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Sample records for liver proteome response

  1. Comparative Proteomics Provides Insights into Metabolic Responses in Rat Liver to Isolated Soy and Meat Proteins.

    PubMed

    Song, Shangxin; Hooiveld, Guido J; Zhang, Wei; Li, Mengjie; Zhao, Fan; Zhu, Jing; Xu, Xinglian; Muller, Michael; Li, Chunbao; Zhou, Guanghong

    2016-04-01

    It has been reported that isolated dietary soy and meat proteins have distinct effects on physiology and liver gene expression, but the impact on protein expression responses are unknown. Because these may differ from gene expression responses, we investigated dietary protein-induced changes in liver proteome. Rats were fed for 1 week semisynthetic diets that differed only regarding protein source; casein (reference) was fully replaced by isolated soy, chicken, fish, or pork protein. Changes in liver proteome were measured by iTRAQ labeling and LC-ESI-MS/MS. A robust set totaling 1437 unique proteins was identified and subjected to differential protein analysis and biological interpretation. Compared with casein, all other protein sources reduced the abundance of proteins involved in fatty acid metabolism and Pparα signaling pathway. All dietary proteins, except chicken, increased oxidoreductive transformation reactions but reduced energy and essential amino acid metabolic pathways. Only soy protein increased the metabolism of sulfur-containing and nonessential amino acids. Soy and fish proteins increased translation and mRNA processing, whereas only chicken protein increased TCA cycle but reduced immune responses. These findings were partially in line with previously reported transcriptome results. This study further shows the distinct effects of soy and meat proteins on liver metabolism in rats.

  2. Proteomic Analysis of Propiconazole Responses in Mouse Liver-Comparison of Genomic and Proteomic Profiles

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have performed for the first time a comprehensive profiling of changes in protein expression of soluble proteins in livers from mice treated with the mouse liver tumorigen, propiconazole, to uncover the pathways and networks altered by this commonly used fungicide. Utilizing t...

  3. Proteomic analysis of propiconazole responses in mouse liver: comparison of genomic and proteomic profiles

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have performed for the first time a comprehensive profiling of changes in protein expression of soluble proteins in livers from mice treated with the mouse liver tumorigen, propiconazole, to uncover the pathways and networks altered by this fungicide. Utilizing twodimensional...

  4. Proteomic analysis of physiological function response to hot summer in liver from lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiangjun; Zhao, Xiaowei; Zhang, Zijun; Zhao, Huiling; Huang, Dongwei; Cheng, Guanglong; Yang, Yongxin

    2017-04-01

    Lactation performance of dairy cattle is susceptible to heat stress. The liver is one of the most crucial organs affected by high temperature in dairy cows. However, the physiological adaption by the liver to hot summer conditions has not been well elucidated in lactating dairy cows. In the present study, proteomic analysis of the liver in dairy cows in spring and hot summer was performed using a label-free method. In total, 127 differentially expressed proteins were identified; most of the upregulated proteins were involved in protein metabolic processes and responses to stimuli, whereas most of the downregulated proteins were related to oxidation-reduction. Pathway analysis indicated that 3 upregulated heat stress proteins (HSP90α, HSP90β, and endoplasmin) were enriched in the NOD-like receptor signaling pathway, whereas several downregulated NADH dehydrogenase proteins were involved in the oxidative phosphorylation pathway. The protein-protein interaction network indicated that several upregulated HSPs (HSP90α, HSP90β, and GRP78) were involved in more interactions than other proteins and were thus considered as central hub nodes. Our findings provide novel insights into the physiological adaption of liver function in lactating dairy cows to natural high temperature.

  5. Chronic Heat Stress Induces Immune Response, Oxidative Stress Response, and Apoptosis of Finishing Pig Liver: A Proteomic Approach.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yanjun; Hao, Yue; Li, Jielei; Bao, Weiguang; Li, Gan; Gao, Yanli; Gu, Xianhong

    2016-05-11

    Heat stress (HS) negatively affects human health, animal welfare, and livestock production. We analyzed the hepatic proteomes of finishing pigs subjected to chronic heat stress (HS), thermal neutral (TN), and restricted feed intake conditions, identifying differences between direct and indirect (via reduced feed intake) HS. Twenty-four castrated male pigs were randomly allocated to three treatments for three weeks: (1) thermal neutral (TN) (22 °C) with ad libitum feeding; (2) chronic HS (30 °C) with ad libitum feeding; and (3) TN, pair-fed to HS intake (PF). Hepatic proteome analysis was conducted using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Both HS and PF significantly reduced liver weight (p < 0.05). Forty-five hepatic proteins were differentially abundant when comparing HS with TN (37), PF with TN (29), and HS with PF (16). These proteins are involved in heat shock response and immune defense, oxidative stress response, cellular apoptosis, metabolism, signal transduction, and cytoskeleton. We also observed increased abundance of proteins and enzymes associated with heat shock response and immune defense, reduced the redox state, enhanced multiple antioxidant abilities, and increased apoptosis in HS liver. Heat-load, independent of reduced feed intake, induced an innate immune response, while food restriction caused stress and cellular apoptosis. Our results provide novel insights into the effects of chronic HS on liver.

  6. Analysis of the liver mitochondrial proteome in response to ethanol and S-adenosylmethionine treatments: novel molecular targets of disease and hepatoprotection.

    PubMed

    Andringa, Kelly K; King, Adrienne L; Eccleston, Heather B; Mantena, Sudheer K; Landar, Aimee; Jhala, Nirag C; Dickinson, Dale A; Squadrito, Giuseppe L; Bailey, Shannon M

    2010-05-01

    S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) minimizes alcohol hepatotoxicity; however, the molecular mechanisms responsible for SAM hepatoprotection remain unknown. Herein, we use proteomics to determine whether the hepatoprotective action of SAM against early-stage alcoholic liver disease is linked to alterations in the mitochondrial proteome. For this, male rats were fed control or ethanol-containing liquid diets +/- SAM and liver mitochondria were prepared for proteomic analysis. Two-dimensional isoelectric focusing (2D IEF/SDS-PAGE) and blue native gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE) were used to determine changes in matrix and oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) proteins, respectively. SAM coadministration minimized alcohol-dependent inflammation and preserved mitochondrial respiration. SAM supplementation preserved liver SAM levels in ethanol-fed rats; however, mitochondrial SAM levels were increased by ethanol and SAM treatments. With use of 2D IEF/SDS-PAGE, 30 proteins showed significant changes in abundance in response to ethanol, SAM, or both. Classes of proteins affected by ethanol and SAM treatments were chaperones, beta oxidation proteins, sulfur metabolism proteins, and dehydrogenase enzymes involved in methionine, glycine, and choline metabolism. BN-PAGE revealed novel changes in the levels of 19 OxPhos proteins in response to ethanol, SAM, or both. Ethanol- and SAM-dependent alterations in the proteome were not linked to corresponding changes in gene expression. In conclusion, ethanol and SAM treatment led to multiple changes in the liver mitochondrial proteome. The protective effects of SAM against alcohol toxicity are mediated, in part, through maintenance of proteins involved in key mitochondrial energy conserving and biosynthetic pathways. This study demonstrates that SAM may be a promising candidate for treatment of alcoholic liver disease.

  7. Liver proteomics in progressive alcoholic steatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Fernando, Harshica; Wiktorowicz, John E.; Soman, Kizhake V.; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S.; Khan, M. Firoze; Shakeel Ansari, G.A.

    2013-02-01

    Fatty liver is an early stage of alcoholic and nonalcoholic liver disease (ALD and NALD) that progresses to steatohepatitis and other irreversible conditions. In this study, we identified proteins that were differentially expressed in the livers of rats fed 5% ethanol in a Lieber–DeCarli diet daily for 1 and 3 months by discovery proteomics (two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry) and non-parametric modeling (Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines). Hepatic fatty infiltration was significantly higher in ethanol-fed animals as compared to controls, and more pronounced at 3 months of ethanol feeding. Discovery proteomics identified changes in the expression of proteins involved in alcohol, lipid, and amino acid metabolism after ethanol feeding. At 1 and 3 months, 12 and 15 different proteins were differentially expressed. Of the identified proteins, down regulation of alcohol dehydrogenase (− 1.6) at 1 month and up regulation of aldehyde dehydrogenase (2.1) at 3 months could be a protective/adaptive mechanism against ethanol toxicity. In addition, betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase 2 a protein responsible for methionine metabolism and previously implicated in fatty liver development was significantly up regulated (1.4) at ethanol-induced fatty liver stage (1 month) while peroxiredoxin-1 was down regulated (− 1.5) at late fatty liver stage (3 months). Nonparametric analysis of the protein spots yielded fewer proteins and narrowed the list of possible markers and identified D-dopachrome tautomerase (− 1.7, at 3 months) as a possible marker for ethanol-induced early steatohepatitis. The observed differential regulation of proteins have potential to serve as biomarker signature for the detection of steatosis and its progression to steatohepatitis once validated in plasma/serum. -- Graphical abstract: The figure shows the Hierarchial cluster analysis of differentially expressed protein spots obtained after ethanol feeding for 1 (1–3

  8. A Cell-type-resolved Liver Proteome*

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Chen; Li, Yanyan; Guo, Feifei; Jiang, Ying; Ying, Wantao; Li, Dong; Yang, Dong; Xia, Xia; Liu, Wanlin; Zhao, Yan; He, Yangzhige; Li, Xianyu; Sun, Wei; Liu, Qiongming; Song, Lei; Zhen, Bei; Zhang, Pumin; Qian, Xiaohong; Qin, Jun; He, Fuchu

    2016-01-01

    Parenchymatous organs consist of multiple cell types, primarily defined as parenchymal cells (PCs) and nonparenchymal cells (NPCs). The cellular characteristics of these organs are not well understood. Proteomic studies facilitate the resolution of the molecular details of different cell types in organs. These studies have significantly extended our knowledge about organogenesis and organ cellular composition. Here, we present an atlas of the cell-type-resolved liver proteome. In-depth proteomics identified 6000 to 8000 gene products (GPs) for each cell type and a total of 10,075 GPs for four cell types. This data set revealed features of the cellular composition of the liver: (1) hepatocytes (PCs) express the least GPs, have a unique but highly homogenous proteome pattern, and execute fundamental liver functions; (2) the division of labor among PCs and NPCs follows a model in which PCs make the main components of pathways, but NPCs trigger the pathways; and (3) crosstalk among NPCs and PCs maintains the PC phenotype. This study presents the liver proteome at cell resolution, serving as a research model for dissecting the cell type constitution and organ features at the molecular level. PMID:27562671

  9. The responses of mitochondrial proteome in rat liver to the consumption of moderate ethanol: the possible roles of aldo-keto reductases.

    PubMed

    Shi, Liang; Wang, Yuan; Tu, Shuyang; Li, Xiaolei; Sun, Maomao; Srivastava, Sanjay; Xu, Ningzhi; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Liu, Siqi

    2008-08-01

    A large body of evidence supports the view that mitochondria are a primary target of alcohol stress. Changes in mitochondrial proteins due to moderate ethanol intake, however, have not been broadly and accurately estimated. For this study, rats were fed low doses of ethanol and the mitochondria were isolated from heart, kidney, and liver, using ultracentrifugation with Nycodenz density gradient. The mitochondrial proteins were well resolved upon two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE), and the alcohol-responsive 2DE spots were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS). Compared with the control group, the proteins extracted from liver mitochondria of ethanol-fed rats exhibited the significant changes on 2DE images, whereas the 2DE images obtained from the kidney and the heart mitochondria remained almost unchanged by ethanol feeding. Significantly, over 50% of the alcohol-responsive proteins in liver mitochondria were members of aldo-keto reductase family (AKR), which were usually present in cytoplasm. The organelle distributions of AKR proteins in liver mitochondria were further confirmed by Western blot analysis as well as by confocal microscopy. In addition, translocations of AKR were examined in the CHANG cell line, which was cultured with and without ethanol. The results of Western blot strongly suggested that the abundances of AKR proteins in the mitochondria were greatly reduced by the presence of ethanol in culture medium. The results of this study show that, even with moderate ethanol feeding, the mitochondrial proteome in rat liver was more sensitive to alcohol stress than that of either the kidney or the heart. The translocation of AKR proteins may be involved in the detoxification of liver cells.

  10. Proteomic analysis of the murine liver in response to a combined exposure to psychological stress and 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene.

    PubMed

    Flint, Melanie S; Hood, Brian L; Sun, Mai; Stewart, Nicolas A; Jones-Laughner, Jacqueline; Conrads, Thomas P

    2010-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are environmental carcinogens implicated to underlie development of several types of cancers. Cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes play key roles in the conversion of PAHs to highly potent carcinogens, namely diol epoxides. 7,12-Dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA), a PAH, is highly carcinogenic, where in mouse models it is known to be responsible for initiating tumor formation in many organs including mammary tissues, ovaries, and skin. Psychological stress, via release of biochemical mediators, can greatly impact carcinogenesis. The present investigation examined the hypothesis that psychological stress modulates metabolism and carcinogenicity of DMBA through alteration of key drug metabolizing enzyme abundance levels in the liver utilizing mass spectrometry-based proteomics. To test this hypothesis, four groups of mice were treated as follows: nonstressed, stressed, nonstressed/DMBA-exposed, and stressed/DMBA-exposed, where the stressor was a well-accepted model of restraint. Liver proteins were extracted, resolved by one-dimensional gel electrophoresis, digested in-gel with trypsin, and analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. This investigation resulted in the unique identification of 59 isoforms of CYP enzymes. Changes in protein abundances derived from spectral counting indicates that stress alone results in increases in the abundance of proteins responsive to oxidative stress, along with Phase I and II metabolizing enzymes, such as CYP2J5 and UDP glucoronytransferases. The proteomic results further indicate that exposure to DMBA induces increases in the abundance of CYP1A2 and serine protease inhibitors and decreases the abundance of CYP4 V3. Finally, significant changes in the abundance of proteins such as CYP1A2, CYP3A11, and Topoisomerase-2 were found between nonstressed and stressed/DMBA-treated mice. These data support the hypothesis that psychological stress modulates DMBA-induced regulation of drug

  11. Proteome analysis of the liver in the Chinese fire-bellied newt Cynops orientalis.

    PubMed

    Zang, X Y; Guo, J L; Geng, X F; Li, P F; Sun, J Y; Wang, Q W; Xu, C S

    2016-08-12

    The Chinese fire-bellied newt, Cynops orientalis, belonging to Amphibia, Caudata, Salamandridae is a species endemic to China. The liver, which is an important digestive gland and the largest amphibian organ, has various functions, including detoxification, glycogen storage, protein synthesis, and hormone production. However, the newt liver has rarely been studied at the molecular level. We performed histomorphology and high-throughput proteomic analysis of the Chinese fire-bellied newt liver, using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining and two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry. The H&E staining showed that the newt liver nuclei are large and round, are located in the lateral cytoplasm, and contain a large quantity of lipid droplets. Melanins were abundantly present throughout the hepatic parenchyma. The proteome analysis showed a total of 545 proteins detected in the newt liver. Furthermore, a gene ontology analysis suggested that these proteins were associated with metabolism, immune response, cellular homeostasis, etc. Among these, proteins with metabolic functions were found to be the most abundant and highly expressed. This supports the role of the liver as the metabolic center. The proteomic results provide new insights into the aspects of the liver proteomes of the Chinese fire-bellied newt. The identification of a more global liver proteome in the newt may provide a basis for characterizing and comparing the liver proteomes from other amphibian species.

  12. Human liver proteome project: plan, progress, and perspectives.

    PubMed

    He, Fuchu

    2005-12-01

    The Human Liver Proteome Project is the first initiative of the human proteome project for human organs/tissues and aims at writing a modern Prometheus myth. Its global scientific objectives are to reveal the "solar system" of the human liver proteome, expression profiles, modification profiles, a protein linkage (protein-protein interaction) map, and a proteome localization map, and to define an ORFeome, physiome, and pathome. Since it was first proposed in April 2002, the Human Liver Proteome Project has attracted more than 100 laboratories from all over the world. In the ensuing 3 years, we set up a management infrastructure, identified reference laboratories, confirmed standard operating procedures, initiated international research collaborations, and finally achieved the first set of expression profile data.

  13. Proteomic Profiling of Mouse Liver following Acute Toxoplasma gondii Infection.

    PubMed

    He, Jun-Jun; Ma, Jun; Elsheikha, Hany M; Song, Hui-Qun; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii remains a global public health problem. However, its pathophysiology is still not-completely understood particularly the impact of infection on host liver metabolism. We performed iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis to evaluate early liver protein responses in BALB/c mice following infection with T. gondii PYS strain (genotype ToxoDB#9) infection. Our data revealed modification of protein expression in key metabolic pathways, as indicated by the upregulation of immune response and downregulation of mitochondrial respiratory chain, and the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and xenobiotics. T. gondii seems to hijack host PPAR signaling pathway to downregulate the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and energy in the liver. The metabolism of over 400 substances was affected by the downregulation of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism. The top 10 transcription factors used by upregulated genes were Stat2, Stat1, Irf2, Irf1, Sp2, Egr1, Stat3, Klf4, Elf1 and Gabpa, while the top 10 transcription factors of downregulated genes were Hnf4A, Ewsr1, Fli1, Hnf4g, Nr2f1, Pparg, Rxra, Hnf1A, Foxa1 and Foxo1. These findings indicate global reprogramming of the metabolism of the mouse liver after acute T. gondii infection. Functional characterization of the altered proteins may enhance understanding of the host responses to T. gondii infection and lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets.

  14. Proteomic Profiling of Mouse Liver following Acute Toxoplasma gondii Infection

    PubMed Central

    He, Jun-Jun; Ma, Jun; Elsheikha, Hany M.; Song, Hui-Qun; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii remains a global public health problem. However, its pathophysiology is still not-completely understood particularly the impact of infection on host liver metabolism. We performed iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis to evaluate early liver protein responses in BALB/c mice following infection with T. gondii PYS strain (genotype ToxoDB#9) infection. Our data revealed modification of protein expression in key metabolic pathways, as indicated by the upregulation of immune response and downregulation of mitochondrial respiratory chain, and the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and xenobiotics. T. gondii seems to hijack host PPAR signaling pathway to downregulate the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and energy in the liver. The metabolism of over 400 substances was affected by the downregulation of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism. The top 10 transcription factors used by upregulated genes were Stat2, Stat1, Irf2, Irf1, Sp2, Egr1, Stat3, Klf4, Elf1 and Gabpa, while the top 10 transcription factors of downregulated genes were Hnf4A, Ewsr1, Fli1, Hnf4g, Nr2f1, Pparg, Rxra, Hnf1A, Foxa1 and Foxo1. These findings indicate global reprogramming of the metabolism of the mouse liver after acute T. gondii infection. Functional characterization of the altered proteins may enhance understanding of the host responses to T. gondii infection and lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets. PMID:27003162

  15. Toxicogenomic analysis of N-nitrosomorpholine induced changes in rat liver: Comparison of genomic and proteomic responses and anchoring to histopathological parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Oberemm, A.; Ahr, H.-J.; Bannasch, P.; Ellinger-Ziegelbauer, H.; Glueckmann, M.; Hellmann, J.; Ittrich, C.; Kopp-Schneider, A.; Kramer, P.-J.; Krause, E.; Kroeger, M.; Kiss, E.; Richter-Reichhelm, H.-B.; Scholz, G.; Seemann, K.; Weimer, M.; Gundert-Remy, U.

    2009-12-01

    A common animal model of chemical hepatocarcinogenesis was used to examine the utility of transcriptomic and proteomic data to identify early biomarkers related to chemically induced carcinogenesis. N-nitrosomorpholine, a frequently used genotoxic model carcinogen, was applied via drinking water at 120 mg/L to male Wistar rats for 7 weeks followed by an exposure-free period of 43 weeks. Seven specimens of each treatment group (untreated control and 120 mg/L N-nitrosomorpholine in drinking water) were sacrificed at nine time points during and after N-nitrosomorpholine treatment. Individual samples from the liver were prepared for histological and toxicogenomic analyses. For histological detection of preneoplastic and neoplastic tissue areas, sections were stained using antibodies against the placental form of glutathione-S-transferase (GST-P). Gene and protein expression profiles of liver tissue homogenates were analyzed using RG-U34A Affymetrix rat gene chips and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis-based proteomics, respectively. In order to compare results obtained by histopathology, transcriptomics and proteomics, GST-P-stained liver sections were evaluated morphometrically, which revealed a parallel time course of the area fraction of preneoplastic lesions and gene plus protein expression patterns. On the transcriptional level, an increase of hepatic GST-P expression was detectable as early as 3 weeks after study onset. Comparing deregulated genes and proteins, eight species were identified which showed a corresponding expression profile on both expression levels. Functional analysis suggests that these genes and corresponding proteins may be useful as biomarkers of early hepatocarcinogenesis.

  16. Toxicogenomic analysis of N-nitrosomorpholine induced changes in rat liver: comparison of genomic and proteomic responses and anchoring to histopathological parameters.

    PubMed

    Oberemm, A; Ahr, H-J; Bannasch, P; Ellinger-Ziegelbauer, H; Glückmann, M; Hellmann, J; Ittrich, C; Kopp-Schneider, A; Kramer, P-J; Krause, E; Kröger, M; Kiss, E; Richter-Reichhelm, H-B; Scholz, G; Seemann, K; Weimer, M; Gundert-Remy, U

    2009-12-01

    A common animal model of chemical hepatocarcinogenesis was used to examine the utility of transcriptomic and proteomic data to identify early biomarkers related to chemically induced carcinogenesis. N-nitrosomorpholine, a frequently used genotoxic model carcinogen, was applied via drinking water at 120 mg/L to male Wistar rats for 7 weeks followed by an exposure-free period of 43 weeks. Seven specimens of each treatment group (untreated control and 120 mg/L N-nitrosomorpholine in drinking water) were sacrificed at nine time points during and after N-nitrosomorpholine treatment. Individual samples from the liver were prepared for histological and toxicogenomic analyses. For histological detection of preneoplastic and neoplastic tissue areas, sections were stained using antibodies against the placental form of glutathione-S-transferase (GST-P). Gene and protein expression profiles of liver tissue homogenates were analyzed using RG-U34A Affymetrix rat gene chips and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis-based proteomics, respectively. In order to compare results obtained by histopathology, transcriptomics and proteomics, GST-P-stained liver sections were evaluated morphometrically, which revealed a parallel time course of the area fraction of preneoplastic lesions and gene plus protein expression patterns. On the transcriptional level, an increase of hepatic GST-P expression was detectable as early as 3 weeks after study onset. Comparing deregulated genes and proteins, eight species were identified which showed a corresponding expression profile on both expression levels. Functional analysis suggests that these genes and corresponding proteins may be useful as biomarkers of early hepatocarcinogenesis.

  17. Effects of calorie restriction on the zebrafish liver proteome

    PubMed Central

    Jury, David R.; Kaveti, Suma; Duan, Zhong-Hui; Willard, Belinda; Kinter, Michael; Londraville, Richard

    2012-01-01

    A proteomic approach was taken to study how fish respond to changes in calorie availability, with the longer-term goal of understanding the evolution of lipid metabolism in vertebrates. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) were fed either high (3 rations/day) or low (1 ration/7 days) calorie diets for 5 weeks and liver proteins extracted for proteomic analyses. Proteins were separated on two-dimensional electrophoresis gels and homologous spots compared between treatments to determine which proteins were up-regulated with high-calorie diet. Fifty-five spots were excised from the gel and analyzed via LC–ESI MS/MS, which resulted in the identification of 69 unique proteins (via multiple peptides). Twenty-nine of these proteins were differentially expressed between treatments. Differentially expressed proteins were mapped to Gene Ontology (GO) terms, and these terms compared to the entire zebrafish GO annotation set by Fisher's exact test. The most significant GO terms associated with high-calorie diet are related to a decrease in oxygen-binding activity in the high-calorie treatment. This response is consistent with a well-characterized response in obese humans, indicating there may be a link between lipid storage and hypoxia sensitivity in vertebrates. PMID:20494847

  18. HepatoProteomics: Applying Proteomic Technologies to the Study of Liver Function and Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, Deborah L.; Proll, Sean; Jacobs, Jon M.; Chan, Eric Y.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Katze, Michael G.

    2006-08-01

    The wealth of human genome sequence information now available, coupled with technological advances in robotics, nanotechnology, mass spectrometry, and information systems, has given rise to a method of scientific inquiry known as functional genomics. By using these technologies to survey gene expression and protein production on a near global scale, the goal of functional genomics is to assign biological function to genes with currently unknown roles in physiology. This approach carries particular appeal in disease research, where it can uncover the function of previously unknown genes and molecular pathways that are directly involved in disease progression. With this knowledge may come improved diagnostic techniques, prognostic capabilities, and novel therapeutic approaches. In this regard, the continuing evolution of proteomic technologies has resulted in an increasingly greater impact of proteome studies in many areas of research and hepatology is no exception. Our laboratory has been extremely active in this area, applying both genomic and proteomic technologies to the analysis of virus-host interactions in several systems, including the study of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and HCV-associated liver disease. Since proteomic technologies are foreign to many hepatologists (and to almost everyone else), this article will provide an overview of proteomic methods and technologies and describe how they're being used to study liver function and disease. We use our studies of HCV infection and HCV-associated liver disease to present an operational framework for performing high throughput proteome analysis and extracting biologically meaningful information.

  19. Proteomic studies in zebrafish liver cells exposed to the brominated flame retardants HBCD and TBBPA.

    PubMed

    Kling, Peter; Förlin, Lars

    2009-10-01

    Proteomic effect screening in zebrafish liver cells was performed to generate hypotheses regarding single and mixed exposure to the BFRs HBCD and TBBPA. Responses at sublethal exposure were analysed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by MALDI-TOF and FT-ICR protein identification. Mixing of HBCD and TBBPA at sublethal doses of individual substances seemed to increase toxicity. Proteomic analyses revealed distinct exposure-specific and overlapping responses suggesting novel mechanisms with regard to HBCD and TBBPA exposure. While distinct HBCD responses were related to decreased protein metabolism, TBBPA revealed effects related to protein folding and NADPH production. Overlapping responses suggest increased gluconeogenesis (GAPDH and aldolase) while distinct mixture effects suggest a pronounced NADPH production and changes in proteins related to cell cycle control (prohibitin and crk-like oncogene). We conclude that mixtures containing HBCD and TBBPA may result in unexpected effects highlighting proteomics as a sensitive tool for detecting and hypothesis generation of mixture effects.

  20. Proteomic Profiling of Human Liver Biopsies: Hepatitis C Virus-Induced Fibrosis and Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, Deborah L.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Paeper, Bryan; Proll, Sean; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Carithers, Jr., Robert L.; Larson , Anne M.; Yeh, Matthew M.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Katze, Michael G.

    2007-09-01

    Liver biopsies from HCV-infected patients offer the unique opportunity to study human liver biology and disease in vivo. However, the low protein yields associated with these small samples present a significant challenge for proteomic analysis. In this study we describe the application of an ultra-sensitive proteomics platform for performing robust quantitative proteomic studies on microgram amounts of HCV-infected human liver tissue from 15 patients at different stages of fibrosis. A high quality liver protein data base containing 5,920 unique protein identifications supported high throughput quantitative studies using 16O:18O stable isotope labeling in combination with the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag approach. A total of 1,641 liver biopsy proteins were quantified and ANOVA identified 210 proteins exhibiting statistically significant differences associated with fibrosis stage. Hierarchical clustering revealed that biopsies representative of later fibrosis stages (e.g. Batts-Ludwig stages 3-4) exhibited a distinct protein expression profile indicating an apparent down-regulation of many proteins when compared to samples from earlier fibrosis stages (e.g. Batts-Ludwig stages 0-2). Functional analysis of these signature proteins suggests that impairment of key mitochondrial processes including fatty acid oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation, and response to oxidative stress and reactive oxygen species occurs during advanced stage 3-4 fibrosis. In conclusion, the results reported here represent a significant advancement in clinical proteomics providing to our knowledge, the first demonstration of global proteomic alterations accompanying liver disease progression in patients chronically infected with HCV. Our findings contribute to a generally emerging theme associating oxidative stress and hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction with HCV pathogenesis.

  1. Proteomic Study of Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium Vivax Liver Stages for Development of Vaccines and Drugs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-02

    Proteomic Study of Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium Vivax Liver Stages for Development of Vaccines and Drugs PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr...AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Proteomic Study of Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium Vivax 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-07-2-0090 Liver Stages...3. Production of sporozoite and preparation for transcriptome and proteomic analysis: Sporozoites harvested from salivary gland, haemolymph

  2. Proteomic analysis of liver mitochondria from rats with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin; Lu, De-Zhao; Li, You-Ming; Zhang, Xue-Qun; Zhou, Xin-Xin; Jin, Xi

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To explore mitochondrial dysfunction in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) by analyzing the proteome of liver mitochondria from a NASH model. METHODS: The NASH rat model was established by feeding rats a fat-rich diet for 24 wk and was confirmed using hematoxylin and eosin staining of liver tissue and by changes in the levels of serum alanine transaminase, aspartate aminotransferase, triglyceride, total cholesterol and other markers. Liver mitochondria from each group were isolated using differential centrifugation. The mitochondrial samples were lyzed, purified and further analyzed using two-dimensional electrophoresis combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Bioinformatic analyses of assigned gene ontology and biological pathway was used to study functional enrichments in the abundant proteomic data. RESULTS: Eight up-regulated and sixteen down-regulated proteins were identified that showed greater than 1.5-fold differences between the controls and the NASH group. These dysregulated proteins were predicted to be involved in different metabolic processes including fatty acid β-oxidation processes, lipid metabolic processes, cell-cycle arrest, cell polarity maintenance, and adenosine triphosphate/sex hormone metabolic processes. Novel proteins that may be involved in NASH pathogenesis including the trifunctional enzyme Hadha, thyroxine, prohibitin, aldehyde dehydrogenase ALDH1L2, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 2B31, and carbamoyl-phosphate synthase were identified using bioinformatics tools. The decreased expression of Hadha in NASH liver was verified by Western blotting, which was used as a complementary technique to confirm the proteomic results. CONCLUSION: This novel report on the liver mitochondrial proteome of a NASH model may provide a reservoir of information on the pathogenesis and treatment of NASH. PMID:24782632

  3. Proteomics studies on stress responses in diatoms.

    PubMed

    Muhseen, Ziyad Tariq; Xiong, Qian; Chen, Zhuo; Ge, Feng

    2015-12-01

    Diatoms are a highly diverse group of eukaryotic phytoplankton that are distributed throughout marine and freshwater environments and are believed to be responsible for approximately 40% of the total marine primary productivity. The ecological success of diatoms suggests that they have developed a range of strategies to cope with various biotic and abiotic stress factors. It is of great interest to understand the adaptive responses of diatoms to different stresses in the marine environment. Proteomic technologies have been applied to the adaptive responses of marine diatoms under different growth conditions in recent years such as nitrogen starvation, iron limitation and phosphorus deficiency. These studies have provided clues to elucidate the sophisticated sensing mechanisms that control their adaptive responses. Although only a very limited number of proteomic studies were conducted in diatoms, the obtained data have led to a better understanding of the biochemical processes that contribute to their ecological success. This review presents the current status of proteomic studies of diatom stress responses and discusses the novel developments and applications for the analysis of protein post-translational modification in diatoms. The potential future application of proteomics could contribute to a better understanding of the physiological mechanisms underlying diatom acclimation to a given stress and the acquisition of an enhanced diatom stress tolerance. Future challenges and research opportunities in the proteomics studies of diatoms are also discussed.

  4. Clinical outcome, proteome kinetics and angiogenic factors in serum after thermoablation of colorectal liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Thermoablation is used to treat patients with unresectable colorectal liver metastases (CRLM). We analyze clinical outcome, proteome kinetics and angiogenic markers in patients treated by cryosurgical ablation (CSA) or radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Methods 205 patients underwent CSA (n = 20), RFA (n = 22), partial hepatectomy (PH, n = 134) or were found truly unresectable (n = 29). Clinical outcome, proteome transitions and angiogenic response in serum were analyzed at various time points after ablation. Result Median overall survival in CSA patients (17.6 months) was worse (p < 0.0001) when compared to RFA treated patients (51.7 months) and patients after PH (43.4 months). The complication rate was higher in the CSA group (50%) as compared to the RFA group (22%). Proteomics analyses showed consistently more changes in serum protein abundance with CSA compared to RFA. In the first four days after ablation a pro-angiogenic serum response occurred. Conclusions RFA of CRLM is superior to CSA with a median survival which equals survival in patients after PH. Proteomics analyses suggests a more aggravated serum response to CSA compared to RFA. Thermoablation is associated with changes in serum levels of angiogenic factors favouring a pro-angiogenic environment, but without differences between RFA and CSA. PMID:23721455

  5. Phenobarbital induces alterations in the proteome of hepatocytes and mesenchymal cells of rat livers.

    PubMed

    Klepeisz, Philip; Sagmeister, Sandra; Haudek-Prinz, Verena; Pichlbauer, Melanie; Grasl-Kraupp, Bettina; Gerner, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Preceding studies on the mode of action of non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogens (NGCs) have concentrated on alterations induced in hepatocytes (HCs). A potential role of non-parenchymal liver cells (NPCs) in NGC-driven hepatocarcinogenesis has been largely neglected so far. The aim of this study is to characterize NGC-induced alterations in the proteome profiles of HCs as well as NPCs. We chose the prototypic NGC phenobarbital (PB) which was applied to male rats for a period of 14 days. The livers of PB-treated rats were perfused by collagenase and the cell suspensions obtained were subjected to density gradient centrifugation to separate HCs from NPCs. In addition, HCs and NPC isolated from untreated animals were treated with PB in vitro. Proteome profiling was done by CHIP-HPLC and ion trap mass spectrometry. Proteome analyses of the in vivo experiments showed many of the PB effects previously described in HCs by other methods, e.g. induction of phase I and phase II drug metabolising enzymes. In NPCs proteins related to inflammation and immune regulation such as PAI-1 and S100-A10, ADP-ribosyl cyclase 1 and to cell migration such as kinesin-1 heavy chain, myosin regulatory light chain RLC-A and dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 1 were found to be induced, indicating major PB effects on these cells. Remarkably, in vitro treatment of HCs and NPCs with PB hardly reproduced the proteome alterations observed in vivo, indicating differences of NGC induced responses of cells at culture conditions compared to the intact organism. To conclude, the present study clearly demonstrated that PB induces proteome alterations not only in HCs but also in NPCs. Thus, any profound molecular understanding on the mode of action of NGCs has to consider effects on cells of the hepatic mesenchyme.

  6. Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) induced changes in the liver proteome of eu- and hypothyroid female rats.

    PubMed

    Miller, I; Serchi, T; Cambier, S; Diepenbroek, C; Renaut, J; Van der Berg, J H J; Kwadijk, C; Gutleb, A C; Rijntjes, E; Murk, A J

    2016-03-14

    Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is a brominated flame retardant known for its low acute toxicity as observed in animal experiments. However, HBCD exposure can affect liver functioning and thyroid hormone (TH) status. As exact mechanisms are unknown and only limited toxicological data exists, a gel-based proteomic approach was undertaken. In a eu- and hypothyroid female rat model, rats were exposed to 3 and 30 mg/kg bw/day HBCD for 7 days via their diet, and exposure was related to a range of canonical endpoints (hormone status, body weight) available for these animals. Alterations in the liver proteome under HBCD exposure were determined in comparison with patterns of control animals, for both thyroid states. This revealed significantly changed abundance of proteins involved in metabolic processes (gluconeogenesis/glycolysis, amino acid metabolism, lipid metabolism), but also in oxidative stress responses, in both euthyroid and hypothyroid rats. The results provide a more detailed picture on the mechanisms involved in these alterations, e.g. at the protein level changes of the proposed influence of HBCD on the lipid metabolism. Present results show that proteomic approaches can provide further mechanistic insights in toxicological studies.

  7. The proteome of methylmalonic acidemia (MMA): the elucidation of altered pathways in patient livers.

    PubMed

    Caterino, Marianna; Chandler, Randy J; Sloan, Jennifer L; Dorko, Kenneth; Cusmano-Ozog, Kristina; Ingenito, Laura; Strom, Stephen C; Imperlini, Esther; Scolamiero, Emanuela; Venditti, Charles P; Ruoppolo, Margherita

    2016-02-01

    Methylmalonic acidemia (MMA) is a heterogeneous and severe autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism most commonly caused by the deficient activity of the vitamin B12 dependent enzyme, methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MUT). The main treatment for MMA patients is the dietary restriction of propiogenic amino acids and carnitine supplementation. Despite treatment, the prognosis for vitamin B12 non-responsive patients remains poor and is associated with neonatal lethality, persistent morbidity and decreased life expectancy. While multi-organ pathology is a feature of MMA, the liver is severely impacted by mitochondrial dysfunction which likely underlies the metabolic instability experienced by the patients. Liver and/or combined liver/kidney transplantation is therefore sometimes performed in severely affected patients. Using liver specimens from donors and MMA patients undergoing elective liver transplantation collected under a dedicated natural history protocol (clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00078078), we employed proteomics to characterize the liver pathology and impaired hepatic metabolism observed in the patients. Pathway analysis revealed perturbations of enzymes involved in energy metabolism, gluconeogenesis and Krebs cycle anaplerosis. Our findings identify new pathophysiologic and therapeutic targets that could be valuable for designing alternative therapies to alleviate clinical manifestations seen in this disorder.

  8. High glucose-induced proteome alterations in hepatocytes and its possible relevance to diabetic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing-Yi; Chou, Hsiu-Chuan; Chen, You-Hsuan; Chan, Hong-Lin

    2013-11-01

    Hyperglycemia can cause several abnormalities in liver cells, including diabetic liver disease. Previous research has shown that high blood glucose levels can damage liver cells through glycoxidation. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of high blood glucose on the development of diabetic liver disease have yet to be elucidated. In this study, we cultured a liver cell line (Chang liver cell) in mannitol-balanced 5.5 mM, 25 mM and 100 mM d-glucose media and evaluated protein expression and redox regulation. We identified 141 proteins that showed significant changes in protein expression and 29 proteins that showed significant changes in thiol reactivity, in response to high glucose concentration. Several proteins involved in transcription-control, signal transduction, redox regulation and cytoskeleton regulation showed significant changes in expression, whereas proteins involved in protein folding and gene regulation displayed changes in thiol reactivity. Further analyses of clinical plasma specimens confirmed that the proteins AKAP8L, galectin-3, PGK 1, syntenin-1, Abin 2, aldose reductase, CD63, GRP-78, GST-pi, RXR-gamma, TPI and vimentin showed type 2 diabetic liver disease-dependent alterations. In summary, in this study we used a comprehensive hepatocyte-based proteomic approach to identify changes in protein expression and to identify redox-associated diabetic liver disease markers induced by high glucose concentration. Some of the identified proteins were validated with clinical samples and are presented as potential targets for the prognosis and diagnosis of diabetic liver disease.

  9. Preliminary Validation of a High Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) and -Linolenic Acid (ALA) Dietary Oil Blend: Tissue Fatty Acid Composition and Liver Proteome Response in Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar) Smolts

    PubMed Central

    Nuez-Ortín, Waldo G.; Carter, Chris G.; Wilson, Richard; Cooke, Ira; Nichols, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Marine oils are important to human nutrition as the major source of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a key omega-3 long-chain (≥C20) polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 LC-PUFA) that is low or lacking in terrestrial plant or animal oils. The inclusion of fish oil as main source of n-3 LC-PUFA in aquafeeds is mostly limited by the increasing price and decreasing availability. Fish oil replacement with cheaper terrestrial plant and animal oils has considerably reduced the content of n-3 LC-PUFA in flesh of farmed Atlantic salmon. Novel DHA-enriched oils with high alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) content will be available from transgenic oilseeds plants in the near future as an alternative for dietary fish oil replacement in aquafeeds. As a preliminary validation, we formulated an oil blend (TOFX) with high DHA and ALA content using tuna oil (TO) high in DHA and the flaxseed oil (FX) high in ALA, and assessed its ability to achieve fish oil-like n-3 LC-PUFA tissue composition in Atlantic salmon smolts. We applied proteomics as an exploratory approach to understand the effects of nutritional changes on the fish liver. Comparisons were made between fish fed a fish oil-based diet (FO) and a commercial-like oil blend diet (fish oil + poultry oil, FOPO) over 89 days. Growth and feed efficiency ratio were lower on the TOFX diet. Fish muscle concentration of n-3 LC-PUFA was significantly higher for TOFX than for FOPO fish, but not higher than for FO fish, while retention efficiency of n-3 LC-PUFA was promoted by TOFX relative to FO. Proteomics analysis revealed an oxidative stress response indicative of the main adaptive physiological mechanism in TOFX fish. While specific dietary fatty acid concentrations and balances and antioxidant supplementation may need further attention, the use of an oil with a high content of DHA and ALA can enhance tissue deposition of n-3 LC-PUFA in relation to a commercially used oil blend. PMID:27556399

  10. Proteomic responses of fruits to environmental stresses

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Zhulong

    2012-01-01

    Fruits and vegetables are extremely susceptible to decay and easily lose commercial value after harvest. Different strategies have been developed to control postharvest decay and prevent quality deterioration during postharvest storage, including cold storage, controlled atmosphere (CA), and application of biotic and abiotic stimulus. In this review, mechanisms related to protein level responses of host side and pathogen side were characterized. Protein extraction protocols have been successfully developed for recalcitrant, low protein content fruit tissues. Comparative proteome profiling and functional analysis revealed that defense related proteins, energy metabolism, and antioxidant pathway played important roles in fruits in response to storage conditions and exogenous elicitor treatments. Secretome of pathogenic fungi has been well-investigated and the results indicated that hydrolytic enzymes were the key virulent factors for the pathogen infection. These protein level changes shed new light on interaction among fruits, pathogens, and environmental conditions. Potential postharvest strategies to reduce risk of fruit decay were further proposed based on currently available proteomic data. PMID:23335934

  11. Proteomic dissection of plant responses to various pathogens.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xianping; Chen, Jianping; Dai, Liangying; Ma, Huasheng; Zhang, Hengmu; Yang, Jian; Wang, Fang; Yan, Chengqi

    2015-05-01

    During their growth and development, plants are vulnerable to the effects of a variety of pathogens. Proteomics technology plays an important role in research studies of plant defense mechanisms by mining the expression changes of proteins in response to various biotic stresses. This review article provides a comprehensive overview of the latest developments in international proteomic research on plant biotic stress. It summarizes the methods commonly used in plant proteomic research to investigate biotic stress, analyze the protein responses of plants in adverse conditions, and reviews the applications of proteomics combined with transgenic technology in plant protection.

  12. Functional proteomic analysis of corticosteroid pharmacodynamics in rat liver: Relationship to hepatic stress, signaling, energy regulation, and drug metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ayyar, Vivaswath S; Almon, Richard R; DuBois, Debra C; Sukumaran, Siddharth; Qu, Jun; Jusko, William J

    2017-03-14

    Corticosteroids (CS) are anti-inflammatory agents that cause extensive pharmacogenomic and proteomic changes in multiple tissues. An understanding of the proteome-wide effects of CS in liver and its relationships to altered hepatic and systemic physiology remains incomplete. Here, we report the application of a functional pharmacoproteomic approach to gain integrated insight into the complex nature of CS responses in liver in vivo. An in-depth functional analysis was performed using rich pharmacodynamic (temporal-based) proteomic data measured over 66h in rat liver following a single dose of methylprednisolone (MPL). Data mining identified 451 differentially regulated proteins. These proteins were analyzed on the basis of temporal regulation, cellular localization, and literature-mined functional information. Of the 451 proteins, 378 were clustered into six functional groups based on major clinically-relevant effects of CS in liver. MPL-responsive proteins were highly localized in the mitochondria (20%) and cytosol (24%). Interestingly, several proteins were related to hepatic stress and signaling processes, which appear to be involved in secondary signaling cascades and in protecting the liver from CS-induced oxidative damage. Consistent with known adverse metabolic effects of CS, several rate-controlling enzymes involved in amino acid metabolism, gluconeogenesis, and fatty-acid metabolism were altered by MPL. In addition, proteins involved in the metabolism of endogenous compounds, xenobiotics, and therapeutic drugs including cytochrome P450 and Phase-II enzymes were differentially regulated. Proteins related to the inflammatory acute-phase response were up-regulated in response to MPL. Functionally-similar proteins showed large diversity in their temporal profiles, indicating complex mechanisms of regulation by CS.

  13. Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Hixson, Kim K.; Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Robinson, Errol W.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2010-02-01

    Proteomics aims to characterize the spatial distribution and temporal dynamics of proteins in biological systems, the protein response to environmental stimuli, and the differences in protein states between diseased and control biological systems. Mass spectrometry (MS) plays a crucial role in enabling the analysis of proteomes and typically is the method of choice for identifying proteins present in biological systems. Peptide (and consequently protein) identifications are made by comparing measured masses to calculated values obtained from genome data. Several methodologies based on MS have been developed for the analysis of proteomes. The complexity of the biological systems requires that the proteome be separated prior to analysis. Both gel based and liquid chromatography based separations have proven very useful in this regard. Typically, separated proteins are analyzed with MS either intact (top-down proteomics) or are digested into peptides (bottom-up) prior to MS analysis. Additionally, several procedures, with and without stable isotopic labeling, have been introduced to facilitate protein quantitation (e.g. characterize changes in protein abundances between given biological states).

  14. Effect of nano-sized, elemental selenium supplement on the proteome of chicken liver.

    PubMed

    Gulyas, G; Csosz, E; Prokisch, J; Javor, A; Mezes, M; Erdelyi, M; Balogh, K; Janaky, T; Szabo, Z; Simon, A; Czegledi, L

    2016-02-22

    The nano-sized (100-500 nm) selenium has higher bioavailability and relatively lower toxicity compared to other selenium forms. The objective of the present study was to compare liver proteome profiles of broiler chicken fed with control diet without Se supplementation and diet supplemented with nano-Se with 4.25 mg/kg DM. Differential proteome analyses were performed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE) followed by tryptic digestion and protein identification by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Seven hundred and eight spots were detected, and 18 protein spots showed significant difference in their intensity (p < 0.05) between the two groups. In response to nano-Se supplementation, the expression of 8 proteins was higher, and 5 proteins were lower in nano-Se supplemented group compared to control group. The functions of the differentially expressed proteins indicate that the high dose of selenium supplementation induced a dietary stress. Selenium supplementation may influence the metabolism of fatty acids and carbohydrates and antioxidant system, and increase the quantity of cytoskeletal actin and the expression of actin regulatory protein as well.

  15. Proteomic characterization of early changes induced by triiodothyronine in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Severino, Valeria; Locker, Joseph; Ledda-Columbano, Giovanna M; Columbano, Amedeo; Parente, Augusto; Chambery, Angela

    2011-07-01

    High doses of T3 are mitogenic in liver, causing hyperplasia that has numerous differences from the compensatory regeneration induced by partial hepatectomy (PH). T3 binds to the thyroid hormone receptor (TR), which directly regulates transcription, while PH acts indirectly through signal transduction pathways. We therefore carried out a proteomic analysis to compare early effects of the two treatments. Transcriptome analysis by DNA microarray also confirmed the observed proteomic changes, demonstrating that they were caused by transcriptional regulation. Among the differentially expressed proteins, many are directly or indirectly involved in energy metabolism and response to oxidative stress. Several enzymes of lipid metabolism (e.g., Acaa2, Acads, Hadh, and Echs1) were differentially regulated by T3. In addition, altered expression levels of several mitochondrial proteins (e.g., Hspa9, Atp5b, Cps1, Glud1, Aldh2, Ak2, Acads) demonstrated the known increase of mitochondrial biogenesis mediated by T3. The present results provide insights in changes in metabolic balance occurring following T3-stimulation and define a basis for dissecting the molecular pathways of hepatocyte hyperplasia.

  16. Proteomic profiling predicts drug response to novel targeted anticancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fan; Li, Zilin; Hua, Yunfen; Lim, Yoon Pin

    2016-01-01

    Most recently approved anti-cancer drugs by the US FDA are targeted therapeutic agents and this represents an important trend for future anticancer therapy. Unlike conventional chemotherapy that rarely considers individual differences, it is crucial for targeted therapies to identify the beneficial subgroup of patients for the treatment. Currently, genomics and transcriptomics are the major 'omic' analytics used in studies of drug response prediction. However, proteomic profiling excels both in its advantages of directly detecting an instantaneous dynamic of the whole proteome, which contains most current diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets. Moreover, proteomic profiling improves understanding of the mechanism for drug resistance and helps finding optimal combination therapy. This article reviews the recent success of applications of proteomic analytics in predicting the response to targeted anticancer therapeutics, and discusses the potential avenues and pitfalls of proteomic platforms and techniques used most in the field.

  17. The human salivary proteome is radiation responsive.

    PubMed

    Moore, Heather D; Ivey, Richard G; Voytovich, Uliana J; Lin, Chenwei; Stirewalt, Derek L; Pogosova-Agadjanyan, Era L; Paulovich, Amanda G

    2014-05-01

    In the event of a nuclear incident in a heavily populated area, the surge in demand for medical evaluation will likely overwhelm our emergency care system, compromising our ability to care for victims with life-threatening injuries or exposures. Therefore, there exists a need for a rapidly deployable biological assay for radiation exposure that can be performed in the field by individuals with little to no medical training. Saliva is an attractive biofluid for this purpose, due to the relative ease of its collection and the wide array of biomolecules it contains. To determine whether the human salivary proteome is responsive to ionizing radiation exposure, we characterized the abundances of salivary proteins in humans before and after total body irradiation. Using an assay panel targeting 90 analytes (growth factors, chemokines and cytokines), we identified proteins that were significantly radiation responsive in human saliva. The responses of three proteins (monocyte chemo-attractant protein 1, interleukin 8 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1) were confirmed using independent immunoassay platforms and then verified and further characterized in 130 saliva samples from a completely independent set of 38 patients undergoing total body irradiation. The results demonstrate the potential for detecting radiation exposure based on analysis of human saliva.

  18. The Human Salivary Proteome is Radiation Responsive

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Heather D.; Ivey, Richard G.; Voytovich, Uliana J.; Lin, Chenwei; Stirewalt, Derek L.; Pogosova-Agadjanyan, Era L.; Paulovich, Amanda G.

    2014-01-01

    In the event of a nuclear incident in a heavily populated area, the surge in demand for medical evaluation will likely overwhelm our emergency care system, compromising our ability to care for victims with life-threatening injuries or exposures. Therefore, there exists a need for a rapidly deployable biological assay for radiation exposure that can be performed in the field by individuals with little to no medical training. Saliva is an attractive biofluid for this purpose, due to the relative ease of its collection and the wide array of biomolecules it contains. To determine whether the human salivary proteome is responsive to ionizing radiation exposure, we characterized the abundances of salivary proteins in humans before and after total body irradiation. Using an assay panel targeting 90 analytes (growth factors, chemokines and cytokines), we identified proteins that were significantly radiation responsive in human saliva. The responses of three proteins (monocyte chemo-attractant protein 1, interleukin 8 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1) were confirmed using independent immunoassay platforms and then verified and further characterized in 130 saliva samples from a completely independent set of 38 patients undergoing total body irradiation. The results demonstrate the potential for detecting radiation exposure based on analysis of human saliva. PMID:24720749

  19. Drought-Responsive Mechanisms in Plant Leaves Revealed by Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoli; Cai, Xiaofeng; Xu, Chenxi; Wang, Quanhua; Dai, Shaojun

    2016-10-18

    Plant drought tolerance is a complex trait that requires a global view to understand its underlying mechanism. The proteomic aspects of plant drought response have been extensively investigated in model plants, crops and wood plants. In this review, we summarize recent proteomic studies on drought response in leaves to reveal the common and specialized drought-responsive mechanisms in different plants. Although drought-responsive proteins exhibit various patterns depending on plant species, genotypes and stress intensity, proteomic analyses show that dominant changes occurred in sensing and signal transduction, reactive oxygen species scavenging, osmotic regulation, gene expression, protein synthesis/turnover, cell structure modulation, as well as carbohydrate and energy metabolism. In combination with physiological and molecular results, proteomic studies in leaves have helped to discover some potential proteins and/or metabolic pathways for drought tolerance. These findings provide new clues for understanding the molecular basis of plant drought tolerance.

  20. Drought-Responsive Mechanisms in Plant Leaves Revealed by Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoli; Cai, Xiaofeng; Xu, Chenxi; Wang, Quanhua; Dai, Shaojun

    2016-01-01

    Plant drought tolerance is a complex trait that requires a global view to understand its underlying mechanism. The proteomic aspects of plant drought response have been extensively investigated in model plants, crops and wood plants. In this review, we summarize recent proteomic studies on drought response in leaves to reveal the common and specialized drought-responsive mechanisms in different plants. Although drought-responsive proteins exhibit various patterns depending on plant species, genotypes and stress intensity, proteomic analyses show that dominant changes occurred in sensing and signal transduction, reactive oxygen species scavenging, osmotic regulation, gene expression, protein synthesis/turnover, cell structure modulation, as well as carbohydrate and energy metabolism. In combination with physiological and molecular results, proteomic studies in leaves have helped to discover some potential proteins and/or metabolic pathways for drought tolerance. These findings provide new clues for understanding the molecular basis of plant drought tolerance. PMID:27763546

  1. Proteomic contributions to our understanding of vaccine and immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Galassie, Allison C.; Link, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines are one of the greatest public health successes; yet, due to the empirical nature of vaccine design, we have an incomplete understanding of how the genes and proteins induced by vaccines contribute to the development of both protective innate and adaptive immune responses. While the advent of genomics has enabled new vaccine development and facilitated understanding of the immune response, proteomics identifies potentially new vaccine antigens with increasing speed and sensitivity. In addition, as proteomics is complementary to transcriptomic approaches, a combination of both approaches provides a more comprehensive view of the immune response after vaccination via systems vaccinology. This review details the advances that proteomic strategies have made in vaccine development and reviews how proteomics contributes to the development of a more complete understanding of human vaccines and immune responses. PMID:26172619

  2. Metabolic changes associated with the long winter fast dominate the liver proteome in 13-lined ground squirrels.

    PubMed

    Hindle, Allyson G; Grabek, Katharine R; Epperson, L Elaine; Karimpour-Fard, Anis; Martin, Sandra L

    2014-05-15

    Small-bodied hibernators partition the year between active homeothermy and hibernating heterothermy accompanied by fasting. To define molecular events underlying hibernation that are both dependent and independent of fasting, we analyzed the liver proteome among two active and four hibernation states in 13-lined ground squirrels. We also examined fall animals transitioning between fed homeothermy and fasting heterothermy. Significantly enriched pathways differing between activity and hibernation were biased toward metabolic enzymes, concordant with the fuel shifts accompanying fasting physiology. Although metabolic reprogramming to support fasting dominated these data, arousing (rewarming) animals had the most distinct proteome among the hibernation states. Instead of a dominant metabolic enzyme signature, torpor-arousal cycles featured differences in plasma proteins and intracellular membrane traffic and its regulation. Phosphorylated NSFL1C, a membrane regulator, exhibited this torpor-arousal cycle pattern; its role in autophagosome formation may promote utilization of local substrates upon metabolic reactivation in arousal. Fall animals transitioning to hibernation lagged in their proteomic adjustment, indicating that the liver is more responsive than preparatory to the metabolic reprogramming of hibernation. Specifically, torpor use had little impact on the fall liver proteome, consistent with a dominant role of nutritional status. In contrast to our prediction of reprogramming the transition between activity and hibernation by gene expression and then within-hibernation transitions by posttranslational modification (PTM), we found extremely limited evidence of reversible PTMs within torpor-arousal cycles. Rather, acetylation contributed to seasonal differences, being highest in winter (specifically in torpor), consistent with fasting physiology and decreased abundance of the mitochondrial deacetylase, SIRT3.

  3. Global Proteome Changes in Liver Tissue 6 Weeks after FOLFOX Treatment of Colorectal Cancer Liver Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Urdzik, Jozef; Vildhede, Anna; Wiśniewski, Jacek R.; Duraj, Frans; Haglund, Ulf; Artursson, Per; Norén, Agneta

    2016-01-01

    (1) Oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy for colorectal cancer liver metastasis is associated with sinusoidal injury of liver parenchyma. The effects of oxaliplatin-induced liver injury on the protein level remain unknown. (2) Protein expression in liver tissue was analyzed—from eight patients treated with FOLFOX (combination of fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin) and seven controls—by label-free liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Recursive feature elimination–support vector machine and Welch t-test were used to identify classifying and relevantly changed proteins, respectively. Resulting proteins were analyzed for associations with gene ontology categories and pathways. (3) A total of 5891 proteins were detected. A set of 184 (3.1%) proteins classified the groups with a 20% error rate, but relevant change was observed only in 55 (0.9%) proteins. The classifying proteins were associated with changes in DNA replication (p < 0.05) through upregulation of the minichromosome maintenance complex and with the innate immune response (p < 0.05). The importance of DNA replication changes was supported by the results of Welch t-test (p < 0.05). (4) Six weeks after FOLFOX treatment, less than 1% of identified proteins showed changes in expression associated with DNA replication, cell cycle entry, and innate immune response. We hypothesize that the changes remain after recovery from FOLFOX treatment injury. PMID:28248240

  4. Changes of the Cytoplasmic Proteome in Response to Alcoholic Hepatotoxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Hwan; Lee, Eun-Mi; Do, Sun-Hee; Jeong, Da-Hee; Jeong, Kyu-Shik

    2015-01-01

    Proteomic analyses have already been used in a number of hepatological studies and provide important information. However, few reports have focused on changes in the cytoplasmic proteome. The present study therefore aimed to evaluate changes in cytoplasmic proteome of rats in response to alcoholic hepatotoxicity. Rats were fed a Liber-DeCarli liquid diet containing ethanol for four weeks. Cytoplasmic proteins except mitochondrial proteins from the livers of these animals were investigated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Alcohol induced a decrease in body weight gain and an increase in alanine transaminase (ALT), cholesterol, and phospholipid levels. Histopathological observations revealed hepatic damage characterized by necrosis and fatty change in alcohol-treated group at week 2, which continues until week 4. Our proteomic analysis revealed that 25 proteins were differentially expressed in the ethanol-fed group. Of these, 12 cytoplasmic proteins are being reported for the first time. Taken together, our results provide further insights into the disease mechanism and therapeutic information of alcoholic liver disease. PMID:26266409

  5. Fish gut-liver immunity during homeostasis or inflammation revealed by integrative transcriptome and proteome studies.

    PubMed

    Wu, Nan; Song, Yu-Long; Wang, Bei; Zhang, Xiang-Yang; Zhang, Xu-Jie; Wang, Ya-Li; Cheng, Ying-Yin; Chen, Dan-Dan; Xia, Xiao-Qin; Lu, Yi-Shan; Zhang, Yong-An

    2016-11-03

    The gut-associated lymphoid tissue, connected with liver via bile and blood, constructs a local immune environment of both defense and tolerance. The gut-liver immunity has been well-studied in mammals, yet in fish remains largely unknown, even though enteritis as well as liver and gallbladder syndrome emerged as a limitation in aquaculture. In this study, we performed integrative bioinformatic analysis for both transcriptomic (gut and liver) and proteomic (intestinal mucus and bile) data, in both healthy and infected tilapias. We found more categories of immune transcripts in gut than liver, as well as more adaptive immune in gut meanwhile more innate in liver. Interestingly reduced differential immune transcripts between gut and liver upon inflammation were also revealed. In addition, more immune proteins in bile than intestinal mucus were identified. And bile probably providing immune effectors to intestinal mucus upon inflammation was deduced. Specifically, many key immune transcripts in gut or liver as well as key immune proteins in mucus or bile were demonstrated. Accordingly, we proposed a hypothesized profile of fish gut-liver immunity, during either homeostasis or inflammation. Current data suggested that fish gut and liver may collaborate immunologically while keep homeostasis using own strategies, including potential unique mechanisms.

  6. Fish gut-liver immunity during homeostasis or inflammation revealed by integrative transcriptome and proteome studies

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Nan; Song, Yu-Long; Wang, Bei; Zhang, Xiang-Yang; Zhang, Xu-Jie; Wang, Ya-Li; Cheng, Ying-Yin; Chen, Dan-Dan; Xia, Xiao-Qin; Lu, Yi-Shan; Zhang, Yong-An

    2016-01-01

    The gut-associated lymphoid tissue, connected with liver via bile and blood, constructs a local immune environment of both defense and tolerance. The gut-liver immunity has been well-studied in mammals, yet in fish remains largely unknown, even though enteritis as well as liver and gallbladder syndrome emerged as a limitation in aquaculture. In this study, we performed integrative bioinformatic analysis for both transcriptomic (gut and liver) and proteomic (intestinal mucus and bile) data, in both healthy and infected tilapias. We found more categories of immune transcripts in gut than liver, as well as more adaptive immune in gut meanwhile more innate in liver. Interestingly reduced differential immune transcripts between gut and liver upon inflammation were also revealed. In addition, more immune proteins in bile than intestinal mucus were identified. And bile probably providing immune effectors to intestinal mucus upon inflammation was deduced. Specifically, many key immune transcripts in gut or liver as well as key immune proteins in mucus or bile were demonstrated. Accordingly, we proposed a hypothesized profile of fish gut-liver immunity, during either homeostasis or inflammation. Current data suggested that fish gut and liver may collaborate immunologically while keep homeostasis using own strategies, including potential unique mechanisms. PMID:27808112

  7. Fish gut-liver immunity during homeostasis or inflammation revealed by integrative transcriptome and proteome studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Nan; Song, Yu-Long; Wang, Bei; Zhang, Xiang-Yang; Zhang, Xu-Jie; Wang, Ya-Li; Cheng, Ying-Yin; Chen, Dan-Dan; Xia, Xiao-Qin; Lu, Yi-Shan; Zhang, Yong-An

    2016-11-01

    The gut-associated lymphoid tissue, connected with liver via bile and blood, constructs a local immune environment of both defense and tolerance. The gut-liver immunity has been well-studied in mammals, yet in fish remains largely unknown, even though enteritis as well as liver and gallbladder syndrome emerged as a limitation in aquaculture. In this study, we performed integrative bioinformatic analysis for both transcriptomic (gut and liver) and proteomic (intestinal mucus and bile) data, in both healthy and infected tilapias. We found more categories of immune transcripts in gut than liver, as well as more adaptive immune in gut meanwhile more innate in liver. Interestingly reduced differential immune transcripts between gut and liver upon inflammation were also revealed. In addition, more immune proteins in bile than intestinal mucus were identified. And bile probably providing immune effectors to intestinal mucus upon inflammation was deduced. Specifically, many key immune transcripts in gut or liver as well as key immune proteins in mucus or bile were demonstrated. Accordingly, we proposed a hypothesized profile of fish gut-liver immunity, during either homeostasis or inflammation. Current data suggested that fish gut and liver may collaborate immunologically while keep homeostasis using own strategies, including potential unique mechanisms.

  8. Proteomic and genomic studies of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease--clues in the pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jun Wei; Dillon, John; Miller, Michael

    2014-07-14

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a widely prevalent hepatic disorder that covers wide spectrum of liver pathology. NAFLD is strongly associated with liver inflammation, metabolic hyperlipidaemia and insulin resistance. Frequently, NAFLD has been considered as the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome. The pathophysiology of NAFLD has not been fully elucidated. Some patients can remain in the stage of simple steatosis, which generally is a benign condition; whereas others can develop liver inflammation and progress into non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The mechanism behind the progression is still not fully understood. Much ongoing proteomic researches have focused on discovering the unbiased circulating biochemical markers to allow early detection and treatment of NAFLD. Comprehensive genomic studies have also begun to provide new insights into the gene polymorphism to understand patient-disease variations. Therefore, NAFLD is considered a complex and mutifactorial disease phenotype resulting from environmental exposures acting on a susceptible polygenic background. This paper reviewed the current status of proteomic and genomic studies that have contributed to the understanding of NAFLD pathogenesis. For proteomics section, this review highlighted functional proteins that involved in: (1) transportation; (2) metabolic pathway; (3) acute phase reaction; (4) anti-inflammatory; (5) extracellular matrix; and (6) immune system. In the genomic studies, this review will discuss genes which involved in: (1) lipolysis; (2) adipokines; and (3) cytokines production.

  9. Current Status of Proteomic Studies on Defense Responses in Rice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xifeng; Bhadauria, Vijai; Ma, Bojun

    2016-01-01

    Biotic stresses are constraints to plant growth and development negatively impacting crop production. To counter such stresses, plants have developed stress-specific adaptations as well as simultaneous responses. The efficacy and magnitude of inducible adaptive responses are dependent on activation of signaling pathways and intracellular networks by modulating expression, or abundance, and/or post-translational modification of proteins associated with defense mechanisms. Proteomics plays an important role in elucidating plant defense mechanisms by mining the differential regulation of proteins to various biotic stresses. Rice, one of the most widely cultivated food crops in world, is constantly challenged by a variety of biotic stresses, and high-throughput proteomics approaches have been employed to unravel the molecular mechanism of the biotic stresses-response in rice. In this review, we summarize the latest advances of proteomic studies on defense responses and discuss the potential relevance of the proteins identified by proteomic means in rice defense mechanism. Furthermore, we provide perspective for proteomics in unraveling the molecular mechanism of rice immunity.

  10. Crop and medicinal plants proteomics in response to salt stress

    PubMed Central

    Aghaei, Keyvan; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2013-01-01

    Increasing of world population marks a serious need to create new crop cultivars and medicinal plants with high growth and production at any environmental situations. Among the environmental unfavorable conditions, salinity is the most widespread in the world. Crop production and growth severely decreases under salt stress; however, some crop cultivars show significant tolerance against the negative effects of salinity. Among salt stress responses of crops, proteomic responses play a pivotal role in their ability to cope with it and have become the main center of notification. Many physiological responses are detectable in terms of protein increase and decrease even before physiological responses take place. Thus proteomic approach makes a short cut in the way of inferring how crops response to salt stress. Nowadays many salt-responsive proteins such as heat shock proteins, pathogen-related proteins, protein kinases, ascorbate peroxidase, osmotin, ornithine decarboxylase, and some transcription factors, have been detected in some major crops which are thought to give them the ability of withstanding against salt stress. Proteomic analysis of medicinal plants also revealed that alkaloid biosynthesis related proteins such as tryptophan synthase, codeinone reductase, strictosidine synthase, and 12-oxophytodienoate reductase might have major role in production of secondary metabolites. In this review we are comparing some different or similar proteomic responses of several crops and medicinal plants to salt stress and discuss about the future prospects. PMID:23386857

  11. Analysis of 3-MCPD- and 3-MCPD dipalmitate-induced proteomic changes in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Braeuning, Albert; Sawada, Stefanie; Oberemm, Axel; Lampen, Alfonso

    2015-12-01

    3-Monochloropropane-1,2-diol (3-MCPD) and 3-MCPD fatty acid esters are process contaminants in foodstuff which are generated during thermal treatment. Long-term exposure to 3-MCPD or 3-MCPD esters causes toxicity especially in kidney and testis. 3-MCPD esters are efficiently hydrolyzed in the gastrointestinal tract, suggesting that their toxicity is mediated by free 3-MCPD. Combined exposure to free 3-MCPD and 3-MCPD released from 3-MCPD esters might lead to dietary consumption above the tolerable daily intake of 2 μg/kg body weight/day. Suspected mechanisms of 3-MCPD toxicity include the inhibition of glycolysis and oxidative stress. Here, a comparative proteomic approach was followed to analyze the effects of 3-MCPD or 3-MCPD dipalmitate in livers from rats exposed to 10 mg/kg body weight 3-MCPD, an equimolar dose of 3-MCPD dipalmitate, or a 4-fold lower dose of the ester during a 28-day repeated-dose feeding study. Early cellular changes were monitored in the absence of overt toxicity. A comprehensive view of 3-MCPD- or 3-MCPD dipalmitate-triggered proteomic changes in rat liver links to previously proposed mechanisms of toxicity and substantially extends our knowledge on molecular hepatic effects of 3-MCPD. Organ-independent marker proteins altered upon 3-MCPD exposure, for example DJ-1/PARK7, were identified by comparison of the proteomic patterns of kidney, testis and liver.

  12. Integrative Quantitative Proteomics Unveils Proteostasis Imbalance in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Developed on Nonfibrotic Livers*

    PubMed Central

    Negroni, Luc; Taouji, Said; Arma, Daniela; Pallares-Lupon, Nestor; Leong, Kristen; Beausang, Lee Anne; Latterich, Martin; Bossé, Roger; Balabaud, Charles; Schmitter, Jean-Marie; Bioulac-Sage, Paulette; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica; Rosenbaum, Jean; Chevet, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Proteomics-based clinical studies represent promising resources for the discovery of novel biomarkers or for unraveling molecular mechanisms underlying particular diseases. Here, we present a discovery study of hepatocellular carcinoma developed on nonfibrotic liver (nfHCC) that combines complementary quantitative iTRAQ-based proteomics and phosphoproteomics approaches. Using both approaches, we compared a set of 24 samples (18 nfHCC versus six nontumor liver tissue). We identified 43 proteins (67 peptides) differentially expressed and 32 peptides differentially phosphorylated between the experimental groups. The functional analysis of the two data sets pointed toward the deregulation of a protein homeostasis (proteostasis) network including the up-regulation of the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) resident HSPA5, HSP90B1, PDIA6, and P4HB and of the cytosolic HSPA1B, HSP90AA1, HSPA9, UBC, CNDP2, TXN, and VCP as well as the increased phosphorylation of the ER resident calnexin at Ser583. Antibody-based validation approaches (immunohistochemistry, immunoblot, Alphascreen®, and AMMP®) on independent nfHCC tumor sets (up to 77 samples) confirmed these observations, thereby indicating a common mechanism occurring in nfHCC tumors. Based on these results we propose that adaptation to proteostasis imbalance in nfHCC tumors might confer selective advantages to those tumors. As such, this model could provide an additional therapeutic opportunity for those tumors arising on normal liver by targeting the tumor proteostasis network. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001253. PMID:25225353

  13. Proteome Characteristics of Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis Liver Tissue and Associated Hepatocellular Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Kakehashi, Anna; Stefanov, Vasily E.; Ishii, Naomi; Okuno, Takahiro; Fujii, Hideki; Kawai, Kazuaki; Kawada, Norifumi; Wanibuchi, Hideki

    2017-01-01

    To uncover mechanisms of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) associated hepatocarcinogenesis, we compared the proteomes of human NASH-associated liver biopsies, resected hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) and HCCs of HCV+ patients with normal liver tissue of patients with gastrointestinal tumor metastasis, in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples obtained after surgery in our hospital during the period from 2006 to 2011. In addition, proteome analysis of liver tumors in male STAM NASH-model mice was performed. Similar changes in the proteome spectrum such as overexpression of enzymes involved in lipid, cholesterol and bile acid biosynthesis and examples associated with suppression of fatty acid oxidation and catabolism, alcohol metabolism, mitochondrial function as well as low expression levels of cytokeratins 8 and 18 were observed in both human NASH biopsies and NASH HCCs, but not HCV+ HCCs. Alterations in downstream protein expression pointed to significant activation of transforming growth factor β, SMAD family member 3, β-catenin, Nrf2, SREBP-LXRα and nuclear receptor-interacting protein 1 (NRIP1), and inhibition of PPARs and p53 in human NASH biopsies and/or HCCs, suggesting their involvement in accumulation of lipids, development of fibrosis, oxidative stress, cell proliferation and suppression of apoptosis in NASH hepatocarcinogenesis. In STAM mice, PPARs inhibition was not obvious, while expression of cytokeratins 8 and 18 was elevated, indicative of essential differences between human and mouse NASH pathogenesis. PMID:28218651

  14. Integrative quantitative proteomics unveils proteostasis imbalance in human hepatocellular carcinoma developed on nonfibrotic livers.

    PubMed

    Negroni, Luc; Taouji, Said; Arma, Daniela; Pallares-Lupon, Nestor; Leong, Kristen; Beausang, Lee Anne; Latterich, Martin; Bossé, Roger; Balabaud, Charles; Schmitter, Jean-Marie; Bioulac-Sage, Paulette; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica; Rosenbaum, Jean; Chevet, Eric

    2014-12-01

    Proteomics-based clinical studies represent promising resources for the discovery of novel biomarkers or for unraveling molecular mechanisms underlying particular diseases. Here, we present a discovery study of hepatocellular carcinoma developed on nonfibrotic liver (nfHCC) that combines complementary quantitative iTRAQ-based proteomics and phosphoproteomics approaches. Using both approaches, we compared a set of 24 samples (18 nfHCC versus six nontumor liver tissue). We identified 43 proteins (67 peptides) differentially expressed and 32 peptides differentially phosphorylated between the experimental groups. The functional analysis of the two data sets pointed toward the deregulation of a protein homeostasis (proteostasis) network including the up-regulation of the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) resident HSPA5, HSP90B1, PDIA6, and P4HB and of the cytosolic HSPA1B, HSP90AA1, HSPA9, UBC, CNDP2, TXN, and VCP as well as the increased phosphorylation of the ER resident calnexin at Ser583. Antibody-based validation approaches (immunohistochemistry, immunoblot, Alphascreen(®), and AMMP(®)) on independent nfHCC tumor sets (up to 77 samples) confirmed these observations, thereby indicating a common mechanism occurring in nfHCC tumors. Based on these results we propose that adaptation to proteostasis imbalance in nfHCC tumors might confer selective advantages to those tumors. As such, this model could provide an additional therapeutic opportunity for those tumors arising on normal liver by targeting the tumor proteostasis network. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001253.

  15. Liver proteome of mice with different genetic susceptibilities to the effects of fluoride

    PubMed Central

    KHAN, Zohaib Nisar; LEITE, Aline de Lima; CHARONE, Senda; SABINO, Isabela Tomazini; MARTINI, Tatiana; PEREIRA, Heloísa Aparecida Barbosa da Silva; OLIVEIRA, Rodrigo Cardoso; BUZALAF, Marília Afonso Rabelo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A/J and 129P3/J mice strains have been widely studied over the last few years because they respond quite differently to fluoride (F) exposure. 129P3/J mice are remarkably resistant to the development of dental fluorosis, despite excreting less F in urine and having higher circulating F levels. These two strains also present different characteristics regardless of F exposure. Objective In this study, we investigated the differential pattern of protein expression in the liver of these mice to provide insights on why they have different responses to F. Material and Methods Weanling male A/J and 129P3/J mice (n=10 from each strain) were pared and housed in metabolic cages with ad libitum access to low-F food and deionized water for 42 days. Liver proteome profiles were examined using nLC-MS/MS. Protein function was classified by GO biological process (Cluego v2.0.7 + Clupedia v1.0.8) and protein-protein interaction network was constructed (PSICQUIC, Cytoscape). Results Most proteins with fold change were increased in A/J mice. The functional category with the highest percentage of altered genes was oxidation-reduction process (20%). Subnetwork analysis revealed that proteins with fold change interacted with Disks large homolog 4 and Calcium-activated potassium channel subunit alpha-1. A/J mice had an increase in proteins related to energy flux and oxidative stress. Conclusion This could be a possible explanation for the high susceptibility of these mice to the effects of F, since the exposure also induces oxidative stress. PMID:27383706

  16. Proteomics Analysis of Alfalfa Response to Heat Stress

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weimin; Wei, Zhenwu; Qiao, Zhihong; Wu, Zinian; Cheng, Lixiang; Wang, Yuyang

    2013-01-01

    The proteome responses to heat stress have not been well understood. In this study, alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. cv. Huaiyin) seedlings were exposed to 25°C (control) and 40°C (heat stress) in growth chambers, and leaves were collected at 24, 48 and 72 h after treatment, respectively. The morphological, physiological and proteomic processes were negatively affected under heat stress. Proteins were extracted and separated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE), and differentially expressed protein spots were identified by mass spectrometry (MS). Totally, 81 differentially expressed proteins were identified successfully by MALDI-TOF/TOF. These proteins were categorized into nine classes: including metabolism, energy, protein synthesis, protein destination/storage, transporters, intracellular traffic, cell structure, signal transduction and disease/defence. Five proteins were further analyzed for mRNA levels. The results of the proteomics analyses provide a better understanding of the molecular basis of heat-stress responses in alfalfa. PMID:24324825

  17. Proteomics dissection of plant responses to mineral nutrient deficiency.

    PubMed

    Liang, Cuiyue; Tian, Jiang; Liao, Hong

    2013-02-01

    Plants require at least 17 essential nutrients to complete their life cycle. Except for carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen, other essential nutrients are mineral nutrients, which are mainly acquired from soils by roots. In natural soils, the availability of most essential mineral nutrients is very low and hard to meet the demand of plants. Developing crops with high nutrient efficiency is essential for sustainable agriculture, which requires more understandings of crop responses to mineral nutrient deficiency. Proteomic techniques provide a crucial and complementary tool to dissect molecular mechanisms underlying crop adaptation to mineral nutrient deficiency in the rapidly processing postgenome era. This review gives a comparative overview about identification of mineral nutrient deficiency responsive proteins using proteomic analysis, and discusses the current status for crop proteomics and its challenges to be integrated into systems biology approaches for developing crops with high mineral nutrient efficiency.

  18. Plant cell organelle proteomics in response to abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Zahed; Nouri, Mohammad-Zaman; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2012-01-01

    Proteomics is one of the finest molecular techniques extensively being used for the study of protein profiling of a given plant species experiencing stressed conditions. Plants respond to a stress by alteration in the pattern of protein expression, either by up-regulating of the existing protein pool or by the synthesizing novel proteins primarily associated with plants antioxidative defense mechanism. Improved protein extraction protocols and advance techniques for identification of novel proteins have been standardized in different plant species at both cellular and whole plant level for better understanding of abiotic stress sensing and intracellular stress signal transduction mechanisms. In contrast, an in-depth proteome study of subcellular organelles could generate much detail information about the intrinsic mechanism of stress response as it correlates the possible relationship between the protein abundance and plant stress tolerance. Although a wealth of reviews devoted to plant proteomics are available, review articles dedicated to plant cell organelle proteins response under abiotic stress are very scanty. In the present review, an attempt has been made to summarize all significant contributions related to abiotic stresses and their impacts on organelle proteomes for better understanding of plants abiotic stress tolerance mechanism at protein level. This review will not only provide new insights into the plants stress response mechanisms, which are necessary for future development of genetically engineered stress tolerant crop plants for the benefit of humankind, but will also highlight the importance of studying changes in protein abundance within the cell organelles in response to abiotic stress.

  19. Abiotic stress responses in plant roots: a proteomics perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Dipanjana; Xu, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Abiotic stress conditions adversely affect plant growth, resulting in significant decline in crop productivity. To mitigate and recover from the damaging effects of such adverse environmental conditions, plants have evolved various adaptive strategies at cellular and metabolic levels. Most of these strategies involve dynamic changes in protein abundance that can be best explored through proteomics. This review summarizes comparative proteomic studies conducted with roots of various plant species subjected to different abiotic stresses especially drought, salinity, flood, and cold. The main purpose of this article is to highlight and classify the protein level changes in abiotic stress response pathways specifically in plant roots. Shared as well as stressor-specific proteome signatures and adaptive mechanism(s) are simultaneously described. Such a comprehensive account will facilitate the design of genetic engineering strategies that enable the development of broad-spectrum abiotic stress-tolerant crops. PMID:24478786

  20. The Physcomitrella patens Chloroplast Proteome Changes in Response to Protoplastation

    PubMed Central

    Fesenko, Igor; Seredina, Anna; Arapidi, Georgij; Ptushenko, Vasily; Urban, Anatoly; Butenko, Ivan; Kovalchuk, Sergey; Babalyan, Konstantin; Knyazev, Andrey; Khazigaleeva, Regina; Pushkova, Elena; Anikanov, Nikolai; Ivanov, Vadim; Govorun, Vadim M.

    2016-01-01

    Plant protoplasts are widely used for genetic manipulation and functional studies in transient expression systems. However, little is known about the molecular pathways involved in a cell response to the combined stress factors resulted from protoplast generation. Plants often face more than one type of stress at a time, and how plants respond to combined stress factors is therefore of great interest. Here, we used protoplasts of the moss Physcomitrella patens as a model to study the effects of short-term stress on the chloroplast proteome. Using label-free comparative quantitative proteomic analysis (SWATH-MS), we quantified 479 chloroplast proteins, 219 of which showed a more than 1.4-fold change in abundance in protoplasts. We additionally quantified 1451 chloroplast proteins using emPAI. We observed degradation of a significant portion of the chloroplast proteome following the first hour of stress imposed by the protoplast isolation process. Electron-transport chain (ETC) components underwent the heaviest degradation, resulting in the decline of photosynthetic activity. We also compared the proteome changes to those in the transcriptional level of nuclear-encoded chloroplast genes. Globally, the levels of the quantified proteins and their corresponding mRNAs showed limited correlation. Genes involved in the biosynthesis of chlorophyll and components of the outer chloroplast membrane showed decreases in both transcript and protein abundance. However, proteins like dehydroascorbate reductase 1 and 2-cys peroxiredoxin B responsible for ROS detoxification increased in abundance. Further, genes such as thylakoid ascorbate peroxidase were induced at the transcriptional level but down-regulated at the proteomic level. Together, our results demonstrate that the initial chloroplast reaction to stress is due changes at the proteomic level. PMID:27867392

  1. Comparisons of liver proteomes in the European flounder Platichthys flesus from three contrasted estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galland, Claire; Dupuy, Célie; Capitaine, Carole; Auffret, Michel; Quiniou, Louis; Laroche, Jean; Pichereau, Vianney

    2013-01-01

    Estuaries are important areas highly susceptible to anthropogenic degradations like pollution. Estuarine species have thus to cope with many types of constraints depending on the estuaries' characteristics. The European flounder Platichthys flesus is considered as a sentinel species for the monitoring of estuarine water quality. In this study, juvenile flounders (0+ group) were sampled from three contrasted Channel estuaries, i.e. the Seine, the Canche and the Tamar, and we characterized their liver proteomes by using a two-dimensional electrophoresis based proteomic approach. We showed that 27 protein spots differentially accumulated between the 3 populations. Six of these proteins were identified by MALDI TOF-TOF mass spectrometry. Flounders from the Seine and from the Tamar, two highly polluted estuaries, displayed common differences, i.e. an increase of the energetic- and the glutathione-metabolism. The most accumulated protein in the Seine's samples (6.7-fold) was a Vitelline Membrane Outer layer protein 1 homolog, suggesting oogenesis deregulation in these juvenile (sexually immature) flounders. Future works applying this kind of proteomic approach on flounders experimentally exposed to conditions that mimic environmental constraints will help to better understand the significance of these environmental proteomic signatures.

  2. Proteomic analysis of plasma from rats following total parenteral nutrition-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jai-Jen; Kuo, Hsing-Chun; Lee, Kam-Fai; Tsai, Tung-Hu

    2015-11-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is provided as the primary nitrogen source to manage patients with intestinal failure who were not able to sustain themselves on enteral feeds. The most common complication of long-term TPN use is hepatitis. A proteomic approach was used to identify proteins that are differentially expressed in the plasma of rats following TPN-related acute liver injury. Six male rats were randomly assigned to either the saline infusion control group or the TPN infusion group. Our results demonstrate that TPN infusion in rats resulted in hepatic dysfunction and hepatocyte apoptosis. Five proteins that were differentially expressed between TPN infusion and normal rats were determined and validated in vivo. Fascinatingly, the proteomic differential displays, downregulated proteins included peroxiredoxin 2 (PRDX2), alpha-1-antiproteinase (A1AT), and fibrinogen gamma chain (FIBG), which were involved in oxidative stress, inflammatory respondence and cells apoptosis. After TPN infusion, two protein spots showed increased expression, namely, the glucagon receptor (GLR) protein and apolipoprotein A-1 (APOA1), which may mediate the effects of TPN administration on glycogen and lipid metabolism. In this study, proteomic analysis suggested TPN-related acute liver injury could be involved in limiting cellular protection mechanisms against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. On the basis of the results, we also give molecular evidences replying TPN-related hepatitis.

  3. Insulin and diet-induced changes in the ubiquitin-modified proteome of rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Shtein, Harrison C.; Nguyen, Thinh Q.; Suryana, Eurwin; Poronnik, Philip; Cooney, Gregory J.; Saunders, Darren N.

    2017-01-01

    Ubiquitin is a crucial post-translational modification regulating numerous cellular processes, but its role in metabolic disease is not well characterized. In this study, we identified the in vivo ubiquitin-modified proteome in rat liver and determined changes in this ubiquitome under acute insulin stimulation and high-fat and sucrose diet-induced insulin resistance. We identified 1267 ubiquitinated proteins in rat liver across diet and insulin-stimulated conditions, with 882 proteins common to all conditions. KEGG pathway analysis of these proteins identified enrichment of metabolic pathways, TCA cycle, glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, fatty acid metabolism, and carbon metabolism, with similar pathways altered by diet and insulin resistance. Thus, the rat liver ubiquitome is sensitive to diet and insulin stimulation and this is perturbed in insulin resistance. PMID:28329008

  4. Proteomic Analysis of Liver Proteins in a Rat Model of Chronic Restraint Stress-Induced Depression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cong; Guo, Zhengguang; Sun, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Depression is a global mental disorder disease and greatly threatened human health and stress is considered to be one of the important factors that lead to depression. In this study, we used newly developed iTRAQ labeling and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and mass spectrum united analysis technology obtained the 2176 accurate proteins. Successively, we used the GO analysis and IPA software to analyze the 98 differentially expressed proteins of liver in depression rats due to chronic restraint stress, showing a map of proteomics analysis of liver proteins from the aspects of related functions, disease and function analysis, canonical pathway analysis, and associated network. This study provide important information for comprehensively understanding the mechanisms of dysfunction or injury in the liver in depression. PMID:28293639

  5. Proteomic Characterization of Host Response to Yersinia pestis

    SciTech Connect

    Chromy, B; Perkins, J; Heidbrink, J; Gonzales, A; Murhpy, G; Fitch, J P; McCutchen-Maloney, S

    2004-05-11

    Host-pathogen interactions result in protein expression changes within both the host and the pathogen. Here, results from proteomic characterization of host response following exposure to Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, and to two near neighbors, Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. enterocolitica, are reported. Human monocyte-like cells were chosen as a model for macrophage immune response to pathogen exposure. Two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry was used to identify host proteins with differential expression following exposure to these three closely related Yersinia species. This comparative proteomic characterization of host response clearly shows that host protein expression patterns are distinct for the different pathogen exposures, and contributes to further understanding of Y. pestis virulence and host defense mechanisms. This work also lays the foundation for future studies aimed at defining biomarkers for presymptomatic detection of plague.

  6. Stress response to laparoscopic liver resection

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Kazuki; Turner, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    Background: The magnitude of the systemic response is proportional to the degree of surgical trauma. Much has been reported in the literature comparing metabolic and immune responses, analgesia use, or length of hospital stay between laparoscopic and open procedures. In particular, metabolic and immune responses are represented by measuring various chemical mediators as stress responses. Laparoscopic procedures are associated with reduced operative trauma compared with open procedures, resulting in lower systemic response. As a result, laparoscopic procedures are now well accepted for both benign and malignant processes. Laparoscopic liver resection, specifically, is employed for symptomatic and some malignant tumors, following improvements in diagnostic accuracy, laparoscopic devices, and techniques. However, laparoscopic liver resection is still controversial in malignant disease because of complex anatomy, the technical difficulty of the procedure, and questionable indications. There are few reports describing the stress responses associated with laparoscopic liver resection, even though many studies reviewing stress responses have been performed recently in both humans and animal models comparing laparoscopic to conventional open surgery. Although this review examines stress response after laparoscopic liver resection in both an animal and human clinical model, further controlled randomized studies with additional investigations of immunologic parameters are needed to demonstrate the consequences of either minimally invasive surgery or open procedures on perioperative or postoperative stress responses for laparoscopic liver resection. PMID:18333082

  7. Exploring the effects of tert-butylhydroperoxide induced liver injury using proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chien-Heng; Tung, Shui-Yi; Huang, Wen-Shih; Lu, Chien-Chang; Lee, Ko-Chao; Hsieh, Yung-Yu; Chang, Pey-Jium; Liang, Hwey-Fang; Chen, Jiann-Hwa; Lin, Tseng-Hsi; Hsieh, Meng Chiao; Kuo, Hsing-Chun

    2014-02-28

    Tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP), an organic lipid hydroperoxide analog, has been demonstrated to exert pro-oxidant effects to evaluate mechanisms involving oxidative stress in hepatocyte cells and rat liver. Herein, we present an investigation of the event of molecular mechanism of t-BHP related acute liver injury. A proteomic approach was used to identify proteins which are differentially expressed in liver cells following t-BHP treatment and the mechanism of its action in apoptotic and endoplasmic reticulum stress pathways. Our results demonstrate that the t-BHP treatment of liver cells increased cell cytoxicity and apoptosis. t-BHP dose-dependent induction of cell apoptosis and stained liver sections relieved the acute rat liver injury were accompanied by sustained phosphorylation of JNK1/2 and p65. In addition, there were 13 differentially displayed proteins between the t-BHP-induced and untreated were assayed and validated in vivo. Furthermore, we demonstrated that t-BHP induced human Chang liver cell viability and apoptosis properties by up-regulating the levels of ETFA (electron transfer flavoprotein subunit alpha). This study demonstrated that there was an increase in the cellular levels of ETFA in the t-BHP induction in viability and apoptosis via the activation of JNK1/2 and NFκB signaling modules. NAC administration and shRNA ETFA conferred resistance to t-BHP-increased ETFA and CHOP expression via IRE1-alpha/TRAF2 complex formation, activation of JNK1/2 and p50. We concluded that the mechanism of t-BHP-induced an apoptosis cascade and endoplasmic reticulum stress in hepatocyte cells by up-regulation of ETFA, providing a new mechanism for liver injury.

  8. Proteomic profiling of liver from Elaphe taeniura, a common snake in eastern and southeastern Asia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liang; Xia, Hengchuan; Wang, Yiting; Chen, Keping; Qin, Lvgao; Wang, Bin; Yao, Qin; Li, Jun; He, Yuanqing; Zhao, Ermi

    2013-01-01

    Snake liver has been implicated in the adaptation of snakes to a variety of habitats. However, to date, there has been no systematic analysis of snake liver proteins. In this study, we undertook a proteomic analysis of liver from the colubrid snake Elaphe taeniura using a combination of two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flightmass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). We also constructed a local protein sequence database based on transcriptome sequencing to facilitate protein identification. Of the 268 protein spots revealed by 2-DE 109 gave positive MS signals, 84 of which were identified by searching the NCBInr, Swiss-Prot and local databases. The other 25 protein spots could not be identified, possibly because their transcripts were not be stable enough to be detected by transcriptome sequencing. GO analysis showed that most proteins may be involved in binding, catalysis, cellular processes and metabolic processes. Forty-two of the liver proteins identified were found in other reptiles and in amphibians. The findings of this study provide a good reference map of snake liver proteins that will be useful in molecular investigations of snake physiology and adaptation. PMID:24130453

  9. Proteomic Analysis of One-carbon Metabolism-related Marker in Liver of Rat Offspring.

    PubMed

    You, Young-Ah; Lee, Ji Hye; Kwon, Eun Jin; Yoo, Jae Young; Kwon, Woo-Sung; Pang, Myung-Geol; Kim, Young Ju

    2015-11-01

    Maternal food intake has a significant effect on the fetal environment, and an inadequate maternal diet may result in intrauterine growth restriction. Intrauterine growth restriction newborn rat pups nursed by normal diet-fed dams exhibited rapid catch-up growth, which plays a critical role in the risk for metabolic and cardiovascular disease in later life. Specifically, one-carbon metabolism in the liver plays a critical role in placental and fetal growth. Impaired functioning of one-carbon metabolism is associated with increased homocysteine levels. In this study, we applied a comprehensive proteomic approach to identify differential expression of proteins related to one-carbon metabolism in the livers of rat offspring as an effect of maternal food restriction during gestation. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002578. We determined that betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase 1, methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase 1, and ATP synthase subunit beta mitochondrial (ATP5B) expression levels were significantly reduced in the livers of rat offspring exposed to maternal food restriction during gestation compared with in the offspring of rats fed a normal diet (p < 0.05). Moreover, the expression levels of betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase 1, methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase 1, and ATP synthase subunit beta mitochondrial were negatively correlated with serum homocysteine concentration in male offspring exposed to maternal food restriction during gestation and normal diet during lactation. However, in female offspring only expression levels of methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase 1 were negatively correlated with homocysteine concentration. This study shows that maternal food restriction during late gestation and normal diet during lactation lead to increased homocysteine concentration through disturbance of one-carbon metabolism in the livers of male offspring. This suggests that male offspring have an increased gender

  10. Genetic and Proteomic characterization of Bile Salt Export Pump (BSEP) in Snake Liver

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xinle; Gao, Fei; Su, Hexiu; Gong, Yajun; Zhang, Jie; Sullivan, Mitchell A.; Chen, Jiachun

    2017-01-01

    Snake gallbladder, a traditional Chinese medicine, has been believed in various Asian countries to improve visual acuity and alleviate rheumatism. Bile acids, a major component of the gallbladder, are toxic to the liver and kidney in humans and animals due to its detergent effects, while also exhibiting therapeutic effects due to an increase in the gallbladder contractions of muscle strips in patients with cholesterol gallstones. Secretion of bile acids in human and mammals depends on the bile salt export pump (BSEP), a liver-specific adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporter encoded by ABCB11. However, the presence of BSEP in snakes has not been thoroughly explored. Here we confirm the existence of BSEP and its coding DNA sequence in snakes on both the proteomic and genetic level. This work provides information on the snake ABCB11 sequence and helps further potential genetic manipulation to affect bile salt metabolism. Our study provides the foundation for research on bile acid production from snakes by using modern genetic and proteomic methodologies. PMID:28368001

  11. Proteomic responses of European flounder to temperature and hypoxia as interacting stressors: Differential sensitivities of populations.

    PubMed

    Pédron, Nicolas; Artigaud, Sébastien; Infante, José-Luis Zambonino; Le Bayon, Nicolas; Charrier, Grégory; Pichereau, Vianney; Laroche, Jean

    2017-02-16

    In the context of global change, ectotherms are increasingly impacted by abiotic perturbations. Along the distribution area of a species, the populations at low latitudes are particularly exposed to temperature increase and hypoxic events. In this study, we have compared the proteomic responses in the liver of European flounder populations, by using 2-D electrophoresis. One southern peripheral population from Portugal vs two northern core populations from France, were reared in a common garden experiment. Most of the proteomic differences were observed between the two experimental conditions, a cold vs a warm and hypoxic conditions. Consistent differentiations between populations were observed in accumulation of proteins involved in the bioenergetics- and methionine-metabolisms, fatty acids transport, and amino-acid catabolism. The specific regulation of crucial enzymes like ATP-synthase and G6PDH, in the liver of the southern population, could be related to a possible local adaptation. This southern peripheral population is spatially distant from northern core populations and has experienced dissimilar ecological conditions; thus it may contain genotypes that confer resilience to climate changes.

  12. Proteomic analysis of liver tissue from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) under high rearing density after administration of dietary vitamin E and selenium nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Naderi, Mahdi; Keyvanshokooh, Saeed; Salati, Amir Parviz; Ghaedi, Alireza

    2017-02-04

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of dietary vitamin E (vit E) and selenium nanoparticles (nanoSe) on liver proteome profile of rainbow trout under high density condition. To correlate the proteome modifications with physiological aspects, growth, serum metabolites (cortisol, glucose, lactate, ALT, AST, and ALP), and liver antioxidant-related parameters (SOD, GPx, CAT, and MDA) were also examined. A total of 1275 fish (average weight of 42.6±2.3g) were stocked into 12 tanks at a density of 80kgm(-3). The fish were divided into four groups according to diet: control (basal diet), vit E (500mgkg(-)(1) vit E-supplemented diet), nanoSe (1mgkg(-1) nanoSe-supplemented diet), and combination (500mgkg(-1) vit E and 1mgkg(-1) nanoSe-supplemented diet). After 60days, the best performance and health status of fish were observed in vit E and combination groups. Supplementation with nanoSe had no significant effects on growth performance. In addition, we compared liver proteome profiles of fish fed with a basal diet (control) and diets supplemented with vit E or nanoSe. Among the identified proteins, GRP78, ATPsyn-d, and HSP70 had an increased abundance in the vit E group, while HPPD and GAPDH showed a decreased abundance. In response to nanoSe supplementation, the expression of MDH, FAA, FBPA, TPI, GRHPR, GNMT, FDH, and Enol was increased. The proteomic data indicate that vit E or nanoSe supplementation can alter the expression of proteins involved in metabolic status of rainbow trout reared under high rearing density.

  13. Proteome Analysis of Borrelia burgdorferi Response to Environmental Change

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, Thomas E.; Luft, Benjamin J.; Yang, Xiaohua; Nicora, Carrie D.; Camp, David G.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2010-11-02

    We examined global changes in protein expression in the B31 strain of Borrelia burgdorferi, in response to two environmental cues (pH and temperature) chosen for their reported similarity to those encountered at different stages of the organism’s life cycle. Multidimensional nano-liquid chromatographic separations coupled with tandem mass spectrometry were used to examine the array of proteins (i.e., the proteome) of B. burgdorferi for different pH and temperature culture conditions. Changes in pH and temperature elicited in vitro adaptations of this spirochete known to cause Lyme disease and led to alterations in protein expression that are associated with increased microbial pathogenesis. We identified 1031 proteins that represent 59% of the annotated genome of B. burgdorferi and elucidated a core proteome of 414 proteins that were present in all environmental conditions investigated. Observed changes in protein abundances indicated varied replicon usage, as well as proteome functional distributions between the in vitro cell culture conditions. Surprisingly, the pH and temperature conditions that mimicked B. burgdorferi residing in the gut of a fed tick showed a marked reduction in protein diversity. Additionally, the results provide us with leading candidates for exploring how B. burgdorferi adapts to and is able to survive in a wide variety of environmental conditions and lay a foundation for planned in situ studies of B. burgdorferi isolated from the tick midgut and infected animals.

  14. Proteomic responses of sea urchin embryos to stressful ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Adams, N L; Campanale, J P; Foltz, K R

    2012-11-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR, 290-400 nm) penetrates into seawater and can harm shallow-dwelling and planktonic marine organisms. Studies dating back to the 1930s revealed that echinoids, especially sea urchin embryos, are powerful models for deciphering the effects of UVR on embryonic development and how embryos defend themselves against UV-induced damage. In addition to providing a large number of synchronously developing embryos amenable to cellular, biochemical, molecular, and single-cell analyses, the purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, also offers an annotated genome. Together, these aspects allow for the in-depth study of molecular and biochemical signatures of UVR stress. Here, we review the effects of UVR on embryonic development, focusing on the early-cleavage stages, and begin to integrate data regarding single-protein responses with comprehensive proteomic assessments. Proteomic studies reveal changes in levels of post-translational modifications to proteins that respond to UVR, and identify proteins that can then be interrogated as putative targets or components of stress-response pathways. These responsive proteins are distributed among systems upon which targeted studies can now begin to be mapped. Post-transcriptional and translational controls may provide early embryos with a rapid, fine-tuned response to stress during early stages, especially during pre-blastula stages that rely primarily on maternally derived defenses rather than on responses through zygotic gene transcription.

  15. SUMO-Enriched Proteome for Drosophila Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Handu, Mithila; Kaduskar, Bhagyashree; Ravindranathan, Ramya; Soory, Amarendranath; Giri, Ritika; Elango, Vijay Barathi; Gowda, Harsha; Ratnaparkhi, Girish S.

    2015-01-01

    Small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) modification modulates the expression of defense genes in Drosophila, activated by the Toll/nuclear factor-κB and immune-deficient/nuclear factor-κB signaling networks. We have, however, limited understanding of the SUMO-modulated regulation of the immune response and lack information on SUMO targets in the immune system. In this study, we measured the changes to the SUMO proteome in S2 cells in response to a lipopolysaccharide challenge and identified 1619 unique proteins in SUMO-enriched lysates. A confident set of 710 proteins represents the immune-induced SUMO proteome and analysis suggests that specific protein domains, cellular pathways, and protein complexes respond to immune stress. A small subset of the confident set was validated by in-bacto SUMOylation and shown to be bona-fide SUMO targets. These include components of immune signaling pathways such as Caspar, Jra, Kay, cdc42, p38b, 14-3-3ε, as well as cellular proteins with diverse functions, many being components of protein complexes, such as prosß4, Rps10b, SmD3, Tango7, and Aats-arg. Caspar, a human FAF1 ortholog that negatively regulates immune-deficient signaling, is SUMOylated at K551 and responds to treatment with lipopolysaccharide in cultured cells. Our study is one of the first to describe SUMO proteome for the Drosophila immune response. Our data and analysis provide a global framework for the understanding of SUMO modification in the host response to pathogens. PMID:26290570

  16. Compensatory Islet Response to Insulin Resistance Revealed by Quantitative Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Gedeon, Nicholas; Kahraman, Sevim; De Jesus, Dario F.; Bhatt, Shweta; Kim, Jong-Seo; Clauss, Therese RW; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Kulkarni, Rohit N.

    2015-01-01

    Compensatory islet response is a distinct feature of the pre-diabetic insulin resistant state in humans and rodents. To identify alterations in the islet proteome that characterize the adaptive response, we analyzed islets from five-month-old male control, high-fat diet fed (HFD) or obese ob/ob mice by LC-MS(/MS) and quantified ~1,100 islet proteins (at least two peptides) with a false discovery rate <1%. Significant alterations in abundance were observed for ~350 proteins between groups. A majority of alterations were common to both models, and the changes of a subset of ~40 proteins and 12 proteins were verified by targeted quantification using selected reaction monitoring and Western blots, respectively. The insulin resistant islets in both groups exhibited reduced expression of proteins controlling energy metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation, hormone processing, and secretory pathways. Conversely, an increased expression of molecules involved in protein synthesis and folding suggested effects in endoplasmic reticulum stress response, cell survival, and proliferation in both insulin resistant models. In summary, we report a unique comparison of the islet proteome that is focused on the compensatory response in two insulin resistant rodent models that are not overtly diabetic. These data provide a valuable resource of candidate proteins to the scientific community to undertake further studies aimed at enhancing β-cell mass in patients with diabetes. The data are available via the MassIVE repository, with accession MSV000079093. PMID:26151086

  17. Compensatory islet response to insulin resistance revealed by quantitative proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    El Ouaamari, Abdelfattah; Zhou, Jian -Ying; Liew, Chong Wee; Shirakawa, Jun; Dirice, Ercument; Gedeon, Nicholas; Kahraman, Sevim; De Jesus, Dario F.; Bhatt, Shweta; Kim, Jong -Seo; Clauss, Therese R. W.; Camp, II, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Wei -Jun; Kulkarni, Rohit N.

    2015-07-07

    Compensatory islet response is a distinct feature of the pre-diabetic insulin resistant state in humans and rodents. To identify alterations in the islet proteome that characterize the adaptive response, we analyzed islets from five-month-old male control, high-fat diet fed (HFD) or obese ob/ob mice by LC-MS(/MS) and quantified ~1,100 islet proteins (at least two peptides) with a false discovery rate <1%. Significant alterations in abundance were observed for ~350 proteins between groups. A majority of alterations were common to both models, and the changes of a subset of ~40 proteins and 12 proteins were verified by targeted quantification using selected reaction monitoring and Western blots, respectively. The insulin resistant islets in both groups exhibited reduced expression of proteins controlling energy metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation, hormone processing, and secretory pathways. Conversely, an increased expression of molecules involved in protein synthesis and folding suggested effects in endoplasmic reticulum stress response, cell survival, and proliferation in both insulin resistant models. In conclusion, we report a unique comparison of the islet proteome that is focused on the compensatory response in two insulin resistant rodent models that are not overtly diabetic. In conclusion, these data provide a valuable resource of candidate proteins to the scientific community to undertake further studies aimed at enhancing β-cell mass in patients with diabetes. The data are available via the MassIVE repository, with accession MSV000079093.

  18. Compensatory islet response to insulin resistance revealed by quantitative proteomics

    DOE PAGES

    El Ouaamari, Abdelfattah; Zhou, Jian -Ying; Liew, Chong Wee; ...

    2015-07-07

    Compensatory islet response is a distinct feature of the pre-diabetic insulin resistant state in humans and rodents. To identify alterations in the islet proteome that characterize the adaptive response, we analyzed islets from five-month-old male control, high-fat diet fed (HFD) or obese ob/ob mice by LC-MS(/MS) and quantified ~1,100 islet proteins (at least two peptides) with a false discovery rate <1%. Significant alterations in abundance were observed for ~350 proteins between groups. A majority of alterations were common to both models, and the changes of a subset of ~40 proteins and 12 proteins were verified by targeted quantification using selectedmore » reaction monitoring and Western blots, respectively. The insulin resistant islets in both groups exhibited reduced expression of proteins controlling energy metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation, hormone processing, and secretory pathways. Conversely, an increased expression of molecules involved in protein synthesis and folding suggested effects in endoplasmic reticulum stress response, cell survival, and proliferation in both insulin resistant models. In conclusion, we report a unique comparison of the islet proteome that is focused on the compensatory response in two insulin resistant rodent models that are not overtly diabetic. In conclusion, these data provide a valuable resource of candidate proteins to the scientific community to undertake further studies aimed at enhancing β-cell mass in patients with diabetes. The data are available via the MassIVE repository, with accession MSV000079093.« less

  19. Dynamic compressive response of bovine liver tissues.

    PubMed

    Pervin, Farhana; Chen, Weinong W; Weerasooriya, Tusit

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to experimentally determine the strain rate effects on the compressive stress-strain behavior of bovine liver tissues. Fresh liver tissues were used to make specimens for mechanical loading. Experiments at quasi-static strain rates were conducted at 0.01 and 0.1 s(-1). Intermediate-rate experiments were performed at 1, 10, and 100 s(-1). High strain rate (1000, 2000, and 3000 s(-1)) experiments were conducted using a Kolsky bar modified for soft material characterization. A hollow transmission bar with semi-conductor strain gages was used to sense the weak forces from the soft specimens. Quartz-crystal force transducers were used to monitor valid testing conditions on the tissue specimens. The experiment results show that the compressive stress-strain response of the liver tissue is non-linear and highly rate-sensitive, especially when the strain rate is in the Kolsky bar range. The tissue stiffens significantly with increasing strain rate. The responses from liver tissues along and perpendicular to the liver surface were consistent, indicating isotropic behavior.

  20. [Changes in proteome profiles of rat liver microsomes induced by silicon dioxide nanoparticles].

    PubMed

    Tananova, O N; Arianova, E A; Gmoshinskii, I V; Toropygin, I Yu; Khryapova, E V; Trusov, N V; Khotimchenko, S A; Tutel'yan, V A

    2015-01-01

    The effect of daily intragastric administration of an aqueous dispersion of silicon nanoparticles (NPs) (the dose range from 1.0 mg/kg to 100 mg/kg body weight for 28 days) to rats on the proteomic profile of liver microsomes has been investigated by 2D-electrophoresis followed by subsequent mass spectrometry identification. The liver microsomal fraction was isolated by differential centrifugation and its protein composition was analyzed by 2D-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Identification of protein spots was carried out using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analysis. The mass spectrometry analysis revealed the protein GRP78 (78 kD glucose-regulated protein precursor), belonging to the family of heat shock proteins. This protein present in animals of the control group was not detected in NP-treated rats of group 2 (1 mg/kg body weight/day) and group 3 (10 mg/kg body weight/day). This protein predominantly localized in the liver cell endoplasmic reticulum and plasma membrane has the chaperone biological activity. Possible mechanisms of the effects of engineered nanoparticles on biosynthetic processes in the body are discussed.

  1. Characteristic molecular and proteomic signatures of drug-induced liver injury in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Eun, Jung Woo; Bae, Hyun Jin; Shen, Qingyu; Park, Se Jin; Kim, Hyung Seok; Shin, Woo Chan; Yang, Hee Doo; Jin, Chan Young; You, Jueng Soo; Kang, Hyun Joo; Kim, Hoguen; Ahn, Young Min; Park, Won Sang; Lee, Jung Young; Nam, Suk Woo

    2015-02-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a major safety concern during drug development and remains one of the main reasons for withdrawal of drugs from the market. Although it is crucial to develop methods that will detect potential hepatotoxicity of drug candidates as early and as quickly as possible, there is still a lack of sensitive and specific biomarkers for DILI that consequently leads to a scarcity of reliable hepatotoxic data. Hence, in this study, we assessed characteristic molecular signatures in rat liver treated with drugs (pyrazinamide, ranitidine, enalapril, carbamazepine and chlorpromazine) that are known to cause DILI in humans. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis of transcriptome changes induced by DILI-causing drugs resulted in three different subclusters on dendrogram, i.e., hepatocellular, cholestatic and mixed type of DILI at early time points (2 days), and multiclassification analysis suggested 31 genes as discernible markers for each DILI pattern. Further analysis for characteristic molecular signature of each DILI pattern provided a molecular basis for different modes of DILI action. A proteomics study of the same rat livers was used to confirm the results, and the two sets of data showed 60 matching classifiers. In conclusion, the data of different DILI-causing drug treatments from genomic analysis in a rat model suggest that DILI-specific molecular signatures can discriminate different patterns of DILI at an early exposure time point, and that they provide useful information for mechanistic studies that may lead to a better understanding of the molecular basis of DILI.

  2. The Proteomic Response to Mutants of the Escherichia coli RNA Degradosome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    pathway of RNA degradation. REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE (SF298) (Continuation Sheet) Continuation for Block 13 ARO Report Number The proteomic response...of the bacterial proteome and provide the first large-scale proteomic description of the response to perturbation of this major pathway of RNA...truncation mutant11 (rightmost column). Significant function enrichments (adjusted P-value o 0.01, compared to entire E. coli genome) are indicated

  3. Proteomic and Physiological Responses of Kineococcus radiotolerans to Copper

    SciTech Connect

    Bagwell, Christopher E.; Hixson, Kim K.; Milliken, Charles E.; Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Weitz, Karl K.

    2010-08-26

    Copper is a highly reactive, toxic metal whose transport into the cell is tightly regulated. Kineococcus radiotolerans was previously shown to specifically accumulate soluble copper in the cytoplasm and cell growth was significantly enhanced by copper during chronic irradiation. This study provides a systematic investigation of copper accumulation, toxicity, and homeostasis in K. radiotolerans through combined physiological experimentation and quantitative shot-gun proteomics. Aerobic growth rates and biomass yields were similar over a range of Cu(II) concentrations, though intracellular metal accumulation was positively correlated with Cu(II) concentration in the growth medium (R2 = 0.7). Global proteomics analysis revealed a significant positive correlation between the total number of response proteins and their abundance with copper concentration and culture age. Approximately 40% of the K. radiotolerans genome was differentially expressed in response to the copper treatments imposed. Copper accumulation coincided with increased abundance of proteins involved in oxidative stress and defense, DNA stabilization and repair, and protein turnover. Concomitant production of antioxidants and protective osmolytes signifies an important adaptation for maintenance of cellular redox; few known metal binding proteins were detected. This study offers a first glimpse into the complexity of coordinated biochemical response pathways in K. radiotolerans invoked by sub-lethal copper concentrations that may be pertinent for new biotechnologies in metal recovery and sequestration, and environmental restoration.

  4. Comparative proteomic analysis of liver antioxidant mechanisms in Megalobrama amblycephala stimulated with dietary emodin.

    PubMed

    Song, Changyou; Liu, Bo; Xie, Jun; Ge, Xianping; Zhao, Zhenxin; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Huimin; Ren, Mingchun; Zhou, Qunlan; Miao, Linghong; Xu, Pao; Lin, Yan

    2017-01-13

    Oxidative stress is a toxicological endpoint that correlates with the nutrition status of fish through cellular damage, inflammation, and apoptosis. In order to understand the antioxidant mechanism induced by dietary emodin in Megalobrama amblycephala liver, a comparative proteomic analysis was performed to investigate the proteome alteration under emodin administration. 27 altered protein spots were separated under 30 mg kg(-1) emodin stimulation based on 2-DE, and were all successfully identified using MALDI-TOF/TOF, representing 17 unique proteins. These proteins were functionally classified into antioxidant, metabolism, cytoskeleton, chaperone, signal transduction and cofactor groups. Network interaction and Gene Ontology annotation indicated 10 unique proteins were closely related to antioxidation and directly regulated by each other. Compared with the control group, administration of 30 mg kg(-1) emodin significantly increased the antioxidant-related mRNA expressions of GPx1, GSTm and HSP70, but decreased the mRNA expressions of GAPDH and Sord, which was consistent with the protein expression. Nevertheless, Pgk1 and Aldh8a1 were up- and down-regulated, and ALDOB was down- and up-regulated at the mRNA and protein levels, respectively. These results revealed that the altered proteins enhanced antioxidation via complex regulatory mechanisms, and 30 mg kg(-1) emodin was a suitable immunostimulant for M. amblycephala.

  5. Comparative proteomic analysis of liver antioxidant mechanisms in Megalobrama amblycephala stimulated with dietary emodin

    PubMed Central

    Song, Changyou; Liu, Bo; Xie, Jun; Ge, Xianping; Zhao, Zhenxin; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Huimin; Ren, Mingchun; Zhou, Qunlan; Miao, Linghong; Xu, Pao; Lin, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a toxicological endpoint that correlates with the nutrition status of fish through cellular damage, inflammation, and apoptosis. In order to understand the antioxidant mechanism induced by dietary emodin in Megalobrama amblycephala liver, a comparative proteomic analysis was performed to investigate the proteome alteration under emodin administration. 27 altered protein spots were separated under 30 mg kg−1 emodin stimulation based on 2-DE, and were all successfully identified using MALDI-TOF/TOF, representing 17 unique proteins. These proteins were functionally classified into antioxidant, metabolism, cytoskeleton, chaperone, signal transduction and cofactor groups. Network interaction and Gene Ontology annotation indicated 10 unique proteins were closely related to antioxidation and directly regulated by each other. Compared with the control group, administration of 30 mg kg−1 emodin significantly increased the antioxidant-related mRNA expressions of GPx1, GSTm and HSP70, but decreased the mRNA expressions of GAPDH and Sord, which was consistent with the protein expression. Nevertheless, Pgk1 and Aldh8a1 were up- and down-regulated, and ALDOB was down- and up-regulated at the mRNA and protein levels, respectively. These results revealed that the altered proteins enhanced antioxidation via complex regulatory mechanisms, and 30 mg kg−1 emodin was a suitable immunostimulant for M. amblycephala. PMID:28084435

  6. [Effect of cold and cool herbs on liver mitochondria proteome of rats with heat symptom].

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Lu, De-Zhao; Tang, Li-Hua; Wo, Xing-De; Yang, Zhen

    2013-12-01

    In the 1960s, modern science began involving the essence of heat syndrome, but there have still no in-depth systematic studies on pathological mechanisms of heat syndrome and action mechanisms of cold and cool herbs. In this study, the animal model with heat syndrome was set up by feeding herbs with hot property, and then cold and cool herbs was applied in the experimental therapy. The two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry technologies were adopted to compare the liver mitochondria proteome of the rats of the heat syndrome model and the ones treated with cold and cool herbs, so as to discover specificity-related proteins after heat syndrome and treatment with cold and cool herbs.

  7. Characterization of the serum and liver proteomes in gut-microbiota-lacking mice

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Yu-Tang; Chen, Ying-Ju; Chuang, Hsiao-Li; Huang, Wen-Ching; Lo, Chun-Tsung; Liao, Chen-Chung; Huang, Chi-Chang

    2017-01-01

    Current nutrition research is focusing on health promotion, disease prevention, and performance improvement for individuals and communities around the world. The humans with required nutritional ingredients depend on both how well the individual is provided with balanced foods and what state of gut microbiota the host has. Studying the mutually beneficial relationships between gut microbiome and host is an increasing attention in biomedical science. The purpose of this study is to understand the role of gut microbiota and to study interactions between gut microbiota and host. In this study, we used a shotgun proteomic approach to reveal the serum and liver proteomes in gut-microbiota-lacking mice. For serum, 15 and 8 proteins were uniquely detected in specific-pathogen-free (SPF) and germ-free (GF) mice, respectively, as well as the 3 and 20 proteins were significantly increased and decreased, respectively, in GF mice compared to SPF mice. Among the proteins of the serum, major urinary protein 1 (MUP-1) of GF mice was significantly decreased compared to SPF mice. In addition, MUP-1 expression is primarily regulated by testosterone. Lacking in gut flora has been implicated in many adverse effects, and now we have found its pathogenic root maybe gut bacteria can regulate the sex-hormone testosterone levels. In the liver, 8 and 22 proteins were uniquely detected in GF mice and SPF mice, respectively, as well as the 14 and 30 proteins were significantly increased and decreased, respectively, in GF mice compared to SPF mice. Furthermore, ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) indicated that gut microbiota influence the host in cancer, organismal injury and abnormalities, respiratory disease; cell cycle, cellular movement and tissue development; cardiovascular disease, reproductive system disease; and lipid metabolism, molecular transport and small molecule biochemistry. Our findings provide more detailed information of the role of gut microbiota and will be useful to help

  8. Quantitative liver proteomics identifies FGF19 targets that couple metabolism and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Massafra, Vittoria; Milona, Alexandra; Vos, Harmjan R; Burgering, Boudewijn M T; van Mil, Saskia W C

    2017-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) is a gut-derived peptide hormone that is produced following activation of Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR). FGF19 is secreted and signals to the liver, where it contributes to the homeostasis of bile acid (BA), lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. FGF19 is a promising therapeutic target for the metabolic syndrome and cholestatic diseases, but enthusiasm for its use has been tempered by FGF19-mediated induction of proliferation and hepatocellular carcinoma. To inform future rational design of FGF19-variants, we have conducted temporal quantitative proteomic and gene expression analyses to identify FGF19-targets related to metabolism and proliferation. Mice were fasted for 16 hours, and injected with human FGF19 (1 mg/kg body weight) or vehicle. Liver protein extracts (containing "light" lysine) were mixed 1:1 with a spike-in protein extract from 13C6-lysine metabolically labelled mouse liver (containing "heavy" lysine) and analysed by LC-MS/MS. Our analyses provide a resource of FGF19 target proteins in the liver. 189 proteins were upregulated (≥ 1.5 folds) and 73 proteins were downregulated (≤ -1.5 folds) by FGF19. FGF19 treatment decreased the expression of proteins involved in fatty acid (FA) synthesis, i.e., Fabp5, Scd1, and Acsl3 and increased the expression of Acox1, involved in FA oxidation. As expected, FGF19 increased the expression of proteins known to drive proliferation (i.e., Tgfbi, Vcam1, Anxa2 and Hdlbp). Importantly, many of the FGF19 targets (i.e., Pdk4, Apoa4, Fas and Stat3) have a dual function in both metabolism and cell proliferation. Therefore, our findings challenge the development of FGF19-variants that fully uncouple metabolic benefit from mitogenic potential.

  9. Quantitative liver proteomics identifies FGF19 targets that couple metabolism and proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Vos, Harmjan R.; Burgering, Boudewijn M. T.; van Mil, Saskia W. C.

    2017-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) is a gut-derived peptide hormone that is produced following activation of Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR). FGF19 is secreted and signals to the liver, where it contributes to the homeostasis of bile acid (BA), lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. FGF19 is a promising therapeutic target for the metabolic syndrome and cholestatic diseases, but enthusiasm for its use has been tempered by FGF19-mediated induction of proliferation and hepatocellular carcinoma. To inform future rational design of FGF19-variants, we have conducted temporal quantitative proteomic and gene expression analyses to identify FGF19-targets related to metabolism and proliferation. Mice were fasted for 16 hours, and injected with human FGF19 (1 mg/kg body weight) or vehicle. Liver protein extracts (containing “light” lysine) were mixed 1:1 with a spike-in protein extract from 13C6-lysine metabolically labelled mouse liver (containing “heavy” lysine) and analysed by LC-MS/MS. Our analyses provide a resource of FGF19 target proteins in the liver. 189 proteins were upregulated (≥ 1.5 folds) and 73 proteins were downregulated (≤ -1.5 folds) by FGF19. FGF19 treatment decreased the expression of proteins involved in fatty acid (FA) synthesis, i.e., Fabp5, Scd1, and Acsl3 and increased the expression of Acox1, involved in FA oxidation. As expected, FGF19 increased the expression of proteins known to drive proliferation (i.e., Tgfbi, Vcam1, Anxa2 and Hdlbp). Importantly, many of the FGF19 targets (i.e., Pdk4, Apoa4, Fas and Stat3) have a dual function in both metabolism and cell proliferation. Therefore, our findings challenge the development of FGF19-variants that fully uncouple metabolic benefit from mitogenic potential. PMID:28178326

  10. Proteomic profile of carbonylated proteins in rat liver: exercise attenuated oxidative stress may be involved in fatty liver improvement.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaofei; Duan, Zhigui; Hu, Hui; Li, Guolin; Yan, Siyu; Wu, Jinfeng; Wang, Jun; Yin, Dazhong; Xie, Qingji

    2013-05-01

    To screen target proteins of oxidative stress which mediate the effects of exercise on preventing nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the methods for selecting carbonylated proteins were modified, and carbonylated proteins were profiled. The results showed that treadmill training reduced oxidative stress and the levels of intrahepatic triglyceride (IHTG). The changes in IHTG showed a significant positive correlation with oxidative stress as indicated by malondialdehyde level. Further results from proteomics illustrated that 17 functional proteins were susceptible to oxidative modification, and exercise protected three proteins from carbonylation. The latter three proteins may serve as both direct target proteins of oxidative stress and mediators contributing to the beneficial effects of exercise. In particular, a long-chain specific acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACADL) which was a key enzyme in lipid metabolism was not carbonylated and with higher activities in exercise group. These findings indicate that this modified technique is practical and powerful in selecting carbonylated proteins. Long-term treadmill training is effective in ameliorating oxidative stress and preventing the accumulation of IHTG. Among the 17 target proteins of oxidative modification, three proteins contribute to the beneficial effects of exercise. Preventing ACADL from carbonylation may be involved in the physiological mechanism of exercise-induced NAFLD improvement.

  11. Proteomic profile response of Paracoccidioides lutzii to the antifungal argentilactone

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Renata S.; Bailão, Alexandre M.; Silva, Lívia C.; de Oliveira, Cecília M. A.; Marques, Monique F.; Silva, Luciano P.; Silveira-Lacerda, Elisângela P.; Lima, Aliny P.; Soares, Célia M.; Pereira, Maristela

    2015-01-01

    The dimorphic fungi Paracoccidioides spp. are the etiological agents of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), a mycosis of high incidence in Brazil. The toxicity of drug treatment and the emergence of resistant organisms have led to research for new candidates for drugs. In this study, we demonstrate that the natural product argentilactone was not cytotoxic or genotoxic to MRC5 cells at the IC50 concentration to the fungus. We also verified the proteomic profile of Paracoccidioides lutzii after incubation with argentilactone using a label free quantitative proteome nanoUPLC-MSE. The results of this study indicated that the fungus has a global metabolic adaptation in the presence of argentilactone. Enzymes of important pathways, such as glycolysis, the Krebs cycle and the glyoxylate cycle, were repressed, which drove the metabolism to the methylcytrate cycle and beta-oxidation. Proteins involved in cell rescue, defense and stress response were induced. In this study, alternative metabolic pathways adopted by the fungi were elucidated, helping to elucidate the course of action of the compound studied. PMID:26150808

  12. Deceptive responsive genes in gel-based proteomics.

    PubMed

    Hamzelou, Sara; Askari, Hossein; Nobari, Nona Abolfathi

    2016-04-01

    The standard method of the global quantitative analysis of gene expression at the protein level combines high-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) with mass spectrometric identification of protein spots. One of the major concerns with the application of gel-based proteomics is the need for the analytical and biological accuracy of the datasets. We mathematically and empirically simulated the possibility of the technical regulations of gene expression using 2DE. Our developed equation predicted a detectable alteration in the quantity of protein spots in response to a new protein added in, with various amounts. Testing the predictability of the developed equation, we observed that a new protein could form deceptive expression profiles, classified using prevalent tools for the analysis of 2DE results. In spite of the theoretically predicted overall reduction of proteins that resulted from adding the new protein, the empirical data revealed differential amount of proteins when various quantities of the new protein were added to the protein sample. The present work emphasize that employment of 2DE would not be a reliable approach for biological samples with extensive proteome alterations such as the developmental and differentiation stages of cells without depletion of high abundant proteins.

  13. From climate change to molecular response: redox proteomics of ozone-induced responses in soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ozone (O3) causes significant agricultural losses with soybean being highly sensitive to this oxidant. Here we assess the effect of elevated seasonal O3 exposure on the total and redox proteomes of soybean. To understand the molecular responses to O3 exposure, soybean grown at the Soybean Free Air C...

  14. Proteome analysis of yeast response to various nutrient limitations

    PubMed Central

    Kolkman, Annemieke; Daran-Lapujade, Pascale; Fullaondo, Asier; Olsthoorn, Maurien M A; Pronk, Jack T; Slijper, Monique; Heck, Albert J R

    2006-01-01

    We compared the response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to carbon (glucose) and nitrogen (ammonia) limitation in chemostat cultivation at the proteome level. Protein levels were differentially quantified using unlabeled and 15N metabolically labeled yeast cultures. A total of 928 proteins covering a wide range of isoelectric points, molecular weights and subcellular localizations were identified. Stringent statistical analysis identified 51 proteins upregulated in response to glucose limitation and 51 upregulated in response to ammonia limitation. Under glucose limitation, typical glucose-repressed genes encoding proteins involved in alternative carbon source utilization, fatty acids β-oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation displayed an increased protein level. Proteins upregulated in response to nitrogen limitation were mostly involved in scavenging of alternative nitrogen sources and protein degradation. Comparison of transcript and protein levels clearly showed that upregulation in response to glucose limitation was mainly transcriptionally controlled, whereas upregulation in response to nitrogen limitation was essentially controlled at the post-transcriptional level by increased translational efficiency and/or decreased protein degradation. These observations underline the need for multilevel analysis in yeast systems biology. PMID:16738570

  15. Seasonal proteomic changes reveal molecular adaptations to preserve and replenish liver proteins during ground squirrel hibernation.

    PubMed

    Epperson, L Elaine; Rose, James C; Carey, Hannah V; Martin, Sandra L

    2010-02-01

    Hibernators are unique among mammals in their ability to survive extended periods of time with core body temperatures near freezing and with dramatically reduced heart, respiratory, and metabolic rates in a state known as torpor. To gain insight into the molecular events underlying this remarkable physiological phenotype, we applied a proteomic screening approach to identify liver proteins that differ between the summer active (SA) and the entrance (Ent) phase of winter hibernation in 13-lined ground squirrels. The relative abundance of 1,600 protein spots separated on two-dimensional gels was quantitatively determined using fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis, and 74 unique proteins exhibiting significant differences between the two states were identified using liquid chromatography followed by tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Proteins elevated in Ent hibernators included liver fatty acid-binding protein, fatty acid transporter, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase, which support the known metabolic fuel switch to lipid and ketone body utilization in winter. Several proteins involved in protein stability and protein folding were also elevated in the Ent phase, consistent with previous findings. In contrast to transcript screening results, there was a surprising increase in the abundance of proteins involved in protein synthesis during Ent hibernation, including several initiation and elongation factors. This finding, coupled with decreased abundance of numerous proteins involved in amino acid and nitrogen metabolism, supports the intriguing hypothesis that the mechanism of protein preservation and resynthesis is used by hibernating ground squirrels to help avoid nitrogen toxicity and ensure preservation of essential amino acids throughout the long winter fast.

  16. Alterations of protein profile in zebrafish liver cells exposed to methyl parathion: a membrane proteomics approach.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qingyu; Huang, He-Qing

    2012-03-01

    Methyl parathion (MP) is an extensively used organophosphorus pesticide, which has been associated with a wide spectrum of toxic effects on environmental organisms. The aim of this study is to investigate the alterations of membrane protein profiles in zebrafish liver (ZFL) cell line exposed to MP for 24 h using proteomic approaches. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed a total of 13 protein spots, whose expression levels were significantly altered by MP. These differential proteins were subjected to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis, and nine proteins were identified to be membrane proteins, among which seven were up-regulated, while two were down-regulated. In addition, the mRNA levels corresponding to these differential membrane proteins were further analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR. And the differential expression of arginase-2 was specially validated via Western blotting. Regarding the physiological functions, these proteins are involved in molecular chaperon, cytoskeleton system, cell metabolism, signal transduction, transport and hormone receptor respectively, suggesting the complexity of MP-mediated toxicity to ZFL cell. These data could provide useful insights for better understanding the hepatotoxic mechanisms of MP and develop novel protein biomarkers for effectively monitoring MP contamination level in aquatic environment.

  17. Comparison of Integrated Responses to Nonlethal and Lethal Hypothermal Stress in Milkfish (Chanos chanos): A Proteomics Study

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Hao; Tang, Cheng-Hao; Kang, Chao-Kai; Lo, Wan-Yu; Lee, Tsung-Han

    2016-01-01

    Milkfish is an important aquaculture species in Taiwan, and its high mortality during cold snaps in winter usually causes huge economic losses. To understand the effect of hypothermal stress and the corresponding compensatory stress response in milkfish, this study aimed to compare liver and gill protein levels between milkfish exposed to nonlethal (18°C), lethal (16°C), and control (28°C) temperatures. Using a proteomics approach based on two-dimensional electrophoresis and nano-LC-MS/MS analysis, this study identified thirty unique protein spots from milkfish livers and gills for which protein abundance was significantly different between nonlethal, lethal, and control temperature groups. Proteins identified in the liver were classified into three different categories according to their cellular function: (1) anti-oxidative stress, (2) apoptotic pathway, and (3) cytoskeleton. Similarly, proteins identified in the gill were sorted in five different functional categories: (1) cytoskeleton, (2) immune response, (3) protein quality control, (4) energy production, and (5) intracellular homeostasis. Based on functional information derived from the identified proteins, we assumed that different levels of hypothermal stress had a different effect and induced a different cellular response. Upon nonlethal hypothermal stress, the identified proteins were involved in anti-oxidative stress and anti-inflammation pathways, suggesting that milkfish had high levels of oxidative stress in the liver and exhibited inflammation response in the gill. Upon lethal hypothermal stress, however, identified proteins were associated with apoptosis in the liver and regulation of intracellular homeostasis in the gill. The present study provided evidence to illustrate different multi-physiological responses to nonlethal and lethal hypothermal stress in milkfish livers and gills. PMID:27657931

  18. Characterizing the Anaerobic Response of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by Quantitative Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Terashima, Mia; Specht, Michael; Naumann, Bianca; Hippler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The versatile metabolism of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is reflected in its complex response to anaerobic conditions. The anaerobic response is also remarkable in the context of renewable energy because C. reinhardtii is able to produce hydrogen under anaerobic conditions. To identify proteins involved during anaerobic acclimation as well as to localize proteins and pathways to the powerhouses of the cell, chloroplasts and mitochondria from C. reinhardtii in aerobic and anaerobic (induced by 8 h of argon bubbling) conditions were isolated and analyzed using comparative proteomics. A total of 2315 proteins were identified. Further analysis based on spectral counting clearly localized 606 of these proteins to the chloroplast, including many proteins of the fermentative metabolism. Comparative quantitative analyses were performed with the chloroplast-localized proteins using stable isotopic labeling of amino acids ([13C6]arginine/[12C6]arginine in an arginine auxotrophic strain). The quantitative data confirmed proteins previously characterized as induced at the transcript level as well as identified several new proteins of unknown function induced under anaerobic conditions. These proteins of unknown function provide new candidates for further investigation, which could bring insights for the engineering of hydrogen-producing alga strains. PMID:20190198

  19. Combined effect of gender and caloric restriction on liver proteomic expression profile.

    PubMed

    Valle, Adamo; Silvestri, Elena; Moreno, Maria; Chambery, Angela; Oliver, Jordi; Roca, Pilar; Goglia, Fernando

    2008-07-01

    We analyzed the combined effect of gender and CR on protein expression profile in liver. We identified 27 differentially expressed proteins involved in several cellular functions such as substrate metabolism, antioxidant systems, stress response, iron homeostasis and cardiovascular protection. This study reveals new cellular pathways liable to be similarly regulated in females and calorie restricted rats and which could be related with the greater longevity in these animals.

  20. Proteome Analysis of Liver Cells Expressing a Full- Length Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Replicon and Biopsy Specimens of Posttransplantation Liver from HCV-Infected Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Jon M.; Diamond, Deborah L.; Chan, Eric Y.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Qian, Weijun; Stastna, Miroslava; Baas, Tracey; Camp, David G.; Carithers, Jr., Robert L.; Smith, Richard D.; Katze, Michael G.

    2005-06-01

    The development of a reproducible model system for the study of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has the potential to significantly enhance the study of virus-host interactions and provide future direction for modeling the pathogenesis of HCV. While there are studies describing global gene expression changes associated with HCV infection, changes in the proteome have not been characterized. We report the first large scale proteome analysis of the highly permissive Huh-7.5 cell line containing a full length HCV replicon. We detected > 4,400 proteins in this cell line, including HCV replicon proteins, using multidimensional liquid chromatographic (LC) separations coupled to mass spectrometry (MS). The set of Huh-7.5 proteins confidently identified is, to our knowledge, the most comprehensive yet reported for a human cell line. Consistent with the literature, a comparison of Huh-7.5 cells (+) and (-) the HCV replicon identified expression changes of proteins involved in lipid metabolism. We extended these analyses to liver biopsy material from HCV-infected patients where > 1,500 proteins were detected from 2 {micro}g protein lysate using the Huh-7.5 protein database and the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag strategy. These findings demonstrate the utility of multidimensional proteome analysis of the HCV replicon model system for assisting the determination of proteins/pathways affected by HCV infection. Our ability to extend these analyses to the highly complex proteome of small liver biopsies with limiting protein yields offers the unique opportunity to begin evaluating the clinical significance of protein expression changes associated with HCV infection.

  1. Proteomic Mapping of the Immune Response to Gluten in Children with Autism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0293 TITLE: Proteomic Mapping of the Immune Response to Gluten in Children with Autism PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Sep 2014 – 29 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Proteomic Mapping of the Immune Response to Gluten in Children with Autism 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms and defects in GI function in the context of autism . Our newly published data indicate that children with autism exhibit

  2. Metabolomic mechanisms of gypenoside against liver fibrosis in rats: An integrative analysis of proteomics and metabolomics data

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ya-Nan; Dong, Shu; Wei, Bin; Liu, Ping; Zhang, Yong-Yu; Su, Shi-Bing

    2017-01-01

    Aims To investigate mechanisms and altered pathways of gypenoside against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced liver fibrosis based on integrative analysis of proteomics and metabolomics data. Methods CCl4-induced liver fibrosis rats were administrated gypenoside. The anti-fibrosis effects were evaluated by histomorphology and liver hydroxyproline (Hyp) content. Protein profiling and metabolite profiling of rats liver tissues were examined by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) approach and gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) technology. Altered pathways and pivotal proteins and metabolites were searched by integrative analysis of proteomics and metabolomics data. The levels of some key proteins in altered pathways were determined by western blot. Results Histopathological changes and Hyp content in gypenoside group had significant improvements (P<0.05). Compared to liver fibrosis model group, we found 301 up-regulated and 296 down-regulated proteins, and 9 up-regulated and 8 down-regulated metabolites in gypenoside group. According to integrative analysis, some important pathways were found, including glycolysis or gluconeogenesis, fructose and mannose metabolism, glycine, serine and threonine metabolism, lysine degradation, arginine and proline metabolism, glutathione metabolism, and sulfur metabolism. Furthermore, the levels of ALDH1B1, ALDH2 and ALDH7A1 were found increased and restored to normal levels after gypenoside treated (P<0.05). Conclusions Gypenoside inhibited CCl4-induced liver fibrosis, which may be involved in the alteration of glycolysis metabolism and the protection against the damage of aldehydes and lipid peroxidation by up-regulating ALDH. PMID:28291813

  3. Protective effect of Phellinus linteus polysaccharide extracts against thioacetamide-induced liver fibrosis in rats: a proteomics analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The hepatoprotective potential of Phellinus linteus polysaccharide (PLP) extracts has been described. However, the molecular mechanism of PLP for the inhibition of liver fibrosis is unclear. This study aims to investigate the molecular protein signatures involved in the hepatoprotective mechanisms of PLP via a proteomics approach using a thioacetamide (TAA)-induced liver fibrosis rat model. Methods Male Sprague–Dawley rats were divided into three groups of six as follows: Normal group; TAA group, in which rats received TAA only; and PLP group, in which rats received PLP and TAA. Liver fibrosis was induced in the rats by repeated intraperitoneal injections of TAA at a dose of 200 mg/kg body weight twice a week for 4 weeks. PLP was given orally at a dose of 50 mg/kg body weight twice a day from the beginning of the TAA treatment until the end of the experiment. The development of liver cirrhosis was verified by histological examination. Liver proteomes were established by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Proteins with significantly altered expression levels were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight/time of flight mass spectrometry and the differentially expressed proteins were validated by immunohistochemical staining and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Results Histological staining showed a remarkable reduction in liver fibrosis in the rats with PLP treatment. A total of 13 differentially expressed proteins including actin, tubulin alpha-1C chain, preprohaptoglobin, hemopexin, galectin-5, glutathione S-transferase alpha-4 (GSTA4), branched chain keto acid dehydrogenase hterotetrameric E1 subunit alpha (BCKDHA), glutathione S-transferase mu (GSTmu); glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH); thiosulfate sulfurtransferase (TFT); betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase 1 (BHMT1); quinoid dihydropteridine reductase (QDPR); ribonuclease UK114 were observed between the TAA and PLP groups. These

  4. Proteomic and Physiological Responses of Kineococcus radiotolerans to Copper

    PubMed Central

    Bagwell, Christopher E.; Hixson, Kim K.; Milliken, Charles E.; Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Weitz, Karl K.

    2010-01-01

    Copper is a highly reactive, toxic metal; consequently, transport of this metal within the cell is tightly regulated. Intriguingly, the actinobacterium Kineococcus radiotolerans has been shown to not only accumulate soluble copper to high levels within the cytoplasm, but the phenotype also correlated with enhanced cell growth during chronic exposure to ionizing radiation. This study offers a first glimpse into the physiological and proteomic responses of K. radiotolerans to copper at increasing concentration and distinct growth phases. Aerobic growth rates and biomass yields were similar over a range of Cu(II) concentrations (0–1.5 mM) in complex medium. Copper uptake coincided with active cell growth and intracellular accumulation was positively correlated with Cu(II) concentration in the growth medium (R2 = 0.7). Approximately 40% of protein coding ORFs on the K. radiotolerans genome were differentially expressed in response to the copper treatments imposed. Copper accumulation coincided with increased abundance of proteins involved in oxidative stress and defense, DNA stabilization and repair, and protein turnover. Interestingly, the specific activity of superoxide dismutase was repressed by low to moderate concentrations of copper during exponential growth, and activity was unresponsive to perturbation with paraquot. The biochemical response pathways invoked by sub-lethal copper concentrations are exceptionally complex; though integral cellular functions are preserved, in part, through the coordination of defense enzymes, chaperones, antioxidants and protective osmolytes that likely help maintain cellular redox. This study extends our understanding of the ecology and physiology of this unique actinobacterium that could potentially inspire new biotechnologies in metal recovery and sequestration, and environmental restoration. PMID:20865147

  5. Proteomic Analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi Response to Ionizing Radiation Stress

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Helaine Graziele Santos; Grynberg, Priscila; Bitar, Mainá; Pires, Simone da Fonseca; Hilário, Heron Oliveira; Macedo, Andrea Mara; Machado, Carlos Renato; de Andrade, Hélida Monteiro; Franco, Glória Regina

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, is extremely resistant to ionizing radiation, enduring up to 1.5 kGy of gamma rays. Ionizing radiation can damage the DNA molecule both directly, resulting in double-strand breaks, and indirectly, as a consequence of reactive oxygen species production. After a dose of 500 Gy of gamma rays, the parasite genome is fragmented, but the chromosomal bands are restored within 48 hours. Under such conditions, cell growth arrests for up to 120 hours and the parasites resume normal growth after this period. To better understand the parasite response to ionizing radiation, we analyzed the proteome of irradiated (4, 24, and 96 hours after irradiation) and non-irradiated T. cruzi using two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry for protein identification. A total of 543 spots were found to be differentially expressed, from which 215 were identified. These identified protein spots represent different isoforms of only 53 proteins. We observed a tendency for overexpression of proteins with molecular weights below predicted, indicating that these may be processed, yielding shorter polypeptides. The presence of shorter protein isoforms after irradiation suggests the occurrence of post-translational modifications and/or processing in response to gamma radiation stress. Our results also indicate that active translation is essential for the recovery of parasites from ionizing radiation damage. This study therefore reveals the peculiar response of T. cruzi to ionizing radiation, raising questions about how this organism can change its protein expression to survive such a harmful stress. PMID:24842666

  6. Proteomics analysis of Bacillus licheniformis in response to oligosaccharides elicitors.

    PubMed

    Reffatti, Patricia Fernanda; Roy, Ipsita; Odell, Mark; Keshavarz, Tajalli

    2014-01-01

    The role of oligosaccharides as biotic elicitors has been recognised in the enhanced production of antibiotics from fungal and bacterial cultures. The yield of bacitracin A in cultures of Bacillus licheniformis was increased after supplementation with oligoguluronate (OG), and mannan oligosaccharides (MO) and its mechanism at transcription level been established already. However, the elicitation mechanism at post transcriptional level has not been reported so far. In this paper we investigate changes in proteomics of B. licheniformis in presence of the oligosaccharide elicitors OG and MO. Differentially expressed proteins were examined using 2D-PAGE stained with colloidal Coomassie and were further identified by LC-MS/MS. We identified 19 differentially expressed proteins including those involved in carbon metabolism, energy generation, amino acid biosynthesis, oxidative and general stress response. The novel findings of this work, together with previous reports, contribute to the unravelling of the overall mechanism of elicitation in B. licheniformis cultures and reliability of the use of these elicitors for potential industrial application.

  7. Tandem Analysis of Transcriptome and Proteome Changes after a Single Dose of Corticosteroid: A Systems Approach to Liver Function in Pharmacogenomics

    PubMed Central

    Kamisoglu, Kubra; Sukumaran, Siddharth; Nouri-Nigjeh, Eslam; Tu, Chengjian; Li, Jun; Shen, Xiaomeng; Duan, Xiaotao; Qu, Jun; Almon, Richard R.; DuBois, Debra C.; Jusko, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Corticosteroids (CS) such as methylprednisolone (MPL) affect almost all liver functions through multiple mechanisms of action, and long-term use results in dysregulation causing diverse side effects. The complexity of involved molecular mechanisms necessitates a systems approach. Integration of information from the transcriptomic and proteomic responses has potential to provide deeper insights into CS actions. The present report describes the tandem analysis of rich time-series transcriptomic and proteomic data in rat liver after a single dose of MPL. Hierarchical clustering of the common genes represented in both mRNA and protein datasets displayed two dominant patterns. One of these patterns exhibited complementary mRNA and protein expression profiles indicating that MPL affected the regulation of these genes at the transcriptional level. Some of the classic pharmacodynamic markers for CS actions, including tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT), were among this group, together with genes encoding urea cycle enzymes and ribosomal proteins. The other pattern was rather unexpected. For this group of genes, MPL had distinctly observable effects at the protein expression level, although a change in the reverse direction occurred at the transcriptional level. These genes were functionally associated with metabolic processes that might be essential to elucidate side effects of MPL on liver, most importantly including modulation of oxidative stress, fatty acid oxidation, and bile acid biosynthesis. Furthermore, profiling of gene and protein expression data was also done independently of one another by a two-way sequential approach. Prominent temporal shifts in expression and relevant cellular functions were described together with the assessment of changes in the complementary side. PMID:25611119

  8. Differential proteomics analysis of liver failure in peripheral blood mononuclear cells using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hua; Tan, Qiu-Pei; Sui, Wei-Guo; Chen, Wen-Biao; Peng, Wu-Jian; Liu, Xing-Chao; Dai, Yong

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine differentially expressed proteome profiles for candidate biomarkers in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of liver failure (LF) patients. Ten patients were diagnosed as LF and 10 age- and gender-matched subjects were recruited as healthy controls. Isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomic technology is efficiently applicable for identification and relative quantitation of the proteomes of PBMCs. Eight-plex iTRAQ coupled with strong cation exchange chromatography, and liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry were used to analyze total proteins in LF patients and healthy control subjects. Molecular variations were detected using the iTRAQ method, and western blotting was used to verify the results. LF is a complex type of medical emergency that evolves following a catastrophic insult to the liver, and its outcome remains the most ominous of all gastroenterologic diseases. Serious complications tend to occur during the course of the disease and further exacerbate the problems. Using the iTRAQ method, differentially expressed proteome profiles of LF patients were determined. In the present study, 627 proteins with different expression levels were identified in LF patients compared with the control subjects; with 409 proteins upregulated and 218 proteins downregulated. Among them, four proteins were significantly differentially expressed; acylaminoacyl-peptide hydrolase and WW domain binding protein 2 were upregulated, and resistin and tubulin β 2A class IIa were downregulated. These proteins demonstrated differences in their expression levels compared with other proteins with normal expression levels and the significant positive correlation with LF. The western blot results were consistent with the results from iTRAQ. Thus, investigation of the molecular mechanism of the proteins involved in LF may facilitate an improved understanding of the

  9. Investigation of rice proteomic change in response to microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Weining

    Gravity is one of the environmental factors that control development and growth of plants. Plant cells which are not part of specialized tissues such as the root columella can also sense gravity. Space environment, such as space shuttle missions, space labortories and space stations, etc. provide unique oppotunities to study the microgravity response of plant. During the Shenzhou 8 mission in November 2011, we cultured rice cali on the spaceship and the samples were fixed 4 days after launch. The flying samples in the static position (micro g, mug) and in the centrifuge which provide 1 g force to mimic the 1 g gravity in space, were recovered and the proteome changes were analyzed by iTRAQ. In total, 4840 proteins were identified, including 2085 proteins with function annotation by GO analysis. 431 proteins were changed >1.5 fold in space µg /ground group, including 179 up-regulated proteins and down-regulated 252 proteins. 321 proteins were changed >1.5 fold in space muµg / space 1 g group, among which 205 proteins were the same differentially expressed proteins responsive to microgravity. Enrichment of the differnetially expressed proteins by GO analysis showed that the ARF GTPase activity regulation proteins were enriched when compared the space µg with space 1 g sample, whereas the nucleic acid binding and DNA damage repairing proteins were enriched when compared the space µg and ground sample. Microscopic comparison of the rice cali showed that the space grown cells are more uniformed in size and proliferation, suggesting that cell proliferation pattern was changed in space microgravity conditions.

  10. Transcriptional and Proteomic Responses to Carbon Starvation in Paracoccidioides

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Patrícia de Sousa; Casaletti, Luciana; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; de Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro; Fernandes, Gabriel da Rocha; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida

    2014-01-01

    Background The genus Paracoccidioides comprises human thermal dimorphic fungi, which cause paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), an important mycosis in Latin America. Adaptation to environmental conditions is key to fungal survival during human host infection. The adaptability of carbon metabolism is a vital fitness attribute during pathogenesis. Methodology/Principal Findings The fungal pathogen Paracoccidioides spp. is exposed to numerous adverse conditions, such as nutrient deprivation, in the human host. In this study, a comprehensive response of Paracoccidioides, Pb01, under carbon starvation was investigated using high-resolution transcriptomic (RNAseq) and proteomic (NanoUPLC-MSE) approaches. A total of 1,063 transcripts and 421 proteins were differentially regulated, providing a global view of metabolic reprogramming during carbon starvation. The main changes were those related to cells shifting to gluconeogenesis and ethanol production, supported by the degradation of amino acids and fatty acids and by the modulation of the glyoxylate and tricarboxylic cycles. This proposed carbon flow hypothesis was supported by gene and protein expression profiles assessed using qRT-PCR and western blot analysis, respectively, as well as using enzymatic, cell dry weight and fungus-macrophage interaction assays. The carbon source provides a survival advantage to Paracoccidioides inside macrophages. Conclusions/Significance For a complete understanding of the physiological processes in an organism, the integration of approaches addressing different levels of regulation is important. To the best of our knowledge, this report presents the first description of the responses of Paracoccidioides spp. to host-like conditions using large-scale expression approaches. The alternative metabolic pathways that could be adopted by the organism during carbon starvation can be important for a better understanding of the fungal adaptation to the host, because systems for detecting and responding

  11. Proteomic Analysis of the Rat Canalicular Membrane Reveals Expression of a Complex System of P4-ATPases in Liver

    PubMed Central

    Chaubey, Pururawa Mayank; Hofstetter, Lia; Roschitzki, Bernd; Stieger, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Transport processes in the canalicular membrane are key elements in bile formation and are the driving force of the enterohepatic circulation of bile salts. The canalicular membrane is constantly exposed to the detergent action of bile salts. One potential element protecting the canalicular membrane from the high canalicular bile salt concentrations may be bile salt resistant microdomains, however additional factors are likely to play a role. To obtain more insights into the molecular composition of the canalicular membrane, the proteome of highly purified rat canalicular membrane vesicles was determined. Isolated rat canalicular membrane vesicles were stripped from adhering proteins, deglycosylated and protease digested before subjecting the samples to shot gun proteomic analysis. The expression of individual candidates was studied by PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. A total of 2449 proteins were identified, of which 1282 were predicted to be membrane proteins. About 50% of the proteins identified here were absent from previously published liver proteomes. In addition to ATP8B1, four more P4-ATPases were identified. ATP8A1 and ATP9A showed expression specific to the canalicular membrane, ATP11C at the bLPM and ATP11A in an intracellular vesicular compartment partially colocalizing with RAB7A and EEA1 as markers of the endosomal compartment. This study helped to identify additional P4-ATPases from rat liver particularly in the canalicular membrane, previously not known to be expressed in liver. These P4-ATPases might be contributing for maintaining transmembrane lipid homeostasis in hepatocytes. PMID:27347675

  12. Insights into immune responses in oral cancer through proteomic analysis of saliva and salivary extracellular vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Winck, Flavia V.; Prado Ribeiro, Ana Carolina; Ramos Domingues, Romênia; Ling, Liu Yi; Riaño-Pachón, Diego Mauricio; Rivera, César; Brandão, Thaís Bianca; Gouvea, Adriele Ferreira; Santos-Silva, Alan Roger; Coletta, Ricardo D.; Paes Leme, Adriana F.

    2015-01-01

    The development and progression of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) involves complex cellular mechanisms that contribute to the low five-year survival rate of approximately 20% among diagnosed patients. However, the biological processes essential to tumor progression are not completely understood. Therefore, detecting alterations in the salivary proteome may assist in elucidating the cellular mechanisms modulated in OSCC and improve the clinical prognosis of the disease. The proteome of whole saliva and salivary extracellular vesicles (EVs) from patients with OSCC and healthy individuals were analyzed by LC-MS/MS and label-free protein quantification. Proteome data analysis was performed using statistical, machine learning and feature selection methods with additional functional annotation. Biological processes related to immune responses, peptidase inhibitor activity, iron coordination and protease binding were overrepresented in the group of differentially expressed proteins. Proteins related to the inflammatory system, transport of metals and cellular growth and proliferation were identified in the proteome of salivary EVs. The proteomics data were robust and could classify OSCC with 90% accuracy. The saliva proteome analysis revealed that immune processes are related to the presence of OSCC and indicate that proteomics data can contribute to determining OSCC prognosis. PMID:26538482

  13. Insights into immune responses in oral cancer through proteomic analysis of saliva and salivary extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Winck, Flavia V; Prado Ribeiro, Ana Carolina; Ramos Domingues, Romênia; Ling, Liu Yi; Riaño-Pachón, Diego Mauricio; Rivera, César; Brandão, Thaís Bianca; Gouvea, Adriele Ferreira; Santos-Silva, Alan Roger; Coletta, Ricardo D; Paes Leme, Adriana F

    2015-11-05

    The development and progression of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) involves complex cellular mechanisms that contribute to the low five-year survival rate of approximately 20% among diagnosed patients. However, the biological processes essential to tumor progression are not completely understood. Therefore, detecting alterations in the salivary proteome may assist in elucidating the cellular mechanisms modulated in OSCC and improve the clinical prognosis of the disease. The proteome of whole saliva and salivary extracellular vesicles (EVs) from patients with OSCC and healthy individuals were analyzed by LC-MS/MS and label-free protein quantification. Proteome data analysis was performed using statistical, machine learning and feature selection methods with additional functional annotation. Biological processes related to immune responses, peptidase inhibitor activity, iron coordination and protease binding were overrepresented in the group of differentially expressed proteins. Proteins related to the inflammatory system, transport of metals and cellular growth and proliferation were identified in the proteome of salivary EVs. The proteomics data were robust and could classify OSCC with 90% accuracy. The saliva proteome analysis revealed that immune processes are related to the presence of OSCC and indicate that proteomics data can contribute to determining OSCC prognosis.

  14. Across intra-mammalian stages of the liver f luke Fasciola hepatica: a proteomic study.

    PubMed

    Di Maggio, Lucía Sánchez; Tirloni, Lucas; Pinto, Antonio F M; Diedrich, Jolene K; Yates Iii, John R; Benavides, Uruguaysito; Carmona, Carlos; da Silva Vaz, Itabajara; Berasain, Patricia

    2016-09-07

    Fasciola hepatica is the agent of fasciolosis, a foodborne zoonosis that affects livestock production and human health. Although flukicidal drugs are available, re-infection and expanding resistance to triclabendazole demand new control strategies. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the complex interaction with the mammalian host could provide relevant clues, aiding the search for novel targets in diagnosis and control of fasciolosis. Parasite survival in the mammalian host is mediated by parasite compounds released during infection, known as excretory/secretory (E/S) products. E/S products are thought to protect parasites from host responses, allowing them to survive for a long period in the vertebrate host. This work provides in-depth proteomic analysis of F. hepatica intra-mammalian stages, and represents the largest number of proteins identified to date for this species. Functional classification revealed the presence of proteins involved in different biological processes, many of which represent original findings for this organism and are important for parasite survival within the host. These results could lead to a better comprehension of host-parasite relationships, and contribute to the development of drugs or vaccines against this parasite.

  15. Across intra-mammalian stages of the liver f luke Fasciola hepatica: a proteomic study

    PubMed Central

    Di Maggio, Lucía Sánchez; Tirloni, Lucas; Pinto, Antonio F. M.; Diedrich, Jolene K.; Yates III, John R.; Benavides, Uruguaysito; Carmona, Carlos; da Silva Vaz Jr., Itabajara; Berasain, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Fasciola hepatica is the agent of fasciolosis, a foodborne zoonosis that affects livestock production and human health. Although flukicidal drugs are available, re-infection and expanding resistance to triclabendazole demand new control strategies. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the complex interaction with the mammalian host could provide relevant clues, aiding the search for novel targets in diagnosis and control of fasciolosis. Parasite survival in the mammalian host is mediated by parasite compounds released during infection, known as excretory/secretory (E/S) products. E/S products are thought to protect parasites from host responses, allowing them to survive for a long period in the vertebrate host. This work provides in-depth proteomic analysis of F. hepatica intra-mammalian stages, and represents the largest number of proteins identified to date for this species. Functional classification revealed the presence of proteins involved in different biological processes, many of which represent original findings for this organism and are important for parasite survival within the host. These results could lead to a better comprehension of host-parasite relationships, and contribute to the development of drugs or vaccines against this parasite. PMID:27600774

  16. Identification of Potential Plasma Biomarkers for Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease by Integrating Transcriptomics and Proteomics in Laying Hens.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Meng-Tsz; Chen, Yu-Jen; Chen, Ching-Yi; Tsai, Mong-Hsun; Han, Chia-Li; Chen, Yu-Ju; Mersmann, Harry J; Ding, Shih-Torng

    2017-03-01

    Background: Prevalent worldwide obesity is associated with increased incidence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and metabolic syndrome. The identification of noninvasive biomarkers for NAFLD is of recent interest. Because primary de novo lipogenesis occurs in chicken liver as in human liver, adult chickens with age-associated steatosis resembling human NAFLD is an appealing animal model.Objective: The objective of this study was to screen potential biomarkers in the chicken model for NAFLD by transcriptomic and proteomic analysis.Methods: Hy-Line W-36 laying hens were fed standard feed from 25 to 45 wk of age to induce fatty liver. They were killed every 4 wk, and liver and plasma were collected at each time point to assess fatty liver development and for transcriptomic and proteomic analysis. Next, selected biomarkers were confirmed in additional experiments by providing supplements of the hepatoprotective nutrients betaine [300, 600, or 900 parts per million (ppm) in vivo; 2 mM in vitro] or docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 1% in vivo; 100 μM in vitro) to 30-wk-old Hy-Line W-36 laying hens for 4 mo and to Hy-Line W-36 chicken primary hepatocytes with oleic acid-induced steatosis. Liver or hepatocyte lipid contents and the expression of biomarkers were then examined.Results: Plasma acetoacetyl-CoA synthetase (AACS), dipeptidyl-peptidase 4 (DPP4), glutamine synthetase (GLUL), and glutathione S-transferase (GST) concentrations are well-established biomarkers for NAFLD. Selected biomarkers had significant positive associations with hepatic lipid deposition (P < 0.001). Betaine (900 ppm in vivo; 2 mM in vitro) and DHA (1% in vivo; 100 μM in vitro) supplementation both resulted in lower steatosis accompanied by the reduced expression of selected biomarkers in vivo and in vitro (P < 0.05).Conclusion: This study used adult laying hens to identify biomarkers for NAFLD and indicated that AACS, DPP4, GLUL, and GST could be considered to be potential diagnostic

  17. A multi-component classifier for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) based on genomic, proteomic, and phenomic data domains

    PubMed Central

    Wood, G. Craig; Chu, Xin; Argyropoulos, George; Benotti, Peter; Rolston, David; Mirshahi, Tooraj; Petrick, Anthony; Gabrielson, John; Carey, David J.; DiStefano, Johanna K.; Still, Christopher D.; Gerhard, Glenn S.

    2017-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents a spectrum of conditions that include steatohepatitis and fibrosis that are thought to emanate from hepatic steatosis. Few robust biomarkers or diagnostic tests have been developed for hepatic steatosis in the setting of obesity. We have developed a multi-component classifier for hepatic steatosis comprised of phenotypic, genomic, and proteomic variables using data from 576 adults with extreme obesity who underwent bariatric surgery and intra-operative liver biopsy. Using a 443 patient training set, protein biomarker discovery was performed using the highly multiplexed SOMAscan® proteomic assay, a set of 19 clinical variables, and the steatosis predisposing PNPLA3 rs738409 single nucleotide polymorphism genotype status. The most stable markers were selected using a stability selection algorithm with a L1-regularized logistic regression kernel and were then fitted with logistic regression models to classify steatosis, that were then tested against a 133 sample blinded verification set. The highest area under the ROC curve (AUC) for steatosis of PNPLA3 rs738409 genotype, 8 proteins, or 19 phenotypic variables was 0.913, whereas the final classifier that included variables from all three domains had an AUC of 0.935. These data indicate that multi-domain modeling has better predictive power than comprehensive analysis of variables from a single domain. PMID:28266614

  18. Plasma proteome response to severe burn injury revealed by 18O-labeled "universal" reference-based quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Qian, Wei-Jun; Petritis, Brianne O; Kaushal, Amit; Finnerty, Celeste C; Jeschke, Marc G; Monroe, Matthew E; Moore, Ronald J; Schepmoes, Athena A; Xiao, Wenzhong; Moldawer, Lyle L; Davis, Ronald W; Tompkins, Ronald G; Herndon, David N; Camp, David G; Smith, Richard D

    2010-09-03

    A burn injury represents one of the most severe forms of human trauma and is responsible for significant mortality worldwide. Here, we present the first quantitative proteomics investigation of the blood plasma proteome response to severe burn injury by comparing the plasma protein concentrations of 10 healthy control subjects with those of 15 severe burn patients at two time-points following the injury. The overall analytical strategy for this work integrated immunoaffinity depletion of the 12 most abundant plasma proteins with cysteinyl-peptide enrichment-based fractionation prior to LC-MS analyses of individual patient samples. Incorporation of an 18O-labeled "universal" reference among the sample sets enabled precise relative quantification across samples. In total, 313 plasma proteins confidently identified with two or more unique peptides were quantified. Following statistical analysis, 110 proteins exhibited significant abundance changes in response to the burn injury. The observed changes in protein concentrations suggest significant inflammatory and hypermetabolic response to the injury, which is supported by the fact that many of the identified proteins are associated with acute phase response signaling, the complement system, and coagulation system pathways. The regulation of approximately 35 proteins observed in this study is in agreement with previous results reported for inflammatory or burn response, but approximately 50 potentially novel proteins previously not known to be associated with burn response or inflammation are also found. Elucidating proteins involved in the response to severe burn injury may reveal novel targets for therapeutic interventions as well as potential predictive biomarkers for patient outcomes such as multiple organ failure.

  19. Proteomic response to acupuncture treatment in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Lai, Xinsheng; Wang, Jiayou; Nabar, Neel R; Pan, Sanqiang; Tang, Chunzhi; Huang, Yong; Hao, Mufeng; Yang, Zhonghua; Ma, Chunmei; Zhang, Jin; Chew, Helen; He, Zhenquan; Yang, Junjun; Su, Baogui; Zhang, Jian; Liang, Jun; Sneed, Kevin B; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Previous animal and clinical studies have shown that acupuncture is an effective alternative treatment in the management of hypertension, but the mechanism is unclear. This study investigated the proteomic response in the nervous system to treatment at the Taichong (LR3) acupoint in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Unanesthetized rats were subject to 5-min daily acupuncture treatment for 7 days. Blood pressure was monitored over 7 days. After euthanasia on the 7(th) day, rat medullas were dissected, homogenized, and subject to 2D gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF analysis. The results indicate that blood pressure stabilized after the 5th day of acupuncture, and compared with non-acupoint treatment, Taichong-acupunctured rat's systolic pressure was reduced significantly (P<0.01), though not enough to bring blood pressure down to normal levels. The different treatment groups also showed differential protein expression: the 2D images revealed 571 ± 15 proteins in normal SD rats' medulla, 576 ± 31 proteins in SHR's medulla, 597 ± 44 proteins in medulla of SHR after acupuncturing Taichong, and 616 ± 18 proteins in medulla of SHR after acupuncturing non-acupoint. In the medulla of Taichong group, compared with non-acupoint group, seven proteins were down-regulated: heat shock protein-90, synapsin-1, pyruvate kinase isozyme, NAD-dependent deacetylase sirtuin-2, protein kinase C inhibitor protein 1, ubiquitin hydrolase isozyme L1, and myelin basic protein. Six proteins were up-regulated: glutamate dehydrogenase 1, aldehyde dehydrogenase 2, glutathione S-transferase M5, Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor 1, DJ-1 protein and superoxide dismutase. The altered expression of several proteins by acupuncture has been confirmed by ELISA, Western blot and qRT-PCR assays. The results indicate an increase in antioxidant enzymes in the medulla of the SHRs subject to acupuncture, which may provide partial explanation for the antihypertensive effect of acupuncture. Further

  20. Lipogenesis Is Decreased by Grape Seed Proanthocyanidins According to Liver Proteomics of Rats Fed a High Fat Diet*

    PubMed Central

    Baiges, Isabel; Palmfeldt, Johan; Bladé, Cinta; Gregersen, Niels; Arola, Lluís

    2010-01-01

    Bioactive proanthocyanidins have been reported to have several beneficial effects on health in relation to metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. We studied the effect of grape seed proanthocyanidin extract (GSPE) in rats fed a high fat diet (HFD). This is the first study of the effects of flavonoids on the liver proteome of rats suffering from metabolic syndrome. Three groups of rats were fed over a period of 13 weeks either a chow diet (control), an HFD, or a high fat diet supplemented for the last 10 days with GSPE (HFD + GSPE). The liver proteome was fractionated, using a Triton X-114-based two-phase separation, into soluble and membrane protein fractions so that total proteome coverage was considerably improved. The data from isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based nano-LC-MS/MS analysis revealed 90 proteins with a significant (p < 0.05) minimal expression difference of 20% due to metabolic syndrome (HFD versus control) and 75 proteins due to GSPE treatment (HFD + GSPE versus HFD). The same animals have previously been studied (Quesada, H., del Bas, J. M., Pajuelo, D., Díaz, S., Fernandez-Larrea, J., Pinent, M., Arola, L., Salvadó, M. J., and Bladé, C. (2009) Grape seed proanthocyanidins correct dyslipidemia associated with a high-fat diet in rats and repress genes controlling lipogenesis and VLDL assembling in liver. Int. J. Obes. 33, 1007–1012), and GSPE was shown to correct dyslipidemia observed in HFD-fed rats probably through the repression of hepatic lipogenesis. Our data corroborate those findings with an extensive list of proteins describing the induction of hepatic glycogenesis, glycolysis, and fatty acid and triglyceride synthesis in HFD, whereas the opposite pattern was observed to a large extent in GSPE-treated animals. GSPE was shown to have a wider effect than previously thought, and putative targets of GSPE involved in the reversal of the symptoms of metabolic syndrome were revealed. Some

  1. Response of larval barnacle proteome to CO(2)-driven seawater acidification.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kelvin K W; Lane, Ackley C; Leung, Priscilla T Y; Thiyagarajan, V

    2011-09-01

    The majority of benthic marine invertebrates have a complex life cycle, during which the pelagic larvae select a suitable substrate, attach to it, and then metamorphose into benthic adults. Anthropogenic ocean acidification (OA) is postulated to affect larval metamorphic success through an altered protein expression pattern (proteome structure) and post-translational modifications. To test this hypothesis, larvae of an economically and ecologically important barnacle species Balanus amphitrite, were cultured from nauplius to the cyprid stage in the present (control) and in the projected elevated concentrations of CO(2) for the year 2100 (the OA treatment). Cyprid response to OA was analyzed at the total proteome level as well as two protein post-translational modification (phosphorylation and glycosylation) levels using a 2-DE based proteomic approach. The cyprid proteome showed OA-driven changes. Proteins that were differentially up or down regulated by OA come from three major groups, namely those related to energy-metabolism, respiration, and molecular chaperones, illustrating a potential strategy that the barnacle larvae may employ to tolerate OA stress. The differentially expressed proteins were tentatively identified as OA-responsive, effectively creating unique protein expression signatures for OA scenario of 2100. This study showed the promise of using a sentinel and non-model species to examine the impact of OA at the proteome level.

  2. Contribution of proteomic studies towards understanding plant heavy metal stress response

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Zahed; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2013-01-01

    Modulation of plant proteome composition is an inevitable process to cope with the environmental challenges including heavy metal (HM) stress. Soil and water contaminated with hazardous metals not only cause permanent and irreversible health problems, but also result substantial reduction in crop yields. In course of time, plants have evolved complex mechanisms to regulate the uptake, mobilization, and intracellular concentration of metal ions to alleviate the stress damages. Since, the functional translated portion of the genome plays an essential role in plant stress response, proteomic studies provide us a finer picture of protein networks and metabolic pathways primarily involved in cellular detoxification and tolerance mechanism. In the present review, an attempt is made to present the state of the art of recent development in proteomic techniques and significant contributions made so far for better understanding the complex mechanism of plant metal stress acclimation. Role of metal stress-related proteins involved in antioxidant defense system and primary metabolism is critically reviewed to get a bird’s-eye view on the different strategies of plants to detoxify HMs. In addition to the advantages and disadvantages of different proteomic methodologies, future applications of proteome study of subcellular organelles are also discussed to get the new insights into the plant cell response to HMs. PMID:23355841

  3. Proteomics-Based Identification of the Molecular Signatures of Liver Tissues from Aged Rats following Eight Weeks of Medium-Intensity Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanying

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity has emerged as a powerful intervention that promotes healthy aging by maintaining the functional capacity of critical organ systems. Here, by combining functional and proteomics analyses, we examined how hepatic phenotypes might respond to exercise treatment in aged rats. 16 male aged (20 months old) SD rats were divided into exercise and parallel control groups at random; the exercise group had 8 weeks of treadmill training with medium intensity. Whole protein samples of the liver were extracted from both groups and separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Alternatively objective protein spots with >2-fold difference in expression were selected for enzymological extraction and MS/MS identification. Results show increased activity of the manganese superoxide dismutase and elevated glutathione levels in the livers of exercise-treated animals, but malondialdehyde contents obviously decreased in the liver of the exercise group. Proteomics-based identification of differentially expressed proteins provided an integrated view of the metabolic adaptations occurring in the liver proteome during exercise, which significantly altered the expression of several proteins involved in key liver metabolic pathways including mitochondrial sulfur, glycolysis, methionine, and protein metabolism. These findings indicate that exercise may be beneficial to aged rats through modulation of hepatic protein expression profiles. PMID:28116034

  4. Global SUMO Proteome Responses Guide Gene Regulation, mRNA Biogenesis, and Plant Stress Responses.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Magdalena J; van den Burg, Harrold A

    2012-01-01

    Small Ubiquitin-like MOdifier (SUMO) is a key regulator of abiotic stress, disease resistance, and development in plants. The identification of >350 plant SUMO targets has revealed many processes modulated by SUMO and potential consequences of SUMO on its targets. Importantly, highly related proteins are SUMO-modified in plants, yeast, and metazoans. Overlapping SUMO targets include heat-shock proteins (HSPs), transcription regulators, histones, histone-modifying enzymes, proteins involved in DNA damage repair, but also proteins involved in mRNA biogenesis and nucleo-cytoplasmic transport. Proteomics studies indicate key roles for SUMO in gene repression by controlling histone (de)acetylation activity at genomic loci. The responsible heavily sumoylated transcriptional repressor complexes are recruited by plant transcription factors (TFs) containing an (ERF)-associated Amphiphilic Repression (EAR) motif. These TFs are not necessarily themselves a SUMO target. Conversely, SUMO acetylation (Ac) prevents binding of downstream partners by blocking binding of their SUMO-interaction peptide motifs to Ac-SUMO. In addition, SUMO acetylation has emerged as a mechanism to recruit specifically bromodomains. Bromodomains are generally linked with gene activation. These findings strengthen the idea of a bi-directional sumo-acetylation switch in gene regulation. Quantitative proteomics has highlighted that global sumoylation provides a dynamic response to protein damage involving SUMO chain-mediated protein degradation, but also SUMO E3 ligase-dependent transcription of HSP genes. With these insights in SUMO function and novel technical advancements, we can now study SUMO dynamics in responses to (a)biotic stress in plants.

  5. Exposure to Cobalt Causes Transcriptomic and Proteomic Changes in Two Rat Liver Derived Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Permenter, Matthew G.; Dennis, William E.; Sutto, Thomas E.; Jackson, David A.; Lewis, John A.; Stallings, Jonathan D.

    2013-01-01

    Cobalt is a transition group metal present in trace amounts in the human diet, but in larger doses it can be acutely toxic or cause adverse health effects in chronic exposures. Its use in many industrial processes and alloys worldwide presents opportunities for occupational exposures, including military personnel. While the toxic effects of cobalt have been widely studied, the exact mechanisms of toxicity remain unclear. In order to further elucidate these mechanisms and identify potential biomarkers of exposure or effect, we exposed two rat liver-derived cell lines, H4-II-E-C3 and MH1C1, to two concentrations of cobalt chloride. We examined changes in gene expression using DNA microarrays in both cell lines and examined changes in cytoplasmic protein abundance in MH1C1 cells using mass spectrometry. We chose to closely examine differentially expressed genes and proteins changing in abundance in both cell lines in order to remove cell line specific effects. We identified enriched pathways, networks, and biological functions using commercial bioinformatic tools and manual annotation. Many of the genes, proteins, and pathways modulated by exposure to cobalt appear to be due to an induction of a hypoxic-like response and oxidative stress. Genes that may be differentially expressed due to a hypoxic-like response are involved in Hif-1α signaling, glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and other energy metabolism related processes. Gene expression changes linked to oxidative stress are also known to be involved in the NRF2-mediated response, protein degradation, and glutathione production. Using microarray and mass spectrometry analysis, we were able to identify modulated genes and proteins, further elucidate the mechanisms of toxicity of cobalt, and identify biomarkers of exposure and effect in vitro, thus providing targets for focused in vivo studies. PMID:24386269

  6. Exposure to cobalt causes transcriptomic and proteomic changes in two rat liver derived cell lines.

    PubMed

    Permenter, Matthew G; Dennis, William E; Sutto, Thomas E; Jackson, David A; Lewis, John A; Stallings, Jonathan D

    2013-01-01

    Cobalt is a transition group metal present in trace amounts in the human diet, but in larger doses it can be acutely toxic or cause adverse health effects in chronic exposures. Its use in many industrial processes and alloys worldwide presents opportunities for occupational exposures, including military personnel. While the toxic effects of cobalt have been widely studied, the exact mechanisms of toxicity remain unclear. In order to further elucidate these mechanisms and identify potential biomarkers of exposure or effect, we exposed two rat liver-derived cell lines, H4-II-E-C3 and MH1C1, to two concentrations of cobalt chloride. We examined changes in gene expression using DNA microarrays in both cell lines and examined changes in cytoplasmic protein abundance in MH1C1 cells using mass spectrometry. We chose to closely examine differentially expressed genes and proteins changing in abundance in both cell lines in order to remove cell line specific effects. We identified enriched pathways, networks, and biological functions using commercial bioinformatic tools and manual annotation. Many of the genes, proteins, and pathways modulated by exposure to cobalt appear to be due to an induction of a hypoxic-like response and oxidative stress. Genes that may be differentially expressed due to a hypoxic-like response are involved in Hif-1α signaling, glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and other energy metabolism related processes. Gene expression changes linked to oxidative stress are also known to be involved in the NRF2-mediated response, protein degradation, and glutathione production. Using microarray and mass spectrometry analysis, we were able to identify modulated genes and proteins, further elucidate the mechanisms of toxicity of cobalt, and identify biomarkers of exposure and effect in vitro, thus providing targets for focused in vivo studies.

  7. Tumor microenvironment-derived proteins dominate the plasma proteome response during breast cancer induction and progression.

    PubMed

    Pitteri, Sharon J; Kelly-Spratt, Karen S; Gurley, Kay E; Kennedy, Jacob; Buson, Tina Busald; Chin, Alice; Wang, Hong; Zhang, Qing; Wong, Chee-Hong; Chodosh, Lewis A; Nelson, Peter S; Hanash, Samir M; Kemp, Christopher J

    2011-08-01

    Tumor development relies upon essential contributions from the tumor microenvironment and host immune alterations. These contributions may inform the plasma proteome in a manner that could be exploited for cancer diagnosis and prognosis. In this study, we employed a systems biology approach to characterize the plasma proteome response in the inducible HER2/neu mouse model of breast cancer during tumor induction, progression, and regression. Mass spectrometry data derived from approximately 1.6 million spectra identified protein networks involved in wound healing, microenvironment, and metabolism that coordinately changed during tumor development. The observed alterations developed prior to cancer detection, increased progressively with tumor growth and reverted toward baseline with tumor regression. Gene expression and immunohistochemical analyses suggested that the cancer-associated plasma proteome was derived from transcriptional responses in the noncancerous host tissues as well as the developing tumor. The proteomic signature was distinct from a nonspecific response to inflammation. Overall, the developing tumor simultaneously engaged a number of innate physiologic processes, including wound repair, immune response, coagulation and complement cascades, tissue remodeling, and metabolic homeostasis that were all detectable in plasma. Our findings offer an integrated view of tumor development relevant to plasma-based strategies to detect and diagnose cancer.

  8. Quantifying Integrated Proteomic Responses to Iron Stress in the Globally Important Marine Diazotroph Trichodesmium

    PubMed Central

    Snow, Joseph T.; Polyviou, Despo; Skipp, Paul; Chrismas, Nathan A. M.; Hitchcock, Andrew; Geider, Richard; Moore, C. Mark; Bibby, Thomas S.

    2015-01-01

    Trichodesmium is a biogeochemically important marine cyanobacterium, responsible for a significant proportion of the annual ‘new’ nitrogen introduced into the global ocean. These non-heterocystous filamentous diazotrophs employ a potentially unique strategy of near-concurrent nitrogen fixation and oxygenic photosynthesis, potentially burdening Trichodesmium with a particularly high iron requirement due to the iron-binding proteins involved in these processes. Iron availability may therefore have a significant influence on the biogeography of Trichodesmium. Previous investigations of molecular responses to iron stress in this keystone marine microbe have largely been targeted. Here a holistic approach was taken using a label-free quantitative proteomics technique (MSE) to reveal a sophisticated multi-faceted proteomic response of Trichodesmium erythraeum IMS101 to iron stress. Increased abundances of proteins known to be involved in acclimation to iron stress and proteins known or predicted to be involved in iron uptake were observed, alongside decreases in the abundances of iron-binding proteins involved in photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation. Preferential loss of proteins with a high iron content contributed to overall reductions of 55–60% in estimated proteomic iron requirements. Changes in the abundances of iron-binding proteins also suggested the potential importance of alternate photosynthetic pathways as Trichodesmium reallocates the limiting resource under iron stress. Trichodesmium therefore displays a significant and integrated proteomic response to iron availability that likely contributes to the ecological success of this species in the ocean. PMID:26562022

  9. Quantitative proteomic analysis reveals posttranslational responses to aneuploidy in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Dephoure, Noah; Hwang, Sunyoung; O'Sullivan, Ciara; Dodgson, Stacie E; Gygi, Steven P; Amon, Angelika; Torres, Eduardo M

    2014-01-01

    Aneuploidy causes severe developmental defects and is a near universal feature of tumor cells. Despite its profound effects, the cellular processes affected by aneuploidy are not well characterized. Here, we examined the consequences of aneuploidy on the proteome of aneuploid budding yeast strains. We show that although protein levels largely scale with gene copy number, subunits of multi-protein complexes are notable exceptions. Posttranslational mechanisms attenuate their expression when their encoding genes are in excess. Our proteomic analyses further revealed a novel aneuploidy-associated protein expression signature characteristic of altered metabolism and redox homeostasis. Indeed aneuploid cells harbor increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Interestingly, increased protein turnover attenuates ROS levels and this novel aneuploidy-associated signature and improves the fitness of most aneuploid strains. Our results show that aneuploidy causes alterations in metabolism and redox homeostasis. Cells respond to these alterations through both transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03023.001 PMID:25073701

  10. Proteomics-based investigation of salt-responsive mechanisms in plant roots.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qi; Zhang, Heng; Wang, Tai; Chen, Sixue; Dai, Shaojun

    2013-04-26

    Salinity is one of the major abiotic stresses that limits agricultural productivity worldwide. Plant roots function as the primary site of salinity perception. Salt responses in roots are essential for maintaining root functionality, as well as for transmitting the salt signal to shoot for proper salt response and adaptation in the entire plant. Therefore, a thorough understanding of signaling and metabolic mechanisms of salt response in roots is critical for improving plant salt tolerance. Current proteomic studies have provided salt-responsive expression patterns of 905 proteins in 14 plant species. Through integrative analysis of salt-responsive proteins and previous physiological and molecular findings, this review summarizes current understanding of salt responses in roots and highlights proteomic findings on the molecular mechanisms in the fine-tuned salt-responsive networks. At the proteome level, the following processes become dominant in root salt response: (i) salt signal perception and transduction; (ii) detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS); (iii) salt uptake/exclusion and compartmentalization; (iv) protein translation and/or turnover dynamics; (v) cytoskeleton/cell wall dynamics; (vi) carbohydrate and energy metabolism; and (vii) other salt-responsive metabolisms. These processes work together to gain cellular homeostasis in roots and determine the overall phenotype of plant growth and development under salt stress.

  11. Global Proteomics Analysis of the Response to Starvation in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Larance, Mark; Pourkarimi, Ehsan; Wang, Bin; Brenes Murillo, Alejandro; Kent, Robert; Lamond, Angus I; Gartner, Anton

    2015-07-01

    Periodic starvation of animals induces large shifts in metabolism but may also influence many other cellular systems and can lead to adaption to prolonged starvation conditions. To date, there is limited understanding of how starvation affects gene expression, particularly at the protein level. Here, we have used mass-spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics to identify global changes in the Caenorhabditis elegans proteome due to acute starvation of young adult animals. Measuring changes in the abundance of over 5,000 proteins, we show that acute starvation rapidly alters the levels of hundreds of proteins, many involved in central metabolic pathways, highlighting key regulatory responses. Surprisingly, we also detect changes in the abundance of chromatin-associated proteins, including specific linker histones, histone variants, and histone posttranslational modifications associated with the epigenetic control of gene expression. To maximize community access to these data, they are presented in an online searchable database, the Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics (http://www.peptracker.com/epd/).

  12. Global Proteomics Analysis of the Response to Starvation in C. elegans*

    PubMed Central

    Larance, Mark; Pourkarimi, Ehsan; Wang, Bin; Brenes Murillo, Alejandro; Kent, Robert; Lamond, Angus I.; Gartner, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Periodic starvation of animals induces large shifts in metabolism but may also influence many other cellular systems and can lead to adaption to prolonged starvation conditions. To date, there is limited understanding of how starvation affects gene expression, particularly at the protein level. Here, we have used mass-spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics to identify global changes in the Caenorhabditis elegans proteome due to acute starvation of young adult animals. Measuring changes in the abundance of over 5,000 proteins, we show that acute starvation rapidly alters the levels of hundreds of proteins, many involved in central metabolic pathways, highlighting key regulatory responses. Surprisingly, we also detect changes in the abundance of chromatin-associated proteins, including specific linker histones, histone variants, and histone posttranslational modifications associated with the epigenetic control of gene expression. To maximize community access to these data, they are presented in an online searchable database, the Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics (http://www.peptracker.com/epd/). PMID:25963834

  13. Macaque Proteome Response to Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza and 1918 Reassortant Influenza Virus Infections▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Joseph N.; Palermo, Robert E.; Baskin, Carole R.; Gritsenko, Marina; Sabourin, Patrick J.; Long, James P.; Sabourin, Carol L.; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Albrecht, Randy; Tumpey, Terrence M.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Richard D.; Katze, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    The host proteome response and molecular mechanisms that drive disease in vivo during infection by a human isolate of the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAI) and 1918 pandemic influenza virus remain poorly understood. This study presents a comprehensive characterization of the proteome response in cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) lung tissue over 7 days of infection with HPAI (the most virulent), a reassortant virus containing 1918 hemagglutinin and neuraminidase surface proteins (intermediate virulence), or a human seasonal strain (least virulent). A high-sensitivity two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy strategy and functional network analysis were implemented to gain insight into response pathways activated in macaques during influenza virus infection. A macaque protein database was assembled and used in the identification of 35,239 unique peptide sequences corresponding to approximately 4,259 proteins. Quantitative analysis identified an increase in expression of 400 proteins during viral infection. The abundance levels of a subset of these 400 proteins produced strong correlations with disease progression observed in the macaques, distinguishing a “core” response to viral infection from a “high” response specific to severe disease. Proteome expression profiles revealed distinct temporal response kinetics between viral strains, with HPAI inducing the most rapid response. While proteins involved in the immune response, metabolism, and transport were increased rapidly in the lung by HPAI, the other viruses produced a delayed response, characterized by an increase in proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation, RNA processing, and translation. Proteomic results were integrated with previous genomic and pathological analysis to characterize the dynamic nature of the influenza virus infection process. PMID:20844032

  14. Quantitative proteomics of rat livers shows that unrestricted feeding is stressful for proteostasis with implications on life span

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Galit; Quadroni, Manfredo; Shtaif, Biana; Goloubinoff, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Studies in young mammals on the molecular effects of food restriction leading to prolong adult life are scares. Here, we used high-throughput quantitative proteomic analysis of whole rat livers to address the molecular basis for growth arrest and the apparent life-prolonging phenotype of the food restriction regimen. Over 1800 common proteins were significantly quantified in livers of ad libitum, restriction- and re-fed rats, which summed up into 92% of the total protein mass of the cells. Compared to restriction, ad libitum cells contained significantly less mitochondrial catabolic enzymes and more cytosolic and ER HSP90 and HSP70 chaperones, which are hallmarks of heat- and chemically-stressed tissues. Following re-feeding, levels of HSPs nearly reached ad libitum levels. The quantitative and qualitative protein values indicated that the restriction regimen was a least stressful condition that used minimal amounts of HSP-chaperones to maintain optimal protein homeostasis and sustain optimal life span. In contrast, the elevated levels of HSP-chaperones in ad libitum tissues were characteristic of a chronic stress, which in the long term could lead to early aging and shorter life span. PMID:27508340

  15. Activity-Based Proteomics Reveals Heterogeneous Kinome and ATP-Binding Proteome Responses to MEK Inhibition in KRAS Mutant Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Young; Stewart, Paul A; Borne, Adam L; Fang, Bin; Welsh, Eric A; Chen, Yian Ann; Eschrich, Steven A; Koomen, John M; Haura, Eric B

    2016-06-01

    One way cancer cells can escape from targeted agents is through their ability to evade drug effects by rapidly rewiring signaling networks. Many protein classes, such as kinases and metabolic enzymes, are regulated by ATP binding and hydrolysis. We hypothesized that a system-level profiling of drug-induced alterations in ATP-binding proteomes could offer novel insights into adaptive responses. Here, we mapped global ATP-binding proteomes perturbed by two clinical MEK inhibitors, AZD6244 and MEK162, in KRAS mutant lung cancer cells as a model system harnessing a desthiobiotin-ATP probe coupled with LC-MS/MS. We observed strikingly unique ATP-binding proteome responses to MEK inhibition, which revealed heterogeneous drug-induced pathway signatures in each cell line. We also identified diverse kinome responses, indicating each cell adapts to MEK inhibition in unique ways. Despite the heterogeneity of kinome responses, decreased probe labeling of mitotic kinases and an increase of kinases linked to autophagy were identified to be common responses. Taken together, our study revealed a diversity of adaptive ATP-binding proteome and kinome responses to MEK inhibition in KRAS mutant lung cancer cells, and our study further demonstrated the utility of our approach to identify potential candidates of targetable ATP-binding enzymes involved in adaptive resistance and to develop rational drug combinations.

  16. Proteomic Responses of Switchgrass and Prairie Cordgrass to Senescence.

    PubMed

    Paudel, Bimal; Das, Aayudh; Tran, Michaellong; Boe, Arvid; Palmer, Nathan A; Sarath, Gautam; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Jose L; Rushton, Paul J; Rohila, Jai S

    2016-01-01

    Senescence in biofuel grasses is a critical issue because early senescence decreases potential biomass production by limiting aerial growth and development. 2-Dimensional, differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) followed by mass spectrometry of selected protein spots was used to evaluate differences between leaf proteomes of early (ES)- and late- senescing (LS) genotypes of Prairie cordgrass (ES/LS PCG) and switchgrass (ES/LS SG), just before and after senescence was initiated. Analysis of the manually filtered and statistically evaluated data indicated that 69 proteins were significantly differentially abundant across all comparisons, and a majority (41%) were associated with photosynthetic processes as determined by gene ontology analysis. Ten proteins were found in common between PCG and SG, and nine and 18 proteins were unique to PCG and SG respectively. Five of the 10 differentially abundant spots common to both species were increased in abundance, and five were decreased in abundance. Leaf proteomes of the LS genotypes of both grasses analyzed before senescence contained significantly higher abundances of a 14-3-3 like protein and a glutathione-S-transferase protein when compared to the ES genotypes, suggesting differential cellular metabolism in the LS vs. the ES genotypes. The higher abundance of 14-3-3 like proteins may be one factor that impacts the senescence process in both LS PCG and LS SG. Aconitase dehydratase was found in greater abundance in all four genotypes after the onset of senescence, consistent with literature reports from genetic and transcriptomic studies. A Rab protein of the Ras family of G proteins and an s-adenosylmethionine synthase were more abundant in ES PCG when compared with the LS PCG. In contrast, several proteins associated with photosynthesis and carbon assimilation were detected in greater abundance in LS PCG when compared to ES PCG, suggesting that a loss of these proteins potentially contributed to the ES phenotype

  17. Proteomic Responses of Switchgrass and Prairie Cordgrass to Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Paudel, Bimal; Das, Aayudh; Tran, Michaellong; Boe, Arvid; Palmer, Nathan A.; Sarath, Gautam; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Jose L.; Rushton, Paul J.; Rohila, Jai S.

    2016-01-01

    Senescence in biofuel grasses is a critical issue because early senescence decreases potential biomass production by limiting aerial growth and development. 2-Dimensional, differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) followed by mass spectrometry of selected protein spots was used to evaluate differences between leaf proteomes of early (ES)- and late- senescing (LS) genotypes of Prairie cordgrass (ES/LS PCG) and switchgrass (ES/LS SG), just before and after senescence was initiated. Analysis of the manually filtered and statistically evaluated data indicated that 69 proteins were significantly differentially abundant across all comparisons, and a majority (41%) were associated with photosynthetic processes as determined by gene ontology analysis. Ten proteins were found in common between PCG and SG, and nine and 18 proteins were unique to PCG and SG respectively. Five of the 10 differentially abundant spots common to both species were increased in abundance, and five were decreased in abundance. Leaf proteomes of the LS genotypes of both grasses analyzed before senescence contained significantly higher abundances of a 14-3-3 like protein and a glutathione-S-transferase protein when compared to the ES genotypes, suggesting differential cellular metabolism in the LS vs. the ES genotypes. The higher abundance of 14-3-3 like proteins may be one factor that impacts the senescence process in both LS PCG and LS SG. Aconitase dehydratase was found in greater abundance in all four genotypes after the onset of senescence, consistent with literature reports from genetic and transcriptomic studies. A Rab protein of the Ras family of G proteins and an s-adenosylmethionine synthase were more abundant in ES PCG when compared with the LS PCG. In contrast, several proteins associated with photosynthesis and carbon assimilation were detected in greater abundance in LS PCG when compared to ES PCG, suggesting that a loss of these proteins potentially contributed to the ES phenotype

  18. Application of quantitative targeted absolute proteomics to profile protein expression changes of hepatic transporters and metabolizing enzymes during cholic acid-promoted liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Miura, Takayuki; Tachikawa, Masanori; Ohtsuka, Hideo; Fukase, Koji; Nakayama, Shun; Sakata, Naoaki; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Naitoh, Takeshi; Katayose, Yu; Uchida, Yasuo; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Terasaki, Tetsuya; Unno, Michiaki

    2017-02-26

    Preoperative administration of cholic acid (CA) may be an option to increase the liver volume before elective liver resection surgery, so it is important to understand its effects on liver functionality for drug transport and metabolism. The purpose of this study was to clarify the absolute protein expression dynamics of transporters and metabolizing enzymes in the liver of mice fed CA-containing diet for 5 days (CA1) and mice fed CA-containing diet for 5 days followed by diet without CA for 7 days (CA2), in comparison with non CA-fed control mice. The CA1 group showed the increased liver weight, cell proliferation index, and oxidative stress, but no increase of apoptosis. Quantitative targeted absolute proteomics revealed (i) decreases in basolateral bile acid transporters ntcp, oatp1a1, oatp1b2, bile acid synthesis-related enzymes cyp7a1 and cyp8b1, and drug transporters bcrp, mrp6, ent1, oatp2b1, and (ii) increases in glutathione biosynthetic enzymes and drug-metabolizing enzyme cyp3a11. Liver concentrations of reduced and oxidized glutathione were both increased. In the CA2 group, the increased liver weight was maintained, while the biochemical features and protein profiles were restored to the non-CA-fed control levels. These findings suggest that CA administration alters liver functionality per body during liver regeneration and restoration.

  19. Global Phosphotyrosine Proteomics Identifies PKCδ as a Marker of Responsiveness to Src Inhibition in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, W. Hayes; Luo, Weifeng; Zhao, Ping; Coffey, Robert J.; Hanks, Steven K.; Manning, H. Charles

    2013-01-01

    Sensitive and specific biomarkers of protein kinase inhibition can be leveraged to accelerate drug development studies in oncology by associating early molecular responses with target inhibition. In this study, we utilized unbiased shotgun phosphotyrosine (pY) proteomics to discover novel biomarkers of response to dasatinib, a small molecule Src-selective inhibitor, in preclinical models of colorectal cancer (CRC). We performed unbiased mass spectrometry shotgun pY proteomics to reveal the pY proteome of cultured HCT-116 colonic carcinoma cells, and then extended this analysis to HCT-116 xenograft tumors to identify pY biomarkers of dasatinib-responsiveness in vivo. Major dasatinib-responsive pY sites in xenograft tumors included sites on delta-type protein kinase C (PKCδ), CUB-domain-containing protein 1 (CDCP1), Type-II SH2-domain-containing inositol 5-phosphatase (SHIP2), and receptor protein-tyrosine phosphatase alpha (RPTPα). The pY313 site PKCδ was further supported as a relevant biomarker of dasatinib-mediated Src inhibition in HCT-116 xenografts by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting with a phosphospecific antibody. Reduction of PKCδ pY313 was further correlated with dasatinib-mediated inhibition of Src and diminished growth as spheroids of a panel of human CRC cell lines. These studies reveal PKCδ pY313 as a promising readout of Src inhibition in CRC and potentially other solid tumors and may reflect responsiveness to dasatinib in a subset of colorectal cancers. PMID:24260357

  20. Extending the limits of quantitative proteome profiling with data-independent acquisition and application to acetaminophen-treated three-dimensional liver microtissues.

    PubMed

    Bruderer, Roland; Bernhardt, Oliver M; Gandhi, Tejas; Miladinović, Saša M; Cheng, Lin-Yang; Messner, Simon; Ehrenberger, Tobias; Zanotelli, Vito; Butscheid, Yulia; Escher, Claudia; Vitek, Olga; Rinner, Oliver; Reiter, Lukas

    2015-05-01

    The data-independent acquisition (DIA) approach has recently been introduced as a novel mass spectrometric method that promises to combine the high content aspect of shotgun proteomics with the reproducibility and precision of selected reaction monitoring. Here, we evaluate, whether SWATH-MS type DIA effectively translates into a better protein profiling as compared with the established shotgun proteomics. We implemented a novel DIA method on the widely used Orbitrap platform and used retention-time-normalized (iRT) spectral libraries for targeted data extraction using Spectronaut. We call this combination hyper reaction monitoring (HRM). Using a controlled sample set, we show that HRM outperformed shotgun proteomics both in the number of consistently identified peptides across multiple measurements and quantification of differentially abundant proteins. The reproducibility of HRM in peptide detection was above 98%, resulting in quasi complete data sets compared with 49% of shotgun proteomics. Utilizing HRM, we profiled acetaminophen (APAP)(1)-treated three-dimensional human liver microtissues. An early onset of relevant proteome changes was revealed at subtoxic doses of APAP. Further, we detected and quantified for the first time human NAPQI-protein adducts that might be relevant for the toxicity of APAP. The adducts were identified on four mitochondrial oxidative stress related proteins (GATM, PARK7, PRDX6, and VDAC2) and two other proteins (ANXA2 and FTCD). Our findings imply that DIA should be the preferred method for quantitative protein profiling.

  1. Extending the Limits of Quantitative Proteome Profiling with Data-Independent Acquisition and Application to Acetaminophen-Treated Three-Dimensional Liver Microtissues*

    PubMed Central

    Bruderer, Roland; Bernhardt, Oliver M.; Gandhi, Tejas; Miladinović, Saša M.; Cheng, Lin-Yang; Messner, Simon; Ehrenberger, Tobias; Zanotelli, Vito; Butscheid, Yulia; Escher, Claudia; Vitek, Olga; Rinner, Oliver; Reiter, Lukas

    2015-01-01

    The data-independent acquisition (DIA) approach has recently been introduced as a novel mass spectrometric method that promises to combine the high content aspect of shotgun proteomics with the reproducibility and precision of selected reaction monitoring. Here, we evaluate, whether SWATH-MS type DIA effectively translates into a better protein profiling as compared with the established shotgun proteomics. We implemented a novel DIA method on the widely used Orbitrap platform and used retention-time-normalized (iRT) spectral libraries for targeted data extraction using Spectronaut. We call this combination hyper reaction monitoring (HRM). Using a controlled sample set, we show that HRM outperformed shotgun proteomics both in the number of consistently identified peptides across multiple measurements and quantification of differentially abundant proteins. The reproducibility of HRM in peptide detection was above 98%, resulting in quasi complete data sets compared with 49% of shotgun proteomics. Utilizing HRM, we profiled acetaminophen (APAP)1-treated three-dimensional human liver microtissues. An early onset of relevant proteome changes was revealed at subtoxic doses of APAP. Further, we detected and quantified for the first time human NAPQI-protein adducts that might be relevant for the toxicity of APAP. The adducts were identified on four mitochondrial oxidative stress related proteins (GATM, PARK7, PRDX6, and VDAC2) and two other proteins (ANXA2 and FTCD). Our findings imply that DIA should be the preferred method for quantitative protein profiling. PMID:25724911

  2. Proteomic-based mechanistic investigation of low-dose radiation-induced cellular responses/effects

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xian

    2013-10-23

    The goal of our project is to apply our unique systems investigation strategy to reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying the radiation induction and transmission of oxidative damage, adaptive response, and bystander effect at low-doses. Beginning with simple in vitro systems such as fibroblast or epithelial pure culture, our amino acid-coded mass tagging (AACT) comparative proteomic platform will be used to measure quantitatively proteomic changes at high- or low-dose level with respect to their endogenous damage levels respectively, in which a broad range of unique regulated proteins sensitive to low-dose IR will be distinguished. To zoom in how these regulated proteins interact with other in the form of networks in induction/transmission pathways, these regulated proteins will be selected as baits for making a series of fibroblast cell lines that stably express each of them. Using our newly developed method of ?dual-tagging? quantitative proteomics that integrate the capabilities of natural complex expression/formation, simple epitope affinity isolation (not through tandem affinity purification or TAP), and ?in-spectra? AACT quantitative measurements using mass spectrometry (MS), we will be able to distinguish systematically interacting proteins with each bait in real time. Further, in addition to both proteome-wide (global differentially expressed proteins) and pathway-scale (bait-specific) profiling information, we will perform a computational network analysis to elucidate a global pathway/mechanisms underlying cellular responses to real-time low-dose IR. Similarly, we will extend our scheme to investigate systematically those induction/transmission pathways occurring in a fibroblast-epithelial interacting model in which the bystander cell (fibroblast) monitor the IR damage to the target cell (epithelial cell). The results will provide the proteome base (molecular mechanisms/pathways for signaling) for the low dose radiation-induced essential tissue

  3. Proteomic changes in maize as a response to heavy metal (lead) stress revealed by iTRAQ quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Li, G K; Gao, J; Peng, H; Shen, Y O; Ding, H P; Zhang, Z M; Pan, G T; Lin, H J

    2016-01-26

    Lead (Pb), a heavy metal, has become a crucial pollutant in soil and water, causing not only permanent and irreversible health problems, but also substantial reduction in crop yields. In this study, we conducted proteome analysis of the roots of the non-hyperaccumulator inbred maize line 9782 at four developmental stages (0, 12, 24, and 48 h) under Pb pollution using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification technology. A total of 252, 72 and 116 proteins were differentially expressed between M12 (after 12-h Pb treatment) and CK (water-mocked treatment), M24 (after 24-h Pb treatment) and CK, and M48 (after 48-h Pb treatment) and CK, respectively. In addition, 14 differentially expressed proteins were common within each comparison group. Moreover, Cluster of Orthologous Groups enrichment analysis revealed predominance of the proteins involved in posttranslational modification, protein turnover, and chaperones. Additionally, the changes in protein profiles showed a lower concordance with corresponding alterations in transcript levels, indicating important roles for transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation in the response of maize roots to Pb pollution. Furthermore, enriched functional categories between the successive comparisons showed that the proteins in functional categories of stress, redox, signaling, and transport were highly up-regulated, while those in the functional categories of nucleotide metabolism, amino acid metabolism, RNA, and protein metabolism were down-regulated. This information will help in furthering our understanding of the detailed mechanisms of plant responses to heavy metal stress by combining protein and mRNA profiles.

  4. Characterizing the proteome and oxi-proteome of apple in response to a compatible (P. expansum) and a non-host (P. digitatum) pathogen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apples are subjected to both abiotic and biotic stresses during the postharvest period, which lead to large economic losses worldwide. To obtain biochemical insights into apple defense response, Researchers monitored the protein abundance changes (proteome), as well as the protein carbonyls (oxi-pr...

  5. Comparative physiological and proteomic responses to drought stress in two poplar species originating from different altitudes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Wang, Yong; Miao, Ling-Feng

    2010-08-01

    Cuttings of Populus kangdingensis C. Wang et Tung and Populus cathayana Rehder were examined during a single growing season in a greenhouse for comparative analysis of their physiological and proteomic responses to drought stress. The said species originate from high and low altitudes, respectively, of the eastern Himalaya. Results revealed that the adaptive responses to drought stress vary between the two poplar species. As a consequence of drought stress, the stem height increment and leaf number increment are more significantly inhibited in P. cathayana compared with P. kangdingensis. On the other hand, in response to drought stress, more significant cellular damages such as reduction in leaf relative water content and CO(2) assimilation rate, increments in the contents of malondialdehyde and hydrogen peroxide and downregulation or degradation of proteins related to photosynthesis occur in P. cathayana compared with P. kangdingensis. On the other hand, P. kangdingensis can cope better with the negative impact on the entire regulatory network. This includes more efficient increases in content of solute sugar, soluble protein and free proline and activities of antioxidant enzymes, as well as specific expressions of certain proteins related to protein processing, redox homeostasis and sugar metabolism. Morphological consequences as well as physiological and proteomic responses to drought stress between species revealed that P. kangdingensis originating from a high altitude manifest stronger drought adaptation than did P. cathayana originating from a low altitude. Functions of various proteins identified by proteomic experiment are related with physiological phenomena. Physiological and proteomic responses to drought stress in poplar may work cooperatively to establish a new cellular homeostasis, allowing poplar to develop a certain level of drought tolerance.

  6. Investigation of the Gracilaria gracilis (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta) proteome response to nitrogen limitation.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Rene K; Rafudeen, Muhammad S; Coyne, Vernon E

    2016-06-01

    Inorganic nitrogen has been identified as the major growth-limiting nutritional factor affecting Gracilaria gracilis populations in South Africa. Although the physiological mechanisms implemented by G. gracilis for adaption to low nitrogen environments have been investigated, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of these adaptions. This study provides the first investigation of G. gracilis proteome changes in response to nitrogen limitation and subsequent recovery. A differential proteomics approach employing two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was used to investigate G. gracilis proteome changes in response to nitrogen limitation and recovery. The putative identity of 22 proteins that changed significantly (P < 0.05) in abundance in response to nitrogen limitation and recovery was determined. The identified proteins function in a range of biological processes including glycolysis, photosynthesis, ATP synthesis, galactose metabolism, protein-refolding and biosynthesis, nitrogen metabolism and cytoskeleton remodeling. The identity of fructose 1,6 biphosphate (FBP) aldolase was confirmed by western blot analysis and the decreased abundance of FBP aldolase observed with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was validated by enzyme assays and western blots. The identification of key proteins and pathways involved in the G. gracilis nitrogen stress response provide a better understanding of G. gracilis proteome responses to varying degrees of nitrogen limitation and is the first step in the identification of biomarkers for monitoring the nitrogen status of cultivated G. gracilis populations.

  7. Proteomic response of marine invertebrate larvae to ocean acidification and hypoxia during metamorphosis and calcification.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Joy; Wong, Kelvin K W; Chandramouli, Kondethimmanahalli H; Qian, Pei-Yuan; Leung, Priscilla T Y; Wu, Rudolf S S; Thiyagarajan, Vengatesen

    2013-12-15

    Calcifying marine invertebrates with complex life cycles are particularly at risk to climate changes as they undergo an abrupt ontogenetic shift during larval metamorphosis. Although our understanding of the larval response to climate changes is rapidly advancing, the proteome plasticity involved in a compensatory response to climate change is still unknown. In this study, we investigated the proteomic response of metamorphosing larvae of the tubeworm Hydroides elegans, challenged with two climate change stressors, ocean acidification (OA; pH 7.6) and hypoxia (HYP; 2.8 mg O2 l(-1)), and with both combined. Using a two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE)-based approach coupled with mass spectrometry, we found that climate change stressors did not affect metamorphosis except under OA, but altered the larval proteome and phosphorylation status. Metabolism and various stress and calcification-related proteins were downregulated in response to OA. In OA and HYP combined, HYP restored the expression of the calcification-related proteins to the control levels. We speculate that mild HYP stress could compensate for the negative effects of OA. This study also discusses the potential functions of selected proteins that might play important roles in larval acclimation and adaption to climate change.

  8. Metabolic effects of the iodothyronine functional analogue TRC150094 on the liver and skeletal muscle of high-fat diet fed overweight rats: an integrated proteomic study.

    PubMed

    Silvestri, Elena; Glinni, Daniela; Cioffi, Federica; Moreno, Maria; Lombardi, Assunta; de Lange, Pieter; Senese, Rosalba; Ceccarelli, Michele; Salzano, Anna Maria; Scaloni, Andrea; Lanni, Antonia; Goglia, Fernando

    2012-07-06

    A novel functional iodothyronine analogue, TRC150094, which has a much lower potency toward thyroid hormone receptor (α1/β1) activation than triiodothyronine, has been shown to be effective at reducing adiposity in rats simultaneously receiving a high-fat diet (HFD). Here, by combining metabolic, functional and proteomic analysis, we studied how the hepatic and skeletal muscle phenotypes might respond to TRC150094 treatment in HFD-fed overweight rats. Drug treatment increased both the liver and skeletal muscle mitochondrial oxidative capacities without altering mitochondrial efficiency. Coherently, in terms of individual respiratory in-gel activity, blue-native analysis revealed an increased activity of complex V in the liver and of complexes II and V in tibialis muscle in TCR150094-treated animals. Subsequently, the identification of differentially expressed proteins and the analysis of their interrelations gave an integrated view of the phenotypic/metabolic adaptations occurring in the liver and muscle proteomes during drug treatment. TRC150094 significantly altered the expression of several proteins involved in key liver metabolic pathways, including amino acid and nitrogen metabolism, and fructose and mannose metabolism. The canonical pathways most strongly influenced by TRC150094 in tibialis muscle included glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, amino acid, fructose and mannose metabolism, and cell signaling. The phenotypic/metabolic influence of TRC150094 on the liver and skeletal muscle of HFD-fed overweight rats suggests the potential clinical application of this iodothyronine analogue in ameliorating metabolic risk parameters altered by diet regimens.

  9. Novel remodeling of the mouse heart mitochondrial proteome in response to acute insulin stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Brian A; Yazdi, Puya G; Taylor, Jared F; Khattab, Omar S; Chen, Yu-Han; Chen, Yumay; Wang, Ping H

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to the pathophysiology of diabetic cardiomyopathy. The aim of this study was to investigate the acute changes in the mitochondrial proteome in response to insulin stimulation. Cardiac mitochondria from C57BL/6 mice after insulin stimulation were analyzed using two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis. MALDI-TOF MS/MS was utilized to identify differences. Two enzymes involved in metabolism and four structural proteins were identified. Succinyl-CoA ligase [ADP forming] subunit beta was identified as one of the differentially regulated proteins. Upon insulin stimulation, a relatively more acidic isoform of this protein was increased by 53% and its functional activity was decreased by ∼32%. This proteomic remodeling in response to insulin stimulation may play an important role in the normal and diabetic heart. PMID:26610654

  10. Quantitative Proteomic Profiles of Androgen Receptor Signaling in the Liver of Fathead Minnows Pimephalus promelas

    EPA Science Inventory

    Androgenic chemicals are present in the environment at concentrations that impair reproductive processes in fish. The objective of this experiment was to identify proteins altered by an androgen receptor agonist (17â-trenbolone) and antagonist (flutamide) in the liver. Female fa...

  11. Exposure to Cobalt Causes Transcriptomic and Proteomic Changes in Two Rat Liver Derived Cell Lines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    phosphofructokinase, liver; phospho- glycerate kinase 1; proteasome (prosome, macropain) subunit, beta type 3; solute carrier family 2 (facilitated glucose...oxidative stress caused by cobalt particles. Arch Toxicol 76: 1–7. 20. Moger WH (1983) Effects of the calcium-channel blockers cobalt, verapamil, and D600

  12. Proteomics reveals a core molecular response of Pseudomonas putida F1 to acute chromate challenge

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas putida is a model organism for bioremediation because of its remarkable metabolic versatility, extensive biodegradative functions, and ubiquity in contaminated soil environments. To further the understanding of molecular pathways responding to the heavy metal chromium(VI) [Cr(VI)], the proteome of aerobically grown, Cr(VI)-stressed P. putida strain F1 was characterized within the context of two disparate nutritional environments: rich (LB) media and minimal (M9L) media containing lactate as the sole carbon source. Results Growth studies demonstrated that F1 sensitivity to Cr(VI) was impacted substantially by nutrient conditions, with a carbon-source-dependent hierarchy (lactate > glucose >> acetate) observed in minimal media. Two-dimensional HPLC-MS/MS was employed to identify differential proteome profiles generated in response to 1 mM chromate under LB and M9L growth conditions. The immediate response to Cr(VI) in LB-grown cells was up-regulation of proteins involved in inorganic ion transport, secondary metabolite biosynthesis and catabolism, and amino acid metabolism. By contrast, the chromate-responsive proteome derived under defined minimal growth conditions was characterized predominantly by up-regulated proteins related to cell envelope biogenesis, inorganic ion transport, and motility. TonB-dependent siderophore receptors involved in ferric iron acquisition and amino acid adenylation domains characterized up-regulated systems under LB-Cr(VI) conditions, while DNA repair proteins and systems scavenging sulfur from alternative sources (e.g., aliphatic sulfonates) tended to predominate the up-regulated proteome profile obtained under M9L-Cr(VI) conditions. Conclusions Comparative analysis indicated that the core molecular response to chromate, irrespective of the nutritional conditions tested, comprised seven up-regulated proteins belonging to six different functional categories including transcription, inorganic ion transport

  13. 3-Tesla MRI Response to TACE in HCC (Liver Cancer)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-22

    Adult Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Resectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Stage A Adult Primary Liver Cancer (BCLC); Stage B Adult Primary Liver Cancer (BCLC)

  14. Stimuli-responsive electrodes detect oxidative stress and liver injury.

    PubMed

    Aran, Kiana; Parades, Jacobo; Rafi, Mohammad; Yau, Jennifer F; Acharya, Abhinav P; Zibinsky, Mikhail; Liepmann, Dorian; Murthy, Niren

    2015-02-25

    A digital point-of-care biosensor for measuring reactive oxygen species is presented based on novel reactive oxygen species responsive polymer-based electrodes. The biosensor is able to detect a drug-induced liver injury by monitoring the oxidative stress in the blood.

  15. Proteomics insights into DNA damage response and translating this knowledge to clinical strategies

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Jesper V.

    2016-01-01

    Genomic instability is a critical driver in the process of cancer formation. At the same time, inducing DNA damage by irradiation or genotoxic compounds constitutes a key therapeutic strategy to kill fast‐dividing cancer cells. Sensing of DNA lesions initiates a complex set of signalling pathways, collectively known as the DNA damage response (DDR). Deciphering DDR signalling pathways with high‐throughput technologies could provide insights into oncogenic transformation, metastasis formation and therapy responses, and could build a basis for better therapeutic interventions in cancer treatment. Mass spectrometry (MS)‐based proteomics emerged as a method of choice for global studies of proteins and their posttranslational modifications (PTMs). MS‐based studies of the DDR have aided in delineating DNA damage‐induced signalling responses. Those studies identified changes in abundance, interactions and modification of proteins in the context of genotoxic stress. Here we review ground‐breaking MS‐based proteomics studies, which analysed changes in protein abundance, protein‐protein and protein‐DNA interactions, phosphorylation, acetylation, ubiquitylation, SUMOylation and Poly(ADP‐ribose)ylation (PARylation) in the DDR. Finally, we provide an outlook on how proteomics studies of the DDR could aid clinical developments on multiple levels. PMID:27682984

  16. Comparative proteomic analysis of methyl jasmonate-induced defense responses in different rice cultivars.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunfeng; Nie, Yanfang; Zhang, Zhihui; Ye, Zhijian; Zou, Xiaotao; Zhang, Lianhui; Wang, Zhenzhong

    2014-05-01

    Jasmonate is an important endogenous chemical signal that plays a role in modulation of plant defense responses. To understand its mechanisms in regulation of rice resistance against the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae, comparative phenotype and proteomic analyses were undertaken using two near-isogenic cultivars with different levels of disease resistance. Methyl-jasmonate (MeJA) treatment significantly enhanced the resistance against M. oryzae in both cultivars but the treated resistant cultivar maintained a higher level of resistance than the same treated susceptible cultivars. Proteomic analysis revealed 26 and 16 MeJA-modulated proteins in resistant and susceptible cultivars, respectively, and both cultivars shared a common set of 13 proteins. Cumulatively, a total of 29 unique MeJA-influenced proteins were identified with many of them known to be associated with plant defense response and ROS accumulation. Consistent with the findings of proteomic analysis, MeJA treatment increased ROS accumulation in both cultivars with the resistant cultivar showing higher levels of ROS production and cell membrane damage than the susceptible cultivar. Taken together, our data add a new insight into the mechanisms of overall MeJA-induced rice defense response and provide a molecular basis of using MeJA to enhance fungal disease resistance in resistant and susceptible rice cultivars.

  17. High Conservation in Transcriptomic and Proteomic Response of White Sturgeon to Equipotent Concentrations of 2,3,7,8-TCDD, PCB 77, and Benzo[a]pyrene.

    PubMed

    Doering, Jon A; Tang, Song; Peng, Hui; Eisner, Bryanna K; Sun, Jianxian; Giesy, John P; Wiseman, Steve; Hecker, Markus

    2016-05-03

    Adverse effects associated with exposure to dioxin-like compounds (DLCs) are mediated primarily through activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). However, little is known about the cascades of events that link activation of the AHR to apical adverse effects. Therefore, this study used high-throughput, next-generation molecular tools to investigate similarities and differences in whole transcriptome and whole proteome responses to equipotent concentrations of three agonists of the AHR, 2,3,7,8-TCDD, PCB 77, and benzo[a]pyrene, in livers of a nonmodel fish, the white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus). A total of 926 and 658 unique transcripts were up- and down-regulated, respectively, by one or more of the three chemicals. Of the transcripts shared by responses to all three chemicals, 85% of up-regulated transcripts and 75% of down-regulated transcripts had the same magnitude of response. A total of 290 and 110 unique proteins were up- and down-regulated, respectively, by one or more of the three chemicals. Of the proteins shared by responses to all three chemicals, 70% of up-regulated proteins and 48% of down-regulated proteins had the same magnitude of response. Among treatments there was 68% similarity between the global transcriptome and global proteome. Pathway analysis revealed that perturbed physiological processes were indistinguishable between equipotent concentrations of the three chemicals. The results of this study contribute toward more completely describing adverse outcome pathways associated with activation of the AHR.

  18. Proteomic analysis of proteins bound to adsorption units of extracorporeal liver support system under clinical conditions.

    PubMed

    Mares, Jan; Thongboonkerd, Visith; Tuma, Zdenek; Moravec, Jiri; Karvunidis, Thomas; Matejovic, Martin

    2009-04-01

    Fractionated Plasma Separation, Adsorption and Dialysis (Prometheus) has a well-documented capacity to remove protein-bound organic toxins in patients with liver failure. However, the compositions of adsorbed proteins remain unknown. Elution of both adsorbers constituting Prometheus system was performed following a 6-h session in a patient with acute on chronic liver failure. Sodium dodecylsulphate was employed to elute proteins from the neutral adsorber (P1), while acetic acid was applied to the cationic one (P2). Eluted proteins were resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and identified by mass spectrometry (MS). Totally, 4113 and 8280 mg of proteins were obtained from P1 and P2 eluates, 2-DE yielded 148 and 163 protein fractions in P1 and P2, respectively. MS identified 18 unique proteins in P1, and 30 unique proteins in P2 sample. Proteins with the highest selective adsorption (as determined by eluate to plasma ratio) included transthyretin (37), trypsin-2 (29), prothrombin (23), hyaluronan-binding protein 2 (13) and plasma retinol-binding protein (8.7), all of which adsorbed to P2. We identified a large number of proteins removed by extracorporeal liver support system. A selective adsorption was demonstrated in a subset of proteins depending on the type of adsorber and proteins' characteristics.

  19. Proteomic responses of oceanic Synechococcus WH8102 to phosphate and zinc scarcity and cadmium additions

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Alysia D.; Saito, Mak A.

    2013-01-01

    Synechococcus sp. WH 8102 is a motile marine cyanobacterium isolated originally from the Sargasso Sea. To test the response of this organism to cadmium (Cd), generally considered a toxin, cultures were grown in a matrix of high and low zinc (Zn) and phosphate (PO43−) and were then exposed to an addition of 4.4 pM free Cd2+ at mid-log phase and harvested after 24 h. Whereas Zn and PO43− had little effect on overall growth rates, in the final 24 h of the experiment three growth effects were noticed: (i) low PO43− treatments showed increased growth rates relative to high PO43− treatments, (ii) the Zn/high PO43− treatment appeared to enter stationary phase, and (iii) Cd increased growth rates further in both the low PO43− and Zn treatments. Global proteomic analysis revealed that: (i) Zn appeared to be critical to the PO43− response in this organism, (ii) bacterial metallothionein (SmtA) appears correlated with PO43− stress-associated proteins, (iii) Cd has the greatest influence on the proteome at low PO43− and Zn, (iv) Zn buffered the effects of Cd, and (v) in the presence of both replete PO43− and added Cd the proteome showed little response to the presence of Zn. Similar trends in alkaline phosphate (ALP) and SmtA suggest the possibility of a Zn supply system to provide Zn to ALP that involves SmtA. In addition, proteome results were consistent with a previous transcriptome study of PO43− stress (with replete Zn) in this organism, including the greater relative abundance of ALP (PhoA), ABC phosphate binding protein (PstS) and other proteins. Yet with no Zn in this proteome experiment the PO43− response was quite different including the greater relative abundance of five hypothetical proteins with no increase in PhoA or PstS, suggesting that Zn nutritional levels are connected to the PO43− response in this cyanobacterium. Alternate ALP PhoX (Ca) was found to be a low abundance protein, suggesting that PhoA (Zn, Mg) may be more

  20. Quantitative proteomics of heavy metal stress responses in Sydney rock oysters.

    PubMed

    Muralidharan, Sridevi; Thompson, Emma; Raftos, David; Birch, Gavin; Haynes, Paul A

    2012-03-01

    Currently, there are few predictive biomarkers in key biomonitoring species, such as oysters, that can detect heavy metal pollution in coastal waterways. Several attributes make oysters superior to other organisms for positive biomonitoring of heavy metal pollution. In particular, they are filter feeders with a high capacity for bioaccumulation. In this study, we used two proteomics approaches, namely label-free shotgun proteomics based on SDS-PAGE gel separation and gas phase fractionation, to investigate the heavy metal stress responses of Sydney rock oysters. Protein samples were prepared from haemolymph of oysters exposed to 100 μg/L of PbCl(2), CuCl(2), or ZnCl(2) for 4 days in closed aquaria. Peptides were identified using a Bivalvia protein sequence database, due to the unavailability of a complete oyster genome sequence. Statistical analysis revealed 56 potential biomarker proteins, as well as several protein biosynthetic pathways to be greatly impacted by metal stress. These have the potential to be incorporated into bioassays for prevention and monitoring of heavy metal pollution in Australian oyster beds. The study confirms that proteomic analysis of biomonitoring species is a promising approach for assessing the effects of environmental pollution, and our experiments have provided insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying oyster stress responses.

  1. Proteomic response of β-lactamases-producing Enterobacter cloacae complex strain to cefotaxime-induced stress.

    PubMed

    Maravić, Ana; Cvjetan, Svjetlana; Konta, Marina; Ladouce, Romain; Martín, Fernando A

    2016-07-01

    Bacteria of the Enterobacter cloacae complex are among the ten most common pathogens causing nosocomial infections in the USA. Consequently, increased resistance to β-lactam antibiotics, particularly expanded-spectrum cephalosporins like cefotaxime (CTX), poses a serious threat. Differential In-Gel Electrophoresis (DIGE), followed by LC-MS/MS analysis and bioinformatics tools, was employed to investigate the survival mechanisms of a multidrug-resistant E. hormaechei subsp. steigerwaltii 51 carrying several β-lactamase-encoding genes, including the 'pandemic' blaCTX-M-15 After exposing the strain with sub-minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of CTX, a total of 1072 spots from the whole-cell proteome were detected, out of which 35 were differentially expressed (P ≤ 0.05, fold change ≥1.5). Almost 50% of these proteins were involved in cell metabolism and energy production, and then cell wall organization/virulence, stress response and transport. This is the first study investigating the whole-cell proteomic response related to the survival of β-lactamases-producing strain, belonging to the E. cloacae complex when exposed to β-lactam antibiotic. Our data support the theory of a multifactorial synergistic effect of diverse proteomic changes occurring in bacterial cells during antibiotic exposure, depicting the complexity of β-lactam resistance and giving us an insight in the key pathways mediating the antibiotic resistance in this emerging opportunistic pathogen.

  2. Molecular Responses of Mouse Macrophages to Copper and Copper Oxide Nanoparticles Inferred from Proteomic Analyses*

    PubMed Central

    Triboulet, Sarah; Aude-Garcia, Catherine; Carrière, Marie; Diemer, Hélène; Proamer, Fabienne; Habert, Aurélie; Chevallet, Mireille; Collin-Faure, Véronique; Strub, Jean-Marc; Hanau, Daniel; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Herlin-Boime, Nathalie; Rabilloud, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    The molecular responses of macrophages to copper-based nanoparticles have been investigated via a combination of proteomic and biochemical approaches, using the RAW264.7 cell line as a model. Both metallic copper and copper oxide nanoparticles have been tested, with copper ion and zirconium oxide nanoparticles used as controls. Proteomic analysis highlighted changes in proteins implicated in oxidative stress responses (superoxide dismutases and peroxiredoxins), glutathione biosynthesis, the actomyosin cytoskeleton, and mitochondrial proteins (especially oxidative phosphorylation complex subunits). Validation studies employing functional analyses showed that the increases in glutathione biosynthesis and in mitochondrial complexes observed in the proteomic screen were critical to cell survival upon stress with copper-based nanoparticles; pharmacological inhibition of these two pathways enhanced cell vulnerability to copper-based nanoparticles, but not to copper ions. Furthermore, functional analyses using primary macrophages derived from bone marrow showed a decrease in reduced glutathione levels, a decrease in the mitochondrial transmembrane potential, and inhibition of phagocytosis and of lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide production. However, only a fraction of these effects could be obtained with copper ions. In conclusion, this study showed that macrophage functions are significantly altered by copper-based nanoparticles. Also highlighted are the cellular pathways modulated by cells for survival and the exemplified cross-toxicities that can occur between copper-based nanoparticles and pharmacological agents. PMID:23882024

  3. Proteomics and metabolomics of Arabidopsis responses to perturbation of glucosinolate biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ya-zhou; Pang, Qiu-Ying; He, Yan; Zhu, Ning; Branstrom, Isabel; Yan, Xiu-Feng; Chen, Sixue

    2012-09-01

    To understand plant molecular networks of glucosinolate metabolism, perturbation of aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis was established using inducible RNA interference (RNAi) in Arabidopsis. Two RNAi lines were chosen for examining global protein and metabolite changes using complementary proteomics and metabolomics approaches. Proteins involved in metabolism including photosynthesis and hormone metabolism, protein binding, energy, stress, and defense showed marked responses to glucosinolate perturbation. In parallel, metabolomics revealed major changes in the levels of amino acids, carbohydrates, peptides, and hormones. The metabolomics data were correlated with the proteomics results and revealed intimate molecular connections between cellular pathways/processes and glucosinolate metabolism. This study has provided an unprecedented view of the molecular networks of glucosinolate metabolism and laid a foundation towards rationale glucosinolate engineering for enhanced defense and quality.

  4. Eucalyptus urograndis stem proteome is responsive to short-term cold stress.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, Gabriela de Almeida; Carlos, Natália Aparecida; Mazzafera, Paulo; Balbuena, Tiago Santana

    2015-05-01

    Eucalyptus urograndis is a hybrid eucalyptus of major economic importance to the Brazilian pulp and paper industry. Although widely used in forest nurseries around the country, little is known about the biochemical changes imposed by environmental stress in this species. In this study, we evaluated the changes in the stem proteome after short-term stimulation by exposure to low temperature. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry-based protein identification, 12 proteins were found to be differentially regulated and successfully identified after stringent database searches against a protein database from a closely related species (Eucalyptus grandis). The identification of these proteins indicated that the E. urograndis stem proteome responded quickly to low temperature, mostly by down-regulating specific proteins involved in energy metabolism, protein synthesis and signaling. The results of this study represent the first step in understanding the molecular and biochemical responses of E. urograndis to thermal stress.

  5. Global proteomic analysis of the chromate response in Arthrobacter sp strain FB24.

    SciTech Connect

    Henne, K. L.; Turse, J. E.; Nicora, C. D.; Lipton, M. S.; Tollaksen, S. L.; Lindberg, C.; Babnigg, G.; Giometti, C. S.; Nakatsu, C. H.; Thompson, D. K.; Konopka, A. E.; Biosciences Division; Purdue Univ.; PNNL

    2009-04-01

    A global proteomic evaluation of the response of Arthrobacter sp. strain FB24 to 5 and 20 mM Cr(VI) was conducted using both two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DGE) and liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC/LC-MS/MS). The changes in protein expression found with 2-DGE indicate alterations in central metabolism and amino acid synthesis. Proteome coverage increased from 22% with 2-DGE to 71% with LC/LC-MS/MS. The proteins exhibiting the highest levels of expression under Cr(VI) stress suggest intracellular sulfur limitation, which could be driven by competition for the sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) transporter by the chromate (CrO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) ion. These results are consistent with the growth defects seen with strain FB24 when Cr(VI) concentrations exceeded 5 mM.

  6. Global Proteomic Analysis of the Chromate Response in Arthrobacter sp strain FB24

    SciTech Connect

    Henne, Kristene L.; Turse, Joshua E.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Lipton, Mary S.; Tollaksen, Sandra L.; Lindberg, Carl; Babbnig, Gyorgy; Giometti, Carol S.; Nakatsu, Cindy N.; Thompson, Dorothea K.; Konopka, Allan

    2009-04-01

    A global proteomic evaluation of the response of Arthrobacter sp. strain FB24 to 5 mM and 20 mM Cr(VI) was conducted using both two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DGE) and liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC/LC-MS/MS). The changes in protein expression found with 2-DGE indicate alterations in central metabolism and amino acid synthesis. Proteome coverage increased from 22% with 2-DGE to 71% with LC/LC-MS/MS. The proteins exhibiting the highest levels of expression under Cr(VI) stress suggest intracellular sulfur limitation, which could be driven by competition for the sulfate (SO42-) transporter by the chromate (CrO42-) ion. These results are consistent with the growth defects seen with strain FB24 when Cr(VI) concentrations exceed 5 mM.

  7. Comparative Proteomics Reveals Important Viral-Host Interactions in HCV-Infected Human Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, BenBen; Zhou, Jianhua; Wang, Tony T.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) poses a global threat to public health. HCV envelop protein E2 is the major component on the virus envelope, which plays an important role in virus entry and morphogenesis. Here, for the first time, we affinity purified E2 complex formed in HCV-infected human hepatoma cells and conducted comparative mass spectrometric analyses. 85 cellular proteins and three viral proteins were successfully identified in three independent trials, among which alphafetoprotein (AFP), UDP-glucose: glycoprotein glucosyltransferase 1 (UGT1) and HCV NS4B were further validated as novel E2 binding partners. Subsequent functional characterization demonstrated that gene silencing of UGT1 in human hepatoma cell line Huh7.5.1 markedly decreased the production of infectious HCV, indicating a regulatory role of UGT1 in viral lifecycle. Domain mapping experiments showed that HCV E2-NS4B interaction requires the transmembrane domains of the two proteins. Altogether, our proteomics study has uncovered key viral and cellular factors that interact with E2 and provided new insights into our understanding of HCV infection. PMID:26808496

  8. Proteomic analysis of cardiac response to thermal acclimation in the eurythermal goby fish Gillichthys mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Jayasundara, Nishad; Tomanek, Lars; Dowd, W Wesley; Somero, George N

    2015-05-01

    Cardiac function is thought to play a central role in determining thermal optima and tolerance limits in teleost fishes. Investigating proteomic responses to temperature in cardiac tissues may provide insights into mechanisms supporting the thermal plasticity of cardiac function. Here, we utilized a global proteomic analysis to investigate changes in cardiac protein abundance in response to temperature acclimation (transfer from 13°C to 9, 19 and 26°C) in a eurythermal goby, Gillichthys mirabilis. Proteomic data revealed 122 differentially expressed proteins across acclimation groups, 37 of which were identified using tandem mass-spectrometry. These 37 proteins are involved in energy metabolism, mitochondrial regulation, iron homeostasis, cytoprotection against hypoxia, and cytoskeletal organization. Compared with the 9 and 26°C groups, proteins involved in energy metabolism increased in 19°C-acclimated fish, indicating an overall increase in the capacity for ATP production. Creatine kinase abundance increased in 9°C-acclimated fish, suggesting an important role for the phosphocreatine energy shuttle in cold-acclimated hearts. Both 9 and 26°C fish also increased abundance of hexosaminidase, a protein directly involved in post-hypoxia stress cytoprotection of cardiac tissues. Cytoskeletal restructuring appears to occur in all acclimation groups; however, the most prominent effect was detected in 26°C-acclimated fish, which exhibited significantly increased actin levels. Overall, proteomic analysis of cardiac tissue suggests that the capacity to adjust ATP-generating processes is crucial to the thermal plasticity of cardiac function. Furthermore, G. mirabilis may optimize cellular functions at temperatures near 19°C, which lies within the species' preferred temperature range.

  9. Serum proteome analysis of vivax malaria: An insight into the disease pathogenesis and host immune response.

    PubMed

    Ray, Sandipan; Kamath, Karthik S; Srivastava, Rajneesh; Raghu, Dinesh; Gollapalli, Kishore; Jain, Rekha; Gupta, Shipra V; Ray, Sayantan; Taur, Santosh; Dhali, Snigdha; Gogtay, Nithya; Thatte, Urmila; Srikanth, Rapole; Patankar, Swati; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2012-06-06

    Vivax malaria is the most widely distributed human malaria resulting in 80-300 million clinical cases every year. It causes severe infection and mortality but is generally regarded as a benign disease and has not been investigated in detail. The present study aimed to perform human serum proteome analysis in a malaria endemic area in India to identify potential serum biomarkers for vivax malaria and understand host response. The proteomic analysis was performed on 16 age and gender matched subjects (vivax patients and control) in duplicate. Protein extraction protocols were optimized for large coverage of the serum proteome and to obtain high-resolution data. Identification of 67 differentially expressed and statistically significant (Student's t-test; p<0.05) protein spots was established by MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. Many of the identified proteins such as apolipoprotein A and E, serum amyloid A and P, haptoglobin, ceruloplasmin, and hemopexin are interesting from a diagnostic point of view and could further be studied as potential serum biomarkers. The differentially expressed serum proteins in vivax malaria identified in this study were subjected to functional pathway analysis using multiple software, including Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA), Protein ANalysis THrough Evolutionary Relationships (PANTHER) and Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) functional annotation tool for better understanding of the biological context of the identified proteins, their involvement in various physiological pathways and association with disease pathogenesis. Functional pathway analysis of the differentially expressed proteins suggested the modulation of multiple vital physiological pathways, including acute phase response signaling, complement and coagulation cascades, hemostasis and vitamin D metabolism pathway due to this parasitic infection. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteomics: The clinical link.

  10. Proteomic Insight into the Response of Arabidopsis Chloroplasts to Darkness

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Yu, Qingbo; Xiong, Haibo; Wang, Jun; Chen, Sixue; Yang, Zhongnan; Dai, Shaojun

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast function in photosynthesis is essential for plant growth and development. It is well-known that chloroplasts respond to various light conditions. However, it remains poorly understood about how chloroplasts respond to darkness. In this study, we found 81 darkness-responsive proteins in Arabidopsis chloroplasts under 8 h darkness treatment. Most of the proteins are nucleus-encoded, indicating that chloroplast darkness response is closely regulated by the nucleus. Among them, 17 ribosome proteins were obviously reduced after darkness treatment. The protein expressional patterns and physiological changes revealed the mechanisms in chloroplasts in response to darkness, e.g., (1) inhibition of photosystem II resulted in preferential cyclic electron flow around PSI; (2) promotion of starch degradation; (3) inhibition of chloroplastic translation; and (4) regulation by redox and jasmonate signaling. The results have improved our understanding of molecular regulatory mechanisms in chloroplasts under darkness. PMID:27137770

  11. Proteomic responses of drought-tolerant and drought-sensitive cotton varieties to drought stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiyan; Ni, Zhiyong; Chen, Quanjia; Guo, Zhongjun; Gao, Wenwei; Su, Xiujuan; Qu, Yanying

    2016-06-01

    Drought, one of the most widespread factors reducing agricultural crop productivity, affects biological processes such as development, architecture, flowering and senescence. Although protein analysis techniques and genome sequencing have made facilitated the proteomic study of cotton, information on genetic differences associated with proteomic changes in response to drought between different cotton genotypes is lacking. To determine the effects of drought stress on cotton seedlings, we used two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry to comparatively analyze proteome of drought-responsive proteins during the seedling stage in two cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) cultivars, drought-tolerant KK1543 and drought-sensitive Xinluzao26. A total of 110 protein spots were detected on 2-DE maps, of which 56 were identified by MALDI-TOF and MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. The identified proteins were mainly associated with metabolism (46.4 %), antioxidants (14.2 %), and transport and cellular structure (23.2 %). Some key proteins had significantly different expression patterns between the two genotypes. In particular, 5-methyltetrahydropteroyltriglutamate-homocysteine methyltransferase, UDP-D-glucose pyrophosphorylase and ascorbate peroxidase were up-regulated in KK1543 compared with Xinluzao26. Under drought stress conditions, the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase catalytic subunit, a 14-3-3g protein, translation initiation factor 5A and pathogenesis-related protein 10 were up-regulated in KK1543, whereas ribosomal protein S12, actin, cytosolic copper/zinc superoxide dismutase, protein disulfide isomerase, S-adenosylmethionine synthase and cysteine synthase were down-regulated in Xinluzao26. This work represents the first characterization of proteomic changes that occur in response to drought in roots of cotton plants. These differentially expressed proteins may be related to

  12. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis Provides Novel Insights into Cold Stress Responses in Petunia Seedlings.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Huilin; Ning, Luyun; Li, Bei; Bao, Manzhu

    2016-01-01

    Low temperature is a major adverse environmental factor that impairs petunia growth and development. To better understand the molecular mechanisms of cold stress adaptation of petunia plants, a quantitative proteomic analysis using iTRAQ technology was performed to detect the effects of cold stress on protein expression profiles in petunia seedlings which had been subjected to 2°C for 5 days. Of the 2430 proteins whose levels were quantitated, a total of 117 proteins were discovered to be differentially expressed under low temperature stress in comparison to unstressed controls. As an initial study, 44 proteins including well known and novel cold-responsive proteins were successfully annotated. By integrating the results of two independent Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analyses, seven common GO terms were found of which "oxidation-reduction process" was the most notable for the cold-responsive proteins. By using the subcellular localization tool Plant-mPLoc predictor, as much as 40.2% of the cold-responsive protein group was found to be located within chloroplasts, suggesting that the chloroplast proteome is particularly affected by cold stress. Gene expression analyses of 11 cold-responsive proteins by real time PCR demonstrated that the mRNA levels were not strongly correlated with the respective protein levels. Further activity assay of anti-oxidative enzymes showed different alterations in cold treated petunia seedlings. Our investigation has highlighted the role of antioxidation mechanisms and also epigenetic factors in the regulation of cold stress responses. Our work has provided novel insights into the plant response to cold stress and should facilitate further studies regarding the molecular mechanisms which determine how plant cells cope with environmental perturbation. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002189.

  13. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis Provides Novel Insights into Cold Stress Responses in Petunia Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Huilin; Ning, Luyun; Li, Bei; Bao, Manzhu

    2016-01-01

    Low temperature is a major adverse environmental factor that impairs petunia growth and development. To better understand the molecular mechanisms of cold stress adaptation of petunia plants, a quantitative proteomic analysis using iTRAQ technology was performed to detect the effects of cold stress on protein expression profiles in petunia seedlings which had been subjected to 2°C for 5 days. Of the 2430 proteins whose levels were quantitated, a total of 117 proteins were discovered to be differentially expressed under low temperature stress in comparison to unstressed controls. As an initial study, 44 proteins including well known and novel cold-responsive proteins were successfully annotated. By integrating the results of two independent Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analyses, seven common GO terms were found of which “oxidation-reduction process” was the most notable for the cold-responsive proteins. By using the subcellular localization tool Plant-mPLoc predictor, as much as 40.2% of the cold-responsive protein group was found to be located within chloroplasts, suggesting that the chloroplast proteome is particularly affected by cold stress. Gene expression analyses of 11 cold-responsive proteins by real time PCR demonstrated that the mRNA levels were not strongly correlated with the respective protein levels. Further activity assay of anti-oxidative enzymes showed different alterations in cold treated petunia seedlings. Our investigation has highlighted the role of antioxidation mechanisms and also epigenetic factors in the regulation of cold stress responses. Our work has provided novel insights into the plant response to cold stress and should facilitate further studies regarding the molecular mechanisms which determine how plant cells cope with environmental perturbation. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002189. PMID:26941746

  14. An overview of stress response proteomes in Listeria monocytogenes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Listeria monocytogenes adapts to diverse stress conditions including cold, osmotic, heat, acid, and alkali stresses encountered during food processing and preservation which is a serious food safety threat. In this review, we have presented the major findings on this bacterium’s stress response prot...

  15. Proteomic Responses in Arabidopsis thaliana Seedlings Treated with Ethylene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ethylene (ET) is a volatile plant growth hormone that most famously modulates fruit ripening, but it also controls plant growth, development and stress responses. In Arabidopsis thaliana, ET is perceived by receptors in the endoplasmic reticulum, and a signal is transduced through a protein kinase,...

  16. Plant Organellar Proteomics in Response to Dehydration: Turning Protein Repertoire into Insights

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Deepti B.; Rai, Yogita; Gayali, Saurabh; Chakraborty, Subhra; Chakraborty, Niranjan

    2016-01-01

    Stress adaptation or tolerance in plants is a complex phenomenon involving changes in physiological and metabolic processes. Plants must develop elaborate networks of defense mechanisms, and adapt to and survive for sustainable agriculture. Water-deficit or dehydration is the most critical environmental factor that plants are exposed to during their life cycle, which influences geographical distribution and productivity of many crop species. The cellular responses to dehydration are orchestrated by a series of multidirectional relays of biochemical events at organelle level. The new challenge is to dissect the underlying mechanisms controlling the perception of stress signals and their transmission to cellular machinery for activation of adaptive responses. The completeness of current descriptions of spatial distribution of proteins, the relevance of subcellular locations in diverse functional processes, and the changes of protein abundance in response to dehydration hold the key to understanding how plants cope with such stress conditions. During past decades, organellar proteomics has proved to be useful not only for deciphering reprograming of plant responses to dehydration, but also to dissect stress–responsive pathways. This review summarizes a range of organellar proteomics investigations under dehydration to gain a holistic view of plant responses to water-deficit conditions, which may facilitate future efforts to develop genetically engineered crops for better adaptation. PMID:27148291

  17. Overlap of proteome changes in Medicago truncatula in response to auxin and Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    van Noorden, Giel E; Kerim, Tursun; Goffard, Nicolas; Wiblin, Robert; Pellerone, Flavia I; Rolfe, Barry G; Mathesius, Ulrike

    2007-06-01

    We used proteome analysis to identify proteins induced during nodule initiation and in response to auxin in Medicago truncatula. From previous experiments, which found a positive correlation between auxin levels and nodule numbers in the M. truncatula supernodulation mutant sunn (supernumerary nodules), we hypothesized (1) that auxin mediates protein changes during nodulation and (2) that auxin responses might differ between the wild type and the supernodulating sunn mutant during nodule initiation. Increased expression of the auxin response gene GH3:beta-glucuronidase was found during nodule initiation in M. truncatula, similar to treatment of roots with auxin. We then used difference gel electrophoresis and tandem mass spectrometry to compare proteomes of wild-type and sunn mutant roots after 24 h of treatment with Sinorhizobium meliloti, auxin, or a control. We identified 131 of 270 proteins responding to treatment with S. meliloti and/or auxin, and 39 of 89 proteins differentially displayed between the wild type and sunn. The majority of proteins changed similarly in response to auxin and S. meliloti after 24 h in both genotypes, supporting hypothesis 1. Proteins differentially accumulated between untreated wild-type and sunn roots also showed changes in auxin response, consistent with altered auxin levels in sunn. However, differences between the genotypes after S. meliloti inoculation were largely not due to differential auxin responses. The role of the identified candidate proteins in nodule initiation and the requirement for their induction by auxin could be tested in future functional studies.

  18. Proteomic profile of Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos snails upon infection with the carcinogenic liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini

    PubMed Central

    Prasopdee, Sattrachai; Tesana, Smarn; Cantacessi, Cinzia; Laha, Thewarach; Mulvenna, Jason; Grams, Rudi; Loukas, Alex; Sotillo, Javier

    2014-01-01

    The snail Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos acts as the first intermediate host for the human liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini, the major cause of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) in Northeast Thailand. The undisputed link between CCA and O. viverrini infection has precipitated efforts to understand the molecular basis of host-parasite interactions with a view to ultimately developing new control strategies to combat this carcinogenic infection. To date most effort has focused on the interactions between the parasite and its human host, and little is known about the molecular relationships between the liver fluke and its snail intermediate host. In the present study we analyse the protein expression changes in different tissues of B. siamensis goniomphalos induced by infection with larval O. viverrini using iTRAQ labelling technology. We show that O. viverrini infection downregulates the expression of oxidoreductases and catalytic enzymes, while stress-related and motor proteins are upregulated. The present work could serve as a basis for future studies on the proteins implicated in the susceptibility/resistance of B. siamensis goniomphalos to O. viverrini, as well as studies on other pulmonate snail intermediate hosts of various parasitic flukes that infect humans. PMID:25284051

  19. Comparative proteomic analysis of thiol proteins in the liver after oxidative stress induced by diethylnitrosamine.

    PubMed

    Aparicio-Bautista, Diana I; Pérez-Carreón, Julio I; Gutiérrez-Nájera, Nora; Reyes-Grajeda, Juan P; Arellanes-Robledo, Jaime; Vásquez-Garzón, Verónica R; Jiménez-García, Mónica N; Villa-Treviño, Saúl

    2013-12-01

    Conversion of protein -SH groups to disulfides is an early event during protein oxidation, which has prompted great interest in the study of thiol proteins. Chemical carcinogenesis is strongly associated with the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The goal of this study was to detect thiol proteins that are sensitive to ROS generated during diethylnitrosamine (DEN) metabolism in the rat liver. DEN has been widely used to induce experimental hepatocellular carcinoma. We used modified redox-differential gel electrophoresis (redox-DIGE method) and mass spectrometry MALDI-TOF/TOF to identify differential oxidation protein profiles associated with carcinogen exposure. Our analysis revealed a time-dependent increase in the number of oxidized thiol proteins after carcinogen treatment; some of these proteins have antioxidant activity, including thioredoxin, peroxirredoxin 2, peroxiredoxin 6 and glutathione S-transferase alpha-3. According to functional classifications, the identified proteins in our study included chaperones, oxidoreductases, activity isomerases, hydrolases and other protein-binding partners. This study demonstrates that oxidative stress generated by DEN tends to increase gradually through DEN metabolism, causes time-dependent necrosis in the liver and has an oxidative effect on thiol proteins, thereby increasing the number of oxidized thiol proteins. Furthermore, these events occurred during the hepatocarcinogenesis initiation period.

  20. Quantitative Proteomics Reveals the Roles of Peroxisome-associated Proteins in Antiviral Innate Immune Responses*

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Mao-Tian; Qin, Yue; Li, Mi; Chen, Chen; Chen, Xi; Shu, Hong-Bing; Guo, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Compared with whole-cell proteomic analysis, subcellular proteomic analysis is advantageous not only for the increased coverage of low abundance proteins but also for generating organelle-specific data containing information regarding dynamic protein movement. In the present study, peroxisome-enriched fractions from Sendai virus (SeV)-infected or uninfected HepG2 cells were obtained and subjected to quantitative proteomics analysis. We identified 311 proteins that were significantly changed by SeV infection. Among these altered proteins, 25 are immune response-related proteins. Further bioinformatic analysis indicated that SeV infection inhibits cell cycle-related proteins and membrane attack complex-related proteins, all of which are beneficial for the survival and replication of SeV within host cells. Using Luciferase reporter assays on several innate immune-related reporters, we performed functional analysis on 11 candidate proteins. We identified LGALS3BP and CALU as potential negative regulators of the virus-induced activation of the type I interferons. PMID:26124285

  1. Response to oxidative stress in Paracoccidioides yeast cells as determined by proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    de Arruda Grossklaus, Daciene; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; Vieira Rezende, Tereza Cristina; Borges, Clayton Luiz; de Oliveira, Milton Adriano Pelli; Parente, Juliana Alves; de Almeida Soares, Célia Maria

    2013-05-01

    An efficient oxidative stress response is important to the fungal pathogen Paracoccidioides to survive within the human host. In this study, oxidative stress was mimicked by exposure of yeast cells to hydrogen peroxide (2 mM H2O2). To investigate the effect of H2O2 on the proteome of Paracoccidioides, we used a large scale 2-DE protein gel electrophoresis approach to analyze differentially expressed proteins/isoforms that were detected in early (2 h) and in late (6 h) oxidative stress treatments. All proteins/isoforms were grouped based on their functional categories that revealed a global activation of antioxidant enzymes, such as catalase, superoxide dismutase, cytochrome C peroxidase and thioredoxin. A view of the metabolic cell profile, as determined by proteomics, depicted a shift in the yeast cells metabolism as suggested by the activation of the pentose phosphate pathway, a great source of cellular reducing power in the form of NADPH. Additionally, in silico analyzes depicted 34 oxidoreductases proteins/isoforms putatively involved with defense against oxidative stress. Confirmatory assays of enzymatic activity, flow cytometry, transcript levels and NADPH measurements, produced data in agreement with proteomic analysis.

  2. Transcriptional and Proteomic Profiling of Aspergillus flavipes in Response to Sulfur Starvation

    PubMed Central

    El-Sayed, Ashraf S. A.; Yassin, Marwa A.; Ali, Gul Shad

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus flavipes has received considerable interest due to its potential to produce therapeutic enzymes involved in sulfur amino acid metabolism. In natural habitats, A. flavipes survives under sulfur limitations by mobilizing endogenous and exogenous sulfur to operate diverse cellular processes. Sulfur limitation affects virulence and pathogenicity, and modulates proteome of sulfur assimilating enzymes of several fungi. However, there are no previous reports aimed at exploring effects of sulfur limitation on the regulation of A. flavipes sulfur metabolism enzymes at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional and proteomic levels. In this report, we show that sulfur limitation affects morphological and physiological responses of A. flavipes. Transcription and enzymatic activities of several key sulfur metabolism genes, ATP-sulfurylase, sulfite reductase, methionine permease, cysteine synthase, cystathionine β- and γ-lyase, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase were increased under sulfur starvation conditions. A 50 kDa protein band was strongly induced by sulfur starvation, and the proteomic analyses of this protein band using LC-MS/MS revealed similarity to many proteins involved in the sulfur metabolism pathway. PMID:26633307

  3. Evaluating Melanoma Drug Response and Therapeutic Escape with Quantitative Proteomics*

    PubMed Central

    Rebecca, Vito W.; Wood, Elizabeth; Fedorenko, Inna V.; Paraiso, Kim H. T.; Haarberg, H. Eirik; Chen, Yi; Xiang, Yun; Sarnaik, Amod; Gibney, Geoffrey T.; Sondak, Vernon K.; Koomen, John M.; Smalley, Keiran S. M.

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of cancer therapy into complex regimens with multiple drugs requires novel approaches for the development and evaluation of companion biomarkers. Liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (LC-MRM) is a versatile platform for biomarker measurement. In this study, we describe the development and use of the LC-MRM platform to study the adaptive signaling responses of melanoma cells to inhibitors of HSP90 (XL888) and MEK (AZD6244). XL888 had good anti-tumor activity against NRAS mutant melanoma cell lines as well as BRAF mutant cells with acquired resistance to BRAF inhibitors both in vitro and in vivo. LC-MRM analysis showed HSP90 inhibition to be associated with decreased expression of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases, modules in the PI3K/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, and the MAPK/CDK4 signaling axis in NRAS mutant melanoma cell lines and the inhibition of PI3K/AKT signaling in BRAF mutant melanoma xenografts with acquired vemurafenib resistance. The LC-MRM approach targeting more than 80 cancer signaling proteins was highly sensitive and could be applied to fine needle aspirates from xenografts and clinical melanoma specimens (using 50 μg of total protein). We further showed MEK inhibition to be associated with signaling through the NFκB and WNT signaling pathways, as well as increased receptor tyrosine kinase expression and activation. Validation studies identified PDGF receptor β signaling as a potential escape mechanism from MEK inhibition, which could be overcome through combined use of AZD6244 and the PDGF receptor inhibitor, crenolanib. Together, our studies show LC-MRM to have unique value as a platform for the systems level understanding of the molecular mechanisms of drug response and therapeutic escape. This work provides the proof-of-principle for the future development of LC-MRM assays for monitoring drug responses in the clinic. PMID:24760959

  4. Proteomic profile of the Bradysia odoriphaga in response to the microbial secondary metabolite benzothiazole.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunhe; Cui, Kaidi; Xu, Chunmei; Wang, Qiuhong; Wang, Yao; Zhang, Zhengqun; Liu, Feng; Mu, Wei

    2016-11-24

    Benzothiazole, a microbial secondary metabolite, has been demonstrated to possess fumigant activity against Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, Ditylenchus destructor and Bradysia odoriphaga. However, to facilitate the development of novel microbial pesticides, the mode of action of benzothiazole needs to be elucidated. Here, we employed iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics analysis to investigate the effects of benzothiazole on the proteomic expression of B. odoriphaga. In response to benzothiazole, 92 of 863 identified proteins in B. odoriphaga exhibited altered levels of expression, among which 14 proteins were related to the action mechanism of benzothiazole, 11 proteins were involved in stress responses, and 67 proteins were associated with the adaptation of B. odoriphaga to benzothiazole. Further bioinformatics analysis indicated that the reduction in energy metabolism, inhibition of the detoxification process and interference with DNA and RNA synthesis were potentially associated with the mode of action of benzothiazole. The myosin heavy chain, succinyl-CoA synthetase and Ca(+)-transporting ATPase proteins may be related to the stress response. Increased expression of proteins involved in carbohydrate metabolism, energy production and conversion pathways was responsible for the adaptive response of B. odoriphaga. The results of this study provide novel insight into the molecular mechanisms of benzothiazole at a large-scale translation level and will facilitate the elucidation of the mechanism of action of benzothiazole.

  5. Proteomic profile of the Bradysia odoriphaga in response to the microbial secondary metabolite benzothiazole

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yunhe; Cui, Kaidi; Xu, Chunmei; Wang, Qiuhong; Wang, Yao; Zhang, Zhengqun; Liu, Feng; Mu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Benzothiazole, a microbial secondary metabolite, has been demonstrated to possess fumigant activity against Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, Ditylenchus destructor and Bradysia odoriphaga. However, to facilitate the development of novel microbial pesticides, the mode of action of benzothiazole needs to be elucidated. Here, we employed iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics analysis to investigate the effects of benzothiazole on the proteomic expression of B. odoriphaga. In response to benzothiazole, 92 of 863 identified proteins in B. odoriphaga exhibited altered levels of expression, among which 14 proteins were related to the action mechanism of benzothiazole, 11 proteins were involved in stress responses, and 67 proteins were associated with the adaptation of B. odoriphaga to benzothiazole. Further bioinformatics analysis indicated that the reduction in energy metabolism, inhibition of the detoxification process and interference with DNA and RNA synthesis were potentially associated with the mode of action of benzothiazole. The myosin heavy chain, succinyl-CoA synthetase and Ca+-transporting ATPase proteins may be related to the stress response. Increased expression of proteins involved in carbohydrate metabolism, energy production and conversion pathways was responsible for the adaptive response of B. odoriphaga. The results of this study provide novel insight into the molecular mechanisms of benzothiazole at a large-scale translation level and will facilitate the elucidation of the mechanism of action of benzothiazole. PMID:27883048

  6. [Heat-responsive mechanisms in plants revealed by proteomic analysis: A review].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-ming; Zhao, Qi; Yin, Ze-peng; Xu, Chen-xi; Wang, Quan-hua; Dai, Shao-jun

    2015-08-01

    Heat stress is a major abiotic stress that limits plant growth and productivity. In recent years, proteomic investigations provide more information for understanding the sophisticated heat-responsive molecular mechanism in plants at systematic biological level. The heat-responsive proteomic patterns in several plants, i. e., model plants (Arabidopsis thaliana), staple food crops (soybean, rice and wheat), heat-tolerant plants (Agrostis stolonifera, Portulaca oleracea, and Carissa spinarum), grapevine, Populus euphratica, Medicago sativa, and Pinellia ternate, were reported. A total of 838 heat-responsive proteins have been identified in these studies. Among them, 534 proteins were induced and the expression of 304 proteins was reduced in plants under heat stress. In this paper, the diverse protein patterns in plants under various heat stress conditions (30-45 °C for 0-10 d) were analyzed integratively. This provided new evidences and clues for further interpreting the signaling and metabolic pathways, e.g., signaling, stress and defense, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, photosynthesis, transcription, protein synthesis and fate, membrane and transport, in heat-responsive networks, and laid a foundation for a holistic understanding of the molecular regulatory mechanism in plants in response to heat stress.

  7. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of the Response of Maize (Zea mays L.) Leaves to Long Photoperiod Condition

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liuji; Tian, Lei; Wang, Shunxi; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Ping; Tian, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Huimin; Liu, Haiping; Chen, Yanhui

    2016-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.), an important industrial material and food source, shows an astonishing environmental adaptation. A remarkable feature of its post-domestication adaptation from tropical to temperate environments is adaptation to a long photoperiod (LP). Many photoperiod-related genes have been identified in previous transcriptomics analysis, but proteomics shows less evidence for this mechanism of photoperiod response. In this study, we sampled newly expanded leaves of maize at the three- and six-leaf stages from an LP-sensitive introgression line H496, the donor CML288, LP-insensitive inbred line, and recurrent parent Huangzao4 (HZ4) grown under long days (15 h light and 9 h dark). To characterize the proteomic changes in response to LP, the iTRAQ-labeling method was used to determine the proteome profiles of plants exposed to LP. A total of 943 proteins differentially expressed at the three- and six-leaf stages in HZ4 and H496 were identified. Functional analysis was performed by which the proteins were classified into stress defense, signal transduction, carbohydrate metabolism, protein metabolism, energy production, and transport functional groups using the WEGO online tool. The enriched gene ontology categories among the identified proteins were identified statistically with the Cytoscape plugin ClueGO + Cluepedia. Twenty Gene Ontology terms showed the highest significance, including those associated with protein processing in the endoplasmic reticulum, splicesome, ribosome, glyoxylate, dicarboxylate metabolism, L-malate dehydrogenase activity, and RNA transport. In addition, for subcellular location, all proteins showed significant enrichment of the mitochondrial outer membrane. The sugars producted by photosynthesis in plants are also a pivotal metabolic output in the circadian regulation. The results permit the prediction of several crucial proteins to photoperiod response and provide a foundation for further study of the influence of LP treatments on

  8. Interclonal proteomic responses to predator exposure in Daphnia magna may depend on predator composition of habitats.

    PubMed

    Otte, Kathrin A; Schrank, Isabella; Fröhlich, Thomas; Arnold, Georg J; Laforsch, Christian

    2015-08-01

    Phenotypic plasticity, the ability of one genotype to express different phenotypes in response to changing environmental conditions, is one of the most common phenomena characterizing the living world and is not only relevant for the ecology but also for the evolution of species. Daphnia, the water flea, is a textbook example for predator-induced phenotypic plastic defences; however, the analysis of molecular mechanisms underlying these inducible defences is still in its early stages. We exposed Daphnia magna to chemical cues of the predator Triops cancriformis to identify key processes underlying plastic defensive trait formation. To get a more comprehensive idea of this phenomenon, we studied four genotypes with five biological replicates each, originating from habitats characterized by different predator composition, ranging from predator-free habitats to habitats containing T. cancriformis. We analysed the morphologies as well as proteomes of predator-exposed and control animals. Three genotypes showed morphological changes when the predator was present. Using a high-throughput proteomics approach, we found 294 proteins which were significantly altered in their abundance after predator exposure in a general or genotype-dependent manner. Proteins connected to genotype-dependent responses were related to the cuticle, protein synthesis and calcium binding, whereas the yolk protein vitellogenin increased in abundance in all genotypes, indicating their involvement in a more general response. Furthermore, genotype-dependent responses at the proteome level were most distinct for the only genotype that shares its habitat with Triops. Altogether, our study provides new insights concerning genotype-dependent and general molecular processes involved in predator-induced phenotypic plasticity in D. magna.

  9. Proteomic Analysis of and Immune Responses to Ehrlichia chaffeensis Lipoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Hai; Lin, Mingqun ..; Wang, Xueqi; Kikuchi, Takane; Mottaz, Heather M.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Rikihisa, Yasuko

    2008-08-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis is an obligatory intracellular Gram-negative bacterium and is the etiologic agent of human monocytic ehrlichiosis (HME). Although E. chaffeensis induces generation of several cytokines and chemokines by leukocytes, E. chaffeensis lacks LPS and peptidoglycan. Bioinfomatic analysis of the E. chaffeensis genome, however, predicted genes encoding fifteen lipoproteins and three posttranslational lipoprotein processing enzymes. The present study showed that using multidimensional liquid chromatography followed by tandem mass spectrometry, all predicted lipoproteins as well as lipoprotein-processing enzymes were expressed by E. chaffeensis cultured in human promyelocytic leukemia cell line, HL-60. Consistent with this observation, a signal peptidase II inhibitor, globomycin was found to inhibit E. chaffeensis infection and lipoprotein processing in HL-60 cell culture. To study in vivo E.chaffeensis lipoprotein expression and host immune responses to E. chaffeensis lipoproteins, thirteen E. chaffeensis lipoprotein genes were cloned into a mammalian expression vector.

  10. Proteomic responses of blue mussel (Mytilus) congeners to temperature acclimation.

    PubMed

    Fields, Peter A; Zuzow, Marcus J; Tomanek, Lars

    2012-04-01

    The ability to acclimate to variable environmental conditions affects the biogeographic range of species, their success at colonizing new habitats, and their likelihood of surviving rapid anthropogenic climate change. Here we compared responses to temperature acclimation (4 weeks at 7, 13 and 19°C) in gill tissue of the warm-adapted intertidal blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis, an invasive species in the northeastern Pacific, and the cold-adapted M. trossulus, the native congener in the region, to better understand the physiological differences underlying the ongoing competition. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and tandem mass spectrometry, we showed that warm acclimation caused changes in cytoskeletal composition and proteins of energy metabolism in both species, consistent with increasing rates of filtration and respiration due to increased ciliary activity. During cold acclimation, changes in cytoskeletal proteins were accompanied by increasing abundances of oxidative stress proteins and molecular chaperones, possibly because of the increased production of aldehydes as indicated by the upregulation of aldehyde dehydrogenase. The cold-adapted M. trossulus showed increased abundances of molecular chaperones at 19°C, but M. galloprovincialis did not, suggesting that the two species differ in their long-term upper thermal limits. In contrast, the warm-adapted M. galloprovincialis showed a stronger response to cold acclimation than M. trossulus, including changes in abundance in more proteins and differing protein expression profiles between 7 and 13°C, a pattern absent in M. trossulus. In general, increasing levels of oxidative stress proteins inversely correlate with modifications in Krebs cycle and electron transport chain proteins, indicating a trade-off between oxidative stress resistance and energy production. Overall, our results help explain why M. galloprovincialis has replaced M. trossulus in southern California over the last century, but

  11. Morphological and proteomic responses of Eruca sativa exposed to silver nanoparticles or silver nitrate.

    PubMed

    Vannini, Candida; Domingo, Guido; Onelli, Elisabetta; Prinsi, Bhakti; Marsoni, Milena; Espen, Luca; Bracale, Marcella

    2013-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are widely used in commercial products, and there are growing concerns about their impact on the environment. Information about the molecular interaction of AgNPs with plants is lacking. To increase our understanding of the mechanisms involved in plant responses to AgNPs and to differentiate between particle specific and ionic silver effects we determined the morphological and proteomic changes induced in Eruca sativa (commonly called rocket) in response to AgNPs or AgNO3. Seedlings were treated for 5 days with different concentrations of AgNPs or AgNO3. A similar increase in root elongation was observed when seedlings were exposed to 10 mg Ag L(1) of either PVP-AgNPs or AgNO3. At this concentration we performed electron microscopy investigations and 2-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) proteomic profiling. The low level of overlap of differentially expressed proteins indicates that AgNPs and AgNO3 cause different plant responses. Both Ag treatments cause changes in proteins involved in the redox regulation and in the sulfur metabolism. These responses could play an important role to maintain cellular homeostasis. Only the AgNP exposure cause the alteration of some proteins related to the endoplasmic reticulum and vacuole indicating these two organelles as targets of the AgNPs action. These data add further evidences that the effects of AgNPs are not simply due to the release of Ag ions.

  12. Morphological and Proteomic Responses of Eruca sativa Exposed to Silver Nanoparticles or Silver Nitrate

    PubMed Central

    Vannini, Candida; Domingo, Guido; Onelli, Elisabetta; Prinsi, Bhakti; Marsoni, Milena; Espen, Luca; Bracale, Marcella

    2013-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are widely used in commercial products, and there are growing concerns about their impact on the environment. Information about the molecular interaction of AgNPs with plants is lacking. To increase our understanding of the mechanisms involved in plant responses to AgNPs and to differentiate between particle specific and ionic silver effects we determined the morphological and proteomic changes induced in Eruca sativa (commonly called rocket) in response to AgNPs or AgNO3. Seedlings were treated for 5 days with different concentrations of AgNPs or AgNO3. A similar increase in root elongation was observed when seedlings were exposed to 10 mg Ag L1 of either PVP-AgNPs or AgNO3. At this concentration we performed electron microscopy investigations and 2-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) proteomic profiling. The low level of overlap of differentially expressed proteins indicates that AgNPs and AgNO3 cause different plant responses. Both Ag treatments cause changes in proteins involved in the redox regulation and in the sulfur metabolism. These responses could play an important role to maintain cellular homeostasis. Only the AgNP exposure cause the alteration of some proteins related to the endoplasmic reticulum and vacuole indicating these two organelles as targets of the AgNPs action. These data add further evidences that the effects of AgNPs are not simply due to the release of Ag ions. PMID:23874747

  13. Toxicological proteomic responses of halophyte Suaeda salsa to lead and zinc.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoli; Shen, Xuejiao; Lai, Yongkai; Ji, Kang; Sun, Hushan; Wang, Yiyan; Hou, Chengzong; Zou, Ning; Wan, Junli; Yu, Junbao

    2016-12-01

    The long term (30 days) toxicological effects of environmentally relevant concentrations of Pb(2+) (20μg/L) and Zn(2+) (100μg/L) were characterized in Suaeda salsa using proteomics techniques. The responsive proteins were related to metabolism (Krebs cycle and Calvin cycle), protein biosynthesis, stress and defense, energy, signaling pathway and photosynthesis in Pb(2+), Zn(2+) and Pb(2+)+ Zn(2+) exposed groups in S. salsa after exposures for 30 days. The proteomic profiles also showed differential responses in S. salsa to metal exposures. In Pb(2+)-treated group, the proteins were categorized into cystein metabolism and pentose phosphate pathway. The responsive proteins were basically involved in glutathione metabolism, glycolysis, cystein and methane metabolism, and voltage-dependent anion channel in Zn(2+)-treated group. In Pb(2+)+ Zn(2+)-treated group, the proecular mechanism at protein level remtein responses were devided into tyrosine metabolism and glycolysis. Our results showed that the two typical heavy metals, lead and zinc, could induce toxicological effects in halophyte S. salsa at protein level.

  14. Chimeric tRNAs as tools to induce proteome damage and identify components of stress responses.

    PubMed

    Geslain, Renaud; Cubells, Laia; Bori-Sanz, Teresa; Alvarez-Medina, Roberto; Rossell, David; Martí, Elisa; Ribas de Pouplana, Lluís

    2010-03-01

    Misfolded proteins are caused by genomic mutations, aberrant splicing events, translation errors or environmental factors. The accumulation of misfolded proteins is a phenomenon connected to several human disorders, and is managed by stress responses specific to the cellular compartments being affected. In wild-type cells these mechanisms of stress response can be experimentally induced by expressing recombinant misfolded proteins or by incubating cells with large concentrations of amino acid analogues. Here, we report a novel approach for the induction of stress responses to protein aggregation. Our method is based on engineered transfer RNAs that can be expressed in cells or tissues, where they actively integrate in the translation machinery causing general proteome substitutions. This strategy allows for the introduction of mutations of increasing severity randomly in the proteome, without exposing cells to unnatural compounds. Here, we show that this approach can be used for the differential activation of the stress response in the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER). As an example of the applications of this method, we have applied it to the identification of human microRNAs activated or repressed during unfolded protein stress.

  15. Deciphering the iron response in Acinetobacter baumannii: a proteomics approach

    PubMed Central

    Nwugo, Chika; Gaddy, Jennifer A.; Zimbler, Daniel L.; Actis, Luis A.

    2010-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient that plays a role in bacterial differential gene expression and protein production. Accordingly, the comparative analysis of total lysate and outer membrane fractions isolated from A. baumannii ATCC 19606T cells cultured under iron-rich and -chelated conditions using 2-D gel electrophoresis-mass spectrometry resulted in the identification of 58 protein spots differentially produced. While 19 and 35 of them represent iron-repressed and iron-induced protein spots, respectively, four other spots represent a metal chelation response unrelated to iron. Most of the iron-repressed protein spots represent outer membrane siderophore receptors, some of which could be involved in the utilization of siderophores produced by other bacteria. The iron-induced protein spots represent a wide range of proteins including those involved in iron storage, such as Bfr, metabolic and energy processes, such as AcnA, AcnB, GlyA, SdhA, and SodB, as well as lipid biosynthesis. The detection of an iron-regulated Hfq ortholog indicates that iron regulation in this bacterium could be mediated by Fur and small RNAs as described in other bacteria. The iron-induced production of OmpA suggests this protein plays a role in iron metabolism as shown by the diminished ability of an OmpA isogenic deficient derivative to grow under iron-chelated conditions. PMID:20692388

  16. The Proteomic Response of Arabidopsis thaliana to Cadmium Sulfide Quantum Dots, and Its Correlation with the Transcriptomic Response

    PubMed Central

    Marmiroli, Marta; Imperiale, Davide; Pagano, Luca; Villani, Marco; Zappettini, Andrea; Marmiroli, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    A fuller understanding of the interaction between plants and engineered nanomaterials is of topical relevance because the latter are beginning to find applications in agriculture and the food industry. There is a growing need to establish objective safety criteria for their use. The recognition of two independent Arabidopsis thaliana mutants displaying a greater level of tolerance than the wild type plant to exposure to cadmium sulfide quantum dots (CdS QDs) has offered the opportunity to characterize the tolerance response at the physiological, transcriptomic, and proteomic levels. Here, a proteomics-based comparison confirmed the conclusions drawn from an earlier transcriptomic analysis that the two mutants responded to CdS QD exposure differently both to the wild type and to each other. Just over half of the proteomic changes mirrored documented changes at the level of gene transcription, but a substantial number of transcript/gene product pairs were altered in the opposite direction. An interpretation of the discrepancies is given, along with some considerations regarding the use and significance of -omics when monitoring the potential toxicity of ENMs for health and environment. PMID:26732871

  17. Physiological and Proteomic Investigations to Study the Response of Tomato Graft Unions under Temperature Stress

    PubMed Central

    Muneer, Sowbiya; Ko, Chung Ho; Wei, Hao; Chen, Yuze; Jeong, Byoung Ryong

    2016-01-01

    Background Grafting is an established practice for asexual propagation in horticultural and agricultural crops. The study on graft unions has become of interest for horticulturists using proteomic and genomic techniques to observe transfer of genetic material and signal transduction pathways from root to shoot and shoot to root. Another reason to study the graft unions was potentially to observe resistance against abiotic stresses. Using physiological and proteomic analyses, we investigated graft unions (rootstock and scions) of tomato genotypes exposed to standard-normal (23/23 and 25/18°C day/night) and high-low temperatures (30/15°C day/night). Results Graft unions had varied responses to the diverse temperatures. High-low temperature, but not standard-normal temperature, induced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the form of H2O2 and O2-1 in rootstock and scions. However, the expression of many cell protection molecules was also induced, including antioxidant enzymes and their immunoblots, which also show an increase in their activities such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX). The graft interfaces thus actively defend against stress by modifying their physiological and proteomic responses to establish a new cellular homeostasis. As a result, many proteins for cellular defense were regulated in graft unions under diverse temperature, in addition to the regulation of photosynthetic proteins, ion binding/transport proteins, and protein synthesis. Moreover, biomass, hardness, and vascular transport activity were evaluated to investigate the basic connectivity between rootstock and scions. Conclusions Our study provides physiological evidence of the grafted plants’ response to diverse temperature. Most notably, our study provides novel insight into the mechanisms used to adapt the diverse temperature in graft unions (rootstock/scion). PMID:27310261

  18. Dosage-Dependent Proteome Response of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to Acute Chromate Challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Melissa R; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Chourey, Karuna; Shah, Manesh B; Thompson, Dorothea K; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L

    2007-01-01

    Proteome alterations in the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in response to different acute dose challenges (0.3, 0.5, or 1 mM) of the toxic metal chromate [Cr(VI)] were characterized with multidimensional HPLC-MS/MS on a linear trapping quadrupole MS. A total of 2,406 functionally diverse proteins were identified, with a subset demonstrating dosage-dependent up- and down-regulated expression, such as proteins involved in detoxification and iron binding and transport.

  19. Seeds in Chernobyl: the database on proteome response on radioactive environment.

    PubMed

    Klubicová, Katarína; Vesel, Martin; Rashydov, Namik M; Hajduch, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Two serious nuclear accidents during the last quarter century (Chernobyl, 1986 and Fukushima, 2011) contaminated large agricultural areas with radioactivity. The database "Seeds in Chernobyl" (http://www.chernobylproteomics.sav.sk) contains the information about the abundances of hundreds of proteins from on-going investigation of mature and developing seed harvested from plants grown in radioactive Chernobyl area. This database provides a useful source of information concerning the response of the seed proteome to permanently increased level of ionizing radiation in a user-friendly format.

  20. TLR4-dependent immune response promotes radiation-induced liver disease by changing the liver tissue interstitial microenvironment during liver cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhi-Feng, Wu; Le-Yuan, Zhou; Xiao-Hui, Zhou; Ya-Bo, Gao; Jian-Ying, Zhang; Yong, Hu; Zhao-Chong, Zeng

    2014-12-01

    Liver tissue interstitial fluid (TIF) a special microenvironment around liver cells, which may play a vital role in cell communication during liver injury. Moreover, toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is an important trigger of the immune response that may also play a role in liver injuries, including radiation-induced liver disease (RILD). Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify the roles of the TLR4-dependent immune response and TIFs in RILD after radiation therapy (RT) for liver cancer. This study consisted of two phases, and in the primary phase, the livers of TLR4 mutant (TLR4(-)) and normal (TLR4(+)) mice were irradiated with 30 Gy. TIF was then obtained from mouse livers and assessed by cytokine array analysis 20 days after irradiation, and cytokines in the TIFs, TLR4 and RILD were analyzed. In the second or validation phase, hepatocytes were isolated from TLR4(+) or TLR4(-) mice irradiated with 8 Gy and were co-cultured with TIFs from mouse livers, apoptosis of the hepatocytes was then measured using flow cytometry. We found that severe RILD was accompanied by higher expression of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2(VEGFR-2) in liver TIFs, from in TLR4(+) mice compared with TLR4(-) mice (P < 0.05). In both TLR4(+) and TLR4(-) hepatocytes, apoptosis after irradiaton was increased significantly after co-culture in TIFs from TLR4(+) mice that had their livers irradiated, compared with TIFs from TLR4(-) mice that had their livers irradiated or TIFs from unirradiated mice (P < 0.05). In summary, these findings indicate that the TLR4-dependent immune response may promote RILD by enhancing the expression of GM-CSF, VEGFR-2 and TRAIL in liver TIFs.

  1. iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Spirulina platensis in Response to Low Temperature Stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingye; Chang, Rong; Sun, Yijun; Li, Bosheng

    2016-01-01

    Low temperature (LT) is one of the most important abiotic stresses that can significantly reduce crop yield. To gain insight into how Spirulina responds to LT stress, comprehensive physiological and proteomic analyses were conducted in this study. Significant decreases in growth and pigment levels as well as excessive accumulation of compatible osmolytes were observed in response to LT stress. An isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomics approach was used to identify changes in protein abundance in Spirulina under LT. A total of 3,782 proteins were identified, of which 1,062 showed differential expression. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that differentially expressed proteins that were enriched in photosynthesis, carbohydrate metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis, and translation are important for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis and metabolic balance in Spirulina when subjected to LT stress. The up-regulation of proteins involved in gluconeogenesis, starch and sucrose metabolism, and amino acid biosynthesis served as coping mechanisms of Spirulina in response to LT stress. Moreover, the down-regulated expression of proteins involved in glycolysis, TCA cycle, pentose phosphate pathway, photosynthesis, and translation were associated with reduced energy consumption. The findings of the present study allow a better understanding of the response of Spirulina to LT stress and may facilitate in the elucidation of mechanisms underlying LT tolerance.

  2. Proteome Dynamics and Physiological Responses to Short-Term Salt Stress in Brassica napus Leaves.

    PubMed

    Jia, Huan; Shao, Mingquan; He, Yongjun; Guan, Rongzhan; Chu, Pu; Jiang, Haidong

    2015-01-01

    Salt stress limits plant growth and crop productivity and is an increasing threat to agriculture worldwide. In this study, proteomic and physiological responses of Brassica napus leaves under salt stress were investigated. Seedlings under salt treatment showed growth inhibition and photosynthesis reduction. A comparative proteomic analysis of seedling leaves exposed to 200 mM NaCl for 24 h, 48 h and 72 h was conducted. Forty-four protein spots were differentially accumulated upon NaCl treatment and 42 of them were identified, including several novel salt-responsive proteins. To determine the functional roles of these proteins in salt adaptation, their dynamic changes in abundance were analyzed. The results suggested that the up-accumulated proteins, which were associated with protein metabolism, damage repair and defense response, might contribute to the alleviation of the deleterious effect of salt stress on chlorophyll biosynthesis, photosynthesis, energy synthesis and respiration in Brassica napus leaves. This study will lead to a better understanding of the molecular basis of salt stress adaptation in Brassica napus and provides a basis for genetic engineering of plants with improved salt tolerance in the future.

  3. Behavioral and Proteomic Analysis of Stress Response in Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the behavioral and proteomic consequences of shock-induced stress in zebrafish (Danio rerio) as a vertebrate model. Here we describe the behavioral effects of exposure to predictable and unpredictable electric shock, together with quantitative tandem mass tag isobaric labeling workflow to detect altered protein candidates in response to shock exposure. Behavioral results demonstrate a hyperactivity response to electric shock and a suppression of activity to a stimulus predicting shock. On the basis of the quantitative changes in protein abundance following shock exposure, eight proteins were significantly up-regulated (HADHB, hspa8, hspa5, actb1, mych4, atp2a1, zgc:86709, and zgc:86725). These proteins contribute crucially in catalytic activities, stress response, cation transport, and motor activities. This behavioral proteomic driven study clearly showed that besides the rapid induction of heat shock proteins, other catalytic enzymes and cation transporters were rapidly elevated as a mechanism to counteract oxidative stress conditions resulting from elevated fear/anxiety levels. PMID:25398274

  4. Transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of Oenococcus oeni PSU-1 response to ethanol shock.

    PubMed

    Olguín, Nair; Champomier-Vergès, Marie; Anglade, Patricia; Baraige, Fabienne; Cordero-Otero, Ricardo; Bordons, Albert; Zagorec, Monique; Reguant, Cristina

    2015-10-01

    The correct development of malolactic fermentation depends on the capacity of Oenococcus oeni to survive under harsh wine conditions. The presence of ethanol is one of the most stressful factors affecting O. oeni performance. In this study, the effect of ethanol addition (12% vol/vol) on O. oeni PSU-1 has been evaluated using a transcriptomic and proteomic approach. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that the main functional categories of the genes affected by ethanol were metabolite transport and cell wall and membrane biogenesis. It was also observed that some genes were over-expressed in response to ethanol stress (for example, the heat shock protein Hsp20 and a dipeptidase). Proteomic analysis showed that several proteins are affected by the presence of ethanol. Functions related to protein synthesis and stability are the main target of ethanol damage. In some cases the decrease in protein concentration could be due to the relocation of cytosolic proteins in the membrane, as a protective mechanism. The omic approach used to study the response of O. oeni to ethanol highlights the importance of the cell membrane in the global stress response and opens the door to future studies on this issue.

  5. Proteomic and histopathological response in the gills of Poecilia reticulata exposed to glyphosate-based herbicide.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Thiago Lopes; Santos, Ana Paula Rezende Dos; Yamada, Áureo Tatsumi; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida; Borges, Clayton Luiz; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; Sabóia-Morais, Simone Maria Teixeira

    2015-07-01

    Glyphosate-based herbicides (GBH) are one of the most used herbicide nowadays, whilst there is growing concern over their impact on aquatic environment. Since data about the early proteomic response and toxic mechanisms of GBH in fish is very limited, the aim of this study was to investigate the early toxicity of GBH in the gills of guppies Poecilia reticulata using a proteomic approach associated with histopathological index. Median lethal concentration (LC50,96 h) was determined and LC50,96h values of guppies exposed to GBH were 3.6 ± 0.4 mg GLIL(-1). Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis associated with mass spectrometry, 14 proteins regulated by GBH were identified, which are involved in different cell processes, as energy metabolism, regulation and maintenance of cytoskeleton, nucleic acid metabolism and stress response. Guppies exposed to GBH at 1.82 mg GLIL(-1) showed time-dependent histopathological response in different epithelial and muscle cell types. The histopathological indexes indicate that GBH cause regressive, vascular and progressive disorders in the gills of guppies. This study helped to unravel the molecular and tissue mechanisms associated with GBH toxicity, which are potential biomarkers for biomonitoring water pollution by herbicides.

  6. Investigating the plant response to cadmium exposure by proteomic and metabolomic approaches.

    PubMed

    Villiers, Florent; Ducruix, Céline; Hugouvieux, Véronique; Jarno, Nolwenn; Ezan, Eric; Garin, Jérôme; Junot, Christophe; Bourguignon, Jacques

    2011-05-01

    Monitoring molecular dynamics of an organism upon stress is probably the best approach to decipher physiological mechanisms involved in the stress response. Quantitative analysis of proteins and metabolites is able to provide accurate information about molecular changes allowing the establishment of a range of more or less specific mechanisms, leading to the identification of major players in the considered pathways. Such tools have been successfully used to analyze the plant response to cadmium (Cd), a major pollutant capable of causing severe health issues as it accumulates in the food chain. We present a summary of proteomics and metabolomics works that contributed to a better understanding of the molecular aspects involved in the plant response to Cd. This work allowed us to provide a finer picture of general signaling, regulatory and metabolic pathways that appeared to be affected upon Cd stress. In particular, we conclude on the advantage of employing different approaches of global proteome- and metabolome-wide techniques, combined with more targeted analysis to answer molecular questions and unravel biological networks. Finally, we propose possible directions and methodologies for future prospectives in this field, as many aspects of the plant-Cd interaction remain to be discovered.

  7. Medicago truncatula root nodule proteome analysis reveals differential plant and bacteroid responses to drought stress.

    PubMed

    Larrainzar, Estíbaliz; Wienkoop, Stefanie; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Ladrera, Rubén; Arrese-Igor, Cesar; González, Esther M

    2007-07-01

    Drought is one of the environmental factors most affecting crop production. Under drought, symbiotic nitrogen fixation is one of the physiological processes to first show stress responses in nodulated legumes. This inhibition process involves a number of factors whose interactions are not yet understood. This work aims to further understand changes occurring in nodules under drought stress from a proteomic perspective. Drought was imposed on Medicago truncatula 'Jemalong A17' plants grown in symbiosis with Sinorhizobium meliloti strain 2011. Changes at the protein level were analyzed using a nongel approach based on liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. Due to the complexity of nodule tissue, the separation of plant and bacteroid fractions in M. truncatula root nodules was first checked with the aim of minimizing cross contamination between the fractions. Second, the protein plant fraction of M. truncatula nodules was profiled, leading to the identification of 377 plant proteins, the largest description of the plant nodule proteome so far. Third, both symbiotic partners were independently analyzed for quantitative differences at the protein level during drought stress. Multivariate data mining allowed for the classification of proteins sets that were involved in drought stress responses. The isolation of the nodule plant and bacteroid protein fractions enabled the independent analysis of the response of both counterparts, gaining further understanding of how each symbiotic member is distinctly affected at the protein level under a water-deficit situation.

  8. Proteomic analysis of the Mexican lime tree response to "Candidatus Phytoplasma aurantifolia" infection.

    PubMed

    Taheri, Farzan; Nematzadeh, Ghorbanali; Zamharir, Maryam Ghayeb; Nekouei, Mojtaba Khayam; Naghavi, Mohammadreza; Mardi, Mohsen; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini

    2011-11-01

    "Candidatus Phytoplasma aurantifolia" is the causative agent of witches' broom disease in the Mexican lime tree (Citrus aurantifolia L.), and is responsible for major tree losses in Southern Iran and Oman. The pathogen is strictly biotrophic, and, therefore, completely dependent on living host cells for its survival. The molecular basis of compatibility and disease development in this system is poorly understood. We applied a proteomics approach to analyse gene expression in Mexican limes infected with "Ca. Phytoplasma aurantifolia". Leaf samples were collected from healthy and infected plants and were analysed using 2-DE coupled with MS. Among 800 leaf proteins that were detected reproducibly in eight biological replicates of healthy and eight biological replicates of infected plants, 55 showed a significant response to the disease. MS resulted in identification of 39 regulated proteins, which included proteins that were involved in oxidative stress defence, photosynthesis, metabolism, and the stress response. Our results provide the first proteomic view of the molecular basis of the infection process and identify genes that could help inhibit the effects of the pathogen.

  9. iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Spirulina platensis in Response to Low Temperature Stress

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingye; Chang, Rong; Sun, Yijun; Li, Bosheng

    2016-01-01

    Low temperature (LT) is one of the most important abiotic stresses that can significantly reduce crop yield. To gain insight into how Spirulina responds to LT stress, comprehensive physiological and proteomic analyses were conducted in this study. Significant decreases in growth and pigment levels as well as excessive accumulation of compatible osmolytes were observed in response to LT stress. An isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomics approach was used to identify changes in protein abundance in Spirulina under LT. A total of 3,782 proteins were identified, of which 1,062 showed differential expression. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that differentially expressed proteins that were enriched in photosynthesis, carbohydrate metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis, and translation are important for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis and metabolic balance in Spirulina when subjected to LT stress. The up-regulation of proteins involved in gluconeogenesis, starch and sucrose metabolism, and amino acid biosynthesis served as coping mechanisms of Spirulina in response to LT stress. Moreover, the down-regulated expression of proteins involved in glycolysis, TCA cycle, pentose phosphate pathway, photosynthesis, and translation were associated with reduced energy consumption. The findings of the present study allow a better understanding of the response of Spirulina to LT stress and may facilitate in the elucidation of mechanisms underlying LT tolerance. PMID:27902743

  10. Proteomic characterization of the Rph15 barley resistance gene-mediated defence responses to leaf rust

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Leaf rust, caused by the biotrophic fungal pathogen Puccinia hordei, is one of the most important foliar disease of barley (Hordeum vulgare) and represents a serious threat in many production regions of the world. The leaf rust resistance gene Rph15 is of outstanding interest for resistance breeding because it confers resistance to over 350 Puccinia hordei isolates collected from around the world. Molecular and biochemical mechanisms responsible for the Rph15 effectiveness are currently not investigated. The aim of the present work was to study the Rph15-based defence responses using a proteomic approach. Results Protein pattern changes in response to the leaf rust pathogen infection were investigated in two barley near isogenic lines (NILs), Bowman (leaf rust susceptible) and Bowman-Rph15 (leaf rust resistant), differing for the introgression of the leaf rust resistance gene Rph15. Two infection time points, 24 hours and four days post inoculation (dpi), were analysed. No statistically significant differences were identified at the early time point, while at 4 dpi eighteen protein spots were significantly up or down regulated with a fold-change equal or higher than two in response to pathogen infection. Almost all the pathogen-responsive proteins were identified in the Bowman-Rph15 resistant NIL. Protein spots were characterized by LC-MS/MS analysis and found to be involved in photosynthesis and energy metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, protein degradation and defence. Proteomic data were complemented by transcriptional analysis of the respective genes. The identified proteins can be related to modulation of the photosynthetic apparatus components, re-direction of the metabolism to sustain defence responses and deployment of defence proteins. Conclusions The identification of leaf rust infection-modulated defence responses restricted to the resistant NIL support the hypothesis that basal defence responses of Bowman, but not the Rph15 resistance gene

  11. An integrated proteomics analysis of bone tissues in response to mechanical stimulation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Bone cells can sense physical forces and convert mechanical stimulation conditions into biochemical signals that lead to expression of mechanically sensitive genes and proteins. However, it is still poorly understood how genes and proteins in bone cells are orchestrated to respond to mechanical stimulations. In this research, we applied integrated proteomics, statistical, and network biology techniques to study proteome-level changes to bone tissue cells in response to two different conditions, normal loading and fatigue loading. We harvested ulna midshafts and isolated proteins from the control, loaded, and fatigue loaded Rats. Using a label-free liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) experimental proteomics technique, we derived a comprehensive list of 1,058 proteins that are differentially expressed among normal loading, fatigue loading, and controls. By carefully developing protein selection filters and statistical models, we were able to identify 42 proteins representing 21 Rat genes that were significantly associated with bone cells' response to quantitative changes between normal loading and fatigue loading conditions. We further applied network biology techniques by building a fatigue loading activated protein-protein interaction subnetwork involving 9 of the human-homolog counterpart of the 21 rat genes in a large connected network component. Our study shows that the combination of decreased anti-apoptotic factor, Raf1, and increased pro-apoptotic factor, PDCD8, results in significant increase in the number of apoptotic osteocytes following fatigue loading. We believe controlling osteoblast differentiation/proliferation and osteocyte apoptosis could be promising directions for developing future therapeutic solutions for related bone diseases. PMID:22784626

  12. Quantitative Proteomic Profiling of Early and Late Responses to Salicylic Acid in Cucumber Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liang; Shang, Qing-Mao

    2016-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is an important phytohormone that plays vital regulatory roles in plant growth, development, and stress responses. However, studies on the molecular mechanism of SA, especially during the early SA responses, are lagging behind. In this study, we initiated a comprehensive isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based proteomic analysis to explore the early and late SA-responsive proteins in leaves of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) seedlings. Upon SA application through the roots, endogenous SA accumulated in cucumber leaves. By assaying the changes in marker gene expression and photosynthetic rate, we collected samples at 12 h and 72 h post treatment (hpt) to profile the early and late SA responsiveness, respectively. The iTRAQ assay followed by tandem mass spectrometry revealed 135 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) at 12 hpt and 301 DEPs at 72 hpt. The functional categories for these SA-responsive proteins included in a variety of biochemical processes, including photosynthesis, redox homeostasis, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, lipid metabolism, transport, protein folding and modification, proteolysis, cell wall organization, and the secondary phenylpropanoid pathway. Conclusively, based on the abundant changes of these DEPs, together with their putative functions, we proposed a possible SA-responsive protein network. It appears that SA could elicit reactive oxygen species (ROS) production via enhancing the photosynthetic electron transferring, and then confer some growth-promoting and stress-priming effects on cells during the late phase, including enhanced photosynthesis and ROS scavenging, altered carbon metabolic flux for the biosynthesis of amino acids and nucleotides, and cell wall reorganization. Overall, the present iTRAQ assay provides higher proteome coverage and deepened our understanding of the molecular basis of SA-responses. PMID:27551830

  13. Proteomic analysis of membrane-associated proteins from rat liver autophagosomes.

    PubMed

    Øverbye, Anders; Fengsrud, Monica; Seglen, Per O

    2007-01-01

    Proteins associated with membranes from purified rat liver autophagosomes were separated by two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis (zoom gels, pl 4-7 and 6-9), silver-stained and identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Among >1,500 detectable protein spots, 58 (derived from 39 different known proteins) were at least twofold (and significantly) enriched in autophagosomal membranes relative to cytoplasmic membranes. All of these membrane-associated proteins were also present in the cytosol, many of them being truncated enzyme variants that would be expected to serve a binding rather than an enzymatic function. Eleven proteins were highly enriched (consistent with the theoretical maximum of 25x), corresponding to an exclusive membrane localization in the delimiting membrane of the autophagosome. Three of these were methyltransferases: betaine:homocysteine methyltransferase (five variants); catechol O-methyltransferase (one phosphorylated and one unphosphorylated variant) and methionine adenosyltransferase, perhaps indicating that methylation/demethylation of membrane components could play a role in autophagy. A fourth highly enriched autophagosomal protein, phosphatidylethanolamine binding protein, is particularly interesting considering that the autophagic marker protein, LC3/ Atg8, is linked to autophagosomal membranes through its covalent conjugation with phosphatidylethanolamine (as the form LC3-II). LC3-II was not detectable on silver-stained 2D-gels, but could be shown by immunoblotting to be highly enriched in autophagosomal membranes. Other highly enriched proteins were heat shock cognate protein Hsc70 (one short and one long variant), peroxiredoxin 2, peroxiredoxin 6 (two variants), fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase (one phosphorylated and one unphosphorylated variant), adenosine kinase, inorganic pyrophosphatase and selenium-binding protein 2. Hsc70, a chaperonin that plays an important role in the recognition and proteasomal degradation of aggregated

  14. Characterization of the Streptococcus sobrinus acid stress response by interspecies microarrays and proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Alaina R.; Abranches, Jacqueline; Kajfasz, Jessica K.; Lemos, José A.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus are considered the primary organisms responsible for human dental caries. The ability to generate acids and to adapt to low pH conditions is directly associated with the cariogenic potential of these bacteria. To survive acidic conditions, both species have been shown to mount an acid tolerance response (ATR). However, previous characterization of the S. sobrinus ATR identified critical differences in the mechanisms of acid adaptation between S. mutans and S. sobrinus. Here, interspecies microarray and proteomic approaches were used to identify novel, previously unrecognized genes and pathways that participate in the S. sobrinus acid stress response. The results revealed that, among other things, metabolic alterations that enhance energy generation and upregulation of the malolactic fermentation enzyme activity constitute important acid resistance properties in S. sobrinus. Some of these acid adaptive traits are shared by S. mutans and might be considered optimal targets for therapeutic treatments designed to control dental caries. PMID:20883222

  15. Proteomic response of wheat embryos to fosthiazate stress in a protected vegetable soil.

    PubMed

    Yin, Chunyan; Teng, Ying; Luo, Yongming; Christie, Peter

    2012-01-01

    A proteomic analysis of wheat defense response induced by the widely used organophosphorus nematicide fosthiazate is reported. Seed germination and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) experiments were performed using a Chinese wheat cultivar, Zhenmai No. 5. Root and shoot elongation decreased but thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) content in embryos increased with increasing pesticide concentration. More than 1000 protein spots were reproducibly detected in each silver-stained gel. Thirty-seven protein spots with at least 2-fold changes were identified using MALDI-TOF MS/MS analysis. Of these, 24 spots were up-regulated and 13 were down-regulated. Proteins identified included some well-known classical stress responsive proteins under abiotic or biotic stresses as well as some unusual responsive proteins. Ten responsive proteins were reported for the first time at the proteomic level, including fatty acyl CoA reductase, dihydrodipicolinate synthase, DEAD-box ATPase-RNA-helicase, fimbriata-like protein, waxy B1, rust resistance kinase Lr10, putative In2.1 protein, retinoblastoma-related protein 1, pollen allergen-like protein and S-adenosyl-L-methionine:phosphoethanolamine N-methyltransferase. The proteins identified were involved in several processes such as metabolism, defense/detoxification, cell structure/cell growth, signal transduction/transcription, photosynthesis and energy. Seven candidate proteins were further analyzed at the mRNA level by RT-PCR to compare transcript and protein accumulation patterns, revealing that not all the genes were correlated well with the protein level. Identification of these responsive proteins may provide new insight into the molecular basis of the fosthiazate-stress response in the early developmental stages of plants and may be useful in stress monitoring or stress-tolerant crop breeding for environmentally friendly agricultural production.

  16. Contrasting Proteomic and Metabolomic Responses of Bermudagrass to Drought and Salt Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Tiantian; Shi, Haitao; Wang, Yanping; Yang, Fan; Chan, Zhulong

    2016-01-01

    Bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon) is one of tolerant grass species to drought and salt. The comparative analyses of bermudagrass in response to drought and salt stresses at the physiological, proteomic, and metabolomic levels were performed in this study. The physiological results indicated that osmolytes accumulation, ROS level and antioxidant enzyme activities were extensively changed by drought and salt stresses. Through comparative proteomic analyses, we successfully identified a total of 77 proteins involved in photosynthesis, oxidative pentose phosphate, glycolysis, and redox metabolic pathways when exposed to drought and salt stresses. Among them, 36 proteins were commonly regulated by both treatments, while other 40 and 13 proteins were specifically regulated by drought and salt, respectively. Totally 15 proteins were involved in carbon metabolic pathway. Moreover, contents of 37 metabolites including amino acids, organic acids, sugars, and sugar alcohols were regulated by drought and salt treatments. Among them, 18 commonly modulated metabolites were involved in carbon and amino acid metabolic pathways. Drought treatment for 21 days caused less accumulation of sugars and sugar alcohols and increased ROS level in bermudagrass which led to relatively more severe cell membrane reflected by high EL-value and lower survival rate when compared to 400 mM salt treatment for 21 days. These results suggested that drought and 400 mM NaCl stresses for 21 days treatment affected common and specific changes in bermudagrass, which would provide new insights to understand the underlying molecular mechanisms and metabolic homeostasis of bermudagrass in responses to abiotic stresses. PMID:27891145

  17. Proteomic Analysis of Metabolic Responses to Biofuels and Chemicals in Photosynthetic Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Sun, T; Chen, L; Zhang, W

    2017-01-01

    Recent progresses in various "omics" technologies have enabled quantitative measurements of biological molecules in a high-throughput manner. Among them, high-throughput proteomics is a rapidly advancing field that offers a new means to quantify metabolic changes at protein level, which has significantly facilitated our understanding of cellular process, such as protein synthesis, posttranslational modifications, and degradation in responding to environmental perturbations. Cyanobacteria are autotrophic prokaryotes that can perform oxygenic photosynthesis and have recently attracted significant attentions as one promising alternative to traditionally biomass-based "microbial cell factories" to produce green fuels and chemicals. However, early studies have shown that the low tolerance to toxic biofuels and chemicals represented one major hurdle for further improving productivity of the cyanobacterial production systems. To address the issue, metabolic responses and their regulation of cyanobacterial cells to toxic end-products need to be defined. In this chapter, we discuss recent progresses in interpreting cyanobacterial responses to biofuels and chemicals using high-throughput proteomics approach, aiming to provide insights and guidelines on how to enhance tolerance and productivity of biofuels or chemicals in the renewable cyanobacteria systems in the future.

  18. Proteomic profiling and redox status alteration of recalcitrant tea (Camellia sinensis) seed in response to desiccation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qi; Yang, Liming; Ahmad, Parvaiz; Wan, Xiaochun; Hu, Xiangyang

    2011-03-01

    Tea seed is believed to be recalcitrant based on its sensitivity to chilling or drying stress. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and alterations in cytosolic redox status have been implicated in intolerance to desiccation by recalcitrant seed, but there is little information available regarding how ROS are regulated in seeds susceptible to drying stress. We investigated changes in protein expression and activity in tea embryo in response to desiccation using physiological and proteomic methods. Results showed that desiccation treatment dramatically induced the accumulation of H(2)O(2) in tea embryos, accompanied by increased activities of antioxidant enzymes like ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and superoxide dismutase (SOD). Proteomic analyses also demonstrated that 23 proteins associated with defense response, metabolism and redox status were up-regulated following desiccation. Increase in antioxidants, ascorbic acid (AsA) and catalase (CAT) (H(2)O(2) scavengers) partially assuaged desiccation damage to tea seed, resulting in improved germination rates. Higher accumulation of H(2)O(2) aggravated desiccation damage to seeds leading to lower germination activity. We propose that desiccation causes an over-accumulation of ROS that are not efficiently scavenged by increased levels of antioxidant enzymes. High levels of ROS alter the redox status and are detrimental to seed viability. Reducing ROS to appropriate concentrations is an efficient way to reduce desiccation damage and improve germination rates of recalcitrant seeds.

  19. The proteome and phosphoproteome of Neurospora crassa in response to cellulose, sucrose and carbon starvation

    DOE PAGES

    Xiong, Yi; Coradetti, Samuel T.; Li, Xin; ...

    2014-05-29

    Improving cellulolytic enzyme production by plant biomass degrading fungi holds great potential in reducing costs associated with production of next-generation biofuels generated from lignocellulose. How fungi sense cellulosic materials and respond by secreting enzymes has mainly been examined by assessing function of transcriptional regulators and via transcriptional profiling. Here, we obtained global proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiles of the plant biomass degrading filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa grown on different carbon sources, i.e. sucrose, no carbon, and cellulose, by performing isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) -based LC-MS/MS analyses. A comparison between proteomes and transcriptomes under identical carbon conditions suggestsmore » that extensive post-transcriptional regulation occurs in N. crassa in response to exposure to cellulosic material. Several hundred amino acid residues with differential phosphorylation levels on crystalline cellulose (Avicel) or carbon-free medium versus sucrose medium were identified, including phosphorylation sites in a major transcriptional activator for cellulase genes, CLR1, as well as a cellobionic acid transporter, CBT1. Finally, we found mutation of phosphorylation sites on CLR1 did not have a major effect on transactivation of cellulase production, while mutation of phosphorylation sites in CBT1 increased its transporting capacity. Our data provides rich information at both the protein and phosphorylation levels of the early cellular responses to carbon starvation and cellulosic induction and aids in a greater understanding of the underlying post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in filamentous fungi.« less

  20. The proteome and phosphoproteome of Neurospora crassa in response to cellulose, sucrose and carbon starvation

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Yi; Coradetti, Samuel T.; Li, Xin; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Clauss, Therese; Petyuk, Vlad; Camp, David; Smith, Richard; Cate, Jamie H. D.; Yang, Feng; Glass, N. Louise

    2014-05-29

    Improving cellulolytic enzyme production by plant biomass degrading fungi holds great potential in reducing costs associated with production of next-generation biofuels generated from lignocellulose. How fungi sense cellulosic materials and respond by secreting enzymes has mainly been examined by assessing function of transcriptional regulators and via transcriptional profiling. Here, we obtained global proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiles of the plant biomass degrading filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa grown on different carbon sources, i.e. sucrose, no carbon, and cellulose, by performing isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) -based LC-MS/MS analyses. A comparison between proteomes and transcriptomes under identical carbon conditions suggests that extensive post-transcriptional regulation occurs in N. crassa in response to exposure to cellulosic material. Several hundred amino acid residues with differential phosphorylation levels on crystalline cellulose (Avicel) or carbon-free medium versus sucrose medium were identified, including phosphorylation sites in a major transcriptional activator for cellulase genes, CLR1, as well as a cellobionic acid transporter, CBT1. Finally, we found mutation of phosphorylation sites on CLR1 did not have a major effect on transactivation of cellulase production, while mutation of phosphorylation sites in CBT1 increased its transporting capacity. Our data provides rich information at both the protein and phosphorylation levels of the early cellular responses to carbon starvation and cellulosic induction and aids in a greater understanding of the underlying post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in filamentous fungi.

  1. Rat liver antioxidant response to iron and copper overloads.

    PubMed

    Musacco-Sebio, Rosario; Saporito-Magriñá, Christian; Semprine, Jimena; Torti, Horacio; Ferrarotti, Nidia; Castro-Parodi, Mauricio; Damiano, Alicia; Boveris, Alberto; Repetto, Marisa G

    2014-08-01

    The rat liver antioxidant response to Fe and Cu overloads (0-60mg/kg) was studied. Dose- and time-responses were determined and summarized by t1/2 and C50, the time and the liver metal content for half maximal oxidative responses. Liver GSH (reduced glutathione) and GSSG (glutathione disulfide) were determined. The GSH content and the GSH/GSSG ratio markedly decreased after Fe (58-66%) and Cu (79-81%) loads, with t1/2 of 4.0 and 2.0h. The C50 were in a similar range for all the indicators (110-124μgFe/g and 40-50μgCu/g) and suggest a unique free-radical mediated process. Hydrophilic antioxidants markedly decreased after Fe and Cu (60-75%; t1/2: 4.5 and 4.0h). Lipophilic antioxidants were also decreased (30-92%; t1/2: 7.0 and 5.5h) after Fe and Cu. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities (Cu,Zn-SOD and Mn-SOD) and protein expression were adaptively increased after metal overloads (Cu,Zn-SOD: t1/2: 8-8.5h and Mn-SOD: t1/2: 8.5-8.0h). Catalase activity was increased after Fe (65%; t1/2: 8.5h) and decreased after Cu (26%; t1/2: 8.0h), whereas catalase expression was increased after Fe and decreased after Cu overloads. Glutathione peroxidase activity decreased after metal loads by 22-39% with a t1/2 of 4.5h and with unchanged protein expression. GSH is the main and fastest responder antioxidant in Fe and Cu overloads. The results indicate that thiol (SH) content and antioxidant enzyme activities are central to the antioxidant defense in the oxidative stress and damage after Fe and Cu overloads.

  2. Proteomic responses of human intestinal Caco-2 cells exposed to silver nanoparticles and ionic silver.

    PubMed

    Oberemm, Axel; Hansen, Ulf; Böhmert, Linda; Meckert, Christine; Braeuning, Albert; Thünemann, Andreas F; Lampen, Alfonso

    2016-03-01

    Even although quite a number of studies have been performed so far to demonstrate nanoparticle-specific effects of substances in living systems, clear evidence of these effects is still under debate. The present study was designed as a comparative proteomic analysis of human intestinal cells exposed to a commercial silver nanoparticle reference material and ions from AgNO3. A two-dimensional gel electrophoresis/MALDI mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic analysis was conducted after 24-h incubation of differentiated Caco-2 cells with non-cytotoxic and low cytotoxic silver concentrations (2.5 and 25 µg ml(-1) nanosilver, 0.5 and 5 µg ml(-1) AgNO3). Out of an overall number of 316 protein spots differentially expressed at a fold change of ≥ 1.4 or ≤ -1.4 in all treatments, 169 proteins could be identified. In total, 231 spots were specifically deregulated in particle-treated groups compared with 41 spots, which were limited to AgNO3-treatments. Forty-four spots (14 %) were commonly deregulated by both types of treatment. A considerable fraction of the proteins differentially expressed after treatment with nanoparticles is related to protein folding, synthesis or modification of proteins as well as cellular assembly and organization. Overlays of networks obtained for particulate and ionic treatments showed matches, indicating common mechanisms of combined particle and ionic silver exposure and exclusive ionic silver treatment. However, proteomic responses of Caco-2 cells treated with higher concentrations of silver species also showed some differences, for example regarding proteins related to fatty acid and energy metabolism, suggesting an induction of also some different molecular mechanisms for particle exposure and ionic treatment.

  3. Global Transcriptomic and Proteomic Responses of Dehalococcoides ethenogenes Strain 195 to Fixed Nitrogen Limitation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Patrick K. H.; Dill, Brian; Louie, Tiffany S.; Shah, Manesh B; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Andersen, Gary L.; Zinder, Stephen H.; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Dehalococcoides play an important role in the reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethenes. A systems level approach was taken in this study to examine the global transcriptomic and proteomic responses of exponentially growing D. ethenogenes strain 195 to fixed nitrogen limitation (FNL) as dechlorination activity and cell yield both decrease during FNL. As expected, the nitrogen-fixing (nif) genes were differentially up-regulated in the transcriptome and proteome of strain 195 during FNL. Aside from the nif operon, a putative methylglyoxal synthase-encoding gene (DET1576), the product of which is predicted to catalyze the formation of the toxic electrophile methylglyoxal and implicated in the uncoupling of anabolism from catabolism in bacteria, was strongly up-regulated in the transcriptome and could potentially play a role in the observed growth inhibition during FNL. Carbon catabolism genes were generally down regulated in response to FNL and a number of transporters were differentially regulated in response to nitrogen limitation, with some playing apparent roles in nitrogen acquisition while others were associated with general stress responses. A number of genes related to the functions of nucleotide synthesis, replication, transcription, translation, and post-translational modifications were also differentially expressed. One gene coding for a putative reductive dehalogenase (DET1545) and a number coding for oxidoreductases, which have implications in energy generation and redox reactions, were also differentially regulated. Interestingly, most of the genes within the multiple integrated elements were not differentially expressed. Overall, this study elucidates the molecular responses of strain 195 to FNL and identifies differentially expressed genes that are potential biomarkers to evaluate environmental cellular nitrogen status.

  4. Data for transcriptomic and iTRAQ proteomic analysis of Anguilla japonica gills in response to osmotic stress

    PubMed Central

    Tse, William Ka Fai; Sun, Jin; Zhang, Huoming; Lai, Keng Po; Gu, Jie; Sheung Law, Alice Yu; Yee Yeung, Bonnie Ho; Ching Chow, Sheung; Qiu, Jian-Wen; Wong, Chris Kong Chu

    2015-01-01

    This article contains data related to the two research articles titled Transcriptomic and iTRAQ proteomic approaches reveal novel short-term hyperosmotic stress responsive proteins in the gill of the Japanese eel (Anguilla japonica) (Tse et al. [1]) and iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis reveals acute hypo-osmotic responsive proteins in the gills of the Japanese eel (Anguilla japonica) (Tse et al. [2]). The two research articles show the usefulness of combining transcriptomic and proteomic approaches to provide molecular insights of osmoregulation mechanism in a non-model organism, the Japanese eel. The information presented here combines the raw data from the two studies and provides an overview on the physiological functions of fish gills. PMID:26217731

  5. Data for transcriptomic and iTRAQ proteomic analysis of Anguilla japonica gills in response to osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Tse, William Ka Fai; Sun, Jin; Zhang, Huoming; Lai, Keng Po; Gu, Jie; Sheung Law, Alice Yu; Yee Yeung, Bonnie Ho; Ching Chow, Sheung; Qiu, Jian-Wen; Wong, Chris Kong Chu

    2015-06-01

    This article contains data related to the two research articles titled Transcriptomic and iTRAQ proteomic approaches reveal novel short-term hyperosmotic stress responsive proteins in the gill of the Japanese eel (Anguilla japonica) (Tse et al. [1]) and iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis reveals acute hypo-osmotic responsive proteins in the gills of the Japanese eel (Anguilla japonica) (Tse et al. [2]). The two research articles show the usefulness of combining transcriptomic and proteomic approaches to provide molecular insights of osmoregulation mechanism in a non-model organism, the Japanese eel. The information presented here combines the raw data from the two studies and provides an overview on the physiological functions of fish gills.

  6. Quantitative Proteomic analysis on Activated Hepatic Stellate Cells reversion Reveal STAT1 as a key regulator between Liver Fibrosis and recovery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongyu; Chen, Fangyan; Fan, Xu; Lin, Cong; Hao, Yunwei; Wei, Handong; Lin, Weiran; Jiang, Ying; He, Fuchu

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the changes of activated HSCs reversion is an essential step toward clarifying the potential roles of HSCs in the treatment of liver fibrosis. In this study, we chose adipocyte differentiation mixture to induce LX-2 cells for 2 days in vitro as reversion phase, comparing with normal cultured LX-2 cells as activation phase. Mass spectrometric-based SILAC technology was adopted to study differentially expressed proteome of LX-2 cells between reversion and activation. Compared with activated HSCs, 273 proteins showed significant differences in reverted HSCs. The main pathway of up-regulated proteins associated with reversion of HSCs mainly related to oxidation-reduction and lipid metabolism, while the top pathway of down-regulated proteins was found in regulated cytoskeleton formation. Changes in the expression levels of selected proteins were verified by Western blotting analysis, especially STAT1, FLNA, LASP1, and NAMPT proteins. The distinct roles of STAT1 were further analyzed between activated and reverted of HSCs, it was found that STAT1 could affect cell proliferation of HSCs and could be viewed as a key regulator in the reversion of HSCs. Thus, the proteomic analysis could accelerate our understanding of the mechanisms of HSC reversion on cessation of fibrogenic stimuli and provide new targets for antifibrotic liver therapy. PMID:28322315

  7. Integrating Transcriptomic and Proteomic Data Using Predictive Regulatory Network Models of Host Response to Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Chasman, Deborah; Walters, Kevin B; Lopes, Tiago J S; Eisfeld, Amie J; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Roy, Sushmita

    2016-07-01

    Mammalian host response to pathogenic infections is controlled by a complex regulatory network connecting regulatory proteins such as transcription factors and signaling proteins to target genes. An important challenge in infectious disease research is to understand molecular similarities and differences in mammalian host response to diverse sets of pathogens. Recently, systems biology studies have produced rich collections of omic profiles measuring host response to infectious agents such as influenza viruses at multiple levels. To gain a comprehensive understanding of the regulatory network driving host response to multiple infectious agents, we integrated host transcriptomes and proteomes using a network-based approach. Our approach combines expression-based regulatory network inference, structured-sparsity based regression, and network information flow to infer putative physical regulatory programs for expression modules. We applied our approach to identify regulatory networks, modules and subnetworks that drive host response to multiple influenza infections. The inferred regulatory network and modules are significantly enriched for known pathways of immune response and implicate apoptosis, splicing, and interferon signaling processes in the differential response of viral infections of different pathogenicities. We used the learned network to prioritize regulators and study virus and time-point specific networks. RNAi-based knockdown of predicted regulators had significant impact on viral replication and include several previously unknown regulators. Taken together, our integrated analysis identified novel module level patterns that capture strain and pathogenicity-specific patterns of expression and helped identify important regulators of host response to influenza infection.

  8. Integrating Transcriptomic and Proteomic Data Using Predictive Regulatory Network Models of Host Response to Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Chasman, Deborah; Walters, Kevin B.; Lopes, Tiago J. S.; Eisfeld, Amie J.; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Roy, Sushmita

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian host response to pathogenic infections is controlled by a complex regulatory network connecting regulatory proteins such as transcription factors and signaling proteins to target genes. An important challenge in infectious disease research is to understand molecular similarities and differences in mammalian host response to diverse sets of pathogens. Recently, systems biology studies have produced rich collections of omic profiles measuring host response to infectious agents such as influenza viruses at multiple levels. To gain a comprehensive understanding of the regulatory network driving host response to multiple infectious agents, we integrated host transcriptomes and proteomes using a network-based approach. Our approach combines expression-based regulatory network inference, structured-sparsity based regression, and network information flow to infer putative physical regulatory programs for expression modules. We applied our approach to identify regulatory networks, modules and subnetworks that drive host response to multiple influenza infections. The inferred regulatory network and modules are significantly enriched for known pathways of immune response and implicate apoptosis, splicing, and interferon signaling processes in the differential response of viral infections of different pathogenicities. We used the learned network to prioritize regulators and study virus and time-point specific networks. RNAi-based knockdown of predicted regulators had significant impact on viral replication and include several previously unknown regulators. Taken together, our integrated analysis identified novel module level patterns that capture strain and pathogenicity-specific patterns of expression and helped identify important regulators of host response to influenza infection. PMID:27403523

  9. Novel aspects of grapevine response to phytoplasma infection investigated by a proteomic and phospho-proteomic approach with data integration into functional networks

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Translational and post-translational protein modifications play a key role in the response of plants to pathogen infection. Among the latter, phosphorylation is critical in modulating protein structure, localization and interaction with other partners. In this work, we used a multiplex staining approach with 2D gels to study quantitative changes in the proteome and phosphoproteome of Flavescence dorée-affected and recovered ‘Barbera’ grapevines, compared to healthy plants. Results We identified 48 proteins that differentially changed in abundance, phosphorylation, or both in response to Flavescence dorée phytoplasma infection. Most of them did not show any significant difference in recovered plants, which, by contrast, were characterized by changes in abundance, phosphorylation, or both for 17 proteins not detected in infected plants. Some enzymes involved in the antioxidant response that were up-regulated in infected plants, such as isocitrate dehydrogenase and glutathione S-transferase, returned to healthy-state levels in recovered plants. Others belonging to the same functional category were even down-regulated in recovered plants (oxidoreductase GLYR1 and ascorbate peroxidase). Our proteomic approach thus agreed with previously published biochemical and RT-qPCR data which reported down-regulation of scavenging enzymes and accumulation of H2O2 in recovered plants, possibly suggesting a role for this molecule in remission from infection. Fifteen differentially phosphorylated proteins (| ratio | > 2, p < 0.05) were identified in infected compared to healthy plants, including proteins involved in photosynthesis, response to stress and the antioxidant system. Many were not differentially phosphorylated in recovered compared to healthy plants, pointing to their specific role in responding to infection, followed by a return to a steady-state phosphorylation level after remission of symptoms. Gene ontology (GO) enrichment and statistical

  10. Proteomic analysis of the European flounder Platichthys flesus response to experimental PAH-PCB contamination.

    PubMed

    Galland, Claire; Dupuy, Célie; Loizeau, Véronique; Danion, Morgane; Auffret, Michel; Quiniou, Louis; Laroche, Jean; Pichereau, Vianney

    2015-06-30

    Platichthys flesus is often used as a sentinel species to monitor the estuarine water quality. In this study, we carried out an experimental contamination of fish using a PAHs/PCBs mixture, which was designed to mimic the concentrations found in the Seine estuary (C1) and 10 times these concentrations (C2). We used a proteomic approach to understand the molecular mechanisms implied in the response of P. flesus to these xenobiotics. We showed that 54 proteins were differentially accumulated in one or several conditions, which 34 displayed accumulation factors higher than two. 18 of these proteins were identified by MALDI TOF-TOF mass spectrometry. The results indicated the deregulation of oxidative stress- and glutathione metabolism-(GST, GPx) proteins as well as of several proteins belonging to the betaine demethylation pathway and the methionine cycle (BHMT, SHMT, SAHH), suggesting a role for these different pathways in the P. flesus response to chemical contamination.

  11. SILAC-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Human Lung Cell Response to Copper Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Edelmann, Mariola J.; Shack, Leslie A.; Naske, Caitlin D.; Walters, Keisha B.; Nanduri, Bindu

    2014-01-01

    Copper (II) oxide (CuO) nanoparticles (NP) are widely used in industry and medicine. In our study we evaluated the response of BEAS-2B human lung cells to CuO NP, using Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based proteomics and phosphoproteomics. Pathway modeling of the protein differential expression showed that CuO NP affect proteins relevant in cellular function and maintenance, protein synthesis, cell death and survival, cell cycle and cell morphology. Some of the signaling pathways represented by BEAS-2B proteins responsive to the NP included mTOR signaling, protein ubiquitination pathway, actin cytoskeleton signaling and epithelial adherens junction signaling. Follow-up experiments showed that CuO NP altered actin cytoskeleton, protein phosphorylation and protein ubiquitination level. PMID:25470785

  12. SILAC-based quantitative proteomic analysis of human lung cell response to copper oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Edelmann, Mariola J; Shack, Leslie A; Naske, Caitlin D; Walters, Keisha B; Nanduri, Bindu

    2014-01-01

    Copper (II) oxide (CuO) nanoparticles (NP) are widely used in industry and medicine. In our study we evaluated the response of BEAS-2B human lung cells to CuO NP, using Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based proteomics and phosphoproteomics. Pathway modeling of the protein differential expression showed that CuO NP affect proteins relevant in cellular function and maintenance, protein synthesis, cell death and survival, cell cycle and cell morphology. Some of the signaling pathways represented by BEAS-2B proteins responsive to the NP included mTOR signaling, protein ubiquitination pathway, actin cytoskeleton signaling and epithelial adherens junction signaling. Follow-up experiments showed that CuO NP altered actin cytoskeleton, protein phosphorylation and protein ubiquitination level.

  13. Molecular responses of genetically modified maize to abiotic stresses as determined through proteomic and metabolomic analyses.

    PubMed

    Benevenuto, Rafael Fonseca; Agapito-Tenfen, Sarah Zanon; Vilperte, Vinicius; Wikmark, Odd-Gunnar; van Rensburg, Peet Jansen; Nodari, Rubens Onofre

    2017-01-01

    Some genetically modified (GM) plants have transgenes that confer tolerance to abiotic stressors. Meanwhile, other transgenes may interact with abiotic stressors, causing pleiotropic effects that will affect the plant physiology. Thus, physiological alteration might have an impact on the product safety. However, routine risk assessment (RA) analyses do not evaluate the response of GM plants exposed to different environmental conditions. Therefore, we here present a proteome profile of herbicide-tolerant maize, including the levels of phytohormones and related compounds, compared to its near-isogenic non-GM variety under drought and herbicide stresses. Twenty differentially abundant proteins were detected between GM and non-GM hybrids under different water deficiency conditions and herbicide sprays. Pathway enrichment analysis showed that most of these proteins are assigned to energetic/carbohydrate metabolic processes. Among phytohormones and related compounds, different levels of ABA, CA, JA, MeJA and SA were detected in the maize varieties and stress conditions analysed. In pathway and proteome analyses, environment was found to be the major source of variation followed by the genetic transformation factor. Nonetheless, differences were detected in the levels of JA, MeJA and CA and in the abundance of 11 proteins when comparing the GM plant and its non-GM near-isogenic variety under the same environmental conditions. Thus, these findings do support molecular studies in GM plants Risk Assessment analyses.

  14. Proteomic response of Rhizoctonia solani GD118 suppressed by Paenibacillus kribbensis PS04.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liuqing; Liu, Mei; Liao, Meide

    2014-12-01

    Rice sheath blight, caused by Rhizoctonia solani, is considered a worldwide destructive rice disease and leads to considerable yield losses. A bio-control agent, Paenibacillus kribbensis PS04, was screened to resist against the pathogen. The inhibitory effects were investigated (>80 %) by the growth of the hyphae. Microscopic observation of the hypha structure manifested that the morphology of the pathogenic mycelium was strongly affected by P. kribbensis PS04. To explore essentially inhibitory mechanisms, proteomic approach was adopted to identify differentially expressed proteins from R. solani GD118 in response to P. kribbensis PS04 using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Protein profiling was used to identify 13 differential proteins: 10 proteins were found to be down-regulated while 3 proteins were up-regulated. These proteins were involved in material and energy metabolism, antioxidant activity, protein folding and degradation, and cytoskeleton regulation. Among them, material and energy metabolism was differentially regulated by P. kribbensis PS04. Protein expression was separately inhibited by the bio-control agent in oxidation resistance, protein folding and degradation, and cytoskeleton regulation. Proteome changes of the mycelium assist in understanding how the pathogen was directly suppressed by P. kribbensis PS04.

  15. Leaf Proteome Analysis Reveals Prospective Drought and Heat Stress Response Mechanisms in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Das, Aayudh; Eldakak, Moustafa; Paudel, Bimal; Kim, Dea-Wook; Hemmati, Homa; Basu, Chhandak

    2016-01-01

    Drought and heat are among the major abiotic stresses that affect soybean crops worldwide. During the current investigation, the effect of drought, heat, and drought plus heat stresses was compared in the leaves of two soybean varieties, Surge and Davison, combining 2D-DIGE proteomic data with physiology and biochemical analyses. We demonstrated how 25 differentially expressed photosynthesis-related proteins affect RuBisCO regulation, electron transport, Calvin cycle, and carbon fixation during drought and heat stress. We also observed higher abundance of heat stress-induced EF-Tu protein in Surge. It is possible that EF-Tu might have activated heat tolerance mechanisms in the soybean. Higher level expressions of heat shock-related protein seem to be regulating the heat tolerance mechanisms. This study identifies the differential expression of various abiotic stress-responsive proteins that regulate various molecular processes and signaling cascades. One inevitable outcome from the biochemical and proteomics assays of this study is that increase of ROS levels during drought stress does not show significant changes at the phenotypic level in Davison and this seems to be due to a higher amount of carbonic anhydrase accumulation in the cell which aids the cell to become more resistant to cytotoxic concentrations of H2O2. PMID:27034942

  16. Elevated temperature alters proteomic responses of individual organisms within a biofilm community

    DOE PAGES

    Mosier, Annika C.; Li, Zhou; Thomas, Brian C.; ...

    2014-07-22

    Microbial communities that underpin global biogeochemical cycles will likely be influenced by elevated temperature associated with environmental change. In this paper, we test an approach to measure how elevated temperature impacts the physiology of individual microbial groups in a community context, using a model microbial-based ecosystem. The study is the first application of tandem mass tag (TMT)-based proteomics to a microbial community. We accurately, precisely and reproducibly quantified thousands of proteins in biofilms growing at 40, 43 and 46 °C. Elevated temperature led to upregulation of proteins involved in amino-acid metabolism at the level of individual organisms and the entiremore » community. Proteins from related organisms differed in their relative abundance and functional responses to temperature. Elevated temperature repressed carbon fixation proteins from two Leptospirillum genotypes, whereas carbon fixation proteins were significantly upregulated at higher temperature by a third member of this genus. Leptospirillum group III bacteria may have been subject to viral stress at elevated temperature, which could lead to greater carbon turnover in the microbial food web through the release of viral lysate. Finally, overall, these findings highlight the utility of proteomics-enabled community-based physiology studies, and provide a methodological framework for possible extension to additional mixed culture and environmental sample analyses.« less

  17. Elevated temperature alters proteomic responses of individual organisms within a biofilm community

    SciTech Connect

    Mosier, Annika C.; Li, Zhou; Thomas, Brian C.; Hettich, Robert L.; Pan, Chongle; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2014-07-22

    Microbial communities that underpin global biogeochemical cycles will likely be influenced by elevated temperature associated with environmental change. In this paper, we test an approach to measure how elevated temperature impacts the physiology of individual microbial groups in a community context, using a model microbial-based ecosystem. The study is the first application of tandem mass tag (TMT)-based proteomics to a microbial community. We accurately, precisely and reproducibly quantified thousands of proteins in biofilms growing at 40, 43 and 46 °C. Elevated temperature led to upregulation of proteins involved in amino-acid metabolism at the level of individual organisms and the entire community. Proteins from related organisms differed in their relative abundance and functional responses to temperature. Elevated temperature repressed carbon fixation proteins from two Leptospirillum genotypes, whereas carbon fixation proteins were significantly upregulated at higher temperature by a third member of this genus. Leptospirillum group III bacteria may have been subject to viral stress at elevated temperature, which could lead to greater carbon turnover in the microbial food web through the release of viral lysate. Finally, overall, these findings highlight the utility of proteomics-enabled community-based physiology studies, and provide a methodological framework for possible extension to additional mixed culture and environmental sample analyses.

  18. Proteomic analysis of the response to cell cycle arrests in human myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Tony; Endo, Aki; Lamond, Angus I

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Previously, we analyzed protein abundance changes across a ‘minimally perturbed’ cell cycle by using centrifugal elutriation to differentially enrich distinct cell cycle phases in human NB4 cells (Ly et al., 2014). In this study, we compare data from elutriated cells with NB4 cells arrested at comparable phases using serum starvation, hydroxyurea, or RO-3306. While elutriated and arrested cells have similar patterns of DNA content and cyclin expression, a large fraction of the proteome changes detected in arrested cells are found to reflect arrest-specific responses (i.e., starvation, DNA damage, CDK1 inhibition), rather than physiological cell cycle regulation. For example, we show most cells arrested in G2 by CDK1 inhibition express abnormally high levels of replication and origin licensing factors and are likely poised for genome re-replication. The protein data are available in the Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics (http://www.peptracker.com/epd/), an online, searchable resource. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04534.001 PMID:25555159

  19. Proteomic analyses of brain tumor cell lines amidst the unfolded protein response

    PubMed Central

    Redzic, Jasmina S.; Gomez, Joe D.; Hellwinkel, Justin E.; Anchordoquy, Thomas J.; Graner, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    Brain tumors such as high grade gliomas are among the deadliest forms of human cancers. The tumor environment is subject to a number of cellular stressors such as hypoxia and glucose deprivation. The persistence of the stressors activates the unfolded proteins response (UPR) and results in global alterations in transcriptional and translational activity of the cell. Although the UPR is known to effect tumorigenesis in some epithelial cancers, relatively little is known about the role of the UPR in brain tumors. Here, we evaluated the changes at the molecular level under homeostatic and stress conditions in two glioma cell lines of differing tumor grade. Using mass spectrometry analysis, we identified proteins unique to each condition (unstressed/stressed) and within each cell line (U87MG and UPN933). Comparing the two, we find differences between both the conditions and cell lines indicating a unique profile for each. Finally, we used our proteomic data to identify the predominant pathways within these cells under unstressed and stressed conditions. Numerous predominant pathways are the same in both cell lines, but there are differences in biological and molecular classifications of the identified proteins, including signaling mechanisms, following UPR induction; we see that relatively minimal proteomic alterations can lead to signaling changes that ultimately promote cell survival. PMID:27323862

  20. Elevated temperature alters proteomic responses of individual organisms within a biofilm community

    PubMed Central

    Mosier, Annika C; Li, Zhou; Thomas, Brian C; Hettich, Robert L; Pan, Chongle; Banfield, Jillian F

    2015-01-01

    Microbial communities that underpin global biogeochemical cycles will likely be influenced by elevated temperature associated with environmental change. Here, we test an approach to measure how elevated temperature impacts the physiology of individual microbial groups in a community context, using a model microbial-based ecosystem. The study is the first application of tandem mass tag (TMT)-based proteomics to a microbial community. We accurately, precisely and reproducibly quantified thousands of proteins in biofilms growing at 40, 43 and 46 °C. Elevated temperature led to upregulation of proteins involved in amino-acid metabolism at the level of individual organisms and the entire community. Proteins from related organisms differed in their relative abundance and functional responses to temperature. Elevated temperature repressed carbon fixation proteins from two Leptospirillum genotypes, whereas carbon fixation proteins were significantly upregulated at higher temperature by a third member of this genus. Leptospirillum group III bacteria may have been subject to viral stress at elevated temperature, which could lead to greater carbon turnover in the microbial food web through the release of viral lysate. Overall, these findings highlight the utility of proteomics-enabled community-based physiology studies, and provide a methodological framework for possible extension to additional mixed culture and environmental sample analyses. PMID:25050524

  1. Molecular responses of genetically modified maize to abiotic stresses as determined through proteomic and metabolomic analyses

    PubMed Central

    Benevenuto, Rafael Fonseca; Agapito-Tenfen, Sarah Zanon; Vilperte, Vinicius; Wikmark, Odd-Gunnar; van Rensburg, Peet Jansen; Nodari, Rubens Onofre

    2017-01-01

    Some genetically modified (GM) plants have transgenes that confer tolerance to abiotic stressors. Meanwhile, other transgenes may interact with abiotic stressors, causing pleiotropic effects that will affect the plant physiology. Thus, physiological alteration might have an impact on the product safety. However, routine risk assessment (RA) analyses do not evaluate the response of GM plants exposed to different environmental conditions. Therefore, we here present a proteome profile of herbicide-tolerant maize, including the levels of phytohormones and related compounds, compared to its near-isogenic non-GM variety under drought and herbicide stresses. Twenty differentially abundant proteins were detected between GM and non-GM hybrids under different water deficiency conditions and herbicide sprays. Pathway enrichment analysis showed that most of these proteins are assigned to energetic/carbohydrate metabolic processes. Among phytohormones and related compounds, different levels of ABA, CA, JA, MeJA and SA were detected in the maize varieties and stress conditions analysed. In pathway and proteome analyses, environment was found to be the major source of variation followed by the genetic transformation factor. Nonetheless, differences were detected in the levels of JA, MeJA and CA and in the abundance of 11 proteins when comparing the GM plant and its non-GM near-isogenic variety under the same environmental conditions. Thus, these findings do support molecular studies in GM plants Risk Assessment analyses. PMID:28245233

  2. Responses of Mytilus galloprovincialis to bacterial challenges by metabolomics and proteomics.

    PubMed

    Ji, Chenglong; Wu, Huifeng; Wei, Lei; Zhao, Jianmin; Wang, Qing; Lu, Hongjian

    2013-08-01

    Pathogens can cause diseases and lead to massive mortalities of aquaculture animals and substantial economic loss. In this work, we studied the responses induced by Micrococcus luteus and Vibrio anguillarum in gill of mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis at protein and metabolite levels. Metabolic biomarkers (e.g., amino acids, betaine, ATP) suggested that both M. luteus and V. anguillarum induced disturbances in energy metabolism and osmotic regulation. The unique and some more remarkably altered metabolic biomarkers (threonine, alanine, aspartate, taurine, succinate) demonstrated that V. anguillarum could cause more severe disturbances in osmotic regulation and energy metabolism. Proteomic biomarkers (e.g., goose-type lysozyme 2, matrilin, ependymin-related protein, peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerases) indicated that M. luteus caused immune stress, and disturbances in signaling pathways and protein synthesis. However, V. anguillarum mainly induced oxidative stress and disturbance in energy metabolism in mussel gills indicated by altered procollagen-proline dioxygenase, protein disulfide isomerase, nucleoside diphosphate kinases, electron transfer flavoprotein and glutathione S-transferase. This work confirmed that an integration of proteomics and metabolomics could provide an insightful view into the effects of pathogens to the marine mussel M. galloprovincialis.

  3. Quantitative proteomic analysis of Edwardsiella tarda in response to oxytetracycline stress in biofilm.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lina; Chen, Huarong; Lin, Wenxiong; Lin, Xiangmin

    2017-01-06

    Edwardsiella tarda is a virulent fish pathogen that causes extensive economic losses in the aquaculture industry worldwide. The antibiotic resistance status of E. tarda is high, especially in the biofilm status; however, the mechanisms underlying its resistance remain largely unknown. In this study, isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomics methods were used to compare the differential expression of E. tarda in response to oxytetracycline (OXY) stress in biofilm. Additional bioinformatics analysis demonstrated an increasing abundance of translation-related proteins, especially ribosomal subunits, and a decreasing abundance of key metabolic pathways underlying the adaptation of E. tarda to OXY in biofilm. We performed Western blotting and quantitative PCR (qPCR) analyses to validate selected proteomics results, and measured enzyme activity to verify the antibiotic resistance functions of central metabolic pathways. In addition, we examined the antibiotic susceptibility of a mutant of an NADP-dependent malic enzyme (MaeB), which is involved in the bacterial tricarboxylic acid cycle, and found significantly increased resistance to OXY in biofilm. Our findings demonstrate the importance of central metabolic pathways in the antibiotic resistance of E. tarda to bacterial biofilms and provide insight into the prevention of this resistance, which would aid in disease control.

  4. Leaf Proteome Analysis Reveals Prospective Drought and Heat Stress Response Mechanisms in Soybean.

    PubMed

    Das, Aayudh; Eldakak, Moustafa; Paudel, Bimal; Kim, Dea-Wook; Hemmati, Homa; Basu, Chhandak; Rohila, Jai S

    2016-01-01

    Drought and heat are among the major abiotic stresses that affect soybean crops worldwide. During the current investigation, the effect of drought, heat, and drought plus heat stresses was compared in the leaves of two soybean varieties, Surge and Davison, combining 2D-DIGE proteomic data with physiology and biochemical analyses. We demonstrated how 25 differentially expressed photosynthesis-related proteins affect RuBisCO regulation, electron transport, Calvin cycle, and carbon fixation during drought and heat stress. We also observed higher abundance of heat stress-induced EF-Tu protein in Surge. It is possible that EF-Tu might have activated heat tolerance mechanisms in the soybean. Higher level expressions of heat shock-related protein seem to be regulating the heat tolerance mechanisms. This study identifies the differential expression of various abiotic stress-responsive proteins that regulate various molecular processes and signaling cascades. One inevitable outcome from the biochemical and proteomics assays of this study is that increase of ROS levels during drought stress does not show significant changes at the phenotypic level in Davison and this seems to be due to a higher amount of carbonic anhydrase accumulation in the cell which aids the cell to become more resistant to cytotoxic concentrations of H2O2.

  5. Proteome analysis of leaves of the desiccation-tolerant grass, Sporobolus stapfianus, in response to dehydration.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Melvin J; Jain, Renuka; Balbuena, Tiago S; Agrawal, Ganesh; Gasulla, Franscisco; Thelen, Jay J

    2011-07-01

    Drought and its affects on agricultural production is a serious issue facing global efforts to increase food supplies and ensure food security for the growing world population. Understanding how plants respond to dehydration is an important prerequisite for developing strategies for crop improvement in drought tolerance. This has proved to be a difficult task as all of the current research plant models do not tolerate cellular dehydration well and, like all crops, they succumb to the effects of a relatively small water deficit of -4MPa or less. For these reasons many researchers have started to investigate the usefulness of resurrection plants, plants that can survive extremes of dehydration to the point of desiccation, to provide answers as to how plants tolerate water loss. We have chosen to investigate the leaf proteome response of the desiccation-tolerant grass Sporobolus stapfianus Gandoger to dehydration to a water content that encompasses the initiation of the cellular protection response evident in these plants. We used a combination of two-dimensional Difference Gel Electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and liquid chromatography-tandem-mass spectrometry to compare the proteomes of young leaves from hydrated plants to those dehydrated to approximately 30% relative water content. High-resolution 2D-DIGE revealed 96 significantly different proteins and 82 of these spots yielded high-quality protein assignments by tandem-mass spectrometry. Inferences from the bioinformatic annotations of these proteins revealed the possible involvement of protein kinase-based signaling cascades and brassinosteroid involvement in the regulation of the cellular protection response. Enzymes of glycolysis, both cytoplasmic and plastidic, as well as five enzymes of the Calvin cycle increased in abundance. However, the RuBisCO large subunit and associated proteins were reduced, indicating a loss of carbon fixation but a continued need to supply the necessary carbon skeletons for the

  6. Transcriptome and Proteome Dynamics of the Cellular Response of Shewanella oneidensis to Chromium Stress

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.K.

    2005-04-18

    The overall goal of this DOE NABIR project is to characterize the molecular basis and regulation of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] stress response and reduction by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. Temporal genomic profiling and mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis were employed to characterize the dynamic molecular response of S. oneidensis MR-1 to both acute and chronic Cr(VI) exposure. The acute stress response of aerobic, mid-exponential phase cells shocked to a final concentration of 1 mM potassium chromate (K2CrO4) was examined at post-exposure time intervals of 5, 30, 60, and 90 min relative to untreated cells. The transcriptome of mid-exponential cultures was also analyzed 30 min after shock doses of 0.3, 0.5, or 1 mM K{sub 2}CrO{sub 4}. The tonB1-exbB1-exbD1 genes comprising the TonB1 iron transport system were some of the most highly induced coding sequences (CDSs) after 90 min (up to {approx}240 fold), followed by other genes involved in heme transport, sulfate transport, and sulfur assimilation pathways. In addition, transcript levels for CDSs with annotated functions in DNA repair (dinP, recX, recA, recN) and detoxification processes (so3585, so3586) were substantially increased in Cr(VI)-exposed cells compared to untreated cells. By contrast, genes predicted to encode hydrogenases (HydA, HydB), oxidoreductases (SO0902-03-04, SO1911), iron-sulfur cluster binding proteins (SO4404), decaheme cytochrome c proteins (MtrA, OmcA, OmcB), and a number of LysR or TetR family transcriptional regulators were some of the most highly repressed CDSs following the 90-min shock period. Transcriptome profiles generated from MR-1 cells adapted to 0.3 mM Cr(VI) differed significantly from those characterizing cells exposed to acute Cr(VI) stress without adaptation. Parallel proteomic characterization of soluble protein and membrane protein fractions extracted from Cr(VI)-shocked and Cr(VI)-adapted MR-1 cells was performed using multidimensional HPLC-ESI-MS/MS (both

  7. Proteome changes in banana fruit peel tissue in response to ethylene and high-temperature treatments

    PubMed Central

    Du, Lina; Song, Jun; Forney, Charles; Palmer, Leslie Campbell; Fillmore, Sherry; Zhang, ZhaoQi

    2016-01-01

    Banana (Musa AAA group) is one of the most consumed fruits in the world due to its flavor and nutritional value. As a typical climacteric fruit, banana responds to ethylene treatment, which induces rapid changes of color, flavor (aroma and taste), sweetness and nutritional composition. It has also been reported that ripening bananas at temperatures above 24 °C inhibits chlorophyll breakdown and color formation but increases the rate of senescence. To gain fundamental knowledge about the effects of high temperature and ethylene on banana ripening, a quantitative proteomic study employing multiplex peptide stable isotope dimethyl labeling was conducted. In this study, green (immature) untreated banana fruit were subjected to treatment with 10 μL L−1 of ethylene for 24 h. After ethylene treatment, treated and untreated fruit were stored at 20 or 30 °C for 24 h. Fruit peel tissues were then sampled after 0 and 1 day of storage, and peel color and chlorophyll fluorescence were evaluated. Quantitative proteomic analysis was conducted on the fruit peels after 1 day of storage. In total, 413 common proteins were identified and quantified from two biological replicates. Among these proteins, 91 changed significantly in response to ethylene and high-temperature treatments. Cluster analysis on these 91 proteins identified 7 groups of changed proteins. Ethylene treatment and storage at 20 °C induced 40 proteins that are correlated with pathogen resistance, cell wall metabolism, ethylene biosynthesis, allergens and ribosomal proteins, and it repressed 36 proteins that are associated with fatty acid and lipid metabolism, redox–oxidative responses, and protein biosynthesis and modification. Ethylene treatment and storage at 30 °C induced 32 proteins, which were mainly similar to those in group 1 but also included 8 proteins in group 3 (identified as chitinase, cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase 1, cysteine synthase, villin-2, leucine-transfer RNA ligase, CP47

  8. Morpho-Physiological and Proteome Level Responses to Cadmium Stress in Sorghum

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Abu Hena Mostafa; Kim, Sang-Woo; Oh, Myeong-Won; Lee, Moon-Soon; Chung, Keun-Yook; Xin, Zhanguo; Woo, Sun-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) stress may cause serious morphological and physiological abnormalities in addition to altering the proteome in plants. The present study was performed to explore Cd-induced morpho-physiological alterations and their potential associated mechanisms in Sorghum bicolor leaves at the protein level. Ten-day-old sorghum seedlings were exposed to different concentrations (0, 100, and 150 μM) of CdCl2, and different morpho-physiological responses were recorded. The effects of Cd exposure on protein expression patterns in S. bicolor were investigated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) in samples derived from the leaves of both control and Cd-treated seedlings. The observed morphological changes revealed that the plants treated with Cd displayed dramatically altered shoot lengths, fresh weights and relative water content. In addition, the concentration of Cd was markedly increased by treatment with Cd, and the amount of Cd taken up by the shoots was significantly and directly correlated with the applied concentration of Cd. Using the 2-DE method, a total of 33 differentially expressed protein spots were analyzed using MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. Of these, treatment with Cd resulted in significant increases in 15 proteins and decreases in 18 proteins. Major changes were absorbed in the levels of proteins known to be involved in carbohydrate metabolism, transcriptional regulation, translation and stress responses. Proteomic results revealed that Cd stress had an inhibitory effect on carbon fixation, ATP production and the regulation of protein synthesis. Our study provides insights into the integrated molecular mechanisms involved in responses to Cd and the effects of Cd on the growth and physiological characteristics of sorghum seedlings. We have aimed to provide a reference describing the mechanisms involved in heavy metal damage to plants. PMID:26919231

  9. Proteomic and Physiological Analyses Reveal Putrescine Responses in Roots of Cucumber Stressed by NaCl

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yinghui; Zhong, Min; Shu, Sheng; Du, Nanshan; Sun, Jin; Guo, Shirong

    2016-01-01

    Soil salinity is a major environmental constraint that threatens agricultural productivity. Different strategies have been developed to improve crop salt tolerance, among which the effects of polyamines have been well-reported. To gain a better understanding of the cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) responses to NaCl and unravel the underlying mechanism of exogenous putrescine (Put) alleviating salt-induced damage, comparative proteomic analysis was conducted on cucumber roots treated with NaCl, and/or Put for 7 days. The results showed that exogenous Put restored the root growth inhibited by NaCl. Sixty-two differentially expressed proteins implicated in various biological processes were successfully identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. The four largest categories included proteins involved in defense response (24.2%), protein metabolism (24.2%), carbohydrate metabolism (19.4%), and amino acid metabolism (14.5%). Exogenous Put up-regulated most identified proteins involved in carbohydrate metabolism, implying an enhancement in energy generation. Proteins involved in defense response and protein metabolism were differently regulated by Put, which indicated the roles of Put in stress resistance and proteome rearrangement. Put also increased the abundance of proteins involved in amino acid metabolism. Meanwhile, physiological analysis showed that Put could further up-regulated the levels of free amino acids in salt stressed-roots. In addition, Put also improved endogenous polyamines contents by regulating the transcription levels of key enzymes in polyamine metabolism. Taken together, these results suggest that Put may alleviate NaCl-induced growth inhibition through degradation of misfolded/damaged proteins, activation of stress defense, and the promotion of carbohydrate metabolism to generate more energy. PMID:27471514

  10. Integrated metabolomic and proteomic analysis reveals systemic responses of Rubrivivax benzoatilyticus JA2 to aniline stress.

    PubMed

    Mujahid, Md; Prasuna, M Lakshmi; Sasikala, Ch; Ramana, Ch Venkata

    2015-02-06

    Aromatic amines are widely distributed in the environment and are major environmental pollutants. Although degradation of aromatic amines is well studied in bacteria, physiological adaptations and stress response to these toxic compounds is not yet fully understood. In the present study, systemic responses of Rubrivivax benzoatilyticus JA2 to aniline stress were deciphered using metabolite and iTRAQ-labeled protein profiling. Strain JA2 tolerated high concentrations of aniline (30 mM) with trace amounts of aniline being transformed to acetanilide. GC-MS metabolite profiling revealed aniline stress phenotype wherein amino acid, carbohydrate, fatty acid, nitrogen metabolisms, and TCA (tricarboxylic acid cycle) were modulated. Strain JA2 responded to aniline by remodeling the proteome, and cellular functions, such as signaling, transcription, translation, stress tolerance, transport and carbohydrate metabolism, were highly modulated. Key adaptive responses, such as transcription/translational changes, molecular chaperones to control protein folding, and efflux pumps implicated in solvent extrusion, were induced in response to aniline stress. Proteo-metabolomics indicated extensive rewiring of metabolism to aniline. TCA cycle and amino acid catabolism were down-regulated while gluconeogenesis and pentose phosphate pathways were up-regulated, leading to the synthesis of extracellular polymeric substances. Furthermore, increased saturated fatty acid ratios in membranes due to aniline stress suggest membrane adaptation. The present study thus indicates that strain JA2 employs multilayered responses: stress response, toxic compound tolerance, energy conservation, and metabolic rearrangements to aniline.

  11. Rapid Response of the Yeast Plasma Membrane Proteome to Salt Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Szopinska, Aleksandra; Degand, Hervé; Hochstenbach, Jean-François; Nader, Joseph; Morsomme, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    The plasma membrane separates the cell from the external environment and plays an important role in the stress response of the cell. In this study, we compared plasma membrane proteome modifications of yeast cells exposed to mild (0.4 m NaCl) or high (1 m NaCl) salt stress for 10, 30, or 90 min. Plasma membrane-enriched fractions were isolated, purified, and subjected to iTRAQ labeling for quantitative analysis. In total, 88–109 plasma membrane proteins were identified and quantified. The quantitative analysis revealed significant changes in the abundance of several plasma membrane proteins. Mild salt stress caused an increase in abundance of 12 plasma membrane proteins, including known salt-responsive proteins, as well as new targets. Interestingly, 20 plasma membrane proteins, including the P-type H+-ATPase Pma1, ABC transporters, glucose and amino acid transporters, t-SNAREs, and proteins involved in cell wall biogenesis showed a significant and rapid decrease in abundance in response to both 0.4 m and 1 m NaCl. We propose that rapid protein internalization occurs as a response to hyper-osmotic and/or ionic shock, which might affect plasma membrane morphology and ionic homeostasis. This rapid response might help the cell to survive until the transcriptional response takes place. PMID:21825281

  12. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Response to Zinc, Magnesium, and Calcium Deficiency in Specific Cell Types of Arabidopsis Roots

    PubMed Central

    Fukao, Yoichiro; Kobayashi, Mami; Zargar, Sajad Majeed; Kurata, Rie; Fukui, Risa; Mori, Izumi C.; Ogata, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    The proteome profiles of specific cell types have recently been investigated using techniques such as fluorescence activated cell sorting and laser capture microdissection. However, quantitative proteomic analysis of specific cell types has not yet been performed. In this study, to investigate the response of the proteome to zinc, magnesium, and calcium deficiency in specific cell types of Arabidopsis thaliana roots, we performed isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomics using GFP-expressing protoplasts collected by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Protoplasts were collected from the pGL2-GFPer and pMGP-GFPer marker lines for epidermis or inner cell lines (pericycle, endodermis, and cortex), respectively. To increase the number of proteins identified, iTRAQ-labeled peptides were separated into 24 fractions by OFFGFEL electrophoresis prior to high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry analysis. Overall, 1039 and 737 proteins were identified and quantified in the epidermal and inner cell lines, respectively. Interestingly, the expression of many proteins was decreased in the epidermis by mineral deficiency, although a weaker effect was observed in inner cell lines such as the pericycle, endodermis, and cortex. Here, we report for the first time the quantitative proteomics of specific cell types in Arabidopsis roots. PMID:28248212

  13. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Response to Zinc, Magnesium, and Calcium Deficiency in Specific Cell Types of Arabidopsis Roots.

    PubMed

    Fukao, Yoichiro; Kobayashi, Mami; Zargar, Sajad Majeed; Kurata, Rie; Fukui, Risa; Mori, Izumi C; Ogata, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-12

    The proteome profiles of specific cell types have recently been investigated using techniques such as fluorescence activated cell sorting and laser capture microdissection. However, quantitative proteomic analysis of specific cell types has not yet been performed. In this study, to investigate the response of the proteome to zinc, magnesium, and calcium deficiency in specific cell types of Arabidopsis thaliana roots, we performed isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomics using GFP-expressing protoplasts collected by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Protoplasts were collected from the pGL2-GFPer and pMGP-GFPer marker lines for epidermis or inner cell lines (pericycle, endodermis, and cortex), respectively. To increase the number of proteins identified, iTRAQ-labeled peptides were separated into 24 fractions by OFFGFEL electrophoresis prior to high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry analysis. Overall, 1039 and 737 proteins were identified and quantified in the epidermal and inner cell lines, respectively. Interestingly, the expression of many proteins was decreased in the epidermis by mineral deficiency, although a weaker effect was observed in inner cell lines such as the pericycle, endodermis, and cortex. Here, we report for the first time the quantitative proteomics of specific cell types in Arabidopsis roots.

  14. Label-free proteomics assisted by affinity enrichment for elucidating the chemical reactivity of the liver mitochondrial proteome toward adduction by the lipid electrophile 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Claudia

    2016-03-01

    The analysis of oxidative stress-induced post-translational modifications remains challenging due to the chemical diversity of these modifications, the possibility of the presence of positional isomers and the low stoichiometry of the modified proteins present in a cell or tissue proteome. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a multifactorial disease in which mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress have been identified as being critically involved in the progression of the disease from steatosis to cirrhosis. Ethanol metabolism leads to increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), glutathione depletion and lipid peroxidation. Posttranslational modification of proteins by electrophilic products of lipid peroxidation has been associated with governing redox-associated signaling mechanisms, but also as contributing to protein dysfunction leading to organelle and liver injury. In particular the prototypical α,β-unsaturated aldehyde, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), has been extensively studied as marker of increased oxidative stress in hepatocytes. In this study, we combined a LC-MS label-free quantification method and affinity enrichment to assess the dose-dependent insult by HNE on the proteome of rat liver mitochondria. We used a carbonyl-selective probe, the ARP probe, to label HNE-protein adducts and to perform affinity capture at the protein level. Using LC-MS to obtain protein abundance estimates, a list of protein targets was obtained with increasing concentration of HNE used in the exposure studies. In parallel, we performed affinity capture at the peptide level to acquire site-specific information. Examining the concentration-dependence of the protein modifications, we observed distinct reactivity profiles for HNE-protein adduction. Pathway analysis indicated that proteins associated with metabolic processes, including amino acid, fatty acid and glyoxylate and dicarboxylate metabolism, bile acid synthesis and TCA cycle, showed enhanced reactivity to HNE

  15. Measurement of response to treatment in colorectal liver metastases.

    PubMed Central

    Dworkin, M. J.; Burke, D.; Earlam, S.; Fordy, C.; Allen-Mersh, T. G.

    1995-01-01

    Assessment of tumour response to chemotherapy is important when assessing efficacy of treatment and comparing differing therapeutic regimens. Percentage hepatic replacement (PHR) is commonly used to assess response to treatment of colorectal hepatic metastases. PHR is dependent not only on tumour volume, but also on hepatic parenchymal volume. The effect of tumour growth on hepatic parenchymal volume is unclear but is of importance owing to its effect on PHR. We assessed tumour and hepatic parenchymal weights in an animal tumour model using dissection, and tumour and hepatic parenchymal volumes in patients with colorectal hepatic metastases using CT scanning, in order to establish how hepatic parenchyma varied with change in metastasis size. There was no significant correlation between tumour and liver parenchyma in either the animal model (r = -0.03, P > 0.05) or the patient study (r = 0.3, P < 0.05). This suggests that hepatic parenchymal volume was preserved in the presence of increasing tumour volume. In a further study of computerised tomographic (CT) scans before and after treatment in patients whose tumours either responded to chemotherapy or continued to grow, change in PHR (median proportion of PHR change = 0.40) significantly (P = 0.04) underestimated the change in tumour volume (median proportion of tumour volume change = 0.56), particularly at higher (> 400 ml) volumes. There was good correlation between change in tumour volume and WHO criteria in assigning patients to tumour growth, stable disease or tumour response categories. This study suggests that, in clinical trials comparing colorectal liver metastasis treatments, metastasis volume and not PHR should be used to assess extent of disease and the effect of treatment. PMID:7710957

  16. Proteomic analysis of membrane proteins of vero cells: exploration of potential proteins responsible for virus entry.

    PubMed

    Guo, Donghua; Zhu, Qinghe; Zhang, Hong; Sun, Dongbo

    2014-01-01

    Vero cells are highly susceptible to many viruses in humans and animals, and its membrane proteins (MPs) are responsible for virus entry. In our study, the MP proteome of the Vero cells was investigated using a shotgun LC-MS/MS approach. Six hundred twenty-seven proteins, including a total of 1839 peptides, were identified in MP samples of the Vero cells. In 627 proteins, 307 proteins (48.96%) were annotated in terms of biological process of gene ontology (GO) categories; 356 proteins (56.78%) were annotated in terms of molecular function of GO categories; 414 proteins (66.03%) were annotated in terms of cellular components of GO categories. Of 627 identified proteins, seventeen proteins had been revealed to be virus receptor proteins. The resulting protein lists and highlighted proteins may provide valuable information to increase understanding of virus infection of Vero cells.

  17. The Dichotomy of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Response in Liver Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haomming; Zhu, Jianjun; Yue, Shi; Lu, Ling; Busuttil, Ronald W; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W; Wang, Xuehao; Zhai, Yuan

    2016-02-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress plays critical roles in the pathogenesis of liver ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). As ER stress triggers an adaptive cellular response, the question of what determines its functional outcome in liver IRI remains to be defined. In a murine liver partial warm ischemia model, we studied how transient (30 minutes) or prolonged (90 minutes) liver ischemia regulated local ER stress response and autophagy activities and their relationship with liver IRI. Effects of chemical chaperon 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PBA) or autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) were evaluated. Our results showed that although the activating transcription factor 6 branch of ER stress response was induced in livers by both types of ischemia, liver autophagy was activated by transient, but inhibited by prolonged, ischemia. Although 3-MA had no effects on liver IRI after prolonged ischemia, it significantly increased liver IRI after transient ischemia. The 4-PBA treatment protected livers from IRI after prolonged ischemia by restoring autophagy flux, and the adjunctive 3-MA treatment abrogated its liver protective effect. The same 4-PBA treatment, however, increased liver IRI and disrupted autophagy flux after transient ischemia. Although both types of ischemia activated 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and inactivated protein kinase B (Akt), prolonged ischemia also resulted in downregulations of autophagy-related gene 3 and autophagy-related gene 5 in ischemic livers. These results indicate a functional dichotomy of ER stress response in liver IRI via its regulation of autophagy. Transient ischemia activates autophagy to protect livers from IRI, whereas prolonged ischemia inhibits autophagy to promote the development of liver IRI.

  18. Impact of toxicant exposure on the proteomic response to intertidal condition in Mytilus edulis.

    PubMed

    Letendre, Julie; Dupont-Rouzeyrol, Myrielle; Hanquet, Anne-Caroline; Durand, Fabrice; Budzinski, Hélène; Chan, Philippe; Vaudry, David; Rocher, Béatrice

    2011-12-01

    Intertidal blue mussels display physiological adaptations to emersion-submersion cycle that can be impacted by response to chemicals. In order to study the interference of cellular response to pollutants on intertidal physiology, we analysed proteomic (2-DE) responses in gills of mussels exposed for 14 days to regular emersion (intertidal condition) or continuous submersion (subtidal condition) and to a mixture (B[a]P/phenantrene) of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Antioxidant activities were measured as general stress markers. In clean context, emersion generated several over-expressions of proteins mainly involved in cytoskeleton, chaperoning, energetic metabolism and transcription regulation. Mussels exposed to PAHs showed equivalent accumulation levels of contaminants in both physiological conditions but an increased GST activity specifically in intertidal context, highlighting the high degree of stress underwent in this group, as well as over-expressions of Cu/Zn SOD and stress proteins in subtidal context. Presence of contaminants partly impacted the response to emersion: cytoskeletal rearrangements and energetic adjustments were mostly maintained whereas stress response was dramatically altered. These findings highlight the potential adverse effects of toxicants on physiological adjustments linked to air-exposure, thus suggesting to take into account in the evaluation of environmental risk the multiplicity of stresses that wild animals are likely to encounter.

  19. Proteomic analysis of protein expression in Lactobacillus plantarum in response to alkaline stress.

    PubMed

    Lee, KiBeom; Rho, Beom-Seop; Pi, KyungBae; Kim, Ho-Jin; Choi, Yun-Jaie

    2011-04-20

    Lactobacillus plantarum, a probiotic organism that plays an important role in the microbial fermentation of alkaline materials in fermenting foods, faces alkaline stress during the fermentation process. Here, we report the patterns of protein expression in L. plantarum subjected to transient (1h) alkaline stress at pH 7.7, 8.7 or 9.7. Thirty-three alkaline-responsive proteins were identified by two-dimensional electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Identification of proteins showing differential expression in response to alkaline stress revealed that the alkaline stress response of L. plantarum is a complex process. Some proteins appear to be induced, others repressed. These proteins could be clustered into nine groups based on their probable functions: energy metabolism, transport system, purine/pyrimidine metabolism, amino acid metabolism, proteolytic activity, transcription-translation, stress-related, general function, and unknown functions. These proteomic analyses are expected to prove useful in understanding the adaptive response of L. plantarum strains to alkaline stress and may facilitate future investigations into the genetic and physiological aspects of this response.

  20. Comparative proteomic analysis of proteins in response to simulated acid rain in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting-Wu; Fu, Bin; Niu, Li; Chen, Juan; Wang, Wen-Hua; He, Jun-Xian; Pei, Zhen-Ming; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2011-05-06

    A proteomic study using 2-D gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF MS was performed to characterize the responses of Arabidopsis thaliana plants to simulated acid rain (SiAR) stress, which is a global environmental problem and has become a serious issue in China in recent years. The emphasis of the present study was to investigate the overall protein expression changes when exposed to SiAR. Out of over 1000 protein spots reproducibly resolved, 50 of them changed their abundance by at least 2-fold. Analysis of protein expression patterns revealed that a set of proteins associated with energy production, metabolism, cell rescue, cell defense and protein folding, etc., could play important roles in mediating plant response to SiAR. In addition to this, some proteins involved in stress responses and jasmonic acid pathway are also involved in plant response to SiAR. More interestingly, the expression of several ubiquitination-related proteins changed dramatically after 32-h SiAR treatment, suggesting that they may act as a molecular marker for the injury phenotype caused by SiAR. Based on our results, we proposed a schematic model to explain the mechanisms associated with the systematic response of Arabidopsis plants to SiAR.

  1. Experimental obstructive cholestasis: the wound-like inflammatory liver response

    PubMed Central

    Aller, María-Angeles; Arias, Jorge-Luis; García-Domínguez, Jose; Arias, Jose-Ignacio; Durán, Manuel; Arias, Jaime

    2008-01-01

    Obstructive cholestasis causes hepatic cirrhosis and portal hypertension. The pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the development of liver disease are multiple and linked. We propose grouping these mechanisms according to the three phenotypes mainly expressed in the interstitial space in order to integrate them. Experimental extrahepatic cholestasis is the model most frequently used to study obstructive cholestasis. The early liver interstitial alterations described in these experimental models would produce an ischemia/reperfusion phenotype with oxidative and nitrosative stress. Then, the hyperexpression of a leukocytic phenotype, in which Kupffer cells and neutrophils participate, would induce enzymatic stress. And finally, an angiogenic phenotype, responsible for peribiliary plexus development with sinusoidal arterialization, occurs. In addition, an intense cholangiocyte proliferation, which acquires neuroendocrine abilities, stands out. This histopathological finding is also associated with fibrosis. It is proposed that the sequence of these inflammatory phenotypes, perhaps with a trophic meaning, ultimately produces a benign tumoral biliary process – although it poses severe hepatocytic insufficiency. Moreover, the persistence of this benign tumor disease would induce a higher degree of dedifferentiation and autonomy and, therefore, its malign degeneration. PMID:19014418

  2. Cadmium stress responses in Brassica juncea: hints from proteomics and metabolomics.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Angelo; Taamalli, Manel; Gevi, Federica; Timperio, Anna Maria; Zolla, Lello; Ghnaya, Tahar

    2013-11-01

    Among heavy metal stressors, cadmium (Cd) pollution is one leading threat to the environment. In this view, research efforts have been increasingly put forward to promote the individuation of phytoextractor plants that are capable of accumulating and withstanding the toxic metals, including Cd, in the aerial parts. We hereby adopted the hyperaccumulator B. juncea (Indian mustard) as a model to investigate plant responses to Cd stress at low (25 μM) and high (100 μM) doses. Analytical strategies included mass-spectrometry-based determination of Cd and the assessment of its effect on the leaf proteome and metabolome. Results were thus integrated with routine physiological data. Taken together, physiology results highlighted the deregulation of photosynthesis efficiency, ATP synthesis, reduced transpiration, and the impairment of light-independent carbon fixation reactions. These results were supported at the proteomics level by the observed Cd-dependent alteration of photosystem components and the alteration of metabolic enzymes, including ATP synthase subunits, carbonic anhydrase, and enzymes involved in antioxidant responses (especially glutathione and phytochelatin homeostasis) and the Calvin cycle. Metabolomics results confirmed the alterations of energy-generating metabolic pathways, sulfur-compound metabolism (GSH and PCs), and Calvin cycle. Besides, metabolomics results highlighted the up-regulation of phosphoglycolate, a byproduct of the photorespiration metabolism. This was suggestive of the likely increased photorespiration rate as a means to cope with Cd-induced unbalance in stomatal conductance and deregulation of CO2 homeostasis, which would, in turn, promote CO2 depletion and O2 (and thus oxidative stress) accumulation under prolonged photosynthesis in the leaves from plants exposed to high doses of CdCl2. Overall, it emerges that Cd-stressed B. juncea might rely on photorespiration, an adaptation that would prevent the over-reduction of the

  3. Comparison of proteome response to saline and zinc stress in lettuce

    PubMed Central

    Lucini, Luigi; Bernardo, Letizia

    2015-01-01

    Zinc salts occurring in soils can exert an osmotic stress toward plants. However, being zinc a heavy metal, some more specific effects on plant metabolisms can be forecast. In this work, lettuce has been used as a model to investigate salt and zinc stresses at proteome level through a shotgun tandem MS proteomic approach. The effect of zinc stress in lettuce, in comparison with NaCl stress, was evaluated to dissect between osmotic/oxidative stress related effects, from those changes specifically related to zinc. The analysis of proteins exhibiting a fold change of 3 as minimum (on log 2 normalized abundances), revealed the involvement of photosynthesis (via stimulation of chlorophyll synthesis and enhanced role of photosystem I) as well as stimulation of photophosphorylation. Increased glycolytic supply of energy substrates and ammonium assimilation [through formation of glutamine synthetase (GS)] were also induced by zinc in soil. Similarly, protein metabolism (at both transcriptional and ribosomal level), heat shock proteins, and proteolysis were affected. According to their biosynthetic enzymes, hormones appear to be altered by both the treatment and the time point considered: ethylene biosynthesis was enhanced, while production of abscisic acid was up-regulated at the earlier time point to decrease markedly and gibberellins were decreased at the later one. Besides aquaporin PIP2 synthesis, other osmotic/oxidative stress related compounds were enhanced under zinc stress, i.e., proline, hydroxycinnamic acids, ascorbate, sesquiterpene lactones, and terpenoids biosynthesis. Although the proteins involved in the response to zinc stress and to salinity were substantially the same, their abundance changed between the two treatments. Lettuce response to zinc was more prominent at the first sampling point, yet showing a faster adaptation than under NaCl stress. Indeed, lettuce plants showed an adaptation after 30 days of stress, in a more pronounced way in the case of

  4. Molecular responses of radiation-induced liver damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei; Xiao, Lei; Ainiwaer, Aimudula; Wang, Yunlian; Wu, Ge; Mao, Rui; Yang, Ying; Bao, Yongxing

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the molecular responses involved in radiation‑induced liver damage (RILD). Sprague‑Dawley rats (6‑weeks‑old) were irradiated once at a dose of 20 Gy to the right upper quadrant of the abdomen. The rats were then sacrificed 3 days and 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks after irradiation and rats, which were not exposed to irradiation were used as controls. Weight measurements and blood was obtained from the rats and liver tissues were collected for histological and apoptotic analysis. Immunohistochemistry, reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT‑qPCR) and western blot analysis were performed to measure the expression levels of mRNAs and proteins, respectively. The serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase were increased significantly in the RILD rats. Histological investigation revealed the proliferation of collagen and the formation of fibrotic tissue 12 weeks after irradiation. Apoptotic cells were observed predominantly 2 and 4 weeks after irradiation. The immunohistochemistry, RT‑qPCR and western blot analysis all revealed the same pattern of changes in the expression levels of the molecules assessed. The expression levels of transforming growth factor‑β1 (TGF‑β1), nuclear factor (NF)‑κB65, mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 3 (Smad3) and Smad7 and connective tissue growth factor were increased during the recovery period following irradiation up to 12 weeks. The expression levels of tumor necrosis factor‑α, Smad7 and Smad4 were only increased during the early phase (first 4 weeks) of recovery following irradiation. In the RILD rat model, the molecular responses indicated that the TGF‑β1/Smads and NF‑κB65 signaling pathways are involved in the mechanism of RILD recovery.

  5. Integrated Transcriptomic and Proteomic Analysis of the Global Response of Synechococcus to High Light Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Qian; Feng, Jie; Li, Si-ting; Zhang, Gui-ying; Qiao, Zhi-xian; Chen, Zhuo; Wu, Ying; Lin, Yan; Li, Tao; Ge, Feng; Zhao, Jin-dong

    2015-01-01

    Sufficient light is essential for the growth and physiological functions of photosynthetic organisms, but prolonged exposure to high light (HL) stress can cause cellular damage and ultimately result in the death of these organisms. Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 (hereafter Synechococcus 7002) is a unicellular cyanobacterium with exceptional tolerance to HL intensities. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in HL response by Synechococcus 7002 are not well understood. Here, an integrated RNA sequencing transcriptomic and quantitative proteomic analysis was performed to investigate the cellular response to HL in Synechococcus 7002. A total of 526 transcripts and 233 proteins were identified to be differentially regulated under HL stress. Data analysis revealed major changes in mRNAs and proteins involved in the photosynthesis pathways, resistance to light-induced damage, DNA replication and repair, and energy metabolism. A set of differentially expressed mRNAs and proteins were validated by quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. Twelve genes differentially regulated under HL stress were selected for knockout generation and growth analysis of these mutants led to the identification of key genes involved in the response of HL in Synechococcus 7002. Taken altogether, this study established a model for global response mechanisms to HL in Synechococcus 7002 and may be valuable for further studies addressing HL resistance in photosynthetic organisms. PMID:25681118

  6. Evaluating the Hypoxia Response of Ruffe and Flounder Gills by a Combined Proteome and Transcriptome Approach

    PubMed Central

    Tiedke, Jessica; Borner, Janus; Beeck, Hendrik; Kwiatkowski, Marcel; Schmidt, Hanno; Thiel, Ralf; Fabrizius, Andrej; Burmester, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia has gained ecological importance during the last decades, and it is the most dramatically increasing environmental factor in coastal areas and estuaries. The gills of fish are the prime target of hypoxia and other stresses. Here we have studied the impact of the exposure to hypoxia (1.5 mg O2/l for 48 h) on the protein expression of the gills of two estuarine fish species, the ruffe (Gymnocephalus cernua) and the European flounder (Platichthys flesus). First, we obtained the transcriptomes of mixed tissues (gills, heart and brain) from both species by Illumina next-generation sequencing. Then, the gill proteomes were investigated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Quantification of the normalized proteome maps resulted in a total of 148 spots in the ruffe, of which 28 (18.8%) were significantly regulated (> 1.5-fold). In the flounder, 121 spots were found, of which 27 (22.3%) proteins were significantly regulated. The transcriptomes were used for the identification of these proteins, which was successful for 15 proteins of the ruffe and 14 of the flounder. The ruffe transcriptome dataset comprised 87,169,850 reads, resulting in an assembly of 72,108 contigs (N50 = 1,828 bp). 20,860 contigs (26.93%) had blastx hits with E < 1e-5 in the human sequences in the RefSeq database, representing 14,771 unique accession numbers. The flounder transcriptome with 78,943,030 reads assembled into 49,241 contigs (N50 = 2,106 bp). 20,127 contigs (40.87%) had a hit with human proteins, corresponding to 14,455 unique accession numbers. The regulation of selected genes was confirmed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Most of the regulated proteins that were identified by this approach function in the energy metabolism, while others are involved in the immune response, cell signalling and the cytoskeleton. PMID:26273839

  7. S-Nitroso-Proteome in Poplar Leaves in Response to Acute Ozone Stress

    PubMed Central

    Vanzo, Elisa; Ghirardo, Andrea; Merl-Pham, Juliane; Lindermayr, Christian; Heller, Werner; Hauck, Stefanie M.; Durner, Jörg; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Protein S-nitrosylation, the covalent binding of nitric oxide (NO) to protein cysteine residues, is one of the main mechanisms of NO signaling in plant and animal cells. Using a combination of the biotin switch assay and label-free LC-MS/MS analysis, we revealed the S-nitroso-proteome of the woody model plant Populus x canescens. Under normal conditions, constitutively S-nitrosylated proteins in poplar leaves and calli comprise all aspects of primary and secondary metabolism. Acute ozone fumigation was applied to elicit ROS-mediated changes of the S-nitroso-proteome. This treatment changed the total nitrite and nitrosothiol contents of poplar leaves and affected the homeostasis of 32 S-nitrosylated proteins. Multivariate data analysis revealed that ozone exposure negatively affected the S-nitrosylation status of leaf proteins: 23 proteins were de-nitrosylated and 9 proteins had increased S-nitrosylation content compared to the control. Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase 2 (log2[ozone/control] = −3.6) and caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (−3.4), key enzymes catalyzing important steps in the phenylpropanoid and subsequent lignin biosynthetic pathways, respectively, were de-nitrosylated upon ozone stress. Measuring the in vivo and in vitro phenylalanine ammonia-lyase activity indicated that the increase of the phenylalanine ammonia-lyase activity in response to acute ozone is partly regulated by de-nitrosylation, which might favor a higher metabolic flux through the phenylpropanoid pathway within minutes after ozone exposure. PMID:25192423

  8. Proteomic changes of the porcine small intestine in response to chronic heat stress.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yanjun; Gu, Xianhong

    2015-12-01

    Acute heat stress (HS) negatively affects intestinal integrity and barrier function. In contrast, chronic mild HS poses a distinct challenge to animals. Therefore, this study integrates biochemical, histological and proteomic approaches to investigate the effects of chronic HS on the intestine in finishing pigs. Castrated male crossbreeds (79.00 ± 1.50 kg BW) were subjected to either thermal neutral (TN, 21 °C; 55% ± 5% humidity; n=8) or HS conditions (30 °C; 55% ± 5% humidity; n=8) for 3 weeks. The pigs were sacrificed after 3 weeks of high environmental exposure and the plasma hormones, the intestinal morphology, integrity, and protein profiles of the jejunum mucosa were determined. Chronic HS reduced the free triiodothyronine (FT3) and GH levels. HS damaged intestinal morphology, increased plasma d-lactate concentrations and decreased alkaline phosphatase activity of intestinal mucosa. Proteome analysis of the jejunum mucosa was conducted by 2D gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Fifty-three intestinal proteins were found to be differentially abundant, 18 of which were related to cell structure and motility, and their changes in abundance could comprise intestinal integrity and function. The down-regulation of proteins involved in tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle), electron transport chain (ETC), and oxidative phosphorylation suggested that chronic HS impaired energy metabolism and thus induced oxidative stress. Moreover, the changes of ten proteins in abundance related to stress response and defense indicated pigs mediated long-term heat exposure and counteracted its negative effects of heat exposure. These findings have important implications for understanding the effect of chronic HS on intestines.

  9. Normal Liver Tissue Density Dose Response in Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Liver Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, Christopher C.; Stinauer, Michelle A.; Diot, Quentin; Westerly, David C.; Schefter, Tracey E.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Miften, Moyed

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the temporal dose response of normal liver tissue for patients with liver metastases treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Ninety-nine noncontrast follow-up computed tomography (CT) scans of 34 patients who received SBRT between 2004 and 2011 were retrospectively analyzed at a median of 8 months post-SBRT (range, 0.7-36 months). SBRT-induced normal liver tissue density changes in follow-up CT scans were evaluated at 2, 6, 10, 15, and 27 months. The dose distributions from planning CTs were mapped to follow-up CTs to relate the mean Hounsfield unit change ({Delta}HU) to dose received over the range 0-55 Gy in 3-5 fractions. An absolute density change of 7 HU was considered a significant radiographic change in normal liver tissue. Results: Increasing radiation dose was linearly correlated with lower post-SBRT liver tissue density (slope, -0.65 {Delta}HU/5 Gy). The threshold for significant change (-7 {Delta}HU) was observed in the range of 30-35 Gy. This effect did not vary significantly over the time intervals evaluated. Conclusions: SBRT induces a dose-dependent and relatively time-independent hypodense radiation reaction within normal liver tissue that is characterized by a decrease of >7 HU in liver density for doses >30-35 Gy.

  10. The Transcriptome and Proteome of the Diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana Reveal a Diverse Phosphorus Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Dyhrman, Sonya T.; Mercier, Melissa L.; Alexander, Harriet; Whitney, LeAnn P.; Drzewianowski, Andrea; Bulygin, Vladimir V.; Bertrand, Erin M.; Wu, Zhijin; Benitez-Nelson, Claudia; Heithoff, Abigail

    2012-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is a critical driver of phytoplankton growth and ecosystem function in the ocean. Diatoms are an abundant class of marine phytoplankton that are responsible for significant amounts of primary production. With the control they exert on the oceanic carbon cycle, there have been a number of studies focused on how diatoms respond to limiting macro and micronutrients such as iron and nitrogen. However, diatom physiological responses to P deficiency are poorly understood. Here, we couple deep sequencing of transcript tags and quantitative proteomics to analyze the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana grown under P-replete and P-deficient conditions. A total of 318 transcripts were differentially regulated with a false discovery rate of <0.05, and a total of 136 proteins were differentially abundant (p<0.05). Significant changes in the abundance of transcripts and proteins were observed and coordinated for multiple biochemical pathways, including glycolysis and translation. Patterns in transcript and protein abundance were also linked to physiological changes in cellular P distributions, and enzyme activities. These data demonstrate that diatom P deficiency results in changes in cellular P allocation through polyphosphate production, increased P transport, a switch to utilization of dissolved organic P through increased production of metalloenzymes, and a remodeling of the cell surface through production of sulfolipids. Together, these findings reveal that T. pseudonana has evolved a sophisticated response to P deficiency involving multiple biochemical strategies that are likely critical to its ability to respond to variations in environmental P availability. PMID:22479440

  11. A proteomic adaptation of small intestinal mucosa in response to dietary protein limitation

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Chunfu; Qiu, Kai; Sun, Wenjuan; Jiao, Ning; Zhang, Xin; Che, Lianqiang; Zhao, Haiyi; Shen, Hexiao; Yin, Jingdong

    2016-01-01

    Dietary protein limitation (PL) is not only beneficial to human health but also applied to minimize nitrogen excretion in livestock production. However, the impact of PL on intestinal physiology is largely unknown. In this study, we identified 5275 quantitative proteins using a porcine model in which pigs suffered PL. A total of 202 proteins |log2 fold-change| > 1 were taken as differentially expressed proteins and subjected to functional and pathway enrichment analysis to reveal proteomic alterations of the jejunal mucosa. Combining with the results of western blotting analysis, we found that protein/carbohydrate digestion, intestinal mucosal tight junction and cell adhesion molecules, and the immune response to foreign antigens were increased in the jejunal mucosa of the pigs upon PL. In contrast, amino acid transport, innate and auto immunity, as well as cell proliferation and apoptosis were reduced. In addition, the expression of functional proteins that involved in DNA replication, transcription and mRNA splicing as well as translation were altered in the jejunal mucosa in response to PL. Furthermore, PL may reduce amino acid transport and cell proliferation through the depression of mTOR pathway. This study provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the small intestinal response to PL. PMID:27841298

  12. Proteome analysis of the Escherichia coli heat shock response under steady-state conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lüders, Svenja; Fallet, Claas; Franco-Lara, Ezequiel

    2009-01-01

    In this study a proteomic approach was used to investigate the steady-state response of Escherichia coli to temperature up-shifts in a cascade of two continuously operated bioreactors. The first reactor served as cell source with optimal settings for microbial growth, while in the second chemostat the cells were exposed to elevated temperatures. By using this reactor configuration, which has not been reported to be used for the study of bacterial stress responses so far, it is possible to study temperature stress under well-defined, steady-state conditions. Specifically the effect on the cellular adaption to temperature stress using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was examined and compared at the cultivation temperatures of 37°C and 47.5°C. As expected, the steady-state study with the double bioreactor configuration delivered a different protein spectrum compared to that obtained with standard batch experiments in shaking flasks and bioreactors. Setting a high cut-out spot-to-spot size ratio of 5, proteins involved in defence against oxygen stress, functional cell envelope proteins, chaperones and proteins involved in protein biosynthesis, the energy metabolism and the amino acid biosynthesis were found to be differently expressed at high cultivation temperatures. The results demonstrate the complexity of the stress response in a steady-state culture not reported elsewhere to date. PMID:19772559

  13. Examination of metabolic responses to phosphorus limitation via proteomic analyses in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    PubMed

    Feng, Tian-Ya; Yang, Zhi-Kai; Zheng, Jian-Wei; Xie, Ying; Li, Da-Wei; Murugan, Shanmugaraj Bala; Yang, Wei-Dong; Liu, Jie-Sheng; Li, Hong-Ye

    2015-05-28

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential macronutrient for the survival of marine phytoplankton. In the present study, phytoplankton response to phosphorus limitation was studied by proteomic profiling in diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum in both cellular and molecular levels. A total of 42 non-redundant proteins were identified, among which 8 proteins were found to be upregulated and 34 proteins were downregulated. The results also showed that the proteins associated with inorganic phosphate uptake were downregulated, whereas the proteins involved in organic phosphorus uptake such as alkaline phosphatase were upregulated. The proteins involved in metabolic responses such as protein degradation, lipid accumulation and photorespiration were upregulated whereas energy metabolism, photosynthesis, amino acid and nucleic acid metabolism tend to be downregulated. Overall our results showed the changes in protein levels of P. tricornutum during phosphorus stress. This study preludes for understanding the role of phosphorous in marine biogeochemical cycles and phytoplankton response to phosphorous scarcity in ocean. It also provides insight into the succession of phytoplankton community, providing scientific basis for elucidating the mechanism of algal blooms.

  14. Proteomic investigation of male Gammarus fossarum, a freshwater crustacean, in response to endocrine disruptors.

    PubMed

    Trapp, Judith; Armengaud, Jean; Pible, Olivier; Gaillard, Jean-Charles; Abbaci, Khedidja; Habtoul, Yassine; Chaumot, Arnaud; Geffard, Olivier

    2015-01-02

    While the decrease in human sperm count in response to pollutants is a worldwide concern, little attention is being devoted to its causes and occurrence in the biodiversity of the animal kingdom. Arthropoda is the most species-rich phyla, inhabiting all aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. During evolution, key molecular players of the arthropod endocrine system have diverged from the vertebrate counterparts. Consequently, arthropods may have different sensitivities toward endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Here alteration of sperm quality in a crustacean, Gammarus fossarum, a popular organism in freshwater risk assessment, was investigated after laboratory exposure to various concentrations of three different xenobiotics: cadmium, methoxyfenozide, and pyriproxyfen. The integrity of the reproductive process was assessed by means of sperm-quality markers. For each substance, semiquantitative/relative proteomics based on spectral counting procedure was carried out on male gonads to observe the biological impact. The changes in a total of 871 proteins were monitored in response to toxic pressure. A drastic effect was observed on spermatozoon production, with a dose-response relationship. While exposure to EDCs leads to strong modulations of male-specific proteins in testis, no induction of female-specific proteins was noted. Also, a significant portion of orphans proved to be sensitive to toxic stress.

  15. Ultrastructural, physiological and proteomic analysis of Nostoc flagelliforme in response to dehydration and rehydration.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wenyu; Zhou, Youwen; Wang, Lingxia; You, Xiangrong; Zhang, Yaping; Cheng, Chi-Lien; Chen, Wei

    2012-10-22

    Nostoc flagelliforme must undergo a dehydration/rehydration cycle during its growth stages; the mechanisms underlying this constraint are examined. The novel insights into N. flagelliforme's response to desiccation and rehydration at ultrastructural, physiological and proteomic levels were offered. The structure of colonies and cells remained unchanged in response to dehydration and rehydration treatments except that the sheath appeared shrunken, and both the quantity and volume of vacuoles were decreased when dehydrated compared with rehydration. A significant increase in photosynthesis, respiration, total Rubisco activity, superoxide anion level, SOD, CAT, POD, nitrogenase and glutamine synthetase (GS) activities in response to rehydration was noted, whereas H(2)O(2), ammonium, proline and glutamate contents all registered a decrease. 32 differentially expressed proteins between dehydrated and rehydrated colonies were categorized according to their predicted functions into secretion, signaling, transcription and translation, antioxidative processes, nitrogen metabolism, energy metabolism, lipid metabolism and chaperonin. The dehydration is a quiescent state in which metabolism is down-regulated, upon rehydration, a metabolic shift occurs from quiescent to active. The specific metabolic and regulated mechanisms to accommodate the dehydration/rehydration cycle in N. flagelliforme is reported here.

  16. Proteomic insights into adaptive responses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to the repeated vacuum fermentation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jing-Sheng; Zhou, Xiao; Ding, Ming-Zhu; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2009-07-01

    The responses and adaptation mechanisms of the industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae to vacuum fermentation were explored using proteomic approach. After qualitative and quantitative analyses, a total of 106 spots corresponding to 68 different proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The differentially expressed proteins were involved in amino acid and carbohydrate metabolisms, various signal pathways (Ras/MAPK, Ras-cyclic adenosine monophosphate, and HOG pathway), and heat shock and oxidative responses. Among them, alternations in levels of 17 proteins associated with carbohydrate metabolisms, in particular, the upregulations of proteins involved in glycolysis, trehalose biosynthesis, and the pentose phosphate pathway, suggested vacuum-induced redistribution of the metabolic fluxes. The upregulation of 17 heat stress and oxidative response proteins indicated that multifactors contributed to oxidative stresses by affecting cell redox homeostasis. Taken together with upregulation in 14-3-3 proteins levels, 22 proteins were detected in multispots, respectively, indicating that vacuum might have promoted posttranslational modifications of some proteins in S. cerevisiae. Further investigation revealed that the elevations of the differentially expressed proteins were mainly derived from vacuum stress rather than the absence of oxygen. These findings provide new molecular mechanisms for understanding of adaptation and tolerance of yeast to vacuum fermentation.

  17. Rice Responses and Resistance to Planthopper-Borne Viruses at Transcriptomic and Proteomic Levels.

    PubMed

    Cui, Feng; Zhao, Wan; Luo, Lan; Kang, Le

    2016-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa) is one of the most important cereal crops in the world, especially in Asian areas. Rice virus diseases are considered as the most serious threat to rice yields. Most rice viruses are transmitted by hemipteran insects such as planthoppers and leafhoppers. In Asia five rice viruses are transmitted mainly by three planthopper species in a persistent manner: Rice stripe virus, Rice black-streaked dwarf virus, Rice ragged stunt virus, Rice grassy stunt virus, and Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus. In rice antivirus studies, several individual genes have been shown to function in rice resistance to viruses. Since plant responses to viral infection are complex, system-level omic studies are required to fully understand the responses. Recently more and more omic studies have appeared in the literatures on relationships between planthoppers and viruses, employing microarray, RNA-Seq, small RNA deep sequencing, degradome sequencing, and proteomic analysis. In this paper, we review the current knowledge and progress of omic studies in rice plant responses and resistance to four planthopper-borned viruses. We also discuss progress in the omic study of the interactions of planthoppers and rice viruses. Future research directions and translational applications of fundamental knowledge of virus-vector-rice interactions are proposed.

  18. Quantitative Proteomics Reveals the Defense Response of Wheat against Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yuheng; Yu, Yang; Bi, Chaowei; Kang, Zhensheng

    2016-01-01

    Wheat stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), is considered one of the most aggressive diseases to wheat production. In this study, we used an iTRAQ-based approach for the quantitative proteomic comparison of the incompatible Pst race CYR23 in infected and non-infected leaves of the wheat cultivar Suwon11. A total of 3,475 unique proteins were identified from three key stages of interaction (12, 24, and 48 h post-inoculation) and control groups. Quantitative analysis showed that 530 proteins were differentially accumulated by Pst infection (fold changes >1.5, p < 0.05). Among these proteins, 10.54% was classified as involved in the immune system process and stimulus response. Intriguingly, bioinformatics analysis revealed that a set of reactive oxygen species metabolism-related proteins, peptidyl–prolyl cis–trans isomerases (PPIases), RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), and chaperonins was involved in the response to Pst infection. Our results were the first to show that PPIases, RBPs, and chaperonins participated in the regulation of the immune response in wheat and even in plants. This study aimed to provide novel routes to reveal wheat gene functionality and better understand the early events in wheat–Pst incompatible interactions. PMID:27678307

  19. Examination of metabolic responses to phosphorus limitation via proteomic analyses in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Tian-Ya; Yang, Zhi-Kai; Zheng, Jian-Wei; Xie, Ying; Li, Da-Wei; Murugan, Shanmugaraj Bala; Yang, Wei-Dong; Liu, Jie-Sheng; Li, Hong-Ye

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential macronutrient for the survival of marine phytoplankton. In the present study, phytoplankton response to phosphorus limitation was studied by proteomic profiling in diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum in both cellular and molecular levels. A total of 42 non-redundant proteins were identified, among which 8 proteins were found to be upregulated and 34 proteins were downregulated. The results also showed that the proteins associated with inorganic phosphate uptake were downregulated, whereas the proteins involved in organic phosphorus uptake such as alkaline phosphatase were upregulated. The proteins involved in metabolic responses such as protein degradation, lipid accumulation and photorespiration were upregulated whereas energy metabolism, photosynthesis, amino acid and nucleic acid metabolism tend to be downregulated. Overall our results showed the changes in protein levels of P. tricornutum during phosphorus stress. This study preludes for understanding the role of phosphorous in marine biogeochemical cycles and phytoplankton response to phosphorous scarcity in ocean. It also provides insight into the succession of phytoplankton community, providing scientific basis for elucidating the mechanism of algal blooms. PMID:26020491

  20. Proteomic alteration of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 in sepsis regulated by heat shock response.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsiang-Wen; Kuo, Hung-Tien; Hwang, Long-Chih; Kuo, Mei-Fang; Yang, Rei-Cheng

    2007-12-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the proteomic alteration of hepatic mitochondria during sepsis and to explore the possible effects induced by heat shock treatment. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture in Sprague-Dawley rats. Liver mitochondrial proteins were isolated and evaluated by 2-dimensional electrophoresis with broad pH-ranged (pH 3 - 10) immobile DryStrip and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The protein spots were visualized with silver stain and analyzed by Bio-2D software. Results showed that around 120 dominant spots could be separated and visualized distinctly by 2-dimensional electrophoresis analysis. Among them, three spots with the same molecular weight (56.4 kd), mitochondrial protein 1 (MP1), MP2, and MP3, were significantly altered in septic specimens. When analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, the three spots all revealed to be an identical enzyme: aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2, EC 1.2.1.3). During sepsis, MP1 and MP2 were downregulated, whereas MP3 was upregulated concomitantly. Interestingly, heat shock treatment could reverse this phenomenon. Phosphoprotein staining showed that the degree of phosphorylation is higher in MP1 and MP2 than that in MP3. The enzyme activity assay showed that ALDH2 activity was downregulated in nonheated septic rats of 18 h after cecal ligation and puncture operation, and preserved in heated septic rats. The results of this study suggest that posttranslation modification, highly possible the phosphorylation, in ALDH2 may play a functional role in the pathogenesis of sepsis and provide a novel protective mechanism of heat shock treatment.

  1. Comparative Proteomic Characterization of 4 Human Liver-Derived Single Cell Culture Models Reveals Significant Variation in the Capacity for Drug Disposition, Bioactivation, and Detoxication

    PubMed Central

    Sison-Young, Rowena L. C.; Mitsa, Dimitra; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Mottram, David; Alexandre, Eliane; Richert, Lysiane; Aerts, Hélène; Weaver, Richard J.; Jones, Robert P.; Johann, Esther; Hewitt, Philip G.; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus; Goldring, Christopher E. P.; Kitteringham, Neil R.; Park, B. Kevin

    2015-01-01

    In vitro preclinical models for the assessment of drug-induced liver injury (DILI) are usually based on cryopreserved primary human hepatocytes (cPHH) or human hepatic tumor-derived cell lines; however, it is unclear how well such cell models reflect the normal function of liver cells. The physiological, pharmacological, and toxicological phenotyping of available cell-based systems is necessary in order to decide the testing purpose for which they are fit. We have therefore undertaken a global proteomic analysis of 3 human-derived hepatic cell lines (HepG2, Upcyte, and HepaRG) in comparison with cPHH with a focus on drug metabolizing enzymes and transport proteins (DMETs), as well as Nrf2-regulated proteins. In total, 4946 proteins were identified, of which 2722 proteins were common across all cell models, including 128 DMETs. Approximately 90% reduction in expression of cytochromes P450 was observed in HepG2 and Upcyte cells, and approximately 60% in HepaRG cells relative to cPHH. Drug transporter expression was also lower compared with cPHH with the exception of MRP3 and P-gp (MDR1) which appeared to be significantly expressed in HepaRG cells. In contrast, a high proportion of Nrf2-regulated proteins were more highly expressed in the cell lines compared with cPHH. The proteomic database derived here will provide a rational basis for the context-specific selection of the most appropriate ‘hepatocyte-like’ cell for the evaluation of particular cellular functions associated with DILI and, at the same time, assist in the construction of a testing paradigm which takes into account the in vivo disposition of a new drug. PMID:26160117

  2. Rootstock-scion interaction affecting citrus response to CTV infection: a proteomic view.

    PubMed

    Laino, Paolo; Russo, Maria P; Guardo, Maria; Reforgiato-Recupero, Giuseppe; Valè, Giampiero; Cattivelli, Luigi; Moliterni, Vita M C

    2016-04-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is the causal agent of various diseases with dramatic effects on citrus crops worldwide. Most Citrus species, grown on their own roots, are symptomless hosts for many CTV isolates. However, depending on different scion-rootstock combination, CTV infection should result in distinct syndromes, being 'tristeza' the more severe one, leading to a complete decline of the susceptible plants in a few weeks. Transcriptomic analyses revealed several genes involved either in defense response, or systemic acquired resistance, as well as transcription factors and components of the phosphorylation cascades, to be differentially regulated during CTV infection in Citrus aurantifolia species. To date little is known about the molecular mechanism of this host-pathogen interaction, and about the rootstock effect on citrus response to CTV infection. In this work, the response to CTV infection has been investigated in tolerant and susceptible scion-rootstock combinations by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE). A total of 125 protein spots have been found to be differently accumulated and/or phosphorylated between the two rootstock combinations. Downregulation in tolerant plants upon CTV infection was detected for proteins involved in reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging and defense response, suggesting a probable acclimation response able to minimize the systemic effects of virus infection. Some of these proteins resulted to be modulated also in absence of virus infection, revealing a rootstock effect on scion proteome modulation. Moreover, the phospho-modulation of proteins involved in ROS scavenging and defense response, further supports their involvement either in scion-rootstock crosstalk or in the establishment of tolerance/susceptibility to CTV infection.

  3. DNA damage response and sphingolipid signaling in liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Yasunobu; Moro, Kazuki; Tsuchida, Junko; Soma, Daiki; Hirose, Yuki; Kobayashi, Takashi; Kosugi, Shin-ichi; Takabe, Kazuaki; Komatsu, Masaaki; Wakai, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cannot generally be cured by systemic chemotherapy or radiotherapy due to their poor response to conventional therapeutic agents. The development of novel and efficient targeted therapies to increase their treatment options depends on the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms that underlie the pathogenesis of HCC. The DNA damage response (DDR) is a network of cell-signaling events that are triggered by DNA damage. Its dysregulation is thought to be one of the key mechanisms underlying the generation of HCC. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a lipid mediator, has emerged as an important signaling molecule that has been found to be involved in many cellular functions. In the liver, the alteration of S1P signaling potentially affects the DDR pathways. In this review, we explore the role of the DDR in hepatocarcinogenesis of various etiologies, including hepatitis B and C infection and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Furthermore, we discuss the metabolism and functions of S1P that may affect the hepatic DDR. The elucidation of the pathogenic role of S1P may create new avenues of research into therapeutic strategies for patients with HCC. PMID:26514817

  4. Quantitative proteomics reveals dynamic responses of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 to next-generation biofuel butanol.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiaoxu; Chen, Lei; Wang, Jiangxin; Qiao, Jianjun; Zhang, Weiwen

    2013-01-14

    Butanol is a promising biofuel, and recent metabolic engineering efforts have demonstrated the use of photosynthetic cyanobacterial hosts for its production. However, cyanobacteria have very low tolerance to butanol, limiting the economic viability of butanol production from these renewable producing systems. The existing knowledge of molecular mechanism involved in butanol tolerance in cyanobacteria is very limited. To build a foundation necessary to engineer robust butanol-producing cyanobacterial hosts, in this study, the responses of Synechocystis PCC 6803 to butanol were investigated using a quantitative proteomics approach with iTRAQ - LC-MS/MS technologies. The resulting high-quality dataset consisted of 25,347 peptides corresponding to 1452 unique proteins, a coverage of approximately 40% of the predicted proteins in Synechocystis. Comparative quantification of protein abundances led to the identification of 303 differentially regulated proteins by butanol. Annotation and GO term enrichment analysis showed that multiple biological processes were regulated, suggesting that Synechocystis probably employed multiple and synergistic resistance mechanisms in dealing with butanol stress. Notably, the analysis revealed the induction of heat-shock protein and transporters, along with modification of cell membrane and envelope were the major protection mechanisms against butanol. A conceptual cellular model of Synechocystis PCC 6803 responses to butanol stress was constructed to illustrate the putative molecular mechanisms employed to defend against butanol stress.

  5. The quantitative proteomic response of Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 to phosphate acclimation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Inorganic phosphate (Pi) is a critical nutrient for all life and is periodically limiting in marine and freshwater provinces, yet little is understood how organisms acclimate to fluctuations in Pi within their environment. To investigate whole cell adaptation, we grew Synechocystis sp. PCC6803, a model freshwater cyanobacterium, in 3%, and 0.3% inorganic phosphate (Pi) media. The cells were allowed to acclimate over 60 days, and cells were harvested for quantitative high throughput mass spectrometry-based proteomics using the iTRAQ™ labelling technology. Results In total, 120 proteins were identified, and 52 proteins were considered differentially abundant compared to the control. Alkaline phosphatase (APase) activities correlated significantly (p < 0.05) with observed relative PhoA abundances. PstS1 and PstS2 were both observed, yet PstS1 was not differentially more abundant than the control. Phycobilisome protein abundances appeared to be coordinated, and are significantly less abundant in 0.3% Pi than 3% Pi cultures. Also, the central metabolic cell function appears to have shifted towards the production of (NADPH) reducing energy and nucleotide sugars. Conclusions This acclimation response bears strong similarity to the previously reported response to nitrogen deprivation within Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. However, it also demonstrates some characteristics of desiccation stress, such as the regulation of fatty acids and increased abundance of rehydrin in the 3% Pi culture. PMID:23442353

  6. Cellular Proteomes Drive Tissue-Specific Regulation of the Heat Shock Response

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jian; Grant, Christopher E.; Plagens, Rosemary N.; Barrett, Lindsey N.; Guisbert, Karen S. Kim; Guisbert, Eric

    2017-01-01

    The heat shock response (HSR) is a cellular stress response that senses protein misfolding and restores protein folding homeostasis, or proteostasis. We previously identified an HSR regulatory network in Caenorhabditis elegans consisting of highly conserved genes that have important cellular roles in maintaining proteostasis. Unexpectedly, the effects of these genes on the HSR are distinctly tissue-specific. Here, we explore this apparent discrepancy and find that muscle-specific regulation of the HSR by the TRiC/CCT chaperonin is not driven by an enrichment of TRiC/CCT in muscle, but rather by the levels of one of its most abundant substrates, actin. Knockdown of actin subunits reduces induction of the HSR in muscle upon TRiC/CCT knockdown; conversely, overexpression of an actin subunit sensitizes the intestine so that it induces the HSR upon TRiC/CCT knockdown. Similarly, intestine-specific HSR regulation by the signal recognition particle (SRP), a component of the secretory pathway, is driven by the vitellogenins, some of the most abundant secretory proteins. Together, these data indicate that the specific protein folding requirements from the unique cellular proteomes sensitizes each tissue to disruption of distinct subsets of the proteostasis network. These findings are relevant for tissue-specific, HSR-associated human diseases such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. Additionally, we characterize organismal phenotypes of actin overexpression including a shortened lifespan, supporting a recent hypothesis that maintenance of the actin cytoskeleton is an important factor for longevity. PMID:28143946

  7. Quantitative Proteomics Analysis of Herbaceous Peony in Response to Paclobutrazol Inhibition of Lateral Branching

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Daqiu; Gong, Saijie; Hao, Zhaojun; Meng, Jiasong; Tao, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Herbaceous peony (Paeonia lactiflora Pall.) is an emerging high-grade cut flower worldwide, which is usually used in wedding bouquets and known as the “wedding flower”. However, abundant lateral branches appear frequently in some excellent cultivars, and a lack of a method to remove Paeonia lactiflora lateral branches other than inefficient artificial methods is an obstacle for improving the quality of its cut flowers. In this study, paclobutrazol (PBZ) application was found to inhibit the growth of lateral branches in Paeonia lactiflora for the first time, including 96.82% decreased lateral bud number per branch, 77.79% and 42.31% decreased length and diameter of lateral branches, respectively, declined cell wall materials and changed microstructures. Subsequently, isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) technology was used for quantitative proteomics analysis of lateral branches under PBZ application and control. The results indicated that 178 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) successfully obtained, 98 DEPs were up-regulated and 80 DEPs were down-regulated. Thereafter, 34 candidate DEPs associated with the inhibited growth of lateral branches were screened according to their function and classification. These PBZ-stress responsive candidate DEPs were involved in eight biological processes, which played a very important role in the growth and development of lateral branches together with the response to PBZ stress. These results provide a better understanding of the molecular theoretical basis for removing Paeonia lactiflora lateral branches using PBZ application. PMID:26473855

  8. Proteomic and Systems Biology Analysis of the Monocyte Response to Coxiella burnetii Infection

    PubMed Central

    Shipman, Matt; Lubick, Kirk; Fouchard, David; Gurram, Rajani; Grieco, Paul; Jutila, Mark; Dratz, Edward A.

    2013-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii is an obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen and the causative agent of Q fever. Chronic Q fever can produce debilitating fatigue and C. burnetii is considered a significant bioterror threat. C. burnetii occupies the monocyte phagolysosome and although prior work has explained features of the host-pathogen interaction, many aspects are still poorly understood. We have conducted a proteomic investigation of human Monomac I cells infected with the Nine Mile Phase II strain of C. burnetii and used the results as a framework for a systems biology model of the host response. Our principal methodology was multiplex differential 2D gel electrophoresis using ZDyes, a new generation of covalently linked fluorescent protein detection dyes under development at Montana State University. The 2D gel analysis facilitated the detection of changes in posttranslational modifications on intact proteins in response to infection. The systems model created from our data a framework for the design of experiments to seek a deeper understanding of the host-pathogen interactions. PMID:23990884

  9. Quantitative transcriptome, proteome, and sulfur metabolite profiling of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae response to arsenite.

    PubMed

    Thorsen, Michael; Lagniel, Gilles; Kristiansson, Erik; Junot, Christophe; Nerman, Olle; Labarre, Jean; Tamás, Markus J

    2007-06-19

    Arsenic is ubiquitously present in nature, and various mechanisms have evolved enabling cells to evade toxicity and acquire tolerance. Herein, we explored how Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast) respond to trivalent arsenic (arsenite) by quantitative transcriptome, proteome, and sulfur metabolite profiling. Arsenite exposure affected transcription of genes encoding functions related to protein biosynthesis, arsenic detoxification, oxidative stress defense, redox maintenance, and proteolytic activity. Importantly, we observed that nearly all components of the sulfate assimilation and glutathione biosynthesis pathways were induced at both gene and protein levels. Kinetic metabolic profiling evidenced a significant increase in the pools of sulfur metabolites as well as elevated cellular glutathione levels. Moreover, the flux in the sulfur assimilation pathway as well as the glutathione synthesis rate strongly increased with a concomitant reduction of sulfur incorporation into proteins. By combining comparative genomics and molecular analyses, we pinpointed transcription factors that mediate the core of the transcriptional response to arsenite. Taken together, our data reveal that arsenite-exposed cells channel a large part of assimilated sulfur into glutathione biosynthesis, and we provide evidence that the transcriptional regulators Yap1p and Met4p control this response in concert.

  10. Proteome analysis of leaves from the resurrection plant Boea hygrometrica in response to dehydration and rehydration.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guoqiang; Wang, Zhi; Shang, Haihong; Yang, Wenlong; Hu, Zhiang; Phillips, Jonathan; Deng, Xin

    2007-05-01

    Resurrection plants differ from other species in their unique ability to survive desiccation. In order to understand the mechanisms of desiccation tolerance, proteome studies were carried out using leaves of the resurrection plant Boea hygrometrica to reveal proteins that were differentially expressed in response to changes in relative water content. This opportunity was afforded by the rare ability of excised B. hygrometrica leaves to survive and resume metabolism following desiccation in a manner similar to intact plants. From a total of 223 proteins that were reproducibly detected and analyzed, 35% showed increased abundance in dehydrated leaves, 5% were induced in rehydrated leaves and 60% showed decreased or unchanged abundance in dehydrated and rehydrated leaves. Since the induction kinetics fall into clearly defined patterns, we suggest that programmed regulation of protein expression triggered by changes of water status. Fourteen dehydration responsive proteins were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Eight proteins were classified as playing a role in reactive oxygen species scavenging, photosynthesis and energy metabolism. In agreement with these findings, glutathione content and polyphenol oxidase activity were found to increase upon dehydration and rapid recovery of photosynthesis was observed.

  11. A proteomic analysis of salt stress response in seedlings of two African rice cultivars.

    PubMed

    Damaris, Rebecca Njeri; Li, Ming; Liu, Yanli; Chen, Xi; Murage, Hunja; Yang, Pingfang

    2016-11-01

    Salt stress is one of the key abiotic stresses threatening future agricultural production and natural ecosystems. This study investigates the salt stress response of two rice seedlings, which were screened from 28 Kenya rice cultivars. A proteomic analysis was carried out and Mapman bin codes employed in protein function categorization. Proteins in the redox, stress, and signaling categories were identified, and whose expression differed between the salt tolerant and the salt sensitive samples employed in the present study. 104 and 102 root proteins were observed as significantly altered during salt stress in the tolerant and sensitive samples, respectively and 13 proteins were commonly expressed. Among the 13 proteins, ketol-acid reductoisomerase protein was upregulated in both 1 and 3days of salt treatment in the tolerant sample, while it was down-regulated in both 1 and 3days of salt treatment in the sensitive sample. Actin-7, tubulin alpha, V-type proton ATPase, SOD (Cu-Zn), SOD (Mn), and pyruvate decarboxylase were among the observed salt-induced proteins. In general, this study improves our understanding about salt stress response mechanisms in rice.

  12. Differential chromatin proteomics of the MMS-induced DNA damage response in yeast

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Protein enrichment by sub-cellular fractionation was combined with differential-in-gel-electrophoresis (DIGE) to address the detection of the low abundance chromatin proteins in the budding yeast proteome. Comparisons of whole-cell extracts and chromatin fractions were used to provide a measure of the degree of chromatin association for individual proteins, which could be compared across sample treatments. The method was applied to analyze the effect of the DNA damaging agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) on levels of chromatin-associated proteins. Results Up-regulation of several previously characterized DNA damage checkpoint-regulated proteins, such as Rnr4, Rpa1 and Rpa2, was observed. In addition, several novel DNA damage responsive proteins were identified and assessed for genotoxic sensitivity using either DAmP (decreased abundance by mRNA perturbation) or knockout strains, including Acf2, Arp3, Bmh1, Hsp31, Lsp1, Pst2, Rnr4, Rpa1, Rpa2, Ste4, Ycp4 and Yrb1. A strain in which the expression of the Ran-GTPase binding protein Yrb1 was reduced was found to be hypersensitive to genotoxic stress. Conclusion The described method was effective at unveiling chromatin-associated proteins that are less likely to be detected in the absence of fractionation. Several novel proteins with altered chromatin abundance were identified including Yrb1, pointing to a role for this nuclear import associated protein in DNA damage response. PMID:21967861

  13. A proteomic kinetic analysis of IGROV1 ovarian carcinoma cell line response to cisplatin treatment.

    PubMed

    Le Moguen, Karen; Lincet, Hubert; Marcelo, Paulo; Lemoisson, Edwige; Heutte, Natacha; Duval, Marilyne; Poulain, Laurent; Vinh, Joëlle; Gauduchon, Pascal; Baudin, Bruno

    2007-11-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the leading causes of mortality by gynecological cancer. Despite good response to surgery and initial chemotherapy, essentially based on cisplatin (cis-diamino-dichloro-platinum(II) (CDDP)) compounds, frequent recurrences with chemoresistance acquisition are responsible for poor prognosis. Several mechanisms have been described as implicated in CDDP resistance, however they are not sufficient to exhaustively account for this resistance emergence. We applied a proteomic approach based on 2-DE coupled with MS (MALDI-TOF/TOF) to identify proteins associated with chemoresistance induced by CDDP. A kinetic analysis of IGROV1 cell behavior following treatment with CDDP and subsequent statistical analysis revealed time and/or concentration-dependent modifications in protein expression. We evidenced events such as decreased amino-acid and nucleotide synthesis potentially associated with cell cycle blockade, and variations that may be related to resistance acquisition, such as possible enhanced glycolysis and increased proliferating potential. Moreover, overexpressions of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 and both cytokeratins 8 and 18 were consistent with our previous findings, demonstrating that expression of these proteins was increased in cisplatin-resistant IGROV1-R10 as compared to IGROV1 parental cells. Identification of such proteins could allow improved understanding of the mechanisms leading to cell death or survival and, thus, to the acquisition of chemoresistance.

  14. Proteomic analyses provide new insights into the responses of Pinus massoniana seedlings to phosphorus deficiency.

    PubMed

    Fan, Fuhua; Ding, Guijie; Wen, Xiaopeng

    2016-02-01

    Phosphorus is an essential macronutrient for plant growth and development. Plants can respond defensively to phosphorus deficiency by modifying their morphology and metabolic pathways via the differential expression of low phosphate responsive genes. To better understand the mechanisms by which the Masson pine (Pinus massoniana) adapts to phosphorus deficiency, we conducted comparative proteomic analysis using an elite line exhibiting high tolerance to phosphorus deficiency. The selected seedlings were treated with 0.5 mM KH2PO4 (control), 0.01 mM KH2PO4 (P1), or 0.06 mM KH2PO4 (P2) for 48 days. Total protein samples were separated via 2DE. A total of 98 differentially expressed proteins, which displayed at least 1.7-fold change expression compared to the control levels (p ≤ 0.05), were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. These phosphate starvation responsive proteins were implicated in photosynthesis, defense, cellular organization, biosynthesis, energy metabolism, secondary metabolism, signal transduction etc. Therefore, these proteins might play important roles in facilitating internal phosphorus homeostasis. Additionally, the obtained data may be useful for the further characterization of gene function and may provide a foundation for a more comprehensive understanding of the adaptations of the Masson pine to phosphorus-deficient conditions.

  15. Comparative proteomic identification of the hemocyte response to cold stress in white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lanfen; Wang, Anli; Wu, Yingxia

    2013-03-27

    To understand molecular responses of crustacean hemocytes to cold stress, flow cytometer analysis and two-dimensional electrophoresis proteomic approach were used to investigate altered proteins in hemocytes of Litopenaeus vannamei during cold stress treatment. Through flow cytometer analysis, 13°C for 24h post-cold stress was selected as the suitable temperature and condition for cold stress treatment. MALDI-TOF/TOF MS analysis revealed that 6 forms of 6 proteins were significantly up-regulated, including three enzymes (cystathionase, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase and glyoxalase 1) and one immune-related protein (oncoprotein nm23), whereas 24 forms of 3 proteins were significantly down-regulated in the treated shrimp (hemocyanin, hemocyte transglutaminase and transketolase). There were 20 spots identified as hemocyanin meaning that it may play important roles in environmental regulation in shrimp. Real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR confirmed that the levels of transcription of the hemocyanin, partial mRNA for hemocyanin, cystathionase, glyoxalase 1 and oncoprotein nm23 genes were found to relate well with that of their translation products after cold stress treated, while only the levels of hemocyte transglutaminase transcripts were not corresponded with that of their translation products. Further investigation of these data may lead to better understanding of the molecular responses of crustacean hemocytes to cold stress.

  16. Comparative proteomic analysis provides new insights into mulberry dwarf responses in mulberry (Morus alba L.).

    PubMed

    Ji, Xianling; Gai, Yingping; Zheng, Chengchao; Mu, Zhimei

    2009-12-01

    Mulberry dwarf (MD) is a serious infectious disease of mulberry caused by phytoplasma. Infection with MD phytoplasma results in stress phenotypes of yellowing, phyllody, stunting, proliferation, and witches' broom. Physiological and biochemical analysis has shown that infection with MD phytoplasma causes an increase in soluble carbohydrate and starch content, and a decrease in the net photosynthesis rate, carboxylation efficiency, and pigment content of leaves. Furthermore, damage to the chloroplast ultrastructure was detected in infected leaves. To better understand the pathogen-stress response of mulberry (Morus alba L.) to MD phytoplasma, we conducted a comparative proteomic analysis using 2-DE of infected and healthy leaves. Among 500 protein spots that were reproducibly detected, 20 were down-regulated and 17 were up-regulated. MS identified 16 differentially expressed proteins. The photosynthetic proteins rubisco large subunit, rubisco activase, and sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphatase showed enhanced degradation in infected leaves. Based these results, a model for the occurrence mechanism of MD is proposed. In conclusion, this study provides new insights into the mulberry response to MD phytoplasma infection.

  17. Plant physiology and proteomics reveals the leaf response to drought in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Aranjuelo, Iker; Molero, Gemma; Erice, Gorka; Avice, Jean Christophe; Nogués, Salvador

    2011-01-01

    Despite its relevance, protein regulation, metabolic adjustment, and the physiological status of plants under drought is not well understood in relation to the role of nitrogen fixation in nodules. In this study, nodulated alfalfa plants were exposed to drought conditions. The study determined the physiological, metabolic, and proteomic processes involved in photosynthetic inhibition in relation to the decrease in nitrogenase (Nase) activity. The deleterious effect of drought on alfalfa performance was targeted towards photosynthesis and Nase activity. At the leaf level, photosynthetic inhibition was mainly caused by the inhibition of Rubisco. The proteomic profile and physiological measurements revealed that the reduced carboxylation capacity of droughted plants was related to limitations in Rubisco protein content, activation state, and RuBP regeneration. Drought also decreased amino acid content such as asparagine, and glutamic acid, and Rubisco protein content indicating that N availability limitations were caused by Nase activity inhibition. In this context, drought induced the decrease in Rubisco binding protein content at the leaf level and proteases were up-regulated so as to degrade Rubisco protein. This degradation enabled the reallocation of the Rubisco-derived N to the synthesis of amino acids with osmoregulant capacity. Rubisco degradation under drought conditions was induced so as to remobilize Rubisco-derived N to compensate for the decrease in N associated with Nase inhibition. Metabolic analyses showed that droughted plants increased amino acid (proline, a major compound involved in osmotic regulation) and soluble sugar (D-pinitol) levels to contribute towards the decrease in osmotic potential (Ψs). At the nodule level, drought had an inhibitory effect on Nase activity. This decrease in Nase activity was not induced by substrate shortage, as reflected by an increase in total soluble sugars (TSS) in the nodules. Proline accumulation in the nodule

  18. Proteomic analysis of cellular response induced by boron neutron capture reaction in human squamous cell carcinoma SAS cells.

    PubMed

    Sato, Akira; Itoh, Tasuku; Imamichi, Shoji; Kikuhara, Sota; Fujimori, Hiroaki; Hirai, Takahisa; Saito, Soichiro; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Minoru; Murakami, Yasufumi; Baiseitov, Diaz; Berikkhanova, Kulzhan; Zhumadilov, Zhaxybay; Imahori, Yoshio; Itami, Jun; Ono, Koji; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Masutani, Mitsuko

    2015-12-01

    To understand the mechanism of cell death induced by boron neutron capture reaction (BNCR), we performed proteome analyses of human squamous tumor SAS cells after BNCR. Cells were irradiated with thermal neutron beam at KUR after incubation under boronophenylalanine (BPA)(+) and BPA(-) conditions. BNCR mainly induced typical apoptosis in SAS cells 24h post-irradiation. Proteomic analysis in SAS cells suggested that proteins functioning in endoplasmic reticulum, DNA repair, and RNA processing showed dynamic changes at early phase after BNCR and could be involved in the regulation of cellular response to BNCR. We found that the BNCR induces fragments of endoplasmic reticulum-localized lymphoid-restricted protein (LRMP). The fragmentation of LRMP was also observed in the rat tumor graft model 20 hours after BNCT treatment carried out at the National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan. These data suggest that dynamic changes of LRMP could be involved during cellular response to BNCR.

  19. Overlapping and unique signatures in the proteomic and transcriptomic responses of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans toward pathogenic Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wentao; Dierking, Katja; Esser, Daniela; Tholey, Andreas; Leippe, Matthias; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schulenburg, Hinrich

    2015-07-01

    Pathogen infection can activate multiple signaling cascades that ultimately alter the abundance of molecules in cells. This change can be measured both at the transcript and protein level. Studies analyzing the immune response at both levels are, however, rare. Here, we compare transcriptome and proteome data generated after infection of the nematode and model organism Caenorhabditis elegans with the Gram-positive pathogen Bacillus thuringiensis. Our analysis revealed a high overlap between abundance changes of corresponding transcripts and gene products, especially for genes encoding C-type lectin domain-containing proteins, indicating their particular role in worm immunity. We additionally identified a unique signature at the proteome level, suggesting that the C. elegans response to infection is shaped by changes beyond transcription. Such effects appear to be influenced by AMP-activated protein kinases (AMPKs), which may thus represent previously unknown regulators of C. elegans immune defense.

  20. Proteomic study of serum using gel chromatography and MALDI-TOF MS reveals diagnostic biomarkers in male patients with liver-cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xin-Hua; Huang, He-Qing; Chen, Dong-Shi; Jin, Hong-Wei; Huang, Hui-Ying

    2007-03-01

    Human serum has been widely employed clinically for diagnosing various fatal diseases. However, the concentration of most proteins in human serum is too low to be directly measured using normal analytical methods. In order to obtain reliable analytical results from proteomic analysis of human serum, appropriate sample preparation is essential. A combined off-line analytical technique of gel chromatography and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has been successfully established to separate proteins for MS analysis. Using these combined techniques, 176 mass signal peaks of proteins/peptides were found in 6 of 18 fractions from normal male serum (NMS) in the presence of buffer consisting of NH4HCO3 and acetonitrile. A simple gel chromatography column packed with Sephadex G-50 removed most signal-suppressing compounds such as salts and high abundance proteins (HAP). The molecular mass to charge (m/z) ratios of differential peptides revealed in serum of male patient with liver-cancer (LCMPS) compared to NMS were 5365, 5644 and 6462, and these peptides can be used as biomarkers to clinically diagnose liver-cancer. The simple and convenient chromatographic method described here is not only superior to recently described HPLC separation for MS analysis, but also reveals many novel and significant serum biomarkers for the clinical diagnosis of various diseases.

  1. The CD8 T-cell response during tolerance induction in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Yik Chun; McCaughan, Geoffrey W; Bowen, David G; Bertolino, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Both experimental and clinical studies have shown that the liver possesses unique tolerogenic properties. Liver allografts can be spontaneously accepted across complete major histocompatibility mismatch in some animal models. In addition, some liver transplant patients can be successfully withdrawn from immunosuppressive medications, developing ‘operational tolerance'. Multiple mechanisms have been shown to be involved in inducing and maintaining alloimmune tolerance associated with liver transplantation. Here, we focus on CD8 T-cell tolerance in this setting. We first discuss how alloreactive cytotoxic T-cell responses are generated against allografts, before reviewing how the liver parenchyma, donor passenger leucocytes and the host immune system function together to attenuate alloreactive CD8 T-cell responses to promote the long-term survival of liver transplants. PMID:27867515

  2. Complementary PTM Profiling of Drug Response in Human Gastric Carcinoma by Immunoaffinity and IMAC Methods with Total Proteome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, Matthew P.; Farnsworth, Charles L.; Gu, Hongbo; Jia, Xiaoying; Worsfold, Camilla R.; Yang, Vicky; Ren, Jian Min; Lee, Kimberly A.; Silva, Jeffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    Gaining insight into normal cellular signaling and disease biology is a critical goal of proteomic analyses. The ability to perform these studies successfully to extract the maximum value and discovery of biologically relevant candidate biomarkers is therefore of primary importance. Many successful studies in the past have focused on total proteome analysis (changes at the protein level) combined with phosphorylation analysis by metal affinity enrichment (changes at the PTM level). Here, we use the gastric carcinoma cell line MKN-45 treated with the c-Met inhibitor SU11274 and PKC inhibitor staurosporine to investigate the most efficient and most comprehensive strategies for both total protein and PTM analysis. Under the conditions used, total protein analysis yielded few changes in response to either compound, while analysis of phosphorylation identified thousands of sites that changed differentially between the two treatments. Both metal affinity and antibody-based enrichments were used to assess phosphopeptide changes, and the data generated by the two methods was largely complementary (non-overlapping). Label-free quantitation of peptide peak abundances was used to accurately determine fold-changes between control and treated samples. Protein interaction network analysis allowed the data to be placed in a biologically relevant context, and follow-up validation of selected findings confirmed the accuracy of the proteomic data. Together, this study provides a framework for start-to-finish proteomic analysis of any experimental system under investigation to maximize the value of the proteomic study and yield the best chance for uncovering actionable target candidates. PMID:28248267

  3. Environmental enrichment alters protein expression as well as the proteomic response to cocaine in rat nucleus accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Lichti, Cheryl F.; Fan, Xiuzhen; English, Robert D.; Zhang, Yafang; Li, Dingge; Kong, Fanping; Sinha, Mala; Andersen, Clark R.; Spratt, Heidi; Luxon, Bruce A.; Green, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Prior research demonstrated that environmental enrichment creates individual differences in behavior leading to a protective addiction phenotype in rats. Understanding the mechanisms underlying this phenotype will guide selection of targets for much-needed novel pharmacotherapeutics. The current study investigates differences in proteome expression in the nucleus accumbens of enriched and isolated rats and the proteomic response to cocaine self-administration using a liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LCMS) technique to quantify 1917 proteins. Results of complementary Ingenuity Pathways Analyses (IPA) and gene set enrichment analyses (GSEA), both performed using protein quantitative data, demonstrate that cocaine increases vesicular transporters for dopamine and glutamate as well as increasing proteins in the RhoA pathway. Further, cocaine regulates proteins related to ERK, CREB and AKT signaling. Environmental enrichment altered expression of a large number of proteins implicated in a diverse number of neuronal functions (e.g., energy production, mRNA splicing, and ubiquitination), molecular cascades (e.g., protein kinases), psychiatric disorders (e.g., mood disorders), and neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., Huntington's and Alzheimer's diseases). Upregulation of energy metabolism components in EC rats was verified using RNA sequencing. Most of the biological functions and pathways listed above were also identified in the Cocaine X Enrichment interaction analysis, providing clear evidence that enriched and isolated rats respond quite differently to cocaine exposure. The overall impression of the current results is that enriched saline-administering rats have a unique proteomic complement compared to enriched cocaine-administering rats as well as saline and cocaine-taking isolated rats. These results identify possible mechanisms of the protective phenotype and provide fertile soil for developing novel pharmacotherapeutics. Proteomics data are available via

  4. Proteomic and metabolomic responses in D-shape larval mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis exposed to cadmium and arsenic.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huifeng; Xu, Lanlan; Ji, Chenglong; Yu, Deliang

    2016-11-01

    Cadmium (Cd) and arsenic (As) are the main metal/metalloid contaminants in the coastal environments of the Bohai Sea, China. In this work, a combined proteomic and metabolomic approach was applied to investigate the biological effects of Cd and As (V) in the early life stage (D-shape larvae) of mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. Results indicated that Cd was a potential immune toxicant to D-shape larval mussel because of the numerous proteomic responses related to immune system. Additionally, Cd induced oxidative stress, cellular injury and disturbance in nucleic acid metabolism in D-shape larval mussels. However, only two identified proteins were significantly altered in As (V)-treated group, suggesting that D-shape larval mussel was less sensitive to As (V) than to Cd at protein level. These two proteins in response to As (V) suggested that As (V) influenced anti-oxidative system and cell proliferation in D-shape larval mussels. Metabolic responses indicated that Cd and As (V) induced disturbances in osmotic regulation and energy metabolism in D-shape larval mussels via different metabolic pathways. In addition, Cd reduced lipid metabolism as well. This work demonstrated that a combination of proteomics and metabolomics could provide an insightful view in the biological effects of pollutants in mussel M. galloprovincialis at an early life stage.

  5. Physiological and proteomic analyses of salt stress response in the halophyte Halogeton glomeratus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juncheng; Meng, Yaxiong; Li, Baochun; Ma, Xiaole; Lai, Yong; Si, Erjing; Yang, Ke; Xu, Xianliang; Shang, Xunwu; Wang, Huajun; Wang, Di

    2015-01-01

    Very little is known about the adaptation mechanism of Chenopodiaceae Halogeton glomeratus, a succulent annual halophyte, under saline conditions. In this study, we investigated the morphological and physiological adaptation mechanisms of seedlings exposed to different concentrations of NaCl treatment for 21 d. Our results revealed that H. glomeratus has a robust ability to tolerate salt; its optimal growth occurs under approximately 100 mm NaCl conditions. Salt crystals were deposited in water-storage tissue under saline conditions. We speculate that osmotic adjustment may be the primary mechanism of salt tolerance in H. glomeratus, which transports toxic ions such as sodium into specific salt-storage cells and compartmentalizes them in large vacuoles to maintain the water content of tissues and the succulence of the leaves. To investigate the molecular response mechanisms to salt stress in H. glomeratus, we conducted a comparative proteomic analysis of seedling leaves that had been exposed to 200 mm NaCl for 24 h, 72 h and 7 d. Forty-nine protein spots, exhibiting significant changes in abundance after stress, were identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS/MS) and similarity searches across EST database of H. glomeratus. These stress-responsive proteins were categorized into nine functional groups, such as photosynthesis, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, and stress and defence response. PMID:25124288

  6. Unraveling the iron deficiency responsive proteome in Arabidopsis shoot by iTRAQ-OFFGEL approach.

    PubMed

    Zargar, Sajad Majeed; Kurata, Rie; Inaba, Shoko; Fukao, Yoichiro

    2013-10-01

    Iron (Fe) is required by plants for basic redox reactions in photosynthesis and respiration, and for many other key enzymatic reactions in biological processes. Fe homeostatic mechanisms have evolved in plants to enable the uptake and sequestration of Fe in cells. To elucidate the network of proteins that regulate Fe homeostasis and transport, we optimized the iTRAQ-OFFGEL method to identify and quantify the number of proteins that respond to Fe deficiency in the model plant Arabidopsis. In this study, Fe deficiency was created using Fe-deficient growth conditions, excess zinc (Zn), and use of the irt1-1 mutant in which the IRT1 Fe transporter is disrupted. Using the iTRAQ-OFFGEL approach, we identified 1139 proteins, including novel Fe deficiency-responsive proteins, in microsomal fractions isolated from 3 different types of Fe-deficient shoots compared with just 233 proteins identified using conventional iTRAQ-CEX. Further analysis showed that greater numbers of low-abundance proteins could be identified using the iTRAQ-OFFGEL method and that proteins could be identified from numerous cellular compartments. The improved iTRAQ-OFFGEL method used in this study provided an efficient means for identifying greater numbers of proteins from microsomal fractions of Arabidopsis shoots. The proteome identified in this study provides new insight into the regulatory cross talk between Fe-deficient and excess Zn conditions.

  7. Insights into the cellular response triggered by silver nanoparticles using quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Verano-Braga, Thiago; Miethling-Graff, Rona; Wojdyla, Katarzyna; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Brewer, Jonathan R; Erdmann, Helmut; Kjeldsen, Frank

    2014-03-25

    The use of nanoparticles in foods, materials, and clinical treatments has increased dramatically in the past decade. Because of the possibility of human exposure to nanoparticles, there is an urgent need to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the cellular responses that might be triggered. Such information is necessary to assess potential health risks arising from the use of nanoparticles, and for developing new formulations of next generation nanoparticles for clinical treatments. Using mass spectrometry-based proteomic technologies and complementary techniques (e.g., Western blotting and confocal laser scanning microscopy), we present insights into the silver nanoparticle-protein interaction in the human LoVo cell line. Our data indicate that some unique cellular processes are driven by the size. The 100 nm nanoparticles exerted indirect effects via serine/threonine protein kinase (PAK), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and phosphatase 2A pathways, and the 20 nm nanoparticles induced direct effects on cellular stress, including generation of reactive oxygen species and protein carbonylation. In addition, we report that proteins involved in SUMOylation were up-regulated after exposure to 20 nm silver nanoparticles. These results were further substantiated by the observation of silver nanoparticles entering the cells; however, data indicate that this was determined by the size of the nanoparticles, since 20 nm particles entered the cells while 100 nm particles did not.

  8. Copper response of Proteus hauseri based on proteomic and genetic expression and cell morphology analyses.

    PubMed

    Ng, I-Son; Zheng, Xuesong; Wang, Nan; Chen, Bor-Yann; Zhang, Xia; Lu, Yinghua

    2014-07-01

    The copper response of Proteus hauseri ZMd44 was determined using one-dimensional (1D) gel electrophoresis coupled with MALDI-TOF-TOF mass spectrometry for a similarity analysis of proteins isolated from P. hauseri ZMd44 cultured in CuSO4-bearing LB medium. Candidate proteins identified as a copper-transporting P-type ATPase (CTPP), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), flagellin (Fla), and outer membrane proteins (Omps) were the major copper-associated proteins in P. hauseri. In a comparative analysis of subcellular (i.e., periplasmic, intracellular, and inner membranes) and cellular debris, proteomics analysis revealed a distinct differential expression of proteins in P. hauseri with and without copper ion exposure. These findings were consistent with the transcription level dynamics determined using quantitative real-time PCR. Based on a genetic cluster analysis of copper-associated proteins from P. hauseri, Fla and one of the Omps showed greater diversity in their protein sequences compared to those of other Proteus species. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the observed growth on LB agar plates showed that the swarming motility of cells was significantly suppressed and inhibited upon Cu(II) exposure. Thus, copper stress could have important therapeutic significance due to the loss of swarming motility capacity in P. hauseri, which causes urinary tract infections.

  9. Cellular response to empty and palladium-conjugated amino-polystyrene nanospheres uptake: a proteomic study.

    PubMed

    Pietrovito, Laura; Cano-Cortés, Victoria; Gamberi, Tania; Magherini, Francesca; Bianchi, Laura; Bini, Luca; Sánchez-Martín, Rosario M; Fasano, Mauro; Modesti, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Amino polystyrene nanospheres are shown to be efficient and controllable delivery devices, capable of transporting several bioactive cargoes. Recently, the design of a new device for prodrug activation, using these nanospheres with palladium encapsulated onto them, has been developed successfully. To study the influence of the cellular uptake of these nanodevices, we investigated the cellular response of human embryonic kidney cells (HEK-293T) and murine fibroblasts (L929) treated with empty or palladium-conjugated amino polystyrene nanospheres. To identify differentially expressed proteins, we performed an exhaustive proteomic analysis. In accordance with genomic data previously obtained, the uptake of the empty nanospheres did not induce significant variation in protein expression levels. Following the treatment with palladium-conjugated nanospheres, some changes in protein profiles in both cell lines were observed; these alterations affect proteins involved in cell metabolism and intracellular transport. No key regulator of the cell cycle result was differentially expressed after the treatment, confirming that these innovative drug delivery systems are harmless and well tolerated by the cells.

  10. Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA010 Proteome Implicates Extracytoplasmic Function Sigma Factor in Stress Response

    DOE PAGES

    Allen, Michael S.; Hurst, Gregory B.; Lu, Tse-Yuan S.; ...

    2015-04-08

    Rhodopseudomonas palustris encodes 16 extracytoplasmic function (ECF) σ factors. In this paper, to begin to investigate the regulatory network of one of these ECF σ factors, the whole proteome of R. palustris CGA010 was quantitatively analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry from cultures episomally expressing the ECF σRPA4225 (ecfT) versus a WT control. Among the proteins with the greatest increase in abundance were catalase KatE, trehalose synthase, a DPS-like protein, and several regulatory proteins. Alignment of the cognate promoter regions driving expression of several upregulated proteins suggested a conserved binding motif in the -35 and -10 regions with the consensus sequencemore » GGAAC-18N-TT. Additionally, the putative anti-σ factor RPA4224, whose gene is contained in the same predicted operon as RPA4225, was identified as interacting directly with the predicted response regulator RPA4223 by mass spectrometry of affinity-isolated protein complexes. Furthermore, another gene (RPA4226) coding for a protein that contains a cytoplasmic histidine kinase domain is located immediately upstream of RPA4225. The genomic organization of orthologs for these four genes is conserved in several other strains of R. palustris as well as in closely related α-Proteobacteria. Finally, taken together, these data suggest that ECF σRPA4225 and the three additional genes make up a sigma factor mimicry system in R. palustris.« less

  11. Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA010 Proteome Implicates Extracytoplasmic Function Sigma Factor in Stress Response

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Michael S.; Hurst, Gregory B.; Lu, Tse-Yuan S.; Perry, Leslie M.; Pan, Chongle; Lankford, Patricia K.; Pelletier, Dale A.

    2015-04-08

    Rhodopseudomonas palustris encodes 16 extracytoplasmic function (ECF) σ factors. In this paper, to begin to investigate the regulatory network of one of these ECF σ factors, the whole proteome of R. palustris CGA010 was quantitatively analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry from cultures episomally expressing the ECF σRPA4225 (ecfT) versus a WT control. Among the proteins with the greatest increase in abundance were catalase KatE, trehalose synthase, a DPS-like protein, and several regulatory proteins. Alignment of the cognate promoter regions driving expression of several upregulated proteins suggested a conserved binding motif in the -35 and -10 regions with the consensus sequence GGAAC-18N-TT. Additionally, the putative anti-σ factor RPA4224, whose gene is contained in the same predicted operon as RPA4225, was identified as interacting directly with the predicted response regulator RPA4223 by mass spectrometry of affinity-isolated protein complexes. Furthermore, another gene (RPA4226) coding for a protein that contains a cytoplasmic histidine kinase domain is located immediately upstream of RPA4225. The genomic organization of orthologs for these four genes is conserved in several other strains of R. palustris as well as in closely related α-Proteobacteria. Finally, taken together, these data suggest that ECF σRPA4225 and the three additional genes make up a sigma factor mimicry system in R. palustris.

  12. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Brassica napus in Response to Drought Stress.

    PubMed

    Koh, Jin; Chen, Gang; Yoo, Mi-Jeong; Zhu, Ning; Dufresne, Daniel; Erickson, John E; Shao, Hongbo; Chen, Sixue

    2015-08-07

    Drought is one of the most widespread stresses leading to retardation of plant growth and development. We examined proteome changes of an important oil seed crop, canola (Brassica napus L.), under drought stress over a 14-day period. Using iTRAQ LC-MS/MS, we identified 1976 proteins expressed during drought stress. Among them, 417 proteins showed significant changes in abundance, and 136, 244, 286, and 213 proteins were differentially expressed in the third, seventh, 10th, and 14th day of stress, respectively. Functional analysis indicated that the number of proteins associated with metabolism, protein folding and degradation, and signaling decreased, while those related to energy (photosynthesis), protein synthesis, and stress and defense increased in response to drought stress. The seventh and 10th-day profiles were similar to each other but with more post-translational modifications (PTMs) at day 10. Interestingly, 181 proteins underwent PTMs; 49 of them were differentially changed in drought-stressed plants, and 33 were observed at the 10th day. Comparison of protein expression changes with those of gene transcription showed a positive correlation in B. napus, although different patterns between transcripts and proteins were observed at each time point. Under drought stress, most protein abundance changes may be attributed to gene transcription, and PTMs clearly contribute to protein diversity and functions.

  13. Comparative Proteomic Insights into the Lactate Responses of Halophilic Salinicoccus roseus W12

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongyan; Wang, Limin; Yang, Han; Cai, Yumeng; Sun, Lifan; Xue, Yanfen; Yu, Bo; Ma, Yanhe

    2015-01-01

    Extremophiles use adaptive mechanisms to survive in extreme environments, which is of great importance for several biotechnological applications. A halophilic strain, Salinicoccus roseus W12, was isolated from salt lake in Inner Mongolia, China in this study. The ability of the strain to survive under high sodium conditions (including 20% sodium lactate or 25% sodium chloride, [w/v]) made it an ideal host to screen for key factors related to sodium lactate resistance. The proteomic responses to lactate were studied using W12 cells cultivated with or without lactate stress. A total of 1,656 protein spots in sodium lactate-treated culture and 1,843 spots in NaCl-treated culture were detected by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and 32 of 120 significantly altered protein spots (fold change > 2, p < 0.05) were identified by matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Among 21 successfully identified spots, 19 proteins were upregulated and 2 were downregulated. The identified proteins are mainly involved in metabolism, cellular processes and signaling, and information storage and processing. Transcription studies confirmed that most of the encoding genes were upregulated after the cells were exposed to lactate in 10 min. Cross-protecting and energy metabolism-related proteins played an important role in lactate tolerance for S. roseus W12. PMID:26358621

  14. Profiling of Host Cell Response to Successive Canine Parvovirus Infection Based on Kinetic Proteomic Change Identification

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hang; Cheng, Yuening; Wang, Jianke; Lin, Peng; Yi, Li; Sun, Yaru; Ren, Jingqiang; Tong, Mingwei; Cao, Zhigang; Li, Jiawei; Deng, Jinliang; Cheng, Shipeng

    2016-01-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) reproduces by co-opting the resources of host cells, inevitably causing cytotoxic effects to the host cells. Feline kidney F81 cells are sensitive to CPV infection and show disparate growing statuses at different time points post-infection. This study analysed the response of F81 cells to CPV infection at successive infection time points by iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics. Differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) during 60 h of infection and at selected time points post-infection were identified by an analysis of variance test and a two-tailed unpaired t test, respectively. DEPs with similar quantitative changes were clustered by hierarchical clustering and analysed by gene ontology enrichment, revealing that 12 h and 60 h post-infection were the optimal times to analyse the autonomous parvovirus replication and apoptosis processes, respectively. Using the MetacoreTM database, 29 DEPs were enriched in a network involved in p53 regulation. Besides, a significantly enriched pathway suggests that the CPV-induced cytopathic effect was probably due to the deficiency of functional CFTR caused by CPV infection. This study uncovered the systemic changes in key cellular factors involved in CPV infection and help to understand the molecular mechanisms of the anti-cancer activity of CPV and the cytopathic effects induced by CPV infection. PMID:27406444

  15. Hop (Humulus lupulus L.) response mechanisms in drought stress: Proteomic analysis with physiology.

    PubMed

    Kolenc, Zala; Vodnik, Dominik; Mandelc, Stanislav; Javornik, Branka; Kastelec, Damijana; Čerenak, Andreja

    2016-08-01

    Drought is one of the major environmental devastating stressors that impair the growth and productivity of crop plants. Despite the relevance of drought stress, changes in physiology and resistance mechanisms are not completely understood for certain crops, including hop (Humulus lupulus L.). In this research the drought response of hop was studied using a conventional physiological approach (gas exchange techniques, fluorescence, relative water content measurements) and proteomic analysis (2D-DIGE). Plants of two cultivars (Aurora and Savinjski golding) were exposed to progressive drought in a pot experiment and analysed at different stress stages (mild, moderate and severe). Measurements of relative water content revealed a hydrostable water balance of hop. Photosynthesis was decreased due to stomatal and non-stomatal limitation to the same extent in both cultivars. Of 28 identified differentially abundant proteins, the majority were down regulated and included in photosynthetic (41%) and sugar metabolism (33%). Fifteen % of identified proteins were classified into the nitrogen metabolism, 4% were related to a ROS related pathway and 7% to other functions.

  16. Identification of flooding stress responsible cascades in root and hypocotyl of soybean using proteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Setsuko; Sugimoto, Tetsuya; Hoshino, Tomoki; Nanjo, Yohei; Furukawa, Kiyoshi

    2010-03-01

    Flooding inducible proteins were analyzed using a proteomic technique to understand the mechanism of soybean response to immersion in water. Soybeans were germinated for 2 days, and then subjected to flooding for 2 days. Proteins were extracted from root and hypocotyl, separated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, stained by Coomassie brilliant blue, and analyzed by protein sequencing and mass spectrometry. Out of 803 proteins, 21 proteins were significantly up-regulated, and seven proteins were down-regulated by flooding stress. Of the total, 11 up-regulated proteins were classified as related to protein destination/storage and three proteins to energy, while four down-regulated proteins were related to protein destination/storage and three proteins to disease/defense. The expression of 22 proteins significantly changed within 1 day after flooding stress. The effects of flooding, nitrogen substitution without flooding, or flooding with aeration were analyzed for 1-4 days. The expression of alcohol dehydrogenase increased remarkably by nitrogen substitution compared to flooding. The expression of many proteins that changed due to flooding showed the same tendencies observed for nitrogen substitution; however, the expression of proteins classified into protein destination/storage did not.

  17. The proteomic response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in very high glucose conditions with amino acid supplementation.

    PubMed

    Pham, Trong Khoa; Wright, Phillip C

    2008-11-01

    Ethanol yield by Saccharomyces cerevisiae in very high glucose (VHG) media with an amino acid supplement was investigated. Amino acid supplementation led to positive cell responses, including reduced lag time and increased cell viability in VHG media. A quantitative shotgun proteomic analysis was used to understand how amino acid supplemented S. cerevisiae responds to high osmotic conditions. iTRAQ data revealed that most proteins involved in glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathways were up-regulated under high glucose shock. Reactivation of amino acid metabolism was also observed at the end of the lag phase. The relative abundance of most identified proteins, including aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis proteins, and heat-shock proteins, remained unchanged in the hours immediately following application of glucose shock. However, the expression of these proteins increased significantly at the end of the lag phase. Furthermore, the up-regulation of trehalose and glycogen biosynthesis proteins, first maintaining then latterly increasing glycolysis pathway activity was also observed. This was verified by enhanced ethanol yields at 10 and 12 h (0.43 and 0.45 g ethanol/g glucose) compared to 2 h (0.32 g ethanol/g glucose). These data combined with relevant metabolite measurements demonstrates that enhanced ethanol fermentation under VHG conditions can be achieved with the aid of amino acid supplementation.

  18. The response of Populus spp. to cadmium stress: chemical, morphological and proteomics study.

    PubMed

    Marmiroli, Marta; Imperiale, Davide; Maestri, Elena; Marmiroli, Nelson

    2013-10-01

    Poplar (Populus) species are seen as candidates for removing heavy metal contamination from polluted soil. A bottom-up multidisciplinary approach was utilized to compare the performances of clones 58-861 and Poli (Populus nigra) and A4A, a Populus nigra × Populus deltoides hybrid to Cd toxicity. Qualitative and quantitative differences in their tolerance to Cd exposure and the uptake, accumulation and translocation of Cd were noted following the hydroponic exposure of rooted cuttings to 20 μM CdSO₄ for either 48 h or 14 d. Cadmium was less toxic for the hybrid clone A4A as compared to Poli and 58-861. Cd uptake and root to shoot translocation were determined by AAS, and its compartmentation was analyzed using SEM/EDX. A comparative proteomic approach was utilized to identify changes in proteins expression according to dose and time of exposure. Toxicity to Cd mainly influenced proteins related to general defense, stress response and carbohydrate metabolism.

  19. Cytokine/Chemokine Secretion and Proteomic Identification of Upregulated Annexin A1 from Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Cocultured with the Liver Fluke Opisthorchis viverrini

    PubMed Central

    Hongsrichan, Nuttanan; Intuyod, Kitti; Pinlaor, Porntip; Khoontawad, Jarinya; Yongvanit, Puangrat; Wongkham, Chaisiri; Roytrakul, Sittiruk

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the cytokine/chemokine secretions and alteration of protein expression from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) cocultured with adult liver flukes (Opisthorchis viverrini) for 6 to 24 h. PBMC-derived proteins were identified by two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, and the cytokines/chemokines in the supernatant were assessed using a cytokine array. Exposure to O. viverrini induced increases in secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, costimulating protein, adhesion molecules, and chemotactic chemokines relative to untreated controls. In contrast, secretion of the CD40 ligand, interleukin 16, and macrophage inflammatory protein 1β decreased. Proteomic analysis revealed that expression of 48 proteins was significantly altered in PBMCs stimulated with O. viverrini. Annexin A1 (ANXA1) was selected for further study, and immunoblotting showed upregulation of ANXA1 expression in PBMCs after 12 and 24 h coculture with liver flukes. In an in vivo study, transcription and translation of ANXA1 significantly increased in livers of hamsters infected with O. viverrini at 21 days and from 3 months onwards compared to normal controls. Interestingly, immunohistochemistry revealed that ANXA1 was present not only in the cytoplasm of inflammatory cells but also in the cytoplasm of cholangiocytes, which are in close contact with the parasite and its excretory/secretory products in the biliary system. Expression of ANXA1 increased with time concomitant with bile duct enlargement, bile duct formation, and epithelial cell proliferation. In conclusion, several cytokines/chemokines secreted by PBMCs and upregulation of ANXA1 in PBMCs and biliary epithelial cells might have a role in host defense against O. viverrini infection and tissue resolution of inflammation. PMID:24614660

  20. The revised human liver cytochrome P450 "Pie": absolute protein quantification of CYP4F and CYP3A enzymes using targeted quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Michaels, Scott; Wang, Michael Zhuo

    2014-08-01

    The CYP4F subfamily of enzymes has been identified recently to be involved in the metabolism of endogenous compounds (arachidonic acid and leukotriene B4), nutrients (vitamins K1 and E), and xenobiotics (pafuramidine and fingolimod). CYP4F2 and CYP4F3B are reported to be expressed in the human liver. However, absolute concentrations of these enzymes in human liver microsomes (HLMs) and their interindividual variability have yet to be determined because of the lack of specific antibodies. Here, an liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based targeted quantitative proteomic approach was employed to determine the absolute protein concentrations of CYP4F2 and CYP4F3B compared with CYP3A in two panels of HLMs (n = 31). As a result, the human hepatic cytochrome P450 (P450) "pie" has been revised to include the contribution of CYP4F enzymes, which amounts to 15% of the total hepatic cytochrome P450 enzymes. CYP4F3B displayed low interindividual variability (3.3-fold) in the HLM panels whereas CYP4F2 displayed large variability (21-fold). However, CYP4F2 variability decreased to 3.4-fold if the two donors with the lowest expression were excluded. In contrast, CYP3A exhibited 29-fold interindividual variability in the same HLM panels. The proposed marker reaction for CYP4F enzymes pafuramidine/DB289 M1 formation did not correlate with CYP4F protein content, suggesting alternate metabolic pathways for DB289 M1 formation in HLMs. In conclusion, CYP4F enzymes are highly expressed in the human liver and their physiologic and pharmacologic roles warrant further investigation.

  1. Proteomic analysis of duck fatty liver during post-mortem storage related to the variability of fat loss during cooking of "foie gras".

    PubMed

    Theron, Laetitia; Fernandez, Xavier; Marty-Gasset, Nathalie; Chambon, Christophe; Viala, Didier; Pichereaux, Carole; Rossignol, Michel; Astruc, Thierry; Molette, Caroline

    2013-01-30

    Fat loss during cooking of duck "foie gras" is the main problem for both manufacturers and consumers. Despite the efforts of the processing industry to control fat loss, the variability of fatty liver cooking yields remains high and uncontrolled. To understand the biochemical effects of postslaughter processing on fat loss during cooking, this study characterizes for the first time the protein expression of fatty liver during chilling using a proteomic approach. For this purpose the proteins were separated according to their solubility: the protein fraction soluble in a buffer of low ionic strength (S) and the protein fraction insoluble in the same buffer (IS). Two-dimensional electrophoresis was used to analyze the S fraction and mass spectrometry for the identification of spots of interest. This analysis revealed 36 (21 identified proteins) and 34 (26 identified proteins) spots of interests in the low-fat-loss and high-fat-loss groups, respectively. The expression of proteins was lower after chilling, which revealed a suppressive effect of chilling on biological processes. The shot-gun strategy was used to analyze the IS fraction, with the identification of all the proteins by mass spectrometry. This allowed identification of 554 and 562 proteins in the low-fat-loss and high-fat-loss groups, respectively. Among these proteins, only the proteins that were up-regulated in the high-fat-loss group were significant (p value = 3.17 × 10(-3)) and corresponded to protein from the cytoskeleton and its associated proteins. Taken together, these results suggest that the variability of technological yield observed in processing plants could be explained by different aging states of fatty livers during chilling, most likely associated with different proteolytic patterns.

  2. Cytokine/chemokine secretion and proteomic identification of upregulated annexin A1 from peripheral blood mononuclear cells cocultured with the liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini.

    PubMed

    Hongsrichan, Nuttanan; Intuyod, Kitti; Pinlaor, Porntip; Khoontawad, Jarinya; Yongvanit, Puangrat; Wongkham, Chaisiri; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Pinlaor, Somchai

    2014-05-01

    We investigated the cytokine/chemokine secretions and alteration of protein expression from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) cocultured with adult liver flukes (Opisthorchis viverrini) for 6 to 24 h. PBMC-derived proteins were identified by two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, and the cytokines/chemokines in the supernatant were assessed using a cytokine array. Exposure to O. viverrini induced increases in secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, costimulating protein, adhesion molecules, and chemotactic chemokines relative to untreated controls. In contrast, secretion of the CD40 ligand, interleukin 16, and macrophage inflammatory protein 1β decreased. Proteomic analysis revealed that expression of 48 proteins was significantly altered in PBMCs stimulated with O. viverrini. Annexin A1 (ANXA1) was selected for further study, and immunoblotting showed upregulation of ANXA1 expression in PBMCs after 12 and 24 h coculture with liver flukes. In an in vivo study, transcription and translation of ANXA1 significantly increased in livers of hamsters infected with O. viverrini at 21 days and from 3 months onwards compared to normal controls. Interestingly, immunohistochemistry revealed that ANXA1 was present not only in the cytoplasm of inflammatory cells but also in the cytoplasm of cholangiocytes, which are in close contact with the parasite and its excretory/secretory products in the biliary system. Expression of ANXA1 increased with time concomitant with bile duct enlargement, bile duct formation, and epithelial cell proliferation. In conclusion, several cytokines/chemokines secreted by PBMCs and upregulation of ANXA1 in PBMCs and biliary epithelial cells might have a role in host defense against O. viverrini infection and tissue resolution of inflammation.

  3. Cellular immune responses to amoebic liver abcess in the guinea-pig.

    PubMed Central

    Bray, R S; Harris, W G

    1977-01-01

    Guinea-pigs infected in the liver with the Biswas strain of Entamoeba histolytica showed no dermal hypersensitivity but showed positive lymphocyte transformation and macrophage-migration inhibition. The time sequence showed an activated response at 4 days after infection, a full response at 8 days when the liver abscesses were resolving and a waning response at 12 days when the abscesses had healed. PMID:891028

  4. Coding and non-coding gene regulatory networks underlie the immune response in liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xueming; Huang, Yongming; Yang, Zhengpeng; Zhang, Yuguo; Zhang, Weihui; Gao, Zu-hua; Xue, Dongbo

    2017-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is recognized as being the consequence of immune-mediated hepatocyte damage and repair processes. However, the regulation of these immune responses underlying liver cirrhosis has not been elucidated. In this study, we used GEO datasets and bioinformatics methods to established coding and non-coding gene regulatory networks including transcription factor-/lncRNA-microRNA-mRNA, and competing endogenous RNA interaction networks. Our results identified 2224 mRNAs, 70 lncRNAs and 46 microRNAs were differentially expressed in liver cirrhosis. The transcription factor -/lncRNA- microRNA-mRNA network we uncovered that results in immune-mediated liver cirrhosis is comprised of 5 core microRNAs (e.g., miR-203; miR-219-5p), 3 transcription factors (i.e., FOXP3, ETS1 and FOS) and 7 lncRNAs (e.g., ENTS00000671336, ENST00000575137). The competing endogenous RNA interaction network we identified includes a complex immune response regulatory subnetwork that controls the entire liver cirrhosis network. Additionally, we found 10 overlapping GO terms shared by both liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma including “immune response” as well. Interestingly, the overlapping differentially expressed genes in liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma were enriched in immune response-related functional terms. In summary, a complex gene regulatory network underlying immune response processes may play an important role in the development and progression of liver cirrhosis, and its development into hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:28355233

  5. Stress Responsive Proteins Are Actively Regulated during Rice (Oryza sativa) Embryogenesis as Indicated by Quantitative Proteomics Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zi, Jin; Zhang, Jiyuan; Wang, Quanhui; Zhou, Baojin; Zhong, Junyan; Zhang, Chaoliang; Qiu, Xuemei; Wen, Bo; Zhang, Shenyan; Fu, Xiqin; Lin, Liang; Liu, Siqi

    2013-01-01

    Embryogenesis is the initial step in a plant’s life, and the molecular changes that occur during embryonic development are largely unknown. To explore the relevant molecular events, we used the isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) coupled with the shotgun proteomics technique (iTRAQ/Shotgun) to study the proteomic changes of rice embryos during embryogenesis. For the first time, a total of 2 165 unique proteins were identified in rice embryos, and the abundances of 867 proteins were actively changed based on the statistical evaluation of the quantitative MS/MS signals. The quantitative data were then confirmed using multiple reactions monitoring (MRM) and were also supported by our previous study based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2 DE). Using the proteome at 6 days after pollination (DAP) as a reference, cluster analysis of these differential proteins throughout rice embryogenesis revealed that 25% were up-regulated and 75% were down-regulated. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis implicated that most of the up-regulated proteins were functionally categorized as stress responsive, mainly including heat shock-, lipid transfer-, and reactive oxygen species-related proteins. The stress-responsive proteins were thus postulated to play an important role during seed maturation. PMID:24058531

  6. Physiological and Proteomic Responses of Continuous Cultures of Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 7806 to Changes in Iron Bioavailability and Growth Rate

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Anna C. Y.; Poljak, Anne; McDonald, James; Bligh, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The hepatotoxin microcystin (MCYST) is produced by a variety of freshwater cyanobacterial species, including Microcystis aeruginosa. Interestingly, MCYST-producing M. aeruginosa strains have been shown to outcompete their nontoxic counterparts under iron-limiting conditions. However, the reasons for this are unclear. Here we examined the proteomic response of M. aeruginosa PCC 7806 continuous cultures under different iron and growth regimes. Iron limitation was correlated with a global reduction in levels of proteins associated with energy metabolism and photosynthesis. These proteomic changes were consistent with physiological observations, including reduced chlorophyll a content and reduced cell size. While levels of MCYST biosynthesis proteins did not fluctuate during the study period, both intra- and extracellular toxin quotas were significantly higher under iron-limiting conditions. Our results support the hypothesis that intracellular MCYST plays a role in protecting the cell against oxidative stress. Further, we propose that extracellular MCYST may act as a signaling molecule, stimulating MCYST production under conditions of iron limitation and enhancing the fitness of bloom populations. IMPORTANCE Microcystin production in water supply reservoirs is a global public health problem. Understanding the ecophysiology of hepatotoxic cyanobacteria, including their responses to the presence of key micronutrient metals such as iron, is central to managing harmful blooms. To our knowledge, this was the first study to examine proteomic and physiological changes occurring in M. aeruginosa continuous cultures under conditions of iron limitation at different growth rates. PMID:27474713

  7. Transcriptional and proteomic analyses of two-component response regulators in multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lei; Yang, Liu; Zeng, Xianfei; Danzheng, Jiacuo; Zheng, Qing; Liu, Jiayun; Liu, Feng; Xin, Yijuan; Cheng, Xiaodong; Su, Mingquan; Ma, Yueyun; Hao, Xiaoke

    2015-07-01

    Two-component systems (TCSs) have been reported to exhibit a sensing and responding role under drug stress that induces drug resistance in several bacterial species. However, the relationship between TCSs and multidrug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis has not been comprehensively analysed to date. In this study, 90 M. tuberculosis clinical isolates were analysed using 15-loci mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit (MIRU)-variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) typing and repetitive extragenic palindromic (rep)-PCR-based DNA fingerprinting. The results showed that all of the isolates were of the Beijing lineage, and strains with a drug-susceptible phenotype had not diverged into similar genotype clusters. Expression analysis of 13 response regulators of TCSs using real-time PCR and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) proteomic analysis demonstrated that four response regulator genes (devR, mtrA, regX3 and Rv3143) were significantly upregulated in multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains compared with the laboratory strain H37Rv as well as drug-susceptible and isoniazid-monoresistant strains (P<0.05). DNA sequencing revealed that the promoter regions of devR, mtrA, regX3 and Rv3143 did not contain any mutations. Moreover, expression of the four genes could be induced by most of the four first-line antitubercular agents. In addition, either deletion or overexpression of devR in Mycobacterium bovis BCG did not alter its sensitivity to the four antitubercular drugs. This suggests that upregulation of devR, which is common in MDR-TB strains, might be induced by drug stress and hypoxic adaptation following the acquisition of multidrug resistance.

  8. Apoplast proteome reveals that extracellular matrix contributes to multistress response in poplar

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Riverine ecosystems, highly sensitive to climate change and human activities, are characterized by rapid environmental change to fluctuating water levels and siltation, causing stress on their biological components. We have little understanding of mechanisms by which riverine plant species have developed adaptive strategies to cope with stress in dynamic environments while maintaining growth and development. Results We report that poplar (Populus spp.) has evolved a systems level "stress proteome" in the leaf-stem-root apoplast continuum to counter biotic and abiotic factors. To obtain apoplast proteins from P. deltoides, we developed pressure-chamber and water-displacement methods for leaves and stems, respectively. Analyses of 303 proteins and corresponding transcripts coupled with controlled experiments and bioinformatics demonstrate that poplar depends on constitutive and inducible factors to deal with water, pathogen, and oxidative stress. However, each apoplast possessed a unique set of proteins, indicating that response to stress is partly compartmentalized. Apoplast proteins that are involved in glycolysis, fermentation, and catabolism of sucrose and starch appear to enable poplar to grow normally under water stress. Pathogenesis-related proteins mediating water and pathogen stress in apoplast were particularly abundant and effective in suppressing growth of the most prevalent poplar pathogen Melampsora. Unexpectedly, we found diverse peroxidases that appear to be involved in stress-induced cell wall modification in apoplast, particularly during the growing season. Poplar developed a robust antioxidative system to buffer oxidation in stem apoplast. Conclusion These findings suggest that multistress response in the apoplast constitutes an important adaptive trait for poplar to inhabit dynamic environments and is also a potential mechanism in other riverine plant species. PMID:21114852

  9. Apoplast proteome reveals that extracellular matrix contributes to multi-stress response in poplar

    SciTech Connect

    Pechanova, Olga; Hsu, Chuan-Yu; Adams, Joshua P.; Pechan, Tibor; Vandervelde, Lindsay; Drnevich, Jenny; Jawdy, Sara; Adeli, Ardeshir; Suttle, Jeffrey; Lawrence, Amanda; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Seguin, Armand; Yuceer, Cetin

    2010-01-01

    Riverine ecosystems, highly sensitive to climate change and human activities, are characterized by rapid environmental change to fluctuating water levels and siltation, causing stress on their biological components. We have little understanding of mechanisms by which riverine plant species have developed adaptive strategies to cope with stress in dynamic environments while maintaining growth and development. We report that poplar (Populus spp.) has evolved a systems level 'stress proteome' in the leaf-stem-root apoplast continuum to counter biotic and abiotic factors. To obtain apoplast proteins from P. deltoides, we developed pressure-chamber and water-displacement methods for leaves and stems, respectively. Analyses of 303 proteins and corresponding transcripts coupled with controlled experiments and bioinformatics demonstrate that poplar depends on constitutive and inducible factors to deal with water, pathogen, and oxidative stress. However, each apoplast possessed a unique set of proteins, indicating that response to stress is partly compartmentalized. Apoplast proteins that are involved in glycolysis, fermentation, and catabolism of sucrose and starch appear to enable poplar to grow normally under water stress. Pathogenesis-related proteins mediating water and pathogen stress in apoplast were particularly abundant and effective in suppressing growth of the most prevalent poplar pathogen Melampsora. Unexpectedly, we found diverse peroxidases that appear to be involved in stress-induced cell wall modification in apoplast, particularly during the growing season. Poplar developed a robust antioxidative system to buffer oxidation in stem apoplast. These findings suggest that multistress response in the apoplast constitutes an important adaptive trait for poplar to inhabit dynamic environments and is also a potential mechanism in other riverine plant species.

  10. Proteomic Assessment of Biochemical Pathways That Are Critical to Nickel-Induced Toxicity Responses in Human Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Yue; Bruno, Maribel; Haykal-Coates, Najwa; Wallace, Kathleen; Andrews, Debora; Swank, Adam; Winnik, Witold; Ross, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms underlying toxicity initiated by nickel, a ubiquitous environmental contaminant and known human carcinogen is necessary for proper assessment of its risks to human and environment. Among a variety of toxic mechanisms, disruption of protein responses and protein response-based biochemical pathways represents a key mechanism through which nickel induces cytotoxicity and carcinogenesis. To identify protein responses and biochemical pathways that are critical to nickel-induced toxicity responses, we measured cytotoxicity and changes in expression and phosphorylation status of 14 critical biochemical pathway regulators in human BEAS-2B cells exposed to four concentrations of nickel using an integrated proteomic approach. A subset of the pathway regulators, including interleukin-6, and JNK, were found to be linearly correlated with cell viability, and may function as molecular determinants of cytotoxic responses of BEAS-2B cells to nickel exposures. In addition, 128 differentially expressed proteins were identified by two dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry. Principal component analysis, hierarchical cluster analyses, and ingenuity signaling pathway analysis (IPA) identified putative nickel toxicity pathways. Some of the proteins and pathways identified have not previously been linked to nickel toxicity. Based on the consistent results obtained from both ELISA and 2-DE proteomic analysis, we propose a core signaling pathway regulating cytotoxic responses of human BEAS-2B cells to nickel exposures, which integrates a small set of proteins involved in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis pathways, apoptosis, protein degradation, and stress responses including inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID:27626938

  11. System-wide survey of proteomic responses of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) to in vitro cultivation.

    PubMed

    Mindaye, Samuel T; Lo Surdo, Jessica; Bauer, Steven R; Alterman, Michail A

    2015-11-01

    Human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs, also loosely called bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells) are the subject of increasing numbers of clinical trials and laboratory research. Our group recently reported on the optimization of a workflow for a sensitive proteomic study of hBMSCs. Here, we couple this workflow with a label-free protein quantitation method to investigate the molecular responses of hBMSCs to long-term in vitro passaging. We explored the proteomic responses of hBMSCs by assessing the expression levels of proteins at early passage (passage 3, P3) and late passage (P7). We used multiple biological as well as technical replicates to ensure that the detected proteomic changes are repeatable between cultures and thus likely to be biologically relevant. Over 1700 proteins were quantified at three passages and a list of differentially expressed proteins was compiled. Bioinformatics-based network analysis and term enrichment revealed that metabolic pathways are largely altered, where many proteins in the glycolytic, pentose phosphate, and TCA pathways were shown to be largely upregulated in late passages. We also observed significant proteomic alterations in functional categories including apoptosis, and ER-based protein processing and sorting following in vitro cell aging. We posit that the comprehensive map outlined in this report of affected phenotypes as well as the underpinning molecular factors tremendously benefit the effort to uncovering targets that are not just used only to monitor cell fitness but can be employed to slowdown the in vitro aging process in hBMSCs and hence ensure manufacturing of cells with known quality, efficacy and stability.

  12. Quantitative proteomic analyses of the response of acidophilic microbial communities to different pH conditions.

    PubMed

    Belnap, Christopher P; Pan, Chongle; Denef, Vincent J; Samatova, Nagiza F; Hettich, Robert L; Banfield, Jillian F

    2011-07-01

    Extensive genomic characterization of multi-species acid mine drainage microbial consortia combined with laboratory cultivation has enabled the application of quantitative proteomic analyses at the community level. In this study, quantitative proteomic comparisons were used to functionally characterize laboratory-cultivated acidophilic communities sustained in pH 1.45 or 0.85 conditions. The distributions of all proteins identified for individual organisms indicated biases for either high or low pH, and suggests pH-specific niche partitioning for low abundance bacteria and archaea. Although the proteome of the dominant bacterium, Leptospirillum group II, was largely unaffected by pH treatments, analysis of functional categories indicated proteins involved in amino acid and nucleotide metabolism, as well as cell membrane/envelope biogenesis were overrepresented at high pH. Comparison of specific protein abundances indicates higher pH conditions favor Leptospirillum group III, whereas low pH conditions promote the growth of certain archaea. Thus, quantitative proteomic comparisons revealed distinct differences in community composition and metabolic function of individual organisms during different pH treatments. Proteomic analysis revealed other aspects of community function. Different numbers of phage proteins were identified across biological replicates, indicating stochastic spatial heterogeneity of phage outbreaks. Additionally, proteomic data were used to identify a previously unknown genotypic variant of Leptospirillum group II, an indication of selection for a specific Leptospirillum group II population in laboratory communities. Our results confirm the importance of pH and related geochemical factors in fine-tuning acidophilic microbial community structure and function at the species and strain level, and demonstrate the broad utility of proteomics in laboratory community studies.

  13. Quantitative proteomic analyses of the response of acidophilic microbial communities to different pH conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Belnap, Christopher P.; Pan, Chongle; Denef, Vincent; Samatova, Nagiza F; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2011-01-01

    Extensive genomic characterization of multi-species acid mine drainage microbial consortia combined with laboratory cultivation has enabled the application of quantitative proteomic analyses at the community level. In this study, quantitative proteomic comparisons were used to functionally characterize laboratory-cultivated acidophilic communities sustained in pH 1.45 or 0.85 conditions. The distributions of all proteins identified for individual organisms indicated biases for either high or low pH, and suggests pH-specific niche partitioning for low abundance bacteria and archaea. Although the proteome of the dominant bacterium, Leptospirillum group II, was largely unaffected by pH treatments, analysis of functional categories indicated proteins involved in amino acid and nucleotide metabolism, as well as cell membrane/envelope biogenesis were overrepresented at high pH. Comparison of specific protein abundances indicates higher pH conditions favor Leptospirillum group III, whereas low pH conditions promote the growth of certain archaea. Thus, quantitative proteomic comparisons revealed distinct differences in community composition and metabolic function of individual organisms during different pH treatments. Proteomic analysis revealed other aspects of community function. Different numbers of phage proteins were identified across biological replicates, indicating stochastic spatial heterogeneity of phage outbreaks. Additionally, proteomic data were used to identify a previously unknown genotypic variant of Leptospirillum group II, an indication of selection for a specific Leptospirillum group II population in laboratory communities. Our results confirm the importance of pH and related geochemical factors in fine-tuning acidophilic microbial community structure and function at the species and strain level, and demonstrate the broad utility of proteomics in laboratory community studies.

  14. Analysis of cellular responses of macrophages to zinc ions and zinc oxide nanoparticles: a combined targeted and proteomic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triboulet, Sarah; Aude-Garcia, Catherine; Armand, Lucie; Gerdil, Adèle; Diemer, Hélène; Proamer, Fabienne; Collin-Faure, Véronique; Habert, Aurélie; Strub, Jean-Marc; Hanau, Daniel; Herlin, Nathalie; Carrière, Marie; van Dorsselaer, Alain; Rabilloud, Thierry

    2014-05-01

    Two different zinc oxide nanoparticles, as well as zinc ions, are used to study the cellular responses of the RAW 264 macrophage cell line. A proteomic screen is used to provide a wide view of the molecular effects of zinc, and the most prominent results are cross-validated by targeted studies. Furthermore, the alteration of important macrophage functions (e.g. phagocytosis) by zinc is also investigated. The intracellular dissolution/uptake of zinc is also studied to further characterize zinc toxicity. Zinc oxide nanoparticles dissolve readily in the cells, leading to high intracellular zinc concentrations, mostly as protein-bound zinc. The proteomic screen reveals a rather weak response in the oxidative stress response pathway, but a strong response both in the central metabolism and in the proteasomal protein degradation pathway. Targeted experiments confirm that carbohydrate catabolism and proteasome are critical determinants of sensitivity to zinc, which also induces DNA damage. Conversely, glutathione levels and phagocytosis appear unaffected at moderately toxic zinc concentrations.Two different zinc oxide nanoparticles, as well as zinc ions, are used to study the cellular responses of the RAW 264 macrophage cell line. A proteomic screen is used to provide a wide view of the molecular effects of zinc, and the most prominent results are cross-validated by targeted studies. Furthermore, the alteration of important macrophage functions (e.g. phagocytosis) by zinc is also investigated. The intracellular dissolution/uptake of zinc is also studied to further characterize zinc toxicity. Zinc oxide nanoparticles dissolve readily in the cells, leading to high intracellular zinc concentrations, mostly as protein-bound zinc. The proteomic screen reveals a rather weak response in the oxidative stress response pathway, but a strong response both in the central metabolism and in the proteasomal protein degradation pathway. Targeted experiments confirm that carbohydrate

  15. Comparative proteomic and physiological analyses reveal the protective effect of exogenous calcium on the germinating soybean response to salt stress.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yongqi; Yang, Runqiang; Han, Yongbin; Gu, Zhenxin

    2015-01-15

    Calcium enhances salt stress tolerance of soybeans. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanism of calcium's involvement in resistance to salt stress is unclear. A comparative proteomic approach was used to investigate protein profiles in germinating soybeans under NaCl-CaCl2 and NaCl-LaCl3 treatments. A total of 80 proteins affected by calcium in 4-day-old germinating soybean cotyledons and 71 in embryos were confidently identified. The clustering analysis showed proteins were subdivided into 5 and 6 clusters in cotyledon and embryo, respectively. Among them, proteins involved in signal transduction and energy pathways, in transportation, and in protein biosynthesis were largely enriched while those involved in proteolysis were decreased. Abundance of nucleoside diphosphate kinase and three antioxidant enzymes were visibly increased by calcium. Accumulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid and polyamines was also detected after application of exogenous calcium. This was consistent with proteomic results, which showed that proteins involved in the glutamate and methionine metabolism were mediated by calcium. Calcium could increase the salt stress tolerance of germinating soybeans via enriching signal transduction, energy pathway and transportation, promoting protein biosynthesis, inhibiting proteolysis, redistributing storage proteins, regulating protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum, enriching antioxidant enzymes and activating their activities, accumulating secondary metabolites and osmolytes, and other adaptive responses. Biological significance Soybean (Glycine max L.), as a traditional edible legume, is being targeted for designing functional foods. During soybean germination under stressful conditions especially salt stress, newly discovered functional components such as gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are rapidly accumulated. However, soybean plants are relatively salt-sensitive and the growth, development and biomass of germinating soybeans are significantly

  16. Changes in the Proteome of Xylem Sap in Brassica oleracea in Response to Fusarium oxysporum Stress.

    PubMed

    Pu, Zijing; Ino, Yoko; Kimura, Yayoi; Tago, Asumi; Shimizu, Motoki; Natsume, Satoshi; Sano, Yoshitaka; Fujimoto, Ryo; Kaneko, Kentaro; Shea, Daniel J; Fukai, Eigo; Fuji, Shin-Ichi; Hirano, Hisashi; Okazaki, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. conlutinans (Foc) is a serious root-invading and xylem-colonizing fungus that causes yellowing in Brassica oleracea. To comprehensively understand the interaction between F. oxysporum and B. oleracea, composition of the xylem sap proteome of the non-infected and Foc-infected plants was investigated in both resistant and susceptible cultivars using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) after in-solution digestion of xylem sap proteins. Whole genome sequencing of Foc was carried out and generated a predicted Foc protein database. The predicted Foc protein database was then combined with the public B. oleracea and B. rapa protein databases downloaded from Uniprot and used for protein identification. About 200 plant proteins were identified in the xylem sap of susceptible and resistant plants. Comparison between the non-infected and Foc-infected samples revealed that Foc infection causes changes to the protein composition in B. oleracea xylem sap where repressed proteins accounted for a greater proportion than those of induced in both the susceptible and resistant reactions. The analysis on the proteins with concentration change > = 2-fold indicated a large portion of up- and down-regulated proteins were those acting on carbohydrates. Proteins with leucine-rich repeats and legume lectin domains were mainly induced in both resistant and susceptible system, so was the case of thaumatins. Twenty-five Foc proteins were identified in the infected xylem sap and 10 of them were cysteine-containing secreted small proteins that are good candidates for virulence and/or avirulence effectors. The findings of differential response of protein contents in the xylem sap between the non-infected and Foc-infected samples as well as the Foc candidate effectors secreted in xylem provide valuable insights into B. oleracea-Foc interactions.

  17. Differential proteomic responses of selectively bred and wild-type Sydney rock oyster populations exposed to elevated CO2.

    PubMed

    Thompson, E L; O'Connor, W; Parker, L; Ross, P; Raftos, D A

    2015-03-01

    Previous work suggests that larvae from Sydney rock oysters that have been selectively bred for fast growth and disease resistance are more resilient to the impacts of ocean acidification than nonselected, wild-type oysters. In this study, we used proteomics to investigate the molecular differences between oyster populations in adult Sydney rock oysters and to identify whether these form the basis for observations seen in larvae. Adult oysters from a selective breeding line (B2) and nonselected wild types (WT) were exposed for 4 weeks to elevated pCO2 (856 μatm) before their proteomes were compared to those of oysters held under ambient conditions (375 μatm pCO2 ). Exposure to elevated pCO2 resulted in substantial changes in the proteomes of oysters from both the selectively bred and wild-type populations. When biological functions were assigned, these differential proteins fell into five broad, potentially interrelated categories of subcellular functions, in both oyster populations. These functional categories were energy production, cellular stress responses, the cytoskeleton, protein synthesis and cell signalling. In the wild-type population, proteins were predominantly upregulated. However, unexpectedly, these cellular systems were downregulated in the selectively bred oyster population, indicating cellular dysfunction. We argue that this reflects a trade-off, whereby an adaptive capacity for enhanced mitochondrial energy production in the selectively bred population may help to protect larvae from the effects of elevated CO2 , whilst being deleterious to adult oysters.

  18. Dynamics of the Escherichia coli proteome in response to nitrogen starvation and entry into the stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Sanchuki, Heloisa B S; Gravina, Fernanda; Rodrigues, Thiago E; Gerhardt, Edileusa C M; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Souza, Emanuel M; Raittz, Roberto T; Valdameri, Glaucio; de Souza, Gustavo A; Huergo, Luciano F

    2017-03-01

    Nitrogen is needed for the biosynthesis of biomolecules including proteins and nucleic acids. In the absence of fixed nitrogen prokaryotes such as E. coli immediately ceases growth. Ammonium is the preferred nitrogen source for E. coli supporting the fastest growth rates. Under conditions of ammonium limitation, E. coli can use alternative nitrogen sources to supply ammonium ions and this reprogramming is led by the induction of the NtrC regulon. Here we used label free proteomics to determine the dynamics of E. coli proteins expression in response to ammonium starvation in both the short (30min) and the longer (60min) starvation. Protein abundances and post-translational modifications confirmed that activation of the NtrC regulon acts as the first line of defense against nitrogen starvation. The ribosome inactivating protein Rmf was induced shortly after ammonium exhaustion and this was preceded by induction of other ribosome inactivating proteins such as Hpf and RaiA supporting the hypothesis that ribosome shut-down is a key process during nitrogen limitation stress. The proteomic data revealed that growth arrest due to nitrogen starvation correlates with the accumulation of proteins involved in DNA condensation, RNA and protein catabolism and ribosome hibernation. Collectively, these proteome adaptations will result in metabolic inactive cells which are likely to exhibit multidrug tolerance.

  19. Proteomic profiling of Bacillus licheniformis reveals a stress response mechanism in the synthesis of extracellular polymeric flocculants.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wencheng; Chen, Zhen; Shen, Liang; Wang, Yuanpeng; Li, Qingbiao; Yan, Shan; Zhong, Chuan-Jian; He, Ning

    2016-04-01

    Some bioflocculants composed of extracellular polymeric substances are produced under peculiar conditions. Bacillus licheniformis CGMCC2876 is a microorganism that secretes both extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) and poly-gamma-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) under stress conditions. In this work, SWATH acquisition LC-MS/MS method was adopted for differential proteomic analysis of B. licheniformis, aiming at determining the bacterial stress mechanism. Compared with LB culture, 190 differentially expressed proteins were identified in B. licheniformis CGMCC2876 cultivated in EPS culture, including 117 up-regulated and 73 down-regulated proteins. In γ-PGA culture, 151 differentially expressed proteins, 89 up-regulated and 62 down-regulated, were found in the cells. Up-regulated proteins involved in amino acid biosynthesis were found to account for 43% and 41% of the proteomes in EPS and γ-PGA cultivated cells, respectively. Additionally, a series of proteins associated with amino acid degradation were found to be repressed under EPS and γ-PGA culture conditions. Transcriptional profiling via the qPCR detection of selected genes verified the proteomic analysis. Analysis of free amino acids in the bacterial cells further suggested the presence of amino acid starvation conditions. EPS or γ-PGA was synthesized to alleviate the effect of amino acid limitation in B. licheniformis. This study identified a stress response mechanism in the synthesis of macromolecules in B. licheniformis, providing potential culture strategies to improve the production of two promising bioflocculants.

  20. Differential Proteomic Profiles of Pleurotus ostreatus in Response to Lignocellulosic Components Provide Insights into Divergent Adaptive Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Qiuyun; Ma, Fuying; Li, Yan; Yu, Hongbo; Li, Chengyun; Zhang, Xiaoyu

    2017-01-01

    Pleurotus ostreatus is a white rot fungus that grows on lignocellulosic biomass by metabolizing the main constituents. Extracellular enzymes play a key role in this process. During the hydrolysis of lignocellulose, potentially toxic molecules are released from lignin, and the molecules are derived from hemicellulose or cellulose that trigger various responses in fungus, thereby influencing mycelial growth. In order to characterize the mechanism underlying the response of P. ostreatus to lignin, we conducted a comparative proteomic analysis of P. ostreatus grown on different lignocellulose substrates. In this work, the mycelium proteome of P. ostreatus grown in liquid minimal medium with lignin, xylan, and carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) was analyzed using the complementary two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) approach; 115 proteins were identified, most of which were classified into five types according to their function. Proteins with an antioxidant function that play a role in the stress response were upregulated in response to lignin. Most proteins involving in carbohydrate and energy metabolism were less abundant in lignin. Xylan and CMC may enhanced the process of carbohydrate metabolism by regulating the level of expression of various carbohydrate metabolism-related proteins. The change of protein expression level was related to the adaptability of P. ostreatus to lignocellulose. These findings provide novel insights into the mechanisms underlying the response of white-rot fungus to lignocellulose. PMID:28386251

  1. Proteomic analyses of early response of unicellular eukaryotic microorganism Tetrahymena thermophila exposed to TiO₂ particles.

    PubMed

    Rajapakse, K; Drobne, D; Kastelec, D; Kogej, K; Makovec, D; Gallampois, C; Amelina, H; Danielsson, G; Fanedl, L; Marinsek-Logar, R; Cristobal, S

    2016-01-01

    Key biological functions involved in cell survival have been studied to understand the difference between the impact of exposure to TiO2 nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) and their bulk counterparts (bulk-TiO2). By selecting a unicellular eukaryotic model organism and applying proteomic analysis an overview of the possible impact of exposure could be obtained. In this study, we investigated the early response of unicellular eukaryotic protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila exposed to TiO2-NPs or bulk-TiO2 particles at subtoxic concentrations for this organism. The proteomic analysis based on 2DE + nLC-ESI-MS/MS revealed 930 distinct protein spots, among which 77 were differentially expressed and 18 were unambiguously identified. We identified alterations in metabolic pathways, including lipid and fatty acid metabolism, purine metabolism and energetic metabolism, as well as salt stress and protein degradation. This proteomic study is consistent with our previous findings, where the early response of T. thermophila to subtoxic concentrations of TiO2 particles included alterations in lipid and fatty acid metabolism and ion regulation. The response to the lowest TiO2-NPs concentration differed significantly from the response to higher TiO2-NPs concentration and both bulk-TiO2 concentrations. Alterations on the physiological landscape were significant after exposure to both nano- and bulk-TiO2; however, no toxic effects were evidenced even at very high exposure concentrations. This study confirms the relevance of the alteration of the lipid profile and lipid metabolism in understanding the early impact of TiO2-NPs in eukaryotic cells, for example, phagocytosing cells like macrophages and ciliated cells in the respiratory epithelium.

  2. Early immune responses in rainbow trout liver upon viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) infection.

    PubMed

    Castro, Rosario; Abós, Beatriz; Pignatelli, Jaime; von Gersdorff Jørgensen, Louise; González Granja, Aitor; Buchmann, Kurt; Tafalla, Carolina

    2014-01-01

    Among the essential metabolic functions of the liver, in mammals, a role as mediator of systemic and local innate immunity has also been reported. Although the presence of an important leukocyte population in mammalian liver is well documented, the characterization of leukocyte populations in the teleost liver has been only scarcely addressed. In the current work, we have confirmed the presence of IgM+, IgD+, IgT+, CD8α+, CD3+ cells, and cells expressing major histocompatibility complex (MHC-II) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) liver by flow cytometry and/or immunohistochemistry analysis. Additionally, the effect of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) on the liver immune response was assessed. First, we studied the effect of viral intraperitoneal injection on the transcription of a wide selection of immune genes at days 1, 2 and 5 post-infection. These included a group of leukocyte markers genes, pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), chemokines, chemokine receptor genes, and other genes involved in the early immune response and in acute phase reaction. Our results indicate that T lymphocytes play a key role in the initial response to VHSV in the liver, since CD3, CD8, CD4, perforin, Mx and interferon (IFN) transcription levels were up-regulated in response to VHSV. Consequently, flow cytometry analysis of CD8α+ cells in liver and spleen at day 5 post-infection revealed a decrease in the number of CD8α+ cells in the spleen and an increased population in the liver. No differences were found however in the percentages of B lymphocyte (IgM+ or IgD+) populations. In addition, a strong up-regulation in the transcription levels of several PRRs and chemokines was observed from the second day of infection, indicating an important role of these factors in the response of the liver to viral infections.

  3. Early Immune Responses in Rainbow Trout Liver upon Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Virus (VHSV) Infection

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Rosario; Abós, Beatriz; Pignatelli, Jaime; von Gersdorff Jørgensen, Louise; González Granja, Aitor; Buchmann, Kurt; Tafalla, Carolina

    2014-01-01

    Among the essential metabolic functions of the liver, in mammals, a role as mediator of systemic and local innate immunity has also been reported. Although the presence of an important leukocyte population in mammalian liver is well documented, the characterization of leukocyte populations in the teleost liver has been only scarcely addressed. In the current work, we have confirmed the presence of IgM+, IgD+, IgT+, CD8α+, CD3+ cells, and cells expressing major histocompatibility complex (MHC-II) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) liver by flow cytometry and/or immunohistochemistry analysis. Additionally, the effect of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) on the liver immune response was assessed. First, we studied the effect of viral intraperitoneal injection on the transcription of a wide selection of immune genes at days 1, 2 and 5 post-infection. These included a group of leukocyte markers genes, pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), chemokines, chemokine receptor genes, and other genes involved in the early immune response and in acute phase reaction. Our results indicate that T lymphocytes play a key role in the initial response to VHSV in the liver, since CD3, CD8, CD4, perforin, Mx and interferon (IFN) transcription levels were up-regulated in response to VHSV. Consequently, flow cytometry analysis of CD8α+ cells in liver and spleen at day 5 post-infection revealed a decrease in the number of CD8α+ cells in the spleen and an increased population in the liver. No differences were found however in the percentages of B lymphocyte (IgM+ or IgD+) populations. In addition, a strong up-regulation in the transcription levels of several PRRs and chemokines was observed from the second day of infection, indicating an important role of these factors in the response of the liver to viral infections. PMID:25338079

  4. Bile acids initiate cholestatic liver injury by triggering a hepatocyte-specific inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yonglin; Soroka, Carol J.; Wang, Juxian; Mennone, Albert; Wang, Yucheng; Mehal, Wajahat Z.; Jain, Dhanpat; Boyer, James L.

    2017-01-01

    Mechanisms of bile acid–induced (BA-induced) liver injury in cholestasis are controversial, limiting development of new therapies. We examined how BAs initiate liver injury using isolated liver cells from humans and mice and in-vivo mouse models. At pathophysiologic concentrations, BAs induced proinflammatory cytokine expression in mouse and human hepatocytes, but not in nonparenchymal cells or cholangiocytes. These hepatocyte-specific cytokines stimulated neutrophil chemotaxis. Inflammatory injury was mitigated in Ccl2–/– mice treated with BA or after bile duct ligation, where less hepatic infiltration of neutrophils was detected. Neutrophils in periportal areas of livers from cholestatic patients also correlated with elevations in their serum aminotransferases. This liver-specific inflammatory response required BA entry into hepatocytes via basolateral transporter Ntcp. Pathophysiologic levels of BAs induced markers of ER stress and mitochondrial damage in mouse hepatocytes. Chemokine induction by BAs was reduced in hepatocytes from Tlr9–/– mice, while liver injury was diminished both in conventional and hepatocyte-specific Tlr9–/– mice, confirming a role for Tlr9 in BA-induced liver injury. These findings reveal potentially novel mechanisms whereby BAs elicit a hepatocyte-specific cytokine-induced inflammatory liver injury that involves innate immunity and point to likely novel pathways for treating cholestatic liver disease. PMID:28289714

  5. Cell death and cell death responses in liver disease: mechanisms and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Luedde, Tom; Kaplowitz, Neil; Schwabe, Robert F

    2014-10-01

    Hepatocellular death is present in almost all types of human liver disease and is used as a sensitive parameter for the detection of acute and chronic liver disease of viral, toxic, metabolic, or autoimmune origin. Clinical data and animal models suggest that hepatocyte death is the key trigger of liver disease progression, manifested by the subsequent development of inflammation, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Modes of hepatocellular death differ substantially between liver diseases. Different modes of cell death such as apoptosis, necrosis, and necroptosis trigger specific cell death responses and promote progression of liver disease through distinct mechanisms. In this review, we first discuss molecular mechanisms by which different modes of cell death, damage-associated molecular patterns, and specific cell death responses contribute to the development of liver disease. We then review the clinical relevance of cell death, focusing on biomarkers; the contribution of cell death to drug-induced, viral, and fatty liver disease and liver cancer; and evidence for cell death pathways as therapeutic targets.

  6. A lectin-coupled, targeted proteomic mass spectrometry (MRM MS) platform for identification of multiple liver cancer biomarkers in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yeong Hee; Shin, Park Min; Oh, Na Ree; Park, Gun Wook; Kim, Hoguen; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2012-09-18

    Aberrantly glycosylated proteins related to liver cancer progression were captured with specific lectin and identified from human plasma by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry as multiple biomarkers for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The lectin fractionation for fucosylated protein glycoforms in human plasma was conducted with a fucose-specific aleuria aurantia lectin (AAL). Following tryptic digestion of the lectin-captured fraction, plasma samples from 30 control cases (including 10 healthy, 10 hepatitis B virus [HBV], and 10 cirrhosis cases) and 10 HCC cases were quantitatively analyzed by MRM to identify which glycoproteins are viable HCC biomarkers. A1AG1, AACT, A1AT, and CERU were found to be potent biomarkers to differentiate HCC plasma from control plasmas. The AUROC generated independently from these four biomarker candidates ranged from 0.73 to 0.92. However, the lectin-coupled MRM assay with multiple combinations of biomarker candidates is superior statistically to those generated from the individual candidates with AUROC more than 0.95, which can be an alternative to the immunoassay inevitably requiring tedious development of multiple antibodies against biomarker candidates to be verified. Eventually the lectin-coupled, targeted proteomic mass spectrometry (MRM MS) platform was found to be efficient to identify multiple biomarkers from human plasma according to cancer progression.

  7. Interferon-mediated innate immune responses against malaria parasite liver stages.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jessica L; Sack, Brandon K; Baldwin, Michael; Vaughan, Ashley M; Kappe, Stefan H I

    2014-04-24

    Mosquito-transmitted malaria parasites infect hepatocytes and asymptomatically replicate as liver stages. Using RNA sequencing, we show that a rodent malaria liver-stage infection stimulates a robust innate immune response including type I interferon (IFN) and IFNγ pathways. Liver-stage infection is suppressed by these infection-engendered innate responses. This suppression was abrogated in mice deficient in IFNγ, the type I IFN α/β receptor (IFNAR), and interferon regulatory factor 3. Natural killer and CD49b(+)CD3(+) natural killer T (NKT) cells increased in the liver after a primary infection, and CD1d-restricted NKT cells, which secrete IFNγ, were critical in reducing liver-stage burden of a secondary infection. Lack of IFNAR signaling abrogated the increase in NKT cell numbers in the liver, showing a link between type I IFN signaling, cell recruitment, and subsequent parasite elimination. Our findings demonstrate innate immune sensing of malaria parasite liver-stage infection and that the ensuing innate responses can eliminate the parasite.

  8. Plant defense responses in opium poppy cell cultures revealed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry proteomics.

    PubMed

    Zulak, Katherine G; Khan, Morgan F; Alcantara, Joenel; Schriemer, David C; Facchini, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) produces a diverse array of bioactive benzylisoquinoline alkaloids, including the narcotic analgesic morphine and the antimicrobial agent sanguinarine. In contrast to the plant, cell cultures of opium poppy do not accumulate alkaloids constitutively but produce sanguinarine in response to treatment with certain fungal-derived elicitors. The induction of sanguinarine biosynthesis provides a model platform to characterize the regulation of benzylisoquinoline alkaloid pathways and other defense responses. Proteome analysis of elicitor-treated opium poppy cell cultures by two-dimensional denaturing-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis coupled with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry facilitated the identification of 219 of 340 protein spots based on peptide fragment fingerprint searches of a combination of databases. Of the 219 hits, 129 were identified through pre-existing plant proteome databases, 63 were identified by matching predicted translation products in opium poppy-expressed sequence tag databases, and the remainder shared evidence from both databases. Metabolic enzymes represented the largest category of proteins and included S-adenosylmethionine synthetase, several glycolytic, and a nearly complete set of tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes, one alkaloid, and several other secondary metabolic enzymes. The abundance of chaperones, heat shock proteins, protein degradation factors, and pathogenesis-related proteins provided a comprehensive proteomics view on the coordination of plant defense responses. Qualitative comparison of protein abundance in control and elicitor-treated cell cultures allowed the separation of induced and constitutive or suppressed proteins. DNA microarrays were used to corroborate increases in protein abundance with a corresponding induction in cognate transcript levels.

  9. The response of Asterochloris erici (Ahmadjian) Skaloud et Peksa to desiccation: a proteomic approach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study of desiccation tolerance of lichens, and of their photobionts in particular, has frequently focused on the antioxidant system that protects the cell against photo-oxidative stress during dehydration/rehydration cycles. Thus, in this work we carried out proteomic and transcript analyses of ...

  10. Morpho-physiological and proteome level responses to cadmium stress in sorghum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cadmium (Cd) stress may cause serious morphological and physiological abnormalities in addition to altering the proteome in plants. The present study was performed to explore Cd-induced morpho-physiological alterations and their potentiality associated mechanisms in Sorghum bicolor leaves at the pro...

  11. Comparative proteomic analysis of early salt stress-responsive proteins in roots of SnRK2 transgenic rice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The rice roots are highly salt-sensitive organ and primary root growth is rapidly suppressed by salt stress. Sucrose nonfermenting 1-related protein kinase2 (SnRK2) family is one of the key regulator of hyper-osmotic stress signalling in various plant cells. To understand early salt response of rice roots and identify SnRK2 signaling components, proteome changes of transgenic rice roots over-expressing OSRK1, a rice SnRK2 kinase were investigated. Results Proteomes were analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis and protein spots were identified by LC-MS/MS from wild type and OSRK1 transgenic rice roots exposed to 150 mM NaCl for either 3 h or 7 h. Fifty two early salt -responsive protein spots were identified from wild type rice roots. The major up-regulated proteins were enzymes related to energy regulation, amino acid metabolism, methylglyoxal detoxification, redox regulation and protein turnover. It is noted that enzymes known to be involved in GA-induced root growth such as fructose bisphosphate aldolase and methylmalonate semialdehyde dehydrogenase were clearly down-regulated. In contrast to wild type rice roots, only a few proteins were changed by salt stress in OSRK1 transgenic rice roots. A comparative quantitative analysis of the proteome level indicated that forty three early salt-responsive proteins were magnified in transgenic rice roots at unstressed condition. These proteins contain single or multiple potential SnRK2 recognition motives. In vitro kinase assay revealed that one of the identified proteome, calreticulin is a good substrate of OSRK1. Conclusions Our present data implicate that rice roots rapidly changed broad spectrum of energy metabolism upon challenging salt stress, and suppression of GA signaling by salt stress may be responsible for the rapid arrest of root growth and development. The broad spectrum of functional categories of proteins affected by over-expression of OSRK1 indicates that OSRK1 is an upstream regulator of

  12. Screening of entomopathogenic Metarhizium anisopliae isolates and proteomic analysis of secretion synthesized in response to cowpea weevil (Callosobruchus maculatus) exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Murad, André M; Laumann, Raul A; Lima, Thaina de A; Sarmento, Rubia B C; Noronha, Eliane F; Rocha, Thales L; Valadares-Inglis, Maria C; Franco, Octávio L

    2006-01-01

    Cowpea crops are severely attacked by Callosobruchus maculatus, a Coleopteran that at the larval stage penetrates into stored seeds and feeds on cotyledons. Cowpea weevil control could be based in utilization of bacteria and fungi to reduce pest development. Entomopathogenic fungi, such as Metarhizium anisopliae, are able to control insect-pests and are widely applied in biological control. This report evaluated ten M. anisopliae isolates according to their virulence, correlating chitinolytic, proteolytic and alpha-amylolytic activities, as well proteomic analysis by two dimensional gels of fungal secretions in response to an induced medium containing C. maculatus shells, indicating novel biotechnological tools capable of improving cowpea crop resistance.

  13. Extracellular matrix remodelling in response to venous hypertension: proteomics of human varicose veins

    PubMed Central

    Barallobre-Barreiro, Javier; Oklu, Rahmi; Lynch, Marc; Fava, Marika; Baig, Ferheen; Yin, Xiaoke; Barwari, Temo; Potier, David N.; Albadawi, Hassan; Jahangiri, Marjan; Porter, Karen E.; Watkins, Michael T.; Misra, Sanjay; Stoughton, Julianne; Mayr, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Aims Extracellular matrix remodelling has been implicated in a number of vascular conditions, including venous hypertension and varicose veins. However, to date, no systematic analysis of matrix remodelling in human veins has been performed. Methods and results To understand the consequences of venous hypertension, normal and varicose veins were evaluated using proteomics approaches targeting the extracellular matrix. Varicose saphenous veins removed during phlebectomy and normal saphenous veins obtained during coronary artery bypass surgery were collected for proteomics analysis. Extracellular matrix proteins were enriched from venous tissues. The proteomics analysis revealed the presence of >150 extracellular matrix proteins, of which 48 had not been previously detected in venous tissue. Extracellular matrix remodelling in varicose veins was characterized by a loss of aggrecan and several small leucine-rich proteoglycans and a compensatory increase in collagen I and laminins. Gene expression analysis of the same tissues suggested that the remodelling process associated with venous hypertension predominantly occurs at the protein rather than the transcript level. The loss of aggrecan in varicose veins was paralleled by a reduced expression of aggrecanases. Chymase and tryptase β1 were among the up-regulated proteases. The effect of these serine proteases on the venous extracellular matrix was further explored by incubating normal saphenous veins with recombinant enzymes. Proteomics analysis revealed extensive extracellular matrix degradation after digestion with tryptase β1. In comparison, chymase was less potent and degraded predominantly basement membrane-associated proteins. Conclusion The present proteomics study provides unprecedented insights into the expression and degradation of structural and regulatory components of the vascular extracellular matrix in varicosis. PMID:27068509

  14. [Assessment of anaesthesia sufficiency and stress response during liver resections].

    PubMed

    Shiganova, A M; Vyzhigina, M A; Buniatian, K A; Vinnitskiĭ, L I; Samokhina, L O; Golovkin, A S; Balaian, O V; Iur'eva, L A

    2013-01-01

    Recently number of patients undergoing a surgery for primary and secondary liver damages is increased. Thus an adequate and safe anaesthesiological care for the surgeries is a very actual problem. The article deals with a study of anaesthesiological care in 51 patients. 26 patients (51%) received multimodal balanced anaesthesia based on sevoflurane and 25 patients (49%) received multimodal balanced anaesthesia based on continuous propofol infusion. Monitoring of haemodynamics, acid-base balance, common liquid volume, intracellular and extracellular liquid, stress hormones (cortisol and prolactin) was carried out during the surgeries. Haemodynamics and infusion and transfusion therapy were adequate during both methods of anaesthesiological care for liver resections. Strongly marked tissue injury during surgery causes neuroendocrine stress. Cortisol activity during anaesthesia based on continuous propofol infusion was less than during anaesthesia based on sevoflurane. This fact shows that propofol provides stronger protection than sevoflurane. Adequate level of anaesthesia does not cause outoregulative mechanisms suppression which is important during strongly traumatic surgery. Anaesthesia based on sevoflurane both to anaesthesia based on continuous propofol infusion is a method of choice for liver resection.

  15. Elucidation of Complex Nature of PEG Induced Drought-Stress Response in Rice Root Using Comparative Proteomics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Lalit; Gupta, Swati; Mishra, Shashank K.; Pandey, Garima; Kumar, Susheel; Chauhan, Puneet S.; Chakrabarty, Debasis; Nautiyal, Chandra S.

    2016-01-01

    Along with many adaptive strategies, dynamic changes in protein abundance seem to be the common strategy to cope up with abiotic stresses which can be best explored through proteomics. Understanding of drought response is the key to decipher regulatory mechanism of better adaptation. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) proteome represents a phenomenal source of proteins that govern traits of agronomic importance, such as drought tolerance. In this study, a comparison of root cytoplasmic proteome was done for a drought tolerant rice (Heena) cultivar in PEG induced drought conditions. A total of 510 protein spots were observed by PDQuest analysis and 125 differentially regulated spots were subjected for MALDI-TOF MS-MS analysis out of which 102 protein spots identified which further led to identification of 78 proteins with a significant score. These 78 differentially expressed proteins appeared to be involved in different biological pathways. The largest percentage of identified proteins was involved in bioenergy and metabolism (29%) and mainly consists of malate dehydrogenase, succinyl-CoA, putative acetyl-CoA synthetase, and pyruvate dehydrogenase etc. This was followed by proteins related to cell defense and rescue (22%) such as monodehydroascorbate reductase and stress-induced protein sti1, then by protein biogenesis and storage class (21%) e.g. putative thiamine biosynthesis protein, putative beta-alanine synthase, and cysteine synthase. Further, cell signaling (9%) proteins like actin and prolyl endopeptidase, and proteins with miscellaneous function (19%) like Sgt1 and some hypothetical proteins were also represented a large contribution toward drought regulatory mechanism in rice. We propose that protein biogenesis, cell defense, and superior homeostasis may render better drought-adaptation. These findings might expedite the functional determination of the drought-responsive proteins and their prioritization as potential molecular targets for perfect adaptation. PMID

  16. Proteomic and Physiological Analysis of the Response of Oat (Avena sativa) Seeds to Heat Stress under Different Moisture Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lingling; Chen, Quanzhu; Kong, Lingqi; Xia, Fangshan; Yan, Huifang; Zhu, Yanqiao; Mao, Peisheng

    2016-01-01

    Seeds lose their viability when they are exposed to high temperature and moisture content (MC) during storage. The expression and metabolism of proteins plays a critical role in seed resistance to heat stress. However, the proteome response to heat stress in oat (Avena sativa) seeds during storage has not been revealed. To understand mechanisms of heat stress acclimation and tolerance in oat seeds, an integrated physiological and comparative proteomic analysis was performed on oat seeds with different MC during heat stress. Oat seeds with 10% and 16% MC were subjected to high temperatures (35, 45, and 50°C) for 24 and 2 days, respectively, and changes in physiological and biochemical characteristics were analyzed. The results showed that seed vigor decreased significantly with temperature increase from 35 to 50°C. Also, the proline content in 10% MC seeds decreased significantly (p < 0.05) whereas that in 16% MC seeds increased significantly (p < 0.05) during heat treatment from 35 to 50°C. There were no significant differences in malondialdehyde content in 10% MC seeds with temperature from 35 to 50°C, but a significant (p < 0.05) decline occurred in 16% MC seeds at 45°C. Proteome analysis revealed 21 significantly different proteins, including 19 down-regulated and two up-regulated proteins. The down-regulated proteins, notably six heat shock proteins and two ATP synthases, have important roles in the mobilization of carbohydrates and energy, and in the balance between synthesis and degradation of other proteins during seed deterioration. The up-regulation of argininosuccinate synthase participated in proline biosynthesis at 16% MC, which is important for maintaining reactive oxygen species homeostasis for the resistance of heat stress. In summary, heat-responsive protein species and mitochondrial respiratory metabolism were sensitive to high temperature and MC treatment. These studies provide a new insight into acclimation and tolerance to heat stress in

  17. Proteomic analysis of acute responses to copper sulfate stress in larvae of the brine shrimp, Artemia sinica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qian; Wu, Changgong; Dong, Bo; Li, Fuhua; Liu, Fengqi; Xiang, Jianhai

    2010-03-01

    Proteomics was used to reveal the differential protein expression profiles of acute responses to copper sulfate exposure in larvae of Artemia sinica. Fourteen differentially displayed protein spots were detected and seven of them were identified. Three spots were up-expressed and identified: actin, heat shock protein 70, and chaperone subunit 1; three down-regulated proteins were identified: arginine kinase, elongation factor-2, and glycine-rich protein; and a newly expressed protein was identified as peroxiredoxin. The study indicates the involvement of all the differentially expressed proteins in the early responses of protein expression, and in the survival of A. sinica in the presence of copper and other heavy metals; the findings improve understanding of the organism’s adaptive responses and resistance.

  18. Transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic analysis of maize responses to UV-B: comparison of greenhouse and field growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Casati, Paula; Campi, Mabel; Morrow, Darren J; Fernandes, John; Walbot, Virginia

    2011-08-01

    UV-B radiation from normal solar fluence elicits physiological and developmental changes in plants under fluctuating environmental conditions. Most UV photobiology studies in plants utilize controlled greenhouse and growth chamber environments in which few conditions vary except the brief presence of UV-B radiation. Our purpose was to compare responses to UV-B in irradiated and shielded maize organs in field (natural solar plus 2x solar supplementation for defined periods) and greenhouse (2x solar supplementation only) conditions during a 4 hour exposure. Three parameters were assessed--transcripts, proteins, and metabolites--to determine the degree of overlap in maize responses in field and greenhouse conditions. We assessed irradiated leaves, and both shielded leaves and immature ears. After comparing transcriptome, proteome and metabolome profiles, we find there are more differences than similarities between field and greenhouse responses.

  19. Proteomics profile of cellular response to chiral drugs: prospects for pharmaceutical applications.

    PubMed

    Bun Ching, Chi; Zhang, Jianhua; Sui, Jianjun; Ning Chen, Wei

    2010-02-01

    Chiral drugs account for a large proportion of drugs available in the market. There is increasing awareness of the importance of drug chirality and the role it plays in explaining the oftentimes dramatic differences in biological activities in the current drug development portfolio. Using recently developed chiral drugs-cell interaction system, several examples of protein profiles induced by chiral drugs were illustrated in detail on the platform of 2-D LC interfaced with MS/MS system. In addition, the background of chiral drug investigation from which contemporary drug chirality research has emerged, the techniques involved in proteomics technology, the application of proteomics in this exciting area, and the perspectives in future applications are also discussed.

  20. Leaf proteome alterations in the context of physiological and morphological responses to drought and heat stress in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.).

    PubMed

    Rollins, J A; Habte, E; Templer, S E; Colby, T; Schmidt, J; von Korff, M

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to identify barley leaf proteins differentially regulated in response to drought and heat and the combined stresses in context of the morphological and physiological changes that also occur. The Syrian landrace Arta and the Australian cultivar Keel were subjected to drought, high temperature, or a combination of both treatments starting at heading. Changes in the leaf proteome were identified using differential gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. The drought treatment caused strong reductions of biomass and yield, while photosynthetic performance and the proteome were not significantly changed. In contrast, the heat treatment and the combination of heat and drought reduced photosynthetic performance and caused changes of the leaf proteome. The proteomic analysis identified 99 protein spots differentially regulated in response to heat treatment, 14 of which were regulated in a genotype-specific manner. Differentially regulated proteins predominantly had functions in photosynthesis, but also in detoxification, energy metabolism, and protein biosynthesis. The analysis indicated that de novo protein biosynthesis, protein quality control mediated by chaperones and proteases, and the use of alternative energy resources, i.e. glycolysis, play important roles in adaptation to heat stress. In addition, genetic variation identified in the proteome, in plant growth and photosynthetic performance in response to drought and heat represent stress adaption mechanisms to be exploited in future crop breeding efforts.

  1. Data set from the proteomic analysis of Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos snails upon infection with the carcinogenic liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini

    PubMed Central

    Prasopdee, Sattrachai; Tesana, Smarn; Cantacessi, Cinzia; Laha, Thewarach; Mulvenna, Jason; Grams, Rudi; Loukas, Alex; Sotillo, Javier

    2014-01-01

    The snail Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos acts as the first intermediate host for the human liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini, the major cause of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) in Northeast Thailand. This data article contains the results obtained from the analysis of the proteins differentially expressed in the snail B. siamensis goniomphalos upon infection with O. viverrini. It contains the data generated from iQuantitator software including a pdf of each sample with a protein׳s relative expression summary and a per-protein detailed analysis of all time points studied and an excel file for each sample containing the raw data from iQuantitator analysis, including ID, mean, standard deviation, credible interval, log2 and description for every protein identified in each of the samples. PMID:26217698

  2. The Escherichia coli O157:H7 bovine rumen fluid proteome reflects adaptive bacterial responses

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To obtain insights into Escherichia coli O157:H7 (O157) survival mechanisms in the bovine rumen, we defined the growth characteristics and proteome of O157 cultured in rumen fluid (RF; pH 6.0-7.2 and low volatile fatty acid content) obtained from rumen-fistulated cattle fed low protein content “maintenance diet” under diverse in vitro conditions. Results Bottom-up proteomics (LC-MS/MS) of whole cell-lysates of O157 cultured under anaerobic conditions in filter-sterilized RF (fRF; devoid of normal ruminal microbiota) and nutrient-depleted and filtered RF (dRF) resulted in an anaerobic O157 fRF-and dRF-proteome comprising 35 proteins functionally associated with cell structure, motility, transport, metabolism and regulation, but interestingly, not with O157 virulence. Shotgun proteomics-based analysis using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation used to further study differential protein expression in unfiltered RF (uRF; RF containing normal rumen microbial flora) complemented these results. Conclusions Our results indicate that in the rumen, the first anatomical compartment encountered by this human pathogen within the cattle gastrointestinal tract (GIT), O157 initiates a program of specific gene expression that enables it to adapt to the in vivo environment, and successfully transit to its colonization sites in the bovine GIT. Further experiments in vitro using uRF from animals fed different diets and with additional O157 strains, and in vivo using rumen-fistulated cattle will provide a comprehensive understanding of the adaptive mechanisms involved, and help direct evolution of novel modalities for blocking O157 infection of cattle. PMID:24559513

  3. Proteomic profiling and pathway analysis of the response of rat renal proximal convoluted tubules to metabolic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Schauer, Kevin L; Freund, Dana M; Prenni, Jessica E; Curthoys, Norman P

    2013-09-01

    Metabolic acidosis is a relatively common pathological condition that is defined as a decrease in blood pH and bicarbonate concentration. The renal proximal convoluted tubule responds to this condition by increasing the extraction of plasma glutamine and activating ammoniagenesis and gluconeogenesis. The combined processes increase the excretion of acid and produce bicarbonate ions that are added to the blood to partially restore acid-base homeostasis. Only a few cytosolic proteins, such as phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, have been determined to play a role in the renal response to metabolic acidosis. Therefore, further analysis was performed to better characterize the response of the cytosolic proteome. Proximal convoluted tubule cells were isolated from rat kidney cortex at various times after onset of acidosis and fractionated to separate the soluble cytosolic proteins from the remainder of the cellular components. The cytosolic proteins were analyzed using two-dimensional liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Spectral counting along with average MS/MS total ion current were used to quantify temporal changes in relative protein abundance. In all, 461 proteins were confidently identified, of which 24 exhibited statistically significant changes in abundance. To validate these techniques, several of the observed abundance changes were confirmed by Western blotting. Data from the cytosolic fractions were then combined with previous proteomic data, and pathway analyses were performed to identify the primary pathways that are activated or inhibited in the proximal convoluted tubule during the onset of metabolic acidosis.

  4. Physiological and Proteomic Responses of Diploid and Tetraploid Black Locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.) Subjected to Salt Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiming; Wang, Mingyue; Liu, Likun; Meng, Fanjuan

    2013-01-01

    Tetraploid black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.) is adaptable to salt stress. Here, we compared morphological, physiological, ultrastructural, and proteomic traits of leaves in tetraploid black locust and its diploid relatives under salt stress. The results showed that diploid (2×) plants suffered from greater negative effects than those of tetraploid (4×) plants. After salt treatment, plant growth was inhibited, photosynthesis was reduced, reactive oxygen species, malondialdehyde content, and relative electrolyte leakage increased, and defense-related enzyme activities decreased in 2× compared to those in 4×. In addition, salt stress resulted in distorted chloroplasts, swollen thylakoid membranes, accumulation of plastoglobules, and increased starch grains in 2× compared to those in 4×. However, 4× developed diverse responses under salt stress. A comparative proteomic analysis revealed that 41 and 37 proteins were differentially expressed in 2× and 4×, respectively. These proteins were mainly involved in photosynthesis, stress and defense, energy, metabolism, transcription/translation, and transportation. Distinct patterns of protein changes between 2× and 4× were analyzed. Collectively, our results suggest that the plants showed significantly different responses to salt stress based on ploidy level of the plant. The 4× possessed a better salt protection mechanism than that of 2×, suggesting salt tolerance in the polyploid plant. PMID:24129170

  5. Physiological and proteomic analyses of leaves from the halophyte Tangut Nitraria reveals diverse response pathways critical for high salinity tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Tielong; Chen, Jinhui; Zhang, Jingbo; Shi, Shengqing; Zhou, Yanwei; Lu, Lu; Wang, Pengkai; Jiang, Zeping; Yang, Jinchang; Zhang, Shougong; Shi, Jisen

    2015-01-01

    Soil salinization poses a serious threat to the environment and agricultural productivity worldwide. Studies on the physiological and molecular mechanisms of salinity tolerance in halophytic plants provide valuable information to enhance their salt tolerance. Tangut Nitraria is a widely distributed halophyte in saline–alkali soil in the northern areas of China. In this study, we used a proteomic approach to investigate the molecular pathways of the high salt tolerance of T. Nitraria. We analyzed the changes in biomass, photosynthesis, and redox-related enzyme activities in T. Nitraria leaves from plant seedlings treated with high salt concentration. Comparative proteomic analysis of the leaves revealed that the expression of 71 proteins was significantly altered after salinity treatments of T. Nitraria. These salinity-responsive proteins were mainly involved in photosynthesis, redox homeostasis, stress/defense, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, protein metabolism, signal transduction, and membrane transport. Results showed that the reduction of photosynthesis under salt stress was attributed to the down-regulation of the enzymes and proteins involved in the light reaction and Calvin cycle. Protein–protein interaction analysis revealed that the proteins involved in redox homeostasis, photosynthesis, and energy metabolism constructed two types of response networks to high salt stress. T. Nitraria plants developed diverse mechanisms for scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS) in their leaves to cope with stress induced by high salinity. This study provides important information regarding the salt tolerance of the halophyte T. Nitraria. PMID:25713577

  6. Proteomic study of low-temperature responses in strawberry cultivars (Fragaria x ananassa) that differ in cold tolerance.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Gage; Wilson, Robert C; Goodpaster, John V; Sønsteby, Anita; Lai, Xianyin; Witzmann, Frank A; You, Jin-Sam; Rohloff, Jens; Randall, Stephen K; Alsheikh, Muath

    2012-08-01

    To gain insight into the molecular basis contributing to overwintering hardiness, a comprehensive proteomic analysis comparing crowns of octoploid strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) cultivars that differ in freezing tolerance was conducted. Four cultivars were examined for freeze tolerance and the most cold-tolerant cultivar ('Jonsok') and least-tolerant cultivar ('Frida') were compared with a goal to reveal how freezing tolerance is achieved in this distinctive overwintering structure and to identify potential cold-tolerance-associated biomarkers. Supported by univariate and multivariate analysis, a total of 63 spots from two-dimensional electrophoresis analysis and 135 proteins from label-free quantitative proteomics were identified as significantly differentially expressed in crown tissue from the two strawberry cultivars exposed to 0-, 2-, and 42-d cold treatment. Proteins identified as cold-tolerance-associated included molecular chaperones, antioxidants/detoxifying enzymes, metabolic enzymes, pathogenesis-related proteins, and flavonoid pathway proteins. A number of proteins were newly identified as associated with cold tolerance. Distinctive mechanisms for cold tolerance were characterized for two cultivars. In particular, the 'Frida' cold response emphasized proteins specific to flavonoid biosynthesis, while the more freezing-tolerant 'Jonsok' had a more comprehensive suite of known stress-responsive proteins including those involved in antioxidation, detoxification, and disease resistance. The molecular basis for 'Jonsok'-enhanced cold tolerance can be explained by the constitutive level of a number of proteins that provide a physiological stress-tolerant poise.

  7. Comparative proteomics analysis of salt response reveals sex-related photosynthetic inhibition by salinity in Populus cathayana cuttings.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fugui; Zhang, Sheng; Jiang, Hao; Ma, Wujun; Korpelainen, Helena; Li, Chunyang

    2011-09-02

    Male and female poplar ( Populus cathayana Rehd.) cuttings respond differently to salinity stress. To understand these differences better, comparative morphological, physiological, and proteomics analyses were performed. Treatments with different concentrations of NaCl applied to male and female poplar cuttings for 4 weeks showed that females reacted more negatively at the morphological and physiological levels than did males, visible as shriveled leaves, decreased growth, lowered photosynthetic capacities, and greater Na(+) accumulation. The proteome analysis identified 73 proteins from 82 sexually related salt-responsive spots. They were involved in photosynthesis, protein folding and assembly, synthesis and degradation, carbon, energy and steroid metabolism, plant stress and defense, redox homeostasis, signal transduction, and so forth. The sex-related changes of these proteins were consistent with the different morphological and physiological responses in males and females. In conclusion, the higher salt resistance of male P. cathayana cuttings is related to higher expression and lower degradation of proteins in the photosynthetic apparatus, more effective metabolic mechanism and protective system, and greater capacity of hydrogen peroxide scavenging. This research allows us to further understand the possible different management strategies of cellular activities in male and female Populus when confronted by salt stress.

  8. Physiological and proteomic responses of different willow clones (Salix fragilis x alba) exposed to dredged sediment contaminated by heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Evlard, Aricia; Sergeant, Kjell; Ferrandis, Salvador; Printz, Bruno; Renaut, Jenny; Guignard, Cedric; Paul, Roger; Hausman, Jean-Francois; Campanella, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    High biomass producing species are considered as tools for remediation of contaminated soils. Willows (Salix spp.) are prominent study subjects in this regard. In this study, different willow clones (Salix fragilis x alba) were planted on heavy-metal polluted dredging sludge. A first objective was assessment of the biomass production for these clones. Using a Gupta statistic, four clones were identified as high biomass producers (HBP). For comparison, a group of four clones with lowest biomass production were selected (LBP). A second objective was to compare metal uptake as well as the physiological and proteomic responses of these two groups. All these complementary data's allow us to have a better picture of the health of the clones that would be used in phytoremediation programs. Cd, Zn, and Ni total uptake was higher in the HBPs but Pb total uptake was higher in LBPs. Our proteomic and physiological results showed that the LBPs were able to maintain cellular activity as much as the HBPs although the oxidative stress response was more pronounced in the LBPs. This could be due to the high Pb content found in this group although a combined effect of the other metals cannot be excluded.

  9. Proteomic responses reveal the differential effects induced by cadmium in mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis at early life stages.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lanlan; Peng, Xiao; Yu, Deliang; Ji, Chenglong; Zhao, Jianmin; Wu, Huifeng

    2016-08-01

    Cadmium (Cd) has become an important metal contaminant and posed severe risk on the organisms in the coastal environments of the Bohai Sea. Marine mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis is widely distributed along the Bohai coast and consumed as seafood by local residents. Evidences indicate that the early stages of marine organisms are more sensitive to metal contaminants. In this study, we applied two-dimensional electrophoresis-based proteomics to characterize the biological effects of Cd (50 μg L(-1)) in the early life stages (D-shape larval and juvenile) of mussels. The different proteomic responses demonstrated the differential responsive mechanisms to Cd exposure in these two early life stages of mussels. In details, results indicated that Cd mainly induced immune and oxidative stresses in both D-shape larval and juvenile mussels via different pathways. In addition, the significant up-regulation of triosephosphate isomerase and metallothionein confirmed the enhanced energy demand and mobilized detoxification mechanism in D-shape larval mussels exposed to Cd. In juvenile mussels, Cd exposure also induced clear apoptosis. Overall, this work suggests that Cd is a potential immune toxicant to mussel M. galloprovincialis at early life stages.

  10. An integrated proteomic and metabolomic study on the gender-specific responses of mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis to tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA).

    PubMed

    Ji, Chenglong; Li, Fei; Wang, Qing; Zhao, Jianmin; Sun, Zuodeng; Wu, Huifeng

    2016-02-01

    Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), accounting for the largest production of brominated flame-retardants (BFRs) along the Laizhou Bay in China, is of great concern due to its diverse toxicities. In this study, we focused on the gender-specific responses of TBBPA in mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis using an integrated proteomic and metabolomic approach. After exposure of TBBPA (10 µg L(-1)) for one month, a total of 9 metabolites and 67 proteins were altered in mussel gills from exposed group. The significant changes of metabolites in female mussel gills from exposed group exhibited the disturbances in energy metabolism and osmotic regulation, while in male samples only be found the variation of metabolites related to osmotic regulation. iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis showed biological differences between male and female mussel gills from solvent control group. The higher levels of proteins related to primary and energy metabolism and defense mechanisms in male mussel gills meant a greater anti-stress capability of male mussels. Further analysis revealed that TBBPA exposure affected multiple biological processes consisting of production and development, material and energy metabolism, signal transduction, gene expression, defense mechanisms and apoptosis in both male and female mussels with different mechanisms. Specially, the responsive proteins of TBBPA in male mussels signified higher tolerance limits than those in female individuals, which was consistent with the biological differences between male and female mussel gills from solvent control group. This work suggested that the gender differences should be considered in ecotoxicology.

  11. Proteomic response of Schizosaccharomyces pombe to static and oscillating extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, John; Weeks, Mark; Butt, Amna; Worthington, Jessica L; Akpan, Akunna; Jones, Nic; Waterfield, Mike; Allanand, Donald; Timms, John F

    2006-09-01

    There is considerable public concern regarding the health effects of exposure to low-frequency electromagnetic fields. In addition, the association between exposure and disease incidence or the possible biological effects of exposure are unclear. Using 2D-DIGE and MS in a blind study, we have investigated the effects of static and oscillating extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF EMFs) on the proteomes of wild type Schizosaccharomyces pombe and a Sty1p deletion mutant which displays increased sensitivity to a variety of cellular stresses. Whilst this study identifies a number of protein isoforms that display significant differential expression across experimental conditions, there was no correlation between their patterns of expression and the ELF EMF exposure regimen. We conclude that there are no significant effects of either static or oscillating EMF on the yeast proteome at the sensitivity afforded by 2D-DIGE. We hypothesise that the proteins identified must be sensitive to subtle changes in culture and/or handling conditions, and that the identification of these proteins in other proteomic studies should be treated with some caution when the results of such studies are interpreted in a biological context.

  12. Histopathological effect and stress response of mantle proteome following TBT exposure in the Hooded oyster Saccostrea cucullata.

    PubMed

    Khondee, Phattirapa; Srisomsap, Chantragan; Chokchaichamnankit, Daranee; Svasti, Jisnuson; Simpson, Richard J; Kingtong, Sutin

    2016-11-01

    Tributyltin (TBT), an environmental pollutant in marine ecosystems, is toxic to organisms. Although contamination by and bioaccumulation and toxicity of this compound have been widely reported, its underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we exposed the Hooded oyster Saccostrea cucullata to TBT to investigate histopathological effects and proteome stress response. Animals were exposed to three TBT sub-lethal concentrations, 10, 50 and 150 μg/l for 48 h. TBT produced stress leading to histopathological changes in oyster tissues including mantle, gill, stomach and digestive diverticula. TBT induced mucocyte production in epithelia and hemocyte aggregation in connective tissue. Cell necrosis occurred when exposure dosages were high. Comparative proteome analyses of mantle protein of oysters exposed to 10 μg/l and control animals were analyzed by a 2-DE based proteomic approach. In total, 32 protein spots were found to differ (p < 0.05). Of these, 17 proteins were identified which included 14 up-regulated and 3 down-regulated proteins. TBT induced the expression of proteins involved in defensive mechanisms (HSP-78, HSP-70, aldehyde dehydrogenase and catalase), calcium homeostasis (VDAC-3), cytoskeleton and cytoskeleton-associated proteins, energy metabolism and amino acid metabolism. Our study revealed that TBT disturbs calcium homeostasis via VDAC-3 protein in mantle and this probably is the key molecular mechanism of TBT acting to distort shell calcification. Moreover, proteins involved in cell structure (tubulin-alpha and tubulin-beta) and protein synthesis were reduced after TBT exposure. Additionally, differential proteins obtained from this work will be useful as potential TBT biomarkers.

  13. Plumbagin elicits differential proteomic responses mainly involving cell cycle, apoptosis, autophagy, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition pathways in human prostate cancer PC-3 and DU145 cells.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jia-Xuan; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; He, Zhi-Xu; Zhao, Ruan Jin; Zhang, Xueji; Yang, Lun; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Mao, Zong-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Plumbagin (PLB) has exhibited a potent anticancer effect in preclinical studies, but the molecular interactome remains elusive. This study aimed to compare the quantitative proteomic responses to PLB treatment in human prostate cancer PC-3 and DU145 cells using the approach of stable-isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC). The data were finally validated using Western blot assay. First, the bioinformatic analysis predicted that PLB could interact with 78 proteins that were involved in cell proliferation and apoptosis, immunity, and signal transduction. Our quantitative proteomic study using SILAC revealed that there were at least 1,225 and 267 proteins interacting with PLB and there were 341 and 107 signaling pathways and cellular functions potentially regulated by PLB in PC-3 and DU145 cells, respectively. These proteins and pathways played a critical role in the regulation of cell cycle, apoptosis, autophagy, epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), and reactive oxygen species generation. The proteomic study showed substantial differences in response to PLB treatment between PC-3 and DU145 cells. PLB treatment significantly modulated the expression of critical proteins that regulate cell cycle, apoptosis, and EMT signaling pathways in PC-3 cells but not in DU145 cells. Consistently, our Western blotting analysis validated the bioinformatic and proteomic data and confirmed the modulating effects of PLB on important proteins that regulated cell cycle, apoptosis, autophagy, and EMT in PC-3 and DU145 cells. The data from the Western blot assay could not display significant differences between PC-3 and DU145 cells. These findings indicate that PLB elicits different proteomic responses in PC-3 and DU145 cells involving proteins and pathways that regulate cell cycle, apoptosis, autophagy, reactive oxygen species production, and antioxidation/oxidation homeostasis. This is the first systematic study with integrated computational, proteomic, and

  14. Quantitative analysis of cytochrome P450 isoforms in human liver microsomes by the combination of proteomics and chemical probe-based assay.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xidong; Hu, Lianghai; Ge, Guangbo; Yang, Bo; Ning, Jing; Sun, Shixin; Yang, Ling; Pors, Klaus; Gu, Jingkai

    2014-08-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) is one of the most important drug-metabolizing enzyme families, which participates in the biotransformation of many endogenous and exogenous compounds. Quantitative analysis of CYP expression levels is important when studying the efficacy of new drug molecules and assessing drug-drug interactions in drug development. At present, chemical probe-based assay is the most widely used approach for the evaluation of CYP activity although there are cross-reactions between the isoforms with high sequence homologies. Therefore, quantification of each isozyme is highly desired in regard to meeting the ever-increasing requirements for carrying out pharmacokinetics and personalized medicine in the academic, pharmaceutical, and clinical setting. Herein, an absolute quantification method was employed for the analysis of the seven isoforms CYP1A2, 2B6, 3A4, 3A5, 2C9, 2C19, and 2E1 using a proteome-derived approach in combination with stable isotope dilution assay. The average absolute amount measured from twelve human liver microsomes samples were 39.3, 4.3, 54.0, 4.6, 10.3, 3.0, and 9.3 (pmol/mg protein) for 1A2, 2B6, 3A4, 3A5, 2C9, 2C19, and 2E1, respectively. Importantly, the expression level of CYP3A4 showed high correlation (r = 0.943, p < 0.0001) with the functional activity, which was measured using bufalin-a highly selective chemical probe we have developed. The combination of MRM identification and analysis of the functional activity, as in the case of CYP3A4, provides a protocol which can be extended to other functional enzyme studies with wide application in pharmaceutical research.

  15. Comparative proteomic analysis of the hepatic response to heat stress in Muscovy and Pekin ducks: insight into thermal tolerance related to energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Tao; Jiang, Xueyuan; Li, Jinjun; Wang, Deqian; Li, Guoqin; Lu, Lizhi; Wang, Genlin

    2013-01-01

    The Pekin duck, bred from the mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) in china, is one of the most famous meat duck species in the world. However, it is more sensitive to heat stress than Muscovy duck, which is believed to have originated in South America. With temperature raising, mortality, laying performance, and meat quality of the Pekin duck are severely affected. This study aims to uncover the temperature-dependent proteins of two duck species using comparative proteomic approach. Duck was cultured under 39°C ± 0.5°C for 1 h, and then immediately returned to 20°C for a 3 h recovery period, the liver proteins were extracted and electrophoresed in two-dimensional mode. After analysis of gel images, 61 differentially expressed proteins were detected, 54 were clearly identified by MALDI TOF/TOF MS. Of the 54 differentially expressed protein spots identified, 7 were found in both species, whereas 47 were species specific (25 in Muscovy duck and 22 in Pekin duck). As is well known, chaperone proteins, such as heat shock protein (HSP) 70 and HSP10, were abundantly up-regulated in both species in response to heat stress. However, we also found that several proteins, such as α-enolase, and S-adenosylmethionine synthetase, showed different expression patterns in the 2 duck species. The enriched biological processes were grouped into 3 main categories according to gene ontology analysis: cell death and apoptosis (20.93%), amino acid metabolism (13.95%) and oxidation reduction (20.93%). The mRNA levels of several differentially expressed protein were investigated by real-time RT-PCR. To our knowledge, this study is the first to provide insights into the differential expression of proteins following heat stress in ducks and enables better understanding of possible heat stress response mechanisms in animals.

  16. A Comprehensive Proteomic View of Responses of A549 Type II Alveolar Epithelial Cells to Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection*

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Keyur A.; Norris, Emma L.; Bukreyev, Alexander A.; Headlam, Madeleine J.; Buchholz, Ursula J.; Singh, Toshna; Collins, Peter L.; Gorman, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus is a major respiratory pathogen for which there are no suitable antivirals or vaccines. A better understanding of the host cell response to this virus may redress this problem. The present report concerns analysis of multiple independent biological replicates of control and 24 h infected lysates of A549 cells by two different proteomic workflows. One workflow involved fractionation of lysates by in-solution protein IEF and individual fractions were digested using trypsin prior to capillary HPLC-LTQ-OrbitrapXL-MS/MS. A second workflow involved digestion of whole cell lysates and analysis by nanoUltraHPLC-LTQ-OrbitrapElite-MS/MS. Both workflows resulted in the quantification of viral proteins exclusively in lysates of infected cells in the relative abundances anticipated from previous studies. Unprecedented numbers (3247 - 5010) of host cell protein groups were also quantified and the infection-specific regulation of a large number (191) of these protein groups was evident based on a stringent false discovery rate cut-off (<1%). Bioinformatic analyses revealed that most of the regulated proteins were potentially regulated by type I, II, and III interferon, TNF-α and noncanonical NF-κB2 mediated antiviral response pathways. Regulation of specific protein groups by infection was validated by quantitative Western blotting and the cytokine-/key regulator-specific nature of their regulation was confirmed by comparable analyses of cytokine treated A549 cells. Overall, it is evident that the workflows described herein have produced the most comprehensive proteomic characterization of host cell responses to human respiratory syncytial virus published to date. These workflows will form the basis for analysis of the impacts of specific genes of human respiratory syncytial virus responses of A549 and other cell lines using a gene-deleted version of the virus. They should also prove valuable for the analysis of the impact of other infectious

  17. Characterization of host response to Cryptococcus neoformans through quantitative proteomic analysis of cryptococcal meningitis co-infected with HIV.

    PubMed

    Selvan, Lakshmi Dhevi N; Sreenivasamurthy, Sreelakshmi K; Kumar, Satwant; Yelamanchi, Soujanya D; Madugundu, Anil K; Anil, Abhijith K; Renuse, Santosh; Nair, Bipin G; Gowda, Harsha; Mathur, Premendu P; Satishchandra, Parthasarathy; Shankar, S K; Mahadevan, Anita; Keshava Prasad, T S

    2015-09-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is the most common opportunistic fungal infection causing morbidity and mortality (>60%) in HIV-associated immunocompromised individuals caused by Cryptococcus neoformans. Molecular mechanisms of cryptococcal infection in brain have been studied using experimental animal models and cell lines. There are limited studies for the molecular understanding of cryptococcal meningitis in human brain. The proteins involved in the process of invasion and infection in human brain still remains obscure. To this end we carried out mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics of frontal lobe brain tissues from cryptococcal meningitis patients and controls to identify host proteins that are associated with the pathogenesis of cryptococcal meningitis. We identified 317 proteins to be differentially expressed (≥2-fold) from a total of 3423 human proteins. We found proteins involved in immune response and signal transduction to be differentially expressed in response to cryptococcal infection in human brain. Immune response proteins including complement factors, major histocompatibility proteins, proteins previously known to be involved in fungal invasion to brain such as caveolin 1 and actin were identified to be differentially expressed in cryptococcal meningitis brain tissues co-infected with HIV. We also validated the expression status of 5 proteins using immunohistochemistry. Overexpression of major histocompatibility complexes, class I, B (HLA-B), actin alpha 2 smooth muscle aorta (ACTA2) and caveolin 1 (CAV1) and downregulation of peripheral myelin protein 2 (PMP2) and alpha crystallin B chain (CRYAB) in cryptococcal meningitis were confirmed by IHC-based validation experiments. This study provides the brain proteome profile of cryptococcal meningitis co-infected with HIV for a better understanding of the host response associated with the disease.

  18. Proteomic Analysis of Frankliniella occidentalis and Differentially Expressed Proteins in Response to Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Badillo-Vargas, I. E.; Rotenberg, D.; Schneweis, D. J.; Hiromasa, Y.; Tomich, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is transmitted by Frankliniella occidentalis in a persistent propagative manner. Despite the extensive replication of TSWV in midgut and salivary glands, there is little to no pathogenic effect on F. occidentalis. We hypothesize that the first-instar larva (L1) of F. occidentalis mounts a response to TSWV that protects it from pathogenic effects caused by virus infection and replication in various insect tissues. A partial thrips transcriptome was generated using 454-Titanium sequencing of cDNA generated from F. occidentalis exposed to TSWV. Using these sequences, the L1 thrips proteome that resolved on a two-dimensional gel was characterized. Forty-seven percent of the resolved protein spots were identified using the thrips transcriptome. Real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) analysis of virus titer in L1 thrips revealed a significant increase in the normalized abundance of TSWV nucleocapsid RNA from 2 to 21 h after a 3-h acquisition access period on virus-infected plant tissue, indicative of infection and accumulation of virus. We compared the proteomes of infected and noninfected L1s to identify proteins that display differential abundances in response to virus. Using four biological replicates, 26 spots containing 37 proteins were significantly altered in response to TSWV. Gene ontology assignments for 32 of these proteins revealed biological roles associated with the infection cycle of other plant- and animal-infecting viruses and antiviral defense responses. Our findings support the hypothesis that L1 thrips display a complex reaction to TSWV infection and provide new insights toward unraveling the molecular basis of this interaction. PMID:22696645

  19. A comprehensive proteomic view of responses of A549 type II alveolar epithelial cells to human respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    PubMed

    Dave, Keyur A; Norris, Emma L; Bukreyev, Alexander A; Headlam, Madeleine J; Buchholz, Ursula J; Singh, Toshna; Collins, Peter L; Gorman, Jeffrey J

    2014-12-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus is a major respiratory pathogen for which there are no suitable antivirals or vaccines. A better understanding of the host cell response to this virus may redress this problem. The present report concerns analysis of multiple independent biological replicates of control and 24 h infected lysates of A549 cells by two different proteomic workflows. One workflow involved fractionation of lysates by in-solution protein IEF and individual fractions were digested using trypsin prior to capillary HPLC-LTQ-OrbitrapXL-MS/MS. A second workflow involved digestion of whole cell lysates and analysis by nanoUltraHPLC-LTQ-OrbitrapElite-MS/MS. Both workflows resulted in the quantification of viral proteins exclusively in lysates of infected cells in the relative abundances anticipated from previous studies. Unprecedented numbers (3247 - 5010) of host cell protein groups were also quantified and the infection-specific regulation of a large number (191) of these protein groups was evident based on a stringent false discovery rate cut-off (<1%). Bioinformatic analyses revealed that most of the regulated proteins were potentially regulated by type I, II, and III interferon, TNF-α and noncanonical NF-κB2 mediated antiviral response pathways. Regulation of specific protein groups by infection was validated by quantitative Western blotting and the cytokine-/key regulator-specific nature of their regulation was confirmed by comparable analyses of cytokine treated A549 cells. Overall, it is evident that the workflows described herein have produced the most comprehensive proteomic characterization of host cell responses to human respiratory syncytial virus published to date. These workflows will form the basis for analysis of the impacts of specific genes of human respiratory syncytial virus responses of A549 and other cell lines using a gene-deleted version of the virus. They should also prove valuable for the analysis of the impact of other infectious

  20. Proteomic profile of hemolymph and detection of induced antimicrobial peptides in response to microbial challenge in Diatraea saccharalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae).

    PubMed

    Rocha, Iara Fernanda; Maller, Alexandre; de Cássia Garcia Simão, Rita; Kadowaki, Marina Kimiko; Angeli Alves, Luis Francisco; Huergo, Luciano Fernandes; da Conceição Silva, José Luis

    2016-04-29

    Insects are organisms extremely well adapted to diverse habitats, primarily due to their innate immune system, which provides them with a range of cellular and humoral responses against microorganisms. Lepidoptera hemolymph proteins involved in humoral responses are well known; however, there is a lack of knowledge about the sugarcane borer Diatraea saccharalis. In this present work, the hemolymph proteins of this pest insect were studied by applying proteomic methodologies. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) gels of proteins extracted from naive larvae and larvae challenged with Escherichia coli (ATCC 11224) and Bacillus subtilis (ATCC 6623) showed an average of 300 spots, and 92 of these spots corresponded in all three 2-DE gels. Forty-one spots were excised and digested with trypsin and analyzed using mass spectrometry. After analysis, 10 proteins were identified, including some proteins of the immune system: β-defensin-like protein, Turandot A-like protein, attacin-like protein, peptidoglycan recognition protein and cyclophilin-like protein. Nine proteins were present in both experimental conditions; however, β-defensin-like protein was present only in hemolymph challenged by B. subtilis. Notably, attacin-like protein was strongly induced by challenge with E. coli, suggesting an immune response against the infection. However, antimicrobial activity was observed in the test zone of microbial growth inhibition of B. subtilis solely with the hemolymph extract of the larvae challenged with B. subtilis. We made for the first time a proteomic profile of the hemolymph of D. saccharalis in which it was possible to identify the presence of important proteins involved in the immune response.

  1. High-throughput single-cell analysis for the proteomic dynamics study of the yeast osmotic stress response

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rongfei; Yuan, Haiyu; Wang, Shujing; Ouyang, Qi; Chen, Yong; Hao, Nan; Luo, Chunxiong

    2017-01-01

    Motorized fluorescence microscopy combined with high-throughput microfluidic chips is a powerful method to obtain information about different biological processes in cell biology studies. Generally, to observe different strains under different environments, high-throughput microfluidic chips require complex preparatory work. In this study, we designed a novel and easily operated high-throughput microfluidic system to observe 96 different GFP-tagged yeast strains in one switchable culture condition or 24 different GFP-tagged yeast strains in four parallel switchable culture conditions. A multi-pipette is the only additional equipment required for high-throughput patterning of cells in the chip. Only eight connections are needed to control 96 conditions. Using these devices, the proteomic dynamics of the yeast stress response pathway were carefully studied based on single-cell data. A new method to characterize the proteomic dynamics using a single cell’s data is proposed and compared to previous methods, and the new technique should be useful for studying underlying control networks. Our method provides an easy and systematic way to study signaling pathways at the single-cell level. PMID:28181485

  2. High-throughput single-cell analysis for the proteomic dynamics study of the yeast osmotic stress response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongfei; Yuan, Haiyu; Wang, Shujing; Ouyang, Qi; Chen, Yong; Hao, Nan; Luo, Chunxiong

    2017-02-09

    Motorized fluorescence microscopy combined with high-throughput microfluidic chips is a powerful method to obtain information about different biological processes in cell biology studies. Generally, to observe different strains under different environments, high-throughput microfluidic chips require complex preparatory work. In this study, we designed a novel and easily operated high-throughput microfluidic system to observe 96 different GFP-tagged yeast strains in one switchable culture condition or 24 different GFP-tagged yeast strains in four parallel switchable culture conditions. A multi-pipette is the only additional equipment required for high-throughput patterning of cells in the chip. Only eight connections are needed to control 96 conditions. Using these devices, the proteomic dynamics of the yeast stress response pathway were carefully studied based on single-cell data. A new method to characterize the proteomic dynamics using a single cell's data is proposed and compared to previous methods, and the new technique should be useful for studying underlying control networks. Our method provides an easy and systematic way to study signaling pathways at the single-cell level.

  3. Transcriptomic and proteomic responses of Serratia marcescens to spaceflight conditions involve large-scale changes in metabolic pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yajuan; Yuan, Yanting; Liu, Jinwen; Su, Longxiang; Chang, De; Guo, Yinghua; Chen, Zhenhong; Fang, Xiangqun; Wang, Junfeng; Li, Tianzhi; Zhou, Lisha; Fang, Chengxiang; Yang, Ruifu; Liu, Changting

    2014-04-01

    The microgravity environment of spaceflight expeditions has been associated with altered microbial responses. This study explores the characterization of Serratia marcescensis grown in a spaceflight environment at the phenotypic, transcriptomic and proteomic levels. From November 1, 2011 to November 17, 2011, a strain of S. marcescensis was sent into space for 398 h on the Shenzhou VIII spacecraft, and ground simulation was performed as a control (LCT-SM213). After the flight, two mutant strains (LCT-SM166 and LCT-SM262) were selected for further analysis. Although no changes in the morphology, post-culture growth kinetics, hemolysis or antibiotic sensitivity were observed, the two mutant strains exhibited significant changes in their metabolic profiles after exposure to spaceflight. Enrichment analysis of the transcriptome showed that the differentially expressed genes of the two spaceflight strains and the ground control strain mainly included those involved in metabolism and degradation. The proteome revealed that changes at the protein level were also associated with metabolic functions, such as glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, pyruvate metabolism, arginine and proline metabolism and the degradation of valine, leucine and isoleucine. In summary S. marcescens showed alterations primarily in genes and proteins that were associated with metabolism under spaceflight conditions, which gave us valuable clues for future research.

  4. Physiological response and differential leaf proteome pattern in the European invasive Asteraceae Solidago canadensis colonizing a former cokery soil.

    PubMed

    Immel, Françoise; Renaut, Jenny; Masfaraud, Jean-François

    2012-02-02

    Derelict contaminated sites are often colonized spontaneously by plant species leading to a vegetal cover thought to limit particle dispersal and polluted water infiltration. Those plants must cope with soil pollutants through tolerance mechanisms that are not yet fully understood. Here, we focused our attention on a particular Asteraceae plant, Solidago canadensis, considered as invasive in Europe. S. canadensis spontaneously growing on either polluted (NM soil) or control soils dumped on experimental plots were studied for their physiological status, oxidative stress and 2D-DIGE of leaf extracts. S. canadensis tolerance to soil pollutants was demonstrated since growth rates, allocation to reproduction ratios and Fv/Fm ratios were similar in plants from control and NM soil. At the cell level, the catalase activity level was increased in plants collected on NM soil while lipoperoxidation was unaffected. Also, the leaf proteomic study revealed thirty down-regulated and sixty-six up-regulated proteins. Abundances of proteins related to oxidative stress, carbohydrate metabolism, ion transport were mainly up-regulated while those of proteins involved in cell cycle and transcription/translation were mostly down-regulated. Proteins associated to protein metabolism were either down- or up-regulated. Considered altogether, we highlighted that S. canadensis exhibited a complex proteome response when experiencing a multicontaminated soil.

  5. Response of leaf and fine roots proteomes of Salix viminalis L. to growth on Cr-rich tannery waste.

    PubMed

    Zemleduch-Barylska, Agata; Lorenc-Plucińska, Gabriela

    2016-09-01

    The tannery industry is a major source of anthropogenic chromium (Cr) contamination due to the large amounts of solid waste produced and its problematic management. The unique composition of tannery waste, usually high concentrations of Cr and other metals as well as organic matter and nutrients, makes it a great risk for soil and water environment but also a possible effective fertilizer for non-food plants that can tolerate metals. The goal of this study was to understand the adaptation mechanism of Salix viminalis to growth on Cr-rich tannery waste from an active landfill. We used a proteomic approach to identify leaf and fine roots proteins altered by tannery waste as compared to control soil conditions. We found no obvious symptoms of oxidative stress in leaves or fine roots. Proteomic results indicated some changes in metabolism, with increases in energy production processes and their greater efficiency for leaves rather than root development. Comparison between S. viminalis and P. × canescens response to tannery waste suggested that S. viminalis is not suitable for remediation of Cr-contaminated areas of a tannery waste landfill site.

  6. Induction of antinuclear antibodies by de novo autoimmune hepatitis regulates alloimmune responses in rat liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Toshiaki; Goto, Shigeru; Lai, Chia-Yun; Hsu, Li-Wen; Tseng, Hui-Peng; Chen, Kuang-Den; Chiu, King-Wah; Wang, Chih-Chi; Cheng, Yu-Fan; Chen, Chao-Long

    2013-01-01

    Concanavalin A (Con A) is a lectin originating from the jack-bean and well known for its ability to stimulate T cells and induce autoimmune hepatitis. We previously demonstrated the induction of immunosuppressive antinuclear autoantibody in the course of Con A-induced transient autoimmune hepatitis. This study aimed to clarify the effects of Con A-induced hepatitis on liver allograft rejection and acceptance. In this study, we observed the unique phenomenon that the induction of transient de novo autoimmune hepatitis by Con A injection paradoxically overcomes the rejection without any immunosuppressive drug and exhibits significantly prolonged survival after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Significantly increased titers of anti-nuclear Abs against histone H1 and high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) and reduced donor specific alloantibody response were observed in Con A-injected recipients. Induction of Foxp3 and IL-10 in OLT livers of Con A-injected recipients suggested the involvement of regulatory T cells in this unique phenomenon. Our present data suggest the significance of autoimmune responses against nuclear histone H1 and HMGB1 for competing allogeneic immune responses, resulting in the acceptance of liver allografts in experimental liver transplantation.

  7. Proteome analysis of fatty liver in feed-deprived dairy cows reveals interaction of fuel sensing, calcium, fatty acid, and glycogen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kuhla, Björn; Albrecht, Dirk; Kuhla, Siegfried; Metges, Cornelia C

    2009-04-10

    The liver of dairy cows is involved in signaling the current hepatic metabolic state to the brain via metabolites and nerval afferents to control and adjust feed intake. Feed deprivation may result in mobilization of body reserves favoring hepatic steatosis. While the overall metabolic changes are well characterized, specific regulatory mechanisms are not readily understood. To identify molecular events associated with metabolic adaptation and the control of energy homeostasis, liver specimens from six ad libitum-fed and six feed-deprived cows were analyzed for selected metabolites, for the activation of AMP kinase, and for regulatory/regulated proteins using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF-MS. Feed deprivation increased total liver fat and the calcium content, as well as augmented AMPK phosphorylation, while it decreased the contents of protein, glucose, glycogen, and cholesterol when expressed as a percentage of dry matter. Among 34 differentially expressed proteins identified, we found downregulation of proteins associated with fatty acid oxidation, glycolysis, electron transfer, protein degradation, and antigen processing, as well as cytoskeletal rearrangement. Proteins upregulated after feed deprivation included enzymes of the urea cycle, fatty acid or cholesterol transport proteins, an inhibitor of glycolysis, and previously unknown changes in calcium signaling network. Direct correlation was found between expression of glycolytic enzymes and glucose/glycogen content, whereas inverse correlation exists between expression of beta-oxidative enzymes and total liver fat content. In conclusion, the regulatory response of identified proteins may help to explain development and consequences of hepatic lipidosis but also offers novel candidates potentially involved in signaling for maintaining energy homeostasis.

  8. Dynamic changes in the leaf proteome of a C3 xerophyte, Citrullus lanatus (wild watermelon), in response to water deficit.

    PubMed

    Akashi, Kinya; Yoshida, Kazuo; Kuwano, Masayoshi; Kajikawa, Masataka; Yoshimura, Kazuya; Hoshiyasu, Saki; Inagaki, Naoyuki; Yokota, Akiho

    2011-05-01

    Wild watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) is a xerophyte native to the Kalahari Desert, Africa. To better understand the molecular mechanisms of drought resistance in this plant, we examined changes in the proteome in response to water deficit. Wild watermelon leaves showed decreased transpiration and a concomitant increase in leaf temperature under water deficit conditions. Comparison of the proteome of stressed plants with that of unstressed plants by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed that the intensity of 40 spots increased in response to the stress, and the intensity of 11 spots decreased. We positively identified 23 stress-induced and 6 stress-repressed proteins by mass spectrometry and database analyses. Interestingly, 15 out of the 23 up-regulated proteins (65% of annotated up-regulated proteins) were heat shock proteins (HSPs). Especially, 10 out of the 15 up-regulated HSPs belonged to the small heat shock protein (sHSP) family. Other stress-induced proteins included those related to antioxidative defense and carbohydrate metabolism. Fifteen distinct cDNA sequences encoding the sHSP were characterized from wild watermelon. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis of the representative sHSP genes revealed strong transcriptional up-regulation in the leaves under water deficit. Moreover, immunoblot analysis confirmed that protein abundance of sHSPs was massively increased under water deficit. Overall, these observations suggest that the defense response of wild watermelon may involve orchestrated regulation of a diverse array of functional proteins related to cellular defense and metabolism, of which HSPs may play a pivotal role on the protection of the plant under water deficit in the presence of strong light.

  9. Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) modulates its proteome differentially in response to salinity, cadmium and their combination stress.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Rita; Bashir, Humayra; Ahmad, Javed; Iqbal, Muhammad; Qureshi, M Irfan

    2015-12-01

    Cadmium (Cd) contamination and salinity are common stressors in agricultural soils all over the globe. Sensitivity and modulation of plant proteome lead to proper signal execution and adaptation to abiotic stress via molecular responses, which strengthen plant defence system. A comparative proteomic study, employing 2DE-MALDI TOF/TOF MS, of Spinacia oleracea plants exposed to cadmium (50 μg CdCl2 g(-1) soil), salinity (10 mg NaCl g(-1) soil) and their combination (NaCl + Cd) was conducted to understand the minimum common adaptation to multiple stress. Analysis of 2D gel maps showed significant increase and decrease in relative abundance of 14 and 39 proteins by Cd; 11 and 46 by salinity and 22 and 37 by combined stress of Cd and salinity, respectively. Peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) helped in the identification of maturase K and PPD4 with increased relative abundance under all stresses; whereas salinity stress and combination stress silenced the presence of one protein (polycomb protein EZ2) and two proteins (cellulose synthase-like protein and ubiquitin conjugation factor E4), respectively. The identified proteins were functionally associated with signal transduction (15%), protein synthesis (16%), stress response and defence (33%), photosynthesis (13%), plant growth/cell division (9%), energy generation (4%), transport (4%), secondary metabolism (3%), and cell death (3%); clearly indicating the importance and necessity of keeping a higher ratio of defence and disease-responsive proteins. The results suggest that plant may increase the abundance of defence proteins and may also lower the abundance of catabolic proteins. Proteins with altered ratios of abundance belonged to different functional categories, suggesting that plants have differential mechanisms to respond to Cd, salinity, and their combined stress, but with unique sets of proteins.

  10. Proteomic Analysis of Early-Responsive Redox-Sensitive Proteins in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Regulation of protein function through oxidative modification has emerged as an important molecular mechanism modulating various biological processes. Here, we report a proteomic study of redox-sensitive proteins in Arabidopsis cells subjected to H2O2 treatment. Four gel-based approaches were employed, leading to the identification of four partially overlapping sets of proteins whose thiols underwent oxidative modification in the H2O2-treated cells. Using a method based on differential labeling of thiols followed by immunoprecipitation and Western blotting, five of the six selected putative redox-sensitive proteins were confirmed to undergo oxidative modification following the oxidant treatment in Arabidopsis leaves. Another method, which is based on differential labeling of thiols coupled with protein electrophoretic mobility shift assay, was adopted to reveal that one of the H2O2-sensitive proteins, a homologue of cytokine-induced apoptosis inhibitor 1 (AtCIAPIN1), also underwent oxidative modification in Arabidopsis leaves after treatments with salicylic acid or the peptide elicitor flg22, two inducers of defense signaling. The redox-sensitive proteins identified from the proteomic study are involved in various biological processes such as metabolism, the antioxidant system, protein biosynthesis and processing, and cytoskeleton organization. The identification of novel redox-sensitive proteins will be helpful toward understanding of cellular components or pathways previously unknown to be redox-regulated. PMID:22050424

  11. Proteome responses of Citrobacter werkmanii BF-6 planktonic cells and biofilms to calcium chloride.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Gang; Shi, Qing-shan; Huang, Xiao-mo; Xie, Xiao-bao

    2016-02-05

    Calcium ions are well-known as intracellular second messengers that also have an important extracellular structural role for bacteria. Recently, we found that denser biofilms were formed by Citrobacter werkmanii BF-6 in the presence of 400 mM Ca(2+) than that of 12.5mM Ca(2+). Therefore, we employed two-dimensional (2-D) electrophoresis methods to investigate the proteome profiles of planktonic cells and biofilms in BF-6 under different concentrations of Ca(2+). Meanwhile, BF-6 biofilm architecture was also visualized with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The results demonstrated that BF-6 biofilms formed at the bottom of microtiter plates when grown in the presence of 400 mM Ca(2+). A total of 151 proteins from planktonic cells and biofilms after exposure of BF-6 cells to 12.5 and 400 mM Ca(2+) were successfully identified. Different gene ontology (GO) and KEGG pathways were categorized and enriched for the above proteins. Growth in the presence of 400 mM Ca(2+) induced more complex signal pathways in BF-6 than 12.5mM Ca(2+). In addition, the biofilm architectures were also affected by Ca(2+). Our results show two different modes of biofilm enhancement for C. werkmanii in the presence of excess Ca(2+) and provide a preliminary expression of these differences based on proteomic assays.

  12. Role of osteopontin in regulating hepatic inflammatory responses and toxic liver injury.

    PubMed

    Ramaiah, Shashi K; Rittling, Susan

    2007-08-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) produced by cells of the immune system, epithelial tissue, smooth muscle cells, osteoblasts and tumor cells has been implicated in various pathophysiological functions such as cell binding, spreading and migration, and tumor metastasis. OPN is known to bind to integrins expressed on macrophages through the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motif and promote migration of cells resulting in granuloma. In the liver, it has been reported that hepatic Kupffer cells secrete OPN facilitating macrophage infiltration in necrotic areas following carbon tetrachloride liver toxicity. Recent work has underlined the importance of OPN as a pivotal cytokine/chemokine in the generated hepatic neutrophil response during early phase alcoholic liver injury. Increased hepatobiliary OPN expression correlated well with higher neutrophil infiltration in a rat model of alcoholic steatohepatitis. In the same model of alcoholic steatohepatitis, higher hepatic expression of OPN in females was attributed to the higher neutrophil infiltration and consequent higher female sensitivity to liver damage. OPN as a potential biomarker for inflammatory liver disease has also been recently assessed. This review will focus on studies demonstrating the role of OPN in mediating hepatic inflammation (neutrophils, monocytes/macrophages and lymphocytes) and the ensuing liver toxicity.

  13. In situ metabolic flux analysis to quantify the liver metabolic response to experimental burn injury.

    PubMed

    Izamis, Maria-Louisa; Sharma, Nripen S; Uygun, Basak; Bieganski, Robert; Saeidi, Nima; Nahmias, Yaakov; Uygun, Korkut; Yarmush, Martin L; Berthiaume, Francois

    2011-04-01

    Trauma such as burns induces a hypermetabolic response associated with altered central carbon and nitrogen metabolism. The liver plays a key role in these metabolic changes; however, studies to date have evaluated the metabolic state of liver using ex vivo perfusions or isotope labeling techniques targeted to specific pathways. Herein, we developed a unique mass balance approach to characterize the metabolic state of the liver in situ, and used it to quantify the metabolic changes to experimental burn injury in rats. Rats received a sham (control uninjured), 20% or 40% total body surface area (TBSA) scald burn, and were allowed to develop a hypermetabolic response. One day prior to evaluation, all animals were fasted to deplete glycogen stores. Four days post-burn, blood flow rates in major vessels of the liver were measured, and blood samples harvested. We combined measurements of metabolite concentrations and flow rates in the major vessels entering and leaving the liver with a steady-state mass balance model to generate a quantitative picture of the metabolic state of liver. The main findings were: (1) Sham-burned animals exhibited a gluconeogenic pattern, consistent with the fasted state; (2) the 20% TBSA burn inhibited gluconeogenesis and exhibited glycolytic-like features with very few other significant changes; (3) the 40% TBSA burn, by contrast, further enhanced gluconeogenesis and also increased amino acid extraction, urea cycle reactions, and several reactions involved in oxidative phosphorylation. These results suggest that increasing the severity of injury does not lead to a simple dose-dependent metabolic response, but rather leads to qualitatively different responses.

  14. Functional Role of Monocytes and Macrophages for the Inflammatory Response in Acute Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Henning W.; Trautwein, Christian; Tacke, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Different etiologies such as drug toxicity, acute viral hepatitis B, or acetaminophen poisoning can cause acute liver injury or even acute liver failure (ALF). Excessive cell death of hepatocytes in the liver is known to result in a strong hepatic inflammation. Experimental murine models of liver injury highlighted the importance of hepatic macrophages, so-called Kupffer cells, for initiating and driving this inflammatory response by releasing proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines including tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-1beta, or monocyte-chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, CCL2) as well as activating other non-parenchymal liver cells, e.g., endothelial or hepatic stellate cells. Many of these proinflammatory mediators can trigger hepatocytic cell death pathways, e.g., via caspase activation, but also activate protective signaling pathways, e.g., via nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB). Recent studies in mice demonstrated that these macrophage actions largely depend on the recruitment of monocytes into the liver, namely of the inflammatory Ly6c+ (Gr1+) monocyte subset as precursors of tissue macrophages. The chemokine receptor CCR2 and its ligand MCP-1/CCL2 promote monocyte subset infiltration upon liver injury. In contrast, the chemokine receptor CX3CR1 and its ligand fractalkine (CX3CL1) are important negative regulators of monocyte infiltration by controlling their survival and differentiation into functionally diverse macrophage subsets upon injury. The recently identified cellular and molecular pathways for monocyte subset recruitment, macrophage differentiation, and interactions with other hepatic cell types in the injured liver may therefore represent interesting novel targets for future therapeutic approaches in ALF. PMID:23091461

  15. Host Responses and Regulation by NFκB Signaling in the Liver and Liver Epithelial Cells Infected with A Novel Tick-borne Bunyavirus

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qiyu; Jin, Cong; Zhu, Lili; Liang, Mifang; Li, Chuan; Cardona, Carol J.; Li, Dexin; Xing, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Infection in humans by severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV), a novel bunyavirus transmitted by ticks, is often associated with pronounced liver damage, especially in fatal cases. Little has been known, however, about how liver cells respond to SFTSV and how the response is regulated. In this study we report that proinflammatory cytokines were induced in liver tissues of C57/BL6 mice infected with SFTSV, which may cause tissue necrosis in mice. Human liver epithelial cells were susceptible to SFTSV and antiviral interferon (IFN) and IFN-inducible proteins were induced upon infection. We observed that infection of liver epithelial cells led to significant increases in proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including IL-6, RANTES, IP-10, and MIP-3a, which were regulated by NFκB signaling, and the activation of NFκB signaling during infection promoted viral replication in liver epithelial cells. Viral nonstructural protein NSs was inhibitory to the induction of IFN-β, but interestingly, NFκB activation was enhanced in the presence of NSs. Therefore, NSs plays dual roles in the suppression of antiviral IFN-β induction as well as the promotion of proinflammatory responses. Our findings provide the first evidence for elucidating host responses and regulation in liver epithelial cells infected by an emerging bunyavirus. PMID:26134299

  16. Xanthohumol suppresses inflammatory response to warm ischemia-reperfusion induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Dorn, Christoph; Massinger, Sabine; Wuzik, Andreas; Heilmann, Jörg; Hellerbrand, Claus

    2013-02-01

    Liver ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) leads to formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which cause hepatic injury and initiate an inflammatory response, which is a critical problem after liver surgery and transplantation. Xanthohumol, the major prenylated chalcone found in hops, has been discussed for its anti-inflammatory and ROS-scavenging properties, and thus, we aimed to investigate the effect of xanthohumol in a model of warm I/R liver injury. Xanthohumol was applied to BALB/c mice orally at a dose of 1 mg/g body weight for 5 days before I/R-injury was induced by clamping the vascular blood supply to the median and left lateral liver lobe for 1 h followed by a 6 h period of reperfusion. At this time, HPLC analysis revealed hepatic xanthohumol levels of approximately 2 μM, a concentration which has been shown to inhibit inflammatory effects in vitro. Assessment of hepatic HMOX1 expression, hepatic glutathione content and immunohistochemical analysis for proteins conjugated with the reactive aldehyde 4-hydroxynonenal indicated that I/R-induced oxidative stress was significantly inhibited in xanthohumol-fed compared to control mice. Histological analysis, TUNEL staining and determination of transaminase serum levels revealed no significant effects of xanthohumol on acute hepatocellular injury. However, at the same time point, pretreatment with xanthohumol almost completely blunted the I/R-induced AKT and NFκB activation and the expression of the proinflammatory genes IL-1alpha, IL-6, MCP-1 and ICAM-1, which are known to play a crucial role in the subacute phase of I/R-induced liver damage. In conclusion, these data indicate the potential of xanthohumol application to prevent adverse inflammatory responses to I/R-induced liver damage such as after surgical liver resection or transplantation.

  17. Proteomic analysis reveals contrasting stress response to uranium in two nitrogen-fixing Anabaena strains, differentially tolerant to uranium.

    PubMed

    Panda, Bandita; Basu, Bhakti; Acharya, Celin; Rajaram, Hema; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Two strains of the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena, native to Indian paddy fields, displayed differential sensitivity to exposure to uranyl carbonate at neutral pH. Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 and Anabaena sp. strain L-31 displayed 50% reduction in survival (LD50 dose), following 3h exposure to 75μM and 200μM uranyl carbonate, respectively. Uranium responsive proteome alterations were visualized by 2D gel electrophoresis, followed by protein identification by MALDI-ToF mass spectrometry. The two strains displayed significant differences in levels of proteins associated with photosynthesis, carbon metabolism, and oxidative stress alleviation, commensurate with their uranium tolerance. Higher uranium tolerance of Anabaena sp. strain L-31 could be attributed to sustained photosynthesis and carbon metabolism and superior oxidative stress defense, as compared to the uranium sensitive Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

  18. Tissue responsiveness to estradiol and genistein in the sea bass liver and scale.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Patrícia I S; Estêvão, M Dulce; Andrade, André; Santos, Soraia; Power, Deborah M

    2016-04-01

    As in mammals, estrogens in fish are essential for reproduction but also important regulators of mineral homeostasis. Fish scales are a non-conventional target tissue responsive to estradiol and constitute a good model to study mineralized tissues effects and mechanisms of action of estrogenic compounds, including phytoestrogens. The responsiveness to estradiol and the phytoestrogen genistein, was compared between the scales and the liver, a classical estrogenic target, in sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax). Injection with estradiol and genistein significantly increased circulating vitellogenin (for both compounds) and mineral levels (estradiol only) and genistein also significantly increased scale enzymatic activities suggesting it increased mineral turnover. The repertoire, abundance and estrogenic regulation of nuclear estrogen receptors (ESR1, 2a and 2b) and membrane G-protein receptors (GPER and GPER-like) were different between liver and scales, which presumably explains the tissue-specific changes detected in estrogen-responsive gene expression. In scales changes in gene expression mainly consisted of small rapid increases, while in liver strong, sustained increases/decreases in gene expression occurred. Similar but not overlapping gene expression changes were observed in response to both estradiol and genistein. This study demonstrates for the first time the expression of membrane estrogen receptors in scales and that estrogens and phytoestrogens, to which fish may be exposed in the wild or in aquaculture, both affect liver and mineralized tissues in a tissue-specific manner.

  19. Dissecting the proteome dynamics of the early heat stress response leading to plant survival or death in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Echevarría-Zomeño, Sira; Fernández-Calvino, Lourdes; Castro-Sanz, Ana B; López, Juan Antonio; Vázquez, Jesús; Castellano, M Mar

    2016-06-01

    In many plant species, an exposure to a sublethal temperature triggers an adaptative response called acclimation. This response involves an extensive molecular reprogramming that allows the plant to further survive to an otherwise lethal increase of temperature. A related response is also launched under an abrupt and lethal heat stress that, in this case, is unable to successfully promote thermotolerance and therefore ends up in plant death. Although these molecular programmes are expected to have common players, the overlapping degree and the specific regulators of each process are currently unknown. We have carried out a high-throughput comparative proteomics analysis during acclimation and during the early stages of the plant response to a severe heat stress that lead Arabidopsis seedlings either to survival or death. This analysis dissects these responses, unravels the common players and identifies the specific proteins associated with these different fates. Thermotolerance assays of mutants in genes with an uncharacterized role in heat stress demonstrate the relevance of this study to uncover both positive and negative heat regulators and pinpoint a pivotal role of JR1 and BAG6 in heat tolerance.

  20. Proteomics for systems toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Titz, Bjoern; Elamin, Ashraf; Martin, Florian; Schneider, Thomas; Dijon, Sophie; Ivanov, Nikolai V.; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C.

    2014-01-01

    Current toxicology studies frequently lack measurements at molecular resolution to enable a more mechanism-based and predictive toxicological assessment. Recently, a systems toxicology assessment framework has been proposed, which combines conventional toxicological assessment strategies with system-wide measurement methods and computational analysis approaches from the field of systems biology. Proteomic measurements are an integral component of this integrative strategy because protein alterations closely mirror biological effects, such as biological stress responses or global tissue alterations. Here, we provide an overview of the technical foundations and highlight select applications of proteomics for systems toxicology studies. With a focus on mass spectrometry-based proteomics, we summarize the experimental methods for quantitative proteomics and describe the computational approaches used to derive biological/mechanistic insights from these datasets. To illustrate how proteomics has been successfully employed to address mechanistic questions in toxicology, we summarized several case studies. Overall, we provide the technical and conceptual foundation for the integration of proteomic measurements in a more comprehensive systems toxicology assessment framework. We conclude that, owing to the critical importance of protein-level measurements and recent technological advances, proteomics will be an integral part of integrative systems toxicology approaches in the future. PMID:25379146

  1. Proteomic analysis of salt-responsive proteins in the leaves of mangrove Kandelia candel during short-term stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingxia; Liu, Xiao; Liang, Meng; Tan, Fanglin; Liang, Wenyu; Chen, Yiyong; Lin, Yongxiang; Huang, Li; Xing, Jianhong; Chen, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Salt stress is a major abiotic stress that limits crop productivity in many regions of the world. A comparative proteomic approach to identify salt stress-responsive proteins and to understand the molecular mechanisms was carried out in the woody halophyte Kandelia candel. Four-leaf-old K. candel seedlings were exposed to 150 (control), 300, 450, and 600 mM NaCl for 3 days. Proteins extracted from the leaves of K. candel seedlings were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). More than 900 protein spots were detected on each gel, and 53 differentially expressed protein spots were located with at least two-fold differences in abundance on 2-DE maps, of which 48 were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-TOF/MS). The results showed that K. candel could withstand up to 450 mM NaCl stress by up-regulating proteins that are mainly involved in photosynthesis, respiration and energy metabolism, Na(+) compartmentalization, protein folding and assembly, and signal transduction. Physiological data, including superoxide dismutase (SOD) and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) activities, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide anion radicals (O2(-)) contents, as well as Na(+) content and K(+)/Na(+) ratios all correlated well with our proteomic results. This study provides new global insights into woody halophyte salt stress responses. Identification of differentially expressed proteins promotes better understanding of the molecular basis for salt stress reduction in K. candel.

  2. Proteomic Analysis of Salt-Responsive Proteins in the Leaves of Mangrove Kandelia candel during Short-Term Stress

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Meng; Tan, Fanglin; Liang, Wenyu; Chen, Yiyong; Lin, Yongxiang; Huang, Li; Xing, Jianhong; Chen, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Salt stress is a major abiotic stress that limits crop productivity in many regions of the world. A comparative proteomic approach to identify salt stress-responsive proteins and to understand the molecular mechanisms was carried out in the woody halophyte Kandelia candel. Four-leaf-old K. candel seedlings were exposed to 150 (control), 300, 450, and 600 mM NaCl for 3 days. Proteins extracted from the leaves of K. candel seedlings were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). More than 900 protein spots were detected on each gel, and 53 differentially expressed protein spots were located with at least two-fold differences in abundance on 2-DE maps, of which 48 were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-TOF/MS). The results showed that K. candel could withstand up to 450 mM NaCl stress by up-regulating proteins that are mainly involved in photosynthesis, respiration and energy metabolism, Na+ compartmentalization, protein folding and assembly, and signal transduction. Physiological data, including superoxide dismutase (SOD) and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) activities, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide anion radicals (O2−) contents, as well as Na+ content and K+/Na+ ratios all correlated well with our proteomic results. This study provides new global insights into woody halophyte salt stress responses. Identification of differentially expressed proteins promotes better understanding of the molecular basis for salt stress reduction in K. candel. PMID:24416157

  3. Cellular-mediated immune responses in the liver tissue of patients with severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Punsawadl, Chuchard; Setthapramote, Chayanee; Viriyavejakul, Parnpen

    2014-09-01

    The immune responses against Plasmodiumfalciparum malaria infections are complex and poorly understood. No published studies have yet reported the lymphocyte subsets involved in the human liver tissue of P. falciparum malaria patients. To understand the cellular-mediated immune responses in the liver during malaria infection, we determined the numbers of the various lymphocyte subsets in tissue samples obtained at autopsy from patients who died with P. falciparum malaria infection. All the liver tissue specimens had been stored at the Department of Tropical Pathology, Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, Thailand. On the basis of total bilirubin (TB) levels prior to death, patients were divided into 2 groups: those with hyperbilirubinemia [total bilirubin (TB) > or =51.3 micromol/l) (n = 9)] and those without hyperbilirubinemia (TB < 51.3 micromol/l) (n = 12). Normal liver specimens (n = 10) were used as controls. An immunohistochemistry method was used to analyze the types and numbers of lymphocytes (T and B lymphocytes), and Kupffer cells, using specific antibodies against CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD20+, and CD68+. Our findings reveal the numbers of T lymphocytes (CD3+ T-cells) and their subsets (CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells) were significantly greater in the portal tracts and sinusoids of liver tissue obtained from P. falciparum malaria cases with hyperbilirubinemia than those without hyperbilirubinemia or controls. CD8+ T-cells were the major lymphocyte subset in the liver tissue of patients with severe falciparum malaria. A significant positive correlation was seen between the numbers of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells and the liver enzyme levels among P. falciparum malaria patients. The number of CD68+ cells (Kupffer cells) was significantly greater in the liver sinusoids of P. falciparum malaria cases with hyperbilirubinemia than those without hyperbilirubinemia. These findings suggest T-cells, especially CD8+ T-cells and Kupffer cells are an important part of the

  4. Quantitative Proteomics Identifies Vasopressin-Responsive Nuclear Proteins in Collecting Duct Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schenk, Laura K.; Bolger, Steven J.; Luginbuhl, Kelli; Gonzales, Patricia A.; Rinschen, Markus M.; Yu, Ming-Jiun; Hoffert, Jason D.; Pisitkun, Trairak

    2012-01-01

    Vasopressin controls transport in the renal collecting duct, in part, by regulating transcription. This complex process, which can involve translocation and/or modification of transcriptional regulators, is not completely understood. Here, we applied a method for large-scale profiling of nuclear proteins to quantify vasopressin-induced changes in the nuclear proteome of cortical collecting duct (mpkCCD) cells. Using stable isotope labeling and tandem mass spectrometry, we quantified 3987 nuclear proteins and identified significant changes in the abundance of 65, including previously established targets of vasopressin signaling in the collecting duct. Vasopressin-induced changes in the abundance of the transcription factors JunB, Elf3, Gatad2b, and Hmbox1; transcriptional co-regulators Ctnnb1 (β-catenin) and Crebbp; subunits of the Mediator complex; E3 ubiquitin ligase Nedd4; nuclear transport regulator RanGap1; and several proteins associated with tight junctions and adherens junctions. Bioinformatic analysis showed that many of the quantified transcription factors have putative binding sites in the 5′-flanking regions of genes coding for the channel proteins Aqp2, Aqp3, Scnn1b (ENaCβ), and Scnn1g (ENaCγ), which are known targets of vasopressin. Immunoblotting demonstrated that the increase in β-catenin in nuclear fractions was accompanied by an even larger increase in its phosphorylated form (pSer552). The findings provide a new online database resource for nuclear proteomics (http://helixweb.nih.gov/ESBL/Database/mNPD/) and generate new hypotheses regarding vasopressin-mediated transcriptional regulation in the collecting duct. PMID:22440904

  5. Time-course analysis of the Shewanella amazonensis SB2B proteome in response to sodium chloride shock

    SciTech Connect

    Parnell, John J.; Callister, Stephen J.; Rompato, Giovanni; Nicora, Carrie D.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Williamson, Ashley; Pfrender, Michael E.

    2011-06-29

    Organisms in the genus Shewanella have become models for response to environmental stress. One of the most important environmental stresses is change in osmolarity. In this study, we experimentally determine the response mechanisms of Shewanella amazonensis SB2B during osmotic stress. Osmotic stress in SB2B was induced through exposure to NaCl, and the time-course proteomics response was measured using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Protein trends were qualitatively compared to gene expression trends and to phenotypic characterization. Osmotic stress affects motility, and has also been associated with a change in the membrane fatty acid composition (due to induction of branched chain amino acid degradation pathways); however, we show this is not the case for SB2B. Although proteins and genes involved with branched chain amino acid degradation are induced, fatty acid degradation pathways are not induced and no change in the fatty acid profile occurs in SB2B as a result of osmotic shock. The most extensive response of SB2B over the time course of acclimation to high salt involves an orchestrated sequence of events comprising increased expression of signal transduction associated with motility and restricted cell division and DNA replication. After SB2B has switched to increased branched chain amino acid degradation, motility, and cellular replication proteins return to pre-perturbed levels.

  6. Integrative proteome analysis of Brachypodium distachyon roots and leaves reveals a synergetic responsive network under H2O2 stress.

    PubMed

    Bian, Yan-Wei; Lv, Dong-Wen; Cheng, Zhi-Wei; Gu, Ai-Qin; Cao, Hui; Yan, Yue-Ming

    2015-10-14

    The plant oxidative stress response is vital for defense against various abiotic and biotic stresses. In this study, ultrastructural changes and the proteomic response to H2O2 stress in roots and leaves of the model plant Brachypodium distachyon were studied. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that the ultrastructural damage in roots was more serious than in leaves. Particularly, the ultrastructures of organelles and the nucleus in root tip cells were damaged, leading to the inhibition of normal biological activities of roots, which then spread throughout the plant. Based on two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS, 84 and 53 differentially accumulated protein (DAP) spots representing 75 and 45 unique proteins responsive to H2O2 stress in roots and leaves, respectively, were identified. These protein species were mainly involved in signal transduction, energy metabolism, redox homeostasis/stress defense, protein folding/degradation, and cell wall/cell structure. Interestingly, two 14-3-3 proteins (GF14-B and GF14-D) were identified as DAPs in both roots and leaves. Protein-protein interaction (PPI) analysis revealed a synergetic H2O2-responsive network.

  7. iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis of defence responses triggered by the necrotrophic pathogen Rhizoctonia solani in cotton.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Cheng, Shou-Ting; Wang, Hai-Yun; Wu, Jia-He; Luo, Yuan-Ming; Wang, Qian; Wang, Fu-Xin; Xia, Gui-Xian

    2017-01-30

    The soil-borne necrotrophic pathogen fungus Rhizoctonia solani is destructive, causing disease in various important crops. To date, little is known about the host defence mechanism in response to invasion of R. solani. Here, an iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis was employed to investigate pathogen-responsive proteins in the disease tolerant/resistant cotton cultivar CRI35. A total of 174 differentially accumulated proteins (DAPs) were identified after inoculation of cotton plants with R. solani. Functional categorization analysis indicated that these DAPs can be divided into 12 subclasses. Notably, a large portion of DAPs are known to function in reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism and the expression of several histone-modifying and DNA methylating proteins were significantly induced upon challenge with the fungus, indicating that the redox homeostasis and epigenetic regulation are important for cotton defence against the pathogen. Additionally, the expression of proteins involved in phenylpropanoid biosynthesis was markedly changed in response to pathogen invasion, which may reflect a particular contribution of secondary metabolism in protection against the fungal attack in cotton. Together, our results indicate that the defence response of cotton plants to R. solani infection is active and multifaceted and involves the induction of proteins from various innate immunity-related pathways.

  8. Proteomic Response and Quality Maintenance in Postharvest Fruit of Strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) to Exogenous Cytokinin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Li, Dongdong; Luo, Zisheng; Huang, Xinhong; Li, Xihong

    2016-01-01

    The limitations in current understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying fruit response to the application of plant growth regulators have increasingly become major challenges in improvement of crop quality. This study aimed to evaluate the response of strawberry to the preharvest application of exogenous cytokinin known as forchlorfenuron (CPPU). Postharvest internal and physiological quality attributes were characterized following storage under different conditions. Hierarchical clustering analysis via a label-free proteomic quantitative approach identified a total of 124 proteins in strawberries across all treatments. The expression profiles of both proteins and genes spanned the ranged role of cytokinin involved in primary and secondary metabolism, stress response, and so on. Eighty-eight proteins and fifty-six proteins were significantly regulated immediately at harvest and after storage, respectively. In general, the glycolysis in strawberry was only regulated by CPPU before storage; in addition to the accelerated photosynthesis and acid metabolism, CPPU application maintained higher capacity of resistance in strawberry to stress stimuli after storage, in comparison to control. Nevertheless, the volatile biosynthesis in strawberry has been suppressed by exogenous CPPU. Novel cytokinin response proteins and processes were identified in addition to the main transcriptomic expression to gain insights into the phytohormone control of fruit postharvest quality. PMID:27250251

  9. An integrated genomic and epigenomic approach predicts therapeutic response to zebularine in human liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Jesper B; Factor, Valentina M; Marquardt, Jens U; Raggi, Chiara; Lee, Yun-Han; Seo, Daekwan; Conner, Elizabeth A; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S

    2010-10-20

    Epigenomic changes such as aberrant hypermethylation and subsequent atypical gene silencing are characteristic features of human cancer. Here, we report a comprehensive characterization of epigenomic modulation caused by zebularine, an effective DNA methylation inhibitor, in human liver cancer. Using transcriptomic and epigenomic profiling, we identified a zebularine response signature that classified liver cancer cell lines into two major subtypes with different drug responses. In drug-sensitive cell lines, zebularine caused inhibition of proliferation coupled with increased apoptosis, whereas drug-resistant cell lines showed up-regulation of oncogenic networks (for example, E2F1, MYC, and TNF) that drive liver cancer growth in vitro and in preclinical mouse models. Assessment of zebularine-based therapy in xenograft mouse models demonstrated potent therapeutic effects against tumors established from zebularine-sensitive but not zebularine-resistant liver cancer cells, leading to increased survival and decreased pulmonary metastasis. Integration of the zebularine gene expression and demethylation response signatures allowed differentiation of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma according to their survival and disease recurrence. This integrated signature identified a subclass of patients within the poor-survivor group that is likely to benefit from therapeutic agents that target the cancer epigenome.

  10. An updated dose–response meta-analysis of coffee consumption and liver cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chengbo; Cao, Qing; Chen, Ping; Yang, Shigui; Deng, Min; Wang, Yugang; Li, Lanjuan

    2016-01-01

    Prospective cohort studies of the relationship between coffee consumption and liver cancer risk have drawn different conclusions. Therefore, a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies was performed to disentangle this causal relationship. Prospective cohort studies of the association between coffee consumption and liver cancer risk published prior to Jan 9, 2016 were identified by searching in the PubMed and EMBASE databases. Extracted data were analyzed using a random-effects model. Of the 2892 records identified using the search strategy, a total of twenty cohort studies from ten publications were included in the final meta-analysis. The pooled estimate of relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) for highest vs. non/occasional coffee drinkers was 0.55(0.44–0.67). No evidence of publication bias was observed (p for Egger’s test = 0.229). Sensitivity analysis indicated the results were robust. Dose-response analysis revealed a significant linear dose-response relationship between coffee consumption and liver cancer risk (p = 0.36). Subgroup analyses stratified by pre-specified variables (gender, geographic region, and adjusted factors) indicated similar results within individual subgroups. Our meta-analysis suggested that coffee consumption is inversely associated with liver cancer risk. PMID:27910873

  11. [A case of liver metastasis of rectal cancer demonstrating complete response to 5-FU + Leucovorin + UFT].

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hideyuki; Ohsawa, Tomonori; Takeuchi, Ikuya; Nakada, Hiroshi; Inokuma, Shigehisa; Hoshino, Takanobu; Daijo, Hashimoto

    2002-04-01

    Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) is a rate-limiting enzyme that metabolizes 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). We report a patient with metachronous liver metastasis from rectal cancer with low expression of DPD, who demonstrated complete response to chemotherapy comprising 5-FU, Leucovorin, and UFT. A 53-year-old man underwent macroscopically curative proctectomy with coloanal anastomosis for lower rectal cancer (Curability B). The DPD level in the primary tumor determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was extremely low (10.3 U/mg.protein). Three months postoperatively, 5-FU (333 mg/m2) + Leucovorin (200 mg/m2) therapy (once a week for 3 weeks with a one-week rest interval, repeatedly) was started as an adjuvant therapy. However, computed tomography demonstrated a solitary liver metastasis 3 cm in size 1 month later. Chemotherapy was continued with dose escalation of 5-FU (500 mg/m2) and with oral administration of UFT-E (400 mg/body, daily). Five months later, computed tomography did not detect the liver metastasis, and this finding was maintained for two months (complete response). This case provides evidence that a low expression of DPD in the primary lesion is related to a favorable response of liver metastasis to 5-FU-based systemic chemotherapy.

  12. Liver but not adipose tissue is responsive to the pattern of enteral feeding

    PubMed Central

    Otero, Yolanda F.; Lundblad, Tammy M.; Ford, Eric A.; House, Lawrence M.; McGuinness, Owen P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Nutritional support is an important aspect of medical care, providing calories to patients with compromised nutrient intake. Metabolism has a diurnal pattern, responding to the light cycle and food intake, which in turn can drive changes in liver and adipose tissue metabolism. In this study, we assessed the response of liver and white adipose tissue (WAT) to different feeding patterns under nutritional support (total enteral nutrition or TEN). Mice received continuous isocaloric TEN for 10 days or equal calories of chow once a day (Ch). TEN was given either at a constant (CN, same infusion rate during 24 h) or variable rate (VN, 80% of calories fed at night, 20% at day). Hepatic lipogenesis and carbohydrate‐responsive element‐binding protein (ChREBP) expression increased in parallel with the diurnal feeding pattern. Relative to Ch, both patterns of enteral feeding increased adiposity. This increase was not associated with enhanced lipogenic gene expression in WAT; moreover, lipogenesis was unaffected by the feeding pattern. Surprisingly, leptin and adiponectin expression increased. Moreover, nutritional support markedly increased hepatic and adipose FGF21 expression in CN and VN, despite being considered a fasting hormone. In summary, liver but not WAT, respond to the pattern of feeding. While hepatic lipid metabolism adapts to the pattern of nutrient availability, WAT does not. Moreover, sustained delivery of nutrients in an isocaloric diet can cause adiposity without the proinflammatory state observed in hypercaloric feeding. Thus, the liver but not adipose tissue is responsive to the pattern of feeding behavior. PMID:24744913

  13. Liver-Stage Specific Response among Endemic Populations: Diet and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Dalai, Sarat Kumar; Yadav, Naveen; Patidar, Manoj; Patel, Hardik; Singh, Agam Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Developing effective anti-malarial vaccine has been a challenge for long. Various factors including complex life cycle of parasite and lack of knowledge of stage specific critical antigens are some of the reasons. Moreover, inadequate understanding of the immune responses vis-à-vis sterile protection induced naturally by Plasmodia infection has further compounded the problem. It has been shown that people living in endemic areas take years to develop protective immunity to blood stage infection. But hardly anyone believes that immunity to liver-stage infection could be developed. Various experimental model studies using attenuated parasite suggest that liver-stage immunity might exist among endemic populations. This could be induced because of the attenuation of parasite in liver by various compounds present in the diet of endemic populations. PMID:25852693

  14. Quantitative proteomics and bioinformatic analysis provide new insight into the dynamic response of porcine intestine to Salmonella Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Collado-Romero, Melania; Aguilar, Carmen; Arce, Cristina; Lucena, Concepción; Codrea, Marius C.; Morera, Luis; Bendixen, Emoke; Moreno, Ángela; Garrido, Juan J.

    2015-01-01

    The enteropathogen Salmonella Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is the most commonly non-typhoideal serotype isolated in pig worldwide. Currently, one of the main sources of human infection is by consumption of pork meat. Therefore, prevention and control of salmonellosis in pigs is crucial for minimizing risks to public health. The aim of the present study was to use isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) to explore differences in the response to Salmonella in two segment of the porcine gut (ileum and colon) along a time course of 1, 2, and 6 days post infection (dpi) with S. Typhimurium. A total of 298 proteins were identified in the infected ileum samples of which, 112 displayed significant expression differences due to Salmonella infection. In colon, 184 proteins were detected in the infected samples of which 46 resulted differentially expressed with respect to the controls. The higher number of changes in protein expression was quantified in ileum at 2 dpi. Further biological interpretation of proteomics data using bioinformatics tools demonstrated that the expression changes in colon were found in proteins involved in cell death and survival, tissue morphology or molecular transport at the early stages and tissue regeneration at 6 dpi. In ileum, however, changes in protein expression were mainly related to immunological and infection diseases, inflammatory response or connective tissue disorders at 1 and 2 dpi. iTRAQ has proved to be a proteomic robust approach allowing us to identify ileum as the earliest response focus upon S. Typhimurium in the porcine gut. In addition, new functions involved in the response to bacteria such as eIF2 signaling, free radical scavengers or antimicrobial peptides (AMP) expression have been identified. Finally, the impairment at of the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids and lipid metabolism by means the under regulation of FABP6 protein and FXR/RXR and LXR/RXR signaling pathway in ileum has been

  15. Fetal Inflammatory Response in Women with Proteomic Biomarkers Characteristic of Intra-Amniotic Inflammation and Preterm Birth

    PubMed Central

    Buhimschi, Catalin S.; Dulay, Antonette T.; Abdel-Razeq, Sonya; Zhao, Guomao; Lee, Sarah; Hodgson, Eric J.; Bhandari, Vineet; Buhimschi, Irina A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the relationship between presence of amniotic fluid (AF) biomarkers characteristic of inflammation (defensins 2 and 1, calgranulins C and A) and fetal inflammatory status at birth. Design Prospective observational cohort. Setting Tertiary referral University hospital Population 132 consecutive mothers (gestational age, median [interquartile range]: 29.6 [24.1-33.6] weeks), who had a clinically indicated amniocentesis to rule-out infection and their newborns. Methods Intra-amniotic inflammation was diagnosed by mass spectrometry SELDI-TOF. The AF proteomic fingerprint [Mass Restricted (MR) score] ranges from 0-4 (none to all biomarkers present). The intensity of intra-amniotic inflammation was graded based on the number of proteomic biomarkers: MR score 0: “no” inflammation; MR score 1-2: “minimal” inflammation; MR score 3-4: “severe” inflammation. At birth, cord blood was obtained for all cases. Severity of histological chorioamnionitis (HCA) and early onset neonatal sepsis (EONS) was based on established histological and hematological criteria. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels were measured by sensitive immunoassays. The cord blood-to-AF IL-6 ratio was used as an indicator of the differential inflammatory response in the fetal versus the AF compartment. Main Outcome Measures to relate proteomic biomarkers of intra-amniotic infection to cord blood IL-6 and to use the latter as the primary marker of fetal inflammatory response. Results Women with intra-amniotic inflammation delivered at an earlier gestational age (ANOVA, P<0.001) and had higher AF IL-6 levels (P<0.001). At birth, neonates of women with “severe” intra-amniotic inflammation had higher cord blood IL-6 levels (P=0.002) and a higher frequency of EONS (P=0.002). EONS was characterized by significantly elevated cord blood IL-6 levels (P<0.001). Out of the 39 neonates delivered by mothers with “minimal” intra-amniotic inflammation, 15 (39%) had umbilical cord blood IL-6

  16. The cytochrome P450 epoxygenase pathway regulates the hepatic inflammatory response in fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Schuck, Robert N; Zha, Weibin; Edin, Matthew L; Gruzdev, Artiom; Vendrov, Kimberly C; Miller, Tricia M; Xu, Zhenghong; Lih, Fred B; DeGraff, Laura M; Tomer, Kenneth B; Jones, H Michael; Makowski, Liza; Huang, Leaf; Poloyac, Samuel M; Zeldin, Darryl C; Lee, Craig R

    2014-01-01

    Fatty liver disease is an emerging public health problem without effective therapies, and chronic hepatic inflammation is a key pathologic mediator in its progression. Cytochrome P450 (CYP) epoxygenases metabolize arachidonic acid to biologically active epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), which have potent anti-inflammatory effects. Although promoting the effects of EETs elicits anti-inflammatory and protective effects in the cardiovascular system, the contribution of CYP-derived EETs to the regulation of fatty liver disease-associated inflammation and injury is unknown. Using the atherogenic diet model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease/non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NAFLD/NASH), our studies demonstrated that induction of fatty liver disease significantly and preferentially suppresses hepatic CYP epoxygenase expression and activity, and both hepatic and circulating levels of EETs in mice. Furthermore, mice with targeted disruption of Ephx2 (the gene encoding soluble epoxide hydrolase) exhibited restored hepatic and circulating EET levels and a significantly attenuated induction of hepatic inflammation and injury. Collectively, these data suggest that suppression of hepatic CYP-mediated EET biosynthesis is an important pathological consequence of fatty liver disease-associated inflammation, and that the CYP epoxygenase pathway is a central regulator of the hepatic inflammatory response in NAFLD/NASH. Future studies investigating the utility of therapeutic strategies that promote the effects of CYP-derived EETs in NAFLD/NASH are warranted.

  17. A SILAC-Based Approach Elicits the Proteomic Responses to Vancomycin-Associated Nephrotoxicity in Human Proximal Tubule Epithelial HK-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-Ling; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2016-01-29

    Vancomycin, a widely used antibiotic, often induces nephrotoxicity, however, the molecular targets and underlying mechanisms of this side effect remain unclear. The present study aimed to examine molecular interactome and analyze the signaling pathways related to the vancomycin-induced nephrotoxicity in human proximal tubule epithelial HK-2 cells using the stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) approach. The quantitative proteomic study revealed that there were at least 492 proteins interacting with vancomycin and there were 290 signaling pathways and cellular functions potentially regulated by vancomycin in HK-2 cells. These proteins and pathways played a critical role in the regulation of cell cycle, apoptosis, autophagy, EMT, and ROS generation. These findings suggest that vancomycin-induced proteomic responses in HK-2 cells involvefunctional proteins and pathways that regulate cell cycle, apoptosis, autophagy, and redox homeostasis. This is the first systemic study revealed the networks of signaling pathways and proteomic responses to vancomycin treatment in HK-2 cells, and the data may be used to discriminate the molecular and clinical subtypes and to identify new targets and biomarkers for vancomycin-induced nephrotoxic effect. Further studies are warranted to explore the potential of quantitative proteomic analysis in the identification of new targets and biomarkers for drug-induced renal toxicity.

  18. Proteomic Analysis of the Secretory Response of Aspergillus niger to D-Maltose and D-Xylose

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira de Oliveira, José Miguel P.; van Passel, Mark W. J.; Schaap, Peter J.; de Graaff, Leo H.

    2011-01-01

    Fungi utilize polysaccharide substrates through extracellular digestion catalyzed by secreted enzymes. Thus far, protein secretion by the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger has mainly been studied at the level of individual proteins and by genome and transcriptome analyses. To extend these studies, a complementary proteomics approach was applied with the aim to investigate the changes in secretome and microsomal protein composition resulting from a shift to a high level secretion condition. During growth of A. niger on d-sorbitol, small amounts of d-maltose or d-xylose were used as inducers of the extracellular amylolytic and xylanolytic enzymes. Upon induction, protein compositions in the extracellular broth as well as in enriched secretory organelle (microsomal) fractions were analyzed using a shotgun proteomics approach. In total 102 secreted proteins and 1,126 microsomal proteins were identified in this study. Induction by d-maltose or d-xylose resulted in the increase in specific extracellular enzymes, such as glucoamylase A on d-maltose and β-xylosidase D on d-xylose, as well as of microsomal proteins. This reflects the differential expression of selected genes coding for dedicated extracellular enzymes. As expected, the addition of extra d-sorbitol had no effect on the expression of carbohydrate-active enzymes, compared to addition of d-xylose or d-maltose. Furthermore, d-maltose induction caused an increase in microsomal proteins related to translation (e.g., Rpl15) and vesicular transport (e.g., the endosomal-cargo receptor Erv14). Millimolar amounts of the inducers d-maltose and d-xylose are sufficient to cause a direct response in specific protein expression levels. Also, after induction by d-maltose or d-xylose, the induced enzymes were found in microsomes and extracellular. In agreement with our previous findings for d-xylose induction, d-maltose induction leads to recruitment of proteins involved in proteasome-mediated degradation. PMID:21698107

  19. Quantitative Proteomics of the Root of Transgenic Wheat Expressing TaBWPR-1.2 Genes in Response to Waterlogging.

    PubMed

    Haque, Emdadul; Abe, Fumitaka; Mori, Masahiko; Nanjo, Yohei; Komatsu, Setsuko; Oyanagi, Atsushi; Kawaguchi, Kentaro

    2014-11-04

    Once candidate genes are available, the application of genetic transformation plays a major part to study their function in plants for adaptation to respective environmental stresses, including waterlogging (WL). The introduction of stress-inducible genes into wheat remains difficult because of low transformation and plant regeneration efficiencies and expression variability and instability. Earlier, we found two cDNAs encoding WL stress-responsive wheat pathogenesis-related proteins 1.2 (TaBWPR-1.2), TaBWPR-1.2#2 and TaBWPR-1.2#13. Using microprojectile bombardment, both cDNAs were introduced into "Bobwhite". Despite low transformation efficiency, four independent T₂ homozygous lines for each gene were isolated, where transgenes were ubiquitously and variously expressed. The highest transgene expression was obtained in Ubi:TaBWPR-1.2#2 L#11a and Ubi:TaBWPR-1.2#13 L#4a. Using quantitative proteomics, the root proteins of L#11a were analyzed to explore possible physiological pathways regulated by TaBWPR-1.2 under normal and waterlogged conditions. In L#11a, the abundance of proteasome subunit alpha type-3 decreased under normal conditions, whereas that of ferredoxin precursor and elongation factor-2 increased under waterlogged conditions in comparison with normal plants. Proteomic results suggest that L#11a is one of the engineered wheat plants where TaBWPR-1.2#2 is most probably involved in proteolysis, protein synthesis and alteration in the energy pathway in root tissues via the above proteins in order to gain metabolic adjustment to WL.

  20. Proteomic Investigation of the Time Course Responses of RAW 264.7 Macrophages to Infection with Salmonella enterica

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Chowdhury, Saiful M.; Smallwood, Heather S.; Yoon, Hyunjin; Mottaz-Brewer, Heather M.; Norbeck, Angela D.; McDermott, Jason E.; Clauss, Therese RW; Heffron, Fred; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2009-08-01

    Macrophages plan important roles in controlling Salmonella-mediated systemic infection. To investigate the responses of macrophages to Salmonella infection, we infected RAW 264.7 macrophages with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (STM) and then performed a comparative liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry [LC-MS(/MS)]-based proteomics analysis of the infected macrophages. A total of 1006 macrophage and 115 STM proteins were indentified from this study. Most of STM proteins were found at late stage of the time course of infection, consistent with the fact that STM proliferates inside RAW 264.7 macrophages. Majority of the identified macrophage proteins were house keeping-related, including cytoplasmic superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), whose peptide abundances were relatively constant during the time course of infection. Compared to those in no infection control, the peptide abundances of 244 macrophage proteins (or 24% of total indentified macrophage proteins) changed considerably after STM infection. The functions of these STM infection-affected macrophage proteins were diverse and ranged from production of antibacterial nitric oxide (i.e., inducible nitric oxide synthase or iNOS) or production of prostaglandin H2 (i.e., prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2, also know as cyclooxygenase-2 or COX-2) to regulation of intracellular traffic (e.g., sorting nexin or SNX 5, 6 and 9), demonstrating a global impact of STM infection on macrophage proteome. Western-blot analysis not only confirmed the LC-MS(/MS) results of SOD1, COX-2 and iNOS, but also revealed that the protein abundances of mitochondrial SOD2 increased after STM infection, indicating an infection-induced oxidative stress in mitochondria.

  1. Gibberellin-Stimulation of Rhizome Elongation and Differential GA-Responsive Proteomic Changes in Two Grass Species

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiqing; Huang, Bingru

    2016-01-01

    Rapid and extensive rhizome development is a desirable trait for perennial grass growth and adaptation to environmental stresses. The objective of this study was to determine proteomic changes and associated metabolic pathways of gibberellin (GA) -regulation of rhizome elongation in two perennial grass species differing in rhizome development. Plants of a short-rhizome bunch-type tall fescue (TF; Festuca arundinacea; ‘BR’) and an extensive rhizomatous Kentucky bluegrass (KB; Poa pratensis; ‘Baron’) were treated with 10 μM GA3 in hydroponic culture in growth chambers. The average rhizome length in KB was significantly longer than that in TF regardless of GA3 treatment, and increased significantly with GA3 treatment, to a greater extent than that in TF. Comparative proteomic analysis using two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry was performed to further investigate proteins and associated metabolic pathways imparting increased rhizome elongation by GA. A total of 37 and 38 differentially expressed proteins in response to GA3 treatment were identified in TF and KB plants, respectively, which were mainly involved in photosynthesis, energy and amino acid metabolism, protein synthesis, defense and cell development processes. Accelerated