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Sample records for liver transplantation case

  1. Polycystic liver transplant: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sakcak, Ibrahim; Olmez, Aydemir; Ozgor, Dincer; Eris, Cengiz; Kayaalp, Cuneyt; Yılmaz, Sezai

    2013-06-01

    A liver from a donor with brain death due to a ruptured cerebral aneurysm was transplanted. The liver had multiple bilobar simple cysts; the largest was less than 3 cm in diameter. The noncystic liver volume was greater than 50%, and the liver had neither fibrosis nor venous congestion. The donor surgery was performed in accordance with the standard protocol without rupture of the cysts. The recipient was a 40-year-old man with cirrhosis associated with hepatitis B. The recipient operation was done by using the piggyback method with no complications. Excessive drainage of chylous ascites (10 000 mL/d) started in the first days after surgery and continued, gradually decreasing until the end of the second month. The patient was discharged with no complications at the end of the third month. No growth in the cysts was observed on follow-up computed tomography scans. Excluding this particular case, a total of 7 other patients have received a polycystic liver transplant. In all 7 cases, the fact that the donor had polycystic liver disease was not known but was encountered by coincidence during procurement. The case reported here is the first case where the polycystic liver disease was diagnosed before procurement and the transplant was still carried out. It appears that, if the donor liver has enough healthy noncystic volume, polycystic livers can be transplanted.

  2. Liver transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatic transplant; Transplant - liver; Orthotopic liver transplant; Liver failure - liver transplant; Cirrhosis - liver transplant ... The donated liver may be from: A donor who has recently died and has not had liver injury. This type of ...

  3. Orthotopic liver transplantation for giant liver haemangioma: A case report.

    PubMed

    Lange, Undine G; Bucher, Julian N; Schoenberg, Markus B; Benzing, Christian; Schmelzle, Moritz; Gradistanac, Tanja; Strocka, Steffen; Hau, Hans-Michael; Bartels, Michael

    2015-12-24

    In liver haemangiomas, the risk of complication rises with increasing size, and treatment can be obligatory. Here we present a case of a 46-year-old female who suffered from a giant haemangioma causing severe portal hypertension and vena cava compression, leading to therapy refractory ascites, hyponatremia and venostasis-associated thrombosis with pulmonary embolism. The patients did not experience tumour rupture or consumptive coagulopathy. Surgical resection was impossible because of steatosis of the non-affected liver. Orthotopic liver transplantation was identified as the only treatment option. The patient's renal function remained stable even though progressive morbidity and organ allocation were improbable according to the patient's lab model for end-stage liver disease (labMELD) score. Therefore, non-standard exception status was approved by the European organ allocation network "Eurotransplant". The patient underwent successful orthotopic liver transplantation 16 mo after admission to our centre. Our case report indicates the underrepresentation of morbidity associated with refractory ascites in the labMELD-based transplant allocation system, and it indicates the necessity of promptly applying for non-standard exception status to enable transplantation in patients with a severe clinical condition but low labMELD score. Our case highlights the fact that liver transplantation should be considered early in patients with non-resectable, symptomatic benign liver tumours.

  4. Orthotopic liver transplantation for giant liver haemangioma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Undine G; Bucher, Julian N; Schoenberg, Markus B; Benzing, Christian; Schmelzle, Moritz; Gradistanac, Tanja; Strocka, Steffen; Hau, Hans-Michael; Bartels, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In liver haemangiomas, the risk of complication rises with increasing size, and treatment can be obligatory. Here we present a case of a 46-year-old female who suffered from a giant haemangioma causing severe portal hypertension and vena cava compression, leading to therapy refractory ascites, hyponatremia and venostasis-associated thrombosis with pulmonary embolism. The patients did not experience tumour rupture or consumptive coagulopathy. Surgical resection was impossible because of steatosis of the non-affected liver. Orthotopic liver transplantation was identified as the only treatment option. The patient’s renal function remained stable even though progressive morbidity and organ allocation were improbable according to the patient’s lab model for end-stage liver disease (labMELD) score. Therefore, non-standard exception status was approved by the European organ allocation network “Eurotransplant”. The patient underwent successful orthotopic liver transplantation 16 mo after admission to our centre. Our case report indicates the underrepresentation of morbidity associated with refractory ascites in the labMELD-based transplant allocation system, and it indicates the necessity of promptly applying for non-standard exception status to enable transplantation in patients with a severe clinical condition but low labMELD score. Our case highlights the fact that liver transplantation should be considered early in patients with non-resectable, symptomatic benign liver tumours. PMID:26722664

  5. Liver Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Your Liver > Liver Disease Information > Liver Transplant Liver Transplant Explore this section to learn more about ... resource. www.paulcox.com.au Why is the liver important? The liver is the second largest organ ...

  6. A case of veno-occlusive disease following liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Wang, Xu; Fan, Tieyan; Li, Jun; Wang, Letian; Shen, Zhongyang

    2014-01-01

    The present case report describes the diagnosis and treatment of a patient with veno-occlusive disease (VOD) following liver transplantation. Combining the clinical data and relevant literature, the study aimed to consider the causes of VOD following liver transplantation, and the pathogenesis, clinical diagnosis and auxiliary examination features of VOD. A 42-year-old man who had a long history of taking traditional Chinese medicine (essential components unknown) underwent an orthotropic liver transplantation on January 14, 2011, due to small venous occlusion disease of the liver. The patient was treated with tacrolimus as an antirejection therapy following the surgery, and gradually developed right upper quadrant pain and fatigue. The examination results were consistent with the diagnostic standards for VOD. Following treatment with methylprednisolone, the patient was treated with alprostadil and Danhong injections. Forty days later, the patient's total bilirubin (TBIL) level was observed to have decreased significantly, the liver function had returned to normal and the ascites had decreased, but had not completely disappeared. The patient then underwent a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) procedure, following which the ascites were shown to have completely disappeared.

  7. [Aspects related to extraction and preservation in 60 cases of liver transplant].

    PubMed

    Mora, N P; Turrión, V S; Pereira, F; Herrera, J; Murcia, J; Vázquez, J; De Vicente, E; Ardaiz, J

    1989-02-01

    Extraction and preservation are of special interest in any liver transplant program. The viability and correct early function of the graft are determinant factors of the success or failure of the transplant. Application of a restrictive criterion in the acceptance of donor livers has allowed us to achieve an optimal viability (96.7%) in our first 60 cases of liver transplant.

  8. Pancreatitis following liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Alexander, J A; Demetrius, A J; Gavaler, J S; Makowka, L; Starzl, T E; Van Thiel, D H

    1988-06-01

    Since 1981, when the liver transplantation program was initiated at the University of Pittsburgh, we have been impressed with the prevalence of pancreatitis occurring following liver transplantation in patients transplanted for hepatitis B-related liver disease. To either confirm this clinical impression or refute it, the records of the 27 HbsAg+ patients and those of an additional 24 HbsAg- but HbcAb and/or HbsAb+ patients who underwent orthotopic liver transplantation were reviewed to determine the prevalence of clinical pancreatitis and hyperamylasemia (biochemical pancreatitis) following liver transplantation (OLTx). Post-OLTx hyperamylasemia occurred significantly more frequently in HbsAg+ patients (6/27) than it did in the HbsAg- patients (0/24) (P less than 0.05). More importantly, clinical pancreatitis occurred in 14% (4/27) of the HbsAg+ patients and 0% (0/24) of the HbsAg- patients. Interestingly, in each case, the pancreatitis was associated with the occurrence of acute hepatitis B infection of the allograft. Based upon these data, we conclude that pancreatitis occurring after liver transplantation is more common in patients transplanted for active viral liver disease caused by hepatitis B than in those with inactive viral liver disease. These observations suggest that pancreatitis occurring in, at least some cases following liver transplantation for viral liver disease, may result from hepatitis B virus infection of the pancreas.

  9. Hepatic gas gangrene following orthotopic liver transplantation: three cases treated with re-transplantation and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Doblecki-Lewis, S; Palaios, E; Bejarano, P A; Tzakis, A G; Selvaggi, G; Morris, M I

    2008-07-01

    Gas gangrene is a rare and devastating infectious process that can occur after liver transplantation, most often following hepatic artery thrombosis. We here report 3 cases of gas gangrene following orthotopic liver transplantation. Blood cultures were positive for Clostridium clostridiiforme in one case. In 2 other cases liver tissue from explanted specimens was positive for Enterobacter cloacae. Ultrasound demonstrated hepatic artery thrombosis and computed tomography imaging revealed diffuse liver necrosis with gas formation in each case. All 3 patients were successfully treated with a combination of antibiotics and emergent re-transplantation. We review previously published cases of gas gangrene after liver transplant and emphasize the importance of hepatic artery thrombosis in the development of this syndrome as well as the frequent involvement of non-clostridial organisms. Early diagnosis and aggressive combined medical and surgical treatment including re-transplantation are essential for successful treatment of these rare and catastrophic infections.

  10. Liver transplantation surgical techniques for extensive retroperitoneal tumor with major blood vessel involvement: a case report.

    PubMed

    Miura, K; Sato, Y; Kokai, H; Hara, Y; Kobayashi, T; Oya, H; Yamamoto, S; Hatakeyama, K

    2012-03-01

    A case of a 71-year-old man with a huge retroperitoneal tumor situated behind the liver, which strongly compressed the liver inferior vena cava (IVC), and gastrointestinal tract is described. With the techniques of whole liver extraction and autologous orthotopic liver transplantation, we successfully removed the tumor. We have the surgical techniques, essential elements, and indications for this procedure.

  11. Multidrug-resistant Combined Infections in a Liver Transplanted Patient: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Carraro, Amedeo; Montin, Umberto; Violi, Paola; Soldani, Fabio; Mazzi, Romualdo; Merighi, Mara; Kanani, Faheem; Concia, Ercole; Tedeschi, Umberto

    2016-04-07

    We report a case of successfully treated multiple liver abscesses in a liver-transplanted patient, sustained by combined multidrug-resistant infections. Two months after a liver transplant, a computed tomography scan revealed the presence of multiple abscesses in the liver graft. Blood cultures and abscessual liver fluid were both positive for acquired colistin- and carbapenem- resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae and an extended-spectrum of beta-lactamases-producing Enterobacter aerogenes. The treatment strategy consisted of different prolonged antimicrobial combinations and draining of the abscesses with complete recovery of the liver lesions.

  12. First case report of isolated penile mucormycosis in a liver transplantation recipient.

    PubMed

    Lai, Ming-chun; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Zhe; Zhang, Wu; Owusu-Ansah, K G; Yu, Song-feng; Geng, Lei; Xie, Hai-yang; Zhou, Lin; Zheng, Shu-sen

    2014-12-01

    Mucormycosis is a rare but potentially lethal complication of liver transplantation. Most reported cases have involved rhinocerebral, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, or disseminated forms. We present herein the case of a 61-year-old male patient with hepatocellular carcinoma who developed isolated penile mucormycosis after orthotopic liver transplantation. Such a case has not been reported in the literature to date. Early diagnosis and timely surgical intervention combined with comprehensive treatment are the key factors for improving the survival rate in patients with mucormycosis.

  13. Does situs inversus totalis preclude liver donation in living donor liver transplantation? A series of 3 cases from single institution

    PubMed Central

    N., Selvakumar; Goyal, Neerav; Nayeem, Mohammed; Vohra, Sandeep; Gupta, Subash

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Liver transplantation (LT) is the gold standard for decompensated Chronic Liver Disease (CLD) in individuals satisfying the selection criteria. Organ scarcity is the rate limiting step in liver transplantation across the globe. Expanding the donor pool is practiced by transplant surgeons across the globe in view of perennial donor organ scarcity and ever increasing organ demand. Presentation of case We have presented series of 3 cases of liver transplantation (LT) with modified left lobe (conventional right) graft from a situs inversus donor and implanting it as a conventional right lobe with a modified technique. The grafts had Type 1, Type 2 and Type 3 biliary anatomies. One graft had inferior hepatic veins also. All three patients had uneventful recoveries. The follow up period range is 4 years to 8 months. Discussion There are multiple case reports in the literature involving situs inversus donors in liver transplantation. Various techniques have also been described. We describe simple and effective technique which has proved successful to our patients. Conclusion SIT donors can be safely accepted for living donor liver transplantation. It is a technically challenging procedure both for donor liver harvesting and implantation in recipient. This is the first case series of LT using modified left lobe graft (conventional right) from a SIT donor with 2 different techniques. Biliary anastomosis is the tricky part of the operation. PMID:26895114

  14. Infections after liver transplantation. An analysis of 101 consecutive cases.

    PubMed

    Kusne, S; Dummer, J S; Singh, N; Iwatsuki, S; Makowka, L; Esquivel, C; Tzakis, A G; Starzl, T E; Ho, M

    1988-03-01

    We studied infections in 101 consecutive patients who underwent liver transplantation between July 1984 and September 1985. The mean length of follow-up was 394 days. Eighty-three percent of population had 1 or more episodes of infection and 67% of the population had severe infections. The overall mortality was 26/101 (26%) and 23 of 26 deaths (88%) were associated with infection. Seventy percent of severe infections occurred in the first 2 months after transplantation. The most frequent severe infections were abdominal abscess, bacterial pneumonia, invasive candidiasis, Pneumocystis pneumonia, and symptomatic cytomegalovirus infection. Patients with more than 12 hours of cumulative surgical time had a higher rate of severe infections (P less than 0.001), particularly fungal (P less than 0.001) and bacterial (P less than 0.01) infections. Also, the use of choledocho-jejunostomy was associated with a higher rate of infection in patients who had more than 1 transplant operation (P less than 0.02). No increase in infection was found in patients who received azathioprine, or more than the median number of steroid boluses or "recycles"; but patients who received OKT3 therapy had a higher rate of protozoal infections (P less than 0.05). A result similar to that of our previous studies was a strong relation between the number of severe fungal infections and prolonged courses of antibiotics after transplant operation (P less than 0.001). Pretransplant manifestations of severe liver disease such as ascites, encephalopathy, and gastrointestinal bleeding were not associated with higher rates of infection after transplantation, but high serum levels of ALT were. Patients with lower ratios of T-helper to T-suppressor lymphocytes had more severe viral (P less than 0.02) and fungal (P less than 0.01) infections after transplantation.

  15. A case of acute humoral rejection in liver transplantation: successful treatment with plasmapheresis and mycophenolate mofetil.

    PubMed

    Rostron, Anthony; Carter, Vaughan; Mutunga, Mbithe; Cavanagh, Gary; O'Suilleabhain, Criostoir; Burt, Alistair; Jaques, Bryon; Talbot, David; Manas, Derek

    2005-11-01

    We present a case of a 23-year-old female who underwent orthotopic liver transplantation (OLTx) for biliary atresia, 22 years after a failed Kasai operation. Unusually, her postoperative course was complicated by severe acute humoral rejection. In this case report, we discuss her management as well as the role of plasmapheresis in treating allograft dysfunction secondary to acute humoral rejection in liver transplant patients.

  16. Cutting balloon treatment of anastomotic biliary stenosis after liver transplantation: Report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Fan; Tang, Hui; Xu, Chi; Jiang, Zai-Bo; Yi, Shu-Hong; Li, Hua; Jiang, Nan; Chen, Wen-Jie; Yang, Qing; Yang, Yang; Chen, Gui-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Biliary stenosis is a common complication after liver transplantation, and has an incidence rate ranging from 4.7% to 12.5% based on our previous study. Three types of biliary stenosis (anastomotic stenosis, non-anastomotic peripheral stenosis and non-anastomotic central hilar stenosis) have been identified. We report the outcome of two patients with anastomotic stricture after liver transplantation who underwent successful cutting balloon treatment. Case 1 was a 40-year-old male transplanted due to subacute fulminant hepatitis C. Case 2 was a 57-year-old male transplanted due to hepatitis B virus-related end-stage cirrhosis associated with hepatocellular carcinoma. Both patients had similar clinical scenarios: refractory anastomotic stenosis after orthotopic liver transplantation and failure of balloon dilation of the common bile duct to alleviate biliary stricture. PMID:28104994

  17. A case study: refractory recurrent autoimmune hepatitis following liver transplantation in two male patients.

    PubMed

    Tencate, V; Komorowski, R; Cronin, D; Hong, J; Gawrieh, S

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) recurs after liver transplantation and significantly impacts graft function and patient survival. In this case report, we present 2 cases of male patients with refractory recurrent AIH after liver transplantation. Each patient lost their first graft due to refractory continuous AIH. We have not noticed a similar refractory course for our female patients with AIH post-transplantation at our center. Based on our single-center experience there appears to be a gender disparity in the aggressive nature of AIH recurrence after transplantation. Despite the aggressive nature of recurrent AIH in both patients, graft loss occurred beyond 3 years for both patients and did not influence the 1- and 3-year patient survival. If these findings are validated, they may have significant impact on post-transplantation immunosuppression management in male patients.

  18. Liver Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... History Research Resources Research at NIDDK Meetings & Events Technology Advancement & Transfer Health Information Diabetes Digestive Diseases Kidney Disease Weight Management Liver Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition ...

  19. Extrahepatic portal vein aneurysm after liver transplantation in a child: case report.

    PubMed

    Molinares, Beatriz; Alvarez, Sergio; García, Vanessa; Sepúlveda, Maria Elsy; Yepes, Nora Luz; Peláez, Sebastián

    2013-02-01

    Portal vein aneurysms are very rare and represent <3% of all venous aneurysms. They can be congenital or acquired. Most patients do not have liver disease at diagnosis. Although uncommon, portal vein aneurysm has been described after liver transplant. We report the case of a six-yr-old girl who presented with an aneurysm of the extrahepatic portal vein after segmental liver transplantation. Because the patient was asymptomatic and owing to its extrahepatic location, this aneurysm has been successfully followed by clinical exam and imaging for four yr.

  20. Liver Transplant in a Patient under Methylphenidate Therapy: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Hoi Y.; Díaz, Carmen; Collantes, Elena; Medrano, Nicolás; Borobia, Alberto M.; Jara, Paloma; Ramírez, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Background. Methylphenidate (MPH) is widely used in treating children with attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder. Hepatotoxicity is a rare phenomenon; only few cases are described with no liver failure. Case. We report on the case of a 12-year-old boy who received MPH for attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder. Two months later the patient presented with signs and symptoms of hepatitis and MPH was discontinued, showing progressive worsening and developing liver failure and a liver transplantation was required. Other causes of liver failure were ruled out and the liver biopsy was suggestive of drug toxicity. Discussion. One rare adverse reaction of MPH is hepatotoxicity. The review of the literature shows few cases of liver injury attributed to MPH; all of them recovered after withdrawing the treatment. The probable mechanism of liver injury was MPH direct toxicity to hepatocytes. In order to establish the diagnosis of MPH-induced liver injury, we used CIOMS/RUCAM scale that led to an assessment of “possible” relationship. This report provides the first published case of acute MPH-induced liver failure with successful hepatic transplantation. Conclusions. It is important to know that hepatotoxicity can occur in patients with MPH treatment and monitoring the liver's function is highly recommended. PMID:25688317

  1. Liver transplant - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100090.htm Liver transplant - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... to slide 5 out of 5 Overview The liver is in the right upper abdomen. The liver ...

  2. Alcoholic cirrhosis is a good indication for liver transplantation, even for cases of recidivism

    PubMed Central

    Pageaux, G; Michel, J; Coste, V; Perney, P; Possoz, P; Perrigault, P; Navarro, F; Fabre, J; Domergue, J; Blanc, P; Larrey, D

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Alcoholic cirrhosis remains a controversial indication for liver transplantation, mainly because of ethical considerations related to the shortage of donor livers. The aim of this study was to review experience to date, focusing on survival rates and complications, and the effect of alcohol relapse on outcome and alterations in marital and socioprofessional status.
METHODS—The results for 53 patients transplanted for alcoholic cirrhosis between 1989 and 1994 were compared with those for 48 patients transplanted for non-alcoholic liver disease. The following variables were analysed: survival, rejection, infection, cancer, retransplantation, employment and marital status, alcoholic recurrence. The same variables were compared between alcohol relapsers and non-relapsers.
RESULTS—Recovery of employment was the only significantly different variable between alcoholic (30%) and non-alcoholic patients (60%). Two factors influenced survival in the absence of alcohol recidivism: age and abstinence before transplantation. For all other variables, there were no differences between alcoholic and non-alcoholic patients, and, within the alcoholic group, between relapsers and non-relapsers. The recidivism rate was 32%.
CONCLUSION—The data indicate that liver transplantation is justified for alcoholic cirrhosis, even in cases of recidivism, which did no affect survival and compliance with the immunosuppressive regimen. These good results should help in educating the general population about alcoholic disease.


Keywords: liver; transplantation; alcohol; cirrhosis PMID:10446113

  3. Bilateral native nephrectomy reduces systemic oxalate level after combined liver-kidney transplant: A case report.

    PubMed

    Villani, Vincenzo; Gupta, Neena; Elias, Nahel; Vagefi, Parsia A; Markmann, James F; Paul, Elahna; Traum, Avram Z; Yeh, Heidi

    2017-03-05

    Primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1) is a rare liver enzymatic defect that causes overproduction of plasma oxalate. Accumulation of oxalate in the kidney and subsequent renal failure are fatal to PH1 patients often in pediatric age. Combined liver and kidney transplantation is the therapy of choice for end-stage renal disease due to PH1. Levels of plasma oxalate remain elevated for several months after liver transplantation, as the residual body oxalate is slowly excreted. Patients with persistent hyperoxaluria after transplant often require hemodialysis, and accumulation of residual oxalate in the kidney can induce graft dysfunction. As the native kidneys are the main target of calcium oxalate accumulation, we postulated that removal of native kidneys could drastically decrease total body oxalate levels after transplantation. Here, we report a case of bilateral nephrectomy at the time of combined liver-kidney transplantation in a pediatric PH1 patient. Bilateral nephrectomy induced a rapid decrease in plasma oxalate to normal levels in less than 20 days, compared to the several months reported in the literature. Our results suggest that removal of native kidneys could be an effective strategy to decrease the need for hemodialysis and the risk of renal dysfunction after combined liver-kidney transplantation in patients with PH1.

  4. Liver transplant with a marginal donor graft containing a hydatid cyst--a case report.

    PubMed

    Eris, C; Akbulut, S; Sakcak, I; Kayaalp, C; Ara, C; Yilmaz, S

    2013-03-01

    Liver transplantation has become the standard treatment for acute failure and end-stage liver disease, but there are fewer donor organs available than patients on the waiting list. The donor pool may be increased by using marginal donor candidates. Some infectious and metabolic diseases have been transmitted to the recipient via marginal donor grafts. Hydatid cyst disease is rarely transmitted to a recipient from the donor graft. A literature search showed only 2 previous cases of liver transplantation using a donor graft that contains a hydatid cyst. We treated a 19-year-old woman who experienced acute on chronic end-stage liver failure secondary to cryptogenic cirrhosis. The liver graft from a 97-year-old marginal cadaveric donor contained a calcified hydatid cyst. No complication was associated with the hydatid cyst at 3 years after transplantation. The present case shows that donor livers with an inactive, calcified hydatid cyst may be used for emergency liver transplantation after considering the location, size, and relation of the cyst to vascular and biliary structures. The cyst may be resected on the back table with a successful treatment outcome.

  5. Right diaphragmatic hernia after liver transplant in pediatrics: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lam, Hwai-Ding; Mejia, Juan; Soltys, Kyle A; Sindhi, Rakesh; Mazariegos, George; Bond, Geoffrey

    2013-05-01

    Diaphragmatic hernias (DH) are an unusual complication after pediatric liver transplantation; however, they have been reported with increased frequency in the past few years. DHs are responsible for nearly half of the small bowel obstructions requiring surgical intervention in this patient population. It has been suggested that the use of a left lobe liver graft, surgical trauma, malnourishment, elevated intra-abdominal pressures, and mTor inhibitors may predispose to development of DH. The use of a segmental graft may increase the recognition of diaphragmatic hernia because the surgically damaged right hemi-diaphragm often remains exposed to underlying viscera, instead of being covered by the right hepatic lobe. Treatment is surgical reduction, with up to 20% of the patients requiring resection of the herniated intestine. Herein we describe a case of DH after left segmental liver transplant in a two- yr-old boy that presented one month post left lobe split liver transplant with abdominal pain, anorexia, and respiratory distress. Just like in the majority of the reported cases, an urgent laparotomy with primary repair was performed. No resection of the herniated segment of intestine was required. For pediatric patients with otherwise unexplained respiratory or gastrointestinal symptoms after a left lateral segment liver transplant, right-sided diaphragmatic hernias should always be high in the differential diagnosis.

  6. [Liver transplantation and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Goarin, A-C; Homer, L

    2010-11-01

    Management during their sexual life of patients with a liver transplantation is a more or less common situation depending centers. Based on literature review, a focus on management of recipient women was conducted, from contraception to pregnancy, describing the complications related to the status of transplant recipient, but also those that may be related to immunosuppressive agents. If fertility and access to contraception are only slightly modified by graft, complications related to graft or immunosuppressive drugs can affect the pregnancy. On the maternal side, hypertension and preeclampsia are more common, as well as renal dysfunction, iatrogenic diabetes and bacterial or viral infections, acute rejection and graft loss do not appear to be influenced by pregnancy. The fetus is also exposed to risks such as induced prematurity and IUGR. Pregnancy in recipients of hepatic grafts therefore requires joint follow-up by transplant specialist and perinatologist, which leads in most cases to successful outcome for mother and child.

  7. Case Report of Relay Liver Transplantation With Graft Infected With Hepatitis B Virus.

    PubMed

    Wong, T C L; She, W H; Cheung, T T; Chan, S C; Lo, C M

    2015-11-01

    Reuse of liver graft for transplantation is extremely uncommon. We report the 1st case of reuse of liver graft from a recipient who had hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, 11 years after the 1st transplantation. Our relay liver transplantation challenged conventional thinking because of late reuse of graft in the presence of HBV infection. Moreover, both the 1st and the 2nd donors were of advanced age. The key questions were whether the liver graft could be reused safely, especially in the setting of HBV infection, and technical concerns during organ procurement and implantation. The absence of HBV replication was confirmed with negative hepatitis B surface antigen and undetectable serum HBV DNA in the 2nd donor. Based on our experience in managing HBV infection after liver transplantation, we were confident that the adequately suppressed HBV infection in the donor would not jeopardize graft function and that the graft would be able to withstand another ischemia-perfusion injury to continue to function well in our recipient.

  8. Kaposi sarcoma of the ureter after liver transplant: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Zhao, Liang; Qiu, Shao-peng; He, Xiao-shun

    2012-02-01

    Kaposi sarcoma after an organ transplant is rare and infrequently involves internal organs. There are 2 reported cases in the English literature of Kaposi sarcoma originating from the transplant ureter after kidney transplant. We report a case of Kaposi sarcoma that occurred in the native ureter of the liver transplant recipient. Initially, the patient refused any further investigation and management and 2 years subsequent, had to undergo a left radical nephroureterectomy owing to the loss of renal function and distending pain. He recovered very well and no recurrence was detected at 47 months' follow-up. To our knowledge, it is the first report in English. We review the literature on this topic and explore the therapeutic principles and histologic features of this sarcoma.

  9. Sister Joseph's nodule in a liver transplant recipient: Case report and mini-review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Panaro, Fabrizio; Andorno, Enzo; Di Domenico, Stefano; Morelli, Nicola; Bottino, Giuliano; Mondello, Rosalia; Miggino, Marco; Jarzembowski, Tomasz M; Ravazzoni, Ferruccio; Casaccia, Marco; Valente, Umberto

    2005-01-01

    Background Umbilical metastasis is one of the main characteristic signs of extensive neoplastic disease and is universally referred to as Sister Mary Joseph's nodule. Case presentation A 59-years-old Caucasian female underwent liver transplant for end stage liver disease due to hepatitis C with whole graft from cadaveric donor in 2003. After transplantation the patient developed multiple subcutaneous nodules in the umbilical region and bilateral inguinal lymphadenopathy. The excision biopsy of the umbilical mass showed the features of a poorly differentiated papillary serous cystadenocarcinoma. Computed tomographic scan and transvaginal ultrasonography were unable to demonstrate any primary lesion. Chemotherapy was start and the dosage of the immunosuppressive drugs was reduced. To date the patient is doing well and liver function is normal. Conclusions The umbilical metastasis can arise from many sites. In some cases, primary tumor may be not identified; nonetheless chemotherapy must be administrated based on patient's history, anatomical and histological findings. PMID:15651984

  10. Liver Transplantation: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Handouts Liver transplant (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Liver Transplantation updates ... ENCYCLOPEDIA Liver transplant Liver transplant - slideshow Related Health Topics Cirrhosis Hepatitis Liver Diseases Organ Transplantation National Institutes ...

  11. Update in liver transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, W. W.; Bain, V. G.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review recent developments in liver transplantation with particular emphasis on issues relevant to patient care before and after transplantation. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Preference was given to recent studies with well-designed cohort methods and large numbers of study subjects. Data on natural history are summarized from large databases in Canada and the United States. Due to the nature of the subjects involved, most treatment studies are open studies or consecutive series rather than randomized controlled trials. MAIN MESSAGE: Substantial advances in liver transplantation have established it as an effective treatment for most end-stage liver diseases, with 1-year survival rates higher than 85% in many centres. Early referral by family physicians and careful patient selection by transplant centres remain crucial to continued success. Managing these patients requires special care from family physicians because of post-transplantation immunosuppression, increased risk of opportunistic infection, and transplantation-associated medical problems. Other unresolved issues include recurrence of disease (hepatitis B and C, and malignancy) and an ongoing shortage of organs. CONCLUSIONS: Liver transplantation is an effective form of therapy for end-stage liver disease, improving both patients' likelihood of survival and their quality of life. Because medical care of liver transplant patients is so complex, coordinated efforts between primary care physicians and transplant teams are crucial. PMID:10349068

  12. A Case Report of Drug-Induced Thrombocytopenia after Living Donor Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Arai, Keisuke; Kuramitsu, Kaori; Fukumoto, Takumi; Kido, Masahiro; Takebe, Atsushi; Tanaka, Motofumi; Kinoshita, Hisoka; Ajiki, Tetsuo; Toyama, Hirochika; Asari, Sadaki; Goto, Tadahiro; Ku, Yonson

    2016-06-16

    There are few descriptions of severe thrombocytopenia during the early postoperative period after liver transplantation, and these have not been fully documented in the literature. Here, we report a case of drug-induced thrombocytopenia requiring transfusion of blood products after living donor liver transplantation. We determined that this was not caused by the interferon-free anti-viral therapy but by tacrolimus A 61-year-old woman with hepatitis C-related cirrhosis and hepatorenal syndrome underwent living donor liver transplantation using a left lobe graft from her son. After transplantation, immunosuppression consisted of tacrolimus and steroid. Seven weeks after transplantation, interferon-free therapy with daclatasvir and asunaprevir was started. Thirteen days thereafter, hepatitis C virus tested negative. However, the platelet count had begun to gradually decrease just before starting anti-viral therapy. Daclatasvir and asunaprevir were stopped because this was suspected to be a side-effect of these drugs, but the patient nonetheless went on to develop severe thrombocytopenia (platelet count 17,000/μL), which needed transfusions. Now suspecting tacrolimus as the inducer of this side effect, we changed to cyclosporin, after which the platelet count gradually recovered. Viral markers were still not detectable up to 2 months after discontinuation of the antiviral drugs. We conclude that when severe thrombocytopenia occurs, possible drug-induced thrombocytopenia as well as other disorders must be investigated.

  13. Transplantable liver production plan

    PubMed Central

    Hata, Toshiyuki; Uemoto, Shinji; Kobayashi, Eiji

    2013-01-01

    Organ grafts developed in the xenogeneic pig scaffold are expected to resolve most issues of donor safety and ethical concerns about living-donor liver transplantation in Japan. We have been working on so-called “Yamaton” projects to develop transplantable organs using genetically engineered pigs. Our goal is to produce chimeric livers with human parenchyma in such pigs. The Yamaton-Liver project demonstrated the proof of concept by showing that rat–mouse chimeric livers could develop in mice and be successfully transplanted into syngeneic or allogeneic rats. Under conventional immunosuppression, the transplanted livers showed long-term function and protection against rejection. Because chimeric liver grafts have xenogeneic components, additional strategies, such as humanization of pig genes, induction of hematopoietic chimeras in donors, and replacement of pig endothelial cells with human ones, might be required in clinical use. Our projects still need to overcome various hurdles but can bring huge benefits to patients in the future. PMID:23896578

  14. Plasmacytoma-like posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder following orthotopic liver transplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Vishnu, P; Jiang, L; Cortese, C; Menke, D M; Tun, H W

    2011-09-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are among the most serious and potentially fatal complications of both stem-cell and solid-organ transplantation. Most monomorphic PTLDs are of B-cell origin and frequently associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in the setting of pharmacological immunosuppression posttransplantation. The majority of monomorphic PTLDs commonly resemble diffuse large B-cell or Burkitt's lymphoma; plasmacytoma-like PTLDs are very rare. We report a case of plasmacytoma-like PTLD arising in the allograft in a 66-year-old male diagnosed 2 months following an orthotopic liver transplant for alcohol-related end-stage liver disease. The liver biopsy revealed marked infiltration of atypical plasma cells with lambda light chain restriction and positivity for EBV by in situ hybridization confirming the diagnosis. Also noted was a remarkable increase of tissue eosinophils. Reduction of immunosuppression led to improvement in his clinical condition, and also resolution of the hepatic lesions and abdominal lymphadenopathy noted on imaging studies. While a few cases of plasmacytoma-like PTLDs have been described in literature, to our knowledge, this is the first reported case of early onset plasmacytoma-like PTLD in a liver transplant recipient occurring in the allograft with associated lymphadenopathy having distinct histopathologic features including tissue eosinophilia. Timely recognition of such an entity is critical in order to initiate early and appropriate intervention.

  15. Acute myeloid leukemia of a primary hepatic carcinoma patient after liver transplantation: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wen-Jun; Dong, Meng-Meng; Chen, Yun; He, Jing-Song; Huang, He; Cai, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) is an important means to treat end-stage liver disease. Although effective immunosuppressant medication greatly assists the survival of patients, it is likely to promote infections and cancer. Acute leukemia (AL) is a rare complication after LDLT and up to now only 1 case of post-transplantation AL has occurred in our liver transplantation center after more than 1,600 LDLT interventions since 1993. In the present report, we describe a rare case of subsequent acute myeloid leukemia (AML), 27 months after LDLT and review the literature of this infrequent complication. PMID:26722593

  16. Protothecal bursitis after simultaneous kidney/liver transplantation: a case report and review.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, I; Nieto-Ríos, J F; Ocampo-Kohn, C; Aristizábal-Alzate, A; Zuluaga-Valencia, G; Muñoz Maya, O; Pérez, J C

    2016-04-01

    Solid organ transplantation is an accepted therapy for end-stage diseases of the kidneys, liver, heart, and lungs. Unfortunately, transplantation is associated with infectious complications. Here, we present a case report of Prototheca wickerhamii olecranon bursitis and review all of the cases in solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients published in the literature to date. In our patient, the infection resolved with surgical therapy and limited antifungal therapy, and no symptoms have recurred over 24 months of follow-up. A review of the literature suggests that 50% of SOT recipients with Prototheca infection present with disseminated infection, and the overall mortality is 75%. More studies are required to determine the optimal management of protothecosis in this population.

  17. Intracranial hemorrhage induced uncontrolled seizure in a deceased donor liver transplant patient: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Seung-Young; Lee, Hannah; Park, Yang-Hyo

    2016-01-01

    Seizure is the second most common neurologic complication after liver transplantation and may be caused by metabolic abnormalities, electrolyte imbalance, infection, and immunosuppressant toxicity. A 61-year-old male patient underwent liver transplantation due to hepatitis B virus-related liver cirrhosis with portal systemic encephalopathy. The immediate postoperative course of the patient was uncomplicated. However, on postoperative day (POD) 6, weakness developed in both lower extremities. No abnormal findings were detected on a brain computed tomography (CT) scan on POD 8, but a generalized tonic clonic seizure developed which was difficult to control even with multiple antiepileptic drugs. A follow-up brain CT scan on POD 15 showed a 2.7 cm sized acute intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) in the left parietal lobe. The patient's mental status improved after 2 months and he was able to communicate through eye blinking or head shaking. Our case reports an acute ICH that manifested into a refractory seizure in a patient who underwent a liver transplant. PMID:27703637

  18. Risk factors and outcomes in post-liver transplantation bile duct stones and casts: A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Spier, Bret J; Pfau, Patrick R; Lorenze, Katelin R; Knechtle, Stuart J; Said, Adnan

    2008-10-01

    Bile duct stones and casts (BDS) after liver transplantation are associated with significant morbidity. Risk factors for BDS formation and the efficacy of treatment in liver transplant recipients have not been systematically studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate potential risk factors for the formation of BDS in patients post-liver transplant. A case-control study of consecutive liver transplant recipients at a university hospital from 1989 to 2007 was performed to identify risk factors for BDS formation. Cases included all liver transplant recipients with BDS, excluding those with concurrent t-tubes or biliary stents. Controls were chosen randomly from the total liver transplant population matched for year of transplantation. Pre- and post-OLT risk factors were analyzed with univariate and multivariate analyses. There were 49 cases and 101 controls over an 18-year-period (1289 liver transplants performed) with an incidence of 3.8% for BDS. In the cases, the median time to BDS diagnosis was 613 days from time of transplant. The controls had a median follow-up of 1530 days. Use of ursodeoxycholic acid was protective (P = 0.005), whereas bile duct pathology (P = 0.003), total cholesterol >/= 200 mg/dL (P = 0.008), and triglyceride >/= 150 mg/dL (P = 0.008) were significant risk factors for BDS formation. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) was technically successful in all cases with resolution or improvement of liver chemistries in 59% (29) of patients. In conclusion, significant risk factors for forming BDS included bile duct pathology and elevated total cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Ursodeoxycholic acid had a significant effect in preventing the development of posttransplant BDS and should be used in those that are at increased risk. ERCP is a safe and effective diagnostic and therapeutic modality for these patients.

  19. About the Operation: Liver Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart/Lung Kidney Pancreas Kidney/Pancreas Liver Intestine Liver Transplant There are two very different surgical approaches to liver transplantation: the orthotopic and the heterotopic approach, both ...

  20. Portal Vein Inflow From Enlarged Coronary Vein in Liver Transplantation: Surgical Approach and Technical Tips: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Safwan, M; Nagai, S; Abouljoud, M S

    2016-11-01

    Portal vein thrombosis is common in patients with end-stage liver disease, with an incidence as high as 26% in liver transplant candidates. It is known to be associated with a high risk of morbidity and mortality posttransplantation, and its management can be challenging. The management options range from a simple thrombendvenectomy to multivisceral transplantation in cases with diffuse portomesenteric thrombosis. We report a case of liver transplantation in which we performed a rare reconstruction of the portal vein. Briefly, the patient had diffuse portomesenteric thrombosis, calcified aneurysmosis, and a large collateral coronary vein, to which we directly anastomosed the donor portal vein in an end-to-side fashion. This report describes a unique surgical approach for similar cases of severe portal vein thrombosis in liver transplant candidates.

  1. Liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma after yttrium therapy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sotiropoulos, G C; Hilgard, P; Antoch, G; Nowak, K M; Ertl, J; Fouzas, I; Molmenti, E P; Sgourakis, G; Beckebaum, S; Paul, A; Broelsch, C E; Lang, H

    2008-12-01

    Yttrium-90 microspheres constitute one of the most recent treatment options for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the setting of cirrhosis. As such, their spectrum of indication is not yet fully established. Herein, we have reported the case of a patient with HCC beyond the listing criteria for liver transplantation (OLT) who was treated preoperatively with selective transarterial chemoembolization and yttrium-90 microspheres. He was subsequently transplanted with a liver from an 81-year-old donor allocated through Eurotransplant as a "rescue offer." The posttransplant course was uneventful. Pathologic examination revealed a multifocal, well-differentiated pT2 tumor with no vascular invasion. The patient is currently alive and in good condition at 14 months posttransplant, with no evidence of tumor recurrence by a current computed tomography scan. This report provided encouraging information on the potential of yttrium-90 microspheres as a bridging option before OLT for multifocal HCC.

  2. Fourteen Years of Experience of Liver Transplantation for Wilson’s Disease; a Report on 107 Cases from Shiraz, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Nikeghbalian, Saman; Dehghani, Mohsen; Pourhashemi, Mohammad; Kazemi, Kourosh; Janghorban, Parisa; Akbari, Maryam; Ghahramani, Sulmaz; Eghtesad, Bijan; Moini, Maryam; Rahmi Jaberi, Abbas; Shamsaifar, Alireza; Gholami, Siavosh; Rahmanian, Fatemeh; Geramizadeh, Bita

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim Liver transplantation is a potential cure for liver damage from Wilson’s disease but the course of neuropsychiatric manifestations after transplantation remains undetermined. Material and methods In this study, data on all patients who’d received a liver transplant for Wilson’s disease at the Shiraz Organ Transplantation Center between December 2000 and March 2014 were reviewed and compared to data on a control group who’d received a liver transplant over the same period but due to other causes. Results Out of 2198 patients who’d received a liver transplant in the period; 107 patients were diagnosed with Wilson’s disease (21 with fulminant hepatic failure); age of patient ranged from 5 to 59 years; 56.07% of patients in this series had some type of neuropsychiatric manifestation before transplantation, of which 66.67% showed improvement after the procedure. 18 patients had aggravation of neuropsychiatric symptoms after transplantation. These neuropsychiatric symptoms were mostly for anxiety, tremor and depression but there were four cases of new onset dysarthria, rigidity and ataxia in various combinations. Survival rates of 1-month, 1-year, and 5-years for patients with Wilson’s disease were 88%, 86%, 82%, respectively, evaluations were not statistically different from that of the control group. Conclusions Liver transplantation showed good long-term results in patients with Wilson’s disease, even in those presenting fulminant hepatic failure. Neuropsychiatric manifestations normally show improvement after transplantation but in some cases new onset of manifestations occurred after successful liver transplantation. PMID:27930723

  3. Getting a New Liver: Facts about Liver Transplants

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2002 December 2006 March 2012 Getting A New Liver Facts About Liver Transplants American Society of Transplantation 1120 Route 73, ... views of the Society. _________________________________________________________________ 1 Getting a New Liver Facts About Liver Transplants A liver transplant is ...

  4. Helicobacter cinaedi bacteremia with cellulitis after ABO-incompatible living-donor liver transplantation: Case report.

    PubMed

    Mishima, Kohei; Obara, Hideaki; Sugita, Kayoko; Shinoda, Masahiro; Kitago, Minoru; Abe, Yuta; Hibi, Taizo; Yagi, Hiroshi; Matsubara, Kentaro; Mori, Takehiko; Takano, Yaoko; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Itano, Osamu; Hasegawa, Naoki; Iwata, Satoshi; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2015-07-07

    Helicobacter cinaedi (H. cinaedi), a Gram-negative spiral-shaped bacterium, is an enterohepatic non-Helicobacter pylori Helicobacter species. We report the first case of H. cinaedi bacteremia with cellulitis after liver transplantation. A 48-year-old male, who had been a dog breeder for 15 years, underwent ABO-incompatible living-donor liver transplantation for hepatitis C virus-induced decompensated cirrhosis using an anti-hepatitis B core antibody-positive graft. The patient was preoperatively administered rituximab and underwent plasma exchange twice to overcome blood type incompatibility. After discharge, he had been doing well with immunosuppression therapy comprising cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil, and steroid according to the ABO-incompatible protocol of our institution. However, 7 mo after transplantation, he was admitted to our hospital with a diagnosis of recurrent cellulitis on the left lower extremity, and H. cinaedi was detected by both blood culture and polymerase chain reaction analysis. Antibiotics improved his symptoms, and he was discharged at day 30 after admission. Clinicians should be more aware of H. cinaedi in immunocompromised patients, such as ABO-incompatible transplant recipients.

  5. Hiding in Plain Sight: A Case of Ornithine Transcarbamylase Deficiency Unmasked Post-Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, M; Uppalapu, S; Patel, N M

    2016-12-20

    Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency represents the most common inherited defect of the urea cycle. This enzyme, predominantly found in the liver, plays a crucial role in recycling free ammonia, with deficiencies often leading to fatal complications. Here, we present the case of a 63-year-old man with alcoholic cirrhosis who underwent orthotopic liver transplantation, gradual worsening of his mental status, and progressive elevation of ammonia levels. Liver allograft function was deemed normal, raising concern for a donor-derived metabolic disorder of the urea cycle. Evaluation of the donor patient's blood revealed that the donor was heterozygous for the OTC gene. Posttransplantation changes in mental status should prompt a clinician to consider the most likely causes; however, once these have been ruled out, it is important to consider the less common causes of metabolic derangements. The rarity of these disorders makes expertise of diagnosis, standardization of evaluation, and treatment strategies challenging.

  6. THEMES OF LIVER TRANSPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    Starzl, Thomas E.; Fung, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Liver transplantation was the product of 5 interlocking themes. These began in 1958-59 with canine studies of then theoretical hepatotrophic molecules in portal venous blood (Theme I) and with the contemporaneous parallel development of liver and multivisceral transplant models (Theme II). Further Theme I investigations showed that insulin was the principal, although not the only, portal hepatotrophic factor. In addition to resolving long-standing controversies about the pathophysiology of portacaval shunt, the hepatotrophic studies blazed new trails in the regulation of liver size, function, and regeneration. They also targeted inborn metabolic errors (e.g. familial hyperlipoproteinemia) whose palliation by portal diversion presaged definitive correction with liver replacement. Clinical use of the Theme II transplant models depended on multiple drug immunosuppression (Theme III, Immunology), guided by an empirical algorithm of pattern recognition and therapeutic response. Successful liver replacement was first accomplished in 1967 with azathioprine, prednisone, and ALG. With this regimen, the world’s longest surviving liver recipient is now 40 years postoperative. Incremental improvements in survival outcome occurred (Theme IV) when azathioprine was replaced by cyclosporine (1979) which was replaced in turn by tacrolimus (1989). However, the biologic meaning of alloengraftment remained enigmatic until multilineage donor leukocyte microchimerism was discovered in 1992 in long surviving organ recipients. Seminal mechanisms were then identified (clonal exhaustion-deletion and immune ignorance) that linked organ engraftment and the acquired tolerance of bone marrow transplantation and eventually clarified the relationship of transplantation immunology to the immunology of infections, neoplasms, and autoimmune disorders. With this insight, better strategies of immunosuppression have evolved. As liver and other kinds of organ transplantation became accepted as

  7. Cognitive and Adaptive Functioning after Liver Transplantation for Maple Syrup Urine Disease: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Shellmer, D. A.; Dabbs, A. DeVito; Dew, M. A.; Noll, R. B.; Feldman, H.; Strauss, K.; Morton, D. H.; Vockley, G.; Mazariegos, G. V.

    2011-01-01

    MSUD is a complex metabolic disorder that has been associated with central nervous system damage, developmental delays, and neurocognitive deficits. Although liver transplantation provides a metabolic cure for MSUD, changes in cognitive and adaptive functioning following transplantation have not been investigated. In this report we present data from 14 patients who completed cognitive and adaptive functioning testing pre- and one year and/or three years post-liver transplantation. Findings show either no significant change or improvement in IQ scores pre- to post-liver transplantation. Greater variability was observed in adaptive functioning scores, but the majority of patients evidenced either no significant change or improvement in adaptive scores. In general, findings may indicate that liver transplantation curtails additional central nervous system damage and neurocognitive decline providing an opportunity for stabilization or improvement in functioning. PMID:20946191

  8. Obesity and liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ayloo, Subhashini; Armstrong, John; Hurton, Scott; Molinari, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The percentage of overweight and obese patients (OPs) waiting for a liver transplant continues to increase. Despite the significant advances occurred in bariatric medicine, obesity is still considered a relative contraindication to liver transplantation (LT). The main aim of this review is to appraise the literature on the outcomes of OPs undergoing LT, treatments that might reduce their weight before, during or after surgery, and discuss some of the controversies and limitations of the current knowledge with the intent of highlighting areas where future research is needed. PMID:26421262

  9. Adrenalectomy for solitary metastasis of Hepatocellular carcinoma post liver transplantation: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Jalbani, Imran Khan; Nazim, Syed M; Tariq, Muhammad Usman; Abbas, Farahat

    2016-01-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is the treatment of choice for localized hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) associated with cirrhosis. Extra hepatic metastasis is the most common cause of death in these patients. There is very little evidence regarding the natural history and treatment options for patients developing HCC recurrence after LT. Surgical resection offers a unique opportunity for solitary metastasis. We report a 61 year old male with solitary right adrenal metastasis 15 months post LT which was managed with open adrenalectomy. The patient is alive and disease free 24 months after the surgery. The case, histo-pathological findings and literature review is discussed.

  10. Diaphragmatic Hernia After Pediatric Liver Transplant.

    PubMed

    Kirnap, Mahir; Akdur, Aydincan; Ozcay, Figen; Soy, Ebru; Coskun, Mehmet; Moray, Gokhan; Haberal, Mehmet

    2015-10-01

    Diaphragmatic hernia is an unusual complication after pediatric liver transplant. Nearly half of bowel obstruction cases, which require surgical intervention in liver transplant patients, are caused by diaphragmatic hernia. The smaller patients are at risk for higher rates of diaphragmatic complication after pediatric liver transplant, but diaphragmatic hernia has not been reported as a unique occurrence. Here, we report 3 cases of diaphragmatic hernia after liver transplant and discuss the possible contributing factors. Diaphragmatic hernia should nevertheless be added to the list of potential complications after liver transplant in the pediatric population. Pediatric transplant physicians and surgeons should be aware of this complication so that it is recognized promptly in both acute and nonacute settings and appropriate action is taken.

  11. Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis in liver transplant recipients: a report of 2 cases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyo Won; Cho, Chan Woo; Lee, Nuri; Lee, Sanghoon; Kim, Jong Man; Choi, Gyu-Seong; Kwon, Choon Hyuck David; Lee, Suk-Koo

    2017-01-01

    Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) is a rare cause of intestinal obstruction by a thick fibrous membrane wrapping around the small intestine. It is a possible complication after liver transplantation (LT) that can be fatal. This report describes 2 cases of EPS after LT that were successfully treated with surgery, corticosteroids, tamoxifen, and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor. After treatment in both cases, the patients were able to start oral feeding and have been symptom free for more than 1 year. These cases suggests that for the management of EPS, surgical treatment is mandatory when the patients present with symptoms of intestinal obstruction or if there are findings suggestive of decreased mural perfusion. Surgery should be accompanied with medical treatment to prevent the relapse of EPS. PMID:28289671

  12. Patient selection for liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Carrion, Andres F; Aye, Lydia; Martin, Paul

    2013-08-01

    Improved outcomes in liver transplant recipients reflect advances in surgical technique, post-operative care, immunosuppression as well as better selection of potential candidates. The pre-transplant evaluation is a multidisciplinary process intended to recognize and treat important comorbid conditions that may impair outcomes during the peri- and post-transplant periods. Important psychosocial issues should also be ascertained and tackled early during the pre-transplant evaluation with an overarching intention to improve the success of liver transplantation.

  13. Interventional radiology in living donor liver transplant.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Fan; Ou, Hsin-You; Yu, Chun-Yen; Tsang, Leo Leung-Chit; Huang, Tung-Liang; Chen, Tai-Yi; Hsu, Hsien-Wen; Concerjero, Allan M; Wang, Chih-Chi; Wang, Shih-Ho; Lin, Tsan-Shiun; Liu, Yueh-Wei; Yong, Chee-Chien; Lin, Yu-Hung; Lin, Chih-Che; Chiu, King-Wah; Jawan, Bruno; Eng, Hock-Liew; Chen, Chao-Long

    2014-05-28

    The shortage of deceased donor liver grafts led to the use of living donor liver transplant (LDLT). Patients who undergo LDLT have a higher risk of complications than those who undergo deceased donor liver transplantation (LT). Interventional radiology has acquired a key role in every LT program by treating the majority of vascular and non-vascular post-transplant complications, improving graft and patient survival and avoiding, in the majority of cases, surgical revision and/or re-transplant. The aim of this paper is to review indications, diagnostic modalities, technical considerations, achievements and potential complications of interventional radiology procedures after LDLT.

  14. Salvage liver transplantation for hepatic gas gangrene.

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, David Jérémie; Grégoire, Emilie; Hardwigsen, Jean; Le Treut, Yves Patrice

    2012-09-01

    Hepatic gas gangrene is an uncommon situation mainly due to bacterial infection by Clostridium perfringens. It remains a life-threatening condition associated with a high mortality rate. Quick diagnosis and aggressive therapy including liver transplantation should be proposed to improve the outcome. This report describes a rare case of hepatic gas gangrene on native liver, secondary to iatrogenic hepatic artery thrombosis and instrumental biliary tree infection, which was successfully treated by liver transplantation.

  15. Cetuximab as treatment for head and neck cancer patients with a previous liver transplant: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Holguin, Francia; Rubió-Casadevall, Jordi; Saigi, Maria; Marruecos, Jordi; Taberna, Miren; Tobed, Marc; Maños, Manuel; Mesía, Ricard

    2016-07-05

    Cetuximab is a monoclonal antibody against epidermal growth factor receptor useful in the treatment of patients with Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma combined with radiotherapy or chemotherapy. Its pharmacokinetics are not influenced by hepatic status and there are no specific warnings concerning its indication in patients with impaired hepatic function. Patients with a previous liver transplant are at risk for hepatic toxicity and use immunosupressants to avoid rejection that can interact with other drugs. We present two cases of patients with a previous liver transplant in which cetuximab was administered to treat head and neck cancer.

  16. Lymphedema tarda after liver transplantation: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Saab, Sammy; Nguyen, Stephen; Collins, James; Kunder, Gregg; Busuttil, Ronald W

    2006-12-01

    We present a patient with lymphedema that developed after orthotopic liver transplantation. The cause of the posttransplant lymphedema was likely related to a developmental abnormality of the lymphatic system that was exaggerated by refractory chylous ascites. A peritoneal fluid with a milky appearance, chylous ascites is rich in triglyceride and is caused by the obstruction or disruption of abdominal lymphatic channels. It is a rare complication that may develop after trauma or abdominal surgery or as a result of a malignant disease, and it is even more uncommon after liver transplantation. Therapy for chylous ascites involves treating its underlying cause. In the patient we describe, lymphedema tarda, which was diagnosed 6 months after liver transplantation, was likely caused by chylous ascites and a developmental abnormality of the lymphatic system.

  17. Update on liver transplants in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Faraj, Walid; Haydar, Ali; Nounou, Ghina El; Naaj, Abdallah Abou El; Khoury, Ghattas; Jabbour, Samar; Khalife, Mohamed

    2015-09-01

    Objective-To review all liver transplants performed at the American University of Beirut Medical Center from 1998 to present. Materials and Methods-From 1998 to present, 21 liver transplants (15 into adults and 6 into children) were performed at the American University of Beirut Medical Center. Of the 21 transplants, 5 were living related liver transplants. Results-Patient survival was 76% at 1, 5, and 10 years. Five recipients died at a median of 9 (range, 1-56) days after transplant. Causes of death included 1 case of severe cellular rejection, 1 case of portal and hepatic artery thrombosis, 1 case of intraoperative cardiac arrest, and 2 cases of primary nonfunction. Two biliary complications and 2 major vascular complications also occurred. All 16 survivors are well, with normal findings on liver function tests at a median follow-up time of 93 (range, 10-185) months after transplant. Conclusions-Although our numbers are small, the 10-year survival rate is comparable to reported rates for other series around the world. Deceased organ donations must be encouraged so that we can perform more transplants. As a source of organs, living related liver transplant is important; however, it cannot replace deceased donation.

  18. A Case of Successful Conservative Treatment for Chylous Ascites After Living-Donor Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Shiba, Hiroaki; Wakiyama, Shigeki; Gocho, Takeshi; Ishida, Yuichi; Misawa, Takeyuki; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2012-01-01

    A 46-year-old man underwent living-donor liver transplantation and splenectomy for primary biliary cirrhosis. On postoperative day 22, cloudiness of ascites increased, and triglyceride concentration in ascites was as high as 1046 mg/dL. With a diagnosis of chylous ascites, total parenteral nutrition was started. Nine days after starting total parenteral nutrition, cloudiness of ascites decreased, and triglycerides in ascites decreased to 93 mg/dL. Oral intake was restarted, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 46. Chylous ascites is a rare complication after living-donor liver transplantation for which total parenteral nutrition may be useful. PMID:23294080

  19. Curative Treatment of Ornithine Transcarbamylase Deficiency With a Liver Transplant: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Shamsaeefar, Alireza; Nikeghbalian, Saman; Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen; Kazemi, Kourosh; Motazedian, Nasrin; Geramizadeh, Bita; Malekhosseini, Seyed Ali

    2016-07-22

    One of the X chromosome-linked disorders is ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency in the urea cycle. This disorder results in increased ammonia and glutamine in the blood. Accumulation of these metabolites without treatment causes brain edema, which often progresses to coma and death. This study describes a 5-year-old girl with ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency who presented with hyperammonemic encephalopathy that was successfully treated with an orthotropic liver transplant. Recently, liver transplant has been introduced as an alternative treatment for patients with ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency.

  20. Metastases of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor to the liver as extremely rare indication for liver transplantation in children. Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Hor; Broniszczak, Dorota; Markiewicz-Kijewska, Małgorzata; Ciopiński, Mateusz; Teisseyre, Joanna; Kluge, Przemysław; Dembowska-Bagińska, Bożenna; Kościesza, Andrzej; Socha, Piotr; Kaliciński, Piotr

    2016-09-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NET) are extremely rare in children (0.75 cases per 100,000 children and adolescents a year) and the majority of these tumors are benign or present low grade of malignancy. According to the American registry Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program of the National Cancer Institute, less than 2% of all neuroendocrine tumors in children occur in the pancreas, making it a rare site for these tumors. The majority of them are found in children over 10years of age, especially those with malignant potential. Treatment of NET consists of different methods: surgery, somatostatin analogues and chemotherapy. Radical surgical resection remains the standard of treatment; however, it is not always feasible because of distant metastases. The authors present a case report of pancreatic NET with multiple metastases to the liver. The patient was treated with pancreatic resection and liver transplantation for liver metastases. Prior to liver transplantation, the patient was treated with somatostatin analogues, sunitinib and chemotherapy. Management of liver metastases with liver transplantation is discussed.

  1. Herpes simplex hepatitis after liver transplantation: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Côté-Daigneault, J; Carrier, F M; Toledano, K; Wartelle-Bladu, C; Willems, B

    2014-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) hepatitis is an uncommon cause of liver failure, but may have a dramatic outcome. We herein present a case report of a liver graft infection by HSV-1 associated with liver failure and encephalitis. A complete hospital chart review of the case and a literature search were undertaken. Literature review suggests that herpes simplex acute liver failure is rare and associated with a poor prognosis, even with early treatment. Novel diagnostic and preventive approaches need to be instituted.

  2. Interventional Radiology in Liver Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Karani, John B. Yu, Dominic F.Q.C.; Kane, Pauline A.

    2005-04-15

    Radiology is a key specialty within a liver transplant program. Interventional techniques not only contribute to graft and recipient survival but also allow appropriate patient selection and ensure that recipients with severe liver decompensation, hepatocellular carcinoma or portal hypertension are transplanted with the best chance of prolonged survival. Equally inappropriate selection for these techniques may adversely affect survival. Liver transplantation is a dynamic field of innovative surgical techniques with a requirement for interventional radiology to parallel these developments. This paper reviews the current practice within a major European center for adult and pediatric transplantation.

  3. Infections After Orthotopic Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Mark; Seetharam, Anil

    2014-01-01

    Opportunistic infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality after orthotopic liver transplantation. Systemic immunosuppression renders the liver recipient susceptible to de novo infection with bacteria, viruses and fungi post-transplantation as well to reactivation of pre-existing, latent disease. Pathogens are also transmissible via the donor organ. The time from transplantation and degree of immunosuppression may guide the differential diagnosis of potential infectious agents. However, typical systemic signs and symptoms of infection are often absent or blunted after transplant and a high index of suspicion is needed. Invasive procedures are often required to procure tissue for culture and guide antimicrobial therapy. Antimicrobial prophylaxis reduces the incidence of opportunistic infections and is routinely employed in the care of patients after liver transplant. In this review, we survey common bacterial, fungal, and viral infections after orthotopic liver transplantation and highlight recent developments in their diagnosis and management. PMID:25755581

  4. Liver transplantation in alcoholic liver disease current status and controversies

    PubMed Central

    Singal, Ashwani K; Chaha, Khushdeep S; Rasheed, Khalid; Anand, Bhupinderjit S

    2013-01-01

    Alcoholic cirrhosis remains the second most common indication for liver transplantation. A comprehensive medical and psychosocial evaluation is needed when making a decision to place such patients on the transplant list. Most transplant centers worldwide need a minimum of 6 mo of alcohol abstinence for listing these patients. Patients with alcohol dependence are at high risk for relapse to alcohol use after transplantation (recidivism). These patients need to be identified and require alcohol rehabilitation treatment before transplantation. Recidivism to the level of harmful drinking is reported in about 15%-20% cases. Although, recurrent cirrhosis and graft loss from recidivism is rare, occurring in less than 5% of all alcoholic cirrhosis-related transplants, harmful drinking in the post-transplant period does impact the long-term outcome. The development of metabolic syndrome with cardiovascular events and de novo malignancy are important contributors to non liver-related mortality amongst transplants for alcoholic liver disease. Surveillance protocols for earlier detection of de novo malignancy are needed to improve the long-term outcome. The need for a minimum of 6 mo of abstinence before listing makes transplant a nonviable option for patients with severe alcoholic hepatitis who do not respond to corticosteroids. Emerging data from retrospective and prospective studies has challenged the 6 mo rule, and beneficial effects of liver transplantation have been reported in select patients with a first episode of severe alcoholic hepatitis who are unresponsive to steroids. PMID:24106395

  5. Pre-Liver Transplant Transthoracic Echocardiogram Findings and 6-Month Post-Transplant Outcomes: A Case-Control Analysis.

    PubMed

    Konerman, Monica A; Price, Jennifer C; Campbell, Catherine Y; Eluri, Swathi; Gurakar, Ahmet; Hamilton, James; Li, Zhiping

    2016-07-05

    BACKGROUND Cardiopulmonary (CP) outcomes remain a leading cause of morbidity and mortality following liver transplantation (LT). The optimal CP risk stratification of LT candidates remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of pre-LT transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) findings and 6-month post-LT outcomes. MATERIAL AND METHODS This retrospective review analyzed adults who underwent LT, comparing those who died within 6 months of LT (cases; n=38) with age- and sex-matched patients who survived >6 months (controls; n=38). Cases were categorized by cause of death (COD) defined as either a primary CP process (n=20) or a non-CP process (n=18). Data were analyzed using logistic regression and survival analysis was performed using Kaplan-Meier curves. RESULTS There was a higher odds of death within 6 months of LT with ≥ mild mitral regurgitation (OR 3.44, p=0.03) or an incomplete assessment of right ventricular systolic function (RVSF) (OR 24, p=0.004). On subgroup analysis, these findings only persisted in patients with a CP COD. Patients with CP COD were older (61 vs. 54.5, p=0.04), had longer intervals between TTE and LT (122 vs. 29 days, p=0.05), less complete assessments of RVSF (p=0.009), and lower RV fractional area change (p=0.04) compared to patients with non-CP COD. CONCLUSIONS Multiple TTE parameters were associated with patients who died within 6 months of LT, and in particular patients with a CP COD. Our findings suggest that pre-LT TTEs can convey useful CP risk stratification information and emphasizes the importance of adequately assessing these parameters prior to LT.

  6. Child-to-Adult Liver Transplantation With Donation After Cardiac Death Donors: Three Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liangshuo; Liu, Xuemin; Zhang, Xiaogang; Yu, Liang; Sha, Huanchen; Zhou, Ying; Tian, Min; Shi, Jianhua; Wang, Wanli; Liu, Chang; Guo, Kun; Lv, Yi; Wang, Bo

    2016-02-01

    Development of organ transplantation is restricted by the discrepancy between the lack of donors and increasing number of patients. The outcome of pediatric donors transplanted into adult recipients especially with donation after circulatory death (DCD) pattern has not been well studied. The aim of this paper is to describe our experience of 3 successful DCD donor child-to-adult liver transplantations lately. Three DCD donors were separately 7, 5, and 8 years old. The ratio between donor graft weight and recipient body weight was 1.42%, 1.00%, and 1.33%, respectively. Ratio between the volume of donor liver and the expected liver volume was 0.65, 0.46, and 0.60. Splenectomy was undertaken for the second recipient according to the portal vein pressure (PVP) which was observed during the operation. Two out of 3 of the recipients suffered with acute kidney injury and got recovered after renal replacement therapy. The first recipient also went through early allograft dysfunction and upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The hospital course of the third recipient was uneventful. After 1 year of follow-up visit, the first and second recipients maintain good quality of life and liver function. The third patient was followed up for 5 months until now and recovered well. DCD child-to-adult liver transplantation should only be used for comparatively matched donor and recipient. PVP should be monitored during the operation. The short-term efficacy is good, but long-term follow-up and clinical study with large sample evaluation are still needed.

  7. Liver transplant for cholestatic liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Carrion, Andres F; Bhamidimarri, Kalyan Ram

    2013-05-01

    Cholestatic liver diseases include a group of diverse disorders with different epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical course, and prognosis. Despite significant advances in the clinical care of patients with cholestatic liver diseases, liver transplant (LT) remains the only definitive therapy for end-stage liver disease, regardless of the underlying cause. As per the United Network for Organ Sharing database, the rate of cadaveric LT for cholestatic liver disease was 18% in 1991, 10% in 2000, and 7.8% in 2008. This review summarizes the available evidence on various common and rare cholestatic liver diseases, disease-specific issues, and pertinent aspects of LT.

  8. Nocardia liver abscess post liver transplantation - a rare presentation.

    PubMed

    Hanchnale, Pavan; Jain, Mayank; Vargese, Joy; V, Jayanthi; Rela, Mohamed

    2017-02-01

    Nocardiosis is usually a disseminated disease seen in immunocompromised individuals. We herein present a rare case of isolated Nocardia liver abscess post liver transplantation. The patient responded well to treatment and is on long-term antibiotics for Nocardia infection. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Intracranial tuberculoma in a liver transplant patient: first reported case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Corey; Meyers, Burt; Humayun Gultekin, S; Liu, Bin; Zhang, David Y

    2003-01-01

    A 66-year-old female who had undergone an orthotopic liver transplant two years before admission was admitted with fever and neurological symptoms of several days' duration. Following an extensive work-up, which revealed positive intracranial lesions on computed typography and magnetic resonance imaging, the patient was begun on broad spectrum antimicrobials including corticosteroids. The patient responded though the etiology of infection remained unclear. After a stereotactic biopsy was performed revealing granulomas and acid-fast bacilli, the patient was started on antituberculous medications. A review of the literature reveals that the rare occurrence of intracranial tuberculoma should be considered in an orthotopic liver transplant (OLT) patient with central nervous system pathology.

  10. Patterns of alcohol consumption after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, H; Boulton, R; Gunson, B; Hubscher, S; Neuberger, J

    1998-01-01

    Background—Uncertainty exists about the extent and consequences of a return to alcohol consumption after liver transplantation for alcoholic liver disease (ALD). 
Aims—To determine the prevalence and consequences of alcohol consumption in patients transplanted for ALD. 
Methods—A retrospective case controlled study of all patients transplanted for ALD at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, between 1987 and 1996. 
Results—Seventy patients with ALD were transplanted, of which 59 survived more than three months; 56 were interviewed. Twenty eight had consumed some alcohol after transplantation; for the nine "heavy drinkers" (HD), the median time to resumption of alcohol intake was six months and for the 19 "moderate drinkers" (MD) it was eight months. There was no significant difference in episodes of acute rejection or compliance with medication between those who were abstinent, MD, or HD. Histological evidence of liver injury was common in ALD patients who had returned to drink. Mild fatty change was found in 1/11 biopsy specimens from abstinent patients but moderate to severe fatty change and ballooned hepatocytes were seen in 3/5 MD and 2/5 HD specimens. Two HD patients had early fibrosis. One HD patient has died of alcohol related complications. 
Conclusions—Moderate to heavy alcohol consumption occurs in patients transplanted for ALD. Patient recall of abstinence advice is unreliable, and patients return to alcohol mainly within the first year after liver transplantation. Return to alcohol consumption after liver transplantation is associated with rapid development of histological liver injury including fibrosis. 

 Keywords: alcohol consumption; liver transplantation PMID:9771419

  11. Pediatric Liver Transplantation: Our Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Basturk, Ahmet; Yılmaz, Aygen; Sayar, Ersin; Dinçhan, Ayhan; Aliosmanoğlu, İbrahim; Erbiş, Halil; Aydınlı, Bülent; Artan, Reha

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of our study was to evaluate our liver transplant pediatric patients and to report our experience in the complications and the long-term follow-up results. Materials and Methods: Patients between the ages of 0 and 18 years, who had liver transplantation in the organ transplantation center of our university hospital between 1997 and 2016, were included in the study. The age, sex, indications for the liver transplantation, complications after the transplantation, and long-term follow-up findings were retrospectively evaluated. The obtained results were analyzed with statistical methods. Results: In our organ transplantation center, 62 pediatric liver transplantations were carried out since 1997. The mean age of our patients was 7.3 years (6.5 months–17 years). The 4 most common reasons for liver transplantation were: Wilson’s disease (n=10; 16.3%), biliary atresia (n=9; 14.5%), progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (n=8; 12.9%), and cryptogenic cirrhosis (n=7; 11.3%). The mortality rate after transplantation was 19.6% (12 of the total 62 patients). The observed acute and chronic rejection rates were 34% and 4.9%, respectively. Thrombosis (9.6%) was observed in the hepatic artery (4.8%) and portal vein (4.8%). Bile leakage and biliary stricture rates were 31% and 11%, respectively. 1-year and 5-year survival rates of our patients were 87% and 84%, respectively. Conclusion: The morbidity and mortality rates in our organ transplantation center, regarding pediatric liver transplantations, are consistent with the literature. PMID:28149148

  12. Nutritional status and liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Merli, Manuela; Giusto, Michela; Giannelli, Valerio; Lucidi, Cristina; Riggio, Oliviero

    2011-12-01

    Chronic liver disease has a profound effect on nutritional status and undernourishment is almost universally present in patients with end-stage liver disease undergoing liver transplantation. In the last decades, due to epidemiological changes, a trend showing an increase in patients with end-stage liver disease and associated obesity has also been reported in developed countries. Nutrition abnormalities may influence the outcome after transplantation therefore, the importance to carefully assess the nutritional status in the work-up of patients candidates for liver transplantation is widely accepted. More attention has been given to malnourished patients as they represent the greater number. The subjective global nutritional assessment and anthropometric measurements are recognized in current guidelines to be adequate in identifying those patients at risk of malnutrition. Cirrhotic patients with a depletion in lean body mass and fat deposits have an increased surgical risk and malnutrition may impact on morbidity, mortality and costs in the post-transplantation setting. For this reason an adequate calorie and protein intake should always be ensured to malnourished cirrhotic patient either through the diet, or using oral nutritional supplements or by enteral or parenteral nutrition although studies supporting the efficacy of nutritional supplementation in improving the clinical outcomes after transplantation are still scarce. When liver function is restored, an amelioration in the nutritional status is expected. After liver transplantation in fact dietary intake rapidly normalizes and fat mass is progressively regained while the recovery of muscle mass can be slower. In some patients unregulated weight gain may lead to over-nutrition and may favor metabolic disorders (hypertension, hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia). This condition, defined as 'metabolic syndrome', may play a negative role on the overall survival of liver transplant patients. In this report we review

  13. Lipids in liver transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Hüsing, Anna; Kabar, Iyad; Schmidt, Hartmut H

    2016-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia is very common after liver transplantation and can be observed in up to 71% of patients. The etiology of lipid disorders in these patients is multifactorial, with different lipid profiles observed depending on the immunosuppressive agents administered and the presence of additional risk factors, such as obesity, diabetes mellitus and nutrition. Due to recent improvements in survival of liver transplant recipients, the prevention of cardiovascular events has become more important, especially as approximately 64% of liver transplant recipients present with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. Management of dyslipidemia and of other modifiable cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes and smoking, has therefore become essential in these patients. Treatment of hyperlipidemia after liver transplantation consists of life style modification, modifying the dose or type of immunosuppressive agents and use of lipid lowering agents. At the start of administration of lipid lowering medications, it is important to monitor drug-drug interactions, especially between lipid lowering agents and immunosuppressive drugs. Furthermore, as combinations of various lipid lowering drugs can lead to severe side effects, such as myopathies and rhabdomyolysis, these combinations should therefore be avoided. To our knowledge, there are no current guidelines targeting the management of lipid metabolism disorders in liver transplant recipients. This paper therefore recommends an approach of managing lipid abnormalities occurring after liver transplantation. PMID:27022213

  14. Chronic hepatitis C and liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Davis, Gary L

    2004-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a worldwide health problem. Approximately 4 million people in the United States are chronically infected with HCV. The incidence of infection peaked between 2 and 3 decades ago, and we are now beginning to see an increase in the complications of cirrhosis from HCV. This trend is expected to continue for another 2 to 3 decades. Survival is poor once complications of cirrhosis, such as liver failure or hepatocellular carcinoma, ensue, and liver transplantation is often the only option. Complications of chronic HCV are the most common indication for liver transplantation, accounting for more than 40% of transplants performed in the United States and Europe. HCV recurs in all patients and rapid development of hepatic fibrosis is very common. Several strategies have been proposed to reduce the risk of graft loss from recurrent HCV infection after transplantation, as the progression of the resulting liver disease is rapid. Although antiviral treatment is successful in some patients, it is extremely difficult to administer and requires dose reductions in the majority of cases. Retransplantation in the current era of the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) system for prioritizing listing for transplant is associated with very low survival rates at a high cost. Furthermore, the system raises difficult ethical issues of utilization of limited resources and fairness to other transplant candidates.

  15. Hepatitis C and liver transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Robert S.

    2005-08-01

    Liver transplantation is a life-saving therapy to correct liver failure, portal hypertension and hepatocellular carcinoma arising from hepatitis C infection. But despite the successful use of living donors and improvements in immunosuppression and antiviral therapy, organ demand continues to outstrip supply and recurrent hepatitis C with accelerated progression to cirrhosis of the graft is a frequent cause of graft loss and the need for retransplantation. Appropriate selection of candidates and timing of transplantation, coupled with better pre- and post-transplant antiviral therapy, are needed to improve outcomes.

  16. Scedosporiosis in a Combined Kidney and Liver Transplant Recipient: A Case Report of Possible Transmission from a Near-Drowning Donor

    PubMed Central

    Nadeem, Iram; Gunabushanam, Vikraman; Sahajpal, Ajay; Kramer, David J.; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Scedosporium spp. are saprobic fungi that cause serious infections in immunocompromised hosts and in near-drowning victims. Solid organ transplant recipients are at increased risk of scedosporiosis as they require aggressive immunosuppression to prevent allograft rejection. We present a case of disseminated Scedosporium apiospermum infection occurring in the recipient of a combined kidney and liver transplantation whose organs were donated by a near-drowning victim and review the literature of scedosporiosis in solid organ transplantation. PMID:28070441

  17. ACUTE APENDICITIS IN LIVER TRANSPLANT RECIPIENTS

    PubMed Central

    da FONSECA-NETO, Olival Cirilo Lucena; LIMA, Heloise Caroline de Souza; de MELO, Paulo Sérgio Vieira; LEMOS, Roberto; LEITÃO, Laércio; AMORIM, Américo Gusmão; LACERDA, Cláudio Moura

    2016-01-01

    Background : Appendicitis is a common cause of emergency surgery that in the population undergoing organ transplantation presents a rare incidence due to late diagnosis and treatment. Aim : To report the occurrence of acute appendicitis in a cohort of liver transplant recipients. Methods : Retrospective analysis in a period of 12 years among 925 liver transplants, in witch five cases of acute appendicitis were encountered. Results : Appendicitis occurred between three and 46 months after liver transplantation. The age ranged between 15 and 58 years. There were three men and two women. The clinical presentations varied, but not discordant from those found in non-transplanted patients. Pain was a symptom found in all patients, in two cases well located in the right iliac fossa (40%). Two patients had symptoms characteristic of peritoneal irritation (40%) and one patient had abdominal distention (20%). All patients were submitted to laparotomies. In 20% there were no complications. In 80% was performed appendectomy complicated by suppuration (40%) or perforation (40%). Superficial infection of the surgical site occurred in two patients, requiring clinical management. The hospital stay ranged from 48 h to 45 days. Conclusion : Acute appendicitis after liver transplantation is a rare event being associated with a high rate of drilling, due to delays in diagnosis and therapy, and an increase in hospital stay. PMID:27120736

  18. Liver Transplantation for Unresectable Metastases from Colon Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Caicedo, Luis Armando; Buitrago, Diego; Thomas, Laura S.; Villegas, Jorge I.; Duque, Mauricio; Serrano, Oscar; Arrunategui, Ana M.; Restrepo, Juan Guillermo; Echeverri, Gabriel Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Liver transplantation is an option that improves quality of life and prolongs life expectancy in patients with different types of liver disease. Liver transplantation is controversial for colorectal metastases and is not recommended in clinical practice guidelines. In this case report, we present, to our knowledge, the first liver transplantation for colorectal metastases conducted in Colombia, with a successful follow-up of more than 2 years. Patients with these characteristics who underwent liver transplantation experience reduced mortality and exponentially improved quality of life. PMID:28203128

  19. Is "intra-operating room" thromboelastometry useful in liver transplantation? A case-control study in 303 patients.

    PubMed

    Alamo, J-M; León, A; Mellado, P; Bernal, C; Marín, L M; Cepeda, C; Suárez, G; Serrano, J; Padillo, J; Gómez, M-Á

    2013-01-01

    Coagulation monitoring during liver transplantation (LT) is, even today, fundamental to reduce blood loss during surgery. Thromboelastometry (TEM) is a proven technique for controlling the various parameters that influence coagulation. However, there are no studies linking "intra-operating room" TEM (orTEM) with LT outcomes. We describe a case-control study in 303 liver graft recipients analyzing variables associated with operative complications and long-term LT outcomes. The results showed that orTEM reduced the use of blood products in patients with Model for End-Stage Liver Disease scores of ≥ 21, retransplantation, and high surgical difficulty and important intraoperative bleeding. In addition, results in survival and postoperative complications were better when orTEM was used. In conclusion, we confirm that use of orTEM is associated with less use of blood products and a lower rate of complications after LT.

  20. Gastric cancer following a liver transplantation for glycogen storage disease type Ia (von Gierke disease): A case report.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hua; Bian, Jianmin; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Zhaoming; Ding, Aixing

    2014-12-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia; also termed von Gierke disease) is an inherited metabolic disorder resulting from a glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency. Liver transplantation is considered to be the most effective treatment for GSD-Ia patients. In the present study, the case of a patient with GSD-Ia who received a liver transplantation at 17 years of age is presented. During the 12 years following transplantation, the patient's quality of life markedly improved. However, recently, the patient was diagnosed with de novo gastric cancer following a biopsy. Thus, a total gastrectomy with lymph node dissection was performed and the tumor was histologically determined to be a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma (histopathological stage, pT4N1M0). The patient recovered well and was discharged on postoperative day 10 without any complications. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of de novo gastric cancer in a patient with GSD-Ia to be reported.

  1. Early-onset EBV-positive post-transplant plasmablastic lymphoma arising in a liver allograft: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Benítez, Carlos E; Rey, Paula; Zoroquiaín, Pablo; Martínez, Jorge; Ramírez, Pablo; Arrese, Marco; Pérez-Ayuso, Rosa María; Valbuena, José R

    2013-08-01

    We report a case of a 51-year-old man who received a cadaveric liver allograft for autoimmune and hepatopulmonary syndrome. The patient was admitted with symptoms of progressive vomiting and diarrhea 16 months after transplantation. Laboratory studies showed abnormal liver functions, and abdominal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a 76-mm heterogeneous mass in the liver. Histological examination showed a malignant lymphoid neoplasm with plasmablastic features. Plasmablastic lymphoma (PL) is rare in the post-transplantation period. To the best of our knowledge, only 25 well-documented cases of posttransplant PL, including ours, have been described.

  2. Hepatocyte transplantation in children with liver cell failure

    PubMed Central

    Hamooda, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Patients with hepatic failure and liver-based metabolic disorders require management which is both costly and complex. Hepatocyte transplantation has been very encouraging as an alternative to organ transplantation for liver disease treatment, and studies in rodents, show that transplants involving isolated liver cells can reverse hepatic failure, and correct various metabolic deficiencies of the liver. This 2016 review is based on a literature search using PubMed including original articles, reviews, cases and clinical guidelines. The search terms were “hepatocyte transplantation”, “liver transplantation”, “liver cell failure”, “metabolic liver disorders”, “orthotropic liver transplantation”, “hepatocytes” and “stem cell transplantation”. The goal of this review is to summarize the significance of hepatocyte transplantation, the sources of hepatocytes and the barriers of hepatocyte transplantation using a detailed review of literature. Our review shows that treatment of patients with liver disease by hepatocyte transplantation has expanded exponentially, especially for patients suffering from liver-based metabolic disorders. Once hepatocyte transplantation has been shown to effectively replace organ transplantation for a portion of patients with life-threatening liver metabolic diseases and those with liver failure it will make cell therapy effective and available for a broad population of patients with liver disorders. PMID:27957309

  3. When Your Child Needs a Liver Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2-Year-Old When Your Child Needs a Liver Transplant KidsHealth > For Parents > When Your Child Needs ... regular checkups to monitor liver function. Causes of Liver Failure The liver — a soft, triangular-shaped organ — ...

  4. The history of liver transplantation in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Moray, Gökhan; Arslan, Gülnaz; Haberal, Mehmet

    2014-03-01

    Liver transplantation is the definitive treatment for end-stage liver diseases. The first successful liver transplant was performed in the United States by Thomas Starzl in 1967. The first successful solid organ transplant in Turkey was a living-related kidney transplant performed by Dr. Haberal in 1975. After much effort by Dr. Haberal, the Turkish parliament enacted a law about organ transplantation in 1979. After clinical and experimental studies, the first liver transplant in Turkey was performed by Dr. Haberal in 1988. The first successful partial living-donor liver transplant in children in Turkey was performed by the same team on March 15, 1990. On April 24, 1990, the first living-donor liver transplant was performed on a child in Turkey using a left lateral segment by Dr. Haberal and coworkers. On May 16, 1992, Dr. Haberal performed a simultaneous living-donor liver and kidney transplantation to an adult from the same donor. There currently are 30 liver transplantation centers in Turkey. According to data from the Ministry of Health, there presently are 2065 patients in Turkey who are waiting for a liver transplantation. From January 2002 to June 2013, there were 6091 liver transplants performed in Turkey (4020 living-donor [66% ] and 2071 deceased donor liver transplants [34% ]). From January 2011 to June 2013, there were 2514 patients who had liver transplants in Turkey, and 437 patients (17%) died. The number of liver transplants per year in Turkey reached 1000 transplants in 2012 and more than 1150 transplants in 2013 (15.1/million/y). Therefore, Turkey has one of the highest volumes of liver transplantation per population worldwide, with 90% survival within 1 year after transplantation.

  5. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation after living-related liver transplant.

    PubMed

    Gedik, Ender; Çelik, Muhammet Reha; Otan, Emrah; Dişli, Olcay Murat; Erdil, Nevzat; Bayındır, Yaşar; Kutlu, Ramazan; Yılmaz, Sezai

    2015-04-01

    Various types of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation methods have been used in liver transplant operations. The main indications are portopulmonary or hepatopulmonary syndromes and other cardiorespiratory failure syndromes that are refractory to conventional therapy. There is little literature available about extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, especially after liver transplant. We describe our experience with 2 patients who had living-related liver transplant. A 69-year-old woman had refractory aspergillosis pneumonia and underwent pumpless extracorporeal lung assist therapy 4 weeks after liver transplant. An 8-month-old boy with biliary atresia underwent urgent liver transplant; he received venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy on postoperative day 1. Despite our unsuccessful experience with 2 patients, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and pumpless extracorporeal lung assist therapy for liver transplant patients may improve prognosis in selected cases.

  6. A case of uneventful ABO-incompatible liver transplantation from a deceased donor managed with routine immunosuppressive treatment.

    PubMed

    Tümgör, Gökhan; Tuncer, Recep; Yıldızdaş, Dinçer; Ülkü, Abdullah; Akcam, Atılgan Tolga; Demiryürek, Haluk

    2014-12-01

    ABO-incompatible liver transplantation (ILT) was formerly contraindicated because of the increased risk of antibody-mediated humoral graft rejection due to preformed anti-A/-B antibodies on recipient endothelial cells. A 2.5-year-old girl with end-stage liver disease underwent cadaveric donation ILT because of acute liver failure and esophageal variceal bleeding before transplantation. The patient's blood type was A Rh (-) and the donor's blood type B Rh (+). The operation and postoperative course were uneventful. The immunosuppression consisted of steroids, and tacrolimus was initiated on the day of the surgery. The patient's hemoglobin level did not change, and direct Coombs test performed daily was consistently negative. Anti-B titer was observed at a maximum of 1/8. The patient was followed up during the first year. This case of ILT from a cadaveric donor is significant because the 2.5-year-old recipient did not experience any complications after undergoing routine immunosuppressive treatment.

  7. Bacterial infection after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Il

    2014-05-28

    Infectious complications are major causes of morbidity and mortality after liver transplantation, despite recent advances in the transplant field. Bacteria, fungi, viruses and parasites can cause infection before and after transplantation. Among them, bacterial infections are predominant during the first two months post-transplantation and affect patient and graft survival. They might cause surgical site infections, including deep intra-abdominal infections, bacteremia, pneumonia, catheter-related infections and urinary tract infections. The risk factors for bacterial infections differ between the periods after transplant, and between centers. Recently, the emergence of multi-drug resistant bacteria is great concern in liver transplant (LT) patients. The instructive data about effects of infections with extended-spectrum beta lactamase producing bacteria, carbapenem-resistant gram-negative bacteria, and glycopeptide-resistant gram-positive bacteria were reported on a center-by-center basis. To prevent post-transplant bacterial infections, proper strategies need to be established based upon center-specific data and evidence from well-controlled studies. This article reviewed the recent epidemiological data, risk factors for each type of infections and important clinical issues in bacterial infection after LT.

  8. Bacterial infection after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Il

    2014-01-01

    Infectious complications are major causes of morbidity and mortality after liver transplantation, despite recent advances in the transplant field. Bacteria, fungi, viruses and parasites can cause infection before and after transplantation. Among them, bacterial infections are predominant during the first two months post-transplantation and affect patient and graft survival. They might cause surgical site infections, including deep intra-abdominal infections, bacteremia, pneumonia, catheter-related infections and urinary tract infections. The risk factors for bacterial infections differ between the periods after transplant, and between centers. Recently, the emergence of multi-drug resistant bacteria is great concern in liver transplant (LT) patients. The instructive data about effects of infections with extended-spectrum beta lactamase producing bacteria, carbapenem-resistant gram-negative bacteria, and glycopeptide-resistant gram-positive bacteria were reported on a center-by-center basis. To prevent post-transplant bacterial infections, proper strategies need to be established based upon center-specific data and evidence from well-controlled studies. This article reviewed the recent epidemiological data, risk factors for each type of infections and important clinical issues in bacterial infection after LT. PMID:24876741

  9. Infections in liver transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Fabian A; Razonable, Raymund R

    2011-01-01

    Liver transplantation is a standard life-saving procedure for the treatment of many end-stage liver diseases. The success of this procedure may be limited by infectious complications. In this article, we review the contemporary state of infectious complications during the post-operative period, with particular emphasis on those that occur most commonly during the first 6 mo after liver transplantation. Bacteria, and less commonly Candida infections, remain the predominant pathogens during the immediate post-operative period, especially during the first month, and infections caused by drug-resistant strains are emerging. Infections caused by cytomegalovirus and Aspergillus sp. present clinically during the “opportunistic” period characterized by intense immunosuppression. As newer potent immunosuppressive therapies with the major aim of reducing allograft rejection are developed, one potential adverse effect is an increase in certain infections. Hence, it is essential for liver transplant centers to have an effective approach to prevention that is based on predicted infection risk, local antimicrobial resistance patterns, and surveillance. A better understanding of the common and most important infectious complications is anticipated to lead to improvements in quality of life and survival of liver transplant recipients. PMID:21603030

  10. [III Consensus Meeting of the Spanish Society of Liver Transplantation. Hepatitis C, living-donor liver transplantation, quality of liver grafts and of liver transplantation programs].

    PubMed

    2011-10-01

    The constant updating in the field of liver transplant led to the holding of the III Consensus Meeting of the Spanish Liver Transplant Association. Three current topics of great clinical interest were debated during this meeting; transplant in patients with liver cirrhosis due to hepatitis C, live donor liver transplant and the evaluation of the quality of liver grafts. A subject of great interest to Liver Transplant Units was also discussed: the assessment of their quality.

  11. [III Consensus Meeting of the Spanish Society of Liver Transplantation. Hepatitis C, living-donor liver transplantation, quality of liver grafts and of liver transplantation programs].

    PubMed

    Herrero, J Ignacio

    2011-11-01

    The constant updating in the field of liver transplant led to the holding of the III Consensus Meeting of the Spanish Liver Transplant Association. Three current topics of great clinical interest were debated during this meeting; transplant in patients with liver cirrhosis due to hepatitis C, live donor liver transplant and the evaluation of the quality of liver grafts. A subject of great interest to Liver Transplant Units was also discussed: the assessment of their quality.

  12. Hyperkalemic distal renal tubular acidosis caused by immunosuppressant treatment with tacrolimus in a liver transplant patient: case report.

    PubMed

    Riveiro-Barciela, M; Campos-Varela, I; Tovar, J L; Vargas, V; Simón-Talero, M; Ventura-Cots, M; Crespo, M; Bilbao, I; Castells, L

    2011-12-01

    Nephrotoxicity is one of the most common side effects of long-term immunosuppressive therapy with calcineurin inhibitors. We describe a case of distal renal tubular acidosis secondary to tacrolimus administration. A 43-year-old man with end-stage liver disease due to hepatitis C and B virus infections and alcoholic cirrhosis received a liver transplantation under immunosuppressive treatment with tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil. In the postoperative period, the patient developed hyperkalemic hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis, with a normal serum anion gap and a positive urinary anion gap, suggesting distal renal tubular acidosis. We excluded other causes of hyperkalemia. Administration of intravenous bicarbonate, loop diuretics, and oral resin exchanger corrected the acidosis and potassium levels. Distal renal tubular acidosis is one of several types of nephrotoxicity induced by tacrolimus treatment, resulting from inhibition of potassium secretion in the collecting duct. Treatment to correct the acidosis and hyperkalemia should be promptly initiated, and the tacrolimus dose adjusted when possible.

  13. Liver transplantation for chronic liver disease: advances and controversies in an era of organ shortages

    PubMed Central

    Prince, M; Hudson, M

    2002-01-01

    Since liver transplantation was first performed in 1968 by Starzl et al, advances in case selection, liver surgery, anaesthetics, and immunotherapy have significantly increased the indications for and success of this operation. Liver transplantation is now a standard therapy for many end stage liver disorders as well as acute liver failure. However, while demand for cadaveric organ grafts has increased, in recent years the supply of organs has fallen. This review addresses current controversies resulting from this mismatch. In particular, methods for increasing graft availability and difficulties arising from transplantation in the context of alcohol related cirrhosis, primary liver tumours, and hepatitis C are reviewed. Together these three indications accounted for 42% of liver transplants performed for chronic liver disease in the UK in 2000. Ethical frameworks for making decisions on patients' suitability for liver transplantation have been developed in both the USA and the UK and these are also reviewed. PMID:11884694

  14. Strategic breakthrough in adult ABO-incompatible living donor liver transplantation: preliminary results of consecutive seven cases.

    PubMed

    Soejima, Yuji; Muto, Jyun; Matono, Rumi; Ninomiya, Mizuki; Ikeda, Tetsuo; Yoshizumi, Tomoharu; Uchiyama, Hideaki; Ikegami, Toru; Shirabe, Ken; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2013-01-01

    ABO-incompatibility is a major obstacle to expanding exiguous donor pools in adult liver transplantation, especially in countries where grafts from deceased donors are uncommon. We present our preliminary results of ABO-incompatible (ABO-I) adult living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) using a new, simple protocol. Seven consecutive cases of ABO-I LDLT were managed by the same protocol including pre-operative administration of a single dose of rituximab (375 mg/m(2) ) followed by three to five sessions of plasma exchange before LDLT without portal infusion therapy. The triple immunosuppression protocol consisted of tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and steroids, with mycophenolate mofetil starting seven d before LDLT. Splenectomy was performed for all cases. All patients are alive (100% survival) with a mean follow-up of 852 d (715-990 d). Neither antibody-mediated nor hyperacute rejection were encountered. There was only one episode of mild acute cellular rejection, for which steroid augmentation was effective. The median preformed isoagglutinin antibody titer before plasma exchange was 256, while the median antibody titer immediately before LDLT was 16. In conclusion, adult ABO-I LDLT results were excellent - comparable or even superior to those of ABO-compatible LDLT. ABO-I adult LDLT has now become a more applicable modality without the need for an appropriate donor.

  15. Splenic Subcapsular Hematoma After Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography in a Liver Transplant Recipient: Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Montenovo, Martin; Javed, Emran; Bakthavatsalam, Ramasamy; Reyes, Jorge

    2017-02-01

    Splenic injuries after an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography are a rare but lethal complication. We describe a subcapsular splenic hematoma requiring emergent splenectomy after an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in a liver transplant recipient.

  16. Living Donor Liver Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... instructions before and after surgery. • Have a compatible blood type. • Have an emotional tie with the recipient. • Not ... test is to find out if the donor's blood type matches the recipient’s blood type. Next, the transplant ...

  17. Liver transplantation: history, outcomes and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Meirelles, Roberto Ferreira; Salvalaggio, Paolo; de Rezende, Marcelo Bruno; Evangelista, Andréia Silva; Guardia, Bianca Della; Matielo, Celso Eduardo Lourenço; Neves, Douglas Bastos; Pandullo, Fernando Luis; Felga, Guilherme Eduardo Gonçalves; Alves, Jefferson André da Silva; Curvelo, Lilian Amorim; Diaz, Luiz Gustavo Guedes; Rusi, Marcela Balbo; Viveiros, Marcelo de Melo; de Almeida, Marcio Dias; Pedroso, Pamella Tung; Rocco, Rodrigo Andrey; Meira, Sérgio Paiva

    2015-01-01

    In 1958 Francis Moore described the orthotopic liver transplantation technique in dogs. In 1963, Starzl et al. performed the first liver transplantation. In the first five liver transplantations no patient survived more than 23 days. In 1967, stimulated by Calne who used antilymphocytic serum, Starzl began a successful series of liver transplantation. Until 1977, 200 liver transplantations were performed in the world. In that period, technical problems were overcome. Roy Calne, in 1979, used the first time cyclosporine in two patients who had undergone liver transplantation. In 1989, Starzl et al. reported a series of 1,179 consecutives patients who underwent liver transplantation and reported a survival rate between one and five years of 73% and 64%, respectively. Finally, in 1990, Starzl et al. reported successful use of tacrolimus in patents undergoing liver transplantation and who had rejection despite receiving conventional immunosuppressive treatment. Liver Transplantation Program was initiated at Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein in 1990 and so far over 1,400 transplants have been done. In 2013, 102 deceased donors liver transplantations were performed. The main indications for transplantation were hepatocellular carcinoma (38%), hepatitis C virus (33.3%) and alcohol liver cirrhosis (19.6%). Of these, 36% of patients who underwent transplantation showed biological MELD score > 30. Patient and graft survival in the first year was, 82.4% and 74.8%, respectively. A major challenge in liver transplantation field is the insufficient number of donors compared with the growing demand of transplant candidates. Thus, we emphasize that appropriated donor/receptor selection, allocation and organ preservation topics should contribute to improve the number and outcomes in liver transplantation. PMID:25993082

  18. Liver Transplant: Nutrition

    MedlinePlus

    ... poultry, eggs, fish, tofu, and soy protein. Low Sodium -- Symptoms of advanced liver disease include excess fluid ... in the legs (edema). A high level of sodium, or salt, intake increases the amount of water ...

  19. Propylthiouracil-induced acute liver failure: role of liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Carrion, Andres F; Czul, Frank; Arosemena, Leopoldo R; Selvaggi, Gennaro; Garcia, Monica T; Tekin, Akin; Tzakis, Andreas G; Martin, Paul; Ghanta, Ravi K

    2010-01-01

    Propylthiouracil- (PTU-) induced hepatotoxicity is rare but potentially lethal with a spectrum of liver injury ranging from asymptomatic elevation of transaminases to fulminant hepatic failure and death. We describe two cases of acute hepatic failure due to PTU that required liver transplantation. Differences in the clinical presentation, histological characteristics, and posttransplant management are described as well as alternative therapeutic options. Frequent monitoring for PTU-induced hepatic dysfunction is strongly advised because timely discontinuation of this drug and implementation of noninvasive therapeutic interventions may prevent progression to liver failure or even death.

  20. Living donor liver transplantation in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Marwan, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    In Egypt there is no doubt that chronic liver diseases are a major health concern. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) prevalence among the 15−59 years age group is estimated to be 14.7%. The high prevalence of chronic liver diseases has led to increasing numbers of Egyptian patients suffering from end stage liver disease (ESLD), necessitating liver transplantation (LT). We reviewed the evolution of LT in Egypt and the current status. A single center was chosen as an example to review the survival and mortality rates. To date, deceased donor liver transplantation (DDLT) has not been implemented in any program though Egyptian Parliament approved the law in 2010. Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) seemed to be the only logical choice to save many patients who are in desperate need for LT. By that time, there was increase in number of centers doing LDLT (13 centers) and increase in number of LDLT cases [2,400] with improvement of the results. Donor mortality rate is 1.66 per 1,000 donors; this comprised four donors in the Egyptian series. The exact recipient survival is not accurately known however, and the one-year, three-year and five-year survival were 73.17%, 70.83% and 64.16% respectively in the International Medical Center (IMC) in a series of 145 adult to adult living donor liver transplantation (AALDLT) cases. There was no donor mortality in this series. LDLT are now routinely and successfully performed in Egypt with reasonable donor and recipient outcomes. Organ shortage remains the biggest hurdle facing the increasing need for LT. Although LDLT had reasonable outcomes, it carries considerable risks to healthy donors. For example, it lacks cadaveric back up, and is not feasible for all patients. The initial success in LDLT should drive efforts to increase the people awareness about deceased organ donation in Egypt. PMID:27115003

  1. Living donor liver transplantation in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Amer, Khaled E; Marwan, Ibrahim

    2016-04-01

    In Egypt there is no doubt that chronic liver diseases are a major health concern. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) prevalence among the 15-59 years age group is estimated to be 14.7%. The high prevalence of chronic liver diseases has led to increasing numbers of Egyptian patients suffering from end stage liver disease (ESLD), necessitating liver transplantation (LT). We reviewed the evolution of LT in Egypt and the current status. A single center was chosen as an example to review the survival and mortality rates. To date, deceased donor liver transplantation (DDLT) has not been implemented in any program though Egyptian Parliament approved the law in 2010. Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) seemed to be the only logical choice to save many patients who are in desperate need for LT. By that time, there was increase in number of centers doing LDLT (13 centers) and increase in number of LDLT cases [2,400] with improvement of the results. Donor mortality rate is 1.66 per 1,000 donors; this comprised four donors in the Egyptian series. The exact recipient survival is not accurately known however, and the one-year, three-year and five-year survival were 73.17%, 70.83% and 64.16% respectively in the International Medical Center (IMC) in a series of 145 adult to adult living donor liver transplantation (AALDLT) cases. There was no donor mortality in this series. LDLT are now routinely and successfully performed in Egypt with reasonable donor and recipient outcomes. Organ shortage remains the biggest hurdle facing the increasing need for LT. Although LDLT had reasonable outcomes, it carries considerable risks to healthy donors. For example, it lacks cadaveric back up, and is not feasible for all patients. The initial success in LDLT should drive efforts to increase the people awareness about deceased organ donation in Egypt.

  2. Isolated bilateral Tapia’s syndrome after liver transplantation: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Bilbao, Itxarone; Dopazo, Cristina; Caralt, Mireia; Castells, Lluis; Pando, Elisabeth; Gantxegi, Amaia; Charco, Ramón

    2016-01-01

    AIM To describe one case of bilateral Tapia’s syndrome in a liver transplanted patient and to review the literature. METHODS We report a case of bilateral Tapia’s syndrome in a 50-year-old man with a history of human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus child. A liver cirrhosis and a bi-nodular hepatocellular carcinoma, who underwent liver transplantation after general anesthesia under orotracheal intubation. Uneventful extubation was performed in the intensive care unit during the following hours. On postoperative day (POD) 3, he required urgent re-laparotomy due to perihepatic hematoma complicated with respiratory gram negative bacilli infection. On POD 13, patient was extubated, but required immediate re-intubation due to severe respiratory failure. At the following day a third weaning failure occurred, requiring the performance of a percutaneous tracheostomy. Five days later, the patient was taken off mechanical ventilation and severe dysphagia, sialorrea and aphonia revealed. A computerized tomography and a magnetic resonance imaging of the head and neck excluded central nervous injury. A stroboscopy showed bilateral paralysis of vocal cords and tongue and a diagnosis of bilateral Tapia’s syndrome was performed. With conservative management, including a prompt establishment of a speech and swallowing rehabilitation program, the patient achieved full recovery within four months after liver transplantation. We carried out MEDLINE search for the term Tapia’s syndrome. The inclusion criteria had no restriction by language or year but must provide sufficient available data to exclude duplicity. We described the clinical evolution of the patients, focusing on author, year of publication, age, sex, preceding problem, history of endotracheal intubation, unilateral or bilateral presentation, diagnostic procedures, type of treatment, follow-up, and outcome. RESULTS Several authors mentioned the existence of around 70 cases, however only 54 fulfilled our

  3. The hepatic artery in orthotopic liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lerut, J. P.; Gordon, R. D.; Tzakis, A. G.; Stieber, A. C.; Iwatsuki, S.; Starzl, T. E.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Hepatic artery thrombosis (HAT) is a dreadful complication of orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). This complication occurred in 27 grafts (68% = 27/393 grafts) in 25 patients (9% = 25/313 patients). HAT was responsible for a high mortality (64% = 16/25 patients) despite a high retransplantation rate (70% = 19/27 grafts). HAT should be suspected in case of fulminant liver failure, delayed bile leak or unexplained fever of sepsis of unknown etiology occurring after liver transplantation. Pulsed doppler examination and arteriogram are the decisive diagnostic procedures. Patients presenting HAT can only be rescued by early diagnosis and retransplantation. Aneurysms of the hepatic arterial supply must also be treated urgently, either by conventional vascular repair if possible or by retransplantation, because or the high incidence of fatal rupture (3/4 patients = 75%). PMID:3049463

  4. Biomarkers for detection of alcohol consumption in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Staufer, Katharina; Yegles, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease is an established, yet controversial, indication for liver transplantation. Although an abstinence period of up to 6 mo prior to transplantation is mandatory, alcohol relapse after transplantation is a common event. In case of recurrence of heavy drinking, graft survival is significantly impaired. Guidelines on detection and surveillance of alcohol consumption in this patient cohort are lacking. This review summarizes the challenge of patient selection as well as the current knowledge on established and novel alcohol biomarkers with special focus on liver transplant candidates and recipients. PMID:27076757

  5. Pediatric liver transplantation for hepatoblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, Rebecka L.; Tiao, Greg M.; Feusner, James H.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatoblastoma is the most common pediatric liver tumor and is usually diagnosed before five years of age. Treatment consists of a combination of chemotherapy and surgery, with the goal being attainment of complete local control by surgical resection and eradication of any extrahepatic disease. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is utilized and is often beneficial in rendering tumors resectable; however, prolonged chemotherapy administration attempting to render tumors resectable by conventional resection should be avoided. For patients whose tumors are too extensive to be conventionally resected, liver transplantation can be curative and remains the treatment of choice for eligible patients otherwise incurable by conventional resection. PMID:28138611

  6. Split liver transplantation in adults

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Koji; Fujiki, Masato; Quintini, Cristiano; Aucejo, Federico N; Uso, Teresa Diago; Kelly, Dympna M; Eghtesad, Bijan; Fung, John J; Miller, Charles M

    2016-01-01

    Split liver transplantation (SLT), while widely accepted in pediatrics, remains underutilized in adults. Advancements in surgical techniques and donor-recipient matching, however, have allowed expansion of SLT from utilization of the right trisegment graft to now include use of the hemiliver graft as well. Despite less favorable outcomes in the early experience, better outcomes have been reported by experienced centers and have further validated the feasibility of SLT. Importantly, more than two decades of experience have identified key requirements for successful SLT in adults. When these requirements are met, SLT can achieve outcomes equivalent to those achieved with other types of liver transplantation for adults. However, substantial challenges, such as surgical techniques, logistics, and ethics, persist as ongoing barriers to further expansion of this highly complex procedure. This review outlines the current state of SLT in adults, focusing on donor and recipient selection based on physiology, surgical techniques, surgical outcomes, and ethical issues. PMID:27672272

  7. Cavo-caval intervention stent insertion after deceased-donor liver transplantation using side-to-side piggyback technique: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Kim, In-Gyu; Kim, Byung Seup; Jeon, Jang Yong; Kwon, Jae Woo; Kim, Joo Seop; Kim, Doo Jin; Jung, Jae Pil; Chon, Seong Eun; Kim, Han Joon; Jeon, Eui Yong; Kim, Min-Jeong; Lee, Kwanseop

    2011-08-01

    Liver transplantation with preservation of the recipient vena cava (piggyback technique) has been performed as an alternative to the conventional method. Outflow disturbance or obstruction of the vena cava in the early period after liver transplantation is associated with high morbidity and mortality. We used side-to-side cavo-caval anastomosis (modified piggyback technique) in a deceased-donor liver transplantation (DDLT) for venous outflow reconstruction. On postoperative day 9, the patient developed abdominal discomfort, and abnormal liver function showing serum total bilirubin of 6.2 mg/dl and serum AST/ALT of 297/597 IU/L. Doppler ultrasound showed mono-phasic wave forms of the hepatic vein. Computed tomography showed focal narrowing of 9.5 mm×12 mm in diameter at the cavo-caval anastomosis site. Liver biopsy was showed that there was no evidence of acute allograft rejection. Direct venogram showed stenosis of the cavo-caval anastomosis with a pressure gradient of 12 mmHg. An interventional stent was inserted in the stenotic site of the inferior vena cava, and the pressure gradient decreased to 2 mmHg. He was discharged from hospital on postoperative day 23 without any other complications. Herein we report a case of deceased-donor liver transplantation using the modified piggyback technique, who received an inferior vena cava stent due to stricture of the reconstructed orifice of the vena cava.

  8. Urea cycle disorders: A case report of a successful treatment with liver transplant and a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Foschi, Francesco Giuseppe; Morelli, Maria Cristina; Savini, Sara; Dall’Aglio, Anna Chiara; Lanzi, Arianna; Cescon, Matteo; Ercolani, Giorgio; Cucchetti, Alessandro; Pinna, Antonio Daniele; Stefanini, Giuseppe Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The urea cycle is the final pathway for nitrogen metabolism. Urea cycle disorders (UCDs) include a variety of genetic defects, which lead to inefficient urea synthesis. Elevated blood ammonium level is usually dominant in the clinical pattern and the primary manifestations affect the central nervous system. Herein, we report the case of a 17-year-old girl who was diagnosed with UCD at the age of 3. Despite a controlled diet, she was hospitalized several times for acute attacks with recurrent life risk. She came to our attention for a hyperammonemic episode. We proposed an orthotopic liver transplant (OLT) as a treatment; the patient and her family were in complete agreement. On February 28, 2007, she successfully received a transplant. Following the surgery, she has remained well, and she is currently leading a normal life. Usually for UCDs diet plays the primary therapeutic role, while OLT is often considered as a last resort. Our case report and the recent literature data on the quality of life and prognosis of traditionally treated patients vs OLT patients, support OLT as a primary intervention to prevent life-threatening acute episodes and chronic mental impairment. PMID:25852294

  9. Hydrothorax with alveolar-pleural fistula mimicking re-expansion pulmonary edema during liver transplantation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of an alveolar-pleural fistula with hepatic hydrothorax in a patient undergoing orthotropic liver transplantation, which was detected by drainage of transudate through an endotracheal tube during operation. A standard endotracheal tube was changed to a double-lumen tube to provide differential lung ventilation. The patient was diagnosed with an alveolar-pleural fistula by direct vision of an air leak during positive-pressure ventilation through a diaphragmatic incision. There was still a concern about worsening his ventilation due to persistent aspiration of pleural effusion towards the ipsilateral lung during the remaining operation period. Surgeon repaired the defect on the exposed lung surface via diaphragmatic opening. Anesthesiologists should consider an alveolar-pleural fistula as a possible differential diagnosis with re-expansion pulmonary edema when transudate emanating from the endotracheal tube is obtained in patients with massive hydrothorax. PMID:25844139

  10. [10 years of liver transplantation in Peru].

    PubMed

    Chaman Ortiz, José Carlos; Padilla Machaca, P Martín; Rondon Leyva, Carlos; Carrasco Mascaró, Felix

    2010-01-01

    The article reviews the experience in 10 years of hepatic transplants performed by The Transplant Department of the National Hospital Guillermo Almenara Irigoyen (HNGAI), describing the history, surgical outcomes in adults and children, retransplantation, combined liver-kidney transplants, complications in 72 transplants performed at the time of submission of the article.

  11. Infectious Complications After Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Maria Del Pilar; Martin, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is the standard of care for patients with decompensated cirrhosis and for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. More than 6000 liver transplants are performed annually in the United States. High patient and graft survival rates have been achieved in great part due to the availability of potent immunosuppressive agents. Systemic immunosuppression has rendered the liver recipient susceptible to de novo infections as well as reactivation of preexisting latent infections. Infections occurring during the first month post-OLT are usually nosocomial, donor-derived, or the result of a perioperative complication. The development of opportunistic infections (OIs) such as Aspergillus and the reactivation of latent infections such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis are more frequent 1 to 6 months posttransplant, when the net state of immunosuppression is the highest. Immunosuppressive therapy is tapered 6 to 12 months post-OLT; therefore, infections occurring during that time period and afterward generally resemble those of the general population. Screening strategies applied to determine the risk of an infection after transplantation and the use of prophylactic antimicrobial therapy have reduced the incidence of OIs after OLT. This article will review the various causes of infection post-OLT and the therapies used to manage complications. PMID:27134589

  12. [Liver transplantation for subcapsular haematoma during HELLP Syndrome].

    PubMed

    Descheemaeker, P-N; Compagnon, P; Lavoué, V; Seguin, P; Lechaux, D; Renaud-Giono, A; Camus, C; Meunier, B; Malledant, Y

    2009-12-01

    The hepatic rupture of a subcapsular haematoma during HELLP syndrome is a rare complication carrying a high mortality. There is no clear guideline management in the literature. We report here a case of a subcapsular haematoma which required liver transplantation.

  13. Acute renal failure in liver transplant patients: Indian study.

    PubMed

    Naik, Pradeep; Premsagar, B; Mallikarjuna, M

    2015-01-01

    The acute renal failure is the frequent medical complication observed in liver transplant patients. The objective of this study was to determine the cause of acute renal failure in post liver transplant patients. A total of 70 patients who underwent (cadaveric 52, live 18) liver transplantation were categorized based on clinical presentation into two groups, namely hepatorenal failure (HRF, n = 29), and Hepatic failure (HF, n = 41). All the patients after the liver transplant had received tacrolimus, mycophenolate and steroids. We analyzed the modification of diet in renal disease, (MDRD) serum urea, creatinine and albumin before and after 5th and 30th day of liver transplant and data was categorized into survivors and non-survivors group. In HRF survivor group, serum creatinine, and urea levels were high and, albumin, MDRD were low in pre- transplant and reached to normal levels on 30th day of post transplant, and 79.3 % of patients in this group showed resumption of normal kidney function. On the contrary in HRF nonsurvivor group, we did not observed any significant difference and 20.7 % of patients showed irreversible changes after the liver transplant. In HF survivor group, 82.9 % of liver failure patients did not show any deviation in serum creatinine, urea, albumin and MDRD, whereas in HF non survivor group, 17.1 % of liver failure patients who had HCV positive before the transplant developed acute renal failure. The levels of creatinine, urea, albumin and MDRD were normal before the transplant and on day 30th, the levels of albumin and MDRD were significantly low whereas serum urea, creatinine levels were high. In conclusion, based on these observations, an diagnosis and treatment of Acute renal failure is important among the liver transplantation cases in the early postoperative period.

  14. Treatment Experience of Severe Abdominal Infection after Orthotopic Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y-G; Wu, J-S; Jiang, B; Wang, J-H; Liu, C-P; Peng, C; Tian, B-Z

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to investigate the causes and treatment experience of severe abdominal infection after orthotopic liver transplantation. Clinical data were retrospectively analysed in perioperative severe abdominal infection of 186 orthotopic liver transplantation cases from March 2004 to November 2011. Among the 186 patients, 16 cases had severe abdominal infection: five cases had bile duct anastomotic leakage-inducing massive hydrops and infection under liver interstice, 10 cases had extensive bleeding of surgical wound leading to massive haematocele and infection around the liver, and one case had postoperative lower oesophageal fistula leakage causing massive hydrops and infection under the left diaphragm. After definite diagnosis, 12 cases underwent surgery within three days, with no death. Among the four cases that underwent surgery three days after diagnosis, one case died of multiple-organ failure five days after abdominal cavity exploration, which was performed 21 days after liver transplantation. Severe abdominal infections after liver transplantation were the most common causes of death in perioperative liver transplantation. Comprehensive treatment with efficacious antibiotics, multiple-organ support, controlled surgical removal of the lesion, and adequate drainage establishment was the key to the entire treatment.

  15. Ohio solid organ transplantation consortium criteria for liver transplantation in patients with alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Hajifathalian, Kaveh; Humberson, Annette; Hanouneh, Mohamad A; Barnes, David S; Arora, Zubin; Zein, Nizar N; Eghtesad, Bijan; Kelly, Dympna; Hanouneh, Ibrahim A

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate risk of recidivism on a case-by-case basis. METHODS From our center’s liver transplant program, we selected patients with alcoholic liver disease who were listed for transplant based on Ohio Solid Organ Transplantation Consortium (OSOTC) exception criteria. They were considered to have either a low or medium risk of recidivism, and had at least one or three or more months of abstinence, respectively. They were matched based on gender, age, and Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score to controls with alcohol-induced cirrhosis from Organ Procurement and Transplant Network data. RESULTS Thirty six patients with alcoholic liver disease were approved for listing based on OSOTC exception criteria and were matched to 72 controls. Nineteen patients (53%) with a median [Inter-quartile range (IQR)] MELD score of 24 (13) received transplant and were followed for a median of 3.4 years. They were matched to 38 controls with a median (IQR) MELD score of 25 (9). At one and five years, cumulative survival rates (± standard error) were 90% ± 7% and 92% ± 5% and 73% ± 12% and 77% ± 8% in patients and controls, respectively (Log-rank test, P = 0.837). Four (21%) patients resumed drinking by last follow-up visit. CONCLUSION Compared to traditional criteria for assessment of risk of recidivism, a careful selection process with more flexibility to evaluate eligibility on a case-by-case basis can lead to similar survival rates after transplantation. PMID:27721920

  16. Cruveilhier-Baumgarten disease in a patient with Turner syndrome: case report of a rare indication for liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Aucejo, Federico; Ibrahim, Zuhaib; Hashimoto, Koji; Quintini, Cristiano; Kelly, Dympna; Vogt, David; Eghtesad, Bijan; Fung, John; Miller, Charles; Tuthill, Ralph

    2008-03-01

    Some chromosomal alterations can be associated with vascular abnormalities. For instance, Turner syndrome can be complicated by agenesis or hypoplasia of the portal venous system causing presinusoidal portal hypertension. Liver transplantation to treat this condition overcomes portal hypertension and reconstitutes the diminished hepatic function due to severe atrophy of the portal venous inflow.

  17. Unusual biliary scan appearance in a child with a transplanted liver with hepatic arterial thrombosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Porn, U; Howman-Giles, R; Shun, A; Dorney, S; Uren, R

    2000-02-01

    A 5-year-old girl with biliary atresia and a subsequent Kasai procedure is described. She had clinical symptoms suggestive of rejection after a recent orthotopic liver transplant A hepatobiliary scan showed partial hepatic infarction and a biloma in the infarcted area.

  18. Liver transplantation in patients with situs inversus

    PubMed Central

    Todo, Satoru; Hall, Roberta; Tzakis, Andreas; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Two patients with situs inversus and biliary atresia were treated with hepatic transplantation, one with an auxiliary liver and the other with an orthotopic graft which was placed using a piggy-back technique. Both transplants functioned well initially. The auxiliary liver was rejected after 1 ½ months, and the patient died after an attempt at retransplantation many months later. The recipient of the orthotopic liver has perfect liver function 10 months postoperatively. PMID:10147625

  19. Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders following liver transplantation: Where are we now?

    PubMed Central

    Dierickx, Daan; Cardinaels, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Liver transplantation has emerged as a life-saving treatment for several patients with acute liver failure, end stage liver disease and primary hepatic malignancies. However, long term immunosuppressive therapy aiming to reduce the risk of transplant rejection increases the incidence of several complications including malignancies. This is illustrated by the observation of a high ratio between observed and expected cases of lymphoproliferative disorders following liver transplantation. Despite a huge heterogeneity in morphological appearance of these disorders ranging from reactive-like lesions to real lymphomas, they are collectively termed posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders. In this review we will provide an overview of this rare but challenging disorder as a complication of liver transplantation. PMID:26494960

  20. LIVER TRANSPLANTATION FOR CARCINOMA HEPATOCELLULAR IN SÃO PAULO: 414 CASES BY THE MILAN/BRAZIL CRITERIA

    PubMed Central

    SÁ, Gustavo Pilotto D.; VICENTINE, Fernando P. P.; SALZEDAS-NETTO, Alcides A.; de MATOS, Carla Adriana Loureiro; ROMERO, Luiz R.; TEJADA, Dario F. P.; MASSAROLLO, Paulo Celso Bosco; LOPES-FILHO, Gaspar J.; GONZALEZ, Adriano M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The criterion of Milan (CM) has been used as standard for indication of liver transplantation (LTx) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) worldwide for nearly 20 years. Several centers have adopted criteria expanded in order to increase the number of patients eligible to liver transplantation, while maintaining good survival rates. In Brazil, since 2006, the criterion of Milan/Brazil (CMB), which disregards nodules <2 cm, is adopted, including patients with a higher number of small nodules. Aim: To evaluate the outcome of liver transplantation within the CMB. Methods: The medical records of patients with HCC undergoing liver transplantation in relation to recurrence and survival by comparing CM and CMB, were analyzed. Results: 414 LTx for HCC, the survival at 1 and 5 years was 84.1 and 72.7%. Of these, 7% reached the CMB through downstaging, with survival at 1 and 5 years of 93.1 and 71.9%. The CMB patient group that exceeded the CM (8.6%) had a survival rate of 58.1% at five years. There was no statistical difference in survival between the groups CM, CMB and downstaging. Vascular invasion (p<0.001), higher nodule size (p=0.001) and number of nodules >2 cm (p=0.028) were associated with relapse. The age (p=0.001), female (p<0.001), real MELD (p<0.001), vascular invasion (p=0.045) and number of nodes >2 cm (p<0.014) were associated with worse survival. Conclusions: CMB increased by 8.6% indications of liver transplantation, and showed survival rates similar to CM. PMID:28076478

  1. Magnetic resonance venography and liver transplant complications.

    PubMed

    Strovski, Evgeny; Liu, Dave; Scudamore, Charles; Ho, Stephen; Yoshida, Eric; Klass, Darren

    2013-09-28

    Hepatic vein stenosis is a rare but serious complication following liver transplantation. Multiple modalities can be utilized to image the hepatic vasculature. Magnetic resonance venography (MRV) provides certain advantages over ultrasound, computed tomography angiography and digital subtraction venography. MRV utilizes the same imaging principles of magnetic resonance angiography in order to image the venous system. Blood pool contrast agents, specifically gadofosveset trisodium, allow for steady state imaging up to 1 h following injection, with improved visualisation of vital venous structures by utilising delayed steady state imaging. Additionally, the inherent physics properties of magnetic resonance imaging also provide excellent soft tissue detail and thus help define the extent of complications that often plague the post-liver transplant patient. This case report describes the use of gadofosveset trisodium in a patient with hepatic venous stenosis following liver transplantation. Initial venography failed to outline the stenoses and thus MRV using a blood pool contrast agent was utilised in order to delineate the anatomy and plan a therapeutic endovascular procedure.

  2. Liver transplantation in acute liver failure: A challenging scenario

    PubMed Central

    Mendizabal, Manuel; Silva, Marcelo Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Acute liver failure is a critical medical condition defined as rapid development of hepatic dysfunction associated with encephalopathy. The prognosis in these patients is highly variable and depends on the etiology, interval between jaundice and encephalopathy, age, and the degree of coagulopathy. Determining the prognosis for this population is vital. Unfortunately, prognostic models with both high sensitivity and specificity for prediction of death have not been developed. Liver transplantation has dramatically improved survival in patients with acute liver failure. Still, 25% to 45% of patients will survive with medical treatment. The identification of patients who will eventually require liver transplantation should be carefully addressed through the combination of current prognostic models and continuous medical assessment. The concerns of inaccurate selection for transplantation are significant, exposing the recipient to a complex surgery and lifelong immunosuppression. In this challenging scenario, where organ shortage remains one of the main problems, alternatives to conventional orthotopic liver transplantation, such as living-donor liver transplantation, auxiliary liver transplant, and ABO-incompatible grafts, should be explored. Although overall outcomes after liver transplantation for acute liver failure are improving, they are not yet comparable to elective transplantation. PMID:26819519

  3. Challenges in transplantation for alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Berlakovich, Gabriela A

    2014-07-07

    Transplantation for the treatment of alcoholic cirrhosis is more controversially discussed than it is for any other indication. The crucial aspect in this setting is abstinence before and after liver transplantation. We established pre-transplant selection criteria for potential transplant candidates. Provided that the underlying disease can be treated, there is no reason to withhold liver transplantation in a patient suffering from alcoholic cirrhosis. Evaluation of the patient by a multidisciplinary team, including an addiction specialist, is considered to be the gold standard. However, several centers demand a specified period of abstinence - usually 6 mo- irrespective of the specialist's assessment. The 6-mo rule is viewed critically because liver transplantation was found to clearly benefit selected patients with acute alcoholic hepatitis; the benefit was similar to that achieved for other acute indications. However, the discussion may well be an academic one because the waiting time for liver transplantation exceeds six months at the majority of centers. The actual challenge in liver transplantation for alcoholic cirrhosis may well be the need for lifelong post-transplant follow-up rather than the patient's pre-transplant evaluation. A small number of recipients experience a relapse of alcoholism; these patients are at risk for organ damage and graft-related death. Post-transplant surveillance protocols should demonstrate alcohol relapse at an early stage, thus permitting the initiation of adequate treatment. Patients with alcoholic cirrhosis are at high risk of developing head and neck, esophageal, or lung cancer. The higher risk of malignancies should be considered in the routine assessment of patients suffering from alcoholic cirrhosis. Tumor surveillance protocols for liver transplant recipients, currently being developed, should become a part of standard care; these will improve survival by permitting diagnosis at an early stage. In conclusion, the key

  4. Renal Function and Transplantation in Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Parajuli, Sandesh; Foley, David; Djamali, Arjang; Mandelbrot, Didier

    2015-09-01

    Kidney injury is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in liver transplant recipients. Since the introduction of the model for end-stage liver disease for the allocation of organs for liver transplantation in 2002, the heavy weighting of serum creatinine in the model for end-stage liver disease score has significantly increased the incidence of renal dysfunction seen among patients undergoing liver transplantation. As a result, the frequency of simultaneous liver-kidney (SLK) transplantation compared to liver transplantation alone (LTA) has also increased. The decision to perform SLK rather than LTA is an important one because the benefits to the liver transplant recipient receiving a kidney transplant must be balanced with the benefits of using that organ for a patient with end-stage renal disease. However, predicting whether or not a patient with liver failure has reversible kidney disease, and therefore does not also need a kidney transplant, is difficult. The severity and duration of pretransplant renal dysfunction, hepatitis c, diabetes, and other risk factors for kidney disease are associated with an increased risk of posttransplant end-stage renal disease. However, there are currently no clinical findings that accurately predict renal recovery post liver transplant. As a result, the rate of SLK versus LTA differs significantly between transplant centers. To increase consistency across centers, multiple guidelines have been proposed to guide the decision between SLK and LTA, but their poor predictive value has limited their uniform adoption. Nevertheless, adoption of uniform rules for the allocation of kidneys would reduce the variability between centers in rates of SLK transplant.

  5. Liver-Regenerative Transplantation: Regrow and Reset

    PubMed Central

    de l’Hortet, A. Collin; Takeishi, K.; Guzman-Lepe, J.; Handa, K.; Matsubara, K.; Fukumitsu, K.; Dorko, K.; Presnell, S. C.; Yagi, H.; Soto-Gutierrez, A.

    2016-01-01

    Liver transplantation, either a partial liver from a living or deceased donor or a whole liver from a deceased donor, is the only curative therapy for severe end-stage liver disease. Only one-third of those on the liver transplant waiting list will be transplanted, and the demand for livers is projected to increase 23% in the next 20 years. Consequently, organ availability is an absolute constraint on the number of liver transplants that can be performed. Regenerative therapies aim to enhance liver tissue repair and regeneration by any means available (cell repopulation, tissue engineering, biomaterials, proteins, small molecules, and genes). Recent experimental work suggests that liver repopulation and engineered liver tissue are best suited to the task if an unlimited availability of functional induced pluripotent stem (iPS)–derived liver cells can be achieved. The derivation of iPS cells by reprogramming cell fate has opened up new lines of investigation, for instance, the generation of iPS-derived xenogeneic organs or the possibility of simply inducing the liver to reprogram its own hepatocyte function after injury. We reviewed current knowledge about liver repopulation, generation of engineered livers and reprogramming of liver function. We also discussed the numerous barriers that have to be overcome for clinical implementation. PMID:26699680

  6. The first clinical liver transplantation of Brazil revisited.

    PubMed

    Bacchella, T; Machado, M C C

    2004-05-01

    The first clinical orthotopic liver transplantation in Brazil was performed on August 5, 1968. The patient was awake after surgery and died on the seventh postoperative day due to subdural hematoma, bronchopneumonia, renal failure, and graft rejection. The report of this case is important to understand the evolution of clinical liver transplantation in Brazil, where this procedure is now routinely carried out in many medical centers.

  7. Chicken pox after pediatric liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Levitsky, Josh; Kalil, Andre C; Meza, Jane L; Hurst, Glenn E; Freifeld, Alison

    2005-12-01

    Previous case series have reported serious complications of chicken pox (CP) after pediatric liver transplantation (PLT), mainly due to visceral dissemination. The goal of our study was to determine the incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of CP after PLT. A case-control study of all CP infections in pediatric transplant recipients followed at our center from September 1993 to April 2004 was performed. Data were collected before and after infection and at the same time points in age-, gender-, and transplant year-matched controls. Potential risk factors prior to CP and adverse outcomes after infection were compared between cases and controls. Twenty (6.2%) developed CP at a median of 1.8 yr (0.6-4.8) after PLT. All CP infections were cutaneous, with no evidence of organ involvement. Twelve were hospitalized: 9 only to receive intravenous acyclovir and 3 stayed > or =2 weeks for other complications. Risk factors were not statistically different among cases and controls. Of the outcomes analyzed, cases were significantly more likely to develop non-CP infections within one year of CP than controls (Hazard Ratio = 12.6, 95% confidence interval = 3.1-51.7; P < 0.001). These infections were often bacterial and occurred long after CP infection. In conclusion, CP is uncommon after PLT and has a low likelihood of organ dissemination. No risk factors were identified. Some cases required prolonged hospitalizations. Close monitoring for the development of late bacterial infections is warranted.

  8. Application of hyperbaric oxygen in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Hu; Han, Cui-hong; Sun, Xue-jun; Liu, Wen-wu

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) has been used in the treatment of a lot of diseases such as decompression sickness, arterial gas embolism, carbon dioxide poisoning, soft tissue infection, refractory osteomyelitis, and problematic wound, but little is known about its application in liver transplantation. Although several studies have been conducted to investigate the protective effects of HBO on liver transplantation and liver preservation, there are still some controversies on this issue, especially its immunomodulatory effect. In this short review, we briefly summarize the findings supporting the application of HBO during liver transplantation (including donors and recipients). PMID:28217293

  9. LIVER TRANSPLANTATION AFTER SEVERE HEPATIC TRAUMA: CURRENT INDICATIONS AND RESULTS

    PubMed Central

    RIBEIRO-JR, Marcelo Augusto Fontenelle; MEDRADO, Melina Botelho; ROSA, Otto Mauro; SILVA, Ana Júlia de Deus; FONTANA, Mariana Prado; CRUVINEL-NETO, José; FONSECA, Alexandre Zanchenko

    2015-01-01

    Background : The liver is the most injured organ in abdominal trauma. Currently, the treatment in most cases is non-operative, but surgery may be necessary in severe abdominal trauma with blunt liver damage, especially those that cause uncontrollable bleeding. Despite the damage control approaches in order to achieve hemodynamic stability, many patients develop hypovolemic shock, acute liver failure, multiple organ failure and death. In this context, liver transplantation appears as the lifesaving last resource Aim : Analyze the use of liver transplantation as a treatment option for severe liver trauma. Methods : Were reviewed 14 articles in the PubMed, Medline and Lilacs databases, selected between 2008-2014 and 10 for this study. Results : Were identified 46 cases undergoing liver transplant after liver trauma; the main trauma mechanism was closed/blunt abdominal trauma in 83%, and severe trauma (>grade IV) in 81 %. The transplant can be done, in this context, performing one-stage procedure (damaged organ removed with immediate transplantation), used in 72% of cases. When the two-stage approach is performed, end-to-side temporary portacaval shunt is provided, until new organ becomes available to be transplanted. If two different periods are considered - from 1980 to 2000 and from 2000 to 2014 - the survival rate increased significantly, from 48% to 76%, while the mortality decreased from 52% to 24%. Conclusion : Despite with quite restricted indications, liver transplantation in hepatic injury is a therapeutic modality viable and feasible today, and can be used in cases when other therapeutic modalities in short and long term, do not provide the patient survival chances. PMID:26734803

  10. Postreperfusion syndrome during liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    As surgical and graft preservation techniques have improved and immunosuppressive drugs have advanced, liver transplantation (LT) is now considered the gold standard for treating patients with end-stage liver disease worldwide. However, despite the improved survival following LT, severe hemodynamic disturbances during LT remain a serious issue for the anesthesiologist. The greatest hemodynamic disturbance is postreperfusion syndrome (PRS), which occurs at reperfusion of the donated liver after unclamping of the portal vein. PRS is characterized by marked decreases in mean arterial pressure and systemic vascular resistance, and moderate increases in pulmonary arterial pressure and central venous pressure. The underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of PRS are complex. Moreover, risk factors associated with PRS are not fully understood. Rapid and appropriate treatment with vasopressors, volume replacement, or venesection must be provided depending on the cause of the hemodynamic disturbance when hemodynamic instability becomes profound after reperfusion. The negative effects of PRS on postoperative early morbidity and mortality are clear, but the effect of PRS on postoperative long-term mortality remains a matter of debate. PMID:26634075

  11. Association between anesthesiologist experience and mortality after orthotopic liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Ira; Spivack, John; Yaport, Miguel; Zerillo, Jeron; Reich, David L; Wax, David; DeMaria, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    The anesthesiologist has been recognized as an integral member of the liver transplant team, and previous studies have demonstrated that inter-anesthesiologist variability can be a driver of outcomes for high-risk patients. We hypothesized that anesthesiologist experience, defined as the number of previous liver transplants performed at our institution, the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, would be independently associated with outcomes for liver transplant patients. Eight hundred forty-nine liver transplants performed between January 2003 and January 2013 with a total of 22 anesthesiologists were analyzed. Each transplant was assigned an incremental case number that corresponded to the number of transplants that the attending anesthesiologist had already performed at our institution. Several perioperative covariates were controlled for in the context of a generalized linear mixed effects model to detail the influence of threshold levels of the incremental case number on the primary outcome, 30-day mortality, and a secondary outcome, 30-day graft failure. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to confirm the robustness of these findings. An incremental case number ≤ 5 was associated with a significantly greater risk of 30-day mortality (odds ratio = 2.24, 95% confidence interval = 1.11-4.54, P = 0.025), and there was evidence suggestive of a greater risk of 30-day graft failure (odds ratio = 1.93, 95% confidence interval = 0.95-3.93, P = 0.071). Sensitivity analyses ruled out threats to the validity of these findings, including dropout effects and time trends in the overall performance of the transplantation unit. In conclusion, this study shows that an anesthesiologist's level of experience has a significant effect on outcomes for liver transplant recipients, with increased mortality and possibly graft failure during a provider's first 5 cases. These findings may indicate the need for increased training and supervision for

  12. Immunological aspects of liver cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Oldhafer, Felix; Bock, Michael; Falk, Christine S; Vondran, Florian W R

    2016-01-01

    Within the field of regenerative medicine, the liver is of major interest for adoption of regenerative strategies due to its well-known and unique regenerative capacity. Whereas therapeutic strategies such as liver resection and orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) can be considered standards of care for the treatment of a variety of liver diseases, the concept of liver cell transplantation (LCTx) still awaits clinical breakthrough. Success of LCTx is hampered by insufficient engraftment/long-term acceptance of cellular allografts mainly due to rejection of transplanted cells. This is in contrast to the results achieved for OLT where long-term graft survival is observed on a regular basis and, hence, the liver has been deemed an immune-privileged organ. Immune responses induced by isolated hepatocytes apparently differ considerably from those observed following transplantation of solid organs and, thus, LCTx requires refined immunological strategies to improve its clinical outcome. In addition, clinical usage of LCTx but also related basic research efforts are hindered by the limited availability of high quality liver cells, strongly emphasizing the need for alternative cell sources. This review focuses on the various immunological aspects of LCTx summarizing data available not only for hepatocyte transplantation but also for transplantation of non-parenchymal liver cells and liver stem cells. PMID:27011904

  13. Evolving surgical approaches in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Petrowsky, Henrik; Busuttil, Ronald W

    2009-02-01

    The growing discrepancy between the need and the availability of donor livers has resulted in evolving surgical approaches in liver transplantation during the last two decades to expand the donor pool. One approach is to transplant partial grafts, obtained either from a living donor or splitting a cadaveric donor liver. For both surgical methods, it is important to obtain a minimal viable graft volume to prevent small-for-size syndrome and graft failure. This minimal volume, expressed as graft-to-whole body ratio, must be between 0.8 and 1%. Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) became the primary transplant option in many Asian countries and is increasingly performed as an adjunct transplant option in countries with low donation rates. Split liver transplantation (SLT) is a surgical method that creates two allografts from one deceased donor. The most widely used splitting technique is the division of the liver into a left lateral sectoral graft (segments 2 and 3) for a pediatric patient and a right trisegmental graft (segments 1 and 4 to 8) for an adult patient. Both LDLT and SLT are also important and established methods for the treatment of pediatric patients. Another evolving surgical approach is auxiliary liver transplantation, which describes the transplanting a whole or partial graft with preservation of the partial native liver. This bridging technique is applied in patients with fulminate liver failure and should allow the regeneration of the injured liver with the potential to discontinue immunosuppression. Other methods such as xenotransplantation, as well as hepatocyte and stem cell transplantation, are promising approaches that are still in experimental phases.

  14. Liver transplant for giant cell hepatitis with autoimmune haemolytic anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Melendez, H. V.; Rela, M.; Baker, A.; Ball, C.; Portmann, B.; Mieli-Vergani, G.; Heaton, N.

    1997-01-01

    

 Giant cell hepatitis (CGH) with autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AHA) is a distinct entity with an aggressive course. Immunosuppression may help early disease. A case is reported of a child with GCH and AHA with early disease recurrence after liver transplantation for end stage liver disease. 

 PMID:9370907

  15. Liver transplantation for metastatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Lang, H; Oldhafer, K J; Weimann, A; Schlitt, H J; Scheumann, G F; Flemming, P; Ringe, B; Pichlmayr, R

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This article describes the experience with liver transplantation in patients with irresectable neuroendocrine hepatic metastases. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Liver transplantation has become an established therapy in primary liver cancer. On contrast, there is little experience with liver transplantation in secondary hepatic tumors. So far, in the majority of patients being transplanted for irresectable liver metastases, long-term results have been disappointing because of early tumor recurrence. Because of their biologically less aggressive nature, the metastases of neuroendocrine tumors could represent a justified indication for liver grafting. METHODS: In a retrospective study, the data of 12 patients who underwent liver transplantation for irresectable neuroendocrine hepatic metastases were analyzed regarding survival, tumor recurrence, and symptomatic relief. RESULTS: Nine of 12 patients currently are alive with a median survival of 55 months (range, 11.0 days to 103.5 months). The operative mortality was 1 of 12, 2 patients died because of septic complications or tumor recurrences or both 6.5 months and 68.0 months after transplantation. all patients had good symptomatic relief after hepatectomy and transplantation. Four of the nine patients who are alive have no evidence of tumor with a follow-up of 2.0, 57.0, 58.0, and 103.5 months after transplantation. CONCLUSIONS: In selected patients, liver transplantation for irresectable neuroendocrine hepatic metastases may provide not only long-term palliation but even cure. Regarding the shortage of donor organs, liver grafting for neuroendocrine metastases should be considered solely in patients without evidence of extrahepatic tumor manifestation and in whom all other treatment methods are no longer effective. Images Figure 1. Figure 3. PMID:9114792

  16. Salvage with a Secondary Infrahepatic Cavocavostomy of the Occluded Modified Piggyback Anastomosis during Split Liver Transplantation: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kinaci, Erdem; Kayaalp, Cuneyt; Yilmaz, Sezai; Otan, Emrah

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic venous outflow obstruction following liver transplantation is rare but disastrous. Here we described a 14-year-old boy who underwent a split right lobe liver transplantation with modified (side-to-side) piggyback technique which resulted in hepatic venous outflow obstruction. When the liver graft was lifted up, the outflow drainage returned to normal but when it was placed back into the abdomen, the outflow obstruction recurred. Because reanastomosis would have resulted in hepatic reischemia, alternatively, a second infrahepatic cavocavostomy was planned without requiring hepatic reischemia. During this procedure, the first assistant hung the liver up to provide sufficient outflow and the portal inflow of the graft continued as well. We only clamped the recipient's infrahepatic vena cava and the caudal cuff of the graft cava. After the second end-to-side cavocaval anastomosis, the graft was placed in its orthotopic position and there was no outflow problem anymore. The patient tolerated the procedure well and there were no problems after three months of follow-up. A second cavocavostomy can provide an extra bypass for some hepatic venous outflow problems after piggyback anastomosis by avoiding hepatic reischemia.

  17. Salvage with a Secondary Infrahepatic Cavocavostomy of the Occluded Modified Piggyback Anastomosis during Split Liver Transplantation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kinaci, Erdem; Kayaalp, Cuneyt; Yilmaz, Sezai; Otan, Emrah

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic venous outflow obstruction following liver transplantation is rare but disastrous. Here we described a 14-year-old boy who underwent a split right lobe liver transplantation with modified (side-to-side) piggyback technique which resulted in hepatic venous outflow obstruction. When the liver graft was lifted up, the outflow drainage returned to normal but when it was placed back into the abdomen, the outflow obstruction recurred. Because reanastomosis would have resulted in hepatic reischemia, alternatively, a second infrahepatic cavocavostomy was planned without requiring hepatic reischemia. During this procedure, the first assistant hung the liver up to provide sufficient outflow and the portal inflow of the graft continued as well. We only clamped the recipient's infrahepatic vena cava and the caudal cuff of the graft cava. After the second end-to-side cavocaval anastomosis, the graft was placed in its orthotopic position and there was no outflow problem anymore. The patient tolerated the procedure well and there were no problems after three months of follow-up. A second cavocavostomy can provide an extra bypass for some hepatic venous outflow problems after piggyback anastomosis by avoiding hepatic reischemia. PMID:24959369

  18. Successful treatment with lenalidomide of secondary multiple myeloma with extramedullary liver plasmacytoma in a renal transplant recipient: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    XIE, XIAOBAO; WU, WEI; ZHU, YUANDONG; LIU, DELIANG; DONG, WEIMIN; LI, HAIQIAN; LI, QING; GU, WEIYING

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) represents a rare form of post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder, and the presence of plasma cells in the liver is generally associated with aggressive forms of MM. In the present study, an unusual case of extramedullary plasmacytoma, affecting the liver and vertebrae of a recipient of a renal transplant, is reported. The patient had been previously treated with bortezomib for an MM following renal transplantation, as diagnosed by percutaneous needle biopsy of the hepatic lesion. He was then treated with 5 cycles of RCD regimen (lenalidomide, 25 mg, days 1–21; cyclophosphamide. 50–100 mg, days 1–21; and dexamethasone, 20 mg, days 1, 8, 15 and 22). The patient achieved partial clinical remission without any severe therapy-associated toxicity effects, indicating that lenalidomide is an effective and safe treatment for extramedullary liver plasmacytoma in renal recipients. In conclusion, the present case study indicated that the RCD regimen was effective and safe in the treatment of relapsed and refractory MM. PMID:26722266

  19. Liver transplantation for viral hepatitis in 2015

    PubMed Central

    Ferrarese, Alberto; Zanetto, Alberto; Gambato, Martina; Bortoluzzi, Ilaria; Nadal, Elena; Germani, Giacomo; Senzolo, Marco; Burra, Patrizia; Russo, Francesco Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is a life-saving treatment for patients with end-stage liver disease and for patients with liver cell cancer related to liver disease. Acute and chronic liver diseases related to hepatitis viruses are between the main indications for liver transplantation. The risk of viral reinfection after transplantation is the main limiting factor in these indications. Before the availability of antiviral prophylaxis, hepatitis B virus (HBV) recurrence was universal in patients who were HBV DNA-positive before transplantation. The natural history of recurrent HBV was accelerated by immunosuppression, and it progressed rapidly to graft failure and death. Introduction of post-transplant prophylaxis with immunoglobulin alone first, and associated to antiviral drugs later, drastically reduced HBV recurrence, resulting in excellent long-term outcomes. On the contrary, recurrence of hepatitis C is the main cause of graft loss in most transplant programs. Overall, patient and graft survival after LT for hepatitis C virus (HCV)-associated cirrhosis is inferior compared with other indications. However, successful pretransplant or post transplant antiviral therapy has been associated with increased graft and overall survival. Until recently, the combination of pegylated interferon and ribavirin was the standard of care for the treatment of patients with chronic hepatitis C. Highly active antiviral compounds have been developed over the past decade, thanks to new in vitro systems to study HCV entry, replication, assembly, and release. PMID:26819523

  20. [IV Consensus meeting of the Spanish Society of Liver Transplantation (SETH) 2012. Liver transplant with non-conventional grafts: Split liver transplantation and non-heart beating donors].

    PubMed

    Abradelo, Manuel; Fondevila, Constantino

    2014-03-01

    The disbalance between the number of candidates to liver transplant and the number of liver grafts leads to waiting list mortality. Two potential ways of increasing the number of liver grafts are split liver transplantation and the transplantation of grafts from non-heart beating donors. Both of them were discussed in a consensus meeting of the Spanish Society of Liver Transplantation in October 2012. This paper outlines the conclusions of that meeting.

  1. Guidelines for surgical procedures after liver transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Testa, G; Goldstein, R M; Toughanipour, A; Abbasoglu, O; Jeyarajah, R; Levy, M F; Husberg, B S; Gonwa, T A; Klintmalm, G B

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The first purpose of this study is to identify the types and incidences of surgical procedures in patients who have previously undergone liver transplantation, with particular focus on the complication rates and the lengths of hospital stay. The second purpose is to present the management guidelines for patients with liver transplants at the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative stages of surgical procedure. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The surgical literature on this issue is scant, and with the growing liver transplant patient population it is not unlikey for any surgery specialist to have to operate on a patient who has undergone liver transplantation. METHODS: A sample of 409 patients with available hospital records, with a minimum of a 2-year follow-up, and with telephone access for interviews was chosen. Type of surgery, time from the liver transplant, hospital stay, immunosuppressive regimen, and complications were recorded. RESULTS: A large proportion of patients (24.2%) underwent some type of surgical procedure 2 to 10 years after liver transplantation. The authors demonstrate that most of the elective procedures can be safely carried out without an increased incidence of complication and without longer hospital stay than the general population. Conversely, emergent procedures are plagued by a greater incidence of complications that not only affect the function of the liver graft but may risk the life of the patient. PMID:9563551

  2. Recurrent hepatitis C after liver transplant

    PubMed Central

    deLemos, Andrew S; Schmeltzer, Paul A; Russo, Mark W

    2014-01-01

    End stage liver disease from hepatitis C is the most common indication for liver transplantation in many parts of the world accounting for up to 40% of liver transplants. Antiviral therapy either before or after liver transplantation is challenging due to side effects and lower efficacy in patients with cirrhosis and liver transplant recipients, as well as from drug interactions with immunosuppressants. Factors that may affect recurrent hepatitis C include donor age, immunosuppression, IL28B genotype, cytomegalovirus infection, and metabolic syndrome. Older donor age has persistently been shown to have the greatest impact on recurrent hepatitis C. After liver transplantation, distinguishing recurrent hepatitis C from acute cellular rejection may be difficult, although the development of molecular markers may help in making the correct diagnosis. The advent of interferon free regimens with direct acting antiviral agents that include NS3/4A protease inhibitors, NS5B polymerase inhibitors and NS5A inhibitors holds great promise in improving outcomes for liver transplant candidates and recipients. PMID:25152571

  3. Psychological adaptation of liver transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Pérez-San-Gregorio, M A; Martin-Rodríguez, A; Asián-Chavez, E; Gallego-Corpa, A; Pérez-Bernal, J

    2005-04-01

    We analyzed the influence of two variables (place of hospitalization of the patients and the mental health of relatives) on symptoms of anxiety and depression in liver transplant patients. The subject groups were made up of 48 liver transplant recipients (mean age 51.15; SD = 8.57) and their close relatives. The tests applied were a psychosocial questionnaire, and the two tests: "The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale" and "The Leeds Scales for the Self-Assessment of Anxiety and Depression." The liver transplant recipients showed more symptoms of depression when they were in the intensive care unit (ICU) and more symptoms of anxiety in the post-ICU phase when their close relatives were more depressed in that phase. The place of hospitalization of the patients and the mental health of relatives influenced the symptoms of anxiety and depression in liver transplant recipients.

  4. Nutrition assessment in patients undergoing liver transplant

    PubMed Central

    Bakshi, Neha; Singh, Kalyani

    2014-01-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is a major surgery performed on patients with end stage liver disease. Nutrition is an integral part of patient care, and protein-energy malnutrition is almost universally present in patients suffering from liver disease undergoing LT. Nutrition assessment of preliver transplant phase helps to make a good nutrition care plan for the patients. Nutrition status has been associated with various factors which are related to the success of liver transplant such as morbidity, mortality, and length of hospital stay. To assess the nutritional status of preliver transplant patients, combinations of nutrition assessment methods should be used like subjective global assessment, Anthropometry mid arm-muscle circumference, Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) and handgrip strength. PMID:25316978

  5. Role of Histopathologist in Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Geramizadeh, B.; Malek-Hosseini, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    A successful liver transplantation team consists of several specialists to work closely together. The histopathologist (anatomical pathologist) is one of the key players in this multidisciplinary team. This role starts with the pre-transplantation evaluation of the recipient’s liver by diagnosis or confirming the underlying liver disease and continues with the evaluation of the explanted recipient’s liver for any further information about the underlying liver disease including malignancies such as hepatocellular carcinoma, cholangiocarcinoma, or any other incidental findings. The evaluation of the new donor liver begins with determining the suitability of the donor liver for transplantation during or before the operation and continues throughout the entire post-transplantation period by evaluating not only the allograft diseases but also evaluating other tissues for infections, malignancies, etc. It is worthy to note that in many of the above-mentioned situations, histopathology is the gold-standard diagnostic test. In this review, we present on various tasks of a histopathologist according to the current literature and our own experience in the largest liver transplantation center in Iran. PMID:28299022

  6. ABO-Incompatible Living Donor Liver Transplantation from Hepatitis B Core Antibody Positive Donor to Hepatitis C Liver Cirrhosis Recipient: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Nitta, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Akira; Hasegawa, Yasushi; Wakabayashi, Go

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we describe an extremely rare experience of a patient with liver cirrhosis from hepatitis C virus (LC-HCV) who underwent an ABO-incompatible living donor liver transplantation (ABO-I-LDLT) using a hepatitis B core antibody (HBc-Ab) positive donor's liver graft. A 47-year-old Japanese woman with end stage LC-HCV, as a recipient, was preoperatively administered rituximab, mycophenolate mofetil, and steroids without plasma exchange. A routine ABO-I-LDLT procedure was applied using her daughter's HBc-Ab positive liver graft. Prophylaxis of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection using hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG) and entecavir had been properly administered. Three months after the ABO-I-LDLT, HCV hepatitis relapsed. To date, this patient has been under antiviral therapy and prophylaxis of HBV infection using HBIG, while entecavir has been continued. The cognitions and techniques with regard to ABO-I-LDLT, prophylaxis of HBV cross infection, various patterns of immunosuppression, and antiviral therapy for HCV relapse are indispensable in managing a transplant recipient. According to the prophylaxis of HBV cross infection under ABO-I-LDLT, it may be very important to keep the HBs-Ab titer higher than usual for HBV naïve recipients, because severe systemic immunosuppression can cause de novo hepatitis. PMID:25045572

  7. Central nervous system complications after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Min; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Lee, Soon-Tae; Chu, Kon; Roh, Jae-Kyu

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the diversity of central nervous system complications after liver transplantation in terms of clinical manifestations and temporal course. Liver transplantation is a lifesaving option for end stage liver disease patients but post-transplantation neurologic complications can hamper recovery. Between 1 January 2001 and 31 December 2010, patients who had undergone liver transplantation at a single tertiary university hospital were included. We reviewed their medical records and brain imaging data and classified central nervous system complications into four categories including vascular, metabolic, infectious and neoplastic. The onset of central nervous system complications was grouped into five post-transplantation intervals including acute (within 1 month), early subacute (1-3 months), late subacute (3-12 months), chronic (1-3 years), and long-term (after 3 years). During follow-up, 65 of 791 patients (8.2%) experienced central nervous system complications, with 30 occurring within 1 month after transplantation. Vascular etiology was the most common (27 patients; 41.5%), followed by metabolic (23; 35.4%), infectious (nine patients; 13.8%), and neoplastic (six patients). Metabolic encephalopathy with altered consciousness was the most common etiology during the acute period, followed by vascular disorders. An initial focal neurologic deficit was detected in vascular and neoplastic complications, whereas metabolic and infectious etiologies presented with non-focal symptoms. Our study shows that the etiology of central nervous system complications after liver transplantation changes over time, and initial symptoms can help to predict etiology.

  8. Liver transplant in a patient with a ventriculoperitoneal shunt.

    PubMed

    Faybush, Elisa; Mulligan, David C; Birch, Barry D; Sirven, Joseph I; Balan, Vijayan

    2005-04-01

    There are no published accounts of patients with ventriculoperitoneal shunts undergoing liver transplantation in the literature. Because patients with ventriculoperitoneal shunts are prone to infections, this may be a theoretical contraindication to transplantation. We present a case of a patient with cirrhosis who had a ventriculoperitoneal shunt placed many years prior to transplantation. The patient had no neurological complications and the shunt was intact and functioning. Prior to transplantation, the patient underwent a ventriculoperitoneal to ventriculopleural shunt conversion that was reversed posttransplantation. Apart from some minor complications, the patient has done remarkably well from a graft and neurological perspective. In conclusion, patients who have ventriculoperitoneal shunts may be considered for liver transplantation as the risk of infectious and neurological complications is low and there are no deleterious effects on graft survival.

  9. Iatrogenic amyloid polyneuropathy after domino liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Mnatsakanova, Diana; Živković, Saša A

    2017-01-01

    Liver transplantation has been used in treatment of transthyretin amyloidosis, and some patients undergo domino liver transplantation (DLT) with explanted liver being transplanted to another patient with liver failure as the liver is otherwise usually functionally normal. Until end of 2015, there were 1154 DLT performed worldwide. DLT for transthyretin amyloidosis is associated with the risk of developing de novo systemic amyloidosis and amyloid neuropathy, and the risk may be greater with some non-Val30Met mutations. De novo amyloid neuropathy has been described in up to 23% of transplant recipients. Neuropathy may be preceded by asymptomatic amyloid deposition in various tissues and symptoms of neuropathy started after a median of 7 years following DLT (5.7 ± 3.2 years; range 2 mo to 10 years). Typical initial symptoms include neuropathic pain and sensory loss, while dysautonomia usually starts later. Progression of neuropathy may necessitate liver re-transplantation, and subsequent improvement of neuropathy has been reported in some patients. Explant allograft recipients need close monitoring for signs of systemic amyloidosis, neuropathy and dysautonomia as progressive symptoms may require re-transplantation. PMID:28217248

  10. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Metabolic Syndrome after Liver Transplant.

    PubMed

    Gitto, Stefano; Villa, Erica

    2016-04-02

    Liver transplant is the unique curative therapy for patients with acute liver failure or end-stage liver disease, with or without hepatocellular carcinoma. Increase of body weight, onset of insulin resistance and drug-induced alterations of metabolism are reported in liver transplant recipients. In this context, post-transplant diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and arterial hypertension can be often diagnosed. Multifactorial illnesses occurring in the post-transplant period represent significant causes of morbidity and mortality. This is especially true for metabolic syndrome. Non-alcoholic steatosis and steatohepatitis are hepatic manifestations of metabolic syndrome and after liver transplant both recurrent and de novo steatosis can be found. Usually, post-transplant steatosis shows an indolent outcome with few cases of fibrosis progression. However, in the post-transplant setting, both metabolic syndrome and steatosis might play a key role in the stratification of morbidity and mortality risk, being commonly associated with cardiovascular disease. The single components of metabolic syndrome can be treated with targeted drugs while lifestyle intervention is the only reasonable therapeutic approach for transplant patients with non-alcoholic steatosis or steatohepatitis.

  11. Technical Skills Required in Split Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huanqiu; Li, Ruijun; Fu, Jinling; He, Qianyan; Li, Ji

    2016-07-01

    The number of liver grafts obtained from a cadaver can be greatly increased with the application of split liver transplantation. In the last 10 years, pediatric waiting list mortality has been reduced significantly with the use of this form of liver transplantation, which has 2 major forms. In its most commonly used form, the liver can be transplanted into 1 adult and 1 child by splitting it into a right extended and a left lateral graft. For adult and pediatric recipients, the results of this procedure are comparable to those of whole-organ techniques. In another form, 2 hemi-grafts are obtained by splitting the liver, which can be transplanted into a medium-sized adult (the right side) and a large child/small adult (the left side). The adult liver graft pool is expanded through the process of full right/full left splitting; but it is also a critical technique when one considers the knowledge required of the potential anatomic variations and the high technical skill level needed. In this review, we provide some basic insights into the technical and anatomical aspects of these 2 forms of split liver transplantation and present an updated summary of both forms.

  12. Gas gangrene caused by clostridium perfringens involving the liver, spleen, and heart in a man 20 years after an orthotopic liver transplant: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kitterer, Daniel; Braun, Niko; Jehs, Margit C; Schulte, Bernhard; Alscher, M Dominik; Latus, Joerg

    2014-04-01

    Despite advances in immunosuppression and liver transplant in the past, mortality and morbidity caused by infections remain major problems. We present a 71-year-old man who was admitted to our internal intensive care unit with septicemia. Upon admission, he had poorly localized epigastric pain and fever of 2 days ' duration. Twenty years earlier, he had undergone an orthotopic liver transplant. Testing revealed a high C-reactive protein level, elevated liver enzymes, and an acute kidney injury. A computer tomography scan showed 2 circular, non--rim-enhancing, totally emphysematous intrahepatic lesions. Additionally, gas could be seen in the portal veins mainly, as well as in the biliary system, in the right auricle, and the splenic veins. To the best of our knowledge, he showed no malignant lesion or predisposing trauma. Empirically, treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics was begun, and the patient was transferred to the operating suite. When surgery began, blood cultures revealed the presence of gram-positive bacilli, which were identified as Clostridium perfringens. Seven hours after the surgery, the patient developed asystole and died. In septic patients presenting with severe hemolysis, Clostridium perfringens infection must be considered in the absence of a malignant lesion or a predisposing trauma; a previous episode of gastroenteritis might be a predisposing trauma by impairing the barrier of the intestinal flora, leading to Clostridium perfringens infection.

  13. [Epithelioid hemangioendothelioma: a rare indication for liver transplantation?].

    PubMed

    Salcedo, M; Alvarez, E; Clemente, G; Bañares, R; Robles, J; Asanza, C G; Sabrido, J L; Calleja, J; Ferreiroa, J; Cos, E

    1995-01-01

    A clinical case of epithelioid hemangioendothelioma without extrahepatic involvement treated with liver transplantation is presented. The patient remains alive 42 months thereafter without tumor recurrence. A review of cases reported to date was carried out with special reference being made to the therapy undertaken and the follow-up.

  14. Emergent Management of Intracardiac Thrombosis during Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Protin, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Intraoperative thromboembolism is a well-documented complication associated with orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) but its identification and intraoperative treatment are still an emerging topic in anesthesia. Intracardiac thrombus during OLT is associated with a high mortality rate. There are only a few reports describing the successful management of thromboembolism during OLT. We describe a case where routine intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography during a live donor liver transplantation enabled early detection of an intracardiac thrombus with subsequent successful heparin treatment. Our case suggests that if an intracardiac thrombus is identified early (before hemodynamic instability occurs), the use of IV heparin may be a safe therapeutic option. PMID:28070442

  15. Perioperative nutritional therapy in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hammad, Ahmed; Kaido, Toshimi; Uemoto, Shinji

    2015-03-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition is frequently seen in patients with end-stage liver disease who undergo liver transplantation. This causes a deterioration of the patients' clinical condition and affects their post-transplantation survival. Accurate assessment of the nutritional status and adequate intervention are prerequisites for perioperative nutritional treatment. However, the metabolic abnormalities induced by liver failure make the traditional assessment of the nutritional status difficult. The methods that were recently developed for accurately assessing the nutritional status by body bioelectrical impedance may be implemented in pre-transplant management. Because preoperative malnutrition and the loss of skeletal muscle mass, called sarcopenia, have a significant negative impact on the post-transplantation outcome, it is essential to provide adequate nutritional support during all phases of liver transplantation. Oral nutrition is preferred, but tube enteral nutrition may be required to provide the necessary caloric intake. We herein discuss both bioelectrical impedance and the latest findings in the current perioperative nutritional interventions in liver transplant patients regarding synbiotics, micronutrients, branched-chain amino acid supplementation, the use of immune system modulating formulas, the fluid balance and the offering of nocturnal meals.

  16. Angiography of Liver Transplantation Patients 1

    PubMed Central

    Zajko, Albert B.; Bron, Klaus M.; Starzl, Thomas E.; Van Thiel, David H.; Gartner, J. Carlton; Iwatsuki, Shunzaburo; Shaw, Byers W.; Zitelli, Basil J.; Malatack, J. Jeffrey; Urbach, Andrew H.

    2010-01-01

    Over 45 months, 119 angiographic examinations were performed in 95 patients prior to liver transplantation, and 53 examinations in 44 patients after transplantation. Transplantation feasibility was influenced by patency of the portal vein and inferior vena cava. Selective arterial portography, wedged hepatic venography, and transhepatic portography were used to assess the portal vein if sonography or computed tomography was inconclusive. Major indications for angiography after transplantation included early liver failure, sepsis, unexplained elevation of liver enzyme levels, and delayed bile leakage, all of which may be due to hepatic artery thrombosis. Other indications included gastrointestinal tract bleeding, hemobilia, and evaluation of portal vein patency in patients with chronic rejection who were being considered for retransplantation. Normal radiographic features of hepatic artery and portal vein reconstruction are demonstrated. Complications diagnosed using results of angiography included hepatic artery or portal vein stenoses and thromboses and pancreaticoduodenal aneurysms. Intrahepatic arterial narrowing, attenuation, slow flow, and poor filling were seen in five patients with rejection PMID:3901102

  17. Living donor liver transplantation in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Capobianco, Ivan; Panaro, Fabrizio; Di Francesco, Fabrizio; Troisi, Roberto; Sainz-Barriga, Mauricio; Muiesan, Paolo; Königsrainer, Alfred; Testa, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) sparked significant interest in Europe when the first reports of its success from USA and Asia were made public. Many transplant programs initiated LDLT and some of them especially in Germany and Belgium became a point of reference for many patients and important contributors to the advancement of the field. After the initial enthusiasm, most of the European programs stopped performing LDLT and today the overall European activity is concentrated in a few centers and the number of living donor liver transplants is only a single digit fraction of the overall number of liver transplants performed. In this paper we analyse the present European activities and highlight the European contribution to the advancement of the field of LDLT. PMID:27115011

  18. Combined Liver and Kidney Transplant in a Patient with Budd-Chiari Syndrome Secondary to Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease Associated with Polycystic Liver Disease: Report of a Case with a 9-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez de la Piscina, Patricia; Duca, Ileana; Estrada, Silvia; Calderón, Rosario; Ganchegui, Idoia; Campos, Amaia; Spicakova, Katerina; Salvador, Marta; Delgado, Elvira; Bengoa, Raquel; García-Campos, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic liver disease (PLD) is a hereditary disease inherited by autosomal dominant trait that occurs as a frequent extrarenal manifestation of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). We report a case of a 59-year-old woman diagnosed with ADPKD associated with PLD. End-stage chronic renal failure with a secondary Budd-Chiari syndrome developed during the patient's clinical course. She underwent combined liver and kidney transplantation, with a successful response over a 9-year follow-up period. PMID:24987537

  19. Anesthetic management of an 8-month-old infant with osteogenesis imperfecta undergoing liver transplantation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jiwon; Kim, Anna; Yoo, Seokha; Shin, Seung-Yeon; Kang, Sun-Hye; Jeong, Jinyoung; Yoo, Yongjae

    2014-01-01

    Anesthetic management of pediatric liver transplantation in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) requires tough decisions and comprehensive considerations of the cascade of effects that may arise and the required monitoring. Total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) with propofol and remifentanil was chosen as the main anesthetic strategy. Malignant hyperthermia (MH), skeletal fragility, anhepatic phase during liver transplantation, uncertainties of TIVA in children, and propofol infusion syndrome were considered and monitored. There were no adverse events during the operation. Despite meticulous precautions with regard to the risk of MH, there was an episode of high fever (40℃) in the ICU a few hours after the operation, which was initially feared as MH. Fortunately, MH was ruled out as the fever subsided soon after hydration and antipyretics were given. Although the delivery of supportive care and the administration of dantrolene are the core principles in the management of MH, perioperative fever does not always mean a MH in patients at risk for MH, and other common causes of fever should also be considered. PMID:25006373

  20. Ganciclovir and Foscarnet Therapy of Cytomegalovirus-Associated Meningoencephalitis in a Hemodialysis Patient With Liver Transplantation: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kang, G W; Hong, H L; Lee, I H; Ahn, K S; Kim, J D; Choi, D L

    2016-05-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in patients with liver transplantation (LT) remains a highly prevalent complication with a significant increase in morbidity and mortality. However, CMV-associated meningoencephalitis is rarely diagnosed, and treatment is very difficult. The aim of the present report is to review the experience of successful treatment with combined ganciclovir and foscarnet of CMV-associated meningoencephalitis refractory to ganciclovir alone in a hemodialysis (HD) patient after LT. A 54-year-old woman with end-stage renal disease on HD developed a seizure with loss of consciousness. She had received a liver transplant 4 months before. Blood CMV polymerase chain reaction was positive, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis was compatible with viral meningitis. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed extensive dural thickening with enhancement and a round ring-like enhancement in the left centrum semiovale. She was diagnosed with CMV-associated meningoencephalitis. At that time, ganciclovir was started intravenously. After that, there were no improvements in mental state, CSF analysis, or brain MRI. Intravenous foscarnet at reduced dose was added to ganciclovir therapy. With combined ganciclovir and foscarnet, there was a slight improvement in her mental state and brain MRI.

  1. Venous outflow obstruction and portopulmonary hypertension after orthotopic liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre-Avalos, Guadalupe; Covarrubias-Velasco, Marco Antonio; Rojas-Sánchez, Antonio Gerardo

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Female, 54 Final Diagnosis: Suprahepatic inferior vena cava anastomosis stricture Symptoms: Ascites • fatigue • lower limb edema • hepatomegaly Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Transplantology • Critical Care Medicine Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Suprahepatic inferior vena cava anastomosis stricture is an unusual vascular complication after orthotopic liver transplantation with the “piggyback” technique. Clinical manifestations are dependent upon the severity of the stenosis. Portopulmonary hypertension after orthotopic liver transplantation is a complication that carries high mortality due to cardiopulmonary dysfunction. The pathogenesis of pulmonary vascular disorders after orthotopic liver transplantation remains uncertain. Case Report: We report a case of acute right heart pressure overload after surgical correction of the suprahepatic inferior vena cava anastomotic stricture in a 54-year-old woman who had preexisting pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with portal hypertension after orthotopic liver transplantation. Twenty months posttransplantation, she developed fatigue and progressive ascites. On admission, the patient had hepatomegaly, ascites, and lower limb edema. Symptoms in the patient developed gradually over time. Conclusions: Recurrent portal hypertension by vascular complications is a cause of pulmonary arterial hypertension after orthotopic liver transplantation. Clinical manifestations of suprahepatic inferior vena cava anastomotic stenosis are dependent upon their severity. Sildenafil is an effective drug for treatment of pulmonary arterial hyper-tension after portal hypertension by vascular complications. PMID:24046802

  2. Pediatric liver transplantation - ethical dilemmas in a disabled patient.

    PubMed

    Toker, A; Salzer, L

    2012-09-01

    Allocation of medical resources, especially resources with absolute scarcity such as organs for transplant, is a difficult task. Medical, surgical, and ethical considerations should be evaluated. In solid organ transplantation, ethics committees are the gate keepers that deal with moral philosophy when moral values are in conflict. Often, no good solution to a dilemma in these medical ethics exists. Our case presents split living liver donation for retransplantation in a mentally disabled girl, with few medical ethics principles at stake.

  3. Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease in liver transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Christina; Schuchmann, Marcus; Zimmermann, Tim

    2011-02-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) are a life-threatening complication following solid organ transplantation. Many posttransplant lymphomas develop from the uncontrolled proliferation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected B-cells, whereas EBV-negative PTLDs were increasingly recognized within the past decade. Major risk factors for the development of PTLDs after liver transplantation are immunosuppressive therapy and the type of underlying disease: viral hepatitis, autoimmune liver disease, or alcoholic liver cirrhosis contribute to an increased risk for PTLD. Therapeutic regimens include reduction of immunosuppression, the anti-CD20 antibody rituximab, and chemotherapy, as well as new approaches using interferon-α and anti-interleukin-6 antibodies. Despite the different therapeutic regimens, mortality from PTLD remains high. Therefore, it is of major importance to identify patients at risk at an early stage of the disease. In this review, risk factors for PTLD development after liver transplantation, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and therapy are discussed.

  4. Mitochondrial dysfunction in liver failure requiring transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lane, Maria; Boczonadi, Veronika; Bachtari, Sahar; Gomez-Duran, Aurora; Langer, Thorsten; Griffiths, Alexandra; Kleinle, Stephanie; Dineiger, Christine; Abicht, Angela; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Schara, Ulrike; Gerner, Patrick; Horvath, Rita

    2016-05-01

    Liver failure is a heterogeneous condition which may be fatal and the primary cause is frequently unknown. We investigated mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in patients undergoing liver transplantation. We studied 45 patients who had liver transplantation due to a variety of clinical presentations. Blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with immunodetection of respiratory chain complexes I-V, biochemical activity of respiratory chain complexes II and IV and quantification of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number were investigated in liver tissue collected from the explanted liver during transplantation. Abnormal mitochondrial function was frequently present in this cohort: ten of 40 patients (25 %) had a defect of one or more respiratory chain enzyme complexes on blue native gels, 20 patients (44 %) had low activity of complex II and/or IV and ten (22 %) had a reduced mtDNA copy number. Combined respiratory chain deficiency and reduced numbers of mitochondria were detected in all three patients with acute liver failure. Low complex IV activity in biliary atresia and complex II defects in cirrhosis were common findings. All six patients diagnosed with liver tumours showed variable alterations in mitochondrial function, probably due to the heterogeneity of the presenting tumour. In conclusion, mitochondrial dysfunction is common in severe liver failure in non-mitochondrial conditions. Therefore, in contrast to the common practice detection of respiratory chain abnormalities in liver should not restrict the inclusion of patients for liver transplantation. Furthermore, improving mitochondrial function may be targeted as part of a complex therapy approach in different forms of liver diseases.

  5. Advances in liver transplantation allocation systems.

    PubMed

    Schilsky, Michael L; Moini, Maryam

    2016-03-14

    With the growing number of patients in need of liver transplantation, there is a need for adopting new and modifying existing allocation policies that prioritize patients for liver transplantation. Policy should ensure fair allocation that is reproducible and strongly predictive of best pre and post transplant outcomes while taking into account the natural history of the potential recipients liver disease and its complications. There is wide acceptance for allocation policies based on urgency in which the sickest patients on the waiting list with the highest risk of mortality receive priority. Model for end-stage liver disease and Child-Turcotte-Pugh scoring system, the two most universally applicable systems are used in urgency-based prioritization. However, other factors must be considered to achieve optimal allocation. Factors affecting pre-transplant patient survival and the quality of the donor organ also affect outcome. The optimal system should have allocation prioritization that accounts for both urgency and transplant outcome. We reviewed past and current liver allocation systems with the aim of generating further discussion about improvement of current policies.

  6. Advances in liver transplantation allocation systems

    PubMed Central

    Schilsky, Michael L; Moini, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    With the growing number of patients in need of liver transplantation, there is a need for adopting new and modifying existing allocation policies that prioritize patients for liver transplantation. Policy should ensure fair allocation that is reproducible and strongly predictive of best pre and post transplant outcomes while taking into account the natural history of the potential recipients liver disease and its complications. There is wide acceptance for allocation policies based on urgency in which the sickest patients on the waiting list with the highest risk of mortality receive priority. Model for end-stage liver disease and Child-Turcotte-Pugh scoring system, the two most universally applicable systems are used in urgency-based prioritization. However, other factors must be considered to achieve optimal allocation. Factors affecting pre-transplant patient survival and the quality of the donor organ also affect outcome. The optimal system should have allocation prioritization that accounts for both urgency and transplant outcome. We reviewed past and current liver allocation systems with the aim of generating further discussion about improvement of current policies. PMID:26973389

  7. Combined 'en bloc' liver and pancreas transplantation in patients with liver disease and type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Pirenne, Jacques; Deloose, Koen; Coosemans, Willy; Aerts, Raymond; Van Gelder, Frank; Kuypers, Dirk; Maes, Bart; Verslype, Chris; Yap, Paul; Van Steenbergen, Werner; Roskams, Tania; Mathieu, Chantal; Fevery, Johan; Nevens, Frederik

    2004-11-01

    Liver disease alters the glucose metabolism and may cause diabetes, but this condition is potentially reversible with liver transplantation (LTx). Type 1 diabetes mellitus may be coincidentally present in a LTx candidate and immunosuppressive drugs will aggravate diabetes and make its management more difficult for posttransplant. In addition, diabetes negatively influences outcome after LTx. Therefore, the question arises as to why not transplanting the pancreas in addition to the liver in selected patients suffering from both liver disease and Type 1 diabetes. We report two cases of en bloc combined liver and pancreatic transplantation, a technique originally described a decade ago in the treatment of upper abdominal malignancies but rarely used for the treatment of combined liver disease and Type 1 diabetes. Both recipients are currently liver disease-free and insulin-free more than 2 and 4 years posttransplant, respectively. Surgical, medical and immunological aspects of combined liver-pancreas transplantation are discussed in the light of the existing relevant literature.

  8. Candidates for liver transplantation with alcoholic liver disease: Psychosocial aspects

    PubMed Central

    Telles-Correia, Diogo; Mega, Inês

    2015-01-01

    In Europe, 30% to 50% of liver transplantations are currently due to alcoholic liver disease (ALD). In the United States, this percentage is 17.2%. Post-transplant survival and other predictors of clinical course do not differ significantly from those in other types of transplanted patients, as long as there is no relapse of drinking. However, 20%-25% of these patients lapse or relapse to heavy drinking post-operatively, which has been associated with an increased risk of liver damage and mortality. It is therefore crucial to design specific selection and follow-up strategies aimed at this particular type of patient. Several good and poor prognosis factors that could help to predict a relapse have been suggested, among them the duration of abstinence, social support, a family history of alcoholism, abuse diagnosis versus alcohol dependence, non-acceptance of diagnosis related to alcohol use, presence of severe mental illness, non-adherence in a broad sense, number of years of alcoholism, and daily quantity of alcohol consumption. In this article, we discuss these and other, more controversial factors in selecting ALD patients for liver transplantation. Abstinence should be the main goal after transplantation in an ALD patient. In this article, we review the several definitions of post-transplant relapse, its monitoring and the psychopharmacological and psychotherapeutic treatment. PMID:26494959

  9. Cadaveric liver transplantation in biliary atresia splenic malformation syndrome with the absence of retrohepatic inferior vena cava, preduodenal portal vein, and intestinal malrotation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sen-Oran, E; Yankol, Y; Tuzun, B; Kocak, B; Kanmaz, T; Acarli, K; Kalayoglu, M

    2008-01-01

    A 9-month-old female infant with biliary atresia underwent cadaveric liver transplantation due to progressive cholestatic hepatitis following a Kasai operation. She had biliary atresia splenic malformation syndrome (BASM) composed of an absent retrohepatic inferior vena cava with an azygous connection, preduodenal portal vein, polysplenia, and intestinal malrotation. A portal vein thrombosis developed on the 4th postoperative day requiring immediate treatment by thrombectomy. The patient is well with normal liver function at 3 months follow-up. Although BASM may render the transplantation more difficult, the presence of BASM is no longer a contraindication to liver transplantation.

  10. Long Term Outcomes after Pediatric Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Long term outcomes after liver transplantation are major determinants of quality of life and of the value of this heroic treatment. As short term outcomes are excellent, our community is turning to take a harder look at long term outcomes. The purpose of this paper is to review these outcomes, and highlight proposed treatments, as well as pressing topics needing to be studied. A systemic review of the English literature was carried in PubMed, covering all papers addressing long term outcomes in pediatric liver transplant from 2000-2013. Late outcomes after pediatric liver transplant affect the liver graft in the form of chronic liver dysfunction. The causes include rejection particularly humoral rejection, but also de novo autoimmune hepatitis, and recurrent disease. The metabolic syndrome is a major factor in long term cardiovascular complication risk. Secondary infections, kidney dysfunction and malignancy remain a reality of those patients. There is growing evidence of late cognitive and executive function delays affecting daily life productivity as well as likely adherence. Finally, despite a good health status, quality of life measures are comparable to those of children with chronic diseases. Long term outcomes are the new frontier in pediatric liver transplantation. Much is needed to improve graft survival, but also to avoid systemic morbidities from long term immunosuppression. Quality of life is a new inclusive measure that will require interventions and innovative approaches respectful not only on the patients but also of their social circle. PMID:24511516

  11. Liver transplantation: Current status and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Jadlowiec, Caroline C; Taner, Timucin

    2016-01-01

    Great progress has been made in the field of liver transplantation over the past two decades. This progress, however, also brings up the next set of challenges: First, organ shortage remains a major limitation, and accounts for a large proportion of wait list mortality. While living donation has successfully increased the total number of liver transplants done in Asian countries, the total number of such transplants has been stagnant in the western hemisphere. As such, there has been a significant effort over the past decade to increase the existing deceased donor pool. This effort has resulted in a greater use of liver allografts following donation after cardiac death (DCD) along with marginal and extended criteria donors. Improved understanding of the pathophysiology of liver allografts procured after circulatory arrest has not only resulted in better selection and management of DCD donors, but has also helped in the development of mechanical perfusion strategies. Early outcomes demonstrating the clinical applicability of both hypothermic and normothermic perfusion and its potential to impact patient survival and allograft function have generated much interest. Second, long-term outcomes of liver transplant recipients have not improved significantly, as recipients continue to succumb to complications of long-term immunosuppression, such as infection, malignancy and renal failure. Furthermore, recent evidence suggests that chronic immune-mediated injury to the liver may also impact graft function. PMID:27182155

  12. Delayed Gastric Emptying after Living Donor Hepatectomy for Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Griesemer, Adam D.; Parsons, Ronald F.; Graham, Jay A.; Emond, Jean C.; Samstein, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Delayed gastric emptying is a significant postoperative complication of living donor hepatectomy for liver transplantation and may require endoscopic or surgical intervention in severe cases. Although the mechanism of posthepatectomy delayed gastric emptying remains unknown, vagal nerve injury during intraoperative dissection and adhesion formation postoperatively between the stomach and cut liver surface are possible explanations. Here, we present the first reported case of delayed gastric emptying following fully laparoscopic hepatectomy for living donor liver transplantation. Additionally, we also present a case in which symptoms developed after open right hepatectomy, but for which dissection for left hepatectomy was first performed. Through our experience and these two specific cases, we favor a neurovascular etiology for delayed gastric emptying after hepatectomy. PMID:25610698

  13. Thoracic radiology in kidney and liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Joel E; Rabkin, John M

    2002-04-01

    Renal transplantation accounts for more than half of all solid organ transplants performed in the U.S., and the liver is the second most commonly transplanted solid organ. Although abdominal imaging procedures are commonplace in these patients, there has been relatively little attention paid to thoracic imaging applications. Preoperative imaging is crucial to aid in the exclusion of infectious or malignant disease. In the perioperative time period, thoracic imaging focuses both on standard intensive care unit care, including monitoring devices and their complications, and on the early infections that can occur. Postoperative management is divided into three time periods, and the principles governing the occurrence of infections and malignancies are reviewed. Anatomic and pathologic aspects unique to kidney and liver transplantation patients are also discussed.

  14. [Hepatic cell transplantation: a new therapy in liver diseases].

    PubMed

    Pareja, Eugenia; Cortés, Miriam; Martínez, Amparo; Vila, Juan José; López, Rafael; Montalvá, Eva; Calzado, Angeles; Mir, José

    2010-07-01

    Liver transplantation has been remarkably effective in the treatment in patients with end-stage liver disease. However, disparity between solid-organ supply and increased demand is the greatest limitation, resulting in longer waiting times and increase in mortality of transplant recipients. This situation creates the need to seek alternatives to orthotopic liver transplantation.Hepatocyte transplantation or liver cell transplantation has been proposed as the best method to support patients. The procedure consists of transplanting individual cells to a recipient organ in sufficient quantity to survive and restore the function. The capacity of hepatic regeneration is the biological basis of hepatocyte transplantation. This therapeutic option is an experimental procedure in some patients with inborn errors of metabolism, fulminant hepatic failure and acute and chronic liver failure, as a bridge to orthotopic liver transplantation. In the Hospital La Fe of Valencia, we performed the first hepatocyte transplantation in Spain creating a new research work on transplant program.

  15. [Sirolimus for rescue of recurrent acute rejection and diabetes mellitus after liver transplantation: report of one case].

    PubMed

    Roque, Jorge; Ríos, Gloria; Hepp, Juan; Humeres, Roberto; Ríos, Horacio; Herrera, José M; Rius, Montserrat

    2005-10-01

    Sirolimus (SRL) is a new immunosuppressive drug approved for renal transplantation, but is being used increasingly in orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Compared with the calcineurin inhibitors, SRL has different mechanisms of action and side effects profile. Thus, this drug offers significant potential advantages over other immunosuppressive agents. SRL does not cause glucose intolerance, hypertension or renal failure, but it may cause dyslipidemia, hepatic artery thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, anemia, leukopenia, oral mucosa ulcers, edema, arthralgias and wound complications. SRL inhibits the signal of interleukin 2 at a post-receptor level, inhibiting lymphocyte proliferation and fibroblast proliferation. It also has antineoplastic and antifungal effects. We report a 10 years old girl who underwent OLT, experiencing a biopsy-proven recurrent acute rejection (AR) in spite of using three immunosuppressive agents (tacrolimus, mofetil micofenolate and steroids). She developed diabetes mellitus as a consequence of the immunosuppressive therapy. She was rescued with SRL, not experiencing AR again. Mofetil micofenolate, steroids and insulin could be discontinued and tacrolimus doses were reduced, without experiencing severe complications. SRL is a new and safe immunosuppressive agent for rescue in patients with OLT and recurrent AR.

  16. Paracoccidioidomycosis in a liver transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Lima, Thais Carneiro; Bezerra, Regis Otaviano Franca; Siqueira, Luiz Tenório de Brito; Menezes, Marcos Roberto de; Leite, Claudia da Costa; Porta, Gilda; Cerri, Giovanni Guido

    2017-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis is a granulomatous systemic mycosis that is endemic in Latin America; it is an extremely rare infection following solid organ transplantation. In this study, we describe the first report of disseminated paracoccidioidomycosis in a 3-year-old girl who underwent liver transplantation 2 years previously. The radiologic diagnosis and patient follow-up are described. In addition, we review the clinical evolution and treatment regimens for this infection.

  17. Use of right lobe graft with type IV portal vein accompanied by type IV biliary tree in living donor liver transplantation: report of a case

    PubMed Central

    Shehata, Mahmoud Refaat; Jung, Sung-Won; Yu, Young-Dong; Suh, Sung-Ock

    2014-01-01

    Anatomic variations of the portal vein (PV) and bile duct (BD) are more common on the right lobe as compared with left lobe grafts in living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). We recently experienced a case of LDLT for hepatocellular carcinoma combined with liver cirrhosis secondary to hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus infection. The only available donor had right lobe graft with type IV PV associated with type IV BD. The patient underwent relaparotomy for PV stenting due to PV stenosis. Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage was done for a stricture at the site of biliary reconstruction. Thereafter, the patient was discharged in good health. Our experience suggests that, the use of right lobe graft with type IV PV accompanied by type IV BD should be the last choice for LDLT, because of its technical difficulty and risks of associated complications. PMID:24949326

  18. Fatal Emmonsia sp. Infection and Fungemia after Orthotopic Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Jason Y.; Luo, Robert; Banaei, Niaz; Concepcion, Waldo; Ho, Dora Y.

    2017-01-01

    We report a fatal case of disseminated Emmonsia sp. infection in a 55-year-old man who received an orthotopic liver transplant. The patient had pneumonia and fungemia, and multisystem organ failure developed. As human habitats and the number of immunocompromised patients increase, physicians must be aware of this emerging fungal infection. PMID:28098544

  19. Extended Criteria Donors in Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Vodkin, Irine; Kuo, Alexander

    2017-05-01

    Mortality rates on the liver transplant waiting list are increasing. The shortage of organs has resulted in higher utilization of extended criteria donors (ECDs), with centers pushing the limits of what is acceptable for transplantation. Donor quality is more appropriately represented as a continuum of risk, and careful selection and matching of ECD grafts with recipients may lead to excellent outcomes. Although there is no precise definition for what constitutes an ECD liver, this review focuses on frequently cited characteristics, including donor age, steatosis, donation after cardiac death, and donors with increased risk of disease transmission.

  20. Subacute liver failure secondary to black cohosh leading to liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Tiong Y; Considine, Aisling; Quaglia, Alberto; Shawcross, Debbie L

    2013-01-01

    The use of herbal medications is increasing significantly in the UK and there is a perception that herbal preparations are without adverse effects. This case report highlights the potential risks of black cohosh, which is one of the most commonly used herbal products. This is a case report of a 60-year-old Caucasian lady who presented with subacute liver failure secondary to taking black cohosh. This was further confirmed by liver biopsy and she subsequently deteriorated and underwent liver transplantation. Available evidence supports an association between black cohosh and risk of hepatotoxicity. In current literature, there have only been four previously reported cases of hepatotoxicity associated with black cohosh, which required liver transplantation. We submit that our patient represents the fifth case. We recommend that patients taking this supplement should have close monitoring of their hepatic function, especially in the presence of other risk factors. PMID:23833086

  1. Donor Safety in Adult-Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation: A Single-Center Experience of 356 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Haipeng; Yang, Jiayin; Yan, Lunan

    2016-01-01

    Background As an important means to tackle the worldwide shortage of liver grafts, adult-adult living donor liver transplantation (A-ALDLT) is the most massive operation a healthy person could undergo, so donor safety is of prime importance. However, most previous research focused on recipients, while complications in donors have not been fully described or investigated. Material/Methods To investigate donor safety in terms of postoperative complications, the clinical data of 356 A-ALDLT donors in our center from January 2002 to September 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. These patients were divided into a pre-2008 group (before January 2008) and a post-2008 group (after January 2008). Donor safety was evaluated with regard to the type, frequency, and severity of postoperative complications. Results There were no donor deaths in our center during this period. The overall complication rate was 23.0% (82/356). The proportion of Clavien I, II, III, and IV complications was 51.2% (42/82), 25.6% (21/82), 22.0% (18/82), and 1.2% (1/82), respectively. In all the donors, the incidence of Clavien I, II, III, and IV complications was 11.8% (42/356), 5.9% (21/356), 5.1% (18/356), and 0.3% (1/356), respectively. The overall complication rate in the post-2008 group was significantly lower than that in the pre-2008 group (18.1% (41/227) vs. 32.6% (42/129), P<0.01). Biliary complications were the most common, with an incidence of 8.4% (30/356). Conclusions The risk to A-ALDLT donors is controllable and acceptable with improvement in preoperative assessment and liver surgery. PMID:27178367

  2. Liver transplant center risk tolerance.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Scott R; Karp, Seth J; Curry, Michael P; Barugel, Martin; Rodrigue, James R; Mandelbrot, Didier A; Rogers, Christin P; Hanto, Douglas W

    2012-01-01

    Recent changes in Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) condition for participation, using benchmark volume/outcomes requirements for certification, have been implemented. Consequently, the ability of a transplant center to assess its risk tolerance is important in successful management. An analysis of SRTR data was performed to determine donor/recipient risk factors for graft loss or patient death in the first year. Each transplant performed was then assigned a prospective relative risk (RR) of failure. Using a Monte-Carlo simulation, transplants were selected at random that met the centers' acceptable risk tolerance. Transplant center volume was fixed and its risk tolerance was adjusted to determine the impact on outcomes. The model was run 1000 times on centers with varying volume. The modeling demonstrates that centers with smaller annual volumes must use a more risk taking strategy than larger volume centers to avoid being flagged for CMS volume requirements. The modeling also demonstrates optimal risk taking strategies for centers based upon volume to minimize the probability of being flagged for not meeting volume or outcomes benchmarks. Small volume centers must perform higher risk transplants to meet current CMS requirements and are at risk for adverse action secondary to chance alone.

  3. Liver Transplantation in India: At the Crossroads.

    PubMed

    Nagral, Sanjay; Nanavati, Aditya; Nagral, Aabha

    2015-12-01

    As the liver transplant journey in India reaches substantial numbers and suggests quality technical expertise, it is time to dispassionately look at the big picture, identify problems, and consider corrective measures for the future. Several features characterize the current scenario. Although the proportion of deceased donor liver transplants is increasing, besides major regional imbalances, the activity is heavily loaded in favor of the private sector and live donor transplants. The high costs of the procedure, the poor participation of public hospitals, the lack of a national registry, and outcomes reporting are issues of concern. Organ sharing protocols currently based on chronology or institutional rotation need to move to a more justiciable severity-based system. Several measures can expand the deceased donor pool. The safety of the living donor continues to need close scrutiny and focus. Multiple medical challenges unique to the Indian situation are also being thrown up. Although many of the deficits demand state intervention and policy changes the transplant community needs to take notice and highlight them. The future of liver transplantation in India should move toward a more accountable, equitable, and accessible form. We owe this to our citizens who have shown tremendous faith in us by volunteering to be living donors as well as consenting for deceased donation.

  4. Liver Transplantation in India: At the Crossroads

    PubMed Central

    Nagral, Sanjay; Nanavati, Aditya; Nagral, Aabha

    2015-01-01

    As the liver transplant journey in India reaches substantial numbers and suggests quality technical expertise, it is time to dispassionately look at the big picture, identify problems, and consider corrective measures for the future. Several features characterize the current scenario. Although the proportion of deceased donor liver transplants is increasing, besides major regional imbalances, the activity is heavily loaded in favor of the private sector and live donor transplants. The high costs of the procedure, the poor participation of public hospitals, the lack of a national registry, and outcomes reporting are issues of concern. Organ sharing protocols currently based on chronology or institutional rotation need to move to a more justiciable severity-based system. Several measures can expand the deceased donor pool. The safety of the living donor continues to need close scrutiny and focus. Multiple medical challenges unique to the Indian situation are also being thrown up. Although many of the deficits demand state intervention and policy changes the transplant community needs to take notice and highlight them. The future of liver transplantation in India should move toward a more accountable, equitable, and accessible form. We owe this to our citizens who have shown tremendous faith in us by volunteering to be living donors as well as consenting for deceased donation. PMID:26900275

  5. Quantification of C4d deposition and hepatitis C virus RNA in tissue in cases of graft rejection and hepatitis C recurrence after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Alice Tung Wan; de Mello, Evandro Sobroza; Alves, Venâncio Avancini Ferreira; Cavalheiro, Norma de Paula; Melo, Carlos Eduardo; Bonazzi, Patricia Rodrigues; Tengan, Fatima Mitiko; Freire, Maristela Pinheiro; Barone, Antonio Alci; D'Albuquerque, Luiz Augusto Carneiro; Abdala, Edson

    2015-01-01

    Histology is the gold standard for diagnosing acute rejection and hepatitis C recurrence after liver transplantation. However, differential diagnosis between the two can be difficult. We evaluated the role of C4d staining and quantification of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA levels in liver tissue. This was a retrospective study of 98 liver biopsy samples divided into four groups by histological diagnosis: acute rejection in patients undergoing liver transplant for hepatitis C (RejHCV+), HCV recurrence in patients undergoing liver transplant for hepatitis C (HCVTx+), acute rejection in patients undergoing liver transplant for reasons other than hepatitis C and chronic hepatitis C not transplanted (HCVTx-). All samples were submitted for immunohistochemical staining for C4d and HCV RNA quantification. Immunoexpression of C4d was observed in the portal vessels and was highest in the HCVTx- group. There was no difference in C4d expression between the RejHCV+ and HCVTx+ groups. However, tissue HCV RNA levels were higher in the HCVTx+ group samples than in the RejHCV+ group samples. Additionally, there was a significant correlation between tissue and serum levels of HCV RNA. The quantification of HCV RNA in liver tissue might prove to be an efficient diagnostic test for the recurrence of HCV infection. PMID:25742264

  6. Metabolic complications in liver transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Pérez, Miguel; González-Grande, Rocío; Omonte Guzmán, Edith; Amo Trillo, Víctor; Rodrigo López, Juan Miguel

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MS), which includes obesity, dyslipidaemia, hypertension and hyperglycaemia according to the most widely accepted definitions now used, is one of the most common post-transplant complications, with a prevalence of 44%-58%. The MS, together with the immunosuppression, is considered the main risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in transplant recipients, which in turn accounts for 19%-42% of all deaths unrelated to the graft. The presence of MS represents a relative risk for the development of CVD and death of 1.78. On the other hand, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), considered as the manifestation of the MS in the liver, is now the second leading reason for liver transplantation in the United States after hepatitis C and alcohol. NAFLD has a high rate of recurrence in the liver graft and a direct relation with the worsening of other metabolic disorders, such as insulin resistance or diabetes mellitus. Consequently, it is vitally important to identify and treat as soon as possible such modifiable factors as hypertension, overweight, hyperlipidaemia or diabetes in transplanted patients to thus minimise the impact on patient survival. Additionally, steroid-free regimens are favoured, with minimal immunosuppression to limit the possible effects on the development of the MS. PMID:27605877

  7. Spectrum of De Novo Cancers and Predictors in Liver Transplantation: Analysis of the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients Database

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jie; Hu, Zhenhua; Zhang, Qijun; Li, Zhiwei; Xiang, Jie; Yan, Sheng; Wu, Jian; Zhang, Min; Zheng, Shusen

    2016-01-01

    Background De novo malignancies occur after liver transplantation because of immunosuppression and improved long-term survival. But the spectrums and associated risk factors remain unclear. Aims To describe the overall pattern of de novo cancers in liver transplant recipients. Methods Data from Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients from October 1987 to December 2009 were analyzed. The spectrum of de novo cancer was analyzed and logistic-regression was used to identify predictors of do novo malignancies. Results Among 89,036 liver transplant recipients, 6,834 recipients developed 9,717 post-transplant malignancies. We focused on non-skin malignancies. A total of 3,845 recipients suffered from 4,854 de novo non-skin malignancies, including 1,098 de novo hematological malignancies, 38 donor-related cases, and 3,718 de novo solid-organ malignancies. Liver transplant recipients had more than 11 times elevated cancer risk compared with the general population. The long-term overall survival was better for recipients without de novo cancer. Multivariate analysis indicated that HCV, alcoholic liver disease, autoimmune liver disease, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, re-transplantation, combined transplantation, hepatocellular carcinoma, immunosuppression regime of cellcept, cyclosporine, sirolimus, steroids and tacrolimus were independent predictors for the development of solid malignancies after liver transplantation. Conclusions De novo cancer risk was elevated in liver transplant recipients. Multiple factors including age, gender, underlying liver disease and immunosuppression were associated with the development of de novo cancer. This is useful in guiding recipient selection as well as post-transplant surveillance and prevention. PMID:27171501

  8. Liver transplantation: Fifty years of experience

    PubMed Central

    Song, Alice Tung Wan; Avelino-Silva, Vivian Iida; Pecora, Rafael Antonio Arruda; Pugliese, Vincenzo; D’Albuquerque, Luiz Augusto Carneiro; Abdala, Edson

    2014-01-01

    Since 1963, when the first human liver transplantation (LT) was performed by Thomas Starzl, the world has witnessed 50 years of development in surgical techniques, immunosuppression, organ allocation, donor selection, and the indications and contraindications for LT. This has led to the mainstream, well-established procedure that has saved innumerable lives worldwide. Today, there are hundreds of liver transplant centres in over 80 countries. This review aims to describe the main aspects of LT regarding the progressive changes that have occurred over the years. We herein review historical aspects since the first experimental studies and the first attempts at human transplantation. We also provide an overview of immunosuppressive agents and their potential side effects, the evolution of the indications and contraindications of LT, the evolution of survival according to different time periods, and the evolution of methods of organ allocation. PMID:24833866

  9. Diagnostic and Therapeutic Challenges in a Liver Transplant Recipient with Central Nervous System Invasive Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Dionissios, Neofytos; Shmuel, Shoham; Kerry, Dierberg; Katharine, Le; Simon, Dufresne; Sean, Zhang X; Kieren, Marr A

    2012-01-01

    This is a case report of central nervous system (CNS) invasive aspergillosis (IA) in a liver transplant recipient, which illustrates the utility of enzyme-based diagnostic tools for the timely and accurate diagnosis of IA, the treatment challenges and poor outcomes associated with CNS IA in liver transplant recipients. PMID:22676861

  10. Transplantation of Deceased Donor Livers With Elevated Levels of Serum Transaminases at Shiraz Transplant Center

    PubMed Central

    Fakhar, Nasir; Nikeghbalian, Saman; Kazemi, Kourosh; Shamsayeefar, Ali Reza; Gholami, Siavash; Kasraianfard, Amir; Malek-Hosseini, Seyed Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background The current organ shortage has prompted the use of marginal organs. We conducted this retrospective study to present our experience with transplanting deceased donor livers with elevated levels of serum transaminases and to explain whether elevated levels of serum transaminases in donors affect allograft function and survival of the recipients. Methods Data of deceased donor livers and patients, who underwent liver transplantation from March 2013 to March 2015 at Shiraz center for organ transplantation, was reviewed. Liver donors with aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and/or alanine aminotransferase (ALT) level of more than 500 IU/l and their related recipients were considered as the case group (n = 24) and the others were considered as the control group (n = 834). Results In the case group, the medians of levels of serum AST and ALT of donors were 834 ± 425 IU/L (range: 250 - 2285) and 507 ± 367 IU/L (range: 100 - 1600), respectively. Recipients were followed for a median of 13.6 ± 9 months (range: 7 - 28.4). Post-transplant complications were acute rejection (n = 5), infection (n = 3), portal vein thrombosis (n = 3), bile duct stricture (n = 1), and hepatic artery stenosis (n = 1). The one-year survival rate of the patients was 91.7%. Demographics, post-transplant complications and one-year survival rates were not significantly different between the two study groups. Conclusions Transplanting deceased donor livers with markedly elevated liver enzymes may be an acceptable choice for expanding the donor pool. PMID:27882068

  11. Fibrin glue-infiltrating hemostasis for intractable bleeding from the liver or spleen during liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Dong-Hwan; Song, Gi-Won; Ha, Tae-Yong; Jwa, Eun-Kyeong; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Portal hypertension induces congestion of the liver and spleen, thus any capsular or parenchymal injury to these organs can produce intractable bleeding which generally is not easily controlled. To cope with intractable bleeding such as being encountered during liver transplantation, we developed an infiltrating hemostasis technique as a conceptual shift from conventional application methods, in which fibrin glue is locally injected into the bleeding area on the liver or spleen. This technique, which uses a fibrin glue kit (2 ml kit; Greenplast, Green Cross, Seoul, Korea), consists of inserting the needle 0.5-1 cm deep at the bleeding point, forcefully injecting 1 ml of fibrin glue contained in the fibrin glue kit, and then slowly withdrawing the needle with continuous forceful injection of the remaining 1 ml of fibrin glue. We have successfully performed this procedure in 6 cases of living donor liver transplantation and in 2 cases of non-transplant resection of the cirrhotic livers with hepatocellular carcinoma. This technique was also successfully applied to one liver transplant recipient in which intractable bleeding occurred from a small laceration at the spleen. Our fibrin glue-infiltrating hemostasis would be indicated to intractable bleeding from the hepatic or splenic cut surface. In such a situation, it would be applicable as a second-line rescue method for hemostasis. PMID:28261700

  12. Fibrin glue-infiltrating hemostasis for intractable bleeding from the liver or spleen during liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Shin; Jung, Dong-Hwan; Song, Gi-Won; Ha, Tae-Yong; Jwa, Eun-Kyeong; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2016-11-01

    Portal hypertension induces congestion of the liver and spleen, thus any capsular or parenchymal injury to these organs can produce intractable bleeding which generally is not easily controlled. To cope with intractable bleeding such as being encountered during liver transplantation, we developed an infiltrating hemostasis technique as a conceptual shift from conventional application methods, in which fibrin glue is locally injected into the bleeding area on the liver or spleen. This technique, which uses a fibrin glue kit (2 ml kit; Greenplast, Green Cross, Seoul, Korea), consists of inserting the needle 0.5-1 cm deep at the bleeding point, forcefully injecting 1 ml of fibrin glue contained in the fibrin glue kit, and then slowly withdrawing the needle with continuous forceful injection of the remaining 1 ml of fibrin glue. We have successfully performed this procedure in 6 cases of living donor liver transplantation and in 2 cases of non-transplant resection of the cirrhotic livers with hepatocellular carcinoma. This technique was also successfully applied to one liver transplant recipient in which intractable bleeding occurred from a small laceration at the spleen. Our fibrin glue-infiltrating hemostasis would be indicated to intractable bleeding from the hepatic or splenic cut surface. In such a situation, it would be applicable as a second-line rescue method for hemostasis.

  13. The Liver Transplant Program at Tianjin First Center Hospital.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhongyang

    2011-01-01

    The liver transplant program at the transplant center of Tianjin First Center Hospital opened in 1994 and has become a leading center for academic research and development in clinical liver transplantation during the past 18 years. As of Nov 30, 2011, we had performed 4,103 liver transplantations in patients ranging from 6 months to 79 years old. Since 1998, the program has ranked first in mainland China in the annual number of liver transplants performed, the cumulative total liver transplants and the number of long-surviving patients. We've accomplished a number of "firsts" among the Chinese liver transplant centers, including: the first split liver transplantation, the first pediatric liver transplant, the first living donor simultaneous liver-kidney transplant, the first dual-graft liver transplant using a domino right lobe and a living donor left lobe, the first laparoscopic assisted live donor right hepatectomy including the middle hepatic vein and we have assembled the first liver transplant chain comprising multiple donors and recipients. We have performed the largest number of living related and split liver transplantations in mainland China. The combined prophylactic protocol of "Lamivudine and HBIG" to prevent HBV recurrence post transplantation was first used by our center in China and now is utilized by most of the domestic transplant centers. We have begun using livers from donors after cardiac death (DCD) during the past 2 years, with careful donor selection and recipient management. All the approaches and techniques we've developed are aimed at the utilization of all types of available grafts. However, increasing the rate of transplantation with excellent graft and recipient survival are still the challenges facing us.

  14. Critical care issues in adult liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Palepu B.; Kapoor, Dharmesh; Raya, Ravichandra; Subrahmanyam, M.; Juneja, Deven; Sukanya, B.

    2009-01-01

    Over the last decade, liver transplantation has become an operational reality in our part of the world. As a result, clinicians working in an intensive care unit are more likely to be exposed to these patients in the immediate postoperative period, and thus, it is important that they have a working knowledge of the common complications, when they are likely to occur, and how to deal with them. The main focus of this review is to address the variety of critical care issues in liver transplant recipients and to impress upon the need to provide favorable circumstances for the new liver to start functioning and maintain the function of other organs to aid in this process. PMID:20040807

  15. Management of arterial hypertension occurring early after living donor liver transplantation in children: report of three cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Taiyu; Kato, Hitoshi; Kaneko, Masahide; Kasahara, Mureo

    2009-11-01

    Three pediatric patients with hypertension occurring early after liver transplantation are reviewed. The patients were all female, and underwent living donor liver transplantation at the age of 9 years, 1 month, and 7 months. The etiology of liver disease was cirrhosis due to biliary atresia in two patients and fulminant hepatitis in one patient. Antihypertensive therapy with calcium channel blocker alone was not effective. Blood pressure was eventually controlled after the administration of a beta-adrenergic blocker in addition to the calcium channel blocker to all patients. No end-organ damage was observed, except that two patients developed temporary left ventricular hypertrophy.

  16. Bioengineering in organ transplantation: targeting the liver.

    PubMed

    Fukumitsu, K; Yagi, H; Soto-Gutierrez, A

    2011-01-01

    About 27,000 deaths are registered annually in the United States due to liver disease. At this time, the only definitive treatment of hepatic failure is orthotopic transplantation. However, there is a critical shortage of organs with the total waiting list for all organs currently at 100,000 requests. The number is increasing by 5% every year. Given that only organs in pristine condition are transplantable and that the hidden demand for organs as an anti-aging solution will be many times the current figures, orthotopic transplantation will always remain a limited pool. The increasing donor organ shortage requires consideration of alternative emerging technologies. Regenerative medicine may offer novel strategies to treat patients with end-stage organ failure. The ultimate aim of cell transplantation, tissue engineering, and stem cells is to regenerate tissues and organs. With the development of whole organ decellularization methods, the equation of organ shortage may dramatically change in the near future. Decellularized organs provide the ideal transplantable scaffold with all the necessary microstructure and extracellular cues for cell attachment, differentiation, vascularization, and function. New techniques to re-engineer organs may have major implications for the fields of drug discovery, regeneration biology, and ultimately organ transplantation. In this review we have provided an overview of complementary approaches to study and enhance the success of organ repopulation strategies creating new grafts/organs for transplantation.

  17. A regional experience with emergency liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Washburn, W K; Bradley, J; Cosimi, A B; Freeman, R B; Hull, D; Jenkins, R L; Lewis, W D; Lorber, M I; Schweizer, R T; Vacanti, J P; Rohrer, R J

    1996-01-27

    Liver transplantation for patients requiring life-support results in the lowest survival and highest costs. A ten year (1983-1993) regional experience with liver transplantation for critically ill patients was undertaken to ascertain the fate of several subgroups of patients. Of the 828 liver transplants performed at six transplant centers within the region over this period, 168 (20%) were done in patients who met today's criteria for a United Network of Organ Sharing (UNOS) status 1 (emergency) liver transplant candidate. Recipients were classified according to chronicity of disease and transplant number (primary-acute, primary-chronic, reTx-acute, reTx-chronic). Overall one-year survival was 50% for all status 1 recipients. The primary-acute subgroup (n = 63) experienced a 57% one-year survival compared with 50% for the primary-chronic (n = 51) subgroup (P = 0.07). Of the reTx-acute recipients (n = 43), 44% were alive at one year in comparison with 20% for the reTx-chronic (n = 11) group (P = 0.18). There was no significant difference in survival for the following: transplant center, blood group compatibility with donors, age, preservation solution, or graft size. For patients retransplanted for acute reasons (primary graft nonfunction (PGNF) or hepatic artery thrombosis [HAT]), survival was significantly better if a second donor was found within 3 days of relisting (52% vs. 20%; P = 0.012). Over the study period progressively fewer donor organs came from outside the region. No strong survival-based argument can be made for separating, in allocation priority, acute and chronic disease patients facing the first transplant as a status 1 recipient. Clearly patients suffering from PGNF or HAT do far better if retransplanted within 3 days. Establishing an even higher status for recipients with PGNF, perhaps drawing from a supraregional donor pool, would allow surgeons to accept more marginal donors, thus potentially expanding the pool, without significantly

  18. Successful embolization of hepatocelluar carcinoma with yttrium-90 glass microspheres prior to liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dean Y; Kwon, David S; Salem, Riad; Ma, Chan K; Abouljoud, Marwan S

    2006-03-01

    We report a case of a patient with end-stage liver disease secondary to hepatitis C, complicated by a large hepatocellular carcinoma. Because of the size of the tumor exceeded the Milan criteria, he was not a candidate for liver transplantation. However, after two treatments with yttrium-90 glass microsphere infusions, the tumor became smaller and the patient's alpha-fetoprotein level dropped to normal range. He was listed for transplantation and subsequently received a deceased donor liver transplant. Two years after his transplantation, he remains tumor free and has normal alpha-fetoprotein levels. This is the first reported case in the literature of using yttrium-90 microspheres as a bridge to liver transplantation in a patient with a large hepatocellular carcinoma. This therapy should be considered in patients with cirrhosis and large hepatocellular carcinomas exceeding current size criterion, who would otherwise be good candidates for transplantation.

  19. Post-transfusion acquired malaria complicating orthotopic liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Talabiska, D G; Komar, M J; Wytock, D H; Rubin, R A

    1996-02-01

    Early infectious complications within the first 3 months of orthotopic liver transplantation are common and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Here we report the first case of transfusion-acquired malaria in an orthotopic liver transplantation recipient. The patient was found to have Plasmodium ovale malaria during evaluation of a severe febrile illness. The infection was traced to a platelet transfusion and responded to treatment with chloroquine. Risk factors associated with the development of malaria infection are identifiable and should be reviewed from the recipient and donor when possible. Routes of infection in the liver transplant patient would include blood products, the organ itself, and resurgence of latent infection. Theoretically, immunosuppression may have an impact on the disease process. Clinicians caring for these patients need to have a high index of suspicion in order to diagnose and treat malaria effectively in the post-transplant setting. Although rare, malaria should be added to the list of pathogens that can infect organ transplant recipients.

  20. [Adult-onset Still's disease with liver failure requiring liver transplantation].

    PubMed

    Terán, Alvaro; Casafont, Fernando; Fábrega, Emilio; Martínez-Taboada, Víctor Manuel; Rodríguez-Valverde, Vicente; Pons-Romero, Fernando

    2009-12-01

    We present the case of a 23-year-old man with fever of unknown origin, who developed acute liver failure 2 months after symptom onset, requiring an urgent liver transplantation. The diagnosis of adult-onset Still's disease was established after the reappearance of symptoms after transplantation, and high doses of corticosteroids were used to control disease activity. Subsequently, given the impossibility of tapering the steroid dose, interleukin-1 receptor blocking treatment was started with satisfactory outcome. We also review the published literature.

  1. Muscle Mass Predicts Outcomes Following Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    DiMartini, Andrea; Cruz, Ruy J.; Dew, Mary Amanda; Myaskovsky, Larissa; Goodpaster, Bret; Fox, Kristen; Kim, Kevin H.; Fontes, Paulo

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims For patients with end-stage liver disease commonly used indices of nutritional status (i.e. body weight and BMI) are often inflated due to fluid overload (i.e. ascites, peripheral edema) resulting in an underdiagnosis of malnutrition. As muscle is the largest protein reservoir in the body, an estimate of muscle mass may be a more reliable and valid estimate of nutritional status. Methods Therefore, we used pre-transplant computerized tomography data of 338 liver transplant (LTX) candidates to identify muscle and fat mass based on a specific abdominal transverse section commonly used in body composition analyses and investigated the contribution of this measure to specific post-LTX outcomes. Results We found the majority, 68%, of our patients could be defined as cachetic. For men muscle mass predicted many important post-transplant outcomes including intensive care unit (ICU) and total length of stay and days of intubation. Muscle mass was a significant predictor of survival and also predicted disposition to home vs another facility. For women muscle mass predicted lengths of ICU and total stay and days of intubation but the effect was modest. Muscle mass did not predict survival or disposition for women. Conclusions As pre-transplant muscle mass was associated with many important post-operative outcomes we discuss these findings in the context of possible pre-transplant interventions to either improve or sustain muscle mass before surgery. PMID:23960026

  2. Liver transplantation in HIV-infected recipients.

    PubMed

    Roland, Michelle E; Stock, Peter G

    2006-08-01

    Although human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients are living longer and dying less often from complications related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), they are experiencing significant morbidity and mortality related to end-stage liver disease. Advances in the management of HIV disease have made it difficult to continue denying transplantation to this population based upon futility arguments alone. Patient and graft survival rates in HIV-infected study subjects appear similar to those in large transplant databases. There are no reports suggesting significant HIV disease progression. There are substantial interactions between immunosuppressants and antiretroviral drugs that require careful monitoring and dose adjustment. The evaluation and management of HIV-infected transplant candidates and recipients require excellent communication among a multidisciplinary team and the primary HIV care provider. It is critical that HIV clinicians and hepatologists are aware that liver transplantation is an option for HIV-infected patients at many transplant centers as delays in referral result in unnecessary mortality during the pretransplantation evaluation process.

  3. Liver Transplant in a Patient With Acquired Epidermolysis Bullosa and Associated End-Stage Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Vennarecci, Giovanni; Miglioresi, Lucia; Guglielmo, Nicola; Pelle, Fabio; Santoro, Roberto; Andreuccetti, Jacopo; Ceribelli, Cecilia; Stella, Pietro; Angelo, Corrado; Ettorre, Giuseppe Maria

    2015-12-15

    We report the first case of a liver transplant in a patient with epidermolysis bullosa acquisita and associated hepatitis B virus-hepatitis D virus cirrhosis and its inherent technical issues. Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita is an autoimmune multisystem disorder involving skin and mucosa characterized by the appearing of blisters and erosions. The more severe forms may result in nutritional compromise, anemia, osteopenia, dilated cardiomyopathy, laryngeal mucosal involvement, esophageal strictures, bladder, and kidney involvement requiring surgical intervention. Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita has become recognized as a multisystem disorder that poses several surgical challenges. This case shows that liver transplant is a feasible procedure in patients affected by epidermolysis bullosa acquisita. Patients with epidermolysis bullosa acquisita require a particular pretransplant assessment and a dedicated intra- and postoperative management of every invasive procedure that can traumatize the skin and mucosal epithelium to achieve an uneventful liver transplant. Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita does not represent a contraindication to liver transplant, and immunosuppression after transplant may favor a good systemic control of this immunologic disorder.

  4. Liver Transplantation at Mayo Clinic Florida.

    PubMed

    Lee, David D; Croome, Kristopher P; Perry, Dana K; Burns, Justin M; Nguyen, Justin H; Keaveny, Andrew P; Taner, C Burcin

    2014-01-01

    Over the sixteen year history of liver transplantation (LT) at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida (MCF), we have maintained a practice devoted to excellence in pre- and post-LT management for patients suffering from end stage liver disease. With an emphasis on quality, MCF has made several adjustments with the goal of better utilizing marginal grafts for both successful post-transplant outcomes and minimizing waitlist mortality. This systematic approach is most exemplified in our experience with donation after cardiac death (DCD) liver allografts. Understanding the events during procurement has been critical to reducing the complications associated with donor warm ischemia time that are unique to DCD allografts. Better matching of donors to recipients has helped identify patients who are safe to receive more marginal grafts with successful patient and graft survival. Recognizing the spectrum of degree of sickness in patients undergoing LT, we implemented a multidisciplinary approach that allows for the avoidance of the intensive care unit after LT. In these ways, MCF continues to distinguish itself as an innovator in the field of transplantation for the benefit of continued better care for our patients suffering from end stage liver disease.

  5. Perforation of the Right Ventricle Induced by Pulmonary Artery Catheter at Induction of Anesthesia for the Surgery for Liver Transplantation: A Case Report and Reviewed of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Auxiliadora-Martins, Maria; Apinagés dos Santos, Erick; Adans Wenzinger, Daniel; Alkmim-Teixeira, Gil Cezar; Neto, Gerardo Cristino de M.; Sankarankutty, Ajith Kumar; de Castro e Silva, Orlando; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Basile-Filho, Anibal

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of a 45-year-old male patient diagnosed with liver cirrhosis by hepatitis C and alcohol, with a Child-Pugh score C and a model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score of 27, and submitted to liver transplantation. The subject underwent insertion of the pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) in the right internal jugular vein, with technical difficulty concerning catheter advance. There was sudden hypotension, increase in central venous pressure (CVP), and decrease in SvO2 15 minutes after the PAC had been inserted, followed by cardiorespiratory arrest in pulseless electrical activity (PEA), which was promptly assisted with resuscitation. Pericardiocentesis was performed without success, so the individual was subjected to a subxiphoid pericardial window, which led to output of large amounts of blood as well as PEA reversal to sinus rhythm. Sternotomy was performed; rupture of the apex of the right ventricle (RV) was detected, and suture of the site was accomplished. After hemodynamic stabilization, the patient was transferred to the ICU, where he developed septic shock and, despite adequate therapy, died on the eighteenth day after ICU admission. PMID:20066172

  6. Bridging therapies and liver transplantation in acute liver failure, 10 years of MARS experience from Finland.

    PubMed

    Kantola, T; Ilmakunnas, M; Koivusalo, A-M; Isoniemi, H

    2011-01-01

    Acute liver failure is a life-threatening condition in the absence of liver transplantation option. The aetiology of liver failure is the most important factor determining the probability of native liver recovery and prognosis of the patient. Extracorporeal liver assist devices like MARS (Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System) may buy time for native liver recovery or serve as bridging therapy to liver transplantation, with reduced risk of cerebral complications. MARS treatment may alleviate hepatic encephalopathy even in patients with a completely necrotic liver. Taking this into account, better prognostic markers than hepatic encephalopathy should be used to assess the need for liver transplantation in acute liver failure.

  7. Split liver transplantation benefits the recipient of the 'leftover liver'.

    PubMed

    Dunn, S P; Haynes, J H; Nicolette, L A; Falkenstein, K; Pierson, A; Billmire, D F; Vinocur, C D; Weintraub, W

    1997-02-01

    The division of a single hepatic allograft to create two reduced-size grafts has been reported with decreased graft survival (50%) resulting in decreased enthusiasm for this approach. The authors reviewed their experience with 12 recipients of this procedure to evaluate the outcome of the children electively undergoing transplant with the "leftover liver." A retrospective review of six pairs of children receiving part of one hepatic allograft included donor anatomy, recipient operation, and allograft and patient outcomes. Recipient pairs were selected according to blood type compatibility, medical priority, and size restrictions of the larger right lobe and the smaller left lateral segment. Patient and graft survival were compared with elective and urgent patients undergoing whole or reduced-size transplants. Six donors weighed 71.8 +/- 17.4 kg and were 22.6 +/- 11.0 years of age. Recipients of the right lobe were 11.8 +/- 4.2 years of age and weighed 41.9 +/- 14 kg. Recipients of the left lateral segment were 1.81 +/- 1.1 years of age and weighed 9.85 +/- 1.82 kg. Six patients were initially offered the donor allograft because of their hospitalization, critical illness or waiting time. Six additional patients electively underwent transplantation with the leftover liver. Donor organs were screened for normal arterial anatomy. Division of the allograft was performed on the back table in the falciform groove. Generally the left lateral segment graft received the major portion of the hepatic artery and the right lobe the major portion of the portal vein. Five of six (83%) elective patients, two receiving the right lobe and three receiving the left lateral segment had prompt recovery and left the hospital without surgical complication. One recipient of a right lobe transplant died from primary allograft nonfunction. These results are not different from the outcomes of all elective patients who underwent transplantation with whole or reduced-sized transplants in the

  8. Brucella infection with pancytopenia after pediatric liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Polat, K Y; Tosun, M S; Ertekin, V; Aydinli, B; Emre, S

    2012-06-01

    Brucellosis is considered the most widespread zoonosis in the world. It has been reported that the prevalence of seropositivity among the Turkish population varies from 3% to 14%. We present a case of brucellosis after pediatric liver transplantation. A 15-year-old boy with the diagnosis of neuro Wilson's disease underwent deceased-donor liver transplantation. The postoperative immunosuppressive protocol consisted of steroids and tacrolimus. Two months after the operation the patient experienced fever to 40°C. The patient complained of poor appetite, headache, and diarrhea. He had had pancytopenia. Despite administration of appropriate antibiotics, antiviral and antifungal agents, fever persisted for > 1 month. Multiple blood, urine, stool, and sputum cultures were negative. Bone marrow aspirate revealed hypocellularity. Liver biopsy was performed, but rejection was not observed on biopsy specimen. Brucella serology was positive and Brucella agglutination titer was 1:320. Bone marrow culture was positive for Brucella but blood culture was negative. The patient was then treated with oral doxycycline and rifampin for 8 weeks. No previous case report about Brucella infection after liver transplantation has appeared in the literature, to our knowledge; our case is presented as the first. Bone marrow hypoplasia is a rare feature of Brucella infection. Our patient with brucellosis and pancytopenia had had hypocellular bone marrow. The clinical and hematologic findings resolved with treatment of the infection. Brucella infection should be suspected in liver transplanted recipients with fever of unknown origin, especially in a recipient who has lived in an endemic area. Brucella also should be considered as a possible diagnosis in patients with pancytopenia.

  9. Perioperative Monitoring in Liver Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shweta; Nasa, Vaibhav; Tandon, Manish

    2012-01-01

    Liver transplant (LT) is a major surgical undertaking involving major fluid shifts, hemodynamic instability and metabolic derangements in a patient with preexisting liver failure and multisystemic derangements. Monitoring and organ support initiated in the preoperative phase is continued intraoperatively and into the postoperative phase to ensure an optimal outcome. As cardiovascular events are the leading cause of non-graft related death among LT recipients, major emphasis is placed on cardiovascular monitoring. The other essential monitoring are the continuous assessment of coagulapathy, extent of metabolic derangements, dyselectrolytemis and intracranial pressure monitoring in patients with fulminant hepatic failure. The type and extent of monitoring differs with need according to preexisting child status of the patient and the extent of systemic derangements. It also varies among transplant centers and is mainly determined by individual or institutional practices. PMID:25755443

  10. Trajectories of Alcohol Consumption Following Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    DiMartini, Andrea; Dew, Mary Amanda; Day, Nancy; Fitzgerald, Mary Grace; Jones, Bobby L.; deVera, Michael; Fontes, Paulo

    2010-01-01

    Any use of alcohol in the years following liver transplantation (LTX) approaches 50% of patients transplanted for alcoholic liver disease (ALD). We collected detailed prospective data on alcohol consumption following LTX for ALD to investigate ongoing patterns of use. Using trajectory modeling we identified four distinct alcohol use trajectories. One group had minimal use over time. Two other groups developed early onset moderate to heavy consumption and one group developed late onset moderate use. These trajectories demonstrate that alcohol use varies based on timing of onset, quantity, and duration. Using discriminant function analysis, we examine characteristics of recipient’s pre-LTX alcohol histories and early post-LTX psychological stressors to identify the profile of those at risk for these specific trajectories. We discuss the relevance of these findings to clinical care and preliminarily to outcomes. PMID:20726963

  11. [Childhood liver transplantation. Long-term results].

    PubMed

    Jara, Paloma; Hierro, Loreto

    2010-05-01

    Liver transplantation allows long-term survival (10 years or more) in 75% of children receiving transplants before 2000. The risk of mortality after the first year is 4-10% in the next 10-20 years. Chronic rejection affects 6%. The need for late retransplantation is 3-5%. However, the follow-up of these patients involves the management of diverse problems in the graft (immunological, biliary, vascular) and others related to the use of immunosuppressants (renal dysfunction, lymphoproliferative syndrome). The transition from pediatric to adult care generates special needs. Adolescence and young adulthood are associated with a lack of compliance. Adult specialists should be aware of the special features of the original diagnosis and the surgical techniques used in childhood transplantation. Final quality of life is good overall but is lower than that in healthy young persons.

  12. Transfusion and coagulation management in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Clevenger, Ben; Mallett, Susan V

    2014-05-28

    There is wide variation in the management of coagulation and blood transfusion practice in liver transplantation. The use of blood products intraoperatively is declining and transfusion free transplantations take place ever more frequently. Allogenic blood products have been shown to increase morbidity and mortality. Primary haemostasis, coagulation and fibrinolysis are altered by liver disease. This, combined with intraoperative disturbances of coagulation, increases the risk of bleeding. Meanwhile, the rebalancing of coagulation homeostasis can put patients at risk of hypercoagulability and thrombosis. The application of the principles of patient blood management to transplantation can reduce the risk of transfusion. This includes: preoperative recognition and treatment of anaemia, reduction of perioperative blood loss and the use of restrictive haemoglobin based transfusion triggers. The use of point of care coagulation monitoring using whole blood viscoelastic testing provides a picture of the complete coagulation process by which to guide and direct coagulation management. Pharmacological methods to reduce blood loss include the use of anti-fibrinolytic drugs to reduce fibrinolysis, and rarely, the use of recombinant factor VIIa. Factor concentrates are increasingly used; fibrinogen concentrates to improve clot strength and stability, and prothrombin complex concentrates to improve thrombin generation. Non-pharmacological methods to reduce blood loss include surgical utilisation of the piggyback technique and maintenance of a low central venous pressure. The use of intraoperative cell salvage and normovolaemic haemodilution reduces allogenic blood transfusion. Further research into methods of decreasing blood loss and alternatives to blood transfusion remains necessary to continue to improve outcomes after transplantation.

  13. Transfusion and coagulation management in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Clevenger, Ben; Mallett, Susan V

    2014-01-01

    There is wide variation in the management of coagulation and blood transfusion practice in liver transplantation. The use of blood products intraoperatively is declining and transfusion free transplantations take place ever more frequently. Allogenic blood products have been shown to increase morbidity and mortality. Primary haemostasis, coagulation and fibrinolysis are altered by liver disease. This, combined with intraoperative disturbances of coagulation, increases the risk of bleeding. Meanwhile, the rebalancing of coagulation homeostasis can put patients at risk of hypercoagulability and thrombosis. The application of the principles of patient blood management to transplantation can reduce the risk of transfusion. This includes: preoperative recognition and treatment of anaemia, reduction of perioperative blood loss and the use of restrictive haemoglobin based transfusion triggers. The use of point of care coagulation monitoring using whole blood viscoelastic testing provides a picture of the complete coagulation process by which to guide and direct coagulation management. Pharmacological methods to reduce blood loss include the use of anti-fibrinolytic drugs to reduce fibrinolysis, and rarely, the use of recombinant factor VIIa. Factor concentrates are increasingly used; fibrinogen concentrates to improve clot strength and stability, and prothrombin complex concentrates to improve thrombin generation. Non-pharmacological methods to reduce blood loss include surgical utilisation of the piggyback technique and maintenance of a low central venous pressure. The use of intraoperative cell salvage and normovolaemic haemodilution reduces allogenic blood transfusion. Further research into methods of decreasing blood loss and alternatives to blood transfusion remains necessary to continue to improve outcomes after transplantation. PMID:24876736

  14. Hepatic intra-arterial infusion of yttrium-90 microspheres in the treatment of recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma after liver transplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Louis; Giap, Huan; Miller, William; Fisher, Jonathan; Hillebrand, Donald J; Marsh, Christopher; Schaffer, Randolph L

    2006-09-21

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) recurs with a reported frequency of 12%-18% after liver transplantation. Recurrence is associated with a mortality rate exceeding 75%. Approximately one-third of recurrences develop in the transplanted liver and are therefore amenable to local therapy. A variety of treatment modalities have been reported including resection, transarterial chemo-embolization (TACE), radiofrequency ablation (RFA), ethanol ablation, cryoablation, and external beam irradiation. Goals of treatment are tumor control and the minimization of toxic effect to functional parenchyma. Efficacy of treatment is mitigated by the need for ongoing immunosuppression. Yttrium-90 microspheres have been used as a treatment modality both for primary HCC and for pre-transplant management of HCC with promising results. Twenty-two months after liver transplantation for hepatitis C cirrhosis complicated by HCC, a 42-year old man developed recurrence of HCC in his transplant allograft. Treatment of multiple right lobe lesions with anatomic resection and adjuvant chemotherapy was unsuccessful. Multifocal recurrence in the remaining liver allograft was treated with hepatic intra-arterial infusion of yttrium-90 microspheres (SIR-Spheres, Sirtex Medical Inc., Lake Forest, IL, USA). Efficacy was demonstrated by tumor necrosis on imaging and a decrease in alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) level. There were no adverse consequences of initial treatment.

  15. Prognosis of adult patients transplanted with liver grafts < 35% of their standard liver volume.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Toshihiko; Masuda, Yuichi; Ohno, Yasunari; Mita, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Akira; Urata, Koichi; Nakazawa, Yuichi; Miwa, Shirou; Hashikura, Yasuhiko; Miyagawa, Shinichi

    2009-11-01

    We have previously reported that a graft volume (GV) > 30% of the recipient's standard liver volume (SLV) can meet the recipient's metabolic demands. Here we report our experience with adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation using left side grafts < 35% of the recipient's SLV. Of 143 adult living donor liver transplants, 13 auxiliary partial orthotopic liver transplants, 8 right side grafts, and 2 retransplantation cases were excluded. The resulting 120 cases were divided into 2 groups: group S consisted of 33 patients who received liver grafts < 35% of their SLV, and group L consisted of 87 patients who received liver grafts > or = 35% of their SLV. Patient characteristics, postoperative liver function, duration of hospital stay, and recipient survival rates were compared between the 2 groups. There were no significant differences between groups in recipient or donor background characteristics. The mean GV/SLV ratio of group S was 31.8%, whereas that of group L was 42.5%. There were no significant differences in the postoperative serum total bilirubin levels, prothrombin time international normalized ratio, daily ascites volume, or duration of postoperative hospital stay between the groups. The 1- and 5-year survival rates in group S were 80.7% and 64.2%, respectively, whereas those of group L were 90.8% and 84.9%, respectively, with no significant difference between groups. In conclusion, graft size was not considered to be the only cause of so-called small-for-size graft syndrome, and left side grafting appears to be the procedure of choice for adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation because of the lower risk to donors in comparison with right lobe grafting.

  16. Simplified technique for auxiliary orthotopic liver transplantation using a whole graft

    PubMed Central

    ROCHA-SANTOS, Vinicius; NACIF, Lucas Souto; PINHEIRO, Rafael Soares; DUCATTI, Liliana; ANDRAUS, Wellington; D'ALBURQUERQUE, Luiz Carneiro

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute liver failure is associated with a high mortality rate and the main purposes of treatment are to prevent cerebral edema and infections, which often are responsible for patient death. The orthotopic liver transplantation is the gold standard treatment and improves the 1-year survival. Aim To describe an alternative technique to auxiliary liver transplant on acute liver failure. Method Was performed whole auxiliary liver transplantation as an alternative technique for a partial auxiliary liver transplantation using a whole liver graft from a child removing the native right liver performed a right hepatectomy. The patient met the O´Grady´s criteria and the rational to indicate an auxiliary orthotopic liver transplantation was the acute classification without hemodynamic instability or renal failure in a patient with deterioration in consciousness. Results The procedure improved liver function and decreased intracranial hypertension in the postoperative period. Conclusion This technique can overcome some postoperative complications that are associated with partial grafts. As far as is known, this is the first case of auxiliary orthotopic liver transplantation in Brazil. PMID:26176253

  17. Vascular complications after pediatric liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lallier, M; St-Vil, D; Dubois, J; Paradis, K; Laberge, J M; Bensoussan, A L; Guttman, F M; Blanchard, H

    1995-08-01

    From February 1986 to July 1994, 81 hepatic transplantations were performed in 73 children, with an overall patient survival rate of 83%. Forty-two patients received whole-liver grafts (WLG) and 39 had reduced-size grafts (RSG). The mean patient weight was 19.7 kg, with 29 patients weighing less than 10 kg. Seventeen vascular complications (21%) occurred in 13 children: 8 (10%) had hepatic artery thrombosis (HAT), 5 (6%) had portal vein thrombosis (PVT), 1 had both HAT and PVT (1%), and 3 (4%) had aortic conduit perforation (ACP). There was no significant difference in the incidence of HAT between RSG (5%) and WLG (14%) or between children weighing less than 10 kg (10%) and those weighing more than 10 kg (10%). The site of arterial reconstruction, end-to-end to the recipient common hepatic artery or end-to-side to the infrarenal aorta, had no significant effect on the occurrence of HAT (7% v 8%), but HAT occurred in 2 of 6 cases (33%) in which an aortic conduit was used. PVT documented in 5 cases (6%) was associated with technical complications (2), preduodenal portal vein (2), and a circulating cardiolipid antibody (1), and required thrombectomy, with no graft loss. Combined HAT and PVT was found in one patient 2 years postretransplantation for HAT. Although graft function is normal, portal hypertension persists. The aortic conduit, used in six patients, led to arterial perforation (3), HAT (2), and death (2). Of the 8 cases of HAT, 1 was diagnosed during autopsy and 7 occurred within 30 days and required retransplantation (6) or thrombectomy with rearterialization (1).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. [Case report of introducing MMF and steroids as an immunosuppressive therapy after living-donor liver transplantation for a patient with the diabetic nephropathy].

    PubMed

    Kuramitsu, Shotaro; Iguchi, Tomohiro; Ninomiya, Mizuki; Yamashita, Yo-ichi; Harimoto, Norifumi; Ikegami, Toru; Uchiyama, Hideaki; Yoshizumi, Tomoharu; Soejima, Yuji; Shirabe, Ken; Kawanaka, Hirofumi; Ikeda, Tetsuo; Furuta, Toshiya; Tamada, Ryuichiro; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2014-03-01

    Calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) combined with mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) and steroid is mainly used as immunosuppressive therapy after the living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT). However, the nephrotoxicity caused by CNI remains a critical problem for patients with chronic renal failure, especially on early postoperative period. A 62-year-old woman with decompensated liver cirrhosis secondary to hepatitis B (Child-Pugh C, MELD score 11 points) and chronic renal failure due to diabetic nephropathy (Cr 1.56 mg/dl, GFR 27 ml/min/1.73 m2) experienced LDLT. During the reconstruction of hepatic vein, the supra-and infra-hepatic vena cava was totally clamped. The estimated right lobe liver graft volume was 540 g, representing 51.3% of the standard liver volume of the recipient. Because of the perioperative renal dysfunction due to diabetic nephropathy and the total clamping the vena cava which induced the congestion kidney, MMF (1500 mg/day) and steroid (250 mg/day converted into predonisolone) were mainly introduced as an immunosuppressive therapy after LDLT. The low-dose CNI, tacrolimus also induced the nephrotoxicity and was given for only a short time. Finally, according to the postoperative renal function, the low-dose CNI, cyclosporin (50 mg/day) was able to be added to the introduced immunosuppressive therapy. After having left the hospital, MMF (1500 mg/day), steroid (20 mg/day converted into predonisolone) and cyclosporin (75 mg/day) continued to be given as the immunosuppressive therapy and neither acute graft rejection nor drug-induced renal dysfunction was occurred. This is a case report of introducing with mainly MMF and steroid as an immunosuppressive therapy after LDLT for a patient with perioperative renal dysfunction.

  19. Successful living donor liver transplantation for acute liver failure after acetylsalicylic acid overdose.

    PubMed

    Shirota, Tomoki; Ikegami, Toshihiko; Sugiyama, Satoshi; Kubota, Kouji; Shimizu, Akira; Ohno, Yasunari; Mita, Atsuyoshi; Urata, Koichi; Nakazawa, Yuichi; Kobayashi, Akira; Iwaya, Mai; Miyagawa, Shinichi

    2015-04-01

    A 20-year-old woman was admitted to an emergency hospital after ingesting 66 g of acetylsalicylic acid in a suicide attempt. Although she was treated with gastric lavage, oral activated charcoal, and intravenous hydration with sodium bicarbonate, her hepatic and renal function gradually deteriorated and serum amylase levels increased. Steroid pulse therapy, plasma exchange, and continuous hemodiafiltration did not yield any improvement in her hepatic or renal function, and she was transferred to our hospital for living donor liver transplantation. Nine days after drug ingestion, she developed hepatic encephalopathy: thus, we diagnosed the patient with acute liver failure with hepatic coma accompanied by acute pancreatitis due to the overdose of acetylsalicylic acid. Living donor liver transplantation was immediately performed using a left lobe graft from the patient's mother. Following transplantation, the patient's renal and hepatic function and consciousness improved, and she was discharged. In this report, we describe a rare case of acetylsalicylic acid-induced acute liver failure with acute hepatic coma and concomitant acute pancreatitis and acute renal failure, which were treated successfully with emergency living donor liver transplantation.

  20. Complications in patients with alcohol-associated liver disease who undergo liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gaglio, Paul J; Gaglio, Paul J

    2012-11-01

    Cirrhosis caused by alcohol-associated liver disease is a common indication for liver transplantation worldwide. Patients with alcohol-associated liver disease who undergo liver transplantation face multiple challenging comorbid medical issues that enhance the potential for perioperative and postoperative complications. Awareness of these issues and appropriate therapeutic intervention may minimize the negative effect of these complications on posttransplantation survival. This article reviews important posttransplantation problems in patients transplanted for alcohol-associated liver disease.

  1. Role of NK, NKT cells and macrophages in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fahrner, René; Dondorf, Felix; Ardelt, Michael; Settmacher, Utz; Rauchfuss, Falk

    2016-01-01

    Liver transplantation has become the treatment of choice for acute or chronic liver disease. Because the liver acts as an innate immunity-dominant organ, there are immunological differences between the liver and other organs. The specific features of hepatic natural killer (NK), NKT and Kupffer cells and their role in the mechanism of liver transplant rejection, tolerance and hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury are discussed in this review. PMID:27468206

  2. [Challenges in liver diseases and transplantation].

    PubMed

    Ben Ari, Ziv

    2012-12-01

    In the recent decade the subject of general hepatology has undergone significant upgrading. Several breakthrough discoveries have lead to substantial improvement in the antiviral treatment of viral hepatitis, the therapy of hepatocellular carcinoma and the development of noninvasive diagnosis of the severity of liver disease. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD] is now established as one of the most common causes of chronic liver disease in the Western world. NAFLD can progress to cirrhosis and its associated complications. This issue of "Harefuah" is dedicated to the current knowledge and challenges in liver disease and transplantation and to novel discoveries in this field. Two new important guidelines of the Israeli Association for the Study of the Liver are published in this issue, the first deals with the management of ascites and its complications and the second relates to the innovative antiviral treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection. An extensive review on this latter subject is also included, summarizing the major breakthroughs in this field: the development of the new direct acting antiviraL agents and the role of IL28B polymorphism in the response to treatment. One article argues the concept of the high hepatitis B virus (HBV) vertical transmission in an Arab cohort in Israel, while another paper provides data on a significantly improved response rate to antiviral therapy in HIV-HCV co-infected patients. Increased serum level of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 level, an independent predictor of coronary heart disease, was detected in patients with nonalcohoLic fatty liver disease [NAFLD] in another article. The issue also provides encouraging data showing that following two decades of liver transplantation in Israel, the survival rate has improved. Several additional articles in the issue shed further light on recent discoveries in the field of hepatology.

  3. Rapid resolution of consumptive hypothyroidism in a child with hepatic hemangioendothelioma following liver transplantation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report a unique case of a 3-mo-old female with consumptive hypothyroidism and liver hemangioendothelioma who required pharmacological doses of thyroid hormones and was cured following liver transplantation. Liver hemangioendotheliomas are capable of producing an excess of the thyroid hormone inac...

  4. Oral ulcers produced by mycophenolate mofetil in two liver transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, J; Poniachik, J; Cisco, D; Contreras, J; Oksenberg, D; Valera, J M; Díaz, J C; Rojas, J; Cardemil, G; Mena, S; Castillo, J; Rencoret, G; Godoy, J; Escobar, J; Rodríguez, J; Leyton, P; Fica, A; Toledo, C

    2007-04-01

    Oral ulcers are a frequent problem in transplant medicine. It is important to consider infectious etiologies, exacerbated by the immunosuppressive treatment, but other etiologies are also possible, like adverse drug reactions. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is an immunosuppressive medication that has been used in combination with calcineurin inhibitors and steroids. Reports of renal transplant patients with oral ulcers related to MMF have appeared lately and herein we have described 2 cases in liver transplant patients. Their oral ulcers resolved quickly after suspension of the medication. Our 2 cases in liver transplant patients represented a unique setting for this type of complication.

  5. Salvage Liver Transplantation Leads to Poorer Outcome in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Compared with Primary Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Yuhua; Huang, Lifeng; Xia, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is the most common liver malignancy. Salvage liver transplantation (SLT) is viewed as a feasible cure for recurrence of HCC after resectomy, but the effect is under dispute. A retrospective study examined data at Renji Hospital for 239 transplants from January 2006 to December 2015, including 211 who received primary liver transplantation (PLT) and 28 who underwent SLT. A multivariable cox regression model was employed to pick out relative factors to overall survival (OS) and recurrence free survival (RFS). Propensity score matching (PSM) was used to balance the bias. Both OS and RFS were worse in SLT group than in PLT group, especially for those patients within Milan criteria. Our study demonstrates that SLT bears higher risk of recurrence and death than PLT, indicating that SLT should be given a more careful thought at performance. PMID:28294176

  6. Liver transplantation in Asia: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kelvin K; Lo, Chung Mau

    2009-04-01

    With the technical advances and improvements in perioperative management and immunosuppressants, liver transplantation is the standard treatment for patients with end-stage liver diseases. In Asia, a shortage of deceased donor liver grafts is the universal problem to be faced with in all transplant centres. Many surgical innovations are then driven to counteract this problem. This review focuses on 3 issues that denote the development of liver transplantation in Asian countries. These include living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), split liver transplantation (SLT) and liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Minimal graft weight, types of liver graft to donate and the inclusion of the middle hepatic vein with the graft are the main issues to be established in LDLT. The rapid growth and wide dissemination of LDLT has certainly alleviated the supply-and-demand problem of liver grafts in Asia. SLT is another attractive approach. Technical expertise, donor selection and graft allocation are the main determinants for its success. Liver transplantation plays a key role in the management of HCC in Asia. LDLT would be the main strategy in this aspect. The issue of extending the selection criteria for HCC patients for LDLT is still controversial. On the whole, future developments to increase the donor pool for the expanding recipient need in Asia would involve transplantation from non-heart beating donor and ABO incompatible transplantation.

  7. [Liver transplantation: how to manage organ shortage?].

    PubMed

    Pruvot, François-René; Boleslawski, Emmanuel

    2009-03-20

    Organ shortage remains a major problem in liver transplantation for which the number of patients on the waiting list is superior to the number of liver grafts harvested each year. In 2007, 1061 liver transplantations have covered 78.7% of the needs for 1348 new candidates. Improvement of the results (5 year-survival 74.9% and 63% at 10 years) do not influence the number of major indications (hepatocellular carcinoma, hepatitis C virus, alcohol), despite a slight decrease in the rate of activity of 1 to 2% per year. Introduction of the national score for each patient to be registered on the waiting list, the use of split grafts or grafts from marginal criteria donors may enlarge the donor pool. Liver grafts from cardiac deceased donors or from living donors are less frequent and are controversial from a technical and psychological point of view. The most efficient solution in order to overcome organ shortage is the increase in the pool of brain dead donors by accompanying people acceptance of organ donation and the use of parts of human body after death. Such education of the population could be made by the valorisation of organ donation, through public campaigns suggesting reflexion rather than coercition.

  8. Overview of the Indications and Contraindications for Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Farkas, Stefan; Hackl, Christina; Schlitt, Hans Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Liver transplantation is the only definitive treatment option for patients with irrevocable acute or chronic liver failure. In the last four decades, liver transplantation has developed from an experimental approach with a very high mortality to an almost routine procedure with good short- and long-term survival rates. Here, we present an up-to-date overview of the indications and contraindications for liver transplantation. It is shown how the evaluation of a candidate and finally listing for transplantation has to be performed in a multidisciplinary setting. Meticulous listing, timing, and organ allocation are the crucial factors to achieve an optimal outcome for the individual patient on the one hand, and reasonably using the limited deceased donor pool on the other hand. Living-donor liver transplantation is demanding but necessarily increasing. Because patients after liver transplantation need lifelong aftercare, it is important for primary care clinicians to understand the basic medical problems and risks. PMID:24789874

  9. Liver transplantation in Turkey: historical review and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Akbulut, Sami; Yilmaz, Sezai

    2015-07-01

    Since the first successful liver transplantation by Starzl et al. in 1967, liver transplantation has become the standard therapy for many liver diseases, mainly chronic liver disease. Most liver transplantations performed in Europe and North America utilize deceased donors while a considerable portion of organ requirements is supplied by living donors in Asian countries including Turkey. The actual history of solid organ transplantation in Turkey began with the pioneering work of Dr. Haberal in collaboration with Thomaz E. Starzl in 1974 in Colorado University at Denver. The first successful solid organ transplantation in Turkey was accomplished by Haberal in 1975 with a living donor renal transplantation. Subsequently, legislations no 2238 and 2594 dated 1979 and 1982, respectively, were passed, paving the way for cadaveric tissue/organ utilization and preservation in Turkey. The first deceased donor liver transplantation and the first living donor liver transplantation were performed in 1988 and 1990, respectively. There are currently 45 liver transplantation centers in Turkey. Of these, 25 are state universities, 8 are private (foundation) universities, 9 are private hospitals, and 3 are training and research hospitals belonging to the Ministry of Health. A total of 7152 liver transplantations were performed in Turkey between January 2002 and May 2014. Of these, 4848 (67.8%) used living donors and 2304 (32.2%) used deceased donors. These figures indicate that, despite widespread organ donation campaigns and media-sponsored propaganda, desired targets have not been met yet in providing deceased organ donation. Despite unsatisfactory levels attained in supplying deceased donors, both the number of annual liver transplantations and improvements in overall survival rates of organ transplanted patients continues to increase. Actually, the one-year patient survival rate after liver transplantation in 2013 was 80.5%. This rate is getting better with each passing year

  10. ABO-incompatible liver transplantation for severe hepatitis B patients.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian; Ju, Weiqiang; Yuan, Xiaopeng; Jiao, Xingyuan; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Wang, Dongping; He, Xiaoshun

    2015-07-01

    Effect of ABO-incompatible liver transplantation on patients with severe hepatitis B (SHB) remains unclear. Herein, we summarized 22 cases with SHB in whom were performed emergency liver transplantation from ABO-incompatible donors. The immunosuppressive protocol consisted basiliximab, tacrolimus, steroids and mycophenolate mofetil. The mean MELD score was 35.2 ± 7.1. Major complications included rejection, infections, biliary complications, hepatic artery thrombosis or stenosis and portal vein thrombosis. Patient survival rates were 40.9%, 78.9% and 82.3% in 1 year, 29.2%, 66.8% and 72.9% in 3 years, and 21.9%, 60.1% and 62.5% in 5 years for ABO-incompatible, ABO-compatible and ABO-identical groups. Graft survival rates were 39%, 78.9% and 82.3% in 1 year, 27.8%, 66.4% and 71.1% in 3 years, and 20.9%, 57.9% and 61.0% in 5 years for incompatible, compatible and identical ABO graft-recipient match. The 1-, 3-, 5-year graft and patient survival rates of ABO-incompatible were distinctly lower than that of ABO-compatible group (P < 0.05). Our results suggested that ABO-incompatible liver transplantation might be a life-saving procedure for patients with SHB as a promising alternative operation when ABO-compatible donors are not available and at least bridges the second opportunity for liver retransplantation.

  11. Assistance continuity from primary care in an inter-level nursing plan for a case of pediatric liver transplant.

    PubMed

    Valls-Ibáñez, Victoria; Fernández-Obispo, Matilde; Torralbas-Ortega, Jordi; Bernal-Jiménez, Montserrat

    Spain is one of the countries where most solid organ transplants are performed each year, in the year 2014 a 2.7% of them were given in childhood. Given the complexity and severity of this disease it is necessary to establish a care plan that covers both pre-transplant and post-transplant, with close cooperation between different levels of care, to approach the several problems that can appear and assure continuum of care. In the following example, a Gambian teen with risk of social exclusion fostered a collaboration between the primary care nurse and transplant nurse that was the key to continuum care. Multiple strategies were used in the care plan to ensure better adherence and compliance of the treatment. However, the knowledge of the culture of origin must be deepened to establish more individualized care plans and thus improve results. The care plan included problems according to the NANDA, NOC, NIC taxonomy.

  12. Simulation: a teaching tool for liver transplantation anesthesiology.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Shushma; Bane, Brian C; Boucek, Charles D; Planinsic, Raymond M; Lutz, John W; Metro, David G

    2012-01-01

    Anesthesia for liver transplantation (ALT) requires extensive preparation and rapid recognition of changing clinical conditions. Owing to the proliferation of transplant centers, greater number of anesthesia providers need training in specific skills required to treat these patients. These cases are no longer limited to few transplant centers; therefore, reduction of cases in individual centers has created a need for simulation training to prepare and supplement clinical experience. We have developed an ALT simulation course for senior anesthesia residents which combines didactic sessions with live-patient-based and mannequin-based simulation. Outcomes have been measured using pre- and post-simulation course quizzes as well as a survey given at the end of the month-long ALT rotation. Twenty-four senior anesthesiology residents (n = 24) have completed the ALT simulation course. Residents had an average score of 75% ± 10% on the pre-simulation quiz, which increased to 92% ± 6.5% on the post-simulation quiz (p < 0.001). Furthermore, survey scores indicated that residents noted that the course provided an improvement in their preparedness, confidence, anticipation, and understanding of the importance of communication skills in the care of this patient population. The ALT simulation course provided a standardized in-depth exposure to clinical issues involved in the perioperative care of liver transplant patients.

  13. Acute fatty liver of pregnancy -- an underlying condition for herpes simplex type 2 fulminant hepatitis necessitating liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Luzar, B; Ferlan-Marolt, V; Poljak, M; Sojar, V; Stanisavljević, D; Bukovac, T; Markovic, S

    2005-05-01

    The infrequent occurrence of herpes simplex virus (HSV) hepatitis in healthy women in comparison with the high prevalence of HSV infections suggests that, in addition to deranged immunity, an underlying condition in the liver might be necessary to develop HSV hepatitis. We report the case of a 28-year-old pregnant woman in the 28 (th) week of gestation. Following HSV type 2 infection of the uterine cervix, acute liver failure developed, necessitating urgent liver transplantation. In addition to fulminant HSV type 2 hepatitis, the explanted liver also showed the histological features of acute fatty liver of pregnancy. The presented case suggests a possible pathogenetic role of acute fatty liver of pregnancy in the development of fulminant HSV hepatitis following recurrent infection with HSV in healthy pregnant women. We believe that early histopathological diagnosis, followed by specific antiviral treatment and liver transplantation in selected patients may improve the clinical outcome of otherwise almost uniformly fatal HSV hepatitis.

  14. Percutaneous venovenous bypass in orthotopic liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Washburn, W K; Lewis, W D; Jenkins, R L

    1995-11-01

    Since January 1994, we have used percutaneous placement of both the subclavian and femoral cannulae to establish access for venovenous bypass during orthotopic liver transplantation. Percutaneous subclavian and femoral cannulae were used in 36 patients of which 5 had portal decompression by placement of a cannula in inferior mesenteric vein percutaneously through the abdominal wall. Intraoperative placement of the subclavian cannula is facilitated by placing a subclavian central venous line before the abdominal incision. One patient underwent exploration for femoral vein bleeding early in our experience. Another patient sustained hypotension as a result of a kinked subclavian cannula. In 4 patients, early in this experience, we had difficulty placing the subclavian cannula and resorted to axillary vein cut-down. There were no episodes of deep venous thrombosis detected by routine postoperative duplex ultrasonography. Minimum and maximum flow rates were significantly better (P < .01), with percutaneously placed cannulae in comparison to a control group of patients who underwent transplantation in whom we used the standard venous cut-down approach with a #7 Gott shunt (2.14 and 3.17 L/min v 1.65 and 2.41 L/min, respectively). Percutaneous placement of cannulae for venovenous bypass during liver transplantation is quick, safe, and effective. We would advocate this technique as an alternative approach for patients in whom bypass is deemed necessary.

  15. Early detection of biliary complications and graft rejection in a non-RH Identitical liver transplant recipient from a non-heart-beating donor: a case report.

    PubMed

    Turiño-Luque, J; Zambudio-Carroll, N; Muffak-Granero, K; Villegas-Herrera, T; Garrote-Lara, D; Ferrón-Orihuela, J-A

    2012-09-01

    Because of a shortage of organs, non-heart-beating donors have been proposed to be a possible source of grafts for orthotopic liver transplantation. Herein, we have presented a blood group A+ patient with primary biliary cirrhosis, who underwent orthotopic liver transplantation from a non-heart-beating blood group A- donor. On day 5 after transplantation the patient displayed a low hemoglobin levels as well as an increased total bilirubin with progressive encephalopathy, hypotension, and oligoanuria on day 11. The patient responded to steroid treatment. We assume the main cause of organ dysfunction was a passenger lymphocyte syndrome (ABO-Rh incompatibility). Biliary complications were detected at a 6-month follow-up visit by increased hepatic enzymes. We thus concluded that it is useful to take Rh group into account.

  16. Successful Liver Transplantation for Hyperammonemic Fibrolamellar Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Alsina, Angel E.; Franco, Edson; Nakshabandi, Ahmad; Albers, Christopher; Kemmer, Nyingi; Finan, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma is a rare hepatocellular tumor usually arising in noninfected and noncirrhotic livers. Only 2 cases accompanied by hyperammonemia due to intrahepatic shunting have been reported. A 23-year-old white woman presented with a 2-week history of nausea, vomiting, generalized weakness, and intermittent right upper quadrant pain. Abdominal computerized tomography revealed a 13 x 9-cm hepatic mass. Core-needle biopsy revealed fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma. She presented with coma due to hyperammonemia levels (peak at 437 mcg/dL) but without metastatic disease. She was urgently transplanted, started on daily sorafenib 8 weeks after transplantation, and was free of disease at 1 year after transplantation. PMID:27807568

  17. En-Bloc Transplant of the Liver, Kidney and Pancreas: Experience from a Latin American Transplant Center

    PubMed Central

    Caicedo, Luis A.; Villegas, Jorge I.; Serrano, Oscar; Millán, Mauricio; Sepúlveda, Mauricio; Jiménez, Diego; García, Jairo; Posada, Juan G.; Mesa, Liliana; Duran, Carlos; Schweineberg, Johanna; Dávalos, Diana; Manzi, Eliana; Sabogal, Angie; Aristizabal, Ana María; Echeverri, Gabriel J.

    2017-01-01

    Case series Patient: Male, 38 • Male, 48 Final Diagnosis: En-bloc transplantation (liver, kidney, pancreas) Symptoms: Encephalopathy • adynamia • ascites • asthenia Medication: — Clinical Procedure: En-bloc transplantation Specialty: Transplantology Objective: Unusual setting of medical care Background: En-bloc transplantation is a surgical procedure in which multiple organs are transplanted simultaneously. It has some similarities with multi-organ transplantation but offers certain advantages. This report highlights the experience of our interdisciplinary group regarding the treatment and follow-up of patients who received en-bloc transplantation, with the aim of encouraging the development of this surgical technique. Case Report: The first case is a 38-year-old patient with type 1 diabetes mellitus, liver cirrhosis, and chronic kidney failure who received an en-bloc transplant of the liver, pancreas, and kidney with no intraoperative complications. He had a prolonged hospital stay due to anemia and systemic inflammatory response syndrome, which were resolved successfully. At follow-up, he had no requirement for insulin or for dialysis, or for new interventions. The second case describes a 48-year-old patient with type 2 diabetes mellitus, renal failure, and liver cirrhosis who received an en-bloc transplant of the liver, pancreas, and kidney with no complications. During the postoperative period, the patient suffered a possible episode of acute tubular necrosis, which evolved towards improvement, with a tendency to normal metabolic and renal functioning, with no additional events. The patient is currently in follow-up and is insulin-independent. Conclusions: En-bloc transplantation is a safe procedure, which is technically simple and which achieves excellent results. This procedure is indicated in patients with end-stage renal disease, cirrhosis, and diabetes mellitus that is difficult to control. PMID:28148909

  18. Early respiratory complications after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Feltracco, Paolo; Carollo, Cristiana; Barbieri, Stefania; Pettenuzzo, Tommaso; Ori, Carlo

    2013-12-28

    The poor clinical conditions associated with end-stage cirrhosis, pre-existing pulmonary abnormalities, and high comorbidity rates in patients with high Model for End-Stage Liver Disease scores are all well-recognized factors that increase the risk of pulmonary complications after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) surgery. Many intraoperative and postoperative events, such as fluid overload, massive transfusion of blood products, hemodynamic instability, unexpected coagulation abnormalities, renal dysfunction, and serious adverse effects of reperfusion syndrome, are other factors that predispose an individual to postoperative respiratory disorders. Despite advances in surgical techniques and anesthesiological management, the lung may still suffer throughout the perioperative period from various types of injury and ventilatory impairment, with different clinical outcomes. Pulmonary complications after OLT can be classified as infectious or non-infectious. Pleural effusion, atelectasis, pulmonary edema, respiratory distress syndrome, and pneumonia may contribute considerably to early morbidity and mortality in liver transplant patients. It is of paramount importance to accurately identify lung disorders because infectious pulmonary complications warrant speedy and aggressive treatment to prevent diffuse lung injury and the risk of evolution into multisystem organ failure. This review discusses the most common perioperative factors that predispose an individual to postoperative pulmonary complications and these complications' early clinical manifestations after OLT and influence on patient outcome.

  19. Liver Transplantation in the Management of Porphyria

    PubMed Central

    Singal, Ashwani K.; Parker, Charles; Bowden, Christine; Thapar, Manish; Liu, Lawrence; McGuire, Brendan M.

    2015-01-01

    Porphyrias are a group of eight metabolic disorders, each resulting from a mutation that affects an enzyme of the heme biosynthetic pathway. Porphyrias are classified as hepatic or erythropoietic, depending upon the site where the gene defect is predominantly expressed. Clinical phenotypes are classified as follows: (1) acute porphyrias with neurovisceral symptoms: acute intermittent porphyria; delta amino-levulinic acid hydratase deficiency porphyria; hereditary coproporphyria; and variegate porphyria and (2) cutaneous porphyrias with skin blistering and photosensitivity: porphyria cutanea tarda; congenital erythropoietic porphyria; hepatoerythropoietic porphyria and both erythropoietic protoporphyrias: autosomal dominant and X-linked. Liver transplantation (LT) may be needed for recurrent and/or life-threatening acute attack in acute intermittent porphyria or acute liver failure or end-stage chronic liver disease in erythropoietic protoporphyria. LT in acute intermittent porphyria is curative. Erythropoietic protoporphyria patients needing LT should be considered for bone marrow transplantation to achieve cure. Conclusion This article provides an overview of porphyria with diagnostic approaches and management strategies for specific porphyrias and recommendations for LT with indications, pretransplant evaluation, and posttransplant management. PMID:24700519

  20. Liver transplantation in transthyretin amyloidosis: issues and challenges.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Andreia; Rocha, Ana; Lobato, Luísa

    2015-03-01

    Hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis (ATTR) is a rare worldwide autosomal dominant disease caused by the systemic deposition of an amyloidogenic variant of transthyretin (TTR), which is usually derived from a single amino acid substitution in the TTR gene. More than 100 mutations have been described, with V30M being the most prevalent. Each variant has a different involvement, although peripheral neuropathy and cardiomyopathy are the most common. Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) was implemented as the inaugural disease-modifying therapy because the liver produces the circulating unstable TTR. In this review, we focus on the results and long-term outcomes of OLT for ATTR after more than 2063 procedures and 23 years of experience. After successful OLT, neuropathy and organ impairment are not usually reversed, and in some cases, the disease progresses. The overall 5-year survival rate is approximately 100% for V30M patients and 59% for non-ATTR V30M patients. Cardiac-related death and septicemia are the main causes of mortality. Lower survival is related to malnutrition, a longer duration of disease, cardiomyopathy, and a later onset (particularly for males). Deposits, which are composed of a mixture of truncated and full-length TTR (type A) fibrils, have been associated with posttransplant myocardial dysfunction. A higher incidence of early hepatic artery thrombosis of the graft has also been documented for these patients. Liver-kidney/heart transplantation is an alternative for patients with advanced renal disease or heart failure. The sequential procedure, in which ATTR livers are reused in patients with liver disease, reveals that neuropathy in the recipient may appear as soon as 6 years after OLT, and ATTR deposits may appear even earlier. Long-term results of trials with amyloid protein stabilizers or disrupters, silencing RNA, and antisense oligonucleotides will highlight the value and limitations of liver transplantation.

  1. Can liver transplantation provide the statistical cure?

    PubMed

    Cucchetti, Alessandro; Vitale, Alessandro; Cescon, Matteo; Gambato, Martina; Maroni, Lorenzo; Ravaioli, Matteo; Ercolani, Giorgio; Burra, Patrizia; Cillo, Umberto; Pinna, Antonio D

    2014-02-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) represents the only chance of long-term survival for patients with end-stage liver disease. When the mortality rate for transplant patients returns to the same level as that for the general population, they can be considered statistically cured. However, cure models in the setting of LT have never been applied. Data from 1371 adult patients undergoing LT for the first time between January 1999 and December 2012 at 2 Italian centers were reviewed in order to establish probabilities of being cured by LT. A parametric Weibull model was applied to compare the mortality rate after LT to the rate expected for the general population (matched by sex and age). The observed 3-, 5-, and 10-year overall survival rates after LT were 77.8%, 73.3%, and 65.6%, respectively, and they did not differ between the 2 centers (P = 0.37). The cure fraction for the entire study population was 63.4% (95% confidence interval = 52.6%-72.0%), and the time to cure was 10 years with a 90% confidence level. The best cure fraction was observed for younger recipients without hepatitis C virus (HCV) who had favorable donor-recipient matches, that is, low Donor Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (D-MELD) scores (90.1%); conversely, the lowest probability was observed for elderly HCV recipients with high D-MELD scores (34.6%). The time to cure was 6.22 years for non-HCV patients and 14.78 years for HCV patients. The median survival time for uncured patients was 2.29 years. Among uncured recipients, the longest survival time was observed for younger patients (7.31 years). In conclusion, we provide here a new clinical measure for LT suggesting that survival after transplantation can approximate that of the general population and provide a statistical cure.

  2. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder after liver transplantation: Incidence, long-term survival and impact of serum tacrolimus level

    PubMed Central

    Eshraghian, Ahad; Imanieh, Mohammad Hadi; Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen; Nikeghbalian, Saman; Shamsaeefar, Alireza; Barshans, Frouzan; Kazemi, Kourosh; Geramizadeh, Bita; Malek-Hosseini, Seyed Ali

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate incidence and survival of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) patients after liver transplantation. METHODS A cross-sectional survey was conducted among patients who underwent liver transplantation at Shiraz Transplant Center (Shiraz, Iran) between August 2004 and March 2015. Clinical and laboratory data of patients were collected using a data gathering form. RESULTS There were 40 cases of PTLD in the pediatric age group and 13 cases in the adult group. The incidence of PTLD was 6.25% in pediatric patients and 1.18% in adult liver transplant recipients. The post-PTLD survival of patients at 6 mo was 75.1% ± 6%, at 1 year was 68.9% ± 6.5% and at 5 years was 39.2% ± 14.2%. Higher serum tacrolimus level was associated with lower post-PTLD survival in pediatric patients (OR = 1.07, 95%CI: 1.006-1.15, P = 0.032). A serum tacrolimus level over 11.1 ng/mL was predictive of post PTLD survival (sensitivity = 90%, specificity = 52%, area under the curve = 0.738, P = 0.035). CONCLUSION Incidence of PTLD in our liver transplant patients is comparable to other centers. Transplant physicians may consider adjustment of tacrolimus dose to maintain its serum level below this cutoff point. PMID:28275302

  3. Liver transplantation in the presence of portal vein thrombosis: report from a single center.

    PubMed

    Orlando, G; De Luca, L; Toti, L; Zazza, S; Angelico, M; Casciani, C U; Tisone, G

    2004-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is a frequent finding in liver transplantation, the management of which depends mainly on its extent. In cases of mild to moderate PVT, a low dissection of the portal trunk, a jump graft, or direct implantation of graft portal vein into large venous collaterals or thrombectomy offer alternatives. For severe PVT anecdotal reports suggest that cavoportal hemitransposition, portal arterialization, or combined liver and intestine transplantation may be attempted, although the results to date are not satisfactory. When extensive perivenous and venous inflammatory changes reach the infrapancreatic region, liver transplantation probably should not be performed due to the high mortality rate.

  4. ADOPTION OF MELD SCORE INCREASES THE NUMBER OF LIVER TRANSPLANT

    PubMed Central

    NACIF, Lucas Souto; ANDRAUS, Wellington; MARTINO, Rodrigo Bronze; SANTOS, Vinicius Rocha; PINHEIRO, Rafael Soares; HADDAD, Luciana BP; D'ALBUQUERQUE, Luiz Carneiro

    2014-01-01

    Background Liver transplantation is performed at large transplant centers worldwide as a therapeutic intervention for patients with end-stage liver diseases. Aim To analyze the outcomes and incidence of liver transplantation performed at the University of São Paulo and to compare those with the State of São Paulo before and after adoption of the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score. Method Evaluation of the number of liver transplantations before and after adoption of the MELD score. Mean values and standard deviations were used to analyze normally distributed variables. The incidence results were compared with those of the State of São Paulo. Results There was a high prevalence of male patients, with a predominance of middle-aged. The main indication for liver transplantation was hepatitis C cirrhosis. The mean and median survival rates and overall survival over ten and five years were similar between the groups (p>0.05). The MELD score increased over the course of the study period for patients who underwent liver transplantation (p>0.05). There were an increased number of liver transplants after adoption of the MELD score at this institution and in the State of São Paulo (p<0.001). Conclusion The adoption of the MELD score led to increase the number of liver transplants performed in São Paulo. PMID:25184772

  5. Mozart's Requiem–Liver Transplantation in 1988

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Liver transplantation is one of the most spectacular of surgical achievements. It is a demanding and expensive procedure, requiring great surgical skill and a great depth of supporting services. Precisely because it is a procedure at the leading edge of medicine, more and more units in developed countries are pressing to be allowed to carry it out. But there are many moral and ethical problems, some of which can be usefully examined using a “Mozart model” as proposed by Starzl. PMID:2282327

  6. Supporting liver transplantation by clinical pathway intelligence.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, K; Malessa, Ch; Herzberg, N; Krumnow, S; Habrecht, O; Scheuerlein, H; Bauschke, A; Settmacher, U

    2013-06-01

    A reproducible and transparent quality of clinical treatments plays an important role in the performance of a hospital. In liver transplantation (LT), this is particularly important for patient safety, resource planning, documentation, and quality management. Thus, the clinical pathway for LT was documented in an electronic format within our research project PIGE. Data from clinical information systems were linked to this pathway, which allows for process monitoring (the assessment of the current state for every patient in the LT process) and a retrospective analysis of all treatments in addition to all data pertaining to the treatment, for example, cost, time, number of personnel, etc.

  7. Subcapsular hematoma after right-lobe living-donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Mureo; Kozaki, Koichi; Yoshida, Toru; Yamamoto, Hidekazu; Ogawa, Kohei; Ogura, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Koichi

    2004-01-01

    Because right-lobe living-donor liver transplantation was introduced in adult-to-adult liver transplantation to mitigate the problems of small-for-size grafts, some technical controversies have been reported. This report describes a case of graft subcapsular hematoma due to parenchymal injury. A 53-year-old woman underwent a right-lobe living-donor liver transplantation for acute-on-chronic liver failure due to primary biliary cirrhosis. A huge subcapsular hematoma was discovered by routine Doppler echogram examination on the first posttransplantation day. Relaparotomy findings revealed that rotation of the graft for the hemostasis procedure during the transplant operation had induced a compression injury to the graft by the xiphoid process. It was speculated that a small laceration in the graft parenchyma led to the major subcapsular hematoma. This experience suggests that the graft liver must be handled with special care to prevent potential mechanical injury.

  8. Cardiac work-up protocol for liver transplant candidates: Experience from a single liver transplant centre

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Carrie; Saincher, Meghana; Tandon, Puneeta; Meeberg, Glenda; Williams, Randy; Burak, Kelly W; Bain, Vincent G

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ischemic cardiac events can cause significant morbidity and mortality postliver transplantation; however, no validated protocols to screen patients before transplantation exist. OBJECTIVES: To report the introduction of a noninvasive cardiac screening protocol used at the Liver Unit, University of Calgary (Calgary, Alberta); to determine whether the protocol decreases use of coronary angiograms; and to compare cardiac outcomes using the new protocol with an appropriately matched historical control group. METHODS: A new cardiac screening protocol was introduced into the program in 2005, which uses perfusion scintigraphy to screen high-risk cardiac patients, reserving coronary angiograms for abnormal results. Transplanted patients screened using this protocol were compared with matched historical controls. Electronic charts were reviewed for cardiac outcomes intra- and postliver transplantation. RESULTS: A total of 396 patients were screened between April 2005 and February 2009. Eighty-two were transplanted by February 2009 and included in the study. Eighty-one patients were successfully matched according to age, sex, cardiac history and presence of diabetes. Twelve of 82 (14.6%) and 11 of 81 (13.6%) in the study and control groups, respectively, underwent coronary angiograms (P=0.85). Coronary artery disease was found in six of 12 (50.0%) study patients and three of 11 (27.3%) control patients who underwent coronary angiography (P=0.27). The mean (± SD) length of the follow-up period was 1.87±0.91 years and 4.45±1.89 years in the study and control groups, respectively. One of 81 in the control group and zero of 82 in the study group experienced an acute coronary syndrome event postoperatively. CONCLUSIONS: Coronary events are infrequent in liver transplant recipients. The described protocol is an effective method of coronary artery disease screening before liver transplant but does not reduce the number of cardiac investigations performed. PMID

  9. Chronic rejection after combined liver and small bowel transplantation in a child with chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction: a case report.

    PubMed

    Giovanelli, M; Gupte, G L; Sharif, K; Mayer, D A; Mirza, D F

    2008-06-01

    An 11-year-old boy with irreversible intestinal failure secondary to chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) and intestinal failure-associated liver disease (IFALD) underwent a combined en bloc reduced liver and small bowel transplantation. He was discharged home after 9 weeks on full oral intake without requiring intravenous nutritional or fluid supplementation. The first episode of mild acute rejection, which occurred 18 months after transplantation, was successfully treated with steroids. An episode of rotavirus gastroenteritis led to severe exfoliative rejection of the bowel graft, which was resistant to steroid and Infliximab treatment but responded to OKT3. There was associated Epstein-Barr virus viremia with no evidence of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease. Another episode of moderate to severe acute liver rejection occurred 5 months later. At the same time, multiple biliary strictures were diagnosed and treated. Persistent clinical symptoms of abdominal pain and increased stomal output as well as atrophy of the ileal mucosa on several biopsies, suggested the possibility of chronic rejection (CR). A second combined whole liver and small bowel transplant was performed. The diagnosis of CR was confirmed on histology of the explanted graft. The postoperative course was severely complicated and 71 days after the retransplantation, the boy died because of respiratory failure and multiorgan failure. In summary, intestinal transplantation can be successfully performed in children with CIPO, giving them the opportunity to be free from total parenteral nutrition. As survival following intestinal transplantation continues to improve, the problem of CR has become increasingly important and the only treatment available is retransplantation, which is associated with poor outcomes.

  10. Living donor liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma achieves better outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chih-Che

    2016-01-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) at Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital mainly relies on live donor LT (LDLT). Owing to taking the risk of LD, we are obligated to adopt strict selection criteria for HCC patients and optimize the pre-transplant conditions to ensure a high disease-free survival similar to those without HCC, even better than deceased donor LT (DDLT). Better outcomes are attributed to excellent surgical results and optimal patient selection. The hospital mortality of primary and salvage LDLT are lower than 2% in our center. Although Taiwan Health Insurance Policy extended the Milan to University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) criteria in 2006, selection criteria will not be consolidated to take into account only by the morphologic size/number of tumors but also by their biology. The criteria are divided into modifiable image morphology, alpha fetoprotein (AFP), and positron emission tomography (PET) scan with standard uptake value (SUV) and unmodifiable unfavorable pathology such as HCC combined with cholangiocarcinoma (CC), sarcomatoid type, and poor differentiation. Downstaging therapy is necessary for HCC patients beyond criteria to fit all modifiable standards. The upper limit of downstaging treatment seems to be extended by more effective drug eluting transarterial chemoembolization in cases without absolute contraindications. In contrast, the pitfall of unmodifiable tumor pathology should be excluded by the findings of pretransplant core biopsy/resection if possible. More recently, achieving complete tumor necrosis in explanted liver could almost predict no recurrence after transplant. Necrotizing therapy is advised if possible before transplant even the tumor status within criteria to minimize the possibility of tumor recurrence. LDLT with low surgical mortality in experienced centers provides the opportunities of optimizing the pre-transplant tumor conditions and timing of transplant to achieve better

  11. Liver Transplantation Without the Use of Blood Products

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Hector C.; Todo, Satoru; Kang, Yoogoo; Felekouras, Evangelos; Doyle, Howard R.; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To examine the techniques and the outcome of liver transplantation with maximal conservation of blood products and to analyze the potential benefits or drawbacks of blood conservation and salvage techniques. Design Case series survey. Setting Tertiary care, major university teaching hospital. Patients and Methods Four patients with religious objections to blood transfusions who were selected on the basis of restrictive criteria that would lower their risk for fatal hemorrhage, including coagulopathy, a thrombosed splanchnic venous system requiring extensive reconstruction, active bleeding, and associated medical complications. All patients were pretreated with erythropoietin to increase production of red blood cells. All operations were performed at the same institution, with a 36-month follow-up. Interventions Orthotopic liver transplantation that used blood salvage, plateletpheresis, and autotransfusion and the withholding of the use of human blood products with the exception of albumin. Main Outcome Measures Survival and postoperative complications, with the effectiveness of erythropoietin and plateletpheresis as secondary measures. Results All patients are alive at 36 months after orthotopic liver transplantation. One patient, a minor (13 years of age), was transfused per a state court ruling. Erythropoietin increased the production of red blood cells as shown by a mean increase in hematocrit levels of 0.08. Plateletpheresis allowed autologous, platelet-rich plasma to be available for use after allograft reperfusion. Three major complications were resolved or corrected without sequelae. Only one patient developed postoperative hemorrhage, which was corrected surgically. The mean charge for bloodless surgery was $174 000 for the three patients with United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) status 3 priority for transplantation. This result was statistically significant when these patients were compared with all the patients with UNOS status 3 priority

  12. Novel Biliary Reconstruction Techniques During Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Carmody, Ian C.; Romano, John; Bohorquez, Humberto; Bugeaud, Emily; Bruce, David S.; Cohen, Ari J.; Seal, John; Reichman, Trevor W.; Loss, George E.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Biliary complications remain a significant problem following liver transplantation. Several surgical options can be used to deal with a significant size mismatch between the donor and recipient bile ducts during the biliary anastomosis. We compared biliary transposition to recipient biliary ductoplasty in cadaveric liver transplant. Methods: A total of 33 reconstructions were performed from January 1, 2005 to December 31, 2013. In the biliary transposition group (n=23), 5 reconstructions were performed using an internal stent (5 or 8 French pediatric feeding tube), and 18 were performed without. Of the 10 biliary ductoplasties, 2 were performed with a stent. All patients were managed with standard immunosuppression and ursodiol. Follow-up ranged from 2 months to 5 years. Results: No patients in the biliary transposition group required reoperation; 1 patient had an internal stent removed for recurrent unexplained leukocytosis, and 2 patients required endoscopic retrograde cholangiography and stent placement for evidence of stricture. Three anastomotic leaks occurred in the biliary ductoplasty group, and 2 patients in the biliary ductoplasty group required reoperation for biliary complications. Conclusion: Our results indicate that biliary reconstruction can be performed with either biliary transposition or biliary ductoplasty. These techniques are particularly useful when a significant mismatch in diameter exists between the donor and recipient bile ducts. PMID:28331447

  13. Reducing transfusion requirements in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Donohue, Ciara I; Mallett, Susan V

    2015-01-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) was historically associated with massive blood loss and transfusion. Over the past two decades transfusion requirements have reduced dramatically and increasingly transfusion-free transplantation is a reality. Both bleeding and transfusion are associated with adverse outcomes in LT. Minimising bleeding and reducing unnecessary transfusions are therefore key goals in the perioperative period. As the understanding of the causes of bleeding has evolved so too have techniques to minimize or reduce the impact of blood loss. Surgical “piggyback” techniques, anaesthetic low central venous pressure and haemodilution strategies and the use of autologous cell salvage, point of care monitoring and targeted correction of coagulopathy, particularly through use of factor concentrates, have all contributed to declining reliance on allogenic blood products. Pre-emptive management of preoperative anaemia and adoption of more restrictive transfusion thresholds is increasingly common as patient blood management (PBM) gains momentum. Despite progress, increasing use of marginal grafts and transplantation of sicker recipients will continue to present new challenges in bleeding and transfusion management. Variation in practice across different centres and within the literature demonstrates the current lack of clear transfusion guidance. In this article we summarise the causes and predictors of bleeding and present the evidence for a variety of PBM strategies in LT. PMID:26722645

  14. Dental health status of liver transplant candidates.

    PubMed

    Guggenheimer, James; Eghtesad, Bijan; Close, John M; Shay, Christine; Fung, John J

    2007-02-01

    A prerequisite dental evaluation is usually recommended for potential organ transplant candidates. This is based on the premise that untreated dental disease may pose a risk for infection and sepsis, although there is no evidence that this has occurred in organ transplant candidates or recipients. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of dental disease and oral health behaviors in a sample of liver transplant candidates (LTCs). Oral examinations were conducted on 300 LTCs for the presence of gingivitis, dental plaque, dental caries, periodontal disease, edentulism, and xerostomia. The prevalence of these conditions was compared with oral health data from national health surveys and examined for possible associations with most recent dental visit, smoking, and type of liver disease. Significant risk factors for plaque-related gingivitis included intervals of more than 1 yr since the last dental visit (P = 0.004), smoking (P = 0.03), and diuretic therapy (P = 0.005). Dental caries and periodontal disease were also significantly associated with intervals of more than 1 yr since the last dental visit (P = 0.004). LTCs with viral hepatitis or alcoholic cirrhosis had the highest smoking rate (78.8%). Higher rates of edentulism occurred among older LTCs who were less likely to have had a recent dental evaluation (mean 88 months). In conclusion, intervals of more than 1 yr since the last dental visit, smoking, and diuretic therapy appear to be the most significant determinants of dental disease and the need for a pretransplantation dental screening evaluation in LTCs. Edentulous patients should have periodic examinations for oral cancer.

  15. [Perioperative management for liver transplant in a patient with familial amyloid polyneuropathy with heart involvement].

    PubMed

    López-Herrera Rodríguez, D; Guerrero Domínguez, R; Mellado Miras, P; Gómez Sosa, L

    2015-01-01

    Familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) is a systemic amyloidosis caused by mutated transthyretin. Cardiac amyloidosis, the major prognostic determinant in systemic amyloidosis, is characterized by infiltration of the myocardium, leading to cardiomyopathy and conduction disturbances. Liver transplantation is the only curative option for patients with FAP. The case is presented of a 36-year-old patient with type i FAP with cardiac involvement, proposed for liver transplant surgery, which was successfully performed without any preoperative event of interest.

  16. Use of Methylene Blue to Treat Hypovolemic Shock Followed by Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in the Postoperative Orthotopic Liver Transplant Patient: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Vilalva, Kelvin Henrique; Mumic, Fabrícia Teixeira; Silveira, Marina Rodrigues Garcia; Mente, Enio David; Evora, Paulo Roberto Barbosa; Castro E Silva, Orlando

    2016-08-24

    A 57-year-old female patient received elective liver transplant due to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis complicated by hepatocellular carcinoma. Her preoperative Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score was 11. The total transplant ischemic time was 10 hours and 35 minutes, and the warm ischemic time was 35 minutes. Even with aggressive fluid overload and use of high concentrations of vasoactive amines, the patient developed possible primary graft dysfunction with poor response to fluids and vasopressor support, suggesting vasoplegic syndrome. On the basis of the hypothesis of vasoplegic syndrome, the patient received methylene blue intravenously (100 mg bolus for 12 h/1.5 mg/kg). The catastrophic situation was controlled. The patient's urine output markedly improved, she was subsequently weaned from vasoactive support, and mechanical ventilation was discontinued 2 days later. The patient was discharged on the 20th postoperative day.

  17. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Prostatic Abscess in a Liver Transplant Recipient

    PubMed Central

    Jana, Tanima; Machicado, Jorge D.; Davogustto, Giovanni E.; Pan, Jen-Jung

    2014-01-01

    Prostatic abscesses are usually related to gram-negative bacilli. However, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has emerged as a substantial cause of prostatic abscesses in recent years. Herein, we report the case of a 31-year-old man with a history of orthotopic liver transplantation 10 years ago who presented with acute onset dysuria and abdominal pain and was diagnosed with a MRSA prostatic abscess. To our knowledge, this is the first case describing a prostatic abscess in a liver transplant recipient and the first reporting MRSA as the causative organism of a prostatic abscess in a solid organ transplant recipient. PMID:25389507

  18. [Orthotopic liver transplant in rats. Surgical technique, complications and treatment].

    PubMed

    Lausada, Natalia R; Gondolesi, G E; Ortiz, E; Dreizzen, E; Raimondi, J C

    2002-01-01

    The orthotopic rat liver transplant model is a widely used technique in transplantation research. It has many advantages over other animal transplant models because of its availability and low cost. However, it must be emphasized that success with the rat model requires thorough training. The aim of this paper is to describe the microsurgical technique involved in 60 rat liver transplants and to discuss the complications and their treatments. Forty-nine liver transplants were performed at the Experimental Laboratory of the University Hospital, Ontario, Canada (ELUH) and 11 were performed at the Laboratorio de Trasplante de Organos de la Facultad de Ciencias Médicas de La Plata, Buenos Aires. Argentina (LTO). Among the transplants performed at the ELUH, the observed complications were haemorrhage (n = 4), pneumothorax (n = 1), anastomotic failure (n = 15), bile leak (n = 3), and bile duct necrosis (n = 9). The remaining 17 rats at the ELUH were healthy at day 7 after surgery. Animal survival immediately postop, at 24 hours postop and at 7 days postop was achieved with the 9th, 20th and 21st transplants respectively. At the LTO, 3 rats died as a result of anaesthetic complications. Seven-day animal survival was achieved with the 11th transplant. We beleive that the description of the orthotopic rat liver transplantation technique, as well as the discussion regarding complications and their management, can be useful for researchers interested in performing liver transplantation in rats.

  19. Prophylactic liver transplantation for high-risk recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Po-Chih; Ho, Cheng-Maw; Hu, Rey-Heng; Ho, Ming-Chih; Wu, Yao-Ming; Lee, Po-Huang

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the second most common cause of cancer-related death in the world. Radical treatment of HCC in early stages results in a long disease-free period and improved overall survival. The choice of optimal management strategy for HCC mainly depends on the severity of the underlying liver disease. For patients with decompensated liver cirrhosis and HCC within Milan criteria (MC), liver transplant (LT) is the choice of treatment. However, for patients with good residual liver reserve and HCC within MC, selection of other curative treatments such as liver resection (LR) or radiofrequency ablation may be a reasonable alternative. For patients without cirrhosis, LR can result in an overall survival similar to that provided by LT. Therefore, it is an accepted alternative to LT especially in areas with organ shortage. However, the cumulative 5-year recurrence rate of HCC post LR might be as high as 70%. For initial transplant-eligible (within MC) patients with recurrent HCC post LR, salvage liver transplant (SLT) was first proposed in 2000. However, most patients with recurrent HCC considered for SLT are untransplantable cases due to HCC recurrence beyond MC or comorbidity. Thus, the strategy of opting for SLT results in the loss of the opportunity of LT for these patients. Some authors proposed the concept of “de principe liver transplant” (i.e., prophylactic LT before HCC recurrence) to prevent losing the chance of LT for these potential candidates. Factors associated with the failure of SLT will be dissected and discussed in three parts: Patient, tumor, and underlying liver disease. Regarding patient-related factors, the rate of transplantability depends on patient compliance. Patients without regular follow-up tend to develop HCC recurrence beyond MC at the time of tumor detection. Advancing age is another factor related to severe comorbidities when LT is considered for HCC recurrence, and these elderly candidates become ineligible as

  20. Orthotopic liver transplantation in an adult with situs inversus: an easy way to fit the liver.

    PubMed

    Hoyos, Sergio; Guzmán, Carlos; Correa, Gonzalo; Restrepo, Juan Carlos; Franco, Hernán; Cárdenas, Andrés

    2006-01-01

    Situs inversus (SI) is a rare congenital disorder with a complete mirror image of thoracic and abdominal organs. In adults with SI and decompensated cirrhosis experience with liver transplantation is limited. Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) in an adult with cirrhosis using a technique where the recipient liver was placed using a 90-degree rotation of the graft was previously reported by Klintmalm et al, however no other reports using this technique have been described. We report a case of a 41 year-old man with situs inversus and decompensated cirrhosis who successfully underwent OLT using this technique. The donor liver was rotated 90-degrees towards the left and easily fitted into the recipients'fossa with the left lobe pointing toward the left lower quadrant. The patient had an uneventful recovery and has been followed for 21 months without any complications. This technique has the advantage of preventing compromise of the size of the donor liver, permits an easy reconstruction of vascular and biliary tree and in this case was associated with an excellent outcome.

  1. NAFLD and liver transplantation: Current burden and expected challenges

    PubMed Central

    Pais, Raluca; Barritt, A. Sidney; Calmus, Yvon; Scatton, Olivier; Runge, Thomas; Lebray, Pascal; Poynard, Thierry; Ratziu, Vlad; Conti, Filomena

    2017-01-01

    Summary Because of global epidemics of obesity and type 2 diabetes, the prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is increasing both in Europe and the United States, becoming one of the most frequent causes of chronic liver disease and predictably, one of the leading causes of liver transplantation both for end-stage liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma. For most transplant teams around the world this will raise many challenges in terms of preand post-transplant management. Here we review the multifaceted impact of NAFLD on liver transplantation and will discuss: (1) NAFLD as a frequent cause of cryptogenic cirrhosis, end-stage chronic liver disease, and hepatocellular carcinoma; (2) prevalence of NAFLD as an indication for liver transplantation both in Europe and the United States; (3) the impact of NAFLD on the donor pool; (4) the access of NAFLD patients to liver transplantation and their management on the waiting list in regard to metabolic, renal and vascular comorbidities; (5) the prevalence and consequences of post-transplant metabolic syndrome, recurrent and de novo NAFLD; (6) the alternative management and therapeutic options to improve the long-term outcomes with particular emphasis on the correction and control of metabolic comorbidities. PMID:27486010

  2. Twin pregnancy in a liver transplant recipient with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Van Schalkwyk, McI; Westbrook, R H; O'Beirne, J; Wright, A; Gonzalez, A; Johnson, M A; Kinloch-de Loës, S

    2016-10-05

    We are not aware of a report detailing the complex obstetrical and medical management of twin pregnancy in the context of HIV infection and early post-liver transplantation period. Here we describe the successful outcome of a twin pregnancy in a 28-year-old HIV-positive female receiving antiretroviral therapy and immunosuppressive therapy who was the recipient of a liver transplant for previous drug-induced liver failure.

  3. Liver transplantation in Taiwan: the Chang Gung experience.

    PubMed

    Chen, C L; Wang, K L; Hui, Y L; Shieh, W B

    1992-01-01

    Between March 1984 and February 1991, six orthotopic liver transplantations were performed at the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital in Taiwan. The indications for transplantation were Wilson's disease (5 patients) and biliary atresia (1 patient). Donors and recipients were matched only for size and ABO blood group compatibility, and the recipient operations were performed without the use of a venovenous bypass. Arterial reconstruction was carried out by end-to-end hepatic artery anastomosis (4), thoracic aortic conduit (1), or interposition of an iliac artery graft (1), whereas biliary reconstruction was accomplished by a choledochocholedochostomy using a T-tube stent (4) or a choledochocholedochostomy using an external cholecystostomy without stenting (2). Biliary complications occurred in three patients, and all required additional surgery. The average duration of donor-liver cold ischemia, operating time, and blood loss during surgery were 7 h and 50 min (range, 4.5-9 h), 13.5 h (range, 11.8-17 h), and 4,385 ml (range, 750-12,000 ml), respectively. The immunosuppressive regimens included a cyclosporin-steroid combination (n = 2) and a triple-drug combination (n = 4). All except one of the surviving patients experienced at least one rejection episode that was reversed by a methyl-prednisolone bolus and/or recycle. One patient developed a primary cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection that responded well to Ganciclovir treatment. Two of the patients died, one of injuries sustained in a traffic accident 3 years after transplantation, and the other of massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The overall survival value at 3 months was 83%, and the follow-up period ranged from 3 months to 7 years. All of the survivors have achieved complete rehabilitation and currently enjoy an excellent quality of life with normal liver function. Although the present study involved a small number of cases, our results indicate that liver transplantation can be successfully achieved in a high

  4. Predictors of employment after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sahota, Amandeep; Zaghla, Hassan; Adkins, Rodney; Ramji, Alnoor; Lewis, Susan; Moser, Jennifer; Sher, Linda S; Fong, Tse-Ling

    2006-01-01

    Employment after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) indicates recipients' physical/psychosocial adjustment. Our aim was to determine clinical, socioeconomic and health-related quality of life parameters influencing employment after OLT. Questionnaire on demographics, medical conditions, alcohol and drug use before/after OLT, and a validated 12-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-12) were mailed to 126 adult OLT patients. Stepwise logistic regression was conducted to identify best predictors of post-OLT employment. Among non-retirees, 49% were employed after OLT. The predictors of employment were: employment status, income, disability status before OLT and Model of End Stage Liver Disease score. These variables had prediction rate of 82%. Individuals working during the five yr prior to OLT were likely to return to work (p<0.0001), particularly those who held a job for >6 months prior to OLT (p<0.0001), income>$80 000 before OLT compared with <$30 000 (p=0.036). Patients receiving Social Security Insurance (SSI) payment for >or=6 months prior to OLT, were less likely to work (p=0.0005). Severity/duration of liver dysfunction prior to OLT did not correlate with employment. Sense of physical health was poorer in those employed after OLT than in unemployed (p=0.0003). Socioeconomic factors were the most important predictors of post-OLT employment.

  5. Declining Liver Graft Quality Threatens the Future of Liver Transplantation in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Orman, Eric S.; Mayorga, Maria E.; Wheeler, Stephanie B.; Townsley, Rachel M.; Toro-Diaz, Hector H.; Hayashi, Paul H.; Barritt, Sidney A.

    2015-01-01

    National liver transplant volume has declined since 2006, in part due to worsening donor organ quality. Trends that degrade organ quality are expected to continue over the next two decades. We used the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) database to inform a 20-year discrete event simulation estimating liver transplant volume from 2010 to 2030. Data to inform the model were obtained from deceased organ donors between 2000 and 2009. If donor liver utilization practices remain constant, utilization will fall from 78% to 44% by 2030, resulting in 2230 fewer liver transplants. If transplant centers increase their risk tolerance for marginal grafts, utilization would decrease to 48%. Institution of “opt-out” organ donation policies to increase the donor pool would still result in 1380-1866 fewer transplants. Ex-vivo perfusion techniques that increase the use of marginal donor livers may stabilize liver transplant volume. Otherwise, the number of liver transplants in the US will decrease substantially over the next 15 years. Conclusions The transplant community will need to accept inferior grafts and potentially worse post-transplant outcomes and/or develop new strategies for increasing organ donation and utilization in order to maintain the number of liver transplants at the current level. PMID:25939487

  6. Impaired Physical Function Following Pediatric Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Amy G.; Neighbors, Katie; Mukherjee, Shubra; Rak, Melanie; Varni, James W.; Alonso, Estella M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Investigate the spectrum of physical function of pediatric liver transplant (LT) recipients 12–24 months post-LT. Study design Review data collected through the Functional Outcomes Group, an ancillary study of Studies of Pediatric Liver Transplantation registry. Patients were eligible if they had survived LT by 12–24 months. Children ≥ 8 years and parents completed the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory™ 4.0 Generic Core Scales, which includes 8 questions assessing physical function. Scores were compared to a matched healthy child population (n=1658), and between survivors with optimal versus non-optimal health. Results A total of 263 patients were included. Median age at transplant and survey was 4.8 years (IQR 1.3–11.4) and 5.9 years (IQR 2.6–13.1), respectively. The mean Physical Functioning Score on child and parent reports were 81.2± 17.3 and 77.1± 23.7, respectively. Compared to a matched healthy population, transplant survivors and their parents reported lower physical function scores (p<0.01). 32.9% of patients and 35.0% of parents reported a physical function score <75, which is >1 SD below the mean of a healthy population. Physical Function Scores were significantly higher in survivors with optimal health than those with non-optimal health (p<0.01). There was a significant relationship between Emotional Functioning and Physical Functioning Scores for LT recipients (r=0.69, p<0.001). In multivariate analysis, primary disease, height Z score<−1.64 at long term follow-up (LTF) visit, ≥4 days of hospitalization since LTF visit, and not listed as Status 1 were predictors of poor physical function. Conclusions Pediatric LT recipients 1–2 years post-LT and their parents report lower physical function than a healthy population. Findings suggest practitioners need to routinely assess physical function, and development of rehabilitation programs may be important. PMID:26850789

  7. Living donor liver transplantation for inborn errors of metabolism - An underutilized resource in the United States.

    PubMed

    Pham, Thomas A; Enns, Gregory M; Esquivel, Carlos O

    2016-09-01

    Inborn metabolic diseases of the liver can be life-threatening disorders that cause debilitating and permanent neurological damage. Symptoms may manifest as early as the neonatal period. Liver transplant replaces the enzymatically deficient liver, allowing for metabolism of toxic metabolites. LDLT for metabolic disorders is rarely performed in the United States as compared to countries such as Japan, where they report >2000 cases performed within the past two decades. Patient and graft survival is comparable to that of the United States, where most of the studies are based on deceased donors. No living donor complications were observed, suggesting that LDLT is as safe and effective as deceased donor transplants performed in the USA. Increased utilization of living donors in the USA will allow for early transplantation to prevent permanent neurological damage in those with severe disease. Pediatric transplant centers should consider utilizing living donors when feasible for children with metabolic disorders of the liver.

  8. Levetiracetam in the Treatment of Epileptic Seizures After Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Hsiang; Chen, Chao-Long; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Chen, Nai-Ching; Tsai, Meng-Han; Chuang, Yao-Chung

    2015-09-01

    After liver transplantation, patients may develop seizures or epilepsy due to a variety of etiologies. The ideal antiepileptic drugs for these patients are those with fewer drug interactions and less hepatic toxicity. In this study, we present patients using levetiracetam to control seizures after liver transplantation. We retrospectively enrolled patients who received levetiracetam for seizure control after liver transplantation. We analyzed the etiology of liver failure that required liver transplantation, etiology of the seizures, outcomes of seizure control, and the condition of the patient after follow-up at the outpatient department. Hematological and biochemical data before and after the use of levetiracetam were also collected. Fifteen patients who received intravenous or oral levetiracetam monotherapy for seizure control after liver transplantation were enrolled into this study. All of the patients remained seizure-free during levetiracetam treatment. Two patients died during the follow-up, and the other 13 patients were alive at the end of the study period and all were seizure-free without neurological sequelae that interfered with their daily activities. No patients experienced liver failure or rejection of the donor liver due to ineffective immunosuppressant medications. The dosage of immunosuppressants did not change before and after levetiracetam treatment, and there were no changes in hematological and biochemical data before and after treatment. Levetiracetam may be a suitable antiepileptic drug for patients who undergo liver transplantation due to fewer drug interactions and a favorable safety profile.

  9. Arterial conduits for hepatic artery revascularisation in adult liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Muralidharan, Vijayaragavan; Imber, Charles; Leelaudomlipi, Surasak; Gunson, Bridget K; Buckels, John A C; Mirza, Darius F; Mayer, A David; Bramhall, Simon R

    2004-05-01

    Arterial complications after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT), including hepatic artery thrombosis (HAT), are important causes of early graft failure. The use of an arterial conduit is an accepted alternative to the utilisation of native recipient hepatic artery for specific indications. This study aims to determine the efficacy of arterial conduits and the outcome in OLT. We retrospectively reviewed 1,575 cadaveric adult OLTs and identified those in which an arterial conduit was used for hepatic revascularisation. Data on the primary disease, indication for using arterial conduit, type of vascular graft, operative technique and outcome were obtained. Thirty-six (2.3%) patients underwent OLT in which arterial conduits were used for hepatic artery (HA) revascularisation. Six of these were performed on the primary transplant, while the rest (n=30) were performed in patients undergoing re-transplantation, including six who had developed hepatic artery aneurysms. The incidence of arterial conduits was 0.4% (6/1,426 cases) in all primary OLTs and 20.1% (30/149 cases) in all re-transplants. Twenty-nine procedures utilised iliac artery grafts from the same donor as the liver, six used iliac artery grafts from a different donor, and a single patient underwent a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) graft. Two techniques were used: infra-renal aorto-hepatic artery conduit and interposition between the donor and recipient native HAs, or branches of the HAs. The 30-day mortality rate for operations using an arterial conduit was 30.6%. Three conduits thrombosed at 9, 25 and 155 months, respectively, but one liver graft survived without re-transplantation. The arterial conduits had 1- and 5-year patency rates of 88.5% and 80.8%. The 1- and 5-year patient survival rates were 66.7% and 44%. We can thus conclude that an arterial conduit is a viable alternative option for hepatic revascularisation in both primary and re-transplantation. Despite a lower patency rate than that of

  10. Epidemiology of invasive fungal infections after liver transplantation and the risk factors of late-onset invasive aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Miki; Fujimoto, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Masaki; Matsumura, Yasufumi; Kaido, Toshimi; Takakura, Shunji; Uemoto, Shinji; Ichiyama, Satoshi

    2016-02-01

    Invasive fungal infection (IFI) in liver transplant recipients is associated with poor outcomes. Targeted antifungal prophylaxis is recommended for high-risk populations; however, the epidemiology of IFI has changed, and the risk criteria remain unclear. In addition, the risk factors for late-onset invasive aspergillosis (IA) have not been fully characterized. We examined 279 recipients over 16 years of age to uncover their IFI epidemiology, clinical characteristics and outcomes. In addition, a case-control study was performed to identify the risk factors of late-onset IA. Of the 279 recipients, 96.1% underwent living donor liver transplantation. Antifungal prophylaxis was administered to 80.6% of the recipients. IFI occurred in 15 patients, among which 8 cases were early-onset (≤90 days after liver transplantation) and 7 cases were late-onset (>90 days after liver transplantation). Five of the late-onset cases were invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, and 2 were fungemia cases. The mortality rate of late-onset IA was 80.0%. According to a multivariate analysis, steroid use before liver transplantation, bloodstream infection within 90 days after liver transplantation and reoperation within 90 days after liver transplantation were significant risk factors for late-onset IA after liver transplantation. The prevalence of IFI was low in our population given that over 80% of liver recipients received antifungal prophylaxis. The prognosis of late-onset IA remains poor, and predictors associated with late-onset IA, such as steroid use before liver transplantation, bloodstream infection and reoperation after liver transplantation, may help clinicians to optimize prevention measures for these devastating infections.

  11. Immunohematologic complications of ABO-unmatched liver transplants.

    PubMed

    Triulzi, D J; Shirey, R S; Ness, P M; Klein, A S

    1992-01-01

    Transplantation of ABO-unmatched livers has been associated with the development of donor-derived antibody (DDAb) and hemolysis. Nine (22%) of 41 consecutive patients undergoing liver transplantation at our institution received 10 ABO-unmatched livers. Five (56%) of nine patients developed DDAbs and hemolysis. All five patients were group A1 and received group O livers. DDAbs appeared a mean of 9.2 +/- 2.8 (1 SD) days after surgery and persisted for 15.2 +/- 10.3 days. All patients with DDAbs developed hemolysis. During the period when DDAbs were demonstrable, the hemoglobin dropped by a mean of 4.8 g per dL (48 g/L), and the patients were transfused with a mean of 7.8 +/- 2.3 units of group O red cells. One patient with hemolysis underwent exchange transfusion for acute renal failure. Patients with hemolysis required significantly more red cells postoperatively (15.0 vs. 6.9 units, p = 0.04) than did ABO-matched patients. None of the parameters examined (age, recipient or donor gender, secretor status, rejection, or donor isoagglutinin titers) were predictive of DDAb or hemolysis, although hemolysis occurred in three of four cases in which donor serum IgG anti-A titers were > or = 128, as opposed to one of four cases in which titers were < 128. Because recipients of ABO-unmatched livers are at high risk for transiently developing DDAb and hemolysis with associated morbidity, the prophylactic use of donor-type red cells for surgery and after operation is justified.

  12. Pulmonary complications following orthotopic liver transplant.

    PubMed

    Durán, F G; Piqueras, B; Romero, M; Carneros, J A; de Diego, A; Salcedo, M; Santos, L; Ferreiroa, J; Cos, E; Clemente, G

    1998-01-01

    Pulmonary complications after orthotopic liver transplant (OLT) are frequent, involving high morbidity and mortality. We have determined the pulmonary complication incidence in 187 patients submitted to OLT at the General University Hospital "Gregorio Marañón" in the last 4 years, analyzing the type of infection, evolution, diagnostic and therapeutic measures and their influence on OLT mortality. A total of 120 patients had pulmonary complications, the most frequent being pleural effusion (61.94%), pneumonia (43.36%), and pneumothorax (11.5%). Serious pulmonary hypertension was diagnosed by invasive methods in two patients at the time of surgery (unidentified before OLT); both died at early post postoperative times. Pleural effusion was noted in 70 patients, 31.42% of them requiring thoracic tube drainage, complications developing in 22.72%. Thirteen patients were diagnosed of pneumothorax, the most frequent etiologies being percutaneous liver biopsy, thoracic tube drainage for pleural effusion, and postoperative complications in 41.6, 33.3, and 23.3%, respectively. Pneumonia was diagnosed in the 1st month after OLT in 45 patients. Tests to diagnose and identify the etiological agent were made in 71.1% of diagnosed pneumonia patients, identification being obtained in 62.5%. Telescope catheter culture identified the agent in 48%, fiber optic bronchoscopy in 50%, and lung or pleural biopsy in 100%. Respiratory insufficiency was noted in 64 patients (34.22% of transplanted patients). Factors involved in their development were pneumonia (42.18%), graft dysfunction (39.06%, pleural effusion (34.37%), sepsis (28.18%), and poor nutritional status (7.81%). Fifty patients (41.66%) died, pulmonary pathology being the determinant factor in 28.8%. Patient mortality with respiratory insufficiency was greater, especially in those with three factors involved the development of respiratory insufficiency.

  13. Brain death and marginal grafts in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Castro, M B; Gracia-Sancho, J; Peralta, C

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that most organs for transplantation are currently procured from brain-dead donors; however, the presence of brain death is an important risk factor in liver transplantation. In addition, one of the mechanisms to avoid the shortage of liver grafts for transplant is the use of marginal livers, which may show higher risk of primary non-function or initial poor function. To our knowledge, very few reviews have focused in the field of liver transplantation using brain-dead donors; moreover, reviews that focused on both brain death and marginal grafts in liver transplantation, both being key risk factors in clinical practice, have not been published elsewhere. The present review aims to describe the recent findings and the state-of-the-art knowledge regarding the pathophysiological changes occurring during brain death, their effects on marginal liver grafts and summarize the more controversial topics of this pathology. We also review the therapeutic strategies designed to date to reduce the detrimental effects of brain death in both marginal and optimal livers, attempting to explain why such strategies have not solved the clinical problem of liver transplantation. PMID:26043077

  14. Brain death and marginal grafts in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Castro, M B; Gracia-Sancho, J; Peralta, C

    2015-06-04

    It is well known that most organs for transplantation are currently procured from brain-dead donors; however, the presence of brain death is an important risk factor in liver transplantation. In addition, one of the mechanisms to avoid the shortage of liver grafts for transplant is the use of marginal livers, which may show higher risk of primary non-function or initial poor function. To our knowledge, very few reviews have focused in the field of liver transplantation using brain-dead donors; moreover, reviews that focused on both brain death and marginal grafts in liver transplantation, both being key risk factors in clinical practice, have not been published elsewhere. The present review aims to describe the recent findings and the state-of-the-art knowledge regarding the pathophysiological changes occurring during brain death, their effects on marginal liver grafts and summarize the more controversial topics of this pathology. We also review the therapeutic strategies designed to date to reduce the detrimental effects of brain death in both marginal and optimal livers, attempting to explain why such strategies have not solved the clinical problem of liver transplantation.

  15. [Cesarean section in an orthotopic liver transplantation patient].

    PubMed

    Guasch Arévalo, E; Alcantarilla Martín, C; López López, M A; Suárez Cobián, A; Gilsanz, F

    2002-01-01

    We describe the case of a woman with a functioning orthotopic liver transplant who was receiving cyclosporine treatment. An emergency cesarean section was performed, with epidural analgesia, for prolonged pregnancy and an unfavorable cervix. No complications were recorded either during or after surgery. She gave birth to a healthy boy and both were discharged on the fifth day after delivery. Organ transplantation is an increasingly common procedure, and Spain, which has a large number of organ donors, is the country where the largest number of transplants in Europe is performed. Immunosuppressive therapy has advanced greatly, allowing patients to survive longer and enjoy good quality of life. Many transplanted women in their childbearing years consider pregnancy, which can lead to medical problems, a worsened clinical picture or complications related to pregnancy, putting the lives of both mother and fetus at risk. Perioperative management by an anesthesiologist is necessary, whether delivery is vaginal or cesarean. Whenever immunosuppressive therapy is involved, the use of general or regional anesthetics carries risk, as do pregnancy and delivery themselves.

  16. Prevention and Treatment of Recurrent Hepatitis B after Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Maiwall, Rakhi; Kumar, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B is a global health problem that leads to development of various complications, such as cirrhosis, liver cancer, and liver failure requiring liver transplantation. The recurrence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) post-liver transplantation is a major cause of allograft dysfunction, cirrhosis of the allograft, and graft failure. Patients with high viral load at the time of transplantation, hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) positivity, or those with a history of anti-viral drug resistance are considered as high-risk for recurrent HBV post-liver transplantation, while patients with low viral load, including HBeAg negative status, acute liver failure, and hepatitis D virus (HDV) co-infection are considered to be at low-risk for recurrent HBV post-liver transplantation. Antivirals for patients awaiting liver transplantation(LT) cause suppression of HBV replication and reduce the risk of recurrent HBV infection of the allograft and, therefore, all HBV patients with decompensated cirrhosis should be treated with potent antivirals with high genetic barrier to resistance (entecavir or tenofovir) prior to liver transplantation. Prevention of post-liver transplantation recurrence should be done using a combination of hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG) and antivirals in patients at high risk of recurrence. Low dose HBIG, HBIG-free protocols, and monoprophylaxis with high potency antivirals can still be considered in patients at low risk of recurrence. Even, marginal grafts from anti-HBc positive donors can be safely used in hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) negative, preferably in anti-hepatitis B core (HBc)/anti-hepatitis B surface (HBs) positive recipients. In this article, we aim to review the mechanisms and risk factors of HBV recurrence post-LT in addition to the various treatment strategies proposed for the prevention of recurrent HBV infection PMID:27047773

  17. Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuretic Hormone Secretion Following Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Kosei; Yagi, Takahito; Shinoura, Susumu; Umeda, Yuzo; Yoshida, Ryuichi; Nobuoka, Daisuke; Watanabe, Nobuyuki; Kuise, Takashi; Fuji, Tomokazu; Araki, Hiroyuki; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi

    2017-02-01

    Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) is an extremely rare cause of hyponatremia post-liver transplantation. A 15-year-old Japanese girl with recurrent cholangitis after Kasai surgery for biliary atresia underwent successful living donor liver transplantation. Peritonitis due to gastrointestinal perforation occurred. Hyponatremia gradually developed but improved after hypertonic sodium treatment. One month later, severe hyponatremia rapidly recurred. We considered the hyponatremia's cause as SIADH. We suspected that tacrolimus was the disease's cause, so we used cyclosporine instead, plus hypertonic sodium plus water intake restriction, which improved the hyponatremia. Symptomatic hyponatremia manifested by SIADH is a rare, serious complication post-liver transplantation.

  18. Herpes simplex virus hepatitis after pediatric liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hori, T; Ogura, Y; Okamoto, S; Nakajima, A; Kami, K; Iwasaki, J; Yonekawa, Y; Ogawa, K; Oike, F; Takada, Y; Egawa, H; Nguyen, J H; Uemoto, S

    2010-08-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) hepatitis has a fatal impact on the outcome of organ transplanted recipients. Here, we present a thought-provoking case of HSV hepatitis in a high-risk recipient after living-related liver transplantation (LRLT). A 1-month-old female newborn infant was affected by HSV encephalitis. Fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) of unknown etiology occurred suddenly at 4.4 years of age. Viral infections were ruled out as the cause of FHF. Intensive care including plasma exchange (PE) was started, and the preoperative treatments for ABO incompatibility were performed. Thereafter, LRLT was performed emergently. Although strong immunosuppression for ABO incompatibility was continued after LRLT, antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) occurred on postoperative day (POD) 4. PE was repeated and improvements were obtained. However, liver dysfunction appeared on POD 8. Histopathological findings of liver needle biopsy clearly revealed HSV hepatitis, although the results of HSV DNA and antibody titer in blood sample did not clearly indicate HSV infection. On POD 21, thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) occurred and the plasma and immunoglobulin were replenished. Our pediatric recipient recovered successfully from AMR, HSV hepatitis, TMA, and repeated sepsis. We conclude that well considered therapy based on the real-time detection of HSV hepatitis is indispensable for the further improvements of outcome in HSV hepatitis after LRLT.

  19. Elevated Fasting Plasma Glucose before Liver Transplantation is Associated with Lower Post-Transplant Survival

    PubMed Central

    Katsura, Emi; Ichikawa, Tatsuki; Taura, Naota; Miyaaki, Hisamitsu; Miuma, Satoshi; Shibata, Hidetaka; Honda, Takuya; Hidaka, Masaaki; Soyama, Akihiko; Takeshima, Fuminao; Eguchi, Susumu; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Background The risk of liver cirrhosis is higher among individuals with diabetes mellitus, and a cirrhotic patient with diabetes may have a poorer prognosis after liver transplantation compared to a patient without diabetes. Thus, we evaluated whether fasting plasma glucose prior to receiving a liver transplant was a prognostic factor for post-transplant survival. Material/Methods Ninety-one patients received a living donor liver transplant between November 2005 and December 2012. Patients were considered diabetic if they were prescribed diabetes medications or had impaired glucose tolerance as measured by an oral glucose tolerance test. Each patient was monitored through December 31, 2013, to evaluate prognosis. Results Fasting plasma glucose of at least 100 mg/dL significantly decreased survival following transplant (52% in the high FPG group compared to 78% in the control group, p=0.04), while postprandial hyperglycemia had no effect on survival. Additionally, overall mortality and the incidence of vascular disease were significantly higher among patients with uncontrolled plasma glucose. Impaired fasting plasma glucose was significantly and inversely associated with overall survival in the univariate and multivariate analyses, while creatinine (at least 1 mg/dL) was inversely associated with survival in the univariate analysis. Conclusions Elevated fasting plasma glucose prior to liver transplantation was inversely associated with post-transplant survival. This effect may be due to underlying microangiopathy as a result of uncontrolled diabetes before transplantation. Our data demonstrated the importance of controlled blood glucose prior to liver transplantation. PMID:27909287

  20. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Key Considerations Before and After Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Yuval A.; Berg, Carl L.

    2017-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common etiology of chronic liver disease in developed countries and is on trajectory to become the leading indication for liver transplantation in the USA and much of the world. Patients with NAFLD cirrhosis awaiting liver transplant face unique challenges and increased risk for waiting list stagnation and dropout due to burdensome comorbidities including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and kidney disease. Thus far, patients transplanted for NAFLD cirrhosis have excellent mid- and long-term patient and graft survival, but concerns regarding short-term morbidity and mortality continue to exist. Post-liver transplantation, NAFLD occurs as both a recurrent and de novo manifestation, each with unique outcomes. NAFLD in the donor population is of concern given the growing demand for liver transplantation and mounting pressure to expand the donor pool. This review addresses key issues surrounding NAFLD as an indication for transplantation, including its increasing prevalence, unique patient demographics, outcomes related to liver transplantation, development of post-liver transplantation NAFLD, and NAFLD in the liver donor population. It also highlights exciting areas where further research is needed, such as the role of bariatric surgery and preconditioning of marginal donor grafts. PMID:26815171

  1. LATE ACUTE REJECTION IN LIVER TRANSPLANT: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    NACIF, Lucas Souto; PINHEIRO, Rafael Soares; PÉCORA, Rafael Antônio de Arruda; DUCATTI, Liliana; ROCHA-SANTOS, Vinicius; ANDRAUS, Wellington; D'ALBUQUERQUE, Luiz Carneiro

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Late acute rejection leads to worse patient and graft survival after liver transplantation. Aim: To analyze the reported results published in recent years by leading transplant centers in evaluating late acute rejection and update the clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment of liver transplantation. Method: Systematic literature review through Medline-PubMed database with headings related to late acute rejection in articles published until November 2013 was done. Were analyzed demographics, immunosuppression, rejection, infection and graft and patient survival rates. Results: Late acute rejection in liver transplantation showed poor results mainly regarding patient and graft survival. Almost all of these cohort studies were retrospective and descriptive. The incidence of late acute rejection varied from 7-40% in these studies. Late acute rejection was one cause for graft loss and resulted in different outcomes with worse patient and graft survival after liver transplant. Late acute rejection has been variably defined and may be a cause of chronic rejection with worse prognosis. Late acute rejection occurs during a period in which the goal is to maintain lower immunosuppression after liver transplantation. Conclusion: The current articles show the importance of late acute rejection. The real benefit is based on early diagnosis and adequate treatment at the onset until late follow up after liver transplantation. PMID:26537150

  2. Management of Alcohol Use Disorder in Patients Requiring Liver Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mary R.; Leggio, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease is the second most common indication for orthotopic liver transplantation in western countries. The majority of patients with alcoholic liver disease, however, are not referred for transplant evaluation. If evaluated, a 6 month period of sobriety is required before waitlisting for transplant. The consequences of relapse to alcohol use in patients on the waitlist are usually removal from the list. Therefore, identification and treatment of alcohol use disorder in patients with end-stage liver disease greatly impacts quality of life, treatment options and survival in patients’ course with this grave illness. Psychosocial and behavioral interventions prior to transplant appear to reduce drinking in the period before the surgery as well as reduce relapse rates post-transplant. Only one of the three medications approved by the Food and Drug Administration, acamprosate, seems feasible for use in patients with end-stage liver disease, while several other medications currently under investigation for the treatment of alcohol use disorder can be considered for use in this population. While only baclofen has been formally studied in alcoholic patients with end-stage liver disease with positive results for safety and efficacy, other medications also hold promise to treat alcohol use disorder in this population. Transplant programs with addictions specialists who function as an integral part of the treatment team may offer better outcomes to patients in terms of success of maintaining sobriety both pre- and post-transplant. PMID:26619772

  3. Treatment of addictive behaviors in liver transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Weinrieb, Robert M; Lucey, Michael R

    2007-11-01

    Very little addiction treatment research has been done concerning smoking cessation, illicit drugs, or even alcohol abuse in liver transplant patients. Our data suggest that a surprising number of patients who are awaiting a liver transplant for alcohol-related end-stage liver disease will return to drinking before transplantation. We found that motivational enhancement therapy afforded no marked benefit over treatment as usual for drinking, smoking, mood, or general health outcomes in alcoholics awaiting liver transplantation. Stably abstinent methadone-maintained opiate-dependent patients should not be tapered off methadone; are generally good candidates for liver transplant; show low relapse rates into illicit use of opiates; and may be at risk for more medical complications than their counterparts. Pre- and posttransplantation smoking rates are high and cause marked morbidity and mortality. Transplant teams should encourage smoking cessation treatments.Marijuana use in liver transplant recipients is not uncommon, and apart from the risk of developing aspergillosis, additional health risks have not yet been identified.

  4. Liver transplantation in the mouse: Insights into liver immunobiology, tissue injury, and allograft tolerance.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Shinichiro; Yoshida, Osamu; Ono, Yoshihiro; Geller, David A; Thomson, Angus W

    2016-04-01

    The surgically demanding mouse orthotopic liver transplant model was first described in 1991. It has proved to be a powerful research tool for the investigation of liver biology, tissue injury, the regulation of alloimmunity and tolerance induction, and the pathogenesis of specific liver diseases. Liver transplantation in mice has unique advantages over transplantation of the liver in larger species, such as the rat or pig, because the mouse genome is well characterized and there is much greater availability of both genetically modified animals and research reagents. Liver transplant experiments using various transgenic or gene knockout mice have provided valuable mechanistic insights into the immunobiology and pathobiology of the liver and the regulation of graft rejection and tolerance over the past 25 years. The molecular pathways identified in the regulation of tissue injury and promotion of liver transplant tolerance provide new potential targets for therapeutic intervention to control adverse inflammatory responses/immune-mediated events in the hepatic environment and systemically. In conclusion, orthotopic liver transplantation in the mouse is a valuable model for gaining improved insights into liver biology, immunopathology, and allograft tolerance that may result in therapeutic innovation in the liver and in the treatment of other diseases.

  5. Immunosuppression in pediatric liver transplant recipients: Unique aspects.

    PubMed

    Miloh, Tamir; Barton, Andrea; Wheeler, Justin; Pham, Yen; Hewitt, Winston; Keegan, Tara; Sanchez, Christine; Bulut, Pinar; Goss, John

    2017-02-01

    Pediatric liver transplantation has experienced improved outcomes over the last 50 years. This can be attributed in part to establishing optimal use of immunosuppressive agents to achieve a balance between minimizing the risks of allograft rejection and infection. The management of immunosuppression in children is generally more complex and can be challenging when compared with the use of these agents in adult liver transplant patients. Physiologic differences in children alter the pharmacokinetics of immunosuppressive agents, which affects absorption, distribution, metabolism, and drug excretion. Children also have a longer expected period of exposure to immunosuppression, which can impact growth, risk of infection (bacterial, viral, and fungal), carcinogenesis, and likelihood of nonadherence. This review discusses immunosuppressive options for pediatric liver transplant recipients and the unique issues that must be addressed when managing this population. Further advances in the field of tolerance and accommodation are needed to relieve the acute and cumulative burden of chronic immunosuppression in children. Liver Transplantation 23 244-256 2017 AASLD.

  6. [Treatment of hepatitis C before and after liver transplantation].

    PubMed

    Llovet, Laura-Patricia; Rodríguez-Tajes, Sergio; Londoño, María-Carlota

    2016-05-01

    Hepatitis C recurrence after liver transplantation is universal and increases morbidity and mortality in these patients. The development of new direct antiviral agents against the hepatitis C virus is a major treatment advance. Pre-transplant treatment avoids graft infection and sometimes improves liver function, allowing the patient to be withdrawn from the transplant waiting list. Delaying treatment until the postpostransplant period may be advisable in patients with advanced cirrhosis. Generally, antiviral therapy after liver transplantation is provided in patients with histological evidence of the disease. In these patients, treatment is more effective in the initial stages of the disease. The choice of antiviral therapy in these patients is based on the degree of liver function, the presence of renal failure, and potential drug-drug interactions.

  7. Liver regeneration after living donor transplantation: adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation cohort study.

    PubMed

    Olthoff, Kim M; Emond, Jean C; Shearon, Tempie H; Everson, Greg; Baker, Talia B; Fisher, Robert A; Freise, Chris E; Gillespie, Brenda W; Everhart, James E

    2015-01-01

    Adult-to-adult living donors and recipients were studied to characterize patterns of liver growth and identify associated factors in a multicenter study. Three hundred and fifty donors and 353 recipients in the Adult-to-Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation Cohort Study (A2ALL) receiving transplants between March 2003 and February 2010 were included. Potential predictors of 3-month liver volume included total and standard liver volumes (TLV and SLV), Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score (in recipients), the remnant and graft size, remnant-to-donor and graft-to-recipient weight ratios (RDWR and GRWR), remnant/TLV, and graft/SLV. Among donors, 3-month absolute growth was 676 ± 251 g (mean ± SD), and percentage reconstitution was 80% ± 13%. Among recipients, GRWR was 1.3% ± 0.4% (8 < 0.8%). Graft weight was 60% ± 13% of SLV. Three-month absolute growth was 549 ± 267 g, and percentage reconstitution was 93% ± 18%. Predictors of greater 3-month liver volume included larger patient size (donors and recipients), larger graft volume (recipients), and larger TLV (donors). Donors with the smallest remnant/TLV ratios had larger than expected growth but also had higher postoperative bilirubin and international normalized ratio at 7 and 30 days. In a combined donor-recipient analysis, donors had smaller 3-month liver volumes than recipients adjusted for patient size, remnant or graft volume, and TLV or SLV (P = 0.004). Recipient graft failure in the first 90 days was predicted by poor graft function at day 7 (HR = 4.50, P = 0.001) but not by GRWR or graft fraction (P > 0.90 for each). Both donors and recipients had rapid yet incomplete restoration of tissue mass in the first 3 months, and this confirmed previous reports. Recipients achieved a greater percentage of expected total volume. Patient size and recipient graft volume significantly influenced 3-month volumes. Importantly, donor liver volume is a

  8. En-Bloc Transplant of the Liver, Kidney and Pancreas: Experience from a Latin American Transplant Center.

    PubMed

    Caicedo, Luis A; Villegas, Jorge I; Serrano, Oscar; Millán, Mauricio; Sepúlveda, Mauricio; Jiménez, Diego; García, Jairo; Posada, Juan G; Mesa, Liliana; Duran, Carlos; Schweineberg, Johanna; Dávalos, Diana; Manzi, Eliana; Sabogal, Angie; Aristizabal, Ana María; Echeverri, Gabriel J

    2017-02-02

    BACKGROUND En-bloc transplantation is a surgical procedure in which multiple organs are transplanted simultaneously. It has some similarities with multi-organ transplantation but offers certain advantages. This report highlights the experience of our interdisciplinary group regarding the treatment and follow-up of patients who received en-bloc transplantation, with the aim of encouraging the development of this surgical technique. CASE REPORT The first case is a 38-year-old patient with type 1 diabetes mellitus, liver cirrhosis, and chronic kidney failure who received an en-bloc transplant of the liver, pancreas, and kidney with no intraoperative complications. He had a prolonged hospital stay due to anemia and systemic inflammatory response syndrome, which were resolved successfully. At follow-up, he had no requirement for insulin or for dialysis, or for new interventions. The second case describes a 48-year-old patient with type 2 diabetes mellitus, renal failure, and liver cirrhosis who received an en-bloc transplant of the liver, pancreas, and kidney with no complications. During the postoperative period, the patient suffered a possible episode of acute tubular necrosis, which evolved towards improvement, with a tendency to normal metabolic and renal functioning, with no additional events. The patient is currently in follow-up and is insulin-independent. CONCLUSIONS En-bloc transplantation is a safe procedure, which is technically simple and which achieves excellent results. This procedure is indicated in patients with end-stage renal disease, cirrhosis, and diabetes mellitus that is difficult to control.

  9. An Assessment of Publication Status of Pediatric Liver Transplantation Studies

    PubMed Central

    Breil, Thomas; Wenning, Daniel; Teufel, Ulrike; Hoffmann, Georg F.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pediatric liver transplantation is a highly specialized, challenging field. Selective reporting may introduce bias into evidence based clinical decision making, but the precise extent of unpublished data in pediatric liver transplantation is unknown today. We therefore assessed the public availability of completed clinical trials in pediatric liver transplantation. Methods We determined the proportion of published and unpublished pre-registered, completed pediatric liver transplantation studies on ClinicalTrials.gov. The major trial and literature databases, i.e., clinicaltrials.gov, Pubmed, and Google Scholar were searched for publications. In addition, principal investigators or sponsors were contacted directly. STROBE criteria were applied for the descriptive analysis. Results Out of N = 33 studies focusing on pediatric liver transplantation registered as completed until March 2014 on clinicaltrials.gov, N = 19 (58%) studies were published until February 2015, whereas N = 14 (42%) studies remained unpublished. The unpublished trials contain data from N = 2105 (35%) patients out of a total population of N = 6044 study participants. Median time-to-publication, i.e., the period from completion of the trial until public availability of the data was 23 IQR 10 to 28 months. Most pertinent key questions in pediatric liver transplantation, i.e., surgical procedures, immunosuppression, concomitant infections, and graft rejection were addressed in 48% of studies (N = 16/33), half of which were published. Conclusion Half of the clinical trials in pediatric liver transplantation focused on key questions such as surgical procedures, immunosuppression, concomitant infections, and graft rejection. There is still a considerable amount of unpublished studies results in pediatric liver transplantation. Time from study completion to publication was almost twice as long as the 12 months mandatory FDAAA-timeline with a trend towards acceleration over time. The data

  10. Physical activity and metabolic syndrome in liver transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Kallwitz, Eric R; Loy, Veronica; Mettu, Praveen; Von Roenn, Natasha; Berkes, Jamie; Cotler, Scott J

    2013-10-01

    There is a high prevalence of metabolic syndrome in liver transplant recipients, a population that tends to be physically inactive. The aim of this study was to characterize physical activity and evaluate the relationship between physical activity and metabolic syndrome after liver transplantation. A cross-sectional analysis was performed in patients more than 3 months after transplantation. Metabolic syndrome was classified according to National Cholesterol Education Panel Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines. Physical activity, including duration, frequency, and metabolic equivalents of task (METs), was assessed. The study population consisted of 204 subjects, with 156 more than 1 year after transplantation. The median time after transplantation was 53.5 months (range = 3-299 months). The mean duration of exercise was 90 ± 142 minutes, and the mean MET score was 3.6 ± 1.5. Metabolic syndrome was observed in 58.8% of all subjects and in 63.5% of the subjects more than 1 year after transplantation. In a multivariate analysis involving all subjects, metabolic syndrome was associated with a time after transplantation greater than 1 year [odds ratio (OR) = 2.909, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.389-6.092] and older age (OR = 1.036, 95% CI = 1.001-1.072). A second analysis was performed for only patients more than 1 year after transplantation. In a multivariate analysis, metabolic syndrome was associated with lower exercise intensity (OR = 0.690, 95% CI = 0.536-0.887), older age (OR = 1.056, 95% CI = 1.014-1.101), and pretransplant diabetes (OR = 4.246, 95% CI = 1.300-13.864). In conclusion, metabolic syndrome is common after liver transplantation, and the rate is significantly higher in patients more than 1 year after transplantation. The observation that exercise intensity is inversely related to metabolic syndrome after transplantation is novel and suggests that physical activity might provide a means for reducing metabolic syndrome complications in liver

  11. Nimesulide-induced severe hemolytic anemia and acute liver failure leading to liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, L; de Francisco, R; Pérez-Pariente, J M; Cadahia, V; Tojo, R; Rodriguez, M; Lucena, Ma I; Andrade, R J

    2002-11-01

    We present the case of a 63-year-old woman who had undergone 7 months of treatment with Nimesulide (100 mg/b.i.d.) for symptomatic osteoarthritis. The patient was admitted to our unit with a clinical picture of progressive jaundice over 3 weeks. Clinical and analytical studies revealed acute liver failure, this being confirmed by liver biopsy, which showed submassive necrosis. Serological tests for different viral agents causing hepatitis were all negative. In addition, she presented a picture of severe haemolytic anaemia resistant to several treatments and needed multiple transfusions. Twenty-three days after admission, the patient presented hepatic encephalopathy and received an orthotopic liver transplant on day 25. The evolution after transplantation was good and the patient continues in good health with no evidence of haemolysis almost 2 years later. Liver toxicity due to Nimesulide is well known, but to our knowledge the occurrence of haemolytic anaemia has not been related to this drug previously. For these reasons, Nimesulide has been restricted or removed from the market in several countries in recent months.

  12. Auxiliary partial orthotopic liver transplantation for fulminant hepatitis. The Paul Brousse experience.

    PubMed Central

    Bismuth, H; Azoulay, D; Samuel, D; Reynes, M; Grimon, G; Majno, P; Castaing, D

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors objective is to report their experience with auxiliary partial orthotopic liver transplantation in fulminant hepatitis (FH) and to discuss the principles that may help in its safe application. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Auxiliary partial orthotopic liver transplantation is an attractive therapeutic method in FH because it provides hepatic function, whereas the remaining native liver is given the possibility to recover. Despite early encouraging reports, its place in the treatment of FH remains to be defined. METHODS: Evaluation of 5 cases of FH treated with auxiliary partial orthotopic liver transplantation from a collective of 22 transplantations for 35 cases of FH referred to the authors' center from January 1994 to November 1995. The grafts were one left lobe, two left livers, and two right livers. RESULTS: The native liver regenerated in three patients: one with Reye's syndrome who died of irreversible neurologic damage, one with FH caused by the hepatitis B virus who is alive 20 months after ABO incompatible graft removal, and one with FH caused by the hepatitis A virus who had her graft removed at 4 months. In two patients, regeneration did not occur: one with drug-induced FH who died of sepsis 3 months after surgery and one with FH of unknown origin who was retransplanted with a standard liver transplantation at 4 months for uncontrollable biliary rejection of an ABO incompatible graft (alive at 10 months). Two of the three patients who survived suffered severe neurologic complications. CONCLUSIONS: Auxiliary partial orthotopic liver transplantation is an attractive treatment for FH, especially in the presence of good prognostic factors for native liver regeneration: a young patient, rapid onset of the disease, and viral hepatitis. It should be considered cautiously in patients with advanced encephalopathy. By providing a smaller mass of liver tissue than with standard orthotopic liver transplantation, and as a more complex operative

  13. Strategies to reduce hepatitis C virus recurrence after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ciria, Ruben; Pleguezuelo, María; Khorsandi, Shirin Elizabeth; Davila, Diego; Suddle, Abid; Vilca-Melendez, Hector; Rufian, Sebastian; de la Mata, Manuel; Briceño, Javier; Cillero, Pedro López; Heaton, Nigel

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major health problem that leads to chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, being the most frequent indication for liver transplantation in several countries. Unfortunately, HCV re-infects the liver graft almost invariably following reperfusion, with an accelerated history of recurrence, leading to 10%-30% of patients progressing to cirrhosis within 5 years of transplantation. In this sense, some groups have even advocated for not re-transplanting this patients, as lower patient and graft outcomes have been reported. However, the management of HCV recurrence is being optimized and several strategies to reduce post-transplant recurrence could improve outcomes, decrease the rate of re-transplantation and optimize the use of available grafts. Three moments may be the focus of potential actions in order to decrease the impact of viral recurrence: the pre-transplant moment, the transplant environment and the post-transplant management. In the pre-transplant setting, it is not well established if reducing the pre transplant viral load affects the risk for HCV progression after transplant. Obviously, antiviral treatment can render the patient HCV RNA negative post transplant but the long-term benefit has not yet been fully established to justify the cost and clinical risk. In the transplant moment, factors as donor age, cold ischemia time, graft steatosis and ischemia/reperfusion injury may lead to a higher and more aggressive viral recurrence. After the transplant, discussion about immunosuppression and the moment to start the treatment (prophylactic, pre-emptive or once-confirmed) together with new antiviral drugs are of interest. This review aims to help clinicians have a global overview of post-transplant HCV recurrence and strategies to reduce its impact on our patients. PMID:23717735

  14. Liver glycogen bodies: ground-glass hepatocytes in transplanted patients.

    PubMed

    Bejarano, Pablo A; Garcia, Monica T; Rodriguez, Maria M; Ruiz, Phillip; Tzakis, Andreas G

    2006-11-01

    Ground-glass hepatocytes have been described in Lafora's disease, fibrinogen deposition, hepatitis B, type IV glycogenosis, and alcohol aversion (cyanamide) therapy. We encountered ground-glass hepatocytes with intracytoplasmic inclusions in four liver biopsies from three transplanted patients who had none of the above-mentioned underlying diseases. One patient was a 4-year-old boy who had a kidney transplant for severe ureterovesical reflux. Patient 2 was a 52-year-old man who had two liver transplants because of hepatitis C. The third patient was a 7-month-old girl who underwent a multivisceral transplant because of necrotizing enterocolitis and liver failure induced by total parenteral nutrition. The patients developed liver abnormalities from 45 days to 4 years after their transplants. The livers showed conspicuous ground-glass hepatocytes in 90% of the children's samples and 30% of the adult liver cells. The cytoplasmic bodies stained strongly for Gomori methenamine-silver; they were positive for periodic acid-Schiff without diastase, but negative after diastase digestion. They were negative for colloidal iron and hepatitis B core and surface antigens. Electron microscopy revealed non-membrane bound aggregates of glycogen. Idiopathic ground-glass hepatocytes occur in transplanted patients and represent accumulation of altered glycogen. However, their clinical significance and cause are not entirely elucidated.

  15. Current status and perspectives in split liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lauterio, Andrea; Di Sandro, Stefano; Concone, Giacomo; De Carlis, Riccardo; Giacomoni, Alessandro; De Carlis, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Growing experience with the liver splitting technique and favorable results equivalent to those of whole liver transplant have led to wider application of split liver transplantation (SLT) for adult and pediatric recipients in the last decade. Conversely, SLT for two adult recipients remains a challenging surgical procedure and outcomes have yet to improve. Differences in organ shortages together with religious and ethical issues related to cadaveric organ donation have had an impact on the worldwide distribution of SLT. Despite technical refinements and a better understanding of the complex liver anatomy, SLT remains a technically and logistically demanding surgical procedure. This article reviews the surgical and clinical advances in this field of liver transplantation focusing on the role of SLT and the issues that may lead a further expansion of this complex surgical procedure. PMID:26494957

  16. Imaging panorama in postoperative complications after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sureka, Binit; Bansal, Kalpana; Rajesh, S; Mukund, Amar; Pamecha, Viniyendra; Arora, Ankur

    2016-01-01

    The liver is the second most-often transplanted solid organ after the kidney, so it is clear that liver disease is a common and serious problem around the globe. With the advancements in surgical, oncological and imaging techniques, orthotopic liver transplantation has become the first-line treatment for many patients with end-stage liver disease. Ultrasound, and Doppler are the most economical and cost-effective imaging modalities for evaluating postoperative fluid collections and vascular complications. Computed tomography (CT) is used to confirm the findings of ultrasound and look for pulmonary complications. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used for the diagnosis of biliary complications, bile leaks and neurological complications. This article illustrates the imaging options for diagnosing the various complications that can be encountered in the postoperative period after liver transplantation. PMID:26534929

  17. Autoimmune hepatitis-primary biliary cirrhosis concurrent with biliary stricture after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yong-Zhen; Sun, Xiao-Ye; Liu, Yi-He; Shen, Zhong-Yang

    2015-02-21

    Although the development of de novo autoimmune liver disease after liver transplantation (LT) has been described in both children and adults, autoimmune hepatitis (AIH)-primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) overlap syndrome has rarely been seen in liver transplant recipients. Here, we report a 50-year-old man who underwent LT for decompensated liver disease secondary to alcoholic steatohepatitis. His liver function tests became markedly abnormal 8 years after LT. Standard autoimmune serological tests were positive for anti-nuclear and anti-mitochondrial antibodies, and a marked biochemical response was observed to a regimen consisting of prednisone and ursodeoxycholic acid added to maintain immunosuppressant tacrolimus. Liver biopsy showed moderate bile duct lesions and periportal lymphocytes infiltrating along with light fibrosis, which confirmed the diagnosis of AIH-PBC overlap syndrome. We believe that this may be a case of post-LT de novo AIH-PBC overlap syndrome; a novel type of autoimmune overlap syndrome.

  18. Liver transplantation in children with progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Englert, Cornelia; Grabhorn, Enke; Richter, Andrea; Rogiers, Xavier; Burdelski, Martin; Ganschow, Rainer

    2007-11-27

    Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) is caused by mutations of the bile salt export pump or the multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein, resulting in chronic hepatic failure. Partial external diversion of bile or ileal bypass is effective in some cases and, in others, liver transplantation (OLT) is necessary. Forty-two children were included in this study. Twenty-six children suffered from PFIC type 2 and 16 from PFIC type 3. Symptoms included pruritus, cholestasis, liver cirrhosis, and growth retardation. Seventeen patients received external biliary diversion. Ten had to undergo OLT in the following course. As of this report, three of the remaining patients were on the wait list for OLT. Twenty-three children received a liver graft primarily with excellent outcome. Our data show that OLT is the option of choice in symptomatic PFIC and whenever liver cirrhosis is present. We suggest a very restrictive recommendation of external biliary diversion. However, gene therapy may be a future option for children with PFIC.

  19. A case of biliary stones and anastomotic biliary stricture after liver transplant treated with the rendez - vous technique and electrokinetic lithotritor

    PubMed Central

    Pisa, Marta Di; Traina, Mario; Miraglia, Roberto; Maruzzelli, Luigi; Volpes, Riccardo; Piazza, Salvatore; Luca, Angelo; Gridelli, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    The paper studies the combined radiologic and endoscopic approach (rendez vous technique) to the treatment of the biliary complications following liver transplant. The “rendez-vous” technique was used with an electrokinetic lithotripter, in the treatment of a biliary anastomotic stricture with multiple biliary stones in a patient who underwent orthotopic liver transplant. In this patient, endoscopic or percutaneous transhepatic management of the biliary complication failed. The combined approach, percutaneous transhepatic and endoscopic treatment (rendez-vous technique) with the use of an electrokinetic lithotritor, was used to solve the biliary stenosis and to remove the stones. Technical success, defined as disappearance of the biliary stenosis and stone removal, was obtained in just one session, which definitively solved the complications. The combined approach of percutaneous transhepatic and endoscopic (rendez-vous technique) treatment, in association with an electrokinetic lithotritor, is a safe and feasible alternative treatment, especially after the failure of endoscopic and/or percutaneous trans-hepatic isolated procedures. PMID:18473423

  20. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and liver transplantation: Outcomes and advances

    PubMed Central

    Said, Adnan

    2013-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most prevalent causes of chronic liver disease worldwide. In the last decade it has become the third most common indication for liver transplantation in the United States. Increasing prevalence of NAFLD in the general population also poses a risk to organ donation, as allograft steatosis can be associated with non-function of the graft. Post-transplant survival is comparable between NAFLD and non-NAFLD causes of liver disease, although long term outcomes beyond 10 year are lacking. NAFLD can recur in the allograft frequently although thus far post transplant survival has not been impacted. De novo NAFLD can also occur in the allograft of patients transplanted for non-NAFLD liver disease. Predictors for NAFLD post-transplant recurrence include obesity, hyperlipidemia and diabetes as well as steroid dose after liver transplantation. A polymorphism in PNPLA3 that mediates triglyceride hydrolysis and is linked to pre-transplant risk of obesity and NAFLD has also been linked to post transplant NAFLD risk. Although immunosuppression side effects potentiate obesity and the metabolic syndrome, studies of immunosuppression modulation and trials of specific immunosuppression regimens post-transplant are lacking in this patient population. Based on pre-transplant data, sustained weight loss through diet and exercise is the most effective therapy for NAFLD. Other agents occasionally utilized in NAFLD prior to transplantation include vitamin E and insulin-sensitizing agents. Studies of these therapies are lacking in the post-transplant population. A multimodality and multidisciplinary approach to treatment should be utilized in management of post-transplant NAFLD. PMID:24409043

  1. Societal reintegration following cadaveric orthotopic liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Ryan; Hurton, Scott; Ayloo, Subhashini; Cwinn, Mathew; De Coutere-Bosse, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies on patients’ societal reintegration following orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) are scarce. Methods Between September 2006 and January 2008, all adults who were alive after 3 years post OLT were included in this prospective cohort study. Validated questionnaires were administered to all candidates with the primary aim of investigating the rate of their social re-integration following OLT and potential barriers they might have encountered. Results Among 157 eligible patients 110 (70%) participated. Mean participants’ age was 57 years (SD 11.4) and 43% were females. Prior to OLT, 75% of patients were married and 6% were divorced. Following OLT there was no significant difference in marital status. Employment rate fell from 72% to 30% post-OLT. Patients who had been employed in either low-skill or advanced-skill jobs were less likely to return to work. After OLT, personal income fell an average of 4,363 Canadian dollars (CAN$) (SD 20,733) (P=0.03) but the majority of recipients (80%) reported high levels of satisfaction for their role in society. Conclusions Although patients’ satisfaction post-OLT is high, employment status is likely to be negatively affected for individuals who are not self-employed. Strategies to assist recipients in returning to their pre-OLT jobs should be developed to improve patients’ economical status and societal ability to recoup resources committed for OLT. PMID:27275465

  2. Percutaneous Management of Biliary Strictures After Pediatric Liver Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Miraglia, Roberto Maruzzelli, Luigi; Caruso, Settimo; Riva, Silvia; Spada, Marco; Luca, Angelo; Gridelli, Bruno

    2008-09-15

    We analyze our experience with the management of biliary strictures (BSs) in 27 pediatric patients who underwent liver transplantation with the diagnosis of BS. Mean recipient age was 38 months (range, 2.5-182 months). In all patients percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, biliary catheter placement, and bilioplasty were performed. In 20 patients the stenoses were judged resolved by percutaneous balloon dilatation and the catheters removed. Mean number of balloon dilatations performed was 4.1 (range, 3-6). No major complications occurred. All 20 patients are symptom-free with respect to BS at a mean follow-up of 13 months (range, 2-46 months). In 15 of 20 patients (75%) one course of percutaneous stenting and bilioplasty was performed, with no evidence of recurrence of BS at a mean follow-up of 15 months (range, 2-46 months). In 4 of 20 patients (20%) two courses of percutaneous stenting and bilioplasty were performed; the mean time to recurrence was 9.8 months (range, 2.4-24 months). There was no evidence of recurrence of BS at a mean follow-up of 12 months (range, 2-16 months). In 1 of 20 patients (5%) three courses of percutaneous stenting and bilioplasty were performed; there was no evidence of recurrence of BS at a mean follow-up of 10 months. In conclusion, BS is a major problem following pediatric liver transplantation. Radiological percutaneous treatment is safe and effective, avoiding, in most cases, surgical revision of the anastomosis.

  3. Seronegative Herpes simplex Associated Esophagogastric Ulcer after Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Matevossian, Edouard; Doll, Dietrich; Weirich, Gregor; Burian, Maria; Knebel, Carolin; Thorban, Stefan; Hüser, Norbert

    2008-01-01

    Herpes simplex infection is characterized by acute or subacute infection, often followed by a chronic carrier state. Consecutive recurrences may flare up if immunocompromise occurs. Herpes simplex associated esophagitis or duodenal ulcer have been reported in immunocompromised patients due to neoplasm, HIV/AIDS or therapeutically induced immune deficiency. Here we report the case of an HSV-DNA seronegative patient who developed grade III dysphagia 13 days after allogeneic liver transplantation. Endoscopy revealed an esophageal-gastric ulcer, and biopsy histopathology showed a distinct fibroplastic and capillary ulcer pattern highly suspicious for viral infection. Immunohistochemistry staining revealed a distinct nuclear positive anti-HSV reaction. Antiviral therapy with acyclovir and high-dose PPI led to a complete revision of clinical symptoms within 48 h. Repeat control endoscopy after 7 days showed complete healing of the former ulcer site at the gastroesophageal junction. Although the incidence of post-transplantation Herpes simplex induced gastroesophageal disease is low, the viral HSV ulcer may be included into a differential diagnosis if dysphagia occurs after transplantation even if HSV-DNA PCR is negative. PMID:21490847

  4. Cell Sources, Liver Support Systems and Liver Tissue Engineering: Alternatives to Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soo Young; Kim, Han Joon; Choi, Dongho

    2015-01-01

    The liver is the largest organ in the body; it has a complex architecture, wide range of functions and unique regenerative capacity. The growing incidence of liver diseases worldwide requires increased numbers of liver transplant and leads to an ongoing shortage of donor livers. To meet the huge demand, various alternative approaches are being investigated including, hepatic cell transplantation, artificial devices and bioprinting of the organ itself. Adult hepatocytes are the preferred cell sources, but they have limited availability, are difficult to isolate, propagate poor and undergo rapid functional deterioration in vitro. There have been efforts to overcome these drawbacks; by improving culture condition for hepatocytes, providing adequate extracellular matrix, co-culturing with extra-parenchymal cells and identifying other cell sources. Differentiation of human stem cells to hepatocytes has become a major interest in the field of stem cell research and has progressed greatly. At the same time, use of decellularized organ matrices and 3 D printing are emerging cutting-edge technologies for tissue engineering, opening up new paths for liver regenerative medicine. This review provides a compact summary of the issues, and the locations of liver support systems and tissue engineering, with an emphasis on reproducible and useful sources of hepatocytes including various candidates formed by differentiation from stem cells. PMID:26019753

  5. Cell sources, liver support systems and liver tissue engineering: alternatives to liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Young; Kim, Han Joon; Choi, Dongho

    2015-05-01

    The liver is the largest organ in the body; it has a complex architecture, wide range of functions and unique regenerative capacity. The growing incidence of liver diseases worldwide requires increased numbers of liver transplant and leads to an ongoing shortage of donor livers. To meet the huge demand, various alternative approaches are being investigated including, hepatic cell transplantation, artificial devices and bioprinting of the organ itself. Adult hepatocytes are the preferred cell sources, but they have limited availability, are difficult to isolate, propagate poor and undergo rapid functional deterioration in vitro. There have been efforts to overcome these drawbacks; by improving culture condition for hepatocytes, providing adequate extracellular matrix, co-culturing with extra-parenchymal cells and identifying other cell sources. Differentiation of human stem cells to hepatocytes has become a major interest in the field of stem cell research and has progressed greatly. At the same time, use of decellularized organ matrices and 3 D printing are emerging cutting-edge technologies for tissue engineering, opening up new paths for liver regenerative medicine. This review provides a compact summary of the issues, and the locations of liver support systems and tissue engineering, with an emphasis on reproducible and useful sources of hepatocytes including various candidates formed by differentiation from stem cells.

  6. Living donor liver transplantation using grafts with hepatic cysts.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Seisuke; Nosaka, Shunsuke; Shigeta, Takanobu; Uchida, Hajime; Hamano, Ikumi; Karaki, Chiaki; Kanazawa, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Akinari; Nakazawa, Atsuko; Kasahara, Mureo

    2012-12-01

    Cystic lesions in the liver are often found through the evaluation of liver donors. Multiple cysts are worrisome, and donor candidates with multiple cysts may be unacceptable as liver donors, especially when their recipients have fibrocystic disease (FCD), which is an inherited disorder. This study reviewed 183 cases of living donor liver transplantation. We collected clinical and radiological data associated with donors with cystic lesions and with donors without cystic lesions, and we evaluated the outcomes of these donors and their recipients. As part of the preoperative radiological assessment of grafts, magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) was performed to evaluate the biliary anatomy of donor candidates with multiple cysts. Thirty-four donors (18.6%) had 1 or more cystic lesions in the liver, and 6 of these donors had multiple cysts (ie, >10). Donors with multiple cysts were older and heavier, and there was a significant relationship between these donors and recipients whose original disease was FCD. During the follow-up (median = 3.1 years), all donors with cystic lesions were found to be doing well without any major postoperative complications. Fifteen recipients who received grafts with cystic lesions (12 left-sided lobes and 3 right-sided lobes) had no complications related to the cystic lesions. In conclusion, donors with cystic lesions may be acceptable as liver donors, although our data are limited mostly to left-sided lobe donation with a short follow-up period. MRC should be preoperatively performed to rule out any biliary anomalies, especially in donor candidates whose recipients have FCD.

  7. Necrotizing encephalitis caused by disseminated Aspergillus infection after orthotopic liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Barrera-Herrera, Luis E; Vera, Alonso; Álvarez, Johanna; Lopez, Rocio

    2015-01-01

    Liver transplantation is the only available treatment for some patients with end-stage liver disease. Despite reduction in mortality rates due to advances related to surgical techniques, intensive medical management and immunosuppressive therapy, invasive fungal infections remain a serious complication in orthotopic liver transplantation. We report the case of an 18-year-old male diagnosed with autoimmune cirrhosis in 2009 who was assessed and listed for liver transplantation for massive variceal hemorrhage. One year after listing a successful orthotopic liver transplantation was performed. Uneventful early recovery was achieved; however, he developed pulmonary and neurological Aspergillus infection 23 and 40 days after surgery, respectively. Antibiotic therapy with voriconazole and amphotericin was started early, with no major response. Neuroimaging revealed multiple right frontal and right parietal lesions with perilesional edema; surgical management of the brain abscesses was performed. A biopsy with periodic acid-Schiff and Gomori stains revealed areas with mycotic microorganisms morphologically consistent with Aspergillus, later confirmed by culture. The patient developed necrotizing encephalitis secondary to aspergillosis and died. Necrotizing encephalitis as a clinical presentation of Aspergillus infection in an orthotopic liver transplant is not common, and even with adequate management, early diagnosis and prompt antifungal treatment, mortality rates remain high.

  8. Recurrence of hepatitis C virus infection after orthotopic liver transplantation: role of genotypes.

    PubMed

    Casino, C; Lilli, D; Rivanera, D; Sabrina, C; Rossi, M; Casciaro, G; Alfani, D; Mancini, C

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the correlation between alanine aminotrasferase levels and hepatitis C virus genotypes in liver transplant patients. We studied 18 patients who had undergone orthotopic liver transplantation because of end-stage cirrhosis (n = 9) or hepatocellular carcinoma (n = 9) hepatitis C virus related. Serum HCV-RNA testing was performed monthly on all the 18 series of serum samples from the first week after liver transplant until the end of the follow up, this period ranging from 1 to 39 months. After liver transplantation, serum HCV-RNA was detected in 14 patients (78%). Of the 8 patients infected with subtype 1b. 1 remained asymptomatic, 2 developed acute liver failure and 5 developed chronic hepatitis. In patients infected with types 1a (Choo et al., 1989), 2a (Choo et al., 1989), with a mixed infection 1b/3 (Kuo et al., 1989) or with an undetermined genotype, significant laboratory abnormalities were not observed. Recurrence of hepatitis C virus infection after liver transplantation is common, and recurrent hepatitis occurs in 50% of cases. Genotype 1b appears to be associated with a higher rate of recurrent hepatitis, compared to other genotypes.

  9. Role of Kupffer cells in failure of fatty livers following liver transplantation and alcoholic liver injury.

    PubMed

    Thurman, R G; Gao, W; Connor, H D; Adachi, Y; Stachlewitz, R F; Zhong, Z; Knecht, K T; Bradford, B U; Mason, R P; Lemasters, J J

    1995-01-01

    Kupffer cells have been implicated in mechanisms of pathophysiology following liver transplantation. Recently, postoperative injury in ethanol-induced fatty liver has been evaluated because fatty livers often fail following transplantation. The low-flow, reflow liver perfusion model was used to study the role of Kupffer cells (KC) in reperfusion injury to fatty livers from rats fed a diet containing ethanol for 4-5 weeks. Treatment with GdCl3, which selectively destroys KC, decreased cell death significantly. Thus, destruction of KC minimized hepatic reperfusion injury, most likely by inhibiting free radical formation and improving microcirculation. Since it was demonstrated recently that destruction of KC prevented the hypermetabolic state observed with acute alcohol exposure, their involvement in events leading to alcohol-induced liver disease was investigated. In rats exposed to ethanol continuously via intragastric feeding for up to 4 weeks, GdCl3 treatment prevented elevation of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and dramatically reduced the average hepatic pathological score. These results indicate that KC participate in the early phases of alcohol-induced liver injury. Endotoxaemia occurs in alcoholics and activates KC; therefore, we evaluated the effect of minimizing bacterial endotoxin by intestinal sterilization with the antibiotics polymyxin B and neomycin. Antibiotics diminished plasma endotoxin levels significantly and prevented ethanol-induced increases in AST values. These results indicate that endotoxin is involved in the mechanism of ethanol-induced liver injury. A six-line radical spectrum was detected with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in bile from alcohol-treated rats which was blocked by GdCl3. The free radical adducts had hyperfine coupling constants characteristic of lipid-derived free radical products. In conclusion, these studies demonstrate that KC are involved in reperfusion injury to ethanol-induced fatty livers and hepatic

  10. Thrombocytopenia, Platelet Transfusion, and Outcome Following Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chin, Jun Liong; Hisamuddin, Syafiah Hanis; O'Sullivan, Aoife; Chan, Grace; McCormick, P Aiden

    2016-05-01

    Thrombocytopenia affects patients undergoing liver transplantation. Intraoperative platelet transfusion has been shown to independently influence survival after liver transplantation at 1 and 5 years. We examined the impact of thrombocytopenia and intraoperative platelet transfusion on short-term graft and overall survival after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). A total of 399 patients undergoing first OLT were studied. Graft and overall survival in patients with different degrees of thrombocytopenia and with or without intraoperative platelet transfusion were described. The degree of thrombocytopenia prior to OLT did not affect graft or overall survival after transplant. However, graft survival in patients receiving platelets was significantly reduced at 1 year (P= .023) but not at 90 days (P= .093). Overall survival was significantly reduced at both 90 days (P= .040) and 1 year (P= .037) in patients receiving platelets. We conclude that a consistently lower graft and overall survival were observed in patients receiving intraoperative platelet transfusion.

  11. Addiction specialist's role in liver transplantation procedures for alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Dom, Geert; Peuskens, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Although liver transplantation (LT) is performed increasingly for patients with end-stage alcoholic liver disease (ALD), the topic remains controversial. Traditionally, the role of an addiction specialist focused on the screening and identification of patients with a high risk on relapse in heavy alcohol use. These patients were in many cases subsequently excluded from a further LT procedure. Recently, awareness is growing that not only screening of patients but also offering treatment, helping patients regain and maintain abstinence is essential, opening up a broader role for the addiction specialist (team) within the whole of the transplant procedure. Within this context, high-risk assessment is proposed to be an indication of increasing addiction treatment intensity, instead of being an exclusion criterion. In this review we present an overview regarding the state of the art on alcohol relapse assessment and treatment in patients with alcohol use disorders, both with and without ALD. Screening, treatment and monitoring is suggested as central roles for the addiction specialist (team) integrated within transplant centers. PMID:26301051

  12. Information needs of family caregivers regarding liver transplant candidates.

    PubMed

    Sá, Amanda Silva; Ziviani, Luciana Costa; Castro-E-Silva, Orlando; Galvão, Cristina Maria; Mendes, Karina Dal Sasso

    2016-03-01

    Objective To assess the information needs of family caregivers of candidates on the waiting list for a liver transplant. Methods It is a cross-sectional study conducted in a transplant center in São Paulo State in the period between April and October of 2012. For the assessment of information needed, an instrument submitted to face and content value was used. The caregivers put 10 subjects in order according to their importance and the amount of interest they had in learning about each, prior to the transplant their family member would be subjected to. Sociodemographic characteristics were also recorded. For data analysis, descriptive statistics were used. Results 42 families participated in the study. The information need about liver disease complications, complications after transplantation and care needed after surgery had higher averages. Conclusions Knowing the information needs of caregivers is important to plan teaching-learning strategies aimed at improving assistance to patients and families in transplant programs.

  13. Liver and kidney transplantation in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Tan-Tam, Clara C; Frassetto, Lynda A; Stock, Peter G

    2009-01-01

    HIV infection has evolved into a chronic condition as a result of improvements in therapeutic options. Chronic exposure with HIV and associated co-pathogens as well as toxicities from prolonged therapy with antiviral medications has resulted in increased morbidity and mortality rates from end-stage liver and kidney disease in the HIV-infected population. Since the definitive treatment for end-stage organ failure is transplantation, demand has increased among HIV-infected patients. Although the transplant community has been slow to recognize HIV as a chronic condition, many transplant centers have eliminated HIV infection as a contraindication to transplantation as a result of better patient management and demand. This review examines the current clinical strategies and issues surrounding liver and kidney transplantation in HIV-infected patients.

  14. Endovascular Treatment of Acute Portal Vein Thrombosis After Liver Transplantation in a Child

    SciTech Connect

    Carnevale, Francisco Cesar Borges, Marcus Vinicius; Moreira, Airton Mota; Cerri, Giovanni Guido; Maksoud, Joao Gilberto

    2006-06-15

    Although operative techniques in hepatic transplantation have reduced the time and mortality on waiting lists, the rate of vascular complications associated with these techniques has increased. Stenosis or thrombosis of the portal vein is an infrequent complication, and if present, surgical treatment is considered the traditional management. This article describes a case of acute portal vein thrombosis after liver transplantation from a living donor to a child managed by percutaneous techniques.

  15. Late onset invasive pneumococcal disease in a liver transplanted patient: beyond the Austrian syndrome.

    PubMed

    Belvisi, V; Del Borgo, C; Morelli, F; Marocco, R; Tieghi, T; Fabietti, P; Vetica, A; Lichtner, M; Mastroianni, C M

    2013-06-01

    Invasive disease caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in high-risk individuals with severe comorbidities, including asplenia, chronic alcoholism, and altered immune status. The risk of invasive pneumococcal disease has been significantly higher in transplant patients compared with the general population. Here, we report an unusual case of a disseminated pneumococcal infection with meningitis, endocarditis, spondylodiscitis, and muscle abscess in an asplenic patient on chronic immunosuppressive therapy for liver transplantation performed 17 years before.

  16. The 2-stage liver transplant: 3 clinical scenarios.

    PubMed

    Gedik, Ender; Bıçakçıoğlu, Murat; Otan, Emrah; İlksen Toprak, Hüseyin; Işık, Burak; Aydın, Cemalettin; Kayaalp, Cüneyt; Yılmaz, Sezai

    2015-04-01

    The main goal of 2-stage liver transplant is to provide time to obtain a new liver source. We describe our experience of 3 patients with 3 different clinical conditions. A 57-year-old man was retransplanted successfully with this technique due to hepatic artery thrombosis. However, a 38-year-old woman with fulminant toxic hepatitis and a 5-year-old-boy with abdominal trauma had poor outcome. This technique could serve as a rescue therapy for liver transplant patients who have toxic liver syndrome or abdominal trauma. These patients required intensive support during long anhepatic states. The transplant team should decide early whether to use this technique before irreversible conditions develop.

  17. Liver transplantation for alveolar echinococcosis in an endemic region.

    PubMed

    Aydinli, Bulent; Ozturk, Gurkan; Arslan, Sukru; Kantarci, Mecit; Tan, Onder; Ahıskalioglu, Ali; Özden, Kemalettin; Colak, Abdurrahim

    2015-08-01

    Alveolar echinococcosis (AE) is a chronic disease caused by ingestion of the eggs of the parasitic cestode Echinococcosis multilocularis (EM). In severe cases, liver transplantation (LT) may represent the only possibility of survival and cure. Patients undergoing LT associated with hepatic AE at our institution between April 2011 and October 2014 were investigated retrospectively. The clinical findings of the 27 patients who participated in the study were noted. Kaplan-Meier and chi-square tests were used to investigate the effect of these characteristics on survival and mortality. Living donor LT was performed on 20 patients (74.1%), and deceased donor LT was performed on 7 patients (25.9%). Hilar invasion was the most common indication (14 patients, 51.9%) for transplantation. The patient follow-up was 16.1 ± 11.4 months, and the overall survival rate was 77.8%. Primary nonfunction developed only in 2 patients in the posttransplantation period. Six patients died during monitoring, the most common cause of death being sepsis (3 patients). The relationship between the mortality rate of the patients and the invasion of the bile duct and/or portal vein by alveolar lesions was found to be statistically significant (P = 0.024 and P = 0.043, respectively). According to PNM staging, when the AE disease exceeds the resectability limits, the only alternative for the treatment of the disease is LT. However, different from LT due to cirrhosis, it is extremely difficult to perform a transplantation for AE disease because of the invasive characteristics of it. In order to decrease the difficulty of the operation and the postoperative mortality, the intracystic abscess and cholangitis which occur because of AE must be treated via medical and percutaneous methods before transplantation.

  18. Biliary liver cirrhosis secondary to cystic fibrosis: a rare indication for liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sańko-Resmer, J; Paczek, L; Wyzgał, J; Ziółkowski, J; Ciszek, M; Alsharabi, A; Grzelak, I; Paluszkiewicz, R; Patkowski, W; Krawczyk, M

    2006-01-01

    As more effective therapies prolong the lives of patients with cystic fibrosis, there are now more patients in this population diagnosed with liver diseases. Secondary biliary cirrhosis is not a rare complication of mucoviscidosis. It is diagnosed in 20% of patients with mucoviscidosis; in 2% it is accompanied by portal hypertension. On average patients with portal hypertension and its complications are 12 years old. Liver transplantation is an accepted method of treatment for children with cystic fibrosis and portal hypertension. It eliminates the cause of the portal hypertension, decreases life-threatening medical conditions, and improves their nutritional status and quality of life. Despite immunosuppressive treatment they do not seem to beat increased risk of upper respiratory tract infections. On the contrary improved respiratory function and status are generally observed. We present our first case of orthotopic liver transplantation performed in a 29-year-old man with cystic fibrosis. The donor was a 42-year-old woman who died of a ruptured cerebral aneurysm. The surgery was performed in September 2004. The patient received immunosuppression based on steroids, basiliximab, tacrolimus, and mycophenolic acid due to renal insufficiency. Antibiotic (meropenem) and antiviral prophylaxis (gancyclovir) were used. A 6-month period of observation confirmed the clinical data from the pediatric population-a good prognosis with improved nutritional status, respiratory function, and quality of life.

  19. Supercooling preservation and transplantation of the rat liver.

    PubMed

    Bruinsma, Bote G; Berendsen, Tim A; Izamis, Maria-Louisa; Yeh, Heidi; Yarmush, Martin L; Uygun, Korkut

    2015-03-01

    The current standard for liver preservation involves cooling of the organ on ice (0-4 °C). Although it is successful for shorter durations, this method of preservation does not allow long-term storage of the liver. The gradual loss of hepatic viability during preservation puts pressure on organ sharing and allocation, may limit the use of suboptimal grafts and necessitates rushed transplantation to achieve desirable post-transplantation outcomes. In an attempt to improve and prolong liver viability during storage, alternative preservation methods are under investigation. For instance, ex vivo machine perfusion systems aim to sustain and even improve viability by supporting hepatic function at warm temperatures, rather than simply slowing down deterioration by cooling. Here we describe a novel subzero preservation technique that combines ex vivo machine perfusion with cryoprotectants to facilitate long-term supercooled preservation. The technique improves the preservation of rat livers to prolong storage times as much as threefold, which is validated by successful long-term recipient survival after orthotopic transplantation. This protocol describes how to load rat livers with cryoprotectants to prevent both intracellular and extracellular ice formation and to protect against hypothermic injury. Cryoprotectants are loaded ex vivo using subnormothermic machine perfusion (SNMP), after which livers can be cooled to -6 °C without freezing and kept viable for up to 96 h. Cooling to a supercooled state is controlled, followed by 3 h of SNMP recovery and orthotopic liver transplantation.

  20. Liver transplantation in the Nordic countries – An intention to treat and post-transplant analysis from The Nordic Liver Transplant Registry 1982–2013

    PubMed Central

    Fosby, Bjarte; Melum, Espen; Bjøro, Kristian; Bennet, William; Rasmussen, Allan; Andersen, Ina Marie; Castedal, Maria; Olausson, Michael; Wibeck, Christina; Gotlieb, Mette; Gjertsen, Henrik; Toivonen, Leena; Foss, Stein; Makisalo, Heikki; Nordin, Arno; Sanengen, Truls; Bergquist, Annika; Larsson, Marie E.; Soderdahl, Gunnar; Nowak, Greg; Boberg, Kirsten Muri; Isoniemi, Helena; Keiding, Susanne; Foss, Aksel; Line, Pål-Dag; Friman, Styrbjörn; Schrumpf, Erik; Ericzon, Bo-Göran; Höckerstedt, Krister; Karlsen, Tom H.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aim and background. The Nordic Liver Transplant Registry (NLTR) accounts for all liver transplants performed in the Nordic countries since the start of the transplant program in 1982. Due to short waiting times, donor liver allocation has been made without considerations of the model of end-stage liver disease (MELD) score. We aimed to summarize key outcome measures and developments for the activity up to December 2013. Materials and methods. The registry is integrated with the operational waiting-list and liver allocation system of Scandiatransplant (www.scandiatransplant.org) and accounted at the end of 2013 for 6019 patients out of whom 5198 were transplanted. Data for recipient and donor characteristics and relevant end-points retransplantation and death are manually curated on an annual basis to allow for statistical analysis and the annual report. Results. Primary sclerosing cholangitis, acute hepatic failure, alcoholic liver disease, primary biliary cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma are the five most frequent diagnoses (accounting for 15.3%, 10.8%, 10.6%, 9.3% and 9.0% of all transplants, respectively). Median waiting time for non-urgent liver transplantation during the last 10-year period was 39 days. Outcome has improved over time, and for patients transplanted during 2004–2013, overall one-, five- and 10-year survival rates were 91%, 80% and 71%, respectively. In an intention-to-treat analysis, corresponding numbers during the same time period were 87%, 75% and 66%, respectively. Conclusion. The liver transplant program in the Nordic countries provides comparable outcomes to programs with a MELD-based donor liver allocation system. Unique features comprise the diagnostic spectrum, waiting times and the availability of an integrated waiting list and transplant registry (NLTR). PMID:25959101

  1. Adherence to immunosuppressive therapy following liver transplantation: an integrative review

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Ramon Antônio; Turrini, Ruth Natália Teresa; Poveda, Vanessa de Brito

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to investigate the evidence available in the literature on non-adherence to immunosuppressive therapy among patients undergoing liver transplantation. Method: integrative literature review, including research whose sample consisted of patients aged over 18 years undergoing liver transplantation. It excluded those containing patients undergoing multiple organ transplants. For the selection of articles, Medline / Pubmed, CINAHL, LILACS, Scopus and Embase were searched. The search period corresponded to the initial date of indexation of different bases, up to the deadline of February 10, 2015, using controlled and uncontrolled descriptors: liver transplantation, hepatic transplantation, liver orthotopic transplantation, medication adherence, medication non-adherence, medication compliance and patient compliance. Results: were located 191 investigations, 10 of which met the objectives of the study and were grouped into four categories, namely: educational process and non-adherence; non-adherence related to the number of daily doses of immunosuppressive medications; detection methods for non-adherence and side effects of therapy. Conclusion: there were risk factors related to the health service, such as control and reduction of the number of doses; related to the individual, such as being male, divorced, alcohol or other substances user, exposed to low social support and being mentally ill. PMID:27579933

  2. Role of liver transplantation in human immunodeficiency virus positive patients

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Deepak; Agarwal, Kosh

    2015-01-01

    End-stage liver disease (ESLD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality amongst human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals. Chronic hepatitis B and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, drug-induced hepatotoxicity related to combined anti-retro-viral therapy, alcohol related liver disease and non-alcohol related fatty liver disease appear to be the leading causes. It is therefore, anticipated that more HIV-positive patients with ESLD will present as potential transplant candidates. HIV infection is no longer a contraindication to liver transplantation. Key transplantation outcomes such as rejection and infection rates as well as medium term graft and patient survival match those seen in the non-HIV infected patients in the absence of co-existing HCV infection. HIV disease does not seem to be negatively impacted by transplantation. However, HIV-HCV co-infection transplant outcomes remain suboptimal due to recurrence. In this article, we review the key challenges faced by this patient cohort in the pre- and post-transplant period. PMID:26604639

  3. Monogenic diseases that can be cured by liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fagiuoli, Stefano; Daina, Erica; D'Antiga, Lorenzo; Colledan, Michele; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2013-09-01

    While the prevalence of most diseases caused by single-gene mutations is low and defines them as rare conditions, all together, monogenic diseases account for approximately 10 in every 1000 births according to the World Health Organisation. Orthotopic liver transplantation (LT) could offer a therapeutic option in monogenic diseases in two ways: by substituting for an injured liver or by supplying a tissue that can replace a mutant protein. In this respect, LT may be regarded as the correction of a disease at the level of the dysfunctional protein. Monogenic diseases that involve the liver represent a heterogeneous group of disorders. In conditions associated with predominant liver parenchymal damage (i.e., genetic cholestatic disorders, Wilson's disease, hereditary hemochromatosis, tyrosinemia, α1 antitrypsin deficiency), hepatic complications are the major source of morbidity and LT not only replaces a dysfunctional liver but also corrects the genetic defect and effectively cures the disease. A second group includes liver-based genetic disorders characterised by an architecturally near-normal liver (urea cycle disorders, Crigler-Najjar syndrome, familial amyloid polyneuropathy, primary hyperoxaluria type 1, atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome-1). In these defects, extrahepatic complications are the main source of morbidity and mortality while liver function is relatively preserved. Combined transplantation of other organs may be required, and other surgical techniques, such as domino and auxiliary liver transplantation, have been attempted. In a third group of monogenic diseases, the underlying genetic defect is expressed at a systemic level and liver involvement is just one of the clinical manifestations. In these conditions, LT might only be partially curative since the abnormal phenotype is maintained by extrahepatic synthesis of the toxic metabolites (i.e., methylmalonic acidemia, propionic acidemia). This review focuses on principles of diagnosis, management

  4. Postoperative imaging in liver transplantation: what radiologists should know.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajay K; Nachiappan, Arun C; Verma, Hetal A; Uppot, Raul N; Blake, Michael A; Saini, Sanjay; Boland, Giles W

    2010-03-01

    Liver transplantation is now frequently used in the treatment of end-stage liver disease. Therefore, it is important that radiologists be aware of common anastomotic techniques and expected postoperative imaging findings. Imaging is most useful in evaluating for posttransplantation complications, which are broadly classified into vascular, biliary, and other complications. Hepatic artery thrombosis is the most significant complication and is often associated with graft failure. Radiologists have multiple modalities at their disposal for optimal evaluation. Doppler ultrasonography (US) is the preliminary imaging modality for gross evaluation of the liver parenchyma, biliary tree, and vasculature for abnormalities. When US findings are indeterminate or there is persistent clinical suspicion for an abnormality, computed tomography (CT) is often performed. The major indications for CT are detection of bile leak, hemorrhage, and abscess, but CT is also useful in the assessment of the vasculature. T-tube cholangiography and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography are the best noninvasive imaging tools for evaluating for biliary stricture. Some investigators would argue that endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is a better diagnostic imaging modality; however, ERCP is invasive. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy is optimal for the evaluation of biliary leakage. Early detection of posttransplantation complications will help lower morbidity rates and will likely allow graft salvage in selected cases.

  5. Liver cell therapy and tissue engineering for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Vacanti, Joseph P; Kulig, Katherine M

    2014-06-01

    Liver transplantation remains the only definitive treatment for liver failure and is available to only a tiny fraction of patients with end-stage liver diseases. Major limitations for the procedure include donor organ shortage, high cost, high level of required expertise, and long-term consequences of immune suppression. Alternative cell-based liver therapies could potentially greatly expand the number of patients provided with effective treatment. Investigative research into augmenting or replacing liver function extends into three general strategies. Bioartificial livers (BALs) are extracorporeal devices that utilize cartridges of primary hepatocytes or cell lines to process patient plasma. Injection of liver cell suspensions aims to foster organ regeneration or provide a missing metabolic function arising from a genetic defect. Tissue engineering recreates the organ in vitro for subsequent implantation to augment or replace patient liver function. Translational models and clinical trials have highlighted both the immense challenges involved and some striking examples of success.

  6. The Unfinished Legacy of Liver Transplantation: Emphasis on Immunology

    PubMed Central

    Starzl, Thomas E.; Lakkis, Fadi G.

    2011-01-01

    Liver transplantation radically changed the philosophy of hepatology practice, enriched multiple areas of basic science, and had pervasive ripple effects in law, public policy, ethics, and theology. Why organ engraftment was feasible remained enigmatic, however, until the discovery in 1992 of donor leukocyte microchimerism in long-surviving liver, and other kinds of organ recipients. Following this discovery, the leukocyte chimerism-associated mechanisms were elucidated that directly linked organ and bone marrow transplantation and eventually clarified the relationship of transplantation immunology to the immunology of infections, neoplasms, and autoimmune disorders. We describe here how the initially controversial paradigm shift mandated revisions of cherished dogmas. With the fresh insight, the reasons for numerous inexplicable phenomena of transplantation either became obvious or have become susceptible to discriminate experimental testing. The therapeutic implications of the “new immunology” in hepatology and in other medical disciplines, have only begun to be explored. Apart from immunology, physiologic investigations of liver transplantation have resulted in the discovery of growth factors (beginning with insulin) that are involved in the regulation of liver size, ultrastructure, function, and the capacity for regeneration. Such studies have partially explained functional and hormonal relationships of different abdominal organs, and ultimately they led to the cure or palliation by liver transplantation of more than 2 dozen hepatic-based inborn errors of metabolism. Liver transplantation should not be viewed as a purely technologic achievement, but rather as a searchlight whose beams have penetrated the murky mist of the past, and continue to potentially illuminate the future. PMID:16447295

  7. Subcapsular hematoma of the graft after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Massarollo, P C B; Shiroma, M E; Rodrigues, A J; Mies, S

    2004-05-01

    Subcapsular hematoma of the graft is an underreported complication of liver transplantation (LT). Among 408 LT performed from September 1, 1985, to September 1, 2000, eight patients developed a subcapsular hematoma within 30 days after LT (8/408 = 2.0%). Among the six early cases observed, five required further surgical approaches due to hematoma progression, rupture, and hemorrhage. One patient underwent liver retransplantation due to uncontrollable hepatic hemorrhage. The two more recent cases were successfully treated by early opening of the Glisson's capsule with hemostasis of the hepatic raw bleeding surface. The five patients who developed acute renal failure required dialysis. Three patients died during hospitalization. Among the survivors, two were discharged on the postoperative (PO) day 15; the others on PO day 37, 38, and 56. In conclusion, subcapsular hematoma of the graft is a potentially serious complication of LT that may produce severe hemorrhage, shock, and in extreme cases, graft loss or even death. The severity of the complication is related to the extension of the decapsulated area of the graft. An early surgical approach with intentional opening of the hematoma before progression of the lesion seems to facilitate hemostasis and improve results.

  8. Liver transplant outcomes in a Canadian First Nations population

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, M; Uhanova, J; Minuk, GY

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A higher incidence of autoimmune disorders may predispose First Nations (FN) individuals to higher rates and more severe episodes of rejection, graft loss and mortality following liver transplantation for advanced liver disease. METHODS: A retrospective review of patient outcomes in a single centre providing long-term follow-up care for FN and non-FN patients transplanted for advanced liver disease was conducted. RESULTS: A total of 20 FN and 129 non-FN charts were available for review. FN subjects were younger at transplantation (mean [± SD] age 32.4±4.1 years versus 46.3±1.4 years; P=0.00005), less often male (35% versus 58%; P=0.05), more commonly transplanted for autoimmune hepatitis (30% versus 4.7%; P=0.006), less often from urban residences (25% versus 74%; P=0.0001) and less compliant with medical care (20% versus 80%; P=0.007). After a mean follow-up period of 11.0±1.5 years and 8.4±0.5 years in FN and non-FN subjects, respectively, the incidence and severity of rejection, graft and patient survival were similar between cohorts. CONCLUSION: Although demographic profiles, nature of the underlying disease and compliance differed, the rates and severity of rejection, graft and patient survival were similar in FN and non-FN patients who underwent liver transplantation for advanced liver disease. PMID:21766089

  9. The Etiology, Incidence, and Impact of Preservation Fluid Contamination during Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lladó, Laura; Vila, Marina; Baliellas, Carme; Tubau, Fe; Sabé, Núria; Fabregat, Joan; Carratalà, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    The role of contaminated preservation fluid in the development of infection after liver transplantation has not been fully elucidated. To assess the incidence and etiology of contaminated preservation fluid and determine its impact on the subsequent development of infection after liver transplantation, we prospectively studied 50 consecutive liver transplants, and cultured the following samples in each instance: preservation fluid (immediately before and at the end of the back-table procedure, and just before implantation), blood, and bile from the donor, and ascitic fluid from the recipient. When any culture was positive, blood cultures were obtained and targeted antimicrobial therapy was started. We found that the incidence of contaminated preservation fluid was 92% (46 of 50 cases of liver transplantation per year), but only 28% (14/50) were contaminated by recognized pathogens. Blood and bile cultures from the donor were positive in 28% and 6% respectively, whereas ascitic fluid was positive in 22%. The most frequently isolated microorganisms were coagulase-negative staphylococci. In nine cases, the microorganisms isolated from the preservation fluid concurred with those grown from the donor blood cultures, and in one case, the isolate matched with the one obtained from bile culture. No liver transplant recipient developed an infection due to the transmission of an organism isolated from the preservation fluid. Our findings indicate that contamination of the preservation fluid is frequent in liver transplantation, and it is mainly caused by saprophytic skin flora. Transmission of infection is low, particularly among those recipients given targeted antimicrobial treatment for organisms isolated in the preservation fluid. PMID:27513941

  10. Resolved Psychosis after Liver Transplantation in a Patient with Wilson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sorbello, Orazio; Riccio, Daniela; Sini, Margherita; Carta, Mauro; Demelia, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    A psychiatric involvement is frequently present in Wilson’s disease. Psychiatric symptoms are sometimes the first and only manifestation of Wilson’s disease. More often a psychiatric involvement is present beside a neurologic or hepatic disease. We describe the case of a 18 years-old male patient who shows a clinic and laboratoristic pattern of cirrhosis and an history of subchronic hallucinatory psychosis, behavioral symptoms and mood disturbances with depressed mood. He hadn’t familiar history of liver or psychiatric disease. Laboratory and imaging tests confirmed the diagnosis of Wilson’s disease with psichiatric involvement. After liver transplantation copper metabolism and liver function normalised and we noticed no recurrency of the psichiatric illness. Very few cases of psychiatric improvement after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) has been described until now. PMID:22291850

  11. Nutritional risk and anthropometric evaluation in pediatric liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zamberlan, Patrícia; Leone, Cláudio; Tannuri, Uenis; de Carvalho, Werther Brunow; Delgado, Artur Figueiredo

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the nutritional status of pediatric patients after orthotopic liver transplantation and the relationship with short-term clinical outcome. METHOD: Anthropometric evaluations of 60 children and adolescents after orthotopic liver transplantation, during the first 24 hours in a tertiary pediatric intensive care unit. Nutritional status was determined from the Z score for the following indices: weight/age, height/age or length/age, weight/height or weight/length, body mass index/age, arm circumference/age and triceps skinfold/age. The severity of liver disease was evaluated using one of the two models which was adequated to the patients' age: 1. Pediatric End-stage Liver Disease, 2. Model for End-Stage Liver Disease. RESULTS: We found 50.0% undernutrition by height/age; 27.3% by weight/age; 11.1% by weight/height or weight/length; 10.0% by body mass index/age; 61.6% by arm circumference/age and 51.0% by triceps skinfold/age. There was no correlation between nutritional status and Pediatric End-stage Liver Disease or mortality. We found a negative correlation between arm circumference/age and length of hospitalization. CONCLUSION: Children with chronic liver diseases experience a significant degree of undernutrition, which makes nutritional support an important aspect of therapy. Despite the difficulties in assessment, anthropometric evaluation of the upper limbs is useful to evaluate nutritional status of children before or after liver transplantation. PMID:23295591

  12. Bridging use of plasma exchange and continuous hemodiafiltration before living donor liver transplantation in fulminant Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Yoshiko; Uto, Hirofumi; Hasuike, Satoru; Ido, Akio; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Eto, Toshiharu; Hamakawa, Toshiro; Tanaka, Koichi; Tsubouchi, Hirohito

    2003-10-01

    A 15-year-old girl presented with acute hepatic failure showing ascites and hepatic encephalopathy, accompanied by hemolytic anemia. She was diagnosed as having fulminant Wilson's disease (FWD). Plasma exchange (PE), continuous hemodiafiltration (CHDF) and D-penicillamine administration were started immediately. Copper [24,000 microg] was removed by PE and CHDF over three days, which relieved the jaundice and the consciousness disorder. A successful liver transplant followed. FWD progresses rapidly and often liver transplantation is the only possible therapy. In this case, PE and CHDF were an effective therapy bridge until liver transplantation.

  13. Reframing the impact of combined heart-liver allocation on liver transplant waitlist candidates

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, David S.; Reese, Peter P.; Amaral, Sandra; Abt, Peter L.

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous heart-liver transplantation, although rare, has become more common in the U.S. When the primary organ is a heart or liver, patients receiving an offer for the primary organ automatically receive the second, non-primary organ from that donor. This policy raises issues of equity—i.e. whether liver transplant-alone candidates bypassed by heart-liver recipients are disadvantaged. No prior published analyses have addressed this issue, and few methods have been developed as a means to measure the impact of such allocation policies. We analyzed OPTN match run data from 2007-2013 to determine whether this combined organ allocation policy disadvantages bypassed liver transplant waitlist candidates in a clinically meaningful way. Among 65 heart-liver recipients since May 2007, 42 had substantially higher priority for the heart relative to the liver, and bypassed 268 liver-alone candidates ranked 1-10 on these match runs. Bypassed patients had lower risk of waitlist removal for death or clinical deterioration compared to controls selected by match MELD score (HR: 0.56, 95% CI: 0.40-0.79), and similar risk as controls selected by laboratory MELD score (HR: 0.91, 95% CI: 0.63-1.33) or on match runs of similar graft quality (HR: 0.97, 95% CI: 0.73-1.37). The waiting time from bypass to subsequent transplantation was significantly longer among bypassed candidates versus controls on match runs of similar graft quality (median: 87 (IQR: 27-192) days versus 24 (5-79) days; p<0.001). Although transplant is delayed, liver transplant waitlist candidates bypassed by heart-liver recipients do not have excess mortality compared to three sets of matched controls. These analytic methods serve as a starting point to consider other potential approaches to evaluate the impact of multi-organ transplant allocation policies PMID:25044621

  14. Cat scratch disease causing hepatic masses after liver transplant.

    PubMed

    Thudi, Kavitha R; Kreikemeier, Jeffrey T; Phillips, Nancy J; Salvalaggio, Paolo R; Kennedy, Donald J; Hayashi, Paul H

    2007-02-01

    Hepatic cat scratch disease is rarely reported in liver transplant recipients and has never been reported with discrete liver lesions in the graft. A 52-year-old woman was transplanted for hepatitis C cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Her posttransplant course was uneventful. She presented 2.7 years after transplantation with fever of unknown origin and went on to develop multiple and diffuse discrete liver lesions. Despite an extensive work-up including percutaneous and laparoscopic biopsies, a subsegmental resection that included one of these masses was required to make the diagnosis of Bartonella henselae infection. Serologic tests were equivocal. Histology was consistent with cat scratch disease of the liver, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing of the resected tissue confirmed the diagnosis. Response to doxycycline was rapid. Fevers resolved within 7 days. Repeat abdominal CT scan showed reduction of the liver masses. Cat scratch disease should be considered in postliver transplant patients presenting with fever and liver lesions, especially if close contact with cats has occurred. Diagnosis by PCR testing of involved tissue is preferred when serologies are equivocal due to immunosuppression.

  15. Power-Pulse Thrombolysis and Stent Recanalization for Acute Post-Liver Transplant Iliocaval Venous Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Baccin, Carlos E.; Haskal, Ziv J.

    2008-07-15

    Postoperative inferior vena cava (IVC) thrombosis is a potentially lethal complication in a liver transplant recipient. We report the case of a 57-year-old liver transplant recipient, who developed acute, postoperative, markedly symptomatic complete IVC, ilial-femoral-caval, and left renal vein thrombosis. After treatment with power-pulse tissue plasminogen activator thrombolysis, thrombectomy, and stent placement, the IVC and iliac veins were successfully recanalized. At 2.5-year imaging and laboratory follow-up, the IVC, iliac, and renal veins remained patent and graft function was preserved.

  16. Colonic mucormycosis presented with ischemic colitis in a liver transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Do, Gi Won; Jung, Seok Won; Jun, Jae-Bum; Seo, Jae Hee; Nah, Yang Won

    2013-06-14

    Mucormycosis is an uncommon opportunistic fungal infection with high mortality in liver transplant recipients. Mucormycosis of the gastrointestinal tract can manifest with features similar to ischemic colitis. Typically signs and symptoms of non-gangrenous ischemic colitis resolve spontaneously within 24-48 h. On the other hand, the clinical course of the mucormycosis is commonly fulminant. We encountered a case of invasive fungal colitis presenting with abdominal pain and hematochezia in a liver transplant recipient. Endoscopic examination showed multiple shallow ulcerations and edema with mucosal friabilities on the sigmoid and distal descending colon, which was consistent with ischemic colitis. However, the histological examination obtained from endoscopic biopsies showed fungal hyphae with surrounding inflammatory cells and mucosal necrosis. The patient was successfully managed with antifungal agent without surgical treatment. Thus, early diagnosis and treatment is essential for improving the prognosis of invasive fungal infection after liver transplantation.

  17. Reduced size liver transplantation from a donor supported by a Berlin Heart.

    PubMed

    Misra, M V; Smithers, C J; Krawczuk, L E; Jenkins, R L; Linden, B C; Weldon, C B; Kim, H B

    2009-11-01

    Patients on cardiac assist devices are often considered to be high-risk solid organ donors. We report the first case of a reduced size liver transplant performed using the left lateral segment of a pediatric donor whose cardiac function was supported by a Berlin Heart. The recipient was a 22-day-old boy with neonatal hemochromatosis who developed fulminant liver failure shortly after birth. The transplant was complicated by mild delayed graft function, which required delayed biliary reconstruction and abdominal wall closure, as well as a bile leak. However, the graft function improved quickly over the first week and the patient was discharged home with normal liver function 8 weeks after transplant. The presence of a cardiac assist device should not be considered an absolute contraindication for abdominal organ donation. Normal organ procurement procedures may require alteration due to the unusual technical obstacles that are encountered when the donor has a cardiac assist device.

  18. Idiopathic cholangiopathy in a biliary cast syndrome necessitating liver transplantation following head trauma.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Michael F; Chong, Hon I; O'Donovan, Deidre; Sheehan, Katherine M; Leader, Mary B; Kay, Elaine; McCormick, P Aiden; Broe, Patrick; Murray, Frank E; McCormack, Aiden

    2003-04-01

    The development of total biliary casts is very unusual, especially in patients who have not undergone liver transplantation. The aetiology of these casts is uncertain but several factors are believed to play a role, including periods of fasting, haemolysis, cholangitis and recent surgery. Resultant bile stasis and/or gallbladder hypocontractility promote sludge and subsequent stone formation. Here we present the case of a previously well 66-year-old woman who developed a total biliary cast several weeks after being involved in a road traffic accident during which she sustained head injuries but no obvious liver insult. This cast was removed at laparotomy but the patient had resultant diffuse biliary tree abnormalities and persistent cholestasis and subsequently required a liver transplant. The possible aetiologies of biliary cast formation and subsequently cholangiopathy necessitating transplantation in this patient are described.

  19. Prognostic factors for the evolution and reversibility of chronic rejection in pediatric liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tannuri, Ana Cristina Aoun; Lima, Fabiana; de Mello, Evandro Sobroza; Tanigawa, Ryan Yukimatsu; Tannuri, Uenis

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Chronic rejection remains a major cause of graft failure with indication for re-transplantation. The incidence of chronic rejection remains high in the pediatric population. Although several risk factors have been implicated in adults, the prognostic factors for the evolution and reversibility of chronic rejection in pediatric liver transplantation are not known. Hence, the current study aimed to determine the factors involved in the progression or reversibility of pediatric chronic rejection by evaluating a series of chronic rejection cases following liver transplantation. METHODS: Chronic rejection cases were identified by performing liver biopsies on patients based on clinical suspicion. Treatment included maintaining high levels of tacrolimus and the introduction of mofetil mycophenolate. The children were divided into 2 groups: those with favorable outcomes and those with adverse outcomes. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify potential risk factors in these groups. RESULTS: Among 537 children subjected to liver transplantation, chronic rejection occurred in 29 patients (5.4%). In 10 patients (10/29, 34.5%), remission of chronic rejection was achieved with immunosuppression (favorable outcomes group). In the remaining 19 patients (19/29, 65.5%), rejection could not be controlled (adverse outcomes group) and resulted in re-transplantation (7 patients, 24.1%) or death (12 patients, 41.4%). Statistical analysis showed that the presence of ductopenia was associated with worse outcomes (risk ratio=2.08, p=0.01). CONCLUSION: The presence of ductopenia is associated with poor prognosis in pediatric patients with chronic graft rejection. PMID:27166772

  20. Predicting short-term survival after liver transplantation on eight score systems: a national report from China Liver Transplant Registry

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Qi; Dai, Haojiang; Zhuang, Runzhou; Shen, Tian; Wang, Weilin; Xu, Xiao; Zheng, Shusen

    2017-01-01

    To compare the performance of eight score systems (MELD, uMELD, MELD-Na. iMELD, UKELD, MELD-AS, CTP, and mCTP) in predicting the post-transplant mortality, we analyzed the data of 6,014 adult cirrhotic patients who underwent liver transplantation between January 2003 and December 2010 from the China Liver Transplant Registry database. In hepatitis B virus (HBV) group, MELD, uMELD and MELD-AS showed good predictive accuracies at 3-month mortality after liver transplantation; by comparison with other five models, MELD presented the best ability in predicting 3-month, 6-month and 1-year mortality, showing a significantly better predictive ability than UKELD and iMELD. In hepatitis C virus and Alcohol groups, the predictive ability did not differ significantly between MELD and other models. Patient survivals in different MELD categories were of statistically significant difference. Among patients with MELD score >35, a new prognostic model based on serum creatinine, need for hemodialysis and moderate ascites could identify the sickest one. In conclusion, MELD is superior to other score systems in predicting short-term post-transplant survival in patients with HBV-related liver disease. Among patients with MELD score >35, a new prognostic model can identify the sickest patients who should be excluded from waiting list to prevent wasteful transplantation. PMID:28198820

  1. Assessment of Graft Selection Criteria in Living-Donor Liver Transplantation: The Jikei Experience.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Hiroaki; Wakiyama, Shigeki; Futagawa, Yasuro; Iida, Tomonori; Matsumoto, Michinori; Haruki, Koichiro; Ishida, Yuichi; Misawa, Takeyuki; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2015-07-01

    In living-donor liver transplantation, graft selection is especially important for the safety of the live donor and an acceptable outcome for the recipient. The essential medical requirements for living liver donation at Jikei University Hospital are as follows: an adult aged 65 years or younger, in good general condition, with partial liver volume of more than 35% of the standard liver volume (SLV) for the recipient, and without severe liver steatosis. Based on our criteria, we performed 13 living-donor liver transplantations between 2007 and 2013, including 1 retransplantation. Three cases were outside our standard donor criteria, including age (18 and 66 years) and 33% graft volume (GV) to SLV ratio for the recipient on preoperative volumetry using computed tomography. In 2 cases, the actual GV to SLV ratio at transplantation was less than 35%. Median postoperative hospital stay was 11 days for the donors, and 29 days for the recipients. All donors returned to their preoperative status, and all recipients were discharged in good condition. Our medical requirements for living liver donation seem to be acceptable because of the good outcome.

  2. Liver transplantation for hepatic cirrhosis in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Noble-Jamieson, G; Valente, J; Barnes, N D; Friend, P J; Jamieson, N V; Rasmussen, A; Calne, R Y

    1994-01-01

    Five children with cystic fibrosis complicated by hepatic cirrhosis received liver grafts. They all had portal hypertension with varices and three had variceal bleeding; respiratory function was only moderately impaired, but four were colonised with pseudomonas and one with aspergillus. Liver transplantation was well tolerated and there was no increase in respiratory or other early postoperative complications. Four of the children were fully well from 14 to 35 months after transplantation; the most recently transplanted had problems from a biliary stricture. In spite of the need for immunosuppression there was no increase in infection and respiratory function improved or remained stable. Once the children were stabilised after transplantation their nutrition and general health were greatly improved. PMID:7979532

  3. Neurological complications post-liver transplantation: impact of nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Bemeur, Chantal

    2013-06-01

    Nutritional status is significantly altered in patients with end-stage liver disease (cirrhosis). Malnutrition is a common complication of cirrhosis and is known to be associated with a greater risk of post-operative complications and mortality, especially following liver transplantation. Neurological complications occur frequently after transplant and the nature and extent of these complications may relate to nutritional deficits such as protein-calorie malnutrition as well as vitamin and micronutrient deficiencies. A consensus document from the International Society on Hepatic Encephalopathy and Nitrogen metabolism (ISHEN) has been established in order to address these concerns. Careful assessment of nutritional status followed by prompt treatment of nutritional deficits has the potential to impact on transplant outcome and, in particular, on post-transplant neurological disorders in patients with cirrhosis.

  4. Outcomes of liver transplantation for paracetamol (acetaminophen)-induced hepatic failure.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Sheldon C; Aldridge, Roland C; Shah, Tahir; Webb, Kerry; Nightingale, Peter; Paris, Sue; Gunson, Bridget K; Mutimer, David J; Neuberger, James M

    2009-10-01

    Paracetamol (acetaminophen) hepatotoxicity, whether due to intentional overdose or therapeutic misadventure, is an indication for liver transplantation in selected cases. However, there is a concern that long-term outcomes may be compromised by associated psychopathology that may predispose patients to further episodes of self-harm or poor treatment adherence. We therefore undertook a retrospective analysis of patients transplanted for paracetamol-induced fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) to determine their long-term outcomes, psychiatric problems, and compliance and whether these issues could be predicted from pretransplant information. Records from patients undergoing liver transplantation for paracetamol-associated liver failure in this unit and 2 comparison groups (patients undergoing liver replacement for FHF from other causes and for chronic liver diseases) were examined. Of 60 patients transplanted for paracetamol-induced FHF between 1989 and 2007, 44 (73%) survived to discharge. Currently, 35 patients (58%) are surviving at an average of 9 years post-transplantation. The incidence of psychiatric disease (principally depression) and 30-day mortality were greatest in the paracetamol group, but for those who survived 30 days, there was no difference in long-term survival rates between the groups. Adherence to follow-up appointments and compliance with immunosuppression were lowest in the paracetamol overdose group. Poor adherence was not predicted by any identifiable premorbid psychiatric conditions. Two patients grafted for paracetamol FHF died from self-harm (1 from suicide and 1 from alcoholic liver disease after 5 years). This study suggests that, notwithstanding the shortage of donor liver grafts, transplantation is an appropriate therapy in selected patients, although close follow-up is indicated.

  5. Liver transplantation for hepatic cirrhosis in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Noble-Jamieson, G; Barnes, N; Jamieson, N; Friend, P; Calne, R

    1996-01-01

    About 10% of children with CF develop hepatic cirrhosis and progressive portal hypertension. As the portal hypertension worsens these children are likely to develop serious variceal bleeding and other complications including malnutrition and a decline in respiratory function. Indices of lung function may fall as much as 50% in a year and chest infections may require frequent admissions to hospital. The respiratory symptoms are often attributed to CF related lung disease and affected children may therefore be considered unsuitable for liver transplantation. We propose a simple scoring system which can help to select patients who should be referred for assessment of liver transplantation. After careful assessment and preparation children with lung function indices as low as 30% predicted can have a successful outcome after liver transplantation. With good graft function portal hypertension is relieved and absorption, nutrition and respiratory function all improve. The improved quality of life of these children is remarkable. PMID:8778448

  6. Protection of bile ducts in liver transplantation: looking beyond ischemia.

    PubMed

    Op den Dries, Sanna; Sutton, Michael E; Lisman, Ton; Porte, Robert J

    2011-08-27

    Biliary complications, especially nonanastomotic biliary strictures (NAS), are a major cause of morbidity after orthotopic liver transplantation. Of all donor and recipient characteristics known to increase the risk of developing NAS, the role of prolonged ischemia times is most extensively described in the literature. However, there is increasing evidence that several other, non-ischemia-related factors play a critical role in the pathogenesis of NAS as well. The clinical presentation of NAS may vary considerably among liver transplant recipients, including large variations in time of occurrence, and in location and severity of the strictures. Additional underlying causes such as bile salt toxicity and immune-mediated injury are believed to explain the wide spectrum of biliary strictures after orthotopic liver transplantation. Current and emerging insight in the pathogenesis of NAS and potential targets to reduce biliary injury and preserve bile ducts are discussed in this overview.

  7. Liver transplantation in Latin America: the state-of-the-art and future trends.

    PubMed

    Salvalaggio, Paolo R; Caicedo, Juan C; de Albuquerque, Luiz Carneiro; Contreras, Alan; Garcia, Valter D; Felga, Guilherme E; Maurette, Rafael J; Medina-Pestana, José O; Niño-Murcia, Alejandro; Pacheco-Moreira, Lucio F; Rocca, Juan; Rodriguez-Davalos, Manuel; Ruf, Andres; Rusca, Luis A Caicedo; Vilatoba, Mario

    2014-08-15

    We reviewed the current status of liver transplantation in Latin America. We used data from the Latin American and Caribbean Transplant Society and national organizations and societies, as well as information obtained from local transplant leaders. Latin America has a population of 589 million (8.5% of world population) and more than 2,500 liver transplantations are performed yearly (17% of world activity), resulting in 4.4 liver transplants per million people (pmp) per year. The number of liver transplantations grows at 6% per year in the region, particularly in Brazil. The top liver transplant rates were found in Argentina (10.4 pmp), Brazil (8.4 pmp), and Uruguay (5.5 pmp). The state of liver transplantation in some countries rivals those in developed countries. Model for End-Stage Liver Disease-based allocation, split, domino, and living-donor adult and pediatric transplantations are now routinely performed with outcomes comparable to those in advanced economies. In contrast, liver transplantation is not performed in 35% of Latin American countries and lags adequate resources in many others. The lack of adequate financial coverage, education, and organization is still the main limiting factor in the development of liver transplantation in Latin America. The liver transplant community in the region should push health care leaders and authorities to comply with the Madrid and Istambul resolutions on organ donation and transplantation. It must pursue fiercely the development of registries to advance the science and quality control of liver transplant activities in Latin America.

  8. Supercooling Preservation Of The Rat Liver For Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Bruinsma, Bote G.; Berendsen, Tim A.; Izamis, Maria-Louisa; Yeh, Heidi; Yarmush, Martin L.; Uygun, Korkut

    2015-01-01

    The current standard for liver preservation is limited in duration. Employing a novel subzero preservation technique that includes supercooling and machine perfusion can significantly improve preservation and prolong storage times. By loading rat livers with cryoprotectants to prevent both intra- and extracellular ice formation and protect against hypothermic injury, livers can be cooled to −6 °C without freezing and kept viable for up to 96 hours. Here, we describe the procedures of loading cryoprotectants by means of subnormothermic machine perfusion (SNMP), controlled cooling to a supercooled state, followed by SNMP recovery and orthotopic liver transplantation. PMID:25692985

  9. Adenocarcinoma in Caroli's Disease Treated by Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Margarit, C.; Murio, E.; Lazaro, J. L.; Charco, R.; Vidal, M. T.; Bonnin, J.

    1993-01-01

    Caroli's disease is characterized by congenital cystic dilatation of the intrahepatic bile ducts. In 7% of casea a malignant tumor develops complicating the course of the disease. We report the case of a 25 year-old woman in whom Caroli's disease was diagnosed at the age of 11. From that time on, she had several episodes of cholangitis. In 1989, the abdominal ultrasound and CT scan showed dilatation of the intrahepatic bile ducts, intracystic lithiasis and a solid mass. FNA cytology showed a papillary adenocarcinoma. At laparotomy a tumor was found occupying both hepatic lobes, and intraoperative US showed another two nodules in the left lobe. The tumor was considered unresectable. Examination of the hilar lymph nodes was tumor-negative. Two weeks later, the patient underwent an ortothopic liver transplantation (OLT). The pathological examination confirmed Caroli's disease with adenocarcinoma. Two years after OLT, the patient is alive with normal liver function and no evidence of disease. To our knowledge this is the first case report of adenocarcinoma in Caroli's disease treated by OLT. PMID:8260439

  10. Female gender in the setting of liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Castro, Kryssia Isabel; De Martin, Eleonora; Gambato, Martina; Lazzaro, Silvia; Villa, Erica; Burra, Patrizia

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of liver diseases to end-stage liver disease or to acute hepatic failure, the evaluation process for liver transplantation, the organ allocation decision-making, as well as the post-transplant outcomes are different between female and male genders. Women’s access to liver transplantation is hampered by the use of model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score, in which creatinine values exert a systematic bias against women due to their lower values even in the presence of variable degrees of renal dysfunction. Furthermore, even when correcting MELD score for gender-appropriate creatinine determination, a quantifiable uneven access to transplant prevails, demonstrating that other factors are also involved. While some of the differences can be explained from the epidemiological point of view, hormonal status plays an important role. Moreover, the pre-menopausal and post-menopausal stages imply profound differences in a woman’s physiology, including not only the passage from the fertile age to the non-fertile stage, but also the loss of estrogens and their potentially protective role in delaying liver fibrosis progression, amongst others. With menopause, the tendency to gain weight may contribute to the development of or worsening of pre-existing metabolic syndrome. As an increasing number of patients are transplanted for non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, and as the average age at transplant increases, clinicians must be prepared for the management of this particular condition, especially in post-menopausal women, who are at particular risk of developing metabolic complications after menopause. PMID:25540733

  11. Chronic hepatitis E virus infection in a pediatric female liver transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Passos-Castilho, Ana Maria; Porta, Gilda; Miura, Irene K; Pugliese, Renata P S; Danesi, Vera L B; Porta, Adriana; Guimarães, Teresa; Seda, João; Antunes, Eduardo; Granato, Celso F H

    2014-12-01

    We describe a case of chronic hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection in a 13-year-old female liver transplant recipient with recurrent increased aminotransferase levels and acute cellular rejection. This finding demonstrates that chronic HEV infection can occur and should be further investigated in immunocompromised patients in Latin America.

  12. Section 1. Image evaluation of fatty liver in living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Fan; Yu, Chun-Yen; Ou, Hsin-You; Tsang, Leo Leung-Chit; Huang, Tung-Liang; Chen, Tai-Yi; Concejero, Allan; Wang, Chih-Chi; Wang, Shih-Ho; Lin, Tsan-Shiun; Liu, Yueh-Wei; Yang, Chin-Hsiang; Yong, Chee-Chien; Chiu, King-Wah; Jawan, Bruno; Eng, Hock-Liew; Chen, Chao-Long

    2014-04-27

    Preoperative evaluation of donors for living-donor liver transplantation aims to select a suitable donor with optimal graft quality and to ensure donor safety. Hepatic steatosis, a common finding in living liver donors, not only influences the outcome of liver transplantation for the recipient but also affects the recovery of the living donor after partial hepatectomy. Histopathologic analysis is the reference standard to detect and quantify fat in the liver, but it is invasive, and results are vulnerable to sampling error. Imaging can be repeated regularly and allows assessment of the entire liver, thus avoiding sampling error. Selection of appropriate imaging methods demands understanding of their advantages and limitations and the suitable clinical setting. This article describes potential clinical applications for liver fat quantification of imaging methods for fat detection and quantification, with an emphasis on the advantages and limitations of ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging for quantifying liver fat.

  13. Kidney and liver transplantation in children with fibrocystic liver-kidney disease: data from the US Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients: 1990-2010.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jessica W; Furth, Susan L; Ruebner, Rebecca L

    2014-11-01

    The natural history and survival of children with fibrocystic liver-kidney disease undergoing solid organ transplantation have infrequently been described. We report outcomes in a cohort of US children with fibrocystic liver-kidney disease receiving solid organ transplants over 20 yr. Retrospective cohort study of pediatric transplant recipients with diagnoses of fibrocystic liver-kidney disease from 1/1990 to 3/2010, using data from the SRTR. Subjects were categorized by the first transplanted organ: LT, KT, or SLK. Primary outcomes were death, re-transplant, transplant of the alternate organ, or initiation of dialysis. Seven hundred and sixteen subjects were transplanted in this period. Median age at first transplant was 9.7 yr. Of the LT, 14 (19%) required a second liver transplant at median of 0.2 yr, and five (7%) required kidney transplant or dialysis at a median of 9.0 yr. Of the KT, 188 (31%) required a second kidney transplant or dialysis at a median of 5.9 yr. Twenty-nine (5%) subsequently received liver transplant at a median of 6.0 yr. Among patients in this registry, far more children underwent kidney than liver transplants. The risk of subsequently needing transplantation of an alternate organ was low.

  14. Clinical application of modern ultrasound techniques after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Teegen, Eva Maria; Denecke, Timm; Eisele, Robert; Lojewski, Christian; Neuhaus, Peter; Chopra, Sascha Santosh

    2016-10-01

    Liver transplantation has been established as a first-line therapy for a number of indications. Conventional ultrasound and contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) are methods of choice during the postoperative period as a safe and fast tool to detect potential complications and to enable early intervention if necessary. CEUS increases diagnostic quality and is an appropriate procedure for the examination of vessels and possibly bile ducts. This article presents the state of the art of ultrasound application during the early period after liver transplantation. It addresses common vascular complications and describes the identification of postoperative abnormal findings using ultrasound and CEUS.

  15. Acute Kidney Disease After Liver and Heart Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Ana P; Vella, John P

    2016-03-01

    After transplantation of nonrenal solid organs, an acute decline in kidney function develops in the majority of patients. In addition, a significant number of nonrenal solid organ transplant recipients develop chronic kidney disease, and some develop end-stage renal disease, requiring renal replacement therapy. The incidence varies depending on the transplanted organ. Acute kidney injury after nonrenal solid organ transplantation is associated with prolonged length of stay, cost, increased risk of death, de novo chronic kidney disease, and end-stage renal disease. This overview focuses on the risk factors for posttransplant acute kidney injury after liver and heart transplantation, integrating discussion of proteinuria and chronic kidney disease with emphasis on pathogenesis, histopathology, and management including the use of mechanistic target of rapamycin inhibition and costimulatory blockade.

  16. Effect of airplane transport of donor livers on post-liver transplantation survival

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yi; MacQuillan, Gerry; Adams, Leon A; Garas, George; Collins, Megan; Nwaba, Albert; Mou, Linjun; Bulsara, Max K; Delriviere, Luc; Jeffrey, Gary P

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the effect of long haul airplane transport of donor livers on post-transplant outcomes. METHODS A retrospective cohort study of patients who received a liver transplantation was performed in Perth, Australia from 1992 to 2012. Donor and recipient characteristics information were extracted from Western Australian liver transplantation service database. Patients were followed up for a mean of six years. Patient and graft survival were evaluated and compared between patients who received a local donor liver and those who received an airplane transported donor liver. Predictors of survival were determined by univariate and multivariate analysis using cox regression. RESULTS One hundred and ninety-three patients received a local donor liver and 93 patients received an airplane transported donor liver. Airplane transported livers had a significantly lower alanine transaminase (mean: 45 U/L vs 84 U/L, P = 0.035), higher donor risk index (mean: 1.88 vs 1.42, P < 0.001) and longer cold ischemic time (CIT) (mean: 10.1 h vs 6.4 h, P < 0.001). There was a weak correlation between CIT and transport distance (r2 = 0.29, P < 0.001). Mean follow up was six years and 93 patients had graft failure. Multivariate analysis found only airplane transport retained significance for graft loss (HR = 1.92, 95%CI: 1.16-3.17). One year graft survival was 0.88 for those with a local liver and was 0.71 for those with an airplane transported liver. One year graft loss was due to primary graft non-function or associated with preservation injury in 20.8% of recipients of an airplane transported liver compared with 4.6% in those with a local liver (P = 0.027). CONCLUSION Airplane transport of donor livers was independently associated with reduced graft survival following liver transplantation. PMID:27895402

  17. Abate Cytochrome C induced apoptosome to protect donor liver against ischemia reperfusion injury on rat liver transplantation model

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Zhuonan; Lian, Peilong; Wu, Xiaojuan; Shi, Baoxu; Zhuang, Maoyou; Zhou, Ruiling; Zhao, Rui; Zhao, Zhen; Guo, Sen; Ji, Zhipeng; Xu, Kesen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Aim of this study is to protect donor liver against ischemia-reperfusion injury by abating Cytochrome C induced apoptosome on rat model. Methods: A total of 25 clean SD inbred male rats were used in this research. The rats in ischemia-reperfusion injury group (I/R group, n=5) were under liver transplantation operation; rats in dichloroacetate diisopropylamine group (DADA group, n=5) were treated DADA before liver transplantation; control group (Ctrl group, n=5); other 10 rats were used to offer donor livers. Results: In DADA therapy group, Cytochrome C expression in donor hepatocellular cytoplasm was detected lower than that in I/R group. And the Cytochrome C induced apoptosome was also decreased in according to the lower expressions of Apaf-1 and Caspase3. Low level of cleaved PARP expression revealed less apoptosis in liver tissue. The morphology of donor liver mitochondria in DADA group was observed to be slightly edema but less than I/R group after operation 12 h. The liver function indexes of ALT and AST in serum were tested, and the results in DADA group showed it is significantly lower than I/R group after operation 12 h. The inflammation indexes of IL-6 and TNF-α expressions in DADA group were significantly lower than that in I/R group after operation 24 h. Conclusion: The dichloroacetate diisopropylamine treatment could protect the hepatocellular mitochondria in case of the spillage of Cytochrome C induced apoptosome, and protect the liver against ischemia-reperfusion injury. Thus, it may be a method to promote the recovery of donor liver function after transplantation. PMID:27186297

  18. Spasms of the Hepatic Artery Following Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty and Tolazoline Administration in a Liver Transplant Patient

    SciTech Connect

    Propst, Albert; Waldenberger, Peter; Propst, Theresa; Vogel, Wolfgang; Koenigsrainer, Alfred

    1996-05-15

    Vascular complications after liver transplantation include occlusion or stenosis near the sites of anastomosis in the hepatic artery, portal vein, and vena cava. Balloon angioplasty of these stenoses carries little risk and is a useful procedure for the treatment of these problems. Here we describe the case of a liver transplant patient who underwent balloon angioplasty for stenosis of the hepatic artery and who developed spasms of the hepatic artery which were aggravated following intraarterial administration of Tolazoline.

  19. Chronic Portal Vein Thrombosis After Liver Transplantation in a Child Treated by a Combined Minimally Invasive Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Carnevale, Francisco Cesar Santos, Aline Cristine Barbosa; Zurstrassen, Charles Edouard; Moreira, Airton Mota; Neto, Joao Seda; Filho, Eduardo Carone; Chapchap, Paulo

    2009-09-15

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) after orthotopic liver transplantation is an infrequent complication, and when it is present surgical treatment is considered for traditional management. Percutaneous transhepatic portal vein angioplasty has been described as an option to treat PVT with a lower morbidity than conventional surgical treatments. This article describes a case of chronic PVT in a child after a living donor liver transplantation managed by percutaneous transhepatic and surgical approaches.

  20. Spanish Experience in Liver Transplantation for Hilar and Peripheral Cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Robles, Ricardo; Figueras, Joan; Turrión, Victor S.; Margarit, Carlos; Moya, Angel; Varo, Evaristo; Calleja, Javier; Valdivieso, Andres; Valdecasas, Juan Carlos G.; López, Pedro; Gómez, Manuel; de Vicente, Emilio; Loinaz, Carmelo; Santoyo, Julio; Fleitas, Manuel; Bernardos, Angel; Lladó, Laura; Ramírez, Pablo; Bueno, F S.; Jaurrieta, Eduardo; Parrilla, Pascual

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To assess the real utility of orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) in patients with cholangiocarcinoma, we need series with large numbers of cases and long follow-ups. The aim of this paper is to review the Spanish experience in OLT for hilar and peripheral cholangiocarcinoma and to try to identify the prognostic factors that could influence survival. Summary Background Data: Palliative treatment of nondisseminated irresectable cholangiocarcinoma carries a zero 5-year survival rate. The role of OLT in these patients is controversial, due to the fact that the survival rate is lower than with other indications for transplantation and due to the lack of organs. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 59 patients undergoing OLT in Spain for cholangiocarcinoma (36 hilar and 23 peripheral) over a period of 13 years. We present the results and prognostic factors that influence survival. Results: The actuarial survival rate for hilar cholangiocarcinoma at 1, 3, and 5 years was 82%, 53%, and 30%, and for peripheral cholangiocarcinoma 77%, 65%, and 42%. The main cause of death, with both types of cholangiocarcinoma, was tumor recurrence (present in 53% and 35% of patients, respectively). Poor prognosis factors were vascular invasion (P < 0.01) and IUAC classification stages III–IVA (P < 0.01) for hilar cholangiocarcinoma and perineural invasion (P < 0.05) and stages III-IVA (P < 0.05) for peripheral cholangiocarcinoma. Conclusions: OLT for nondisseminated irresectable cholangiocarcinoma has higher survival rates at 3 and 5 years than palliative treatments, especially with tumors in their initial stages, which means that more information is needed to help better select cholangiocarcinoma patients for transplantation. PMID:14745336

  1. Enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium experience in liver transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Cantisani, G P C; Zanotelli, M L; Gleisner, A L M; de Mello Brandão, A; Marroni, C A

    2006-04-01

    Mycophenolate sodium (EC-MPS) has been shown to be as effective and as safe as mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) in renal transplant patients. Nevertheless, compared to MMF its use in liver transplant patients has been limited. The purpose of this study was to analyze the efficacy of EC-MPS as a primary immunosuppressant or as a replacement for MMF in liver transplant patients. Ninety among 470 liver transplant recipients were receiving or had added an antimetabolite to their immunosuppressant therapy. The most common reason for this change was renal dysfunction (47.8%) or diabetes (32.2%). EC-MPS was started at a median of 30 months after liver transplantation. The mean administered daily dose was 720 mg/d. At least one gastrointestinal symptom was reported by 25 patients. Abdominal pain (16.6%) and diarrhea (14.5%) were the most frequent. EC-MPS had to be discontinued in two patients, while six others required dose reduction to resolve the symptoms. Hematological adverse events were infrequent: three patients had leukopenia and one, anemia, all of which responded to dosage reduction. There was a creatinine reduction within 6 months of drug commencement and maintenance of the lower creatinine levels at 1 year among patients who began EC-MPS for renal dysfunction. Serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels were significantly lower among patients on EC-MPS than on MMF. In conclusion, EC-MPS appears to have a similar efficacy and safety profile as MMF in liver transplant patients. Hematological and gastrointestinal adverse events were infrequent; seldom had the drug to be discontinued.

  2. Liver Transplantation and Cirrhotomimetic Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Classification and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Erica F; Malik, Saloni; Bonnel, Alexander; Mu, Yifei; Olthoff, Kim; Shaked, Abraham; Abt, Peter L; Peterman, Heather; Reddy, K. Rajender; Ottmann, Shane; Furth, Emma E; Levine, Matthew H

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Liver transplantation has become the standard of care treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) that falls within size and numeric criteria in cirrhotic patients. Cirrhotomimetic (CMM) hepatocellular carcinoma is an uncommon growth pattern that infiltrates cirrhotic parenchyma, can become extensive in size, and can evade detection via radiologic studies. Liver transplant outcomes for this type of HCC is not well reported but generally considered to be poor. We wished to better describe this variant of HCC in explanted livers, derive a classification system for this tumor type, and assess the outcomes of liver transplantation for this tumor variant. Methods Upon retrospective analysis of all patients transplanted at a single center for HCC in 1996–2009 (358 patients) a series of 26 patients exhibiting CMM growth pattern were identified. We developed a classification system for this tumor growth pattern variant and determined patient and tumor-specific outcomes. Results We derived a classification schema of CMM HCC based upon tumor extent and cellular histopathology with clear cell pathology being associated with favorable outcome. We note a 100% 3-year and 58.3% 5-year recurrence free survival after transplant in those with tumor confined to one lobe who have clear cell pathology versus 16.2% 3- and 5-year recurrence free survival in those who do not meet these criteria. Conclusion Cirrhotomimetic HCC features are noted in 7% of patients transplanted for HCC in our center with favorable outcomes inpatients with clear cell histology and growth involving less than 50% of the liver. PMID:24668931

  3. A simultaneous liver-kidney transplant recipient with IgA nephropathy limited to native kidneys and BK virus nephropathy limited to the transplant kidney.

    PubMed

    Ujire, Manasa P; Curry, Michael P; Stillman, Isaac E; Hanto, Douglas W; Mandelbrot, Didier A

    2013-08-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) deposition in the native kidneys of patients with liver disease is well described. Secondary IgA nephropathy usually is thought to be benign, but hematuria, proteinuria, and loss of kidney function have been reported in this context. BK virus nephropathy is an important cause of kidney transplant loss; however, BK virus nephropathy is rare in the native kidneys of patients who underwent transplantation of other organs. We report the case of a patient with alcohol-related end-stage liver disease and chronic kidney disease with hematuria who underwent simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation. His kidney function decreased over the course of several weeks posttransplantation. Biopsy of the transplant kidney showed BK virus nephropathy, but no IgA deposits. In contrast, biopsy of the native kidneys showed IgA deposits, but no BK virus nephropathy. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation wherein both the native and transplant kidneys were biopsied posttransplantation and showed exclusively different pathologies. These findings confirm the predilection of BK virus nephropathy for transplant rather than native kidneys.

  4. Portal hypertension in polycystic liver disease patients does not affect wait-list or immediate post-liver transplantation outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Rajoriya, Neil; Tripathi, Dhiraj; Leithead, Joanna A; Gunson, Bridget K; Lord, Sophie; Ferguson, James W; Hirschfield, Gideon M

    2016-01-01

    AIM To establish the impact of portal hypertension (PH) on wait-list/post-transplant outcomes in patients with polycystic liver disease (PCLD) listed for liver transplantation. METHODS A retrospective single-centre case controlled study of consecutive patients listed for liver transplantation over 12 years was performed from our centre. PH in the PCLD cohort was defined by the one or more of following parameters: (1) presence of radiological or endoscopic documented varices from our own centre or the referral centre; (2) splenomegaly (> 11 cm) on radiology in absence of splenic cysts accounting for increased imaging size; (3) thrombocytopenia (platelets < 150 × 109/L); or (4) ascites without radiological evidence of hepatic venous outflow obstruction from a single cyst. RESULTS Forty-seven PCLD patients (F: M = 42: 5) were listed for liver transplantation (LT) (single organ, n = 35; combined liver-kidney transplantation, n = 12) with 19 patients (40.4%) having PH. When comparing the PH group with non-PH group, the mean listing age (PH group, 50.6 (6.4); non-PH group, 47.1 (7.4) years; P = 0.101), median listing MELD (PH group, 12; non-PH group, 11; P = 0.422) median listing UKELD score (PH group, 48; non-PH group, 46; P = 0.344) and need for renal replacement therapy (P = 0.317) were similar. In the patients who underwent LT alone, there was no difference in the duration of ICU stay (PH, 3 d; non-PH, 2 d; P = 0.188), hospital stay length (PH, 9 d; non-PH, 10 d; P = 0.973), or frequency of renal replacement therapy (PH, 2/8; non-PH, 1/14; P = 0.121) in the immediate post-transplantation period. CONCLUSION Clinically apparent portal hypertension in patients with PCLD listed for liver transplantation does not appear to have a major impact on wait-list or peri-transplant morbidity. PMID:28018103

  5. Inferior Vena Cava Torsion and Stenosis Complicated by Compressive Pericaval Regional Ascites following Orthotopic Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Gilroy, Richard; Johnson, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) stenosis and torsion are well-described rare complications following orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). We present a case of inferior vena cava intermittent torsion and stenosis complicated by compressive regional ascites. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second case of post-OLT regional ascites related compressive IVC stenosis reported and the first reported case of torsion complicated by regional ascites compression. PMID:24386585

  6. Liver transplantation for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: new challenges and new opportunities.

    PubMed

    Shaker, Mina; Tabbaa, Adam; Albeldawi, Mazen; Alkhouri, Naim

    2014-05-14

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is becoming rapidly one of the most common indications for orthotopic liver transplantation in the world. Development of graft steatosis is a significant problem during the post-transplant course, which may happen as a recurrence of pre-existing disease or de novo NAFLD. There are different risk factors that might play a role in development of graft steatosis including post-transplant metabolic syndrome, immune-suppressive medications, genetics and others. There are few studies that assessed the effects of NAFLD on graft and patient survival; most of them were limited by the duration of follow up or by the number of patients. With this review article we will try to shed light on post-liver transplantation NAFLD, significance of the disease, how it develops, risk factors, clinical course and treatment options.

  7. Multiple indications for everolimus after liver transplantation in current clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Bilbao, Itxarone; Dopazo, Cristina; Lazaro, Jose; Castells, Lluis; Caralt, Mireia; Sapisochin, Gonzalo; Charco, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess our experience with the use and management of everolimus-based regimens post-liver transplantation and to redefine the potential role of this drug in current clinical practice. METHODS: From October 1988 to December 2012, 1023 liver transplantations were performed in 955 patients in our Unit. Seventy-four patients (7.74%) received immunosuppression with everolimus at some time post-transplantation. Demographic characteristics, everolimus indication, time elapsed from transplantation to the introduction of everolimus, doses and levels administered, efficacy, side effects, discontinuation and post-conversion survival were analyzed. RESULTS: Mean age at the time of conversion to everolimus was 57.7 ± 10 years. Indications for conversion were: refractory rejection 31.1%, extended hepatocellular carcinoma in explanted liver 19%, post-transplant hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence 8.1%, de novo tumour 17.6%, renal insufficiency 8.1%, severe neurotoxicity 10.8%, and others 5.4%. Median time from transplantation to introduction of everolimus was 6 mo (range: 0.10-192). Mean follow-up post-conversion was 22 ± 19 mo (range: 0.50-74). The event for which the drug was indicated was resolved in 60.8% of patients, with the best results in cases of refractory rejection, renal insufficiency and neurotoxicity. Results in patients with cancer were similar to those of a historical cohort treated with other immunosuppressants. The main side effects were dyslipidemia and infections. Post-conversion acute rejection occurred in 14.9% of cases. The drug was discontinued in 28.4% of patients. CONCLUSION: Everolimus at low doses in combination with tacrolimus is a safe immunosuppressant with multiple early and late indications post-liver transplantation. PMID:25032101

  8. Rejection is less common in children undergoing liver transplantation for hepatoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Ruth, N D; Kelly, D; Sharif, K; Morland, B; Lloyd, C; McKiernan, P J

    2014-02-01

    To compare the incidence of acute histologically proven rejection in children who have had a liver transplant for hepatoblastoma with a control group of children transplanted for biliary atresia (EHBA). A retrospective case notes based study was performed. Twenty patients were identified with hepatoblastoma who were transplanted at a single unit between 1991 and 2008. These were matched as closely as possible for age, gender, year of transplant and type of immunosuppression used to the control group transplanted for biliary atresia (n = 60). There was a significant decrease in rate of acute rejection as assessed by the rejection activity index (RAI) in the hepatoblastoma group (75% vs. 50%, respectively, p < 0.04). Chronic rejection was rare in both groups, but twice as common in the biliary atresia group. Equal levels of immunosuppression were achieved in both groups. Renal function was noted to be reduced one yr post-transplant in both groups, as previously reported. A modified immunosuppression regimen could be considered in children with hepatoblastoma undergoing liver transplantation.

  9. An experience of liver transplantation in Latin America: a medical center in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Londoño, Mauricio; Marín, Juan; Muñoz, Octavio; Mena, Álvaro; Guzmán, Carlos; Hoyos, Sergio; Restrepo, Juan; Arbeláez, María; Correa, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Liver transplantation is the treatment of choice for acute and chronic liver failure, for selected cases of tumors, and for conditions resulting from errors in metabolism. This paper reports the experience of a medical center in Latin America. Methods: Were conducted 305 orthotopic liver transplantations on 284 patients between 2004 and 2010. Of these patients, 241 were adults undergoing their first transplantation. Results: The average age of patients was 52 years old, and 62% of the individuals were male. The most common indication was alcoholic cirrhosis. The rate of patient survival after 1 and 5 years was 82 and 72% respectively. The rate of liver graft survival after 1 and 5 years was 78 and 68% respectively. The main cause of death was sepsis. Complications in the hepatic artery were documented for 5% of the patients. Additionally, 14.5% of the patients had complications in the biliary tract. Infections were found in 41% of the individuals. Acute rejection was observed in 30% of the subjects, and chronic rejection in 3%. Conclusion: In conclusion, liver transplantation at our medical center in Colombia offers good mid-term results, with a complication rate similar to that reported by other centers around the world. PMID:26019379

  10. The inferior mesenteric vein to the left gonadal vein shunt for gastroesophageal varices and extrahepatic portal vein thrombosis after living donor liver transplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Sato, Y; Yamamoto, S; Oya, H; Kokai, H; Hatakeyama, K

    2012-03-01

    This 59-year-old woman underwent living donor liver transplantation using a left lobe graft as an aid for autoimmune hepatitis in 2003. Splenectomy was also performed because of blood type incompatibility. Follow-up endoscopic and computed tomography examinations showed gastroesophageal varices with extra hepatic portal vein thrombosis in 2007 that increased (esophageal varices [EV]: locus superior [Ls], moderately enlarged, beady varices [F2], Blue varices [Cb], presence of small in number and localized red color sign [RC1] and telangiectasia [TE+], gastric varices [GV]: extension from the cardiac orifice to the fornix [Lg-cf], moderately enlarged, beady varices [F2], white varices [Cw], absence of red color sign [RC-]). Portal venous flow to the gastroesophageal varices was also confirmed from a large right gastric vein. The splenic vein was thrombosed. Blood flow to the liver graft was totally supplied from the hepatic artery. The graft was functioning well. Because these gastroesophageal varices had a high risk of variceal bleeding, we decided to proceed with a portal reconstruction of a surgical portosystemic shunt in 2008. Severe adhesions were observed around the portal vein. It was impossible to perform portal reconstruction. There were relatively fewes adhesious in the left lower side of the abdominal cavity. We decided to create an inferior mesenteric vein to left gonadal vein shunt. The portal vein pressure decreased from 31.0 to 21.5 cm H2O thereafter. The postoperative course was smooth without any complication. This patient was discharged on the postoperative day 15. Follow-up endoscopic study showed the improvement in the gastroesophageal varices (EV: Ls, F2, Cb, RC(-), GV: Lg-c, F2, Cw, RC-) at 3 months after the operation. We also comfirmed the patency of the shunt by serial computed tomography examinations.

  11. Liver transplantation as a management of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Azzam, Ayman Zaki

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide and has a poor prognosis if untreated. It is ranked the third among the causes of cancer-related death. There are multiple etiologic factors that can lead to HCC. Screening for early HCC is challenging due to the lack of well specific biomarkers. However, early diagnosis through successful screening is very important to provide cure rate. Liver transplantation (LT) did not gain wide acceptance until the mid-1980s, after the effective immunosuppression with cyclosporine became available. Orthotopic LT is the best therapeutic option for early, unresectable HCC. It is limited by both, graft shortage and the need for appropriate patient selection. It provides both, the removal of tumor and the remaining cirrhotic liver. In Milan, a prospective cohort study defined restrictive selection criteria known as Milan criteria (MC) that led to superior survival for transplant patients in comparison with any other previous experience with transplantation or other options for HCC. When transplantation occurs within the established MC, the outcomes are similar to those for nonmalignant liver disease after transplantation. The shortage of organs from deceased donors has led to the problems of long waiting times and dropouts. This has led to the adoption of extended criteria by many centers. Several measures have been taken to solve these problems including prioritization of patients with HCC, use of pretransplant adjuvant treatment, and living donor LT. PMID:26052380

  12. Serum ionized magnesium changes during and immediately after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Douzdjian, V; Filos, D; Okorodudu, A O

    1995-01-01

    Alterations in magnesium (Mg) homeostasis during and after orthotopic liver transplantation are common. The purpose of this study is to compare total Mg (TMg), calculated ionized Mg (cMg++) and measured ionized Mg (mMg++) during and immediately following liver transplantation. The newly developed first generation ion selective electrode analyzer, AVL 988-4, was used to measure mMg++ in 63 serum samples from 3 transplant recipients and 48 serum samples from 48 healthy volunteers. Analysis was divided into intraoperative (stages 1 to 3) and postoperative periods. Decreased TMg, cMg++ and mMg++ levels were observed intraoperatively and > 2 weeks postoperatively. The cMg++ levels were consistently higher than mMg++, presumably owing to the fact that the equation used for the calculation does not take complex-Mg++ into account. A better correlation was observed between mMg++ and cMg++ in the transplant group (r = 0.87 to 0.99) compared to controls (r = 0.74). The usefulness of direct measurement of Mg++ in liver transplantation remains to be determined.

  13. Persistence of the intestinal defect in abetalipoproteinaemia after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Braegger, C P; Belli, D C; Mentha, G; Steinmann, B

    1998-07-01

    A 16-year-old girl is described with abetalipoproteinaemia who underwent liver transplantation for hepatic cirrhosis. After this procedure her serum lipoprotein profile was corrected; however, fat malabsorption and steatorrhea persisted because the primary defect, a mutant microsomal triglyceride-transfer protein, remains expressed in the intestine.

  14. Living donor liver transplantation in Brazil—current state

    PubMed Central

    Andraus, Wellington; D’Alburquerque, Luiz A. C.

    2016-01-01

    Currently in Brazil, living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) represents 8.5% of liver transplantation (LT), being the majority pediatric one. Up to now, according to Brazilian Organ Transplantation Association (ABTO) annual report, 2,086 procedures have been done nationwide, most of them in southeast and south regions. Based on national centers reports, biliary complication is the most common recipient postoperative complication (14.5–20.6%), followed by hepatic artery thrombosis (3.1–10.7%) and portal vein thrombosis (2.3–9.1%). Patient and graft overall 5-y survival correspond to 76% and 74%, respectively. Regarding the donor, morbidity rate ranges from 12.4% to 28.3%, with a national mortality rate of 0.14%. In conclusion, Brazilian LDLT programs enhance international experience that this is a feasible and safe procedure, as well as an excellent alternative strategy to overcome organs shortage. PMID:27115012

  15. Continuous transcatheter arterial thrombolysis for early hepatic artery thrombosis after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J; Fan, J; Wang, J-H; Wu, Z-Q; Qiu, S-J; Shen, Y-H; Shi, Y-H; Huang, X-W; Wang, Z; Tang, Z-Y; Wang, Y-Q

    2005-12-01

    Early hepatic artery thrombosis (HAT) after orthotopic liver transplantation remains a significant cause of graft loss and patient death. The most effective treatment approach is still controversial. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of continuous transcatheter arterial thrombolysis in the treatment of early HAT. Routine posttransplant color Doppler imaging (CDI) was performed to monitor hepatic artery blood flow. HAT was confirmed by arterial angiography in suspected cases. HAT was identified in 8 patients (8/287, 2.8%) which occurred on days 2 to 19 (mean, 5.2 days) after liver transplantation. Patients with HAT were treated with continuous transcatheter arterial thrombolysis using urokinase. Successful revascularization through thrombolysis was obtained in all eight cases. One patient died of a pulmonary infection at 2 months after liver transplantation. Another patient underwent retransplantation because of resistant allograft rejection and recurrence of HAT 6 months after the first operation, but died from multiple system organ failure 2 months later. The other six patients remained in good health during the follow-up period of 3 to 27 months. Our results demonstrate that CDI is an effective method to monitor the occurrence of early HAT after liver transplantation. Furthermore, continuous transcatheter arterial thrombolysis with urokinase could be a rational therapeutic approach to rescue the allograft following early HAT diagnosis confirmed by arterial angiography.

  16. Utilization of Intraoperative TEE to Assess Supraventricular Tachycardia-Inducing Right-Sided Cardiac Compression by the Liver, Post-Liver-Transplantation Status

    PubMed Central

    Stoll, W. David; Hand, William R.; Rohan, Vinayak S.; Gaddy, Parker M.; Reeves, Scott T.; Chavin, Kenneth D.

    2015-01-01

    This unique and interesting case report involves a patient who recently underwent a combined liver and kidney transplant (due to autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease) and subsequently suffered from episodes of supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) secondary to the new liver graft compressing the right atrium and ventricle. After this was diagnosed, the patient underwent operative plication of the right hemidiaphragm. Intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography was used to demonstrate cardiac compression from the liver and demonstrate resolution of compression after plication of the hemidiaphragm. PMID:25861512

  17. Age and equity in liver transplantation: An organ allocation model.

    PubMed

    Cucchetti, Alessandro; Ross, Lainie Friedman; Thistlethwaite, J Richard; Vitale, Alessandro; Ravaioli, Matteo; Cescon, Matteo; Ercolani, Giorgio; Burra, Patrizia; Cillo, Umberto; Pinna, Antonio Daniele

    2015-10-01

    A moral liver allocation policy must be fair. We considered a 2-step, 2-principle allocation system called "age mapping." Its first principle, equal opportunity, ensures that candidates of all ages have an equal chance of getting an organ. Its second principle, prudential lifespan equity, allocates younger donor grafts to younger candidates and older donors to older candidates in order to increase the likelihood that all recipients achieve a "full lifespan." Data from 2476 candidates and 1371 consecutive adult liver transplantations (from 1999 to 2012) were used to determine whether age mapping can reduce the gap in years of life lost (YLL) between younger and older recipients. A parametric Weibull prognostic model was developed to estimate total life expectancy after transplantation using survival of the general population matched by sex and age as a reference. Life expectancy from birth was calculated by adding age at transplant and total life expectancy after transplantation. In multivariate analysis, recipient age, hepatitis C virus status, Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score at transplant of >30, and donor age were significantly related to prognosis after surgery (P < 0.05). The mean (and standard deviation) number of years of life from birth, calculated from the current allocation model, for various age groups were: recipients 18-47 years (n = 340) = 65.2 (3.3); 48-55 years (n = 387) = 72.7 (2.1); 56-61 years (n = 372) = 74.7 (1.7) and for recipients >61 years (n = 272) = 77.4 (1.4). The total number of YLL equaled 523 years. Redistributing liver grafts, using an age mapping algorithm, reduces the lifespan gap between younger and older candidates by 33% (from 12.3% to 8.3%) and achieves a 14% overall reduction of YLL (73 years) compared to baseline liver distribution. In conclusion, deliberately incorporating age into an allocation algorithm promotes fairness and increases efficiency.

  18. Liver transplantation: where we are and where we are heading.

    PubMed

    Esquivel, C O

    2010-03-01

    Outcomes after liver transplantation are outstanding; however, the limiting factor is the shortage of organs. Recently, the utilization of donors after cardiac death has been encouraged; however, such transplants are associated with a high complication rate, mainly a high incidence of biliary complications, particularly ischemic cholangiopahty, a serious complication that often leads to retransplantation. The second problem is the morbidity associated with the use of immunosuppressive drugs. In this manuscript, the current status of clinical protocols for induction of tolerance is briefly discussed. Furthermore, the future of research in transplantation will involve basic scientists and clinical scholars working in concert as has been developed at Stanford School of Medicine with the creation of the Institute for Immunity, Transplantation and Infection.

  19. [Orthotopic liver transplantation: results at the "12 de Octubre" Hospital].

    PubMed

    Moreno González, E; García García, I; González Pinto, I; Gómez Sanz, R; Loinaz Segurola, C; Riaño Carrera, D; Bercedo Martínez, J; Pérez Cerdá, F; Ibáñez Aguirre, J; Moral Gutiérrez, P

    1990-11-01

    The authors report their experience on 132 liver transplants performed on 111 patients. Eighteen have a re-transplantation and in 3 of them a second retransplantation (total re-transplanted patients 21 = 15.9%). Hepatic cirrhosis was the most common indication (57.65%) for transplantation (34.37% of alcoholic etiology). The authors report briefly their operative techniques and the results of their experience. The per-operative mortality (30 days) was 16.21% (18/111). The most important complications were: 9 hepatic arterial thromboses (6.8%), 4 arterial strictures (3.03%), 1 portal stricture (0.75%), 4 portal vein thromboses (3.03%), 5 biliary fistulae (3.78%) (3 following biliary duct-to-duct anastomosis and 2 following hepatic-jejunoanastomosis) and 2 strictures of the choledocus (1.51%). The actuarial survival rate (48 months) is 80%.

  20. Neoplastic disease after liver transplantation: Focus on de novo neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Burra, Patrizia; Rodriguez-Castro, Kryssia I

    2015-01-01

    De novo neoplasms account for almost 30% of deaths 10 years after liver transplantation and are the most common cause of mortality in patients surviving at least 1 year after transplant. The risk of malignancy is two to four times higher in transplant recipients than in an age- and sex-matched population, and cancer is expected to surpass cardiovascular complications as the primary cause of death in transplanted patients within the next 2 decades. Since exposure to immunosuppression is associated with an increased frequency of developing neoplasm, long-term immunosuppression should be therefore minimized. Promising results in the prevention of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) recurrence have been reported with the use of mTOR inhibitors including everolimus and sirolimus and the ongoing open-label prospective randomized controlled SILVER. Study will provide more information on whether sirolimus-containing vs mTOR-inhibitor-free immunosuppression is more efficacious in reducing HCC recurrence. PMID:26269665

  1. Liver transplantation in children using organs from young paediatric donors.

    PubMed

    Herden, Uta; Ganschow, Rainer; Briem-Richter, Andrea; Helmke, Knut; Nashan, Bjoern; Fischer, Lutz

    2011-06-01

    Nowadays, most paediatric liver transplant recipients receive a split or other technical variant graft from adult deceased or live donors, because of a lack of available age- and size matched paediatric donors. Few data are available, especially for liver grafts obtained from very young children (<6 years). We analysed all paediatric liver transplantations between 1989 and 2009. Recipients were divided into five groups (1-5) depending on donor age (<1, ≥1 to <6, ≥6 to <16, ≥16 to <45, ≥45 years). Overall, 413 paediatric liver transplantations from deceased donors were performed; 1- and 5-year graft survival rates were 75%, 80%, 78%, 81%, 74% and 75%, 64%, 70%, 67%, 46%, and 1- and 5-year patient survival rates were 88%, 91%, 90%, 89%, 78% and 88%, 84%, 84%, 83%, 63% for groups 1-5, respectively, without significant difference. Eight children received organs from donors younger than 1 year and 45 children received organs from donors between 1 and 6 years of age. Overall, vascular complications occurred in 13.2% of patients receiving organs from donors younger than 6 years. Analysis of our data revealed that the usage of liver grafts from donors younger than 6 years is a safe procedure. The outcome was comparable with grafts from older donors with excellent graft and patient survival, even for donors younger than 1 year.

  2. Combined liver and kidney transplantation: Our experience and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Halemani, Kusuma Ramachandra; Bhadrinath, N

    2017-01-01

    Increased awareness of organ donation has increased the availability of deceased donors, and it has boosted the opportunities for treating patients with multiple organ dysfunction. Simultaneously replacing two organs gives advantages of single surgery, lower immunosuppression dose and better survival than when one organ alone is transplanted. We present reports of management of three cases of combined liver and kidney transplantation (CLKT) from deceased donors. Based on management of these cases we discuss the importance of CLKT and anaesthetic concerns during such complex procedures. PMID:28216707

  3. Management of the Cirrhotic Patient Before Liver Transplantation: The Role of the Referring Gastroenterologist

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    The referral of a patient with cirrhosis to a liver transplant center for evaluation is usually made by a local gastroenterologist. The role of the referring gastroenterologist begins with early identification and modification of high-risk behaviors, which may delay listing a patient for liver transplantation. The local gastroenterologist must also fully appreciate what constitutes a timely referral of a patient to a liver transplant center and the consequences of late referral. Although patients experience the inevitable deterioration of their liver function, which in turn advances their priority on the liver transplant waiting list, the referring gastroenterologist must also anticipate medical complications of cirrhosis, and should initiate appropriate surveillance and prophylaxis programs to detect and prevent these complications. Finally, the referring gastroenterologist constitutes a vital link of information between the patient and the transplant center. Adherence to these guidelines will increase the probability that a patient with chronic liver failure will undergo successful liver transplantation and will decrease post-transplant morbidity.

  4. Section 4. Further expanding the criteria for HCC in living donor liver transplantation: the Tokyo University experience.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Sumihito; Sugawara, Yasuhiko; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2014-04-27

    In Asia, evidence-based guidelines for the management of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) have evolved, including the option of liver transplantation. Because of the continuing serious organ shortage, however, living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) remains the mainstream in Japan. Unlike deceased donor transplantation, living donor transplantation is not always limited by the restrictions imposed by the nationwide organ allocation system. The decision for transplantation may depend on institutional or case-by-case considerations, balancing the will of the donor, the operative risk, and the overall survival benefit. Cumulative data from the Japanese national multicenter registry analysis as well as individual center experiences suggest further expanding the criteria for LDLT for HCC from the Milan criteria is feasible with acceptable outcomes.

  5. Biliary atresia-polysplenia syndrome: surgical and clinical relevance in liver transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Varela-Fascinetto, G; Castaldo, P; Fox, I J; Sudan, D; Heffron, T G; Shaw, B W; Langnas, A N

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review a single center's 10-year experience with liver transplantation (LTx) for the biliary atresia-polysplenia syndrome (BA-PS) and to define surgical and clinical guidelines for its management. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: BA is the most common indication for pediatric liver transplantation (LTx) and is associated with PS in 12% of cases. Only a few studies of LTx for BA-PS have been reported, and the optimal management of BA-PS patients undergoing LTx has yet to be determined. METHODS: From July 1985 to September 1995, 166 liver transplants were performed in 130 patients with BA and were included in the study. The malformations most commonly associated with BA-PS, surgical techniques used to overcome these anomalies, and surgical pitfalls that could have contributed to the outcome were characterized. Actuarial 10-year patient and graft survival for patients undergoing LTx for BA-PS were calculated and compared to those with isolated BA. RESULTS: Ten patients (7.8%) with BA had associated PS. An additional patient with PS without BA was included in the study. The diagnosis of PS was unknown before the transplantation in 72% of cases. Thirteen liver transplants were performed in these 11 patients. Modifications of the usual surgical technique were used to overcome the complex anatomy encountered. There was no association between the type of anomaly and the outcome, nor were there any significant differences in patient survival (72% vs. 73.5%, p = 0.79) or graft survival (56.4% vs. 54.6%, p = 0.54). CONCLUSIONS: The association of BA with various anomalies should be considered a spectrum that may vary widely from patient to patient. The finding of two or more of these malformations in a patient awaiting transplantation should lead the surgeon to look systematically for other associated anomalies. With some special surgical considerations, the outcome in BA-PS patients should not differ from those with isolated BA. Images Figure 3. PMID:9563550

  6. Living donor liver transplantation in Taiwan-challenges beyond surgery.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Vinod G; Chen, Chao-Long

    2016-04-01

    Taiwan has a high prevalence of hepatitis B and C viral infections, and consequently a high burden of chronic liver diseases. Liver transplantation (LT) began in Taiwan in 1984, and living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) in 1994. Education and collaboration between physicians on a national and international scale were important factors in the development of transplantation in East Asia. Technical innovations in donor hepatectomy, vascular and biliary reconstruction, and interventional radiology, perioperative management of transplant patients and development of associated specialties have enabled achievement of excellent results after both adult and pediatric LDLT. The establishment of rigorous protocols to withstand strict medico-legal scrutiny, combined with technical excellence has contributed to excellent surgical outcomes. The socioeconomic development of Taiwan and the first nationwide hepatitis B vaccination program in the world have also contributed to the decrease in disease burden and improvement of quality of healthcare. This article examines the factors enabling the development of LT in Taiwan, the innovations that have contributed to excellent outcomes, and indicates the future prospects of LDLT in Taiwan.

  7. Medical Management of Metabolic Complications of Liver Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Barnard, Abbey; Konyn, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Improved short- and long-term survival of liver transplant recipients has led to increased focus on complications of both the early and late posttransplant periods. A variety of metabolic complications have been observed in the post–orthotopic liver transplant population, including hypertension, hyperlipidemia, obesity, diabetes mellitus, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Although only a small proportion of patients experience metabolic complications prior to transplantation, the prevalence of these complications posttransplantation reaches or exceeds that of the general population. This is of particular concern, as cardiovascular disease is the second leading cause of death in the late transplant period. A number of mechanisms mediate these metabolic complications, including reversal of cirrhosis pathophysiology, patient lifestyle factors, and immunosuppressive medications. Titration and modification of immunosuppression have been demonstrated to improve and sometimes even eliminate these conditions. Therefore, given the multiple etiologies contributing to the metabolic derangements, an effective management approach must incorporate lifestyle modifications, immunosuppression titration, and medical management. Best practices and understanding of the mechanisms underlying these complications allow for discussion of initial therapies and strategies; however, further study is necessary to determine the optimal management of metabolic complications over time. PMID:27917074

  8. Pituitary apoplexy precipitating diabetes insipidus after living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Matsusaki, Takashi; Morimatsu, Hiroshi; Matsumi, Junya; Matsuda, Hiroaki; Sato, Tetsufumi; Sato, Kenji; Mizobuchi, Satoshi; Yagi, Takahito; Morita, Kiyoshi

    2011-02-01

    Pituitary apoplexy occurring after surgery is a rare but life-threatening acute clinical condition that follows extensive hemorrhagenous necrosis within a pituitary adenoma. Pituitary apoplexy has been reported to occur spontaneously in the majority of cases or in association with various inducing factors. Reported is a case of pituitary apoplexy complicated by diabetes insipidus following living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). To the best of our knowledge, this has not been previously reported. A 56-year-old woman with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis underwent LDLT from her daughter. The patient also required dopamine support and transfusions because of massive intraoperative bleeding. Postoperatively, her coagulopathy continued, and she underwent a second laparotomy because of unknown bleeding on postoperative day 7, when she needed transfusions and dopamine support to maintain her vital signs. She complained of severe headache, excessive thirst, frequent urination, and diplopia from postoperative day 10. She also had polyuria greater than 300 ml/h and was diagnosed with pituitary apoplexy precipitating diabetes insipidus on postoperative day 13. She was treated conservatively without surgery because of the hormonally inactive status and slight mass effect of her tumor. It is important for anesthesiologists and critical care personnel in LDLT settings to take into consideration this complication as a differential diagnosis.

  9. Croup as Unusual Presentation of Post-transplantation Lymphoproliferative Disorder after Liver Transplantation in an 18-month-old Child

    PubMed Central

    Keshtkari, A.; Dehghani, S. M.; Haghighat, M.; Imanieh, M. H.; Nasimfard, A.; Yousefi, G.; Javaherizadeh, H.

    2016-01-01

    Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a serious complication of solid organ transplantation that occurs due to immunosuppression and other risk factors. PTLD may present with involvement of other organs and with unusual presentation. The presentation is often extranodal (e.g., in the gastrointestinal tract, lung, or the central nervous system). Herein, we report on a 1.5-year-old girl who underwent liver transplantation almost 5 months prior to admission. She was on medications such as tacrolimus and prednisolone. Her presentation was started with symptoms of the upper respiratory infection followed by croupy cough and respiratory distress with no response to usual treatments. She had respiratory arrest during broncoscopy. Therefore, emergency tracheostomy was done. Biopsy from the paratracheal mass revealed large B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (PTLD, monomorphic and high grade). This case presentation shows that persistent upper airway symptoms, particularly stridor and croupy cough, in children who underwent liver transplant should be further evaluated; the physician needs to have a high degree of clinical suspicion for the diagnosis of PTLD in this situation. PMID:26889375

  10. Subcapsular liver hematoma after Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography in a liver transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Andrés; Crespo, Gonzalo; Balderramo, Domingo; Bordas, Josep P; Sendino, Oriol; Llach, Josep

    2008-01-01

    Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is commonly performed in patients after liver transplantation. The most common indications for ERCP include treatment of bile leaks and anastomotic and nonanastomotic biliary strictures. In this report we describe an unusual complication of ERCP in a liver transplant recipient with a bile leak two months after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). After confirming a bile leak, a hydrophilic guide wire was placed in the intrahepatic duct, an endoscopic sphincterotomy was performed, and a biliary plastic stent was successfully placed over the wire across the bile leak. Within the following 24 hours the patient developed a sharp right-sided upper quadrant pain and a drop in his hemoglobin level. An abdominal CT scan demonstrated a subcapsular hepatic hematoma that was successfully managed conservatively.

  11. Prognostic and diagnostic value of procalcitonin in the post-transplant setting after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Stirkat, Falk; Croner, Roland S.; Vassos, Nikolaos; Raptis, Dimitrios; Yedibela, Süleyman; Hohenberger, Werner; Müller, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of procalcitonin (PCT) as a marker for complications and as a prognostic factor for mortality after liver transplantation. Material and methods Liver transplant patients between January 2007 and April 2011 were prospectively included in the study. Procalcitonin serum concentration was recorded before, 6 h after reperfusion and then daily. Postoperative clinical course was prospectively analyzed from admission to discharge. Main surgical data such as operating procedure, type of reperfusion, operating and ischemic times, high urgency (HU) status and MELD score at the time of transplantation were also recorded. Results Sixteen patients with initial PCT > 5 ng/ml suffered ≥ 1 complication (p = 0.03). However, there was no association between the level of the 1st peak PCT and the further postoperative course or the occurrence of complications. Patients in whom a 2nd PCT peak occurred had a significantly higher risk for a complicated course, for a complicated sepsis course and for mortality (p < 0.0001). Warm ischemic time over 58 min, operating time over 389 min and HU status were significant independent factors for a complicated postoperative course (p < 0.001, p < 0.001 and p = 0.03 respectively). Conclusions Based on our results, we believe that PCT course and the occurrence of a 2nd peak seem to possess important diagnostic and prognostic power in the post-transplant setting after liver transplantation. PMID:27186183

  12. Rectal Carcinoid Tumor With Liver Metastases Treated by Local Excision and Orthotopic Liver Transplant With Long-term Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Vennarecci, Giovanni; Mascianà, Gianluca; de Werra, Edoardo; Guglielmo, Nicola; Levi Sandri, Giovanni Battista; Coluzzi, Mariagrazia; Ettorre, Giuseppe Maria

    2017-03-28

    In patients affected by unresectable liver metastases from neuroendocrine tumor, liver transplant represents currently the only realistic chance for cure. The first attempt to establish selection criteria for liver transplant in patients affected by neuroendocrine tumor liver metastases was made by Mazzaferro and associates in 2007. We report the case of a 46-year-old man who came to our institution in 2006 with right upper quadrant abdominal pain. Diagnosis of rectal neuroendocrine tumor with bilobar liver nodules was made; the patient underwent transanal local resection. A liver biopsy confirmed the metastatic nature of the hepatic lesion, showing a low-grade neuroendocrine tumor (G1, proliferation index Ki-67 <2%). The patient underwent 2 sessions of transarterial chemoembolization that resulted in stable disease. Afterward, the patient underwent a liver transplant, using the piggyback technique without a venous-venous bypass. His postoperative course was uneventful. The patient has been disease-free for 3 years. Posttransplant treatment has played a key role in increasing the overall survival of the patient and assuring him a good quality of life. He died 9 years (102 mo) after liver transplant.

  13. Summary of the British Transplantation Society UK Guidelines for Living Donor Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Manas, Derek; Burnapp, Lisa; Andrews, Peter Antony

    2016-06-01

    The British Transplantation Society Guidelines for Living Donor Liver Transplantation was published in July 2015 and is the first national guideline in the field of living donor liver transplantation. The guideline aims to review the evidence relating to the evaluation process of both recipient and donor candidates; address the moral and ethical issues surrounding the procedure; outline the technical aspects of the procedure, including the middle hepatic vein controversy and the "small for size syndrome"; review donor and recipient outcomes and complications including donor mortality; and examine evidence relating to the advantages and disadvantages of living donor liver transplantation. In line with previous guidelines published by the BTS, the guideline has used the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system to rate the strength of evidence and recommendations. This article summarizes the Statements of Recommendation contained in the guideline, which provide a framework for the delivery of living liver donation in the United Kingdom and may be of wide international interest. It is recommended that the full guideline document is consulted for details of the relevant references and evidence base. This may be accessed at http://www.bts.org.uk/BTS/Guidelines_Standards/Current/BTS/Guidelines_Standards/Current_Guidelines.aspx?hkey=e285ca32-5920-4613-ac08-fa9fd90915b5.

  14. Frequency of urinary tract infection in pediatric liver transplantation candidates.

    PubMed

    Baskin, E; Ozçay, F; Sakalli, H; Agras, P I; Karakayali, H; Canan, O; Haberal, M

    2007-06-01

    An increased frequency of infections has been reported in patients with chronic liver disease. The tendency of patients in this population to acquire UTI is not completely understood. We aimed at investigating the incidence of UTI in children with cirrhosis, before liver transplantation. Twenty-six children (9 girls, 17 boys; mean age, 7.66 +/- 5.73 yr) with chronic liver disease who had undergone liver transplantation between 2002 and 2004 were included. On admission for liver transplantation, patients were examined for presence of UTI. Serum biochemistry, complete blood cell count, urinalysis and culture, glomerular filtration rate, and abdominal ultrasonography were performed prior to liver transplantation. Ten of 26 patients (38.5%) were found to have symptomatic UTI. Urine cultures revealed E. coli in five (50%), Klebsiella pneumoniae in three (30%), Enterococcus faecalis in one (10%), and Enterobacter aeruginosa in one (10%) patient(s), respectively, as etiologic factors. The etiologies of chronic liver disease in our patients with UTI were BA in five, PFIC in three, Wilson's disease in one, and alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency in one patient. We found a significantly greater number of UTIs in patients with biliary atresia than in those without biliary atresia (p < 0.05). The mean age of the patients with UTI was 2.75 +/- 3.49 yr, which was significantly lower than in those without UTI (9.75 +/- 4.86 yr, p < 0.05). Levels for white blood cells, thrombocytes, ALT, and alkaline phosphatase were significantly higher in patients with UTI than in those without UTI. There were no significant differences between the groups with regard to serum albumin, bilirubin, AST, GGT, BUN, or creatinine levels, glomerular filtration rate, duration of disease, and PELD scores. In patients with bacteriuria, renal USG revealed normal findings in all, but except one patient who had pelvicalyceal dilatation. Scintigraphic findings demonstrated acute pyelonephritis in six (60

  15. Technetium-99m galactosyl-neoglycoalbumin (Tc-NGA) liver imaging: Application in liver transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Woodle, E.S.; Ward, R.E.; Vera, D.R.; Stadalnik, R.C.

    1985-05-01

    Tc-NGA is a new liver imaging agent which binds to hepatic binding protein (HBP), a hepatocyte-specific membrane receptor. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the potential role of Tc-NGA imaging in liver transplantation. The molar Tc-NGA dose was standardized according to patient weight (0.7 nmole/kg). After a 30 minute dynamic imaging study (5 mCi, IV), kinetic analysis of time activity data (heart, liver), provided values for receptor concentration, (HBP), and hepatic blood flow, Q. Eleven Tc-NGA imaging studies were performed in transplant candidates and 22 studies were performed in seven transplant recipients. Preservation damage was manifested by diffuse patchiness in tracer distribution which resolved during the following two weeks. Histologically proven, localized hepatic infarcts were demonstrated in three recipients. Lobar infarction was demonstrated in one recipient. Hepatic regeneration was later demonstrated in this patient after hepatic lobectomy. Hepatic blood flow was markedly decreased in the early postoperative period, but improved with time. Increased (HBP) was demonstrated with regeneration. Markedly decreased (HBP) and Q were obtained in several candidates who died awaiting transplantation. These studies indicate that TC-NGA liver imaging provides a valuable new means for: (1) evaluation of preservation damage, (2) early demonstration of hepatic infarction, (3) evaluation of hepatic rejection, and (4) selection of patients for hepatic transplantation.

  16. Liver transplantation and the management of progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis in children

    PubMed Central

    Mehl, Ashley; Bohorquez, Humberto; Serrano, Maria-Stella; Galliano, Gretchen; Reichman, Trevor W

    2016-01-01

    Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) is a constellation of inherited disorders that result in the impairment of bile flow through the liver that predominantly affects children. The accumulation of bile results in progressive liver damage, and if left untreated leads to end stage liver disease and death. Patients often present with worsening jaundice and pruritis within the first few years of life. Many of these patients will progress to end stage liver disease and require liver transplantation. The role and timing of liver transplantation still remains debated especially in the management of PFIC1. In those patients who are appropriately selected, liver transplantation offers an excellent survival benefit. Appropriate timing and selection of patients for liver transplantation will be discussed, and the short and long term management of patients post liver transplantation will also be described. PMID:27358773

  17. Liver transplantation and the management of progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis in children.

    PubMed

    Mehl, Ashley; Bohorquez, Humberto; Serrano, Maria-Stella; Galliano, Gretchen; Reichman, Trevor W

    2016-06-24

    Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) is a constellation of inherited disorders that result in the impairment of bile flow through the liver that predominantly affects children. The accumulation of bile results in progressive liver damage, and if left untreated leads to end stage liver disease and death. Patients often present with worsening jaundice and pruritis within the first few years of life. Many of these patients will progress to end stage liver disease and require liver transplantation. The role and timing of liver transplantation still remains debated especially in the management of PFIC1. In those patients who are appropriately selected, liver transplantation offers an excellent survival benefit. Appropriate timing and selection of patients for liver transplantation will be discussed, and the short and long term management of patients post liver transplantation will also be described.

  18. Future Economics of Liver Transplantation: A 20-Year Cost Modeling Forecast and the Prospect of Bioengineering Autologous Liver Grafts.

    PubMed

    Habka, Dany; Mann, David; Landes, Ronald; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    During the past 20 years liver transplantation has become the definitive treatment for most severe types of liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma, in both children and adults. In the U.S., roughly 16,000 individuals are on the liver transplant waiting list. Only 38% of them will receive a transplant due to the organ shortage. This paper explores another option: bioengineering an autologous liver graft. We developed a 20-year model projecting future demand for liver transplants, along with costs based on current technology. We compared these cost projections against projected costs to bioengineer autologous liver grafts. The model was divided into: 1) the epidemiology model forecasting the number of wait-listed patients, operated patients and postoperative patients; and 2) the treatment model forecasting costs (pre-transplant-related costs; transplant (admission)-related costs; and 10-year post-transplant-related costs) during the simulation period. The patient population was categorized using the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score. The number of patients on the waiting list was projected to increase 23% over 20 years while the weighted average treatment costs in the pre-liver transplantation phase were forecast to increase 83% in Year 20. Projected demand for livers will increase 10% in 10 years and 23% in 20 years. Total costs of liver transplantation are forecast to increase 33% in 10 years and 81% in 20 years. By comparison, the projected cost to bioengineer autologous liver grafts is $9.7M based on current catalog prices for iPS-derived liver cells. The model projects a persistent increase in need and cost of donor livers over the next 20 years that's constrained by a limited supply of donor livers. The number of patients who die while on the waiting list will reflect this ever-growing disparity. Currently, bioengineering autologous liver grafts is cost prohibitive. However, costs will decline rapidly with the introduction of new manufacturing

  19. Incidence and diagnosis of active toxoplasma infection among liver transplant recipients in Western Turkey.

    PubMed

    Caner, Ayşe; Döşkaya, Mert; Karasu, Zeki; Değirmenci, Aysu; Guy, Edward; Kiliç, Murat; Zeytunlu, Murat; Francis, Janet; Bozoklar, Ata; Gürüz, Yüksel

    2008-10-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a serious and potentially life-threatening disease in liver transplant recipients while they are immunosuppressed. We report the clinical and laboratory findings related to active toxoplasma infection associated with 40 immunosuppressed liver transplant procedures that took place over a 12-month period at a major transplant unit in Izmir, Turkey. Twenty-seven (67.5%) of the 40 transplant recipients were found to be seropositive for toxoplasma infection and therefore at risk of reactivated infection. From the serological status of the donors, which was ascertained in 38 of 40 cases, we identified 3 (7.9%) of 38 transplants to be from a seropositive donor to a seronegative recipient. In 10 (26.3%) of 38 transplants, both the donor and recipient were seronegative, and this excluded toxoplasma as a risk. A comparison of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and nested PCR was undertaken in combination with a range of serological assays (the Sabin-Feldman dye test, enzyme immunoassay immunoglobulin M, and immunosorbent agglutination assay immunoglobulin M). Ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid blood samples from 3 of the 30 recipients at risk from toxoplasma were found positive by PCR, but only 1 of these was found positive in both assays. Among the 3 PCR-positive patients, immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin G antibody levels increased in only 1 patient. Correlations between symptoms, laboratory findings, and clinical management (use of anti-toxoplasma therapy) are presented. Our findings suggest that toxoplasma presents a significant risk to our liver transplant population and that PCR is a helpful addition in identifying active infections and hence in informing clinical management decisions.

  20. Living Donor Liver Transplantation for Combined Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Cholangiocarcinoma: Experience of a Single Center.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cheng-Chih; Chen, Ying-Ju; Huang, Tzu-Hao; Chen, Chun-Han; Kuo, Fang-Ying; Eng, Hock-Liew; Yong, Chee-Chien; Liu, Yueh-Wei; Lin, Ting-Lung; Li, Wei-Feng; Lin, Yu-Hung; Lin, Chih-Che; Wang, Chih-Chi; Chen, Chao-Long

    2017-02-28

    BACKGROUND Because the outcome of liver transplantation for cholangiocarcinoma is often poor, cholangiocarcinoma is a contraindication for liver transplantation in most centers. Combined hepatocellular carcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma is a rare type of primary hepatic malignancy containing features of hepatocellular carcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma. Diagnosing combined hepatocellular carcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma pre-operatively is difficult. Because of sparse research presentations worldwide, we report our experience with living donor liver transplantation for combined hepatocellular carcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 710 patients underwent living donor liver transplantation at our institution from April 2006 to June 2014; 377 of them received transplantation because of hepatocellular carcinoma with University of California San Francisco (UCSF) staging criteria fulfilled pre-operatively. Eleven patients (2.92%) were diagnosed with combined hepatocellular carcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma confirmed pathologically from explant livers; we reviewed these cases retrospectively. Long-term survival was compared between patients diagnosed with combined hepatocellular carcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma and patients diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma. RESULTS The mean age of the patients in our series was 60.2 years, and the median follow-up period was 23.9 months. Four patients were diagnosed with a recurrence during the follow-up period, including one intra-hepatic and three extra-hepatic recurrences. Four patients died due to tumor recurrence. Except for patients with advanced-stage cancer, disease-free survival of patients with combined hepatocellular carcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma compared with that of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma was 80% versus 97.2% in 1 year, and 46.7% versus 92.5% in 3 years (p<0.001), and overall survival was 90% versus 97.2% in 1 year, and 61.7% versus 95.1% in 3 years (p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS

  1. A major burn injury in a liver transplant patient

    PubMed Central

    Delikonstantinou, I.; Philp, B.; Kamel, D.; Barnes, D.; Dziewulski, P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Immunosuppressive therapy may aggravate the clinical course of a burned patient, primarily affecting wound healing and thus complicating permanent wound coverage. We hereby present the successful management of a 48-year-old female liver transplant recipient with a major burn injury, aiming to elucidate the effects of the patient’s immunosuppression on surgical treatment. After admission to the Burns ITU, the patient underwent serial debridement of the burn and coverage with cryopreserved allografts. Despite immunosuppression, no prolonged survival of the allo-epidermis was documented. Nevertheless, a variable degree of vascularized allo-dermis was clinically identified. She subsequently underwent skin autografting and was discharged home with most of the wounds healed. Although there are isolated reports of survival of skin allografts in immunocompromised patients, in our case the allografted skin did not provide permanent wound coverage. However, it permitted a staged surgical management, allowing the immunosuppressive regime to change, the skin donor sites to heal and it also provided a dermal scaffold for successful skin autografting. PMID:28149251

  2. Treatment of Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Liver Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Suraweera, Duminda; Sundaram, Vinay

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the leading cause of liver transplantation in adults. Although the recurrence of HCV infection after liver transplantation is nearly universal, the recent advances in direct-acting antiviral (DAA) agents have revolutionized the management of HCV infection in the posttransplant setting. A number of these agents have been evaluated in recent clinical trials and have shown high sustained virologic response rates, shorter durations of treatment, and decreased adverse events when compared with the previous treatment of pegylated interferon and ribavirin. This article will review the current literature on the efficacy, tolerability, and potential drug interactions of various DAA agents in patients with recurrent HCV infection posttransplant. PMID:27330501

  3. Management of immunosuppressant agents following liver transplantation: Less is more

    PubMed Central

    Ascha, Mustafa S; Ascha, Mona L; Hanouneh, Ibrahim A

    2016-01-01

    Immunosuppression in organ transplantation was revolutionary for its time, but technological and population changes cast new light on its use. First, metabolic syndrome (MS) is increasing as a public health issue, concomitantly increasing as an issue for post-orthotopic liver transplantation patients; yet the medications regularly used for immunosuppression contribute to dysfunctional metabolism. Current mainstay immunosuppression involves the use of calcineurin inhibitors; these are potent, but nonspecifically disrupt intracellular signaling in such a way as to exacerbate the impact of MS on the liver. Second, the impacts of acute cellular rejection and malignancy are reviewed in terms of their severity and possible interactions with immunosuppressive medications. Finally, immunosuppressive agents must be considered in terms of new developments in hepatitis C virus treatment, which undercut what used to be inevitable viral recurrence. Overall, while traditional immunosuppressive agents remain the most used, the specific side-effect profiles of all immunosuppressants must be weighed in light of the individual patient. PMID:26839639

  4. Outcomes of Living Donor Liver Transplantation Alone for Patients on Maintenance Renal Replacement Therapy in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Eguchi, Susumu; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Uemoto, Shinji; Umeshita, Koji; Imamura, Hajime; Soyama, Akihiko; Shimamura, Tsuyoshi; Isaji, Shuji; Ogura, Yasuhiro; Egawa, Hiroto; Kawachi, Shigeyuki; Kasahara, Mureo; Nagano, Hiroaki; Ku, Yonson; Ohdan, Hideki; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Sato, Shuntaro; Inomata, Yukihiro

    2016-01-01

    Background Because simultaneous liver and kidney transplantation has been limited as a standard practice because of a severe shortage of deceased donors in Japan, living donor (LD) liver transplantation alone (LTA) is indicated in most recipients with maintenance renal replacement therapy (MRRT). Methods A retrospective nationwide survey of LD LTA was performed for liver transplant patients on MRRT. The characteristics of donors and recipients, postoperative complications, survival rate, and causes of death were analyzed. Results In the adult cases (n = 28), the overall survival rate at 1 year and 5 years were 66.1% and 57.3%, respectively. When compared with those adults without MRRT (n = 237), it was significantly worse. In the 7 pediatric cases, the overall survival rate at 1 and 5 years were both 83.3%. Three adult recipients died of nonaneurysm cerebral hemorrhage after 1 year and 1 adult recipient died of acute heart failure after 7 months. In adult recipients with MRRT, graft weight versus standard liver volume, and duration and blood loss in LTA surgery were associated with poor outcomes after LD LTA. Multivariate analysis revealed that MRRT was highest hazard ratio on patient survival after LD LTA. Conclusions Early post-LD LTA mortality was higher in patients with MRRT than in those without MRRT with characteristic causes. Smaller grafts for size and a complicated surgery were associated with poor outcome after LD LTA. Thus, LD LTA in adult patients on MRRT should be carefully treated with meticulous postoperative management and follow-up. PMID:27500264

  5. Gabapentin withdrawal syndrome in a post-liver transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Finch, Christopher K; Eason, James; Usery, Justin B

    2010-09-01

    A 41-year-old male with a previous orthotopic liver transplant began experiencing insomnia, anxiety, diaphoresis, headaches, and palpitations that progressed over a 2-day period. As part of his home medication regimen, the patient was taking gabapentin for peripheral neuropathy. His acute onset of increasing symptoms coincided with an inadvertent discontinuation of gabapentin. After reinitiation of gabapentin therapy, the symptoms slowly improved over the next 24 hours and the episode of gabapentin withdrawal syndrome resolved.

  6. Echinocandin Resistance in Candida Species Isolates from Liver Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Prigent, Gwénolé; Aït-Ammar, Nawel; Levesque, Eric; Fekkar, Arnaud; Costa, Jean-Marc; El Anbassi, Sarra; Foulet, Françoise; Duvoux, Christophe; Merle, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Liver transplant recipients are at risk of invasive fungal infections, especially candidiasis. Echinocandin is recommended as prophylactic treatment but is increasingly associated with resistance. Our aim was to assess echinocandin drug resistance in Candida spp. isolated from liver transplant recipients treated with this antifungal class. For this, all liver-transplanted patients in a University Hospital (Créteil, France) between January and June of 2013 and 2015 were included. Susceptibilities of Candida isolates to echinocandins were tested by Etest and the EUCAST reference method. Isolates were analyzed by FKS sequencing and genotyped based on microsatellites or multilocus sequence typing (MLST) profiles. Ninety-four patients were included, and 39 patients were colonized or infected and treated with echinocandin. Echinocandin resistance appeared in 3 (8%) of the treated patients within 1 month of treatment. One patient was colonized by resistant Candida glabrata, one by resistant Candida dubliniensis, and one by resistant Candida albicans. Molecular analysis found three mutations in FKS2 HS1 (F659S, S663A, and D666E) for C. glabrata and one mutation in FKS1 HS1 (S645P) for C. dubliniensis and C. albicans. Susceptible and resistant isolates belonged to the same genotype. To our knowledge, this is the first study on echinocandin resistance in Candida spp. in a liver transplant population. Most resistant isolates were found around/in digestive sites, perhaps due to lower diffusion of echinocandin in these sites. This work documents the risk of emergence of resistance to echinocandin, even after short-term treatment. PMID:27855078

  7. Pharmacokinetics of cefoperazone and sulbactam in liver transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Muder, Robert R; Agarwala, Sangeeta; Mirani, Aja; Gayowski, Timothy; Venkataramanan, Raman

    2002-06-01

    The authors evaluated the pharmacokinetics of cefoperazone and sulbactam in 9 liver transplant patients. Cefoperazone and sulbactam were administered as an intravenous infusion over 30 minutes every 12 hours for six doses, and multiple blood samples were collected immediately after the first dose (administered during the surgery) and after the last dose. The concentrations of cefoperazone and sulbactam in serum and, when possible, in urine and bile collected over one dosing interval were measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography. The concentration of cefaperazone ranged from 436 to 4118 microg/ml, and sulbactam ranged from 3.3 to 8.7 microg/ml in the bile samples. The intraoperative clearance of cefoperazone (0.53+/-0.18 ml/min/kg) was significantly higher than the postoperative clearance (0.21+/-0.23 ml/min/kg). The half-life of cefaperazone, although not statistically significantly different, was prolonged in all patients during the postoperative period. The clearance of sulbactam (1.51+/-0.51 ml/min/kg) was lower than what is reported in patients with normal renal function but was comparable to what has been reported in patients with renal impairment and in critically ill patients. There were no significant differences in any of the pharmacokinetic parameters of sulbactam during and after surgery. The pharmacokinetic parameters of cefoperazone and sulbactam were significantly altered in liver transplant patients compared to what has been reported in normal subjects but were similar to what has been reported in patients with liver and renal impairment. There was a significant impairment in the biliary excretion of cefoperazone during the postoperative period in liver transplant patients. Although the percentage of the dose of cefoperazone excreted in the bile was drastically reduced, the biliary concentrations were generally high and above the MIC for most organisms. Given that both renal and hepatic elimination of cefoperazone is decreased, leading to a

  8. Socioeconomic status does not affect the outcome of liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hwan Y; Galabova, Violetta; Edwin, David; Thuluvath, Paul J

    2002-12-01

    The outcome of liver transplantation is dependent on many factors. It was suggested that racial disparities in outcome may be related to differences in socioeconomic status (SES). In this retrospective study, we analyzed the effect of SES on graft and patient survival. Two hundred seventy-six adult patients who underwent liver transplantation at our institution from July 1988 to June 2001 were included in the analysis. Educational and occupation statuses were coded using established criteria (Hollingshead Index of Social Status [HI]). SES then was calculated using the HI formula: SES = education level x 3 + occupation x 5, and categorized into four groups: group 1, score less than 29 (n = 71); group 2, score of 29 to 42 (n = 82); group 3, score of 42 to 53 (n = 69); and group 4, score greater than 53 (n = 54). Kaplan-Meier analysis was used for graft and patient survival, and Cox regression analysis was used to determine the effect of confounding factors. Demographics of all four groups were similar. One-, 2-, and 5-year graft and patient survival did not differ significantly across groups by Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression survival analysis. In conclusion, SES did not predict graft and patient survival after liver transplantation.

  9. Biliary reconstruction in living donor liver transplantation with dye injection leakage test and without stent use.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, T; Nishizaki, T; Kishikawa, K; Nomoto, K; Uchiyama, H; Ohta, R; Hiroshige, S; Sugimachi, K

    2001-01-01

    Biliary complication remains a significant source of morbidity and mortality in living donor liver transplantation. From October 1996 to December 1999, 34 patients underwent 35 living donor liver transplantations at Kyushu University Hospital. In the initial twenty cases, anastomotic internal stents were placed. In the most recent fifteen cases, no internal stent was inserted and routine postreconstruction dye injection leakage tests were administered. In recipient biliary reconstruction, hepaticojejunostomy was performed using interrupted sutures without an anastomotic stent. After an intestinal clamp was applied at the anal side of the hepaticojejunostomy, leakage test was done using diluted indigocarmine solution injected into the jejunal loop lumen. Two (13%) of the fifteen recent patients suffered from biliary complications, whereas eight patients (40%) from the former twenty patients suffered from biliary complications. We conclude that the use of the stent was not useful, but the application of the dye injection leakage test was useful.

  10. Unique molecular changes in kidney allografts after simultaneous liver-kidney compared with solitary kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Taner, Timucin; Park, Walter D; Stegall, Mark D

    2017-02-20

    Kidney allografts transplanted simultaneously with liver allografts from the same donor are known to be immunologically privileged. This is especially evident in recipients with high levels of donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies. Here we investigated the mechanisms of liver's protective impact using gene expression in the kidney allograft. Select solitary kidney transplant or simultaneous liver-kidney transplant recipients were retrospectively reviewed and separated into four groups: 16 cross-match negative kidney transplants, 15 cross-match positive kidney transplants, 12 cross-match negative simultaneous liver-kidney transplants, and nine cross-match-positive simultaneous liver-kidney transplants. Surveillance biopsies of cross-match-positive kidney transplants had increased expression of genes associated with donor-specific antigens, inflammation, and endothelial cell activation compared to cross-match-negative kidney transplants. These changes were not found in cross-match-positive simultaneous liver-kidney transplant biopsies when compared to cross-match-negative simultaneous liver-kidney transplants. In addition, simultaneously transplanting a liver markedly increased renal expression of genes associated with tissue integrity/metabolism, regardless of the cross-match status. While the expression of inflammatory gene sets in cross-match-positive simultaneous liver-kidney transplants was not completely reduced to the level of cross-match-negative kidney transplants, the downstream effects of donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies were blocked. Thus, simultaneous liver-kidney transplants can have a profound impact on the kidney allograft, not only by decreasing inflammation and avoiding endothelial cell activation in cross-match-positive recipients, but also by increasing processes associated with tissue integrity/metabolism by unknown mechanisms.

  11. Potential Liver Transplant Recipients with Hepatitis C: Should They Be Treated Before or After Transplantation?

    PubMed

    Anand, Anil C

    2017-03-01

    Treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) with newer directly acting antivirals (DAAs) and lead to sustained viral response (SVR) in majority of patients and SVR has been documented to be associated with reversal of liver cirrhosis. The improved SVR rates and safety profiles of DAAs have led to the treatment of patients with decompensated cirrhosis awaiting liver transplantation (LT). Several clinical trials of DAAs in decompensated HCV patients have recently demonstrated SVR rates above 80%, which have been associated with significant improvements, in the Child-Pugh-Turcotte scores/or model for end-stage liver disease scores in a proportion of patients. Moreover, it has been shown that HCV RNA becomes negative after 2-4 weeks of treatment, and those who are transplanted after becoming HCV RNA negative will be have very low the risk of HCV recurrence after transplantation. Some of the patients may have reached the "point of no return" and may proceed to worsening of decomposition over time. To avoid the risk of worsening, there is an additional option of treating these patients after LT should they develop recurrent HCV infection. Currently there are no guidelines as to select patients who would benefit from treatment prior to LT as opposed to those who will be better off being treated after the transplant surgery. The article discusses a possible approach for such selection.

  12. Dumb bell shaped morphology of liver: an autopsy case report.

    PubMed

    Jagadish Rao, P P; Murlimanju, B V; Menezes, R G

    2013-01-01

    Medicolegal autopsy on the dead body of an elderly female revealed that the liver was having some unusual shape. The left lobe of liver was bifid, having dumb bell type morphology. Also there were some furrows which were observed over the anterior surface of the liver. This type of morphological variant has not been reported hitherto. The clinicians should be aware of developmental morphological anomalies like in this case, as they might cause confusion during the procedures like biopsy, transplantation and lobectomies. We believe that this case report is important for the clinicians who are involved in the diagnosis and management of hepatic diseases. The knowledge is also enlightening for morphologists and embryologists.

  13. De novo autoimmune hepatitis following liver transplantation for primary biliary cirrhosis: an unusual cause of late grafts dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ennaifer, Rym; Ayadi, Hend; Romdhane, Haifa; Cheikh, Meriem; Mestiri, Hafedh; Khalfallah, Taher; Hadj, Najet Bel

    2015-01-01

    De novo autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a rare disorder first described in 1998. It occurs in patients who underwent liver transplantation for a different etiology. We present the case of a 56-year-old woman who was diagnosed with primary biliary cirrhosis and had liver transplantation for refractory pruritis. Seven years after transplantation, she presented alterations in the hepatic profile with hypertransaminasemia, elevated alkaline phosphatase and gamma-glutamyl-transferase. Her liver functions test also showed elevated IgG levels. Serum autoantibodies were negative except for antimitochondrial antibodies. Histological findings indicated features of AIH without bile duct damage or loss. She had a pretreatment AIH score of 13 points and a post treatment score of 15 points according to the International AIH Group. The patient was treated effectively with prednisolone and her liver function and globulin levels rapidly returned to normal.

  14. Usefulness of liver stiffness measurement during acute cellular rejection in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Gonzalo; Castro-Narro, Graciela; García-Juárez, Ignacio; Benítez, Carlos; Ruiz, Pablo; Sastre, Lydia; Colmenero, Jordi; Miquel, Rosa; Sánchez-Fueyo, Alberto; Forns, Xavier; Navasa, Miquel

    2016-03-01

    Liver stiffness measurement (LSM) is a useful method to estimate liver fibrosis and portal hypertension. The inflammatory process that takes place in post-liver transplant acute cellular rejection (ACR) may also increase liver stiffness. We aimed to explore the association between liver stiffness and the severity of ACR, as well as to assess the relationship between liver stiffness and response to rejection treatment in a prospective study that included 27 liver recipients with biopsy-proven ACR, 30 stable recipients with normal liver tests, and 30 hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected LT recipients with histologically diagnosed HCV recurrence. Patients with rejection were stratified into 2 groups (mild and moderate/severe) according to the severity of rejection evaluated with the Banff score. Routine biomarkers and LSM with FibroScan were performed at the time of liver biopsy (baseline) and at 7, 30, and 90 days in patients with rejection and at baseline in control patients. Median baseline liver stiffness was 5.9 kPa in the mild rejection group, 11 kPa in the moderate/severe group (P = 0.001), 4.2 kPa in stable recipients (P = 0.02 versus mild rejection), and 13.6 kPa in patients with recurrent HCV (P = 0.17 versus moderate/severe rejection). The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve of LSM to discriminate mild versus moderate/severe ACR was 0.924, and a LSM value of 8.5 kPa yielded a positive predictive value of 100% to diagnose moderate/severe rejection. Liver stiffness improved in 7%, 21%, and 64% of patients with moderate/severe rejection at 7, 30, and 90 days. In conclusion, according to the results of this exploratory study, LSM is associated with the severity of ACR in liver transplantation and thus may be of help in its assessment.

  15. Current techniques for AB0-incompatible living donor liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Rummler, Silke; Bauschke, Astrid; Bärthel, Erik; Jütte, Heike; Maier, Katrin; Ziehm, Patrice; Malessa, Christina; Settmacher, Utz

    2016-01-01

    For a long time, it was considered medical malpractice to neglect the blood group system during transplantation. Because there are far more patients waiting for organs than organs available, a variety of attempts have been made to transplant AB0-incompatible (AB0i) grafts. Improvements in AB0i graft survival rates have been achieved with immunosuppression regimens and plasma treatment procedures. Nevertheless, some grafts are rejected early after AB0i living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) due to antibody mediated rejection or later biliary complications that affect the quality of life. Therefore, the AB0i LDLT is an option only for emergency situations, and it requires careful planning. This review compares the treatment possibilities and their effect on the patients’ graft outcome from 2010 to the present. We compared 11 transplant center regimens and their outcomes. The best improvement, next to plasma treatment procedures, has been reached with the prophylactic use of rituximab more than one week before AB0i LDLT. Unfortunately, no standardized treatment protocols are available. Each center treats its patients with its own scheme. Nevertheless, the transplant results are homogeneous. Due to refined treatment strategies, AB0i LDLT is a feasible option today and almost free of severe complications. PMID:27683633

  16. [Validation of multidimensional adherence questionnaire for liver transplantated patients (MAQ)].

    PubMed

    Telles-Correia, Diogo; Barbosa, António; Mega, Inês; Monteiro, Estela

    2008-01-01

    Nonadherence is considered as determinant for the increase of morbility and mortality, reduction of quality of life, increase of medical costs and excess health services utilization in transplanted patients, and it can be direct cause of 21% of the fails of transplants and 26% of the mortality after transplantation. It was demonstrated that patient description obtained by means of an interview with a good questionnaire is the best way to access to adherence. In transplanted patients, non adherence with a more extended sense, is much more prevalent than adherence related only with medication intake, and therefore the instrument that should be used to measure adherence in this population should be a questionnaire that accesses adherence in a more extended sense. There wasn't found in literature any instrument to evaluate multidimensional adherence in liver transplanted patients. Based on an extended review of literature and with supervision of hepatologists the authors elaborated a questionnaire that mentions 3 adherence dimensions: presence in medical appointments and exams, medication intake and alcohol ingestion, with three questions to each dimension. This questionnaire has passed threw several steps to be validated: cognitive debriefing, liability tests, concept validity, construct validity, and criterium validity.

  17. Pre-Transplant Depression Is Associated with Length of Hospitalization, Discharge Disposition, and Survival after Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Rogal, Shari S.; Mankaney, Gautham; Udawatta, Viyan; Chinman, Matthew; Good, Chester B.; Zickmund, Susan; Bielefeldt, Klaus; Chidi, Alexis; Jonassaint, Naudia; Jazwinski, Alison; Shaikh, Obaid; Hughes, Christopher; Fontes, Paulo; Humar, Abhinav; DiMartini, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Depression after liver transplantation has been associated with decreased survival, but the effects of pre-transplant depression on early and late post-transplant outcomes remain incompletely evaluated. We assessed all patients who had undergone single-organ liver transplantation at a single center over the prior 10 years. A diagnosis of pre-transplant depression, covariates, and the outcomes of interest were extracted from the electronic medical record. Potential covariates included demographics, etiology and severity of liver disease, comorbidities, donor age, graft type, immunosuppression, and ischemic times. In multivariable models adjusting for these factors, we evaluated the effect of pre-transplant depression on transplant length of stay (LOS), discharge disposition (home vs. facility) and long-term survival. Among 1115 transplant recipients with a median follow-up time of 5 years, the average age was 56±11 and MELD was 12±9. Nineteen percent of the study population had a history of pre-transplant depression. Pre-transplant depression was associated with longer LOS (median = 19 vs. 14 days, IRR = 1.25, CI = 1.13,1.39), discharge to a facility (36% vs. 25%, OR 1.70,CI = 1.18,2.45), and decreased survival (HR = 1.54,CI = 1.14,2.08) in this cohort, accounting for other potential confounders. In conclusion, pre-transplant depression was significantly associated with longer transplant length of stay, discharge to a facility, and mortality in this cohort. PMID:27820828

  18. Time spent in hospital after liver transplantation: Effects of primary liver disease and comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Tovikkai, Chutwichai; Charman, Susan C; Praseedom, Raaj K; Gimson, Alexander E; van der Meulen, Jan

    2016-01-01

    AIM To explore the effect of primary liver disease and comorbidities on transplant length of stay (TLOS) and LOS in later admissions in the first two years after liver transplantation (LLOS). METHODS A linked United Kingdom Liver Transplant Audit - Hospital Episode Statistics database of patients who received a first adult liver transplant between 1997 and 2010 in England was analysed. Patients who died within the first two years were excluded from the primary analysis, but a sensitivity analysis was also performed including all patients. Multivariable linear regression was used to evaluate the impact of primary liver disease and comorbidities on TLOS and LLOS. RESULTS In 3772 patients, the mean (95%CI) TLOS was 24.8 (24.2 to 25.5) d, and the mean LLOS was 24.2 (22.9 to 25.5) d. Compared to patients with cancer, we found that the largest difference in TLOS was seen for acute hepatic failure group (6.1 d; 2.8 to 9.4) and the largest increase in LLOS was seen for other liver disease group (14.8 d; 8.1 to 21.5). Patients with cardiovascular disease had 8.5 d (5.7 to 11.3) longer TLOS and 6.0 d (0.2 to 11.9) longer LLOS, compare to those without. Patients with congestive cardiac failure had 7.6 d longer TLOS than those without. Other comorbidities did not significantly increase TLOS nor LLOS. CONCLUSION The time patients spent in hospital varied according to their primary liver disease and some comorbidities. Time spent in hospital of patients with cancer was relatively short compared to most other indications. Cardiovascular disease and congestive cardiac failure were the comorbidities with a strong impact on increased LOS. PMID:28058226

  19. Interventional Radiological Treatment of Perihepatic Vascular Stenosis or Occlusion in Pediatric Patients After Liver Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Uller, Wibke; Knoppke, Birgit; Schreyer, Andreas G.; Heiss, Peter; Schlitt, Hans J.; Melter, Michael; Stroszczynski, Christian; Zorger, Niels; Wohlgemuth, Walter A.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of percutaneous treatment of vascular stenoses and occlusions in pediatric liver transplant recipients. Methods: Fifteen children (mean age 8.3 years) underwent interventional procedures for 18 vascular complications after liver transplantation. Patients had stenoses or occlusions of portal veins (n = 8), hepatic veins (n = 3), inferior vena cava (IVC; n = 2) or hepatic arteries (n = 5). Technical and clinical success rates were evaluated. Results: Stent angioplasty was performed in seven cases (portal vein, hepatic artery and IVC), and sole balloon angioplasty was performed in eight cases. One child underwent thrombolysis (hepatic artery). Clinical and technical success was achieved in 14 of 18 cases of vascular stenoses or occlusions (mean follow-up 710 days). Conclusion: Pediatric interventional radiology allows effective and safe treatment of vascular stenoses after pediatric liver transplantation (PLT). Individualized treatment with special concepts for each pediatric patient is necessary. The variety, the characteristics, and the individuality of interventional management of all kinds of possible vascular stenoses or occlusions after PLT are shown.

  20. Technical aspects and outcomes of living donor liver transplantation for pediatric patients with situs inversus.

    PubMed

    Vincenzi, Rodrigo; Seda-Neto, Joao; Fonseca, Eduardo Antunes da; Ketzer, Bernardo Mazzini; Benavides, Marcel; Cândido, Helry Lopes; Porta, Gilda; Miura, Irene Kazue; Pugliese, Renata; Danesi, Vera Baggio; Guimaraes, Teresa Cristina; Porta, Adriana; Borges, Cristian Barbieri; Kondo, Mario; Chapchap, Paulo

    2013-04-01

    The vascular anomalies encountered in patients with biliary atresia associated with polysplenia syndrome and situs inversus (SI) demand technical refinements when liver transplantation is being performed. The available data describing the technique used in living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) in this population are limited; the short vascular stumps of the donor's liver can impart additional technical difficulties during vascular reconstruction. Here we describe our experience with 9 children with biliary atresia and SI who underwent LDLT. In our series, the retrohepatic vena cava was absent for 7 patients, 7 had a preduodenal portal vein (PV), and 4 had a variant arterial anatomy. The donor's left hepatic vein was anastomosed to the confluence of the recipient's 3 hepatic veins in 7 patients. Vascular grafts were used for PV reconstruction in 3 cases. A left lateral segment graft was used in all but 1 patient who needed a graft reduction. All grafts were placed in the upper left abdomen. There were no vascular complications after transplantation. All patients were alive and well at a median follow-up of 55 months. In conclusion, LDLT can be successfully performed in pediatric patients with SI. Complex vascular anomalies associated with the use of partial liver grafts obtained from living donors are not associated with an increased occurrence of vascular complications.

  1. Successful Treatment with a Covered Stent and 6-Year Follow-Up of Biliary Complication After Liver Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Doros, Attila Nemeth, Andrea; Deak, Akos Pal; Hartmann, Erika; Gerlei, Zsuzsa; Fazakas, Janos; Kobori, Laszlo

    2010-04-15

    The role of covered stent in the management of biliary complications is not yet defined in liver transplant recipients. This Case Report presents a patient with anastomotic stricture and leakage with biloma treated with a covered stent 32 months following liver transplantation. Signs of in-stent restenosis developed 52 months following covered stent placement, which was resolved by balloon dilation. There were no complications during the interventions. The latest follow-up, at 69 months following primary and 19 months following secondary percutaneous intervention, shows a patent covered stent without any clinical or morphological sign of further restenosis. The clinical success with long-term follow-up data suggests that covered stent implantation can be a rational, minimally invasive option for simultaneous treatment of bile duct stenosis and bile leak following liver transplantation in selected cases.

  2. Molecular characterization of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders of donor origin occurring in liver transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Capello, Daniela; Rasi, Silvia; Oreste, Pierluigi; Veronese, Silvio; Cerri, Michaela; Ravelli, Erika; Rossi, Davide; Minola, Ernesto; Colosimo, Anna; Gambacorta, Marcello; Muti, Giuliana; Morra, Enrica; Gaidano, Gianluca

    2009-08-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) represent a frequent complication of solid organ transplantation. Although most PTLDs arise from recipient lymphoid cells, a considerable fraction of cases may arise from donor B-cells. In an attempt to clarify the histogenesis and pathogenesis of PTLDs derived from donor B-cells, monoclonal PTLDs occurring in liver transplant recipients were chosen as a model to compare donor (D-PTLDs) versus recipient PTLDs (R-PTLDs). The tumour panel included nine D-PTLDs and six R-PTLDs. D-PTLDs were early-onset, EBV-infected lymphoproliferations classified as polymorphic PTLD (P-PTLD; n = 7) or diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL; n = 2) with tumour localization confined to the hepatic hilum. All R-PTLDs were late-onset DLBCLs and showed extrahepatic localization. A BCL-6(-)/MUM1(+)/CD138(+/-) phenotype, consistent with a post-germinal centre (GC) stage of pre-terminal B-cell differentiation, was observed in all D-PTLDs and in 2/6 R-PTLDs, whereas a BCL6(+)/MUM1(-)/CD138(-) profile, reminiscent of GC B-cells, was detected in 4/6 R-PTLDs. The presence of somatic IGHV hypermutation was observed in 6/9 D-PTLDs and in 4/6 R-PTLDs, suggesting derivation from antigen-experienced B-cells. IGHV4-39 was the IGHV gene most frequently encountered, being rearranged in 3/9 D-PTLDs. Among IGHV-mutated PTLDs, a mutational profile suggesting antigen stimulation and/or selection was observed in 4/6 D-s and in 2/4 R-PTLDs. The presence of ongoing IGHV mutations was detected in 2/4 D-PTLDs. Aberrant SHM was detected in 10/15 (66.7%) PTLDs, including 6/9 D-PTLDs and 4/6 R-PTLDs. Our findings suggest that (i) D-PTLDs show a clinical presentation distinct from R-PTLDs; (ii) immunophenotypic and genetic features of D-PTLDs are consistent with mature, GC-experienced B-cells; (iii) transformed donor-derived B-cells may experience antigen-driven stimulation and selection, and may acquire genetic lesions during neoplastic expansion in the recipient

  3. Cholesterol metabolism in cholestatic liver disease and liver transplantation: From molecular mechanisms to clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Nemes, Katriina; Åberg, Fredrik; Gylling, Helena; Isoniemi, Helena

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to enlighten the critical roles that the liver plays in cholesterol metabolism. Liver transplantation can serve as gene therapy or a source of gene transmission in certain conditions that affect cholesterol metabolism, such as low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene mutations that are associated with familial hypercholesterolemia. On the other hand, cholestatic liver disease often alters cholesterol metabolism. Cholestasis can lead to formation of lipoprotein X (Lp-X), which is frequently mistaken for LDL on routine clinical tests. In contrast to LDL, Lp-X is non-atherogenic, and failure to differentiate between the two can interfere with cardiovascular risk assessment, potentially leading to prescription of futile lipid-lowering therapy. Statins do not effectively lower Lp-X levels, and cholestasis may lead to accumulation of toxic levels of statins. Moreover, severe cholestasis results in poor micellar formation, which reduces cholesterol absorption, potentially impairing the cholesterol-lowering effect of ezetimibe. Apolipoprotein B-100 measurement can help distinguish between atherogenic and non-atherogenic hypercholesterolemia. Furthermore, routine serum cholesterol measurements alone cannot reflect cholesterol absorption and synthesis. Measurements of serum non-cholesterol sterol biomarkers - such as cholesterol precursor sterols, plant sterols, and cholestanol - may help with the comprehensive assessment of cholesterol metabolism. An adequate cholesterol supply is essential for liver-regenerative capacity. Low preoperative and perioperative serum cholesterol levels seem to predict mortality in liver cirrhosis and after liver transplantation. Thus, accurate lipid profile evaluation is highly important in liver disease and after liver transplantation. PMID:27574546

  4. Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Liver Transplantation: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Mancuso, Andrea; Perricone, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an aggressive tumor that often occurs in chronic liver disease and cirrhosis. The incidence of HCC is growing worldwide. With respect to any other available treatment for liver cancer, liver transplantation (LT) has the highest potential to cure. LT allows for removal at once of both the tumor (“seed”) and the damaged-hepatic tissue (“soil”) where cancerogenesis and chronic liver disorders have progressed together. The Milan criteria (MC) have been applied worldwide to select patients with HCC for LT, yielding a 4-year survival rate of 75%. These criteria represent the benchmark for patient selection and are the basis for comparison with any other suggested criteria. However, MC are often considered to be too restrictive, and recent data show that between 25% and 50% of patients with HCC are currently transplanted beyond conventional indications. Consequently, any unrestricted expansion of selection criteria will increase the need for donor organs, lengthen waiting periods, increase drop-out rates, and impair outcomes on intention-to-treat analysis. Management of HCC recurrence after LT is challenging. There are a few reports available regarding the safety and efficacy of sorafenib for HCC recurrence after LT, but the data are heterogeneous. A multi-center prospective randomized controlled trial comparing placebo with sorafenib is advised. Alternatively, a meta-analysis of patient survival with sorafenib for HCC recurrence after LT could be helpful to characterize the therapeutic benefit and safety of sorafenib. Here, we review the use of LT for HCC, with particular emphasis on the selection criteria for transplantation in patients with HCC and management of HCC recurrence after LT. PMID:26357625

  5. Longitudinal Analysis of the Intestinal Microbiota in Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Karin; Nagao, Miki; Miyamoto, Kentaro; Oka, Kentaro; Takahashi, Motomichi; Yamamoto, Masaki; Matsumura, Yasufumi; Kaido, Toshimi; Uemoto, Shinji; Ichiyama, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    Background Increasing evidence suggests that the intestinal microbiota plays an important role in liver diseases. However, the dynamics of the intestinal microbiota during liver transplantation (LT) and its potential role in clinical course remain unknown. Methods We prospectively analyzed the intestinal microbiota of 38 patients who underwent LT in Kyoto University Hospital. We characterized the microbial compositions of fecal specimens from LT patients using a metagenomics approach by an Illumina MiSeq platform. We analyzed the diversity of microbiota sequentially from pretransplantation until 2 months after LT and also compared the microbiota during an episode of acute cellular rejection (ACR) and bloodstream infections (BSI) to the microbial composition of time-matched fecal specimens obtained from patients who did not experience ACR or BSI, respectively. Results Three hundred twenty fecal specimens were analyzed. Dynamic changes were observed in the microbial composition of LT recipients during the perioperative period. Over the course of LT, the mean diversity index decreased during the first 3 weeks after LT and gradually increased during our observation period. The loss of intestinal microbiota diversity was associated with high Child-Pugh scores, high model for end-stage liver disease scores, ACR, and BSI. At the family level, Bacteroides, Enterobacteriaceae, Streptococcaceae, and Bifidobacteriaceae were increased whereas Enterococcaceae, Lactobacillaceae, Clostridiaceae, Ruminococcaceae, and Peptostreptococcaceae were decreased in ACR patients. Conclusions The microbiota of LT patients was associated with the severity of liver diseases and the presence of ACR and BSI. These results lay the groundwork for more comprehensive investigations of microbiota characteristics to identify diagnostic markers for transplant health and to guide intervention strategies to improve transplant outcomes.

  6. Management issues in post living donor liver transplant biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Wadhawan, Manav; Kumar, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Biliary complications are common after living donor liver transplant (LDLT) although with advancements in surgical understanding and techniques, the incidence is decreasing. Biliary strictures are more common than leaks. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is the first line modality of treatment of post LDLT biliary strictures with a technical success rate of 75%-80%. Most of ERCP failures are successfully treated by percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) and rendezvous technique. A minority of patients may require surgical correction. ERCP for these strictures is technically more challenging than routine as well post deceased donor strictures. Biliary strictures may increase the morbidity of a liver transplant recipient, but the mortality is similar to those with or without strictures. Post transplant strictures are short segment and soft, requiring only a few session of ERCP before complete dilatation. Long-term outcome of patients with biliary stricture is similar to those without stricture. With the introduction of new generation cholangioscopes, ERCP success rate may increase, obviating the need for PTBD and surgery in these patients. PMID:27057304

  7. New method of hepatocyte transplantation and extracorporeal liver support.

    PubMed Central

    Demetriou, A A; Whiting, J; Levenson, S M; Chowdhury, N R; Schechner, R; Michalski, S; Feldman, D; Chowdhury, J R

    1986-01-01

    A technique has been developed by the authors that allows hepatocyte attachment on collagen-coated microcarriers resulting in prolonged hepatocyte viability and function both in vivo and in vitro. Rat hepatocytes were obtained by portal vein collagenase perfusion. Intraperitoneally transplanted microcarrier-attached normal hepatocytes into congeneic Gunn rats were functioning 3-4 weeks later, as shown by the presence and persistence of conjugated bilirubin in recipient bile, sustained decrease in serum bilirubin, uptake of Tc99m-DESIDA, and morphologic criteria. Intraperitoneal transplantation of normal microcarrier-attached hepatocytes into genetically albumin deficient rats (NAR) resulted in marked increase in plasma albumin levels (6 days without and 21 days with Cyclosporin A immunosuppression). Microcarrier-attached hepatocytes transplanted after 2 weeks of storage at -80 C into congeneic Gunn rats were viable and functional as assessed by criteria outlined above. An extracorporeal liver perfusion system was developed using the microcarrier-attached hepatocytes that was capable of synthesizing and conjugating bilirubin and synthesizing liver-specific proteins. Images FIGS. 5A and B. FIG. 7. FIG. 8. FIG. 9. FIG. 12. PMID:3530153

  8. Liver transplantation for cholangiocarcinoma: Current status and new insights

    PubMed Central

    Sapisochín, Gonzalo; Fernández de Sevilla, Elena; Echeverri, Juan; Charco, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma is a malignant tumor of the biliary system that can be classified into intrahepatic (iCCA), perihiliar (phCCA) and distal. Initial experiences with orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) for patients with iCCA and phCCA had very poor results and this treatment strategy was abandoned. In the last decade, thanks to a strict selection process and a neoadjuvant chemoradiation protocol, the results of OLT for patients with non-resectable phCCA have been shown to be excellent and this strategy has been extended worldwide in selected transplant centers. Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma is a growing disease in most countries and can be diagnosed both in cirrhotic and in non-cirrhotic livers. Even though OLT is contraindicated in most centers, recent investigations analyzing patients that were transplanted with a misdiagnosis of HCC and were found to have an iCCA have shown encouraging results. There is some information suggesting that patients with early stages of the disease could benefit from OLT. In this review we analyze the current state-of-the-art of OLT for cholangiocarcinoma as well as the new insights and future perspectives. PMID:26464755

  9. Successful Portal Vein Stent Placement in a Child with Cavernomatous Replacement of the Portal Vein After Partial Liver Transplantation: The Importance of a Recognizable Portal Vein Remnant.

    PubMed

    Miraglia, Roberto; Maruzzelli, Luigi; Caruso, Settimo; Ricotta, Calogero; Riva, Silvia; Burgio, Gaetano; Spada, Marco; Luca, Angelo

    2015-12-01

    Late portal vein thrombosis with cavernomatous replacement has been reported in 4.5% of pediatric patients who have undergone partial liver transplantation. In such cases, minimally invasive radiological treatments have a high failure rate. We report a successful case of percutaneous recanalization of the portal vein remnant, and subsequent stent placement, in a pediatric patient who underwent left lateral split liver transplantation with cavernomatous replacement of the portal vein.

  10. Comparison of histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate solution (HTK) and University of Wisconsin solution (UW) in adult liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mangus, Richard S; Tector, A Joseph; Agarwal, Avinash; Vianna, Rodrigo; Murdock, Phillip; Fridell, Jonathan A

    2006-02-01

    Histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate solution (HTK) and University of Wisconsin solution (UW) have been shown to have similar outcomes in cadaveric kidney, pancreas, and liver transplantation. Our institution changed from UW to HTK as the primary preservation solution for liver, kidney and pancreas transplantation. This study compares the perioperative and first year outcomes of liver transplantation using UW or HTK. Primary use of HTK began on May 1, 2003. We reviewed the records of all adult liver transplant recipients from July 1, 2002 to December 31, 2004. Recipients were compared based on organ preservation solution (UW n = 204, HTK n = 174). Outcomes included 1-, 6- and 12-month graft and patient survival and 1-, 7-, 14-, and 30-day liver function and serum creatinine. During the entire study period, the two groups were managed similarly in operative technique, immunosuppressive regimens, and donor liver criteria. Over 30 months, 378 adult patients underwent liver transplantation. There were no significant differences between UW and HTK in 1-, 6-, or 12-month graft or patient survival. The HTK group had a higher day 1 median AST, ALT, and total bilirubin, but the two groups were similar thereafter. An anticipated difference in infused volume between UW and HTK was demonstrated. In conclusion, to our knowledge, this is the first reported large case series from North America comparing HTK and UW in liver transplantation with 2- to 12-month follow-up. There were no significant differences between HTK and UW in this population when comparing 1 month graft function and first-year graft and patient survival.

  11. Autoimmune Liver Disease Post-Liver Transplantation: A Summary and Proposed Areas for Future Research.

    PubMed

    Edmunds, Catherine; Ekong, Udeme D

    2016-03-01

    Autoimmune liver diseases (AILD) are rare diseases with a reported prevalence of less than 50 per 100 000 population. As the research landscape and our understanding of AILDs and liver transplantation evolves, there remain areas of unmet needs. One of these areas of unmet needs is prevention of disease recurrence after liver transplantation. Disease recurrence is not an insignificant event because allograft loss with the need for retransplantation can occur. Patients transplanted for AILD are more likely to experience acute rejection compared to those transplanted for non-AILD, and the reason(s) behind this observation is unclear. Tasks for the future include a better understanding of the pathogenesis of AILD, definition of the precise pathogenetic mechanisms of recurrent AILD, and development of strategies that can identify recipients at risk for disease recurrence. Importantly, the role of crosstalk between alloimmune responses and autoimmune responses in AILD is an important area that needs further study.This article reviews the relevant literature of de novo autoimmune hepatitis, recurrent autoimmune hepatitis, recurrent primary sclerosing cholangitis, and recurrent primary biliary cirrhosis in terms of the clinical entity, the scientific advancements, and future scientific goals to enhance our understanding of these diseases.

  12. The management of perioperative nutrition in patients with end stage liver disease undergoing liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi-Kun

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition is found in almost 100% of patients with end stage liver disease (ESLD) awaiting transplantation and malnutrition before transplantation leads to higher rates of post-transplant complications and worse graft survival outcomes. Reasons for protein energy malnutrition include several metabolic alterations such as inadequate intake, malabsorption, and overloaded expenditure. And also, stress from surgery, gastrointestinal reperfusion injury, immunosuppressive therapy and corticosteriods use lead to delayed bowl function recovery and disorder of nutrients absorption. In the pretransplant phase, nutritional goals include optimization of nutritional status and treatment of nutrition-related symptoms induced by hepatic decompensation. During the acute post-transplant phase, adequate nutrition is required to help support metabolic demands, replenish lost stores, prevent infection, arrive at a new immunologic balance, and promote overall recovery. In a word, it is extremely important to identify and correct nutritional deficiencies in this population and provide an adequate nutritional support during all phases of liver transplantation (LT). This study review focuses on prevalence, nutrition support, evaluation, and management of perioperative nutrition disorder in patients with ESLD undergoing LT. PMID:26605281

  13. The management of perioperative nutrition in patients with end stage liver disease undergoing liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi-Kun; Wang, Meng-Long

    2015-10-01

    Malnutrition is found in almost 100% of patients with end stage liver disease (ESLD) awaiting transplantation and malnutrition before transplantation leads to higher rates of post-transplant complications and worse graft survival outcomes. Reasons for protein energy malnutrition include several metabolic alterations such as inadequate intake, malabsorption, and overloaded expenditure. And also, stress from surgery, gastrointestinal reperfusion injury, immunosuppressive therapy and corticosteriods use lead to delayed bowl function recovery and disorder of nutrients absorption. In the pretransplant phase, nutritional goals include optimization of nutritional status and treatment of nutrition-related symptoms induced by hepatic decompensation. During the acute post-transplant phase, adequate nutrition is required to help support metabolic demands, replenish lost stores, prevent infection, arrive at a new immunologic balance, and promote overall recovery. In a word, it is extremely important to identify and correct nutritional deficiencies in this population and provide an adequate nutritional support during all phases of liver transplantation (LT). This study review focuses on prevalence, nutrition support, evaluation, and management of perioperative nutrition disorder in patients with ESLD undergoing LT.

  14. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy as a Bridge to Transplantation and for Recurrent Disease in the Transplanted Liver of a Patient with Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mazloom, Ali; Hezel, Aram F.; Katz, Alan W.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common causes of cancer mortality worldwide. Despite orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT), recurrent HCC is a major cause of morbidity. In this case report, we evaluate the efficacy of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) as a bridge to OLT and for recurrence in the transplanted liver of a patient with HCC. A 52-year-old male with a history of chronic hepatitis C presented with a 1.7-cm liver lesion radiographically consistent with HCC, which was subsequently treated with a course of SBRT to 50 Gy in 5 fractions followed by OLT in 2009. The patient had a 2.2-cm recurrence in the transplanted liver in 2012, which was treated with SBRT to 62.5 Gy in 5 fractions. He tolerated the course of radiotherapy well with no significant radiation-related toxicity and remains in complete remission approximately 1 year after SBRT. SBRT is a safe and effective modality for the treatment of recurrent HCC in the transplanted liver of the same patient initially treated with SBRT as a bridge to OLT. PMID:24575010

  15. Liver transplant for relapsed undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma in a young child.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Michael J; Martin, Laura; Alonso, Maria; Altura, Rachel A

    2009-12-01

    Undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma of the liver is a rare hepatic malignancy of childhood with a historically poor prognosis. Recent improvements in outcomes have been reported in small numbers of cases with the use of combination therapy involving aggressive surgical resection and chemotherapy. Complete surgical resection is frequently difficult to achieve when the location of the tumor is along the margins of the major hepatic vessels (portal vein, hepatic vein, and hepatic artery). Here we report a case of undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma of the liver that recurred along surgical hepatic vein margins in a 9-year-old boy who subsequently underwent orthotopic liver transplantation from a cadaveric donor. The patient has been in continuous clinical remission for the last 5 years.

  16. Living donor liver transplantation for Budd–Chiari syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ara, Cengiz; Akbulut, Sami; Ince, Volkan; Karakas, Serdar; Baskiran, Adil; Yilmaz, Sezai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The aim of the study was to report the detailed surgical techniques of living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) in patients with Budd–Chiari syndrome (BCS). Methods: Demographic and surgical techniques characteristics of 39 patients with BCS who underwent LDLT were retrospectively reviewed. Thirty-two of them had native vena cava inferior (VCI) preservation and 6 had retrohepatic VCI resection with venous continuity established by cryopreserved VCI (n = 4) or aortic graft (n = 2). In 1 patient, the anastomosis was established between the graft hepatic vein (HV) and the suprahepatic VCI. For preservation of the native VCI, immediately before the graft implantation, the thickened anterior, and right/left lateral walls of the recipient VCI were resected caudally and cranially until the intact vein wall was reached, and then an anastomosis was created between the (HV) of the graft reconstructed as a circumferential fence and the reconstructed recipient VCI. For resection of the retrohepatic VCI, the anastomosis was created with the same technique in all 6 patients in whom VCI was reformed by using a vascular graft. Results: Post-LT complications developed in 19 of the patients. Complications related to the biliary anastomosis accounted for 12 of these cases, with 11 treated by PTC and/or ERCP, and 1 by hepaticojejunostomy. Two of the 39 patients developed recurrent BCS and were treated by interventional radiological methods. Thirteen patients died and none were related to the BCS recurrence. Conclusion: Favorable outcomes are achievable with LDLT treatment of patients with BCS, which carries important implications for countries with inadequate cadaveric donor pools. PMID:27787368

  17. Cancer Incidence among Heart, Kidney, and Liver Transplant Recipients in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwai-Fong; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Hsieh, Chung-Bao; Wu, Sheng-Tang; Ke, Hung-Yen; Lin, Yi-Chang; Lin, Feng-Yen; Lee, Wei-Hwa; Tsai, Chien-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Population-based evidence of the relative risk of cancer among heart, kidney, and liver transplant recipients from Asia is lacking. The Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database was used to conduct a population-based cohort study of transplant recipients (n = 5396), comprising 801 heart, 2847 kidney, and 1748 liver transplant recipients between 2001 and 2012. Standardized incidence ratios and Cox regression models were used. Compared with the general population, the risk of cancer increased 3.8-fold after heart transplantation, 4.1-fold after kidney transplantation and 4.6-fold after liver transplantation. Cancer occurrence showed considerable variation according to transplanted organs. The most common cancers in all transplant patients were cancers of the head and neck, liver, bladder, and kidney and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Male recipients had an increased risk of cancers of the head and neck and liver, and female kidney recipients had a significant risk of bladder and kidney cancer. The adjusted hazard ratio for any cancer in all recipients was higher in liver transplant recipients compared with that in heart transplant recipients (hazard ratio = 1.5, P = .04). Cancer occurrence varied considerably and posttransplant cancer screening should be performed routinely according to transplanted organ and sex. PMID:27196400

  18. Embryonic porcine liver as a source for transplantation: advantage of intact liver implants over isolated hepatoblasts in overcoming homeostatic inhibition by the quiescent host liver.

    PubMed

    Katchman, Helena; Tal, Orna; Eventov-Friedman, Smadar; Shezen, Elias; Aronovich, Anna; Tchorsh, Dalit; Cohen, Sivan; Shtabsky, Alexander; Hecht, Gil; Dekel, Benjamin; Freud, Enrique; Reisner, Yair

    2008-05-01

    Cell therapy as an alternative to orthotopic liver transplantation represents a major challenge, since negligible proliferation of isolated hepatocytes occurs after transplantation because of the stringent homeostatic control displayed by the host liver. Thus, different modalities of liver injury as part of the pretransplant conditioning are a prerequisite for this approach. The major objective of the present study was to test whether xenotransplantation of pig fetal liver fragments, in which potential cell-cell and cell-stroma interactions are spared, might afford more robust growth and proliferation compared with isolated pig fetal hepatoblasts. After transplantation into SCID mice, fetal liver tissue fragments exhibited marked growth and proliferation, in the setting of a quiescent host liver, compared with isolated fetal hepatoblasts harvested at the same gestational age (embryonic day 28). The proliferative advantage of fetal pig liver fragments was clearly demonstrated by immunohistochemical and morphometric assays and was observed not only after implantation into the liver but also into extrahepatic sites, such as the spleen and the subrenal capsule. The presence of all types of nonparenchymal liver cells that is crucial for normal liver development and regeneration was demonstrated in the implants. Preservation of the three-dimensional structure in pig fetal liver fragments enables autonomous proliferation of transplanted hepatic cells in the setting of a quiescent host liver, without any requirement for liver injury in the pretransplant conditioning. The marked proliferation and functional maturation exhibited by the pig fetal liver fragments suggests that it could afford a preferable source for transplantation.

  19. Primary biliary cirrhosis in the era of liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Raczyńska, Joanna; Habior, Andrzej; Pączek, Leszek; Foroncewicz, Bartosz; Pawełas, Andrzej; Mucha, Krzysztof

    2014-09-29

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is an autoimmune disease of the liver, characterized by the presence of antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) and progressive immune-mediated destruction of biliary ductules, which lead to cirrhosis. Theories of the PBC etiopathogenesis assume that the disease develops secondarily as an improper immunological reaction to undefined environmental and/or infectious factors in genetically predisposed individuals. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is the only drug recommended to treat PBC; it delays the progression of liver disease, but remains only a symptomatic treatment. In the advanced stage of PBC, the treatment of choice is liver transplantation (LTx). Nowadays, PBC is the third indication for LTx, after viral-related and alcoholic liver cirrhosis. Unfortunately, PBC recurs in 21-37% of patients at 10 years after LTx, and in 43% at 15 years after LTx, with the median time to recurrence of 3-5.5 years. Diagnosis of recurrent PBC (rPBC) is based on the liver histopathology. Although various risk factors of rPBC have been investigated, the cause of the recurrence is not clear. There is no specific treatment of rPBC. Together with immunosuppression after LTx, UDCA remains the treatment of choice. New diagnostic technologies (e.g., genomics, proteomics, cell-based therapy, and clinical study of the rPBC patients) may be helpful in understanding the pathogenesis of PBC and the development of new treatment modalities.

  20. How can we utilize livers from advanced aged donors for liver transplantation for hepatitis C?

    PubMed

    Uemura, Tadahiro; Nikkel, Lucas E; Hollenbeak, Christopher S; Ramprasad, Varun; Schaefer, Eric; Kadry, Zakiyah

    2012-06-01

    Advanced age donors have inferior outcomes of liver transplantation for Hepatitis C (HCV). Aged donors grafts may be transplanted into young or low model for end stage liver disease (MELD) patients in order to offset the effect of donor age. However, it is not well understood how to utilize liver grafts from advanced aged donors for HCV patients. Using the UNOS database, we retrospectively studied 7508 HCV patients who underwent primary liver transplantation. Risk factors for graft failure and graft survival using advanced aged grafts (donor age ≥ 60 years) were analyzed by Cox hazards models, donor risk index (DRI) and organ patient index (OPI). Recipient's age did not affect on graft survival regardless of donor age. Advanced aged grafts had significant inferior survival compared to younger aged grafts regardless of MELD score (P < 0.0001). Risk factors of HCV patients receiving advanced aged grafts included donation after cardiac death (DCD, HR: 1.69) and recent hospitalization (HR: 1.43). Advanced aged grafts showed significant difference in graft survival of HCV patients with stratification of DRI and OPI. In conclusion, there was no offsetting effect by use of advanced aged grafts into younger or low MELD patients. Advanced aged grafts, especially DCD, should be judiciously used for HCV patients with low MELD score.

  1. Occult hepatitis B virus infection in liver transplant patients in a Brazilian referral center

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, T.C.A.; Xavier, M.A.P.; Vidigal, P.V.T.; Amaral, N.S.; Diniz, P.A.; Resende, A.P.; Miranda, D.M.; Faria, A.C.; Lima, A.S.; Faria, L.C.

    2014-01-01

    Estimates of occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection prevalence varies among different studies depending on the prevalence of HBV infection in the study population and on the sensitivity of the assay used to detect HBV DNA. We investigated the prevalence of occult HBV infection in cirrhotic patients undergoing liver transplantation in a Brazilian referral center. Frozen liver samples from 68 adults were analyzed using a nested polymerase chain reaction assay for HBV DNA. The specificity of the amplified HBV sequences was confirmed by direct sequencing of the amplicons. The patient population comprised 49 (72.1%) males and 19 (27.9%) females with a median age of 53 years (range=18-67 years). Occult HBV infection was diagnosed in three (4.4%) patients. The etiologies of the underlying chronic liver disease in these cases were alcohol abuse, HBV infection, and cryptogenic cirrhosis. Two of the patients with cryptic HBV infection also presented hepatocellular carcinoma. Markers of previous HBV infection were available in two patients with occult HBV infection and were negative in both. In conclusion, using a sensitive nested polymerase chain reaction assay to detect HBV DNA in frozen liver tissue, we found a low prevalence of occult HBV infection in cirrhotic patients undergoing liver transplant, probably due to the low prevalence of HBV infection in our population. PMID:25296362

  2. De novo autoimmune hepatitis in liver transplant: State-of-the-art review

    PubMed Central

    Vukotic, Ranka; Vitale, Giovanni; D’Errico-Grigioni, Antonia; Muratori, Luigi; Andreone, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    In the two past decades, a number of communications, case-control studies, and retrospective reports have appeared in the literature with concerns about the development of a complex set of clinical, laboratory and histological characteristics of a liver graft dysfunction that is compatible with autoimmune hepatitis. The de novo prefix was added to distinguish this entity from a pre-transplant primary autoimmune hepatitis, but the globally accepted criteria for the diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis have been adopted in the diagnostic algorithm. Indeed, de novo autoimmune hepatitis is characterized by the typical liver necro-inflammation that is rich in plasma cells, the presence of interface hepatitis and the consequent laboratory findings of elevations in liver enzymes, increases in serum gamma globulin and the appearance of non-organ specific auto-antibodies. Still, the overall features of de novo autoimmune hepatitis appear not to be attributable to a univocal patho-physiological pathway because they can develop in the patients who have undergone liver transplantation due to different etiologies. Specifically, in subjects with hepatitis C virus recurrence, an interferon-containing antiviral treatment has been indicated as a potential inception of immune system derangement. Herein, we attempt to review the currently available knowledge about de novo liver autoimmunity and its clinical management. PMID:26973387

  3. Association Between TT Virus Infection and Cirrhosis in Liver Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, Mohammad Javad; Yaghobi, Ramin; Iravani Saadi, Mahdiyar; Geramizadeh, Bita; Moayedi, Javad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cirrhosis is one of the most severe liver complications, with multiple etiologies. The torque teno virus (TTV), also known as transfusion transmitted virus, which has a high incidence in the world population, is one of the possible increasing risk factors in patients with idiopathic fulminant hepatitis and cryptogenic cirrhosis. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate solitary and co-infection with TTV, in patients with cryptogenic and determined cause of cirrhosis. Patients and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 200 liver transplant patients were consecutively recruited between years 2007 and 2011. Patients were classified, based on recognition of the etiology of cirrhosis to determined (n = 81) and cryptogenic (n = 119) patient groups. The existence of TTV infection was analyzed, using a semi-nested polymerase chain reaction method. The presence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infective markers, including HBV DNA, hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg), hepatitis B core antibody (HBcAb), and hepatitis B e antibody (HBeAb), was evaluated using qualitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay protocols, respectively. Results: The TTV infection was found in 37 of 200 (18.5%) and 53 of 200 (26.5%) plasma and tissue samples of studied liver transplanted patients, respectively. The TTV genomic DNA was found in 32 (26.9%) and 28 (23.5%) of 119 liver tissue and plasma samples of transplanted patients with cryptogenic cirrhosis, respectively. The genomic DNA of TTV was also diagnosed in 21 (25.9%) and nine (11.1%) of the 81 liver tissue and plasma samples of patients with determined cirrhosis, respectively. Significant associations were found between TTV infection with HBV molecular and immunologic infective markers, in liver transplanted patients, with determined and cryptogenic cirrhosis. Conclusions: The diagnosis of the high frequency of solitary TTV and co-infection with HBV, in both liver

  4. Survey of adult liver transplantation techniques (SALT): an international study of current practices in deceased donor liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kluger, Michael D; Memeo, Riccardo; Laurent, Alexis; Tayar, Claude; Cherqui, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Background There has been little focus lately on operative techniques for full graft liver transplantation, and the standard technique is unclear. Methods An internet survey addressing the key technical issues was e-mailed to programme directors. Results Responses were obtained from 93 out of 128 (73%) directors contacted. Programmes performed a median of 60 (8–240) transplants per year. Maximum mean cold time of 13 ± 3 h and maximum median steatosis of 40% (15–90%) were tolerated. The inferior vena cava was preserved by 48% of centres all the time and 43% selectively. European centres used temporary portacaval shunting (42%) four times more often than USA programmes. Venous bypass was always used when not preserving the inferior vena cava by less than 25%, and used selectively by approximately 40% of centres. Portal vein anastomosis with room for expansion (88%), graft hepatic artery to native gastroduodenal/common hepatic artery bifurcation (57%) and bile duct-to-duct (47%) were the favoured techniques. Discussion A standard international operative technique for deceased donor liver transplantation does not exist, although there is a trend towards inferior vena cava preservation. Donor selection criteria were more homogenous across programmes. As suggested by the high response rate, there likely exists interest to investigate technical variations on an international scale. PMID:21929669

  5. Portopulmonary hypertension: Still an appropriate consideration for liver transplantation?

    PubMed

    Verma, Suman; Hand, Fiona; Armstrong, Matthew J; de Vos, Marie; Thorburn, Douglas; Pan, Terry; Klinck, John; Westbrook, Rachel H; Auzinger, Georg; Bathgate, Andrew; Masson, Steven; Holt, Andrew; Houlihan, Diarmaid D; Ferguson, James W

    2016-12-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) in patients with portopulmonary hypertension (PoPH) has historically resulted in unpredictable and often poor outcomes. The United Kingdom experience for the period 1992-2012 is reported in this article. A retrospective analysis of patients, preoperatively fulfilling the PoPH European Respiratory Society Task Force on Pulmonary-Hepatic Vascular Disorders diagnostic criteria was conducted across all UK LT centers. Data collection included comorbidities, use of preoperative and postoperative pharmacotherapy, patient survival, and cause of death. To enable survival stratification, PoPH was classified as mild, moderate, or severe based on mean pulmonary pressure of <35 mm Hg, 35-49 mm Hg, and ≥50 mm Hg, respectively. Of 127 patients reported to have PoPH, just 28 fulfilled the diagnostic criteria (14 mild, 9 moderate, 5 severe). Twenty (71.4%) patients were male with median age and Model for End-Stage Liver Disease of 50 years (range, 23-62 years) and 18 (range, 6-43), respectively. Twelve (42.9%) patients died within 5 years of LT. The majority of deaths (10 of 12; 83%) occurred within the first 6 months after LT, aetiologies of which included right heart failure (n = 3), progressive PoPH (n = 2), and sepsis (n = 2). Of those receiving preoperative pharmacotherapy (n = 8), 5 are currently alive and were classified as mild to moderate PoPH. Both severe PoPH patients optimized preoperatively with pharmacotherapy died within a year of LT. Development of effective vasodilatory therapies in the setting of pulmonary arterial hypertension has led to a dramatic improvement in patient survival. The available data indicate that in this era of pharmacotherapy, PoPH in isolation no longer represents a valid consideration to transplant. Liver Transplantation 22 1637-1642 2016 AASLD.

  6. Anxiety and Stress Levels on Liver Transplantation Candidates.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, H R S; Marques, D M; Lopes, A R F; Ziviani, L C; Magro, J T J; Mente, Ênio D; Castro-E-Silva, O; Galvão, C M; Mendes, K D S

    2016-09-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the anxiety and stress levels of liver transplant candidates during the preoperative period. A cross-sectional, prospective study was conducted on 52 liver transplantation candidates seen at a specialized public hospital outpatient clinic in the interior of the state of São Paulo, Brazil. Data were collected from November 2014 to April 2015 using a self-applicable questionnaire for the assessment of anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, short version) and stress (Perceived Stress Scale), in addition to sociodemographic and clinic characterization. The mean (±SD) anxiety level detected was 23.06 ± 5.51 points, with 1.92% of the subjects showing minimum levels (0 to 12 points), 59.62% a medium level (12 to 24 points), 36.54% a moderate level (24 to 36 points), and 1.92% a severe level (36 to 48 points) of anxiety. The mean level on the stress scale was 12.10 ± 5.62 points, with 7.69% of the subjects showing high stress levels. When individuals with good and poor stress levels were compared, a significant difference was observed between them (P = .0004). The Spearman correlation test showed that the higher the stress, the higher the levels of anxiety (r = 0.4258), P < .0001. The present study contributes to the analysis of the mental health of liver transplantation candidates in view of the need for interventions for the improvement of anxiety and stress levels since the waiting period for the organ generates emotional changes that can affect the quality of life of the patient and the success of this complex therapeutic modality.

  7. Postperfusion Syndrome in Cadaveric Liver Transplantations: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Aydınlı, Bahar; Karadeniz, Ümit; Demir, Aslı; Güçlü, Çiğdem Yıldırım; Kazancı, Dilek; Koçulu, Rabia; Haytural, Candan; Özgök, Ayşegül; Bostancı, Erdal Birol; Zorlu, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the factors that affects the postperfusion syndrome in cadaveric liver transplantations and the effect of the postperfusion syndrome on discharge from the hospital. Methods Patients who underwent cadaveric liver transplantations between 2007 and 2013 were scanned retrospectively. Intraoperative anaesthesia records, intensive care unit follow-up forms and discharge reports were examined from patient files. Overall, 43 patients having complete data were included in the study. The postperfusion syndrome is defined as asystoli or a decrease in mean arterial pressure of more than 30%, which occurred in the first 5 min of reperfusion and continued for 1 min. Patients were divided into two groups: those who had the postperfusion syndrome and those who did not. Results The number of patients who had the postperfusion syndrome was 25 of 43 (58.1%). The MELD score of patients without the postperfusion syndrome was calculated as 16.9±3.2 and that of patients with the postperfusion syndrome was 19.7±3.6. A statistically significant relationship was detected between the postperfusion syndrome occurrence and a high MELD score (p=0.013). The diastolic blood pressure just before reperfusion was statistically lower in the group with the postperfusion syndrome than in the other group (p=0.023, 50±8 vs. 58±11). According to the logistic regression analysis, the MELD score and the decrease in diastolic blood pressure before reperfusion were defined as independent predictive factors. Conclusion According to the study, the ratio for having the postperfusion syndrome was found to be 58.1%. The independent predictor factors affecting the postperfusion syndrome were detected as the MELD score and the decrease in diastolic blood pressure before reperfusion. The postperfusion syndrome during orthotropic liver transplantation is an important issue for anaesthesiologists. The awareness of the related factors with the postperfusion syndrome may help in the development

  8. Donor-derived metastatic melanoma in a liver transplant recipient established by DNA fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Bilal, Muhammad; Eason, James D; Das, Kanak; Sylvestre, Pamela B; Dean, Amanda G; Vanatta, Jason M

    2013-10-01

    Metastatic melanoma is a donor-derived malignancy that has rarely been reported in liver allograft recipients. We present a case of a transmitted donor-derived melanoma to a liver allograft recipient in whom the diagnosis was established by polymerase chain reaction-based DNA fingerprinting. A 52-year-old African-American man underwent a successful orthotropic liver transplant for alcohol-induced cirrhosis. One year after the orthotropic liver transplant, he presented at our institution with diffuse abdominal pain, and a computed tomography scan of the abdomen and chest showed innumerable masses diffusely involving the liver and multiple subcutaneous nodules in the abdominal and chest wall. A liver biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of metastatic melanoma. The origin of melanoma was traced to the donor by DNA fingerprinting of the native liver, the donor liver, and the donor gallbladder. Chemotherapy was initiated with temozolomide (75 mg/m² daily) and thalidomide (50 mg daily), to which he responded within 8 weeks with radiologic improvement in metastatic lesions. Tacrolimus was switched to sirolimus because of renal insufficiency as well as reported effectiveness against melanoma. Our patient survived for 9 months after the diagnosis of metastatic melanoma. He ultimately died of brain metastases. Donor-derived metastatic melanoma is a rare cancer with the highest transmission and mortality rates, which requires better recognition. Prompt diagnosis of donor-derived melanoma is critical and can be achieved reliably with polymerase chain reaction-based DNA analysis. Management options after diagnosis include de-escalation of immunosuppression, with or without urgent organ removal or retransplant. The roles of chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and radiotherapy require further study.

  9. Fatal cross infection by carbapenem resistant Klebsiella in two liver transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Mathers, Amy J.; Cox, Heather L.; Bonatti, Hugo; Kitchel, Brandon; Brassinga, Ann Karen C.; Wispelwey, Brian; Sawyer, Robert G.; Pruett, Timothy L.; Hazen, Kevin C.; Patel, Jean B.; Sifri, Costi D.

    2010-01-01

    Members of the family Enterobacteriaceae including Klebsiella have re-emerged as major pathogens in solid organ transplantation. The recent appearance and dissemination of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in Europe and the northeastern United States represents a major challenge to the treatment of enteric gram-negative bacterial infections in immunocompromised patients; however, few reports have detailed the outcomes of such infections. Here we report two cases of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing Klebsiella infections in orthotopic liver transplant recipients, which were the index case and initial secondary case for an outbreak of KPC-producing Enterobacteriaceae in our institution. In both instances, the pathogens were initially misidentified as being carbapenem sensitive, the infections recurred after cessation of directed therapy, and the patients ultimately succumbed to their infections. PMID:19254325

  10. Serial Liver Stiffness Measurements and Monitoring of Liver-Transplanted Patients in a Real-Life Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Luca; Valente, Giovanna; Piai, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Background Liver transplanted patients need close surveillance for early signs of graft disease. Objectives Transient elastography can safely be repeated over time, offering serial liver stiffness measurement values. Serial stiffness measurements were compared to single baseline stiffness measurements in predicting the appearance of liver-related clinical events and guiding subsequent clinical decisions. Methods One hundred and sixty liver transplanted patients were observed for three years in our real-life practice. Results Liver stiffness measurements were stable in 75% of patients, decreased in 4% of patients, and increased in 21% of patients. The pattern of increased stiffness measurements was associated with both HCV-RNA positive status and the presence of an active biliary complication of liver transplantation and was more predictive of a clinically significant event resulting from any disease of the transplanted liver when compared to a stable pattern or to a single liver stiffness measurement. The procedures that were consequently performed were often diagnostic for unexpected situations, both in HCV-RNA positive and HCV-RNA negative patients. Conclusions The pattern of longitudinally increased liver stiffness measurements efficiently supported clinical decisions for individualized management strategies. Repeated transient elastography in real-life clinical practice appears to have a practical role in monitoring liver transplanted patients. PMID:28123442

  11. Graft versus host anti-Rho(D) following minor Rh-incompatible orthotopic liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lee, J H; Mintz, P D

    1993-11-01

    Hemolysis caused by ABO antibodies after ABO-compatible, nonidentical solid organ transplantation has been previously reported. The passenger B lymphocytes within the donor organ presumably generate an acute, primarily red cell-directed graft vs. host (GVH) response. Graft survival may also be compromised. GVH Rh antibodies have also been described, primarily in renal transplants. Only three cases, two only in abstract form, have been reported thus far describing GVH Rh antibodies in liver transplant patients, to which we add a fourth. A 62-year-old blood group A Rho(D)-positive woman with cirrhosis underwent orthotopic liver transplantation from a group A Rho(D)-negative, previously Rho(D)-sensitized donor and subsequently developed acute, self-limited hemolysis requiring four units of packed red cells. Anti-Rho(D) was identified in both serum and red cell eluate. An antibody detection test, identification, and assessment of the antibody reactivity score from the pretransplant donor specimen may identify patients at risk for hemolysis due to GVH Rh antibodies.

  12. First report of severe parainfluenza virus 4B and rhinovirus C coinfection in a liver transplant recipient treated with immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Siddharth; Luk, Hayes K H; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2014-12-01

    We describe the first reported case of severe pneumonia due to coinfection by parainfluenza virus type 4B and rhinovirus C in a liver transplant recipient. The patient responded promptly to intravenous immunoglobulin and timely infection control measures prevented spreading of the infections. This report highlights respiratory viral coinfections as a possible cause of severe morbidity in transplant recipients and the importance of efficient molecular diagnostic technologies with major impact on clinical practice in a transplant center. It also describes a potential therapeutic strategy for such patients.

  13. Recent advances in understanding and managing liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Francesco Paolo; Ferrarese, Alberto; Zanetto, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) has been established as the most effective treatment modality for end-stage liver disease over the last few decades. Currently, patient and graft survival after LT are excellent, with 1- and 5-year survival of 90% and 80%, respectively. However, the timing of referral to LT is crucial for improving survival benefit and outcome. The current shortage of donors and the increasing demand for LT currently lengthen the waiting time. Thus, waiting list mortality is about 10–15%, according to the geographical area. For this reason, over the last several years, alternatives to deceased donor LT and new options for prioritizing patients on the waiting list have been proposed. PMID:28105300

  14. Yersinia enterocolitica Infection Simulating Lymphoproliferative Disease, after Liver Transplant