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Sample records for liver progenitor cell

  1. Liver progenitor cells-mediated liver regeneration in liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Shang, Haitao; Wang, Zhijun; Song, Yuhu

    2016-05-01

    Cirrhosis is defined as the histological development of regenerative nodules surrounded by fibrous bands in response to chronic liver injury. In cirrhotic liver where hepatocytes proliferation is compromised, liver progenitor cells (LPCs) are activated and then differentiated into hepatocytes and cholangiocytes, leading to the generation of regenerative nodules and functional restoration. Here, we summarize and discuss recent findings on the mechanisms underlying LPCs-mediated regeneration in liver cirrhosis. Firstly, we provide recent research on the mechanism underlying LPCs activation in severe or chronic liver injury. Secondly, we present new and exciting data on exploring the origin of LPCs, which reveal that the hepatocytes give rise to duct-like progenitors that then differentiate back into hepatocytes in chronic liver injury or liver cirrhosis. Finally, we highlight recent findings from the literature exploring the role of LPCs niche in directing the behavior and fate of LPCs. This remarkable insight into the cellular and molecular mechanisms of LPCs-mediated regeneration in liver cirrhosis will provide a basis for translating this knowledge into clinical application.

  2. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cell progenitor cells promote liver regeneration in rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin; Wang, Xiangdong; Xie, Guanhua; Wang, Lei; Hill, Colin K.; DeLeve, Laurie D.

    2012-01-01

    The ability of the liver to regenerate is crucial to protect liver function after injury and during chronic disease. Increases in hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) are thought to drive liver regeneration. However, in contrast to endothelial progenitor cells, mature LSECs express little HGF. Therefore, we sought to establish in rats whether liver injury causes BM LSEC progenitor cells to engraft in the liver and provide increased levels of HGF and to examine the relative contribution of resident and BM LSEC progenitors. LSEC label-retaining cells and progenitors were identified in liver and LSEC progenitors in BM. BM LSEC progenitors did not contribute to normal LSEC turnover in the liver. However, after partial hepatectomy, BM LSEC progenitor proliferation and mobilization to the circulation doubled. In the liver, one-quarter of the LSECs were BM derived, and BM LSEC progenitors differentiated into fenestrated LSECs. When irradiated rats underwent partial hepatectomy, liver regeneration was compromised, but infusion of LSEC progenitors rescued the defect. Further analysis revealed that BM LSEC progenitors expressed substantially more HGF and were more proliferative than resident LSEC progenitors after partial hepatectomy. Resident LSEC progenitors within their niche may play a smaller role in recovery from partial hepatectomy than BM LSEC progenitors, but, when infused after injury, these progenitors engrafted and expanded markedly over a 2-month period. In conclusion, LSEC progenitor cells are present in liver and BM, and recruitment of BM LSEC progenitors is necessary for normal liver regeneration. PMID:22406533

  3. Mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells in patients with liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Gehling, Ursula M; Willems, Marc; Schlagner, Kathleen; Benndorf, Ralf A; Dandri, Maura; Petersen, Jörg; Sterneck, Martina; Pollok, Joerg-Matthias; Hossfeld, Dieter K; Rogiers, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To test the hypothesis that liver cirrhosis is associated with mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. METHODS: Peripheral blood samples from 72 patients with liver cirrhosis of varying etiology were analyzed by flow cytometry. Identified progenitor cell subsets were immunoselected and used for functional assays in vitro. Plasma levels of stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) were measured using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: Progenitor cells with a CD133+/CD45+/CD14+ phenotype were observed in 61% of the patients. Between 1% and 26% of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNCs) displayed this phenotype. Furthermore, a distinct population of c-kit+ progenitor cells (between 1% and 38 % of the MNCs) could be detected in 91% of the patients. Additionally, 18% of the patients showed a population of progenitor cells (between 1% and 68% of the MNCs) that was characterized by expression of breast cancer resistance protein-1. Further phenotypic analysis disclosed that the circulating precursors expressed CXC chemokine receptor 4, the receptor for SDF-1. In line with this finding, elevated plasma levels of SDF-1 were present in all patients and were found to correlate with the number of mobilized CD133+ progenitor cells. CONCLUSION: These data indicate that in humans, liver cirrhosis leads to recruitment of various populations of hematopoietic progenitor cells that display markers of intrahepatic progenitor cells. PMID:20066741

  4. Long Term Fate of Human Fetal Liver Progenitor Cells Transplanted in Injured Mouse Livers.

    PubMed

    Irudayaswamy, Antony; Muthiah, Mark; Zhou, Lei; Hung, Hau; Jumat, Nur Halisah Bte; Haque, Jamil; Teoh, Narcissus; Farrell, Geoffrey; Riehle, Kimberly J; Lin, Jaymie Siqi; Su, Lin Lin; Chan, Jerry Ky; Choolani, Mahesh; Wong, P C; Wee, Aileen; Lim, Seng Gee; Campbell, Jean; Fausto, Nelson; Dan, Yock Young

    2017-09-28

    Liver progenitor cells have the potential to repair and regenerate a diseased liver. The success of any translational efforts, however, hinges on thorough understanding of the fate of these cells after transplant, especially in terms of long-term safety and efficacy. Here we report transplantation of a liver progenitor population isolated from human fetal livers into immune-permissive mice with follow-up up to 36 weeks after transplant. We found that human progenitor cells engraft and differentiate into functional human hepatocytes in the mouse, producing albumin, alpha-1-antitrypsin, and glycogen. They create tight junctions with mouse hepatocytes, with no evidence of cell fusion. Interestingly, they also differentiate into functional endothelial cell and bile duct cells. Transplantation of progenitor cells abrogated carbon tetrachloride-induced fibrosis in recipient mice, with down-regulation of procollagen and anti-smooth muscle actin. Paradoxically, the degree of engraftment of human hepatocytes correlated negatively with the anti-fibrotic effect. Progenitor cell expansion was most prominent in cirrhotic animals, and correlated with transcript levels of pro-fibrotic genes. Animals that had resolution of fibrosis had quiescent native progenitor cells in their livers. No evidence of neoplasia was observed, even up to 9 months after transplantation. Human fetal liver progenitor cells successfully attenuate liver fibrosis in mice. They are activated in the setting of liver injury, but become quiescent when injury resolves, mimicking the behavior of de novo progenitor cells. Our data suggest that liver progenitor cells transplanted into injured livers maintain a functional role in the repair and regeneration of the liver. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  5. Hepatic progenitor cells of biliary origin with liver repopulation capacity

    PubMed Central

    Boulter, Luke; Tsuchiya, Atsunori; Cole, Alicia M; Hay, Trevor; Guest, Rachel V; Wojtacha, Davina; Man, Tak Yung; Mackinnon, Alison; Ridgway, Rachel A; Kendall, Timothy; Williams, Michael J; Jamieson, Thomas; Raven, Alex; Hay, David C; Iredale, John P; Clarke, Alan R; Sansom, Owen J; Forbes, Stuart J

    2015-01-01

    Summary Hepatocytes and cholangiocytes self renew following liver injury. Following severe injury hepatocytes are increasingly senescent, whether Hepatic Progenitor Cells (HPCs) then contribute to liver regeneration is unclear. Here, we describe a mouse model where Mdm2 is inducibly deleted in over 98% of hepatocytes, causing apoptosis, necrosis and senescence with nearly all hepatocytes expressing p21. This results in florid HPC activation, which is necessary for survival, followed by complete, functional liver reconstitution. HPCs isolated from genetically normal mice, using cell surface markers, were highly expandable and phenotypically stable in vitro. These HPCs were transplanted into adult mouse livers where hepatocyte Mdm2 was repeatedly deleted, creating a non-competitive repopulation assay. Transplanted HPCs contributed significantly to restoration of liver parenchyma, regenerating hepatocytes and biliary epithelia, highlighting their in vivo lineage potency. HPCs are therefore a potential future alternative to hepatocyte or liver transplantation for liver disease. PMID:26192438

  6. A Transcriptomic Signature of Mouse Liver Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Low, Jasmine; Miyajima, Atsushi; Tanaka, Minoru; Strick-Marchand, Helene; Darlington, Gretchen J.; Ochsner, Scott; Zhu, Cornelia; Whelan, James; Callus, Bernard A.

    2016-01-01

    Liver progenitor cells (LPCs) can proliferate extensively, are able to differentiate into hepatocytes and cholangiocytes, and contribute to liver regeneration. The presence of LPCs, however, often accompanies liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), indicating that they may be a cancer stem cell. Understanding LPC biology and establishing a sensitive, rapid, and reliable method to detect their presence in the liver will assist diagnosis and facilitate monitoring of treatment outcomes in patients with liver pathologies. A transcriptomic meta-analysis of over 400 microarrays was undertaken to compare LPC lines against datasets of muscle and embryonic stem cell lines, embryonic and developed liver (DL), and HCC. Three gene clusters distinguishing LPCs from other liver cell types were identified. Pathways overrepresented in these clusters denote the proliferative nature of LPCs and their association with HCC. Our analysis also revealed 26 novel markers, LPC markers, including Mcm2 and Ltbp3, and eight known LPC markers, including M2pk and Ncam. These markers specified the presence of LPCs in pathological liver tissue by qPCR and correlated with LPC abundance determined using immunohistochemistry. These results showcase the value of global transcript profiling to identify pathways and markers that may be used to detect LPCs in injured or diseased liver. PMID:27777588

  7. The Biliary Epithelium Gives Rise to Liver Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo-Torres, Daniel; Affò, Silvia; Coll, Mar; Morales-Ibanez, Oriol; Millán, Cristina; Blaya, Delia; Alvarez-Guaita, Anna; Rentero, Carles; José Lozano, Juan; Maestro, Miguel Angel; Solar, Myriam; Arroyo, Vicente; Caballería, Joan; van Grunsven, Leo A.; Enrich, Carlos; Ginès, Pere; Bataller, Ramon; Sancho-Bru, Pau

    2015-01-01

    Severe liver diseases are characterized by expansion of liver progenitor cells (LPC), which correlates with disease severity. However, the origin and role of LPC in liver physiology and in hepatic injury remains a contentious topic. We found that ductular reaction cells in human cirrhotic livers express hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 homeobox B (HNF1β). However, HNF1β expression was not present in newly generated epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM)-positive hepatocytes. In order to investigate the role of HNF1β- expressing cells we used a tamoxifen-inducible Hnf1βCreER/R26RYfp/LacZ mouse to lineage-trace Hnf1β+ biliary duct cells and to assess their contribution to LPC expansion and hepatocyte generation. Lineage tracing demonstrated no contribution of HNF1β+ cells to hepatocytes during liver homeostasis in healthy mice or after loss of liver mass. After acute acetaminophen or carbon tetrachloride injury no contribution of HNF1β+ cells to hepatocyte was detected. We next assessed the contribution of Hnf1β+ -derived cells following two liver injury models with LPC expansion, a diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidin (DDC)-diet and a choline-deficient ethionine-supplemented (CDE)-diet. The contribution of Hnf1β+ cells to liver regeneration was dependent on the liver injury model. While no contribution was observed after DDC-diet treatment, mice fed with a CDE-diet showed a small population of hepatocytes derived from Hnf1β+ cells that were expanded to 1.86% of total hepatocytes after injury recovery. Genome-wide expression profile of Hnf1β+ -derived cells from the DDC and CDE models indicated that no contribution of LPC to hepatocytes was associated with LPC expression of genes related to telomere maintenance, inflammation, and chemokine signaling pathways. Conclusion HNF1β+ biliary duct cells are the origin of LPC. HNF1β+ cells do not contribute to hepatocyte turnover in the healthy liver, but after certain liver injury, they can differentiate to

  8. Potential applications for cell regulatory factors in liver progenitor cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shupe, Thomas; Petersen, Bryon E.

    2010-01-01

    Orthotopic liver transplant represent the state of the art treatment for terminal liver pathologies such as cirrhosis in adults and hemochromatosis in neonates. A limited supply of transplantable organs in relationship to the demand means that many patients will succumb to disease before an organ becomes available. One promising alternative to liver transplant is therapy based on the transplant of liver progenitor cells. These cells may be derived from the patient, expanded in vitro, and transplanted back to the diseased liver. Inborn metabolic disorders represent the most attractive target for liver progenitor cell therapy, as many of these disorders may be corrected by repopulation of only a portion of the liver by healthy cells. Another potential application for liver progenitor cell therapy is the seeding of bio-artificial liver matrix. These ex vivo bioreactors may someday be used to bridge critically ill patients to other treatments. Conferring a selective growth advantage to the progenitor cell population remains an obstacle to therapy development. Understanding the molecular signaling mechanisms and micro-environmental cues that govern liver progenitor cell phenotype may someday lead to strategies for providing this selective growth advantage. The discovery of a population of cells within the bone marrow possessing the ability to differentiate into hepatocytes may provide an easily accessible source of cells for liver therapies. PMID:20851776

  9. Progressive induction of hepatocyte progenitor cells in chronically injured liver

    PubMed Central

    Tanimizu, Naoki; Ichinohe, Norihisa; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Nishikawa, Yuji; Mitaka, Toshihiro

    2017-01-01

    Differentiated epithelial cells show substantial lineage plasticity upon severe tissue injuries. In chronically injured mouse livers, part of hepatocytes become Sry-HMG box containing 9 (Sox9) (+) epithelial cell adhesion molecule (−) hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 α (+) biphenotypic hepatocytes. However, it is not clear whether all Sox9+ hepatocytes uniformly possess cellular properties as hepatocyte progenitors. Here, we examined the microarray data comparing Sox9+ hepatocytes with mature hepatocytes and identified CD24 as a novel marker for biphenotypic hepatocytes. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that part of Sox9+ hepatocytes near expanded ductular structures expressed CD24 in the liver injured by 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydro-collidine (DDC) diet and by bile duct ligation. Indeed, Sox9+ hepatocytes could be separated into CD24− and CD24+ cells by fluorescence activated cell sorting. The ratio of CD24+ cells against CD24− ones in Sox9+ hepatocytes gradually increased while DDC-injury progressed and colony-forming capability mostly attributed to CD24+ cells. Although hepatocyte markers were remarkably downregulated in of Sox9+ CD24+ hepatocytes, they re-differentiated into mature hepatocytes in vitro and in vivo. Our current results demonstrate that the emergence of biphenotypic hepatocytes is a sequential event including the transition from CD24− and CD24+ status, which may be a crucial step for hepatocytes to acquire progenitor properties. PMID:28051157

  10. Interleukin-1 regulates hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells in the midgestation mouse fetal liver

    PubMed Central

    Orelio, Claudia; Peeters, Marian; Haak, Esther; van der Horn, Karin; Dzierzak, Elaine

    2009-01-01

    Background Hematopoietic progenitors are generated in the yolk sac and aorta-gonad-mesonephros region during early mouse development. At embryonic day 10.5 the first hematopoietic stem cells emerge in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros. Subsequently, hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors are found in the fetal liver. The fetal liver is a potent hematopoietic site, playing an important role in the expansion and differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors and hematopoietic stem cells. However, little is known concerning the regulation of fetal liver hematopoietic stem cells. In particular, the role of cytokines such as interleukin-1 in the regulation of hematopoietic stem cells in the embryo has been largely unexplored. Recently, we observed that the adult pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 is involved in regulating aorta-gonad-mesonephros hematopoietic progenitor and hematopoietic stem cell activity. Therefore, we set out to investigate whether interleukin-1 also plays a role in regulating fetal liver progenitor cells and hematopoietic stem cells. Design and Methods We examined the interleukin-1 ligand and receptor expression pattern in the fetal liver. The effects of interleukin-1 on hematopoietic progenitor cells and hematopoietic stem cells were studied by FACS and transplantation analyses of fetal liver explants, and in vivo effects on hematopoietic stem cell and progenitors were studied in Il1r1−/− embryos. Results We show that fetal liver hematopoietic progenitor cells express the IL-1RI and that interleukin-1 increases fetal liver hematopoiesis, progenitor cell activity and promotes hematopoietic cell survival. Moreover, we show that in Il1r1−/− embryos, hematopoietic stem cell activity is impaired and myeloid progenitor activity is increased. Conclusions The IL-1 ligand and receptor are expressed in the midgestation liver and act in the physiological regulation of fetal liver hematopoietic progenitor cells and hematopoietic stem cells. PMID

  11. Adult human liver mesenchymal progenitor cells express phenylalanine hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Baruteau, Julien; Nyabi, Omar; Najimi, Mustapha; Fauvart, Maarten; Sokal, Etienne

    2014-09-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is one of the most prevalent inherited metabolic diseases and is accountable for a severe encephalopathy by progressive intoxication of the brain by phenylalanine. This results from an ineffective L-phenylalanine hydroxylase enzyme (PAH) due to a mutated phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene. Neonatal screening programs allow an early dietetic treatment with restrictive phenylalanine intake. This diet prevents most of the neuropsychological disabilities but remains challenging for lifelong compliance. Adult-derived human liver progenitor cells (ADHLPC) are a pool of precursors that can differentiate into hepatocytes. We aim to study PAH expression and PAH activity in a differenciated ADHLPC. ADHLPC were isolated from human hepatocyte primary culture of two different donors and differenciated under specific culture conditions. We demonstrated the high expression of PAH and a large increase of PAH activity in differenciated LPC. The age of the donor, the cellular viability after liver digestion and cryopreservation affects PAH activity. ADHLPC might therefore be considered as a suitable source for cell therapy in PKU.

  12. Transplantation of mouse fetal liver cells for analyzing the function of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Gudmundsson, Kristbjorn Orri; Stull, Steven W; Keller, Jonathan R

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells are defined by their ability to self-renew and differentiate through progenitor cell stages into all types of mature blood cells. Gene-targeting studies in mice have demonstrated that many genes are essential for the generation and function of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. For definitively analyzing the function of these cells, transplantation studies have to be performed. In this chapter, we describe methods to isolate and transplant fetal liver cells as well as how to analyze donor cell reconstitution. This protocol is tailored toward mouse models where embryonic lethality precludes analysis of adult hematopoiesis or where it is suspected that the function of fetal liver hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells is compromised.

  13. The role of liver progenitor cells during liver regeneration, fibrogenesis, and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Köhn-Gaone, Julia; Gogoi-Tiwari, Jully; Ramm, Grant A; Olynyk, John K; Tirnitz-Parker, Janina E E

    2016-02-01

    The growing worldwide challenge of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma due to increasing prevalence of excessive alcohol consumption, viral hepatitis, obesity, and the metabolic syndrome has sparked interest in stem cell-like liver progenitor cells (LPCs) as potential candidates for cell therapy and tissue engineering, as an alternative approach to whole organ transplantation. However, LPCs always proliferate in chronic liver diseases with a predisposition to cancer; they have been suggested to play major roles in driving fibrosis, disease progression, and may even represent tumor-initiating cells. Hence, a greater understanding of the factors that govern their activation, communication with other hepatic cell types, and bipotential differentiation as opposed to their potential transformation is needed before their therapeutic potential can be harnessed.

  14. The Involving Roles of Intrahepatic and Extrahepatic Stem/Progenitor Cells (SPCs) to Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei-hui; Ren, Li-na; Wang, Tao; Navarro-Alvarez, Nalu; Tang, Li-jun

    2016-01-01

    Liver regeneration is usually attributed to mature hepatocytes, which possess a remarkable potential to proliferate under mild to moderate injury. However, when the liver is severely damaged or hepatocyte proliferation is greatly inhibited, liver stem/progenitor cells (LSPCs) will contribute to the liver regeneration process. LSPCs in the developing liver have been extensively characterized, however, their contributing role to liver regeneration has not been completely understood. In addition to the restoration of the liver parenchymal tissue by hepatocytes or/and LSPCs, or in some cases bone marrow (BM) derived cells, such as hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), the wound healing after injury in terms of angiopoiesis by liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) or/and sinusoidal endothelial progenitor cells (SEPCs) is another important aspect taking place during regeneration. To conclude, liver regeneration can be mainly divided into three distinct restoring levels according to the cause and severity of injury: hepatocyte dominant regeneration, LSPCs mediated regeneration, extrahepatic stem cells participative regeneration. In this review, we focus on the recent findings of liver regeneration, especially on those related to stem/progenitor cells (SPCs)-mediated regeneration and their potential clinical applications and challenges. PMID:27489499

  15. Advances in Liver Regeneration: Revisiting Hepatic Stem/Progenitor Cells and Their Origin

    PubMed Central

    Jeschke, Marc G.; Amini-Nik, Saeid

    2016-01-01

    The liver has evolved to become a highly plastic organ with extraordinary regenerative capabilities. What drives liver regeneration is still being debated. Adult liver stem/progenitor cells have been characterized and used to produce functional hepatocytes and biliary cells in vitro. However, in vivo, numerous studies have questioned whether hepatic progenitor cells have a significant role in liver regeneration. Mature hepatocytes have recently been shown to be more plastic than previously believed and give rise to new hepatocytes after acute and chronic injury. In this review, we discuss current knowledge in the field of liver regeneration and the importance of the serotonin pathway as a clinical target for patients with liver dysfunction. PMID:26798363

  16. A novel method of mouse ex utero transplantation of hepatic progenitor cells into the fetal liver

    SciTech Connect

    Shikanai, Mima; Asahina, Kinji; Iseki, Sachiko Teramoto, Kenichi; Nishida, Tomohiro; Shimizu-Saito, Keiko; Ota, Masato; Eto, Kazuhiro; Teraoka, Hirobumi

    2009-04-03

    Avoiding the limitations of the adult liver niche, transplantation of hepatic stem/progenitor cells into fetal liver is desirable to analyze immature cells in a hepatic developmental environment. Here, we established a new monitor tool for cell fate of hepatic progenitor cells transplanted into the mouse fetal liver by using ex utero surgery. When embryonic day (ED) 14.5 hepatoblasts were injected into the ED14.5 fetal liver, the transplanted cells expressed albumin abundantly or {alpha}-fetoprotein weakly, and contained glycogen in the neonatal liver, indicating that transplanted hepatoblasts can proliferate and differentiate in concord with surrounding recipient parenchymal cells. The transplanted cells became mature in the liver of 6-week-old mice. Furthermore, this method was applicable to transplantation of hepatoblast-like cells derived from mouse embryonic stem cells. These data indicate that this unique technique will provide a new in vivo experimental system for studying cell fate of hepatic stem/progenitor cells and liver organogenesis.

  17. Relationship between hepatic progenitor cell-mediated liver regeneration and non-parenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Kitade, Mitsuteru; Kaji, Kosuke; Yoshiji, Hitoshi

    2016-11-01

    Hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs) are thought to reside in the canals of Hering and can be activated and contribute to liver regeneration in response to liver injury by proliferating and differentiating towards both hepatocytes and biliary epithelial cells. In this setting, several cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors related to liver inflammation and other liver cells comprising the HPC niche, namely hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), play crucial roles in HPC activation and differentiation. In response to several types of liver injury, tumor necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) is secreted by several inflammatory cells, including monocytes, T lymphocytes, and macrophages, and acts as an initiator of the HPC niche and HSC activation. Following TWEAK-induced activation of the HPC niche, fibroblast growth factor 7 and hepatocyte growth factor released from activated HSC play central roles in maintaining HPC proliferation. In contrast, HGF-MET and Wnt3a-β-catenin signals are the predominant mediators of the hepatocyte differentiation of HPC, whereas epidermal growth factor receptor-NOTCH signaling controls HPC differentiation towards biliary epithelial cells. These signals are maintained exclusively by activated HSC and inflammatory cells surrounding HPC. Together, HSC and inflammatory cells surrounding HPC are responsible for the precise control of HPC proliferation and differentiation fate. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding of interactions between HPC and other liver cells in HPC-mediated liver regeneration in the setting of liver inflammation. © 2016 The Japan Society of Hepatology.

  18. Ultrastructure of liver progenitor/oval cells in children with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Sobaniec-Łotowska, M E; Lebensztejn, D M; Lotowska, J M; Kańczuga-Koda, L; Sulkowski, S

    2011-01-01

    Very interesting reports have appeared lately on the role of liver progenitor/oval cells in the morphogenesis and development of nonalcoholic steatohepatits (NASH) in adult patients and experimental animals. However, no literature data concerning pediatric patients have been available. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to evaluate the ultrastructure of the population of liver progenitor/oval cells in the biopsy material from children with previously clinocopathologically diagnosed NASH. Electron-microscopic examinations were conducted on fresh tissue samples collected from 10 children with NASH (aged 2-14 years), which were fixed with a solution of 2% paraformaldehyde and 2.5% glutaraldehyde in 0.1 M cacodylate buffer. Ultrastructural examinations of the liver progenitor/oval cells in children with NASH show a quite prominent number of these cells, especially their two types, hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs) and intermediate hepatocyte-like cells (IHCs), with intermediate bile-like cells being the least frequent. They were found to occur single or in clusters of two, seldom of three, and frequently in the areas of advanced liver fibrosis or close to them. Many times, these cells were accompanied by hepatocytes showing a varying degree of death, to total cell disintegration. Interesting was the presence of activated nonparenchymal liver cells, i.e. Kupffer cells/macrophages and hepatic stellate cells, frequently found to adhere to the hepatic oval cells. The current study suggests a marked involvement of the population of liver progenitor/oval cells, mainly HPCs and IHCs, in the development of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in pediatric patients, especially in fibrosis progression.

  19. Hepatic progenitor cells, stem cells, and AFP expression in models of liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Kuhlmann, Wolf D; Peschke, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Adult hepatocytes and liver-cell progenitors play a role in restoring liver tissue after injury. For the study of progenitor cells in liver repair, experimental models included (a) surgical removal of liver tissue by partial hepatectomy; (b) acute injury by carbontetrachloride; (c) acute injury by d-galactosamine (GalN) and N-nitrosomorpholine (NNM); and (d) chemical hepatocarcinogenesis by feeding NNM in low and high doses. Serological and immunohistological detection of alpha-fetoprotein gene expression served to follow pathways of cellular differentiation. Stem cells were not required in models of surgical removal of parenchyma and in carbon tetrachloride intoxication of adult hepatocytes. In contrast, regeneration of liver occurred through biliary epithelial cells in injuries induced by GalN and NNM. These biliary epithelial cells, collectively called oval cells, are most probably derived from the canals of Hering. Proliferating bile duct cells reached a level of differentiation with reactivation of foetal genes and significant alpha-1-fetoprotein (AFP) synthesis signalling a certain degree of retrodifferentiation with potential stemness. Due to the same embryonic origin of bile ducts and hepatocytes, biliary epithelium and its proliferating progeny (oval cells) have a defined role in liver regeneration as a transit and amplification compartment. In their early proliferation stage, oval cells were heavily engaged in DNA synthesis ([3H]thymidine labelling). Pulse-chase experiments during experimental hepatocarcinogenesis exhibited their development into hepatocytes with high risk for transformation and leading to foci of altered hepatocytes. Hepatocellular carcinomas may arise either from proliferating/differentiating oval cells or from adult hepatocytes; both cell types have stem-like properties. AFP-positive and AFP-negative carcinomas occurred in the same liver. They may represent random clonal origin. The heterogeneity of phenotypic marker (AFP) correlated

  20. Polycomb Group Protein Ezh2 Regulates Hepatic Progenitor Cell Proliferation and Differentiation in Murine Embryonic Liver

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Yasuharu; Nakata, Susumu; Obana, Yuta; Sekine, Keisuke; Zheng, Yun-Wen; Takebe, Takanori; Isono, Kyoichi; Koseki, Haruhiko; Taniguchi, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    In embryonic liver, hepatic progenitor cells are actively proliferating and generate a fundamental cellular pool for establishing parenchymal components. However, the molecular basis for the expansion of the progenitors maintaining their immature state remains elusive. Polycomb group proteins regulate gene expression throughout the genome by modulating of chromatin structure and play crucial roles in development. Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (Ezh2), a key component of polycomb group proteins, catalyzes tri-methylation of lysine 27 of histone H3 (H3K27me3), which trigger the gene suppression. In the present study, we investigated a role of Ezh2 in the regulation of the expanding hepatic progenitor population in vivo. We found that Ezh2 is highly expressed in the actively proliferating cells at the early developmental stage. Using a conditional knockout mouse model, we show that the deletion of the SET domain of Ezh2, which is responsible for catalytic induction of H3K27me3, results in significant reduction of the total liver size, absolute number of liver parenchymal cells, and hepatic progenitor cell population in size. A clonal colony assay in the hepatic progenitor cells directly isolated from in vivo fetal livers revealed that the bi-potent clonogenicity was significantly attenuated by the Ezh2 loss of function. Moreover, a marker expression based analysis and a global gene expression analysis showed that the knockout of Ezh2 inhibited differentiation to hepatocyte with reduced expression of a number of liver-function related genes. Taken together, our results indicate that Ezh2 is required for the hepatic progenitor expansion in vivo, which is essential for the functional maturation of embryonic liver, through its activity for catalyzing H3K27me3. PMID:25153170

  1. Fetal liver hepatic progenitors are supportive stromal cells for hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chou, Song; Lodish, Harvey F

    2010-04-27

    Previously we showed that the ~2% of fetal liver cells reactive with an anti-CD3epsilon monoclonal antibody support ex vivo expansion of both fetal liver and bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs); these cells express two proteins important for HSC ex vivo expansion, IGF2, and angiopoietin-like 3. Here we show that these cells do not express any CD3 protein and are not T cells; rather, we purified these HSC-supportive stromal cells based on the surface phenotype of SCF(+)DLK(+). Competitive repopulating experiments show that SCF(+)DLK(+) cells support the maintenance of HSCs in ex vivo culture. These are the principal fetal liver cells that express not only angiopoietin-like 3 and IGF2, but also SCF and thrombopoietin, two other growth factors important for HSC expansion. They are also the principal fetal liver cells that express CXCL12, a factor required for HSC homing, and also alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), indicating that they are fetal hepatic stem or progenitor cells. Immunocytochemistry shows that >93% of the SCF(+) cells express DLK and Angptl3, and a portion of SCF(+) cells also expresses CXCL12. Thus SCF(+)DLK(+) cells are a highly homogenous population that express a complete set of factors for HSC expansion and are likely the primary stromal cells that support HSC expansion in the fetal liver.

  2. Convenient and efficient enrichment of the CD133+ liver cells from rat fetal liver as a source of liver stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weihui; You, Nan; Dou, Kefeng

    2012-01-01

    Although stem cells are commonly isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting or magnetic affinity cell sorting, they are very expensive, and they need known markers. However, there is no specific marker for liver stem/progenitor cells (LSPCs). Here, we describe a convenient and efficient method (three-step method) to enrich LSPCs. The fetal liver cells (FLCs) were firstly enriched by Percoll discontinuous gradient centrifugation from the rat fetal liver. Then the FLCs in culture were purified to be homogeneous in size by differential trypsinization and differential adherence. Finally, fetal liver stem/progenitor cells (FLSPCs) were enriched from purified FLCs by Percoll continuous gradient centrifugation. Flow cytometric analysis combining with marker CD133 was used to detect the purity of FLSPCs and evaluate the isolating effects of the three-step method.

  3. Comparison of liver progenitor cells in human atypical ductular reactions with those seen in experimental models of liver injury.

    PubMed

    Sell, S

    1998-02-01

    The ultrastructural characteristics of liver progenitor cell types of human atypical ductular reactions seen in chronic cholestasis, in regenerating human liver after submassive necrosis, in alcoholic liver disease, and in focal nodular hyperplasia are compared with liver progenitor cell types seen during experimental cholangiocarcinogenesis in hamsters; during hepatocarcinogenesis in rats; and in response to periportal liver injury induced by allyl alcohol in rats. Three types of progenitor cells have been identified in human atypical ductular reactions: type I: primitive, has an oval shape, marginal chromatin, few cellular organelles, rare tonofilaments, and forms desmosomal junctions with adjacent liver cells; type II: bile duct-like, is located within ducts, has few organelles, and forms lateral membrane interdigitations with other duct-like cells; and type III: hepatocyte-like, is located in hepatic cords, forms a bile canaliculus, has tight junctions with other hepatocyte-like cells, prominent mitochondria and rough endoplasmic reticulum, and some have lysosomes and a poorly developed Golgi apparatus. Each type is seen during cholangiocarcinogenesis in hamsters, but the most prominent cell type is type II, duct-like. A more primitive cell type ("type 0 cell"), as well as type I cells, are seen in the intraportal zone of the liver within 1 to 2 days after carcinogen exposure or periportal injury in the rat, but both type II and type III are seen later as the progenitor cells expand into the liver lobule. After allyl alcohol injury, type 0 cells precede the appearance of type I and type III cells, but most of the cells that span the periportal necrotic zone are type III hepatocyte-like cells showing different degrees of hepatocytic differentiation. Some type II cells are also seen, but these are essentially limited to ducts. It is concluded that there is a primitive stem cell type in the liver (type 0) that may differentiate directly into type I and then into

  4. Hepatic Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Regulates Recruitment of Rat Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cell Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin; Wang, Xiangdong; Wang, Lei; Chiu, Jenny D.; van de Ven, Gijs; Gaarde, William A.; DeLeve, Laurie D.

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims After liver injury, bone marrow-derived liver sinusoidal endothelial cell progenitor cells (BM SPCs) repopulate the sinusoid as liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs). After partial hepatectomy, BM SPCs provide hepatocyte growth factor, promote hepatocyte proliferation, and are necessary for normal liver regeneration. We examined how hepatic vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) regulates recruitment of BM SPC and their effects on liver injury. Methods Rats were given injections of dimethylnitrosamine to induce liver injury, which was assessed by histology and transaminase assays. Recruitment of SPCs was analyzed by examining BM SPC proliferation, mobilization to the circulation, engraftment in liver, and development of fenestration (differentiation). Results Dimethylnitrosamine caused extensive denudation of LSEC at 24 hours, followed by centrilobular hemorrhagic necrosis at 48 hours. Proliferation of BM SPCs, number of SPCs in the bone marrow, and mobilization of BM SPCs to the circulation increased 2- to 4-fold by 24 hours after injection of dimethylnitrosamine; within 5 days, 40% of all LSEC came from engrafted BM SPC. Allogeneic resident SPCs, infused 24 hours after injection of dimethylnitrosamine, repopulated the sinusoid as LSEC and reduced liver injury. Expression of hepatic VEGF mRNA and protein increased 5-fold by 24 hours after dimethylnitrosamine injection. Knockdown of hepatic VEGF with antisense oligonucleotides completely prevented dimethylnitrosamine-induced proliferation of BM SPCs and their mobilization to the circulation, reduced their engraftment by 46%, completely prevented formation of fenestration after engraftment as LSEC, and exacerbated dimethylnitrosamine injury. Conclusions BM SPC recruitment is a repair response to dimethylnitrosamine liver injury in rats. Hepatic VEGF regulates recruitment of BM SPCs to liver and reduces this form of liver injury. PMID:22902870

  5. Activin A-Smad Signaling Mediates Connective Tissue Growth Factor Synthesis in Liver Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ze-Yang; Jin, Guan-Nan; Wang, Wei; Sun, Yi-Min; Chen, Wei-Xun; Chen, Lin; Liang, Hui-Fang; Datta, Pran K; Zhang, Ming-Zhi; Zhang, Bixiang; Chen, Xiao-Ping

    2016-03-22

    Liver progenitor cells (LPCs) are activated in chronic liver damage and may contribute to liver fibrosis. Our previous investigation reported that LPCs produced connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2), an inducer of liver fibrosis, yet the regulatory mechanism of the production of CTGF/CCN2 in LPCs remains elusive. In this study, we report that Activin A is an inducer of CTGF/CCN2 in LPCs. Here we show that expression of both Activin A and CTGF/CCN2 were upregulated in the cirrhotic liver, and the expression of Activin A positively correlates with that of CTGF/CCN2 in liver tissues. We go on to show that Activin A induced de novo synthesis of CTGF/CCN2 in LPC cell lines LE/6 and WB-F344. Furthermore, Activin A contributed to autonomous production of CTGF/CCN2 in liver progenitor cells (LPCs) via activation of the Smad signaling pathway. Smad2, 3 and 4 were all required for this induction. Collectively, these results provide evidence for the fibrotic role of LPCs in the liver and suggest that the Activin A-Smad-CTGF/CCN2 signaling in LPCs may be a therapeutic target of liver fibrosis.

  6. Activin A-Smad Signaling Mediates Connective Tissue Growth Factor Synthesis in Liver Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ze-Yang; Jin, Guan-Nan; Wang, Wei; Sun, Yi-Min; Chen, Wei-Xun; Chen, Lin; Liang, Hui-Fang; Datta, Pran K.; Zhang, Ming-Zhi; Zhang, Bixiang; Chen, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Liver progenitor cells (LPCs) are activated in chronic liver damage and may contribute to liver fibrosis. Our previous investigation reported that LPCs produced connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2), an inducer of liver fibrosis, yet the regulatory mechanism of the production of CTGF/CCN2 in LPCs remains elusive. In this study, we report that Activin A is an inducer of CTGF/CCN2 in LPCs. Here we show that expression of both Activin A and CTGF/CCN2 were upregulated in the cirrhotic liver, and the expression of Activin A positively correlates with that of CTGF/CCN2 in liver tissues. We go on to show that Activin A induced de novo synthesis of CTGF/CCN2 in LPC cell lines LE/6 and WB-F344. Furthermore, Activin A contributed to autonomous production of CTGF/CCN2 in liver progenitor cells (LPCs) via activation of the Smad signaling pathway. Smad2, 3 and 4 were all required for this induction. Collectively, these results provide evidence for the fibrotic role of LPCs in the liver and suggest that the Activin A-Smad-CTGF/CCN2 signaling in LPCs may be a therapeutic target of liver fibrosis. PMID:27011166

  7. Embryonic Ductal Plate Cells Give Rise to Cholangiocytes, Periportal Hepatocytes and Adult Liver Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Carpentier, Rodolphe; Suñer, Regina Español; Van Hul, Noémi; Kopp, Janel L.; Beaudry, Jean-Bernard; Cordi, Sabine; Antoniou, Aline; Raynaud, Peggy; Lepreux, Sébastien; Jacquemin, Patrick; Leclercq, Isabelle A.; Sander, Maike; Lemaigre, Frédéric P.

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims Embryonic biliary precursor cells form a periportal sheet called the ductal plate, which is progressively remodeled to generate intrahepatic bile ducts. A limited number of ductal plate cells participate in duct formation; those not involved in duct development are believed to involute by apoptosis. Moreover, cells that express the SRY-related HMG box transcription factor 9 (SOX9), which include the embryonic ductal plate cells, were proposed to continuously supply the liver with hepatic cells. We investigated the role of the ductal plate in hepatic morphogenesis. Methods Apoptosis and proliferation were investigated by immunostaining of mouse and human fetal liver tissue. The post-natal progeny of SOX9-expressing ductal plate cells was analysed after genetic labeling, at the ductal plate stage, by Cre-mediated recombination of a ROSA26RYFP reporter allele. Inducible Cre expression was induced by SOX9 regulatory regions, inserted in a bacterial artificial chromosome. Livers were studied from mice under normal conditions and during diet-induced regeneration. Results Ductal plate cells did not undergo apoptosis and showed limited proliferation. They generated cholangiocytes lining interlobular bile ducts, bile ductules and canals of Hering, as well as periportal hepatocytes. Oval cells that appeared during regeneration also derived from the ductal plate. We did not find that liver homeostasis required a continuous supply of cells from SOX9-expressing progenitors. Conclusions The ductal plate gives rise to cholangiocytes lining the intrahepatic bile ducts, including its most proximal segments. It also generates periportal hepatocytes and adult hepatic progenitor cells. PMID:21708104

  8. Role of liver progenitors in liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Best, Jan; Manka, Paul; Syn, Wing-Kin; Dollé, Laurent; van Grunsven, Leo A; Canbay, Ali

    2015-02-01

    During massive liver injury and hepatocyte loss, the intrinsic regenerative capacity of the liver by replication of resident hepatocytes is overwhelmed. Treatment of this condition depends on the cause of liver injury, though in many cases liver transplantation (LT) remains the only curative option. LT for end stage chronic and acute liver diseases is hampered by shortage of donor organs and requires immunosuppression. Hepatocyte transplantation is limited by yet unresolved technical difficulties. Since currently no treatment is available to facilitate liver regeneration directly, therapies involving the use of resident liver stem or progenitor cells (LPCs) or non-liver stem cells are coming to fore. LPCs are quiescent in the healthy liver, but may be activated under conditions where the regenerative capacity of mature hepatocytes is severely impaired. Non-liver stem cells include embryonic stem cells (ES cells) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In the first section, we aim to provide an overview of the role of putative cytokines, growth factors, mitogens and hormones in regulating LPC response and briefly discuss the prognostic value of the LPC response in clinical practice. In the latter section, we will highlight the role of other (non-liver) stem cells in transplantation and discuss advantages and disadvantages of ES cells, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS), as well as MSCs.

  9. Two sides of one coin: massive hepatic necrosis and progenitor cell-mediated regeneration in acute liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Hong-Lei; Cai, Xiaobo; Yuan, Xiaodong; Liebe, Roman; Dooley, Steven; Li, Hai; Wang, Tai-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Massive hepatic necrosis is a key event underlying acute liver failure, a serious clinical syndrome with high mortality. Massive hepatic necrosis in acute liver failure has unique pathophysiological characteristics including extremely rapid parenchymal cell death and removal. On the other hand, massive necrosis rapidly induces the activation of liver progenitor cells, the so-called “second pathway of liver regeneration.” The final clinical outcome of acute liver failure depends on whether liver progenitor cell-mediated regeneration can efficiently restore parenchymal mass and function within a short time. This review summarizes the current knowledge regarding massive hepatic necrosis and liver progenitor cell-mediated regeneration in patients with acute liver failure, the two sides of one coin. PMID:26136687

  10. Capacity of bioregulators of stem and progenitor cells to strongly affect liver redox-dependent processes.

    PubMed

    Cherkashina, Daria V; Tkacheva, Elena N; Somov, Alexander Y; Semenchenko, Olga A; Nardid, Oleg A; Petrenko, Alexander Y

    2011-12-01

    Abstract Effects of stem and progenitor cells or their compounds on recipient cells are investigated intensively today. In spite of this, their ability to interact with native cells and the final targets affected by them, particularly biochemical parameters that characterize cell redox-dependent processes, remain little studied. We have studied how bioregulators of stem and progenitor cells affect these processes in freshly isolated liver after animal pretreatment in vivo. Cytosol of human fetal mesenchymal-mesodermal tissues (8-10 weeks gestation) was administered intravenously; the control group was treated with Hanks' solution. After 4 hr, rats were sacrificed and their livers were isolated. To evaluate liver redox-dependent state, mitochondrial respiratory activity and nitroxyl radical and Alamar Blue™ reduction rates, mitochondrial and cytosolic glycerol kinase and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-dependent malate dehydrogenase activities were studied. The results obtained demonstrate that bioregulators strongly affect liver redox-dependent processes, increasing mitochondrial respiration in state III and spin probe reduction rate and enhancing Alamar Blue™ reduction by glycolytic and nonglycolytic postmitochondrial enzymes. In addition, mitochondrial glycerol kinase and both isoforms of NADH-dependent malate dehydrogenase were inhibited. These data bring us closer to understanding stem and progenitor cell effects via directed regulation of metabolic redox-dependent processes.

  11. Decellularization and Recellularization of Rat Livers With Hepatocytes and Endothelial Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Pengcheng; Huang, Yan; Guo, Yibing; Wang, Lei; Ling, Changchun; Guo, Qingsong; Wang, Yao; Zhu, Shajun; Fan, Xiangjun; Zhu, Mingyan; Huang, Hua; Lu, Yuhua; Wang, Zhiwei

    2016-03-01

    Whole-organ decellularization has been identified as a promising choice for tissue engineering. The aim of the present study was to engineer intact whole rat liver scaffolds and repopulate them with hepatocytes and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in a bioreactor. Decellularized liver scaffolds were obtained by perfusing Triton X-100 with ammonium hydroxide. The architecture and composition of the original extracellular matrix were preserved, as confirmed by morphologic, histological, and immunolabeling methods. To determine biocompatibility, the scaffold was embedded in the subcutaneous adipose layer of the back of a heterologous animal to observe the infiltration of inflammatory cells. Hepatocytes were reseeded using a parenchymal injection method and cultured by continuous perfusion. EPCs were reseeded using a portal vein infusion method. Morphologic and functional examination showed that the hepatocytes and EPCs grew well in the scaffold. The present study describes an effective method of decellularization and recellularization of rat livers, providing the foundation for liver engineering and the development of bioartificial livers.

  12. Progenitor cell expansion and impaired hepatocyte regeneration in explanted livers from alcoholic hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Dubuquoy, Laurent; Louvet, Alexandre; Lassailly, Guillaume; Truant, Stéphanie; Boleslawski, Emmanuel; Artru, Florent; Maggiotto, François; Gantier, Emilie; Buob, David; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Cannesson, Amélie; Dharancy, Sébastien; Moreno, Christophe; Pruvot, François-René; Bataller, Ramon; Mathurin, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Objective In alcoholic hepatitis (AH), development of targeted therapies is crucial and requires improved knowledge of cellular and molecular drivers in liver dysfunction. The unique opportunity of using explanted livers from patients with AH having undergone salvage liver transplantation allowed to perform more in-depth molecular translational studies. Design We studied liver explants from patients with AH submitted to salvage transplantation (n=16), from patients with alcoholic cirrhosis without AH (n=12) and fragments of normal livers (n=16). Hepatic cytokine content was quantified. Hepatocyte function and proliferation and the presence of hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs) were evaluated by immunohistochemistry, western blot or quantitative PCR. Mitochondrial morphology was evaluated by electron microscopy. Results Livers from patients with AH showed decreased cytokine levels involved in liver regeneration (tumour necrosis factor α and interleukin-6), as well as a virtual absence of markers of hepatocyte proliferation compared with alcoholic cirrhosis and normal livers. Electron microscopy revealed obvious mitochondrial abnormalities in AH hepatocytes. Importantly, livers from patients with AH showed substantial accumulation of HPCs that, unexpectedly, differentiate only into biliary cells. AH livers predominantly express laminin (extracellular matrix protein favouring cholangiocyte differentiation); consequently, HPC expansion is inefficient at yielding mature hepatocytes. Conclusions AH not responding to medical therapy is associated with lack of expression of cytokines involved in liver regeneration and profound mitochondrial damage along with lack of proliferative hepatocytes. Expansion of HPCs is inefficient to yield mature hepatocytes. Manoeuvres aimed at promoting differentiation of HPCs into mature hepatocytes should be tested in AH. PMID:25731872

  13. Fn14 hepatic progenitor cells are associated with liver fibrosis in biliary atresia.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lulu; Lv, Zhibao; Gong, Zhenhua; Sheng, Qingfeng; Gao, Zhimei; Zhang, Yuting; Yu, Shenghua; Zhou, Junmei; Xi, Zhengjun; Wang, Xueli

    2017-05-01

    The liver in biliary atresia (BA) is characterized by progressing fibrosis which is promoted by unclear reasons. We aimed to understand the factors influencing liver fibrosis. This study hypothesized that HPCs (hepatic progenitor cells) are activated and associated with liver fibrosis in biliary atresia. Liver samples from biliary atresia patients are as BA group, and the normal liver derived from hepatoblastoma infants during operation are control group. The extent of fibrosis in liver samples was blindly evaluated by two experienced pathologists depending on Ishak system. The BA liver samples were divided into mild liver fibrosis group (grade I-IV, BAa) and severe liver fibrosis group (grade V-VI, BAb) to detect Fn14 protein expression. In mRNA level, Fn14 expression was 21.23 ± 8.3 vs. 1.00 ± 0.17, p = 0.023 < 0.05 and CD133 expression was 6.02 ± 2.16 vs. 1.14 ± 0.75, p = 0.008 < 0.01 between BA group and control group. Fn14 cells co-expressed the progenitor marker CD133 in liver, and activated in BA. Fn14 andα-SMA were co-location in fibrous area in liver. Compared to the control group, Fn14, CD133, and α-SMA protein expression were 2.10 ± 0.53 vs. 0.97 ± 0.2, p = 0.001, 2.23 ± 0.57 vs. 1.00 ± 0.03, p = 0.000, 4.96 ± 2.4 vs. 1.00 ± 0.22, p = 0.001. The Fn14 protein expression was 2.60 ± 0.35 vs. 1.86 ± 0.42, p = 0.012, between BAb and BAa group. Fn14 cells, which co-express the progenitor marker CD133 in liver, are HPCs and activated in BA. Fn14 + HPCs are associated with liver fibrosis in BA.

  14. Alcohol Increases Liver Progenitor Populations and Induces Disease Phenotypes in Human IPSC-Derived Mature Stage Hepatic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Lipeng; Deshmukh, Abhijeet; Prasad, Neha; Jang, Yoon-Young

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol consumption has long been a global problem affecting human health, and has been found to influence both fetal and adult liver functions. However, how alcohol affects human liver development and liver progenitor cells remains largely unknown. Here, we used human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) as a model to examine the effects of alcohol, on multi-stage hepatic cells including hepatic progenitors, early and mature hepatocyte-like cells derived from human iPSCs. While alcohol has little effect on endoderm development from iPSCs, it reduces formation of hepatic progenitor cells during early hepatic specification. The proliferative activities of early and mature hepatocyte-like cells are significantly decreased after alcohol exposure. Importantly, at a mature stage of hepatocyte-like cells, alcohol treatment increases two liver progenitor subsets, causes oxidative mitochondrial injury and results in liver disease phenotypes (i.e., steatosis and hepatocellular carcinoma associated markers) in a dose dependent manner. Some of the phenotypes were significantly improved by antioxidant treatment. This report suggests that fetal alcohol exposure may impair generation of hepatic progenitors at early stage of hepatic specification and decrease proliferation of fetal hepatocytes; meanwhile alcohol injury in post-natal or mature stage human liver may contribute to disease phenotypes. This human iPSC model of alcohol-induced liver injury can be highly valuable for investigating alcoholic injury in the fetus as well as understanding the pathogenesis and ultimately developing effective treatment for alcoholic liver disease in adults. PMID:27570479

  15. Environmental Ligands of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor and Their Effects in Models of Adult Liver Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vondráček, Jan; Machala, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    The toxicity of environmental and dietary ligands of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in mature liver parenchymal cells is well appreciated, while considerably less attention has been paid to their impact on cell populations exhibiting phenotypic features of liver progenitor cells. Here, we discuss the results suggesting that the consequences of the AhR activation in the cellular models derived from bipotent liver progenitors could markedly differ from those in hepatocytes. In contact-inhibited liver progenitor cells, the AhR agonists induce a range of effects potentially linked with tumor promotion. They can stimulate cell cycle progression/proliferation and deregulate cell-to-cell communication, which is associated with downregulation of proteins forming gap junctions, adherens junctions, and desmosomes (such as connexin 43, E-cadherin, β-catenin, and plakoglobin), as well as with reduced cell adhesion and inhibition of intercellular communication. At the same time, toxic AhR ligands may affect the activity of the signaling pathways contributing to regulation of liver progenitor cell activation and/or differentiation, such as downregulation of Wnt/β-catenin and TGF-β signaling, or upregulation of transcriptional targets of YAP/TAZ, the effectors of Hippo signaling pathway. These data illustrate the need to better understand the potential role of liver progenitors in the AhR-mediated liver carcinogenesis and tumor promotion. PMID:27274734

  16. Rapid evaluation of Antrodia camphorata natural products and derivatives in tumourigenic liver progenitor cells with a novel cell proliferation assay.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Scott G; Ho, Louisa A; Polomska, Marta E; Percival, Alexander T; Yeoh, George C T

    2009-10-01

    We report the syntheses of five natural product maleimide and maleic anhydrides from the mushroom Antrodia camphorata. The ability of these compounds to affect proliferation in non-tumourigenic and tumourigenic liver progenitor cell lines was monitored by the Cellscreen system, a novel and nondestructive rapid-screening instrument. Additionally, a range of new aryl-functionalised differentiated derivatives were prepared through a Suzuki cross-coupling reaction to influence cell-growth effects. Several derivatives radically slowed the proliferation of liver progenitor cells; however, of particular interest were two maleic anhydride derivatives containing aryl tethers. These analogues demonstrated selectivity for limiting the proliferation of tumourigenic progenitor cells in comparison with their non-tumourigenic counterparts. Also highlighted is the application of the Cellscreen system in medicinal chemistry to rapidly measure the effect of compound libraries on cell proliferation.

  17. Response of Human Fetal Liver Progenitor Cell Types to Temperature and pH Stresses In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Schmelzer, Eva; Foka, Hubert G; Thompson, Robert L; Luca, Angelo; Gridelli, Bruno; Gerlach, Jörg C

    2017-09-11

    Prolonged physiological stresses including abnormal pH and temperature are deleterious. Yet, human hepatic progenitors have been shown to be quite tolerant of temporary temperature stress such as in cold ischemia. We aimed to identify how various stresses affect liver progenitors, and to determine whether distinct effects exist on different progenitor cells of the human liver. Total fetal liver cells were exposed to low (25°C), normal (37°C), or high (40°C) temperatures, or low (6.76), normal (7.35), or high (7.88) pH in vitro. Culture at 25°C increased cell numbers and percentages of proliferation marker Ki67 positive total cells. In total cell cultures, percentages of CD326+ hepatic progenitors co-expressing DLK1 (delta-like 1 homolog), SSEA4, or CD90 increased, as well as proliferation of SSEA4+ and CD235a+ progenitors. Analyses of pre-sorted hepatic progenitors revealed that culture at 25°C increased cell numbers of CD326+ hepatic stem/progenitor cells but not DLK+ hepatoblasts. The expressions of several mesenchymal genes were reduced, and distinct hepatic stem/progenitor cell colonies emerged. At 40°C, numbers of adherent hepatic cells decreased but those of hematopoietic non-adherent cells increased. High pH did not cause major effects. Acidic pH resulted in decreased total cell numbers and affected hematopoietic cells. Percentages of DLK1+ hepatoblasts were increased but those of hematopoietic mature CD45+ cells were decreased. In particular, proliferation of adherent hepatic CD326+, SSEA4+ progenitors, and hematopoietic CD45+ cells and CD235a+ erythroblasts were reduced. Conclusively, our data indicate that low-temperature stress stimulates hepatic progenitor and erythroblast proliferation, whereas acidic pH promotes hepatic maturation and reduces hematopoietic cells.

  18. Hedgehog signal activation coordinates proliferation and differentiation of fetal liver progenitor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hirose, Yoshikazu; Itoh, Tohru; Miyajima, Atsushi

    2009-09-10

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays crucial roles in development and homeostasis of various organs. In the adult liver, it regulates proliferation and/or viability of several types of cells, particularly under injured conditions, and is also implicated in stem/progenitor cell maintenance. However, the role of this signaling pathway during the normal developmental process of the liver remains elusive. Although Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is expressed in the ventral foregut endoderm from which the liver derives, the expression disappears at the onset of the liver bud formation, and its possible recurrence at the later stages has not been investigated. Here we analyzed the activation and functional relevance of Hh signaling during the mouse fetal liver development. At E11.5, Shh and an activation marker gene for Hh signaling, Gli1, were expressed in Dlk{sup +} hepatoblasts, the fetal liver progenitor cells, and the expression was rapidly decreased thereafter as the development proceeded. In the culture of Dlk{sup +} hepatoblasts isolated from the E11.5 liver, activation of Hh signaling stimulated their proliferation and this effect was cancelled by a chemical Hh signaling inhibitor, cyclopamine. In contrast, hepatocyte differentiation of Dlk{sup +} hepatoblasts in vitro as manifested by the marker gene expression and acquisition of ammonia clearance activity was significantly inhibited by forced activation of Hh signaling. Taken together, these results demonstrate the temporally restricted manner of Hh signal activation and its role in promoting the hepatoblast proliferation, and further suggest that the pathway needs to be shut off for the subsequent hepatic differentiation of hepatoblasts to proceed normally.

  19. Stages based molecular mechanisms for generating cholangiocytes from liver stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei-Hui; Ren, Li-Na; Chen, Tao; Liu, Li-Ye; Tang, Li-Jun

    2013-11-07

    Except for the most organized mature hepatocytes, liver stem/progenitor cells (LSPCs) can differentiate into many other types of cells in the liver including cholangiocytes. In addition, LSPCs are demonstrated to be able to give birth to other kinds of extra-hepatic cell types such as insulin-producing cells. Even more, under some bad conditions, these LSPCs could generate liver cancer stem like cells (LCSCs) through malignant transformation. In this review, we mainly concentrate on the molecular mechanisms for controlling cell fates of LSPCs, especially differentiation of cholangiocytes, insulin-producing cells and LCSCs. First of all, to certificate the cell fates of LSPCs, the following three features need to be taken into account to perform accurate phenotyping: (1) morphological properties; (2) specific markers; and (3) functional assessment including in vivo transplantation. Secondly, to promote LSPCs differentiation, systematical attention should be paid to inductive materials (such as growth factors and chemical stimulators), progressive materials including intracellular and extracellular signaling pathways, and implementary materials (such as liver enriched transcriptive factors). Accordingly, some recommendations were proposed to standardize, optimize, and enrich the effective production of cholangiocyte-like cells out of LSPCs. At the end, the potential regulating mechanisms for generation of cholangiocytes by LSPCs were carefully analyzed. The differentiation of LSPCs is a gradually progressing process, which consists of three main steps: initiation, progression and accomplishment. It's the unbalanced distribution of affecting materials in each step decides the cell fates of LSPCs.

  20. Endothelial Progenitor Cells Combined with Cytosine Deaminase-Endostatin for Suppression of Liver Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong; Yu, Hui; An, Yan-Li; Chen, Hua-Jun; Jia, ZhenYu; Teng, Gao-Jun

    2016-06-01

    Transplantation of gene transfected endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) provides a novel method for treatment of human tumors. To study treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma using cytosine deaminase (CD)- and endostatin (ES)-transfected endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), mouse bone marrow-derived EPCs were cultured and transfected with Lenti6.3-CD-EGFP and Lenti6.3-ES-Monomer-DsRed labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles. DiD (lipophilic fluorescent dye)-labeled EPCs were injected into normal mice and mice with liver carcinoma. The EPCs loaded with CD-ES were infused into the mice through caudal veins and tumor volumes were measured. The tumor volumes in the EPC + SPIO + CD/5-Fc + ES group were found to be smaller as a result and grew more slowly than those from the EPC + SPIO + LV (lentivirus, empty vector control) group. Survival times were also measured after infusion of the cells into the mice. The median survival time was found to be longer in the EPC + SPIO + CD/5-Fc + ES group than in the others. In conclusion, the EPCs transfected with CD-ES suppressed the liver carcinoma cells in vitro, migrated primarily to the carcinoma, inhibited tumor growth, and also extended the median survival time for the mice with liver carcinoma.

  1. Liver-derived matrix metalloproteinase-9 (gelatinase B) recruits progenitor cells from bone marrow into the blood circulation.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yoshifumi; Haruyama, Takahiro; Akaike, Toshihiro

    2003-04-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are involved in invasive cell behavior, embryonic development and organ remodeling. In this report, we investigated the role of liver-derived MMP-9 in the in vivo system at liver injury. Liver injury induced MMP-9 expression in the liver 3 to 12 h after intravenous administration of anti-Fas antibody, followed by the expression of the activity and the protein detected by zymography and Western blotting, respectively, in the blood circulation. Interestingly, the MMP-9 expression was accompanied by the recruitment of hematopoietic progenitor cells from bone marrow into the circulation. The recruitment was blocked by a specific MMP-9 inhibitor, R94138, which did not affect the Fas-mediated liver injury or induced expression of MMP-9. Compulsive expression of mutant active MMP-9 in the liver also recruited the progenitor cells into the circulation. In contrast, partial hepatectomy, which treatment does not directly injure hepatocytes, did not recruit progenitor cells despite the increased expression of MMP-9 in the circulation. These results suggest that liver-derived MMP-9 induced by liver injury plays an essential role in the recruitment of hematopoietic progenitor cells from bone marrow into the blood circulation.

  2. Stepwise reprogramming of liver cells to a pancreas progenitor state by the transcriptional regulator Tgif2

    PubMed Central

    Cerdá-Esteban, Nuria; Naumann, Heike; Ruzittu, Silvia; Mah, Nancy; Pongrac, Igor M.; Cozzitorto, Corinna; Hommel, Angela; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.; Bonifacio, Ezio; Spagnoli, Francesca M.

    2017-01-01

    The development of a successful lineage reprogramming strategy of liver to pancreas holds promises for the treatment and potential cure of diabetes. The liver is an ideal tissue source for generating pancreatic cells, because of its close developmental origin with the pancreas and its regenerative ability. Yet, the molecular bases of hepatic and pancreatic cellular plasticity are still poorly understood. Here, we report that the TALE homeoprotein TGIF2 acts as a developmental regulator of the pancreas versus liver fate decision and is sufficient to elicit liver-to-pancreas fate conversion both ex vivo and in vivo. Hepatocytes expressing Tgif2 undergo extensive transcriptional remodelling, which represses the original hepatic identity and, over time, induces a pancreatic progenitor-like phenotype. Consistently, in vivo forced expression of Tgif2 activates pancreatic progenitor genes in adult mouse hepatocytes. This study uncovers the reprogramming activity of TGIF2 and suggests a stepwise reprogramming paradigm, whereby a ‘lineage-restricted' dedifferentiation step precedes the identity switch. PMID:28193997

  3. VEGF-sdf1 recruitment of CXCR7+ bone marrow progenitors of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells promotes rat liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    DeLeve, Laurie D; Wang, Xiangdong; Wang, Lei

    2016-05-01

    In liver injury, recruitment of bone marrow (BM) progenitors of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (sprocs) is necessary for normal liver regeneration. Hepatic vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a central regulator of the recruitment process. We examine whether stromal cell-derived factor 1 [sdf1, or CXC ligand 12 (CXCL12)] acts downstream from VEGF to mediate recruitment of BM sprocs, what the sdf1 receptor type [CXC receptor (CXCR)-4 or CXCR7] is on sprocs, and whether sdf1 signaling is required for normal liver regeneration. Studies were performed in the rat partial hepatectomy model. Tracking studies of BM sprocs were performed in wild-type Lewis rats that had undergone BM transplantation from transgenic enhanced green fluorescent protein-positive Lewis rats. Knockdown studies were performed using antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs). Expression of sdf1 doubles in liver and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) after partial hepatectomy. Upregulation of sdf1 expression increases proliferation of sprocs in the BM, mobilization of CXCR7(+) BM sprocs to the circulation, and engraftment of CXCR7(+) BM sprocs in the liver and promotes liver regeneration. Knockdown of hepatic VEGF with ASOs decreases hepatic sdf1 expression and plasma sdf1 levels. When the effect of VEGF knockdown on sdf1 is offset by infusion of sdf1, VEGF knockdown-induced impairment of BM sproc recruitment after partial hepatectomy is completely attenuated and liver regeneration is normalized. These data demonstrate that the VEGF-sdf1 pathway regulates recruitment of CXCR7(+) BM sprocs to the hepatic sinusoid after partial hepatectomy and is required for normal liver regeneration. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Participation of liver progenitor cells in liver regeneration: lack of evidence in the AAF/PH rat model.

    PubMed

    Dusabineza, Ange-Clarisse; Van Hul, Noémi K; Abarca-Quinones, Jorge; Starkel, Peter; Najimi, Mustapha; Leclercq, Isabelle A

    2012-01-01

    When hepatocyte proliferation is impaired, liver progenitor cells (LPC) are activated to participate in liver regeneration. We used the 2-acetaminofluorene/partial hepatectomy (AAF/PH) model to evaluate the contribution of LPC to liver cell replacement and function restoration. Fischer rats subjected to AAF/PH (or PH alone) were investigated 7, 10 and 14 days post-hepatectomy. Liver mass recovery (LMR) was estimated, and the liver mass to body weight ratio calculated. We used serum albumin and bilirubin levels, and liver albumin mRNA levels to assess the liver function. LPC expansion was analyzed by cytokeratin 19 (CK19), glutathione S-transferase protein (GSTp) immunohistochemistry and by CK19, CD133, transforming growth factor-β1 and hepatocyte growth factor mRNA expression in livers. Cell proliferation was evaluated by Ki67 and BrdU immunostaining. Compared with PH alone where LMR was ∼100% 14 days post-PH, LMR was defective in AAF/PH rats (64.1±15.5%, P=0.0004). LPC expansion was scarce in PH livers (0.5±0.4% of CK19(+) area), but significant in AAF/PH livers (8.5±7.2% of CK19(+)), and inversely correlated to LMR (r(2)=0.63, P<0.0001). A quarter of AAF/PH animals presented liver failure (low serum albumin and high serum bilirubin) 14 days post-PH. Compared with animals with preserved function, this was associated with a lower LMR (50±6.8 vs 74.6±9.4%, P=0.0005), a decreased liver to body weight ratio (2±0.3 vs 3.5±0.6%, P=0.001), and a larger LPC expansion such as proliferating Ki67(+) LPC covered 17.4±4.2% of the liver parenchyma vs 3.1±1.5%, (P<0.0001). Amongst those, rare LPC with an intermediate hepatocyte-like phenotype were seen. Also, less than 2% of hepatocytes were engaged into the cell cycle (Ki67(+)), while more numerous (∼25% of hepatocytes) in the livers with preserved function. These observations suggest that, in this model, the efficient recovery of the liver function was ensured rather by the proliferation of mature hepatocytes

  5. Repopulation of the fibrotic/cirrhotic rat liver by transplanted hepatic stem/progenitor cells and mature hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yovchev, Mladen I.; Xue, Yuhua; Shafritz, David A.; Locker, Joseph; Oertel, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aim Considerable progress has been made in developing anti-fibrotic agents and other strategies to treat liver fibrosis; however, significant long-term restoration of functional liver mass has not yet been achieved. Therefore, we investigated whether transplanted hepatic stem/progenitor cells can effectively repopulate the liver with advanced fibrosis/cirrhosis. Methods Stem/progenitor cells derived from fetal livers or mature hepatocytes from DPPIV+ F344 rats were transplanted into DPPIV− rats with thioacetamide (TAA)-induced fibrosis/cirrhosis; rats were sacrificed 1, 2, or 4 months later. Liver tissues were analyzed by histochemistry, hydroxyproline determination, RT-PCR, and immunohistochemistry. Results After chronic TAA administration, DPPIV− F344 rats exhibited progressive fibrosis, cirrhosis and severe hepatocyte damage. Besides stellate cell activation, increased numbers of stem/progenitor cells (Dlk-1+, AFP+, CD133+, Sox-9+, FoxJ1+) were observed. In conjunction with partial hepatectomy (PH), transplanted stem/progenitor cells engrafted, proliferated competitively compared to host hepatocytes, differentiated into hepatocytic and biliary epithelial cells, and generated new liver mass with extensive long-term liver repopulation (40.8 ± 10.3%). Remarkably, more than 20% liver repopulation was achieved in the absence of PH, associated with reduced fibrogenic activity (e.g., expression of α-SMA, PDGFRβ, desmin, vimentin, TIMP1) and fibrosis (reduced collagen). Furthermore, hepatocytes can also replace liver mass with advanced fibrosis/cirrhosis, but to a lesser extent than FLSPCs. Conclusions This study is a Proof of Principle demonstration that transplanted epithelial stem/progenitor cells can restore injured parenchyma in a liver environment with advanced fibrosis/cirrhosis and exhibit anti-fibrotic effects. PMID:23840008

  6. Transplanted fibroblast cell sheets promote migration of hepatic progenitor cells in the incised host liver in allogeneic rat model.

    PubMed

    Muraoka, Izumi; Takatsuki, Mitsuhisa; Sakai, Yusuke; Tomonaga, Tetsuo; Soyama, Akihiko; Hidaka, Masaaki; Hishikawa, Yoshitaka; Koji, Takehiko; Utoh, Rie; Ohashi, Kazuo; Okano, Teruo; Kanematsu, Takashi; Eguchi, Susumu

    2015-11-01

    Cell sheet engineering has been noted as a new and valuable approach in the tissue-engineering field. The objective of this study was to explore a procedure to induce hepatic progenitor cells and biliary duct structures in the liver. Sprague-Dawley rat dermal fibroblast (DF) sheets were transplanted into the incised surface of the liver of F344 nude rats. In the control group, an incision was made without transplantation of the DF sheets. Bile duct (BD)-like structures and immature hepatocyte-like cells were observed in the DF sheet transplant sites. These BD-like structures were cytokeratin-8-positive, while the hepatocyte-like cells were both OV-6-positive and α-fetoprotein-positive as well. The proliferation and differentiation of liver progenitor cells were not influenced by hepatectomy. We also transplanted DF sheets transfected with a plasmid encoding the enhanced yellow fluorescent protein target to mitochondria (pEYFP-Mito) by electroporation, and found that the new structures were pEYFP-Mito-negative. We observed new BD-like structures and immature hepatocytes after transplantation of DF sheets onto incised liver surfaces, and clarified that the origin of these BD-like structures and hepatocyte-like cells was the recipient liver. The present study described an aspect of the hepatic differentiation process induced at the site of liver injury.

  7. DJ-1 deficiency attenuates expansion of liver progenitor cells through modulating the inflammatory and fibrogenic niches

    PubMed Central

    Chen, L; Luo, M; Sun, X; Qin, J; Yu, C; Wen, Y; Zhang, Q; Gu, J; Xia, Q; Kong, X

    2016-01-01

    Our previous study suggested that DJ-1 has a critical role in initiating an inflammatory response, but its role in the liver progenitor cell (LPC) expansion, a process highly dependent on the inflammatory niche, remains elusive. The objective of this study is to determine the role of DJ-1 in LPC expansion. The correlation of DJ-1 expression with LPC markers was examined in the liver of patients with hepatitis B or hepatitis C virus (HBV and HCV, respectively) infection, primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), respectively. The role of DJ-1 in LPC expansion and the formation of LPC-associated fibrosis and inflammation was examined in a 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC) diet-induced liver injury murine model. We also determined the ability of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) in recruiting macrophages in DJ-1 knockout (KO) mice. The expression levels of DJ-1 were upregulated in the liver of HBV, HCV, PBC and PSC patients and DDC-fed mice. Additionally, DJ-1 expression was positively correlated with LPC proliferation in patients with liver injury and mice with DDC exposure. DJ-1 has no direct effect on LPC proliferation. Reduced activation of HSCs and collagen deposition were observed in DJ-1 KO mice. Furthermore, infiltrated CD11b+Gr-1low macrophages and pro-inflammatory factors (IL-6, TNF-α) were attenuated in DJ-1 KO mice. Mechanistically, we found that HSCs isolated from DJ-1 KO mice had decreased secretion of macrophage-mobilizing chemokines, such as CCL2 and CX3CL1, resulting in impaired macrophage infiltration. DJ-1 positively correlates with LPC expansion during liver injury. DJ-1 deficiency negatively regulates LPC proliferation by impairing the formation of LPC-associated fibrosis and inflammatory niches. PMID:27277679

  8. Macrophage Activation in Pediatric Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) Correlates with Hepatic Progenitor Cell Response via Wnt3a Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Renzi, Anastasia; De Stefanis, Cristiano; Stronati, Laura; Franchitto, Antonio; Alisi, Anna; Onori, Paolo; De Vito, Rita; Alpini, Gianfranco; Gaudio, Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is one of the most important causes of liver-related morbidity in children. In non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, the activation of liver resident macrophage pool is a central event in the progression of liver injury. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the polarization of liver macrophages and the possible role of Wnt3a production by macrophages in hepatic progenitor cell response in the progression of pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. 32 children with biopsy-proven non-alcoholic fatty liver disease were included. 20 out of 32 patients were treated with docosahexaenoic acid for 18 months and biopsies at the baseline and after 18 months were included. Hepatic progenitor cell activation, macrophage subsets and Wnt/β-catenin pathway were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Our results indicated that in pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, pro-inflammatory macrophages were the predominant subset. Macrophage polarization was correlated with Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease Activity Score, ductular reaction, and portal fibrosis; docosahexaenoic acid treatment determined a macrophage polarization towards an anti-inflammatory phenotype in correlation with the reduction of serum inflammatory cytokines, with increased macrophage apoptosis, and with the up-regulation of macrophage Wnt3a expression; macrophage Wnt3a expression was correlated with β-catenin phosphorylation in hepatic progenitor cells and signs of commitment towards hepatocyte fate. In conclusion, macrophage polarization seems to have a key role in the progression of pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; the modulation of macrophage polarization could drive hepatic progenitor cell response by Wnt3a production. PMID:27310371

  9. Pleiotrophin regulates the ductular reaction by controlling the migration of cells in liver progenitor niches.

    PubMed

    Michelotti, Gregory A; Tucker, Anikia; Swiderska-Syn, Marzena; Machado, Mariana Verdelho; Choi, Steve S; Kruger, Leandi; Soderblom, Erik; Thompson, J Will; Mayer-Salman, Meredith; Himburg, Heather A; Moylan, Cynthia A; Guy, Cynthia D; Garman, Katherine S; Premont, Richard T; Chute, John P; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2016-04-01

    The ductular reaction (DR) involves mobilisation of reactive-appearing duct-like cells (RDC) along canals of Hering, and myofibroblastic (MF) differentiation of hepatic stellate cells (HSC) in the space of Disse. Perivascular cells in stem cell niches produce pleiotrophin (PTN) to inactivate the PTN receptor, protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor zeta-1 (PTPRZ1), thereby augmenting phosphoprotein-dependent signalling. We hypothesised that the DR is regulated by PTN/PTPRZ1 signalling. PTN-GFP, PTN-knockout (KO), PTPRZ1-KO, and wild type (WT) mice were examined before and after bile duct ligation (BDL) for PTN, PTPRZ1 and the DR. RDC and HSC from WT, PTN-KO, and PTPRZ1-KO mice were also treated with PTN to determine effects on downstream signaling phosphoproteins, gene expression, growth, and migration. Liver biopsies from patients with DRs were also interrogated. Although quiescent HSC and RDC lines expressed PTN and PTPRZ1 mRNAs, neither PTN nor PTPRZ1 protein was demonstrated in healthy liver. BDL induced PTN in MF-HSC and increased PTPRZ1 in MF-HSC and RDC. In WT mice, BDL triggered a DR characterised by periportal accumulation of collagen, RDC and MF-HSC. All aspects of this DR were increased in PTN-KO mice and suppressed in PTPRZ1-KO mice. In vitro studies revealed PTN-dependent accumulation of phosphoproteins that control cell-cell adhesion and migration, with resultant inhibition of cell migration. PTPRZ1-positive cells were prominent in the DRs of patients with ductal plate defects and adult cholestatic diseases. PTN, and its receptor, PTPRZ1, regulate the DR to liver injury by controlling the migration of resident cells in adult liver progenitor niches. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  10. Pleiotrophin regulates the ductular reaction by controlling the migration of cells in liver progenitor niches

    PubMed Central

    Michelotti, Gregory A; Tucker, Anikia; Swiderska-Syn, Marzena; Machado, Mariana Verdelho; Choi, Steve S; Kruger, Leandi; Soderblom, Erik; Thompson, J Will; Mayer-Salman, Meredith; Himburg, Heather A; Moylan, Cynthia A; Guy, Cynthia D; Garman, Katherine S; Premont, Richard T; Chute, John P; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2016-01-01

    Objective The ductular reaction (DR) involves mobilisation of reactive-appearing duct-like cells (RDC) along canals of Hering, and myofibroblastic (MF) differentiation of hepatic stellate cells (HSC) in the space of Disse. Perivascular cells in stem cell niches produce pleiotrophin (PTN) to inactivate the PTN receptor, protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor zeta-1 (PTPRZ1), thereby augmenting phosphoprotein-dependent signalling. We hypothesised that the DR is regulated by PTN/PTPRZ1 signalling. Design PTN-GFP, PTN-knockout (KO), PTPRZ1-KO, and wild type (WT) mice were examined before and after bile duct ligation (BDL) for PTN, PTPRZ1 and the DR. RDC and HSC from WT, PTN-KO, and PTPRZ1-KO mice were also treated with PTN to determine effects on downstream signaling phosphoproteins, gene expression, growth, and migration. Liver biopsies from patients with DRs were also interrogated. Results Although quiescent HSC and RDC lines expressed PTN and PTPRZ1 mRNAs, neither PTN nor PTPRZ1 protein was demonstrated in healthy liver. BDL induced PTN in MF-HSC and increased PTPRZ1 in MF-HSC and RDC. In WT mice, BDL triggered a DR characterised by periportal accumulation of collagen, RDC and MF-HSC. All aspects of this DR were increased in PTN-KO mice and suppressed in PTPRZ1-KO mice. In vitro studies revealed PTN-dependent accumulation of phosphoproteins that control cell-cell adhesion and migration, with resultant inhibition of cell migration. PTPRZ1-positive cells were prominent in the DRs of patients with ductal plate defects and adult cholestatic diseases. Conclusions PTN, and its receptor, PTPRZ1, regulate the DR to liver injury by controlling the migration of resident cells in adult liver progenitor niches. PMID:25596181

  11. Expression kinetics of hepatic progenitor markers in cellular models of human liver development recapitulating hepatocyte and biliary cell fate commitment.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Pooja; Tian, Lipeng; Deshmukh, Abhijeet; Jang, Yoon-Young

    2016-09-01

    Due to the limitations of research using human embryos and the lack of a biological model of human liver development, the roles of the various markers associated with liver stem or progenitor cell potential in humans are largely speculative, and based on studies utilizing animal models and certain patient tissues. Human pluripotent stem cell-based in vitro multistage hepatic differentiation systems may serve as good surrogate models for mimicking normal human liver development, pathogenesis and injury/regeneration studies. Here, we describe the implications of various liver stem or progenitor cell markers and their bipotency (i.e. hepatocytic- and biliary-epithelial cell differentiation), based on the pluripotent stem cell-derived model of human liver development. Future studies using the human cellular model(s) of liver and biliary development will provide more human relevant biological and/or pathological roles of distinct markers expressed in heterogeneous liver stem/progenitor cell populations. © 2016 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  12. Expression of Coxsackievirus and Adenovirus Receptor Separates Hematopoietic and Cardiac Progenitor Cells in Fetal Liver Kinase 1-Expressing Mesoderm

    PubMed Central

    Tashiro, Katsuhisa; Hirata, Nobue; Okada, Atsumasa; Yamaguchi, Tomoko; Takayama, Kazuo; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    In developing embryos or in vitro differentiation cultures using pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), such as embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, fetal liver kinase 1 (Flk1)-expressing mesodermal cells are thought to be a heterogeneous population that includes hematopoietic progenitors, endothelial progenitors, and cardiac progenitors. However, information on cell surface markers for separating these progenitors in Flk1+ cells is currently limited. In the present study, we show that distinct types of progenitor cells in Flk1+ cells could be separated according to the expression of coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR, also known as CXADR), a tight junction component molecule. We found that mouse and human PSC- and mouse embryo-derived Flk1+ cells could be subdivided into Flk1+CAR+ cells and Flk1+CAR− cells. The progenitor cells with cardiac potential were almost entirely restricted to Flk1+CAR+ cells, and Flk1+CAR− cells efficiently differentiated into hematopoietic cells. Endothelial differentiation potential was observed in both populations. Furthermore, from the expression of CAR, Flk1, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α (PDGFRα), Flk1+ cells could be separated into three populations (Flk1+PDGFRα−CAR− cells, Flk1+PDGFRα−CAR+ cells, and Flk1+PDGFRα+CAR+ cells). Flk1+PDGFRα+ cells and Flk1+PDGFRα− cells have been reported as cardiac and hematopoietic progenitor cells, respectively. We identified a novel population (Flk1+PDGFRα−CAR+ cells) with the potential to differentiate into not only hematopoietic cells and endothelial cells but also cardiomyocytes. Our findings indicate that CAR would be a novel and prominent marker for separating PSC- and embryo-derived Flk1+ mesodermal cells with distinct differentiation potentials. PMID:25762001

  13. Repair of liver mediated by adult mouse liver neuro-glia antigen 2-positive progenitor cell transplantation in a mouse model of cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongyu; Siegel, Christopher T.; Shuai, Ling; Lai, Jiejuan; Zeng, Linli; Zhang, Yujun; Lai, Xiangdong; Bie, Ping; Bai, Lianhua

    2016-01-01

    NG2-expressing cells are a population of periportal vascular stem/progenitors (MLpvNG2+ cells) that were isolated from healthy adult mouse liver by using a “Percoll-Plate-Wait” procedure. We demonstrated that isolated cells are able to restore liver function after transplantation into a cirrhotic liver, and co-localized with the pericyte marker (immunohistochemistry: PDGFR-β) and CK19. Cells were positive for: stem cell (Sca-1, CD133, Dlk) and liver stem cell markers (EpCAM, CD14, CD24, CD49f); and negative for: hematopoietic (CD34, CD45) and endothelial markers (CD31, vWf, von Willebrand factor). Cells were transplanted (1 × 106 cells) in mice with diethylnitrosamine-induced cirrhosis at week 6. Cells showed increased hepatic associated gene expression of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), Albumin (Alb), Glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pc), SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 9 (Sox9), hepatic nuclear factors (HNF1a, HNF1β, HNF3β, HNF4α, HNF6, Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), Leucine-rich repeated-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5-positive (Lgr5) and Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT). Cells showed decreased fibrogenesis, hepatic stellate cell infiltration, Kupffer cells and inflammatory cytokines. Liver function markers improved. In a cirrhotic liver environment, cells could differentiate into hepatic lineages. In addition, grafted MLpvNG2+ cells could mobilize endogenous stem/progenitors to participate in liver repair. These results suggest that MLpvNG2+ cells may be novel adult liver progenitors that participate in liver regeneration. PMID:26905303

  14. Identification and Characterization of Mesenchymal-Epithelial Progenitor-Like Cells in Normal and Injured Rat Liver

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Daqing; Yovchev, Mladen I.; Zhang, Jinghang; Alfieri, Alan A.; Tchaikovskaya, Tatyana; Laconi, Ezio; Dabeva, Mariana D.

    2016-01-01

    In normal rat liver, thymocyte antigen 1 (Thy1) is expressed in fibroblasts/myofibroblasts and in some blood progenitor cells. Thy1-expressing cells also accumulate in the liver during impaired liver regeneration. The origin and nature of these cells are not well understood. By using RT-PCR analysis and immunofluorescence microscopy, we describe the presence of rare Thy1+ cells in the liver lobule of normal animals, occasionally forming small collections of up to 20 cells. These cells constitute a small portion (1.7% to 1.8%) of nonparenchymal cells and reveal a mixed mesenchymal-epithelial phenotype, expressing E-cadherin, cytokeratin 18, and desmin. The most potent mitogens for mesenchymal-epithelial Thy1+ cells in vitro are the inflammatory cytokines interferon γ, IL-1, and platelet-derived growth factor-BB, which are not produced by Thy1+ cells. Thy1+ cells express all typical mesenchymal stem cell and hepatic progenitor cell markers and produce growth factor and cytokine mRNA (Hgf, Il6, Tgfa, and Tweak) for proteins that maintain oval cell growth and differentiation. Under appropriate conditions, mesenchymal-epithelial cells differentiate in vitro into hepatocyte-like cells. In this study, we show that the adult rat liver harbors a small pool of endogenous mesenchymal-epithelial cells not recognized previously. In the quiescent state, these cells express both mesenchymal and epithelial cell markers. They behave like hepatic stem cells/progenitors with dual phenotype, exhibiting high plasticity and long-lasting proliferative activity. PMID:25447047

  15. Bioregulators of stem and progenitor cells in preservation solution reduce cold ischemia-reperfusion injury of isolated rat livers.

    PubMed

    Cherkashina, Daria V; Sosimchyk, Irina A; Semenchenko, Olga A; Semenchenko, Alexander Yu; Volina, Victoria V; Petrenko, Alexander Yu

    2016-05-01

    The effects of bioregulators of stem and progenitor cells (BSPC) of fetal tissue cytosol on rat liver during 24h hypothermic storage (HS) and following normothermic reperfusion (NR) were investigated. It was shown that BSPC presence in the preservation medium stabilized pro-oxidant-antioxidant balance impaired in liver after HS and NR, prevented the uncoupling of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and ATP level decline. These consequences led to significant improvement of hepatic morphological integrity and functional state. Powerful protective effect of BSPC on liver at sub-zero temperatures can serve as basis for new approaches to extend safe time for organ preservation and foster understanding of pathways of stem and progenitor cell paracrine action. © 2016 BioFactors, 42(3):287-295, 2016. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  16. Reversal of hyperglycemia in mice by using human expandable insulin-producing cells differentiated from fetal liver progenitor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalzman, Michal; Gupta, Sanjeev; Giri, Ranjit K.; Berkovich, Irina; Sappal, Baljit S.; Karnieli, Ohad; Zern, Mark A.; Fleischer, Norman; Efrat, Shimon

    2003-06-01

    Beta-cell replacement is considered to be the most promising approach for treatment of type 1 diabetes. Its application on a large scale is hindered by a shortage of cells for transplantation. Activation of insulin expression, storage, and regulated secretion in stem/progenitor cells offers novel ways to overcome this shortage. We explored whether fetal human progenitor liver cells (FH) could be induced to differentiate into insulin-producing cells after expression of the pancreatic duodenal homeobox 1 (Pdx1) gene, which is a key regulator of pancreatic development and insulin expression in beta cells. FH cells possess a considerable replication capacity, and this was further extended by introduction of the gene for the catalytic subunit of human telomerase. Immortalized FH cells expressing Pdx1 activated multiple beta-cell genes, produced and stored considerable amounts of insulin, and released insulin in a regulated manner in response to glucose. When transplanted into hyperglycemic immunodeficient mice, the cells restored and maintained euglycemia for prolonged periods. Quantitation of human C-peptide in the mouse serum confirmed that the glycemia was normalized by the transplanted human cells. This approach offers the potential of a novel source of cells for transplantation into patients with type 1 diabetes.

  17. Expansion and hepatocytic differentiation of liver progenitor cells in vivo using a vascularized tissue engineering chamber in mice.

    PubMed

    Forster, Natasha; Palmer, Jason A; Yeoh, George; Ong, Wei-Chen; Mitchell, Geraldine M; Slavin, John; Tirnitz-Parker, Janina; Morrison, Wayne A

    2011-03-01

    Current cell-based treatment alternatives to organ transplantation for liver failure remain unsatisfactory. Hepatocytes have a strong tendency to dedifferentiate and apoptose when isolated and maintained in culture. In contrast, liver progenitor cells (LPCs) are robust, easy to culture and have been shown to replace damaged hepatocytes in liver disease. In this study we investigate whether isolated LPCs can survive and differentiate toward mature hepatocytes in vivo when implanted into a heterotopic mouse tissue engineering chamber model. Healthy Balb/c mice and those put on a choline-deficient ethionin-supplemented diet to induce chronic liver disease were implanted with a tissue engineering chamber based on the epigastric flow through pedicle model, containing either 1 × 10(6) LPCs suspended in Matrigel, or LPC-spheroids produced by preculture for 1 week in Matrigel. Four weeks after implantation the chamber contents were harvested. In all four groups, progenitor cells persisted in large numbers to 4 weeks and demonstrated evidence of considerable proliferation judged by Ki67-positive cells. Periodic acid Schiff staining demonstrated differentiation of some cells into mature hepatocytes. Constructs grown from LPC-spheroids demonstrated considerably greater LPC survival than those from LPCs that were grown as monolayers and implanted as dissociated cells. The combined use of LPC spheroids and the vascularized chamber model could be the basis for a viable alternative to current treatments for chronic liver failure.

  18. Effect of prolyl hydroxylase domain 2 haplodeficiency on liver progenitor cell characteristics in early mouse hepatocarcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bogaerts, Eliene; Paridaens, Annelies; Verhelst, Xavier; Carmeliet, Peter; Geerts, Anja; Van Vlierberghe, Hans; Devisscher, Lindsey

    2016-01-01

    Activation of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-pathway in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) induces therapy resistant tumours, characterized by increased liver progenitor cell (LPCs) characteristics and poor prognosis. We previously reported corresponding results in mice with HCC in which hypoxia was mimicked by prolyl hydroxylase domain (PHD) inhibition. Here, we aimed at investigating whether induction of LPC characteristics occurs during the onset of hepatocarcinogenesis and if this is associated with activation of Notch signalling. Dietheylnitrosamine (DEN) was used to induce hepatic tumours in PHD2 haplodeficient (PHD2+/-) mice which were euthanized at 5, 10, 15 and 17 weeks following DEN during neoplastic transformation, before tumour formation. Neoplasia and mRNA expression of LPC and Notch markers were evaluated by histology and qPCR on isolated livers. PHD2 haplodeficiency resulted in enhanced expression of HIF target genes after 17 weeks of DEN compared to wild type (WT) littermates but had no effect on the onset of neoplastic transformation. The mRNA expression of Afp and Epcam was increased at all time points following DEN whereas CK19, Prom1 and Notch3 were increased after 17 weeks of DEN, without difference between PHD2+/- and WT mice. MDR1 mRNA expression was increased in all DEN treated mice compared to saline control with increased expression in PHD2+/- compared to WT from 15 weeks. These results indicate that the effects of PHD2 haplodeficiency on the expression of LPC and Notch markers manifest during tumour nodule formation and not early on during neoplastic transformation. PMID:28337100

  19. Cryopreservation of human fetal liver hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells using sucrose as an additive to the cryoprotective medium.

    PubMed

    Petrenko, Yu A; Jones, D R E; Petrenko, A Yu

    2008-12-01

    Human fetal liver (HFL) is a valuable source of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSCs) for the treatment of various hematological disorders. This study describes the effect of sucrose addition to a cryoprotective medium in order to reduce the Me(2)SO concentration during cryopreservation of HFL hematopoietic cell preparations. Human fetal liver (HFL) cells of 8-12 weeks of gestation were cryopreserved with a cooling rate of 1 degrees C/min down to -80 degrees C and stored in liquid nitrogen. The cryoprotectant solutions contained 2% or 5% Me(2)SO (v/v) with or without sucrose at a final concentration of 0.05, 0.1, 0.2 or 0.3M. The metabolic activity of HFL cells was determined using the alamar blue assay. For the determination of the number and survival of hematopoietic progenitors present, cells were stained with CD34 (FITC) and 7-AAD, and analyzed by flow cytometry. The colony-forming activity of HFL hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells after cryopreservation was assessed in semisolid methylcellulose. The addition of sucrose to the cryoprotective medium produced a significant reduction in HFL cell loss during cryopreservation. The metabolic activity of HFL cells, cryopreserved with 5% Me(2)SO/0.3M sucrose mixture was comparable to cryopreservation in 5% Me(2)SO/10% FCS. Although the inclusion of sucrose did not affect the survival of CD34(+) cells in HFL after cryopreservation it did improve the functional capacity of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. The inclusion of sucrose as an additive to cryoprotective media for HFL cells enables a reduction in the concentration of Me(2)SO, replacing serum and increasing the efficiency of cryopreservation.

  20. Unbalanced distribution of materials: the art of giving rise to hepatocytes from liver stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei-Hui; Ren, Li-Na; Chen, Tao; You, Nan; Liu, Li-Ye; Wang, Tao; Yan, Hong-Tao; Luo, Hao; Tang, Li-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Liver stem/progenitor cells (LSPCs) are able to duplicate themselves and differentiate into each type of cells in the liver, including mature hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. Understanding how to accurately control the hepatic differentiation of LSPCs is a challenge in many fields from preclinical to clinical treatments. This review summarizes the recent advances made to control the hepatic differentiation of LSPCs over the last few decades. The hepatic differentiation of LSPCs is a gradual process consisting of three main steps: initiation, progression and accomplishment. The unbalanced distribution of the affecting materials in each step results in the hepatic maturation of LSPCs. As the innovative and creative works for generating hepatocytes with full functions from LSPCs are gradually accumulated, LSPC therapies will soon be a new choice for treating liver diseases.

  1. Effect of human patient plasma ex vivo treatment on gene expression and progenitor cell activation of primary human liver cells in multi-compartment 3D perfusion bioreactors for extra-corporeal liver support.

    PubMed

    Schmelzer, Eva; Mutig, Kerim; Schrade, Petra; Bachmann, Sebastian; Gerlach, Jörg C; Zeilinger, Katrin

    2009-07-01

    Cultivation of primary human liver cells in innovative 3D perfusion multi-compartment capillary membrane bioreactors using decentralized mass exchange and integral oxygenation provides in vitro conditions close to the physiologic environment in vivo. While a few scale-up bioreactors were used clinically, inoculated liver progenitors in these bioreactors were not investigated. Therefore, we characterized regenerative processes and expression patterns of auto- and paracrine mediators involved in liver regeneration in bioreactors after patient treatment. Primary human liver cells containing parenchymal and non-parenchymal cells co-cultivated in bioreactors were used for clinical extra-corporeal liver support to bridge to liver transplantation. 3D tissue re-structuring in bioreactors was studied; expression of proteins and genes related to regenerative processes and hepatic progenitors was analyzed. Formation of multiple bile ductular networks and colonies of putative progenitors were observed within parenchymal cell aggregates. HGF was detected in scattered cells located close to vascular-like structures, expression of HGFA and c-Met was assigned to biliary cells and hepatocytes. Increased expression of genes associated to hepatic progenitors was detected following clinical application. The results confirm auto- and paracrine interactions between co-cultured cells in the bioreactor. The 3D bioreactor provides a valuable tool to study mechanisms of progenitor activation and hepatic regeneration ex vivo under patient plasma treatment. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Immunolocalization of putative human liver progenitor cells in livers from patients with end-stage primary biliary cirrhosis and sclerosing cholangitis using the monoclonal antibody OV-6.

    PubMed

    Crosby, H A; Hubscher, S; Fabris, L; Joplin, R; Sell, S; Kelly, D; Strain, A J

    1998-03-01

    The term oval cell describes small cells with oval nuclei that arise in the periphery of the portal tracts in rat models of hepatocarcinogenesis and injury and can differentiate into either hepatocytes or bile duct cells, ie, are bipotential. The presence of such cells in human liver is controversial. Here, immunolocalization of OV-6 and two biliary markers, cytokeratin 19 (CK-19) and human epithelial antigen 125 (HEA-125) is compared in normal adult human livers and in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) liver sections. CK-19 and HEA-125 stained bile ducts and ductules in normal liver as well as proliferating ductular structures in diseased livers. OV-6 did not label ducts or ductules in normal liver, but in PBC and PSC stained numerous proliferating ductular and periductular cells and lobular hepatocytes. In PBC, discrete OV-6-positive cells with a mature biliary-cell-like morphology were seen integrated into some intact bile ducts as well as occasional small immature oval-like cells. In addition, in PSC, hepatocytes in regenerating lobules were also strongly stained with OV-6, and on close inspection, in both PBC and PSC, oval cells and small hepatocytes at the margins of the lobules were strongly labeled. In contrast to the rat liver, OV-6 and CK-19 staining did not always co-localize. It is proposed that the small OV-6-positive oval cells are analogous to those seen in rat models and may represent human liver progenitor cells that may differentiate into OV-6-positive ductal cells or lobular hepatocytes.

  3. Inhibition of adult liver progenitor (oval) cell growth and viability by an agonist of the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) family member gamma, but not alpha or delta.

    PubMed

    Knight, Belinda; Yeap, Bu B; Yeoh, George C; Olynyk, John K

    2005-10-01

    Multifaceted evidence links the development of liver tumours to the activation and proliferation of adult liver progenitor (oval) cells during the early stages of chronic liver injury. The aim of this study was to examine the role of the peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs): PPARalpha, delta and gamma, in mediating the behaviour of liver progenitor cells during pre-neoplastic disease and to investigate their potential as therapeutic targets for the treatment of chronic liver injury. We observed increased liver expression of PPARalpha and gamma in concert with expanding oval cell numbers during the first 21 days following commencement of the choline deficient, ethionine supplemented (CDE) dietary model of carcinogenic liver injury in mice. Both primary and immortalized liver progenitor cells were found to express PPARalpha, delta and gamma, but not gamma2, the alternate splice form of PPARgamma. WY14643 (PPARalpha agonist), GW501516 (PPARdelta agonist) and ciglitazone (PPARgamma agonist) were tested for their ability to modulate the behaviour of p53-immortalized liver (PIL) progenitor cell lines in vitro. Both PPARdelta and gamma agonists induced dose-dependent growth inhibition and apoptosis of PIL cells. In contrast, the PPARalpha agonist had no effect on PIL cell growth. None of the drugs affected the maturation of PIL cells along either the hepatocytic or biliary lineages, as judged by their patterns of hepatic gene expression prior to and following treatment. Administration of the PPARgamma agonist ciglitazone to mice fed with the CDE diet for 14 days resulted in a significantly diminished oval cell response and decreased fibrosis compared with those receiving placebo. In contrast, GW501516 did not affect oval cell numbers or liver fibrosis, but inhibited CDE-induced hepatic steatosis. In summary, PPARgamma agonists reduce oval cell proliferation and fibrosis during chronic liver injury and may be useful in the prevention of hepatocellular

  4. Adult-Derived Human Liver Stem/Progenitor Cells Infused 3 Days Postsurgery Improve Liver Regeneration in a Mouse Model of Extended Hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Astrid; Prigent, Julie; Lombard, Catherine; Rosseels, Valérie; Daujat-Chavanieu, Martine; Breckpot, Karine; Najimi, Mustapha; Deblandre, Gisèle; Sokal, Etienne M

    2017-02-16

    There is growing evidence that cell therapy constitutes a promising strategy for liver regenerative medicine. In the setting of hepatic cancer treatments, cell therapy could prove a useful therapeutic approach for managing the acute liver failure that occurs following extended hepatectomy. In this study, we examined the influence of delivering adult-derived human liver stem/progenitor cells (ADHLSCs) at two different early time points in an immunodeficient mouse model (Rag2-/-IL2Rγ-/-) that had undergone a 70% hepatectomy procedure. The hepatic mesenchymal cells were intrasplenically infused either immediately after surgery (n = 26) or following a critical 3-day period (n = 26). We evaluated the cells' capacity to engraft at day 1 and day 7 following transplantation by means of human Alu qPCR quantification, along with histological assessment of human albumin and α-smooth muscle actin. In addition, cell proliferation (anti-mouse and human Ki-67 staining) and murine liver weight were measured in order to evaluate liver regeneration. At day 1 posttransplantation, the ratio of human to mouse cells was similar in both groups, whereas 1 week posttransplantation this ratio was significantly improved (p < 0.016) in mice receiving ADHLSC injection at day 3 posthepatectomy (1.7%), compared to those injected at the time of surgery (1%). On the basis of liver weight, mouse liver regeneration was more extensive 1 week posttransplantation in mice transplanted with ADHLSCs (+65.3%) compared to that of mice from the sham vehicle group (+42.7%). In conclusion, infusing ADHLSCs 3 days after extensive hepatectomy improves the cell engraftment and murine hepatic tissue regeneration, thereby confirming that ADHLSCs could be a promising cell source for liver cell therapy and hepatic tissue repair.

  5. Enhanced liver progenitor cell survival and differentiation in vivo by spheroid implantation in a vascularized tissue engineering chamber.

    PubMed

    Yap, Kiryu K; Dingle, Aaron M; Palmer, Jason A; Dhillon, Raminder S; Lokmic, Zerina; Penington, Anthony J; Yeoh, George C; Morrison, Wayne A; Mitchell, Geraldine M

    2013-05-01

    Liver tissue engineering is hampered by poor implanted cell survival due to inadequate vascularization and cell-cell/cell-matrix interactions. Here, we use liver progenitor cell (LPC) spheroids to enhance cell-cell/cell-matrix interactions, with implantation into an angiogenic in vivo mouse chamber. Spheroids were generated in vitro in methylcellulose medium. Day 2 spheroids were optimal for implantation (22,407 +/-645 cells/spheroid), demonstrating maximal proliferation (Ki67 immunolabeling) and minimal apoptosis (caspase-3 immunolabelling). In vivo chambers established bilaterally on epigastric vessels of immunodeficient mice were implanted with equivalent numbers of LPCs as a cell suspension (200,000 cells), or spheroids (9 spheroids). At day 14, a trend of increased LPC survival was observed in spheroid-implanted chambers [pan-cytokeratin (panCK+) cells, p = 0.38, 2.4 fold increase)], with significantly increased differentiation [cytokeratin 18 (CK18+) cells, p < 0.002, 5.1 fold increase)] compared to cell suspension-implanted chambers. At day 45, both measures were significantly increased in spheroid-implanted chambers (panCK, p < 0.006, 16 fold increase) (CK18, p < 0.019, 6 fold increase). Hepatic acini/plates of CK18 + cells expressed hepatocyte nuclear factor 4-α and β-catenin, indicating ongoing hepatic differentiation. Spheroid cell-delivery significantly increased LPC survival and differentiation compared to conventional cell suspensions. This LPC spheroid/vascularized chamber model has clinical potential to generate three-dimensional vascularized liver tissue for liver replacement.

  6. Convenient and efficient enrichment of the CD133+ liver cells from rat fetal liver cells as a source of liver stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei-hui; Li, Ren; Dou, Ke-feng

    2011-03-01

    Although the stem cells are commonly isolated by FACS or MACS, they are very expensive and these is no specific marker for liver stem/progentior cells (LSPCs). This paper applied a convenient and efficient method to enrich LSPCs. The fetal liver cells (FLCs) were firstly enriched by Percoll discontinuous gradient centrifugation (PDGC) from the rat fetal liver. Then the FLCs in culture were purified to be homogeneous in size by differential trypsinization and differential adherence (DTDA). Flow cytometric analysis revealed more than half of the purified FLCs expressed alternative markers of LSPCs (CD117, c-Met, Sca-1, CD90, CD49f and CD133). In other words, the purified FLCs were heterogeneous. Therefore, they were sequentially layered into six fractions by Percoll continuous gradient centrifugation (PCGC). Both CD133 and CD49f expressed decreasingly from fraction 1 to 6. In fraction 1 and 2, about 85% FLCs expressed CD133, which were revealed to be LSPCs by high expressions of AFP and CK-19, low expressions of G-6-P and ALB. To conclude, the purity of CD133(+) LSPCs enriched by combination of PDGC, DTDA and PCGC is close to that obtained by MACS. This study will greatly contribute to two important biological aspects: liver stem cells isolation and liver cell therapy.

  7. Small hepatocyte-like progenitor cells may be a Hedgehog signaling pathway-controlled subgroup of liver stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhibin; Li, Wei; Li, Chun; Yang, Yang; Li, Wang; Zhang, Liying; Sun, Shumei; Li, Junxiang; Cai, Yidong

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the expression levels of components of the Hedgehog signaling pathway (HH) during the proliferation of a liver stem cell subgroup, namely small hepatocyte-like progenitor cells (SHPCs). Retrorsine-treated Fisher 344 rats underwent a partial hepatectomy (PH) to induce the proliferation of SHPCs, after which reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (PCR), quantitative PCR, immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis were performed to analyze the expression of various components of the HH in primary SHPCs at different times points post-PH. A number of components of the HH, including Indian hedgehog (IHH), patched (PTCH), smoothened and glioma-associated oncogene (GLI)1, 2 and 3, were continuously expressed and showed dynamic changes in proliferating SHPCs. In addition, the expression levels of IHH, PTCH and GLI1 were significantly different as compared with those of the control group at the same time point, and there were significant differences among the various time points in the experimental group (P<0.01). Furthermore, there was an association between the postoperative day and expression levels of HH components in the retrorsine-treated group. An immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that PTCH was also expressed at the protein level. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggested that the HH was continuously activated during the proliferation of SHPCs, thus indicating that SHPCs may be a subgroup of stem cells that are regulated by the HH. PMID:27703504

  8. Ablation of Foxl1-Cre-labeled hepatic progenitor cells and their descendants impairs recovery of mice from liver injury.

    PubMed

    Shin, Soona; Upadhyay, Naman; Greenbaum, Linda E; Kaestner, Klaus H

    2015-01-01

    Foxl1(+) hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs) differentiate into cholangiocytes and hepatocytes after liver injury. We investigated the requirement for Foxl1(+) HPCs in recovery from liver injury in mice. We developed mice in which we could trace and delete Foxl1-expressing HPCs and their descendants (Foxl1-Cre;Rosa(YFP/iDTR)-inducible diphtheria toxin receptor [iDTR] mice). Foxl1-Cre-negative mice were used as controls. Liver damage was induced in male mice by placing them on choline-deficient, ethionine-supplemented (CDE) diets for 15 days; mice then were placed on normal diets and allowed to recover. Liver damage was induced in female mice by placing them on 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC)-containing diets, followed by a recovery period. Some mice were given injections of diphtheria toxin during the recovery phase to delete Foxl1-Cre-marked HPCs and their descendants. Livers were collected from all mice and analyzed by immunofluorescence, quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, flow cytometry, and histologic analyses. Foxl1-Cre-marked HPCs were required for the development of cholangiocytes and hepatocytes in livers after CDE diet-induced injury. A smaller percentage of yellow fluorescent protein-positive (YFP(+)) hepatocytes contained markers of oxidative stress, DNA damage, or cell death than YFP-negative hepatocytes, indicating that YFP(+) hepatocytes are newly formed cells. Injection of diphtheria toxin deleted YFP(+) cells from Foxl1-Cre;Rosa(YFP/iDTR) mice and prevented the resolution of hepatic steatosis. In mice recovering from DDC diet-induced injury, most cholangiocytes arose from Foxl1-Cre-marked HPCs. Deletion of YFP(+) cells did not alter levels of markers of liver injury or liver function. Based on studies of Foxl1-Cre;Rosa(YFP/iDTR) mice, Foxl1(+) HPCs and/or their descendants are required for the development of cholangiocytes and hepatocytes in liver after CDE diet-induced injury. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute

  9. Sox9 and programming of liver and pancreatic progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, Yoshiya

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in developmental biology have greatly expanded our understanding of progenitor cell programming and the fundamental roles that Sox9 plays in liver and pancreas organogenesis. In the last 2 years, several studies have dissected the behavior of the Sox9+ duct cells in adult organs, but conflicting results have left unanswered the long-standing question of whether physiologically functioning progenitors exist in adult liver and pancreas. On the other hand, increasing evidence suggests that duct cells function as progenitors in the tissue restoration process after injury, during which embryonic programs are sometimes reactivated. This article discusses the role of Sox9 in programming liver and pancreatic progenitors as well as controversies in the field. PMID:23635786

  10. Resident vascular progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Torsney, Evelyn; Xu, Qingbo

    2011-02-01

    Homeostasis of the vessel wall is essential for maintaining its function, including blood pressure and patency of the lumen. In physiological conditions, the turnover rate of vascular cells, i.e. endothelial and smooth muscle cells, is low, but markedly increased in diseased situations, e.g. vascular injury after angioplasty. It is believed that mature vascular cells have an ability to proliferate to replace lost cells normally. On the other hand, recent evidence indicates stem/progenitor cells may participate in vascular repair and the formation of neointimal lesions in severely damaged vessels. It was found that all three layers of the vessels, the intima, media and adventitia, contain resident progenitor cells, including endothelial progenitor cells, mesenchymal stromal cells, Sca-1+ and CD34+ cells. Data also demonstrated that these resident progenitor cells could differentiate into a variety of cell types in response to different culture conditions. However, collective data were obtained mostly from in vitro culture assays and phenotypic marker studies. There are many unanswered questions concerning the mechanism of cell differentiation and the functional role of these cells in vascular repair and the pathogenesis of vascular disease. In the present review, we aim to summarize the data showing the presence of the resident progenitor cells, to highlight possible signal pathways orchestrating cell differentiation toward endothelial and smooth muscle cells, and to discuss the data limitations, challenges and controversial issues related to the role of progenitors. This article is part of a special issue entitled, "Cardiovascular Stem Cells Revisited".

  11. Liver Progenitors Isolated from Adult Healthy Mouse Liver Efficiently Differentiate to Functional Hepatocytes In Vitro and Repopulate Liver Tissue.

    PubMed

    Tanimizu, Naoki; Ichinohe, Norihisa; Ishii, Masayuki; Kino, Junichi; Mizuguchi, Toru; Hirata, Koichi; Mitaka, Toshihiro

    2016-12-01

    It has been proposed that tissue stem cells supply multiple epithelial cells in mature tissues and organs. However, it is unclear whether tissue stem cells generally contribute to cellular turnover in normal healthy organs. Here, we show that liver progenitors distinct from bipotent liver stem/progenitor cells (LPCs) persistently exist in mouse livers and potentially contribute to tissue maintenance. We found that, in addition to LPCs isolated as EpCAM(+) cells, liver progenitors were enriched in CD45(-) TER119(-) CD31(-) EpCAM(-) ICAM-1(+) fraction isolated from late-fetal and postnatal livers. ICAM-1(+) liver progenitors were abundant by 4 weeks (4W) after birth. Although their number decreased with age, ICAM-1(+) liver progenitors existed in livers beyond that stage. We established liver progenitor clones derived from ICAM-1(+) cells between 1 and 20W and found that those clones efficiently differentiated into mature hepatocytes (MHs), which secreted albumin, eliminated ammonium ion, stored glycogen, and showed cytochrome P450 activity. Even after long-term culture, those clones kept potential to differentiate to MHs. When ICAM-1(+) clones were transplanted into nude mice after retrorsine treatment and 70% partial hepatectomy, donor cells were incorporated into liver plates and expressed hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α, and carbamoylphosphate synthetase I. Moreover, after short-term treatment with oncostatin M, ICAM-1(+) clones could efficiently repopulate the recipient liver tissues. Our results indicate that liver progenitors that can efficiently differentiate to MHs exist in normal adult livers. Those liver progenitors could be an important source of new MHs for tissue maintenance and repair in vivo, and for regenerative medicine ex vivo. Stem Cells 2016;34:2889-2901.

  12. Possibility of the enhanced progression of fetal liver stem/progenitor cells therapy for treating end-stage liver diseases by regulating the notch signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    You, Nan; Liu, Weihui; Zhong, Xiao; Dou, Kefeng; Tao, Kaishan

    2012-10-01

    Cell therapy is the most promising therapy for end-stage liver diseases (ESLDs). Fetal liver stem/progenitor cells (FLSPCs) have the advantages of a high survival rate, high proliferation, small volume, and high safety, which make them one of the ideal cells for stem cell therapy for liver diseases. During the early phase of our study, we applied a three-step separation method to enrich FLSPCs and obtained a separation efficiency that was similar to the flow cell-sorting method. Additionally, using a fulminant hepatic failure rat model, we demonstrated that FLSPCs can contribute to the recovery of hepatic morphogenesis and function. However, two problems remain to be resolved to explore the therapeutic potential of FLSPCs. First, how can FLSPCs be induced to accurately differentiate into hepatocytes and cholangiocytes? Second, how do FLSPCs maintain self-renewal? The Notch signaling plays a critical role in regulating the differentiation and self-renewal of many types of stem cells. Additionally, our previous findings have shown that the Notch signaling plays an important role in FLSPC differentiation into hepatocytes. Therefore, we hypothesized that the Notch signaling may be involved in the differentiation and self-renewal of FLSPCs. We began a study on the regulatory effects and relative molecular mechanisms of the Notch signaling on FLSPCs and found the corresponding interfering target, which may become an index for the clinical application of FLSPCs.

  13. Levels and values of circulating endothelial progenitor cells, soluble angiogenic factors, and mononuclear cell apoptosis in liver cirrhosis patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The roles of circulating endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) and mononuclear cell apoptosis (MCA) in liver cirrhosis (LC) patients are unknown. Moreover, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1α are powerful endogenous substances enhancing EPC migration into circulation. We assessed the level and function of EPCs [CD31/CD34 (E1), KDR/CD34 (E2), CXCR4/CD34 (E3)], levels of MCA, VEGF and SDF-1α in circulation of LC patients. Methods Blood sample was prospectively collected once for assessing EPC level and function, MCA, and plasma levels of VEGF and SDF-1α using flow cytometry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively, in 78 LC patients and 25 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Results Number of EPCs (E1, E2, E3) was lower (all p < 0.0001), whereas SDF-1α level and MCA were higher (p < 0.001) in study patients compared with healthy controls. Number of EPCs (E2, E3) was higher but MCA was lower (all p < 0.05) in Child's class A compared with Child's class B and C patients, although no difference in VEGF and SDF-1α levels were noted among these patients. Chronic hepatitis B and esophageal varices bleeding were independently, whereas chronic hepatitis C, elevated aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and decompensated LC were inversely and independently correlated with circulating EPC level (all p < 0.03). Additionally, angiogenesis and transwell migratory ability of EPCs were reduced in LC patients than in controls (all p < 0.001). Conclusion The results of this study demonstrated that level, angiogenic capacity, and function of circulating EPCs were significantly reduced, whereas plasma levels of SDF-1α and circulating MCA were substantially enhanced in cirrhotic patients. PMID:22809449

  14. Isolation of Hepatic Progenitor Cells From Human Liver With Cirrhosis Secondary to Biliary Atresia Using EpCAM or Thy-1 Markers

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Taisuke; Enosawa, Shin; Kasahara, Mureo; Fukuda, Akinari; Sakamoto, Seisuke; Shigeta, Takanobu; Nakazawa, Atsuko; Tokiwa, Takayoshi

    2012-01-01

    We sought to determine whether hepatic progenitor cells can be isolated from cirrhotic liver using epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) or Thy-1 markers. Liver tissue with cirrhosis secondary to biliary atresia (BA) was collagenase digested, and nonparenchymal cells (NPCs) were cultivated for 24 h. Noncirrhotic NPCs derived from patients with carbamyl phosphate synthetase and ornithine transcarbamylase deficiencies were used as controls. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that the percentages of EpCAM- and Thy-1-positive cells were significantly higher in NPC populations derived from BA liver than in those derived from control liver. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that EpCAM-positive sorted cells expressed EpCAM, Thy-1, albumin, and CK-19, whereas Thy-1-positive sorted cells expressed Thy-1, albumin, and CK-19. These findings indicate that EpCAM- or Thy-1-positive hepatic progenitor cells can be more efficiently isolated from BA liver than from control liver and suggest that the properties of EpCAM-positive cells are somewhat different from those of Thy-1-positive cells. PMID:28058189

  15. Isolation of Hepatic Progenitor Cells From Human Liver With Cirrhosis Secondary to Biliary Atresia Using EpCAM or Thy-1 Markers.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Taisuke; Enosawa, Shin; Kasahara, Mureo; Fukuda, Akinari; Sakamoto, Seisuke; Shigeta, Takanobu; Nakazawa, Atsuko; Tokiwa, Takayoshi

    2012-01-01

    We sought to determine whether hepatic progenitor cells can be isolated from cirrhotic liver using epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) or Thy-1 markers. Liver tissue with cirrhosis secondary to biliary atresia (BA) was collagenase digested, and nonparenchymal cells (NPCs) were cultivated for 24 h. Noncirrhotic NPCs derived from patients with carbamyl phosphate synthetase and ornithine transcarbamylase deficiencies were used as controls. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that the percentages of EpCAM- and Thy-1-positive cells were significantly higher in NPC populations derived from BA liver than in those derived from control liver. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that EpCAM-positive sorted cells expressed EpCAM, Thy-1, albumin, and CK-19, whereas Thy-1-positive sorted cells expressed Thy-1, albumin, and CK-19. These findings indicate that EpCAM- or Thy-1-positive hepatic progenitor cells can be more efficiently isolated from BA liver than from control liver and suggest that the properties of EpCAM-positive cells are somewhat different from those of Thy-1-positive cells.

  16. Immunoprofiling of Adult-Derived Human Liver Stem/Progenitor Cells: Impact of Hepatogenic Differentiation and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    El-Kehdy, Hoda; Sargiacomo, Camillo; Fayyad-Kazan, Mohammad; Sokal, Etienne

    2017-01-01

    Adult-derived human liver stem/progenitor cells (ADHLSCs) are, nowadays, developed as therapeutic medicinal product for the treatment of liver defects. In this study, the impact of hepatogenic differentiation and inflammation priming on the ADHLSCs' immune profile was assessed in vitro and compared to that of mature hepatocytes. The constitutive immunological profile of ADHLSCs was greatly different from that of hepatocytes. Differences in the expression of the stromal markers CD90 and CD105, adhesion molecules CD44 and CD49e, immunoregulatory molecules CD73 and HO-1, and NK ligands CD112 and CD155 were noted. While they globally preserved their immunological profile in comparison to undifferentiated counterparts, differentiated ADHLSCs showed a significant downregulation of CD200 expression as in hepatocytes. This was mainly induced by signals issued from EGF and OSM. On the other hand, the impact of inflammation was quite similar for all studied cell populations with an increased expression level of CD54 and CD106 and induction of that of CD40 and CD274. In conclusion, our immune profiling study suggests CD200 as a key factor in regulating the immunobiology of differentiated ADHLSCs. A better understanding of the molecular and physiological events related to such marker could help in designing the optimal conditions for an efficient therapeutic use of ADHLSCs. PMID:28491094

  17. Proliferation and differentiation of ductular progenitor cells and littoral cells during the regeneration of the rat liver to CCl4/2-AAF injury.

    PubMed

    Yin, L; Lynch, D; Ilic, Z; Sell, S

    2002-01-01

    Restoration of centrolobular injury induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), when hepatocyte proliferation is inhibited by treatment with N-2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF), is accomplished by proliferation of ductular progenitor cells, that arise intraportally and extend into the liver lobule. This pattern contrasts to the restitutive proliferation of hepatocytes when AAF is not administered, and the proliferation of non-ductular periportal oval cells follows periportal necrosis induced by allyl alcohol. The expanding ducts stain for alphafetoprotein (AFP), OV-6, pan-cytokeratin (CKPan), and laminin. The neoductular proliferation is accompanied by fibronectin-positive Kupffer cells and desmin-positive stellate (Ito) cells, which may play critical roles not only in controlling proliferation and differentiation of ductular progenitor cells, but also in reestablishing hepatic cord structure. When AAF is discontinued 7 days after injury, clusters of small hepatocytes appear next to the neoductules. Some of these small hepatocytes, as well as some larger hepatocytes adjacent to the ducts, stain for AFP and for carbamoylphosphate synthetase I (CPS-I), suggesting that the ductular progenitor cells may differentiate into hepatocytes when AAF is withdrawn. The restitutive process is facilitated by clearing of the central necrotic zone by infiltrating macrophages and co-migration of mature hepatocytes, with Kupffer cells and stellate cells, into the necrotic zone.

  18. Generation of natural killer cells from both Fc gamma RII/III+ and Fc gamma RII/III- murine fetal liver progenitors.

    PubMed

    Moingeon, P; Rodewald, H R; McConkey, D; Mildonian, A; Awad, K; Reinherz, E L

    1993-09-01

    In vitro culture of day-15.5 murine fetal liver (FL) cells in the presence of recombinant interleukin-2 (IL-2) results in the expansion of Fc gamma RII/III+ CD3-Ti-NK1.1+ cells displaying both natural killer (NK) and antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity (ADCC) cytolytic activities. These FL-derived NK cells express Fc gamma RIII (CD16) in association with an Fc epsilon RI gamma homodimer on their surface. In contrast, in vitro expansion of FL cells in the absence of IL-2 generates noncytotoxic cells belonging to the myelomonocytic lineage (Mac1+Gr1+NK1.1-). Hence, IL-2 appears to be critical for the proliferation and differentiation of NK cells from FL progenitors. Experiments in which FL cells were fractionated by density gradient centrifugation before in vitro expansion showed that NK progenitors are contained within a cell population with a density of 1.04 < d < 1.08 g/mL. Cells with d > 1.08 g/mL (representing > or = 40% of FL cells) have no such NK progenitor activity. In addition, after intrathymic injection into Ly5 congenic host animals, day-15.5 CD4-CD8- FL cells mature into CD4+CD8+ thymocytes within 12 days. Interestingly, this T-cell progenitor activity is restricted to subpopulations of FL cells that also contain NK progenitors, but is absent in high-density (d > 1.08 g/mL) FL cells. Finally, fractionation of FL cells according to surface expression of Fc gamma RII/III complexes shows that NK (and T-lymphocyte) progenitors are found in both Fc gamma RII/III+ and Fc gamma RII/III-FL subpopulations.

  19. Colony-forming progenitor cells in the postnatal mouse liver and pancreas give rise to morphologically distinct insulin-expressing colonies in 3D cultures.

    PubMed

    Jin, Liang; Feng, Tao; Chai, Jing; Ghazalli, Nadiah; Gao, Dan; Zerda, Ricardo; Li, Zhuo; Hsu, Jasper; Mahdavi, Alborz; Tirrell, David A; Riggs, Arthur D; Ku, Hsun Teresa

    2014-01-01

    In our previous studies, colony-forming progenitor cells isolated from murine embryonic stem cell-derived cultures were differentiated into morphologically distinct insulin-expressing colonies. These colonies were small and not light-reflective when observed by phase-contrast microscopy (therefore termed "Dark" colonies). A single progenitor cell capable of giving rise to a Dark colony was termed a Dark colony-forming unit (CFU-Dark). The goal of the current study was to test whether endogenous pancreas, and its developmentally related liver, harbored CFU-Dark. Here we show that dissociated single cells from liver and pancreas of one-week-old mice give rise to Dark colonies in methylcellulose-based semisolid culture media containing either Matrigel or laminin hydrogel (an artificial extracellular matrix protein). CFU-Dark comprise approximately 0.1% and 0.03% of the postnatal hepatic and pancreatic cells, respectively. Adult liver also contains CFU-Dark, but at a much lower frequency (~0.003%). Microfluidic qRT-PCR, immunostaining, and electron microscopy analyses of individually handpicked colonies reveal the expression of insulin in many, but not all, Dark colonies. Most pancreatic insulin-positive Dark colonies also express glucagon, whereas liver colonies do not. Liver CFU-Dark require Matrigel, but not laminin hydrogel, to become insulin-positive. In contrast, laminin hydrogel is sufficient to support the development of pancreatic Dark colonies that express insulin. Postnatal liver CFU-Dark display a cell surface marker CD133⁺CD49f(low)CD107b(low) phenotype, while pancreatic CFU-Dark are CD133⁻. Together, these results demonstrate that specific progenitor cells in the postnatal liver and pancreas are capable of developing into insulin-expressing colonies, but they differ in frequency, marker expression, and matrix protein requirements for growth.

  20. Methoxychlor and Vinclozolin Induce Rapid Changes in Intercellular and Intracellular Signaling in Liver Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Babica, Pavel; Zurabian, Rimma; Kumar, Esha R.; Chopra, Rajus; Mianecki, Maxwell J.; Park, Joon-Suk; Jaša, Libor; Trosko, James E.; Upham, Brad L.

    2016-01-01

    Methoxychlor (MXC) and vinclozolin (VIN) are well-recognized endocrine disrupting chemicals known to alter epigenetic regulations and transgenerational inheritance; however, non-endocrine disruption endpoints are also important. Thus, we determined the effects of MXC and VIN on the dysregulation of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in WB-F344 rat liver epithelial cells. Both chemicals induced a rapid dysregulation of GJIC at non-cytotoxic doses, with 30 min EC50 values for GJIC inhibition being 10 µM for MXC and 126 µM for VIN. MXC inhibited GJIC for at least 24 h, while VIN effects were transient and GJIC recovered after 4 h. VIN induced rapid hyperphosphorylation and internalization of gap junction protein connexin43, and both chemicals also activated MAPK ERK1/2 and p38. Effects on GJIC were not prevented by MEK1/2 inhibitor, but by an inhibitor of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC), resveratrol, and in the case of VIN, also, by a p38 inhibitor. Estrogen (ER) and androgen receptor (AR) modulators (estradiol, ICI 182,780, HPTE, testosterone, flutamide, VIN M2) did not attenuate MXC or VIN effects on GJIC. Our data also indicate that the effects were elicited by the parental compounds of MXC and VIN. Our study provides new evidence that MXC and VIN dysregulate GJIC via mechanisms involving rapid activation of PC-PLC occurring independently of ER- or AR-dependent genomic signaling. Such alterations of rapid intercellular and intracellular signaling events involved in regulations of gene expression, tissue development, function and homeostasis, could also contribute to transgenerational epigenetic effects of endocrine disruptors. PMID:27413106

  1. Methoxychlor and Vinclozolin Induce Rapid Changes in Intercellular and Intracellular Signaling in Liver Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Babica, Pavel; Zurabian, Rimma; Kumar, Esha R; Chopra, Rajus; Mianecki, Maxwell J; Park, Joon-Suk; Jaša, Libor; Trosko, James E; Upham, Brad L

    2016-09-01

    Methoxychlor (MXC) and vinclozolin (VIN) are well-recognized endocrine disrupting chemicals known to alter epigenetic regulations and transgenerational inheritance; however, non-endocrine disruption endpoints are also important. Thus, we determined the effects of MXC and VIN on the dysregulation of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in WB-F344 rat liver epithelial cells. Both chemicals induced a rapid dysregulation of GJIC at non-cytotoxic doses, with 30 min EC50 values for GJIC inhibition being 10 µM for MXC and 126 µM for VIN. MXC inhibited GJIC for at least 24 h, while VIN effects were transient and GJIC recovered after 4 h. VIN induced rapid hyperphosphorylation and internalization of gap junction protein connexin43, and both chemicals also activated MAPK ERK1/2 and p38. Effects on GJIC were not prevented by MEK1/2 inhibitor, but by an inhibitor of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC), resveratrol, and in the case of VIN, also, by a p38 inhibitor. Estrogen (ER) and androgen receptor (AR) modulators (estradiol, ICI 182,780, HPTE, testosterone, flutamide, VIN M2) did not attenuate MXC or VIN effects on GJIC. Our data also indicate that the effects were elicited by the parental compounds of MXC and VIN. Our study provides new evidence that MXC and VIN dysregulate GJIC via mechanisms involving rapid activation of PC-PLC occurring independently of ER- or AR-dependent genomic signaling. Such alterations of rapid intercellular and intracellular signaling events involved in regulations of gene expression, tissue development, function and homeostasis, could also contribute to transgenerational epigenetic effects of endocrine disruptors. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Lung Epithelial Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rawlins, Emma L.

    2008-01-01

    The current enthusiasm for stem cell research stems from the hope that damaged or diseased tissues may one day be repaired through the manipulation of endogenous or exogenous stem cells. The postnatal human respiratory system is highly accessible and provides unique opportunities for the application of such techniques. Several putative adult lung epithelial stem cells have been identified in the mouse model system. However, their in vivo capabilities to contribute to different lineages, and their control mechanisms, remain unclear. If stem cell–based therapies are to be successful in the lung, it is vitally important that we understand the normal behavior of adult lung stem cells, and how this is regulated. Lung embryonic progenitor cells are much better defined and characterized than their adult counterparts. Moreover, experiments on a variety of developing tissues are beginning to uncover general mechanisms by which embryonic progenitors influence final organ size and structure. This provides a framework for the study of lung embryonic progenitor cells, facilitating experimental design and interpretation. A similar approach to investigating adult lung stem cells could produce rapid advances in the field. PMID:18684716

  3. Advances in hepatic stem/progenitor cell biology

    PubMed Central

    Verhulst, Stefaan; Best, Jan; van Grunsven, Leo A.; Dollé, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    The liver is famous for its strong regenerative capacity, employing different modes of regeneration according to type and extent of injury. Mature liver cells are able to proliferate in order to replace the damaged tissue allowing the recovery of the parenchymal function. In more severe scenarios hepatocytes are believed to arise also from a facultative liver progenitor cell compartment. In human, severe acute liver failure and liver cirrhosis are also both important clinical targets in which regeneration is impaired, where the role of this stem cell compartment seems more convincing. In animal models, the current state of ambiguity regarding the identity and role of liver progenitor cells in liver physiology dampens the enthusiasm for the potential use of these cells in regenerative medicine. The aim of this review is to give the basics of liver progenitor cell biology and discuss recent results vis-à-vis their identity and contribution to liver regeneration. PMID:26600740

  4. CPM Is a Useful Cell Surface Marker to Isolate Expandable Bi-Potential Liver Progenitor Cells Derived from Human iPS Cells.

    PubMed

    Kido, Taketomo; Koui, Yuta; Suzuki, Kaori; Kobayashi, Ayaka; Miura, Yasushi; Chern, Edward Y; Tanaka, Minoru; Miyajima, Atsushi

    2015-10-13

    To develop a culture system for large-scale production of mature hepatocytes, liver progenitor cells (LPCs) with a high proliferation potential would be advantageous. We have found that carboxypeptidase M (CPM) is highly expressed in embryonic LPCs, hepatoblasts, while its expression is decreased along with hepatic maturation. Consistently, CPM expression was transiently induced during hepatic specification from human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). CPM(+) cells isolated from differentiated hiPSCs at the immature hepatocyte stage proliferated extensively in vitro and expressed a set of genes that were typical of hepatoblasts. Moreover, the CPM(+) cells exhibited a mature hepatocyte phenotype after induction of hepatic maturation and also underwent cholangiocytic differentiation in a three-dimensional culture system. These results indicated that hiPSC-derived CPM(+) cells share the characteristics of LPCs, with the potential to proliferate and differentiate bi-directionally. Thus, CPM is a useful marker for isolating hiPSC-derived LPCs, which allows development of a large-scale culture system for producing hepatocytes and cholangiocytes.

  5. CPM Is a Useful Cell Surface Marker to Isolate Expandable Bi-Potential Liver Progenitor Cells Derived from Human iPS Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kido, Taketomo; Koui, Yuta; Suzuki, Kaori; Kobayashi, Ayaka; Miura, Yasushi; Chern, Edward Y.; Tanaka, Minoru; Miyajima, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Summary To develop a culture system for large-scale production of mature hepatocytes, liver progenitor cells (LPCs) with a high proliferation potential would be advantageous. We have found that carboxypeptidase M (CPM) is highly expressed in embryonic LPCs, hepatoblasts, while its expression is decreased along with hepatic maturation. Consistently, CPM expression was transiently induced during hepatic specification from human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). CPM+ cells isolated from differentiated hiPSCs at the immature hepatocyte stage proliferated extensively in vitro and expressed a set of genes that were typical of hepatoblasts. Moreover, the CPM+ cells exhibited a mature hepatocyte phenotype after induction of hepatic maturation and also underwent cholangiocytic differentiation in a three-dimensional culture system. These results indicated that hiPSC-derived CPM+ cells share the characteristics of LPCs, with the potential to proliferate and differentiate bi-directionally. Thus, CPM is a useful marker for isolating hiPSC-derived LPCs, which allows development of a large-scale culture system for producing hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. PMID:26365514

  6. The role of aryl hydrocarbon receptor in regulation of enzymes involved in metabolic activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a model of rat liver progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Vondrácek, Jan; Krcmár, Pavel; Procházková, Jirina; Trilecová, Lenka; Gavelová, Martina; Skálová, Lenka; Szotáková, Barbora; Buncek, Martin; Radilová, Hana; Kozubík, Alois; Machala, Miroslav

    2009-07-15

    In contrast to hepatocytes, there is only limited information about the expression and activities of enzymes participating in metabolic activation of environmental mutagens, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), in liver progenitor cells. In rat liver "stem-like" WB-F344 cell line, sharing many characteristics with rat liver progenitor cells, PAHs are efficiently activated to their ultimate genotoxic metabolites forming DNA adducts. The present study aimed to characterize expression/activities of enzymes of two major pathways involved in the metabolism of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP): cytochrome P450 (CYP) family 1 enzymes and cytosolic aldo-keto reductases (AKRs). We report here that, apart from induction of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression and the corresponding enzymatic activity, both BaP and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induced rat 3alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (AKR1C9) expression and activity. In contrast, the aldehyde reductase AKR1A1 was not induced by either treatment. Thus, both CYP1 and AKR metabolic pathways were inducible in the model of liver progenitor cells. BaP and TCDD were efficient inducers of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) expression and activity in WB-F344 cells, a principal enzyme of cellular antioxidant defense. Both compounds also induced expression of transcription factor NRF2, involved in control of enzymes protecting cells from oxidative stress. However, although BaP induced a significant formation of reactive oxygen species, it did not induce expression of heme oxygenase-1, suggesting that induction of oxidative stress by BaP was limited. Using shRNA against the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), we found that similar to CYP1A1 and CYP1B1, the AKR1C9 induction was AhR-dependent. Moreover, constitutive AKR1C9 levels in AhR-deficient rat BP8 hepatoma cells were significantly lower than in their AhR-positive 5L variant, thus supporting possible role of AhR in regulation of AKR1C9 expression. Taken together, both

  7. Nf2/Merlin controls progenitor homeostasis and tumorigenesis in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Benhamouche, Samira; Curto, Marcello; Saotome, Ichiko; Gladden, Andrew B.; Liu, Ching-Hui; Giovannini, Marco; McClatchey, Andrea I.

    2010-01-01

    The molecular signals that control the maintenance and activation of liver stem/progenitor cells are poorly understood, and the role of liver progenitor cells in hepatic tumorigenesis is unclear. We report here that liver-specific deletion of the neurofibromatosis type 2 (Nf2) tumor suppressor gene in the developing or adult mouse specifically yields a dramatic, progressive expansion of progenitor cells throughout the liver without affecting differentiated hepatocytes. All surviving mice eventually developed both cholangiocellular and hepatocellular carcinoma, suggesting that Nf2−/− progenitors can be a cell of origin for these tumors. Despite the suggested link between Nf2 and the Hpo/Wts/Yki signaling pathway in Drosophila, and recent studies linking the corresponding Mst/Lats/Yap pathway to mammalian liver tumorigenesis, our molecular studies suggest that Merlin is not a major regulator of YAP in liver progenitors, and that the overproliferation of Nf2−/− liver progenitors is instead driven by aberrant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activity. Indeed, pharmacologic inhibition of EGFR blocks the proliferation of Nf2−/− liver progenitors in vitro and in vivo, consistent with recent studies indicating that the Nf2-encoded protein Merlin can control the abundance and signaling of membrane receptors such as EGFR. Together, our findings uncover a critical role for Nf2/Merlin in controlling homeostasis of the liver stem cell niche. PMID:20675406

  8. Mouse fetal and embryonic liver cells differentiate human umbilical cord blood (UCB) progenitors into CD56 negative NK cell precursors in the absence of IL-15

    PubMed Central

    McCullar, Valarie; Oostendorp, Robert; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Yung, Gong; Lutz, Charles T.; Wagner, John E.; Miller, Jeffrey S.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Human NK cell maturation involves the orderly acquisition of NK cell receptors. Our aim was to understand how stromal interactions and cytokines are important in this developmental process. Methods Human UCB CD34+/Lin−/CD38− cells were cultured on two murine stromal cell lines (AFT024 and EL08-1D2) in a switch culture to study NK cell development. Results When human progenitors were cultured on AFT024 with IL-3 and Flt3-L in the absence of IL-15, NK cell differentiation occurred, albeit at low frequency. These conditions favored the accumulation of CD56− NK cell precursors (CD34+CD7−, CD34+CD7+ and CD34−CD7+ cells), which are populations rare in adult blood but abundant in fresh UCB. In secondary culture, addition of IL-3 or IL-3+Flt3L to IL-15 increased the absolute number of CD56+ NK cells from precursors and the acquisition of CD94 and KIR. To further explore the microenvironment in early NK cell maturation, a cell line derived from murine embryonic liver (EL08-1D2) was studied. NK cell development and KIR acquisition was superior with EL08-1D2 which supported the differentiation of NK cell precursors, NK cell commitment, and proliferation. Conclusion Although the earliest events in NK cell maturation do not require exogenous human IL-15, it is required at a later stage of NK cell commitment. At a minimum, murine stroma, IL-3, and Flt3-L are required to recapitulate early NK cell development and differentiation into distinct NK cell precursors. EL08-1D2 induces KIR acquisition suggesting that extrinsic signals in NK cell development are conserved between mouse and man. PMID:18295962

  9. Phase 1-2 pilot clinical trial in patients with decompensated liver cirrhosis treated with bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    D'Avola, Delia; Fernández-Ruiz, Verónica; Carmona-Torre, Francisco; Méndez, Miriam; Pérez-Calvo, Javier; Prósper, Felipe; Andreu, Enrique; Herrero, José Ignacio; Iñarrairaegui, Mercedes; Fuertes, Carmen; Bilbao, José Ignacio; Sangro, Bruno; Prieto, Jesús; Quiroga, Jorge

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this nonrandomized, open label, phase 1 clinical trial was to evaluate the safety and the feasibility of the treatment with autologous bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) in decompensated liver cirrhosis. In addition, the changes in liver function and hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) and their relation with the characteristics of the cellular product were analyzed. Twelve patients with Child-Pugh ≥8 liver cirrhosis underwent bone marrow harvest for ex vivo differentiation of EPC. The final product was administered through the hepatic artery in a single administration. Patients underwent clinical and radiologic follow-up for 12 months. The phenotype and the ability to produce cytokines and growth factors of the final cellular suspension were analyzed. Eleven patients were treated (feasibility 91%). No treatment-related severe adverse events were observed as consequence of any study procedure or treatment. Model for end-stage liver disease score improved significantly (P 0.042) in the first 90 days after cells administration and 5 of the 9 patients alive at 90 days showed a decreased of HVPG. There was a direct correlation between the expression of acetylated-low density lipoprotein and von Willebrand factor in the cellular product and the improvement in liver function and HVPG. The treatment with EPCs in patients with decompensated liver cirrhosis is safe and feasible and might have therapeutic potential. Patients receiving a higher amount of functionally active EPC showed an improvement of liver function and portal hypertension suggesting that the potential usefulness of these cells for the treatment of liver cirrhosis deserves further evaluation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. IFN-γ inhibits liver progenitor cell proliferation in HBV-infected patients and in 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine diet-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Weng, Hong-lei; Feng, De-chun; Radaeva, Svetlana; Kong, Xiao-ni; Wang, Lei; Liu, Yan; Li, Qi; Shen, Hong; Gao, Yun-peng; Müllenbach, Roman; Munker, Stefan; Huang, Tong; Chen, Jia-lin; Zimmer, Vincent; Lammert, Frank; Mertens, Peter R; Cai, Wei-min; Dooley, Steven; Gao, Bin

    2013-10-01

    Proliferation of liver progenitor cells (LPCs) is associated with inflammation and fibrosis in chronic liver diseases. However, how inflammation and fibrosis affect LPCs remains obscure. We examined the role of interferon (IFN)-γ, an important pro-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic cytokine, in LPC expansion in HBV-infected patients and in mice challenged with 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC)- or choline-deficient, ethionine-supplemented (CDE) diet as well as in primary LPCs and LPC cell line. The CK19 staining scores correlated with inflammation and fibrosis grades in the livers from 110 HBV-infected patients. Nine-month IFN-γ treatment decreased LPC numbers, inflammation, and fibrosis in these HBV-infected patients. Similarly, a two-week IFN-γ treatment also decreased LPC activation in DDC-treated mice. Disruption of IFN-γ or its signaling components (e.g., IFNGR, STAT1, and IRF-1) increased LPC proliferation and liver fibrosis in DDC-fed mice. In contrast, deletion of IFN-γ did not increase, but rather slightly reduced LPC proliferation in CDE-fed mice. In vitro, IFN-γ attenuated proliferation of the LPC cell line BMOL and of primary LPCs from wild type mice, but not STAT1(-/-) or IRF-1(-/-) mice. Furthermore, co-culture assays suggest that IFN-γ can indirectly promote LPC proliferation via the activation of macrophages but attenuate it via the inhibition of hepatic stellate cells. IFN-γ inhibits LPC expansion via the direct inhibition of LPC proliferation and indirect attenuation of liver fibrosis in the DDC model, but it may also enhance LPC expansion via the promotion of inflammation in the CDE model; thereby playing dual roles in regulating LPC proliferation in vivo. Copyright © 2013 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Promoting the selection and maintenance of fetal liver stem/progenitor cell colonies by layer-by-layer polypeptide tethered supported lipid bilayer.

    PubMed

    Lee, I-Chi; Liu, Yung-Chiang; Tsai, Hsuan-Ang; Shen, Chia-Ning; Chang, Ying-Chih

    2014-12-10

    In this study, we designed and constructed a series of layer-by-layer polypeptide adsorbed supported lipid bilayer (SLB) films as a novel and label-free platform for the isolation and maintenance of rare populated stem cells. In particular, four alternative layers of anionic poly-l-glutamic acid and cationic poly-l-lysine were sequentially deposited on an anionic SLB. We found that the fetal liver stem/progenitor cells from the primary culture were selected and formed colonies on all layer-by-layer polypeptide adsorbed SLB surfaces, regardless of the number of alternative layers and the net charges on those layers. Interestingly, these isolated stem/progenitor cells formed colonies which were maintained for an 8 day observation period. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation measurements showed that all SLB-polypeptide films were protein resistant with serum levels significantly lower than those on the polypeptide multilayer films without an underlying SLB. We suggest the fluidic SLB promotes selective binding while minimizing the cell-surface interaction due to its nonfouling nature, thus limiting stem cell colonies from spreading.

  12. Disruption of polyubiquitin gene Ubc leads to defective proliferation of hepatocytes and bipotent fetal liver epithelial progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyejin; Yoon, Min-Sik; Ryu, Kwon-Yul

    2013-06-07

    We have previously demonstrated that disruption of polyubiquitin gene Ubc leads to mid-gestation embryonic lethality most likely due to a defect in fetal liver development, which can be partially rescued by ectopic expression of Ub. In a previous study, we assessed the cause of embryonic lethality with respect to the fetal liver hematopoietic system. We confirmed that Ubc(-/-) embryonic lethality could not be attributed to impaired function of hematopoietic stem cells, which raises the question of whether or not FLECs such as hepatocytes and bile duct cells, the most abundant cell types in the liver, are affected by disruption of Ubc and contribute to embryonic lethality. To answer this, we isolated FLCs from E13.5 embryos and cultured them in vitro. We found that proliferation capacity of Ubc(-/-) cells was significantly reduced compared to that of control cells, especially during the early culture period, however we did not observe the increased number of apoptotic cells. Furthermore, levels of Ub conjugate, but not free Ub, decreased upon disruption of Ubc expression in FLCs, and this could not be compensated for by upregulation of other poly- or mono-ubiquitin genes. Intriguingly, the highest Ubc expression levels throughout the entire culture period were observed in bipotent FLEPCs. Hepatocytes and bipotent FLEPCs were most affected by disruption of Ubc, resulting in defective proliferation as well as reduced cell numbers in vitro. These results suggest that defective proliferation of these cell types may contribute to severe reduction of fetal liver size and potentially mid-gestation lethality of Ubc(-/-) embryos. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Comprehensive Screening of Cell Surface Markers Expressed by Adult-Derived Human Liver Stem/Progenitor Cells Harvested at Passage 5: Potential Implications for Engraftment

    PubMed Central

    Sokal, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are known to have potential therapeutic benefits for a number of diseases. However, many studies report low engraftment levels, regardless of the target organ. One possible explanation could be that MSCs do not express the necessary receptors for engraftment. Indeed, MSCs appear to use a similar mechanism to leukocytes to engraft into injured organs, relying on various receptors for rolling, firm adhesion, and transmigration. In this study, we conducted an extensive surface molecule screening of adult-derived human liver stem/progenitor cells (ADHLSC) in an attempt to shed some light on this subject. We observed that ADHLSCs lack expression of most of the costimulatory molecules tested. Furthermore, study of the adhesion molecule profile of ADHLSCs revealed that they do not express selectin ligands or LFA-1 which are, respectively, involved in the rolling process and the firm adhesion. In addition, ADHLSCs slightly express VLA-4 and lose expression of CXCR4 altogether on their surface during culture expansion. However, ADHLSCs express all the integrin couples and matrix metalloproteinases needed to bind and integrate the extracellular matrix once the endothelial barrier is crossed. Collectively, these results suggest that binding to the endothelium may be the critical weak point in the engraftment process. PMID:27956903

  14. Circulating Progenitor Cells and Scleroderma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Scleroderma (systemic sclerosis) is a disease of unknown origins that involves tissue ischemia and fibrosis in the skin and internal organs such as the lungs. The tissue ischemia is due to a lack of functional blood vessels and an inability to form new blood vessels. Bone marrow–derived circulating endothelial progenitor cells play a key role in blood vessel repair and neovascularization. Scleroderma patients appear to have defects in the number and function of circulating endothelial progenitor cells. Scleroderma patients also develop fibrotic lesions, possibly as the result of tissue ischemia. Fibroblast-like cells called fibrocytes that differentiate from a different pool of bone marrow–derived circulating progenitor cells seem to be involved in this process. Manipulating the production, function, and differentiation of circulating progenitor cells represents an exciting new possibility for treating scleroderma. PMID:18638425

  15. Disruption of polyubiquitin gene Ubc leads to defective proliferation of hepatocytes and bipotent fetal liver epithelial progenitor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Hyejin; Yoon, Min-Sik; Ryu, Kwon-Yul

    2013-06-07

    Highlights: •Proliferation capacity of Ubc{sup −/−} FLCs was reduced during culture in vitro. •Ubc is required for proliferation of both hepatocytes and bipotent FLEPCs. •Bipotent FLEPCs exhibit highest Ubc transcription and proliferation capacity. •Cell types responsible for Ubc{sup −/−} fetal liver developmental defect were identified. -- Abstract: We have previously demonstrated that disruption of polyubiquitin gene Ubc leads to mid-gestation embryonic lethality most likely due to a defect in fetal liver development, which can be partially rescued by ectopic expression of Ub. In a previous study, we assessed the cause of embryonic lethality with respect to the fetal liver hematopoietic system. We confirmed that Ubc{sup −/−} embryonic lethality could not be attributed to impaired function of hematopoietic stem cells, which raises the question of whether or not FLECs such as hepatocytes and bile duct cells, the most abundant cell types in the liver, are affected by disruption of Ubc and contribute to embryonic lethality. To answer this, we isolated FLCs from E13.5 embryos and cultured them in vitro. We found that proliferation capacity of Ubc{sup −/−} cells was significantly reduced compared to that of control cells, especially during the early culture period, however we did not observe the increased number of apoptotic cells. Furthermore, levels of Ub conjugate, but not free Ub, decreased upon disruption of Ubc expression in FLCs, and this could not be compensated for by upregulation of other poly- or mono-ubiquitin genes. Intriguingly, the highest Ubc expression levels throughout the entire culture period were observed in bipotent FLEPCs. Hepatocytes and bipotent FLEPCs were most affected by disruption of Ubc, resulting in defective proliferation as well as reduced cell numbers in vitro. These results suggest that defective proliferation of these cell types may contribute to severe reduction of fetal liver size and potentially mid

  16. Progenitor/stem cells give rise to liver cancer due to aberrant TGF-β and IL-6 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yi; Kitisin, Krit; Jogunoori, Wilma; Li, Cuiling; Deng, Chu-Xia; Mueller, Susette C.; Ressom, Habtom W.; Rashid, Asif; He, Aiwu Ruth; Mendelson, Jonathan S.; Jessup, John M.; Shetty, Kirti; Zasloff, Michael; Mishra, Bibhuti; Reddy, E. P.; Johnson, Lynt; Mishra, Lopa

    2008-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are critical for the initiation, propagation, and treatment resistance of multiple cancers. Yet functional interactions between specific signaling pathways in solid organ “cancer stem cells,” such as those of the liver, remain elusive. We report that in regenerating human liver, two to four cells per 30,000–50,000 cells express stem cell proteins Stat3, Oct4, and Nanog, along with the prodifferentiation proteins TGF-β-receptor type II (TBRII) and embryonic liver fodrin (ELF). Examination of human hepatocellular cancer (HCC) reveals cells that label with stem cell markers that have unexpectedly lost TBRII and ELF. elf+/− mice spontaneously develop HCC; expression analysis of these tumors highlighted the marked activation of the genes involved in the IL-6 signaling pathway, including IL-6 and Stat3, suggesting that HCC could arise from an IL-6-driven transformed stem cell with inactivated TGF-β signaling. Similarly, suppression of IL-6 signaling, through the generation of mouse knockouts involving a positive regulator of IL-6, Inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor-heavy chain-4 (ITIH4), resulted in reduction in HCC in elf+/− mice. This study reveals an unexpected functional link between IL-6, a major stem cell signaling pathway, and the TGF-β signaling pathway in the modulation of mammalian HCC, a lethal cancer of the foregut. These experiments suggest an important therapeutic role for targeting IL-6 in HCCs lacking a functional TGF-β pathway. PMID:18263735

  17. Safety and feasibility of third-party multipotent adult progenitor cells for immunomodulation therapy after liver transplantation--a phase I study (MISOT-I).

    PubMed

    Popp, Felix C; Fillenberg, Barbara; Eggenhofer, Elke; Renner, Philipp; Dillmann, Johannes; Benseler, Volker; Schnitzbauer, Andreas A; Hutchinson, James; Deans, Robert; Ladenheim, Deborah; Graveen, Cheryl A; Zeman, Florian; Koller, Michael; Hoogduijn, Martin J; Geissler, Edward K; Schlitt, Hans J; Dahlke, Marc H

    2011-07-28

    Liver transplantation is the definitive treatment for many end-stage liver diseases. However, the life-long immunosuppression needed to prevent graft rejection causes clinically significant side effects. Cellular immunomodulatory therapies may allow the dose of immunosuppressive drugs to be reduced. In the current protocol, we propose to complement immunosuppressive pharmacotherapy with third-party multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPCs), a culture-selected population of adult adherent stem cells derived from bone marrow that has been shown to display potent immunomodulatory and regenerative properties. In animal models, MAPCs reduce the need for pharmacological immunosuppression after experimental solid organ transplantation and regenerate damaged organs. Patients enrolled in this phase I, single-arm, single-center safety and feasibility study (n = 3-24) will receive 2 doses of third-party MAPCs after liver transplantation, on days 1 and 3, in addition to a calcineurin-inhibitor-free "bottom-up" immunosuppressive regimen with basiliximab, mycophenolic acid, and steroids. The study objective is to evaluate the safety and clinical feasibility of MAPC administration in this patient cohort. The primary endpoint of the study is safety, assessed by standardized dose-limiting toxicity events. One secondary endpoint is the time until first biopsy-proven acute rejection, in order to collect first evidence of efficacy. Dose escalation (150, 300, 450, and 600 million MAPCs) will be done according to a 3 + 3 classical escalation design (4 groups of 3-6 patients each). If MAPCs are safe for patients undergoing liver transplantation in this study, a phase II/III trial will be conducted to assess their clinical efficacy.

  18. Comparison of hepatic-like cell production from human embryonic stem cells and adult liver progenitor cells: CAR transduction activates a battery of detoxification genes.

    PubMed

    Funakoshi, Natalie; Duret, Cédric; Pascussi, Jean-Marc; Blanc, Pierre; Maurel, Patrick; Daujat-Chavanieu, Martine; Gerbal-Chaloin, Sabine

    2011-09-01

    In vitro production of human hepatocytes is of primary importance in basic research, pharmacotoxicology and biotherapy of liver diseases. We have developed a protocol of differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (ES) towards hepatocyte-like cells (ES-Hep). Using a set of human adult markers including CAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBPalpha), hepatocyte nuclear factor 4/7 ratio (HNF4alpha1/HNF4alpha7), cytochrome P450 7A1 (CYP7A1), CYP3A4 and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), and fetal markers including alpha-fetoprotein, CYP3A7 and glutathione S-transferase P1, we analyzed the expression of a panel of 41 genes in ES-Hep comparatively with human adult primary hepatocytes, adult and fetal liver. The data revealed that after 21 days of differentiation, ES-Hep are representative of fetal hepatocytes at less than 20 weeks of gestation. The glucocorticoid receptor pathway was functional in ES-Hep. Extending protocols of differentiation to 4 weeks did not improve cell maturation. When compared with hepatocyte-like cells derived from adult liver non parenchymal epithelial (NPE) cells (NPE-Hep), ES-Hep expressed several adult and fetal liver makers at much greater levels (at least one order of magnitude), consistent with greater expression of liver-enriched transcription factors Forkhead box A2, C/EBPalpha, HNF4alpha and HNF6. It therefore seems that ES-Hep reach a better level of differentiation than NPE-Hep and that these cells use different lineage pathways towards the hepatic phenotype. Finally we showed that lentivirus-mediated expression of xenoreceptor CAR in ES-Hep induced the expression of several detoxification genes including CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP3A4, UDP-glycosyltransferase 1A1, solute carriers 21A6, as well as biotransformation of midazolam, a CYP3A4-specific substrate.

  19. Combinatorial microenvironmental regulation of liver progenitor differentiation by Notch ligands, TGFβ, and extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Kaylan, Kerim B.; Ermilova, Viktoriya; Yada, Ravi Chandra; Underhill, Gregory H.

    2016-01-01

    The bipotential differentiation of liver progenitor cells underlies liver development and bile duct formation as well as liver regeneration and disease. TGFβ and Notch signaling are known to play important roles in the liver progenitor specification process and tissue morphogenesis. However, the complexity of these signaling pathways and their currently undefined interactions with other microenvironmental factors, including extracellular matrix (ECM), remain barriers to complete mechanistic understanding. Utilizing a series of strategies, including co-cultures and cellular microarrays, we identified distinct contributions of different Notch ligands and ECM proteins in the fate decisions of bipotential mouse embryonic liver (BMEL) progenitor cells. In particular, we demonstrated a cooperative influence of Jagged-1 and TGFβ1 on cholangiocytic differentiation. We established ECM-specific effects using cellular microarrays consisting of 32 distinct combinations of collagen I, collagen III, collagen IV, fibronectin, and laminin. In addition, we demonstrated that exogenous Jagged-1, Delta-like 1, and Delta-like 4 within the cellular microarray format was sufficient for enhancing cholangiocytic differentiation. Further, by combining Notch ligand microarrays with shRNA-based knockdown of Notch ligands, we systematically examined the effects of both cell-extrinsic and cell-intrinsic ligand. Our results highlight the importance of divergent Notch ligand function and combinatorial microenvironmental regulation in liver progenitor fate specification. PMID:27025873

  20. AKT induces erythroid-cell maturation of JAK2-deficient fetal liver progenitor cells and is required for Epo regulation of erythroid-cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ghaffari, Saghi; Kitidis, Claire; Zhao, Wei; Marinkovic, Dragan; Fleming, Mark D; Luo, Biao; Marszalek, Joseph; Lodish, Harvey F

    2006-03-01

    AKT serine threonine kinase of the protein kinase B (PKB) family plays essential roles in cell survival, growth, metabolism, and differentiation. In the erythroid system, AKT is known to be rapidly phosphorylated and activated in response to erythropoietin (Epo) engagement of Epo receptor (EpoR) and to sustain survival signals in cultured erythroid cells. Here we demonstrate that activated AKT complements EpoR signaling and supports erythroid-cell differentiation in wild-type and JAK2-deficient fetal liver cells. We show that erythroid maturation of AKT-transduced cells is not solely dependent on AKT-induced cell survival or proliferation signals, suggesting that AKT transduces also a differentiation-specific signal downstream of EpoR in erythroid cells. Down-regulation of expression of AKT kinase by RNA interference, or AKT activity by expression of dominant negative forms, inhibits significantly fetal liver-derived erythroid-cell colony formation and gene expression, demonstrating that AKT is required for Epo regulation of erythroid-cell maturation.

  1. Mesenchymal progenitor cells for the osteogenic lineage.

    PubMed

    Ono, Noriaki; Kronenberg, Henry M

    2015-09-01

    Mesenchymal progenitors of the osteogenic lineage provide the flexibility for bone to grow, maintain its function and homeostasis. Traditionally, colony-forming-unit fibroblasts (CFU-Fs) have been regarded as surrogates for mesenchymal progenitors; however, this definition cannot address the function of these progenitors in their native setting. Transgenic murine models including lineage-tracing technologies based on the cre-lox system have proven to be useful in delineating mesenchymal progenitors in their native environment. Although heterogeneity of cell populations of interest marked by a promoter-based approach complicates overall interpretation, an emerging complexity of mesenchymal progenitors has been revealed. Current literatures suggest two distinct types of bone progenitor cells; growth-associated mesenchymal progenitors contribute to explosive growth of bone in early life, whereas bone marrow mesenchymal progenitors contribute to the much slower remodeling process and response to injury that occurs mainly in adulthood. More detailed relationships of these progenitors need to be studied through further experimentation.

  2. Repopulation of human origin hepatocyte progenitor-like cell line, THLE-5b, in the SCID mouse liver under p21-mediated cell growth-arresting conditions.

    PubMed

    Enosawa, Shin; Yamazaki, Taisuke; Kohsaka, Hitoshi; Tokiwa, Takayoshi

    2012-01-01

    The in vivo repopulation of hepatocytes depends on donor cell growth potential and recipient conditioning. We herein demonstrate the successful cell transplantation of a human hepatocyte cell line, THLE-5b, into the SCID mouse liver by means of a rather mild conditioning using a 55% hepatectomy and p21 transfection. Adult human liver-derived cells, THLE-5b, are SV40 T antigen-immortalized epithelial cells. A phenotypic examination of THLE-5b showed they expressed hepatic stem cell markers such as EpCAM, OCT3/4, and Thy-1, thus indicating the immature nature of the cells. A three-dimensional aggregate culture of THLE-5b showed a higher expression level of liver-specific genes such as albumin, α1-antitrypsin, and CYP3A4, thus suggesting that THLE-5b possess the capability to differentiate into hepatocytes. In a cell transplantation experiment, the cell cycle regulator p21 was transfected with adenoviral vector into the SCID mouse liver. On the next day, 8 × 10(5) cells of GFP-transfected THLE-5b were injected intrasplenically, together with the intraperitoneal administration of anti-asialo GM1 antibodies. The following day, a partial hepatectomy was performed. The GFP-THLE-5b cells were observed to have migrated and become integrated into the liver parenchyma 14 days after transplantation. The present protocol is thus considered to be a novel experimental model to elucidate the mechanism of hepatocyte repopulation and to develop efficient stem cell therapy in the liver.

  3. Stem Cells and Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    DUNCAN, ANDREW W.; DORRELL, CRAIG; GROMPE, MARKUS

    2011-01-01

    One of the defining features of the liver is the capacity to maintain a constant size despite injury. Although the precise molecular signals involved in the maintenance of liver size are not completely known, it is clear that the liver delicately balances regeneration with overgrowth. Mammals, for example, can survive surgical removal of up to 75% of the total liver mass. Within 1 week after liver resection, the total number of liver cells is restored. Moreover, liver overgrowth can be induced by a variety of signals, including hepatocyte growth factor or peroxisome proliferators; the liver quickly returns to its normal size when the proliferative signal is removed. The extent to which liver stem cells mediate liver regeneration has been hotly debated. One of the primary reasons for this controversy is the use of multiple definitions for the hepatic stem cell. Definitions for the liver stem cell include the following: (1) cells responsible for normal tissue turnover, (2) cells that give rise to regeneration after partial hepatectomy, (3) cells responsible for progenitor-dependent regeneration, (4) cells that produce hepatocyte and bile duct epithelial phenotypes in vitro, and (5) transplantable liver-repopulating cells. This review will consider liver stem cells in the context of each definition. PMID:19470389

  4. Development of Erythroid Progenitors under Erythropoietin Stimulation in Xenopus laevis Larval Liver.

    PubMed

    Okui, Takehito; Hosozawa, Sakiko; Kohama, Satoka; Fujiyama, Shingo; Maekawa, Shun; Muto, Hiroshi; Kato, Takashi

    2016-12-01

    Erythroid progenitors that respond to erythropoietin (Epo) are present in the liver of adult Xenopus laevis. However, cells responding to Epo in the larval liver and through the metamorphosis period under hepatic remodeling have not been characterized. In this study, tadpoles were staged using the tables of Nieuwkoop and Faber (NF). Liver cells from pre- (NF56) or post- (NF66) metamorphic stage were cultured in the presence of Epo. β2-globin mRNA expression peaked at day 7 after the start of culture. Larval β2-globin was highly expressed in NF56-derived cells, while adult β2-globinwas detected in those of NF66. In both NF56- and NF66-derived cells, mRNA expression of eporand gata2 peaked at day 5 and days 3-4, respectively. In contrast, gata1 expression peaked at day 6 in NF56 cells and at day 5 in NF66 cells. Half maximal proliferation of erythrocytic blast cells derived from the liver at NF66 was observed at day 3, which was earlier than that of NF56. These results indicate that erythroid progenitors that respond to Xenopus laevis Epo are maintained in pre- and post-metamorphic liver, although the tissue architecture changes dramatically during metamorphosis. Additionally, the globin switching occurred, and/or the erythroid progenitors for larval erythrocytes were replaced by those for adult erythrocytes in the metamorphic liver.

  5. Development and molecular composition of the hepatic progenitor cell niche.

    PubMed

    Vestentoft, Peter Siig

    2013-05-01

    End-stage liver diseases represent major health problems that are currently treated by liver transplantation. However, given the world-wide shortage of donor livers novel strategies are needed for therapeutic treatment. Adult stem cells have the ability to self-renew and differentiate into the more specialized cell types of a given organ and are found in tissues throughout the body. These cells, whose progeny are termed progenitor cells in human liver and oval cells in rodents, have the potential to treat patients through the generation of hepatic parenchymal cells, even from the patient's own tissue. Little is known regarding the nature of the hepatic progenitor cells. Though they are suggested to reside in the most distal part of the biliary tree, the canal of Hering, the lack of unique surface markers for these cells has hindered their isolation and characterization. Upon activation, they proliferate and form ductular structures, termed "ductular reactions", which radiate into the hepatic parenchyma. The ductular reactions contain activated progenitor cells that not only acquire a phenotype resembling that observed in developing liver but also display markers of differentiation shared with the cholangiocytic or hepatocytic lineages, the two parenchymal hepatic cell types. Interactions between the putative progenitor cells, the surrounding support cells and the extracellular matrix scaffold, all constituting the progenitor cell niche, are likely to be important for regulating progenitor cell activity and differentiation. Therefore, identifying novel progenitor cell markers and deciphering their microenvironment could facilitate clinical use. The aims of the present PhD thesis were to expand knowledge of the hepatic progenitor cell niche and characterize it both during development and in disease. Several animal models of hepatic injury are known to induce activation of the progenitor cells. In order to identify possible progenitor cell markers and niche components

  6. [Characterization of hematopoietic progenitor cells during the human embryonic development].

    PubMed

    Coulombel, L; Huyhn, A; Izac, B

    1995-01-01

    In a search for assays that might facilitate identification of pluripotent stem cells with extended potentialities, we analysed the properties of hematopoietic progenitor cells detected in the extraembryonic yolk sac and in the intraembryonic part of human embryos between approximately 28 and 45 days of development. Cells from the yolk sac, the liver rudiment and the remainder of the embryo were plated in semi solid methylcellulose colony-assays supplemented with combinations of cytokines. Large BFU-E-derived colonies as well as granulocytic colonies were detected in every yolk sac sample. Interestingly, progenitor cells were also detected in the intraembryonic part, outside the liver and a subclass of these progenitors were detected that generated large granulomacrophagic colonies capable of generating secondary colonies when replated. These were preferentially located in the embryo. Colony-assays initiated with CD34+ cells sorted from the different tissues confirmed these data. These results first indicate that embryonic progenitors exhibit unique phenotypic features, and second, analysis of the distribution of progenitors between the different tissues may suggest the existence of other sites of hematopoietic production. More detailed analysis of the potentialities of these progenitors should now be assessed in vitro in cocultures assays and in vivo by reconstituting immunodeficient mice.

  7. Human fetal hepatic progenitor cells are distinct from, but closely related to, hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qingfeng; Khoury, Maroun; Limmon, Gino; Choolani, Mahesh; Chan, Jerry K Y; Chen, Jianzhu

    2013-06-01

    Much controversy surrounds the identity and origin of human hepatic stem and progenitor cells in part because of a lack of small animal models in which the developmental potential of isolated candidate cell populations can be functionally evaluated. We show here that adoptive transfer of CD34(+) cells from human fetal liver into sublethally irradiated NOD-SCID Il2rg(-/-) (NSG) mice leads to an efficient development of not only human hematopoietic cells but also human hepatocyte-like cells in the liver of the recipient mice. Using this simple in vivo assay in combination with cell fractionation, we show that CD34(+) fetal liver cells can be separated into three distinct subpopulations: CD34(hi) CD133(hi), CD34(lo) CD133(lo), and CD34(hi) CD133(neg). The CD34(hi) CD133(hi) population contains hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) as they give rise to T cells, B cells, NK cells, dendritic cells, and monocytes/macrophages in NSG mice and colony-forming unit (CFU)-GEMM cells in vitro. The CD34(lo) CD133(lo) population does not give rise to hematopoietic cells, but reproducibly generates hepatocyte-like cells in NSG mice and in vitro. The CD34(hi) CD133(neg) population only gives rise to CFU-GM and burst-forming unit-erythroid in vitro. Furthermore, we show that the CD34(lo) CD133(lo) cells express hematopoietic, hepatic, and mesenchymal markers, including CD34, CD133, CD117, epithelial cell adhesion molecule, CD73, albumin, α-fetal protein, and vimentin and transcriptionally are more closely related to HSPCs than to mature hepatocytes. These results show that CD34(lo) CD133(lo) fetal liver cells possess the hepatic progenitor cell properties and that human hepatic and hematopoietic progenitor cells are distinct, although they may originate from the same precursors in the fetal liver.

  8. Functional liver tissue engineering by an adult mouse liver-derived neuro-glia antigen 2-expressing stem/progenitor population.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongyu; Siegel, Christopher T; Li, Jing; Lai, Jiejuan; Shuai, Ling; Lai, Xiangdong; Zhang, Yujun; Jiang, Yan; Bie, Ping; Bai, Lianhua

    2016-09-17

    Deaths due to end-stage liver diseases (ESLD) are increasingly registered annually in the world. Liver transplantation is the ultimate treatment for ESLD to date, which has been hampered by a critical shortage of organs. The potential of decellularized liver scaffolds (DLS) derived from solid organs as a three dimensional (3D) platform has been evolved as a promising approach in liver tissue engineering for translating functional liver organ replacements, but questions still exist regarding the optimal cell population for seeding in DLS and the preparation of the DLS themselves. The aim of our study was to utilize a sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) decellularization procedure in combination with a low concentration of trypsin (0.005%)-EDTA (0.002%) process to manufacture DLS from whole mouse livers and recellularized with hepatic stem/progenitors for use in liver tissue engineering and injured liver treatment. Results showed that the DLS generated with all the necessary microstructure and the extracellular components to support seeded hepatic stem/progenitor cell attachment, functional hepatic cell differentiation. Hepatic differentiation from stem/progenitor cells loaded by DLS was more efficient than that of the stem/progenitor cells in the 2D cell culture model. In summary, the method of DLS loaded by hepatic stem/progenitor cells provided by this study was effective in maintaining DLS extracellular matrix (ECM) to introduce seeded stem/progenitor cell differentiation, hepatic-like tissue formation and functional hepatic protein production in vitro that promoted functional recovery and survival in a mouse model of dimethylnitrosamine (DEN)-induced liver cirrhosis after auxiliary heterotopic liver transplantation.

  9. Progenitors for Ly-1 B cells are distinct from progenitors for other B cells

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Data from previous multiparameter fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis and sorting studies define a subset of murine B cells that expresses the Ly-1 surface determinant in conjunction with IgM, IgD, Ia, and other typical B cell markers. These Ly-1 B cells are physically and functionally distinct. They express more IgM and less IgD than most other B cells; they are not normally found in lymph node or bone marrow; they are always present at low frequencies (1-5%) in normal spleens, and, as we show here, they comprise about half of the B cells (10-20% of total cells) recovered from the peritoneal cavity in normal mice. Furthermore, most of the commonly studied IgM autoantibodies in normal and autoimmune mice are produced by these Ly-1 B cells, even though they seldom produce antibodies to exogenous antigens such as trinitrophenyl-Ficoll or trinitrophenyl-keyhole limpet hemocyanin. Cell transfer studies presented here demonstrate that the progenitors of Ly-1 B cells are different from the progenitors of the predominant B cell populations in spleen and lymph node. In these studies, we used FACS analysis and functional assays to characterize donor-derived (allotype-marked) B cells present in lethally irradiated recipients 1-2 mo after transfer. Surprisingly, adult bone marrow cells typically used to reconstitute B cells in irradiated recipients selectively failed to reconstitute the Ly-1 B subset. Liver, spleen, and bone marrow cells from young mice, in contrast, reconstituted all B cells (including Ly-1 B), and peritoneal "washout" cells (PerC) from adult mice uniquely reconstituted Ly-1 B. Bone marrow did not block Ly- 1 B development, since PerC and newborn liver still gave rise to Ly-1 B when jointly transferred with marrow. These findings tentatively assign Ly-1 B to a distinct developmental lineage originating from progenitors that inhabit the same locations as other B cell progenitors in young animals, but move to unique location(s) in adults. PMID

  10. Endothelial progenitor cells in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Du, Fuyong; Zhou, Jun; Gong, Ren; Huang, Xiao; Pansuria, Meghana; Virtue, Anthony; Li, Xinyuan; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are involved in the maintenance of endothelial homoeostasis and in the process of new vessel formation. Experimental and clinical studies have shown that atherosclerosis is associated with reduced numbers and dysfunction of EPCs; and that medications alone are able to partially reverse the impairment of EPCs in patients with atherosclerosis. Therefore, novel EPC-based therapies may provide enhancement in restoring EPCs’ population and improvement of vascular function. Here, for a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying EPC impairment in atherosclerosis, we provide a comprehensive overview on EPC characteristics, phenotypes, and the signaling pathways underlying EPC impairment in atherosclerosis. PMID:22652782

  11. Role of SDF-1 (CXCL12) in regulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells traffic into the liver during extramedullary hematopoiesis induced by G-CSF, AMD3100 and PHZ.

    PubMed

    Mendt, Mayela; Cardier, Jose E

    2015-12-01

    The stromal cell derived factor 1 (SDF-1/CXCL12) plays an essential role in the homing of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) to bone marrow (BM). It is not known whether SDF-1 may also regulate the homing of HSPCs to the liver during extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH). Here, we investigated the possible role of SDF-1 in attracting HSPCs to the liver during experimental EMH induced by the hematopoietic mobilizers G-CSF, AMD3100 and phenylhydrazine (PHZ). Mice treated with G-CSF, AMD3100 and PHZ showed a significant increase in the expression of SDF-1 in the liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) microenvironments. Liver from mice treated with the hematopoietic mobilizers showed HSPCs located adjacent to the LSEC microenvironments, expressing high levels of SDF-1. An inverse relationship was found between the hepatic SDF-1 levels and those in the BM. In vitro, LSEC monolayers induced the migration of HSPCs, and this effect was significantly reduced by AMD3100. In conclusion, our results provide the first evidence showing that SDF-1 expressed by LSEC can be a major player in the recruitment of HSPCs to the liver during EMH induced by hematopoietic mobilizers.

  12. Foetal hepatic progenitor cells assume a cholangiocytic cell phenotype during two-dimensional pre-culture.

    PubMed

    Anzai, Kazuya; Chikada, Hiromi; Tsuruya, Kota; Ida, Kinuyo; Kagawa, Tatehiro; Inagaki, Yutaka; Mine, Tesuya; Kamiya, Akihide

    2016-06-23

    Liver consists of parenchymal hepatocytes and other cells. Liver progenitor cell (LPC) is the origin of both hepatocytes and cholangiocytic cells. The analyses of mechanism regulating differentiation of LPCs into these functional cells are important for liver regenerative therapy using progenitor cells. LPCs in adult livers were found to form cysts with cholangiocytic characteristics in 3D culture. In contrast, foetal LPCs cannot form these cholangiocytic cysts in the same culture. Thus, the transition of foetal LPCs into cholangiocytic progenitor cells might occur during liver development. Primary CD45(-)Ter119(-)Dlk1(+) LPCs derived from murine foetal livers formed ALBUMIN (ALB)(+)CYTOKERATIN (CK)19(-) non-cholangiocytic cysts within 3D culture. In contrast, when foetal LPCs were pre-cultured on gelatine-coated dishes, they formed ALB(-)CK19(+) cholangiocytic cysts. When hepatocyte growth factor or oncostatin M, which are inducers of hepatocytic differentiation, was added to pre-culture, LPCs did not form cholangiocytic cysts. These results suggest that the pre-culture on gelatine-coated dishes changed the characteristics of foetal LPCs into cholangiocytic cells. Furthermore, neonatal liver progenitor cells were able to form cholangiocytic cysts in 3D culture without pre-culture. It is therefore possible that the pre-culture of mid-foetal LPCs in vitro functioned as a substitute for the late-foetal maturation step in vivo.

  13. Fetal hepatic progenitors support long-term expansion of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chou, Song; Flygare, Johan; Lodish, Harvey F

    2013-05-01

    We have developed a coculture system that establishes DLK(+) fetal hepatic progenitors as the authentic supportive cells for expansion of hematopoietic stem (HSCs) and progenitor cells. In 1-week cultures supplemented with serum and supportive cytokines, both cocultured DLK(+) fetal hepatic progenitors and their conditioned medium supported rapid expansion of hematopoietic progenitors and a small increase in HSC numbers. In 2- and 3-week cultures DLK(+) cells, but not their conditioned medium, continuously and significantly (>20-fold) expanded both hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Physical contact between HSCs and DLK(+) cells was crucial to maintaining this long-term expansion. Similar HSC expansion (approximately sevenfold) was achieved in cocultures using a serum-free, low cytokine- containing medium. In contrast, DLK(-) cells are incapable of expanding hematopoietic cells, demonstrating that hepatic progenitors are the principle supportive cells for HSC expansion in the fetal liver.

  14. The plastic liver: differentiated cells, stem cells, every cell?

    PubMed Central

    Hindley, Christopher J.; Mastrogiovanni, Gianmarco; Huch, Meritxell

    2014-01-01

    The liver is capable of full regeneration following several types and rounds of injury, ranging from hepatectomy to toxin-mediated damage. The source of this regenerative capacity has long been a hotly debated topic. The damage response that occurs when hepatocyte proliferation is impaired is thought to be mediated by oval/dedifferentiated progenitor cells, which replenish the hepatocyte and ductal compartments of the liver. Recently, reports have questioned whether these oval/progenitor cells truly serve as the facultative stem cell of the liver following toxin-mediated damage. In this issue of the JCI, Kordes and colleagues use lineage tracing to follow transplanted rat hepatic stellate cells, a resident liver mesenchymal cell population, in hosts that have suffered liver damage. Transplanted stellate cells repopulated the damaged rat liver by contributing to the oval cell response. These data establish yet another cell type of mesenchymal origin as the progenitor for the oval/ductular response in the rat. The lack of uniformity between different damage models, the extent of the injury to the liver parenchyma, and potential species-specific differences might be at the core of the discrepancy between different studies. Taken together, these data imply a considerable degree of plasticity in the liver, whereby several cell types can contribute to regeneration. PMID:25401467

  15. Evidence for epithelial-mesenchymal transitions in adult liver cells.

    PubMed

    Sicklick, Jason K; Choi, Steve S; Bustamante, Marcia; McCall, Shannon J; Pérez, Elizabeth Hernández; Huang, Jiawen; Li, Yin-Xiong; Rojkind, Marcos; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2006-10-01

    Both myofibroblastic hepatic stellate cells (HSC) and hepatic epithelial progenitors accumulate in damaged livers. In some injured organs, the ability to distinguish between fibroblastic and epithelial cells is sometimes difficult because cells undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transitions (EMT). During EMT, cells coexpress epithelial and mesenchymal cell markers. To determine whether EMT occurs in adult liver cells, we analyzed the expression profile of primary HSC, two HSC lines, and hepatic epithelial progenitors. As expected, all HSC expressed HSC markers. Surprisingly, these markers were also expressed by epithelial progenitors. In addition, one HSC line expressed typical epithelial progenitor mRNAs, and these epithelial markers were inducible in the second HSC line. In normal and damaged livers, small ductular-type cells stained positive for an HSC marker. In conclusion, HSC and hepatic epithelial progenitors both coexpress epithelial and mesenchymal markers, providing evidence that EMT occurs in adult liver cells.

  16. Hematopoietic Progenitors from Early Murine Fetal Liver Possess Hepatic Differentiation Potential

    PubMed Central

    Khurana, Satish; Mukhopadhyay, Asok

    2008-01-01

    Bipotential hepatoblasts differentiate into hepatocytes and cholangiocytes during liver development. It is believed that hepatoblasts originate from endodermal tissue. Here, we provide evidence for the presence of hepatic progenitor cells in the hematopoietic compartment at an early stage of liver development. Flow cytometric analysis showed that at early stages of liver development, approximately 13% of CD45+ cells express Δ-like protein-1, a marker of hepatoblasts. Furthermore, reverse transcriptase-PCR data suggest that many hepatic genes are expressed in these cells. Cell culture experiments confirmed the hepatic differentiation potential of these cells with the loss of the CD45 marker. We observed that both hematopoietic activity in Δ-like protein-1+ cells and hepatic activity in CD45+ cells were high at embryonic day 10.5 and declined thereafter. Clonal analysis revealed that the hematopoietic fraction of fetal liver cells at embryonic day 10.5 gave rise to both hepatic and hematopoietic colonies. The above results suggest a common source of these two functionally distinct cell lineages. In utero transplantation experiments confirmed these results, as green fluorescent protein-expressing CD45+ cells at the same stage of development yielded functional hepatocytes and hematopoietic reconstitution. Since these cells were unable to differentiate into cytokeratin-19-expressing cholangiocytes, we distinguished them from hepatoblasts. This preliminary study provides hope to correct many liver diseases during prenatal development via transplantation of fetal liver hematopoietic cells. PMID:18988804

  17. Circulating Vascular Progenitor Cells in Moyamoya Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hyun-Seung; Wang, Kyu-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Various approaches have been attempted in translational moyamoya disease research. One promising material for modeling and treating this disease is vascular progenitor cells, which can be acquired and expanded from patient peripheral blood. These cells may provide a novel experimental model and enable us to obtain insights regarding moyamoya disease pathogenesis. We briefly present the recent accomplishments in regard to the studies of vascular progenitor cells in moyamoya disease. PMID:26180610

  18. Large tumor suppressor homologs 1 and 2 regulate mouse liver progenitor cell proliferation and maturation through antagonism of the coactivators YAP and TAZ.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jing; Lu, Li; Yanger, Kilangsungla; Wang, Wenqi; Sohn, Bo Hwa; Stanger, Ben Z; Zhang, Min; Martin, James F; Ajani, Jaffer A; Chen, Junjie; Lee, Ju-Seog; Song, Shumei; Johnson, Randy L

    2016-11-01

    In the adult liver, the Hippo pathway mammalian STE20-like protein kinases 1 and 2 and large tumor suppressor homologs 1 and 2 (LATS1/2) control activation of the transcriptional coactivators Yes-associated protein (YAP) and WW domain containing transcription regulator 1 (TAZ) in hepatocytes and biliary epithelial cells, thereby regulating liver cell proliferation, differentiation, and malignant transformation. Less is known about the contribution of Hippo signaling to liver development. We used conditional mutagenesis to show that the Hippo signaling pathway kinases LATS1 and LATS2 are redundantly required during mouse liver development to repress YAP and TAZ in both the biliary epithelial and hepatocyte lineages. In the absence of LATS1/2, biliary epithelial cells exhibit excess proliferation while hepatoblasts fail to mature into hepatocytes, defects that result in perinatal lethality. Using an in vitro hepatocyte differentiation assay, we demonstrate that YAP activity decreases and Hippo pathway kinase activities increase upon differentiation. In addition, we show that YAP activation in vitro, resulting from either depletion of its negative regulators LATS1/2 or expression of a mutant form of YAP that is less efficiently phosphorylated by LATS1/2, results in transcriptional suppression of genes that normally accompany hepatocyte maturation. Moreover, we provide evidence that YAP activity is repressed by Hippo pathway activation upon hepatocytic maturation in vitro. Finally, we examine the localization of YAP during fetal liver development and show that higher levels of YAP are found in biliary epithelial cells, while in hepatocytes YAP levels decrease with hepatocyte maturation. Hippo signaling, mediated by the LATS1 and LATS2 kinases, is required to restrict YAP and TAZ activation during both biliary and hepatocyte differentiation. These findings suggest that dynamic regulation of the Hippo signaling pathway plays an important role in differentiation and

  19. Pioneer factors, genetic competence, and inductive signaling: programming liver and pancreas progenitors from the endoderm.

    PubMed

    Zaret, K S; Watts, J; Xu, J; Wandzioch, E; Smale, S T; Sekiya, T

    2008-01-01

    The endoderm is a multipotent progenitor cell population in the embryo that gives rise to the liver, pancreas, and other cell types and provides paradigms for understanding cell-type specification. Studies of isolated embryo tissue cells and genetic approaches in vivo have defined fibroblast growth factor/mitogen-activated protein kinase (FGF/MAPK) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling pathways that induce liver and pancreatic fates in the endoderm. In undifferentiated endoderm cells, the FoxA and GATA transcription factors are among the first to engage silent genes, helping to endow competence for cell-type specification. FoxA proteins can bind their target sites in highly compacted chromatin and open up the local region for other factors to bind; hence, they have been termed "pioneer factors." We recently found that FoxA proteins remain bound to chromatin in mitosis, as an epigenetic mark. In embryonic stem cells, which lack FoxA, FoxA target sites can be occupied by FoxD3, which in turn helps to maintain a local demethylation of chromatin. By these means, a cascade of Fox factors helps to endow progenitor cells with the competence to activate genes in response to tissue-inductive signals. Understanding such epigenetic mechanisms for transcriptional competence coupled with knowledge of the relevant signals for cell-type specification should greatly facilitate efforts to predictably differentiate stem cells to liver and pancreatic fates.

  20. Mutually exclusive signaling signatures define the hepatic and pancreatic progenitor cell lineage divergence

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Seguel, Elisa; Mah, Nancy; Naumann, Heike; Pongrac, Igor M.; Cerdá-Esteban, Nuria; Fontaine, Jean-Fred; Wang, Yongbo; Chen, Wei; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.; Spagnoli, Francesca M.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how distinct cell types arise from multipotent progenitor cells is a major quest in stem cell biology. The liver and pancreas share many aspects of their early development and possibly originate from a common progenitor. However, how liver and pancreas cells diverge from a common endoderm progenitor population and adopt specific fates remains elusive. Using RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), we defined the molecular identity of liver and pancreas progenitors that were isolated from the mouse embryo at two time points, spanning the period when the lineage decision is made. The integration of temporal and spatial gene expression profiles unveiled mutually exclusive signaling signatures in hepatic and pancreatic progenitors. Importantly, we identified the noncanonical Wnt pathway as a potential developmental regulator of this fate decision and capable of inducing the pancreas program in endoderm and liver cells. Our study offers an unprecedented view of gene expression programs in liver and pancreas progenitors and forms the basis for formulating lineage-reprogramming strategies to convert adult hepatic cells into pancreatic cells. PMID:24013505

  1. Liver cell adenoma and liver cell adenomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Barthelmes, Ludger

    2005-01-01

    During the last three decades liver cell adenoma and liver cell adenomatosis have emerged as new clinical entities in hepato-logical practice due to the widespread use of oral contraceptives and increased imaging of the liver. On review of published series there is evidence that 10% of liver cell adenomas progress to hepatocellular carcinoma, diagnosis is best made by open or laparoscopic excision biopsy, and the preferred treatment modality is resection of the liver cell adenoma to prevent bleeding and malignant transformation. In liver cell adenomatosis, the association with oral contraceptive use is not as high as in solitary liver cell adenomas. The risk of malignant transformation is not increased compared with solitary liver cell adenomas. Treatment consists of close monitoring and imaging, resection of superficially located, large (>4 cm) or growing liver cell adenomas. Liver transplantation is the last resort in case of substantive concern about malignant transformation or for large, painful adenomas in liver cell adenomatosis after treatment attempts by liver resection. PMID:18333188

  2. Role of stem cells in repair of liver injury: Experimental and clinical benefit of transferred stem cells on liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Esrefoglu, Mukaddes

    2013-01-01

    Although the liver has a high regenerative capacity, as a result of massive hepatocyte death, liver failure occurs. In addition to liver failure, for acute, chronic and hereditary diseases of the liver, cell transplantation therapies can stimulate regeneration or at least ensure sufficient function until liver transplantation can be performed. The lack of donor organs and the risks of rejection have prompted extensive experimental and clinical research in the field of cellular transplantation. Transplantation of cell lineages involved in liver regeneration, including mature hepatocytes, fetal hepatocytes, fetal liver progenitor cells, fetal stem cells, hepatic progenitor cells, hepatic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, hematopoietic stem cells, and peripheral blood and umbilical cord blood stem cells, have been found to be beneficial in the treatment of liver failure. In this article, the results of experimental and clinical cell transplantation trials for liver failure are reviewed, with an emphasis on regeneration. PMID:24187451

  3. Role of stem cells in repair of liver injury: experimental and clinical benefit of transferred stem cells on liver failure.

    PubMed

    Esrefoglu, Mukaddes

    2013-10-28

    Although the liver has a high regenerative capacity, as a result of massive hepatocyte death, liver failure occurs. In addition to liver failure, for acute, chronic and hereditary diseases of the liver, cell transplantation therapies can stimulate regeneration or at least ensure sufficient function until liver transplantation can be performed. The lack of donor organs and the risks of rejection have prompted extensive experimental and clinical research in the field of cellular transplantation. Transplantation of cell lineages involved in liver regeneration, including mature hepatocytes, fetal hepatocytes, fetal liver progenitor cells, fetal stem cells, hepatic progenitor cells, hepatic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, hematopoietic stem cells, and peripheral blood and umbilical cord blood stem cells, have been found to be beneficial in the treatment of liver failure. In this article, the results of experimental and clinical cell transplantation trials for liver failure are reviewed, with an emphasis on regeneration.

  4. Hepatic progenitor cell resistance to TGF-{beta}1's proliferative and apoptotic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, J. Brian; Rice, Lisa; Sadiq, Tim; Brittain, Evan; Song, Lujun; Wang Jian; Gerber, David A. . E-mail: David_Gerber@med.unc.edu

    2005-04-01

    The success of hepatocellular therapies using stem or progenitor cell populations is dependent upon multiple factors including the donor cell, microenvironment, and etiology of the liver injury. The following experiments investigated the impact of TGF-{beta}1 on a previously described population of hepatic progenitor cells (HPC). The majority of the hepatic progenitor cells were resistant to endogenously produced TGF-{beta}1's proapoptotic and anti-proliferative effects unlike more well-differentiated cellular populations (e.g., mature hepatocytes). Surprisingly, in vitro TGF-{beta}1 supplementation significantly inhibited de novo hepatic progenitor cell colony formation possibly via an indirect mechanism(s). Therefore despite the HPC's direct resistance to supplemental TGF-{beta}1, this cytokine's inhibitory effect on colony formation could have a potential negative impact on the use of these cells as a therapy for patients with liver disease.

  5. Endothelial progenitor cells in cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Poay Sian Sabrina; Poh, Kian Keong

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction has been associated with the development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. Adult endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are derived from hematopoietic stem cells and are capable of forming new blood vessels through a process of vasculogenesis. There are studies which report correlations between circulating EPCs and cardiovascular risk factors. There are also studies on how pharmacotherapies may influence levels of circulating EPCs. In this review, we discuss the potential role of endothelial progenitor cells as both diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. In addition, we look at the interaction between cardiovascular pharmacotherapies and endothelial progenitor cells. We also discuss how EPCs can be used directly and indirectly as a therapeutic agent. Finally, we evaluate the challenges facing EPC research and how these may be overcome. PMID:25126384

  6. Interaction of endothelial progenitor cells expressing cytosine deaminase in tumor tissues and 5-fluorocytosine administration suppresses growth of 5-fluorouracil-sensitive liver cancer in mice.

    PubMed

    Torimura, Takuji; Ueno, Takato; Taniguchi, Eitaro; Masuda, Hiroshi; Iwamoto, Hideki; Nakamura, Toru; Inoue, Kinya; Hashimoto, Osamu; Abe, Mitsuhiko; Koga, Hironori; Barresi, Vincenza; Nakashima, Emi; Yano, Hirohisa; Sata, Michio

    2012-03-01

    The drug delivery system to tumors is a critical factor in upregulating the effect of anticancer drugs and reducing adverse events. Recent studies indicated selective migration of bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) into tumor tissues. Cytosine deaminase (CD) transforms nontoxic 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into the highly toxic 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). We investigated the antitumor effect of a new CD/5-FC system with CD cDNA transfected EPC for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in mice. We used human hepatoma cell lines (HuH-7, HLF, HAK1-B, KYN-2, KIM-1) and a rat EPC cell line (TR-BME-2). Escherichia coli CD cDNA was transfected into TR-BME-2 (CD-TR-BME). The inhibitory effect of 5-FU on the proliferation of hepatoma cell lines and the inhibitory effect of 5-FU secreted by CD-TR-BME and 5-FC on the proliferation of co-cultured hepatoma cells were evaluated by a tetrazolium-based assay. In mouse subcutaneous xenograft models of KYN-2 and HuH-7, CD-TR-BME was transplanted intravenously followed by 5-FC injection intraperitoneally. HuH-7 cells were the most sensitive to 5-FU and KYN-2 cells were the most resistant. CD-TR-BME secreted 5-FU and inhibited HuH-7 proliferation in a 5-FC dose-dependent manner. CD-TR-BME were recruited into the tumor tissues and some were incorporated into tumor vessels. Tumor growth of HuH-7 was significantly suppressed during 5-FC administration. No bodyweight loss, ALT abnormality or bone marrow suppression was observed. These findings suggest that our new CD/5-FC system with CD cDNA transfected EPC could be an effective and safe treatment for suppression of 5-FU-sensitive HCC growth.

  7. Noninvasive Imaging of Administered Progenitor Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Steven R Bergmann, M.D., Ph.D.

    2012-12-03

    The objective of this research grant was to develop an approach for labeling progenitor cells, specifically those that we had identified as being able to replace ischemic heart cells, so that the distribution could be followed non-invasively. In addition, the research was aimed at determining whether administration of progenitor cells resulted in improved myocardial perfusion and function. The efficiency and toxicity of radiolabeling of progenitor cells was to be evaluated. For the proposed clinical protocol, subjects with end-stage ischemic coronary artery disease were to undergo a screening cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) scan using N-13 ammonia to delineate myocardial perfusion and function. If they qualified based on their PET scan, they would undergo an in-hospital protocol whereby CD34+ cells were stimulated by the administration of granulocytes-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). CD34+ cells would then be isolated by apharesis, and labeled with indium-111 oxine. Cells were to be re-infused and subjects were to undergo single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scanning to evaluate uptake and distribution of labeled progenitor cells. Three months after administration of progenitor cells, a cardiac PET scan was to be repeated to evaluate changes in myocardial perfusion and/or function. Indium oxine is a radiopharmaceutical for labeling of autologous lymphocytes. Indium-111 (In-111) decays by electron capture with a t{sub ½} of 67.2 hours (2.8 days). Indium forms a saturated complex that is neutral, lipid soluble, and permeates the cell membrane. Within the cell, the indium-oxyquinolone complex labels via indium intracellular chelation. Following leukocyte labeling, ~77% of the In-111 is incorporated in the cell pellet. The presence of red cells and /or plasma reduces the labeling efficacy. Therefore, the product needed to be washed to eliminate plasma proteins. This repeated washing can damage cells. The CD34 selected product was a 90

  8. Chondrogenic Progenitor Cells Respond to Cartilage Injury

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Hyeonghun; Zheng, Hongjun; Yu, Yin; Jang, Keewoong; Walter, Morgan W.; Lehman, Abigail D.; Ding, Lei; Buckwalter, Joseph A.; Martin, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Hypocellularity resulting from chondrocyte death in the aftermath of mechanical injury is thought to contribute to posttraumatic osteoarthritis. However, we observed that nonviable areas in cartilage injured by blunt impact were repopulated within 7–14 days by cells that appeared to migrate from the surrounding matrix. The aim of this study was to assess our hypothesis that the migrating cell population included chondrogenic progenitor cells that were drawn to injured cartilage by alarmins. Methods Osteochondral explants obtained from mature cattle were injured by blunt impact or scratching, resulting in localized chondrocyte death. Injured sites were serially imaged by confocal microscopy, and migrating cells were evaluated for chondrogenic progenitor characteristics. Chemotaxis assays were used to measure the responses to chemokines, injury-conditioned medium, dead cell debris, and high mobility group box chromosomal protein 1 (HMGB-1). Results Migrating cells were highly clonogenic and multipotent and expressed markers associated with chondrogenic progenitor cells. Compared with chondrocytes, these cells overexpressed genes involved in proliferation and migration and underexpressed cartilage matrix genes. They were more active than chondrocytes in chemotaxis assays and responded to cell lysates, conditioned medium, and HMGB-1. Glycyrrhizin, a chelator of HMGB-1 and a blocking antibody to receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), inhibited responses to cell debris and conditioned medium and reduced the numbers of migrating cells on injured explants. Conclusion Injuries that caused chondrocyte death stimulated the emergence and homing of chondrogenic progenitor cells, in part via HMGB-1 release and RAGE-mediated chemotaxis. Their repopulation of the matrix could promote the repair of chondral damage that might otherwise contribute to progressive cartilage loss. PMID:22777600

  9. The isolation and in vitro expansion of hepatic Sca-1 progenitor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, Elizabeth

    2009-04-17

    The intra-hepatic population of liver progenitor cells expands during liver injury when hepatocyte proliferation is inhibited. These cells can be purified by density gradient centrifugation and cultured. Separated by size only this population contains small cells of hematopoietic, epithelial and endothelial lineages and is thought to contain liver stem cells. The identity of liver stem cells remains unknown although there is some evidence that tissue Sca1{sup +} CD45{sup -} cells display progenitor cell characteristics. We identified both intra-hepatic and gall bladder Sca1{sup +} cells following liver injury and expanded ex vivo Sca1 cells as part of heterogenous cell culture or as a purified population. We found significant difference between the proliferation of Sca-1 cells when plated on laminin or collagen I while proliferation of heterogenous population was not affected by the extracellular matrix indicating the necessity for culture of Sca1{sup +} cells with laminin matrix or laminin producing cells in long term liver progenitor cell cultures.

  10. Human embryonic hemopoiesis. Kinetics of progenitors and precursors underlying the yolk sac----liver transition.

    PubMed Central

    Migliaccio, G; Migliaccio, A R; Petti, S; Mavilio, F; Russo, G; Lazzaro, D; Testa, U; Marinucci, M; Peschle, C

    1986-01-01

    Human embryonic development involves transition from yolk sac (YS) to liver (L) hemopoiesis. We report the identification of pluripotent, erythroid, and granulo-macrophage progenitors in YS, L, and blood from human embryos. Furthermore, comprehensive studies are presented on the number of hemopoietic progenitors and precursors, as well as of other cell types, in YS, L, and blood at precisely sequential stages in embryos and early fetuses (i.e., at 4.5-8 wk and 9-10 wk postconception, respectively). Our results provide circumstantial support to a monoclonal hypothesis for human embryonic hemopoiesis, based on migration of stem and early progenitor cells from a generation site (YS) to a colonization site (L) via circulating blood. The YS----L transition is associated with development of the differentiation program in proliferating stem cells: their erythroid progeny shows, therefore, parallel switches of multiple parameters, e.g., morphology (megaloblasts----macrocytes) and globin expression (zeta----alpha, epsilon----gamma). Images PMID:3722384

  11. Gastrointestinal stem cells. III. Emergent themes of liver stem cell biology: niche, quiescence, self-renewal, and plasticity.

    PubMed

    Theise, Neil D

    2006-02-01

    This essay will address areas of liver stem/progenitor cell studies in which consensus has emerged and in which controversy still prevails over consensus, but it will also highlight important themes that inevitably should be a focus of liver stem/progenitor cell investigations in coming years. Thus concepts regarding cell plasticity, the existence of a physiological/anatomic stem cell niche, and whether intrahepatic liver stem/progenitor cells comprise true stem cells or progenitor cells (or both) will be approached in some detail.

  12. Isolation and characterization of portal branch ligation-stimulated Hmga2-positive bipotent hepatic progenitor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Hiroshi; Tagawa, Yoh-ichi; Tamai, Miho; Motoyama, Hiroaki; Ogawa, Shinichiro; Soeda, Junpei; Nakata, Takenari; Miyagawa, Shinichi

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} Hepatic progenitor cells were isolated from the portal branch-ligated liver of mice. {yields} Portal branch ligation-stimulated hepatic progenitor cells (PBLHCs) express Hmga2. {yields} PBLHCs have bidirectional differentiation capability in vitro. -- Abstract: Hepatic stem/progenitor cells are one of several cell sources that show promise for restoration of liver mass and function. Although hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs), including oval cells, are induced by administration of certain hepatotoxins in experimental animals, such a strategy would be inappropriate in a clinical setting. Here, we investigated the possibility of isolating HPCs in a portal branch-ligated liver model without administration of any chemical agents. A non-parenchymal cell fraction was prepared from the portal branch-ligated or non-ligated lobe, and seeded onto plates coated with laminin. Most of the cells died, but a small number were able to proliferate. These proliferating cells were cloned as portal branch ligation-stimulated hepatic cells (PBLHCs) by the limiting dilution method. The PBLHCs expressed cytokeratin19, albumin, and Hmga2. The PBLHCs exhibited metabolic functions such as detoxification of ammonium ions and synthesis of urea on Matrigel-coated plates in the presence of oncostatin M. In Matrigel mixed with type I collagen, the PBLHCs became rearranged into cystic and tubular structures. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated the presence of Hmga2-positive cells around the interlobular bile ducts in the portal branch-ligated liver lobes. In conclusion, successful isolation of bipotent hepatic progenitor cell clones, PBLHCs, from the portal branch-ligated liver lobes of mice provides the possibility of future clinical application of portal vein ligation to induce hepatic progenitor cells.

  13. Human progenitor cells for bone engineering applications.

    PubMed

    de Peppo, G M; Thomsen, P; Karlsson, C; Strehl, R; Lindahl, A; Hyllner, J

    2013-06-01

    In this report, the authors review the human skeleton and the increasing burden of bone deficiencies, the limitations encountered with the current treatments and the opportunities provided by the emerging field of cell-based bone engineering. Special emphasis is placed on different sources of human progenitor cells, as well as their pros and cons in relation to their utilization for the large-scale construction of functional bone-engineered substitutes for clinical applications. It is concluded that, human pluripotent stem cells represent a valuable source for the derivation of progenitor cells, which combine the advantages of both embryonic and adult stem cells, and indeed display high potential for the construction of functional substitutes for bone replacement therapies.

  14. Liver stem cells and possible clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Carloni, Guido; Ponzetto, Antonio; Marchese, Rodolfo; Brunetti, Ercole; Crema, Annalisa

    2010-12-01

    The discovery of several sources of hepatic progenitors in extra-hepatic organs and tissues, both in animal models and in humans, supports opportunities to isolate, grow and expand them in vitro. Microenvironment factors involved in regulating proliferation and commitment of liver cell precursors have been identified and better characterization of liver stem cell pathobiology would greatly improve the understanding of liver differentiation/ regeneration processes, especially those leading to hepatocarcinogenesis. The goal of these researches has been to discover the most available, suitable and easy-to-use pluripotent stem cells (PSC) sources for cell-based therapies in genetic and acquired liver diseases, therapies which to date have required liver transplantation. This report reviews the efforts, so far, to either investigate the presence of PSC in hepatic and extra-hepatic districts or evaluate their capacity to differentiate in vitro and to restore in vivo liver function.

  15. Perivascular mesenchymal progenitors in human fetal and adult liver.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Jörg C; Over, Patrick; Turner, Morris E; Thompson, Robert L; Foka, Hubert G; Chen, William C W; Péault, Bruno; Gridelli, Bruno; Schmelzer, Eva

    2012-12-10

    The presence of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been described in various organs. Pericytes possess a multilineage differentiation potential and have been suggested to be one of the developmental sources for MSCs. In human liver, pericytes have not been defined. Here, we describe the identification, purification, and characterization of pericytes in human adult and fetal liver. Flow cytometry sorting revealed that human adult and fetal liver contains 0.56%±0.81% and 0.45%±0.39% of CD146(+)CD45(-)CD56(-)CD34(-) pericytes, respectively. Of these, 41% (adult) and 30% (fetal) were alkaline phosphatase-positive (ALP(+)). In situ, pericytes were localized around periportal blood vessels and were positive for NG2 and vimentin. Purified pericytes could be cultured extensively and had low population doubling times. Immunofluorescence of cultures demonstrated that cells were positive for pericyte and mesenchymal cell markers CD146, NG2, CD90, CD140b, and vimentin, and negative for endothelial, hematopoietic, stellate, muscle, or liver epithelial cell markers von Willebrand factor, CD31, CD34, CD45, CD144, CD326, CK19, albumin, α-fetoprotein, CYP3A7, glial fibrillary acid protein, MYF5, and Pax7 by gene expression; myogenin and alpha-smooth muscle actin expression were variable. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis of cultures confirmed surface expression of CD146, CD73, CD90, CD10, CD13, CD44, CD105, and ALP and absence of human leukocyte antigen-DR. In vitro differentiation assays demonstrated that cells possessed robust osteogenic and myogenic, but low adipogenic and low chondrogenic differentiation potentials. In functional in vitro assays, cells had typical mesenchymal strong migratory and invasive activity. In conclusion, human adult and fetal livers harbor pericytes that are similar to those found in other organs and are distinct from hepatic stellate cells.

  16. Importance of a three-stage cooling regime and induced ice nucleation during cryopreservation on colony-forming potential and differentiation in mesenchymal stem progenitor cells from human fetal liver.

    PubMed

    Skorobogatova, Nataliya G; Novikov, Aalexander N; Fuller, Barry J; Petrenko, Aalexander Y

    2010-01-01

    Colony-forming activity, as well as osteogenic and adipogenic capacities of primary human fetal liver (HFL) mesenchymal stem or progenitor cells (MSCs) were compared before and after cryopreservation using a standard three-step cooling protocol (Cryo3-S) or the same protocol with induced ice nucleation (Cryo3-IIN) and 5% and 10% w/v dimethyl sulphoxide (Me₂SO). Cell viability, using the Cryo3-S protocol with 5 % and 10 % Me₂SO, was about 60 to 70 % as assessed by the trypan blue staining method, but the ability to undergo growth in culture and form colonies was completely lost. Cryopreservation using Cryo3-IIN resulted in conservation of colony-forming MSCs. Colony-forming efficiency (CFE) of the cell samples cryopreserved with Cryo3-IIN and 5 % Me₂SO was on average 0.4 +/- 0.1 colonies per 10⁵ cells, whereas with 10% Me₂SO 1.6 +/- 0.7 colonies were obtained. HFL MSCs recovered after cryopreservation in the both groups demonstrated capacity to be expanded and induced into either osteogenic or adipogenic differentiation.

  17. Liver cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sell, Stewart; Leffert, Hyam L

    2008-06-10

    In an effort to review the evidence that liver cancer stem cells exist, two fundamental questions must be addressed. First, do hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) arise from liver stem cells? Second, do HCCs contain cells that possess properties of cancer stem cells? For many years the finding of preneoplastic nodules in the liver during experimental induction of HCCs by chemicals was interpreted to support the hypothesis that HCC arose by dedifferentiation of mature liver cells. More recently, recognition of the role of small oval cells in the carcinogenic process led to a new hypothesis that HCC arises by maturation arrest of liver stem cells. Analysis of the cells in HCC supports the presence of cells with stem-cell properties (ie, immortality, transplantability, and resistance to therapy). However, definitive markers for these putative cancer stem cells have not yet been found and a liver cancer stem cell has not been isolated.

  18. Progenitor endothelial cell involvement in Alzheimer's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Budinger, Thomas F.

    2003-05-01

    There is compelling evidence that endothelial cells of the brain and periphery are dysfunctional in Alzheimer's Disease. There is evidence for a fundamental defect in, or abnormal aging of, endothelial progenitor cells in atherosclerosis. The possibility that endothelial cell defects are a primary cause for Alzheimer's Disease or other dementias can be researched by molecular and cell biology studies as well as cell trafficking studies using recently demonstrated molecular imaging methods. The evidence for abnormal endothelial function and the methods to explore this hypothesis are presented.

  19. Non-dioxin-like organic toxicant PCB153 modulates sphingolipid metabolism in liver progenitor cells: its role in Cx43-formed gap junction impairment.

    PubMed

    Pierucci, F; Frati, A; Squecco, R; Lenci, E; Vicenti, C; Slavik, J; Francini, F; Machala, M; Meacci, E

    2017-02-01

    The non-dioxin-like environmental toxicant 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB153), member of a group of persistent organic pollutants wide-spread throughout the environment, reduces gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC), an event possibly associated with tumor promotion. Since very few studies have investigated the signaling effectors and mode(s) of action of PCB153, and it is known that the gap junction (GJ) protein Cx43 can be regulated by the bioactive sphingolipid (SL) sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), this in vitro study mainly addresses whether SL metabolism is affected by PCB153 in rat liver epithelial WB-F344 cells. PCB153 treatment obtained significant changes in the S1P/ceramide (Cer) ratio, known to be crucial in determining cell fate. In particular, an increase in S1P at 30 min and a decrease of the bioactive lipid at 3 h were observed, whereas Cer level increased at 1 h and 24 h. Notably, a time-dependent modulation of sphingosine kinase (SphK), the enzyme responsible for S1P synthesis, and of its regulators, ERK1/2 and protein phosphatase PP2A, supports the involvement of these signaling effectors in PCB153 toxicity. Electrophysiological analyses, furthermore, indicated that the lipophilic environmental toxicant significantly reduced GJ biophysical properties, affecting both voltage-dependent (such as those formed by Cx43 and/or Cx32) and voltage-independent channels, thereby demonstrating that PCB153 may act differently on GJs formed by distinct Cx isoforms. SphK down-regulation alone induced GJIC impairment, and, when combined with PCB153, the acute effect on GJ suppression was additive. Moreover, after enzyme-specific gene silencing, the SphK1 isoform appears to be responsible for down-regulating Cx43 expression, while being the target of PCB153 at short-term exposure. In conclusion, we provide the first evidence of novel effectors in PCB153 toxic action in rat liver stem-like cells, leading us to consider SLs as potential markers

  20. Adult Stem and Progenitor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraerts, Martine; Verfaillie, Catherine M.

    The discovery of adult stem cells in most adult tissues is the basis of a number of clinical studies that are carried out, with therapeutic use of hematopoietic stem cells as a prime example. Intense scientific debate is still ongoing as to whether adult stem cells may have a greater plasticity than previously thought. Although cells with some features of embryonic stem cells that, among others, express Oct4, Nanog and SSEA1 are isolated from fresh tissue, it is not clear if the greater differentiation potential is acquired during cell culture. Moreover, adult more pluripotent cells do not have all pluripotent characteristics typical for embryonic stem cells. Recently, some elegant studies were published in which adult cells could be completely reprogrammed to embryonic stem cell-like cells by overexpression of some key transcription factors for pluripotency (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc). It will be interesting for the future to investigate the exact mechanisms underlying this reprogramming and whether similar transcription factor pathways are present and/or can be activated in adult more pluripotent stem cells.

  1. ENDOTHELIAL PROGENITOR CELLS: FROM SENESCENCE TO REJUVENATION

    PubMed Central

    Goligorsky, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    Discovered more than 15 years ago, endothelial progenitor cells attract both basic and translational researchers. It has become clear that they represent a heterogeneous population of endothelial colony forming cells, early or late outgrowth endothelial cells, or blood outgrowth endothelial cells, each characterized by differing proliferative and regenerative capacity. Scattered within the vascular wall, these cells participate in angiogenesis and vasculogenesis and support regeneration of epithelial cells. There is growing evidence that this cell population is impaired during the course of chronic cardiovascular and kidney disease when it undergoes premature senescence and loss of specialized functions. Senescence-associated secretory products released by such cells can affect the neighboring cells and further exacerbate their regenerative capacity. For those reasons adoptive transfer of endothelial progenitor cells is being used in more than 150 on-going clinical trials in diverse cardiovascular diseases. There is emergence of attempts to rejuvenate this cell population either ex vivo or in situ. The progress in this field is paramount to regenerate the injured kidney. PMID:25217265

  2. Endothelial progenitor cells: from senescence to rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Goligorsky, Michael S

    2014-07-01

    Discovered more than 15 years ago, endothelial progenitor cells attract both basic and translational researchers. It has become clear that they represent a heterogeneous population of endothelial colony-forming cells, early or late outgrowth endothelial cells, or blood outgrowth endothelial cells, each characterized by differing proliferative and regenerative capacity. Scattered within the vascular wall, these cells participate in angiogenesis and vasculogenesis and support regeneration of epithelial cells. There is growing evidence that this cell population is impaired during the course of chronic cardiovascular and kidney disease when it undergoes premature senescence and loss of specialized functions. Senescence-associated secretory products released by such cells can affect the neighboring cells and further exacerbate their regenerative capacity. For these reasons, adoptive transfer of endothelial progenitor cells is being used in more than 150 ongoing clinical trials of diverse cardiovascular diseases. Attempts to rejuvenate this cell population either ex vivo or in situ are emerging. The progress in this field is paramount to regenerate the injured kidney. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Progenitor Cell Dysfunctions Underlie Some Diabetic Complications

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Melanie; Wong, Victor W.; Rennert, Robert C.; Davis, Christopher R.; Longaker, Michael T.; Gurtner, Geoffrey C.

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells and progenitor cells are integral to tissue homeostasis and repair. They contribute to health through their ability to self-renew and commit to specialized effector cells. Recently, defects in a variety of progenitor cell populations have been described in both preclinical and human diabetes. These deficits affect multiple aspects of stem cell biology, including quiescence, renewal, and differentiation, as well as homing, cytokine production, and neovascularization, through mechanisms that are still unclear. More important, stem cell aberrations resulting from diabetes have direct implications on tissue function and seem to persist even after return to normoglycemia. Understanding how diabetes alters stem cell signaling and homeostasis is critical for understanding the complex pathophysiology of many diabetic complications. Moreover, the success of cell-based therapies will depend on a more comprehensive understanding of these deficiencies. This review has three goals: to analyze stem cell pathways dysregulated during diabetes, to highlight the effects of hyperglycemic memory on stem cells, and to define ways of using stem cell therapy to overcome diabetic complications. PMID:26079815

  4. Stem/Progenitor cells in vascular regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Xu, Qingbo

    2014-06-01

    A series of studies has been presented in the search for proof of circulating and resident vascular progenitor cells, which can differentiate into endothelial and smooth muscle cells and pericytes in animal and human studies. In terms of pluripotent stem cells, including embryonic stem cells, iPS, and partial-iPS cells, they display a great potential for vascular lineage differentiation. Development of stem cell therapy for treatment of vascular and ischemic diseases remains a major challenging research field. At the present, there is a clear expansion of research into mechanisms of stem cell differentiation into vascular lineages that are tested in animal models. Although there are several clinical trials ongoing that primarily focus on determining the benefits of stem cell transplantation in ischemic heart or peripheral ischemic tissues, intensive investigation for translational aspects of stem cell therapy would be needed. It is a hope that stem cell therapy for vascular diseases could be developed for clinic application in the future.

  5. Endothelial progenitor cell biology in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Verma, Inderjeet; Syngle, Ashit; Krishan, Pawan

    2015-03-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are unique populations which have reparative potential in overcoming endothelial damage and reducing cardiovascular risk. Patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) have increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate the endothelial progenitor cell population in AS patients and its potential relationships with disease variables. Endothelial progenitor cells were measured in peripheral blood samples from 20 AS and 20 healthy controls by flow cytometry on the basis of CD34 and CD133 expression. Disease activity was evaluated by using Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI). Functional ability was monitored by using Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI). EPCs were depleted in AS patients as compared to healthy controls (CD34(+) /CD133(+) : 0.027 ± 0.010% vs. 0.044 ± 0.011%, P < 0.001). EPC depletions were significantly associated with disease duration (r = -0.52, P = 0.01), BASDAI (r = -0.45, P = 0.04) and C-reactive protein (r = -0.5, P = 0.01). This is the first study to demonstrate endothelial progenitor cell depletion in AS patients. EPC depletions inversely correlate with disease duration, disease activity and inflammation, suggesting the pivotal role of inflammation in depletion of EPCs. EPC would possibly also serve as a therapeutic target for preventing cardiovascular disease in AS. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. Origin of hemopoietic stromal progenitor cells in chimeras

    SciTech Connect

    Chertkov, J.L.; Drize, N.J.; Gurevitch, O.A.; Samoylova, R.S.

    1985-12-01

    Intravenously injected bone marrow cells do not participate in the regeneration of hemopoietic stromal progenitors in irradiated mice, nor in the curetted parts of the recipient's marrow. The hemopoietic stromal progenitors in allogeneic chimeras are of recipient origin. The adherent cell layer (ACL) of long-term cultures of allogeneic chimera bone marrow contains only recipient hemopoietic stromal progenitors. However, in ectopic hemopoietic foci produced by marrow implantation under the renal capsule and repopulated by the recipient hemopoietic cells after irradiation and reconstitution by syngeneic hemopoietic cells, the stromal progenitors were of implant donor origin, as were stromal progenitors of the ACL in long-term cultures of hemopoietic cells from ectopic foci. Our results confirm that the stromal and hemopoietic progenitors differ in origin and that hemopoietic stromal progenitors are not transplantable by the intravenous route in mice.

  7. Adrenomedullary progenitor cells: Isolation and characterization of a multi-potent progenitor cell population.

    PubMed

    Vukicevic, Vladimir; Rubin de Celis, Maria Fernandez; Pellegata, Natalia S; Bornstein, Stefan R; Androutsellis-Theotokis, Andreas; Ehrhart-Bornstein, Monika

    2015-06-15

    The adrenal is a highly plastic organ with the ability to adjust to physiological needs by adapting hormone production but also by generating and regenerating both adrenocortical and adrenomedullary tissue. It is now apparent that many adult tissues maintain stem and progenitor cells that contribute to their maintenance and adaptation. Research from the last years has proven the existence of stem and progenitor cells also in the adult adrenal medulla throughout life. These cells maintain some neural crest properties and have the potential to differentiate to the endocrine and neural lineages. In this article, we discuss the evidence for the existence of adrenomedullary multi potent progenitor cells, their isolation and characterization, their differentiation potential as well as their clinical potential in transplantation therapies but also in pathophysiology.

  8. Prethymic CD34+ progenitors capable of developing into T cells are not committed to the T cell lineage.

    PubMed

    Blom, B; Res, P; Noteboom, E; Weijer, K; Spits, H

    1997-04-15

    Progenitor cells that seed the fetal thymus are derived from the fetal liver and the bone marrow. These cells migrate through the fetal blood to the thymus. In this work, we address which peripheral progenitor cells have the potential to become T cells and whether these progenitor cells are already committed to the T cell lineage. All CD34+CD38- precursor cells, regardless of their origin, are able to develop into T cells in a hybrid human/mouse fetal thymic organ culture. Previously, we found that the more differentiated CD34+CD38+ progenitor cells from fetal liver cannot develop into T cells. In this work, we show that CD34+CD38+ cells from fetal bone marrow and cord blood are capable of T cell development. In spite of the T cell-developing potential, we did not detect rearrangements of TCR-delta or TCR-beta loci in any of the CD34+ peripheral precursors. CD34+ fetal bone marrow cell subpopulations express pre-TCR-alpha. However, we could not detect expression of pT alpha or of recombination-activating gene 1 in CD34+ cord blood cells. Since cord blood CD34+ cells should contain the direct progenitors of the CD34+ thymocytes, our data do not support the notion that in humans commitment to the T cell lineage occurs before the cells migrate into the thymus.

  9. Transfusion Support for ABO-Incompatible Progenitor Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kopko, Patricia M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary ABO-incompatible transplants comprise up to 50% of allogeneic progenitor cell transplants. Major, minor and bidirectional ABO-incompatible transplants each have unique complications that can occur, including hemolysis at the time of progenitor cell infusion, hemolysis during donor engraftment, passenger lymphocyte syndrome, delayed red blood cell engraftment, and pure red cell aplasia. Appropriate transfusion support during the different phases of the allogeneic progenitor cell transplant process is an important part of ABO-incompatible transplantation. PMID:27022318

  10. Nutritional regulation of stem and progenitor cells in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Jiwon; Gururaja-Rao, Shubha; Banerjee, Utpal

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells and their progenitors are maintained within a microenvironment, termed the niche, through local cell-cell communication. Systemic signals originating outside the niche also affect stem cell and progenitor behavior. This review summarizes studies that pertain to nutritional effects on stem and progenitor cell maintenance and proliferation in Drosophila. Multiple tissue types are discussed that utilize the insulin-related signaling pathway to convey nutritional information either directly to these progenitors or via other cell types within the niche. The concept of systemic control of these cell types is not limited to Drosophila and may be functional in vertebrate systems, including mammals. PMID:24255094

  11. Liver natural killer and natural killer T cells: immunobiology and emerging roles in liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Bin; Radaeva, Svetlana; Park, Ogyi

    2009-01-01

    Hepatic lymphocytes are enriched in NK and NKT cells that play important roles in antiviral and antitumor defenses and in the pathogenesis of chronic liver disease. In this review, we discuss the differential distribution of NK and NKT cells in mouse, rat, and human livers, the ultrastructural similarities and differences between liver NK and NKT cells, and the regulation of liver NK and NKT cells in a variety of murine liver injury models. We also summarize recent findings about the role of NK and NKT cells in liver injury, fibrosis, and repair. In general, NK and NKT cells accelerate liver injury by producing proinflammatory cytokines and killing hepatocytes. NK cells inhibit liver fibrosis via killing early-activated and senescent-activated stellate cells and producing IFN-γ. In regulating liver fibrosis, NKT cells appear to be less important than NK cells as a result of hepatic NKT cell tolerance. NK cells inhibit liver regeneration by producing IFN-γ and killing hepatocytes; however, the role of NK cells on the proliferation of liver progenitor cells and the role of NKT cells in liver regeneration have been controversial. The emerging roles of NK/NKT cells in chronic human liver disease will also be discussed. Understanding the role of NK and NKT cells in the pathogenesis of chronic liver disease may help us design better therapies to treat patients with this disease. PMID:19542050

  12. Hepatic progenitor cells in canine and feline medicine: potential for regenerative strategies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    New curative therapies for severe liver disease are urgently needed in both the human and veterinary clinic. It is important to find new treatment modalities which aim to compensate for the loss of parenchymal tissue and to repopulate the liver with healthy hepatocytes. A prime focus in regenerative medicine of the liver is the use of adult liver stem cells, or hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs), for functional recovery of liver disease. This review describes recent developments in HPC research in dog and cat and compares these findings to experimental rodent studies and human pathology. Specifically, the role of HPCs in liver regeneration, key components of the HPC niche, and HPC activation in specific types of canine and feline liver disease will be reviewed. Finally, the potential applications of HPCs in regenerative medicine of the liver are discussed and a potential role is suggested for dogs as first target species for HPC-based trials. PMID:24946932

  13. Embryonic Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells Reside in Muscle before Bone Marrow Hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuka; Inoue-Yokoo, Tomoko; Kulkeaw, Kasem; Yanagi-Mizuochi, Chiyo; Shirasawa, Senji; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Sugiyama, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    In mice, hematopoietic cells home to bone marrow from fetal liver prenatally. To elucidate mechanisms underlying homing, we performed immunohistochemistry with the hematopoietic cell marker c-Kit, and observed c-Kit(+) cells localized inside muscle surrounding bone after 14.5 days post coitum. Flow cytometric analysis showed that CD45(+) c-Kit(+) hematopoietic cells were more abundant in muscle than in bone marrow between 14.5 and 17.5 days post coitum, peaking at 16.5 days post coitum. CD45(+) c-Kit(+) cells in muscle at 16.5 days post coitum exhibited higher expression of Gata2, among several hematopoietic genes, than did fetal liver or bone marrow cells. Colony formation assays revealed that muscle hematopoietic cells possess hematopoietic progenitor activity. Furthermore, exo utero transplantation revealed that fetal liver hematopoietic progenitor cells home to muscle and then to BM. Our findings demonstrate that hematopoietic progenitor cell homing occurs earlier than previously reported and that hematopoietic progenitor cells reside in muscle tissue before bone marrow hematopoiesis occurs during mouse embryogenesis.

  14. CD133+ Renal Progenitor Cells Contribute to Tumor Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Stefania; Bussolati, Benedetta; Grange, Cristina; Collino, Federica; Efrem Graziano, Manuela; Ferrando, Ugo; Camussi, Giovanni

    2006-01-01

    In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that resident progenitor cells may contribute to tumor vascularization and growth. CD133+ cells were isolated from 30 human renal carcinomas and characterized as renal resident progenitor cells on the basis of the expression of renal embryonic and mesenchymal stem cell markers. CD133+ progenitors differentiated into endothelial and epithelial cells as the normal CD133+ counterpart present in renal tissue. In the presence of tumor-derived growth factors, these cells were committed to differentiate into endothelial cells able to form vessels in vivo in SCID mice. Undifferentiated CD133+ progenitors were unable to form tumors when transplanted alone in SCID mice. When co-transplanted with renal carcinoma cells, CD133+ progenitors significantly enhanced tumor development and growth. This effect was not attributable to the tumorigenic nature of CD133+ progenitor cells because the same results were obtained with CD133+ cells from normal kidney. CD133+ progenitors contributed to tumor vascularization as the majority of neoformed vessels present within the transplanted tumors were of human origin and derived from the co-transplanted CD133+ progenitors. In conclusion, these results indicate the presence of a renal progenitor cell population in renal carcinomas that may differentiate in endothelial cells and favor vascularization and tumor growth. PMID:17148683

  15. Proliferation of mouse liver stem/progenitor cells induced by plasma from patients with acute liver failure is modulated by P2Y2 receptor-mediated JNK activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Takikawa, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Asako; Kakisaka, Keisuke; Oikawa, Kanta; Oigawa, Kanta; Miyamoto, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Kazuyuki

    2014-12-01

    We recently reported that acute liver failure plasma (ALF-P) promotes the proliferation of mouse liver oval cells (OCs) through c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism by which ALF-P induces JNK activation and OC proliferation. OCs and primary hepatocytes were exposed to ALF-P or normal control plasma (NC-P). Cell proliferation and activation of JNK and other JNK signaling molecules were detected subsequently. Next, we determined the effects of extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and ATP receptors on ALF-P-stimulated cell growth. Finally, the relationship between the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and ATP receptor pathways was investigated. Cell proliferation accompanied by JNK activation was only observed in ALF-P-stimulated OCs. ALF-P stimulated the activation of SEK1/MKK4 and ATF2, but not c-Jun. Both PPADS (pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonic acid) treatment and P2Y2 (G-protein-coupled) small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection blocked the effects of ALF-P on cell proliferation and JNK activation. However, ATP levels in ALF-P were significantly lower than that in NC-P, and ATP did not stimulate the proliferation of OCs. On the other hand, TNFα stimulated JNK activation and proliferation of OCs. TNFα receptor antagonist partly inhibited the ALF-P-stimulated proliferation of OCs. Moreover, PPADS significantly inhibited TNFα-stimulated cell proliferation, induced apoptosis, and inhibited the activation of JNK. However, our data showed no significant difference in plasma TNFα levels between the NC-P and ALF-P samples. JNK activation induced by P2Y2 receptor crosstalk with the TNFα signaling pathway is important in mediating the effects of ALF-P on the proliferation and survival of OCs.

  16. Progenitor Cells in Proximal Airway Epithelial Development and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Thomas J.; Engelhardt, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple distinct epithelial domains are found throughout the airway that are distinguishable by location, structure, function, and cell-type composition. Several progenitor cell populations in the proximal airway have been identified to reside in confined microenvironmental niches including the submucosal glands (SMGs), which are embedded in the tracheal connective tissue between the surface epithelium and cartilage, and basal cells that reside within the surface airway epithelium (SAE). Current research suggests that regulatory pathways that coordinate development of the proximal airway and establishment of progenitor cell niches may overlap with pathways that control progenitor cell responses during airway regeneration following injury. SMGs have been shown to harbor epithelial progenitor cells, and this niche is dysregulated in diseases such as cystic fibrosis. However, mechanisms that regulate progenitor cell proliferation and maintenance within this glandular niche are not completely understood. Here we discuss glandular progenitor cells during development and regeneration of the proximal airway and compare properties of glandular progenitors to those of basal cell progenitors in the SAE. Further investigation into glandular progenitor cell control will provide a direction for interrogating therapeutic interventions to correct aberrant conditions affecting the SMGs in diseases such as cystic fibrosis, chronic bronchitis, and asthma. PMID:24818588

  17. Developmental origin of postnatal cardiomyogenic progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan-Hung; Lai, Ling-Ping; Huang, Shih-Yun; Lin, Yi-Shuan; Wu, Shinn-Chih; Chou, Chih-Jen; Lin, Jiunn-Lee

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To trace the cell origin of the cells involved in postnatal cardiomyogenesis. Materials & methods: Nkx2.5 enhancer-eGFP (Nkx2.5 enh-eGFP) mice were used to test the cardiomyogenic potential of Nkx2.5 enhancer-expressing cells. By analyzing Cre excision of activated Nkx2.5-eGFP+ cells from different lineage-Cre/Nkx2.5 enh-eGFP/ROSA26 reporter mice, we traced the developmental origin of Nkx2.5 enhancer-expressing cells. Results: Nkx2.5 enhancer-expressing cells could differentiate into striated cardiomyocytes both in vitro and in vivo. Nkx2.5-eGFP+ cells increased remarkably after experimental myocardial infarction (MI). The post-MI Nkx2.5-eGFP+ cells originated from the embryonic epicardial cells, not from the pre-existing cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, cardiac neural crest cells or perinatal/postnatal epicardial cells. Conclusion: Postnatal Nkx2.5 enhancer-expressing cells are cardiomyogenic progenitor cells and originate from embryonic epicardium-derived cells. PMID:28031967

  18. ANGPTL8 reverses established adriamycin cardiomyopathy by stimulating adult cardiac progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuyuan; Chen, Jiaxi; Meng, Xing-Li; Shen, Jin-Song; Huang, Jing; Huang, Pintong; Pu, Zhaoxia; McNeill, Nathan H.; Grayburn, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Established adriamycin cardiomyopathy is a lethal disease. When congestive heart failure develops, mortality is approximately 50% in a year. It has been known that ANGPTLs has various functions in lipid metabolism, inflammation, cancer cell invasion, hematopoietic stem activity and diabetes. We hypothesized that ANGPTL8 is capable of maintaining heart function by stimulating adult cardiac progenitor cells to initiate myocardial regeneration. We employed UTMD to deliver piggybac transposon plasmids with the human ANGPTL8 gene to the liver of rats with adriamycin cardiomyopathy. After ANGPTL8 gene liver delivery, overexpression of transgenic human ANGPTL8 was found in rat liver cells and blood. UTMD- ANGPTL8 gene therapy restored LV mass, fractional shortening index, and LV posterior wall diameter to nearly normal. Our results also showed that ANGPTL8 reversed established ADM cardiomyopathy. This was associated with activation of ISL-1 positive cardiac progenitor cells in the epicardium. A time-course experiment shown that ISL-1 cardiac progenitor cells proliferated and formed a niche in the epicardial layer and then migrated into sub-epicardium. The observed myocardial regeneration accompanying reversal of adriamycin cardiomyopathy was associated with upregulation of PirB expression on the cell membrane of cardiac muscle cells or progenitor cells stimulated by ANGPTL8. PMID:27823982

  19. PET imaging of adoptive progenitor cell therapies.

    SciTech Connect

    Gelovani, Juri G.

    2008-05-13

    Objectives. The overall objective of this application is to develop novel technologies for non-invasive imaging of adoptive stem cell-based therapies with positron emission tomography (PET) that would be applicable to human patients. To achieve this objective, stem cells will be genetically labeled with a PET-reporter gene and repetitively imaged to assess their distribution, migration, differentiation, and persistence using a radiolabeled reporter probe. This new imaging technology will be tested in adoptive progenitor cell-based therapy models in animals, including: delivery pro-apoptotic genes to tumors, and T-cell reconstitution for immunostimulatory therapy during allogeneic bone marrow progenitor cell transplantation. Technical and Scientific Merits. Non-invasive whole body imaging would significantly aid in the development and clinical implementation of various adoptive progenitor cell-based therapies by providing the means for non-invasive monitoring of the fate of injected progenitor cells over a long period of observation. The proposed imaging approaches could help to address several questions related to stem cell migration and homing, their long-term viability, and their subsequent differentiation. The ability to image these processes non-invasively in 3D and repetitively over a long period of time is very important and will help the development and clinical application of various strategies to control and direct stem cell migration and differentiation. Approach to accomplish the work. Stem cells will be genetically with a reporter gene which will allow for repetitive non-invasive “tracking” of the migration and localization of genetically labeled stem cells and their progeny. This is a radically new approach that is being developed for future human applications and should allow for a long term (many years) repetitive imaging of the fate of tissues that develop from the transplanted stem cells. Why the approach is appropriate. The novel approach to

  20. Redefining endothelial progenitor cells via clonal analysis and hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell principals.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Mervin C; Mead, Laura E; Prater, Daniel; Krier, Theresa R; Mroueh, Karim N; Li, Fang; Krasich, Rachel; Temm, Constance J; Prchal, Josef T; Ingram, David A

    2007-03-01

    The limited vessel-forming capacity of infused endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) into patients with cardiovascular dysfunction may be related to a misunderstanding of the biologic potential of the cells. EPCs are generally identified by cell surface antigen expression or counting in a commercially available kit that identifies "endothelial cell colony-forming units" (CFU-ECs). However, the origin, proliferative potential, and differentiation capacity of CFU-ECs is controversial. In contrast, other EPCs with blood vessel-forming ability, termed endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs), have been isolated from human peripheral blood. We compared the function of CFU-ECs and ECFCs and determined that CFU-ECs are derived from the hematopoietic system using progenitor assays, and analysis of donor cells from polycythemia vera patients harboring a Janus kinase 2 V617F mutation in hematopoietic stem cell clones. Further, CFU-ECs possess myeloid progenitor cell activity, differentiate into phagocytic macrophages, and fail to form perfused vessels in vivo. In contrast, ECFCs are clonally distinct from CFU-ECs, display robust proliferative potential, and form perfused vessels in vivo. Thus, these studies establish that CFU-ECs are not EPCs and the role of these cells in angiogenesis must be re-examined prior to further clinical trials, whereas ECFCs may serve as a potential therapy for vascular regeneration.

  1. L1 Retrotransposition in Neural Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Muotri, Alysson R

    2016-01-01

    Long interspersed nucleotide element 1 (LINE-1 or L1) is a family of non-LTR retrotransposons that can replicate and reintegrate into the host genome. L1s have considerably influenced mammalian genome evolution by retrotransposing during germ cell development or early embryogenesis, leading to massive genome expansion. For many years, L1 retrotransposons were viewed as a selfish DNA parasite that had no contribution in somatic cells. Historically, L1s were thought to only retrotranspose during gametogenesis and in neoplastic processes, but recent studies have shown that L1s are extremely active in the mouse, rat, and human neuronal progenitor cells (NPCs). These de novo L1 insertions can impact neuronal transcriptional expression, creating unique transcriptomes of individual neurons, possibly contributing to the uniqueness of the individual cognition and mental disorders in humans.

  2. Defining human dendritic cell progenitors by multiparametric flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Breton, Gaëlle; Lee, Jaeyop; Liu, Kang; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2015-01-01

    Human dendritic cells (DCs) develop from progressively restricted bone marrow (BM) progenitors: these progenitor cells include granulocyte, monocyte and DC progenitor (GMDP) cells; monocyte and DC progenitor (MDP) cells; and common DC progenitor (CDP) and DC precursor (pre-DC) cells. These four DC progenitors can be defined on the basis of the expression of surface markers such as CD34 and hematopoietin receptors. In this protocol, we describe five multiparametric flow cytometry panels that can be used as a tool (i) to simultaneously detect or phenotype the four DC progenitors, (ii) to isolate DC progenitors to enable in vitro differentiation or (iii) to assess the in vitro differentiation and proliferation of DC progenitors. The entire procedure from isolation of cells to flow cytometry can be completed in 3–7 h. This protocol provides optimized antibody panels, as well as gating strategies, for immunostaining of BM and cord blood specimens to study human DC hematopoiesis in health, disease and vaccine settings. PMID:26292072

  3. Murine Mueller cells are progenitor cells for neuronal cells and fibrous tissue cells

    SciTech Connect

    Florian, Christian; Langmann, Thomas; Weber, Bernhard H.F.; Morsczeck, Christian

    2008-09-19

    Mammalian Mueller cells have been reported to possess retinal progenitor cell properties and generate new neurons after injury. This study investigates murine Mueller cells under in vitro conditions for their capability of dedifferentiation into retinal progenitor cells. Mueller cells were isolated from mouse retina, and proliferating cells were expanded in serum-containing medium. For dedifferentiation, the cultured cells were transferred to serum-replacement medium (SRM) at different points in time after their isolation. Interestingly, early cell passages produced fibrous tissue in which extracellular matrix proteins and connective tissue markers were differentially expressed. In contrast, aged Mueller cell cultures formed neurospheres in SRM that are characteristic for neuronal progenitor cells. These neurospheres differentiated into neuron-like cells after cultivation on laminin/ornithine cell culture substrate. Here, we report for the first time that murine Mueller cells can be progenitors for both, fibrous tissue cells and neuronal cells, depending on the age of the cell culture.

  4. Hematopoietic stem cell and progenitor cell mechanisms in myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Wendy W.; Pluvinage, John V.; Price, Elizabeth A.; Sridhar, Kunju; Arber, Daniel A.; Greenberg, Peter L.; Schrier, Stanley L.; Park, Christopher Y.; Weissman, Irving L.

    2013-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a group of disorders characterized by variable cytopenias and ineffective hematopoiesis. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and myeloid progenitors in MDS have not been extensively characterized. We transplanted purified human HSCs from MDS samples into immunodeficient mice and show that HSCs are the disease-initiating cells in MDS. We identify a recurrent loss of granulocyte-macrophage progenitors (GMPs) in the bone marrow of low risk MDS patients that can distinguish low risk MDS from clinical mimics, thus providing a simple diagnostic tool. The loss of GMPs is likely due to increased apoptosis and increased phagocytosis, the latter due to the up-regulation of cell surface calreticulin, a prophagocytic marker. Blocking calreticulin on low risk MDS myeloid progenitors rescues them from phagocytosis in vitro. However, in the high-risk refractory anemia with excess blasts (RAEB) stages of MDS, the GMP population is increased in frequency compared with normal, and myeloid progenitors evade phagocytosis due to up-regulation of CD47, an antiphagocytic marker. Blocking CD47 leads to the selective phagocytosis of this population. We propose that MDS HSCs compete with normal HSCs in the patients by increasing their frequency at the expense of normal hematopoiesis, that the loss of MDS myeloid progenitors by programmed cell death and programmed cell removal are, in part, responsible for the cytopenias, and that up-regulation of the “don’t eat me” signal CD47 on MDS myeloid progenitors is an important transition step leading from low risk MDS to high risk MDS and, possibly, to acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:23388639

  5. Pigment Cell Progenitors in Zebrafish Remain Multipotent through Metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajeet Pratap; Dinwiddie, April; Mahalwar, Prateek; Schach, Ursula; Linker, Claudia; Irion, Uwe; Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane

    2016-08-08

    The neural crest is a transient, multipotent embryonic cell population in vertebrates giving rise to diverse cell types in adults via intermediate progenitors. The in vivo cell-fate potential and lineage segregation of these postembryonic progenitors is poorly understood, and it is unknown if and when the progenitors become fate restricted. We investigate the fate restriction in the neural crest-derived stem cells and intermediate progenitors in zebrafish, which give rise to three distinct adult pigment cell types: melanophores, iridophores, and xanthophores. By inducing clones in sox10-expressing cells, we trace and quantitatively compare the pigment cell progenitors at four stages, from embryogenesis to metamorphosis. At all stages, a large fraction of the progenitors are multipotent. These multipotent progenitors have a high proliferation ability, which diminishes with fate restriction. We suggest that multipotency of the nerve-associated progenitors lasting into metamorphosis may have facilitated the evolution of adult-specific traits in vertebrates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Hepatic progenitor cell lines from allyl alcohol-treated adult rats are derived from gamma-irradiated mouse STO cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingjun; Sell, Stewart; Leffert, Hyam L

    2003-01-01

    In attempts to recharacterize several markers of putative rat liver progenitor cells, single-stage reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyses failed to confirm the reported immunochemical detection of albumin, alpha(1)-fetoprotein, and cytochrome P450-1A2 in the clonal line, 3(8)#21, and the cloned derivative, 3(8)#21-EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein). Undetectable expression occurred whether or not both lines were cultured on or off feeder layers of gamma-irradiated mouse embryonic STO (SIM [Sandoz inbred Swiss mouse] thioguanine-resistant ouabain-resistant) cells. PCR amplification of liver progenitor cell chromosomal (rat and mouse Pigr, rat INS1, mouse INS2) and mitochondrial (rat and mouse COX1) genes revealed only mouse sequences. Further analyses of rat and mouse COX1 sequences in cells from untampered storage vials of all 11 reported liver progenitor cell lines and strains revealed only mouse sequences. In addition, uniquely similar metaphase spreads were observed in STO, 3(8)#21, and 3(8)#21-EGFP cells. The combined results suggest that the previously reported "rat" liver progenitor cell lines were most likely generated during early derivation in cell culture from gamma-radiation-resistant or ineffectively irradiated mouse STO cells used as the feeder layers. These findings reveal new types of artifacts encountered in cocultures of tissue progenitor cells and feeder layer cell lines, and they sound a cautionary note: phenotypic and genotypic properties of feeder layers should be well-characterized before and during coculture with newly derived stem cells and clonal derivatives.

  7. New therapy targeting differential androgen receptor signaling in prostate cancer stem/progenitor vs. non-stem/progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soo Ok; Ma, Zhifang; Yeh, Chiuan-Ren; Luo, Jie; Lin, Tzu-Hua; Lai, Kuo-Pao; Yamashita, Shinichi; Liang, Liang; Tian, Jing; Li, Lei; Jiang, Qi; Huang, Chiung-Kuei; Niu, Yuanjie; Yeh, Shuyuan; Chang, Chawnshang

    2013-01-01

    The androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) to systematically suppress/reduce androgens binding to the androgen receptor (AR) has been the standard therapy for prostate cancer (PCa); yet, most of ADT eventually fails leading to the recurrence of castration resistant PCa. Here, we found that the PCa patients who received ADT had increased PCa stem/progenitor cell population. The addition of the anti-androgen, Casodex®, or AR-siRNA in various PCa cells led to increased stem/progenitor cells, whereas, in contrast, the addition of functional AR led to decreased stem/progenitor cell population but increased non-stem/progenitor cell population, suggesting that AR functions differentially in PCa stem/progenitor vs. non-stem/progenitor cells. Therefore, the current ADT might result in an undesired expansion of PCa stem/progenitor cell population, which explains why this therapy fails. Using various human PCa cell lines and three different mouse models, we concluded that targeting PCa non-stem/progenitor cells with AR degradation enhancer ASC-J9® and targeting PCa stem/progenitor cells with 5-azathioprine and γ-tocotrienol resulted in a significant suppression of the tumors at the castration resistant stage. This suggests that a combinational therapy that simultaneously targets both stem/progenitor and non-stem/progenitor cells will lead to better therapeutic efficacy and may become a new therapy to battle the PCa before and after castration resistant stages. PMID:22831834

  8. Progenitor cells in arteriosclerosis: good or bad guys?

    PubMed

    Campagnolo, Paola; Wong, Mei Mei; Xu, Qingbo

    2011-08-15

    Accumulating evidence indicates that the mobilization and recruitment of circulating or tissue-resident progenitor cells that give rise to endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) can participate in atherosclerosis, neointima hyperplasia after arterial injury, and transplant arteriosclerosis. It is believed that endothelial progenitor cells do exist and can repair and rejuvenate the arteries under physiologic conditions; however, they may also contribute to lesion formation by influencing plaque stability in advanced atherosclerotic plaque under specific pathologic conditions. At the same time, smooth muscle progenitors, despite their capacity to expedite lesion formation during restenosis, may serve to promote atherosclerotic plaque stabilization by producing extracellular matrix proteins. This profound evidence provides support to the hypothesis that both endothelial and smooth muscle progenitors may act as a double-edged sword in the pathogenesis of arteriosclerosis. Therefore, the understanding of the regulatory networks that control endothelial and smooth muscle progenitor differentiation is undoubtedly fundamental both for basic research and for improving current therapeutic avenues for atherosclerosis. We update the progress in progenitor cell study related to the development of arteriosclerosis, focusing specifically on the role of progenitor cells in lesion formation and discuss the controversial issues that regard the origins, frequency, and impact of the progenitors in the disease.

  9. Integrin αvβ6 Critically Regulates Hepatic Progenitor Cell Function and Promotes Ductular Reaction, Fibrosis, and Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhen-Wei; Ikenaga, Naoki; Liu, Susan B.; Sverdlov, Deanna Y.; Vaid, Kahini A.; Dixit, Richa; Weinreb, Paul H.; Violette, Shelia; Sheppard, Dean; Schuppan, Detlef; Popov, Yury

    2017-01-01

    Integrin αvβ6 is rapidly up-regulated on cells of epithelial lineage during tissue injury, where one of its primary functions is activation of latent transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFβ1). In human liver cirrhosis, αvβ6 is overexpressed by cells comprising the ductular reaction, and its inhibition suppresses experimental biliary fibrosis in rodents. Here, we show that αvβ6 is expressed on the actively proliferating subset of hepatic progenitor cells and is required for their progenitor function in vivo and in vitro through integrin αvβ6-dependent TGFβ1 activation. Freshly isolated αvβ6+ liver cells demonstrate clonogenic potential and differentiate into cholangiocytes and functional hepatocytes in vitro, whereas colony formation by epithelial cell adhesion molecule-positive progenitor cells is blocked by αvβ6-neutralizing antibody and in integrin beta 6-deficient cells. Inhibition of progenitors by anti-αvβ6 antibody is recapitulated by TGFβ1 neutralization and rescued by addition of bioactive TGFβ1. Genetic disruption or selective targeting of αvβ6 with 3G9 antibody potently inhibits progenitor cell responses in mouse models of chronic biliary injury and protects from liver fibrosis and tumorigenesis, two conditions clinically associated with exacerbated ductular reaction. Conclusion These results suggest that αvβ6 is a promising target for chronic fibrotic liver diseases and associated cancers. PMID:26448099

  10. Vascular smooth muscle progenitor cells: building and repairing blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Majesky, Mark W; Dong, Xiu Rong; Regan, Jenna N; Hoglund, Virginia J

    2011-02-04

    Molecular pathways that control the specification, migration, and number of available smooth muscle progenitor cells play key roles in determining blood vessel size and structure, capacity for tissue repair, and progression of age-related disorders. Defects in these pathways produce malformations of developing blood vessels, depletion of smooth muscle progenitor cell pools for vessel wall maintenance and repair, and aberrant activation of alternative differentiation pathways in vascular disease. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that uniquely specify and maintain vascular smooth muscle cell precursors is essential if we are to use advances in stem and progenitor cell biology and somatic cell reprogramming for applications directed to the vessel wall.

  11. Differential Effects of Isoxazole-9 on Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells, Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells, and Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maki, Takakuni; Shindo, Akihiro; Osumi, Noriko; Zhao, Jing; Lin, Hong; Holder, Julie C.; Chuang, Tsu Tshen; McNeish, John D.; Arai, Ken; Lo, Eng H.

    2015-01-01

    Adult mammalian brain can be plastic after injury and disease. Therefore, boosting endogenous repair mechanisms would be a useful therapeutic approach for neurological disorders. Isoxazole-9 (Isx-9) has been reported to enhance neurogenesis from neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs). However, the effects of Isx-9 on other types of progenitor/precursor cells remain mostly unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of Isx-9 on the three major populations of progenitor/precursor cells in brain: NSPCs, oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs), and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). Cultured primary NSPCs, OPCs, or EPCs were treated with various concentrations of Isx-9 (6.25, 12.5, 25, 50 μM), and their cell numbers were counted in a blinded manner. Isx-9 slightly increased the number of NSPCs and effectively induced neuronal differentiation of NSPCs. However, Isx-9 significantly decreased OPC number in a concentration-dependent manner, suggesting cytotoxicity. Isx-9 did not affect EPC cell number. But in a matrigel assay of angiogenesis, Isx-9 significantly inhibited tube formation in outgrowth endothelial cells derived from EPCs. This potential anti-tube-formation effect of Isx-9 was confirmed in a brain endothelial cell line. Taken together, our data suggest that mechanisms and targets for promoting stem/progenitor cells in the central nervous system may significantly differ between cell types. PMID:26407349

  12. Pannexin 1 regulates postnatal neural stem and progenitor cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pannexin 1 forms ion and metabolite permeable hexameric channels and is abundantly expressed in the brain. After discovering pannexin 1 expression in postnatal neural stem and progenitor cells we sought to elucidate its functional role in neuronal development. Results We detected pannexin 1 in neural stem and progenitor cells in vitro and in vivo. We manipulated pannexin 1 expression and activity in Neuro2a neuroblastoma cells and primary postnatal neurosphere cultures to demonstrate that pannexin 1 regulates neural stem and progenitor cell proliferation likely through the release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Conclusions Permeable to ATP, a potent autocrine/paracine signaling metabolite, pannexin 1 channels are ideally suited to influence the behavior of neural stem and progenitor cells. Here we demonstrate they play a robust role in the regulation of neural stem and progenitor cell proliferation. Endogenous postnatal neural stem and progenitor cells are crucial for normal brain health, and their numbers decline with age. Furthermore, these special cells are highly responsive to neurological injury and disease, and are gaining attention as putative targets for brain repair. Therefore, understanding the fundamental role of pannexin 1 channels in neural stem and progenitor cells is of critical importance for brain health and disease. PMID:22458943

  13. Identification of functional progenitor cells in the pulmonary vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Firth, Amy L.; Yuan, Jason X. -J.

    2012-01-01

    The pulmonary vasculature comprises a complex network of branching arteries and veins all functioning to reoxygenate the blood for circulation around the body. The cell types of the pulmonary artery are able to respond to changes in oxygen tension in order to match ventilation to perfusion. Stem and progenitor cells in the pulmonary vasculature are also involved, be it in angiogenesis, endothelial dysfunction or formation of vascular lesions. Stem and progenitor cells may be circulating around the body, residing in the pulmonary artery wall or stimulated for release from a central niche like the bone marrow and home to the pulmonary vasculature along a chemotactic gradient. There may currently be some controversy over the pathogenic versus therapeutic roles of stem and progenitor cells and, indeed, it is likely both chains of evidence are correct due to the specific influence of the immediate environmental niche a progenitor cell may be in. Due to their great plasticity and a lack of specific markers for stem and progenitor cells, they can be difficult to precisely identify. This review discusses the methodological approaches used to validate the presence of and subtype of progenitors cells in the pulmonary vasculature while putting it in context of the current knowledge of the therapeutic and pathogenic roles for such progenitor cells. PMID:22558524

  14. Human Retinal Progenitor Cell Transplantation Preserves Vision*

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jing; Baranov, Petr; Patel, Sherrina; Ouyang, Hong; Quach, John; Wu, Frances; Qiu, Austin; Luo, Hongrong; Hicks, Caroline; Zeng, Jing; Zhu, Jing; Lu, Jessica; Sfeir, Nicole; Wen, Cindy; Zhang, Meixia; Reade, Victoria; Patel, Sara; Sinden, John; Sun, Xiaodong; Shaw, Peter; Young, Michael; Zhang, Kang

    2014-01-01

    Cell transplantation is a potential therapeutic strategy for retinal degenerative diseases involving the loss of photoreceptors. However, it faces challenges to clinical translation due to safety concerns and a limited supply of cells. Human retinal progenitor cells (hRPCs) from fetal neural retina are expandable in vitro and maintain an undifferentiated state. This study aimed to investigate the therapeutic potential of hRPCs transplanted into a Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rat model of retinal degeneration. At 12 weeks, optokinetic response showed that hRPC-grafted eyes had significantly superior visual acuity compared with vehicle-treated eyes. Histological evaluation of outer nuclear layer (ONL) characteristics such as ONL thickness, spread distance, and cell count demonstrated a significantly greater preservation of the ONL in hRPC-treated eyes compared with both vehicle-treated and control eyes. The transplanted hRPCs arrested visual decline over time in the RCS rat and rescued retinal morphology, demonstrating their potential as a therapy for retinal diseases. We suggest that the preservation of visual acuity was likely achieved through host photoreceptor rescue. We found that hRPC transplantation into the subretinal space of RCS rats was well tolerated, with no adverse effects such as tumor formation noted at 12 weeks after treatment. PMID:24407289

  15. Effect of acyclovir and interferon on human hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Parker, L M; Lipton, J M; Binder, N; Crawford, E L; Kudisch, M; Levin, M J

    1982-01-01

    Continuous in vitro exposure of human bone marrow cells to acyclovir (approximately 200 microM) or human leukocyte interferon (approximately 250 U/ml) caused 50% inhibition of granulocyte colony-forming cell differentiation. Colonies expressed in the presence of either agent were reduced both in size and number. Erythroid progenitors were more resistant than granulocyte progenitors to the antiproliferative effects of acyclovir. Progenitor cells of patients recovering from cytotoxic chemotherapy were no more sensitive to the effects of acyclovir or interferon than were cells obtained from patients before chemotherapy. PMID:6177284

  16. Endothelial progenitor cells in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Tracy, Russell P.; Parikh, Megha A.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Shimbo, Daichi; Austin, John H. M.; Smith, Benjamin M.; Hueper, Katja; Vogel-Claussen, Jens; Lima, Joao; Gomes, Antoinette; Watson, Karol; Kawut, Steven; Barr, R. Graham

    2017-01-01

    Endothelial injury is implicated in the pathogenesis of COPD and emphysema; however the role of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), a marker of endothelial cell repair, and circulating endothelial cells (CECs), a marker of endothelial cell injury, in COPD and its subphenotypes is unresolved. We hypothesized that endothelial progenitor cell populations would be decreased in COPD and emphysema and that circulating endothelial cells would be increased. Associations with other subphenotypes were examined. The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis COPD Study recruited smokers with COPD and controls age 50–79 years without clinical cardiovascular disease. Endothelial progenitor cell populations (CD34+KDR+ and CD34+KDR+CD133+ cells) and circulating endothelial cells (CD45dimCD31+CD146+CD133-) were measured by flow cytometry. COPD was defined by standard spirometric criteria. Emphysema was assessed qualitatively and quantitatively on CT. Full pulmonary function testing and expiratory CTs were measured in a subset. Among 257 participants, both endothelial progenitor cell populations, and particularly CD34+KDR+ endothelial progenitor cells, were reduced in COPD. The CD34+KDR+CD133+ endothelial progenitor cells were associated inversely with emphysema extent. Both endothelial progenitor cell populations were associated inversely with extent of panlobular emphysema and positively with diffusing capacity. Circulating endothelial cells were not significantly altered in COPD but were inversely associated with pulmonary microvascular blood flow on MRI. There was no consistent association of endothelial progenitor cells or circulating endothelial cells with measures of gas trapping. These data provide evidence that endothelial repair is impaired in COPD and suggest that this pathological process is specific to emphysema. PMID:28291826

  17. Endothelial progenitor cells in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and emphysema.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Margaret F; Tracy, Russell P; Parikh, Megha A; Hoffman, Eric A; Shimbo, Daichi; Austin, John H M; Smith, Benjamin M; Hueper, Katja; Vogel-Claussen, Jens; Lima, Joao; Gomes, Antoinette; Watson, Karol; Kawut, Steven; Barr, R Graham

    2017-01-01

    Endothelial injury is implicated in the pathogenesis of COPD and emphysema; however the role of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), a marker of endothelial cell repair, and circulating endothelial cells (CECs), a marker of endothelial cell injury, in COPD and its subphenotypes is unresolved. We hypothesized that endothelial progenitor cell populations would be decreased in COPD and emphysema and that circulating endothelial cells would be increased. Associations with other subphenotypes were examined. The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis COPD Study recruited smokers with COPD and controls age 50-79 years without clinical cardiovascular disease. Endothelial progenitor cell populations (CD34+KDR+ and CD34+KDR+CD133+ cells) and circulating endothelial cells (CD45dimCD31+CD146+CD133-) were measured by flow cytometry. COPD was defined by standard spirometric criteria. Emphysema was assessed qualitatively and quantitatively on CT. Full pulmonary function testing and expiratory CTs were measured in a subset. Among 257 participants, both endothelial progenitor cell populations, and particularly CD34+KDR+ endothelial progenitor cells, were reduced in COPD. The CD34+KDR+CD133+ endothelial progenitor cells were associated inversely with emphysema extent. Both endothelial progenitor cell populations were associated inversely with extent of panlobular emphysema and positively with diffusing capacity. Circulating endothelial cells were not significantly altered in COPD but were inversely associated with pulmonary microvascular blood flow on MRI. There was no consistent association of endothelial progenitor cells or circulating endothelial cells with measures of gas trapping. These data provide evidence that endothelial repair is impaired in COPD and suggest that this pathological process is specific to emphysema.

  18. Fas Activation Increases Neural progenitor Cell Survival

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Julia C.; Scharf, Eugene L.; Mao-Draayer, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Although there is a sizable amount of research focusing on adult neural progenitor cells (NPCs) as a therapeutic approach for many neurodegenerative diseases, including multiple sclerosis, little is known about the pathways that govern NPC survival and apoptosis. Fas, a member of the death receptor superfamily, plays a well-characterized role in the immune system, but its function in neural stem cells remains uncertain. Our study focuses on the effects of Fas on NPC survival in vitro. Activation of Fas by recombinant Fas ligand (FasL) did not induce apoptosis in murine NPCs in culture. In fact, both an increase in the amount of viable cells and a decrease in apoptotic and dying cells were observed with FasL treatment. Our data indicate that FasL-mediated adult NPC neuroprotection is characterized by a reduction in apoptosis, but not increased proliferation. Further investigation of this effect revealed that the antiapoptotic effects of FasL are mediated by the up-regulation of Birc3, an inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP). Conversely, the observed effect is not the result of altered caspase activation or FLIP (Fas-associated death domain-like interleukin-1beta-converting enzyme inhibitory protein) up-regulation, which is known to inhibit caspase-8-mediated cell death in T cells. Our data indicate that murine adult NPCs are resistant to FasL-induced cell death. Activation of Fas increased cell survival by decreasing apoptosis through Birc3 up-regulation. These results describe a novel pathway involved in NPC survival. PMID:19830835

  19. Cellular Mechanisms of Liver Regeneration and Cell-Based Therapies of Liver Diseases.

    PubMed

    Kholodenko, Irina V; Yarygin, Konstantin N

    2017-01-01

    The emerging field of regenerative medicine offers innovative methods of cell therapy and tissue/organ engineering as a novel approach to liver disease treatment. The ultimate scientific foundation of both cell therapy of liver diseases and liver tissue and organ engineering is delivered by the in-depth studies of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of liver regeneration. The cellular mechanisms of the homeostatic and injury-induced liver regeneration are unique. Restoration of the mass of liver parenchyma is achieved by compensatory hypertrophy and hyperplasia of the differentiated parenchymal cells, hepatocytes, while expansion and differentiation of the resident stem/progenitor cells play a minor or negligible role. Participation of blood-borne cells of the bone marrow origin in liver parenchyma regeneration has been proven but does not exceed 1-2% of newly formed hepatocytes. Liver regeneration is activated spontaneously after injury and can be further stimulated by cell therapy with hepatocytes, hematopoietic stem cells, or mesenchymal stem cells. Further studies aimed at improving the outcomes of cell therapy of liver diseases are underway. In case of liver failure, transplantation of engineered liver can become the best option in the foreseeable future. Engineering of a transplantable liver or its major part is an enormous challenge, but rapid progress in induced pluripotency, tissue engineering, and bioprinting research shows that it may be doable.

  20. Cellular Mechanisms of Liver Regeneration and Cell-Based Therapies of Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yarygin, Konstantin N.

    2017-01-01

    The emerging field of regenerative medicine offers innovative methods of cell therapy and tissue/organ engineering as a novel approach to liver disease treatment. The ultimate scientific foundation of both cell therapy of liver diseases and liver tissue and organ engineering is delivered by the in-depth studies of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of liver regeneration. The cellular mechanisms of the homeostatic and injury-induced liver regeneration are unique. Restoration of the mass of liver parenchyma is achieved by compensatory hypertrophy and hyperplasia of the differentiated parenchymal cells, hepatocytes, while expansion and differentiation of the resident stem/progenitor cells play a minor or negligible role. Participation of blood-borne cells of the bone marrow origin in liver parenchyma regeneration has been proven but does not exceed 1-2% of newly formed hepatocytes. Liver regeneration is activated spontaneously after injury and can be further stimulated by cell therapy with hepatocytes, hematopoietic stem cells, or mesenchymal stem cells. Further studies aimed at improving the outcomes of cell therapy of liver diseases are underway. In case of liver failure, transplantation of engineered liver can become the best option in the foreseeable future. Engineering of a transplantable liver or its major part is an enormous challenge, but rapid progress in induced pluripotency, tissue engineering, and bioprinting research shows that it may be doable. PMID:28210629

  1. Biology and Flow Cytometry of Proangiogenic Hematopoietic Progenitors Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Jonathan A.; Erzurum, Serpil; Asosingh, Kewal

    2015-01-01

    During development hematopoiesis and neovascularization are closely linked to each other via a common bipotent stem cell called the hemangioblast that gives rise to both hematopoietic cells and endothelial cells. In postnatal life this functional connection between the vasculature and hematopoiesis is maintained by a subset of hematopoietic progenitor cells endowed with the capacity to differentiate into potent proangiogenic cells. These proangiogenic hematopoietic progenitors comprise a specific subset of bone marrow-derived cells that homes to sites of neovascularization and possess potent paracrine angiogenic activity. There is emerging evidence that this subpopulation of hematopoietic progenitors plays a critical role in vascular health and disease. Their angiogenic activity is distinct from putative “endothelial progenitor cells” that become structural cells of the endothelium by differentiation into endothelial cells. Proangiogenic hematopoietic progenitor cell research requires multi-disciplinary expertise in flow cytometry, hematology and vascular biology. This review provides a comprehensive overview of proangiogenic hematopoietic progenitor cell biology and flow cytometric methods to detect these cells in the peripheral blood circulation and bone marrow. PMID:25418030

  2. Harnessing endogenous stem/progenitor cells for tendon regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang H; Lee, Francis Y; Tarafder, Solaiman; Kao, Kristy; Jun, Yena; Yang, Guodong; Mao, Jeremy J

    2015-07-01

    Current stem cell-based strategies for tissue regeneration involve ex vivo manipulation of these cells to confer features of the desired progenitor population. Recently, the concept that endogenous stem/progenitor cells could be used for regenerating tissues has emerged as a promising approach that potentially overcomes the obstacles related to cell transplantation. Here we applied this strategy for the regeneration of injured tendons in a rat model. First, we identified a rare fraction of tendon cells that was positive for the known tendon stem cell marker CD146 and exhibited clonogenic capacity, as well as multilineage differentiation ability. These tendon-resident CD146+ stem/progenitor cells were selectively enriched by connective tissue growth factor delivery (CTGF delivery) in the early phase of tendon healing, followed by tenogenic differentiation in the later phase. The time-controlled proliferation and differentiation of CD146+ stem/progenitor cells by CTGF delivery successfully led to tendon regeneration with densely aligned collagen fibers, normal level of cellularity, and functional restoration. Using siRNA knockdown to evaluate factors involved in tendon generation, we demonstrated that the FAK/ERK1/2 signaling pathway regulates CTGF-induced proliferation and differentiation of CD146+ stem/progenitor cells. Together, our findings support the use of endogenous stem/progenitor cells as a strategy for tendon regeneration without cell transplantation and suggest this approach warrants exploration in other tissues.

  3. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells in periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, Daniel; Spinell, Thomas; Vrettos, Anastasios; Stoecklin-Wasmer, Christin; Celenti, Romanita; Demmer, Ryan T; Kebschull, Moritz; Papapanou, Panos N

    2014-12-01

    Several biologically plausible mechanisms have been proposed to mediate the association between periodontitis and atherosclerotic vascular disease (AVD), including adverse effects on vascular endothelial function. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (cEPCs) are known to contribute to vascular repair, but limited data are available regarding the relationship between cEPC levels and periodontitis. The aims of this cross-sectional study are to investigate the levels of hemangioblastic and monocytic cEPCs in patients with periodontitis and periodontally healthy controls and to associate cEPC levels with the extent and severity of periodontitis. A total of 112 individuals (56 patients with periodontitis and 56 periodontally healthy controls, aged 26 to 65 years; mean age: 43 years) were enrolled. All participants underwent a full-mouth periodontal examination and provided a blood sample. Hemangioblastic cEPCs were assessed using flow cytometry, and monocytic cEPCs were identified using immunohistochemistry in cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells. cEPC levels were analyzed in the entire sample, as well as in a subset of 50 pairs of patients with periodontitis/periodontally healthy controls, matched with respect to age, sex, and menstrual cycle. Levels of hemangioblastic cEPCs were approximately 2.3-fold higher in patients with periodontitis than periodontally healthy controls, after adjustments for age, sex, physical activity, systolic blood pressure, and body mass index (P = 0.001). A non-significant trend for higher levels of monocytic cEPCs in periodontitis was also observed. The levels of hemangioblastic cEPCs were positively associated with the extent of bleeding on probing, probing depth, and clinical attachment loss. Hemangioblastic and monocytic cEPC levels were not correlated (Spearman correlation coefficient 0.03, P = 0.77), suggesting that they represent independent populations of progenitor cells. These findings further support the notion that

  4. Cells and materials for liver tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan-Sheng; Harn, Horng-Jyh; Hsieh, Dean-Kuo; Wen, Tung-Chou; Subeq, Yi-Maun; Sun, Li-Yi; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Chiou, Tzyy-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Liver transplantation is currently the most efficacious treatment for end-stage liver diseases. However, one main problem with liver transplantation is the limited number of donor organs that are available. Therefore, liver tissue engineering based on cell transplantation that combines materials to mimic the liver is under investigation with the goal of restoring normal liver functions. Tissue engineering aims to mimic the interactions among cells with a scaffold. Particular materials or a matrix serve as a scaffold and provide a three-dimensional environment for cell proliferation and interaction. Moreover, the scaffold plays a role in regulating cell maturation and function via these interactions. In cultures of hepatic lineage cells, regulation of cell proliferation and specific function using biocompatible synthetic, biodegradable bioderived matrices, protein-coated materials, surface-modified nanofibers, and decellularized biomatrix has been demonstrated. Furthermore, beneficial effects of addition of growth factor cocktails to a flow bioreactor or coculture system on cell viability and function have been observed. In addition, a system for growing stem cells, liver progenitor cells, and primary hepatocytes for transplantation into animal models was developed, which produces hepatic lineage cells that are functional and that show long-term proliferation following transplantation. The major limitation of cells proliferated with matrix-based transplantation systems is the high initial cell loss and dysfunction, which may be due to the absence of blood flow and the changes in nutrients. Thus, the development of vascular-like scaffold structures, the formation of functional bile ducts, and the maintenance of complex metabolic functions remain as major problems in hepatic tissue engineering and will need to be addressed to enable further advances toward clinical applications.

  5. Harnessing endogenous stem/progenitor cells for tendon regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang H.; Lee, Francis Y.; Tarafder, Solaiman; Kao, Kristy; Jun, Yena; Yang, Guodong; Mao, Jeremy J.

    2015-01-01

    Current stem cell–based strategies for tissue regeneration involve ex vivo manipulation of these cells to confer features of the desired progenitor population. Recently, the concept that endogenous stem/progenitor cells could be used for regenerating tissues has emerged as a promising approach that potentially overcomes the obstacles related to cell transplantation. Here we applied this strategy for the regeneration of injured tendons in a rat model. First, we identified a rare fraction of tendon cells that was positive for the known tendon stem cell marker CD146 and exhibited clonogenic capacity, as well as multilineage differentiation ability. These tendon-resident CD146+ stem/progenitor cells were selectively enriched by connective tissue growth factor delivery (CTGF delivery) in the early phase of tendon healing, followed by tenogenic differentiation in the later phase. The time-controlled proliferation and differentiation of CD146+ stem/progenitor cells by CTGF delivery successfully led to tendon regeneration with densely aligned collagen fibers, normal level of cellularity, and functional restoration. Using siRNA knockdown to evaluate factors involved in tendon generation, we demonstrated that the FAK/ERK1/2 signaling pathway regulates CTGF-induced proliferation and differentiation of CD146+ stem/progenitor cells. Together, our findings support the use of endogenous stem/progenitor cells as a strategy for tendon regeneration without cell transplantation and suggest this approach warrants exploration in other tissues. PMID:26053662

  6. EpCAM and the biology of hepatic stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Dollé, Laurent; Theise, Neil D; Schmelzer, Eva; Boulter, Luke; Gires, Olivier; van Grunsven, Leo A

    2015-02-15

    Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is a transmembrane glycoprotein, which is frequently and highly expressed on carcinomas, tumor-initiating cells, selected tissue progenitors, and embryonic and adult stem cells. During liver development, EpCAM demonstrates a dynamic expression, since it can be detected in fetal liver, including cells of the parenchyma, whereas mature hepatocytes are devoid of EpCAM. Liver regeneration is associated with a population of EpCAM-positive cells within ductular reactions, which gradually lose the expression of EpCAM along with maturation into hepatocytes. EpCAM can be switched on and off through a wide panel of strategies to fine-tune EpCAM-dependent functional and differentiative traits. EpCAM-associated functions relate to cell-cell adhesion, proliferation, maintenance of a pluripotent state, regulation of differentiation, migration, and invasion. These functions can be conferred by the full-length protein and/or EpCAM-derived fragments, which are generated upon regulated intramembrane proteolysis. Control by EpCAM therefore not only depends on the presence of full-length EpCAM at cellular membranes but also on varying rates of the formation of EpCAM-derived fragments that have their own regulatory properties and on changes in the association of EpCAM with interaction partners. Thus spatiotemporal localization of EpCAM in immature liver progenitors, transit-amplifying cells, and mature liver cells will decisively impact the regulation of EpCAM functions and might be one of the triggers that contributes to the adaptive processes in stem/progenitor cell lineages. This review will summarize EpCAM-related molecular events and how they relate to hepatobiliary differentiation and regeneration.

  7. Direct transcriptional reprogramming of adult cells to embryonic nephron progenitors.

    PubMed

    Hendry, Caroline E; Vanslambrouck, Jessica M; Ineson, Jessica; Suhaimi, Norseha; Takasato, Minoru; Rae, Fiona; Little, Melissa H

    2013-09-01

    Direct reprogramming involves the enforced re-expression of key transcription factors to redefine a cellular state. The nephron progenitor population of the embryonic kidney gives rise to all cells within the nephron other than the collecting duct through a mesenchyme-to-epithelial transition, but this population is exhausted around the time of birth. Here, we sought to identify the conditions under which adult proximal tubule cells could be directly transcriptionally reprogrammed to nephron progenitors. Using a combinatorial screen for lineage-instructive transcription factors, we identified a pool of six genes (SIX1, SIX2, OSR1, EYA1, HOXA11, and SNAI2) that activated a network of genes consistent with a cap mesenchyme/nephron progenitor phenotype in the adult proximal tubule (HK2) cell line. Consistent with these reprogrammed cells being nephron progenitors, we observed differential contribution of the reprogrammed population into the Six2(+) nephron progenitor fields of an embryonic kidney explant. Dereplication of the pool suggested that SNAI2 can suppress E-CADHERIN, presumably assisting in the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) required to form nephron progenitors. However, neither TGFβ-induced EMT nor SNAI2 overexpression alone was sufficient to create this phenotype, suggesting that additional factors are required. In conclusion, these results suggest that reinitiation of kidney development from a population of adult cells by generating embryonic progenitors may be feasible, opening the way for additional cellular and bioengineering approaches to renal repair and regeneration.

  8. [Umbilical cord hematopoietic progenitor cells bank].

    PubMed

    Morales, V H; Milone, J; Etchegoyen, O; Bordone, J; Uranga, A

    2001-01-01

    Transplantation of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) from bone marrow and mobilized peripheral blood is a standard therapy in malignant and non malignant diseases. The lack of suitable donors is an important limitation. The discovery that umbilical cord blood (CB) contains high numbers of HPC that can be used as an alternative source for allogeneic stem cell transplantation led ITMO to establish BANCEL, the first Argentine and Latinoamerican experience of its kind. The blood remaining in the umbilical cord and in the placenta was requested from women who were in the last quarter of pregnancy. An informed consent together with a medical record focused on family disease was completed. Out of 65 donations, 55 (85%) were collected and 51 (78%) were cryopreserved. Mean collected volume was 110 ml with 68% (75 ml) reduction and mean cryopreservation of 35 ml; ABO and Rh blood group systems were determined, HLA, class I, A and B loci, and class II, DR locus were typed by molecular biology methods using PCR-SSOP. Infectious disease screening was carried out for brucellosis, syphilis, Chagas, hepatitis B and C, HIV I and II, HTLV I and II, toxoplasmosis and cytomegalovirus. Two positive units for hepatitis B (anticore) and two positive units for Chagas were discarded. The quantity of total nucleated cells (TNC), CD34+ cells and the clonogenic capacity were determined twice at the collection and after the procedures of volume reduction previous to cryopreservation. A 5% reduction in both TNC and CD34 cells and a 10% in the colony forming units (CFU) were detected. A good correlation coefficient between TNC and CFU was obtained.

  9. Isolation of resident cardiac progenitor cells by Hoechst 33342 staining.

    PubMed

    Pfister, Otmar; Oikonomopoulos, Angelos; Sereti, Konstantina-Ioanna; Liao, Ronglih

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac resident stem/progenitor cells are critical to the cellular and functional integrity of the heart by maintaining myocardial cell homeostasis. Given their central role in myocardial biology, resident cardiac progenitor cells have become a major focus in cardiovascular research. Identification of putative cardiac progenitor cells within the myocardium is largely based on the presence or absence of specific cell surface markers. Additional purification strategies take advantage of the ability of stem cells to efficiently efflux vital dyes such as Hoechst 33342. During fluoresence activated cell sorting (FACS) such Hoechst-extruding cells appear to the side of Hoechst-dye retaining cells and have thus been termed side population (SP) cells. We have shown that cardiac SP cells that express stem cell antigen 1 (Sca-1) but not CD31 are cardiomyogenic, and thus represent a putative cardiac progenitor cell population. This chapter describes the methodology for the isolation of resident cardiac progenitor cells utilizing the SP phenotype combined with stem cell surface markers.

  10. EpCAM and the biology of hepatic stem/progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Theise, Neil D.; Schmelzer, Eva; Boulter, Luke; Gires, Olivier; van Grunsven, Leo A.

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is a transmembrane glycoprotein, which is frequently and highly expressed on carcinomas, tumor-initiating cells, selected tissue progenitors, and embryonic and adult stem cells. During liver development, EpCAM demonstrates a dynamic expression, since it can be detected in fetal liver, including cells of the parenchyma, whereas mature hepatocytes are devoid of EpCAM. Liver regeneration is associated with a population of EpCAM-positive cells within ductular reactions, which gradually lose the expression of EpCAM along with maturation into hepatocytes. EpCAM can be switched on and off through a wide panel of strategies to fine-tune EpCAM-dependent functional and differentiative traits. EpCAM-associated functions relate to cell–cell adhesion, proliferation, maintenance of a pluripotent state, regulation of differentiation, migration, and invasion. These functions can be conferred by the full-length protein and/or EpCAM-derived fragments, which are generated upon regulated intramembrane proteolysis. Control by EpCAM therefore not only depends on the presence of full-length EpCAM at cellular membranes but also on varying rates of the formation of EpCAM-derived fragments that have their own regulatory properties and on changes in the association of EpCAM with interaction partners. Thus spatiotemporal localization of EpCAM in immature liver progenitors, transit-amplifying cells, and mature liver cells will decisively impact the regulation of EpCAM functions and might be one of the triggers that contributes to the adaptive processes in stem/progenitor cell lineages. This review will summarize EpCAM-related molecular events and how they relate to hepatobiliary differentiation and regeneration. PMID:25477371

  11. Lkb1 regulation of skeletal muscle development, metabolism and muscle progenitor cell homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Shan, Tizhong; Xu, Ziye; Liu, Jiaqi; Wu, Weiche; Wang, Yizhen

    2017-10-01

    Liver kinase B1 (Lkb1), also named as Serine/Threonine protein kinase 11 (STK11), is a serine/threonine kinase that plays crucial roles in various cellular processes including cell survival, cell division, cellular polarity, cell growth, cell differentiation, and cell metabolism. In metabolic tissues, Lkb1 regulates glucose homeostasis and energy metabolism through phosphorylating and activating the AMPK subfamily proteins. In skeletal muscle, Lkb1 affects muscle development and postnatal growth, lipid and fatty acid oxidation, glucose metabolism, and insulin sensitivity. Recently, the regulatory roles of Lkb1 in regulating division, self-renew, proliferation, and differentiation of skeletal muscle progenitor cells have been reported. In this review, we discuss the roles of Lkb1 in regulating skeletal muscle progenitor cell homeostasis and skeletal muscle development and metabolism. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Dual Function of Sox1 in Telencephalic Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Lixin; Jalali, Ali; Zhao, Li-Ru; Zhou, Xiaojing; McGuire, Tammy; Kazanis, Ilias; Episkopou, Vasso; Bassuk, Alexander G.; Kessler, John A.

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factor, Sox1 has been implicated in the maintenance of neural progenitor cell status, but accumulating evidence suggests that this is only part of its function. This study examined the role of Sox1 expression in proliferation, lineage commitment, and differentiation by telencephalic neural progenitor cells in vitro and in vivo, and further clarified the pattern of Sox1 expression in postnatal and adult mouse brain. Telencephalic neural progenitor cells isolated from Sox1 null embryos formed neurospheres normally, but were specifically deficient in neuronal differentiation. Conversely, overexpression of Sox1 in the embryonic telencephalon in vivo both expanded the progenitor pool and biased neural progenitor cells towards neuronal lineage commitment. Sox1 mRNA and protein were found to be persistently expressed in the postnatal and adult brain in both differentiated and neurogenic regions. Importantly, in differentiated regions Sox1 co-labeled only with neuronal markers. These observations, coupled with previous studies, suggest that Sox1 expression by early embryonic progenitor cells initially helps to maintain the cells in cell cycle, but that continued expression subsequently promotes neuronal lineage commitment. PMID:17719572

  13. Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Lois, Noemi; McCarter, Rachel V.; O’Neill, Christina; Medina, Reinhold J.; Stitt, Alan W.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a leading cause of visual impairment worldwide. Patients with DR may irreversibly lose sight as a result of the development of diabetic macular edema (DME) and/or proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR); retinal blood vessel dysfunction and degeneration plays an essential role in their pathogenesis. Although new treatments have been recently introduced for DME, including intravitreal vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors (anti-VEGFs) and steroids, a high proportion of patients (~40–50%) do not respond to these therapies. Furthermore, for people with PDR, laser photocoagulation remains a mainstay therapy despite this being an inherently destructive procedure. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are a low-frequency population of circulating cells known to be recruited to sites of vessel damage and tissue ischemia where they promote vascular healing and re-perfusion. A growing body of evidence suggests that the number and function of EPCs are altered in patients with varying degrees of diabetes duration, metabolic control, and in the presence or absence of DR. Although there are no clear-cut outcomes from these clinical studies, there is mounting evidence that some EPC sub-types may be involved in the pathogenesis of DR and may also serve as biomarkers for disease progression and stratification. Moreover, some EPC sub-types have considerable potential as therapeutic modalities for DME and PDR in the context of cell therapy. This study presents basic clinical concepts of DR and combines this with a general insight on EPCs and their relation to future directions in understanding and treating this important diabetic complication. PMID:24782825

  14. Neural and oligodendrocyte progenitor cells: transferrin effects on cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Silvestroff, Lucas; Franco, Paula Gabriela; Pasquini, Juana María

    2013-01-01

    NSC (neural stem cells)/NPC (neural progenitor cells) are multipotent and self-renew throughout adulthood in the SVZ (subventricular zone) of the mammalian CNS (central nervous system). These cells are considered interesting targets for CNS neurodegenerative disorder cell therapies, and understanding their behaviour in vitro is crucial if they are to be cultured prior to transplantation. We cultured the SVZ tissue belonging to newborn rats under the form of NS (neurospheres) to evaluate the effects of Tf (transferrin) on cell proliferation. The NS were heterogeneous in terms of the NSC/NPC markers GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein), Nestin and Sox2 and the OL (oligodendrocyte) progenitor markers NG2 (nerve/glia antigen 2) and PDGFRα (platelet-derived growth factor receptor α). The results of this study indicate that aTf (apoTransferrin) is able to increase cell proliferation of SVZ-derived cells in vitro, and that these effects were mediated at least in part by the TfRc1 (Tf receptor 1). Since OPCs (oligodendrocyte progenitor cells) represent a significant proportion of the proliferating cells in the SVZ-derived primary cultures, we used the immature OL cell line N20.1 to show that Tf was able to augment the proliferation rate of OPC, either by adding aTf to the culture medium or by overexpressing rat Tf in situ. The culture medium supplemented with ferric iron, together with aTf, increased the DNA content, while ferrous iron did not. The present work provides data that could have a potential application in human cell replacement therapies for neurodegenerative disease and/or CNS injury that require the use of in vitro amplified NPCs. PMID:23368675

  15. Establishment of bipotent progenitor cell clone from rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yousuke; Yada, Erica; Nakano, Shin-ichi; Miyagoe-Suzuki, Yuko; Hosoyama, Tohru; Matsuwaki, Takashi; Yamanouchi, Keitaro; Nishihara, Masugi

    2011-12-01

    The present study describes the isolation, cloning and characterization of adipogenic progenitor cells from rat skeletal muscle. Among the obtained 10 clones, the most highly adipogenic progenitor, 2G11 cells, were further characterized. In addition to their adipogenicity, 2G11 cells retain myogenic potential as revealed by formation of multinucleated myotubes when co-cultured with myoblasts. 2G11 cells were resistant to an inhibitory effect of basic fibroblast growth factor on adipogenesis, while adipogenesis of widely used preadipogenic cell line, 3T3-L1 cells, was suppressed almost completely by the same treatment. In vivo transplantation experiments revealed that 2G11 cells are able to possess both adipogenicity and myogenicity in vivo. These results indicate the presence of bipotent progenitor cells in rat skeletal muscle, and suggest that such cells may contribute to ectopic fat formation in skeletal muscle. © 2011 The Authors. Animal Science Journal © 2011 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  16. Pluripotent plasticity of stem cells and liver repopulation.

    PubMed

    Gennero, Luisa; Roos, Maria Augusta; Sperber, Kirk; Denysenko, Tetyana; Bernabei, Paola; Calisti, Gian Franco; Papotti, Mauro; Cappia, Susanna; Pagni, Roberto; Aimo, Giuseppe; Mengozzi, Giulio; Cavallo, Giovanni; Reguzzi, Stefano; Pescarmona, Gian Piero; Ponzetto, Antonio

    2010-04-01

    Different types of stem cells have a role in liver regeneration or fibrous repair during and after several liver diseases. Otherwise, the origin of hepatic and/or extra-hepatic stem cells in reactive liver repopulation is under controversy. The ability of the human body to self-repair and replace the cells and tissues of some organs is often evident. It has been estimated that complete renewal of liver tissue takes place in about a year. Replacement of lost liver tissues is accomplished by proliferation of mature hepatocytes, hepatic oval stem cells differentiation, and sinusoidal cells as support. Hepatic oval cells display a distinct phenotype and have been shown to be a bipotential progenitor of two types of epithelial cells found in the liver, hepatocytes, and bile ductular cells. In gastroenterology and hepatology, the first attempts to translate stem cell basic research into novel therapeutic strategies have been made for the treatment of several disorders, such as inflammatory bowel diseases, diabetes mellitus, celiachy, and acute or chronic hepatopaties. In the future, pluripotent plasticity of stem cells will open a variety of clinical application strategies for the treatment of tissue injuries, degenerated organs. The promise of liver stem cells lie in their potential to provide a continuous and readily available source of liver cells that can be used for gene therapy, cell transplant, bio-artificial liver-assisted devices, drug toxicology testing, and use as an in vitro model to understand the developmental biology of the liver.

  17. Stem and progenitor cell dysfunction in human trisomies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Binbin; Filippi, Sarah; Roy, Anindita; Roberts, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Trisomy 21, the commonest constitutional aneuploidy in humans, causes profound perturbation of stem and progenitor cell growth, which is both cell context dependent and developmental stage specific and mediated by complex genetic mechanisms beyond increased Hsa21 gene dosage. While proliferation of fetal hematopoietic and testicular stem/progenitors is increased and may underlie increased susceptibility to childhood leukemia and testicular cancer, fetal stem/progenitor proliferation in other tissues is markedly impaired leading to the characteristic craniofacial, neurocognitive and cardiac features in individuals with Down syndrome. After birth, trisomy 21-mediated premature aging of stem/progenitor cells may contribute to the progressive multi-system deterioration, including development of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25520324

  18. Great promise of tissue-resident adult stem/progenitor cells in transplantation and cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Mimeault, Murielle; Batra, Surinder K

    2012-01-01

    Recent progress in tissue-resident adult stem/progenitor cell research has inspired great interest because these immature cells from your own body can act as potential, easily accessible cell sources for cell transplantation in regenerative medicine and cancer therapies. The use of adult stem/progenitor cells endowed with a high self-renewal ability and multilineage differentiation potential, which are able to regenerate all the mature cells in the tissues from their origin, offers great promise in replacing non-functioning or lost cells and regenerating diseased and damaged tissues. The presence of a small subpopulation of adult stem/progenitor cells in most tissues and organs provides the possibility of stimulating their in vivo differentiation, or of using their ex vivo expanded progenies for cell-replacement and gene therapies with multiple applications in humans without a high-risk of graft rejection and major side effects. Among the diseases that could be treated by adult stem cell-based therapies are hematopoietic and immune disorders, multiple degenerative disorders such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, Types 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus as well as skin, eye, liver, lung, tooth and cardiovascular disorders. In addition, a combination of the current cancer treatments with an adjuvant treatment consisting of an autologous or allogeneic adult stem/progenitor cell transplantation also represents a promising strategy for treating and even curing diverse aggressive, metastatic, recurrent and lethal cancers. In this chapter, we reviewed the most recent advancements on the characterization of phenotypic and functional properties of adult stem/progenitor cell types found in bone marrow, heart, brain and other tissues and discussed their therapeutic implications in the stem cell-based transplantation therapy.

  19. Apoptotic lymphocytes induce progenitor cell mobilization after exercise.

    PubMed

    Mooren, Frank C; Krüger, Karsten

    2015-07-15

    There is evidence that apoptotic cells and their components have immunmodulatory properties and signaling function. The present study investigated first whether exercise-induced apoptosis and exercise-induced mobilization of progenitor cells are similarly affected by subjects' training status and, second, whether the appearance of dying cells in the circulation might mobilize progenitor cells. CD1 SWISS mice were subjected to a 10-wk endurance training using free wheel running or served as untrained controls. Mice of both groups performed an intensive exercise test after the training period at a velocity corresponding to 80% maximal oxygen uptake for 30 min. Cells from blood and bone marrow were analyzed, and apoptosis and number of progenitor cells determined via flow cytometry. In a second experiment, apoptotic cells were transferred into recipient mice, and mobilization of progenitor cells was analyzed while vital cells served as controls. In untrained animals, the exhaustive exercise was followed by an enhanced rate of annexin V positive CD3(+) cells in blood and bone marrow (P < 0.05), whereas no increase was found in trained mice. Similarly, exercise mobilized Sca-1(+)/c-kit(+) and Sca-1(+)/Flk(+) cells in untrained (P < 0.05) but not trained mice. Furthermore, application of apoptotic cells and their supernatant mobilized Sca-1(+)/c-kit(+) cells into the blood (P < 0.05), whereas Sca-1(+)/Flk(+) cells were not affected. The present study demonstrated that both lymphocyte apoptosis, as well as mobilization of progenitor cells are similarly related to training status. Furthermore, apoptotic cells seem to induce signals that effectively mobilize hematopoietic progenitor cells. The relevance of this effect for the adaptation to exercise stimuli remains to be shown. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Stem and progenitor cells: the premature desertion of rigorous definitions.

    PubMed

    Seaberg, Raewyn M; van der Kooy, Derek

    2003-03-01

    A current disturbing trend in stem cell biology is the abandonment of rigorous definitions of stem and progenitor cells in favor of more ambiguous, all-encompassing concepts. However, recent studies suggest that there are consistent, functional differences in the biology of these two cell types. Admittedly, it can be difficult to harmonize the in vivo and in vitro functional differences between stem and progenitor cells. Nonetheless, these distinctions between cell types should be emphasized rather than ignored, as they can be used to test specific hypotheses in neural stem cell biology.

  1. Invited review: mesenchymal progenitor cells in intramuscular connective tissue development.

    PubMed

    Miao, Z G; Zhang, L P; Fu, X; Yang, Q Y; Zhu, M J; Dodson, M V; Du, M

    2016-01-01

    The abundance and cross-linking of intramuscular connective tissue contributes to the background toughness of meat, and is thus undesirable. Connective tissue is mainly synthesized by intramuscular fibroblasts. Myocytes, adipocytes and fibroblasts are derived from a common pool of progenitor cells during the early embryonic development. It appears that multipotent mesenchymal stem cells first diverge into either myogenic or non-myogenic lineages; non-myogenic mesenchymal progenitors then develop into the stromal-vascular fraction of skeletal muscle wherein adipocytes, fibroblasts and derived mesenchymal progenitors reside. Because non-myogenic mesenchymal progenitors mainly undergo adipogenic or fibrogenic differentiation during muscle development, strengthening progenitor proliferation enhances the potential for both intramuscular adipogenesis and fibrogenesis, leading to the elevation of both marbling and connective tissue content in the resulting meat product. Furthermore, given the bipotent developmental potential of progenitor cells, enhancing their conversion to adipogenesis reduces fibrogenesis, which likely results in the overall improvement of marbling (more intramuscular adipocytes) and tenderness (less connective tissue) of meat. Fibrogenesis is mainly regulated by the transforming growth factor (TGF) β signaling pathway and its regulatory cascade. In addition, extracellular matrix, a part of the intramuscular connective tissue, provides a niche environment for regulating myogenic differentiation of satellite cells and muscle growth. Despite rapid progress, many questions remain in the role of extracellular matrix on muscle development, and factors determining the early differentiation of myogenic, adipogenic and fibrogenic cells, which warrant further studies.

  2. Circulating Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells are Decreased in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, William J.; Yunt, Zulma X.; Muldrow, Alaina; Kearns, Mark T.; Kloepfer, Angela; Barthel, Lea; Bratton, Donna L.; Bowler, Russell P.; Henson, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Bone marrow derived progenitor cells participate in the repair of injured vessels. The lungs of individuals with emphysema have reduced alveolar capillary density and increased endothelial apoptosis. We hypothesized that circulating levels of endothelial and hematopoietic progenitor cells would be reduced in this group of patients. Objectives The goal of this study was to measure circulating levels of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) in subjects with COPD and to determine if progenitor levels correlated with disease severity and the presence of emphysema. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from 61 patients with COPD and 32 control subjects. Levels of EPCs (CD45dim CD34+ ) and HPCs (CD45+ CD34+ VEGF-R2+) were quantified using multi-parameter flow cytometry. Progenitor cell function was assessed using cell culture assays. All subjects were evaluated with spirometry and CT scanning. Measurements and Main Results HPC levels were reduced in subjects with COPD compared to controls, whereas circulating EPC levels were similar between the two groups. HPC levels correlated with severity of obstruction and were lowest in subjects with severe emphysema. These associations remained after correction for factors known to affect progenitor cell levels including age, smoking status, the use of statin medications and the presence of coronary artery disease. The ability of mononuclear cells to form endothelial cell colony forming units (EC-CFU) was also reduced in subjects with COPD. Conclusions HPC levels are reduced in subjects with COPD and correlate with emphysema phenotype and severity of obstruction. Reduction of HPCs may disrupt maintenance of the capillary endothelium, thereby contributing to the pathogenesis of COPD. PMID:24182349

  3. HGF/c-Met signaling promotes liver progenitor cell migration and invasion by an epithelial-mesenchymal transition-independent, phosphatidyl inositol-3 kinase-dependent pathway in an in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Causado, A; Caballero-Díaz, D; Bertrán, E; Roncero, C; Addante, A; García-Álvaro, M; Fernández, M; Herrera, B; Porras, A; Fabregat, I; Sánchez, A

    2015-10-01

    Oval cells constitute an interesting hepatic cell population. They contribute to sustain liver regeneration during chronic liver damage, but in doing this they can be target of malignant conversion and become tumor-initiating cells and drive hepatocarcinogenesis. The molecular mechanisms beneath either their pro-regenerative or pro-tumorigenic potential are still poorly understood. In this study, we have investigated the role of the HGF/c-Met pathway in regulation of oval cell migratory and invasive properties. Our results show that HGF induces c-Met-dependent oval cell migration both in normal culture conditions and after in vitro wounding. HGF-triggered migration involves F-actin cytoskeleton reorganization, which is also evidenced by activation of Rac1. Furthermore, HGF causes ZO-1 translocation from cell-cell contact sites to cytoplasm and its concomitant activation by phosphorylation. However, no loss of expression of cell-cell adhesion proteins, including E-cadherin, ZO-1 and Occludin-1, is observed. Additionally, migration does not lead to cell dispersal but to a characteristic organized pattern in rows, in turn associated with Golgi compaction, providing strong evidence of a morphogenic collective migration. Besides migration, HGF increases oval cell invasion through extracellular matrix, a process that requires PI3K activation and is at least partly mediated by expression and activation of metalloproteases. Altogether, our findings provide novel insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms mediating the essential role of HGF/c-Met signaling during oval cell-mediated mouse liver regeneration.

  4. Vascular wall progenitor cells in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Psaltis, Peter J; Simari, Robert D

    2015-04-10

    The vasculature plays an indispensible role in organ development and maintenance of tissue homeostasis, such that disturbances to it impact greatly on developmental and postnatal health. Although cell turnover in healthy blood vessels is low, it increases considerably under pathological conditions. The principle sources for this phenomenon have long been considered to be the recruitment of cells from the peripheral circulation and the re-entry of mature cells in the vessel wall back into cell cycle. However, recent discoveries have also uncovered the presence of a range of multipotent and lineage-restricted progenitor cells in the mural layers of postnatal blood vessels, possessing high proliferative capacity and potential to generate endothelial, smooth muscle, hematopoietic or mesenchymal cell progeny. In particular, the tunica adventitia has emerged as a progenitor-rich compartment with niche-like characteristics that support and regulate vascular wall progenitor cells. Preliminary data indicate the involvement of some of these vascular wall progenitor cells in vascular disease states, adding weight to the notion that the adventitia is integral to vascular wall pathogenesis, and raising potential implications for clinical therapies. This review discusses the current body of evidence for the existence of vascular wall progenitor cell subpopulations from development to adulthood and addresses the gains made and significant challenges that lie ahead in trying to accurately delineate their identities, origins, regulatory pathways, and relevance to normal vascular structure and function, as well as disease. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Cytoglobin modulates myogenic progenitor cell viability and muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sarvjeet; Canseco, Diana C; Manda, Shilpa M; Shelton, John M; Chirumamilla, Rajendra R; Goetsch, Sean C; Ye, Qiu; Gerard, Robert D; Schneider, Jay W; Richardson, James A; Rothermel, Beverly A; Mammen, Pradeep P A

    2014-01-07

    Mammalian skeletal muscle can remodel, repair, and regenerate itself by mobilizing satellite cells, a resident population of myogenic progenitor cells. Muscle injury and subsequent activation of myogenic progenitor cells is associated with oxidative stress. Cytoglobin is a hemoprotein expressed in response to oxidative stress in a variety of tissues, including striated muscle. In this study, we demonstrate that cytoglobin is up-regulated in activated myogenic progenitor cells, where it localizes to the nucleus and contributes to cell viability. siRNA-mediated depletion of cytoglobin from C2C12 myoblasts increased levels of reactive oxygen species and apoptotic cell death both at baseline and in response to stress stimuli. Conversely, overexpression of cytoglobin reduced reactive oxygen species levels, caspase activity, and cell death. Mice in which cytoglobin was knocked out specifically in skeletal muscle were generated to examine the role of cytoglobin in vivo. Myogenic progenitor cells isolated from these mice were severely deficient in their ability to form myotubes as compared with myogenic progenitor cells from wild-type littermates. Consistent with this finding, the capacity for muscle regeneration was severely impaired in mice deficient for skeletal-muscle cytoglobin. Collectively, these data demonstrate that cytoglobin serves an important role in muscle repair and regeneration.

  6. Dendritic cell potentials of early lymphoid and myeloid progenitors.

    PubMed

    Manz, M G; Traver, D; Miyamoto, T; Weissman, I L; Akashi, K

    2001-06-01

    It has been proposed that there are at least 2 classes of dendritic cells (DCs), CD8alpha(+) DCs derived from the lymphoid lineage and CD8alpha(-) DCs derived from the myeloid lineage. Here, the abilities of lymphoid- and myeloid-restricted progenitors to generate DCs are compared, and their overall contributions to the DC compartment are evaluated. It has previously been shown that primitive myeloid-committed progenitors (common myeloid progenitors [CMPs]) are efficient precursors of both CD8alpha(+) and CD8alpha(-) DCs in vivo. Here it is shown that the earliest lymphoid-committed progenitors (common lymphoid progenitors [CLPs]) and CMPs and their progeny granulocyte-macrophage progenitors (GMPs) can give rise to functional DCs in vitro and in vivo. CLPs are more efficient in generating DCs than their T-lineage descendants, the early thymocyte progenitors and pro-T cells, and CMPs are more efficient DC precursors than the descendant GMPs, whereas pro-B cells and megakaryocyte-erythrocyte progenitors are incapable of generating DCs. Thus, DC developmental potential is preserved during T- but not B-lymphoid differentiation from CLP and during granulocyte-macrophage but not megakaryocyte-erythrocyte development from CMP. In vivo reconstitution experiments show that CLPs and CMPs can reconstitute CD8alpha(+) and CD8alpha(-) DCs with similar efficiency on a per cell basis. However, CMPs are 10-fold more numerous than CLPs, suggesting that at steady state, CLPs provide only a minority of splenic DCs and approximately half the DCs in thymus, whereas most DCs, including CD8alpha(+) and CD8alpha(-) subtypes, are of myeloid origin. (Blood. 2001;97:3333-3341)

  7. Matrix metalloproteinase-14 mediates formation of bile ducts and hepatic maturation of fetal hepatic progenitor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Otani, Satoshi; Kakinuma, Sei; Kamiya, Akihide; Goto, Fumio; Kaneko, Shun; Miyoshi, Masato; Tsunoda, Tomoyuki; Asano, Yu; Kawai-Kitahata, Fukiko; Nitta, Sayuri; Nakata, Toru; Okamoto, Ryuichi; Itsui, Yasuhiro; Nakagawa, Mina; Azuma, Seishin; Asahina, Yasuhiro; Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki; Koshikawa, Naohiko; Seiki, Motoharu; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; and others

    2016-01-22

    Fetal hepatic stem/progenitor cells, called hepatoblasts, play central roles in liver development; however, the molecular mechanisms regulating the phenotype of these cells have not been completely elucidated. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-14 is a type I transmembrane proteinase regulating pericellular proteolysis of the extracellular matrix and is essential for the activation of several MMPs and cytokines. However, the physiological functions of MMP-14 in liver development are unknown. Here we describe a functional role for MMP-14 in hepatic and biliary differentiation of mouse hepatoblasts. MMP-14 was upregulated in cells around the portal vein in perinatal stage liver. Formation of bile duct-like structures in MMP-14–deficient livers was significantly delayed compared with wild-type livers in vivo. In vitro biliary differentiation assays showed that formation of cholangiocytic cysts derived from MMP-14–deficient hepatoblasts was completely impaired, and that overexpression of MMP-14 in hepatoblasts promoted the formation of bile duct-like cysts. In contrast, the expression of molecules associated with metabolic functions in hepatocytes, including hepatic nuclear factor 4α and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase, were significantly increased in MMP-14–deficient livers. Expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor and phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases were significantly upregulated in MMP-14–deficient livers. We demonstrate that MMP-14–mediated signaling in fetal hepatic progenitor cells promotes biliary luminal formation around the portal vein and negatively controls the maturation of hepatocytes. - Highlights: • Loss of MMP-14 delayed formation of bile duct-like structures in perinatal liver. • Overexpression of MMP-14 in hepatobalsts promoted the biliary formation in vitro. • Loss of MMP-14 promoted hepatocyte maturation of hepatoblasts in vivo. • MMP-14–mediated signaling regulates terminal differentiation of

  8. Sall1 in renal stromal progenitors non-cell autonomously restricts the excessive expansion of nephron progenitors.

    PubMed

    Ohmori, Tomoko; Tanigawa, Shunsuke; Kaku, Yusuke; Fujimura, Sayoko; Nishinakamura, Ryuichi

    2015-10-29

    The mammalian kidney develops from reciprocal interactions between the metanephric mesenchyme and ureteric bud, the former of which contains nephron progenitors. The third lineage, the stroma, fills up the interstitial space and is derived from distinct progenitors that express the transcription factor Foxd1. We showed previously that deletion of the nuclear factor Sall1 in nephron progenitors leads to their depletion in mice. However, Sall1 is expressed not only in nephron progenitors but also in stromal progenitors. Here we report that specific Sall1 deletion in stromal progenitors leads to aberrant expansion of nephron progenitors, which is in sharp contrast with a nephron progenitor-specific deletion. The mutant mice also exhibited cystic kidneys after birth and died before adulthood. We found that Decorin, which inhibits Bmp-mediated nephron differentiation, was upregulated in the mutant stroma. In contrast, the expression of Fat4, which restricts nephron progenitor expansion, was reduced mildly. Furthermore, the Sall1 protein binds to many stroma-related gene loci, including Decorin and Fat4. Thus, the expression of Sall1 in stromal progenitors restricts the excessive expansion of nephron progenitors in a non-cell autonomous manner, and Sall1-mediated regulation of Decorin and Fat4 might at least partially underlie the pathogenesis.

  9. Sall1 in renal stromal progenitors non-cell autonomously restricts the excessive expansion of nephron progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Ohmori, Tomoko; Tanigawa, Shunsuke; Kaku, Yusuke; Fujimura, Sayoko; Nishinakamura, Ryuichi

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian kidney develops from reciprocal interactions between the metanephric mesenchyme and ureteric bud, the former of which contains nephron progenitors. The third lineage, the stroma, fills up the interstitial space and is derived from distinct progenitors that express the transcription factor Foxd1. We showed previously that deletion of the nuclear factor Sall1 in nephron progenitors leads to their depletion in mice. However, Sall1 is expressed not only in nephron progenitors but also in stromal progenitors. Here we report that specific Sall1 deletion in stromal progenitors leads to aberrant expansion of nephron progenitors, which is in sharp contrast with a nephron progenitor-specific deletion. The mutant mice also exhibited cystic kidneys after birth and died before adulthood. We found that Decorin, which inhibits Bmp-mediated nephron differentiation, was upregulated in the mutant stroma. In contrast, the expression of Fat4, which restricts nephron progenitor expansion, was reduced mildly. Furthermore, the Sall1 protein binds to many stroma-related gene loci, including Decorin and Fat4. Thus, the expression of Sall1 in stromal progenitors restricts the excessive expansion of nephron progenitors in a non-cell autonomous manner, and Sall1-mediated regulation of Decorin and Fat4 might at least partially underlie the pathogenesis. PMID:26511275

  10. Functional blockade of α5β1 integrin induces scattering and genomic landscape remodeling of hepatic progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cell scattering is a physiological process executed by stem and progenitor cells during embryonic liver development and postnatal organ regeneration. Here, we investigated the genomic events occurring during this process induced by functional blockade of α5β1 integrin in liver progenitor cells. Results Cells treated with a specific antibody against α5β1 integrin exhibited cell spreading and scattering, over-expression of liver stem/progenitor cell markers and activation of the ERK1/2 and p38 MAPKs signaling cascades, in a similar manner to the process triggered by HGF/SF1 stimulation. Gene expression profiling revealed marked transcriptional changes of genes involved in cell adhesion and migration, as well as genes encoding chromatin remodeling factors. These responses were accompanied by conspicuous spatial reorganization of centromeres, while integrin genes conserved their spatial positioning in the interphase nucleus. Conclusion Collectively, our results demonstrate that α5β1 integrin functional blockade induces cell migration of hepatic progenitor cells, and that this involves a dramatic remodeling of the nuclear landscape. PMID:20958983

  11. Adipose Tissue Residing Progenitors (Adipocyte Lineage Progenitors and Adipose Derived Stem Cells (ADSC)

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Ryan; Rodeheffer, Matthew S.; Rosen, Clifford J.; Horowitz, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of brown, white and beige adipocytes have been a subject of intense scientific interest in recent years due to the growing obesity epidemic in the United States and around the world. This interest has led to the identification and characterization of specific tissue resident progenitor cells that give rise to each adipocyte population in vivo. However, much still remains to be discovered about each progenitor population in terms of their “niche” within each tissue and how they are regulated at the cellular and molecular level during healthy and diseased states. While our knowledge of brown, white and beige adipose tissue is rapidly increasing, little is still known about marrow adipose tissue and its progenitor despite recent studies demonstrating possible roles for marrow adipose tissue in regulating the hematopoietic space and systemic metabolism at large. This chapter focuses on our current knowledge of brown, white, beige and marrow adipose tissue with a specific focus on the formation of each tissue from tissue resident progenitor cells. PMID:26526875

  12. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 affects endothelial progenitor cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Colleselli, Daniela; Bijuklic, Klaudija; Mosheimer, Birgit A.; Kaehler, Christian M. . E-mail: C.M.Kaehler@uibk.ac.at

    2006-09-10

    Growing evidence indicates that inducible cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory disorders and various types of cancer. Endothelial progenitor cells recruited from the bone marrow have been shown to be involved in the formation of new vessels in malignancies and discussed for being a key point in tumour progression and metastasis. However, until now, nothing is known about an interaction between COX and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC). Expression of COX-1 and COX-2 was detected by semiquantitative RT-PCR and Western blot. Proliferation kinetics, cell cycle distribution and rate of apoptosis were analysed by MTT test and FACS analysis. Further analyses revealed an implication of Akt phosphorylation and caspase-3 activation. Both COX-1 and COX-2 expression can be found in bone-marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells in vitro. COX-2 inhibition leads to a significant reduction in proliferation of endothelial progenitor cells by an increase in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. COX-2 inhibition leads further to an increased cleavage of caspase-3 protein and inversely to inhibition of Akt activation. Highly proliferating endothelial progenitor cells can be targeted by selective COX-2 inhibition in vitro. These results indicate that upcoming therapy strategies in cancer patients targeting COX-2 may be effective in inhibiting tumour vasculogenesis as well as angiogenic processes.

  13. NFIX regulates neural progenitor cell differentiation during hippocampal morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Heng, Yee Hsieh Evelyn; McLeay, Robert C; Harvey, Tracey J; Smith, Aaron G; Barry, Guy; Cato, Kathleen; Plachez, Céline; Little, Erica; Mason, Sharon; Dixon, Chantelle; Gronostajski, Richard M; Bailey, Timothy L; Richards, Linda J; Piper, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Neural progenitor cells have the ability to give rise to neurons and glia in the embryonic, postnatal and adult brain. During development, the program regulating whether these cells divide and self-renew or exit the cell cycle and differentiate is tightly controlled, and imbalances to the normal trajectory of this process can lead to severe functional consequences. However, our understanding of the molecular regulation of these fundamental events remains limited. Moreover, processes underpinning development of the postnatal neurogenic niches within the cortex remain poorly defined. Here, we demonstrate that Nuclear factor one X (NFIX) is expressed by neural progenitor cells within the embryonic hippocampus, and that progenitor cell differentiation is delayed within Nfix(-/-) mice. Moreover, we reveal that the morphology of the dentate gyrus in postnatal Nfix(-/-) mice is abnormal, with fewer subgranular zone neural progenitor cells being generated in the absence of this transcription factor. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that the progenitor cell maintenance factor Sry-related HMG box 9 (SOX9) is upregulated in the hippocampus of Nfix(-/-) mice and demonstrate that NFIX can repress Sox9 promoter-driven transcription. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that NFIX plays a central role in hippocampal morphogenesis, regulating the formation of neuronal and glial populations within this structure.

  14. Vascular stem/progenitor cells: functions and signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Lu, Weisi; Li, Xuri

    2017-09-27

    Vascular stem/progenitor cells (VSCs) are an important source of all types of vascular cells needed to build, maintain, repair, and remodel blood vessels. VSCs, therefore, play critical roles in the development, normal physiology, and pathophysiology of numerous diseases. There are four major types of VSCs, including endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), smooth muscle progenitor cells (SMPCs), pericytes, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). VSCs can be found in bone marrow, circulating blood, vessel walls, and other extravascular tissues. During the past two decades, considerable progress has been achieved in the understanding of the derivation, surface markers, and differentiation of VSCs. Yet, the mechanisms regulating their functions and maintenance under normal and pathological conditions, such as in eye diseases, remain to be further elucidated. Owing to the essential roles of blood vessels in human tissues and organs, understanding the functional properties and the underlying molecular basis of VSCs is of critical importance for both basic and translational research.

  15. CXCR4 Expression in Prostate Cancer Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dubrovska, Anna; Elliott, Jimmy; Salamone, Richard J.; Telegeev, Gennady D.; Stakhovsky, Alexander E.; Schepotin, Ihor B.; Yan, Feng; Wang, Yan; Bouchez, Laure C.; Kularatne, Sumith A.; Watson, James; Trussell, Christopher; Reddy, Venkateshwar A.; Cho, Charles Y.; Schultz, Peter G.

    2012-01-01

    Tumor progenitor cells represent a population of drug-resistant cells that can survive conventional chemotherapy and lead to tumor relapse. However, little is known of the role of tumor progenitors in prostate cancer metastasis. The studies reported herein show that the CXCR4/CXCL12 axis, a key regulator of tumor dissemination, plays a role in the maintenance of prostate cancer stem-like cells. The CXCL4/CXCR12 pathway is activated in the CD44+/CD133+ prostate progenitor population and affects differentiation potential, cell adhesion, clonal growth and tumorigenicity. Furthermore, prostate tumor xenograft studies in mice showed that a combination of the CXCR4 receptor antagonist AMD3100, which targets prostate cancer stem-like cells, and the conventional chemotherapeutic drug Taxotere, which targets the bulk tumor, is significantly more effective in eradicating tumors as compared to monotherapy. PMID:22359577

  16. Telomerase extends a helping hand to progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Natesan, Sridaran

    2005-01-01

    The idea of a cell-based regeneration therapy for controlling or curing chronic human diseases is highly attractive. However, realization of this idea in the clinic has been hampered by the safety concerns associated with the transplantation of immortalized cells into human patients. An elegant study done by Roy and colleagues shows that neural progenitor cells immortalized by the ectopic expression of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) can give rise to specific types of functionally competent neurons both in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, the immortalized progenitors maintained their phenotype with no evidence of transformation even several months after transplantation in mouse disease models. Although the potential use of telomerase-immortalized cells in the clinic remains controversial, Roy and colleagues work provides a compelling reason to seriously evaluate the potential use of telomerase-immortalized progenitor cells to treat neurodegenerative and other chronic human illnesses.

  17. Cell trafficking of endothelial progenitor cells in tumor progression.

    PubMed

    de la Puente, Pilar; Muz, Barbara; Azab, Feda; Azab, Abdel Kareem

    2013-07-01

    Blood vessel formation plays an essential role in many physiologic and pathologic processes, including normal tissue growth and healing, as well as tumor progression. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) are a subtype of stem cells with high proliferative potential that are capable of differentiating into mature endothelial cells, thus contributing to neovascularization in tumors. In response to tumor-secreted cytokines, EPCs mobilize from the bone marrow to the peripheral blood, home to the tumor site, and differentiate to mature endothelial cells and secrete proangiogenic factors to facilitate vascularization of tumors. In this review, we summarize the expression of surface markers, cytokines, receptors, adhesion molecules, proteases, and cell signaling mechanisms involved in the different steps (mobilization, homing, and differentiation) of EPC trafficking from the bone marrow to the tumor site. Understanding the biologic mechanisms of EPC cell trafficking opens a window for new therapeutic targets in cancer.

  18. Oral mucosal progenitor cell clones resist in vitro myogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Locke, Matthew; Davies, Lindsay C; Stephens, Phil

    2016-10-01

    Progenitor cells derived from the oral mucosa lamina propria (OMLP-PCs) demonstrate an ability to differentiate into tissue lineages removed from their anatomical origin. This clonally derived population of neural-crest cells have demonstrated potential to differentiate along mesenchymal and neuronal cell lineages.

  19. Interleukin-1 regulates proliferation and differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Vela, José M; Molina-Holgado, Eduardo; Arévalo-Martín, Angel; Almazán, Guillermina; Guaza, Carmen

    2002-07-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) is a pleiotropic cytokine expressed during normal CNS development and in inflammatory demyelinating diseases, but remarkably little is known about its effect on oligodendroglial cells. In this study we explored the role of IL-1beta in oligodendrocyte progenitors and differentiated oligodendrocytes. The effects of IL-1beta were compared to those of IL-1 receptor antagonist, the specific inhibitor of IL-1 activity, since progenitors and differentiated oligodendrocytes produce IL-1beta and express IL-1 receptors. Unlike other proinflammatory cytokines (TNFalpha and IFNgamma), IL-1beta was not toxic for oligodendrocyte lineage cells. However, this cytokine inhibited proliferation of oligodendrocyte progenitors in the presence of growth factors (PDGF plus bFGF). This was evidenced by a significant decrease in both cells incorporating bromodeoxyuridine (45%) and total cell numbers (57%) after 6 days of treatment. Interestingly, IL-1beta blocked proliferation at the late progenitor/prooligodendrocyte (O4+) stage but did not affect proliferation of early progenitors (A2B5+). Inhibition of proliferation paralleled with promotion of differentiation, as revealed by the increased percentage of R-mab+ cells (6.7-fold). Moreover, when oligodendrocyte progenitors were allowed to differentiate in the absence of growth factors, treatment with IL-1beta promoted maturation to the MBP+ stage (4.2-fold) and survival of differentiating oligodendrocytes (2.1-fold). Regarding intracellular signaling, IL-1beta activated the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) but not the p42/p44 MAPK and, when combined with growth factors, intensified p38 activation but inhibited the growth-factor-induced p42/p44 activation. IL-1beta also induced a time-dependent inhibition of PFGF-Ralpha gene expression. These results support a role for IL-1beta in promoting mitotic arrest and differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitors as well as maturation and survival of differentiating

  20. Impaired DNA replication within progenitor cell pools promotes leukemogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bilousova, Ganna; Marusyk, Andriy; Porter, Christopher C; Cardiff, Robert D; DeGregori, James

    2005-12-01

    Impaired cell cycle progression can be paradoxically associated with increased rates of malignancies. Using retroviral transduction of bone marrow progenitors followed by transplantation into mice, we demonstrate that inhibition of hematopoietic progenitor cell proliferation impairs competition, promoting the expansion of progenitors that acquire oncogenic mutations which restore cell cycle progression. Conditions that impair DNA replication dramatically enhance the proliferative advantage provided by the expression of Bcr-Abl or mutant p53, which provide no apparent competitive advantage under conditions of healthy replication. Furthermore, for the Bcr-Abl oncogene the competitive advantage in contexts of impaired DNA replication dramatically increases leukemogenesis. Impaired replication within hematopoietic progenitor cell pools can select for oncogenic events and thereby promote leukemia, demonstrating the importance of replicative competence in the prevention of tumorigenesis. The demonstration that replication-impaired, poorly competitive progenitor cell pools can promote tumorigenesis provides a new rationale for links between tumorigenesis and common human conditions of impaired DNA replication such as dietary folate deficiency, chemotherapeutics targeting dNTP synthesis, and polymorphisms in genes important for DNA metabolism.

  1. Endometrial stem/progenitor cells: the first 10 years

    PubMed Central

    Gargett, Caroline E.; Schwab, Kjiana E.; Deane, James A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The existence of stem/progenitor cells in the endometrium was postulated many years ago, but the first functional evidence was only published in 2004. The identification of rare epithelial and stromal populations of clonogenic cells in human endometrium has opened an active area of research on endometrial stem/progenitor cells in the subsequent 10 years. METHODS The published literature was searched using the PubMed database with the search terms ‘endometrial stem cells and menstrual blood stem cells' until December 2014. RESULTS Endometrial epithelial stem/progenitor cells have been identified as clonogenic cells in human and as label-retaining or CD44+ cells in mouse endometrium, but their characterization has been modest. In contrast, endometrial mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) have been well characterized and show similar properties to bone marrow MSCs. Specific markers for their enrichment have been identified, CD146+PDGFRβ+ (platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta) and SUSD2+ (sushi domain containing-2), which detected their perivascular location and likely pericyte identity in endometrial basalis and functionalis vessels. Transcriptomics and secretomics of SUSD2+ cells confirm their perivascular phenotype. Stromal fibroblasts cultured from endometrial tissue or menstrual blood also have some MSC characteristics and demonstrate broad multilineage differentiation potential for mesodermal, endodermal and ectodermal lineages, indicating their plasticity. Side population (SP) cells are a mixed population, although predominantly vascular cells, which exhibit adult stem cell properties, including tissue reconstitution. There is some evidence that bone marrow cells contribute a small population of endometrial epithelial and stromal cells. The discovery of specific markers for endometrial stem/progenitor cells has enabled the examination of their role in endometrial proliferative disorders, including endometriosis, adenomyosis and Asherman

  2. Endometrial stem/progenitor cells: the first 10 years.

    PubMed

    Gargett, Caroline E; Schwab, Kjiana E; Deane, James A

    2016-01-01

    The existence of stem/progenitor cells in the endometrium was postulated many years ago, but the first functional evidence was only published in 2004. The identification of rare epithelial and stromal populations of clonogenic cells in human endometrium has opened an active area of research on endometrial stem/progenitor cells in the subsequent 10 years. The published literature was searched using the PubMed database with the search terms 'endometrial stem cells and menstrual blood stem cells' until December 2014. Endometrial epithelial stem/progenitor cells have been identified as clonogenic cells in human and as label-retaining or CD44(+) cells in mouse endometrium, but their characterization has been modest. In contrast, endometrial mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) have been well characterized and show similar properties to bone marrow MSCs. Specific markers for their enrichment have been identified, CD146(+)PDGFRβ(+) (platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta) and SUSD2(+) (sushi domain containing-2), which detected their perivascular location and likely pericyte identity in endometrial basalis and functionalis vessels. Transcriptomics and secretomics of SUSD2(+) cells confirm their perivascular phenotype. Stromal fibroblasts cultured from endometrial tissue or menstrual blood also have some MSC characteristics and demonstrate broad multilineage differentiation potential for mesodermal, endodermal and ectodermal lineages, indicating their plasticity. Side population (SP) cells are a mixed population, although predominantly vascular cells, which exhibit adult stem cell properties, including tissue reconstitution. There is some evidence that bone marrow cells contribute a small population of endometrial epithelial and stromal cells. The discovery of specific markers for endometrial stem/progenitor cells has enabled the examination of their role in endometrial proliferative disorders, including endometriosis, adenomyosis and Asherman's syndrome

  3. Stress-Induced Premature Senescence of Endothelial and Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Goligorsky, M.S.; Hirschi, K.

    2016-01-01

    This brief overview of premature senescence of dysfunctional endothelial and endothelial progenitor cells provides information on endothelial cell differentiation and specialization, their ontogeny, and controversies related to endothelial stem and progenitor cells. Stressors responsible for the dysfunction of endothelial and endothelial progenitor cells, as well as cellular mechanisms and consequences of endothelial cell dysfunction are presented. Metabolic signatures of dysfunctional endothelial cells and senescence pathways are described. Emerging strategies to rejuvenate endothelial and endothelial progenitor cells conclude the review. PMID:27451101

  4. Multipotent adult progenitor cells from bone marrow differentiate into functional hepatocyte-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Robert E.; Reyes, Morayma; Koodie, Lisa; Jiang, Yuehua; Blackstad, Mark; Lund, Troy; Lenvik, Todd; Johnson, Sandra; Hu, Wei-Shou; Verfaillie, Catherine M.

    2002-01-01

    We have derived from normal human, mouse, and rat postnatal bone marrow primitive, multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPCs) that can differentiate into most mesodermal cells and neuroectodermal cells in vitro and into all embryonic lineages in vivo. Here, we show that MAPCs can also differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro. Human, mouse, and rat MAPCs, cultured on Matrigel with FGF-4 and HGF, differentiated into epithelioid cells that expressed hepatocyte nuclear factor-3β (HNF-3β), GATA4, cytokeratin 19 (CK19), transthyretin, and α-fetoprotein by day 7, and expressed CK18, HNF-4, and HNF-1α on days 14–28. Virtually all human, as well as a majority of rodent cells stained positive for albumin and CK18 on day 21; 5% (rodent) to 25% (human) cells were binucleated by day 21. These cells also acquired functional characteristics of hepatocytes: they secreted urea and albumin, had phenobarbital-inducible cytochrome p450, could take up LDL, and stored glycogen. MAPCs, which can be expanded in vitro and maintained in an undifferentiated state for more than 100 population doublings, can thus differentiate into cells with morphological, phenotypic, and functional characteristics of hepatocytes. MAPCs may therefore be an ideal cell for in vivo therapies for liver disorders or for use in bioartificial liver devices. PMID:12021244

  5. Distinguishing Mast Cell Progenitors from Mature Mast Cells in Mice.

    PubMed

    Dahlin, Joakim S; Ding, Zhoujie; Hallgren, Jenny

    2015-07-15

    Mast cells originate from the bone marrow and develop into c-kit(+) FcɛRI(+) cells. Both mast cell progenitors (MCp) and mature mast cells express these cell surface markers, and ways validated to distinguish between the two maturation forms with flow cytometry have been lacking. Here, we show that primary peritoneal MCp from naïve mice expressed high levels of integrin β7 and had a low side scatter (SSC) light profile; whereas mature mast cells expressed lower levels of integrin β7 and had a high SSC light profile. The maturation statuses of the cells were confirmed using three main strategies: (1) MCp, but not mature mast cells, were shown to be depleted by sublethal whole-body γ-irradiation. (2) The MCp were small and immature in terms of granule formation, whereas the mature mast cells were larger and had fully developed metachromatic granules. (3) The MCp had fewer transcripts of mast cell-specific proteases and the enzyme responsible for sulfation of heparin than mature mast cells. Moreover, isolated peritoneal MCp gave rise to mast cells when cultured in vitro. To summarize, we have defined MCp and mature mast cells in naïve mice by flow cytometry. Using this strategy, mast cell maturation can be studied in vivo.

  6. Characterization of Progenitor Cells during Canine Retinal Development

    PubMed Central

    Ávila-García, Mallely; García-Sánchez, Gustavo; Lira-Romero, Esmeralda; Moreno-Mendoza, Norma

    2012-01-01

    We identify the presence of progenitor cells during retinal development in the dog, as this species represents a natural model for studying several breed-specific degenerative retinal disorders. Antibodies to detected progenitor cells (Pax6, C-kit, and nestin) and ganglion cells (BDNF, Brn3a, and Thy1) were used in combination with H3 for the purpose of identifying proliferating cells. Pax6, nestin, C-kit, and H3 were localized mainly in the neuroblastic layer of the retina during the embryonic stage. During the fetal stage, proteins were expressed in the inner neuroblastic layer (INL) as well as in the outer neuroblastic layer; BDNF, Thy1, and Brn3a were also expressed in the INL. During the neonatal stage only C-kit was not expressed. Proliferating cells were present in both undifferentiated and differentiated retina. These results suggest that, during canine retinogenesis, progenitor cells are distributed along the retina and some of these cells remain as progenitor cells of the ganglion cells during the first postnatal days. PMID:22567026

  7. The phenotypic characteristic of liver-derived stem cells from adult human deceased donor liver.

    PubMed

    Lee, J-H; Park, H-J; Kim, Y-A; Lee, D-H; Noh, J-K; Kwon, C H D; Jung, S-M; Lee, S-K

    2012-05-01

    Liver transplantation is the only effective treatment for end-stage liver disease. Because of the limited donor availability, attention has been focused on the possibility to restore liver mass and function through cell transplantation. Stem cells are a promising source for liver repopulation after cell transplantation, but whether or not the adult liver contains hepatic stem cells is highly controversial. Several studies have suggested the presence of stem cells in the adult normal human liver. However, a population with stem cell properties has not yet been isolated. The purpose of this study was to identify and characterize progenitor cells in normal adult human liver. We isolated and expanded human liver stem cells (HLSCs) from a donated liver not suitable for liver transplantation or characterizing them by fluorescence-activated cell sorter, polymerase chain reaction, and immunofluorescence assay. HLSCs expressed the mesenchymal stem cell markers CD29, CD73, CD44, CD90, CD105, and CD166 but not the hematopoietic stem cell markers CD34, CD45, and CD117. HLSCs were also positive for vimentin and nestin, a stem cell marker. The absence of staining for cytokeratin-19, CD117, and CD34 indicated that HLSCs were not oval stem cells. In addition, HLSCs expressed CD26, and in a small percentage of cells, cytokeratin-8 and cytokeratin-18, indicating a partial commitment to hepatic cells. We concluded that HLSCs expressed several mesenchymal but not hematopoietic stem cell markers as well as CD26 and CK18, indicating a partial commitment to hepatic cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Foetal and adult cardiomyocyte progenitor cells have different developmental potential

    PubMed Central

    Van Vliet, Patrick; Smits, Anke M; De Boer, Teun P; Korfage, Tom H; Metz, Corina HG; Roccio, Marta; Van Der Heyden, Marcel AG; Van Veen, Toon AB; Sluijter, Joost PG; Doevendans, Pieter A; Goumans, Marie-José

    2010-01-01

    Abstract In the past years, cardiovascular progenitor cells have been isolated from the human heart and characterized. Up to date, no studies have been reported in which the developmental potential of foetal and adult cardiovascular progenitors was tested simultaneously. However, intrinsic differences will likely affect interpretations regarding progenitor cell potential and application for regenerative medicine. Here we report a direct comparison between human foetal and adult heart-derived cardiomyocyte progenitor cells (CMPCs). We show that foetal and adult CMPCs have distinct preferences to differentiate into mesodermal lineages. Under pro-angiogenic conditions, foetal CMPCs form more endothelial but less smooth muscle cells than adult CMPCs. Foetal CMPCs can also develop towards adipocytes, whereas neither foetal nor adult CMPCs show significant osteogenic differentiation. Interestingly, although both cell types differentiate into heart muscle cells, adult CMPCs give rise to electrophysiologically more mature cardiomyocytes than foetal CMPCs. Taken together, foetal CMPCs are suitable for molecular cell biology and developmental studies. The potential of adult CMPCs to form mature cardiomyocytes and smooth muscle cells may be essential for cardiac repair after transplantation into the injured heart. PMID:20219011

  9. Large volume leukapheresis maximizes the progenitor cell yield for allogeneic peripheral blood progenitor donation.

    PubMed

    Kobbe, G; Soehngen, D; Heyll, A; Fischer, J; Thiele, K P; Aul, C; Wernet, P

    1997-04-01

    We have investigated the efficiency and safety of large volume leukapheresis (LVL) for the collection of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-mobilized peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPCs) from healthy donors. In six apheresis sessions in four healthy individuals on a COBE-BCT Spectra cell separator (median processed volume 3.5 X total blood volume, TBV, range 3.3-4.4 X TBV), harvested cells were collected sequentially into three single bags. The collection bags were changed after processing 33%, 66%, and 100% of the prospective apheresis volume, allowing analysis of PBPCs collected at different periods during one harvest. Mononuclear cells (MNCs), CD34+ cells, CD34+ subsets, and lymphocyte subsets were determined in each bag. Substantially more PBPCs were harvested than were in the circulation before G-CSF administration preceding LVL (median 171%, range 69-267%), reflecting progenitor release during the procedure. In donors 1 and 3, the CD34+ cell yields decreased in the third bag to 53% and 42% of that collected in the first bag, whereas the progenitor cell yields in donors 2 and 4 were stable or rose during the procedure, achieving in the third bag 157% and 105% of the number of CD34+ cells collected in the first bag. Minor changes were found in the subsets of CD34+ cells, lymphocytes, and monocytes collected at different periods during a single harvest. LVL was well tolerated. Reversible thombocytopenia developed in all cases. No late effects attributable to LVL or G-CSF were found in the 4 donors and 16 other healthy individuals who have undergone LVL in our institution. We conclude that LVL is safe and maximizes PBPC yields for allogeneic transplantation.

  10. Endothelial progenitor cells: a new player in lupus?

    PubMed

    Haque, Sahena; Alexander, M Yvonne; Bruce, Ian N

    2012-02-20

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have a greatly increased risk of cardiovascular disease. There is growing interest in the link between vascular damage and lupus-specific inflammatory factors. Impaired endothelial repair could account for the endothelial dysfunction in this patient group. This review describes the contribution that endothelial progenitor cells could play in the pathogenesis of premature vascular damage in this disease. The methods of isolation, detection, and characterization of endothelial progenitor cells, together with their potential role in repair of the endothelium and as a therapeutic target in SLE, are discussed.

  11. [Research and clinical applications regarding endothelial progenitor cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Tan, Kefang; Sun, Xuan

    2014-11-01

    Endothelial injury or dysfunction leads to multiple cardiovascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction, stroke, hypertension and peripheral vascular disease. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are precursor cells of endothelial cells, including the early endothelial progenitor cells and the late endothelial progenitor cells. These two EPC types have different function and surface markers. EPC in this article mainly means late endothelial progenitors which could grow into endothelial cloning and form vessels in vivo. Late EPCs can express CD133, CD31, KDR, CD144, CD34 etc, take in low density lipoprotein, bind with ulex europaeus lectin 1 and form blood vessels in vitro and in vivo. EPCs not only participate in new blood vessels formation, but also are closely related to the repair of damaged endothelium. Many studies confirm that the transplanted EPCs are able to be mobilized to vascular injury location and repair the damaged endothelial cells thus promote new blood vessel formation, which provides a promising strategy for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases and ischemic diseases.

  12. Human cardiomyocyte progenitor cells: a short history of nearly everything.

    PubMed

    van Vliet, Patrick; Goumans, Marie-José; Doevendans, Pieter A; Sluijter, Joost P G

    2012-08-01

    The high occurrence of cardiac disease in the Western world has driven clinicians and cardiovascular biologists to look for alternative strategies to treat patients. A challenging approach is the use of stem cells to repair the heart, in itself an inspiring thought. In the past 10 years, stem cells from different sources have been under intense investigation and, as a result, a multitude of studies have been published on the identification, isolation, and characterization, of cardiovascular progenitor cells and repair in different animal models. However, relatively few cardiovascular progenitor populations have been identified in human hearts, including, but not limited to, cardiosphere-derived cells, cKit+ human cardiac stem cells , Isl1+ cardiovascular progenitors, and, in our lab, cardiomyocyte progenitor cells (CMPCs). Here, we aim to provide a comprehensive summary of the past findings and present challenges for future therapeutic potential of CMPCs. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine © 2012 Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. [Stem and progenitor cells in biostructure of blood vessel walls].

    PubMed

    Korta, Krzysztof; Kupczyk, Piotr; Skóra, Jan; Pupka, Artur; Zejler, Paweł; Hołysz, Marcin; Gajda, Mariusz; Nowakowska, Beata; Barć, Piotr; Dorobisz, Andrzej T; Dawiskiba, Tomasz; Szyber, Piotr; Bar, Julia

    2013-09-18

    Development of vascular and hematopoietic systems during organogenesis occurs at the same time. During vasculogenesis, a small part of cells does not undergo complete differentiation but stays on this level, "anchored" in tissue structures described as stem cell niches. The presence of blood vessels within tissue stem cell niches is typical and led to identification of niches and ensures that they are functioning. The three-layer biostructure of vessel walls for artery and vein, tunica: intima, media and adventitia, for a long time was defined as a mechanical barrier between vessel light and the local tissue environment. Recent findings from vascular biology studies indicate that vessel walls are dynamic biostructures, which are equipped with stem and progenitor cells, described as vascular wall-resident stem cells/progenitor cells (VW-SC/PC). Distinct zones for vessel wall harbor heterogeneous subpopulations of VW-SC/PC, which are described as "subendothelial or vasculogenic zones". Recent evidence from in vitro and in vivo studies show that prenatal activity of stem and progenitor cells is not only limited to organogenesis but also exists in postnatal life, where it is responsible for vessel wall homeostasis, remodeling and regeneration. It is believed that VW-SC/PC could be engaged in progression of vascular disorders and development of neointima. We would like to summarize current knowledge about mesenchymal and progenitor stem cell phenotype with special attention to distribution and biological properties of VW-SC/PC in biostructures of intima, media and adventitia niches. It is postulated that in the near future, niches for VW-SC/PC could be a good source of stem and progenitor cells, especially in the context of vessel tissue bioengineering as a new alternative to traditional revascularization therapies.

  14. Effect of Reishi polysaccharides on human stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wan-Yu; Yang, Wen-Bin; Wong, Chi-Huey; Shih, Daniel Tzu-Bi

    2010-12-15

    The polysaccharide fraction of Ganoderma lucidum (F3) was found to benefit our health in many ways by influencing the activity of tissue stem/progenitor cells. In this study, F3 was found to promote the adipose tissue MSCs' aggregation and chondrosphere formation, with the increase of CAM (N-CAM, I-CAM) expressions and autokine (BMP-2, IL-11, and aggrecan) secretions, in an in vitro chondrogenesis assay. In a stem cell expansion culture, it possesses the thrombopoietin (TPO) and GM-CSF like functions to enhance the survival/renewal abilities of primitive hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSCs). F3 was found to promote the dendrite growth of blood mononuclear cells (MNCs) and the expression of cell adhesion molecules in the formation of immature dendritic cells (DC). On the other hand, F3 exhibited inhibitory effects on blood endothelial progenitor (EPC) colony formation, with concomitant reduction of cell surface endoglin (CD105) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 (VEGFR-3) marker expressions, in the presence of angiogenic factors. A further cytokine array analysis revealed that F3 indeed inhibited the angiogenin synthesis and enhanced IL-1, MCP-1, MIP-1, RANTES, and GRO productions in the blood EPC derivation culture. Collectively, we have demonstrated that the polysaccharide fraction of G. lucidum F3 exhibits cytokine and chemokine like functions which are beneficial to human tissue stem/progenitor cells by modulating their CAM expressions and biological activities. These findings provide us a better the observation that F3 glycopolysaccharides indeed possesses anti-angiogenic and immune-modulating functions and promotes hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell homing for better human tissue protection, reducing disease progression and health.

  15. Notch Signaling Coordinates Progenitor Cell-Mediated Biliary Regeneration Following Partial Hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jie; Zhou, Yingqun; Hu, Tianyuan; Zhang, Hui; Shen, Miao; Cheng, Ping; Dai, Weiqi; Wang, Fan; Chen, Kan; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Chengfeng; Li, Jingjing; Zheng, Yuanyuan; Yang, Jing; Zhu, Rong; Wang, Jianrong; Lu, Wenxia; Zhang, Huawei; Wang, Junshan; Xia, Yujing; De Assuncao, Thiago M.; Jalan-Sakrikar, Nidhi; Huebert, Robert C.; Bin Zhou; Guo, Chuanyong

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant transcriptional regulation contributes to the pathogenesis of both congenital and adult forms of liver disease. Although the transcription factor RBPJ is essential for liver morphogenesis and biliary development, its specific function in the differentiation of hepatic progenitor cells (HPC) has not been investigated, and little is known about its role in adult liver regeneration. HPCs are bipotent liver stem cells that can self-replicate and differentiate into hepatocytes or cholangiocytes in vitro. HPCs are thought to play an important role in liver regeneration and repair responses. While the coordinated repopulation of both hepatocyte and cholangiocyte compartment is pivotal to the structure and function of the liver after regeneration, the mechanisms coordinating biliary regeneration remain vastly understudied. Here, we utilized complex genetic manipulations to drive liver-specific deletion of the Rbpj gene in conjunction with lineage tracing techniques to delineate the precise functions of RBPJ during biliary development and HPC-associated biliary regeneration after hepatectomy. Furthermore, we demonstrate that RBPJ promotes HPC differentiation toward cholangiocytes in vitro and blocks hepatocyte differentiation through mechanisms involving Hippo-Notch crosstalk. Overall, this study demonstrates that the Notch-RBPJ signaling axis critically regulates biliary regeneration by coordinating the fate decision of HPC and clarifies the molecular mechanisms involved. PMID:26951801

  16. Engineering Retina from Human Retinal Progenitors (Cell Lines)

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yang

    2009-01-01

    Retinal degeneration resulting in the loss of photoreceptors is the leading cause of blindness. Several therapeutic protocols are under consideration for treatment of this disease. Tissue replacement is one such strategy currently being explored. However, availability of tissues for transplant poses a major obstacle. Another strategy with great potential is the use of adult stem cells, which could be expanded in culture and then utilized to engineer retinal tissue. In this study, we have explored a spontaneously immortalized human retinal progenitor cell line for its potential in retinal engineering using rotary cultures to generate three-dimensional (3D) structures. Retinal progenitors cultured alone or cocultured with retinal pigment epithelial cells form aggregates. The aggregate size increases between days 1 and 10. The cells grown as a 3D culture rotary system, which promotes cell–cell interaction, retain a spectrum of differentiation capability. Photoreceptor differentiation in these cultures is confirmed by significant upregulation of rhodopsin and AaNat, an enzyme implicated in melatonin synthesis (immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis). Photoreceptor induction and differentiation is further attested to by the upregulation of rod transcription factor Nrl, Nr2e3, expression of interstitial retinal binding protein, and rhodopsin kinase by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. Differentiation toward other cell lineages is confirmed by the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase in amacrine cells, thy 1.1 expression in ganglion cells and calbindin, and GNB3 expression in cone cells. The capability of retinal progenitors to give rise to several retinal cell types when grown as aggregated cells in rotary culture offers hope that progenitor stem cells under appropriate culture conditions will be valuable to engineer retinal constructs, which could be further tested for their transplant potential. The fidelity with which this multipotential cell

  17. Hepatic differentiation of embryonic stem cells by murine fetal liver mesenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Takamichi; Yasuchika, Kentaro; Ikai, Iwao

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocytes derived from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are a potential cell source for regenerative medicine. However, it has been technically difficult to differentiate ESCs into mature hepatocytes because the definitive growth factors and molecular mechanisms governing hepatocyte differentiation have not yet been well defined. The CD45(-)CD49f(+/-)Thy1(+)gp38(+) mesenchymal cells that reside in murine fetal livers induce hepatic progenitor cells to differentiate into mature hepatocytes by direct cell-cell contact. Utilizing these cells, we employ a two-step procedure for hepatic maturation of ESCs: first, ESCs are differentiated into endodermal cells or hepatic progenitor cells, and second, ESC-derived endodermal cells are matured into functional hepatocytes by coculture with murine fetal liver mesenchymal cells. The ESC-derived hepatocyte-like cells possess hepatic functions, including ammonia removal activity, albumin secretion ability, glycogen synthesis and storage, and cytochrome P450 enzymatic activity.

  18. Derivation, characterization, and phenotypic variation of hepatic progenitor cell lines isolated from adult rats.

    PubMed

    Yin, Li; Sun, Mingzeng; Ilic, Zoran; Leffert, Hyam L; Sell, Stewart

    2002-02-01

    Liver progenitor cells (LPCs) cloned from adult rat livers following allyl alcohol injury express hematopoietic stem cell and early hepatic lineage markers when cultured on feeder layers; under these conditions, neither mature hepatocyte nor bile duct, Ito, stellate, Kupffer cell, or macrophage markers are detected. These phenotypes have remained stable without aneuploidy or morphological transformation after more than 100 population doublings. When cultured without feeder layers, the early lineage markers disappear, and mature hepatocyte markers are expressed; mature hepatocytic differentiation and cell size are also augmented by polypeptide and steroidal growth factors. In contrast to hepatocytic potential, duct-like structures and biliary epithelial markers are expressed on Matrigel. Because they were derived without carcinogens or mutagens, these bipotential LPC lines provide novel tools for models of cellular plasticity and hepatocarcinogenesis, as well as lines for use in cellular transplantation, gene therapy, and bioreactor construction.

  19. Cell cycle regulation of hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Hao, Sha; Chen, Chen; Cheng, Tao

    2016-05-01

    The highly regulated process of blood production is achieved through the hierarchical organization of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) subsets and their progenies, which differ in self-renewal and differentiation potential. Genetic studies in mice have demonstrated that cell cycle is tightly controlled by the complex interplay between extrinsic cues and intrinsic regulatory pathways involved in HSC self-renewal and differentiation. Deregulation of these cellular programs may transform HSCs or hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) into disease-initiating stem cells, and can result in hematopoietic malignancies such as leukemia. While previous studies have shown roles for some cell cycle regulators and related signaling pathways in HSCs and HPCs, a more complete picture regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying cell cycle regulation in HSCs or HPCs is lacking. Based on accumulated studies in this field, the present review introduces the basic components of the cell cycle machinery and discusses their major cellular networks that regulate the dormancy and cell cycle progression of HSCs. Knowledge on this topic would help researchers and clinicians to better understand the pathogenesis of relevant blood disorders and to develop new strategies for therapeutic manipulation of HSCs.

  20. Stem and progenitor cells: advancing bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Tevlin, R; Walmsley, G G; Marecic, O; Hu, Michael S; Wan, D C; Longaker, M T

    2016-04-01

    Unlike many other postnatal tissues, bone can regenerate and repair itself; nevertheless, this capacity can be overcome. Traditionally, surgical reconstructive strategies have implemented autologous, allogeneic, and prosthetic materials. Autologous bone--the best option--is limited in supply and also mandates an additional surgical procedure. In regenerative tissue engineering, there are myriad issues to consider in the creation of a functional, implantable replacement tissue. Importantly, there must exist an easily accessible, abundant cell source with the capacity to express the phenotype of the desired tissue, and a biocompatible scaffold to deliver the cells to the damaged region. A literature review was performed using PubMed; peer-reviewed publications were screened for relevance in order to identify key advances in stem and progenitor cell contribution to the field of bone tissue engineering. In this review, we briefly introduce various adult stem cells implemented in bone tissue engineering such as mesenchymal stem cells (including bone marrow- and adipose-derived stem cells), endothelial progenitor cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells. We then discuss numerous advances associated with their application and subsequently focus on technological advances in the field, before addressing key regenerative strategies currently used in clinical practice. Stem and progenitor cell implementation in bone tissue engineering strategies have the ability to make a major impact on regenerative medicine and reduce patient morbidity. As the field of regenerative medicine endeavors to harness the body's own cells for treatment, scientific innovation has led to great advances in stem cell-based therapies in the past decade.

  1. Conversion of human fibroblasts into monocyte-like progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Vitaloni, Marianna; Guenechea, Guillermo; Xia, Yun; Kurian, Leo; Dubova, Ilir; Bueren, Juan; Laricchia-Robbio, Leopoldo; Belmonte, Juan Carlos Izpisua

    2014-01-01

    Reprogramming technologies have emerged as a promising approach for future regenerative medicine. Here we report on the establishment of a novel methodology allowing for the conversion of human fibroblasts into Hematopoietic Progenitor-like Cells (HPC) with macrophage differentiation potential. SOX2 overexpression in human fibroblasts, a gene found to be upregulated during hematopoietic reconstitution in mice, induced the rapid appearance of CD34+ cells with a concomitant upregulation of mesoderm-related markers. Profiling of Cord Blood hematopoietic progenitor cell populations identified miR-125b as a factor facilitating commitment of SOX2-generated CD34+ cells to immature hematopoietic-like progenitor cells with grafting potential. Further differentiation towards the monocytic lineage resulted in the appearance of CD14+ cells with functional phagocytic capacity. In vivo transplantation of SOX2/miR-125b-generated CD34+ cells facilitated the maturation of the engrafted cells towards CD45+ cells and ultimately the monocytic/macrophage lineage. Altogether, our results indicate that strategies combining lineage conversion and further lineage specification by in vivo or in vitro approaches could help to circumvent long-standing obstacles for the reprogramming of human cells into hematopoietic cells with clinical potential. PMID:25175072

  2. A Progenitor Cell Expressing Transcription Factor RORγt Generates All Human Innate Lymphoid Cell Subsets.

    PubMed

    Scoville, Steven D; Mundy-Bosse, Bethany L; Zhang, Michael H; Chen, Li; Zhang, Xiaoli; Keller, Karen A; Hughes, Tiffany; Chen, Luxi; Cheng, Stephanie; Bergin, Stephen M; Mao, Hsiaoyin C; McClory, Susan; Yu, Jianhua; Carson, William E; Caligiuri, Michael A; Freud, Aharon G

    2016-05-17

    The current model of murine innate lymphoid cell (ILC) development holds that mouse ILCs are derived downstream of the common lymphoid progenitor through lineage-restricted progenitors. However, corresponding lineage-restricted progenitors in humans have yet to be discovered. Here we identified a progenitor population in human secondary lymphoid tissues (SLTs) that expressed the transcription factor RORγt and was unique in its ability to generate all known ILC subsets, including natural killer (NK) cells, but not other leukocyte populations. In contrast to murine fate-mapping data, which indicate that only ILC3s express Rorγt, these human progenitor cells as well as human peripheral blood NK cells and all mature ILC populations expressed RORγt. Thus, all human ILCs can be generated through an RORγt(+) developmental pathway from a common progenitor in SLTs. These findings help establish the developmental signals and pathways involved in human ILC development.

  3. Generation and characterization of rat liver stem cell lines and their engraftment in a rat model of liver failure.

    PubMed

    Kuijk, Ewart W; Rasmussen, Shauna; Blokzijl, Francis; Huch, Meritxell; Gehart, Helmuth; Toonen, Pim; Begthel, Harry; Clevers, Hans; Geurts, Aron M; Cuppen, Edwin

    2016-02-26

    The rat is an important model for liver regeneration. However, there is no in vitro culture system that can capture the massive proliferation that can be observed after partial hepatectomy in rats. We here describe the generation of rat liver stem cell lines. Rat liver stem cells, which grow as cystic organoids, were characterized by high expression of the stem cell marker Lgr5, by the expression of liver progenitor and duct markers, and by low expression of hepatocyte markers, oval cell markers, and stellate cell markers. Prolonged cultures of rat liver organoids depended on high levels of WNT-signalling and the inhibition of BMP-signaling. Upon transplantation of clonal lines to a Fah(-/-) Il2rg(-/-) rat model of liver failure, the rat liver stem cells engrafted into the host liver where they differentiated into areas with FAH and Albumin positive hepatocytes. Rat liver stem cell lines hold potential as consistent reliable cell sources for pharmacological, toxicological or metabolic studies. In addition, rat liver stem cell lines may contribute to the development of regenerative medicine in liver disease. To our knowledge, the here described liver stem cell lines represent the first organoid culture system in the rat.

  4. Generation and characterization of rat liver stem cell lines and their engraftment in a rat model of liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Kuijk, Ewart W.; Rasmussen, Shauna; Blokzijl, Francis; Huch, Meritxell; Gehart, Helmuth; Toonen, Pim; Begthel, Harry; Clevers, Hans; Geurts, Aron M.; Cuppen, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    The rat is an important model for liver regeneration. However, there is no in vitro culture system that can capture the massive proliferation that can be observed after partial hepatectomy in rats. We here describe the generation of rat liver stem cell lines. Rat liver stem cells, which grow as cystic organoids, were characterized by high expression of the stem cell marker Lgr5, by the expression of liver progenitor and duct markers, and by low expression of hepatocyte markers, oval cell markers, and stellate cell markers. Prolonged cultures of rat liver organoids depended on high levels of WNT-signalling and the inhibition of BMP-signaling. Upon transplantation of clonal lines to a Fah−/− Il2rg−/− rat model of liver failure, the rat liver stem cells engrafted into the host liver where they differentiated into areas with FAH and Albumin positive hepatocytes. Rat liver stem cell lines hold potential as consistent reliable cell sources for pharmacological, toxicological or metabolic studies. In addition, rat liver stem cell lines may contribute to the development of regenerative medicine in liver disease. To our knowledge, the here described liver stem cell lines represent the first organoid culture system in the rat. PMID:26915950

  5. Imparting regenerative capacity to limbs by progenitor cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Gufa; Chen, Ying; Slack, Jonathan M.W.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The frog Xenopus can normally regenerate its limbs at early developmental stages but loses the ability during metamorphosis. This behavior provides a potential gain-of-function model for measures that can enhance limb regeneration. Here we show that frog limbs can be caused to form multidigit regenerates after receiving transplants of larval limb progenitor cells. It is necessary to activate Wnt/β -catenin signaling in the cells, and to add Sonic hedgehog, FGF10 and thymosin β4. These factors promote survival and growth of the grafted cells and also provide pattern information. The eventual regenerates are not composed solely of donor tissue; the host cells also make a substantial contribution despite their lack of regeneration-competence. Cells from adult frog legs or from regenerating tadpole tails do not promote limb regeneration, demonstrating the necessity for limb progenitor cells. These findings have obvious implications for the development of a technology to promote limb regeneration in mammals. PMID:23273877

  6. Clinical Application of Endothelial Progenitor Cell: Are We Ready?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao-Hung; Huang, Po-Hsun; Chen, Jaw-Wen; Lin, Shing-Jong; Lee, Ming-Feng; Yang, Ning-I; Cherng, Wen-Jin

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) opened up a new era of EPC-based therapies for cardiovascular diseases. While researchers are enthusiastic about applying EPCs to clinical therapy, progress has been substantially limited due to the lack of a thorough characterization and understanding of early and late outgrowth EPCs (also called endothelial colony-forming cell, ECFCs) biology. As a means of facilitating the understanding of how late EPCs can most effectively be applied to clinical therapeutics, this article reviews the recent progress covering 5 important issues: (1) The best passages of ex vivo-cultivated EPCs for cell therapy; (2) inflammatory activation of late EPCs: a real world consideration; (3) late EPC is not an endothelial cell: an issue of cell contamination; (4) ways to improve EPC function and differentiation; and (5) how to separate and delete smooth muscle progenitor cells (SPCs). PMID:27122748

  7. Flow cytometric data analysis of circulating progenitor cell stability.

    PubMed

    Mahar, Ernestine A; Mou, Liping; Hayek, Salim S; Quyyumi, Arshed A; Waller, Edmund K

    2017-02-01

    A recent publication by Mekonnen et al. demonstrated that among women with non-obstructive coronary artery disease, higher levels of circulating progenitor cells in the blood (CPC), were associated with impaired coronary flow reserve [1]. We performed a quality control assessment of the stability of circulating blood progenitor cells in blood samples stored at 4 °C, to determine the time period during which blood samples can be analyzed and yield consistent data for progenitor cell content. Healthy volunteers (n=6) were recruited and underwent phlebotomy, and blood was stored in EDTA tubes at 4 °C. Flow cytometry was performed to quantitate progenitor cell subsets at 0-4 h, 24 h, and 48 h post phlebotomy. All processed samples were fixed with 1% Paraformaldehyde and 1,000,000 total data events were collected. We found no significant differences in PC data for both CD34+ (P=0.68 for one-way ANOVA) and CD34+/CD133+ (P=0.74 for one-way ANOVA).

  8. Multipotent adult progenitor cells improve the hematopoietic function in myelodysplasia.

    PubMed

    Roobrouck, Valerie D; Wolfs, Esther; Delforge, Michel; Broekaert, Dorien; Chakraborty, Soumen; Sels, Kathleen; Vanwelden, Thomas; Holvoet, Bryan; Lhoest, Larissa; Khurana, Satish; Pandey, Shubham; Hoornaert, Chloé; Ponsaerts, Peter; Struys, Tom; Boeckx, Nancy; Vandenberghe, Peter; Deroose, Christophe M; Verfaillie, Catherine M

    2017-06-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a group of clonal stem cell disorders affecting the normal hematopoietic differentiation process and leading to abnormal maturation and differentiation of all blood cell lineages. Treatment options are limited, and there is an unmet medical need for effective therapies for patients with severe cytopenias. We demonstrate that multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPC) improve the function of hematopoietic progenitors derived from human MDS bone marrow (BM) by significantly increasing the frequency of primitive progenitors as well as the number of myeloid colonies. This effect was more pronounced in a non-contact culture, indicating the importance of soluble factors produced by the MAPC cells. Moreover, the cells did not stimulate the growth of the abnormal MDS clone, as shown by fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis on BM cells from patients with a known genetic abnormality. We also demonstrate that MAPC cells can provide stromal support for patient-derived hematopoietic cells. When MAPC cells were intravenously injected into a mouse model of MDS, they migrated to the site of injury and increased the hematopoietic function in diseased mice. The preclinical studies undertaken here indicate an initial proof of concept for the use of MAPC cell therapy in patients with MDS-related severe and symptomatic cytopenias and should pave the way for further investigation in clinical trials. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Endothelial cells are progenitors of cardiac pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qi; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Yang; Adams, Susanne; Eilken, Hanna; Stehling, Martin; Corada, Monica; Dejana, Elisabetta; Zhou, Bin; Adams, Ralf H.

    2016-01-01

    Mural cells of the vessel wall, namely pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells, are essential for vascular integrity. The developmental sources of these cells and molecular mechanisms controlling their progenitors in the heart are only partially understood. Here we show that endocardial endothelial cells are progenitors of pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells in the murine embryonic heart. Endocardial cells undergo endothelial–mesenchymal transition and convert into primitive mesenchymal progenitors expressing the platelet-derived growth factor receptors, PDGFRα and PDGFRβ. These progenitors migrate into the myocardium, differentiate and assemble the wall of coronary vessels, which requires canonical Wnt signalling involving Frizzled4, β-catenin and endothelial cell-derived Wnt ligands. Our findings identify a novel and unexpected population of progenitors for coronary mural cells with potential relevance for heart function and disease conditions. PMID:27516371

  10. Centroacinar Cells Are Progenitors That Contribute to Endocrine Pancreas Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Delaspre, Fabien; Beer, Rebecca L.; Rovira, Meritxell; Huang, Wei; Wang, Guangliang; Gee, Stephen; Vitery, Maria del Carmen; Wheelan, Sarah J.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with a paucity of insulin-producing β-cells. With the goal of finding therapeutic routes to treat diabetes, we aim to find molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in β-cell neogenesis and regeneration. To facilitate discovery of such mechanisms, we use a vertebrate organism where pancreatic cells readily regenerate. The larval zebrafish pancreas contains Notch-responsive progenitors that during development give rise to adult ductal, endocrine, and centroacinar cells (CACs). Adult CACs are also Notch responsive and are morphologically similar to their larval predecessors. To test our hypothesis that adult CACs are also progenitors, we took two complementary approaches: 1) We established the transcriptome for adult CACs. Using gene ontology, transgenic lines, and in situ hybridization, we found that the CAC transcriptome is enriched for progenitor markers. 2) Using lineage tracing, we demonstrated that CACs do form new endocrine cells after β-cell ablation or partial pancreatectomy. We concluded that CACs and their larval predecessors are the same cell type and represent an opportune model to study both β-cell neogenesis and β-cell regeneration. Furthermore, we show that in cftr loss-of-function mutants, there is a deficiency of larval CACs, providing a possible explanation for pancreatic complications associated with cystic fibrosis. PMID:26153247

  11. Irx4 Marks a Multipotent, Ventricular-Specific Progenitor Cell.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Daryl O; Lalit, Pratik A; Biermann, Mitch; Markandeya, Yogananda S; Capes, Deborah L; Addesso, Luke; Patel, Gina; Han, Tianxiao; John, Manorama C; Powers, Patricia A; Downs, Karen M; Kamp, Timothy J; Lyons, Gary E

    2016-12-01

    While much progress has been made in the resolution of the cellular hierarchy underlying cardiogenesis, our understanding of chamber-specific myocardium differentiation remains incomplete. To better understand ventricular myocardium differentiation, we targeted the ventricle-specific gene, Irx4, in mouse embryonic stem cells to generate a reporter cell line. Using an antibiotic-selection approach, we purified Irx4(+) cells in vitro from differentiating embryoid bodies. The isolated Irx4(+) cells proved to be highly proliferative and presented Cxcr4, Pdgfr-alpha, Flk1, and Flt1 on the cell surface. Single Irx4(+) ventricular progenitor cells (VPCs) exhibited cardiovascular potency, generating endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and ventricular myocytes in vitro. The ventricular specificity of the Irx4(+) population was further demonstrated in vivo as VPCs injected into the cardiac crescent subsequently produced Mlc2v(+) myocytes that exclusively contributed to the nascent ventricle at E9.5. These findings support the existence of a newly identified ventricular myocardial progenitor. This is the first report of a multipotent cardiac progenitor that contributes progeny specific to the ventricular myocardium. Stem Cells 2016;34:2875-2888. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  12. ENDOTHELIAL PROGENITOR CELLS AS SHUTTLE OF ANTICANCER AGENTS.

    PubMed

    Laurenzana, Anna; Margheri, Francesca; Chilla', Anastasia; Biagioni, Alessio; Margheri, Giancarlo; Calorini, Lido; Fibbi, Gabriella; Del Rosso, Mario

    2016-08-08

    Cell therapies are treatments in which stem or progenitor cells are induced to differentiate into the specific cell type required to repair damaged or destroyed tissues. Following their discovery, endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have stimulated a worldwide interest as possible vehicles to perform an autologous cell-therapy of tumors. Taking into account the tumor-homing properties of EPCs, two different approaches to control cancer progression have been pursued by combining the cell-based therapy with gene therapy or with nanomedicine. The first one is based on the possibility to engineer EPCs to express different transgenes, the second one on the capacity of EPCs to uptake nanomaterials. Here we will review the most important progresses covering the following issues: the characterization of bona fide endothelial progenitor cells, their role in tumor vascularisation and metastasis, and preclinical data about their use in cell-based tumor therapy, considering anti-angiogenic, suicide, immune-stimulating and oncolytic virus gene-therapy. The mixed approach of EPC cell therapy and nanomedicine will be discussed in terms of plasmonic-dependent thermoablation and molecular imaging.

  13. Glial progenitor cell-based treatment of the childhood leukodystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, M. Joana; Goldman, Steven A.

    2017-01-01

    The childhood leukodystrophies comprise a group of hereditary disorders characterized by the absence, malformation or destruction of myelin. These disorders share common clinical, radiological and pathological features, despite their diverse molecular and genetic etiologies. Oligodendrocytes and astrocytes are the major affected cell populations, and are either structurally impaired or metabolically compromised through cell-intrinsic pathology, or are the victims of mis-accumulated toxic byproducts of metabolic derangement. In either case, glial cell replacement using implanted tissue or pluripotent stem cell-derived human neural or glial progenitor cells may comprise a promising strategy for both structural remyelination and metabolic rescue. A broad variety of pediatric white matter disorders, including the primary hypomyelinating disorders, the lysosomal storage disorders, and the broader group of non-lysosomal metabolic leukodystrophies, may all be appropriate candidates for glial progenitor cell-based treatment. Nonetheless, a variety of specific challenges remain before this therapeutic strategy can be applied to children. These include timely diagnosis, before irreparable neuronal injury has ensued; understanding the natural history of the targeted disease; defining the optimal cell phenotype for each disorder; achieving safe and scalable cellular compositions, designing age-appropriate controlled clinical trials; and for autologous therapy of genetic disorders, achieving the safe genetic editing of pluripotent stem cells. Yet these challenges notwithstanding, the promise of glial progenitor cell-based treatment of the childhood myelin disorders offers hope to the many victims of this otherwise largely untreatable class of disease. PMID:27170209

  14. Liver natural killer cells: subsets and roles in liver immunity

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hui; Wisse, Eddie; Tian, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    The liver represents a frontline immune organ that is constantly exposed to a variety of gut-derived antigens as a result of its unique location and blood supply. With a predominant role in innate immunity, the liver is enriched with various innate immune cells, among which natural killer (NK) cells play important roles in host defense and in maintaining immune balance. Hepatic NK cells were first described as ‘pit cells' in the rat liver in the 1970s. Recent studies of NK cells in mouse and human livers have shown that two distinct NK cell subsets, liver-resident NK cells and conventional NK (cNK) cells, are present in this organ. Here, we review liver NK cell subsets in different species, revisiting rat hepatic pit cells and highlighting recent progress related to resident NK cells in mouse and human livers, and also discuss the dual roles of NK cells in liver immunity. PMID:26639736

  15. Liver natural killer cells: subsets and roles in liver immunity.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hui; Wisse, Eddie; Tian, Zhigang

    2016-05-01

    The liver represents a frontline immune organ that is constantly exposed to a variety of gut-derived antigens as a result of its unique location and blood supply. With a predominant role in innate immunity, the liver is enriched with various innate immune cells, among which natural killer (NK) cells play important roles in host defense and in maintaining immune balance. Hepatic NK cells were first described as 'pit cells' in the rat liver in the 1970s. Recent studies of NK cells in mouse and human livers have shown that two distinct NK cell subsets, liver-resident NK cells and conventional NK (cNK) cells, are present in this organ. Here, we review liver NK cell subsets in different species, revisiting rat hepatic pit cells and highlighting recent progress related to resident NK cells in mouse and human livers, and also discuss the dual roles of NK cells in liver immunity.

  16. Retinal endothelial cell apoptosis stimulates recruitment of endothelial progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Bhatwadekar, Ashay D; Glenn, Josephine V; Curtis, Tim M; Grant, Maria B; Stitt, Alan W; Gardiner, Tom A

    2009-10-01

    Bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) contribute to vascular repair although it is uncertain how local endothelial cell apoptosis influences their reparative function. This study was conducted to determine how the presence of apoptotic bodies at sites of endothelial damage may influence participation of EPCs in retinal microvascular repair. Microlesions of apoptotic cell death were created in monolayers of retinal microvascular endothelial cells (RMECs) by using the photodynamic drug verteporfin. The adhesion of early-EPCs to these lesions was studied before detachment of the apoptotic cells or after their removal from the wound site. Apoptotic bodies were fed to normal RMECs and mRNA levels for adhesion molecules were analyzed. Endothelial lesions where apoptotic bodies were left attached at the wound site showed a fivefold enhancement in EPC recruitment (P < 0.05) compared with lesions where the apoptotic cells had been removed. In intact RMEC monolayers exposed to apoptotic bodies, expression of ICAM, VCAM, and E-selectin was upregulated by 5- to 15-fold (P < 0.05-0.001). EPCs showed a characteristic chemotactic response (P < 0.05) to conditioned medium obtained from apoptotic bodies, whereas analysis of the medium showed significantly increased levels of VEGF, IL-8, IL-6, and TNF-alpha when compared to control medium; SDF-1 remained unchanged. The data indicate that apoptotic bodies derived from retinal capillary endothelium mediate release of proangiogenic cytokines and chemokines and induce adhesion molecule expression in a manner that facilitates EPC recruitment.

  17. RBP-J (Rbpsuh) is essential to maintain muscle progenitor cells and to generate satellite cells.

    PubMed

    Vasyutina, Elena; Lenhard, Diana C; Wende, Hagen; Erdmann, Bettina; Epstein, Jonathan A; Birchmeier, Carmen

    2007-03-13

    In the developing muscle, a pool of myogenic progenitor cells is formed and maintained. These resident progenitors provide a source of cells for muscle growth in development and generate satellite cells in the perinatal period. By the use of conditional mutagenesis in mice, we demonstrate here that the major mediator of Notch signaling, the transcription factor RBP-J, is essential to maintain this pool of progenitor cells in an undifferentiated state. In the absence of RBP-J, these cells undergo uncontrolled myogenic differentiation, leading to a depletion of the progenitor pool. This results in a lack of muscle growth in development and severe muscle hypotrophy. In addition, satellite cells are not formed late in fetal development in conditional RBP-J mutant mice. We conclude that RBP-J is required in the developing muscle to set aside proliferating progenitors and satellite cells.

  18. [Advances in Classification and Research Methods of Lung Epithelial Stem 
and Progenitor Cells].

    PubMed

    Deng, Minhua; Li, Jinhua; Gan, Ye; Chen, Ping

    2017-02-20

    Isolation and characterization of lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells and understanding of their specific role in lung physiopathology are critical for preventing and controlling lung diseases including lung cancer. In this review, we summarized recent advances in classification and research methods of lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells. Lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells were region-specific, which primarily included basal cells and duct cells in proximal airway, Clara cells, variant Clara cells, bronchioalveolar stem cells and induced krt5+ cells in bronchioles, type II alveolar cells and type II alveolar progenitor cells in alveoli. The research methods of lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells were mainly focused on lung injury models, lineage-tracing experiments, three dimensional culture, transplantation, chronic labeled cells and single-cell transcriptome analysis. Lastly, the potential relationship between lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells and lung cancer as well as lung cancer stem cell-targeted drug development were briefly reviewed.

  19. Role of Pigment Epithelium-Derived Factor in Stem/Progenitor Cell-Associated Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jung-Tung; Chen, Yuh-Lien; Chen, Wen-Chi; Chen, Huey-Yi; Lin, Yi-Wen; Wang, Shu-Huei; Man, Kee-Ming; Wan, Hui-Min; Yin, Wei-Hsian; Liu, Po-Len; Chen, Yung-Hsiang

    2012-01-01

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) was first identified in retinal pigment epithelium cells. It is an endogenously produced protein that is widely expressed throughout the human body such as in the eyes, liver, heart, and adipose tissue; it exhibits multiple and varied biological activities. PEDF is a multifunctional protein with antiangiogenic, antitumorigenic, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antithrombotic, neurotrophic, and neuroprotective properties. More recently, PEDF has been shown to be the most potent inhibitor of stem/progenitor cell-associated neovascularization. Neovascularization is a complex process regulated by a large, interacting network of molecules from stem/progenitor cells. PEDF is also involved in the pathogenesis of angiogenic eye disease, tumor growth, and cardiovascular disease. Novel antiangiogenic agents with tolerable side effects are desired for the treatment of patients with various diseases. Here, we review the value of PEDF as an important endogenous antiangiogenic molecule; we focus on the recently identified role of PEDF as a possible new target molecule to influence stem/progenitor cell-related neovascularization. PMID:22685380

  20. Regulation of Circulating Progenitor Cells in Left Ventricular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Boilson, Barry A.; Larsen, Katarina; Harbuzariu, Adriana; Delacroix, Sinny; Korinek, Josef; Froehlich, Harald; Bailey, Kent R.; Scott, Christopher G.; Shapiro, Brian P.; Boerrigter, Guido; Chen, Horng H.; Redfield, Margaret M.; Burnett, John C.; Simari, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Reductions in numbers of circulating progenitor cells (CD34+ cell subsets) have been demonstrated in patients at risk for, or in the presence of, cardiovascular disease. The mediators of these reductions remain undefined. To determine whether neurohumoral factors might regulate circulating CD34+ cell subsets in vivo, we studied complementary canine models of left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. Methods and Results A pacing model of severe LV dysfunction and a hypertensive renal wrap (RW) model in which dogs were randomized to receive deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA) were studied. Circulating CD34+ cell subsets including hematopoietic precursor cells (HPCs:CD34+/CD45dim/VEGFR2-) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs:CD34+/CD45-/VEGFR2+) were quantified. Additionally, the effect of mineralocorticoid excess on circulating progenitor cells in normal dogs was studied. The majority of circulating CD34+ cells expressed CD45 dimly and did not express VEGFR2, consistent with an HPC phenotype. HPCs were decreased in response to pacing, and this decrease correlated with plasma aldosterone levels (Spearman Rank correlation = -0.67, p=0.03). In the RW model, administration of DOCA resulted in decreased HPCs. No changes were seen in EPCs in either model. Normal dogs treated with DOCA exhibited a decrease in HPCs in peripheral blood but not bone marrow associated with decreased telomerase activity. Conclusions This is the first study to demonstrate that mineralocorticoid excess, either endogenous or exogenous, results in reduction in HPCs. These data suggest that mineralocorticoids may induce accelerated senescence of progenitor cells leading to their reduced survival and decline in numbers. PMID:20573992

  1. Initiating Differentiation in Immortalized Multipotent Otic Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jadali, Azadeh; Song, Zhichao; Ruiz-Laureano, Alejandra S.; Toro-Ramos, Alana

    2017-01-01

    Use of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) or embryonic stem cells (ESC) for cell replacement therapies holds great promise. Several limitations including low yields and heterogeneous populations of differentiated cells hinder the progress of stem cell therapies. A fate restricted immortalized multipotent otic progenitor (iMOP) cell line was generated to facilitate efficient differentiation of large numbers of functional hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons (SGN) for inner ear cell replacement therapies. Starting from dissociated cultures of single iMOP cells, protocols that promote cell cycle exit and differentiation by growth factor (bFGF) withdrawal were described. A significant decrease in proliferating cells after bFGF withdrawal was confirmed using an EdU cell proliferation assay. Concomitant with a decrease in proliferation, successful differentiation resulted in expression of molecular markers and morphological changes. Immunostaining of Cdkn1b (p27KIP) and Cdh1 (E-cadherin) in iMOP-derived otospheres was used as an indicator for differentiation into inner ear sensory epithelia while immunostaining of Cdkn1b and Tubb3 (neuronal β-tubulin) was used to identify iMOP-derived neurons. Use of iMOP cells provides an important tool for understanding cell fate decisions made by inner ear neurosensory progenitors and will help develop protocols for generating large numbers of iPSC or ESC-derived hair cells and SGNs. These methods will accelerate efforts for generating otic cells for replacement therapies. PMID:26780605

  2. Endothelial progenitor cells, cardiovascular risk factors and lifestyle modifications.

    PubMed

    Di Stefano, Rossella; Felice, Francesca; Feriani, Roberto; Balbarini, Alberto

    2013-04-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) contribute substantially to preservation of a structurally and functionally intact endothelium. EPCs home in to the sites of endothelial injury and ischemia, where they proliferate, differentiate and integrate into the endothelial layer or exert a paracrine function by producing vascular growth factors. This review will focus on successful lifestyle interventions that aim to maintain vascular health through beneficial actions on cell populations with vasculogenic potential. The results of the studies proving the role of healthy lifestyle are particularly emphasized.

  3. In Search of Adrenocortical Stem and Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Alex C.; Barlaskar, Ferdous M.; Heaton, Joanne H.; Else, Tobias; Kelly, Victoria R.; Krill, Kenneth T.; Scheys, Joshua O.; Simon, Derek P.; Trovato, Alessia; Yang, Wei-Hsiung; Hammer, Gary D.

    2009-01-01

    Scientists have long hypothesized the existence of tissue-specific (somatic) stem cells and have searched for their location in different organs. The theory that adrenocortical organ homeostasis is maintained by undifferentiated stem or progenitor cells can be traced back nearly a century. Similar to other organ systems, it is widely believed that these rare cells of the adrenal cortex remain relatively undifferentiated and quiescent until needed to replenish the organ, at which time they undergo proliferation and terminal differentiation. Historical studies examining cell cycle activation by label retention assays and regenerative potential by organ transplantation experiments suggested that the adrenocortical progenitors reside in the outer periphery of the adrenal gland. Over the past decade, the Hammer laboratory, building on this hypothesis and these observations, has endeavored to understand the mechanisms of adrenocortical development and organ maintenance. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of adrenal organogenesis. We present evidence for the existence and location of adrenocortical stem/progenitor cells and their potential contribution to adrenocortical carcinomas. Data described herein come primarily from studies conducted in the Hammer laboratory with incorporation of important related studies from other investigators. Together, the work provides a framework for the emerging somatic stem cell field as it relates to the adrenal gland. PMID:19403887

  4. Stem/progenitor cells: a potential source of retina-specific cells for retinal repair.

    PubMed

    Bi, Yong-Yan; Feng, Dong-Fu; Pan, Dong-Chao

    2009-11-01

    Retinal injury generally results in permanent visual disturbance or even blindness. Any effort to restore vision in such condition would require replacement of the highly specialized retinal cells. Stem/progenitor cells have been proposed as a potential source of new retina-specific cells to replace those lost due to retina injury. Evidence to date suggests that continued development of stem cell therapies may ultimately lead to viable treatment options for retina injury. A wide range of stem/progenitor cells from various sources is currently being investigated for the treatment of retinal injury. This article reviews the recent achievements about stem/progenitor cell source for retinal repair.

  5. Immature hematopoietic stem cells undergo maturation in the fetal liver.

    PubMed

    Kieusseian, Aurelie; Brunet de la Grange, Philippe; Burlen-Defranoux, Odile; Godin, Isabelle; Cumano, Ana

    2012-10-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which are defined by their capacity to reconstitute adult conventional mice, are first found in the dorsal aorta after 10.5 days post coitus (dpc) and in the fetal liver at 11 dpc. However, lympho-myeloid hematopoietic progenitors are detected in the dorsal aorta from 9 dpc, raising the issue of their role in establishing adult hematopoiesis. Here, we show that these progenitors are endowed with long-term reconstitution capacity, but only engraft natural killer (NK)-deficient Rag2γc(-/-) mice. This novel population, called here immature HSCs, evolves in culture with thrombopoietin and stromal cells, into HSCs, defined by acquisition of CD45 and MHC-1 expression and by the capacity to reconstitute NK-competent mice. This evolution occurs during ontogeny, as early colonization of fetal liver by immature HSCs precedes that of HSCs. Moreover, organ culture experiments show that immature HSCs acquire, in this environment, the features of HSCs.

  6. TopBP1 Governs Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells Survival in Zebrafish Definitive Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lei; Li, Dantong; Ma, Ke; Zhang, Wenjuan; Xu, Tao; Fu, Cong; Jing, Changbin; Jia, Xiaoe; Wu, Shuang; Sun, Xin; Dong, Mei; Deng, Min; Chen, Yi; Zhu, Wenge; Peng, Jinrong; Wan, Fengyi; Zhou, Yi; Zon, Leonard I.; Pan, Weijun

    2015-01-01

    In vertebrate definitive hematopoiesis, nascent hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) migrate to and reside in proliferative hematopoietic microenvironment for transitory expansion. In this process, well-established DNA damage response pathways are vital to resolve the replication stress, which is deleterious for genome stability and cell survival. However, the detailed mechanism on the response and repair of the replication stress-induced DNA damage during hematopoietic progenitor expansion remains elusive. Here we report that a novel zebrafish mutantcas003 with nonsense mutation in topbp1 gene encoding topoisomerase II β binding protein 1 (TopBP1) exhibits severe definitive hematopoiesis failure. Homozygous topbp1cas003 mutants manifest reduced number of HSPCs during definitive hematopoietic cell expansion, without affecting the formation and migration of HSPCs. Moreover, HSPCs in the caudal hematopoietic tissue (an equivalent of the fetal liver in mammals) in topbp1cas003 mutant embryos are more sensitive to hydroxyurea (HU) treatment. Mechanistically, subcellular mislocalization of TopBP1cas003 protein results in ATR/Chk1 activation failure and DNA damage accumulation in HSPCs, and eventually induces the p53-dependent apoptosis of HSPCs. Collectively, this study demonstrates a novel and vital role of TopBP1 in the maintenance of HSPCs genome integrity and survival during hematopoietic progenitor expansion. PMID:26131719

  7. Ovarian monocyte progenitor cells: phenotypic and functional characterization.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Cherry J; Sanberg, Paul R; Chamizo, Wilfredo; Haraguchi, Soichi; Lerner, Danika; Baldwin, Margi; El-Badri, Nagwa S

    2005-04-01

    Leukocytes of the macrophage lineage are abundant in the ovarian tissues and have an important function in both follicular development and regression of postovulatory follicles. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that continuous production of macrophages in the ovarian stroma is maintained by a resident population of progenitors. We established a long-term culture of ovarian follicular stromal cells from BALB/c and green fluorescent protein-transgenic (GFP-TG) C57BL/6 mice. Nonadherent cells were collected and tested for hematopoietic function in vitro and in vivo. Histological and ultrastructural analyses revealed a homogenous population of monocyte-like rounded cells. Nonadherent cells continued to proliferate in culture for several months without senescence. When plated at very low density in methylcellulose, these cells formed colonies consisting of monocyte-like cells. Ovarian monocyte-like cells reacted with CD45, CD11b, CD11c, and Ly6-Gr-1 cell surface markers. A distinct CD45low population within these cells reacted with CD117 (C-kit) surface marker, suggestive of a primitive hematopoietic progenitor. Fifty thousand nonadherent cells failed to provide radioprotection to lethally irradiated mice and thus were not considered to be equivalent to pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells. Ovarian nonadherent stromal cells were positive for alkaline phosphatase but lacked embryonic cell antigens stage-specific embryonic antigen (SSEA-1) and Oct-4. We conclude that in the ovaries, a higher requirement for macrophages is provided by a resident stromal population of progenitors whose progeny is restricted to the production of cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage.

  8. Dentin regeneration using deciduous pulp stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Y; Wang, X Y; Wang, Y M; Liu, X Y; Zhang, C M; Hou, B X; Wang, S L

    2012-07-01

    Reparative dentin formation is essential for maintaining the integrity of dentin structure during disease or trauma. In this study, we investigated stem/progenitor cell-based tissue engineering for dentin regeneration in a large animal model. Porcine deciduous pulp stem/progenitor cells (PDPSCs) were mixed with a beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffold for dentin regeneration. Different concentrations of PDPSCs were tested to determine the optimal density for dentin regeneration. Aliquots of 5×10(5) PDPSCs in 1 mL resulted in the highest number of cells attached to the scaffold and the greatest alkaline phosphatase activity. We labeled PDPSCs with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and used the optimal cell numbers mixed with β-TCP to repair pulp chamber roof defects in the premolars of swine. Four weeks after transplantation, GFP-positive PDPSCs were observed in PDPSC-embedded scaffold constructs. At 16 weeks after transplantation, the PDPSCs mixed with β-TCP significantly regenerated the dentin-like structures and nearly completely restored the pulp chamber roof defects. This study demonstrated that the PDPSC/scaffold construct was useful in direct pulp-capping and provides pre-clinical evidence for stem/progenitor cell-based dentin regeneration.

  9. Extracellular Matrix-Mediated Differentiation of Periodontal Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dangaria, Smit J.; Ito, Yoshihiro; Walker, Cameron; Druzinsky, Robert; Luan, Xianghong; Diekwisch, Thomas G.H.

    2009-01-01

    The periodontal ligament (PDL) is a specialized connective tissue that connects the surface of the tooth root with the bony tooth socket. The healthy PDL harbors stem cell niches and extracellular matrix (ECM) microenvironments that facilitate periodontal regeneration. During periodontal disease, the PDL is often compromised or destroyed, reducing the life-span of the tooth. In order to explore new approaches toward the regeneration of diseased periodontal tissues, we have tested the effect of periodontal ECM signals, fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), and the cell adhesion peptide Arg-Gly- Asp (RGD) on the differentiation of two types of periodontal progenitor cells, PDL progenitor cells (PDLPs) and dental follicle progenitor cells (DFCs). Our studies documented that CTGF and FGF2 significantly enhanced the expression of collagens I & III, biglycan and periostin in tissue engineered regenerates after 4 weeks compared to untreated controls. Specifically, CTGF promoted mature PDL-like tissue regeneration as demonstrated by dense periostin localization in collagen fiber bundles. CTGF and FGF2 displayed synergistic effects on collagen III and biglycan gene expression, while effects on mineralization were antagonistic to each other: CTGF promoted while FGF2 inhibited mineralization in PDL cell cultures. Incorporation of RGD peptides in hydrogel matrices significantly enhanced attachment, spreading, survival and mineralization of the encapsulated DFCs, suggesting that RGD additives might promote the use of hydrogels for periodontal mineralized tissue engineering. Together, our studies have documented the effect of three key components of the periodontal ECM on the differentiation of periodontal progenitor populations. PMID:19433344

  10. Efficacy and Safety of Human Retinal Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Semo, Ma'ayan; Haamedi, Nasrin; Stevanato, Lara; Carter, David; Brooke, Gary; Young, Michael; Coffey, Peter; Sinden, John; Patel, Sara; Vugler, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We assessed the long-term efficacy and safety of human retinal progenitor cells (hRPC) using established rodent models. Methods Efficacy of hRPC was tested initially in Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) dystrophic rats immunosuppressed with cyclosporine/dexamethasone. Due to adverse effects of dexamethasone, this drug was omitted from a subsequent dose-ranging study, where different hRPC doses were tested for their ability to preserve visual function (measured by optokinetic head tracking) and retinal structure in RCS rats at 3 to 6 months after grafting. Safety of hRPC was assessed by subretinal transplantation into wild type (WT) rats and NIH-III nude mice, with analysis at 3 to 6 and 9 months after grafting, respectively. Results The optimal dose of hRPC for preserving visual function/retinal structure in dystrophic rats was 50,000 to 100,000 cells. Human retinal progenitor cells integrated/survived in dystrophic and WT rat retina up to 6 months after grafting and expressed nestin, vimentin, GFAP, and βIII tubulin. Vision and retinal structure remained normal in WT rats injected with hRPC and there was no evidence of tumors. A comparison between dexamethasone-treated and untreated dystrophic rats at 3 months after grafting revealed an unexpected reduction in the baseline visual acuity of dexamethasone-treated animals. Conclusions Human retinal progenitor cells appear safe and efficacious in the preclinical models used here. Translational Relevance Human retinal progenitor cells could be deployed during early stages of retinal degeneration or in regions of intact retina, without adverse effects on visual function. The ability of dexamethasone to reduce baseline visual acuity in RCS dystrophic rats has important implications for the interpretation of preclinical and clinical cell transplant studies. PMID:27486556

  11. Dual requirement for Pax6 in retinal progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Elgart, Michael; Marquardt, Till; Remizova, Lena; Yaron, Orly; Xie, Qing; Cvekl, Ales; Ashery-Padan, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Throughout the developing central nervous system, pre-patterning of the ventricular zone into discrete neural progenitor domains is one of the predominant strategies used to produce neuronal diversity in a spatially coordinated manner. In the retina, neurogenesis proceeds in an intricate chronological and spatial sequence, yet it remains unclear whether retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) display intrinsic heterogeneity at any given time point. Here, we performed a detailed study of RPC fate upon temporally and spatially confined inactivation of Pax6. Timed genetic removal of Pax6 appeared to unmask a cryptic divergence of RPCs into qualitatively divergent progenitor pools. In the more peripheral RPCs under normal circumstances, Pax6 seemed to prevent premature activation of a photoreceptor-differentiation pathway by suppressing expression of the transcription factor Crx. More centrally, Pax6 contributed to the execution of the comprehensive potential of RPCs: Pax6 ablation resulted in the exclusive generation of amacrine interneurons. Together, these data suggest an intricate dual role for Pax6 in retinal neurogenesis, while pointing to the cryptic divergence of RPCs into distinct progenitor pools. PMID:19004853

  12. Progenitor Cell Fate Decisions in Mammary Tumorigenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    Double-strand break repair is mediated by two major repair pathways, homologous recombination (HR) or nonhomologous end joining ( NHEJ ). In mammalian...cells more than 90% of double-strand breaks are repaired by NHEJ . Impairment of these pathways is associated with cell cycle arrest, cell death

  13. Lineage tracing of neuromesodermal progenitors reveals novel Wnt-dependent roles in trunk progenitor cell maintenance and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Garriock, Robert J; Chalamalasetty, Ravindra B; Kennedy, Mark W; Canizales, Lauren C; Lewandoski, Mark; Yamaguchi, Terry P

    2015-05-01

    In the development of the vertebrate body plan, Wnt3a is thought to promote the formation of paraxial mesodermal progenitors (PMPs) of the trunk region while suppressing neural specification. Recent lineage-tracing experiments have demonstrated that these trunk neural progenitors and PMPs derive from a common multipotent progenitor called the neuromesodermal progenitor (NMP). NMPs are known to reside in the anterior primitive streak (PS) region; however, the extent to which NMPs populate the PS and contribute to the vertebrate body plan, and the precise role that Wnt3a plays in regulating NMP self-renewal and differentiation are unclear. To address this, we used cell-specific markers (Sox2 and T) and tamoxifen-induced Cre recombinase-based lineage tracing to locate putative NMPs in vivo. We provide functional evidence for NMP location primarily in the epithelial PS, and to a lesser degree in the ingressed PS. Lineage-tracing studies in Wnt3a/β-catenin signaling pathway mutants provide genetic evidence that trunk progenitors normally fated to enter the mesodermal germ layer can be redirected towards the neural lineage. These data, combined with previous PS lineage-tracing studies, support a model that epithelial anterior PS cells are Sox2(+)T(+) multipotent NMPs and form the bulk of neural progenitors and PMPs of the posterior trunk region. Finally, we find that Wnt3a/β-catenin signaling directs trunk progenitors towards PMP fates; however, our data also suggest that Wnt3a positively supports a progenitor state for both mesodermal and neural progenitors. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. Nucleostemin rejuvenates cardiac progenitor cells and antagonizes myocardial aging.

    PubMed

    Hariharan, Nirmala; Quijada, Pearl; Mohsin, Sadia; Joyo, Anya; Samse, Kaitlen; Monsanto, Megan; De La Torre, Andrea; Avitabile, Daniele; Ormachea, Lucia; McGregor, Michael J; Tsai, Emily J; Sussman, Mark A

    2015-01-20

    Functional decline in stem cell-mediated regeneration contributes to aging associated with cellular senescence in c-kit+ cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs). Clinical implementation of CPC-based therapy in elderly patients would benefit tremendously from understanding molecular characteristics of senescence to antagonize aging. Nucleostemin (NS) is a nucleolar protein regulating stem cell proliferation and pluripotency. This study sought to demonstrate that NS preserves characteristics associated with "stemness" in CPCs and antagonizes myocardial senescence and aging. CPCs isolated from human fetal (fetal human cardiac progenitor cell [FhCPC]) and adult failing (adult human cardiac progenitor cell [AhCPC]) hearts, as well as young (young cardiac progenitor cell [YCPC]) and old mice (old cardiac progenitor cell [OCPC]), were studied for senescence characteristics and NS expression. Heterozygous knockout mice with 1 functional allele of NS (NS+/-) were used to demonstrate that NS preserves myocardial structure and function and slows characteristics of aging. NS expression is decreased in AhCPCs relative to FhCPCs, correlating with lowered proliferation potential and shortened telomere length. AhCPC characteristics resemble those of OCPCs, which have a phenotype induced by NS silencing, resulting in cell flattening, senescence, multinucleated cells, decreased S-phase progression, diminished expression of stemness markers, and up-regulation of p53 and p16. CPC senescence resulting from NS loss is partially p53 dependent and is rescued by concurrent silencing of p53. Mechanistically, NS induction correlates with Pim-1 kinase-mediated stabilization of c-Myc. Engineering OCPCs and AhCPCs to overexpress NS decreases senescent and multinucleated cells, restores morphology, and antagonizes senescence, thereby preserving phenotypic properties of "stemness." Early cardiac aging with a decline in cardiac function, an increase in senescence markers p53 and p16, telomere attrition

  15. Amplification of neural stem cell proliferation by intermediate progenitor cells in Drosophila brain development.

    PubMed

    Bello, Bruno C; Izergina, Natalya; Caussinus, Emmanuel; Reichert, Heinrich

    2008-02-19

    In the mammalian brain, neural stem cells divide asymmetrically and often amplify the number of progeny they generate via symmetrically dividing intermediate progenitors. Here we investigate whether specific neural stem cell-like neuroblasts in the brain of Drosophila might also amplify neuronal proliferation by generating symmetrically dividing intermediate progenitors. Cell lineage-tracing and genetic marker analysis show that remarkably large neuroblast lineages exist in the dorsomedial larval brain of Drosophila. These lineages are generated by brain neuroblasts that divide asymmetrically to self renew but, unlike other brain neuroblasts, do not segregate the differentiating cell fate determinant Prospero to their smaller daughter cells. These daughter cells continue to express neuroblast-specific molecular markers and divide repeatedly to produce neural progeny, demonstrating that they are proliferating intermediate progenitors. The proliferative divisions of these intermediate progenitors have novel cellular and molecular features; they are morphologically symmetrical, but molecularly asymmetrical in that key differentiating cell fate determinants are segregated into only one of the two daughter cells. Our findings provide cellular and molecular evidence for a new mode of neurogenesis in the larval brain of Drosophila that involves the amplification of neuroblast proliferation through intermediate progenitors. This type of neurogenesis bears remarkable similarities to neurogenesis in the mammalian brain, where neural stem cells as primary progenitors amplify the number of progeny they generate through generation of secondary progenitors. This suggests that key aspects of neural stem cell biology might be conserved in brain development of insects and mammals.

  16. EMP-1 is a junctional protein in a liver stem cell line and in the liver.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hsuan-Shu; Sherley, James L; Chen, Jeremy J W; Chiu, Chien-Chang; Chiou, Ling-Ling; Liang, Ja-Der; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Huang, Guan-Tarn; Sheu, Jin-Chuan

    2005-09-09

    In an attempt to discover cell markers for liver stem cells, a cDNA microarray analysis was carried out to compare the gene expression profiles between an adult liver stem cell line, Lig-8, and mature hepatocytes. Several genes in the categories of extracellular matrix, cell membrane, cell adhesion, transcription factor, signal molecule, transporter, and metabolic enzyme were shown to be differentially expressed in Lig-8 cells. Among them, epithelial membrane protein (EMP)-1 has been previously implicated with stem cell phenotypes. Antiserum to EMP-1 was produced to localize its expression. On monolayers of Lig-8 cells, EMP-1 was expressed along the intercellular border. In the liver harboring proliferating oval cells, the liver progenitors, EMP-1 was localized as ribbon bands, a staining pattern for epithelial junctions, all the way through bile duct epithelia, oval cell ductules, and into peri-hepatocytic regions. These peri-hepatocytic regions were proved to be bile canaliculi by co-localization of EMP-1 and dipeptidyl peptidase IV, an enzyme located on bile canaliculi. This report is the first to indicate EMP-1 to be a junctional protein in the liver.

  17. The supply of choline is important for fetal progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Zeisel, Steven H

    2011-08-01

    Fetal progenitor cells proliferate, migrate, differentiate and undergo apoptosis at specific times during fetal development. Choline is needed by these cells for membrane synthesis and for methylation. There is growing evidence that this nutrient also modulates epigenetic regulation of gene expression in both neuronal and endothelial progenitor cells, thereby modifying brain development. It is likely that these mechanisms explain why, in rodent models, maternal dietary intake of choline influences both angiogenesis and neurogenesis in fetal hippocampus, and results in life-long changes in memory function. This also may explain why women eating diets low in choline have a greater risk of having a baby with a birth defect. Choline is mainly found in foods that contain fat and cholesterol, and intake of such foods has diminished in response dietary advice from nutritionists and physicians. Forty years ago, diets commonly contained choline-rich foods but now women in the USA tend to eat diets low in choline content. Premenopausal women normally may require less choline in their diet than do men and postmenopausal women, because estrogen induces the gene for the enzyme catalyzing endogenous biosynthesis of the choline-containing phospholipid phosphatidylcholine. However, many women have a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) that blocks the induction of endogenous biosynthesis, thereby making them require more dietary choline. When these women eat diets low in choline, the supply of this nutrient to the fetus is likely to be inadequate, and may perturb progenitor cell proliferation, migration, differentiation and apoptosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Mesp1 Marked Cardiac Progenitor Cells Repair Infarcted Mouse Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Chen, Li; Diaz, Andrea Diaz; Benham, Ashley; Xu, Xueping; Wijaya, Cori S.; Fa’ak, Faisal; Luo, Weijia; Soibam, Benjamin; Azares, Alon; Yu, Wei; Lyu, Qiongying; Stewart, M. David; Gunaratne, Preethi; Cooney, Austin; McConnell, Bradley K.; Schwartz, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Mesp1 directs multipotential cardiovascular cell fates, even though it’s transiently induced prior to the appearance of the cardiac progenitor program. Tracing Mesp1-expressing cells and their progeny allows isolation and characterization of the earliest cardiovascular progenitor cells. Studying the biology of Mesp1-CPCs in cell culture and ischemic disease models is an important initial step toward using them for heart disease treatment. Because of Mesp1’s transitory nature, Mesp1-CPC lineages were traced by following EYFP expression in murine Mesp1Cre/+; Rosa26EYFP/+ ES cells. We captured EYFP+ cells that strongly expressed cardiac mesoderm markers and cardiac transcription factors, but not pluripotent or nascent mesoderm markers. BMP2/4 treatment led to the expansion of EYFP+ cells, while Wnt3a and Activin were marginally effective. BMP2/4 exposure readily led EYFP+ cells to endothelial and smooth muscle cells, but inhibition of the canonical Wnt signaling was required to enter the cardiomyocyte fate. Injected mouse pre-contractile Mesp1-EYFP+ CPCs improved the survivability of injured mice and restored the functional performance of infarcted hearts for at least 3 months. Mesp1-EYFP+ cells are bona fide CPCs and they integrated well in infarcted hearts and emerged de novo into terminally differentiated cardiac myocytes, smooth muscle and vascular endothelial cells. PMID:27538477

  19. Endothelial progenitor cells: Exploring the pleiotropic effects of statins.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Kully; Mamas, Mamas; Butler, Robert

    2017-01-26

    Statins have become a cornerstone of risk modification for ischaemic heart disease patients. A number of studies have shown that they are effective and safe. However studies have observed an early benefit in terms of a reduction in recurrent infarct and or death after a myocardial infarction, prior to any significant change in lipid profile. Therefore, pleiotropic mechanisms, other than lowering lipid profile alone, must account for this effect. One such proposed pleiotropic mechanism is the ability of statins to augment both number and function of endothelial progenitor cells. The ability to augment repair and maintenance of a functioning endothelium may have profound beneficial effect on vascular repair and potentially a positive impact on clinical outcomes in patients with cardiovascular disease. The following literature review will discuss issues surrounding endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) identification, role in vascular repair, factors affecting EPC numbers, the role of statins in current medical practice and their effects on EPC number.

  20. Endothelial progenitor cells: Exploring the pleiotropic effects of statins

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Kully; Mamas, Mamas; Butler, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Statins have become a cornerstone of risk modification for ischaemic heart disease patients. A number of studies have shown that they are effective and safe. However studies have observed an early benefit in terms of a reduction in recurrent infarct and or death after a myocardial infarction, prior to any significant change in lipid profile. Therefore, pleiotropic mechanisms, other than lowering lipid profile alone, must account for this effect. One such proposed pleiotropic mechanism is the ability of statins to augment both number and function of endothelial progenitor cells. The ability to augment repair and maintenance of a functioning endothelium may have profound beneficial effect on vascular repair and potentially a positive impact on clinical outcomes in patients with cardiovascular disease. The following literature review will discuss issues surrounding endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) identification, role in vascular repair, factors affecting EPC numbers, the role of statins in current medical practice and their effects on EPC number. PMID:28163831

  1. Pax genes: regulators of lineage specification and progenitor cell maintenance.

    PubMed

    Blake, Judith A; Ziman, Melanie R

    2014-02-01

    Pax genes encode a family of transcription factors that orchestrate complex processes of lineage determination in the developing embryo. Their key role is to specify and maintain progenitor cells through use of complex molecular mechanisms such as alternate RNA splice forms and gene activation or inhibition in conjunction with protein co-factors. The significance of Pax genes in development is highlighted by abnormalities that arise from the expression of mutant Pax genes. Here, we review the molecular functions of Pax genes during development and detail the regulatory mechanisms by which they specify and maintain progenitor cells across various tissue lineages. We also discuss mechanistic insights into the roles of Pax genes in regeneration and in adult diseases, including cancer.

  2. CD95 death receptor and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in liver cell apoptosis and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Reinehr, Roland; Häussinger, Dieter

    2012-02-01

    Recent evidence suggests that signaling pathways towards cell proliferation and cell death are much more interconnected than previously thought. Whereas not only death receptors such as CD95 (Fas, APO-1) can couple to both, cell death and proliferation, also growth factor receptors such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are involved in these opposing kinds of cell fate. EGFR is briefly discussed as a growth factor receptor involved in liver cell proliferation during liver regeneration. Then the role of EGFR in activating CD95 death receptor in liver parenchymal cells (PC) and hepatic stellate cells (HSC), which represent a liver stem/progenitor cell compartment, is described summarizing different ways of CD95- and EGFR-dependent signaling in the liver. Here, depending on the hepatic cell type (PC vs. HSC) and the respective signaling context (sustained vs. transient JNK activation) CD95-/EGFR-mediated signaling ends up in either liver cell apoptosis or cell proliferation.

  3. Kinetics of circulating progenitor cell mobilization during submaximal exercise.

    PubMed

    Niemiro, Grace M; Parel, Justin; Beals, Joseph; van Vliet, Stephan; Paluska, Scott A; Moore, Daniel R; Burd, Nicholas A; De Lisio, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Circulating progenitor cells (CPCs) are a heterogeneous population of stem/progenitor cells in peripheral blood that includes hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs and HSCs), endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that are involved in tissue repair and adaptation. CPC mobilization during exercise remains uncharacterized in young adults. The purpose of this study was to investigate the kinetics of CPC mobilization during and after submaximal treadmill running and their relationship to mobilization factors. Seven men [age = 25.3 ± 2.4 yr, body mass index = 23.5 ± 1.0 kg/m(2), peak O2 uptake (V̇o2peak) = 60.9 ± 2.74 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)] ran on a treadmill for 60 min at 70% V̇o2peak Blood sampling occurred before (Pre), during [20 min (20e), 40 min (40e), 60 min (60e)], and after exercise [15 min (15p), 60 min (60p), 120 min (120p)] for quantification of CPCs (CD34(+)), HSPCs (CD34(+)/CD45(low)), HSCs (CD34(+)/CD45(low)/CD38(-)), CD34(+) MSCs (CD45(-)/CD34(+)/CD31(-)/CD105(+)), CD34(-) MSCs (CD45(-)/CD34(-)/CD31(-)/CD105(+)), and EPCs (CD45(-)/CD34(+)/CD31(+)) via flow cytometry. CPC concentration increased compared with Pre at 20e and 40e (2.7- and 2.4-fold, respectively, P < 0.05). HSPCs and HSCs increased at 20e compared with 60p (2.7- and 2.8-fold, respectively, P < 0.05), whereas EPCs and both MSC populations did not change. CXC chemokine ligand (CXCL) 12 (1.5-fold; P < 0.05) and stem cell factor (1.3-fold; P < 0.05) were increased at 40e and remained elevated postexercise. The peak increase in CPCs was positively correlated to concentration of endothelial cells during exercise with no relationship to CXCL12 and SCF. Our data show the kinetics of progenitor cell mobilization during exercise that could provide insight into cellular mediators of exercise-induced adaptations, and have implication for the use of exercise as an adjuvant therapy for CPC collection in hematopoietic stem cell transplant.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Using

  4. Circulating Endothelial Cells and Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Pediatric Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zahran, Asmaa Mohamad; Elsayh, Khalid Ibrahim; Mohamad, Ismail Lotfy; Hassan, Gamal Mohamad; Abdou, Madleen Adel A

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study was to measure the number of circulating endothelial cells (CECs) and circulating endothelial progenitor cells (CEPs) in pediatric patients with sepsis and correlating it with the severity of the disease and its outcome. The study included 19 children with sepsis, 26 with complicated sepsis, and 30 healthy controls. The patients were investigated within 48 hours of pediatric intensive care unit admission together with flow cytometric detection of CECs and CEPs. The levels of both CECs and CEPs were significantly higher in patient with sepsis and complicated sepsis than the controls. The levels of CECs were higher in patients with complicated sepsis, whereas the levels of CEPs were lower in patients with complicated sepsis. Comparing the survival and nonsurvival septic patients, the levels of CEPs were significantly higher in the survival than in nonsurvival patients, whereas the levels of CECs were significantly lower in the survival than in nonsurvival patients. Serum albumin was higher in survival than in nonsurvival patients. Estimation of CECs and CEPs and their correlation with other parameters such as serum albumen could add important information regarding prognosis in septic pediatric patients.

  5. Xenotransplantation of human cultured parathyroid progenitor cells into mouse peritoneum does not induce rejection reaction.

    PubMed

    Nawrot, Ireneusz; Woźniewicz, Bogdan; Szmidt, Jacek; Śladowski, Dariusz; Zając, Krzysztof; Chudziński, Witold

    2014-01-01

    Parathyroid progenitor cells devoid of immunogenic antigens were used for human allotransplantation. Although there were many potential reasons for the expiry of transplant activity in humans, we decided to exclude a subclinical form of rejection reaction, and test the rejection reaction in an animal model. Experiments were carried out on 40 conventional male mice in their third month of life. The animals were housed in groups of 10 per cage in 4 cages with fitted water dispensers and fed a conventional diet based on standard pellet food. They were divided into four groups of 10 animals each, three experimental groups and one control group. Identified progenitor cells were stored in a cell bank. After testing the phenotype, viability, and absence of immunogenic properties, the cells were transplanted into mouse peritoneum cavity. Animals were observed for 9 weeks. At 9 weeks of observation, the mean serum PTH concentration in the experimental groups was 2.0-2.5 pg/ml, while in the control group it did not exceed 1.5 pg/ml. The immunohistochemical assays demonstrated that millions of viable cells with a phenotype identical to the endocrine cells had survived in the peritoneum. Histologic specimens from different internal organs stained for PTH revealed positive cells labelled with anti-PTH Ab in the intestinal lamina, brain, liver, and spleen. In the present paper we have demonstrated that xenotransplantation may be used as a model for an explanation of the immunogenic properties of cells generated from postnatal organs for regenerative therapy.

  6. Proliferation control in neural stem and progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Homem, Catarina CF; Repic, Marko; Knoblich, Juergen A

    2015-01-01

    Neural circuit function can be drastically affected by variations in the number of cells that are produced during development or by a reduction in adult cell number due to disease. Unlike many other organs, the brain is unable to compensate for such changes by increasing cell numbers or altering the size of the cells. For this reason, unique cell cycle and cell growth control mechanisms operate in the developing and adult brain. In Drosophila melanogaster and mammalian neural stem and progenitor cells these mechanisms are intricately coordinated with the developmental age and the nutritional, metabolic and hormonal state of the animal. Defects in neural stem cell proliferation that result in the generation of incorrect cell numbers or defects in neural stem cell differentiation can cause microcephaly or megalencephaly. PMID:26420377

  7. Transplantation of Airway Epithelial Stem/Progenitor Cells: A Future for Cell-Based Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Moumita; Ahmad, Shama; White, Carl W; Reynolds, Susan D

    2017-01-01

    Cell therapy has the potential to cure disease through replacement of malfunctioning cells. Although the tissue stem cell (TSC) is thought to be the optimal therapeutic cell, transplantation of TSC/progenitor cell mixtures has saved lives. We previously purified the mouse tracheobronchial epithelial TSCs and reported that in vitro amplification generated numerous TSCs. However, these cultures also contained TSC-derived progenitor cells and TSC repurification by flow cytometry compromised TSC self-renewal. These limitations prompted us to determine if a TSC/progenitor cell mixture would repopulate the injured airway epithelium. We developed a cell transplantation protocol and demonstrate that transplanted mouse and human tracheobronchial epithelial TSC/progenitor cell mixtures are 20-25% of airway epithelial cells, actively contribute to epithelial repair, and persist for at least 43 days. At 2 weeks after transplantation, TSCs/progenitor cells differentiated into the three major epithelial cell types: basal, secretory, and ciliated. We conclude that cell therapy that uses adult tracheobronchial TSCs/progenitor cells is an effective therapeutic option.

  8. Homing and migration assays of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    He, Xi C; Li, Zhenrui; Sugimura, Rio; Ross, Jason; Zhao, Meng; Li, Linheng

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) reside mainly in bone marrow; however, under homeostatic and stressed conditions, HSPCs dynamically change their location-either egressing from bone marrow and getting into circulation, a process of mobilization; or coming back to the bone marrow, the homing process. How to analyze these two processes will be critical for understanding the behavior of HSPCs. Here we provide an experimental protocol to monitor and analyze homing and migration of HSPCs.

  9. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells in obese children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Pires, António; Martins, Paula; Paiva, Artur; Pereira, Ana Margarida; Marques, Margarida; Castela, Eduardo; Sena, Cristina; Seiça, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the relationship between circulating endothelial progenitor cell count and endothelial activation in a pediatric population with obesity. Observational and transversal study, including 120 children and adolescents with primary obesity of both sexes, aged 6-17 years, who were recruited at this Cardiovascular Risk Clinic. The control group was made up of 41 children and adolescents with normal body mass index. The variables analyzed were: age, gender, body mass index, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, lipid profile, leptin, adiponectin, homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, E-selectin, asymmetric dimethylarginine and circulating progenitor endothelial cell count. Insulin resistance was correlated to asymmetric dimethylarginine (ρ=0.340; p=0.003), which was directly, but weakly correlated to E-selectin (ρ=0.252; p=0.046). High sensitivity C-reactive protein was not found to be correlated to markers of endothelial activation. Systolic blood pressure was directly correlated to body mass index (ρ=0.471; p<0.001) and the homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (ρ=0.230; p=0.012), and inversely correlated to adiponectin (ρ=-0.331; p<0.001) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (ρ=-0.319; p<0.001). Circulating endothelial progenitor cell count was directly, but weakly correlated, to body mass index (r=0.211; p=0.016), leptin (ρ=0.245; p=0.006), triglyceride levels (r=0.241; p=0.031), and E-selectin (ρ=0.297; p=0.004). Circulating endothelial progenitor cell count is elevated in obese children and adolescents with evidence of endothelial activation, suggesting that, during infancy, endothelial repairing mechanisms are present in the context of endothelial activation. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. EGF Enhances Oligodendrogenesis from Glial Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Junlin; Cheng, Xuejun; Qi, Jiajun; Xie, Binghua; Zhao, Xiaofeng; Zheng, Kang; Zhang, Zunyi; Qiu, Mengsheng

    2017-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling plays a positive role in myelin development and repair, but little is known about its biological effects on the early generation and differentiation of oligodendrocyte (OL) lineage cells. In this study, we investigated the role of EGF in early OL development with isolated glial restricted precursor (GRP) cells. It was found that EGF collaborated with Platelet Derived Growth Factor-AA (PDGFaa) to promote the survival and self-renewal of GRP cells, but predisposed GRP cells to develop into O4− early-stage oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) in the absence of or PDGFaa. In OPCs, EGF synergized with PDGFaa to maintain their O4 negative antigenic phenotype. Upon PDGFaa withdrawal, EGF promoted the terminal differentiation of OPCs by reducing apoptosis and increasing the number of mature OLs. Together, these data revealed that EGF is an important mitogen to enhance oligodendroglial development. PMID:28442994

  11. Genetic immunotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma by endothelial progenitor cells armed with cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong; Yu, Hui; An, Yan-Li; Yu-Jia, Zhen; Teng, Gao-Jun

    2014-02-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) serve as cellular vehicles for targeting cancer cells and are a powerful tool for delivery of therapeutic genes. Cytosine deaminase (CD), a kind of frequent suicide gene which can kill carcinoma cells by converting a non-poisonous pro-drug 5-flucytosine (5-FC) into a poisonous cytotoxic 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). We combined super-paramagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles labeled EPCs with CD gene to treat grafted liver carcinomas and tracked them with 7.0 T Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Results showed that the therapeutic EPCs loaded with CD plus 5-Fc provided stronger carcinoma growth suppression compared with treatment using CD alone. The CD/5-Fc significantly inhibited the growth of endothelial cells and induced carcinoma cells apoptosis. These results indicate that EPCs transfected with anti-carcinoma genes can be used in carcinoma therapy as a novel therapeutic modality.

  12. Mesenchymal Stem/Progenitor Cell Isolation from Tooth Extraction Sockets

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, R.; Ono, M.; Hara, E.S.; Oida, Y.; Shinkawa, S.; Pham, H.T.; Akiyama, K.; Sonoyama, W.; Maekawa, K.; Kuboki, T.

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (BMSCs) are commonly used in regeneration therapy. The current primary source of BMSCs is the iliac crest; however, the procedure is associated with various burdens on the patient, including the risk of pain and infection. Hence, the possibility to collect BMSCs from other, more accessible, sources would be an attractive approach. It is well known that stem cells migrate from surrounding tissues and play important roles in wound healing. We thus hypothesized that stem/progenitor cells could be isolated from granulation tissue in the dental socket, and we subsequently collected granulation tissue from dog dental socket 3 d after tooth extraction. After enzyme digestion of the collected tissue, the cells forming colonies constituted the dental socket–derived stem/progenitor cells (dDSCs). Next, dDSCs were compared with dog BMSCs (dBMSCs) for phenotype characterization. A flow cytometric analysis showed that dDSCs were positive for CD44, CD90, and CD271 but negative for CD34 and CD45, similar to dBMSCs. dDSCs also exhibited osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic differentiation ability, similar to dBMSCs, with a higher capacity for colony formation, proliferation, and motility than dBMSCs. In addition, an in vivo ectopic bone formation assay showed that dDSCs and dBMSCs both induced hard tissue formation, although only dDSCs formed a fibrous tissue-like structure connected to the newly formed bone. Finally, we tested the ability of dDSCs to regenerate periodontal tissue in a one-wall defect model. The defects in the dDSC-transplanted group (β-TCP/PGA/dDSCs) were regenerated with cementum-like and periodontal ligament-like tissues and alveolar bone, whereas only bony tissue was observed in the control group (β-TCP/PGA). In conclusion, we identified and characterized a population of stem/progenitor cells in granulation tissue obtained from the dental socket that exhibited several characteristics similar to

  13. Mesenchymal stem/progenitor cell isolation from tooth extraction sockets.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, R; Ono, M; Hara, E S; Oida, Y; Shinkawa, S; Pham, H T; Akiyama, K; Sonoyama, W; Maekawa, K; Kuboki, T

    2014-11-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (BMSCs) are commonly used in regeneration therapy. The current primary source of BMSCs is the iliac crest; however, the procedure is associated with various burdens on the patient, including the risk of pain and infection. Hence, the possibility to collect BMSCs from other, more accessible, sources would be an attractive approach. It is well known that stem cells migrate from surrounding tissues and play important roles in wound healing. We thus hypothesized that stem/progenitor cells could be isolated from granulation tissue in the dental socket, and we subsequently collected granulation tissue from dog dental socket 3 d after tooth extraction. After enzyme digestion of the collected tissue, the cells forming colonies constituted the dental socket-derived stem/progenitor cells (dDSCs). Next, dDSCs were compared with dog BMSCs (dBMSCs) for phenotype characterization. A flow cytometric analysis showed that dDSCs were positive for CD44, CD90, and CD271 but negative for CD34 and CD45, similar to dBMSCs. dDSCs also exhibited osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic differentiation ability, similar to dBMSCs, with a higher capacity for colony formation, proliferation, and motility than dBMSCs. In addition, an in vivo ectopic bone formation assay showed that dDSCs and dBMSCs both induced hard tissue formation, although only dDSCs formed a fibrous tissue-like structure connected to the newly formed bone. Finally, we tested the ability of dDSCs to regenerate periodontal tissue in a one-wall defect model. The defects in the dDSC-transplanted group (β-TCP/PGA/dDSCs) were regenerated with cementum-like and periodontal ligament-like tissues and alveolar bone, whereas only bony tissue was observed in the control group (β-TCP/PGA). In conclusion, we identified and characterized a population of stem/progenitor cells in granulation tissue obtained from the dental socket that exhibited several characteristics similar to those

  14. NLRP1 inflammasome activation induces pyroptosis of hematopoietic progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Masters, Seth L.; Gerlic, Motti; Metcalf, Donald; Preston, Simon; Pellegrini, Marc; O’Donnell, Joanne A.; McArthur, Kate; Baldwin, Tracey M.; Chevrier, Stephane; Nowell, Cameron J.; Cengia, Louise H.; Henley, Katya J.; Collinge, Janelle E.; Kastner, Daniel L.; Feigenbaum, Lionel; Hilton, Douglas J.; Alexander, Warren S.; Kile, Benjamin T.; Croker, Ben A.

    2014-01-01

    Cytopenias are key prognostic indicators of life-threatening infection, contributing to immunosuppression and mortality. Here we define a role for Caspase-1-dependent death, known as pyroptosis, in infection-induced cytopenias by studying inflammasome activation in hematopoietic progenitor cells. The NLRP1a inflammasome is expressed in hematopoietic progenitor cells and its activation triggers their pyroptotic death. Active NLRP1a induced a lethal systemic inflammatory disease that was driven by Caspase-1 and IL-1β but was independent of apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC) and ameliorated by IL-18. Surprisingly, in the absence of IL-1β-driven inflammation, active NLRP1a triggered pyroptosis of hematopoietic progenitor cells resulting in leukopenia in the steady state. During periods of hematopoietic stress induced by chemotherapy or lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection, active NLRP1a caused prolonged cytopenia, bone marrow hypoplasia and immunosuppression. Conversely, NLRP1-deficient mice showed enhanced recovery from chemotherapy and LCMV infection, demonstrating that NLRP1 acts as a cellular sentinel to alert Caspase-1 to hematopoietic and infectious stress. PMID:23219391

  15. Analysing human neural stem cell ontogeny by consecutive isolation of Notch active neural progenitors.

    PubMed

    Edri, Reuven; Yaffe, Yakey; Ziller, Michael J; Mutukula, Naresh; Volkman, Rotem; David, Eyal; Jacob-Hirsch, Jasmine; Malcov, Hagar; Levy, Carmit; Rechavi, Gideon; Gat-Viks, Irit; Meissner, Alexander; Elkabetz, Yechiel

    2015-03-23

    Decoding heterogeneity of pluripotent stem cell (PSC)-derived neural progeny is fundamental for revealing the origin of diverse progenitors, for defining their lineages, and for identifying fate determinants driving transition through distinct potencies. Here we have prospectively isolated consecutively appearing PSC-derived primary progenitors based on their Notch activation state. We first isolate early neuroepithelial cells and show their broad Notch-dependent developmental and proliferative potential. Neuroepithelial cells further yield successive Notch-dependent functional primary progenitors, from early and midneurogenic radial glia and their derived basal progenitors, to gliogenic radial glia and adult-like neural progenitors, together recapitulating hallmarks of neural stem cell (NSC) ontogeny. Gene expression profiling reveals dynamic stage-specific transcriptional patterns that may link development of distinct progenitor identities through Notch activation. Our observations provide a platform for characterization and manipulation of distinct progenitor cell types amenable for developing streamlined neural lineage specification paradigms for modelling development in health and disease.

  16. Turning terminally differentiated skeletal muscle cells into regenerative progenitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Heng; Lööf, Sara; Borg, Paula; Nader, Gustavo A; Blau, Helen M; Simon, András

    2015-08-05

    The ability to repeatedly regenerate limbs during the entire lifespan of an animal is restricted to certain salamander species among vertebrates. This ability involves dedifferentiation of post-mitotic cells into progenitors that in turn form new structures. A long-term enigma has been how injury leads to dedifferentiation. Here we show that skeletal muscle dedifferentiation during newt limb regeneration depends on a programmed cell death response by myofibres. We find that programmed cell death-induced muscle fragmentation produces a population of 'undead' intermediate cells, which have the capacity to resume proliferation and contribute to muscle regeneration. We demonstrate the derivation of proliferating progeny from differentiated, multinucleated muscle cells by first inducing and subsequently intercepting a programmed cell death response. We conclude that cell survival may be manifested by the production of a dedifferentiated cell with broader potential and that the diversion of a programmed cell death response is an instrument to achieve dedifferentiation.

  17. Lung stem and progenitor cells in tissue homeostasis and disease.

    PubMed

    Leeman, Kristen T; Fillmore, Christine M; Kim, Carla F

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian lung is a complex organ containing numerous putative stem/progenitor cell populations that contribute to region-specific tissue homeostasis and repair. In this review, we discuss recent advances in identifying and studying these cell populations in the context of lung homeostasis and disease. Genetically engineered mice now allow for lineage tracing of several lung stem and progenitor cell populations in vivo during different types of lung injury repair. Using specific sets of cell surface markers, these cells can also be isolated from murine and human lung and tested in 3D culture systems and in vivo transplant assays. The pathology of devastating lung diseases, including lung cancers, is likely in part due to dysregulation and dysfunction of lung stem cells. More precise characterization of stem cells with identification of new, unique markers; improvement in isolation and transplant techniques; and further development of functional assays will ultimately lead to new therapies for a host of human lung diseases. In particular, lung cancer biology may be greatly informed by findings in normal lung stem cell biology as evidence suggests that lung cancer is a disease that begins in, and may be driven by, neoplastic lung stem cells. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Prostate cancer stem/progenitor cells: identification, characterization, and implications.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dean G; Patrawala, Lubna; Calhoun, Tammy; Bhatia, Bobby; Choy, Grace; Schneider-Broussard, Robin; Jeter, Collene

    2007-01-01

    Several solid tumors have now been shown to contain stem cell-like cells called cancer stem cells (CSC). These cells, although generally rare, appear to be highly tumorigenic and may be the cells that drive tumor formation, maintain tumor homeostasis, and mediate tumor metastasis. In this Perspective, we first provide our insight on how a CSC should be defined. We then summarize our current knowledge of stem/progenitor cells in the normal human prostate (NHP), an organ highly susceptible to hyperproliferative diseases such as benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (PCa). We further review the evidence that cultured PCa cells, xenograft prostate tumors, and patient tumors may contain stem/progenitor cells. Along with our discussion, we present several methodologies that can be potentially used to identify putative tumor-reinitiating CSC. Finally, we present a hypothetical model for the hierarchical organization of human PCa cells and discuss the implications of this model in helping understand prostate carcinogenesis and design novel diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic approaches.

  19. Tracking of Normal and Malignant Progenitor Cell Cycle Transit in a Defined Niche

    PubMed Central

    Pineda, Gabriel; Lennon, Kathleen M.; Delos Santos, Nathaniel P.; Lambert-Fliszar, Florence; Riso, Gennarina L.; Lazzari, Elisa; Marra, Marco A.; Morris, Sheldon; Sakaue-Sawano, Asako; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Jamieson, Catriona H. M.

    2016-01-01

    While implicated in therapeutic resistance, malignant progenitor cell cycle kinetics have been difficult to quantify in real-time. We developed an efficient lentiviral bicistronic fluorescent, ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator reporter (Fucci2BL) to image live single progenitors on a defined niche coupled with cell cycle gene expression analysis. We have identified key differences in cell cycle regulatory gene expression and transit times between normal and chronic myeloid leukemia progenitors that may inform cancer stem cell eradication strategies. PMID:27041210

  20. Evidence of progenitor cells of glandular and myoepithelial cell lineages in the human adult female breast epithelium: a new progenitor (adult stem) cell concept.

    PubMed

    Boecker, Werner; Buerger, Horst

    2003-10-01

    Although experimental data clearly confirm the existence of self-renewing mammary stem cells, the characteristics of such progenitor cells have never been satisfactorily defined. Using a double immunofluorescence technique for simultaneous detection of the basal cytokeratin 5, the glandular cytokeratins 8/18 and the myoepithelial differentiation marker smooth muscle actin (SMA), we were able to demonstrate the presence of CK5+ cells in human adult breast epithelium. These cells have the potential to differentiate to either glandular (CK8/18+) or myoepithelial cells (SMA+) through intermediary cells (CK5+ and CK8/18+ or SMA+). We therefore proceeded on the assumption that the CK5+ cells are phenotypically and behaviourally progenitor (committed adult stem) cells of human breast epithelium. Furthermore, we furnish evidence that most of these progenitor cells are located in the luminal epithelium of the ductal lobular tree. Based on data obtained in extensive analyses of proliferative breast disease lesions, we have come to regard usual ductal hyperplasia as a progenitor cell-derived lesion, whereas most breast cancers seem to evolve from differentiated glandular cells. Double immunofluorescence experiments provide a new tool to characterize phenotypically progenitor (adult stem) cells and their progenies. This model has been shown to be of great value for a better understanding not only of normal tissue regeneration but also of proliferative breast disease. Furthermore, this model provides a new tool for unravelling further the regulatory mechanisms that govern normal and pathological cell growth.

  1. Resident cardiac progenitor cells: at the heart of regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bollini, Sveva; Smart, Nicola; Riley, Paul R

    2011-02-01

    Stem cell therapy has recently emerged as an innovative strategy over conventional cardiovascular treatments to restore cardiac function in patients affected by ischemic heart disease. Various stem cell populations have been tested and their potential for cardiac repair has been analyzed. Embryonic stem cells retain the greatest differentiation potential, but concerns persist with regard to their immunogenic and teratogenic effects. Although adult somatic stem cells are not tumourigenic and easier to use in an autologous setting, they exist in small numbers and possess reduced differentiation potential. Traditionally the heart was considered to be a post-mitotic organ; however, this dogma has recently been challenged with the identification of a reservoir of resident stem cells, defined as cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs). These endogenous progenitors may represent the best candidates for cardiovascular cell therapy, as they are tissue-specific, often pre-committed to a cardiac fate, and display a greater propensity to differentiate towards cardiovascular lineages. This review will focus on current research into the biology of CPCs and their regenerative potential. This article is part of a special issue entitled, "Cardiovascular Stem Cells Revisited".

  2. Bone marrow-derived progenitor cells in pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Naozumi; Jin, Hong; Liu, Tianju; Chensue, Stephen W; Phan, Sem H

    2004-01-01

    The origin of fibroblasts in pulmonary fibrosis is assumed to be intrapulmonary, but their extrapulmonary origin and especially derivation from bone marrow (BM) progenitor cells has not been ruled out. To examine this possibility directly, adult mice were durably engrafted with BM isolated from transgenic mice expressing enhanced GFP. Induction of pulmonary fibrosis in such chimera mice by endotracheal bleomycin (BLM) injection caused large numbers of GFP(+) cells to appear in active fibrotic lesions, while only a few GFP(+) cells could be identified in control lungs. Flow-cytometric analysis of lung cells confirmed the BLM-induced increase in GFP(+) cells in chimera mice and revealed a significant increase in GFP(+) cells that also express type I collagen. GFP(+) lung fibroblasts isolated from chimera mice expressed collagen and telomerase reverse transcriptase but not alpha-smooth muscle actin. Treatment of isolated GFP(+) fibroblasts with TGF-beta failed to induce myofibroblast differentiation. Cultured lung fibroblasts expressed the chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CCR7 and responded chemotactically to their cognate ligands, stromal cell-derived factor-1 alpha and secondary lymphoid chemokine, respectively. Thus the collagen-producing lung fibroblasts in pulmonary fibrosis can also be derived from BM progenitor cells.

  3. Migrating Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Cells Swell Prior to Soma Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Happel, Patrick; Möller, Kerstin; Schwering, Nina K.; Dietzel, Irmgard D.

    2013-01-01

    The migration of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) to the white matter is an indispensable requirement for an intact brain function. The mechanism of cell migration in general is not yet completely understood. Nevertheless, evidence is accumulating that besides the coordinated rearrangement of the cytoskeleton, a finetuned interplay of ion and water fluxes across the cell membrane is essential for cell migration. One part of a general hypothesis is that a local volume increase towards the direction of movement triggers a mechano-activated calcium influx that regulates various procedures at the rear end of a migrating cell. Here, we investigated cell volume changes of migrating OPCs using scanning ion conductance microscopy. We found that during accelerated migration OPCs undergo an increase in the frontal cell body volume. These findings are supplemented with time lapse calcium imaging data that hint an increase in calcium content the frontal part of the cell soma. PMID:23657670

  4. The Earliest Thymic T Cell Progenitors Sustain B Cell and Myeloid Lineage Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Luc, Sidinh; Luis, Tiago C.; Boukarabila, Hanane; Macaulay, Iain C.; Buza-Vidas, Natalija; Bouriez-Jones, Tiphaine; Lutteropp, Michael; Woll, Petter S.; Loughran, Stephen J.; Mead, Adam J.; Hultquist, Anne; Brown, John; Mizukami, Takuo; Matsuoka, Sahoko; Ferry, Helen; Anderson, Kristina; Duarte, Sara; Atkinson, Deborah; Soneji, Shamit; Domanski, Aniela; Farley, Alison; Sanjuan-Pla, Alejandra; Carella, Cintia; Patient, Roger; de Bruijn, Marella; Enver, Tariq; Nerlov, Claus; Blackburn, Clare; Godin, Isabelle; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W.

    2012-01-01

    The stepwise commitment from hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow (BM) to T lymphocyte-restricted progenitors in the thymus represents a paradigm for understanding the requirement for distinct extrinsic cues during different stages of lineage restriction from multipotent to lineage restricted progenitors. However, the commitment stage at which progenitors migrate from the BM to the thymus remains unclear. Here we provide functional and molecular evidence at the single cell level that the earliest progenitors in the neonatal thymus possessed combined granulocyte-monocyte, T and B lymphocyte, but not megakaryocyte-erythroid lineage potential. These potentials were identical to those of thymus-seeding progenitors in the BM, which were closely related at the molecular level. These findings establish the distinct lineage-restriction stage at which the T lineage commitment transits from the BM to the remote thymus. PMID:22344248

  5. Exfoliated Human Olfactory Neuroepithelium: A Source of Neural Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Vaca, Ana L; Benitez-King, Gloria; Ruiz, Víctor; Ramírez-Rodríguez, Gerardo B; Hernández-de la Cruz, Beatriz; Salamanca-Gómez, Fabio A; González-Márquez, Humberto; Ramírez-Sánchez, Israel; Ortíz-López, Leonardo; Vélez-Del Valle, Cristina; Ordoñez-Razo, Rosa Ma

    2017-04-08

    Neural progenitor cells (NPC) contained in the human adult olfactory neuroepithelium (ONE) possess an undifferentiated state, the capability of self-renewal, the ability to generate neural and glial cells as well as being kept as neurospheres in cell culture conditions. Recently, NPC have been isolated from human or animal models using high-risk surgical methods. Therefore, it was necessary to improve methodologies to obtain and maintain human NPC as well as to achieve better knowledge of brain disorders. In this study, we propose the establishment and characterization of NPC cultures derived from the human olfactory neuroepithelium, using non-invasive procedures. Twenty-two healthy individuals (29.7 ± 4.5 years of age) were subjected to nasal exfoliation. Cells were recovered and kept as neurospheres under serum-free conditions. The neural progenitor origin of these neurospheres was determined by immunocytochemistry and qPCR. Their ability for self-renewal and multipotency was analyzed by clonogenic and differentiation assays, respectively. In the cultures, the ONE cells preserved the phenotype of the neurospheres. The expression levels of Nestin, Musashi, Sox2, and βIII-tubulin demonstrated the neural origin of the neurospheres; 48% of the cells separated could generate neurospheres, determining that they retained their self-renewal capacity. Neurospheres were differentiated in the absence of growth factors (EGF and FGF), and their multipotency ability was maintained as well. We were also able to isolate and grow human neural progenitor cells (neurospheres) through nasal exfoliates (non-invasive method) of the ONE from healthy adults, which is an extremely important contribution for the study of brain disorders and for the development of new therapies.

  6. Endothelial progenitor cells in cardiovascular disease and chronic inflammation: from biomarker to therapeutic agent

    PubMed Central

    Grisar, Johannes C; Haddad, Francois; Gomari, Fatemeh A; Wu, Joseph C

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of endothelial progenitor cells in the 1990s challenged the paradigm of angiogenesis by showing that cells derived from hematopoietic stem cells are capable of forming new blood vessels even in the absence of a pre-existing vessel network, a process termed vasculogenesis. Since then, the majority of studies in the field have found a strong association between circulating endothelial progenitor cells and cardiovascular risk. Several studies have also reported that inflammation influences the mobilization and differentiation of endothelial progenitor cells. In this review, we discuss the emerging role of endothelial progenitor cells as biomarkers of cardiovascular disease as well as the interplay between inflammation and endothelial progenitor cell biology. We will also review the challenges in the field of endothelial progenitor cell-based therapy. PMID:22103609

  7. Culture and Characterization of Circulating Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Patients with Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wenyu; Sun, Wei; Guo, Changcheng; Yan, Yang; Liu, Min; Yao, Xudong; Yang, Bin; Zheng, Junhua

    2015-07-01

    Although emerging evidence demonstrates increased circulating endothelial progenitor cells in patients with solid tumors, to our knowledge it is still unknown whether such cells can be cultured from patients with highly angiogenic renal cell carcinoma. We cultured and characterized circulating endothelial progenitor cells from patients with renal cell carcinoma. The circulating endothelial progenitor cell level (percent of CD45(-)CD34(+) VEGF-R2(+) cells in total peripheral blood mononuclear cells) was quantified in 47 patients with renal cell carcinoma and 40 healthy controls. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were then isolated from 33 patients with renal cell carcinoma and 30 healthy controls to culture and characterize circulating endothelial progenitor cells. The circulating endothelial progenitor cell level was significantly higher in patients with renal cell carcinoma than in healthy controls (0.276% vs 0.086%, p <0.001). A colony of circulating endothelial progenitor cells first emerged significantly earlier in patient than in control preparations (6.72 vs 14.67 days, p <0.001). The culture success rate (87.8% vs 40.0% of participants) and the number of colonies (10.06 vs 1.83) were significantly greater for patients than for controls (each p <0.001). The circulating endothelial progenitor cell level correlated positively with the number of patient colonies (r = 0.762, p <0.001). Cells cultured from patients and controls showed a similar growth pattern, immunophenotype, ability to uptake Ac-LDL and bind lectin, and form capillary tubes in vitro. However, significantly more VEGF-R2(+) circulating endothelial progenitor cells were found in preparations from patients with renal cell carcinoma than from healthy controls (21.1% vs 13.4%, p <0.001). Earlier emergence of circulating endothelial progenitor cell colonies, a higher cell culture success rate and more colonies were found for patients with renal cell carcinoma than for healthy controls. Results

  8. Kell expression on myeloid progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Wagner, T; Lanzer, G; Geissler, K

    2002-03-01

    Kell is one of the major human red blood cell groups and comprises 22 antigens. These antigens are produced by alleles located on chromosome 7, including sets of antithetical antigens such as Kell (K, K1) and cellano (k, K2), which differ in a single amino acid change (T193M). It consists of a 93-Kd transmembrane glycoprotein that is surface-exposed and shares sequence and structural homology with zinc endopeptidases, which are involved in regulating bioactive peptides. Anti-Kell antibodies have been shown to suppress fetal erythropoiesis. Recently published data indicate a similar effect on myeolopoiesis and megakaryopoiesis. Substantial thrombocytopenia in fetuses affected with HDN due to anti-K antibodies led to the discovery of the inhibitory effect of Kell-related antibodies on CFU-MK growth. In addition to its inhibitory effect on BFU-E growth, anti-Kell antibodies significantly reduced CFU-GM colony formation from haematologically normal individuals. Moreover, anti-cellano and anti-Kp(b) antibodies also inhibited the growth of CFU-GM from antigen positive MNC. These data indicate that Kell is not restricted to erythroid blood cells, but is expressed on a broader spectrum of haematopoietic cells than previously believed.

  9. Bone marrow–derived progenitor cells in pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Naozumi; Jin, Hong; Liu, Tianju; Chensue, Stephen W.; Phan, Sem H.

    2004-01-01

    The origin of fibroblasts in pulmonary fibrosis is assumed to be intrapulmonary, but their extrapulmonary origin and especially derivation from bone marrow (BM) progenitor cells has not been ruled out. To examine this possibility directly, adult mice were durably engrafted with BM isolated from transgenic mice expressing enhanced GFP. Induction of pulmonary fibrosis in such chimera mice by endotracheal bleomycin (BLM) injection caused large numbers of GFP+ cells to appear in active fibrotic lesions, while only a few GFP+ cells could be identified in control lungs. Flow-cytometric analysis of lung cells confirmed the BLM-induced increase in GFP+ cells in chimera mice and revealed a significant increase in GFP+ cells that also express type I collagen. GFP+ lung fibroblasts isolated from chimera mice expressed collagen and telomerase reverse transcriptase but not α-smooth muscle actin. Treatment of isolated GFP+ fibroblasts with TGF-β failed to induce myofibroblast differentiation. Cultured lung fibroblasts expressed the chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CCR7 and responded chemotactically to their cognate ligands, stromal cell–derived factor-1α and secondary lymphoid chemokine, respectively. Thus the collagen-producing lung fibroblasts in pulmonary fibrosis can also be derived from BM progenitor cells. PMID:14722616

  10. Adult stem cell and mesenchymal progenitor theories of aging.

    PubMed

    Fukada, So-Ichiro; Ma, Yuran; Uezumi, Akiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Advances in medical science and technology allow people live longer lives, which results in age-related problems. Humans cannot avoid the various aged-related alterations of aging; in other words, humans cannot remain young at molecular and cellular levels. In 1956, Harman proposed the "free radical theory of aging" to explain the molecular mechanisms of aging. Telomere length, and accumulation of DNA or mitochondrial damage are also considered to be mechanisms of aging. On the other hand, stem cells are essential for maintaining tissue homeostasis by replacing parenchymal cells; therefore, the stem cell theory of aging is also used to explain the progress of aging. Importantly, the stem cell theory of aging is likely related to other theories. In addition, recent studies have started to reveal the essential roles of tissue-resident mesenchymal progenitors/stem cells/stromal cells in maintaining tissue homeostasis, and some evidence of their fundamental roles in the progression of aging has been presented. In this review, we discuss how stem cell and other theories connect to explain the progress of aging. In addition, we consider the mesenchymal progenitor theory of aging to describing the process of aging.

  11. The involvement of multipotential progenitor cells in Mooren's ulcer.

    PubMed

    Lee, In Gul; Ye, Juan; Kim, Jae Chan

    2005-06-30

    The aim of this study was to assess the involvement of multipotential progenitor cells in the pathogenesis of Mooren's ulcer using immunohistochemical staining techniques. Tissue specimens were collected from 3 Mooren's ulcer patients who underwent lamellar keratectomy. Immunohistochemical staining patterns were analyzed using antibodies: CD34, c-kit, STRO-1, CD45RO, VEGF and a-SMA. Strong positive CD34, c-kit and STRO-1 cells were revealed in Mooren's ulcer specimens, especially in the superficial stroma. A few weakly expressed CD34 stroma cells were seen in normal limbal cornea but no immunoreactivity for c-kit and STRO-1 could be found. CD45RO positive T cells were found to have infiltrated in Mooren's ulcer. The immunostaining pattern of VEGF and a- SMA was closely correlated with the degree of expression and the number of CD34 positive cells. Bone marrow-derived multipotential progenitor cells may be involved in the pathogenesis of Mooren's ulcer by synergizing with other factors to amplify autoimmune destructive reactions and to contribute to the regeneration process. Specific therapeutic strategies that target the role of these cells in the disease are warranted.

  12. Hair cell damage recruited Lgr5-expressing cells are hair cell progenitors in neonatal mouse utricle

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jinchao; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wu, Fengfang; Lin, Weinian

    2015-01-01

    Damage-activated stem/progenitor cells play important roles in regenerating lost cells and in tissue repair. Previous studies reported that the mouse utricle has limited hair cell regeneration ability after hair cell ablation. However, the potential progenitor cell population regenerating new hair cells remains undiscovered. In this study, we first found that Lgr5, a Wnt target gene that is not usually expressed in the neonatal mouse utricle, can be activated by 24 h neomycin treatment in a sub-population of supporting cells in the striolar region of the neonatal mouse utricle. Lineage tracing demonstrated that these Lgr5-positive supporting cells could regenerate new hair cells in explant culture. We isolated the damage-activated Lgr5-positive cells with flow cytometry and found that these Lgr5-positive supporting cells could regenerate hair cells in vitro, and self-renew to form spheres, which maintained the capacity to differentiate into hair cells over seven generations of passages. Our results suggest that damage-activated Lgr5-positive supporting cells act as hair cell progenitors in the neonatal mouse utricle, which may help to uncover a potential route to regenerate hair cell in mammals. PMID:25883551

  13. Presence of stem/progenitor cells in the rat penis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Guiting; Alwaal, Amjad; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Jianwen; Wang, Lin; Li, Huixi; Wang, Guifang; Ning, Hongxiu; Lin, Ching-Shwun; Xin, Zhongcheng; Lue, Tom F

    2015-01-15

    Tissue resident stem cells are believed to exist in every organ, and their identification is commonly done using a combination of immunostaining for putative stem cell markers and label-retaining cell (LRC) strategy. In this study, we employed these approaches to identify potential stem cells in the penis. Newborn rats were intraperitoneally injected with thymidine analog, 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine (EdU), and their penis was harvested at 7 h, 3 days, 1 week, and 4 weeks. It was processed for EdU stains and immunofluorescence staining for stem cell markers A2B5, PCNA, and c-kit. EdU-positive cells were counted for each time point and co-localized with each stem cell marker, then isolated and cultured in vitro followed by their characterization using flowcytometry and immunofluorescence. At 7 h post-EdU injection, 410 ± 105.3 penile corporal cells were labeled in each cross-section (∼28%). The number of EdU-positive cells at 3 days increased to 536 ± 115.6, while their percentage dropped to 25%. Progressively fewer EdU-positive cells were present in the sacrificed rat penis at longer time points (1 and 4 weeks). They were mainly distributed in the subtunic and perisinusoidal spaces, and defined as subtunic penile progenitor cells (STPCs) and perisinusoidal penile progenitor cells (PPCs). These cells expressed c-kit, A2B5, and PCNA. After culturing in vitro, only ∼0.324% corporal cells were EdU-labeled LRCs and expressed A2B5/PCNA. Therefore, labeling of penis cells by EdU occurred randomly, and label retaining was not associated with expression of c-kit, A2B5, or PCNA. The penile LRCs are mainly distributed within the subtunic and perisinusoidal space.

  14. Regulation of Mammary Progenitor Cells by p53 and Parity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    family was shown to be depleted in the m ammary progenitor cells and highly expressed in the m ore differentiated cell types and the let-7c sensor...apoptosis and tumor suppression. Nat. Med. 4, 835-838 (1998). 21. Giono, L. E. & Manfredi, J. J. The p53 tumor suppressor participates in multiple ...Schauble, B., zur, H. A., Esteve, J. & Ohgaki, H. Tumors associated with p53 germline mutations: a synopsis of 91 families . Am. J. Pathol. 150, 1-13 (1997

  15. Methylene blue promotes quiescence of rat neural progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Luokun; Choudhury, Gourav R; Wang, Jixian; Park, Yong; Liu, Ran; Yuan, Fang; Zhang, Chun-Li; Yorio, Thomas; Jin, Kunlin; Yang, Shao-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Neural stem cell-based treatment holds a new therapeutic opportunity for neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we investigated the effect of methylene blue on proliferation and differentiation of rat neural progenitor cells (NPCs) both in vitro and in vivo. We found that methylene blue inhibited proliferation and promoted quiescence of NPCs in vitro without affecting committed neuronal differentiation. Consistently, intracerebroventricular infusion of methylene blue significantly inhibited NPC proliferation at the subventricular zone (SVZ). Methylene blue inhibited mTOR signaling along with down-regulation of cyclins in NPCs in vitro and in vivo. In summary, our study indicates that methylene blue may delay NPC senescence through enhancing NPCs quiescence.

  16. MiR-128-2 inhibits common lymphoid progenitors from developing into progenitor B cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Xu, Jie; Chen, Huo; Fei, Xia; Tang, YuXu; Yan, Yunqiu; Zhang, Huimin; Zhang, Jinping

    2016-04-05

    A considerable number of studies revealed that B cell development is finely regulated by transcription factors (TFs). Recent studies suggested that TFs are coordinated with microRNAs to control the development of B cells in numerous checkpoints. In the present study, we first found that miR-128-2 was differentially expressed in various immune organs and immunocytes. B cell development was inhibited in miR-128-2-overexpressed chimera and transgenic (TG) mice in bone marrow with decreased preproB, preB, proB, immature B, and recirculating B cells, as well as increased common lymphoid progenitors (CLPs). Further experiments showed that the apoptosis of CLP decreased, but proliferation was not altered in miR-128-2-overexpressed mice. Extensive studies suggested that the inhibition of apoptosis of CLP may be caused by miR-128-2 targeting A2B and MALT1, thereby increasing the phosphorylation of ERK and P38 MAPK. Such findings have prompted future investigations on the function of miR-128-2 in lymph genesis.

  17. MiR-128-2 inhibits common lymphoid progenitors from developing into progenitor B cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huo; Fei, Xia; Tang, YuXu; Yan, Yunqiu; Zhang, Huimin; Zhang, Jinping

    2016-01-01

    A considerable number of studies revealed that B cell development is finely regulated by transcription factors (TFs). Recent studies suggested that TFs are coordinated with microRNAs to control the development of B cells in numerous checkpoints. In the present study, we first found that miR-128-2 was differentially expressed in various immune organs and immunocytes. B cell development was inhibited in miR-128-2-overexpressed chimera and transgenic (TG) mice in bone marrow with decreased preproB, preB, proB, immature B, and recirculating B cells, as well as increased common lymphoid progenitors (CLPs). Further experiments showed that the apoptosis of CLP decreased, but proliferation was not altered in miR-128-2-overexpressed mice. Extensive studies suggested that the inhibition of apoptosis of CLP may be caused by miR-128-2 targeting A2B and MALT1, thereby increasing the phosphorylation of ERK and P38 MAPK. Such findings have prompted future investigations on the function of miR-128-2 in lymph genesis. PMID:27008703

  18. Apheresis techniques for collection of peripheral blood progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Moog, Rainer

    2004-12-01

    The combination of effective mobilisation protocols and efficient use of apheresis machines has caused peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPC) transplantation to grow rapidly. The development of apheresis technology has improved over the years. Today PBSC procedures have changed towards systems to minimise operator interaction and to reduce the collection of undesired cells such as polymorphonuclear cells and platelets using functionally closed, sterile environments for PBSC collection in keeping with Good Manufacturing Practice guidelines. Blood cell separators with continuous flow technique allow the processing of more blood than intermittent flow devices resulting in higher PBSC yields. Large volume leukapheresis with the processing of 3-4-fold donor's/patient's blood volume can increase the number of collected progenitor cells. Therefore, intermittent flow cell separators are indicated if only single vein access is available. Anticoagulant induced hypocalcaemia is an often observed side effect in long lasting PBPC harvesting and monitoring of electrolytes should be performed especially at the end of the apheresis procedure to supplement low levels of potassium, calcium or magnesium. Refinement and improvement of collection techniques continue to add to the armamentarium of current approaches for cancer and non-malignant conditions and will enable future strategies.

  19. Role of medullary progenitor cells in epithelial cell migration and proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dong; Chen, Zhiyong; Zhang, Yuning; Park, Chanyoung; Al-Omari, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    This study is aimed at characterizing medullary interstitial progenitor cells and to examine their capacity to induce tubular epithelial cell migration and proliferation. We have isolated a progenitor cell side population from a primary medullary interstitial cell line. We show that the medullary progenitor cells (MPCs) express CD24, CD44, CXCR7, CXCR4, nestin, and PAX7. MPCs are CD34 negative, which indicates that they are not bone marrow-derived stem cells. MPCs survive >50 passages, and when grown in epithelial differentiation medium develop phenotypic characteristics of epithelial cells. Inner medulla collecting duct (IMCD3) cells treated with conditioned medium from MPCs show significantly accelerated cell proliferation and migration. Conditioned medium from PGE2-treated MPCs induce tubule formation in IMCD3 cells grown in 3D Matrigel. Moreover, most of the MPCs express the pericyte marker PDGFR-b. Our study shows that the medullary interstitium harbors a side population of progenitor cells that can differentiate to epithelial cells and can stimulate tubular epithelial cell migration and proliferation. The findings of this study suggest that medullary pericyte/progenitor cells may play a critical role in collecting duct cell injury repair. PMID:24808539

  20. Biodegradable and synthetic membranes for the expansion and functional differentiation of rat embryonic liver cells.

    PubMed

    Piscioneri, Antonella; Campana, Carla; Salerno, Simona; Morelli, Sabrina; Bader, Augustinus; Giordano, Francesca; Drioli, Enrico; Bartolo, Loredana De

    2011-01-01

    The insufficient availability of donor organs for orthotopic liver transplantation worldwide has urgently increased the requirement for new therapies for acute and chronic liver disease. The creation of an unlimited source of donor cells for hepatocyte transplantation therapy and pharmaceutical applications may be the isolation and expansion of liver progenitor cells or stem cells. Here we report the expansion and functional differentiation of rat embryonic liver cells on biodegradable and synthetic polymeric membranes in comparison with traditional substrates, such as collagen and polystyrene culture dishes. Membranes prepared from chitosan and modified polyetheretherketone were used for the culture of liver progenitor cells derived from rat embryonic liver. Cells proliferated, with a significant increase in their number within 8-11 days. The cells displayed functional differentiation showing urea synthesis, albumin production and diazepam biotransformation on all substrates investigated. In particular, on a chitosan membrane liver-specific functions were expressed at significantly higher levels for prolonged times compared with other synthetic membranes, utilizing traditional substrates (collagen and PSCD) as references. These results demonstrate that chitosan membranes offer cells favourable conditions to promote the expansion and functional differentiation of embryonic liver cells that could be effectively used in liver tissue engineering and in pharmaceutical applications. Copyright © 2010 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. DENTAL FOLLICLE PROGENITOR CELL HETEROGENEITY IN THE DEVELOPING MOUSE PERIODONTIUM

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Xianghong; Ito, Yoshihiro; Dangaria, Smit; Diekwisch, Thomas G.H.

    2009-01-01

    As a developmental precursor for diverse periodontal tissues the dental follicle harbors great promise for periodontal tissue regeneration. However, development of optimal therapy awaits the answer to a key question that impinges on many issues in development; do adult progenitor tissues form a homogeneous cell population that differentiates into target tissues when they arrive at the site, or they contain heterogeneous cell populations that are committed to specific fates? In order to address the homogeneity/heterogeneity question we analyzed differentiation pathways and markers in several cloned dental follicle cell lines. Our studies revealed that each of our cloned dental follicle lines featured remarkably unique characteristics indicative of a separate and distinct lineage. One line, DF1 was high in proliferative activity while it did not display any mineralization behavior, suggesting that it might be related to a periodontal ligament-type lineage. DF2 was similar to DF1 but featured remarkably high alkaline phosphatase activity indicative of a highly undifferentiated state. DF3 matched the mineralization characteristics of a same stage alveolar bone line AB1 in terms of gene expression and von Kossa staining indicating that DF3 might be of cementoblastic or alveolar bone osteoblastic lineage. In order to verify the multilineage potential of the dental follicle for purposes of tissue engineering, a series of differentiation induction experiments was conducted. For identification purposes, characteristics of these heterogeneous follicular progenitor cells were compared with follicle components in tissue sections of the postnatal developing periodontium. The presence of heterogeneous cell populations in the dental follicle mirrors individual developmental pathways in the formation of the dental integument. The profound cellular heterogeneity of the dental follicle as an adult progenitor for tissue regeneration also suggests that heterogeneous cellular

  2. Mouse Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells Expressing Adipogenic and Osteogenic Transcription Factors Suppress the Macrophage Inflammatory Response.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Natalie; Renna, Heather; McHugh, Lauren; Mazolkova, Katie; Crugnola, William; Evans, Jodi F

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal progenitor cell characteristics that can identify progenitor populations with specific functions in immunity are actively being investigated. Progenitors from bone marrow and adipose tissue regulate the macrophage (MΦ) inflammatory response by promoting the switch from an inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory phenotype. Conversely, mesenchymal progenitors from the mouse aorta (mAo) support and contribute to the MΦ response under inflammatory conditions. We used cell lines with purported opposing immune-regulatory function, a bone marrow derived mesenchymal progenitor cell line (D1) and a mouse aorta derived mesenchymal progenitor cell line (mAo). Their interaction and regulation of the MΦ cell response to the inflammatory mediator, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), was examined by coculture. As expected, D1 cells suppressed NO, TNF-α, and IL-12p70 production but MΦ phagocytic activity remained unchanged. The mAo cells enhanced NO and TNF-α production in coculture and enhanced MΦ phagocytic activity. Using flow cytometry and PCR array, we then sought to identify sets of MSC-associated genes and markers that are expressed by these progenitor populations. We have determined that immune-supportive mesenchymal progenitors highly express chondrogenic and tenogenic transcription factors while immunosuppressive mesenchymal progenitors highly express adipogenic and osteogenic transcription factors. These data will be useful for the isolation, purification, and modification of mesenchymal progenitors to be used in the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  3. Mouse Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells Expressing Adipogenic and Osteogenic Transcription Factors Suppress the Macrophage Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Natalie; Renna, Heather; McHugh, Lauren; Mazolkova, Katie; Crugnola, William

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal progenitor cell characteristics that can identify progenitor populations with specific functions in immunity are actively being investigated. Progenitors from bone marrow and adipose tissue regulate the macrophage (MΦ) inflammatory response by promoting the switch from an inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory phenotype. Conversely, mesenchymal progenitors from the mouse aorta (mAo) support and contribute to the MΦ response under inflammatory conditions. We used cell lines with purported opposing immune-regulatory function, a bone marrow derived mesenchymal progenitor cell line (D1) and a mouse aorta derived mesenchymal progenitor cell line (mAo). Their interaction and regulation of the MΦ cell response to the inflammatory mediator, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), was examined by coculture. As expected, D1 cells suppressed NO, TNF-α, and IL-12p70 production but MΦ phagocytic activity remained unchanged. The mAo cells enhanced NO and TNF-α production in coculture and enhanced MΦ phagocytic activity. Using flow cytometry and PCR array, we then sought to identify sets of MSC-associated genes and markers that are expressed by these progenitor populations. We have determined that immune-supportive mesenchymal progenitors highly express chondrogenic and tenogenic transcription factors while immunosuppressive mesenchymal progenitors highly express adipogenic and osteogenic transcription factors. These data will be useful for the isolation, purification, and modification of mesenchymal progenitors to be used in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:28191017

  4. Notch3 marks clonogenic mammary luminal progenitor cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lafkas, Daniel; Rodilla, Veronica; Huyghe, Mathilde; Mourao, Larissa; Kiaris, Hippokratis

    2013-01-01

    The identity of mammary stem and progenitor cells remains poorly understood, mainly as a result of the lack of robust markers. The Notch signaling pathway has been implicated in mammary gland development as well as in tumorigenesis in this tissue. Elevated expression of the Notch3 receptor has been correlated to the highly aggressive “triple negative” human breast cancer. However, the specific cells expressing this Notch paralogue in the mammary gland remain unknown. Using a conditionally inducible Notch3-CreERT2SAT transgenic mouse, we genetically marked Notch3-expressing cells throughout mammary gland development and followed their lineage in vivo. We demonstrate that Notch3 is expressed in a highly clonogenic and transiently quiescent luminal progenitor population that gives rise to a ductal lineage. These cells are capable of surviving multiple successive pregnancies, suggesting a capacity to self-renew. Our results also uncover a role for the Notch3 receptor in restricting the proliferation and consequent clonal expansion of these cells. PMID:24100291

  5. Notch3 marks clonogenic mammary luminal progenitor cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lafkas, Daniel; Rodilla, Veronica; Huyghe, Mathilde; Mourao, Larissa; Kiaris, Hippokratis; Fre, Silvia

    2013-10-14

    The identity of mammary stem and progenitor cells remains poorly understood, mainly as a result of the lack of robust markers. The Notch signaling pathway has been implicated in mammary gland development as well as in tumorigenesis in this tissue. Elevated expression of the Notch3 receptor has been correlated to the highly aggressive "triple negative" human breast cancer. However, the specific cells expressing this Notch paralogue in the mammary gland remain unknown. Using a conditionally inducible Notch3-CreERT2(SAT) transgenic mouse, we genetically marked Notch3-expressing cells throughout mammary gland development and followed their lineage in vivo. We demonstrate that Notch3 is expressed in a highly clonogenic and transiently quiescent luminal progenitor population that gives rise to a ductal lineage. These cells are capable of surviving multiple successive pregnancies, suggesting a capacity to self-renew. Our results also uncover a role for the Notch3 receptor in restricting the proliferation and consequent clonal expansion of these cells.

  6. Potential implications of vascular wall resident endothelial progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Ergün, Süleyman; Tilki, Derya; Hohn, Hans-Peter; Gehling, Ursula; Kilic, Nerbil

    2007-11-01

    A rapidly increasing body of data suggests an essential role of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in vascular regeneration, formation of new vessels in cardiovascular diseases and also in tumor vasculogenesis. Moreover, recent data obtained from clinical studies with anti-angiogenic drugs in tumor therapy or with pro-angiogenic stimuli in ischemic disorders implicate a predictive role of the number of EPCs circulating in the peripheral blood in monitoring of these diseases. However, there is still some controversial data regarding the relevance of the EPCs in vascular formation depending on models used and diseases studied. One of the essential prerequisites for a better understanding of the whole contribution of EPCs to vascular formation in adult, a process called postnatal vasculogenesis, is to identify their exact sources. We could recently discover the existence of EPCs in a distinct zone of the vascular wall of large and middle sized adult blood vessels and showed that these cells are capable to differentiate into mature endothelial cells, to form capillary sprouts in arterial ring assay and to build vasa vasorum-like structures within the vascular wall. They also can be mobilized very rapidly from the vascular wall by tumor cells. This review will discuss the functional implications of these vascular wall resident endothelial progenitor cells (VW-EPCs) in relation to those of EPCs circulating in peripheral blood or derived from the bone marrow in cardiovascular and neoplastic diseases.

  7. Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Vascular Progenitor Cells Capable of Endothelial and Smooth Muscle Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Katherine L; Obrtlikova, Petra; Alvarez, Diego F; King, Judy A; Keirstead, Susan A; Allred, Jeremy R; Kaufman, Dan S

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Previous studies have demonstrated development of endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) as separate cell lineages derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). We demonstrate CD34+ cells isolated from differentiated hESCs function as vascular progenitor cells capable of producing both ECs and SMCs. These studies better define the developmental origin and reveal the relationship between these two cell types, as well as provide a more complete biological characterization. MATERIALS AND METHODS hESCs are co-cultured on M2-10B4 stromal cells or Wnt1 expressing M2-10B4 for 13–15 days to generate a CD34+ cell population. These cells are isolated using a magnetic antibody separation kit and cultured on fibronectin coated dishes in EC medium. To induce SMC differentiation, culture medium is changed and a morphological and phenotypic change occurs within 24–48 hours. RESULTS CD34+ vascular progenitor cells give rise to ECs and SMCs. The two populations express respective cell specific transcripts and proteins, exhibit intracellular calcium in response to various agonists, and form robust tube-like structures when co-cultured in Matrigel. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) cultured under SMC conditions do not exhibit a change in phenotype or genotype. Wnt1 overexpressing stromal cells produced an increased number of progenitor cells. CONCLUSIONS The ability to generate large numbers of ECs and SMCs from a single vascular progenitor cell population is promising for therapeutic use to treat a variety of diseased and ischemic conditions. The step-wise differentiation outlined here is an efficient, reproducible method with potential for large scale cultures suitable for clinical applications. PMID:20067819

  8. De novo generation of adipocytes from circulating progenitor cells in mouse and human adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Gavin, Kathleen M.; Gutman, Jonathan A.; Kohrt, Wendy M.; Wei, Qi; Shea, Karen L.; Miller, Heidi L.; Sullivan, Timothy M.; Erickson, Paul F.; Helm, Karen M.; Acosta, Alistaire S.; Childs, Christine R.; Musselwhite, Evelyn; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Kelly, Kimberly; Majka, Susan M.; Klemm, Dwight J.

    2016-01-01

    White adipocytes in adults are typically derived from tissue resident mesenchymal progenitors. The recent identification of de novo production of adipocytes from bone marrow progenitor-derived cells in mice challenges this paradigm and indicates an alternative lineage specification that adipocytes exist. We hypothesized that alternative lineage specification of white adipocytes is also present in human adipose tissue. Bone marrow from transgenic mice in which luciferase expression is governed by the adipocyte-restricted adiponectin gene promoter was adoptively transferred to wild-type recipient mice. Light emission was quantitated in recipients by in vivo imaging and direct enzyme assay. Adipocytes were also obtained from human recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. DNA was isolated, and microsatellite polymorphisms were exploited to quantify donor/recipient chimerism. Luciferase emission was detected from major fat depots of transplanted mice. No light emission was observed from intestines, liver, or lungs. Up to 35% of adipocytes in humans were generated from donor marrow cells in the absence of cell fusion. Nontransplanted mice and stromal-vascular fraction samples were used as negative and positive controls for the mouse and human experiments, respectively. This study provides evidence for a nontissue resident origin of an adipocyte subpopulation in both mice and humans.—Gavin, K. M., Gutman, J. A., Kohrt, W. M., Wei, Q., Shea, K. L., Miller, H. L., Sullivan, T. M., Erickson, P. F., Helm, K. M., Acosta, A. S., Childs, C. R., Musselwhite, E., Varella-Garcia, M., Kelly, K., Majka, S. M., Klemm, D. J. De novo generation of adipocytes from circulating progenitor cells in mouse and human adipose tissue. PMID:26581599

  9. A study of structural differences between liver cancer cells and normal liver cells using FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Daping; Xu, Fangcheng; Yu, Qiang; Fang, Tingting; Xia, Junjun; Li, Seruo; Wang, Xin

    2015-11-01

    Since liver cancer seriously threatens human health, it is very urgent to explore an effective method for diagnosing liver cancer early. In this study, we investigated the structure differences of IR spectra between neoplastic liver cells and normal liver cells. The major differences of absorption bands were observed between liver cancer cells and normal liver cells, the values of A2955/A2921, A1744/A1082, A1640/A1535, H1121/H1020 might be potentially useful factors for distinguishing liver cancer cells from normal liver cells. Curve fitting also provided some important information on structural differences between malignant and normal liver cancer cells. Furthermore, IR spectra combined with hierarchical cluster analysis could make a distinction between liver cancer cells and normal liver cells. The present results provided enough cell basis for diagnosis of liver cancer by FTIR spectroscopy, suggesting FTIR spectroscopy may be a potentially useful tool for liver cancer diagnosis.

  10. Circulating Progenitor Cells in Regenerative Technologies: A Realistic Strategy in Bone Regeneration?

    PubMed

    Chang, Jessica B; Lee, Justine C

    Strategies in skeletal regeneration research have been primarily focused on optimization of three components: cellular progenitors, biomaterials, and growth factors. With the increased understanding that circulating progenitor cells exist in peripheral blood, the question arises whether such cell types would allow for adequate osteogenesis and mineralization. In this review, we discuss the current literature on circulating progenitor cells in in vitro and in vivo studies on bone regeneration.

  11. Comparison of direct and indirect radiation effects on osteoclast formation from progenitor cells derived from different hemopoietic sources

    SciTech Connect

    Scheven, B.A.; Wassenaar, A.M.; Kawilarang-de Haas, E.W.; Nijweide, P.J.

    1987-07-01

    Hemopoietic stem and progenitor cells from different sources differ in radiosensitivity. Recently, we have demonstrated that the multinucleated cell responsible for bone resorption and marrow cavity formation, the osteoclast, is in fact of hemopoietic lineage. In this investigation we have studied the radiosensitivity of osteoclast formation from two different hemopoietic tissues: fetal liver and adult bone marrow. Development of osteoclasts from hemopoietic progenitors was induced by coculture of hemopoietic cell populations with fetal mouse long bones depleted of their own osteoclast precursor pool. During culture, osteoclasts developed from the exogenous cell population and invaded the calcified hypertrophic cartilage of the long bone model, thereby giving rise to the formation of a primitive marrow cavity. To analyze the radiosensitivity of osteoclast formation, either the hemopoietic cells or the bone rudiments were irradiated before coculture. Fetal liver cells were found to be less radiosensitive than bone marrow cells. The D0, Dq values and extrapolation numbers were 1.69 Gy, 5.30 Gy, and 24.40 for fetal liver cells and 1.01 Gy, 1.85 Gy, and 6.02 for bone marrow cells. Irradiation of the (pre)osteoclast-free long bone rudiments instead of the hemopoietic sources resulted in a significant inhibition of osteoclast formation at doses of 4 Gy or more. This indirect effect appeared to be more prominent in the cocultures with fetal than with adult hemopoietic cells. Furthermore, radiation doses of 8.0-10.0 Gy indirectly affected the appearance of other cell types (e.g., granulocytes) in the newly formed but underdeveloped marrow cavity. The results indicate that osteoclast progenitors from different hemopoietic sources exhibit a distinct sensitivity to ionizing irradiation. Radiation injury to long bone rudiments disturbs the osteoclast-forming capacity as well as the hemopoietic microenvironment.

  12. Biological behaviour and role of endothelial progenitor cells in vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiu-hua; She, Ming-peng

    2007-12-20

    To review the biological behaviour of endothelial progenitor cells and their role in vascular diseases. Data sources The data used in this review were mainly from Medline and PubMed for relevant English language articles published from 1985 to March 2007. The search term was "endothelial progenitor cells". Study selection Articles about the biological behaviour of endothelial progenitor cells and their roles in the pathogenesis of vascular diseases such as atherogenesis were used. Progenitor cells in bone marrow, peripheral blood and adventitia can differentiate into mature endothelial cells (ECs). The progenitor cells, which express certain surface markers including AC133, CD34 and KDR, enable restoration of the microcirculation and ECs when injury or ischaemia occurs. Endothelial progenitor cells used in experimental models and clinical trials for ischaemic syndromes could restore endothelial integrity and inhibit neointima development. Moreover, their number and functional properties are influenced by certain cytokines and atherosclerotic risk factors. Impairment of the progenitor cells might limit the regenerative capacity, even lead to the development of atherosclerosis or other vascular diseases. Endothelial progenitor cells have a particular role in prevention and treatment of certain cardiovascular diseases. However, many challenges remain in understanding differentiation of endothelial progenitor cells, their mobilization and revascularization.

  13. Latent progenitor cells as potential regulators for tympanic membrane regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seung Won; Kim, Jangho; Seonwoo, Hoon; Jang, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Yeon Ju; Lim, Hye Jin; Lim, Ki-Taek; Tian, Chunjie; Chung, Jong Hoon; Choung, Yun-Hoon

    2015-06-01

    Tympanic membrane (TM) perforation, in particular chronic otitis media, is one of the most common clinical problems in the world and can present with sensorineural healing loss. Here, we explored an approach for TM regeneration where the latent progenitor or stem cells within TM epithelial layers may play an important regulatory role. We showed that potential TM stem cells present highly positive staining for epithelial stem cell markers in all areas of normal TM tissue. Additionally, they are present at high levels in perforated TMs, especially in proximity to the holes, regardless of acute or chronic status, suggesting that TM stem cells may be a potential factor for TM regeneration. Our study suggests that latent TM stem cells could be potential regulators of regeneration, which provides a new insight into this clinically important process and a potential target for new therapies for chronic otitis media and other eardrum injuries.

  14. Distinct populations of endoderm cells converge to generate the embryonic liver bud and ventral foregut tissues.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Kimberly D; Zaret, Kenneth S

    2005-04-01

    The location and movement of mammalian gut tissue progenitors, prior to the expression of tissue-specific genes, has been unknown, but this knowledge is essential to identify transitions that lead to cell type specification. To address this, we used vital dyes to label exposed anterior endoderm cells of early somite stage mouse embryos, cultured the embryos into the tissue bud phase of development, and determined the tissue fate of the dye labeled cells. This approach was performed at three embryonic stages that are prior to, or coincident with, foregut tissue patterning (1-3 somites, 4-6 somites, and 7-10 somites). Short-term labeling experiments tracked the movement of tissue progenitor cells during foregut closure. Surprisingly, we found that two distinct types of endoderm-progenitor cells, lateral and medial, arising from three spatially separated embryonic domains, converge to generate the epithelial cells of the liver bud. Whereas the lateral endoderm-progenitors give rise to descendants that are constrained in tissue fate and position along the anterior-posterior axis of the gut, the medial gut endoderm-progenitors give rise to descendants that stream along the anterior-posterior axis at the ventral midline and contribute to multiple gut tissues. The fate map reveals extensive morphogenetic movement of progenitors prior to tissue specification, it permits a detailed analysis of endoderm tissue patterning, and it illustrates that diverse progenitor domains can give rise to individual tissue cell types.

  15. De novo generation of adipocytes from circulating progenitor cells in mouse and human adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Gavin, Kathleen M; Gutman, Jonathan A; Kohrt, Wendy M; Wei, Qi; Shea, Karen L; Miller, Heidi L; Sullivan, Timothy M; Erickson, Paul F; Helm, Karen M; Acosta, Alistaire S; Childs, Christine R; Musselwhite, Evelyn; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Kelly, Kimberly; Majka, Susan M; Klemm, Dwight J

    2016-03-01

    White adipocytes in adults are typically derived from tissue resident mesenchymal progenitors. The recent identification of de novo production of adipocytes from bone marrow progenitor-derived cells in mice challenges this paradigm and indicates an alternative lineage specification that adipocytes exist. We hypothesized that alternative lineage specification of white adipocytes is also present in human adipose tissue. Bone marrow from transgenic mice in which luciferase expression is governed by the adipocyte-restricted adiponectin gene promoter was adoptively transferred to wild-type recipient mice. Light emission was quantitated in recipients by in vivo imaging and direct enzyme assay. Adipocytes were also obtained from human recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. DNA was isolated, and microsatellite polymorphisms were exploited to quantify donor/recipient chimerism. Luciferase emission was detected from major fat depots of transplanted mice. No light emission was observed from intestines, liver, or lungs. Up to 35% of adipocytes in humans were generated from donor marrow cells in the absence of cell fusion. Nontransplanted mice and stromal-vascular fraction samples were used as negative and positive controls for the mouse and human experiments, respectively. This study provides evidence for a nontissue resident origin of an adipocyte subpopulation in both mice and humans.

  16. Integration-deficient lentivectors: an effective strategy to purify and differentiate human embryonic stem cell-derived hepatic progenitors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) hold great promise for applications in regenerative medicine. However, the safety of cell therapy using differentiated hPSC derivatives must be improved through methods that will permit the transplantation of homogenous populations of a specific cell type. To date, purification of progenitors and mature cells generated from either embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells remains challenging with use of conventional methods. Results We used lentivectors encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) driven by the liver-specific apoliprotein A-II (APOA-II) promoter to purify human hepatic progenitors. We evaluated both integrating and integration-defective lentivectors in combination with an HIV integrase inhibitor. A human embryonic stem cell line was differentiated into hepatic progenitors using a chemically defined protocol. Subsequently, cells were transduced and sorted at day 16 of differentiation to obtain a cell population enriched in hepatic progenitor cells. After sorting, more than 99% of these APOA-II-GFP-positive cells expressed hepatoblast markers such as α-fetoprotein and cytokeratin 19. When further cultured for 16 days, these cells underwent differentiation into more mature cells and exhibited hepatocyte properties such as albumin secretion. Moreover, they were devoid of vector DNA integration. Conclusions We have developed an effective strategy to purify human hepatic cells from cultures of differentiating hPSCs, producing a novel tool that could be used not only for cell therapy but also for in vitro applications such as drug screening. The present strategy should also be suitable for the purification of a broad range of cell types derived from either pluripotent or adult stem cells. PMID:23870169

  17. Integration-deficient lentivectors: an effective strategy to purify and differentiate human embryonic stem cell-derived hepatic progenitors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guanghua; Si-Tayeb, Karim; Corbineau, Sébastien; Vernet, Rémi; Gayon, Régis; Dianat, Noushin; Martinet, Clémence; Clay, Denis; Goulinet-Mainot, Sylvie; Tachdjian, Gérard; Tachdjian, Gérard; Burks, Deborah; Vallier, Ludovic; Bouillé, Pascale; Dubart-Kupperschmitt, Anne; Weber, Anne

    2013-07-19

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) hold great promise for applications in regenerative medicine. However, the safety of cell therapy using differentiated hPSC derivatives must be improved through methods that will permit the transplantation of homogenous populations of a specific cell type. To date, purification of progenitors and mature cells generated from either embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells remains challenging with use of conventional methods. We used lentivectors encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) driven by the liver-specific apoliprotein A-II (APOA-II) promoter to purify human hepatic progenitors. We evaluated both integrating and integration-defective lentivectors in combination with an HIV integrase inhibitor. A human embryonic stem cell line was differentiated into hepatic progenitors using a chemically defined protocol. Subsequently, cells were transduced and sorted at day 16 of differentiation to obtain a cell population enriched in hepatic progenitor cells. After sorting, more than 99% of these APOA-II-GFP-positive cells expressed hepatoblast markers such as α-fetoprotein and cytokeratin 19. When further cultured for 16 days, these cells underwent differentiation into more mature cells and exhibited hepatocyte properties such as albumin secretion. Moreover, they were devoid of vector DNA integration. We have developed an effective strategy to purify human hepatic cells from cultures of differentiating hPSCs, producing a novel tool that could be used not only for cell therapy but also for in vitro applications such as drug screening. The present strategy should also be suitable for the purification of a broad range of cell types derived from either pluripotent or adult stem cells.

  18. Impaired hematopoietic progenitor cells in trauma hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Bhoi, Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock (HS) is the major cause of death during trauma. Mortality due to HS is about 50%. Dysfunction of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) has been observed during severe trauma and HS. HS induces the elevation of cytokines, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), peripheral blood HPCs, and circulating catecholamines, and decreases the expression of erythropoietin receptor connected with suppression of HPCs. Impaired HPCs may lead to persistent anemia and risk of susceptibility to infection, sepsis, and MOF. There is a need to reactivate impaired HPCs during trauma hemorrhagic shock.

  19. Stem cell-based regenerative opportunities for the liver: State of the art and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Tsolaki, Eleftheria; Yannaki, Evangelia

    2015-01-01

    The existing mismatch between the great demand for liver transplants and the number of available donor organs highlights the urgent need for alternative therapeutic strategies in patients with acute or chronic liver failure. The rapidly growing knowledge on stem cell biology and the intrinsic repair processes of the liver has opened new avenues for using stem cells as a cell therapy platform in regenerative medicine for hepatic diseases. An impressive number of cell types have been investigated as sources of liver regeneration: adult and fetal liver hepatocytes, intrahepatic stem cell populations, annex stem cells, adult bone marrow-derived hematopoietic stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells, mesenchymal stromal cells, embryonic stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells. All these highly different cell types, used either as cell suspensions or, in combination with biomaterials as implantable liver tissue constructs, have generated great promise for liver regeneration. However, fundamental questions still need to be addressed and critical hurdles to be overcome before liver cell therapy emerges. In this review, we summarize the state-of-the-art in the field of stem cell-based therapies for the liver along with existing challenges and future perspectives towards a successful liver cell therapy that will ultimately deliver its demanding goals. PMID:26604641

  20. The effect of hematopoietic progenitor cells' temperature on cardiac arrhythmias in patients given peripheral blood progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Donmez, Ayhan; Zoghi, Mehdi; Cagirgan, Seckin; Acarlar, Ceylan; Tombuloglu, Murat

    2006-06-01

    Infusion of cryopreserved and non-cryopreserved hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) is associated with a broad variety of symptoms. In this study, we have investigated infusion-related toxicity regarding temperature of cryopreserved autologous peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPCs) transplanted in 31 and allogeneic non-cryopreserved PBPCs in 4 patients receiving high dose chemotherapy and stem cells transplantation for hematological malignancies. A 24h ECG-Holter recording system was used to obtain cardiac arrhythmias. Two milliliters HPC were collected from entrance site of venous access to evaluate the temperature of infused HPC. We have detected arrhythmias in 17 (48.58%) of our patients before, during and after infusion. Median temperature of the infusat was 21 degrees C (18-28.2). Arrhythmias during infusion were detected in 8 (22.85%) patients. The temperatures of infused HPCs were not statistically different in group with and without arrhythmias as 22 degrees C and 21 degrees C, respectively (P>0.05). And also, volume, contents [dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO), red blood cells (RBC), platelet (PLT), and total nucleated cell (TNC)] of product, and rate of infusion speed did not have any effect on arrhythmias. As a result of this study, we have concluded that the temperature of HPC does not cause any systemic hypothermia and does not have any relation to arrhythmias detected during infusion.

  1. [Stem/progenitor cells in diseases of the respiratory tract].

    PubMed

    Płusa, Tadeusz

    2017-03-21

    Stem cells (SCs - stem cells) are characterized by plasticity and the ability to differentiate into other cell types. They are obtained from bone marrow, peripheral blood and cord blood. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) shows a broad immunomodulating, increases the number of regulatory T cells (Treg), modifies the activity of T cells, dendritic cells and NK (natural killer). Direct impact on reducing the release of proinflammatory cytokines and increased release of proinflammatory cytokines. Within the respiratory tract has a number of resident stem and progenitor cells referred to as L-MSCs (lung mesenchymal stem cells) whose presence was confirmed by markers as defined in the trachea, epithelial cells and alveolar. Demonstrated the efficacy of MSCs administration in the first stage of septic shock and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS - acute respiratory distress syndrome). There was a significant stimulation of repair processes, along with an improvement in lung function. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs - embryonic stem cells) are the latest addition in the treatment of congenital and acquired diseases of the airways and lung parenchyma. In patients with sarcoidosis MSCs are obtained from umbilical cord blood (PDA - placenta-derived mesenchymal-like cells) with phenotype CD34 +, CD10 +, CD105 + and CD200 +. The results of this therapy are very encouraging, and for this reason it is taken in subsequent research centers.

  2. Adenosine signaling promotes hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell emergence.

    PubMed

    Jing, Lili; Tamplin, Owen J; Chen, Michael J; Deng, Qing; Patterson, Shenia; Kim, Peter G; Durand, Ellen M; McNeil, Ashley; Green, Julie M; Matsuura, Shinobu; Ablain, Julien; Brandt, Margot K; Schlaeger, Thorsten M; Huttenlocher, Anna; Daley, George Q; Ravid, Katya; Zon, Leonard I

    2015-05-04

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) emerge from aortic endothelium via the endothelial-to-hematopoietic transition (EHT). The molecular mechanisms that initiate and regulate EHT remain poorly understood. Here, we show that adenosine signaling regulates hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) development in zebrafish embryos. The adenosine receptor A2b is expressed in the vascular endothelium before HSPC emergence. Elevated adenosine levels increased runx1(+)/cmyb(+) HSPCs in the dorsal aorta, whereas blocking the adenosine pathway decreased HSPCs. Knockdown of A2b adenosine receptor disrupted scl(+) hemogenic vascular endothelium and the subsequent EHT process. A2b adenosine receptor activation induced CXCL8 via cAMP-protein kinase A (PKA) and mediated hematopoiesis. We further show that adenosine increased multipotent progenitors in a mouse embryonic stem cell colony-forming assay and in embryonic day 10.5 aorta-gonad-mesonephros explants. Our results demonstrate that adenosine signaling plays an evolutionary conserved role in the first steps of HSPC formation in vertebrates.

  3. Progenitor Cell Self-renewal and Cyclic Neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Dingli, David; Antal, Tibor; Traulsen, Arne; Pacheco, Jorge M.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic neutropenia (CN) is a rare genetic disorder where patients experience regular cycling of neutrophils and various other hematopoietic lineages. The nadir in the neutrophil count is the main source of problems due to the risk of life-threatening infections. Patients with CN benefit from G-CSF therapy although cycling persists. Mutations in the neutrophil elastase gene (ELA2) have been found in more than half of the patients with CN. However, neither the connection between phenotypic expression of ELA2 and CN nor the mechanism of cycling are known. Recently a multi-compartment model of hematopoiesis that couples stem cell replication with marrow output was proposed. In the following, we couple this model of hematopoiesis with a linear feedback mechanism via G-CSF. We propose that the phenotypic effect of ELA2 mutations leads to a reduction in self-renewal of granulocytic progenitors. The body responds by an overall relative increase of G-CSF and increasing progenitor cell self-renewal leading to cell count cycling. The model is compatible with the available experimental data and makes testable predictions. PMID:19397594

  4. Activin A expression regulates multipotency of mesenchymal progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Bone marrow (BM) stroma currently represents the most common and investigated source of mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPCs); however, comparable adult progenitor or stem cells have also been isolated from a wide variety of tissues. This study aims to assess the functional similarities of MPCs from different tissues and to identify specific factor(s) related to their multipotency. Methods For this purpose, we directly compared MPCs isolated from different adult tissues, including bone marrow, tonsil, muscle, and dental pulp. We first examined and compared proliferation rates, immunomodulatory properties, and multidifferentiation potential of these MPCs in vitro. Next, we specifically evaluated activin A expression profile and activin A:follistatin ratio in MPCs from the four sources. Results The multidifferentiation potential of the MPCs is correlated with activin A level and/or the activin A:follistatin ratio. Interestingly, by siRNA-mediated activin A knockdown, activin A was shown to be required for the chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation of MPCs. These findings strongly suggest that activin A has a pivotal differentiation-related role in the early stages of chondrogenesis and osteogenesis while inhibiting adipogenesis of MPCs. Conclusions This comparative analysis of MPCs from different tissue sources also identifies bone marrow-derived MPCs as the most potent MPCs in terms of multilineage differentiation and immunosuppression, two key requirements in cell-based regenerative medicine. In addition, this study implicates the significance of activin A as a functional marker of MPC identity. PMID:20637060

  5. Kupffer Cells in the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Laura J.; Barnes, Mark; Tang, Hui; Pritchard, Michele T.; Nagy, Laura E.

    2016-01-01

    Kupffer cells are a critical component of the mononuclear phagocytic system and are central to both the hepatic and systemic response to pathogens. Kupffer cells are reemerging as critical mediators of both liver injury and repair. Kupffer cells exhibit a tremendous plasticity; depending on the local metabolic and immune environment, then can express a range of polarized phenotypes, from the proinflammatory M1 phenotype to the alternative/M2 phenotype. Multiple M2 phenotypes can be distinguished, each involved in the resolution of inflammation and wound healing. Here, we have provided an update on recent research that has contributed to the developing delineation of the contribution of Kupffer cells to different types of liver injury, with an emphasis on alcoholic and nonalcoholic liver diseases. These recent advances in our understanding of Kupffer cell function and regulation will likely provide new insights into the potential for therapeutic manipulation of Kupffer cells to promote the resolution of inflammation and enhance wound healing in liver disease. PMID:23720329

  6. Regulation of development of rat stem and progenitor Leydig cells by activin.

    PubMed

    Li, L; Wang, Y; Li, X; Liu, S; Wang, G; Lin, H; Zhu, Q; Guo, J; Chen, H; Ge, H-S; Ge, R-S

    2017-01-01

    Stem Leydig cells have been demonstrated to differentiate into adult Leydig cells via intermediate stages of progenitor and immature Leydig cells. However, the exact regulatory mechanisms are unclear. We hypothesized that the development of stem or progenitor Leydig cells depends upon locally produced growth factors. Microarray analysis revealed that the expression levels of activin type I receptor (Acvr1) and activin A receptor type II-like 1 (Acvrl1) were stem > progenitor = immature = adult Leydig cells. This indicates that their ligand activin might play an important role in stem and progenitor Leydig cell proliferation and differentiation. When seminiferous tubules were incubated with 1 or 10 ng/mL activin A for 3 days, it concentration-dependently increased EdU incorporation into stem Leydig cells by up to 20-fold. When progenitor Leydig cells were incubated with 1 or 10 ng/mL activin A for 2 days, it concentration-dependently increased (3) H-thymidine incorporation into progenitor Leydig cells by up to 200%. Real-time PCR analysis showed that activin A primarily increased Pcna expression but reduced Star, Hsd3b1, and Cyp17a1 expression levels. Activin A also significantly inhibited the basal and luteinizing hormone-stimulated androgen production. In conclusion, activin A primarily stimulates the proliferation of stem and progenitor Leydig cells, but inhibits the differentiation of stem and progenitor Leydig cells into the Leydig cell lineage in rat testis.

  7. TGF-β1 Induces the Dual Regulation of Hepatic Progenitor Cells with Both Anti- and Proliver Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ai-Ting; Hu, Dou-Dou; Wang, Ping; Cong, Min; Liu, Tian-Hui; Zhang, Dong; Sun, Ya-Meng; Zhao, Wen-Shan; Jia, Ji-Dong; You, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) plays a central role in hepatic progenitor cells- (HPCs-) mediated liver repair and fibrosis. However, different effects of TGF-β1 on progenitor cells have not been described. In this study, both in vitro (HPCs cocultured with hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) in transwells) and in vivo (CCl4-injured liver fibrosis rat) systems were used to evaluate the impacts. We found that HPCs pretreated with TGF-β1 for 12 hours inhibited the activation of HSCs, while sensitization for 48 hours increased the activation of HSCs. Consistent with these in vitro results, the in vivo fibrosis rat model showed the same time-dependent dual effect of TGF-β1. Regression of liver fibrosis as well as normalization of serum aminotransferase and albumin levels was detected in the rats transplanted with HPCs pretreated with TGF-β1 for 12 hours. In contrast, severe liver fibrosis and elevated collagen-1 levels were detected in the rats transplanted with HPCs pretreated with TGF-β1 for 48 hours. Furthermore, the TGF-β1-pretreated HPCs were shown to deactivate HSCs via enhancing SERPINE1 expression. Inhibition of SERPINE1 reversed the deactivation response in a dose-dependent manner.

  8. Fetal progenitor cell transplantation treats methylmalonic aciduria in a mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, Nicole E.; Pennell, Samuel D.; Wood, Leonie R.; Pitt, James J.; Allen, Katrina J.; Peters, Heidi L.

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fetal cells were transplanted into a methylmalonic acid mouse model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell engraftment was detected in liver, spleen and bone marrow. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biochemical disease correction was measured in blood samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A double dose of 5 million cells (1 week apart) proved more effective. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Higher levels of engraftment may be required for greater disease correction. -- Abstract: Methylmalonic aciduria is a rare disorder caused by an inborn error of organic acid metabolism. Current treatment options are limited and generally focus on disease management. We aimed to investigate the use of fetal progenitor cells to treat this disorder using a mouse model with an intermediate form of methylmalonic aciduria. Fetal liver cells were isolated from healthy fetuses at embryonic day 15-17 and intravenously transplanted into sub-lethally irradiated mice. Liver donor cell engraftment was determined by PCR. Disease correction was monitored by urine and blood methylmalonic acid concentration and weight change. Initial studies indicated that pre-transplantation sub-lethal irradiation followed by transplantation with 5 million cells were suitable. We found that a double dose of 5 million cells (1 week apart) provided a more effective treatment. Donor cell liver engraftment of up to 5% was measured. Disease correction, as defined by a decrease in blood methylmalonic acid concentration, was effected in methylmalonic acid mice transplanted with a double dose of cells and who showed donor cell liver engraftment. Mean plasma methylmalonic acid concentration decreased from 810 {+-} 156 (sham transplanted) to 338 {+-} 157 {mu}mol/L (double dose of 5 million cells) while mean blood C3 carnitine concentration decreased from 20.5 {+-} 4 (sham transplanted) to 5.3 {+-} 1.9 {mu}mol/L (double dose of 5 million cells). In conclusion, higher levels of engraftment may

  9. From Here to There, Progenitor Cells and Stem Cells Are Everywhere in Lung Vascular Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Heise, Rebecca L.; Link, Patrick A.; Farkas, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    The field of stem cell biology, cell therapy, and regenerative medicine has expanded almost exponentially, in the last decade. Clinical trials are evaluating the potential therapeutic use of stem cells in many adult and pediatric lung diseases with vascular component, such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), or pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Extensive research activity is exploring the lung resident and circulating progenitor cells and their contribution to vascular complications of chronic lung diseases, and researchers hope to use resident or circulating stem/progenitor cells to treat chronic lung diseases and their vascular complications. It is becoming more and more clear that progress in mechanobiology will help to understand the various influences of physical forces and extracellular matrix composition on the phenotype and features of the progenitor cells and stem cells. The current review provides an overview of current concepts in the field. PMID:27583245

  10. Spontaneous Calcium Oscillations Regulate Human Cardiac Progenitor Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira-Martins, João; Rondon-Clavo, Carlos; Tugal, Derin; Korn, Justin A; Rizzi, Roberto; Padin-Iruegas, Maria Elena; Ottolenghi, Sergio; De Angelis, Antonella; Urbanek, Konrad; Iwata, Noriko; D’Amario, Domenico; Hosoda, Toru; Leri, Annarosa; Kajstura, Jan; Anversa, Piero; Rota, Marcello

    2009-01-01

    Rationale The adult heart possesses a pool of progenitor cells stored in myocardial niches but the mechanisms involved in the activation of this cell compartment are currently unknown. Objective Ca2+ promotes cell growth raising the possibility that changes in intracellular Ca2+ initiate division of c-kit-positive human cardiac progenitor cells (hCPCs) and determine their fate. Methods and Results Ca2+ oscillations were identified in hCPCs and these events occurred independently from coupling with cardiomyocytes or the presence of extracellular Ca2+. These findings were confirmed in the heart of transgenic mice in which EGFP was under the control of the c-kit-promoter. Ca2+ oscillations in hCPCs were regulated by the release of Ca2+ from the ER through activation of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) and the re-uptake of Ca2+ by the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ pump (SERCA). IP3Rs and SERCA were highly expressed in hCPCs while ryanodine receptors were not detected. Although Na+-Ca2+ exchanger, store-operated Ca2+-channels and plasma membrane Ca2+-pump were present and functional in hCPCs, they had no direct effects on Ca2+ oscillations. Conversely, Ca2+ oscillations and their frequency markedly increased with ATP and histamine which activated purinoceptors and histamine-1 receptors highly expressed in hCPCs. Importantly, Ca2+ oscillations in hCPCs were coupled with the entry of cells into the cell cycle and BrdUrd incorporation. Induction of Ca2+ oscillations in hCPCs prior to their intramyocardial delivery to infarcted hearts was associated with enhanced engraftment and expansion of these cells promoting the generation of a large myocyte progeny. Conclusion IP3R-mediated Ca2+ mobilization control hCPC growth and their regenerative potential. PMID:19745162

  11. Uncaria tomentosa stimulates the proliferation of myeloid progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Farias, Iria; do Carmo Araújo, Maria; Zimmermann, Estevan Sonego; Dalmora, Sergio Luiz; Benedetti, Aloisio Luiz; Alvarez-Silva, Marcio; Asbahr, Ana Carolina Cavazzin; Bertol, Gustavo; Farias, Júlia; Schetinger, Maria Rosa Chitolina

    2011-09-01

    The Asháninkas, indigenous people of Peru, use cat's claw (Uncaria tomentosa) to restore health. Uncaria tomentosa has antioxidant activity and works as an agent to repair DNA damage. It causes different effects on cell proliferation depending on the cell type involved; specifically, it can stimulate the proliferation of myeloid progenitors and cause apoptosis of neoplastic cells. Neutropenia is the most common collateral effect of chemotherapy. For patients undergoing cancer treatment, the administration of a drug that stimulates the proliferation of healthy hematopoietic tissue cells is very desirable. It is important to assess the acute effects of Uncaria tomentosa on granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming cells (CFU-GM) and in the recovery of neutrophils after chemotherapy-induced neutropenia, by establishing the correlation with filgrastim (rhG-CSF) treatment to evaluate its possible use in clinical oncology. The in vivo assay was performed in ifosfamide-treated mice receiving oral doses of 5 and 15 mg of Uncaria tomentosa and intraperitoneal doses of 3 and 9 μg of filgrastim, respectively, for four days. Colony-forming cell (CFC) assays were performed with human hematopoietic stem/precursor cells (hHSPCs) obtained from umbilical cord blood (UCB). Bioassays showed that treatment with Uncaria tomentosa significantly increased the neutrophil count, and a potency of 85.2% was calculated in relation to filgrastim at the corresponding doses tested. An in vitro CFC assay showed an increase in CFU-GM size and mixed colonies (CFU-GEMM) size at the final concentrations of 100 and 200 μg extract/mL. At the tested doses, Uncaria tomentosa had a positive effect on myeloid progenitor number and is promising for use with chemotherapy to minimize the adverse effects of this treatment. These results support the belief of the Asháninkas, who have classified Uncaria tomentosa as a 'powerful plant'. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Pak2 regulates hematopoietic progenitor cell proliferation, survival and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yi; Broxmeyer, Hal E.; Staser, Karl; Chitteti, Brahmananda Reddy; Park, Su-Jung; Hahn, Seongmin; Cooper, Scott; Sun, Zejin; Jiang, Li; Yang, XianLin; Yuan, Jin; Kosoff, Rachelle; Sandusky, George; Srour, Edward F.; Chernoff, Jonathan; Clapp, Wade

    2015-01-01

    p21-activated kinase 2 (Pak2), a serine/threonine kinase, has been previously shown to be essential for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) engraftment. However, Pak2 modulation of long-term hematopoiesis and lineage commitment remain unreported. Utilizing a conditional Pak2 knock out (KO) mouse model, we found that disruption of Pak2 in HSCs induced profound leukopenia and a mild macrocytic anemia. Although loss of Pak2 in HSCs leads to less efficient short- and long-term competitive hematopoiesis than wild type (WT) cells, it does not affect HSC self-renewal per se. Pak2 disruption decreased the survival and proliferation of multi-cytokine stimulated immature progenitors. Loss of Pak2 skewed lineage differentiation toward granulocytopoiesis and monocytopoiesis in mice as evidenced by 1) a three to six-fold increase in the percentage of peripheral blood granulocytes and a significant increase in the percentage of granulocyte-monocyte progenitors (GMPs) in mice transplanted with Pak2-disrupted BM; 2) Pak2-disrupted BM and c-kit+ cells yielded higher numbers of more mature subsets of granulocyte-monocyte colonies and polymophonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), respectively, when cultured in the presence of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Pak2 disruption resulted respectively in decreased and increased gene expression of transcription factors JunB and c-Myc, which may suggest underlying mechanisms by which Pak2 regulates granulocyte-monocyte lineage commitment. Furthermore, Pak2 disruption led to 1) higher percentage of CD4+CD8+ double positive T cells and lower percentages of CD4+CD8− or CD4−CD8+ single positive T cells in thymus and 2) decreased numbers of mature B cells and increased numbers of Pre-Pro B cells in BM, suggesting defects in lymphopoiesis. PMID:25586960

  13. Functional genetic targeting of embryonic kidney progenitor cells ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Junttila, Sanna; Saarela, Ulla; Halt, Kimmo; Manninen, Aki; Pärssinen, Heikki; Lecca, M Rita; Brändli, André W; Sims-Lucas, Sunder; Skovorodkin, Ilya; Vainio, Seppo J

    2015-05-01

    The embryonic mammalian metanephric mesenchyme (MM) is a unique tissue because it is competent to generate the nephrons in response to Wnt signaling. An ex vivo culture in which the MM is separated from the ureteric bud (UB), the natural inducer, can be used as a classic tubule induction model for studying nephrogenesis. However, technological restrictions currently prevent using this model to study the molecular genetic details before or during tubule induction. Using nephron segment-specific markers, we now show that tubule induction in the MM ex vivo also leads to the assembly of highly segmented nephrons. This induction capacity was reconstituted when MM tissue was dissociated into a cell suspension and then reaggregated (drMM) in the presence of human recombinant bone morphogenetic protein 7/human recombinant fibroblast growth factor 2 for 24 hours before induction. Growth factor-treated drMM also recovered the capacity for organogenesis when recombined with the UB. Cell tracking and time-lapse imaging of chimeric drMM cultures indicated that the nephron is not derived from a single progenitor cell. Furthermore, viral vector-mediated transduction of green fluorescent protein was much more efficient in dissociated MM cells than in intact mesenchyme, and the nephrogenic competence of transduced drMM progenitor cells was preserved. Moreover, drMM cells transduced with viral vectors mediating Lhx1 knockdown were excluded from the nephric tubules, whereas cells transduced with control vectors were incorporated. In summary, these techniques allow reproducible cellular and molecular examinations of the mechanisms behind nephrogenesis and kidney organogenesis in an ex vivo organ culture/organoid setting.

  14. Fractalkine Expression Induces Endothelial Progenitor Cell Lysis by Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Todorova, Dilyana; Sabatier, Florence; Doria, Evelyne; Lyonnet, Luc; Vacher Coponat, Henri; Robert, Stéphane; Despoix, Nicolas; Legris, Tristan; Moal, Valérie; Loundou, Anderson; Morange, Sophie; Berland, Yvon; George, Francoise Dignat; Burtey, Stéphane; Paul, Pascale

    2011-01-01

    Background Circulating CD34+ cells, a population that includes endothelial progenitors, participate in the maintenance of endothelial integrity. Better understanding of the mechanisms that regulate their survival is crucial to improve their regenerative activity in cardiovascular and renal diseases. Chemokine-receptor cross talk is critical in regulating cell homeostasis. We hypothesized that cell surface expression of the chemokine fractalkine (FKN) could target progenitor cell injury by Natural Killer (NK) cells, thereby limiting their availability for vascular repair. Methodology/Principal Findings We show that CD34+-derived Endothelial Colony Forming Cells (ECFC) can express FKN in response to TNF-α and IFN-γ inflammatory cytokines and that FKN expression by ECFC stimulates NK cell adhesion, NK cell-mediated ECFC lysis and microparticles release in vitro. The specific involvement of membrane FKN in these processes was demonstrated using FKN-transfected ECFC and anti-FKN blocking antibody. FKN expression was also evidenced on circulating CD34+ progenitor cells and was detected at higher frequency in kidney transplant recipients, when compared to healthy controls. The proportion of CD34+ cells expressing FKN was identified as an independent variable inversely correlated to CD34+ progenitor cell count. We further showed that treatment of CD34+ circulating cells isolated from adult blood donors with transplant serum or TNF-α/IFN-γ can induce FKN expression. Conclusions Our data highlights a novel mechanism by which FKN expression on CD34+ progenitor cells may target their NK cell mediated killing and participate to their immune depletion in transplant recipients. Considering the numerous diseased contexts shown to promote FKN expression, our data identify FKN as a hallmark of altered progenitor cell homeostasis with potential implications in better evaluation of vascular repair in patients. PMID:22039526

  15. Endothelial Progenitor Cells=EPC=Elemental Pernicious Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Ushio-Fukai, Masuko

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) represent a heterogeneous population of cells with a pro-angiogenic potential that are derived not only from bone marrow but also from other tissues. Depending on the model and cell type used, the pro-angiogenic effect is a consequence of direct vascular integration, the paracrine release of growth factors and cytokines, or complex interactions with other cellular components like monocytes or platelets. The pro-angiogenic potential of EPCs is dependent on the particular type of EPC studied and modulated by the risk and life style factors of the patient as well as by local factors determining the homing to diseased tissue and the EPC proteome. In this Forum on EPCs these aspects will be covered in individual review articles, which are accompanied by two original research studies on the role of NADPH oxidases for EPC mobilization and the impact of organic nitrates on EPCs. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 911–914. PMID:21128729

  16. [Autotransplantation of hematopoietic progenitor cells in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Fernández, J; Correale, J; Campestri, R; Koziner, B

    1999-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune demyelinating disease exhibiting great clinical variability. For control of its primary and secondary progressive variants, treatment has met with limited success. In recent years, increasing experience has been gained with the administration of high dose chemotherapy supported by the autologous infusion of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC), in some instances depleted of T cells. The European and International Registry of Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Autoimmune Diseases include 43 MS patients. BEAM was the most frequently used conditioning therapy. Treatment related mortality was 7%. The actuarial disease free survival and the overall projected survival at 38 months were 85% and 90% respectively. The inclusion of an increasing number of MS patients into these treatment programs and the growing submission of cases to the Registries will provide useful information to determine if the initial enthusiasm generated by this approach for the control of primary and secondary progressive forms of MS is justified.

  17. Glucocorticoid suppresses steroidogenesis in rat progenitor Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ye-Chen; Huang, Ya-Dong; Hardy, Dianne O; Li, Xiao-Kun; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2010-01-01

    Glucocorticoid (GC) inhibits testosterone production in adult Leydig cells by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). However, whether GC affects the development of Leydig cells is unclear. The goal of the present study is to investigate the effects of GC on steroidogenesis of rat progenitor Leydig cells (PLCs) in vitro. Dexamethasone (DEX) inhibited androsterone (AO) production in PLCs. The GR antagonist RU38486 reversed the DEX-induced inhibition of AO, whereas the mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist RU28318 did not. RU38486 also reversed DEX-induced reductions in steady-state mRNA levels of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (Star) and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (Hsd3b1). Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) protein expression and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3βHSD) enzyme activity were affected similarly. These results show that GCs inhibit steroidogenesis of PLCs by suppression of StAR and 3βHSD via a GR-mediated mechanism.

  18. Electrically Induced Calcium Handling in Cardiac Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Mary B.

    2016-01-01

    For nearly a century, the heart was viewed as a terminally differentiated organ until the discovery of a resident population of cardiac stem cells known as cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs). It has been shown that the regenerative capacity of CPCs can be enhanced by ex vivo modification. Preconditioning CPCs could provide drastic improvements in cardiac structure and function; however, a systematic approach to determining a mechanistic basis for these modifications founded on the physiology of CPCs is lacking. We have identified a novel property of CPCs to respond to electrical stimulation by initiating intracellular Ca2+ oscillations. We used confocal microscopy and intracellular calcium imaging to determine the spatiotemporal properties of the Ca2+ signal and the key proteins involved in this process using pharmacological inhibition and confocal Ca2+ imaging. Our results provide valuable insights into mechanisms to enhance the therapeutic potential in stem cells and further our understanding of human CPC physiology. PMID:27818693

  19. Multipotent adult progenitor cells on an allograft scaffold facilitate the bone repair process

    PubMed Central

    LoGuidice, Amanda; Houlihan, Alison; Deans, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent adult progenitor cells are a recently described population of stem cells derived from the bone marrow stroma. Research has demonstrated the potential of multipotent adult progenitor cells for treating ischemic injury and cardiovascular repair; however, understanding of multipotent adult progenitor cells in orthopedic applications remains limited. In this study, we evaluate the osteogenic and angiogenic capacity of multipotent adult progenitor cells, both in vitro and loaded onto demineralized bone matrix in vivo, with comparison to mesenchymal stem cells, as the current standard. When compared to mesenchymal stem cells, multipotent adult progenitor cells exhibited a more robust angiogenic protein release profile in vitro and developed more extensive vasculature within 2 weeks in vivo. The establishment of this vascular network is critical to the ossification process, as it allows nutrient exchange and provides an influx of osteoprogenitor cells to the wound site. In vitro assays confirmed the multipotency of multipotent adult progenitor cells along mesodermal lineages and demonstrated the enhanced expression of alkaline phosphatase and production of calcium-containing mineral deposits by multipotent adult progenitor cells, necessary precursors for osteogenesis. In combination with a demineralized bone matrix scaffold, multipotent adult progenitor cells demonstrated enhanced revascularization and new bone formation in vivo in an orthotopic defect model when compared to mesenchymal stem cells on demineralized bone matrix or demineralized bone matrix–only control groups. The potent combination of angiogenic and osteogenic properties provided by multipotent adult progenitor cells appears to create a synergistic amplification of the bone healing process. Our results indicate that multipotent adult progenitor cells have the potential to better promote tissue regeneration and healing and to be a functional cell source for use in orthopedic applications

  20. Cis-regulatory mechanisms governing stem and progenitor cell transitions

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kirby D.; Kong, Guangyao; Gao, Xin; Chang, Yuan-I; Hewitt, Kyle J.; Sanalkumar, Rajendran; Prathibha, Rajalekshmi; Ranheim, Erik A.; Dewey, Colin N.; Zhang, Jing; Bresnick, Emery H.

    2015-01-01

    Cis-element encyclopedias provide information on phenotypic diversity and disease mechanisms. Although cis-element polymorphisms and mutations are instructive, deciphering function remains challenging. Mutation of an intronic GATA motif (+9.5) in GATA2, encoding a master regulator of hematopoiesis, underlies an immunodeficiency associated with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Whereas an inversion relocalizes another GATA2 cis-element (−77) to the proto-oncogene EVI1, inducing EVI1 expression and AML, whether this reflects ectopic or physiological activity is unknown. We describe a mouse strain that decouples −77 function from proto-oncogene deregulation. The −77−/− mice exhibited a novel phenotypic constellation including late embryonic lethality and anemia. The −77 established a vital sector of the myeloid progenitor transcriptome, conferring multipotentiality. Unlike the +9.5−/− embryos, hematopoietic stem cell genesis was unaffected in −77−/− embryos. These results illustrate a paradigm in which cis-elements in a locus differentially control stem and progenitor cell transitions, and therefore the individual cis-element alterations cause unique and overlapping disease phenotypes. PMID:26601269

  1. Reduced in vitro erythroid progenitor cell growth in bronchial cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Masters, G S; Baines, P; Bailey-Wood, R; Gorvett, T; Littlewood, T; Bentley, P; Parry-Jones, H; Jacobs, A

    1987-01-01

    Peripheral blood and bone marrow were studied in 21 men with disseminated untreated bronchial cancer in an attempt to define abnormalities of erythropoiesis associated with the development of anaemia. Haemoglobin concentration at or below 13 g/dl was present in 13 cases. Marrow morphology was normal in all cases except one, in which small numbers of tumour cells were found. Clonal assay of erythroid progenitors showed a significant decrease in the number of BFU-E (p = 0.03) and CFU-E (p = 0.01) compared with cultures from normal marrow (12 subjects). The growth of granulocyte and macrophage progenitors (GM-CFCs) was similar in patients with bronchial cancer and normal subjects. When normal marrow was incubated in the presence of serum from bronchial cancer patients, no inhibitory factors could be detected either for BFU-E or CFU-E growth. In all patients circulating T8 numbers were significantly raised (p = 0.0002). Consequently, the median T4:T8 ratio in blood was 1.2, and this was significantly lower than the ratio of 1.7 found in 20 normal subjects (p = 0.036). In 18 patients the bone marrow T4:T8 ratio of 1.1 was significantly lower than the ratio of 2.9 found in seven normal subjects (p = 0.04). Total blood white cell counts, neutrophils, and monocyte numbers were also increased (p = 0.0001; p = 0.0001; p = 0.002). PMID:3818975

  2. Isolated rat cortical progenitor cells are maintained in division in vitro by membrane-associated factors.

    PubMed

    Temple, S; Davis, A A

    1994-04-01

    Ventricular zone cells in the developing CNS undergo extensive cell division in vivo and under certain conditions in vitro. The culture conditions that promote cell division have been studied to determine the role that contact with cell membrane associated factors play in the proliferation of these cells. Progenitor cells have been taken from the ventricular zone of developing rat cerebral cortex and placed into microwells. Small clusters of these cells can generate large numbers of neurons and non-neuronal progeny. In contrast, single progenitor cells largely cease division, approximately 90% acquiring neuron-like characteristics by 1 day in vitro. DiI-labeled, single cells from embryonic day 14 cortex plated onto clusters of unmarked progenitor cells have a significantly higher probability (approximately 3-fold) of maintaining a progenitor cell phenotype than if plated onto the plastic substratum around 100 microns away from the clusters. Contact with purified astrocytes also promotes the progenitor cell phenotype, whereas contact with meningeal fibroblasts or balb3T3 cells promotes their differentiation. Membrane homogenates from cortical astrocytes stimulate significantly more incorporation of BrdU by E14 cortical progenitor cells than membrane homogenates from meningeal fibroblasts. These data indicate that the proliferation of rat cortical progenitor cells can be maintained by cell-type specific, membrane-associated factors.

  3. Human neural progenitor cells promote photoreceptor survival in retinal explants.

    PubMed

    Englund-Johansson, Ulrica; Mohlin, Camilla; Liljekvist-Soltic, Ingela; Ekström, Per; Johansson, Kjell

    2010-02-01

    Different types of progenitor and stem cells have been shown to provide neuroprotection in animal models of photoreceptor degeneration. The present study was conducted to investigate whether human neural progenitor cells (HNPCs) have neuroprotective properties on retinal explants models with calpain- and caspase-3-dependent photoreceptor cell death. In the first experiments, HNPCs in a feeder layer were co-cultured for 6 days either with postnatal rd1 mouse or normal rat retinas. Retinal histological sections were used to determine outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness, and to detect the number of photoreceptors with labeling for calpain activity, cleaved caspase-3 and TUNEL. The ONL thickness of co-cultured rat and rd1 retinas was found to be almost 10% and 40% thicker, respectively, compared to controls. Cell counts of calpain activity, cleaved caspase-3 and TUNEL labeled photoreceptors in both models revealed a 30-50% decrease when co-cultured with HNPCs. The results represent significant increases of photoreceptor survival in the co-cultured retinas. In the second experiments, for an identification of putative survival factors, or a combination of them, a growth factor profile was performed on conditioned medium. The relative levels of various growth factors were analyzed by densitometric measurements of growth factor array membranes. Following growth factors were identified as most potential survival factors; granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GMCSF), insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II), neurotrophic factor 3 (NT-3), placental growth factor (PIGF), transforming growth factors (TGF-beta1 and TGF-beta2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-D). HNPCs protect both against calpain- and caspase-3-dependent photoreceptor cell death in the rd1 mouse and against caspase-3-dependent photoreceptor cell death in normal rat retinas in vitro. The protective effect is possibly achieved by a variety of

  4. Lysosomal disruption preferentially targets acute myeloid leukemia cells and progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Sukhai, Mahadeo A.; Prabha, Swayam; Hurren, Rose; Rutledge, Angela C.; Lee, Anna Y.; Sriskanthadevan, Shrivani; Sun, Hong; Wang, Xiaoming; Skrtic, Marko; Seneviratne, Ayesh; Cusimano, Maria; Jhas, Bozhena; Gronda, Marcela; MacLean, Neil; Cho, Eunice E.; Spagnuolo, Paul A.; Sharmeen, Sumaiya; Gebbia, Marinella; Urbanus, Malene; Eppert, Kolja; Dissanayake, Dilan; Jonet, Alexia; Dassonville-Klimpt, Alexandra; Li, Xiaoming; Datti, Alessandro; Ohashi, Pamela S.; Wrana, Jeff; Rogers, Ian; Sonnet, Pascal; Ellis, William Y.; Corey, Seth J.; Eaves, Connie; Minden, Mark D.; Wang, Jean C.Y.; Dick, John E.; Nislow, Corey; Giaever, Guri; Schimmer, Aaron D.

    2012-01-01

    Despite efforts to understand and treat acute myeloid leukemia (AML), there remains a need for more comprehensive therapies to prevent AML-associated relapses. To identify new therapeutic strategies for AML, we screened a library of on- and off-patent drugs and identified the antimalarial agent mefloquine as a compound that selectively kills AML cells and AML stem cells in a panel of leukemia cell lines and in mice. Using a yeast genome-wide functional screen for mefloquine sensitizers, we identified genes associated with the yeast vacuole, the homolog of the mammalian lysosome. Consistent with this, we determined that mefloquine disrupts lysosomes, directly permeabilizes the lysosome membrane, and releases cathepsins into the cytosol. Knockdown of the lysosomal membrane proteins LAMP1 and LAMP2 resulted in decreased cell viability, as did treatment of AML cells with known lysosome disrupters. Highlighting a potential therapeutic rationale for this strategy, leukemic cells had significantly larger lysosomes compared with normal cells, and leukemia-initiating cells overexpressed lysosomal biogenesis genes. These results demonstrate that lysosomal disruption preferentially targets AML cells and AML progenitor cells, providing a rationale for testing lysosomal disruption as a novel therapeutic strategy for AML. PMID:23202731

  5. Growth of connective tissue progenitor cells on microtextured polydimethylsiloxane surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mata, Alvaro; Boehm, Cynthia; Fleischman, Aaron J; Muschler, George; Roy, Shuvo

    2002-12-15

    Growth of human connective tissue progenitor cells (CTPs) was characterized on smooth and microtextured polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces. Human bone-marrow-derived cells were cultured for 9 days under conditions promoting osteoblastic differentiation on smooth PDMS surfaces and on PDMS post microtextures that were 6 microm high and 5, 10, 20, and 40 microm in diameter, respectively. Glass tissue-culture dishes were used as controls. The number of viable cells was determined, and an alkaline phosphatase stain was used as a marker for osteoblastic phenotype. CTPs attached, proliferated, and differentiated on all surfaces. Cells on the smooth PDMS and control surfaces spread and proliferated as colonies in proximity to other cells and migrated in random directions, with cell process lengths of up to 80 microm. In contrast, cells on the PDMS post microtextures grew as sparsely distributed networks of cells, with processes, occasionally up to 300 microm, that appeared to interact with the posts. Cell counts revealed that there were fewer (50%) CTPs on the smooth PDMS surface than were on the glass control surfaces. However, there were consistently more (>144%) CTPs on the PDMS post textures than on the controls. In particular, the 10-microm-in-diameter posts (268%) exhibited a significantly (p < 0.05) greater cell number than did the smooth PDMS.

  6. A Twist2-dependent progenitor cell contributes to adult skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Garry, Glynnis A; Li, Stephen; Bezprozvannaya, Svetlana; Sanchez-Ortiz, Efrain; Chen, Beibei; Shelton, John M; Jaichander, Priscilla; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N

    2017-03-01

    Skeletal muscle possesses remarkable regenerative potential due to satellite cells, an injury-responsive stem cell population located beneath the muscle basal lamina that expresses Pax7. By lineage tracing of progenitor cells expressing the Twist2 (Tw2) transcription factor in mice, we discovered a myogenic lineage that resides outside the basal lamina of adult skeletal muscle. Tw2(+) progenitors are molecularly and anatomically distinct from satellite cells, are highly myogenic in vitro, and can fuse with themselves and with satellite cells. Tw2(+) progenitors contribute specifically to type IIb/x myofibres during adulthood and muscle regeneration, and their genetic ablation causes wasting of type IIb myofibres. We show that Tw2 expression maintains progenitor cells in an undifferentiated state that is poised to initiate myogenesis in response to appropriate cues that extinguish Tw2 expression. Tw2-expressing myogenic progenitors represent a previously unrecognized, fibre-type-specific stem cell involved in postnatal muscle growth and regeneration.

  7. Function of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Supporting Cells in Neural Progenitor Cell Maturation and Long Term Cxpansion

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Yunqian; Du, Qing-An; Zhu, Wanwan; Zou, Chunlin; Wu, Di; Chen, Ling; Zhang, Yu Alex

    2013-01-01

    Background In the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells into neurons using the 5-stage method, cells in stage 4 are in general used as neural progenitors (NPs) because of their ability to give rise to neurons. The choice of stage 4 raises several questions about neural progenitors such as the type of cell types that are specifically considered to be neural progenitors, the exact time when these progenitors become capable of neurogenesis and whether neurogenesis is an independent and autonomous process or the result of an interaction between NP cells and the surrounding cells. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we found that the confluent monolayer cells and neural sphere like cell clusters both appeared in the culture of the first 14 days and the subsequent 6 weeks. However, only the sphere cells are neural progenitors that give rise to neurons and astrocytes. The NP cells require 14 days to mature into neural lineages fully capable of differentiation. We also found that although the confluent monolayer cells do not undergo neurogenesis, they play a crucial role in the growth, differentiation, and apoptosis of the sphere cells, during the first 14 days and long term culture, by secreted factors and direct cell to cell contact. Conclusions/Significance The sphere cells in stage 4 are more committed to developing into neural progenitors than monolayer cells. Interaction between the monolayer cells and sphere cells is important in the development of stage 4 cell characteristics. PMID:23342136

  8. Colonization of the satellite cell niche by skeletal muscle progenitor cells depends on Notch signals.

    PubMed

    Bröhl, Dominique; Vasyutina, Elena; Czajkowski, Maciej T; Griger, Joscha; Rassek, Claudia; Rahn, Hans-Peter; Purfürst, Bettina; Wende, Hagen; Birchmeier, Carmen

    2012-09-11

    Skeletal muscle growth and regeneration rely on myogenic progenitor and satellite cells, the stem cells of postnatal muscle. Elimination of Notch signals during mouse development results in premature differentiation of myogenic progenitors and formation of very small muscle groups. Here we show that this drastic effect is rescued by mutation of the muscle differentiation factor MyoD. However, rescued myogenic progenitors do not assume a satellite cell position and contribute poorly to myofiber growth. The disrupted homing is due to a deficit in basal lamina assembly around emerging satellite cells and to their impaired adhesion to myofibers. On a molecular level, emerging satellite cells deregulate the expression of basal lamina components and adhesion molecules like integrin α7, collagen XVIIIα1, Megf10, and Mcam. We conclude that Notch signals control homing of satellite cells, stimulating them to contribute to their own microenvironment and to adhere to myofibers.

  9. Cell-cycle-independent transitions in temporal identity of mammalian neural progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Mayumi; Miyata, Takaki; Konno, Daijiro; Ueda, Hiroki R; Kasukawa, Takeya; Hashimoto, Mitsuhiro; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Kawaguchi, Ayano

    2016-04-20

    During cerebral development, many types of neurons are sequentially generated by self-renewing progenitor cells called apical progenitors (APs). Temporal changes in AP identity are thought to be responsible for neuronal diversity; however, the mechanisms underlying such changes remain largely unknown. Here we perform single-cell transcriptome analysis of individual progenitors at different developmental stages, and identify a subset of genes whose expression changes over time but is independent of differentiation status. Surprisingly, the pattern of changes in the expression of such temporal-axis genes in APs is unaffected by cell-cycle arrest. Consistent with this, transient cell-cycle arrest of APs in vivo does not prevent descendant neurons from acquiring their correct laminar fates. Analysis of cultured APs reveals that transitions in AP gene expression are driven by both cell-intrinsic and -extrinsic mechanisms. These results suggest that the timing mechanisms controlling AP temporal identity function independently of cell-cycle progression and Notch activation mode.

  10. Smooth muscle progenitor cells from peripheral blood promote the neovascularization of endothelial colony-forming cells

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, Hyung Joon; Seo, Ha-Rim; Jeong, Hyo Eun; Choi, Seung-Cheol; Park, Jae Hyung; Yu, Cheol Woong; Hong, Soon Jun; Chung, Seok; Lim, Do-Sun

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • Two distinct vascular progenitor cells are induced from adult peripheral blood. • ECFCs induce vascular structures in vitro and in vivo. • SMPCs augment the in vitro and in vivo angiogenic potential of ECFCs. • Both cell types have synergistic therapeutic potential in ischemic hindlimb model. - Abstract: Proangiogenic cell therapy using autologous progenitors is a promising strategy for treating ischemic disease. Considering that neovascularization is a harmonized cellular process that involves both endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, peripheral blood-originating endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) and smooth muscle progenitor cells (SMPCs), which are similar to mature endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, could be attractive cellular candidates to achieve therapeutic neovascularization. We successfully induced populations of two different vascular progenitor cells (ECFCs and SMPCs) from adult peripheral blood. Both progenitor cell types expressed endothelial-specific or smooth muscle-specific genes and markers, respectively. In a protein array focused on angiogenic cytokines, SMPCs demonstrated significantly higher expression of bFGF, EGF, TIMP2, ENA78, and TIMP1 compared to ECFCs. Conditioned medium from SMPCs and co-culture with SMPCs revealed that SMPCs promoted cell proliferation, migration, and the in vitro angiogenesis of ECFCs. Finally, co-transplantation of ECFCs and SMPCs induced robust in vivo neovascularization, as well as improved blood perfusion and tissue repair, in a mouse ischemic hindlimb model. Taken together, we have provided the first evidence of a cell therapy strategy for therapeutic neovascularization using two different types of autologous progenitors (ECFCs and SMPCs) derived from adult peripheral blood.

  11. Dynamic gene expression by putative hair-cell progenitors during regeneration in the zebrafish lateral line.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Aaron B; Kim, Taeryn; Cabot, Victoria; Hudspeth, A J

    2014-04-08

    Hearing loss is most commonly caused by the destruction of mechanosensory hair cells in the ear. This condition is usually permanent: Despite the presence of putative hair-cell progenitors in the cochlea, hair cells are not naturally replenished in adult mammals. Unlike those of the mammalian ear, the progenitor cells of nonmammalian vertebrates can regenerate hair cells throughout life. The basis of this difference remains largely unexplored but may lie in molecular dissimilarities that affect how progenitors respond to hair-cell death. To approach this issue, we analyzed gene expression in hair-cell progenitors of the lateral-line system. We developed a transgenic line of zebrafish that expresses a red fluorescent protein in the presumptive hair-cell progenitors known as mantle cells. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting from the skins of transgenic larvae, followed by microarray-based expression analysis, revealed a constellation of transcripts that are specifically enriched in these cells. Gene expression analysis after hair-cell ablation uncovered a cohort of genes that are differentially regulated early in regeneration, suggesting possible roles in the response of progenitors to hair-cell death. These results provide a resource for studying hair-cell regeneration and the biology of sensory progenitor cells.

  12. Dynamic gene expression by putative hair-cell progenitors during regeneration in the zebrafish lateral line

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Taeryn; Cabot, Victoria; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2014-01-01

    Hearing loss is most commonly caused by the destruction of mechanosensory hair cells in the ear. This condition is usually permanent: Despite the presence of putative hair-cell progenitors in the cochlea, hair cells are not naturally replenished in adult mammals. Unlike those of the mammalian ear, the progenitor cells of nonmammalian vertebrates can regenerate hair cells throughout life. The basis of this difference remains largely unexplored but may lie in molecular dissimilarities that affect how progenitors respond to hair-cell death. To approach this issue, we analyzed gene expression in hair-cell progenitors of the lateral-line system. We developed a transgenic line of zebrafish that expresses a red fluorescent protein in the presumptive hair-cell progenitors known as mantle cells. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting from the skins of transgenic larvae, followed by microarray-based expression analysis, revealed a constellation of transcripts that are specifically enriched in these cells. Gene expression analysis after hair-cell ablation uncovered a cohort of genes that are differentially regulated early in regeneration, suggesting possible roles in the response of progenitors to hair-cell death. These results provide a resource for studying hair-cell regeneration and the biology of sensory progenitor cells. PMID:24706895

  13. Development of Advanced Dressings for the Delivery of Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Giles T S; Mills, Stuart J; Vandenpoel, Liesbeth; Pinxteren, Jef; Ting, Anthony; Short, Robert D; Cowin, Allison J; Michelmore, Andrew; Smith, Louise E

    2017-02-01

    Culture surfaces that substantially reduce the degree of cell manipulation in the delivery of cell sheets to patients are described. These surfaces support the attachment, culture, and delivery of multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPC). It was essential that the processes of attachment/detachment to the surface did not affect cell phenotype nor the function of the cultured cells. Both acid-based and amine-based surface coatings were generated from acrylic acid, propanoic acid, diaminopropane, and heptylamine precursors, respectively. While both functional groups supported cell attachment/detachment, amine coated surfaces gave optimal performance. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) showed that at a primary amine to carbon surface ratio of between 0.01 and 0.02, greater than 90% of attached cells were effectively transferred to a model wound bed. A dependence on primary amine concentration has not previously been reported. After 48 h of culture on the optimized amine surface, PCR, functional, and viability assays showed that MAPC retained their stem cell phenotype, full metabolic activity, and biological function. Consequently, in a proof of concept experiment, it was shown that this amine surface when coated onto a surgical dressing provides an effective and simple technology for the delivery of MAPC to murine dorsal excisional wounds, with MAPC delivery verified histologically. By optimizing for cell delivery using a combination of in vitro and in vivo techniques, we developed an effective surface for the delivery of MAPC in a clinically relevant format.

  14. Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Sprouting Angiogenesis: Proteases Pave the Way.

    PubMed

    Laurenzana, A; Fibbi, G; Margheri, F; Biagioni, A; Luciani, C; Del Rosso, M; Chillà, A

    2015-01-01

    Sprouting angiogenesis consists of the expansion and remodelling of existing vessels, where the vascular sprouts connect each other to form new vascular loops. Endothelial Progenitor Cells (EPCs) are a subtype of stem cells, with high proliferative potential, able to differentiate into mature Endothelial Cells (ECs) during the neovascularization process. In addition to this direct structural role EPCs improve neovascularization, also secreting numerous pro-angiogenic factors able to enhance the proliferation, survival and function of mature ECs, and other surrounding progenitor cells. While sprouting angiogenesis by mature ECs involves resident ECs, the vasculogenic contribution of EPCs is a high hurdle race. Bone marrowmobilized EPCs have to detach from the stem cell niche, intravasate into bone marrow vessels, reach the hypoxic area or tumour site, extravasate and incorporate into the new vessel lumen, thus complementing the resident mature ECs in sprouting angiogenesis. The goal of this review is to highlight the role of the main protease systems able to control each of these steps. The pivotal protease systems here described, involved in vascular patterning in sprouting angiogenesis, are the matrix-metalloproteinases (MMPs), the serineproteinases urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) associated with its receptor (uPAR) and receptorassociated plasminogen/plasmin, the neutrophil elastase and the cathepsins. Since angiogenesis plays a critical role not only in physiological but also in pathological processes, such as in tumours, controlling the contribution of EPCs to the angiogenic process, through the regulation of the protease systems involved, could yield new opportunities for the therapeutic prospect of efficient control of pathological angiogenesis.

  15. [Isolation and gene modification of amniotic fluid derived progenitor cells].

    PubMed

    Yang, Chenmin; Fan, Shuyue; Tang, Huixiang; Gong, Zhijuan; Gong, Xiuli; Ren, Zhaorui; Zeng, Fanyi

    2014-03-01

    We established methods to isolate human amniotic fluid-derived progenitor cells (hAFPCs), and analyze the ability of hAFPCs to secrete human coagulation factor IX (hFIX) after gene modification. The hAFPCs were manually isolated by selection for attachment to gelatin coated culture dish. hFIX cDNA was transfected into hAPFCs by using a lentiviral vector. The hFIX protein concentration and activity produced from hAFPCs were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and clotting assay. The isolated spindle-shaped cells showed fibroblastoid morphology after three culture passages. The doubling time in culture was 39.05 hours. Immunocytochemistry staining of the fibroblast-like cells from amniotic fluid detected expression of stem cell markers such as SSEA4 and TRA1-60. Quantitative PCR analysis demonstrated the expression of NANOG, OCT4 and SOX2 mRNAs. Transfected hAFPCs could produce and secrete hFIX into the culture medium. The observed concentration of secreted hFIX was 20.37% +/- 2.77% two days after passage, with clotting activity of 16.42% +/- 1.78%. The amount of hFIX:Ag reached a plateau of 50.35% +/- 5.42%, with clotting activity 45.34% +/- 4.67%. In conclusion, this study established method to isolate and culture amniotic fluid progenitor cells. Transfected hAFPCs can produce hFIX at stable levels in vitro, and clotting activity increases with higher hFIX concentration. Genetically engineered hAFPC are a potential method for prenatal treatment of hemophilia B.

  16. Stem and progenitor cell alterations in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Shastri, Aditi; Will, Britta; Steidl, Ulrich; Verma, Amit

    2017-03-23

    Recent studies have demonstrated that myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) arise from a small population of disease-initiating hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that persist and expand through conventional therapies and are major contributors to disease progression and relapse. MDS stem and progenitor cells are characterized by key founder and driver mutations and are enriched for cytogenetic alterations. Quantitative alterations in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) numbers are also seen in a stage-specific manner in human MDS samples as well as in murine models of the disease. Overexpression of several markers such as interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor accessory protein (IL1RAP), CD99, T-cell immunoglobulin mucin-3, and CD123 have begun to differentiate MDS HSPCs from healthy counterparts. Overactivation of innate immune components such as Toll-like receptors, IL-1 receptor-associated kinase/tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor-6, IL8/CXCR2, and IL1RAP signaling pathways has been demonstrated in MDS HSPCs and is being targeted therapeutically in preclinical and early clinical studies. Other dysregulated pathways such as signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, tyrosine kinase with immunoglobulinlike and EGF-like domains 1/angiopoietin-1, p21-activated kinase, microRNA 21, and transforming growth factor β are also being explored as therapeutic targets against MDS HSPCs. Taken together, these studies have demonstrated that MDS stem cells are functionally critical for the initiation, transformation, and relapse of disease and need to be targeted therapeutically for future curative strategies in MDSs.

  17. Role of circulating osteogenic progenitor cells in calcific aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Gössl, Mario; Khosla, Sundeep; Zhang, Xin; Higano, Nara; Jordan, Kyra L; Loeffler, Darrell; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice; Lennon, Ryan J; McGregor, Ulrike; Lerman, Lilach O; Lerman, Amir

    2012-11-06

    The purpose of this study was to determine the role of circulating endothelial progenitor cells with osteoblastic phenotype (EPC-OCN) in human aortic valve calcification (AVC). Recent evidence suggests that rather than passive mineralization, AVC is an active atherosclerotic process with an osteoblastic component resembling coronary calcification. We have recently identified circulating EPCs with osteogenic properties carrying both endothelial progenitor (CD34, KDR) and osteoblastic (osteocalcin [OCN]) cell surface markers. Blood samples from controls (n = 22) and patients with mild to moderate calcific aortic stenosis (mi-moAS, n = 17), severe calcific AS (sAS, n = 26), and both sAS and severe coronary artery disease (sCAD) (n = 33) were collected during diagnostic coronary angiography. By using flow cytometry, peripheral blood mononuclear cells were analyzed for CD34, KDR, and OCN. Resected normal and calcified aortic valves were analyzed histologically. Patients with mi-moAS and patients with sAS/sCAD had significantly less EPCs (CD34+/KDR+/OCN-) than controls. Patients with sAS showed significantly higher numbers of EPC-OCN (CD34+/KDR+/OCN+) than controls. In addition, the percentage of EPC costaining for OCN was higher in all disease groups compared with controls. A subgroup analysis of younger patients with bicuspid sAS showed a similar pattern of significantly lower EPCs but a high percentage of coexpression of OCN. Immunofluorescence showed colocalization of nuclear factor kappa-B and OCN in diseased and normal valves. CD34+/OCN+ cells were abundant in the endothelial and deeper cell layers of calcific aortic valve tissue but not in normal aortic valve tissue. Circulating EPC-OCN may play a significant role in the pathogenesis and as markers of prognostication of calcific AS. Copyright © 2012 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Histamine receptors expressed in circulating progenitor cells have reciprocal actions in ligation-induced arteriosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Sohsuke; Wang, Ke-Yong; Tanimoto, Akihide; Guo, Xin; Nabeshima, Atsunori; Watanabe, Takeshi; Sasaguri, Yasuyuki

    2013-09-01

    Histamine is synthesized as a low-molecular-weight amine from L-histidine by histidine decarboxylase (HDC). Recently, we demonstrated that carotid artery-ligated HDC gene-deficient mice (HDC(-/-)) showed less neointimal formation than wild-type (WT) mice, indicating that histamine participates in the process of arteriosclerosis. However, little is known about the roles of histamine-specific receptors (HHRs) in arteriosclerosis. To define the roles of HHRs in arteriosclerosis, we investigated intimal remodeling in ligated carotid arteries of HHR-deficient mice (H1R(-/-) or H2R(-/-)). Quantitative analysis showed that H1R(-/-) mice had significantly less arteriosclerogenesis, whereas H2R(-/-) mice had more, as compared with WT mice. Bone marrow transplantation from H1R(-/-) or H2R(-/-) to WT mice confirmed the above observation. Furthermore, the increased expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), adhesion molecules and liver X receptor (LXR)-related inflammatory signaling factors, including Toll-like receptor (TLR3), interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R) and tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNF-R), was consistent with the arteriosclerotic phenotype of H2R(-/-) mice. Peripheral progenitor cells in H2R(-/-) mice accelerate ligation-induced arteriosclerosis through their regulation of MCP-1, PDGF, adhesion molecules and LXR-related inflammatory signaling factors. In contrast, peripheral progenitor cells act to suppress arteriosclerosis in H1R(-/-) mice, indicating that HHRs reciprocally regulate inflammation in the ligation-induced arteriosclerosis.

  19. Culture materials affect ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    LaIuppa, J A; McAdams, T A; Papoutsakis, E T; Miller, W M

    1997-09-05

    Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic cells is important for applications such as cancer treatment, gene therapy, and transfusion medicine. While cell culture systems are widely used to evaluate the biocompatibility of materials for implantation, the ability of materials to support proliferation of primary human cells in cultures for reinfusion into patients has not been addressed. We screened a variety of commercially available polymer (15 types), metal (four types), and glass substrates for their ability to support expansion of hematopoietic cells when cultured under conditions that would be encountered in a clinical setting. Cultures of peripheral blood (PB) CD34+ cells and mononuclear cells (MNC) were evaluated for expansion of total cells and colony-forming unit-granulocyte monocyte (CFU-GM; progenitors committed to the granulocyte and/or monocyte lineage). Human hematopoietic cultures in serum-free medium were found to be extremely sensitive to the substrate material. The only materials tested that supported expansion at or near the levels of polystyrene were tissue culture polystyrene, Teflon perfluoroalkoxy, Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene, cellulose acetate, titanium, new polycarbonate, and new polymethylpentene. MNC were less sensitive to the substrate materials than the primitive CD34+ progenitors, although similar trends were seen for expansion of the two cell populations on the substrates tested. CFU-GM expansion was more sensitive to substrate materials than was total cell expansion. The detrimental effects of a number of the materials on hematopoietic cultures appear to be caused by protein adsorption and/or leaching of toxins. Factors such as cleaning, sterilization, and reuse significantly affected the performance of some materials as culture substrates. We also used PB CD34+ cell cultures to examine the biocompatibility of gas-permeable cell culture and blood storage bags and several types of tubing commonly used with biomedical equipment

  20. Topological defects control collective dynamics in neural progenitor cell cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Kyogo; Kageyama, Ryoichiro; Sano, Masaki

    2017-04-01

    Cultured stem cells have become a standard platform not only for regenerative medicine and developmental biology but also for biophysical studies. Yet, the characterization of cultured stem cells at the level of morphology and of the macroscopic patterns resulting from cell-to-cell interactions remains largely qualitative. Here we report on the collective dynamics of cultured murine neural progenitor cells (NPCs), which are multipotent stem cells that give rise to cells in the central nervous system. At low densities, NPCs moved randomly in an amoeba-like fashion. However, NPCs at high density elongated and aligned their shapes with one another, gliding at relatively high velocities. Although the direction of motion of individual cells reversed stochastically along the axes of alignment, the cells were capable of forming an aligned pattern up to length scales similar to that of the migratory stream observed in the adult brain. The two-dimensional order of alignment within the culture showed a liquid-crystalline pattern containing interspersed topological defects with winding numbers of +1/2 and -1/2 (half-integer due to the nematic feature that arises from the head-tail symmetry of cell-to-cell interaction). We identified rapid cell accumulation at +1/2 defects and the formation of three-dimensional mounds. Imaging at the single-cell level around the defects allowed us to quantify the velocity field and the evolving cell density; cells not only concentrate at +1/2 defects, but also escape from -1/2 defects. We propose a generic mechanism for the instability in cell density around the defects that arises from the interplay between the anisotropic friction and the active force field.

  1. Inflammation increases cells expressing ZSCAN4 and progenitor cell markers in the adult pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Sakiko; Yokoyama, Yukihiro; Yamamoto, Akiko; Kyokane, Kazuhiro; Niida, Shumpei; Ishiguro, Hiroshi; Ko, Minoru S. H.

    2013-01-01

    We have recently identified the zinc finger and SCAN domain containing 4 (Zscan4), which is transiently expressed and regulates telomere elongation and genome stability in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. The aim of this study was to examine the expression of ZSCAN4 in the adult pancreas and elucidate the role of ZSCAN4 in tissue inflammation and subsequent regeneration. The expression of ZSCAN4 and other progenitor or differentiated cell markers in the human pancreas was immunohistochemically examined. Pancreas sections of alcoholic or autoimmune pancreatitis patients before and under maintenance corticosteroid treatment were used in this study. In the adult human pancreas a small number of ZSCAN4-positive (ZSCAN4+) cells are present among cells located in the islets of Langerhans, acini, ducts, and oval-shaped cells. These cells not only express differentiated cell markers for each compartment of the pancreas but also express other tissue stem/progenitor cell markers. Furthermore, the number of ZSCAN4+ cells dramatically increased in patients with chronic pancreatitis, especially in the pancreatic tissues of autoimmune pancreatitis actively regenerating under corticosteroid treatment. Interestingly, a number of ZSCAN4+ cells in the pancreas of autoimmune pancreatitis returned to the basal level after 1 yr of maintenance corticosteroid treatment. In conclusion, coexpression of progenitor cell markers and differentiated cell markers with ZSCAN4 in each compartment of the pancreas may indicate the presence of facultative progenitors for both exocrine and endocrine cells in the adult pancreas. PMID:23599043

  2. Growth factor- and cytokine-stimulated endothelial progenitor cells in post-ischemic cerebral neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Peplow, Philip V.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells are resident in the bone marrow blood sinusoids and circulate in the peripheral circulation. They mobilize from the bone marrow after vascular injury and home to the site of injury where they differentiate into endothelial cells. Activation and mobilization of endothelial progenitor cells from the bone marrow is induced via the production and release of endothelial progenitor cell-activating factors and includes specific growth factors and cytokines in response to peripheral tissue hypoxia such as after acute ischemic stroke or trauma. Endothelial progenitor cells migrate and home to specific sites following ischemic stroke via growth factor/cytokine gradients. Some growth factors are less stable under acidic conditions of tissue ischemia, and synthetic analogues that are stable at low pH may provide a more effective therapeutic approach for inducing endothelial progenitor cell mobilization and promoting cerebral neovascularization following ischemic stroke. PMID:25317152

  3. Diabetes Irreversibly Depletes Bone Marrow–Derived Mesenchymal Progenitor Cell Subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Januszyk, Michael; Sorkin, Michael; Glotzbach, Jason P.; Vial, Ivan N.; Maan, Zeshaan N.; Rennert, Robert C.; Duscher, Dominik; Thangarajah, Hariharan; Longaker, Michael T.; Butte, Atul J.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic vascular pathology is largely attributable to impairments in tissue recovery from hypoxia. Circulating progenitor cells have been postulated to play a role in ischemic recovery, and deficiencies in these cells have been well described in diabetic patients. Here, we examine bone marrow–derived mesenchymal progenitor cells (BM-MPCs) that have previously been shown to be important for new blood vessel formation and demonstrate significant deficits in the context of diabetes. Further, we determine that this dysfunction is attributable to intrinsic defects in diabetic BM-MPCs that are not correctable by restoring glucose homeostasis. We identify two transcriptionally distinct subpopulations that are selectively depleted by both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and these subpopulations have provasculogenic expression profiles, suggesting that they are vascular progenitor cells. These results suggest that the clinically observed deficits in progenitor cells may be attributable to selective and irreversible depletion of progenitor cell subsets in patients with diabetes. PMID:24740572

  4. Yap controls stem/progenitor cell proliferation in the mouse postnatal epidermis.

    PubMed

    Beverdam, Annemiek; Claxton, Christina; Zhang, Xiaomeng; James, Gregory; Harvey, Kieran F; Key, Brian

    2013-06-01

    Tissue renewal is an ongoing process in the epithelium of the skin. We have begun to examine the genetic mechanisms that control stem/progenitor cell activation in the postnatal epidermis. The conserved Hippo pathway regulates stem cell turnover in arthropods through to vertebrates. Here we show that its downstream effector, yes-associated protein (YAP), is active in the stem/progenitor cells of the postnatal epidermis. Overexpression of a C-terminally truncated YAP mutant in the basal epidermis of transgenic mice caused marked expansion of epidermal stem/progenitor cell populations. Our data suggest that the C-terminus of YAP controls the balance between stem/progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation in the postnatal interfollicular epidermis. We conclude that YAP functions as a molecular switch of stem/progenitor cell activation in the epidermis. Moreover, our results highlight YAP as a possible therapeutic target for diseases such as skin cancer, psoriasis, and epidermolysis bullosa.

  5. Establishment of Human Neural Progenitor Cells from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells with Diverse Tissue Origins

    PubMed Central

    Fukusumi, Hayato; Shofuda, Tomoko; Bamba, Yohei; Yamamoto, Atsuyo; Kanematsu, Daisuke; Handa, Yukako; Okita, Keisuke; Nakamura, Masaya; Yamanaka, Shinya; Okano, Hideyuki; Kanemura, Yonehiro

    2016-01-01

    Human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) have previously been generated from limited numbers of human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) clones. Here, 21 hiPSC clones derived from human dermal fibroblasts, cord blood cells, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were differentiated using two neural induction methods, an embryoid body (EB) formation-based method and an EB formation method using dual SMAD inhibitors (dSMADi). Our results showed that expandable hNPCs could be generated from hiPSC clones with diverse somatic tissue origins. The established hNPCs exhibited a mid/hindbrain-type neural identity and uniform expression of neural progenitor genes. PMID:27212953

  6. SWI/SNF in cardiac progenitor cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Ienglam; Liu, Liu; Sham, Mai Har; Wang, Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Cardiogenesis requires proper specification, proliferation, and differentiation of cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs). The differentiation of CPCs to specific cardiac cell types is likely guided by a comprehensive network comprised of cardiac transcription factors and epigenetic complexes. In this review, we describe how the ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling SWI/SNF complexes work synergistically with transcription and epigenetic factors to direct specific cardiac gene expression during CPC differentiation. Furthermore, we discuss how SWI/SNF may prime chromatin for cardiac gene expression at a genome-wide level. A detailed understanding of SWI/SNF-mediated CPC differentiation will provide important insight into the etiology of cardica defects and help design novel therapies for heart disease. PMID:23606236

  7. Neural stem/progenitor cells in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Tincer, Gizem; Mashkaryan, Violeta; Bhattarai, Prabesh; Kizil, Caghan

    2016-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent neurodegenerative disease and a worldwide health challenge. Different therapeutic approaches are being developed to reverse or slow the loss of affected neurons. Another plausible therapeutic way that may complement the studies is to increase the survival of existing neurons by mobilizing the existing neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) - i.e. "induce their plasticity" - to regenerate lost neurons despite the existing pathology and unfavorable environment. However, there is controversy about how NSPCs are affected by the unfavorable toxic environment during AD. In this review, we will discuss the use of stem cells in neurodegenerative diseases and in particular how NSPCs affect the AD pathology and how neurodegeneration affects NSPCs. In the end of this review, we will discuss how zebrafish as a useful model organism with extensive regenerative ability in the brain might help to address the molecular programs needed for NSPCs to respond to neurodegeneration by enhanced neurogenesis.

  8. Differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells from dissociated monolayer and feeder-free cultured pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Yuki; Bando, Yoshio; Ono, Takashi; Kobayashi, Sakurako; Doi, Ayano; Araki, Toshihiro; Kato, Yosuke; Shirakawa, Takayuki; Suzuki, Yutaka; Yamauchi, Junji; Yoshida, Shigetaka; Sato, Naoya

    2017-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes myelinate axons and form myelin sheaths in the central nervous system. The development of therapies for demyelinating diseases, including multiple sclerosis and leukodystrophies, is a challenge because the pathogenic mechanisms of disease remain poorly understood. Primate pluripotent stem cell-derived oligodendrocytes are expected to help elucidate the molecular pathogenesis of these diseases. Oligodendrocytes have been successfully differentiated from human pluripotent stem cells. However, it is challenging to prepare large amounts of oligodendrocytes over a short amount of time because of manipulation difficulties under conventional primate pluripotent stem cell culture methods. We developed a proprietary dissociated monolayer and feeder-free culture system to handle pluripotent stem cell cultures. Because the dissociated monolayer and feeder-free culture system improves the quality and growth of primate pluripotent stem cells, these cells could potentially be differentiated into any desired functional cells and consistently cultured in large-scale conditions. In the current study, oligodendrocyte progenitor cells and mature oligodendrocytes were generated within three months from monkey embryonic stem cells. The embryonic stem cell-derived oligodendrocytes exhibited in vitro myelinogenic potency with rat dorsal root ganglion neurons. Additionally, the transplanted oligodendrocyte progenitor cells differentiated into myelin basic protein-positive mature oligodendrocytes in the mouse corpus callosum. This preparative method was used for human induced pluripotent stem cells, which were also successfully differentiated into oligodendrocyte progenitor cells and mature oligodendrocytes that were capable of myelinating rat dorsal root ganglion neurons. Moreover, it was possible to freeze, thaw, and successfully re-culture the differentiating cells. These results showed that embryonic stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells maintained in a

  9. Differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells from dissociated monolayer and feeder-free cultured pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Tomoko; Miyamoto, Yuki; Bando, Yoshio; Ono, Takashi; Kobayashi, Sakurako; Doi, Ayano; Araki, Toshihiro; Kato, Yosuke; Shirakawa, Takayuki; Suzuki, Yutaka; Yamauchi, Junji; Yoshida, Shigetaka; Sato, Naoya

    2017-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes myelinate axons and form myelin sheaths in the central nervous system. The development of therapies for demyelinating diseases, including multiple sclerosis and leukodystrophies, is a challenge because the pathogenic mechanisms of disease remain poorly understood. Primate pluripotent stem cell-derived oligodendrocytes are expected to help elucidate the molecular pathogenesis of these diseases. Oligodendrocytes have been successfully differentiated from human pluripotent stem cells. However, it is challenging to prepare large amounts of oligodendrocytes over a short amount of time because of manipulation difficulties under conventional primate pluripotent stem cell culture methods. We developed a proprietary dissociated monolayer and feeder-free culture system to handle pluripotent stem cell cultures. Because the dissociated monolayer and feeder-free culture system improves the quality and growth of primate pluripotent stem cells, these cells could potentially be differentiated into any desired functional cells and consistently cultured in large-scale conditions. In the current study, oligodendrocyte progenitor cells and mature oligodendrocytes were generated within three months from monkey embryonic stem cells. The embryonic stem cell-derived oligodendrocytes exhibited in vitro myelinogenic potency with rat dorsal root ganglion neurons. Additionally, the transplanted oligodendrocyte progenitor cells differentiated into myelin basic protein-positive mature oligodendrocytes in the mouse corpus callosum. This preparative method was used for human induced pluripotent stem cells, which were also successfully differentiated into oligodendrocyte progenitor cells and mature oligodendrocytes that were capable of myelinating rat dorsal root ganglion neurons. Moreover, it was possible to freeze, thaw, and successfully re-culture the differentiating cells. These results showed that embryonic stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells maintained in a

  10. Normal ovarian surface epithelial label-retaining cells exhibit stem/progenitor cell characteristics.

    PubMed

    Szotek, Paul P; Chang, Henry L; Brennand, Kristen; Fujino, Akihiro; Pieretti-Vanmarcke, Rafael; Lo Celso, Cristina; Dombkowski, David; Preffer, Frederic; Cohen, Kenneth S; Teixeira, Jose; Donahoe, Patricia K

    2008-08-26

    Ovulation induces cyclic rupture and regenerative repair of the ovarian coelomic epithelium. This process of repeated disruption and repair accompanied by complex remodeling typifies a somatic stem/progenitor cell-mediated process. Using BrdU incorporation and doxycycline inducible histone2B-green fluorescent protein pulse-chase techniques, we identify a label-retaining cell population in the coelomic epithelium of the adult mouse ovary as candidate somatic stem/progenitor cells. The identified population exhibits quiescence with asymmetric label retention, functional response to estrous cycling in vivo by proliferation, enhanced growth characteristics by in vitro colony formation, and cytoprotective mechanisms by enrichment for the side population. Together, these characteristics identify the label-retaining cell population as a candidate for the putative somatic stem/progenitor cells of the coelomic epithelium of the mouse ovary.

  11. Normal ovarian surface epithelial label-retaining cells exhibit stem/progenitor cell characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Szotek, Paul P.; Chang, Henry L.; Brennand, Kristen; Fujino, Akihiro; Pieretti-Vanmarcke, Rafael; Lo Celso, Cristina; Dombkowski, David; Preffer, Frederic; Cohen, Kenneth S.; Teixeira, Jose; Donahoe, Patricia K.

    2008-01-01

    Ovulation induces cyclic rupture and regenerative repair of the ovarian coelomic epithelium. This process of repeated disruption and repair accompanied by complex remodeling typifies a somatic stem/progenitor cell-mediated process. Using BrdU incorporation and doxycycline inducible histone2B-green fluorescent protein pulse–chase techniques, we identify a label-retaining cell population in the coelomic epithelium of the adult mouse ovary as candidate somatic stem/progenitor cells. The identified population exhibits quiescence with asymmetric label retention, functional response to estrous cycling in vivo by proliferation, enhanced growth characteristics by in vitro colony formation, and cytoprotective mechanisms by enrichment for the side population. Together, these characteristics identify the label-retaining cell population as a candidate for the putative somatic stem/progenitor cells of the coelomic epithelium of the mouse ovary. PMID:18711140

  12. Characterization of Progenitor Cells in Pulps of Murine Incisors

    PubMed Central

    Balic, A.; Mina, M.

    2010-01-01

    The continuous growth of rodent incisors requires the presence of stem cells capable of generating ameloblasts and odontoblasts. While epithelial stem cells giving rise to ameloblasts have been well-characterized, cells giving rise to the odontoblasts in incisors have not been fully characterized. The goal of this study was to gain insight into the potential population in dental pulps of unerupted and erupted incisors that give rise to odontoblasts. We show that pulps from unerupted incisors contain a significant mesenchymal-stem-cell (MSC)-like population (cells expressing CD90+/CD45-, CD117+/CD45-, Sca-1+/CD45-) and few CD45+ cells. Our in vitro studies showed that these cells displayed extensive osteo-dentinogenic potential, but were unable to differentiate into chondrocytes and adipocytes. Dental pulps from erupted incisors displayed increased percentages of CD45+ and decreased percentages of cells expressing markers of an MSC-like population. Despite these differences, pulps from erupted incisors also displayed extensive osteo-dentinogenic potential and inability to differentiate into chondrocytes and adipocytes. These results provide evidence that continuous generation of odontoblasts and dentin on the labial and lingual sides of unerupted and erupted incisors is supported by a progenitor population and not multipotent MSCs in the dental pulp. PMID:20739699

  13. Role of progenitor cell producing normal vagina by metaplasia in laparoscopic peritoneal vaginoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Mhatre, Pravin N.; Narkhede, Hemraj R.; Pawar, P. Amol; Mhatre, P. Jyoti; Kumar, Das Dhanjit

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT: Host of vaginoplasty techniques have been described. None has been successful in developing normal vagina. Laparoscopic peritoneal vaginoplasty (LPV) is performed in Mayer–Rokitansky–Küster–Hauser syndrome (MRKHS) culminating in normal vagina. AIMS: This study aims to confirm normal development of neovagina by anatomical and functional parameters of histology, cytology, and ultrasonography (USG) in LPV. To identify peritoneal progenitor cell by OCT4/SOX2 markers. To demonstrate the metaplastic conversion of peritoneum to neovagina and the progenitor cell concentration, distribution pattern. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: This is prospective experimental study, conducted at teaching hospital and private hospital. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Fifteen women of MRKHS underwent LPV followed by histology, cytology, two-/three-dimensional USG of neovagina. Four women underwent peritoneal biopsy for identification of progenitor cells with OCT4/SOX2 markers. One patient underwent serial biopsies for 4 weeks for histology and progenitor cell immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Normal vaginal histology and cytology were apparent. USG of neovagina showed normal appearance and blood flow. Two peritoneal samples confirmed the presence of progenitor cells. Serial biopsies demonstrated the epithelial change from single to multilayer with stromal compaction and neoangiogenesis. The progenitor cells concentration and different distribution patterns were described using SOX2/OCT4 markers. CONCLUSIONS: We have shown successful peritoneal metaplastic conversion to normal vagina in LPV. The progenitor cell was identified in normal peritoneum using SOX2/OCT4 markers. The progenitor cell concentration and pattern were demonstrated at various stages of neovaginal development. PMID:28216908

  14. A  Complex Code of Extrinsic Influences on Cortical Progenitor Cells of Higher Mammals.

    PubMed

    Reillo, Isabel; de Juan Romero, Camino; Cárdenas, Adrián; Clascá, Francisco; Martínez-Martinez, Maria Ángeles; Borrell, Víctor

    2017-09-01

    Development of the cerebral cortex depends critically on the regulation of progenitor cell proliferation and fate. Cortical progenitor cells are remarkably diverse with regard to their morphology as well as laminar and areal position. Extrinsic factors, such as thalamic axons, have been proposed to play key roles in progenitor cell regulation, but the diversity, extent and timing of interactions between extrinsic elements and each class of cortical progenitor cell in higher mammals remain undefined. Here we use the ferret to demonstrate the existence of a complex set of extrinsic elements that may interact, alone or in combination, with subpopulations of progenitor cells, defining a code of extrinsic influences. This code and its complexity vary significantly between developmental stages, layer of residence and morphology of progenitor cells. By analyzing the spatial-temporal overlap of progenitor cell subtypes with neuronal and axonal populations, we show that multiple sets of migrating neurons and axon tracts overlap extensively with subdivisions of the Subventricular Zones, in an exquisite lamina-specific pattern. Our findings provide a framework for understanding the feedback influence of both intra- and extra-cortical elements onto progenitor cells to modulate their dynamics and fate decisions in gyrencephalic brains. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  15. Different thresholds of Wnt-Frizzled 7 signaling coordinate proliferation, morphogenesis and fate of endoderm progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zheng; Rankin, Scott A.; Zorn, Aaron M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Wnt signaling has multiple dynamic roles during development of the gastrointestinal and respiratory systems. Differential Wnt signaling is thought to be a critical step in Xenopus endoderm patterning such that during late gastrula and early somite stages of embryogenesis, Wnt activity must be suppressed in the anterior to allow the specification of foregut progenitors. However, the foregut endoderm also expresses the Wnt-receptor Frizzled 7 (Fzd7) as well as several Wnt ligands suggesting that the current model may be too simple. In this study, we show that Fzd7 is required to transduce a low level of Wnt signaling that is essential to maintain foregut progenitors. Foregut-specific Fzd7-depletion from the Xenopus foregut resulted in liver and pancreas agenesis. Fzd7-depleted embryos failed to maintain the foregut progenitor marker hhex and exhibited decreased proliferation; in addition the foregut cells were enlarged with a randomized orientation. We show that in the foregut Fzd7 signals via both the Wnt/β-catenin and Wnt/JNK pathways and that different thresholds of Wnt-Fzd7 activity coordinate progenitor cell fate, proliferation and morphogenesis. PMID:23562607

  16. Liver involvement in Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Adelaine; Ortiz-Neira, Clara L; Reslan, Walid Abou; Sharon, Raphael; Pinto-Rojas, Alfredo; Kaura, Deepak; Anderson, Ronald

    2006-10-01

    Liver involvement in Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) typically presents with hepatomegaly and other signs of liver dysfunction. We present an 11-month-old child having only minimally elevated liver enzymes as an indication of liver involvement. Using sonography as the initial diagnostic tool followed by MRI, LCH of the liver was revealed. A review of sonographic, CT, MRI and MR cholangiopancreatography findings in liver LCH is presented. We recommend that physicians consider sonography and MRI screening for liver involvement in patients with newly diagnosed LCH, as periportal involvement may be present with little or no liver function abnormality present, as in this patient.

  17. Endothelial cell promotion of early liver and pancreas development.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Deborah A; Kashima, Yasushige; Zaret, Kenneth S

    2007-01-01

    Different steps of embryonic pancreas and liver development require inductive signals from endothelial cells. During liver development, interactions between newly specified hepatic endoderm cells and nascent endothelial cells are crucial for the endoderm's subsequent growth and morphogenesis into a liver bud. Reconstitution of endothelial cell stimulation of hepatic cell growth with embryonic tissue explants demonstrated that endothelial signalling occurs independent of the blood supply. During pancreas development, midgut endoderm interactions with aortic endothelial cells induce Ptf1a, a crucial pancreatic determinant. Endothelial cells also have a later effect on pancreas development, by promoting survival of the dorsal mesenchyme, which in turn produces factors supporting pancreatic endoderm. A major goal of our laboratory is to determine the endothelial-derived molecules involved in these inductive events. Our data show that cultured endothelial cells induce Ptf1a in dorsal endoderm explants lacking an endogenous vasculature. We are purifying endothelial cell line product(s) responsible for this effect. We are also identifying endothelial-responsive regulatory elements in genes such as Ptf1a by genetic mapping and chromatin-based assays. These latter approaches will allow us to track endothelial-responsive signal pathways from DNA targets within progenitor cells. The diversity of organogenic steps dependent upon endothelial cell signalling suggests that cross-regulation of tissue development with its vasculature is a general phenomenon.

  18. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase PRL2 Mediates Notch and Kit Signals in Early T Cell Progenitors.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Michihiro; Nabinger, Sarah C; Bai, Yunpeng; Yoshimoto, Momoko; Gao, Rui; Chen, Sisi; Yao, Chonghua; Dong, Yuanshu; Zhang, Lujuan; Rodriguez, Sonia; Yashiro-Ohtani, Yumi; Pear, Warren S; Carlesso, Nadia; Yoder, Mervin C; Kapur, Reuben; Kaplan, Mark H; Daniel Lacorazza, Hugo; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Liu, Yan

    2017-04-01

    The molecular pathways regulating lymphoid priming, fate, and development of multipotent bone marrow hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) that continuously feed thymic progenitors remain largely unknown. While Notch signal is indispensable for T cell specification and differentiation, the downstream effectors are not well understood. PRL2, a protein tyrosine phosphatase that regulates hematopoietic stem cell proliferation and self-renewal, is highly expressed in murine thymocyte progenitors. Here we demonstrate that protein tyrosine phosphatase PRL2 and receptor tyrosine kinase c-Kit are critical downstream targets and effectors of the canonical Notch/RBPJ pathway in early T cell progenitors. While PRL2 deficiency resulted in moderate defects of thymopoiesis in the steady state, de novo generation of T cells from Prl2 null hematopoietic stem cells was significantly reduced following transplantation. Prl2 null HSPCs also showed impaired T cell differentiation in vitro. We found that Notch/RBPJ signaling upregulated PRL2 as well as c-Kit expression in T cell progenitors. Further, PRL2 sustains Notch-mediated c-Kit expression and enhances stem cell factor/c-Kit signaling in T cell progenitors, promoting effective DN1-DN2 transition. Thus, we have identified a critical role for PRL2 phosphatase in mediating Notch and c-Kit signals in early T cell progenitors. Stem Cells 2017;35:1053-1064.

  19. Thrombopoietin is a growth factor for rat hepatic progenitors.

    PubMed

    Schmelzer, Eva; Deiwick, Andrea; Bruns, Helge; Fiegel, Henning C; Bader, Augustinus

    2008-03-01

    The liver is the primary site of hematopoiesis during fetal development; it has been shown that thrombopoietin (TPO) produced by the liver during fetal development is a major regulator of megakaryocytopoiesis. As maximum liver growth and hematopoiesis occur simultaneously, we hypothesized that TPO may act as a growth factor for hepatic progenitors. Therefore, the influence of TPO on the proliferation of fetal hepatic progenitors in vitro compared with that of adult hepatocytes was analyzed. The expression of the TPO receptor, c-mpl, was investigated in fetal and adult liver. Cell proliferation was measured by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation and total cell counts. TPO and c-mpl gene expression was investigated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The cell surface expression of c-mpl was analyzed in fetal and adult human liver by immunohistochemistry. Hepatic progenitors of fetal and adult liver but not hepatocytes expressed the TPO receptor, c-mpl, on the cell surface. Fetal hepatic progenitors expressed mRNA for TPO and its receptor. TPO stimulated cell proliferation and increased cell numbers of cultured rat fetal hepatic progenitors but not adult hepatocytes. We conclude that TPO acts in addition to its known role in megakaryocytopoiesis as a growth factor for hepatic progenitors but not hepatocytes in vitro; thus, TPO represents a growth factor for hepatic progenitors during fetal liver development.

  20. High-density lipoprotein exerts vasculoprotection via endothelial progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Petoumenos, Vasileios; Nickenig, Georg; Werner, Nikos

    2009-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) enhance endothelial cell repair, improve endothelial dysfunction and are a predictor for cardiovascular mortality. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels inversely correlate with cardiovascular events and have vasculoprotective effects. Here we postulate that HDL influences EPC biology. HDL and EPC were isolated according to standard procedures. Differentiation of mononuclear cells into DiLDL/lectin positive cells was enhanced after HDL treatment compared to vehicle. HDL was able to inhibit apoptosis (TUNEL assay, annexin V staining) while proliferation (BrdU incorporation) of early outgrowth colonies after extended cell cultivation (14 days) was increased. Flow chamber experiments revealed an improved adhesion of HDL pre-incubated EPC on human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC) compared to vehicle while HDL treatment of HCAEC prevented adhesion of inflammatory cells. Flow cytometry demonstrated an up-regulation of β2- and α4-integrins on HDL pre-incubated EPC. Blocking experiments revealed a unique role of β2-integrin in EPC adhesion. Treatment of wild-type mice with recombinant HDL after endothelial denudation resulted in enhanced re-endothelialization compared to vehicle. Finally, in patients with coronary artery disease a correlation between circulating EPC and HDL concentrations was demonstrated. We provide evidence that HDL mediates important vasculoprotective action via the improvement of function of circulating EPC. PMID:18705697

  1. CXCL12 in early mesenchymal progenitors is required for haematopoietic stem-cell maintenance.

    PubMed

    Greenbaum, Adam; Hsu, Yen-Michael S; Day, Ryan B; Schuettpelz, Laura G; Christopher, Matthew J; Borgerding, Joshua N; Nagasawa, Takashi; Link, Daniel C

    2013-03-14

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) primarily reside in the bone marrow where signals generated by stromal cells regulate their self-renewal, proliferation and trafficking. Endosteal osteoblasts and perivascular stromal cells including endothelial cells, CXCL12-abundant reticular cells, leptin-receptor-positive stromal cells, and nestin-green fluorescent protein (GFP)-positive mesenchymal progenitors have all been implicated in HSC maintenance. However, it is unclear whether specific haematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) subsets reside in distinct niches defined by the surrounding stromal cells and the regulatory molecules they produce. CXCL12 (chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 12) regulates both HSCs and lymphoid progenitors and is expressed by all of these stromal cell populations. Here we selectively deleted Cxcl12 from candidate niche stromal cell populations and characterized the effect on HPCs. Deletion of Cxcl12 from mineralizing osteoblasts has no effect on HSCs or lymphoid progenitors. Deletion of Cxcl12 from osterix-expressing stromal