely used as a short-acting antidepressant and anxiolytic agent and its effect appears at very low doses while ethanol is used as a social drug worldwide. Sometimes, toxic interactions occur following combined administration of these two drugs. In this study we have investigated the interaction between ethanol and high-dose alprazolam using human liver microsomes in vitro. The interaction effects between ethanol and alprazolam were examined by a mixed-function oxidation reaction using a human liver microsomal preparation. Alprazolam and its two main metabolites (alpha-hydroxyalprazolam: alpha-OH alprazolam, 4-hydroxyalprazolam: 4-OH alprazolam) were measured by HPLC/UV. The production of 4-OH alprazolam, one main metabolite of alprazolam, was weakly inhibited by higher dose of ethanol, but not alpha-OH alprazolam. These results using a human liver microsomal preparation show that the production of 4-OH alprazolam is weakly inhibited by ethanol but not alpha-OH alprazolam. Toxic levels may be reached by simultaneous administration of ethanol and high-dose alprazolam.

  5. Local Response and Impact on Survival After Local Ablation of Liver Metastases From Colorectal Carcinoma by Computed Tomography-Guided High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ricke, Jens; Mohnike, Konrad; Pech, Maciej; Seidensticker, Max; Ruehl, Ricarda; Wieners, Gero; Gaffke, Gunnar; Kropf, Siegfried; Felix, Roland; Wust, Peter

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To determine local tumor control after CT-guided brachytherapy at various dose levels and the prognostic impact of extensive cytoreduction in colorectal liver metastases. Methods and Materials: Seventy-three patients were treated on a single-center prospective trial that was initially designed to be randomized to three dose levels of 15 Gy, 20 Gy, or 25 Gy per lesion, delivered in a single fraction. However, because there was a high rate of cross-over of subjects from higher to lower dose levels, this study is better understood as a prospective trial with three dose levels. No upper size limit for the metastases was applied. We assessed time to local progression, progression-free survival, and overall survival. Results: According to safety constraints cross-over was performed. The final assignment was n = 98, n = 68, and n = 33 in the 15-Gy, 20-Gy, and 25-Gy groups, respectively. Median diameter of the largest tumor lesion in each patient was 5 cm (range, 1-13.5 cm). Estimated mean local recurrence-free survival for all lesions was 34 months (median not reached). The group assigned to 15 Gy after cross-over displayed 34 local recurrences out of 98 lesions; 20 Gy, 15 out of 68 lesions; 25 Gy, 1 out of 33 lesions. The difference between the 25-Gy and the 20-Gy or 15-Gy group was significant (p < 0.05). Repeated local tumor ablations were the most prominent factor for increased survival and dominated additional systemic antitumor treatments. Conclusions: Local tumor control after CT-guided brachytherapy of colorectal liver metastases demonstrated a strong dose dependency. The role of extensive minimally invasive tumor ablation in metastatic colorectal cancer needs to be further established.

  6. In vivo dosimetry for estimation of effective doses in multislice CT coronary angiography

    SciTech Connect

    De Denaro, M.; Bregant, P.; Severgnini, M.; De Guarrini, F.

    2007-10-15

    In vivo dosimetry represents a technique that has been widely employed to evaluate the dose to the patient mainly in radiotherapy. Considering the increment in dose to the population due to new high-dose multislice CT examinations, such as coronary angiography, it is becoming important to more accurately know the dose to the patient. The desire to know patient dose extends even to radiological examinations. Thermoluminescent dosimeters are considered the gold standard for in vivo dosimetry, but their use is time consuming. A rapid, less labor-intensive method has been developed to perform in vivo dosimetry using radiochromic film positioned next to the patient's skin. Multislice CT scanners allow the estimation of the effective dose to the patient from the dose length product (DLP) parameter, the value of which is displayed on the acquisition console, simply multiplying the DLP by published conversion factors. The method represents only an approximation based on standard size circular phantoms and neglects the actual size of the patient. More accurate evaluations can be carried out using software-based Monte Carlo simulations. However, these methods do not consider possible dose reduction techniques, such as automatic tube-current modulation. For 22 patients effective doses measured by in vivo dosimetry and calculated by software were compared. The technique of using in vivo dosimetry measured with radiochromic film appears a promising procedure for improving the assessment of the effective dose to the patient.

  7. [Estimation of the committed effective dose of radioactive cesium and potassium by the market basket method].

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Tomoaki; Nabeshi, Hiromi; Ikarashi, Atsuko; Hachisuka, Akiko; Matsuda, Rieko

    2013-01-01

    The Tokyo Electric Power Company's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant disaster after the Great East Japan Earthquake has caused radioactive contamination in food. Using the market basket method, total diet samples in Tokyo, Miyagi prefecture and Fukushima prefecture were analyzed for cesium-134 and -137 (radioactive cesium) and naturally occurring potassium-40 (radioactive potassium) in order to estimate the committed effective doses of these radioactive materials from food. Doses were calculated on the assumption that "not detected" corresponded to zero or to half the limit of detection (values in brackets). The estimated doses of radioactive cesium in Tokyo, Miyagi and Fukushima were 0.0021 (0.0024), 0.017 (0.018) and 0.019 (0.019) mSv/year, respectively. Although the doses in Miyagi and Fukushima were more than 8 times the dose in Tokyo, they were significantly lower than the maximum permissible dose (1 mSv/year) determined by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan. The estimated doses of naturally occurring radioactive potassium in these areas were in the range of 0.17-0.20 (0.18-0.20) mSv/year, and there were no significant differences between the areas.

  8. Dose estimation based on a behavior survey of residents around the JCO facility.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, K; Yonehara, H; Yamaguchi, Y; Endo, A

    2001-09-01

    The NIRS staff interviewed the residents in the evacuated zone around the JCO facility in Tokai-mura on 19 and 20 November, 1999, to obtain the following parameters every 30 minutes starting from 10:35 A.M. on 30 September to 6:15 A.M. on 1 October: the distance from the precipitation tank, the type of the house, positions in the house, wall materials and their thickness in order to estimate individual doses due to the accident. The ambient dose equivalents were obtained based on monitoring data during the accident. In addition, computer calculations were conducted to evaluate the conversion factor from ambient dose equivalent to effective dose equivalent as well as the shielding effect of the house or factory to estimate the effective dose equivalent to the residents. The estimated individual doses based on the behavior survey were in the range from zero to 21 mSv. The individual doses were reported to the residents during the second visit to each house and factory at the end of January, 2000.

  9. Medium chain triglycerides dose-dependently prevent liver pathology in a rat model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metabolic syndrome is often accompanied by development of hepatic steatosis and less frequently by nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) leading to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Replacement of corn oil with medium chain triacylglycerols (MCT) in the diets of alcohol-fed rats has been show...

  10. RADTRAD: A simplified model for RADionuclide Transport and Removal And Dose estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, S.L.; Miller, L.A.; Monroe, D.K.; Heames, T.J.

    1998-04-01

    This report documents the RADTRAD computer code developed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR) to estimate transport and removal of radionuclides and dose at selected receptors. The document includes a users` guide to the code, a description of the technical basis for the code, the quality assurance and code acceptance testing documentation, and a programmers` guide. The RADTRAD code can be used to estimate the containment release using either the NRC TID-14844 or NUREG-1465 source terms and assumptions, or a user-specified table. In addition, the code can account for a reduction in the quantity of radioactive material due to containment sprays, natural deposition, filters, and other natural and engineered safety features. The RADTRAD code uses a combination of tables and/or numerical models of source term reduction phenomena to determine the time-dependent dose at user-specified locations for a given accident scenario. The code system also provides the inventory, decay chain, and dose conversion factor tables needed for the dose calculation. The RADTRAD code can be used to assess occupational radiation exposures, typically in the control room; to estimate site boundary doses; and to estimate dose attenuation due to modification of a facility or accident sequence.

  11. Estimation of organ and effective dose due to Compton backscatter security scans

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, Michael E.; Schmidt, Taly Gilat

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: To estimate organ and effective radiation doses due to backscatter security scanners using Monte Carlo simulations and a voxelized phantom set. Methods: Voxelized phantoms of male and female adults and children were used with the GEANT4 toolkit to simulate a backscatter security scan. The backscatter system was modeled based on specifications available in the literature. The simulations modeled a 50 kVp spectrum with 1.0 mm-aluminum-equivalent filtration and a previously measured exposure of approximately 4.6 {mu}R at 30 cm from the source. Photons and secondary interactions were tracked from the source until they reached zero kinetic energy or exited from the simulation's boundaries. The energy deposited in the phantoms' respective organs was tallied and used to calculate total organ dose and total effective dose for frontal, rear, and full scans with subjects located 30 and 75 cm from the source. Results: For a full screen, all phantoms' total effective doses were below the established 0.25 {mu}Sv standard, with an estimated maximum total effective dose of 0.07 {mu}Sv for full screen of a male child. The estimated maximum organ dose due to a full screen was 1.03 {mu}Gy, deposited in the adipose tissue of the male child phantom when located 30 cm from the source. All organ dose estimates had a coefficient of variation of less than 3% for a frontal scan and less than 11% for a rear scan. Conclusions: Backscatter security scanners deposit dose in organs beyond the skin. The effective dose is below recommended standards set by the Health Physics Society (HPS) and the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) assuming the system provides a maximum exposure of approximately 4.6 {mu}R at 30 cm.

  12. Estimated radiation dose to the newborn in FDG-PET studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ruotsalainen, U.; Suhonen-Polvi, H.; Eronen, E.; Kinnala, A.

    1996-02-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the radiation dose due to intravenous injection of 2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) for infants studied with PET. The radioactivity concentration in the brain and bladder content was measured with PET to determine the cumulated activity in these organs in 21 infant FDG studies. The individual organ masses were estimated according to the whole-body and brain masses, and they were used to calculate the absorbed dose per unit cumulated activity (S values). For organs other than brain and bladder, the cumulated activity was defined from adult studies. For each individual patient, the absorbed dose to the brain, bladder wall and selected organs were calculated. An estimation of the effective dose was determined. Whole-body distribution of FDG in the infants differed from adults: a greater proportion of the injected activity accumulated into the brain (9% versus 7%) and less was excreted to urine (7% versus 20% respectively). The measured cumulated activity in the brain was 0.25 MBq {center_dot} h/MBq and in the bladder content 0.04 MBq {center_dot}h/MBq with a large individual variation in latter. The calculated absorbed dose was 0.24 mGy/MBq to the brain and 1.03 mGy/MBq to the bladder wall. The estimated effective dose was 0.43 mSv/MBq. The dose to the bladder wall was lower in infants as compared to adults with ordinary amounts of injected activity. The greater amount of activity remaining in the body may increase the dose to other organs. The effective dose was lower compared to adults and conventional nuclear medicine studies of infants. PET can be a valuable tool in pediatric nuclear medicine because of good resolution images, sensitive radiation measurement and a variety of tracers labeled with short-lived isotopes. 27 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Variability in dose estimates associated with the food-chain transport and ingestion of selected radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, F.O.; Gardner, R.H.; Eckerman, K.F.

    1982-06-01

    Dose predictions for the ingestion of /sup 90/Sr and /sup 137/Cs, using aquatic and terrestrial food chain transport models similar to those in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Regulatory Guide 1.109, are evaluated through estimating the variability of model parameters and determining the effect of this variability on model output. The variability in the predicted dose equivalent is determined using analytical and numerical procedures. In addition, a detailed discussion is included on /sup 90/Sr dosimetry. The overall estimates of uncertainty are most relevant to conditions where site-specific data is unavailable and when model structure and parameter estimates are unbiased. Based on the comparisons performed in this report, it is concluded that the use of the generic default parameters in Regulatory Guide 1.109 will usually produce conservative dose estimates that exceed the 90th percentile of the predicted distribution of dose equivalents. An exception is the meat pathway for /sup 137/Cs, in which use of generic default values results in a dose estimate at the 24th percentile. Among the terrestrial pathways of exposure, the non-leafy vegetable pathway is the most important for /sup 90/Sr. For /sup 90/Sr, the parameters for soil retention, soil-to-plant transfer, and internal dosimetry contribute most significantly to the variability in the predicted dose for the combined exposure to all terrestrial pathways. For /sup 137/Cs, the meat transfer coefficient the mass interception factor for pasture forage, and the ingestion dose factor are the most important parameters. The freshwater finfish bioaccumulation factor is the most important parameter for the dose prediction of /sup 90/Sr and /sup 137/Cs transported over the water-fish-man pathway.

  14. Comprehensive assessment of radiation dose estimates for the CORE320 study.

    PubMed

    Rybicki, Frank J; Mather, Richard T; Kumamaru, Kanako K; Brinker, Jeffrey; Chen, Marcus Y; Cox, Christopher; Matheson, Matthew B; Dewey, Marc; DiCarli, Marcelo F; Miller, Julie M; Geleijns, Jacob; George, Richard T; Paul, Narinder; Texter, John; Vavere, Andrea; Yaw, Tan Swee; Lima, Joao A C; Clouse, Melvin E

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to comprehensively study estimated radiation doses for subjects included in the main analysis of the Combined Non-invasive Coronary Angiography and Myocardial Perfusion Imaging Using 320 Detector Computed Tomography (CORE320) study ( ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00934037), a clinical trial comparing combined CT angiography (CTA) and perfusion CT with the reference standard catheter angiography plus myocardial perfusion SPECT. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. Prospectively acquired data on 381 CORE320 subjects were analyzed in four groups of testing related to radiation exposure. Radiation dose estimates were compared between modalities for combined CTA and perfusion CT with respect to covariates known to influence radiation exposure and for the main clinical outcomes defined by the trial. The final analysis assessed variations in radiation dose with respect to several factors inherent to the trial. RESULTS. The mean radiation dose estimate for the combined CTA and perfusion CT protocol (8.63 mSv) was significantly (p < 0.0001 for both) less than the average dose delivered from SPECT (10.48 mSv) and the average dose from diagnostic catheter angiography (11.63 mSv). There was no significant difference in estimated CTA-perfusion CT radiation dose for subjects who had false-positive or false-negative results in the CORE320 main analyses in a comparison with subjects for whom the CTA-perfusion CT findings were in accordance with the reference standard SPECT plus catheter angiographic findings. CONCLUSION. Radiation dose estimates from CORE320 support clinical implementation of a combined CT protocol for assessing coronary anatomy and myocardial perfusion.

  15. Application of computational models to estimate organ radiation dose in rainbow trout from uptake of molybdenum-99 with comparison to iodine-131.

    PubMed

    Martinez, N E; Johnson, T E; Pinder, J E

    2016-01-01

    This study compares three anatomical phantoms for rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the purpose of estimating organ radiation dose and dose rates from molybdenum-99 ((99)Mo) uptake in the liver and GI tract. Model comparison and refinement is important to the process of determining accurate doses and dose rates to the whole body and the various organs. Accurate and consistent dosimetry is crucial to the determination of appropriate dose-effect relationships for use in environmental risk assessment. The computational phantoms considered are (1) a geometrically defined model employing anatomically relevant organ size and location, (2) voxel reconstruction of internal anatomy obtained from CT imaging, and (3) a new model utilizing NURBS surfaces to refine the model in (2). Dose Conversion Factors (DCFs) for whole body as well as selected organs of O. mykiss were computed using Monte Carlo modeling and combined with empirical models for predicting activity concentration to estimate dose rates and ultimately determine cumulative radiation dose (μGy) to selected organs after several half-lives of (99)Mo. The computational models provided similar results, especially for organs that were both the source and target of radiation (less than 30% difference between all models). Values in the empirical model as well as the 14 day cumulative organ doses determined from (99)Mo uptake are compared to similar models developed previously for (131)I. Finally, consideration is given to treating the GI tract as a solid organ compared to partitioning it into gut contents and GI wall, which resulted in an order of magnitude difference in estimated dose for most organs.

  16. Primate polonium metabolic models and their use in estimation of systemic radiation doses from bioassay data. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, N.

    1989-03-15

    A Polonium metabolic model was derived and incorporated into a Fortran algorithm which estimates the systemic radiation dose from {sup 210}Po when applied to occupational urine bioassay data. The significance of the doses estimated are examined by defining the degree of uncertainty attached to them through comprehensive statistical testing procedures. Many parameters necessary for dosimetry calculations (such as organ partition coefficients and excretion fractions), were evaluated from metabolic studies of {sup 210}Po in non-human primates. Two tamarins and six baboons were injected intravenously with {sup 210}Po citrate. Excreta and blood samples were collected. Five of the baboons were sacrificed at times ranging from 1 day to 3 months post exposure. Complete necropsies were performed and all excreta and the majority of all skeletal and tissue samples were analyzed radiochemically for their {sup 210}Po content. The {sup 210}Po excretion rate in the baboon was more rapid than in the tamarin. The biological half-time of {sup 210}Po excretion in the baboon was approximately 15 days while in the tamarin, the {sup 210}Po excretion rate was in close agreement with the 50 day biological half-time predicted by ICRP 30. Excretion fractions of {sup 210}Po in the non-human primates were found to be markedly different from data reported elsewhere in other species, including man. A thorough review of the Po urinalysis procedure showed that significant recovery losses resulted when metabolized {sup 210}Po was deposited out of raw urine. Polonium-210 was found throughout the soft tissues of the baboon but not with the partition coefficients for liver, kidneys, and spleen that are predicted by the ICRP 30 metabolic model. A fractional distribution of 0.29 for liver, 0.07 for kidneys, and 0.006 for spleen was determined. Retention times for {sup 210}Po in tissues are described by single exponential functions with biological half-times ranging from 15 to 50 days.

  17. SU-E-T-330: To Analyze the Calculation Error of Live Dose-Volume Indices Applying 4D-CT in Radiotherapy for PTVs Within the Liver Completely

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, G; Liu, C; Yin, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the variation rule of normal liver dose-volume indices calculation for the liver malignancy patients whose plan target volumes were in the liver completely in all breath phases. Methods: Ten patients who accepted radiotherapy for malignant tumor were selected in our study. All patients underwent 4D-CT simulation and 3D-CT simulation in free breathing(FB). 4D-CT was sorted into 10 series CT images according to breath phase, named CT0, CT10 to CT90, respectively. And GTVs were contoured on different CT series, and the individual target volume(ITV) was obtained by merging 10 GTVs from 4D-CT. The PTVs were obtained from ITV applying margins. The PTVs were not beyond the boundary of liver in all breath phase observed by dynamic 4D-CT. The radiotherapy plans were designed and irradiation dose was calculated on 3D-CT images, and the livers were contoured on different series CT images and mapped to 3D-CT images applying rigid registration. To compare the dose-volume difference of livers based on distinct CT images. Results: (1)The liver volumes were similar on 4D-CT and 3D-CT images(CTFB 1485±500cm{sup 3}, CT0 1413±377cm{sup 3}, CT10 1409±396cm{sup 3}, CT20 1419±418cm{sup 3},CT30 1485±500cm{sup 3}, CT40 1438±392cm{sup 3}, CT50 1437±404cm{sup 3}, CT60 1439±409cm{sup 3}, CT70 1408±393cm{sup 3}, CT80 1384±397cm{sup 3}, CT90 1398±397cm{sup 3}; F=0.064,p=1.00) (2) The PTVs volume were 30.17±14.62cm{sup 3};(3) The mean dose and V5 to V10 of liver were similar among 4D-CT different series CT images(p>0.05), and the indices varied less than ±4% refer to liver on CT50. Conclusion: The calculation affection of liver dose-volume indices induced by breath motion were not significant for the PTV within liver completely as estimation before. And more objective prediction indices for radiation induced l.

  18. Convolution-based estimation of organ dose in tube current modulated CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Segars, W. P.; Dixon, R. L.; Samei, Ehsan

    2015-03-01

    Among the various metrics that quantify radiation dose in computed tomography (CT), organ dose is one of the most representative quantities reflecting patient-specific radiation burden.1 Accurate estimation of organ dose requires one to effectively model the patient anatomy and the irradiation field. As illustrated in previous studies, the patient anatomy factor can be modeled using a library of computational phantoms with representative body habitus.2 However, the modeling of irradiation field can be practically challenging, especially for CT exams performed with tube current modulation. The central challenge is to effectively quantify the scatter irradiation field created by the dynamic change of tube current. In this study, we present a convolution-based technique to effectively quantify the primary and scatter irradiation field for TCM examinations. The organ dose for a given clinical patient can then be rapidly determined using the convolution-based method, a patient-matching technique, and a library of computational phantoms. 58 adult patients were included in this study (age range: 18-70 y.o., weight range: 60-180 kg). One computational phantom was created based on the clinical images of each patient. Each patient was optimally matched against one of the remaining 57 computational phantoms using a leave-one-out strategy. For each computational phantom, the organ dose coefficients (CTDIvol-normalized organ dose) under fixed tube current were simulated using a validated Monte Carlo simulation program. Such organ dose coefficients were multiplied by a scaling factor, (CTDIvol )organ, convolution that quantifies the regional irradiation field. The convolution-based organ dose was compared with the organ dose simulated from Monte Carlo program with TCM profiles explicitly modeled on the original phantom created based on patient images. The estimation error was within 10% across all organs and modulation profiles for abdominopelvic examination. This strategy

  19. Estimating Radiation Dose Metrics for Patients Undergoing Tube Current Modulation CT Scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Kyle Lorin

    Computed tomography (CT) has long been a powerful tool in the diagnosis of disease, identification of tumors and guidance of interventional procedures. With CT examinations comes the concern of radiation exposure and the associated risks. In order to properly understand those risks on a patient-specific level, organ dose must be quantified for each CT scan. Some of the most widely used organ dose estimates are derived from fixed tube current (FTC) scans of a standard sized idealized patient model. However, in current clinical practice, patient size varies from neonates weighing just a few kg to morbidly obese patients weighing over 200 kg, and nearly all CT exams are performed with tube current modulation (TCM), a scanning technique that adjusts scanner output according to changes in patient attenuation. Methods to account for TCM in CT organ dose estimates have been previously demonstrated, but these methods are limited in scope and/or restricted to idealized TCM profiles that are not based on physical observations and not scanner specific (e.g. don't account for tube limits, scanner-specific effects, etc.). The goal of this work was to develop methods to estimate organ doses to patients undergoing CT scans that take into account both the patient size as well as the effects of TCM. This work started with the development and validation of methods to estimate scanner-specific TCM schemes for any voxelized patient model. An approach was developed to generate estimated TCM schemes that match actual TCM schemes that would have been acquired on the scanner for any patient model. Using this approach, TCM schemes were then generated for a variety of body CT protocols for a set of reference voxelized phantoms for which TCM information does not currently exist. These are whole body patient models representing a variety of sizes, ages and genders that have all radiosensitive organs identified. TCM schemes for these models facilitated Monte Carlo-based estimates of fully

  20. Estimation of the effects of normal tissue sparing using equivalent uniform dose-based optimization

    PubMed Central

    Senthilkumar, K.; Maria Das, K. J.; Balasubramanian, K.; Deka, A. C.; Patil, B. R.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we intend to estimate the effects of normal tissue sparing between intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment plans generated with and without a dose volume (DV)-based physical cost function using equivalent uniform dose (EUD). Twenty prostate cancer patients were retrospectively selected for this study. For each patient, two IMRT plans were generated (i) EUD-based optimization with a DV-based physical cost function to control inhomogeneity (EUDWith DV) and (ii) EUD-based optimization without a DV-based physical cost function to allow inhomogeneity (EUDWithout DV). The generated plans were prescribed a dose of 72 Gy in 36 fractions to planning target volume (PTV). Mean dose, D30%, and D5% were evaluated for all organ at risk (OAR). Normal tissue complication probability was also calculated for all OARs using BioSuite software. The average volume of PTV for all patients was 103.02 ± 27 cm3. The PTV mean dose for EUDWith DV plans was 73.67 ± 1.7 Gy, whereas for EUDWithout DV plans was 80.42 ± 2.7 Gy. It was found that PTV volume receiving dose more than 115% of prescription dose was negligible in EUDWith DV plans, whereas it was 28% in EUDWithout DV plans. In almost all dosimetric parameters evaluated, dose to OARs in EUDWith DV plans was higher than in EUDWithout DV plans. Allowing inhomogeneous dose (EUDWithout DV) inside the target would achieve better normal tissue sparing compared to homogenous dose distribution (EUDWith DV). Hence, this inhomogeneous dose could be intentionally dumped on the high-risk volume to achieve high local control. Therefore, it was concluded that EUD optimized plans offer added advantage of less OAR dose as well as selectively boosting dose to gross tumor volume. PMID:27217624

  1. Gold nanoparticle-aided brachytherapy with vascular dose painting: Estimation of dose enhancement to the tumor endothelial cell nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Ngwa, Wilfred; Makrigiorgos, G. Mike; Berbeco, Ross I.

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: Theoretical microdosimetry at the subcellular level is employed in this study to estimate the dose enhancement to tumor endothelial cell nuclei, caused by radiation-induced photo/Auger electrons originating from gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) targeting the tumor endothelium, during brachytherapy. Methods: A tumor vascular endothelial cell (EC) is modeled as a slab of 2 {mu}m (thickness) x 10 {mu}m (length) x 10 {mu}m (width). The EC contains a nucleus of 5 {mu}m diameter and thickness of 0.5-1 {mu}m, corresponding to nucleus size 5%-10% of cellular volume, respectively. Analytic calculations based on the electron energy loss formula of Cole were carried out to estimate the dose enhancement to the nucleus caused by photo/Auger electrons from AuNPs attached to the exterior surface of the EC. The nucleus dose enhancement factor (nDEF), representing the ratio of the dose to the nucleus with and without the presence of gold nanoparticles was calculated for different AuNP local concentrations. The investigated concentration range considers the potential for significantly higher local concentration near the EC due to preferential accumulation of AuNP in the tumor vasculature. Four brachytherapy sources: I-125, Pd-103, Yb-169, and 50 kVp x-rays were investigated. Results: For nucleus size of 10% of the cellular volume and AuNP concentrations ranging from 7 to 140 mg/g, brachytherapy sources Pd-103, I-125, 50 kVp, and Yb-169 yielded nDEF values of 5.6-73, 4.8-58.3, 4.7-56.6, and 3.2-25.8, respectively. Meanwhile, for nucleus size 5% of the cellular volume in the same concentration range, Pd-103, I-125, 50 kVp, and Yb-169 yielded nDEF values of 6.9-79.2, 5.1-63.2, 5.0-61.5, and 3.3-28.3, respectively. Conclusions: The results predict that a substantial dose boost to the nucleus of endothelial cells can be achieved by applying tumor vasculature-targeted AuNPs in combination with brachytherapy. Such vascular dose boosts could induce tumor vascular shutdown, prompting

  2. Patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk estimation in CT: Part II. Application to patients

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Toncheva, Greta; Yoshizumi, Terry T.; Frush, Donald P.

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Current methods for estimating and reporting radiation dose from CT examinations are largely patient-generic; the body size and hence dose variation from patient to patient is not reflected. Furthermore, the current protocol designs rely on dose as a surrogate for the risk of cancer incidence, neglecting the strong dependence of risk on age and gender. The purpose of this study was to develop a method for estimating patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk from CT examinations. Methods: The study included two patients (a 5-week-old female patient and a 12-year-old male patient), who underwent 64-slice CT examinations (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare) of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis at our institution in 2006. For each patient, a nonuniform rational B-spine (NURBS) based full-body computer model was created based on the patient's clinical CT data. Large organs and structures inside the image volume were individually segmented and modeled. Other organs were created by transforming an existing adult male or female full-body computer model (developed from visible human data) to match the framework defined by the segmented organs, referencing the organ volume and anthropometry data in ICRP Publication 89. A Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated for dose simulation on the LightSpeed VCT scanner was used to estimate patient-specific organ dose, from which effective dose and risks of cancer incidence were derived. Patient-specific organ dose and effective dose were compared with patient-generic CT dose quantities in current clinical use: the volume-weighted CT dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) and the effective dose derived from the dose-length product (DLP). Results: The effective dose for the CT examination of the newborn patient (5.7 mSv) was higher but comparable to that for the CT examination of the teenager patient (4.9 mSv) due to the size-based clinical CT protocols at our institution, which employ lower scan techniques for smaller

  3. MAXINE: An improved methodology for estimating maximum individual dose from chronic atmospheric radioactive releases

    SciTech Connect

    Hamby, D.M.

    1994-02-01

    An EXCEL{reg_sign} spreadsheet has been developed that, when combined with the PC version of XOQDOQ, will generate estimates of maximum individual dose from routine atmospheric releases of radionuclides. The spreadsheet, MAXINE, utilizes a variety of atmospheric dispersion factors to calculate radiation dose as recommended by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in Regulatory Guide 1.109 [USNRC 1977a]. The methodology suggested herein includes use of both the MAXINE spreadsheet and the PC version of XOQDOQ.

  4. Organ doses for reference pediatric and adolescent patients undergoing computed tomography estimated by Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Choonsik; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Long, Daniel J.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: To establish an organ dose database for pediatric and adolescent reference individuals undergoing computed tomography (CT) examinations by using Monte Carlo simulation. The data will permit rapid estimates of organ and effective doses for patients of different age, gender, examination type, and CT scanner model. Methods: The Monte Carlo simulation model of a Siemens Sensation 16 CT scanner previously published was employed as a base CT scanner model. A set of absorbed doses for 33 organs/tissues normalized to the product of 100 mAs and CTDI{sub vol} (mGy/100 mAs mGy) was established by coupling the CT scanner model with age-dependent reference pediatric hybrid phantoms. A series of single axial scans from the top of head to the feet of the phantoms was performed at a slice thickness of 10 mm, and at tube potentials of 80, 100, and 120 kVp. Using the established CTDI{sub vol}- and 100 mAs-normalized dose matrix, organ doses for different pediatric phantoms undergoing head, chest, abdomen-pelvis, and chest-abdomen-pelvis (CAP) scans with the Siemens Sensation 16 scanner were estimated and analyzed. The results were then compared with the values obtained from three independent published methods: CT-Expo software, organ dose for abdominal CT scan derived empirically from patient abdominal circumference, and effective dose per dose-length product (DLP). Results: Organ and effective doses were calculated and normalized to 100 mAs and CTDI{sub vol} for different CT examinations. At the same technical setting, dose to the organs, which were entirely included in the CT beam coverage, were higher by from 40 to 80% for newborn phantoms compared to those of 15-year phantoms. An increase of tube potential from 80 to 120 kVp resulted in 2.5-2.9-fold greater brain dose for head scans. The results from this study were compared with three different published studies and/or techniques. First, organ doses were compared to those given by CT-Expo which revealed dose

  5. Estimation of Radiobiologic Parameters and Equivalent Radiation Dose of Cytotoxic Chemotherapy in Malignant Glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Bleddyn . E-mail: b.jones.1@bham.ac.uk; Sanghera, Paul

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the radiobiologic parameters for high-grade gliomas. Methods and Materials: The biologic effective dose concept is used to estimate the {alpha}/{beta} ratio and K (dose equivalent for tumor repopulation/d) for high-grade glioma patients treated in a randomized fractionation trial. The equivalent radiation dose of temozolomide (Temodar) chemotherapy was estimated from another randomized study. The method assumes that the radiotherapy biologic effective dose is proportional to the adjusted radiotherapy survival duration of high-grade glioma patients. Results: The median tumor {alpha}/{beta} and K estimate is 9.32 Gy and 0.23 Gy/d, respectively. Using the published surviving fraction after 2-Gy exposure (SF{sub 2}) data, and the above {alpha}/{beta} ratio, the estimated median {alpha} value was 0.077 Gy{sup -1}, {beta} was 0.009 Gy{sup -2}, and the cellular doubling time was 39.5 days. The median equivalent biologic effective dose of temozolomide was 11.03 Gy{sub 9.3} (equivalent to a radiation dose of 9.1 Gy given in 2-Gy fractions). Random sampling trial simulations based on a cure threshold of 70 Gy in high-grade gliomas have shown the potential increase in tumor cure with dose escalation. Partial elimination of hypoxic cells (by chemical hypoxic cell sensitizers or carbon ion therapy) has suggested that considerable gains in tumor control, which are further supplemented by temozolomide, are achievable. Conclusion: The radiobiologic parameters for human high-grade gliomas can be estimated from clinical trials and could be used to inform future clinical trials, particularly combined modality treatments with newer forms of radiotherapy. Other incurable cancers should be studied using similar radiobiologic analysis.

  6. Childhood leukaemia incidence around French nuclear installations using geographic zoning based on gaseous discharge dose estimates

    PubMed Central

    Evrard, A-S; Hémon, D; Morin, A; Laurier, D; Tirmarche, M; Backe, J-C; Chartier, M; Clavel, J

    2006-01-01

    The present study investigated for the first time the incidence of childhood leukaemia (1990–2001) around French nuclear installations using a geographic zoning based on estimated doses to the red bone marrow due to gaseous radioactive discharges. The observed number of cases of acute leukaemia (O=750) in 40 km2 centred on 23 French nuclear installations between 1990 and 2001 was lower than expected (E=795.01), although not significantly so (standardised incidence ratio SIR=0.94, 95% confidence interval=(0.88–1.01)). In none of the five zones defined on the basis of the estimated doses was the SIR significantly >1. There was no evidence of a trend in SIR with the estimated doses for all the children or for any of the three age groups studied. This study confirmed that there was no evidence of an increased incidence of childhood leukaemia around the 23 French nuclear sites. PMID:16622448

  7. Fetal radiation dose estimates for I-131 sodium iodide in cases where conception occurs after administration

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, R.B.; Stabin, M.G.

    1999-01-01

    After administration of I-131 to the female patient, the possibility of radiation exposure of the embryo/fetus exists if the patient becomes pregnant while radioiodine remains in the body. Fetal radiation dose estimates for such cases were calculated. Doses were calculated for various maternal thyroid uptakes and time intervals between administration and conception, including euthyroid and hyperthyroid cases. The maximum fetal dose calculating was about 9.8E-03 mGy/MBq, which occurred with 100% maternal thyroid uptake and a 1 week interval between administration and conception. Placental crossover of the small amount of radioiodine remaining 90 days after conception was also considered. Such crossover could result in an additional fetal dose of 9.8E-05 mGy/MBq and a maximum fetal thyroid self dose of 3.5E-04 mGy/MBq.

  8. Parameterizing dose-response models to estimate relative potency functions directly.

    PubMed

    Dinse, Gregg E; Umbach, David M

    2012-10-01

    Many comparative analyses of toxicity assume that the potency of a test chemical relative to a reference chemical is constant, but employing such a restrictive assumption uncritically may generate misleading conclusions. Recent efforts to characterize non-constant relative potency rely on relative potency functions and estimate them secondarily after fitting dose-response models for the test and reference chemicals. We study an alternative approach of specifying a relative potency model a priori and estimating it directly using the dose-response data from both chemicals. We consider a power function in dose as a relative potency model and find that it keeps the two chemicals' dose-response functions within the same family of models for families typically used in toxicology. When differences in the response limits for the test and reference chemicals are attributable to the chemicals themselves, the older two-stage approach is the more convenient. When differences in response limits are attributable to other features of the experimental protocol or when response limits do not differ, the direct approach is straightforward to apply with nonlinear regression methods and simplifies calculation of simultaneous confidence bands. We illustrate the proposed approach using Hill models with dose-response data from U.S. National Toxicology Program bioassays. Though not universally applicable, this method of estimating relative potency functions directly can be profitably applied to a broad family of dose-response models commonly used in toxicology.

  9. Chip-based human liver-intestine and liver-skin co-cultures--A first step toward systemic repeated dose substance testing in vitro.

    PubMed

    Maschmeyer, Ilka; Hasenberg, Tobias; Jaenicke, Annika; Lindner, Marcus; Lorenz, Alexandra Katharina; Zech, Julie; Garbe, Leif-Alexander; Sonntag, Frank; Hayden, Patrick; Ayehunie, Seyoum; Lauster, Roland; Marx, Uwe; Materne, Eva-Maria

    2015-09-01

    Systemic repeated dose safety assessment and systemic efficacy evaluation of substances are currently carried out on laboratory animals and in humans due to the lack of predictive alternatives. Relevant international regulations, such as OECD and ICH guidelines, demand long-term testing and oral, dermal, inhalation, and systemic exposure routes for such evaluations. So-called "human-on-a-chip" concepts are aiming to replace respective animals and humans in substance evaluation with miniaturized functional human organisms. The major technical hurdle toward success in this field is the life-like combination of human barrier organ models, such as intestine, lung or skin, with parenchymal organ equivalents, such as liver, at the smallest biologically acceptable scale. Here, we report on a reproducible homeostatic long-term co-culture of human liver equivalents with either a reconstructed human intestinal barrier model or a human skin biopsy applying a microphysiological system. We used a multi-organ chip (MOC) platform, which provides pulsatile fluid flow within physiological ranges at low media-to-tissue ratios. The MOC supports submerse cultivation of an intact intestinal barrier model and an air-liquid interface for the skin model during their co-culture with the liver equivalents respectively at (1)/100.000 the scale of their human counterparts in vivo. To increase the degree of organismal emulation, microfluidic channels of the liver-skin co-culture could be successfully covered with human endothelial cells, thus mimicking human vasculature, for the first time. Finally, exposure routes emulating oral and systemic administration in humans have been qualified by applying a repeated dose administration of a model substance - troglitazone - to the chip-based co-cultures.

  10. Internal thyroid doses to Fukushima residents—estimation and issues remaining

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eunjoo; Kurihara, Osamu; Kunishima, Naoaki; Momose, Takumaro; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Akashi, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Enormous quantities of radionuclides were released into the environment following the disastrous accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) in March 2011. It is of great importance to determine the exposure doses received by the populations living in the radiologically affected areas; however, there has been significant difficulty in estimating the internal thyroid dose received through the intake of short-lived radionuclides (mainly, 131I), because of the lack of early measurements on people. An estimation by the National Institute of Radiological Sciences for 1 April 2012 to 31 March 2013 was thus performed using a combination of the following three sources: thyroid measurement data (131I) for 1080 children examined in the screening campaign, whole-body counter measurement data (134Cs, 137Cs) for 3000 adults, and atmospheric transport dispersion model simulations. In this study, the residents of Futaba town, Iitate village and Iwaki city were shown to have the highest thyroid equivalent dose, and their doses were estimated to be mostly below 30 mSv. However, this result involved a lot of uncertainties and provided only representative values for the residents. The present paper outlines a more recent dose estimation and preliminary analyses of personal behavior data used in the new method. PMID:27538842

  11. Accidental embryo irradiation during barium enema examinations: An estimation of absorbed dose

    SciTech Connect

    Damilakis, J.; Perisinakis, K.; Grammatikakis, J.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to investigate the possibility of an embryo to receive a dose of more than 10 cGy, the threshold of malformation induction in embryos reported by the International Commission on Radiological Protection, during barium enema examinations. Thermoluminescent dosimeters were place in a phantom to calculate the depth-to-skin conversion coefficient needed for dose estimation at the average embryo depth in patients. Barium enema examinations were performed in 20 women of childbearing age with diagnostic problems demanding longer fluoroscopy times. Doses at 6 cm, the average embryo depth, were determined by measurements at the patients` skin followed by dose calculation at the site of interest. The range of doses estimated at embryo depth for patients was 1.9 to 8.2 cGy. The dose always exceeded 5 cGy when fluoroscopy time was longer than 7 minutes. The dose at the embryo depth never exceeded 10 cGy. This study indicates that fluoroscopy time should not exceed 7 minutes in childbearing-age female patients undergoing barium enema examinations. 6 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  12. Fetus dose estimation in thyroid cancer post-surgical radioiodine therapy.

    PubMed

    Mianji, Fereidoun A; Diba, Jila Karimi; Babakhani, Asad

    2015-01-01

    Unrecognised pregnancy during radioisotope therapy of thyroid cancer results in hardly definable embryo/fetus exposures, particularly when the thyroid gland is already removed. Sources of such difficulty include uncertainty in data like pregnancy commencing time, amount and distribution of metastasized thyroid cells in body, effect of the thyroidectomy on the fetus dose coefficient etc. Despite all these uncertainties, estimation of the order of the fetus dose in most cases is enough for medical and legal decision-making purposes. A model for adapting the dose coefficients recommended by the well-known methods to the problem of fetus dose assessment in athyrotic patients is proposed. The model defines a correction factor for the problem and ensures that the fetus dose in athyrotic pregnant patients is less than the normal patients. A case of pregnant patient undergone post-surgical therapy by I-131 is then studied for quantitative comparison of the methods. The results draw a range for the fetus dose in athyrotic patients using the derived factor. This reduces the concerns on under- or over-estimation of the embryo/fetus dose and is helpful for personal and/or legal decision-making on abortion.

  13. Oxidative stress in rat brain but not in liver following oral administration of a low dose of nanoparticulate silver.

    PubMed

    Skalska, Joanna; Dąbrowska-Bouta, Beata; Strużyńska, Lidia

    2016-11-01

    While it is known that silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) can enter the brain, our knowledge of AgNP-induced neurotoxicity remains incomplete. We investigated the ability of 10 nm citrate-stabilized AgNPs to generate oxidative stress in brain and liver of adult male Wistar rats after repeated oral exposure for 14 days, using a low dose of 0.2 mg/kg b.w. as compared with the same dose of ionic silver (silver citrate). In AgNP-exposed animals, the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxidation (MDA) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity were found to be significantly higher in brain relative to the control group receiving saline. Administration of ionic silver (silver citrate) increased ROS and MDA levels in both tissues. Activities of GPx in brain so as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) in liver of exposed animals were also elevated. Besides, AgNPs and silver ions were both found to cause statistically significant decrease in the reduced-to-oxidized glutathione ratio (GSH/GSSG) in brain. The results show that exposure to a very low dose of particulate silver generates mild oxidative stress in the brain but not in the liver of rats, indicating a role of oxidative stress in AgNP-induced neurotoxicity.

  14. Radiation dose estimates for typical piloted NTR lunar and Mars mission engine operations

    SciTech Connect

    Schnitzler, B.G. ); Borowski, S.K. . Lewis Research Center)

    1991-01-01

    The natural and manmade radiation environments to be encountered during lunar and Mars missions are qualitatively summarized. The computational methods available to characterize the radiation environment produced by an operating nuclear propulsion system are discussed. Mission profiles and vehicle configurations are presented for a typical all-propulsive, fully reusable lunar mission and for a typical all-propulsive Mars mission. Estimates of crew location biological doses are developed for all propulsive maneuvers. Post-shutdown dose rates near the nuclear engine are estimated at selected mission times. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Combined methodology for estimating dose rates and health effects from exposure to radioactive pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Leggett, R.W.; Yalcintas, M.G.

    1980-12-01

    The work described in the report is basically a synthesis of two previously existing computer codes: INREM II, developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); and CAIRD, developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The INREM II code uses contemporary dosimetric methods to estimate doses to specified reference organs due to inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide. The CAIRD code employs actuarial life tables to account for competing risks in estimating numbers of health effects resulting from exposure of a cohort to some incremental risk. The combined computer code, referred to as RADRISK, estimates numbers of health effects in a hypothetical cohort of 100,000 persons due to continuous lifetime inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide. Also briefly discussed in this report is a method of estimating numbers of health effects in a hypothetical cohort due to continuous lifetime exposure to external radiation. This method employs the CAIRD methodology together with dose conversion factors generated by the computer code DOSFACTER, developed at ORNL; these dose conversion factors are used to estimate dose rates to persons due to radionuclides in the air or on the ground surface. The combination of the life table and dosimetric guidelines for the release of radioactive pollutants to the atmosphere, as required by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1977.

  16. Radiation dose estimates for C-11 iomazenil, a benzodiazepine receptor radioligand

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, R.B.; Dey, H.M.; Siebyl, I.B.

    1994-05-01

    SPECT imaging of the brain with I-123 iomazenil has shown avid uptake of the radioligand in a distribution consistent with benzodiazepine receptor binding. It was desirable to radiolabel this compound with a positron emitting radionuclide so that quantitation of the receptor density could be assessed with PET imaging. Radiation dose estimates for C-11 iomazenil were calculated prior to obtaining Institutional Review Board approval of this procedure. A previously published multicompartmental model was used as the biological model for estimating residence times associated with the C-11 labeled iomazenil. According to this model, 85-90% is excreted in the urine and 10-15% in the feces. A dynamic, voiding urinary bladder model was utilized for activity excreted renally and the ICRP 30 gastrointestinal tract kinetic model was used for activity excreted via the hepatobiliary system. Absorbed doses from C-11 (I-123) iomazenil to the urinary bladder were calculated to be 0.099 mGy/MBq (0.19 mGy/MBq) for a 4.8 hour bladder voiding interval. Shortening the bladder voiding interval to 2.0 hours had little effect on the bladder wall dose (0.095 mGy/MBq). However, a 30-minute void interval was estimated to lower the bladder wall dose substantially (0.045 mGy/MBq). Absorbed dose to the kidney was higher for C-11 iomazenil (0.054 vs 0.031 mGy/MBq) than for I-123 iomazenil due to rapid, early renal excretion of this very short-lived positron emitter. Doses to the gastrointestinal tract were estimated to be 4- to 20-fold lower for C-11 iomazenil compared to I-123 iomazenil. Overall, labeling iomazenil with C-11 rather than I-123 greatly reduces the radiation dose, per unit administered, to all organs except the kidneys.

  17. High-dose methylprednisolone for veno-occlusive disease of the liver in pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients.

    PubMed

    Myers, Kasiani C; Lawrence, Julia; Marsh, Rebecca A; Davies, Stella M; Jodele, Sonata

    2013-03-01

    Veno-occlusive disease (VOD) of the liver is a well-recognized serious complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), with few successful treatment modalities available for severe disease. Some reports have demonstrated success in adults with the use of high-dose steroid therapy, but experience in the pediatric population is lacking. We retrospectively reviewed HSCT patients treated at our institution since 2003 and identified 15 (2.4%) who developed VOD. Of these, nine (60%) were treated with intravenous high-dose methylprednisolone (500 mg/m(2) per dose every 12 hours for six doses). Steroid therapy was initiated at or before first ultrasound evidence of reversal of portal venous flow and before meeting criteria for initiation of defibrotide therapy. Four patients were also treated with defibrotide starting 2 to 5 days after initiation of steroids. Eight of nine patients (88%) with VOD were diagnosed with multiorgan failure. Response to high-dose steroid therapy as defined by decrease in bilirubin by 50% in 10 days from therapy initiation was noted in six of nine patients (67%), occurring within 3 to 6 days of steroid therapy. Two patients died from multiorgan failure due to VOD. Seven survivors of VOD recovered at the median 6 days (range, 5 to 38) from VOD diagnosis. Overall, VOD survival as a group was 78%; however, survival among responders was 100%. No serious toxicities related to high-dose steroid therapy were observed. We conclude that high-dose steroid therapy if initiated early may reverse VOD of the liver in pediatric HSCT patients, abrogating the need for defibrotide therapy with its associated toxicities and regulatory difficulties.

  18. Deterministic absorbed dose estimation in computed tomography using a discrete ordinates method

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, Edward T.; Liu, Xin; Hsieh, Jiang

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Organ dose estimation for a patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scanning is very important. Although Monte Carlo methods are considered gold-standard in patient dose estimation, the computation time required is formidable for routine clinical calculations. Here, the authors instigate a deterministic method for estimating an absorbed dose more efficiently. Methods: Compared with current Monte Carlo methods, a more efficient approach to estimating the absorbed dose is to solve the linear Boltzmann equation numerically. In this study, an axial CT scan was modeled with a software package, Denovo, which solved the linear Boltzmann equation using the discrete ordinates method. The CT scanning configuration included 16 x-ray source positions, beam collimators, flat filters, and bowtie filters. The phantom was the standard 32 cm CT dose index (CTDI) phantom. Four different Denovo simulations were performed with different simulation parameters, including the number of quadrature sets and the order of Legendre polynomial expansions. A Monte Carlo simulation was also performed for benchmarking the Denovo simulations. A quantitative comparison was made of the simulation results obtained by the Denovo and the Monte Carlo methods. Results: The difference in the simulation results of the discrete ordinates method and those of the Monte Carlo methods was found to be small, with a root-mean-square difference of around 2.4%. It was found that the discrete ordinates method, with a higher order of Legendre polynomial expansions, underestimated the absorbed dose near the center of the phantom (i.e., low dose region). Simulations of the quadrature set 8 and the first order of the Legendre polynomial expansions proved to be the most efficient computation method in the authors’ study. The single-thread computation time of the deterministic simulation of the quadrature set 8 and the first order of the Legendre polynomial expansions was 21 min on a personal computer

  19. A novel method of estimating effective dose from the point dose method: a case study—parathyroid CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Januzis, Natalie; Nguyen, Giao; Hoang, Jenny K.; Lowry, Carolyn; Yoshizumi, Terry T.

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate a novel approach of applying a partial volume correction factor (PVCF) using a limited number of MOSFET detectors in the effective dose (E) calculation. The results of the proposed PVCF method were compared to the results from both the point dose (PD) method and a commercial CT dose estimation software (CT-Expo). To measure organ doses, an adult female anthropomorphic phantom was loaded with 20 MOSFET detectors and was scanned using the non-contrast and 2 phase contrast-enhanced parathyroid imaging protocols on a 64-slice multi-detector computed tomography scanner. E was computed by three methods: the PD method, the PVCF method, and the CT-Expo method. The E (in mSv) for the PD method, the PVCF method, and CT-Expo method was 2.6  ±  0.2, 1.3  ±  0.1, and 1.1 for the non-contrast scan, 21.9  ±  0.4, 13.9  ±  0.2, and 14.6 for the 1st phase of the contrast-enhanced scan, and 15.5  ±  0.3, 9.8  ±  0.1, and 10.4 for the 2nd phase of the contrast-enhanced scan, respectively. The E with the PD method differed from the PVCF method by 66.7% for the non-contrast scan, by 44.9% and by 45.5% respectively for the 1st and 2nd phases of the contrast-enhanced scan. The E with PVCF was comparable to the results from the CT-Expo method with percent differences of 15.8%, 5.0%, and 6.3% for the non-contrast scan and the 1st and 2nd phases of the contrast-enhanced scan, respectively. To conclude, the PVCF method estimated E within 16% difference as compared to 50-70% in the PD method. In addition, the results demonstrate that E can be estimated accurately from a limited number of detectors.

  20. Estimation of doses to personnel and patients during endovascular brachytherapy applications.

    PubMed

    Kirisits, Christian; Hefner, Alfred; Wexberg, Paul; Pokrajac, Boris; Glogar, Dietmar; Pötter, Richard; Georg, Dietmar

    2004-01-01

    In the last few years coronary endovascular brachytherapy using gamma- and beta-emitting radionuclides has been established as a standard treatment procedure to prevent restenosis after percutaneous coronary interventions. Direct measurements and calculations were made to determine personnel doses and organ doses of patients due to gamma rays of 192Ir and beta rays of 90Sr/90Y and 32P sources. In general, our results show that the dose levels are low compared with the X-ray exposure from angiography. The dose rate from bremsstrahlung at 1 m distance from a device containing a 90Sr/90Y source of 2.3 GBq is 4 micro Sv h(-1). The skin dose from beta rays during source transfer into and from the patient was estimated with the directional dose equivalent H'(0.07) of 10 micro Sv at 1 m distance from the catheter. By maintaining safe distances, the dose levels can be kept well within annual dose limits.

  1. Estimated Fluoride Doses from Toothpastes Should be Based on Total Soluble Fluoride

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Maria José L.; Martins, Carolina C.; Paiva, Saul M.; Tenuta, Livia M. A.; Cury, Jaime A.

    2013-01-01

    The fluoride dose ingested by young children may be overestimated if based on levels of total fluoride (TF) rather than levels of bioavailable fluoride (total soluble fluoride—TSF) in toothpaste. The aim of the present study was to compare doses of fluoride intake based on TF and TSF. Fluoride intake in 158 Brazilian children aged three and four years was determined after tooth brushing with their usual toothpaste (either family toothpaste (n = 80) or children’s toothpaste (n = 78)). The estimated dose (mg F/day/Kg of body weight) of TF or TSF ingested was calculated from the chemical analysis of the toothpastes. Although the ingested dose of TF from the family toothpastes was higher than that from the children’s toothpastes (0.074 ± 0.007 and 0.039 ± 0.003 mg F/day/Kg, respectively; p < 0.05), no difference between types of toothpaste was found regarding the ingested dose based on TSF (0.039 ± 0.005 and 0.039 ± 0.005 mg F/day/Kg, respectively; p > 0.05). The fluoride dose ingested by children from toothpastes may be overestimated if based on the TF of the product. This finding suggests that the ingested dose should be calculated based on TSF. Dose of TSF ingested by children is similar whether family or children’s toothpaste is used. PMID:24189183

  2. Estimated fluoride doses from toothpastes should be based on total soluble fluoride.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Maria José L; Martins, Carolina C; Paiva, Saul M; Tenuta, Livia M A; Cury, Jaime A

    2013-11-01

    The fluoride dose ingested by young children may be overestimated if based on levels of total fluoride (TF) rather than levels of bioavailable fluoride (total soluble fluoride-TSF) in toothpaste. The aim of the present study was to compare doses of fluoride intake based on TF and TSF. Fluoride intake in 158 Brazilian children aged three and four years was determined after tooth brushing with their usual toothpaste (either family toothpaste (n = 80) or children's toothpaste (n = 78)). The estimated dose (mg F/day/Kg of body weight) of TF or TSF ingested was calculated from the chemical analysis of the toothpastes. Although the ingested dose of TF from the family toothpastes was higher than that from the children's toothpastes (0.074 ± 0.007 and 0.039 ± 0.003 mg F/day/Kg, respectively; p < 0.05), no difference between types of toothpaste was found regarding the ingested dose based on TSF (0.039 ± 0.005 and 0.039 ± 0.005 mg F/day/Kg, respectively; p > 0.05). The fluoride dose ingested by children from toothpastes may be overestimated if based on the TF of the product. This finding suggests that the ingested dose should be calculated based on TSF. Dose of TSF ingested by children is similar whether family or children's toothpaste is used.

  3. Image-Guided Robotic Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Liver Metastases: Is There a Dose Response Relationship?

    SciTech Connect

    Vautravers-Dewas, Claire; Dewas, Sylvain; Bonodeau, Francois; Adenis, Antoine; Lacornerie, Thomas; Penel, Nicolas; Lartigau, Eric; Mirabel, Xavier

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome, tolerance, and toxicity of stereotactic body radiotherapy, using image-guided robotic radiation delivery, for the treatment of patients with unresectable liver metastases. Methods and Material: Patients were treated with real-time respiratory tracking between July 2007 and April 2009. Their records were retrospectively reviewed. Metastases from colorectal carcinoma and other primaries were not necessarily confined to liver. Toxicity was evaluated using National Cancer Institute Common Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: Forty-two patients with 62 metastases were treated with two dose levels of 40 Gy in four Dose per Fraction (23) and 45 Gy in three Dose per Fraction (13). Median follow-up was 14.3 months (range, 3-23 months). Actuarial local control for 1 and 2 years was 90% and 86%, respectively. At last follow-up, 41 (66%) complete responses and eight (13%) partial responses were observed. Five lesions were stable. Nine lesions (13%) were locally progressed. Overall survival was 94% at 1 year and 48% at 2 years. The most common toxicity was Grade 1 or 2 nausea. One patient experienced Grade 3 epidermitis. The dose level did not significantly contribute to the outcome, toxicity, or survival. Conclusion: Image-guided robotic stereotactic body radiation therapy is feasible, safe, and effective, with encouraging local control. It provides a strong alternative for patients who cannot undergo surgery.

  4. Estimated dose from diagnostic nuclear medicine patients to people outside the Nuclear Medicine department.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Marissa L

    2013-11-01

    Patients undergoing nuclear medicine scans can be a source of radiation exposure for staff, family and the public. In this paper, 12 common nuclear medicine scans are considered. Doses are estimated for a range of scenarios, to hospital staff, to the public and to the patients' co-workers and family. Estimates are based on dose rates measured as patients left the Nuclear Medicine department. Radiopharmaceutical clearance is calculated from biokinetic models described in International Commission on Radiological Protection publications 53, 80 and 106. For all scan types, and all scenarios, doses are estimated to be substantially less than the trigger level of 300 µSv. Within the hospital, Intensive Care Unit staff receive the highest dose (up to 80 µSv) from patients who have had a myocardial scan or a positron emission tomography scan. For out-patients, the highest doses (up to 100 µSv) are associated with travel on public transport (for 4 h) on the same day as the scan.

  5. [Estimation of the Average Glandular Dose Using the Mammary Gland Image Analysis in Mammography].

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Tomoko; Teramoto, Atsushi; Asada, Yasuki; Suzuki, Shoichi; Fujita, Hiroshi; Kamiya, Satoru; Anno, Hirofumi

    2016-05-01

    Currently, the glandular dose is evaluated quantitatively on the basis of the measured data using phantom, and not in a dose based on the mammary gland structure of an individual patient. However, mammary gland structures of the patients are different from each other and mammary gland dose of an individual patient cannot be obtained by the existing methods. In this study, we present an automated estimation method of mammary gland dose by means of mammary structure which is measured automatically using mammogram. In this method, mammary gland structure is extracted by Gabor filter; mammary region is segmented by the automated thresholding. For the evaluation, mammograms of 100 patients diagnosed with category 1 were collected. Using these mammograms we compared the mammary gland ratio measured by proposed method and visual evaluation. As a result, 78% of the total cases were matched. Furthermore, the mammary gland ratio and average glandular dose among the patients with same breast thickness was matched well. These results show that the proposed method may be useful for the estimation of average glandular dose for the individual patients.

  6. Estimates of radiation doses in space on the basis of current data.

    PubMed

    Foelsche, T

    1963-01-01

    A gross survey of data on Van Allen belt radiations, galactic cosmic radiation, and solar cosmic radiation is presented. On the basis of these data that are, in part, fragmentary and uncertain, upper and lower limits of rad doses under different amounts of mass shielding are estimated. The estimates are preliminary especially in the cases of chance encounter with solar flare protons. Generally, the relative biological effectiveness of the high energetic space radiations and their secondaries appear insufficiently known to give detailed biological or rem doses. The overall ionization dosage of the low level galactic cosmic radiation in free space is estimated to be even in solar minimum years equivalent to less than 50 rem/year or 1 rem/week. Mass shielding up to 80 g/cm2 would not reduce the ionization dosage but would shield against heavy primaries and heavy ionizing secondaries, thus reducing the biological dose. The flux of energetic protons in the maximum intensity zone of the inner Van Allen belt is by about four orders of magnitude higher, their energy and penetration power, of course, lower. A shield of 25 g/cm2 would reduce the dose rate from 20 rad/hour under 2 g/cm2 to 5 rad/hour. These proton dose rates and also the electron and X-radiation dose rates under some g/cm2 shielding of low z-number material will not constitute a radiation hazard for flights straight through the inner and outer belt in about two hours. Staying within the maximum of the inner belt for two days would, however, lead even within 25 g/cm2 depth of outer shield and body itself to a dose of 200 rad which is on the permissible limit. Extreme solar cosmic ray events or proton showers of high intensity and a duration of days occurred with a frequency of 1-4 per year during the last highly active cycle. For the penetrating, most intense high energy event of February 23, 1956, the dose within 25 g/cm2 is estimated to have been in the order of 50 rad. In most cases the dose decreased more

  7. Radiation exposure and dose estimates for a nuclear-powered manned Mars sprint mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nealy, John E.; Simonsen, Lisa C.; Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Schnitzler, Bruce G.; Qualls, Garry D.; Gates, Michele M.

    1991-01-01

    A conceptual manned mission to Mars is analyzed in order to estimate potential ionizing radiation doses that may be incurred by crew members during the course of the mission. The scenario is set for a journey during the solar active period and includes a brief stay on the Martian surface. Propulsion is assumed to be provided by nuclear thermal rocket power, and estimates of the dose contributions from the reactors are included. However, due to effective shielding of the reactors by large propellant tanks, it is found that the incurred doses are principally due to the charged particle natural environment. Recent data (August-December 1989) for large solar proton events are used to simulate the flame environment, while standard models are used for the trapped particle and galactic cosmic ray contributions. Shield effectiveness for several candidate materials are investigated.

  8. Estimation of Maximum Recommended Therapeutic Dose Using Predicted Promiscuity and Potency

    PubMed Central

    Liu, T; Oprea, T; Ursu, O; Hasselgren, C

    2016-01-01

    We report a simple model that predicts the maximum recommended therapeutic dose (MRTD) of small molecule drugs based on an assessment of likely protein–drug interactions. Previously, we reported methods for computational estimation of drug promiscuity and potency. We used these concepts to build a linear model derived from 238 small molecular drugs to predict MRTD. We applied this model successfully to predict MRTDs for 16 nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and 14 antiretroviral drugs. Of note, based on the estimated promiscuity of low‐dose drugs (and active chemicals), we identified 83 proteins as “high‐risk off‐targets” (HROTs) that are often associated with low doses; the evaluation of interactions with HROTs may be useful during early phases of drug discovery. Our model helps explain the MRTD for drugs with severe adverse reactions caused by interactions with HROTs. PMID:27736015

  9. ESTIMATING CHILDREN'S DERMAL AND NON-DIETARY INGESTION EXPOSURE AND DOSE WITH EPA'S SHEDS MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physically-based stochastic model (SHEDS) has been developed to estimate pesticide exposure and dose to children via dermal residue contact and non-dietary ingestion. Time-location-activity data are sampled from national survey results to generate a population of simulated ch...

  10. Dose-response modeling in mental health using stein-like estimators with instrumental variables.

    PubMed

    Ginestet, Cedric E; Emsley, Richard; Landau, Sabine

    2017-02-21

    A mental health trial is analyzed using a dose-response model, in which the number of sessions attended by the patients is deemed indicative of the dose of psychotherapeutic treatment. Here, the parameter of interest is the difference in causal treatment effects between the subpopulations that take part in different numbers of therapy sessions. For this data set, interactions between random treatment allocation and prognostic baseline variables provide the requisite instrumental variables. While the corresponding two-stage least squares (TSLS) estimator tends to have smaller bias than the ordinary least squares (OLS) estimator; the TSLS suffers from larger variance. It is therefore appealing to combine the desirable properties of the OLS and TSLS estimators. Such a trade-off is achieved through an affine combination of these two estimators, using mean squared error as a criterion. This produces the semi-parametric Stein-like (SPSL) estimator as introduced by Judge and Mittelhammer (2004). The SPSL estimator is used in conjunction with multiple imputation with chained equations, to provide an estimator that can exploit all available information. Simulated data are also generated to illustrate the superiority of the SPSL estimator over its OLS and TSLS counterparts. A package entitled SteinIV implementing these methods has been made available through the R platform. © 2017 The Authors. Statistics in Medicine Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. [Estimation of appropriate dose for computed radiography by the threshold value of the image quality figure].

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Yasuo; Abe, Shinji; Yamaguchi, Kojirou

    2009-04-20

    We estimated the optimum dose for imaging with a computed radiography (CR) system at two different pixel sizes based on the area under curve (AUC) in receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and image quality figure (IQF). Samples for ROC analysis were prepared as follows. Acryl beads, 2.0 mm in diameter, were placed on a 50.0 mm tough water phantom that was fitted with a 20.0 mm Al filter (SID 200 cm, tube voltage 80 kV). The dose level at which the film density of the screen-film system (SRO250/SRG) was 1.0+/-0.05 served as the reference dose (0.69microC/kg). Five samples were prepared by multiplying the reference dose by 1/4, 1/2, 1, 2, and 4. The samples for image quality evaluation on the basis of IQF were prepared under identical conditions. A contrast-detail (C-D) phantom was placed on a 50.0 mm tough water phantom and images were taken. The contrast threshold of these samples was determined by 10 film readers, the same as those for the ROC analysis. When the significance of differences in the AUC was tested by the paired t-test (two-sided) and the Jackknife method, significant differences were noted between the reference dose and the 1/4 or 4-times dose at the standard pixel size (0.175 mm) and smaller pixel size (0.0875 mm) size, while no significant difference was noted between the reference dose and the 1/2 or 2-times dose. In terms of IQF, no significant difference was noted between standard and smaller pixel sizes (paired t-test). The IQF data indicate that the dose level for imaging with CR can be reduced by about 30% from the reference dose.

  12. SU-E-T-238: Monte Carlo Estimation of Cerenkov Dose for Photo-Dynamic Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chibani, O; Price, R; Ma, C; Eldib, A; Mora, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Estimation of Cerenkov dose from high-energy megavoltage photon and electron beams in tissue and its impact on the radiosensitization using Protoporphyrine IX (PpIX) for tumor targeting enhancement in radiotherapy. Methods: The GEPTS Monte Carlo code is used to generate dose distributions from 18MV Varian photon beam and generic high-energy (45-MV) photon and (45-MeV) electron beams in a voxel-based tissueequivalent phantom. In addition to calculating the ionization dose, the code scores Cerenkov energy released in the wavelength range 375–425 nm corresponding to the pick of the PpIX absorption spectrum (Fig. 1) using the Frank-Tamm formula. Results: The simulations shows that the produced Cerenkov dose suitable for activating PpIX is 4000 to 5500 times lower than the overall radiation dose for all considered beams (18MV, 45 MV and 45 MeV). These results were contradictory to the recent experimental studies by Axelsson et al. (Med. Phys. 38 (2011) p 4127), where Cerenkov dose was reported to be only two orders of magnitude lower than the radiation dose. Note that our simulation results can be corroborated by a simple model where the Frank and Tamm formula is applied for electrons with 2 MeV/cm stopping power generating Cerenkov photons in the 375–425 nm range and assuming these photons have less than 1mm penetration in tissue. Conclusion: The Cerenkov dose generated by high-energy photon and electron beams may produce minimal clinical effect in comparison with the photon fluence (or dose) commonly used for photo-dynamic therapy. At the present time, it is unclear whether Cerenkov radiation is a significant contributor to the recently observed tumor regression for patients receiving radiotherapy and PpIX versus patients receiving radiotherapy only. The ongoing study will include animal experimentation and investigation of dose rate effects on PpIX response.

  13. Natural radionuclides in cigarette tobacco from Serbian market and effective dose estimate from smoke inhalation.

    PubMed

    Janković Mandić, Ljiljana; Đolić, Maja; Marković, Dragana; Todorović, Dragana; Onjia, Antonije; Dragović, Snežana

    2016-01-01

    The activity concentrations of natural radionuclides ((40)K, (210)Pb, (210)Po, (226)Ra and (228)Ra) in 17 most frequently used cigarette brands in Serbia and corresponding effective doses due to smoke inhalation are presented. The mean annual effective doses for (210)Pb and (210)Po were estimated to be 47.3 and 724 µSv y(-1) for (210)Pb and (210)Po, respectively. Serbia currently has the highest smoking rate in the world. The results of this study indicate the high contribution of the annual effective dose due to smoke inhalation to the total inhalation dose from natural radionuclides. The more effective implementation of actions for reducing smoking prevalence in Serbia is highly needed.

  14. The clinical estimation of liver size: a comparison of techniques and an analysis of the source of error.

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, S; Krasner, N; Williams, R

    1976-01-01

    The clinical estimation of liver size using radioisotope scintiscans as a standard of reference has been shown to be very inaccurate. The main source of error is in the location of the upper border of the liver. Physical characteristics of the patients influence this measurement. PMID:990752

  15. Adaptive Liver Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy: Automated Daily Plan Reoptimization Prevents Dose Delivery Degradation Caused by Anatomy Deformations

    SciTech Connect

    Leinders, Suzanne M.; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Méndez Romero, Alejandra; Schaart, Dennis; Seppenwoolde, Yvette; Heijmen, Ben J.M.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate how dose distributions for liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) can be improved by using automated, daily plan reoptimization to account for anatomy deformations, compared with setup corrections only. Methods and Materials: For 12 tumors, 3 strategies for dose delivery were simulated. In the first strategy, computed tomography scans made before each treatment fraction were used only for patient repositioning before dose delivery for correction of detected tumor setup errors. In adaptive second and third strategies, in addition to the isocenter shift, intensity modulated radiation therapy beam profiles were reoptimized or both intensity profiles and beam orientations were reoptimized, respectively. All optimizations were performed with a recently published algorithm for automated, multicriteria optimization of both beam profiles and beam angles. Results: In 6 of 12 cases, violations of organs at risk (ie, heart, stomach, kidney) constraints of 1 to 6 Gy in single fractions occurred in cases of tumor repositioning only. By using the adaptive strategies, these could be avoided (<1 Gy). For 1 case, this needed adaptation by slightly underdosing the planning target volume. For 2 cases with restricted tumor dose in the planning phase to avoid organ-at-risk constraint violations, fraction doses could be increased by 1 and 2 Gy because of more favorable anatomy. Daily reoptimization of both beam profiles and beam angles (third strategy) performed slightly better than reoptimization of profiles only, but the latter required only a few minutes of computation time, whereas full reoptimization took several hours. Conclusions: This simulation study demonstrated that replanning based on daily acquired computed tomography scans can improve liver stereotactic body radiation therapy dose delivery.

  16. Dose-related carcinogenic effects of water-borne benzo(a)pyrene on livers of two small fish species

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, W.E.; Walker, W.W.; Overstreet, R.M.; Lytle, T.F.; Lytle, J.S.

    1988-12-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) administered by water-borne exposures caused dose-related carcinogenic effects in livers of two small fish species, the Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) and the guppy (Poecilia reticulata). Medaka and guppies each were given two 6-h exposures. The first exposure was conducted on 6- to 10-day-old specimens. The second exposure was given 7 days later. The tests incorporated five treatment groups: (1) control, (2) carrier (dimethylformamide) control, (3) low BaP dose (not detectable--4 ppb), (4) intermediate BaP dose (about 8-47 ppb BaP), and (5) high BaP dose (200-270 ppb). Following the high-dose exposure, hepatocellular lesions classified as foci of cellular alteration (altered foci), adenomas, and hepatocellular carcinomas occurred in both species. In medaka, the lesions appeared to develop sequentially with the appearance of altered foci followed by adenomas and then hepatocellular carcinomas. Most lesions in guppies, however, were classified as altered foci although a few adenomas occurred in the early (24-week) sample and hepatocellular carcinomas occurred in the late (52-week) sample. When total lesions were combined, medaka had an 11% incidence at 24 weeks after the initial exposure and 36% incidence at 36 weeks. In guppies, 8% had liver lesions at 24 weeks, 19% at 36 weeks, and 20% at 52 weeks. A single extrahepatic neoplasm, a capillary hemangioma in a gill filament, occurred in a medaka from the 36-week high-dose sample. The results suggest that the medaka and guppy are capable of metabolizing water-borne BaP to carcinogenic metabolites which initiate hepatic tumor development.

  17. Protection by pantothenol and beta-carotene against liver damage produced by low-dose gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Slyshenkov, V S; Omelyanchik, S N; Moiseenok, A G; Petushok, N E; Wojtczak, L

    1999-01-01

    Rats were exposed to a total dose of 0.75 Gy of gamma radiation from a 60Co source, receiving three doses of 0.25 Gy at weekly intervals. During two days before each irradiation, the animals received daily intragastric doses of 26 mg pantothenol or 15 mg beta-carotene per kg body mass. The animals were killed after the third irradiation session, and their blood and livers were analyzed. As found previously (Slyshenkov, V.S., Omelyanchik, S.N., Moiseenok, A.G., Trebukhina, R.V. & Wojtczak, L. (1998) Free Radical Biol. Med. 24, 894-899), in livers of animals not supplied with either pantothenol or beta-carotene and killed one hour after the irradiation, a large accumulation of lipid peroxidation products, as conjugated dienes, ketotrienes and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, could be observed. The contents of CoA, pantothenic acid, total phospholipids, total glutathione and GSH/GSSG ratio were considerably decreased, whereas the NAD/NADH ratio was increased. All these effects were alleviated in animals supplied with beta-carotene and were completely abolished in animals supplied with pantothenol. In the present paper, we extended our observations of irradiation effects over a period of up to 7 days after the last irradiation session. We found that most of these changes, with the exception of GSH/GSSG ratio, disappeared spontaneously, whereas supplementation with beta-carotene shortened the time required for the normalization of biochemical parameters. In addition, we found that the activities of glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase, catalase and NADP-dependent malate (decarboxylating) dehydrogenase ('malic enzyme') in liver were also significantly decreased one hour after irradiation but returned to the normal level within 7 days. Little or no decrease in these activities, already 1 h after the irradiation, could be seen in animals supplemented with either beta-carotene or pantothenol. It is concluded that pantothenol is an excellent radioprotective

  18. Cancer risk estimation of genotoxic chemicals based on target dose and a multiplicative model

    SciTech Connect

    Granath, F.N. . Dept. of Mathematical Statistics Karolinska Inst., Stockholm . Dept. of Medical Epidemiology); Vaca, C.E. . Dept. of Radiobiology Casco Products AB, Stockholm ); Ehrenberg, L.G.; Toernqvist, M.A. )

    1999-04-01

    A mechanistic model and associated procedures are proposed for cancer risk assessment of genotoxic chemicals. As previously shown for ionizing radiation, a linear multiplicative model was found to be compatible with published experimental data for ethylene oxide, acrylamide, and butadiene. Concurrent analysis led to rejection of an additive model. A reanalysis of data for radiogenic cancer in mouse, dog and man shows that the relative risk coefficient is approximately the same for tumors induced in the three species. Doses in vivo, defined as the time-integrated concentrations of ultimate mutagens, expressed in millimol x kg[sup [minus]1] x h (mMh) are, like radiation doses given in Gy or rad, proportional to frequencies of potentially mutagenic events. The radiation dose equivalents of chemical doses are, calculated by multiplying chemical doses (in mMh) with the relative genotoxic potencies determined in vitro. In this way the relative cancer incidence increments in rats and mice exposed to ethylene oxide were shown to be about 0.4% per rad-equivalent, in agreement with the data for radiogenic cancer. The analyses suggest that values of the relative risk coefficients for genotoxic chemicals are independent of species and that relative cancer risks determined in animal tests apply also to humans. If reliable animal test data are not available, cancer risks may be estimated by the relative potency. In both cases exposure dose/target dose relationships, the latter via macromolecule adducts, should be determined.

  19. Estimation of internal organ motion-induced variance in radiation dose in non-gated radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Sumin; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Mutian; Zheng, Dandan; Lei, Yu; Li, Sicong; Bennion, Nathan; Verma, Vivek; Zhen, Weining; Enke, Charles

    2016-12-01

    In the delivery of non-gated radiotherapy (RT), owing to intra-fraction organ motion, a certain degree of RT dose uncertainty is present. Herein, we propose a novel mathematical algorithm to estimate the mean and variance of RT dose that is delivered without gating. These parameters are specific to individual internal organ motion, dependent on individual treatment plans, and relevant to the RT delivery process. This algorithm uses images from a patient’s 4D simulation study to model the actual patient internal organ motion during RT delivery. All necessary dose rate calculations are performed in fixed patient internal organ motion states. The analytical and deterministic formulae of mean and variance in dose from non-gated RT were derived directly via statistical averaging of the calculated dose rate over possible random internal organ motion initial phases, and did not require constructing relevant histograms. All results are expressed in dose rate Fourier transform coefficients for computational efficiency. Exact solutions are provided to simplified, yet still clinically relevant, cases. Results from a volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) patient case are also presented. The results obtained from our mathematical algorithm can aid clinical decisions by providing information regarding both mean and variance of radiation dose to non-gated patients prior to RT delivery.

  20. Review of methods of dose estimation for epidemiological studies of the radiological impact of nevada test site and global fallout.

    PubMed

    Beck, Harold L; Anspaugh, Lynn R; Bouville, André; Simon, Steven L

    2006-07-01

    Methods to assess radiation doses from nuclear weapons test fallout have been used to estimate doses to populations and individuals in a number of studies. However, only a few epidemiology studies have relied on fallout dose estimates. Though the methods for assessing doses from local and regional compared to global fallout are similar, there are significant differences in predicted doses and contributing radionuclides depending on the source of the fallout, e.g. whether the nuclear debris originated in Nevada at the U.S. nuclear test site or whether it originated at other locations worldwide. The sparse historical measurement data available are generally sufficient to estimate external exposure doses reasonably well. However, reconstruction of doses to body organs from ingestion and inhalation of radionuclides is significantly more complex and is almost always more uncertain than are external dose estimates. Internal dose estimates are generally based on estimates of the ground deposition per unit area of specific radionuclides and subsequent transport of radionuclides through the food chain. A number of technical challenges to correctly modeling deposition of fallout under wet and dry atmospheric conditions still remain, particularly at close-in locations where sizes of deposited particles vary significantly over modest changes in distance. This paper summarizes the various methods of dose estimation from weapons test fallout and the most important dose assessment and epidemiology studies that have relied on those methods.

  1. Effect of Radiation Dose Reduction and Reconstruction Algorithm on Image Noise, Contrast, Resolution, and Detectability of Subtle Hypoattenuating Liver Lesions at Multidetector CT: Filtered Back Projection versus a Commercial Model-based Iterative Reconstruction Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Justin; Marin, Daniele; Roy Choudhury, Kingshuk; Patel, Bhavik; Samei, Ehsan

    2017-02-07

    Purpose To determine the effect of radiation dose and iterative reconstruction (IR) on noise, contrast, resolution, and observer-based detectability of subtle hypoattenuating liver lesions and to estimate the dose reduction potential of the IR algorithm in question. Materials and Methods This prospective, single-center, HIPAA-compliant study was approved by the institutional review board. A dual-source computed tomography (CT) system was used to reconstruct CT projection data from 21 patients into six radiation dose levels (12.5%, 25%, 37.5%, 50%, 75%, and 100%) on the basis of two CT acquisitions. A series of virtual liver lesions (five per patient, 105 total, lesion-to-liver prereconstruction contrast of -15 HU, 12-mm diameter) were inserted into the raw CT projection data and images were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) (B31f kernel) and sinogram-affirmed IR (SAFIRE) (I31f-5 kernel). Image noise (pixel standard deviation), lesion contrast (after reconstruction), lesion boundary sharpness (average normalized gradient at lesion boundary), and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were compared. Next, a two-alternative forced choice perception experiment was performed (16 readers [six radiologists, 10 medical physicists]). A linear mixed-effects statistical model was used to compare detection accuracy between FBP and SAFIRE and to estimate the radiation dose reduction potential of SAFIRE. Results Compared with FBP, SAFIRE reduced noise by a mean of 53% ± 5, lesion contrast by 12% ± 4, and lesion sharpness by 13% ± 10 but increased CNR by 89% ± 19. Detection accuracy was 2% higher on average with SAFIRE than with FBP (P = .03), which translated into an estimated radiation dose reduction potential (±95% confidence interval) of 16% ± 13. Conclusion SAFIRE increases detectability at a given radiation dose (approximately 2% increase in detection accuracy) and allows for imaging at reduced radiation dose (16% ± 13), while maintaining low

  2. [Effects of low doses of essential oil on the antioxidant state of the erythrocytes, liver, and the brains of mice].

    PubMed

    Misharina, T A; Fatkullina, L D; Alinkina, E S; Kozachenko, A I; Nagler, L G; Medvedeva, I B; Goloshchapov, A N; Burlakova, E B

    2014-01-01

    We studied the effects of essential oil from oregano and clove and a mixture of lemon essential oil and a ginger extract on the antioxidant state of organs in intact and three experimental groups of Bulb mice. We found that the essential oil was an efficient in vivo bioantioxidant when mice were treated with it for 6 months even at very low doses, such as 300 ng/day. All essential oil studied inhibited lipid peroxidation (LPO) in the membranes of erythrocytes that resulted in increased membrane resistance to spontaneous hemolysis, decreased membrane microviscosity, maintenance of their structural integrity, and functional activity. The essential oil substantially decreased the LPO intensity in the liver and the brains of mice and increased the resistance of liver and brain lipids to oxidation and the activity of antioxidant enzymes in the liver. The most expressed bioantioxidant effect on erythrocytes was observed after clove oil treatment, whereas on the liver and brain, after treatment with a mixture of lemon essential oil and a ginger extract.

  3. Prospective estimation of organ dose in CT under tube current modulation

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Li, Xiang; Segars, W. Paul; Frush, Donald P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) has been widely used worldwide as a tool for medical diagnosis and imaging. However, despite its significant clinical benefits, CT radiation dose at the population level has become a subject of public attention and concern. In this light, optimizing radiation dose has become a core responsibility for the CT community. As a fundamental step to manage and optimize dose, it may be beneficial to have accurate and prospective knowledge about the radiation dose for an individual patient. In this study, the authors developed a framework to prospectively estimate organ dose for chest and abdominopelvic CT exams under tube current modulation (TCM). Methods: The organ dose is mainly dependent on two key factors: patient anatomy and irradiation field. A prediction process was developed to accurately model both factors. To model the anatomical diversity and complexity in the patient population, the authors used a previously developed library of computational phantoms with broad distributions of sizes, ages, and genders. A selected clinical patient, represented by a computational phantom in the study, was optimally matched with another computational phantom in the library to obtain a representation of the patient’s anatomy. To model the irradiation field, a previously validated Monte Carlo program was used to model CT scanner systems. The tube current profiles were modeled using a ray-tracing program as previously reported that theoretically emulated the variability of modulation profiles from major CT machine manufacturers Li et al., [Phys. Med. Biol. 59, 4525–4548 (2014)]. The prediction of organ dose was achieved using the following process: (1) CTDIvol-normalized-organ dose coefficients (horgan) for fixed tube current were first estimated as the prediction basis for the computational phantoms; (2) each computation phantom, regarded as a clinical patient, was optimally matched with one computational phantom in the library; (3) to account

  4. Prospective estimation of organ dose in CT under tube current modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Li, Xiang; Segars, W. Paul; Frush, Donald P.; Samei, Ehsan

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) has been widely used worldwide as a tool for medical diagnosis and imaging. However, despite its significant clinical benefits, CT radiation dose at the population level has become a subject of public attention and concern. In this light, optimizing radiation dose has become a core responsibility for the CT community. As a fundamental step to manage and optimize dose, it may be beneficial to have accurate and prospective knowledge about the radiation dose for an individual patient. In this study, the authors developed a framework to prospectively estimate organ dose for chest and abdominopelvic CT exams under tube current modulation (TCM). Methods: The organ dose is mainly dependent on two key factors: patient anatomy and irradiation field. A prediction process was developed to accurately model both factors. To model the anatomical diversity and complexity in the patient population, the authors used a previously developed library of computational phantoms with broad distributions of sizes, ages, and genders. A selected clinical patient, represented by a computational phantom in the study, was optimally matched with another computational phantom in the library to obtain a representation of the patient’s anatomy. To model the irradiation field, a previously validated Monte Carlo program was used to model CT scanner systems. The tube current profiles were modeled using a ray-tracing program as previously reported that theoretically emulated the variability of modulation profiles from major CT machine manufacturers Li et al., [Phys. Med. Biol. 59, 4525–4548 (2014)]. The prediction of organ dose was achieved using the following process: (1) CTDI{sub vol}-normalized-organ dose coefficients (h{sub organ}) for fixed tube current were first estimated as the prediction basis for the computational phantoms; (2) each computation phantom, regarded as a clinical patient, was optimally matched with one computational phantom in the library; (3

  5. Comparison of measured and estimated maximum skin doses during CT fluoroscopy lung biopsies

    SciTech Connect

    Zanca, F.; Jacobs, A.; Crijns, W.; De Wever, W.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To measure patient-specific maximum skin dose (MSD) associated with CT fluoroscopy (CTF) lung biopsies and to compare measured MSD with the MSD estimated from phantom measurements, as well as with the CTDIvol of patient examinations. Methods: Data from 50 patients with lung lesions who underwent a CT fluoroscopy-guided biopsy were collected. The CT protocol consisted of a low-kilovoltage (80 kV) protocol used in combination with an algorithm for dose reduction to the radiology staff during the interventional procedure, HandCare (HC). MSD was assessed during each intervention using EBT2 gafchromic films positioned on patient skin. Lesion size, position, total fluoroscopy time, and patient-effective diameter were registered for each patient. Dose rates were also estimated at the surface of a normal-size anthropomorphic thorax phantom using a 10 cm pencil ionization chamber placed at every 30°, for a full rotation, with and without HC. Measured MSD was compared with MSD values estimated from the phantom measurements and with the cumulative CTDIvol of the procedure. Results: The median measured MSD was 141 mGy (range 38–410 mGy) while the median cumulative CTDIvol was 72 mGy (range 24–262 mGy). The ratio between the MSD estimated from phantom measurements and the measured MSD was 0.87 (range 0.12–4.1) on average. In 72% of cases the estimated MSD underestimated the measured MSD, while in 28% of the cases it overestimated it. The same trend was observed for the ratio of cumulative CTDIvol and measured MSD. No trend was observed as a function of patient size. Conclusions: On average, estimated MSD from dose rate measurements on phantom as well as from CTDIvol of patient examinations underestimates the measured value of MSD. This can be attributed to deviations of the patient's body habitus from the standard phantom size and to patient positioning in the gantry during the procedure.

  6. The dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor linagliptin exhibits time- and dose-dependent localization in kidney, liver, and intestine after intravenous dosing: results from high resolution autoradiography in rats.

    PubMed

    Greischel, Andreas; Binder, Rudolf; Baierl, Juergen

    2010-09-01

    Linagliptin is an orally active dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor that is under development for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and shows dose-dependent pharmacokinetics in rats and humans. With microscopic autoradiography, the dose dependence of cellular distribution of [(3)H]linagliptin-related radioactivity was investigated in kidney at 3 h after intravenous injection of 7.4, 100, and 2000 microg/kg [(3)H]linagliptin. Furthermore, distribution of radioactivity in kidney, liver, and small intestine was investigated in relation to time (2 min, 3 h, and 192 h) after intravenous injection of 7.4 microg/kg [(3)H]linagliptin. The localization of radioactivity in the kidney at 3 h after administration of 7.4, 100, and 2000 microg/kg [(3)H]linagliptin changed with increasing dose from cortical glomeruli and parts of proximal tubule parts to parts of medullar proximal tubule. In addition, the compound distribution in the kidney shifted with time after administration of 7.4 microg/kg [(3)H]linagliptin from glomeruli (2 min) to the lower parts of proximal tubules (192 h). The radioactivity within proximal tubules was located primarily in the brush border. In the liver, the radioactivity persisted mainly around the portal triads and in the bile duct from 2 min to 192 h. In the small intestine, the radioactivity shifted from the lamina propria (2 min) to the surface of the villi and/or intestinal lumen (192 h). In conclusion, the cellular distribution pattern of [(3)H]linagliptin-related radioactivity reflected the known distribution of DPP-4. Together with the persistence of binding, this result supports the high relevance of DPP-4 binding of linagliptin for its pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics.

  7. Methodology for estimating radiation dose rates to freshwater biota exposed to radionuclides in the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Blaylock, B.G.; Frank, M.L.; O`Neal, B.R.

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a methodology for evaluating the potential for aquatic biota to incur effects from exposure to chronic low-level radiation in the environment. Aquatic organisms inhabiting an environment contaminated with radioactivity receive external radiation from radionuclides in water, sediment, and from other biota such as vegetation. Aquatic organisms receive internal radiation from radionuclides ingested via food and water and, in some cases, from radionuclides absorbed through the skin and respiratory organs. Dose rate equations, which have been developed previously, are presented for estimating the radiation dose rate to representative aquatic organisms from alpha, beta, and gamma irradiation from external and internal sources. Tables containing parameter values for calculating radiation doses from selected alpha, beta, and gamma emitters are presented in the appendix to facilitate dose rate calculations. The risk of detrimental effects to aquatic biota from radiation exposure is evaluated by comparing the calculated radiation dose rate to biota to the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) recommended dose rate limit of 0.4 mGy h{sup {minus}1} (1 rad d{sup {minus}1}). A dose rate no greater than 0.4 mGy h{sup {minus}1} to the most sensitive organisms should ensure the protection of populations of aquatic organisms. DOE`s recommended dose rate is based on a number of published reviews on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms that are summarized in the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Report No. 109 (NCRP 1991). DOE recommends that if the results of radiological models or dosimetric measurements indicate that a radiation dose rate of 0. 1 mGy h{sup {minus}1} will be exceeded, then a more detailed evaluation of the potential ecological consequences of radiation exposure to endemic populations should be conducted.

  8. Dose estimation for atomic bomb survivor studies: its evolution and present status.

    PubMed

    Cullings, Harry M; Fujita, Shoichiro; Funamoto, Sachiyo; Grant, Eric J; Kerr, George D; Preston, Dale L

    2006-07-01

    In the decade after the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, several large cohorts of survivors were organized for studies of radiation health effects. The U.S. Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) and its U.S./Japan successor, the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF), have performed continuous studies since then, with extensive efforts to collect data on survivor locations and shielding and to create systems to estimate individual doses from the bombs' neutrons and gamma rays. Several successive systems have been developed by extramural working groups and collaboratively implemented by ABCC and RERF investigators. We describe the cohorts and the history and evolution of dose estimation from early efforts through the newest system, DS02, emphasizing the technical development and use of DS02. We describe procedures and data developed at RERF to implement successive systems, including revised rosters of survivors, development of methods to calculate doses for some classes of persons not fitting criteria of the basic systems, and methods to correct for bias arising from errors in calculated doses. We summarize calculated doses and illustrate their change and elaboration through the various systems for a hypothetical example case in each city. We conclude with a description of current efforts and plans for further improvements.

  9. GLODEP2: a computer model for estimating gamma dose due to worldwide fallout of radioactive debris

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, L.L.; Harvey, T.F.; Peterson, K.R.

    1984-03-01

    The GLODEP2 computer code provides estimates of the surface deposition of worldwide radioactivity and the gamma-ray dose to man from intermediate and long-term fallout. The code is based on empirical models derived primarily from injection-deposition experience gained from the US and USSR nuclear tests in 1958. Under the assumption that a nuclear power facility is destroyed and that its debris behaves in the same manner as the radioactive cloud produced by the nuclear weapon that attached the facility, predictions are made for the gamma does from this source of radioactivity. As a comparison study the gamma dose due to the atmospheric nuclear tests from the period of 1951 to 1962 has been computed. The computed and measured values from Grove, UK and Chiba, Japan agree to within a few percent. The global deposition of radioactivity and resultant gamma dose from a hypothetical strategic nuclear exchange between the US and the USSR is reported. Of the assumed 5300 Mton in the exchange, 2031 Mton of radioactive debris is injected in the atmosphere. The highest estimated average whole body total integrated dose over 50 years (assuming no reduction by sheltering or weathering) is 23 rem in the 30 to 50 degree latitude band. If the attack included a 100 GW(e) nuclear power industry as targets in the US, this dose is increased to 84.6 rem. Hotspots due to rainfall could increase these values by factors of 10 to 50.

  10. Molybdenum target specifications for cyclotron production of 99mTc based on patient dose estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, X.; Tanguay, J.; Buckley, K.; Schaffer, P.; Bénard, F.; Ruth, T. J.; Celler, A.

    2016-01-01

    In response to the recognized fragility of reactor-produced 99Mo supply, direct production of 99mTc via 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc reaction using medical cyclotrons has been investigated. However, due to the existence of other Molybdenum (Mo) isotopes in the target, in parallel with 99mTc, other technetium (Tc) radioactive isotopes (impurities) will be produced. They will be incorporated into the labeled radiopharmaceuticals and result in increased patient dose. The isotopic composition of the target and beam energy are main factors that determine production of impurities, thus also dose increases. Therefore, they both must be considered when selecting targets for clinical 99mTc production. Although for any given Mo target, the patient dose can be predicted based on complicated calculations of production yields for each Tc radioisotope, it would be very difficult to reverse these calculations to specify target composition based on dosimetry considerations. In this article, a relationship between patient dosimetry and Mo target composition is studied. A simple and easy algorithm for dose estimation, based solely on the knowledge of target composition and beam energy, is described. Using this algorithm, the patient dose increase due to every Mo isotope that could be present in the target is estimated. Most importantly, a technique to determine Mo target composition thresholds that would meet any given dosimetry requirement is proposed.

  11. Estimation of external dose by car-borne survey in Kerala, India.

    PubMed

    Hosoda, Masahiro; Tokonami, Shinji; Omori, Yasutaka; Sahoo, Sarata Kumar; Akiba, Suminori; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Nair, Raghu Ram; Jayalekshmi, Padmavathy Amma; Sebastian, Paul; Iwaoka, Kazuki; Akata, Naofumi; Kudo, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    A car-borne survey was carried out in Kerala, India to estimate external dose. Measurements were made with a 3-in × 3-in NaI(Tl) scintillation spectrometer from September 23 to 27, 2013. The routes were selected from 12 Panchayats in Karunagappally Taluk which were classified into high level, mid-level and low level high background radiation (HBR) areas. A heterogeneous distribution of air kerma rates was seen in the dose rate distribution map. The maximum air kerma rate, 2.1 μGy/h, was observed on a beach sand surface. 232Th activity concentration for the beach sand was higher than that for soil and grass surfaces, and the range of activity concentration was estimated to be 0.7-2.3 kBq/kg. The contribution of 232Th to air kerma rate was over 70% at the measurement points with values larger than 0.34 μGy/h. The maximum value of the annual effective dose in Karunagappally Taluk was observed around coastal areas, and it was estimated to be 13 mSv/y. More than 30% of all the annual effective doses obtained in this survey exceeded 1 mSv/y.

  12. Estimation of External Dose by Car-Borne Survey in Kerala, India

    PubMed Central

    Hosoda, Masahiro; Tokonami, Shinji; Omori, Yasutaka; Sahoo, Sarata Kumar; Akiba, Suminori; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Nair, Raghu Ram; Jayalekshmi, Padmavathy Amma; Sebastian, Paul; Iwaoka, Kazuki; Akata, Naofumi; Kudo, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    A car-borne survey was carried out in Kerala, India to estimate external dose. Measurements were made with a 3-in × 3-in NaI(Tl) scintillation spectrometer from September 23 to 27, 2013. The routes were selected from 12 Panchayats in Karunagappally Taluk which were classified into high level, mid-level and low level high background radiation (HBR) areas. A heterogeneous distribution of air kerma rates was seen in the dose rate distribution map. The maximum air kerma rate, 2.1 μGy/h, was observed on a beach sand surface. 232Th activity concentration for the beach sand was higher than that for soil and grass surfaces, and the range of activity concentration was estimated to be 0.7–2.3 kBq/kg. The contribution of 232Th to air kerma rate was over 70% at the measurement points with values larger than 0.34 μGy/h. The maximum value of the annual effective dose in Karunagappally Taluk was observed around coastal areas, and it was estimated to be 13 mSv/y. More than 30% of all the annual effective doses obtained in this survey exceeded 1 mSv/y. PMID:25885680

  13. Estimated collective effective dose to the population from X-ray and nuclear medicine examinations in Finland.

    PubMed

    Bly, R; Järvinen, H; Korpela, M H; Tenkanen-Rautakoski, P; Mäkinen, A

    2011-09-01

    The collective effective doses to the population from X-ray and nuclear medicine (NM) examinations in Finland in 2008 and 2009, respectively, were estimated. The estimated collective effective dose per inhabitant was 0.45 mSv from X-ray examinations and 0.03 mSv from NM examinations. The collective effective doses per inhabitant have not changed substantially during the last 10 y. However, proportional dose due to CT examinations has increased from 50 % in 2005 to 58 % in 2009 of the total collective effective dose from all X-ray examinations and proportional dose of PET examinations from 7 to 13 % of the total collective effective dose from NM examinations. The collective effective dose from conventional plain radiography was over 20 % higher when estimated using the new (ICRP 103) tissue weighting factors than that obtained using the old (ICRP 60) tissue weighting factors.

  14. Estimating Radiological Doses to Predators Foraging in a Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Area

    SciTech Connect

    L.Soholt; G.Gonzales; P.Fresquez; K.Bennett; E.Lopez

    2003-03-01

    Since 1957, Los Alamos National Laboratory has operated Area G as its low-level, solid radioactive waste management and disposal area. Although the waste management area is developed, plants, small mammals, and avian and mammalian predators still occupy the less disturbed and revegetated portions of the land. For almost a decade, we have monitored the concentrations of selected radionuclides in soils, plants, and small mammals at Area G. The radionuclides tritium, plutonium-238, and plutonium-239 are regularly found at levels above regional background in all three media. Based on radionuclide concentrations in mice collected from 1994 to 1999, we calculated doses to higher trophic levels (owl, hawk, kestrel, and coyote) that forage on the waste management area. These predators play important functions in the regional ecosystems and are an important part of local Native American traditional tales that identify the uniqueness of their culture. The estimated doses are compared to Department of Energy's interim limit of 0.1 rad/day for the protection of terrestrial wildlife. We used exposure parameters that were derived from the literature for each receptor, including Environmental Protection Agency's exposure factors handbook. Estimated doses to predators ranged from 9E-06 to 2E-04 rad/day, assuming that they forage entirely on the waste management area. These doses are greater than those calculated for predators foraging exclusively in reference areas, but are still well below the interim dose limit. We believe that these calculated doses represent upper-bound estimates of exposure for local predators because the larger predators forage over areas that are much greater than the 63-acre waste management area. Based on these results, we concluded that predators foraging on this area do not face a hazard from radiological exposure under current site conditions.

  15. Estimating Effective Dose from Phantom Dose Measurements in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation Procedures and Comparison of MOSFET and TLD Detectors in a Small Animal Dosimetry Setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson-Evans, Colin David

    Two different studies will be presented in this work. The first involves the calculation of effective dose from a phantom study which simulates an atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation procedure. The second involves the validation of metal-oxide semiconducting field effect transistors (MOSFET) for small animal dosimetry applications as well as improved characterization of the animal irradiators on Duke University's campus. Atrial Fibrillation is an ever increasing health risk in the United States. The most common type of cardiac arrhythmia, AF is associated with increased mortality and ischemic cerebrovascular events. Managing AF can include, among other treatments, an interventional procedure called catheter ablation. The procedure involves the use of biplane fluoroscopy during which a patient can be exposed to radiation for as much as two hours or more. The deleterious effects of radiation become a concern when dealing with long fluoroscopy times, and because the AF ablation procedure is elective, it makes relating the risks of radiation ever more essential. This study hopes to quantify the risk through the derivation of dose conversion coefficients (DCCs) from the dose-area product (DAP) with the intent that DCCs can be used to provide estimates of effective dose (ED) for typical AF ablation procedures. A bi-plane fluoroscopic and angiographic system was used for the simulated AF ablation procedures. For acquisition of organ dose measurements, 20 diagnostic MOSFET detectors were placed at selected organs in a male anthropomorphic phantom, and these detectors were attached to 4 bias supplies to obtain organ dose readings. The DAP was recorded from the system console and independently validated with an ionization chamber and radiochromic film. Bi-plane fluoroscopy was performed on the phantom for 10 minutes to acquire the dose rate for each organ, and the average clinical procedure time was multiplied by each organ dose rate to obtain individual organ doses. The

  16. Estimating radiation effective doses from whole body computed tomography scans based on U.S. soldier patient height and weight

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to explore how a patient's height and weight can be used to predict the effective dose to a reference phantom with similar height and weight from a chest abdomen pelvis computed tomography scan when machine-based parameters are unknown. Since machine-based scanning parameters can be misplaced or lost, a predictive model will enable the medical professional to quantify a patient's cumulative radiation dose. Methods One hundred mathematical phantoms of varying heights and weights were defined within an x-ray Monte Carlo based software code in order to calculate organ absorbed doses and effective doses from a chest abdomen pelvis scan. Regression analysis was used to develop an effective dose predictive model. The regression model was experimentally verified using anthropomorphic phantoms and validated against a real patient population. Results Estimates of the effective doses as calculated by the predictive model were within 10% of the estimates of the effective doses using experimentally measured absorbed doses within the anthropomorphic phantoms. Comparisons of the patient population effective doses show that the predictive model is within 33% of current methods of estimating effective dose using machine-based parameters. Conclusions A patient's height and weight can be used to estimate the effective dose from a chest abdomen pelvis computed tomography scan. The presented predictive model can be used interchangeably with current effective dose estimating techniques that rely on computed tomography machine-based techniques. PMID:22004072

  17. Estimates of intakes and internal doses from ingestion of {sup 32}P at MIT and NIH

    SciTech Connect

    Stabin, M.G.; Toohey, R.E.

    1996-06-01

    A researcher at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) became internally contaminated with {sup 32}P, probably due to an intentional act. The incident occurred on or about 14 August 1995. Subsequent measurement of activity in urine and a single whole body count were used to estimate the individual`s intake, with the assumption of ingestion as the route of intake. Two separate Sets of urine data were analyzed-one supplied by MIT and one from independent analyses of urine samples conducted at Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE); the former data set contained 35 samples, the latter 49. In addition, the results of 35 whole body counts, provided by MIT from a chair-type counter calibrated for 32p, were used to obtain a separate estimate of intake. The kinetic model for 32P proposed in ICRP Publication 30 and implemented in NUREG/CR-4884 was used to interpret the data. The data were analyzed using both the weighted and unweighted least squares techniques. All of the intake estimates were in very good agreement with each other, ranging from 18-22 MBq. Based on the dose model in ICRP 30, this would indicate a committed effective dose equivalent of 38-46 mSv. The incident was helpful in assessing the value of the least squares techniques in determining estimates of intake and dose. The ICRP model tended to slightly overestimate the whole body retention data and underestimate the urinary excretion at later times. Further results obtained by visual best fit and development of an individual-specific kinetic and dose model will also be discussed. This incident was quite similar to another case of ingestion of 32p that occurred at the National Institute of Health (NIH) on 28 June 1995. Dose assessment for the NIH case will also be presented if the data are available for public release.

  18. Estimation of contrast agent bolus arrival delays for improved reproducibility of liver DCE MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouhan, Manil D.; Bainbridge, Alan; Atkinson, David; Punwani, Shonit; Mookerjee, Rajeshwar P.; Lythgoe, Mark F.; Taylor, Stuart A.

    2016-10-01

    Delays between contrast agent (CA) arrival at the site of vascular input function (VIF) sampling and the tissue of interest affect dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI pharmacokinetic modelling. We investigate effects of altering VIF CA bolus arrival delays on liver DCE MRI perfusion parameters, propose an alternative approach to estimating delays and evaluate reproducibility. Thirteen healthy volunteers (28.7  ±  1.9 years, seven males) underwent liver DCE MRI using dual-input single compartment modelling, with reproducibility (n  =  9) measured at 7 days. Effects of VIF CA bolus arrival delays were assessed for arterial and portal venous input functions. Delays were pre-estimated using linear regression, with restricted free modelling around the pre-estimated delay. Perfusion parameters and 7 days reproducibility were compared using this method, freely modelled delays and no delays using one-way ANOVA. Reproducibility was assessed using Bland-Altman analysis of agreement. Maximum percent change relative to parameters obtained using zero delays, were  -31% for portal venous (PV) perfusion, +43% for total liver blood flow (TLBF), +3247% for hepatic arterial (HA) fraction, +150% for mean transit time and  -10% for distribution volume. Differences were demonstrated between the 3 methods for PV perfusion (p  =  0.0085) and HA fraction (p  <  0.0001), but not other parameters. Improved mean differences and Bland-Altman 95% Limits-of-Agreement for reproducibility of PV perfusion (9.3 ml/min/100 g, ±506.1 ml/min/100 g) and TLBF (43.8 ml/min/100 g, ±586.7 ml/min/100 g) were demonstrated using pre-estimated delays with constrained free modelling. CA bolus arrival delays cause profound differences in liver DCE MRI quantification. Pre-estimation of delays with constrained free modelling improved 7 days reproducibility of perfusion parameters in volunteers.

  19. Correlation of clinical outcome to the estimated radiation dose from Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Chadha, M.; Coderre, J.A.; Chanana, A.D.

    1996-12-31

    A phase I/II trial delivering a single fraction of BNCT using p-Boronophenylalanine-Fructose and epithermal neutrons at the the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor was initiated in September 1994. The primary endpiont of the study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of a given BNCT dose. The clinical outcome of the disease was a secondary endpoint of the study. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the correlation of the clinical outcome of patients to the estimated radiation dose from BNCT.

  20. Thyroid Remnant Estimation by Diagnostic Dose (131)I Scintigraphy or (99m)TcO4(-) Scintigraphy after Thyroidectomy: A Comparison with Therapeutic Dose (131)I Imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guanghui; Li, Na; Li, Xuena; Chen, Song; Du, Bulin; Li, Yaming

    2016-01-01

    In this clinical study, we have compared routine diagnostic dose (131)I scan and (99m)TcO4(-) thyroid scintigraphy with therapeutic dose (131)I imaging for accurate thyroid remnant estimation after total thyroidectomy. We conducted a retrospective review of the patients undergoing total thyroidectomy for differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) and subsequently receiving radioactive iodine (RAI) treatment to ablate remnant thyroid tissue. All patients had therapeutic dose RAI whole body scan, which was compared with that of diagnostic dose RAI, (99m)TcO4(-) thyroid scan, and ultrasound examination. We concluded that therapeutic dose RAI scan reveals some extent thyroid remnant in all DTC patients following total thyroidectomy. Diagnostic RAI scan is much superior to ultrasound and (99m)TcO4(-) thyroid scan for the postoperative estimation of thyroid remnant. Ultrasound and (99m)TcO4(-) thyroid scan provide little information for thyroid remnant estimation and, therefore, would not replace diagnostic RAI scan.

  1. Dose-response relationship for rat liver DNA damage caused by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine.

    PubMed

    Kitchin, K T; Brown, J L

    1996-12-02

    An experimental approach was taken to the question of dose-response curves for chemical carcinogenesis, using DNA damage as a biomarker. Female rats were give 13 different doses of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (from 1.4 to 135,000 micrograms/kg) and the subsequent hepatic DNA damage was determined by the alkaline elution technique. DMH doses below 450 micrograms/kg did not significantly damage DNA; all DMH doses of 1000 micrograms/kg or higher damaged rat hepatic DNA (P < 0.05). In this study the x values (dose) ranged over five orders of magnitude and the y values (DNA damage) ranged 30-fold. Ten different regression models (linear, quadratic, cubic, power, and six nonlinear transition models) were compared in their ability to fit the experimental data. With respect to log transformed dose, the six nonlinear transition equations fit the data considerably better than the four power type of equations. A sigmoid model fit to the log transformed dose of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine had an r2 of 0.9979, a degree of freedom adjusted r2 of 0.9969, a F-statistic of 1,457, and a fit standard error of 0.50. With respect to untransformed dose, only three equations (sigmoid, cascade and gaussian cumulative) could creditably fit the DMH data. The experimental results are interpreted with respect to hormesis, use of log transformed dose, sigmoid dose-response models, thresholds of biological response and cancer risk assessment.

  2. Methodology for Estimating Radiation Dose Rates to Freshwater Biota Exposed to Radionuclides in the Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Blaylock, B.G.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a methodology for evaluating the potential for aquatic biota to incur effects from exposure to chronic low-level radiation in the environment. Aquatic organisms inhabiting an environment contaminated with radioactivity receive external radiation from radionuclides in water, sediment, and from other biota such as vegetation. Aquatic organisms receive internal radiation from radionuclides ingested via food and water and, in some cases, from radionuclides absorbed through the skin and respiratory organs. Dose rate equations, which have been developed previously, are presented for estimating the radiation dose rate to representative aquatic organisms from alpha, beta, and gamma irradiation from external and internal sources. Tables containing parameter values for calculating radiation doses from selected alpha, beta, and gamma emitters are presented in the appendix to facilitate dose rate calculations. The risk of detrimental effects to aquatic biota from radiation exposure is evaluated by comparing the calculated radiation dose rate to biota to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) recommended dose rate limit of 0.4 mGy h{sup -1} (1 rad d{sup -1}). A dose rate no greater than 0.4 mGy h{sup -1} to the most sensitive organisms should ensure the protection of populations of aquatic organisms. DOE's recommended dose rate is based on a number of published reviews on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms that are summarized in the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Report No. 109 (NCRP 1991). The literature identifies the developing eggs and young of some species of teleost fish as the most radiosensitive organisms. DOE recommends that if the results of radiological models or dosimetric measurements indicate that a radiation dose rate of 0.1 mGy h{sup -1} will be exceeded, then a more detailed evaluation of the potential ecological consequences of radiation exposure to endemic populations should be

  3. Superiority of helical tomotherapy on liver sparing and dose escalation in hepatocellular carcinoma: a comparison study of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qianqian; Wang, Renben; Zhu, Jian; Jin, Linzhi; Zhu, Kunli; Xu, Xiaoqing; Feng, Rui; Jiang, Shumei; Qi, Zhonghua; Yin, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose To compare the difference of liver sparing and dose escalation between three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and helical tomotherapy (HT) for hepatocellular carcinoma. Patients and methods Sixteen unresectable HCC patients were enrolled in this study. First, some evaluation factors of 3DCRT, IMRT, and HT plans were calculated with prescription dose at 50 Gy/25 fractions. Then, the doses were increased using HT or IMRT independently until either the plans reached 70 Gy or any normal tissue reached the dose limit according to quantitative analysis of normal tissue effects in the clinic criteria. Results The conformal index of 3DCRT was lower than that of IMRT (P<0.001) or HT (P<0.001), and the homogeneity index of 3DCRT was higher than that of IMRT (P<0.001) or HT (P<0.001). HT took the longest treatment time (P<0.001). For V50% (fraction of normal liver treated to at least 50% of the isocenter dose) of the normal liver, there was a significant difference: 3DCRT > IMRT > HT (P<0.001). HT had a lower Dmean (mean dose) and V20 (Vn, the percentage of organ volume receiving ≥n Gy) of liver compared with 3DCRT (P=0.005 and P=0.005, respectively) or IMRT (P=0.508 and P=0.007, respectively). Dmean of nontarget normal liver and V30 of liver were higher for 3DCRT than IMRT (P=0.005 and P=0.005, respectively) or HT (P=0.005 and P=0.005, respectively). Seven patients in IMRT (43.75%) and nine patients in HT (56.25%) reached the isodose 70 Gy, meeting the dose limit of the organs at risk. Conclusion HT may provide significantly better liver sparing and allow more patients to achieve higher prescription dose in HCC radiotherapy. PMID:27445485

  4. Radiation-Induced Leukemia at Doses Relevant to Radiation Therapy: Modeling Mechanisms and Estimating Risks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuryak, Igor; Sachs, Rainer K.; Hlatky, Lynn; Mark P. Little; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Brenner, David J.

    2006-01-01

    Because many cancer patients are diagnosed earlier and live longer than in the past, second cancers induced by radiation therapy have become a clinically significant issue. An earlier biologically based model that was designed to estimate risks of high-dose radiation induced solid cancers included initiation of stem cells to a premalignant state, inactivation of stem cells at high radiation doses, and proliferation of stem cells during cellular repopulation after inactivation. This earlier model predicted the risks of solid tumors induced by radiation therapy but overestimated the corresponding leukemia risks. Methods: To extend the model to radiation-induced leukemias, we analyzed in addition to cellular initiation, inactivation, and proliferation a repopulation mechanism specific to the hematopoietic system: long-range migration through the blood stream of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from distant locations. Parameters for the model were derived from HSC biologic data in the literature and from leukemia risks among atomic bomb survivors v^ ho were subjected to much lower radiation doses. Results: Proliferating HSCs that migrate from sites distant from the high-dose region include few preleukemic HSCs, thus decreasing the high-dose leukemia risk. The extended model for leukemia provides risk estimates that are consistent with epidemiologic data for leukemia risk associated with radiation therapy over a wide dose range. For example, when applied to an earlier case-control study of 110000 women undergoing radiotherapy for uterine cancer, the model predicted an excess relative risk (ERR) of 1.9 for leukemia among women who received a large inhomogeneous fractionated external beam dose to the bone marrow (mean = 14.9 Gy), consistent with the measured ERR (2.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.2 to 6.4; from 3.6 cases expected and 11 cases observed). As a corresponding example for brachytherapy, the predicted ERR of 0.80 among women who received an inhomogeneous low-dose

  5. Potential Offsite Radiological Doses Estimated for the Proposed Divine Strake Experiment, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Ron Warren

    2006-12-01

    An assessment of the potential radiation dose that residents offsite of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) might receive from the proposed Divine Strake experiment was made to determine compliance with Subpart H of Part 61 of Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities. The Divine Strake experiment, proposed by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, consists of a detonation of 700 tons of heavy ammonium nitrate fuel oil-emulsion above the U16b Tunnel complex in Area 16 of the NTS. Both natural radionuclides suspended, and historic fallout radionuclides resuspended from the detonation, have potential to be transported outside the NTS boundary by wind. They may, therefore, contribute radiological dose to the public. Subpart H states ''Emissions of radionuclides to the ambient air from Department of Energy facilities shall not exceed those amounts that would cause any member of the public to receive in any year an effective dose equivalent of 10 mrem/yr'' (Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 61.92) where mrem/yr is millirem per year. Furthermore, application for U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approval of construction of a new source or modification of an existing source is required if the effective dose equivalent, caused by all emissions from the new construction or modification, is greater than or equal to 0.1 mrem/yr (40 CFR 61.96). In accordance with Section 61.93, a dose assessment was conducted with the computer model CAP88-PC, Version 3.0. In addition to this model, a dose assessment was also conducted by the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This modeling was conducted to obtain dose estimates from a model designed for acute releases and which addresses terrain effects and uses meteorology from multiple locations. Potential radiation dose to a hypothetical maximally

  6. Low-dose interleukin-2 promotes STAT-5 phosphorylation, Treg survival and CTLA-4-dependent function in autoimmune liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, H C; Jeffery, L E; Lutz, P; Corrigan, M; Webb, G J; Hirschfield, G M; Adams, D H; Oo, Y H

    2017-02-08

    CD4(+) CD25(high) CD127(low) forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3(+) ) regulatory T cells (Treg ) are essential for the maintenance of peripheral tolerance. Impaired Treg function and an imbalance between effector and Tregs contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. We reported recently that the hepatic microenvironment is deficient in interleukin (IL)-2, a cytokine essential for Treg survival and function. Consequently, few liver-infiltrating Treg demonstrate signal transducer and activator of transcription-5 (STAT-5) phosphorylation. To establish the potential of IL-2 to enhance Treg therapy, we investigated the effects of very low dose Proleukin (VLDP) on the phosphorylation of STAT-5 and the subsequent survival and function of Treg and T effector cells from the blood and livers of patients with autoimmune liver diseases. VLDP, at less than 5 IU/ml, resulted in selective phosphorylation of STAT-5 in Treg but not effector T cells or natural killer cells and associated with increased expression of cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4), FoxP3 and CD25 and the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 in Treg with the greatest enhancement of regulatory phenotype in the effector memory Treg population. VLDP also maintained expression of the liver-homing chemokine receptor CXCR3. VLDP enhanced Treg function in a CTLA-4-dependent manner. These findings open new avenues for future VLDP cytokine therapy alone or in combination with clinical grade Treg in autoimmune liver diseases, as VLDP could not only enhance regulatory phenotype and functional property but also the survival of intrahepatic Treg .

  7. Repeated dose liver micronucleus assay using adult mice with multiple genotoxicity assays concurrently performed as a combination test.

    PubMed

    Hagio, Soichiro; Furukawa, Satoshi; Abe, Masayoshi; Kuroda, Yusuke; Hayashi, Seigo; Ogawa, Izumi

    2014-06-01

    Recently, the liver micronucleus (MN) assay using young adult rats with repeated administrations has been investigated by employing a new method without partial hepatectomy or in situcollagenase perfusion as the repeated dose liver MN (RDLMN) assay by Narumi et al. (2012). In our study, in order to investigate the possibility of the RDLMN assay using young adult mice instead of rats and the feasibility of employing some genotoxicity assays along with the RDLMN assay as a combination test, two genotoxic carcinogens (N,N-diethylnitrosoamine (DEN) and cisplatin (CIS)) and a nongenotoxic carcinogen (phenobarbital sodium (PHE)) were administered to mice for 15 or 29 days. Then, the liver MN assay, peripheral blood (PB) MN assay and comet assay using the liver and kidney were concurrently performed as a combination test. DEN showed positive responses to all endpoints except MN induction in PB after 15 days of repeat administration. A cross-linking agent, CIS, showed MN induction in liver after 29 days of repeat administration, and in PB after 15 and 29 days of repeat administration, although the comet assay yielded negative responses for both organs at both sampling times. PHE yielded negative responses for all endpoints. In conclusion, it is suggested that the RDLMN assay using mice is a feasible method to be integrated into the general repeated toxicity test along with the combination assays, i.e., comet assay or PB MN assay, which would help in risk assessment for carcinogenicity by comparing the results of combination assays with each other.

  8. Estimation of organ doses from kilovoltage cone-beam CT imaging used during radiotherapy patient position verification

    SciTech Connect

    Hyer, Daniel E.; Hintenlang, David E.

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a practical method for estimating organ doses from kilovoltage cone-beam CT (CBCT) that can be performed with readily available phantoms and dosimeters. The accuracy of organ dose estimates made using the ImPACT patient dose calculator was also evaluated. Methods: A 100 mm pencil chamber and standard CT dose index (CTDI) phantoms were used to measure the cone-beam dose index (CBDI). A weighted CBDI (CBDI{sup w}) was then calculated from these measurements to represent the average volumetric dose in the CTDI phantom. By comparing CBDI{sup w} to the previously published organ doses, organ dose conversion coefficients were developed. The measured CBDI values were also used as inputs for the ImPACT calculator to estimate organ doses. All CBDI dose measurements were performed on both the Elekta XVI and Varian OBI at three clinically relevant locations: Head, chest, and pelvis. Results: The head, chest, and pelvis protocols yielded CBDI{sup w} values of 0.98, 16.62, and 24.13 mGy for the XVI system and 5.17, 6.14, and 21.57 mGy for the OBI system, respectively. Organ doses estimated with the ImPACT CT dose calculator showed a large range of variation from the previously measured organ doses, demonstrating its limitations for use with CBCT. Conclusions: The organ dose conversion coefficients developed in this work relate CBDI{sup w} values to organ doses previously measured using the same clinical protocols. Ultimately, these coefficients will allow for the quick estimation of organ doses from routine measurements performed using standard CTDI phantoms and pencil chambers.

  9. Estimated dose to man from uranium milling via the terrestrial food-chain pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Rayno, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    One of the major pathways of radiological exposure to man from uranium milling operations is through the terrestrial food chain. Studies by various investigators have shown the extent of uptake and distribution of U-238, U-234, Th-230, Ra-226, Pb-210, and Po-210 in plants and animals. These long-lived natural radioisotopes, all nuclides of the uranium decay series, are found in concentrated amounts in uranium mill tailings. Data from these investigations are used to estimate the dose to man from consumption of beef and milk contaminated by the tailings. This dose estimate from this technologically enhanced source is compared with that from average normal dietary intake of these radionuclides from natural sources.

  10. Estimated dose to man from uranium milling via the beef/milk food-chain pathway.

    PubMed

    Rayno, D R

    1983-12-01

    One of the major pathways of radiological exposure to man from uranium milling operations is through the beef/milk food chain. Studies by various investigators have shown the extent of uptake and distribution of 238U, 234U, 230Th, 226Ra, 210Pb, and 210Po in plants and cattle. These long-lived natural radioisotopes, all nuclides of the uranium decay series, are found in concentrated amounts in uranium mill tailings. In this paper, data from these investigations are used to estimate the dose to man from consumption of beef and milk from cattle that have fed on forage contaminated with the tailings. The estimated doses from this technologically enhanced source are compared with those resulting from average dietary intake of these radionuclides from natural sources.

  11. Estimation of the radiation dose in man due to 6-(/sup 18/F) fluoro-L-dopa

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, J.; Firnau, G.; Garnett, E.S.

    1985-08-01

    The radiation dose to the organs of the human body after an intravenous administration of 6-(/sup 18/F) fluoro-L-dopa was estimated using the recommendations of the International Committee on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The bladder wall received the highest dose, and as a consequence the dose to the genitalia was high. The major organs received a dose of 5.66E- 12 to 1.87E- 11 Sv/Bq (20 to 60 mrem/mCi). The effective dose equivalent was estimated at 5.39E- 11 Sv/Bq (200 mrem/mCi).

  12. Estimates of Radiation Doses and Cancer Risk from Food Intake in Korea

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate internal radiation doses and lifetime cancer risk from food ingestion. Radiation doses from food intake were calculated using the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and the measured radioactivity of 134Cs, 137Cs, and 131I from the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety in Korea. Total number of measured data was 8,496 (3,643 for agricultural products, 644 for livestock products, 43 for milk products, 3,193 for marine products, and 973 for processed food). Cancer risk was calculated by multiplying the estimated committed effective dose and the detriment adjusted nominal risk coefficients recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Protection. The lifetime committed effective doses from the daily diet are ranged 2.957-3.710 mSv. Excess lifetime cancer risks are 14.4-18.1, 0.4-0.5, and 1.8-2.3 per 100,000 for all solid cancers combined, thyroid cancer, and leukemia, respectively. PMID:26770031

  13. Radiation Dose and Cancer Risk Estimates in 16-Slice Computed Tomography Coronary Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Einstein, Andrew J.; Sanz, Javier; Dellegrottaglie, Santo; Milite, Margherita; Sirol, Marc; Henzlova, Milena; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2008-01-01

    Background Recent advances have led to a rapid increase in the number of computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) studies performed. While several studies have reported effective dose (E), there is no data available on cancer risk for current CTCA protocols. Methods and Results E and organ doses were estimated, using scanner-derived parameters and Monte Carlo methods, for 50 patients having 16-slice CTCA performed for clinical indications. Lifetime attributable risks (LARs) were estimated with models developed in the National Academies’ Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation VII report. E of a complete CTCA averaged 9.5 mSv, while that of a complete study, including calcium scoring when indicated, averaged 11.7 mSv. Calcium scoring increased E by 25%, while tube current modulation reduced it by 34% and was more effective at lower heart rates. Organ doses were highest to the lungs and female breast. LAR of cancer incidence from CTCA averaged approximately 1 in 1600, but varied widely between patients, being highest in younger women. For all patients, the greatest risk was from lung cancer. Conclusions CTCA is associated with non-negligible risk of malignancy. Doses can be reduced by careful attention to scanning protocol. PMID:18371595

  14. Estimates of Radiation Doses and Cancer Risk from Food Intake in Korea.

    PubMed

    Moon, Eun-Kyeong; Ha, Wi-Ho; Seo, Songwon; Jin, Young Woo; Jeong, Kyu Hwan; Yoon, Hae-Jung; Kim, Hyoung-Soo; Hwang, Myung-Sil; Choi, Hoon; Lee, Won Jin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate internal radiation doses and lifetime cancer risk from food ingestion. Radiation doses from food intake were calculated using the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and the measured radioactivity of (134)Cs, (137)Cs, and (131)I from the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety in Korea. Total number of measured data was 8,496 (3,643 for agricultural products, 644 for livestock products, 43 for milk products, 3,193 for marine products, and 973 for processed food). Cancer risk was calculated by multiplying the estimated committed effective dose and the detriment adjusted nominal risk coefficients recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Protection. The lifetime committed effective doses from the daily diet are ranged 2.957-3.710 mSv. Excess lifetime cancer risks are 14.4-18.1, 0.4-0.5, and 1.8-2.3 per 100,000 for all solid cancers combined, thyroid cancer, and leukemia, respectively.

  15. Estimated UV doses to psoriasis patients during climate therapy at Gran Canaria in March 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsen, L. T. N.; Søyland, E.; Krogstad, A. L.

    2008-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease involving about 2-3% of the Norwegian population. Sun exposure has a positive effect on most psoriasis lesions, but ultraviolet (UV) radiation also causes a direct DNA damage in the skin cells and comprises a carcinogenic potential. UV exposure on the skin causes a local as well as a systemic immune suppressive effect, but the relation between sun exposure and these biological effects is not well known. In March 2006 a study was carried out to investigate possible therapeutic outcome mechanisms in 20 psoriasis patients receiving climate therapy at Gran Canaria. This paper presents estimates of their individual skin UV-doses based on UV measurements and the patients' diaries with information on time spent in the sun. On the first day of exposure the patients received on average 5.1 Standard Erythema Doses (SED: median=4.0 SED, range 2.6-10.3 SED) estimated to the skin. During the 15 days study they received 165.8 SED (range 104.3-210.1 SED). The reduction in PASI score was 72.8% on average, but there was no obvious relation between the improvement and the UV dose. The UV doses were higher than those found from climate therapy studies at other locations. It seems beneficial to use more strict exposure schedules that consider the available UV irradiance, depending on time of the day, time of the year and weather conditions.

  16. A comparison of analytic models for estimating dose equivalent rates in shielding with beam spill measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Frankle, S.C.; Fitzgerald, D.H.; Hutson, R.L.; Macek, R.J.; Wilkinson, C.A.

    1992-12-31

    A comparison of 800-MeV proton beam spill measurements at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) with analytical model calculations of neutron dose equivalent rates (DER) show agreement within factors of 2-3 for simple shielding geometries. The DER estimates were based on a modified Moyer model for transverse angles and a Monte Carlo based forward angle model described in the proceeding paper.

  17. Considerations on Estimating Upper Bounds of Neutron Doses Equivalents to Military Participants at Atmospheric Nuclear Tests

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    Tissue kerma for monoenergetic neutrons of energy up to 14 MeV and contributions from different interactions that produce charged ionizing particles...fluence for each energy group obtained from calculations for monoenergetic neutrons similar to calculations in Figure 2-I, and the energy dependence of the...Considerations on Estimating Upper Bounds of Neutron Dose Equivalents to Military Partici pants at Atmospheric Nuclear Tests Approved for public release

  18. Low-Dose Liver-Targeted Gene Therapy for Pompe Disease Enhances Therapeutic Efficacy of ERT via Immune Tolerance Induction.

    PubMed

    Han, Sang-Oh; Ronzitti, Giuseppe; Arnson, Benjamin; Leborgne, Christian; Li, Songtao; Mingozzi, Federico; Koeberl, Dwight

    2017-03-17

    Pompe disease results from acid α-glucosidase (GAA) deficiency, and enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant human (rh) GAA has clinical benefits, although its limitations include the short half-life of GAA and the formation of antibody responses. The present study compared the efficacy of ERT against gene transfer with an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector containing a liver-specific promoter. GAA knockout (KO) mice were administered either a weekly injection of rhGAA (20 mg/kg) or a single injection of AAV2/8-LSPhGAA (8 × 10(11) vector genomes [vg]/kg). Both treatments significantly reduced glycogen content of the heart and diaphragm. Although ERT triggered anti-GAA antibody formation, there was no detectable antibody response following AAV vector administration. The efficacy of three lower dosages of AAV2/8-LSPhGAA was evaluated in GAA-KO mice, either alone or in combination with ERT. The minimum effective dose (MED) identified was 8 × 10(10) vg/kg to reduce glycogen content in the heart and diaphragm of GAA-KO mice. A 3-fold higher dose was required to suppress antibody responses to ERT. Efficacy from liver gene therapy was slightly greater in male mice than in female mice. Vector dose correlated inversely with anti-GAA antibody formation, whereas higher vector doses suppressed previously formed anti-GAA antibodies as late as 25 weeks after the start of ERT and achieved biochemical correction of glycogen accumulation. In conclusion, we identified the MED for effective AAV2/8-LSPhGAA-mediated tolerogenic gene therapy in Pompe disease mice.

  19. A revised burial dose estimation procedure for optical dating of youngand modern-age sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arnold, L.J.; Roberts, R.G.; Galbraith, R.F.; DeLong, S.B.

    2009-01-01

    The presence of genuinely zero-age or near-zero-age grains in modern-age and very young samples poses a problem for many existing burial dose estimation procedures used in optical (optically stimulated luminescence, OSL) dating. This difficulty currently necessitates consideration of relatively simplistic and statistically inferior age models. In this study, we investigate the potential for using modified versions of the statistical age models of Galbraith et??al. [Galbraith, R.F., Roberts, R.G., Laslett, G.M., Yoshida, H., Olley, J.M., 1999. Optical dating of single and multiple grains of quartz from Jinmium rock shelter, northern Australia: Part I, experimental design and statistical models. Archaeometry 41, 339-364.] to provide reliable equivalent dose (De) estimates for young and modern-age samples that display negative, zero or near-zero De estimates. For this purpose, we have revised the original versions of the central and minimum age models, which are based on log-transformed De values, so that they can be applied to un-logged De estimates and their associated absolute standard errors. The suitability of these 'un-logged' age models is tested using a series of known-age fluvial samples deposited within two arroyo systems from the American Southwest. The un-logged age models provide accurate burial doses and final OSL ages for roughly three-quarters of the total number of samples considered in this study. Sensitivity tests reveal that the un-logged versions of the central and minimum age models are capable of producing accurate burial dose estimates for modern-age and very young (<350??yr) fluvial samples that contain (i) more than 20% of well-bleached grains in their De distributions, or (ii) smaller sub-populations of well-bleached grains for which the De values are known with high precision. Our results indicate that the original (log-transformed) versions of the central and minimum age models are still preferable for most routine dating applications

  20. Modified Maxium Likelihood Estimation Method for Completely Separated and Quasi-Completely Separated Data for a Dose-Response Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    MODIFIED MAXIMUM LIKELIHOOD ESTIMATION METHOD FOR COMPLETELY SEPARATED AND QUASI-COMPLETELY SEPARATED DATA...Likelihood Estimation Method for Completely Separated and Quasi-Completely Separated Data for a Dose-Response Model 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...quasi-completely separated , the traditional maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) method generates infinite estimates. The bias-reduction (BR) method

  1. Dose rate estimation of the Tohoku hynobiid salamander, Hynobius lichenatus, in Fukushima.

    PubMed

    Fuma, Shoichi; Ihara, Sadao; Kawaguchi, Isao; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Watanabe, Yoshito; Kubota, Yoshihisa; Sato, Youji; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Aono, Tatsuo; Ishii, Nobuyoshi; Soeda, Haruhi; Matsui, Kumi; Une, Yumi; Minamiya, Yukio; Yoshida, Satoshi

    2015-05-01

    The radiological risks to the Tohoku hynobiid salamanders (class Amphibia), Hynobius lichenatus due to the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident were assessed in Fukushima Prefecture, including evacuation areas. Aquatic egg clutches (n = 1 for each sampling date and site; n = 4 in total), overwintering larvae (n = 1-5 for each sampling date and site; n = 17 in total), and terrestrial juveniles or adults (n = 1 or 3 for each sampling date and site; n = 12 in total) of H. lichenatus were collected from the end of April 2011 to April 2013. Environmental media such as litter (n = 1-5 for each sampling date and site; n = 30 in total), soil (n = 1-8 for each sampling date and site; n = 31 in total), water (n = 1 for each sampling date and site; n = 17 in total), and sediment (n = 1 for each sampling date and site; n = 17 in total) were also collected. Activity concentrations of (134)Cs + (137)Cs were 1.9-2800, 0.13-320, and 0.51-220 kBq (dry kg) (-1) in the litter, soil, and sediment samples, respectively, and were 0.31-220 and <0.29-40 kBq (wet kg)(-1) in the adult and larval salamanders, respectively. External and internal absorbed dose rates to H. lichenatus were calculated from these activity concentration data, using the ERICA Assessment Tool methodology. External dose rates were also measured in situ with glass dosimeters. There was agreement within a factor of 2 between the calculated and measured external dose rates. In the most severely contaminated habitat of this salamander, a northern part of Abukuma Mountains, the highest total dose rates were estimated to be 50 and 15 μGy h(-1) for the adults and overwintering larvae, respectively. Growth and survival of H. lichenatus was not affected at a dose rate of up to 490 μGy h(-1) in the previous laboratory chronic gamma-irradiation experiment, and thus growth and survival of this salamander would not be affected, even in the most severely contaminated habitat in Fukushima Prefecture. However, further

  2. Adaptive urn designs for estimating several percentiles of a dose--response curve.

    PubMed

    Mugno, Raymond; Zhus, Wei; Rosenberger, William F

    2004-07-15

    Dose--response experiments are crucial in biomedical studies. There are usually multiple objectives in such experiments and among the goals is the estimation of several percentiles on the dose--response curve. Here we present the first non-parametric adaptive design approach to estimate several percentiles simultaneously via generalized Pólya urns. Theoretical properties of these designs are investigated and their performance is gaged by the locally compound optimal designs. As an example, we re-investigated a psychophysical experiment where one of the goals was to estimate the three quartiles. We show that these multiple-objective adaptive designs are more efficient than the original single-objective adaptive design targeting the median only. We also show that urn designs which target the optimal designs are slightly more efficient than those which target the desired percentiles directly. Guidelines are given as to when to use which type of design. Overall we are pleased with the efficiency results and hope compound adaptive designs proposed in this work or their variants may prove to be a viable non-parametric alternative in multiple-objective dose--response studies.

  3. The use of estimated glomerular filtration rate for dose adjustment of medications in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Elinder, Carl-Gustaf; Bárány, Peter; Heimbürger, Olof

    2014-07-01

    Adverse drug effects as a consequence of inappropriate dosage are a common cause of hospitalization among the elderly. Older individuals are at a particular risk of overdosing because their kidney function decreases with advancing age and the elderly are often prescribed several pharmaceutical drugs. In addition, serum creatinine levels decrease owing to a reduction in muscle mass with age. Therefore, drug dosing based on the serum creatinine level only, instead of using assessment of the renal function, may result in overdosing of frail elderly patients. Renal function, i.e., the glomerular filtration rate can, with simple formulas, be estimated from analysis of creatinine and/or plasma cystatin C (eGFR). Such estimations performed with modern and validated formulas, as a rule present renal function normalized to the body surface area (mL/min/1.73 m(2)). A good estimation of how much the normal dosing interval should be prolonged, or the dose reduced, to obtain a desired plasma concentration of drugs that are mainly eliminated by glomerular filtration can be obtained by calculating the ratio between the patient's eGFR and the normal renal function (about 90-125 mL/min/1.73 m(2)). Increased knowledge and use of eGFR by prescribing physicians will reduce the risk of overdosing drugs in the elderly.

  4. Shear-Wave Elastography for the Estimation of Liver Fibrosis in Chronic Liver Disease: Determining Accuracy and Ideal Site for Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Dhyani, Manish; Vij, Abhinav; Bhan, Atul K.; Halpern, Elkan F.; Méndez-Navarro, Jorge; Corey, Kathleen E.; Chung, Raymond T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the accuracy of shear-wave elastography (SWE) for staging liver fibrosis in patients with diffuse liver disease (including patients with hepatitis C virus [HCV]) and to determine the relative accuracy of SWE measurements obtained from different hepatic acquisition sites for staging liver fibrosis. Materials and Methods The institutional review board approved this single-institution prospective study, which was performed between January 2010 and March 2013 in 136 consecutive patients who underwent SWE before their scheduled liver biopsy (age range, 18–76 years; mean age, 49 years; 70 men, 66 women). Informed consent was obtained from all patients. SWE measurements were obtained at four sites in the liver. Biopsy specimens were reviewed in a blinded manner by a pathologist using METAVIR criteria. SWE measurements and biopsy results were compared by using the Spearman correlation and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Results SWE values obtained at the upper right lobe showed the highest correlation with estimation of fibrosis (r = 0.41, P < .001). Inflammation and steatosis did not show any correlation with SWE values except for values from the left lobe, which showed correlation with steatosis (r = 0.24, P = .004). The area under the ROC curve (AUC) in the differentiation of stage F2 fibrosis or greater, stage F3 fibrosis or greater, and stage F4 fibrosis was 0.77 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.68, 0.86), 0.82 (95% CI: 0.75, 0.91), and 0.82 (95% CI: 0.70, 0.95), respectively, for all subjects who underwent liver biopsy. The corresponding AUCs for the subset of patients with HCV were 0.80 (95% CI: 0.67, 0.92), 0.82 (95% CI: 0.70, 0.95), and 0.89 (95% CI: 0.73, 1.00). The adjusted AUCs for differentiating stage F2 or greater fibrosis in patients with chronic liver disease and those with HCV were 0.84 and 0.87, respectively. Conclusion SWE estimates of liver stiffness obtained from the right upper lobe showed the best

  5. Estimation of the absorbed dose in radiation-processed food. 4. EPR measurements on eggshell

    SciTech Connect

    Desrosiers, M.F.; Le, F.G. ); Harewood, P.M.; Josephson, E.S. ); Montesalvo, M. )

    1993-09-01

    Fresh whole eggs treated with ionizing radiation for Salmonellae control testing. The eggshell was then removed and examined by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to determine if EPR could be used to (1) distinguish irradiated from unirradiated eggs and (2) assess the absorbed dose. No EPR signals were detected in unirradiated eggs, while strong signals were measurable for more than 200 days after irradiation. Although a number of EPR signals were measured, the most intense resonance (g = 2.0019) was used for dosimetry throughout the study. This signal was observed to increase linearly with dose (up to [approximately]6 kGy), which decayed [approximately]20% within the first 5 days after irradiation and remained relatively constant thereafter. The standard added-dose method was used to assess, retrospectively, the dose to eggs processed at 0.2, 0.7, and 1.4 kGy. Relatively good results were obtained when measurement was made on the day the shell was reirradiated; with this procedure estimates were better for shell processed at the lower doses.

  6. WE-AB-BRA-02: Development of Biomechanical Models to Describe Dose-Volume Response to Liver Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) Patients

    SciTech Connect

    McCulloch, M; Polan, D; Feng, M; Lawrence, T; Haken, R Ten; Brock, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Previous studies have shown that radiotherapy treatment for liver metastases causes marked liver hypertrophy in areas receiving low dose and atrophy/fibrosis in areas receiving high dose. The purpose of this work is to develop and evaluate a biomechanical model-based dose-response model to describe these liver responses to SBRT. Methods: In this retrospective study, a biomechanical model-based deformable registration algorithm, Morfeus, was expanded to include dose-based boundary conditions. Liver and tumor volumes were contoured on the planning images and CT/MR images three months post-RT and converted to finite element models. A thermal expansion-based relationship correlating the delivered dose and volume response was generated from 22 patients previously treated. This coefficient, combined with the planned dose, was applied as an additional boundary condition to describe the volumetric response of the liver of an additional cohort of metastatic liver patients treated with SBRT. The accuracy of the model was evaluated based on overall volumetric liver comparisons and the target registration error (TRE) using the average deviations in positions of identified vascular bifurcations on each set of registered images, with a target accuracy of the 2.5mm isotropic dose grid (vector dimension 4.3mm). Results: The thermal expansion coefficient models the volumetric change of the liver to within 3%. The accuracy of Morfeus with dose-expansion boundary conditions a TRE of 5.7±2.8mm compared to 11.2±3.7mm using rigid registration and 8.9±0.28mm using Morfeus with only spatial boundary conditions. Conclusion: A biomechanical model has been developed to describe the volumetric and spatial response of the liver to SBRT. This work will enable the improvement of correlating functional imaging with delivered dose, the mapping of the delivered dose from one treatment onto the planning images for a subsequent treatment, and will further provide information to assist

  7. An estimation of radiation doses to benthic invertebrates from sediments collected near a Canadian uranium mine.

    PubMed

    Thomas, P; Liber, K

    2001-10-01

    A new method is described for calculating radiation doses to benthic invertebrates from radionuclide concentrations in freshwater sediment. Both internal and external radiation doses were estimated for all 14 principal radionuclides of the uranium-238 decay series. Sediments were collected from three sites downstream of a uranium mining operation in northern Saskatchewan, Canada. Sediments from two sites, located approximately 1.6 and 4.4 km downstream from mining operations, yielded absorbed doses to both larval midges, Chironomus tentans, and adult amphipods, Hyalella azteca, of 59-60 and 19 mGy/year, respectively, compared to 3.2 mGy/year for a nearby control site. External beta radiation from protactinium-234 (234Pa) and alpha radiation from uranium (U) contributed most of the dose at the impacted sites, whereas polonium-210 (210Po) was most important at the control site. If a weighting factor of 20 was employed for the greater biological effect of alpha vs. beta and gamma radiation, then total equivalent doses rose to 540-560 mGy/year at the site closest to uranium operations. Such equivalent doses are above the 360-mGy/year no-observed-effect level for reproductive effects in vertebrates from gamma radiation exposure. Data are not available to determine the effect of such doses on benthic organisms, but they are high enough to warrant concern. Detrimental effects have been observed in H. azteca at similar uranium concentration in laboratory toxicity tests, but it remains unclear whether the radiotoxicity or the chemotoxicity of uranium is responsible for these effects.

  8. Acute response of rat liver microsomal lipids, lipid peroxidation, and membrane anisotropy to a single oral dose of polybrominated biphenyls.

    PubMed

    Bernert, J T; Groce, D F

    1984-01-01

    Liver microsomal lipids and lipid peroxidation activities were examined in adult male rats at intervals over a 2-mo period after the administration of a single oral dose of 0 or 500 mg/kg of FireMaster BP-6 in corn oil. Microsomal lipids were markedly altered in the polybrominated biphenyl- (PBB-) dosed animals at the earliest time examined (1 wk), and these changes persisted throughout the remainder of the study. An early decrease in the cholesterol-phospholipid ratio was noted, which probably contributed to the significant decrease in the steady-state fluorescence anisotropy demonstrable in both intact microsomes and in liposomes prepared from microsomal lipid extracts. Significant concentrations of PBBs were present in dosed rat microsomes, but the changes in anisotropy appeared to result from membrane lipid alterations rather than from a direct perturbation by PBBs. Iron ascorbate-induced peroxidation was also greatly enhanced in dosed rat microsomes, even when rats were maintained on a low-iron (25 ppm) diet. These early alterations in membrane fluidity and peroxidative capacity of microsomes may ultimately contribute to the hepatotoxicity of PBBs.

  9. Attenuation-based size metric for estimating organ dose to patients undergoing tube current modulated CT exams

    SciTech Connect

    Bostani, Maryam McMillan, Kyle; Lu, Peiyun; Kim, Hyun J.; Cagnon, Chris H.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; DeMarco, John J.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Task Group 204 introduced effective diameter (ED) as the patient size metric used to correlate size-specific-dose-estimates. However, this size metric fails to account for patient attenuation properties and has been suggested to be replaced by an attenuation-based size metric, water equivalent diameter (D{sub W}). The purpose of this study is to investigate different size metrics, effective diameter, and water equivalent diameter, in combination with regional descriptions of scanner output to establish the most appropriate size metric to be used as a predictor for organ dose in tube current modulated CT exams. Methods: 101 thoracic and 82 abdomen/pelvis scans from clinically indicated CT exams were collected retrospectively from a multidetector row CT (Sensation 64, Siemens Healthcare) with Institutional Review Board approval to generate voxelized patient models. Fully irradiated organs (lung and breasts in thoracic scans and liver, kidneys, and spleen in abdominal scans) were segmented and used as tally regions in Monte Carlo simulations for reporting organ dose. Along with image data, raw projection data were collected to obtain tube current information for simulating tube current modulation scans using Monte Carlo methods. Additionally, previously described patient size metrics [ED, D{sub W}, and approximated water equivalent diameter (D{sub Wa})] were calculated for each patient and reported in three different ways: a single value averaged over the entire scan, a single value averaged over the region of interest, and a single value from a location in the middle of the scan volume. Organ doses were normalized by an appropriate mAs weighted CTDI{sub vol} to reflect regional variation of tube current. Linear regression analysis was used to evaluate the correlations between normalized organ doses and each size metric. Results: For the abdominal organs, the correlations between normalized organ dose and size metric were overall slightly higher for all three

  10. Influence of different dose calculation algorithms on the estimate of NTCP for lung complications.

    PubMed

    Hedin, Emma; Bäck, Anna

    2013-09-06

    Due to limitations and uncertainties in dose calculation algorithms, different algorithms can predict different dose distributions and dose-volume histograms for the same treatment. This can be a problem when estimating the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for patient-specific dose distributions. Published NTCP model parameters are often derived for a different dose calculation algorithm than the one used to calculate the actual dose distribution. The use of algorithm-specific NTCP model parameters can prevent errors caused by differences in dose calculation algorithms. The objective of this work was to determine how to change the NTCP model parameters for lung complications derived for a simple correction-based pencil beam dose calculation algorithm, in order to make them valid for three other common dose calculation algorithms. NTCP was calculated with the relative seriality (RS) and Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) models. The four dose calculation algorithms used were the pencil beam (PB) and collapsed cone (CC) algorithms employed by Oncentra, and the pencil beam convolution (PBC) and anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) employed by Eclipse. Original model parameters for lung complications were taken from four published studies on different grades of pneumonitis, and new algorithm-specific NTCP model parameters were determined. The difference between original and new model parameters was presented in relation to the reported model parameter uncertainties. Three different types of treatments were considered in the study: tangential and locoregional breast cancer treatment and lung cancer treatment. Changing the algorithm without the derivation of new model parameters caused changes in the NTCP value of up to 10 percentage points for the cases studied. Furthermore, the error introduced could be of the same magnitude as the confidence intervals of the calculated NTCP values. The new NTCP model parameters were tabulated as the algorithm was varied from PB

  11. Chronic Liver Disease: Noninvasive Subharmonic Aided Pressure Estimation of Hepatic Venous Pressure Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Eisenbrey, John R.; Dave, Jaydev K.; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G.; Merton, Daniel A.; Miller, Cynthia; Gonzalez, José M.; Machado, Priscilla; Park, Suhyun; Dianis, Scott; Chalek, Carl L.; Kim, Christopher E.; Baliff, Jeffrey P.; Thomenius, Kai E.; Brown, Daniel B.; Navarro, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To compare subharmonic aided pressure estimation (SHAPE) with pressure catheter–based measurements in human patients with chronic liver disease undergoing transjugular liver biopsy. Materials and Methods: This HIPAA-compliant study had U.S. Food and Drug Administration and institutional review board approval, and written informed consent was obtained from all participants. Forty-five patients completed this study between December 2010 and December 2011. A clinical ultrasonography (US) scanner was modified to obtain SHAPE data. After transjugular liver biopsy with pressure measurements as part of the standard of care, 45 patients received an infusion of a microbubble US contrast agent and saline. During infusion, SHAPE data were collected from a portal and hepatic vein and were compared with invasive measurements. Correlations between data sets were determined by using the Pearson correlation coefficient, and statistical significance between groups was determined by using the Student t test. Results:- The 45 study patients included 27 men and 18 women (age range, 19–71 years; average age, 55.8 years). The SHAPE gradient between the portal and hepatic veins was in good overall agreement with the hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) (R = 0.82). Patients at increased risk for variceal hemorrhage (HVPG ≥ 12 mm Hg) had a significantly higher mean subharmonic gradient than patients with lower HVPGs (1.93 dB ± 0.61 [standard deviation] vs −1.47 dB ± 0.29, P < .001), with a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 81%, indicating that SHAPE may be a useful tool for the diagnosis of clinically important portal hypertension. Conclusion: Preliminary results show SHAPE to be an accurate noninvasive technique for estimating portal hypertension. © RSNA, 2013 Supplemental material: http://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/radiol.13121769/-/DC1 PMID:23525208

  12. A pharmacometric case study regarding the sensitivity of structural model parameter estimation to error in patient reported dosing times.

    PubMed

    Knights, Jonathan; Rohatagi, Shashank

    2015-12-01

    Although there is a body of literature focused on minimizing the effect of dosing inaccuracies on pharmacokinetic (PK) parameter estimation, most of the work centers on missing doses. No attempt has been made to specifically characterize the effect of error in reported dosing times. Additionally, existing work has largely dealt with cases in which the compound of interest is dosed at an interval no less than its terminal half-life. This work provides a case study investigating how error in patient reported dosing times might affect the accuracy of structural model parameter estimation under sparse sampling conditions when the dosing interval is less than the terminal half-life of the compound, and the underlying kinetics are monoexponential. Additional effects due to noncompliance with dosing events are not explored and it is assumed that the structural model and reasonable initial estimates of the model parameters are known. Under the conditions of our simulations, with structural model CV % ranging from ~20 to 60 %, parameter estimation inaccuracy derived from error in reported dosing times was largely controlled around 10 % on average. Given that no observed dosing was included in the design and sparse sampling was utilized, we believe these error results represent a practical ceiling given the variability and parameter estimates for the one-compartment model. The findings suggest additional investigations may be of interest and are noteworthy given the inability of current PK software platforms to accommodate error in dosing times.

  13. Preliminary validation of a new methodology for estimating dose reduction protocols in neonatal chest computed radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Don, Steven; Whiting, Bruce R.; Hildebolt, Charles F.; Sehnert, W. James; Ellinwood, Jacquelyn S.; Töpfer, Karin; Masoumzadeh, Parinaz; Kraus, Richard A.; Kronemer, Keith A.; Herman, Thomas; McAlister, William H.

    2006-03-01

    The risk of radiation exposure is greatest for pediatric patients and, thus, there is a great incentive to reduce the radiation dose used in diagnostic procedures for children to "as low as reasonably achievable" (ALARA). Testing of low-dose protocols presents a dilemma, as it is unethical to repeatedly expose patients to ionizing radiation in order to determine optimum protocols. To overcome this problem, we have developed a computed-radiography (CR) dose-reduction simulation tool that takes existing images and adds synthetic noise to create realistic images that correspond to images generated with lower doses. The objective of our study was to determine the extent to which simulated, low-dose images corresponded with original (non-simulated) low-dose images. To make this determination, we created pneumothoraces of known volumes in five neonate cadavers and obtained images of the neonates at 10 mR, 1 mR and 0.1 mR (as measured at the cassette plate). The 10-mR exposures were considered "relatively-noise-free" images. We used these 10 mR-images and our simulation tool to create simulated 0.1- and 1-mR images. For the simulated and original images, we identified regions of interest (ROI) of the entire chest, free-in-air region, and liver. We compared the means and standard deviations of the ROI grey-scale values of the simulated and original images with paired t tests. We also had observers rate simulated and original images for image quality and for the presence or absence of pneumothoraces. There was no statistically significant difference in grey-scale-value means nor standard deviations between simulated and original entire chest ROI regions. The observer performance suggests that an exposure >=0.2 mR is required to detect the presence or absence of pneumothoraces. These preliminary results indicate that the use of the simulation tool is promising for achieving ALARA exposures in children.

  14. APPLICATION AND USE OF DOSE ESTIMATING EXPOSURE MODEL (DEEM) FOR DOSE COMPARISONS AFTER EXPOSURE TO TRICHLOROETHYLENE (TCE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Route-to-route extrapolations are a crucial step in many risk assessments. Often the doses which result In toxicological end points in one route must be compared with doses resulting from typical environmental exposures by another route. In this case we used EPA's Dose Estimati...

  15. APPLICATION AND USE OF DOSE ESTIMATING EXPOSURE MODEL (DEEM) FOR ROUTE TO ROUTE DOSE COMPARISONS AFTER EXPOSURE TO TRICHLOROETHYLENE (TCE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Route-to-route extrapolations are a crucial step in many risk assessments. Often the doses which result In toxicological end points in one route must be compared with doses resulting from typical environmental exposures by another route. In this case we used EPA's Dose Estimati...

  16. Impacts of stable element intake on 14C and 129I dose estimates.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Dade W; Ryan, Michael T; Sun, Lin-Shen C; Cherry, Robert N

    2005-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and provide insights related to the influence of the intake of stable isotopes of carbon and iodine on the committed doses due to the ingestion of (14)C and (129)I. This was accomplished through the application of two different computational approaches. The first was based on the assumption that ground (drinking) water was the only source of intake of (14)C and (129)I, as well as stable carbon and stable iodine. In the second, the intake of (14)C and (129)I was still assumed to be restricted to that in the ground (drinking) water, but the intake of stable carbon and stable iodine was expanded to include that in other components of the diet. The doses were estimated using either a conversion formula or the applicable dose coefficients in Federal Guidance Reports No. 11 and No. 13. Serving as input for the analyses was the estimated maximum concentrations of (14)C or (129)I that would be present in the ground water due to potential releases from the proposed Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository during the first 10,000 y after closure. The estimated contributions of stable carbon and iodine through the consumption of ground water were based on analyses of samples collected in the Amargosa Valley, NV. The contributions through dietary intake were based on surveys conducted in the United States. Based on the accompanying analyses, it was noted that stable isotope intake has a significant effect on the estimated doses due to the intake of radioactive isotopes of the same element. While this is a well-known fact, this observation has international implications in terms of dose estimates for key radionuclides, such as (14)C and (129)I, a primary reason being the wide variations in the intakes of stable carbon and iodine in various countries. For this reason, analysts planning to apply the dose coefficients developed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) should either confirm that the

  17. Formation and subsequent removal of O6-methylguanine from deoxyribonucleic acid in rat liver and kidney after small doses of dimethylnitrosamine

    PubMed Central

    Pegg, Anthony E.; Hui, Georgiani

    1978-01-01

    1. The amounts of 7-methylguanine and O6-methylguanine present in the DNA of liver and kidney of rats 4h and 24h after administration of low doses of dimethylnitrosamine were measured. 2. O6-Methylguanine was rapidly removed from liver DNA so that less than 15% of the expected amount (on the basis of 7-methylguanine found) was present within 4h after doses of 0.25mg/kg body wt. or less. Within 24h of administration of dimethylnitrosamine at doses of 1mg/kg or below, more than 85% of the expected amount of O6-methylguanine was removed. Removal was most efficient (defined in terms of the percentage of the O6-methylguanine formed that was subsequently lost within 24h) after doses of 0.25–0.5mg/kg body wt. At doses greater or less than this the removal was less efficient, even though the absolute amount of O6-methylguanine lost during 24h increased with the dose of dimethylnitrosamine over the entire range of doses from 0.001 to 20mg/kg body wt. 3. Alkylation of kidney DNA after intraperitoneal injections of 1–50μg of dimethylnitrosamine/kg body wt. occurred at about one-tenth the extent of alkylation of liver DNA. Removal of O6-methylguanine from the DNA also took place in the kidney, but was slower than in the liver. 4. After oral administration of these doses of dimethylnitrosamine, the alkylation of kidney DNA was much less than after intraperitoneal administration and represented only 1–2% of that found in the liver. 5. Alkylation of liver and kidney DNA was readily detectable when measured 24h after the final injection in rats that received daily injections of 1μg of [3H]dimethylnitrosamine/kg for 2 or 3 weeks. After 3 weeks, O6-methylguanine contents in the liver DNA were about 1% of the 7-methylguanine contents. The amount of 7-methylguanine in the liver DNA was 10 times that in the kidney DNA, but liver O6-methylguanine contents were only twice those in the kidney. 6. Extracts able to catalyse the removal of O6-methylguanine from alkylated DNA in vitro

  18. Patient-based estimation of organ dose for a population of 58 adult patients across 13 protocol categories

    SciTech Connect

    Sahbaee, Pooyan; Segars, W. Paul; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: This study aimed to provide a comprehensive patient-specific organ dose estimation across a multiplicity of computed tomography (CT) examination protocols. Methods: A validated Monte Carlo program was employed to model a common CT system (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare). The organ and effective doses were estimated from 13 commonly used body and neurological CT examination. The dose estimation was performed on 58 adult computational extended cardiac-torso phantoms (35 male, 23 female, mean age 51.5 years, mean weight 80.2 kg). The organ dose normalized by CTDI{sub vol} (h factor) and effective dose normalized by the dose length product (DLP) (k factor) were calculated from the results. A mathematical model was derived for the correlation between the h and k factors with the patient size across the protocols. Based on this mathematical model, a dose estimation iPhone operating system application was designed and developed to be used as a tool to estimate dose to the patients for a variety of routinely used CT examinations. Results: The organ dose results across all the protocols showed an exponential decrease with patient body size. The correlation was generally strong for the organs which were fully or partially located inside the scan coverage (Pearson sample correlation coefficient (r) of 0.49). The correlation was weaker for organs outside the scan coverage for which distance between the organ and the irradiation area was a stronger predictor of dose to the organ. For body protocols, the effective dose before and after normalization by DLP decreased exponentially with increasing patient's body diameter (r > 0.85). The exponential relationship between effective dose and patient's body diameter was significantly weaker for neurological protocols (r < 0.41), where the trunk length was a slightly stronger predictor of effective dose (0.15 < r < 0.46). Conclusions: While the most accurate estimation of a patient dose requires specific modeling of the patient

  19. Assessment of intraoperative 3D imaging alternatives for IOERT dose estimation.

    PubMed

    García-Vázquez, Verónica; Marinetto, Eugenio; Guerra, Pedro; Valdivieso-Casique, Manlio Fabio; Calvo, Felipe Ángel; Alvarado-Vásquez, Eduardo; Sole, Claudio Vicente; Vosburgh, Kirby Gannett; Desco, Manuel; Pascau, Javier

    2016-08-23

    Intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT) involves irradiation of an unresected tumour or a post-resection tumour bed. The dose distribution is calculated from a preoperative computed tomography (CT) study acquired using a CT simulator. However, differences between the actual IOERT field and that calculated from the preoperative study arise as a result of patient position, surgical access, tumour resection and the IOERT set-up. Intraoperative CT imaging may then enable a more accurate estimation of dose distribution. In this study, we evaluated three kilovoltage (kV) CT scanners with the ability to acquire intraoperative images. Our findings indicate that current IOERT plans may be improved using data based on actual anatomical conditions during radiation. The systems studied were two portable systems ("O-arm", a cone-beam CT [CBCT] system, and "BodyTom", a multislice CT [MSCT] system) and one CBCT integrated in a conventional linear accelerator (LINAC) ("TrueBeam"). TrueBeam and BodyTom showed good results, as the gamma pass rates of their dose distributions compared to the gold standard (dose distributions calculated from images acquired with a CT simulator) were above 97% in most cases. The O-arm yielded a lower percentage of voxels fulfilling gamma criteria owing to its reduced field of view (which left it prone to truncation artefacts). Our results show that the images acquired using a portable CT or even a LINAC with on-board kV CBCT could be used to estimate the dose of IOERT and improve the possibility to evaluate and register the treatment administered to the patient.

  20. Graphical user interface for yield and dose estimations for cyclotron-produced technetium.

    PubMed

    Hou, X; Vuckovic, M; Buckley, K; Bénard, F; Schaffer, P; Ruth, T; Celler, A

    2014-07-07

    The cyclotron-based (100)Mo(p,2n)(99m)Tc reaction has been proposed as an alternative method for solving the shortage of (99m)Tc. With this production method, however, even if highly enriched molybdenum is used, various radioactive and stable isotopes will be produced simultaneously with (99m)Tc. In order to optimize reaction parameters and estimate potential patient doses from radiotracers labeled with cyclotron produced (99m)Tc, the yields for all reaction products must be estimated. Such calculations, however, are extremely complex and time consuming. Therefore, the objective of this study was to design a graphical user interface (GUI) that would automate these calculations, facilitate analysis of the experimental data, and predict dosimetry. The resulting GUI, named Cyclotron production Yields and Dosimetry (CYD), is based on Matlab®. It has three parts providing (a) reaction yield calculations, (b) predictions of gamma emissions and (c) dosimetry estimations. The paper presents the outline of the GUI, lists the parameters that must be provided by the user, discusses the details of calculations and provides examples of the results. Our initial experience shows that the proposed GUI allows the user to very efficiently calculate the yields of reaction products and analyze gamma spectroscopy data. However, it is expected that the main advantage of this GUI will be at the later clinical stage when entering reaction parameters will allow the user to predict production yields and estimate radiation doses to patients for each particular cyclotron run.

  1. Preliminary estimates of economic impact of liver fluke infection in Thailand and the feasibility of irradiation as a control measure.

    PubMed

    Loaharanu, P; Sornmani, S

    1991-12-01

    Liver fluke infection by Opisthorchis viverrini is the leading cause of food-borne parasitic disease in Thailand. Approximately one third of the population in the northeastern region of the country, ie, 6-7 million, are infected by this parasite through the habit of consuming raw or insufficiently cooked freshwater fish, especially those of cyprinoid family. A recent survey showed that 60% of the work force in the Northeast between the age of 15 and 60 is infected. The estimated wage loss of this population may be approximately Baht 1,620 million (US$65 million) per annum. The estimated direct cost of medical care may be as high as Baht 495 million (US$19.4 million) per annum. Thus, the total direct cost of the infected work force is estimated to be Baht 2115 million (US$84.6 million) per annum. Irradiation of fish flesh infected by metacercaria of O. viverrini has been demonstrated as an effective method of control. A minimum dose of 0.1 kGy is effective without changing physiochemical properties of the fish flesh. This technology, therefore, shows promise as a method to control infection by O. viverrini acquired by the habit of consuming raw freshwater fish in the country. Preliminary economic analyses indicate that the public health benefit from preventing infection with this parasite could outweigh the investment cost of irradiation facilities. Detailed economic feasibility studies should be carried out to demonstrate the practical efficacy and cost-effectiveness of the treatment as a public health intervention measure in the country.

  2. Cytogenetical dose estimation for 3 severely exposed patients in the JCO criticality accident in Tokai-mura.

    PubMed

    Hayata, I; Kanda, R; Minamihisamatsu, M; Furukawa, M; Sasaki, M S

    2001-09-01

    A dose estimation by chromosome analysis was performed on the 3 severely exposed patients in the Tokai-mura criticality accident. Drastically reduced lymphocyte counts suggested that the whole-body dose of radiation which they had been exposed to was unprecedentedly high. Because the number of lymphocytes in the white blood cells in two patients was very low, we could not culture and harvest cells by the conventional method. To collect the number of lymphocytes necessary for chromosome preparation, we processed blood samples by a modified method, called the high-yield chromosome preparation method. With this technique, we could culture and harvest cells, and then make air-dried chromosome slides. We applied a new dose-estimation method involving an artificially induced prematurely condensed ring chromosome, the PCC-ring method, to estimate an unusually high dose with a short time. The estimated doses by the PCC-ring method were in fairly good accordance with those by the conventional dicentric and ring chromosome (Dic+R) method. The biologically estimated dose was comparable with that estimated by a physical method. As far as we know, the estimated dose of the most severely exposed patient in the present study is the highest recorded among that chromosome analyses have been able to estimate in humans.

  3. Mercury demethylation in waterbird livers: Dose-response thresholds and differences among species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eagles-Smith, C. A.; Ackerman, J.T.; Julie, Y.E.E.; Adelsbach, T.L.

    2009-01-01

    We assessed methylmercury (MeHg) demethylation in the livers of adults and chicks of four waterbird species that commonly breed in San Francisco Bay: American avocets, black-necked stilts, Caspian terns, and Forster's terns. In adults (all species combined), we found strong evidence for a threshold, model where MeHg demethylation occurred above a hepatic total mercury concentration threshold of 8.51 ?? 0.93 ??g/g dry weight, and there was a strong decline in %MeHg values as total mercury (THg) concentrations increased above 8.51 ??g/g dry weight. Conversely, there was no evidence for a demethylation threshold in chicks, and we found that %MeHg values declined linearly with increasing THg concentrations. For adults, we also found taxonomie differences in the demethylation responses, with avocets and stilts showing a higher demethylation rate than that of terns when concentrations exceeded the threshold, whereas terns had a lower demethylation threshold (7.48 ?? 1.48 ??g/g dry wt) than that of avocets and stilts (9.91 ?? 1.29 ??g/g dry wt). Finally, we assessed the role of selenium (Se) in the demethylation process. Selenium concentrations were positively correlated with inorganic Hg in livers of birds above the demethylation threshold but not below. This suggests that Se may act as a binding site for demethylated Hg and may reduce the potential for secondary toxicity. Our findings indicate that waterbirds demethylate mercury in their livers if exposure exceeds a threshold value and suggest that taxonomie differences in demethylation ability may be an important factor in evaluating species-specific risk to MeHg exposure. Further, we provide strong evidence for a threshold of approximately 8.5 ??g/g dry weight of THg in the liver where demethylation is initiated. ?? 2009 SETAC.

  4. High doses of olive leaf extract induce liver changes in mice.

    PubMed

    Arantes-Rodrigues, R; Henriques, A; Pires, M J; Colaço, B; Calado, A M; Rema, P; Colaço, A; Fernandes, T; De la Cruz, P L F; Lopes, C; Fidalgo-Gonçalves, L; Vilela, S; Pedrosa, T; Peixoto, F; Oliveira, P A

    2011-09-01

    Virtually ever since it was first commercialized in 1995, there have been several studies focusing on the use of olive leaf extract (OLE) as a natural therapy and its medical properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of three different concentrations of OLE on the function of mice livers over the course of 14 weeks. Female ICR mice were divided into four groups, depending on OLE concentration used: 0%, 0.25%, 0.5%, and 0.75%. Alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, total bilirubin and albumin serum concentrations were all measured. Histopathological changes of the liver were observed after haematoxylin and eosin, reticulin, and Masson's trichrome staining was carried out while liver mitochondrial bioenergetics were also evaluated. Alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase serum enzyme activities increased significantly in the groups in which 0.5% and 0.75% OLE concentrations were used. Histologically, all the groups exposed to OLE exhibited hyperplasia of the bile ducts, cholestasis, hepatocyte necrosis and inflammatory infiltrated. Hepatic fibrosis was observed in the groups featuring 0.5% and 0.75% OLE concentrations. The mitochondrial membrane potential, respiratory control ratio and ADP/O of samples from animals fed the higher OLE concentration was significantly decreased when compared to the control group.

  5. Feasibility of using the computed tomography dose indices to estimate radiation dose to partially and fully irradiated brains in pediatric neuroradiology examinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Januzis, Natalie; Nguyen, Giao; Frush, Donald P.; Hoang, Jenny K.; Lowry, Carolyn; Yoshizumi, Terry T.

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was two-fold: (a) to measure the dose to the brain using clinical protocols at our institution, and (b) to develop a scanner-independent dosimetry method to estimate brain dose. Radiation dose was measured with a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom and MOSFET detectors. Six current neuroradiology protocols were used: brain, sinuses, facial bones, orbits, temporal bones, and craniofacial areas. Two different CT vendor scanners (scanner A and B) were used. Partial volume correction factors (PVCFs) were determined for the brain to account for differences between point doses measured by the MOSFETs and average organ dose. The CTDIvol and DLP for each protocol were recorded. The dose to the brain (mGy) for scanners A and B was 10.7 and 10.0 for the brain protocol, 7.8 and 3.2 for the sinus, 10.2 and 8.6 for the facial bones, 7.4 and 4.7 for the orbits and 1.6 and 1.9 for the temporal bones, respectively. On scanner A, the craniofacial protocol included a standard and high dose option; the dose measured for these exams was 3.9 and 16.9 mGy, respectively. There was only one craniofacial protocol on scanner B; the brain dose measured on this exam was 4.8 mGy. A linear correlation was found between DLP and brain dose with the conversion factors: 0.049 (R2 = 0.87), 0.046 (R2 = 0.89) for scanner A and B, and 0.048 (R2 = 0.89) for both scanners. The range of dose observed was between 1.8 and 16.9 mGy per scan. This suggests that brain dose estimates may be made from DLP.

  6. Feasibility of using the computed tomography dose indices to estimate radiation dose to partially and fully irradiated brains in pediatric neuroradiology examinations.

    PubMed

    Januzis, Natalie; Nguyen, Giao; Frush, Donald P; Hoang, Jenny K; Lowry, Carolyn; Yoshizumi, Terry T

    2015-07-21

    The purpose of this study was two-fold: (a) to measure the dose to the brain using clinical protocols at our institution, and (b) to develop a scanner-independent dosimetry method to estimate brain dose. Radiation dose was measured with a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom and MOSFET detectors. Six current neuroradiology protocols were used: brain, sinuses, facial bones, orbits, temporal bones, and craniofacial areas. Two different CT vendor scanners (scanner A and B) were used. Partial volume correction factors (PVCFs) were determined for the brain to account for differences between point doses measured by the MOSFETs and average organ dose. The CTDIvol and DLP for each protocol were recorded. The dose to the brain (mGy) for scanners A and B was 10.7 and 10.0 for the brain protocol, 7.8 and 3.2 for the sinus, 10.2 and 8.6 for the facial bones, 7.4 and 4.7 for the orbits and 1.6 and 1.9 for the temporal bones, respectively. On scanner A, the craniofacial protocol included a standard and high dose option; the dose measured for these exams was 3.9 and 16.9 mGy, respectively. There was only one craniofacial protocol on scanner B; the brain dose measured on this exam was 4.8 mGy. A linear correlation was found between DLP and brain dose with the conversion factors: 0.049 (R(2) = 0.87), 0.046 (R(2) = 0.89) for scanner A and B, and 0.048 (R(2) = 0.89) for both scanners. The range of dose observed was between 1.8 and 16.9 mGy per scan. This suggests that brain dose estimates may be made from DLP.

  7. Monte Carlo estimation of radiation doses during paediatric barium meal and cystourethrography examinations.

    PubMed

    Dimitriadis, A; Gialousis, G; Makri, T; Karlatira, M; Karaiskos, P; Georgiou, E; Papaodysseas, S; Yakoumakis, E

    2011-01-21

    Organ doses are important quantities in assessing the radiation risk. In the case of children, estimation of this risk is of particular concern due to their significant radiosensitivity and the greater health detriment. The purpose of this study is to estimate the organ doses to paediatric patients undergoing barium meal and micturating cystourethrography examinations by clinical measurements and Monte Carlo simulation. In clinical measurements, dose-area products (DAPs) were assessed during examination of 50 patients undergoing barium meal and 90 patients undergoing cystourethrography examinations, separated equally within three age categories: namely newborn, 1 year and 5 years old. Monte Carlo simulation of photon transport in male and female mathematical phantoms was applied using the MCNP5 code in order to estimate the equivalent organ doses. Regarding the micturating cystourethrography examinations, the organs receiving considerable amounts of radiation doses were the urinary bladder (1.87, 2.43 and 4.7 mSv, the first, second and third value in the parentheses corresponds to neonatal, 1 year old and 5 year old patients, respectively), the large intestines (1.54, 1.8, 3.1 mSv), the small intestines (1.34, 1.56, 2.78 mSv), the stomach (1.46, 1.02, 2.01 mSv) and the gall bladder (1.46, 1.66, 2.18 mSv), depending upon the age of the child. Organs receiving considerable amounts of radiation during barium meal examinations were the stomach (9.81, 9.92, 11.5 mSv), the gall bladder (3.05, 5.74, 7.15 mSv), the rib bones (9.82, 10.1, 11.1 mSv) and the pancreas (5.8, 5.93, 6.65 mSv), depending upon the age of the child. DAPs to organ/effective doses conversion factors were derived for each age and examination in order to be compared with other studies.

  8. Monte Carlo estimation of radiation doses during paediatric barium meal and cystourethrography examinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitriadis, A.; Gialousis, G.; Makri, T.; Karlatira, M.; Karaiskos, P.; Georgiou, E.; Papaodysseas, S.; Yakoumakis, E.

    2011-01-01

    Organ doses are important quantities in assessing the radiation risk. In the case of children, estimation of this risk is of particular concern due to their significant radiosensitivity and the greater health detriment. The purpose of this study is to estimate the organ doses to paediatric patients undergoing barium meal and micturating cystourethrography examinations by clinical measurements and Monte Carlo simulation. In clinical measurements, dose-area products (DAPs) were assessed during examination of 50 patients undergoing barium meal and 90 patients undergoing cystourethrography examinations, separated equally within three age categories: namely newborn, 1 year and 5 years old. Monte Carlo simulation of photon transport in male and female mathematical phantoms was applied using the MCNP5 code in order to estimate the equivalent organ doses. Regarding the micturating cystourethrography examinations, the organs receiving considerable amounts of radiation doses were the urinary bladder (1.87, 2.43 and 4.7 mSv, the first, second and third value in the parentheses corresponds to neonatal, 1 year old and 5 year old patients, respectively), the large intestines (1.54, 1.8, 3.1 mSv), the small intestines (1.34, 1.56, 2.78 mSv), the stomach (1.46, 1.02, 2.01 mSv) and the gall bladder (1.46, 1.66, 2.18 mSv), depending upon the age of the child. Organs receiving considerable amounts of radiation during barium meal examinations were the stomach (9.81, 9.92, 11.5 mSv), the gall bladder (3.05, 5.74, 7.15 mSv), the rib bones (9.82, 10.1, 11.1 mSv) and the pancreas (5.8, 5.93, 6.65 mSv), depending upon the age of the child. DAPs to organ/effective doses conversion factors were derived for each age and examination in order to be compared with other studies.

  9. SU-E-I-85: Absorbed Dose Estimation for a Commercially Available MicroCT Scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, A; Ahmad, S; Chen, Y; Ren, L; Liu, H; Yang, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify the simulated absorbed dose delivered for a typical scan from a commercially available microCT scanner in order to aid in the dose estimation. Methods: The simulations were conducted using the Geant4 Monte Carlo Toolkit (version 10) with the standard electromagnetic classes. The Quantum FX microCT scanner (PerkinElmer, Waltham, MA) was modeled incorporating the energy fluence and angular distributions of generated photons, spatial dimensions of nominal source-to-object and source-to-detector distances. The energy distribution was measured using a spectrometer (X-123CdTe, Amptek Inc., Bedford, USA) with a 300 angular spread from the source for the 90 kVp X-ray beams with no additional filtration. The nominal distances from the source to object consisted of three setups: 154.0 mm, 104.0 mm, and 51.96 mm. Our simulations recorded the dose absorbed in a cylindrical phantom of PMMA with a fixed length of 2 cm and varying radii (10, 20, 30 and 40 mm) using 100 million incident photons. The averaged absorbed dose in the object was then quantified for all setups. An exposure measurement of 417 mR was taken using a Radcal 9095 system utilizing 10×9–180 ion chamber with the given technique of 90 kVp, 63 μA, and 12 s. The exposure rate was also simulated with same setup to calculate the conversion factor of the beam current and the number of incident photons. Results: For a typical cone-beam scan with non-filtered 90kVp, the dose coefficients (the absorbed dose per mAs) were 2.614, 2.549 and 2.467 μGy/mAs under source to object distance of 104 mm for the object diameters of 10 mm, 20 mm and 30 mm, respectively. Conclusion: A look-up table was developed where an investigator can estimate the delivered dose using this particular microCT given the scanning protocol (kVp and mAs) as well as the size of the scanned object.

  10. Patient-specific organ dose estimation during transcatheter arterial embolization using Monte Carlo method and adaptive organ segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Hui-Yu; Lin, Yung-Chieh; Tyan, Yeu-Sheng

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate organ doses for individual patients undergoing interventional transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using measurement-based Monte Carlo simulation and adaptive organ segmentation. Five patients were enrolled in this study after institutional ethical approval and informed consent. Gafchromic XR-RV3 films were used to measure entrance surface dose to reconstruct the nonuniform fluence distribution field as the input data in the Monte Carlo simulation. XR-RV3 films were used to measure entrance surface doses due to their lower energy dependence compared with that of XR-RV2 films. To calculate organ doses, each patient's three-dimensional dose distribution was incorporated into CT DICOM images with image segmentation using thresholding and k-means clustering. Organ doses for all patients were estimated. Our dose evaluation system not only evaluated entrance surface doses based on measurements, but also evaluated the 3D dose distribution within patients using simulations. When film measurements were unavailable, the peak skin dose (between 0.68 and 0.82 of a fraction of the cumulative dose) can be calculated from the cumulative dose obtained from TAE dose reports. Successful implementation of this dose evaluation system will aid radiologists and technologists in determining the actual dose distributions within patients undergoing TAE.

  11. Aircrew radiation dose estimates during recent solar particle events and the effect of particle anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Al Anid, H; Lewis, B J; Bennett, L G I; Takada, M; Duldig, M

    2014-01-01

    A model was developed using a Monte-Carlo radiation transport code, MCNPX, to estimate the additional radiation exposure to aircrew members during solar particle events. The model transports an extrapolated particle spectrum based on satellite measurements through the atmosphere to aircraft altitudes. This code produces the estimated flux at a specific altitude where radiation dose conversion coefficients are applied to convert the particle flux into effective and ambient dose-equivalent rates. A cut-off rigidity model accounts for the shielding effects of the Earth's magnetic field. Comparisons were made between the model predictions and actual flight measurements taken with various types of instruments used to measure the mixed radiation field during ground level enhancements (GLEs) 60 and 65. An anisotropy analysis that uses neutron monitor responses and the pitch angle distribution of energetic solar particles was used to identify particle anisotropy for a solar event in December 2006. In anticipation of future commercial use, a computer code has been developed to implement the radiation dose assessment model for routine analysis.

  12. The gas chromatography/mass spectrometry can be used for dose estimation in irradiated pork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Oca, M. C.; Bartolotta, A.; Cammilleri, M. C.; Giuffrida, S. A.; Parlato, A.; Di Noto, A. M.; Caracappa, S.

    2009-07-01

    Food safety can be improved using ionizing radiation to reduce food spoilage and to extend its shelf life. The gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) has been validated by the European Community as a powerful method to identify irradiated food containing fat. The preliminary goals of our research were: (i) to set up this method, based on the detection of radiation induced 2-dodecylcyclobutanones (2-DCB) in pork muscle samples and (ii) to check the microbiological efficacy of the treatment. The main objective was to render the GC/MS a quantitative technique for dose estimation, through the measurement of the 2-DCB concentration in the irradiated sample. Our results show that the reduction of the microbial population is substantially reduced even at 2 kGy, and that a clear identification of irradiated samples can be achieved also one month after irradiation at 2 kGy in frozen-stored samples. The 2-DCB concentration showed a linear dependence on dose in the range 1-10 kGy, no matter the origin of the sample; a unique calibration function was obtained, that allowed dose estimation in irradiated pork samples. A retrospective evaluation on the quality of the treatment could be carried out this way.

  13. The Sandia total-dose estimator: SANDOSE description and user guide

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, C.D.

    1995-02-01

    The SANdia total-DOSe Estimator (SANDOSE) is used to estimate total radiation dose to a (BRL-CAT) solid model, SANDOSE uses the mass-sectoring technique to sample the model using ray-tracing techniques. The code is integrated directly into the BRL-CAD solid model editor and is operated using a simple graphical user interface. Several diagnostic tools are available to allow the user to analyze the results. Based on limited validation using several benchmark problems, results can be expected to fall between a 10% underestimate and a factor of 2 overestimate of the actual dose predicted by rigorous radiation transport techniques. However, other situations may be encountered where the results might fall outside of this range. The code is written in C and uses X-windows graphics. It presently runs on SUN SPARCstations, but in theory could be ported to any workstation with a C compiler and X-windows. SANDOSE is available via license by contacting either the Sandia National Laboratories Technology Transfer Center or the author.

  14. Methods for estimating doses to organisms from radioactive materials released into the aquatic environment

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A.; Soldat, J.K.

    1992-06-01

    The US Department of Energy recently published an interim dose limit of 1 rad d{sup {minus}1} for controlling the radiation exposure of nature aquatic organisms. A computer program named CRITR, developed previously for calculating radiation doses to aquatic organisms and their predators, has been updated as an activity of the Hanford Site Surface Environmental Surveillance Project to facilitate demonstration of compliance with this limit. This report presents the revised models and the updated computer program, CRITR2, for the assessment of radiological doses to aquatic organisms and their predators; tables of the required input parameters are also provided. Both internal and external doses to fish, crustacea, mollusks, and algae, as well as organisms that subsist on them, such as muskrats, raccoons, and ducks, may be estimated using CRITR2. Concentrations of radionuclides in the water to which the organisms are exposed may be entered directly into the user-input file or may be calculated from a source term and standard dilution models developed for the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements.

  15. Evaluation of Simplified Models for Estimating Public Dose from Spent Nuclear Fuel Shipments

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, Kevin J.; Radulescu, Georgeta

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the dose rate as a function of distance from a representative high-capacity SNF rail-type transportation cask. It uses the SCALE suite of radiation transport modeling and simulation codes to determine neutron and gamma radiation dose rates. The SCALE calculated dose rate is compared with simplified analytical methods historically used for these calculations. The SCALE dose rate calculation presented in this paper employs a very detailed transportation cask model (e.g., pin-by-pin modeling of fuel assembly) and a new hybrid computational transport method. Because it includes pin-level heterogeneity and models ample air and soil outside the cask to simulate scattering of gamma and neutron radiation, this detailed SCALE model is expected to yield more accurate results than previously used models which made more simplistic assumptions (e.g., fuel assembly treated as a point or line source, simple 1-D model of environment outside of cask). The results in this paper are preliminary and, as progress is made on developing and validating improved models, results may be subject to change as models and estimates become more refined and better information leads to more accurate assumptions.

  16. A practical method for skin dose estimation in interventional cardiology based on fluorographic DICOM information.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Lucy; Dixon, Matthew; Rowles, Nick; Stevens, Greg

    2016-03-01

    A practical method for skin dose estimation for interventional cardiology patients has been developed to inform pre-procedure planning and post-procedure patient management. Absorbed dose to the patient skin for certain interventional radiology procedures can exceed thresholds for deterministic skin injury, requiring documentation within the patient notes and appropriate patient follow-up. The primary objective was to reduce uncertainty associated with current methods, particularly surrounding field overlap. This was achieved by considering rectangular field geometry incident on a spherical patient model in a polar coordinate system. The angular size of each field was quantified at surface of the sphere, i.e. the skin surface. Computer-assisted design software enabled the modelling of a sufficient dataset that was subsequently validated with radiochromic film. Modelled overlap was found to agree with overlap measured using film to within 2.2° ± 2.0°, showing that the overall error associated with the model was < 1 %. Mathematical comparison against exposure data extracted from procedural Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine files was used to generate a graphical skin dose map, demonstrating the dose distribution over a sphere centred at the interventional reference point. Dosimetric accuracy of the software was measured as between 3.5 and 17 % for different variables.

  17. The estimation of absorbed dose rates for non-human biota : an extended inter-comparison.

    SciTech Connect

    Batlle, J. V. I.; Beaugelin-Seiller, K.; Beresford, N. A.; Copplestone, D.; Horyna, J.; Hosseini, A.; Johansen, M.; Kamboj, S.; Keum, D.-K.; Kurosawa, N.; Newsome, L.; Olyslaegers, G.; Vandenhove, H.; Ryufuku, S.; Lynch, S. V.; Wood, M. D.; Yu, C.

    2011-05-01

    An exercise to compare 10 approaches for the calculation of unweighted whole-body absorbed dose rates was conducted for 74 radionuclides and five of the ICRP's Reference Animals and Plants, or RAPs (duck, frog, flatfish egg, rat and elongated earthworm), selected for this exercise to cover a range of body sizes, dimensions and exposure scenarios. Results were analysed using a non-parametric method requiring no specific hypotheses about the statistical distribution of data. The obtained unweighted absorbed dose rates for internal exposure compare well between the different approaches, with 70% of the results falling within a range of variation of {+-}20%. The variation is greater for external exposure, although 90% of the estimates are within an order of magnitude of one another. There are some discernible patterns where specific models over- or under-predicted. These are explained based on the methodological differences including number of daughter products included in the calculation of dose rate for a parent nuclide; source-target geometry; databases for discrete energy and yield of radionuclides; rounding errors in integration algorithms; and intrinsic differences in calculation methods. For certain radionuclides, these factors combine to generate systematic variations between approaches. Overall, the technique chosen to interpret the data enabled methodological differences in dosimetry calculations to be quantified and compared, allowing the identification of common issues between different approaches and providing greater assurance on the fundamental dose conversion coefficient approaches used in available models for assessing radiological effects to biota.

  18. Photon dose estimation from ultraintense laser-solid interactions and shielding calculation with Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bo; Qiu, Rui; Li, JunLi; Lu, Wei; Wu, Zhen; Li, Chunyan

    2017-02-01

    When a strong laser beam irradiates a solid target, a hot plasma is produced and high-energy electrons are usually generated (the so-called "hot electrons"). These energetic electrons subsequently generate hard X-rays in the solid target through the Bremsstrahlung process. To date, only limited studies have been conducted on this laser-induced radiological protection issue. In this study, extensive literature reviews on the physics and properties of hot electrons have been conducted. On the basis of these information, the photon dose generated by the interaction between hot electrons and a solid target was simulated with the Monte Carlo code FLUKA. With some reasonable assumptions, the calculated dose can be regarded as the upper boundary of the experimental results over the laser intensity ranging from 1019 to 1021 W/cm2. Furthermore, an equation to estimate the photon dose generated from ultraintense laser-solid interactions based on the normalized laser intensity is derived. The shielding effects of common materials including concrete and lead were also studied for the laser-driven X-ray source. The dose transmission curves and tenth-value layers (TVLs) in concrete and lead were calculated through Monte Carlo simulations. These results could be used to perform a preliminary and fast radiation safety assessment for the X-rays generated from ultraintense laser-solid interactions.

  19. PARMA: PHITS-based Analytical Radiation Model in the Atmosphere--Verification of Its Accuracy in Estimating Cosmic Radiation Doses

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Tatsuhiko; Satoh, Daiki; Endo, Akira; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Takada, Masashi; Nakamura, Takashi; Niita, Koji; Sihver, Lembit

    2008-08-07

    Estimation of cosmic-ray spectra in the atmosphere has been an essential issue in the evaluation of the aircrew doses. We therefore developed an analytical model that can predict the terrestrial neutron, proton, He nucleus, muon, electron, positron and photon spectra at altitudes below 20 km, based on the Monte Carlo simulation results of cosmic-ray propagation in the atmosphere performed by the PHITS code. The model was designated PARMA. In order to examine the accuracy of PARMA in terms of the neutron dose estimation, we measured the neutron dose rates at the altitudes between 20 to 10400 m, using our developed dose monitor DARWIN mounted on an aircraft. Excellent agreement was observed between the measured dose rates and the corresponding data calculated by PARMA coupled with the fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients, indicating the applicability of the model to be utilized in the route-dose calculation.

  20. ESTIMATING BASAL ENERGY EXPENDITURE IN LIVER TRANSPLANT RECIPIENTS: THE VALUE OF THE HARRIS-BENEDICT EQUATION

    PubMed Central

    PINTO, Andressa S.; CHEDID, Marcio F.; GUERRA, Léa T.; ÁLVARES-DA-SILVA, Mario R.; de ARAÚJO, Alexandre; GUIMARÃES, Luciano S.; LEIPNITZ, Ian; CHEDID, Aljamir D.; KRUEL, Cleber R. P.; GREZZANA-FILHO, Tomaz J. M.; KRUEL, Cleber D. P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Reliable measurement of basal energy expenditure (BEE) in liver transplant (LT) recipients is necessary for adapting energy requirements, improving nutritional status and preventing weight gain. Indirect calorimetry (IC) is the gold standard for measuring BEE. However, BEE may be estimated through alternative methods, including electrical bioimpedance (BI), Harris-Benedict Equation (HBE), and Mifflin-St. Jeor Equation (MSJ) that carry easier applicability and lower cost. Aim: To determine which of the three alternative methods for BEE estimation (HBE, BI and MSJ) would provide most reliable BEE estimation in LT recipients. Methods: Prospective cross-sectional study including dyslipidemic LT recipients in follow-up at a 735-bed tertiary referral university hospital. Comparisons of BEE measured through IC to BEE estimated through each of the three alternative methods (HBE, BI and MSJ) were performed using Bland-Altman method and Wilcoxon Rank Sum test. Results: Forty-five patients were included, aged 58±10 years. BEE measured using IC was 1664±319 kcal for males, and 1409±221 kcal for females. Average difference between BEE measured by IC (1534±300 kcal) and BI (1584±377 kcal) was +50 kcal (p=0.0384). Average difference between the BEE measured using IC (1534±300 kcal) and MSJ (1479.6±375 kcal) was -55 kcal (p=0.16). Average difference between BEE values measured by IC (1534±300 kcal) and HBE (1521±283 kcal) was -13 kcal (p=0.326). Difference between BEE estimated through IC and HBE was less than 100 kcal for 39 of all 43patients. Conclusions: Among the three alternative methods, HBE was the most reliable for estimating BEE in LT recipients. PMID:27759783

  1. Environmental radioactivity in the UK: the airborne geophysical view of dose rate estimates.

    PubMed

    Beamish, David

    2014-12-01

    This study considers UK airborne gamma-ray data obtained through a series of high spatial resolution, low altitude surveys over the past decade. The ground concentrations of the naturally occurring radionuclides Potassium, Thorium and Uranium are converted to air absorbed dose rates and these are used to assess terrestrial exposure levels from both natural and technologically enhanced sources. The high resolution airborne information is also assessed alongside existing knowledge from soil sampling and ground-based measurements of exposure levels. The surveys have sampled an extensive number of the UK lithological bedrock formations and the statistical information provides examples of low dose rate lithologies (the formations that characterise much of southern England) to the highest sustained values associated with granitic terrains. The maximum dose rates (e.g. >300 nGy h(-1)) encountered across the sampled granitic terrains are found to vary by a factor of 2. Excluding granitic terrains, the most spatially extensive dose rates (>50 nGy h(-1)) are found in association with the Mercia Mudstone Group (Triassic argillaceous mudstones) of eastern England. Geological associations between high dose rate and high radon values are also noted. Recent studies of the datasets have revealed the extent of source rock (i.e. bedrock) flux attenuation by soil moisture in conjunction with the density and porosity of the temperate latitude soils found in the UK. The presence or absence of soil cover (and associated presence or absence of attenuation) appears to account for a range of localised variations in the exposure levels encountered. The hypothesis is supported by a study of an extensive combined data set of dose rates obtained from soil sampling and by airborne geophysical survey. With no attenuation factors applied, except those intrinsic to the airborne estimates, a bias to high values of between 10 and 15 nGy h(-1) is observed in the soil data. A wide range of

  2. Study of the Phototransference in GR-200 Dosimetric Material and its Convenience for Dose Re-estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Baly, L.; Otazo, M. R.; Molina, D.; Pernas, R.

    2006-09-08

    A study of the phototransference of charges from deep to dosimetric traps in GR-200 material is presented and its convenience for dose re-estimation in the dose range between 2 and 100mSv is also analyzed. The recovering coefficient (RC) defined as the ratio between the phototransferred thermoluminescence (PTTL) and the original thermoluminescence (TL) of the dosimetric trap was used to evaluate the ratio of phototransferred charges from deep traps and the original charges in the dosimetric traps. The results show the convenience of this method for dose re-estimation for this material in the selected range of doses.

  3. Estimating radiation dose to organs of patients undergoing conventional and novel multidetector CT exams using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angel, Erin

    Advances in Computed Tomography (CT) technology have led to an increase in the modality's diagnostic capabilities and therefore its utilization, which has in turn led to an increase in radiation exposure to the patient population. As a result, CT imaging currently constitutes approximately half of the collective exposure to ionizing radiation from medical procedures. In order to understand the radiation risk, it is necessary to estimate the radiation doses absorbed by patients undergoing CT imaging. The most widely accepted risk models are based on radiosensitive organ dose as opposed to whole body dose. In this research, radiosensitive organ dose was estimated using Monte Carlo based simulations incorporating detailed multidetector CT (MDCT) scanner models, specific scan protocols, and using patient models based on accurate patient anatomy and representing a range of patient sizes. Organ dose estimates were estimated for clinical MDCT exam protocols which pose a specific concern for radiosensitive organs or regions. These dose estimates include estimation of fetal dose for pregnant patients undergoing abdomen pelvis CT exams or undergoing exams to diagnose pulmonary embolism and venous thromboembolism. Breast and lung dose were estimated for patients undergoing coronary CTA imaging, conventional fixed tube current chest CT, and conventional tube current modulated (TCM) chest CT exams. The correlation of organ dose with patient size was quantified for pregnant patients undergoing abdomen/pelvis exams and for all breast and lung dose estimates presented. Novel dose reduction techniques were developed that incorporate organ location and are specifically designed to reduce close to radiosensitive organs during CT acquisition. A generalizable model was created for simulating conventional and novel attenuation-based TCM algorithms which can be used in simulations estimating organ dose for any patient model. The generalizable model is a significant contribution of this

  4. Organ dose and effective dose estimation in paediatric chest radiographic examinations by using pin silicon photodiode dosemeters.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Toshio; Aoyama, Takahiko; Yamauchi-Kawaura, Chiyo; Fujii, Keisuke; Koyama, Shuji

    2013-01-01

    Organ and effective doses during paediatric chest radiographic examination were investigated for various tube voltages between 60 and 110 kV at a constant milliampere-second value and focus-to-film distance by using an in-phantom dose measuring system and a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation software (PCXMC), where the former was composed of 32 photodiode dosemeters embedded in various tissue and organ sites within a 6-y-old child anthropomorphic phantom. Lung doses obtained ranged from 0.010 to 0.066 mGy and effective doses from 0.004 to 0.025 mSv, where these doses varied by a factor of 6 with the change in the tube voltage. Effective doses obtained using the MC simulation software agreed with those obtained using the dose measuring system within 23 %, revealing the usefulness of PCXMC software for evaluating effective doses. The present study would provide helpful dose data for the selection of technical parameters in paediatric chest radiography in Japan.

  5. Concordance of Transcriptional and Apical Benchmark Dose Levels for Conazole-Induced Liver Effects in Mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT The ability to anchor chemical class-based gene expression changes to phenotypic lesions and to describe these changes as a function of dose and time informs mode of action determinations and improves quantitative risk assessments. Previous transcription-based microarra...

  6. Temporal regularization of ultrasound-based liver motion estimation for image-guided radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    O’Shea, Tuathan P. Bamber, Jeffrey C.; Harris, Emma J.

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: Ultrasound-based motion estimation is an expanding subfield of image-guided radiation therapy. Although ultrasound can detect tissue motion that is a fraction of a millimeter, its accuracy is variable. For controlling linear accelerator tracking and gating, ultrasound motion estimates must remain highly accurate throughout the imaging sequence. This study presents a temporal regularization method for correlation-based template matching which aims to improve the accuracy of motion estimates. Methods: Liver ultrasound sequences (15–23 Hz imaging rate, 2.5–5.5 min length) from ten healthy volunteers under free breathing were used. Anatomical features (blood vessels) in each sequence were manually annotated for comparison with normalized cross-correlation based template matching. Five sequences from a Siemens Acuson™ scanner were used for algorithm development (training set). Results from incremental tracking (IT) were compared with a temporal regularization method, which included a highly specific similarity metric and state observer, known as the α–β filter/similarity threshold (ABST). A further five sequences from an Elekta Clarity™ system were used for validation, without alteration of the tracking algorithm (validation set). Results: Overall, the ABST method produced marked improvements in vessel tracking accuracy. For the training set, the mean and 95th percentile (95%) errors (defined as the difference from manual annotations) were 1.6 and 1.4 mm, respectively (compared to 6.2 and 9.1 mm, respectively, for IT). For each sequence, the use of the state observer leads to improvement in the 95% error. For the validation set, the mean and 95% errors for the ABST method were 0.8 and 1.5 mm, respectively. Conclusions: Ultrasound-based motion estimation has potential to monitor liver translation over long time periods with high accuracy. Nonrigid motion (strain) and the quality of the ultrasound data are likely to have an impact on tracking

  7. Analgesia dose prescribing and estimated glomerular filtration rate decline: a general practice database linkage cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Nderitu, Paul; Doos, Lucy; Strauss, Vicky Y; Lambie, Mark; Davies, Simon J; Kadam, Umesh T

    2014-01-01

    Objective We aimed to quantify the short-term effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), aspirin and paracetamol analgesia dose prescribing on estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) decline in the general practice population. Design A population-based longitudinal clinical data linkage cohort study. Setting Two large general practices in North Staffordshire, UK. Participants Patients aged 40 years and over with ≥2 eGFR measurements spaced ≥90 days apart between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2010 were selected. Exposure Using WHO Defined Daily Dose standardised cumulative analgesia prescribing, patients were categorised into non-user, normal and high-dose groups. Outcome measure The primary outcome was defined as a >5 mL/min/1.73 m2/year eGFR decrease between the first and last eGFR. Logistic regression analyses were used to estimate risk, adjusting for sociodemographics, comorbidity, baseline chronic kidney disease (CKD) status, renin-angiotensin-system inhibitors and other analgesia prescribing. Results There were 4145 patients (mean age 66 years, 55% female) with an analgesia prescribing prevalence of 17.2% for NSAIDs, 39% for aspirin and 22% for paracetamol and stage 3–5 CKD prevalence was 16.1% (n=667). Normal or high-dose NSAID and paracetamol prescribing was not significantly associated with eGFR decline. High-dose aspirin prescribing was associated with a reduced risk of eGFR decline in patients with a baseline (first) eGFR ≥60 mL/min/1.73 m2; OR=0.52 (95% CI 0.35 to 0.77). Conclusions NSAID, aspirin and paracetamol prescribing over 2 years did not significantly affect eGFR decline with a reduced risk of eGFR decline in high-dose aspirin users with well-preserved renal function. However, the long-term effects of analgesia use on eGFR decline remain to be determined. PMID:25138808

  8. Repair of sublethal radiation injury after multiple small doses in mouse kidney: an estimate of flexure dose

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, F.A.; Oussoren, Y.; Luts, A.; Begg, A.C.; Dewit, L.; Lebesque, J.; Bartelink, H.

    1987-05-01

    Functional kidney damage in mice was measured after a series of fractionated X-irradiations. Doses per fraction of 0.75-12.5 Gy were given as 2, 5, 10, 30, 40, 60, or 80 equal doses in a total treatment time of 4 weeks. Renal function (measured by clearance of /sup 51/CrEDTA or hematocrit levels) deteriorated progressively, in a dose related manner, from 20 to 46 weeks after the start of treatment. The changes in renal function versus time were fitted by a polynomial regression through all data and interpolated values for /sup 51/CrEDTA clearance were then calculated at 30 and 40 weeks after treatment. Steep dose response curves were obtained and these were used to calculate isoeffective doses for the different fractionation schedules. There was a marked increase in total isoeffective doses from 2-30 fractions and these data were well described by a linear quadratic (L.Q.) expression for damage with an alpha/beta ratio of 2.3 +/- 0.2 Gy. There was only a slight increase in the total isoeffect dose as the size of the dose per fraction was decreased below 2 Gy and the measured isoeffect doses after 40 to 80 fractions were lower than predicted on the basis of an L.Q. model assuming complete repair between successive irradiations. The flexure dose for mouse kidneys irradiated 3 times per day was, effectively, 1 to 2 Gy and hyperfractionation using lower doses per fraction did not lead to significant, additional repair.

  9. The use of carbon fibre material in radiographic cassettes: estimation of the dose and contrast advantages.

    PubMed

    Dance, D R; Lester, S A; Carlsson, G A; Sandborg, M; Persliden, J

    1997-04-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation has been used to estimate the dose and contrast advantages of replacing radiographic cassette fronts fabricated from aluminium with cassette fronts fabricated from low atomic number material (carbon fibre). The simulation used a realistic imaging geometry and calculations were made both with and without an anti-scatter grid. Account was taken of the scatter generated in the cassette front and the effect of beam hardening on primary contrast. Dose and contrast were evaluated for a range of cassette front thicknesses and tube potentials (60-150 kV) as well as for four examinations representative of situations with varying amounts of scatter. The results with an anti-scatter grid show a clear dose and contrast advantage in all cases when an aluminium cassette front is replaced with a low attenuation cassette front. The contrast advantage is dependent upon the examination and is generally greater for imaging bony structures than for imaging soft tissue. If a 1.74 mm aluminium cassette front is compared with a 1.1 mm carbon fibre cassette front, then the dose advantages are 16%, 9%, 8% and 6% and the contrast advantages are 10%, 7%, 4% and 5% for the AP paediatric pelvis examination at 60 kV, the anteroposterior (AP) lumbar spine examination at 80 kV, the lateral lumbar spine examination at 100 kV and the posteroanterior (PA) chest examination at 150 kV, respectively. The results without an anti-scatter grid show an increased dose advantage when a low attenuation cassette front is used, but the contrast advantage is small and in some situations negative.

  10. Dose estimation for astronauts using dose conversion coefficients calculated with the PHITS code and the ICRP/ICRU adult reference computational phantoms.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tatsuhiko; Endo, Akira; Sihver, Lembit; Niita, Koji

    2011-03-01

    Absorbed-dose and dose-equivalent rates for astronauts were estimated by multiplying fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients in the units of Gy.cm(2) and Sv.cm(2), respectively, and cosmic-ray fluxes around spacecrafts in the unit of cm(-2) s(-1). The dose conversion coefficients employed in the calculation were evaluated using the general-purpose particle and heavy ion transport code system PHITS coupled to the male and female adult reference computational phantoms, which were released as a common ICRP/ICRU publication. The cosmic-ray fluxes inside and near to spacecrafts were also calculated by PHITS, using simplified geometries. The accuracy of the obtained absorbed-dose and dose-equivalent rates was verified by various experimental data measured both inside and outside spacecrafts. The calculations quantitatively show that the effective doses for astronauts are significantly greater than their corresponding effective dose equivalents, because of the numerical incompatibility between the radiation quality factors and the radiation weighting factors. These results demonstrate the usefulness of dose conversion coefficients in space dosimetry.

  11. Improvement of the quality of effective dose estimation by interlaboratory comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katarzyna, Ciszewska; Malgorzata, Dymecka; Tomasz, Pliszczynski; Jakub, Osko

    2010-01-01

    Radiation Protection Measurements Laboratory (RPLM) of the Institute of Atomic Energy POLATOM determines radionuclides in human urine to estimate the effective dose. Being an accredited laboratory, RPLM participated in interlaboratory comparisons in order to assure the quality of services concerning monitoring of internal contamination. The purpose of the study was to examine the effect of interlaboratory comparisons on the accuracy of the provided measurements. The results regarding tritium (3H) and strontium (90Sr) determination, obtained within the radiotoxicological intercomparison exercises, organized by PROCORAD, in 2005-2010, were analyzed and the methods used by the laboratory were verified and improved.

  12. A feasibility study evaluating the relationship between dose and focal liver reaction in stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for liver cancer based on intensity change of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance images

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sang Hoon; Yu, Jeong Il; Lim, Do Hoon; Han, Youngyih

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In order to evaluate the relationship between the dose to the liver parenchyma and focal liver reaction (FLR) after stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR), we suggest a novel method using a three-dimensional dose distribution and change in signal intensity of gadoxetate disodium-gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) hepatobiliary phase images. Materials and Methods In our method, change of the signal intensity between the pretreatment and follow-up hepatobiliary phase images of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI was calculated and then threshold dose (TD) for developing FLR was obtained from correlation of dose with the change of the signal intensity. For validation of the method, TDs for six patients, who had been treated for liver cancer with SABR with 45–60 Gy in 3 fractions, were calculated using the method, and we evaluated concordance between volume enclosed by isodose of TD by the method and volume identified as FLR by a physician. Results The dose to normal liver was correlated with change in signal intensity between pretreatment and follow-up MRI with a median R2 of 0.935 (range, 0.748 to 0.985). The median TD by the method was 23.5 Gy (range, 18.3 to 39.4 Gy). The median value of concordance was 84.5% (range, 44.7% to 95.9%). Conclusion Our method is capable of providing a quantitative evaluation of the relationship between dose and intensity changes on follow-up MRI, as well as determining individual TD for developing FLR. We expect our method to provide better information about the individual relationship between dose and FLR in radiotherapy for liver cancer. PMID:27104169

  13. ROC Estimation from Clustered Data with an Application to Liver Cancer Data

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joungyoun; Yun, Sung-Cheol; Lim, Johan; Lee, Moo-Song; Son, Won; Park, DoHwan

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we propose a regression model to compare the performances of different diagnostic methods having clustered ordinal test outcomes. The proposed model treats ordinal test outcomes (an ordinal categorical variable) as grouped-survival time data and uses random effects to explain correlation among outcomes from the same cluster. To compare different diagnostic methods, we introduce a set of covariates indicating diagnostic methods and compare their coefficients. We find that the proposed model defines a Lehmann family and can also introduce a location-scale family of a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. The proposed model can easily be estimated using standard statistical software such as SAS and SPSS. We illustrate its practical usefulness by applying it to testing different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods to detect abnormal lesions in a liver. PMID:28050126

  14. Estimating radiation doses from multidetector CT using Monte Carlo simulations: effects of different size voxelized patient models on magnitudes of organ and effective dose.

    PubMed

    DeMarco, J J; Cagnon, C H; Cody, D D; Stevens, D M; McCollough, C H; Zankl, M; Angel, E; McNitt-Gray, M F

    2007-05-07

    The purpose of this work is to examine the effects of patient size on radiation dose from CT scans. To perform these investigations, we used Monte Carlo simulation methods with detailed models of both patients and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scanners. A family of three-dimensional, voxelized patient models previously developed and validated by the GSF was implemented as input files using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. These patient models represent a range of patient sizes and ages (8 weeks to 48 years) and have all radiosensitive organs previously identified and segmented, allowing the estimation of dose to any individual organ and calculation of patient effective dose. To estimate radiation dose, every voxel in each patient model was assigned both a specific organ index number and an elemental composition and mass density. Simulated CT scans of each voxelized patient model were performed using a previously developed MDCT source model that includes scanner specific spectra, including bowtie filter, scanner geometry and helical source path. The scan simulations in this work include a whole-body scan protocol and a thoracic CT scan protocol, each performed with fixed tube current. The whole-body scan simulation yielded a predictable decrease in effective dose as a function of increasing patient weight. Results from analysis of individual organs demonstrated similar trends, but with some individual variations. A comparison with a conventional dose estimation method using the ImPACT spreadsheet yielded an effective dose of 0.14 mSv mAs(-1) for the whole-body scan. This result is lower than the simulations on the voxelized model designated 'Irene' (0.15 mSv mAs(-1)) and higher than the models 'Donna' and 'Golem' (0.12 mSv mAs(-1)). For the thoracic scan protocol, the ImPACT spreadsheet estimates an effective dose of 0.037 mSv mAs(-1), which falls between the calculated values for Irene (0.042 mSv mAs(-1)) and Donna (0.031 mSv mAs(-1)) and is higher relative

  15. Long-lasting morphofunctional remodelling of liver parenchyma and stroma after a single exposure to low and moderate doses of cadmium in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cupertino, Marli C; Costa, Kyvia L C; Santos, Daiane C M; Novaes, Rômulo D; Condessa, Suellen S; Neves, Ana C; Oliveira, Juraci A; Matta, Sérgio L P

    2013-01-01

    Frequent exposure to cadmium (Cd) in low doses is common; however, the long-lasting effects of this exposure are still poorly understood. Therefore in this study we have evaluated long-lasting hepatic morphofunctional adaptations in rats exposed to low and moderate doses of Cd. Five experimental groups were tested: control (0.9% saline) and other four receiving single intraperitoneal doses of 0.67, 0.74, 0.86 and 1.1 mg of Cd/kg. The animals were killed after eight weeks and the following parameters were analysed: biometrics, oedema, Cd bio-accumulation, collagen, glycogen, lipid droplets, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), serum transaminases, liver histopathology and stereology. In all groups exposed to Cd there was significant increase in SOD and CAT activities, ALP levels, proportion of binucleated hepatocytes, nuclei/cytoplasm ratio, macrophages (Kupffer cells) and collagen fibres. In these groups, glycogen accumulation by hepatocytes and the proportion of sinusoidal capillaries were significantly reduced compared with controls. The liver somatic index was increased, and liver oedema was evident in animals exposed to higher dose of Cd. Areas of necrosis were found in animals exposed to the three highest doses. These results indicate that Cd is an extremely toxic bioactive heavy metal, which even at low doses is able to disrupt liver homeostasis. At low and moderate doses, Cd exposure induces morphofunctional pathological remodelling of the hepatic stroma and parenchyma, which remain active after eight weeks. In response to injury, the liver tissue triggers a reactive process by enhancing activation of antioxidant enzymes and collagenogenesis. PMID:24020407

  16. Delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase enzyme activity in blood, brain, and liver of lead-dosed ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dieter, M.P.; Finley, M.T.

    1979-01-01

    Mallard ducks were dosed with a single shotgun pellet (ca. 200 mg lead). After 1 month there was about 1 ppm lead in blood, 2.5 in liver, and 0.5 in brain. Lead-induced inhibition of delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase enzyme in blood and cerebellum was much greater than in cerebral hemisphere or liver and was strongly correlated with the lead concentration in these tissues. The cerebellar portion of the brain was more sensitive to delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase enzyme inhibition by lead than were the other tissues examined. There was also a greater increase in the glial cell marker enzyme, butyrylcholinesterase, in cerebellum than in cerebral hemisphere, suggesting that nonregenerating neuronal cells were destroyed by lead and replaced by glial cells in that portion of the brain. Even partial loss of cerebellar tissue is severely debilitating in waterfowl, because functions critical to survival such as visual, auditory, motor, and reflex responses are integrated at this brain center.

  17. Early Dose Response to Yttrium-90 Microsphere Treatment of Metastatic Liver Cancer by a Patient-Specific Method Using Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography and Positron Emission Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Janice M. Wong, C. Oliver; Muzik, Otto; Marples, Brian; Joiner, Michael; Burmeister, Jay

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a patient-specific single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-based method of dose calculation for treatment planning of yttrium-90 ({sup 90}Y) microsphere selective internal radiotherapy (SIRT). Methods and Materials: Fourteen consecutive {sup 90}Y SIRTs for colorectal liver metastasis were retrospectively analyzed. Absorbed dose to tumor and normal liver tissue was calculated by partition methods with two different tumor/normal liver vascularity ratios: an average 3:1 and a patient-specific ratio derived from pretreatment technetium-99m macroaggregated albumin SPECT. Tumor response was quantitatively evaluated from fluorine-18 fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography scans. Results: Positron emission tomography showed a significant decrease in total tumor standardized uptake value (average, 52%). There was a significant difference in the tumor absorbed dose between the average and specific methods (p = 0.009). Response vs. dose curves fit by linear and linear-quadratic modeling showed similar results. Linear fit r values increased for all tumor response parameters with the specific method (+0.20 for mean standardized uptake value). Conclusion: Tumor dose calculated with the patient-specific method was more predictive of response in liver-directed {sup 90}Y SIRT.

  18. Persistent liver lesions in rats after a single oral dose of polybrominated biphenyls (firemaster FF-1) and concomitant PBB tissue levels.

    PubMed

    Kimbrough, R D; Burse, V W; Liddle, J A

    1978-04-01

    In a preliminary study, 12 male and 12 female weanling Sherman strain rats were given a single dose of 1000 mg polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) FireMaster FF1 Lot 7042 kg/body weight as a 5% solution in corn oil. Three male and three female weanling rats were given corn oil. One day after dosing PBB blood levels ranged from 78 to 162 ppm and 42 days later they ranged from 1.1 to 2.99 ppm. The liver was the only organ with pathological changes. In a long-term recovery study groups of 20 male and female rats, 2 months old, were given 0 or 1000 mg PBBs/kg body weight as a single dose in peanut oil. Five rats per group killed 2, 6, 10, and 14 months after dosing had pronounced liver pathology, including hepatic porphyria in the female rats and neoplastic nodules also mainly in female rats. Chemical analyses of blood, liver, and adipose tissue for PPBs 10 and 14 months after dosing gave the following mean results. Blood levels in females were 2.9 and 2.92 ppm, respectively, and males 0.94 and 1.34 ppm, respectively. Adipose tissue levels in females were 1202 and 783 ppm and in males 713 and 866 ppm, respectively. The liver levels in females were 37 and 22 ppm and in males 60 and 63 ppm, respectively.

  19. SU-E-J-110: Dosimetric Analysis of Respiratory Motion Based On Four-Dimensional Dose Accumulation in Liver Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S; Kim, D; Kim, T; Kim, K; Cho, M; Shin, D; Suh, T; Kim, S; Park, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Respiratory motion in thoracic and abdominal region could lead to significant underdosing of target and increased dose to healthy tissues. The aim of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric effect of respiratory motion in conventional 3D dose by comparing 4D deformable dose in liver stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods: Five patients who had previously treated liver SBRT were included in this study. Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) images with 10 phases for all patients were acquired on multi-slice CT scanner (Siemens, Somatom definition). Conventional 3D planning was performed using the average intensity projection (AIP) images. 4D dose accumulation was calculated by summation of dose distribution for all phase images of 4DCT using deformable image registration (DIR) . The target volume and normal organs dose were evaluated with the 4D dose and compared with those from 3D dose. And also, Index of achievement (IOA) which assesses the consistency between planned dose and prescription dose was used to compare target dose distribution between 3D and 4D dose. Results: Although the 3D dose calculation considered the moving target coverage, significant differences of various dosimetric parameters between 4D and 3D dose were observed in normal organs and PTV. The conventional 3D dose overestimated dose to PTV, however, there was no significant difference for GTV. The average difference of IOA which become ‘1’ in an ideal case was 3.2% in PTV. The average difference of liver and duodenum was 5% and 16% respectively. Conclusion: 4D dose accumulation which can provide dosimetric effect of respiratory motion has a possibility to predict the more accurate delivered dose to target and normal organs and improve treatment accuracy. This work was supported by the Radiation Technology R&D program (No. 2013M2A2A7043498) and the Mid-career Researcher Program (2014R1A2A1A10050270) through the National Research Foundation of Korea funded by the

  20. Development of in vivo tooth EPR for individual radiation dose estimation and screening.

    PubMed

    Williams, Benjamin B; Dong, Ruhong; Kmiec, Maciej; Burke, Greg; Demidenko, Eugene; Gladstone, David; Nicolalde, Roberto J; Sucheta, Artur; Lesniewski, Piotr; Swartz, Harold M

    2010-02-01

    The development of in vivo EPR has made it feasible to perform tooth dosimetry measurements in situ, greatly expanding the potential for using this approach for immediate screening after radiation exposures. The ability of in vivo tooth dosimetry to provide estimates of absorbed dose has been established through a series of experiments using unirradiated volunteers with specifically irradiated molar teeth placed in situ within gaps in their dentition and in natural canine teeth of patients who have completed courses of radiation therapy for head and neck cancers. Multiple measurements in patients who have received radiation therapy demonstrate the expected heterogeneous dose distributions. Dose-response curves have been generated using both populations and, using the current methodology and instrument, the standard error of prediction based on single 4.5-min measurements is approximately 1.5 Gy for inserted molar teeth and between 2.0 and 2.5 Gy in the more irregularly shaped canine teeth. Averaging of independent measurements can reduce this error significantly to values near 1 Gy. Developments to reduce these errors are underway, focusing on geometric optimization of the resonators, detector positioning techniques, and optimal data averaging approaches. In summary, it seems plausible that the EPR dosimetry techniques will have an important role in retrospective dosimetry for exposures involving large numbers of individuals.

  1. Development of In Vivo Tooth EPR for Individual Radiation Dose Estimation and Screening

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Benjamin B.; Dong, Ruhong; Kmiec, Maciej; Burke, Greg; Demidenko, Eugene; Gladstone, David; Nicolalde, Roberto J; Sucheta, Artur; Lesniewski, Piotr; Swartz, Harold M

    2009-01-01

    The development of in vivo EPR has made it feasible to perform tooth dosimetry measurements in situ, greatly expanding the potential for using this approach for immediate screening after radiation exposures. The ability of in vivo tooth dosimetry to provide estimates of absorbed dose has been established through a series of experiments using unirradiated volunteers with specifically irradiated molar teeth placed in situ within gaps in their dentition and in natural canine teeth of patients who have completed courses of radiation therapy for head and neck cancers. Multiple measurements in patients who have received radiation therapy demonstrate the expected heterogeneous dose distributions. Dose response curves have been generated using both populations and, using the current methodology and instrument, the standard error of prediction based on single 4.5 minute measurements is approximately 1.5 Gy for inserted molar teeth and between 2.0 and 2.5 Gy in the more irregularly shaped canine teeth. Averaging of independent measurements can reduce this error significantly to values near 1 Gy. Developments to reduce these errors are underway, focusing on geometric optimization of the resonators, detector positioning techniques, and optimal data averaging approaches. In summary, it seems plausible that the EPR dosimetry techniques will have an important role in retrospective dosimetry for exposures involving large numbers of individuals. PMID:20065702

  2. Quantitative estimation of UV light dose concomitant to irradiation with ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petin, Vladislav G.; Morozov, Ivan I.; Kim, Jin Kyu; Semkina, Maria A.

    2011-01-01

    A simple mathematical model for biological estimation of UV light dose concomitant to ionizing radiation was suggested. This approach was applied to determine the dependency of equivalent UV light dose accompanied by 100 Gy of ionizing radiation on energy of sparsely ionizing radiation and on volume of the exposed cell suspension. It was revealed that the relative excitation contribution to the total lethal effect and the value of UV dose was greatly increased with an increase in energy of ionizing radiation and volume of irradiated suspensions. It is concluded that these observations are in agreement with the supposition that Čerenkov emission is responsible for the production of UV light damage and the phenomenon of photoreactivation observed after ionizing exposure of bacterial and yeast cells hypersensitive to UV light. A possible synergistic interaction of the damages produced by ionizations and excitations as well as a probable participation of UV component of ionizing radiation in the mechanism of hormesis and adaptive response observed after ionizing radiation exposure is discussed.

  3. Estimation of the indoor radon and the annual effective dose from granite samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sola, P.; Srinuttrakul, W.; Kewsuwan, P.

    2015-05-01

    Inhalation of radon and thoron daughters increases the risk of lung cancer. The main sources of indoor radon are building materials. The aim of this research is to estimate the indoor radon and the annual effective dose from the building materials. Eighteen granite samples bought from the markets in Thailand were measured using an ionization chamber (ATMOS 12 DPX) for the radon concentration in air. Radon exhalation rates were calculated from the radon concentration in chamber. The indoor radon from the granite samples ranged from 10.04 to 55.32 Bq·m-2·h-1 with an average value of 20.30 Bq·m-2·h-1 and the annual effective dose ranged from 0.25 to 1.39 mSv·y-1 with an average value of 0.48 mSv·y-1. The results showed that the annual effective doses of three granite samples were higher than the annual exposure limit for the general public (1 mSv·y-1) recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). In addition, the relationship between the colours and radon exhalation rates of granite samples was also explained.

  4. Maximum likelihood estimation of proton irradiated field and deposited dose distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Inaniwa, Taku; Kohno, Toshiyuki; Yamagata, Fumiko; Tomitani, Takehiro; Sato, Shinji; Kanazawa, Mitsutaka; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Urakabe, Eriko

    2007-05-15

    In proton therapy, it is important to evaluate the field irradiated with protons and the deposited dose distribution in a patient's body. Positron emitters generated through fragmentation reactions of target nuclei can be used for this purpose. By detecting the annihilation gamma rays from the positron emitters, the annihilation gamma ray distribution can be obtained which has information about the quantities essential to proton therapy. In this study, we performed irradiation experiments with mono-energetic proton beams of 160 MeV and the spread-out Bragg peak beams to three kinds of targets. The annihilation events were detected with a positron camera for 500 s after the irradiation and the annihilation gamma ray distributions were obtained. In order to evaluate the range and the position of distal and proximal edges of the SOBP, the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) method was applied to the detected distributions. The evaluated values with the MLE method were compared with those estimated from the measured dose distributions. As a result, the ranges were determined with the difference between the MLE range and the experimental range less than 1.0 mm for all targets. For the SOBP beams, the positions of distal edges were determined with the difference less than 1.0 mm. On the other hand, the difference amounted to 7.9 mm for proximal edges.

  5. Maximum likelihood estimation of proton irradiated field and deposited dose distribution.

    PubMed

    Inaniwa, Taku; Kohno, Toshiyuki; Yamagata, Fumiko; Tomitani, Takehiro; Sato, Shinji; Kanazawa, Mitsutaka; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Urakabe, Eriko

    2007-05-01

    In proton therapy, it is important to evaluate the field irradiated with protons and the deposited dose distribution in a patient's body. Positron emitters generated through fragmentation reactions of target nuclei can be used for this purpose. By detecting the annihilation gamma rays from the positron emitters, the annihilation gamma ray distribution can be obtained which has information about the quantities essential to proton therapy. In this study, we performed irradiation experiments with mono-energetic proton beams of 160 MeV and the spread-out Bragg peak beams to three kinds of targets. The annihilation events were detected with a positron camera for 500 s after the irradiation and the annihilation gamma ray distributions were obtained. In order to evaluate the range and the position of distal and proximal edges of the SOBP, the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) method was applied to the detected distributions. The evaluated values with the MLE method were compared with those estimated from the measured dose distributions. As a result, the ranges were determined with the difference between the MLE range and the experimental range less than 1.0 mm for all targets. For the SOBP beams, the positions of distal edges were determined with the difference less than 1.0 mm. On the other hand, the difference amounted to 7.9 mm for proximal edges.

  6. Primate polonium metabolic models and their use in estimation of systemic radiation doses from bioassay data

    SciTech Connect

    Fellman, A.

    1989-01-01

    A Polonium metabolic model was derived and incorporated into a Fortran algorithm which estimates the systemic radiation dose from {sup 210}Po when applied to occupational urine bioassay data. The significance of the doses estimated are examined by defining the degree of uncertainty attached to them through comprehensive statistical testing procedures. Many parameters necessary for dosimetry calculations, were evaluated from metabolic studies of {sup 210}Po in non-human primates. Two tamarins and six baboons were injected intravenously with {sup 210}Po citrate. Excreta and blood samples were collected. Five of the baboons were sacrifice at times ranging from 1 day to 3 months post exposure. Complete necropsies were performed and all excreta and the majority of all skeletal and tissue samples were analyzed radiochemically for their {sup 210}Po content. The {sup 210}Po excretion rate in the baboon was more rapid than in the tamarin. The biological half-time of {sup 210}Po excretion in the baboon was approximately 15 days while in the tamarin, the {sup 210}Po excretion rate was in close agreement with the 50 day biological half-time predicted by ICRP 30. Excretion fractions of {sup 210}Po in the non-human primates were found to be markedly different from data reported elsewhere in other species, including man.

  7. Estimation and uncertainty analysis of dose response in an inter-laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toman, Blaza; Rösslein, Matthias; Elliott, John T.; Petersen, Elijah J.

    2016-02-01

    An inter-laboratory experiment for the evaluation of toxic effects of NH2-polystyrene nanoparticles on living human cancer cells was performed with five participating laboratories. Previously published results from nanocytoxicity assays are often contradictory, mostly due to challenges related to producing a reliable cytotoxicity assay protocol for use with nanomaterials. Specific challenges include reproducibility preparing nanoparticle dispersions, biological variability from testing living cell lines, and the potential for nano-related interference effects. In this experiment, such challenges were addressed by developing a detailed experimental protocol and using a specially designed 96-well plate layout which incorporated a range of control measurements to assess multiple factors such as nanomaterial interference, pipetting accuracy, cell seeding density, and instrument performance. Detailed data analysis of these control measurements showed that good control of the experiments was attained by all participants in most cases. The main measurement objective of the study was the estimation of a dose response relationship between concentration of the nanoparticles and metabolic activity of the living cells, under several experimental conditions. The dose curve estimation was achieved by imbedding a three parameter logistic curve in a three level Bayesian hierarchical model, accounting for uncertainty due to all known experimental conditions as well as between laboratory variability in a top-down manner. Computation was performed using Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods. The fit of the model was evaluated using Bayesian posterior predictive probabilities and found to be satisfactory.

  8. Dose estimation and shielding calculation for X-ray hazard at high intensity laser facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Rui; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Bo; James, C. Liu; Sayed, H. Rokni; Michael, B. Woods; Li, Jun-Li

    2014-12-01

    An ionizing radiation hazard produced from the interaction between high intensity lasers and solid targets has been observed. Laser-plasma interactions create “hot” electrons, which generate bremsstrahlung X-rays when they interact with ions in the target. However, up to now only limited studies have been conducted on this laser-induced radiological protection issue. In this paper, the physical process and characteristics of the interaction between high intensity lasers and solid targets are analyzed. The parameters of the radiation sources are discussed, including the energy conversion efficiency from laser to hot electrons, hot electron energy spectrum and electron temperature, and the bremsstrahlung X-ray energy spectrum produced by hot electrons. Based on this information, the X-ray dose generated with high-Z targets for laser intensities between 1014 and 1020 W/cm2 is estimated. The shielding effects of common shielding items such as the glass view port, aluminum chamber wall and concrete wall are also studied using the FLUKA Monte Carlo code. This study provides a reference for the dose estimation and the shielding design of high intensity laser facilities.

  9. Application of RADTRAN to estimation of doses to persons in enclosed spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Neuhauser, K. S.

    1992-01-01

    The RADTRAN computer code for transportation risk analysis can be used to estimate doses to persons in enclosed volumes. This application was developed in response to a need to examine consequences of a hypothetical container leak during accident-free transportation by cargo air. The original problem addressed tritium containers, but the method can be applied to any gaseous or suspended particulate material potentially released in an airplane or other enclosed area (e.g., warehouse) under accident-free conditions. Such leakage can occur during shipment of any radioactive gas or material with a gaseous phase. Atmospheric dispersion is normally modeled in RADTRAN as a series of downwind isopleths each of which is assigned a dilution factor (also known as time-integrated concentration or X/Q value). These values are located in look-up tables in RADTRAN and are normally taken from externally performed Gaussian dispersion calculations. The dilution factors are used to estimate inhalation dose to persons in the specified downwind areas.

  10. [Dose estimation for renal-excretion drugs in neonates and infants based on physiological development of renal function].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shinya; Murayama, Yuka; Sugiyama, Erika; Sekiyama, Masao; Sato, Hitoshi

    2009-07-01

    We established dose estimation formulae for renal-excretion drugs using the glomerular filtration rate (GFR), tubular secretion clearance (Sc), and unbound fraction of drug in plasma (fp) as a renal function index of physiological development in neonates and infants not more than 2 years of age. A dose ratio of (DC/DA)=clearance ratio of (CLC/CLA) congruent with(fpC.GFRC)/(fpA.GFRA) for neonates and infants/adults was applied to drugs with fp.GFR>Sc, while DC/DA=CLC/CLA congruent with(beta.BSAC+fpC.GFRC)/(beta.BSAA+fpA.GFRA) was applied to drugs with Sc>fp.GFR using the coefficient of each drug (beta) and body surface area (BSA). Validity of the estimation formulae was investigated in drugs with fp.GFR>Sc such as vancomycin (VCM), arbekacin (ABK), fosfomycin (FOM) and norfloxacin (NFLX), and in drugs with Sc>fp.GFR such as digoxin (DGX) and amoxicillin (AMPC). First, we compared the clearance ratio (CLC/ CLA) of VCM, ABK, and DGX estimated by our method with those calculated using the Japanese population clearance values and those estimated allometrically (BSAC/BSAA). Next, we compared the established doses of all drugs investigated with the doses for neonates and infants calculated from the conventional dose estimation methods for children and our estimation formulae, and evaluated our method. As a result, favorable consistency was observed in the CL ratio for all drugs, and the doses of VCM, FOM, NFLX and AMPC calculated from our estimation formulae approximated the established doses. In conclusion, the validity of the dose estimation method using pharmacokinetic factors related to physiological development (i.e., GFR, fp, Sc) for renal-excretion drugs in neonates and infants was demonstrated.

  11. The Concentration Of Tritium In Urine And Internal Radiation Dose Estimation Of PTNBR Radiation Workers

    SciTech Connect

    Tjahaja, Poppy Intan; Sukmabuana, Putu; Aisyah, Neneng Nur

    2010-12-23

    The operation of Triga 2000 reactor in Nuclear Technology Center for Materials and Radiometry (PTNBR BATAN) normally produce tritium radionuclide which is the activation product of deuterium atom in reactor primary cooling water. According to previous monitoring, tritium was detected with the concentration of 8.236{+-}0.677 kBq/L and 1.704{+-}0.046 Bq/L in the primary cooling water and in reactor hall air, respectively. The tritium in reactor hall air chronically can be inhaled by the workers. In this research, tritium content in radiation workers' urine was determined to estimate the internal radiation doses received by the workers. About 50-100 mL of urine samples were collected from 48 PTNBR workers that is classified as 24 radiation workers and 24 administration staffs as a control. Urine samples of 25 mL were then prepared by active charcoal and KMnO{sub 4} addition and followed with complete distillation. The 2 mL of distillate was added with 13 mL scintillator, shaked vigorously and remained in cool and dark condition for about 24 hours. The tritium in the samples was then measured using liquid scintillation counter (LSC) for 1 hour. From the measurement results it was obtained that the tritium concentration in the urine of radiation workers were in the range of not detected and 5.191 Bq/mL, whereas in the administration staffs the concentration were between not detected and 4.607 Bq/mL. Internally radiation doses were calculated using the tritium concentration data, and it was found the averages about 0.602 {mu}Sv/year and 0.532 {mu}Sv/year for radiation workers and administration staffs, respectively. The doses received by the workers were lower than that of the permissible doses from tritium, i.e. 40 {mu}Sv/year.

  12. A review of source term and dose estimation for the TMI-2 reactor accident

    SciTech Connect

    Gudiksen, P.H.; Dickerson, M.H.

    1990-09-01

    The TMI-2 nuclear reactor accident, which occurred on March 28, 1979 in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, produced environmental releases of noble gases and small quantities of radioiodine. The releases occurred over a roughly two week period with almost 90% of the noble gases being released during the first three days after the initiation of the accident. Meteorological conditions during the prolonged release period varied from strong synoptic driven flows that rapidly transported the radioactive gases out of the Harrisburg area to calm situations that allowed the radioactivity to accumulate within the low lying river area and to subsequently slowly disperse within the immediate vicinity of the reactor. The results reported by various analysts, revealed that approximately 2.4--10 million curies of noble gases (mainly Xe-133), and about 14 curies of I-131 were released. During the first two days, when most of the noble gas release occurred, the plume was transported in a northerly direction causing the most exposed area to lie within a northwesterly to northeasterly direction from TMI. Changing surface winds caused the plume to be subsequently transported in a southerly direction, followed by an easterly direction. The calculated maximum whole body dose due to plume passage exceeded 100 mrem over an area extending several kilometers north of the plant, although the highest measured dose was 75 mrem. The collective dose equivalent (within a radius of 80 km) due to the noble gas exposure ranged over several orders of magnitude with a central estimate of 3300 person-rem. The small I-131 release produced barely detectable levels of activity in air and milk samples. This may have produced thyroid doses of a few milirem to a small segment of the population. 7 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Applying gold nanoparticles as tumor-vascular disrupting agents during brachytherapy: estimation of endothelial dose enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngwa, Wilfred; Makrigiorgos, G. Mike; Berbeco, Ross I.

    2010-11-01

    Tumor vascular disrupting agents (VDAs) represent a promising approach to the treatment of cancer, in view of the tumor vasculature's pivotal role in tumor survival, growth and metastasis. VDAs targeting the tumor's dysmorphic endothelial cells can cause selective and rapid occlusion of the tumor vasculature, leading to tumor cell death from ischemia and extensive hemorrhagic necrosis. In this study, the potential for applying gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as VDAs, during brachytherapy, is examined. Analytic calculations based on the electron energy loss formula of Cole were carried out to estimate the endothelial dose enhancement caused by radiation-induced photo/Auger electrons originating from AuNPs targeting the tumor endothelium. The endothelial dose enhancement factor (EDEF), representing the ratio of the dose to the endothelium with and without gold nanoparticles was calculated for different AuNP local concentrations, and endothelial cell thicknesses. Four brachytherapy sources were investigated, I-125, Pd-103, Yb-169, as well as 50 kVp x-rays. The results reveal that, even at relatively low intra-vascular AuNP concentrations, ablative dose enhancement to tumor endothelial cells due to photo/Auger electrons from the AuNPs can be achieved. Pd-103 registered the highest EDEF values of 7.4-271.5 for local AuNP concentrations ranging from 7 to 350 mg g-1, respectively. Over the same concentration range, I-125, 50 kVp and Yb-169 yielded values of 6.4-219.9, 6.3-214.5 and 4.0-99.7, respectively. Calculations of the EDEF as a function of endothelial cell thickness showed that lower energy sources like Pd-103 reach the maximum EDEF at smaller thicknesses. The results also reveal that the highest contribution to the EDEF comes from Auger electrons, apparently due to their shorter range. Overall, the data suggest that ablative dose enhancement to tumor endothelial cells can be achieved by applying tumor vasculature-targeted AuNPs as adjuvants to brachytherapy, with lower

  14. An automated technique for estimating patient-specific regional imparted energy and dose in TCM CT exams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Jeremiah W.; Tian, Xiaoyu; Segars, W. Paul; Boone, John; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-03-01

    Currently computed tomography (CT) dosimetry relies on CT dose index (CTDI) and size specific dose estimates (SSDE). Organ dose is a better metric of radiation burden. However, organ dose estimation requires precise knowledge of organ locations. Regional imparted energy and dose can also be used to quantify radiation burden. Estimating the imparted energy from CT exams is beneficial in that it does not require precise estimates of the organ size or location. This work investigated an automated technique for retrospectively estimating the imparted energy from chest and abdominopelvic tube current modulated (TCM) CT exams. Monte Carlo simulations of chest and abdominopelvic TCM CT examinations across various tube potentials and TCM strengths were performed on 58 adult computational extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms to develop relationships between scanned mass and imparted energy normalized by dose length product (DLP). An automated algorithm for calculating the scanned patient volume was further developed using an open source mesh generation toolbox. The scanned patient volume was then used to estimate the scanned mass accounting for diverse density within the scan region. The scanned mass and DLP from the exam were used to estimate the imparted energy to the patient using the knowledgebase developed from the Monte Carlo simulations. Patientspecific imparted energy estimates were made from 20 chest and 20 abdominopelvic clinical CT exams. The average imparted energy was 274 +/- 141 mJ and 681 +/- 376 mJ for the chest and abdominopelvic exams, respectively. This method can be used to estimate the regional imparted energy and/or regional dose in chest and abdominopelvic TCM CT exams across clinical operations.

  15. Thyroid Remnant Estimation by Diagnostic Dose 131I Scintigraphy or 99mTcO4− Scintigraphy after Thyroidectomy: A Comparison with Therapeutic Dose 131I Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In this clinical study, we have compared routine diagnostic dose 131I scan and 99mTcO4− thyroid scintigraphy with therapeutic dose 131I imaging for accurate thyroid remnant estimation after total thyroidectomy. We conducted a retrospective review of the patients undergoing total thyroidectomy for differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) and subsequently receiving radioactive iodine (RAI) treatment to ablate remnant thyroid tissue. All patients had therapeutic dose RAI whole body scan, which was compared with that of diagnostic dose RAI, 99mTcO4− thyroid scan, and ultrasound examination. We concluded that therapeutic dose RAI scan reveals some extent thyroid remnant in all DTC patients following total thyroidectomy. Diagnostic RAI scan is much superior to ultrasound and 99mTcO4− thyroid scan for the postoperative estimation of thyroid remnant. Ultrasound and 99mTcO4− thyroid scan provide little information for thyroid remnant estimation and, therefore, would not replace diagnostic RAI scan. PMID:27034938

  16. Estimation of Effective Doses for Radiation Cancer Risks on ISS, Lunar, and Mars Missions with Space Radiation Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, M.Y.; Cucinotta, F.A.

    2005-01-01

    Radiation protection practices define the effective dose as a weighted sum of equivalent dose over major sites for radiation cancer risks. Since a crew personnel dosimeter does not make direct measurement of effective dose, it has been estimated with skin-dose measurements and radiation transport codes for ISS and STS missions. The Phantom Torso Experiment (PTE) of NASA s Operational Radiation Protection Program has provided the actual flight measurements of active and passive dosimeters which were placed throughout the phantom on STS-91 mission for 10 days and on ISS Increment 2 mission. For the PTE, the variation in organ doses, which is resulted by the absorption and the changes in radiation quality with tissue shielding, was considered by measuring doses at many tissue sites and at several critical body organs including brain, colon, heart, stomach, thyroid, and skins. These measurements have been compared with the organ dose calculations obtained from the transport models. Active TEPC measurements of lineal energy spectra at the surface of the PTE also provided the direct comparison of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) or trapped proton dose and dose equivalent. It is shown that orienting the phantom body as actual in ISS is needed for the direct comparison of the transport models to the ISS data. One of the most important observations for organ dose equivalent of effective dose estimates on ISS is the fractional contribution from trapped protons and GCR. We show that for most organs over 80% is from GCR. The improved estimation of effective doses for radiation cancer risks will be made with the resultant tissue weighting factors and the modified codes.

  17. Virtual Liver: Estimating Proliferation and Apoptosis of Hepatocytes Exposed to Environmental Chemicals Using ToxCastTM Data

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA’s ToxCastTM program has screened over a thousand chemicals for potential toxicity using hundreds of high-throughput, in vitro assays. The U.S. EPA’s Virtual Liver (v-Liver™) is a cellular systems model of hepatic tissues that enables the estimation of in vivo effects...

  18. A framework for organ dose estimation in x-ray angiography and interventional radiology based on dose-related data in DICOM structured reports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, Artur; Bujila, Robert; Fransson, Annette; Andreo, Pedro; Poludniowski, Gavin

    2016-04-01

    Although interventional x-ray angiography (XA) procedures involve relatively high radiation doses that can lead to deterministic tissue reactions in addition to stochastic effects, convenient and accurate estimation of absorbed organ doses has traditionally been out of reach. This has mainly been due to the absence of practical means to access dose-related data that describe the physical context of the numerous exposures during an XA procedure. The present work provides a comprehensive and general framework for the determination of absorbed organ dose, based on non-proprietary access to dose-related data by utilizing widely available DICOM radiation dose structured reports. The framework comprises a straightforward calculation workflow to determine the incident kerma and reconstruction of the geometrical relation between the projected x-ray beam and the patient’s anatomy. The latter is difficult in practice, as the position of the patient on the table top is unknown. A novel patient-specific approach for reconstruction of the patient position on the table is presented. The proposed approach was evaluated for 150 patients by comparing the estimated position of the primary irradiated organs (the target organs) with their position in clinical DICOM images. The approach is shown to locate the target organ position with a mean (max) deviation of 1.3 (4.3), 1.8 (3.6) and 1.4 (2.9) cm for neurovascular, adult and paediatric cardiovascular procedures, respectively. To illustrate the utility of the framework for systematic and automated organ dose estimation in routine clinical practice, a prototype implementation of the framework with Monte Carlo simulations is included.

  19. A framework for organ dose estimation in x-ray angiography and interventional radiology based on dose-related data in DICOM structured reports.

    PubMed

    Omar, Artur; Bujila, Robert; Fransson, Annette; Andreo, Pedro; Poludniowski, Gavin

    2016-04-21

    Although interventional x-ray angiography (XA) procedures involve relatively high radiation doses that can lead to deterministic tissue reactions in addition to stochastic effects, convenient and accurate estimation of absorbed organ doses has traditionally been out of reach. This has mainly been due to the absence of practical means to access dose-related data that describe the physical context of the numerous exposures during an XA procedure. The present work provides a comprehensive and general framework for the determination of absorbed organ dose, based on non-proprietary access to dose-related data by utilizing widely available DICOM radiation dose structured reports. The framework comprises a straightforward calculation workflow to determine the incident kerma and reconstruction of the geometrical relation between the projected x-ray beam and the patient's anatomy. The latter is difficult in practice, as the position of the patient on the table top is unknown. A novel patient-specific approach for reconstruction of the patient position on the table is presented. The proposed approach was evaluated for 150 patients by comparing the estimated position of the primary irradiated organs (the target organs) with their position in clinical DICOM images. The approach is shown to locate the target organ position with a mean (max) deviation of 1.3 (4.3), 1.8 (3.6) and 1.4 (2.9) cm for neurovascular, adult and paediatric cardiovascular procedures, respectively. To illustrate the utility of the framework for systematic and automated organ dose estimation in routine clinical practice, a prototype implementation of the framework with Monte Carlo simulations is included.

  20. Estimation of the Scatterer Distribution of the Cirrhotic Liver using Ultrasonic Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Tadashi; Hachiya, Hiroyuki

    1998-05-01

    In the B-mode image of the liver obtained by an ultrasonic imaging system, the speckled pattern changes with the progression of the disease such as liver cirrhosis.In this paper we present the statistical characteristics of the echo envelope of the liver, and the technique to extract information of the scatterer distribution from the normal and cirrhotic liver images using constant false alarm rate (CFAR) processing.We analyze the relationship between the extracted scatterer distribution and the stage of liver cirrhosis. The ratio of the area in which the amplitude of the processing signal is more than the threshold to the entire processed image area is related quantitatively to the stage of liver cirrhosis.It is found that the proposed technique is valid for the quantitative diagnosis of liver cirrhosis.

  1. Military participants at U.S. Atmospheric nuclear weapons testing--methodology for estimating dose and uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Till, John E; Beck, Harold L; Aanenson, Jill W; Grogan, Helen A; Mohler, H Justin; Mohler, S Shawn; Voillequé, Paul G

    2014-05-01

    Methods were developed to calculate individual estimates of exposure and dose with associated uncertainties for a sub-cohort (1,857) of 115,329 military veterans who participated in at least one of seven series of atmospheric nuclear weapons tests or the TRINITY shot carried out by the United States. The tests were conducted at the Pacific Proving Grounds and the Nevada Test Site. Dose estimates to specific organs will be used in an epidemiological study to investigate leukemia and male breast cancer. Previous doses had been estimated for the purpose of compensation and were generally high-sided to favor the veteran's claim for compensation in accordance with public law. Recent efforts by the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) to digitize the historical records supporting the veterans' compensation assessments make it possible to calculate doses and associated uncertainties. Our approach builds upon available film badge dosimetry and other measurement data recorded at the time of the tests and incorporates detailed scenarios of exposure for each veteran based on personal, unit, and other available historical records. Film badge results were available for approximately 25% of the individuals, and these results assisted greatly in reconstructing doses to unbadged persons and in developing distributions of dose among military units. This article presents the methodology developed to estimate doses for selected cancer cases and a 1% random sample of the total cohort of veterans under study.

  2. Estimating pediatric entrance skin dose from digital radiography examination using DICOM metadata: A quality assurance tool

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, S. L. Kaufman, R. A.

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: To develop an automated methodology to estimate patient examination dose in digital radiography (DR) imaging using DICOM metadata as a quality assurance (QA) tool. Methods: Patient examination and demographical information were gathered from metadata analysis of DICOM header data. The x-ray system radiation output (i.e., air KERMA) was characterized for all filter combinations used for patient examinations. Average patient thicknesses were measured for head, chest, abdomen, knees, and hands using volumetric images from CT. Backscatter factors (BSFs) were calculated from examination kVp. Patient entrance skin air KERMA (ESAK) was calculated by (1) looking up examination technique factors taken from DICOM header metadata (i.e., kVp and mA s) to derive an air KERMA (k{sub air}) value based on an x-ray characteristic radiation output curve; (2) scaling k{sub air} with a BSF value; and (3) correcting k{sub air} for patient thickness. Finally, patient entrance skin dose (ESD) was calculated by multiplying a mass–energy attenuation coefficient ratio by ESAK. Patient ESD calculations were computed for common DR examinations at our institution: dual view chest, anteroposterior (AP) abdomen, lateral (LAT) skull, dual view knee, and bone age (left hand only) examinations. Results: ESD was calculated for a total of 3794 patients; mean age was 11 ± 8 yr (range: 2 months to 55 yr). The mean ESD range was 0.19–0.42 mGy for dual view chest, 0.28–1.2 mGy for AP abdomen, 0.18–0.65 mGy for LAT view skull, 0.15–0.63 mGy for dual view knee, and 0.10–0.12 mGy for bone age (left hand) examinations. Conclusions: A methodology combining DICOM header metadata and basic x-ray tube characterization curves was demonstrated. In a regulatory era where patient dose reporting has become increasingly in demand, this methodology will allow a knowledgeable user the means to establish an automatable dose reporting program for DR and perform patient dose related QA testing for

  3. [ESTIMATION OF IONIZING RADIATION EFFECTIVE DOSES IN THE INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION CREWS BY THE METHOD OF CALCULATION MODELING].

    PubMed

    Mitrikas, V G

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring of the radiation loading on cosmonauts requires calculation of absorbed dose dynamics with regard to the stay of cosmonauts in specific compartments of the space vehicle that differ in shielding properties and lack means of radiation measurement. The paper discusses different aspects of calculation modeling of radiation effects on human body organs and tissues and reviews the effective dose estimates for cosmonauts working in one or another compartment over the previous period of the International space station operation. It was demonstrated that doses measured by a real or personal dosimeters can be used to calculate effective dose values. Correct estimation of accumulated effective dose can be ensured by consideration for time course of the space radiation quality factor.

  4. Radon Exposure Assessment and Relative Effective Dose Estimation to Inhabitants of Puglia Region, South Italy.

    PubMed

    Quarto, Maria; Pugliese, Mariagabriella; La Verde, Giuseppe; Loffredo, Filomena; Roca, Vincenzo

    2015-11-23

    Indoor radon concentrations were measured in dwellings of the Puglia region in Southern Italy using LR-115 passive detectors. The results show that the radon concentrations varied from 15 ± 2 to 2166 ± 133 Bq/m³ with a geometric mean of 114 Bq/m³ and a geometric standard deviation of 2.3. An analysis on the factors affecting radon concentration such as age of the dwellings, floors, and stories, was performed. The mean effective dose to inhabitants has been calculated and found to be 8.2 mSv/y. Finally, for estimation of cancer risks, the lifetime risk and lung cancer cases per years per million have been calculated.

  5. Radon Exposure Assessment and Relative Effective Dose Estimation to Inhabitants of Puglia Region, South Italy

    PubMed Central

    Quarto, Maria; Pugliese, Mariagabriella; La Verde, Giuseppe; Loffredo, Filomena; Roca, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Indoor radon concentrations were measured in dwellings of the Puglia region in Southern Italy using LR-115 passive detectors. The results show that the radon concentrations varied from 15 ± 2 to 2166 ± 133 Bq/m3 with a geometric mean of 114 Bq/m3 and a geometric standard deviation of 2.3. An analysis on the factors affecting radon concentration such as age of the dwellings, floors, and stories, was performed. The mean effective dose to inhabitants has been calculated and found to be 8.2 mSv/y. Finally, for estimation of cancer risks, the lifetime risk and lung cancer cases per years per million have been calculated. PMID:26610543

  6. ESR spectroscopy for detecting gamma-irradiated dried vegetables and estimating absorbed doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Joong-Ho; Chung, Hyung-Wook; Byun, Myung-Woo

    2000-03-01

    In view of an increasing demand for food irradiation technology, the development of a reliable means of detection for the control of irradiated foods has become necessary. Various vegetable food materials (dried cabbage, carrot, chunggyungchae, garlic, onion, and green onion), which can be legally irradiated in Korea, were subjected to a detection study using ESR spectroscopy. Correlation coefficients ( R2) between absorbed doses (2.5-15 kGy) and their corresponding ESR signals were identified from ESR signals. Pre-established threshold values were successfully applied to the detection of 54 coded unknown samples of dried clean vegetables ( chunggyungchae, Brassica camestris var. chinensis), both non-irradiated and irradiated. The ESR signals of irradiated chunggyungchae decreased over a longer storage time, however, even after 6 months of ambient storage, these signals were still distinguishable from those of non-irradiated samples. The most successful estimates of absorbed dose (5 and 8 kGy) were obtained immediately after irradiation using a quadratic fit with average values of 4.85 and 8.65 kGy being calculated.

  7. RESRAD-BUILD: A model to estimate dose from contaminated structures. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    The RESRAD-BUILD model is an exposure pathway and analysis code used to determine whether radiologically contaminated buildings and structures can be free released for a specific land use (e.g., residential or industrial). The model provides estimates of dose to a hypothetical receptor from the structure. The RESRAD-BUILD technology can calculate dose from variety of site-specific hypothetical scenarios, decay-time intervals, and radionuclides. When using the RESRAD-BUILD code, specific project assumptions must be developed with the appropriate regulatory agencies, especially the cleanup criteria and the exposure scenario to be used. The C Reactor demonstration of RESRAD-BUILD modeled hypothetical future use of below grade portions of the reactor building complex. A residential exposure scenario with a cleanup criteria of 15 mrem/yr above background (Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] draft guidance) was used to coordinate decommissioning with adjacent ongoing remedial actions conducted in accordance with an existing Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) Record of Decision. This paper gives a description of the technology and discusses its performance, applications, cost, regulatory and policy issues, and lessons learned.

  8. Natural radioactivity in various water samples and radiation dose estimations in Bolu province, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Gorur, F Korkmaz; Camgoz, H

    2014-10-01

    The level of natural radioactivity for Bolu province of north-western Turkey was assessed in this study. There is no information about radioactivity measurement reported in water samples in the Bolu province so far. For this reason, gross α and β activities of 55 different water samples collected from tap, spring, mineral, river and lake waters in Bolu were determined. The mean activity concentrations were 68.11 mBq L(-1), 169.44 mBq L(-1) for gross α and β in tap water. For all samples the gross β activity is always higher than the gross α activity. All value of the gross α were lower than the limit value of 500 mBq L(-1) while two spring and one mineral water samples were found to have gross β activity concentrations of greater than 1000 mBq L(-1). The associated age-dependent dose from all water ingestion in Bolu was estimated. The total dose for adults had an average value exceeds the WHO recommended limit value. The risk levels from the direct ingestion of the natural radionuclides in tap and mineral water in Bolu were determinated. The mean (210)Po and (228)Ra risk the value of tap and mineral waters slightly exceeds what some consider on acceptable risk of 10(-4) or less.

  9. Estimating dose rates to organs as a function of age following internal exposure to radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, R.W.; Eckerman, K.F.; Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Cristy, M.; Crawford-Brown, D.J.; Williams, L.R.

    1984-03-01

    The AGEDOS methodology allows estimates of dose rates, as a function of age, to radiosensitive organs and tissues in the human body at arbitrary times during or after internal exposure to radioactive material. Presently there are few, if any, radionuclides for which sufficient metabolic information is available to allow full use of all features of the methodology. The intention has been to construct the methodology so that optimal information can be gained from a mixture of the limited amount of age-dependent, nuclide-specific data and the generally plentiful age-dependent physiological data now available. Moreover, an effort has been made to design the methodology so that constantly accumulating metabolic information can be incorporated with minimal alterations in the AGEDOS computer code. Some preliminary analyses performed by the authors, using the AGEDOS code in conjunction with age-dependent risk factors developed from the A-bomb survivor data and other studies, has indicated that the doses and subsequent risks of eventually experiencing radiogenic cancers may vary substantially with age for some exposure scenarios and may be relatively invariant with age for other scenarios. We believe that the AGEDOS methodology provides a convenient and efficient means for performing the internal dosimetry.

  10. Estimate of safe human exposure levels for lunar dust based on comparative benchmark dose modeling.

    PubMed

    James, John T; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Santana, Patricia A; Scully, Robert R

    2013-04-01

    Brief exposures of Apollo astronauts to lunar dust occasionally elicited upper respiratory irritation; however, no limits were ever set for prolonged exposure to lunar dust. The United States and other space faring nations intend to return to the moon for extensive exploration within a few decades. In the meantime, habitats for that exploration, whether mobile or fixed, must be designed to limit human exposure to lunar dust to safe levels. Herein we estimate safe exposure limits for lunar dust collected during the Apollo 14 mission. We instilled three respirable-sized (∼2 μ mass median diameter) lunar dusts (two ground and one unground) and two standard dusts of widely different toxicities (quartz and TiO₂) into the respiratory system of rats. Rats in groups of six were given 0, 1, 2.5 or 7.5 mg of the test dust in a saline-Survanta® vehicle, and biochemical and cellular biomarkers of toxicity in lung lavage fluid were assayed 1 week and one month after instillation. By comparing the dose--response curves of sensitive biomarkers, we estimated safe exposure levels for astronauts and concluded that unground lunar dust and dust ground by two different methods were not toxicologically distinguishable. The safe exposure estimates were 1.3 ± 0.4 mg/m³ (jet-milled dust), 1.0 ± 0.5 mg/m³ (ball-milled dust) and 0.9 ± 0.3 mg/m³ (unground, natural dust). We estimate that 0.5-1 mg/m³ of lunar dust is safe for periodic human exposures during long stays in habitats on the lunar surface.

  11. Repeated administration of a mild acute toxic dose of di-n-butyltin dichloride at intervals of 3 weeks induces severe lesions in pancreas and liver of rats.

    PubMed

    Merkord, J; Weber, H; Kröning, G; Hennighausen, G

    2001-08-01

    Di-n-butyltin dichloride (DBTC) induced thymus atrophy, bile duct lesions, pancreatitis, and liver lesions in rats. Depending on dose [6 and 8 mg/kg intravenous (i.v.) DBTC] and time (1-24 weeks), the lesions in pancreas developed to a pancreatic fibrosis and the lesions in liver to liver cirrhosis. A single i.v. administration of 4 mg/kg DBTC induces a mild interstitial pancreatitis after 2-4 days followed by a restitutio ad integrum after 21-28 days. In the present study, the lesions of biliopancreatic duct, pancreas, and liver of rats after repeated administration of 4 mg/kg DBTC i.v. at intervals of 3 weeks have been investigated. The histopathological changes of pancreas and liver were examined by light microscopy 1,4, and 7 days and 2,3,4,6,9, and 12 weeks after administration of DBTC. Furthermore, pathobiochemical parameters of pancreatitis (amylase and lipase activity in serum), liver lesions (alkaline phosphatase activity and bilirubin in serum), and of fibrosis (hyaluronic acid in serum) were studied. Repeated administration of rats with DBTC (4 mg/kg i.v.) at intervals of 3 weeks induced an acute interstitial pancreatitis and after 9-12 weeks, a pancreatic fibrosis and liver lesions (intrahepatic bile duct hyperplasia, inflammation in periportal tract, and necrosis). In serum, elevated levels of alkaline phosphatase, bilirubin, and hyaluronic acid were found. This study demonstrates that the organotin compound induces toxic effects on pancreas and liver of rats by repeated administration of lower doses at long intervals. The risk of exposure to organotin at long intervals should be considered.

  12. Protective effect of Ginkgo biloba extract on liver damage by a single dose of CCl(4) in male rats.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Morales, R M; Jaramillo-Juárez, F; Posadas del Río, F A; Reyes-Romero, M A; Rodríguez-Vázquez, M L; Martínez-Saldaña, M C

    2011-03-01

    Functional and morphological alterations were generated by p.o. (per os) administration of a single oral dose of carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4); 0.125 mL/kg b.w., equivalent to 293 mg/kg) to adult male Wistar rats. CCl(4) significantly increased (p < 0.05) the serum activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT; 7478 ± 1044%) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST; 6964 ± 833%), compared to control rats; CCl(4) also significantly decreased serum concentration of albumin (23 ± 5.5%) and increased the concentration of malondialhdeyde (MDA) in liver (300 ± 33%). Furthermore, CCl(4) down-regulated the mRNA steady-state level of tumor necrosis factor a(TNF-a). CCl(4) produced necrosis in the central lobe area, extended to the periphery, nuclear alterations (pycnosis, karyolysis and karyorrhexis), and cytoplasmic acidophilia. The pretreatment with 4 mg/kg (p.o.) of Ginkgo biloba extract (GbE), for 5 days, prevented most of the damage caused by CCl(4): significantly decreased the serum activities of ALT and AST (54 and 65%, respectively), compared to CCl(4)-treated rats; GbE partially prevented the increase of liver MDA (55 ± 14%) and the decrease of albumin concentration to 12 ± 0.2%. This pretreatment prevented the down-regulation of TNF-a and up-regulated the interleukine 6 (IL-6) mRNA steady-state level. Moreover, the GbE reduced the amount of necrotic areas in the central lobe area, compared to CCl(4)-treated rats.

  13. Effects of low-dose tolvaptan on electrolyte abnormality and hemodynamic parameters in a liver cirrhosis-associated portopulmonary hypertension patient: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Ogihara, Yoshito; Yamada, Norikazu; Dohi, Kaoru; Matsuda, Akimasa; Ota, Satoshi; Ishikura, Ken; Nakamura, Mashio; Ito, Masaaki

    2017-01-01

    The present study reported a case of portopulmonary hypertension (POPH) that was secondary to underlying liver cirrhosis in a 58-year-old woman, who was successfully treated with low-dose tolvaptan. The patient had suffered from refractory peripheral edema and electrolyte abnormalities, including severe hypokalemia, under the combination therapy of sildenafil, ambrisentan, furosemide and spironolactone. Subsequent to the initiation of low-dose tolvaptan at 3.75 mg/day with concurrent de-escalation of the dose of furosemide, the daily urine volume increased, peripheral edema improved and the serum potassium level increased immediately. In addition, plasma renin activity, plasma aldosterone concentration and plasma brain natriuretic peptide level decreased within 1 week after the initiation of tolvaptan therapy. Hemodynamic assessments using a right heart catheter revealed that the pulmonary vascular resistance decreased by ~20%. Finally, chronic combination therapy with spironolactone and low-dose tolvaptan without loop diuretics achieved adequate fluid management. In conclusion, the findings of the present study suggest that low-dose tolvaptan may be a promising therapeutic option for liver cirrhosis-associated POPH in patients with an electrolyte abnormality due to liver cirrhosis and conventional diuretics. PMID:28123500

  14. Distribution of carbon-14 and associated radiation dose in rat fetal brain and liver after maternal injection of [{sup 14}C]thymidine

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Sentaro; Kubota, Yoshihisa; Koshimoto, Chihiro; Sato, Hiroshi; Hatashita, Shizuo

    1994-10-01

    Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were injected intravenously with [{sup 14}C]thymidine on day 13.5 of gestation, and the concentrations and radiation doses of {sup 14}C in the fetal brain and liver were determined by liquid scintillation counting were 1.01% of the injected dose per gram wet weight at 6 h after injection and decreased to 0.39% g{sup {minus}1} at 48 h after injection. A significant accumulation of {sup 14}C was observed in the fetal liver: 3.8 and 0.51% of the injected dose per gram wet weight at 6 and 48 h after injection, respectively. Autoradiography showed that, especially at earlier periods after injection, there was remarkable concentration of {sup 14}C in the ventricular zone of the brain and the central region of the liver. With increasing time after injection, the distribution of {sup 14}C became relatively uniform. The concentrations of {sup 14}C in the ventricular zone of the fetal brain, determined by autoradiography, were much higher than those in the whole brain as determined by liquid scintillation counting. Cumulative radiation doses for 6-48 h after injection were 1.27 mGy for the whole fetus and 1.45 mGy for the whole brain. In contrast, the cumulative radiation dose for the ventricular zone of the brain which was determined by autoradiography was approximately 2.2 times that for the whole brain. 18 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. The Balance between CD8(+) T Cell-Mediated Clearance of AAV-Encoded Antigen in the Liver and Tolerance Is Dependent on the Vector Dose.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep R P; Hoffman, Brad E; Terhorst, Cox; de Jong, Ype P; Herzog, Roland W

    2017-04-05

    The liver continuously receives antigens from circulation and the gastrointestinal tract. A complex immune regulatory system has evolved in order to both limit inflammation and promote tolerance in the liver. Although in situ immune tolerance mechanisms enable successful gene therapy and liver transplantation, at the same time they facilitate chronic infections by pathogens such as hepatitis viruses. It is, however, poorly understood why hepatocytes infected with hepatitis viruses or transduced with adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors may be rejected by CD8(+) T cells several months later. We found that hepatic transfer of limited doses of an AAV-ovalbumin vector rapidly induced antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells that only became functionally competent after >2 months. At this time, CD8(+) T cells had downregulated negative checkpoint markers, e.g., the programmed death 1 [PD-1] receptor, and upregulated expression of relevant cytokines. At further reduced vector dose, only intrahepatic rather than systemic CD8(+) T cell responses occurred, showing identical delay in antigen clearance. In contrast, PD-1-deficient mice rapidly cleared ovalbumin. Interestingly, higher vector dose directed sustained transgene expression without CD8(+) T cell responses. Regulatory T cells, IL-10 expression, and Fas-L contributed to high-dose tolerance. Thus, viral vector doses profoundly impact CD8(+) T cell responses.

  16. 3D inpatient dose reconstruction from the PET-CT imaging of {sup 90}Y microspheres for metastatic cancer to the liver: Feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Fourkal, E.; Veltchev, I.; Lin, M.; Meyer, J.; Koren, S.; Doss, M.; Yu, J. Q.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: The introduction of radioembolization with microspheres represents a significant step forward in the treatment of patients with metastatic disease to the liver. This technique uses semiempirical formulae based on body surface area or liver and target volumes to calculate the required total activity for a given patient. However, this treatment modality lacks extremely important information, which is the three-dimensional (3D) dose delivered by microspheres to different organs after their administration. The absence of this information dramatically limits the clinical efficacy of this modality, specifically the predictive power of the treatment. Therefore, the aim of this study is to develop a 3D dose calculation technique that is based on the PET imaging of the infused microspheres.Methods: The Fluka Monte Carlo code was used to calculate the voxel dose kernel for {sup 90}Y source with voxel size equal to that of the PET scan. The measured PET activity distribution was converted to total activity distribution for the subsequent convolution with the voxel dose kernel to obtain the 3D dose distribution. In addition, dose-volume histograms were generated to analyze the dose to the tumor and critical structures.Results: The 3D inpatient dose distribution can be reconstructed from the PET data of a patient scanned after the infusion of microspheres. A total of seven patients have been analyzed so far using the proposed reconstruction method. Four patients underwent treatment with SIR-Spheres for liver metastases from colorectal cancer and three patients were treated with Therasphere for hepatocellular cancer. A total of 14 target tumors were contoured on post-treatment PET-CT scans for dosimetric evaluation. Mean prescription activity was 1.7 GBq (range: 0.58–3.8 GBq). The resulting mean maximum measured dose to targets was 167 Gy (range: 71–311 Gy). Mean minimum dose to 70% of target (D70) was 68 Gy (range: 25–155 Gy). Mean minimum dose to 90% of target

  17. Dual time-point imaging for post-dose binding potential estimation applied to a [(11)C]raclopride PET dose occupancy study.

    PubMed

    Alves, Isadora L; Willemsen, Antoon Tm; Dierckx, Rudi A; da Silva, Ana Maria M; Koole, Michel

    2017-03-01

    Receptor occupancy studies performed with PET often require time-consuming dynamic imaging for baseline and post-dose scans. Shorter protocol approximations based on standard uptake value ratios have been proposed. However, such methods depend on the time-point chosen for the quantification and often lead to overestimation and bias. The aim of this study was to develop a shorter protocol for the quantification of post-dose scans using a dual time-point approximation, which employs kinetic parameters from the baseline scan. Dual time-point was evaluated for a [(11)C]raclopride PET dose occupancy study with the D2 antagonist JNJ-37822681, obtaining estimates for binding potential and receptor occupancy. Results were compared to standard simplified reference tissue model and standard uptake value ratios-based estimates. Linear regression and Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated excellent correlation and agreement between dual time-point and the standard simplified reference tissue model approach. Moreover, the stability of dual time-point-based estimates is shown to be independent of the time-point chosen for quantification. Therefore, a dual time-point imaging protocol can be applied to post-dose [(11)C]raclopride PET scans, resulting in a significant reduction in total acquisition time while maintaining accuracy in the quantification of both the binding potential and the receptor occupancy.

  18. MO-E-17A-04: Size-Specific Dose Estimate (SSDE) Provides a Simple Method to Calculate Organ Dose for Pediatric CT Examinations

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, B; Brady, S; Kaufman, R; Mirro, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Investigate the correlation of SSDE with organ dose in a pediatric population. Methods: Four anthropomorphic phantoms, representing a range of pediatric body habitus, were scanned with MOSFET dosimeters placed at 23 organ locations to determine absolute organ dosimetry. Phantom organ dosimetry was divided by phantom SSDE to determine correlation between organ dose and SSDE. Correlation factors were then multiplied by patient SSDE to estimate patient organ dose. Patient demographics consisted of 352 chest and 241 abdominopelvic CT examinations, 22 ± 15 kg (range 5−55 kg) mean weight, and 6 ± 5 years (range 4 mon to 23 years) mean age. Patient organ dose estimates were compared to published pediatric Monte Carlo study results. Results: Phantom effective diameters were matched with patient population effective diameters to within 4 cm. 23 organ correlation factors were determined in the chest and abdominopelvic region across nine pediatric weight subcategories. For organs fully covered by the scan volume, correlation in the chest (average 1.1; range 0.7−1.4) and abdominopelvic (average 0.9; range 0.7−1.3) was near unity. For organs that extended beyond the scan volume (i.e., skin, bone marrow, and bone surface), correlation was determined to be poor (average 0.3; range: 0.1−0.4) for both the chest and abdominopelvic regions, respectively. Pediatric organ dosimetry was compared to published values and was found to agree in the chest to better than an average of 5% (27.6/26.2) and in the abdominopelvic region to better than 2% (73.4/75.0). Conclusion: Average correlation of SSDE and organ dosimetry was found to be better than ± 10% for fully covered organs within the scan volume. This study provides a list of organ dose correlation factors for the chest and abdominopelvic regions, and describes a simple methodology to estimate individual pediatric patient organ dose based on patient SSDE.

  19. Radium-226 in drinking water and terrestrial food chains: a review of parameters and an estimate of potential exposure and dose

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, A.P.; Etnier, E.L.; McDowell-Boyer, L.M.

    1983-04-01

    Environmental transport of /sup 226/Ra from geological formations to drinking water and from soil to vegetation, meat and milk were quantitatively analyzed following a review of literature. Both natural and industrial sources were investigated. Particular attention was given to references specific for the phosphate-mining region of southwestern Florida. Literature sources have been interpreted to develop concentration factors describing terrestrial food-chain transport. Unweighted means and associated ranges of concentration factor values, representing averages of data collected over a variety of environmental conditions, soil types, and chemical forms, are also provided. Annual human exposure and 50-year dose commitments to bone, lung, liver, kidney and whole body were estimated by assuming mean concentration factors as well as annual food and water consumption rates.

  20. Measurement of soil contamination by radionuclides due to the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident and associated estimated cumulative external dose estimation.

    PubMed

    Endo, S; Kimura, S; Takatsuji, T; Nanasawa, K; Imanaka, T; Shizuma, K

    2012-09-01

    Soil sampling was carried out at an early stage of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident. Samples were taken from areas around FDNPP, at four locations northwest of FDNPP, at four schools and in four cities, including Fukushima City. Radioactive contaminants in soil samples were identified and measured by using a Ge detector and included (129 m)Te, (129)Te, (131)I, (132)Te, (132)I, (134)Cs, (136)Cs, (137)Cs, (140)Ba and (140)La. The highest soil depositions were measured to the northwest of FDNPP. From this soil deposition data, variations in dose rates over time and the cumulative external doses at the locations for 3 months and 1y after deposition were estimated. At locations northwest of FDNPP, the external dose rate at 3 months after deposition was 4.8-98 μSv/h and the cumulative dose for 1 y was 51 to 1.0 × 10(3)mSv; the highest values were at Futaba Yamada. At the four schools, which were used as evacuation shelters, and in the four urban cities, the external dose rate at 3 months after deposition ranged from 0.03 to 3.8μSv/h and the cumulative doses for 1 y ranged from 3 to 40 mSv. The cumulative dose at Fukushima Niihama Park was estimated as the highest in the four cities. The estimated external dose rates and cumulative doses show that careful countermeasures and remediation will be needed as a result of the accident, and detailed measurements of radionuclide deposition densities in soil will be important input data to conduct these activities.

  1. SU-E-T-163: Evaluation of Dose Distributions Recalculated with Per-Field Measurement Data Under the Condition of Respiratory Motion During IMRT for Liver Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J; Yoon, M; Nam, T; Ahn, S; Chung, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The dose distributions within the real volumes of tumor targets and critical organs during internal target volume-based intensity-modulated radiation therapy (ITV-IMRT) for liver cancer were recalculated by applying the effects of actual respiratory organ motion, and the dosimetric features were analyzed through comparison with gating IMRT (Gate-IMRT) plan results. Methods: The 4DCT data for 10 patients who had been treated with Gate-IMRT for liver cancer were selected to create ITV-IMRT plans. The ITV was created using MIM software, and a moving phantom was used to simulate respiratory motion. The period and range of respiratory motion were recorded in all patients from 4DCT-generated movie data, and the same period and range were applied when operating the dynamic phantom to realize coincident respiratory conditions in each patient. The doses were recalculated with a 3 dose-volume histogram (3DVH) program based on the per-field data measured with a MapCHECK2 2-dimensional diode detector array and compared with the DVHs calculated for the Gate-IMRT plan. Results: Although a sufficient prescription dose covered the PTV during ITV-IMRT delivery, the dose homogeneity in the PTV was inferior to that with the Gate-IMRT plan. We confirmed that there were higher doses to the organs-at-risk (OARs) with ITV-IMRT, as expected when using an enlarged field, but the increased dose to the spinal cord was not significant and the increased doses to the liver and kidney could be considered as minor when the reinforced constraints were applied during IMRT plan optimization. Conclusion: Because Gate-IMRT cannot always be considered an ideal method with which to correct the respiratory motional effect, given the dosimetric variations in the gating system application and the increased treatment time, a prior analysis for optimal IMRT method selection should be performed while considering the patient's respiratory condition and IMRT plan results.

  2. Short-Term, Low-Dose Use of Tolvaptan as a Bridge Therapy to Expedite Liver Transplant for Severe Hyponatremic, Cirrhotic Patients With High Model for End-Stage Liver Disease Scores.

    PubMed

    Lenci, Ilaria; Milana, Martina; Angelico, Mario; Baiocchi, Leonardo

    2015-11-17

    For patients on liver transplant waiting lists, hyponatremia is associated with increased mortality before transplant and complications during the early posttransplant period. Conventional therapies, such as fluid restriction or hypertonic saline infusion, are of limited value. We describe 2 patients with high Model for End-Stage Liver Disease scores (> 30) who were referred to our unit for expedited liver transplant. While on waiting lists, these patients developed severe hyponatremia (< 125 mEq/L) that was refractory to conventional therapies. Low-dose, short-term tolvaptan therapy (15 mg/d for 5 d) was then administered, as a bridge therapy to transplant, resulting in prompt restoration of serum sodium levels without any major clinical event. One patient died a few days later as no suitable grafts were available. The other received a liver transplant, and the outcome was uneventful. In conclusion, our report demonstrates that a short-term, low-dose tolvaptan-based strategy promptly resolves hyponatremia in patients who are on expedited waiting lists for liver transplant, allowing surgery with improved sodium levels and possibly limiting peritransplant complications.

  3. The cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay: dose estimation and inter-individual differences in the response to γ-radiation.

    PubMed

    Antunes, A C; Martins, V; Cardoso, J; Santos, L; Monteiro Gil, O

    2014-01-15

    Biological dosimetry plays an important role in case of a radiation accident or incident, either when it is the only way to estimate the dose or when it is used to complement physical dosimetry. A cytogenetic study was conducted in a group of 16 Portuguese individuals by use of the cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus (CBMN) assay. A dose-response curve for micronuclei yield was established with a linear-quadratic model: Y=(0.0122±0.0010)+(0.0241±0.0023)D+(0.0193±0.0007)D(2). Also, baseline values for the micronucleus formation in the 16 donors were analyzed, with results in close agreement with those from other laboratories. A validation experiment was carried out with three individuals. The real and the estimated doses obtained with the dose-response curve were in very good agreement, allowing the use of the micronucleus dose-response calibration curve in biological dosimetry for estimation of radiation dose in case of overexposure. The results obtained for the cytogenetic endpoints, studied in the same group of 16 individuals, were also analyzed as a function of age and gender. A higher inter-variability was observed for the higher dose points and differences in response were identified between genders, above 2Gy, for all endpoints.

  4. Application of airborne gamma spectrometric survey data to estimating terrestrial gamma-ray dose rates: an example in California.

    PubMed

    Wollenberg, H A; Revzan, K L; Smith, A R

    1994-01-01

    We examined the applicability of radioelement data from the National Aerial Radiometric Reconnaissance, an element of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation, to estimate terrestrial gamma-ray absorbed dose rates, by comparing dose rates calculated from aeroradiometric surveys of uranium, thorium, and potassium concentrations with dose rates calculated from a radiogeologic data base and the distribution of lithologies in California. Gamma-ray dose rates increase generally from north to south following lithological trends, with low values of 25-30 nGy h-1 in the northernmost 1 x 2 degrees quadrangles between 41 and 42 degrees N to high values of 75-100 nGy h-1 in southeastern California. Lithologic-based estimates of mean dose rates in the quadrangles generally match those from aeroradiometric data, with statewide means of 63 and 60 nGy h-1, respectively. These are intermediate between a population-weighted global average of 51 nGy h-1 reported in 1982 by UNSCEAR and a weighted continental average of 70 nGy h-1, based on the global distribution of rock types. The concurrence of lithologically and aeroradiometrically determined dose rates in California, with its varied geology and topography encompassing settings representative of the continents, indicates that the National Aerial Radiometric Reconnaissance data are applicable to estimates of terrestrial absorbed dose rates from natural gamma emitters.

  5. Effect of Anatomical Modeling on Space Radiation Dose Estimates: A Comparison of Doses for NASA Phantoms and 5th, 50th, and 95th Percentile UF Hybrid Phantoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahadori, A.; VanBaalen, M.; Shavers, M.; Semones, E.; Dodge, C.; Bolch, W.

    2010-01-01

    The estimate of absorbed dose to individual organs of a space crewmember is affected by the geometry of the anatomical model of the astronaut used in the radiation transport calculation. For astronaut dosimetry, NASA currently uses the computerized anatomical male (CAM) and computerized anatomical female (CAF) stylized phantoms to represent astronauts in its operational radiation dose analyses. These phantoms are available in one size and in two body positions. In contrast, the UF Hybrid Adult Male and Female (UFHADM and UFHADF) phantoms have organ shapes based on actual CT data. The surfaces of these phantoms are defined by non-uniform rational B-spline surfaces, and are thus flexible in terms of body morphometry and extremity positioning. In this study, UFHADM and UFHADF are scaled to dimensions corresponding to 5th, 50th, and 95th percentile (PCTL) male and female astronauts. A ray-tracing program is written in Visual Basic 2008, which is then used to create areal density maps for dose points corresponding to various organs within the phantoms. The areal density maps, along with appropriate space radiation spectra, are input into the NASA program couplet HZETRN/BRYNTRN, and organ doses are calculated. The areal density maps selected tissues and organs of the 5th, 50th, and 95th PCTL male and female phantoms are presented and compared. In addition, the organ doses for the 5th, 50th, and 95th PCTL male and female phantoms are presented and compared to organ doses for CAM and CAF.

  6. Emission rate estimation through data assimilation of gamma dose measurements in a Lagrangian atmospheric dispersion model.

    PubMed

    Tsiouri, V; Kovalets, I; Andronopoulos, S; Bartzis, J G

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an efficient algorithm for estimating the unknown emission rate of radionuclides in the atmosphere following a nuclear accident. The algorithm is based on assimilation of gamma dose rate measured data in a Lagrangian atmospheric dispersion model. Such models are used in the framework of nuclear emergency response systems (ERSs). It is shown that the algorithm is applicable in both deterministic and stochastic modes of operation of the dispersion model. The method is evaluated by computational simulations of a 3-d field experiment on atmospheric dispersion of ⁴¹Ar emitted routinely from a research reactor. Available measurements of fluence rate (photons flux) in air are assimilated in the Lagrangian dispersion model DIPCOT and the ⁴¹Ar emission rate is estimated. The statistical analysis shows that the model-calculated emission rates agree well with the real ones. In addition the model-predicted fluence rates at the locations of the sensors, which were not used in the data assimilation procedure are in better agreement with the measurements. The first evaluation results of the method presented in this study show that the method performs satisfactorily and therefore it is applicable in nuclear ERSs provided that more comprehensive validation studies will be performed.

  7. THE SIZE-SPECIFIC DOSE ESTIMATE (SSDE) FOR TRUNCATED COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY IMAGES.

    PubMed

    Anam, Choirul; Haryanto, Freddy; Widita, Rena; Arif, Idam; Dougherty, Geoff

    2016-11-24

    The purpose of this study is to investigate truncated axial computed tomography (CT) images in the clinical environment and to produce correction factors for abdomen, thoracic and head regions based on clinical data, in order to accurately predict the water-equivalent diameter (DW) and size-specific dose estimate (SSDE). We investigated axial images of 75 patients who underwent CT examinations. Truncated axial images were characterized by the truncation percentage (TP). Correction factors were calculated by using the value of DW for a certain TP (truncated image) divided by the value of DW for TP = 0% (the non-truncated image). Most of the thorax images acquired for this study were truncated images (86.2%), in the abdomen region about half of the images were truncated (48.1%), and in the head region only a small portion were truncated (9.1%). In the thorax region the value of TP for the truncated images varied up to 50%, in the abdomen region it varied up to 35%, and in the head region it was smaller than 10%. We have shown how to accurately estimate DW and SSDE by applying a correction factor to the truncated images. The correction factors increase exponentially with increasing TP. The corrected DW and SSDE for the truncated images were significant in the thoracic region, but were not significant in the abdomen and head regions.

  8. Discrimination of kinetic models in heteroscedastic parametric estimation of bentazepam following multiple dosing.

    PubMed

    Fernandez Lastra, C; Gonzalez Lopez, F; Dominguez-Gil, A; Mariño, E L

    1988-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to attempt to discriminate between single- and two-compartment kinetic models used for calculating the pharmacokinetic parameters of bentazepam when the plasma concentrations of different administrations are used as initial data during multiple dosage regimes. Determination of the best estimated pharmacokinetic parameters was performed using non-linear regression analysis, weighting the data as a function of the error of the analytical technique. Bentazepam was administered at a dose of 25 mg orally at intervals of 8, 12 or 24 h to a total of 9 patients. The mean values of the parameters established for the single-compartment model were Ka = 2.024 h-1; Vd = 2.198 l/kg and Ke = 0.130 h-1. For the two-compartment model these values were: Ka = 2.134 h-1, Vc = 2.049 l/kg, K10 = 0.154 h-1, K12 = 0.042 h-1 and K21 = 0.103 h-1. By application of the MAICE test mean AIC values of 41.62 and 42.52 were obtained for the single- and two-compartment models, respectively. The most suitable kinetic model was determined for each patient according to the predictive nature of the individual parameters of the two kinetic models and by analysis of the residuals of the non-linear regressions of the parametric estimation.

  9. Estimation of effective dose and lifetime attributable risk from multiple head CT scans in ventriculoperitoneal shunted children

    PubMed Central

    Aw-Zoretic, J.; Seth, D.; Katzman, G.; Sammet, S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this review is to determine the averaged effective dose and lifetime attributable risk factor from multiple head computed tomography (CT) dose data on children with ventriculoperitoneal shunts (VPS). Method and materials A total of 422 paediatric head CT exams were found between October 2008 and January 2011 and retrospectively reviewed. The CT dose data was weighted with the latest IRCP 103 conversion factor to obtain the effective dose per study and the averaged effective dose was calculated. Estimates of the lifetime attributable risk were also calculated from the averaged effective dose using a conversion factor from the latest BEIR VII report. Results Our study found the highest effective doses in neonates and the lowest effective doses were observed in the 10–18 years age group. We estimated a 0.007% potential increase risk in neonates and 0.001% potential increased risk in teenagers over the base risk. Conclusion Multiple head CTs in children equates to a slight potential increase risk in lifetime attributable risk over the baseline risk for cancer, slightly higher in neonates relative to teenagers. The potential risks versus clinical benefit must be assessed. PMID:25130177

  10. A macroscopic and microscopic study of radon exposure using Geant4 and MCNPX to estimate dose rates and DNA damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Akker, Mary Evelyn

    Radon is considered the second-leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. Epidemiological studies have been conducted in miner cohorts as well as general populations to estimate the risks associated with high and low dose exposures. There are problems with extrapolating risk estimates to low dose exposures, mainly that the dose-response curve at low doses is not well understood. Calculated dosimetric quantities give average energy depositions in an organ or a whole body, but morphological features of an individual can affect these values. As opposed to human phantom models, Computed Tomography (CT) scans provide unique, patient-specific geometries that are valuable in modeling the radiological effects of the short-lived radon progeny sources. Monte Carlo particle transport code Geant4 was used with the CT scan data to model radon inhalation in the main bronchial bifurcation. The equivalent dose rates are near the lower bounds of estimates found in the literature, depending on source volume. To complement the macroscopic study, simulations were run in a small tissue volume in Geant4-DNA toolkit. As an expansion of Geant4 meant to simulate direct physical interactions at the cellular level, the particle track structure of the radon progeny alphas can be analyzed to estimate the damage that can occur in sensitive cellular structures like the DNA molecule. These estimates of DNA double strand breaks are lower than those found in Geant4-DNA studies. Further refinements of the microscopic model are at the cutting edge of nanodosimetry research.

  11. Using the Microsoft Kinect for patient size estimation and radiation dose normalization: proof of concept and initial validation.

    PubMed

    Cook, Tessa S; Couch, Gregory; Couch, Timothy J; Kim, Woojin; Boonn, William W

    2013-08-01

    Monitoring patients' imaging-related radiation is currently a hot topic, but there are many obstacles to accurate, patient-specific dose estimation. While some, such as easier access to dose data and parameters, have been overcome, the challenge remains as to how accurately these dose estimates reflect the actual dose received by the patient. The main parameter that is often not considered is patient size. There are many surrogates-weight, body mass index, effective diameter-but none of these truly reflect the three-dimensional "size" of an individual. In this work, we present and evaluate a novel approach to estimating patient volume using the Microsoft Kinect™, a combination RGB camera-infrared depth sensor device. The goal of using this device is to generate a three-dimensional estimate of patient size, in order to more effectively model the dimensions of the anatomy of interest and not only enable better normalization of dose estimates but also promote more patient-specific protocoling of future CT examinations. Preliminary testing and validation of this system reveals good correlation when individuals are standing upright with their arms by their sides, but demonstrates some variation with arm position. Further evaluation and testing is necessary with multiple patient positions and in both adult and pediatric patients. Correlation with other patient size metrics will also be helpful, as the ideal measure of patient "size" may in fact be a combination of existing metrics and newly developed techniques.

  12. The effect of dose reduction and feasibility of edge-preserving noise reduction on the detection of liver lesions using MSCT.

    PubMed

    Wessling, Johannes; Esseling, Rainer; Raupach, Rainer; Fockenberg, Stefanie; Osada, Nani; Gerss, Joachim; Heindel, Walter; Fischbach, Roman

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of dose reduction and the potential of noise reduction filters on image quality and the detection of liver lesions using MSCT. Twenty-nine patients with a total of 40 liver lesions underwent 16-slice CT (120 kV; 180 mAs). Virtual noise was added to CT raw datasets simulating effective mAs levels of 155, 130, 105, 80, 55, 30 and 10 mAs. All datasets were post-processed with an edge-preserving noise-reduction filter (ANR-3D), yielding a total of 15 datasets per patient. Ten radiologists performed independent evaluations of image quality, the presence of liver lesions and diagnostic confidence. Quantitative noise and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) were obtained. Superior image quality (P < 0.02), reduction of image noise (P < 0.001) and the increase of lesion-to-liver CNR (P < 0.001) were observed in images processed with the ANR-3D filter. Sensitivity for lesion detection remained unchanged down to 105 mAs (CTDI(w) 6.6 mGy) without filter and 80 mAs (CTDI(w) 5.1 mGy) with ANR-3D. Confidence was rated significantly higher for datasets reconstructed with ANR-3D. The use of a noise-reducing, but edge-preserving filter (ANR-3D) is a promising option to reduce further the radiation dose in liver CT.

  13. Multiomics reveal non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in rats following chronic exposure to an ultra-low dose of Roundup herbicide

    PubMed Central

    Mesnage, Robin; Renney, George; Séralini, Gilles-Eric; Ward, Malcolm; Antoniou, Michael N.

    2017-01-01

    The impairment of liver function by low environmentally relevant doses of glyphosate-based herbicides (GBH) is still a debatable and unresolved matter. Previously we have shown that rats administered for 2 years with 0.1 ppb (50 ng/L glyphosate equivalent dilution; 4 ng/kg body weight/day daily intake) of a Roundup GBH formulation showed signs of enhanced liver injury as indicated by anatomorphological, blood/urine biochemical changes and transcriptome profiling. Here we present a multiomic study combining metabolome and proteome liver analyses to obtain further insight into the Roundup-induced pathology. Proteins significantly disturbed (214 out of 1906 detected, q < 0.05) were involved in organonitrogen metabolism and fatty acid β-oxidation. Proteome disturbances reflected peroxisomal proliferation, steatosis and necrosis. The metabolome analysis (55 metabolites altered out of 673 detected, p < 0.05) confirmed lipotoxic conditions and oxidative stress by showing an activation of glutathione and ascorbate free radical scavenger systems. Additionally, we found metabolite alterations associated with hallmarks of hepatotoxicity such as γ-glutamyl dipeptides, acylcarnitines, and proline derivatives. Overall, metabolome and proteome disturbances showed a substantial overlap with biomarkers of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and its progression to steatohepatosis and thus confirm liver functional dysfunction resulting from chronic ultra-low dose GBH exposure. PMID:28067231

  14. Multiomics reveal non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in rats following chronic exposure to an ultra-low dose of Roundup herbicide.

    PubMed

    Mesnage, Robin; Renney, George; Séralini, Gilles-Eric; Ward, Malcolm; Antoniou, Michael N

    2017-01-09

    The impairment of liver function by low environmentally relevant doses of glyphosate-based herbicides (GBH) is still a debatable and unresolved matter. Previously we have shown that rats administered for 2 years with 0.1 ppb (50 ng/L glyphosate equivalent dilution; 4 ng/kg body weight/day daily intake) of a Roundup GBH formulation showed signs of enhanced liver injury as indicated by anatomorphological, blood/urine biochemical changes and transcriptome profiling. Here we present a multiomic study combining metabolome and proteome liver analyses to obtain further insight into the Roundup-induced pathology. Proteins significantly disturbed (214 out of 1906 detected, q < 0.05) were involved in organonitrogen metabolism and fatty acid β-oxidation. Proteome disturbances reflected peroxisomal proliferation, steatosis and necrosis. The metabolome analysis (55 metabolites altered out of 673 detected, p < 0.05) confirmed lipotoxic conditions and oxidative stress by showing an activation of glutathione and ascorbate free radical scavenger systems. Additionally, we found metabolite alterations associated with hallmarks of hepatotoxicity such as γ-glutamyl dipeptides, acylcarnitines, and proline derivatives. Overall, metabolome and proteome disturbances showed a substantial overlap with biomarkers of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and its progression to steatohepatosis and thus confirm liver functional dysfunction resulting from chronic ultra-low dose GBH exposure.

  15. Comparison of proposed alternative methods for rescaling dialysis dose: resting energy expenditure, high metabolic rate organ mass, liver size, and body surface area.

    PubMed

    Daugirdas, John T; Levin, Nathan W; Kotanko, Peter; Depner, Thomas A; Kuhlmann, Martin K; Chertow, Glenn M; Rocco, Michael V

    2008-01-01

    A number of denominators for scaling the dose of dialysis have been proposed as alternatives to the urea distribution volume (V). These include resting energy expenditure (REE), mass of high metabolic rate organs (HMRO), visceral mass, and body surface area. Metabolic rate is an unlikely denominator as it varies enormously among humans with different levels of activity and correlates poorly with the glomerular filtration rate. Similarly, scaling based on HMRO may not be optimal, as many organs with high metabolic rates such as spleen, brain, and heart are unlikely to generate unusually large amounts of uremic toxins. Visceral mass, in particular the liver and gut, has potential merit as a denominator for scaling; liver size is related to protein intake and the liver, along with the gut, is known to be responsible for the generation of suspected uremic toxins. Surface area is time-honored as a scaling method for glomerular filtration rate and scales similarly to liver size. How currently recommended dialysis doses might be affected by these alternative rescaling methods was modeled by applying anthropometric equations to a large group of dialysis patients who participated in the HEMO study. The data suggested that rescaling to REE would not be much different from scaling to V. Scaling to HMRO mass would mandate substantially higher dialysis doses for smaller patients of either gender. Rescaling to liver mass would require substantially more dialysis for women compared with men at all levels of body size. Rescaling to body surface area would require more dialysis for smaller patients of either gender and also more dialysis for women of any size. Of these proposed alternative rescaling measures, body surface area may be the best, because it reflects gender-based scaling of liver size and thereby the rate of generation of uremic toxins.

  16. A stochastic approach to estimate the uncertainty of dose mapping caused by uncertainties in b-spline registration

    SciTech Connect

    Hub, Martina; Thieke, Christian; Kessler, Marc L.; Karger, Christian P.

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: In fractionated radiation therapy, image guidance with daily tomographic imaging becomes more and more clinical routine. In principle, this allows for daily computation of the delivered dose and for accumulation of these daily dose distributions to determine the actually delivered total dose to the patient. However, uncertainties in the mapping of the images can translate into errors of the accumulated total dose, depending on the dose gradient. In this work, an approach to estimate the uncertainty of mapping between medical images is proposed that identifies areas bearing a significant risk of inaccurate dose accumulation. Methods: This method accounts for the geometric uncertainty of image registration and the heterogeneity of the dose distribution, which is to be mapped. Its performance is demonstrated in context of dose mapping based on b-spline registration. It is based on evaluation of the sensitivity of dose mapping to variations of the b-spline coefficients combined with evaluation of the sensitivity of the registration metric with respect to the variations of the coefficients. It was evaluated based on patient data that was deformed based on a breathing model, where the ground truth of the deformation, and hence the actual true dose mapping error, is known. Results: The proposed approach has the potential to distinguish areas of the image where dose mapping is likely to be accurate from other areas of the same image, where a larger uncertainty must be expected. Conclusions: An approach to identify areas where dose mapping is likely to be inaccurate was developed and implemented. This method was tested for dose mapping, but it may be applied in context of other mapping tasks as well.

  17. Estimating the Hepatic Effects of Xenobiotic Perturbations in a Virtual Liver

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are thousands of environmental chemicals and hundreds of new ones are introduced each year. Human health risk assessments for this number of chemicals is a challenge, and have been completed for only a fraction of these chemicals. The US EPA Virtual Liver (v-LiverTM) projec...

  18. A simple method for accurate liver volume estimation by use of curve-fitting: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Masahito; Nakayama, Yoshiharu; Awai, Kazuo; Inomata, Yukihiro; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the effectiveness of our curve-fitting method by comparing liver volumes estimated by our new technique to volumes obtained with the standard manual contour-tracing method. Hepatic parenchymal-phase images of 13 patients were obtained with multi-detector CT scanners after intravenous bolus administration of 120-150 mL of contrast material (300 mgI/mL). The liver contours of all sections were traced manually by an abdominal radiologist, and the liver volume was computed by summing of the volumes inside the contours. The section number between the first and last slice was then divided into 100 equal parts, and each volume was re-sampled by use of linear interpolation. We generated 13 model profile curves by averaging 12 cases, leaving out one case, and we estimated the profile curve for each patient by fitting the volume values at 4 points using a scale and translation transform. Finally, we determined the liver volume by integrating the sampling points of the profile curve. We used Bland-Altman analysis to evaluate the agreement between the volumes estimated with our curve-fitting method and the volumes measured by the manual contour-tracing method. The correlation between the volume measured by manual tracing and that estimated with our curve-fitting method was relatively high (r = 0.98; slope 0.97; p < 0.001). The mean difference between the manual tracing and our method was -22.9 cm(3) (SD of the difference, 46.2 cm(3)). Our volume-estimating technique that requires the tracing of only 4 images exhibited a relatively high linear correlation with the manual tracing technique.

  19. Prolonged rest period enables the detection of micronucleated hepatocytes in the liver of young adult rats after a single dose of diethylnitrosamine or mitomycin C.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Keisuke; Yamamoto, Mika; Takashima, Miyuki; Seki, Jiro; Miyamae, Yoichi; Wakata, Akihiro

    2015-09-01

    A repeated-dose micronucleus assay utilizing young adult rat hepatocytes was recently developed to evaluate the genotoxicity. In this assay, accumulation of micronucleated hepatocytes (MNHEPs) induced by repeated dosing of genotoxic chemicals is considered to be a key factor in the detection of micronuclei induction. Then, we hypothesized that the period following chemical exposure enable the detection of MNHEP induction in young adult rats, namely that MNHEPs can be generated from chromosomally damaged cells and accumulate following initiation of chemical exposure until sampling. We therefore measured MNHEP induction at 2 or 4 weeks after a single oral administration of 12.5, 50, or 100mg/kg of diethylnitrosamine (DEN) or an intraperitoneal administration of 0.5, 1.0, or 2.0mg/kg of mitomycin C (MMC) to young adult rats. Results showed a statistically significant, dose-dependent increase in the numbers of MNHEPs in DEN- or MMC-treated rats, indicating that prolonged rest period following a single dose of a genotoxic chemical enables the detection of MNHEP induction in the liver of young adult rats. From these results, a single oral administration of 50mg/kg of DEN with a 2- or 4- week rest period can be used as a positive control in repeated-dose liver micronucleus assays. This procedure is superior in terms of labor saving and animal welfare to repeated dosing of DEN.

  20. Effects of High-Dose Creatine Supplementation on Kidney and Liver Responses In Sedentary and Exercised Rats

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Renato A.; Miranda, Humberto; Xavier, Murilo; Lazo-Osorio, Rodrigo A.; Gouvea, Hélio A.; Cogo, José C.; Vieira, Rodolfo P.; Ribeiro, Wellington

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of high-dose of short-term creatine supplementation (5g.kg-1.day-1 to 1 week) and long-term creatine supplementation (1g.kg-1. day-1 to 4-8 weeks) on kidney and liver structure and function of sedentary and exercised Wistar rats (Exercise sessions consisted of swimming at 80% of maximal work load supported during 5 days per week with daily sessions of 60 minutes throughout the duration of the supplementation). Seventy- two animals (245 ± 5g) were divided into four groups (n = 18): control diet Sedentary (SED), Creatine diet Sedentary (CRE), control diet Exercised (EXE), and Creatine diet Exercised (EXECRE). Histological and blood biochemical studies were performed after one, four, and eight weeks of creatine supplementation and exercise (n = 6). No differences were found when comparing SED, EXE and EXECRE groups for kidney and liver structure and function at one, four and eight weeks. However, the CRE group showed higher levels of creatinine (1.1 ± 0.2 vs. 0.4 ± 0.1 mg.dl-1; p < 0.05), and urea (37 ± 3 vs. 19 ± 1 mg.dl-1; p < 0.05) when compared with all others groups at four and eight weeks. At eight weeks, the CRE group presented increased levels of ALT (41 ± 7 vs. 23 ± 7 U.L-1; p < 0.05), AST (89 ± 6 vs. 62 ± 5 U.L-1; p < 0.05), GGT (8.0 ± 0.9 vs. 3.9 ± 1.0 U.L-1; p < 0.05), and AP (125 ± 10 vs. 69 ± 9 U.L-1; p < 0.05) also when compared with all others groups. Moreover, the CRE group demonstrated some structural alterations indicating renal and hepatic damage at four and eight weeks, respectively. These results suggest that long-term creatine supplementation (up to 4-8 weeks) may adversely affect kidney and liver structure and function of sedentary but not of exercised rats. Key points Creatine supplementation is an established ergogenic aid in sports and is now claimed to have therapeutical applications in a variety of diseases. Although acknowledged, this nutritional supplement is rarely monitored precisely about

  1. Induction of rhodanese, a detoxification enzyme, in livers from mice after long-term irradiation with low-dose-rate gamma-rays.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Tetsuo; Taki, Keiko; Wang, Bing; Ono, Tetsuya; Matsumoto, Tsuneya; Oghiso, Yoichi; Tanaka, Kimio; Ichinohe, Kazuaki; Nakamura, Shingo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2008-11-01

    The health effects of low-dose radiation exposure are of public concern. Although molecular events in the cellular response to high-dose-rate radiation exposure have been fully investigated, effects of long-term exposure to extremely low-dose-rate radiation remain unclear. Protein expression was analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis in livers from mice irradiated for 485 days (22 hr/day) at low-dose-rates of 0.032 microGy/min, 0.65 microGy/min and 13 microGy/min (total doses of 21 mGy, 420 mGy and 8000 mGy, respectively). One of the proteins that showed marked changes in expression was identified as rhodanese (thiosulfate sulfurtransferase). Rhodanese expression was increased after irradiation at 0.65 microGy/min and 13 microGy/min, while its expression was not changed at 0.032 microGy/min. Rhodanese is a detoxification enzyme, probably related to the regulation of antioxidative function. However, antioxidative proteins, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD)1 (also known as Cu,Zn-SOD) and SOD2 (also known as Mn-SOD), which can be induced by high-dose-rate radiation, were not induced at any low-dose-rates tested. These findings indicate that rhodanese is a novel protein induced by low-dose-rate radiation, and further analysis could provide insight into the effects of extremely low-dose-rate radiation exposure.

  2. Comparison of different approaches of estimating effective dose from reported exposure data in 3D imaging with interventional fluoroscopy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svalkvist, Angelica; Hansson, Jonny; Bâth, Magnus

    2014-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) imaging with interventional fluoroscopy systems is today a common examination. The examination includes acquisition of two-dimensional projection images, used to reconstruct section images of the patient. The aim of the present study was to investigate the difference in resulting effective dose obtained using different levels of complexity in calculations of effective doses from these examinations. In the study the Siemens Artis Zeego interventional fluoroscopy system (Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany) was used. Images of anthropomorphic chest and pelvis phantoms were acquired. The exposure values obtained were used to calculate the resulting effective doses from the examinations, using the computer software PCXMC (STUK, Helsinki, Finland). The dose calculations were performed using three different methods: 1. using individual exposure values for each projection image, 2. using the mean tube voltage and the total DAP value, evenly distributed over the projection images, and 3. using the mean kV and the total DAP value, evenly distributed over smaller selection of projection images. The results revealed that the difference in resulting effective dose between the first two methods was smaller than 5%. When only a selection of projection images were used in the dose calculations the difference increased to over 10%. Given the uncertainties associated with the effective dose concept, the results indicate that dose calculations based on average exposure values distributed over a smaller selection of projection angles can provide reasonably accurate estimations of the radiation doses from 3D imaging using interventional fluoroscopy systems.

  3. Dose estimation, kinetics and dating of fossil marine mollusc shells from northwestern part of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Aydaş, Canan; Engin, Birol; Kapan, Sevinç; Komut, Tolga; Aydın, Talat; Paksu, Ufuk

    2015-11-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy was used to determine the geological formation age of fossil mollusc shells taken from marine terrace deposits (İkizlerçeşme-Çanakkale) in northwestern part of Turkey. This work reports the first results obtained by the ESR technique on shells collected from this region. In the ESR spectra of the natural and γ-irradiated shell samples, two different signals attributed to orthorombic (gxx=2.0030, gzz=2.0015, gyy=1.9980) and isotropic (g=2.0006) CO2(-) ion radicals were overlaped (Signal C). Annealing and kinetic experiments suggest the possibility of using the ESR signal at g=2.0015 (C signal) for the estimation of accumulated geological doses. The ESR signal growth curve on additional gamma irradiation has been best fitted by a combination of two single exponential saturation functions. This may support the existence of at least two components of the g=2.0015 ESR dating signal. Based on this model, the accumulated dose of the samples was determined as 110±11Gy. Also the isothermal decay curves of the ESR dating signal could be best described by the combination of two first order decay functions. Activation energy and meanlifetime values at 15°C of the two components were calculated as E1=1.4±0.1eV, E2=1.1±0.1eV, τ1=7.2×10(6) years and τ2=3.3×10(3) years, respectively. Uranium content of the studied shells was found to be high according to their chemical analysis. This may point out that the marine shell has received uranium from outside particularly in carbonate sediment. Therefore, the ESR age of the samples was also calculated using Early Uptake (EU), Linear Uptake (LU) and Combined Uptake (CU) models and results were discussed.

  4. Dose estimation using dicentric chromosome assay and cytokinesis block micronucleus assay: comparison between manual and automated scoring in triage mode.

    PubMed

    De Amicis, Andrea; De Sanctis, Stefania; Di Cristofaro, Sara; Franchini, Valeria; Regalbuto, Elisa; Mammana, Giacomo; Lista, Florigio

    2014-06-01

    In cases of an accidental overexposure to ionizing radiation, it is essential to estimate the individual absorbed dose of a potentially radiation-exposed person. For this purpose, biological dosimetry can be performed to confirm, complement or even replace physical dosimetry when this proves to be unavailable. The most validated biodosimetry techniques for dose estimation are the dicentric chromosome assay, the "gold standard" for individual dose assessment, and cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay. However, both assays are time consuming and require skilled scorers. In case of large-scale accidents, different strategies have been developed to increase the throughput of cytogenetic service laboratories. These are the decrease of cell numbers to be scored for triage dosimetry; the automation of procedures including the scoring of, for example, aberrant chromosomes and micronuclei; and the establishment of laboratory networks in order to enable mutual assistance if necessary. In this study, the authors compared the accuracy of triage mode biodosimetry by dicentric chromosome analysis and the cytokinesis block micronucleus assay performing both the manual and the automated scoring mode. For dose estimation using dicentric chromosome assay of 10 blind samples irradiated up to 6.4 Gy of x-rays, a number of metaphase spreads were analyzed ranging from 20 up to 50 cells for the manual and from 20 up to 500 cells for the automatic scoring mode. For dose estimation based on the cytokinesis block micronucleus assay, the micronucleus frequency in both 100 and 200 binucleated cells was determined by manual and automatic scoring. The results of both assays and scoring modes were compared and analyzed considering the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of dose estimation with regard to the discrimination power of clinically relevant binary categories of exposure doses.

  5. Interplanetary crew dose estimates for worst case solar particle events based on historical data for the Carrington flare of 1859.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Daniel L; Townsend, Lawrence W; Hoff, Jennifer L

    2005-01-01

    Over the past two decades, hypothetical models of "worst-case" solar particle event (SPE) spectra have been proposed in order to place an upper bound on radiation doses to critical body organs of interplanetary crews on deep space missions. These event spectra are usually formulated using hypothetical extrapolations of space measurements for previous large events. Here we take a different approach. Recently reported analyses of ice core samples indicate that the Carrington flare of 1859 is the largest event observed in the past 500 years. These ice core data yield estimates of the proton fluence for energies greater than 30 MeV, but provide no other spectrum information. Assuming that the proton energy distribution for such an event is similar to that measured for other recent, large events, interplanetary crew doses are estimated for these hypothetical worst case SPE spectra. These estimated doses are life threatening unless substantial shielding is provided.

  6. Simple Method to Estimate Mean Heart Dose From Hodgkin Lymphoma Radiation Therapy According to Simulation X-Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Nimwegen, Frederika A. van; Cutter, David J.; Schaapveld, Michael; Rutten, Annemarieke; Kooijman, Karen; Krol, Augustinus D.G.; Janus, Cécile P.M.; Darby, Sarah C.; Leeuwen, Flora E. van; Aleman, Berthe M.P.

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: To describe a new method to estimate the mean heart dose for Hodgkin lymphoma patients treated several decades ago, using delineation of the heart on radiation therapy simulation X-rays. Mean heart dose is an important predictor for late cardiovascular complications after Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) treatment. For patients treated before the era of computed tomography (CT)-based radiotherapy planning, retrospective estimation of radiation dose to the heart can be labor intensive. Methods and Materials: Patients for whom cardiac radiation doses had previously been estimated by reconstruction of individual treatments on representative CT data sets were selected at random from a case–control study of 5-year Hodgkin lymphoma survivors (n=289). For 42 patients, cardiac contours were outlined on each patient's simulation X-ray by 4 different raters, and the mean heart dose was estimated as the percentage of the cardiac contour within the radiation field multiplied by the prescribed mediastinal dose and divided by a correction factor obtained by comparison with individual CT-based dosimetry. Results: According to the simulation X-ray method, the medians of the mean heart doses obtained from the cardiac contours outlined by the 4 raters were 30 Gy, 30 Gy, 31 Gy, and 31 Gy, respectively, following prescribed mediastinal doses of 25-42 Gy. The absolute-agreement intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.93 (95% confidence interval 0.85-0.97), indicating excellent agreement. Mean heart dose was 30.4 Gy with the simulation X-ray method, versus 30.2 Gy with the representative CT-based dosimetry, and the between-method absolute-agreement intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.87 (95% confidence interval 0.80-0.95), indicating good agreement between the two methods. Conclusion: Estimating mean heart dose from radiation therapy simulation X-rays is reproducible and fast, takes individual anatomy into account, and yields results comparable to the labor

  7. Age- and sex-dependent model for estimating radioiodine dose to a normal thyroid

    SciTech Connect

    Killough, G.G.; Eckerman, K.F.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the derivation of an age- and sex-dependent model of radioiodine dosimetry in the thyroid and the application of the model to estimating the thyroid dose for each of 4215 patients who were exposed to /sup 131/I in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. The model was made to conform to these data requirements by the use of age-specific estimates of the biological half-time of iodine in the thyroid and an age- and sex-dependent representation of the mass of the thyroid. Also, it was assumed that the thyroid burden was maximum 24 hours after administration (the /sup 131/I dose is not critically sensitive to this assumption). The metabolic model is of the form A(t) = K(exp(-..mu../sub 1/t) - exp(-..mu../sub 2/t)) (..mu..Ci), where ..mu../sub 1/ = lambda/sub r/ + lambda/sub i//sup b/ (i = 1, 2), lambda/sub r/ is the radiological decay-rate coefficient, and lambda/sub i//sup b/ are biological removal rate coefficients. The values of lambda/sub i//sup b/ are determined by solving a nonlinear equation that depends on assumptions about the time of maximum uptake and the eventual biological loss rate (through which age dependence enters). The value of K may then be calculated from knowledge of the uptake at a particular time. The dosimetric S-factor (rad/..mu..Ci-day) is based on specific absorbed fractions for photons of energy ranging from 0.01 to 4.0 MeV for thyroid masses from 1.29 to 19.6 g; the functional form of the S-factor also involves the thyroid mass explicitly, through which the dependence on age and sex enters. An analysis of sensitivity of the model to uncertainties in the thyroid mass and the biological removal rate for several age groups is reported. The model could prove useful in the dosimetry of very short-lived radioiodines. Tables of age- and sex-dependent coefficients are provided to enable readers to make their own calculations. 12 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Demonstration of the Effect of Generic Anatomical Divisions versus Clinical Protocols on Computed Tomography Dose Estimates and Risk Burden

    PubMed Central

    Moorin, Rachael E.; Gibson, David A. J.; Forsyth, Rene K.; Fox, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Objective Choosing to undertake a CT scan relies on balancing risk versus benefit, however risks associated with CT scanning have generally been limited to broad anatomical locations, which do not provided adequate information to evaluate risk against benefit. Our study aimed to determine differences in radiation dose and risk estimates associated with modern CT scanning examinations when computed for clinical protocols compared with those using anatomical area. Methods Technical data were extracted from a tertiary hospital Picture Archiving Communication System for random samples of 20–40 CT examinations per adult clinical CT protocol. Organ and whole body radiation dose were calculated using ImPACT Monte Carlo simulation software and cancer incidence and mortality estimated using BEIR VII age and gender specific lifetime attributable risk weights. Results Thirty four unique CT protocols were identified by our study. When grouped according to anatomic area the radiation dose varied substantially, particularly for abdominal protocols. The total estimated number of incident cancers and cancer related deaths using the mean dose of anatomical area were 86 and 69 respectively. Using more specific protocol doses the estimates rose to 214 and 138 incident cancers and cancer related deaths, at least doubling the burden estimated. Conclusions Modern CT scanning produces a greater diversity of effective doses than much of the literature describes; where a lack of focus on actual scanning protocols has produced estimates that do not reflect the range and complexity of modern CT practice. To allow clinicians, patients and policy makers to make informed risk versus benefit decisions the individual and population level risks associated with modern CT practices are essential. PMID:24878841

  9. Estimating exposure and dose to characterize health risks: the role of human tissue monitoring in exposure assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Sexton, K; Callahan, M A; Bryan, E F

    1995-01-01

    Exposure assessment is an integral part of health risk characterization. Exposure assessments typically address three critical aspects of exposure: the number of people exposed to the environmental toxicant, at specific concentrations, for the time period of interest; the resulting dose; and the relative contribution of important sources and pathways to exposure/dose. Because historically both "point-of-contact" measurements and information about dose and related pharmacokinetic processes have been lacking, exposure assessments have had to rely on construction of "scenarios" to estimate exposure and dose. This could change, however, as advances in development of biologic markers of exposure and dose make it possible to measure and interpret toxicant concentrations in accessible human tissues. The increasing availability of "biomarkers," coupled with improvements in pharmacokinetic understanding, present opportunities to estimate ("reconstruct") exposure from measurements of dose and knowledge of intake and uptake parameters. Human tissue monitoring, however, is not a substitute for more traditional methods of measuring exposure, but rather a complementary approach. A combination of exposure measurements and dose measurements provides the most credible scientific basis for exposure assessment. PMID:7635107

  10. Comparison of Radiation Dose Estimation for Myeloablative Radioimmunotherapy for Relapsed or Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma using 131I Tositumomab to that of Other Types of Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Rajendran, Joseph G.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Durack, Larry; Fisher, Darrell R.; Press, Oliver W.; Eary, Janet F.

    2004-12-01

    Patients with relapsed or refractory mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) demonstrate poor survival after standard treatment. Myeloablative radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using 131I tositumomab (anti-CD20) has the ability to deliver specific radiation absorbed dose to antigen bearing tumor. We reviewed normal organ radiation absorbed doses in MCL patients. METHODS: Records of patients with MCL (n = 25), who received myeloablative RIT between January 1996 and December 2003 were reviewed. Individual patient radiation dosimetry was performed on all patients after a trace labeled infusion of 131I tositumomab (mean = 348 MBq), to calculate the required amount of radioactivity for therapy, based on MIRD schema. RESULTS: Mean organ residence times (hr) corrected for CT derived organ volumes for MCL, were as follows: Lungs:9.0; Liver:12.4; Kidneys:1.7; Spleen:2.17; Whole Body:62.4 and mean radiation absorbed doses mGy/Mbq were: Lungs:1.2; Liver:1.1; Kidneys:0.85; Spleen:1.7; Whole Body: 0.21. This is similar to patients with other NHL. Patients received a mean activity of 21 GBq of 131I (range = 11.5 - 41.4) for therapy estimated to deliver 25 Gy to the normal organ receiving the highest radiation absorbed dose. CONCLUSION: Myeloablative RIT using 131I tositumomab results in normal organ radiation absorbed doses similar to those in patients with other non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and is suitable for treating patients with relapsed or refractory MCL.

  11. Over-dose insulin and stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157. Attenuated gastric ulcers, seizures, brain lesions, hepatomegaly, fatty liver, breakdown of liver glycogen, profound hypoglycemia and calcification in rats.

    PubMed

    Ilic, S; Brcic, I; Mester, M; Filipovic, M; Sever, M; Klicek, R; Barisic, I; Radic, B; Zoricic, Z; Bilic, V; Berkopic, L; Brcic, L; Kolenc, D; Romic, Z; Pazanin, L; Seiwerth, S; Sikiric, P

    2009-12-01

    We focused on over-dose insulin (250 IU/kg i.p.) induced gastric ulcers and then on other disturbances that were concomitantly induced in rats, seizures (eventually fatal), severely damaged neurons in cerebral cortex and hippocampus, hepatomegaly, fatty liver, increased AST, ALT and amylase serum values, breakdown of liver glycogen with profound hypoglycemia and calcification development. Calcium deposits were present in the blood vessel walls, hepatocytes surrounding blood vessels and sometimes even in parenchyma of the liver mainly as linear and only occasionally as granular accumulation. As an antidote after insulin, we applied the stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (10 microg/kg) given (i) intraperitoneally or (ii) intragastrically immediately after insulin. Controls received simultaneously an equivolume of saline (5 ml/kg). Those rats that survived till the 180 minutes after over-dose application were further assessed. Interestingly, pentadecapeptide BPC 157, as an antiulcer peptide, may besides stomach ulcer consistently counteract all insulin disturbances and fatal outcome. BPC 157 rats showed no fatal outcome, they were mostly without hypoglycemic seizures with apparently higher blood glucose levels (glycogen was still present in hepatocytes), less liver pathology (i.e., normal liver weight, less fatty liver), decreased ALT, AST and amylase serum values, markedly less damaged neurons in brain and they only occasionally had small gastric lesions. BPC 157 rats exhibited mostly only dot-like calcium presentation. In conclusion, the success of BPC 157 therapy may indicate a likely role of BPC 157 in insulin controlling and BPC 157 may influence one or more causative process(es) after excessive insulin application.

  12. Low-dose dioxins alter gene expression related to cholesterol biosynthesis, lipogenesis, and glucose metabolism through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated pathway in mouse liver

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Shoko; Shirakawa, Hitoshi Tomita, Shuhei; Ohsaki, Yusuke; Haketa, Keiichi; Tooi, Osamu; Santo, Noriaki; Tohkin, Masahiro; Furukawa, Yuji; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Komai, Michio

    2008-05-15

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a common environmental contaminant. TCDD binds and activates the transcription factor aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), leading to adverse biological responses via the alteration of the expression of various AHR target genes. Although small amounts of TCDD are consumed via contaminated daily foodstuffs and environmental exposures, the effects of low-dose TCDD on gene expression in animal tissues have not been clarified, while a number of genes affected by high-dose TCDD were reported. In this study, we comprehensively analyzed gene expression profiles in livers of C57BL/6N mice that were orally administered relatively low doses of TCDD (5, 50, or 500 ng/kg body weight (bw) day{sup -1}) for 18 days. The hepatic TCDD concentrations, measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, were 1.2, 17, and 1063 pg toxicity equivalent quantity (TEQ)/g, respectively. The mRNA level of the cytochrome P450 CYP1A1 was significantly increased by treatment with only TCDD 500 ng/kg bw day{sup -1}. DNA microarray and quantitative RT-PCR analyses revealed changes in the expression of genes involved in the circadian rhythm, cholesterol biosynthesis, fatty acid synthesis, and glucose metabolism in the liver with at all doses of TCDD employed. However, repression of expression of genes involved in energy metabolism was not observed in the livers of Ahr-null mice that were administered the same dose of TCDD. These results indicate that changes in gene expression by TCDD are mediated by AHR and that exposure to low-dose TCDD could affect energy metabolism via alterations of gene expression.

  13. Hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD) with complete occlusion of liver venules after tandem autologous stem cell transplantation-- successful treatment with high-dose methylprednisolone and defibrotide.

    PubMed

    Sayer, H G; Will, U; Schilling, K; Vogt, T; Wollina, K; Höffken, K

    2002-03-01

    Veno-occlusive disease (VOD) is a life-threatening complication following allogeneic or autologous stem cell transplantation. We report on a patient with a high grade B-cell lymphoma who presented 28 days after the second autologous stem cell transplantation with weight gain, ascites, hyperbilirubinemia, and liver venules occlusion as demonstrated by sonography. Starting with high-dose methylprednisolone treatment followed by defibrotide maintenance therapy the patient showed dramatic complete response of VOD, resulting in a normal sonography of the liver and normalization of laboratory values. The response of the occlusion of nearly all liver venules underlines the value of anti-inflammatory treatment combined with new thrombolytic medication such as defibrotide for the treatment of severe VOD.

  14. Absorbed dose estimates to structures of the brain and head using a high-resolution voxel-based head phantom.

    PubMed

    Evans, J F; Blue, T E; Gupta, N

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the viability of using a high-resolution 3-D head phantom in Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) structure dosimetry. This work describes a high-resolution voxel-based model of a human head and its use for calculating absorbed doses to the structures of the brain. The Zubal head phantom is a 3-D model of a human head that can be displayed and manipulated on a computer. Several changes were made to the original head phantom which now contains over 29 critical structures of the brain and head. The modified phantom is a 85 x 109 x 120 lattice of voxels, where each voxel is 2.2 x 2.2 x 1.4 mm3. This model was translated into MCNP lattice format. As a proof of principle study, two MCNP absorbed dose calculations were made (left and right lateral irradiations) using a uniformly distributed neutron disk source with an 1/E energy spectrum. Additionally, the results of these two calculations were combined to estimate the absorbed doses from a bilateral irradiation. Radiobiologically equivalent (RBE) doses were calculated for all structures and were normalized to 12.8 Gy-Eq. For a left lateral irradiation, the left motor cortex receives the limiting RBE dose. For a bilateral irradiation, the insula cortices receive the limiting dose. Among the nonencephalic structures, the parotid glands receive RBE doses that were within 15% of the limiting dose.

  15. An estimate by two methods of thyroid absorbed doses due to BRAVO fallout in several northern Marshall Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Musolino, S.V.; Hull, A.P.; Greenhouse, N.A.

    1997-10-01

    Estimates of the thyroid absorbed doses due to fallout originating from the 1 March 1954 BRAVO thermonuclear test on Bikini Atoll have been made for several inhabited locations in the Northern Marshall Islands. Rongelap, Utirik, Rongerik and Ailinginae Atolls were also inhabited on 1 March 1954, where retrospective thyroid absorbed doses have previously been reconstructed. Current estimates are based primarily on external exposure data, which were recorded shortly after each nuclear test in the Castle Series, and secondarily on soil concentrations of {sup 137}Cs in samples collected in 1978 and 1988, along with aerial monitoring done in 1978. External exposures and {sup 137}Cs Soil concentrations were representative of the atmospheric transport and deposition patterns of the entire Castle Series tests and show that the BRAVO test was the major contributor to fallout exposure during the Castle series and other test series which were carried out in the Marshall Islands. These data have been used as surrogates for fission product radioiodines and telluriums in order to estimate the range of thyroid absorbed doses that may have occurred throughout the Marshall Islands. Dosimetry based on these two sets of estimates agreed within a factor of 4 at the locations where BRAVO was the dominant contributor to the total exposure and deposition. Both methods indicate that thyroid absorbed doses in the range of 1 Gy (100 rad) may have been incurred in some of the northern locations, whereas the doses at southern locations did not significantly exceed levels comparable to those from worldwide fallout. The results of these estimates indicate that a systematic medical survey for thyroid disease should be conducted, and that a more definitive dose reconstruction should be made for all the populated atolls and islands in the Northern Marshall Islands beyond Rongelap, Utirik, Rongerik and Ailinginae, which were significantly contaminated by BRAVO fallout. 30 refs., 2 figs., 10 tabs.

  16. An estimate by two methods of thyroid absorbed doses due to BRAVO fallout in several Northern Marshall Islands.

    PubMed

    Musolino, S V; Greenhouse, N A; Hull, A P

    1997-10-01

    Estimates of the thyroid absorbed doses due to fallout originating from the 1 March 1954 BRAVO thermonuclear test on Bikini Atoll have been made for several inhabited locations in the Northern Marshall Islands. Rongelap, Utirik, Rongerik and Ailinginae Atolls were also inhabited on 1 March 1954, where retrospective thyroid absorbed doses have previously been reconstructed. The current estimates are based primarily on external exposure data, which were recorded shortly after each nuclear test in the Castle Series, and secondarily on soil concentrations of 137Cs in samples collected in 1978 and 1988, along with aerial monitoring done in 1978. The external exposures and 137Cs soil concentrations were representative of the atmospheric transport and deposition patterns of the entire Castle Series tests and show that the BRAVO test was the major contributor to fallout exposure during the Castle series and other test series which were carried out in the Marshall Islands. These data have been used as surrogates for fission product radioiodines and telluriums in order to estimate the range of thyroid absorbed doses that may have occurred throughout the Marshall Islands. Dosimetry based on these two sets of estimates agreed within a factor of 4 at the locations where BRAVO was the dominant contributor to the total exposure and deposition. Both methods indicate that thyroid absorbed doses in the range of 1 Gy (100 rad) may have been incurred in some of the northern locations, whereas the doses at southern locations did not significantly exceed levels comparable to those from worldwide fallout. The results of these estimates indicate that a systematic medical survey for thyroid disease should be conducted, and that a more definitive dose reconstruction should be made for all the populated atolls and islands in the Northern Marshall Islands beyond Rongelap, Utirik, Rongerik and Ailinginae, which were significantly contaminated by BRAVO fallout.

  17. Estimation of effective imaging dose for kilovoltage intratreatment monitoring of the prostate position during cancer radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ng, J A; Booth, J; Poulsen, P; Kuncic, Z; Keall, P J

    2013-01-01

    Kilovoltage Intratreatment Monitoring (KIM) is a novel real-time localization modality where the tumor position is continuously measured during Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) or Intensity Modulated Arc Therapy (IMAT) by a kilovoltage (kV) x-ray imager. Adding kV imaging during therapy adds radiation dose. The additional effective dose is quantified for prostate radiotherapy and compared to dose from other localization modalities. The software PCXMC 2.0 was used to calculate the effective dose delivered to a phantom as a function of imager angle and field size for a Varian On-Board Imager. The average angular effective dose was calculated for a field size of 6 cm × 6 cm. The average angular effective dose was used in calculations for different treatment scenarios. Treatment scenarios considered were treatment type and fractionation. For all treatment scenarios, (i.e. conventionally fractionated and SBRT; IMRT and IMAT), the total KIM dose at 1 Hz ranged from 2–10 mSv. This imaging dose is less than the Navotek radioactive implant dose (64 mSv) and a standard SBRT CBCT pretreatment scan dose (22 mSv) over an entire treatment regime. KIM delivers an acceptably low effective dose for daily use as a real-time image-guidance method for prostate radiotherapy. PMID:23938470

  18. Estimation of effective imaging dose for kilovoltage intratreatment monitoring of the prostate position during cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, J. A.; Booth, J.; Poulsen, P.; Kuncic, Z.; Keall, P. J.

    2013-09-01

    Kilovoltage intratreatment monitoring (KIM) is a novel real-time localization modality where the tumor position is continuously measured during intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) by a kilovoltage (kV) x-ray imager. Adding kV imaging during therapy adds radiation dose. The additional effective dose is quantified for prostate radiotherapy and compared to dose from other localization modalities. The software PCXMC 2.0 was used to calculate the effective dose delivered to a phantom as a function of imager angle and field size for a Varian On-Board Imager. The average angular effective dose was calculated for a field size of 6 cm × 6 cm. The average angular effective dose was used in calculations for different treatment scenarios. Treatment scenarios considered were treatment type and fractionation. For all treatment scenarios, (i.e. conventionally fractionated and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), IMRT and IMAT), the total KIM dose at 1 Hz ranged from 2-10 mSv. This imaging dose is less than the Navotek radioactive implant dose (64 mSv) and a standard SBRT cone beam computed tomography pretreatment scan dose (22 mSv) over an entire treatment regime. KIM delivers an acceptably low effective dose for daily use as a real-time image-guidance method for prostate radiotherapy.

  19. Comparison of dose at an interventional reference point between the displayed estimated value and measured value.

    PubMed

    Chida, Koichi; Inaba, Yohei; Morishima, Yoshiaki; Taura, Masaaki; Ebata, Ayako; Yanagawa, Isao; Takeda, Ken; Zuguchi, Masayuki

    2011-07-01

    Today, interventional radiology (IR) X-ray units are required for display of doses at an interventional reference point (IRP) for the operator (IR physician). The dose displayed at the IRP (the reference dose) of an X-ray unit has been reported to be helpful for characterizing patient exposure in real time. However, no detailed report has evaluated the accuracy of the reference doses displayed on X-ray equipment. Thus, in this study, we compared the displayed reference dose to the actual measured value in many IR X-ray systems. Although the displayed reference doses of many IR X-ray systems agreed with the measured actual values within approximately 15%, the doses of a few IR units were not close. Furthermore, some X-ray units made in Japan displayed reference doses quite different from the actual measured value, probably because the reference point of these units differs from the International Electrotechnical Commission standard. Thus, IR physicians should pay attention to the location of the IRP of the displayed reference dose in Japan. Furthermore, physicians should be aware of the accuracy of the displayed reference dose of the X-ray system that they use for IR. Thus, regular checks of the displayed reference dose of the X-ray system are important.

  20. Estimated dose rates to members of the public from external exposure to patients with 131I thyroid treatment

    DOE PAGES

    Dewji, S.; Bellamy, M.; Hertel, N.; ...

    2015-03-25

    The purpose of this study is to estimate dose rates that may result from exposure to patients who had been administered iodine-131 (131I) as part of medical therapy were calculated. These effective dose rate estimates were compared with simplified assumptions under United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 8.39, which does not consider body tissue attenuation nor time-dependent redistribution and excretion of the administered 131I. Methods: Dose rates were estimated for members of the public potentially exposed to external irradiation from patients recently treated with 131I. Tissue attenuation and iodine biokinetics were considered in the patient in a larger comprehensivemore » effort to improve external dose rate estimates. The external dose rate estimates are based on Monte Carlo simulations using the Phantom with Movable Arms and Legs (PIMAL), previously developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission. PIMAL was employed to model the relative positions of the 131I patient and members of the public in three exposure scenarios: (1) traveling on a bus in a total of six seated or standing permutations, (2) two nursing home cases where a caregiver is seated at 30 cm from the patient’s bedside and a nursing home resident seated 250 cm away from the patient in an adjacent bed, and (3) two hotel cases where the patient and a guest are in adjacent rooms with beds on opposite sides of the common wall, with the patient and guest both in bed and either seated back-to-back or lying head to head. The biokinetic model predictions of the retention and distribution of 131I in the patient assumed a single voiding of urinary bladder contents that occurred during the trip at 2, 4, or 8 h after 131I administration for the public transportation cases, continuous first-order voiding for the nursing home cases, and regular periodic voiding at 4, 8, or 12 h after administration for the hotel room cases. Organ

  1. Estimated dose rates to members of the public from external exposure to patients with {sup 131}I thyroid treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Dewji, S. Bellamy, M.; Leggett, R.; Eckerman, K.; Hertel, N.; Sherbini, S.; Saba, M.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Estimated dose rates that may result from exposure to patients who had been administered iodine-131 ({sup 131}I) as part of medical therapy were calculated. These effective dose rate estimates were compared with simplified assumptions under United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 8.39, which does not consider body tissue attenuation nor time-dependent redistribution and excretion of the administered {sup 131}I. Methods: Dose rates were estimated for members of the public potentially exposed to external irradiation from patients recently treated with {sup 131}I. Tissue attenuation and iodine biokinetics were considered in the patient in a larger comprehensive effort to improve external dose rate estimates. The external dose rate estimates are based on Monte Carlo simulations using the Phantom with Movable Arms and Legs (PIMAL), previously developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission. PIMAL was employed to model the relative positions of the {sup 131}I patient and members of the public in three exposure scenarios: (1) traveling on a bus in a total of six seated or standing permutations, (2) two nursing home cases where a caregiver is seated at 30 cm from the patient’s bedside and a nursing home resident seated 250 cm away from the patient in an adjacent bed, and (3) two hotel cases where the patient and a guest are in adjacent rooms with beds on opposite sides of the common wall, with the patient and guest both in bed and either seated back-to-back or lying head to head. The biokinetic model predictions of the retention and distribution of {sup 131}I in the patient assumed a single voiding of urinary bladder contents that occurred during the trip at 2, 4, or 8 h after {sup 131}I administration for the public transportation cases, continuous first-order voiding for the nursing home cases, and regular periodic voiding at 4, 8, or 12 h after administration for the hotel room cases. Organ

  2. Evaluation of in vivo genotoxicity by thioacetamide in a 28-day repeated-dose liver micronucleus assay using male young adult rats.

    PubMed

    Sui, Hajime; Matsumoto, Hirotaka; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi

    2015-03-01

    The repeated-dose liver micronucleus (RDLMN) assay has the potential to detect liver carcinogens and can be integrated into general toxicological studies. In this study, thioacetamide (TAA) was tested in 14- and 28-day RDLMN assays to assess the performance of the assay. The test substance, TAA, was administered orally to 6-week-old male Crl:CD (SD) rats once daily for 14 or 28 days at a dosage of 5, 10 or 20mg/kg/day. Hepatocytes were collected approximately 24h after the last TAA administration, and the incidence of micronuclei was assessed. In this study, bone marrow micronucleus assays were also conducted in the same animals. The 14- and 28-day RDLMN assays indicated that none of the TAA dosages significantly increased the proportion of micronucleated hepatocytes. Bone marrow micronucleus assays with TAA also provided negative results. It is known that TAA is a liver carcinogen in mice and rats. In the previous genotoxic studies, the Ames test and the chromosomal aberration test using CHL/IU cells have yielded negative results [1-4]. The liver micronucleus assay using young adult rats singly dosed with TAA (75 and 150mg/kg) also produced negative results [5]. TAA gave positive results only in the mouse bone marrow micronucleus assays [6,7].

  3. Modulation of ornithine decarboxylase activity in the normal and regenerating rat liver by various doses of the peptide morphogen of Hydra

    SciTech Connect

    Yarygin, K.N.; Kazimirskii, A.N.; Kositskii, G.I.; Rubina, A.Yu.; Vinogradov, V.A.; Pylaev, A.S.

    1986-11-01

    In this investigation, changes in ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity were studied in the normal and regenerating liver of rats receiving injections of various doses of Hydra peptide morphogen (HPM). Activity of ODC was determined by a radioisotope method based on liberation of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ from L-(1-/sup 14/C)-ornithine. The results indicate in the author's opinion that HPM may have a role in the regulation of anabolic processes and, in particular, of regenerative processes in mammals.

  4. Dose of Phenobarbital and Age of Treatment at Early Life are Two Key Factors for the Persistent Induction of Cytochrome P450 Enzymes in Adult Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Tien, Yun-Chen; Liu, Ke; Pope, Chad; Wang, Pengcheng; Ma, Xiaochao

    2015-01-01

    Drug treatment of neonates and infants and its long-term consequences on drug responses have emerged in recent years as a major challenge for health care professionals. In the current study, we use phenobarbital as a model drug and mouse as an in vivo model to demonstrate that the dose of phenobarbital and age of treatment are two key factors for the persistent induction of gene expression and consequential increases of enzyme activities of Cyp2b, Cyp2c, and Cyp3a in adult livers. We show that phenobarbital treatment at early life of day 5 after birth with a low dose (<100 mg/kg) does not change expression and enzyme activities of Cyp2b, Cyp2c, and Cyp3a in adult mouse liver, whereas phenobarbital treatment with a high dose (>200 mg/kg) significantly increases expression and enzyme activities of these P450s in adult liver. We also demonstrate that phenobarbital treatment before day 10 after birth, but not at later ages, significantly increases mRNAs, proteins, and enzyme activities of the tested P450s. Such persistent induction of P450 gene expression and enzyme activities in adult livers by phenobarbital treatment only occurs within a sensitive age window early in life. The persistent induction in gene expression and enzyme activities is higher in female mice than in male mice for Cyp2b10 but not for Cyp2c29 and Cyp3a11. These results will stimulate studies to evaluate the long-term impacts of drug treatment with different doses at neonatal and infant ages on drug metabolism, therapeutic efficacy, and drug-induced toxicity throughout the rest of life. PMID:26400395

  5. Is the assumption of normality or log-normality for continuous response data critical for benchmark dose estimation?

    PubMed

    Shao, Kan; Gift, Jeffrey S; Setzer, R Woodrow

    2013-11-01

    Continuous responses (e.g. body weight) are widely used in risk assessment for determining the benchmark dose (BMD) which is used to derive a U.S. EPA reference dose. One critical question that is not often addressed in dose-response assessments is whether to model the continuous data as normally or log-normally distributed. Additionally, if lognormality is assumed, and only summarized response data (i.e., mean±standard deviation) are available as is usual in the peer-reviewed literature, the BMD can only be approximated. In this study, using the "hybrid" method and relative deviation approach, we first evaluate six representative continuous dose-response datasets reporting individual animal responses to investigate the impact on BMD/BMDL estimates of (1) the distribution assumption and (2) the use of summarized versus individual animal data when a log-normal distribution is assumed. We also conduct simulation studies evaluating model fits to various known distributions to investigate whether the distribution assumption has influence on BMD/BMDL estimates. Our results indicate that BMDs estimated using the hybrid method are more sensitive to the distribution assumption than counterpart BMDs estimated using the relative deviation approach. The choice of distribution assumption has limited impact on the BMD/BMDL estimates when the within dose-group variance is small, while the lognormality assumption is a better choice for relative deviation method when data are more skewed because of its appropriateness in describing the relationship between mean and standard deviation. Additionally, the results suggest that the use of summarized data versus individual response data to characterize log-normal distributions has minimal impact on BMD estimates.

  6. Estimation of beta-ray skin dose from exposure to fission fallout from the Hiroshima atomic bomb.

    PubMed

    Endo, Satoru; Tanaka, Kenichi; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Hoshi, Masaharu; Imanaka, Tetsuji

    2012-03-01

    Beta-ray skin dose due to the fission fallout from the Hiroshima atomic bomb is potentially related to the epilation in the black rain area. The absorbed dose to the skin from beta-rays emitted by fission fallout has been estimated for an initial ¹³⁷Cs deposition of 1 kBq m⁻² on the ground at 0.5 h after the explosion. The estimated skin dose takes into account both external exposure from fission fallout radionuclides uniformly distributed in 1 mm of soil on the surface of the ground and from a 26 μm thickness of contaminated soil on the skin, using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP-4C. The cumulative skin dose for 1 month after the explosion is taken as the representative value. The estimated skin dose for an initial ¹³⁷Cs deposition of 1 kBq m⁻² was determined to be about 500 mSv.