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Sample records for liver proteome response

  1. Proteomic analysis of propiconazole responses in mouse liver: comparison of genomic and proteomic profiles.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Pedro A; Bruno, Maribel E; Moore, Tanya; Nesnow, Stephen; Winnik, Witold; Ge, Yue

    2010-03-01

    We have performed for the first time a comprehensive profiling of changes in protein expression of soluble proteins in livers from mice treated with the mouse liver tumorigen, propiconazole, to uncover the pathways and networks altered by this fungicide. Utilizing two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry (MS), we identified 62 proteins that were altered. Several of these protein changes detected by 2-DE/MS were verified by Western blot analyses. These differentially expressed proteins were mapped using Ingenuity Pathway Analyses (IPA) canonical pathways and IPA tox lists. Forty-four pathways/lists were identified. IPA was also used to create networks of interacting protein clusters. The protein-generated IPA canonical pathways and IPA tox lists were compared to those pathways and lists previously generated from genomic analyses from livers of mice treated with propiconazole under the same experimental conditions. There was a significant overlap in the specific pathways and lists generated from the proteomic and the genomic data with 27 pathways common to both proteomic and genomic analyses. However, there were also 17 pathways/lists identified only by proteomics analysis and 21 pathways/lists only identified by genomic analysis. The protein network analysis produced interacting subnetworks centered around hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4 alpha), MYC, proteasome subunit type 4 alpha, and glutathione S-transferase (GST). The HNF4 alpha network hub was also identified by genomic analysis. Five GST isoforms were identified by proteomic analysis and GSTs were present in 10 of the 44 protein-based pathways/lists. Hepatic GST activities were compared between mice treated with propiconazole and 2 additional conazoles and higher GST activities were found to be associated with the tumorigenic conazoles. Overall, this comparative proteomic and genomic study has revealed a series of alterations in livers induced by propiconazole: nuclear receptor

  2. System-based proteomic analysis of the interferon response in human liver cells

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Wei; Lee, Hookeun; Yi, Eugene C; Reiss, David; Shannon, Paul; Kwieciszewski, Bartlomiej K; Coito, Carlos; Li, Xiao-jun; Keller, Andrew; Eng, Jimmy; Galitski, Timothy; Goodlett, David R; Aebersold, Ruedi; Katze, Michael G

    2004-01-01

    Background Interferons (IFNs) play a critical role in the host antiviral defense and are an essential component of current therapies against hepatitis C virus (HCV), a major cause of liver disease worldwide. To examine liver-specific responses to IFN and begin to elucidate the mechanisms of IFN inhibition of virus replication, we performed a global quantitative proteomic analysis in a human hepatoma cell line (Huh7) in the presence and absence of IFN treatment using the isotope-coded affinity tag (ICAT) method and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Results In three subcellular fractions from the Huh7 cells treated with IFN (400 IU/ml, 16 h) or mock-treated, we identified more than 1,364 proteins at a threshold that corresponds to less than 5% false-positive error rate. Among these, 54 were induced by IFN and 24 were repressed by more than two-fold, respectively. These IFN-regulated proteins represented multiple cellular functions including antiviral defense, immune response, cell metabolism, signal transduction, cell growth and cellular organization. To analyze this proteomics dataset, we utilized several systems-biology data-mining tools, including Gene Ontology via the GoMiner program and the Cytoscape bioinformatics platform. Conclusions Integration of the quantitative proteomics with global protein interaction data using the Cytoscape platform led to the identification of several novel and liver-specific key regulatory components of the IFN response, which may be important in regulating the interplay between HCV, interferon and the host response to virus infection. PMID:15287976

  3. Proteomic analysis of propiconazole responses in mouse liver: comparison of genomic and proteomic profiles

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have performed for the first time a comprehensive profiling of changes in protein expression of soluble proteins in livers from mice treated with the mouse liver tumorigen, propiconazole, to uncover the pathways and networks altered by this fungicide. Utilizing twodimensional...

  4. Proteomic Analysis of Propiconazole Responses in Mouse Liver-Comparison of Genomic and Proteomic Profiles

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have performed for the first time a comprehensive profiling of changes in protein expression of soluble proteins in livers from mice treated with the mouse liver tumorigen, propiconazole, to uncover the pathways and networks altered by this commonly used fungicide. Utilizing t...

  5. Chronic Heat Stress Induces Immune Response, Oxidative Stress Response, and Apoptosis of Finishing Pig Liver: A Proteomic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yanjun; Hao, Yue; Li, Jielei; Bao, Weiguang; Li, Gan; Gao, Yanli; Gu, Xianhong

    2016-01-01

    Heat stress (HS) negatively affects human health, animal welfare, and livestock production. We analyzed the hepatic proteomes of finishing pigs subjected to chronic heat stress (HS), thermal neutral (TN), and restricted feed intake conditions, identifying differences between direct and indirect (via reduced feed intake) HS. Twenty-four castrated male pigs were randomly allocated to three treatments for three weeks: (1) thermal neutral (TN) (22 °C) with ad libitum feeding; (2) chronic HS (30 °C) with ad libitum feeding; and (3) TN, pair-fed to HS intake (PF). Hepatic proteome analysis was conducted using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Both HS and PF significantly reduced liver weight (p < 0.05). Forty-five hepatic proteins were differentially abundant when comparing HS with TN (37), PF with TN (29), and HS with PF (16). These proteins are involved in heat shock response and immune defense, oxidative stress response, cellular apoptosis, metabolism, signal transduction, and cytoskeleton. We also observed increased abundance of proteins and enzymes associated with heat shock response and immune defense, reduced the redox state, enhanced multiple antioxidant abilities, and increased apoptosis in HS liver. Heat-load, independent of reduced feed intake, induced an innate immune response, while food restriction caused stress and cellular apoptosis. Our results provide novel insights into the effects of chronic HS on liver. PMID:27187351

  6. Proteomic analysis of methyl parathion-responsive proteins in Sparus latus liver.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hai-bin; Huang, He-qing

    2011-03-01

    The contamination of marine ecosystems by organophosphate pesticides is of great concern. The use of protein expression profiles may provide a good method to help us understand the methyl parathion (MP) toxicity to aquatic organisms. In this study, Sparus latus, was selected as the target organism. The toxicological effects of MP were investigated after 24 h exposure using proteomics to analyze their liver tissues. Certain enzyme activity parameters of the liver extracts were also examined, including CAT. After analyzing the proteomic profile of the liver using 2D gel electrophoresis, we found that the protein expression levels of 25 spots increased or decreased significantly in the exposed groups. Sixteen of the 25 protein spots were successfully identified using MALDI-TOF MS/MS. These proteins were roughly categorized into diverse functional classes such as cell redox homeostasis, metabolic processes and cytoskeleton system. These data demonstrated that proteomics was a powerful tool to provide valuable insights into the possible mechanisms of toxicity of MP contaminants in aquatic species. Additionally, these data may provide novel biomarkers for evaluation of MP contamination in the environment.

  7. Gender-specific proteomic responses in zebrafish liver following exposure to a selected mixture of brominated flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Kling, P; Norman, A; Andersson, P L; Norrgren, L; Förlin, L

    2008-10-01

    Proteomic effect screening in zebrafish liver was performed to generate hypotheses following exposure (21 days) to a structurally diverse mixture of brominated flame retardants (BFRs). Fish were exposed to two doses (10 and 100 nmol/g feed). Two-dimensional gel-electrophoresis, image analysis and MALDI-TOF mass-spectrometry revealed 13 and 19 significant responses in males and females, respectively. Effects on proteins related to cellular maintenance and stress were observed in both genders. Regulated proteins were gender-specific, but functionally indicated common protective responses (peroxiredoxin 6 and Zgc:92891 in males and transketolase in females) suggesting oxidative stress. Betaine homocysteine methyltransferase (BHMT) was induced in both genders. In addition a female-specific downregulation of ironhomeostatic proteins (iron-regulatory protein 1 and transferrin) were observed. Our proteomic approach revealed novel responses that suggest important gender-specific sensitivity to BFRs that should be considered when interpreting adverse effects of BFRs. PMID:18258299

  8. Systematic investigation of cellular response and pleiotropic effects in atorvastatin-treated liver cells by MS-based proteomics.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Haopeng; Chen, Weixuan; Tang, George X; Smeekens, Johanna M; Wu, Ronghu

    2015-03-01

    For decades, statins have been widely used to lower cholesterol levels by inhibiting the enzyme HMG Co-A reductase (HMGCR). It is well-known that statins have pleiotropic effects including improving endothelial function and inhibiting vascular inflammation and oxidation. However, the cellular responses to statins and corresponding pleiotropic effects are largely unknown at the proteome level. Emerging mass spectrometry-based proteomics provides a unique opportunity to systemically investigate protein and phosphoprotein abundance changes as a result of statin treatment. Many lipid-related protein abundances were increased in HepG2 cells treated by atorvastatin, including HMGCR, FDFT, SQLE, and LDLR, while the abundances of proteins involved in cellular response to stress and apoptosis were decreased. Comprehensive analysis of protein phosphorylation demonstrated that several basic motifs were enriched among down-regulated phosphorylation sites, which indicates that kinases with preference for these motifs, such as protein kinase A and protein kinase C, have attenuated activities. Phosphopeptides on a group of G-protein modulators were up-regulated, which strongly suggests that cell signal rewiring was a result of the effect of protein lipidation by the statin. This work provides a global view of liver cell responses to atorvastatin at the proteome and phosphoproteome levels, which provides insight into the pleiotropic effects of statins.

  9. Liver proteomics in progressive alcoholic steatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Fernando, Harshica; Wiktorowicz, John E.; Soman, Kizhake V.; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S.; Khan, M. Firoze; Shakeel Ansari, G.A.

    2013-02-01

    Fatty liver is an early stage of alcoholic and nonalcoholic liver disease (ALD and NALD) that progresses to steatohepatitis and other irreversible conditions. In this study, we identified proteins that were differentially expressed in the livers of rats fed 5% ethanol in a Lieber–DeCarli diet daily for 1 and 3 months by discovery proteomics (two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry) and non-parametric modeling (Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines). Hepatic fatty infiltration was significantly higher in ethanol-fed animals as compared to controls, and more pronounced at 3 months of ethanol feeding. Discovery proteomics identified changes in the expression of proteins involved in alcohol, lipid, and amino acid metabolism after ethanol feeding. At 1 and 3 months, 12 and 15 different proteins were differentially expressed. Of the identified proteins, down regulation of alcohol dehydrogenase (− 1.6) at 1 month and up regulation of aldehyde dehydrogenase (2.1) at 3 months could be a protective/adaptive mechanism against ethanol toxicity. In addition, betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase 2 a protein responsible for methionine metabolism and previously implicated in fatty liver development was significantly up regulated (1.4) at ethanol-induced fatty liver stage (1 month) while peroxiredoxin-1 was down regulated (− 1.5) at late fatty liver stage (3 months). Nonparametric analysis of the protein spots yielded fewer proteins and narrowed the list of possible markers and identified D-dopachrome tautomerase (− 1.7, at 3 months) as a possible marker for ethanol-induced early steatohepatitis. The observed differential regulation of proteins have potential to serve as biomarker signature for the detection of steatosis and its progression to steatohepatitis once validated in plasma/serum. -- Graphical abstract: The figure shows the Hierarchial cluster analysis of differentially expressed protein spots obtained after ethanol feeding for 1 (1–3

  10. Liver proteome response of largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) exposed to several environmental contaminants: potential insights into biomarker development.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Brian C; Ralston-Hooper, Kimberly J; Kowalski, Kevin A; Dorota Inerowicz, H; Adamec, Jiri; Sepúlveda, María S

    2009-10-19

    Liver proteome response of largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) exposed to environmental contaminants was analyzed to identify novel biomarkers of exposure. Adult male bass were exposed to cadmium chloride (CdCl(2)), atrazine, PCB 126, phenanthrene, or toxaphene via intraperitoneal injection with target body burdens of 0.00067, 3.0, 2.5, 50, and 100 microg/g, respectively. After a 96 h exposure, hepatic proteins were separated with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and differentially expressed proteins (vs. controls) recognized and identified with MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. We identified, 30, 18, eight, 19, and five proteins as differentially expressed within the CdCl(2), atrazine, PCB 126, phenanthrene, and toxaphene treatments, respectively. Alterations were observed in the expression of proteins associated with cellular ion homeostasis (toxaphene), oxidative stress (phenanthrene, PCB 126), and energy production including glycolysis (CdCl(2), atrazine) and ATP synthesis (atrazine). This work supports the further evaluation of several of these proteins as biomarkers of contaminant exposure in fish.

  11. A Cell-type-resolved Liver Proteome*

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Chen; Li, Yanyan; Guo, Feifei; Jiang, Ying; Ying, Wantao; Li, Dong; Yang, Dong; Xia, Xia; Liu, Wanlin; Zhao, Yan; He, Yangzhige; Li, Xianyu; Sun, Wei; Liu, Qiongming; Song, Lei; Zhen, Bei; Zhang, Pumin; Qian, Xiaohong; Qin, Jun; He, Fuchu

    2016-01-01

    Parenchymatous organs consist of multiple cell types, primarily defined as parenchymal cells (PCs) and nonparenchymal cells (NPCs). The cellular characteristics of these organs are not well understood. Proteomic studies facilitate the resolution of the molecular details of different cell types in organs. These studies have significantly extended our knowledge about organogenesis and organ cellular composition. Here, we present an atlas of the cell-type-resolved liver proteome. In-depth proteomics identified 6000 to 8000 gene products (GPs) for each cell type and a total of 10,075 GPs for four cell types. This data set revealed features of the cellular composition of the liver: (1) hepatocytes (PCs) express the least GPs, have a unique but highly homogenous proteome pattern, and execute fundamental liver functions; (2) the division of labor among PCs and NPCs follows a model in which PCs make the main components of pathways, but NPCs trigger the pathways; and (3) crosstalk among NPCs and PCs maintains the PC phenotype. This study presents the liver proteome at cell resolution, serving as a research model for dissecting the cell type constitution and organ features at the molecular level. PMID:27562671

  12. Liver proteomic response to hypertriglyceridemia in human-apolipoprotein C-III transgenic mice at cellular and mitochondrial compartment levels

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) is defined as a triglyceride (TG) plasma level exceeding 150 mg/dl and is tightly associated with atherosclerosis, metabolic syndrome, obesity, diabetes and acute pancreatitis. The present study was undertaken to investigate the mitochondrial, sub-mitochondrial and cellular proteomic impact of hypertriglyceridemia in the hepatocytes of hypertriglyceridemic transgenic mice (overexpressing the human apolipoproteinC-III). Methods Quantitative proteomics (2D-DIGE) analysis was carried out on both “low-expressor” (LE) and “high-expressor” (HE) mice, respectively exhibiting moderate and severe HTG, to characterize the effect of the TG plasma level on the proteomic response. Results The mitoproteome analysis has revealed a large-scale phenomenon in transgenic mice, i.e. a general down-regulation of matricial proteins and up-regulation of inner membrane proteins. These data also demonstrate that the magnitude of proteomic changes strongly depends on the TG plasma level. Our different analyses indicate that, in HE mice, the capacity of several metabolic pathways is altered to promote the availability of acetyl-CoA, glycerol-3-phosphate, ATP and NADPH for TG de novo biosynthesis. The up-regulation of several cytosolic ROS detoxifying enzymes has also been observed, suggesting that the cytoplasm of HTG mice is subjected to oxidative stress. Moreover, our results suggest that iron over-accumulation takes place in the cytosol of HE mice hepatocytes and may contribute to enhance oxidative stress and to promote cellular proliferation. Conclusions These results indicate that the metabolic response to HTG in human apolipoprotein C-III overexpressing mice may support a high TG production rate and that the cytosol of hepatocytes is subjected to an important oxidative stress, probably as a result of FFA over-accumulation, iron overload and enhanced activity of some ROS-producing catabolic enzymes. PMID:25047818

  13. Proteomic analysis of the murine liver in response to a combined exposure to psychological stress and 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene.

    PubMed

    Flint, Melanie S; Hood, Brian L; Sun, Mai; Stewart, Nicolas A; Jones-Laughner, Jacqueline; Conrads, Thomas P

    2010-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are environmental carcinogens implicated to underlie development of several types of cancers. Cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes play key roles in the conversion of PAHs to highly potent carcinogens, namely diol epoxides. 7,12-Dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA), a PAH, is highly carcinogenic, where in mouse models it is known to be responsible for initiating tumor formation in many organs including mammary tissues, ovaries, and skin. Psychological stress, via release of biochemical mediators, can greatly impact carcinogenesis. The present investigation examined the hypothesis that psychological stress modulates metabolism and carcinogenicity of DMBA through alteration of key drug metabolizing enzyme abundance levels in the liver utilizing mass spectrometry-based proteomics. To test this hypothesis, four groups of mice were treated as follows: nonstressed, stressed, nonstressed/DMBA-exposed, and stressed/DMBA-exposed, where the stressor was a well-accepted model of restraint. Liver proteins were extracted, resolved by one-dimensional gel electrophoresis, digested in-gel with trypsin, and analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. This investigation resulted in the unique identification of 59 isoforms of CYP enzymes. Changes in protein abundances derived from spectral counting indicates that stress alone results in increases in the abundance of proteins responsive to oxidative stress, along with Phase I and II metabolizing enzymes, such as CYP2J5 and UDP glucoronytransferases. The proteomic results further indicate that exposure to DMBA induces increases in the abundance of CYP1A2 and serine protease inhibitors and decreases the abundance of CYP4 V3. Finally, significant changes in the abundance of proteins such as CYP1A2, CYP3A11, and Topoisomerase-2 were found between nonstressed and stressed/DMBA-treated mice. These data support the hypothesis that psychological stress modulates DMBA-induced regulation of drug

  14. Systems proteomics of liver mitochondria function.

    PubMed

    Williams, Evan G; Wu, Yibo; Jha, Pooja; Dubuis, Sébastien; Blattmann, Peter; Argmann, Carmen A; Houten, Sander M; Amariuta, Tiffany; Wolski, Witold; Zamboni, Nicola; Aebersold, Ruedi; Auwerx, Johan

    2016-06-10

    Recent improvements in quantitative proteomics approaches, including Sequential Window Acquisition of all Theoretical Mass Spectra (SWATH-MS), permit reproducible large-scale protein measurements across diverse cohorts. Together with genomics, transcriptomics, and other technologies, transomic data sets can be generated that permit detailed analyses across broad molecular interaction networks. Here, we examine mitochondrial links to liver metabolism through the genome, transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome of 386 individuals in the BXD mouse reference population. Several links were validated between genetic variants toward transcripts, proteins, metabolites, and phenotypes. Among these, sequence variants in Cox7a2l alter its protein's activity, which in turn leads to downstream differences in mitochondrial supercomplex formation. This data set demonstrates that the proteome can now be quantified comprehensively, serving as a key complement to transcriptomics, genomics, and metabolomics--a combination moving us forward in complex trait analysis. PMID:27284200

  15. Systems proteomics of liver mitochondria function.

    PubMed

    Williams, Evan G; Wu, Yibo; Jha, Pooja; Dubuis, Sébastien; Blattmann, Peter; Argmann, Carmen A; Houten, Sander M; Amariuta, Tiffany; Wolski, Witold; Zamboni, Nicola; Aebersold, Ruedi; Auwerx, Johan

    2016-06-10

    Recent improvements in quantitative proteomics approaches, including Sequential Window Acquisition of all Theoretical Mass Spectra (SWATH-MS), permit reproducible large-scale protein measurements across diverse cohorts. Together with genomics, transcriptomics, and other technologies, transomic data sets can be generated that permit detailed analyses across broad molecular interaction networks. Here, we examine mitochondrial links to liver metabolism through the genome, transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome of 386 individuals in the BXD mouse reference population. Several links were validated between genetic variants toward transcripts, proteins, metabolites, and phenotypes. Among these, sequence variants in Cox7a2l alter its protein's activity, which in turn leads to downstream differences in mitochondrial supercomplex formation. This data set demonstrates that the proteome can now be quantified comprehensively, serving as a key complement to transcriptomics, genomics, and metabolomics--a combination moving us forward in complex trait analysis.

  16. Proteomics analysis of human nonalcoholic fatty liver.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Suarez, Eva; Mato, Jose M; Elortza, Felix

    2012-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is being increasingly recognized as a major cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality. Given the increasing prevalence of obesity in western countries, NAFLD has become an important public health problem. The principal aim of this study was to find differences in protein expression between patients with NAFLD and healthy controls. Changes in protein expression of liver samples from controls, nonalcoholic steatosis, and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) subjects were analyzed by two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE). With this proteomic technique, hundreds of proteins can be analyzed simultaneously and their relative abundance can be calculated. Proteins showing significant changes (ratio ≥ 1.5, p < 0.05) were identified by MALDI TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. Western blot of tissue homogenates was then used as a complementary method to validate protein expression changes observed by DIGE. With the aim to have a noninvasive approach to detect changes produced in NAFLD-affected liver, validated proteins were further tested in serum samples of different cohorts of patients. Following this approach, we identified two candidate markers CPS1 and GRP78 that were differentially expressed between control, steatosis, and NASH. This proteomics approach demonstrates that DIGE combined with MALDI TOF/TOF and Western blot analysis of tissue and serum samples is a useful approach to identify candidate markers associated with NAFLD.

  17. Proteome analysis of the liver in the Chinese fire-bellied newt Cynops orientalis.

    PubMed

    Zang, X Y; Guo, J L; Geng, X F; Li, P F; Sun, J Y; Wang, Q W; Xu, C S

    2016-01-01

    The Chinese fire-bellied newt, Cynops orientalis, belonging to Amphibia, Caudata, Salamandridae is a species endemic to China. The liver, which is an important digestive gland and the largest amphibian organ, has various functions, including detoxification, glycogen storage, protein synthesis, and hormone production. However, the newt liver has rarely been studied at the molecular level. We performed histomorphology and high-throughput proteomic analysis of the Chinese fire-bellied newt liver, using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining and two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry. The H&E staining showed that the newt liver nuclei are large and round, are located in the lateral cytoplasm, and contain a large quantity of lipid droplets. Melanins were abundantly present throughout the hepatic parenchyma. The proteome analysis showed a total of 545 proteins detected in the newt liver. Furthermore, a gene ontology analysis suggested that these proteins were associated with metabolism, immune response, cellular homeostasis, etc. Among these, proteins with metabolic functions were found to be the most abundant and highly expressed. This supports the role of the liver as the metabolic center. The proteomic results provide new insights into the aspects of the liver proteomes of the Chinese fire-bellied newt. The identification of a more global liver proteome in the newt may provide a basis for characterizing and comparing the liver proteomes from other amphibian species. PMID:27525932

  18. Current advances in proteomic analysis of (fatty) liver.

    PubMed

    Molette, C; Théron, L; Marty-Gasset, N; Fernandez, X; Rémignon, H

    2012-07-19

    In this review, an overview on proteomic studies conducted in livers of farm animals is conducted with a special focus on liver steatosis in waterfowl. Several studies had interest in understanding liver metabolism in dairy cows under various conditions (e.g. fasting) or the evolution of liver proteome during embryonic phases or growing periods in chicken. Those studies provide interesting results leading to a better understanding of the liver metabolism. Liver steatosis development in waterfowl represents a special case and a focus on proteomic studies conducted in these birds will be done. Indeed, recent studies aimed at resolving protein evolution during overfeeding in duck. Proteomic analysis combining two complementary approaches (2-dimensional electrophoresis gels and shot gun strategy) in order to better understand the mechanisms underlying the variability of cooking yield of fatty liver will be presented.

  19. Proteomic Profiling of Mouse Liver following Acute Toxoplasma gondii Infection.

    PubMed

    He, Jun-Jun; Ma, Jun; Elsheikha, Hany M; Song, Hui-Qun; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii remains a global public health problem. However, its pathophysiology is still not-completely understood particularly the impact of infection on host liver metabolism. We performed iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis to evaluate early liver protein responses in BALB/c mice following infection with T. gondii PYS strain (genotype ToxoDB#9) infection. Our data revealed modification of protein expression in key metabolic pathways, as indicated by the upregulation of immune response and downregulation of mitochondrial respiratory chain, and the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and xenobiotics. T. gondii seems to hijack host PPAR signaling pathway to downregulate the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and energy in the liver. The metabolism of over 400 substances was affected by the downregulation of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism. The top 10 transcription factors used by upregulated genes were Stat2, Stat1, Irf2, Irf1, Sp2, Egr1, Stat3, Klf4, Elf1 and Gabpa, while the top 10 transcription factors of downregulated genes were Hnf4A, Ewsr1, Fli1, Hnf4g, Nr2f1, Pparg, Rxra, Hnf1A, Foxa1 and Foxo1. These findings indicate global reprogramming of the metabolism of the mouse liver after acute T. gondii infection. Functional characterization of the altered proteins may enhance understanding of the host responses to T. gondii infection and lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets.

  20. Proteomic Profiling of Mouse Liver following Acute Toxoplasma gondii Infection

    PubMed Central

    He, Jun-Jun; Ma, Jun; Elsheikha, Hany M.; Song, Hui-Qun; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii remains a global public health problem. However, its pathophysiology is still not-completely understood particularly the impact of infection on host liver metabolism. We performed iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis to evaluate early liver protein responses in BALB/c mice following infection with T. gondii PYS strain (genotype ToxoDB#9) infection. Our data revealed modification of protein expression in key metabolic pathways, as indicated by the upregulation of immune response and downregulation of mitochondrial respiratory chain, and the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and xenobiotics. T. gondii seems to hijack host PPAR signaling pathway to downregulate the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and energy in the liver. The metabolism of over 400 substances was affected by the downregulation of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism. The top 10 transcription factors used by upregulated genes were Stat2, Stat1, Irf2, Irf1, Sp2, Egr1, Stat3, Klf4, Elf1 and Gabpa, while the top 10 transcription factors of downregulated genes were Hnf4A, Ewsr1, Fli1, Hnf4g, Nr2f1, Pparg, Rxra, Hnf1A, Foxa1 and Foxo1. These findings indicate global reprogramming of the metabolism of the mouse liver after acute T. gondii infection. Functional characterization of the altered proteins may enhance understanding of the host responses to T. gondii infection and lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets. PMID:27003162

  1. Proteomic analysis of liver in rats chronically exposed to fluoride.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Heloísa Aparecida Barbosa da Silva; Leite, Aline de Lima; Charone, Senda; Lobo, Janete Gualiume Vaz Madureira; Cestari, Tania Mary; Peres-Buzalaf, Camila; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo

    2013-01-01

    Fluoride (F) is a potent anti-cariogenic element, but when ingestion is excessive, systemic toxicity may be observed. This can occur as acute or chronic responses, depending on both the amount of F and the time of exposure. The present study identified the profile of protein expression possibly associated with F-induced chronic hepatotoxicity. Weanling male Wistar rats (three-weeks old) were divided into three groups and treated with drinking water containing 0, 5 or 50 mg/L F for 60 days (n=6/group). At this time point, serum and livers were collected for F analysis, which was done using the ion-sensitive electrode, after hexamethyldisiloxane-facilitated diffusion. Livers were also submitted to histological and proteomic analyses (2D-PAGE followed by LC-MS/MS). Western blotting was done for confirmation of the proteomic data A dose-response was observed in serum F levels. In the livers, F levels were significantly increased in the 50 mg/L F group compared to groups treated with 0 and 5 mg/L F. Liver morphometric analysis did not reveal alterations in the cellular structures and lipid droplets were present in all groups. Proteomic quantitative intensity analysis detected 33, 44, and 29 spots differentially expressed in the comparisons between control vs. 5 mg/L F, control vs. 50 mg/L F, and 5 mg/L vs. 50 mg/L F, respectively. From these, 92 proteins were successfully identified. In addition, 18, 1, and 5 protein spots were shown to be exclusive in control, 5, and 50 mg/L F, respectively. Most of proteins were related to metabolic process and pronounced alterations were seen for the high-F level group. In F-treated rats, changes in the apolipoprotein E (ApoE) and GRP-78 expression may account for the F-induced toxicity in the liver. This can contribute to understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying hepatoxicity induced by F, by indicating key-proteins that should be better addressed in future studies.

  2. Serum proteomics for biomarker discovery in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Yusuf

    2012-08-16

    Proteomic platforms have gained increasing attention in the clinical spectrum of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). This approach allows for the unbiased discovery of circulating biochemical markers, i.e., it is not limited to known molecules of presumed importance. This manuscript provides an overview of proteomic serum biomarker discovery in NAFLD. Hemoglobin is currently the most widely replicated proteomic circulating biomarker of NAFLD; it was identified as a biomarker of fatty liver in two distinct proteomic studies and subsequently validated using distinct analytical methods by independent research groups in large replication cohorts. Given the increasing availability of numerous serum samples and the refinement of the technological platforms available to scrutinize the blood proteome, large collaborative studies between academia and industry are warmly encouraged to identify novel, unbiased circulating biomarkers of NAFLD.

  3. Toxicogenomic analysis of N-nitrosomorpholine induced changes in rat liver: comparison of genomic and proteomic responses and anchoring to histopathological parameters.

    PubMed

    Oberemm, A; Ahr, H-J; Bannasch, P; Ellinger-Ziegelbauer, H; Glückmann, M; Hellmann, J; Ittrich, C; Kopp-Schneider, A; Kramer, P-J; Krause, E; Kröger, M; Kiss, E; Richter-Reichhelm, H-B; Scholz, G; Seemann, K; Weimer, M; Gundert-Remy, U

    2009-12-01

    A common animal model of chemical hepatocarcinogenesis was used to examine the utility of transcriptomic and proteomic data to identify early biomarkers related to chemically induced carcinogenesis. N-nitrosomorpholine, a frequently used genotoxic model carcinogen, was applied via drinking water at 120 mg/L to male Wistar rats for 7 weeks followed by an exposure-free period of 43 weeks. Seven specimens of each treatment group (untreated control and 120 mg/L N-nitrosomorpholine in drinking water) were sacrificed at nine time points during and after N-nitrosomorpholine treatment. Individual samples from the liver were prepared for histological and toxicogenomic analyses. For histological detection of preneoplastic and neoplastic tissue areas, sections were stained using antibodies against the placental form of glutathione-S-transferase (GST-P). Gene and protein expression profiles of liver tissue homogenates were analyzed using RG-U34A Affymetrix rat gene chips and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis-based proteomics, respectively. In order to compare results obtained by histopathology, transcriptomics and proteomics, GST-P-stained liver sections were evaluated morphometrically, which revealed a parallel time course of the area fraction of preneoplastic lesions and gene plus protein expression patterns. On the transcriptional level, an increase of hepatic GST-P expression was detectable as early as 3 weeks after study onset. Comparing deregulated genes and proteins, eight species were identified which showed a corresponding expression profile on both expression levels. Functional analysis suggests that these genes and corresponding proteins may be useful as biomarkers of early hepatocarcinogenesis.

  4. Toxicogenomic analysis of N-nitrosomorpholine induced changes in rat liver: Comparison of genomic and proteomic responses and anchoring to histopathological parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Oberemm, A.; Ahr, H.-J.; Bannasch, P.; Ellinger-Ziegelbauer, H.; Glueckmann, M.; Hellmann, J.; Ittrich, C.; Kopp-Schneider, A.; Kramer, P.-J.; Krause, E.; Kroeger, M.; Kiss, E.; Richter-Reichhelm, H.-B.; Scholz, G.; Seemann, K.; Weimer, M.; Gundert-Remy, U.

    2009-12-01

    A common animal model of chemical hepatocarcinogenesis was used to examine the utility of transcriptomic and proteomic data to identify early biomarkers related to chemically induced carcinogenesis. N-nitrosomorpholine, a frequently used genotoxic model carcinogen, was applied via drinking water at 120 mg/L to male Wistar rats for 7 weeks followed by an exposure-free period of 43 weeks. Seven specimens of each treatment group (untreated control and 120 mg/L N-nitrosomorpholine in drinking water) were sacrificed at nine time points during and after N-nitrosomorpholine treatment. Individual samples from the liver were prepared for histological and toxicogenomic analyses. For histological detection of preneoplastic and neoplastic tissue areas, sections were stained using antibodies against the placental form of glutathione-S-transferase (GST-P). Gene and protein expression profiles of liver tissue homogenates were analyzed using RG-U34A Affymetrix rat gene chips and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis-based proteomics, respectively. In order to compare results obtained by histopathology, transcriptomics and proteomics, GST-P-stained liver sections were evaluated morphometrically, which revealed a parallel time course of the area fraction of preneoplastic lesions and gene plus protein expression patterns. On the transcriptional level, an increase of hepatic GST-P expression was detectable as early as 3 weeks after study onset. Comparing deregulated genes and proteins, eight species were identified which showed a corresponding expression profile on both expression levels. Functional analysis suggests that these genes and corresponding proteins may be useful as biomarkers of early hepatocarcinogenesis.

  5. Proteomics in the liver of gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) to elucidate the cellular response induced by the intake of maslinic acid.

    PubMed

    Rufino-Palomares, Eva; Reyes-Zurita, Fernando J; Fuentes-Almagro, Carlos A; de la Higuera, Manuel; Lupiáñez, José A; Peragón, Juan

    2011-08-01

    Maslinic acid (MA) is a pentacyclic triterpene used as a feed additive to stimulate growth, protein-turnover rates, and hyperplasia in fish. To further our understanding of cellular mechanisms underlying the action of MA, we have used 2-DE coupled with MS to identify proteins differentially expressed in the livers of juvenile gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) grown under fish-farm conditions and fed with a 100 mg/kg MA-enriched diet (MA(100)). After the comparison of the protein profiles from MA(100) fed fish and from control, 49 protein spots were found to be altered in abundance (≥2-fold). Analysis by MALDI-TOF/TOF allowed the unambiguous identification of 29 spots, corresponding to 19 different proteins. These proteins were: phosphoglucomutase, phosphoglucose isomerase, S-adenosyl methionine-dependent methyltransferase class I, aldehyde dehydrogenase, catalase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase, 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvic dioxygenase, methylmalonate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, lysozyme, urate oxidase, elongation factor 2, 60 kDa heat-shock protein, 58 kDa glucose-regulated protein, cytokeratin E7, type-II keratin, intermediate filament proteins, 17-β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 4, and kinase suppressor of Ras1. Western blot analysis of kinase suppressor of Ras1, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, elongation factor 2, 60 kDa heat-shock protein, and catalase supported the proteome evidence. Based on the changes found in the protein-expression levels of these proteins, we proposed a cellular-signalling pathway to explain the hepatic-cell response to the intake of a diet containing MA.

  6. Quantitative proteomic comparison of mouse peroxisomes from liver and kidney.

    PubMed

    Mi, Jia; Kirchner, Eva; Cristobal, Susana

    2007-06-01

    The peroxisome plays a central role in the catabolic and anabolic pathways that contribute to the lipid homeostasis. Besides this main function, this organelle has gained functional diversity. Although several approaches have been used for peroxisomal proteome analysis, a quantitative protein expression analysis of peroxisomes from different tissues has not been elucidated yet. Here, we applied a 2-DE-based method on mouse liver and kidney peroxisomal enriched fractions to study the tissue-dependent protein expression. Ninety-one spots were identified from the 2-DE maps from pH 3.0-10.0 and 51 spots from the basic range corresponding to 31 peroxisomal proteins, 10 putative peroxisomal, 6 cytosolic, 17 mitochondrial and 1 protein from endoplasmic reticulum. Based on the identification and on the equivalent quality of both tissue preparations, the differences emerging from the comparison could be quantified. In liver, proteins involved in pathways such as alpha- and beta-oxidation, isoprenoid biosynthesis, amino acid metabolism and purine and pyrimidine metabolism were more abundant whereas in kidney, proteins from the straight-chain fatty acid beta-oxidation were highly expressed. These results indicate that tissue-specific functional classes of peroxisomal proteins could be relevant to study peroxisomal cellular responses or pathologies. Finally, a web-based peroxisomal proteomic database was built.

  7. Cell-type-resolved quantitative proteomics of murine liver.

    PubMed

    Azimifar, S Babak; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Cox, Juergen; Mann, Matthias

    2014-12-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics provides a powerful approach to globally investigate the biological function of individual cell types in mammalian organs. Here, we applied this technology to the in-depth analysis of purified hepatic cell types from mouse. We quantified 11,520 proteins, making this the most comprehensive proteomic resource of any organ to date. Global protein copy number determination demonstrated that a large proportion of the hepatocyte proteome is dedicated to fatty acid and xenobiotic metabolism. We identified as-yet-unknown components of the TGF-β signaling pathway and extracellular matrix in hepatic stellate cells, uncovering their regulative role in liver physiology. Moreover, our high-resolution proteomic data set enabled us to compare the distinct functional roles of hepatic cell types in cholesterol flux, cellular trafficking, and growth factor receptor signaling. This study provides a comprehensive resource for liver biology and biomedicine.

  8. Quantitative proteomic survey of endoplasmic reticulum in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Song, Yanping; Jiang, Ying; Ying, Wantao; Gong, Yan; Yan, Yujuan; Yang, Dong; Ma, Jie; Xue, Xiaofang; Zhong, Fan; Wu, Songfeng; Hao, Yunwei; Sun, Aihua; Li, Tao; Sun, Wei; Wei, Handong; Zhu, Yunping; Qian, Xiaohong; He, Fuchu

    2010-03-01

    To gain a better understanding of the critical function of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in liver, we carried out a proteomic survey of mouse liver ER. The ER proteome was profiled with a new three-dimensional, gel-based strategy. From 6152 and 6935 MS spectra, 903 and 1042 proteins were identified with at least two peptides matches at 95% confidence in the rough (r) and smooth (s) ER, respectively. Comparison of the rER and sER proteomes showed that calcium-binding proteins are significantly enriched in the sER suggesting that the ion-binding function of the ER is compartmentalized. Comparison of the rat and mouse ER proteomes showed that 662 proteins were common to both, comprising 53.5% and 49.3% of those proteomes, respectively. We proposed that these proteins were stably expressed proteins that were essential for the maintenance of ER function. GO annotation with a hypergeometric model proved this hypothesis. Unexpectedly, 210 unknown proteins and some proteins previously reported to occur in the cytosol were highly enriched in the ER. This study provides a reference map for the ER proteome of liver. Identification of new ER proteins will enhance our current understanding of the ER and also suggest new functions for this organelle.

  9. HepatoProteomics: Applying Proteomic Technologies to the Study of Liver Function and Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, Deborah L.; Proll, Sean; Jacobs, Jon M.; Chan, Eric Y.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Katze, Michael G.

    2006-08-01

    The wealth of human genome sequence information now available, coupled with technological advances in robotics, nanotechnology, mass spectrometry, and information systems, has given rise to a method of scientific inquiry known as functional genomics. By using these technologies to survey gene expression and protein production on a near global scale, the goal of functional genomics is to assign biological function to genes with currently unknown roles in physiology. This approach carries particular appeal in disease research, where it can uncover the function of previously unknown genes and molecular pathways that are directly involved in disease progression. With this knowledge may come improved diagnostic techniques, prognostic capabilities, and novel therapeutic approaches. In this regard, the continuing evolution of proteomic technologies has resulted in an increasingly greater impact of proteome studies in many areas of research and hepatology is no exception. Our laboratory has been extremely active in this area, applying both genomic and proteomic technologies to the analysis of virus-host interactions in several systems, including the study of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and HCV-associated liver disease. Since proteomic technologies are foreign to many hepatologists (and to almost everyone else), this article will provide an overview of proteomic methods and technologies and describe how they're being used to study liver function and disease. We use our studies of HCV infection and HCV-associated liver disease to present an operational framework for performing high throughput proteome analysis and extracting biologically meaningful information.

  10. Proteomic profiles of mesenchymal stem cells induced by a liver differentiation protocol.

    PubMed

    Leelawat, Kawin; Narong, Siriluck; Chaijan, Suthidarak; Sa-Ngiamsuntorn, Khanit; Disthabanchong, Sinee; Wongkajornsilp, Adisak; Hongeng, Suradej

    2010-01-01

    The replacement of disease hepatocytes and the stimulation of endogenous or exogenous regeneration by human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are promising candidates for liver-directed cell therapy. In this study, we isolated MSCs from adult bone marrow by plastic adhesion and induced differentiation with a liver differentiation protocol. Western blot analyses were used to assess the expression of liver-specific markers. Next, MSC-specific proteins were analyzed with two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis and peptide mass fingerprinting matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-time of flight (TOF)-mass spectrometry (MS). To confirm the results from the proteomic study, semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyses were performed. We demonstrated that MSCs treated with the liver differentiation protocol expressed significantly more albumin, CK19 and CK20, than did undifferentiated cells. In addition the results of proteomic study demonstrated increases expression of FEM1B, PSMC2 and disulfide-isomerase A3 in MSCs treated with the liver differentiation protocol. These results from proteomic profiling will not only provide insight into the global responses of MSCs to hepatocyte differentiation, but will also lead to in-depth studies on the mechanisms of proteomic changes in MSCs.

  11. Rapid development of proteomics in China: from the perspective of the Human Liver Proteome Project and technology development.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Xu, ZhongWei; Zhai, LinHui; Li, YanChang; Fan, FengXu; Zheng, JunJie; Xu, Ping; He, FuChu

    2014-12-01

    Proteomics focuses on the systematic identification and quantification of entire proteomes and interpretation of proteins' biological functions. During the last decade, proteomics in China has grown much faster than other research fields in the life sciences. At the beginning of the second decade of the 21(st) century, the rapid development of high-resolution and high-speed mass spectrometry makes proteomics a powerful tool to study the mechanisms underlying physiological/pathological processes in organisms. This article provides a brief overview of proteomics technology development and representative scientific progress of the Human Liver Proteome Project (HLPP) in China over the past three years.

  12. Proteomic Profiling of Human Liver Biopsies: Hepatitis C Virus-Induced Fibrosis and Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, Deborah L.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Paeper, Bryan; Proll, Sean; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Carithers, Jr., Robert L.; Larson , Anne M.; Yeh, Matthew M.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Katze, Michael G.

    2007-09-01

    Liver biopsies from HCV-infected patients offer the unique opportunity to study human liver biology and disease in vivo. However, the low protein yields associated with these small samples present a significant challenge for proteomic analysis. In this study we describe the application of an ultra-sensitive proteomics platform for performing robust quantitative proteomic studies on microgram amounts of HCV-infected human liver tissue from 15 patients at different stages of fibrosis. A high quality liver protein data base containing 5,920 unique protein identifications supported high throughput quantitative studies using 16O:18O stable isotope labeling in combination with the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag approach. A total of 1,641 liver biopsy proteins were quantified and ANOVA identified 210 proteins exhibiting statistically significant differences associated with fibrosis stage. Hierarchical clustering revealed that biopsies representative of later fibrosis stages (e.g. Batts-Ludwig stages 3-4) exhibited a distinct protein expression profile indicating an apparent down-regulation of many proteins when compared to samples from earlier fibrosis stages (e.g. Batts-Ludwig stages 0-2). Functional analysis of these signature proteins suggests that impairment of key mitochondrial processes including fatty acid oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation, and response to oxidative stress and reactive oxygen species occurs during advanced stage 3-4 fibrosis. In conclusion, the results reported here represent a significant advancement in clinical proteomics providing to our knowledge, the first demonstration of global proteomic alterations accompanying liver disease progression in patients chronically infected with HCV. Our findings contribute to a generally emerging theme associating oxidative stress and hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction with HCV pathogenesis.

  13. Comprehensive proteomics analysis of autophagy-deficient mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Naomi; Ezaki, Junji; Komatsu, Masaaki; Takahashi, Katsuyuki; Mineki, Reiko; Taka, Hikari; Kikkawa, Mika; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Takeda-Ezaki, Mitsue; Ueno, Takashi; Tanaka, Keiji; Kominami, Eiki

    2008-04-11

    Autophagy is a bulk protein degradation system for the entire organelles and cytoplasmic proteins. Previously, we have shown the liver dysfunction by autophagy deficiency. To examine the pathological effect of autophagy deficiency, we examined protein composition and their levels in autophagy-deficient liver by the proteomic analysis. While impaired autophagy led to an increase in total protein mass, the protein composition was largely unchanged, consistent with non-selective proteins/organelles degradation of autophagy. However, a series of oxidative stress-inducible proteins, including glutathione S-transferase families, protein disulfide isomerase and glucose-regulated proteins were specifically increased in autophagy-deficient liver, probably due to enhanced gene expression, which is induced by accumulation of Nrf2 in the nuclei of mutant hepatocytes. Our results suggest that autophagy deficiency causes oxidative stress, and such stress might be the main cause of liver injury in autophagy-deficient liver.

  14. Proteomic analysis of mouse liver for the evaluation of effects of Scutellariae radix by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ong, Eng Shi; Len, Shea Mei; Lee, Audrey Chee Huay; Chui, Paul; Chooi, Kum Fai

    2004-01-01

    Scutellariae radix or Scutellaria baicalensis is a medicinal plant that contains major flavonoids such as baicalein, baicalin, wogonin and wogonosides. The present work describes the development of an approach using proteomic analysis of mouse liver to study the effects of prolonged exposure to substances present in chemically standardized Scutellariae radix extracts. Histopathological examination of the mouse liver was compared with the proteome data. The botanical extracts were prepared using pressurized liquid extraction (PLE). A method without isotope labeling was developed, using proteolytic digestion with one- and two-dimensional liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry, and was used to characterize the extent of differential protein expression in mouse liver in response to external factors such as extracts from Scutellariae radix. From the histopathological examination and proteome data, significant changes in the mouse livers were not observed for the low-dose group. The Scutellariae radix extracts at high dose were observed to cause damage at the bile duct and expression change of a number of proteins including some involved in catabolism of triglyceride-rich particles, carbohydrate metabolism, regulators of cell signaling processes, and enzymes involved in biotransformation. Thus, proteomic analysis of liver samples from mice treated with botanical extracts is a promising approach to provide information on any potential toxicity effects of the extracts. The present method also provides another means for comparing proteomes in biological samples such as liver lysates from mice subjected to different treatments.

  15. Proteome analysis of a hepatocyte-specific BIRC5 (survivin)-knockout mouse model during liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bracht, Thilo; Hagemann, Sascha; Loscha, Marius; Megger, Dominik A; Padden, Juliet; Eisenacher, Martin; Kuhlmann, Katja; Meyer, Helmut E; Baba, Hideo A; Sitek, Barbara

    2014-06-01

    The Baculoviral IAP repeat-containing protein 5 (BIRC5), also known as inhibitor of apoptosis protein survivin, is a member of the chromosomal passenger complex and a key player in mitosis. To investigate the function of BIRC5 in liver regeneration, we analyzed a hepatocyte-specific BIRC5-knockout mouse model using a quantitative label-free proteomics approach. Here, we present the analyses of the proteome changes in hepatocyte-specific BIRC5-knockout mice compared to wildtype mice, as well as proteome changes during liver regeneration induced by partial hepatectomy in wildtype mice and mice lacking hepatic BIRC5, respectively. The BIRC5-knockout mice showed an extensive overexpression of proteins related to cellular maintenance, organization and protein synthesis. Key regulators of cell growth, transcription and translation MTOR and STAT1/STAT2 were found to be overexpressed. During liver regeneration proteome changes representing a response to the mitotic stimulus were detected in wildtype mice. Mainly proteins corresponding to proliferation, cell cycle and cytokinesis were up-regulated. The hepatocyte-specific BIRC5-knockout mice showed impaired liver regeneration, which had severe consequences on the proteome level. However, several proteins with function in mitosis were found to be up-regulated upon the proliferative stimulus. Our results show that the E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase UHRF1 is strongly up-regulated during liver regeneration independently of BIRC5.

  16. Purification and proteomic analysis of liver membrane skeletons.

    PubMed

    He, Jintang; Liu, Yashu; Wang, Qingsong; Ji, Jianguo

    2012-01-01

    The detergent-resistant membrane skeletons play a critical role in cell shaping and signaling. The focus of the methods described in this chapter is first on the preparation of membrane skeletons from liver by multistep sucrose density gradient centrifugation, and then on the analysis of the protein components of membrane skeletons using proteomics techniques. Two proteomic analysis strategies are described. In the first strategy, membrane skeleton proteins are separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry. In the other strategy, proteins are separated by SDS-PAGE and identified by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The methods facilitate the understanding of the structure of membrane skeletons.

  17. Phenobarbital Induces Alterations in the Proteome of Hepatocytes and Mesenchymal Cells of Rat Livers

    PubMed Central

    Klepeisz, Philip; Sagmeister, Sandra; Haudek-Prinz, Verena; Pichlbauer, Melanie; Grasl-Kraupp, Bettina; Gerner, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Preceding studies on the mode of action of non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogens (NGCs) have concentrated on alterations induced in hepatocytes (HCs). A potential role of non-parenchymal liver cells (NPCs) in NGC-driven hepatocarcinogenesis has been largely neglected so far. The aim of this study is to characterize NGC-induced alterations in the proteome profiles of HCs as well as NPCs. We chose the prototypic NGC phenobarbital (PB) which was applied to male rats for a period of 14 days. The livers of PB-treated rats were perfused by collagenase and the cell suspensions obtained were subjected to density gradient centrifugation to separate HCs from NPCs. In addition, HCs and NPC isolated from untreated animals were treated with PB in vitro. Proteome profiling was done by CHIP-HPLC and ion trap mass spectrometry. Proteome analyses of the in vivo experiments showed many of the PB effects previously described in HCs by other methods, e.g. induction of phase I and phase II drug metabolising enzymes. In NPCs proteins related to inflammation and immune regulation such as PAI-1 and S100-A10, ADP-ribosyl cyclase 1 and to cell migration such as kinesin-1 heavy chain, myosin regulatory light chain RLC-A and dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 1 were found to be induced, indicating major PB effects on these cells. Remarkably, in vitro treatment of HCs and NPCs with PB hardly reproduced the proteome alterations observed in vivo, indicating differences of NGC induced responses of cells at culture conditions compared to the intact organism. To conclude, the present study clearly demonstrated that PB induces proteome alterations not only in HCs but also in NPCs. Thus, any profound molecular understanding on the mode of action of NGCs has to consider effects on cells of the hepatic mesenchyme. PMID:24204595

  18. Phenobarbital induces alterations in the proteome of hepatocytes and mesenchymal cells of rat livers.

    PubMed

    Klepeisz, Philip; Sagmeister, Sandra; Haudek-Prinz, Verena; Pichlbauer, Melanie; Grasl-Kraupp, Bettina; Gerner, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Preceding studies on the mode of action of non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogens (NGCs) have concentrated on alterations induced in hepatocytes (HCs). A potential role of non-parenchymal liver cells (NPCs) in NGC-driven hepatocarcinogenesis has been largely neglected so far. The aim of this study is to characterize NGC-induced alterations in the proteome profiles of HCs as well as NPCs. We chose the prototypic NGC phenobarbital (PB) which was applied to male rats for a period of 14 days. The livers of PB-treated rats were perfused by collagenase and the cell suspensions obtained were subjected to density gradient centrifugation to separate HCs from NPCs. In addition, HCs and NPC isolated from untreated animals were treated with PB in vitro. Proteome profiling was done by CHIP-HPLC and ion trap mass spectrometry. Proteome analyses of the in vivo experiments showed many of the PB effects previously described in HCs by other methods, e.g. induction of phase I and phase II drug metabolising enzymes. In NPCs proteins related to inflammation and immune regulation such as PAI-1 and S100-A10, ADP-ribosyl cyclase 1 and to cell migration such as kinesin-1 heavy chain, myosin regulatory light chain RLC-A and dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 1 were found to be induced, indicating major PB effects on these cells. Remarkably, in vitro treatment of HCs and NPCs with PB hardly reproduced the proteome alterations observed in vivo, indicating differences of NGC induced responses of cells at culture conditions compared to the intact organism. To conclude, the present study clearly demonstrated that PB induces proteome alterations not only in HCs but also in NPCs. Thus, any profound molecular understanding on the mode of action of NGCs has to consider effects on cells of the hepatic mesenchyme.

  19. Isolation, Proteomic Analysis, and Microscopy Confirmation of the Liver Nuclear Envelope Proteome.

    PubMed

    Korfali, Nadia; Florens, Laurence; Schirmer, Eric C

    2016-01-01

    Nuclei can be relatively easily extracted from homogenized liver due to the softness of the tissue and crudely separated from other cellular organelles by low-speed centrifugation due to the comparatively large size of nuclei. However, further purification is complicated by nuclear envelope continuity with the endoplasmic reticulum, invaginations containing mitochondria, and connections to the cytoskeleton. Subsequent purification to nuclear envelopes is additionally confounded by connections of inner nuclear membrane proteins to chromatin. For these reasons, it is necessary to confirm proteomic identification of nuclear envelope proteins by testing targeting of individual proteins. The proteomic identification of nuclear envelope fractions is affected by the tendencies of transmembrane proteins to have extreme isoelectric points, strongly hydrophobic peptides, posttranslational modifications, and a propensity to aggregate, thus making proteolysis inefficient. To circumvent these problems, we have developed a MudPIT approach that uses multiple extractions and sequential proteolysis to increase identifications. Here we describe methods for isolating nuclear envelopes, determining their proteome by MudPIT, and confirming their targeting to the nuclear periphery by microscopy.

  20. Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) induced changes in the liver proteome of eu- and hypothyroid female rats.

    PubMed

    Miller, I; Serchi, T; Cambier, S; Diepenbroek, C; Renaut, J; Van der Berg, J H J; Kwadijk, C; Gutleb, A C; Rijntjes, E; Murk, A J

    2016-03-14

    Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is a brominated flame retardant known for its low acute toxicity as observed in animal experiments. However, HBCD exposure can affect liver functioning and thyroid hormone (TH) status. As exact mechanisms are unknown and only limited toxicological data exists, a gel-based proteomic approach was undertaken. In a eu- and hypothyroid female rat model, rats were exposed to 3 and 30 mg/kg bw/day HBCD for 7 days via their diet, and exposure was related to a range of canonical endpoints (hormone status, body weight) available for these animals. Alterations in the liver proteome under HBCD exposure were determined in comparison with patterns of control animals, for both thyroid states. This revealed significantly changed abundance of proteins involved in metabolic processes (gluconeogenesis/glycolysis, amino acid metabolism, lipid metabolism), but also in oxidative stress responses, in both euthyroid and hypothyroid rats. The results provide a more detailed picture on the mechanisms involved in these alterations, e.g. at the protein level changes of the proposed influence of HBCD on the lipid metabolism. Present results show that proteomic approaches can provide further mechanistic insights in toxicological studies. PMID:26795019

  1. The Human Liver Proteome Project (HLPP) Workshop August 2008, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Beretta, Laura

    2015-01-01

    An HLPP workshop was held in conjunction with the 7th HUPO 2008 World Congress in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. The workshop was chaired by Laura Beretta (Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (FHCRC)) and Xiaohong Qian (Beijing Proteome Research Center (BPRC)). The workshop was organized in three sessions: Session 1: The Human Proteome Project: the liver perspective, moderated by John Bergeron (McGill University); Session 2: The comparative analysis of the liver and plasma proteomes, moderated by Young-Ki Paik (Yonsei University) and Session 3: Opportunities for the study of liver diseases within the HLPP, moderated by Chantal Housset (INSERM, France). PMID:19862759

  2. Proteomic and bioinformatic analysis of membrane proteome in type 2 diabetic mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gun-Hwa; Park, Edmond Changkyun; Yun, Sung-Ho; Hong, Yeonhee; Lee, Dong-Gyu; Shin, Eun-Young; Jung, Jongsun; Kim, Young Hwan; Lee, Kyung-Bok; Jang, Ik-Soon; Lee, Zee-Won; Chung, Young-Ho; Choi, Jong-Soon; Cheong, Chaejoon; Kim, Soohyun; Kim, Seung Il

    2013-04-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is the most prevalent and serious metabolic disease affecting people worldwide. T2DM results from insulin resistance of the liver, muscle, and adipose tissue. In this study, we used proteomic and bioinformatic methodologies to identify novel hepatic membrane proteins that are related to the development of hepatic insulin resistance, steatosis, and T2DM. Using FT-ICR MS, we identified 95 significantly differentially expressed proteins in the membrane fraction of normal and T2DM db/db mouse liver. These proteins are primarily involved in energy metabolism pathways, molecular transport, and cellular signaling, and many of them have not previously been reported in diabetic studies. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that 16 proteins may be related to the regulation of insulin signaling in the liver. In addition, six proteins are associated with energy stress-induced, nine proteins with inflammatory stress-induced, and 14 proteins with endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced hepatic insulin resistance. Moreover, we identified 19 proteins that may regulate hepatic insulin resistance in a c-Jun amino-terminal kinase-dependent manner. In addition, three proteins, 14-3-3 protein beta (YWHAB), Slc2a4 (GLUT4), and Dlg4 (PSD-95), are discovered by comprehensive bioinformatic analysis, which have correlations with several proteins identified by proteomics approach. The newly identified proteins in T2DM should provide additional insight into the development and pathophysiology of hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance, and they may serve as useful diagnostic markers and/or therapeutic targets for these diseases.

  3. The proteome of methylmalonic acidemia (MMA): the elucidation of altered pathways in patient livers.

    PubMed

    Caterino, Marianna; Chandler, Randy J; Sloan, Jennifer L; Dorko, Kenneth; Cusmano-Ozog, Kristina; Ingenito, Laura; Strom, Stephen C; Imperlini, Esther; Scolamiero, Emanuela; Venditti, Charles P; Ruoppolo, Margherita

    2016-02-01

    Methylmalonic acidemia (MMA) is a heterogeneous and severe autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism most commonly caused by the deficient activity of the vitamin B12 dependent enzyme, methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MUT). The main treatment for MMA patients is the dietary restriction of propiogenic amino acids and carnitine supplementation. Despite treatment, the prognosis for vitamin B12 non-responsive patients remains poor and is associated with neonatal lethality, persistent morbidity and decreased life expectancy. While multi-organ pathology is a feature of MMA, the liver is severely impacted by mitochondrial dysfunction which likely underlies the metabolic instability experienced by the patients. Liver and/or combined liver/kidney transplantation is therefore sometimes performed in severely affected patients. Using liver specimens from donors and MMA patients undergoing elective liver transplantation collected under a dedicated natural history protocol (clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00078078), we employed proteomics to characterize the liver pathology and impaired hepatic metabolism observed in the patients. Pathway analysis revealed perturbations of enzymes involved in energy metabolism, gluconeogenesis and Krebs cycle anaplerosis. Our findings identify new pathophysiologic and therapeutic targets that could be valuable for designing alternative therapies to alleviate clinical manifestations seen in this disorder. PMID:26672496

  4. In-depth proteomic characterization of endogenous nuclear receptors in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiongming; Ding, Chen; Liu, Wanlin; Song, Lei; Liu, Mingwei; Qi, Liang; Fu, Tianyi; Malovannaya, Anna; Wang, Yi; Qin, Jun; Zhen, Bei

    2013-02-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are a superfamily of transcription factors that, upon binding to ligands, bind specific DNA sequences and regulate a transcriptional program governing cell proliferation, differentiation, and metabolism. In the liver, by sensing lipid-soluble hormones and dietary lipids and governing the expression of key liver metabolic genes, NR proteins direct a large array of key hepatic functions that include lipid and glucose metabolism, bile secretion, and bile acid homeostasis. Although much has been learned about the physiology of NRs, little is known about their protein expression and DNA binding activity in the liver because of their low abundance and the lack of high-throughput methods for detection at the protein level. Here we report a method for profiling the DNA binding activity of the NR transcription factor superfamily in mouse liver. We use DNA constructs of hormone response elements (HREs) as affinity reagents to enrich NR proteins from nuclear extracts of mouse liver and then identify them using mass spectrometry. We evaluated 20 DNA constructs containing various combinations of HREs for their ability to enrich endogenous NR proteins and found that two different HREs are sufficient to achieve isolation and identification of nearly all endogenous NR proteins from one mouse liver. We have detected proteins for 35 members of the NR family out of 41 that are expressed in mouse liver at mRNA level. Thus, this method allows coverage of most of the whole NR proteome and establishes a practical assay for the investigation of NR actions in mouse liver. We anticipate that this method will find widespread use in future investigations of NR actions in liver biology and pathology. Furthermore, this workflow is a useful tool for NR biologists interested in measuring NR expression, DNA binding, post-translational modifications, cellular localization, and other functional aspects of NRs in organs under normal physiological and pathological conditions

  5. High glucose-induced proteome alterations in hepatocytes and its possible relevance to diabetic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing-Yi; Chou, Hsiu-Chuan; Chen, You-Hsuan; Chan, Hong-Lin

    2013-11-01

    Hyperglycemia can cause several abnormalities in liver cells, including diabetic liver disease. Previous research has shown that high blood glucose levels can damage liver cells through glycoxidation. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of high blood glucose on the development of diabetic liver disease have yet to be elucidated. In this study, we cultured a liver cell line (Chang liver cell) in mannitol-balanced 5.5 mM, 25 mM and 100 mM d-glucose media and evaluated protein expression and redox regulation. We identified 141 proteins that showed significant changes in protein expression and 29 proteins that showed significant changes in thiol reactivity, in response to high glucose concentration. Several proteins involved in transcription-control, signal transduction, redox regulation and cytoskeleton regulation showed significant changes in expression, whereas proteins involved in protein folding and gene regulation displayed changes in thiol reactivity. Further analyses of clinical plasma specimens confirmed that the proteins AKAP8L, galectin-3, PGK 1, syntenin-1, Abin 2, aldose reductase, CD63, GRP-78, GST-pi, RXR-gamma, TPI and vimentin showed type 2 diabetic liver disease-dependent alterations. In summary, in this study we used a comprehensive hepatocyte-based proteomic approach to identify changes in protein expression and to identify redox-associated diabetic liver disease markers induced by high glucose concentration. Some of the identified proteins were validated with clinical samples and are presented as potential targets for the prognosis and diagnosis of diabetic liver disease.

  6. Preliminary Validation of a High Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) and -Linolenic Acid (ALA) Dietary Oil Blend: Tissue Fatty Acid Composition and Liver Proteome Response in Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar) Smolts

    PubMed Central

    Nuez-Ortín, Waldo G.; Carter, Chris G.; Wilson, Richard; Cooke, Ira; Nichols, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Marine oils are important to human nutrition as the major source of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a key omega-3 long-chain (≥C20) polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 LC-PUFA) that is low or lacking in terrestrial plant or animal oils. The inclusion of fish oil as main source of n-3 LC-PUFA in aquafeeds is mostly limited by the increasing price and decreasing availability. Fish oil replacement with cheaper terrestrial plant and animal oils has considerably reduced the content of n-3 LC-PUFA in flesh of farmed Atlantic salmon. Novel DHA-enriched oils with high alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) content will be available from transgenic oilseeds plants in the near future as an alternative for dietary fish oil replacement in aquafeeds. As a preliminary validation, we formulated an oil blend (TOFX) with high DHA and ALA content using tuna oil (TO) high in DHA and the flaxseed oil (FX) high in ALA, and assessed its ability to achieve fish oil-like n-3 LC-PUFA tissue composition in Atlantic salmon smolts. We applied proteomics as an exploratory approach to understand the effects of nutritional changes on the fish liver. Comparisons were made between fish fed a fish oil-based diet (FO) and a commercial-like oil blend diet (fish oil + poultry oil, FOPO) over 89 days. Growth and feed efficiency ratio were lower on the TOFX diet. Fish muscle concentration of n-3 LC-PUFA was significantly higher for TOFX than for FOPO fish, but not higher than for FO fish, while retention efficiency of n-3 LC-PUFA was promoted by TOFX relative to FO. Proteomics analysis revealed an oxidative stress response indicative of the main adaptive physiological mechanism in TOFX fish. While specific dietary fatty acid concentrations and balances and antioxidant supplementation may need further attention, the use of an oil with a high content of DHA and ALA can enhance tissue deposition of n-3 LC-PUFA in relation to a commercially used oil blend. PMID:27556399

  7. Preliminary Validation of a High Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) and -Linolenic Acid (ALA) Dietary Oil Blend: Tissue Fatty Acid Composition and Liver Proteome Response in Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar) Smolts.

    PubMed

    Nuez-Ortín, Waldo G; Carter, Chris G; Wilson, Richard; Cooke, Ira; Nichols, Peter D

    2016-01-01

    Marine oils are important to human nutrition as the major source of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a key omega-3 long-chain (≥C20) polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 LC-PUFA) that is low or lacking in terrestrial plant or animal oils. The inclusion of fish oil as main source of n-3 LC-PUFA in aquafeeds is mostly limited by the increasing price and decreasing availability. Fish oil replacement with cheaper terrestrial plant and animal oils has considerably reduced the content of n-3 LC-PUFA in flesh of farmed Atlantic salmon. Novel DHA-enriched oils with high alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) content will be available from transgenic oilseeds plants in the near future as an alternative for dietary fish oil replacement in aquafeeds. As a preliminary validation, we formulated an oil blend (TOFX) with high DHA and ALA content using tuna oil (TO) high in DHA and the flaxseed oil (FX) high in ALA, and assessed its ability to achieve fish oil-like n-3 LC-PUFA tissue composition in Atlantic salmon smolts. We applied proteomics as an exploratory approach to understand the effects of nutritional changes on the fish liver. Comparisons were made between fish fed a fish oil-based diet (FO) and a commercial-like oil blend diet (fish oil + poultry oil, FOPO) over 89 days. Growth and feed efficiency ratio were lower on the TOFX diet. Fish muscle concentration of n-3 LC-PUFA was significantly higher for TOFX than for FOPO fish, but not higher than for FO fish, while retention efficiency of n-3 LC-PUFA was promoted by TOFX relative to FO. Proteomics analysis revealed an oxidative stress response indicative of the main adaptive physiological mechanism in TOFX fish. While specific dietary fatty acid concentrations and balances and antioxidant supplementation may need further attention, the use of an oil with a high content of DHA and ALA can enhance tissue deposition of n-3 LC-PUFA in relation to a commercially used oil blend. PMID:27556399

  8. Developmental cigarette smoke exposure: liver proteome profile alterations in low birth weight pups.

    PubMed

    Canales, Lorena; Chen, Jing; Kelty, Elizabeth; Musah, Sadiatu; Webb, Cindy; Pisano, M Michele; Neal, Rachel E

    2012-10-01

    Cigarette smoke is composed of over 4000 chemicals many of which are strong oxidizing agents and chemical carcinogens. Chronic cigarette smoke exposure (CSE) induces mild alterations in liver histology indicative of toxicity though the molecular pathways underlying these alterations remain to be explored. Utilizing a mouse model of 'active' developmental CSE (gestational day (GD) 1 through postnatal day (PD) 21; cotinine >50ng/mL) characterized by low birth weight offspring, the impact of developmental CSE on liver protein abundances was determined. On PD21, liver tissue was collected from pups for 2D SDS-PAGE based proteome analysis with statistical analysis by Partial Least Squares-Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA). Protein spots of interest were identified by ESI-MS/MS with impacted molecular pathways identified by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Developmental CSE decreased the abundance of proteins associated with the small molecule biochemistry (includes glucose metabolism), lipid metabolism, amino acid metabolism, and inflammatory response pathways. Decreased gluconeogenic enzyme activity and lysophosphatidylcholine availability following developmental CSE were found and supports the impact of CSE on these pathways. Proteins with increased abundance belonged to the cell death and drug metabolism networks. Liver antioxidant enzyme abundances [glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and peroxiredoxins] were also altered by CSE, but GST enzymatic activity was unchanged. In summary, cigarette smoke exposure spanning pre- and post-natal development resulted in persistent decreased offspring weights, decreased abundances of liver metabolic proteins, decreased gluconeogenic activity, and altered lipid metabolism. The companion paper details the kidney proteome alterations in the same offspring.

  9. Comparative studies of early liver dysfunction in senescence-accelerated mouse using mitochondrial proteomics approaches.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yashu; He, Jintang; Ji, Shaoyi; Wang, Qingsong; Pu, Hai; Jiang, Tingting; Meng, Lingyao; Yang, Xiuwei; Ji, Jianguo

    2008-09-01

    The liver is a complex and unique organ responsible for a breadth of functions crucial to sustaining life, especially for various metabolic processes in its mitochondria. Senescence-accelerated mouse prone/8 (SAMP8), a widely used aging model, exhibits an oxidative stress-induced aging phenotype and severe mitochondria-related liver pathology that are not seen in senescence-accelerated mouse resistant/1 (SAMR1). Here we used both two-dimensional electrophoresis- and ICAT-based mitochondrial proteomics analysis to view the liver mitochondrial protein alterations between SAMP8 and SAMR1. Compared with SAMR1, decreased expression and activity of mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase were detected in SAMP8 at 6 months old (SAMP8-6m). As the key enzyme of ketogenesis, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase is well known to be transcriptionally regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, which was also expressed at lower levels in SAMP8-6m livers. In addition, down-regulation of two peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha target gene products (acyl-CoA oxidase and enoyl-CoA hydratase), elevation of triglyceride, and reduction of acetyl-CoA were observed, indicating abnormal fatty acid metabolism in SAMP8-6m livers. In addition eight proteins (NDUAA, NDUBA, NDUB7, NDUS1, NDUS3, NDUV1, ETFA, and UCRI) of mitochondrial complexes were down-regulated in SAMP8-6m, resulting in mitochondria-related liver dysfunction characterized by enhanced oxidative stress-induced molecular damage (lipid peroxide and oxidized protein) and depressed energy production (ATP). Glutamine synthetase and ornithine aminotransferase involved in glutamine synthesis were up-regulated in SAMP8 livers at both 1 and 6 months old that may be related to the accumulation of glutamate and glutamine. Our work provided useful clues to understanding the molecular mechanism underlying liver dysfunction in senescence-accelerated mouse.

  10. Expression of hemopexin in acute rejection of rat liver allograft identified by serum proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Min; Tan, Changjun; Hu, Jinwu; Alwahsh, Salamah Mohammad; Yan, Jun; Hu, Jie; Dai, Zhi; Wang, Zheng; Zhou, Jian; Fan, Jia; Huang, Xiaowu

    2014-07-01

    Acute rejection (AR) and acceptance of allograft after liver transplantation (LTx) remain critical issues that need addressing to improve prognosis. We therefore performed rat orthotopic LTx and proteomic analyses to screen for immune response-related biomarkers in sera. Markers identified were validated at the mRNA and/or protein levels, and the molecules of interest were functionally explored. Compared with syngeneic controls, signs of AR as well as spontaneous acceptance were observed in hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections of liver allografts. In accordance with the severity of AR, 30 protein spots displaying significant changes in abundance were identified using two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis. Ultimately, 14 serum proteins were sequenced and five spots of interest were identified as hemopexin (HPX). Expression of HPX was significantly and inversely associated with the severity of AR at both the mRNA and protein levels. In vitro, Mt-1, Ho-1, Fth, Ifn-γ, and Il-17 transcripts were significantly upregulated in lysates of lymphocytes stimulated with HPX, whereas Il-10 markedly was remarkably downregulated. Interferon-γ, IL-10, and IL-17 proteins in the supernatant of HPX-stimulated lymphocytes were significantly altered in keeping with the mRNA level. Our data facilitated the generation of a proteomic profile to enhance the understanding of rat liver AR. In view of finding that the HPX serum level is negatively associated with the severity of AR of rat liver allograft, we propose that in vitro treatment with HPX regulates cytokine expression in rat lymphocytes.

  11. Proteomic characterization of hepatitis C eradication: enzyme switch in the healing liver.

    PubMed

    Babudieri, S; Soddu, A; Nieddu, P; Tanca, A; Madeddu, G; Addis, M F; Pagnozzi, D; Cossu-Rocca, P; Massarelli, G; Dore, M P; Uzzau, S; Mura, M S

    2013-07-01

    Lipid pathway impairment, decrease in the antioxidant pool and downregulation in amino-acid metabolism are just some of the metabolic variations attributed to chronic HCV infection. All of them have been studied separately, mainly in animal models. Thanks to proteomic analysis we managed to describe (for the fist time to the best of our knowledge), in vivo and in humans, the metabolic alterations caused by HCV, and the recovery of the same alterations during HCV treatment. We performed proteomic analysis on liver specimens of a 28-year-old woman affected by hepatitis C genotype 1a, alcoholism and diabetes mellitus type 1, before and after antiviral treatment with pegylated interferon alpha 2b and ribavirin. The subject, thanks to a patient-tailored therapy, reached Sustained Virological Response. Throughout the treatment period the patient was monitored with subsequent biochemical, clinical and psychological examinations. The data obtained by the patient's close monitoring suggest a direct interaction between insulin resistance and an active HCV genotype 1 infection, with a leading role played by the infection, and not by insulin resistance, as demonstrated by the sharp fall of the insulin units needed per day during treatment. The proteomic analysis showed that after therapy, a downregulation of enzymes involved in amino acid metabolism, glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and alcohol catabolism takes place, the latter probably due to cessation of alcohol abuse. On the contrary, the metabolic pathways linked to metabolism of the reactive oxygen species were upregulated after therapy. Finally, a significant alteration in the pathway regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARA), a major regulator of lipid metabolism in the liver, was reported. These "real time" data confirm in vivo, in humans, that during HCV infection, the pathways related to fatty acids, glucose metabolism and free radical scavenging are inhibited. The same enzyme deficit is

  12. Proteomic responses of fruits to environmental stresses

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Zhulong

    2012-01-01

    Fruits and vegetables are extremely susceptible to decay and easily lose commercial value after harvest. Different strategies have been developed to control postharvest decay and prevent quality deterioration during postharvest storage, including cold storage, controlled atmosphere (CA), and application of biotic and abiotic stimulus. In this review, mechanisms related to protein level responses of host side and pathogen side were characterized. Protein extraction protocols have been successfully developed for recalcitrant, low protein content fruit tissues. Comparative proteome profiling and functional analysis revealed that defense related proteins, energy metabolism, and antioxidant pathway played important roles in fruits in response to storage conditions and exogenous elicitor treatments. Secretome of pathogenic fungi has been well-investigated and the results indicated that hydrolytic enzymes were the key virulent factors for the pathogen infection. These protein level changes shed new light on interaction among fruits, pathogens, and environmental conditions. Potential postharvest strategies to reduce risk of fruit decay were further proposed based on currently available proteomic data. PMID:23335934

  13. An investigation of hormesis of trichloroethylene in L-02 liver cells by differential proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hai-Yan; Liu, Jian-Jun; Xi, Ren-Rong; Xing, Xiu-Mei; Yuan, Jian-Hui; Yang, Lin-Qing; Tao, Gong-Hua; Gong, Chun-Mei; Zhuang, Zhi-Xiong

    2009-11-01

    Hormesis is the dose-response pattern of the biological responses to toxic chemicals, characterized by low-dose stimulation and high-dose inhibition. Although it is known that some cell types exhibit an adaptive response to low levels of cytotoxic agents, its molecular mechanism is still unclear and it has yet to be established whether this is a universal phenomenon that occurs in all cell types in response to exposure to every chemical. Trichloroethylene (TCE) is an organic solvent widely used and is released into the atmosphere from industrial degreasing operations. Acute (short-term) and chronic (long-term) inhalation exposure to trichloroethylene can affect the human health. In order to elucidate a cell-survival adaptive response of L-02 liver cells exposed to low dose of TCE, CCK-8 assay was used to assess cytotoxicity, and examined the possible mechanisms of hormesis by proteomics technology. We found that exposure of L-02 liver cells to low level of TCE resulted in adaptation to further exposure to higher level, about 1,000 protein-spots were obtained by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and five protein spots were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry sequencing of tryptic peptides. Our results suggest that a relationship may exist between identified proteins and TCE-induced hormesis, which are very useful for further study of the mechanism and risk assessment of TCE.

  14. Distinct proteomic features of two fibrogenic liver cell populations: hepatic stellate cells and portal myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Bosselut, Nelly; Housset, Chantal; Marcelo, Paulo; Rey, Colette; Burmester, Thorsten; Vinh, Jöelle; Vaubourdolle, Michel; Cadoret, Axelle; Baudin, Bruno

    2010-03-01

    In chronic liver diseases, the accumulation of extracellular matrix leading to fibrosis is caused by myofibroblasts, the origins of which are debatable. We performed a comparative proteomic study to identify markers and gain insight into distinct functions of myofibroblasts derived either from hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) or from portal mesenchymal cells. After isolation from normal liver and culture in similar conditions, myofibroblastic HSCs (MF-HSCs) presented enlarged cytoplasms whereas portal myofibroblasts (PMFs) were more proliferative, and formed more stress fibers. The two cell types were subjected to comparative analyses by 2-D MS/MS. Six proteins were overexpressed in PMFs, with myofibroblast-related typical functions. Among them, cofilin-1 showed the greatest difference in expression and a lower pI than expected. Immunoblot demonstrated higher levels of phosphorylation, a modification of the protein implicated in stress fiber formation. Eleven proteins, mostly involved in stress response, were overexpressed in MF-HSCs. Cytoglobin had the highest level of overexpression, as confirmed by reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR, immunoblot and immunocytochemical analyses. These results identify cytoglobin as the best marker for distinguishing MF-HSCs from PMFs and suggest different functions for the two cell populations in the liver wound healing response, with a prominent role for PMFs in scar formation.

  15. Proteomic dissection of plant responses to various pathogens.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xianping; Chen, Jianping; Dai, Liangying; Ma, Huasheng; Zhang, Hengmu; Yang, Jian; Wang, Fang; Yan, Chengqi

    2015-05-01

    During their growth and development, plants are vulnerable to the effects of a variety of pathogens. Proteomics technology plays an important role in research studies of plant defense mechanisms by mining the expression changes of proteins in response to various biotic stresses. This review article provides a comprehensive overview of the latest developments in international proteomic research on plant biotic stress. It summarizes the methods commonly used in plant proteomic research to investigate biotic stress, analyze the protein responses of plants in adverse conditions, and reviews the applications of proteomics combined with transgenic technology in plant protection.

  16. Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Hixson, Kim K.; Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Robinson, Errol W.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2010-02-01

    Proteomics aims to characterize the spatial distribution and temporal dynamics of proteins in biological systems, the protein response to environmental stimuli, and the differences in protein states between diseased and control biological systems. Mass spectrometry (MS) plays a crucial role in enabling the analysis of proteomes and typically is the method of choice for identifying proteins present in biological systems. Peptide (and consequently protein) identifications are made by comparing measured masses to calculated values obtained from genome data. Several methodologies based on MS have been developed for the analysis of proteomes. The complexity of the biological systems requires that the proteome be separated prior to analysis. Both gel based and liquid chromatography based separations have proven very useful in this regard. Typically, separated proteins are analyzed with MS either intact (top-down proteomics) or are digested into peptides (bottom-up) prior to MS analysis. Additionally, several procedures, with and without stable isotopic labeling, have been introduced to facilitate protein quantitation (e.g. characterize changes in protein abundances between given biological states).

  17. The impact of blood on liver metabolite profiling - a combined metabolomic and proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Ly-Verdú, Saray; Schaefer, Alexander; Kahle, Melanie; Groeger, Thomas; Neschen, Susanne; Arteaga-Salas, Jose M; Ueffing, Marius; de Angelis, Martin Hrabe; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2014-02-01

    Metabolomics has entered the well-established omic sciences as it is an indispensable information resource to achieve a global picture of biological systems. The aim of the present study was to estimate the influence of blood removal from mice liver as part of sample preparation for metabolomic and proteomic studies. For this purpose, perfused mice liver tissue (i.e. with blood removed) and unperfused mice liver tissue (i.e. containing blood) were compared by two-dimensional gas chromatography time of flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC-TOFMS) for the metabolomic part, and by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for the proteomic part. Our data showed significant differences between the unperfused and perfused liver tissue samples. Furthermore, we also observed an overlap of blood and tissue metabolite profiles in our data, suggesting that the perfusion of liver tissue prior to analysis is beneficial for an accurate metabolic profile of this organ.

  18. Quantitative proteomics analysis of the liver reveals immune regulation and lipid metabolism dysregulation in a mouse model of depression.

    PubMed

    Wu, You; Tang, Jianyong; Zhou, Chanjuan; Zhao, Libo; Chen, Jin; Zeng, Li; Rao, Chenglong; Shi, Haiyang; Liao, Li; Liang, Zihong; Yang, Yongtao; Zhou, Jian; Xie, Peng

    2016-09-15

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a highly prevalent and debilitating mental illness with substantial impairments in quality of life and functioning. However, the pathophysiology of major depression remains poorly understood. Combining the brain and body should provide a comprehensive understanding of the etiology of MDD. As the largest internal organ of the human body, the liver has an important function, yet no proteomic study has assessed liver protein expression in a preclinical model of depression. Using the chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) mouse model of depression, differential protein expression between CUMS and control (CON) mice was examined in the liver proteome using isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. More than 4000 proteins were identified and 66 most significantly differentiated proteins were used for further bioinformatic analysis. According to the ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA), we found that proteins related to the inflammation response, immune regulation, lipid metabolism and NFκB signaling network were altered by CUMS. Moreover, four proteins closely associated with these processes, hemopexin, haptoglobin, cytochrome P450 2A4 (CYP2A4) and bile salt sulfotransferase 1 (SULT2A1), were validated by western blotting. In conclusion, we report, for the first time, the liver protein expression profile in the CUMS mouse model of depression. Our findings provide novel insight (liver-brain axis) into the multifaceted mechanisms of major depressive disorder.

  19. Integrative proteomic and microRNA analysis of the priming phase during rat liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xiaofang; Chang, Cuifang; Zang, Xiayan; Sun, Jingyan; Li, Pengfei; Guo, Jianli; Xu, Cunshuan

    2016-01-10

    The partial hepatectomy (PH) model provides an effective medium for study of liver regeneration (LR). Considering that LR is regulated by microRNAs (miRNAs), investigation of the regulatory role of miRNAs is critical for revealing how regenerative processes are initiated and controlled. Using high-throughput sequencing technology, we examined miRNA expression profiles of the regenerating rat liver after PH, and found that 23 miRNAs were related to rat LR. Among them, several miRNAs were significantly altered at 2h and 6h after PH, corresponding to the priming phase of LR. Furthermore, we examined the protein profiles in the regenerating rat liver at 2h and 6h after PH by iTRAQ coupled with LC-MS/MS, and found that 278 proteins were significantly changed. Subsequently, an integrative proteomic and microRNA analysis by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis 9.0 (IPA) software showed that miR-125a, miR-143, miR-150, miR-181c, miR-182, miR-183, miR-199a, miR-429 regulated the priming phase of rat LR by modulating the expression of proteins involved in networks critical for cell apoptosis, cell survival, cell cycle, inflammatory response, metabolism, etc. Thus, our studies provide novel evidence for a functional molecular network populated by the down-regulated targets of the up-regulated miRNAs in the priming phase of rat LR.

  20. Early changes in the liver-soluble proteome from mice fed a nonalcoholic steatohepatitis inducing diet.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Anja; Stevens, Axel P; Klein, Matthias S; Hellerbrand, Claus; Dettmer, Katja; Gronwald, Wolfram; Oefner, Peter J; Reinders, Jörg

    2012-05-01

    Despite the increasing incidence of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) with the rise in lifestyle-related diseases such as the metabolic syndrome, little is known about the changes in the liver proteome that precede the onset of inflammation and fibrosis. Here, we investigated early changes in the liver-soluble proteome of female C57BL/6N mice fed an NASH-inducing diet by 2D-DIGE and nano-HPLC-MS/MS. In parallel, histology and measurements of hepatic content of triglycerides, cholesterol and intermediates of the methionine cycle were performed. Hepatic steatosis manifested itself after 2 days of feeding, albeit significant changes in the liver-soluble proteome were not evident before day 10 in the absence of inflammatory or fibrotic signs. Proteomic alterations affected mainly energy and amino acid metabolism, detoxification processes, urea cycle, and the one-carbon/S-adenosylmethionine pathways. Additionally, intermediates of relevant affected pathways were quantified from liver tissue, confirming the findings from the proteomic analysis.

  1. Global liver proteome analysis using iTRAQ labeling quantitative proteomic technology to reveal biomarkers in mice exposed to perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS).

    PubMed

    Tan, Feng; Jin, Yihe; Liu, Wei; Quan, Xie; Chen, Jingwen; Liang, Zhen

    2012-11-01

    Proteomic analysis allows detection of changes of proteins expression in organisms exposed to environmental pollutants, leading to the discovery of biomarkers of exposure and understanding of the action mechanism of toxicity. In the present study, we applied iTRAQ labeling quantitative proteomic technology for global characterization of the liver proteome in mice exposed to perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS). This successfully identified and quantified 1038 unique proteins. Seventy-one proteins showed a significant expression change in the treated groups (1.0, 2.5, 5.0 mg/kg of body weight) compared with the control group, and 16 proteins displayed strong dose-dependent changes. Gene ontology analysis showed that these differential proteins were significantly enriched and mainly involved in lipid metabolism, transport, biosynthetic processes, and response to stimulus. We detected significantly increased expression levels of enzymes regulating peroxisomal β-oxidation-including long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase, acyl-CoA oxidase 1, bifunctional enzyme, and 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase A. PFOS also significantly induced cytochrome P450s and glutathione S-transferases that are responsible for the metabolism of xenobiotic compounds. The expressions of several proteins with important biological functions-such as cysteine sulfinic acid decarboxylase, aldehyde dehydrogenase, and apolipoprotein A-I, also correlated with PFOS exposure. Together, the present results provide insight into the molecular mechanism and biomarkers for PFOS-induced effects.

  2. The Human Salivary Proteome is Radiation Responsive

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Heather D.; Ivey, Richard G.; Voytovich, Uliana J.; Lin, Chenwei; Stirewalt, Derek L.; Pogosova-Agadjanyan, Era L.; Paulovich, Amanda G.

    2014-01-01

    In the event of a nuclear incident in a heavily populated area, the surge in demand for medical evaluation will likely overwhelm our emergency care system, compromising our ability to care for victims with life-threatening injuries or exposures. Therefore, there exists a need for a rapidly deployable biological assay for radiation exposure that can be performed in the field by individuals with little to no medical training. Saliva is an attractive biofluid for this purpose, due to the relative ease of its collection and the wide array of biomolecules it contains. To determine whether the human salivary proteome is responsive to ionizing radiation exposure, we characterized the abundances of salivary proteins in humans before and after total body irradiation. Using an assay panel targeting 90 analytes (growth factors, chemokines and cytokines), we identified proteins that were significantly radiation responsive in human saliva. The responses of three proteins (monocyte chemo-attractant protein 1, interleukin 8 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1) were confirmed using independent immunoassay platforms and then verified and further characterized in 130 saliva samples from a completely independent set of 38 patients undergoing total body irradiation. The results demonstrate the potential for detecting radiation exposure based on analysis of human saliva. PMID:24720749

  3. Plant proteome changes under abiotic stress--contribution of proteomics studies to understanding plant stress response.

    PubMed

    Kosová, Klára; Vítámvás, Pavel; Prášil, Ilja Tom; Renaut, Jenny

    2011-08-12

    Plant acclimation to stress is associated with profound changes in proteome composition. Since proteins are directly involved in plant stress response, proteomics studies can significantly contribute to unravel the possible relationships between protein abundance and plant stress acclimation. In this review, proteomics studies dealing with plant response to a broad range of abiotic stress factors--cold, heat, drought, waterlogging, salinity, ozone treatment, hypoxia and anoxia, herbicide treatments, inadequate or excessive light conditions, disbalances in mineral nutrition, enhanced concentrations of heavy metals, radioactivity and mechanical wounding are discussed. Most studies have been carried out on model plants Arabidopsis thaliana and rice due to large protein sequence databases available; however, the variety of plant species used for proteomics analyses is rapidly increasing. Protein response pathways shared by different plant species under various stress conditions (glycolytic pathway, enzymes of ascorbate-glutathione cycle, accumulation of LEA proteins) as well as pathways unique to a given stress are discussed. Results from proteomics studies are interpreted with respect to physiological factors determining plant stress response. In conclusion, examples of application of proteomics studies in search for protein markers underlying phenotypic variation in physiological parameters associated with plant stress tolerance are given.

  4. Metabolic changes associated with the long winter fast dominate the liver proteome in 13-lined ground squirrels

    PubMed Central

    Hindle, Allyson G.; Grabek, Katharine R.; Epperson, L. Elaine; Karimpour-Fard, Anis

    2014-01-01

    Small-bodied hibernators partition the year between active homeothermy and hibernating heterothermy accompanied by fasting. To define molecular events underlying hibernation that are both dependent and independent of fasting, we analyzed the liver proteome among two active and four hibernation states in 13-lined ground squirrels. We also examined fall animals transitioning between fed homeothermy and fasting heterothermy. Significantly enriched pathways differing between activity and hibernation were biased toward metabolic enzymes, concordant with the fuel shifts accompanying fasting physiology. Although metabolic reprogramming to support fasting dominated these data, arousing (rewarming) animals had the most distinct proteome among the hibernation states. Instead of a dominant metabolic enzyme signature, torpor-arousal cycles featured differences in plasma proteins and intracellular membrane traffic and its regulation. Phosphorylated NSFL1C, a membrane regulator, exhibited this torpor-arousal cycle pattern; its role in autophagosome formation may promote utilization of local substrates upon metabolic reactivation in arousal. Fall animals transitioning to hibernation lagged in their proteomic adjustment, indicating that the liver is more responsive than preparatory to the metabolic reprogramming of hibernation. Specifically, torpor use had little impact on the fall liver proteome, consistent with a dominant role of nutritional status. In contrast to our prediction of reprogramming the transition between activity and hibernation by gene expression and then within-hibernation transitions by posttranslational modification (PTM), we found extremely limited evidence of reversible PTMs within torpor-arousal cycles. Rather, acetylation contributed to seasonal differences, being highest in winter (specifically in torpor), consistent with fasting physiology and decreased abundance of the mitochondrial deacetylase, SIRT3. PMID:24642758

  5. Drought-Responsive Mechanisms in Plant Leaves Revealed by Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoli; Cai, Xiaofeng; Xu, Chenxi; Wang, Quanhua; Dai, Shaojun

    2016-01-01

    Plant drought tolerance is a complex trait that requires a global view to understand its underlying mechanism. The proteomic aspects of plant drought response have been extensively investigated in model plants, crops and wood plants. In this review, we summarize recent proteomic studies on drought response in leaves to reveal the common and specialized drought-responsive mechanisms in different plants. Although drought-responsive proteins exhibit various patterns depending on plant species, genotypes and stress intensity, proteomic analyses show that dominant changes occurred in sensing and signal transduction, reactive oxygen species scavenging, osmotic regulation, gene expression, protein synthesis/turnover, cell structure modulation, as well as carbohydrate and energy metabolism. In combination with physiological and molecular results, proteomic studies in leaves have helped to discover some potential proteins and/or metabolic pathways for drought tolerance. These findings provide new clues for understanding the molecular basis of plant drought tolerance. PMID:27763546

  6. Liver proteomic analysis of the large yellow croaker (Pseudosciaena crocea) following polyriboinosinic:polyribocytidylic acid induction.

    PubMed

    Mu, Yinnan; Wan, Xiang; Lin, Kebing; Ao, Jingqun; Chen, Xinhua

    2013-10-01

    In the present study, we examined the liver protein profiles of the large yellow croaker (Pseudosciaena crocea) exposed to polyriboinosinic:polyribocytidylic acid [poly(I:C)], a viral mimic, using the differential proteomic approach. Sixteen altered protein spots were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry or matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight/time of flight mass spectrometry, including eight upregulated proteins and eight downregulated proteins. These altered host proteins were classified into six categories based on their biological function: cellular process, metabolic process, biological regulation, binding, and catabolic process, highlighting the fact that response to poly(I:C) induction in fish seems to be complex and diverse. Moreover, four corresponding genes of the differentially expressed proteins were validated by relative quantitative real-time PCR. Western blot analysis further demonstrated the changes in protein abundance of natural killer enhancing factor and peroxiredoxin 6. These results will be helpful in furthering our understanding of the changes of physiological processes in liver of fish during virus infection.

  7. Targeting hepatocytes from liver tissue by laser capture microdissection and proteomics expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Marko-Varga, György; Berglund, Magnus; Malmström, Johan; Lindberg, Henrik; Fehniger, Thomas E

    2003-11-01

    A tissue proteomics process is presented where hepatocyte cell isolation in combination with two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometric identification were used to annotate the liver proteome. Laser microdissection of 8 microm liver tissue sections was performed and protein expression profiling was compared using a variety of quantities of input cells, and gel separation conditions. The 30 microm diameter laser generated the highest protein yields from the polymer coated caps following microsolubilization. We found that 6000 laser pulses (approximately 7200 hepatocytes) were required in order to generate high-resolution gel maps. Within homogeneous tissue samples, this could be accomplished in a total cycle time of 20 min using an automated dissection procedure. Close to 1000 high-quality gel annotations were generated from the corresponding 2-D gel expression profiles which matched closely the corresponding patterns of analytical-scale liver preparations detected by silver staining.

  8. Comparative proteomic analysis on human L-02 liver cells treated with varying concentrations of trichloroethylene.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianjun; Huang, Haiyan; Xing, Xiumei; Xi, Renrong; Zhuang, Zhixiong; Yuan, Jianhui; Yang, Fan; Zhao, Jin

    2007-03-01

    To determine the differential proteomic expressions in human L-02 liver cells induced by varying concentrations of trichloroethylene (TCE), comparative proteomic analysis was performed on human L-02 liver cells which were treated with varying concentrations of TCE. According to the result of MTT test, we designed four different groups, in which the cells were treated with 0 microM (control group), 3, 10 or 40 microM TCE for 24 h, respectively. Comparative analysis of approximately 800 spots resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) in the soluble proteomes of L-02 cells from the four different groups resulted in 10 differential proteins. To identify the differential spots, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) was carried out; if the results from the tool were insufficient, tandem MS (MALDI-TOF-TOF-MS) was then performed. The raw data of peptide mass fingerprints (PMFs) and MS/MS spectra were searched against the IPI human data base for exact matches. Then western blot was employed to verify the result of proteomic analysis, the following result confirmed that the results of proteomic analysis were reliable. These results might provide an insight into the underlying mechanism of TCE intoxication and find biological markers for diagnosis and therapy of TCE-induced diseases.

  9. Proteomic and genomic studies of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease--clues in the pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jun Wei; Dillon, John; Miller, Michael

    2014-07-14

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a widely prevalent hepatic disorder that covers wide spectrum of liver pathology. NAFLD is strongly associated with liver inflammation, metabolic hyperlipidaemia and insulin resistance. Frequently, NAFLD has been considered as the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome. The pathophysiology of NAFLD has not been fully elucidated. Some patients can remain in the stage of simple steatosis, which generally is a benign condition; whereas others can develop liver inflammation and progress into non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The mechanism behind the progression is still not fully understood. Much ongoing proteomic researches have focused on discovering the unbiased circulating biochemical markers to allow early detection and treatment of NAFLD. Comprehensive genomic studies have also begun to provide new insights into the gene polymorphism to understand patient-disease variations. Therefore, NAFLD is considered a complex and mutifactorial disease phenotype resulting from environmental exposures acting on a susceptible polygenic background. This paper reviewed the current status of proteomic and genomic studies that have contributed to the understanding of NAFLD pathogenesis. For proteomics section, this review highlighted functional proteins that involved in: (1) transportation; (2) metabolic pathway; (3) acute phase reaction; (4) anti-inflammatory; (5) extracellular matrix; and (6) immune system. In the genomic studies, this review will discuss genes which involved in: (1) lipolysis; (2) adipokines; and (3) cytokines production.

  10. Proteomic analysis of changes in protein expression in liver mitochondria in apoE knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Suski, Maciej; Olszanecki, Rafał; Madej, Józef; Totoń-Żurańska, Justyna; Niepsuj, Anna; Jawień, Jacek; Bujak-Giżycka, Beata; Okoń, Krzysztof; Korbut, Ryszard

    2011-05-16

    The involvement of both apolipoprotein E (apoE) and mitochondria in lipid metabolism is widely recognized, however there is surprisingly scarce data about the putative mitochondrial action(s) of this protein. The aim of the study was to screen the alterations in liver mitochondrial proteome caused by apoE deficiency. We applied 2DE-LC-MS/MS methodology to investigate the changes in liver mitochondrial protein expression in 6-months old apoE(-/-) mice as compared to C57BL/6J controls. ApoE(-/-), but not C57BL/6J mice developed visible atherosclerotic changes in aorta and mild, diffuse steatosis of the liver. Collectively, 18 differentially expressed proteins were identified in mitochondria, related to apoptosis, antioxidant and detoxifying mechanisms of mitochondria, as well as lipid metabolism and transport. In conclusion, differential proteomic approach revealed several lines of proteomic evidence that mitochondrial function in the liver of apoE(-/-) mice could be altered as a result of overlapping of pathological and compensatory changes in expression of proteins.

  11. Differential proteomic analysis of STAT6 knockout mice reveals new regulatory function in liver lipid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Iff, Joël; Wang, Wei; Sajic, Tatjana; Oudry, Nathalie; Gueneau, Estelle; Hopfgartner, Gérard; Varesio, Emmanuel; Szanto, Ildiko

    2009-10-01

    Increased inflammatory signaling is a key feature of metabolic disorders. In this context, the role of increased pro-inflammatory signals has been extensively studied. By contrast, no efforts have been dedicated to study the contrasting scenario: the attenuation of anti-inflammatory signals and their role in metabolic homeostasis. IL-4 and IL-13 are anti-inflammatory cytokines signaling through the Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 6 (STAT6). Our study was aimed at evaluating the lack of STAT6 signaling on liver homeostasis. To this end we analyzed the liver proteome of wild type and STAT6 knock-out mice using 2D nanoscale LC-MS/MS with iTRAQ labeling technique. The coordinated changes in proteins identified by this quantitative proteome analysis indicated disturbed lipid homeostasis and a state of hepatocellular stress. Most significantly, the expression of the liver fatty acid binding protein (FABP1) was increased in the knock-out mice. In line with the elevated FABP1 expression we found latent liver lipid accumulation in the STAT6-deficient mice which was further aggravated when mice were challenged by a high fat diet. In conclusion, our study revealed a so far uncharacterized role for STAT6 in regulating liver lipid homeostasis and demonstrates the importance of anti-inflammatory signaling in the defense against the development of liver steatosis.

  12. Dataset from proteomic analysis of rat, mouse, and human liver microsomes and S9 fractions.

    PubMed

    Golizeh, Makan; Schneider, Christina; Ohlund, Leanne B; Sleno, Lekha

    2015-06-01

    Rat, mouse and human liver microsomes and S9 fractions were analyzed using an optimized method combining ion exchange fractionation of digested peptides, and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) coupled to high resolution tandem mass spectrometry (HR-MS/MS). The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org) via the PRIDE partner repository (Vizcaíno et al., 2013 [1]) with the dataset identifiers PXD000717, PXD000720, PXD000721, PXD000731, PXD000733 and PXD000734. Data related to the peptides (trypsin digests only) were also uploaded to Peptide Atlas (Farrah et al., 2013 [2]) and are available with the dataset identifiers PASS00407, PASS00409, PASS00411, PASS00412, PASS00413 and PASS00414. The present dataset is associated with a research article published in EuPA Open Proteomics [3].

  13. Proteomics analysis of liver tissues from C57BL/6J mice receiving low-dose 137Cs radiation.

    PubMed

    Yi, Lan; Li, Linwei; Yin, Jie; Hu, Nan; Li, Guangyue; Ding, Dexin

    2016-02-01

    Differentially expressed proteins in liver tissues of C57BL/6J mice receiving low-dose (137)Cs radiation were examined by proteomics analysis. Compared with the control group, 80 proteins were differentially expressed in the irradiated group. Among the 40 randomly selected proteins used for peptide mass fingerprinting analysis and bioinformatics, 24 were meaningful. These proteins were related to antioxidant defense, amino acid metabolism, detoxification, anti-tumor development, amino acid transport, anti-peroxidation, and composition of respiratory chain. Western blot analysis showed that catalase (CAT), glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT), and glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1) were up-regulated in the irradiated group; these results were in agreement with qPCR results. These results show that CAT, GNMT, and GSTP1 may be related to stress response induced by low-dose irradiation in mice liver. The underlying mechanism however requires further investigation. PMID:26429139

  14. Proteomics analysis of liver tissues from C57BL/6J mice receiving low-dose 137Cs radiation.

    PubMed

    Yi, Lan; Li, Linwei; Yin, Jie; Hu, Nan; Li, Guangyue; Ding, Dexin

    2016-02-01

    Differentially expressed proteins in liver tissues of C57BL/6J mice receiving low-dose (137)Cs radiation were examined by proteomics analysis. Compared with the control group, 80 proteins were differentially expressed in the irradiated group. Among the 40 randomly selected proteins used for peptide mass fingerprinting analysis and bioinformatics, 24 were meaningful. These proteins were related to antioxidant defense, amino acid metabolism, detoxification, anti-tumor development, amino acid transport, anti-peroxidation, and composition of respiratory chain. Western blot analysis showed that catalase (CAT), glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT), and glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1) were up-regulated in the irradiated group; these results were in agreement with qPCR results. These results show that CAT, GNMT, and GSTP1 may be related to stress response induced by low-dose irradiation in mice liver. The underlying mechanism however requires further investigation.

  15. Circulating Extracellular Vesicles with Specific Proteome and Liver MicroRNAs Are Potential Biomarkers for Liver Injury in Experimental Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Povero, Davide; Eguchi, Akiko; Li, Hongying; Johnson, Casey D.; Papouchado, Bettina G.; Wree, Alexander; Messer, Karen; Feldstein, Ariel E.

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aim Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in both adult and children. Currently there are no reliable methods to determine disease severity, monitor disease progression, or efficacy of therapy, other than an invasive liver biopsy. Design Choline Deficient L-Amino Acid (CDAA) and high fat diets were used as physiologically relevant mouse models of NAFLD. Circulating extracellular vesicles were isolated, fully characterized by proteomics and molecular analyses and compared to control groups. Liver-related microRNAs were isolated from purified extracellular vesicles and liver specimens. Results We observed statistically significant differences in the level of extracellular vesicles (EVs) in liver and blood between two control groups and NAFLD animals. Time-course studies showed that EV levels increase early during disease development and reflect changes in liver histolopathology. EV levels correlated with hepatocyte cell death (r2 = 0.64, p<0.05), fibrosis (r2 = 0.66, p<0.05) and pathological angiogenesis (r2 = 0.71, p<0.05). Extensive characterization of blood EVs identified both microparticles (MPs) and exosomes (EXO) present in blood of NAFLD animals. Proteomic analysis of blood EVs detected various differentially expressed proteins in NAFLD versus control animals. Moreover, unsupervised hierarchical clustering identified a signature that allowed for discrimination between NAFLD and controls. Finally, the liver appears to be an important source of circulating EVs in NAFLD animals as evidenced by the enrichment in blood with miR-122 and 192 - two microRNAs previously described in chronic liver diseases, coupled with a corresponding decrease in expression of these microRNAs in the liver. Conclusions These findings suggest a potential for using specific circulating EVs as sensitive and specific biomarkers for the noninvasive diagnosis and monitoring of NAFLD. PMID:25470250

  16. [Progress and application of phosphoproteomics in the proteomics of liver pathological and physiological state].

    PubMed

    Yi, Tailong; Tian, Miaomiao; Yang, Xiaoming; Xu, Ping

    2014-07-01

    The phosphorylation is one of most common protein post-translational modifications. The protein phosphorylation plays important roles in the life through the reversible process of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation by kinases and phosphatases. Systematical analysis of the phosphorylation state of proteins would greatly help to reveal the mystery of the life. Recently, with the development of mass spectrometer, bioinformatics sortwares and enrichment methods of phosphopeptides, phosphorylation stduy of orgnism proteins by mass spectrometer has become mature gradually. Liver is one of the most important metabolic and immune organs. In-depth study of protein phosphorylation in liver is of great importance to reveal its function. And booming phosphoproteomics has been applied into the study of liver, which has deepened the knowledge of molecular mechnism of its physiology and pathology states. Here, we review the recent progress on the research and development of phosphoproteomics and their application in liver proteomics study.

  17. Proteomic analysis of liver development of lean Pekin duck (Anas platyrhynchos domestica).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Aijuan; Liu, Guohua; Zhang, Yunsheng; Hou, Shuisheng; Chang, Wenhuan; Zhang, Shu; Cai, Huiyi; Chen, Guilan

    2012-09-18

    The liver plays vital roles in digestion, metabolism and immune defense. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of nutrient metabolism and antioxidation of lean Pekin duck liver from hatching to slaughter, the proteome changes were investigated using 2-DE, MS, quantitative real-time PCR and bioinformatics. A total of 59 differentially expressed proteins were identified. Proteins involved in transportation were highly up-regulated in newborn ducks whereas 37 proteins associated with metabolism, defense and antioxidation were up-regulated in adult ducks. The over-expression of proteins at the last developmental stage presumably occurs to fulfill the needs of multiple functions of the liver. However, the over-expressed proteins related to transportation during the first developmental stage are involved in maintaining the high basal metabolism of newborn ducks. The functional enrichment analysis also confirmed these results. Furthermore, the protein interaction network predicted 28 proteins acting as key nodes for liver development. The validated expression between proteins and genes provides us target genes for future genetic analyses to improve the health and performance of these ducks. These significant advanced proteome data expand our knowledge on the physiology of the duck liver, thereby providing a potentially valuable foundation for molecular breeding to enhance feed efficiency and immunity and for optimizing the feeding strategy.

  18. Analysis of 3-MCPD- and 3-MCPD dipalmitate-induced proteomic changes in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Braeuning, Albert; Sawada, Stefanie; Oberemm, Axel; Lampen, Alfonso

    2015-12-01

    3-Monochloropropane-1,2-diol (3-MCPD) and 3-MCPD fatty acid esters are process contaminants in foodstuff which are generated during thermal treatment. Long-term exposure to 3-MCPD or 3-MCPD esters causes toxicity especially in kidney and testis. 3-MCPD esters are efficiently hydrolyzed in the gastrointestinal tract, suggesting that their toxicity is mediated by free 3-MCPD. Combined exposure to free 3-MCPD and 3-MCPD released from 3-MCPD esters might lead to dietary consumption above the tolerable daily intake of 2 μg/kg body weight/day. Suspected mechanisms of 3-MCPD toxicity include the inhibition of glycolysis and oxidative stress. Here, a comparative proteomic approach was followed to analyze the effects of 3-MCPD or 3-MCPD dipalmitate in livers from rats exposed to 10 mg/kg body weight 3-MCPD, an equimolar dose of 3-MCPD dipalmitate, or a 4-fold lower dose of the ester during a 28-day repeated-dose feeding study. Early cellular changes were monitored in the absence of overt toxicity. A comprehensive view of 3-MCPD- or 3-MCPD dipalmitate-triggered proteomic changes in rat liver links to previously proposed mechanisms of toxicity and substantially extends our knowledge on molecular hepatic effects of 3-MCPD. Organ-independent marker proteins altered upon 3-MCPD exposure, for example DJ-1/PARK7, were identified by comparison of the proteomic patterns of kidney, testis and liver. PMID:26597043

  19. Sample preparation method for isolation of single-cell types from mouse liver for proteomic studies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Hou, Yufang; Chen, Huahai; Wei, Handong; Lin, Weiran; Li, Jichang; Zhang, Ming; He, Fuchu; Jiang, Ying

    2011-09-01

    It becomes increasingly clear that separation of pure cell populations provides a uniquely sensitive and accurate approach to protein profiling in biological systems and opens up a new area for proteomic analysis. The method we described could simultaneously isolate population of hepatocytes (HCs), hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), Kupffer cells (KCs) and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) by a combination of collagenase-based density gradient centrifugation and magnetic activated cell sorting with high purity and yield for the first time. More than 98% of the isolated HCs were positive for cytokeratin 18, with a viability of 91%. Approximately 97% of the isolated HSCs expressed glial fibrillary acidic protein with a viability of 95%. Nearly 98% of isolated KCs expressed F4/80 with a viability of 94%. And the purity of LSECs reached up to 91% with a viability of 94%. And yield for HCs, HSCs, LSECs and KCs were 6.3, 1.3, 2.6 and 5.0 million per mouse. This systematic isolation method enables us to study the proteome profiling of different types of liver cells with high purity and yield, which is especially useful for sample preparation of Human Liver Proteome Project.

  20. Analysis of 3-MCPD- and 3-MCPD dipalmitate-induced proteomic changes in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Braeuning, Albert; Sawada, Stefanie; Oberemm, Axel; Lampen, Alfonso

    2015-12-01

    3-Monochloropropane-1,2-diol (3-MCPD) and 3-MCPD fatty acid esters are process contaminants in foodstuff which are generated during thermal treatment. Long-term exposure to 3-MCPD or 3-MCPD esters causes toxicity especially in kidney and testis. 3-MCPD esters are efficiently hydrolyzed in the gastrointestinal tract, suggesting that their toxicity is mediated by free 3-MCPD. Combined exposure to free 3-MCPD and 3-MCPD released from 3-MCPD esters might lead to dietary consumption above the tolerable daily intake of 2 μg/kg body weight/day. Suspected mechanisms of 3-MCPD toxicity include the inhibition of glycolysis and oxidative stress. Here, a comparative proteomic approach was followed to analyze the effects of 3-MCPD or 3-MCPD dipalmitate in livers from rats exposed to 10 mg/kg body weight 3-MCPD, an equimolar dose of 3-MCPD dipalmitate, or a 4-fold lower dose of the ester during a 28-day repeated-dose feeding study. Early cellular changes were monitored in the absence of overt toxicity. A comprehensive view of 3-MCPD- or 3-MCPD dipalmitate-triggered proteomic changes in rat liver links to previously proposed mechanisms of toxicity and substantially extends our knowledge on molecular hepatic effects of 3-MCPD. Organ-independent marker proteins altered upon 3-MCPD exposure, for example DJ-1/PARK7, were identified by comparison of the proteomic patterns of kidney, testis and liver.

  1. Liver proteome of mice with different genetic susceptibilities to the effects of fluoride

    PubMed Central

    KHAN, Zohaib Nisar; LEITE, Aline de Lima; CHARONE, Senda; SABINO, Isabela Tomazini; MARTINI, Tatiana; PEREIRA, Heloísa Aparecida Barbosa da Silva; OLIVEIRA, Rodrigo Cardoso; BUZALAF, Marília Afonso Rabelo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A/J and 129P3/J mice strains have been widely studied over the last few years because they respond quite differently to fluoride (F) exposure. 129P3/J mice are remarkably resistant to the development of dental fluorosis, despite excreting less F in urine and having higher circulating F levels. These two strains also present different characteristics regardless of F exposure. Objective In this study, we investigated the differential pattern of protein expression in the liver of these mice to provide insights on why they have different responses to F. Material and Methods Weanling male A/J and 129P3/J mice (n=10 from each strain) were pared and housed in metabolic cages with ad libitum access to low-F food and deionized water for 42 days. Liver proteome profiles were examined using nLC-MS/MS. Protein function was classified by GO biological process (Cluego v2.0.7 + Clupedia v1.0.8) and protein-protein interaction network was constructed (PSICQUIC, Cytoscape). Results Most proteins with fold change were increased in A/J mice. The functional category with the highest percentage of altered genes was oxidation-reduction process (20%). Subnetwork analysis revealed that proteins with fold change interacted with Disks large homolog 4 and Calcium-activated potassium channel subunit alpha-1. A/J mice had an increase in proteins related to energy flux and oxidative stress. Conclusion This could be a possible explanation for the high susceptibility of these mice to the effects of F, since the exposure also induces oxidative stress. PMID:27383706

  2. Identification of human liver microsomal proteins adducted by a reactive metabolite using shotgun proteomics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanou; Xiao, Qing; Humphreys, W Griffith; Dongre, Ashok; Shu, Yue-Zhong

    2014-09-15

    Covalent modification of cellular proteins by chemically reactive compounds/metabolites has the potential to disrupt biological function and elicit serious adverse drug reactions. Information on the nature and binding patterns of protein targets are critical toward understanding the mechanism of drug induced toxicity. Protein covalent binding studies established in liver microsomes can quantitively estimate the extent of protein modification, but they provide little information on the nature of the modified proteins. In this article, we describe a label-free shotgun proteomic workflow for the identification of target proteins modified in situ by reactive metabolites in human liver microsome incubations. First, we developed a shotgun proteomic workflow for the characterization of the human liver microsomal subproteome, which consists of predominately membrane-bound proteins. Human liver microsomes were solubilized with a combination of MS-compatible organic solvents followed by protein reduction, alkylation, and tryptic digestion. The unmodified samples were analyzed by UHPLC-MS/MS, and the proteins were identified by database searching. This workflow led to the successful identification of 329 human liver microsomal subproteome proteins with 1% FDR (false discovery rate). The same method was then applied to identify the modifications of human liver microsomal proteins by a known reactive metabolite 2-(methylsulfonyl)benzo[d]thiazole (2), either after incubation directly with 2 or with its parent compound 2-(methylthio)benzo[d]thiazole (1). A total of 19 modified constituent peptides which could be mapped to 18 proteins were identified in human liver microsomes incubated directly with 2. Among these, 5 modified constituent peptides which could be mapped to 4 proteins were identified in incubation with 1, which is known to generate 2 in human liver microsomal incubations. This label-free workflow is generally applicable to the identification and characterization of

  3. The Proteome of Human Liver Peroxisomes: Identification of Five New Peroxisomal Constituents by a Label-Free Quantitative Proteomics Survey

    PubMed Central

    Ofman, Rob; Bunse, Christian; Pawlas, Magdalena; Hayen, Heiko; Eisenacher, Martin; Stephan, Christian; Meyer, Helmut E.; Waterham, Hans R.; Erdmann, Ralf; Wanders, Ronald J.; Warscheid, Bettina

    2013-01-01

    The peroxisome is a key organelle of low abundance that fulfils various functions essential for human cell metabolism. Severe genetic diseases in humans are caused by defects in peroxisome biogenesis or deficiencies in the function of single peroxisomal proteins. To improve our knowledge of this important cellular structure, we studied for the first time human liver peroxisomes by quantitative proteomics. Peroxisomes were isolated by differential and Nycodenz density gradient centrifugation. A label-free quantitative study of 314 proteins across the density gradient was accomplished using high resolution mass spectrometry. By pairing statistical data evaluation, cDNA cloning and in vivo colocalization studies, we report the association of five new proteins with human liver peroxisomes. Among these, isochorismatase domain containing 1 protein points to the existence of a new metabolic pathway and hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase like 2 protein is likely involved in the transport or β-oxidation of fatty acids in human peroxisomes. The detection of alcohol dehydrogenase 1A suggests the presence of an alternative alcohol-oxidizing system in hepatic peroxisomes. In addition, lactate dehydrogenase A and malate dehydrogenase 1 partially associate with human liver peroxisomes and enzyme activity profiles support the idea that NAD+ becomes regenerated during fatty acid β-oxidation by alternative shuttling processes in human peroxisomes involving lactate dehydrogenase and/or malate dehydrogenase. Taken together, our data represent a valuable resource for future studies of peroxisome biochemistry that will advance research of human peroxisomes in health and disease. PMID:23460848

  4. Proteomics Analysis of Alfalfa Response to Heat Stress

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weimin; Wei, Zhenwu; Qiao, Zhihong; Wu, Zinian; Cheng, Lixiang; Wang, Yuyang

    2013-01-01

    The proteome responses to heat stress have not been well understood. In this study, alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. cv. Huaiyin) seedlings were exposed to 25°C (control) and 40°C (heat stress) in growth chambers, and leaves were collected at 24, 48 and 72 h after treatment, respectively. The morphological, physiological and proteomic processes were negatively affected under heat stress. Proteins were extracted and separated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE), and differentially expressed protein spots were identified by mass spectrometry (MS). Totally, 81 differentially expressed proteins were identified successfully by MALDI-TOF/TOF. These proteins were categorized into nine classes: including metabolism, energy, protein synthesis, protein destination/storage, transporters, intracellular traffic, cell structure, signal transduction and disease/defence. Five proteins were further analyzed for mRNA levels. The results of the proteomics analyses provide a better understanding of the molecular basis of heat-stress responses in alfalfa. PMID:24324825

  5. Characterization of the rat liver membrane proteome using peptide immobilized pH gradient isoelectric focusing.

    PubMed

    Chick, J M; Haynes, P A; Molloy, M P; Bjellqvist, B; Baker, M S; Len, A C L

    2008-03-01

    Membrane proteins are of particular interest in proteomics because of their potential therapeutic utility. Past proteomic approaches used to investigate membrane proteins have only been partially successful at providing a comprehensive analysis due to the inherently hydrophobic nature and low abundance for some of these proteins. Recently, these difficulties have been improved by analyzing membrane protein enriched samples using shotgun proteomics. In addition, the recent application of methanol-assisted trypsin digestion of membrane proteins has been shown to be a method to improve membrane protein identifications. In this study, a comparison of different concentrations of methanol was assessed for assisting membrane protein digestion with trypsin prior to analysis using a gel-based shotgun proteomics approach called peptide immobilized pH gradient isoelectric focusing (IPG-IEF). We demonstrate the use of peptide IEF on pH 3-10 IPG strips as the first dimension of two-dimensional shotgun proteomics for protein identifications from the membrane fraction of rat liver. Tryptic digestion of proteins was carried out in varying concentrations of methanol in 10 mM ammonium bicarbonate: 0% (v/v), 40% (v/v), and 60% (v/v). A total of 800 proteins were identified from 60% (v/v) methanol, which increased the protein identifications by 17% and 14% compared to 0% (v/v) methanol and 40% (v/v) methanol assisted digestion, respectively. In total, 1549 nonredundant proteins were identified from all three concentrations of methanol including 690 (42%) integral membrane proteins of which 626 of these proteins contained at least one transmembrane domain. Peptide IPG-IEF separation of peptides was successful as the peptides were separated into discrete pI regions with high resolution. The results from this study prove utility of 60% (v/v) methanol assisted digestion in conjunction with peptide IPG-IEF as an optimal shotgun proteomics technique for the separation and identification of

  6. Plant cell organelle proteomics in response to abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Zahed; Nouri, Mohammad-Zaman; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2012-01-01

    Proteomics is one of the finest molecular techniques extensively being used for the study of protein profiling of a given plant species experiencing stressed conditions. Plants respond to a stress by alteration in the pattern of protein expression, either by up-regulating of the existing protein pool or by the synthesizing novel proteins primarily associated with plants antioxidative defense mechanism. Improved protein extraction protocols and advance techniques for identification of novel proteins have been standardized in different plant species at both cellular and whole plant level for better understanding of abiotic stress sensing and intracellular stress signal transduction mechanisms. In contrast, an in-depth proteome study of subcellular organelles could generate much detail information about the intrinsic mechanism of stress response as it correlates the possible relationship between the protein abundance and plant stress tolerance. Although a wealth of reviews devoted to plant proteomics are available, review articles dedicated to plant cell organelle proteins response under abiotic stress are very scanty. In the present review, an attempt has been made to summarize all significant contributions related to abiotic stresses and their impacts on organelle proteomes for better understanding of plants abiotic stress tolerance mechanism at protein level. This review will not only provide new insights into the plants stress response mechanisms, which are necessary for future development of genetically engineered stress tolerant crop plants for the benefit of humankind, but will also highlight the importance of studying changes in protein abundance within the cell organelles in response to abiotic stress.

  7. Comparisons of liver proteomes in the European flounder Platichthys flesus from three contrasted estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galland, Claire; Dupuy, Célie; Capitaine, Carole; Auffret, Michel; Quiniou, Louis; Laroche, Jean; Pichereau, Vianney

    2013-01-01

    Estuaries are important areas highly susceptible to anthropogenic degradations like pollution. Estuarine species have thus to cope with many types of constraints depending on the estuaries' characteristics. The European flounder Platichthys flesus is considered as a sentinel species for the monitoring of estuarine water quality. In this study, juvenile flounders (0+ group) were sampled from three contrasted Channel estuaries, i.e. the Seine, the Canche and the Tamar, and we characterized their liver proteomes by using a two-dimensional electrophoresis based proteomic approach. We showed that 27 protein spots differentially accumulated between the 3 populations. Six of these proteins were identified by MALDI TOF-TOF mass spectrometry. Flounders from the Seine and from the Tamar, two highly polluted estuaries, displayed common differences, i.e. an increase of the energetic- and the glutathione-metabolism. The most accumulated protein in the Seine's samples (6.7-fold) was a Vitelline Membrane Outer layer protein 1 homolog, suggesting oogenesis deregulation in these juvenile (sexually immature) flounders. Future works applying this kind of proteomic approach on flounders experimentally exposed to conditions that mimic environmental constraints will help to better understand the significance of these environmental proteomic signatures.

  8. Proteomic analysis of plasma from rats following total parenteral nutrition-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jai-Jen; Kuo, Hsing-Chun; Lee, Kam-Fai; Tsai, Tung-Hu

    2015-11-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is provided as the primary nitrogen source to manage patients with intestinal failure who were not able to sustain themselves on enteral feeds. The most common complication of long-term TPN use is hepatitis. A proteomic approach was used to identify proteins that are differentially expressed in the plasma of rats following TPN-related acute liver injury. Six male rats were randomly assigned to either the saline infusion control group or the TPN infusion group. Our results demonstrate that TPN infusion in rats resulted in hepatic dysfunction and hepatocyte apoptosis. Five proteins that were differentially expressed between TPN infusion and normal rats were determined and validated in vivo. Fascinatingly, the proteomic differential displays, downregulated proteins included peroxiredoxin 2 (PRDX2), alpha-1-antiproteinase (A1AT), and fibrinogen gamma chain (FIBG), which were involved in oxidative stress, inflammatory respondence and cells apoptosis. After TPN infusion, two protein spots showed increased expression, namely, the glucagon receptor (GLR) protein and apolipoprotein A-1 (APOA1), which may mediate the effects of TPN administration on glycogen and lipid metabolism. In this study, proteomic analysis suggested TPN-related acute liver injury could be involved in limiting cellular protection mechanisms against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. On the basis of the results, we also give molecular evidences replying TPN-related hepatitis.

  9. Proteomic profiling of expression of proteasomal subunits from livers of mice treated with diethylnitrosamine.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Fuqiang; Lu, Jia; You, Pan; Yang, Zengming; Yang, Pengyuan; Ma, Qiling; Tao, Tao

    2013-01-01

    The liver plays a central role in transforming and clearing chemicals and is susceptible to the toxicity from these agents. Diethylnitrosamine is metabolized primarily in the liver by cytochrome P-450 and can cause DNA damage. The 26S proteasome is a large proteolytic complex that degrades ubiquitinated proteins, and regulates many physiological processes. We used proteomics-based approaches to examine expressional differences of liver proteasomal subunits from diethylnitrosamine-treated mice. The expression of most proteasomal subunits was observed to be upregulated in the analysis of 2DE and MALDI-TOF MS/MS. Some of these differentially expressed proteasomal subunits were further confirmed by Western blot, RT-PCR, and immunohistochemistry. Our results provided useful information on the relationship between the proteasomal complex and related diseases.

  10. Mitochondrial Molecular Pathophysiology of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Proteomics Approach.

    PubMed

    Nuño-Lámbarri, Natalia; Barbero-Becerra, Varenka J; Uribe, Misael; Chávez-Tapia, Norberto C

    2016-03-15

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver condition that can progress to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, cirrhosis and cancer. It is considered an emerging health problem due to malnourishment or a high-fat diet (HFD) intake, which is observed worldwide. It is well known that the hepatocytes' apoptosis phenomenon is one of the most important features of NAFLD. Thus, this review focuses on revealing, through a proteomics approach, the complex network of protein interactions that promote fibrosis, liver cell stress, and apoptosis. According to different types of in vitro and murine models, it has been found that oxidative/nitrative protein stress leads to mitochondrial dysfunction, which plays a major role in stimulating NAFLD damage. Human studies have revealed the importance of novel biomarkers, such as retinol-binding protein 4, lumican, transgelin 2 and hemoglobin, which have a significant role in the disease. The post-genome era has brought proteomics technology, which allows the determination of molecular pathogenesis in NAFLD. This has led to the search for biomarkers which improve early diagnosis and optimal treatment and which may effectively prevent fatal consequences such as cirrhosis or cancer.

  11. Mitochondrial Molecular Pathophysiology of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Proteomics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Nuño-Lámbarri, Natalia; Barbero-Becerra, Varenka J.; Uribe, Misael; Chávez-Tapia, Norberto C.

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic liver condition that can progress to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, cirrhosis and cancer. It is considered an emerging health problem due to malnourishment or a high-fat diet (HFD) intake, which is observed worldwide. It is well known that the hepatocytes’ apoptosis phenomenon is one of the most important features of NAFLD. Thus, this review focuses on revealing, through a proteomics approach, the complex network of protein interactions that promote fibrosis, liver cell stress, and apoptosis. According to different types of in vitro and murine models, it has been found that oxidative/nitrative protein stress leads to mitochondrial dysfunction, which plays a major role in stimulating NAFLD damage. Human studies have revealed the importance of novel biomarkers, such as retinol-binding protein 4, lumican, transgelin 2 and hemoglobin, which have a significant role in the disease. The post-genome era has brought proteomics technology, which allows the determination of molecular pathogenesis in NAFLD. This has led to the search for biomarkers which improve early diagnosis and optimal treatment and which may effectively prevent fatal consequences such as cirrhosis or cancer. PMID:26999105

  12. Environmental Proteomics: Changes in the Proteome of Marine Organisms in Response to Environmental Stress, Pollutants, Infection, Symbiosis, and Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomanek, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Environmental proteomics, the study of changes in the abundance of proteins and their post-translational modifications, has become a powerful tool for generating hypotheses regarding how the environment affects the biology of marine organisms. Proteomics discovers hitherto unknown cellular effects of environmental stressors such as changes in thermal, osmotic, and anaerobic conditions. Proteomic analyses have advanced the characterization of the biological effects of pollutants and identified comprehensive and pollutant-specific sets of biomarkers, especially those highlighting post-translational modifications. Proteomic analyses of infected organisms have highlighted the broader changes occurring during immune responses and how the same pathways are attenuated during the maintenance of symbiotic relationships. Finally, proteomic changes occurring during the early life stages of marine organisms emphasize the importance of signaling events during development in a rapidly changing environment. Changes in proteins functioning in energy metabolism, cytoskeleton, protein stabilization and turnover, oxidative stress, and signaling are common responses to environmental change.

  13. Proteomic Characterization of Host Response to Yersinia pestis

    SciTech Connect

    Chromy, B; Perkins, J; Heidbrink, J; Gonzales, A; Murhpy, G; Fitch, J P; McCutchen-Maloney, S

    2004-05-11

    Host-pathogen interactions result in protein expression changes within both the host and the pathogen. Here, results from proteomic characterization of host response following exposure to Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, and to two near neighbors, Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. enterocolitica, are reported. Human monocyte-like cells were chosen as a model for macrophage immune response to pathogen exposure. Two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry was used to identify host proteins with differential expression following exposure to these three closely related Yersinia species. This comparative proteomic characterization of host response clearly shows that host protein expression patterns are distinct for the different pathogen exposures, and contributes to further understanding of Y. pestis virulence and host defense mechanisms. This work also lays the foundation for future studies aimed at defining biomarkers for presymptomatic detection of plague.

  14. Proteomics of mouse liver microsomes: performance of different protein separation workflows for LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Zgoda, Victor G; Moshkovskii, Sergei A; Ponomarenko, Elena A; Andreewski, Timofey V; Kopylov, Arthur T; Tikhonova, Olga V; Melnik, Stanislav A; Lisitsa, Andrei V; Archakov, Alexander I

    2009-08-01

    The mouse liver microsome proteome was investigated using ion trap MS combined with three separation workflows including SDS-PAGE followed by reverse-phase LC of in-gel protein digestions (519 proteins identified); 2-D LC of protein digestion (1410 proteins); whole protein separation on mRP heat-stable column followed by 2-D LC of protein digestions from each fraction (3-D LC; 3703 proteins). The higher number of proteins identified in the workflow corresponded to the lesser percentage of run-to-run reproducibility. Gel-based method yielded a number of predicted membrane proteins similar to LC-based workflows.

  15. Exploring the effects of tert-butylhydroperoxide induced liver injury using proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chien-Heng; Tung, Shui-Yi; Huang, Wen-Shih; Lu, Chien-Chang; Lee, Ko-Chao; Hsieh, Yung-Yu; Chang, Pey-Jium; Liang, Hwey-Fang; Chen, Jiann-Hwa; Lin, Tseng-Hsi; Hsieh, Meng Chiao; Kuo, Hsing-Chun

    2014-02-28

    Tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP), an organic lipid hydroperoxide analog, has been demonstrated to exert pro-oxidant effects to evaluate mechanisms involving oxidative stress in hepatocyte cells and rat liver. Herein, we present an investigation of the event of molecular mechanism of t-BHP related acute liver injury. A proteomic approach was used to identify proteins which are differentially expressed in liver cells following t-BHP treatment and the mechanism of its action in apoptotic and endoplasmic reticulum stress pathways. Our results demonstrate that the t-BHP treatment of liver cells increased cell cytoxicity and apoptosis. t-BHP dose-dependent induction of cell apoptosis and stained liver sections relieved the acute rat liver injury were accompanied by sustained phosphorylation of JNK1/2 and p65. In addition, there were 13 differentially displayed proteins between the t-BHP-induced and untreated were assayed and validated in vivo. Furthermore, we demonstrated that t-BHP induced human Chang liver cell viability and apoptosis properties by up-regulating the levels of ETFA (electron transfer flavoprotein subunit alpha). This study demonstrated that there was an increase in the cellular levels of ETFA in the t-BHP induction in viability and apoptosis via the activation of JNK1/2 and NFκB signaling modules. NAC administration and shRNA ETFA conferred resistance to t-BHP-increased ETFA and CHOP expression via IRE1-alpha/TRAF2 complex formation, activation of JNK1/2 and p50. We concluded that the mechanism of t-BHP-induced an apoptosis cascade and endoplasmic reticulum stress in hepatocyte cells by up-regulation of ETFA, providing a new mechanism for liver injury.

  16. Proteomic changes at 8 weeks after infection are associated with chronic liver pathology in experimental schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Manivannan, Bhagyashree; Jordan, T William; Secor, W Evan; La Flamme, Anne Camille

    2012-03-16

    Chronic Schistosoma mansoni infection can present as a moderate or severe disease, termed intestinal or hepatosplenic schistosomiasis, respectively. Similarly, either moderate splenomegaly or hypersplenomegaly syndrome develops in CBA/J mice by 20weeks of infection and is similar to intestinal or hepatosplenic schistosomiasis respectively. Using this mouse model and two-dimensional differential in gel electrophoresis, the liver proteomic signatures of uninfected mice and mice infected for 6, 8, 12, or 20weeks were compared, and significant protein spots identified using mass spectrometry. We found the greatest number of changes at 12weeks suggesting that this period represents the peak time of change. Pathway analysis identified specific proteins and pathways that correlated to the pathological changes indicative of severe disease, and these pathways were involved as early as 8weeks after infection. These findings provide insight into the development of severe liver pathology in schistosomiasis and may aid in developing biomarkers for hepatosplenic schistosomiasis.

  17. Discovery of novel genes and gene isoforms by integrating transcriptomic and proteomic profiling from mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Wu, Peng; Zhang, Hongyu; Lin, Weiran; Hao, Yunwei; Ren, Liangliang; Zhang, Chengpu; Li, Ning; Wei, Handong; Jiang, Ying; He, Fuchu

    2014-05-01

    Comprehensively identifying gene expression in both transcriptomic and proteomic levels of one tissue is a prerequisite for a deeper understanding of its biological functions. Alternative splicing and RNA editing, two main forms of transcriptional processing, play important roles in transcriptome and proteome diversity and result in multiple isoforms for one gene, which are hard to identify by mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics approach due to the relative lack of isoform information in standard protein databases. In our study, we employed MS and RNA-Seq in parallel into mouse liver tissue and captured a considerable catalogue of both transcripts and proteins that, respectively, covered 60 and 34% of protein-coding genes in Ensembl. We then developed a bioinformatics workflow for building a customized protein database that for the first time included new splicing-derived peptides and RNA-editing-caused peptide variants, allowing us to more completely identify protein isoforms. Using this experimentally determined database, we totally identified 150 peptides not present in standard biological databases at false discovery rate of <1%, corresponding to 72 novel splicing isoforms, 43 new genetic regions, and 15 RNA-editing sites. Of these, 11 randomly selected novel events passed experimental verification by PCR and Sanger sequencing. New discoveries of gene products with high confidence in two omics levels demonstrated the robustness and effectiveness of our approach and its potential application into improve genome annotation. All the MS data have been deposited to the iProx ( http://ww.iprox.org ) with the identifier IPX00003601.

  18. Proteomic Analysis of One-carbon Metabolism-related Marker in Liver of Rat Offspring.

    PubMed

    You, Young-Ah; Lee, Ji Hye; Kwon, Eun Jin; Yoo, Jae Young; Kwon, Woo-Sung; Pang, Myung-Geol; Kim, Young Ju

    2015-11-01

    Maternal food intake has a significant effect on the fetal environment, and an inadequate maternal diet may result in intrauterine growth restriction. Intrauterine growth restriction newborn rat pups nursed by normal diet-fed dams exhibited rapid catch-up growth, which plays a critical role in the risk for metabolic and cardiovascular disease in later life. Specifically, one-carbon metabolism in the liver plays a critical role in placental and fetal growth. Impaired functioning of one-carbon metabolism is associated with increased homocysteine levels. In this study, we applied a comprehensive proteomic approach to identify differential expression of proteins related to one-carbon metabolism in the livers of rat offspring as an effect of maternal food restriction during gestation. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002578. We determined that betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase 1, methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase 1, and ATP synthase subunit beta mitochondrial (ATP5B) expression levels were significantly reduced in the livers of rat offspring exposed to maternal food restriction during gestation compared with in the offspring of rats fed a normal diet (p < 0.05). Moreover, the expression levels of betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase 1, methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase 1, and ATP synthase subunit beta mitochondrial were negatively correlated with serum homocysteine concentration in male offspring exposed to maternal food restriction during gestation and normal diet during lactation. However, in female offspring only expression levels of methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase 1 were negatively correlated with homocysteine concentration. This study shows that maternal food restriction during late gestation and normal diet during lactation lead to increased homocysteine concentration through disturbance of one-carbon metabolism in the livers of male offspring. This suggests that male offspring have an increased gender

  19. Plasma proteome analysis reveals the geographical origin and liver tumor status of Dab (Limanda limanda) from UK marine waters.

    PubMed

    Ward, Douglas G; Wei, Wenbin; Cheng, Yaping; Billingham, Lucinda J; Martin, Ashley; Johnson, Philip I; Lyons, Brett P; Feist, Stephen W; Stentiford, Grant D

    2006-06-15

    The flatfish species dab (Limanda limanda) is the sentinel for offshore marine monitoring in the United Kingdom National Marine Monitoring Programme (NMMP). At certain sites in the North and Irish Seas, the prevalence of macroscopic liver tumors can exceed 10%. The plasma proteome of these fish potentially contains reporter proteins or "biomarkers" that may enable development of diagnostic tests for liver cancer and further our understanding of the disease. Following selection of sample groups by quality-assured histopathology ("phenotype anchoring"), we used surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization (SELDI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry to produce proteomic profiles of plasma from 213 dab collected during the 2004 UK NMMP. The resulting protein profiles were compared between fish from the North and Irish Seas and between fish with liver neoplasia or nondiseased liver. Significant differences were found between the plasma proteomes of dab from the North Sea and Irish Sea, which in conjunction with artificial neural networks can correctly determine from which sea dab were captured in 85% of the cases. In addition, the presence of liver tumors is associated with significant changes in the plasma proteome. We conclude that SELDI-based plasma profiling is potentially of use in nonlethal marine monitoring using wild sentinels such as dab. Furthermore, accurate selection of sample groups is critical for avoiding effects of confounding factors such as age, gender, and geographic origin of samples. PMID:16830578

  20. Alteration of protein profile in rat liver of animals exposed to subacute diazinon: a proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Lari, Parisa; Rashedinia, Marzieh; Abnous, Khalil; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2014-05-01

    Diazinon, an organophosphorus insecticide, is employed to control pests in agriculture. Diazinon may contaminate the environment during the manufacturing process or agricultural application. Previous studies have revealed that diazinon may induce alteration in the protein profile of the liver. Here, a proteomics approach was used to investigate the effects on the protein profile in the liver of rats of subacute oral exposures at 15 mg/kg of diazinon. Liver proteins were separated using 2D-PAGE, and stained by MS-compatible silver staining and/or the fluorescent SYPRO® Ruby protein gel stain. Gels were scanned and analyzed using the Image Master software. Differentially displayed protein species were identified using MALDI-TOF/TOF and MASCOT software. Significantly altered protein species were identified to be involved in apoptosis, cell metabolism, transport, and antioxidant systems. Exposure to diazinon decreased levels of some species of catalase, peroxiredoxin-6, 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase, and glucose regulated protein78, whereas the level of protein disulfide-isomerase A3 increased. Our results suggested that diazinon may induce hepatotoxicity through oxidative stress, apoptosis, and metabolic disorders in rat liver.

  1. Proteome response at the edge of protein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez de Groot, Natalia; Gomes, Ricardo A.; Villar-Pique, Anna; Babu, M. Madan; Coelho, Ana Varela; Ventura, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    Proteins adopt defined structures and are crucial to most cellular functions. Their misfolding and aggregation is associated with numerous degenerative human disorders such as type II diabetes, Huntington's or Alzheimer's diseases. Here, we aim to understand why cells promote the formation of protein foci. Comparison of two amyloid-β-peptide variants, mostly insoluble but differently recruited by the cell (inclusion body versus diffused), reveals small differences in cell fitness and proteome response. We suggest that the levels of oxidative stress act as a sensor to trigger protein recruitment into foci. Our data support a common cytoplasmic response being able to discern and react to the specific properties of polypeptides. PMID:25673330

  2. Proteome response at the edge of protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Sanchez de Groot, Natalia; Gomes, Ricardo A; Villar-Pique, Anna; Babu, M Madan; Coelho, Ana Varela; Ventura, Salvador

    2015-02-01

    Proteins adopt defined structures and are crucial to most cellular functions. Their misfolding and aggregation is associated with numerous degenerative human disorders such as type II diabetes, Huntington's or Alzheimer's diseases. Here, we aim to understand why cells promote the formation of protein foci. Comparison of two amyloid-β-peptide variants, mostly insoluble but differently recruited by the cell (inclusion body versus diffused), reveals small differences in cell fitness and proteome response. We suggest that the levels of oxidative stress act as a sensor to trigger protein recruitment into foci. Our data support a common cytoplasmic response being able to discern and react to the specific properties of polypeptides. PMID:25673330

  3. Comparative proteomic analysis of primary mouse liver c-Kit-(CD45/TER119)- stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    He, Yu-Fei; Liu, Yin-Kun; Lu, Hao-Jie; Chen, Jun; Yang, Peng-Yuan

    2007-11-01

    Liver stem/progenitor cells play a key role in liver development and maybe also in liver cancer development. In our previous study a population of c-Kit-(CD45/TER119)- liver stem/progenitor cells in mouse fetal liver, was successfully sorted with large amount (10(6)-10(7)) by using immuno-magnetic microbeads. In this study, the sorted liver stem/progenitor cells were used for proteomic study. Proteins of the sorted liver stem/progenitor cells and unsorted fetal liver cells were investigated using two-dimensional electrophoresis. A two-dimensional proteome map of liver stem/progenitor cells was obtained for the first time. Proteins that exhibited significantly upregulation in liver stem/progenitor cells were identified by peptide mass fingerprinting and peptide sequencing. Nineteen protein spots corresponding to 12 different proteins were identified as showing significant upregulation in liver stem/progenitor cells and seem to play important roles in such cells in cell metabolism, cell cycle regulation, and stress. An interesting finding is that most of the upregulated proteins were overexpressed in various cancers (11 of 12, including 6 in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)) and involved in cancer development as reported in previous studies. Some of the identified proteins were validated by real-time PCR, Western blotting, and immunostaining. Taken together, the data presented provide a significant new protein-level insight into the biology of liver stem/progenitor cells, a key population of cells that might be also involved in liver cancer development.

  4. Liver membrane proteome glycosylation changes in mice bearing an extra-hepatic tumor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Albert; Chick, Joel M; Kolarich, Daniel; Haynes, Paul A; Robertson, Graham R; Tsoli, Maria; Jankova, Lucy; Clarke, Stephen J; Packer, Nicolle H; Baker, Mark S

    2011-09-01

    Cancer is well known to be associated with alterations in membrane protein glycosylation (Bird, N. C., Mangnall, D., and Majeed, A. W. (2006) Biology of colorectal liver metastases: A review. J. Surg. Oncol. 94, 68-80; Dimitroff, C. J., Pera, P., Dall'Olio, F., Matta, K. L., Chandrasekaran, E. V., Lau, J. T., and Bernacki, R. J. (1999) Cell surface n-acetylneuraminic acid alpha2,3-galactoside-dependent intercellular adhesion of human colon cancer cells. Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 256, 631-636; and Arcinas, A., Yen, T. Y., Kebebew, E., and Macher, B. A. (2009) Cell surface and secreted protein profiles of human thyroid cancer cell lines reveal distinct glycoprotein patterns. J. Proteome Res. 8, 3958-3968). Equally, it has been well established that tumor-associated inflammation through the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines is a common cause of reduced hepatic drug metabolism and increased toxicity in advanced cancer patients being treated with cytotoxic chemotherapies. However, little is known about the impact of bearing a tumor (and downstream effects like inflammation) on liver membrane protein glycosylation. In this study, proteomic and glycomic analyses were used in combination to determine whether liver membrane protein glycosylation was affected in mice bearing the Engelbreth-Holm Swarm sarcoma. Peptide IPG-IEF and label-free quantitation determined that many enzymes involved in the protein glycosylation pathway specifically; mannosidases (Man1a-I, Man1b-I and Man2a-I), mannoside N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases (Mgat-I and Mgat-II), galactosyltransferases (B3GalT-VII, B4GalT-I, B4GalT-III, C1GalT-I, C1GalT-II, and GalNT-I), and sialyltransferases (ST3Gal-I, ST6Gal-I, and ST6GalNAc-VI) were up-regulated in all livers of tumor-bearing mice (n = 3) compared with nontumor bearing controls (n = 3). In addition, many cell surface lectins: Sialoadhesin-1 (Siglec-1), C-type lectin family 4f (Kupffer cell receptor), and Galactose-binding lectin 9 (Galectin-9

  5. Proteome Analysis of Borrelia burgdorferi Response to Environmental Change

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, Thomas E.; Luft, Benjamin J.; Yang, Xiaohua; Nicora, Carrie D.; Camp, David G.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2010-11-02

    We examined global changes in protein expression in the B31 strain of Borrelia burgdorferi, in response to two environmental cues (pH and temperature) chosen for their reported similarity to those encountered at different stages of the organism’s life cycle. Multidimensional nano-liquid chromatographic separations coupled with tandem mass spectrometry were used to examine the array of proteins (i.e., the proteome) of B. burgdorferi for different pH and temperature culture conditions. Changes in pH and temperature elicited in vitro adaptations of this spirochete known to cause Lyme disease and led to alterations in protein expression that are associated with increased microbial pathogenesis. We identified 1031 proteins that represent 59% of the annotated genome of B. burgdorferi and elucidated a core proteome of 414 proteins that were present in all environmental conditions investigated. Observed changes in protein abundances indicated varied replicon usage, as well as proteome functional distributions between the in vitro cell culture conditions. Surprisingly, the pH and temperature conditions that mimicked B. burgdorferi residing in the gut of a fed tick showed a marked reduction in protein diversity. Additionally, the results provide us with leading candidates for exploring how B. burgdorferi adapts to and is able to survive in a wide variety of environmental conditions and lay a foundation for planned in situ studies of B. burgdorferi isolated from the tick midgut and infected animals.

  6. Proteomic analysis of human osteoprogenitor response to disordered nanotopography

    PubMed Central

    Kantawong, Fahsai; Burchmore, Richard; Gadegaard, Nikolaj; Oreffo, Richard O. C.; Dalby, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that microgroove-initiated contact guidance can induce bone formation in osteoprogenitor cells (OPGs) and produce changes in the cell proteome. For proteomic analysis, differential in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE) can be used as a powerful diagnostic method to provide comparable data between the proteomic profiles of cells cultured in different conditions. This study focuses on the response of OPGs to a novel nanoscale pit topography with osteoinductive properties compared with planar controls. Disordered near-square nanopits with 120 nm diameter and 100 nm depth with an average 300 nm centre-to-centre spacing (300 nm spaced pits in square pattern, but with ±50 nm disorder) were fabricated on 1×1 cm2 polycaprolactone sheets. Human OPGs were seeded onto the test materials. DIGE analysis revealed changes in the expression of a number of distinct proteins, including upregulation of actin isoforms, beta-galectin1, vimentin and procollagen-proline, 2-oxoglutarate 4-dioxygenase and prolyl 4-hydroxylase. Downregulation of enolase, caldesmon, zyxin, GRASP55, Hsp70 (BiP/GRP78), RNH1, cathepsin D and Hsp27 was also observed. The differences in cell morphology and mineralization are also reported using histochemical techniques. PMID:19068473

  7. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of human liver cytochrome(s) P450

    SciTech Connect

    Shrivas, Kamlesh; Mindaye, Samuel T.; Getie-Kebtie, Melkamu; Alterman, Michail A.

    2013-02-15

    The major objective of personalized medicine is to select optimized drug therapies and to a large degree such mission is determined by the expression profiles of cytochrome(s) P450 (CYP). Accordingly, a proteomic case study in personalized medicine is provided by the superfamily of cytochromes P450. Our knowledge about CYP isozyme expression on a protein level is very limited and based exclusively on DNA/mRNA derived data. Such information is not sufficient because transcription and translation events do not lead to correlated levels of expressed proteins. Here we report expression profiles of CYPs in human liver obtained by mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic approach. We analyzed 32 samples of human liver microsomes (HLM) of different sexes, ages and ethnicity along with samples of recombinant human CYPs. We have experimentally confirmed that each CYP isozyme can be effectively differentiated by their unique isozyme-specific tryptic peptide(s). Trypsin digestion patterns for almost 30 human CYP isozymes were established. Those findings should assist in selecting tryptic peptides suitable for MS-based quantitation. The data obtained demonstrate remarkable differences in CYP expression profiles. CYP2E1, CYP2C8 and CYP4A11 were the only isozymes found in all HLM samples. Female and pediatric HLM samples revealed much more diverse spectrum of expressed CYPs isozymes compared to male HLM. We have confirmed expression of a number of “rare” CYP (CYP2J2, CYP4B1, CYP4V2, CYP4F3, CYP4F11, CYP8B1, CYP19A1, CYP24A1 and CYP27A1) and obtained first direct experimental data showing expression of such CYPs as CYP2F1, CYP2S1, CYP2W1, CYP4A22, CYP4X1, and CYP26A1 on a protein level. - Highlights: ► First detailed proteomic analysis of CYP isozymes expression in human liver ► Trypsin digestion patterns for almost 30 human CYP isozymes established ► The data obtained demonstrate remarkable differences in CYP expression profiles. ► Female HLM samples revealed more

  8. Serum Proteome Profiling Identifies Novel and Powerful Markers of Cystic Fibrosis Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kügler, Marion; Menendez Menendez, Katrin; Zachoval, Reinhart; Naehrlich, Lutz; Schulz, Richard; Roderfeld, Martin; Roeb, Elke

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Cystic Fibrosis associated liver disease (CFLD) develops in approximately 30% of CF patients. However, routine sensitive diagnostic tools for CFLD are lacking. Within this study, we aimed to identify new experimental biomarkers for the detection of CFLD. Methods 45 CF patients were included in the study and received transient elastography. Differential regulation of 220 different serum proteins was assessed in a subgroup of patients with and without CFLD. Most interesting candidate proteins were further quantified and validated by ELISA in the whole patient cohort. To assess a potential relation of biomarker expression to the degree of hepatic fibrosis, serum biomarkers were further determined in 18 HCV patients where liver histology was available. Results 43 serum proteins differed at least 2-fold in patients with CFLD compared to those without liver disease as identified in proteome profiling. In ELISA quantifications, TIMP-4 and Endoglin were significantly up-regulated in patients with CFLD as diagnosed by clinical guidelines or increased liver stiffness. Pentraxin-3 was significantly decreased in patients with CFLD. Serum TIMP-4 and Endoglin showed highest values in HCV patients with liver cirrhosis compared to those with fibrosis but without cirrhosis. At a cut-off value of 6.3 kPa, transient elastography compassed a very high diagnostic accuracy and specificity for the detection of CFLD. Among the biomarkers, TIMP-4 and Endoglin exhibited a high diagnostic accuracy for CFLD. Diagnostic sensitivities and negative predictive values were increased when elastography and TIMP-4 and Endoglin were combined for the detection of CFLD. Conclusions Serum TIMP-4 and Endoglin are increased in CFLD and their expression correlates with hepatic staging. Determination of TIMP-4 and Endoglin together with transient elastography can increase the sensitivity for the non-invasive diagnosis of CFLD. PMID:23516586

  9. SUMO-Enriched Proteome for Drosophila Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Handu, Mithila; Kaduskar, Bhagyashree; Ravindranathan, Ramya; Soory, Amarendranath; Giri, Ritika; Elango, Vijay Barathi; Gowda, Harsha; Ratnaparkhi, Girish S.

    2015-01-01

    Small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) modification modulates the expression of defense genes in Drosophila, activated by the Toll/nuclear factor-κB and immune-deficient/nuclear factor-κB signaling networks. We have, however, limited understanding of the SUMO-modulated regulation of the immune response and lack information on SUMO targets in the immune system. In this study, we measured the changes to the SUMO proteome in S2 cells in response to a lipopolysaccharide challenge and identified 1619 unique proteins in SUMO-enriched lysates. A confident set of 710 proteins represents the immune-induced SUMO proteome and analysis suggests that specific protein domains, cellular pathways, and protein complexes respond to immune stress. A small subset of the confident set was validated by in-bacto SUMOylation and shown to be bona-fide SUMO targets. These include components of immune signaling pathways such as Caspar, Jra, Kay, cdc42, p38b, 14-3-3ε, as well as cellular proteins with diverse functions, many being components of protein complexes, such as prosß4, Rps10b, SmD3, Tango7, and Aats-arg. Caspar, a human FAF1 ortholog that negatively regulates immune-deficient signaling, is SUMOylated at K551 and responds to treatment with lipopolysaccharide in cultured cells. Our study is one of the first to describe SUMO proteome for the Drosophila immune response. Our data and analysis provide a global framework for the understanding of SUMO modification in the host response to pathogens. PMID:26290570

  10. [Changes in proteome profiles of rat liver microsomes induced by silicon dioxide nanoparticles].

    PubMed

    Tananova, O N; Arianova, E A; Gmoshinskii, I V; Toropygin, I Yu; Khryapova, E V; Trusov, N V; Khotimchenko, S A; Tutel'yan, V A

    2015-01-01

    The effect of daily intragastric administration of an aqueous dispersion of silicon nanoparticles (NPs) (the dose range from 1.0 mg/kg to 100 mg/kg body weight for 28 days) to rats on the proteomic profile of liver microsomes has been investigated by 2D-electrophoresis followed by subsequent mass spectrometry identification. The liver microsomal fraction was isolated by differential centrifugation and its protein composition was analyzed by 2D-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Identification of protein spots was carried out using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analysis. The mass spectrometry analysis revealed the protein GRP78 (78 kD glucose-regulated protein precursor), belonging to the family of heat shock proteins. This protein present in animals of the control group was not detected in NP-treated rats of group 2 (1 mg/kg body weight/day) and group 3 (10 mg/kg body weight/day). This protein predominantly localized in the liver cell endoplasmic reticulum and plasma membrane has the chaperone biological activity. Possible mechanisms of the effects of engineered nanoparticles on biosynthetic processes in the body are discussed.

  11. Characteristic molecular and proteomic signatures of drug-induced liver injury in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Eun, Jung Woo; Bae, Hyun Jin; Shen, Qingyu; Park, Se Jin; Kim, Hyung Seok; Shin, Woo Chan; Yang, Hee Doo; Jin, Chan Young; You, Jueng Soo; Kang, Hyun Joo; Kim, Hoguen; Ahn, Young Min; Park, Won Sang; Lee, Jung Young; Nam, Suk Woo

    2015-02-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a major safety concern during drug development and remains one of the main reasons for withdrawal of drugs from the market. Although it is crucial to develop methods that will detect potential hepatotoxicity of drug candidates as early and as quickly as possible, there is still a lack of sensitive and specific biomarkers for DILI that consequently leads to a scarcity of reliable hepatotoxic data. Hence, in this study, we assessed characteristic molecular signatures in rat liver treated with drugs (pyrazinamide, ranitidine, enalapril, carbamazepine and chlorpromazine) that are known to cause DILI in humans. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis of transcriptome changes induced by DILI-causing drugs resulted in three different subclusters on dendrogram, i.e., hepatocellular, cholestatic and mixed type of DILI at early time points (2 days), and multiclassification analysis suggested 31 genes as discernible markers for each DILI pattern. Further analysis for characteristic molecular signature of each DILI pattern provided a molecular basis for different modes of DILI action. A proteomics study of the same rat livers was used to confirm the results, and the two sets of data showed 60 matching classifiers. In conclusion, the data of different DILI-causing drug treatments from genomic analysis in a rat model suggest that DILI-specific molecular signatures can discriminate different patterns of DILI at an early exposure time point, and that they provide useful information for mechanistic studies that may lead to a better understanding of the molecular basis of DILI.

  12. Proteomics approach on microcystin binding proteins in mouse liver for investigation of microcystin toxicity.

    PubMed

    Imanishi, Susumu; Harada, Ken-ichi

    2004-05-01

    Microcystins (MC) produced by freshwater cyanobacteria are potent hepatotoxins. MC inhibit protein phosphatases (PP) 1 and 2A. MC and okadaic acid (OA), which is a similar PP inhibitor whereas it has a less affinity to PP1 than PP2A, behave similarly to primary culture hepatocytes, with inducements of phosphorylations of cytoskeleton, morphological changes and apoptosis. Although the distribution of OA in mouse liver was observed immunohistochemically, no OA injury was found. The purpose of this study was therefore to determine why only MC has specific toxicities on the liver. A systematic process of MC affinity chromatography and proteomics, using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOFMS, indicated the existence of some MC-binding proteins including the complexes of PP1, PP2A, and PP4 with their own regulatory subunits in mouse liver extracts. The competitive inhibition experiments using affinity chromatography with OA showed that two of the three protein complexes strongly interacted with OA, whereas only the complex of PP1 with the inhibitory subunit NIPP1 did not strongly interacted with OA. These results suggest that the PP1 complex is not related to the common behavior of MC and OA of primary culture hepatocytes, and is related to the specific hepatotoxicities of MC.

  13. Proteomic analysis of hepatitis B surface antigen positive transgenic mouse liver and decrease of cyclophilin A.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chao; Fang, Cai-Yun; Tian, Xiao-Chen; Wang, Long; Yang, Peng-Yuan; Wen, Yu-Mei

    2007-10-01

    The small, 22-nm spherical particles associated with hepatitis B infection are composed of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and usually outnumber the virions by a ratio of 10(2) or 10(3). To study the interactions and pathogenesis between liver cells and the expression of HBsAg, global protein profiles were compared by two dimensional gel-based differential proteomics between the livers of a lineage of HBsAg positive transgenic mice and their HBsAg negative control siblings. A total of 93 proteins were identified in the HBV transgenic mice. Around 45% of these differentially expressed proteins were enzymes associated with metabolism, suggesting that the processing of lipids, carbohydrates and certain amino acids were up- or down-regulated. Among these proteins, cyclophilin A (CypA), the major target for the potent immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin A, was found decreased in HBsAg positive transgenic mouse liver and in a stable cell line expressing HBsAg when compared to their controls. The decrease of intracellular CypA was accompanied by an increased secretion of this protein into the supernatant of HBsAg positive cells. Possible implications of HBsAg expression and the intracellular decrease of CypA are discussed.

  14. Proteomic analysis of liver mitochondria of apolipoprotein E knockout mice treated with metformin.

    PubMed

    Stachowicz, Aneta; Suski, Maciej; Olszanecki, Rafał; Madej, Józef; Okoń, Krzysztof; Korbut, Ryszard

    2012-12-21

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is strongly associated with insulin resistance. Metformin, a widely known anti-diabetic drug, used for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, is also claimed to be useful in treatment of NAFLD. However, both the clinical efficacy and the putative mechanisms underlying the clinical effects of metformin in treating NAFLD are unclear. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), the primary molecular target for metformin, is a known regulator of mitochondrial function. Thus, we used a proteomic approach to investigate the effect of metformin on liver mitochondria of apolipoprotein E knockout (apoE(-/-)) mice, an animal model of NAFLD. Two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry was applied to study the changes in liver mitochondrial protein expression in 6-month old metformin-treated apoE(-/-) mice as compared to non-treated animals. Collectively, 25 differentially expressed proteins were indentified upon metformin treatment including proteins related to metabolism, oxidative stress and cellular respiration. The most up-regulated protein was glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT) - an enzyme, whose deficiency was shown to be directly related to the development of NAFLD. Our results clearly point to the strong mitochondrial action of metformin in NAFLD. Up-regulation of GNMT may represent an important mechanism of beneficial action of metformin in NAFLD treatment.

  15. Compensatory islet response to insulin resistance revealed by quantitative proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    El Ouaamari, Abdelfattah; Zhou, Jian -Ying; Liew, Chong Wee; Shirakawa, Jun; Dirice, Ercument; Gedeon, Nicholas; Kahraman, Sevim; De Jesus, Dario F.; Bhatt, Shweta; Kim, Jong -Seo; Clauss, Therese R. W.; Camp, II, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Wei -Jun; Kulkarni, Rohit N.

    2015-07-07

    Compensatory islet response is a distinct feature of the pre-diabetic insulin resistant state in humans and rodents. To identify alterations in the islet proteome that characterize the adaptive response, we analyzed islets from five-month-old male control, high-fat diet fed (HFD) or obese ob/ob mice by LC-MS(/MS) and quantified ~1,100 islet proteins (at least two peptides) with a false discovery rate <1%. Significant alterations in abundance were observed for ~350 proteins between groups. A majority of alterations were common to both models, and the changes of a subset of ~40 proteins and 12 proteins were verified by targeted quantification using selected reaction monitoring and Western blots, respectively. The insulin resistant islets in both groups exhibited reduced expression of proteins controlling energy metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation, hormone processing, and secretory pathways. Conversely, an increased expression of molecules involved in protein synthesis and folding suggested effects in endoplasmic reticulum stress response, cell survival, and proliferation in both insulin resistant models. In conclusion, we report a unique comparison of the islet proteome that is focused on the compensatory response in two insulin resistant rodent models that are not overtly diabetic. In conclusion, these data provide a valuable resource of candidate proteins to the scientific community to undertake further studies aimed at enhancing β-cell mass in patients with diabetes. The data are available via the MassIVE repository, with accession MSV000079093.

  16. Compensatory islet response to insulin resistance revealed by quantitative proteomics

    DOE PAGES

    El Ouaamari, Abdelfattah; Zhou, Jian -Ying; Liew, Chong Wee; Shirakawa, Jun; Dirice, Ercument; Gedeon, Nicholas; Kahraman, Sevim; De Jesus, Dario F.; Bhatt, Shweta; Kim, Jong -Seo; et al

    2015-07-07

    Compensatory islet response is a distinct feature of the pre-diabetic insulin resistant state in humans and rodents. To identify alterations in the islet proteome that characterize the adaptive response, we analyzed islets from five-month-old male control, high-fat diet fed (HFD) or obese ob/ob mice by LC-MS(/MS) and quantified ~1,100 islet proteins (at least two peptides) with a false discovery rate <1%. Significant alterations in abundance were observed for ~350 proteins between groups. A majority of alterations were common to both models, and the changes of a subset of ~40 proteins and 12 proteins were verified by targeted quantification using selectedmore » reaction monitoring and Western blots, respectively. The insulin resistant islets in both groups exhibited reduced expression of proteins controlling energy metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation, hormone processing, and secretory pathways. Conversely, an increased expression of molecules involved in protein synthesis and folding suggested effects in endoplasmic reticulum stress response, cell survival, and proliferation in both insulin resistant models. In conclusion, we report a unique comparison of the islet proteome that is focused on the compensatory response in two insulin resistant rodent models that are not overtly diabetic. In conclusion, these data provide a valuable resource of candidate proteins to the scientific community to undertake further studies aimed at enhancing β-cell mass in patients with diabetes. The data are available via the MassIVE repository, with accession MSV000079093.« less

  17. Quantitative proteomic analysis of cold-responsive proteins in rice.

    PubMed

    Neilson, Karlie A; Mariani, Michael; Haynes, Paul A

    2011-05-01

    Rice is susceptible to cold stress and with a future of climatic instability we will be unable to produce enough rice to satisfy increasing demand. A thorough understanding of the molecular responses to thermal stress is imperative for engineering cultivars, which have greater resistance to low temperature stress. In this study we investigated the proteomic response of rice seedlings to 48, 72 and 96 h of cold stress at 12-14°C. The use of both label-free and iTRAQ approaches in the analysis of global protein expression enabled us to assess the complementarity of the two techniques for use in plant proteomics. The approaches yielded a similar biological response to cold stress despite a disparity in proteins identified. The label-free approach identified 236 cold-responsive proteins compared to 85 in iTRAQ results, with only 24 proteins in common. Functional analysis revealed differential expression of proteins involved in transport, photosynthesis, generation of precursor metabolites and energy; and, more specifically, histones and vitamin B biosynthetic proteins were observed to be affected by cold stress. PMID:21433000

  18. Proteomic analysis of liver tissue from HBx-transgenic mice at early stages of hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Young; Lee, Phil Young; Shin, Hye-Jun; Kim, Do Hyung; Kang, Sunghyun; Moon, Hyung-Bae; Kang, Sang Won; Kim, Jin-Man; Park, Sung Goo; Park, Byoung Chul; Yu, Dae-Yeul; Bae, Kwang-Hee; Lee, Sang Chul

    2009-11-01

    The hepatitis B virus X-protein (HBx), a multifunctional viral regulator, participates in the viral life cycle and in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We previously reported a high incidence of HCC in transgenic mice expressing HBx. In this study, proteomic analysis was performed to identify proteins that may be involved in hepatocarcinogenesis and/or that could be utilized as early detection biomarkers for HCC. Proteins from the liver tissue of HBx-transgenic mice at early stages of carcinogenesis (dysplasia and hepatocellular adenoma) were separated by 2-DE, and quantitative changes were analyzed. A total of 22 spots displaying significant quantitative changes were identified using LC-MS/MS. In particular, several proteins involved in glucose and fatty acid metabolism, such as mitochondrial 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase, intestinal fatty acid-binding protein 2 and cytoplasmic malate dehydrogenase, were differentially expressed, implying that significant metabolic alterations occurred during the early stages of hepatocarcinogenesis. The results of this proteomic analysis provide insights into the mechanism of HBx-mediated hepatocarcinogenesis. Additionally, this study identifies possible therapeutic targets for HCC diagnosis and novel drug development for treatment of the disease.

  19. [Effect of cold and cool herbs on liver mitochondria proteome of rats with heat symptom].

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Lu, De-Zhao; Tang, Li-Hua; Wo, Xing-De; Yang, Zhen

    2013-12-01

    In the 1960s, modern science began involving the essence of heat syndrome, but there have still no in-depth systematic studies on pathological mechanisms of heat syndrome and action mechanisms of cold and cool herbs. In this study, the animal model with heat syndrome was set up by feeding herbs with hot property, and then cold and cool herbs was applied in the experimental therapy. The two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry technologies were adopted to compare the liver mitochondria proteome of the rats of the heat syndrome model and the ones treated with cold and cool herbs, so as to discover specificity-related proteins after heat syndrome and treatment with cold and cool herbs.

  20. Impact of high-fat diet on the proteome of mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Benard, Outhiriaradjou; Lim, Jihyeon; Apontes, Pasha; Jing, Xiaohong; Angeletti, Ruth H; Chi, Yuling

    2016-05-01

    Chronic overnutrition, for instance, high-fat diet (HFD) feeding, is a major cause of rapidly growing incidence of metabolic syndromes. However, the mechanisms underlying HFD-induced adverse effects on human health are not clearly understood. HFD-fed C57BL6/J mouse has been a popular model employed to investigate the mechanisms. Yet, there is no systematic and comprehensive study of the impact of HFD on the protein profiles of the animal. Here, we present a proteome-wide study of the consequences of long-term HFD feeding. Utilizing a powerful technology, stable isotope labeling of mammals, we detected and quantitatively compared 965 proteins extracted from livers of chow-diet-fed and HFD-fed mice. Among which, 122 proteins were significantly modulated by HFD. Fifty-four percent of those 122 proteins are involved in metabolic processes and the majority participate in lipid metabolism. HFD up-regulates proteins that play important roles in fatty acid uptake and subsequent oxidation and are linked to the transcription factors PPARα and PGC-1α. HFD suppresses lipid biosynthesis-related proteins that play major roles in de novo lipogenesis and are linked to SREBP-1 and PPARγ. These data suggest that HFD-fed mice tend to develop enhanced fat utilization and suppressed lipid biosynthesis, understandably a self-protective mechanism to counteract to excessive fat loading, which causes liver steatosis. Enhanced fatty acid oxidation increases reactive oxygen species and inhibits glucose oxidation, which are associated with hyperglycemia and insulin resistance. This proteomics study provides molecular understanding of HFD-induced pathology and identifies potential targets for development of therapeutics for metabolic syndromes. PMID:27133419

  1. Proteomic and Physiological Responses of Kineococcus radiotolerans to Copper

    SciTech Connect

    Bagwell, Christopher E.; Hixson, Kim K.; Milliken, Charles E.; Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Weitz, Karl K.

    2010-08-26

    Copper is a highly reactive, toxic metal whose transport into the cell is tightly regulated. Kineococcus radiotolerans was previously shown to specifically accumulate soluble copper in the cytoplasm and cell growth was significantly enhanced by copper during chronic irradiation. This study provides a systematic investigation of copper accumulation, toxicity, and homeostasis in K. radiotolerans through combined physiological experimentation and quantitative shot-gun proteomics. Aerobic growth rates and biomass yields were similar over a range of Cu(II) concentrations, though intracellular metal accumulation was positively correlated with Cu(II) concentration in the growth medium (R2 = 0.7). Global proteomics analysis revealed a significant positive correlation between the total number of response proteins and their abundance with copper concentration and culture age. Approximately 40% of the K. radiotolerans genome was differentially expressed in response to the copper treatments imposed. Copper accumulation coincided with increased abundance of proteins involved in oxidative stress and defense, DNA stabilization and repair, and protein turnover. Concomitant production of antioxidants and protective osmolytes signifies an important adaptation for maintenance of cellular redox; few known metal binding proteins were detected. This study offers a first glimpse into the complexity of coordinated biochemical response pathways in K. radiotolerans invoked by sub-lethal copper concentrations that may be pertinent for new biotechnologies in metal recovery and sequestration, and environmental restoration.

  2. [Genomic, proteomic and metabolomic predictors of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease development in obese patients. Part I].

    PubMed

    Chernyak, O O; Sentsova, T B; Vorozhko, I V; Tutelyan, V A; Gapparova, K M; Isakov, V A

    2015-01-01

    The prevention, diagnosis and treatment of diseases associated to obesity require a qualitative increase of efficiency. There are still disputable questions about diagnostic significance of some molecules, including genomic, proteomic and metabolomic biomarkers. We observed 72 obese patients (20 men and 52 women, mean age--41.3 +/- 2.5) and performed ultrasound elastography and ultrasound of liver. We have identified two groups of patients: Group 1 consisted of 50 obese patients without complications (BMI 43.2 +/- 0.6), group 2 consisted of 22 patients with obesity complicated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (BMI 45.8 +/- 2.3). Determination of the adipokines (adiponectin, ghrelin, resistin, visfatin, and apelin), cytokine (interleukin--6, TNFalpha) oxidized lipoproteins (oxLDL), adhesion molecule sICAM (soluble intercellular cell adhesion molecule), fatty acid transporter L-FABP in serum was performed by ELISA. The study of the lipid metabolism involved determination of the concentration of total cholesterols, triglycerides, low and high density lipoproteins (LDL and HDL) by turbidimetry and spectrophotometry by analyzer. In addition, we conducted analysis of polymorphic alleles epsilon2, epsilon3, episolon4 of ApoE gene using polymerase chain reaction. Our data indicate that reducing the concentration of adiponectin (0.46-1.71 mcg/ml), increasing the level of glucose (5.57-6.25 mmol/l), triglycerides (2.06-3.94 mmol/l), TNFalpha (5.07-16.68 pg/ml) and L-FABP (11.62-23.76 pg/ml) are predictors of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in obese patients, and the presence of genotype epsilon3/epsilon4 of ApoE gene is a poor prognostic marker of severity of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:26852528

  3. Proteomic profile of carbonylated proteins in rat liver: exercise attenuated oxidative stress may be involved in fatty liver improvement.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaofei; Duan, Zhigui; Hu, Hui; Li, Guolin; Yan, Siyu; Wu, Jinfeng; Wang, Jun; Yin, Dazhong; Xie, Qingji

    2013-05-01

    To screen target proteins of oxidative stress which mediate the effects of exercise on preventing nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the methods for selecting carbonylated proteins were modified, and carbonylated proteins were profiled. The results showed that treadmill training reduced oxidative stress and the levels of intrahepatic triglyceride (IHTG). The changes in IHTG showed a significant positive correlation with oxidative stress as indicated by malondialdehyde level. Further results from proteomics illustrated that 17 functional proteins were susceptible to oxidative modification, and exercise protected three proteins from carbonylation. The latter three proteins may serve as both direct target proteins of oxidative stress and mediators contributing to the beneficial effects of exercise. In particular, a long-chain specific acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACADL) which was a key enzyme in lipid metabolism was not carbonylated and with higher activities in exercise group. These findings indicate that this modified technique is practical and powerful in selecting carbonylated proteins. Long-term treadmill training is effective in ameliorating oxidative stress and preventing the accumulation of IHTG. Among the 17 target proteins of oxidative modification, three proteins contribute to the beneficial effects of exercise. Preventing ACADL from carbonylation may be involved in the physiological mechanism of exercise-induced NAFLD improvement.

  4. Proteomic profile of carbonylated proteins in rat liver: discovering possible mechanisms for tetracycline-induced steatosis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhenglu; Yan, Siyu; Hu, Hui; Duan, Zhigui; Yin, Lanxuan; Liao, Shenke; Sun, Yubai; Yin, Dazhong; Li, Guolin

    2015-01-01

    To investigate biochemical mechanisms for the tetracycline-induced steatosis in rats, targeted proteins of oxidative modification were profiled. The results showed that tetracycline induced lipid accumulation, oxidative stress, and cell viability decline in HepG2 cells only under the circumstances of palmitic acid overload. Tetracycline administration in rats led to significant decrement in blood lipids, while resulted in more than four times increment in intrahepatic triacylglycerol and typical microvesicular steatosis in the livers. The triacylglycerol levels were positively correlated with oxidative stress. Proteomic profiles of carbonylated proteins revealed 26 targeted proteins susceptible to oxidative modification and most of them located in mitochondria. Among them, the long-chain specific acyl-CoA dehydrogenase was one of the key enzymes regulating fatty acid β-oxidation. Oxidative modification of the enzyme in the tetracycline group depressed its enzymatic activity. In conclusion, the increased influx of lipid into the livers is the first hit of tetracycline-induced microvesicular steatosis. Oxidative stress is an essential part of the second hit, which may arise from the lipid overload and attack a series of functional proteins, aggravating the development of steatosis. The 26 targeted proteins revealed here provide a potential direct link between oxidative stress and tetracycline-induced steatosis.

  5. Proteomic profile response of Paracoccidioides lutzii to the antifungal argentilactone

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Renata S.; Bailão, Alexandre M.; Silva, Lívia C.; de Oliveira, Cecília M. A.; Marques, Monique F.; Silva, Luciano P.; Silveira-Lacerda, Elisângela P.; Lima, Aliny P.; Soares, Célia M.; Pereira, Maristela

    2015-01-01

    The dimorphic fungi Paracoccidioides spp. are the etiological agents of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), a mycosis of high incidence in Brazil. The toxicity of drug treatment and the emergence of resistant organisms have led to research for new candidates for drugs. In this study, we demonstrate that the natural product argentilactone was not cytotoxic or genotoxic to MRC5 cells at the IC50 concentration to the fungus. We also verified the proteomic profile of Paracoccidioides lutzii after incubation with argentilactone using a label free quantitative proteome nanoUPLC-MSE. The results of this study indicated that the fungus has a global metabolic adaptation in the presence of argentilactone. Enzymes of important pathways, such as glycolysis, the Krebs cycle and the glyoxylate cycle, were repressed, which drove the metabolism to the methylcytrate cycle and beta-oxidation. Proteins involved in cell rescue, defense and stress response were induced. In this study, alternative metabolic pathways adopted by the fungi were elucidated, helping to elucidate the course of action of the compound studied. PMID:26150808

  6. Identification of novel translational urinary biomarkers for acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury using proteomic profiling in mice.

    PubMed

    van Swelm, Rachel P L; Laarakkers, Coby M M; van der Kuur, Ellen C; Morava-Kozicz, Eva; Wevers, Ron A; Augustijn, Kevin D; Touw, Daan J; Sandel, Maro H; Masereeuw, Rosalinde; Russel, Frans G M

    2012-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is the leading cause of acute liver failure. Currently, no adequate predictive biomarkers for DILI are available. This study describes a translational approach using proteomic profiling for the identification of urinary proteins related to acute liver injury induced by acetaminophen (APAP). Mice were given a single intraperitoneal dose of APAP (0-350 mg/kg bw) followed by 24 h urine collection. Doses of ≥275 mg/kg bw APAP resulted in hepatic centrilobular necrosis and significantly elevated plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) values (p<0.0001). Proteomic profiling resulted in the identification of 12 differentially excreted proteins in urine of mice with acute liver injury (p<0.001), including superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), carbonic anhydrase 3 (CA3) and calmodulin (CaM), as novel biomarkers for APAP-induced liver injury. Urinary levels of SOD1 and CA3 increased with rising plasma ALT levels, but urinary CaM was already present in mice treated with high dose of APAP without elevated plasma ALT levels. Importantly, we showed in human urine after APAP intoxication the presence of SOD1 and CA3, whereas both proteins were absent in control urine samples. Urinary concentrations of CaM were significantly increased and correlated well with plasma APAP concentrations (r = 0.97; p<0.0001) in human APAP intoxicants, who did not present with elevated plasma ALT levels. In conclusion, using this urinary proteomics approach we demonstrate CA3, SOD1 and, most importantly, CaM as potential human biomarkers for APAP-induced liver injury.

  7. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Human Liver Tissue and Isolated Hepatocytes with a Focus on Proteins Determining Drug Exposure.

    PubMed

    Vildhede, Anna; Wiśniewski, Jacek R; Norén, Agneta; Karlgren, Maria; Artursson, Per

    2015-08-01

    Freshly isolated human hepatocytes are considered the gold standard for in vitro studies of liver functions, including drug transport, metabolism, and toxicity. For accurate predictions of the in vivo outcome, the isolated hepatocytes should reflect the phenotype of their in vivo counterpart, i.e., hepatocytes in human liver tissue. Here, we quantified and compared the membrane proteomes of freshly isolated hepatocytes and human liver tissue using a label-free shotgun proteomics approach. A total of 5144 unique proteins were identified, spanning over 6 orders of magnitude in abundance. There was a good global correlation in protein abundance. However, the expression of many plasma membrane proteins was lower in the isolated hepatocytes than in the liver tissue. This included transport proteins that determine hepatocyte exposure to many drugs and endogenous compounds. Pathway analysis of the differentially expressed proteins confirmed that hepatocytes are exposed to oxidative stress during isolation and suggested that plasma membrane proteins were degraded via the protein ubiquitination pathway. Finally, using pitavastatin as an example, we show how protein quantifications can improve in vitro predictions of in vivo liver clearance. We tentatively conclude that our data set will be a useful resource for improved hepatocyte predictions of the in vivo outcome.

  8. Differential protective effects of extra virgin olive oil and corn oil in liver injury: a proteomic study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hualin; Sit, Wat-Hung; Tipoe, George Lim; Wan, Jennifer Man-Fan

    2014-12-01

    Extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) presents benefits against chronic liver injury induced by hepatotoxins such as carbon tetrachloride (CCl4); however, the protective mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, a two-dimensional gel based proteomic approach was constructed to explore the mechanisms. Rats are injected with CCl4 twice a week for 4 weeks to induce liver fibrosis, and were fed laboratory chow plus 20% (w/w) of either corn oil or EVOO over the entire experimental period. Histological staining, MDA assay and fibrogenesis marker gene analysis illustrate that the CCl4-treated animals fed EVOO have a lower fibrosis and lipid peroxidation level in the liver than the corn oil fed group. The proteomic study indicates that the protein expression of thioredoxin domain-containing protein 12, peroxiredoxin-1, thiosulphate sulphurtransferase, calcium-binding protein 1, Annexin A2 and heat shock cognate 71 kDa protein are higher in livers from EVOO-fed rats with the CCl4 treatment compared with those from rats fed with corn oil, whereas the expression of COQ9, cAMP-dependent protein kinase type I-alpha regulatory subunit, phenylalanine hydroxylase and glycerate kinase are lower. Our findings confirmed the benefits of EVOO against chronic liver injury, which may be attributable to the antioxidant effects, hepatocellular function regulation and hepatic metabolism modification effects of EVOO.

  9. Application of a proteomic approach to identify proteins associated with primary graft non-function after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kornasiewicz, Oskar; Bojarczuk, Kamil; Bugajski, Marek; Golab, Jakub; Krawczyk, Marek

    2012-10-01

    Primary graft non-function (PNF) is a rare, life-threatening complication of liver transplantation. Increasing use of extended criteria donor pools and high-risk recipients seem to influence the incidence of PNF. Primary failure is associated with high patient morbidity and inferior graft survival. The only available treatment for PNF is emergency hepatic retransplantation, which is also correlated with significant morbidity and mortality. Therefore, researchers are working to identify risk factors of diagnostic value to prevent PNF. The current study attempted to explore liver proteomic patterns in patients with PNF. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), we compared liver protein homogenates from 3 patients with PNF to those obtained from 6 healthy liver samples to identify potential new biomarkers of PNF. Our comparisons revealed 21 proteins with differential expression (13 upregulated and 8 downregulated). Most of these proteins are involved in energy metabolism, lipid metabolism, peptide cleavage, cell differentiation, and apoptosis. Although none of these proteins appeared more than once in separate analyses, this preliminary study shows that two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and LC-MS may allow identification of characteristic proteins to be used as biomarkers of a life-threatening complication of liver transplantation. Larger-scale analyses could improve patient care by finding suitable prognostic and therapeutic options. These data represent the first global proteomic approach to study PNF.

  10. Proteomic Analysis of the Rat Canalicular Membrane Reveals Expression of a Complex System of P4-ATPases in Liver.

    PubMed

    Chaubey, Pururawa Mayank; Hofstetter, Lia; Roschitzki, Bernd; Stieger, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Transport processes in the canalicular membrane are key elements in bile formation and are the driving force of the enterohepatic circulation of bile salts. The canalicular membrane is constantly exposed to the detergent action of bile salts. One potential element protecting the canalicular membrane from the high canalicular bile salt concentrations may be bile salt resistant microdomains, however additional factors are likely to play a role. To obtain more insights into the molecular composition of the canalicular membrane, the proteome of highly purified rat canalicular membrane vesicles was determined. Isolated rat canalicular membrane vesicles were stripped from adhering proteins, deglycosylated and protease digested before subjecting the samples to shot gun proteomic analysis. The expression of individual candidates was studied by PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. A total of 2449 proteins were identified, of which 1282 were predicted to be membrane proteins. About 50% of the proteins identified here were absent from previously published liver proteomes. In addition to ATP8B1, four more P4-ATPases were identified. ATP8A1 and ATP9A showed expression specific to the canalicular membrane, ATP11C at the bLPM and ATP11A in an intracellular vesicular compartment partially colocalizing with RAB7A and EEA1 as markers of the endosomal compartment. This study helped to identify additional P4-ATPases from rat liver particularly in the canalicular membrane, previously not known to be expressed in liver. These P4-ATPases might be contributing for maintaining transmembrane lipid homeostasis in hepatocytes.

  11. Seasonal proteomic changes reveal molecular adaptations to preserve and replenish liver proteins during ground squirrel hibernation.

    PubMed

    Epperson, L Elaine; Rose, James C; Carey, Hannah V; Martin, Sandra L

    2010-02-01

    Hibernators are unique among mammals in their ability to survive extended periods of time with core body temperatures near freezing and with dramatically reduced heart, respiratory, and metabolic rates in a state known as torpor. To gain insight into the molecular events underlying this remarkable physiological phenotype, we applied a proteomic screening approach to identify liver proteins that differ between the summer active (SA) and the entrance (Ent) phase of winter hibernation in 13-lined ground squirrels. The relative abundance of 1,600 protein spots separated on two-dimensional gels was quantitatively determined using fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis, and 74 unique proteins exhibiting significant differences between the two states were identified using liquid chromatography followed by tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Proteins elevated in Ent hibernators included liver fatty acid-binding protein, fatty acid transporter, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase, which support the known metabolic fuel switch to lipid and ketone body utilization in winter. Several proteins involved in protein stability and protein folding were also elevated in the Ent phase, consistent with previous findings. In contrast to transcript screening results, there was a surprising increase in the abundance of proteins involved in protein synthesis during Ent hibernation, including several initiation and elongation factors. This finding, coupled with decreased abundance of numerous proteins involved in amino acid and nitrogen metabolism, supports the intriguing hypothesis that the mechanism of protein preservation and resynthesis is used by hibernating ground squirrels to help avoid nitrogen toxicity and ensure preservation of essential amino acids throughout the long winter fast.

  12. Proteomic analysis of ubiquitinated proteins in normal hepatocyte cell line Chang liver cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, Fengwei; Lu, Lifang; Cai, Yun; Wang, Jinglan; Xie, Yunfei; Wang, Lin; Gong, Yanhua; Xu, Bing-E; Wu, Jun; Luo, Ying; Qiang, Boqin; Yuan, Jiangang; Sun, Xiaoqing; Peng, Xiaozhong

    2008-07-01

    Post-translational modification by ubiquitin (Ub) and Ub-like modifiers is one of the most important mechanisms regulating a wide range of cellular processes in eukaryotes. Through mediating 26S proteasome-dependent degradation of substrates, the covalent modification of proteins by multiple Ub (ubiquitination) can regulate many different cellular functions such as transcription, antigen processing, signal transduction and cell cycle. To better understand ubiquitination and its functions, proteomic approaches have been developed to purify and identify more protein substrates. The S5a subunit of the 26S proteasome binds to poly-Ub chains containing four or more Ub. In this study, immobilized GST-S5a fusion protein was used to affinity-purify ubiquitinated proteins from Chang liver cells. The purified proteins were then identified with multi-dimensional LC combined with MS/MS. Eighty-three potential ubiquitination substrates were identified. From these proteins, 19 potential ubiquitination sites on 17 potential substrates were determined. These potential ubiquitination substrates are mainly related to important cellular functions including metabolism, translation and transcription. Our results provide helpful information for further understanding of the relationship between ubiquitination machinery and different cell functions.

  13. Proteomic identification network analysis of haptoglobin as a key regulator associated with liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Aihua; Sun, Hui; Sun, Wejun; Ye, Yuan; Wang, Xijun

    2013-02-01

    Liver fibrosis (LF) is the final stage of liver dysfunction, characterized by diffuse fibrosis which is the main response to the liver injury. Haptoglobin (HP) protein, produced as an acute phase reactant during LF, preventing liver damage, may be potential molecular targets for early LF diagnostics and therapeutic applications. However, protein networks associated with the HP are largely unknown. To address this issue, we used a pathological mouse model of LF that was induced by treatment with carbon tetrachloride for 8 days. HP protein was separated and identified by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight mass spectrometry. HP protein was subjected to functional pathway analysis using STRING and Cytoscape software for better understanding of the protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks in biological context. Bioinformatics analyses revealed that HP expression associated with fibrosis was upregulated, and suggested that HP responsible for fibrosis may precede the onset and progression of LF. Using the web-based database, functional pathway analysis suggested the modulation of multiple vital physiological pathways, including antioxidation immunity, signal transduction, metabolic process, energy production, cell apoptosis, oxidation reduction, DNA repair process, cell communication, and regulation of cellular process. The generation of protein interaction networks clearly enhances the interpretation and understanding of the molecular mechanisms of HP. HP protein represents targets for further experimental investigation that will provide biological insight and potentially could be exploited for novel therapeutic approaches to combat LF.

  14. Comparison of Integrated Responses to Nonlethal and Lethal Hypothermal Stress in Milkfish (Chanos chanos): A Proteomics Study

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Hao; Tang, Cheng-Hao; Kang, Chao-Kai; Lo, Wan-Yu; Lee, Tsung-Han

    2016-01-01

    Milkfish is an important aquaculture species in Taiwan, and its high mortality during cold snaps in winter usually causes huge economic losses. To understand the effect of hypothermal stress and the corresponding compensatory stress response in milkfish, this study aimed to compare liver and gill protein levels between milkfish exposed to nonlethal (18°C), lethal (16°C), and control (28°C) temperatures. Using a proteomics approach based on two-dimensional electrophoresis and nano-LC-MS/MS analysis, this study identified thirty unique protein spots from milkfish livers and gills for which protein abundance was significantly different between nonlethal, lethal, and control temperature groups. Proteins identified in the liver were classified into three different categories according to their cellular function: (1) anti-oxidative stress, (2) apoptotic pathway, and (3) cytoskeleton. Similarly, proteins identified in the gill were sorted in five different functional categories: (1) cytoskeleton, (2) immune response, (3) protein quality control, (4) energy production, and (5) intracellular homeostasis. Based on functional information derived from the identified proteins, we assumed that different levels of hypothermal stress had a different effect and induced a different cellular response. Upon nonlethal hypothermal stress, the identified proteins were involved in anti-oxidative stress and anti-inflammation pathways, suggesting that milkfish had high levels of oxidative stress in the liver and exhibited inflammation response in the gill. Upon lethal hypothermal stress, however, identified proteins were associated with apoptosis in the liver and regulation of intracellular homeostasis in the gill. The present study provided evidence to illustrate different multi-physiological responses to nonlethal and lethal hypothermal stress in milkfish livers and gills. PMID:27657931

  15. Proteome Analysis of Liver Cells Expressing a Full- Length Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Replicon and Biopsy Specimens of Posttransplantation Liver from HCV-Infected Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Jon M.; Diamond, Deborah L.; Chan, Eric Y.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Qian, Weijun; Stastna, Miroslava; Baas, Tracey; Camp, David G.; Carithers, Jr., Robert L.; Smith, Richard D.; Katze, Michael G.

    2005-06-01

    The development of a reproducible model system for the study of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has the potential to significantly enhance the study of virus-host interactions and provide future direction for modeling the pathogenesis of HCV. While there are studies describing global gene expression changes associated with HCV infection, changes in the proteome have not been characterized. We report the first large scale proteome analysis of the highly permissive Huh-7.5 cell line containing a full length HCV replicon. We detected > 4,400 proteins in this cell line, including HCV replicon proteins, using multidimensional liquid chromatographic (LC) separations coupled to mass spectrometry (MS). The set of Huh-7.5 proteins confidently identified is, to our knowledge, the most comprehensive yet reported for a human cell line. Consistent with the literature, a comparison of Huh-7.5 cells (+) and (-) the HCV replicon identified expression changes of proteins involved in lipid metabolism. We extended these analyses to liver biopsy material from HCV-infected patients where > 1,500 proteins were detected from 2 {micro}g protein lysate using the Huh-7.5 protein database and the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag strategy. These findings demonstrate the utility of multidimensional proteome analysis of the HCV replicon model system for assisting the determination of proteins/pathways affected by HCV infection. Our ability to extend these analyses to the highly complex proteome of small liver biopsies with limiting protein yields offers the unique opportunity to begin evaluating the clinical significance of protein expression changes associated with HCV infection.

  16. Characterizing the anaerobic response of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Terashima, Mia; Specht, Michael; Naumann, Bianca; Hippler, Michael

    2010-07-01

    The versatile metabolism of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is reflected in its complex response to anaerobic conditions. The anaerobic response is also remarkable in the context of renewable energy because C. reinhardtii is able to produce hydrogen under anaerobic conditions. To identify proteins involved during anaerobic acclimation as well as to localize proteins and pathways to the powerhouses of the cell, chloroplasts and mitochondria from C. reinhardtii in aerobic and anaerobic (induced by 8 h of argon bubbling) conditions were isolated and analyzed using comparative proteomics. A total of 2315 proteins were identified. Further analysis based on spectral counting clearly localized 606 of these proteins to the chloroplast, including many proteins of the fermentative metabolism. Comparative quantitative analyses were performed with the chloroplast-localized proteins using stable isotopic labeling of amino acids ([(13)C(6)]arginine/[(12)C(6)]arginine in an arginine auxotrophic strain). The quantitative data confirmed proteins previously characterized as induced at the transcript level as well as identified several new proteins of unknown function induced under anaerobic conditions. These proteins of unknown function provide new candidates for further investigation, which could bring insights for the engineering of hydrogen-producing alga strains. PMID:20190198

  17. Tandem Analysis of Transcriptome and Proteome Changes after a Single Dose of Corticosteroid: A Systems Approach to Liver Function in Pharmacogenomics

    PubMed Central

    Kamisoglu, Kubra; Sukumaran, Siddharth; Nouri-Nigjeh, Eslam; Tu, Chengjian; Li, Jun; Shen, Xiaomeng; Duan, Xiaotao; Qu, Jun; Almon, Richard R.; DuBois, Debra C.; Jusko, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Corticosteroids (CS) such as methylprednisolone (MPL) affect almost all liver functions through multiple mechanisms of action, and long-term use results in dysregulation causing diverse side effects. The complexity of involved molecular mechanisms necessitates a systems approach. Integration of information from the transcriptomic and proteomic responses has potential to provide deeper insights into CS actions. The present report describes the tandem analysis of rich time-series transcriptomic and proteomic data in rat liver after a single dose of MPL. Hierarchical clustering of the common genes represented in both mRNA and protein datasets displayed two dominant patterns. One of these patterns exhibited complementary mRNA and protein expression profiles indicating that MPL affected the regulation of these genes at the transcriptional level. Some of the classic pharmacodynamic markers for CS actions, including tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT), were among this group, together with genes encoding urea cycle enzymes and ribosomal proteins. The other pattern was rather unexpected. For this group of genes, MPL had distinctly observable effects at the protein expression level, although a change in the reverse direction occurred at the transcriptional level. These genes were functionally associated with metabolic processes that might be essential to elucidate side effects of MPL on liver, most importantly including modulation of oxidative stress, fatty acid oxidation, and bile acid biosynthesis. Furthermore, profiling of gene and protein expression data was also done independently of one another by a two-way sequential approach. Prominent temporal shifts in expression and relevant cellular functions were described together with the assessment of changes in the complementary side. PMID:25611119

  18. Subacute calorie restriction and rapamycin discordantly alter mouse liver proteome homeostasis and reverse aging effects.

    PubMed

    Karunadharma, Pabalu P; Basisty, Nathan; Dai, Dao-Fu; Chiao, Ying A; Quarles, Ellen K; Hsieh, Edward J; Crispin, David; Bielas, Jason H; Ericson, Nolan G; Beyer, Richard P; MacKay, Vivian L; MacCoss, Michael J; Rabinovitch, Peter S

    2015-08-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) and rapamycin (RP) extend lifespan and improve health across model organisms. Both treatments inhibit mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, a conserved longevity pathway and a key regulator of protein homeostasis, yet their effects on proteome homeostasis are relatively unknown. To comprehensively study the effects of aging, CR, and RP on protein homeostasis, we performed the first simultaneous measurement of mRNA translation, protein turnover, and abundance in livers of young (3 month) and old (25 month) mice subjected to 10-week RP or 40% CR. Protein abundance and turnover were measured in vivo using (2) H3 -leucine heavy isotope labeling followed by LC-MS/MS, and translation was assessed by polysome profiling. We observed 35-60% increased protein half-lives after CR and 15% increased half-lives after RP compared to age-matched controls. Surprisingly, the effects of RP and CR on protein turnover and abundance differed greatly between canonical pathways, with opposite effects in mitochondrial (mt) dysfunction and eIF2 signaling pathways. CR most closely recapitulated the young phenotype in the top pathways. Polysome profiles indicated that CR reduced polysome loading while RP increased polysome loading in young and old mice, suggesting distinct mechanisms of reduced protein synthesis. CR and RP both attenuated protein oxidative damage. Our findings collectively suggest that CR and RP extend lifespan in part through the reduction of protein synthetic burden and damage and a concomitant increase in protein quality. However, these results challenge the notion that RP is a faithful CR mimetic and highlight mechanistic differences between the two interventions.

  19. Quantitative proteome changes in Arabidopsis thaliana suspension-cultured cells in response to plant natriuretic peptides.

    PubMed

    Turek, Ilona; Wheeler, Janet I; Gehring, Chris; Irving, Helen R; Marondedze, Claudius

    2015-09-01

    Proteome changes in the Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cells in response to the A. thaliana plant natriuretic peptide (PNP), AtPNP-A (At2g18660) were assessed using quantitative proteomics employing tandem mass tag (TMT) labeling and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In this study, we characterized temporal responses of suspension-cultured cells to 1 nM and 10 pM AtPNP-A at 0, 10 and 30 min post-treatment. Both concentrations we found to yield a distinct differential proteome signature. The data shown in this article are associated with the article "Plant natriuretic peptides induce a specific set of proteins diagnostic for an adaptive response to abiotic stress" by Turek et al. (Front. Plant Sci. 5 (2014) 661) and have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001386. PMID:26217812

  20. Proteomic differences between hepatocellular carcinoma and nontumorous liver tissue investigated by a combined gel-based and label-free quantitative proteomics study.

    PubMed

    Megger, Dominik A; Bracht, Thilo; Kohl, Michael; Ahrens, Maike; Naboulsi, Wael; Weber, Frank; Hoffmann, Andreas-Claudius; Stephan, Christian; Kuhlmann, Katja; Eisenacher, Martin; Schlaak, Jörg F; Baba, Hideo A; Meyer, Helmut E; Sitek, Barbara

    2013-07-01

    Proteomics-based clinical studies have been shown to be promising strategies for the discovery of novel biomarkers of a particular disease. Here, we present a study of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) that combines complementary two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and liquid chromatography (LC-MS)-based approaches of quantitative proteomics. In our proteomic experiments, we analyzed a set of 14 samples (7 × HCC versus 7 × nontumorous liver tissue) with both techniques. Thereby we identified 573 proteins that were differentially expressed between the experimental groups. Among these, only 51 differentially expressed proteins were identified irrespective of the applied approach. Using Western blotting and immunohistochemical analysis the regulation patterns of six selected proteins from the study overlap (inorganic pyrophosphatase 1 (PPA1), tumor necrosis factor type 1 receptor-associated protein 1 (TRAP1), betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase 1 (BHMT)) were successfully verified within the same sample set. In addition, the up-regulations of selected proteins from the complements of both approaches (major vault protein (MVP), gelsolin (GSN), chloride intracellular channel protein 1 (CLIC1)) were also reproducible. Within a second independent verification set (n = 33) the altered protein expression levels of major vault protein and betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase were further confirmed by Western blots quantitatively analyzed via densitometry. For the other candidates slight but nonsignificant trends were detectable in this independent cohort. Based on these results we assume that major vault protein and betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase have the potential to act as diagnostic HCC biomarker candidates that are worth to be followed in further validation studies.

  1. Proteomic Analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi Response to Ionizing Radiation Stress

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Helaine Graziele Santos; Grynberg, Priscila; Bitar, Mainá; Pires, Simone da Fonseca; Hilário, Heron Oliveira; Macedo, Andrea Mara; Machado, Carlos Renato; de Andrade, Hélida Monteiro; Franco, Glória Regina

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, is extremely resistant to ionizing radiation, enduring up to 1.5 kGy of gamma rays. Ionizing radiation can damage the DNA molecule both directly, resulting in double-strand breaks, and indirectly, as a consequence of reactive oxygen species production. After a dose of 500 Gy of gamma rays, the parasite genome is fragmented, but the chromosomal bands are restored within 48 hours. Under such conditions, cell growth arrests for up to 120 hours and the parasites resume normal growth after this period. To better understand the parasite response to ionizing radiation, we analyzed the proteome of irradiated (4, 24, and 96 hours after irradiation) and non-irradiated T. cruzi using two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry for protein identification. A total of 543 spots were found to be differentially expressed, from which 215 were identified. These identified protein spots represent different isoforms of only 53 proteins. We observed a tendency for overexpression of proteins with molecular weights below predicted, indicating that these may be processed, yielding shorter polypeptides. The presence of shorter protein isoforms after irradiation suggests the occurrence of post-translational modifications and/or processing in response to gamma radiation stress. Our results also indicate that active translation is essential for the recovery of parasites from ionizing radiation damage. This study therefore reveals the peculiar response of T. cruzi to ionizing radiation, raising questions about how this organism can change its protein expression to survive such a harmful stress. PMID:24842666

  2. Proteomic and Physiological Responses of Kineococcus radiotolerans to Copper

    PubMed Central

    Bagwell, Christopher E.; Hixson, Kim K.; Milliken, Charles E.; Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Weitz, Karl K.

    2010-01-01

    Copper is a highly reactive, toxic metal; consequently, transport of this metal within the cell is tightly regulated. Intriguingly, the actinobacterium Kineococcus radiotolerans has been shown to not only accumulate soluble copper to high levels within the cytoplasm, but the phenotype also correlated with enhanced cell growth during chronic exposure to ionizing radiation. This study offers a first glimpse into the physiological and proteomic responses of K. radiotolerans to copper at increasing concentration and distinct growth phases. Aerobic growth rates and biomass yields were similar over a range of Cu(II) concentrations (0–1.5 mM) in complex medium. Copper uptake coincided with active cell growth and intracellular accumulation was positively correlated with Cu(II) concentration in the growth medium (R2 = 0.7). Approximately 40% of protein coding ORFs on the K. radiotolerans genome were differentially expressed in response to the copper treatments imposed. Copper accumulation coincided with increased abundance of proteins involved in oxidative stress and defense, DNA stabilization and repair, and protein turnover. Interestingly, the specific activity of superoxide dismutase was repressed by low to moderate concentrations of copper during exponential growth, and activity was unresponsive to perturbation with paraquot. The biochemical response pathways invoked by sub-lethal copper concentrations are exceptionally complex; though integral cellular functions are preserved, in part, through the coordination of defense enzymes, chaperones, antioxidants and protective osmolytes that likely help maintain cellular redox. This study extends our understanding of the ecology and physiology of this unique actinobacterium that could potentially inspire new biotechnologies in metal recovery and sequestration, and environmental restoration. PMID:20865147

  3. Proteomic profile of Aspergillus flavus in response to water activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Zhong, Hong; Han, Xiaoyun; Guo, Zhenni; Yang, Weiqiang; Liu, Yongfeng; Yang, Kunlong; Zhuang, Zhenhong; Wang, Shihua

    2015-03-01

    Aspergillus flavus, a common contaminant of crops and stored grains, can produce aflatoxins that are harmful to humans and other animals. Water activity (aw) is one of the key factors influencing both fungal growth and mycotoxin production. In this study, we used the isobaric tagging for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) technique to investigate the effect of aw on the proteomic profile of A. flavus. A total of 3566 proteins were identified, of which 837 were differentially expressed in response to variations in aw. Among these 837 proteins, 403 were over-expressed at 0.99 aw, whereas 434 proteins were over-expressed at 0.93 aw. According to Gene Ontology (GO) analysis, the secretion of extracellular hydrolases increased as aw was raised, suggesting that extracellular hydrolases may play a critical role in induction of aflatoxin biosynthesis. On the basis of Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) categorizations, we identified an exportin protein, KapK, that may down-regulate aflatoxin biosynthesis by changing the location of NirA. Finally, we considered the role of two osmotic stress-related proteins (Sln1 and Glo1) in the Hog1 pathway and investigated the expression patterns of proteins related to aflatoxin biosynthesis. The data uncovered in this study are critical for understanding the effect of water stress on toxin production and for the development of strategies to control toxin contamination of agricultural products.

  4. Proteomic Analysis of the Rat Canalicular Membrane Reveals Expression of a Complex System of P4-ATPases in Liver

    PubMed Central

    Chaubey, Pururawa Mayank; Hofstetter, Lia; Roschitzki, Bernd; Stieger, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Transport processes in the canalicular membrane are key elements in bile formation and are the driving force of the enterohepatic circulation of bile salts. The canalicular membrane is constantly exposed to the detergent action of bile salts. One potential element protecting the canalicular membrane from the high canalicular bile salt concentrations may be bile salt resistant microdomains, however additional factors are likely to play a role. To obtain more insights into the molecular composition of the canalicular membrane, the proteome of highly purified rat canalicular membrane vesicles was determined. Isolated rat canalicular membrane vesicles were stripped from adhering proteins, deglycosylated and protease digested before subjecting the samples to shot gun proteomic analysis. The expression of individual candidates was studied by PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. A total of 2449 proteins were identified, of which 1282 were predicted to be membrane proteins. About 50% of the proteins identified here were absent from previously published liver proteomes. In addition to ATP8B1, four more P4-ATPases were identified. ATP8A1 and ATP9A showed expression specific to the canalicular membrane, ATP11C at the bLPM and ATP11A in an intracellular vesicular compartment partially colocalizing with RAB7A and EEA1 as markers of the endosomal compartment. This study helped to identify additional P4-ATPases from rat liver particularly in the canalicular membrane, previously not known to be expressed in liver. These P4-ATPases might be contributing for maintaining transmembrane lipid homeostasis in hepatocytes. PMID:27347675

  5. Proteomic Analysis of the Rat Canalicular Membrane Reveals Expression of a Complex System of P4-ATPases in Liver.

    PubMed

    Chaubey, Pururawa Mayank; Hofstetter, Lia; Roschitzki, Bernd; Stieger, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Transport processes in the canalicular membrane are key elements in bile formation and are the driving force of the enterohepatic circulation of bile salts. The canalicular membrane is constantly exposed to the detergent action of bile salts. One potential element protecting the canalicular membrane from the high canalicular bile salt concentrations may be bile salt resistant microdomains, however additional factors are likely to play a role. To obtain more insights into the molecular composition of the canalicular membrane, the proteome of highly purified rat canalicular membrane vesicles was determined. Isolated rat canalicular membrane vesicles were stripped from adhering proteins, deglycosylated and protease digested before subjecting the samples to shot gun proteomic analysis. The expression of individual candidates was studied by PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. A total of 2449 proteins were identified, of which 1282 were predicted to be membrane proteins. About 50% of the proteins identified here were absent from previously published liver proteomes. In addition to ATP8B1, four more P4-ATPases were identified. ATP8A1 and ATP9A showed expression specific to the canalicular membrane, ATP11C at the bLPM and ATP11A in an intracellular vesicular compartment partially colocalizing with RAB7A and EEA1 as markers of the endosomal compartment. This study helped to identify additional P4-ATPases from rat liver particularly in the canalicular membrane, previously not known to be expressed in liver. These P4-ATPases might be contributing for maintaining transmembrane lipid homeostasis in hepatocytes. PMID:27347675

  6. Induction of apoptosis in mouse liver by microcystin-LR: a combined transcriptomic, proteomic, and simulation strategy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting; Wang, Qingsong; Cui, Jun; Yang, Wei; Shi, Qian; Hua, Zichun; Ji, Jianguo; Shen, Pingping

    2005-07-01

    Microcystins (MCs) are a family of cyclic heptapeptide hepatotoxins produced by freshwater species of cyanobacteria that have been implicated in the development of liver cancer, necrosis, and even deadly intrahepatic bleeding. MC-LR, the most toxic MC variant, is also the most commonly encountered in a contaminated aquatic system. This study presents the first data in the toxicological research of MCs that combines the use of standard apoptotic assays with transcriptomics, proteomic technologies, and computer simulations. By using histochemistry, DNA fragmentation assays, and flow cytometry analysis, we determined that MC-LR causes rapid, dose-dependent apoptosis in mouse liver when BALB/c mice are treated with MC-LR for 24 h at doses of either 50, 60, or 70 microg/kg of body weight. We then used gene expression profiling to demonstrate differential expressions (>2-fold) of 61 apoptosis-related genes in cells treated with MC-LR. Further proteomic analysis identified a total of 383 proteins of which 35 proteins were up-regulated and 30 proteins were down-regulated more than 2.5-fold when compared with controls. Combining computer simulations with the transcriptomic and proteomic data, we found that low doses (50 microg/kg) of MC-LR lead to apoptosis primarily through the BID-BAX-BCL-2 pathway, whereas high doses of MC-LR (70 microg/kg) caused apoptosis via a reactive oxygen species pathway. These results indicated that MC-LR exposure can cause apoptosis in mouse liver and revealed two independent pathways playing a major regulatory role in MC-LR-induced apoptosis, thereby contributing to a better understanding of the hepatotoxicity and the tumor-promoting mechanisms of MCs.

  7. Investigation of rice proteomic change in response to microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Weining

    Gravity is one of the environmental factors that control development and growth of plants. Plant cells which are not part of specialized tissues such as the root columella can also sense gravity. Space environment, such as space shuttle missions, space labortories and space stations, etc. provide unique oppotunities to study the microgravity response of plant. During the Shenzhou 8 mission in November 2011, we cultured rice cali on the spaceship and the samples were fixed 4 days after launch. The flying samples in the static position (micro g, mug) and in the centrifuge which provide 1 g force to mimic the 1 g gravity in space, were recovered and the proteome changes were analyzed by iTRAQ. In total, 4840 proteins were identified, including 2085 proteins with function annotation by GO analysis. 431 proteins were changed >1.5 fold in space µg /ground group, including 179 up-regulated proteins and down-regulated 252 proteins. 321 proteins were changed >1.5 fold in space muµg / space 1 g group, among which 205 proteins were the same differentially expressed proteins responsive to microgravity. Enrichment of the differnetially expressed proteins by GO analysis showed that the ARF GTPase activity regulation proteins were enriched when compared the space µg with space 1 g sample, whereas the nucleic acid binding and DNA damage repairing proteins were enriched when compared the space µg and ground sample. Microscopic comparison of the rice cali showed that the space grown cells are more uniformed in size and proliferation, suggesting that cell proliferation pattern was changed in space microgravity conditions.

  8. Transcriptional and Proteomic Responses to Carbon Starvation in Paracoccidioides

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Patrícia de Sousa; Casaletti, Luciana; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; de Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro; Fernandes, Gabriel da Rocha; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida

    2014-01-01

    Background The genus Paracoccidioides comprises human thermal dimorphic fungi, which cause paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), an important mycosis in Latin America. Adaptation to environmental conditions is key to fungal survival during human host infection. The adaptability of carbon metabolism is a vital fitness attribute during pathogenesis. Methodology/Principal Findings The fungal pathogen Paracoccidioides spp. is exposed to numerous adverse conditions, such as nutrient deprivation, in the human host. In this study, a comprehensive response of Paracoccidioides, Pb01, under carbon starvation was investigated using high-resolution transcriptomic (RNAseq) and proteomic (NanoUPLC-MSE) approaches. A total of 1,063 transcripts and 421 proteins were differentially regulated, providing a global view of metabolic reprogramming during carbon starvation. The main changes were those related to cells shifting to gluconeogenesis and ethanol production, supported by the degradation of amino acids and fatty acids and by the modulation of the glyoxylate and tricarboxylic cycles. This proposed carbon flow hypothesis was supported by gene and protein expression profiles assessed using qRT-PCR and western blot analysis, respectively, as well as using enzymatic, cell dry weight and fungus-macrophage interaction assays. The carbon source provides a survival advantage to Paracoccidioides inside macrophages. Conclusions/Significance For a complete understanding of the physiological processes in an organism, the integration of approaches addressing different levels of regulation is important. To the best of our knowledge, this report presents the first description of the responses of Paracoccidioides spp. to host-like conditions using large-scale expression approaches. The alternative metabolic pathways that could be adopted by the organism during carbon starvation can be important for a better understanding of the fungal adaptation to the host, because systems for detecting and responding

  9. Parasite-induced ER stress response in hepatocytes facilitates Plasmodium liver stage infection.

    PubMed

    Inácio, Patricia; Zuzarte-Luís, Vanessa; Ruivo, Margarida T G; Falkard, Brie; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Rooijers, Koos; Mann, Matthias; Mair, Gunnar; Fidock, David A; Mota, Maria M

    2015-08-01

    Upon infection of a mammalian host, Plasmodium parasites first replicate inside hepatocytes, generating thousands of new parasites. Although Plasmodium intra-hepatic development represents a substantial metabolic challenge to the host hepatocyte, how infected cells respond to and integrate this stress remains poorly understood. Here, we present proteomic and transcriptomic analyses, revealing that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident unfolded protein response (UPR) is activated in host hepatocytes upon Plasmodium berghei infection. The expression of XBP1s--the active form of the UPR mediator XBP1--and the liver-specific UPR mediator CREBH is induced by P. berghei infection in vivo. Furthermore, this UPR induction increases parasite liver burden. Altogether, our data suggest that ER stress is a central feature of P. berghei intra-hepatic development, contributing to the success of infection. PMID:26113366

  10. Parasite-induced ER stress response in hepatocytes facilitates Plasmodium liver stage infection

    PubMed Central

    Inácio, Patricia; Zuzarte-Luís, Vanessa; Ruivo, Margarida TG; Falkard, Brie; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Rooijers, Koos; Mann, Matthias; Mair, Gunnar; Fidock, David A; Mota, Maria M

    2015-01-01

    Upon infection of a mammalian host, Plasmodium parasites first replicate inside hepatocytes, generating thousands of new parasites. Although Plasmodium intra-hepatic development represents a substantial metabolic challenge to the host hepatocyte, how infected cells respond to and integrate this stress remains poorly understood. Here, we present proteomic and transcriptomic analyses, revealing that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident unfolded protein response (UPR) is activated in host hepatocytes upon Plasmodium berghei infection. The expression of XBP1s—the active form of the UPR mediator XBP1—and the liver-specific UPR mediator CREBH is induced by P. berghei infection in vivo. Furthermore, this UPR induction increases parasite liver burden. Altogether, our data suggest that ER stress is a central feature of P. berghei intra-hepatic development, contributing to the success of infection. PMID:26113366

  11. Parasite-induced ER stress response in hepatocytes facilitates Plasmodium liver stage infection.

    PubMed

    Inácio, Patricia; Zuzarte-Luís, Vanessa; Ruivo, Margarida T G; Falkard, Brie; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Rooijers, Koos; Mann, Matthias; Mair, Gunnar; Fidock, David A; Mota, Maria M

    2015-08-01

    Upon infection of a mammalian host, Plasmodium parasites first replicate inside hepatocytes, generating thousands of new parasites. Although Plasmodium intra-hepatic development represents a substantial metabolic challenge to the host hepatocyte, how infected cells respond to and integrate this stress remains poorly understood. Here, we present proteomic and transcriptomic analyses, revealing that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident unfolded protein response (UPR) is activated in host hepatocytes upon Plasmodium berghei infection. The expression of XBP1s--the active form of the UPR mediator XBP1--and the liver-specific UPR mediator CREBH is induced by P. berghei infection in vivo. Furthermore, this UPR induction increases parasite liver burden. Altogether, our data suggest that ER stress is a central feature of P. berghei intra-hepatic development, contributing to the success of infection.

  12. Relationships between hematopoiesis and hepatogenesis in the midtrimester fetal liver characterized by dynamic transcriptomic and proteomic profiles.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuanbiao; Zhang, Xuequn; Huang, Jian; Zeng, Yan; Liu, Wei; Geng, Chao; Li, Ka Wan; Yang, Dong; Wu, Songfeng; Wei, Handong; Han, Zeguang; Qian, Xiaohong; Jiang, Ying; He, Fuchu

    2009-10-28

    In fetal hematopoietic organs, the switch from hematopoiesis is hypothesized to be a critical time point for organogenesis, but it is not yet evidenced. The transient coexistence of hematopoiesis will be useful to understand the development of fetal liver (FL) around this time and its relationship to hematopoiesis. Here, the temporal and the comparative transcriptomic and proteomic profiles were observed during the critical time points corresponding to the initiation (E11.5), peak (E14.5), recession (E15.5), and disappearance (3 ddp) of mouse FL hematopoiesis. We found that E11.5-E14.5 corresponds to a FL hematopoietic expansion phase with distinct molecular features, including the expression of new transcription factors, many of which are novel KRAB (Kruppel-associated box)-containing zinc finger proteins. This time period is also characterized by extensive depression of some liver functions, especially catabolism/utilization, immune and defense, classical complement cascades, and intrinsic blood coagulation. Instead, the other liver functions increased, such as xenobiotic and sterol metabolism, synthesis of carbohydrate and glycan, the alternate and lectin complement cascades and extrinsic blood coagulation, and etc. Strikingly, all of the liver functions were significantly increased at E14.5-E15.5 and thereafter, and the depression of the key pathways attributes to build the hematopoietic microenvironment. These findings signal hematopoiesis emigration is the key to open the door of liver maturation.

  13. Proteomic profiling in incubation medium of mouse, rat and human precision-cut liver slices for biomarker detection regarding acute drug-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    van Swelm, Rachel P L; Hadi, Mackenzie; Laarakkers, Coby M M; Masereeuw, Rosalinde; Groothuis, Geny M M; Russel, Frans G M

    2014-09-01

    Drug-induced liver injury is one of the leading causes of drug withdrawal from the market. In this study, we investigated the applicability of protein profiling of the incubation medium of human, mouse and rat precision-cut liver slices (PCLS) exposed to liver injury-inducing drugs for biomarker identification, using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. PCLS were incubated with acetaminophen (APAP), 3-acetamidophenol, diclofenac and lipopolysaccharide for 24-48 h. PCLS medium from all species treated with APAP demonstrated similar changes in protein profiles, as previously found in mouse urine after APAP-induced liver injury, including the same key proteins: superoxide dismutase 1, carbonic anhydrase 3 and calmodulin. Further analysis showed that the concentration of hepcidin, a hepatic iron-regulating hormone peptide, was reduced in PCLS medium after APAP treatment, resembling the decreased mouse plasma concentrations of hepcidin observed after APAP treatment. Interestingly, comparable results were obtained after 3-acetamidophenol incubation in rat and human, but not mouse PCLS. Incubation with diclofenac, but not with lipopolysaccharide, resulted in the same toxicity parameters as observed for APAP, albeit to a lesser extent. In conclusion, proteomics can be applied to identify potential translational biomarkers using the PCLS system.

  14. Stressor-induced proteome alterations in zebrafish: a meta-analysis of response patterns.

    PubMed

    Groh, Ksenia J; Suter, Marc J-F

    2015-02-01

    Proteomics approaches are being increasingly applied in ecotoxicology on the premise that the identification of specific protein expression changes in response to a particular chemical would allow elucidation of the underlying molecular pathways leading to an adverse effect. This in turn is expected to promote the development of focused testing strategies for specific groups of toxicants. Although both gel-based and gel-free global characterization techniques provide limited proteome coverage, the conclusions regarding the cellular processes affected are still being drawn based on the few changes detected. To investigate how specific the detected responses are, we analyzed a set of studies that characterized proteome alterations induced by various physiological, chemical and biological stressors in zebrafish, a popular model organism. Our analysis highlights several proteins and protein groups, including heat shock and oxidative stress defense proteins, energy metabolism enzymes and cytoskeletal proteins, to be most frequently identified as responding to diverse stressors. In contrast, other potentially more specifically responding protein groups are detected much less frequently. Thus, zebrafish proteome responses to stress reported by different studies appear to depend mostly on the level of stress rather than on the specific stressor itself. This suggests that the most broadly used current proteomics technologies do not provide sufficient proteome coverage to allow in-depth investigation of specific mechanisms of toxicant action. We suggest that the results of any differential proteomics experiment performed with zebrafish should be interpreted keeping in mind the list of the most frequent responders that we have identified. Similar reservations should apply to any other species where proteome responses are analyzed by global proteomics methods. Careful consideration of the reliability and significance of observed changes is necessary in order not to over

  15. Insights into immune responses in oral cancer through proteomic analysis of saliva and salivary extracellular vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Winck, Flavia V.; Prado Ribeiro, Ana Carolina; Ramos Domingues, Romênia; Ling, Liu Yi; Riaño-Pachón, Diego Mauricio; Rivera, César; Brandão, Thaís Bianca; Gouvea, Adriele Ferreira; Santos-Silva, Alan Roger; Coletta, Ricardo D.; Paes Leme, Adriana F.

    2015-01-01

    The development and progression of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) involves complex cellular mechanisms that contribute to the low five-year survival rate of approximately 20% among diagnosed patients. However, the biological processes essential to tumor progression are not completely understood. Therefore, detecting alterations in the salivary proteome may assist in elucidating the cellular mechanisms modulated in OSCC and improve the clinical prognosis of the disease. The proteome of whole saliva and salivary extracellular vesicles (EVs) from patients with OSCC and healthy individuals were analyzed by LC-MS/MS and label-free protein quantification. Proteome data analysis was performed using statistical, machine learning and feature selection methods with additional functional annotation. Biological processes related to immune responses, peptidase inhibitor activity, iron coordination and protease binding were overrepresented in the group of differentially expressed proteins. Proteins related to the inflammatory system, transport of metals and cellular growth and proliferation were identified in the proteome of salivary EVs. The proteomics data were robust and could classify OSCC with 90% accuracy. The saliva proteome analysis revealed that immune processes are related to the presence of OSCC and indicate that proteomics data can contribute to determining OSCC prognosis. PMID:26538482

  16. Comparative proteomic study reveals 17β-HSD13 as a pathogenic protein in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Su, Wen; Wang, Yang; Jia, Xiao; Wu, Wenhan; Li, Linghai; Tian, Xiaodong; Li, Sha; Wang, Chunjiong; Xu, Huamin; Cao, Jiaqi; Han, Qifei; Xu, Shimeng; Chen, Yong; Zhong, Yanfeng; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Liu, Pingsheng; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Guan, Youfei

    2014-08-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by a massive accumulation of lipid droplets (LDs). The aim of this study was to determine the function of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-13 (17β-HSD13), one of our newly identified LD-associated proteins in human subjects with normal liver histology and simple steatosis, in NAFLD development. LDs were isolated from 21 human liver biopsies, including 9 cases with normal liver histology (group 1) and 12 cases with simple steatosis (group 2). A complete set of LD-associated proteins from three liver samples of group 1 or group 2 were determined by 2D LC-MS/MS. By comparing the LD-associated protein profiles between subjects with or without NAFLD, 54 up-regulated and 35 down-regulated LD-associated proteins were found in NAFLD patients. Among them, 17β-HSD13 represents a previously unidentified LD-associated protein with a significant up-regulation in NAFLD. Because the 17β-HSD family plays an important role in lipid metabolism, 17β-HSD13 was selected for validating the proteomic findings and exploring its role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Increased hepatic 17β-HSD13 and its LD surface location were confirmed in db/db (diabetic) and high-fat diet-fed mice. Adenovirus-mediated hepatic overexpression of human 17β-HSD13 induced a fatty liver phenotype in C57BL/6 mice, with a significant increase in mature sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 and fatty acid synthase levels. The present study reports an extensive set of human liver LD proteins and an array of proteins differentially expressed in human NAFLD. We also identified 17β-HSD13 as a pathogenic protein in the development of NAFLD.

  17. Across intra-mammalian stages of the liver f luke Fasciola hepatica: a proteomic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Maggio, Lucía Sánchez; Tirloni, Lucas; Pinto, Antonio F. M.; Diedrich, Jolene K.; Yates, John R., III; Benavides, Uruguaysito; Carmona, Carlos; da Silva Vaz, Itabajara, Jr.; Berasain, Patricia

    2016-09-01

    Fasciola hepatica is the agent of fasciolosis, a foodborne zoonosis that affects livestock production and human health. Although flukicidal drugs are available, re-infection and expanding resistance to triclabendazole demand new control strategies. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the complex interaction with the mammalian host could provide relevant clues, aiding the search for novel targets in diagnosis and control of fasciolosis. Parasite survival in the mammalian host is mediated by parasite compounds released during infection, known as excretory/secretory (E/S) products. E/S products are thought to protect parasites from host responses, allowing them to survive for a long period in the vertebrate host. This work provides in-depth proteomic analysis of F. hepatica intra-mammalian stages, and represents the largest number of proteins identified to date for this species. Functional classification revealed the presence of proteins involved in different biological processes, many of which represent original findings for this organism and are important for parasite survival within the host. These results could lead to a better comprehension of host-parasite relationships, and contribute to the development of drugs or vaccines against this parasite.

  18. Across intra-mammalian stages of the liver f luke Fasciola hepatica: a proteomic study.

    PubMed

    Di Maggio, Lucía Sánchez; Tirloni, Lucas; Pinto, Antonio F M; Diedrich, Jolene K; Yates Iii, John R; Benavides, Uruguaysito; Carmona, Carlos; da Silva Vaz, Itabajara; Berasain, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Fasciola hepatica is the agent of fasciolosis, a foodborne zoonosis that affects livestock production and human health. Although flukicidal drugs are available, re-infection and expanding resistance to triclabendazole demand new control strategies. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the complex interaction with the mammalian host could provide relevant clues, aiding the search for novel targets in diagnosis and control of fasciolosis. Parasite survival in the mammalian host is mediated by parasite compounds released during infection, known as excretory/secretory (E/S) products. E/S products are thought to protect parasites from host responses, allowing them to survive for a long period in the vertebrate host. This work provides in-depth proteomic analysis of F. hepatica intra-mammalian stages, and represents the largest number of proteins identified to date for this species. Functional classification revealed the presence of proteins involved in different biological processes, many of which represent original findings for this organism and are important for parasite survival within the host. These results could lead to a better comprehension of host-parasite relationships, and contribute to the development of drugs or vaccines against this parasite. PMID:27600774

  19. Across intra-mammalian stages of the liver f luke Fasciola hepatica: a proteomic study

    PubMed Central

    Di Maggio, Lucía Sánchez; Tirloni, Lucas; Pinto, Antonio F. M.; Diedrich, Jolene K.; Yates III, John R.; Benavides, Uruguaysito; Carmona, Carlos; da Silva Vaz Jr., Itabajara; Berasain, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Fasciola hepatica is the agent of fasciolosis, a foodborne zoonosis that affects livestock production and human health. Although flukicidal drugs are available, re-infection and expanding resistance to triclabendazole demand new control strategies. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the complex interaction with the mammalian host could provide relevant clues, aiding the search for novel targets in diagnosis and control of fasciolosis. Parasite survival in the mammalian host is mediated by parasite compounds released during infection, known as excretory/secretory (E/S) products. E/S products are thought to protect parasites from host responses, allowing them to survive for a long period in the vertebrate host. This work provides in-depth proteomic analysis of F. hepatica intra-mammalian stages, and represents the largest number of proteins identified to date for this species. Functional classification revealed the presence of proteins involved in different biological processes, many of which represent original findings for this organism and are important for parasite survival within the host. These results could lead to a better comprehension of host-parasite relationships, and contribute to the development of drugs or vaccines against this parasite. PMID:27600774

  20. Proteomic analysis of Nrf2 deficient transgenic mice reveals cellular defence and lipid metabolism as primary Nrf2-dependent pathways in the liver.

    PubMed

    Kitteringham, Neil R; Abdullah, Azman; Walsh, Joanne; Randle, Laura; Jenkins, Rosalind E; Sison, Rowena; Goldring, Christopher E P; Powell, Helen; Sanderson, Christopher; Williams, Samantha; Higgins, Larry; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Hayes, John; Park, B Kevin

    2010-06-16

    The transcription factor Nrf2 regulates expression of multiple cellular defence proteins through the antioxidant response element (ARE). Nrf2-deficient mice (Nrf2(-/-)) are highly susceptible to xenobiotic-mediated toxicity, but the precise molecular basis of enhanced toxicity is unknown. Oligonucleotide array studies suggest that a wide range of gene products is altered constitutively, however no equivalent proteomics analyses have been conducted. To define the range of Nrf2-regulated proteins at the constitutive level, protein expression profiling of livers from Nrf2(-/-) and wild type mice was conducted using both stable isotope labelling (iTRAQ) and gel electrophoresis methods. To establish a robust reproducible list of Nrf2-dependent proteins, three independent groups of mice were analysed. Correlative network analysis (MetaCore) identified two predominant groups of Nrf2-regulated proteins. As expected, one group comprised proteins involved in phase II drug metabolism, which were down-regulated in the absence of Nrf2. Surprisingly, the most profound changes were observed amongst proteins involved in the synthesis and metabolism of fatty acids and other lipids. Importantly, we show here for the first time, that the enzyme ATP-citrate lyase, responsible for acetyl-CoA production, is negatively regulated by Nrf2. This latter finding suggests that Nrf2 is a major regulator of cellular lipid disposition in the liver.

  1. Liver response to hemorrhagic shock and subsequent resuscitation: MRI analysis.

    PubMed

    Matot, Idit; Cohen, Keren; Pappo, Orit; Barash, Hila; Abramovitch, Rinat

    2008-01-01

    The liver is a target for injury in low flow states. Markers of liver injury are either invasive or not rapidly responding. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may offer a noninvasive alternative to evaluate liver injury due to reduced perfusion. Recently, we reported an MRI method (functional MRI [fMRI]) that enables us to follow liver perfusion by changing the enrichment of inspired gas (air, air-5% carbon dioxide, 95% oxygen-5% carbon dioxide). Rats were subjected to hemorrhagic shock (HS) (bleeding to a MAP of 25 mmHg) and randomized to no resuscitation or resuscitation with Ringer lactate (RL) or adrenaline infusion targeted to a MAP of 50 mmHg or baseline. Significantly decreased fMRI responses to hyperoxia and hypercapnia were observed immediately after HS. Liver enzymes levels, liver histology, and apoptosis assessments were normal immediately after hemorrhage, however, showed significant changes after 6 h. Functional MRI revealed that adrenaline, but not RL infusion, significantly (P < 0.01) improved liver perfusion. Similarly, liver injury, as assessed by liver enzyme levels, liver histology, and apoptosis, was attenuated to a greater extent with adrenaline resuscitation. No significant differences in liver perfusion and injury were noted between resuscitation to low (50 mmHg) versus high (baseline) MAP. This study shows that fMRI enables early assessment of changes in liver perfusion, resulting in liver injury or recovery, and therefore, it may be considered as a noninvasive, rapidly responding tool for following liver outcome subsequent to hemorrhage and resuscitation. Using fMRI, we showed that adrenaline may be preferable to RL as an initial measure to attenuate liver injury after HS.

  2. Comparative proteomic analysis of mouse livers from embryo to adult reveals an association with progression of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nikki P Y; Leung, Kar-wai; Cheung, Nicole; Lam, Brian Y; Xu, Michelle Z; Sham, Pak C; Lau, George K; Poon, Ronnie T P; Fan, Sheung Tat; Luk, John M

    2008-05-01

    To identify potential oncofetal biomarkers that distinguish hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) from healthy liver tissues, we compared and analyzed the proteomic profiles of mouse livers at different developmental stages. Fetal (E13.5, E16.5), newborn (NB), postnatal (3-week) and adult (3-month) livers were isolated and profiled by 2-D PAGE. Statistical analysis using linear regression and false discovery rate (FDR) revealed that 361 protein spots showed significant changes. Unsupervised hierarchical tree analysis segregated the proteins into fetal, NB, and postnatal-adult clusters. Distinctive protein markers were identified by MALDI-TOF/MS and the corresponding mRNA profiles were further determined by Q-PCR. Fetal markers (hPCNA, hHSP7C, hHEM6) and postnatal-adult markers (hARGI1, hASSY, hBHMT, hFABPL) were selected for testing against a panel of seven human hepatocyte/HCC cell lines and 59 clinical specimens. The fetal proteins were found to be overexpressed in the metastatic HCC cell lines and the tumor tissues, whereas the postnatal-adult proteins were expressed in non-tumor tissues and normal hepatocytes. This "Ying-Yang" pattern, as orchestrated by distinct fetal and adult markers, is hypothesized to indicate the progressive change of the liver from a growing, less-differentiated organ into a functional metabolic center. Thus, embryogenesis and tumorigenesis share certain oncofetal markers and adult "hepatic" phenotypes are lost in HCC.

  3. Understanding the complex nature of salinity and drought-stress response in cereals using proteomics technologies.

    PubMed

    Ngara, Rudo; Ndimba, Bongani K

    2014-03-01

    Worldwide, crop productivity is drastically reduced by drought and salinity stresses. In order to develop food crops with increased productivity in marginal areas, it is important to first understand the nature of plant stress response mechanisms. In the past decade, proteomics tools have been extensively used in the study of plants' proteome responses under experimental conditions mimicking drought and salinity stresses. A lot of proteomic data have been generated using different experimental designs. However, the precise roles of these proteins in stress tolerance are yet to be elucidated. This review summarises the applications of proteomics in understanding the complex nature of drought and salinity stress effects on plants, particularly cereals and also highlights the usefulness of sorghum as the next logical model crop for use in understanding drought and salinity tolerance in cereals. With the vast amount of proteomic data that have been generated to date, a call for integrated efforts across the agricultural, biotechnology, and molecular biology sectors is also highlighted in an effort to translate proteomics data into increased food productivity for the world's growing population.

  4. Proteome alterations in response to aristolochic acids in experimental animal model.

    PubMed

    Rucevic, Marijana; Rosenquist, Thomas; Breen, Lucas; Cao, Lulu; Clifton, James; Hixson, Douglas; Josic, Djuro

    2012-12-01

    Strong indications have been presented that dietary poisoning with aristolochic acids (AA) is responsible for Endemic Nephropathy (EN) and AA associated cancer of the upper urinary tract (UUTC). Our recent investigation showed drastic urinary proteome changes in AA treated mice. This study was designed to identify proteome changes associated with AA nephrotoxicity in experimental animal model. The DBA and C57BL mice, which differ in AA sensitivity, were exposed to AA for 4 days. The strategy for urinary, plasma and kidney tissue proteome study of AA exposed and control mice integrated gel-based and in-solution tryptic digestion combined with LC-ESI-MS/MS. To maximize proteome coverage, plasma fractionation scheme was developed and MS compatible sequential tissue extraction procedure was established. Proteomic analyses of urinary, plasma and kidney tissue tryptic digests resulted in identification of several cytoskeletal proteins, as well as proteins involved in kidney development and inflammatory response, that are differentially expressed in both AA exposed and control mice. These proteins are consistent with renal pathogenesis of endotoxicity and cancer. This proteomic strategy could be effectively translated for unbiased discovery of potential biomarkers for EN and associated UUTC in humans. At the same time, these results highlight the significance of AA exposure with EN. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Integrated omics.

  5. Proteomic analysis of livers from a transgenic mouse line with activated polyamine catabolism.

    PubMed

    Cerrada-Gimenez, Marc; Häyrinen, Jukka; Juutinen, Sisko; Reponen, Tuula; Jänne, Juhani; Alhonen, Leena

    2010-02-01

    We have generated a transgenic mouse line that over expresses the rate-controlling enzyme of the polyamine catabolism, spermidine/spermine N (1)-acetyltransferase, under the control of a heavy metal inducible promoter. This line is characterized by a notable increase in SSAT activity in liver, pancreas and kidneys and a moderate increase in the rest of the tissues. SSAT induction results in an enhanced polyamine catabolism manifested as a depletion of spermidine and spermine and an overaccumulation of putrescine in all tissues. To study how the activation of polyamine catabolism affects other metabolic pathways, protein expression pattern of the livers of transgenic animals was analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. A total of 23 proteins were shown to be differentially expressed in the transgenic from the wild-type animals. Many of the identified proteins showed expression patterns associated with polyamine catabolism activation. However, the expression pattern of other proteins, such as repression of GST pi and selenium-binding protein 2 and 60 kDa heat-shock protein, could be explained by the overexpression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator 1alpha in response to depleted ATP pools. The activation of the latter proteins is thought to lead to the improved insulin sensitivity seen in the MT-SSAT animals.

  6. Proteomic analyses of the response of cyanobacteria to different stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Castielli, Ornella; De la Cerda, Berta; Navarro, José A; Hervás, Manuel; De la Rosa, Miguel A

    2009-06-01

    Cyanobacteria are significant contributors to global photosynthetic productivity, thus making it relevant to study how the different environmental stresses can alter their physiological activities. Here, we review the current research work on the response of cyanobacteria to different kinds of stress, mainly focusing on their response to metal stress as studied by using the modern proteomic tools. We also report a proteomic analysis of plastocyanin and cytochrome c(6) deletion mutants of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 grown under copper or iron deprivation, as compared to wild-type cells, so as to get a further understanding of the metal homeostasis in cyanobacteria and their response to changing environmental conditions.

  7. Plasma proteome response to severe burn injury revealed by 18O-labeled "universal" reference-based quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Qian, Wei-Jun; Petritis, Brianne O; Kaushal, Amit; Finnerty, Celeste C; Jeschke, Marc G; Monroe, Matthew E; Moore, Ronald J; Schepmoes, Athena A; Xiao, Wenzhong; Moldawer, Lyle L; Davis, Ronald W; Tompkins, Ronald G; Herndon, David N; Camp, David G; Smith, Richard D

    2010-09-01

    A burn injury represents one of the most severe forms of human trauma and is responsible for significant mortality worldwide. Here, we present the first quantitative proteomics investigation of the blood plasma proteome response to severe burn injury by comparing the plasma protein concentrations of 10 healthy control subjects with those of 15 severe burn patients at two time-points following the injury. The overall analytical strategy for this work integrated immunoaffinity depletion of the 12 most abundant plasma proteins with cysteinyl-peptide enrichment-based fractionation prior to LC-MS analyses of individual patient samples. Incorporation of an 18O-labeled "universal" reference among the sample sets enabled precise relative quantification across samples. In total, 313 plasma proteins confidently identified with two or more unique peptides were quantified. Following statistical analysis, 110 proteins exhibited significant abundance changes in response to the burn injury. The observed changes in protein concentrations suggest significant inflammatory and hypermetabolic response to the injury, which is supported by the fact that many of the identified proteins are associated with acute phase response signaling, the complement system, and coagulation system pathways. The regulation of approximately 35 proteins observed in this study is in agreement with previous results reported for inflammatory or burn response, but approximately 50 potentially novel proteins previously not known to be associated with burn response or inflammation are also found. Elucidating proteins involved in the response to severe burn injury may reveal novel targets for therapeutic interventions as well as potential predictive biomarkers for patient outcomes such as multiple organ failure.

  8. Attached and planktonic Listeria monocytogenes global proteomic responses and associated influence of strain genetics and temperature.

    PubMed

    Mata, Marcia M; da Silva, Wladimir P; Wilson, Richard; Lowe, Edwin; Bowman, John P

    2015-02-01

    Contamination of industrial and domestic food usage environments by the attachement of bacterial food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes has public health and economic implications. Comprehensive proteomics experiments using label-free liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry were used to compare the proteomes of two different L. monocytogenes strains (Siliken_1/2c and F2365_4b), which show very different capacities to attach to surfaces. Growth temperature and strain type were highly influential on the proteomes in both attached and planktonic cells. On the basis of the proteomic data, it is highly unlikely that specific surface proteins play a direct role in adherence to inanimate surfaces. Instead, strain-dependent responses related to cell envelope polymer biosynthesis and stress response regulation likely contribute to a different ability to attach and also to survive external stressors. Collectively, the divergent proteome-level responses observed define strain- and growth-temperature-dependent differences relevant to attachment efficacy, highlight relevant proteins involved in stress protection in attached cells, and suggest that strain differences and growth conditions are important in relation to environmental persistence.

  9. Lipogenesis Is Decreased by Grape Seed Proanthocyanidins According to Liver Proteomics of Rats Fed a High Fat Diet*

    PubMed Central

    Baiges, Isabel; Palmfeldt, Johan; Bladé, Cinta; Gregersen, Niels; Arola, Lluís

    2010-01-01

    Bioactive proanthocyanidins have been reported to have several beneficial effects on health in relation to metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. We studied the effect of grape seed proanthocyanidin extract (GSPE) in rats fed a high fat diet (HFD). This is the first study of the effects of flavonoids on the liver proteome of rats suffering from metabolic syndrome. Three groups of rats were fed over a period of 13 weeks either a chow diet (control), an HFD, or a high fat diet supplemented for the last 10 days with GSPE (HFD + GSPE). The liver proteome was fractionated, using a Triton X-114-based two-phase separation, into soluble and membrane protein fractions so that total proteome coverage was considerably improved. The data from isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based nano-LC-MS/MS analysis revealed 90 proteins with a significant (p < 0.05) minimal expression difference of 20% due to metabolic syndrome (HFD versus control) and 75 proteins due to GSPE treatment (HFD + GSPE versus HFD). The same animals have previously been studied (Quesada, H., del Bas, J. M., Pajuelo, D., Díaz, S., Fernandez-Larrea, J., Pinent, M., Arola, L., Salvadó, M. J., and Bladé, C. (2009) Grape seed proanthocyanidins correct dyslipidemia associated with a high-fat diet in rats and repress genes controlling lipogenesis and VLDL assembling in liver. Int. J. Obes. 33, 1007–1012), and GSPE was shown to correct dyslipidemia observed in HFD-fed rats probably through the repression of hepatic lipogenesis. Our data corroborate those findings with an extensive list of proteins describing the induction of hepatic glycogenesis, glycolysis, and fatty acid and triglyceride synthesis in HFD, whereas the opposite pattern was observed to a large extent in GSPE-treated animals. GSPE was shown to have a wider effect than previously thought, and putative targets of GSPE involved in the reversal of the symptoms of metabolic syndrome were revealed. Some

  10. The cellular and proteomic response of primary and immortalized murine Kupffer cells following immune stimulation diverges from that of monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Tweedell, Rebecca; Tao, Dingyin; Dinglasan, Rhoel R

    2015-01-01

    Kupffer cells (KCs) are the first line of defense in the liver against pathogens, yet several microbes successfully target the liver, bypass immune surveillance, and effectively develop in this tissue. Our current, albeit poor, understanding of KC-pathogen interactions has been largely achieved through the study of primary cells, requiring isolation from large numbers of animals. To facilitate the study of KC biology, an immortalized rat KC line 1, RKC1, was developed. We performed a comparative global proteomic analysis of RKC1 and primary rat KCs (PRKC) to characterize their respective responses to lipopolysaccharide-mediated immune stimulation. We identified patent differences in the proteomic response profile of RKC1 and PRKC to lipopolysaccharide. We observed that PRKC upregulated more immune function pathways and exhibited marked changes in cellular morphology following stimulation. We consequently analyzed the cytoskeletal signaling pathways of these cells in light of the fact that macrophages are known to induce cytoskeletal changes in response to pathogens. Our findings suggest that KCs respond differently to inflammatory stimulus than do monocyte-derived macrophages, and such data may provide insight into how pathogens, such as the malaria parasite, may have evolved mechanisms of liver entry through KCs without detection.

  11. Investigating Cellular Responses During Photohydrogen Production by the Marine Microalga Tetraselmis subcordiformis by Quantitative Proteome Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ji, Chaofan; Cao, Xupeng; Liu, Hongwei; Qu, Junge; Yao, Changhong; Zou, Hanfa; Xue, Song

    2015-10-01

    The marine microalga Tetraselmis subcordiformis could photoproduce hydrogen under the regulation of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), and a hydrogen production process kinetic analysis was characterized by two peaks, suggesting that two distinct mechanisms might exist in this alga. Therefore, 2D nanoliquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was introduced to analyze the proteome of samples from different time points. A total of 912 proteins were identified, providing a global view of the cellular responses at the proteomic level. These proteins can be divided into multiple functional groups including stress responses, energy metabolism and redox homeostasis. The quantitative proteomic data provided more details on the electron donors for hydrogen production. During the first stage, photosystem II produced electrons for hydrogen production; during the second stage, metabolites were the major electron donors via nonphotochemical plastoquinone reduction by NADH dehydrogenase. PMID:26234437

  12. Contribution of proteomic studies towards understanding plant heavy metal stress response

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Zahed; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2013-01-01

    Modulation of plant proteome composition is an inevitable process to cope with the environmental challenges including heavy metal (HM) stress. Soil and water contaminated with hazardous metals not only cause permanent and irreversible health problems, but also result substantial reduction in crop yields. In course of time, plants have evolved complex mechanisms to regulate the uptake, mobilization, and intracellular concentration of metal ions to alleviate the stress damages. Since, the functional translated portion of the genome plays an essential role in plant stress response, proteomic studies provide us a finer picture of protein networks and metabolic pathways primarily involved in cellular detoxification and tolerance mechanism. In the present review, an attempt is made to present the state of the art of recent development in proteomic techniques and significant contributions made so far for better understanding the complex mechanism of plant metal stress acclimation. Role of metal stress-related proteins involved in antioxidant defense system and primary metabolism is critically reviewed to get a bird’s-eye view on the different strategies of plants to detoxify HMs. In addition to the advantages and disadvantages of different proteomic methodologies, future applications of proteome study of subcellular organelles are also discussed to get the new insights into the plant cell response to HMs. PMID:23355841

  13. A new insight into the impact of different proteases on SILAC quantitative proteome of the mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Li, Wenbo; Lv, Yongzhuang; Chang, Cheng; Wu, Songfeng; Song, Lei; Ding, Chen; Wei, Handong; He, Fuchu; Jiang, Ying; Zhu, Yunping

    2013-08-01

    In this study, we examined the use of multiple proteases (trypsin, LysC, tandem LysC/trypsin) on both protein identification and quantification in the Lys-labeled SILAC mouse liver. Our results show that trypsin and tandem LysC/trypsin digestion are superior to LysC in peptides and protein identification while LysC shows advantages in quantification of Lys-labeled proteins. Combination of experimental results from different proteases (LysC and trypsin) enabled a significant increase in the number of identified protein and protein can be quantified. Thus, taking advantage of the complementation of different protease should be a good strategy to improve both qualitative and quantitative proteomics research.

  14. Exposure to cobalt causes transcriptomic and proteomic changes in two rat liver derived cell lines.

    PubMed

    Permenter, Matthew G; Dennis, William E; Sutto, Thomas E; Jackson, David A; Lewis, John A; Stallings, Jonathan D

    2013-01-01

    Cobalt is a transition group metal present in trace amounts in the human diet, but in larger doses it can be acutely toxic or cause adverse health effects in chronic exposures. Its use in many industrial processes and alloys worldwide presents opportunities for occupational exposures, including military personnel. While the toxic effects of cobalt have been widely studied, the exact mechanisms of toxicity remain unclear. In order to further elucidate these mechanisms and identify potential biomarkers of exposure or effect, we exposed two rat liver-derived cell lines, H4-II-E-C3 and MH1C1, to two concentrations of cobalt chloride. We examined changes in gene expression using DNA microarrays in both cell lines and examined changes in cytoplasmic protein abundance in MH1C1 cells using mass spectrometry. We chose to closely examine differentially expressed genes and proteins changing in abundance in both cell lines in order to remove cell line specific effects. We identified enriched pathways, networks, and biological functions using commercial bioinformatic tools and manual annotation. Many of the genes, proteins, and pathways modulated by exposure to cobalt appear to be due to an induction of a hypoxic-like response and oxidative stress. Genes that may be differentially expressed due to a hypoxic-like response are involved in Hif-1α signaling, glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and other energy metabolism related processes. Gene expression changes linked to oxidative stress are also known to be involved in the NRF2-mediated response, protein degradation, and glutathione production. Using microarray and mass spectrometry analysis, we were able to identify modulated genes and proteins, further elucidate the mechanisms of toxicity of cobalt, and identify biomarkers of exposure and effect in vitro, thus providing targets for focused in vivo studies.

  15. Exposure to Cobalt Causes Transcriptomic and Proteomic Changes in Two Rat Liver Derived Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Permenter, Matthew G.; Dennis, William E.; Sutto, Thomas E.; Jackson, David A.; Lewis, John A.; Stallings, Jonathan D.

    2013-01-01

    Cobalt is a transition group metal present in trace amounts in the human diet, but in larger doses it can be acutely toxic or cause adverse health effects in chronic exposures. Its use in many industrial processes and alloys worldwide presents opportunities for occupational exposures, including military personnel. While the toxic effects of cobalt have been widely studied, the exact mechanisms of toxicity remain unclear. In order to further elucidate these mechanisms and identify potential biomarkers of exposure or effect, we exposed two rat liver-derived cell lines, H4-II-E-C3 and MH1C1, to two concentrations of cobalt chloride. We examined changes in gene expression using DNA microarrays in both cell lines and examined changes in cytoplasmic protein abundance in MH1C1 cells using mass spectrometry. We chose to closely examine differentially expressed genes and proteins changing in abundance in both cell lines in order to remove cell line specific effects. We identified enriched pathways, networks, and biological functions using commercial bioinformatic tools and manual annotation. Many of the genes, proteins, and pathways modulated by exposure to cobalt appear to be due to an induction of a hypoxic-like response and oxidative stress. Genes that may be differentially expressed due to a hypoxic-like response are involved in Hif-1α signaling, glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and other energy metabolism related processes. Gene expression changes linked to oxidative stress are also known to be involved in the NRF2-mediated response, protein degradation, and glutathione production. Using microarray and mass spectrometry analysis, we were able to identify modulated genes and proteins, further elucidate the mechanisms of toxicity of cobalt, and identify biomarkers of exposure and effect in vitro, thus providing targets for focused in vivo studies. PMID:24386269

  16. The Proteome Response to Amyloid Protein Expression In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Ricardo A.; Franco, Catarina; Da Costa, Gonçalo; Planchon, Sébastien; Renaut, Jenny; Ribeiro, Raquel M.; Pinto, Francisco; Silva, Marta Sousa; Coelho, Ana Varela; Freire, Ana Ponces; Cordeiro, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Protein misfolding disorders such as Alzheimer, Parkinson and transthyretin amyloidosis are characterized by the formation of protein amyloid deposits. Although the nature and location of the aggregated proteins varies between different diseases, they all share similar molecular pathways of protein unfolding, aggregation and amyloid deposition. Most effects of these proteins are likely to occur at the proteome level, a virtually unexplored reality. To investigate the effects of an amyloid protein expression on the cellular proteome, we created a yeast expression system using human transthyretin (TTR) as a model amyloidogenic protein. We used Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a living test tube, to express native TTR (non-amyloidogenic) and the amyloidogenic TTR variant L55P, the later forming aggregates when expressed in yeast. Differential proteome changes were quantitatively analyzed by 2D-differential in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE). We show that the expression of the amyloidogenic TTR-L55P causes a metabolic shift towards energy production, increased superoxide dismutase expression as well as of several molecular chaperones involved in protein refolding. Among these chaperones, members of the HSP70 family and the peptidyl-prolyl-cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) were identified. The latter is highly relevant considering that it was previously found to be a TTR interacting partner in the plasma of ATTR patients but not in healthy or asymptomatic subjects. The small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) expression is also increased. Our findings suggest that refolding and degradation pathways are activated, causing an increased demand of energetic resources, thus the metabolic shift. Additionally, oxidative stress appears to be a consequence of the amyloidogenic process, posing an enhanced threat to cell survival. PMID:23185553

  17. Global SUMO Proteome Responses Guide Gene Regulation, mRNA Biogenesis, and Plant Stress Responses

    PubMed Central

    Mazur, Magdalena J.; van den Burg, Harrold A.

    2012-01-01

    Small Ubiquitin-like MOdifier (SUMO) is a key regulator of abiotic stress, disease resistance, and development in plants. The identification of >350 plant SUMO targets has revealed many processes modulated by SUMO and potential consequences of SUMO on its targets. Importantly, highly related proteins are SUMO-modified in plants, yeast, and metazoans. Overlapping SUMO targets include heat-shock proteins (HSPs), transcription regulators, histones, histone-modifying enzymes, proteins involved in DNA damage repair, but also proteins involved in mRNA biogenesis and nucleo-cytoplasmic transport. Proteomics studies indicate key roles for SUMO in gene repression by controlling histone (de)acetylation activity at genomic loci. The responsible heavily sumoylated transcriptional repressor complexes are recruited by plant transcription factors (TFs) containing an (ERF)-associated Amphiphilic Repression (EAR) motif. These TFs are not necessarily themselves a SUMO target. Conversely, SUMO acetylation (Ac) prevents binding of downstream partners by blocking binding of their SUMO-interaction peptide motifs to Ac-SUMO. In addition, SUMO acetylation has emerged as a mechanism to recruit specifically bromodomains. Bromodomains are generally linked with gene activation. These findings strengthen the idea of a bi-directional sumo-acetylation switch in gene regulation. Quantitative proteomics has highlighted that global sumoylation provides a dynamic response to protein damage involving SUMO chain-mediated protein degradation, but also SUMO E3 ligase-dependent transcription of HSP genes. With these insights in SUMO function and novel technical advancements, we can now study SUMO dynamics in responses to (a)biotic stress in plants. PMID:23060889

  18. Quantifying Integrated Proteomic Responses to Iron Stress in the Globally Important Marine Diazotroph Trichodesmium

    PubMed Central

    Snow, Joseph T.; Polyviou, Despo; Skipp, Paul; Chrismas, Nathan A. M.; Hitchcock, Andrew; Geider, Richard; Moore, C. Mark; Bibby, Thomas S.

    2015-01-01

    Trichodesmium is a biogeochemically important marine cyanobacterium, responsible for a significant proportion of the annual ‘new’ nitrogen introduced into the global ocean. These non-heterocystous filamentous diazotrophs employ a potentially unique strategy of near-concurrent nitrogen fixation and oxygenic photosynthesis, potentially burdening Trichodesmium with a particularly high iron requirement due to the iron-binding proteins involved in these processes. Iron availability may therefore have a significant influence on the biogeography of Trichodesmium. Previous investigations of molecular responses to iron stress in this keystone marine microbe have largely been targeted. Here a holistic approach was taken using a label-free quantitative proteomics technique (MSE) to reveal a sophisticated multi-faceted proteomic response of Trichodesmium erythraeum IMS101 to iron stress. Increased abundances of proteins known to be involved in acclimation to iron stress and proteins known or predicted to be involved in iron uptake were observed, alongside decreases in the abundances of iron-binding proteins involved in photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation. Preferential loss of proteins with a high iron content contributed to overall reductions of 55–60% in estimated proteomic iron requirements. Changes in the abundances of iron-binding proteins also suggested the potential importance of alternate photosynthetic pathways as Trichodesmium reallocates the limiting resource under iron stress. Trichodesmium therefore displays a significant and integrated proteomic response to iron availability that likely contributes to the ecological success of this species in the ocean. PMID:26562022

  19. Proteomics-based investigation of salt-responsive mechanisms in plant roots.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qi; Zhang, Heng; Wang, Tai; Chen, Sixue; Dai, Shaojun

    2013-04-26

    Salinity is one of the major abiotic stresses that limits agricultural productivity worldwide. Plant roots function as the primary site of salinity perception. Salt responses in roots are essential for maintaining root functionality, as well as for transmitting the salt signal to shoot for proper salt response and adaptation in the entire plant. Therefore, a thorough understanding of signaling and metabolic mechanisms of salt response in roots is critical for improving plant salt tolerance. Current proteomic studies have provided salt-responsive expression patterns of 905 proteins in 14 plant species. Through integrative analysis of salt-responsive proteins and previous physiological and molecular findings, this review summarizes current understanding of salt responses in roots and highlights proteomic findings on the molecular mechanisms in the fine-tuned salt-responsive networks. At the proteome level, the following processes become dominant in root salt response: (i) salt signal perception and transduction; (ii) detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS); (iii) salt uptake/exclusion and compartmentalization; (iv) protein translation and/or turnover dynamics; (v) cytoskeleton/cell wall dynamics; (vi) carbohydrate and energy metabolism; and (vii) other salt-responsive metabolisms. These processes work together to gain cellular homeostasis in roots and determine the overall phenotype of plant growth and development under salt stress.

  20. Global Proteomics Analysis of the Response to Starvation in C. elegans*

    PubMed Central

    Larance, Mark; Pourkarimi, Ehsan; Wang, Bin; Brenes Murillo, Alejandro; Kent, Robert; Lamond, Angus I.; Gartner, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Periodic starvation of animals induces large shifts in metabolism but may also influence many other cellular systems and can lead to adaption to prolonged starvation conditions. To date, there is limited understanding of how starvation affects gene expression, particularly at the protein level. Here, we have used mass-spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics to identify global changes in the Caenorhabditis elegans proteome due to acute starvation of young adult animals. Measuring changes in the abundance of over 5,000 proteins, we show that acute starvation rapidly alters the levels of hundreds of proteins, many involved in central metabolic pathways, highlighting key regulatory responses. Surprisingly, we also detect changes in the abundance of chromatin-associated proteins, including specific linker histones, histone variants, and histone posttranslational modifications associated with the epigenetic control of gene expression. To maximize community access to these data, they are presented in an online searchable database, the Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics (http://www.peptracker.com/epd/). PMID:25963834

  1. Quantitative proteomics of rat livers shows that unrestricted feeding is stressful for proteostasis with implications on life span

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Galit; Quadroni, Manfredo; Shtaif, Biana; Goloubinoff, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Studies in young mammals on the molecular effects of food restriction leading to prolong adult life are scares. Here, we used high-throughput quantitative proteomic analysis of whole rat livers to address the molecular basis for growth arrest and the apparent life-prolonging phenotype of the food restriction regimen. Over 1800 common proteins were significantly quantified in livers of ad libitum, restriction- and re-fed rats, which summed up into 92% of the total protein mass of the cells. Compared to restriction, ad libitum cells contained significantly less mitochondrial catabolic enzymes and more cytosolic and ER HSP90 and HSP70 chaperones, which are hallmarks of heat- and chemically-stressed tissues. Following re-feeding, levels of HSPs nearly reached ad libitum levels. The quantitative and qualitative protein values indicated that the restriction regimen was a least stressful condition that used minimal amounts of HSP-chaperones to maintain optimal protein homeostasis and sustain optimal life span. In contrast, the elevated levels of HSP-chaperones in ad libitum tissues were characteristic of a chronic stress, which in the long term could lead to early aging and shorter life span. PMID:27508340

  2. Quantitative proteomics of rat livers shows that unrestricted feeding is stressful for proteostasis with implications on life span.

    PubMed

    Gat-Yablonski, Galia; Finka, Andrija; Pinto, Galit; Quadroni, Manfredo; Shtaif, Biana; Goloubinoff, Pierre

    2016-08-01

    Studies in young mammals on the molecular effects of food restriction leading to prolong adult life are scares. Here, we used high-throughput quantitative proteomic analysis of whole rat livers to address the molecular basis for growth arrest and the apparent life-prolonging phenotype of the food restriction regimen. Over 1800 common proteins were significantly quantified in livers of ad libitum, restriction- and re-fed rats, which summed up into 92% of the total protein mass of the cells. Compared to restriction, ad libitum cells contained significantly less mitochondrial catabolic enzymes and more cytosolic and ER HSP90 and HSP70 chaperones, which are hallmarks of heat- and chemically-stressed tissues. Following re-feeding, levels of HSPs nearly reached ad libitum levels. The quantitative and qualitative protein values indicated that the restriction regimen was a least stressful condition that used minimal amounts of HSP-chaperones to maintain optimal protein homeostasis and sustain optimal life span. In contrast, the elevated levels of HSP-chaperones in ad libitum tissues were characteristic of a chronic stress, which in the long term could lead to early aging and shorter life span. PMID:27508340

  3. The effects of daily supplementation of Dendrobium huoshanense polysaccharide on ethanol-induced subacute liver injury in mice by proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Yu; Luo, Jian-Ping; Chen, Rui; Zha, Xue-Qiang; Wang, He

    2014-09-01

    Polysaccharides isolated from edible Dendrobium huoshanense have been shown to possess a hepatoprotection function for selenium- and carbon tetrachloride-induced liver injury. In this study, we investigated the preventive effects of daily supplementation with an homogeneous polysaccharide (DHP) purified from D. huoshanense on ethanol-induced subacute liver injury in mice and its potential mechanisms in liver protection by a proteomic approach. DHP was found to effectively depress the increased ratio of liver weight to body weight, reduce the elevated levels of serum aspartate aminotransferase, total cholesterol, total bilirubin and low density lipoprotein, and alleviate hepatic steatosis in mice with ethanol-induced subacute liver injury. Hepatic proteomics analysis performed by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS) revealed that cystathionine beta-synthase (Cbs) and D-lactate dehydrogenase (Ldhd) were two key proteins regulated by daily DHP intervention, which may assist in correcting the abnormal hepatic methionine metabolism pathway and decreasing the level of hepatic methylglyoxal generated from disordered metabolic pathways caused by ethanol. Our data suggest that DHP can protect liver function from alcoholic injury with complicated molecular mechanisms involving regulation of Cbs and Ldhd.

  4. Proteomic characterization of copper stress response in Cannabis sativa roots.

    PubMed

    Bona, Elisa; Marsano, Francesco; Cavaletto, Maria; Berta, Graziella

    2007-04-01

    Cannabis sativa is an annual herb with very high biomass and capability to absorb and accumulate heavy metals in roots and shoots; it is therefore a good candidate for phytoremediation of soils contaminated with metals. Copper is an essential micronutrient for all living organisms, it participates as an important redox component in cellular electron transport chains; but is extremely toxic to plants at high concentrations. The aim of this work was to investigate copper effects on the root proteome of C. sativa, whose genome is still unsequenced. Copper stress induced the suppression of two proteins, the down-regulation of seven proteins, while five proteins were up-regulated. The resulting differences in protein expression pattern were indicative of a plant adaptation to chronic stress and were directed to the reestablishment of the cellular and redox homeostasis. PMID:17352425

  5. Integrated proteomic and transcriptomic investigation of the acetaminophen toxicity in liver microfluidic biochip.

    PubMed

    Prot, Jean Matthieu; Briffaut, Anne-Sophie; Letourneur, Franck; Chafey, Philippe; Merlier, Franck; Grandvalet, Yves; Legallais, Cécile; Leclerc, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidic bioartificial organs allow the reproduction of in vivo-like properties such as cell culture in a 3D dynamical micro environment. In this work, we established a method and a protocol for performing a toxicogenomic analysis of HepG2/C3A cultivated in a microfluidic biochip. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses have shown the induction of the NRF2 pathway and the related drug metabolism pathways when the HepG2/C3A cells were cultivated in the biochip. The induction of those pathways in the biochip enhanced the metabolism of the N-acetyl-p-aminophenol drug (acetaminophen-APAP) when compared to Petri cultures. Thus, we observed 50% growth inhibition of cell proliferation at 1 mM in the biochip, which appeared similar to human plasmatic toxic concentrations reported at 2 mM. The metabolic signature of APAP toxicity in the biochip showed similar biomarkers as those reported in vivo, such as the calcium homeostasis, lipid metabolism and reorganization of the cytoskeleton, at the transcriptome and proteome levels (which was not the case in Petri dishes). These results demonstrate a specific molecular signature for acetaminophen at transcriptomic and proteomic levels closed to situations found in vivo. Interestingly, a common component of the signature of the APAP molecule was identified in Petri and biochip cultures via the perturbations of the DNA replication and cell cycle. These findings provide an important insight into the use of microfluidic biochips as new tools in biomarker research in pharmaceutical drug studies and predictive toxicity investigations.

  6. A Novel Systems-Biology Algorithm for the Analysis of Coordinated Protein Responses Using Quantitative Proteomics.

    PubMed

    García-Marqués, Fernando; Trevisan-Herraz, Marco; Martínez-Martínez, Sara; Camafeita, Emilio; Jorge, Inmaculada; Lopez, Juan Antonio; Méndez-Barbero, Nerea; Méndez-Ferrer, Simón; Del Pozo, Miguel Angel; Ibáñez, Borja; Andrés, Vicente; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Redondo, Juan Miguel; Bonzon-Kulichenko, Elena; Vázquez, Jesús

    2016-05-01

    The coordinated behavior of proteins is central to systems biology. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly known and methods to analyze coordination by conventional quantitative proteomics are still lacking. We present the Systems Biology Triangle (SBT), a new algorithm that allows the study of protein coordination by pairwise quantitative proteomics. The Systems Biology Triangle detected statistically significant coordination in diverse biological models of very different nature and subjected to different kinds of perturbations. The Systems Biology Triangle also revealed with unprecedented molecular detail an array of coordinated, early protein responses in vascular smooth muscle cells treated at different times with angiotensin-II. These responses included activation of protein synthesis, folding, turnover, and muscle contraction - consistent with a differentiated phenotype-as well as the induction of migration and the repression of cell proliferation and secretion. Remarkably, the majority of the altered functional categories were protein complexes, interaction networks, or metabolic pathways. These changes could not be detected by other algorithms widely used by the proteomics community, and the vast majority of proteins involved have not been described before to be regulated by AngII. The unique capabilities of The Systems Biology Triangle to detect functional protein alterations produced by the coordinated action of proteins in pairwise quantitative proteomics experiments make this algorithm an attractive choice for the biological interpretation of results on a routine basis.

  7. Microsomal proteomics.

    PubMed

    Wong, Diana M; Adeli, Khosrow

    2009-01-01

    Proteomic profiling of subcellular compartments has many advantages over traditional proteomic approaches using whole cell lysates as it allows for detailed proteome analysis of a specific organelle and corresponding functional characteristics. The microsome is a critical, membranous compartment involved in the synthesis, sorting, and secretion of proteins as well as other metabolic functions. This chapter will describe detailed methods for the isolation of microsomal organelles including the ER, Golgi, and prechylomicron transport vesicle (PCTV), a recently identified vesicular system involved in intestinal lipoprotein assembly and secretion. Particular focus is given to the isolation of microsomes from primary hepatocytes and enterocytes freshly isolated from rodent liver and intestinal tissue, and their proteomic profiling using a combination of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry.

  8. Proteomic Responses of Switchgrass and Prairie Cordgrass to Senescence.

    PubMed

    Paudel, Bimal; Das, Aayudh; Tran, Michaellong; Boe, Arvid; Palmer, Nathan A; Sarath, Gautam; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Jose L; Rushton, Paul J; Rohila, Jai S

    2016-01-01

    Senescence in biofuel grasses is a critical issue because early senescence decreases potential biomass production by limiting aerial growth and development. 2-Dimensional, differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) followed by mass spectrometry of selected protein spots was used to evaluate differences between leaf proteomes of early (ES)- and late- senescing (LS) genotypes of Prairie cordgrass (ES/LS PCG) and switchgrass (ES/LS SG), just before and after senescence was initiated. Analysis of the manually filtered and statistically evaluated data indicated that 69 proteins were significantly differentially abundant across all comparisons, and a majority (41%) were associated with photosynthetic processes as determined by gene ontology analysis. Ten proteins were found in common between PCG and SG, and nine and 18 proteins were unique to PCG and SG respectively. Five of the 10 differentially abundant spots common to both species were increased in abundance, and five were decreased in abundance. Leaf proteomes of the LS genotypes of both grasses analyzed before senescence contained significantly higher abundances of a 14-3-3 like protein and a glutathione-S-transferase protein when compared to the ES genotypes, suggesting differential cellular metabolism in the LS vs. the ES genotypes. The higher abundance of 14-3-3 like proteins may be one factor that impacts the senescence process in both LS PCG and LS SG. Aconitase dehydratase was found in greater abundance in all four genotypes after the onset of senescence, consistent with literature reports from genetic and transcriptomic studies. A Rab protein of the Ras family of G proteins and an s-adenosylmethionine synthase were more abundant in ES PCG when compared with the LS PCG. In contrast, several proteins associated with photosynthesis and carbon assimilation were detected in greater abundance in LS PCG when compared to ES PCG, suggesting that a loss of these proteins potentially contributed to the ES phenotype

  9. Proteomic Responses of Switchgrass and Prairie Cordgrass to Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Paudel, Bimal; Das, Aayudh; Tran, Michaellong; Boe, Arvid; Palmer, Nathan A.; Sarath, Gautam; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Jose L.; Rushton, Paul J.; Rohila, Jai S.

    2016-01-01

    Senescence in biofuel grasses is a critical issue because early senescence decreases potential biomass production by limiting aerial growth and development. 2-Dimensional, differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) followed by mass spectrometry of selected protein spots was used to evaluate differences between leaf proteomes of early (ES)- and late- senescing (LS) genotypes of Prairie cordgrass (ES/LS PCG) and switchgrass (ES/LS SG), just before and after senescence was initiated. Analysis of the manually filtered and statistically evaluated data indicated that 69 proteins were significantly differentially abundant across all comparisons, and a majority (41%) were associated with photosynthetic processes as determined by gene ontology analysis. Ten proteins were found in common between PCG and SG, and nine and 18 proteins were unique to PCG and SG respectively. Five of the 10 differentially abundant spots common to both species were increased in abundance, and five were decreased in abundance. Leaf proteomes of the LS genotypes of both grasses analyzed before senescence contained significantly higher abundances of a 14-3-3 like protein and a glutathione-S-transferase protein when compared to the ES genotypes, suggesting differential cellular metabolism in the LS vs. the ES genotypes. The higher abundance of 14-3-3 like proteins may be one factor that impacts the senescence process in both LS PCG and LS SG. Aconitase dehydratase was found in greater abundance in all four genotypes after the onset of senescence, consistent with literature reports from genetic and transcriptomic studies. A Rab protein of the Ras family of G proteins and an s-adenosylmethionine synthase were more abundant in ES PCG when compared with the LS PCG. In contrast, several proteins associated with photosynthesis and carbon assimilation were detected in greater abundance in LS PCG when compared to ES PCG, suggesting that a loss of these proteins potentially contributed to the ES phenotype

  10. A specific proteomic response of Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 to gamma radiations.

    PubMed

    Larmony, Sharon; Garnier, Florence; Hoste, Astrid; Nadal, Marc

    2015-11-01

    Sulfolobus solfataricus is an acidophilic hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon living at 80 °C in aerobic conditions. As other thermophilic organisms, S. solfataricus is resistant to gamma irradiation and we studied the response of this microorganism to this ionizing irradiation by monitoring cell growth, DNA integrity and proteome variations. In aerobic conditions, the S. solfataricus genome was fragmented due to the multiple DNA double strand breakages induced by γ-rays and was fully restored within a couple of hours. Comparison of irradiated and unirradiated cell proteomes indicated that only few proteins changed. The proteins identified by mass spectrometry are involved in different cellular pathways including DNA replication, recombination and repair. Interestingly, we observed that some proteins are irradiation dose-specific while others are common to the cell response regardless of the irradiation dose. Most of the proteins highlighted in these conditions seem to act together to allow an efficient cell response to γ-irradiation.

  11. Proteomic characterization of host response to Yersinia pestis and near neighbors.

    PubMed

    Chromy, Brett A; Perkins, Julie; Heidbrink, Jenny L; Gonzales, Arlene D; Murphy, Gloria A; Fitch, J Patrick; McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L

    2004-07-23

    Host-pathogen interactions result in protein expression changes within both the host and the pathogen. Here, results from proteomic characterization of host response following exposure to Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, and to two near neighbors, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia enterocolitica, are reported. Human monocyte-like cells were chosen as a model for macrophage immune response to pathogen exposure. Two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry was used to identify host proteins with differential expression following exposure to these three closely related Yersinia species. This comparative proteomic characterization of host response clearly shows that host protein expression patterns are distinct for the different pathogen exposures, and contributes to further understanding of Y. pestis virulence and host defense mechanisms. This work also lays the foundation for future studies aimed at defining biomarkers for presymptomatic detection of plague.

  12. Metabolic effects of the iodothyronine functional analogue TRC150094 on the liver and skeletal muscle of high-fat diet fed overweight rats: an integrated proteomic study.

    PubMed

    Silvestri, Elena; Glinni, Daniela; Cioffi, Federica; Moreno, Maria; Lombardi, Assunta; de Lange, Pieter; Senese, Rosalba; Ceccarelli, Michele; Salzano, Anna Maria; Scaloni, Andrea; Lanni, Antonia; Goglia, Fernando

    2012-07-01

    A novel functional iodothyronine analogue, TRC150094, which has a much lower potency toward thyroid hormone receptor (α1/β1) activation than triiodothyronine, has been shown to be effective at reducing adiposity in rats simultaneously receiving a high-fat diet (HFD). Here, by combining metabolic, functional and proteomic analysis, we studied how the hepatic and skeletal muscle phenotypes might respond to TRC150094 treatment in HFD-fed overweight rats. Drug treatment increased both the liver and skeletal muscle mitochondrial oxidative capacities without altering mitochondrial efficiency. Coherently, in terms of individual respiratory in-gel activity, blue-native analysis revealed an increased activity of complex V in the liver and of complexes II and V in tibialis muscle in TCR150094-treated animals. Subsequently, the identification of differentially expressed proteins and the analysis of their interrelations gave an integrated view of the phenotypic/metabolic adaptations occurring in the liver and muscle proteomes during drug treatment. TRC150094 significantly altered the expression of several proteins involved in key liver metabolic pathways, including amino acid and nitrogen metabolism, and fructose and mannose metabolism. The canonical pathways most strongly influenced by TRC150094 in tibialis muscle included glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, amino acid, fructose and mannose metabolism, and cell signaling. The phenotypic/metabolic influence of TRC150094 on the liver and skeletal muscle of HFD-fed overweight rats suggests the potential clinical application of this iodothyronine analogue in ameliorating metabolic risk parameters altered by diet regimens.

  13. Proteomic-based mechanistic investigation of low-dose radiation-induced cellular responses/effects

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xian

    2013-10-23

    The goal of our project is to apply our unique systems investigation strategy to reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying the radiation induction and transmission of oxidative damage, adaptive response, and bystander effect at low-doses. Beginning with simple in vitro systems such as fibroblast or epithelial pure culture, our amino acid-coded mass tagging (AACT) comparative proteomic platform will be used to measure quantitatively proteomic changes at high- or low-dose level with respect to their endogenous damage levels respectively, in which a broad range of unique regulated proteins sensitive to low-dose IR will be distinguished. To zoom in how these regulated proteins interact with other in the form of networks in induction/transmission pathways, these regulated proteins will be selected as baits for making a series of fibroblast cell lines that stably express each of them. Using our newly developed method of ?dual-tagging? quantitative proteomics that integrate the capabilities of natural complex expression/formation, simple epitope affinity isolation (not through tandem affinity purification or TAP), and ?in-spectra? AACT quantitative measurements using mass spectrometry (MS), we will be able to distinguish systematically interacting proteins with each bait in real time. Further, in addition to both proteome-wide (global differentially expressed proteins) and pathway-scale (bait-specific) profiling information, we will perform a computational network analysis to elucidate a global pathway/mechanisms underlying cellular responses to real-time low-dose IR. Similarly, we will extend our scheme to investigate systematically those induction/transmission pathways occurring in a fibroblast-epithelial interacting model in which the bystander cell (fibroblast) monitor the IR damage to the target cell (epithelial cell). The results will provide the proteome base (molecular mechanisms/pathways for signaling) for the low dose radiation-induced essential tissue

  14. Proteomic analysis of protective effects of polysaccharides from Salvia miltiorrhiza against immunological liver injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xue-Gang; Fu, Xiu-Qiong; Cai, Hong-Bing; Liu, Qiang; Li, Chun-Hua; Liu, Ya-Wei; Li, Ying-Jia; Liu, Zhi-Feng; Song, Yu-Hong; Lv, Zhi-Ping

    2011-07-01

    This study was designed to investigate mechanisms of the protective effects of Salvia miltiorrhiza polysaccharide (SMPS) against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced immunological liver injury (ILI) in Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-primed mice. Two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis showed that three proteins are down-regulated and six proteins are up-regulated by SMPS. SMPS reduces the degree of liver injury by up-regulating the enzymes of the citric acid cycle, namely malate dehydrogenase (MDH) and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex. LPS significantly increases nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and MDA level in BCG primed mice liver, whereas SMPS treatment protects against the immunological liver injury through inhibition of the NF-κB activation by up-regulation of PRDX6 and the subsequent attenuation of lipid peroxidation, iNOS expression and inflammation.

  15. Proteomic analysis of mouse liver plasma membrane: use of differential extraction to enrich hydrophobic membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijun; Xie, Jinyun; Wang, Xi'e; Liu, Xiaohui; Tang, Xinke; Cao, Rui; Hu, Weijun; Nie, Song; Fan, Chunming; Liang, Songping

    2005-11-01

    To comprehensively identify proteins of liver plasma membrane (PM), we isolated PMs from mouse liver by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. An optimized extraction method for whole PM proteins and several methods of differential extraction expected to enrich hydrophobic membrane proteins were tested. The extracted PM proteins were separated by 2-DE, and were identified by MALDI-TOF-MS, and ESI-quadrupole-TOF MS. As the complementary method, 1-DE-MS/MS was also used to identify PM proteins. The optimized lysis buffer containing urea, thiourea, CHAPS and NP-40 was able to extract more PM proteins, and treatment of PM samples with chloroform/methanol and sodium carbonate led to enrichment of more hydrophobic PM proteins. From the mouse liver PM fraction, 175 non-redundant gene products were identified, of which 88 (about 50%) were integral membrane proteins with one to seven transmembrane domains. The remaining products were probably membrane-associated and cytosolic proteins. The function distribution of all the identified liver PM proteins was analyzed; 40% represented enzymes, 12% receptors and 9% proteins with unknown function.

  16. Quantitative Proteomic Profiles of Androgen Receptor Signaling in the Liver of Fathead Minnows Pimephalus promelas

    EPA Science Inventory

    Androgenic chemicals are present in the environment at concentrations that impair reproductive processes in fish. The objective of this experiment was to identify proteins altered by an androgen receptor agonist (17â-trenbolone) and antagonist (flutamide) in the liver. Female fa...

  17. Characterizing the proteome and oxi-proteome of apple in response to a compatible (P. expansum) and a non-host (P. digitatum) pathogen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apples are subjected to both abiotic and biotic stresses during the postharvest period, which lead to large economic losses worldwide. To obtain biochemical insights into apple defense response, Researchers monitored the protein abundance changes (proteome), as well as the protein carbonyls (oxi-pr...

  18. Investigation of the Gracilaria gracilis (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta) proteome response to nitrogen limitation.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Rene K; Rafudeen, Muhammad S; Coyne, Vernon E

    2016-06-01

    Inorganic nitrogen has been identified as the major growth-limiting nutritional factor affecting Gracilaria gracilis populations in South Africa. Although the physiological mechanisms implemented by G. gracilis for adaption to low nitrogen environments have been investigated, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of these adaptions. This study provides the first investigation of G. gracilis proteome changes in response to nitrogen limitation and subsequent recovery. A differential proteomics approach employing two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was used to investigate G. gracilis proteome changes in response to nitrogen limitation and recovery. The putative identity of 22 proteins that changed significantly (P < 0.05) in abundance in response to nitrogen limitation and recovery was determined. The identified proteins function in a range of biological processes including glycolysis, photosynthesis, ATP synthesis, galactose metabolism, protein-refolding and biosynthesis, nitrogen metabolism and cytoskeleton remodeling. The identity of fructose 1,6 biphosphate (FBP) aldolase was confirmed by western blot analysis and the decreased abundance of FBP aldolase observed with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was validated by enzyme assays and western blots. The identification of key proteins and pathways involved in the G. gracilis nitrogen stress response provide a better understanding of G. gracilis proteome responses to varying degrees of nitrogen limitation and is the first step in the identification of biomarkers for monitoring the nitrogen status of cultivated G. gracilis populations.

  19. Comparative proteomic analysis of the short-term responses of rice roots and leaves to cadmium.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyunghee; Bae, Dong Won; Kim, Sun Ho; Han, Hay Ju; Liu, Xiaomin; Park, Hyeong Cheol; Lim, Chae Oh; Lee, Sang Yeol; Chung, Woo Sik

    2010-02-15

    Cadmium (Cd) is a non-essential heavy metal that is recognized as a major environmental pollutant. While Cd responses and toxicities in some plant species have been well established, there are few reports about the effects of short-term exposure to Cd on rice, a model monocotyledonous plant, at the proteome level. To investigate the effect of Cd in rice, we monitored the influence of Cd exposure on root and leaf proteomes. After Cd treatment, root and leaf tissues were separately collected and leaf proteins were fractionated with polyethylene glycol. Differentially regulated proteins were selected after image analysis and identified using MALDI-TOF MS. A total of 36 proteins were up- or down-regulated following Cd treatment. As expected, total glutathione levels were significantly decreased in Cd-treated roots, and approximately half of the up-regulated proteins in roots were involved in responses to oxidative stress. These results suggested that prompt antioxidative responses might be necessary for the reduction of Cd-induced oxidative stress in roots but not in leaves. In addition, RNA gel blot analysis showed that the proteins identified in the proteomic analysis were also differentially regulated at the transcriptional level. Collectively, our study provides insights into the integrated molecular mechanisms of early responses to Cd in rice.

  20. Proteomic response of marine invertebrate larvae to ocean acidification and hypoxia during metamorphosis and calcification.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Joy; Wong, Kelvin K W; Chandramouli, Kondethimmanahalli H; Qian, Pei-Yuan; Leung, Priscilla T Y; Wu, Rudolf S S; Thiyagarajan, Vengatesen

    2013-12-15

    Calcifying marine invertebrates with complex life cycles are particularly at risk to climate changes as they undergo an abrupt ontogenetic shift during larval metamorphosis. Although our understanding of the larval response to climate changes is rapidly advancing, the proteome plasticity involved in a compensatory response to climate change is still unknown. In this study, we investigated the proteomic response of metamorphosing larvae of the tubeworm Hydroides elegans, challenged with two climate change stressors, ocean acidification (OA; pH 7.6) and hypoxia (HYP; 2.8 mg O2 l(-1)), and with both combined. Using a two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE)-based approach coupled with mass spectrometry, we found that climate change stressors did not affect metamorphosis except under OA, but altered the larval proteome and phosphorylation status. Metabolism and various stress and calcification-related proteins were downregulated in response to OA. In OA and HYP combined, HYP restored the expression of the calcification-related proteins to the control levels. We speculate that mild HYP stress could compensate for the negative effects of OA. This study also discusses the potential functions of selected proteins that might play important roles in larval acclimation and adaption to climate change.

  1. Recent developments in the application of proteomics to the analysis of plant responses to heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Ahsan, Nagib; Renaut, Jenny; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2009-05-01

    Pollution of soils by heavy metals is an ever-growing problem throughout the world, and is the result of human activities as well as geochemical weathering of rocks and other environmental causes such as volcanic eruptions, acid rain and continental dusts. Plants everywhere are continuously exposed to metal-contaminated soils. The uptake of heavy metals not only constrains crop yields, but can also be a major hazard to the health of humans and to the entire ecosystem. Although analysis of gene expression at the mRNA level has enhanced our understanding of the response of plants to heavy metals, many questions regarding the functional translated portions of plant genomes under metal stress remain unanswered. Proteomics offers a new platform for studying complex biological functions involving large numbers and networks of proteins, and can serve as a key tool for revealing the molecular mechanisms that are involved in interactions between toxic metals and plant species. This review focuses on recent developments in the applications of proteomics to the analysis of the responses of plants to heavy metals; such studies provide a deeper understanding of protein responses and the interactions among the possible pathways that are involved in detoxification of toxic metals in plant cells. In addition, the challenges faced by proteomics in understanding the responses of plants to toxic metal are discussed, and some possible future strategies for meeting these challenges are proposed.

  2. Proteomic characterization of acid stress response in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Kurian, Dominic; Phadwal, Kanchan; Mäenpää, Pirkko

    2006-06-01

    A comparative proteomic analysis using 2-DE coupled with MALDI-MS and LC-MS/MS was performed in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 to identify protein candidates involved in acid stress response in cyanobacteria. Comparison of soluble proteins from the cytoplasmic fraction of cells grown on media set at pH 7.5 and 5.5 using 2-DE identified four proteins, which showed significant changes in the abundance. Surprisingly, several general stress proteins, either the heat shock family proteins or chaperonins, did not show perceptible fold changes in response to acidity. Compared to the cytoplasmic proteome, the periplasmic proteome showed remarkable changes as a function of external pH. Protein expression profiling at different external pH, i.e., 9.0, 7.5, 6.0 and 5.5, allowed classifying the periplasmic proteins depending on their preferential expression patterns towards acidity or alkalinity. Among the acid- and base-induced proteins, oxalate decarboxylase and carbonic anhydrase were already known for their role in pH homeostasis. Several unknown proteins from the periplasm, that showed significant changes in response to pH, provide ideal targets for further studies in understanding pH stress response in cyanobacteria. This study also identified 14 novel proteins, hitherto unknown from the periplasmic space of Synechocystis. PMID:16691555

  3. Comparative proteomic analysis of Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) in response to thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Wei, Dong; Jia, Fu-Xian; Tian, Chuan-Bei; Tian, Yi; Smagghe, Guy; Dou, Wei; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2015-03-01

    Temperature is one of the most important environmental variables affecting growth, reproduction and distribution of insects. The rise of comparative proteomics provides a powerful tool to explore the response in proteins to thermal stress. As an important worldwide pest, the oriental fruit fly Bactrocera dorsalis causes severe economic losses to crops. To understand the response of B. dorsalis to thermal stress, we performed a comparative proteome analysis of this insect after exposure to extreme low and high temperatures using two-dimensional electrophoresis. Among the separated proteins, 51 diverse protein spots were present differently in response to extreme temperatures. Using tandem mass spectrometry sequencing analysis 39 proteins were successfully identified, which included 13 oxidoreductases, 10 binding proteins, 5 transferases, and 2 each of lyases, isomerases, ligases, and developmental proteins. Subsequently, the expression of these protein transcripts was studied by RT-qPCR to validate the proteomic results. In conclusion, this study provides a first look into the thermal stress response of B. dorsalis at the protein level, and thus it paves the way for further functional studies in the physiological mechanism related to thermal stress.

  4. 3-Tesla MRI Response to TACE in HCC (Liver Cancer)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-22

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Resectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Stage A Adult Primary Liver Cancer (BCLC); Stage B Adult Primary Liver Cancer (BCLC)

  5. Identification of Differentially Expressed Proteins in Liver in Response to Subacute Ruminal Acidosis (SARA) Induced by High-concentrate Diet

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, X. Y.; Ni, Y. D.; Zhang, S. K.; Zhang, Y. S.; Shen, X. Z.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate protein expression patterns of liver in response to subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) induced by high-concentrate diet. Sixteen healthy mid-lactating goats were randomly divided into 2 groups and fed either a high-forage (HF) diet or a high-concentrate (HC) diet. The HC diet was expected to induce SARA. After ensuring the occurrence of SARA, liver samples were collected. Proteome analysis with differential in gel electrophoresis technology revealed that, 15 proteins were significantly modulated in liver in a comparison between HF and HC-fed goats. These proteins were found mainly associated with metabolism and energy transfer after identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time of flight. The results indicated that glucose, lipid and protein catabolism could be enhanced when SARA occurred. It prompted that glucose, lipid and amine acid in the liver mainly participated in oxidation and energy supply when SARA occurred, which possibly consumed more precursors involved in milk protein and milk fat synthesis. These results suggest new candidate proteins that may contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms that mediate liver adaptation to SARA. PMID:25083113

  6. Mass spectrometry-based analysis of rat liver and hepatocellular carcinoma Morris hepatoma 7777 plasma membrane proteome.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lulu; Clifton, James G; Reutter, Werner; Josic, Djuro

    2013-09-01

    The gel-based proteomic analysis of plasma membranes from rat liver and chemically induced, malignant hepatocellular carcinoma Morris hepatoma 7777 was systematically optimized to yield the maximum number of proteins containing transmembrane domains (TMDs). Incorporation of plasma membrane proteins into a polyacrylamide "tube gel" followed by in-gel digestion of "tube gel" pieces significantly improved detection by electrospray ionization-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Removal of less hydrophobic proteins by washing isolated plasma membranes with 0.1 M sodium carbonate enables detection of a higher number of hydrophobic proteins containing TMDs in both tissues. Subsequent treatment of plasma membranes by a proteolytic enzyme (trypsin) causes the loss of some of the proteins that are detected after washing with sodium carbonate, but it enables the detection of other hydrophobic proteins containing TMDs. Introduction of mass spectrometers with higher sensitivity, higher mass resolution and mass accuracy, and a faster scan rate significantly improved detection of membrane proteins, but the improved sample preparation is still useful and enables detection of additional hydrophobic proteins. Proteolytic predigestion of plasma membranes enables detection of additional hydrophobic proteins and better sequence coverage of TMD-containing proteins in plasma membranes from both tissues.

  7. Proteomic response to physiological fermentation stresses in a wild-type wine strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Trabalzini, Lorenza; Paffetti, Alessandro; Scaloni, Andrea; Talamo, Fabio; Ferro, Elisa; Coratza, Grazietta; Bovalini, Lucia; Lusini, Paola; Martelli, Paola; Santucci, Annalisa

    2003-01-01

    We report a study on the adaptive response of a wild-type wine Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, isolated from natural spontaneous grape must, to mild and progressive physiological stresses due to fermentation. We observed by two-dimensional electrophoresis how the yeast proteome changes during glucose exhaustion, before the cell enters its complete stationary phase. On the basis of their identification, the proteins representing the S. cerevisiae proteomic response to fermentation stresses were divided into three classes: repressed proteins, induced proteins and autoproteolysed proteins. In an overall view, the proteome adaptation of S. cerevisiae at the time of glucose exhaustion seems to be directed mainly against the effects of ethanol, causing both hyperosmolarity and oxidative responses. Stress-induced autoproteolysis is directed mainly towards specific isoforms of glycolytic enzymes. Through the use of a wild-type S. cerevisiae strain and PMSF, a specific inhibitor of vacuolar proteinase B, we could also distinguish the specific contributions of the vacuole and the proteasome to the autoproteolytic process. PMID:12401115

  8. Spike-in SILAC proteomic approach reveals the vitronectin as an early molecular signature of liver fibrosis in hepatitis C infections with hepatic iron overload.

    PubMed

    Montaldo, Claudia; Mattei, Simone; Baiocchini, Andrea; Rotiroti, Nicolina; Del Nonno, Franca; Pucillo, Leopoldo Paolo; Cozzolino, Angela Maria; Battistelli, Cecilia; Amicone, Laura; Ippolito, Giuseppe; van Noort, Vera; Conigliaro, Alice; Alonzi, Tonino; Tripodi, Marco; Mancone, Carmine

    2014-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-induced iron overload has been shown to promote liver fibrosis, steatosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The zonal-restricted histological distribution of pathological iron deposits has hampered the attempt to perform large-scale in vivo molecular investigations on the comorbidity between iron and HCV. Diagnostic and prognostic markers are not yet available to assess iron overload-induced liver fibrogenesis and progression in HCV infections. Here, by means of Spike-in SILAC proteomic approach, we first unveiled a specific membrane protein expression signature of HCV cell cultures in the presence of iron overload. Computational analysis of proteomic dataset highlighted the hepatocytic vitronectin expression as the most promising specific biomarker for iron-associated fibrogenesis in HCV infections. Next, the robustness of our in vitro findings was challenged in human liver biopsies by immunohistochemistry and yielded two major results: (i) hepatocytic vitronectin expression is associated to liver fibrogenesis in HCV-infected patients with iron overload; (ii) hepatic vitronectin expression was found to discriminate also the transition between mild to moderate fibrosis in HCV-infected patients without iron overload.

  9. Comparative Proteomics Reveals Important Viral-Host Interactions in HCV-Infected Human Liver Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shufeng; Zhao, Ting; Song, BenBen; Zhou, Jianhua; Wang, Tony T

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) poses a global threat to public health. HCV envelop protein E2 is the major component on the virus envelope, which plays an important role in virus entry and morphogenesis. Here, for the first time, we affinity purified E2 complex formed in HCV-infected human hepatoma cells and conducted comparative mass spectrometric analyses. 85 cellular proteins and three viral proteins were successfully identified in three independent trials, among which alphafetoprotein (AFP), UDP-glucose: glycoprotein glucosyltransferase 1 (UGT1) and HCV NS4B were further validated as novel E2 binding partners. Subsequent functional characterization demonstrated that gene silencing of UGT1 in human hepatoma cell line Huh7.5.1 markedly decreased the production of infectious HCV, indicating a regulatory role of UGT1 in viral lifecycle. Domain mapping experiments showed that HCV E2-NS4B interaction requires the transmembrane domains of the two proteins. Altogether, our proteomics study has uncovered key viral and cellular factors that interact with E2 and provided new insights into our understanding of HCV infection. PMID:26808496

  10. Comparative Proteomics Reveals Important Viral-Host Interactions in HCV-Infected Human Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, BenBen; Zhou, Jianhua; Wang, Tony T.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) poses a global threat to public health. HCV envelop protein E2 is the major component on the virus envelope, which plays an important role in virus entry and morphogenesis. Here, for the first time, we affinity purified E2 complex formed in HCV-infected human hepatoma cells and conducted comparative mass spectrometric analyses. 85 cellular proteins and three viral proteins were successfully identified in three independent trials, among which alphafetoprotein (AFP), UDP-glucose: glycoprotein glucosyltransferase 1 (UGT1) and HCV NS4B were further validated as novel E2 binding partners. Subsequent functional characterization demonstrated that gene silencing of UGT1 in human hepatoma cell line Huh7.5.1 markedly decreased the production of infectious HCV, indicating a regulatory role of UGT1 in viral lifecycle. Domain mapping experiments showed that HCV E2-NS4B interaction requires the transmembrane domains of the two proteins. Altogether, our proteomics study has uncovered key viral and cellular factors that interact with E2 and provided new insights into our understanding of HCV infection. PMID:26808496

  11. Proteomic responses of oceanic Synechococcus WH8102 to phosphate and zinc scarcity and cadmium additions.

    PubMed

    Cox, Alysia D; Saito, Mak A

    2013-01-01

    Synechococcus sp. WH 8102 is a motile marine cyanobacterium isolated originally from the Sargasso Sea. To test the response of this organism to cadmium (Cd), generally considered a toxin, cultures were grown in a matrix of high and low zinc (Zn) and phosphate (PO4 (3-)) and were then exposed to an addition of 4.4 pM free Cd(2+) at mid-log phase and harvested after 24 h. Whereas Zn and PO4 (3-) had little effect on overall growth rates, in the final 24 h of the experiment three growth effects were noticed: (i) low PO4 (3-) treatments showed increased growth rates relative to high PO4 (3-) treatments, (ii) the Zn/high PO4 (3-) treatment appeared to enter stationary phase, and (iii) Cd increased growth rates further in both the low PO4 (3-) and Zn treatments. Global proteomic analysis revealed that: (i) Zn appeared to be critical to the PO4 (3-) response in this organism, (ii) bacterial metallothionein (SmtA) appears correlated with PO4 (3-) stress-associated proteins, (iii) Cd has the greatest influence on the proteome at low PO4 (3-) and Zn, (iv) Zn buffered the effects of Cd, and (v) in the presence of both replete PO4 (3-) and added Cd the proteome showed little response to the presence of Zn. Similar trends in alkaline phosphate (ALP) and SmtA suggest the possibility of a Zn supply system to provide Zn to ALP that involves SmtA. In addition, proteome results were consistent with a previous transcriptome study of PO4 (3-) stress (with replete Zn) in this organism, including the greater relative abundance of ALP (PhoA), ABC phosphate binding protein (PstS) and other proteins. Yet with no Zn in this proteome experiment the PO4 (3-) response was quite different including the greater relative abundance of five hypothetical proteins with no increase in PhoA or PstS, suggesting that Zn nutritional levels are connected to the PO4 (3-) response in this cyanobacterium. Alternate ALP PhoX (Ca) was found to be a low abundance protein, suggesting that PhoA (Zn, Mg) may be

  12. Proteomic responses of oceanic Synechococcus WH8102 to phosphate and zinc scarcity and cadmium additions.

    PubMed

    Cox, Alysia D; Saito, Mak A

    2013-01-01

    Synechococcus sp. WH 8102 is a motile marine cyanobacterium isolated originally from the Sargasso Sea. To test the response of this organism to cadmium (Cd), generally considered a toxin, cultures were grown in a matrix of high and low zinc (Zn) and phosphate (PO4 (3-)) and were then exposed to an addition of 4.4 pM free Cd(2+) at mid-log phase and harvested after 24 h. Whereas Zn and PO4 (3-) had little effect on overall growth rates, in the final 24 h of the experiment three growth effects were noticed: (i) low PO4 (3-) treatments showed increased growth rates relative to high PO4 (3-) treatments, (ii) the Zn/high PO4 (3-) treatment appeared to enter stationary phase, and (iii) Cd increased growth rates further in both the low PO4 (3-) and Zn treatments. Global proteomic analysis revealed that: (i) Zn appeared to be critical to the PO4 (3-) response in this organism, (ii) bacterial metallothionein (SmtA) appears correlated with PO4 (3-) stress-associated proteins, (iii) Cd has the greatest influence on the proteome at low PO4 (3-) and Zn, (iv) Zn buffered the effects of Cd, and (v) in the presence of both replete PO4 (3-) and added Cd the proteome showed little response to the presence of Zn. Similar trends in alkaline phosphate (ALP) and SmtA suggest the possibility of a Zn supply system to provide Zn to ALP that involves SmtA. In addition, proteome results were consistent with a previous transcriptome study of PO4 (3-) stress (with replete Zn) in this organism, including the greater relative abundance of ALP (PhoA), ABC phosphate binding protein (PstS) and other proteins. Yet with no Zn in this proteome experiment the PO4 (3-) response was quite different including the greater relative abundance of five hypothetical proteins with no increase in PhoA or PstS, suggesting that Zn nutritional levels are connected to the PO4 (3-) response in this cyanobacterium. Alternate ALP PhoX (Ca) was found to be a low abundance protein, suggesting that PhoA (Zn, Mg) may be

  13. Proteomic basis of stress responses in the gills of the pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Sun, Jin; Mu, Huawei; Li, Jun; Zhang, Yuehuan; Xu, Fengjiao; Xiang, Zhiming; Qian, Pei-Yuan; Qiu, Jian-Wen; Yu, Ziniu

    2015-01-01

    The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas is one of the dominant sessile inhabitants of the estuarine intertidal zone, which is a physically harsh environment due to the presence of a number of stressors. Oysters have adapted to highly dynamic and stressful environments, but the molecular mechanisms underlying such stress adaptation are largely unknown. In the present study, we examined the proteomic responses in the gills of C. gigas exposed to three stressors (high temperature, low salinity, and aerial exposure) they often encounter in the field. We quantitatively compared the gill proteome profiles using iTRAQ-coupled 2-D LC-MS/MS. There were 3165 identified proteins among which 2379 proteins could be quantified. Heat shock, hyposalinity, and aerial exposure resulted in 50, 15, and 33 differentially expressed gill proteins, respectively. Venn diagram analysis revealed substantial different responses to the three stressors. Only xanthine dehydrogenase/oxidase showed a similar expression pattern across the three stress treatments, suggesting that reduction of ROS accumulation may be a conserved response to these stressors. Heat shock caused significant overexpression of molecular chaperones and production of S-adenosyl-l-methionine, indicating their crucial protective roles against protein denature. In addition, heat shock also activated immune responses, Ca(2+) binding protein expression. By contrast, hyposalinity and aerial exposure resulted in the up-regulation of 3-demethylubiquinone-9 3-methyltransferase, indicating that increase in ubiquinone synthesis may contribute to withstanding both the osmotic and desiccation stress. Strikingly, the majority of desiccation-responsive proteins, including those involved in metabolism, ion transportation, immune responses, DNA duplication, and protein synthesis, were down-regulated, indicating conservation of energy as an important strategy to cope with desiccation stress. There was a high consistency between the expression

  14. Molecular Responses of Mouse Macrophages to Copper and Copper Oxide Nanoparticles Inferred from Proteomic Analyses*

    PubMed Central

    Triboulet, Sarah; Aude-Garcia, Catherine; Carrière, Marie; Diemer, Hélène; Proamer, Fabienne; Habert, Aurélie; Chevallet, Mireille; Collin-Faure, Véronique; Strub, Jean-Marc; Hanau, Daniel; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Herlin-Boime, Nathalie; Rabilloud, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    The molecular responses of macrophages to copper-based nanoparticles have been investigated via a combination of proteomic and biochemical approaches, using the RAW264.7 cell line as a model. Both metallic copper and copper oxide nanoparticles have been tested, with copper ion and zirconium oxide nanoparticles used as controls. Proteomic analysis highlighted changes in proteins implicated in oxidative stress responses (superoxide dismutases and peroxiredoxins), glutathione biosynthesis, the actomyosin cytoskeleton, and mitochondrial proteins (especially oxidative phosphorylation complex subunits). Validation studies employing functional analyses showed that the increases in glutathione biosynthesis and in mitochondrial complexes observed in the proteomic screen were critical to cell survival upon stress with copper-based nanoparticles; pharmacological inhibition of these two pathways enhanced cell vulnerability to copper-based nanoparticles, but not to copper ions. Furthermore, functional analyses using primary macrophages derived from bone marrow showed a decrease in reduced glutathione levels, a decrease in the mitochondrial transmembrane potential, and inhibition of phagocytosis and of lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide production. However, only a fraction of these effects could be obtained with copper ions. In conclusion, this study showed that macrophage functions are significantly altered by copper-based nanoparticles. Also highlighted are the cellular pathways modulated by cells for survival and the exemplified cross-toxicities that can occur between copper-based nanoparticles and pharmacological agents. PMID:23882024

  15. Quantitative proteomics of heavy metal stress responses in Sydney rock oysters.

    PubMed

    Muralidharan, Sridevi; Thompson, Emma; Raftos, David; Birch, Gavin; Haynes, Paul A

    2012-03-01

    Currently, there are few predictive biomarkers in key biomonitoring species, such as oysters, that can detect heavy metal pollution in coastal waterways. Several attributes make oysters superior to other organisms for positive biomonitoring of heavy metal pollution. In particular, they are filter feeders with a high capacity for bioaccumulation. In this study, we used two proteomics approaches, namely label-free shotgun proteomics based on SDS-PAGE gel separation and gas phase fractionation, to investigate the heavy metal stress responses of Sydney rock oysters. Protein samples were prepared from haemolymph of oysters exposed to 100 μg/L of PbCl(2), CuCl(2), or ZnCl(2) for 4 days in closed aquaria. Peptides were identified using a Bivalvia protein sequence database, due to the unavailability of a complete oyster genome sequence. Statistical analysis revealed 56 potential biomarker proteins, as well as several protein biosynthetic pathways to be greatly impacted by metal stress. These have the potential to be incorporated into bioassays for prevention and monitoring of heavy metal pollution in Australian oyster beds. The study confirms that proteomic analysis of biomonitoring species is a promising approach for assessing the effects of environmental pollution, and our experiments have provided insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying oyster stress responses. PMID:22539440

  16. Proteomic analysis of salt-responsive proteins in the mangrove plant, Bruguiera gymnorhiza.

    PubMed

    Tada, Yuichi; Kashimura, Takaaki

    2009-03-01

    To identify key proteins in the regulation of salt tolerance in the mangrove plant Bruguiera gymnorhiza, proteome analysis of samples grown under conditions of salt stress was performed. Comparative two-dimensional electrophoresis revealed that two, three and one protein were differentially expressed in the main root, lateral root and leaf, respectively, in response to salt stress. Among these, three proteins were identified by internal peptide sequence analysis: fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) aldolase and a novel protein in the main root, and osmotin in the lateral root. These results suggest that FBP aldolase and osmotin play roles in salt tolerance mechanisms common to both glycophytes and mangrove plants. Osmotin was abundant at early time points following salt treatment and seems to play a role in initial osmotic adaptation in lateral roots of B. gymnorhiza under salt stress, but does not contribute towards adaptation to prolonged or continuous exposure to salt stress. The amounts of these proteins were not correlated with those of the respective mRNAs, as determined by microarray analysis. A novel salt-responsive protein, not previously detected by expressed sequence tag analysis or transcriptome analysis, was also identified in this proteomic approach, and may provide insight into the salt tolerance mechanism of the mangrove plant. This is the first report of proteome analysis with detailed analysis of main and lateral roots of mangrove plants under salt stress conditions. PMID:19131358

  17. Global proteomic analysis of the chromate response in Arthrobacter sp strain FB24.

    SciTech Connect

    Henne, K. L.; Turse, J. E.; Nicora, C. D.; Lipton, M. S.; Tollaksen, S. L.; Lindberg, C.; Babnigg, G.; Giometti, C. S.; Nakatsu, C. H.; Thompson, D. K.; Konopka, A. E.; Biosciences Division; Purdue Univ.; PNNL

    2009-04-01

    A global proteomic evaluation of the response of Arthrobacter sp. strain FB24 to 5 and 20 mM Cr(VI) was conducted using both two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DGE) and liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC/LC-MS/MS). The changes in protein expression found with 2-DGE indicate alterations in central metabolism and amino acid synthesis. Proteome coverage increased from 22% with 2-DGE to 71% with LC/LC-MS/MS. The proteins exhibiting the highest levels of expression under Cr(VI) stress suggest intracellular sulfur limitation, which could be driven by competition for the sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) transporter by the chromate (CrO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) ion. These results are consistent with the growth defects seen with strain FB24 when Cr(VI) concentrations exceeded 5 mM.

  18. Critical comparison of sample preparation strategies for shotgun proteomic analysis of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples: insights from liver tissue

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The growing field of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue proteomics holds promise for improving translational research. Direct tissue trypsinization (DT) and protein extraction followed by in solution digestion (ISD) or filter-aided sample preparation (FASP) are the most common workflows for shotgun analysis of FFPE samples, but a critical comparison of the different methods is currently lacking. Experimental design DT, FASP and ISD workflows were compared by subjecting to the same label-free quantitative approach three independent technical replicates of each method applied to FFPE liver tissue. Data were evaluated in terms of method reproducibility and protein/peptide distribution according to localization, MW, pI and hydrophobicity. Results DT showed lower reproducibility, good preservation of high-MW proteins, a general bias towards hydrophilic and acidic proteins, much lower keratin contamination, as well as higher abundance of non-tryptic peptides. Conversely, FASP and ISD proteomes were depleted in high-MW proteins and enriched in hydrophobic and membrane proteins; FASP provided higher identification yields, while ISD exhibited higher reproducibility. Conclusions These results highlight that diverse sample preparation strategies provide significantly different proteomic information, and present typical biases that should be taken into account when dealing with FFPE samples. When a sufficient amount of tissue is available, the complementary use of different methods is suggested to increase proteome coverage and depth. PMID:25097466

  19. Proteomic identification of plasma protein tyrosine phosphatase alpha and fibronectin associated with liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, infection.

    PubMed

    Khoontawad, Jarinya; Laothong, Umawadee; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Pinlaor, Porntip; Mulvenna, Jason; Wongkham, Chaisiri; Yongvanit, Puangrat; Pairojkul, Chawalit; Mairiang, Eimorn; Sithithaworn, Paiboon; Pinlaor, Somchai

    2012-01-01

    Opisthorchiasis caused by Opisthorchis viverrini induces periductal fibrosis via host immune/inflammatory responses. Plasma protein alteration during host-parasite interaction-mediated inflammation may provide potential diagnostic and/or prognostic biomarkers. To search for target protein changes in O. viverrini-infected hamsters, a 1-D PAGE gel band was trypsin-digested and analyzed by a LC-MS/MS-based proteomics approach in the plasma profile of infected hamsters, and applied to humans. Sixty seven proteins were selected for further analysis based on at least two unique tryptic peptides with protein ID score >10 and increased expression at least two times across time points. These proteins have not been previously identified in O. viverrini-associated infection. Among those, proteins involved in structural (19%), immune response (13%), cell cycle (10%) and transcription (10%) were highly expressed. Western blots revealed an expression level of protein tyrosine phosphatase alpha (PTPα) which reached a peak at 1 month and subsequently tended to decrease. Fibronectin significantly increased at 1 month and tended to increase with time, supporting proteomic analysis. PTPα was expressed in the cytoplasm of inflammatory cells, while fibronectin was observed mainly in the cytoplasm of fibroblasts and the extracellular matrix at periductal fibrosis areas. In addition, these protein levels significantly increased in the plasma of O. viverrini-infected patients compared to healthy individuals, and significantly decreased at 2-months post-treatment, indicating their potential as disease markers. In conclusion, our results suggest that plasma PTPα and fibronectin may be associated with opisthorchiasis and the hamster model provides the basis for development of novel diagnostic markers in the future.

  20. Proteomic profile of Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos snails upon infection with the carcinogenic liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini

    PubMed Central

    Prasopdee, Sattrachai; Tesana, Smarn; Cantacessi, Cinzia; Laha, Thewarach; Mulvenna, Jason; Grams, Rudi; Loukas, Alex; Sotillo, Javier

    2014-01-01

    The snail Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos acts as the first intermediate host for the human liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini, the major cause of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) in Northeast Thailand. The undisputed link between CCA and O. viverrini infection has precipitated efforts to understand the molecular basis of host-parasite interactions with a view to ultimately developing new control strategies to combat this carcinogenic infection. To date most effort has focused on the interactions between the parasite and its human host, and little is known about the molecular relationships between the liver fluke and its snail intermediate host. In the present study we analyse the protein expression changes in different tissues of B. siamensis goniomphalos induced by infection with larval O. viverrini using iTRAQ labelling technology. We show that O. viverrini infection downregulates the expression of oxidoreductases and catalytic enzymes, while stress-related and motor proteins are upregulated. The present work could serve as a basis for future studies on the proteins implicated in the susceptibility/resistance of B. siamensis goniomphalos to O. viverrini, as well as studies on other pulmonate snail intermediate hosts of various parasitic flukes that infect humans. PMID:25284051

  1. Comparative proteomic analysis of thiol proteins in the liver after oxidative stress induced by diethylnitrosamine.

    PubMed

    Aparicio-Bautista, Diana I; Pérez-Carreón, Julio I; Gutiérrez-Nájera, Nora; Reyes-Grajeda, Juan P; Arellanes-Robledo, Jaime; Vásquez-Garzón, Verónica R; Jiménez-García, Mónica N; Villa-Treviño, Saúl

    2013-12-01

    Conversion of protein -SH groups to disulfides is an early event during protein oxidation, which has prompted great interest in the study of thiol proteins. Chemical carcinogenesis is strongly associated with the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The goal of this study was to detect thiol proteins that are sensitive to ROS generated during diethylnitrosamine (DEN) metabolism in the rat liver. DEN has been widely used to induce experimental hepatocellular carcinoma. We used modified redox-differential gel electrophoresis (redox-DIGE method) and mass spectrometry MALDI-TOF/TOF to identify differential oxidation protein profiles associated with carcinogen exposure. Our analysis revealed a time-dependent increase in the number of oxidized thiol proteins after carcinogen treatment; some of these proteins have antioxidant activity, including thioredoxin, peroxirredoxin 2, peroxiredoxin 6 and glutathione S-transferase alpha-3. According to functional classifications, the identified proteins in our study included chaperones, oxidoreductases, activity isomerases, hydrolases and other protein-binding partners. This study demonstrates that oxidative stress generated by DEN tends to increase gradually through DEN metabolism, causes time-dependent necrosis in the liver and has an oxidative effect on thiol proteins, thereby increasing the number of oxidized thiol proteins. Furthermore, these events occurred during the hepatocarcinogenesis initiation period.

  2. In-vivo quantitative proteomics reveals a key contribution of post-transcriptional mechanisms to the circadian regulation of liver metabolism.

    PubMed

    Robles, Maria S; Cox, Jürgen; Mann, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Circadian clocks are endogenous oscillators that drive the rhythmic expression of a broad array of genes, orchestrating metabolism and physiology. Recent evidence indicates that post-transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms play essential roles in modulating temporal gene expression for proper circadian function, particularly for the molecular mechanism of the clock. Due to technical limitations in large-scale, quantitative protein measurements, it remains unresolved to what extent the circadian clock regulates metabolism by driving rhythms of protein abundance. Therefore, we aimed to identify global circadian oscillations of the proteome in the mouse liver by applying in vivo SILAC mouse technology in combination with state of the art mass spectrometry. Among the 3000 proteins accurately quantified across two consecutive cycles, 6% showed circadian oscillations with a defined phase of expression. Interestingly, daily rhythms of one fifth of the liver proteins were not accompanied by changes at the transcript level. The oscillations of almost half of the cycling proteome were delayed by more than six hours with respect to the corresponding, rhythmic mRNA. Strikingly we observed that the length of the time lag between mRNA and protein cycles varies across the day. Our analysis revealed a high temporal coordination in the abundance of proteins involved in the same metabolic process, such as xenobiotic detoxification. Apart from liver specific metabolic pathways, we identified many other essential cellular processes in which protein levels are under circadian control, for instance vesicle trafficking and protein folding. Our large-scale proteomic analysis reveals thus that circadian post-transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms play a key role in the temporal orchestration of liver metabolism and physiology.

  3. Cytokinin modulates proteomic, transcriptomic and growth responses to temperature shocks in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Cerný, Martin; Jedelský, Petr L; Novák, Jan; Schlosser, Andreas; Brzobohatý, Břetislav

    2014-07-01

    As sessile organisms, plants must sense environmental conditions and adjust their growth and development processes accordingly, through adaptive responses regulated by various internal factors, including hormones. A key environmental factor is temperature, but temperature-sensing mechanisms are not fully understood despite intense research. We investigated proteomic responses to temperature shocks (15 min cold or heat treatments) with and without exogenous applications of cytokinin in Arabidopsis. Image and mass spectrometric analysis of the two-dimensionally separated proteins detected 139 differentially regulated spots, in which 148 proteins were identified, most of which have not been previously linked to temperature perception. More than 70% of the temperature-shock response proteins were modulated by cytokinin, mostly in a similar manner as heat shock. Data mining of previous transcriptomic datasets supported extensive interactions between temperature and cytokinin signalling. The biological significance of this finding was tested by assaying an independent growth response of Arabidopsis seedlings to heat stress: hypocotyl elongation. This response was strongly inhibited in mutants with deficiencies in cytokinin signalling or endogenous cytokinin levels. Thus, cytokinins may directly participate in heat signalling in plants. Finally, large proportions of both temperature-shock and cytokinin responsive proteomes co-localize to the chloroplast, which might therefore host a substantial proportion of the temperature response machinery.

  4. Physiological and proteomic analysis of Lactobacillus casei in response to acid adaptation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chongde; He, Guiqiang; Zhang, Juan

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the acid tolerance response (ATR) in Lactobacillus casei by a combined physiological and proteomic analysis. To optimize the ATR induction, cells were acid adapted for 1 h at different pHs, and then acid challenged at pH 3.5. The result showed that acid adaptation improved acid tolerance, and the highest survival was observed in cells adapted at pH 4.5 for 1 h. Analysis of the physiological data showed that the acid-adapted cells exhibited higher intracellular pH (pHi), intracellular NH4 (+) content, and lower inner permeability compared with the cells without adaptation. Proteomic analysis was performed upon acid adaptation to different pHs (pH 6.5 vs. pH 4.5) using two-dimensional electrophoresis. A total of 24 proteins that exhibited at least 1.5-fold differential expression were identified. Four proteins (Pgk, LacD, Hpr, and Galm) involved in carbohydrate catabolism and five classic stress response proteins (GroEL, GrpE, Dnak, Hspl, and LCAZH_2811) were up-regulated after acid adaptation at pH 4.5 for 1 h. Validation of the proteomic data was performed by quantitative RT-PCR, and transcriptional regulation of all selected genes showed a positive correlation with the proteomic patterns of the identified proteins. Results presented in this study may be useful for further elucidating the acid tolerance mechanisms and may help in formulating new strategies to improve the industrial performance of this species during acid stress. PMID:25062817

  5. Proteomic Insight into the Response of Arabidopsis Chloroplasts to Darkness

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Yu, Qingbo; Xiong, Haibo; Wang, Jun; Chen, Sixue; Yang, Zhongnan; Dai, Shaojun

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast function in photosynthesis is essential for plant growth and development. It is well-known that chloroplasts respond to various light conditions. However, it remains poorly understood about how chloroplasts respond to darkness. In this study, we found 81 darkness-responsive proteins in Arabidopsis chloroplasts under 8 h darkness treatment. Most of the proteins are nucleus-encoded, indicating that chloroplast darkness response is closely regulated by the nucleus. Among them, 17 ribosome proteins were obviously reduced after darkness treatment. The protein expressional patterns and physiological changes revealed the mechanisms in chloroplasts in response to darkness, e.g., (1) inhibition of photosystem II resulted in preferential cyclic electron flow around PSI; (2) promotion of starch degradation; (3) inhibition of chloroplastic translation; and (4) regulation by redox and jasmonate signaling. The results have improved our understanding of molecular regulatory mechanisms in chloroplasts under darkness. PMID:27137770

  6. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis Provides Novel Insights into Cold Stress Responses in Petunia Seedlings.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Huilin; Ning, Luyun; Li, Bei; Bao, Manzhu

    2016-01-01

    Low temperature is a major adverse environmental factor that impairs petunia growth and development. To better understand the molecular mechanisms of cold stress adaptation of petunia plants, a quantitative proteomic analysis using iTRAQ technology was performed to detect the effects of cold stress on protein expression profiles in petunia seedlings which had been subjected to 2°C for 5 days. Of the 2430 proteins whose levels were quantitated, a total of 117 proteins were discovered to be differentially expressed under low temperature stress in comparison to unstressed controls. As an initial study, 44 proteins including well known and novel cold-responsive proteins were successfully annotated. By integrating the results of two independent Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analyses, seven common GO terms were found of which "oxidation-reduction process" was the most notable for the cold-responsive proteins. By using the subcellular localization tool Plant-mPLoc predictor, as much as 40.2% of the cold-responsive protein group was found to be located within chloroplasts, suggesting that the chloroplast proteome is particularly affected by cold stress. Gene expression analyses of 11 cold-responsive proteins by real time PCR demonstrated that the mRNA levels were not strongly correlated with the respective protein levels. Further activity assay of anti-oxidative enzymes showed different alterations in cold treated petunia seedlings. Our investigation has highlighted the role of antioxidation mechanisms and also epigenetic factors in the regulation of cold stress responses. Our work has provided novel insights into the plant response to cold stress and should facilitate further studies regarding the molecular mechanisms which determine how plant cells cope with environmental perturbation. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002189. PMID:26941746

  7. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis Provides Novel Insights into Cold Stress Responses in Petunia Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Huilin; Ning, Luyun; Li, Bei; Bao, Manzhu

    2016-01-01

    Low temperature is a major adverse environmental factor that impairs petunia growth and development. To better understand the molecular mechanisms of cold stress adaptation of petunia plants, a quantitative proteomic analysis using iTRAQ technology was performed to detect the effects of cold stress on protein expression profiles in petunia seedlings which had been subjected to 2°C for 5 days. Of the 2430 proteins whose levels were quantitated, a total of 117 proteins were discovered to be differentially expressed under low temperature stress in comparison to unstressed controls. As an initial study, 44 proteins including well known and novel cold-responsive proteins were successfully annotated. By integrating the results of two independent Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analyses, seven common GO terms were found of which “oxidation-reduction process” was the most notable for the cold-responsive proteins. By using the subcellular localization tool Plant-mPLoc predictor, as much as 40.2% of the cold-responsive protein group was found to be located within chloroplasts, suggesting that the chloroplast proteome is particularly affected by cold stress. Gene expression analyses of 11 cold-responsive proteins by real time PCR demonstrated that the mRNA levels were not strongly correlated with the respective protein levels. Further activity assay of anti-oxidative enzymes showed different alterations in cold treated petunia seedlings. Our investigation has highlighted the role of antioxidation mechanisms and also epigenetic factors in the regulation of cold stress responses. Our work has provided novel insights into the plant response to cold stress and should facilitate further studies regarding the molecular mechanisms which determine how plant cells cope with environmental perturbation. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002189. PMID:26941746

  8. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis Provides Novel Insights into Cold Stress Responses in Petunia Seedlings.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Huilin; Ning, Luyun; Li, Bei; Bao, Manzhu

    2016-01-01

    Low temperature is a major adverse environmental factor that impairs petunia growth and development. To better understand the molecular mechanisms of cold stress adaptation of petunia plants, a quantitative proteomic analysis using iTRAQ technology was performed to detect the effects of cold stress on protein expression profiles in petunia seedlings which had been subjected to 2°C for 5 days. Of the 2430 proteins whose levels were quantitated, a total of 117 proteins were discovered to be differentially expressed under low temperature stress in comparison to unstressed controls. As an initial study, 44 proteins including well known and novel cold-responsive proteins were successfully annotated. By integrating the results of two independent Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analyses, seven common GO terms were found of which "oxidation-reduction process" was the most notable for the cold-responsive proteins. By using the subcellular localization tool Plant-mPLoc predictor, as much as 40.2% of the cold-responsive protein group was found to be located within chloroplasts, suggesting that the chloroplast proteome is particularly affected by cold stress. Gene expression analyses of 11 cold-responsive proteins by real time PCR demonstrated that the mRNA levels were not strongly correlated with the respective protein levels. Further activity assay of anti-oxidative enzymes showed different alterations in cold treated petunia seedlings. Our investigation has highlighted the role of antioxidation mechanisms and also epigenetic factors in the regulation of cold stress responses. Our work has provided novel insights into the plant response to cold stress and should facilitate further studies regarding the molecular mechanisms which determine how plant cells cope with environmental perturbation. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002189.

  9. Comparative proteomics and physiological characterization of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings in responses to Ochratoxin A.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Hao, Junran; Zhao, Weiwei; Yang, Zhuojun; Wu, Weihong; Zhang, Yu; Xu, Wentao; Luo, YunBo; Huang, Kunlun

    2013-07-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin that is primarily produced by Aspergillus ochraceus and Penicillium verrucosum. This mycotoxin is a contaminant of food and feedstock worldwide and may induce cell death in plants. To investigate the dynamic growth process of Arabidopsis seedlings in response to OTA stress and to obtain a better understanding of the mechanism of OTA toxicity towards Arabidopsis, a comparative proteomics study using 2-DE and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS/MS was performed. Mass spectrometry analysis identified 59 and 51 differentially expressed proteins in seedlings exposed to 25 and 45 μM OTA for 7 days, respectively. OTA treatment decreased root elongation and leaf area, increased anthocyanin accumulation, damaged the photosynthetic apparatus and inhibited photosynthesis. Treatment of the seedlings with 25 μM OTA enhanced energy metabolism, whereas higher concentration of OTA (45 μM) inhibited energy metabolism in the seedlings. OTA treatment caused an increase of ROS, an enhancement of antioxidant enzyme defense responses, disturbance of redox homeostasis and activation of lipid oxidation. Glutamine and S-adenosylmethionine metabolism may also play important roles in the response to OTA. In conclusion, our study provided novel insights regarding the response of Arabidopsis to OTA at the level of the proteome. These results are expected to be highly useful for understanding the physiological responses and dissecting the OTA response pathways in higher plants. PMID:23625346

  10. Plant Organellar Proteomics in Response to Dehydration: Turning Protein Repertoire into Insights

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Deepti B.; Rai, Yogita; Gayali, Saurabh; Chakraborty, Subhra; Chakraborty, Niranjan

    2016-01-01

    Stress adaptation or tolerance in plants is a complex phenomenon involving changes in physiological and metabolic processes. Plants must develop elaborate networks of defense mechanisms, and adapt to and survive for sustainable agriculture. Water-deficit or dehydration is the most critical environmental factor that plants are exposed to during their life cycle, which influences geographical distribution and productivity of many crop species. The cellular responses to dehydration are orchestrated by a series of multidirectional relays of biochemical events at organelle level. The new challenge is to dissect the underlying mechanisms controlling the perception of stress signals and their transmission to cellular machinery for activation of adaptive responses. The completeness of current descriptions of spatial distribution of proteins, the relevance of subcellular locations in diverse functional processes, and the changes of protein abundance in response to dehydration hold the key to understanding how plants cope with such stress conditions. During past decades, organellar proteomics has proved to be useful not only for deciphering reprograming of plant responses to dehydration, but also to dissect stress–responsive pathways. This review summarizes a range of organellar proteomics investigations under dehydration to gain a holistic view of plant responses to water-deficit conditions, which may facilitate future efforts to develop genetically engineered crops for better adaptation. PMID:27148291

  11. Plant Organellar Proteomics in Response to Dehydration: Turning Protein Repertoire into Insights.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Deepti B; Rai, Yogita; Gayali, Saurabh; Chakraborty, Subhra; Chakraborty, Niranjan

    2016-01-01

    Stress adaptation or tolerance in plants is a complex phenomenon involving changes in physiological and metabolic processes. Plants must develop elaborate networks of defense mechanisms, and adapt to and survive for sustainable agriculture. Water-deficit or dehydration is the most critical environmental factor that plants are exposed to during their life cycle, which influences geographical distribution and productivity of many crop species. The cellular responses to dehydration are orchestrated by a series of multidirectional relays of biochemical events at organelle level. The new challenge is to dissect the underlying mechanisms controlling the perception of stress signals and their transmission to cellular machinery for activation of adaptive responses. The completeness of current descriptions of spatial distribution of proteins, the relevance of subcellular locations in diverse functional processes, and the changes of protein abundance in response to dehydration hold the key to understanding how plants cope with such stress conditions. During past decades, organellar proteomics has proved to be useful not only for deciphering reprograming of plant responses to dehydration, but also to dissect stress-responsive pathways. This review summarizes a range of organellar proteomics investigations under dehydration to gain a holistic view of plant responses to water-deficit conditions, which may facilitate future efforts to develop genetically engineered crops for better adaptation. PMID:27148291

  12. Proteome Dynamics Reveals Pro-Inflammatory Remodeling of Plasma Proteome in a Mouse Model of NAFLD.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Bebek, Gurkan; Previs, Stephen F; Smith, Jonathan D; Sadygov, Rovshan G; McCullough, Arthur J; Willard, Belinda; Kasumov, Takhar

    2016-09-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Because the liver is the major source of circulatory proteins, it is not surprising that hepatic disease could lead to alterations in the plasma proteome, which are therein implicated in atherosclerosis. The current study used low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (LDLR(-/-)) mice to examine the impact of Western diet (WD)-induced NAFLD on plasma proteome homeostasis. Using a (2)H2O-metabolic labeling method, we found that a WD led to a proinflammatory distribution of circulatory proteins analyzed in apoB-depleted plasma, which was attributed to an increased production. The fractional turnover rates of short-lived proteins that are implicated in stress-response, lipid metabolism, and transport functions were significantly increased with WD (P < 0.05). Pathway analyses revealed that alterations in plasma proteome dynamics were related to the suppression of hepatic PPARα, which was confirmed based on reduced gene and protein expression of PPARα in mice fed a WD. These changes were associated with ∼4-fold increase (P < 0.0001) in the proinflammatory property of apoB-depleted plasma. In conclusion, the proteome dynamics method reveals proinflammatory remodeling of the plasma proteome relevant to liver disease. The approach used herein may provide a useful metric of in vivo liver function and better enable studies of novel therapies surrounding NAFLD and other diseases. PMID:27439437

  13. Transcriptional and Proteomic Profiling of Aspergillus flavipes in Response to Sulfur Starvation

    PubMed Central

    El-Sayed, Ashraf S. A.; Yassin, Marwa A.; Ali, Gul Shad

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus flavipes has received considerable interest due to its potential to produce therapeutic enzymes involved in sulfur amino acid metabolism. In natural habitats, A. flavipes survives under sulfur limitations by mobilizing endogenous and exogenous sulfur to operate diverse cellular processes. Sulfur limitation affects virulence and pathogenicity, and modulates proteome of sulfur assimilating enzymes of several fungi. However, there are no previous reports aimed at exploring effects of sulfur limitation on the regulation of A. flavipes sulfur metabolism enzymes at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional and proteomic levels. In this report, we show that sulfur limitation affects morphological and physiological responses of A. flavipes. Transcription and enzymatic activities of several key sulfur metabolism genes, ATP-sulfurylase, sulfite reductase, methionine permease, cysteine synthase, cystathionine β- and γ-lyase, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase were increased under sulfur starvation conditions. A 50 kDa protein band was strongly induced by sulfur starvation, and the proteomic analyses of this protein band using LC-MS/MS revealed similarity to many proteins involved in the sulfur metabolism pathway. PMID:26633307

  14. Proteomic changes in response to crystal formation in Drosophila Malpighian tubules.

    PubMed

    Chung, Vera Y; Konietzny, Rebecca; Charles, Philip; Kessler, Benedikt; Fischer, Roman; Turney, Benjamin W

    2016-04-01

    Kidney stone disease is a major health burden with a complex and poorly understood pathophysiology. Drosophila Malpighian tubules have been shown to resemble human renal tubules in their physiological function. Herein, we have used Drosophila as a model to study the proteomic response to crystal formation induced by dietary manipulation in Malpighian tubules. Wild-type male flies were reared in parallel groups on standard medium supplemented with lithogenic agents: control, Sodium Oxalate (NaOx) and Ethylene Glycol (EG). Malpighian tubules were dissected after 2 weeks to visualize crystals with polarized light microscopy. The parallel group was dissected for protein extraction. A new method of Gel Assisted Sample Preparation (GASP) was used for protein extraction. Differentially abundant proteins (p<0.05) were identified by label-free quantitative proteomic analysis in flies fed with NaOx and EG diet compared with control. Their molecular functions were further screened for transmembrane ion transporter, calcium or zinc ion binder. Among these, 11 candidate proteins were shortlisted in NaOx diet and 16 proteins in EG diet. We concluded that GASP is a proteomic sample preparation method that can be applied to individual Drosophila Malpighian tubules. Our results may further increase the understanding of the pathophysiology of human kidney stone disease. PMID:27064297

  15. Quantitative Proteomics Reveals the Roles of Peroxisome-associated Proteins in Antiviral Innate Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mao-Tian; Qin, Yue; Li, Mi; Chen, Chen; Chen, Xi; Shu, Hong-Bing; Guo, Lin

    2015-09-01

    Compared with whole-cell proteomic analysis, subcellular proteomic analysis is advantageous not only for the increased coverage of low abundance proteins but also for generating organelle-specific data containing information regarding dynamic protein movement. In the present study, peroxisome-enriched fractions from Sendai virus (SeV)-infected or uninfected HepG2 cells were obtained and subjected to quantitative proteomics analysis. We identified 311 proteins that were significantly changed by SeV infection. Among these altered proteins, 25 are immune response-related proteins. Further bioinformatic analysis indicated that SeV infection inhibits cell cycle-related proteins and membrane attack complex-related proteins, all of which are beneficial for the survival and replication of SeV within host cells. Using Luciferase reporter assays on several innate immune-related reporters, we performed functional analysis on 11 candidate proteins. We identified LGALS3BP and CALU as potential negative regulators of the virus-induced activation of the type I interferons.

  16. A novel single-cell screening platform reveals proteome plasticity during yeast stress responses

    PubMed Central

    Breker, Michal; Gymrek, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    Uncovering the mechanisms underlying robust responses of cells to stress is crucial for our understanding of cellular physiology. Indeed, vast amounts of data have been collected on transcriptional responses in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, only a handful of pioneering studies describe the dynamics of proteins in response to external stimuli, despite the fact that regulation of protein levels and localization is an essential part of such responses. Here we characterized unprecedented proteome plasticity by systematically tracking the localization and abundance of 5,330 yeast proteins at single-cell resolution under three different stress conditions (DTT, H2O2, and nitrogen starvation) using the GFP-tagged yeast library. We uncovered a unique “fingerprint” of changes for each stress and elucidated a new response arsenal for adapting to radical environments. These include bet-hedging strategies, organelle rearrangement, and redistribution of protein localizations. All data are available for download through our online database, LOQATE (localization and quantitation atlas of yeast proteome). PMID:23509072

  17. [Heat-responsive mechanisms in plants revealed by proteomic analysis: A review].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-ming; Zhao, Qi; Yin, Ze-peng; Xu, Chen-xi; Wang, Quan-hua; Dai, Shao-jun

    2015-08-01

    Heat stress is a major abiotic stress that limits plant growth and productivity. In recent years, proteomic investigations provide more information for understanding the sophisticated heat-responsive molecular mechanism in plants at systematic biological level. The heat-responsive proteomic patterns in several plants, i. e., model plants (Arabidopsis thaliana), staple food crops (soybean, rice and wheat), heat-tolerant plants (Agrostis stolonifera, Portulaca oleracea, and Carissa spinarum), grapevine, Populus euphratica, Medicago sativa, and Pinellia ternate, were reported. A total of 838 heat-responsive proteins have been identified in these studies. Among them, 534 proteins were induced and the expression of 304 proteins was reduced in plants under heat stress. In this paper, the diverse protein patterns in plants under various heat stress conditions (30-45 °C for 0-10 d) were analyzed integratively. This provided new evidences and clues for further interpreting the signaling and metabolic pathways, e.g., signaling, stress and defense, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, photosynthesis, transcription, protein synthesis and fate, membrane and transport, in heat-responsive networks, and laid a foundation for a holistic understanding of the molecular regulatory mechanism in plants in response to heat stress.

  18. Environmental Interactions and Epistasis Are Revealed in the Proteomic Responses to Complex Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Samir, Parimal; Rahul; Slaughter, James C; Link, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Ultimately, the genotype of a cell and its interaction with the environment determine the cell's biochemical state. While the cell's response to a single stimulus has been studied extensively, a conceptual framework to model the effect of multiple environmental stimuli applied concurrently is not as well developed. In this study, we developed the concepts of environmental interactions and epistasis to explain the responses of the S. cerevisiae proteome to simultaneous environmental stimuli. We hypothesize that, as an abstraction, environmental stimuli can be treated as analogous to genetic elements. This would allow modeling of the effects of multiple stimuli using the concepts and tools developed for studying gene interactions. Mirroring gene interactions, our results show that environmental interactions play a critical role in determining the state of the proteome. We show that individual and complex environmental stimuli behave similarly to genetic elements in regulating the cellular responses to stimuli, including the phenomena of dominance and suppression. Interestingly, we observed that the effect of a stimulus on a protein is dominant over other stimuli if the response to the stimulus involves the protein. Using publicly available transcriptomic data, we find that environmental interactions and epistasis regulate transcriptomic responses as well. PMID:26247773

  19. [Heat-responsive mechanisms in plants revealed by proteomic analysis: A review].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-ming; Zhao, Qi; Yin, Ze-peng; Xu, Chen-xi; Wang, Quan-hua; Dai, Shao-jun

    2015-08-01

    Heat stress is a major abiotic stress that limits plant growth and productivity. In recent years, proteomic investigations provide more information for understanding the sophisticated heat-responsive molecular mechanism in plants at systematic biological level. The heat-responsive proteomic patterns in several plants, i. e., model plants (Arabidopsis thaliana), staple food crops (soybean, rice and wheat), heat-tolerant plants (Agrostis stolonifera, Portulaca oleracea, and Carissa spinarum), grapevine, Populus euphratica, Medicago sativa, and Pinellia ternate, were reported. A total of 838 heat-responsive proteins have been identified in these studies. Among them, 534 proteins were induced and the expression of 304 proteins was reduced in plants under heat stress. In this paper, the diverse protein patterns in plants under various heat stress conditions (30-45 °C for 0-10 d) were analyzed integratively. This provided new evidences and clues for further interpreting the signaling and metabolic pathways, e.g., signaling, stress and defense, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, photosynthesis, transcription, protein synthesis and fate, membrane and transport, in heat-responsive networks, and laid a foundation for a holistic understanding of the molecular regulatory mechanism in plants in response to heat stress. PMID:26685622

  20. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of the Response of Maize (Zea mays L.) Leaves to Long Photoperiod Condition.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liuji; Tian, Lei; Wang, Shunxi; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Ping; Tian, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Huimin; Liu, Haiping; Chen, Yanhui

    2016-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.), an important industrial material and food source, shows an astonishing environmental adaptation. A remarkable feature of its post-domestication adaptation from tropical to temperate environments is adaptation to a long photoperiod (LP). Many photoperiod-related genes have been identified in previous transcriptomics analysis, but proteomics shows less evidence for this mechanism of photoperiod response. In this study, we sampled newly expanded leaves of maize at the three- and six-leaf stages from an LP-sensitive introgression line H496, the donor CML288, LP-insensitive inbred line, and recurrent parent Huangzao4 (HZ4) grown under long days (15 h light and 9 h dark). To characterize the proteomic changes in response to LP, the iTRAQ-labeling method was used to determine the proteome profiles of plants exposed to LP. A total of 943 proteins differentially expressed at the three- and six-leaf stages in HZ4 and H496 were identified. Functional analysis was performed by which the proteins were classified into stress defense, signal transduction, carbohydrate metabolism, protein metabolism, energy production, and transport functional groups using the WEGO online tool. The enriched gene ontology categories among the identified proteins were identified statistically with the Cytoscape plugin ClueGO + Cluepedia. Twenty Gene Ontology terms showed the highest significance, including those associated with protein processing in the endoplasmic reticulum, splicesome, ribosome, glyoxylate, dicarboxylate metabolism, L-malate dehydrogenase activity, and RNA transport. In addition, for subcellular location, all proteins showed significant enrichment of the mitochondrial outer membrane. The sugars producted by photosynthesis in plants are also a pivotal metabolic output in the circadian regulation. The results permit the prediction of several crucial proteins to photoperiod response and provide a foundation for further study of the influence of LP treatments on

  1. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of the Response of Maize (Zea mays L.) Leaves to Long Photoperiod Condition

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liuji; Tian, Lei; Wang, Shunxi; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Ping; Tian, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Huimin; Liu, Haiping; Chen, Yanhui

    2016-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.), an important industrial material and food source, shows an astonishing environmental adaptation. A remarkable feature of its post-domestication adaptation from tropical to temperate environments is adaptation to a long photoperiod (LP). Many photoperiod-related genes have been identified in previous transcriptomics analysis, but proteomics shows less evidence for this mechanism of photoperiod response. In this study, we sampled newly expanded leaves of maize at the three- and six-leaf stages from an LP-sensitive introgression line H496, the donor CML288, LP-insensitive inbred line, and recurrent parent Huangzao4 (HZ4) grown under long days (15 h light and 9 h dark). To characterize the proteomic changes in response to LP, the iTRAQ-labeling method was used to determine the proteome profiles of plants exposed to LP. A total of 943 proteins differentially expressed at the three- and six-leaf stages in HZ4 and H496 were identified. Functional analysis was performed by which the proteins were classified into stress defense, signal transduction, carbohydrate metabolism, protein metabolism, energy production, and transport functional groups using the WEGO online tool. The enriched gene ontology categories among the identified proteins were identified statistically with the Cytoscape plugin ClueGO + Cluepedia. Twenty Gene Ontology terms showed the highest significance, including those associated with protein processing in the endoplasmic reticulum, splicesome, ribosome, glyoxylate, dicarboxylate metabolism, L-malate dehydrogenase activity, and RNA transport. In addition, for subcellular location, all proteins showed significant enrichment of the mitochondrial outer membrane. The sugars producted by photosynthesis in plants are also a pivotal metabolic output in the circadian regulation. The results permit the prediction of several crucial proteins to photoperiod response and provide a foundation for further study of the influence of LP treatments on

  2. Interclonal proteomic responses to predator exposure in Daphnia magna may depend on predator composition of habitats.

    PubMed

    Otte, Kathrin A; Schrank, Isabella; Fröhlich, Thomas; Arnold, Georg J; Laforsch, Christian

    2015-08-01

    Phenotypic plasticity, the ability of one genotype to express different phenotypes in response to changing environmental conditions, is one of the most common phenomena characterizing the living world and is not only relevant for the ecology but also for the evolution of species. Daphnia, the water flea, is a textbook example for predator-induced phenotypic plastic defences; however, the analysis of molecular mechanisms underlying these inducible defences is still in its early stages. We exposed Daphnia magna to chemical cues of the predator Triops cancriformis to identify key processes underlying plastic defensive trait formation. To get a more comprehensive idea of this phenomenon, we studied four genotypes with five biological replicates each, originating from habitats characterized by different predator composition, ranging from predator-free habitats to habitats containing T. cancriformis. We analysed the morphologies as well as proteomes of predator-exposed and control animals. Three genotypes showed morphological changes when the predator was present. Using a high-throughput proteomics approach, we found 294 proteins which were significantly altered in their abundance after predator exposure in a general or genotype-dependent manner. Proteins connected to genotype-dependent responses were related to the cuticle, protein synthesis and calcium binding, whereas the yolk protein vitellogenin increased in abundance in all genotypes, indicating their involvement in a more general response. Furthermore, genotype-dependent responses at the proteome level were most distinct for the only genotype that shares its habitat with Triops. Altogether, our study provides new insights concerning genotype-dependent and general molecular processes involved in predator-induced phenotypic plasticity in D. magna.

  3. Tumor Necrosis Factor-α -and Interleukin-1-Induced Cellular Responses: Coupling Proteomic and Genomic Information

    PubMed Central

    Ott, Lee W.; Resing, Katheryn A.; Sizemore, Alecia W.; Heyen, Joshua W.; Cocklin, Ross R.; Pedrick, Nathan M.; Woods, H. Cary; Chen, Jake Y.; Goebl, Mark G.; Witzmann, Frank A.; Harrington, Maureen A.

    2010-01-01

    The pro-inflammatory cytokines, Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNFα) and Interleukin-1 (IL-1) mediate the innate immune response. Dysregulation of the innate immune response contributes to the pathogenesis of cancer, arthritis, and congestive heart failure. TNFα- and IL-1-induced changes in gene expression are mediated by similar transcription factors; however, TNFα and IL-1 receptor knock-out mice differ in their sensitivities to a known initiator (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) of the innate immune response. The contrasting responses to LPS indicate that TNFα and IL-1 regulate different processes. A large-scale proteomic analysis of TNFα- and IL-1-induced responses was undertaken to identify processes uniquely regulated by TNFα and IL-1. When combined with genomic studies, our results indicate that TNFα, but not IL-1, mediates cell cycle arrest. PMID:17503796

  4. Responses of the Emiliania huxleyi proteome to ocean acidification.

    PubMed

    Jones, Bethan M; Iglesias-Rodriguez, M Debora; Skipp, Paul J; Edwards, Richard J; Greaves, Mervyn J; Young, Jeremy R; Elderfield, Henry; O'Connor, C David

    2013-01-01

    Ocean acidification due to rising atmospheric CO2 is expected to affect the physiology of important calcifying marine organisms, but the nature and magnitude of change is yet to be established. In coccolithophores, different species and strains display varying calcification responses to ocean acidification, but the underlying biochemical properties remain unknown. We employed an approach combining tandem mass-spectrometry with isobaric tagging (iTRAQ) and multiple database searching to identify proteins that were differentially expressed in cells of the marine coccolithophore species Emiliania huxleyi (strain NZEH) between two CO2 conditions: 395 (∼current day) and ∼1340 p.p.m.v. CO2. Cells exposed to the higher CO2 condition contained more cellular particulate inorganic carbon (CaCO3) and particulate organic nitrogen and carbon than those maintained in present-day conditions. These results are linked with the observation that cells grew slower under elevated CO2, indicating cell cycle disruption. Under high CO2 conditions, coccospheres were larger and cells possessed bigger coccoliths that did not show any signs of malformation compared to those from cells grown under present-day CO2 levels. No differences in calcification rate, particulate organic carbon production or cellular organic carbon: nitrogen ratios were observed. Results were not related to nutrient limitation or acclimation status of cells. At least 46 homologous protein groups from a variety of functional processes were quantified in these experiments, of which four (histones H2A, H3, H4 and a chloroplastic 30S ribosomal protein S7) showed down-regulation in all replicates exposed to high CO2, perhaps reflecting the decrease in growth rate. We present evidence of cellular stress responses but proteins associated with many key metabolic processes remained unaltered. Our results therefore suggest that this E. huxleyi strain possesses some acclimation mechanisms to tolerate future CO2 scenarios

  5. Quantitative Proteomic Atlas of Ubiquitination and Acetylation in the DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Elia, Andrew E.H.; Boardman, Alexander P.; Wang, David C.; Huttlin, Edward L.; Everley, Robert A.; Dephoure, Noah; Zhou, Chunshui; Koren, Itay; Gygi, Steven P.; Elledge, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Execution of the DNA damage response (DDR) relies upon a dynamic array of protein modifications. Using quantitative proteomics, we have globally profiled ubiquitination, acetylation, and phosphorylation in response to ultraviolet and ionizing radiation. To improve acetylation site profiling, we developed the strategy FACET-IP. Our datasets of 33,500 ubiquitination and 16,740 acetylation sites provide valuable insight into DDR remodeling of the proteome. We find that K6- and K33-linked polyubiquitination undergo bulk increases in response to DNA damage, raising the possibility that these linkages are largely dedicated to DDR function. We also show that Cullin Ring Ligases mediate 10% of DNA damage induced ubiquitination events and that EXO1 is an SCF-Cyclin F substrate in the response to UV radiation. Our extensive datasets uncover additional regulated sites on known DDR players such as PCNA and identify previously unknown DDR targets such as CENPs, underscoring the broad impact of the DDR on cellular physiology. PMID:26051181

  6. Morphological and Proteomic Responses of Eruca sativa Exposed to Silver Nanoparticles or Silver Nitrate

    PubMed Central

    Vannini, Candida; Domingo, Guido; Onelli, Elisabetta; Prinsi, Bhakti; Marsoni, Milena; Espen, Luca; Bracale, Marcella

    2013-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are widely used in commercial products, and there are growing concerns about their impact on the environment. Information about the molecular interaction of AgNPs with plants is lacking. To increase our understanding of the mechanisms involved in plant responses to AgNPs and to differentiate between particle specific and ionic silver effects we determined the morphological and proteomic changes induced in Eruca sativa (commonly called rocket) in response to AgNPs or AgNO3. Seedlings were treated for 5 days with different concentrations of AgNPs or AgNO3. A similar increase in root elongation was observed when seedlings were exposed to 10 mg Ag L1 of either PVP-AgNPs or AgNO3. At this concentration we performed electron microscopy investigations and 2-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) proteomic profiling. The low level of overlap of differentially expressed proteins indicates that AgNPs and AgNO3 cause different plant responses. Both Ag treatments cause changes in proteins involved in the redox regulation and in the sulfur metabolism. These responses could play an important role to maintain cellular homeostasis. Only the AgNP exposure cause the alteration of some proteins related to the endoplasmic reticulum and vacuole indicating these two organelles as targets of the AgNPs action. These data add further evidences that the effects of AgNPs are not simply due to the release of Ag ions. PMID:23874747

  7. Deciphering the iron response in Acinetobacter baumannii: a proteomics approach

    PubMed Central

    Nwugo, Chika; Gaddy, Jennifer A.; Zimbler, Daniel L.; Actis, Luis A.

    2010-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient that plays a role in bacterial differential gene expression and protein production. Accordingly, the comparative analysis of total lysate and outer membrane fractions isolated from A. baumannii ATCC 19606T cells cultured under iron-rich and -chelated conditions using 2-D gel electrophoresis-mass spectrometry resulted in the identification of 58 protein spots differentially produced. While 19 and 35 of them represent iron-repressed and iron-induced protein spots, respectively, four other spots represent a metal chelation response unrelated to iron. Most of the iron-repressed protein spots represent outer membrane siderophore receptors, some of which could be involved in the utilization of siderophores produced by other bacteria. The iron-induced protein spots represent a wide range of proteins including those involved in iron storage, such as Bfr, metabolic and energy processes, such as AcnA, AcnB, GlyA, SdhA, and SodB, as well as lipid biosynthesis. The detection of an iron-regulated Hfq ortholog indicates that iron regulation in this bacterium could be mediated by Fur and small RNAs as described in other bacteria. The iron-induced production of OmpA suggests this protein plays a role in iron metabolism as shown by the diminished ability of an OmpA isogenic deficient derivative to grow under iron-chelated conditions. PMID:20692388

  8. The Proteomic Response of Arabidopsis thaliana to Cadmium Sulfide Quantum Dots, and Its Correlation with the Transcriptomic Response

    PubMed Central

    Marmiroli, Marta; Imperiale, Davide; Pagano, Luca; Villani, Marco; Zappettini, Andrea; Marmiroli, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    A fuller understanding of the interaction between plants and engineered nanomaterials is of topical relevance because the latter are beginning to find applications in agriculture and the food industry. There is a growing need to establish objective safety criteria for their use. The recognition of two independent Arabidopsis thaliana mutants displaying a greater level of tolerance than the wild type plant to exposure to cadmium sulfide quantum dots (CdS QDs) has offered the opportunity to characterize the tolerance response at the physiological, transcriptomic, and proteomic levels. Here, a proteomics-based comparison confirmed the conclusions drawn from an earlier transcriptomic analysis that the two mutants responded to CdS QD exposure differently both to the wild type and to each other. Just over half of the proteomic changes mirrored documented changes at the level of gene transcription, but a substantial number of transcript/gene product pairs were altered in the opposite direction. An interpretation of the discrepancies is given, along with some considerations regarding the use and significance of -omics when monitoring the potential toxicity of ENMs for health and environment. PMID:26732871

  9. Physiological and Proteomic Investigations to Study the Response of Tomato Graft Unions under Temperature Stress

    PubMed Central

    Muneer, Sowbiya; Ko, Chung Ho; Wei, Hao; Chen, Yuze; Jeong, Byoung Ryong

    2016-01-01

    Background Grafting is an established practice for asexual propagation in horticultural and agricultural crops. The study on graft unions has become of interest for horticulturists using proteomic and genomic techniques to observe transfer of genetic material and signal transduction pathways from root to shoot and shoot to root. Another reason to study the graft unions was potentially to observe resistance against abiotic stresses. Using physiological and proteomic analyses, we investigated graft unions (rootstock and scions) of tomato genotypes exposed to standard-normal (23/23 and 25/18°C day/night) and high-low temperatures (30/15°C day/night). Results Graft unions had varied responses to the diverse temperatures. High-low temperature, but not standard-normal temperature, induced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the form of H2O2 and O2-1 in rootstock and scions. However, the expression of many cell protection molecules was also induced, including antioxidant enzymes and their immunoblots, which also show an increase in their activities such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX). The graft interfaces thus actively defend against stress by modifying their physiological and proteomic responses to establish a new cellular homeostasis. As a result, many proteins for cellular defense were regulated in graft unions under diverse temperature, in addition to the regulation of photosynthetic proteins, ion binding/transport proteins, and protein synthesis. Moreover, biomass, hardness, and vascular transport activity were evaluated to investigate the basic connectivity between rootstock and scions. Conclusions Our study provides physiological evidence of the grafted plants’ response to diverse temperature. Most notably, our study provides novel insight into the mechanisms used to adapt the diverse temperature in graft unions (rootstock/scion). PMID:27310261

  10. Proteomic profile of the plant-pathogenic oomycete Phytophthora capsici in response to the fungicide pyrimorph.

    PubMed

    Pang, Zhili; Chen, Lei; Miao, Jianqiang; Wang, Zhiwen; Bulone, Vincent; Liu, Xili

    2015-09-01

    Pyrimorph is a novel fungicide from the carboxylic acid amide (CAA) family used to control plant-pathogenic oomycetes such as Phytophthora capsici. The proteomic response of P. capsici to pyrimorph was investigated using the iTRAQ technology to determine the target site of the fungicide and potential biomarker candidates of drug efficacy. A total of 1336 unique proteins were identified from the mycelium of wild-type P. capsici isolate (Hd3) and two pyrimorph-resistant mutants (R3-1 and R3-2) grown in the presence or absence of pyrimorph. Comparative analysis revealed that the three P. capsici isolates Hd3, R3-1, and R3-2 produced 163, 77, and 13 unique proteins, respectively, which exhibited altered levels of abundance in response to the pyrimorph treatment. Further investigations, using Cluster of Orthologous Groups of Proteins (COG) analysis and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis identified 35 proteins related to the mode of action of pyrimorph against P. capsici and 62 proteins involved in the stress response of P. capsici to pyrimorph. Many of the proteins with altered expression were associated with glucose and energy metabolism. Biochemical analysis using d-[U-(14) C]glucose verified the proteomics data, suggesting that the major mode of action of pyrimorph in P. capsici is the inhibition of cell wall biosynthesis. These results also illustrate that proteomics approaches are useful tools for determining the pathways targeted by novel fungicides as well as for evaluating the tolerance of plant pathogens to environmental challenges, such as the presence of fungicides.

  11. Dosage-Dependent Proteome Response of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to Acute Chromate Challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Melissa R; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Chourey, Karuna; Shah, Manesh B; Thompson, Dorothea K; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L

    2007-01-01

    Proteome alterations in the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in response to different acute dose challenges (0.3, 0.5, or 1 mM) of the toxic metal chromate [Cr(VI)] were characterized with multidimensional HPLC-MS/MS on a linear trapping quadrupole MS. A total of 2,406 functionally diverse proteins were identified, with a subset demonstrating dosage-dependent up- and down-regulated expression, such as proteins involved in detoxification and iron binding and transport.

  12. Seeds in Chernobyl: the database on proteome response on radioactive environment.

    PubMed

    Klubicová, Katarína; Vesel, Martin; Rashydov, Namik M; Hajduch, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Two serious nuclear accidents during the last quarter century (Chernobyl, 1986 and Fukushima, 2011) contaminated large agricultural areas with radioactivity. The database "Seeds in Chernobyl" (http://www.chernobylproteomics.sav.sk) contains the information about the abundances of hundreds of proteins from on-going investigation of mature and developing seed harvested from plants grown in radioactive Chernobyl area. This database provides a useful source of information concerning the response of the seed proteome to permanently increased level of ionizing radiation in a user-friendly format.

  13. Comparative proteomics analysis of selenium responses in selenium-enriched rice grains.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Dong; Wang, Xu; Ngai, Sai-ming; Wong, Yum-shing

    2013-02-01

    By foliar fortification with selenite, selenium (Se)-enriched rice with a higher Se content and grain yield has been generated. However, the regulatory mechanisms of Se response in rice grains remain unknown; therefore, we carried out a comparative proteomics study in Se-enriched rice grains by using two approaches including two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE)-coupled MALDI-TOF/TOF MS and 1-DE/LC-FTICR-MS-coupled label-free quantification. By comparison between Se treatment and control, 62 and 250 abundance changed proteins were identified from 2-DE and 1-DE, respectively. By functional classification, proteins involved in metabolism, cell redox regulation, and seed nutritional storage were the most highly affected by Se accumulation. The up-regulation of late embryogenesis abundant proteins as well as proteins involved in sucrose synthesis and other metabolism pathways may contribute to the earlier maturation and higher yield of the Se-enriched rice. In addition, there have been six proteins identified to contain selenoamino acid modification, which is the first identification of selenoproteins in higher plants. In conclusion, our study provided novel insights into Se response in rice grains at the proteome level, which are expected to be highly useful for dissecting the Se response pathways in rice and for the production of Se-enriched rice in the future.

  14. Proteomic and histopathological response in the gills of Poecilia reticulata exposed to glyphosate-based herbicide.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Thiago Lopes; Santos, Ana Paula Rezende Dos; Yamada, Áureo Tatsumi; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida; Borges, Clayton Luiz; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; Sabóia-Morais, Simone Maria Teixeira

    2015-07-01

    Glyphosate-based herbicides (GBH) are one of the most used herbicide nowadays, whilst there is growing concern over their impact on aquatic environment. Since data about the early proteomic response and toxic mechanisms of GBH in fish is very limited, the aim of this study was to investigate the early toxicity of GBH in the gills of guppies Poecilia reticulata using a proteomic approach associated with histopathological index. Median lethal concentration (LC50,96 h) was determined and LC50,96h values of guppies exposed to GBH were 3.6 ± 0.4 mg GLIL(-1). Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis associated with mass spectrometry, 14 proteins regulated by GBH were identified, which are involved in different cell processes, as energy metabolism, regulation and maintenance of cytoskeleton, nucleic acid metabolism and stress response. Guppies exposed to GBH at 1.82 mg GLIL(-1) showed time-dependent histopathological response in different epithelial and muscle cell types. The histopathological indexes indicate that GBH cause regressive, vascular and progressive disorders in the gills of guppies. This study helped to unravel the molecular and tissue mechanisms associated with GBH toxicity, which are potential biomarkers for biomonitoring water pollution by herbicides.

  15. Behavioral and proteomic analysis of stress response in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Magdeldin, Sameh; Blaser, Rachel E; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Yates, John R

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the behavioral and proteomic consequences of shock-induced stress in zebrafish (Danio rerio) as a vertebrate model. Here we describe the behavioral effects of exposure to predictable and unpredictable electric shock, together with quantitative tandem mass tag isobaric labeling workflow to detect altered protein candidates in response to shock exposure. Behavioral results demonstrate a hyperactivity response to electric shock and a suppression of activity to a stimulus predicting shock. On the basis of the quantitative changes in protein abundance following shock exposure, eight proteins were significantly up-regulated (HADHB, hspa8, hspa5, actb1, mych4, atp2a1, zgc:86709, and zgc:86725). These proteins contribute crucially in catalytic activities, stress response, cation transport, and motor activities. This behavioral proteomic driven study clearly showed that besides the rapid induction of heat shock proteins, other catalytic enzymes and cation transporters were rapidly elevated as a mechanism to counteract oxidative stress conditions resulting from elevated fear/anxiety levels.

  16. Transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of Oenococcus oeni PSU-1 response to ethanol shock.

    PubMed

    Olguín, Nair; Champomier-Vergès, Marie; Anglade, Patricia; Baraige, Fabienne; Cordero-Otero, Ricardo; Bordons, Albert; Zagorec, Monique; Reguant, Cristina

    2015-10-01

    The correct development of malolactic fermentation depends on the capacity of Oenococcus oeni to survive under harsh wine conditions. The presence of ethanol is one of the most stressful factors affecting O. oeni performance. In this study, the effect of ethanol addition (12% vol/vol) on O. oeni PSU-1 has been evaluated using a transcriptomic and proteomic approach. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that the main functional categories of the genes affected by ethanol were metabolite transport and cell wall and membrane biogenesis. It was also observed that some genes were over-expressed in response to ethanol stress (for example, the heat shock protein Hsp20 and a dipeptidase). Proteomic analysis showed that several proteins are affected by the presence of ethanol. Functions related to protein synthesis and stability are the main target of ethanol damage. In some cases the decrease in protein concentration could be due to the relocation of cytosolic proteins in the membrane, as a protective mechanism. The omic approach used to study the response of O. oeni to ethanol highlights the importance of the cell membrane in the global stress response and opens the door to future studies on this issue.

  17. Proteome Dynamics and Physiological Responses to Short-Term Salt Stress in Brassica napus Leaves.

    PubMed

    Jia, Huan; Shao, Mingquan; He, Yongjun; Guan, Rongzhan; Chu, Pu; Jiang, Haidong

    2015-01-01

    Salt stress limits plant growth and crop productivity and is an increasing threat to agriculture worldwide. In this study, proteomic and physiological responses of Brassica napus leaves under salt stress were investigated. Seedlings under salt treatment showed growth inhibition and photosynthesis reduction. A comparative proteomic analysis of seedling leaves exposed to 200 mM NaCl for 24 h, 48 h and 72 h was conducted. Forty-four protein spots were differentially accumulated upon NaCl treatment and 42 of them were identified, including several novel salt-responsive proteins. To determine the functional roles of these proteins in salt adaptation, their dynamic changes in abundance were analyzed. The results suggested that the up-accumulated proteins, which were associated with protein metabolism, damage repair and defense response, might contribute to the alleviation of the deleterious effect of salt stress on chlorophyll biosynthesis, photosynthesis, energy synthesis and respiration in Brassica napus leaves. This study will lead to a better understanding of the molecular basis of salt stress adaptation in Brassica napus and provides a basis for genetic engineering of plants with improved salt tolerance in the future. PMID:26691228

  18. Characterization of proteome alterations in Phanerochaete chrysosporium in response to lead exposure

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Total soluble proteome alterations of white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium in response to different doses (25, 50 and 100 μM) of Pb (II) were characterized by 2DE in combination with MALDI-TOF-MS. Results Dose-dependent molecular response to Pb (II) involved a total of 14 up-regulated and 21 down-regulated proteins. The induction of an isoform of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, alcohol dehydrogenase class V, mRNA splicing factor, ATP-dependent RNA helicase, thioredoxin reductase and actin required a Pb (II) dose of at least 50 μM. Analysis of the proteome dynamics of mid-exponential phase cells of P. chrysosporium subjected to 50 μM lead at exposure time intervals of 1, 2, 4 and 8 h, identified a total of 23 proteins in increased and 67 proteins in decreased amount. Overall, the newly induced/strongly up-regulated proteins involved in (i) amelioration of lipid peroxidation products, (ii) defense against oxidative damage and redox metabolism, (iii) transcription, recombination and DNA repair (iv) a yet unknown function represented by a putative protein. Conclusion The present study implicated the particular role of the elements of DNA repair, post-tanscriptional regulation and heterotrimeric G protein signaling in response to Pb (II) stress as shown for the first time for a basidiomycete. PMID:21388532

  19. Proteome Dynamics and Physiological Responses to Short-Term Salt Stress in Brassica napus Leaves

    PubMed Central

    He, Yongjun; Guan, Rongzhan; Chu, Pu; Jiang, Haidong

    2015-01-01

    Salt stress limits plant growth and crop productivity and is an increasing threat to agriculture worldwide. In this study, proteomic and physiological responses of Brassica napus leaves under salt stress were investigated. Seedlings under salt treatment showed growth inhibition and photosynthesis reduction. A comparative proteomic analysis of seedling leaves exposed to 200 mM NaCl for 24 h, 48 h and 72 h was conducted. Forty-four protein spots were differentially accumulated upon NaCl treatment and 42 of them were identified, including several novel salt-responsive proteins. To determine the functional roles of these proteins in salt adaptation, their dynamic changes in abundance were analyzed. The results suggested that the up-accumulated proteins, which were associated with protein metabolism, damage repair and defense response, might contribute to the alleviation of the deleterious effect of salt stress on chlorophyll biosynthesis, photosynthesis, energy synthesis and respiration in Brassica napus leaves. This study will lead to a better understanding of the molecular basis of salt stress adaptation in Brassica napus and provides a basis for genetic engineering of plants with improved salt tolerance in the future. PMID:26691228

  20. Differentially delayed root proteome responses to salt stress in sugar cane varieties.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Cinthya Mirella; Pestana-Calsa, Maria Clara; Gozzo, Fabio Cesar; Mansur Custodio Nogueira, Rejane Jurema; Menossi, Marcelo; Calsa, Tercilio

    2013-12-01

    Soil salinity is a limiting factor to sugar cane crop development, although in general plants present variable mechanisms of tolerance to salinity stress. The molecular basis underlying these mechanisms can be inferred by using proteomic analysis. Thus, the objective of this work was to identify differentially expressed proteins in sugar cane plants submitted to salinity stress. For that, a greenhouse experiment was established with four sugar cane varieties and two salt conditions, 0 mM (control) and 200 mM NaCl. Physiological and proteomics analyses were performed after 2 and 72 h of stress induction by salt. Distinct physiological responses to salinity stress were observed in the varieties and linked to tolerance mechanisms. In proteomic analysis, the roots soluble protein fraction was extracted, quantified, and analyzed through bidimensional electrophoresis. Gel images analyses were done computationally, where in each contrast only one variable was considered (salinity condition or variety). Differential spots were excised, digested by trypsin, and identified via mass spectrometry. The tolerant variety RB867515 showed the highest accumulation of proteins involved in growth, development, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, reactive oxygen species metabolization, protein protection, and membrane stabilization after 2 h of stress. On the other hand, the presence of these proteins in the sensitive variety was verified only in stress treatment after 72 h. These data indicate that these stress responses pathways play a role in the tolerance to salinity in sugar cane, and their effectiveness for phenotypical tolerance depends on early stress detection and activation of the coding genes expression. PMID:24251627

  1. Quantitative Proteomic Profiling of Early and Late Responses to Salicylic Acid in Cucumber Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liang; Shang, Qing-Mao

    2016-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is an important phytohormone that plays vital regulatory roles in plant growth, development, and stress responses. However, studies on the molecular mechanism of SA, especially during the early SA responses, are lagging behind. In this study, we initiated a comprehensive isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based proteomic analysis to explore the early and late SA-responsive proteins in leaves of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) seedlings. Upon SA application through the roots, endogenous SA accumulated in cucumber leaves. By assaying the changes in marker gene expression and photosynthetic rate, we collected samples at 12 h and 72 h post treatment (hpt) to profile the early and late SA responsiveness, respectively. The iTRAQ assay followed by tandem mass spectrometry revealed 135 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) at 12 hpt and 301 DEPs at 72 hpt. The functional categories for these SA-responsive proteins included in a variety of biochemical processes, including photosynthesis, redox homeostasis, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, lipid metabolism, transport, protein folding and modification, proteolysis, cell wall organization, and the secondary phenylpropanoid pathway. Conclusively, based on the abundant changes of these DEPs, together with their putative functions, we proposed a possible SA-responsive protein network. It appears that SA could elicit reactive oxygen species (ROS) production via enhancing the photosynthetic electron transferring, and then confer some growth-promoting and stress-priming effects on cells during the late phase, including enhanced photosynthesis and ROS scavenging, altered carbon metabolic flux for the biosynthesis of amino acids and nucleotides, and cell wall reorganization. Overall, the present iTRAQ assay provides higher proteome coverage and deepened our understanding of the molecular basis of SA-responses. PMID:27551830

  2. Quantitative Proteomic Profiling of Early and Late Responses to Salicylic Acid in Cucumber Leaves.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chun-Juan; Cao, Ning; Li, Liang; Shang, Qing-Mao

    2016-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is an important phytohormone that plays vital regulatory roles in plant growth, development, and stress responses. However, studies on the molecular mechanism of SA, especially during the early SA responses, are lagging behind. In this study, we initiated a comprehensive isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based proteomic analysis to explore the early and late SA-responsive proteins in leaves of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) seedlings. Upon SA application through the roots, endogenous SA accumulated in cucumber leaves. By assaying the changes in marker gene expression and photosynthetic rate, we collected samples at 12 h and 72 h post treatment (hpt) to profile the early and late SA responsiveness, respectively. The iTRAQ assay followed by tandem mass spectrometry revealed 135 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) at 12 hpt and 301 DEPs at 72 hpt. The functional categories for these SA-responsive proteins included in a variety of biochemical processes, including photosynthesis, redox homeostasis, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, lipid metabolism, transport, protein folding and modification, proteolysis, cell wall organization, and the secondary phenylpropanoid pathway. Conclusively, based on the abundant changes of these DEPs, together with their putative functions, we proposed a possible SA-responsive protein network. It appears that SA could elicit reactive oxygen species (ROS) production via enhancing the photosynthetic electron transferring, and then confer some growth-promoting and stress-priming effects on cells during the late phase, including enhanced photosynthesis and ROS scavenging, altered carbon metabolic flux for the biosynthesis of amino acids and nucleotides, and cell wall reorganization. Overall, the present iTRAQ assay provides higher proteome coverage and deepened our understanding of the molecular basis of SA-responses. PMID:27551830

  3. Comparative Proteomics Analysis of the Root Apoplasts of Rice Seedlings in Response to Hydrogen Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lu; Bokhari, Saleem A.; Dong, Chun-Juan; Liu, Jin-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    Background Plant apoplast is the prime site for signal perception and defense response, and of great importance in responding to environmental stresses. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) plays a pivotal role in determining the responsiveness of cells to stress. However, how the apoplast proteome changes under oxidative condition is largely unknown. In this study, we initiated a comparative proteomic analysis to explore H2O2-responsive proteins in the apoplast of rice seedling roots. Methodology/Principal Findings 14-day-old rice seedlings were treated with low concentrations (300 and 600 µM) of H2O2 for 6 h and the levels of relative electrolyte leakage, malondialdehyde and H2O2 were assayed in roots. The modified vacuum infiltration method was used to extract apoplast proteins of rice seedling roots, and then two-dimensional electrophoresis gel analysis revealed 58 differentially expressed protein spots under low H2O2 conditions. Of these, 54 were successfully identified by PMF or MS/MS as matches to 35 different proteins including known and novel H2O2-responsive proteins. Almost all of these identities (98%) were indeed apoplast proteins confirmed either by previous experiments or through publicly available prediction programs. These proteins identified are involved in a variety of processes, including redox homeostasis, cell wall modification, signal transduction, cell defense and carbohydrate metabolism, indicating a complex regulative network in the apoplast of seedling roots under H2O2 stress. Conclusions/Significance The present study is the first apoplast proteome investigation of plant seedlings in response to H2O2 and may be of paramount importance for the understanding of the plant network to environmental stresses. Based on the abundant changes in these proteins, together with their putative functions, we proposed a possible protein network that provides new insights into oxidative stress response in the rice root apoplast and clues for the further functional

  4. Time course proteomic profiling of cellular responses to immunological challenge in the sea urchin, Heliocidaris erythrogramma.

    PubMed

    Dheilly, Nolwenn M; Haynes, Paul A; Raftos, David A; Nair, Sham V

    2012-06-01

    Genome sequences and high diversity cDNA arrays have provided a detailed molecular understanding of immune responses in a number of invertebrates, including sea urchins. However, complementary analyses have not been undertaken at the level of proteins. Here, we use shotgun proteomics to describe changes in the abundance of proteins from coelomocytes of sea urchins after immunological challenge and wounding. The relative abundance of 345 reproducibly identified proteins were measured 6, 24 and 48 h after injection. Significant changes in the relative abundance of 188 proteins were detected. These included pathogen-binding proteins, such as the complement component C3 and scavenger receptor cysteine rich proteins, as well as proteins responsible for cytoskeletal remodeling, endocytosis and intracellular signaling. An initial systemic reaction to wounding was followed by a more specific response to immunological challenge involving proteins such as apolipophorin, dual oxidase, fibrocystin L, aminopeptidase N and α-2-macroglobulin.

  5. The proteome and phosphoproteome of Neurospora crassa in response to cellulose, sucrose and carbon starvation

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Yi; Coradetti, Samuel T.; Li, Xin; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Clauss, Therese; Petyuk, Vlad; Camp, David; Smith, Richard; Cate, Jamie H.D.; Yang, Feng; Glass, N. Louise

    2014-01-01

    Improving cellulolytic enzyme production by plant biomass degrading fungi holds great potential in reducing costs associated with production of next-generation biofuels generated from lignocellulose. How fungi sense cellulosic materials and respond by secreting enzymes has mainly been examined by assessing function of transcriptional regulators and via transcriptional profiling. Here, we obtained global proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiles of the plant biomass degrading filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa grown on different carbon sources, i.e. sucrose, no carbon, and cellulose, by performing isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ)-based LC–MS/MS analyses. A comparison between proteomes and transcriptomes under identical carbon conditions suggests that extensive post-transcriptional regulation occurs in N. crassa in response to exposure to cellulosic material. Several hundred amino acid residues with differential phosphorylation levels on crystalline cellulose (Avicel) or carbon-free medium vs sucrose medium were identified, including phosphorylation sites in a major transcriptional activator for cellulase genes, CLR1, as well as a cellobionic acid transporter, CBT1. Mutation of phosphorylation sites on CLR1 did not have a major effect on transactivation of cellulase production, while mutation of phosphorylation sites in CBT1 increased its transporting capacity. Our data provides rich information at both the protein and phosphorylation levels of the early cellular responses to carbon starvation and cellulosic induction and aids in a greater understanding of the underlying post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in filamentous fungi. PMID:24881580

  6. Proteomic Response of Bacillus subtilis to Lantibiotics Reflects Differences in Interaction with the Cytoplasmic Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, Michaela; Kohl, Bastian; Münch, Daniela; Raatschen, Nadja; Albada, H. Bauke; Hamoen, Leendert; Metzler-Nolte, Nils; Sahl, Hans-Georg

    2012-01-01

    Mersacidin, gallidermin, and nisin are lantibiotics, antimicrobial peptides containing lanthionine. They show potent antibacterial activity. All three interfere with cell wall biosynthesis by binding lipid II, but they display different levels of interaction with the cytoplasmic membrane. On one end of the spectrum, mersacidin interferes with cell wall biosynthesis by binding lipid II without integrating into bacterial membranes. On the other end of the spectrum, nisin readily integrates into membranes, where it forms large pores. It destroys the membrane potential and causes leakage of nutrients and ions. Gallidermin, in an intermediate position, also readily integrates into membranes. However, pore formation occurs only in some bacteria and depends on membrane composition. In this study, we investigated the impact of nisin, gallidermin, and mersacidin on cell wall integrity, membrane pore formation, and membrane depolarization in Bacillus subtilis. The impact of the lantibiotics on the cell envelope was correlated to the proteomic response they elicit in B. subtilis. By drawing on a proteomic response library, including other envelope-targeting antibiotics such as bacitracin, vancomycin, gramicidin S, or valinomycin, YtrE could be identified as the most reliable marker protein for interfering with membrane-bound steps of cell wall biosynthesis. NadE and PspA were identified as markers for antibiotics interacting with the cytoplasmic membrane. PMID:22926563

  7. Pseudomonas putida KT2440 response to nickel or cobalt induced stress by quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Ray, Prasun; Girard, Vincent; Gault, Manon; Job, Claudette; Bonneu, Marc; Mandrand-Berthelot, Marie-Andrée; Singh, Surya S; Job, Dominique; Rodrigue, Agnès

    2013-01-01

    Nickel and cobalt are obligate nutrients for the gammaproteobacteria but when present at high concentrations they display toxic effects. These two metals are present in the environment, their origin being either from natural sources or from industrial use. In this study, the effect of inhibitory concentrations of Ni or Co was assessed on the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440 using a proteomic approach. The identification of more than 400 spots resulted in the quantification of 160 proteins that underwent significant variations in cells exposed to Co and Ni. This analysis allowed us to depict the cellular response of P. putida cells toward metallic stress. More precisely, the parallel comparison of the two proteomes showed distinct responses of P. putida to Ni or Co toxicity. The most striking effect of Co was revealed by the accumulation of several proteins involved in the defense against oxidative damage, which include proteins involved in the detoxification of the reactive oxygen species, superoxides and peroxides. The up-regulation of the genes encoding these enzymes was confirmed using qRT-PCR. Interestingly, in the Ni-treated samples, sodB, encoding superoxide dismutase, was up-regulated, indicating the apparition of superoxide radicals due to the presence of Ni. However, the most striking effect of Ni was the accumulation of several proteins involved in the synthesis of amino acids. The measurement of the amount of amino acids in Ni-treated cells revealed a strong accumulation of glutamate. PMID:23235558

  8. The proteome and phosphoproteome of Neurospora crassa in response to cellulose, sucrose and carbon starvation

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Yi; Coradetti, Samuel T.; Li, Xin; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Clauss, Therese; Petyuk, Vlad; Camp, David; Smith, Richard; Cate, Jamie H. D.; Yang, Feng; Glass, N. Louise

    2014-05-29

    Improving cellulolytic enzyme production by plant biomass degrading fungi holds great potential in reducing costs associated with production of next-generation biofuels generated from lignocellulose. How fungi sense cellulosic materials and respond by secreting enzymes has mainly been examined by assessing function of transcriptional regulators and via transcriptional profiling. Here, we obtained global proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiles of the plant biomass degrading filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa grown on different carbon sources, i.e. sucrose, no carbon, and cellulose, by performing isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) -based LC-MS/MS analyses. A comparison between proteomes and transcriptomes under identical carbon conditions suggests that extensive post-transcriptional regulation occurs in N. crassa in response to exposure to cellulosic material. Several hundred amino acid residues with differential phosphorylation levels on crystalline cellulose (Avicel) or carbon-free medium versus sucrose medium were identified, including phosphorylation sites in a major transcriptional activator for cellulase genes, CLR1, as well as a cellobionic acid transporter, CBT1. Finally, we found mutation of phosphorylation sites on CLR1 did not have a major effect on transactivation of cellulase production, while mutation of phosphorylation sites in CBT1 increased its transporting capacity. Our data provides rich information at both the protein and phosphorylation levels of the early cellular responses to carbon starvation and cellulosic induction and aids in a greater understanding of the underlying post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in filamentous fungi.

  9. The proteome and phosphoproteome of Neurospora crassa in response to cellulose, sucrose and carbon starvation

    DOE PAGES

    Xiong, Yi; Coradetti, Samuel T.; Li, Xin; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Clauss, Therese; Petyuk, Vlad; Camp, David; Smith, Richard; Cate, Jamie H. D.; Yang, Feng; et al

    2014-05-29

    Improving cellulolytic enzyme production by plant biomass degrading fungi holds great potential in reducing costs associated with production of next-generation biofuels generated from lignocellulose. How fungi sense cellulosic materials and respond by secreting enzymes has mainly been examined by assessing function of transcriptional regulators and via transcriptional profiling. Here, we obtained global proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiles of the plant biomass degrading filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa grown on different carbon sources, i.e. sucrose, no carbon, and cellulose, by performing isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) -based LC-MS/MS analyses. A comparison between proteomes and transcriptomes under identical carbon conditions suggestsmore » that extensive post-transcriptional regulation occurs in N. crassa in response to exposure to cellulosic material. Several hundred amino acid residues with differential phosphorylation levels on crystalline cellulose (Avicel) or carbon-free medium versus sucrose medium were identified, including phosphorylation sites in a major transcriptional activator for cellulase genes, CLR1, as well as a cellobionic acid transporter, CBT1. Finally, we found mutation of phosphorylation sites on CLR1 did not have a major effect on transactivation of cellulase production, while mutation of phosphorylation sites in CBT1 increased its transporting capacity. Our data provides rich information at both the protein and phosphorylation levels of the early cellular responses to carbon starvation and cellulosic induction and aids in a greater understanding of the underlying post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in filamentous fungi.« less

  10. Comparative proteomic analysis provides insight into cadmium stress responses in brown algae Sargassum fusiforme.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Aiqin; Xu, Tao; Zou, Huixi; Pang, Qiuying

    2015-06-01

    Sargassum fusiforme is one of the most widely consumed seaweeds in China, Korea and Japan. In this work, we performed growth analysis and comparative proteomics to investigate the molecular mechanisms of the response to 1 day and 5 days Cd stress in S. fusiforme. Our results showed a significant decrease in growth rate and an increase in Cd ion content in S. fusiforme in response to Cd treatment. Comparative proteomic analysis revealed 25 and 51 differentially expressed protein spots in S. fusiforme under 1 day and 5 days Cd stress, respectively. A great number of these proteins was metabolic enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism and energy metabolism. Many proteins involved in the processing of genetic information showed a decrease in abundance under 1 day Cd stress. In contrast, 9 of the identified protein spots primarily involved in genetic information processing and carbohydrate metabolism were greatly enriched under 5 days Cd stress. Overall, our investigation indicated that Cd stress negatively affects the metabolic activity of S. fusiforme through the down-regulation of key metabolic enzymes. In addition, S. fusiforme may adapt to 5 days Cd stress by promoting consumption of photoassimilates through the up-regulation of glycolysis and the citrate cycle to supply energy for survival. PMID:25827747

  11. Impact of temperature dependent sampling procedures in proteomics and peptidomics--a characterization of the liver and pancreas post mortem degradome.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Birger; Sköld, Karl; Kultima, Kim; Fernandez, Celine; Waldemarson, Sofia; Savitski, Mikhail M; Söderquist, Marcus; Borén, Mats; Stella, Robert; Andrén, Per; Zubarev, Roman; James, Peter

    2011-03-01

    Little is known about the nature of post mortem degradation of proteins and peptides on a global level, the so-called degradome. This is especially true for nonneural tissues. Degradome properties in relation to sampling procedures on different tissues are of great importance for the studies of, for instance, post translational modifications and/or the establishment of clinical biobanks. Here, snap freezing of fresh (<2 min post mortem time) mouse liver and pancreas tissue is compared with rapid heat stabilization with regard to effects on the proteome (using two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis) and peptidome (using label free liquid chromatography). We report several proteins and peptides that exhibit heightened degradation sensitivity, for instance superoxide dismutase in liver, and peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase and insulin C-peptides in pancreas. Tissue sampling based on snap freezing produces a greater amount of degradation products and lower levels of endogenous peptides than rapid heat stabilization. We also demonstrate that solely snap freezing related degradation can be attenuated by subsequent heat stabilization. We conclude that tissue sampling involving a rapid heat stabilization step is preferable to freezing with regard to proteomic and peptidomic sample quality.

  12. Proteomic responses of human intestinal Caco-2 cells exposed to silver nanoparticles and ionic silver.

    PubMed

    Oberemm, Axel; Hansen, Ulf; Böhmert, Linda; Meckert, Christine; Braeuning, Albert; Thünemann, Andreas F; Lampen, Alfonso

    2016-03-01

    Even although quite a number of studies have been performed so far to demonstrate nanoparticle-specific effects of substances in living systems, clear evidence of these effects is still under debate. The present study was designed as a comparative proteomic analysis of human intestinal cells exposed to a commercial silver nanoparticle reference material and ions from AgNO3. A two-dimensional gel electrophoresis/MALDI mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic analysis was conducted after 24-h incubation of differentiated Caco-2 cells with non-cytotoxic and low cytotoxic silver concentrations (2.5 and 25 µg ml(-1) nanosilver, 0.5 and 5 µg ml(-1) AgNO3). Out of an overall number of 316 protein spots differentially expressed at a fold change of ≥ 1.4 or ≤ -1.4 in all treatments, 169 proteins could be identified. In total, 231 spots were specifically deregulated in particle-treated groups compared with 41 spots, which were limited to AgNO3-treatments. Forty-four spots (14 %) were commonly deregulated by both types of treatment. A considerable fraction of the proteins differentially expressed after treatment with nanoparticles is related to protein folding, synthesis or modification of proteins as well as cellular assembly and organization. Overlays of networks obtained for particulate and ionic treatments showed matches, indicating common mechanisms of combined particle and ionic silver exposure and exclusive ionic silver treatment. However, proteomic responses of Caco-2 cells treated with higher concentrations of silver species also showed some differences, for example regarding proteins related to fatty acid and energy metabolism, suggesting an induction of also some different molecular mechanisms for particle exposure and ionic treatment.

  13. Global Transcriptomic and Proteomic Responses of Dehalococcoides ethenogenes Strain 195 to Fixed Nitrogen Limitation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Patrick K. H.; Dill, Brian; Louie, Tiffany S.; Shah, Manesh B; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Andersen, Gary L.; Zinder, Stephen H.; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Dehalococcoides play an important role in the reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethenes. A systems level approach was taken in this study to examine the global transcriptomic and proteomic responses of exponentially growing D. ethenogenes strain 195 to fixed nitrogen limitation (FNL) as dechlorination activity and cell yield both decrease during FNL. As expected, the nitrogen-fixing (nif) genes were differentially up-regulated in the transcriptome and proteome of strain 195 during FNL. Aside from the nif operon, a putative methylglyoxal synthase-encoding gene (DET1576), the product of which is predicted to catalyze the formation of the toxic electrophile methylglyoxal and implicated in the uncoupling of anabolism from catabolism in bacteria, was strongly up-regulated in the transcriptome and could potentially play a role in the observed growth inhibition during FNL. Carbon catabolism genes were generally down regulated in response to FNL and a number of transporters were differentially regulated in response to nitrogen limitation, with some playing apparent roles in nitrogen acquisition while others were associated with general stress responses. A number of genes related to the functions of nucleotide synthesis, replication, transcription, translation, and post-translational modifications were also differentially expressed. One gene coding for a putative reductive dehalogenase (DET1545) and a number coding for oxidoreductases, which have implications in energy generation and redox reactions, were also differentially regulated. Interestingly, most of the genes within the multiple integrated elements were not differentially expressed. Overall, this study elucidates the molecular responses of strain 195 to FNL and identifies differentially expressed genes that are potential biomarkers to evaluate environmental cellular nitrogen status.

  14. Serum, liver, and kidney proteomic analysis for the alloxan-induced type I diabetic mice after insulin gene transfer of naked plasmid through electroporation.

    PubMed

    Diao, Wei-Fei; Chen, Wei-Qiang; Wu, Yuanyuan; Liu, Peng; Xie, Xiao-Lei; Li, Shuai; Shen, Ping-Ping; Ji, Jianguo

    2006-11-01

    Gene therapy has been reported to be effective in treating diabetes mellitus (DM), while little has been found out about the functional protein changes since. The liver and kidney play important roles in glucose absorption, metabolism, and excretion. Changes in the two organs may reflect pathologic alterations during DM, while the serum has a direct connection with most organs and pathological changes. We used alloxan to induce diabetic mice, electrotranferred the insulin gene into their sural muscles, and discovered that their blood glucose decreased to normal level. Consequently, proteomic approaches were applied to evaluate protein changes in the liver, kidney, and serum of normal, diabetic, and gene transferred mice. Forty-three proteins were found either up-regulated or down-reglulated in the liver, kidney, and serum of the alloxan-induced type I diabetic mice. Only five proteins in the liver, five proteins in the kidney, and seven proteins in the serum of diabetic mice were found to be back-regulated to normal levels after gene transfer. These back-regulated proteins are involved in lipid and glucose metabolism, associated with phosphorylation, signal transduction, oxidation, and immune inflammation. Our findings might promote a better understanding for the mechanism of DM, and provide novel targets for estimating the effects of gene therapy.

  15. Proteomic analysis of beta-catenin activation in mouse liver by DIGE analysis identifies glucose metabolism as a new target of the Wnt pathway.

    PubMed

    Chafey, Philippe; Finzi, Laetitia; Boisgard, Raphael; Caüzac, Michèle; Clary, Guillem; Broussard, Cédric; Pégorier, Jean-Paul; Guillonneau, François; Mayeux, Patrick; Camoin, Luc; Tavitian, Bertrand; Colnot, Sabine; Perret, Christine

    2009-08-01

    The Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway has been increasingly implicated in liver development and physiology. Aberrant activation of this pathway is one of the major genetic events observed during the process of human HCC development. To gain insight into the mechanism underlying beta-catenin action in the liver, we conducted a quantitative differential proteomic analysis using 2-D DIGE combined with MS, in mice with liver-specific deletion of Apc resulting in acute activation of beta-catenin signaling (Apc(KOliv) mice). We identified 94 protein spots showing differential expression between mutant Apc(KOliv) and control mice, corresponding to 56 individual proteins. Most of the proteins identified were associated with metabolic pathways, such as ammonia and glucose metabolism. Our analysis showed an increase in lactate dehydrogenase activity together with a downregulation of two mitochondrial ATPase subunits (ATP5a1 and ATP5b). These observations indicate that beta-catenin signaling may induce a shift in the glucose metabolism from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis, known as the "Warburg effect". Imaging with (18)F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography suggests that the specific metabolic reprogramming induced by beta-catenin in the liver does not imply the first step of glycolysis. This observation may explain why some HCCs are difficult to assess by fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography imaging.

  16. Integrating Transcriptomic and Proteomic Data Using Predictive Regulatory Network Models of Host Response to Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Chasman, Deborah; Walters, Kevin B.; Lopes, Tiago J. S.; Eisfeld, Amie J.; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Roy, Sushmita

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian host response to pathogenic infections is controlled by a complex regulatory network connecting regulatory proteins such as transcription factors and signaling proteins to target genes. An important challenge in infectious disease research is to understand molecular similarities and differences in mammalian host response to diverse sets of pathogens. Recently, systems biology studies have produced rich collections of omic profiles measuring host response to infectious agents such as influenza viruses at multiple levels. To gain a comprehensive understanding of the regulatory network driving host response to multiple infectious agents, we integrated host transcriptomes and proteomes using a network-based approach. Our approach combines expression-based regulatory network inference, structured-sparsity based regression, and network information flow to infer putative physical regulatory programs for expression modules. We applied our approach to identify regulatory networks, modules and subnetworks that drive host response to multiple influenza infections. The inferred regulatory network and modules are significantly enriched for known pathways of immune response and implicate apoptosis, splicing, and interferon signaling processes in the differential response of viral infections of different pathogenicities. We used the learned network to prioritize regulators and study virus and time-point specific networks. RNAi-based knockdown of predicted regulators had significant impact on viral replication and include several previously unknown regulators. Taken together, our integrated analysis identified novel module level patterns that capture strain and pathogenicity-specific patterns of expression and helped identify important regulators of host response to influenza infection. PMID:27403523

  17. Novel aspects of grapevine response to phytoplasma infection investigated by a proteomic and phospho-proteomic approach with data integration into functional networks

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Translational and post-translational protein modifications play a key role in the response of plants to pathogen infection. Among the latter, phosphorylation is critical in modulating protein structure, localization and interaction with other partners. In this work, we used a multiplex staining approach with 2D gels to study quantitative changes in the proteome and phosphoproteome of Flavescence dorée-affected and recovered ‘Barbera’ grapevines, compared to healthy plants. Results We identified 48 proteins that differentially changed in abundance, phosphorylation, or both in response to Flavescence dorée phytoplasma infection. Most of them did not show any significant difference in recovered plants, which, by contrast, were characterized by changes in abundance, phosphorylation, or both for 17 proteins not detected in infected plants. Some enzymes involved in the antioxidant response that were up-regulated in infected plants, such as isocitrate dehydrogenase and glutathione S-transferase, returned to healthy-state levels in recovered plants. Others belonging to the same functional category were even down-regulated in recovered plants (oxidoreductase GLYR1 and ascorbate peroxidase). Our proteomic approach thus agreed with previously published biochemical and RT-qPCR data which reported down-regulation of scavenging enzymes and accumulation of H2O2 in recovered plants, possibly suggesting a role for this molecule in remission from infection. Fifteen differentially phosphorylated proteins (| ratio | > 2, p < 0.05) were identified in infected compared to healthy plants, including proteins involved in photosynthesis, response to stress and the antioxidant system. Many were not differentially phosphorylated in recovered compared to healthy plants, pointing to their specific role in responding to infection, followed by a return to a steady-state phosphorylation level after remission of symptoms. Gene ontology (GO) enrichment and statistical

  18. Understanding the Mechanism of Thermotolerance Distinct From Heat Shock Response Through Proteomic Analysis of Industrial Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    PubMed Central

    Shui, Wenqing; Xiong, Yun; Xiao, Weidi; Qi, Xianni; Zhang, Yong; Lin, Yuping; Guo, Yufeng; Zhang, Zhidan; Wang, Qinhong; Ma, Yanhe

    2015-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been intensively studied in responses to different environmental stresses such as heat shock through global omic analysis. However, the S. cerevisiae industrial strains with superior thermotolerance have not been explored in any proteomic studies for elucidating the tolerance mechanism. Recently a new diploid strain was obtained through evolutionary engineering of a parental industrial strain, and it exhibited even higher resistance to prolonged thermal stress. Herein, we performed iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis on both the parental and evolved industrial strains to further understand the mechanism of thermotolerant adaptation. Out of ∼2600 quantifiable proteins from biological quadruplicates, 193 and 204 proteins were differentially regulated in the parental and evolved strains respectively during heat-stressed growth. The proteomic response of the industrial strains cultivated under prolonged thermal stress turned out to be substantially different from that of the laboratory strain exposed to sudden heat shock. Further analysis of transcription factors underlying the proteomic perturbation also indicated the distinct regulatory mechanism of thermotolerance. Finally, a cochaperone Mdj1 and a metabolic enzyme Adh1 were selected to investigate their roles in mediating heat-stressed growth and ethanol production of yeasts. Our proteomic characterization of the industrial strain led to comprehensive understanding of the molecular basis of thermotolerance, which would facilitate future improvement in the industrially important trait of S. cerevisiae by rational engineering. PMID:25926660

  19. Molecular response of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells on hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Bartneck, Matthias; Topuz, Fuat; Tag, Carmen Gabriele; Sauer-Lehnen, Sibille; Warzecha, Klaudia Theresa; Trautwein, Christian; Weiskirchen, Ralf; Tacke, Frank

    2015-06-01

    There is a high demand for the isolation of primary endothelial cells for biomaterial endotheliazation studies, tissue engineering, and artificial organ development. Further, biomarkers for monitoring the response of endothelial cells in biomaterials science are required. We systematically compared two strategies for isolating liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC) from mouse liver. We demonstrate that fluorescence-activated cell sorting results in a considerably higher purity (~97%) compared to magnetic-assisted cell sorting (~80%), but is associated with a lower yield and recovery rate. Cell repellent polyethylene glycol (PEG) substrates affected the morphology of primary LSEC in culture and significantly downregulated the intracellular adhesion molecule (ICAM) and upregulated the vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM). This molecular response could partially be reverted by further modification with arginylglycylaspartic acid (RGD). Thus, usage of PEGylated materials may reduce, while applying RGD may support endotheliazation of materials, and we could relate LSEC attachment to their expression of ICAM and VCAM mRNA, suggesting their usage as biomarkers for endothelialization.

  20. SILAC-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Human Lung Cell Response to Copper Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Edelmann, Mariola J.; Shack, Leslie A.; Naske, Caitlin D.; Walters, Keisha B.; Nanduri, Bindu

    2014-01-01

    Copper (II) oxide (CuO) nanoparticles (NP) are widely used in industry and medicine. In our study we evaluated the response of BEAS-2B human lung cells to CuO NP, using Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based proteomics and phosphoproteomics. Pathway modeling of the protein differential expression showed that CuO NP affect proteins relevant in cellular function and maintenance, protein synthesis, cell death and survival, cell cycle and cell morphology. Some of the signaling pathways represented by BEAS-2B proteins responsive to the NP included mTOR signaling, protein ubiquitination pathway, actin cytoskeleton signaling and epithelial adherens junction signaling. Follow-up experiments showed that CuO NP altered actin cytoskeleton, protein phosphorylation and protein ubiquitination level. PMID:25470785

  1. Proteomic and transcriptomic analysis of the response to bile stress of Lactobacillus casei BL23.

    PubMed

    Alcántara, Cristina; Zúñiga, Manuel

    2012-05-01

    Lactobacillus casei is a lactic acid bacterium commonly found in the gastrointestinal tract of animals, and some strains are used as probiotics. The ability of probiotic strains to survive the passage through the gastrointestinal tract is considered a key factor for their probiotic action. Therefore, tolerance to bile salts is a desirable feature for probiotic strains. In this study we have characterized the response of L. casei BL23 to bile by a transcriptomic and proteomic approach. The analysis revealed that exposure to bile induced changes in the abundance of 52 proteins and the transcript levels of 67 genes. The observed changes affected genes and proteins involved in the stress response, fatty acid and cell wall biosynthesis, metabolism of carbohydrates, transport of peptides, coenzyme levels, membrane H(+)-ATPase, and a number of uncharacterized genes and proteins. These data provide new insights into the mechanisms that enable L. casei BL23 to cope with bile stress. PMID:22322960

  2. SILAC-based quantitative proteomic analysis of human lung cell response to copper oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Edelmann, Mariola J; Shack, Leslie A; Naske, Caitlin D; Walters, Keisha B; Nanduri, Bindu

    2014-01-01

    Copper (II) oxide (CuO) nanoparticles (NP) are widely used in industry and medicine. In our study we evaluated the response of BEAS-2B human lung cells to CuO NP, using Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based proteomics and phosphoproteomics. Pathway modeling of the protein differential expression showed that CuO NP affect proteins relevant in cellular function and maintenance, protein synthesis, cell death and survival, cell cycle and cell morphology. Some of the signaling pathways represented by BEAS-2B proteins responsive to the NP included mTOR signaling, protein ubiquitination pathway, actin cytoskeleton signaling and epithelial adherens junction signaling. Follow-up experiments showed that CuO NP altered actin cytoskeleton, protein phosphorylation and protein ubiquitination level.

  3. Proteomic profile of KSR1-regulated signalling in response to genotoxic agents in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Angelopoulos, Nicos; Xu, Yichen; Grothey, Arnhild; Nunes, Joao; Stebbing, Justin; Giamas, Georgios

    2015-06-01

    Kinase suppressor of Ras 1 (KSR1) has been implicated in tumorigenesis in multiple cancers, including skin, pancreatic and lung carcinomas. However, our recent study revealed a role of KSR1 as a tumour suppressor in breast cancer, the expression of which is potentially correlated with chemotherapy response. Here, we aimed to further elucidate the KSR1-regulated signalling in response to genotoxic agents in breast cancer. Stable isotope labelling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS) was implemented to globally characterise cellular protein levels induced by KSR1 in the presence of doxorubicin or etoposide. The acquired proteomic signature was compared and GO-STRING analysis was subsequently performed to illustrate the activated functional signalling networks. Furthermore, the clinical associations of KSR1 with identified targets and their relevance in chemotherapy response were examined in breast cancer patients. We reveal a comprehensive repertoire of thousands of proteins identified in each dataset and compare the unique proteomic profiles as well as functional connections modulated by KSR1 after doxorubicin (Doxo-KSR1) or etoposide (Etop-KSR1) stimulus. From the up-regulated top hits, several proteins, including STAT1, ISG15 and TAP1 are also found to be positively associated with KSR1 expression in patient samples. Moreover, high KSR1 expression, as well as high abundance of these proteins, is correlated with better survival in breast cancer patients who underwent chemotherapy. In aggregate, our data exemplify a broad functional network conferred by KSR1 with genotoxic agents and highlight its implication in predicting chemotherapy response in breast cancer. PMID:26022350

  4. Rock geochemistry induces stress and starvation responses in the bacterial proteome.

    PubMed

    Bryce, Casey C; Le Bihan, Thierry; Martin, Sarah F; Harrison, Jesse P; Bush, Timothy; Spears, Bryan; Moore, Alanna; Leys, Natalie; Byloos, Bo; Cockell, Charles S

    2016-04-01

    Interactions between microorganisms and rocks play an important role in Earth system processes. However, little is known about the molecular capabilities microorganisms require to live in rocky environments. Using a quantitative label-free proteomics approach, we show that a model bacterium (Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34) can use volcanic rock to satisfy some elemental requirements, resulting in increased rates of cell division in both magnesium- and iron-limited media. However, the rocks also introduced multiple new stresses via chemical changes associated with pH, elemental leaching and surface adsorption of nutrients that were reflected in the proteome. For example, the loss of bioavailable phosphorus was observed and resulted in the upregulation of diverse phosphate limitation proteins, which facilitate increase phosphate uptake and scavenging within the cell. Our results revealed that despite the provision of essential elements, rock chemistry drives complex metabolic reorganization within rock-dwelling organisms, requiring tight regulation of cellular processes at the protein level. This study advances our ability to identify key microbial responses that enable life to persist in rock environments. PMID:26470852

  5. Proteomic analysis of the molecular response of Raji cells to maslinic acid treatment.

    PubMed

    Yap, W H; Khoo, K S; Lim, S H; Yeo, C C; Lim, Y M

    2012-01-15

    Maslinic acid, a natural pentacyclic triterpene has been shown to inhibit growth and induce apoptosis in some tumour cell lines. We studied the molecular response of Raji cells towards maslinic acid treatment. A proteomics approach was employed to identify the target proteins. Seventeen differentially expressed proteins including those involved in DNA replication, microtubule filament assembly, nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking, cell signaling, energy metabolism and cytoskeletal organization were identified by MALDI TOF-TOF MS. The down-regulation of stathmin, Ran GTPase activating protein-1 (RanBP1), and microtubule associated protein RP/EB family member 1 (EB1) were confirmed by Western blotting. The study of the effect of maslinic acid on Raji cell cycle regulation showed that it induced a G1 cell cycle arrest. The differential proteomic changes in maslinic acid-treated Raji cells demonstrated that it also inhibited expression of dUTPase and stathmin which are known to induce early S and G2 cell cycle arrests. The mechanism of maslinic acid-induced cell cycle arrest may be mediated by inhibiting cyclin D1 expression and enhancing the levels of cell cycle-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor p21 protein. Maslinic acid suppressed nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activity which is known to stimulate expression of anti-apoptotic and cell cycle regulatory gene products. These results suggest that maslinic acid affects multiple signaling molecules and inhibits fundamental pathways regulating cell growth and survival in Raji cells. PMID:21893403

  6. Global response of Plasmodium falciparum to hyperoxia: a combined transcriptomic and proteomic approach

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Over its life cycle, the Plasmodium falciparum parasite is exposed to different environmental conditions, particularly to variations in O2 pressure. For example, the parasite circulates in human venous blood at 5% O2 pressure and in arterial blood, particularly in the lungs, at 13% O2 pressure. Moreover, the parasite is exposed to 21% O2 levels in the salivary glands of mosquitoes. Methods To study the metabolic adaptation of P. falciparum to different oxygen pressures during the intraerythrocytic cycle, a combined approach using transcriptomic and proteomic techniques was undertaken. Results Even though hyperoxia lengthens the parasitic cycle, significant transcriptional changes were detected in hyperoxic conditions in the late-ring stage. Using PS 6.0™ software (Ariadne Genomics) for microarray analysis, this study demonstrate up-expression of genes involved in antioxidant systems and down-expression of genes involved in the digestive vacuole metabolism and the glycolysis in favour of mitochondrial respiration. Proteomic analysis revealed increased levels of heat shock proteins, and decreased levels of glycolytic enzymes. Some of this regulation reflected post-transcriptional modifications during the hyperoxia response. Conclusions These results seem to indicate that hyperoxia activates antioxidant defence systems in parasites to preserve the integrity of its cellular structures. Moreover, environmental constraints seem to induce an energetic metabolism adaptation of P. falciparum. This study provides a better understanding of the adaptive capabilities of P. falciparum to environmental changes and may lead to the development of novel therapeutic targets. PMID:21223545

  7. Leaf Proteome Analysis Reveals Prospective Drought and Heat Stress Response Mechanisms in Soybean.

    PubMed

    Das, Aayudh; Eldakak, Moustafa; Paudel, Bimal; Kim, Dea-Wook; Hemmati, Homa; Basu, Chhandak; Rohila, Jai S

    2016-01-01

    Drought and heat are among the major abiotic stresses that affect soybean crops worldwide. During the current investigation, the effect of drought, heat, and drought plus heat stresses was compared in the leaves of two soybean varieties, Surge and Davison, combining 2D-DIGE proteomic data with physiology and biochemical analyses. We demonstrated how 25 differentially expressed photosynthesis-related proteins affect RuBisCO regulation, electron transport, Calvin cycle, and carbon fixation during drought and heat stress. We also observed higher abundance of heat stress-induced EF-Tu protein in Surge. It is possible that EF-Tu might have activated heat tolerance mechanisms in the soybean. Higher level expressions of heat shock-related protein seem to be regulating the heat tolerance mechanisms. This study identifies the differential expression of various abiotic stress-responsive proteins that regulate various molecular processes and signaling cascades. One inevitable outcome from the biochemical and proteomics assays of this study is that increase of ROS levels during drought stress does not show significant changes at the phenotypic level in Davison and this seems to be due to a higher amount of carbonic anhydrase accumulation in the cell which aids the cell to become more resistant to cytotoxic concentrations of H2O2. PMID:27034942

  8. Leaf Proteome Analysis Reveals Prospective Drought and Heat Stress Response Mechanisms in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Das, Aayudh; Eldakak, Moustafa; Paudel, Bimal; Kim, Dea-Wook; Hemmati, Homa; Basu, Chhandak

    2016-01-01

    Drought and heat are among the major abiotic stresses that affect soybean crops worldwide. During the current investigation, the effect of drought, heat, and drought plus heat stresses was compared in the leaves of two soybean varieties, Surge and Davison, combining 2D-DIGE proteomic data with physiology and biochemical analyses. We demonstrated how 25 differentially expressed photosynthesis-related proteins affect RuBisCO regulation, electron transport, Calvin cycle, and carbon fixation during drought and heat stress. We also observed higher abundance of heat stress-induced EF-Tu protein in Surge. It is possible that EF-Tu might have activated heat tolerance mechanisms in the soybean. Higher level expressions of heat shock-related protein seem to be regulating the heat tolerance mechanisms. This study identifies the differential expression of various abiotic stress-responsive proteins that regulate various molecular processes and signaling cascades. One inevitable outcome from the biochemical and proteomics assays of this study is that increase of ROS levels during drought stress does not show significant changes at the phenotypic level in Davison and this seems to be due to a higher amount of carbonic anhydrase accumulation in the cell which aids the cell to become more resistant to cytotoxic concentrations of H2O2. PMID:27034942

  9. Proteome analysis of gametophores identified a metallothionein involved in various abiotic stress responses in Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung Hyun; Hoang, Quoc Truong; Kim, Yoon Young; Shin, Hyun Young; Ok, Sung Han; Bae, Jung Myung; Shin, Jeong Sheop

    2006-05-01

    Physcomitrella patens is a model plant for studying gene function using a knockout strategy. To establish a proteome database for P. patens, we resolved over 1,500 soluble proteins from gametophore and protonema tissues by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and obtained peptide mass fingerprints (PMFs) by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Using expressed sequence tags (ESTs), we were able to predict the identities of 90 protein spots. Most of these were related to energy or primary metabolism. Comparative proteome analysis was used to identify proteins specific for each of the tissue types. One of these was a metallothionein type-2 (PpMT2) protein that was highly upregulated in gametophore tissue. PpMT2 was induced in both the gametophore and protonema following culture on solid media and in response to various abiotic stresses such as copper, cadmium, cold, indole-3-acetic acid, and ethylene. We suggest that PpMT2 is not only involved in metal binding and detoxification, but also in many biological aspects as a metal messenger or a protein with additional functions.

  10. Label-Free Proteomics Assisted by Affinity Enrichment for Elucidating the Chemical Reactivity of the Liver Mitochondrial Proteome toward Adduction by the Lipid Electrophile 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE).

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Shin-Cheng; Maier, Claudia S

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of oxidative stress-induced post-translational modifications remains challenging due to the chemical diversity of these modifications, the possibility of the presence of positional isomers and the low stoichiometry of the modified proteins present in a cell or tissue proteome. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a multifactorial disease in which mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress have been identified as being critically involved in the progression of the disease from steatosis to cirrhosis. Ethanol metabolism leads to increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), glutathione depletion and lipid peroxidation. Posttranslational modification of proteins by electrophilic products of lipid peroxidation has been associated with governing redox-associated signaling mechanisms, but also as contributing to protein dysfunction leading to organelle and liver injury. In particular the prototypical α,β-unsaturated aldehyde, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), has been extensively studied as marker of increased oxidative stress in hepatocytes. In this study, we combined a LC-MS label-free quantification method and affinity enrichment to assess the dose-dependent insult by HNE on the proteome of rat liver mitochondria. We used a carbonyl-selective probe, the ARP probe, to label HNE-protein adducts and to perform affinity capture at the protein level. Using LC-MS to obtain protein abundance estimates, a list of protein targets was obtained with increasing concentration of HNE used in the exposure studies. In parallel, we performed affinity capture at the peptide level to acquire site-specific information. Examining the concentration-dependence of the protein modifications, we observed distinct reactivity profiles for HNE-protein adduction. Pathway analysis indicated that proteins associated with metabolic processes, including amino acid, fatty acid, and glyoxylate and dicarboxylate metabolism, bile acid synthesis and TCA cycle, showed enhanced reactivity to HNE

  11. Label-free proteomics assisted by affinity enrichment for elucidating the chemical reactivity of the liver mitochondrial proteome toward adduction by the lipid electrophile 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Claudia

    2016-03-01

    The analysis of oxidative stress-induced post-translational modifications remains challenging due to the chemical diversity of these modifications, the possibility of the presence of positional isomers and the low stoichiometry of the modified proteins present in a cell or tissue proteome. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a multifactorial disease in which mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress have been identified as being critically involved in the progression of the disease from steatosis to cirrhosis. Ethanol metabolism leads to increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), glutathione depletion and lipid peroxidation. Posttranslational modification of proteins by electrophilic products of lipid peroxidation has been associated with governing redox-associated signaling mechanisms, but also as contributing to protein dysfunction leading to organelle and liver injury. In particular the prototypical α,β-unsaturated aldehyde, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), has been extensively studied as marker of increased oxidative stress in hepatocytes. In this study, we combined a LC-MS label-free quantification method and affinity enrichment to assess the dose-dependent insult by HNE on the proteome of rat liver mitochondria. We used a carbonyl-selective probe, the ARP probe, to label HNE-protein adducts and to perform affinity capture at the protein level. Using LC-MS to obtain protein abundance estimates, a list of protein targets was obtained with increasing concentration of HNE used in the exposure studies. In parallel, we performed affinity capture at the peptide level to acquire site-specific information. Examining the concentration-dependence of the protein modifications, we observed distinct reactivity profiles for HNE-protein adduction. Pathway analysis indicated that proteins associated with metabolic processes, including amino acid, fatty acid and glyoxylate and dicarboxylate metabolism, bile acid synthesis and TCA cycle, showed enhanced reactivity to HNE

  12. Label-Free Proteomics Assisted by Affinity Enrichment for Elucidating the Chemical Reactivity of the Liver Mitochondrial Proteome toward Adduction by the Lipid Electrophile 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE)

    PubMed Central

    Tzeng, Shin-Cheng; Maier, Claudia S.

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of oxidative stress-induced post-translational modifications remains challenging due to the chemical diversity of these modifications, the possibility of the presence of positional isomers and the low stoichiometry of the modified proteins present in a cell or tissue proteome. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a multifactorial disease in which mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress have been identified as being critically involved in the progression of the disease from steatosis to cirrhosis. Ethanol metabolism leads to increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), glutathione depletion and lipid peroxidation. Posttranslational modification of proteins by electrophilic products of lipid peroxidation has been associated with governing redox-associated signaling mechanisms, but also as contributing to protein dysfunction leading to organelle and liver injury. In particular the prototypical α,β-unsaturated aldehyde, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), has been extensively studied as marker of increased oxidative stress in hepatocytes. In this study, we combined a LC-MS label-free quantification method and affinity enrichment to assess the dose-dependent insult by HNE on the proteome of rat liver mitochondria. We used a carbonyl-selective probe, the ARP probe, to label HNE-protein adducts and to perform affinity capture at the protein level. Using LC-MS to obtain protein abundance estimates, a list of protein targets was obtained with increasing concentration of HNE used in the exposure studies. In parallel, we performed affinity capture at the peptide level to acquire site-specific information. Examining the concentration-dependence of the protein modifications, we observed distinct reactivity profiles for HNE-protein adduction. Pathway analysis indicated that proteins associated with metabolic processes, including amino acid, fatty acid, and glyoxylate and dicarboxylate metabolism, bile acid synthesis and TCA cycle, showed enhanced reactivity to HNE

  13. Proteome analysis of leaves of the desiccation-tolerant grass, Sporobolus stapfianus, in response to dehydration.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Melvin J; Jain, Renuka; Balbuena, Tiago S; Agrawal, Ganesh; Gasulla, Franscisco; Thelen, Jay J

    2011-07-01

    Drought and its affects on agricultural production is a serious issue facing global efforts to increase food supplies and ensure food security for the growing world population. Understanding how plants respond to dehydration is an important prerequisite for developing strategies for crop improvement in drought tolerance. This has proved to be a difficult task as all of the current research plant models do not tolerate cellular dehydration well and, like all crops, they succumb to the effects of a relatively small water deficit of -4MPa or less. For these reasons many researchers have started to investigate the usefulness of resurrection plants, plants that can survive extremes of dehydration to the point of desiccation, to provide answers as to how plants tolerate water loss. We have chosen to investigate the leaf proteome response of the desiccation-tolerant grass Sporobolus stapfianus Gandoger to dehydration to a water content that encompasses the initiation of the cellular protection response evident in these plants. We used a combination of two-dimensional Difference Gel Electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and liquid chromatography-tandem-mass spectrometry to compare the proteomes of young leaves from hydrated plants to those dehydrated to approximately 30% relative water content. High-resolution 2D-DIGE revealed 96 significantly different proteins and 82 of these spots yielded high-quality protein assignments by tandem-mass spectrometry. Inferences from the bioinformatic annotations of these proteins revealed the possible involvement of protein kinase-based signaling cascades and brassinosteroid involvement in the regulation of the cellular protection response. Enzymes of glycolysis, both cytoplasmic and plastidic, as well as five enzymes of the Calvin cycle increased in abundance. However, the RuBisCO large subunit and associated proteins were reduced, indicating a loss of carbon fixation but a continued need to supply the necessary carbon skeletons for the

  14. Proteome changes in banana fruit peel tissue in response to ethylene and high-temperature treatments.

    PubMed

    Du, Lina; Song, Jun; Forney, Charles; Palmer, Leslie Campbell; Fillmore, Sherry; Zhang, ZhaoQi

    2016-01-01

    Banana (Musa AAA group) is one of the most consumed fruits in the world due to its flavor and nutritional value. As a typical climacteric fruit, banana responds to ethylene treatment, which induces rapid changes of color, flavor (aroma and taste), sweetness and nutritional composition. It has also been reported that ripening bananas at temperatures above 24 °C inhibits chlorophyll breakdown and color formation but increases the rate of senescence. To gain fundamental knowledge about the effects of high temperature and ethylene on banana ripening, a quantitative proteomic study employing multiplex peptide stable isotope dimethyl labeling was conducted. In this study, green (immature) untreated banana fruit were subjected to treatment with 10 μL L(-1) of ethylene for 24 h. After ethylene treatment, treated and untreated fruit were stored at 20 or 30 °C for 24 h. Fruit peel tissues were then sampled after 0 and 1 day of storage, and peel color and chlorophyll fluorescence were evaluated. Quantitative proteomic analysis was conducted on the fruit peels after 1 day of storage. In total, 413 common proteins were identified and quantified from two biological replicates. Among these proteins, 91 changed significantly in response to ethylene and high-temperature treatments. Cluster analysis on these 91 proteins identified 7 groups of changed proteins. Ethylene treatment and storage at 20 °C induced 40 proteins that are correlated with pathogen resistance, cell wall metabolism, ethylene biosynthesis, allergens and ribosomal proteins, and it repressed 36 proteins that are associated with fatty acid and lipid metabolism, redox-oxidative responses, and protein biosynthesis and modification. Ethylene treatment and storage at 30 °C induced 32 proteins, which were mainly similar to those in group 1 but also included 8 proteins in group 3 (identified as chitinase, cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase 1, cysteine synthase, villin-2, leucine-transfer RNA ligase, CP47

  15. Proteome changes in banana fruit peel tissue in response to ethylene and high-temperature treatments

    PubMed Central

    Du, Lina; Song, Jun; Forney, Charles; Palmer, Leslie Campbell; Fillmore, Sherry; Zhang, ZhaoQi

    2016-01-01

    Banana (Musa AAA group) is one of the most consumed fruits in the world due to its flavor and nutritional value. As a typical climacteric fruit, banana responds to ethylene treatment, which induces rapid changes of color, flavor (aroma and taste), sweetness and nutritional composition. It has also been reported that ripening bananas at temperatures above 24 °C inhibits chlorophyll breakdown and color formation but increases the rate of senescence. To gain fundamental knowledge about the effects of high temperature and ethylene on banana ripening, a quantitative proteomic study employing multiplex peptide stable isotope dimethyl labeling was conducted. In this study, green (immature) untreated banana fruit were subjected to treatment with 10 μL L−1 of ethylene for 24 h. After ethylene treatment, treated and untreated fruit were stored at 20 or 30 °C for 24 h. Fruit peel tissues were then sampled after 0 and 1 day of storage, and peel color and chlorophyll fluorescence were evaluated. Quantitative proteomic analysis was conducted on the fruit peels after 1 day of storage. In total, 413 common proteins were identified and quantified from two biological replicates. Among these proteins, 91 changed significantly in response to ethylene and high-temperature treatments. Cluster analysis on these 91 proteins identified 7 groups of changed proteins. Ethylene treatment and storage at 20 °C induced 40 proteins that are correlated with pathogen resistance, cell wall metabolism, ethylene biosynthesis, allergens and ribosomal proteins, and it repressed 36 proteins that are associated with fatty acid and lipid metabolism, redox–oxidative responses, and protein biosynthesis and modification. Ethylene treatment and storage at 30 °C induced 32 proteins, which were mainly similar to those in group 1 but also included 8 proteins in group 3 (identified as chitinase, cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase 1, cysteine synthase, villin-2, leucine-transfer RNA ligase, CP47

  16. Transcriptome and Proteome Dynamics of the Cellular Response of Shewanella oneidensis to Chromium Stress

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.K.

    2005-04-18

    The overall goal of this DOE NABIR project is to characterize the molecular basis and regulation of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] stress response and reduction by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. Temporal genomic profiling and mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis were employed to characterize the dynamic molecular response of S. oneidensis MR-1 to both acute and chronic Cr(VI) exposure. The acute stress response of aerobic, mid-exponential phase cells shocked to a final concentration of 1 mM potassium chromate (K2CrO4) was examined at post-exposure time intervals of 5, 30, 60, and 90 min relative to untreated cells. The transcriptome of mid-exponential cultures was also analyzed 30 min after shock doses of 0.3, 0.5, or 1 mM K{sub 2}CrO{sub 4}. The tonB1-exbB1-exbD1 genes comprising the TonB1 iron transport system were some of the most highly induced coding sequences (CDSs) after 90 min (up to {approx}240 fold), followed by other genes involved in heme transport, sulfate transport, and sulfur assimilation pathways. In addition, transcript levels for CDSs with annotated functions in DNA repair (dinP, recX, recA, recN) and detoxification processes (so3585, so3586) were substantially increased in Cr(VI)-exposed cells compared to untreated cells. By contrast, genes predicted to encode hydrogenases (HydA, HydB), oxidoreductases (SO0902-03-04, SO1911), iron-sulfur cluster binding proteins (SO4404), decaheme cytochrome c proteins (MtrA, OmcA, OmcB), and a number of LysR or TetR family transcriptional regulators were some of the most highly repressed CDSs following the 90-min shock period. Transcriptome profiles generated from MR-1 cells adapted to 0.3 mM Cr(VI) differed significantly from those characterizing cells exposed to acute Cr(VI) stress without adaptation. Parallel proteomic characterization of soluble protein and membrane protein fractions extracted from Cr(VI)-shocked and Cr(VI)-adapted MR-1 cells was performed using multidimensional HPLC-ESI-MS/MS (both

  17. Morpho-Physiological and Proteome Level Responses to Cadmium Stress in Sorghum

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Abu Hena Mostafa; Kim, Sang-Woo; Oh, Myeong-Won; Lee, Moon-Soon; Chung, Keun-Yook; Xin, Zhanguo; Woo, Sun-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) stress may cause serious morphological and physiological abnormalities in addition to altering the proteome in plants. The present study was performed to explore Cd-induced morpho-physiological alterations and their potential associated mechanisms in Sorghum bicolor leaves at the protein level. Ten-day-old sorghum seedlings were exposed to different concentrations (0, 100, and 150 μM) of CdCl2, and different morpho-physiological responses were recorded. The effects of Cd exposure on protein expression patterns in S. bicolor were investigated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) in samples derived from the leaves of both control and Cd-treated seedlings. The observed morphological changes revealed that the plants treated with Cd displayed dramatically altered shoot lengths, fresh weights and relative water content. In addition, the concentration of Cd was markedly increased by treatment with Cd, and the amount of Cd taken up by the shoots was significantly and directly correlated with the applied concentration of Cd. Using the 2-DE method, a total of 33 differentially expressed protein spots were analyzed using MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. Of these, treatment with Cd resulted in significant increases in 15 proteins and decreases in 18 proteins. Major changes were absorbed in the levels of proteins known to be involved in carbohydrate metabolism, transcriptional regulation, translation and stress responses. Proteomic results revealed that Cd stress had an inhibitory effect on carbon fixation, ATP production and the regulation of protein synthesis. Our study provides insights into the integrated molecular mechanisms involved in responses to Cd and the effects of Cd on the growth and physiological characteristics of sorghum seedlings. We have aimed to provide a reference describing the mechanisms involved in heavy metal damage to plants. PMID:26919231

  18. Morpho-Physiological and Proteome Level Responses to Cadmium Stress in Sorghum.

    PubMed

    Roy, Swapan Kumar; Cho, Seong-Woo; Kwon, Soo Jeong; Kamal, Abu Hena Mostafa; Kim, Sang-Woo; Oh, Myeong-Won; Lee, Moon-Soon; Chung, Keun-Yook; Xin, Zhanguo; Woo, Sun-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) stress may cause serious morphological and physiological abnormalities in addition to altering the proteome in plants. The present study was performed to explore Cd-induced morpho-physiological alterations and their potential associated mechanisms in Sorghum bicolor leaves at the protein level. Ten-day-old sorghum seedlings were exposed to different concentrations (0, 100, and 150 μM) of CdCl2, and different morpho-physiological responses were recorded. The effects of Cd exposure on protein expression patterns in S. bicolor were investigated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) in samples derived from the leaves of both control and Cd-treated seedlings. The observed morphological changes revealed that the plants treated with Cd displayed dramatically altered shoot lengths, fresh weights and relative water content. In addition, the concentration of Cd was markedly increased by treatment with Cd, and the amount of Cd taken up by the shoots was significantly and directly correlated with the applied concentration of Cd. Using the 2-DE method, a total of 33 differentially expressed protein spots were analyzed using MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. Of these, treatment with Cd resulted in significant increases in 15 proteins and decreases in 18 proteins. Major changes were absorbed in the levels of proteins known to be involved in carbohydrate metabolism, transcriptional regulation, translation and stress responses. Proteomic results revealed that Cd stress had an inhibitory effect on carbon fixation, ATP production and the regulation of protein synthesis. Our study provides insights into the integrated molecular mechanisms involved in responses to Cd and the effects of Cd on the growth and physiological characteristics of sorghum seedlings. We have aimed to provide a reference describing the mechanisms involved in heavy metal damage to plants.

  19. Proteomics and transcriptomics characterization of bile stress response in probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG.

    PubMed

    Koskenniemi, Kerttu; Laakso, Kati; Koponen, Johanna; Kankainen, Matti; Greco, Dario; Auvinen, Petri; Savijoki, Kirsi; Nyman, Tuula A; Surakka, Anu; Salusjärvi, Tuomas; de Vos, Willem M; Tynkkynen, Soile; Kalkkinen, Nisse; Varmanen, Pekka

    2011-02-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (GG) is a widely used and intensively studied probiotic bacterium. Although the health benefits of strain GG are well documented, the systematic exploration of mechanisms by which this strain exerts probiotic effects in the host has only recently been initiated. The ability to survive the harsh conditions of the gastrointestinal tract, including gastric juice containing bile salts, is one of the vital characteristics that enables a probiotic bacterium to transiently colonize the host. Here we used gene expression profiling at the transcriptome and proteome levels to investigate the cellular response of strain GG toward bile under defined bioreactor conditions. The analyses revealed that in response to growth of strain GG in the presence of 0.2% ox gall the transcript levels of 316 genes changed significantly (p < 0.01, t test), and 42 proteins, including both intracellular and surface-exposed proteins (i.e. surfome), were differentially abundant (p < 0.01, t test in total proteome analysis; p < 0.05, t test in surfome analysis). Protein abundance changes correlated with transcriptome level changes for 14 of these proteins. The identified proteins suggest diverse and specific changes in general stress responses as well as in cell envelope-related functions, including in pathways affecting fatty acid composition, cell surface charge, and thickness of the exopolysaccharide layer. These changes are likely to strengthen the cell envelope against bile-induced stress and signal the GG cells of gut entrance. Notably, the surfome analyses demonstrated significant reduction in the abundance of a protein catalyzing the synthesis of exopolysaccharides, whereas a protein dedicated for active removal of bile compounds from the cells was up-regulated. These findings suggest a role for these proteins in facilitating the well founded interaction of strain GG with the host mucus in the presence of sublethal doses of bile. The significance of these findings

  20. Proteomic characterization of iron deficiency responses in Cucumis sativus L. roots

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency induces in Strategy I plants physiological, biochemical and molecular modifications capable to increase iron uptake from the rhizosphere. This effort needs a reorganization of metabolic pathways to efficiently sustain activities linked to the acquisition of iron; in fact, carbohydrates and the energetic metabolism has been shown to be involved in these responses. The aim of this work was to find both a confirmation of the already expected change in the enzyme concentrations induced in cucumber root tissue in response to iron deficiency as well as to find new insights on the involvement of other pathways. Results The proteome pattern of soluble cytosolic proteins extracted from roots was obtained by 2-DE. Of about two thousand spots found, only those showing at least a two-fold increase or decrease in the concentration were considered for subsequent identification by mass spectrometry. Fifty-seven proteins showed significant changes, and 44 of them were identified. Twenty-one of them were increased in quantity, whereas 23 were decreased in quantity. Most of the increased proteins belong to glycolysis and nitrogen metabolism in agreement with the biochemical evidence. On the other hand, the proteins being decreased belong to the metabolism of sucrose and complex structural carbohydrates and to structural proteins. Conclusions The new available techniques allow to cast new light on the mechanisms involved in the changes occurring in plants under iron deficiency. The data obtained from this proteomic study confirm the metabolic changes occurring in cucumber as a response to Fe deficiency. Two main conclusions may be drawn. The first one is the confirmation of the increase in the glycolytic flux and in the anaerobic metabolism to sustain the energetic effort the Fe-deficient plants must undertake. The second conclusion is, on one hand, the decrease in the amount of enzymes linked to the biosynthesis of complex carbohydrates of the cell wall

  1. Proteomic and Physiological Analyses Reveal Putrescine Responses in Roots of Cucumber Stressed by NaCl.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yinghui; Zhong, Min; Shu, Sheng; Du, Nanshan; Sun, Jin; Guo, Shirong

    2016-01-01

    Soil salinity is a major environmental constraint that threatens agricultural productivity. Different strategies have been developed to improve crop salt tolerance, among which the effects of polyamines have been well-reported. To gain a better understanding of the cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) responses to NaCl and unravel the underlying mechanism of exogenous putrescine (Put) alleviating salt-induced damage, comparative proteomic analysis was conducted on cucumber roots treated with NaCl, and/or Put for 7 days. The results showed that exogenous Put restored the root growth inhibited by NaCl. Sixty-two differentially expressed proteins implicated in various biological processes were successfully identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. The four largest categories included proteins involved in defense response (24.2%), protein metabolism (24.2%), carbohydrate metabolism (19.4%), and amino acid metabolism (14.5%). Exogenous Put up-regulated most identified proteins involved in carbohydrate metabolism, implying an enhancement in energy generation. Proteins involved in defense response and protein metabolism were differently regulated by Put, which indicated the roles of Put in stress resistance and proteome rearrangement. Put also increased the abundance of proteins involved in amino acid metabolism. Meanwhile, physiological analysis showed that Put could further up-regulated the levels of free amino acids in salt stressed-roots. In addition, Put also improved endogenous polyamines contents by regulating the transcription levels of key enzymes in polyamine metabolism. Taken together, these results suggest that Put may alleviate NaCl-induced growth inhibition through degradation of misfolded/damaged proteins, activation of stress defense, and the promotion of carbohydrate metabolism to generate more energy. PMID:27471514

  2. Proteomic and Physiological Analyses Reveal Putrescine Responses in Roots of Cucumber Stressed by NaCl

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yinghui; Zhong, Min; Shu, Sheng; Du, Nanshan; Sun, Jin; Guo, Shirong

    2016-01-01

    Soil salinity is a major environmental constraint that threatens agricultural productivity. Different strategies have been developed to improve crop salt tolerance, among which the effects of polyamines have been well-reported. To gain a better understanding of the cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) responses to NaCl and unravel the underlying mechanism of exogenous putrescine (Put) alleviating salt-induced damage, comparative proteomic analysis was conducted on cucumber roots treated with NaCl, and/or Put for 7 days. The results showed that exogenous Put restored the root growth inhibited by NaCl. Sixty-two differentially expressed proteins implicated in various biological processes were successfully identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. The four largest categories included proteins involved in defense response (24.2%), protein metabolism (24.2%), carbohydrate metabolism (19.4%), and amino acid metabolism (14.5%). Exogenous Put up-regulated most identified proteins involved in carbohydrate metabolism, implying an enhancement in energy generation. Proteins involved in defense response and protein metabolism were differently regulated by Put, which indicated the roles of Put in stress resistance and proteome rearrangement. Put also increased the abundance of proteins involved in amino acid metabolism. Meanwhile, physiological analysis showed that Put could further up-regulated the levels of free amino acids in salt stressed-roots. In addition, Put also improved endogenous polyamines contents by regulating the transcription levels of key enzymes in polyamine metabolism. Taken together, these results suggest that Put may alleviate NaCl-induced growth inhibition through degradation of misfolded/damaged proteins, activation of stress defense, and the promotion of carbohydrate metabolism to generate more energy. PMID:27471514

  3. Understanding pea resistance mechanisms in response to Fusarium oxysporum through proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Castillejo, María Ángeles; Bani, Moustafa; Rubiales, Diego

    2015-07-01

    Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. pisi (Fop) is an important and destructive pathogen affecting pea crop (Pisum sativum) throughout the world. Control of this disease is achieved mainly by integration of different disease management procedures. However, the constant evolution of the pathogen drives the necessity to broaden the molecular basis of resistance to Fop. Our proteomic study was performed on pea with the aim of identifying proteins involved in different resistance mechanisms operating during F. oxysporum infection. For such purpose, we used a two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) coupled to mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF) analysis to study the root proteome of three pea genotypes showing different resistance response to Fop race 2. Multivariate statistical analysis identified 132 differential protein spots under the experimental conditions (genotypes/treatments). All of these protein spots were subjected to mass spectrometry analysis to deduce their possible functions. A total of 53 proteins were identified using a combination of peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) and MSMS fragmentation. The following main functional categories were assigned to the identified proteins: carbohydrate and energy metabolism, nucleotides and aminoacid metabolism, signal transduction and cellular process, folding and degradation, redox and homeostasis, defense, biosynthetic process and transcription/translation. Results obtained in this work suggest that the most susceptible genotypes have increased levels of enzymes involved in the production of reducing power which could then be used as cofactor for enzymes of the redox reactions. This is in concordance with the fact that a ROS burst occurred in the same genotypes, as well as an increase of PR proteins. Conversely, in the resistant genotype proteins responsible to induce changes in the membrane and cell wall composition related to reinforcement were identified. Results are discussed in terms of the differential response to Fop.

  4. Integrated metabolomic and proteomic analysis reveals systemic responses of Rubrivivax benzoatilyticus JA2 to aniline stress.

    PubMed

    Mujahid, Md; Prasuna, M Lakshmi; Sasikala, Ch; Ramana, Ch Venkata

    2015-02-01

    Aromatic amines are widely distributed in the environment and are major environmental pollutants. Although degradation of aromatic amines is well studied in bacteria, physiological adaptations and stress response to these toxic compounds is not yet fully understood. In the present study, systemic responses of Rubrivivax benzoatilyticus JA2 to aniline stress were deciphered using metabolite and iTRAQ-labeled protein profiling. Strain JA2 tolerated high concentrations of aniline (30 mM) with trace amounts of aniline being transformed to acetanilide. GC-MS metabolite profiling revealed aniline stress phenotype wherein amino acid, carbohydrate, fatty acid, nitrogen metabolisms, and TCA (tricarboxylic acid cycle) were modulated. Strain JA2 responded to aniline by remodeling the proteome, and cellular functions, such as signaling, transcription, translation, stress tolerance, transport and carbohydrate metabolism, were highly modulated. Key adaptive responses, such as transcription/translational changes, molecular chaperones to control protein folding, and efflux pumps implicated in solvent extrusion, were induced in response to aniline stress. Proteo-metabolomics indicated extensive rewiring of metabolism to aniline. TCA cycle and amino acid catabolism were down-regulated while gluconeogenesis and pentose phosphate pathways were up-regulated, leading to the synthesis of extracellular polymeric substances. Furthermore, increased saturated fatty acid ratios in membranes due to aniline stress suggest membrane adaptation. The present study thus indicates that strain JA2 employs multilayered responses: stress response, toxic compound tolerance, energy conservation, and metabolic rearrangements to aniline.

  5. Integrated metabolomic and proteomic analysis reveals systemic responses of Rubrivivax benzoatilyticus JA2 to aniline stress.

    PubMed

    Mujahid, Md; Prasuna, M Lakshmi; Sasikala, Ch; Ramana, Ch Venkata

    2015-02-01

    Aromatic amines are widely distributed in the environment and are major environmental pollutants. Although degradation of aromatic amines is well studied in bacteria, physiological adaptations and stress response to these toxic compounds is not yet fully understood. In the present study, systemic responses of Rubrivivax benzoatilyticus JA2 to aniline stress were deciphered using metabolite and iTRAQ-labeled protein profiling. Strain JA2 tolerated high concentrations of aniline (30 mM) with trace amounts of aniline being transformed to acetanilide. GC-MS metabolite profiling revealed aniline stress phenotype wherein amino acid, carbohydrate, fatty acid, nitrogen metabolisms, and TCA (tricarboxylic acid cycle) were modulated. Strain JA2 responded to aniline by remodeling the proteome, and cellular functions, such as signaling, transcription, translation, stress tolerance, transport and carbohydrate metabolism, were highly modulated. Key adaptive responses, such as transcription/translational changes, molecular chaperones to control protein folding, and efflux pumps implicated in solvent extrusion, were induced in response to aniline stress. Proteo-metabolomics indicated extensive rewiring of metabolism to aniline. TCA cycle and amino acid catabolism were down-regulated while gluconeogenesis and pentose phosphate pathways were up-regulated, leading to the synthesis of extracellular polymeric substances. Furthermore, increased saturated fatty acid ratios in membranes due to aniline stress suggest membrane adaptation. The present study thus indicates that strain JA2 employs multilayered responses: stress response, toxic compound tolerance, energy conservation, and metabolic rearrangements to aniline. PMID:25388363

  6. Dynamic changes in the proteome of Synechocystis 6803 in response to CO(2) limitation revealed by quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Battchikova, Natalia; Vainonen, Julia P; Vorontsova, Natalia; Keranen, Mika; Carmel, Dalton; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2010-11-01

    Cyanobacteria developed efficient carbon concentrating mechanisms which significantly improve the photosynthetic performance and survival of cells under limiting CO(2) conditions. Dynamic changes of the Synechocystis proteome to CO(2) limitation were investigated using shotgun LC-MS/MS approach with isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) technique. Synechocystis cells grown at high (3%) CO(2) were shifted to air-level CO(2) followed by protein extraction after 6, 24, and 72 h. About 19% of the cyanobacterial proteome was identified and the expression changes were quantified for 17% of theoretical ORFs. For 76 proteins, up- or down-regulation was found to be significant (more than 1.5 or less than 0.7). Major changes were observed in proteins participating in inorganic carbon uptake, CO(2) fixation, nitrogen transport and assimilation, as well as in the protection of the photosynthetic machinery from excess of light. Further, a number of hypothetical proteins with unknown functions were discovered. In general, the cells appear to acclimate to low CO(2) without a significant stress since the stress-related molecular chaperones were down-regulated and only a minor decline was detected for proteins of phycobilisomes, photosynthetic complexes, and translation machinery. The results of iTRAQ experiment were validated by the Western blot analysis for selected proteins.

  7. The Dichotomy of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Response in Liver Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haomming; Zhu, Jianjun; Yue, Shi; Lu, Ling; Busuttil, Ronald W; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W; Wang, Xuehao; Zhai, Yuan

    2016-02-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress plays critical roles in the pathogenesis of liver ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). As ER stress triggers an adaptive cellular response, the question of what determines its functional outcome in liver IRI remains to be defined. In a murine liver partial warm ischemia model, we studied how transient (30 minutes) or prolonged (90 minutes) liver ischemia regulated local ER stress response and autophagy activities and their relationship with liver IRI. Effects of chemical chaperon 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PBA) or autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) were evaluated. Our results showed that although the activating transcription factor 6 branch of ER stress response was induced in livers by both types of ischemia, liver autophagy was activated by transient, but inhibited by prolonged, ischemia. Although 3-MA had no effects on liver IRI after prolonged ischemia, it significantly increased liver IRI after transient ischemia. The 4-PBA treatment protected livers from IRI after prolonged ischemia by restoring autophagy flux, and the adjunctive 3-MA treatment abrogated its liver protective effect. The same 4-PBA treatment, however, increased liver IRI and disrupted autophagy flux after transient ischemia. Although both types of ischemia activated 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and inactivated protein kinase B (Akt), prolonged ischemia also resulted in downregulations of autophagy-related gene 3 and autophagy-related gene 5 in ischemic livers. These results indicate a functional dichotomy of ER stress response in liver IRI via its regulation of autophagy. Transient ischemia activates autophagy to protect livers from IRI, whereas prolonged ischemia inhibits autophagy to promote the development of liver IRI.

  8. Methyl viologen responsive proteome dynamics of Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120.

    PubMed

    Panda, Bandita; Basu, Bhakti; Rajaram, Hema; Kumar Apte, Shree

    2014-08-01

    A proteomic approach was employed to elucidate the response of an agriculturally important microbe, Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120, to methyl viologen (MV). Exposure to 2 μM MV caused 50% lethality (LD50 ) within 6 h and modified the cellular levels of several proteins. About 31 proteins increased in abundance and 24 proteins decreased in abundance, while 55 proteins showed only a minor change in abundance. Of these, 103 proteins were identified by MS. Levels of proteins involved in ROS detoxification and chaperoning activities were enhanced but that of crucial proteins involved in light and dark reactions of photosynthesis declined or constitutive. The abundance of proteins involved in carbon and energy biogenesis were altered. The study elaborated the oxidative stress defense mechanism deployed by Anabaena, identified carbon metabolism and energy biogenesis as possible major targets of MV sensitivity, and suggested potential biotechnological interventions for improved stress tolerance in Anabaena 7120.

  9. Proteomic Analysis of Membrane Proteins of Vero Cells: Exploration of Potential Proteins Responsible for Virus Entry

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Donghua; Zhu, Qinghe; Zhang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Vero cells are highly susceptible to many viruses in humans and animals, and its membrane proteins (MPs) are responsible for virus entry. In our study, the MP proteome of the Vero cells was investigated using a shotgun LC-MS/MS approach. Six hundred twenty-seven proteins, including a total of 1839 peptides, were identified in MP samples of the Vero cells. In 627 proteins, 307 proteins (48.96%) were annotated in terms of biological process of gene ontology (GO) categories; 356 proteins (56.78%) were annotated in terms of molecular function of GO categories; 414 proteins (66.03%) were annotated in terms of cellular components of GO categories. Of 627 identified proteins, seventeen proteins had been revealed to be virus receptor proteins. The resulting protein lists and highlighted proteins may provide valuable information to increase understanding of virus infection of Vero cells. PMID:24286161

  10. Comparative Analysis of Sorghum bicolor Proteome in Response to Drought Stress and following Recovery.

    PubMed

    Jedmowski, Christoph; Ashoub, Ahmed; Beckhaus, Tobias; Berberich, Thomas; Karas, Michael; Brüggemann, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    The adaptive response of Sorghum bicolor landraces from Egypt to drought stress and following recovery was analyzed using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis, 2D-DIGE. Physiological measurements and proteome alterations of accession number 11434, drought tolerant, and accession number 11431, drought sensitive, were compared to their relative control values after drought stress and following recovery. Differentially expressed proteins were analysed by Matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry, MALDI-TOF-MS. Alterations in protein contents related to the energy balance, metabolism (sensu Mewes et al. 1997), and chaperons were the most apparent features to elucidate the differences between the drought tolerant and sensitive accessions. Further alterations in the levels of proteins related to transcription and protein synthesis are discussed.

  11. Comparative proteomic analysis of proteins in response to simulated acid rain in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting-Wu; Fu, Bin; Niu, Li; Chen, Juan; Wang, Wen-Hua; He, Jun-Xian; Pei, Zhen-Ming; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2011-05-01

    A proteomic study using 2-D gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF MS was performed to characterize the responses of Arabidopsis thaliana plants to simulated acid rain (SiAR) stress, which is a global environmental problem and has become a serious issue in China in recent years. The emphasis of the present study was to investigate the overall protein expression changes when exposed to SiAR. Out of over 1000 protein spots reproducibly resolved, 50 of them changed their abundance by at least 2-fold. Analysis of protein expression patterns revealed that a set of proteins associated with energy production, metabolism, cell rescue, cell defense and protein folding, etc., could play important roles in mediating plant response to SiAR. In addition to this, some proteins involved in stress responses and jasmonic acid pathway are also involved in plant response to SiAR. More interestingly, the expression of several ubiquitination-related proteins changed dramatically after 32-h SiAR treatment, suggesting that they may act as a molecular marker for the injury phenotype caused by SiAR. Based on our results, we proposed a schematic model to explain the mechanisms associated with the systematic response of Arabidopsis plants to SiAR.

  12. Proteomic identification of early salicylate- and flg22-responsive redox-sensitive proteins in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pei; Zhang, Huoming; Yu, Boying; Xiong, Liming; Xia, Yiji

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is one of the early defense responses against pathogen infection in plants. The mechanism about the initial and direct regulation of the defense signaling pathway by ROS remains elusive. Perturbation of cellular redox homeostasis by ROS is believed to alter functions of redox-sensitive proteins through their oxidative modifications. Here we report an OxiTRAQ-based proteomic study in identifying proteins whose cysteines underwent oxidative modifications in Arabidopsis cells during the early response to salicylate or flg22, two defense pathway elicitors that are known to disturb cellular redox homeostasis. Among the salicylate- and/or flg22-responsive redox-sensitive proteins are those involved in transcriptional regulation, chromatin remodeling, RNA processing, post-translational modifications, and nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. The identification of the salicylate-/flg22-responsive redox-sensitive proteins provides a foundation from which further study can be conducted toward understanding biological significance of their oxidative modifications during the plant defense response. PMID:25720653

  13. Differential expression proteomics to investigate responses and resistance to Orobanche crenata in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Castillejo, Ma Ángeles; Maldonado, Ana M; Dumas-Gaudot, Eliane; Fernández-Aparicio, Mónica; Susín, Rafael; Diego, Rubiales; Jorrín, Jesús V

    2009-01-01

    Background Parasitic angiosperm Orobanche crenata infection represents a major constraint for the cultivation of legumes worldwide. The level of protection achieved to date is either incomplete or ephemeral. Hence, an efficient control of the parasite requires a better understanding of its interaction and associated resistance mechanisms at molecular levels. Results In order to study the plant response to this parasitic plant and the molecular basis of the resistance we have used a proteomic approach. The root proteome of two accessions of the model legume Medicago truncatula displaying differences in their resistance phenotype, in control as well as in inoculated plants, over two time points (21 and 25 days post infection), has been compared. We report quantitative as well as qualitative differences in the 2-DE maps between early- (SA 27774) and late-resistant (SA 4087) genotypes after Coomassie and silver-staining: 69 differential spots were observed between non-inoculated genotypes, and 42 and 25 spots for SA 4087 and SA 27774 non-inoculated and inoculated plants, respectively. In all, 49 differential spots were identified by peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) following MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. Many of the proteins showing significant differences between genotypes and after parasitic infection belong to the functional category of defense and stress-related proteins. A number of spots correspond to proteins with the same function, and might represent members of a multigenic family or post-transcriptional forms of the same protein. Conclusion The results obtained suggest the existence of a generic defense mechanism operating during the early stages of infection and differing in both genotypes. The faster response to the infection observed in the SA 27774 genotype might be due to the action of proteins targeted against key elements needed for the parasite's successful infection, such as protease inhibitors. Our data are discussed and compared with those

  14. Comparison of proteome response to saline and zinc stress in lettuce.

    PubMed

    Lucini, Luigi; Bernardo, Letizia

    2015-01-01

    Zinc salts occurring in soils can exert an osmotic stress toward plants. However, being zinc a heavy metal, some more specific effects on plant metabolisms can be forecast. In this work, lettuce has been used as a model to investigate salt and zinc stresses at proteome level through a shotgun tandem MS proteomic approach. The effect of zinc stress in lettuce, in comparison with NaCl stress, was evaluated to dissect between osmotic/oxidative stress related effects, from those changes specifically related to zinc. The analysis of proteins exhibiting a fold change of 3 as minimum (on log 2 normalized abundances), revealed the involvement of photosynthesis (via stimulation of chlorophyll synthesis and enhanced role of photosystem I) as well as stimulation of photophosphorylation. Increased glycolytic supply of energy substrates and ammonium assimilation [through formation of glutamine synthetase (GS)] were also induced by zinc in soil. Similarly, protein metabolism (at both transcriptional and ribosomal level), heat shock proteins, and proteolysis were affected. According to their biosynthetic enzymes, hormones appear to be altered by both the treatment and the time point considered: ethylene biosynthesis was enhanced, while production of abscisic acid was up-regulated at the earlier time point to decrease markedly and gibberellins were decreased at the later one. Besides aquaporin PIP2 synthesis, other osmotic/oxidative stress related compounds were enhanced under zinc stress, i.e., proline, hydroxycinnamic acids, ascorbate, sesquiterpene lactones, and terpenoids biosynthesis. Although the proteins involved in the response to zinc stress and to salinity were substantially the same, their abundance changed between the two treatments. Lettuce response to zinc was more prominent at the first sampling point, yet showing a faster adaptation than under NaCl stress. Indeed, lettuce plants showed an adaptation after 30 days of stress, in a more pronounced way in the case of

  15. Comparison of proteome response to saline and zinc stress in lettuce

    PubMed Central

    Lucini, Luigi; Bernardo, Letizia

    2015-01-01

    Zinc salts occurring in soils can exert an osmotic stress toward plants. However, being zinc a heavy metal, some more specific effects on plant metabolisms can be forecast. In this work, lettuce has been used as a model to investigate salt and zinc stresses at proteome level through a shotgun tandem MS proteomic approach. The effect of zinc stress in lettuce, in comparison with NaCl stress, was evaluated to dissect between osmotic/oxidative stress related effects, from those changes specifically related to zinc. The analysis of proteins exhibiting a fold change of 3 as minimum (on log 2 normalized abundances), revealed the involvement of photosynthesis (via stimulation of chlorophyll synthesis and enhanced role of photosystem I) as well as stimulation of photophosphorylation. Increased glycolytic supply of energy substrates and ammonium assimilation [through formation of glutamine synthetase (GS)] were also induced by zinc in soil. Similarly, protein metabolism (at both transcriptional and ribosomal level), heat shock proteins, and proteolysis were affected. According to their biosynthetic enzymes, hormones appear to be altered by both the treatment and the time point considered: ethylene biosynthesis was enhanced, while production of abscisic acid was up-regulated at the earlier time point to decrease markedly and gibberellins were decreased at the later one. Besides aquaporin PIP2 synthesis, other osmotic/oxidative stress related compounds were enhanced under zinc stress, i.e., proline, hydroxycinnamic acids, ascorbate, sesquiterpene lactones, and terpenoids biosynthesis. Although the proteins involved in the response to zinc stress and to salinity were substantially the same, their abundance changed between the two treatments. Lettuce response to zinc was more prominent at the first sampling point, yet showing a faster adaptation than under NaCl stress. Indeed, lettuce plants showed an adaptation after 30 days of stress, in a more pronounced way in the case of

  16. Comparison of proteome response to saline and zinc stress in lettuce.

    PubMed

    Lucini, Luigi; Bernardo, Letizia

    2015-01-01

    Zinc salts occurring in soils can exert an osmotic stress toward plants. However, being zinc a heavy metal, some more specific effects on plant metabolisms can be forecast. In this work, lettuce has been used as a model to investigate salt and zinc stresses at proteome level through a shotgun tandem MS proteomic approach. The effect of zinc stress in lettuce, in comparison with NaCl stress, was evaluated to dissect between osmotic/oxidative stress related effects, from those changes specifically related to zinc. The analysis of proteins exhibiting a fold change of 3 as minimum (on log 2 normalized abundances), revealed the involvement of photosynthesis (via stimulation of chlorophyll synthesis and enhanced role of photosystem I) as well as stimulation of photophosphorylation. Increased glycolytic supply of energy substrates and ammonium assimilation [through formation of glutamine synthetase (GS)] were also induced by zinc in soil. Similarly, protein metabolism (at both transcriptional and ribosomal level), heat shock proteins, and proteolysis were affected. According to their biosynthetic enzymes, hormones appear to be altered by both the treatment and the time point considered: ethylene biosynthesis was enhanced, while production of abscisic acid was up-regulated at the earlier time point to decrease markedly and gibberellins were decreased at the later one. Besides aquaporin PIP2 synthesis, other osmotic/oxidative stress related compounds were enhanced under zinc stress, i.e., proline, hydroxycinnamic acids, ascorbate, sesquiterpene lactones, and terpenoids biosynthesis. Although the proteins involved in the response to zinc stress and to salinity were substantially the same, their abundance changed between the two treatments. Lettuce response to zinc was more prominent at the first sampling point, yet showing a faster adaptation than under NaCl stress. Indeed, lettuce plants showed an adaptation after 30 days of stress, in a more pronounced way in the case of

  17. Medicago truncatula and Glycine max: Different Drought Tolerance and Similar Local Response of the Root Nodule Proteome.

    PubMed

    Gil-Quintana, Erena; Lyon, David; Staudinger, Christiana; Wienkoop, Stefanie; González, Esther M

    2015-12-01

    Legume crops present important agronomical and environmental advantages mainly due to their capacity to reduce atmospheric N2 to ammonium via symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF). This process is very sensitive to abiotic stresses such as drought, but the mechanism underlying this response is not fully understood. The goal of the current work is to compare the drought response of two legumes with high economic impact and research importance, Medicago truncatula and Glycine max, by characterizing their root nodule proteomes. Our results show that, although M. truncatula exhibits lower water potential values under drought conditions compared to G. max, SNF declined analogously in the two legumes. Both of their nodule proteomes are very similar, and comparable down-regulation responses in the diverse protein functional groups were identified (mainly proteins related to the metabolism of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur). We suggest lipoxygenases and protein turnover as newly recognized players in SNF regulation. Partial drought conditions applied to a split-root system resulted in the local down-regulation of the entire proteome of drought-stressed nodules in both legumes. The high degree of similarity between both legume proteomes suggests that the vast amount of research conducted on M. truncatula could be applied to economically important legume crops, such as soybean.

  18. Proteomic Identification of Proteins Suggestive of Immune-Mediated Response or Neuronal Degeneration in Serum of Achalasia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Im, Seon Kyo; Yeo, Mari

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims The primary pathophysiologic abnormality in achalasia is known to be a loss of inhibitory myenteric ganglion cells, which may result from an immune-mediated response or neuronal degeneration. The aim of this study was to identify proteins suggestive of an immune-mediated response or neuronal degeneration in the serum of achalasia patients using a proteomic analysis. Methods Blood samples were collected from five symptomatic achalasia patients and five sex- and age-matched healthy controls. Serum proteomic analysis was conducted, and the protein spots were identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time-of-flight and a proteomics analyzer. The serum level of C3 was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in nine patients with achalasia and 18 sex- and age-matched healthy controls. Results Of the 658 matched protein spots, 28 spots were up-regulated over 2-fold in the serum from achalasia patients compared with that from controls. The up-regulated proteins included complement C4B5, complement C3, cyclin-dependent kinase 5, transthyretin, and alpha 2 macroglobulin. The serum levels of C3 in achalasia patients were significantly higher than those of controls. Conclusions The serum proteomic analysis of achalasia patients suggests an immune-mediated response or neuronal degeneration. Further validation studies in larger samples and the esophageal tissue of achalasia patients are required. PMID:23898380

  19. Medicago truncatula and Glycine max: Different Drought Tolerance and Similar Local Response of the Root Nodule Proteome

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Legume crops present important agronomical and environmental advantages mainly due to their capacity to reduce atmospheric N2 to ammonium via symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF). This process is very sensitive to abiotic stresses such as drought, but the mechanism underlying this response is not fully understood. The goal of the current work is to compare the drought response of two legumes with high economic impact and research importance, Medicago truncatula and Glycine max, by characterizing their root nodule proteomes. Our results show that, although M. truncatula exhibits lower water potential values under drought conditions compared to G. max, SNF declined analogously in the two legumes. Both of their nodule proteomes are very similar, and comparable down-regulation responses in the diverse protein functional groups were identified (mainly proteins related to the metabolism of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur). We suggest lipoxygenases and protein turnover as newly recognized players in SNF regulation. Partial drought conditions applied to a split-root system resulted in the local down-regulation of the entire proteome of drought-stressed nodules in both legumes. The high degree of similarity between both legume proteomes suggests that the vast amount of research conducted on M. truncatula could be applied to economically important legume crops, such as soybean. PMID:26503705

  20. Proteomic profiling of serologic response to Candida albicans during host-commensal and host-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Pitarch, Aida; Nombela, César; Gil, Concha

    2009-01-01

    Candida albicans is a commensal inhabitant of the normal human microflora that can become pathogenic and invade almost all body sites and organs in response to both host-mediated and fungus-mediated mechanisms. Serologic responses to C. albicans that underlie its dichotomist relationship with the host (host-commensal and host-pathogen interactions) display a high degree of heterogeneity, resulting in distinct serum anti-Candida antibody signatures (molecular fingerprints of anti-Candida antibodies in serum) that can be used to discriminate commensal colonization from invasive disease. We describe the typical proteomic strategy to globally and integratively profile these host antibody responses and determine serum antibody signatures. This approach is based on the combination of classic immunoproteomics or serologic proteome analysis (two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by quantitative Western blotting and mass spectrometry) with data mining procedures. This global proteomic stratagem is a useful tool not only for obtaining an overview of different anti-Candida antibodies that are being elicited during the host-fungus interaction and, consequently, of the complex C. albicans immunome (the subset of the C. albicans proteome targeted by the immune system), but also for evaluating how this pathogen organism interacts with its host to trigger infection. In contrast with genomics and transcriptomics, this proteomic technology has the potential to detect antigenicity associated with posttranslational modification, subcellular localization, and other functional aspects that can be relevant in the host immune response. Furthermore, this strategy to define molecular fingerprints of serum anti-Candida antibodies may hopefully bring to light potential candidates for diagnosis, prognosis, risk stratification, clinical follow-up, therapeutic monitoring, and/or immunotherapy of candidiasis, especially of its life-threatening systemic forms. PMID:19089396

  1. Normal Liver Tissue Density Dose Response in Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Liver Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, Christopher C.; Stinauer, Michelle A.; Diot, Quentin; Westerly, David C.; Schefter, Tracey E.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Miften, Moyed

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the temporal dose response of normal liver tissue for patients with liver metastases treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Ninety-nine noncontrast follow-up computed tomography (CT) scans of 34 patients who received SBRT between 2004 and 2011 were retrospectively analyzed at a median of 8 months post-SBRT (range, 0.7-36 months). SBRT-induced normal liver tissue density changes in follow-up CT scans were evaluated at 2, 6, 10, 15, and 27 months. The dose distributions from planning CTs were mapped to follow-up CTs to relate the mean Hounsfield unit change ({Delta}HU) to dose received over the range 0-55 Gy in 3-5 fractions. An absolute density change of 7 HU was considered a significant radiographic change in normal liver tissue. Results: Increasing radiation dose was linearly correlated with lower post-SBRT liver tissue density (slope, -0.65 {Delta}HU/5 Gy). The threshold for significant change (-7 {Delta}HU) was observed in the range of 30-35 Gy. This effect did not vary significantly over the time intervals evaluated. Conclusions: SBRT induces a dose-dependent and relatively time-independent hypodense radiation reaction within normal liver tissue that is characterized by a decrease of >7 HU in liver density for doses >30-35 Gy.

  2. Integrated Transcriptomic and Proteomic Analysis of the Global Response of Synechococcus to High Light Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Qian; Feng, Jie; Li, Si-ting; Zhang, Gui-ying; Qiao, Zhi-xian; Chen, Zhuo; Wu, Ying; Lin, Yan; Li, Tao; Ge, Feng; Zhao, Jin-dong

    2015-01-01

    Sufficient light is essential for the growth and physiological functions of photosynthetic organisms, but prolonged exposure to high light (HL) stress can cause cellular damage and ultimately result in the death of these organisms. Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 (hereafter Synechococcus 7002) is a unicellular cyanobacterium with exceptional tolerance to HL intensities. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in HL response by Synechococcus 7002 are not well understood. Here, an integrated RNA sequencing transcriptomic and quantitative proteomic analysis was performed to investigate the cellular response to HL in Synechococcus 7002. A total of 526 transcripts and 233 proteins were identified to be differentially regulated under HL stress. Data analysis revealed major changes in mRNAs and proteins involved in the photosynthesis pathways, resistance to light-induced damage, DNA replication and repair, and energy metabolism. A set of differentially expressed mRNAs and proteins were validated by quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. Twelve genes differentially regulated under HL stress were selected for knockout generation and growth analysis of these mutants led to the identification of key genes involved in the response of HL in Synechococcus 7002. Taken altogether, this study established a model for global response mechanisms to HL in Synechococcus 7002 and may be valuable for further studies addressing HL resistance in photosynthetic organisms. PMID:25681118

  3. Comparative Proteomic Characterization of 4 Human Liver-Derived Single Cell Culture Models Reveals Significant Variation in the Capacity for Drug Disposition, Bioactivation, and Detoxication

    PubMed Central

    Sison-Young, Rowena L. C.; Mitsa, Dimitra; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Mottram, David; Alexandre, Eliane; Richert, Lysiane; Aerts, Hélène; Weaver, Richard J.; Jones, Robert P.; Johann, Esther; Hewitt, Philip G.; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus; Goldring, Christopher E. P.; Kitteringham, Neil R.; Park, B. Kevin

    2015-01-01

    In vitro preclinical models for the assessment of drug-induced liver injury (DILI) are usually based on cryopreserved primary human hepatocytes (cPHH) or human hepatic tumor-derived cell lines; however, it is unclear how well such cell models reflect the normal function of liver cells. The physiological, pharmacological, and toxicological phenotyping of available cell-based systems is necessary in order to decide the testing purpose for which they are fit. We have therefore undertaken a global proteomic analysis of 3 human-derived hepatic cell lines (HepG2, Upcyte, and HepaRG) in comparison with cPHH with a focus on drug metabolizing enzymes and transport proteins (DMETs), as well as Nrf2-regulated proteins. In total, 4946 proteins were identified, of which 2722 proteins were common across all cell models, including 128 DMETs. Approximately 90% reduction in expression of cytochromes P450 was observed in HepG2 and Upcyte cells, and approximately 60% in HepaRG cells relative to cPHH. Drug transporter expression was also lower compared with cPHH with the exception of MRP3 and P-gp (MDR1) which appeared to be significantly expressed in HepaRG cells. In contrast, a high proportion of Nrf2-regulated proteins were more highly expressed in the cell lines compared with cPHH. The proteomic database derived here will provide a rational basis for the context-specific selection of the most appropriate ‘hepatocyte-like’ cell for the evaluation of particular cellular functions associated with DILI and, at the same time, assist in the construction of a testing paradigm which takes into account the in vivo disposition of a new drug. PMID:26160117

  4. Comparative Proteomic Characterization of 4 Human Liver-Derived Single Cell Culture Models Reveals Significant Variation in the Capacity for Drug Disposition, Bioactivation, and Detoxication.

    PubMed

    Sison-Young, Rowena L C; Mitsa, Dimitra; Jenkins, Rosalind E; Mottram, David; Alexandre, Eliane; Richert, Lysiane; Aerts, Hélène; Weaver, Richard J; Jones, Robert P; Johann, Esther; Hewitt, Philip G; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus; Goldring, Christopher E P; Kitteringham, Neil R; Park, B Kevin

    2015-10-01

    In vitro preclinical models for the assessment of drug-induced liver injury (DILI) are usually based on cryopreserved primary human hepatocytes (cPHH) or human hepatic tumor-derived cell lines; however, it is unclear how well such cell models reflect the normal function of liver cells. The physiological, pharmacological, and toxicological phenotyping of available cell-based systems is necessary in order to decide the testing purpose for which they are fit. We have therefore undertaken a global proteomic analysis of 3 human-derived hepatic cell lines (HepG2, Upcyte, and HepaRG) in comparison with cPHH with a focus on drug metabolizing enzymes and transport proteins (DMETs), as well as Nrf2-regulated proteins. In total, 4946 proteins were identified, of which 2722 proteins were common across all cell models, including 128 DMETs. Approximately 90% reduction in expression of cytochromes P450 was observed in HepG2 and Upcyte cells, and approximately 60% in HepaRG cells relative to cPHH. Drug transporter expression was also lower compared with cPHH with the exception of MRP3 and P-gp (MDR1) which appeared to be significantly expressed in HepaRG cells. In contrast, a high proportion of Nrf2-regulated proteins were more highly expressed in the cell lines compared with cPHH. The proteomic database derived here will provide a rational basis for the context-specific selection of the most appropriate 'hepatocyte-like' cell for the evaluation of particular cellular functions associated with DILI and, at the same time, assist in the construction of a testing paradigm which takes into account the in vivo disposition of a new drug.

  5. Proteomic Characterization of Middle Ear Fluid Confirms Neutrophil Extracellular Traps as a Predominant Innate Immune Response in Chronic Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Val, Stephanie; Poley, Marian; Brown, Kristy; Choi, Rachel; Jeong, Stephanie; Colberg-Poley, Annie; Rose, Mary C.; Panchapakesan, Karuna C.; Devaney, Joe C.; Perez-Losada, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic Otitis Media (COM) is characterized by middle ear effusion (MEE) and conductive hearing loss. MEE reflect mucus hypersecretion, but global proteomic profiling of the mucosal components are limited. Objective This study aimed at characterizing the proteome of MEEs from children with COM with the goal of elucidating important innate immune responses. Method MEEs were collected from children (n = 49) with COM undergoing myringotomy. Mass spectrometry was employed for proteomic profiling in nine samples. Independent samples were further analyzed by cytokine multiplex assay, immunoblotting, neutrophil elastase activity, next generation DNA sequencing, and/or immunofluorescence analysis. Results 109 unique and common proteins were identified by MS. A majority were innate immune molecules, along with typically intracellular proteins such as histones and actin. 19.5% percent of all mapped peptide counts were from proteins known to be released by neutrophils. Immunofluorescence and immunoblotting demonstrated the presence of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) in every MEE, along with MUC5B colocalization. DNA found in effusions revealed unfragmented DNA of human origin. Conclusion Proteomic analysis of MEEs revealed a predominantly neutrophilic innate mucosal response in which MUC5B is associated with NET DNA. NETs are a primary macromolecular constituent of human COM middle ear effusions. PMID:27078692

  6. Proteomic and physiological responses of the halophyte Cakile maritima to moderate salinity at the germinative and vegetative stages.

    PubMed

    Debez, Ahmed; Braun, Hans-Peter; Pich, Andreas; Taamalli, Wael; Koyro, Hans-Werner; Abdelly, Chedly; Huchzermeyer, Bernhard

    2012-10-22

    Responses of the halophyte Cakile maritima to moderate salinity were addressed at germination and vegetative stages by bringing together proteomics and eco-physiological approaches. 75 mM NaCl-salinity delayed significantly the germination process and decreased slightly the seed germination percentage compared to salt-free conditions. Monitoring the proteome profile between 0 h and 120 h after seed sowing revealed a delay in the degradation of seed storage proteins when germination took place under salinity, which may explain the slower germination rate observed. Of the sixty-seven proteins identified by mass spectrometry, several proteins involved in glycolysis, amino acid metabolism, photosynthesis, and protein folding showed significantly increased abundance during germination. This pattern was less pronounced under salinity. At the vegetative stage, 100mM NaCl-salinity stimulated significantly the plant growth, which was sustained by enhanced leaf expansion, water content, and photosynthetic activity. Comparative proteome analyses of leaf tissue revealed 44 proteins with different abundance changes, most of which being involved in energy metabolism. A specific set of proteins predominantly involved in photosynthesis and respiration showed significantly higher abundance in salt-treated plants. Altogether, combining proteomics with eco-physiological tools provides valuable information, which contributes to improve our understanding in the salt-response of this halophyte during its life cycle. PMID:22940175

  7. Nano LC-MS Based Proteomic Analysis as a Predicting Approach to Study Cellular Responses of Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruibin; Wang, Fangjun; Liu, Hongwei; Wu, Ren'an; Zou, Hanfa

    2016-03-01

    Nano-bio interface has been paid much attention recently, though with the lack of methodology to predict the potential responses in biological systems such as cells induced by nanomaterials. In this study, we described a proteomic approach to investigate the proteome change in K562 cells exposed to oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (o-SWCNTs). 605 proteins were identified by semi-quantitative proteomic analysis (SQPA), including 29 significantly changed proteins with spectra count (SpC) ratios lager than 2 or less than 0.5. Three of them including HBA, CFL1 and LMAN2 were further validated by western blotting. The differential proteins were further classified by Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) to integrate them into a signaling network. Based on the information by this network, we predict that o-SWCNT treatment activated cell aggregation, decreased cell migration, but had no effect on cell death. And these cellular responses were further experimentally demonstrated. The protein signaling network established in this study would greatly benefit the studies on the bio-applications of o-SWCNTs and their toxicity studies. Our study demonstrated that proteomics could be used as a predicting tool to study nano-bio interface at cellular level.

  8. Nano LC-MS Based Proteomic Analysis as a Predicting Approach to Study Cellular Responses of Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruibin; Wang, Fangjun; Liu, Hongwei; Wu, Ren'an; Zou, Hanfa

    2016-03-01

    Nano-bio interface has been paid much attention recently, though with the lack of methodology to predict the potential responses in biological systems such as cells induced by nanomaterials. In this study, we described a proteomic approach to investigate the proteome change in K562 cells exposed to oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (o-SWCNTs). 605 proteins were identified by semi-quantitative proteomic analysis (SQPA), including 29 significantly changed proteins with spectra count (SpC) ratios lager than 2 or less than 0.5. Three of them including HBA, CFL1 and LMAN2 were further validated by western blotting. The differential proteins were further classified by Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) to integrate them into a signaling network. Based on the information by this network, we predict that o-SWCNT treatment activated cell aggregation, decreased cell migration, but had no effect on cell death. And these cellular responses were further experimentally demonstrated. The protein signaling network established in this study would greatly benefit the studies on the bio-applications of o-SWCNTs and their toxicity studies. Our study demonstrated that proteomics could be used as a predicting tool to study nano-bio interface at cellular level. PMID:27455640

  9. Proteomic changes of the porcine small intestine in response to chronic heat stress.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yanjun; Gu, Xianhong

    2015-12-01

    Acute heat stress (HS) negatively affects intestinal integrity and barrier function. In contrast, chronic mild HS poses a distinct challenge to animals. Therefore, this study integrates biochemical, histological and proteomic approaches to investigate the effects of chronic HS on the intestine in finishing pigs. Castrated male crossbreeds (79.00 ± 1.50 kg BW) were subjected to either thermal neutral (TN, 21 °C; 55% ± 5% humidity; n=8) or HS conditions (30 °C; 55% ± 5% humidity; n=8) for 3 weeks. The pigs were sacrificed after 3 weeks of high environmental exposure and the plasma hormones, the intestinal morphology, integrity, and protein profiles of the jejunum mucosa were determined. Chronic HS reduced the free triiodothyronine (FT3) and GH levels. HS damaged intestinal morphology, increased plasma d-lactate concentrations and decreased alkaline phosphatase activity of intestinal mucosa. Proteome analysis of the jejunum mucosa was conducted by 2D gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Fifty-three intestinal proteins were found to be differentially abundant, 18 of which were related to cell structure and motility, and their changes in abundance could comprise intestinal integrity and function. The down-regulation of proteins involved in tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle), electron transport chain (ETC), and oxidative phosphorylation suggested that chronic HS impaired energy metabolism and thus induced oxidative stress. Moreover, the changes of ten proteins in abundance related to stress response and defense indicated pigs mediated long-term heat exposure and counteracted its negative effects of heat exposure. These findings have important implications for understanding the effect of chronic HS on intestines.

  10. Evaluating the Hypoxia Response of Ruffe and Flounder Gills by a Combined Proteome and Transcriptome Approach

    PubMed Central

    Tiedke, Jessica; Borner, Janus; Beeck, Hendrik; Kwiatkowski, Marcel; Schmidt, Hanno; Thiel, Ralf; Fabrizius, Andrej; Burmester, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia has gained ecological importance during the last decades, and it is the most dramatically increasing environmental factor in coastal areas and estuaries. The gills of fish are the prime target of hypoxia and other stresses. Here we have studied the impact of the exposure to hypoxia (1.5 mg O2/l for 48 h) on the protein expression of the gills of two estuarine fish species, the ruffe (Gymnocephalus cernua) and the European flounder (Platichthys flesus). First, we obtained the transcriptomes of mixed tissues (gills, heart and brain) from both species by Illumina next-generation sequencing. Then, the gill proteomes were investigated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Quantification of the normalized proteome maps resulted in a total of 148 spots in the ruffe, of which 28 (18.8%) were significantly regulated (> 1.5-fold). In the flounder, 121 spots were found, of which 27 (22.3%) proteins were significantly regulated. The transcriptomes were used for the identification of these proteins, which was successful for 15 proteins of the ruffe and 14 of the flounder. The ruffe transcriptome dataset comprised 87,169,850 reads, resulting in an assembly of 72,108 contigs (N50 = 1,828 bp). 20,860 contigs (26.93%) had blastx hits with E < 1e-5 in the human sequences in the RefSeq database, representing 14,771 unique accession numbers. The flounder transcriptome with 78,943,030 reads assembled into 49,241 contigs (N50 = 2,106 bp). 20,127 contigs (40.87%) had a hit with human proteins, corresponding to 14,455 unique accession numbers. The regulation of selected genes was confirmed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Most of the regulated proteins that were identified by this approach function in the energy metabolism, while others are involved in the immune response, cell signalling and the cytoskeleton. PMID:26273839

  11. S-Nitroso-Proteome in Poplar Leaves in Response to Acute Ozone Stress

    PubMed Central

    Vanzo, Elisa; Ghirardo, Andrea; Merl-Pham, Juliane; Lindermayr, Christian; Heller, Werner; Hauck, Stefanie M.; Durner, Jörg; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Protein S-nitrosylation, the covalent binding of nitric oxide (NO) to protein cysteine residues, is one of the main mechanisms of NO signaling in plant and animal cells. Using a combination of the biotin switch assay and label-free LC-MS/MS analysis, we revealed the S-nitroso-proteome of the woody model plant Populus x canescens. Under normal conditions, constitutively S-nitrosylated proteins in poplar leaves and calli comprise all aspects of primary and secondary metabolism. Acute ozone fumigation was applied to elicit ROS-mediated changes of the S-nitroso-proteome. This treatment changed the total nitrite and nitrosothiol contents of poplar leaves and affected the homeostasis of 32 S-nitrosylated proteins. Multivariate data analysis revealed that ozone exposure negatively affected the S-nitrosylation status of leaf proteins: 23 proteins were de-nitrosylated and 9 proteins had increased S-nitrosylation content compared to the control. Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase 2 (log2[ozone/control] = −3.6) and caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (−3.4), key enzymes catalyzing important steps in the phenylpropanoid and subsequent lignin biosynthetic pathways, respectively, were de-nitrosylated upon ozone stress. Measuring the in vivo and in vitro phenylalanine ammonia-lyase activity indicated that the increase of the phenylalanine ammonia-lyase activity in response to acute ozone is partly regulated by de-nitrosylation, which might favor a higher metabolic flux through the phenylpropanoid pathway within minutes after ozone exposure. PMID:25192423

  12. Evaluating the Hypoxia Response of Ruffe and Flounder Gills by a Combined Proteome and Transcriptome Approach.

    PubMed

    Tiedke, Jessica; Borner, Janus; Beeck, Hendrik; Kwiatkowski, Marcel; Schmidt, Hanno; Thiel, Ralf; Fabrizius, Andrej; Burmester, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia has gained ecological importance during the last decades, and it is the most dramatically increasing environmental factor in coastal areas and estuaries. The gills of fish are the prime target of hypoxia and other stresses. Here we have studied the impact of the exposure to hypoxia (1.5 mg O2/l for 48 h) on the protein expression of the gills of two estuarine fish species, the ruffe (Gymnocephalus cernua) and the European flounder (Platichthys flesus). First, we obtained the transcriptomes of mixed tissues (gills, heart and brain) from both species by Illumina next-generation sequencing. Then, the gill proteomes were investigated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Quantification of the normalized proteome maps resulted in a total of 148 spots in the ruffe, of which 28 (18.8%) were significantly regulated (> 1.5-fold). In the flounder, 121 spots were found, of which 27 (22.3%) proteins were significantly regulated. The transcriptomes were used for the identification of these proteins, which was successful for 15 proteins of the ruffe and 14 of the flounder. The ruffe transcriptome dataset comprised 87,169,850 reads, resulting in an assembly of 72,108 contigs (N50 = 1,828 bp). 20,860 contigs (26.93%) had blastx hits with E < 1e-5 in the human sequences in the RefSeq database, representing 14,771 unique accession numbers. The flounder transcriptome with 78,943,030 reads assembled into 49,241 contigs (N50 = 2,106 bp). 20,127 contigs (40.87%) had a hit with human proteins, corresponding to 14,455 unique accession numbers. The regulation of selected genes was confirmed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Most of the regulated proteins that were identified by this approach function in the energy metabolism, while others are involved in the immune response, cell signalling and the cytoskeleton. PMID:26273839

  13. Proteomic changes of the porcine small intestine in response to chronic heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yanjun; Gu, Xianhong

    2015-01-01

    Acute heat stress (HS) negatively affects intestinal integrity and barrier function. In contrast, chronic mild HS poses a distinct challenge to animals. Therefore, this study integrates biochemical, histological and proteomic approaches to investigate the effects of chronic HS on the intestine in finishing pigs. Castrated male crossbreeds (79.00±1.50 kg BW) were subjected to either thermal neutral (TN, 21 °C; 55%±5% humidity; n=8) or HS conditions (30 °C; 55%±5% humidity; n=8) for 3 weeks. The pigs were sacrificed after 3 weeks of high environmental exposure and the plasma hormones, the intestinal morphology, integrity, and protein profiles of the jejunum mucosa were determined. Chronic HS reduced the free triiodothyronine (FT3) and GH levels. HS damaged intestinal morphology, increased plasma d-lactate concentrations and decreased alkaline phosphatase activity of intestinal mucosa. Proteome analysis of the jejunum mucosa was conducted by 2D gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Fifty-three intestinal proteins were found to be differentially abundant, 18 of which were related to cell structure and motility, and their changes in abundance could comprise intestinal integrity and function. The down-regulation of proteins involved in tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle), electron transport chain (ETC), and oxidative phosphorylation suggested that chronic HS impaired energy metabolism and thus induced oxidative stress. Moreover, the changes of ten proteins in abundance related to stress response and defense indicated pigs mediated long-term heat exposure and counteracted its negative effects of heat exposure. These findings have important implications for understanding the effect of chronic HS on intestines. PMID:26416815

  14. Proteomic Analysis of Erythritol-Producing Yarrowia lipolytica from Glycerol in Response to Osmotic Pressure.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Bo; Dai, Xiao-Meng; Zheng, Zhi-Yong; Zhu, Li; Zhan, Xiao-Bei; Lin, Chi-Chung

    2015-07-01

    Osmotic pressure is a critical factor for erythritol production with osmophilic yeast. Protein expression patterns of an erythritol-producing yeast, Yarrowia lipolytica, were analyzed to identify differentially-expressed proteins in response to osmotic pressure. In order to analyze intracellular protein levels quantitatively, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was performed to separate and visualize the differential expression of the intracellular proteins extracted from Y. lipolytica cultured under low (3.17 osmol/kg) and high (4.21 osmol/kg) osmotic pressures. Proteomic analyses allowed identification of 54 differentially-expressed proteins among the proteins distributed in the range of pI 3-10 and 14.4-97.4 kDa molecular mass between the osmotic stress conditions. Remarkably, the main proteins were involved in the pathway of energy, metabolism, cell rescue, and stress response. The expression of such enzymes related to protein and nucleotide biosynthesis was inhibited drastically, reflecting the growth arrest of Y. lipolytica under hyperosmotic stress. The improvement of erythritol production under high osmotic stress was due to the significant induction of a range of crucial enzymes related to polyols biosynthesis, such as transketolase and triosephosphate isomerase, and the osmotic stress responsive proteins like pyridoxine-4-dehydrogenase and the AKRs family. The polyols biosynthesis was really related to an osmotic response and a protection mechanism against hyperosmotic stress in Y. lipolytica. Additionally, the high osmotic stress could also induce other cell stress responses as with heat shock and oxidation stress responses, and these responsive proteins, such as the HSPs family, catalase T, and superoxide dismutase, also had drastically increased expression levels under hyperosmotic pressure.

  15. Proteomic Analysis of Erythritol-Producing Yarrowia lipolytica from Glycerol in Response to Osmotic Pressure.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Bo; Dai, Xiao-Meng; Zheng, Zhi-Yong; Zhu, Li; Zhan, Xiao-Bei; Lin, Chi-Chung

    2015-07-01

    Osmotic pressure is a critical factor for erythritol production with osmophilic yeast. Protein expression patterns of an erythritol-producing yeast, Yarrowia lipolytica, were analyzed to identify differentially-expressed proteins in response to osmotic pressure. In order to analyze intracellular protein levels quantitatively, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was performed to separate and visualize the differential expression of the intracellular proteins extracted from Y. lipolytica cultured under low (3.17 osmol/kg) and high (4.21 osmol/kg) osmotic pressures. Proteomic analyses allowed identification of 54 differentially-expressed proteins among the proteins distributed in the range of pI 3-10 and 14.4-97.4 kDa molecular mass between the osmotic stress conditions. Remarkably, the main proteins were involved in the pathway of energy, metabolism, cell rescue, and stress response. The expression of such enzymes related to protein and nucleotide biosynthesis was inhibited drastically, reflecting the growth arrest of Y. lipolytica under hyperosmotic stress. The improvement of erythritol production under high osmotic stress was due to the significant induction of a range of crucial enzymes related to polyols biosynthesis, such as transketolase and triosephosphate isomerase, and the osmotic stress responsive proteins like pyridoxine-4-dehydrogenase and the AKRs family. The polyols biosynthesis was really related to an osmotic response and a protection mechanism against hyperosmotic stress in Y. lipolytica. Additionally, the high osmotic stress could also induce other cell stress responses as with heat shock and oxidation stress responses, and these responsive proteins, such as the HSPs family, catalase T, and superoxide dismutase, also had drastically increased expression levels under hyperosmotic pressure. PMID:25737116

  16. Proteomic analysis of serum marker proteins in recipient mice with liver cirrhosis after bone marrow cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Yuichiro; Terai, Shuji; Ishikawa, Tsuyoshi; Aoyama, Koji; Urata, Yohei; Marumoto, Yoshio; Nishina, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kazuyuki; Okita, Kiwamu; Sakaida, Isao

    2006-04-01

    We previously found that transplantation with bone marrow cells (BMCs) improves liver function and liver fibrosis in cirrhotic mice. In the presence of liver damage induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), transplanted BMC migrated into the peri-portal region and trans-differentiated into hepatocytes that produce albumin. Thus under these conditions, BMC transplantation induces liver regeneration. Detecting serum marker proteins is important to monitor the recovery of liver function of cirrhotic mice after BMC transplantation. We therefore initially resolved proteins extracted from serum samples at 48 h after BMC transplantation by 2-DE and compared spot intensity between control and BMC groups of mice. Six protein spots increased in the BMC group compared with the control group. MS revealed that these spots comprised apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1), apolipoprotein C3 (apoC3), vitamin D-binding protein, alpha-1-antitrypsin and proteasome subunit alpha type 1. We subsequently confirmed the levels of apoA1 in serum and liver samples by immunoblotting. ApoA1 increased at early stage (48 h and 1 wk) after BMC transplantation in this mouse model of liver cirrhosis. The early elevation of apoA1 might be useful to predict liver regeneration in cirrhotic mice after BMC transplantation.

  17. Proteome analysis of the Escherichia coli heat shock response under steady-state conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lüders, Svenja; Fallet, Claas; Franco-Lara, Ezequiel

    2009-01-01

    In this study a proteomic approach was used to investigate the steady-state response of Escherichia coli to temperature up-shifts in a cascade of two continuously operated bioreactors. The first reactor served as cell source with optimal settings for microbial growth, while in the second chemostat the cells were exposed to elevated temperatures. By using this reactor configuration, which has not been reported to be used for the study of bacterial stress responses so far, it is possible to study temperature stress under well-defined, steady-state conditions. Specifically the effect on the cellular adaption to temperature stress using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was examined and compared at the cultivation temperatures of 37°C and 47.5°C. As expected, the steady-state study with the double bioreactor configuration delivered a different protein spectrum compared to that obtained with standard batch experiments in shaking flasks and bioreactors. Setting a high cut-out spot-to-spot size ratio of 5, proteins involved in defence against oxygen stress, functional cell envelope proteins, chaperones and proteins involved in protein biosynthesis, the energy metabolism and the amino acid biosynthesis were found to be differently expressed at high cultivation temperatures. The results demonstrate the complexity of the stress response in a steady-state culture not reported elsewhere to date. PMID:19772559

  18. Proteomic analysis of secreted proteins by human bronchial epithelial cells in response to cadmium toxicity.

    PubMed

    Chen, De-Ju; Xu, Yan-Ming; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Dong-Yang; Wong, Wing-Yan; Tai, William Chi-Shing; Cho, Yong-Yeon; Lau, Andy T Y

    2015-09-01

    For years, many studies have been conducted to investigate the intracellular response of cells challenged with toxic metal(s), yet, the corresponding secretome responses, especially in human lung cells, are largely unexplored. Here, we provide a secretome analysis of human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) treated with cadmium chloride (CdCl2 ), with the aim of identifying secreted proteins in response to Cd toxicity. Proteins from control and spent media were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis and visualized by silver staining. Differentially-secreted proteins were identified by MALDI-TOF-MS analysis and database searching. We characterized, for the first time, the extracellular proteome changes of BEAS-2B dosed with Cd. Our results unveiled that Cd treatment led to the marked upregulation of molecular chaperones, antioxidant enzymes, enzymes associated with glutathione metabolic process, proteins involved in cellular energy metabolism, as well as tumor-suppressors. Pretreatment of cells with the thiol antioxidant glutathione before Cd treatment effectively abrogated the secretion of these proteins and prevented cell death. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Cd causes oxidative stress-induced cytotoxicity; and the differentially-secreted protein signatures could be considered as targets for potential use as extracellular biomarkers upon Cd exposure.

  19. Quantitative Proteomics Reveals the Defense Response of Wheat against Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yuheng; Yu, Yang; Bi, Chaowei; Kang, Zhensheng

    2016-01-01

    Wheat stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), is considered one of the most aggressive diseases to wheat production. In this study, we used an iTRAQ-based approach for the quantitative proteomic comparison of the incompatible Pst race CYR23 in infected and non-infected leaves of the wheat cultivar Suwon11. A total of 3,475 unique proteins were identified from three key stages of interaction (12, 24, and 48 h post-inoculation) and control groups. Quantitative analysis showed that 530 proteins were differentially accumulated by Pst infection (fold changes >1.5, p < 0.05). Among these proteins, 10.54% was classified as involved in the immune system process and stimulus response. Intriguingly, bioinformatics analysis revealed that a set of reactive oxygen species metabolism-related proteins, peptidyl–prolyl cis–trans isomerases (PPIases), RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), and chaperonins was involved in the response to Pst infection. Our results were the first to show that PPIases, RBPs, and chaperonins participated in the regulation of the immune response in wheat and even in plants. This study aimed to provide novel routes to reveal wheat gene functionality and better understand the early events in wheat–Pst incompatible interactions. PMID:27678307

  20. Proteomic Analysis of Early Response Lymph Node Proteins in Mice Treated with Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yuan; Gopee, Neera V.; Howard, Paul C.; Yu, Li-Rong

    2011-01-01

    Human exposure to nanoparticles is inevitable from natural and anthropogenic sources. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles are increasingly being used in pharmaceutical and cosmetic products. Previous studies revealed that TiO2 levels were significantly increased in tissues (e.g., lymph nodes) after mice were injected with nanosized TiO2. To identify early response lymph node proteins to TiO2 nanoparticles, groups of mice were intradermally injected with a low dose of DeGussa P25 TiO2 nanoparticles or vehicle alone. The proteomes of lymph nodes at 24 h were quantitatively analyzed using trypsin-catalyzed 16O/18O labeling in conjunction with two-dimensional liquid chromatography separation and tandem mass spectrometry (2DLC-MS/MS). A total of 33 proteins were significantly changed (over 1.3-fold, p<0.05) in the mice treated with TiO2 nanoparticles, which accounted for approximately 1% of the total proteins identified. The differentially expressed proteins mainly involve the immune response (e.g., inflammation), lipid and fatty acid metabolism, mRNA processing, and nucleosome assembly. Regulation of functionally distinct classes of proteins could be mediated by estrogen receptor (ESR1), PPARγ, and c-Myc signalings, etc. The differentially expressed proteins identified in this experiment could represent early response proteins to TiO2 nanoparticle treatment in mouse lymph nodes. PMID:21884834

  1. Proteomic analysis of host responses in HepG2 cells during dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Pattanakitsakul, Sa-Nga; Rungrojcharoenkit, Kamonthip; Kanlaya, Rattiyaporn; Sinchaikul, Supachok; Noisakran, Sansanee; Chen, Shui-Tein; Malasit, Prida; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2007-12-01

    Dengue virus infection remains a public health problem worldwide. However, its pathogenic mechanisms and pathophysiology are still poorly understood. We performed proteomic analysis to evaluate early host responses (as indicated by altered proteins) in human target cells during dengue virus infection. HepG2 cells were infected with dengue virus serotype 2 (DEN-2) at multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0. Quantitative analyses of DEN-2 infection and cell death at 12, 24, and 48 h postinfection showed that the MOI of 1.0 with 24 h postinfection duration was the optimal condition to evaluate early host responses, as this condition provided the high %Infection ( approximately 80%), while %Cell death ( approximately 20%) was comparable to that of the mock-control cells. Proteins derived from the mock-control and DEN-2-infected cells were resolved by 2-D PAGE ( n = 5 gels for each group) and visualized by SYPRO Ruby stain. Quantitative intensity analysis revealed 17 differentially expressed proteins, which were successfully identified by peptide mass fingerprinting. Most of these altered proteins were the key factors involved in transcription and translation processes. Further functional study on these altered proteins may lead to better understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms and host responses to dengue virus infection, and also to the identification of new therapeutic targets for dengue virus infection.

  2. Physiological and proteomic analyses of salt stress response in the halophyte Halogeton glomeratus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juncheng; Meng, Yaxiong; Li, Baochun; Ma, Xiaole; Lai, Yong; Si, Erjing; Yang, Ke; Xu, Xianliang; Shang, Xunwu; Wang, Huajun; Wang, Di

    2015-04-01

    Very little is known about the adaptation mechanism of Chenopodiaceae Halogeton glomeratus, a succulent annual halophyte, under saline conditions. In this study, we investigated the morphological and physiological adaptation mechanisms of seedlings exposed to different concentrations of NaCl treatment for 21 d. Our results revealed that H. glomeratus has a robust ability to tolerate salt; its optimal growth occurs under approximately 100 mm NaCl conditions. Salt crystals were deposited in water-storage tissue under saline conditions. We speculate that osmotic adjustment may be the primary mechanism of salt tolerance in H. glomeratus, which transports toxic ions such as sodium into specific salt-storage cells and compartmentalizes them in large vacuoles to maintain the water content of tissues and the succulence of the leaves. To investigate the molecular response mechanisms to salt stress in H. glomeratus, we conducted a comparative proteomic analysis of seedling leaves that had been exposed to 200 mm NaCl for 24 h, 72 h and 7 d. Forty-nine protein spots, exhibiting significant changes in abundance after stress, were identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS/MS) and similarity searches across EST database of H. glomeratus. These stress-responsive proteins were categorized into nine functional groups, such as photosynthesis, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, and stress and defence response.

  3. Examination of metabolic responses to phosphorus limitation via proteomic analyses in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Tian-Ya; Yang, Zhi-Kai; Zheng, Jian-Wei; Xie, Ying; Li, Da-Wei; Murugan, Shanmugaraj Bala; Yang, Wei-Dong; Liu, Jie-Sheng; Li, Hong-Ye

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential macronutrient for the survival of marine phytoplankton. In the present study, phytoplankton response to phosphorus limitation was studied by proteomic profiling in diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum in both cellular and molecular levels. A total of 42 non-redundant proteins were identified, among which 8 proteins were found to be upregulated and 34 proteins were downregulated. The results also showed that the proteins associated with inorganic phosphate uptake were downregulated, whereas the proteins involved in organic phosphorus uptake such as alkaline phosphatase were upregulated. The proteins involved in metabolic responses such as protein degradation, lipid accumulation and photorespiration were upregulated whereas energy metabolism, photosynthesis, amino acid and nucleic acid metabolism tend to be downregulated. Overall our results showed the changes in protein levels of P. tricornutum during phosphorus stress. This study preludes for understanding the role of phosphorous in marine biogeochemical cycles and phytoplankton response to phosphorous scarcity in ocean. It also provides insight into the succession of phytoplankton community, providing scientific basis for elucidating the mechanism of algal blooms. PMID:26020491

  4. Examination of metabolic responses to phosphorus limitation via proteomic analyses in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    PubMed

    Feng, Tian-Ya; Yang, Zhi-Kai; Zheng, Jian-Wei; Xie, Ying; Li, Da-Wei; Murugan, Shanmugaraj Bala; Yang, Wei-Dong; Liu, Jie-Sheng; Li, Hong-Ye

    2015-05-28

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential macronutrient for the survival of marine phytoplankton. In the present study, phytoplankton response to phosphorus limitation was studied by proteomic profiling in diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum in both cellular and molecular levels. A total of 42 non-redundant proteins were identified, among which 8 proteins were found to be upregulated and 34 proteins were downregulated. The results also showed that the proteins associated with inorganic phosphate uptake were downregulated, whereas the proteins involved in organic phosphorus uptake such as alkaline phosphatase were upregulated. The proteins involved in metabolic responses such as protein degradation, lipid accumulation and photorespiration were upregulated whereas energy metabolism, photosynthesis, amino acid and nucleic acid metabolism tend to be downregulated. Overall our results showed the changes in protein levels of P. tricornutum during phosphorus stress. This study preludes for understanding the role of phosphorous in marine biogeochemical cycles and phytoplankton response to phosphorous scarcity in ocean. It also provides insight into the succession of phytoplankton community, providing scientific basis for elucidating the mechanism of algal blooms.

  5. DNA damage response and sphingolipid signaling in liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Yasunobu; Moro, Kazuki; Tsuchida, Junko; Soma, Daiki; Hirose, Yuki; Kobayashi, Takashi; Kosugi, Shin-ichi; Takabe, Kazuaki; Komatsu, Masaaki; Wakai, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cannot generally be cured by systemic chemotherapy or radiotherapy due to their poor response to conventional therapeutic agents. The development of novel and efficient targeted therapies to increase their treatment options depends on the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms that underlie the pathogenesis of HCC. The DNA damage response (DDR) is a network of cell-signaling events that are triggered by DNA damage. Its dysregulation is thought to be one of the key mechanisms underlying the generation of HCC. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a lipid mediator, has emerged as an important signaling molecule that has been found to be involved in many cellular functions. In the liver, the alteration of S1P signaling potentially affects the DDR pathways. In this review, we explore the role of the DDR in hepatocarcinogenesis of various etiologies, including hepatitis B and C infection and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Furthermore, we discuss the metabolism and functions of S1P that may affect the hepatic DDR. The elucidation of the pathogenic role of S1P may create new avenues of research into therapeutic strategies for patients with HCC. PMID:26514817

  6. Proteomics of rice in response to heat stress and advances in genetic engineering for heat tolerance in rice.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jie; Liu, Cuifang; Chen, Xinbo

    2011-12-01

    Rice is the most important food crop worldwide. Global warming inevitably affects the grain yields of rice. Recent proteomics studies in rice have provided evidence for better understanding the mechanisms of thermal adaptation. Heat stress response in rice is complicated, involving up- or down-regulation of numerous proteins related to different metabolic pathways. The heat-responsive proteins mainly include protection proteins, proteins involved in protein biosynthesis, protein degradation, energy and carbohydrate metabolism, and redox homeostasis. In addition, increased thermotolerance in transgenic rice was obtained by overexpression of rice genes and genes from other plants. On the other hand, heterologous expression of some rice proteins led to enhanced thermotolerance in bacteria and other easily transformed plants. In this paper, we review the proteomic characterization of rice in response to high temperature and achievements of genetic engineering for heat tolerance in rice.

  7. Rootstock-scion interaction affecting citrus response to CTV infection: a proteomic view.

    PubMed

    Laino, Paolo; Russo, Maria P; Guardo, Maria; Reforgiato-Recupero, Giuseppe; Valè, Giampiero; Cattivelli, Luigi; Moliterni, Vita M C

    2016-04-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is the causal agent of various diseases with dramatic effects on citrus crops worldwide. Most Citrus species, grown on their own roots, are symptomless hosts for many CTV isolates. However, depending on different scion-rootstock combination, CTV infection should result in distinct syndromes, being 'tristeza' the more severe one, leading to a complete decline of the susceptible plants in a few weeks. Transcriptomic analyses revealed several genes involved either in defense response, or systemic acquired resistance, as well as transcription factors and components of the phosphorylation cascades, to be differentially regulated during CTV infection in Citrus aurantifolia species. To date little is known about the molecular mechanism of this host-pathogen interaction, and about the rootstock effect on citrus response to CTV infection. In this work, the response to CTV infection has been investigated in tolerant and susceptible scion-rootstock combinations by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE). A total of 125 protein spots have been found to be differently accumulated and/or phosphorylated between the two rootstock combinations. Downregulation in tolerant plants upon CTV infection was detected for proteins involved in reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging and defense response, suggesting a probable acclimation response able to minimize the systemic effects of virus infection. Some of these proteins resulted to be modulated also in absence of virus infection, revealing a rootstock effect on scion proteome modulation. Moreover, the phospho-modulation of proteins involved in ROS scavenging and defense response, further supports their involvement either in scion-rootstock crosstalk or in the establishment of tolerance/susceptibility to CTV infection. PMID:26459956

  8. Proteomics for prediction of disease progression and response to therapy in diabetic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Pena, Michelle J; Mischak, Harald; Heerspink, Hiddo J L

    2016-09-01

    The past decade has resulted in multiple new findings of potential proteomic biomarkers of diabetic kidney disease (DKD). Many of these biomarkers reflect an important role in the (patho)physiology and biological processes of DKD. Situations in which proteomics could be applied in clinical practice include the identification of individuals at risk of progressive kidney disease and those who would respond well to treatment, in order to tailor therapy for those at highest risk. However, while many proteomic biomarkers have been discovered, and even found to be predictive, most lack rigorous external validation in sufficiently powered studies with renal endpoints. Moreover, studies assessing short-term changes in the proteome for therapy-monitoring purposes are lacking. Collaborations between academia and industry and enhanced interactions with regulatory agencies are needed to design new, sufficiently powered studies to implement proteomics in clinical practice. PMID:27344310

  9. Analysis of the biological response of mouse liver (Mus musculus) exposed to As2O3 based on integrated -omics approaches.

    PubMed

    García-Sevillano, M A; García-Barrera, T; Navarro, F; Gómez-Ariza, J L

    2013-12-01

    Organic and inorganic mass spectrometries were used to investigate the biochemical response of mice (Mus musculus) to inorganic arsenic exposure using liver as the target organ. The toxicological effects of trivalent inorganic arsenic after oral administration (3 mg kg(-1) body weight and per day) were investigated over a period of 7 days using metallomics, metabonomics and redox proteomics approaches. Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) with ICP-MS detection was combined with anion exchange chromatography (AEC) to characterize the biological response of the exposed mice. On the other hand, direct infusion mass spectrometry (DI-ESI-QTOF-MS) of polar and lipophilic extracts using positive and negative modes of acquisition (ESI+/ESI-) provided information about time-dependent changes in endogenous metabolites identified by Partial Least Square-Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA). Finally, the study has been complemented with the evaluation of up/down-regulation of enzymes related to oxidative stress such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione reductase (GR), catalase (CAT) and peroxidases in connection with metal toxicity issues. The results show that the inorganic arsenic methylation in the liver may reach the saturation point upon chronic exposure to the element. On the other hand, SEC-ICP-MS coupling provided information about metal containing-proteins and metabolites related to arsenic exposure (metallomics) which has been correlated with the changes in the global metabolism (metabonomics), also considering their consequences on the redox status of protein and protein expression (redox proteomics). Our study shows that arsenic causes biochemical pathway alterations, such as energy metabolism (e.g. glycolysis, Krebs cycle), amino acid metabolism, choline metabolism and degradation of membrane phospholipids (apoptosis). This work illustrates the high reliability of the integrated use of organic mass spectrometry for the metabonomic study of biochemical effects

  10. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of the Aspergillus fumigatus hypoxia response using an oxygen-controlled fermenter

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Aspergillus fumigatus is a mold responsible for the majority of cases of aspergillosis in humans. To survive in the human body, A. fumigatus must adapt to microenvironments that are often characterized by low nutrient and oxygen availability. Recent research suggests that the ability of A. fumigatus and other pathogenic fungi to adapt to hypoxia contributes to their virulence. However, molecular mechanisms of A. fumigatus hypoxia adaptation are poorly understood. Thus, to better understand how A. fumigatus adapts to hypoxic microenvironments found in vivo during human fungal pathogenesis, the dynamic changes of the fungal transcriptome and proteome in hypoxia were investigated over a period of 24 hours utilizing an oxygen-controlled fermenter system. Results Significant increases in transcripts associated with iron and sterol metabolism, the cell wall, the GABA shunt, and transcriptional regulators were observed in response to hypoxia. A concomitant reduction in transcripts was observed with ribosome and terpenoid backbone biosynthesis, TCA cycle, amino acid metabolism and RNA degradation. Analysis of changes in transcription factor mRNA abundance shows that hypoxia induces significant positive and negative changes that may be important for regulating the hypoxia response in this pathogenic mold. Growth in hypoxia resulted in changes in the protein levels of several glycolytic enzymes, but these changes were not always reflected by the corresponding transcriptional profiling data. However, a good correlation overall (R2 = 0.2, p < 0.05) existed between the transcriptomic and proteomics datasets for all time points. The lack of correlation between some transcript levels and their subsequent protein levels suggests another regulatory layer of the hypoxia response in A. fumigatus. Conclusions Taken together, our data suggest a robust cellular response that is likely regulated both at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level in response to hypoxia

  11. Quantitative chemical proteomics for investigating the biomarkers of dioscin against liver fibrosis caused by CCl4 in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoling; Xu, Lina; Yin, Lianhong; Qi, Yan; Xu, Youwei; Han, Xu; Peng, Jinyong

    2015-07-14

    In the present work, the effect of dioscin against liver fibrosis in rats caused by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) was confirmed. Then, the differentially expressed proteins from rat liver were identified using two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis technology. Ten new biomarkers including protein disulfide isomerase A3, selenium-binding protein 1, glutamine synthetase, senescence marker protein 30, hemopexin, keratin 8, keratin 18, vimentin, Annexin A5 and dermatopontin associated with liver fibrosis were found and validated, and new insights through affecting multiple drug targets and biological processes were also provided to reveal the mechanisms of dioscin against hepatic fibrosis for the first time. PMID:26069897

  12. Comparative proteomic analysis using 2DE-LC-MS/MS reveals the mechanism of Fuzhuan brick tea extract against hepatic fat accumulation in rats with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhonghua; Lin, Yong; Zhang, Sheng; Wang, Die; Liang, Qionglin; Luo, Guoan

    2015-09-01

    Fuzhuan brick tea has received increasing attention in recent years owing to its benefits for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and associated metabolic syndrome. For exploring the ameliorative mechanism, the liver proteomes from three groups of rats fed either a normal control diet (NCD), a high fat diet (HFD), or a HFD supplemented with high-dose Fuzhuan brick tea extract (FTE) (HFD + HFTE) were comprehensively compared by quantitative proteomics using 2DE-LC-MS/MS. This is the first study of the effects of tea aqueous extract on the liver proteome of rats suffering from metabolic syndrome. The results showed that 57 proteins displayed more than 1.5-fold differences in at least one of two comparisons of HFD versus NCD and HFD versus HFD + HFTE due to HFD feeding and FTE treatment, respectively. Of them, over 75% of proteins exhibited a similar tendency of expression in the two comparisons, meaning FTE was able to correct HFD effects on rat livers. By function analyses, an extensive list of proteins was involved in sugar and lipid metabolism. Compared with HFD-fed rats, the reduced lipogenesis and enhanced β-oxidation, tricarboxylic acid cycle and respiratory chain in HFD + HFTE-fed rats, which mainly contributed to ameliorate hepatic fat accumulation and associated NAFLD. Additionally, some putative drug targets were also revealed such as COX2, PGAM1, ACACB, FAS, and ECHS1.

  13. Quantitative Proteomics Analysis of Herbaceous Peony in Response to Paclobutrazol Inhibition of Lateral Branching.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Daqiu; Gong, Saijie; Hao, Zhaojun; Meng, Jiasong; Tao, Jun

    2015-10-14

    Herbaceous peony (Paeonia lactiflora Pall.) is an emerging high-grade cut flower worldwide, which is usually used in wedding bouquets and known as the "wedding flower". However, abundant lateral branches appear frequently in some excellent cultivars, and a lack of a method to remove Paeonia lactiflora lateral branches other than inefficient artificial methods is an obstacle for improving the quality of its cut flowers. In this study, paclobutrazol (PBZ) application was found to inhibit the growth of lateral branches in Paeonia lactiflora for the first time, including 96.82% decreased lateral bud number per branch, 77.79% and 42.31% decreased length and diameter of lateral branches, respectively, declined cell wall materials and changed microstructures. Subsequently, isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) technology was used for quantitative proteomics analysis of lateral branches under PBZ application and control. The results indicated that 178 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) successfully obtained, 98 DEPs were up-regulated and 80 DEPs were down-regulated. Thereafter, 34 candidate DEPs associated with the inhibited growth of lateral branches were screened according to their function and classification. These PBZ-stress responsive candidate DEPs were involved in eight biological processes, which played a very important role in the growth and development of lateral branches together with the response to PBZ stress. These results provide a better understanding of the molecular theoretical basis for removing Paeonia lactiflora lateral branches using PBZ application.

  14. Quantitative Proteomics Analysis of Herbaceous Peony in Response to Paclobutrazol Inhibition of Lateral Branching

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Daqiu; Gong, Saijie; Hao, Zhaojun; Meng, Jiasong; Tao, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Herbaceous peony (Paeonia lactiflora Pall.) is an emerging high-grade cut flower worldwide, which is usually used in wedding bouquets and known as the “wedding flower”. However, abundant lateral branches appear frequently in some excellent cultivars, and a lack of a method to remove Paeonia lactiflora lateral branches other than inefficient artificial methods is an obstacle for improving the quality of its cut flowers. In this study, paclobutrazol (PBZ) application was found to inhibit the growth of lateral branches in Paeonia lactiflora for the first time, including 96.82% decreased lateral bud number per branch, 77.79% and 42.31% decreased length and diameter of lateral branches, respectively, declined cell wall materials and changed microstructures. Subsequently, isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) technology was used for quantitative proteomics analysis of lateral branches under PBZ application and control. The results indicated that 178 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) successfully obtained, 98 DEPs were up-regulated and 80 DEPs were down-regulated. Thereafter, 34 candidate DEPs associated with the inhibited growth of lateral branches were screened according to their function and classification. These PBZ-stress responsive candidate DEPs were involved in eight biological processes, which played a very important role in the growth and development of lateral branches together with the response to PBZ stress. These results provide a better understanding of the molecular theoretical basis for removing Paeonia lactiflora lateral branches using PBZ application. PMID:26473855

  15. Using environmental proteomics to assess pollutant response of Carcinus maenas along the Tunisian coast.

    PubMed

    Ghedira, Jihene; Chicano-Gálvez, Eduardo; Fernández-Cisnal, Ricardo; Jebali, Jamel; Banni, Mohamed; Chouba, Lassaad; Boussetta, Hamadi; López-Barea, Juan; Alhama, José

    2016-01-15

    Biochemical responses to pollutants were studied at four Tunisia littoral sites using Carcinus maenas as a bioindicator. Proteomic analysis was used to assess the global impact of complex pollution mixtures, and to provide new biomarkers and basic insights into pollutant toxicity. Metal contents and metallothionein levels followed a gradient based on sampling sites: Bizerte ≫ Teboulba > Gargour~Mahres. Approximately 900 and 700 spots were resolved in digestive glands and gills, respectively. Gills from Bizerte animals had the maximum number of altered spots, mostly upregulated. In other locations, the number of altered spots in gills decreased in parallel to total metals in in the following order: Teboulba > Gargour > Mahres (mostly downregulated). Out of the 39 spots excised, ten proteins were identified in digestive glands and eight in gills. Digestive glands of Bizerte crabs had higher levels of ferritin, three vitellogenin forms and mannose-binding protein, while Gargour crabs had higher levels of four cryptocyanin forms. Gills of Bizerte crabs had higher levels of ferritin, three vitellogenins forms, lectin 4C, actin, and collagenolytic serine protease. Proteins with altered expression in crabs from Tunisia littoral are related to molting, oxidative stress and inflammation, innate immune response, and proteolysis. PMID:26402481

  16. Differential chromatin proteomics of the MMS-induced DNA damage response in yeast

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Protein enrichment by sub-cellular fractionation was combined with differential-in-gel-electrophoresis (DIGE) to address the detection of the low abundance chromatin proteins in the budding yeast proteome. Comparisons of whole-cell extracts and chromatin fractions were used to provide a measure of the degree of chromatin association for individual proteins, which could be compared across sample treatments. The method was applied to analyze the effect of the DNA damaging agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) on levels of chromatin-associated proteins. Results Up-regulation of several previously characterized DNA damage checkpoint-regulated proteins, such as Rnr4, Rpa1 and Rpa2, was observed. In addition, several novel DNA damage responsive proteins were identified and assessed for genotoxic sensitivity using either DAmP (decreased abundance by mRNA perturbation) or knockout strains, including Acf2, Arp3, Bmh1, Hsp31, Lsp1, Pst2, Rnr4, Rpa1, Rpa2, Ste4, Ycp4 and Yrb1. A strain in which the expression of the Ran-GTPase binding protein Yrb1 was reduced was found to be hypersensitive to genotoxic stress. Conclusion The described method was effective at unveiling chromatin-associated proteins that are less likely to be detected in the absence of fractionation. Several novel proteins with altered chromatin abundance were identified including Yrb1, pointing to a role for this nuclear import associated protein in DNA damage response. PMID:21967861

  17. Proteomic and Systems Biology Analysis of the Monocyte Response to Coxiella burnetii Infection

    PubMed Central

    Shipman, Matt; Lubick, Kirk; Fouchard, David; Gurram, Rajani; Grieco, Paul; Jutila, Mark; Dratz, Edward A.

    2013-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii is an obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen and the causative agent of Q fever. Chronic Q fever can produce debilitating fatigue and C. burnetii is considered a significant bioterror threat. C. burnetii occupies the monocyte phagolysosome and although prior work has explained features of the host-pathogen interaction, many aspects are still poorly understood. We have conducted a proteomic investigation of human Monomac I cells infected with the Nine Mile Phase II strain of C. burnetii and used the results as a framework for a systems biology model of the host response. Our principal methodology was multiplex differential 2D gel electrophoresis using ZDyes, a new generation of covalently linked fluorescent protein detection dyes under development at Montana State University. The 2D gel analysis facilitated the detection of changes in posttranslational modifications on intact proteins in response to infection. The systems model created from our data a framework for the design of experiments to seek a deeper understanding of the host-pathogen interactions. PMID:23990884

  18. Quantitative Proteomics Analysis of Herbaceous Peony in Response to Paclobutrazol Inhibition of Lateral Branching.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Daqiu; Gong, Saijie; Hao, Zhaojun; Meng, Jiasong; Tao, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Herbaceous peony (Paeonia lactiflora Pall.) is an emerging high-grade cut flower worldwide, which is usually used in wedding bouquets and known as the "wedding flower". However, abundant lateral branches appear frequently in some excellent cultivars, and a lack of a method to remove Paeonia lactiflora lateral branches other than inefficient artificial methods is an obstacle for improving the quality of its cut flowers. In this study, paclobutrazol (PBZ) application was found to inhibit the growth of lateral branches in Paeonia lactiflora for the first time, including 96.82% decreased lateral bud number per branch, 77.79% and 42.31% decreased length and diameter of lateral branches, respectively, declined cell wall materials and changed microstructures. Subsequently, isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) technology was used for quantitative proteomics analysis of lateral branches under PBZ application and control. The results indicated that 178 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) successfully obtained, 98 DEPs were up-regulated and 80 DEPs were down-regulated. Thereafter, 34 candidate DEPs associated with the inhibited growth of lateral branches were screened according to their function and classification. These PBZ-stress responsive candidate DEPs were involved in eight biological processes, which played a very important role in the growth and development of lateral branches together with the response to PBZ stress. These results provide a better understanding of the molecular theoretical basis for removing Paeonia lactiflora lateral branches using PBZ application. PMID:26473855

  19. Liver.

    PubMed

    Kim, W R; Lake, J R; Smith, J M; Skeans, M A; Schladt, D P; Edwards, E B; Harper, A M; Wainright, J L; Snyder, J J; Israni, A K; Kasiske, B L

    2016-01-01

    The median waiting time for patients with MELD ≥ 35 decreased from 18 days in 2012 to 9 days in 2014, after implementation of the Share 35 policy in June 2013. Similarly, mortality among candidates listed with MELD ≥ 35 decreased from 366 per 100 waitlist years in 2012 to 315 in 2014. The number of new active candidates added to the pediatric liver transplant waiting list in 2014 was 655, down from a peak of 826 in 2005. The number of prevalent candidates (on the list on December 31 of the given year) continued to decline, 401 active and 173 inactive. The number of deceased donor pediatric liver transplants peaked at 542 in 2008 and was 478 in 2014. The number of living donor liver pediatric transplants was 52 in 2014; most were from donors closely related to the recipients. Graft survival continued to improve among pediatric recipients of deceased donor and living donor livers. PMID:26755264

  20. Proteomic study of serum using gel chromatography and MALDI-TOF MS reveals diagnostic biomarkers in male patients with liver-cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xin-Hua; Huang, He-Qing; Chen, Dong-Shi; Jin, Hong-Wei; Huang, Hui-Ying

    2007-03-01

    Human serum has been widely employed clinically for diagnosing various fatal diseases. However, the concentration of most proteins in human serum is too low to be directly measured using normal analytical methods. In order to obtain reliable analytical results from proteomic analysis of human serum, appropriate sample preparation is essential. A combined off-line analytical technique of gel chromatography and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has been successfully established to separate proteins for MS analysis. Using these combined techniques, 176 mass signal peaks of proteins/peptides were found in 6 of 18 fractions from normal male serum (NMS) in the presence of buffer consisting of NH4HCO3 and acetonitrile. A simple gel chromatography column packed with Sephadex G-50 removed most signal-suppressing compounds such as salts and high abundance proteins (HAP). The molecular mass to charge (m/z) ratios of differential peptides revealed in serum of male patient with liver-cancer (LCMPS) compared to NMS were 5365, 5644 and 6462, and these peptides can be used as biomarkers to clinically diagnose liver-cancer. The simple and convenient chromatographic method described here is not only superior to recently described HPLC separation for MS analysis, but also reveals many novel and significant serum biomarkers for the clinical diagnosis of various diseases.

  1. Proteomic response of methicillin-resistant S. aureus to a synergistic antibacterial drug combination: a novel erythromycin derivative and oxacillin

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaofen; Pai, Pei-Jin; Zhang, Weipeng; Hu, Yingwei; Dong, Xiaojing; Qian, Pei-yuan; Chen, Daijie; Lam, Henry

    2016-01-01

    The use of antibacterial drug combinations with synergistic effects is increasingly seen as a critical strategy to combat multi-drug resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). In this work, the proteome responses in MRSA under the stress of a sub-inhibitory dose of a synergistic drug combination of a novel erythromycin derivative, SIPI-8294, and oxacillin, were studied by label-free quantitative proteomics. Several control treatment groups were designed to isolate proteome responses potentially related to the synergy: (1) the non-synergistic drug combination of erythromycin and oxacillin, (2) SIPI-8294 only, (3) oxacillin only and (4) erythromycin only. Results showed that 200 proteins were differentially expressed in SIPI-8294/oxacillin-treated cells. Among these proteins, the level of penicillin binding protein 2a, the protein mainly responsible for oxacillin resistance in MRSA, was four times lower in the SIPI-8294/oxacillin group than in the erythromycin/oxacillin group, suggesting that SIPI-8294 may interfere with this known oxacillin resistance mechanism. Moreover, hierarchical clustering analysis of differentially expressed proteins under different treatments revealed that SIPI-8294/oxacillin elicits very different responses than the individual drugs or the non-synergistic erythromycin/oxacillin combination. Bioinformatic analysis indicated that the synergistic effect can be further traced to a disruption in oxidation-reduction homeostasis and cell wall biosynthesis. PMID:26806358

  2. Plant physiology and proteomics reveals the leaf response to drought in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Aranjuelo, Iker; Molero, Gemma; Erice, Gorka; Avice, Jean Christophe; Nogués, Salvador

    2011-01-01

    Despite its relevance, protein regulation, metabolic adjustment, and the physiological status of plants under drought is not well understood in relation to the role of nitrogen fixation in nodules. In this study, nodulated alfalfa plants were exposed to drought conditions. The study determined the physiological, metabolic, and proteomic processes involved in photosynthetic inhibition in relation to the decrease in nitrogenase (Nase) activity. The deleterious effect of drought on alfalfa performance was targeted towards photosynthesis and Nase activity. At the leaf level, photosynthetic inhibition was mainly caused by the inhibition of Rubisco. The proteomic profile and physiological measurements revealed that the reduced carboxylation capacity of droughted plants was related to limitations in Rubisco protein content, activation state, and RuBP regeneration. Drought also decreased amino acid content such as asparagine, and glutamic acid, and Rubisco protein content indicating that N availability limitations were caused by Nase activity inhibition. In this context, drought induced the decrease in Rubisco binding protein content at the leaf level and proteases were up-regulated so as to degrade Rubisco protein. This degradation enabled the reallocation of the Rubisco-derived N to the synthesis of amino acids with osmoregulant capacity. Rubisco degradation under drought conditions was induced so as to remobilize Rubisco-derived N to compensate for the decrease in N associated with Nase inhibition. Metabolic analyses showed that droughted plants increased amino acid (proline, a major compound involved in osmotic regulation) and soluble sugar (D-pinitol) levels to contribute towards the decrease in osmotic potential (Ψs). At the nodule level, drought had an inhibitory effect on Nase activity. This decrease in Nase activity was not induced by substrate shortage, as reflected by an increase in total soluble sugars (TSS) in the nodules. Proline accumulation in the nodule

  3. Plant physiology and proteomics reveals the leaf response to drought in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Aranjuelo, Iker; Molero, Gemma; Erice, Gorka; Avice, Jean Christophe; Nogués, Salvador

    2011-01-01

    Despite its relevance, protein regulation, metabolic adjustment, and the physiological status of plants under drought is not well understood in relation to the role of nitrogen fixation in nodules. In this study, nodulated alfalfa plants were exposed to drought conditions. The study determined the physiological, metabolic, and proteomic processes involved in photosynthetic inhibition in relation to the decrease in nitrogenase (N(ase)) activity. The deleterious effect of drought on alfalfa performance was targeted towards photosynthesis and N(ase) activity. At the leaf level, photosynthetic inhibition was mainly caused by the inhibition of Rubisco. The proteomic profile and physiological measurements revealed that the reduced carboxylation capacity of droughted plants was related to limitations in Rubisco protein content, activation state, and RuBP regeneration. Drought also decreased amino acid content such as asparagine, and glutamic acid, and Rubisco protein content indicating that N availability limitations were caused by N(ase) activity inhibition. In this context, drought induced the decrease in Rubisco binding protein content at the leaf level and proteases were up-regulated so as to degrade Rubisco protein. This degradation enabled the reallocation of the Rubisco-derived N to the synthesis of amino acids with osmoregulant capacity. Rubisco degradation under drought conditions was induced so as to remobilize Rubisco-derived N to compensate for the decrease in N associated with N(ase) inhibition. Metabolic analyses showed that droughted plants increased amino acid (proline, a major compound involved in osmotic regulation) and soluble sugar (D-pinitol) levels to contribute towards the decrease in osmotic potential (Ψ(s)). At the nodule level, drought had an inhibitory effect on N(ase) activity. This decrease in N(ase) activity was not induced by substrate shortage, as reflected by an increase in total soluble sugars (TSS) in the nodules. Proline accumulation

  4. Proteomic analysis of cellular response induced by boron neutron capture reaction in human squamous cell carcinoma SAS cells.

    PubMed

    Sato, Akira; Itoh, Tasuku; Imamichi, Shoji; Kikuhara, Sota; Fujimori, Hiroaki; Hirai, Takahisa; Saito, Soichiro; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Minoru; Murakami, Yasufumi; Baiseitov, Diaz; Berikkhanova, Kulzhan; Zhumadilov, Zhaxybay; Imahori, Yoshio; Itami, Jun; Ono, Koji; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Masutani, Mitsuko

    2015-12-01

    To understand the mechanism of cell death induced by boron neutron capture reaction (BNCR), we performed proteome analyses of human squamous tumor SAS cells after BNCR. Cells were irradiated with thermal neutron beam at KUR after incubation under boronophenylalanine (BPA)(+) and BPA(-) conditions. BNCR mainly induced typical apoptosis in SAS cells 24h post-irradiation. Proteomic analysis in SAS cells suggested that proteins functioning in endoplasmic reticulum, DNA repair, and RNA processing showed dynamic changes at early phase after BNCR and could be involved in the regulation of cellular response to BNCR. We found that the BNCR induces fragments of endoplasmic reticulum-localized lymphoid-restricted protein (LRMP). The fragmentation of LRMP was also observed in the rat tumor graft model 20 hours after BNCT treatment carried out at the National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan. These data suggest that dynamic changes of LRMP could be involved during cellular response to BNCR.

  5. Overlapping and unique signatures in the proteomic and transcriptomic responses of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans toward pathogenic Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wentao; Dierking, Katja; Esser, Daniela; Tholey, Andreas; Leippe, Matthias; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schulenburg, Hinrich

    2015-07-01

    Pathogen infection can activate multiple signaling cascades that ultimately alter the abundance of molecules in cells. This change can be measured both at the transcript and protein level. Studies analyzing the immune response at both levels are, however, rare. Here, we compare transcriptome and proteome data generated after infection of the nematode and model organism Caenorhabditis elegans with the Gram-positive pathogen Bacillus thuringiensis. Our analysis revealed a high overlap between abundance changes of corresponding transcripts and gene products, especially for genes encoding C-type lectin domain-containing proteins, indicating their particular role in worm immunity. We additionally identified a unique signature at the proteome level, suggesting that the C. elegans response to infection is shaped by changes beyond transcription. Such effects appear to be influenced by AMP-activated protein kinases (AMPKs), which may thus represent previously unknown regulators of C. elegans immune defense.

  6. Pentamers Not Found in the Universal Proteome Can Enhance Antigen Specific Immune Responses and Adjuvant Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ami; Dong, Jessica C.; Trost, Brett; Richardson, Jason S.; Tohme, Sarah; Babiuk, Shawn; Kusalik, Anthony; Kung, Sam K. P.; Kobinger, Gary P.

    2012-01-01

    Certain short peptides do not occur in humans and are rare or non-existent in the universal proteome. Antigens that contain rare amino acid sequences are in general highly immunogenic and may activate different arms of the immune system. We first generated a list of rare, semi-common, and common 5-mer peptides using bioinformatics tools to analyze the UniProtKB database. Experimental observations indicated that rare and semi-common 5-mers generated stronger cellular responses in comparison with common-occurring sequences. We hypothesized that the biological process responsible for this enhanced immunogenicity could be used to positively modulate immune responses with potential application for vaccine development. Initially, twelve rare 5-mers, 9-mers, and 13-mers were incorporated in frame at the end of an H5N1 hemagglutinin (HA) antigen and expressed from a DNA vaccine. The presence of some 5-mer peptides induced improved immune responses. Adding one 5-mer peptide exogenously also offered improved clinical outcome and/or survival against a lethal H5N1 or H1N1 influenza virus challenge in BALB/c mice and ferrets, respectively. Interestingly, enhanced anti-HBsAg antibody production by up to 25-fold in combination with a commercial Hepatitis B vaccine (Engerix-B, GSK) was also observed in BALB/c mice. Mechanistically, NK cell activation and dependency was observed with enhancing peptides ex vivo and in NK-depleted mice. Overall, the data suggest that rare or non-existent oligopeptides can be developed as immunomodulators and supports the further evaluation of some 5-mer peptides as potential vaccine adjuvants. PMID:22937099

  7. Pentamers not found in the universal proteome can enhance antigen specific immune responses and adjuvant vaccines.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ami; Dong, Jessica C; Trost, Brett; Richardson, Jason S; Tohme, Sarah; Babiuk, Shawn; Kusalik, Anthony; Kung, Sam K P; Kobinger, Gary P

    2012-01-01

    Certain short peptides do not occur in humans and are rare or non-existent in the universal proteome. Antigens that contain rare amino acid sequences are in general highly immunogenic and may activate different arms of the immune system. We first generated a list of rare, semi-common, and common 5-mer peptides using bioinformatics tools to analyze the UniProtKB database. Experimental observations indicated that rare and semi-common 5-mers generated stronger cellular responses in comparison with common-occurring sequences. We hypothesized that the biological process responsible for this enhanced immunogenicity could be used to positively modulate immune responses with potential application for vaccine development. Initially, twelve rare 5-mers, 9-mers, and 13-mers were incorporated in frame at the end of an H5N1 hemagglutinin (HA) antigen and expressed from a DNA vaccine. The presence of some 5-mer peptides induced improved immune responses. Adding one 5-mer peptide exogenously also offered improved clinical outcome and/or survival against a lethal H5N1 or H1N1 influenza virus challenge in BALB/c mice and ferrets, respectively. Interestingly, enhanced anti-HBsAg antibody production by up to 25-fold in combination with a commercial Hepatitis B vaccine (Engerix-B, GSK) was also observed in BALB/c mice. Mechanistically, NK cell activation and dependency was observed with enhancing peptides ex vivo and in NK-depleted mice. Overall, the data suggest that rare or non-existent oligopeptides can be developed as immunomodulators and supports the further evaluation of some 5-mer peptides as potential vaccine adjuvants. PMID:22937099

  8. Quantitative comparison of CrkL-SH3 binding proteins from embryonic murine brain and liver: Implications for developmental signaling and the quantification of protein species variants in bottom-up proteomics.

    PubMed

    Cheerathodi, Mujeeburahim; Vincent, James J; Ballif, Bryan A

    2015-07-01

    A major aim of proteomics is to comprehensively identify and quantify all protein species variants from a given biological source. However, in spite of its tremendous utility, bottom-up proteomic strategies can do little to provide true quantification of distinct whole protein species variants given its reliance on proteolysis. This is particularly true when molecular size information is lost as in gel-free proteomics. Crk and CrkL comprise a family of adaptor proteins that couple upstream phosphotyrosine signals to downstream effectors by virtue of their SH2 and SH3 domains respectively. Here we compare the identification and quantification of CrkL-SH3 binding partners between embryonic murine brain and liver. We also uncover and quantify tissue-specific variants in CrkL-SH3 binding proteins.

  9. Environmental enrichment alters protein expression as well as the proteomic response to cocaine in rat nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Lichti, Cheryl F; Fan, Xiuzhen; English, Robert D; Zhang, Yafang; Li, Dingge; Kong, Fanping; Sinha, Mala; Andersen, Clark R; Spratt, Heidi; Luxon, Bruce A; Green, Thomas A

    2014-01-01

    Prior research demonstrated that environmental enrichment creates individual differences in behavior leading to a protective addiction phenotype in rats. Understanding the mechanisms underlying this phenotype will guide selection of targets for much-needed novel pharmacotherapeutics. The current study investigates differences in proteome expression in the nucleus accumbens of enriched and isolated rats and the proteomic response to cocaine self-administration using a liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LCMS) technique to quantify 1917 proteins. Results of complementary Ingenuity Pathways Analyses (IPA) and gene set enrichment analyses (GSEA), both performed using protein quantitative data, demonstrate that cocaine increases vesicular transporters for dopamine and glutamate as well as increasing proteins in the RhoA pathway. Further, cocaine regulates proteins related to ERK, CREB and AKT signaling. Environmental enrichment altered expression of a large number of proteins implicated in a diverse number of neuronal functions (e.g., energy production, mRNA splicing, and ubiquitination), molecular cascades (e.g., protein kinases), psychiatric disorders (e.g., mood disorders), and neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., Huntington's and Alzheimer's diseases). Upregulation of energy metabolism components in EC rats was verified using RNA sequencing. Most of the biological functions and pathways listed above were also identified in the Cocaine X Enrichment interaction analysis, providing clear evidence that enriched and isolated rats respond quite differently to cocaine exposure. The overall impression of the current results is that enriched saline-administering rats have a unique proteomic complement compared to enriched cocaine-administering rats as well as saline and cocaine-taking isolated rats. These results identify possible mechanisms of the protective phenotype and provide fertile soil for developing novel pharmacotherapeutics. Proteomics data are available via

  10. Environmental enrichment alters protein expression as well as the proteomic response to cocaine in rat nucleus accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Lichti, Cheryl F.; Fan, Xiuzhen; English, Robert D.; Zhang, Yafang; Li, Dingge; Kong, Fanping; Sinha, Mala; Andersen, Clark R.; Spratt, Heidi; Luxon, Bruce A.; Green, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Prior research demonstrated that environmental enrichment creates individual differences in behavior leading to a protective addiction phenotype in rats. Understanding the mechanisms underlying this phenotype will guide selection of targets for much-needed novel pharmacotherapeutics. The current study investigates differences in proteome expression in the nucleus accumbens of enriched and isolated rats and the proteomic response to cocaine self-administration using a liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LCMS) technique to quantify 1917 proteins. Results of complementary Ingenuity Pathways Analyses (IPA) and gene set enrichment analyses (GSEA), both performed using protein quantitative data, demonstrate that cocaine increases vesicular transporters for dopamine and glutamate as well as increasing proteins in the RhoA pathway. Further, cocaine regulates proteins related to ERK, CREB and AKT signaling. Environmental enrichment altered expression of a large number of proteins implicated in a diverse number of neuronal functions (e.g., energy production, mRNA splicing, and ubiquitination), molecular cascades (e.g., protein kinases), psychiatric disorders (e.g., mood disorders), and neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., Huntington's and Alzheimer's diseases). Upregulation of energy metabolism components in EC rats was verified using RNA sequencing. Most of the biological functions and pathways listed above were also identified in the Cocaine X Enrichment interaction analysis, providing clear evidence that enriched and isolated rats respond quite differently to cocaine exposure. The overall impression of the current results is that enriched saline-administering rats have a unique proteomic complement compared to enriched cocaine-administering rats as well as saline and cocaine-taking isolated rats. These results identify possible mechanisms of the protective phenotype and provide fertile soil for developing novel pharmacotherapeutics. Proteomics data are available via

  11. Cytokine/Chemokine Secretion and Proteomic Identification of Upregulated Annexin A1 from Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Cocultured with the Liver Fluke Opisthorchis viverrini

    PubMed Central

    Hongsrichan, Nuttanan; Intuyod, Kitti; Pinlaor, Porntip; Khoontawad, Jarinya; Yongvanit, Puangrat; Wongkham, Chaisiri; Roytrakul, Sittiruk

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the cytokine/chemokine secretions and alteration of protein expression from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) cocultured with adult liver flukes (Opisthorchis viverrini) for 6 to 24 h. PBMC-derived proteins were identified by two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, and the cytokines/chemokines in the supernatant were assessed using a cytokine array. Exposure to O. viverrini induced increases in secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, costimulating protein, adhesion molecules, and chemotactic chemokines relative to untreated controls. In contrast, secretion of the CD40 ligand, interleukin 16, and macrophage inflammatory protein 1β decreased. Proteomic analysis revealed that expression of 48 proteins was significantly altered in PBMCs stimulated with O. viverrini. Annexin A1 (ANXA1) was selected for further study, and immunoblotting showed upregulation of ANXA1 expression in PBMCs after 12 and 24 h coculture with liver flukes. In an in vivo study, transcription and translation of ANXA1 significantly increased in livers of hamsters infected with O. viverrini at 21 days and from 3 months onwards compared to normal controls. Interestingly, immunohistochemistry revealed that ANXA1 was present not only in the cytoplasm of inflammatory cells but also in the cytoplasm of cholangiocytes, which are in close contact with the parasite and its excretory/secretory products in the biliary system. Expression of ANXA1 increased with time concomitant with bile duct enlargement, bile duct formation, and epithelial cell proliferation. In conclusion, several cytokines/chemokines secreted by PBMCs and upregulation of ANXA1 in PBMCs and biliary epithelial cells might have a role in host defense against O. viverrini infection and tissue resolution of inflammation. PMID:24614660

  12. Proteomic analysis of duck fatty liver during post-mortem storage related to the variability of fat loss during cooking of "foie gras".

    PubMed

    Theron, Laetitia; Fernandez, Xavier; Marty-Gasset, Nathalie; Chambon, Christophe; Viala, Didier; Pichereaux, Carole; Rossignol, Michel; Astruc, Thierry; Molette, Caroline

    2013-01-30

    Fat loss during cooking of duck "foie gras" is the main problem for both manufacturers and consumers. Despite the efforts of the processing industry to control fat loss, the variability of fatty liver cooking yields remains high and uncontrolled. To understand the biochemical effects of postslaughter processing on fat loss during cooking, this study characterizes for the first time the protein expression of fatty liver during chilling using a proteomic approach. For this purpose the proteins were separated according to their solubility: the protein fraction soluble in a buffer of low ionic strength (S) and the protein fraction insoluble in the same buffer (IS). Two-dimensional electrophoresis was used to analyze the S fraction and mass spectrometry for the identification of spots of interest. This analysis revealed 36 (21 identified proteins) and 34 (26 identified proteins) spots of interests in the low-fat-loss and high-fat-loss groups, respectively. The expression of proteins was lower after chilling, which revealed a suppressive effect of chilling on biological processes. The shot-gun strategy was used to analyze the IS fraction, with the identification of all the proteins by mass spectrometry. This allowed identification of 554 and 562 proteins in the low-fat-loss and high-fat-loss groups, respectively. Among these proteins, only the proteins that were up-regulated in the high-fat-loss group were significant (p value = 3.17 × 10(-3)) and corresponded to protein from the cytoskeleton and its associated proteins. Taken together, these results suggest that the variability of technological yield observed in processing plants could be explained by different aging states of fatty livers during chilling, most likely associated with different proteolytic patterns.

  13. The revised human liver cytochrome P450 "Pie": absolute protein quantification of CYP4F and CYP3A enzymes using targeted quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Michaels, Scott; Wang, Michael Zhuo

    2014-08-01

    The CYP4F subfamily of enzymes has been identified recently to be involved in the metabolism of endogenous compounds (arachidonic acid and leukotriene B4), nutrients (vitamins K1 and E), and xenobiotics (pafuramidine and fingolimod). CYP4F2 and CYP4F3B are reported to be expressed in the human liver. However, absolute concentrations of these enzymes in human liver microsomes (HLMs) and their interindividual variability have yet to be determined because of the lack of specific antibodies. Here, an liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based targeted quantitative proteomic approach was employed to determine the absolute protein concentrations of CYP4F2 and CYP4F3B compared with CYP3A in two panels of HLMs (n = 31). As a result, the human hepatic cytochrome P450 (P450) "pie" has been revised to include the contribution of CYP4F enzymes, which amounts to 15% of the total hepatic cytochrome P450 enzymes. CYP4F3B displayed low interindividual variability (3.3-fold) in the HLM panels whereas CYP4F2 displayed large variability (21-fold). However, CYP4F2 variability decreased to 3.4-fold if the two donors with the lowest expression were excluded. In contrast, CYP3A exhibited 29-fold interindividual variability in the same HLM panels. The proposed marker reaction for CYP4F enzymes pafuramidine/DB289 M1 formation did not correlate with CYP4F protein content, suggesting alternate metabolic pathways for DB289 M1 formation in HLMs. In conclusion, CYP4F enzymes are highly expressed in the human liver and their physiologic and pharmacologic roles warrant further investigation.

  14. Proteomic analysis of NME1/NDPK A null mouse liver: evidence for a post-translational regulation of annexin IV and EF-1Bα.

    PubMed

    Bruneel, Arnaud; Wendum, Dominique; Labas, Valérie; Mulner-Lorillon, Odile; Vinh, Joelle; Bosselut, Nelly; Ballot, Eric; Baudin, Bruno; Housset, Chantal; Dabernat, Sandrine; Lacombe, Marie-Lise; Boissan, Mathieu

    2011-10-01

    NME/NDPK family proteins are involved in the control of intracellular nucleotide homeostasis as well as in both physiological and pathological cellular processes, such as proliferation, differentiation, development, apoptosis, and metastasis dissemination, through mechanisms still largely unknown. One family member, NME1/NDPK-A, is a metastasis suppressor, yet the primary physiological functions of this protein are still missing. The purpose of this study was to identify new NME1/NDPK-A-dependent biological functions and pathways regulated by this gene in the liver. We analyzed the proteomes of wild-type and transgenic NME1-null mouse livers by combining two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry). We found that the levels of three proteins, namely, phenylalanine hydroxylase, annexin IV, and elongation factor 1 Bα (EF-1Bα), were strongly reduced in the cytosolic fraction of NME1(-/-) mouse livers when compared to the wild type. This was confirmed by immunoblotting analysis. No concomitant reduction in the corresponding messenger RNAs or of total protein level was observed, however, suggesting that NME1 controls annexin IV and EF-1Bα amounts by post-translational mechanisms. NME1 deletion induced a change in the subcellular location of annexin IV in hepatocytes resulting in enrichment of this protein at the plasma membrane. We also observed a redistribution of EF-1Bα in NME1(-/-) hepatocytes to an intracytoplasmic compartment that colocalized with a marker of the reticulum endoplasmic. Finally, we found reduced expression of annexin IV coincident with decreased NME1 expression in a panel of different carcinoma cell lines. Taken together, our data suggest for the first time that NME1 might regulate the subcellular trafficking of annexin IV and EF-1Bα. The potential role of these proteins in metastatic dissemination is discussed.

  15. Cellular immune responses to amoebic liver abcess in the guinea-pig.

    PubMed Central

    Bray, R S; Harris, W G

    1977-01-01

    Guinea-pigs infected in the liver with the Biswas strain of Entamoeba histolytica showed no dermal hypersensitivity but showed positive lymphocyte transformation and macrophage-migration inhibition. The time sequence showed an activated response at 4 days after infection, a full response at 8 days when the liver abscesses were resolving and a waning response at 12 days when the abscesses had healed. PMID:891028

  16. Physiological and proteomic analyses of salt stress response in the halophyte Halogeton glomeratus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juncheng; Meng, Yaxiong; Li, Baochun; Ma, Xiaole; Lai, Yong; Si, Erjing; Yang, Ke; Xu, Xianliang; Shang, Xunwu; Wang, Huajun; Wang, Di

    2015-01-01

    Very little is known about the adaptation mechanism of Chenopodiaceae Halogeton glomeratus, a succulent annual halophyte, under saline conditions. In this study, we investigated the morphological and physiological adaptation mechanisms of seedlings exposed to different concentrations of NaCl treatment for 21 d. Our results revealed that H. glomeratus has a robust ability to tolerate salt; its optimal growth occurs under approximately 100 mm NaCl conditions. Salt crystals were deposited in water-storage tissue under saline conditions. We speculate that osmotic adjustment may be the primary mechanism of salt tolerance in H. glomeratus, which transports toxic ions such as sodium into specific salt-storage cells and compartmentalizes them in large vacuoles to maintain the water content of tissues and the succulence of the leaves. To investigate the molecular response mechanisms to salt stress in H. glomeratus, we conducted a comparative proteomic analysis of seedling leaves that had been exposed to 200 mm NaCl for 24 h, 72 h and 7 d. Forty-nine protein spots, exhibiting significant changes in abundance after stress, were identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS/MS) and similarity searches across EST database of H. glomeratus. These stress-responsive proteins were categorized into nine functional groups, such as photosynthesis, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, and stress and defence response. PMID:25124288

  17. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Brassica napus in Response to Drought Stress.

    PubMed

    Koh, Jin; Chen, Gang; Yoo, Mi-Jeong; Zhu, Ning; Dufresne, Daniel; Erickson, John E; Shao, Hongbo; Chen, Sixue

    2015-08-01

    Drought is one of the most widespread stresses leading to retardation of plant growth and development. We examined proteome changes of an important oil seed crop, canola (Brassica napus L.), under drought stress over a 14-day period. Using iTRAQ LC-MS/MS, we identified 1976 proteins expressed during drought stress. Among them, 417 proteins showed significant changes in abundance, and 136, 244, 286, and 213 proteins were differentially expressed in the third, seventh, 10th, and 14th day of stress, respectively. Functional analysis indicated that the number of proteins associated with metabolism, protein folding and degradation, and signaling decreased, while those related to energy (photosynthesis), protein synthesis, and stress and defense increased in response to drought stress. The seventh and 10th-day profiles were similar to each other but with more post-translational modifications (PTMs) at day 10. Interestingly, 181 proteins underwent PTMs; 49 of them were differentially changed in drought-stressed plants, and 33 were observed at the 10th day. Comparison of protein expression changes with those of gene transcription showed a positive correlation in B. napus, although different patterns between transcripts and proteins were observed at each time point. Under drought stress, most protein abundance changes may be attributed to gene transcription, and PTMs clearly contribute to protein diversity and functions. PMID:26086353

  18. The proteomic response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in very high glucose conditions with amino acid supplementation.

    PubMed

    Pham, Trong Khoa; Wright, Phillip C

    2008-11-01

    Ethanol yield by Saccharomyces cerevisiae in very high glucose (VHG) media with an amino acid supplement was investigated. Amino acid supplementation led to positive cell responses, including reduced lag time and increased cell viability in VHG media. A quantitative shotgun proteomic analysis was used to understand how amino acid supplemented S. cerevisiae responds to high osmotic conditions. iTRAQ data revealed that most proteins involved in glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathways were up-regulated under high glucose shock. Reactivation of amino acid metabolism was also observed at the end of the lag phase. The relative abundance of most identified proteins, including aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis proteins, and heat-shock proteins, remained unchanged in the hours immediately following application of glucose shock. However, the expression of these proteins increased significantly at the end of the lag phase. Furthermore, the up-regulation of trehalose and glycogen biosynthesis proteins, first maintaining then latterly increasing glycolysis pathway activity was also observed. This was verified by enhanced ethanol yields at 10 and 12 h (0.43 and 0.45 g ethanol/g glucose) compared to 2 h (0.32 g ethanol/g glucose). These data combined with relevant metabolite measurements demonstrates that enhanced ethanol fermentation under VHG conditions can be achieved with the aid of amino acid supplementation.

  19. Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA010 Proteome Implicates Extracytoplasmic Function Sigma Factor in Stress Response

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Michael S.; Hurst, Gregory B.; Lu, Tse-Yuan S.; Perry, Leslie M.; Pan, Chongle; Lankford, Patricia K.; Pelletier, Dale A.

    2015-04-08

    Rhodopseudomonas palustris encodes 16 extracytoplasmic function (ECF) σ factors. In this paper, to begin to investigate the regulatory network of one of these ECF σ factors, the whole proteome of R. palustris CGA010 was quantitatively analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry from cultures episomally expressing the ECF σRPA4225 (ecfT) versus a WT control. Among the proteins with the greatest increase in abundance were catalase KatE, trehalose synthase, a DPS-like protein, and several regulatory proteins. Alignment of the cognate promoter regions driving expression of several upregulated proteins suggested a conserved binding motif in the -35 and -10 regions with the consensus sequence GGAAC-18N-TT. Additionally, the putative anti-σ factor RPA4224, whose gene is contained in the same predicted operon as RPA4225, was identified as interacting directly with the predicted response regulator RPA4223 by mass spectrometry of affinity-isolated protein complexes. Furthermore, another gene (RPA4226) coding for a protein that contains a cytoplasmic histidine kinase domain is located immediately upstream of RPA4225. The genomic organization of orthologs for these four genes is conserved in several other strains of R. palustris as well as in closely related α-Proteobacteria. Finally, taken together, these data suggest that ECF σRPA4225 and the three additional genes make up a sigma factor mimicry system in R. palustris.

  20. Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA010 Proteome Implicates Extracytoplasmic Function Sigma Factor in Stress Response

    DOE PAGES

    Allen, Michael S.; Hurst, Gregory B.; Lu, Tse-Yuan S.; Perry, Leslie M.; Pan, Chongle; Lankford, Patricia K.; Pelletier, Dale A.

    2015-04-08

    Rhodopseudomonas palustris encodes 16 extracytoplasmic function (ECF) σ factors. In this paper, to begin to investigate the regulatory network of one of these ECF σ factors, the whole proteome of R. palustris CGA010 was quantitatively analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry from cultures episomally expressing the ECF σRPA4225 (ecfT) versus a WT control. Among the proteins with the greatest increase in abundance were catalase KatE, trehalose synthase, a DPS-like protein, and several regulatory proteins. Alignment of the cognate promoter regions driving expression of several upregulated proteins suggested a conserved binding motif in the -35 and -10 regions with the consensus sequencemore » GGAAC-18N-TT. Additionally, the putative anti-σ factor RPA4224, whose gene is contained in the same predicted operon as RPA4225, was identified as interacting directly with the predicted response regulator RPA4223 by mass spectrometry of affinity-isolated protein complexes. Furthermore, another gene (RPA4226) coding for a protein that contains a cytoplasmic histidine kinase domain is located immediately upstream of RPA4225. The genomic organization of orthologs for these four genes is conserved in several other strains of R. palustris as well as in closely related α-Proteobacteria. Finally, taken together, these data suggest that ECF σRPA4225 and the three additional genes make up a sigma factor mimicry system in R. palustris.« less

  1. Proteomic responses to hypoxia at different temperatures in the great scallop (Pecten maximus)

    PubMed Central

    Lacroix, Camille; Richard, Joëlle; Flye-Sainte-Marie, Jonathan; Bargelloni, Luca; Pichereau, Vianney

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia and hyperthermia are two connected consequences of the ongoing global change and constitute major threats for coastal marine organisms. In the present study, we used a proteomic approach to characterize the changes induced by hypoxia in the great scallop, Pecten maximus, subjected to three different temperatures (10 °C, 18 °C and 25 °C). We did not observe any significant change induced by hypoxia in animals acclimated at 10 °C. At 18 °C and 25 °C, 16 and 11 protein spots were differentially accumulated between normoxia and hypoxia, respectively. Moreover, biochemical data (octopine dehydrogenase activity and arginine assays) suggest that animals grown at 25 °C switched their metabolism towards anaerobic metabolism when exposed to both normoxia and hypoxia, suggesting that this temperature is out of the scallops’ optimal thermal window. The 11 proteins identified with high confidence by mass spectrometry are involved in protein modifications and signaling (e.g., CK2, TBK1), energy metabolism (e.g., ENO3) or cytoskeleton (GSN), giving insights into the thermal-dependent response of scallops to hypoxia. PMID:25861557

  2. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Brassica napus in Response to Drought Stress.

    PubMed

    Koh, Jin; Chen, Gang; Yoo, Mi-Jeong; Zhu, Ning; Dufresne, Daniel; Erickson, John E; Shao, Hongbo; Chen, Sixue

    2015-08-01

    Drought is one of the most widespread stresses leading to retardation of plant growth and development. We examined proteome changes of an important oil seed crop, canola (Brassica napus L.), under drought stress over a 14-day period. Using iTRAQ LC-MS/MS, we identified 1976 proteins expressed during drought stress. Among them, 417 proteins showed significant changes in abundance, and 136, 244, 286, and 213 proteins were differentially expressed in the third, seventh, 10th, and 14th day of stress, respectively. Functional analysis indicated that the number of proteins associated with metabolism, protein folding and degradation, and signaling decreased, while those related to energy (photosynthesis), protein synthesis, and stress and defense increased in response to drought stress. The seventh and 10th-day profiles were similar to each other but with more post-translational modifications (PTMs) at day 10. Interestingly, 181 proteins underwent PTMs; 49 of them were differentially changed in drought-stressed plants, and 33 were observed at the 10th day. Comparison of protein expression changes with those of gene transcription showed a positive correlation in B. napus, although different patterns between transcripts and proteins were observed at each time point. Under drought stress, most protein abundance changes may be attributed to gene transcription, and PTMs clearly contribute to protein diversity and functions.

  3. Proteomic analysis of rice endosperm cells in response to expression of hGM-CSF.

    PubMed

    Luo, Junling; Ning, Tingting; Sun, Yunfang; Zhu, Jinghua; Zhu, Yingguo; Lin, Qishan; Yang, Daichang

    2009-02-01

    The accumulation of significant levels of transgenic products in plant cells is required not only for crop improvement, but also for molecular pharming. However, knowledge about the fate of transgenic products and endogenous proteins in grain cells is lacking. Here, we utilized a quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomic approach for comparative analysis of expression profiles of transgenic rice endosperm cells in response to expression of a recombinant pharmaceutical protein, human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulation factor (hGM-CSF). This study provided the first available evidence concerning the fate of exogenous and endogenous proteins in grain cells. Among 1883 identified proteins with a false positive rate of 5%, 103 displayed significant changes (p-value < 0.05) between the transgenic and the wild-type endosperm cells. Notably, endogenous storage proteins and most carbohydrate metabolism-related proteins were down-regulated, while 26S proteasome-related proteins and chaperones were up-regulated in the transgenic rice endosperm. Furthermore, it was observed that expression of hGM-CSF induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and activated the ubiquitin/26S-proteasome pathway, which led to ubiquitination of this foreign gene product in the transgenic rice endosperm.

  4. Hop (Humulus lupulus L.) response mechanisms in drought stress: Proteomic analysis with physiology.

    PubMed

    Kolenc, Zala; Vodnik, Dominik; Mandelc, Stanislav; Javornik, Branka; Kastelec, Damijana; Čerenak, Andreja

    2016-08-01

    Drought is one of the major environmental devastating stressors that impair the growth and productivity of crop plants. Despite the relevance of drought stress, changes in physiology and resistance mechanisms are not completely understood for certain crops, including hop (Humulus lupulus L.). In this research the drought response of hop was studied using a conventional physiological approach (gas exchange techniques, fluorescence, relative water content measurements) and proteomic analysis (2D-DIGE). Plants of two cultivars (Aurora and Savinjski golding) were exposed to progressive drought in a pot experiment and analysed at different stress stages (mild, moderate and severe). Measurements of relative water content revealed a hydrostable water balance of hop. Photosynthesis was decreased due to stomatal and non-stomatal limitation to the same extent in both cultivars. Of 28 identified differentially abundant proteins, the majority were down regulated and included in photosynthetic (41%) and sugar metabolism (33%). Fifteen % of identified proteins were classified into the nitrogen metabolism, 4% were related to a ROS related pathway and 7% to other functions. PMID:27085598

  5. Comparative Proteomic Insights into the Lactate Responses of Halophilic Salinicoccus roseus W12

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongyan; Wang, Limin; Yang, Han; Cai, Yumeng; Sun, Lifan; Xue, Yanfen; Yu, Bo; Ma, Yanhe

    2015-01-01

    Extremophiles use adaptive mechanisms to survive in extreme environments, which is of great importance for several biotechnological applications. A halophilic strain, Salinicoccus roseus W12, was isolated from salt lake in Inner Mongolia, China in this study. The ability of the strain to survive under high sodium conditions (including 20% sodium lactate or 25% sodium chloride, [w/v]) made it an ideal host to screen for key factors related to sodium lactate resistance. The proteomic responses to lactate were studied using W12 cells cultivated with or without lactate stress. A total of 1,656 protein spots in sodium lactate-treated culture and 1,843 spots in NaCl-treated culture were detected by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and 32 of 120 significantly altered protein spots (fold change > 2, p < 0.05) were identified by matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Among 21 successfully identified spots, 19 proteins were upregulated and 2 were downregulated. The identified proteins are mainly involved in metabolism, cellular processes and signaling, and information storage and processing. Transcription studies confirmed that most of the encoding genes were upregulated after the cells were exposed to lactate in 10 min. Cross-protecting and energy metabolism-related proteins played an important role in lactate tolerance for S. roseus W12. PMID:26358621

  6. Temporal quantitative proteomics of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in response to a nonlethal concentration of furfural.

    PubMed

    Lin, Feng-Ming; Tan, Ying; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2009-12-01

    Furfural, one of the main inhibitory compounds in lignocellulosic hydrolytes, inhibits the growth and ethanol production rate of yeast. To get a global view of the dynamic expression pattern of proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae during the fermentation with the introduction of 8 g/L furfural, the protein samples were taken before the addition of furfural, during the initial phase of furfural conversion and immediately after the conversion of furfural for comparative proteomic analysis with iTRAQ on a LC-ESI-MS/MS instrument. A comparison of the temporal expression pattern of 107 proteins related to protein synthesis between the reference cultures and the furfural-treated cultures showed that a temporal downregulation of these proteins was retarded after the addition of furfural. The expression levels of 20 enzymes in glucose fermentation and 5 enzymes in the tricarboxylic acid cycle were reduced by furfural, with notably delayed temporal downregulations of Glk1p, Tdh1p, Eno1p and Aco1p, which is correlated to the reduced ethanol formation rate and glucose consumption rate by 66.7 and 60.4%, respectively. In the presence of furfural, proteins catalyzing the upper part of the super pathway of sulfur amino acid biosynthesis were repressed at all time points, which is related to the inhibited growth of furfural-treated yeast. The expressions of 18 proteins related to stress response showed increased trends, including several highly induced heat shock proteins and proteins related to cellular signaling pathways.

  7. Comparative Proteomic Insights into the Lactate Responses of Halophilic Salinicoccus roseus W12.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongyan; Wang, Limin; Yang, Han; Cai, Yumeng; Sun, Lifan; Xue, Yanfen; Yu, Bo; Ma, Yanhe

    2015-01-01

    Extremophiles use adaptive mechanisms to survive in extreme environments, which is of great importance for several biotechnological applications. A halophilic strain, Salinicoccus roseus W12, was isolated from salt lake in Inner Mongolia, China in this study. The ability of the strain to survive under high sodium conditions (including 20% sodium lactate or 25% sodium chloride, [w/v]) made it an ideal host to screen for key factors related to sodium lactate resistance. The proteomic responses to lactate were studied using W12 cells cultivated with or without lactate stress. A total of 1,656 protein spots in sodium lactate-treated culture and 1,843 spots in NaCl-treated culture were detected by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and 32 of 120 significantly altered protein spots (fold change > 2, p < 0.05) were identified by matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Among 21 successfully identified spots, 19 proteins were upregulated and 2 were downregulated. The identified proteins are mainly involved in metabolism, cellular processes and signaling, and information storage and processing. Transcription studies confirmed that most of the encoding genes were upregulated after the cells were exposed to lactate in 10 min. Cross-protecting and energy metabolism-related proteins played an important role in lactate tolerance for S. roseus W12. PMID:26358621

  8. Profiling of Host Cell Response to Successive Canine Parvovirus Infection Based on Kinetic Proteomic Change Identification.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hang; Cheng, Yuening; Wang, Jianke; Lin, Peng; Yi, Li; Sun, Yaru; Ren, Jingqiang; Tong, Mingwei; Cao, Zhigang; Li, Jiawei; Deng, Jinliang; Cheng, Shipeng

    2016-01-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) reproduces by co-opting the resources of host cells, inevitably causing cytotoxic effects to the host cells. Feline kidney F81 cells are sensitive to CPV infection and show disparate growing statuses at different time points post-infection. This study analysed the response of F81 cells to CPV infection at successive infection time points by iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics. Differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) during 60 h of infection and at selected time points post-infection were identified by an analysis of variance test and a two-tailed unpaired t test, respectively. DEPs with similar quantitative changes were clustered by hierarchical clustering and analysed by gene ontology enrichment, revealing that 12 h and 60 h post-infection were the optimal times to analyse the autonomous parvovirus replication and apoptosis processes, respectively. Using the Metacore(TM) database, 29 DEPs were enriched in a network involved in p53 regulation. Besides, a significantly enriched pathway suggests that the CPV-induced cytopathic effect was probably due to the deficiency of functional CFTR caused by CPV infection. This study uncovered the systemic changes in key cellular factors involved in CPV infection and help to understand the molecular mechanisms of the anti-cancer activity of CPV and the cytopathic effects induced by CPV infection. PMID:27406444

  9. Proteomics of inflammatory and oxidative stress response in cows with subclinical and clinical mastitis.

    PubMed

    Turk, Romana; Piras, Cristian; Kovačić, Mislav; Samardžija, Marko; Ahmed, Hany; De Canio, Michele; Urbani, Andrea; Meštrić, Zlata Flegar; Soggiu, Alessio; Bonizzi, Luigi; Roncada, Paola

    2012-07-19

    Cow serum proteome was evaluated by three different complementary approaches in the control group, subclinical and clinical mastitis in order to possibly find differential protein expression useful for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of mastitis as well as for an early diagnosis of the disease. The systemic inflammatory and oxidative stress response in cows with subclinical and clinical mastitis were observed. The collected evidence shows a differential protein expression of serpin A3-1, vitronectin-like protein and complement factor H in subclinical mastitis in comparison with the control. It was also found a differential protein expression of inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4, serpin A3-1, C4b-binding protein alpha chain, haptoglobin and apolipoprotein A-I in clinical mastitis compared to the control. Among the inflammatory proteins up-regulated in clinical mastitis, vitronectin is over-expressed in both subclinical and clinical mastitis indicating a strong bacterial infection. This suggests vitronectin as an important mediator in the pathogenesis of the onset of mastitis as well as a valuable marker for diagnosis of the subclinical form of the disease. Obtained data could be useful for the detection of mastitis during the subclinical phase and for a better comprehension of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the onset of the disease.

  10. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Rice (Oryza sativa L.) Salt Response

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jianwen; Lan, Hongxia; Fang, Huimin; Huang, Xi; Zhang, Hongsheng; Huang, Ji

    2015-01-01

    Salt stress is one of most serious limiting factors for crop growth and production. An isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation (iTRAQ) approach was used to analyze proteomic changes in rice shoots under salt stress in this study. A total of 56 proteins were significantly altered and 16 of them were enriched in the pathways of photosynthesis, antioxidant and oxidative phosphorylation. Among these 16 proteins, peroxiredoxin Q and photosystem I subunit D were up-regulated, while thioredoxin M-like, thioredoxin x, thioredoxin peroxidase, glutathione S-transferase F3, PSI subunit H, light-harvesting antenna complex I subunits, chloroplast chaperonin, vacuolar ATP synthase subunit H, and ATP synthase delta chain were down-regulated. Moreover, physiological data including total antioxidant capacity, peroxiredoxin activity, chlorophyll a/b content, glutathione S-transferase activity, reduced glutathione content and ATPase activity were consistent with changes in the levels of these proteins. The levels of the mRNAs encoding these proteins were also analyzed by real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR, and approximately 86% of the results were consistent with the iTRAQ data. Importantly, our data suggest the important role of PSI in balancing energy supply and ROS generation under salt stress. This study provides information for an improved understanding of the function of photosynthesis and PSI in the salt-stress response of rice. PMID:25793471

  11. Proteomic analysis of rice endosperm cells in response to expression of hGM-CSF.

    PubMed

    Luo, Junling; Ning, Tingting; Sun, Yunfang; Zhu, Jinghua; Zhu, Yingguo; Lin, Qishan; Yang, Daichang

    2009-02-01

    The accumulation of significant levels of transgenic products in plant cells is required not only for crop improvement, but also for molecular pharming. However, knowledge about the fate of transgenic products and endogenous proteins in grain cells is lacking. Here, we utilized a quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomic approach for comparative analysis of expression profiles of transgenic rice endosperm cells in response to expression of a recombinant pharmaceutical protein, human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulation factor (hGM-CSF). This study provided the first available evidence concerning the fate of exogenous and endogenous proteins in grain cells. Among 1883 identified proteins with a false positive rate of 5%, 103 displayed significant changes (p-value < 0.05) between the transgenic and the wild-type endosperm cells. Notably, endogenous storage proteins and most carbohydrate metabolism-related proteins were down-regulated, while 26S proteasome-related proteins and chaperones were up-regulated in the transgenic rice endosperm. Furthermore, it was observed that expression of hGM-CSF induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and activated the ubiquitin/26S-proteasome pathway, which led to ubiquitination of this foreign gene product in the transgenic rice endosperm. PMID:18778094

  12. Cellular response to empty and palladium-conjugated amino-polystyrene nanospheres uptake: a proteomic study.

    PubMed

    Pietrovito, Laura; Cano-Cortés, Victoria; Gamberi, Tania; Magherini, Francesca; Bianchi, Laura; Bini, Luca; Sánchez-Martín, Rosario M; Fasano, Mauro; Modesti, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Amino polystyrene nanospheres are shown to be efficient and controllable delivery devices, capable of transporting several bioactive cargoes. Recently, the design of a new device for prodrug activation, using these nanospheres with palladium encapsulated onto them, has been developed successfully. To study the influence of the cellular uptake of these nanodevices, we investigated the cellular response of human embryonic kidney cells (HEK-293T) and murine fibroblasts (L929) treated with empty or palladium-conjugated amino polystyrene nanospheres. To identify differentially expressed proteins, we performed an exhaustive proteomic analysis. In accordance with genomic data previously obtained, the uptake of the empty nanospheres did not induce significant variation in protein expression levels. Following the treatment with palladium-conjugated nanospheres, some changes in protein profiles in both cell lines were observed; these alterations affect proteins involved in cell metabolism and intracellular transport. No key regulator of the cell cycle result was differentially expressed after the treatment, confirming that these innovative drug delivery systems are harmless and well tolerated by the cells.

  13. Physiological and proteomic responses of cotton (Gossypium herbaceum L.) to drought stress.

    PubMed

    Deeba, Farah; Pandey, Ashutosh K; Ranjan, Sanjay; Mishra, Ashwarya; Singh, Ruchi; Sharma, Y K; Shirke, Pramod A; Pandey, Vivek

    2012-04-01

    Cotton genotype RAHS 187 was analyzed for changes in physiology, biochemistry and proteome due to drought stress. The deleterious effect of drought in cotton plants was mainly targeted towards photosynthesis. The gas-exchange parameters of net photosynthesis (A), stomatal conductance (g(s)) and transpiration (E) showed a decreasing trend as the drought intensity increased. The fluorescence parameters of, effective quantum yield of PSII (Φ(PSII)), and electron transport rates (ETR), also showed a declining trend. As the intensity of drought increased, both H(2)O(2) and MDA levels increased indicating oxidative stress. Anthocyanin levels were increased by more than four folds in the droughted plants. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis detected more than 550 protein spots. Significantly expressed proteins were analyzed by peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) using MALDI-TOF-TOF. The number of up-regulated spots was found to be 16 while 6 spots were down-regulated. The reasonable implications in drought response of the identified proteins vis-à-vis physiological changes are discussed. Results provide some additional information that can lead to a better understanding of the molecular basis of drought-sensitivity in cotton plants.

  14. Profiling of Host Cell Response to Successive Canine Parvovirus Infection Based on Kinetic Proteomic Change Identification

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hang; Cheng, Yuening; Wang, Jianke; Lin, Peng; Yi, Li; Sun, Yaru; Ren, Jingqiang; Tong, Mingwei; Cao, Zhigang; Li, Jiawei; Deng, Jinliang; Cheng, Shipeng

    2016-01-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) reproduces by co-opting the resources of host cells, inevitably causing cytotoxic effects to the host cells. Feline kidney F81 cells are sensitive to CPV infection and show disparate growing statuses at different time points post-infection. This study analysed the response of F81 cells to CPV infection at successive infection time points by iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics. Differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) during 60 h of infection and at selected time points post-infection were identified by an analysis of variance test and a two-tailed unpaired t test, respectively. DEPs with similar quantitative changes were clustered by hierarchical clustering and analysed by gene ontology enrichment, revealing that 12 h and 60 h post-infection were the optimal times to analyse the autonomous parvovirus replication and apoptosis processes, respectively. Using the MetacoreTM database, 29 DEPs were enriched in a network involved in p53 regulation. Besides, a significantly enriched pathway suggests that the CPV-induced cytopathic effect was probably due to the deficiency of functional CFTR caused by CPV infection. This study uncovered the systemic changes in key cellular factors involved in CPV infection and help to understand the molecular mechanisms of the anti-cancer activity of CPV and the cytopathic effects induced by CPV infection. PMID:27406444

  15. Profiling of Host Cell Response to Successive Canine Parvovirus Infection Based on Kinetic Proteomic Change Identification.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hang; Cheng, Yuening; Wang, Jianke; Lin, Peng; Yi, Li; Sun, Yaru; Ren, Jingqiang; Tong, Mingwei; Cao, Zhigang; Li, Jiawei; Deng, Jinliang; Cheng, Shipeng

    2016-01-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) reproduces by co-opting the resources of host cells, inevitably causing cytotoxic effects to the host cells. Feline kidney F81 cells are sensitive to CPV infection and show disparate growing statuses at different time points post-infection. This study analysed the response of F81 cells to CPV infection at successive infection time points by iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics. Differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) during 60 h of infection and at selected time points post-infection were identified by an analysis of variance test and a two-tailed unpaired t test, respectively. DEPs with similar quantitative changes were clustered by hierarchical clustering and analysed by gene ontology enrichment, revealing that 12 h and 60 h post-infection were the optimal times to analyse the autonomous parvovirus replication and apoptosis processes, respectively. Using the Metacore(TM) database, 29 DEPs were enriched in a network involved in p53 regulation. Besides, a significantly enriched pathway suggests that the CPV-induced cytopathic effect was probably due to the deficiency of functional CFTR caused by CPV infection. This study uncovered the systemic changes in key cellular factors involved in CPV infection and help to understand the molecular mechanisms of the anti-cancer activity of CPV and the cytopathic effects induced by CPV infection.

  16. Identification of flooding stress responsible cascades in root and hypocotyl of soybean using proteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Setsuko; Sugimoto, Tetsuya; Hoshino, Tomoki; Nanjo, Yohei; Furukawa, Kiyoshi

    2010-03-01

    Flooding inducible proteins were analyzed using a proteomic technique to understand the mechanism of soybean response to immersion in water. Soybeans were germinated for 2 days, and then subjected to flooding for 2 days. Proteins were extracted from root and hypocotyl, separated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, stained by Coomassie brilliant blue, and analyzed by protein sequencing and mass spectrometry. Out of 803 proteins, 21 proteins were significantly up-regulated, and seven proteins were down-regulated by flooding stress. Of the total, 11 up-regulated proteins were classified as related to protein destination/storage and three proteins to energy, while four down-regulated proteins were related to protein destination/storage and three proteins to disease/defense. The expression of 22 proteins significantly changed within 1 day after flooding stress. The effects of flooding, nitrogen substitution without flooding, or flooding with aeration were analyzed for 1-4 days. The expression of alcohol dehydrogenase increased remarkably by nitrogen substitution compared to flooding. The expression of many proteins that changed due to flooding showed the same tendencies observed for nitrogen substitution; however, the expression of proteins classified into protein destination/storage did not.

  17. Copper response of Proteus hauseri based on proteomic and genetic expression and cell morphology analyses.

    PubMed

    Ng, I-Son; Zheng, Xuesong; Wang, Nan; Chen, Bor-Yann; Zhang, Xia; Lu, Yinghua

    2014-07-01

    The copper response of Proteus hauseri ZMd44 was determined using one-dimensional (1D) gel electrophoresis coupled with MALDI-TOF-TOF mass spectrometry for a similarity analysis of proteins isolated from P. hauseri ZMd44 cultured in CuSO4-bearing LB medium. Candidate proteins identified as a copper-transporting P-type ATPase (CTPP), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), flagellin (Fla), and outer membrane proteins (Omps) were the major copper-associated proteins in P. hauseri. In a comparative analysis of subcellular (i.e., periplasmic, intracellular, and inner membranes) and cellular debris, proteomics analysis revealed a distinct differential expression of proteins in P. hauseri with and without copper ion exposure. These findings were consistent with the transcription level dynamics determined using quantitative real-time PCR. Based on a genetic cluster analysis of copper-associated proteins from P. hauseri, Fla and one of the Omps showed greater diversity in their protein sequences compared to those of other Proteus species. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the observed growth on LB agar plates showed that the swarming motility of cells was significantly suppressed and inhibited upon Cu(II) exposure. Thus, copper stress could have important therapeutic significance due to the loss of swarming motility capacity in P. hauseri, which causes urinary tract infections.

  18. Identification of flooding stress responsible cascades in root and hypocotyl of soybean using proteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Setsuko; Sugimoto, Tetsuya; Hoshino, Tomoki; Nanjo, Yohei; Furukawa, Kiyoshi

    2010-03-01

    Flooding inducible proteins were analyzed using a proteomic technique to understand the mechanism of soybean response to immersion in water. Soybeans were germinated for 2 days, and then subjected to flooding for 2 days. Proteins were extracted from root and hypocotyl, separated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, stained by Coomassie brilliant blue, and analyzed by protein sequencing and mass spectrometry. Out of 803 proteins, 21 proteins were significantly up-regulated, and seven proteins were down-regulated by flooding stress. Of the total, 11 up-regulated proteins were classified as related to protein destination/storage and three proteins to energy, while four down-regulated proteins were related to protein destination/storage and three proteins to disease/defense. The expression of 22 proteins significantly changed within 1 day after flooding stress. The effects of flooding, nitrogen substitution without flooding, or flooding with aeration were analyzed for 1-4 days. The expression of alcohol dehydrogenase increased remarkably by nitrogen substitution compared to flooding. The expression of many proteins that changed due to flooding showed the same tendencies observed for nitrogen substitution; however, the expression of proteins classified into protein destination/storage did not. PMID:19333721

  19. Responses to nickel in the proteome of the hyperaccumulator plant Alyssum lesbiacum.

    PubMed

    Ingle, Robert A; Smith, J Andrew C; Sweetlove, Lee J

    2005-12-01

    A proteomic analysis of the Ni hyperaccumulator plant Alyssum lesbiacum was carried out to identify proteins that may play a role in the exceptional degree of Ni tolerance and accumulation characteristic of this metallophyte. Of the 816 polypeptides detected in root tissue by 2D SDS-PAGE, eleven increased and one decreased in abundance relative to total protein after 6-week-old plants were transferred from a standard nutrient solution containing trace concentrations of Ni to a moderately high Ni treatment (0.3 mM NiSO4) for 48 h. These polypeptides were identified by tandem mass spectrometry and the majority were found to be involved in sulphur metabolism (consistent with a re-allocation of sulphur towards cysteine and glutathione), protection against reactive oxygen species, or heat-shock response. In contrast, very few polypeptides were found to change in abundance in root or shoot tissue after plants were exposed for 28 days to 0.03 mM NiSO4, a concentration representing the optimum for growth of this species but sufficient to lead to hyperaccumulation of Ni in the shoot. Under these conditions, constitutively expressed genes in this highly Ni-tolerant species may be sufficient to allow for effective chelation and sequestration of Ni without the need for additional protein synthesis. PMID:16388402

  20. Stress Responsive Proteins Are Actively Regulated during Rice (Oryza sativa) Embryogenesis as Indicated by Quantitative Proteomics Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zi, Jin; Zhang, Jiyuan; Wang, Quanhui; Zhou, Baojin; Zhong, Junyan; Zhang, Chaoliang; Qiu, Xuemei; Wen, Bo; Zhang, Shenyan; Fu, Xiqin; Lin, Liang; Liu, Siqi

    2013-01-01

    Embryogenesis is the initial step in a plant’s life, and the molecular changes that occur during embryonic development are largely unknown. To explore the relevant molecular events, we used the isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) coupled with the shotgun proteomics technique (iTRAQ/Shotgun) to study the proteomic changes of rice embryos during embryogenesis. For the first time, a total of 2 165 unique proteins were identified in rice embryos, and the abundances of 867 proteins were actively changed based on the statistical evaluation of the quantitative MS/MS signals. The quantitative data were then confirmed using multiple reactions monitoring (MRM) and were also supported by our previous study based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2 DE). Using the proteome at 6 days after pollination (DAP) as a reference, cluster analysis of these differential proteins throughout rice embryogenesis revealed that 25% were up-regulated and 75% were down-regulated. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis implicated that most of the up-regulated proteins were functionally categorized as stress responsive, mainly including heat shock-, lipid transfer-, and reactive oxygen species-related proteins. The stress-responsive proteins were thus postulated to play an important role during seed maturation. PMID:24058531

  1. Apoplast proteome reveals that extracellular matrix contributes to multistress response in poplar

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Riverine ecosystems, highly sensitive to climate change and human activities, are characterized by rapid environmental change to fluctuating water levels and siltation, causing stress on their biological components. We have little understanding of mechanisms by which riverine plant species have developed adaptive strategies to cope with stress in dynamic environments while maintaining growth and development. Results We report that poplar (Populus spp.) has evolved a systems level "stress proteome" in the leaf-stem-root apoplast continuum to counter biotic and abiotic factors. To obtain apoplast proteins from P. deltoides, we developed pressure-chamber and water-displacement methods for leaves and stems, respectively. Analyses of 303 proteins and corresponding transcripts coupled with controlled experiments and bioinformatics demonstrate that poplar depends on constitutive and inducible factors to deal with water, pathogen, and oxidative stress. However, each apoplast possessed a unique set of proteins, indicating that response to stress is partly compartmentalized. Apoplast proteins that are involved in glycolysis, fermentation, and catabolism of sucrose and starch appear to enable poplar to grow normally under water stress. Pathogenesis-related proteins mediating water and pathogen stress in apoplast were particularly abundant and effective in suppressing growth of the most prevalent poplar pathogen Melampsora. Unexpectedly, we found diverse peroxidases that appear to be involved in stress-induced cell wall modification in apoplast, particularly during the growing season. Poplar developed a robust antioxidative system to buffer oxidation in stem apoplast. Conclusion These findings suggest that multistress response in the apoplast constitutes an important adaptive trait for poplar to inhabit dynamic environments and is also a potential mechanism in other riverine plant species. PMID:21114852

  2. Transcriptional and proteomic analyses of two-component response regulators in multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lei; Yang, Liu; Zeng, Xianfei; Danzheng, Jiacuo; Zheng, Qing; Liu, Jiayun; Liu, Feng; Xin, Yijuan; Cheng, Xiaodong; Su, Mingquan; Ma, Yueyun; Hao, Xiaoke

    2015-07-01

    Two-component systems (TCSs) have been reported to exhibit a sensing and responding role under drug stress that induces drug resistance in several bacterial species. However, the relationship between TCSs and multidrug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis has not been comprehensively analysed to date. In this study, 90 M. tuberculosis clinical isolates were analysed using 15-loci mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit (MIRU)-variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) typing and repetitive extragenic palindromic (rep)-PCR-based DNA fingerprinting. The results showed that all of the isolates were of the Beijing lineage, and strains with a drug-susceptible phenotype had not diverged into similar genotype clusters. Expression analysis of 13 response regulators of TCSs using real-time PCR and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) proteomic analysis demonstrated that four response regulator genes (devR, mtrA, regX3 and Rv3143) were significantly upregulated in multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains compared with the laboratory strain H37Rv as well as drug-susceptible and isoniazid-monoresistant strains (P<0.05). DNA sequencing revealed that the promoter regions of devR, mtrA, regX3 and Rv3143 did not contain any mutations. Moreover, expression of the four genes could be induced by most of the four first-line antitubercular agents. In addition, either deletion or overexpression of devR in Mycobacterium bovis BCG did not alter its sensitivity to the four antitubercular drugs. This suggests that upregulation of devR, which is common in MDR-TB strains, might be induced by drug stress and hypoxic adaptation following the acquisition of multidrug resistance.

  3. Transcriptomic and Proteomic Responses of Sweetpotato Whitefly, Bemisia tabaci, to Thiamethoxam

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Nina; Xie, Wen; Yang, Xin; Wang, Shaoli; Wu, Qingjun; Li, Rumei; Pan, Huipeng; Liu, Baiming; Shi, Xiaobin; Fang, Yong; Xu, Baoyun; Zhou, Xuguo; Zhang, Youjun

    2013-01-01

    Background The sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae), is one of the most widely distributed agricultural pests. Although it has developed resistance to many registered insecticides including the neonicotinoid insecticide thiamethoxam, the mechanisms that regulate the resistance are poorly understood. To understand the molecular basis of thiamethoxam resistance, “omics” analyses were carried out to examine differences between resistant and susceptible B. tabaci at both transcriptional and translational levels. Results A total of 1,338 mRNAs and 52 proteins were differentially expressed between resistant and susceptible B. tabaci. Among them, 11 transcripts had concurrent transcription and translation profiles. KEGG analysis mapped 318 and 35 differentially expressed genes and proteins, respectively, to 160 and 59 pathways (p<0.05). Thiamethoxam treatment activated metabolic pathways (e.g., drug metabolism), in which 118 transcripts were putatively linked to insecticide resistance, including up-regulated glutathione-S-transferase, UDP glucuronosyltransferase, glucosyl/glucuronosyl transferase, and cytochrome P450. Gene Ontology analysis placed these genes and proteins into protein complex, metabolic process, cellular process, signaling, and response to stimulus categories. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis validated “omics” response, and suggested a highly overexpressed P450, CYP6CX1, as a candidate molecular basis for the mechanistic study of thiamethoxam resistance in whiteflies. Finally, enzymatic activity assays showed elevated detoxification activities in the resistant B. tabaci. Conclusions This study demonstrates the applicability of high-throughput omics tools for identifying molecular candidates related to thiamethoxam resistance in an agricultural important insect pest. In addition, transcriptomic and proteomic analyses provide a solid foundation for future functional investigations into the complex molecular mechanisms

  4. Apoplast proteome reveals that extracellular matrix contributes to multi-stress response in poplar

    SciTech Connect

    Pechanova, Olga; Hsu, Chuan-Yu; Adams, Joshua P.; Pechan, Tibor; Vandervelde, Lindsay; Drnevich, Jenny; Jawdy, Sara; Adeli, Ardeshir; Suttle, Jeffrey; Lawrence, Amanda; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Seguin, Armand; Yuceer, Cetin

    2010-01-01

    Riverine ecosystems, highly sensitive to climate change and human activities, are characterized by rapid environmental change to fluctuating water levels and siltation, causing stress on their biological components. We have little understanding of mechanisms by which riverine plant species have developed adaptive strategies to cope with stress in dynamic environments while maintaining growth and development. We report that poplar (Populus spp.) has evolved a systems level 'stress proteome' in the leaf-stem-root apoplast continuum to counter biotic and abiotic factors. To obtain apoplast proteins from P. deltoides, we developed pressure-chamber and water-displacement methods for leaves and stems, respectively. Analyses of 303 proteins and corresponding transcripts coupled with controlled experiments and bioinformatics demonstrate that poplar depends on constitutive and inducible factors to deal with water, pathogen, and oxidative stress. However, each apoplast possessed a unique set of proteins, indicating that response to stress is partly compartmentalized. Apoplast proteins that are involved in glycolysis, fermentation, and catabolism of sucrose and starch appear to enable poplar to grow normally under water stress. Pathogenesis-related proteins mediating water and pathogen stress in apoplast were particularly abundant and effective in suppressing growth of the most prevalent poplar pathogen Melampsora. Unexpectedly, we found diverse peroxidases that appear to be involved in stress-induced cell wall modification in apoplast, particularly during the growing season. Poplar developed a robust antioxidative system to buffer oxidation in stem apoplast. These findings suggest that multistress response in the apoplast constitutes an important adaptive trait for poplar to inhabit dynamic environments and is also a potential mechanism in other riverine plant species.

  5. Proteomic Assessment of Biochemical Pathways That Are Critical to Nickel-Induced Toxicity Responses in Human Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Yue; Bruno, Maribel; Haykal-Coates, Najwa; Wallace, Kathleen; Andrews, Debora; Swank, Adam; Winnik, Witold; Ross, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms underlying toxicity initiated by nickel, a ubiquitous environmental contaminant and known human carcinogen is necessary for proper assessment of its risks to human and environment. Among a variety of toxic mechanisms, disruption of protein responses and protein response-based biochemical pathways represents a key mechanism through which nickel induces cytotoxicity and carcinogenesis. To identify protein responses and biochemical pathways that are critical to nickel-induced toxicity responses, we measured cytotoxicity and changes in expression and phosphorylation status of 14 critical biochemical pathway regulators in human BEAS-2B cells exposed to four concentrations of nickel using an integrated proteomic approach. A subset of the pathway regulators, including interleukin-6, and JNK, were found to be linearly correlated with cell viability, and may function as molecular determinants of cytotoxic responses of BEAS-2B cells to nickel exposures. In addition, 128 differentially expressed proteins were identified by two dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry. Principal component analysis, hierarchical cluster analyses, and ingenuity signaling pathway analysis (IPA) identified putative nickel toxicity pathways. Some of the proteins and pathways identified have not previously been linked to nickel toxicity. Based on the consistent results obtained from both ELISA and 2-DE proteomic analysis, we propose a core signaling pathway regulating cytotoxic responses of human BEAS-2B cells to nickel exposures, which integrates a small set of proteins involved in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis pathways, apoptosis, protein degradation, and stress responses including inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID:27626938

  6. Proteomic Assessment of Biochemical Pathways That Are Critical to Nickel-Induced Toxicity Responses in Human Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Ge, Yue; Bruno, Maribel; Haykal-Coates, Najwa; Wallace, Kathleen; Andrews, Debora; Swank, Adam; Winnik, Witold; Ross, Jeffrey A

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms underlying toxicity initiated by nickel, a ubiquitous environmental contaminant and known human carcinogen is necessary for proper assessment of its risks to human and environment. Among a variety of toxic mechanisms, disruption of protein responses and protein response-based biochemical pathways represents a key mechanism through which nickel induces cytotoxicity and carcinogenesis. To identify protein responses and biochemical pathways that are critical to nickel-induced toxicity responses, we measured cytotoxicity and changes in expression and phosphorylation status of 14 critical biochemical pathway regulators in human BEAS-2B cells exposed to four concentrations of nickel using an integrated proteomic approach. A subset of the pathway regulators, including interleukin-6, and JNK, were found to be linearly correlated with cell viability, and may function as molecular determinants of cytotoxic responses of BEAS-2B cells to nickel exposures. In addition, 128 differentially expressed proteins were identified by two dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry. Principal component analysis, hierarchical cluster analyses, and ingenuity signaling pathway analysis (IPA) identified putative nickel toxicity pathways. Some of the proteins and pathways identified have not previously been linked to nickel toxicity. Based on the consistent results obtained from both ELISA and 2-DE proteomic analysis, we propose a core signaling pathway regulating cytotoxic responses of human BEAS-2B cells to nickel exposures, which integrates a small set of proteins involved in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis pathways, apoptosis, protein degradation, and stress responses including inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID:27626938

  7. System-wide survey of proteomic responses of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) to in vitro cultivation.

    PubMed

    Mindaye, Samuel T; Lo Surdo, Jessica; Bauer, Steven R; Alterman, Michail A

    2015-11-01

    Human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs, also loosely called bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells) are the subject of increasing numbers of clinical trials and laboratory research. Our group recently reported on the optimization of a workflow for a sensitive proteomic study of hBMSCs. Here, we couple this workflow with a label-free protein quantitation method to investigate the molecular responses of hBMSCs to long-term in vitro passaging. We explored the proteomic responses of hBMSCs by assessing the expression levels of proteins at early passage (passage 3, P3) and late passage (P7). We used multiple biological as well as technical replicates to ensure that the detected proteomic changes are repeatable between cultures and thus likely to be biologically relevant. Over 1700 proteins were quantified at three passages and a list of differentially expressed proteins was compiled. Bioinformatics-based network analysis and term enrichment revealed that metabolic pathways are largely altered, where many proteins in the glycolytic, pentose phosphate, and TCA pathways were shown to be largely upregulated in late passages. We also observed significant proteomic alterations in functional categories including apoptosis, and ER-based protein processing and sorting following in vitro cell aging. We posit that the comprehensive map outlined in this report of affected phenotypes as well as the underpinning molecular factors tremendously benefit the effort to uncovering targets that are not just used only to monitor cell fitness but can be employed to slowdown the in vitro aging process in hBMSCs and hence ensure manufacturing of cells with known quality, efficacy and stability. PMID:26523674

  8. Quantitative proteomic analyses of the response of acidophilic microbial communities to different pH conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Belnap, Christopher P.; Pan, Chongle; Denef, Vincent; Samatova, Nagiza F; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2011-01-01

    Extensive genomic characterization of multi-species acid mine drainage microbial consortia combined with laboratory cultivation has enabled the application of quantitative proteomic analyses at the community level. In this study, quantitative proteomic comparisons were used to functionally characterize laboratory-cultivated acidophilic communities sustained in pH 1.45 or 0.85 conditions. The distributions of all proteins identified for individual organisms indicated biases for either high or low pH, and suggests pH-specific niche partitioning for low abundance bacteria and archaea. Although the proteome of the dominant bacterium, Leptospirillum group II, was largely unaffected by pH treatments, analysis of functional categories indicated proteins involved in amino acid and nucleotide metabolism, as well as cell membrane/envelope biogenesis were overrepresented at high pH. Comparison of specific protein abundances indicates higher pH conditions favor Leptospirillum group III, whereas low pH conditions promote the growth of certain archaea. Thus, quantitative proteomic comparisons revealed distinct differences in community composition and metabolic function of individual organisms during different pH treatments. Proteomic analysis revealed other aspects of community function. Different numbers of phage proteins were identified across biological replicates, indicating stochastic spatial heterogeneity of phage outbreaks. Additionally, proteomic data were used to identify a previously unknown genotypic variant of Leptospirillum group II, an indication of selection for a specific Leptospirillum group II population in laboratory communities. Our results confirm the importance of pH and related geochemical factors in fine-tuning acidophilic microbial community structure and function at the species and strain level, and demonstrate the broad utility of proteomics in laboratory community studies.

  9. Complex changes in the liver mitochondrial proteome of short chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Mohsen, Al-Walid; Uechi, Guy; Schreiber, Emanuel; Balasubramani, Manimalha; Day, Billy; Michael Barmada, M; Vockley, Jerry

    2014-05-01

    Short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD) deficiency is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism that leads to the impaired mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation of short chain fatty acids. It is heterogeneous in clinical presentation including asymptomatic in most patients identified by newborn screening. Multiple mutations have been identified in patients; however, neither clear genotype-phenotype relationships nor a good correlation between genotype and current biochemical markers for diagnosis has been identified. The definition and pathophysiology of this deficiency remain unclear. To better understand this disorder at a global level, quantitative alterations in the mitochondrial proteome in SCAD deficient mice were examined using a combined proteomics approach: two-dimensional gel difference electrophoresis (2DIGE) followed by protein identification with MALDI-TOF/TOF and iTRAQ labeling followed by nano-LC/MALDI-TOF/TOF. We found broad mitochondrial dysfunction in SCAD deficiency. Changes in the levels of multiple energy metabolism related proteins were identified indicating that a more complex mechanism for development of symptoms may exist. Affected pathways converge on disorders with neurologic symptoms, suggesting that even asymptomatic individuals with SCAD deficiency may be at risk to develop more severe disease. Our results also identified a pattern associated with hepatotoxicity implicated in mitochondrial dysfunction, fatty acid metabolism, decrease of depolarization of mitochondria and mitochondrial membranes, and swelling of mitochondria, demonstrating that SCAD deficiency relates more directly to mitochondrial dysfunction and alteration of fatty acid metabolism. We propose several candidate molecules that may serve as markers for recognition of clinical risk associated with this disorder.

  10. Analysis of cellular responses of macrophages to zinc ions and zinc oxide nanoparticles: a combined targeted and proteomic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triboulet, Sarah; Aude-Garcia, Catherine; Armand, Lucie; Gerdil, Adèle; Diemer, Hélène; Proamer, Fabienne; Collin-Faure, Véronique; Habert, Aurélie; Strub, Jean-Marc; Hanau, Daniel; Herlin, Nathalie; Carrière, Marie; van Dorsselaer, Alain; Rabilloud, Thierry

    2014-05-01

    Two different zinc oxide nanoparticles, as well as zinc ions, are used to study the cellular responses of the RAW 264 macrophage cell line. A proteomic screen is used to provide a wide view of the molecular effects of zinc, and the most prominent results are cross-validated by targeted studies. Furthermore, the alteration of important macrophage functions (e.g. phagocytosis) by zinc is also investigated. The intracellular dissolution/uptake of zinc is also studied to further characterize zinc toxicity. Zinc oxide nanoparticles dissolve readily in the cells, leading to high intracellular zinc concentrations, mostly as protein-bound zinc. The proteomic screen reveals a rather weak response in the oxidative stress response pathway, but a strong response both in the central metabolism and in the proteasomal protein degradation pathway. Targeted experiments confirm that carbohydrate catabolism and proteasome are critical determinants of sensitivity to zinc, which also induces DNA damage. Conversely, glutathione levels and phagocytosis appear unaffected at moderately toxic zinc concentrations.Two different zinc oxide nanoparticles, as well as zinc ions, are used to study the cellular responses of the RAW 264 macrophage cell line. A proteomic screen is used to provide a wide view of the molecular effects of zinc, and the most prominent results are cross-validated by targeted studies. Furthermore, the alteration of important macrophage functions (e.g. phagocytosis) by zinc is also investigated. The intracellular dissolution/uptake of zinc is also studied to further characterize zinc toxicity. Zinc oxide nanoparticles dissolve readily in the cells, leading to high intracellular zinc concentrations, mostly as protein-bound zinc. The proteomic screen reveals a rather weak response in the oxidative stress response pathway, but a strong response both in the central metabolism and in the proteasomal protein degradation pathway. Targeted experiments confirm that carbohydrate

  11. Proteomic analysis of cellular protein expression profiles in response to grass carp reovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dan; Song, Lang; Wang, Hao; Xu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Tu; Lu, Liqun

    2015-06-01

    Grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) hemorrhagic disease, caused by grass carp reovirus (GCRV), is emerging as a serious problem in grass carp aquaculture. To better understand the molecular responses to GCRV infection, two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem mass spectroscopy were performed to investigate altered proteins in C. idella kidney (CIK) cells. Differentially expressed proteins in mock infected CIK cells and GCRV-infected CIK cells were compared. Twenty-three differentially expressed spots were identified (22 upregulated spots and 1 downregulated spot), which included cytoskeleton proteins, macromolecular biosynthesis-associated proteins, stress response proteins, signal transduction proteins, energy metabolism-associated proteins and ubiquitin proteasome pathway-associated proteins. Moreover, 10 of the corresponding genes of the differentially expressed proteins were quantified by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to examine their transcriptional profiles. The T cell internal antigen 1 (TIA1) and Ras-GTPase-activating SH3-domain-binding protein1 (G3BP1) of the cellular stress granule pathway from grass carp C. idella (designated as CiTIA1 and CiG3BP1) were upregulated and downregulated during GCRV infection, respectively. The full-length cDNA of CiTIA1 was 2753 bp, with an open reading frame (ORF) of 1155bp, which encodes a putative 385-amino acid protein. The 2271 bp full-length cDNA of CiG3BP1 comprised an ORF of 1455 bp that encodes a putative 485-amino acid protein. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the complete ORFs of CiTIA1 and CiG3BP1 were very similar to zebrafish and well-characterized mammalian homologs. The expressions of the cellular proteins CiTIA1 and CiG3BP1 in response to GCRV were validated by western blotting, which indicated that the GCRV should unlink TIA1 aggregation and stress granule formation. This study provides useful information on the proteomic

  12. Biomechanical response of human liver in tensile loading.

    PubMed

    Kemper, Andrew R; Santago, Anthony C; Stitzel, Joel D; Sparks, Jessica L; Duma, Stefan M

    2010-01-01

    Motor vehicle collisions commonly result in serious life threatening liver injuries. Although finite element models are becoming an integral tool in the reduction of automotive related liver injuries, the establishment of accurate material models and tissue level tolerance values is critical for accurate injury risk assessment. This study presents a total of 51 tension tests performed on human liver parenchyma at various loading rates in order to characterize the viscoelastic and failure properties of human liver. Standard dog-bone coupons were obtained from fresh human livers and tested within 48 hours of death. Each coupon was tested once to failure at one of four loading rates (0.008 s(-1), 0.089 s(-1), 0.871 s(-1), and 9.477 s(-1)) to investigate the effects of rate dependence. Load and acceleration data were obtained from each of the specimen grips. High-speed video and optical markers placed on the specimens were used to measure local displacement. Failure stress and strain were calculated at the location of failure in the gage length of the coupon. The results of the study showed that liver parenchyma is rate dependent, with higher rate tests giving higher failure stresses and lower failure strains. The failure strains for all tests ranged from 11% to 54% and the failure stresses ranged from 7 kPa to 95 kPa. This study provides novel biomechanical data that can be used in the development of both rate dependent material models and tissue level tolerance values critical for the validation of finite element models used to assess injury risk in automobile collisions. PMID:21050588

  13. Biomechanical Response of Human Liver in Tensile Loading

    PubMed Central

    Kemper, Andrew R.; Santago, Anthony C.; Stitzel, Joel D.; Sparks, Jessica L.; Duma, Stefan M.

    2010-01-01

    Motor vehicle collisions commonly result in serious life threatening liver injuries. Although finite element models are becoming an integral tool in the reduction of automotive related liver injuries, the establishment of accurate material models and tissue level tolerance values is critical for accurate injury risk assessment. This study presents a total of 51 tension tests performed on human liver parenchyma at various loading rates in order to characterize the viscoelastic and failure properties of human liver. Standard dog-bone coupons were obtained from fresh human livers and tested within 48 hours of death. Each coupon was tested once to failure at one of four loading rates (0.008 s–1, 0.089 s–1, 0.871 s–1, and 9.477 s–1) to investigate the effects of rate dependence. Load and acceleration data were obtained from each of the specimen grips. High-speed video and optical markers placed on the specimens were used to measure local displacement. Failure stress and strain were calculated at the location of failure in the gage length of the coupon. The results of the study showed that liver parenchyma is rate dependent, with higher rate tests giving higher failure stresses and lower failure strains. The failure strains for all tests ranged from 11% to 54% and the failure stresses ranged from 7 kPa to 95 kPa. This study provides novel biomechanical data that can be used in the development of both rate dependent material models and tissue level tolerance values critical for the validation of finite element models used to assess injury risk in automobile collisions. PMID:21050588

  14. Comparative proteomic and physiological analyses reveal the protective effect of exogenous calcium on the germinating soybean response to salt stress.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yongqi; Yang, Runqiang; Han, Yongbin; Gu, Zhenxin

    2015-01-15

    Calcium enhances salt stress tolerance of soybeans. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanism of calcium's involvement in resistance to salt stress is unclear. A comparative proteomic approach was used to investigate protein profiles in germinating soybeans under NaCl-CaCl2 and NaCl-LaCl3 treatments. A total of 80 proteins affected by calcium in 4-day-old germinating soybean cotyledons and 71 in embryos were confidently identified. The clustering analysis showed proteins were subdivided into 5 and 6 clusters in cotyledon and embryo, respectively. Among them, proteins involved in signal transduction and energy pathways, in transportation, and in protein biosynthesis were largely enriched while those involved in proteolysis were decreased. Abundance of nucleoside diphosphate kinase and three antioxidant enzymes were visibly increased by calcium. Accumulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid and polyamines was also detected after application of exogenous calcium. This was consistent with proteomic results, which showed that proteins involved in the glutamate and methionine metabolism were mediated by calcium. Calcium could increase the salt stress tolerance of germinating soybeans via enriching signal transduction, energy pathway and transportation, promoting protein biosynthesis, inhibiting proteolysis, redistributing storage proteins, regulating protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum, enriching antioxidant enzymes and activating their activities, accumulating secondary metabolites and osmolytes, and other adaptive responses. Biological significance Soybean (Glycine max L.), as a traditional edible legume, is being targeted for designing functional foods. During soybean germination under stressful conditions especially salt stress, newly discovered functional components such as gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are rapidly accumulated. However, soybean plants are relatively salt-sensitive and the growth, development and biomass of germinating soybeans are significantly

  15. Changes in the Proteome of Xylem Sap in Brassica oleracea in Response to Fusarium oxysporum Stress.

    PubMed

    Pu, Zijing; Ino, Yoko; Kimura, Yayoi; Tago, Asumi; Shimizu, Motoki; Natsume, Satoshi; Sano, Yoshitaka; Fujimoto, Ryo; Kaneko, Kentaro; Shea, Daniel J; Fukai, Eigo; Fuji, Shin-Ichi; Hirano, Hisashi; Okazaki, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. conlutinans (Foc) is a serious root-invading and xylem-colonizing fungus that causes yellowing in Brassica oleracea. To comprehensively understand the interaction between F. oxysporum and B. oleracea, composition of the xylem sap proteome of the non-infected and Foc-infected plants was investigated in both resistant and susceptible cultivars using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) after in-solution digestion of xylem sap proteins. Whole genome sequencing of Foc was carried out and generated a predicted Foc protein database. The predicted Foc protein database was then combined with the public B. oleracea and B. rapa protein databases downloaded from Uniprot and used for protein identification. About 200 plant proteins were identified in the xylem sap of susceptible and resistant plants. Comparison between the non-infected and Foc-infected samples revealed that Foc infection causes changes to the protein composition in B. oleracea xylem sap where repressed proteins accounted for a greater proportion than those of induced in both the susceptible and resistant reactions. The analysis on the proteins with concentration change > = 2-fold indicated a large portion of up- and down-regulated proteins were those acting on carbohydrates. Proteins with leucine-rich repeats and legume lectin domains were mainly induced in both resistant and susceptible system, so was the case of thaumatins. Twenty-five Foc proteins were identified in the infected xylem sap and 10 of them were cysteine-containing secreted small proteins that are good candidates for virulence and/or avirulence effectors. The findings of differential response of protein contents in the xylem sap between the non-infected and Foc-infected samples as well as the Foc candidate effectors secreted in xylem provide valuable insights into B. oleracea-Foc interactions.

  16. Changes in the Proteome of Xylem Sap in Brassica oleracea in Response to Fusarium oxysporum Stress

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Zijing; Ino, Yoko; Kimura, Yayoi; Tago, Asumi; Shimizu, Motoki; Natsume, Satoshi; Sano, Yoshitaka; Fujimoto, Ryo; Kaneko, Kentaro; Shea, Daniel J.; Fukai, Eigo; Fuji, Shin-Ichi; Hirano, Hisashi; Okazaki, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. conlutinans (Foc) is a serious root-invading and xylem-colonizing fungus that causes yellowing in Brassica oleracea. To comprehensively understand the interaction between F. oxysporum and B. oleracea, composition of the xylem sap proteome of the non-infected and Foc-infected plants was investigated in both resistant and susceptible cultivars using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) after in-solution digestion of xylem sap proteins. Whole genome sequencing of Foc was carried out and generated a predicted Foc protein database. The predicted Foc protein database was then combined with the public B. oleracea and B. rapa protein databases downloaded from Uniprot and used for protein identification. About 200 plant proteins were identified in the xylem sap of susceptible and resistant plants. Comparison between the non-infected and Foc-infected samples revealed that Foc infection causes changes to the protein composition in B. oleracea xylem sap where repressed proteins accounted for a greater proportion than those of induced in both the susceptible and resistant reactions. The analysis on the proteins with concentration change > = 2-fold indicated a large portion of up- and down-regulated proteins were those acting on carbohydrates. Proteins with leucine-rich repeats and legume lectin domains were mainly induced in both resistant and susceptible system, so was the case of thaumatins. Twenty-five Foc proteins were identified in the infected xylem sap and 10 of them were cysteine-containing secreted small proteins that are good candidates for virulence and/or avirulence effectors. The findings of differential response of protein contents in the xylem sap between the non-infected and Foc-infected samples as well as the Foc candidate effectors secreted in xylem provide valuable insights into B. oleracea-Foc interactions. PMID:26870056

  17. Changes in the Proteome of Xylem Sap in Brassica oleracea in Response to Fusarium oxysporum Stress.

    PubMed

    Pu, Zijing; Ino, Yoko; Kimura, Yayoi; Tago, Asumi; Shimizu, Motoki; Natsume, Satoshi; Sano, Yoshitaka; Fujimoto, Ryo; Kaneko, Kentaro; Shea, Daniel J; Fukai, Eigo; Fuji, Shin-Ichi; Hirano, Hisashi; Okazaki, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. conlutinans (Foc) is a serious root-invading and xylem-colonizing fungus that causes yellowing in Brassica oleracea. To comprehensively understand the interaction between F. oxysporum and B. oleracea, composition of the xylem sap proteome of the non-infected and Foc-infected plants was investigated in both resistant and susceptible cultivars using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) after in-solution digestion of xylem sap proteins. Whole genome sequencing of Foc was carried out and generated a predicted Foc protein database. The predicted Foc protein database was then combined with the public B. oleracea and B. rapa protein databases downloaded from Uniprot and used for protein identification. About 200 plant proteins were identified in the xylem sap of susceptible and resistant plants. Comparison between the non-infected and Foc-infected samples revealed that Foc infection causes changes to the protein composition in B. oleracea xylem sap where repressed proteins accounted for a greater proportion than those of induced in both the susceptible and resistant reactions. The analysis on the proteins with concentration change > = 2-fold indicated a large portion of up- and down-regulated proteins were those acting on carbohydrates. Proteins with leucine-rich repeats and legume lectin domains were mainly induced in both resistant and susceptible system, so was the case of thaumatins. Twenty-five Foc proteins were identified in the infected xylem sap and 10 of them were cysteine-containing secreted small proteins that are good candidates for virulence and/or avirulence effectors. The findings of differential response of protein contents in the xylem sap between the non-infected and Foc-infected samples as well as the Foc candidate effectors secreted in xylem provide valuable insights into B. oleracea-Foc interactions. PMID:26870056

  18. Proteomic analysis of the response to high-salinity stress in Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoqin; Yang, Pingfang; Gao, Qian; Liu, Xianglin; Kuang, Tingyun; Shen, Shihua; He, Yikun

    2008-06-01

    Physcomitrella patens is well known because of its importance in the study of plant systematics and evolution. The tolerance of P. patens for high-salinity environments also makes it an ideal candidate for studying the molecular mechanisms by which plants respond to salinity stresses. We measured changes in the proteome of P. patens gametophores that were exposed to high-salinity (250, 300, and 350 mM NaCl) using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) via liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Sixty-five protein spots were significantly altered by exposure to the high-salinity environment. Among them, 16 protein spots were down-regulated and 49 protein spots were up-regulated. These proteins were associated with a variety of functions, including energy and material metabolism, protein synthesis and degradation, cell defense, cell growth/division, transport, signal transduction, and transposons. Specifically, the up-regulated proteins were primarily involved in defense, protein folding, and ionic homeostasis. In summary, we outline several novel insights into the response of P. patens to high-salinity; (1) HSP70 is likely to play a significant role in protecting proteins from denaturation and degradation during salinity stress, (2) signaling proteins, such as 14-3-3 and phototropin, may work cooperatively to regulate plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase and maintain ion homeostasis, (3) an increase in photosynthetic activity may contribute to salinity tolerance, and (4) ROS scavengers were up-regulated suggesting that the antioxidative system may play a crucial role in protecting cells from oxidative damage following exposure to salinity stress in P. patens.

  19. Gender differences in responses in Gammarus pulex exposed to BDE-47: A gel-free proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Gismondi, E; Mazzucchelli, G; De Pauw, E; Joaquim-Justo, C; Thomé, J P

    2015-12-01

    Very few ecotoxicological studies have considered differences in toxic effects on male and female organisms. Here, we investigated protein expression differences in caeca of Gammarus pulex males and females under control conditions (unexposed) and after 96h exposure to BDE-47. Using gel-free proteomic analysis, we have identified 45 proteins, of which 25 were significantly differently expressed according to sex and/or BDE-47 exposure. These proteins were involved in several biological processes such as energy metabolism, chaperone proteins, or transcription/translation. In unexposed amphipods, 11 proteins were significantly over-expressed in females, and 6 proteins were over-expressed in males. Under BDE-47 stress, 7 proteins were differently impacted according to sex. For example, catalase was over-expressed in exposed females and under-expressed in exposed males, as compared to respective controls. Conversely, proteins involved in energy metabolism were up-regulated in males and down-regulated in females. Our proteomic study showed differences in responses of males and females to BDE-47 exposure, emphasizing that sex is a confounding factor in ecotoxicological assessment. However, due to the limited information existing in databases on Gammarids, it was difficult to define a BDE-47 mechanism of action. The gel-free proteomic seems to be a promising method to develop in future ecotoxicological studies and thus, to improve our understanding of the mechanism of action of xenobiotics. PMID:26256056

  20. Differential proteomic responses of selectively bred and wild-type Sydney rock oyster populations exposed to elevated CO2.

    PubMed

    Thompson, E L; O'Connor, W; Parker, L; Ross, P; Raftos, D A

    2015-03-01

    Previous work suggests that larvae from Sydney rock oysters that have been selectively bred for fast growth and disease resistance are more resilient to the impacts of ocean acidification than nonselected, wild-type oysters. In this study, we used proteomics to investigate the molecular differences between oyster populations in adult Sydney rock oysters and to identify whether these form the basis for observations seen in larvae. Adult oysters from a selective breeding line (B2) and nonselected wild types (WT) were exposed for 4 weeks to elevated pCO2 (856 μatm) before their proteomes were compared to those of oysters held under ambient conditions (375 μatm pCO2 ). Exposure to elevated pCO2 resulted in substantial changes in the proteomes of oysters from both the selectively bred and wild-type populations. When biological functions were assigned, these differential proteins fell into five broad, potentially interrelated categories of subcellular functions, in both oyster populations. These functional categories were energy production, cellular stress responses, the cytoskeleton, protein synthesis and cell signalling. In the wild-type population, proteins were predominantly upregulated. However, unexpectedly, these cellular systems were downregulated in the selectively bred oyster population, indicating cellular dysfunction. We argue that this reflects a trade-off, whereby an adaptive capacity for enhanced mitochondrial energy production in the selectively bred population may help to protect larvae from the effects of elevated CO2 , whilst being deleterious to adult oysters.

  1. Insights into the proteomic response of soybean towards Al₂O₃, ZnO, and Ag nanoparticles stress.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Zahed; Mustafa, Ghazala; Sakata, Katsumi; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the complex mechanisms involved in plant response to nanoparticles is indispensable in assessing the impact of nano-pollutants on environment. The present study compares the phytotoxicity of three different metal-based nanoparticles (Al2O3, ZnO, and Ag) in soybean seedling at proteome level. Plant growth, rigidity of roots, and root cell viability were markedly affected by ZnO- and Ag-NPs stress; while, Al2O3-NPs challenged soybean maintained normal seedling growth like control. Moreover, severe oxidative burst was evident in ZnO-NPs and Ag-NPs treatments. Gel-free proteomic analysis of NPs stressed soybean roots revealed 104 commonly changed proteins primarily associated with secondary metabolism, cell organization, and hormone metabolism. Oxidation-reduction cascade related genes, such as GDSL motif lipase 5, SKU5 similar 4, galactose oxidase, and quinone reductase were up-regulated in Al2O3-NPs challenged roots and down-regulated in ZnO- and Ag-NPs treatments. In comparison to root, 16 common proteins were found to be significantly changed in leaves of NPs exposed soybean that were predominantly associated to photosystem and protein degradation. The proteomic findings suggest that high abundance of proteins involved in oxidation-reduction, stress signaling, hormonal pathways related to growth and development might be the principal key for optimum growth of soybean under Al2O3-NPs stress.

  2. Early Immune Responses in Rainbow Trout Liver upon Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Virus (VHSV) Infection

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Rosario; Abós, Beatriz; Pignatelli, Jaime; von Gersdorff Jørgensen, Louise; González Granja, Aitor; Buchmann, Kurt; Tafalla, Carolina

    2014-01-01

    Among the essential metabolic functions of the liver, in mammals, a role as mediator of systemic and local innate immunity has also been reported. Although the presence of an important leukocyte population in mammalian liver is well documented, the characterization of leukocyte populations in the teleost liver has been only scarcely addressed. In the current work, we have confirmed the presence of IgM+, IgD+, IgT+, CD8α+, CD3+ cells, and cells expressing major histocompatibility complex (MHC-II) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) liver by flow cytometry and/or immunohistochemistry analysis. Additionally, the effect of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) on the liver immune response was assessed. First, we studied the effect of viral intraperitoneal injection on the transcription of a wide selection of immune genes at days 1, 2 and 5 post-infection. These included a group of leukocyte markers genes, pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), chemokines, chemokine receptor genes, and other genes involved in the early immune response and in acute phase reaction. Our results indicate that T lymphocytes play a key role in the initial response to VHSV in the liver, since CD3, CD8, CD4, perforin, Mx and interferon (IFN) transcription levels were up-regulated in response to VHSV. Consequently, flow cytometry analysis of CD8α+ cells in liver and spleen at day 5 post-infection revealed a decrease in the number of CD8α+ cells in the spleen and an increased population in the liver. No differences were found however in the percentages of B lymphocyte (IgM+ or IgD+) populations. In addition, a strong up-regulation in the transcription levels of several PRRs and chemokines was observed from the second day of infection, indicating an important role of these factors in the response of the liver to viral infections. PMID:25338079

  3. A lectin-coupled, targeted proteomic mass spectrometry (MRM MS) platform for identification of multiple liver cancer biomarkers in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yeong Hee; Shin, Park Min; Oh, Na Ree; Park, Gun Wook; Kim, Hoguen; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2012-09-18

    Aberrantly glycosylated proteins related to liver cancer progression were captured with specific lectin and identified from human plasma by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry as multiple biomarkers for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The lectin fractionation for fucosylated protein glycoforms in human plasma was conducted with a fucose-specific aleuria aurantia lectin (AAL). Following tryptic digestion of the lectin-captured fraction, plasma samples from 30 control cases (including 10 healthy, 10 hepatitis B virus [HBV], and 10 cirrhosis cases) and 10 HCC cases were quantitatively analyzed by MRM to identify which glycoproteins are viable HCC biomarkers. A1AG1, AACT, A1AT, and CERU were found to be potent biomarkers to differentiate HCC plasma from control plasmas. The AUROC generated independently from these four biomarker candidates ranged from 0.73 to 0.92. However, the lectin-coupled MRM assay with multiple combinations of biomarker candidates is superior statistically to those generated from the individual candidates with AUROC more than 0.95, which can be an alternative to the immunoassay inevitably requiring tedious development of multiple antibodies against biomarker candidates to be verified. Eventually the lectin-coupled, targeted proteomic mass spectrometry (MRM MS) platform was found to be efficient to identify multiple biomarkers from human plasma according to cancer progression.

  4. Proteomic analysis of livers from fat-fed mice deficient in either PKCδ or PKCε identifies Htatip2 as a regulator of lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Liao, Bing M; Raddatz, Katy; Zhong, Ling; Parker, Benjamin L; Raftery, Mark J; Schmitz-Peiffer, Carsten

    2014-11-01

    Insulin resistance contributes to the development of Type 2 diabetes, and is associated with lipid oversupply. Deletion of isoforms of the lipid-activated protein kinase C (PKC) family, PKCδ or PKCε, improves insulin action in fat-fed mice, but differentially affects hepatic lipid metabolism. To investigate the mechanisms involved, we employed an in vivo adaptation of SILAC to examine the effects of a fat diet together with deletion of PKCδ or PKCε on the expression of liver proteins. We identified a total of 3359 and 3488 proteins from the PKCδ and PKCε knockout study groups, respectively, and showed that several enzymes of lipid metabolism were affected by the fat diet. In fat-fed mice, 23 proteins showed changes upon PKCδ deletion while 19 proteins were affected by PKCε deletion. Enzymes of retinol metabolism were affected by the absence of either PKC. Pathway analysis indicated that monosaccharide metabolism was affected only upon PKCδ deletion, while isoprenoid biosynthesis was affected in a PKCε-specific manner. Certain proteins were regulated inversely, including HIV-1 tat interactive protein 2 (Htatip2). Overexpression or knockdown of Htatip2 in hepatocytes affected fatty acid storage and oxidation, consistent with a novel role in mediating the differential effects of PKC isoforms on lipid metabolism. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000971 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000971).

  5. Proteome analysis of proliferative response of bystander cells adjacent to cells exposed to ionizing radiation

    PubMed Central

    Gerashchenko, Bogdan I.; Yamagata, Akira; Oofusa, Ken; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; de Toledo, Sonia M.; Howell, Roger W.

    2010-01-01

    Recently (Cytometry 2003, 56A, 71–80), we reported that direct cell-to-cell contact is required for stimulating proliferation of bystander rat liver cells (WB-F344) cocultured with irradiated cells, and neither functional gap junction intercellular communication nor long-range extracellular factors appear to be involved in this proliferative bystander response (PBR). The molecular basis for this response is unknown. Confluent monolayers of WB-F344 cells were exposed to 5-Gray (Gy) of γ-rays. Irradiated cells were mixed with unirradiated cells and co-cultured for 24 h. Cells were harvested and protein expression was examined using 2-DE. Protein expression was also determined in cultures of unirradiated and 5-Gy irradiated cells. Proteins were identified by MS. Nucleophosmin (NPM)-1, a multifunctional nucleolar protein, was more highly expressed in bystander cells than in either unirradiated or 5-Gy irradiated cells. Enolase-α, a glycolytic enzyme, was present in acidic and basic variants in unirradiated cells. In bystander and 5-Gy irradiated cells, the basic variant was weakly expressed, whereas the acidic variant was overwhelmingly present. These data indicate that the presence of irradiated cells can affect NPM-1 and enolase-α in adjacent bystander cells. These proteins appear to participate in molecular events related to the PBR and suggest that this response may involve cellular defense, proliferation, and metabolism. PMID:17514680

  6. Proteome analysis of proliferative response of bystander cells adjacent to cells exposed to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Gerashchenko, Bogdan I; Yamagata, Akira; Oofusa, Ken; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; de Toledo, Sonia M; Howell, Roger W

    2007-06-01

    Recently (Cytometry 2003, 56A, 71-80), we reported that direct cell-to-cell contact is required for stimulating proliferation of bystander rat liver cells (WB-F344) cocultured with irradiated cells, and neither functional gap junction intercellular communication nor long-range extracellular factors appear to be involved in this proliferative bystander response (PBR). The molecular basis for this response is unknown. Confluent monolayers of WB-F344 cells were exposed to 5-Gray (Gy) of gamma-rays. Irradiated cells were mixed with unirradiated cells and co-cultured for 24 h. Cells were harvested and protein expression was examined using 2-DE. Protein expression was also determined in cultures of unirradiated and 5-Gy irradiated cells. Proteins were identified by MS. Nucleophosmin (NPM)-1, a multifunctional nucleolar protein, was more highly expressed in bystander cells than in either unirradiated or 5-Gy irradiated cells. Enolase-alpha, a glycolytic enzyme, was present in acidic and basic variants in unirradiated cells. In bystander and 5-Gy irradiated cells, the basic variant was weakly expressed, whereas the acidic variant was overwhelmingly present. These data indicate that the presence of irradiated cells can affect NPM-1 and enolase-alpha in adjacent bystander cells. These proteins appear to participate in molecular events related to the PBR and suggest that this response may involve cellular defense, proliferation, and metabolism.

  7. iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis of the metabolism mechanism associated with silicon response in the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana.

    PubMed

    Du, Chao; Liang, Jun-Rong; Chen, Dan-Dan; Xu, Bin; Zhuo, Wen-Hao; Gao, Ya-Hui; Chen, Chang-Ping; Bowler, Chris; Zhang, Wen

    2014-02-01

    Silicon is a critical element for diatom growth; however our understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in intracellular silicon responses are limited. In this study, an iTRAQ-LC-MS/MS quantitative proteomic approach was coupled with an established synchrony technique to reveal the global metabolic silicon-response in the model diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana subject to silicon starvation and readdition. Four samples, which corresponded to the time of silicon starvation, girdle band synthesis, valve formation, and right after daughter cell separation (0, 1, 5, 7 h), were collected for the proteomic analysis. The results indicated that a total of 1,831 proteins, representing 16% of the predicted proteins encoded by the T. pseudonana genome, could be identified. Of the identified proteins, 165 were defined as being differentially expressed proteins, and these proteins could be linked to multiple biochemical pathways. In particular, a number of proteins related to silicon transport, cell wall synthesis, and cell-cycle progress could be identified. In addition, other proteins that are potentially involved in amino acid synthesis, protein metabolism, and energy generation may have roles in the cellular response to silicon. Our findings provide a range of valuable information that will be of use for further studies of this important physiological response that is unique to diatoms.

  8. Analysis of cellular responses of macrophages to zinc ions and zinc oxide nanoparticles: a combined targeted and proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Triboulet, Sarah; Aude-Garcia, Catherine; Armand, Lucie; Gerdil, Adèle; Diemer, Hélène; Proamer, Fabienne; Collin-Faure, Véronique; Habert, Aurélie; Strub, Jean-Marc; Hanau, Daniel; Herlin, Nathalie; Carrière, Marie; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Rabilloud, Thierry

    2014-06-01

    Two different zinc oxide nanoparticles, as well as zinc ions, are used to study the cellular responses of the RAW 264 macrophage cell line. A proteomic screen is used to provide a wide view of the molecular effects of zinc, and the most prominent results are cross-validated by targeted studies. Furthermore, the alteration of important macrophage functions (e.g. phagocytosis) by zinc is also investigated. The intracellular dissolution/uptake of zinc is also studied to further characterize zinc toxicity. Zinc oxide nanoparticles dissolve readily in the cells, leading to high intracellular zinc concentrations, mostly as protein-bound zinc. The proteomic screen reveals a rather weak response in the oxidative stress response pathway, but a strong response both in the central metabolism and in the proteasomal protein degradation pathway. Targeted experiments confirm that carbohydrate catabolism and proteasome are critical determinants of sensitivity to zinc, which also induces DNA damage. Conversely, glutathione levels and phagocytosis appear unaffected at moderately toxic zinc concentrations.

  9. Plant defense responses in opium poppy cell cultures revealed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry proteomics.

    PubMed

    Zulak, Katherine G; Khan, Morgan F; Alcantara, Joenel; Schriemer, David C; Facchini, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) produces a diverse array of bioactive benzylisoquinoline alkaloids, including the narcotic analgesic morphine and the antimicrobial agent sanguinarine. In contrast to the plant, cell cultures of opium poppy do not accumulate alkaloids constitutively but produce sanguinarine in response to treatment with certain fungal-derived elicitors. The induction of sanguinarine biosynthesis provides a model platform to characterize the regulation of benzylisoquinoline alkaloid pathways and other defense responses. Proteome analysis of elicitor-treated opium poppy cell cultures by two-dimensional denaturing-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis coupled with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry facilitated the identification of 219 of 340 protein spots based on peptide fragment fingerprint searches of a combination of databases. Of the 219 hits, 129 were identified through pre-existing plant proteome databases, 63 were identified by matching predicted translation products in opium poppy-expressed sequence tag databases, and the remainder shared evidence from both databases. Metabolic enzymes represented the largest category of proteins and included S-adenosylmethionine synthetase, several glycolytic, and a nearly complete set of tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes, one alkaloid, and several other secondary metabolic enzymes. The abundance of chaperones, heat shock proteins, protein degradation factors, and pathogenesis-related proteins provided a comprehensive proteomics view on the coordination of plant defense responses. Qualitative comparison of protein abundance in control and elicitor-treated cell cultures allowed the separation of induced and constitutive or suppressed proteins. DNA microarrays were used to corroborate increases in protein abundance with a corresponding induction in cognate transcript levels.

  10. Morpho-physiological and proteome level responses to cadmium stress in sorghum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cadmium (Cd) stress may cause serious morphological and physiological abnormalities in addition to altering the proteome in plants. The present study was performed to explore Cd-induced morpho-physiological alterations and their potentiality associated mechanisms in Sorghum bicolor leaves at the pro...

  11. The response of Asterochloris erici (Ahmadjian) Skaloud et Peksa to desiccation: a proteomic approach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study of desiccation tolerance of lichens, and of their photobionts in particular, has frequently focused on the antioxidant system that protects the cell against photo-oxidative stress during dehydration/rehydration cycles. Thus, in this work we carried out proteomic and transcript analyses of ...

  12. Postponing the Hypoglycemic Response to Partial Hepatectomy Delays Mouse Liver Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiansheng; Schriefer, Andrew E; Cliften, Paul F; Dietzen, Dennis; Kulkarni, Sakil; Sing, Sucha; Monga, Satdarshan P S; Rudnick, David A

    2016-03-01

    All serious liver injuries alter metabolism and initiate hepatic regeneration. Recent studies using partial hepatectomy (PH) and other experimental models of liver regeneration implicate the metabolic response to hepatic insufficiency as an important source of signals that promote regeneration. Based on these considerations, the analyses reported here were undertaken to assess the impact of interrupting the hypoglycemic response to PH on liver regeneration in mice. A regimen of parenteral dextrose infusion that delays PH-induced hypoglycemia for 14 hours after surgery was identified, and the hepatic regenerative response to PH was compared between dextrose-treated and control mice. The results showed that regenerative recovery of the liver was postponed in dextrose-infused mice (versus vehicle control) by an interval of time comparable to the delay in onset of PH-induced hypoglycemia. The regulation of specific liver regeneration-promoting signals, including hepatic induction of cyclin D1 and S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 expression and suppression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ and p27 expression, was also disrupted by dextrose infusion. These data support the hypothesis that alterations in metabolism that occur in response to hepatic insufficiency promote liver regeneration, and they define specific pro- and antiregenerative molecular targets whose regenerative regulation is postponed when PH-induced hypoglycemia is delayed.

  13. Comparative proteomic analysis of early salt stress-responsive proteins in roots of SnRK2 transgenic rice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The rice roots are highly salt-sensitive organ and primary root growth is rapidly suppressed by salt stress. Sucrose nonfermenting 1-related protein kinase2 (SnRK2) family is one of the key regulator of hyper-osmotic stress signalling in various plant cells. To understand early salt response of rice roots and identify SnRK2 signaling components, proteome changes of transgenic rice roots over-expressing OSRK1, a rice SnRK2 kinase were investigated. Results Proteomes were analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis and protein spots were identified by LC-MS/MS from wild type and OSRK1 transgenic rice roots exposed to 150 mM NaCl for either 3 h or 7 h. Fifty two early salt -responsive protein spots were identified from wild type rice roots. The major up-regulated proteins were enzymes related to energy regulation, amino acid metabolism, methylglyoxal detoxification, redox regulation and protein turnover. It is noted that enzymes known to be involved in GA-induced root growth such as fructose bisphosphate aldolase and methylmalonate semialdehyde dehydrogenase were clearly down-regulated. In contrast to wild type rice roots, only a few proteins were changed by salt stress in OSRK1 transgenic rice roots. A comparative quantitative analysis of the proteome level indicated that forty three early salt-responsive proteins were magnified in transgenic rice roots at unstressed condition. These proteins contain single or multiple potential SnRK2 recognition motives. In vitro kinase assay revealed that one of the identified proteome, calreticulin is a good substrate of OSRK1. Conclusions Our present data implicate that rice roots rapidly changed broad spectrum of energy metabolism upon challenging salt stress, and suppression of GA signaling by salt stress may be responsible for the rapid arrest of root growth and development. The broad spectrum of functional categories of proteins affected by over-expression of OSRK1 indicates that OSRK1 is an upstream regulator of

  14. Global whole-cell FTICR mass spectrometric proteomics analysis of the heat shock response in the radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, Amy K.; Lipton, Mary S.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Smith, Richard D.; Lidstrom, Mary E.

    2005-05-01

    Despite intense interest in the response to radiation in D. radiodurans, little is known about how the organism responds to other stress factors. Our previous studies indicated that D. radiodurans mounts a regulated protective response to heat shock, and that expression of the groESL and dnaKJ operons are induced in response to elevated temperature. In order to gain greater insight into the heat shock response of D. radiodurans on a more global scale, we undertook the study reported here. Using whole-cell semiquantitative mass spectrometric proteomics integrated with global transcriptome microarray analyses, we have determined a core set of highly induced heat shock genes whose expression correlates well at the transcriptional and translational levels. In addition, we observed that the higher the absolute expression of a given gene at physiological conditions, the better the quantitative correlation between RNA and protein expression levels.

  15. Extracellular matrix remodelling in response to venous hypertension: proteomics of human varicose veins

    PubMed Central

    Barallobre-Barreiro, Javier; Oklu, Rahmi; Lynch, Marc; Fava, Marika; Baig, Ferheen; Yin, Xiaoke; Barwari, Temo; Potier, David N.; Albadawi, Hassan; Jahangiri, Marjan; Porter, Karen E.; Watkins, Michael T.; Misra, Sanjay; Stoughton, Julianne; Mayr, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Aims Extracellular matrix remodelling has been implicated in a number of vascular conditions, including venous hypertension and varicose veins. However, to date, no systematic analysis of matrix remodelling in human veins has been performed. Methods and results To understand the consequences of venous hypertension, normal and varicose veins were evaluated using proteomics approaches targeting the extracellular matrix. Varicose saphenous veins removed during phlebectomy and normal saphenous veins obtained during coronary artery bypass surgery were collected for proteomics analysis. Extracellular matrix proteins were enriched from venous tissues. The proteomics analysis revealed the presence of >150 extracellular matrix proteins, of which 48 had not been previously detected in venous tissue. Extracellular matrix remodelling in varicose veins was characterized by a loss of aggrecan and several small leucine-rich proteoglycans and a compensatory increase in collagen I and laminins. Gene expression analysis of the same tissues suggested that the remodelling process associated with venous hypertension predominantly occurs at the protein rather than the transcript level. The loss of aggrecan in varicose veins was paralleled by a reduced expression of aggrecanases. Chymase and tryptase β1 were among the up-regulated proteases. The effect of these serine proteases on the venous extracellular matrix was further explored by incubating normal saphenous veins with recombinant enzymes. Proteomics analysis revealed extensive extracellular matrix degradation after digestion with tryptase β1. In comparison, chymase was less potent and degraded predominantly basement membrane-associated proteins. Conclusion The present proteomics study provides unprecedented insights into the expression and degradation of structural and regulatory components of the vascular extracellular matrix in varicosis. PMID:27068509

  16. Radiographic Response to Yttrium-90 Radioembolization in Anterior Versus Posterior Liver Segments

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, Saad M.; Lewandowski, Robert J.; Ryu, Robert K.; Sato, Kent T.; Gates, Vanessa L.; Mulcahy, Mary F.; Kulik, Laura; Larson, Andrew C.; Omary, Reed A.; Salem, Riad

    2008-11-15

    The purpose of our study was to determine if preferential radiographic tumor response occurs in tumors located in posterior versus anterior liver segments following radioembolization with yttrium-90 glass microspheres. One hundred thirty-seven patients with chemorefractory liver metastases of various primaries were treated with yttrium-90 glass microspheres. Of these, a subset analysis was performed on 89 patients who underwent 101 whole-right-lobe infusions to liver segments V, VI, VII, and VIII. Pre- and posttreatment imaging included either triphasic contrast material-enhanced CT or gadolinium-enhanced MRI. Responses to treatment were compared in anterior versus posterior right lobe lesions using both RECIST and WHO criteria. Statistical comparative studies were conducted in 42 patients with both anterior and posterior segment lesions using the paired-sample t-test. Pearson correlation was used to determine the relationship between pretreatment tumor size and posttreatment tumor response. Median administered activity, delivered radiation dose, and treatment volume were 2.3 GBq, 118.2 Gy, and 1,072 cm{sup 3}, respectively. Differences between the pretreatment tumor size of anterior and posterior liver segments were not statistically significant (p = 0.7981). Differences in tumor response between anterior and posterior liver segments were not statistically significant using WHO criteria (p = 0.8557). A statistically significant correlation did not exist between pretreatment tumor size and posttreatment tumor response (r = 0.0554, p = 0.4434). On imaging follow-up using WHO criteria, for anterior and posterior regions of the liver, (1) response rates were 50% (PR = 50%) and 45% (CR = 9%, PR = 36%), and (2) mean changes in tumor size were -41% and -40%. In conclusion, this study did not find evidence of preferential radiographic tumor response in posterior versus anterior liver segments treated with yttrium-90 glass microspheres.

  17. Application of a discovery to targeted LC-MS proteomics approach to identify deregulated proteins associated with idiosyncratic liver toxicity in a rat model of LPS/diclofenac co-administration.

    PubMed

    Ramm, S; Morissey, B; Hernandez, B; Rooney, C; Pennington, S R; Mally, A

    2015-05-01

    Increasing experimental and clinical evidence suggest a contribution of non-drug related risk factors (e.g., underlying disease, bacterial/viral infection) to idiosyncratic drug reactions (IDR). Our previous work showed that co-treatment with bacterial endotoxin (LPS) and therapeutic doses of diclofenac (Dcl), an analgesic associated with drug idiosyncrasy in patients, induced severe hepatotoxicity in rats. Here, we used an integrated discovery to targeted LC-MS proteomics approach to identify mechanistically relevant liver and plasma proteins modulated by LPS/Dcl treatment, potentially applicable as early markers for IDRs. Based on pre-screening results and their role in liver toxicity, 47 liver and 15 plasma proteins were selected for targeted LC-MS analysis. LPS alone significantly changed the levels of 19 and 3 of these proteins, respectively. T-kininogen-1, previously suggested as a marker of drug-induced liver injury, was markedly elevated in plasma after repeated Dcl treatment in the absence of hepatotoxicity, possibly indicating clinically silent stress. Dcl both alone and in combination with LPS, caused up-regulation of the ATP synthase subunits (ATP5J, ATPA, and ATPB), suggesting that Dcl may sensitize cells against additional stress factors, such as LPS through generation of mitochondrial stress. Additionally, depletion of plasma fibrinogen was observed in the co-treatment group, consistent with an increased hepatic fibrin deposition and suspected contribution of the hemostatic system to IDRs. In contrast, several proteins previously suggested as liver biomarkers, such as clusterin, did not correlate with liver injury in this model. Taken together, these analyses revealed proteomic changes in a rat model of LPS/Dcl co-administration that could offer mechanistic insight and may serve as biomarkers or safety alert for a drug's potential to cause IDRs.

  18. Elucida