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Sample records for lkb1 regulates pancreatic

  1. LKB1 Regulates Pancreatic β Cell Size, Polarity, and Function

    PubMed Central

    Granot, Zvi; Swisa, Avital; Magenheim, Judith; Stolovich-Rain, Miri; Fujimoto, Wakako; Manduchi, Elisabetta; Miki, Takashi; Lennerz, Jochen K.; Stoeckert, Christian J.; Meyuhas, Oded; Seino, Susumu; Permutt, M. Alan; Piwnica-Worms, Helen; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Dor, Yuval

    2009-01-01

    Summary Pancreatic β cells, organized in the islets of Langerhans, sense glucose and secrete appropriate amounts of insulin. We have studied the roles of LKB1, a conserved kinase implicated in the control of cell polarity and energy metabolism, in adult β cells. LKB1-deficient β cells show a dramatic increase in insulin secretion in vivo. Histologically, LKB1-deficient β cells have striking alterations in the localization of the nucleus and cilia relative to blood vessels, suggesting a shift from hepatocyte-like to columnar polarity. Additionally, LKB1 deficiency causes a 65% increase in β cell volume. We show that distinct targets of LKB1 mediate these effects. LKB1 controls β cell size, but not polarity, via the mTOR pathway. Conversely, the precise position of the β cell nucleus, but not cell size, is controlled by the LKB1 target Par1b. Insulin secretion and content are restricted by LKB1, at least in part, via AMPK. These results expose a molecular mechanism, orchestrated by LKB1, for the coordinated maintenance of β cell size, form, and function. PMID:19808022

  2. The tumour suppressor LKB1 regulates myelination through mitochondrial metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Pooya, Shabnam; Liu, Xiaona; Kumar, V.B. Sameer; Anderson, Jane; Imai, Fumiyasu; Zhang, Wujuan; Ciraolo, Georgianne; Ratner, Nancy; Setchell, Kenneth D.R.; Yoshida, Yutaka; Jankowski, Michael P.; Dasgupta, Biplab

    2015-01-01

    A prerequisite to myelination of peripheral axons by Schwann cells (SCs) is SC differentiation, and recent evidence indicates that reprogramming from a glycolytic to oxidative metabolism occurs during cellular differentiation. Whether this reprogramming is essential for SC differentiation, and the genes that regulate this critical metabolic transition are unknown. Here we show that the tumour suppressor Lkb1 is essential for this metabolic transition and myelination of peripheral axons. Hypomyelination in the Lkb1-mutant nerves and muscle atrophy lead to hindlimb dysfunction and peripheral neuropathy. Lkb1-null SCs failed to optimally activate mitochondrial oxidative metabolism during differentiation. This deficit was caused by Lkb1-regulated diminished production of the mitochondrial Krebs cycle substrate citrate, a precursor to cellular lipids. Consequently, myelin lipids were reduced in Lkb1-mutant mice. Restoring citrate partially rescued Lkb1-mutant SC defects. Thus, Lkb1-mediated metabolic shift during SC differentiation increases mitochondrial metabolism and lipogenesis, necessary for normal myelination. PMID:25256100

  3. STRAD pseudokinases regulate axogenesis and LKB1 stability

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuronal polarization is an essential step of morphogenesis and connectivity in the developing brain. The serine/threonine kinase LKB1 is a key regulator of cell polarity, metabolism, tumorigenesis, and is required for axon formation. It is allosterically regulated by two related and evolutionarily conserved pseudokinases, STe20-Related ADapters (STRADs) α and β. The roles of STRADα and STRADβ in the developing nervous system are not fully defined, nor is it known whether they serve distinct functions. Results We find that STRADα is highly spliced and appears to be the primal STRAD paralog. We report that each STRAD is sufficient for axogenesis and promoting cell survival in the developing cortex. We also reveal a reciprocal protein-stabilizing relationship in vivo between LKB1 and STRADα, whereby STRADα specifically maintains LKB1 protein levels via cytoplasmic compartmentalization. Conclusions We demonstrate a novel role for STRADβ in axogenesis and also show for the first time in vivo that STRADα, but not STRADβ, is responsible for LKB1 protein stability. PMID:24594058

  4. The protein kinase LKB1 negatively regulates bone morphogenetic protein receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Raja, Erna; Edlund, Karolina; Kahata, Kaoru; Zieba, Agata; Morén, Anita; Watanabe, Yukihide; Voytyuk, Iryna; Botling, Johan; Söderberg, Ola; Micke, Patrick; Pyrowolakis, George; Heldin, Carl-Henrik; Moustakas, Aristidis

    2016-01-01

    The protein kinase LKB1 regulates cell metabolism and growth and is implicated in intestinal and lung cancer. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling regulates cell differentiation during development and tissue homeostasis. We demonstrate that LKB1 physically interacts with BMP type I receptors and requires Smad7 to promote downregulation of the receptor. Accordingly, LKB1 suppresses BMP-induced osteoblast differentiation and affects BMP signaling in Drosophila wing longitudinal vein morphogenesis. LKB1 protein expression and Smad1 phosphorylation analysis in a cohort of non-small cell lung cancer patients demonstrated a negative correlation predominantly in a subset enriched in adenocarcinomas. Lung cancer patient data analysis indicated strong correlation between LKB1 loss-of-function mutations and high BMP2 expression, and these two events further correlated with expression of a gene subset functionally linked to apoptosis and migration. This new mechanism of BMP receptor regulation by LKB1 has ramifications in physiological organogenesis and disease. PMID:26701726

  5. LKB1 Regulates Cerebellar Development by Controlling Sonic Hedgehog-mediated Granule Cell Precursor Proliferation and Granule Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Men, Yuqin; Zhang, Aizhen; Li, Haixiang; Jin, Yecheng; Sun, Xiaoyang; Li, Huashun; Gao, Jiangang

    2015-01-01

    The Liver Kinase B1 (LKB1) gene plays crucial roles in cell differentiation, proliferation and the establishment of cell polarity. We created LKB1 conditional knockout mice (LKB1Atoh1 CKO) to investigate the function of LKB1 in cerebellar development. The LKB1Atoh1 CKO mice displayed motor dysfunction. In the LKB1Atoh1 CKO cerebellum, the overall structure had a larger volume and morelobules. LKB1 inactivationled to an increased proliferation of granule cell precursors (GCPs), aberrant granule cell migration and overproduction of unipolar brush cells. To investigate the mechanism underlying the abnormal foliation, we examined sonic hedgehog signalling (Shh) by testing its transcriptional mediators, the Gli proteins, which regulate the GCPs proliferation and cerebellar foliation during cerebellar development. The expression levels of Gli genes were significantly increased in the mutant cerebellum. In vitro assays showed that the proliferation of cultured GCPs from mutant cerebellum significantly increased, whereas the proliferation of mutant GCPs significantly decreased in the presence of a Shh inhibitor GDC-0049. Thus, LKB1 deficiency in the LKB1Atoh1 CKO mice enhanced Shh signalling, leading to the excessive GCP proliferation and the formation of extra lobules. We proposed that LKB1 regulates cerebellar development by controlling GCPs proliferation through Shh signalling during cerebellar development. PMID:26549569

  6. Altered LKB1/CREB-regulated transcription co-activator (CRTC) signaling axis promotes esophageal cancer cell migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Gu, Y; Lin, S; Li, J-L; Nakagawa, H; Chen, Z; Jin, B; Tian, L; Ucar, D A; Shen, H; Lu, J; Hochwald, S N; Kaye, F J; Wu, L

    2012-01-26

    LKB1 is a tumor susceptibility gene for the Peutz-Jeghers cancer syndrome and is a target for mutational inactivation in sporadic human malignancies. LKB1 encodes a serine/threonine kinase that has critical roles in cell growth, polarity and metabolism. A novel and important function of LKB1 is its ability to regulate the phosphorylation of CREB-regulated transcription co-activators (CRTCs) whose aberrant activation is linked with oncogenic activities. However, the roles and mechanisms of LKB1 and CRTC in the pathogenesis of esophageal cancer have not been previously investigated. In this study, we observed altered LKB1-CRTC signaling in a subset of human esophageal cancer cell lines and patient samples. LKB1 negatively regulates esophageal cancer cell migration and invasion in vitro. Mechanistically, we determined that CRTC signaling becomes activated because of LKB1 loss, which results in the transcriptional activation of specific downstream targets including LYPD3, a critical mediator for LKB1 loss-of-function. Our data indicate that de-regulated LKB1-CRTC signaling might represent a crucial mechanism for esophageal cancer progression.

  7. cAMP/CREB-regulated LINC00473 marks LKB1-inactivated lung cancer and mediates tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zirong; Lin, Shuibin; Cao, Chunxia; Gimbrone, Nicholas T.; Yang, Rongqiang; Fu, Dongtao A.; Carper, Miranda B.; Haura, Eric B.; Schabath, Matthew B.; Cress, W. Douglas; Kaye, Frederic J.

    2016-01-01

    The LKB1 tumor suppressor gene is frequently mutated and inactivated in non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Loss of LKB1 promotes cancer progression and influences therapeutic responses in preclinical studies; however, specific targeted therapies for lung cancer with LKB1 inactivation are currently unavailable. Here, we have identified a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) signature that is associated with the loss of LKB1 function. We discovered that LINC00473 is consistently the most highly induced gene in LKB1-inactivated human primary NSCLC samples and derived cell lines. Elevated LINC00473 expression correlated with poor prognosis, and sustained LINC00473 expression was required for the growth and survival of LKB1-inactivated NSCLC cells. Mechanistically, LINC00473 was induced by LKB1 inactivation and subsequent cyclic AMP–responsive element–binding protein (CREB)/CREB-regulated transcription coactivator (CRTC) activation. We determined that LINC00473 is a nuclear lncRNA and interacts with NONO, a component of the cAMP signaling pathway, thereby facilitating CRTC/CREB-mediated transcription. Collectively, our study demonstrates that LINC00473 expression potentially serves as a robust biomarker for tumor LKB1 functional status that can be integrated into clinical trials for patient selection and treatment evaluation, and implicates LINC00473 as a therapeutic target for LKB1-inactivated NSCLC. PMID:27140397

  8. cAMP/CREB-regulated LINC00473 marks LKB1-inactivated lung cancer and mediates tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zirong; Li, Jian-Liang; Lin, Shuibin; Cao, Chunxia; Gimbrone, Nicholas T; Yang, Rongqiang; Fu, Dongtao A; Carper, Miranda B; Haura, Eric B; Schabath, Matthew B; Lu, Jianrong; Amelio, Antonio L; Cress, W Douglas; Kaye, Frederic J; Wu, Lizi

    2016-06-01

    The LKB1 tumor suppressor gene is frequently mutated and inactivated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Loss of LKB1 promotes cancer progression and influences therapeutic responses in preclinical studies; however, specific targeted therapies for lung cancer with LKB1 inactivation are currently unavailable. Here, we have identified a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) signature that is associated with the loss of LKB1 function. We discovered that LINC00473 is consistently the most highly induced gene in LKB1-inactivated human primary NSCLC samples and derived cell lines. Elevated LINC00473 expression correlated with poor prognosis, and sustained LINC00473 expression was required for the growth and survival of LKB1-inactivated NSCLC cells. Mechanistically, LINC00473 was induced by LKB1 inactivation and subsequent cyclic AMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB)/CREB-regulated transcription coactivator (CRTC) activation. We determined that LINC00473 is a nuclear lncRNA and interacts with NONO, a component of the cAMP signaling pathway, thereby facilitating CRTC/CREB-mediated transcription. Collectively, our study demonstrates that LINC00473 expression potentially serves as a robust biomarker for tumor LKB1 functional status that can be integrated into clinical trials for patient selection and treatment evaluation, and implicates LINC00473 as a therapeutic target for LKB1-inactivated NSCLC.

  9. Feeding and Fasting Signals Converge on the LKB1-SIK3 Pathway to Regulate Lipid Metabolism in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sekyu; Lim, Dae-Sik; Chung, Jongkyeong

    2015-05-01

    LKB1 plays important roles in governing energy homeostasis by regulating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and other AMPK-related kinases, including the salt-inducible kinases (SIKs). However, the roles and regulation of LKB1 in lipid metabolism are poorly understood. Here we show that Drosophila LKB1 mutants display decreased lipid storage and increased gene expression of brummer, the Drosophila homolog of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL). These phenotypes are consistent with those of SIK3 mutants and are rescued by expression of constitutively active SIK3 in the fat body, suggesting that SIK3 is a key downstream kinase of LKB1. Using genetic and biochemical analyses, we identify HDAC4, a class IIa histone deacetylase, as a lipolytic target of the LKB1-SIK3 pathway. Interestingly, we found that the LKB1-SIK3-HDAC4 signaling axis is modulated by dietary conditions. In short-term fasting, the adipokinetic hormone (AKH) pathway, related to the mammalian glucagon pathway, inhibits the kinase activity of LKB1 as shown by decreased SIK3 Thr196 phosphorylation, and consequently induces HDAC4 nuclear localization and brummer gene expression. However, under prolonged fasting conditions, AKH-independent signaling decreases the activity of the LKB1-SIK3 pathway to induce lipolytic responses. We also identify that the Drosophila insulin-like peptides (DILPs) pathway, related to mammalian insulin pathway, regulates SIK3 activity in feeding conditions independently of increasing LKB1 kinase activity. Overall, these data suggest that fasting stimuli specifically control the kinase activity of LKB1 and establish the LKB1-SIK3 pathway as a converging point between feeding and fasting signals to control lipid homeostasis in Drosophila.

  10. Feeding and Fasting Signals Converge on the LKB1-SIK3 Pathway to Regulate Lipid Metabolism in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sekyu; Lim, Dae-Sik; Chung, Jongkyeong

    2015-01-01

    LKB1 plays important roles in governing energy homeostasis by regulating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and other AMPK-related kinases, including the salt-inducible kinases (SIKs). However, the roles and regulation of LKB1 in lipid metabolism are poorly understood. Here we show that Drosophila LKB1 mutants display decreased lipid storage and increased gene expression of brummer, the Drosophila homolog of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL). These phenotypes are consistent with those of SIK3 mutants and are rescued by expression of constitutively active SIK3 in the fat body, suggesting that SIK3 is a key downstream kinase of LKB1. Using genetic and biochemical analyses, we identify HDAC4, a class IIa histone deacetylase, as a lipolytic target of the LKB1-SIK3 pathway. Interestingly, we found that the LKB1-SIK3-HDAC4 signaling axis is modulated by dietary conditions. In short-term fasting, the adipokinetic hormone (AKH) pathway, related to the mammalian glucagon pathway, inhibits the kinase activity of LKB1 as shown by decreased SIK3 Thr196 phosphorylation, and consequently induces HDAC4 nuclear localization and brummer gene expression. However, under prolonged fasting conditions, AKH-independent signaling decreases the activity of the LKB1-SIK3 pathway to induce lipolytic responses. We also identify that the Drosophila insulin-like peptides (DILPs) pathway, related to mammalian insulin pathway, regulates SIK3 activity in feeding conditions independently of increasing LKB1 kinase activity. Overall, these data suggest that fasting stimuli specifically control the kinase activity of LKB1 and establish the LKB1-SIK3 pathway as a converging point between feeding and fasting signals to control lipid homeostasis in Drosophila. PMID:25996931

  11. Primary cilia regulate mTORC1 activity and cell size through Lkb1.

    PubMed

    Boehlke, Christopher; Kotsis, Fruzsina; Patel, Vishal; Braeg, Simone; Voelker, Henriette; Bredt, Saskia; Beyer, Theresa; Janusch, Heike; Hamann, Christoph; Gödel, Markus; Müller, Klaus; Herbst, Martin; Hornung, Miriam; Doerken, Mara; Köttgen, Michael; Nitschke, Roland; Igarashi, Peter; Walz, Gerd; Kuehn, E Wolfgang

    2010-11-01

    The mTOR pathway is the central regulator of cell size. External signals from growth factors and nutrients converge on the mTORC1 multi-protein complex to modulate downstream targets, but how the different inputs are integrated and translated into specific cellular responses is incompletely understood. Deregulation of the mTOR pathway occurs in polycystic kidney disease (PKD), where cilia (filiform sensory organelles) fail to sense urine flow because of inherited mutations in ciliary proteins. We therefore investigated if cilia have a role in mTOR regulation. Here, we show that ablation of cilia in transgenic mice results in enlarged cells when compared with control animals. In vitro analysis demonstrated that bending of the cilia by flow is required for mTOR downregulation and cell-size control. Surprisingly, regulation of cell size by cilia is independent of flow-induced calcium transients, or Akt. However, the tumour-suppressor protein Lkb1 localises in the cilium, and flow results in increased AMPK phosphorylation at the basal body. Conversely, knockdown of Lkb1 prevents normal cell-size regulation under flow conditions. Our results demonstrate that the cilium regulates mTOR signalling and cell size, and identify the cilium-basal body compartment as a spatially restricted activation site for Lkb1 signalling. PMID:20972424

  12. Stabilization of LKB1 and Akt by neddylation regulates energy metabolism in liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Barbier-Torres, Lucía; Delgado, Teresa C.; García-Rodríguez, Juan L.; Zubiete-Franco, Imanol; Fernández-Ramos, David; Buqué, Xabier; Cano, Ainara; Juan, Virginia Gutiérrez-de; Fernández-Domínguez, Itziar; Lopitz-Otsoa, Fernando; Fernández-Tussy, Pablo; Boix, Loreto; Bruix, Jordi; Villa, Erica; Castro, Azucena; Lu, Shelly C.; Aspichueta, Patricia; Xirodimas, Dimitris; Varela-Rey, Marta; Mato, José M.; Beraza, Naiara; Martínez-Chantar, María L.

    2015-01-01

    The current view of cancer progression highlights that cancer cells must undergo through a post-translational regulation and metabolic reprogramming to progress in an unfriendly environment. In here, the importance of neddylation modification in liver cancer was investigated. We found that hepatic neddylation was specifically enriched in liver cancer patients with bad prognosis. In addition, the treatment with the neddylation inhibitor MLN4924 in Phb1-KO mice, an animal model of hepatocellular carcinoma showing elevated neddylation, reverted the malignant phenotype. Tumor cell death in vivo translating into liver tumor regression was associated with augmented phosphatidylcholine synthesis by the PEMT pathway, known as a liver-specific tumor suppressor, and restored mitochondrial function and TCA cycle flux. Otherwise, in protumoral hepatocytes, neddylation inhibition resulted in metabolic reprogramming rendering a decrease in oxidative phosphorylation and concomitant tumor cell apoptosis. Moreover, Akt and LKB1, hallmarks of proliferative metabolism, were altered in liver cancer being new targets of neddylation. Importantly, we show that neddylation-induced metabolic reprogramming and apoptosis were dependent on LKB1 and Akt stabilization. Overall, our results implicate neddylation/signaling/metabolism, partly mediated by LKB1 and Akt, in the development of liver cancer, paving the way for novel therapeutic approaches targeting neddylation in hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:25650664

  13. YAP promotes malignant progression of Lkb1-deficient lung adenocarcinoma through downstream regulation of survivin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjing; Gao, Yijun; Li, Fuming; Tong, Xinyuan; Ren, Yan; Han, Xiangkun; Yao, Shun; Long, Fei; Yang, Zhongzhou; Fan, Hengyu; Zhang, Lei; Ji, Hongbin

    2015-11-01

    The serine/threonine kinase LKB1 is a well-characterized tumor suppressor that governs diverse cellular processes, including growth, polarity, and metabolism. Somatic-inactivating mutations in LKB1 are observed in about 15% to 30% of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). LKB1 inactivation confers lung adenocarcinomas (ADC) with malignant features that remain refractory to therapeutic intervention. YAP activation has been linked to LKB1 deficiency, but the role of YAP in lung ADC formation and progression is uncertain. In this study, we showed that ectopic expression of YAP in type II alveolar epithelial cells led to hyperplasia in mouse lungs. YAP overexpression in the Kras(G12D) lung cancer mouse model accelerated lung ADC progression. Conversely, YAP deletion dramatically delayed the progression of lung ADC in LKB1-deficient Kras(G12D) mice. Mechanistic studies identified the antiapoptotic oncoprotein survivin as the downstream mediator of YAP responsible for promoting malignant progression of LKB1-deficient lung ADC. Collectively, our findings identify YAP as an important contributor to lung cancer progression, rationalizing YAP inhibition in the context of LKB1 deficiency as a therapeutic strategy to treat lung ADC.

  14. Improved myocardial perfusion in chronic diabetic mice by the up-regulation of pLKB1 and AMPK signaling.

    PubMed

    Kusmic, Claudia; L'abbate, Antonio; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Drummond, George; Barsanti, Cristina; Matteucci, Marco; Cao, Jian; Piccolomini, Francesco; Cheng, Jennifer; Abraham, Nader G

    2010-04-01

    Previous studies related impaired myocardial microcirculation in diabetes to oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. Thus, this study was aimed to determine the effect of up-regulating pAMPK-pAKT signaling on coronary microvascular reactivity in the isolated heart of diabetic mice. We measured coronary resistance in wild-type and streptozotocin (STZ)-treated mice, during perfusion pressure changes. Glucose, insulin, and adiponectin levels in plasma and superoxide formation, NOx levels and heme oxygenase (HO) activity in myocardial tissue were determined. In addition, the expression of HO-1, 3-nitrotyrosine, pLKB1, pAMPK, pAKT, and peNOS proteins in control and diabetic hearts were measured. Coronary response to changes in perfusion pressure diverged from control in a time-dependent manner following STZ administration. The responses observed at 28 weeks of diabetes (the maximum time examined) were mimicked by L-NAME administration to control animals and were associated with a decrease in serum adiponectin and myocardial pLKB1, pAMPK, pAKT, and pGSK-3 expression. Cobalt protoporphyrin treatment to induce HO-1 expression reversed the microvascular reactivity seen in diabetes towards that of controls. Up-regulation of HO-1 was associated with an increase in adiponectin, pLKB1, pAKT, pAMPK, pGSK-3, and peNOS levels and a decrease in myocardial superoxide and 3-nitrotyrosine levels. In the present study we describe the time course of microvascular functional changes during the development of diabetes and the existence of a unique relationship between the levels of serum adiponectin, pLKB1, pAKT, and pAMPK activation in diabetic hearts. The restoration of microvascular function suggests a new therapeutic approach to even advanced cardiac microvascular derangement in diabetes.

  15. LKB1 Regulates Mitochondria-Dependent Presynaptic Calcium Clearance and Neurotransmitter Release Properties at Excitatory Synapses along Cortical Axons.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Seok-Kyu; Sando, Richard; Lewis, Tommy L; Hirabayashi, Yusuke; Maximov, Anton; Polleux, Franck

    2016-07-01

    Individual synapses vary significantly in their neurotransmitter release properties, which underlie complex information processing in neural circuits. Presynaptic Ca2+ homeostasis plays a critical role in specifying neurotransmitter release properties, but the mechanisms regulating synapse-specific Ca2+ homeostasis in the mammalian brain are still poorly understood. Using electrophysiology and genetically encoded Ca2+ sensors targeted to the mitochondrial matrix or to presynaptic boutons of cortical pyramidal neurons, we demonstrate that the presence or absence of mitochondria at presynaptic boutons dictates neurotransmitter release properties through Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter (MCU)-dependent Ca2+ clearance. We demonstrate that the serine/threonine kinase LKB1 regulates MCU expression, mitochondria-dependent Ca2+ clearance, and thereby, presynaptic release properties. Re-establishment of MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake at glutamatergic synapses rescues the altered neurotransmitter release properties characterizing LKB1-null cortical axons. Our results provide novel insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms whereby mitochondria control neurotransmitter release properties in a bouton-specific way through presynaptic Ca2+ clearance. PMID:27429220

  16. LKB1 Regulates Mitochondria-Dependent Presynaptic Calcium Clearance and Neurotransmitter Release Properties at Excitatory Synapses along Cortical Axons

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Seok-Kyu; Sando, Richard; Maximov, Anton; Polleux, Franck

    2016-01-01

    Individual synapses vary significantly in their neurotransmitter release properties, which underlie complex information processing in neural circuits. Presynaptic Ca2+ homeostasis plays a critical role in specifying neurotransmitter release properties, but the mechanisms regulating synapse-specific Ca2+ homeostasis in the mammalian brain are still poorly understood. Using electrophysiology and genetically encoded Ca2+ sensors targeted to the mitochondrial matrix or to presynaptic boutons of cortical pyramidal neurons, we demonstrate that the presence or absence of mitochondria at presynaptic boutons dictates neurotransmitter release properties through Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter (MCU)-dependent Ca2+ clearance. We demonstrate that the serine/threonine kinase LKB1 regulates MCU expression, mitochondria-dependent Ca2+ clearance, and thereby, presynaptic release properties. Re-establishment of MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake at glutamatergic synapses rescues the altered neurotransmitter release properties characterizing LKB1-null cortical axons. Our results provide novel insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms whereby mitochondria control neurotransmitter release properties in a bouton-specific way through presynaptic Ca2+ clearance. PMID:27429220

  17. A novel LKB1 isoform enhances AMPK metabolic activity and displays oncogenic properties.

    PubMed

    Dahmani, R; Just, P-A; Delay, A; Canal, F; Finzi, L; Prip-Buus, C; Lambert, M; Sujobert, P; Buchet-Poyau, K; Miller, E; Cavard, C; Marmier, S; Terris, B; Billaud, M; Perret, C

    2015-04-30

    The LKB1 tumor suppressor gene encodes a master kinase that coordinates the regulation of energetic metabolism and cell polarity. We now report the identification of a novel isoform of LKB1 (named ΔN-LKB1) that is generated through alternative transcription and internal initiation of translation of the LKB1 mRNA. The ΔN-LKB1 protein lacks the N-terminal region and a portion of the kinase domain. Although ΔN-LKB1 is catalytically inactive, it potentiates the stimulating effect of LKB1 on the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) metabolic sensor through a direct interaction with the regulatory autoinhibitory domain of AMPK. In contrast, ΔN-LKB1 negatively interferes with the LKB1 polarizing activity. Finally, combining in vitro and in vivo approaches, we showed that ΔN-LKB1 has an intrinsic oncogenic property. ΔN-LKB1 is expressed solely in the lung cancer cell line, NCI-H460. Silencing of ΔN-LKB1 decreased the survival of NCI-H460 cells and inhibited their tumorigenicity when engrafted in nude mice. In conclusion, we have identified a novel LKB1 isoform that enhances the LKB1-controlled AMPK metabolic activity but inhibits LKB1-induced polarizing activity. Both the LKB1 tumor suppressor gene and the oncogene ΔN-LKB1 are expressed from the same locus and this may account for some of the paradoxical effects of LKB1 during tumorigenesis.

  18. Lkb1 controls brown adipose tissue growth and thermogenesis by regulating the intracellular localization of CRTC3

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Tizhong; Xiong, Yan; Zhang, Pengpeng; Li, Zhiguo; Jiang, Qingyang; Bi, Pengpeng; Yue, Feng; Yang, Gongshe; Wang, Yizhen; Liu, Xiaoqi; Kuang, Shihuan

    2016-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) dissipates energy through Ucp1-mediated uncoupled respiration and its activation may represent a therapeutic strategy to combat obesity. Here we show that Lkb1 controls BAT expansion and UCP1 expression in mice. We generate adipocyte-specific Lkb1 knockout mice and show that, compared with wild-type littermates, these mice exhibit elevated UCP1 expression in BAT and subcutaneous white adipose tissue, have increased BAT mass and higher energy expenditure. Consequently, KO mice have improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, and are more resistant to high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. Deletion of Lkb1 results in a cytoplasm to nuclear translocation of CRTC3 in brown adipocytes, where it recruits C/EBPβ to enhance Ucp1 transcription. In parallel, the absence of Lkb1 also suppresses AMPK activity, leading to activation of the mTOR signalling pathway and subsequent BAT expansion. These data suggest that inhibition of Lkb1 or its downstream signalling in adipocytes could be a novel strategy to increase energy expenditure in the context of obesity, diabetes and other metabolic diseases. PMID:27461402

  19. Protein Kinase Cζ-dependent LKB1 Serine 428 Phosphorylation Increases LKB1 Nucleus Export and Apoptosis in Endothelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ping; Xie, Zhonglin; Wu, Yong; Xu, Jian; Dong, Yunzhou; Zou, Ming-Hui

    2008-01-01

    LKB1 is a serine-threonine protein kinase that, when inhibited, may result in unregulated cell growth and tumor formation. However, how LKB1 is regulated remains poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to define the upstream signaling events responsible for peroxynitrite (ONOO-)-induced LKB1 activation. Exposure of cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells to a low concentration of ONOO- (5 μm) significantly increased the phosphorylation of LKB1 at Ser428 and protein kinase Cζ (PKCζ) at Thr410. These effects were accompanied by increased activity of the lipid phosphatase PTEN, decreased activity and phosphorylation (Ser473) of Akt, and induction of apoptosis. ONOO- enhanced Akt-Ser473 phosphorylation in LKB1-deficient HeLa S3 cells or in HeLa S3 cells transfected with kinase-dead LKB1. Conversely, ONOO- inhibited Akt Ser473 phosphorylation when wild type LKB1 were reintroduced in HeLa S3 cells. Further analysis revealed that PKCζ directly phosphorylated LKB1 at Ser428 in vitro and in intact cells, resulting in increased PTEN phosphorylation at Ser380/Thr382/383. Finally, ONOO- enhanced PKCζ nuclear import and LKB1 nuclear export. We conclude that PKCζ mediates LKB1-dependent Akt inhibition in response to ONOO-, resulting in endothelial apoptosis. PMID:18321849

  20. Targeting LKB1 in cancer – exposing and exploiting vulnerabilities

    PubMed Central

    Momcilovic, M; Shackelford, D B

    2015-01-01

    The LKB1 tumour suppressor is a serine/threonine kinase that functions as master regulator of cell growth, metabolism, survival and polarity. LKB1 is frequently mutated in human cancers and research spanning the last two decades have begun decoding the cellular pathways deregulated following LKB1 inactivation. This work has led to the identification of vulnerabilities present in LKB1-deficient tumour cells. Pre-clinical studies have now identified therapeutic strategies targeting this subset of tumours that promise to benefit this large patient population harbouring LKB1 mutations. Here, we review the current efforts that are underway to translate pre-clinical discovery of therapeutic strategies targeting LKB1 mutant cancers into clinical practice. PMID:26196184

  1. ETC-1002 regulates immune response, leukocyte homing, and adipose tissue inflammation via LKB1-dependent activation of macrophage AMPK

    PubMed Central

    Filippov, Sergey; Pinkosky, Stephen L.; Lister, Richard J.; Pawloski, Catherine; Hanselman, Jeffrey C.; Cramer, Clay T.; Srivastava, Rai Ajit K.; Hurley, Timothy R.; Bradshaw, Cheryl D.; Spahr, Mark A.; Newton, Roger S.

    2013-01-01

    ETC-1002 is an investigational drug currently in Phase 2 development for treatment of dyslipidemia and other cardiometabolic risk factors. In dyslipidemic subjects, ETC-1002 not only reduces plasma LDL cholesterol but also significantly attenuates levels of hsCRP, a clinical biomarker of inflammation. Anti-inflammatory properties of ETC-1002 were further investigated in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and in in vivo models of inflammation. In cells treated with ETC-1002, increased levels of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation coincided with reduced activity of MAP kinases and decreased production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. AMPK phosphorylation and inhibitory effects of ETC-1002 on soluble mediators of inflammation were significantly abrogated by siRNA-mediated silencing of macrophage liver kinase B1 (LKB1), indicating that ETC-1002 activates AMPK and exerts its anti-inflammatory effects via an LKB1-dependent mechanism. In vivo, ETC-1002 suppressed thioglycollate-induced homing of leukocytes into mouse peritoneal cavity. Similarly, in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity, ETC-1002 restored adipose AMPK activity, reduced JNK phosphorylation, and diminished expression of macrophage-specific marker 4F/80. These data were consistent with decreased epididymal fat-pad mass and interleukin (IL)-6 release by inflamed adipose tissue. Thus, ETC-1002 may provide further clinical benefits for patients with cardiometabolic risk factors by reducing systemic inflammation linked to insulin resistance and vascular complications of metabolic syndrome. PMID:23709692

  2. ETC-1002 regulates immune response, leukocyte homing, and adipose tissue inflammation via LKB1-dependent activation of macrophage AMPK.

    PubMed

    Filippov, Sergey; Pinkosky, Stephen L; Lister, Richard J; Pawloski, Catherine; Hanselman, Jeffrey C; Cramer, Clay T; Srivastava, Rai Ajit K; Hurley, Timothy R; Bradshaw, Cheryl D; Spahr, Mark A; Newton, Roger S

    2013-08-01

    ETC-1002 is an investigational drug currently in Phase 2 development for treatment of dyslipidemia and other cardiometabolic risk factors. In dyslipidemic subjects, ETC-1002 not only reduces plasma LDL cholesterol but also significantly attenuates levels of hsCRP, a clinical biomarker of inflammation. Anti-inflammatory properties of ETC-1002 were further investigated in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and in in vivo models of inflammation. In cells treated with ETC-1002, increased levels of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation coincided with reduced activity of MAP kinases and decreased production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. AMPK phosphorylation and inhibitory effects of ETC-1002 on soluble mediators of inflammation were significantly abrogated by siRNA-mediated silencing of macrophage liver kinase B1 (LKB1), indicating that ETC-1002 activates AMPK and exerts its anti-inflammatory effects via an LKB1-dependent mechanism. In vivo, ETC-1002 suppressed thioglycollate-induced homing of leukocytes into mouse peritoneal cavity. Similarly, in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity, ETC-1002 restored adipose AMPK activity, reduced JNK phosphorylation, and diminished expression of macrophage-specific marker 4F/80. These data were consistent with decreased epididymal fat-pad mass and interleukin (IL)-6 release by inflamed adipose tissue. Thus, ETC-1002 may provide further clinical benefits for patients with cardiometabolic risk factors by reducing systemic inflammation linked to insulin resistance and vascular complications of metabolic syndrome.

  3. Loss of Liver Kinase B1 (LKB1) in Beta Cells Enhances Glucose-stimulated Insulin Secretion Despite Profound Mitochondrial Defects*

    PubMed Central

    Swisa, Avital; Granot, Zvi; Tamarina, Natalia; Sayers, Sophie; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Philipson, Louis; Hodson, David J.; Wikstrom, Jakob D.; Rutter, Guy A.; Leibowitz, Gil; Glaser, Benjamin; Dor, Yuval

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressor liver kinase B1 (LKB1) is an important regulator of pancreatic β cell biology. LKB1-dependent phosphorylation of distinct AMPK (adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase) family members determines proper β cell polarity and restricts β cell size, total β cell mass, and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). However, the full spectrum of LKB1 effects and the mechanisms involved in the secretory phenotype remain incompletely understood. We report here that in the absence of LKB1 in β cells, GSIS is dramatically and persistently improved. The enhancement is seen both in vivo and in vitro and cannot be explained by altered cell polarity, increased β cell number, or increased insulin content. Increased secretion does require membrane depolarization and calcium influx but appears to rely mostly on a distal step in the secretion pathway. Surprisingly, enhanced GSIS is seen despite profound defects in mitochondrial structure and function in LKB1-deficient β cells, expected to greatly diminish insulin secretion via the classic triggering pathway. Thus LKB1 is essential for mitochondrial homeostasis in β cells and in parallel is a powerful negative regulator of insulin secretion. This study shows that β cells can be manipulated to enhance GSIS to supra-normal levels even in the face of defective mitochondria and without deterioration over months. PMID:26139601

  4. LKB1 acts as a critical gatekeeper of ovarian primordial follicle pool

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xue-Shan; Schatten, Heide; Fan, Heng-Yu; Wang, Zhen-Bo; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Liver Kinase b1 (LKB1/STK11)is a tumor suppressor responsible for the Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, an autosomal-dominant, cancer-prone disorder in which patients develop neoplasms in several organs, including the oviduct, ovary, and cervix. Besides, the C allele of a SNP in the Lkb1 gene impedes the likelihood of ovulation in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in women treated with metformin, a known LKB1-AMPK activator. It is very likely that LKB1 plays roles in female fertility. To identify the physiological functions of LKB1 in the mouse ovary, we selectively disrupted LKB1 in oocytes by the Cre-LoxP conditional knockout system and found that Lkb1fl/fl; Gdf9-Cre mice were severely subfertile with significantly enlarged ovaries compared to Lkb1fl/fl mice. Interestingly, without Lkb1 expression in oocytes from the primordial follicle stage, the entire primordial follicle pool was activated but failed to mature and ovulate, subsequently causing premature ovarian failure (POF). Further investigation demonstrated that elevated mTOR signaling regulated by an AKT-independent LKB1-AMPK pathway was responsible for the excessive follicle activation and growth. Our findings reveal the role of LKB1 as an indispensable gatekeeper for the primordial follicle pool, offer new functional understanding for the tumor suppressor genes in reproductive organs, and might also provide valuable information for understanding POF and infertility. PMID:26745759

  5. Skp2-dependent ubiquitination and activation of LKB1 is essential for cancer cell survival under energy stress.

    PubMed

    Lee, Szu-Wei; Li, Chien-Feng; Jin, Guoxiang; Cai, Zhen; Han, Fei; Chan, Chia-Hsin; Yang, Wei-Lei; Li, Bin-Kui; Rezaeian, Abdol Hossein; Li, Hong-Yu; Huang, Hsuan-Ying; Lin, Hui-Kuan

    2015-03-19

    LKB1 is activated by forming a heterotrimeric complex with STRAD and MO25. Recent studies suggest that LKB1 has pro-oncogenic functions, besides acting as a tumor suppressor. How the LKB1 activity is maintained and how LKB1 regulates cancer development are largely unclear. Here we show that K63-linked LKB1 polyubiquitination by Skp2-SCF ubiquitin ligase is critical for LKB1 activation by maintaining LKB1-STRAD-MO25 complex integrity. We further demonstrate that oncogenic Ras acts upstream of Skp2 to promote LKB1 polyubiquitination by activating Skp2-SCF ubiquitin ligase. Moreover, Skp2-mediated LKB1 polyubiquitination is required for energy-stress-induced cell survival. We also detected overexpression of Skp2 and LKB1 in late-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and their overexpression predicts poor survival outcomes. Finally, we show that Skp2-mediated LKB1 polyubiquitination is important for HCC tumor growth in vivo. Our study provides new insights into the upstream regulation of LKB1 activation and suggests a potential target, the Ras/Skp2/LKB1 axis, for cancer therapy.

  6. The tumor suppressor gene lkb1 is essential for glucose homeostasis during zebrafish early development.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Xia; Liu, Chao; Fang, Junshun; Ma, Weirui; Zhang, Jian; Cui, Sheng

    2016-07-01

    The liver kinase B1 (LKB1) is encoded by tumor suppressor gene STK11, which is mutated in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome patients. Lkb1 plays indispensable roles in energy homeostasis. However, how Lkb1 regulates energy homeostasis in vivo remains to be fully understood. We found that inactivation of zebrafish Lkb1 upregulates pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 expression and inactivates pyruvate dehydrogenase complex by increasing phosphorylation of pyruvate dehydrogenase. As a result, glycolysis is significantly enhanced as indicated by increased lactate production, which resembles the Warburg effect in cancer cells. Inhibition of Pdk2 in lkb1 mutants with dichloroacetate, a promising anticancer drug, rescued the lactate production to wild-type level, suggesting the lkb1 mutant may be used to screen compounds targeting aerobic glycolysis in cancer therapy. PMID:27264935

  7. Mitochondrial and performance adaptations to exercise training in mice lacking skeletal muscle LKB1.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Colby B; Madsen, Steven R; Hallowell, David M; Goring, Darren M J; Moore, Timothy M; Hardman, Shalene E; Heninger, Megan R; Atwood, Daniel R; Thomson, David M

    2013-10-15

    LKB1 and its downstream targets of the AMP-activated protein kinase family are important regulators of many aspects of skeletal muscle cell function, including control of mitochondrial content and capillarity. LKB1 deficiency in skeletal and cardiac muscle (mLKB1-KO) greatly impairs exercise capacity. However, cardiac dysfunction in that genetic model prevents a clear assessment of the role of skeletal muscle LKB1 in the observed effects. Our purposes here were to determine whether skeletal muscle-specific knockout of LKB1 (skmLKB1-KO) decreases exercise capacity and mitochondrial protein content, impairs accretion of mitochondrial proteins after exercise training, and attenuates improvement in running performance after exercise training. We found that treadmill and voluntary wheel running capacity was reduced in skmLKB1-KO vs. control (CON) mice. Citrate synthase activity, succinate dehydrogenase activity, and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase content were lower in KO vs. CON muscles. Three weeks of treadmill training resulted in significantly increased treadmill running performance in both CON and skmLKB1-KO mice. Citrate synthase activity increased significantly with training in both genotypes, but protein content and activity for components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain increased only in CON mice. Capillarity and VEGF protein was lower in skmLKB1-KO vs. CON muscles, but VEGF increased with training only in skmLKB1-KO. Three hours after an acute bout of muscle contractions, PGC-1α, cytochrome c, and VEGF gene expression all increased in CON but not skmLKB1-KO muscles. Our findings indicate that skeletal muscle LKB1 is required for accretion of some mitochondrial proteins but not for early exercise capacity improvements with exercise training.

  8. LKB1 Destabilizes Microtubules in Myoblasts and Contributes to Myoblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Dole, Neha; Gilberti, Renée M.; Dodge-Kafka, Kimberly; Tirnauer, Jennifer S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Skeletal muscle myoblast differentiation and fusion into multinucleate myotubes is associated with dramatic cytoskeletal changes. We find that microtubules in differentiated myotubes are highly stabilized, but premature microtubule stabilization blocks differentiation. Factors responsible for microtubule destabilization in myoblasts have not been identified. Findings We find that a transient decrease in microtubule stabilization early during myoblast differentiation precedes the ultimate microtubule stabilization seen in differentiated myotubes. We report a role for the serine-threonine kinase LKB1 in both microtubule destabilization and myoblast differentiation. LKB1 overexpression reduced microtubule elongation in a Nocodazole washout assay, and LKB1 RNAi increased it, showing LKB1 destabilizes microtubule assembly in myoblasts. LKB1 levels and activity increased during myoblast differentiation, along with activation of the known LKB1 substrates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and microtubule affinity regulating kinases (MARKs). LKB1 overexpression accelerated differentiation, whereas RNAi impaired it. Conclusions Reduced microtubule stability precedes myoblast differentiation and the associated ultimate microtubule stabilization seen in myotubes. LKB1 plays a positive role in microtubule destabilization in myoblasts and in myoblast differentiation. This work suggests a model by which LKB1-induced microtubule destabilization facilitates the cytoskeletal changes required for differentiation. Transient destabilization of microtubules might be a useful strategy for enhancing and/or synchronizing myoblast differentiation. PMID:22348111

  9. Breaking the epithelial polarity barrier in cancer: the strange case of LKB1/PAR-4

    PubMed Central

    Partanen, Johanna I.; Tervonen, Topi A.; Klefström, Juha

    2013-01-01

    The PAR clan of polarity regulating genes was initially discovered in a genetic screen searching for genes involved in asymmetric cell divisions in the Caenorhabditis elegans embryo. Today, investigations in worms, flies and mammals have established PAR proteins as conserved and fundamental regulators of animal cell polarization in a broad range of biological phenomena requiring cellular asymmetries. The human homologue of invertebrate PAR-4, a serine–threonine kinase LKB1/STK11, has caught attention as a gene behind Peutz–Jeghers polyposis syndrome and as a bona fide tumour suppressor gene commonly mutated in sporadic cancer. LKB1 functions as a master regulator of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and 12 other kinases referred to as the AMPK-related kinases, including four human homologues of PAR-1. The role of LKB1 as part of the energy sensing LKB1-AMPK module has been intensively studied, whereas the polarity function of LKB1, in the context of homoeostasis or cancer, has gained less attention. Here, we focus on the PAR-4 identity of LKB1, discussing the weight of evidence indicating a role for LKB1 in regulation of cell polarity and epithelial integrity across species and highlight recent investigations providing new insight into the old question: does the PAR-4 identity of LKB1 matter in cancer? PMID:24062587

  10. LKB1, the multitasking tumour suppressor kinase.

    PubMed

    Marignani, P A

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the lkb1 gene are found in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS), with loss of heterozygosity or somatic mutations at the lkb1 locus, suggesting the gene product, the serine/threonine kinase LKB1, may function as a tumour suppressor. Patients with PJS are at a greater risk of developing cancers of epithelial tissue origin. It is widely accepted that the presence of hamartomatous polyps in PJS does not in itself lead to the development of malignancy. The signalling mechanisms that lead to these PJS related malignancies are not well understood. However, it is evident from the recent literature that LKB1 is a multitasking kinase, with unlimited potential in orchestrating cell activity. Thus far, LKB1 has been found to play a role in chromatin remodelling, cell cycle arrest, Wnt signalling, cell polarity, and energy metabolism, all of which may require the tumour suppressor function of this kinase and/or its catalytic activity.

  11. Lkb1 deletion promotes ectopic lipid accumulation in muscle progenitor cells and mature muscles.

    PubMed

    Shan, Tizhong; Zhang, Pengpeng; Bi, Pengpeng; Kuang, Shihuan

    2015-05-01

    Excessive intramyocellular triglycerides (muscle lipids) are associated with reduced contractile function, insulin resistance, and Type 2 diabetes, but what governs lipid accumulation in muscle is unclear. Here we report a role of Lkb1 in regulating lipid metabolism in muscle stem cells and their descendent mature muscles. We used Myod(Cre) and Lkb1(flox/flox) mice to specifically delete Lkb1 in myogenic cells including stem and differentiated cells, and examined the lipid accumulation and gene expression of myoblasts cultured from muscle stem cells (satellite cells). Genetic deletion of Lkb1 in myogenic progenitors led to elevated expression of lipogenic genes and ectopic lipid accumulation in proliferating myoblasts. Interestingly, the Lkb1-deficient myoblasts differentiated into adipocyte-like cells upon adipogenic induction. However, these adipocyte-like cells maintained myogenic gene expression with reduced ability to form myotubes efficiently. Activation of AMPK by AICAR prevented ectopic lipid formation in the Lkb1-null myoblasts. Notably, Lkb1-deficient muscles accumulated excessive lipids in vivo in response to high-fat diet feeding. These results demonstrate that Lkb1 acts through AMPK to limit lipid deposition in muscle stem cells and their derivative mature muscles, and point to the possibility of controlling muscle lipid content using AMPK activating drugs.

  12. Loss of the tumor suppressor LKB1 promotes metabolic reprogramming of cancer cells via HIF-1α.

    PubMed

    Faubert, Brandon; Vincent, Emma E; Griss, Takla; Samborska, Bozena; Izreig, Said; Svensson, Robert U; Mamer, Orval A; Avizonis, Daina; Shackelford, David B; Shaw, Reuben J; Jones, Russell G

    2014-02-18

    One of the major metabolic changes associated with cellular transformation is enhanced nutrient utilization, which supports tumor progression by fueling both energy production and providing biosynthetic intermediates for growth. The liver kinase B1 (LKB1) is a serine/threonine kinase and tumor suppressor that couples bioenergetics to cell-growth control through regulation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity; however, the influence of LKB1 on tumor metabolism is not well defined. Here, we show that loss of LKB1 induces a progrowth metabolic program in proliferating cells. Cells lacking LKB1 display increased glucose and glutamine uptake and utilization, which support both cellular ATP levels and increased macromolecular biosynthesis. This LKB1-dependent reprogramming of cell metabolism is dependent on the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), which accumulates under normoxia in LKB1-deficient cells and is antagonized by inhibition of mTOR complex I signaling. Silencing HIF-1α reverses the metabolic advantages conferred by reduced LKB1 signaling and impairs the growth and survival of LKB1-deficient tumor cells under low-nutrient conditions. Together, our data implicate the tumor suppressor LKB1 as a central regulator of tumor metabolism and growth control through the regulation of HIF-1α-dependent metabolic reprogramming.

  13. A role for Drosophila LKB1 in anterior-posterior axis formation and epithelial polarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Sophie G.; St Johnston, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    The PAR-4 and PAR-1 kinases are necessary for the formation of the anterior-posterior (A-P) axis in Caenorhabditis elegans. PAR-1 is also required for A-P axis determination in Drosophila. Here we show that the Drosophila par-4 homologue, lkb1, is required for the early A-P polarity of the oocyte, and for the repolarization of the oocyte cytoskeleton that defines the embryonic A-P axis. LKB1 is phosphorylated by PAR-1 in vitro, and overexpression of LKB1 partially rescues the par-1 phenotype. These two kinases therefore function in a conserved pathway for axis formation in flies and worms. lkb1 mutant clones also disrupt apical-basal epithelial polarity, suggesting a general role in cell polarization. The human homologue, LKB1, is mutated in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome and is regulated by prenylation and by phosphorylation by protein kinase A. We show that protein kinase A phosphorylates Drosophila LKB1 on a conserved site that is important for its activity. Thus, Drosophila and human LKB1 may be functional homologues, suggesting that loss of cell polarity may contribute to tumour formation in individuals with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome.

  14. LKB1/AMPK and PKA control ABCB11 trafficking and polarization in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Homolya, László; Fu, Dong; Sengupta, Prabuddha; Jarnik, Michal; Gillet, Jean-Pierre; Vitale-Cross, Lynn; Gutkind, J Silvio; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Arias, Irwin M

    2014-01-01

    Polarization of hepatocytes is manifested by bile canalicular network formation and activation of LKB1 and AMPK, which control cellular energy metabolism. The bile acid, taurocholate, also regulates development of the canalicular network through activation of AMPK. In the present study, we used collagen sandwich hepatocyte cultures from control and liver-specific LKB1 knockout mice to examine the role of LKB1 in trafficking of ABCB11, the canalicular bile acid transporter. In polarized hepatocytes, ABCB11 traffics from Golgi to the apical plasma membrane and endogenously cycles through the rab 11a-myosin Vb recycling endosomal system. LKB1 knockout mice were jaundiced, lost weight and manifested impaired bile canalicular formation and intracellular trafficking of ABCB11, and died within three weeks. Using live cell imaging, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), particle tracking, and biochemistry, we found that LKB1 activity is required for microtubule-dependent trafficking of ABCB11 to the canalicular membrane. In control hepatocytes, ABCB11 trafficking was accelerated by taurocholate and cAMP; however, in LKB1 knockout hepatocytes, ABCB11 trafficking to the apical membrane was greatly reduced and restored only by cAMP, but not taurocholate. cAMP acted through a PKA-mediated pathway which did not activate AMPK. Our studies establish a regulatory role for LKB1 in ABCB11 trafficking to the canalicular membrane, hepatocyte polarization, and canalicular network formation. PMID:24643070

  15. The LKB1 tumor suppressor differentially affects anchorage independent growth of HPV positive cervical cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, Hildegard I.D.; Munger, Karl

    2013-11-15

    Infection with high-risk human papillomaviruses is causally linked to cervical carcinogenesis. However, most lesions caused by high-risk HPV infections do not progress to cancer. Host cell mutations contribute to malignant progression but the molecular nature of such mutations is unknown. Based on a previous study that reported an association between liver kinase B1 (LKB1) tumor suppressor loss and poor outcome in cervical cancer, we sought to determine the molecular basis for this observation. LKB1-negative cervical and lung cancer cells were reconstituted with wild type or kinase defective LKB1 mutants and we examined the importance of LKB1 catalytic activity in known LKB1-regulated processes including inhibition of cell proliferation and elevated resistance to energy stress. Our studies revealed marked differences in the biological activities of two kinase defective LKB1 mutants in the various cell lines. Thus, our results suggest that LKB1 may be a cell-type specific tumor suppressor. - Highlights: • LKB1 is a tumor suppressor that is linked to Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. • Peutz-Jeghers syndrome patients have a high incidence of cervical cancer. • Cervical cancer is caused by HPV infections. • This study investigates LKB1 tumor suppressor activity in cervical cancer.

  16. LKB1 and lung cancer: more than the usual suspects.

    PubMed

    Shah, Usman; Sharpless, Norman E; Hayes, D Neil

    2008-05-15

    Often, the problem in cancer research is figuring out how a gene or pathway works in regulating cellular transformation. The question of what RAS activates or PTEN inhibits have been classic dilemmas of modern cancer biology. In these cases, biochemical and genetic studies have provided us with a fairly clear picture of the cancer relevant functions of these genes. For LKB1, a more recently identified human tumor suppressor gene, however, the problem is different. This serine-threonine kinase that is conserved from yeast to mammals seems to play a role in many diverse cellular pathways. Therefore, although elegant functional and genetic approaches have established critical roles for LKB1 in the regulation of metabolism, motility, polarity, and the cell cycle, the role(s) responsible for its true tumor suppressor function(s) is unknown. One is reminded of an Agatha Christie murder mystery where nearly every character in the book has reason to be suspected of committing the crime-there are too many suspects for how LKB1 might repress lung cancer.

  17. LKB1 inhibits the proliferation of gastric cancer cells by suppressing the nuclear translocation of Yap and β-catenin.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lian-Gang; Bian, Shi-Bo; Cui, Jian-Xin; Xi, Hong-Qing; Zhang, Ke-Cheng; Qin, Hong-Zhen; Zhu, Xiao-Ming; Chen, Lin

    2016-04-01

    Liver kinase B1 (LKB1) is known to suppress the proliferation, energy metabolism and mesenchymal transition of various cancer cells, and is involved in the regulation of Hippo-Yes-associated protein (Yap) and the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways. However, the role of LKB1 in gastric cancer (GC) was not fully understood. Thus, in the present study, we studied LKB1 and found that protein expression (0.37±0.061 vs. 0.59±0.108, P=0.006) and the protein ratio of p-Yap/Yap (0.179±0.085 vs. 0.8±0.126, P=0.001) were reduced in 54 gastric adenocarcinoma (GAC) tissues compared with the matched adjacent non-cancerous tissues, using western blotting and RT-qPCR assays. LKB1 expression was also observed decreased in 109 GAC tissues compared with 54 adjacent non-cancerous tissues (χ2=4.678, P=0.0306), and negatively correlated with the nuclear expression of Yap (r=-0.6997) and β-catenin (r=-0.3510), using immunohistochemical analysis. In GC patients, LKB1 expression was negatively associated with tumor size, tumor infiltration, lymph node metastasis and the TNM stage. LKB1 expression was determined to be positively correlated with longer overall survival of GC patients using Kaplan-Meier analysis (P=0.001). Subsequently, LKB1 expression in human GAC AGS cells was enhanced with a full‑length LKB1 transfection. In vitro and in vivo proliferation was inhibited in LKB1-overexpressing GC cells compared with the control cells. Yap and β-catenin expression were assessed by western blotting and RT-qPCR, and were found to be increased in the cytoplasm but decreased in the nucleus in LKB1-overexpressing GC cells compared with the control cells. The increase in cytoplasmic β-catenin was reversed by the silencing of LKB1 or Yap with shRNAs in LKB1-overexpressing GC cells. Moreover, Yap and β-catenin mRNA were barely altered by LKB1 overexpression. Thus, we concluded that LKB1 expression was reduced in GAC tissues but that it correlated positively with better prognosis for GC

  18. Enhanced activity of the CREB co-activator Crtc1 in LKB1 null lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Komiya, T; Coxon, A; Park, Y; Chen, W-D; Zajac-Kaye, M; Meltzer, P; Karpova, T; Kaye, F J

    2010-03-18

    Activation of Crtc1 (also known as Mect1/Torc1) by a t(11;19) chromosomal rearrangement underlies the etiology of malignant salivary gland tumors. As LKB1 is a target for mutational inactivation in lung cancer and was recently shown to regulate hepatic Crtc2/CREB transcriptional activity in mice, we now present evidence suggesting disruption of an LKB1/Crtc pathway in cancer. Although Crtc1 is preferentially expressed in adult brain tissues, we observed elevated levels of steady-state Crtc1 in thoracic tumors. In addition, we show that somatic loss of LKB1 is associated with underphosphorylation of endogenous Crtc1, enhanced Crtc1 nuclear localization and enhanced expression of the Crtc prototypic target gene, NR4A2/Nurr1. Inhibition of NR4A2 was associated with growth suppression of LKB1 null tumors, but showed little effect on LKB1-wildtype cells. These data strengthen the role of dysregulated Crtc as a bona fide cancer gene, present a new element to the complex LKB1 tumorigenic axis, and suggest that Crtc genes may be aberrantly activated in a wider range of common adult malignancies.

  19. The Prognostic Value of Decreased LKB1 in Solid Tumors: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jian; Zou, Yong; Chen, Xi; Gao, Ying; Xie, Mingxuan; Lu, Xiaoxiao; Li, Wei; He, Bixiu; He, Shuya; You, Shaojin; Chen, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Background Liver kinase B1 (LKB1) is a protein kinase that regulates the growth, integrity and polarity of mammalian cells. Recent studies have reported the prognostic value of decreased LKB1 expression in different tumors. However, the results of these studies remain controversial. Therefore, this meta-analysis was performed to more accurately estimate the role of decreased LKB1 in the prognostication of human solid tumors. Methods A systematic literature search in the electronic databases PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and CNKI (updated to October 15, 2015) was performed to identify eligible studies. The overall survival (OS), relapse-free survival (RFS), disease-free survival (DFS) and clinicopathological features data were collected from these studies. The hazard ratios (HRs), odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated and pooled with a random-effects models using Stata12.0 software. Results A total of 14 studies covering 1915 patients with solid tumors were included in this meta-analysis. Decreased LKB1 was associated with poorer OS in both the univariate (HR: 1.86, 95%CI: 1.42–2.42, P<0.001) and multivariate (HR: 1.55, 95%CI: 1.09–2.21, P = 0.015) analyses. A subgroup analysis revealed that the associations between decreased LKB1 and poor OS were significant within the Asian region (HR 2.18, 95%CI: 1.66–2.86, P<0.001) and obvious for lung cancer (HR: 2.16, 95%CI: 1.47–3.18, P<0.001). However, the articles that involved analyses of both RFS and DFS numbered only 3, and no statistically significant correlations of decreased LKB1 with RFS or DFS were observed in this study. Additionally, the pooled odds ratios (ORs) indicated that decreased LKB1 was associated with larger tumor size (OR: 1.60, 95%CI: 1.09–2.36, P = 0.017), lymph node metastasis (OR: 2.41, 95%CI: 1.53–3.78, P<0.001) and a higher TNM stage (OR: 3.35, 95%CI: 2.20–5.09, P<0.001). Conclusion These results suggest that decreased LKB1 expression in patients with

  20. A Mouse Model Uncovers LKB1 as an UVB-Induced DNA Damage Sensor Mediating CDKN1A (p21WAF1/CIP1) Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Esteve-Puig, Rosaura; Gil, Rosa; González-Sánchez, Elena; Bech-Serra, Joan Josep; Grueso, Judit; Hernández-Losa, Javier; Moliné, Teresa; Canals, Francesc; Ferrer, Berta; Cortés, Javier; Bastian, Boris; Ramón y Cajal, Santiago; Martín-Caballero, Juan; Flores, Juana Maria; Vivancos, Ana; García-Patos, Vicenç; Recio, Juan Ángel

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from sunlight accounts for 90% of the symptoms of premature skin aging and skin cancer. The tumor suppressor serine-threonine kinase LKB1 is mutated in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome and in a spectrum of epithelial cancers whose etiology suggests a cooperation with environmental insults. Here we analyzed the role of LKB1 in a UV-dependent mouse skin cancer model and show that LKB1 haploinsufficiency is enough to impede UVB-induced DNA damage repair, contributing to tumor development driven by aberrant growth factor signaling. We demonstrate that LKB1 and its downstream kinase NUAK1 bind to CDKN1A. In response to UVB irradiation, LKB1 together with NUAK1 phosphorylates CDKN1A regulating the DNA damage response. Upon UVB treatment, LKB1 or NUAK1 deficiency results in CDKN1A accumulation, impaired DNA repair and resistance to apoptosis. Importantly, analysis of human tumor samples suggests that LKB1 mutational status could be a prognostic risk factor for UV-induced skin cancer. Altogether, our results identify LKB1 as a DNA damage sensor protein regulating skin UV-induced DNA damage response. PMID:25329316

  1. The role of LKB1 in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Cespedes, Montse

    2011-09-01

    In humans, the LKB1 gene is located on the short arm of chromosome 19, which is frequently deleted in lung tumors. Unlike most cancers of sporadic origin, in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) nearly half of the tumors harbor somatic and homozygous inactivating mutations in LKB1. In NSCLC, LKB1 inactivation strongly predominates in adenocarcinomas from smokers and coexists with mutations at other important cancer genes, including KRAS and TP53. Remarkably, LKB1 alterations frequently occur simultaneously with inactivation at another important tumor suppressor gene, BRG1 (also called SMARCA4), which is also located on chromosome 19p. The present review considers the frequency and pattern of LKB1 mutations in lung cancer and the distinct biological pathways in which the LKB1 protein is involved in the development of this type of cancer. Finally, the possible clinical applications in cancer management, especially in lung cancer treatment, associated with the presence of absence of LKB1 are discussed.

  2. LKB1 expression reverses the tumorigenicity of L02 cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Ge; Gao, Qing; Tao, Xiaohong

    2016-08-01

    The tumor-suppressor liver kinase B1 (LKB1), a highly conserved and ubiquitously expressed protein kinase, plays a critical role in tumorigenesis. In the present study, we revealed that human hepatic L02 cells had severely impaired endogenous LKB1 expression as gauged by western blot, northern blot and RT-PCR analyses. Stable ectopic expression of LKB1 in L02 cells resulted in decreased cell growth, hypophosphorylation of Rb, and marked attenuation of colony formation on soft agar. Inoculation of L02 cells into immunocompromised mice resulted in the development of subcutaneous tumors, which could be completely abrogated by ectopic LKB1 expression. The tumors that formed in the mouse model recapitulated the histopathological features of hepatocellular carcinoma under the microscope. Our results jointly suggest that severely compromised endogenous LKB1 expression in the L02 cell line may confer to L02 cells tumor-initiating capacities in vivo and in vitro, and ectopic LKB1 expression antagonizes the tumorigenic properties of L02 cells. Our findings imply that caution may be needed to interpret the results obtained on the widely used human hepatic L02 cell line. The L02 cell line may be a new model to define the cellular mechanisms of liver transformation, and to unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying the growth suppressive effect of LKB1. PMID:27349837

  3. LKB1 expression reverses the tumorigenicity of L02 cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Ge; Gao, Qing; Tao, Xiaohong

    2016-08-01

    The tumor-suppressor liver kinase B1 (LKB1), a highly conserved and ubiquitously expressed protein kinase, plays a critical role in tumorigenesis. In the present study, we revealed that human hepatic L02 cells had severely impaired endogenous LKB1 expression as gauged by western blot, northern blot and RT-PCR analyses. Stable ectopic expression of LKB1 in L02 cells resulted in decreased cell growth, hypophosphorylation of Rb, and marked attenuation of colony formation on soft agar. Inoculation of L02 cells into immunocompromised mice resulted in the development of subcutaneous tumors, which could be completely abrogated by ectopic LKB1 expression. The tumors that formed in the mouse model recapitulated the histopathological features of hepatocellular carcinoma under the microscope. Our results jointly suggest that severely compromised endogenous LKB1 expression in the L02 cell line may confer to L02 cells tumor-initiating capacities in vivo and in vitro, and ectopic LKB1 expression antagonizes the tumorigenic properties of L02 cells. Our findings imply that caution may be needed to interpret the results obtained on the widely used human hepatic L02 cell line. The L02 cell line may be a new model to define the cellular mechanisms of liver transformation, and to unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying the growth suppressive effect of LKB1.

  4. BRG1 and LKB1: tales of two tumor suppressor genes on chromosome 19p and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Nieto, Salvador; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montse

    2009-04-01

    Losses of heterozygosity (LOH) of the short arm of chromosome 19 are frequent in lung cancer, suggesting that one or more tumor suppressor genes are present in this region. The LKB1 gene, also called STK11, is somatically inactivated through point mutations and large deletions in lung tumors, demonstrating that LKB1 is a target of the LOH of this chromosomal arm. Data from several independent groups have provided information about the profiles of lung tumors with LKB1 inactivation and it is generally agreed that this alteration strongly predominates in non-small cell lung cancer, in particular adenocarcinomas, in smokers. The LKB1 protein has serine-threonine kinase activity and is involved in the regulation of the cell energetic checkpoint through the phosphorylation and activation of adenosine monophosphate-dependent kinase (AMPK). LKB1 is also involved in other processes such as cell polarization, probably through substrates other than AMPK. Interestingly, another gene on chromosome 19p, BRG1, encoding a component of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex, has emerged as a tumor suppressor gene that is altered in lung tumors. Similar to LKB1, BRG1 is somatically inactivated by point mutations or large deletions in lung tumors featuring LOH of chromosome 19p. These observations suggest an important role for BRG1 in lung cancer and highlight the need to further our understanding of the function of Brahma/SWI2-related gene 1 (BRG1) in cancer. Finally, simultaneous mutations at LKB1 and BRG1 are common in lung cancer cells, which exemplifies how a single event, LOH of chromosome 19p in this instance, targets two different tumor suppressors.

  5. The nuclear protein Artemis promotes AMPK activation by stabilizing the LKB1-AMPK complex

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, Koji; Uehata, Yasuko; Natsuizaka, Mitsuteru; Kohara, Toshihisa; Darmanin, Stephanie; Asaka, Masahiro; Takeda, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Masanobu

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nuclear protein Artemis physically interacts with AMPK{alpha}2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Artemis co-localizes with AMPK{alpha}2 in the nucleus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Artemis promotes phosphorylation and activation of AMPK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The interaction between AMPK{alpha}2 and LKB1 is stabilized by Artemis. -- Abstract: AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a hetero-trimeric Ser/Thr kinase composed of a catalytic {alpha} subunit and regulatory {beta} and {gamma} subunits; it functions as an energy sensor that controls cellular energy homeostasis. In response to an increased cellular AMP/ATP ratio, AMPK is activated by phosphorylation at Thr172 in the {alpha}-subunit by upstream AMPK kinases (AMPKKs), including tumor suppressor liver kinase B1 (LKB1). To elucidate more precise molecular mechanisms of AMPK activation, we performed yeast two-hybrid screening and isolated the complementary DNA (cDNA) encoding the nuclear protein Artemis/DNA cross-link repair 1C (DCLRE1C) as an AMPK{alpha}2-binding protein. Artemis was found to co-immunoprecipitate with AMPK{alpha}2, and the co-localization of Artemis with AMPK{alpha}2 in the nucleus was confirmed by immunofluorescence staining in U2OS cells. Moreover, over-expression of Artemis enhanced the phosphorylation of AMPK{alpha}2 and the AMPK substrate acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC). Conversely, RNAi-mediated knockdown of Artemis reduced AMPK and ACC phosphorylation. In addition, Artemis markedly increased the physical association between AMPK{alpha}2 and LKB1. Taken together, these results suggest that Artemis functions as a positive regulator of AMPK signaling by stabilizing the LKB1-AMPK complex.

  6. AMP as a low-energy charge signal autonomously initiates assembly of AXIN-AMPK-LKB1 complex for AMPK activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya-Lin; Guo, Huiling; Zhang, Chen-Song; Lin, Shu-Yong; Yin, Zhenyu; Peng, Yongying; Luo, Hui; Shi, Yuzhe; Lian, Guili; Zhang, Cixiong; Li, Mengqi; Ye, Zhiyun; Ye, Jing; Han, Jiahuai; Li, Peng; Wu, Jia-Wei; Lin, Sheng-Cai

    2013-10-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master regulator of metabolic homeostasis by sensing cellular energy status. AMPK is mainly activated via phosphorylation by LKB1 when cellular AMP/ADP levels are increased. However, how AMP/ADP brings about AMPK phosphorylation remains unclear. Here, we show that it is AMP, but not ADP, that drives AXIN to directly tether LKB1 to phosphorylate AMPK. The complex formation of AXIN-AMPK-LKB1 is greatly enhanced in glucose-starved or AICAR-treated cells and in cell-free systems supplemented with exogenous AMP. Depletion of AXIN abrogated starvation-induced AMPK-LKB1 colocalization. Importantly, adenovirus-based knockdown of AXIN in the mouse liver impaired AMPK activation and caused exacerbated fatty liver after starvation, underscoring an essential role of AXIN in AMPK activation. These findings demonstrate an initiating role of AMP and demonstrate that AXIN directly transmits AMP binding of AMPK to its activation by LKB1, uncovering the mechanistic route for AMP to elicit AMPK activation by LKB1.

  7. The Peutz-Jeghers kinase LKB1 suppresses polyp growth from intestinal cells of a proglucagon-expressing lineage in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zac-Varghese, Sagen; Trapp, Stefan; Richards, Paul; Sayers, Sophie; Sun, Gao; Bloom, Stephen R.; Reimann, Frank; Gribble, Fiona M.; Rutter, Guy A.

    2014-01-01

    Liver kinase B1 (LKB1; also known as STK11) is a serine/threonine kinase and tumour suppressor that is mutated in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS), a premalignant syndrome associated with the development of gastrointestinal polyps. Proglucagon-expressing enteroendocrine cells are involved in the control of glucose homeostasis and the regulation of appetite through the secretion of gut hormones such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY). To determine the role of LKB1 in these cells, we bred mice bearing floxed alleles of Lkb1 against animals carrying Cre recombinase under proglucagon promoter control. These mice (GluLKB1KO) were viable and displayed near-normal growth rates and glucose homeostasis. However, they developed large polyps at the gastro-duodenal junction, and displayed premature mortality (death from 120 days of age). Histological analysis of the polyps demonstrated that they had a PJS-like appearance with an arborising smooth-muscle core. Circulating GLP-1 levels were normal in GluLKB1KO mice and the polyps expressed low levels of the peptide, similar to levels in the neighbouring duodenum. Lineage tracing using a Rosa26tdRFP transgene revealed, unexpectedly, that enterocytes within the polyps were derived from non-proglucagon-expressing precursors, whereas connective tissue was largely derived from proglucagon-expressing precursors. Developmental studies in wild-type mice suggested that a subpopulation of proglucagon-expressing cells undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) to become smooth-muscle-like cells. Thus, it is likely that polyps in the GluLKB1KO mice developed from a unique population of smooth-muscle-like cells derived from a proglucagon-expressing precursor. The loss of LKB1 within this subpopulation seems to be sufficient to drive tumorigenesis. PMID:25190708

  8. LKB1 inhibition of NF-κB in B cells prevents T follicular helper cell differentiation and germinal center formation

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Nicole C; Waters, Lynnea R; Fowler, Jessica A; Lin, Mark; Cunningham, Cameron R; Brooks, David G; Rehg, Jerold E; Morse, Herbert C; Teitell, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    T-cell-dependent antigenic stimulation drives the differentiation of B cells into antibody-secreting plasma cells and memory B cells, but how B cells regulate this process is unclear. We show that LKB1 expression in B cells maintains B-cell quiescence and prevents the premature formation of germinal centers (GCs). Lkb1-deficient B cells (BKO) undergo spontaneous B-cell activation and secretion of multiple inflammatory cytokines, which leads to splenomegaly caused by an unexpected expansion of T cells. Within this cytokine response, increased IL-6 production results from heightened activation of NF-κB, which is suppressed by active LKB1. Secreted IL-6 drives T-cell activation and IL-21 production, promoting T follicular helper (TFH) cell differentiation and expansion to support a ∽100-fold increase in steady-state GC B cells. Blockade of IL-6 secretion by BKO B cells inhibits IL-21 expression, a known inducer of TFH-cell differentiation and expansion. Together, these data reveal cell intrinsic and surprising cell extrinsic roles for LKB1 in B cells that control TFH-cell differentiation and GC formation, and place LKB1 as a central regulator of T-cell-dependent humoral immunity. PMID:25916856

  9. LKB1 inhibition of NF-κB in B cells prevents T follicular helper cell differentiation and germinal center formation.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Nicole C; Waters, Lynnea R; Fowler, Jessica A; Lin, Mark; Cunningham, Cameron R; Brooks, David G; Rehg, Jerold E; Morse, Herbert C; Teitell, Michael A

    2015-06-01

    T-cell-dependent antigenic stimulation drives the differentiation of B cells into antibody-secreting plasma cells and memory B cells, but how B cells regulate this process is unclear. We show that LKB1 expression in B cells maintains B-cell quiescence and prevents the premature formation of germinal centers (GCs). Lkb1-deficient B cells (BKO) undergo spontaneous B-cell activation and secretion of multiple inflammatory cytokines, which leads to splenomegaly caused by an unexpected expansion of T cells. Within this cytokine response, increased IL-6 production results from heightened activation of NF-κB, which is suppressed by active LKB1. Secreted IL-6 drives T-cell activation and IL-21 production, promoting T follicular helper (TFH ) cell differentiation and expansion to support a ~100-fold increase in steady-state GC B cells. Blockade of IL-6 secretion by BKO B cells inhibits IL-21 expression, a known inducer of TFH -cell differentiation and expansion. Together, these data reveal cell intrinsic and surprising cell extrinsic roles for LKB1 in B cells that control TFH -cell differentiation and GC formation, and place LKB1 as a central regulator of T-cell-dependent humoral immunity. PMID:25916856

  10. Normal hypertrophy accompanied by phosphoryation and activation of AMP-activated protein kinase α1 following overload in LKB1 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    McGee, Sean L; Mustard, Kirsty J; Hardie, D Grahame; Baar, Keith

    2008-01-01

    The activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is hypothesized to underlie the fact that muscle growth following resistance exercise is decreased by concurrent endurance exercise. To directly test this hypothesis, the capacity for muscle growth was determined in mice lacking the primary upstream kinase for AMPK in skeletal muscle, LKB1. Following either 1 or 4 weeks of overload, there was no difference in muscle growth between the wild type (wt) and LKB1−/− mice (1 week: wt, 38.8 ± 7.75%; LKB1−/−, 27.8 ± 12.98%; 4 week: wt, 75.8 ± 15.2%; LKB1−/−, 85.0 ± 22.6%). In spite of the fact that the LKB1 had been knocked out in skeletal muscle, the phosphorylation and activity of the α1 isoform of AMPK were markedly increased in both the wt and the LKB1−/− mice. To identify the upstream kinase(s) responsible, we studied potential upstream kinases other than LKB1. The activity of both Ca2+–calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase α(CaMKKα) (5.05 ± 0.86-fold) and CaMKKβ (10.1 ± 2.59-fold) increased in the overloaded muscles, and this correlated with their increased expression. Phosphorylation of TAK-1 also increased 10-fold following overload in both the wt and LKB1 mice. Even though the α1 isoform of AMPK was activated by overload, there were no increases in expression of mitochondrial proteins or GLUT4, indicating that the α1 isoform is not involved in these metabolic adaptations. The phosphorylation of TSC2, an upstream regulator of the TORC1 pathway, at the AMPK site (Ser1345) was increased in response to overload, and this was not affected by LKB1 deficiency. Taken together, these data suggest that the α1 isoform of AMPK is preferentially activated in skeletal muscle following overload in the absence of metabolic adaptations, suggesting that this isoform might be important in the regulation of growth but not metabolism. PMID:18202101

  11. Low LKB1 Expression Results in Unfavorable Prognosis in Prostate Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jianlei; Sun, Peng; Sun, Beibei; Wang, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Background The present study aimed to compare the expression of liver kinase B1 (LKB1) in prostate cancer (PCa) tissues and the paired adjacent tissues, then to evaluate the statistical relationship between LKB1 expression and prognosis of PCa patients. Material/Methods The relative expression of LKB1 at mRNA level was detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The expression of LKB1 at protein level was measured by immunohistochemistry (IHC) method. The relationship between LKB1 expression and clinicopathologic characteristics was estimated by chi-square test. Kaplan-Meier method was used to analyze the overall survival of PCa patients with different LKB1 expression. Cox regression analysis was performed to estimate the significance of LKB1 expression and clinicopathologic characteristics in the prognosis of PCa patients. Results The relative expression of LKB1 at mRNA level was significantly lower in PCa tissues than in the normal tissues (P<0.001). The LKB1 expression was proved to be affected by clinical stage (P=0.019) and PSA concentration (P=0.031) of PCa patients. Moreover, patients with negative LKB1 expression had shorter survival than those with positive expression. Cox regression analysis confirmed that LKB1 could be regarded as a prognostic biomarker for PCa patients (P=0.001, HR=3.981, 95% CI=1.698–9.336). Conclusions The expression of LKB1 was lower in PCa tissues and might be a predictor for the prognosis of PCa patients. PMID:26616116

  12. Clinical Relevance of Liver Kinase B1(LKB1) Protein and Gene Expression in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, I-Chun; Chang, Yuan-Ching; Lu, Yen-Shen; Chung, Kuei-Pin; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Lu, Tzu-Pin; Kuo, Wen-Hung; Wang, Ming-Yang; Kuo, Kuan-Ting; Wu, Pei-Fang; Hsueh, Tsu-Hsin; Shen, Chen-Yang; Lin, Ching-Hung; Cheng, Ann-Lii

    2016-01-01

    Liver kinase B1 (LKB1) is a tumor suppressor, and its loss might lead to activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and tumorigenesis. This study aimed to determine the clinical relevance of LKB1 gene and protein expression in breast cancer patients. LKB1 protein expression was evaluated using immunohistochemistry in tumors from early breast cancer patients in two Taiwanese medical centers. Data on LKB1 gene expression were obtained from the Molecular Taxonomy of Breast Cancer International Consortium (METABRIC) data set. The correlations between LKB1 expression, clinicopathologic factors, and patient outcome were analyzed. LKB1 expression was significantly associated with estrogen receptor (ER) expression in 2 of the 4 cohorts, but not with other clinicopathologic factors. LKB1 expression was not a predictor for relapse-free survival, overall survival (OS), or breast cancer-specific survival. In a subgroup analysis of the two Taiwanese cohorts, high LKB1 protein expression was predictive of high OS in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer patients (P = 0.013). Our study results indicate that LKB1 expression is not prognostic in the whole population of breast cancer patients, but it is a potential predictor of OS in the subset of HER2-positive patients PMID:26877155

  13. Cadmium induces autophagy through ROS-dependent activation of the LKB1-AMPK signaling in skin epidermal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Young-Ok; Wang Xin; Hitron, John Andrew; Zhang Zhuo; Cheng Senping; Budhraja, Amit; Ding Songze; Lee, Jeong-Chae; Shi Xianglin

    2011-09-15

    Cadmium is a toxic heavy metal which is environmentally and occupationally relevant. The mechanisms underlying cadmium-induced autophagy are not yet completely understood. The present study shows that cadmium induces autophagy, as demonstrated by the increase of LC3-II formation and the GFP-LC3 puncta cells. The induction of autophagosomes was directly visualized by electron microscopy in cadmium-exposed skin epidermal cells. Blockage of LKB1 or AMPK by siRNA transfection suppressed cadmium-induced autophagy. Cadmium-induced autophagy was inhibited in dominant-negative AMPK-transfected cells, whereas it was accelerated in cells transfected with the constitutively active form of AMPK. mTOR signaling, a negative regulator of autophagy, was downregulated in cadmium-exposed cells. In addition, cadmium generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) at relatively low levels, and caused poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP) activation and ATP depletion. Inhibition of PARP by pharmacological inhibitors or its siRNA transfection suppressed ATP reduction and autophagy in cadmium-exposed cells. Furthermore, cadmium-induced autophagy signaling was attenuated by either exogenous addition of catalase and superoxide dismutase, or by overexpression of these enzymes. Consequently, these results suggest that cadmium-mediated ROS generation causes PARP activation and energy depletion, and eventually induces autophagy through the activation of LKB1-AMPK signaling and the down-regulation of mTOR in skin epidermal cells. - Highlights: > Cadmium, a toxic heavy metal, induces autophagic cell death through ROS-dependent activation of the LKB1-AMPK signaling. > Cadmium generates intracellular ROS at low levels and this leads to severe DNA damage and PARP activation, resulting in ATP depletion, which are the upstream events of LKB1-AMPK-mediated autophagy. > This novel finding may contribute to further understanding of cadmium-mediated diseases.

  14. Ursolic Acid Inhibits Adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 Adipocytes through LKB1/AMPK Pathway

    PubMed Central

    He, Yonghan; Li, Ying; Zhao, Tiantian; Wang, Yanwen; Sun, Changhao

    2013-01-01

    Background Ursolic acid (UA) is a triterpenoid compound with multiple biological functions. This compound has recently been reported to possess an anti-obesity effect; however, the mechanisms are less understood. Objective As adipogenesis plays a critical role in obesity, the present study was conducted to investigate the effect of UA on adipogenesis and mechanisms of action in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Methods and Results The 3T3-L1 preadipocytes were induced to differentiate in the presence or absence of UA for 6 days. The cells were determined for proliferation, differentiation, fat accumulation as well as the protein expressions of molecular targets that regulate or are involved in fatty acid synthesis and oxidation. The results demonstrated that ursolic acid at concentrations ranging from 2.5 µM to 10 µM dose-dependently attenuated adipogenesis, accompanied by reduced protein expression of CCAAT element binding protein β (C/EBPβ), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), CCAAT element binding protein α (C/EBPα) and sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c), respectively. Ursolic acid increased the phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and protein expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1), but decreased protein expression of fatty acid synthase (FAS) and fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4). Ursolic acid increased the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and protein expression of (silent mating type information regulation 2, homolog) 1 (Sirt1). Further studies demonstrated that the anti-adipogenic effect of UA was reversed by the AMPK siRNA, but not by the Sirt1 inhibitor nicotinamide. Liver kinase B1 (LKB1), the upstream kinase of AMPK, was upregulated by UA. When LKB1 was silenced with siRNA or the inhibitor radicicol, the effect of UA on AMPK activation was diminished. Conclusions Ursolic acid inhibited 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation and adipogenesis through the LKB1/AMPK pathway

  15. MicroRNA-17 promotes normal ovarian cancer cells to cancer stem cells development via suppression of the LKB1-p53-p21/WAF1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Te; Qin, Wenxing; Hou, Lengchen; Huang, Yongyi

    2015-03-01

    The mechanism underlying the development of human ovarian cancer is poorly understood. The liver kinase protein, LKB1, is hypothesized to play a pivotal role in tumor cell proliferation and invasion capacity through regulation of p53 and p21/WAF1 expression. Previous studies suggest LKB1 may, in turn, be regulated by microRNA-17. Here, we examined the role of miR-17 in the expression of LKB1 and the downstream effects on proliferation and invasion capacity of normal ovarian cancer cells (OCCs) and ovarian stem cells. In this study, both the mRNA and protein expression levels of LKB1, p53, and p21 decreased in OCCs following transfection with a miR-17 expression plasmid. MiR-17 expression affected cell cycle regulation and stimulated the proliferation and invasion capacity of OCCs in vitro. ChIP assays indicated that the binding efficiency of p53 to the p21/WAF1 gene promoter was much lower in miR-17 transfected OCCs than in OCCs transfected with a mutated miR-17. Co-immunoprecipitation and western blotting showed significantly lower levels of p53 and p53 Ser15-pho in the miR-17 transfected OCCs as compared to the mutant miR-17 transfected OCCs. Xenograft experiments confirmed that suppression of tumor growth in vivo occurred in the absence of functional miR-17. These findings suggest that mature miR-17 expression may have an important role in the pathogenesis of human ovarian tumors through its interference with the LKB1-p53-p21/WAF1 pathway expression by epigenetic modification. These findings are of potential importance in the identification of novel therapeutic targets in human ovarian cancer.

  16. LKB1 loss promotes endometrial cancer progression via CCL2-dependent macrophage recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Christopher G.; Nakada, Yuji; Saatcioglu, Hatice D.; Aloisio, Gina M.; Cuevas, Ileana; Zhang, Song; Miller, David S.; Lea, Jayanthi S.; Wong, Kwok-Kin; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Amelio, Antonio L.; Brekken, Rolf A.; Castrillon, Diego H.

    2015-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic malignancy and the fourth most common malignancy in women. For most patients in whom the disease is confined to the uterus, treatment results in successful remission; however, there are no curative treatments for tumors that have progressed beyond the uterus. The serine/threonine kinase LKB1 has been identified as a potent suppressor of uterine cancer, but the biological modes of action of LKB1 in this context remain incompletely understood. Here, we have shown that LKB1 suppresses tumor progression by altering gene expression in the tumor microenvironment. We determined that LKB1 inactivation results in abnormal, cell-autonomous production of the inflammatory cytokine chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) within tumors, which leads to increased recruitment of macrophages with prominent tumor-promoting activities. Inactivation of Ccl2 in an Lkb1-driven mouse model of endometrial cancer slowed tumor progression and increased survival. In human primary endometrial cancers, loss of LKB1 protein was strongly associated with increased CCL2 expression by tumor cells as well as increased macrophage density in the tumor microenvironment. These data demonstrate that CCL2 is a potent effector of LKB1 loss in endometrial cancer, creating potential avenues for therapeutic opportunities. PMID:26413869

  17. Genetic Screening and Analysis of LKB1 Gene in Chinese Patients with Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chunyan; Zhang, Xiaomei; Wang, Deqiang; Wang, Fangyu; Pan, Jian; Wang, Zhenkai; Liu, Chang; Wu, Lin; Lu, Heng; Li, Nan; Wei, Juan; Shi, Hui; Wan, Haijun; Zhu, Ming; Chen, Senqing; Zhou, Yun; Zhou, Xin; Yang, Liu; Liu, Jiong

    2016-01-01

    Background Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is an autosomal dominant genetic disease. It severely decreases patient quality of life and leads elevated cancer risk. Germline mutation of LKB1 is the leading cause of familial PJS. Material/Methods To characterize the germline mutation of LKB1 gene in Chinese familial and sporadic PJS patients, 14 PJS families, 5 sporadic PJS patients, and 250 healthy adults were collected and genomic DNAs of peripheral blood were extracted. Mutation screenings of LKB1 were performed using MLPA (multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification), PCR, direct sequencing, and PCR-DHPLC (denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography). Results A total of 12 kinds of germline mutations were found in 9 familial PJS patients, most of which were point mutations (7/12); 4 large deletions of LKB1 were also observed. Of the 12 mutations, 7 were pathogenic (2 were de novo), 4 were just polymorphisms, and 1 was indefinitely pathogenic. No pathogenic mutation in exons of the LKB1 gene was detected in the 5 sporadic PJS patients. The mutation detection rate for the LKB1 gene was 85.7% in our Chinese familial PJS and 63.2% in all Chinese PJS patients. Eight familial PJS patients were identified with pathogenic germline mutations in 14 unrelated families (57.1%). Further methylation detection and analysis showed promoter methylation in carcinomatous polyps. Conclusions LKB1 gene germline mutation with pathogenic effect is a common cause of familial PJS in Chinese patients; however, it is not the only molecular pathogen of PJS. Methylation in the LKB1 gene promoter region may cause carcinomatous change in intestinal polyps. PMID:27721366

  18. Methylisoindigo preferentially kills cancer stem cells by interfering cell metabolism via inhibition of LKB1 and activation of AMPK in PDACs.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xinlai; Kim, Jee Young; Ghafoory, Shahrouz; Duvaci, Tijen; Rafiee, Roya; Theobald, Jannick; Alborzinia, Hamed; Holenya, Pavlo; Fredebohm, Johannes; Merz, Karl-Heinz; Mehrabi, Arianeb; Hafezi, Mohammadreza; Saffari, Arash; Eisenbrand, Gerhard; Hoheisel, Jörg D; Wölfl, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) clinically has a very poor prognosis. No small molecule is available to reliably achieve cures. Meisoindigo is chemically related to the natural product indirubin and showed substantial efficiency in clinical chemotherapy for CML in China. However, its effect on PDAC is still unknown. Our results showed strong anti-proliferation effect of meisoindigo on gemcitabine-resistant PDACs. Using a recently established primary PDAC cell line, called Jopaca-1 with a larger CSCs population as model, we observed a reduction of CD133+ and ESA+/CD44+/CD24+ populations upon treatment and concomitantly a decreased expression of CSC-associated genes, and reduced cellular mobility and sphere formation. Investigating basic cellular metabolic responses, we detected lower oxygen consumption and glucose uptake, while intracellular ROS levels increased. This was effectively neutralized by the addition of antioxidants, indicating an essential role of the cellular redox balance. Further analysis on energy metabolism related signaling revealed that meisoindigo inhibited LKB1, but activated AMPK. Both of them were involved in cellular apoptosis. Additional in situ hybridization in tissue sections of PDAC patients reproducibly demonstrated co-expression and -localization of LKB1 and CD133 in malignant areas. Finally, we detected that CD133+/CD44+ were more vulnerable to meisoindigo, which could be mimicked by LKB1 siRNAs. Our results provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, that LKB1 sustains the CSC population in PDACs and demonstrate a clear benefit of meisoindigo in treatment of gemcitabine-resistant cells. This novel mechanism may provide a promising new treatment option for PDAC. PMID:26887594

  19. Underexpression of LKB1 tumor suppressor is associated with enhanced Wnt signaling and malignant characteristics of human intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinghan; Zhang, Keqiang; Wang, Jinhui; Wu, Xiwei; Liu, Xiyong; Li, Bin; Zhu, Yan; Yu, Yong; Cheng, Qingbao; Hu, Zhenli; Guo, Chao; Hu, Shuya; Mu, Bing; Tsai, Chun-Hao; Li, Jie; Smith, Lynne; Yang, Lu; Liu, Qi; Chu, Peiguo; Chang, Vincent; Zhang, Baihe; Wu, Mengchao; Jiang, Xiaoqing; Yen, Yun

    2015-08-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) is a rare and highly aggressive malignancy. In this study, we identified the presence of gene deletion and missense mutation leading to inactivation or underexpression of liver kinase B1 (LKB1) tumor suppressor and excluded the involvement of LKB1 gene hypermethylation in ICC tissues. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that LKB1 was underexpressed in a portion of 326 ICC tissues compared to their adjacent normal tissues. By statistical analysis underexpression of LKB1 in ICC tissues significantly correlated with poor survival and malignant disease characteristics in ICC patients. Moreover, we showed that knockdown of LKB1 significantly enhanced growth, migration, and invasion of three LKB1-competent ICC cell lines. Global transcriptional profiling analysis identified multiple malignancy-promoting genes, such as HIF-1α, CD24, Talin1, Vinculin, Wnt5, and signaling pathways including Hedgehog, Wnt/β-catenin, and cell adhesion as novel targets of LKB1 underexpression in ICC cells. Furthermore, knockdown of LKB1 gene expression dramatically enhanced Wnt/β-catenin signaling in ICC cells, while an inverse correlation between LKB1 and nuclear β-catenin was observed in ICC tissues. Our findings suggest a novel mechanism for ICC carcinogenesis in which LKB1 underexpression enhances multiple signaling pathways including Wnt/β-catenin to promote disease progression.

  20. Pancreatic cancer modeling using retrograde viral vector delivery and in vivo CRISPR/Cas9-mediated somatic genome editing

    PubMed Central

    Chiou, Shin-Heng; Winters, Ian P.; Wang, Jing; Naranjo, Santiago; Dudgeon, Crissy; Tamburini, Fiona B.; Brady, Jennifer J.; Yang, Dian; Grüner, Barbara M.; Chuang, Chen-Hua; Caswell, Deborah R.; Zeng, Hong; Chu, Pauline; Kim, Grace E.; Carpizo, Darren R.; Kim, Seung K.; Winslow, Monte M.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a genomically diverse, prevalent, and almost invariably fatal malignancy. Although conventional genetically engineered mouse models of human PDAC have been instrumental in understanding pancreatic cancer development, these models are much too labor-intensive, expensive, and slow to perform the extensive molecular analyses needed to adequately understand this disease. Here we demonstrate that retrograde pancreatic ductal injection of either adenoviral-Cre or lentiviral-Cre vectors allows titratable initiation of pancreatic neoplasias that progress into invasive and metastatic PDAC. To enable in vivo CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene inactivation in the pancreas, we generated a Cre-regulated Cas9 allele and lentiviral vectors that express Cre and a single-guide RNA. CRISPR-mediated targeting of Lkb1 in combination with oncogenic Kras expression led to selection for inactivating genomic alterations, absence of Lkb1 protein, and rapid tumor growth that phenocopied Cre-mediated genetic deletion of Lkb1. This method will transform our ability to rapidly interrogate gene function during the development of this recalcitrant cancer. PMID:26178787

  1. Pancreatic cancer modeling using retrograde viral vector delivery and in vivo CRISPR/Cas9-mediated somatic genome editing.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Shin-Heng; Winters, Ian P; Wang, Jing; Naranjo, Santiago; Dudgeon, Crissy; Tamburini, Fiona B; Brady, Jennifer J; Yang, Dian; Grüner, Barbara M; Chuang, Chen-Hua; Caswell, Deborah R; Zeng, Hong; Chu, Pauline; Kim, Grace E; Carpizo, Darren R; Kim, Seung K; Winslow, Monte M

    2015-07-15

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a genomically diverse, prevalent, and almost invariably fatal malignancy. Although conventional genetically engineered mouse models of human PDAC have been instrumental in understanding pancreatic cancer development, these models are much too labor-intensive, expensive, and slow to perform the extensive molecular analyses needed to adequately understand this disease. Here we demonstrate that retrograde pancreatic ductal injection of either adenoviral-Cre or lentiviral-Cre vectors allows titratable initiation of pancreatic neoplasias that progress into invasive and metastatic PDAC. To enable in vivo CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene inactivation in the pancreas, we generated a Cre-regulated Cas9 allele and lentiviral vectors that express Cre and a single-guide RNA. CRISPR-mediated targeting of Lkb1 in combination with oncogenic Kras expression led to selection for inactivating genomic alterations, absence of Lkb1 protein, and rapid tumor growth that phenocopied Cre-mediated genetic deletion of Lkb1. This method will transform our ability to rapidly interrogate gene function during the development of this recalcitrant cancer. PMID:26178787

  2. Heightening Energetic Stress Selectively Targets LKB1-Deficient Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers.

    PubMed

    Momcilovic, Milica; McMickle, Robert; Abt, Evan; Seki, Atsuko; Simko, Sarah A; Magyar, Clara; Stout, David B; Fishbein, Michael C; Walser, Tonya C; Dubinett, Steven M; Shackelford, David B

    2015-11-15

    Inactivation of the LKB1 tumor suppressor is a frequent event in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) leading to the activation of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and sensitivity to the metabolic stress inducer phenformin. In this study, we explored the combinatorial use of phenformin with the mTOR catalytic kinase inhibitor MLN0128 as a treatment strategy for NSCLC bearing comutations in the LKB1 and KRAS genes. NSCLC is a genetically and pathologically heterogeneous disease, giving rise to lung tumors of varying histologies that include adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). We demonstrate that phenformin in combination with MLN0128 induced a significant therapeutic response in KRAS/LKB1-mutant human cell lines and genetically engineered mouse models of NSCLC that develop both adenocarcinomas and SCCs. Specifically, we found that KRAS/LKB1-mutant lung adenocarcinomas responded strongly to phenformin + MLN0128 treatment, but the response of SCCs to single or combined treatment with MLN0128 was more attenuated due to acquired resistance to mTOR inhibition through modulation of the AKT-GSK signaling axis. Combinatorial use of the mTOR inhibitor and AKT inhibitor MK2206 robustly inhibited the growth and viability of squamous lung tumors, thus providing an effective strategy to overcome resistance. Taken together, our findings define new personalized therapeutic strategies that may be rapidly translated into clinical use for the treatment of KRAS/LKB1-mutant adenocarcinomas and squamous cell tumors. PMID:26574479

  3. AMPK induces vascular smooth muscle cell senescence via LKB1 dependent pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Jin Young; Woo, Chang-Hoon; Kang, Young Jin; Lee, Kwang Youn; Choi, Hyoung Chul

    2011-09-16

    Highlights: {yields} An aging model was established by stimulating VSMC with adriamycin. {yields} Adriamycin increased p-LKB1, p-AMPK, p53 and p21 expressions. {yields} Inhibition of AMPK diminished SA-{beta}-gal staining and restored VSMC proliferation. {yields} p53 and p21 siRNA attenuated adriamycin-induced SA-{beta}-gal staining in VSMC. {yields} p53-p21 pathway is a mediator of LKB1/AMPK induced VSMC senescence. -- Abstract: Vascular cells have a limited lifespan with limited cell proliferation and undergo cellular senescence. The functional changes associated with cellular senescence are thought to contribute to age-related vascular disorders. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been discussed in terms of beneficial or harmful effects for aging-related diseases. However, the detailed functional mechanisms of AMPK are largely unclear. An aging model was established by stimulating vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) with adriamycin. Adriamycin progressively increased the mRNA and protein expressions of AMPK. The phosphorylation levels of LKB1 and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), the upstream and downstream of AMPK, were dramatically increased by adriamycin stimulation. The expressions of p53 and p21, which contribute to vascular senescence, were also increased. Inhibition of AMPK diminished senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase (SA-{beta}-gal) staining, and restored VSMC proliferation. Cytosolic translocation of LKB1 by adriamycin could be a mechanism for AMPK activation in senescence. Furthermore, p53 siRNA and p21 siRNA transfection attenuated adriamycin-induced SA-{beta}-gal staining. These results suggest that LKB1 dependent AMPK activation elicits VSMC senescence and p53-p21 pathway is a mediator of LKB1/AMPK-induced senescence.

  4. LKB1 promotes cell survival by modulating TIF-IA-mediated pre-ribosomal RNA synthesis under uridine downregulated conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fakeng; Jin, Rui; Liu, Xiuju; Huang, Henry; Wilkinson, Scott C; Zhong, Diansheng; Khuri, Fadlo R; Fu, Haian; Marcus, Adam; He, Yulong; Zhou, Wei

    2016-01-19

    We analyzed the mechanism underlying 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside (AICAR) mediated apoptosis in LKB1-null non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Metabolic profile analysis revealed depletion of the intracellular pyrimidine pool after AICAR treatment, but uridine was the only nucleotide precursor capable of rescuing this apoptosis, suggesting the involvement of RNA metabolism. Because half of RNA transcription in cancer is for pre-ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis, which is suppressed by over 90% after AICAR treatment, we evaluated the role of TIF-IA-mediated rRNA synthesis. While the depletion of TIF-IA by RNAi alone promoted apoptosis in LKB1-null cells, the overexpression of a wild-type or a S636A TIF-IA mutant, but not a S636D mutant, attenuated AICAR-induced apoptosis. In LKB1-null H157 cells, pre-rRNA synthesis was not suppressed by AICAR when wild-type LKB1 was present, and cellular fractionation analysis indicated that TIF-IA quickly accumulated in the nucleus in the presence of a wild-type LKB1 but not a kinase-dead mutant. Furthermore, ectopic expression of LKB1 was capable of attenuating AICAR-induced death in AMPK-null cells. Because LKB1 promotes cell survival by modulating TIF-IA-mediated pre-rRNA synthesis, this discovery suggested that targeted depletion of uridine related metabolites may be exploited in the clinic to eliminate LKB1-null cancer cells.

  5. Intact LKB1 activity is required for survival of dormant ovarian cancer spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Peart, Teresa; Valdes, Yudith Ramos; Correa, Rohann J. M.; Fazio, Elena; Bertrand, Monique; McGee, Jacob; Préfontaine, Michel; Sugimoto, Akira; DiMattia, Gabriel E.; Shepherd, Trevor G.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cells can form multicellular spheroids while in suspension and disperse directly throughout the peritoneum to seed secondary lesions. There is growing evidence that EOC spheroids are key mediators of metastasis, and they use specific intracellular signalling pathways to control cancer cell growth and metabolism for increased survival. Our laboratory discovered that AKT signalling is reduced during spheroid formation leading to cellular quiescence and autophagy, and these may be defining features of tumour cell dormancy. To further define the phenotype of EOC spheroids, we have initiated studies of the Liver kinase B1 (LKB1)-5′-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway as a master controller of the metabolic stress response. We demonstrate that activity of AMPK and its upstream kinase LKB1 are increased in quiescent EOC spheroids as compared with proliferating adherent EOC cells. We also show elevated AMPK activity in spheroids isolated directly from patient ascites. Functional studies reveal that treatment with the AMP mimetic AICAR or allosteric AMPK activator A-769662 led to a cytostatic response in proliferative adherent ovarian cancer cells, but they fail to elicit an effect in spheroids. Targeted knockdown of STK11 by RNAi to reduce LKB1 expression led to reduced viability and increased sensitivity to carboplatin treatment in spheroids only, a phenomenon which was AMPK-independent. Thus, our results demonstrate a direct impact of altered LKB1-AMPK signalling function in EOC. In addition, this is the first evidence in cancer cells demonstrating a pro-survival function for LKB1, a kinase traditionally thought to act as a tumour suppressor. PMID:26068970

  6. Folic acid supplementation during high-fat diet feeding restores AMPK activation via an AMP-LKB1-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Sid, Victoria; Wu, Nan; Sarna, Lindsei K; Siow, Yaw L; House, James D; O, Karmin

    2015-11-15

    AMPK is an endogenous energy sensor that regulates lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is regarded as a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome with impaired lipid and glucose metabolism and increased oxidative stress. Our recent study showed that folic acid supplementation attenuated hepatic oxidative stress and lipid accumulation in high-fat diet-fed mice. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of folic acid on hepatic AMPK during high-fat diet feeding and the mechanisms involved. Male C57BL/6J mice were fed a control diet (10% kcal fat), a high-fat diet (60% kcal fat), or a high-fat diet supplemented with folic acid (26 mg/kg diet) for 5 wk. Mice fed a high-fat diet exhibited hyperglycemia, hepatic cholesterol accumulation, and reduced hepatic AMPK phosphorylation. Folic acid supplementation restored AMPK phosphorylation (activation) and reduced blood glucose and hepatic cholesterol levels. Activation of AMPK by folic acid was mediated through an elevation of its allosteric activator AMP and activation of its upstream kinase, namely, liver kinase B1 (LKB1) in the liver. Consistent with in vivo findings, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (bioactive form of folate) restored phosphorylation (activation) of both AMPK and LKB1 in palmitic acid-treated HepG2 cells. Activation of AMPK by folic acid might be responsible for AMPK-dependent phosphorylation of HMG-CoA reductase, leading to reduced hepatic cholesterol synthesis during high-fat diet feeding. These results suggest that folic acid supplementation may improve cholesterol and glucose metabolism by restoration of AMPK activation in the liver.

  7. Transdifferentiation of lung adenocarcinoma in mice with Lkb1 deficiency to squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiangkun; Li, Fuming; Fang, Zhaoyuan; Gao, Yijun; Li, Fei; Fang, Rong; Yao, Shun; Sun, Yihua; Li, Li; Zhang, Wenjing; Ma, Huimin; Xiao, Qian; Ge, Gaoxiang; Fang, Jing; Wang, Hongda; Zhang, Lei; Wong, Kwok-kin; Chen, Haiquan; Hou, Yingyong; Ji, Hongbin

    2014-01-01

    Lineage transition in adenocarcinoma (ADC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of non-small cell lung cancer, as implicated by clinical observation of mixed ADC and SCC pathologies in adenosquamous cell carcinoma, remains a fundamental yet unsolved question. Here we provide in vivo evidence showing the transdifferentiation of lung cancer from ADC to SCC in mice: Lkb1-deficient lung ADC progressively transdifferentiates into SCC, via a pathologically mixed mAd-SCC intermediate. We find that reduction of lysyl oxidase (Lox) in Lkb1-deficient lung ADC decreases collagen disposition and triggers extracellular matrix remodelling and upregulates p63 expression, a SCC lineage survival oncogene. Pharmacological Lox inhibition promotes the transdifferentiation, whereas ectopic Lox expression significantly inhibits this process. Notably, ADC and SCC show differential responses to Lox inhibition. Collectively, our findings demonstrate the de novo transdifferentiation of lung ADC to SCC in mice and provide mechanistic insight that may have important implications for lung cancer treatment. PMID:24531128

  8. LKB1 promotes cell survival by modulating TIF-IA-mediated pre-ribosomal RNA synthesis under uridine downregulated conditions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiuju; Huang, Henry; Wilkinson, Scott C.; Zhong, Diansheng; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Fu, Haian; Marcus, Adam; He, Yulong; Zhou, Wei

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the mechanism underlying 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside (AICAR) mediated apoptosis in LKB1-null non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Metabolic profile analysis revealed depletion of the intracellular pyrimidine pool after AICAR treatment, but uridine was the only nucleotide precursor capable of rescuing this apoptosis, suggesting the involvement of RNA metabolism. Because half of RNA transcription in cancer is for pre-ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis, which is suppressed by over 90% after AICAR treatment, we evaluated the role of TIF-IA-mediated rRNA synthesis. While the depletion of TIF-IA by RNAi alone promoted apoptosis in LKB1-null cells, the overexpression of a wild-type or a S636A TIF-IA mutant, but not a S636D mutant, attenuated AICAR-induced apoptosis. In LKB1-null H157 cells, pre-rRNA synthesis was not suppressed by AICAR when wild-type LKB1 was present, and cellular fractionation analysis indicated that TIF-IA quickly accumulated in the nucleus in the presence of a wild-type LKB1 but not a kinase-dead mutant. Furthermore, ectopic expression of LKB1 was capable of attenuating AICAR-induced death in AMPK-null cells. Because LKB1 promotes cell survival by modulating TIF-IA-mediated pre-rRNA synthesis, this discovery suggested that targeted depletion of uridine related metabolites may be exploited in the clinic to eliminate LKB1-null cancer cells. PMID:26506235

  9. LKB1 kinase-dependent and -independent defects disrupt polarity and adhesion signaling to drive collagen remodeling during invasion

    PubMed Central

    Konen, Jessica; Wilkinson, Scott; Lee, Byoungkoo; Fu, Haian; Zhou, Wei; Jiang, Yi; Marcus, Adam I.

    2016-01-01

    LKB1 is a serine/threonine kinase and a commonly mutated gene in lung adenocarcinoma. The majority of LKB1 mutations are truncations that disrupt its kinase activity and remove its C-terminal domain (CTD). Because LKB1 inactivation drives cancer metastasis in mice and leads to aberrant cell invasion in vitro, we sought to determine how compromised LKB1 function affects lung cancer cell polarity and invasion. Using three-dimensional models, we show that LKB1 kinase activity is essential for focal adhesion kinase–mediated cell adhesion and subsequent collagen remodeling but not cell polarity. Instead, cell polarity is overseen by the kinase-independent function of its CTD and more specifically its farnesylation. This occurs through a mesenchymal-amoeboid morphological switch that signals through the Rho-GTPase RhoA. These data suggest that a combination of kinase-dependent and -independent defects by LKB1 inactivation creates a uniquely invasive cell with aberrant polarity and adhesion signaling that drives invasion into the microenvironment. PMID:26864623

  10. Differential control of Yorkie activity by LKB1/AMPK and the Hippo/Warts cascade in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Gailite, Ieva; Aerne, Birgit L; Tapon, Nicolas

    2015-09-15

    The Hippo (Hpo) pathway is a highly conserved tumor suppressor network that restricts developmental tissue growth and regulates stem cell proliferation and differentiation. At the heart of the Hpo pathway is the progrowth transcriptional coactivator Yorkie [Yki-Yes-activated protein (YAP)/transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) in mammals]. Yki activity is restricted through phosphorylation by the Hpo/Warts core kinase cascade, but increasing evidence indicates that core kinase-independent modes of regulation also play an important role. Here, we examine Yki regulation in the Drosophila larval central nervous system and uncover a Hpo/Warts-independent function for the tumor suppressor kinase liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and its downstream effector, the energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), in repressing Yki activity in the central brain/ventral nerve cord. Although the Hpo/Warts core cascade restrains Yki in the optic lobe, it is dispensable for Yki target gene repression in the late larval central brain/ventral nerve cord. Thus, we demonstrate a dramatically different wiring of Hpo signaling in neighboring cell populations of distinct developmental origins in the central nervous system.

  11. Honokiol activates LKB1-miR-34a axis and antagonizes the oncogenic actions of leptin in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Avtanski, Dimiter B; Nagalingam, Arumugam; Bonner, Michael Y; Arbiser, Jack L; Saxena, Neeraj K; Sharma, Dipali

    2015-10-01

    Leptin, a major adipocytokine produced by adipocytes, is emerging as a key molecule linking obesity with breast cancer therefore, it is important to find effective strategies to antagonize oncogenic effects of leptin to disrupt obesity-cancer axis. Here, we examine the potential of honokiol (HNK), a bioactive polyphenol from Magnolia grandiflora, as a leptin-antagonist and systematically elucidate the underlying mechanisms. HNK inhibits leptin-induced epithelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT), and mammosphere-formation along with a reduction in the expression of stemness factors, Oct4 and Nanog. Investigating the downstream mediator(s), that direct leptin-antagonist actions of HNK; we discovered functional interactions between HNK, LKB1 and miR-34a. HNK increases the expression and cytoplasmic-localization of LKB1 while HNK-induced SIRT1/3 accentuates the cytoplasmic-localization of LKB1. We found that HNK increases miR-34a in LKB1-dependent manner as LKB1-silencing impedes HNK-induced miR-34a which can be rescued by LKB1-overexpression. Finally, an integral role of miR-34a is discovered as miR-34a mimic potentiates HNK-mediated inhibition of EMT, Zeb1 expression and nuclear-localization, mammosphere-formation, and expression of stemness factors. Leptin-antagonist actions of HNK are further enhanced by miR-34a mimic whereas miR-34a inhibitor results in inhibiting HNK's effect on leptin. These data provide evidence for the leptin-antagonist potential of HNK and reveal the involvement of LKB1 and miR-34a.

  12. Honokiol activates LKB1-miR-34a axis and antagonizes the oncogenic actions of leptin in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Avtanski, Dimiter B; Nagalingam, Arumugam; Bonner, Michael Y; Arbiser, Jack L; Saxena, Neeraj K; Sharma, Dipali

    2015-10-01

    Leptin, a major adipocytokine produced by adipocytes, is emerging as a key molecule linking obesity with breast cancer therefore, it is important to find effective strategies to antagonize oncogenic effects of leptin to disrupt obesity-cancer axis. Here, we examine the potential of honokiol (HNK), a bioactive polyphenol from Magnolia grandiflora, as a leptin-antagonist and systematically elucidate the underlying mechanisms. HNK inhibits leptin-induced epithelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT), and mammosphere-formation along with a reduction in the expression of stemness factors, Oct4 and Nanog. Investigating the downstream mediator(s), that direct leptin-antagonist actions of HNK; we discovered functional interactions between HNK, LKB1 and miR-34a. HNK increases the expression and cytoplasmic-localization of LKB1 while HNK-induced SIRT1/3 accentuates the cytoplasmic-localization of LKB1. We found that HNK increases miR-34a in LKB1-dependent manner as LKB1-silencing impedes HNK-induced miR-34a which can be rescued by LKB1-overexpression. Finally, an integral role of miR-34a is discovered as miR-34a mimic potentiates HNK-mediated inhibition of EMT, Zeb1 expression and nuclear-localization, mammosphere-formation, and expression of stemness factors. Leptin-antagonist actions of HNK are further enhanced by miR-34a mimic whereas miR-34a inhibitor results in inhibiting HNK's effect on leptin. These data provide evidence for the leptin-antagonist potential of HNK and reveal the involvement of LKB1 and miR-34a. PMID:26359358

  13. Honokiol activates LKB1-miR-34a axis and antagonizes the oncogenic actions of leptin in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, Michael Y.; Arbiser, Jack L.; Saxena, Neeraj K.; Sharma, Dipali

    2015-01-01

    Leptin, a major adipocytokine produced by adipocytes, is emerging as a key molecule linking obesity with breast cancer therefore, it is important to find effective strategies to antagonize oncogenic effects of leptin to disrupt obesity-cancer axis. Here, we examine the potential of honokiol (HNK), a bioactive polyphenol from Magnolia grandiflora, as a leptin-antagonist and systematically elucidate the underlying mechanisms. HNK inhibits leptin-induced epithelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT), and mammosphere-formation along with a reduction in the expression of stemness factors, Oct4 and Nanog. Investigating the downstream mediator(s), that direct leptin-antagonist actions of HNK; we discovered functional interactions between HNK, LKB1 and miR-34a. HNK increases the expression and cytoplasmic-localization of LKB1 while HNK-induced SIRT1/3 accentuates the cytoplasmic-localization of LKB1. We found that HNK increases miR-34a in LKB1-dependent manner as LKB1-silencing impedes HNK-induced miR-34a which can be rescued by LKB1-overexpression. Finally, an integral role of miR-34a is discovered as miR-34a mimic potentiates HNK-mediated inhibition of EMT, Zeb1 expression and nuclear-localization, mammosphere-formation, and expression of stemness factors. Leptin-antagonist actions of HNK are further enhanced by miR-34a mimic whereas miR-34a inhibitor results in inhibiting HNK's effect on leptin. These data provide evidence for the leptin-antagonist potential of HNK and reveal the involvement of LKB1 and miR-34a. PMID:26359358

  14. RIP2-mediated LKB1 deletion causes axon degeneration in the spinal cord and hind-limb paralysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Gao; Reynolds, Richard; Leclerc, Isabelle; Rutter, Guy A

    2011-03-01

    Axon degeneration is observed in neurodegenerative diseases and neuroinflammatory disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and multiple sclerosis. The molecular basis of this process remains largely unknown. Here, we show that mice deleted for the tumour suppressor LKB1 (also called STK11) in the spinal cord, some parts of the brain and in the endocrine pancreas (βLKB1KO mice) develop hind-limb dysfunction and axon degeneration at about 7 weeks. Demyelination and macrophage infiltration are observed in the white matter of these mice, predominantly in the bilateral and anterior funiculi of the thoracic segment of the spinal cord, suggesting damage to the ascending sensory signalling pathway owing to LKB1 deletion in the brain. Microtubule structures were also affected in the degenerated foci, with diminished neurofilament and tubulin expression. Deletion of both PRKAA1 genes, whose products AMPKα1 and AMPKα2 are also downstream targets of LKB1, with the same strategy was without effect. We thus define LKB1 as an intrinsic suppressor of axon degeneration and a possible target for strategies that can reverse this process. PMID:21135058

  15. STK11/LKB1 Deficiency Promotes Neutrophil Recruitment and Proinflammatory Cytokine Production to Suppress T-cell Activity in the Lung Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Shohei; Akbay, Esra A; Li, Yvonne Y; Aref, Amir R; Skoulidis, Ferdinandos; Herter-Sprie, Grit S; Buczkowski, Kevin A; Liu, Yan; Awad, Mark M; Denning, Warren L; Diao, Lixia; Wang, Jing; Parra-Cuentas, Edwin R; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Soucheray, Margaret; Thai, Tran; Asahina, Hajime; Kitajima, Shunsuke; Altabef, Abigail; Cavanaugh, Jillian D; Rhee, Kevin; Gao, Peng; Zhang, Haikuo; Fecci, Peter E; Shimamura, Takeshi; Hellmann, Matthew D; Heymach, John V; Hodi, F Stephen; Freeman, Gordon J; Barbie, David A; Dranoff, Glenn; Hammerman, Peter S; Wong, Kwok-Kin

    2016-03-01

    STK11/LKB1 is among the most commonly inactivated tumor suppressors in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), especially in tumors harboring KRAS mutations. Many oncogenes promote immune escape, undermining the effectiveness of immunotherapies, but it is unclear whether the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, such as STK11/LKB1, exerts similar effects. In this study, we investigated the consequences of STK11/LKB1 loss on the immune microenvironment in a mouse model of KRAS-driven NSCLC. Genetic ablation of STK11/LKB1 resulted in accumulation of neutrophils with T-cell-suppressive effects, along with a corresponding increase in the expression of T-cell exhaustion markers and tumor-promoting cytokines. The number of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes was also reduced in LKB1-deficient mouse and human tumors. Furthermore, STK11/LKB1-inactivating mutations were associated with reduced expression of PD-1 ligand PD-L1 in mouse and patient tumors as well as in tumor-derived cell lines. Consistent with these results, PD-1-targeting antibodies were ineffective against Lkb1-deficient tumors. In contrast, treating Lkb1-deficient mice with an IL6-neutralizing antibody or a neutrophil-depleting antibody yielded therapeutic benefits associated with reduced neutrophil accumulation and proinflammatory cytokine expression. Our findings illustrate how tumor suppressor mutations can modulate the immune milieu of the tumor microenvironment, and they offer specific implications for addressing STK11/LKB1-mutated tumors with PD-1-targeting antibody therapies. PMID:26833127

  16. Regulation of pancreatic beta-cell mass.

    PubMed

    Bouwens, Luc; Rooman, Ilse

    2005-10-01

    Beta-cell mass regulation represents a critical issue for understanding diabetes, a disease characterized by a near-absolute (type 1) or relative (type 2) deficiency in the number of pancreatic beta cells. The number of islet beta cells present at birth is mainly generated by the proliferation and differentiation of pancreatic progenitor cells, a process called neogenesis. Shortly after birth, beta-cell neogenesis stops and a small proportion of cycling beta cells can still expand the cell number to compensate for increased insulin demands, albeit at a slow rate. The low capacity for self-replication in the adult is too limited to result in a significant regeneration following extensive tissue injury. Likewise, chronically increased metabolic demands can lead to beta-cell failure to compensate. Neogenesis from progenitor cells inside or outside islets represents a more potent mechanism leading to robust expansion of the beta-cell mass, but it may require external stimuli. For therapeutic purposes, advantage could be taken from the surprising differentiation plasticity of adult pancreatic cells and possibly also from stem cells. Recent studies have demonstrated that it is feasible to regenerate and expand the beta-cell mass by the application of hormones and growth factors like glucagon-like peptide-1, gastrin, epidermal growth factor, and others. Treatment with these external stimuli can restore a functional beta-cell mass in diabetic animals, but further studies are required before it can be applied to humans. PMID:16183912

  17. LKB1 deficiency enhances sensitivity to energetic stress induced by erlotinib treatment in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells

    PubMed Central

    Whang, Young Mi; Park, Serk In; Trenary, Irina A.; Egnatchik, Robert A.; Fessel, Joshua P.; Kaufman, Jacob M.; Carbone, David P.; Young, Jamey D.

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressor serine/threonine kinase 11 (STK11 or LKB1) is mutated in 20–30% of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patient tumors. Loss of LKB1-AMPK signaling confers sensitivity to metabolic inhibition or stress-induced mitochondrial insults. We tested the hypothesis that loss of LKB1 sensitizes NSCLC cells to energetic stress induced by treatment with erlotinib. LKB1-deficient cells exhibited enhanced sensitivity to erlotinib in vitro and in vivo that was associated with alterations in energy metabolism and mitochondrial dysfunction. Loss of LKB1 expression altered the cellular response to erlotinib treatment, resulting in impaired ATP homeostasis and an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, erlotinib selectively blocked mTOR signaling, inhibited cell growth, and activated apoptosis in LKB1-deficient cells. Erlotinib treatment also induced AMPK activation despite loss of LKB1 expression, which was partially reduced by the application of a CaMKKβ inhibitor (STO-609) or calcium chelator (BAPTA-AM). These findings may have significant implications for the design of novel NSCLC treatments that target dysregulated metabolic and signaling pathways in LKB1-deficient tumors. PMID:26119936

  18. Pulsed Azidohomoalanine Labeling in Mammals (PALM) Detects Changes in Liver-Specific LKB1 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Quantification of proteomes by mass spectrometry has proven to be useful to study human pathology recapitulated in cellular or animal models of disease. Enriching and quantifying newly synthesized proteins (NSPs) at set time points by mass spectrometry has the potential to identify important early regulatory or expression changes associated with disease states or perturbations. NSP can be enriched from proteomes by employing pulsed introduction of the noncanonical amino acid, azidohomoalanine (AHA). We demonstrate that pulsed introduction of AHA in the feed of mice can label and identify NSP from multiple tissues. Furthermore, we quantitate differences in new protein expression resulting from CRE-LOX initiated knockout of LKB1 in mouse livers. Overall, the PALM strategy allows for the first time in vivo labeling of mouse tissues to differentiate protein synthesis rates at discrete time points. PMID:26445171

  19. Pulsed Azidohomoalanine Labeling in Mammals (PALM) Detects Changes in Liver-Specific LKB1 Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    McClatchy, Daniel B; Ma, Yuanhui; Liu, Chao; Stein, Benjamin D; Martínez-Bartolomé, Salvador; Vasquez, Debbie; Hellberg, Kristina; Shaw, Reuben J; Yates, John R

    2015-11-01

    Quantification of proteomes by mass spectrometry has proven to be useful to study human pathology recapitulated in cellular or animal models of disease. Enriching and quantifying newly synthesized proteins (NSPs) at set time points by mass spectrometry has the potential to identify important early regulatory or expression changes associated with disease states or perturbations. NSP can be enriched from proteomes by employing pulsed introduction of the noncanonical amino acid, azidohomoalanine (AHA). We demonstrate that pulsed introduction of AHA in the feed of mice can label and identify NSP from multiple tissues. Furthermore, we quantitate differences in new protein expression resulting from CRE-LOX initiated knockout of LKB1 in mouse livers. Overall, the PALM strategy allows for the first time in vivo labeling of mouse tissues to differentiate protein synthesis rates at discrete time points.

  20. Cardioprotective actions of Notch1 against myocardial infarction via LKB1-dependent AMPK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Sun, Wanqing; Quan, Nanhu; Wang, Lin; Chu, Dongyang; Cates, Courtney; Liu, Quan; Zheng, Yang; Li, Ji

    2016-05-15

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathway plays a pivotal role in intracellular adaptation to energy stress during myocardial ischemia. Notch1 signaling in the adult myocardium is also activated in response to ischemic stress. However, the relationship between Notch1 and AMPK signaling pathways during ischemia remains unclear. We hypothesize that Notch1 as an adaptive signaling pathway protects the heart from ischemic injury via modulating the cardioprotective AMPK signaling pathway. C57BL/6J mice were subjected to an in vivo ligation of left anterior descending coronary artery and the hearts from C57BL/6J mice were subjected to an ex vivo globe ischemia and reperfusion in the Langendorff perfusion system. The Notch1 signaling was activated during myocardial ischemia. A Notch1 γ-secretase inhibitor, dibenzazepine (DBZ), was intraperitoneally injected into mice to inhibit Notch1 signaling pathway by ischemia. The inhibition of Notch1 signaling by DBZ significantly augmented cardiac dysfunctions caused by myocardial infarction. Intriguingly, DBZ treatment also significantly blunted the activation of AMPK signaling pathway. The immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that an interaction between Notch1 and liver kinase beta1 (LKB1) modulated AMPK activation during myocardial ischemia. Furthermore, a ligand of Notch1 Jagged1 can significantly reduce cardiac damage caused by ischemia via activation of AMPK signaling pathway and modulation of glucose oxidation and fatty acid oxidation during ischemia and reperfusion. But Jagged1 did not have any cardioprotections on AMPK kinase dead transgenic hearts. Taken together, the results indicate that the cardioprotective effect of Notch1 against ischemic damage is mediated by AMPK signaling via an interaction with upstream LKB1.

  1. Testosterone stimulates glucose uptake and GLUT4 translocation through LKB1/AMPK signaling in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, Kazuteru; Senmaru, Takafumi; Fukuda, Takuya; Yamazaki, Masahiro; Shinomiya, Katsuhiko; Ueno, Morio; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Kitawaki, Jo; Katsuyama, Masato; Tsujikawa, Muneo; Obayashi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Naoto; Fukui, Michiaki

    2016-01-01

    Decreases in serum testosterone concentrations in aging men are associated with metabolic disorders. Testosterone has been reported to increase GLUT4-dependent glucose uptake in skeletal muscle cells and cardiomyocytes. However, studies on glucose uptake occurring in response to testosterone stimulation in adipocytes are currently not available. This study was designed to determine the effects of testosterone on glucose uptake in adipocytes. Glucose uptake was assessed with 2-[(3)H] deoxyglucose in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. GLUT4 translocation was evaluated in plasma membrane (PM) sheets and PM fractions by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting, respectively. Activation of GLUT4 translocation-related protein kinases, including Akt, AMPK, LKB1, CaMKI, CaMKII, and Cbl was followed by immunoblotting. Expression levels of androgen receptor (AR) mRNA and AR translocation to the PM were assessed by real-time RT-PCR and immunoblotting, respectively. The results showed that both high-dose (100 nM) testosterone and testosterone-BSA increased glucose uptake and GLUT4 translocation to the PM, independently of the intracellular AR. Testosterone and testosterone-BSA stimulated the phosphorylation of AMPK, LKB1, and CaMKII. The knockdown of LKB1 by siRNA attenuated testosterone- and testosterone-BSA-stimulated AMPK phosphorylation and glucose uptake. These results indicate that high-dose testosterone and testosterone-BSA increase GLUT4-dependent glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes by inducing the LKB1/AMPK signaling pathway.

  2. Honokiol activates the LKB1–AMPK signaling pathway and attenuates the lipid accumulation in hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Min Suk; Kim, Jung Hwan; Kim, Hye Jung; Chang, Ki Churl; Park, Sang Won

    2015-04-15

    Honokiol is a bioactive neolignan compound isolated from the species of Magnolia. This study was designed to elucidate the cellular mechanism by which honokiol alleviates the development of non-alcoholic steatosis. HepG2 cells were treated with honokiol for 1 h, and then exposed to 1 mM free fatty acid (FFA) for 24 h to simulate non-alcoholic steatosis in vitro. C57BL/6 mice were fed with a high-fat diet for 28 days, and honokiol (10 mg/kg/day) was daily treated. Honokiol concentration-dependently attenuated intracellular fat overloading and triglyceride (TG) accumulation in FFA-exposed HepG2 cells. These effects were blocked by pretreatment with an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibitor. Honokiol significantly inhibited sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) maturation and the induction of lipogenic proteins, stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD-1) and fatty acid synthase (FAS) in FFA-exposed HepG2 cells, but these effects were blocked by pretreatment of an AMPK inhibitor. Honokiol induced AMPK phosphorylation and subsequent acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) phosphorylation, which were inhibited by genetic deletion of liver kinase B1 (LKB1). Honokiol stimulated LKB1 phosphorylation, and genetic deletion of LKB1 blocked the effect of honokiol on SREBP-1c maturation and the induction of SCD-1 and FAS proteins in FFA-exposed HepG2 cells. Honokiol attenuated the increases in hepatic TG and lipogenic protein levels and fat accumulation in the mice fed with high-fat diet, while significantly induced LKB1 and AMPK phosphorylation. Taken together, our findings suggest that honokiol has an anti-lipogenic effect in hepatocytes, and this effect may be mediated by the LKB1–AMPK signaling pathway, which induces ACC phosphorylation and inhibits SREBP-1c maturation in hepatocytes. - Highlights: • Honokiol attenuates lipid accumulation induced by free fatty acid in hepatocyte. • Honokiol inhibits the increase in lipogenic enzyme levels induced by free fatty

  3. Insulin: pancreatic secretion and adipocyte regulation.

    PubMed

    Baumgard, L H; Hausman, G J; Sanz Fernandez, M V

    2016-01-01

    Insulin is the primary acute anabolic coordinator of nutrient partitioning. Hyperglycemia is the main stimulant of insulin secretion, but other nutrients such as specific amino acids, fatty acids, and ketoacids can potentiate pancreatic insulin release. Incretins are intestinal hormones with insulinotropic activity and are secreted in response to food ingestion, thus integrating diet chemical composition with the regulation of insulin release. In addition, prolactin is required for proper islet development, and it stimulates β-cell proliferation. Counterintuitively, bacterial components appear to signal insulin secretion. In vivo lipopolysaccharide infusion acutely increases circulating insulin, which is paradoxical as endotoxemia is a potent catabolic condition. Insulin is a potent anabolic orchestrator of nutrient partitioning, and this is particularly true in adipocytes. Insulin dictates lipid accretion in a dose-dependent manner during preadipocyte development in adipose tissue-derived stromal vascular cell culture. However, in vivo studies focused on insulin's role in regulating adipose tissue metabolism from growing, and market weight pigs are sometimes inconsistent, and this variability appears to be animal, age and depot dependent. Additionally, porcine adipose tissue synthesizes and secretes a number of adipokines (leptin, adiponectin, and so forth) that directly or indirectly influence insulin action. Therefore, because insulin has an enormous impact on agriculturally important phenotypes, it is critical to have a better understanding of how insulin homeostasis is governed.

  4. Post-translational modification of serine/threonine kinase LKB1 via Adduction of the Reactive Lipid Species 4-Hydroxy-trans-2-nonenal (HNE) at lysine residue 97 directly inhibits kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Calamaras, Timothy D; Lee, Charlie; Lan, Fan; Ido, Yasuo; Siwik, Deborah A; Colucci, Wilson S

    2012-12-01

    Oxidative stress is pathogenic in a variety of diseases, but the mechanism by which cellular signaling is affected by oxidative species has yet to be fully characterized. Lipid peroxidation, a secondary process that occurs during instances of free radical production, may play an important role in modulating cellular signaling under conditions of oxidative stress. 4-Hydroxy-trans-2-nonenal (HNE) is an electrophilic aldehyde produced during lipid peroxidation that forms covalent adducts on proteins, altering their activity and function. One such target, LKB1, has been reported to be inhibited by HNE adduction. We tested the hypothesis that HNE inhibits LKB1 activity through adduct formation on a specific reactive residue of the protein. To elucidate the mechanism of the inhibitory effect, HEK293T cells expressing LKB1 were treated with HNE (10 μm for 1 h) and assayed for HNE-LKB1 adduct formation and changes in LKB1 kinase activity. HNE treatment resulted in the formation of HNE-LKB1 adducts and decreased LKB1 kinase activity by 31 ± 9% (S.E.) but had no effect on the association of LKB1 with its adaptor proteins sterile-20-related adaptor and mouse protein 25. Mutation of LKB1 lysine residue 97 reduced HNE adduct formation and attenuated the effect of HNE on LKB1 activity. Taken together, our results suggest that adduction of LKB1 Lys-97 mediates the inhibitory effect of HNE. PMID:23086944

  5. Cilostazol Modulates Autophagic Degradation of β-Amyloid Peptide via SIRT1-Coupled LKB1/AMPKα Signaling in Neuronal Cells.

    PubMed

    Park, So Youn; Lee, Hye Rin; Lee, Won Suk; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Kim, Hye Young; Hong, Ki Whan; Kim, Chi Dae

    2016-01-01

    A neuroprotective role of autophagy mediates the degradation of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The previous study showed cilostazol modulates autophagy by increasing beclin1, Atg5 and LC3-II expressions, and depletes intracellular Aβ accumulation. This study elucidated the mechanisms through which cilostazol modulates the autophagic degradation of Aβ in neurons. In N2a cells, cilostazol (10-30 μM), significantly increased the expression of P-AMPKα (Thr 172) and downstream P-ACC (acetyl-CoA carboxylase) (Ser 79) as did resveratrol (SIRT1 activator), or AICAR (AMPK activator), which were blocked by KT5720, compound C (AMPK inhibitor), or sirtinol. Furthermore, phosphorylated-mTOR (Ser 2448) and phosphorylated-P70S6K (Thr 389) expressions were suppressed, and LC3-II levels were elevated in association with decreased P62/Sqstm1 by cilostazol. Cilostazol increased cathepsin B activity and decreased p62/SQSTM 1, consequently decreased accumulation of Aβ1-42 in the activated N2aSwe cells, and these results were blocked by sirtinol, compound C and bafilomycin A1 (autophagosome blocker), suggesting enhanced autophagosome formation by cilostazol. In SIRT1 gene-silenced N2a cells, cilostazol failed to increase the expressions of P-LKB1 (Ser 428) and P-AMPKα, which contrasted with its effect in negative control cells transfected with scrambled siRNA duplex. Further, N2a cells transfected with expression vectors encoding pcDNA SIRT1 showed increased P-AMPKα expression, which mimicked the effect of cilostazol in N2a cells; suggesting cilostazol-stimulated expressions of P-LKB1 and P-AMPKα were SIRT1-dependent. Unlike their effects in N2a cells, in HeLa cells, which lack LKB1, cilostazol and resveratrol did not elevate SIRT1 or P-AMPKα expression, indicating cilostazol and resveratrol-stimulated expressions of SIRT1 and P-AMPKα are LKB1-dependent. In conclusion, cilostazol upregulates autophagy by activating SIRT1-coupled P-LKB1/P-AMPKα and

  6. Cilostazol Modulates Autophagic Degradation of β-Amyloid Peptide via SIRT1-Coupled LKB1/AMPKα Signaling in Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won Suk; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Kim, Hye Young; Hong, Ki Whan; Kim, Chi Dae

    2016-01-01

    A neuroprotective role of autophagy mediates the degradation of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The previous study showed cilostazol modulates autophagy by increasing beclin1, Atg5 and LC3-II expressions, and depletes intracellular Aβ accumulation. This study elucidated the mechanisms through which cilostazol modulates the autophagic degradation of Aβ in neurons. In N2a cells, cilostazol (10–30 μM), significantly increased the expression of P-AMPKα (Thr 172) and downstream P-ACC (acetyl-CoA carboxylase) (Ser 79) as did resveratrol (SIRT1 activator), or AICAR (AMPK activator), which were blocked by KT5720, compound C (AMPK inhibitor), or sirtinol. Furthermore, phosphorylated-mTOR (Ser 2448) and phosphorylated-P70S6K (Thr 389) expressions were suppressed, and LC3-II levels were elevated in association with decreased P62/Sqstm1 by cilostazol. Cilostazol increased cathepsin B activity and decreased p62/SQSTM 1, consequently decreased accumulation of Aβ1–42 in the activated N2aSwe cells, and these results were blocked by sirtinol, compound C and bafilomycin A1 (autophagosome blocker), suggesting enhanced autophagosome formation by cilostazol. In SIRT1 gene-silenced N2a cells, cilostazol failed to increase the expressions of P-LKB1 (Ser 428) and P-AMPKα, which contrasted with its effect in negative control cells transfected with scrambled siRNA duplex. Further, N2a cells transfected with expression vectors encoding pcDNA SIRT1 showed increased P-AMPKα expression, which mimicked the effect of cilostazol in N2a cells; suggesting cilostazol-stimulated expressions of P-LKB1 and P-AMPKα were SIRT1-dependent. Unlike their effects in N2a cells, in HeLa cells, which lack LKB1, cilostazol and resveratrol did not elevate SIRT1 or P-AMPKα expression, indicating cilostazol and resveratrol-stimulated expressions of SIRT1 and P-AMPKα are LKB1-dependent. In conclusion, cilostazol upregulates autophagy by activating SIRT1-coupled P-LKB1/P-AMPKα and

  7. SUMOylation of Pancreatic Glucokinase Regulates Its Cellular Stability and Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Aukrust, Ingvild; Bjørkhaug, Lise; Negahdar, Maria; Molnes, Janne; Johansson, Bente B.; Müller, Yvonne; Haas, Wilhelm; Gygi, Steven P.; Søvik, Oddmund; Flatmark, Torgeir; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; Njølstad, Pål R.

    2013-01-01

    Glucokinase is the predominant hexokinase expressed in hepatocytes and pancreatic β-cells, with a pivotal role in regulating glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, illustrated by glucokinase gene mutations causing monogenic diabetes and congenital hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia. A complex tissue-specific network of mechanisms regulates this enzyme, and a major unanswered question in glucokinase biology is how post-translational modifications control the function of the enzyme. Here, we show that the pancreatic isoform of human glucokinase is SUMOylated in vitro, using recombinant enzymes, and in insulin-secreting model cells. Three N-terminal lysines unique for the pancreatic isoform (Lys-12/Lys-13 and/or Lys-15) may represent one SUMOylation site, with an additional site (Lys-346) common for the pancreatic and the liver isoform. SUMO-1 and E2 overexpression stabilized preferentially the wild-type human pancreatic enzyme in MIN6 β-cells, and SUMOylation increased the catalytic activity of recombinant human glucokinase in vitro and also of glucokinase in target cells. Small ubiquitin-like modifier conjugation represents a novel form of post-translational modification of the enzyme, and it may have an important regulatory function in pancreatic β-cells. PMID:23297408

  8. Neural Regulation of Pancreatic Cancer: A Novel Target for Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Aeson; Kim-Fuchs, Corina; Le, Caroline P.; Hollande, Frédéric; Sloan, Erica K.

    2015-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is known to play a pivotal role in driving cancer progression and governing response to therapy. This is of significance in pancreatic cancer where the unique pancreatic tumor microenvironment, characterized by its pronounced desmoplasia and fibrosis, drives early stages of tumor progression and dissemination, and contributes to its associated low survival rates. Several molecular factors that regulate interactions between pancreatic tumors and their surrounding stroma are beginning to be identified. Yet broader physiological factors that influence these interactions remain unclear. Here, we discuss a series of preclinical and mechanistic studies that highlight the important role chronic stress plays as a physiological regulator of neural-tumor interactions in driving the progression of pancreatic cancer. These studies propose several approaches to target stress signaling via the β-adrenergic signaling pathway in order to slow pancreatic tumor growth and metastasis. They also provide evidence to support the use of β-blockers as a novel therapeutic intervention to complement current clinical strategies to improve cancer outcome in patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:26193320

  9. Metformin increases antitumor activity of MEK inhibitors through GLI1 downregulation in LKB1 positive human NSCLC cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Della Corte, Carminia Maria; Ciaramella, Vincenza; Mauro, Concetta Di; Castellone, Maria Domenica; Papaccio, Federica; Fasano, Morena; Sasso, Ferdinando Carlo; Martinelli, Erika; Troiani, Teresa; De Vita, Ferdinando; Orditura, Michele; Bianco, Roberto; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Morgillo, Floriana

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Metformin, widely used as antidiabetic drug, showed antitumoral effects expecially in combination with chemotherapy. Our group recently has demonstrated that metformin and gefitinib are synergistic in LKB1-wild-type NSCLC cells. In these models, metformin as single agent induced an activation and phosphorylation of mitogen-activated-protein-kinase (MAPK) through an increased C-RAF/B-RAF heterodimerization. Experimental design Since single agent metformin enhances proliferating signals through the RAS/RAF/MAPK pathway, and several MEK inhibitors (MEK-I) demonstrated clinical efficacy in combination with other agents in NSCLC, we tested the effects of metformin plus MEK-I (selumetinib or pimasertib) on proliferation, invasiveness, migration abilities in vitro and in vivo in LKB1 positive NSCLC models harboring KRAS wild type and mutated gene. Results The combination of metformin with MEK-I showed a strong anti-proliferative and proapoptotic effect in Calu-3, H1299, H358 and H1975 human NSCLC cell lines, independently from the KRAS mutational status. The combination reduced the metastatic behaviour of NSCLC cells, via a downregulation of GLI1 trascritional activity, thus affecting the transition from an epithelial to a mesenchymal phenotype. Metformin and MEK-Is combinations also decreased the production and activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 by reducing the NF-jB (p65) binding to MMP-2 and MMP-9 promoters. Conclusions Metformin potentiates the antitumor activity of MEK-Is in human LKB1-wild-type NSCLC cell lines, independently from the KRAS mutational status, through GLI1 downregulation and by reducing the NF-jB (p65)-mediated transcription of MMP-2 and MMP-9. PMID:26673006

  10. Cinnamon extract enhances glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and C2C12 myocytes by inducing LKB1-AMP-activated protein kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yan; Honma, Natsumi; Kobayashi, Katsuya; Jia, Liu Nan; Hosono, Takashi; Shindo, Kazutoshi; Ariga, Toyohiko; Seki, Taiichiro

    2014-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that cinnamon extract (CE) ameliorates type 1 diabetes induced by streptozotocin in rats through the up-regulation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) translocation in both muscle and adipose tissues. This present study was aimed at clarifying the detailed mechanism(s) with which CE increases the glucose uptake in vivo and in cell culture systems using 3T3-L1 adipocytes and C2C12 myotubes in vitro. Specific inhibitors of key enzymes in insulin signaling and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathways, as well as small interference RNA, were used to examine the role of these kinases in the CE-induced glucose uptake. The results showed that CE stimulated the phosphorylation of AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase. An AMPK inhibitor and LKB1 siRNA blocked the CE-induced glucose uptake. We also found for the first time that insulin suppressed AMPK activation in the adipocyte. To investigate the effect of CE on type 2 diabetes in vivo, we further performed oral glucose tolerance tests and insulin tolerance tests in type 2 diabetes model rats administered with CE. The CE improved glucose tolerance in oral glucose tolerance tests, but not insulin sensitivity in insulin tolerance test. In summary, these results indicate that CE ameliorates type 2 diabetes by inducing GLUT4 translocation via the AMPK signaling pathway. We also found insulin antagonistically regulates the activation of AMPK. PMID:24551069

  11. LKB1/AMPK inhibits TGF-β1 production and the TGF-β signaling pathway in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Nian-Shuang; Zou, Jun-Rong; Lin, Hui; Ke, Rong; He, Xiao-Ling; Xiao, Lu; Huang, Deqiang; Luo, Lingyu; Lv, Nonghua; Luo, Zhijun

    2016-06-01

    Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) acts as a fuel gauge that maintains energy homeostasis in both normal and cancerous cells, and has emerged as a tumor suppressor. The present study aims to delineate the functional relationship between AMPK and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β). Our results showed that expression of liver kinase B1 (LKB1), an upstream kinase of AMPK, impeded TGF-β-induced Smad phosphorylation and their transcriptional activity in breast cancer cells, whereas knockdown of LKB1 or AMPKα1 subunit by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) enhanced the effect of TGF-β. Furthermore, AMPK activation reduced the promoter activity of TGF-β1. In accordance, type 2 diabetic patients taking metformin displayed a trend of reduction of serum TGF-β1, as compared with those without metformin. A significant reduction of serum TGF-β1 was found in mice after treatment with metformin. These results suggest that AMPK inhibits the transcription of TGF-β1, leading to reduction of its concentration in serum. Finally, metformin suppressed epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition of mammary epithelial cells. Taken together, our study demonstrates that AMPK exerts multiple actions on TGF-β signaling and supports that AMPK can serve as a therapeutic drug target for breast cancer. PMID:26718214

  12. LKB1/AMPK inhibits TGF-β1 production and the TGF-β signaling pathway in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Nian-Shuang; Zou, Jun-Rong; Lin, Hui; Ke, Rong; He, Xiao-Ling; Xiao, Lu; Huang, Deqiang; Luo, Lingyu; Lv, Nonghua; Luo, Zhijun

    2016-06-01

    Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) acts as a fuel gauge that maintains energy homeostasis in both normal and cancerous cells, and has emerged as a tumor suppressor. The present study aims to delineate the functional relationship between AMPK and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β). Our results showed that expression of liver kinase B1 (LKB1), an upstream kinase of AMPK, impeded TGF-β-induced Smad phosphorylation and their transcriptional activity in breast cancer cells, whereas knockdown of LKB1 or AMPKα1 subunit by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) enhanced the effect of TGF-β. Furthermore, AMPK activation reduced the promoter activity of TGF-β1. In accordance, type 2 diabetic patients taking metformin displayed a trend of reduction of serum TGF-β1, as compared with those without metformin. A significant reduction of serum TGF-β1 was found in mice after treatment with metformin. These results suggest that AMPK inhibits the transcription of TGF-β1, leading to reduction of its concentration in serum. Finally, metformin suppressed epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition of mammary epithelial cells. Taken together, our study demonstrates that AMPK exerts multiple actions on TGF-β signaling and supports that AMPK can serve as a therapeutic drug target for breast cancer.

  13. Pancreatic acinar cells produce, release, and respond to tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Role in regulating cell death and pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Gukovskaya, A S; Gukovsky, I; Zaninovic, V; Song, M; Sandoval, D; Gukovsky, S; Pandol, S J

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) and receptors for TNFalpha are expressed in the exocrine pancreas, and whether pancreatic acinar cells release and respond to TNFalpha. Reverse transcription PCR, immunoprecipitation, and Western blot analysis demonstrated the presence of TNFalpha and 55- and 75-kD TNFalpha receptors in pancreas from control rats, rats with experimental pancreatitis induced by supramaximal doses of cerulein, and in isolated pancreatic acini. Immunohistochemistry showed TNFalpha presence in pancreatic acinar cells. ELISA and bioassay measurements of TNFalpha indicated its release from pancreatic acinar cells during incubation in primary culture. Acinar cells responded to TNFalpha. TNFalpha potentiated NF-kappaB translocation into the nucleus and stimulated apoptosis in isolated acini while not affecting LDH release. In vivo studies demonstrated that neutralization of TNFalpha with an antibody produced a mild improvement in the parameters of cerulein-induced pancreatitis. However, TNFalpha neutralization greatly inhibited apoptosis in a modification of the cerulein model of pancreatitis which is associated with a high percentage of apoptotic cell death. The results indicate that pancreatic acinar cells produce, release, and respond to TNFalpha. This cytokine regulates apoptosis in both isolated pancreatic acini and experimental pancreatitis. PMID:9312187

  14. Mild Electrical Stimulation Increases Stress Resistance and Suppresses Fat Accumulation via Activation of LKB1-AMPK Signaling Pathway in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Matsuyama, Shingo; Moriuchi, Masataka; Suico, Mary Ann; Yano, Shuichiro; Morino-Koga, Saori; Shuto, Tsuyoshi; Yamanaka, Kunitoshi; Kondo, Tatsuya; Araki, Eiichi; Kai, Hirofumi

    2014-01-01

    Electrical current at physiological strength has been applied as a therapeutic approach for various diseases. Several of our works showed that mild electrical stimulation (MES) at 0.1-ms pulse width has positive impact on organisms. But despite the growing evidence of the beneficial effects of MES, its effects on individual animals and the molecular underpinnings are poorly understood and rarely studied. Here, we examined the effects of MES on individual animal and its mechanisms by mainly using Caenorhabditis elegans, a powerful genetic model organism. Interestingly, MES increased stress resistance and suppressed excess fat accumulation in wild-type N2 worms but not in AMPK/AAK-2 and LKB1/PAR-4 mutant worms. MES promoted the nuclear localization of transcription factors DAF-16 and SKN-1 and consequently increased the expression of anti-stress genes, whereas MES inhibited the nuclear localization of SBP-1 and suppressed the expression of lipogenic genes. Moreover, we found that MES induced the activation of LKB1/PAR4-AMPK/AAK2 pathway in C. elegans and in several mammalian cell lines. The mitochondrial membrane potential and cellular ATP level were slightly and transiently decreased by MES leading to the activation of LKB1-AMPK signaling pathway. Together, we firstly and genetically demonstrated that MES exerts beneficial effects such as stress resistance and suppression of excess fat accumulation, via activation of LKB1-AMPK signaling pathway. PMID:25490091

  15. Minireview: Dopaminergic Regulation of Insulin Secretion from the Pancreatic Islet

    PubMed Central

    Ustione, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Exogenous dopamine inhibits insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells, but the lack of dopaminergic neurons in pancreatic islets has led to controversy regarding the importance of this effect. Recent data, however, suggest a plausible physiologic role for dopamine in the regulation of insulin secretion. We review the literature underlying our current understanding of dopaminergic signaling that can down-regulate glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from pancreatic islets. In this negative feedback loop, dopamine is synthesized in the β-cells from circulating l-dopa, serves as an autocrine signal that is cosecreted with insulin, and causes a tonic inhibition on glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. On the whole animal scale, l-dopa is produced by cells in the gastrointestinal tract, and its concentration in the blood plasma increases following a mixed meal. By reviewing the outcome of certain types of bariatric surgery that result in rapid amelioration of glucose tolerance, we hypothesize that dopamine serves as an “antiincretin” signal that counterbalances the stimulatory effect of glucagon-like peptide 1. PMID:23744894

  16. Metformin and pancreatic cancer: Is there a role?

    PubMed

    De Souza, Andre; Khawaja, Khadija Irfan; Masud, Faisal; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2016-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the USA, with a 5-year survival rate of 6 %. Anti-hyperglycemic treatments for type 2 diabetes mellitus that induce hyperinsulinemia (i.e., sulfonylureas) are thought to increase cancer risk, whereas treatments that lower insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia (i.e., metformin) are considered cancer prevention strategies. Metformin is a cornerstone in the treatment of diabetes mellitus type 2. Retrospective studies have shown a survival benefit in diabetic patients with many solid tumors including pancreatic cancer that have been treated with metformin compared with patients treated with insulin or sulfonylureas. Metformin influences various cellular pathways, including activation of the LKB1/AMPK pathway, inhibition of cell division, promotion of apoptosis and autophagy, down-regulation of circulating insulin, and activation of the immune system. Ongoing research is redefining our understanding about how metformin modulates the molecular pathways implicated in pancreatic cancer. The authors review the topic critically and also give their opinion. Further studies investigating the effect of metformin in combination with chemotherapy, targeted agents, or radiation therapy are undergoing. In addition, the role of metabolic and other biomarkers is needed.

  17. Regulation of pancreatic somatostatin gene expression by insulin and glucagon.

    PubMed

    Ehrman, Melissa M; Melroe, Gregory T; Kittilson, Jeffrey D; Sheridan, Mark A

    2005-05-12

    Rainbow trout were used as a model system to study the effects of insulin and glucagon on the expression of preprosomatostatins (PPSS). We previously showed that the endocrine pancreas of trout contains three mRNAs that encode for distinct somatostatin-containing peptides: PPSS I, which contains somatostain-14 (SS-14) at its C-terminus, and two separate PPSS IIs, PPSS II' and PPSS II'', each containing [Tyr7, Gly10]-SS-14 at their C-terminus. Rainbow trout injected (100 ng/g body weight) with insulin displayed elevated expression of PPSS II' and PPSS II'' mRNAs. Glucagon-injected (100 ng/g body weight) animals displayed elevated pancreatic expression of all PPSS mRNAs compared to saline-injected control animals. Insulin directly stimulated the expression of pancreatic PPSS II' and PPSS II'' mRNAs in vitro in a dose-dependent manner in the presence of 4mM glucose. Glucagon, in the presence of 10mM glucose, directly stimulated the expression of all PPSS mRNAs in a dose-dependent manner in vitro. These results indicate that the pancreatic expression of PPSS mRNAs is differentially regulated by insulin and glucagon and that the regulatory pattern is dependent on glucose concentration. PMID:15866425

  18. Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, R M S; Byrne, M F; Baillie, J

    2003-04-26

    In the past decade, our understanding of the genetic basis, pathogenesis, and natural history of pancreatitis has grown strikingly. In severe acute pancreatitis, intensive medical support and non-surgical intervention for complications keeps patients alive; surgical drainage (necrosectomy) is reserved for patients with infected necrosis for whom supportive measures have failed. Enteral feeding has largely replaced the parenteral route; controversy remains with respect to use of prophylactic antibiotics. Although gene therapy for chronic pancreatitis is years away, our understanding of the roles of gene mutations in hereditary and sporadic pancreatitis offers tantalising clues about the disorder's pathogenesis. The division between acute and chronic pancreatitis has always been blurred: now, genetics of the disorder suggest a continuous range of disease rather than two separate entities. With recognition of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia, we see that chronic pancreatitis is a premalignant disorder in some patients. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasound are destined to replace endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography for many diagnostic indications in pancreatic disease.

  19. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. It happens when digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself. Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic. Either form is ...

  20. Deoxypodophyllotoxin suppresses tumor vasculature in HUVECs by promoting cytoskeleton remodeling through LKB1-AMPK dependent Rho A activatio.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yurong; Wang, Bin; Guerram, Mounia; Sun, Li; Shi, Wei; Tian, Chongchong; Zhu, Xiong; Jiang, Zhenzhou; Zhang, Luyong

    2015-10-01

    Angiogenesis plays a critical role in the growth and metastasis of tumors, which makes it an attractive target for anti-tumor drug development. Deoxypodophyllotoxin (DPT), a natural product isolated from Anthriscus sylvestris, inhibits cell proliferation and migration in various cancer cell types. Our previous studies indicate that DPT possesses both anti-angiogenic and vascular-disrupting activities. Although the RhoA/ RhoA kinase (ROCK) signaling pathway is implicated in DPT-stimulated cytoskeleton remodeling and tumor vasculature suppressing, the detailed mechanisms by which DPT mediates these effects are poorly understood. In the current study, we found that DPT promotes cytoskeleton remodeling in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) via stimulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and that this effect is abolished by either treatment with a selective AMPK inhibitor or knockdown. Moreover, the cellular levels of LKB1, a kinase upstream of AMPK, were enhanced following DPT exposure. DPT-induced activation of AMPK in tumor vasculature effect was also verified by transgenic zebrafish (VEGFR2:GFP), Matrigel plug assay, and xenograft model in nude mice. The present findings may lay the groundwork for a novel therapeutic approach in treating cancer. PMID:26470595

  1. TEAD and YAP regulate the enhancer network of human embryonic pancreatic progenitors.

    PubMed

    Cebola, Inês; Rodríguez-Seguí, Santiago A; Cho, Candy H-H; Bessa, José; Rovira, Meritxell; Luengo, Mario; Chhatriwala, Mariya; Berry, Andrew; Ponsa-Cobas, Joan; Maestro, Miguel Angel; Jennings, Rachel E; Pasquali, Lorenzo; Morán, Ignasi; Castro, Natalia; Hanley, Neil A; Gomez-Skarmeta, Jose Luis; Vallier, Ludovic; Ferrer, Jorge

    2015-05-01

    The genomic regulatory programmes that underlie human organogenesis are poorly understood. Pancreas development, in particular, has pivotal implications for pancreatic regeneration, cancer and diabetes. We have now characterized the regulatory landscape of embryonic multipotent progenitor cells that give rise to all pancreatic epithelial lineages. Using human embryonic pancreas and embryonic-stem-cell-derived progenitors we identify stage-specific transcripts and associated enhancers, many of which are co-occupied by transcription factors that are essential for pancreas development. We further show that TEAD1, a Hippo signalling effector, is an integral component of the transcription factor combinatorial code of pancreatic progenitor enhancers. TEAD and its coactivator YAP activate key pancreatic signalling mediators and transcription factors, and regulate the expansion of pancreatic progenitors. This work therefore uncovers a central role for TEAD and YAP as signal-responsive regulators of multipotent pancreatic progenitors, and provides a resource for the study of embryonic development of the human pancreas. PMID:25915126

  2. TEAD and YAP regulate the enhancer network of human embryonic pancreatic progenitors.

    PubMed

    Cebola, Inês; Rodríguez-Seguí, Santiago A; Cho, Candy H-H; Bessa, José; Rovira, Meritxell; Luengo, Mario; Chhatriwala, Mariya; Berry, Andrew; Ponsa-Cobas, Joan; Maestro, Miguel Angel; Jennings, Rachel E; Pasquali, Lorenzo; Morán, Ignasi; Castro, Natalia; Hanley, Neil A; Gomez-Skarmeta, Jose Luis; Vallier, Ludovic; Ferrer, Jorge

    2015-05-01

    The genomic regulatory programmes that underlie human organogenesis are poorly understood. Pancreas development, in particular, has pivotal implications for pancreatic regeneration, cancer and diabetes. We have now characterized the regulatory landscape of embryonic multipotent progenitor cells that give rise to all pancreatic epithelial lineages. Using human embryonic pancreas and embryonic-stem-cell-derived progenitors we identify stage-specific transcripts and associated enhancers, many of which are co-occupied by transcription factors that are essential for pancreas development. We further show that TEAD1, a Hippo signalling effector, is an integral component of the transcription factor combinatorial code of pancreatic progenitor enhancers. TEAD and its coactivator YAP activate key pancreatic signalling mediators and transcription factors, and regulate the expansion of pancreatic progenitors. This work therefore uncovers a central role for TEAD and YAP as signal-responsive regulators of multipotent pancreatic progenitors, and provides a resource for the study of embryonic development of the human pancreas.

  3. TEAD and YAP regulate the enhancer network of human embryonic pancreatic progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Luengo, Mario; Chhatriwala, Mariya; Berry, Andrew; Ponsa-Cobas, Joan; Maestro, Miguel Angel; Jennings, Rachel E.; Pasquali, Lorenzo; Morán, Ignasi; Castro, Natalia; Hanley, Neil A.; Gomez-Skarmeta, Jose Luis; Vallier, Ludovic; Ferrer, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The genomic regulatory programs that underlie human organogenesis are poorly understood. Pancreas development, in particular, has pivotal implications for pancreatic regeneration, cancer, and diabetes. We have now characterized the regulatory landscape of embryonic multipotent progenitor cells that give rise to all pancreatic epithelial lineages. Using human embryonic pancreas and embryonic stem cell-derived progenitors we identify stage-specific transcripts and associated enhancers, many of which are co-occupied by transcription factors that are essential for pancreas development. We further show that TEAD1, a Hippo signaling effector, is an integral component of the transcription factor combinatorial code of pancreatic progenitor enhancers. TEAD and its coactivator YAP activate key pancreatic signaling mediators and transcription factors, and regulate the expansion of pancreatic progenitors. This work therefore uncovers a central role of TEAD and YAP as signal-responsive regulators of multipotent pancreatic progenitors, and provides a resource for the study of embryonic development of the human pancreas. PMID:25915126

  4. Histamine regulation of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer: a review of recent findings

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Taylor; Graf, Allyson; Hodges, Kyle; Kennedy, Lindsey; Hargrove, Laura; Price, Mattie; Kearney, Kate

    2013-01-01

    The pancreas is a dynamic organ that performs a multitude of functions within the body. Diseases that target the pancreas, like pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, are devastating and often fatal to the suffering patient. Histamine and histamine receptors (H1-H4HRs) have been found to play a critical role in biliary diseases. Accordingly, the biliary tract and the pancreas share similarities with regards to morphological, phenotypical and functional features and disease progression, studies related the role of H1-H4HRs in pancreatic diseases are important. In this review, we have highlighted the role that histamine, histidine decarboxylase (HDC), histamine receptors and mast cells (the main source of histamine in the body) play during both pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. The objective of the review is to demonstrate that histamine and histamine signaling may be a potential therapeutic avenue towards treatment strategies for pancreatic diseases. PMID:24570946

  5. Regulation of triple-negative breast cancer cell metastasis by the tumor-suppressor liver kinase B1

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, L V; Tate, C R; Hoang, V T; Burks, H E; Gilliam, D; Martin, E C; Elliott, S; Miller, D B; Buechlein, A; Rusch, D; Tang, H; Nephew, K P; Burow, M E; Collins-Burow, B M

    2015-01-01

    Liver kinase B1 (LKB1), also known as serine/threonine kinase 11 (STK11), has been identified as a tumor suppressor in many cancers including breast. Low LKB1 expression has been associated with poor prognosis of breast cancer patients, and we report here a significant association between loss of LKB1 expression and reduced patient survival specifically in the basal subtype of breast cancer. Owing to the aggressive nature of the basal subtype as evidenced by high incidences of metastasis, the purpose of this study was to determine if LKB1 expression could regulate the invasive and metastatic properties of this specific breast cancer subtype. Induction of LKB1 expression in basal-like breast cancer (BLBC)/triple-negative breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 and BT-549, inhibited invasiveness in vitro and lung metastatic burden in an orthotopic xenograft model. Further analysis of BLBC cells overexpressing LKB1 by unbiased whole transcriptomics (RNA-sequencing) revealed striking regulation of metastasis-associated pathways, including cell adhesion, extracellular matrix remodeling, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). In addition, LKB1 overexpression inhibited EMT-associated genes (CDH2, Vimentin, Twist) and induced the epithelial cell marker CDH1, indicating reversal of the EMT phenotype in the MDA-MB-231 cells. We further demonstrated marked inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase 1 expression and activity via regulation of c-Jun through inhibition of p38 signaling in LKB1-expressing cells. Taken together, these data support future development of LKB1 inducing therapeutics for the suppression of invasion and metastasis of BLBC. PMID:26436950

  6. The Role of miRNAs in the Regulation of Pancreatic Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bimonte, Sabrina; Barbieri, Antonio; Leongito, Maddalena; Palma, Giuseppe; del Vecchio, Vitale; Falco, Michela; Palaia, Raffaele; Albino, Vittorio; Piccirillo, Mauro; Amore, Alfonso; Petrillo, Antonella; Granata, Vincenza; Izzo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is currently one of the deadliest cancers with low overall survival rate. This disease leads to an aggressive local invasion and early metastases and is poorly responsive to treatment with chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Several studies have shown that pancreatic cancer stem cells (PCSCs) play different roles in the regulation of drug resistance and recurrence in pancreatic cancer. MicroRNA (miRNA), a class of newly emerging small noncoding RNAs, is involved in the modulation of several biological activities ranging from invasion to metastases development, as well as drug resistance of pancreatic cancer. In this review, we synthesize the latest findings on the role of miRNAs in regulating different biological properties of pancreatic cancer stem cells. PMID:27006664

  7. Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule regulates the interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei-Wei; Zhan, Shu-Hui; Geng, Chang-Xin; Sun, Xin; Erkan, Mert; Kleeff, Jörg; Xie, Xiang-Jun

    2016-01-01

    PSCs. Silencing of ALCAM by siRNA revealed no significant alteration in the invasion of pancreatic cancer cells, however, it inhibited the invasive ability of PSCs, and decreased the interaction between Panc-1 cells and PSCs. In conclusion, ALCAM is upregulated in PSCs of pancreatic cancer tissues, suggesting a potential role of ALCAM in regulating pancreatic cancer cell-PSC interactions. PMID:27573419

  8. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the abdomen. In 1 out of 4 childhood cases, a cause is never found. What are the symptoms of pancreatitis? Inflammation of the pancreas is often associated with pain in the upper abdomen and/or the back which may develop slowly, ...

  9. N-n-butyl haloperidol iodide ameliorates hypoxia/reoxygenation injury through modulating the LKB1/AMPK/ROS pathway in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Binger; Wang, Bin; Zhong, Shuping; Zhang, Yanmei; Gao, Fenfei; Chen, Yicun; Zheng, Fuchun; Shi, Ganggang

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cells are highly sensitive to hypoxia and contribute to myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. We have reported that N-n-butyl haloperidol iodide (F2) can attenuate hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) injury in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (CMECs). However, the molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Neonatal rat CMECs were isolated and subjected to H/R. Pretreatment of F2 leads to a reduction in H/R injury, as evidenced by increased cell viability, decreased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage and apoptosis, together with enhanced AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and liver kinase B1 (LKB1) phosphorylation in H/R ECs. Blockade of AMPK with compound C reversed F2-induced inhibition of H/R injury, as evidenced by decreased cell viability, increased LDH release and apoptosis. Moreover, compound C also blocked the ability of F2 to reduce H/R-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Supplementation with the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) reduced ROS levels, increased cell survival rate, and decreased both LDH release and apoptosis after H/R. In conclusion, our data indicate that F2 may mitigate H/R injury by stimulating LKB1/AMPK signaling pathway and subsequent suppression of ROS production in CMECs. PMID:27166184

  10. Ajoene, a stable garlic by-product, inhibits high fat diet-induced hepatic steatosis and oxidative injury through LKB1-dependent AMPK activation.

    PubMed

    Han, Chang Yeob; Ki, Sung Hwan; Kim, Young Woo; Noh, Kyoung; Lee, Da Yeon; Kang, Bomi; Ryu, Jae-Ha; Jeon, Raok; Kim, Eun Hyun; Hwang, Se Jin; Kim, Sang Geon

    2011-01-15

    Hepatic steatosis, a hepatic component of metabolic syndrome, is common and may progress to steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. The liver X receptor-α (LXRα)-sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) pathway plays a key role in hepatic steatosis. This study investigated the potential of ajoene, a stable garlic by-product, to inhibit high fat diet (HFD)-induced hepatic steatosis and the underlying mechanism. Ajoene treatment attenuated fat accumulation and induction of lipogenic genes in the liver of HFD-fed mice. Blood biochemical analyses and histopathologic examinations showed that ajoene prevented liver injury with the inhibition of oxidative stress, as evidenced by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances formation and nitrotyrosinylation. Moreover, ajoene treatment inhibited LXRα agonist (T0901317)-mediated SREBP-1c activation, and transactivation of the lipogenic target genes in hepatocytes. Ajoene was found to activate AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) via LKB1, responsible for the inhibition of p70 ribosomal S6 kinase-1 (S6K1). The ability of ajoene to repress T0901317-induced SREBP-1c expression was antagonized by inhibition of AMPK or activation of S6K1, supporting the role of these kinases in the antisteatotic effect. Our results demonstrate that ajoene has an effect of activating AMPK through LKB1 and inhibit S6K1 activity, contributing to the prevention of SREBP-1c-mediated hepatic lipogenesis via the inhibition of LXRα activity.

  11. Sirtuin 1–Mediated Cellular Metabolic Memory of High Glucose Via the LKB1/AMPK/ROS Pathway and Therapeutic Effects of Metformin

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhi; Chen, Haibing; Li, Jun; Li, Tao; Zheng, Bingqing; Zheng, Ying; Jin, Huiyi; He, Ying; Gu, Qing; Xu, Xun

    2012-01-01

    Cellular metabolic memory occurs in diabetic microvascular and macrovascular complications, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we investigate the role of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and metformin in this phenomenon. In bovine retinal capillary endothelial cells (BRECs) and retinas of diabetic rats, the inflammatory gene, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), and the proapoptotic gene, Bax, induced by hyperglycemia, remained elevated after returning to normoglycemia. BRECs with small interfering RNA–mediated SIRT1 knockdown had increased sensitivity to hyperglycemia stress, whereas SIRT1 overexpression or activation by metformin inhibited the increase of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species–mediated glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase by poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activity through the upregulation of liver kinase B1/AMP-activated protein kinase (LKB1/AMPK), ultimately suppressing NF-κB and Bax expression. Furthermore, we showed that hyperglycemia led to PARP activation, which in turn may have downregulated SIRT1. Of importance, this study also demonstrated that metformin suppressed the “memory” of hyperglycemia stress in the diabetic retinas, which may be involved in the SIRT1/LKB1/AMPK pathway. Our data suggest that SIRT1 is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of the cellular metabolic memory, and the use of metformin specifically for such therapy may be a new avenue of investigation in the diabetes field. PMID:22124463

  12. Transcriptional Regulation of Chemokine Genes: A Link to Pancreatic Islet Inflammation?

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Susan J.; Collier, J. Jason

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced expression of chemotactic cytokines (aka chemokines) within pancreatic islets likely contributes to islet inflammation by regulating the recruitment and activation of various leukocyte populations, including macrophages, neutrophils, and T-lymphocytes. Because of the powerful actions of these chemokines, precise transcriptional control is required. In this review, we highlight what is known about the signals and mechanisms that govern the transcription of genes encoding specific chemokine proteins in pancreatic islet β-cells, which include contributions from the NF-κB and STAT1 pathways. We further discuss increased chemokine expression in pancreatic islets during autoimmune-mediated and obesity-related development of diabetes. PMID:26018641

  13. A positive feedback regulation of ISL-1 in DLBCL but not in pancreatic β-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qiao; Yang, Zhe; Wang, Weiping; Guo, Ting; Jia, Zhuqing; Ma, Kangtao; Zhou, Chunyan

    2014-07-04

    Highlights: • ISL-1 is highly expressed in human pancreatic β-cells and DLBCL. • ISL-1 accelerates the tumorigenesis of DLBCL in vivo. • c-Myc positively regulates ISL-1 expression in DLBCL but not in pancreatic β-cells. • ISL-1 and c-Myc forms an ISL-1/c-Myc transcriptional complex only in DLBCL. • Positive feedback regulation of ISL-1 does not exist in normal pancreatic β-cell. - Abstract: Insulin enhancer binding protein-1 (ISL-1), a LIM-homeodomain transcription factor, has been reported to play essential roles in promoting adult pancreatic β-cells proliferation. Recent studies indicate that ISL-1 may also involve in the occurrence of a variety of tumors. However, whether ISL-1 has any functional effect on tumorigenesis, and what are the differences on ISL-1 function in distinct conditions, are completely unknown. In this study, we found that ISL-1 was highly expressed in human pancreatic β-cells, as well as in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), but to a much less extent in other normal tissues or tumor specimens. Further study revealed that ISL-1 promoted the proliferation of pancreatic β-cells and DLBCL cells, and also accelerated the tumorigenesis of DLBCL in vivo. We also found that ISL-1 could activate c-Myc transcription not only in pancreatic β-cells but also in DLBCL cells. However, a cell-specific feedback regulation was detectable only in DLBCL cells. This auto-regulatory loop was established by the interaction of ISL-1 and c-Myc to form an ISL-1/c-Myc transcriptional complex, and synergistically to promote ISL-1 transcription through binding on the ISL-1 promoter. Taken together, our results demonstrate a positive feedback regulation of ISL-1 in DLBCL but not in pancreatic β-cells, which might result in the functional diversities of ISL-1 in different physiological and pathological processes.

  14. Androgen regulated expression of the alpha 2u-globulin gene in pancreatic hepatocytes of rat

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Under a copper-deficient regimen, pancreatic cells in the adult rat can be found to undergo differentiation into hepatocytes. Pancreatic hepatocytes induced in male and female rats were examined for the expression of the androgen-inducible hepatic protein, alpha 2u- globulin. Alpha 2u-Globulin protein was demonstrable by immunoperoxidase method in all the pancreatic hepatocytes of male rats. Northern blot analysis confirmed the presence of 1.3 kb alpha 2u- globulin mRNA transcript in the pancreas of male rats with hepatocytes. Orchiectomy resulted in marked decrease of alpha 2u-globulin protein and its mRNA. Administration of dihydrotestosterone to castrated rats resulted in increased levels of alpha 2u-globulin mRNA and the amount of alpha 2u-globulin protein in the pancreatic hepatocytes. Unlike normal males, in intact and ovariectomized females alpha 2u-globulin was not detectable in pancreatic hepatocytes. These results indicate that similar to hepatic parenchymal cells pancreatic hepatocytes synthesize alpha 2u-globulin under androgenic regulation. Furthermore, unlike in liver where it is expressed predominantly in perivenular and midlobular hepatocytes, there is no localized difference in the expression of this gene in the transdifferentiated pancreatic hepatocytes. PMID:1688854

  15. GATA4 and GATA6 regulate pancreatic endoderm identity through inhibition of hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Shouhong; Sussel, Lori

    2016-03-01

    GATA4 and GATA6 are zinc finger transcription factors that have important functions in several mesodermal and endodermal organs, including heart, liver and pancreas. In humans, heterozygous mutations of either factor are associated with pancreatic agenesis; however, homozygous deletion of both Gata4 and Gata6 is necessary to disrupt pancreas development in mice. In this study, we demonstrate that arrested pancreatic development in Gata4(fl/fl); Gata6(fl/fl); Pdx1:Cre (pDKO) embryos is accompanied by the transition of ventral and dorsal pancreatic fates into intestinal or stomach lineages, respectively. These results indicate that GATA4 and GATA6 play essential roles in maintaining pancreas identity by regulating foregut endodermal fates. Remarkably, pancreatic anlagen derived from pDKO embryos also display a dramatic upregulation of hedgehog pathway components, which are normally absent from the presumptive pancreatic endoderm. Consistent with the erroneous activation of hedgehog signaling, we demonstrate that GATA4 and GATA6 are able to repress transcription through the sonic hedgehog (Shh) endoderm-specific enhancer MACS1 and that GATA-binding sites within this enhancer are necessary for this repressive activity. These studies establish the importance of GATA4/6-mediated inhibition of hedgehog signaling as a major mechanism regulating pancreatic endoderm specification during patterning of the gut tube.

  16. GATA4 and GATA6 regulate pancreatic endoderm identity through inhibition of hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Shouhong; Sussel, Lori

    2016-03-01

    GATA4 and GATA6 are zinc finger transcription factors that have important functions in several mesodermal and endodermal organs, including heart, liver and pancreas. In humans, heterozygous mutations of either factor are associated with pancreatic agenesis; however, homozygous deletion of both Gata4 and Gata6 is necessary to disrupt pancreas development in mice. In this study, we demonstrate that arrested pancreatic development in Gata4(fl/fl); Gata6(fl/fl); Pdx1:Cre (pDKO) embryos is accompanied by the transition of ventral and dorsal pancreatic fates into intestinal or stomach lineages, respectively. These results indicate that GATA4 and GATA6 play essential roles in maintaining pancreas identity by regulating foregut endodermal fates. Remarkably, pancreatic anlagen derived from pDKO embryos also display a dramatic upregulation of hedgehog pathway components, which are normally absent from the presumptive pancreatic endoderm. Consistent with the erroneous activation of hedgehog signaling, we demonstrate that GATA4 and GATA6 are able to repress transcription through the sonic hedgehog (Shh) endoderm-specific enhancer MACS1 and that GATA-binding sites within this enhancer are necessary for this repressive activity. These studies establish the importance of GATA4/6-mediated inhibition of hedgehog signaling as a major mechanism regulating pancreatic endoderm specification during patterning of the gut tube. PMID:26932670

  17. Green Tea Extract Rich in Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate Prevents Fatty Liver by AMPK Activation via LKB1 in Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Santamarina, Aline B; Oliveira, Juliana L; Silva, Fernanda P; Carnier, June; Mennitti, Laís V; Santana, Aline A; de Souza, Gabriel H I; Ribeiro, Eliane B; Oller do Nascimento, Cláudia M; Lira, Fábio S; Oyama, Lila M

    2015-01-01

    Supplementation with epigallocatechin-3-gallate has been determined to aid in the prevention of obesity. Decaffeinated green tea extract appears to restore a normal hepatic metabolic profile and attenuate high-fat diet (HFD)-induced effects, thereby preventing non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in mice. Mice were maintained on either a control diet (CD) or HFD for 16 weeks and supplemented with either water or green tea extract (50 mg/kg/day). The body mass increase, serum adiponectin level, and lipid profile were measured over the course of the treatment. Furthermore, the AMPK pathway protein expression in the liver was measured. From the fourth week, the weight gain in the CD + green tea extract (CE) group was lower than that in the CD + water (CW) group. From the eighth week, the weight gain in the HFD + water (HFW) group was found to be higher than that in the CW group. Moreover, the weight gain in the HFD + green tea extract (HFE) group was found to be lower than that in the HFW group. Carcass lipid content was found to be higher in the HFW group than that in the CW and HFE groups. Serum analysis showed reduced non-esterified fatty acid level in the CE and HFE groups as compared with their corresponding placebo groups. Increased adiponectin level was observed in the same groups. Increased VLDL-TG secretion was observed in the HFW group as compared with the CW and HFE groups. Increased protein expression of AdipoR2, SIRT1, pLKB1, and pAMPK was observed in the HFE group, which explained the reduced expression of ACC, FAS, SREBP-1, and ChREBP in this group. These results indicate that the effects of decaffeinated green tea extract may be related to the activation of AMPK via LKB1 in the liver of HFD-fed mice.

  18. Green Tea Extract Rich in Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate Prevents Fatty Liver by AMPK Activation via LKB1 in Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Santamarina, Aline B.; Oliveira, Juliana L.; Silva, Fernanda P.; Carnier, June; Mennitti, Laís V.; Santana, Aline A.; de Souza, Gabriel H. I.; Ribeiro, Eliane B.; Oller do Nascimento, Cláudia M.; Lira, Fábio S.; Oyama, Lila M.

    2015-01-01

    Supplementation with epigallocatechin-3-gallate has been determined to aid in the prevention of obesity. Decaffeinated green tea extract appears to restore a normal hepatic metabolic profile and attenuate high-fat diet (HFD)-induced effects, thereby preventing non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in mice. Mice were maintained on either a control diet (CD) or HFD for 16 weeks and supplemented with either water or green tea extract (50 mg/kg/day). The body mass increase, serum adiponectin level, and lipid profile were measured over the course of the treatment. Furthermore, the AMPK pathway protein expression in the liver was measured. From the fourth week, the weight gain in the CD + green tea extract (CE) group was lower than that in the CD + water (CW) group. From the eighth week, the weight gain in the HFD + water (HFW) group was found to be higher than that in the CW group. Moreover, the weight gain in the HFD + green tea extract (HFE) group was found to be lower than that in the HFW group. Carcass lipid content was found to be higher in the HFW group than that in the CW and HFE groups. Serum analysis showed reduced non-esterified fatty acid level in the CE and HFE groups as compared with their corresponding placebo groups. Increased adiponectin level was observed in the same groups. Increased VLDL-TG secretion was observed in the HFW group as compared with the CW and HFE groups. Increased protein expression of AdipoR2, SIRT1, pLKB1, and pAMPK was observed in the HFE group, which explained the reduced expression of ACC, FAS, SREBP-1, and ChREBP in this group. These results indicate that the effects of decaffeinated green tea extract may be related to the activation of AMPK via LKB1 in the liver of HFD-fed mice. PMID:26536464

  19. Isoflurane suppresses the self-renewal of normal mouse neural stem cells in a p53-dependent manner by activating the Lkb1-p53-p21 signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Hou, Lengchen; Liu, Te; Wang, Jian

    2015-11-01

    Isoflurane is widely used in anaesthesia for surgical operations. However, whether it elicits unwanted side effects, particularly in neuronal cells, remains to be fully elucidated. The Lkb1-p53-p21 signalling pathway is able to modulate neuronal self‑renewal and proliferation. Furthermore, the suppression of Lkb1‑dependent p21 induction leads to apoptosis. In the present study, whether Lkb1‑p53‑p21 signalling is involved in the response to isoflurane was investigated. A comparison of mouse primary, wild‑type neural stem cells (WT NSCs) with the p53‑/‑ NSC cell line, NE‑4C, revealed that isoflurane inhibited proliferation in a dose‑, a time‑ and a p53‑dependent manner. However, flow cytometric analysis revealed that the concentration of isoflurane which caused 50% inhibition (the IC50 value) induced cell cycle arrest in WT NSCs. Furthermore, the protein expression levels of LKB1, p53 and p21 were increased, although those of nestin and survivin decreased, following treatment of WT NSCs with isoflurane. On the other hand, isoflurane induced the phosphorylation of Ser15 in p53 in WT NSCs, which was associated with p53 binding to the p21 promoter, and consequentially, the transcriptional activation of p21. All these events were abrogated in NE‑4C cells. Taken together, the present study has demonstrated that isoflurane suppresses the self-renewal of normal mouse NSCs by activating the Lkb1-p53-p21 signalling pathway.

  20. Proteasome regulates turnover of toxic human amylin in pancreatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sanghamitra; Trikha, Saurabh; Sarkar, Anjali; Jeremic, Aleksandar M.

    2016-01-01

    Toxic human amylin (hA) oligomers and aggregates are implicated in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Although recent studies demonstrated a causal connection between hA uptake and toxicity in pancreatic cells, the mechanism of amylin’s clearance following its internalization and its relationship to toxicity is yet to be determined, and hence was investigated here. Using pancreatic rat insulinoma β-cells and human islets as model systems, we show that hA, following its internalization, first accumulates in the cytosol followed by its translocation into nucleus, and to a lesser extent lysosomes, keeping the net cytosolic amylin content low. An increase in hA accumulation in the nucleus of pancreatic cells correlated with its cytotoxicity, suggesting that its excessive accumulation in the nucleus is detrimental. hA interacted with 20S core and 19S lid subunits of the β-cell proteasomal complex, as suggested by immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy studies, which subsequently resulted in a decrease in the proteasome’s proteolytic activity in these cells. In vitro binding and activity assays confirmed an intrinsic and potent ability of amylin to interact with the 20S core complex thereby modulating its proteolytic activity. Interestingly, less toxic and aggregation incapable rat amylin (rA) showed a comparable inhibitory effect on proteasome activity and protein ubiquitination, decoupling amylin aggregation/toxicity and amylin-induced protein stress. In agreement with these studies, inhibition of proteasomal proteolytic activity significantly increased intracellular amylin content and toxicity. Taken together, our results suggest a pivotal role of proteasomes in amylin’s turnover and detoxification in pancreatic cells. PMID:27340132

  1. GROWTH OF HUMAN PANCREATIC CANCER IS INHIBITED BY DOWN-REGULATION OF GASTRIN GENE EXPRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Matters, Gail L.; Harms, John F.; McGovern, Christopher O.; Jayakumar, Calpurnia; Crepin, Keisha; Smith, Zachary P.; Nelson, Melissa C.; Stock, Heather; Fenn, Craig W.; Kaiser, James; Kester, Mark; Smith, Jill P.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives This study evaluated the effects of gastrin mRNA down-regulation on growth of human pancreatic cancer. Methods Gastrin expression was examined in human pancreatic cancer cell lines by RT-PCR and peptide expression was assessed by immunocytochemistry. Gastrin was down-regulated using either stable transfection of an antisense gastrin cDNA or one of three shRNA (short hairpin RNA) constructs. Tumor formation was evaluated following either subcutaneous or orthotopic injections into nude mice. The effect of nanoliposomes loaded with gastrin siRNA was tested in mice bearing pancreatic tumors. Results Stable transfection of gastrin antisense or shRNAs into BxPC-3 cells resulted in clones with >90% reduction in gastrin mRNA. Tumor growth rate and incidence of metastases in both wild type and transfected pancreatic cancer cells was directly proportional to the degrees of gastrin mRNA expression. Immunofluoresence analysis confirmed that gastrin peptide levels were decreased in antisense and shRNA tumors. Gastrin knockdown clones had lower Ki-67 and increased cleaved caspase-3 staining, consistent with known effects of gastrin on proliferation and apoptosis. Tumors in mice treated with gastrin siRNA were smaller than controls. Conclusions These results suggest that RNAi targeting of gastrin could serve as an effective treatment for pancreatic cancer. PMID:19465883

  2. Efficient targeting and tumor retardation effect of pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF)-specific RNA replacement in pancreatic cancer mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun-Hee; Moon, Ju Young; Kim, Eun-Ok; Lee, Sang-Jin; Kang, Se Hun; Kim, Seok Ki; Heo, Kyun; Lee, Yusun; Kim, Hana; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Kim, Daehong; Song, Min Sun; Lee, Seoung-Wook; Lee, Yangsoon; Koh, Sang Seok; Kim, In-Hoo

    2014-03-28

    The soluble protein pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF) plays an important role in pancreatic tumor progression and has begun to attract attention as a therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer. We herein present PAUF RNA-targeting gene therapy strategies with both targeting and therapeutic function using trans-splicing ribozyme (TSR) in pancreatic cancer. We developed adenoviral PAUF-targeting TSR (Rz) containing a PAUF-specific internal guide sequence (IGS) determined by library screening. This Rz harbors suicide gene, herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) or firefly luciferase (Luc) as a transgene for 3' exon replacement of PAUF RNAs. Ad-Rz-TK, Rz harboring the HSV-tk, showed significant inhibition of tumor growth in vivo as well as PAUF-dependent cell death in vitro via a successful trans-splicing reaction. Selective induction of Rz-controlled transgene in PAUF-expressing pancreatic cancer was confirmed through noninvasive in vivo imaging; a luminescence signal from Rz harboring Luc (Ad-Rz-Luc) was detectable only in pancreatic tumor sites, not in normal mice. In addition, a [(125)I] FIAU signal reflecting thymidine kinase expression through SPECT and ex vivo biodistribution was co-localized with the tumor sites when we treated with Ad-Rz-TK in orthotopic xenograft model. Taken together, these results imply that PAUF-targeting TSR can contribute to successful targeted gene therapy for pancreatic cancer.

  3. Protein kinase D2 induces invasion of pancreatic cancer cells by regulating matrix metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Wille, Christoph; Köhler, Conny; Armacki, Milena; Jamali, Arsia; Gössele, Ulrike; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Seufferlein, Thomas; Eiseler, Tim

    2014-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer cell invasion, metastasis, and angiogenesis are major challenges for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. Protein kinase D (PKD) isoforms are involved in controlling tumor cell motility, angiogenesis, and metastasis. In particular PKD2 expression is up-regulated in pancreatic cancer, whereas PKD1 expression is lowered. We report that both kinases control pancreatic cancer cell invasive properties in an isoform-specific manner. PKD2 enhances invasion in three-dimensional extracellular matrix (3D-ECM) cultures by stimulating expression and secretion of matrix metalloproteinases 7 and 9 (MMP7/9), by which MMP7 is likely to act upstream of MMP9. Knockdown of MMP7/9 blocks PKD2-mediated invasion in 3D-ECM assays and in vivo using tumors growing on chorioallantois membranes. Furthermore, MMP9 enhances PKD2-mediated tumor angiogenesis by releasing extracellular matrix-bound vascular endothelial growth factor A, increasing its bioavailability and angiogenesis. Of interest, specific knockdown of PKD1 in PKD2-expressing pancreatic cancer cells further enhanced the invasive properties in 3D-ECM systems by generating a high-motility phenotype. Loss of PKD1 thus may be beneficial for tumor cells to enhance their matrix-invading abilities. In conclusion, we define for the first time PKD1 and 2 isoform-selective effects on pancreatic cancer cell invasion and angiogenesis, in vitro and in vivo, addressing PKD isoform specificity as a major factor for future therapeutic strategies. PMID:24336522

  4. Osteoprotegerin Regulates Pancreatic β-Cell Homeostasis upon Microbial Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Yukiko; Maruyama, Kenta; Fujii, Hideki; Sugawara, Isamu; Ko, Shigeru B. H.; Yasuda, Hisataka; Matsui, Hidenori; Matsuo, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG), a decoy receptor for receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL), antagonizes RANKL’s osteoclastogenic function in bone. We previously demonstrated that systemic administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to mice elevates OPG levels and reduces RANKL levels in peripheral blood. Here, we show that mice infected with Salmonella, Staphylococcus, Mycobacteria or influenza virus also show elevated serum OPG levels. We then asked whether OPG upregulation following microbial invasion had an effect outside of bone. To do so, we treated mice with LPS and observed OPG production in pancreas, especially in β-cells of pancreatic islets. Insulin release following LPS administration was enhanced in mice lacking OPG, suggesting that OPG inhibits insulin secretion under acute inflammatory conditions. Consistently, treatment of MIN6 pancreatic β-cells with OPG decreased their insulin secretion following glucose stimulation in the presence of LPS. Finally, our findings suggest that LPS-induced OPG upregulation is mediated in part by activator protein (AP)-1 family transcription factors, particularly Fos proteins. Overall, we report that acute microbial infection elevates serum OPG, which maintains β-cell homeostasis by restricting glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, possibly preventing microbe-induced exhaustion of β-cell secretory capacity. PMID:26751951

  5. Carbachol regulates cholecystokinin receptor on pancreatic acinar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Honda, T.; Adachi, H.; Noguchi, M.; Sato, S.; Onishi, S.; Aoki, E.; Torizuka, K.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have examined the effect of carbamylcholine on the binding of cholecystokinin (CCK) to dispersed acini from rat pancreas. The CCK receptor on pancreatic acini possesses two classes of binding sites. Simultaneous addition of carbamylcholine inhibited binding of CCK binding sites. Atropine prevented the inhibitory effect of carbamylcholine, whereas calcium ionophore A23187 did not alter binding of CCK. 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) inhibited binding of CCK in the same manner as carbamylcholine. Inhibition by carbamylcholine was reversible and the recovery was time dependent. By contrast, inhibition of binding of CCK by TPA did not reverse after a 60-min incubation without the agent. These findings, at least in part, account for the inhibition of the CCK-induced stimulation of amylase secretion by carbamylcholine. The action of TPA on binding of CCK suggests the possible involvement of the activation of protein kinase C in the inhibition of binding.

  6. Hypoxic stellate cells of pancreatic cancer stroma regulate extracellular matrix fiber organization and cancer cell motility.

    PubMed

    Sada, Masafumi; Ohuchida, Kenoki; Horioka, Kohei; Okumura, Takashi; Moriyama, Taiki; Miyasaka, Yoshihiro; Ohtsuka, Takao; Mizumoto, Kazuhiro; Oda, Yoshinao; Nakamura, Masafumi

    2016-03-28

    Desmoplasia and hypoxia in pancreatic cancer mutually affect each other and create a tumor-supportive microenvironment. Here, we show that microenvironment remodeling by hypoxic pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promotes cancer cell motility through alteration of extracellular matrix (ECM) fiber architecture. Three-dimensional (3-D) matrices derived from PSCs under hypoxia exhibited highly organized parallel-patterned matrix fibers compared with 3-D matrices derived from PSCs under normoxia, and promoted cancer cell motility by inducing directional migration of cancer cells due to the parallel fiber architecture. Microarray analysis revealed that procollagen-lysine, 2-oxoglutarate 5-dioxygenase 2 (PLOD2) in PSCs was the gene that potentially regulates ECM fiber architecture under hypoxia. Stromal PLOD2 expression in surgical specimens of pancreatic cancer was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of PLOD2 in PSCs blocked parallel fiber architecture of 3-D matrices, leading to decreased directional migration of cancer cells within the matrices. In conclusion, these findings indicate that hypoxia-induced PLOD2 expression in PSCs creates a permissive microenvironment for migration of cancer cells through architectural regulation of stromal ECM in pancreatic cancer.

  7. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Gene Mutations and Risk for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    McWilliams, Robert R.; Petersen, Gloria M.; Rabe, Kari G.; Holtegaard, Leonard M.; Lynch, Pamela J.; Bishop, Michele D.; Highsmith, W. Edward

    2009-01-01

    Background Mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene are common in white persons and are associated with pancreatic disease. The purpose of this case-control study was to determine whether CFTR mutations confer a higher risk of pancreatic cancer. Methods In a case-control study, we compared the rates of 39 common cystic fibrosis–associated CFTR mutations between 949 white patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma and 13,340 white controls from a clinical laboratory database for prenatal testing for CFTR mutations. The main outcome measure was the CFTR mutation frequency in patients and controls. Results Overall, 50 (5.3%) of 949 patients with pancreatic cancer carried a common CFTR mutation versus 510 (3.8%) of 13,340 controls (odds ratio, 1.40; 95% confidence interval, 1.04–1.89; P=.027). Among patients who were younger when their disease was diagnosed (<60 years), the carrier frequency was higher than in controls (odds ratio, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.14–2.94; P=.011). In patient-only analyses, the presence of a mutation was associated with younger age (median 62 vs 67 years; P=.034). In subgroups, the difference was seen only among ever-smokers, (60 vs 65 years, p=.028). Subsequent sequencing analysis of the CFTR gene detected 8 (16%) compound heterozygotes among the 50 patients initially detected to have 1 mutation. Conclusions Carrying a disease-associated mutation in CFTR is associated with a modest increase in risk for pancreatic cancer. Those affected appear to be diagnosed at a younger age, especially among smokers. Clinical evidence of antecedent pancreatitis was uncommon among both carriers and noncarriers of CFTR mutations. PMID:19885835

  8. Disruption of BASIGIN decreases lactic acid export and sensitizes non-small cell lung cancer to biguanides independently of the LKB1 status.

    PubMed

    Granja, Sara; Marchiq, Ibtissam; Le Floch, Renaud; Moura, Conceição Souto; Baltazar, Fátima; Pouysségur, Jacques

    2015-03-30

    Most cancers rely on aerobic glycolysis to generate energy and metabolic intermediates. To maintain a high glycolytic rate, cells must efficiently export lactic acid through the proton-coupled monocarboxylate transporters (MCT1/4). These transporters require a chaperone, CD147/BASIGIN (BSG) for trafficking to the plasma membrane and function.To validate the key role of these transporters in lung cancer, we first analysed the expression of MCT1/4 and BSG in 50 non-small lung cancer (NSCLC) cases. These proteins were specifically upregulated in tumour tissues. We then disrupted BSG in three NSCLC cell lines (A549, H1975 and H292) via 'Zinc-Finger Nucleases'. The three homozygous BSG-/- cell lines displayed a low MCT activity (10- to 5-fold reduction, for MCT1 and MCT4, respectively) compared to wild-type cells. Consequently, the rate of glycolysis, compared to the wild-type counterpart, was reduced by 2.0- to 3.5-fold, whereas the rate of respiration was stimulated in BSG-/- cell lines. Both wild-type and BSG-null cells were extremely sensitive to the mitochondria inhibitor metformin/phenformin in normoxia. However, only BSG-null cells, independently of their LKB1 status, remained sensitive to biguanides in hypoxia in vitro and tumour growth in nude mice. Our results demonstrate that inhibiting glycolysis by targeting lactic acid export sensitizes NSCLC to phenformin. PMID:25894929

  9. Disruption of BASIGIN decreases lactic acid export and sensitizes non-small cell lung cancer to biguanides independently of the LKB1 status.

    PubMed

    Granja, Sara; Marchiq, Ibtissam; Le Floch, Renaud; Moura, Conceição Souto; Baltazar, Fátima; Pouysségur, Jacques

    2015-03-30

    Most cancers rely on aerobic glycolysis to generate energy and metabolic intermediates. To maintain a high glycolytic rate, cells must efficiently export lactic acid through the proton-coupled monocarboxylate transporters (MCT1/4). These transporters require a chaperone, CD147/BASIGIN (BSG) for trafficking to the plasma membrane and function.To validate the key role of these transporters in lung cancer, we first analysed the expression of MCT1/4 and BSG in 50 non-small lung cancer (NSCLC) cases. These proteins were specifically upregulated in tumour tissues. We then disrupted BSG in three NSCLC cell lines (A549, H1975 and H292) via 'Zinc-Finger Nucleases'. The three homozygous BSG-/- cell lines displayed a low MCT activity (10- to 5-fold reduction, for MCT1 and MCT4, respectively) compared to wild-type cells. Consequently, the rate of glycolysis, compared to the wild-type counterpart, was reduced by 2.0- to 3.5-fold, whereas the rate of respiration was stimulated in BSG-/- cell lines. Both wild-type and BSG-null cells were extremely sensitive to the mitochondria inhibitor metformin/phenformin in normoxia. However, only BSG-null cells, independently of their LKB1 status, remained sensitive to biguanides in hypoxia in vitro and tumour growth in nude mice. Our results demonstrate that inhibiting glycolysis by targeting lactic acid export sensitizes NSCLC to phenformin.

  10. The pancreatitis-associated protein VMP1, a key regulator of inducible autophagy, promotes KrasG12D-mediated pancreatic cancer initiation

    PubMed Central

    Loncle, C; Molejon, M I; Lac, S; Tellechea, J I; Lomberk, G; Gramatica, L; Fernandez Zapico, M F; Dusetti, N; Urrutia, R; Iovanna, J L

    2016-01-01

    Both clinical and experimental evidence have firmly established that chronic pancreatitis, in particular in the context of Kras oncogenic mutations, predisposes to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). However, the repertoire of molecular mediators of pancreatitis involved in Kras-mediated initiation of pancreatic carcinogenesis remains to be fully defined. In this study we demonstrate a novel role for vacuole membrane protein 1 (VMP1), a pancreatitis-associated protein critical for inducible autophagy, in the regulation of Kras-induced PDAC initiation. Using a newly developed genetically engineered model, we demonstrate that VMP1 increases the ability of Kras to give rise to preneoplastic lesions, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias (PanINs). This promoting effect of VMP1 on PanIN formation is due, at least in part, by an increase in cell proliferation combined with a decrease in apoptosis. Using chloroquine, an inhibitor of autophagy, we show that this drug antagonizes the effect of VMP1 on PanIN formation. Thus, we conclude that VMP1-mediated autophagy cooperate with Kras to promote PDAC initiation. These findings are of significant medical relevance, molecules targeting autophagy are currently being tested along chemotherapeutic agents to treat PDAC and other tumors in human trials. PMID:27415425

  11. Two chalcones, 4-hydroxyderricin and xanthoangelol, stimulate GLUT4-dependent glucose uptake through the LKB1/AMP-activated protein kinase signaling pathway in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Mitsuhiro; Fujinami, Aya; Kobayashi, Norihiro; Amano, Akiko; Ishigami, Akihito; Tokuda, Harukuni; Suzuki, Nobutaka; Ito, Fumitake; Mori, Taisuke; Sawada, Morio; Iwasa, Koichi; Kitawaki, Jo; Ohnishi, Katsunori; Tsujikawa, Muneo; Obayashi, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    4-Hydroxyderricin (4HD) and xanthoangelol (XAG) are major components of n-hexane/ethyl acetate (5:1) extract of the yellow-colored stem juice of Angelica keiskei. 4-Hydroxyderricin and XAG have been reported to increase glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4)-dependent glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, but the detailed mechanism of this phenomenon remains unknown. This present study was aimed at clarifying the detailed mechanism by which 4HD and XAG increase GLUT4-dependent glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Both 4HD and XAG increased glucose uptake and GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane. 4-Hydroxyderricin and XAG also stimulated the phosphorylation of 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and its downstream target acetyl-CoA carboxylase. In addition, phosphorylation of liver kinase B1 (LKB1), which acts upstream of AMPK, was also increased by 4HD and XAG treatment. Small interfering RNA knockdown of LKB1 attenuated 4HD- and XAG-stimulated AMPK phosphorylation and suppressed glucose uptake. These findings demonstrate that 4HD and XAG can increase GLUT4-dependent glucose uptake through the LKB1/AMPK signaling pathway in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. PMID:26077869

  12. CXCR2 signaling regulates KRAS(G12D)-induced autocrine growth of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Purohit, Abhilasha; Varney, Michelle; Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Ouellette, Michel M.; Batra, Surinder K.; Singh, Rakesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological inhibition of RAS, the master regulator of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), continues to be a challenge. Mutations in various isoforms of RAS gene, including KRAS are known to upregulate CXC chemokines; however, their precise role in KRAS-driven pancreatic cancer remains unclear. In this report, we reveal a previously unidentified tumor cell-autonomous role of KRAS(G12D)-induced CXCR2 signaling in mediating growth of neoplastic PDAC cells. Progressively increasing expression of mCXCR2 and its ligands was detected in the malignant ductal cells of Pdx1-cre;LSL-Kras(G12D) mice. Knocking-down CXCR2 in KRAS(G12D)-bearing human pancreatic duct-derived cells demonstrated a significant decrease in the in vitro and in vivo tumor cell proliferation. Furthermore, CXCR2 antagonists showed selective growth inhibition of KRAS(G12D)-bearing cells in vitro. Intriguingly, both genetic and pharmacological inhibition of CXCR2 signaling in KRAS(G12D)-bearing pancreatic ductal cells reduced the levels of KRAS protein, strongly implying the presence of a KRAS-CXCR2 feed-forward loop. Together, these data demonstrate the role of CXCR2 signaling in KRAS(G12D)-induced growth transformation and progression in PDAC. PMID:26771140

  13. Regulation of exercise-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a Ser/Thr kinase that has been thought to be an important mediator for exercise-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle. Liver kinase B1 (LKB1) is an upstream kinase for AMPK and AMPK-related protein kinases, of which the function in skeletal muscle has not been well documented. Our group and others have generated mice lacking AMPK activity in skeletal muscle, as well as muscle-specific LKB1 knockout mice. In this review, we discuss the potential role of AMPK and LKB1 in regulating exercise-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle. We also discuss our recent study, demonstrating the molecular mechanism of obesity-induced development of skeletal muscle insulin resistance. PMID:27462580

  14. TNF-alpha-dependent regulation of acute pancreatitis severity by Ly-6C(hi) monocytes in mice.

    PubMed

    Perides, George; Weiss, Eric R; Michael, Emily S; Laukkarinen, Johanna M; Duffield, Jeremy S; Steer, Michael L

    2011-04-15

    The roles of monocytes/macrophages and their mechanisms of action in the regulation of pancreatitis are poorly understood. To address these issues, we have employed genetically altered mouse strains that either express the human diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) coupled to the CD11b promoter or have global deletion of TNF-α. Targeted, conditional depletion of monocytes/macrophages was achieved by administration of diphtheria toxin (DT) to CD11b-DTR mice. We show that in the absence of DT administration, pancreatitis is associated with an increase in pancreatic content of Ly-6C(hi) monocytes/macrophages but that this response is prevented by prior administration of DT to CD11b-DTR mice. DT administration also reduces pancreatic edema and acinar cell injury/necrosis in two dissimilar experimental models of acute pancreatitis (a secretagogue-induced model and a model elicited by retrograde pancreatic duct infusion of sodium taurocholate). In the secretagogue-elicited model, the DT-induced decrease in pancreatitis severity is reversed by adoptive transfer of purified Ly-6C(hi) monocytes harvested from non-DT-treated CD11b-DTR mice or by the transfer of purified Ly-6C(hi) monocytes harvested from TNF-α(+/+) donor mice, but it is not reversed by the transfer of Ly-6C(hi) monocytes harvested from TNF-α(-/-) donors. Our studies indicate that the Ly-6C(hi) monocyte subset regulates the severity of pancreatitis by promoting pancreatic edema and acinar cell injury/necrosis and that this phenomenon is dependent upon the expression of TNF-α by those cells. They suggest that therapies targeting Ly-6C(hi) monocytes and/or TNF-α expression by Ly-6C(hi) monocytes might prove beneficial in the prevention or treatment of acute pancreatitis.

  15. Alcohol Disrupts Levels and Function of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator to Promote Development of Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Maléth, József; Balázs, Anita; Pallagi, Petra; Balla, Zsolt; Kui, Balázs; Katona, Máté; Judák, Linda; Németh, István; Kemény, Lajos V.; Rakonczay, Zoltán; Venglovecz, Viktória; Földesi, Imre; Pető, Zoltán; Somorácz, Áron; Borka, Katalin; Perdomo, Doranda; Lukacs, Gergely L.; Gray, Mike A.; Monterisi, Stefania; Zaccolo, Manuela; Sendler, Matthias; Mayerle, Julia; Kühn, Jens-Peter; Lerch, Markus M.; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Hegyi, Péter

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Excessive consumption of ethanol is one of the most common causes of acute and chronic pancreatitis. Alterations to the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) also cause pancreatitis. However, little is known about the role of CFTR in the pathogenesis of alcohol-induced pancreatitis. METHODS We measured CFTR activity based on chloride concentrations in sweat from patients with cystic fibrosis, patients admitted to the emergency department because of excessive alcohol consumption, and healthy volunteers. We measured CFTR levels and localization in pancreatic tissues and in patients with acute or chronic pancreatitis induced by alcohol. We studied the effects of ethanol, fatty acids, and fatty acid ethyl esters on secretion of pancreatic fluid and HCO3− , levels and function of CFTR, and exchange of Cl− for HCO3− in pancreatic cell lines as well as in tissues from guinea pigs and CFTR knockout mice after administration of alcohol. RESULTS Chloride concentrations increased in sweat samples from patients who acutely abused alcohol but not in samples from healthy volunteers, indicating that alcohol affects CFTR function. Pancreatic tissues from patients with acute or chronic pancreatitis had lower levels of CFTR than tissues from healthy volunteers. Alcohol and fatty acids inhibited secretion of fluid and HCO3− , as well as CFTR activity, in pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. These effects were mediated by sustained increases in concentrations of intracellular calcium and adenosine 3’,5’-cyclic monophosphate, depletion of adenosine triphosphate, and depolarization of mitochondrial membranes. In pancreatic cell lines and pancreatic tissues of mice and guinea pigs, administration of ethanol reduced expression of CFTR messenger RNA, reduced the stability of CFTR at the cell surface, and disrupted folding of CFTR at the endoplasmic reticulum. CFTR knockout mice given ethanol or fatty acids developed more

  16. Transcriptional Regulation of the Pancreatic Islet: Implications for Islet Function

    PubMed Central

    Stitzel, Michael L.; Kycia, Ina; Kursawe, Romy; Ucar, Duygu

    2015-01-01

    Islets of Langerhans contain multiple hormone-producing endocrine cells controlling glucose homeostasis. Transcription establishes and maintains islet cellular fates and identities. Genetic and environmental disruption of islet transcription triggers cellular dysfunction and disease. Early transcriptional regulation studies of specific islet genes, including insulin (INS) and the transcription factor PDX1, identified the first cis-regulatory DNA sequences and trans-acting factors governing islet function. Here, we review how human islet “omics” studies are reshaping our understanding of transcriptional regulation in islet (dys)function and diabetes. First, we highlight the expansion of islet transcript number, form, and function and of DNA transcriptional regulatory elements controlling their production. Next, we cover islet transcriptional effects of genetic and environmental perturbation. Finally, we discuss how these studies’ emerging insights should empower our diabetes research community to build mechanistic understanding of diabetes pathophysiology and to equip clinicians with tailored, precision medicine options to prevent and treat islet dysfunction and diabetes. PMID:26272056

  17. Pancreatic β cell enhancers regulate rhythmic transcription of genes controlling insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Perelis, Mark; Marcheva, Biliana; Ramsey, Kathryn Moynihan; Schipma, Matthew J; Hutchison, Alan L; Taguchi, Akihiko; Peek, Clara Bien; Hong, Heekyung; Huang, Wenyu; Omura, Chiaki; Allred, Amanda L; Bradfield, Christopher A; Dinner, Aaron R; Barish, Grant D; Bass, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    The mammalian transcription factors CLOCK and BMAL1 are essential components of the molecular clock that coordinate behavior and metabolism with the solar cycle. Genetic or environmental perturbation of circadian cycles contributes to metabolic disorders including type 2 diabetes. To study the impact of the cell-autonomous clock on pancreatic β cell function, we examined pancreatic islets from mice with either intact or disrupted BMAL1 expression both throughout life and limited to adulthood. We found pronounced oscillation of insulin secretion that was synchronized with the expression of genes encoding secretory machinery and signaling factors that regulate insulin release. CLOCK/BMAL1 colocalized with the pancreatic transcription factor PDX1 within active enhancers distinct from those controlling rhythmic metabolic gene networks in liver. We also found that β cell clock ablation in adult mice caused severe glucose intolerance. Thus, cell type-specific enhancers underlie the circadian control of peripheral metabolism throughout life and may help to explain its dysregulation in diabetes.

  18. Galectin-3 is a regulator of metaflammation in adipose tissue and pancreatic islets

    PubMed Central

    Pejnovic, Nada N; Pantic, Jelena M; Jovanovic, Ivan P; Radosavljevic, Gordana D; Djukic, Aleksandar Lj; Arsenijevic, Nebojsa N; Lukic, Miodrag L

    2013-01-01

    The cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems have been implicated in the development of obesity-induced metaflammation and metabolic disorders including type 2 diabetes. Galectin-3, a β-galactoside-binding lectin, modulates immune/inflammatory responses and specifically binds to advanced glycation end products (AGE), modified lipoproteins, and endotoxin. In the recently published study we demonstrate proinflammatory changes in the visceral adipose tissue and pancreatic islets in galectin-3-deficient mice fed high-fat diet which also exhibited excess adiposity, hyperglycemia, insulin resistance and systemic inflammation compared with their diet matched wild-type controls. This was associated with the increased incidence of Type-1 T and NKT cells and pro-inflammatory CD11c+CD11b+ macrophages in the visceral adipose tissue. Severe insulitis, infiltration of macrophages expressing NLRP3 inflammasome and IL-1β, and enhanced accumulation of AGE were present within the pancreatic islets in obese LGALS3−/− mice. Moreover, increased caspase-1 dependent IL-1β secretion with increased expression of NLRP3 inflammasome and phospho-NFκBp65 were observed in LGALS3−/− peritoneal macrophages stimulated in vitro by lipopolysaccharide and/or saturated fatty acid palmitate. The amplified high-fat diet-induced obesity and hyperglycemia and exacerbated inflammation in adipose tissue and pancreatic islets in LGALS3−/− mice suggest an important role for galectin-3 in the regulation of adiposity, metaflammation and type 2 diabetes. PMID:24052904

  19. Galectin-3 is a regulator of metaflammation in adipose tissue and pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Pejnovic, Nada N; Pantic, Jelena M; Jovanovic, Ivan P; Radosavljevic, Gordana D; Djukic, Aleksandar Lj; Arsenijevic, Nebojsa N; Lukic, Miodrag L

    2013-10-01

    The cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems have been implicated in the development of obesity-induced metaflammation and metabolic disorders including type 2 diabetes. Galectin-3, a β-galactoside-binding lectin, modulates immune/inflammatory responses and specifically binds to advanced glycation end products (AGE), modified lipoproteins, and endotoxin. In the recently published study we demonstrate proinflammatory changes in the visceral adipose tissue and pancreatic islets in galectin-3-deficient mice fed high-fat diet which also exhibited excess adiposity, hyperglycemia, insulin resistance and systemic inflammation compared with their diet matched wild-type controls. This was associated with the increased incidence of Type-1 T and NKT cells and pro-inflammatory CD11c(+)CD11b(+) macrophages in the visceral adipose tissue. Severe insulitis, infiltration of macrophages expressing NLRP3 inflammasome and IL-1β, and enhanced accumulation of AGE were present within the pancreatic islets in obese LGALS3(-/-) mice. Moreover, increased caspase-1 dependent IL-1β secretion with increased expression of NLRP3 inflammasome and phospho-NFκBp65 were observed in LGALS3(-/-) peritoneal macrophages stimulated in vitro by lipopolysaccharide and/or saturated fatty acid palmitate. The amplified high-fat diet-induced obesity and hyperglycemia and exacerbated inflammation in adipose tissue and pancreatic islets in LGALS3(-/-) mice suggest an important role for galectin-3 in the regulation of adiposity, metaflammation and type 2 diabetes. PMID:24052904

  20. Deep sequencing and in silico analyses identify MYB-regulated gene networks and signaling pathways in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Azim, Shafquat; Zubair, Haseeb; Srivastava, Sanjeev K.; Bhardwaj, Arun; Zubair, Asif; Ahmad, Aamir; Singh, Seema; Khushman, Moh’d.; Singh, Ajay P.

    2016-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that the transcription factor MYB can modulate several cancer-associated phenotypes in pancreatic cancer. In order to understand the molecular basis of these MYB-associated changes, we conducted deep-sequencing of transcriptome of MYB-overexpressing and -silenced pancreatic cancer cells, followed by in silico pathway analysis. We identified significant modulation of 774 genes upon MYB-silencing (p < 0.05) that were assigned to 25 gene networks by in silico analysis. Further analyses placed genes in our RNA sequencing-generated dataset to several canonical signalling pathways, such as cell-cycle control, DNA-damage and -repair responses, p53 and HIF1α. Importantly, we observed downregulation of the pancreatic adenocarcinoma signaling pathway in MYB-silenced pancreatic cancer cells exhibiting suppression of EGFR and NF-κB. Decreased expression of EGFR and RELA was validated by both qPCR and immunoblotting and they were both shown to be under direct transcriptional control of MYB. These observations were further confirmed in a converse approach wherein MYB was overexpressed ectopically in a MYB-null pancreatic cancer cell line. Our findings thus suggest that MYB potentially regulates growth and genomic stability of pancreatic cancer cells via targeting complex gene networks and signaling pathways. Further in-depth functional studies are warranted to fully understand MYB signaling in pancreatic cancer. PMID:27354262

  1. Deep sequencing and in silico analyses identify MYB-regulated gene networks and signaling pathways in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Azim, Shafquat; Zubair, Haseeb; Srivastava, Sanjeev K; Bhardwaj, Arun; Zubair, Asif; Ahmad, Aamir; Singh, Seema; Khushman, Moh'd; Singh, Ajay P

    2016-06-29

    We have recently demonstrated that the transcription factor MYB can modulate several cancer-associated phenotypes in pancreatic cancer. In order to understand the molecular basis of these MYB-associated changes, we conducted deep-sequencing of transcriptome of MYB-overexpressing and -silenced pancreatic cancer cells, followed by in silico pathway analysis. We identified significant modulation of 774 genes upon MYB-silencing (p < 0.05) that were assigned to 25 gene networks by in silico analysis. Further analyses placed genes in our RNA sequencing-generated dataset to several canonical signalling pathways, such as cell-cycle control, DNA-damage and -repair responses, p53 and HIF1α. Importantly, we observed downregulation of the pancreatic adenocarcinoma signaling pathway in MYB-silenced pancreatic cancer cells exhibiting suppression of EGFR and NF-κB. Decreased expression of EGFR and RELA was validated by both qPCR and immunoblotting and they were both shown to be under direct transcriptional control of MYB. These observations were further confirmed in a converse approach wherein MYB was overexpressed ectopically in a MYB-null pancreatic cancer cell line. Our findings thus suggest that MYB potentially regulates growth and genomic stability of pancreatic cancer cells via targeting complex gene networks and signaling pathways. Further in-depth functional studies are warranted to fully understand MYB signaling in pancreatic cancer.

  2. Hypothalamic prolyl endopeptidase (PREP) regulates pancreatic insulin and glucagon secretion in mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Dae; Toda, Chitoku; D'Agostino, Giuseppe; Zeiss, Caroline J; DiLeone, Ralph J; Elsworth, John D; Kibbey, Richard G; Chan, Owen; Harvey, Brandon K; Richie, Christopher T; Savolainen, Mari; Myöhänen, Timo; Jeong, Jin Kwon; Diano, Sabrina

    2014-08-12

    Prolyl endopeptidase (PREP) has been implicated in neuronal functions. Here we report that hypothalamic PREP is predominantly expressed in the ventromedial nucleus (VMH), where it regulates glucose-induced neuronal activation. PREP knockdown mice (Prep(gt/gt)) exhibited glucose intolerance, decreased fasting insulin, increased fasting glucagon levels, and reduced glucose-induced insulin secretion compared with wild-type controls. Consistent with this, central infusion of a specific PREP inhibitor, S17092, impaired glucose tolerance and decreased insulin levels in wild-type mice. Arguing further for a central mode of action of PREP, isolated pancreatic islets showed no difference in glucose-induced insulin release between Prep(gt/gt) and wild-type mice. Furthermore, hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp studies showed no difference between Prep(gt/gt) and wild-type control mice. Central PREP regulation of insulin and glucagon secretion appears to be mediated by the autonomic nervous system because Prep(gt/gt) mice have elevated sympathetic outflow and norepinephrine levels in the pancreas, and propranolol treatment reversed glucose intolerance in these mice. Finally, re-expression of PREP by bilateral VMH injection of adeno-associated virus-PREP reversed the glucose-intolerant phenotype of the Prep(gt/gt) mice. Taken together, our results unmask a previously unknown player in central regulation of glucose metabolism and pancreatic function.

  3. Cellular contractility and extracellular matrix stiffness regulate matrix metalloproteinase activity in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Haage, Amanda; Schneider, Ian C

    2014-08-01

    The pathogenesis of cancer is often driven by local invasion and metastasis. Recently, mechanical properties of the tumor microenvironment have been identified as potent regulators of invasion and metastasis, while matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are classically known as significant enhancers of cancer cell migration and invasion. Here we have been able to sensitively measure MMP activity changes in response to specific extracellular matrix (ECM) environments and cell contractility states. Cells of a pancreatic cancer cell line, Panc-1, up-regulate MMP activities between 3- and 10-fold with increased cell contractility. Conversely, they down-regulate MMP activities when contractility is blocked to levels seen with pan-MMP activity inhibitors. Similar, albeit attenuated, responses are seen in other pancreatic cancer cell lines, BxPC-3 and AsPC-1. In addition, MMP activity was modulated by substrate stiffness, collagen gel concentration, and the degree of collagen cross-linking, when cells were plated on collagen gels ranging from 0.5 to 5 mg/ml that span the physiological range of substrate stiffness (50-2000 Pa). Panc-1 cells showed enhanced MMP activity on stiffer substrates, whereas BxPC-3 and AsPC-1 cells showed diminished MMP activity. In addition, eliminating heparan sulfate proteoglycans using heparinase completely abrogated the mechanical induction of MMP activity. These results demonstrate the first functional link between MMP activity, contractility, and ECM stiffness and provide an explanation as to why stiffer environments result in enhanced cell migration and invasion.

  4. SIRT1 inhibits proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells expressing pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF), a novel oncogene, by suppression of {beta}-catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Il-Rae; Koh, Sang Seok; Malilas, Waraporn; Srisuttee, Ratakorn; Moon, Jeong; Choi, Young-Whan; Horio, Yoshiyuki; Oh, Sangtaek; Chung, Young-Hwa

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 inhibits protein levels of {beta}-catenin and its transcriptional activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear localization of SIRT1 is not required for the decrease of {beta}-catenin expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1-mediated degradation of {beta}-catenin is not required for GSK-3{beta} and Siah-1 but for proteosome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 activation inhibits proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells expressing PAUF. -- Abstract: Because we found in a recent study that pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF), a novel oncogene, induces a rapid proliferation of pancreatic cells by up-regulation of {beta}-catenin, we postulated that {beta}-catenin might be a target molecule for pancreatic cancer treatment. We thus speculated whether SIRT1, known to target {beta}-catenin in a colon cancer model, suppresses {beta}-catenin in those pancreatic cancer cells that express PAUF (Panc-PAUF). We further evaluated whether such suppression would lead to inhibition of the proliferation of these cells. The ectopic expression of either SIRT1 or resveratrol (an activator of SIRT1) suppressed levels of {beta}-catenin protein and its transcriptional activity in Panc-PAUF cells. Conversely, suppression of SIRT1 expression by siRNA enhanced {beta}-catenin expression and transcriptional activity. SIRT1 mutant analysis showed that nuclear localization of SIRT1 is not required for reduction of {beta}-catenin. Treatment with MG132, a proteasomal inhibitor, restored {beta}-catenin protein levels, suggesting that SIRT1-mediated degradation of {beta}-catenin requires proteasomal activity. It was reported that inhibition of GSK-3{beta} or Siah-1 stabilizes {beta}-catenin in colon cancer cells, but suppression of GSK-3{beta} or Siah-1 using siRNA in the presence of resveratrol instead diminished {beta}-catenin protein levels in Panc-PAUF cells. This suggests that GSK-3{beta} and Siah-1 are not involved in SIRT1

  5. Transcriptional regulation of fibronectin by p21-activated kinase-1 modulates pancreatic tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Jagadeeshan, S; Krishnamoorthy, Y R; Singhal, M; Subramanian, A; Mavuluri, J; Lakshmi, A; Roshini, A; Baskar, G; Ravi, M; Joseph, L D; Sadasivan, K; Krishnan, A; Nair, A S; Venkatraman, G; Rayala, S K

    2015-01-22

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the eighth largest cause of cancer-related mortality across the world, with a median 5-year survival rate of less than 3.5%. This is partly because the molecules and the molecular mechanisms that contribute to PDAC are not well understood. Our goal is to understand the role of p21-activated kinase 1 (Pak1) signaling axis in the progression of PDAC. Pak1, a serine/threonine kinase, is a well-known regulator of cytoskeletal remodeling, cell motility, cell proliferation and cell survival. Recent reports suggest that Pak1 by itself can have an oncogenic role in a wide variety of cancers. In this study, we analyzed the expression of Pak1 in human pancreatic cancer tissues and found that Pak1 levels are significantly upregulated in PDAC samples as compared with adjacent normals. Further, to study the functional role of Pak1 in pancreatic cancer model systems, we developed stable overexpression and lentiviral short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown (KD) clones of Pak1 and studied the changes in transforming properties of the cells. We also observed that Pak1 KD clones failed to form tumors in nude mice. By adopting a quantitative PCR array-based approach, we identified fibronectin, a component of the extracellular matrix and a mesenchymal marker, as a transcriptional target of Pak1 signaling. The underlying molecular mechanism of Pak1-mediated transformation includes its nuclear import and recruitment to the fibronectin promoter via interaction with nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)-p65 complex. To our knowledge, this is the first study illustrating Pak1-NF-κB-p65-mediated fibronectin regulation as a potent tumor-promoting mechanism in KRAS intact model.

  6. pVHL is a regulator of glucose metabolism and insulin secretion in pancreatic β cells

    PubMed Central

    Zehetner, Jens; Danzer, Carsten; Collins, Stephan; Eckhardt, Katrin; Gerber, Philipp A.; Ballschmieter, Pia; Galvanovskis, Juris; Shimomura, Kenju; Ashcroft, Frances M.; Thorens, Bernard; Rorsman, Patrik; Krek, Wilhelm

    2008-01-01

    Insulin secretion from pancreatic β cells is stimulated by glucose metabolism. However, the relative importance of metabolizing glucose via mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation versus glycolysis for insulin secretion remains unclear. von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor protein, pVHL, negatively regulates hypoxia-inducible factor HIF1α, a transcription factor implicated in promoting a glycolytic form of metabolism. Here we report a central role for the pVHL–HIF1α pathway in the control of β-cell glucose utilization, insulin secretion, and glucose homeostasis. Conditional inactivation of Vhlh in β cells promoted a diversion of glucose away from mitochondria into lactate production, causing cells to produce high levels of glycolytically derived ATP and to secrete elevated levels of insulin at low glucose concentrations. Vhlh-deficient mice exhibited diminished glucose-stimulated changes in cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration, electrical activity, and insulin secretion, which culminate in impaired systemic glucose tolerance. Importantly, combined deletion of Vhlh and Hif1α rescued these phenotypes, implying that they are the result of HIF1α activation. Together, these results identify pVHL and HIF1α as key regulators of insulin secretion from pancreatic β cells. They further suggest that changes in the metabolic strategy of glucose metabolism in β cells have profound effects on whole-body glucose homeostasis. PMID:19056893

  7. RLIP76 Regulates PI3K/Akt Signaling and Chemo-Radiotherapy Resistance in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leake, Kathryn; Singhal, Jyotsana; Nagaprashantha, Lokesh Dalasanur; Awasthi, Sanjay; Singhal, Sharad S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy with characteristic metastatic course of disease and resistance to conventional chemo-radiotherapy. RLIP76 is a multi-functional cell membrane protein that functions as a major mercapturic acid pathway transporter as well as key regulator of receptor-ligand complexes. In this regard, we investigated the significance of targeting RLIP76 on PI3K/Akt pathway and mechanisms regulating response to chemo-radiotherapy. Research Design and Methods Cell survival was assessed by MTT and colony forming assays. Cellular levels of proteins and phosphorylation was determined by Western blot analyses. The impact on apoptosis was determined by TUNEL assay. The anti-cancer effects of RLIP76 targeted interventions in vivo were determined using mice xenograft model of the pancreatic cancer. The regulation of doxorubicin transport and radiation sensitivity were determined by transport studies and colony forming assays, respectively. Results Our current studies reveal an encompassing model for the role of RLIP76 in regulating the levels of fundamental proteins like PI3K, Akt, E-cadherin, CDK4, Bcl2 and PCNA which are of specific importance in the signal transduction from critical upstream signaling cascades that determine the proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation of pancreatic cancer cells. RLIP76 depletion also caused marked and sustained regression of established human BxPC-3 pancreatic cancer tumors in nude mouse xenograft model. RLIP76 turned out to be a major regulator of drug transport along with contributing to the radiation resistance in pancreatic cancer. Conclusions/Significance RLIP76 represents a mechanistically significant target for developing effective interventions in aggressive and refractory pancreatic cancers. PMID:22509328

  8. Ape1 regulates WNT/β-catenin signaling through its redox functional domain in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shaojie; Zhu, Lina; Tang, Haimei; Zhang, Miaofeng; Chen, Zhihua; Fei, Jian; Han, Baosan; Zou, Gang-Ming

    2015-08-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox factor-1 (Ape1/Ref-1, Ape1) is a multifunctional protein that is upregulated in human pancreatic cancer. Ape1 redox domain plays an essential role in regulating the effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated during physiological metabolism and pathological stress. In the present study, we explored whether Ape1 and ROS affect WNT/β-catenin signaling. We used E3330, a small molecule inhibitor of the redox activity of Ape1, and a siRNA approach to knock down Ape1, in two human pancreatic cancer cell lines. Inhibition of Ape1 resulted in growth suppression of pancreatic cancer cells, increased ROS levels, upregulation of β-catenin and c-myc and downregulation of cyclin D1. Consistent with these data, overexpression of Ape1 in pancreatic cancer cells reduced ROS and c-myc levels and increased cyclin D1 levels. Moreover, treatment of pancreatic cancer cells with H2O2 to induce oxidative stress resulted in upregulated ROS levels, decreased Ape1 at both the mRNA and protein level, and alterations in WNT/β-catenin pathway components. Finally, treatment of pancreatic cancer cells with the WNT/β-catenin inhibitor IWR-1 resulted in growth inhibition, which was greatly enhanced when combined with E3330 treatment. In summary, our results demonstrate that ROS is an important intracellular messenger that can modulate WNT/β‑catenin signaling. The present study provides interesting new insight into crosstalk between the redox function of Ape1 and WNT/β-catenin signaling in cancer cells. Furthermore, our data show that the combination of Ape1 and WNT inhibitors enhanced the inhibition of pancreatic cell proliferation. These results provide a promising novel therapeutic strategy for treating pancreatic cancer in future.

  9. Rapid regulation of pancreatic alpha- and beta- cell signalling systems by estrogens.

    PubMed

    Ripoll, Cristina; Ropero, Ana B; Alonso-Magdalena, Paloma; Quesada, Ivan; Fuentes, Esther; Nadal, Angel

    2008-03-01

    Rapid estrogen actions are triggered after estrogens are bound to a variety of proteins in organelles other than the nucleus. Those include classic estrogen receptors ERalpha and ERbeta, novel membrane proteins that behave as estrogen receptors such as GPR30, ion channels, and other ligand receptors. In pancreatic alpha and beta-cells, estrogens binding to a non-classical membrane estrogen receptors at physiological concentrations regulate ion channels and [Ca(2+)](i) signals, provoking important physiological responses. In beta-cells, 17beta-estradiol regulates K(ATP) channel activity and glucose-induced [Ca(2+)](i) oscillations, eliciting changes in insulin release and the activation of Ca(2+)-dependent transcription factors. In alpha-cells, 17beta-estradiol abolishes low glucose-induced [Ca(2+)](i) oscillations.

  10. The matricellular protein CCN1/Cyr61 is a critical regulator of Sonic Hedgehog in pancreatic carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Haque, Inamul; De, Archana; Majumder, Monami; Mehta, Smita; McGregor, Douglas; Banerjee, Sushanta K; Van Veldhuizen, Peter; Banerjee, Snigdha

    2012-11-01

    CCN1 is a matricellular protein and a member of the CCN family of growth factors. CCN1 is associated with the development of various cancers including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Our recent studies found that CCN1 plays a critical role in pancreatic carcinogenesis through the induction of EMT and stemness. CCN1 mRNA and protein were detected in the early precursor lesions, and their expression intensified with disease progression. However, biochemical activity and the molecular targets of CCN1 in pancreatic cancer cells are unknown. Here we show that CCN1 regulates the Sonic Hedgehog (SHh) signaling pathway, which is associated with the PDAC progression and poor prognosis. SHh regulation by CCN1 in pancreatic cancer cells is mediated through the active Notch-1. Notably, active Notch-1is recruited by CCN1 in these cells via the inhibition of proteasomal degradation results in stabilization of the receptor. We find that CCN1-induced activation of SHh signaling might be necessary for CCN1-dependent in vitro pancreatic cancer cell migration and tumorigenicity of the side population of pancreatic cancer cells (cancer stem cells) in a xenograft in nude mice. Moreover, the functional role of CCN1 could be mediated through the interaction with the αvβ3 integrin receptor. These extensive studies propose that targeting CCN1 can provide a new treatment option for patients with pancreatic cancer since blocking CCN1 simultaneously blocks two critical pathways (i.e. SHh and Notch1) associated with the development of the disease as well as drug resistance.

  11. Veratri Nigri Rhizoma et Radix (Veratrum nigrum L.) and Its Constituent Jervine Prevent Adipogenesis via Activation of the LKB1-AMPKα-ACC Axis In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jinbong; Jeon, Yong-Deok; Kim, Hye-Lin; Kim, Dae-Seung; Han, Yo-Han; Jung, Yunu; Youn, Dong-Hyun; Kang, JongWook; Yoon, Daeyeon; Jeong, Mi-Young; Lee, Jong-Hyun; Hong, Seung-Heon; Lee, Junhee; Um, Jae-Young

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed in order to investigate the antiobese effects of the ethanolic extract of Veratri Nigri Rhizoma et Radix (VN), a herb with limited usage, due to its toxicology. An HPLC analysis identified jervine as a constituent of VN. By an Oil Red O assay and a Real-Time RT-PCR assay, VN showed higher antiadipogenic effects than jervine. In high-fat diet- (HFD-) induced obese C57BL/6J mice, VN administration suppressed body weight gain. The levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBPα), adipocyte fatty-acid-binding protein (aP2), adiponectin, resistin, and LIPIN1 were suppressed by VN, while SIRT1 was upregulated. Furthermore, VN activated phosphorylation of the liver kinase B1- (LKB1-) AMP-activated protein kinase alpha- (AMPKα-) acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC) axis. Further investigation of cotreatment of VN with the AMPK agonist AICAR or AMPK inhibitor Compound C showed that VN can activate the phosphorylation of AMPKα in compensation to the inhibition of Compound C. In conclusion, VN shows antiobesity effects in HFD-induced obese C57BL/6J mice. In 3T3-L1 adipocytes, VN has antiadipogenic features, which is due to activating the LKB1-AMPKα-ACC axis. These results suggest that VN has a potential benefit in preventing obesity. PMID:27143989

  12. Mechanisms of regulation of PFKFB expression in pancreatic and gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Minchenko, Oleksandr H; Tsuchihara, Katsuya; Minchenko, Dmytro O; Bikfalvi, Andreas; Esumi, Hiroyasu

    2014-10-14

    Enzymes 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase-3 and -4 (PFKFB-3 and PFKFB-4) play a significant role in the regulation of glycolysis in cancer cells as well as its proliferation and survival. The expression of these mRNAs is increased in malignant tumors and strongly induced in different cancer cell lines by hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) through active HIF binding sites in promoter region of PFKFB-4 and PFKFB-3 genes. Moreover, the expression and hypoxia responsibility of PFKFB-4 and PFKFB-3 was also shown for pancreatic (Panc1, PSN-1, and MIA PaCa-2) as well as gastric (MKN45 and NUGC3) cancer cells. At the same time, their basal expression level and hypoxia responsiveness vary in the different cells studied: the highest level of PFKFB-4 protein expression was found in NUGC3 gastric cancer cell line and lowest in Panc1 cells, with a stronger response to hypoxia in the pancreatic cancer cell line. Overexpression of different PFKFB in pancreatic and gastric cancer cells under hypoxic condition is correlated with enhanced expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and Glut1 mRNA as well as with increased level of HIF-1α protein. Increased expression of different PFKFB genes was also demonstrated in gastric, lung, breast, and colon cancers as compared to corresponding non-malignant tissue counterparts from the same patients, being more robust in the breast and lung tumors. Moreover, induction of PFKFB-4 mRNA expression in the breast and lung cancers is stronger than PFKFB-3 mRNA. The levels of both PFKFB-4 and PFKFB-3 proteins in non-malignant gastric and colon tissues were more pronounced than in the non-malignant breast and lung tissues. It is interesting to note that Panc1 and PSN-1 cells transfected with dominant/negative PFKFB-3 (dnPFKFB-3) showed a lower level of endogenous PFKFB-3, PFKFB-4, and VEGF mRNA expressions as well as a decreased proliferation rate of these cells. Moreover, a similar effect had dnPFKFB-4. In conclusion

  13. Mechanisms of regulation of PFKFB expression in pancreatic and gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Minchenko, Oleksandr H; Tsuchihara, Katsuya; Minchenko, Dmytro O; Bikfalvi, Andreas; Esumi, Hiroyasu

    2014-01-01

    Enzymes 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase-3 and -4 (PFKFB-3 and PFKFB-4) play a significant role in the regulation of glycolysis in cancer cells as well as its proliferation and survival. The expression of these mRNAs is increased in malignant tumors and strongly induced in different cancer cell lines by hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) through active HIF binding sites in promoter region of PFKFB-4 and PFKFB-3 genes. Moreover, the expression and hypoxia responsibility of PFKFB-4 and PFKFB-3 was also shown for pancreatic (Panc1, PSN-1, and MIA PaCa-2) as well as gastric (MKN45 and NUGC3) cancer cells. At the same time, their basal expression level and hypoxia responsiveness vary in the different cells studied: the highest level of PFKFB-4 protein expression was found in NUGC3 gastric cancer cell line and lowest in Panc1 cells, with a stronger response to hypoxia in the pancreatic cancer cell line. Overexpression of different PFKFB in pancreatic and gastric cancer cells under hypoxic condition is correlated with enhanced expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and Glut1 mRNA as well as with increased level of HIF-1α protein. Increased expression of different PFKFB genes was also demonstrated in gastric, lung, breast, and colon cancers as compared to corresponding non-malignant tissue counterparts from the same patients, being more robust in the breast and lung tumors. Moreover, induction of PFKFB-4 mRNA expression in the breast and lung cancers is stronger than PFKFB-3 mRNA. The levels of both PFKFB-4 and PFKFB-3 proteins in non-malignant gastric and colon tissues were more pronounced than in the non-malignant breast and lung tissues. It is interesting to note that Panc1 and PSN-1 cells transfected with dominant/negative PFKFB-3 (dnPFKFB-3) showed a lower level of endogenous PFKFB-3, PFKFB-4, and VEGF mRNA expressions as well as a decreased proliferation rate of these cells. Moreover, a similar effect had dnPFKFB-4. In conclusion

  14. Pancreatic β-cell Enhancers Regulate Rhythmic Transcription of Genes Controlling Insulin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Perelis, Mark; Marcheva, Biliana; Ramsey, Kathryn Moynihan; Schipma, Matthew J.; Hutchison, Alan L.; Taguchi, Akihiko; Peek, Clara Bien; Hong, Heekyung; Huang, Wenyu; Omura, Chiaki; Allred, Amanda L.; Bradfield, Christopher A.; Dinner, Aaron R.; Barish, Grant D.; Bass, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian transcription factors CLOCK and BMAL1 are essential components of the molecular clock that coordinate behavior and metabolism with the solar cycle. Genetic or environmental perturbation of circadian cycles contributes to metabolic disorders including type 2 diabetes. To study the impact of the cell-autonomous clock on pancreatic β-cell function, we examined islets from mice with either intact or disrupted BMAL1 expression both throughout life and limited to adulthood. We found pronounced oscillation of insulin secretion that was synchronized with the expression of genes encoding secretory machinery and signaling factors that regulate insulin release. CLOCK/BMAL1 co-localized with the pancreatic transcription factor PDX1 within active enhancers distinct from those controlling rhythmic metabolic gene networks in liver. β-cell clock ablation in adult mice caused severe glucose intolerance. Thus cell-type specific enhancers underlie the circadian control of peripheral metabolism throughout life and may help explain its deregulation in diabetes. PMID:26542580

  15. Regulation of Pancreatic Beta Cell Stimulus-Secretion Coupling by microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Esguerra, Jonathan L. S.; Mollet, Inês G.; Salunkhe, Vishal A.; Wendt, Anna; Eliasson, Lena

    2014-01-01

    Increased blood glucose after a meal is countered by the subsequent increased release of the hypoglycemic hormone insulin from the pancreatic beta cells. The cascade of molecular events encompassing the initial sensing and transport of glucose into the beta cell, culminating with the exocytosis of the insulin large dense core granules (LDCVs) is termed “stimulus-secretion coupling.” Impairment in any of the relevant processes leads to insufficient insulin release, which contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). The fate of the beta cell, when exposed to environmental triggers of the disease, is determined by the possibility to adapt to the new situation by regulation of gene expression. As established factors of post-transcriptional regulation, microRNAs (miRNAs) are well-recognized mediators of beta cell plasticity and adaptation. Here, we put focus on the importance of comprehending the transcriptional regulation of miRNAs, and how miRNAs are implicated in stimulus-secretion coupling, specifically those influencing the late stages of insulin secretion. We suggest that efficient beta cell adaptation requires an optimal balance between transcriptional regulation of miRNAs themselves, and miRNA-dependent gene regulation. The increased knowledge of the beta cell transcriptional network inclusive of non-coding RNAs such as miRNAs is essential in identifying novel targets for the treatment of T2D. PMID:25383562

  16. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy during pancreatic insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Berry, Amy J

    2014-06-01

    Pancreatic stimulation and therefore digestion is a tightly controlled and hormonally mediated process. Any alterations affecting any of the systematic steps for successful digestion and absorption to occur will impair appropriate pancreatic enzymatic secretion, entry into the bowel lumen, functionality once inside the lumen, and thus appropriate mixing with foods and nutrients. Many causes of pancreatic insufficiency may require the initiation of pancreatic enzyme therapy, including but not limited to cystic fibrosis, pancreatic cancer, acute and chronic pancreatitis, and pancreatic surgery. This purpose of this article is to help clarify the conditions that cause pancreatic insufficiency, how to determine if the patient is malabsorbing, and the best use of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy for treatment in these conditions. The first step in determining if pancreatic enzyme therapy is appropriate is to determine if the patient is malabsorbing specifically due to pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. An overview of the methods used to determine pancreatic insufficiency is provided, as well as appropriate treatment methods. Recent Food and Drug Administration regulations require a more thorough process, including randomized controlled trials to prove the safety and efficacy of pancreatic enzymes, to approve them for use. The studies used to verify efficacy also are examined. Last, dosing guidelines and some unconventional ways to administer pancreatic enzymes, such as during enteral feedings, are reviewed.

  17. Activation of neurokinin-1 receptors up-regulates substance P and neurokinin-1 receptor expression in murine pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Koh, Yung-Hua; Moochhala, Shabbir; Bhatia, Madhav

    2012-07-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) has been associated with an up-regulation of substance P (SP) and neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R) in the pancreas. Increased SP-NK1R interaction was suggested to be pro-inflammatory during AP. Previously, we showed that caerulein treatment increased SP/NK1R expression in mouse pancreatic acinar cells, but the effect of SP treatment was not evaluated. Pancreatic acinar cells were obtained from pancreas of male swiss mice (25-30 g). We measured mRNA expression of preprotachykinin-A (PPTA) and NK1R following treatment of SP (10(-6) M). SP treatment increased PPTA and NK1R expression in isolated pancreatic acinar cells, which was abolished by pretreatment of a selective NK1R antagonist, CP96,345. SP also time dependently increased protein expression of NK1R. Treatment of cells with a specific NK1R agonist, GR73,632, up-regulated SP protein levels in the cells. Using previously established concentrations, pre-treatment of pancreatic acinar cells with Gö6976 (10 nM), rottlerin (5 μM), PD98059 (30 μM), SP600125 (30 μM) or Bay11-7082 (30 μM) significantly inhibited up-regulation of SP and NK1R. These observations suggested that the PKC-ERK/JNK-NF-κB pathway is necessary for the modulation of expression levels. In comparison, pre-treatment of CP96,345 reversed gene expression in SP-induced cells, but not in caerulein-treated cells. Overall, the findings in this study suggested a possible auto-regulatory mechanism of SP/NK1R expression in mouse pancreatic acinar cells, via activation of NK1R. Elevated SP levels during AP might increase the occurrence of a positive feedback loop that contributes to abnormally high expression of SP and NK1R.

  18. Activation of neurokinin-1 receptors up-regulates substance P and neurokinin-1 receptor expression in murine pancreatic acinar cells

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Yung-Hua; Moochhala, Shabbir; Bhatia, Madhav

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Acute pancreatitis (AP) has been associated with an up-regulation of substance P (SP) and neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R) in the pancreas. Increased SP-NK1R interaction was suggested to be pro-inflammatory during AP. Previously, we showed that caerulein treatment increased SP/NK1R expression in mouse pancreatic acinar cells, but the effect of SP treatment was not evaluated. Pancreatic acinar cells were obtained from pancreas of male swiss mice (25–30 g). We measured mRNA expression of preprotachykinin-A (PPTA) and NK1R following treatment of SP (10−6M). SP treatment increased PPTA and NK1R expression in isolated pancreatic acinar cells, which was abolished by pretreatment of a selective NK1R antagonist, CP96,345. SP also time dependently increased protein expression of NK1R. Treatment of cells with a specific NK1R agonist, GR73,632, up-regulated SP protein levels in the cells. Using previously established concentrations, pre-treatment of pancreatic acinar cells with Gö6976 (10 nM), rottlerin (5 μM), PD98059 (30 μM), SP600125 (30 μM) or Bay11-7082 (30 μM) significantly inhibited up-regulation of SP and NK1R. These observations suggested that the PKC-ERK/JNK-NF-κB pathway is necessary for the modulation of expression levels. In comparison, pre-treatment of CP96,345 reversed gene expression in SP-induced cells, but not in caerulein-treated cells. Overall, the findings in this study suggested a possible auto-regulatory mechanism of SP/NK1R expression in mouse pancreatic acinar cells, via activation of NK1R. Elevated SP levels during AP might increase the occurrence of a positive feedback loop that contributes to abnormally high expression of SP and NK1R. PMID:22040127

  19. ZIP4 Regulates Pancreatic Cancer Cell Growth by Activating IL-6/STAT3 Pathway via Zinc Finger Transcription Factor CREB

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuqing; Bharadwaj, Uddalak; Logsdon, Craig D.; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi; Li, Min

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Recent studies indicate a strong correlation of zinc transporter ZIP4 and pancreatic cancer progression; however, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. We have recently found that ZIP4 is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer. In this study, we investigated the signaling pathway through which ZIP4 regulates pancreatic cancer growth. Experimental Design The expression of cyclin D1, IL-6, and STAT3 in pancreatic cancer xenografts and cells were examined by real time PCR, Bio-Plex cytokine assay, and Western blot, respectively. The activity of CREB is examined by a promoter activity assay. Results Cyclin D1 was significantly increased in the ZIP4 overexpressing MIA PaCa-2 cells (MIA-ZIP4)-injected orthotopic xenografts and was downregulated in the ZIP4 silenced ASPC-1 (ASPC-shZIP4) group. The phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), an upstream activator of cyclin D1, was increased in MIA-ZIP4 cells, and decreased in ASPC-shZIP4 cells. IL-6, a known upstream activator for STAT3, was also found to be significantly increased in the MIA-ZIP4 cells and xenografts, and decreased in the ASPC-shZIP4 group. Overexpression of ZIP4 led to a 75% increase of IL-6 promoter activity, and caused increased phosphorylation of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). Conclusions Our study suggest that ZIP4 overexpression causes increased IL-6 transcription via CREB, which in turn activates STAT3, and leads to increased cyclin D1 expression, resulting in increased cell proliferation and tumor progression in pancreatic cancer. These results elucidated a novel pathway in ZIP4-mediated pancreatic cancer growth, and suggest new therapeutic targets including ZIP4, IL-6, and STAT3 in pancreatic cancer treatment. PMID:20160059

  20. Regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in cultured guinea pig pancreatic acini

    SciTech Connect

    Hootman, S.R.; Brown, M.E.; Williams, J.A.; Logsdon, C.D.

    1986-07-01

    Regulation of muscarinic receptors in cultured guinea pig pancreatic acini was investigated by assessing the effects of cholinergic agonists on binding of (N-methyl-TH)scopolamine ((TH)NMS) and on amylase release. Freshly dispersed acini bound (TH)NMS with a K/sub d/ of 74 pM and a maximal binding level (B/sub max/) of 908 fmol/mg DNA. Carbachol (CCh) stimulated amylase secretion and inhibited (TH)NMS binding. Incubation of acini for 30 min with 0.1 mM CCh decreased the subsequent efficacy of CCh in stimulating amylase release by threefold but had no effect on its potency. In contrast, amylase release in response to cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8) was not altered by CCh preincubation. (TH)NMS binding to acini was decreased only 15-20% after 30-min incubation with CCh. However, culture of acini with 0.1 mM CCh decreased (TH)NMS binding by 50% at 3-4 h and by 85-90% at 24 h. This decrease was attributable primarily to a reduction in B/sub max/ (TH)NMS binding also was decreased to a similar extent by the cholinergic agonists bethanechol and methacholine but not by other secretagogues. The decrease in antagonist binding induced by CCh was dose dependent, with the IC50, 5.8 M, approximating the EC50 for amylase release, 4.3 M. Cultured of acini for 24 h with CCh abolished subsequent amylase release in response to CCh but not to CCK-8. The results indicate that muscarinic receptor turnover in the pancreatic acinus is regulated by receptor activation and that both a decease in receptor numbers and sensitivity to agonists follows prolonged cholinergic agonist exposure.

  1. UCP-2 and UCP-3 Proteins Are Differentially Regulated in Pancreatic Beta-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunfeng; Maedler, Kathrin; Shu, Luan; Haataja, Leena

    2008-01-01

    Background Increased uncoupling protein-2 (UCP-2) expression has been associated with impaired insulin secretion, whereas UCP-3 protein levels are decreased in the skeleton muscle of type-2 diabetic subjects. In the present studies we hypothesize an opposing effect of glucose on the regulation of UCP-2 and UCP-3 in pancreatic islets. Methodology Dominant negative UCP-2 and wild type UCP-3 adenoviruses were generated, and insulin release by transduced human islets was measured. UCP-2 and UCP-3 mRNA levels were determined using quantitative PCR. UCP-2 and UCP-3 protein expression was investigated in human islets cultured in the presence of different glucose concentrations. Human pancreatic sections were analyzed for subcellular localization of UCP-3 using immunohistochemistry. Principal Findings Dominant negative UCP-2 expression in human islets increased insulin secretion compared to control islets (p<0.05). UCP-3 mRNA is expressed in human islets, but the relative abundance of UCP-2 mRNA was 8.1-fold higher (p<0.05). Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed co-localization of UCP-3 protein with mitochondria in human beta-cells. UCP-2 protein expression in human islets was increased ∼2-fold after high glucose exposure, whereas UCP-3 protein expression was decreased by ∼40% (p<0.05). UCP-3 overexpression improved glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Conclusions UCP-2 and UCP-3 may have distinct roles in regulating beta-cell function. Increased expression of UCP-2 and decreased expression of UCP-3 in humans with chronic hyperglycemia may contribute to impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. These data imply that mechanisms that suppress UCP-2 or mechanisms that increase UCP-3 expression and/or function are potential therapeutic targets to offset defects of insulin secretion in humans with type-2 diabetes. PMID:18167556

  2. Glucose regulates protein kinase CK2 in pancreatic β-cells and its interaction with PDX-1.

    PubMed

    Welker, Sabrina; Götz, Claudia; Servas, Christina; Laschke, Matthias W; Menger, Michael D; Montenarh, Mathias

    2013-12-01

    The pancreatic duodenal homeodomain transcription factor PDX-1 plays a pivotal role in the development of the pancreas and the maintenance of glucose homeostasis by pancreatic β-cells. Recently, we found that the highly conserved, ubiquitously expressed tetrameric Ser/Thr protein kinase CK2, which is formed by two catalytic subunits (α and/or α') and two non-catalytic subunits (β), phosphorylates PDX-1. So far, only little is known about CK2 in pancreatic β-cells and how this enzyme is regulated in these cells. In the present study, we found that (i) CK2 binds to PDX-1, (ii) the binding between CK2 and PDX-1 is regulated by glucose, (iii) glucose modulates the subcellular localization of PDX-1 and CK2 and (iv) the kinase activity is also regulated by glucose. Our novel data indicate that CK2 is a co-factor of PDX-1 in response to glucose in pancreatic β-cells.

  3. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor is present in pancreatic acinar cells and regulates amylase secretion through cAMP.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yanan; Ernst, Stephen A; Heidenreich, Kaeli; Williams, John A

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a glucoincretin hormone that can act through its receptor (GLP-1R) on pancreatic β-cells and increase insulin secretion and production. GLP-1R agonists are used clinically to treat type 2 diabetes. GLP-1 may also regulate the exocrine pancreas at multiple levels, including inhibition through the central nervous system, stimulation indirectly through insulin, and stimulation directly on acinar cells. However, it has been unclear whether GLP-1R is present in pancreatic acini and what physiological functions these receptors regulate. In the current study we utilized GLP-1R knockout (KO) mice to study the role of GLP-1R in acinar cells. RNA expression of GLP-1R was detected in acutely isolated pancreatic acini. Acinar cell morphology and expression of digestive enzymes were not affected by loss of GLP-1R. GLP-1 induced amylase secretion in wild-type (WT) acini. In GLP-1R KO mice, this effect was abolished, whereas vasoactive intestinal peptide-induced amylase release in KO acini showed a pattern similar to that in WT acini. GLP-1 stimulated cAMP production and increased protein kinase A-mediated protein phosphorylation in WT acini, and these effects were absent in KO acini. These data show that GLP-1R is present in pancreatic acinar cells and that GLP-1 can regulate secretion through its receptor and cAMP signaling pathway.

  4. Down-regulation of miR-223 reverses epithelial-mesenchymal transition in gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jia; Fang, Binbin; Zeng, Fanpeng; Ma, Cong; Pang, Haijie; Cheng, Long; Shi, Ying; Wang, Hui; Yin, Bin; Xia, Jun; Wang, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that acquisition of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is associated with drug resistance in pancreatic cancer cells; however, the underlying mechanisms are not fully elucidated. Emerging evidence suggests that microRNAs play a crucial role in controlling EMT. The aims of this study were to explore the potential role of miR-223 in governing EMT in gemcitabine-resistant (GR) pancreatic cancer cells. To achieve this goal, real-time reverse transcription-PCR and western blot analysis were used to validate whether GR cells acquired EMT in AsPC-1 and PANC-1 cells. Invasion, migration, and detachment assays were performed to further identify the EMT characteristics in GR cells. The miR-223 inhibitor was used to determine its role in GR-induced EMT. We found that GR cells acquired EMT features, which obtained elongated fibroblastoid morphology, decreased expression of epithelial marker E-cadherin, and up-regulation of mesenchymal markers. Furthermore, we observed that GR cells are associated with high expression of miR-223. Notably, inhibition of miR-223 led to the reversal of EMT phenotype. More importantly, miR-223 governs GR-induced EMT in part due to down-regulation of its target Fbw7 and subsequent upregulation of Notch-1 in pancreatic cancer. Our study implied that down-regulation of miR-223 could be a novel therapy for pancreatic cancer. PMID:25638153

  5. Chronic pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can lead to chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be ...

  6. Regulation of PDK mRNA by high fatty acid and glucose in pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianxiang; Han, Junying; Epstein, Paul N; Liu, Ye Q

    2006-06-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) converts pyruvate to acetyl-CoA, links glycolysis to the Krebs cycle, and plays an important role in glucose metabolism and insulin secretion in pancreatic beta cells. In beta cells from obese and Type 2 diabetic animals, PDH activity is significantly reduced. PDH is negatively regulated by multiple pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) isotypes (PDK subtypes 1-4). However, we do not know whether fatty acids or high glucose modulate PDKs in islets. To test this we determined PDH and PDK activities and PDK gene and protein expression in C57BL/6 mouse islets. Both high palmitate and high glucose reduced active PDH activity and increased PDK activity. The gene and protein for PDK3 were not expressed in islets. Palmitate up-regulated mRNA expression of PDK1 (2.9-fold), PDK2 (1.9-fold), and PDK4 (3.1-fold). High glucose increased PDK1 (1.8-fold) and PDK2 (2.7-fold) mRNA expression but reduced PDK4 mRNA expression by 40 percent in cultured islets. Changed PDK expression was confirmed by Western blotting. These results demonstrate that in islet cells both fat and glucose regulate PDK gene and protein expression and indicate that hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia contribute to the decline in diabetic islet PDH activity by increasing mRNA and protein expression of PDK. PMID:16631612

  7. Inhibition of Calcium Influx Reduces Dysfunction and Apoptosis in Lipotoxic Pancreatic β-Cells via Regulation of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; Chen, Kaixian; Zhu, Weiliang; Wang, Heyao

    2015-01-01

    Lipotoxicity plays an important role in pancreatic β-cell failure during the development of type 2 diabetes. Prolonged exposure of β-cells to elevated free fatty acids level could cause deterioration of β-cell function and induce cell apoptosis. Therefore, inhibition of fatty acids-induced β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis might provide benefit for the therapy of type 2 diabetes. The present study examined whether regulation of fatty acids-triggered calcium influx could protect pancreatic β-cells from lipotoxicity. Two small molecule compounds, L-type calcium channel blocker nifedipine and potassium channel activator diazoxide were used to inhibit palmitic acid-induced calcium influx. And whether the compounds could reduce palmitic acid-induced β-cell failure and the underlying mechanism were also investigated. It was found that both nifedipine and diazoxide protected MIN6 pancreatic β-cells and primary cultured murine islets from palmitic acid-induced apoptosis. Meanwhile, the impaired insulin secretion was also recovered to varying degrees by these two compounds. Our results verified that nifedipine and diazoxide could reduce palmitic acid-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress to generate protective effects on pancreatic β-cells. More importantly, it suggested that regulation of calcium influx by small molecule compounds might provide benefits for the prevention and therapy of type 2 diabetes. PMID:26147439

  8. N-methylhemeanthidine chloride, a novel Amaryllidaceae alkaloid, inhibits pancreatic cancer cell proliferation via down-regulating AKT activation

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Guoli; Yao, Guangmin; Zhan, Guanqun; Hu, Yufeng; Yue, Ming; Cheng, Ling; Liu, Yaping; Ye, Qi; Qing, Guoliang; Zhang, Yonghui; Liu, Hudan

    2014-11-01

    We previously reported the isolation of a novel Amaryllidaceae alkaloid, N-methylhemeanthidine chloride (NMHC), from Zephyranthes candida, which exhibits potent cytotoxicity in a spectrum of tumor cells. However, the mechanism of action remains unclear. Using multiple cell lines derived from human pancreatic cancer, one of the most mortal and refractory human malignancies, we further studied the NMHC-mediated cytotoxicity and found that it induced drastic cytotoxicity in pancreatic cancer cells whereas an insignificant effect on a noncancerous cell line. The NMHC-mediated growth inhibition was more severe than the first-line chemotherapeutic agent gemcitabine, leading to cell cycle arrest, apoptotic death and decreased glycolysis. NMHC exerted its function through down-regulating AKT activation, and the ectopic expression of activated AKT rescued the growth inhibition. Consistently, NMHC injections in a pancreatic cancer xenograft model manifested the anti-tumor effect in vivo. Engrafted tumor cells underwent AKT attenuation and apoptotic death upon treatments. As such, we here demonstrate the AKT inhibition may be one of the mechanisms by which NMHC decreases tumor cell survival rate in vitro and in vivo. Our data thereby suggest that NMHC holds great promise as a potent chemotherapeutic agent against pancreatic cancer and sheds new light on obtaining such agents from natural products toward therapeutic purposes. - Highlights: • N-methylhemeanthidine chloride (NMHC) is a novel Amaryllidaceae alkaloid. • NMHC exhibits potent anti-neoplastic activity. • NMHC leads to cell cycle arrest, apoptotic death and decreased metabolism. • NMHC down-regulates the AKT signaling pathway.

  9. PARP-1 and YY1 Are Important Novel Regulators of CXCL12 Gene Transcription in Rat Pancreatic Beta Cells

    PubMed Central

    Marković, Jelena; Grdović, Nevena; Dinić, Svetlana; Karan-Djurašević, Teodora; Uskoković, Aleksandra; Arambašić, Jelena; Mihailović, Mirjana; Pavlović, Sonja; Poznanović, Goran; Vidaković, Melita

    2013-01-01

    Despite significant progress, the molecular mechanisms responsible for pancreatic beta cell depletion and development of diabetes remain poorly defined. At present, there is no preventive measure against diabetes. The positive impact of CXCL12 expression on the pancreatic beta cell prosurvival phenotype initiated this study. Our aim was to provide novel insight into the regulation of rat CXCL12 gene (Cxcl12) transcription. The roles of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) and transcription factor Yin Yang 1 (YY1) in Cxcl12 transcription were studied by examining their in vitro and in vivo binding affinities for the Cxcl12 promoter in a pancreatic beta cell line by the electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation. The regulatory activities of PARP-1 and YY1 were assessed in transfection experiments using a reporter vector with a Cxcl12 promoter sequence driving luciferase gene expression. Experimental evidence for PARP-1 and YY1 revealed their trans-acting potential, wherein PARP-1 displayed an inhibitory, and YY1 a strong activating effect on Cxcl12 transcription. Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced general toxicity in pancreatic beta cells was followed by changes in Cxcl12 promoter regulation. PARP-1 binding to the Cxcl12 promoter during basal and in STZ-compromised conditions led us to conclude that PARP-1 regulates constitutive Cxcl12 expression. During the early stage of oxidative stress, YY1 exhibited less affinity toward the Cxcl12 promoter while PARP-1 displayed strong binding. These interactions were accompanied by Cxcl12 downregulation. In the later stages of oxidative stress and intensive pancreatic beta cell injury, YY1 was highly expressed and firmly bound to Cxcl12 promoter in contrast to PARP-1. These interactions resulted in higher Cxcl12 expression. The observed ability of PARP-1 to downregulate, and of YY1 to upregulate Cxcl12 promoter activity anticipates corresponding effects in the natural context where the functional

  10. Pancreatic Acinar Cells Employ miRNAs as Mediators of Intercellular Communication to Participate in the Regulation of Pancreatitis-Associated Macrophage Activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yong; Wang, Hao; Qiao, Xin; Sun, Bei

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage activation plays an important role in the inflammatory response in acute pancreatitis. In the present study, the activation of AR42J pancreatic acinar cells was induced by taurolithocholate treatment. The results showed that the culture medium from the activated AR42J cells significantly enhanced NFκB activation in the macrophages compared to that without taurolithocholate treatment. Additionally, the precipitates obtained from ultracentrifugation of the culture media that were rich in exosomes were markedly more potent in activating macrophages compared with the supernatant fraction lacking exosomes. The results indicated that the mediators carried by the exosomes played important roles in macrophage activation. Exosomal miRNAs were extracted and examined using microarrays. A total of 115 differentially expressed miRNAs were identified, and 30 showed upregulated expression, while 85 displayed downregulated expression. Target genes of the differentially expressed miRNAs were predicted using TargetScan, MiRanda, and PicTar software programs. The putative target genes were subjected to KEGG functional analysis. The functions of the target genes were primarily enriched in MAPK pathways. Specifically, the target genes regulated macrophage activation through the TRAF6-TAB2-TAK1-NIK/IKK-NFκB pathway. As the mediators of signal transduction, miRNAs and their predicted target mRNAs regulate every step in the MAPK pathway. PMID:27546996

  11. Pancreatic Acinar Cells Employ miRNAs as Mediators of Intercellular Communication to Participate in the Regulation of Pancreatitis-Associated Macrophage Activation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong; Wang, Hao; Lu, Ming; Qiao, Xin; Sun, Bei; Zhang, Weihui; Xue, Dongbo

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage activation plays an important role in the inflammatory response in acute pancreatitis. In the present study, the activation of AR42J pancreatic acinar cells was induced by taurolithocholate treatment. The results showed that the culture medium from the activated AR42J cells significantly enhanced NFκB activation in the macrophages compared to that without taurolithocholate treatment. Additionally, the precipitates obtained from ultracentrifugation of the culture media that were rich in exosomes were markedly more potent in activating macrophages compared with the supernatant fraction lacking exosomes. The results indicated that the mediators carried by the exosomes played important roles in macrophage activation. Exosomal miRNAs were extracted and examined using microarrays. A total of 115 differentially expressed miRNAs were identified, and 30 showed upregulated expression, while 85 displayed downregulated expression. Target genes of the differentially expressed miRNAs were predicted using TargetScan, MiRanda, and PicTar software programs. The putative target genes were subjected to KEGG functional analysis. The functions of the target genes were primarily enriched in MAPK pathways. Specifically, the target genes regulated macrophage activation through the TRAF6-TAB2-TAK1-NIK/IKK-NFκB pathway. As the mediators of signal transduction, miRNAs and their predicted target mRNAs regulate every step in the MAPK pathway. PMID:27546996

  12. miR-184 Regulates Pancreatic β-Cell Function According to Glucose Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tattikota, Sudhir G; Rathjen, Thomas; Hausser, Jean; Khedkar, Aditya; Kabra, Uma D; Pandey, Varun; Sury, Matthias; Wessels, Hans-Hermann; Mollet, Inês G; Eliasson, Lena; Selbach, Matthias; Zinzen, Robert P; Zavolan, Mihaela; Kadener, Sebastian; Tschöp, Matthias H; Jastroch, Martin; Friedländer, Marc R; Poy, Matthew N

    2015-08-14

    In response to fasting or hyperglycemia, the pancreatic β-cell alters its output of secreted insulin; however, the pathways governing this adaptive response are not entirely established. Although the precise role of microRNAs (miRNAs) is also unclear, a recurring theme emphasizes their function in cellular stress responses. We recently showed that miR-184, an abundant miRNA in the β-cell, regulates compensatory proliferation and secretion during insulin resistance. Consistent with previous studies showing miR-184 suppresses insulin release, expression of this miRNA was increased in islets after fasting, demonstrating an active role in the β-cell as glucose levels lower and the insulin demand ceases. Additionally, miR-184 was negatively regulated upon the administration of a sucrose-rich diet in Drosophila, demonstrating strong conservation of this pathway through evolution. Furthermore, miR-184 and its target Argonaute2 remained inversely correlated as concentrations of extracellular glucose increased, underlining a functional relationship between this miRNA and its targets. Lastly, restoration of Argonaute2 in the presence of miR-184 rescued suppression of miR-375-targeted genes, suggesting these genes act in a coordinated manner during changes in the metabolic context. Together, these results highlight the adaptive role of miR-184 according to glucose metabolism and suggest the regulatory role of this miRNA in energy homeostasis is highly conserved. PMID:26152724

  13. miR-184 Regulates Pancreatic β-Cell Function According to Glucose Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Tattikota, Sudhir G.; Rathjen, Thomas; Hausser, Jean; Khedkar, Aditya; Kabra, Uma D.; Pandey, Varun; Sury, Matthias; Wessels, Hans-Hermann; Mollet, Inês G.; Eliasson, Lena; Selbach, Matthias; Zinzen, Robert P.; Zavolan, Mihaela; Kadener, Sebastian; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Jastroch, Martin; Friedländer, Marc R.; Poy, Matthew N.

    2015-01-01

    In response to fasting or hyperglycemia, the pancreatic β-cell alters its output of secreted insulin; however, the pathways governing this adaptive response are not entirely established. Although the precise role of microRNAs (miRNAs) is also unclear, a recurring theme emphasizes their function in cellular stress responses. We recently showed that miR-184, an abundant miRNA in the β-cell, regulates compensatory proliferation and secretion during insulin resistance. Consistent with previous studies showing miR-184 suppresses insulin release, expression of this miRNA was increased in islets after fasting, demonstrating an active role in the β-cell as glucose levels lower and the insulin demand ceases. Additionally, miR-184 was negatively regulated upon the administration of a sucrose-rich diet in Drosophila, demonstrating strong conservation of this pathway through evolution. Furthermore, miR-184 and its target Argonaute2 remained inversely correlated as concentrations of extracellular glucose increased, underlining a functional relationship between this miRNA and its targets. Lastly, restoration of Argonaute2 in the presence of miR-184 rescued suppression of miR-375-targeted genes, suggesting these genes act in a coordinated manner during changes in the metabolic context. Together, these results highlight the adaptive role of miR-184 according to glucose metabolism and suggest the regulatory role of this miRNA in energy homeostasis is highly conserved. PMID:26152724

  14. The voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 is expressed in pancreatic islet β-cells and regulates insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qing; Che, Yongzhe; Li, Qiang; Zhang, Shangrong; Gao, Ying-Tang; Wang, Yifan; Wang, Xudong; Xi, Wang; Zuo, Weiyan; Li, Shu Jie

    2015-12-25

    The voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 is a potent acid extruder that participates in the extrusion of the intracellular acid. Here, we showed for the first time, Hv1 is highly expressed in mouse and human pancreatic islet β-cells, as well as β-cell lines. Imaging studies demonstrated that Hv1 resides in insulin-containing granules in β-cells. Knockdown of Hv1 with RNA interference significantly reduces glucose- and K(+)-induced insulin secretion in isolated islets and INS-1 (832/13) β-cells and has an impairment on glucose- and K(+)-induced intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis. Our data demonstrated that the expression of Hv1 in pancreatic islet β-cells regulates insulin secretion through regulating Ca(2+) homeostasis. PMID:26559003

  15. Secretagogin affects insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells by regulating actin dynamics and focal adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Seo-Yun; Lee, Jae-Jin; Lee, Jin-Hee; Lee, Kyungeun; Oh, Seung Hoon; Lim, Yu-Mi; Lee, Myung-Shik; Lee, Kong-Joo

    2016-01-01

    Secretagogin (SCGN), a Ca2+-binding protein having six EF-hands, is selectively expressed in pancreatic β-cells and neuroendocrine cells. Previous studies suggested that SCGN enhances insulin secretion by functioning as a Ca2+-sensor protein, but the underlying mechanism has not been elucidated. The present study explored the mechanism by which SCGN enhances glucose-induced insulin secretion in NIT-1 insulinoma cells. To determine whether SCGN influences the first or second phase of insulin secretion, we examined how SCGN affects the kinetics of insulin secretion in NIT-1 cells. We found that silencing SCGN suppressed the second phase of insulin secretion induced by glucose and H2O2, but not the first phase induced by KCl stimulation. Recruitment of insulin granules in the second phase of insulin secretion was significantly impaired by knocking down SCGN in NIT-1 cells. In addition, we found that SCGN interacts with the actin cytoskeleton in the plasma membrane and regulates actin remodelling in a glucose-dependent manner. Since actin dynamics are known to regulate focal adhesion, a critical step in the second phase of insulin secretion, we examined the effect of silencing SCGN on focal adhesion molecules, including FAK (focal adhesion kinase) and paxillin, and the cell survival molecules ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2) and Akt. We found that glucose- and H2O2-induced activation of FAK, paxillin, ERK1/2 and Akt was significantly blocked by silencing SCGN. We conclude that SCGN controls glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and thus may be useful in the therapy of Type 2 diabetes. PMID:27095850

  16. Secretagogin affects insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells by regulating actin dynamics and focal adhesion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Seo-Yun; Lee, Jae-Jin; Lee, Jin-Hee; Lee, Kyungeun; Oh, Seung Hoon; Lim, Yu-Mi; Lee, Myung-Shik; Lee, Kong-Joo

    2016-06-15

    Secretagogin (SCGN), a Ca(2+)-binding protein having six EF-hands, is selectively expressed in pancreatic β-cells and neuroendocrine cells. Previous studies suggested that SCGN enhances insulin secretion by functioning as a Ca(2+)-sensor protein, but the underlying mechanism has not been elucidated. The present study explored the mechanism by which SCGN enhances glucose-induced insulin secretion in NIT-1 insulinoma cells. To determine whether SCGN influences the first or second phase of insulin secretion, we examined how SCGN affects the kinetics of insulin secretion in NIT-1 cells. We found that silencing SCGN suppressed the second phase of insulin secretion induced by glucose and H2O2, but not the first phase induced by KCl stimulation. Recruitment of insulin granules in the second phase of insulin secretion was significantly impaired by knocking down SCGN in NIT-1 cells. In addition, we found that SCGN interacts with the actin cytoskeleton in the plasma membrane and regulates actin remodelling in a glucose-dependent manner. Since actin dynamics are known to regulate focal adhesion, a critical step in the second phase of insulin secretion, we examined the effect of silencing SCGN on focal adhesion molecules, including FAK (focal adhesion kinase) and paxillin, and the cell survival molecules ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2) and Akt. We found that glucose- and H2O2-induced activation of FAK, paxillin, ERK1/2 and Akt was significantly blocked by silencing SCGN. We conclude that SCGN controls glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and thus may be useful in the therapy of Type 2 diabetes. PMID:27095850

  17. Regulation of pancreatic islet beta-cell mass by growth factor and hormone signaling.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yao; Chang, Yongchang

    2014-01-01

    Dysfunction and destruction of pancreatic islet beta cells is a hallmark of diabetes. Better understanding of cellular signals in beta cells will allow development of therapeutic strategies for diabetes, such as preservation and expansion of beta-cell mass and improvement of beta-cell function. During the past several decades, the number of studies analyzing the molecular mechanisms, including growth factor/hormone signaling pathways that impact islet beta-cell mass and function, has increased exponentially. Notably, somatolactogenic hormones including growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and their receptors (GHR, PRLR, and IGF-1R) are critically involved in beta-cell growth, survival, differentiation, and insulin secretion. In this chapter, we focus more narrowly on GH, PRL, and IGF-1 signaling, and GH-IGF-1 cross talk. We also discuss how these signaling aspects contribute to the regulation of beta-cell proliferation and apoptosis. In particular, our novel findings of GH-induced formation of GHR-JAK2-IGF-1R protein complex and synergistic effects of GH and IGF-1 on beta-cell signaling, proliferation, and antiapoptosis lead to a new concept that IGF-1R may serve as a proximal component of GH/GHR signaling.

  18. Calcium co-regulates oxidative metabolism and ATP synthase-dependent respiration in pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    De Marchi, Umberto; Thevenet, Jonathan; Hermant, Aurelie; Dioum, Elhadji; Wiederkehr, Andreas

    2014-03-28

    Mitochondrial energy metabolism is essential for glucose-induced calcium signaling and, therefore, insulin granule exocytosis in pancreatic beta cells. Calcium signals are sensed by mitochondria acting in concert with mitochondrial substrates for the full activation of the organelle. Here we have studied glucose-induced calcium signaling and energy metabolism in INS-1E insulinoma cells and human islet beta cells. In insulin secreting cells a surprisingly large fraction of total respiration under resting conditions is ATP synthase-independent. We observe that ATP synthase-dependent respiration is markedly increased after glucose stimulation. Glucose also causes a very rapid elevation of oxidative metabolism as was followed by NAD(P)H autofluorescence. However, neither the rate of the glucose-induced increase nor the new steady-state NAD(P)H levels are significantly affected by calcium. Our findings challenge the current view, which has focused mainly on calcium-sensitive dehydrogenases as the target for the activation of mitochondrial energy metabolism. We propose a model of tight calcium-dependent regulation of oxidative metabolism and ATP synthase-dependent respiration in beta cell mitochondria. Coordinated activation of matrix dehydrogenases and respiratory chain activity by calcium allows the respiratory rate to change severalfold with only small or no alterations of the NAD(P)H/NAD(P)(+) ratio.

  19. Molecular landscape of pancreatic cancer: implications for current clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Heestand, Gregory M.; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent improvements, overall survival for advanced adenocarcinoma of the pancreas continues to be poor. In comparison to other tumor types that have enjoyed marked survival benefit by targeting aberrant cell signaling pathways, standard of care treatment for pancreatic cancer is limited to conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy. Multiple pathway aberrations have been documented in pancreatic cancer. A review of the COSMIC database reveals that most pancreatic cancers contain somatic mutations, with the five most frequent being KRAS, TP53, CDKN2A, SMAD4, and ARID1A, and multiple other abnormalities seen including, but not limited to, mutations in STK11/LKB1, FBXW7, PIK3CA, and BRAF. In the era of tumor profiling, these aberrations may provide an opportunity for new therapeutic approaches. Yet, searching clinicaltrials.gov for recent drug intervention trials for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, remarkably few (10 of 116 (8.6%)) new study protocols registered in the last three years included a molecular/biomarker stratification strategy. Enhanced efforts to target subsets of patients with pancreatic cancer in order to optimize therapy benefit are warranted. PMID:25714017

  20. Pancreatic cancer cell migration and metastasis is regulated by chemokine-biased agonism and bioenergetic signaling

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ishan; McAllister, Donna M.; Gorse, Egal; Dixon, Kate; Piper, Clinton T.; Zimmerman, Noah P.; Getschman, Anthony E.; Tsai, Susan; Engle, Dannielle D.; Evans, Douglas B.; Volkman, Brian F.; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Dwinell, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) invariably succumb to metastatic disease, but the underlying mechanisms that regulate PDAC cell movement and metastasis remain little understood. In this study, we investigated the effects of the chemokine gene CXCL12, which is silenced in PDAC tumors yet is sufficient to suppress growth and metastasis when re-expressed. Chemokines like CXCL12 regulate cell movement in a biphasic pattern, with peak migration typically in the low nanomolar concentration range. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that the biphasic cell migration pattern induced by CXCL12 reflected a bias of agonist bioenergetic signaling that might be exploited to interfere with PDAC metastasis. In human and murine PDAC cell models, we observed that non-migratory doses of CXCL12 were sufficient to decrease oxidative phosphorylation and glycolytic capacity and to increase levels of phosphorylated forms of the master metabolic kinase AMPK. Those same doses of CXCL12 locked myosin light chain into a phosphorylated state, thereby decreasing F-actin polymerization and preventing cell migration in a manner dependent upon AMPK and the calcium-dependent kinase CAMKII. Notably, at elevated concentrations of CXCL12 that were insufficient to trigger chemotaxis of PDAC cells, AMPK blockade resulted in increased cell movement. In two preclinical mouse models of PDAC, administration of CXCL12 decreased tumor dissemination, supporting our hypothesis that chemokine-biased agonist signaling may offer a useful therapeutic strategy. Our results offer a mechanistic rationale for further investigation of CXCL12 as a potential therapy to prevent or treat PDAC metastasis. PMID:26330165

  1. Synergistic Combination of Gemcitabine and Dietary Molecule Induces Apoptosis in Pancreatic Cancer Cells and Down Regulates PKM2 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Pandita, Archana; Kumar, Bhupender; Manvati, Siddharth; Vaishnavi, Samantha; Singh, Shashank K.; Bamezai, Rameshwar N. K.

    2014-01-01

    Gemcitabine, an effective agent in treatment of cancer of pancreas, has undergone failures in many instances after multiple cycles of therapy due to emergence of drug resistance. Combination of dietary compounds with clinically validated drugs has emerged as an effective therapeutic approach to treat pancreatic tumors, refractory to gemcitabine therapy. In order to optimize a possible synergistic combination of Gemcitabine (GCB) with dietary molecules, Betuilnic acid (BA) and Thymoquinone (TQ), stand-alone IC50 dose of GCB, BA and TQ was calculated for pancreatic cancer cell lines. Fixed IC50 dose ratio of the dietary molecules in combination with reduced IC50 dose of GCB was tested on GCB resistant PANC-1 and sensitive MIA PaCa-2 cells for synergism, additive response and antagonism, using calcusyn. Combination index (CI) revealed that pre-treatment of BA and TQ along with GCB synergistically inhibited the cancer cell proliferation in in-vitro experiments. Pyruvate kinase (PK) M2 isoform, a promising target involved in cancer cell metabolism, showed down-regulation in presence of TQ or BA in combination with GCB. GCB with BA acted preferentially on tumor mitochondria and triggered mitochondrial permeability transition. Pre-exposure of the cell lines, MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1, to TQ in combination with GCB induced apoptosis. Thus, the effectiveness of BA or TQ in combination with GCB to inhibit cell proliferation, induce apoptosis and down-regulate the expression of PKM2, reflects promise in pancreatic cancer treatment. PMID:25197966

  2. Evidence that an isoform of calpain-10 is a regulator of exocytosis in pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Catriona; Hitman, Graham A; Partridge, Christopher J; Clark, Anne; Ma, Hong; Shearer, Thomas R; Turner, Mark D

    2005-01-01

    Calpain-10 (CAPN10) is the first type 2 diabetes susceptibility gene to be identified through a genome scan, with polymorphisms being associated with altered CAPN10 expression. Functional data have been hitherto elusive, but we report here a corresponding increase between CAPN10 expression level and regulated insulin secretion. Pancreatic beta-cell secretory granule exocytosis is mediated by the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein attachment receptor protein complex of synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25), syntaxin 1, and vesicle-associated membrane protein 2. We report, for the first time, direct binding of a calpain-10 isoform with members of this complex. Furthermore, SNAP-25 undergoes a Ca2+-dependent partial proteolysis during exocytosis, with calpain protease inhibitor similarly suppressing both insulin secretion and SNAP-25 proteolysis. Based upon these findings, we postulate that an isoform of calpain-10 is a Ca2+-sensor that functions to trigger exocytosis in pancreatic beta-cells.

  3. Hereditary pancreatitis for the endoscopist.

    PubMed

    Patel, Milan R; Eppolito, Amanda L; Willingham, Field F

    2013-03-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis shares a majority of clinical and morphologic features with chronic alcoholic pancreatitis, but may present at an earlier age. The term hereditary pancreatitis has primarily been associated with mutations in the serine protease 1 gene (PRSS1) which encodes for cationic trypsinogen. PRSS1 mutations account for approximately 68-81% of hereditary pancreatitis. Mutations in other genes, primarily serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK1) and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) are also associated with hereditary pancreatitis. While chronic alcoholic pancreatitis may develop in the fourth or fifth decades, patients with hereditary pancreatitis may develop symptoms in the first or second decades of life. Hereditary pancreatitis is diagnosed either by detecting a causative gene mutation or by the presence of chronic pancreatitis in two first-degree or three second-degree relatives, in two or more generations, without precipitating factors and with a negative workup for known causes. Patients with hereditary pancreatitis may have recurrent acute pancreatitis and may develop pancreatic exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Hereditary pancreatitis may involve premature trypsinogen activation or decreased control of trypsin. Recurrent inflammation can lead to acute pancreatitis and subsequently to chronic pancreatitis with parenchymal calcification. There is a markedly increased risk of pancreatic carcinoma compared with the general population. Patients are often referred for evaluation of pancreatitis, biliary or pancreatic ductal dilatation, jaundice, biliary obstruction, pancreatic duct stone or stricture, pancreatic pseudocysts, and for evaluation for malignancy. Medical treatment includes pancreatic enzyme supplementation, nutritional supplementation, diabetes management, and palliation of pain. Patients should avoid tobacco use and alcohol exposure. Hereditary pancreatitis is reviewed and recommendations for

  4. IL-1β reciprocally regulates chemokine and insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells via NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Burke, Susan J; Stadler, Krisztian; Lu, Danhong; Gleason, Evanna; Han, Anna; Donohoe, Dallas R; Rogers, Richard C; Hermann, Gerlinda E; Karlstad, Michael D; Collier, J Jason

    2015-10-15

    Proinflammatory cytokines impact islet β-cell mass and function by altering the transcriptional activity within pancreatic β-cells, producing increases in intracellular nitric oxide abundance and the synthesis and secretion of immunomodulatory proteins such as chemokines. Herein, we report that IL-1β, a major mediator of inflammatory responses associated with diabetes development, coordinately and reciprocally regulates chemokine and insulin secretion. We discovered that NF-κB controls the increase in chemokine transcription and secretion as well as the decrease in both insulin secretion and proliferation in response to IL-1β. Nitric oxide production, which is markedly elevated in pancreatic β-cells exposed to IL-1β, is a negative regulator of both glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and glucose-induced increases in intracellular calcium levels. By contrast, the IL-1β-mediated production of the chemokines CCL2 and CCL20 was not influenced by either nitric oxide levels or glucose concentration. Instead, the synthesis and secretion of CCL2 and CCL20 in response to IL-1β were dependent on NF-κB transcriptional activity. We conclude that IL-1β-induced transcriptional reprogramming via NF-κB reciprocally regulates chemokine and insulin secretion while also negatively regulating β-cell proliferation. These findings are consistent with NF-κB as a major regulatory node controlling inflammation-associated alterations in islet β-cell function and mass. PMID:26306596

  5. Reverse-migrated neutrophils regulated by JAM-C are involved in acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Deqing; Zeng, Yue; Fan, Yuting; Wu, Jianghong; Mulatibieke, Tunike; Ni, Jianbo; Yu, Ge; Wan, Rong; Wang, Xingpeng; Hu, Guoyong

    2016-01-01

    Junctional adhesion molecule-C (JAM-C) plays a key role in the promotion of the reverse transendothelial migration (rTEM) of neutrophils, which contributes to the dissemination of systemic inflammation and to secondary organ damage. During acute pancreatitis (AP), systemic inflammatory responses lead to distant organ damage and typically result in acute lung injury (ALI). Here, we investigated the role of rTEM neutrophils in AP-associated ALI and the molecular mechanisms by which JAM-C regulates neutrophil rTEM in this disorder. In this study, rTEM neutrophils were identified in the peripheral blood both in murine model of AP and human patients with AP, which elevated with increased severity of lung injury. Pancreatic JAM-C was downregulated during murine experimental pancreatitis, whose expression levels were inversely correlated with both increased neutrophil rTEM and severity of lung injury. Knockout of JAM-C resulted in more severe lung injury and systemic inflammation. Significantly greater numbers of rTEM neutrophils were present both in the circulation and pulmonary vascular washout in JAM-C knockout mice with AP. This study demonstrates that during AP, neutrophils that are recruited to the pancreas may migrate back into the circulation and then contribute to ALI. JAM-C downregulation may contribute to AP-associated ALI via promoting neutrophil rTEM. PMID:26841848

  6. MicroRNA-21 induces 5-fluorouracil resistance in human pancreatic cancer cells by regulating PTEN and PDCD4.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xueju; Wang, Weibin; Wang, Lanlan; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Xian; Chen, Mingtai; Wang, Fang; Yu, Jia; Ma, Yanni; Sun, Guotao

    2016-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer patients are often resistant to chemotherapy treatment, which results in poor prognosis. The objective of this study was to delineate the mechanism by which miR-21 induces drug resistance to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in human pancreatic cancer cells (PATU8988 and PANC-1). We report that PATU8988 cells resistant to 5-FU express high levels of miR-21 in comparison to sensitive primary PATU8988 cells. Suppression of miR-21 expression in 5-Fu-resistant PATU8988 cells can alleviate its 5-FU resistance. Meanwhile, lentiviral vector-mediated overexpression of miR-21 not only conferred resistance to 5-FU but also promoted proliferation, migration, and invasion of PATU8988 and PANC-1 cells. The proresistance effects of miR-21 were attributed to the attenuated expression of tumor suppressor genes, including PTEN and PDCD4. Overexpression of PTEN and PDCD4 antagonized miR-21-induced resistance to 5-FU and migration activity. Our work demonstrates that miR-21 can confer drug resistance to 5-FU in pancreatic cancer cells by regulating the expression of tumor suppressor genes, as the target genes of miR-21, PTEN and PDCD4 can rescue 5-FU sensitivity and the phenotypic characteristics disrupted by miR-21.

  7. Phorbol esters and A23187 regulate Na/sup +/=K/sup +/-pump activity in pancreatic acinar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hootman, S.R.; Brown, M.E.; Williams, J.A.

    1987-04-01

    To clarify the subcellular mechanisms that mediate stimulation of Na/sup +/-K/sup +/-pump activity in pancreatic acinar cells by cholinergic agonists, the authors examined the effects of the phorbol ester, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and the Ca/sup 2 +/ ionophore A23187 on (/sup 3/H)ouabain binding to dispersed guinea pig pancreatic acinar cells under conditions in which binding reflects the average rate of pump cycling. The phorbol ester more than doubled Na/sup +/-K/sup +/-pump activity as did the diacylglycerol analogue, 1-oleoyl-2-acetolyl-sn-3-glycerol. A23187 increased pump activity by a maximum of 31% at 0.3 ..mu..M but was progressively inhibitory at higher concentrations. The stimulatory effects of TPA and A23187 were additive, although either secretagogue elicited a less than additive response when added together with a maximally effective concentration of the cholinergic agonist, carbachol. Removal of extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ had little effect on the pump response to TPA and did not reduce the maximal effect of A23187 but abolished the inhibitory effect seen at high ionophore concentrations in Ca/sup 2 +/-containing medium. These results indicate that both Ca/sup 2 +/ and protein kinase c are involved in regulating Na/sup +/-K/sup +/-pump activity in the pancreatic acinar cell.

  8. MYB Promotes Desmoplasia in Pancreatic Cancer through Direct Transcriptional Up-regulation and Cooperative Action of Sonic Hedgehog and Adrenomedullin.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Arun; Srivastava, Sanjeev K; Singh, Seema; Tyagi, Nikhil; Arora, Sumit; Carter, James E; Khushman, Moh'd; Singh, Ajay P

    2016-07-29

    Extensive desmoplasia is a prominent pathological characteristic of pancreatic cancer (PC) that not only impacts tumor development, but therapeutic outcome as well. Recently, we demonstrated a novel role of MYB, an oncogenic transcription factor, in PC growth and metastasis. Here we studied its effect on pancreatic tumor histopathology and associated molecular and biological mechanisms. Tumor-xenografts derived from orthotopic-inoculation of MYB-overexpressing PC cells exhibited far-greater desmoplasia in histological analyses compared with those derived from MYB-silenced PC cells. These findings were further confirmed by immunostaining of tumor-xenograft sections with collagen-I, fibronectin (major extracellular-matrix proteins), and α-SMA (well-characterized marker of myofibroblasts or activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs)). Likewise, MYB-overexpressing PC cells provided significantly greater growth benefit to PSCs in a co-culture system as compared with the MYB-silenced cells. Interrogation of deep-sequencing data from MYB-overexpressing versus -silenced PC cells identified Sonic-hedgehog (SHH) and Adrenomedullin (ADM) as two differentially-expressed genes among others, which encode for secretory ligands involved in tumor-stromal cross-talk. In-silico analyses predicted putative MYB-binding sites in SHH and ADM promoters, which was later confirmed by chromatin-immunoprecipitation. A cooperative role of SHH and ADM in growth promotion of PSCs was confirmed in co-culture by using their specific-inhibitors and exogenous recombinant-proteins. Importantly, while SHH acted exclusively in a paracrine fashion on PSCs and influenced the growth of PC cells only indirectly, ADM could directly impact the growth of both PC cells and PSCs. In summary, we identified MYB as novel regulator of pancreatic tumor desmoplasia, which is suggestive of its diverse roles in PC pathobiology. PMID:27246849

  9. Pancreatitis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - discharge; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - discharge; Acute pancreatitis - discharge ... fluids through an intravenous (IV) tube in your vein and nutrition through a feeding tube or IV. ...

  10. B-cell translocation gene 2 positively regulates GLP-1-stimulated insulin secretion via induction of PDX-1 in pancreatic β-cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Seung-Lark; Kwon, Okyun; Kim, Sun-Gyun; Lee, In-Kyu; Kim, Yong Deuk

    2013-05-24

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a potent glucoincretin hormone and an important agent for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Here we demonstrate that B-cell translocation gene 2 (BTG2) is a crucial regulator in GLP-1-induced insulin gene expression and insulin secretion via upregulation of pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1 (PDX-1) in pancreatic β-cells. GLP-1 treatment significantly increased BTG2, PDX-1 and insulin gene expression in pancreatic β-cells. Notably, adenovirus-mediated overexpression of BTG2 significantly elevated insulin secretion, as well as insulin and PDX-1 gene expression. Physical interaction studies showed that BTG2 is associated with increased PDX-1 occupancy on the insulin gene promoter via a direct interaction with PDX-1. Exendin-4 (Ex-4), a GLP-1 agonist, and GLP-1 in pancreatic β-cells increased insulin secretion through the BTG2-PDX-1-insulin pathway, which was blocked by endogenous BTG2 knockdown using a BTG2 small interfering RNA knockdown system. Finally, we revealed that Ex-4 and GLP-1 significantly elevated insulin secretion via upregulation of the BTG2-PDX-1 axis in pancreatic islets, and this phenomenon was abolished by endogenous BTG2 knockdown. Collectively, our current study provides a novel molecular mechanism by which GLP-1 positively regulates insulin gene expression via BTG2, suggesting that BTG2 has a key function in insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells.

  11. PTEN regulates angiogenesis through PI3K/Akt/VEGF signaling pathway in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jiachi; Sawai, Hirozumi; Ochi, Nobuo; Matsuo, Yoichi; Xu, Donghui; Yasuda, Akira; Takahashi, Hiroki; Wakasugi, Takehiro; Takeyama, Hiromitsu

    2009-11-01

    Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway exerts its effects through Akt, its downstream target molecule, and thereby regulates various cell functions including cell proliferation, cell transformation, apoptosis, tumor growth, and angiogenesis. Phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) has been implicated in regulating cell survival signaling through the PI3K/Akt pathway. However, the mechanism by PI3K/PTEN signaling regulates angiogenesis and tumor growth in vivo remains to be elucidated. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a pivotal role in tumor angiogenesis. The effect of PTEN on VEGF-mediated signal in pancreatic cancer is unknown. This study aimed to determine the effect of PTEN on both the expression of VEGF and angiogenesis. Toward that end, we used the siRNA knockdown method to specifically define the role of PTEN in the expression of VEGF and angiogenesis. We found that siRNA-mediated inhibition of PTEN gene expression in pancreatic cancer cells increase their VEGF secretion, up-modulated the proliferation, and migration of co-cultured vascular endothelial cell and enhanced tubule formation by HUVEC. In addition, PTEN modulated VEGF-mediated signaling and affected tumor angiogenesis through PI3K/Akt/VEGF/eNOS pathway.

  12. GAIP Interacting Protein C-Terminus Regulates Autophagy and Exosome Biogenesis of Pancreatic Cancer through Metabolic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Santanu; Pal, Krishnendu; Sharma, Anil K.; Dutta, Shamit K.; Lau, Julie S.; Yan, Irene K.; Wang, Enfeng; Elkhanany, Ahmed; Alkharfy, Khalid M.; Sanyal, Arunik; Patel, Tushar C.; Chari, Suresh T.; Spaller, Mark R.; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2014-01-01

    GAIP interacting protein C terminus (GIPC) is known to play an important role in a variety of physiological and disease states. In the present study, we have identified a novel role for GIPC as a master regulator of autophagy and the exocytotic pathways in cancer. We show that depletion of GIPC-induced autophagy in pancreatic cancer cells, as evident from the upregulation of the autophagy marker LC3II. We further report that GIPC regulates cellular trafficking pathways by modulating the secretion, biogenesis, and molecular composition of exosomes. We also identified the involvement of GIPC on metabolic stress pathways regulating autophagy and microvesicular shedding, and observed that GIPC status determines the loading of cellular cargo in the exosome. Furthermore, we have shown the overexpression of the drug resistance gene ABCG2 in exosomes from GIPC-depleted pancreatic cancer cells. We also demonstrated that depletion of GIPC from cancer cells sensitized them to gemcitabine treatment, an avenue that can be explored as a potential therapeutic strategy to overcome drug resistance in cancer. PMID:25469510

  13. GAIP interacting protein C-terminus regulates autophagy and exosome biogenesis of pancreatic cancer through metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Santanu; Pal, Krishnendu; Sharma, Anil K; Dutta, Shamit K; Lau, Julie S; Yan, Irene K; Wang, Enfeng; Elkhanany, Ahmed; Alkharfy, Khalid M; Sanyal, Arunik; Patel, Tushar C; Chari, Suresh T; Spaller, Mark R; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2014-01-01

    GAIP interacting protein C terminus (GIPC) is known to play an important role in a variety of physiological and disease states. In the present study, we have identified a novel role for GIPC as a master regulator of autophagy and the exocytotic pathways in cancer. We show that depletion of GIPC-induced autophagy in pancreatic cancer cells, as evident from the upregulation of the autophagy marker LC3II. We further report that GIPC regulates cellular trafficking pathways by modulating the secretion, biogenesis, and molecular composition of exosomes. We also identified the involvement of GIPC on metabolic stress pathways regulating autophagy and microvesicular shedding, and observed that GIPC status determines the loading of cellular cargo in the exosome. Furthermore, we have shown the overexpression of the drug resistance gene ABCG2 in exosomes from GIPC-depleted pancreatic cancer cells. We also demonstrated that depletion of GIPC from cancer cells sensitized them to gemcitabine treatment, an avenue that can be explored as a potential therapeutic strategy to overcome drug resistance in cancer.

  14. Differential regulation of pancreatic digestive enzymes during chronic high-fat diet-induced obesity in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Birk, Ruth Z; Rubio-Aliaga, Isabel; Boekschoten, Mark V; Danino, Hila; Müller, Michael; Daniel, Hannelore

    2014-07-28

    Exocrine pancreatic digestive enzymes are essential for the digestion of dietary components and are regulated by them. Chronic excess dietary high fat (HF) consumption is a contributing factor of diet-induced obesity (DIO) and associated chronic diseases and requires adaptation by the pancreas. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of chronic HF diet feeding on exocrine pancreatic digestive enzyme transcript levels in DIO C57BL/6J mice. C57BL/6J mice were fed diets containing either 10 or 45% energy (E%) derived from fat for 12 weeks (n 10 mice per diet group). Pancreatic tissue and blood samples were collected at 0, 4 and 12 weeks. The expression of a panel of exocrine pancreatic digestive enzymes was analysed using quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. The HF (45 E%) diet-fed C57BL/6J mice developed obesity, hyperleptinaemia, hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinaemia. The transcript levels of pancreatic lipase (PL), pancreatic lipase-related protein 2 (PLRP2) and pancreatic phospholipase A2 (PLA2) were initially elevated; however, they were down-regulated to basal control levels at week 12. The transcript levels of colipase were significantly affected by diet and time. The protein levels of PL and PLRP2 responded to HF diet feeding. The transcript levels of amylase and proteases were not significantly affected by diet and time. The transcript levels of specific lipases in hyperinsulinaemic, hyperleptinaemic and hyperglycaemic DIO C57BL/6J mice are down-regulated. However, these mice compensate for this by the post-transcriptional regulation of the levels of proteins that respond to dietary fat. This suggests a complex regulatory mechanism involved in the modulation of fat digestion.

  15. Regulation of pancreatic cancer by neuropsychological stress responses: a novel target for intervention

    PubMed Central

    Schuller, Hildegard M.; Al-Wadei, Hussein A.N.; Ullah, Mohammad F.; Plummer, Howard K.

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has a poor prognosis and is associated with high levels of psychological stress that may adversely affect clinical outcomes. However, the potential influence of neuropsychological factors on pancreatic cancer has not been investigated to date. Using a mouse model of social stress, we have tested the hypothesis that psychological stress promotes the progression of pancreatic cancer xenografts via neurotransmitter-induced activation of multiple pathways and that the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutiric acid (GABA) inhibits these responses. Sytemic and xenograft levels of noradrenalin, adrenalin, GABA, cortisol, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and cyclic adenosine 3′, 5′-monophosphate (cAMP) were measured by immunoassays. Xenograft expression of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) α3, α4, α5, α6 and α7 and β-adrenergic receptors 1 and 2 were assessed by real-time PCR and western blots. Expression of glutamate decarboxylases GAD65 and GAD67 and phosphorylated and unphosphorylated signaling proteins of relevance to pancreatic cancer were determined in tumor tissue by western blots. Psychological stress significantly promoted xenograft growth and increased systemic and tumor levels of noradrenalin, adrenalin, cortisol, VEGF and cAMP while GABA and GAD were suppressed. Stress upregulated nAChR proteins but not RNAs and induced phosphorylated ERK, CREB, Src and AKT in xenografts. Reduction of cAMP by treatment with GABA prevented tumor progression and activation of signaling proteins. Our findings suggest that neurotransmitter responses to psychological stress negatively impact clinical outcomes of pancreatic cancer via the activation of multiple pathways and that replacement of the suppressed inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA prevents these effects. PMID:22072614

  16. Leukemia inhibitory factor receptor negatively regulates the metastasis of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ding; Jing, Xiaoqian; Shen, Baiyong; Liu, Xinyu; Cheng, Xi; Wang, Bingrui; Fu, Zhiping; Peng, Chenghong; Qiu, Weihua

    2016-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Frequent metastasis and recurrence are the main reasons for the poor prognosis of PC patients. Thus, the discovery of new biomarkers and wider insights into the mechanisms involved in pancreatic tumorigenesis and metastasis is crucial. In the present study, we report that leukemia inhibitory factor receptor (LIFR) suppresses tumorigenesis and metastasis of PC cells both in vitro and in vivo. LIFR expression was significantly lower in PC tissues and was associated with local invasion (P=0.047), lymph node metastasis (P=0.014) and tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage (P=0.002). Overexpression of LIFR significantly suppressed PC cell colony formation (P=0.005), migration (P=0.003), invasion (P=0.010) and wound healing ability (P=0.013) in vitro, while opposing results were observed after LIFR was silenced. Furthermore, animal xenograft and metastasis models confirm that the in vivo results were consistent with the outcomes in vitro. Meanwhile, LIFR inhibited the expression of β-catenin, vimentin and slug and induced the expression of E-cadherin, suggesting that the epithelial-mesenchymal transition regulation pathway may underlie the mechanism. These results indicate that LIFR negatively regulates the metastasis of PC cells. PMID:27375070

  17. Downregulation of GRP78 and XIAP is correlated with apoptosis during cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in rats via regulation of caspase activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Zhou, Zong-Guang; Zhou, Bing; Wang, Rong; Yan, Hui; Li, Yuan

    2013-03-01

    Our aim in the present study was to investigate the potential roles of the 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) and the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) in the regulation of apoptosis during cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis (CAP). A rat CAP model was induced by injection of cerulein (50 µg/kg), and the severity of CAP was estimated by measuring serum amylase and lipase, pancreatic edema and histological changes. Pancreatic acinar cell apoptosis was determined by terminal-deoxynucleotidyl-transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay, and the expression of GRP78, XIAP and the apoptotic genes caspase-3, -7 and -9 were determined by real‑time quantitative PCR and western blotting. After induction with cerulein, increased serum amylase and lipase, pancreatic edema, inflammation and apoptosis were observed in CAP rats. Furthermore, the mRNA and protein levels of GRP78 and XIAP were significantly downregulated in CAP rats, while the mRNA levels of caspase-3, -7 and -9, as well as the cell apoptotic index were markedly increased when compared with control rats (P<0.05). The expression of GRP78 and XIAP was negatively correlated with caspase expression in CAP (P<0.05). This study suggests that the downregulation of GRP78 and XIAP were correlated with apoptosis in pancreatic acinar cells, and that this may occur through the regulation of caspase activation during CAP. PMID:23254244

  18. Protein-bound Polysaccharide-K Inhibits Hedgehog Signaling Through Down-regulation of MAML3 and RBPJ Transcription Under Hypoxia, Suppressing the Malignant Phenotype in Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Akio; Onishi, Hideya; Imaizumi, Akira; Kawamoto, Makoto; Fujimura, Akiko; Oyama, Yasuhiro; Katano, Mitsuo

    2016-08-01

    Hedgehog signaling is activated in pancreatic cancer and could be a therapeutic target. We previously demonstrated that recombination signal binding protein for immunoglobulin-kappa-J region (RBPJ) and mastermind-like 3 (MAML3) contribute to the hypoxia-induced up-regulation of Smoothened (SMO) transcription. We have also shown that protein-bound polysaccharide-K (PSK) could be effective for refractory pancreatic cancer that down-regulates SMO transcription under hypoxia. In this study, we evaluated whether the anticancer mechanism of PSK involves inhibiting RBPJ and MAML3 expression under hypoxia. PSK reduced SMO, MAML3 and RBPJ expression in pancreatic cancer cells under hypoxia. PSK also blocked RBPJ-induced invasiveness under hypoxia by inhibiting matrix metalloproteinase expression. Lastly, we showed that PSK attenuated RBPJ-induced proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that PSK suppresses Hedgehog signaling through down-regulation of MAML3 and RBPJ transcription under hypoxia, inhibiting the induction of a malignant phenotype in pancreatic cancer. Our results may lead to development of new treatments for refractory pancreatic cancer using PSK as a Hedgehog inhibitor. PMID:27466498

  19. Dynamic regulation of PDX-1 and FoxO1 expression by FoxA2 in dexamethasone-induced pancreatic β-cells dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fang; Zhu, Yunxia; Tang, Xinyi; Sun, Yidan; Jia, Weiping; Sun, Yujie; Han, Xiao

    2011-05-01

    Transcription factors forkhead box (Fox)O1 and pancreatic and duodenal homeobox-1 (PDX-1) are involved in dexamethasone (DEX)-induced dysfunction in pancreatic β-cells. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of FoxO1 and PDX-1 expression in β-cells treated with DEX is not fully understood. In this study, we found that DEX markedly increased FoxO1 mRNA and protein expression, whereas it decreased PDX-1 mRNA and protein expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Further study showed that FoxA2 was involved in regulation of FoxO1 and PDX-1 expression in DEX-induced pancreatic β-cells dysfunction. Interestingly, we demonstrated for the first time that FoxA2 could bind to the FoxO1 gene promoter and positively regulate FoxO1 expression. Moreover, we found that DEX increased the activity of FoxA2 binding to the FoxO1 promoter but decreased the activity of FoxA2 binding to the PDX-1 promoter of RINm5F cells. Knockdown of FoxA2 by RNA interference inhibited FoxO1 expression and restored PDX-1 expression in pancreatic β-cells treated with DEX. However, DEX had no effect on the expression of FoxA2. Together, the results of the present study demonstrated that FoxA2 could dynamically regulate FoxO1 and PDX-1 expression in pancreatic β-cells treated with DEX, which provides new important information on the transcriptional regulation of FoxO1 and PDX-1 in DEX-induced pancreatic β-cells. Inhibition of FoxA2 can effectively protect β-cells against DEX-induced dysfunction.

  20. Uric acid induces oxidative stress and growth inhibition by activating adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase signal pathways in pancreatic β cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongneng; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Hisatome, Ichiro; Li, Youfeng; Cheng, Weijie; Sun, Ning; Cai, Bozhi; Huang, Tianliang; Zhu, Yuzhang; Li, Zhi; Jing, Xubin; Zhou, Rui; Cheng, Jidong

    2013-08-15

    Hyperuricaemia is a disorder of purine metabolism, and is strongly associated with insulin resistance and abnormal glucose metabolism. As the producer of insulin, pancreatic β cells might be affected by elevated serum uric acid levels and contribute to the disregulated glucose metabolism. In this study, we investigated the effect of high uric acid on rat pancreatic β cell function. Under high uric acid condition, proliferation of pancreatic β cells was inhibited, production of reactive oxygen species increased, and glucose stimulated insulin secretion was also compromised. Further examination on signal transduction pathways revealed that uric acid-induced ROS is involved in the activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Pharmacological inhibition of ERK activation rescued β cells from growth inhibition. More importantly, activation of ERK induced by uric acid is significantly diminished by AMPK inhibitor, indicating ERK as a downstream target of AMPK in response to high uric acid condition. We also investigated the transportation channel for uric acid into pancreatic β cells. While major urate transporter URAT1 is not expressed in β cells, organic anion transporter (OAT) inhibitor successfully blocked the activation of ERK by uric acid. Our data indicate that high uric acid levels induce oxidative damage and inhibit growth of rat pancreatic β cells by activating the AMPK and ERK signal pathways. Hyperuricemia may contribute to abnormal glucose metabolism by causing oxidative damage and function inhibition of pancreatic β cells.

  1. Mechanisms of CFTR Functional Variants That Impair Regulated Bicarbonate Permeation and Increase Risk for Pancreatitis but Not for Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Michele D.; Park, Hyun Woo; Brand, Randall E.; Gelrud, Andres; Anderson, Michelle A.; Banks, Peter A.; Conwell, Darwin; Lawrence, Christopher; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Baillie, John; Alkaade, Samer; Cote, Gregory; Gardner, Timothy B.; Amann, Stephen T.; Slivka, Adam; Sandhu, Bimaljit; Aloe, Amy; Kienholz, Michelle L.; Yadav, Dhiraj; Barmada, M. Michael; Bahar, Ivet; Lee, Min Goo; Whitcomb, David C.

    2014-01-01

    CFTR is a dynamically regulated anion channel. Intracellular WNK1-SPAK activation causes CFTR to change permeability and conductance characteristics from a chloride-preferring to bicarbonate-preferring channel through unknown mechanisms. Two severe CFTR mutations (CFTRsev) cause complete loss of CFTR function and result in cystic fibrosis (CF), a severe genetic disorder affecting sweat glands, nasal sinuses, lungs, pancreas, liver, intestines, and male reproductive system. We hypothesize that those CFTR mutations that disrupt the WNK1-SPAK activation mechanisms cause a selective, bicarbonate defect in channel function (CFTRBD) affecting organs that utilize CFTR for bicarbonate secretion (e.g. the pancreas, nasal sinus, vas deferens) but do not cause typical CF. To understand the structural and functional requirements of the CFTR bicarbonate-preferring channel, we (a) screened 984 well-phenotyped pancreatitis cases for candidate CFTRBD mutations from among 81 previously described CFTR variants; (b) conducted electrophysiology studies on clones of variants found in pancreatitis but not CF; (c) computationally constructed a new, complete structural model of CFTR for molecular dynamics simulation of wild-type and mutant variants; and (d) tested the newly defined CFTRBD variants for disease in non-pancreas organs utilizing CFTR for bicarbonate secretion. Nine variants (CFTR R74Q, R75Q, R117H, R170H, L967S, L997F, D1152H, S1235R, and D1270N) not associated with typical CF were associated with pancreatitis (OR 1.5, p = 0.002). Clones expressed in HEK 293T cells had normal chloride but not bicarbonate permeability and conductance with WNK1-SPAK activation. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest physical restriction of the CFTR channel and altered dynamic channel regulation. Comparing pancreatitis patients and controls, CFTRBD increased risk for rhinosinusitis (OR 2.3, p<0.005) and male infertility (OR 395, p<<0.0001). WNK1-SPAK pathway-activated increases in CFTR

  2. Fibulin-3 negatively regulates ALDH1 via c-MET suppression and increases γ-radiation-induced sensitivity in some pancreatic cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, In-Gyu; Lee, Jae-Ha; Kim, Seo-Yoen; Kim, Jeong-Yul; Cho, Eun-Wie

    2014-11-21

    Highlights: • FBLN-3 gene was poorly expressed in some pancreatic cancer lines. • FBLN-3 promoter region was highly methylated in some pancreatic cancer cell lines. • FBLN-3 inhibited c-MET activation and expression and reduced cellular level of ALDH1. • FBLN-3/c-Met/ALDH1 axis modulates stemness and EMT in pancreatic cancer cells. - Abstract: Fibulin-3 (FBLN-3) has been postulated to be either a tumor suppressor or promoter depending on the cell type, and hypermethylation of the FBLN-3 promoter is often associated with human disease, especially cancer. We report that the promoter region of the FBLN-3 was significantly methylated (>95%) in some pancreatic cancer cell lines and thus FBLN-3 was poorly expressed in pancreatic cancer cell lines such as AsPC-1 and MiaPaCa-2. FBLN-3 overexpression significantly down-regulated the cellular level of c-MET and inhibited hepatocyte growth factor-induced c-MET activation, which were closely associated with γ-radiation resistance of cancer cells. Moreover, we also showed that c-MET suppression or inactivation decreased the cellular level of ALDH1 isozymes (ALDH1A1 or ALDH1A3), which serve as cancer stem cell markers, and subsequently induced inhibition of cell growth in pancreatic cancer cells. Therefore, forced overexpression of FBLN-3 sensitized cells to cytotoxic agents such as γ-radiation and strongly inhibited the stemness and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) property of pancreatic cancer cells. On the other hand, if FBLN3 was suppressed in FBLN-3-expressing BxPC3 cells, the results were opposite. This study provides the first demonstration that the FBLN-3/c-MET/ALDH1 axis in pancreatic cancer cells partially modulates stemness and EMT as well as sensitization of cells to the detrimental effects of γ-radiation.

  3. Transforming growth factor-beta/Smad3 signaling regulates insulin gene transcription and pancreatic islet beta-cell function.

    PubMed

    Lin, Huei-Min; Lee, Ji-Hyeon; Yadav, Hariom; Kamaraju, Anil K; Liu, Eric; Zhigang, Duan; Vieira, Anthony; Kim, Seong-Jin; Collins, Heather; Matschinsky, Franz; Harlan, David M; Roberts, Anita B; Rane, Sushil G

    2009-05-01

    Pancreatic islet beta-cell dysfunction is a signature feature of Type 2 diabetes pathogenesis. Consequently, knowledge of signals that regulate beta-cell function is of immense clinical relevance. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta signaling plays a critical role in pancreatic development although the role of this pathway in the adult pancreas is obscure. Here, we define an important role of the TGF-beta pathway in regulation of insulin gene transcription and beta-cell function. We identify insulin as a TGF-beta target gene and show that the TGF-beta signaling effector Smad3 occupies the insulin gene promoter and represses insulin gene transcription. In contrast, Smad3 small interfering RNAs relieve insulin transcriptional repression and enhance insulin levels. Transduction of adenoviral Smad3 into primary human and non-human primate islets suppresses insulin content, whereas, dominant-negative Smad3 enhances insulin levels. Consistent with this, Smad3-deficient mice exhibit moderate hyperinsulinemia and mild hypoglycemia. Moreover, Smad3 deficiency results in improved glucose tolerance and enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in vivo. In ex vivo perifusion assays, Smad3-deficient islets exhibit improved glucose-stimulated insulin release. Interestingly, Smad3-deficient islets harbor an activated insulin-receptor signaling pathway and TGF-beta signaling regulates expression of genes involved in beta-cell function. Together, these studies emphasize TGF-beta/Smad3 signaling as an important regulator of insulin gene transcription and beta-cell function and suggest that components of the TGF-beta signaling pathway may be dysregulated in diabetes.

  4. Prrx1 isoform switching regulates pancreatic cancer invasion and metastatic colonization

    PubMed Central

    Takano, Shigetsugu; Reichert, Maximilian; Bakir, Basil; Das, Koushik K.; Nishida, Takahiro; Miyazaki, Masaru; Heeg, Steffen; Collins, Meredith A.; Marchand, Benoît; Hicks, Philip D.; Maitra, Anirban; Rustgi, Anil K.

    2016-01-01

    The two major isoforms of the paired-related homeodomain transcription factor 1 (Prrx1), Prrx1a and Prrx1b, are involved in pancreatic development, pancreatitis, and carcinogenesis, although the biological role that these isoforms serve in the systemic dissemination of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has not been investigated. An epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) is believed to be important for primary tumor progression and dissemination, whereas a mesenchymal–epithelial transition (MET) appears crucial for metastatic colonization. Here, we describe novel roles for both isoforms in the metastatic cascade using complementary in vitro and in vivo models. Prrx1b promotes invasion, tumor dedifferentiation, and EMT. In contrast, Prrx1a stimulates metastatic outgrowth in the liver, tumor differentiation, and MET. We further demonstrate that the switch from Prrx1b to Prrx1a governs EMT plasticity in both mouse models of PDAC and human PDAC. Last, we identify hepatocyte growth factor ( HGF) as a novel transcriptional target of Prrx1b. Targeted therapy of HGF in combination with gemcitabine in a preclinical model of PDAC reduces primary tumor volume and eliminates metastatic disease. Overall, we provide new insights into the isoform-specific roles of Prrx1a and Prrx1b in primary PDAC formation, dissemination, and metastatic colonization, allowing for novel therapeutic strategies targeting EMT plasticity. PMID:26773005

  5. Transferrin receptor regulates pancreatic cancer growth by modulating mitochondrial respiration and ROS generation.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seung Min; Hwang, Sunsook; Seong, Rho Hyun

    2016-03-11

    The transferrin receptor (TfR1) is upregulated in malignant cells and its expression is associated with cancer progression. Because of its pre-eminent role in cell proliferation, TfR1 has been an important target for the development of cancer therapy. Although TfR1 is highly expressed in pancreatic cancers, what it carries out in these refractory cancers remains poorly understood. Here we report that TfR1 supports mitochondrial respiration and ROS production in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells, which is required for their tumorigenic growth. Elevated TfR1 expression in PDAC cells contributes to oxidative phosphorylation, which allows for the generation of ROS. Importantly, mitochondrial-derived ROS are essential for PDAC growth. However, exogenous iron supplement cannot rescue the defects caused by TfR1 knockdown. Moreover, we found that TfR1 expression determines PDAC cells sensitivity to oxidative stress. Together, our findings reveal that TfR1 can contribute to the mitochondrial respiration and ROS production, which have essential roles in growth and survival of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26869514

  6. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and SLC26 transporters in HCO₃⁻ secretion by pancreatic duct cells.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Hiroshi; Steward, Martin; Naruse, Satoru

    2007-08-25

    Pancreatic duct cells secrete HCO3(-) ions into a HCO3(-)-rich luminal fluid (~140 mmol/L in human) against at least a 6-fold concentration gradient. Candidate mechanisms for HCO3(-) transport across the apical membrane include Cl(-)-HCO3(-)exchange by an SLC26 anion transporter and diffusion via the HCO3(-) conductance of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Members of the SLC26 family are known to mediate Cl(-)-HCO3(-) exchange across the apical membrane of other epithelia and both SLC26A6 and SLC26A3 have been detected in pancreatic ducts. Co-expression studies have also revealed that murine slc26a6 and slc26a3 physically interact with CFTR through the STAS domain of slc26 and the R domain of CFTR, resulting in mutually enhanced activity. Other studies have indicated that these exchangers are electrogenic: slc26a6 mediating 1Cl(-)-2HCO3(-) exchange and slc26a3 mediating 2Cl(-)-1HCO3(-) exchange. Recent experiments using isolated pancreatic ducts from slc26a6(-)/(-) mice suggest that slc26a6 mediates most of the Cl(-)-dependent secretion of HCO3(-) across the apical membrane in the mouse and the data are consistent with the reported electrogenicity of slc26a6. However, the role of SLC26A6 in human pancreatic HCO3(-) secretion is less clear because human ducts are capable of secreting much higher concentrations of HCO3(-). The role of SLC26A6 must now be evaluated in a species such as the guinea pig which, like the human, is capable of secreting HCO3(-) at a concentration of ~140 mmol/L. From existing guinea pig data we calculate that a 1Cl(-)-2HCO3(-) exchanger such as slc26a6 would be unable to secrete HCO3(-) against such a steep gradient. On the other hand, the HCO3(-) conductance of CFTR could theoretically support secretion of HCO3(-) to a much higher concentrations. CFTR may therefore play a more important role than SLC26A6 in HCO3(-) secretion by the guinea pig and human pancreas.

  7. Identification of a novel mechanism regulating β-cell mass: neuronal relay from the liver to pancreatic β-cells.

    PubMed

    Imai, Junta; Oka, Yoshitomo; Katagiri, Hideki

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that β-cell replication plays a central role in maintaining adult β-cell mass. β-cell proliferative activity changes dynamically to meet systemic needs throughout life. One condition in which β-cell proliferation is enhanced is obesity-related insulin resistance. However, the mechanism underlying this compensatory β-cell response is not well understood. We have identified a neuronal relay, originating in the liver, which enhances both insulin secretion and pancreatic β-cell proliferation. Blockade of this neural relay in murine obesity models inhibited pancreatic islet expansion during obesity development, showing this inter-organ communication system to be physiologically involved in compensatory β-cell proliferation. While there is controversy about which mechanism, proliferation of pre-existing β-cells or production of new β cells from progenitor cells, plays the dominant role in maintaining or regulating β-cell mass, we herein provide an example that proliferation of pre-existing β-cells contributes to a β-cell increment in obesity-related insulin resistance. Furthermore, we have shown the potential for clinical application of this inter-organ system as a therapeutic target for insulin-deficient diabetes.

  8. Extracellular matrix composition and rigidity regulate invasive behavior and response to PDT in 3D pancreatic tumor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, Gwendolyn; El-Hamidi, Hamid; Jafari, Seyedehrojin; Jones, Dustin P.; Celli, Jonathan P.

    2016-03-01

    The composition and mechanical compliance of the extracellular matrix (ECM) have been shown to serve as regulators of tumor growth and invasive behavior. These effects may be particularly relevant in tumors of the pancreas, noted for a profound desmoplastic reaction and an abundance of stroma rich in ECM. In view of recent progress in the clinical implementation of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for pancreatic tumors, in this report we examine how ECM composition and rheological properties impact upon invasive behavior and response to PDT in 3D multicellular pancreatic tumor spheroids in ECM environments with characterized rheological properties. Tumor spheroids were cultured initially in attachment-free conditions to form millimeter-sized spheroids that were transplanted into reconstituted ECM microenvironments (Matrigel and Type I Collagen) that were characterized using bulk oscillatory shear rheology. Analysis of growth behavior shows that the soft collagen ECM promoted growth and extensive invasion and this microenvironment was used in subsequent assessment of PDT and chemotherapy response. Evaluation of treatment response revealed that primary tumor nodule growth is inhibited more effectively with PDT, while verteporfin PDT response is significantly enhanced in the ECM-infiltrating populations that are non-responsive to oxaliplatin chemotherapy. This finding is potentially significant, suggesting the potential for PDT to target these clinically problematic invasive populations that are associated with aggressive metastatic progression and chemoresistance. Experiments to further validate and identify the mechanistic basis of this observation are ongoing.

  9. HAP1 helps to regulate actin-based transport of insulin-containing granules in pancreatic β cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiyong; Peng, Ting; Wu, Hongnian; He, Jun; Li, He

    2015-07-01

    Huntingtin-associated protein 1 (HAP1) is enriched in neurons and binds to polyglutamine-expanded huntingtin. It consists of two alternatively spliced isoforms, HAP1A and HAP1B, which differ only in their short C-terminal sequences. Both HAP1A and HAP1B have been also detected in pancreatic β cells, where the loss of HAP1 impairs glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Here, we use time-lapse laser scanning confocal microscopy to provide direct evidence that HAP1A, but not HAP1B, co-localizes and co-migrates with insulin-containing vesicles and actin-based myosin Va motor protein in the INS-1 pancreatic β cell line. Knocking down HAP1 expression using small interfering RNA significantly inhibited actin-based transport of insulin vesicles following glucose stimulation. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated interaction between HAP1A, myosin Va, and phogrin, a transmembrane protein in insulin-containing vesicles. Stimulating INS-1 cells with glucose increased the association of HAP1A with myosin Va, while silencing HAP1 expression reduced the association of myosin Va with phogrin after glucose stimulation, without affecting levels of myosin Va or actin. Our results provide real-time evidence in living cells that HAP1 may help regulate transport of insulin-containing secretory granules along cortical actin filaments. This also raises the possibility that HAP1 may play an important role in actin-based secretory vesicle trafficking in neurons. PMID:25744490

  10. A hypusine-eIF5A-PEAK1 switch regulates the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fujimura, Ken; Wright, Tracy; Strnadel, Jan; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Metildi, Cristina; Lowy, Andrew M.; Bouvet, Michael; Kelber, Jonathan A.; Klemke, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    Deregulation of protein synthesis is a hallmark of cancer cell proliferation, survival, and metastatic progression. eIF5A1, and its highly related isoform eIF5A2, are translation initiation factors that have been implicated in a range of human malignancies, but how they control cancer development and disease progression is still poorly understood. Here, we investigated how eIF5A proteins regulate pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) pathogenesis. eIF5A proteins are the only known proteins regulated by a distinct posttranslational modification termed hypusination, which is catalyzed by two enzymes, deoxyhypusine synthase (DHPS) and deoxyhypusine hydroxylase (DOHH). The highly selective nature of the hypusine modification and its amenability to pharmacological inhibition make eIF5A proteins attractive therapeutic targets. We found that the expression and hypusination of eIF5A proteins are upregulated in human PDAC tissues and in premalignant pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) tissues isolated from Pdx-1-Cre: LSL-KRASG12D mice. Knockdown of eIF5A proteins in PDAC cells inhibited their growth in vitro and orthotopic tumor growth in vivo, whereas amplification of eIF5A proteins increased PDAC cell growth and tumor formation in mice. Small molecule inhibitors of DHPS and DOHH both suppressed eIF5A hypusination, preventing PDAC cell growth. Interestingly, we found that eIF5A proteins regulate PDAC cell growth by modulating the expression of PEAK1, a non-receptor tyrosine kinase essential for PDAC cell growth and therapy resistance. Our findings suggest that eIF5A proteins utilize PEAK1 as a downstream effector to drive PDAC pathogenesis, and that pharmacological inhibition of the eIF5A-hypusine-PEAK1 axis may provide a novel therapeutic strategy to combat this deadly disease. PMID:25261239

  11. Characterization of Zinc Influx Transporters (ZIPs) in Pancreatic β Cells: ROLES IN REGULATING CYTOSOLIC ZINC HOMEOSTASIS AND INSULIN SECRETION.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Batchuluun, Battsetseg; Ho, Louisa; Zhu, Dan; Prentice, Kacey J; Bhattacharjee, Alpana; Zhang, Ming; Pourasgari, Farzaneh; Hardy, Alexandre B; Taylor, Kathryn M; Gaisano, Herbert; Dai, Feihan F; Wheeler, Michael B

    2015-07-24

    Zinc plays an essential role in the regulation of pancreatic β cell function, affecting important processes including insulin biosynthesis, glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, and cell viability. Mutations in the zinc efflux transport protein ZnT8 have been linked with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, further supporting an important role for zinc in glucose homeostasis. However, very little is known about how cytosolic zinc is controlled by zinc influx transporters (ZIPs). In this study, we examined the β cell and islet ZIP transcriptome and show consistent high expression of ZIP6 (Slc39a6) and ZIP7 (Slc39a7) genes across human and mouse islets and MIN6 β cells. Modulation of ZIP6 and ZIP7 expression significantly altered cytosolic zinc influx in pancreatic β cells, indicating an important role for ZIP6 and ZIP7 in regulating cellular zinc homeostasis. Functionally, this dysregulated cytosolic zinc homeostasis led to impaired insulin secretion. In parallel studies, we identified both ZIP6 and ZIP7 as potential interacting proteins with GLP-1R by a membrane yeast two-hybrid assay. Knock-down of ZIP6 but not ZIP7 in MIN6 β cells impaired the protective effects of GLP-1 on fatty acid-induced cell apoptosis, possibly via reduced activation of the p-ERK pathway. Therefore, our data suggest that ZIP6 and ZIP7 function as two important zinc influx transporters to regulate cytosolic zinc concentrations and insulin secretion in β cells. In particular, ZIP6 is also capable of directly interacting with GLP-1R to facilitate the protective effect of GLP-1 on β cell survival.

  12. Melanocortin-induced PKA activation inhibits AMPK activity via ERK-1/2 and LKB-1 in hypothalamic GT1-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Damm, Ellen; Buech, Thomas R H; Gudermann, Thomas; Breit, Andreas

    2012-04-01

    α-Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH)-induced activation of the melanocortin-4 receptor in hypothalamic neurons increases energy expenditure and inhibits food intake. Active hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has recently been reported to enhance food intake, and in vivo experiments suggested that intrahypothalamic injection of melanocortins decreased food intake due to the inhibition of AMPK activity. However, it is not clear whether α-MSH affects AMPK via direct intracellular signaling cascades or if the release of paracrine factors is involved. Here, we used a murine, hypothalamic cell line (GT1-7 cells) and monitored AMPK phosphorylation at Thr(172), which has been suggested to increase AMPK activity. We found that α-MSH dephosphorylated AMPK at Thr(172) and consequently decreased phosphorylation of the established AMPK substrate acetyl-coenzyme A-carboxylase at Ser(79). Inhibitory effects of α-MSH on AMPK were blocked by specific inhibitors of protein kinase A (PKA) or ERK-1/2, pointing to an important role of both kinases in this process. Because α-MSH-induced activation of ERK-1/2 was blunted by PKA inhibitors, we propose that ERK-1/2 serves as a link between PKA and AMPK in GT1-7 cells. Furthermore, down-regulation of liver kinase B-1, but not inhibition of calcium-calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase-β or TGFβ-activated kinase-1 decreased basal phosphorylation of AMPK and its dephosphorylation induced by α-MSH. Thus, we propose that α-MSH inhibits AMPK activity via a linear pathway, including PKA, ERK-1/2, and liver kinase B-1 in GT1-7 cells. Given the importance of the melanocortin system in the formation of adipositas, detailed knowledge about this pathway might help to develop drugs targeting obesity.

  13. Regulation of oncogenic KRAS signaling via a novel KRAS-integrin-linked kinase-hnRNPA1 regulatory loop in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chu, P-C; Yang, M-C; Kulp, S K; Salunke, S B; Himmel, L E; Fang, C-S; Jadhav, A M; Shan, Y-S; Lee, C-T; Lai, M-D; Shirley, L A; Bekaii-Saab, T; Chen, C-S

    2016-07-28

    Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is a mediator of aggressive phenotype in pancreatic cancer. On the basis of our finding that knockdown of either KRAS or ILK has a reciprocal effect on the other's expression, we hypothesized the presence of an ILK-KRAS regulatory loop that enables pancreatic cancer cells to regulate KRAS expression. This study aimed to elucidate the mechanism by which this regulatory circuitry is regulated and to investigate the translational potential of targeting ILK to suppress oncogenic KRAS signaling in pancreatic cancer. Interplay between KRAS and ILK and the roles of E2F1, c-Myc and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein as intermediary effectors in this feedback loop was interrogated by genetic manipulations through small interfering RNA/short hairpin RNA knockdown and ectopic expression, western blotting, PCR, promoter-luciferase reporter assays, chromatin immunoprecipitation and pull-down analyses. In vivo efficacy of ILK inhibition was evaluated in two murine xenograft models. Our data show that KRAS regulated the expression of ILK through E2F1-mediated transcriptional activation, which, in turn, controlled KRAS gene expression via hnRNPA1-mediated destabilization of the G-quadruplex on the KRAS promoter. Moreover, ILK inhibition blocked KRAS-driven epithelial-mesenchymal transition and growth factor-stimulated KRAS expression. The knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of ILK suppressed pancreatic tumor growth, in part, by suppressing KRAS signaling. These studies suggest that this KRAS-E2F1-ILK-hnRNPA1 regulatory loop enables pancreatic cancer cells to promote oncogenic KRAS signaling and to interact with the tumor microenvironment to promote aggressive phenotypes. This regulatory loop provides a mechanistic rationale for targeting ILK to suppress oncogenic KRAS signaling, which might foster new therapeutic strategies for pancreatic cancer.

  14. DISCOVERY OF NOVEL GLUCOSE-REGULATED PROTEINS IN ISOLATED HUMAN PANCREATIC ISLETS USING LC-MS/MS-BASED PROTEOMICS

    PubMed Central

    Schrimpe-Rutledge, Alexandra C.; Fontès, Ghislaine; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Anderson, David J.; Waters, Katrina M.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Smith, Richard D.; Poitout, Vincent; Metz, Thomas O.

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus is increasing dramatically throughout the world, and the disease has become a major public health issue. The most common form of the disease, type 2 diabetes, is characterized by insulin resistance and insufficient insulin production from the pancreatic beta-cell. Since glucose is the most potent regulator of beta-cell function under physiological conditions, identification of the insulin secretory defect underlying type 2 diabetes requires a better understanding of glucose regulation of human beta-cell function. To this aim, a bottom-up LC-MS/MS-based proteomics approach was used to profile pooled islets from multiple donors under basal (5 mM) or high (15 mM) glucose conditions. Our analysis discovered 256 differentially abundant proteins (~p<0.05) after 24 h of high glucose exposure from more than 4500 identified in total. Several novel glucose-regulated proteins were elevated under high glucose conditions, including regulators of mRNA splicing (Pleiotropic regulator 1), processing (Retinoblastoma binding protein 6), and function (Nuclear RNA export factor 1), in addition to Neuron navigator 1 and Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1. Proteins whose abundances markedly decreased during incubation at 15 mM glucose included Bax inhibitor 1 and Synaptotagmin-17. Up-regulation of Dicer 1 and SLC27A2 and down-regulation of Phospholipase Cβ4 were confirmed by Western blots. Many proteins found to be differentially abundant after high glucose stimulation are annotated as uncharacterized or hypothetical. These findings expand our knowledge of glucose regulation of the human islet proteome and suggest many hitherto unknown responses to glucose that require additional studies to explore novel functional roles. PMID:22578083

  15. Genome-wide identification of palmitate-regulated immediate early genes and target genes in pancreatic beta-cells reveals a central role of NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyung Jin; Hwang, Seungwoo; Lee, Se-Hee; Lee, You Ri; Shin, Jiyon; Park, Kyong Soo; Cho, Young Min

    2012-06-01

    Free fatty acid-induced pancreatic β-cell dysfunction plays a key role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. We conducted gene expression microarray analysis to comprehensively investigate the transcription machinery of palmitate-regulated genes in pancreatic β-cells in vitro. In particular, mouse pancreatic βTC3 cells were treated with palmitate in the presence or absence of cycloheximide (CHX), which blocks protein synthesis and thereby allows us to distinguish immediate early genes (IEGs) from their target genes. The microarray experiments identified 34 palmitate-regulated IEGs and 74 palmitate-regulated target genes. In silico promoter analysis revealed that transcription factor binding sites for NF-κB were over-represented, regulating approximately one-third of the palmitate-regulated target genes. In cells treated with CHX, nfkb1 showed an up-regulation by palmitate, suggesting that NF-κB could be an IEG. Functional enrichment analysis of 27 palmitate-regulated genes with NF-κB binding sites showed an over-representation of genes involved in immune response, inflammatory response, defense response, taxis, regulation of cell proliferation, and regulation of cell death pathways. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that palmitate stimulates NF-κB activity both in the presence and absence of CHX. In conclusion, by identifying IEGs and target genes, the present study depicted a comprehensive view of transcription machinery underlying palmitate-induced inflammation and cell proliferation/death in pancreatic β-cells and our data demonstrated the central role of NF-κB.

  16. Homotypic cell cannibalism, a cell-death process regulated by the nuclear protein 1, opposes to metastasis in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cano, Carla E; Sandí, María José; Hamidi, Tewfik; Calvo, Ezequiel L; Turrini, Olivier; Bartholin, Laurent; Loncle, Céline; Secq, Véronique; Garcia, Stéphane; Lomberk, Gwen; Kroemer, Guido; Urrutia, Raul; Iovanna, Juan L

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an extremely deadly disease for which all treatments available have failed to improve life expectancy significantly. This may be explained by the high metastatic potential of PDAC cells, which results from their dedifferentiation towards a mesenchymal phenotype. Some PDAC present cell-in-cell structures whose origin and significance are currently unknown. We show here that cell-in-cells form after homotypic cell cannibalism (HoCC). We found PDAC patients whose tumours display HoCC develop less metastasis than those without. In vitro, HoCC was promoted by inactivation of the nuclear protein 1 (Nupr1), and was enhanced by treatment with transforming growth factor β. HoCC ends with death of PDAC cells, consistent with a metastasis suppressor role for this phenomenon. Hence, our data indicates a protective role for HoCC in PDAC and identifies Nupr1 as a molecular regulator of this process. PMID:22821859

  17. Vitamin D analogues up-regulate p21 and p27 during growth inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Kawa, S.; Nikaido, T.; Aoki, Y.; Zhai, Y.; Kumagai, T.; Furihata, K.; Fujii, S.; Kiyosawa, K.

    1997-01-01

    To obtain information regarding the growth-inhibitory effect of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and its non-calcaemic analogue 22-oxa-1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 on pancreatic cancer cell lines, differences in the effects of G1-phase cell cycle-regulating factors were studied in vitamin D-responsive and non-responsive cell lines. Levels of expression of cyclins (D1, E and A), cyclin-dependent kinases (2 and 4) and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (p21 and p27) were analysed by Western blotting after treatment with these compounds. In the responsive cells (BxPC-3, Hs 700T and SUP-1), our observations were: (1) marked up-regulation of p21 and p27 after 24 h treatment with 10(-7) mol l(-1) 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and 22-oxa-1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3; and (2) marked down-regulation of cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinases and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors after 7 days' treatment. In non-responsive cells (Hs 766T and Capan-1), no such changes were observed. In conclusion, vitamin D analogues up-regulate p21 and p27 as an early event, which in turn could block the G1/S transition and induce growth inhibition in responsive cells. Images Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9328147

  18. Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  19. Discovery of novel glucose-regulated proteins in isolated human pancreatic islets using LC-MS/MS-based proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Rutledge, Alexandra C.; Fontes, Ghislaine; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Anderson, David J.; Waters, Katrina M.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Smith, Richard D.; Poitout, Vincent; Metz, Thomas O.

    2012-07-06

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus is increasing dramatically throughout the world, and the disease has become a major public health issue. The most common form of the disease, type 2 diabetes, is due in part to insufficient insulin production from the pancreatic beta-cell. Since glucose is the most potent and physiologically important regulators of beta-cell function under physiological conditions, understanding the insulin secretory defect underlying type 2 diabetes requires a better understanding of glucose regulation of beta-cell function. To this aim, a bottom-up LC-MS/MS-based proteomics approach was used to profile pooled islets from multiple donors under basal (5 mM) or high (15 mM) glucose conditions. Our analysis discovered 256 differentially abundant proteins ({approx}p < 0.05) after 24 h of high glucose exposure from more than 4500 identified in total. Several novel glucose-regulated proteins were elevated under high glucose conditions, including regulators of mRNA splicing (Pleiotropic regulator 1), processing (Retinoblastoma binding protein 6), and function (Nuclear RNA export factor 1), in addition to Neuron navigator 1 and Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1. Proteins whose abundances markedly decreased during incubation at 15 mM glucose included Bax inhibitor 1 and Synaptotagmin-17. Many proteins found to be differentially abundant after high glucose stimulation were uncharacterized or hypothetical. These findings expand our knowledge of glucose regulation of the human islet proteome and suggest many hitherto unknown responses to glucose that require additional studies to explore novel functional roles.

  20. Pancreatic Transdifferentiation and Glucose-Regulated Production of Human Insulin in the H4IIE Rat Liver Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Ren, Binhai; Tao, Chang; Swan, Margaret Anne; Joachim, Nichole; Martiniello-Wilks, Rosetta; Nassif, Najah T; O'Brien, Bronwyn A; Simpson, Ann M

    2016-01-01

    Due to the limitations of current treatment regimes, gene therapy is a promising strategy being explored to correct blood glucose concentrations in diabetic patients. In the current study, we used a retroviral vector to deliver either the human insulin gene alone, the rat NeuroD1 gene alone, or the human insulin gene and rat NeuroD1 genes together, to the rat liver cell line, H4IIE, to determine if storage of insulin and pancreatic transdifferentiation occurred. Stable clones were selected and expanded into cell lines: H4IIEins (insulin gene alone), H4IIE/ND (NeuroD1 gene alone), and H4IIEins/ND (insulin and NeuroD1 genes). The H4IIEins cells did not store insulin; however, H4IIE/ND and H4IIEins/ND cells stored 65.5 ± 5.6 and 1475.4 ± 171.8 pmol/insulin/5 × 10⁶ cells, respectively. Additionally, several β cell transcription factors and pancreatic hormones were expressed in both H4IIE/ND and H4IIEins/ND cells. Electron microscopy revealed insulin storage vesicles in the H4IIE/ND and H4IIEins/ND cell lines. Regulated secretion of insulin to glucose (0-20 mmol/L) was seen in the H4IIEins/ND cell line. The H4IIEins/ND cells were transplanted into diabetic immunoincompetent mice, resulting in normalization of blood glucose. This data shows that the expression of NeuroD1 and insulin in liver cells may be a useful strategy for inducing islet neogenesis and reversing diabetes. PMID:27070593

  1. Pancreatic Transdifferentiation and Glucose-Regulated Production of Human Insulin in the H4IIE Rat Liver Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Binhai; Tao, Chang; Swan, Margaret Anne; Joachim, Nichole; Martiniello-Wilks, Rosetta; Nassif, Najah T.; O’Brien, Bronwyn A.; Simpson, Ann M.

    2016-01-01

    Due to the limitations of current treatment regimes, gene therapy is a promising strategy being explored to correct blood glucose concentrations in diabetic patients. In the current study, we used a retroviral vector to deliver either the human insulin gene alone, the rat NeuroD1 gene alone, or the human insulin gene and rat NeuroD1 genes together, to the rat liver cell line, H4IIE, to determine if storage of insulin and pancreatic transdifferentiation occurred. Stable clones were selected and expanded into cell lines: H4IIEins (insulin gene alone), H4IIE/ND (NeuroD1 gene alone), and H4IIEins/ND (insulin and NeuroD1 genes). The H4IIEins cells did not store insulin; however, H4IIE/ND and H4IIEins/ND cells stored 65.5 ± 5.6 and 1475.4 ± 171.8 pmol/insulin/5 × 106 cells, respectively. Additionally, several β cell transcription factors and pancreatic hormones were expressed in both H4IIE/ND and H4IIEins/ND cells. Electron microscopy revealed insulin storage vesicles in the H4IIE/ND and H4IIEins/ND cell lines. Regulated secretion of insulin to glucose (0–20 mmol/L) was seen in the H4IIEins/ND cell line. The H4IIEins/ND cells were transplanted into diabetic immunoincompetent mice, resulting in normalization of blood glucose. This data shows that the expression of NeuroD1 and insulin in liver cells may be a useful strategy for inducing islet neogenesis and reversing diabetes. PMID:27070593

  2. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Chari, S T; DiMagno, E P

    2000-09-01

    In the past year, there has been at least one important clinical paper that sheds light on the character and natural history of painful chronic pancreatitis, which has important clinical implications. In addition, several novel mutations have been described in the cationic trypsinogen gene in patients with hereditary pancreatitis. The mechanism by which these mutations cause pancreatic disease remains speculative. The diagnosis of early chronic pancreatitis is controversial. A novel noninvasive pancreatic function test (measurement of postprandial APOB-48) was reported but is unlikely to be a sensitive test of pancreatic function. Pancreatic fibrosis is frequently seen in alcoholics without chronic pancreatitis, and this makes it difficult to interpret the findings on endoscopic ultrasonogram. Recent studies highlight the difficulty in abolishing pancreatic steatorrhea. Recently fibrosing colonopathy in adult patients has been reported. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy combined with endoscopic therapy failed to benefit patients with calcific chronic pancreatitis.

  3. Somatostatin receptors on rat pancreatic acinar cells. Pharmacological and structural characterization and demonstration of down-regulation in streptozotocin diabetes.

    PubMed

    Srikant, C B; Patel, Y C

    1986-06-15

    The binding of somatostatin-14 (S-14) to rat pancreatic acinar cell membranes was characterized using [125I-Tyr11]S-14 as the radioligand. Maximum binding was observed at pH 7.4 and was Ca2+-dependent. Such Ca2+ dependence of S-14 receptor binding was not observed in other tissues. Scatchard analysis of the competitive inhibition by S-14 of [125I-Tyr11]S-14 binding revealed a single class of high affinity sites (Kd = 0.5 +/- 0.07 nM) with a binding capacity (Bmax) of 266 +/- 22 fmol/mg of protein. [D-Trp8]S-14 and structural analogs with halogenated Trp moiety exhibited 2-32-fold greater binding affinity than S-14, [D-F5-Trp8]S-14 being the most potent. [Tyr11]S-14 was equipotent with S-14. The affinity of somatostatin-28 for binding to these receptors was 50% of that of S-14. Cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8) inhibited the binding of [125I-Tyr11]S-14, but its inhibition curve was not parallel to that of S-14. In the presence of 1 nM CCK-8, the Bmax of S-14 receptors was reduced to 150 +/- 17 fmol/mg of protein. Dibutyryl cyclic GMP, a CCK receptor antagonist, partially reversed the inhibitory action of CCK-8, suggesting that CCK receptors mediate the inhibition of S-14 receptor binding. GDP, GTP, and guanyl-5'-yl imidodiphosphate inhibit S-14 receptor binding in this tissue. The inhibition was shown to be due to decrease in binding capacity and not due to change in affinity. Specifically bound [125I-Tyr11]S-14 cross-linked to the S-14 receptors was found associated with three proteins of approximate Mr = 200,000, 80,000, and 70,000 which could be detected under both reducing and nonreducing conditions. Finally, pancreatic acinar cell S-14 receptors were shown to be down-regulated by persistent hypersomatostatinemia 1 week after streptozotocin-induced diabetes characterized by decreased Bmax (105 +/- 13 fmol/mg of protein) without any change in affinity. We conclude that pancreatic acinar cell membrane S-14 receptors require Ca2+ for maximal binding and thus

  4. Metabolism Regulates Exposure of Pancreatic Islets to Circulating Molecules In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Michau, Aurélien; Hodson, David J; Fontanaud, Pierre; Guillou, Anne; Espinosa-Carrasco, Gabriel; Molino, François; Peters, Catherine J; Robinson, Iain C; Le Tissier, Paul; Mollard, Patrice; Schaeffer, Marie

    2016-02-01

    Pancreatic β-cells modulate insulin secretion through rapid sensing of blood glucose and integration of gut-derived signals. Increased insulin demand during pregnancy and obesity alters islet function and mass and leads to gestational diabetes mellitus and type 2 diabetes in predisposed individuals. However, it is unclear how blood-borne factors dynamically access the islets of Langerhans. Thus, understanding the changes in circulating molecule distribution that accompany compensatory β-cell expansion may be key to developing novel antidiabetic therapies. Here, using two-photon microscopy in vivo in mice, we demonstrate that islets are almost instantly exposed to peaks of circulating molecules, which rapidly pervade the tissue before clearance. In addition, both gestation and short-term high-fat-diet feeding decrease molecule extravasation and uptake rates in vivo in islets, independently of β-cell expansion or islet blood flow velocity. Together, these data support a role for islet vascular permeability in shaping β-cell adaptive responses to metabolic demand by modulating the access and sensing of circulating molecules. PMID:26581596

  5. The Carboxyl Tail of Connexin32 Regulates Gap Junction Assembly in Human Prostate and Pancreatic Cancer Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Katoch, Parul; Mitra, Shalini; Ray, Anuttoma; Kelsey, Linda; Roberts, Brett J.; Wahl, James K.; Johnson, Keith R.; Mehta, Parmender P.

    2015-01-01

    Connexins, the constituent proteins of gap junctions, are transmembrane proteins. A connexin (Cx) traverses the membrane four times and has one intracellular and two extracellular loops with the amino and carboxyl termini facing the cytoplasm. The transmembrane and the extracellular loop domains are highly conserved among different Cxs, whereas the carboxyl termini, often called the cytoplasmic tails, are highly divergent. We have explored the role of the cytoplasmic tail of Cx32, a Cx expressed in polarized and differentiated cells, in regulating gap junction assembly. Our results demonstrate that compared with the full-length Cx32, the cytoplasmic tail-deleted Cx32 is assembled into small gap junctions in human pancreatic and prostatic cancer cells. Our results further document that the expression of the full-length Cx32 in cells, which express the tail-deleted Cx32, increases the size of gap junctions, whereas the expression of the tail-deleted Cx32 in cells, which express the full-length Cx32, has the opposite effect. Moreover, we show that the tail is required for the clustering of cell-cell channels and that in cells expressing the tail-deleted Cx32, the expression of cell surface-targeted cytoplasmic tail alone is sufficient to enhance the size of gap junctions. Our live-cell imaging data further demonstrate that gap junctions formed of the tail-deleted Cx32 are highly mobile compared with those formed of full-length Cx32. Our results suggest that the cytoplasmic tail of Cx32 is not required to initiate the assembly of gap junctions but for their subsequent growth and stability. Our findings suggest that the cytoplasmic tail of Cx32 may be involved in regulating the permeability of gap junctions by regulating their size. PMID:25548281

  6. Concerted Trafficking Regulation of Kv2.1 and KATP Channels by Leptin in Pancreatic β-Cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi; Shyng, Show-Ling; Chen, Pei-Chun

    2015-12-11

    In pancreatic β-cells, voltage-gated potassium 2.1 (Kv2.1) channels are the dominant delayed rectifier potassium channels responsible for action potential repolarization. Here, we report that leptin, a hormone secreted by adipocytes known to inhibit insulin secretion, causes a transient increase in surface expression of Kv2.1 channels in rodent and human β-cells. The effect of leptin on Kv2.1 surface expression is mediated by the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Activation of AMPK mimics whereas inhibition of AMPK occludes the effect of leptin. Inhibition of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β, a known upstream kinase of AMPK, also blocks the effect of leptin. In addition, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is involved in Kv2.1 channel trafficking regulation. Inhibition of PKA prevents leptin or AMPK activators from increasing Kv2.1 channel density, whereas stimulation of PKA is sufficient to promote Kv2.1 channel surface expression. The increased Kv2.1 surface expression by leptin is dependent on actin depolymerization, and pharmacologically induced actin depolymerization is sufficient to enhance Kv2.1 surface expression. The signaling and cellular mechanisms underlying Kv2.1 channel trafficking regulation by leptin mirror those reported recently for ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels, which are critical for coupling glucose stimulation with membrane depolarization. We show that the leptin-induced increase in surface KATP channels results in more hyperpolarized membrane potentials than control cells at stimulating glucose concentrations, and the increase in Kv2.1 channels leads to a more rapid repolarization of membrane potential in cells firing action potentials. This study supports a model in which leptin exerts concerted trafficking regulation of KATP and Kv2.1 channels to coordinately inhibit insulin secretion.

  7. [Pancreatic Diseases].

    PubMed

    Schöfl, Rainer

    2016-06-22

    The author presents his personal choice of practical relevant papers of pancreatic diseases from 2014 to 2015. Nutritional factors and hypertriglycidemia are discussed as causes of acute pancreatitis. Tools to avoid post-ERCP(endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography) pancreatitis are described and the natural course of fluid collections and pseudocysts is demonstrated. The value of secretin-MRCP(magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography) for diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis is illustrated. Data help to choose the minimally effective prednisolone dose in autoimmune pancreatitis. The increased prevalence of fractures in patients with chronic pancreatitis highlights the necessity of screening for bone density loss. The association of vitamin D intake with pancreatic cancer is described. The probability of cancer in IPNM is shown and innovative surgical concepts to reduce the loss of pancreatic function are presented. Finally neoadjuvant concepts for the treatment of pancreatic cancer are highlighted. PMID:27329710

  8. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor expression is associated with disease-specific survival in cervical cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Choi, Chel Hun; Chung, Joon-Yong; Park, Ho-Seop; Jun, Minsik; Lee, Yoo-Young; Kim, Byung-Gie; Hewitt, Stephen M

    2015-06-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF) is a novel soluble protein involved in tumor development and metastases. This study was to investigate the PAUF expression and its prognostic value in cervical cancer patients. The expression of PAUF was immunohistochemically determined in 345 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cervical cancer tissues and 107 normal cervical epitheliums. Subsequently, its associations with clinicopathological characteristics and patient survival were assessed. PAUF protein was expressed both in cytoplasm and nucleus, and cytoplasmic expression was more frequent in cancers than normal tissues (32% versus 17%, P = .002), and the difference was prominent in glandular cells. Notably, the expression was more frequent in adenocarcinoma than in squamous cell carcinoma (57% versus 25%, respectively; P < .001), and the differential expression was also seen at the messenger RNA level (P = .014). Cox regression analysis showed that the cytoplasmic expression of PAUF protein was independently associated with poor disease-free (hazard ratio = 2.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-4.3; P = .008) and overall survival (hazard ratio = 2.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-7.5; P = .020). Detection of PAUF expression may aid current evaluation of prognosis in cervical adenocarcinoma.

  9. BET Bromodomain Proteins Brd2, Brd3 and Brd4 Selectively Regulate Metabolic Pathways in the Pancreatic β-Cell

    PubMed Central

    Deeney, Jude T.; Belkina, Anna C.; Shirihai, Orian S.; Corkey, Barbara E.; Denis, Gerald V.

    2016-01-01

    Displacement of Bromodomain and Extra-Terminal (BET) proteins from chromatin has promise for cancer and inflammatory disease treatments, but roles of BET proteins in metabolic disease remain unexplored. Small molecule BET inhibitors, such as JQ1, block BET protein binding to acetylated lysines, but lack selectivity within the BET family (Brd2, Brd3, Brd4, Brdt), making it difficult to disentangle contributions of each family member to transcriptional and cellular outcomes. Here, we demonstrate multiple improvements in pancreatic β-cells upon BET inhibition with JQ1 or BET-specific siRNAs. JQ1 (50–400 nM) increases insulin secretion from INS-1 cells in a concentration dependent manner. JQ1 increases insulin content in INS-1 cells, accounting for increased secretion, in both rat and human islets. Higher concentrations of JQ1 decrease intracellular triglyceride stores in INS-1 cells, a result of increased fatty acid oxidation. Specific inhibition of both Brd2 and Brd4 enhances insulin transcription, leading to increased insulin content. Inhibition of Brd2 alone increases fatty acid oxidation. Overlapping yet discrete roles for individual BET proteins in metabolic regulation suggest new isoform-selective BET inhibitors may be useful to treat insulin resistant/diabetic patients. Results imply that cancer and diseases of chronic inflammation or disordered metabolism are related through shared chromatin regulatory mechanisms. PMID:27008626

  10. BET Bromodomain Proteins Brd2, Brd3 and Brd4 Selectively Regulate Metabolic Pathways in the Pancreatic β-Cell.

    PubMed

    Deeney, Jude T; Belkina, Anna C; Shirihai, Orian S; Corkey, Barbara E; Denis, Gerald V

    2016-01-01

    Displacement of Bromodomain and Extra-Terminal (BET) proteins from chromatin has promise for cancer and inflammatory disease treatments, but roles of BET proteins in metabolic disease remain unexplored. Small molecule BET inhibitors, such as JQ1, block BET protein binding to acetylated lysines, but lack selectivity within the BET family (Brd2, Brd3, Brd4, Brdt), making it difficult to disentangle contributions of each family member to transcriptional and cellular outcomes. Here, we demonstrate multiple improvements in pancreatic β-cells upon BET inhibition with JQ1 or BET-specific siRNAs. JQ1 (50-400 nM) increases insulin secretion from INS-1 cells in a concentration dependent manner. JQ1 increases insulin content in INS-1 cells, accounting for increased secretion, in both rat and human islets. Higher concentrations of JQ1 decrease intracellular triglyceride stores in INS-1 cells, a result of increased fatty acid oxidation. Specific inhibition of both Brd2 and Brd4 enhances insulin transcription, leading to increased insulin content. Inhibition of Brd2 alone increases fatty acid oxidation. Overlapping yet discrete roles for individual BET proteins in metabolic regulation suggest new isoform-selective BET inhibitors may be useful to treat insulin resistant/diabetic patients. Results imply that cancer and diseases of chronic inflammation or disordered metabolism are related through shared chromatin regulatory mechanisms. PMID:27008626

  11. Curcumin inhibits cell growth and invasion and induces apoptosis through down-regulation of Skp2 in pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jingna; Zhou, Xiuxia; Wang, Lixia; Yin, Xuyuan; Wang, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    Natural polyphenol compound curcumin has been found to exhibit its anticancer activity in a variety of human malignancies including pancreatic cancer (PC). However, the underlying mechanism has not been fully understood. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that Skp2 (S-phase kinase associated protein 2) plays an oncogenic role in the development and progression of human cancers. In this study, we aim to explore the molecular basis of curcumin-induced cell growth inhibition in PC cells.Multiple methods such as CTG assay, Flow cytometry, clonogenic assay, wound healing assay, Transwell invasion assay, Western blotting, and transfection were performed to validate the oncogenic role of curcumin in PC cells. We found that curcumin suppressed cell growth, clonogenic potential, migration and invasion, and induced cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Moreover, we observed thatover-expression of Skp2 significantly promoted cell growth, whereas down-regulation of Skp2 with siRNAs inhibited cell growth. The molecular basis of curcumin-mediated cell growth inhibition we identified is that curcumin significantly suppressed Skp2 expression and subsequently induced p21 expression. These findings suggested thattargeting Skp2 by curcumin could be a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of PC patients. PMID:27725901

  12. Fibulin-3 negatively regulates ALDH1 via c-MET suppression and increases γ-radiation-induced sensitivity in some pancreatic cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kim, In-Gyu; Lee, Jae-Ha; Kim, Seo-Yoen; Kim, Jeong-Yul; Cho, Eun-Wie

    2014-11-21

    Fibulin-3 (FBLN-3) has been postulated to be either a tumor suppressor or promoter depending on the cell type, and hypermethylation of the FBLN-3 promoter is often associated with human disease, especially cancer. We report that the promoter region of the FBLN-3 was significantly methylated (>95%) in some pancreatic cancer cell lines and thus FBLN-3 was poorly expressed in pancreatic cancer cell lines such as AsPC-1 and MiaPaCa-2. FBLN-3 overexpression significantly down-regulated the cellular level of c-MET and inhibited hepatocyte growth factor-induced c-MET activation, which were closely associated with γ-radiation resistance of cancer cells. Moreover, we also showed that c-MET suppression or inactivation decreased the cellular level of ALDH1 isozymes (ALDH1A1 or ALDH1A3), which serve as cancer stem cell markers, and subsequently induced inhibition of cell growth in pancreatic cancer cells. Therefore, forced overexpression of FBLN-3 sensitized cells to cytotoxic agents such as γ-radiation and strongly inhibited the stemness and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) property of pancreatic cancer cells. On the other hand, if FBLN3 was suppressed in FBLN-3-expressing BxPC3 cells, the results were opposite. This study provides the first demonstration that the FBLN-3/c-MET/ALDH1 axis in pancreatic cancer cells partially modulates stemness and EMT as well as sensitization of cells to the detrimental effects of γ-radiation. PMID:25451256

  13. Inflammasomes in pancreatic physiology and disease

    PubMed Central

    Hoque, Rafaz

    2015-01-01

    In this review we summarize the role of inflammasomes in pancreatic physiology and disease with a focus on acute pancreatitis where much recent progress has been made. New findings have identified inducers of and cell specificity of inflammasome component expression in the pancreas, the contribution of inflammasome-regulated effectors to pancreatitis, and metabolic regulation of inflammasome activation, which are strong determinants of injury in pancreatitis. New areas of pancreatic biology will be highlighted in the context of our evolving understanding of gut microbiome- and injury-induced inflammasome priming, pyroptosis, and innate immune-mediated regulation of cell metabolism. PMID:25700081

  14. NAD kinase regulates the size of the NADPH pool and insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells.

    PubMed

    Gray, Joshua P; Alavian, Kambiz N; Jonas, Elizabeth A; Heart, Emma A

    2012-07-15

    NADPH is an important component of the antioxidant defense system and a proposed mediator in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from pancreatic β-cells. An increase in the NADPH/NADP(+) ratio has been reported to occur within minutes following the rise in glucose concentration in β-cells. However, 30 min following the increase in glucose, the total NADPH pool also increases through a mechanism not yet characterized. NAD kinase (NADK) catalyzes the de novo formation of NADP(+) by phosphorylation of NAD(+). NAD kinases have been shown to be essential for redox regulation, oxidative stress defense, and survival in bacteria and yeast. However, studies on NADK in eukaryotic cells are scarce, and the function of this enzyme has not been described in β-cells. We employed INS-1 832/13 cells, an insulin-secreting rat β-cell line, and isolated rodent islets to investigate the role of NADK in β-cell metabolic pathways. Adenoviral-mediated overexpression of NADK resulted in a two- to threefold increase in the total NADPH pool and NADPH/NADP(+) ratio, suggesting that NADP(+) formed by the NADK-catalyzed reaction is rapidly reduced to NADPH via cytosolic reductases. This increase in the NADPH pool was accompanied by an increase in GSIS in NADK-overexpressing cells. Furthermore, NADK overexpression protected β-cells against oxidative damage by the redox cycling agent menadione and reversed menadione-mediated inhibition of GSIS. Knockdown of NADK via shRNA exerted the opposite effect on all these parameters. These data suggest that NADK kinase regulates intracellular redox and affects insulin secretion and oxidative defense in the β-cell.

  15. Early peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma regulated genes involved in expansion of pancreatic beta cell mass

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The progression towards type 2 diabetes depends on the allostatic response of pancreatic beta cells to synthesise and secrete enough insulin to compensate for insulin resistance. The endocrine pancreas is a plastic tissue able to expand or regress in response to the requirements imposed by physiological and pathophysiological states associated to insulin resistance such as pregnancy, obesity or ageing, but the mechanisms mediating beta cell mass expansion in these scenarios are not well defined. We have recently shown that ob/ob mice with genetic ablation of PPARγ2, a mouse model known as the POKO mouse failed to expand its beta cell mass. This phenotype contrasted with the appropriate expansion of the beta cell mass observed in their obese littermate ob/ob mice. Thus, comparison of these models islets particularly at early ages could provide some new insights on early PPARγ dependent transcriptional responses involved in the process of beta cell mass expansion Results Here we have investigated PPARγ dependent transcriptional responses occurring during the early stages of beta cell adaptation to insulin resistance in wild type, ob/ob, PPARγ2 KO and POKO mice. We have identified genes known to regulate both the rate of proliferation and the survival signals of beta cells. Moreover we have also identified new pathways induced in ob/ob islets that remained unchanged in POKO islets, suggesting an important role for PPARγ in maintenance/activation of mechanisms essential for the continued function of the beta cell. Conclusions Our data suggest that the expansion of beta cell mass observed in ob/ob islets is associated with the activation of an immune response that fails to occur in POKO islets. We have also indentified other PPARγ dependent differentially regulated pathways including cholesterol biosynthesis, apoptosis through TGF-β signaling and decreased oxidative phosphorylation. PMID:22208362

  16. NAD kinase regulates the size of the NADPH pool and insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells.

    PubMed

    Gray, Joshua P; Alavian, Kambiz N; Jonas, Elizabeth A; Heart, Emma A

    2012-07-15

    NADPH is an important component of the antioxidant defense system and a proposed mediator in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from pancreatic β-cells. An increase in the NADPH/NADP(+) ratio has been reported to occur within minutes following the rise in glucose concentration in β-cells. However, 30 min following the increase in glucose, the total NADPH pool also increases through a mechanism not yet characterized. NAD kinase (NADK) catalyzes the de novo formation of NADP(+) by phosphorylation of NAD(+). NAD kinases have been shown to be essential for redox regulation, oxidative stress defense, and survival in bacteria and yeast. However, studies on NADK in eukaryotic cells are scarce, and the function of this enzyme has not been described in β-cells. We employed INS-1 832/13 cells, an insulin-secreting rat β-cell line, and isolated rodent islets to investigate the role of NADK in β-cell metabolic pathways. Adenoviral-mediated overexpression of NADK resulted in a two- to threefold increase in the total NADPH pool and NADPH/NADP(+) ratio, suggesting that NADP(+) formed by the NADK-catalyzed reaction is rapidly reduced to NADPH via cytosolic reductases. This increase in the NADPH pool was accompanied by an increase in GSIS in NADK-overexpressing cells. Furthermore, NADK overexpression protected β-cells against oxidative damage by the redox cycling agent menadione and reversed menadione-mediated inhibition of GSIS. Knockdown of NADK via shRNA exerted the opposite effect on all these parameters. These data suggest that NADK kinase regulates intracellular redox and affects insulin secretion and oxidative defense in the β-cell. PMID:22550069

  17. Calcium-Oxidant Signaling Network Regulates AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Activation upon Matrix Deprivation*

    PubMed Central

    Sundararaman, Ananthalakshmy; Amirtham, Usha; Rangarajan, Annapoorni

    2016-01-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has recently been implicated in anoikis resistance. However, the molecular mechanisms that activate AMPK upon matrix detachment remain unexplored. In this study, we show that AMPK activation is a rapid and sustained phenomenon upon matrix deprivation, whereas re-attachment to the matrix leads to its dephosphorylation and inactivation. Because matrix detachment leads to loss of integrin signaling, we investigated whether integrin signaling negatively regulates AMPK activation. However, modulation of focal adhesion kinase or Src, the major downstream components of integrin signaling, failed to cause a corresponding change in AMPK signaling. Further investigations revealed that the upstream AMPK kinases liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ) contribute to AMPK activation upon detachment. In LKB1-deficient cells, we found AMPK activation to be predominantly dependent on CaMKKβ. We observed no change in ATP levels under detached conditions at early time points suggesting that rapid AMPK activation upon detachment was not triggered by energy stress. We demonstrate that matrix deprivation leads to a spike in intracellular calcium as well as oxidant signaling, and both these intracellular messengers contribute to rapid AMPK activation upon detachment. We further show that endoplasmic reticulum calcium release-induced store-operated calcium entry contributes to intracellular calcium increase, leading to reactive oxygen species production, and AMPK activation. We additionally show that the LKB1/CaMKK-AMPK axis and intracellular calcium levels play a critical role in anchorage-independent cancer sphere formation. Thus, the Ca2+/reactive oxygen species-triggered LKB1/CaMKK-AMPK signaling cascade may provide a quick, adaptable switch to promote survival of metastasizing cancer cells. PMID:27226623

  18. Pancreatic Amylase Is an Environmental Signal for Regulation of Biofilm Formation and Host Interaction in Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Jowiya, Waheed; Brunner, Katja; Abouelhadid, Sherif; Hussain, Haitham A.; Nair, Sean P.; Sadiq, Sohaib; Williams, Lisa K.; Trantham, Emma K.; Stephenson, Holly; Wren, Brendan W.; Bajaj-Elliott, Mona; Cogan, Tristan A.; Laws, Andrew P.; Wade, Jim; Dorrell, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a commensal bacterium in the intestines of animals and birds and a major cause of food-borne gastroenteritis in humans worldwide. Here we show that exposure to pancreatic amylase leads to secretion of an α-dextran by C. jejuni and that a secreted protease, Cj0511, is required. Exposure of C. jejuni to pancreatic amylase promotes biofilm formation in vitro, increases interaction with human epithelial cell lines, increases virulence in the Galleria mellonella infection model, and promotes colonization of the chicken ileum. We also show that exposure to pancreatic amylase protects C. jejuni from stress conditions in vitro, suggesting that the induced α-dextran may be important during transmission between hosts. This is the first evidence that pancreatic amylase functions as an interkingdom signal in an enteric microorganism. PMID:26438798

  19. Pancreatic amylase is an environmental signal for regulation of biofilm formation and host interaction in Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Jowiya, Waheed; Brunner, Katja; Abouelhadid, Sherif; Hussain, Haitham A; Nair, Sean P; Sadiq, Sohaib; Williams, Lisa K; Trantham, Emma K; Stephenson, Holly; Wren, Brendan W; Bajaj-Elliott, Mona; Cogan, Tristan A; Laws, Andrew P; Wade, Jim; Dorrell, Nick; Allan, Elaine

    2015-12-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a commensal bacterium in the intestines of animals and birds and a major cause of food-borne gastroenteritis in humans worldwide. Here we show that exposure to pancreatic amylase leads to secretion of an α-dextran by C. jejuni and that a secreted protease, Cj0511, is required. Exposure of C. jejuni to pancreatic amylase promotes biofilm formation in vitro, increases interaction with human epithelial cell lines, increases virulence in the Galleria mellonella infection model, and promotes colonization of the chicken ileum. We also show that exposure to pancreatic amylase protects C. jejuni from stress conditions in vitro, suggesting that the induced α-dextran may be important during transmission between hosts. This is the first evidence that pancreatic amylase functions as an interkingdom signal in an enteric microorganism.

  20. Fisetin attenuates cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis through down regulation of JNK and NF-κB signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Jo, Il-Joo; Bae, Gi-Sang; Choi, Sun Bok; Kim, Dong-Goo; Shin, Joon-Yeon; Seo, Seung-Hee; Choi, Mee-Ok; Kim, Tae-Hyeon; Song, Ho-Joon; Park, Sung-Joo

    2014-08-15

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a complicated disease which is largely undiscovered. Fisetin, a natural flavonoid from fruits and vegetables, has been shown to have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-cancer activities in various disease models. However, the effects of fisetin on AP have not been determined. Pre- and post- treatment of mice with fisetin reduced the severity of AP and pancreatitis-associated lung injury and inhibited several biochemical parameters (pancreatic weight to body weight ratio, amylase, lipase, and myeloperoxidase activity) and production of inflammatory cytokines. In pancreatic acinar cells, fisetin also inhibited cell death and production of inflammatory cytokines. In addition, fisetin inhibited activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB in vivo and in vitro. In conclusion, these results suggest that fisetin exhibits anti-inflammatory effect on AP and could be a beneficial agent in the treatment of AP and its pulmonary complications.

  1. Fisetin attenuates cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis through down regulation of JNK and NF-κB signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Jo, Il-Joo; Bae, Gi-Sang; Choi, Sun Bok; Kim, Dong-Goo; Shin, Joon-Yeon; Seo, Seung-Hee; Choi, Mee-Ok; Kim, Tae-Hyeon; Song, Ho-Joon; Park, Sung-Joo

    2014-08-15

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a complicated disease which is largely undiscovered. Fisetin, a natural flavonoid from fruits and vegetables, has been shown to have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-cancer activities in various disease models. However, the effects of fisetin on AP have not been determined. Pre- and post- treatment of mice with fisetin reduced the severity of AP and pancreatitis-associated lung injury and inhibited several biochemical parameters (pancreatic weight to body weight ratio, amylase, lipase, and myeloperoxidase activity) and production of inflammatory cytokines. In pancreatic acinar cells, fisetin also inhibited cell death and production of inflammatory cytokines. In addition, fisetin inhibited activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB in vivo and in vitro. In conclusion, these results suggest that fisetin exhibits anti-inflammatory effect on AP and could be a beneficial agent in the treatment of AP and its pulmonary complications. PMID:24861022

  2. Childhood pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Uretsky, G; Goldschmiedt, M; James, K

    1999-05-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a rare finding in childhood but probably more common than is generally realized. This condition should be considered in the evaluation of children with vomiting and abdominal pain, because it can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Clinical suspicion is required to make the diagnosis, especially when the serum amylase concentration is normal. Recurrent pancreatitis may be familial as a result of inherited biochemical or anatomic abnormalities. Patients with hereditary pancreatitis are at high risk for pancreatic cancer.

  3. Carbohydrate-Responsive Element-Binding Protein (ChREBP) Is a Negative Regulator of ARNT/HIF-1β Gene Expression in Pancreatic Islet β-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Noordeen, Nafeesa A.; Khera, Tarnjit K.; Sun, Gao; Longbottom, E. Rebecca; Pullen, Timothy J.; da Silva Xavier, Gabriela; Rutter, Guy A.; Leclerc, Isabelle

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP) is a transcription factor that has been shown to regulate carbohydrate metabolism in the liver and pancreatic β-cells in response to elevated glucose concentrations. Because few genes have been identified so far as bona fide ChREBP-target genes, we have performed a genome-wide analysis of the ChREBP transcriptome in pancreatic β-cells. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Chromatin immunoprecipitation and high-density oligonucleotide tiling arrays (ChIP-chip; Agilent Technologies) using MIN6 pancreatic β-cell extracts were performed together with transcriptional and other analysis using standard techniques. RESULTS One of the genes identified by ChIP-chip and linked to glucose sensing and insulin secretion was aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT)/hypoxia-inducible factor-1β (HIF-1β), a transcription factor implicated in altered gene expression and pancreatic-islet dysfunction in type 2 diabetes. We first confirmed that elevated glucose concentrations decreased ARNT/HIF-1β levels in INS-1 (832/13) cells and primary mouse islets. Demonstrating a role for ChREBP in ARNT gene regulation, ChREBP silencing increased ARNT mRNA levels in INS-1 (832/13) cells, and ChREBP overexpression decreased ARNT mRNA in INS-1 (832/13) cells and primary mouse islets. We demonstrated that ChREBP and Max-like protein X (MLX) bind on the ARNT/HIF-1β promoter on the proximal region that also confers the negative glucose responsiveness. CONCLUSIONS These results demonstrate that ChREBP acts as a novel repressor of the ARNT/HIF-1β gene and might contribute to β-cell dysfunction induced by glucotoxicity. PMID:19833882

  4. Environmental risk factors for chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Nitsche, Claudia; Simon, Peter; Weiss, F Ulrich; Fluhr, Gabriele; Weber, Eckhard; Gärtner, Simone; Behn, Claas O; Kraft, Matthias; Ringel, Jörg; Aghdassi, Ali; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis has long been thought to be mainly associated with immoderate alcohol consumption. The observation that only ∼10% of heavy drinkers develop chronic pancreatitis not only suggests that other environmental factors, such as tobacco smoke, are potent additional risk factors, but also that the genetic component of pancreatitis is more common than previously presumed. Either disease-causing or protective traits have been indentified for mutations in different trypsinogen genes, the gene for the trypsin inhibitor SPINK1, chymotrypsinogen C, and the cystic fibrosis transmembane conductance regulator (CFTR). Other factors that have been proposed to contribute to pancreatitis are obesity, diets high in animal protein and fat, as well as antioxidant deficiencies. For the development of pancreatic cancer, preexisting chronic pancreatitis, more prominently hereditary pancreatitis, is a risk factor. The data on environmental risk factors for pancreatic cancer are, with the notable exception of tobacco smoke, either sparse, unconfirmed or controversial. Obesity appears to increase the risk of pancreatic cancer in the West but not in Japan. Diets high in processed or red meat, diets low in fruits and vegetables, phytochemicals such as lycopene and flavonols, have been proposed and refuted as risk or protective factors in different trials. The best established and single most important risk factor for cancer as well as pancreatitis and the one to clearly avoid is tobacco smoke.

  5. Clock-controlled output gene Dbp is a regulator of Arnt/Hif-1β gene expression in pancreatic islet β-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nakabayashi, Hiroko; Ohta, Yasuharu Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Susuki, Yosuke; Taguchi, Akihiko; Tanabe, Katsuya; Kondo, Manabu; Hatanaka, Masayuki; Nagao, Yuko; Tanizawa, Yukio

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: •Arnt mRNA expressed in a circadian manner in mouse pancreatic islets. •Expressions of Dbp and Arnt damped in the islets of a diabetic model mouse. •DBP and E4BP4 regulate Arnt promoter activity by direct binding. •Arnt may have a role in connecting circadian rhythm and metabolism. -- Abstract: Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT)/hypoxia inducible factor-1β (HIF-1β) has emerged as a potential determinant of pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and type 2 diabetes in humans. An 82% reduction in Arnt expression was observed in islets from type 2 diabetic donors as compared to non-diabetic donors. However, few regulators of Arnt expression have been identified. Meanwhile, disruption of the clock components CLOCK and BMAL1 is known to result in hypoinsulinemia and diabetes, but the molecular details remain unclear. In this study, we identified a novel molecular connection between Arnt and two clock-controlled output genes, albumin D-element binding protein (Dbp) and E4 binding protein 4 (E4bp4). By conducting gene expression studies using the islets of Wfs1{sup −/−} A{sup y}/a mice that develop severe diabetes due to β-cell apoptosis, we demonstrated clock-related gene expressions to be altered in the diabetic mice. Dbp mRNA decreased by 50%, E4bp4 mRNA increased by 50%, and Arnt mRNA decreased by 30% at Zeitgever Time (ZT) 12. Mouse pancreatic islets exhibited oscillations of clock gene expressions. E4BP4, a D-box negative regulator, oscillated anti-phase to DBP, a D-box positive regulator. We also found low-amplitude circadian expression of Arnt mRNA, which peaked at ZT4. Over-expression of DBP raised both mRNA and protein levels of ARNT in HEK293 and MIN6 cell lines. Arnt promoter-driven luciferase reporter assay in MIN6 cells revealed that DBP increased Arnt promoter activity by 2.5-fold and that E4BP4 competitively inhibited its activation. In addition, on ChIP assay, DBP and E4BP4 directly bound to D-box elements within the

  6. Beyond the brain: disrupted in schizophrenia 1 regulates pancreatic β-cell function via glycogen synthase kinase-3β.

    PubMed

    Jurczyk, Agata; Nowosielska, Anetta; Przewozniak, Natalia; Aryee, Ken-Edwin; DiIorio, Philip; Blodgett, David; Yang, Chaoxing; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Atkinson, Mark; Shultz, Leonard; Rittenhouse, Ann; Harlan, David; Greiner, Dale; Bortell, Rita

    2016-02-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia and their first-degree relatives have higher rates of type 2 diabetes (T2D) than the general population (18-30 vs. 1.2-6.3%), independent of body mass index and antipsychotic medication, suggesting shared genetic components may contribute to both diseases. The cause of this association remains unknown. Mutations in disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) increase the risk of developing psychiatric disorders [logarithm (base 10) of odds = 7.1]. Here, we identified DISC1 as a major player controlling pancreatic β-cell proliferation and insulin secretion via regulation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β). DISC1 expression was enriched in developing mouse and human pancreas and adult β- and ductal cells. Loss of DISC1 function, through siRNA-mediated depletion or expression of a dominant-negative truncation that models the chromosomal translocation of human DISC1 in schizophrenia, resulted in decreased β-cell proliferation (3 vs. 1%; P < 0.01), increased apoptosis (0.1 vs. 0.6%; P < 0.01), and glucose intolerance in transgenic mice. Insulin secretion was reduced (0.5 vs. 0.1 ng/ml; P < 0.05), and critical β-cell transcription factors Pdx1 and Nkx6.1 were significantly decreased. Impaired DISC1 allowed inappropriate activation of GSK3β in β cells, and antagonizing GSK3β (SB216763; IC50 = 34.3 nM) rescued the β-cell defects. These results uncover an unexpected role for DISC1 in normal β-cell physiology and suggest that DISC1 dysregulation contributes to T2D independently of its importance for cognition. PMID:26546129

  7. Epigenetic Regulation of the lncRNA MEG3 and Its Target c-MET in Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Modali, Sita D.; Parekh, Vaishali I.; Kebebew, Electron

    2015-01-01

    Biallelic inactivation of MEN1 encoding menin in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) associated with the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) syndrome is well established, but how menin loss/inactivation initiates tumorigenesis is not well understood. We show that menin activates the long noncoding RNA maternally expressed gene 3 (Meg3) by histone-H3 lysine-4 trimethylation and CpG hypomethylation at the Meg3 promoter CRE site, to allow binding of the transcription factor cAMP response element-binding protein. We found that Meg3 has tumor-suppressor activity in PNET cells because the overexpression of Meg3 in MIN6 cells (insulin-secreting mouse PNET cell line) blocked cell proliferation and delayed cell cycle progression. Gene expression microarray analysis showed that Meg3 overexpression in MIN6 mouse insulinoma cells down-regulated the expression of the protooncogene c-Met (hepatocyte growth factor receptor), and these cells showed significantly reduced cell migration/invasion. Compared with normal islets, mouse or human MEN1-associated PNETs expressed less MEG3 and more c-MET. Therefore, a tumor-suppressor long noncoding RNA (MEG3) and suppressed protooncogene (c-MET) combination could elicit menin's tumor-suppressor activity. Interestingly, MEG3 and c-MET expression was also altered in human sporadic insulinomas (insulin secreting PNETs) with hypermethylation at the MEG3 promoter CRE-site coinciding with reduced MEG3 expression. These data provide insights into the β-cell proliferation mechanisms that could retain their functional status. Furthermore, in MIN6 mouse insulinoma cells, DNA-demethylating drugs blocked cell proliferation and activated Meg3 expression. Our data suggest that the epigenetic activation of lncRNA MEG3 and/or inactivation of c-MET could be therapeutic for treating PNETs and insulinomas. PMID:25565142

  8. Beyond the brain: disrupted in schizophrenia 1 regulates pancreatic β-cell function via glycogen synthase kinase-3β.

    PubMed

    Jurczyk, Agata; Nowosielska, Anetta; Przewozniak, Natalia; Aryee, Ken-Edwin; DiIorio, Philip; Blodgett, David; Yang, Chaoxing; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Atkinson, Mark; Shultz, Leonard; Rittenhouse, Ann; Harlan, David; Greiner, Dale; Bortell, Rita

    2016-02-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia and their first-degree relatives have higher rates of type 2 diabetes (T2D) than the general population (18-30 vs. 1.2-6.3%), independent of body mass index and antipsychotic medication, suggesting shared genetic components may contribute to both diseases. The cause of this association remains unknown. Mutations in disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) increase the risk of developing psychiatric disorders [logarithm (base 10) of odds = 7.1]. Here, we identified DISC1 as a major player controlling pancreatic β-cell proliferation and insulin secretion via regulation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β). DISC1 expression was enriched in developing mouse and human pancreas and adult β- and ductal cells. Loss of DISC1 function, through siRNA-mediated depletion or expression of a dominant-negative truncation that models the chromosomal translocation of human DISC1 in schizophrenia, resulted in decreased β-cell proliferation (3 vs. 1%; P < 0.01), increased apoptosis (0.1 vs. 0.6%; P < 0.01), and glucose intolerance in transgenic mice. Insulin secretion was reduced (0.5 vs. 0.1 ng/ml; P < 0.05), and critical β-cell transcription factors Pdx1 and Nkx6.1 were significantly decreased. Impaired DISC1 allowed inappropriate activation of GSK3β in β cells, and antagonizing GSK3β (SB216763; IC50 = 34.3 nM) rescued the β-cell defects. These results uncover an unexpected role for DISC1 in normal β-cell physiology and suggest that DISC1 dysregulation contributes to T2D independently of its importance for cognition.

  9. Complexin 2 modulates vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP) 2-regulated zymogen granule exocytosis in pancreatic acini.

    PubMed

    Falkowski, Michelle A; Thomas, Diana D H; Groblewski, Guy E

    2010-11-12

    Complexins are soluble proteins that regulate the activity of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complexes necessary for vesicle fusion. Neuronal specific complexin 1 has inhibitory and stimulatory effects on exocytosis by clamping trans-SNARE complexes in a prefusion state and promoting conformational changes to facilitate membrane fusion following cell stimulation. Complexins are unable to bind to monomeric SNARE proteins but bind with high affinity to ternary SNARE complexes and with lower affinity to target SNARE complexes. Far less is understood about complexin function outside the nervous system. Pancreatic acini express the complexin 2 isoform by RT-PCR and immunoblotting. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed complexin 2 localized along the apical plasma membrane consistent with a role in secretion. Accordingly, complexin 2 was found to interact with vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP) 2, syntaxins 3 and 4, but not with VAMP 8 or syntaxin 2. Introduction of recombinant complexin 2 into permeabilized acini inhibited Ca(2+)-stimulated secretion in a concentration-dependent manner with a maximal inhibition of nearly 50%. Mutations of the central α-helical domain reduced complexin 2 SNARE binding and concurrently abolished its inhibitory activity. Surprisingly, mutation of arginine 59 to histidine within the central α-helical domain did not alter SNARE binding and moreover, augmented Ca(2+)-stimulated secretion by 130% of control. Consistent with biochemical studies, complexin 2 colocalized with VAMP 2 along the apical plasma membrane following cholecystokinin-8 stimulation. These data demonstrate a functional role for complexin 2 outside the nervous system and indicate that it participates in the Ca(2+)-sensitive regulatory pathway for zymogen granule exocytosis.

  10. Complexin 2 Modulates Vesicle-associated Membrane Protein (VAMP) 2-regulated Zymogen Granule Exocytosis in Pancreatic Acini*

    PubMed Central

    Falkowski, Michelle A.; Thomas, Diana D. H.; Groblewski, Guy E.

    2010-01-01

    Complexins are soluble proteins that regulate the activity of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complexes necessary for vesicle fusion. Neuronal specific complexin 1 has inhibitory and stimulatory effects on exocytosis by clamping trans-SNARE complexes in a prefusion state and promoting conformational changes to facilitate membrane fusion following cell stimulation. Complexins are unable to bind to monomeric SNARE proteins but bind with high affinity to ternary SNARE complexes and with lower affinity to target SNARE complexes. Far less is understood about complexin function outside the nervous system. Pancreatic acini express the complexin 2 isoform by RT-PCR and immunoblotting. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed complexin 2 localized along the apical plasma membrane consistent with a role in secretion. Accordingly, complexin 2 was found to interact with vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP) 2, syntaxins 3 and 4, but not with VAMP 8 or syntaxin 2. Introduction of recombinant complexin 2 into permeabilized acini inhibited Ca2+-stimulated secretion in a concentration-dependent manner with a maximal inhibition of nearly 50%. Mutations of the central α-helical domain reduced complexin 2 SNARE binding and concurrently abolished its inhibitory activity. Surprisingly, mutation of arginine 59 to histidine within the central α-helical domain did not alter SNARE binding and moreover, augmented Ca2+-stimulated secretion by 130% of control. Consistent with biochemical studies, complexin 2 colocalized with VAMP 2 along the apical plasma membrane following cholecystokinin-8 stimulation. These data demonstrate a functional role for complexin 2 outside the nervous system and indicate that it participates in the Ca2+-sensitive regulatory pathway for zymogen granule exocytosis. PMID:20829354

  11. MST1 is a novel regulator of apoptosis in pancreatic beta-cells

    PubMed Central

    Ardestani, Amin; Khobragade, Vrushali; Yuan, Ting; Frogne, Thomas; Tao, Wufan; Oberholzer, Jose; Pattou, Francois; Conte, Julie Kerr; Maedler, Kathrin

    2014-01-01

    Apoptotic cell death is a hallmark of the loss of insulin producing beta-cells in all forms of diabetes mellitus. Current treatment fails to halt the decline in functional beta-cell mass. Strategies to prevent beta-cell apoptosis and dysfunction are urgently needed. Here, we identified Mammalian Sterile 20-like kinase 1 (MST1) as a critical regulator of apoptotic beta-cell death and function. MST1 was strongly activated in beta-cells under diabetogenic conditions and correlated with beta-cell apoptosis. MST1 specifically induced the mitochondrial-dependent pathway of apoptosis in beta-cells through up-regulation of the BH3-only protein Bim. MST1 directly phosphorylated PDX1 at Thr11, resulting in its ubiquitination, degradation and impaired insulin secretion. Mst1 deficiency completely restored normoglycemia, beta-cell function and survival in vitro and in vivo. We show MST1 as novel pro-apoptotic kinase and key mediator of apoptotic signaling and beta-cell dysfunction, which may serve as target for the development of novel therapies for diabetes. PMID:24633305

  12. PEDIATRIC PANCREATITIS

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, John F.; Uc, Aliye

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review The purpose of this review is to describe recent developments in pediatric pancreatitis and to discuss etiologies and current management. Recent Findings Although recent studies have estimated the annual incidence of pediatric acute pancreatitis approaching that of adults, there are no established guidelines about its diagnosis and treatment in children. Genetic and structural/congenital abnormalities are emerging as the primary risk factors for pediatric acute recurrent and chronic pancreatitis. Specifically, chronic pancreatitis is associated with a significant socioeconomic burden in children. Both medical and surgical therapies are proposed for pediatric chronic pancreatitis, but there is little evidence that they are beneficial. Summary Acute, acute recurrent and chronic pancreatitis create significant health issues in the pediatric population. Medical and surgical therapies exist to potentially treat these conditions, but the pediatric data is limited and the cohorts are small. A multidisciplinary and multicenter approach is necessary to better determine pancreatic disease processes and treatment options in children. PMID:26181572

  13. Enriched environment inhibits mouse pancreatic cancer growth and down-regulates the expression of mitochondria-related genes in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Guohua; Gan, Yu; Fan, Yingchao; Wu, Yufeng; Lin, Hechun; Song, Yanfang; Cai, Xiaojin; Yu, Xiang; Pan, Weihong; Yao, Ming; Gu, Jianren; Tu, Hong

    2015-01-19

    Psycho-social stress has been suggested to influence the development of cancer, but it remains poorly defined with regard to pancreatic cancer, a lethal malignancy with few effective treatment modalities. In this study, we sought to investigate the impacts of enriched environment (EE) housing, a rodent model of "eustress", on the growth of mouse pancreatic cancer, and to explore the potential underlying mechanisms through gene expression profiling. The EE mice showed significantly reduced tumor weights in both subcutaneous (53%) and orthotopic (41%) models, while each single component of EE (inanimate stimulation, social stimulation or physical exercise) was not profound enough to achieve comparative anti-tumor effects as EE. The integrative transcriptomic and proteomic analysis revealed that in response to EE, a total of 129 genes in the tumors showed differential expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. The differentially expressed genes were mostly localized to the mitochondria and enriched in the citrate cycle and oxidative phosphorylation pathways. Interestingly, nearly all of the mitochondria-related genes were down-regulated by EE. Our data have provided experimental evidence in favor of the application of positive stress or of benign environmental stimulation in pancreatic cancer therapy.

  14. Enriched Environment Inhibits Mouse Pancreatic Cancer Growth and Down-regulates the Expression of Mitochondria-related Genes in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guohua; Gan, Yu; Fan, Yingchao; Wu, Yufeng; Lin, Hechun; Song, Yanfang; Cai, Xiaojin; Yu, Xiang; Pan, Weihong; Yao, Ming; Gu, Jianren; Tu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Psycho-social stress has been suggested to influence the development of cancer, but it remains poorly defined with regard to pancreatic cancer, a lethal malignancy with few effective treatment modalities. In this study, we sought to investigate the impacts of enriched environment (EE) housing, a rodent model of “eustress”, on the growth of mouse pancreatic cancer, and to explore the potential underlying mechanisms through gene expression profiling. The EE mice showed significantly reduced tumor weights in both subcutaneous (53%) and orthotopic (41%) models, while each single component of EE (inanimate stimulation, social stimulation or physical exercise) was not profound enough to achieve comparative anti-tumor effects as EE. The integrative transcriptomic and proteomic analysis revealed that in response to EE, a total of 129 genes in the tumors showed differential expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. The differentially expressed genes were mostly localized to the mitochondria and enriched in the citrate cycle and oxidative phosphorylation pathways. Interestingly, nearly all of the mitochondria-related genes were down-regulated by EE. Our data have provided experimental evidence in favor of the application of positive stress or of benign environmental stimulation in pancreatic cancer therapy. PMID:25598223

  15. Dopamine D2 Receptor-Mediated Regulation of Pancreatic β Cell Mass.

    PubMed

    Sakano, Daisuke; Choi, Sungik; Kataoka, Masateru; Shiraki, Nobuaki; Uesugi, Motonari; Kume, Kazuhiko; Kume, Shoen

    2016-07-12

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate β cell mass and proliferation is important for the treatment of diabetes. Here, we identified domperidone (DPD), a dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) antagonist that enhances β cell mass. Over time, islet β cell loss occurs in dissociation cultures, and this was inhibited by DPD. DPD increased proliferation and decreased apoptosis of β cells through increasing intracellular cAMP. DPD prevented β cell dedifferentiation, which together highly contributed to the increased β cell mass. DRD2 knockdown phenocopied the effects of domperidone and increased the number of β cells. Drd2 overexpression sensitized the dopamine responsiveness of β cells and increased apoptosis. Further analysis revealed that the adenosine agonist 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine, a previously identified promoter of β cell proliferation, acted with DPD to increase the number of β cells. In humans, dopamine also modulates β cell mass through DRD2 and exerts an inhibitory effect on adenosine signaling. PMID:27373926

  16. Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript: a novel regulator of energy homeostasis expressed in a subpopulation of pancreatic islet cells.

    PubMed

    Gilon, Patrick

    2016-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterised by chronic hyperglycaemia and its incidence is highly increased by exaggerated food consumption. It results from a lack of insulin action/production, but growing evidence suggests that it might also involve hyperglucagonaemia and impaired control of glucose homeostasis by the brain. In recent years, the cocaine and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptides have generated a lot of interest in the battle against obesity because, via the brain, they exert anorexic effects and they increase energy expenditure. They are also localised, outside the brain, in discrete regions of the body and play a hormonal role in controlling various functions. In this issue of Diabetologia, the Wierup group (doi: 10.1007/s00125-016-4020-6 ) shows that CART peptides are expressed heterogeneously in islet cells of various species, including humans, and that their expression is upregulated in diabetes. The authors also shine a spotlight on some interesting effects of CART peptides on islet function, including stimulation of insulin secretion and inhibition of glucagon release. CART peptides would thus be at the centre of a cooperation between the brain and the endocrine pancreas to control glucose homeostasis. Although the mechanisms of action of CART peptides remain enigmatic because no specific receptor for these peptides has so far been discovered, their potential therapeutic use is evident and represents a new challenge for future research. PMID:27421727

  17. Pancreatic Cancer Cell Glycosylation Regulates Cell Adhesion and Invasion through the Modulation of α2β1 Integrin and E-Cadherin Function

    PubMed Central

    Bassagañas, Sònia; Carvalho, Sandra; Dias, Ana M.; Pérez-Garay, Marta; Ortiz, M. Rosa; Figueras, Joan; Reis, Celso A.; Pinho, Salomé S.; Peracaula, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    In our previous studies we have described that ST3Gal III transfected pancreatic adenocarcinoma Capan-1 and MDAPanc-28 cells show increased membrane expression levels of sialyl-Lewis x (SLex) along with a concomitant decrease in α2,6-sialic acid compared to control cells. Here we have addressed the role of this glycosylation pattern in the functional properties of two glycoproteins involved in the processes of cancer cell invasion and migration, α2β1 integrin, the main receptor for type 1 collagen, and E-cadherin, responsible for cell-cell contacts and whose deregulation determines cell invasive capabilities. Our results demonstrate that ST3Gal III transfectants showed reduced cell-cell aggregation and increased invasive capacities. ST3Gal III transfected Capan-1 cells exhibited higher SLex and lower α2,6-sialic acid content on the glycans of their α2β1 integrin molecules. As a consequence, higher phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase tyrosine 397, which is recognized as one of the first steps of integrin-derived signaling pathways, was observed in these cells upon adhesion to type 1 collagen. This molecular mechanism underlies the increased migration through collagen of these cells. In addition, the pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines as well as human pancreatic tumor tissues showed colocalization of SLex and E-cadherin, which was higher in the ST3Gal III transfectants. In conclusion, changes in the sialylation pattern of α2β1 integrin and E-cadherin appear to influence the functional role of these two glycoproteins supporting the role of these glycans as an underlying mechanism regulating pancreatic cancer cell adhesion and invasion. PMID:24878505

  18. Oleic acid and glucose regulate glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor expression in a rat pancreatic ductal cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Leshuai W.; McMahon Tobin, Grainne A.; Rouse, Rodney L.

    2012-10-15

    The glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP1R) plays a critical role in glucose metabolism and has become an important target for a growing class of drugs designed to treat type 2 diabetes. In vitro studies were designed to investigate the effect of the GLP1R agonist, exenatide (Ex4), in “on-target” RIN-5mF (islet) cells as well as in “off-target” AR42J (acinar) and DSL-6A/C1 (ductal) cells in a diabetic environment. Ex4 increased islet cell proliferation but did not affect acinar cells or ductal cells at relevant concentrations. A high caloric, high fat diet is a risk factor for impaired glucose tolerance and type-2 diabetes. An in vitro Oleic acid (OA) model was used to investigate the effect of Ex4 in a high calorie, high fat environment. At 0.1 and 0.4 mM, OA mildly decreased the proliferation of all pancreatic cell types. Ex4 did not potentiate the inhibitory effect of OA on cell proliferation. Akt phosphorylation in response to Ex4 was diminished in OA-treated ductal cells. GLP1R protein detected by western blot was time and concentration dependently decreased after glucose stimulation in OA-treated ductal cells. In ductal cells, OA treatment altered the intracellular localization of GLP1R and its co-localization with early endosome and recycling endosomes. Chloroquine (lysosomal inhibitor), N-acetyl-L-cysteine (reactive oxygen species scavenger) and wortmannin (a phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase inhibitor), fully or partially, rescued GLP1R protein in OA-pretreated, glucose-stimulated ductal cells. The impact of altered regulation on phenotype/function is presently unknown. However, these data suggest that GLP1R regulation in ductal cells can be altered by a high fat, high calorie environment. -- Highlights: ► Exenatide did not inhibit islet, acinar or ductal cell proliferation. ► GLP1R protein decreased after glucose stimulation in oleic acid-treated ductal cells. ► Oleic acid treatment altered localization of GLP1R with early and recycling

  19. APE1/Ref-1 regulates STAT3 transcriptional activity and APE1/Ref-1-STAT3 dual-targeting effectively inhibits pancreatic cancer cell survival.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Angelo A; Jiang, Yanlin; Luo, Meihua; Reed, April M; Shahda, Safi; He, Ying; Maitra, Anirban; Kelley, Mark R; Fishel, Melissa L

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a largely incurable disease, and increasing evidence supports strategies targeting multiple molecular mediators of critical functions of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells. Intracellular redox state modulates the activity of various signal transduction pathways and biological processes, including cell survival, drug resistance and responsiveness to microenvironmental factors. Recently, it has been shown that the transcription factor STAT3 is under redox control, but the mechanisms involved in its regulation are unknown. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that STAT3 DNA binding and transcriptional activity is directly regulated by the redox function of the APE1/Ref-1 endonuclease, using overexpression and redox-specific mutational strategies, and gene knockdown. Also, pharmacological blockade of APE1/Ref-1 by the redox-selective inhibitor E3330 abrogates STAT3 DNA binding. Since APE1/Ref-1 also exerts redox control on other cancer-associated transcription factors, we assessed the impact of dual-targeting of STAT3 signaling and APE1/Ref-1 redox on pancreatic cancer cell functions. We observed that disruption of APE1/Ref-1 redox activity synergizes with STAT3 blockade to potently inhibit the proliferation and viability of human PDAC cells. Mechanistically, we show that STAT3-APE1/Ref-1 dual targeting promotes marked tumor cell apoptosis, with engagement of caspase-3 signaling, which are significantly increased in comparison to the effects triggered by single target blockade. Also, we show that STAT3-APE1/Ref-1 dual blockade results in significant inhibition of tumor cell migration. Overall, this work demonstrates that the transcriptional activity of STAT3 is directly regulated by the redox function of APE1/Ref-1, and that concurrent blockade of STAT3 and APE1/Ref-1 redox synergize effectively inhibit critical PDAC cell functions.

  20. Down-regulation of 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D receptors inhibits proliferation, clonogenicity and invasion of human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gurbuz, Nilgun; Ashour, Ahmed A; Alpay, S Neslihan; Ozpolat, Bulent

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is characterized by extensive local tumor invasion, metastasis and early systemic dissemination. The vast majority of pancreatic cancer (PaCa) patients already have metastatic complications at the time of diagnosis, and the death rate of this lethal type of cancer has increased over the past decades. Thus, efforts at identifying novel molecularly targeted therapies are priorities. Recent studies have suggested that serotonin (5-HT) contributes to the tumor growth in a variety of cancers including prostate, colon, bladder and liver cancer. However, there is lack of evidence about the impact of 5-HT receptors on promoting pancreatic cancer. Having considered the role of 5-HT-1 receptors, especially 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D subtypes in different types of malignancies, the aim of this study was to investigate the role of 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D receptors in PaCa growth and progression and analyze their potential as cytotoxic targets. We found that knockdown of 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D receptors expression, using specific small interfering RNA (siRNA), induced significant inhibition of proliferation and clonogenicity of PaCa cells. Also, it significantly suppressed PaCa cells invasion and reduced the activity of uPAR/MMP-2 signaling and Integrin/Src/Fak-mediated signaling, as integral tumor cell pathways associated with invasion, migration, adhesion, and proliferation. Moreover, targeting 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D receptors down-regulates zinc finger ZEB1 and Snail proteins, the hallmarks transcription factors regulating epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), concomitantly with up-regulating of claudin-1 and E-Cadherin. In conclusion, our data suggests that 5-HT1B- and 5-HT1D- mediated signaling play an important role in the regulation of the proliferative and invasive phenotype of PaCa. It also highlights the therapeutic potential of targeting of 5-HT1B/1D receptors in the treatment of PaCa, and opens a new avenue for biomarkers identification, and valuable new

  1. Down-regulation of 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D receptors inhibits proliferation, clonogenicity and invasion of human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gurbuz, Nilgun; Ashour, Ahmed A; Alpay, S Neslihan; Ozpolat, Bulent

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is characterized by extensive local tumor invasion, metastasis and early systemic dissemination. The vast majority of pancreatic cancer (PaCa) patients already have metastatic complications at the time of diagnosis, and the death rate of this lethal type of cancer has increased over the past decades. Thus, efforts at identifying novel molecularly targeted therapies are priorities. Recent studies have suggested that serotonin (5-HT) contributes to the tumor growth in a variety of cancers including prostate, colon, bladder and liver cancer. However, there is lack of evidence about the impact of 5-HT receptors on promoting pancreatic cancer. Having considered the role of 5-HT-1 receptors, especially 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D subtypes in different types of malignancies, the aim of this study was to investigate the role of 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D receptors in PaCa growth and progression and analyze their potential as cytotoxic targets. We found that knockdown of 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D receptors expression, using specific small interfering RNA (siRNA), induced significant inhibition of proliferation and clonogenicity of PaCa cells. Also, it significantly suppressed PaCa cells invasion and reduced the activity of uPAR/MMP-2 signaling and Integrin/Src/Fak-mediated signaling, as integral tumor cell pathways associated with invasion, migration, adhesion, and proliferation. Moreover, targeting 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D receptors down-regulates zinc finger ZEB1 and Snail proteins, the hallmarks transcription factors regulating epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), concomitantly with up-regulating of claudin-1 and E-Cadherin. In conclusion, our data suggests that 5-HT1B- and 5-HT1D-mediated signaling play an important role in the regulation of the proliferative and invasive phenotype of PaCa. It also highlights the therapeutic potential of targeting of 5-HT1B/1D receptors in the treatment of PaCa, and opens a new avenue for biomarkers identification, and valuable new

  2. Dual Role of cAMP in the Transcriptional Regulation of Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 4 (MRP4) in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Carozzo, Alejandro; Diez, Federico; Gomez, Natalia; Cabrera, Maia; Shayo, Carina; Davio, Carlos; Fernández, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic AMP represents one of the most studied signaling molecules and its role in proliferation and differentiation processes has been well established. Intracellular cAMP levels are tightly regulated where the MRP4 transporter plays a major role. In the present study, we sought to establish whether cAMP modulated MRP4 expression in pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines. Quantitative PCR and western blot studies showed that cAMP-increasing agents enhanced MRP4 transcripts and protein levels in PANC-1 cells. Reporter luciferase experiments carried out in pancreatic AR42J cells showed that intracellular cAMP up-regulates MRP4 through an Epac2- and Rap1- mediated mechanism whereas extracellular cAMP reduced MRP4 promoter activity by a MEK/ERK-mediated pathway. Present results show that cAMP regulates MRP4 promoter activity, and further indicate that the balance between intracellular and extracellular cAMP levels determines MRP4 expression. PMID:25790437

  3. Pentoxifylline Treatment in Acute Pancreatitis (AP)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-14

    Acute Pancreatitis (AP); Gallstone Pancreatitis; Alcoholic Pancreatitis; Post-ERCP/Post-procedural Pancreatitis; Trauma Acute Pancreatitis; Hypertriglyceridemia Acute Pancreatitis; Idiopathic (Unknown) Acute Pancreatitis; Medication Induced Acute Pancreatitis; Cancer Acute Pancreatitis; Miscellaneous (i.e. Acute on Chronic Pancreatitis)

  4. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Shounak; Chari, Suresh T

    2016-05-01

    Chronic pancreatitis describes a wide spectrum of fibro-inflammatory disorders of the exocrine pancreas that includes calcifying, obstructive, and steroid-responsive forms. Use of the term chronic pancreatitis without qualification generally refers to calcifying chronic pancreatitis. Epidemiology is poorly defined, but incidence worldwide seems to be on the rise. Smoking, drinking alcohol, and genetic predisposition are the major risk factors for chronic calcifying pancreatitis. In this Seminar, we discuss the clinical features, diagnosis, and management of chronic calcifying pancreatitis, focusing on pain management, the role of endoscopic and surgical intervention, and the use of pancreatic enzyme-replacement therapy. Management of patients is often challenging and necessitates a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:26948434

  5. Identification of KCa3.1 Channel as a Novel Regulator of Oxidative Phosphorylation in a Subset of Pancreatic Carcinoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Kovalenko, Ilya; Glasauer, Andrea; Schöckel, Laura; Sauter, Daniel R. P.; Ehrmann, Alexander; Sohler, Florian; Hägebarth, Andrea; Novak, Ivana; Christian, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) represents the most common form of pancreatic cancer with rising incidence in developing countries and overall 5-year survival rates of less than 5%. The most frequent mutations in PDAC are gain-of-function mutations in KRAS as well as loss-of-function mutations in p53. Both mutations have severe impacts on the metabolism of tumor cells. Many of these metabolic changes are mediated by transporters or channels that regulate the exchange of metabolites and ions between the intracellular compartment and the tumor microenvironment. In the study presented here, our goal was to identify novel transporters or channels that regulate oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) in PDAC in order to characterize novel potential drug targets for the treatment of these cancers. We set up a Seahorse Analyzer XF based siRNA screen and identified previously described as well as novel regulators of OxPhos. The siRNA that resulted in the greatest change in cellular oxygen consumption was targeting the KCNN4 gene, which encodes for the Ca2+-sensitive K+ channel KCa3.1. This channel has not previously been reported to regulate OxPhos. Knock-down experiments as well as the use of a small molecule inhibitor confirmed its role in regulating oxygen consumption, ATP production and cellular proliferation. Furthermore, PDAC cell lines sensitive to KCa3.1 inhibition were shown to express the channel protein in the plasma membrane as well as in the mitochondria. These differences in the localization of KCa3.1 channels as well as differences in the regulation of cellular metabolism might offer opportunities for targeted therapy in subsets of PDAC. PMID:27494181

  6. Identification of KCa3.1 Channel as a Novel Regulator of Oxidative Phosphorylation in a Subset of Pancreatic Carcinoma Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, Ilya; Glasauer, Andrea; Schöckel, Laura; Sauter, Daniel R P; Ehrmann, Alexander; Sohler, Florian; Hägebarth, Andrea; Novak, Ivana; Christian, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) represents the most common form of pancreatic cancer with rising incidence in developing countries and overall 5-year survival rates of less than 5%. The most frequent mutations in PDAC are gain-of-function mutations in KRAS as well as loss-of-function mutations in p53. Both mutations have severe impacts on the metabolism of tumor cells. Many of these metabolic changes are mediated by transporters or channels that regulate the exchange of metabolites and ions between the intracellular compartment and the tumor microenvironment. In the study presented here, our goal was to identify novel transporters or channels that regulate oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) in PDAC in order to characterize novel potential drug targets for the treatment of these cancers. We set up a Seahorse Analyzer XF based siRNA screen and identified previously described as well as novel regulators of OxPhos. The siRNA that resulted in the greatest change in cellular oxygen consumption was targeting the KCNN4 gene, which encodes for the Ca2+-sensitive K+ channel KCa3.1. This channel has not previously been reported to regulate OxPhos. Knock-down experiments as well as the use of a small molecule inhibitor confirmed its role in regulating oxygen consumption, ATP production and cellular proliferation. Furthermore, PDAC cell lines sensitive to KCa3.1 inhibition were shown to express the channel protein in the plasma membrane as well as in the mitochondria. These differences in the localization of KCa3.1 channels as well as differences in the regulation of cellular metabolism might offer opportunities for targeted therapy in subsets of PDAC. PMID:27494181

  7. Pathophysiology of autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Pezzilli, Raffaele; Pagano, Nico

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a recently discovered form of pancreatitis and represents one of the diseases of the pancreas which can be cured and healed medically. International consensus diagnostic criteria have been developed, and the clinical phenotypes associated with the histopathologic patterns of lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis and idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis should be referred to as type 1 and type 2 AIP, respectively. Most importantly, in type 1 AIP, the pancreatic manifestations are associated with other extrapancreatic disorders, resembling an immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related disease. In addition, the pancreas of a patient with AIP is often infiltrated by various types of immune cells; the cluster of differentiation (CD) 4 or CD8 T lymphocytes and IgG4-bearing plasma cells have been found in the pancreatic parenchyma and other involved organs in AIP and factors regulating T-cell function may influence the development of AIP. From a genetic point of view, it has also been reported that DRB1*0405 and DQB1*0401 mutations are significantly more frequent in patients with AIP when compared to those with chronic calcifying pancreatitis, and that only DQB1*0302 had a significant association with the relapse of AIP. Finally, it has been found that the polymorphic genes encoding cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4, a key negative regulator of the T-cell immune response, are associated with AIP in a Chinese population. Even if these data are not concordant, it is possible that physiological IgG4 responses are induced by prolonged antigen exposure and controlled by type 2 helper T cells. We reviewed the current concepts regarding the pathophysiology of this intriguing disease, focusing on the importance of the humoral and cellular immune responses. PMID:24891971

  8. Down-regulation of zinc transporter 8 (SLC30A8) in pancreatic beta-cells promotes cell survival

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pancreatic islet contains high levels of zinc in granular vesicles of beta-cells where insulin is matured, crystallized, and stored before secretion. Zinc is an essential co-factor for insulin crystallization forming dense core in secretory granules. In insulin-containing secretory granules, zin...

  9. Down-regulation of zinc transporter 8 (SLC30A8) in pancreatic beta-cells promotes cell survival.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pancreatic islet contains high levels of zinc in granular vesicles of ß-cells where insulin is matured, crystallized, and stored before secretion. Zinc is an essential co-factor for insulin crystallization forming dense cores in secretory granules. In insulin-containing secretory granules, zinc ...

  10. Regulation of pancreatic exocrine secretion in goats: differential effects of short- and long-term duodenal phenylalanine treatment.

    PubMed

    Yu, Z P; Xu, M; Yao, J H; Liu, K; Li, F; Liu, Y; Wang, F; Sun, F F; Liu, N N

    2013-06-01

    Four yearling goats (31.2 ± 2.5 kg), surgically fitted with common bile duct reentrant and duodenal catheter, were used in two 4 × 4 Latin square design experiments to investigate the effects of duodenal infusion of phenylalanine for different times on pancreatic exocrine secretion (PES). In experiment 1 (the long-term experiment), goats were duodenally infused with 0, 2, 4 or 8 g/day phenylalanine for 14 day. Pancreatic juice and jugular blood samples were collected over 1-h intervals for 6 h daily from day 11 to day 14 to encompass a 24-h day. In experiment 2 (the short-term experiment), goats were infused with phenylalanine for 10 h continuously at the same infusion rate as experiment 1 after feed deprivation for 24 h repeated every 10 day. Pancreatic juice and blood samples were collected at 0, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 h of infusion. The volume and pH of pancreatic juice were measured, and a 5% subsample was composited and frozen until analysis of enzyme activities. Plasma was frozen until analysis of insulin and cholecystokinin (CCK). In experiment 1, pancreatic juice, α-amylase secretion and plasma CCK concentration responded quadratically (p < 0.05), with the top value observed at the 2 g/day phenylalanine. Trypsin secretion had a quadratic response (p < 0.05), with secretion increasing up to 4 g/day phenylalanine and decreasing thereafter. Phenylalanine linearly decreased pancreatic protein and lipase secretion (p < 0.05). The results of correlation analysis showed significant correlations (p < 0.05) between plasma CCK concentration and secretion of α-amylase and trypsin. However, the short-term phenylalanine infusion did not influence (p > 0.05) pancreatic juice, protein, α-amylase, lipase, trypsin secretion and plasma CCK concentration. These results indicate PES of ruminants is stimulated by phenylalanine and is potentially mediated by CCK in the long-term duodenal infusion treatment, but is not

  11. Activation of Toll-like receptor 7 regulates the expression of IFN-λ1, p53, PTEN, VEGF, TIMP-1 and MMP-9 in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Jin, Rui; Zou, Bing-Bing; Li, Lei; Cheng, Feng-Wei; Luo, Xin; Geng, Xiaoping; Zhang, Sheng-Quan

    2016-02-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are critical in the induction of the immune response in tumor development. TLR7 has previously been demonstrated to be associated with the development of pancreatic cancer, and the release of cytokines and chemokines from other types of cancer cell; however, the specific expression induced by TLR7 agonists in pancreatic cancer cells remains to be elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of the TLR7 agonist, gardiquimod, on ERK1/2 signaling pathway, and on the expression of genes involved in the pathogenesis of cancer, including phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN), p53, type Ⅲ interferon (IFN-λ1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1). The results demonstrated that activation of TLR7 upregulated the expression levels of certain genes to varying degrees; the expression levels of IFN-λ1 and MMP-9 were increased by ~3 fold, whereas other genes (p53, PTEN, TIMP-1) were upregulated by ~2 fold, and VEGF was marginally upregulated after 10 min. Furthermore, gardiquimod increased the expression levels of phosphorylated-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2. In addition, PD98059, a specific inhibitor of ERK phosphorylation, inhibited the ability of gardiquimod to activate ERK1/2; consequently weakening the effect of gardiquimod on gene regulation. These findings indicated that the effect of TLR7 agonists, including gardiquimod, on gene expression in BxPC-3 pancreatic cancer cells was partly associated with the mitogen-activated protein kinase-ERK1/2 signaling pathway.

  12. Reduction in ATP levels triggers immunoproteasome activation by the 11S (PA28) regulator during early antiviral response mediated by IFNβ in mouse pancreatic β-cells.

    PubMed

    Freudenburg, Wieke; Gautam, Madhav; Chakraborty, Pradipta; James, Jared; Richards, Jennifer; Salvatori, Alison S; Baldwin, Aaron; Schriewer, Jill; Buller, R Mark L; Corbett, John A; Skowyra, Dorota

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune destruction of insulin producing pancreatic β-cells is the hallmark of type I diabetes. One of the key molecules implicated in the disease onset is the immunoproteasome, a protease with multiple proteolytic sites that collaborates with the constitutive 19S and the inducible 11S (PA28) activators to produce immunogenic peptides for presentation by MHC class I molecules. Despite its importance, little is known about the function and regulation of the immunoproteasome in pancreatic β-cells. Of special interest to immunoproteasome activation in β-cells are the effects of IFNβ, a type I IFN secreted by virus-infected cells and implicated in type I diabetes onset, compared to IFNγ, the classic immunoproteasome inducer secreted by cells of the immune system. By qPCR analysis, we show that mouse insulinoma MIN6 cells and mouse islets accumulate the immune proteolytic β1(i), β2(i) and β5(i), and 11S mRNAs upon exposure to IFNβ or IFNγ. Higher concentrations of IFNβ than IFNγ are needed for similar expression, but in each case the expression is transient, with maximal mRNA accumulation in 12 hours, and depends primarily on Interferon Regulatory Factor 1. IFNs do not alter expression of regular proteasome genes, and in the time frame of IFNβ-mediated response, the immune and regular proteolytic subunits co-exist in the 20S particles. In cell extracts with ATP, these particles have normal peptidase activities and degrade polyubiquitinated proteins with rates typical of the regular proteasome, implicating normal regulation by the 19S activator. However, ATP depletion rapidly stimulates the catalytic rates in a manner consistent with levels of the 11S activator. These findings suggest that stochastic combination of regular and immune proteolytic subunits may increase the probability with which unique immunogenic peptides are produced in pancreatic β-cells exposed to IFNβ, but primarily in cells with reduced ATP levels that stimulate the 11S

  13. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Chari, S T; DiMagno, E P

    2001-09-01

    An increasing number of novel mutations are associated with chronic pancreatitis. Some cause a high-penetrance, autosomal dominant type of clinical picture (eg, mutations at codons 29 and 122 of the cationic trypsinogen gene), whereas others have a low penetrance or are frequent in the general population (eg, mutations in Kazal type 1 [SPINK1] and in codons 16, 22, and 23 of the cationic trypsinogen gene) and act as disease modifiers. The results of recent studies indicate that smoking adversely affects the course and complications of chronic pancreatitis (more frequent and faster rate of calcification and higher risk of development of pancreatic cancer). Thus, regardless of the cause of chronic pancreatis, patients with this condition should not smoke. Using current diagnostic criteria, the accuracy of endoscopic ultrasound for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis is not good. For example, 39% of dyspeptic persons without any other evidence of chronic pancreatitis fulfilled the endoscopic ultrasound criteria for chronic pancreatitis. Diabetes frequently occurs in chronic pancreatitis, but it is not prevented or increased by pancreatic surgery. Islet cell autotransplantation holds promise for the prevention of diabetes in patients requiring total pancreatectomy if the pancreas is not extensively fibrotic. Splenic vein occlusion is present in 7% of patients undergoing surgery for chronic pancreatitis, but fewer than one fifth of these patients have variceal bleeding before or after surgery.

  14. Clusterin silencing sensitizes pancreatic cancer MIA-PaCa-2 cells to gmcitabine via regulation of NF-kB/Bcl-2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Miao; Chen, Xiumei; Han, Yanling; Ma, Chunqing; Ma, Lin; Li, Shirong

    2015-01-01

    Clusterin (CLU) is known as a multifunctional protein involved in a variety of physiological processes including lipid transport, epithelial cell differentiation, tumorigenesis, and apoptosis. Our recent study has demonstrated that knockdown of clusterin sensitizes pancreatic cancer cell lines to gmcitabine treatment. However the details of this survival mechanism remain undefined. Of the various downstream targets of CLU, we examined activation of the NF-kB transcription factor and subsequent transcriptional regulation of BCL-2 gene in pancreatic cancer cell MIA-PaCa-2. The MIA-PaCa-2 cells were transfected with an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) against clusterin, which led to a decreased protein level of the antiapoptotic gene BCL-2. Furthermore, inhibition of CLU decreased the function of NF-kB, which is capable of transcriptional regulation of the BCL-2 gene. Inhibiting this pathway increased the apoptotic effect of gmcitabine chemotherapy. Re-activated NF-kB resulted in attenuation of ASO-induced effects, followed by the bcl-2 upregulation, and bcl-2 re-inhibition resulted in attenuation of Re-activated NF-kB -induced effects. Animals injected with ASO CLU in MIA-PaCa-2 cells combined with gmcitabine treatment had fewer tumors than gmcitabine or ASO CLU alone. These findings suggest that knockdown of CLU sensitized MIA-PaCa-2 cells to gmcitabine chemotherapy through modulating NF-Kb/bcl-2 pathway. PMID:26550158

  15. HuR mediated post-transcriptional regulation as a new potential adjuvant therapeutic target in chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jakstaite, Aldona; Maziukiene, Aurelija; Silkuniene, Giedre; Kmieliute, Kristina; Gulbinas, Antanas; Dambrauskas, Zilvinas

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of HuR in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) and to assess the effects of HuR silencing on the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and the in vitro response to gemcitabine (GEM) treatment in pancreatic cell lines. METHODS: We compared the expression of HuR, COX-2, and HO-1 in PDA and normal pancreatic tissue using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and western blot. In addition, the HuR, COX-2 and HO-1 were analyzed in four types of cancer cell lines (MiaPaca2, Su.86.86, Capan-1, and Capan-2) with and without GEM treatment. Immunocytofluorescence analysis was used to investigate HuR localization in cells. Cell viability and response to GEM after HuR silencing were determined with the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-Yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide test and the crystal violet clonogenic assay, respectively. To measure apoptosis, activation of caspases 3/7 was evaluated using immunofluorescence. RESULTS: In PDA tissue obtained from patients not treated with GEM, HuR mRNA expression was 3.2 times lower (P < 0.05) and COX-2 and HO-1 mRNA expression was 2.3-fold and 7.2-fold higher (P < 0.05), respectively, than normal pancreatic tissue (from organ donor). qRT-PCR analysis showed that HuR, COX-2, and HO-1 mRNA were overexpressed in all cancer cell lines treated with the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) dose of GEM compared with control cells (P < 0.05). Western blot analysis revealed that COX-2 and HO-1 levels were significantly decreased in cancer cells after HuR silencing. Furthermore, HuR silencing increased the response to GEM treatment and decreased cell viability by 11.6%-53.7% compared to control cell lines. Caspases 3 and 7 were activated after HuR silencing and GEM treatment in all pancreatic cancer cell lines. In comparison, treatment with GEM alone did not activate caspases 3 and 7 in the same cell lines. CONCLUSION: HuR mediated post

  16. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary α-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  17. [Hereditary pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Dyrla, Przemysław; Nowak, Tomasz; Gil, Jerzy; Adamiec, Cezary; Bobula, Mariusz; Saracyn, Marek

    2016-02-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is a rare, heterogeneous familial disease and should be suspected in any patient who has suffered at least two attacks of acute pancreatitis for which there is no underlying cause and unexplained chronic pancreatitis with a family history in a first- or second degree relative. with an early onset, mostly during childhood. Genetic factors have been implied in cases of familial chronic pancreatitis. The most common are mutations of the PRSS1 gene on the long arm of the chromosome 7, encoding for the cationic trypsinogen. The inheritance pattern is autosomal dominant with an incomplete penetrance (80%). The inflammation results in repeated DNA damage, error-prone repair mechanisms and the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations. Risk of pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a major concern of many patients with hereditary chronic pancreatitis, but the individual risk is poorly defined. Better risk models of pancreatic cancer in individual patients based on etiology of pancreatitis, family history, genetics, smoking, alcohol, diabetes and the patient's age are needed. PMID:27000817

  18. Pancreatic injury.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nasim; Vernick, Jerome J

    2009-12-01

    Injury to the pancreas, because of its retroperitoneal location, is a rare occurrence, most commonly seen with penetrating injuries (gun shot or stab wounds). Blunt trauma to the pancreas accounts for only 25% of the cases. Pancreatic injuries are associated with high morbidity and mortality due to accompanying vascular and duodenal injuries. Pancreatic injuries are not always easy to diagnose resulting in life threatening complications. Physical examination as well as serum amylase is not diagnostic following blunt trauma. Computed tomography (CT) scan can delineate the injury or transaction of the pancreas. Endoscopic retrograde pancreaticography (ERCP) is the main diagnostic modality for evaluation of the main pancreatic duct. Unrecognized ductal injury leads to pancreatic pseudocyst, fistula, abscess, and other complications. Management depends upon the severity of the pancreatic injury as well as associated injuries. Damage control surgery in hemodynamic unstable patients reduces morbidity and mortality.

  19. Transcription factor Ets-1 inhibits glucose-stimulated insulin secretion of pancreatic β-cells partly through up-regulation of COX-2 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiong-Fei; Zhu, Yi; Liang, Wen-Biao; Zhang, Jing-Jing

    2014-08-01

    Increased cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression is associated with pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. We previously demonstrated that the transcription factor Ets-1 significantly up-regulated COX-2 gene promoter activity. In this report, we used the pancreatic β-cell line INS-1 and isolated rat islets to investigate whether Ets-1 could induce β-cell dysfunction through up-regulating COX-2 gene expression. We investigated the effects of ETS-1 overexpression and the effects of ETS-1 RNA interference on endogenous COX-2 expression in INS-1 cells. We used site-directed mutagenesis and a dual luciferase reporter assay to study putative Ets-1 binding sites in the COX-2 promoter. The effect of ETS-1 1 overexpression on the insulin secretion function of INS-1 cells and rat islets and the potential reversal of these effects by a COX-2 inhibitor were determined in a glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) assay. ETS-1 overexpression significantly induces endogenous COX-2 expression, but ETS-1 RNA interference has no effect on basal COX-2 expression in INS-1 cells. Ets-1 protein significantly increases COX-2 promoter activity through the binding site located in the -195/-186 region of the COX-2 promoter. ETS-1 overexpression significantly inhibited the GSIS function of INS-1 cells and islet cells and COX-2 inhibitor treatment partly reversed this effect. These findings indicated that ETS-1 overexpression induces β-cell dysfunction partly through up-regulation of COX-2 gene expression. Moreover, Ets-1, the transcriptional regulator of COX-2 expression, may be a potential target for the prevention of β-cell dysfunction mediated by COX-2.

  20. Molybdenum induces pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis via interdependent of JNK and AMPK activation-regulated mitochondria-dependent and ER stress-triggered pathways.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tsung-Yuan; Yen, Cheng-Chieh; Lee, Kuan-I; Su, Chin-Chuan; Yang, Ching-Yao; Wu, Chin-Ching; Hsieh, Shang-Shu; Ueng, Kwo-Chang; Huang, Chun-Fa

    2016-03-01

    Molybdenum (Mo), a well-known toxic environmental and industrial pollutant, causes adverse health effects and diseases in humans and has received attention as a potential risk factor for DM. However, the roles of Mo in the mechanisms of the toxicological effects in pancreatic β-cells are mostly unclear. In this study, the results revealed dysfunction of insulin secretion and apoptosis in the pancreatic β-cell-derived RIN-m5F cells and the isolated mouse islets in response to Mo. These effects were accompanied by a mitochondria-dependent apoptotic signals including a decreased in the MMP, an increase in cytochrome c release, and the activation of caspase cascades and PARP. In addition, ER stress was triggered as indicated by several key molecules of the UPR. Furthermore, exposure to Mo induced the activation of ERK1/2, JNK, AMPKα, and GSK3-α/β. Pretreatment with specific pharmacological inhibitors (in RIN-m5F cells and isolated mouse islets) of JNK (SP600125) and AMPK (Compound C) or transfection with si-RNAs (in RIN-m5F cells) specific to JNK and AMPKα effectively prevented the Mo-induced apoptosis and related signals, but inhibitors of ERK1/2 and GSK3-α/β (PD98059 and LiCl, respectively) did not reverse the Mo-induced effects. Additionally, both the inhibitors and specific si-RNAs could suppress the Mo-induced phosphorylation of JNK and AMPKα each other. Taken together, these results suggest that Mo exerts its cytotoxicity on pancreatic β-cells by inducing dysfunction and apoptosis via interdependent JNK and AMPK activation downstream-regulated mitochondrial-dependent and ER stress-triggered apoptosis pathways.

  1. A peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ligand MCC-555 imparts anti-proliferative response in pancreatic cancer cells by PPARgamma-independent up-regulation of KLF4

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Kyung-Won; Zhang, Xiaobo; Imchen, Temjenmongla; Baek, Seung Joon

    2012-09-01

    MCC-555 is a novel PPARα/γ dual ligand of the thiazolidinedione class and was recently developed as an anti-diabetic drug with unique properties. MCC-555 also has anti-proliferative activity through growth inhibition and apoptosis induction in several cancer cell types. Our group has shown that MCC-555 targets several proteins in colorectal tumorigenesis including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-activated gene (NAG-1) which plays an important role in chemoprevention responsible for chemopreventive compounds. NAG-1 is a member of the TGF-β superfamily and is involved in tumor progression and development; however, NAG-1's roles in pancreatic cancer have not been studied. In this report, we found that MCC-555 alters not only NAG-1 expression, but also p21 and cyclin D1 expression. NAG-1 and p21 expression was not blocked by PPARγ-specific antagonist GW9662, suggesting that MCC-555-induced NAG-1 and p21 expression is independent of PPARγ activation. However, decreasing cyclin D1 by MCC-555 seems to be affected by PPARγ activation. Further, we found that the GC box located in the NAG-1 promoter play an important role in NAG-1 transactivation by MCC-555. Subsequently, we screened several transcription factors that may bind to the GC box region in the NAG-1 promoter and found that KLF4 potentially binds to this region. Expression of KLF4 precedes NAG-1 and p21 expression in the presence of MCC-555, whereas blocking KLF4 expression using specific KLF4 siRNA showed that both NAG-1 and p21 expression by MCC-555 was blocked. In conclusion, MCC-555's actions on anti-proliferation involve both PPARγ-dependent and -independent pathways, thereby enhancing anti-tumorigenesis in pancreatic cancer cells. -- Highlights: ► PPARα/γ ligand MCC-555 exhibits anti-proliferative activity in pancreatic cancer cells. ► MCC-555 affects KLF4 expression following by NAG-1 and p21 expression in a PPARγ independent manner. ► MCC-555 also affects cyclin D1 down-regulation

  2. Activation of PPAR{delta} up-regulates fatty acid oxidation and energy uncoupling genes of mitochondria and reduces palmitate-induced apoptosis in pancreatic {beta}-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Jun; Jiang, Li; Lue, Qingguo; Ke, Linqiu; Li, Xiaoyu; Tong, Nanwei

    2010-01-15

    Recent evidence indicates that decreased oxidative capacity, lipotoxicity, and mitochondrial aberrations contribute to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {delta} (PPAR{delta}) activation on lipid oxidation, mitochondrial function, and insulin secretion in pancreatic {beta}-cells. After HIT-T15 cells (a {beta}-cell line) were exposed to high concentrations of palmitate and GW501516 (GW; a selective agonist of PPAR{delta}), we found that administration of GW increased the expression of PPAR{delta} mRNA. GW-induced activation of PPAR{delta} up-regulated carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1), long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCAD), pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4), and uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2); alleviated mitochondrial swelling; attenuated apoptosis; and reduced basal insulin secretion induced by increased palmitate in HIT cells. These results suggest that activation of PPAR{delta} plays an important role in protecting pancreatic {beta}-cells against aberrations caused by lipotoxicity in metabolic syndrome and diabetes.

  3. Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    DiMagno, Matthew J.; DiMagno, Eugene P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review We review important new clinical observations in chronic pancreatitis (CP) reported in 2011. Recent findings Smoking increases the risk of non-gallstone acute pancreatitis (AP) and the progression of AP to CP. Binge drinking during Oktoberfest did not associate with increased hospital admissions for AP. The unfolded protein response is an adaptive mechanism to maintain pancreatic health in response to noxious stimuli such as alcohol. Onset of diabetes mellitus in CP is likely due to progressive disease rather than individual variables. Insufficient pancreatic enzyme dosing is common for treatment of pancreatic steatorrhea; 90,000 USP U of lipase should be given with meals. Surgical drainage provides sustained, superior pain relief compared to endoscopic treatment in patients advanced CP with a dilated main duct +/− pancreatic stones. The central acting gabapentoid pregabalin affords a modest 12% pain reduction in patients with CP but ~30% of patients have significant side effects. Summary Patients with non-gallstone related AP or CP of any etiology should cease smoking. Results of this year’s investigations further elucidated the pancreatic pathobiology due to alcohol, onset of diabetes mellitus in CP, and the mechanisms and treatment of neuropathic pain in CP. PMID:22782018

  4. α-Mangostin suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced invasion by inhibiting matrix metalloproteinase-2/9 and increasing E-cadherin expression through extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling in pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    YUAN, JIANGTAO; WU, YAOLU; LU, GUIFANG

    2013-01-01

    Invasion and metastasis are major factors in the poor prognosis of pancreatic cancer, which remains one of the most aggressive and lethal diseases worldwide. α-mangostin, a major xanthone compound identified in the pericarp of mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana, Linn; GML), possesses unique biological activities, including antioxidant, antitumor and anti-inflammatory effects. Whether α-mangostin is able to inhibit the invasive ability of pancreatic cancer cells has not been elucidated. In the present study, α-mangostin was shown to inhibit the invasive ability of the pancreatic cancer cell lines MIAPaCa-2 and BxPC-3. The results showed that α-mangostin inhibited the growth of the pancreatic cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. At concentrations of <5 μM, α-mangostin had no significant effects on cytotoxicity, but significantly inhibited the invasion and migration of pancreatic cancer cells and the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9, while increasing the expression of E-cadherin. The present data also showed that α-mangostin exerted an inhibitory effect on the phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Furthermore, the reduction of ERK phosphorylation by small interfering RNA (siRNA) potentiated the effect of α-mangostin. Taken together, the data suggest that α-mangostin inhibited the invasion and metastasis of pancreatic cancer cells by reducing MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression, increasing E-cadherin expression and suppressing the ERK signaling pathway. The present study suggests that α-mangostin may be a promising agent against pancreatic cancer. PMID:23833675

  5. Acute pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... rate Lab tests that show the release of pancreatic enzymes will be done. These include: Increased blood amylase level Increased serum blood lipase level Increased urine amylase ... swelling of the pancreas include: CT scan of the abdomen MRI of ...

  6. Pancreatitis - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... perform lab tests to check the release of pancreatic enzymes. These include tests to check the: Blood amylase level Blood lipase level Urine amylase level Other blood tests ... the pancreas include: Ultrasound of the abdomen (most common) CT ...

  7. Pancreatic abscess.

    PubMed Central

    Gartell, P C

    1982-01-01

    Three cases of pancreatic abscess are described to show the difficulties in diagnosis and that inadequate treatment is invariably fatal. Early recognition and prompt surgical drainage, together with biliary decompression if indicated, are advised. PMID:7069670

  8. Hereditary Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Rivera Rivera, Edgardo D; Chugh, Ankur; Cordova, Jonathon; Young, Sona

    2016-02-01

    A 13-year-old boy with a strong family history of hereditary pancreatitis was found to have a PRSS1 mutation after being tested at age 5 years during his first documented incident of pancreatitis. Since then, a multidisciplinary team has been treating him for the diagnosis of hereditary pancreatitis. His pain episodes increased in severity over the past several months such that the pain began to severely interfere with his daily life. After extensive discussion, a total pancreatectomy with auto islet cell transplant was performed. He is now pain free and does not require any insulin. This leads us to the questions of what is hereditary pancreatitis and how is it diagnosed? What are the management and follow-up strategies needed for these patients? This article addresses these questions and informs the reader about this diagnosis and the importance of having a high index of clinical suspicion. PMID:26878183

  9. O-Linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) Acts as a Glucose Sensor to Epigenetically Regulate the Insulin Gene in Pancreatic Beta Cells.

    PubMed

    Durning, Sean P; Flanagan-Steet, Heather; Prasad, Nripesh; Wells, Lance

    2016-01-29

    The post-translational protein modification O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) is a proposed nutrient sensor that has been shown to regulate multiple biological pathways. This dynamic and inducible enzymatic modification to intracellular proteins utilizes the end product of the nutrient sensing hexosamine biosynthetic pathway, UDP-GlcNAc, as its substrate donor. Type II diabetic patients have elevated O-GlcNAc-modified proteins within pancreatic beta cells due to chronic hyperglycemia-induced glucose overload, but a molecular role for O-GlcNAc within beta cells remains unclear. Using directed pharmacological approaches in the mouse insulinoma-6 (Min6) cell line, we demonstrate that elevating nuclear O-GlcNAc increases intracellular insulin levels and preserves glucose-stimulated insulin secretion during chronic hyperglycemia. The molecular mechanism for these observed changes appears to be, at least in part, due to elevated O-GlcNAc-dependent increases in Ins1 and Ins2 mRNA levels via elevations in histone H3 transcriptional activation marks. Furthermore, RNA deep sequencing reveals that this mechanism of altered gene transcription is restricted and that the majority of genes regulated by elevated O-GlcNAc levels are similarly regulated by a shift from euglycemic to hyperglycemic conditions. These findings implicate the O-GlcNAc modification as a potential mechanism for hyperglycemic-regulated gene expression in the beta cell.

  10. Chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Maisonneuve, Patrick; Lowenfels, Albert B

    2002-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the USA in both sexes. Early diagnosis is difficult and the overall mortality rate is high. Individuals at high risk for pancreatic cancer include smokers, and persons with all forms of chronic alcoholic, metabolic, tropical or hereditary pancreatitis. The duration of exposure to inflammation seems to be the major factor involved in the transition from benign to malignant condition. Smoking, which appears to further accelerate the carcinogenic transformation, remains the strongest risk factor amenable to preventive intervention.

  11. A novel role for carbon monoxide as a potent regulator of intracellular Ca2+ and nitric oxide in rat pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Amira; Habara, Yoshiaki

    2014-12-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is known as an essential gaseous messenger that regulates a wide array of physiological and pathological processes, similar to nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the potential role of CO in Ca(2+) homeostasis and to explore the underlying mechanisms in pancreatic acinar cells. The exogenous application of a CO-releasing molecule dose-dependently increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i). A heme oxygenase (HO) inducer increased [Ca(2+)]i in a concentration-dependent manner, and the increase was diminished by an HO inhibitor. The CO-induced [Ca(2+)]i increase persisted in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+), indicating that Ca(2+) release is the initial source for the increase. The inhibition of G protein, phospholipase C (PLC), and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor diminished the CO-induced [Ca(2+)]i increase. CO upregulated endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression and stimulated NO production, and NOS inhibitor, calmodulin inhibitor, or the absence of extracellular Ca(2+) eliminated the latter response. Blocking the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt/protein kinase B (PKB) pathway abolished CO-induced NO production. Pretreatment with an NOS inhibitor, NO scavenger, or soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor, did not affect the CO-induced [Ca(2+)]i increase, indicating that NO, soluble guanylate cyclase, and cyclic guanosine 5'-monophosphate are not involved in the CO-induced [Ca(2+)]i increase. CO inhibited the secretory responses to CCK-octapeptide or carbachol. We conclude that CO acts as a regulator not only for [Ca(2+)]i homeostasis via a PLC-IP3-IP3 receptor cascade but also for NO production via the calmodulin and PI3K-Akt/PKB pathway, and both CO and NO interact. Moreover, CO may provide potential therapy to ameliorate acute pancreatitis by inhibiting amylase secretion.

  12. Autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Omiyale, Ayodeji Oluwarotimi

    2016-06-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare, distinct and increasingly recognized form of pancreatitis which has autoimmune features. The international consensus diagnostic criteria (ICDC) for AIP recently described two subtypes; type 1[lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP)] and type 2 [idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) or AIP with granulocytic epithelial lesion (GEL)]. Type 1 is the more common form of the disease worldwide and current understanding suggests that it is a pancreatic manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). In contrast, type 2 AIP is a pancreas-specific disease not associated with IgG4 and mostly without the overt extra-pancreatic organ involvement seen in type 1. The pathogenesis of AIP is not completely understood and its clinical presentation is non-specific. It shares overlapping features with more sinister pathologies such as cancer of the pancreas, which continues to pose a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. The diagnostic criteria requires a variable combination of histopathological, imaging and serological features in the presence of typical extrapancreatic lesions and a predictable response to steroids. PMID:27294040

  13. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare, distinct and increasingly recognized form of pancreatitis which has autoimmune features. The international consensus diagnostic criteria (ICDC) for AIP recently described two subtypes; type 1[lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP)] and type 2 [idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) or AIP with granulocytic epithelial lesion (GEL)]. Type 1 is the more common form of the disease worldwide and current understanding suggests that it is a pancreatic manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). In contrast, type 2 AIP is a pancreas-specific disease not associated with IgG4 and mostly without the overt extra-pancreatic organ involvement seen in type 1. The pathogenesis of AIP is not completely understood and its clinical presentation is non-specific. It shares overlapping features with more sinister pathologies such as cancer of the pancreas, which continues to pose a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. The diagnostic criteria requires a variable combination of histopathological, imaging and serological features in the presence of typical extrapancreatic lesions and a predictable response to steroids. PMID:27294040

  14. Pancreatic Cancer Early Detection Program

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-30

    Pancreatic Cancer; Pancreas Cancer; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Familial Pancreatic Cancer; BRCA 1/2; HNPCC; Lynch Syndrome; Hereditary Pancreatitis; FAMMM; Familial Atypical Multiple Mole Melanoma; Peutz Jeghers Syndrome

  15. Effects of ORP150 on appearance and function of pancreatic beta cells following acute necrotizing pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wen-Hong; Chen, Chen; Wang, Wei-Xing; Yu, Jia; Li, Jin-You; Liu, Lei

    2011-06-15

    Pancreatic beta cells produce and release insulin, which decreases the blood glucose level. Endoplasmic reticulum stress caused pancreatic beta cell dysfunction and death in acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP). The 150kD oxygen-regulated protein (ORP150) took part in the process of endoplasmic reticulum stress. This study investigated the effect of ORP150 on appearance and function of pancreatic beta cells in ANP. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis relied on retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the bile-pancreatic duct. The severity of ANP was estimated by serum amylase, secretory phospholipase A(2,) and pancreatic histopathology. The changes in appearance and function of pancreatic beta cells were detected by light and electron microscopy and the levels of serum glucose, insulin, and C-peptide. ORP150 expression was studied using western blot and immunohistochemisty assay. The expression of ORP150 mainly appeared on pancreatic beta cells and decreased gradually during the pathogenesis of ANP. The results of light and electron microscopy indicated pancreatic beta cell dysfunction and death, concomitant with elevation of serum glucose, insulin, and C-peptide in ANP. These results imply a probable role of ORP150 in the changes in appearance and function of pancreatic beta cells following acute necrotizing pancreatitis, through the pathway of endoplasmic reticulum stress.

  16. Molecular biology of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Zavoral, Miroslav; Minarikova, Petra; Zavada, Filip; Salek, Cyril; Minarik, Marek

    2011-06-28

    In spite of continuous research efforts directed at early detection and treatment of pancreatic cancer, the outlook for patients affected by the disease remains dismal. With most cases still being diagnosed at advanced stages, no improvement in survival prognosis is achieved with current diagnostic imaging approaches. In the absence of a dominant precancerous condition, several risk factors have been identified including family history, chronic pancreatitis, smoking, diabetes mellitus, as well as certain genetic disorders such as hereditary pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, familial atypical multiple mole melanoma, and Peutz-Jeghers and Lynch syndromes. Most pancreatic carcinomas, however, remain sporadic. Current progress in experimental molecular techniques has enabled detailed understanding of the molecular processes of pancreatic cancer development. According to the latest information, malignant pancreatic transformation involves multiple oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes that are involved in a variety of signaling pathways. The most characteristic aberrations (somatic point mutations and allelic losses) affect oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes within RAS, AKT and Wnt signaling, and have a key role in transcription and proliferation, as well as systems that regulate the cell cycle (SMAD/DPC, CDKN2A/p16) and apoptosis (TP53). Understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms should promote development of new methodology for early diagnosis and facilitate improvement in current approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment.

  17. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Sabater, Luis; Sastre, Juan

    2015-08-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF-VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis.

  18. CCL20 is elevated during obesity and differentially regulated by NF-κB subunits in pancreatic β-cells

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Susan J.; Karlstad, Michael D.; Regal, Kellie M.; Sparer, Tim E.; Lu, Danhong; Elks, Carrie M.; Grant, Ryan W.; Stephens, Jacqueline M.; Burk, David H.; J. Jason, Collier

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced leukocytic infiltration into pancreatic islets contributes to inflammation-based diminutions in functional β-cell mass. Insulitis (aka islet inflammation), which can be present in both T1DM and T2DM, is one factor influencing pancreatic β-cell death and dysfunction. IL-1β, an inflammatory mediator in both T1DM and T2DM, acutely (within 1h) induced expression of the CCL20 gene in rat and human islets and clonal β-cell lines. Transcriptional induction of CCL20 required the p65 subunit of NF-κB to replace the p50 subunit at two functional κB sites within the CCL20 proximal gene promoter. The NF-κB p50 subunit prevents CCL20 gene expression during unstimulated conditions and overexpression of p50 reduces CCL20, but enhances cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), transcript accumulation after exposure to IL-1β. We also identified differential recruitment of specific co-activator molecules to the CCL20 gene promoter, when compared with the CCL2 and COX2 genes, revealing distinct transcriptional requirements for individual NF-κB responsive genes. Moreover, IL-1β, TNF-α and IFN-γ individually increased the expression of CCR6, the receptor for CCL20, on the surface of human neutrophils. We further found that the chemokine CCL20 is elevated in serum from both genetically obese db/db mice and in C57BL6/J mice fed a high-fat diet. Taken together, these results are consistent with a possible activation of the CCL20-CCR6 axis in diseases with inflammatory components. Thus, interfering with this signaling pathway, either at the level of NF-κB-mediated chemokine production, or downstream receptor activation, could be a potential therapeutic target to offset inflammation-associated tissue dysfunction in obesity and diabetes. PMID:25882704

  19. Chronic pancreatitis and cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Witt, H

    2003-01-01

    Recent discoveries of trypsinogen and trypsin inhibitor mutations in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) support the hypothesis that an inappropriate activation of pancreatic zymogens to active enzymes within the pancreatic parenchyma starts the inflammatory process. Current data suggest that CP may be inherited dominant, recessive, or complex as a result of mutations in the above mentioned or yet unidentified genes. Evaluation of patients with CP should include genetic testing. Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene and is characterised by pancreatic insufficiency and chronic bronchopulmonary infection. The progression and severity of pulmonary disease differs considerably between people with identical CFTR mutations and does not seem to correlate with the type or class of the CFTR mutation. The identification of further disease modifying genetic factors will increase the pathophysiological understanding and may help to identify new therapeutic targets. PMID:12651880

  20. Somatostatin, somatostatin receptors, and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Fisher, William E; Kim, Hee Joon; Wang, Xiaoping; Brunicardi, Charles F; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi

    2005-03-01

    Somatostatin may play an important role in the regulation of cancer growth including pancreatic cancer by interaction with somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) on the cell surface. Five SSTRs were cloned, and the function of these SSTRs is addressed in this review. SSTR-2, SSTR-5, and SSTR-1 are thought to play major roles in inhibiting pancreatic cancer growth both in vitro and in vivo. SSTR-3 may be involved in mediating apoptosis, but the role of SSTR-4 is not clear. In most pancreatic cancers, functional SSTRs are absent. Reintroduction of SSTR genes has been shown to inhibit pancreatic cancer growth in cell cultures and animal models.

  1. [Pancreatic ultrasonography].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Rodríguez, T; Segura-Grau, A; Rodríguez-Lorenzo, A; Segura-Cabral, J M

    2015-04-01

    Despite the recent technological advances in imaging, abdominal ultrasonography continues to be the first diagnostic test indicated in patients with a suspicion of pancreatic disease, due to its safety, accessibility and low cost. It is an essential technique in the study of inflammatory processes, since it not only assesses changes in pancreatic parenchyma, but also gives an indication of the origin (bile or alcoholic). It is also essential in the detection and tracing of possible complications as well as being used as a guide in diagnostic and therapeutic punctures. It is also the first technique used in the study of pancreatic tumors, detecting them with a sensitivity of around 70% and a specificity of 90%.

  2. [Pancreatic pseudocysts].

    PubMed

    Stăncescu, M; Ciurea, S

    1989-01-01

    Clinical, evolutive and therapeutical aspects were studied, of 66 cases of patients with pancreatic pseudocysts hospitalized in the clinic over a period of 27 years. Particular modalities of onset were, those of patients with duodenal stenosis, mechanical jaundice, ascites and pleurisy, those in whom symptomatology suggested kidney or cholecystic disease. The intraoperative diagnosis raises the problem of differentiating a retroperitoneal tumor, identifying the possible association with a pancreatic cancer, and the condition when the pseudocysts are found at a certain distance from the pancreas itself. The therapeutical methods are codified, but recidives are possible. Cholecystectomy removes the biliary cause of pancreatitis which can determine the development of pseudocysts. The death rate of these cases was 6.3%.

  3. Delayed-rectifier (KV2.1) regulation of pancreatic beta-cell calcium responses to glucose: inhibitor specificity and modeling.

    PubMed

    Tamarina, Natalia A; Kuznetsov, Andrey; Fridlyand, Leonid E; Philipson, Louis H

    2005-10-01

    The delayed-rectifier (voltage-activated) K(+) conductance (K(V)) in pancreatic islet beta-cells has been proposed to regulate plasma membrane repolarization during responses to glucose, thereby determining bursting and Ca(2+) oscillations. Here, we verified the expression of K(V)2.1 channel protein in mouse and human islets of Langerhans. We then probed the function of K(V)2.1 channels in islet glucose responses by comparing the effect of hanatoxin (HaTx), a specific blocker of K(V)2.1 channels, with a nonspecific K(+) channel blocker, tetraethylammonium (TEA). Application of HaTx (1 microM) blocked delayed-rectifier currents in mouse beta-cells, resulting in a 40-mV rightward shift in threshold of activation of the voltage-dependent outward current. In the presence of HaTx, there was negligible voltage-activated outward current below 0 mV, suggesting that K(V)2.1 channels form the predominant part of this current in the physiologically relevant range. We then employed HaTx to study the role of K(V)2.1 in the beta-cell Ca(2+) responses to elevated glucose in comparison with TEA. Only HaTx was able to induce slow intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) oscillations in cells stimulated with 20 mM glucose, whereas TEA induced an immediate rise in [Ca(2+)](i) followed by rapid oscillations. In human islets, HaTx acted in a similar fashion. The data were analyzed using a detailed mathematical model of ionic flux and Ca(2+) regulation in beta-cells. The results can be explained by a specific HaTx effect on the K(V) current, whereas TEA affects multiple K(+) conductances. The results underscore the importance of K(V)2.1 channel in repolarization of the pancreatic beta-cell plasma membrane and its role in regulating insulin secretion. PMID:16014354

  4. Computed Tomography of Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Furlow, Bryant

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic disease often is asymptomatic until tissue damage and complications occur or until malignancies have reached advanced stages and have metastasized. Contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography plays a central role in diagnosing, staging, and treatment planning for pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. This article introduces the functional anatomy of the pancreas and common bile duct and the epidemiology, pathobiology, and computed tomography imaging of pancreatitis, calculi, and pancreatic cancer.

  5. Npas4 Transcription Factor Expression Is Regulated by Calcium Signaling Pathways and Prevents Tacrolimus-induced Cytotoxicity in Pancreatic Beta Cells.

    PubMed

    Speckmann, Thilo; Sabatini, Paul V; Nian, Cuilan; Smith, Riley G; Lynn, Francis C

    2016-02-01

    Cytosolic calcium influx activates signaling pathways known to support pancreatic beta cell function and survival by modulating gene expression. Impaired calcium signaling leads to decreased beta cell mass and diabetes. To appreciate the causes of these cytotoxic perturbations, a more detailed understanding of the relevant signaling pathways and their respective gene targets is required. In this study, we examined the calcium-induced expression of the cytoprotective beta cell transcription factor Npas4. Pharmacological inhibition implicated the calcineurin, Akt/protein kinase B, and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase signaling pathways in the regulation of Npas4 transcription and translation. Both Npas4 mRNA and protein had high turnover rates, and, at the protein level, degradation was mediated via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Finally, beta cell cytotoxicity of the calcineurin inhibitor and immunosuppressant tacrolimus (FK-506) was prevented by Npas4 overexpression. These results delineate the pathways regulating Npas4 expression and stability and demonstrate its importance in clinical settings such as islet transplantation.

  6. Activation of Protein Kinases and Inhibition of Protein Phosphatases Play a Central Role in the Regulation of Exocytosis in Mouse Pancreatic β Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammala, Carina; Eliasson, Lena; Bokvist, Krister; Berggren, Per-Olof; Honkanen, Richard E.; Sjoholm, Ake; Rorsman, Patrik

    1994-05-01

    The mechanisms that regulate insulin secretion were investigated using capacitance measurements of exocytosis in single β cells maintained in tissue culture. Exocytosis was stimulated by voltage-clamp depolarizations to activate the voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels that mediate Ca2+ influx into the β cell. Under basal conditions, the exocytotic responses were small despite large Ca2+ currents. The exocytotic responses were dramatically increased (10- to 20-fold) by conditions that promote protein phosphorylation, such as activation of protein kinases A and C or inhibition of protein phosphatases. The stimulation of secretion was not due to an enhancement of Ca2+ influx and both peak and integrated Ca2+ currents were largely unaffected. Our data indicate that exocytosis in the insulin-secreting pancreatic β cell is determined by a balance between protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. They further suggest that although Ca2+ is required for the initiation of exocytosis, modulation of exocytosis by protein kinases and phosphatases, at a step distal to the elevation of Ca2+, is of much greater quantitative importance. Thus an elevation of Ca2+ may represent a permissive rather than a decisive factor in the regulation of the insulin secretory process.

  7. TAp63 is a master transcriptional regulator of lipid and glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xiaohua; Gi, Young Jin; Chakravarti, Deepavali; Chan, Io Long; Zhang, Aijun; Xia, Xuefeng; Tsai, Kenneth Y.; Flores, Elsa R.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY TAp63 prevents premature aging suggesting a link to genes that regulate longevity. Further characterization of TAp63−/− mice revealed that these mice develop obesity, insulin resistance, and glucose intolerance, similar to those seen in mice lacking two key metabolic regulators, Silent information regulator T1 (Sirt1) and AMPK. While the roles of Sirt1 and AMPK in metabolism have been well studied, their upstream regulators are not well understood. We found that TAp63 is important in regulating energy metabolism by accumulating in response to metabolic stress and transcriptionally activating Sirt1, AMPKα2, and LKB1 resulting in increased fatty acid synthesis and decreased fatty acid oxidation. Moreover, we found that TAp63 lowers blood glucose levels in response to metformin. Restoration of Sirt1, AMPKα2, and LKB1 in TAp63−/− mice rescued some of the metabolic defects of the TAp63−/− mice. Our study defines a role for TAp63 in metabolism and weight control. PMID:23040072

  8. Coordinated regulation by Shp2 tyrosine phosphatase of signaling events controlling insulin biosynthesis in pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sharon S; Hao, Ergeng; Yu, Jianxiu; Liu, Wen; Wang, Jing; Levine, Fred; Feng, Gen-Sheng

    2009-05-01

    Intracellular signaling by which pancreatic beta-cells synthesize and secrete insulin in control of glucose homeostasis is not fully understood. Here we show that Shp2, a cytoplasmic tyrosine phosphatase possessing 2 SH2 domains, coordinates signaling events required for insulin biosynthesis in beta-cells. Mice with conditional ablation of the Shp2/Ptpn11 gene in the pancreas exhibited defective glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and impaired glucose tolerance. Consistently, siRNA-mediated Shp2-knockdown in rat insulinoma INS-1 832/13 cells resulted in decreased insulin production and secretion despite an increase in cellular ATP. Shp2 modulates the strength of signals flowing through Akt/FoxO1 and Erk pathways, culminating in control of Pdx1 expression and activity on Ins1 and Ins2 promoters, and forced Pdx1 expression rescued insulin production in Shp2-knockdown beta-cells. Therefore, Shp2 acts as a signal coordinator in beta-cells, orchestrating multiple pathways controlling insulin biosynthesis to maintain glucose homeostasis.

  9. Up-regulation of fatty acid synthase induced by EGFR/ERK activation promotes tumor growth in pancreatic cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, Yong; Yu, Yun; Wang, Shanshan; Li, Lin

    2015-08-07

    Lipid metabolism is dysregulated in many human diseases including atherosclerosis, type 2 diabetes and cancers. Fatty acid synthase (FASN), a key lipogenic enzyme involved in de novo lipid biosynthesis, is significantly upregulated in multiple types of human cancers and associates with tumor progression. However, limited data is available to understand underlying biological functions and clinical significance of overexpressed FASN in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Here, upregulated FASN was more frequently observed in PDAC tissues compared with normal pancreas in a tissue microarray. Kaplan–Meier survival analysis revealed that high expression level of FASN resulted in a significantly poor prognosis of PDAC patients. Knockdown or inhibition of endogenous FASN decreased cell proliferation and increased cell apoptosis in HPAC and AsPC-1 cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that EGFR/ERK signaling accounts for elevated FASN expression in PDAC as ascertained by performing siRNA assays and using specific pharmacological inhibitors. Collectively, our results indicate that FASN exhibits important roles in tumor growth and EGFR/ERK pathway is responsible for upregulated expression of FASN in PDAC. - Highlights: • Increased expression of FASN indicates a poor prognosis in PDAC. • Elevated FASN favors tumor growth in PDAC in vitro. • Activation of EGFR signaling contributes to elevated FASN expression.

  10. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3

    MedlinePlus

    ... historical Searches are case-insensitive Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3 Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 720x576 ... Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3 Description: Stage III pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer ...

  11. Thymoquinone, a bioactive component of Nigella sativa, normalizes insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells under glucose overload via regulation of malonyl-CoA.

    PubMed

    Gray, Joshua P; Burgos, Delaine Zayasbazan; Yuan, Tao; Seeram, Navindra; Rebar, Rebecca; Follmer, Rebecca; Heart, Emma A

    2016-03-15

    Thymoquinone (2-isopropyl-5-methylbenzo-1,4-quinone) is a major bioactive component of Nigella sativa, a plant used in traditional medicine to treat a variety of symptoms, including elevated blood glucose levels in type 2 diabetic patients. Normalization of elevated blood glucose depends on both glucose disposal by peripheral tissues and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from pancreatic β-cells. We employed clonal β-cells and rodent islets to investigate the effects of thymoquinone (TQ) and Nigella sativa extracts (NSEs) on GSIS and cataplerotic metabolic pathways implicated in the regulation of GSIS. TQ and NSE regulated NAD(P)H/NAD(P)(+) ratios via a quinone-dependent redox cycling mechanism. TQ content was positively correlated with the degree of redox cycling activity of NSE extracts, suggesting that TQ is a major component engaged in mediating NSE-dependent redox cycling. Both acute and chronic exposure to TQ and NSE enhanced GSIS and were associated with the ability of TQ and NSE to increase the ATP/ADP ratio. Furthermore, TQ ameliorated the impairment of GSIS following chronic exposure of β-cells to glucose overload. This protective action was associated with the TQ-dependent normalization of chronic accumulation of malonyl-CoA, elevation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), fatty acid synthase, and fatty acid-binding proteins following chronic glucose overload. Together, these data suggest that TQ modulates the β-cell redox circuitry and enhances the sensitivity of β-cell metabolic pathways to glucose and GSIS under normal conditions as well as under hyperglycemia. This action is associated with the ability of TQ to regulate carbohydrate-to-lipid flux via downregulation of ACC and malonyl-CoA.

  12. Thymoquinone, a bioactive component of Nigella sativa, normalizes insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells under glucose overload via regulation of malonyl-CoA.

    PubMed

    Gray, Joshua P; Burgos, Delaine Zayasbazan; Yuan, Tao; Seeram, Navindra; Rebar, Rebecca; Follmer, Rebecca; Heart, Emma A

    2016-03-15

    Thymoquinone (2-isopropyl-5-methylbenzo-1,4-quinone) is a major bioactive component of Nigella sativa, a plant used in traditional medicine to treat a variety of symptoms, including elevated blood glucose levels in type 2 diabetic patients. Normalization of elevated blood glucose depends on both glucose disposal by peripheral tissues and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from pancreatic β-cells. We employed clonal β-cells and rodent islets to investigate the effects of thymoquinone (TQ) and Nigella sativa extracts (NSEs) on GSIS and cataplerotic metabolic pathways implicated in the regulation of GSIS. TQ and NSE regulated NAD(P)H/NAD(P)(+) ratios via a quinone-dependent redox cycling mechanism. TQ content was positively correlated with the degree of redox cycling activity of NSE extracts, suggesting that TQ is a major component engaged in mediating NSE-dependent redox cycling. Both acute and chronic exposure to TQ and NSE enhanced GSIS and were associated with the ability of TQ and NSE to increase the ATP/ADP ratio. Furthermore, TQ ameliorated the impairment of GSIS following chronic exposure of β-cells to glucose overload. This protective action was associated with the TQ-dependent normalization of chronic accumulation of malonyl-CoA, elevation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), fatty acid synthase, and fatty acid-binding proteins following chronic glucose overload. Together, these data suggest that TQ modulates the β-cell redox circuitry and enhances the sensitivity of β-cell metabolic pathways to glucose and GSIS under normal conditions as well as under hyperglycemia. This action is associated with the ability of TQ to regulate carbohydrate-to-lipid flux via downregulation of ACC and malonyl-CoA. PMID:26786775

  13. AMPK regulates mitotic spindle orientation through phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain.

    PubMed

    Thaiparambil, Jose T; Eggers, Carrie M; Marcus, Adam I

    2012-08-01

    The proper orientation of the mitotic spindle is essential for mitosis; however, how these events unfold at the molecular level is not well understood. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulates energy homeostasis in eukaryotes, and AMPK-null Drosophila mutants have spindle defects. We show that threonine(172) phosphorylated AMPK localizes to the mitotic spindle poles and increases when cells enter mitosis. AMPK depletion causes a mitotic delay with misoriented spindles relative to the normal division plane and a reduced number and length of astral microtubules. AMPK-depleted cells contain mitotic actin bundles, which prevent astral microtubule-actin cortex attachments. Since myosin regulatory light chain (MRLC) is an AMPK downstream target and mediates actin function, we investigated whether AMPK signals through MRLC to control spindle orientation. Mitotic levels of serine(19) phosphorylated MRLC (pMRLC(ser19)) and spindle pole-associated pMRLC(ser19) are abolished when AMPK function is compromised, indicating that AMPK is essential for pMRLC(ser19) spindle pole activity. Phosphorylation of AMPK and MRLC in the mitotic spindle is dependent upon calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase (CamKK) activity in LKB1-deficient cells, suggesting that CamKK regulates this pathway when LKB1 function is compromised. Taken together, these data indicate that AMPK mediates spindle pole-associated pMRLC(ser19) to control spindle orientation via regulation of actin cortex-astral microtubule attachments.

  14. Melatonin induces the expression of Nrf2-regulated antioxidant enzymes via PKC and Ca2+ influx activation in mouse pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Santofimia-Castaño, Patricia; Clea Ruy, Deborah; Garcia-Sanchez, Lourdes; Jimenez-Blasco, Daniel; Fernandez-Bermejo, Miguel; Bolaños, Juan P; Salido, Gines M; Gonzalez, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the potential activation of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor and the antioxidant-responsive element (Nrf2-ARE) signaling pathway in response to melatonin in isolated mouse pancreatic acinar cells. Changes in intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration were followed by fluorimetric analysis of fura-2-loaded cells. The activations of PKC and JNK were measured by Western blot analysis. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was employed to detect the expression of Nrf2-regulated antioxidant enzymes. Immunocytochemistry was employed to determine nuclear location of phosphorylated Nrf2, and the cellular redox state was monitored following MitoSOX Red-derived fluorescence. Our results show that stimulation of fura-2-loaded cells with melatonin (1 µM to 1 mM), in the presence of Ca(2+) in the extracellular medium, induced a slow and progressive increase of [Ca(2+)](c) toward a stable level. Melatonin did not inhibit the typical Ca(2+) response induced by CCK-8 (1 nM). When the cells were challenged with indoleamine in the absence of Ca(2+) in the extracellular solution (medium containing 0.5 mM EGTA) or in the presence of 1 mM LaCl(3), to inhibit Ca(2+) entry, we could not detect any change in [Ca(2+)](c). Nevertheless, CCK-8 (1 nM) was able to induce the typical mobilization of Ca(2+). When the cells were incubated with the PKC activator PMA (1 µM) in the presence of Ca(2+) in the extracellular medium, we observed a response similar to that noted when the cells were challenged with melatonin 100 µM. However, in the presence of Ro31-8220 (3 µM), a PKC inhibitor, stimulation of cells with melatonin failed to evoke changes in [Ca(2+)]c. Immunoblots, using an antibody specific for phospho-PKC, revealed that melatonin induces PKCα activation, either in the presence or in the absence of external Ca(2+). Melatonin induced the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of the transcription factor Nrf2, and

  15. Autoimmune pancreatitis can develop into chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been recognized as a distinct type of pancreatitis that is possibly caused by autoimmune mechanisms. AIP is characterized by high serum IgG4 and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration in affected pancreatic tissue. Acute phase AIP responds favorably to corticosteroid therapy and results in the amelioration of clinical findings. However, the long-term prognosis and outcome of AIP remain unclear. We have proposed a working hypothesis that AIP can develop into ordinary chronic pancreatitis resembling alcoholic pancreatitis over a long-term course based on several clinical findings, most notably frequent pancreatic stone formation. In this review article, we describe a series of study results to confirm our hypothesis and clarify that: 1) pancreatic calcification in AIP is closely associated with disease recurrence; 2) advanced stage AIP might have earlier been included in ordinary chronic pancreatitis; 3) approximately 40% of AIP patients experience pancreatic stone formation over a long-term course, for which a primary risk factor is narrowing of both Wirsung’s and Santorini’s ducts; and 4) nearly 20% of AIP patients progress to confirmed chronic pancreatitis according to the revised Japanese Clinical Diagnostic Criteria, with independent risk factors being pancreatic head swelling and non-narrowing of the pancreatic body duct. PMID:24884922

  16. The Epidemiology of Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Dhiraj; Lowenfels, Albert B.

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is one of the most frequent gastrointestinal causes for hospital admission in the US. Chronic pancreatitis, although lower in incidence, significantly reduces patients’ quality of life. Pancreatic cancer has high mortality and is 1 of the top 5 causes of death from cancer. The burden of pancreatic disorders is expected to increase over time. The risk and etiology of pancreatitis differ with age and sex, and all pancreatic disorders affect Blacks more than any other race. Gallstones are the most common cause of acute pancreatitis, and early cholecystectomy eliminates the risk of future attacks. Alcohol continues to be the single most important risk factor for chronic pancreatitis. Smoking is an independent risk factor for acute and chronic pancreatitis, and its effects could synergize with those of alcohol. Significant risk factors for pancreatic cancer include smoking and non-O blood groups. Alcohol abstinence and smoking cessation can alter progression of pancreatitis and reduce recurrence; smoking cessation is the most effective strategy to reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer. PMID:23622135

  17. Reactive nitrogen species regulate autophagy through ATM-AMPK-TSC2-mediated suppression of mTORC1.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Durga N; Chowdhury, Rajdeep; Trudel, Laura J; Tee, Andrew R; Slack, Rebecca S; Walker, Cheryl Lyn; Wogan, Gerald N

    2013-08-01

    Reactive intermediates such as reactive nitrogen species play essential roles in the cell as signaling molecules but, in excess, constitute a major source of cellular damage. We found that nitrosative stress induced by steady-state nitric oxide (NO) caused rapid activation of an ATM damage-response pathway leading to downstream signaling by this stress kinase to LKB1 and AMPK kinases, and activation of the TSC tumor suppressor. As a result, in an ATM-, LKB1-, TSC-dependent fashion, mTORC1 was repressed, as evidenced by decreased phosphorylation of S6K, 4E-BP1, and ULK1, direct targets of the mTORC1 kinase. Decreased ULK1 phosphorylation by mTORC1 at S757 and activation of AMPK to phosphorylate ULK1 at S317 in response to nitrosative stress resulted in increased autophagy: the LC3-II/LC3-I ratio increased as did GFP-LC3 puncta and acidic vesicles; p62 levels decreased in a lysosome-dependent manner, confirming an NO-induced increase in autophagic flux. Induction of autophagy by NO correlated with loss of cell viability, suggesting that, in this setting, autophagy was functioning primarily as a cytotoxic response to excess nitrosative stress. These data identify a nitrosative-stress signaling pathway that engages ATM and the LKB1 and TSC2 tumor suppressors to repress mTORC1 and regulate autophagy. As cancer cells are particularly sensitive to nitrosative stress, these data open another path for therapies capitalizing on the ability of reactive nitrogen species to induce autophagy-mediated cell death.

  18. Diacylglycerol Signaling Pathway in Pancreatic β-Cells: An Essential Role of Diacylglycerol Kinase in the Regulation of Insulin Secretion.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yukiko K; Ishikawa, Tomohisa

    2015-01-01

    Diacylglycerol (DAG) is a lipid signal messenger and plays a physiological role in β-cells. Since defective glucose homeostasis increases de novo DAG synthesis, DAG may also contribute to β-cell dysfunction in type 2 diabetes. Although the primary function of DAG is to activate protein kinase C (PKC), the role of PKC in insulin secretion is controversial: PKC has been reported to act as both a positive and negative regulator of insulin secretion. In addition to the PKC pathway, DAG has also been shown to mediate other pathways such as the Munc-13-dependent pathway in β-cells. The intracellular levels of DAG are strictly regulated by diacylglycerol kinase (DGK); however, the role of DGK in β-cells and their involvement in β-cell failure in type 2 diabetes remain to be fully elucidated. We have recently reported the roles of type I DGK, DGKα and γ, in insulin secretion from β-cells. DGKα and γ were activated by glucose or high K(+) stimulation in β-cells, and the inhibition of the DGKs by a type I DGK inhibitor or by knockdown with small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreased insulin secretion. Thus, DGKα and γ are suggested to be activated in response to elevated [Ca(2+)]i in β-cells and to act as positive regulators of insulin secretion. In this article, we review the current understanding of the roles of DAG and DGK in β-cell function and their involvement in the development of β-cell dysfunction in type 2 diabetes.

  19. The mRNA-binding protein HuR promotes hypoxia-induced chemoresistance through posttranscriptional regulation of the proto-oncogene PIM1 in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Blanco, F F; Jimbo, M; Wulfkuhle, J; Gallagher, I; Deng, J; Enyenihi, L; Meisner-Kober, N; Londin, E; Rigoutsos, I; Sawicki, J A; Risbud, M V; Witkiewicz, A K; McCue, P A; Jiang, W; Rui, H; Yeo, C J; Petricoin, E; Winter, J M; Brody, J R

    2016-05-01

    Previously, it has been shown that pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) tumors exhibit high levels of hypoxia, characterized by low oxygen pressure (pO2) and decreased O2 intracellular perfusion. Chronic hypoxia is strongly associated with resistance to cytotoxic chemotherapy and chemoradiation in an understudied phenomenon known as hypoxia-induced chemoresistance. The hypoxia-inducible, pro-oncogenic, serine-threonine kinase PIM1 (Proviral Integration site for Moloney murine leukemia virus 1) has emerged as a key regulator of hypoxia-induced chemoresistance in PDA and other cancers. Although its role in therapeutic resistance has been described previously, the molecular mechanism behind PIM1 overexpression in PDA is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that cis-acting AU-rich elements (ARE) present within a 38-base pair region of the PIM1 mRNA 3'-untranslated region mediate a regulatory interaction with the mRNA stability factor HuR (Hu antigen R) in the context of tumor hypoxia. Predominantly expressed in the nucleus in PDA cells, HuR translocates to the cytoplasm in response to hypoxic stress and stabilizes the PIM1 mRNA transcript, resulting in PIM1 protein overexpression. A reverse-phase protein array revealed that HuR-mediated regulation of PIM1 protects cells from hypoxic stress through phosphorylation and inactivation of the apoptotic effector BAD and activation of MEK1/2. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of HuR by MS-444 inhibits HuR homodimerization and its cytoplasmic translocation, abrogates hypoxia-induced PIM1 overexpression and markedly enhances PDA cell sensitivity to oxaliplatin and 5-fluorouracil under physiologic low oxygen conditions. Taken together, these results support the notion that HuR has prosurvival properties in PDA cells by enabling them with growth advantages in stressful tumor microenvironment niches. Accordingly, these studies provide evidence that therapeutic disruption of HuR's regulation of PIM1 may be a key strategy in

  20. Pancreatic panniculitis associated with pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guannan; Cao, Zhe; Yang, Gang; Wu, Wenming; Zhang, Taiping; Zhao, Yupei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Pancreatic panniculitis is a very rare complication of pancreatic cancer, most often accompanying rare acinar cell carcinoma. We herein report a case of pancreatic panniculitis that was associated with pancreatic mucinous adenocarcinoma. Patient information: A 57-year-old male was referred to our hospital for weight loss. A physical examination revealed subcutaneous nodules on his lower extremities. The blood test showed abnormal increases in amylase, lipase, and carbohydrate antigen 19–9 levels. A computed tomography scan detected a hypodense 2 × 1.5 cm solid mass with an unclear margin in the head of the pancreas. The biopsy of subcutaneous nodules on the lower extremities was conducted and revealed lobular panniculitis. Pancreatic cancer and pancreatic panniculitis were strongly suspected. After the administration of octreotide acetate and the Whipple procedure, the serous amylase and lipase levels returned to normal, and the pancreatic panniculitis had almost resolved by 4 weeks later. Conclusion: Pancreatic panniculitis is a rare complication of pancreatic cancer. However, in the presence of a pancreatic mass, as in this case, clinicians should be aware that panniculitis may be the sentinel of pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:27495045

  1. IL-1α Expression in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Affects the Tumor Cell Migration and Is Regulated by the p38MAPK Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tjomsland, Vegard; Bojmar, Linda; Sandström, Per; Bratthäll, Charlotte; Messmer, Davorka; Spångeus, Anna; Larsson, Marie

    2013-01-01

    The interplay between the tumor cells and the surrounding stroma creates inflammation, which promotes tumor growth and spread. The inflammation is a hallmark for pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and is to high extent driven by IL-1α. IL-1α is expressed and secreted by the tumor cells and exerting its effect on the stroma, i.e. cancer associated fibroblasts (CAF), which in turn produce massive amount of inflammatory and immune regulatory factors. IL-1 induces activation of transcription factors such as nuclear factor-κβ (NF-κβ), but also activator protein 1 (AP-1) via the small G-protein Ras. Dysregulation of Ras pathways are common in cancer as this oncogene is the most frequently mutated in many cancers. In contrast, the signaling events leading up to the expression of IL-1α by tumor cells are not well elucidated. Our aim was to examine the signaling cascade involved in the induction of IL-1α expression in PDAC. We found p38MAPK, activated by the K-Ras signaling pathway, to be involved in the expression of IL-1α by PDAC as blocking this pathway decreased both the gene and protein expression of IL-1α. Blockage of the P38MAPK signaling in PDAC also dampened the ability of the tumor cell to induce inflammation in CAFs. In addition, the IL-1α autocrine signaling regulated the migratory capacity of PDAC cells. Taken together, the blockage of signaling pathways leading to IL-1α expression and/or neutralization of IL-1α in the PDAC microenvironment should be taken into consideration as possible treatment or complement to existing treatment of this cancer. PMID:23951028

  2. A role for cytosolic isocitrate dehydrogenase as a negative regulator of glucose signaling for insulin secretion in pancreatic ß-cells.

    PubMed

    Guay, Claudiane; Joly, Erik; Pepin, Emilie; Barbeau, Annie; Hentsch, Lisa; Pineda, Marco; Madiraju, S R Murthy; Brunengraber, Henri; Prentki, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Cytosolic NADPH may act as one of the signals that couple glucose metabolism to insulin secretion in the pancreatic ß-cell. NADPH levels in the cytoplasm are largely controlled by the cytosolic isoforms of malic enzyme and isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDHc). Some studies have provided evidence for a role of malic enzyme in glucose-induced insulin secretion (GIIS) via pyruvate cycling, but the role of IDHc in ß-cell signaling is unsettled. IDHc is an established component of the isocitrate/α-ketoglutarate shuttle that transfers reducing equivalents (NADPH) from the mitochondrion to the cytosol. This shuttle is energy consuming since it is coupled to nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase that uses the mitochondrial proton gradient to produce mitochondrial NADPH and NAD(+) from NADP(+) and NADH. To determine whether flux through IDHc is positively or negatively linked to GIIS, we performed RNAi knockdown experiments in ß-cells. Reduced IDHc expression in INS 832/13 cells and isolated rat islet ß-cells resulted in enhanced GIIS. This effect was mediated at least in part via the KATP-independent amplification arm of GIIS. IDHc knockdown in INS 832/13 cells did not alter glucose oxidation but it reduced fatty acid oxidation and increased lipogenesis from glucose. Metabolome profiling in INS 832/13 cells showed that IDHc knockdown increased isocitrate and NADP(+) levels. It also increased the cellular contents of several metabolites linked to GIIS, in particular some Krebs cycle intermediates, acetyl-CoA, glutamate, cAMP and ATP. The results identify IDHc as a component of the emerging pathways that negatively regulate GIIS.

  3. Gap junctions and other mechanisms of cell-cell communication regulate basal insulin secretion in the pancreatic islet.

    PubMed

    Benninger, R K P; Head, W Steven; Zhang, Min; Satin, Leslie S; Piston, David W

    2011-11-15

    Cell-cell communication in the islet of Langerhans is important for the regulation of insulin secretion. Gap-junctions coordinate oscillations in intracellular free-calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) and insulin secretion in the islet following elevated glucose. Gap-junctions can also ensure that oscillatory [Ca(2+)](i) ceases when glucose is at a basal levels. We determine the roles of gap-junctions and other cell-cell communication pathways in the suppression of insulin secretion under basal conditions. Metabolic, electrical and insulin secretion levels were measured from islets lacking gap-junction coupling following deletion of connexion36 (Cx36(-/-)), and these results were compared to those obtained using fully isolated β-cells. K(ATP) loss-of-function islets provide a further experimental model to specifically study gap-junction mediated suppression of electrical activity. In isolated β-cells or Cx36(-/-) islets, elevations in [Ca(2+)](i) persisted in a subset of cells even at basal glucose. Isolated β-cells showed elevated insulin secretion at basal glucose; however, insulin secretion from Cx36(-/-) islets was minimally altered. [Ca(2+)](i) was further elevated under basal conditions, but insulin release still suppressed in K(ATP) loss-of-function islets. Forced elevation of cAMP led to PKA-mediated increases in insulin secretion from islets lacking gap-junctions, but not from islets expressing Cx36 gap junctions. We conclude there is a redundancy in how cell-cell communication in the islet suppresses insulin release. Gap junctions suppress cellular heterogeneity and spontaneous [Ca(2+)](i) signals, while other juxtacrine mechanisms, regulated by PKA and glucose, suppress more distal steps in exocytosis. Each mechanism is sufficiently robust to compensate for a loss of the other and still suppress basal insulin secretion.

  4. Regulation of gene expression by glucose in pancreatic beta -cells (MIN6) via insulin secretion and activation of phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase.

    PubMed

    da Silva Xavier, G; Varadi, A; Ainscow, E K; Rutter, G A

    2000-11-17

    Increases in glucose concentration control the transcription of the preproinsulin (PPI) gene and several other genes in the pancreatic islet beta-cell. Although recent data have demonstrated that secreted insulin may regulate the PPI gene (Leibiger, I. B., Leibiger, B., Moede, T., and Berggren, P. O. (1998) Mol. Cell 1, 933-938), the role of insulin in the control of other beta-cell genes is unexplored. To study the importance of insulin secretion in the regulation of the PPI and liver-type pyruvate kinase (L-PK) genes by glucose, we have used intranuclear microinjection of promoter-luciferase constructs into MIN6 beta-cells and photon-counting imaging. The activity of each promoter was increased either by 30 (versus 3) mm glucose or by 1-20 nm insulin. These effects of insulin were not due to enhanced glucose metabolism since culture with the hormone had no impact on the stimulation of increases in intracellular ATP concentration caused by 30 mm glucose. Furthermore, the islet-specific glucokinase promoter and cellular glucokinase immunoreactivity were unaffected by 30 mm glucose or 20 nm insulin. Inhibition of insulin secretion with the Ca(2+) channel blocker verapamil, the ATP-sensitive K(+) channel opener diazoxide, or the alpha(2)-adrenergic agonist clonidine blocked the effects of glucose on L-PK gene transcription. Similarly, 30 mm glucose failed to induce the promoter after inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase activity with LY294002 and the expression of dominant negative-acting phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase (Deltap85) or the phosphoinositide 3'-phosphatase PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue). LY294002 also diminished the activation of the L-PK gene caused by inhibition of 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase with anti-5'-AMP-activated protein kinase alpha2 antibodies. Conversely, stimulation of insulin secretion with 13 mm KCl or 10 microm tolbutamide strongly activated the PPI and L-PK promoters. These data indicate that, in MIN6 beta

  5. Phagocyte-like NADPH oxidase promotes cytokine-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in pancreatic β-cells: evidence for regulation by Rac1.

    PubMed

    Subasinghe, Wasanthi; Syed, Ismail; Kowluru, Anjaneyulu

    2011-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important mediators of cellular signal transduction cascades such as proliferation, migration, and apoptosis. Chronic exposure of isolated β-cells to proinflammatory cytokines elevates intracellular oxidative stress leading to the demise of pancreatic β-cells culminating in the onset of diabetes. Although the mitochondrial electron transport chain is felt to be the primary source of ROS, several lines of recent evidence suggest that phagocyte-like NADPH oxidase plays a central role in cytokine-mediated ROS generation and apoptosis of β-cells. However, the precise mechanisms underlying the regulation of NADPH oxidase remain unknown. To address this, insulin-secreting INS 832/13 cells were treated with cytomix (IL-1β, IFN-γ, and TNF-α; 10 ng/ml each) for different time intervals (0-24 h). A significant, time-dependent increase in NADPH oxidase activation/intracellular ROS production, p47(phox) subunit, but not p67(phox) subunit, expression of the phagocyte-like NADPH oxidase were demonstrable under these conditions. Furthermore, siRNA-p47(phox) transfection or exposure of INS 832/13 cells to apocynin, a selective inhibitor of NADPH oxidase, markedly attenuated cytomix-induced ROS generation in these cells. Cytomix-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction in INS 832/13 cells was evident by a significant loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and upregulated caspase 3 activity. Cytomix treatment also caused a transient (within 15 min) activation of Rac1, a component of the NADPH oxidase holoenzyme. Furthermore, GGTI-2147 and NSC23766, known Rac1 inhibitors, not only attenuated the cytomix-induced Rac1 activation but also significantly prevented loss of MMP (NSC23766 > GGTI-2147). However, NSC23766 had no effect on cytomix-induced NO generation or caspase 3 activation, suggesting additional regulatory mechanisms might underlie these signaling steps. Together, these findings suggested that Rac1-mediated regulation of phagocyte

  6. Imaging of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Thoeni, Ruedi F

    2015-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammation of the pancreas. Several classification systems have been used in the past but were considered unsatisfactory. A revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis was published that assessed the clinical course and severity of disease; divided acute pancreatitis into interstitial edematous pancreatitis and necrotizing pancreatitis; discerned an early phase (first week) from a late phase (after the first week); and focused on systemic inflammatory response syndrome and organ failure. This article focuses on the revised classification of acute pancreatitis, with emphasis on imaging features, particularly on newly-termed fluid collections and implications for the radiologist.

  7. AMP-activated protein kinase regulates the assembly of epithelial tight junctions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Li, Ji; Young, Lawrence H.; Caplan, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK), a sensor of cellular energy status in all eukaryotic cells, is activated by LKB1-dependent phosphorylation. Recent studies indicate that activated LKB1 induces polarity in epithelial cells and that this polarization is accompanied by the formation of tight junction structures. We wished to determine whether AMPK also contributes to the assembly of tight junctions in the epithelial cell polarization process. We found that AMPK is activated during calcium-induced tight junction assembly. Activation of AMPK by 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside facilitates tight junction assembly under conditions of normal extracellular Ca2+ concentrations and initiates tight junction assembly in the absence of Ca2+ as revealed by the relocation of zonula occludens 1, the establishment of transepithelial electrical resistance, and the paracellular flux assay. Expression of a dominant negative AMPK construct inhibits tight junction assembly in MDCK cells, and this defect in tight junction assembly can be partially ameliorated by rapamycin. These results suggest that AMPK plays a role in the regulation of tight junction assembly. PMID:17088526

  8. AMP-activated protein kinase regulates the assembly of epithelial tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Li, Ji; Young, Lawrence H; Caplan, Michael J

    2006-11-14

    AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK), a sensor of cellular energy status in all eukaryotic cells, is activated by LKB1-dependent phosphorylation. Recent studies indicate that activated LKB1 induces polarity in epithelial cells and that this polarization is accompanied by the formation of tight junction structures. We wished to determine whether AMPK also contributes to the assembly of tight junctions in the epithelial cell polarization process. We found that AMPK is activated during calcium-induced tight junction assembly. Activation of AMPK by 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside facilitates tight junction assembly under conditions of normal extracellular Ca2+ concentrations and initiates tight junction assembly in the absence of Ca2+ as revealed by the relocation of zonula occludens 1, the establishment of transepithelial electrical resistance, and the paracellular flux assay. Expression of a dominant negative AMPK construct inhibits tight junction assembly in MDCK cells, and this defect in tight junction assembly can be partially ameliorated by rapamycin. These results suggest that AMPK plays a role in the regulation of tight junction assembly. PMID:17088526

  9. Alleviation of hepatic fat accumulation by betaine involves reduction of homocysteine via up-regulation of betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase (BHMT).

    PubMed

    Ahn, Chul Won; Jun, Doo Sung; Na, Jong Deok; Choi, Yeo Jin; Kim, Young Chul

    2016-08-26

    We investigated the anti-lipogenic effect of betaine in rats fed methionine and choline-deficient diet (MCD). Intake of MCD for 3 wk resulted in a significant accumulation of hepatic lipids, which was prevented by betaine supplementation in drinking water (1%). Phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), and liver kinase B1 (LKB1) was inhibited by MCD intake, and these changes were all inhibited by betaine feeding. Meanwhile, betaine supplementation reversed the reduction of methionine and S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), and the elevation of homocysteine levels in the liver, which could be attributable to the induction of betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase (BHMT) and methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT). Different cell lines were used to clarify the role of homocysteine on activation of the AMPK pathway. Homocysteine treatment decreased pAMPK, pACC, pSREBP-1c and pLKB1 in HepG2 cells. Metformin-induced activation of AMPK was also inhibited by homocysteine. Treatment with hydroxylamine, a cystathionine β-synthase inhibitor, resulted in a reduction of pAMPK, pACC and pSREBP-1c, accompanied by an elevation of intracellular homocysteine. Betaine treatment prevented the homocysteine-induced reduction of pAMPK, pACC, pSREBP-1c and pLKB1 in H4IIE cells, but not in HepG2 cells. Also the elevation of cellular homocysteine and inhibition of protein expression of BHMT were prevented by betaine only in H4IIE cells which express BHMT. The results suggest that the beneficial effect of betaine against hepatic lipid accumulation may be attributed, at least in part, to the depletion of homocysteine via up-regulation of BHMT in hepatocytes. PMID:27320863

  10. Chronic stress accelerates pancreatic cancer growth and invasion: a critical role for beta-adrenergic signaling in the pancreatic microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Kim-Fuchs, Corina; Le, Caroline P; Pimentel, Matthew A; Shackleford, David; Ferrari, Davide; Angst, Eliane; Hollande, Frédéric; Sloan, Erica K

    2014-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer cells intimately interact with a complex microenvironment that influences pancreatic cancer progression. The pancreas is innervated by fibers of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and pancreatic cancer cells have receptors for SNS neurotransmitters which suggests that pancreatic cancer may be sensitive to neural signaling. In vitro and non-orthotopic in vivo studies showed that neural signaling modulates tumour cell behavior. However the effect of SNS signaling on tumor progression within the pancreatic microenvironment has not previously been investigated. To address this, we used in vivo optical imaging to non-invasively track growth and dissemination of primary pancreatic cancer using an orthotopic mouse model that replicates the complex interaction between pancreatic tumor cells and their microenvironment. Stress-induced neural activation increased primary tumor growth and tumor cell dissemination to normal adjacent pancreas. These effects were associated with increased expression of invasion genes by tumor cells and pancreatic stromal cells. Pharmacological activation of β-adrenergic signaling induced similar effects to chronic stress, and pharmacological β-blockade reversed the effects of chronic stress on pancreatic cancer progression. These findings indicate that neural β-adrenergic signaling regulates pancreatic cancer progression and suggest β-blockade as a novel strategy to complement existing therapies for pancreatic cancer.

  11. Translating discovery in zebrafish pancreatic development to human pancreatic cancer: biomarkers, targets, pathogenesis, and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Yee, Nelson S; Kazi, Abid A; Yee, Rosemary K

    2013-06-01

    Abstract Experimental studies in the zebrafish have greatly facilitated understanding of genetic regulation of the early developmental events in the pancreas. Various approaches using forward and reverse genetics, chemical genetics, and transgenesis in zebrafish have demonstrated generally conserved regulatory roles of mammalian genes and discovered novel genetic pathways in exocrine pancreatic development. Accumulating evidence has supported the use of zebrafish as a model of human malignant diseases, including pancreatic cancer. Studies have shown that the genetic regulators of exocrine pancreatic development in zebrafish can be translated into potential clinical biomarkers and therapeutic targets in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Transgenic zebrafish expressing oncogenic K-ras and zebrafish tumor xenograft model have emerged as valuable tools for dissecting the pathogenetic mechanisms of pancreatic cancer and for drug discovery and toxicology. Future analysis of the pancreas in zebrafish will continue to advance understanding of the genetic regulation and biological mechanisms during organogenesis. Results of those studies are expected to provide new insights into how aberrant developmental pathways contribute to formation and growth of pancreatic neoplasia, and hopefully generate valid biomarkers and targets as well as effective and safe therapeutics in pancreatic cancer.

  12. The miR-17∼92 microRNA Cluster Is a Global Regulator of Tumor Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Izreig, Said; Samborska, Bozena; Johnson, Radia M; Sergushichev, Alexey; Ma, Eric H; Lussier, Carine; Loginicheva, Ekaterina; Donayo, Ariel O; Poffenberger, Maya C; Sagan, Selena M; Vincent, Emma E; Artyomov, Maxim N; Duchaine, Thomas F; Jones, Russell G

    2016-08-16

    A central hallmark of cancer cells is the reprogramming of cellular metabolism to meet the bioenergetic and biosynthetic demands of malignant growth. Here, we report that the miR-17∼92 microRNA (miRNA) cluster is an oncogenic driver of tumor metabolic reprogramming. Loss of miR-17∼92 in Myc(+) tumor cells leads to a global decrease in tumor cell metabolism, affecting both glycolytic and mitochondrial metabolism, whereas increased miR-17∼92 expression is sufficient to drive increased nutrient usage by tumor cells. We mapped the metabolic control element of miR-17∼92 to the miR-17 seed family, which influences cellular metabolism and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling through negative regulation of the LKB1 tumor suppressor. miR-17-dependent tuning of LKB1 levels regulates both the metabolic potential of Myc(+) lymphomas and tumor growth in vivo. Our results establish metabolic reprogramming as a central function of the oncogenic miR-17∼92 miRNA cluster that drives the progression of MYC-dependent tumors. PMID:27498867

  13. Pancreatic-pleural fistula in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Elkaoui, Hakim; Atoini, Fouad; Bouchentouf, Sidi Mohamed; El Omari, Fatima; Mahi, Mohamed; Ait Ali, Abdelmounaim; Bounaim, Ahmed; Sair, Khalid; Zentar, Aziz

    2012-03-01

    Pancreatic-pleural fistula is a rare condition and few data related to its diagnosis and treatment are available. A fistulous connection linking the pancreas with the pleura via the diaphragm or mediastinum through the retroperitoneal area is formed. We report on a case with pancreatic-pleural fistula at its early stages in an alcoholic male patient aged 45 years with known chronic pancreatitis. The operation by Roux-en-Y jejuno-pseudocystostomy was followed by chest tube drainage. PMID:22560825

  14. Pancreatic blood flow in experimental acute pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, A.R.; Millar, A.M.; Taylor, T.V.

    1982-05-01

    The etiology and pathogenesis of acute necrotizing hemorrhagic pancreatitis remain controversial. Recent work has suggested that an early fall in pancreatic blood flow, causing ischemia, may be the initiating factor. Using an established rat model of hemorrhagic pancreatitis and the fractional indicator distribution technique with /sup 86/RbCl, pancreatic blood flow and tissue perfusion have been measured at various times in the condition. Six groups of ten rats were studied: control sham operation and pancreatitis groups were sacrificed at 1, 6, and 24 hr. Pancreatic blood flow (% of cardiac output) and perfusion (blood flow/g tissue) were measured. Blood flow was increased by a maximum of 53% at 1 hr (P less than 0.001) and remained elevated for 24 hr, and perfusion was increased by a maximum of 70% (P less than 0.001) at 1 hr and remained elevated at 6 hr. Pancreatic perfusion declines after 6 hr due to increasing gland edema. The results demonstrate a significant increase in pancreatic blood flow and perfusion in experimentally induced acute pancreatitis, suggesting a primary inflammatory response, and refute the ischemic etiological theory.

  15. Ovatodiolide of Anisomeles indica Exerts the Anticancer Potential on Pancreatic Cancer Cell Lines through STAT3 and NF-κB Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Ya-Ju; Tseng, Sung-Pin; Kuo, Yu-Hsuan; Cheng, Tain-Lu; Chiang, Chiao-Yu; Tzeng, Yew-Min; Tsai, Wan-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the eighth leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Patients with pancreatic cancer are normally diagnosed at an advanced stage and present poor survival rate. Ovatodiolide (OV), a bioactive macrocyclic diterpenoid isolated from Anisomeles indica, showed cytotoxicity effects in pancreatic cancer cells by inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis. Moreover, not only were cell adhesion and invasion markedly suppressed in a dose-dependent manner, but the mRNA expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) was also significantly decreased. Western blot analysis indicated that OV potently suppressed the phosphorylation of STAT-3 and its upstream kinase including ERK1/2, P38, and AKT Ser473. Meanwhile, OV inactivated the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) by inhibiting IκB kinase (IKK α/β) activation and the subsequent suppression of inhibitor of kappa B (IκB) phosphorylation. These results demonstrated that OV could potentially inhibit Mia-PaCa2 cancer cells proliferation and induce apoptosis through modulation of NF-κB and STAT3 pathway. Moreover, OV suppressed cell invasiveness and interfered with cell-matrix adhesion in Mia-PaCa2 cancer cells by reducing MMP-9 and FAK transcription through suppressing NF-κB and STAT3 pathway. Taken together, our findings reveal a new therapeutic and antimetastatic potential of ovatodiolide for pancreatic cancer remedy. PMID:27242913

  16. PDX-1 (pancreatic/duodenal homeobox-1 protein 1).

    PubMed

    Pedica, F; Beccari, S; Pedron, S; Montagna, L; Piccoli, P; Doglioni, C; Chilosi, M

    2014-12-01

    The homeodomain-containing transcription factor pancreatic duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX-1) plays a key role in pancreatic development and β-cell function. It is a major regulator of transcription in pancreatic cells, and transactivates the insulin gene by binding to a specific DNA motif in its promoter region. Glucose also regulates insulin gene transcription through PDX-1. It has been shown that PDX-1 is required for maintaining pancreatic islet functions by activating gene expression and has a dual role in pancreatic development. It initially contributes to pancreatic formation during embryogenesis and subsequently regulates the pancreatic islet cell physiology in mature islet cells. Because of this key role in the embryologic development of the pancreas, PDX-1 expression has been investigated in pancreatic cancer cell lines and human tumors. Moreover, a few reports have described expression of PDX-1 in other human neoplasms and have investigated its potential role in differential diagnosis, but data on normal human tissues are lacking. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of pancreas formation, and especially the function of PDX-1, may contribute to the improved treatment and prevention of debilitating diseases such as diabetes, insulinomas and pancreatic carcinomas. Nevertheless, further studies are needed concerning its possible application in routine practice.

  17. Pancreatitis - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... common bile duct and block the flow of pancreatic enzymes out of the pancreas into the intestine. Pancreatitis ... three to five days, to prevent secretion of enzymes by the pancreas. He will also receive pain medication to control ...

  18. Cholecystokinin acts as an essential factor in the exacerbation of pancreatic bile duct ligation-induced rat pancreatitis model under non-fasting condition.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, K; Washizuka, M; Segawa, Y

    2000-09-01

    We examined the influence of 2 gut hormones involved in the enhancement of pancreatic exocrine secretion, secretin and cholecystokinin (CCK), in the exacerbation of pancreatitis. We also examined the role of the vagal system, which was considered to be a transmission route for these hormones. Our model of pancreatitis in the rat was prepared by pancreatic bile duct ligation (PBDL), which simultaneously ligated the pancreatic duct and the common bile duct. Serum amylase activity and histopathological changes in the pancreas were used as indices of pancreatitis. We also measured the volume of pancreatic juice, as well as the amylase activity and protein level of the pancreatic juice, as indices of increased pancreatic exocrine secretion. Two gut hormones were given 6 times at 1-h intervals. Administration of secretin (1-3 microg/kg, s.c.) did not influence serum amylase activity in rats with PBDL-induced pancreatitis. However, food stimulation and administration of CCK-8 (1 microg/kg, s.c.) increased serum amylase activity and promoted vacuolation of the pancreatic acinar cells in rats with PBDL-induced pancreatitis. Administration of atropine (3 mg/kg, s.c.) or a CCK1-receptor antagonist, Z-203 (0.1 mg/kg, i.v.), inhibited food-stimulated or CCK-8-induced (1 microg/kg, s.c.) enhancement of pancreatic exocrine secretion and exacerbation after the development of PBDL-induced pancreatitis. These results suggest that not secretin, which regulates the volume of pancreatic juice, but CCK, which regulates the secretion of pancreatic enzymes via the vagal system, plays an essential role in food-stimulated exacerbation after the development of pancreatitis.

  19. Calcium signaling of pancreatic acinar cells in the pathogenesis of pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Zhou, Rui; Zhang, Jian; Li, Zong-Fang

    2014-11-21

    Pancreatitis is an increasingly common and sometimes severe disease that lacks a specific therapy. The pathogenesis of pancreatitis is still not well understood. Calcium (Ca(2+)) is a versatile carrier of signals regulating many aspects of cellular activity and plays a central role in controlling digestive enzyme secretion in pancreatic acinar cells. Ca(2+) overload is a key early event and is crucial in the pathogenesis of many diseases. In pancreatic acinar cells, pathological Ca(2+) signaling (stimulated by bile, alcohol metabolites and other causes) is a key contributor to the initiation of cell injury due to prolonged and global Ca(2+) elevation that results in trypsin activation, vacuolization and necrosis, all of which are crucial in the development of pancreatitis. Increased release of Ca(2+) from stores in the intracellular endoplasmic reticulum and/or increased Ca(2+) entry through the plasma membrane are causes of such cell damage. Failed mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production reduces re-uptake and extrusion of Ca(2+) by the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-activated ATPase and plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase pumps, which contribute to Ca(2+) overload. Current findings have provided further insight into the roles and mechanisms of abnormal pancreatic acinar Ca(2+) signals in pancreatitis. The lack of available specific treatments is therefore an objective of ongoing research. Research is currently underway to establish the mechanisms and interactions of Ca(2+) signals in the pathogenesis of pancreatitis.

  20. Preoperative Folfirinox for Resectable Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma - A Phase II Study

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-16

    Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Poorly Differentiated Malignant Neoplasm; Resectable Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Undifferentiated Pancreatic Carcinoma

  1. Pancreatic and duodenal homeobox gene 1 (Pdx1) down-regulates hepatic transcription factor 1 alpha (HNF1α) expression during reprogramming of human hepatic cells into insulin-producing cells

    PubMed Central

    Donelan, William; Li, Shiwu; Wang, Hai; Lu, Shun; Xie, Chao; Tang, Dongqi; Chang, Lung-Ji; Yang, Li-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Ectopic expression of Pdx1 triggers rapid hepatocyte dedifferentiation by down-regulating liver-enriched transcription factors and liver-specific functional genes such as hepatic nuclear factor-1α (HNF1α), albumin, and AAT. However, the links between Pdx1 over-expression and hepatic gene down-regulation are incompletely understood. HNF1α and HNF4α are important transcription factors that establish and maintain the hepatocyte phenotype. The human HNF4α gene contains two promoters (P1 and P2) that drive expression of P1-(HNF4α 1-6) or P2-(HNF4α 7-9)-derived isoforms, which are used in different tissues and at different times during development. We hypothesized that the relative expression of HNF1α and HNF4α following ectopic Pdx1 expression may promote hepatic cell dedifferentiation and transdifferentiation toward pancreatic beta-cells. We produced lentiviruses expressing Pdx1, Pdx1-VP16, and Ngn3, along with dual-color reporter genes to indicate hepatic and pancreatic beta-cell phenotype changes. Using these PTF alone or in combinations, we demonstrated that Pdx1 not only activates specific beta-cell genes but down-regulates HNF1α. Pdx1-mediated reduction of HNF1α is accompanied by altered expression of its major activator, HNF4α isoforms, down-regulating hepatic genes ALB and AAT. Pdx1 up-regulates HNF4α via the P2 promoter. These P2-driven isoforms compete with P1-driven isoforms to suppress target gene transcription. In Huh7 cells, the AF-1 activation domain is more important for transactivation, whereas in INS1 cells, the F inhibitory domain is more important. The loss and gain of functional activity strongly suggests that Pdx1 plays a central role in reprogramming hepatocytes into beta-cells by suppressing the hepatic phenotype. PMID:26279745

  2. Pancreatic regulation of glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Röder, Pia V; Wu, Bingbing; Liu, Yixian; Han, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    In order to ensure normal body function, the human body is dependent on a tight control of its blood glucose levels. This is accomplished by a highly sophisticated network of various hormones and neuropeptides released mainly from the brain, pancreas, liver, intestine as well as adipose and muscle tissue. Within this network, the pancreas represents a key player by secreting the blood sugar-lowering hormone insulin and its opponent glucagon. However, disturbances in the interplay of the hormones and peptides involved may lead to metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) whose prevalence, comorbidities and medical costs take on a dramatic scale. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to uncover and understand the mechanisms underlying the various interactions to improve existing anti-diabetic therapies and drugs on the one hand and to develop new therapeutic approaches on the other. This review summarizes the interplay of the pancreas with various other organs and tissues that maintain glucose homeostasis. Furthermore, anti-diabetic drugs and their impact on signaling pathways underlying the network will be discussed. PMID:26964835

  3. Pancreatic regulation of glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Röder, Pia V; Wu, Bingbing; Liu, Yixian; Han, Weiping

    2016-03-11

    In order to ensure normal body function, the human body is dependent on a tight control of its blood glucose levels. This is accomplished by a highly sophisticated network of various hormones and neuropeptides released mainly from the brain, pancreas, liver, intestine as well as adipose and muscle tissue. Within this network, the pancreas represents a key player by secreting the blood sugar-lowering hormone insulin and its opponent glucagon. However, disturbances in the interplay of the hormones and peptides involved may lead to metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) whose prevalence, comorbidities and medical costs take on a dramatic scale. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to uncover and understand the mechanisms underlying the various interactions to improve existing anti-diabetic therapies and drugs on the one hand and to develop new therapeutic approaches on the other. This review summarizes the interplay of the pancreas with various other organs and tissues that maintain glucose homeostasis. Furthermore, anti-diabetic drugs and their impact on signaling pathways underlying the network will be discussed.

  4. Pancreatic regulation of glucose homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Röder, Pia V; Wu, Bingbing; Liu, Yixian; Han, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    In order to ensure normal body function, the human body is dependent on a tight control of its blood glucose levels. This is accomplished by a highly sophisticated network of various hormones and neuropeptides released mainly from the brain, pancreas, liver, intestine as well as adipose and muscle tissue. Within this network, the pancreas represents a key player by secreting the blood sugar-lowering hormone insulin and its opponent glucagon. However, disturbances in the interplay of the hormones and peptides involved may lead to metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) whose prevalence, comorbidities and medical costs take on a dramatic scale. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to uncover and understand the mechanisms underlying the various interactions to improve existing anti-diabetic therapies and drugs on the one hand and to develop new therapeutic approaches on the other. This review summarizes the interplay of the pancreas with various other organs and tissues that maintain glucose homeostasis. Furthermore, anti-diabetic drugs and their impact on signaling pathways underlying the network will be discussed. PMID:26964835

  5. Down-regulation of HSP60 expression by RNAi increases lipopolysaccharide- and cerulein-induced damages on isolated rat pancreatic tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shuai; Li, Kun; Feng, Jia-Yan; Li, Yan-Na; Gao, Zhi-Rong; Chen, Chang-Jie

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the function of heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) on pancreatic tissues by applying HSP60 small interfering RNA (siRNA) to reduce HSP60 expression. Rat pancreas was isolated and pancreatic tissue snips were prepared, cultured, and stimulated with low and high concentrations of cerulein (10−11 and 10−5 mol/L) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 10 and 20 μg/mL). Before the stimulation and 1 and 4 h after the stimulation, the viability and the level of trypsinogen activation peptide (TAP) in the tissue fragments were determined and the levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) in the culture supernatants were measured. Real-time PCR and Western blotting were used to evaluate the HSP60 mRNA and protein expression. After the administration of siRNA to inhibit HSP60 expression in the isolated tissues, these injury parameters were measured and compared. The pancreatic tissues in the control (mock-interfering) group showed a decreased viability to varying degrees after being stimulated with cerulein or LPS, and the levels of TAP, TNF-α, and IL-6 increased significantly (p < 0.05) in the tissues and/or in the culture supernatant. The expressions of HSP60 mRNA and protein were raised moderately after stimulating 1 h with low concentrations of cerulein or LPS, but decreased with high concentrations of the toxicants. In particular, the expression of HSP60 protein was reduced significantly (p < 0.05) when the tissues were stimulated by the two toxicants for 4 h. In contrast, the tissue fragments in which HSP60 siRNA was applied showed much lower tissue viability (p < 0.01) and higher levels of TNF-a, IL-6, and TAP (p < 0.01) in the tissues or culture supernatant after stimulating with the toxicants at the same dose and for the same time duration as compared with those of the control groups (p < 0.05). The results indicated that both cerulein and LPS can induce injuries on isolated

  6. Genes Regulating Epithelial Polarity Are Critical Suppressors of Esophageal Oncogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiu-Min; Wang, Hui; Zhu, Li-Li; Zhao, Run-Zhen; Ji, Hong-Long

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is an aggressive disease featured by early lymphatic and hematogenous dissemination, and is the sixth leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. The proper formation of apicobasal polarity is essential for normal epithelium physiology and tissue homeostasis, while loss of polarity is a hallmark of cancer development including esophageal oncogenesis. In this review, we summarized the stages of esophageal cancer development associated with the loss or deregulation of epithelial cell apicobasal polarity. Loss of epithelial apicobasal polarity exerts an indispensable role in the initiation of esophageal oncogenesis, tumor progression, and the advancement of tumors from benign to malignant. In particular, we reviewed the involvement of several critical genes, including Lkb1, claudin-4, claudin-7, Par3, Lgl1, E-cadherin, and the Scnn1 gene family. Understanding the role of apicobasal regulators may lead to new paradigms for treatment of esophageal tumors, including improvement of prognostication, early diagnosis, and individually tailored therapeutic interventions in esophageal oncology. PMID:26185530

  7. Pancreatic Cancer Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Amundadottir, Laufey T.

    2016-01-01

    Although relatively rare, pancreatic tumors are highly lethal [1]. In the United States, an estimated 48,960 individuals will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and 40,560 will die from this disease in 2015 [1]. Globally, 337,872 new pancreatic cancer cases and 330,391 deaths were estimated in 2012 [2]. In contrast to most other cancers, mortality rates for pancreatic cancer are not improving; in the US, it is predicted to become the second leading cause of cancer related deaths by 2030 [3, 4]. The vast majority of tumors arise in the exocrine pancreas, with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) accounting for approximately 95% of tumors. Tumors arising in the endocrine pancreas (pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors) represent less than 5% of all pancreatic tumors [5]. Smoking, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), obesity and pancreatitis are the most consistent epidemiological risk factors for pancreatic cancer [5]. Family history is also a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer with odds ratios (OR) ranging from 1.7-2.3 for first-degree relatives in most studies, indicating that shared genetic factors may play a role in the etiology of this disease [6-9]. This review summarizes the current knowledge of germline pancreatic cancer risk variants with a special emphasis on common susceptibility alleles identified through Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS). PMID:26929738

  8. Pancreatic cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ya-Yun; Yuan, Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Studies are emerging in support of the cancer stem cells (CSCs) theory which considers that a tiny subset of cancer cells is exclusively responsible for the initiation and malignant behavior of a cancer. This cell population, also termed CSCs, possesses the capacity both to self-renew, producing progeny that have the identical tumorigenic potential, and to differentiate into the bulk of cancer cells, helping serve the formation of the tumor entities, which, altogether, build the hierarchically organized structure of a cancer. In this review, we try to articulate the complicated signaling pathways regulating the retention of the characteristics of pancreatic CSCs, and in the wake of which, we seek to offer insights into the CSCs-relevant targeted therapeutics which are, in the meantime, confronted with bigger challenges than ever. PMID:26045976

  9. Pancreatitis in children.

    PubMed

    Winchester, M

    1992-12-01

    The pathophysiology of pancreatic autodigestion is poorly understood. Pancreatitis affects all age groups, and the diagnosis is sometimes missed when serum amylase and lipase activities are not measured in the child with abdominal pain. Acute pancreatitis in children has become a more commonly seen condition and the causes have varied. Laboratory and radiological studies play an important role in determining the diagnosis and prognosis. Family history is important in the diagnosis of idiopathic hereditary pancreatitis. Most acute episodes resolve with supportive care, but the mortality in acute pancreatitis is currently about 15% (Hadorn et al., 1980). Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography or an endoscopic retrograde pancreatogram may be necessary to investigate relapses of pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis can be a life-threatening condition requiring lifetime medical management.

  10. The MUC1 oncomucin regulates pancreatic cancer cell biological properties and chemoresistance. Implication of p42–44 MAPK, Akt, Bcl-2 and MMP13 pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Tréhoux, Solange; Duchêne, Bélinda; Jonckheere, Nicolas; Van Seuningen, Isabelle

    2015-01-16

    Highlights: • Loss of MUC1 decreases proliferation and tumor growth via β-catenin and p42–44 MAPK. • Inhibition of MUC1 decreases cell migration and invasion through MMP13. • Loss of MUC1 decreases survival and increases apoptosis via Akt and Bcl-2 pathways. • Loss of MUC1 sensitizes cells to gemcitabine and 5-Fluorouracil chemotherapeutic drugs. - Abstract: MUC1 is an oncogenic mucin overexpressed in several epithelial cancers, including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and is considered as a potent target for cancer therapy. To this aim, we undertook to study MUC1 biological effects on pancreatic cancer cells and identify pathways mediating these effects. Our in vitro experiments indicate that inhibiting MUC1 expression decreases cell proliferation, cell migration and invasion, cell survival and increases cell apoptosis. Moreover, lack of MUC1 in these cells profoundly altered their sensitivity to gemcitabine and 5-Fluorouracil chemotherapeutic drugs. In vivo MUC1-KD cell xenografts in SCID mice grew slower. Altogether, we show that MUC1 oncogenic mucin alters proliferation, migration, and invasion properties of pancreatic cancer cells and that these effects are mediated by p42–44 MAPK, Akt, Bcl-2 and MMP13 pathways.

  11. HCO3- Transport through Anoctamin/Transmembrane Protein ANO1/TMEM16A in Pancreatic Acinar Cells Regulates Luminal pH.

    PubMed

    Han, Yanfeng; Shewan, Annette M; Thorn, Peter

    2016-09-23

    The identification of ANO1/TMEM16A as the likely calcium-dependent chloride channel of exocrine glands has led to a more detailed understanding of its biophysical properties. This includes a calcium-dependent change in channel selectivity and evidence that HCO3 (-) permeability can be significant. Here we use freshly isolated pancreatic acini that preserve the luminal structure to measure intraluminal pH and test the idea that ANO1/TMEM16A contributes to luminal pH balance. Our data show that, under physiologically relevant stimulation with 10 pm cholesystokinin, the luminal acid load that results from the exocytic fusion of zymogen granules is significantly blunted by HCO3 (-) buffer in comparison with HEPES, and that this is blocked by the specific TMEM16A inhibitor T16inh-A01. Furthermore, in a model of acute pancreatitis, we observed substantive luminal acidification and provide evidence that ANO1/TMEM16A acts to attenuate this pH shift. We conclude that ANO1/TMEM16A is a significant pathway in pancreatic acinar cells for HCO3 (-) secretion into the lumen.

  12. Fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes.

    PubMed

    Goundan, Poorani; Junqueira, Ana; Kelleher-Yassen, Donna; Steenkamp, Devin

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to review the relevant literature related to the epidemiology, pathophysiology, natural history, clinical features and treatment of fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes (FCPD). We review the English-language literature on this topic published between 1956 and 2014. FCPD is a form of diabetes usually associated with chronic calcific pancreatitis. It has been predominantly, though not exclusively, described in lean, young adults living in tropical developing countries. Historically linked to malnutrition, the etiology of this phenotype has not been clearly elucidated, nor has there been a clear consensus on specific diagnostic criteria or clinical features. Affected individuals usually present with a long-standing history of abdominal pain, which may begin as early as childhood. Progressive pancreatic endocrine and exocrine dysfunction, consistent with chronic pancreatitis is expected. Common causes of chronic pancreatitis, such as alcohol abuse, are usually absent. Typical radiographic and pathological features include coarse pancreatic calcifications, main pancreatic duct dilation, pancreatic fibrosis and atrophy. Progressive microvascular complications are common, but diabetic ketoacidosis is remarkably unusual. Pancreatic carcinoma is an infrequently described long term complication. FCPD is an uncommon diabetes phenotype characterized by early onset non-alcoholic chronic pancreatitis with hyperglycemia, insulin deficiency and a striking resistance to ketosis. PMID:26472503

  13. Quantitative proteomics investigation of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Sheng; Chen, Ru; Reimel, Beth Ann; Crispin, David A.; Mirzaei, Hamid; Cooke, Kelly; Coleman, Joshua F.; Lane, Zhaoli; Bronner, Mary P.; Goodlett, David R.; McIntosh, Martin; Traverso, William; Aebersold, Ruedi; Brentnall, Teresa A.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with pancreatic cancer are usually diagnosed at late stages, when the disease is incurable. Pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) 3, is believed to be the immediate precursor lesion of pancreatic adenocarcinoma, and would be an ideal stage to diagnose patients, when intervention and cure are possible and patients are curable. In this study, we used quantitative proteomics to identify dysregulated proteins in PanIN 3 lesions. Altogether, over 200 dysregulated proteins were identified in the PanIN 3 tissues, with a minimum of a 1.75 fold change compared to the proteins in normal pancreas. These dysregulated PanIN 3 proteins play roles in cell motility, the inflammatory response, the blood clotting cascade, the cell cycle and its regulation, and protein degradation. Further network analysis of the proteins identified c-MYC as an important regulatory protein in PanIN 3 lesions. Finally, three of the overexpressed proteins, laminin beta-1, galectin-1, and actinin-4 were validated by IHC analysis. All three of these proteins were overexpressed in the stroma or ductal epithelial cells of advanced PanIN lesions, as well as in pancreatic cancer tissue. Our findings suggest that these three proteins may be useful as biomarkers for advanced PanIN and pancreatic cancer if further validated. The dysregulated proteins identified in this study may assist in the selection of candidates for future development of biomarkers for detecting early and curable pancreatic neoplasia. PMID:19373808

  14. Immune cell functions in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Plate, J M; Harris, J E

    2000-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer kills nearly 29,000 people in the United States annually-as many people as are diagnosed with the disease. Chemotherapeutic treatment is ineffective in halting progression of the disease. Yet, specific immunity to pancreatic tumor cells in subjects with pancreatic cancer has been demonstrated repeatedly during the last 24 years. Attempts to expand and enhance tumor-specific immunity with biotherapy, however, have not met with success. The question remains, "Why can't specific immunity regulate pancreatic cancer growth?" The idea that tumor cells have evolved protective mechanisms against immunity was raised years ago and has recently been revisited by a number of research laboratories. In pancreatic cancer, soluble factors produced by and for the protection of the tumor environment have been detected and are often distributed to the victim's circulatory system where they may effect a more generalized immunosuppression. Yet the nature of these soluble factors remains controversial, since some also serve as tumor antigens that are recognized by the same T cells that may become inactivated by them. Unless the problem of tumor-derived immunosuppressive products is addressed directly through basic and translational research studies, successful biotherapeutic treatment for pancreatic cancer may not be forthcoming.

  15. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer This page lists cancer ... in pancreatic cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer Abraxane (Paclitaxel Albumin-stabilized ...

  16. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2B Description: Stage IIB pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas and in nearby lymph nodes. Also shown are the bile duct, pancreatic duct, and duodenum. Stage IIB pancreatic cancer. Cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes and ...

  17. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2A

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2A Description: Stage IIA pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas and duodenum. The bile duct and pancreatic duct are also shown. Stage IIA pancreatic cancer. Cancer has spread to nearby tissue and organs ...

  18. Synergistic Role of TRPV1 and TRPA1 in Pancreatic Pain and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Erica S.; Christianson, Julie A.; Chen, Xiaowei; La, Jun-Ho; Davis, Brian M.; Albers, Kathryn M.; Gebhart, G.F.

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims The transient receptor potential (TRP) channels TRPV1 and TRPA1 have each been associated with regulation of efferent properties of primary afferent neurons that initiate neurogenic inflammation and are required for the development of inflammatory hyperalgesia. To evaluate the role of these channels in producing pain during pancreatic inflammation, we studied pancreatic nodose (NG) and dorsal root (DRG) ganglion sensory neurons (identified by content of retrograde tracer) and behavioral outcomes in a mouse model of acute pancreatitis. Methods Pancreatic inflammation was induced by 8 hourly injections of caerulein (50 μg/kg). The extent of inflammation, pancreatic neuron TRP channel expression and function and excitability, and pain-related behaviors were evaluated over the course of the following week. Results Histology and myeloperoxidase activity confirmed pancreatic inflammation that was associated with increased excitability and mRNA expression of the TRP channels in NG and DRG pancreatic neurons. Calcium imaging of pancreatic NG and DRG neurons from mice given caerulein revealed increased responses to TRP agonists. TRPV1 and TRPA1 antagonists attenuated caerulein-induced pain behaviors and pancreatic inflammation; they had a synergistic effect. Conclusions Pancreatic inflammation significantly increased the expression and functional properties of TRPV1 and TRPA1, as well as the excitability of pancreatic sensory neurons in vagal and spinal pathways. TRP channel antagonists acted synergistically to reverse pancreatic inflammation and associated pain behaviors; reagents that target interactions between these channels might be developed to reduce pain in patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:21185837

  19. Characteristic changes in the concentrations of some peptide hormones, in particular those regulating serum calcium, in acute pancreatitis and myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    de Boer, A C; Mulder, H; Fischer, H R; Schopman, W; Hackeng, W H; Silberbusch, J

    1981-01-01

    In order to further investigate hormonal changes and possible metabolic consequences in acute pancreatitis, 10 cases with a mild form of the disease was studied. The influence of tissue injury per se on the hormones in question was assessed from comparison with the hormone levels in the course of myocardial infarction (MI) in 9 cases. Insulin and glucose showed no consistent changes. Glucagon was suppressed on admission, 22 +/- 10 pg . ml-1, compared with the ultimate concentration, 40 +/- 20 pg . ml-1 (p less than 0.05), and with the initial value in MI, 74 +/- 32 pg . ml-1 (p less than 0.01). Serum calcitonin (CT) was strongly elevated initially, 348 +/- 313 pg . ml-1, compared with the ultimate level, 24 +/- 7 pg . ml-1 (p less than 0.001), and with the normal initial level in MI, 43 +/- 44 pg . ml-1 (p less than 0.01). Serum CT elevations were time-related to a slight reduction in corrected serum Ca, which might reflect a biological expression of this substance. In pancreatitis, parathyroid hormone (PTH) remained normal and unchanged throughout the study, whereas patients with MI had an increased level of this hormone on admission, 0.19 +/- 0.08 microgramEq . 1(-1), compared with the ultimate concentration, 0.09 +/- 0.03 microgram/q . 1(-1) (p less than 0.02) and with the initial concentration in pancreatitis, 0.11 +/- 0.06 microgramEq . 1(-1) (p less than 0.05). Supranormal PTH levels were found in more than half of the infarction patients on days 0 and 1. PMID:7013427

  20. Loss of TGF-beta signaling contributes to autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hahm, K B; Im, Y H; Lee, C; Parks, W T; Bang, Y J; Green, J E; Kim, S J

    2000-04-01

    Recent observations suggest that immune response is involved in the development of pancreatitis. However, the exact pathogenesis underlying this immune-mediated response is still under debate. TGF-beta has been known to be an important regulating factor in maintaining immune homeostasis. To determine the role of TGF-beta in the initiation or progression of pancreatitis, TGF-beta signaling was inactivated in mouse pancreata by overexpressing a dominant-negative mutant form of TGF-beta type II receptor in the pancreas, under control of the pS2 mouse trefoil peptide promoter. Transgenic mice showed marked increases in MHC class II molecules and matrix metalloproteinase expression in pancreatic acinar cells. These mice also showed increased susceptibility to cerulein-induced pancreatitis. This pancreatitis was characterized by severe pancreatic edema, inflammatory cell infiltration, T- and B-cell hyperactivation, IgG-type autoantibodies against pancreatic acinar cells, and IgM-type autoantibodies against pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. Therefore, TGF-beta signaling seems to be essential either in maintaining the normal immune homeostasis and suppressing autoimmunity or in preserving the integrity of pancreatic acinar cells.

  1. Nutrition in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Nompleggi, D J

    1999-08-01

    Pancreatitis is a common disorder. Numerous factors have been implicated in the pathogenesis of acute and chronic pancreatitis, but the exact mechanisms of these conditions are still poorly understood. Depending on the cause of the disorder, patients who have pancreatitis are usually not malnourished and are able to eat within 5 to 7 days of disease onset. In these patients, nutritional support is unnecessary. However, severe disease induces a catabolic state similar to that seen in trauma and sepsis, resulting in rapid weight loss and increased morbidity and mortality. Thus, vigorous nutritional support may be useful in the treatment of severe pancreatitis. Studies have shown that parenteral and enteral nutritional support are well tolerated and can maintain or improve nutritional status in patients with pancreatitis. This article reviews nutritional assessment and therapy in pancreatitis.

  2. Smoking and Pancreatic Disease.

    PubMed

    Edderkaoui, Mouad; Thrower, Edwin

    2013-11-01

    Smoking is a major risk factor for chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. However, the mechanisms through which it causes the diseases remain unknown. In the present manuscript we reviewed the latest knowledge gained on the effect of cigarette smoke and smoking compounds on cell signaling pathways mediating both diseases. We also reviewed the effect of smoking on the pancreatic cell microenvironment including inflammatory cells and stellate cells.

  3. ATF3 expression is induced by low glucose in pancreatic α and β cells and regulates glucagon but not insulin gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Soo; Kobayashi, Masaki; Kikuchi, Osamu; Sasaki, Tsutomu; Yokota-Hashimoto, Hiromi; Susanti, Vina Yanti; Ido Kitamura, Yukari; Kitamura, Tadahiro

    2014-01-01

    The pancreas is critical for maintaining glucose homeostasis. Activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) is an adaptive response transcription factor. There are major discrepancies in previous reports on pancreatic ATF3; therefore, its role in the pancreas is unclear. To better elucidate the role of ATF3 in the pancreas, we conducted in vitro studies using pancreatic α and β cell lines, and also evaluated the use of ATF3 antibodies for immunohistochemistry. We determined ATF3 expression was increased by low glucose and decreased by high glucose in both αTC-1.6 and βTC3 cells. We also showed that adenovirus-mediated ATF3 overexpression increased glucagon promoter activity and glucagon mRNA levels in αTC-1.6 cells; whereas, it had no effect on insulin promoter activity and insulin mRNA levels in βTC3 cells. Although immunostaining with the C-19 ATF3 antibody demonstrated predominant expression in α cells rather than β cells, ATF3 staining was still detected in ATF3 knockout mice as clearly as in control mice. On the other hand, another ATF3 antibody (H-90) detected ATF3 in both α cells and β cells, and was clearly diminished in ATF3 knockout mice. These results indicate that previous discrepancies in ATF3 expression patterns in the pancreas were caused by the varying specificities of the ATF3 antibodies used, and that ATF3 is actually expressed in both α cells and β cells.

  4. Effects of Local Pancreatic Renin-Angiotensin System on the Microcirculation of Rat with Severe Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhijian; Feng, Ling; Long, Haocheng; Wang, Hui; Feng, Jiarui; Chen, Feixiang

    2015-07-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is normally related to multiorgan dysfunction and local complications. Studies have found that local pancreatic renin-angiotensin system (RAS) was significantly upregulated in drug-induced SAP. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of angiotensin II receptors inhibitor valsartan on dual role of RAS in SAP in a rat model and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. 3.8% sodium taurocholate (1 ml/kg) was injected to the pancreatic capsule in order for pancreatitis induction. Rats in the sham group were injected with normal saline in identical locations. We also investigated the regulation of experimentally induced SAP on local RAS expression in the pancreas through determination of the activities of serum amylase, lipase and myeloperoxidase, histological and biochemical analysis, radioimmunoassay, fluorescence quantitative PCR and Western blot analysis. The results indicated that valsartan could effectively suppress the local RAS to protect against experimental acute pancreatitis through inhibition of microcirculation disturbances and inflammation. The results suggest that pancreatic RAS plays a critical role in the regulation of pancreatic functions and demonstrates application potential as AT1 receptor antagonists. Moreover, other RAS inhibitors could be a new therapeutic target in acute pancreatitis. PMID:26170733

  5. Embryonic stem cell factors and pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Bujanda, Luis; Billadeau, Daniel D; Zhang, Jin-San

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the most common type of pancreatic tumor, is a highly aggressive human cancer with the lowest five-year survival rate of any human maligancy primarily due to its early- metastasis and lack of response to chemotherapy and radiation. Recent research suggests that PDAC cells comprise a hierarchy of tumor cells that develop around a population of cancer stem cells (CSCs), a small and distinct population of cancer cells that mediates tumoregenesis, metastasis and resistance to standard treatments. Thus, CSCs could be a target for more effective treatment options. Interestingly, pancreatic CSCs are subject to regulation by some of key embryonic stem cell (ESC) transctiption factors abberently expressed in PDAC, such as SOX2, OCT4 and NANOG. ESC transcription factors are important DNA-binding proteins present in both embryonic and adult somatic cells. The critical role of these factors in reprogramming processes makes them essential not only for embryonic development but also tumorigenesis. Here we provide an overview of stem cell transcription factors, particularly SOX2, OCT4, and NANOG, on their expression and function in pancreatic cancer. In contrast to embryonic stem cells, in which OCT4 and SOX2 are tightly regulated and physically interact to regulate a wide spectrum of target genes, de novo SOX2 expression alone in pancreatic cancer cells is sufficient to promote self-renewal, de-differentiation and imparting stemness characteristics via impacting specific cell cycle regulatory genes and epithelial-mesnechymal transtion driver genes. Thus, targeting ESC factors, particularly SOX2, could be a worthy strategy for pancreatic cancer therapy. PMID:24605024

  6. Embryonic stem cell factors and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Bujanda, Luis; Billadeau, Daniel D; Zhang, Jin-San

    2014-03-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the most common type of pancreatic tumor, is a highly aggressive human cancer with the lowest five-year survival rate of any human maligancy primarily due to its early- metastasis and lack of response to chemotherapy and radiation. Recent research suggests that PDAC cells comprise a hierarchy of tumor cells that develop around a population of cancer stem cells (CSCs), a small and distinct population of cancer cells that mediates tumoregenesis, metastasis and resistance to standard treatments. Thus, CSCs could be a target for more effective treatment options. Interestingly, pancreatic CSCs are subject to regulation by some of key embryonic stem cell (ESC) transctiption factors abberently expressed in PDAC, such as SOX2, OCT4 and NANOG. ESC transcription factors are important DNA-binding proteins present in both embryonic and adult somatic cells. The critical role of these factors in reprogramming processes makes them essential not only for embryonic development but also tumorigenesis. Here we provide an overview of stem cell transcription factors, particularly SOX2, OCT4, and NANOG, on their expression and function in pancreatic cancer. In contrast to embryonic stem cells, in which OCT4 and SOX2 are tightly regulated and physically interact to regulate a wide spectrum of target genes, de novo SOX2 expression alone in pancreatic cancer cells is sufficient to promote self-renewal, de-differentiation and imparting stemness characteristics via impacting specific cell cycle regulatory genes and epithelial-mesnechymal transtion driver genes. Thus, targeting ESC factors, particularly SOX2, could be a worthy strategy for pancreatic cancer therapy.

  7. Unraveling pancreatic islet biology by quantitative proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jianying; Dann, Geoffrey P.; Liew, Chong W.; Smith, Richard D.; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; Qian, Weijun

    2011-08-01

    The pancreatic islets of Langerhans play a critical role in maintaining blood glucose homeostasis by secreting insulin and several other important peptide hormones. Impaired insulin secretion due to islet dysfunction is linked to the pathogenesis underlying both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Over the past 5 years, emerging proteomic technologies have been applied to dissect the signaling pathways that regulate islet functions and gain an understanding of the mechanisms of islet dysfunction relevant to diabetes. Herein, we briefly review some of the recent quantitative proteomic studies involving pancreatic islets geared towards gaining a better understanding of islet biology relevant to metabolic diseases.

  8. Palliation in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kruse, E James

    2010-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer is rarely curable, and because of its location causes significant symptoms for patients in need of palliation. The common problems of incurable pancreatic cancer are biliary obstruction, duodenal obstruction, and pain. Approaches include surgical, endoscopic and radiologic interventions. This article discusses the palliative options and controversies related to these symptoms.

  9. Pancreatitis in cats.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, P Jane; Williams, David A

    2012-08-01

    Pancreatitis was considered a rare disease in the cat until a couple of decades ago when several retrospective studies of severe acute pancreatitis were published. It was apparent that few of the diagnostic tests of value in the dog were helpful in cats. With increasing clinical suspicion, availability of abdominal ultrasonography, and introduction of pancreas-specific blood tests of increasing utility, it is now accepted that acute pancreatitis is probably almost as common in cats as it is in dogs, although the etiology(s) remain more obscure. Pancreatitis in cats often co-exists with inflammatory bowel disease, less commonly with cholangitis, and sometimes with both. Additionally, pancreatitis may trigger hepatic lipidosis, while other diseases, such as diabetes mellitus, may be complicated by pancreatitis. Therapy is similar to that used in dogs, with added emphasis on early nutritional support to prevent hepatic lipidosis. Less is known about chronic pancreatitis than the acute form, but chronic pancreatitis is more common in cats than it is in dogs and may respond positively to treatment with corticosteroids.

  10. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma: Outstanding problems

    PubMed Central

    Zakharova, Olga P; Karmazanovsky, Grigory G; Egorov, Viacheslav I

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death and is one of the most aggressive malignant tumors with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 4%. Surgical resection remains the only potentially curative treatment but is only possible for 15%-20% of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. About 40% of patients have locally advanced nonresectable disease. In the past, determination of pancreatic cancer resectability was made at surgical exploration. The development of modern imaging techniques has allowed preoperative staging of patients. Institutions disagree about the criteria used to classify patients. Vascular invasion in pancreatic cancers plays a very important role in determining treatment and prognosis. There is no evidence-based consensus on the optimal preoperative imaging assessment of patients with suspected pancreatic cancer and a unified definition of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer is also lacking. Thus, there is much room for improvement in all aspects of treatment for pancreatic cancer. Multi-detector computed tomography has been widely accepted as the imaging technique of choice for diagnosing and staging pancreatic cancer. With improved surgical techniques and advanced perioperative management, vascular resection and reconstruction are performed more frequently; patients thought once to be unresectable are undergoing radical surgery. However, when attempting heroic surgery, a realistic approach concerning the patient’s age and health status, probability of recovery after surgery, perioperative morbidity and mortality and life quality after tumor resection is necessary. PMID:22655124

  11. Natural course of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Beger, H G; Rau, B; Mayer, J; Pralle, U

    1997-02-01

    Acute pancreatitis comprises, in terms of clinical, pathologic, biochemical, and bacteriologic data, four entities. Interstitial edematous pancreatitis and necrotizing pancreatitis are the most frequent clinical manifestations; pancreatic pseudocyst and pancreatic abscess are late complications after necrotizing pancreatitis, developing after 3 to 5 weeks. Determinants of the natural course of acute pancreatitis are pancreatic parenchymal necrosis, extrapancreatic retroperitoneal fatty tissue necrosis, biologically active compounds in pancreatic ascites, and infection of necrosis. Early in the course of acute pancreatitis multiple organ failure is the consequence of various inflammatory mediators that are released from the inflammatory process and from activated leukocytes attracted by pancreatic injury. During the late course, starting the second week, local and systemic septic complications are dominant. Around 80% of deaths in acute pancreatitis are caused by septic complications. The infection of pancreatic necrosis occurs in 8% to 12% of acute pancreatitis and in 30% to 40% of patients with necrotizing pancreatitis. Bacteriologic analysis of intraoperative smears and aspirates reveals predominantly gram-negative germs deriving from the intestine, most frequently Escherichia coli. It has been confirmed that after necrotizing pancreatitis a considerable large group of patients suffer long-lasting exocrine and endocrine insufficiency.

  12. Achillea Millefolium L. Hydro- Alcoholic Extract Protects Pancreatic Cells by Down Regulating IL- 1β and iNOS Gene Expression in Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zolghadri, Yalda; Fazeli, Mehdi; Kooshki, Marzieh; Shomali, Tahoora; Karimaghayee, Negar; Dehghani, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) has a role in β- cell destruction in autoimmune diabetes by stimulating the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) that generates the free radical nitric oxide. We aimed to investigate the effect of Achillea millefolium L, as a traditional hypoglycemic agent, on IL-1β and iNOS gene expression of pancreatic tissue in the STZ- induced diabetic rats. Forty adult male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups: 1. diabetic control; 2. diabetic rats treated with Achillea millefolium L. extract; 3. normal rats received only extract and 4. negative control (n= 10 each). Diabetes was induced by single i.p. injection of 45 mg/ kg streptozotocin (STZ). Rats in groups 2 and 3 were treated with i.p. injection of Achillea millefolium L. extract (100 mg/ kg/ day) for 14 days. Body weight, serum glucose and insulin levels were assayed at baseline and on days 3, 7, 10 and 14 of the experiment. Finally, the quantity of pancreatic IL-1β and iNOS mRNA was determined by real- time PCR. The mRNA expression level of IL-1β and iNOS genes, was significantly (p<0.001) increased in diabetic rats of group 1. Treatment with Achillea millefolium L. caused a significant (p<0.01) reduction in both IL-1β and iNOS genes expression. Moreover, rats in group 2 had higher insulin level associated with lower glucose level and higher body weight compared to control diabetic group. It seems that beneficial effect of Achillea millefolium L. on STZ- induced diabetes is at least partly due to amelioration of IL-1β and iNOS gene over expression which can have a β-cell protective effect. PMID:25635252

  13. Cyclin D1 inhibits whereas c-Myc enhances the cytotoxicity of cisplatin in mouse pancreatic cancer cells via regulation of several members of the NF-κB and Bcl-2 families

    PubMed Central

    El-Kady, Ayman; Sun, Yuan; Li, Ying-xia; Liao, D Joshua

    2011-01-01

    Background: Cisplatin (CDDP) is a drug used for treatment of many types of malignancy but pancreatic cancer is relatively resistant to it. This study aims to determine whether and how cyclin D1 (D1) and c-Myc influence the response of pancreatic cancer cells to CDDP. Materials and Methods: Ela-mycPT mouse pancreatic cancer cells were transfected with D1 or c-myc cDNA and treated with CDDP alone or together with NPCD, an inhibitor of cyclin dependent ckinase (CDK) 4 and 6. Reverse transcription followed by polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot assays were used to determine the mRNA and protein levels of interested genes. Cell viability was determined using 3-(4, 5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Results: Treatment of Ela-mycPT1 cells with CDDP caused an increase in c-myc expression but a slightly latent decrease in D1 expression, whereas D1 and c-Myc proteins repressed each other. D1 or c-Myc rendered Ela-mycPT1 cells resistant or sensitive, respectively, to CDDP. D1 induced the expression of several members of the NF-κB family, including RelA, RelB, Nfκb1 and Nfκb2. D1 also induced BIRC5 and several pro-survival members of the Bcl-2 gene family, including Bcl-2 , Mcl-1 and Bad while it decreased the level of the pro-apoptotic Noxa. Inhibition of CDK4 or CDK6 kinase activity by NPCD did not affect these effects of D1. In contrast, c-Myc in Ela-mycPT1 and Ela-mycPT4 cells has the opposite effects to D1 on the expression of most of these apoptosis regulating genes. Conclusion: Our results suggest that induction of c-Myc and inhibition of D1 may be mechanisms for CDDP to elicit cytotoxicity. On the other hand, D1 induces whereas c-Myc represses the expression of key NF-κB family members to induce and repress, respectively, the expression of BIRC5 and several Bcl-2 family members, in turn inhibiting or enhancing the response to CDDP. PMID:22190866

  14. Review of idiopathic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jason Kihyuk; Enns, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in understanding of pancreatitis and advances in technology have uncovered the veils of idiopathic pancreatitis to a point where a thorough history and judicious use of diagnostic techniques elucidate the cause in over 80% of cases. This review examines the multitude of etiologies of what were once labeled idiopathic pancreatitis and provides the current evidence on each. This review begins with a background review of the current epidemiology of idiopathic pancreatitis prior to discussion of various etiologies. Etiologies of medications, infections, toxins, autoimmune disorders, vascular causes, and anatomic and functional causes are explored in detail. We conclude with management of true idiopathic pancreatitis and a summary of the various etiologic agents. Throughout this review, areas of controversies are highlighted. PMID:18081217

  15. Clinical nutrition in pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    McClave, S A; Snider, H; Owens, N; Sexton, L K

    1997-10-01

    In patients with acute pancreatitis or an acute flare of chronic pancreatitis, a discrepancy exists between increased protein/calorie requirements induced by a hypermetabolic stress state and reduced ingestion/assimilation of exogenous nutrients, which promotes progressive nutritional deterioration. Patients with severe pancreatitis (defined by > or =3 Ranson criteria, an APACHE II score of > or =10, development of major organ failure, and/or presence of pancreatic necrosis) are more likely to require aggressive nutritional support than patients with mild disease. The type of formula and level of the gastrointestinal tract into which nutrients are infused determine the degree to which pancreatic exocrine secretion is stimulated. Animal studies and early prospective randomized controlled trials in humans suggest that total enteral nutrition via jejunal feeding may be the preferred route to parenteral alimentation in this disease setting.

  16. Acute Obstructive Suppurative Pancreatic Ductitis

    PubMed Central

    Palakodeti, Sandeep; Munroe, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Acute obstructive suppurative pancreatic ductitis (AOSPD) is a rare clinical entity defined as suppuration from the pancreatic duct without concomitant pancreatic cyst, abscess, or necrosis. We describe a case of AOSPD in a woman with a past medical history of type 2 diabetes and chronic pancreatitis who presented with abdominal sepsis, which resolved only after therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Our case highlights the importance of considering AOSPD as a cause of abdominal sepsis particularly in patients with chronic pancreatitis or any recent pancreatic duct instrumentation and demonstrates that treatment requires prompt drainage and decompression of the pancreatic duct.

  17. Noncoding RNAs and pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Juan-Fei; Zhuang, Yan-Yan; Huang, Feng-Ting; Zhang, Shi-Neng

    2016-01-01

    Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) represent a class of RNA molecules that typically do not code for proteins. Emerging data suggest that ncRNAs play an important role in several physiological and pathological conditions such as cancer. The best-characterized ncRNAs are the microRNAs (miRNAs), which are short, approximately 22-nucleotide sequences of RNA of approximately 22-nucleotide in length that regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level, through transcript degradation or translational repression. MiRNAs can function as master gene regulators, impacting a variety of cellular pathways important to normal cellular functions as well as cancer development and progression. In addition to miRNAs, long ncRNAs, which are transcripts longer than 200 nucleotides, have recently emerged as novel drivers of tumorigenesis. However, the molecular mechanisms of their regulation and function, and the significance of other ncRNAs such as piwi-interacting RNAs in pancreas carcinogenesis are largely unknown. This review summarizes the growing body of evidence supporting the vital roles of ncRNAs in pancreatic cancer, focusing on their dysregulation through both genetic and epigenetic mechanisms, and highlighting the promise of ncRNAs in diagnostic and therapeutic applications of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26811626

  18. Mechanism of insulin gene regulation by the pancreatic transcription factor Pdx-1: application of pre-mRNA analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation to assess formation of functional transcriptional complexes.

    PubMed

    Iype, Tessy; Francis, Joshua; Garmey, James C; Schisler, Jonathan C; Nesher, Rafael; Weir, Gordon C; Becker, Thomas C; Newgard, Christopher B; Griffen, Steven C; Mirmira, Raghavendra G

    2005-04-29

    The homeodomain factor Pdx-1 regulates an array of genes in the developing and mature pancreas, but whether regulation of each specific gene occurs by a direct mechanism (binding to promoter elements and activating basal transcriptional machinery) or an indirect mechanism (via regulation of other genes) is unknown. To determine the mechanism underlying regulation of the insulin gene by Pdx-1, we performed a kinetic analysis of insulin transcription following adenovirus-mediated delivery of a small interfering RNA specific for pdx-1 into insulinoma cells and pancreatic islets to diminish endogenous Pdx-1 protein. insulin transcription was assessed by measuring both a long half-life insulin mRNA (mature mRNA) and a short half-life insulin pre-mRNA species by real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR. Following progressive knock-down of Pdx-1 levels, we observed coordinate decreases in pre-mRNA levels (to about 40% of normal levels at 72 h). In contrast, mature mRNA levels showed strikingly smaller and delayed declines, suggesting that the longer half-life of this species underestimates the contribution of Pdx-1 to insulin transcription. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that the decrease in insulin transcription was associated with decreases in the occupancies of Pdx-1 and p300 at the proximal insulin promoter. Although there was no corresponding change in the recruitment of RNA polymerase II to the proximal promoter, its recruitment to the insulin coding region was significantly reduced. Our results suggest that Pdx-1 directly regulates insulin transcription through formation of a complex with transcriptional coactivators on the proximal insulin promoter. This complex leads to enhancement of elongation by the basal transcriptional machinery.

  19. [Etiological factors of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Spicák, J

    2002-09-01

    Acute pancreatitis develops immediately after the causative impulse, while chronic pancreatitis develops after the long-term action of the noxious agent. A typical representative of acute pancreatitis is biliary pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis develops in alcoholism and has a long latency. As alcoholic pancreatitis is manifested at first as a rule by a potent attack, it is classified in this stage as acute pancreatitis. The most frequent etiological factors in our civilization are thus cholelithiasis and alcoholism (both account for 20-50% in different studies). The assumed pathogenetic principles in acute biliary pancreatitis are the common canal of both efferent ducts above the obturated papilla, duodenopancreatic reflux and intrapancreatic hypertension. A detailed interpretation is however lacking. The pathogenesis of alcoholic pancreatitis is more complicated. Among others some part is played by changes in the calcium concentration and fusion of cellular membranes. Idiopathic pancreatitis occurs in up to 10%, part of the are due to undiagnosed alcoholism and cholelithiasis. Other etiologies are exceptional. Similarly as in cholelithiasis pancreatitis develops also during other pathological processes in the area of the papilla of Vater such as dysfunction of the sphincter of Oddi, ampulloma and juxtapapillary diverticulum, it is however usually mild. The incidence of postoperative pancreatitis is declining. Its lethality is 30% and the diagnosis is difficult. In the pathogenesis changes of the ion concentration are involved, hypoxia and mechanical disorders of the integrity of the gland. Pancreatitis develops in association with other infections--frequently in mumps, rarely in hepatitis, tuberculosis, typhoid and mycoses. Viral pancreatitis is usually mild. In parasitoses pancreatitis develops due to a block of the papilla Vateri. In hyperparathyroidism chronic pancreatitis is more likely to develop, recent data are lacking. As to dyslipoproteinaemias

  20. CFTR: A New Horizon in the Pathomechanism and Treatment of Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hegyi, Péter; Wilschanski, Michael; Muallem, Shmuel; Lukacs, Gergely L; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Uc, Aliye; Gray, Michael A; Rakonczay, Zoltán; Maléth, József

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an ion channel that conducts chloride and bicarbonate ions across epithelial cell membranes. Mutations in the CFTR gene diminish the ion channel function and lead to impaired epithelial fluid transport in multiple organs such as the lung and the pancreas resulting in cystic fibrosis. Heterozygous carriers of CFTR mutations do not develop cystic fibrosis but exhibit increased risk for pancreatitis and associated pancreatic damage characterized by elevated mucus levels, fibrosis, and cyst formation. Importantly, recent studies demonstrated that pancreatitis causing insults, such as alcohol, smoking, or bile acids, strongly inhibit CFTR function. Furthermore, human studies showed reduced levels of CFTR expression and function in all forms of pancreatitis. These findings indicate that impairment of CFTR is critical in the development of pancreatitis; therefore, correcting CFTR function could be the first specific therapy in pancreatitis. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the field and discuss new possibilities for the treatment of pancreatitis. PMID:26856995

  1. Diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Matsubayashi, Hiroyuki; Kakushima, Naomi; Takizawa, Kohei; Tanaka, Masaki; Imai, Kenichiro; Hotta, Kinichi; Ono, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a distinct form of chronic pancreatitis that is increasingly being reported. The presentation and clinical image findings of AIP sometimes resemble those of several pancreatic malignancies, but the therapeutic strategy differs appreciably. Therefore, accurate diagnosis is necessary for cases of AIP. To date, AIP is classified into two distinct subtypes from the viewpoints of etiology, serum markers, histology, other organ involvements, and frequency of relapse: type 1 is related to IgG4 (lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis) and type 2 is related to a granulocytic epithelial lesion (idiopathic duct-centric chronic pancreatitis). Both types of AIP are characterized by focal or diffuse pancreatic enlargement accompanied with a narrowing of the main pancreatic duct, and both show dramatic responses to corticosteroid. Unlike type 2, type 1 is characteristically associated with increasing levels of serum IgG4 and positive serum autoantibodies, abundant infiltration of IgG4-positive plasmacytes, frequent extrapancreatic lesions, and relapse. These findings have led several countries to propose diagnostic criteria for AIP, which consist of essentially similar diagnostic items; however, several differences exist for each country, mainly due to differences in the definition of AIP and the modalities used to diagnose this disease. An attempt to unite the diagnostic criteria worldwide was made with the publication in 2011 of the international consensus diagnostic criteria for AIP, established at the 2010 Congress of the International Association of Pancreatology (IAP). PMID:25469024

  2. Pleuropulmonary complications of pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Michael D.

    1968-01-01

    Pancreatitis, in common with many other upper abdominal diseases, often leads to pleuropulmonary complications. Radiological evidence of pleuropulmonary abnormality was found in 55% of 58 cases examined retrospectively. The majority of such abnormalities are not specific for pancreatitis; but a particular category of pleural effusions, rich in pancreatic enzymes, is a notable exception. A patient with this type of effusion, complicated by a spontaneous bronchopleural fistula and then by an empyema, is reported. The literature relating to pancreatic enzyme-rich pleural effusions (pathognomonic of pancreatitis) is reviewed. Of several possible mechanisms involved in pathogenesis, transdiaphragmatic lymphatic transfer of pancreatic enzymes, intrapleural rupture of mediastinal extensions of pseudocysts, and diaphragmatic perforation are the most important. The measurement of pleural fluid amylase, at present little employed in this country, has considerable diagnostic value. Enzyme-rich effusions are more commonly left-sided, are often blood-stained, are frequently associated with pancreatic pseudocysts, and—if long standing—may be complicated by a bronchopleural fistula. Images PMID:4872925

  3. Autoimmune pancreatitis and cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Jani, Niraj; Buxbaum, James

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is part of a systemic fibrosclerotic process characterized by lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate with immunoglobulin G subtype-4 (IgG4) positive cells. It characteristically presents with biliary obstruction due to mass-like swelling of the pancreas. Frequently AIP is accompanied by extra-pancreatic manifestations including retroperitoneal fibrosis, thyroid disease, and salivary gland involvement. Auto-antibodies, hypergammaglobulemia, and prompt resolution of pancreatic and extrapancreatic findings with steroids signify its autoimmune nature. Refractory cases are responsive to immunomodulators and rituximab. Involvement of the biliary tree, termed IgG4 associated cholangiopathy, mimics primary sclerosing cholangitis and is challenging to manage. High IgG4 levels and swelling of the pancreas with a diminutive pancreatic duct are suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis. Given similarities in presentation but radical differences in management and outcome, differentiation from pancreatic malignancy is of paramount importance. There is controversy regarding the optimal diagnostic criterion and steroid trials to make the diagnosis. Additionally, the retroperitoneal location of the pancreas and requirement for histologic sampling, makes tissue acquisition challenging. Recently, a second type of autoimmune pancreatitis has been recognized with similar clinical presentation and steroid response though different histology, serologic, and extrapancreatic findings. PMID:26558153

  4. Fatal Pancreatic Panniculitis Associated with Acute Pancreatitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woo Sun; Kim, Mi Yeon; Kim, Sang Woo; Paik, Chang Nyol; Kim, Hyung Ok

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic panniculitis is a rare disease in which necrosis of fat in the panniculus and other distant foci occurs in the setting of pancreatic diseases; these diseases include acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic carcinoma, pseudocyst, and other pancreatic diseases. This malady is manifested as tender erythematous nodules on the legs, buttock, or trunk. Histopathologically, it shows the pathognomonic findings of focal subcutaneous fat necrosis and ghost-like anucleated cells with a thick shadowy wall. We herein report a case of fatal pancreatic panniculitis that was associated with acute pancreatitis in a 50-yr-old man. He presented with a 3-week history of multiple tender skin nodules, abdominal pain and distension. Laboratory and radiologic findings revealed acute pancreatitis, and skin biopsy showed pancreatic panniculitis. Despite intensive medical care, he died of multi-organ failure 3 weeks after presentation. PMID:17982246

  5. Inactivation of TGFβ receptor II signalling in pancreatic epithelial cells promotes acinar cell proliferation, acinar-to-ductal metaplasia and fibrosis during pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Grabliauskaite, Kamile; Saponara, Enrica; Reding, Theresia; Bombardo, Marta; Seleznik, Gitta M; Malagola, Ermanno; Zabel, Anja; Faso, Carmen; Sonda, Sabrina; Graf, Rolf

    2016-02-01

    Determining signalling pathways that regulate pancreatic regeneration following pancreatitis is critical for implementing therapeutic interventions. In this study we elucidated the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) in pancreatic epithelial cells during tissue regeneration. To this end, we conditionally inactivated TGFβ receptor II (TGFβ-RII) using a Cre-LoxP system under the control of pancreas transcription factor 1a (PTF1a) promoter, specific for the pancreatic epithelium, and evaluated the molecular and cellular changes in a mouse model of cerulein-induced pancreatitis. We show that TGFβ-RII signalling does not mediate the initial acinar cell damage observed at the onset of pancreatitis. However, TGFβ-RII signalling not only restricts acinar cell replication during the regenerative phase of the disease but also limits ADM formation in vivo and in vitro in a cell-autonomous manner. Analyses of molecular mechanisms underlying the observed phenotype revealed that TGFβ-RII signalling stimulates the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors and intersects with the EGFR signalling axis. Finally, TGFβ-RII ablation in epithelial cells resulted in increased infiltration of inflammatory cells in the early phases of pancreatitis and increased activation of pancreatic stellate cells in the later stages of pancreatitis, thus highlighting a TGFβ-based crosstalk between epithelial and stromal cells regulating the development of pancreatic inflammation and fibrosis. Collectively, our data not only contribute to clarifying the cellular processes governing pancreatic tissue regeneration, but also emphasize the conserved role of TGFβ as a tumour suppressor, both in the regenerative process following pancreatitis and in the initial phases of pancreatic cancer.

  6. Inactivation of TGFβ receptor II signalling in pancreatic epithelial cells promotes acinar cell proliferation, acinar-to-ductal metaplasia and fibrosis during pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Grabliauskaite, Kamile; Saponara, Enrica; Reding, Theresia; Bombardo, Marta; Seleznik, Gitta M; Malagola, Ermanno; Zabel, Anja; Faso, Carmen; Sonda, Sabrina; Graf, Rolf

    2016-02-01

    Determining signalling pathways that regulate pancreatic regeneration following pancreatitis is critical for implementing therapeutic interventions. In this study we elucidated the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) in pancreatic epithelial cells during tissue regeneration. To this end, we conditionally inactivated TGFβ receptor II (TGFβ-RII) using a Cre-LoxP system under the control of pancreas transcription factor 1a (PTF1a) promoter, specific for the pancreatic epithelium, and evaluated the molecular and cellular changes in a mouse model of cerulein-induced pancreatitis. We show that TGFβ-RII signalling does not mediate the initial acinar cell damage observed at the onset of pancreatitis. However, TGFβ-RII signalling not only restricts acinar cell replication during the regenerative phase of the disease but also limits ADM formation in vivo and in vitro in a cell-autonomous manner. Analyses of molecular mechanisms underlying the observed phenotype revealed that TGFβ-RII signalling stimulates the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors and intersects with the EGFR signalling axis. Finally, TGFβ-RII ablation in epithelial cells resulted in increased infiltration of inflammatory cells in the early phases of pancreatitis and increased activation of pancreatic stellate cells in the later stages of pancreatitis, thus highlighting a TGFβ-based crosstalk between epithelial and stromal cells regulating the development of pancreatic inflammation and fibrosis. Collectively, our data not only contribute to clarifying the cellular processes governing pancreatic tissue regeneration, but also emphasize the conserved role of TGFβ as a tumour suppressor, both in the regenerative process following pancreatitis and in the initial phases of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26510396

  7. Familial pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Klein, A P; Hruban, R H; Brune, K A; Petersen, G M; Goggins, M

    2001-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in both men and women in the United States and will be responsible for an estimated 28,900 deaths in 2001. Relatively little is known of its etiology, and the only well-established risk factor is cigarette smoking. Studies over the past 3 decades have shown that 4%-16% of patients with pancreatic cancer have a family history of the disease. A small fraction of this aggregation can be accounted for in inherited cancer syndromes, including familial atypical multiple-mole melanoma, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, hereditary breast-ovarian cancer, hereditary pancreatitis, and hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer. These syndromes arise as a result of germline mutations in the BRCA2, pl6 (familial atypical multiple-mole melanoma), mismatch repair (hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer), and STK11 (Peutz-Jeghers syndrome) genes. In addition, hereditary plays a role in predisposing certain patients with apparently sporadic pancreatic cancer. Many patients with pancreatic cancers caused by a germline mutation in a cancer-causing gene do not have a pedigree that is suggestive of a familial cancer syndrome. A recent prospective analysis of the pedigrees in the National Familial Pancreatic Tumor Registry found that individuals with a family history of pancreatic cancer in multiple first-degree relatives have a high risk of pancreatic cancer themselves. The identification of such high-risk individuals will help clinicians target screening programs and develop preventive interventions with the hope of reducing the mortality of pancreatic cancer in these families.

  8. [Primary pancreatic plasmacytoma].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Acevedo, Z; Pomares Rey, B; Alpera Tenza, M R; Andrada Becerra, E

    2014-01-01

    Extramedullary plasmacytomas are uncommon malignant plasma cell tumors that present outside the bone marrow; 80% of extramedullary plasmacytomas are located in the upper respiratory tract, and gastrointestinal plasmacytomas are rare. We present the case of an asymptomatic 65-year-old man in whom a pancreatic mass was found incidentally. The lesion was determined to be a pancreatic plasmacytoma after fine-needle aspiration cytology and surgical resection. No clinical, laboratory, or imaging findings indicative of multiple myeloma or association with other plasmacytomas were found, so the tumor was considered to be a primary pancreatic plasmacytoma. PMID:22738942

  9. Aloe-Emodin Protects RIN-5F (Pancreatic β-cell) Cell from Glucotoxicity via Regulation of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine and Downregulation of Bax and Caspase 3

    PubMed Central

    Alshatwi, Ali A; Subash-Babu, P.

    2016-01-01

    To determine the protective effect of aloe-emodin (AE) from high glucose induced toxicity in RIN-5F (pancreatic β-cell) cell and restoration of its function was analyzed. RIN-5F cells have been cultured in high glucose (25 mM glucose) condition, with and without AE treatment. RIN-5F cells cultured in high glucose decreased cell viability and increased ROS levels after 48 hr compared with standard medium (5.5 mM glucose). Glucotoxicity was confirmed by significantly increased ROS production, increased pro-inflammatory (IFN-γ, IL-1β,) & decreased anti-inflammatory (IL-6&IL-10) cytokine levels, increased DNA fragmentation. In addition, we found increased Bax, caspase 3, Fadd, and Fas and significantly reduced Bcl-2 expression after 48 hr. RIN-5F treated with both high glucose and AE (20 μM) decreased ROS generation and prevent RIN-5F cell from glucotoxicity. In addition, AE treated cells cultured in high glucose were transferred to standard medium, normal responsiveness to glucose was restored within 8hr and normal basal insulin release within 24 hr was achieved when compared to high glucose. PMID:26759701

  10. Surgical Approaches to Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Daniel; Friess, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease resulting in permanent structural damage of the pancreas. It is mainly characterized by recurring epigastric pain and pancreatic insufficiency. In addition, progression of the disease might lead to additional complications, such as pseudocyst formation or development of pancreatic cancer. The medical and surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis has changed significantly in the past decades. With regard to surgical management, pancreatic head resection has been shown to be a mainstay in the treatment of severe chronic pancreatitis because the pancreatic head mass is known to trigger the chronic inflammatory process. Over the years, organ-preserving procedures, such as the duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection and the pylorus-preserving Whipple, have become the surgical standard and have led to major improvements in pain relief, preservation of pancreatic function, and quality of life of patients. PMID:26681935

  11. Retinoic Acid Ameliorates Pancreatic Fibrosis and Inhibits the Activation of Pancreatic Stellate Cells in Mice with Experimental Chronic Pancreatitis via Suppressing the Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Guojian; Fan, Yuting; Wu, Deqing; Qiu, Lei; Yu, Ge; Xing, Miao; Hu, Guoyong; Wang, Xingpeng; Wan, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic fibrosis, a prominent feature of chronic pancreatitis (CP), induces persistent and permanent damage in the pancreas. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) provide a major source of extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition during pancreatic injury, and persistent activation of PSCs plays a vital role in the progression of pancreatic fibrosis. Retinoic acid (RA), a retinoid, has a broad range of biological functions, including regulation of cell differentiation and proliferation, attenuating progressive fibrosis of multiple organs. In the present study, we investigated the effects of RA on fibrosis in experimental CP and cultured PSCs. CP was induced in mice by repetitive cerulein injection in vivo, and mouse PSCs were isolated and activated in vitro. Suppression of pancreatic fibrosis upon administration of RA was confirmed based on reduction of histological damage, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression and mRNA levels of β-catenin, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-Rβ transforming growth factor (TGF)-βRII and collagen 1α1 in vivo. Wnt 2 and β-catenin protein levels were markedly down-regulated, while Axin 2 expression level was up-regulated in the presence of RA, both in vivo and in vitro. Nuclear translation of β-catenin was significantly decreased following RA treatment, compared with cerulein-induced CP in mice and activated PSCs. Furthermore, RA induced significant PSC apoptosis, inhibited proliferation, suppressed TCF/LEF-dependent transcriptional activity and ECM production of PSC via down-regulation of TGFβRII, PDGFRβ and collagen 1α1 in vitro. These results indicate a critical role of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in RA-induced effects on CP and PSC regulation and support the potential of RA as a suppressor of pancreatic fibrosis in mice. PMID:26556479

  12. Retinoic Acid Ameliorates Pancreatic Fibrosis and Inhibits the Activation of Pancreatic Stellate Cells in Mice with Experimental Chronic Pancreatitis via Suppressing the Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wenqin; Jiang, Weiliang; Shen, Jie; Yin, Guojian; Fan, Yuting; Wu, Deqing; Qiu, Lei; Yu, Ge; Xing, Miao; Hu, Guoyong; Wang, Xingpeng; Wan, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic fibrosis, a prominent feature of chronic pancreatitis (CP), induces persistent and permanent damage in the pancreas. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) provide a major source of extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition during pancreatic injury, and persistent activation of PSCs plays a vital role in the progression of pancreatic fibrosis. Retinoic acid (RA), a retinoid, has a broad range of biological functions, including regulation of cell differentiation and proliferation, attenuating progressive fibrosis of multiple organs. In the present study, we investigated the effects of RA on fibrosis in experimental CP and cultured PSCs. CP was induced in mice by repetitive cerulein injection in vivo, and mouse PSCs were isolated and activated in vitro. Suppression of pancreatic fibrosis upon administration of RA was confirmed based on reduction of histological damage, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression and mRNA levels of β-catenin, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-Rβ transforming growth factor (TGF)-βRII and collagen 1α1 in vivo. Wnt 2 and β-catenin protein levels were markedly down-regulated, while Axin 2 expression level was up-regulated in the presence of RA, both in vivo and in vitro. Nuclear translation of β-catenin was significantly decreased following RA treatment, compared with cerulein-induced CP in mice and activated PSCs. Furthermore, RA induced significant PSC apoptosis, inhibited proliferation, suppressed TCF/LEF-dependent transcriptional activity and ECM production of PSC via down-regulation of TGFβRII, PDGFRβ and collagen 1α1 in vitro. These results indicate a critical role of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in RA-induced effects on CP and PSC regulation and support the potential of RA as a suppressor of pancreatic fibrosis in mice. PMID:26556479

  13. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Domínguez Muñoz, J Enrique

    2015-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the early diagnosis of the disease, the treatment of symptoms and complications, mainly pain and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, and the diagnosis and therapy of autoimmune pancreatitis. The multimodal dynamic endoscopic ultrasound-guided secretin-stimulated evaluation of the pancreas provides relevant morphological and functional information for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis at early stages. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in patients with calcifying pancreatitis and endoscopic pancreatic stent placement are effective alternatives for pain therapy in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Presence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in patients with chronic pancreatitis is associated with a significantly increase of mortality rate. Despite that, pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is not prescribed in the majority of patients with pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, or it is prescribed at a low dose. The newly developed and commercialized needles for endoscopic ultrasound-guided pancreatic biopsy are effective in retrieving appropriate tissue samples for the histological diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis. Maintenance therapy with azathioprine is effective and safe to prevent relapses in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis. PMID:26520201

  14. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Domínguez Muñoz, J Enrique

    2015-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the early diagnosis of the disease, the treatment of symptoms and complications, mainly pain and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, and the diagnosis and therapy of autoimmune pancreatitis. The multimodal dynamic endoscopic ultrasound-guided secretin-stimulated evaluation of the pancreas provides relevant morphological and functional information for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis at early stages. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in patients with calcifying pancreatitis and endoscopic pancreatic stent placement are effective alternatives for pain therapy in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Presence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in patients with chronic pancreatitis is associated with a significantly increase of mortality rate. Despite that, pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is not prescribed in the majority of patients with pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, or it is prescribed at a low dose. The newly developed and commercialized needles for endoscopic ultrasound-guided pancreatic biopsy are effective in retrieving appropriate tissue samples for the histological diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis. Maintenance therapy with azathioprine is effective and safe to prevent relapses in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis.

  15. Vitamin D Metabolic Pathway Genes and Pancreatic Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Arem, Hannah; Yu, Kai; Xiong, Xiaoqin; Moy, Kristin; Freedman, Neal D.; Mayne, Susan T.; Albanes, Demetrius; Arslan, Alan A.; Austin, Melissa; Bamlet, William R.; Beane-Freeman, Laura; Bracci, Paige; Canzian, Federico; Cotterchio, Michelle; Duell, Eric J.; Gallinger, Steve; Giles, Graham G.; Goggins, Michael; Goodman, Phyllis J.; Hartge, Patricia; Hassan, Manal; Helzlsouer, Kathy; Henderson, Brian; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Hoover, Robert; Jacobs, Eric J.; Kamineni, Aruna; Klein, Alison; Klein, Eric; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Li, Donghui; Malats, Núria; Männistö, Satu; McCullough, Marjorie L.; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Peters, Ulrike; Petersen, Gloria M.; Porta, Miquel; Severi, Gianluca; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Visvanathan, Kala; White, Emily; Yu, Herbert; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Tobias, Geoffrey S.; Maeder, Dennis; Brotzman, Michelle; Risch, Harvey; Sampson, Joshua N.; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence on the association between vitamin D status and pancreatic cancer risk is inconsistent. This inconsistency may be partially attributable to variation in vitamin D regulating genes. We selected 11 vitamin D-related genes (GC, DHCR7, CYP2R1, VDR, CYP27B1, CYP24A1, CYP27A1, RXRA, CRP2, CASR and CUBN) totaling 213 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and examined associations with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Our study included 3,583 pancreatic cancer cases and 7,053 controls from the genome-wide association studies of pancreatic cancer PanScans-I-III. We used the Adaptive Joint Test and the Adaptive Rank Truncated Product statistic for pathway and gene analyses, and unconditional logistic regression for SNP analyses, adjusting for age, sex, study and population stratification. We examined effect modification by circulating vitamin D concentration (≤50, >50 nmol/L) for the most significant SNPs using a subset of cohort cases (n = 713) and controls (n = 878). The vitamin D metabolic pathway was not associated with pancreatic cancer risk (p = 0.830). Of the individual genes, none were associated with pancreatic cancer risk at a significance level of p<0.05. SNPs near the VDR (rs2239186), LRP2 (rs4668123), CYP24A1 (rs2762932), GC (rs2282679), and CUBN (rs1810205) genes were the top SNPs associated with pancreatic cancer (p-values 0.008–0.037), but none were statistically significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Associations between these SNPs and pancreatic cancer were not modified by circulating concentrations of vitamin D. These findings do not support an association between vitamin D-related genes and pancreatic cancer risk. Future research should explore other pathways through which vitamin D status might be associated with pancreatic cancer risk. PMID:25799011

  16. Pancreatic Cancer Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... age at the time of diagnosis is 71. Gender Men are slightly more likely to develop pancreatic ... of these syndromes can be found by genetic testing. For more information on genetic testing, see Can ...

  17. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... sudden inflammation of the pancreas manifested clinically by abdominal pain, nausea and dehydration that is usually self-limiting ... room for evaluation should they develop any abnormal abdominal pain symptoms. Conclusions While a rare event, acute pancreatitis ...

  18. Acute Pancreatitis in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... are the symptoms of pancreatitis? Common symptoms include abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. However, not every patient with ... help the pancreas to recover. Patients who have abdominal pain can be treated with pain medications. Some patients ...

  19. What Is Pancreatic Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... very important to distinguish between exocrine and endocrine cancers of the pancreas. They have distinct risk factors and causes, have ... are by far the most common type of pancreas cancer. If you are told you have pancreatic cancer, ...

  20. Nutrition support in pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Marulendra, S; Kirby, D F

    1995-04-01

    Nutrition support in patients with pancreatitis has created a challenge for clinicians. Because the pancreas is normally stimulated by the ingestion of food, particularly fat, patients are often denied oral nutrition. This reduction in the ingestion of food, together with the increased metabolic demands of this disease, often results in a negative energy balance and occasionally undernutrition or malnutrition. This review summarizes the etiologies and methods for staging pancreatitis, the physiology of pancreatic exocrine secretion and the response of the pancreas to different methods of nutrition support. The results of clinical trials, which examine both parenteral and enteral nutrition in animals and humans with this disease, are reviewed. Recommendations for nutrition management of patients with acute and chronic pancreatitis and areas for future research are discussed.

  1. Management of necrotizing pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Slavin, John; Ghaneh, Paula; Sutton, Robert; Hartley, Mark; Rowlands, Peter; Garvey, Conall; Hughes, Mark; Neoptolemos, John

    2001-01-01

    Infection complicating pancreatic necrosis leads to persisting sepsis, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome and accounts for about half the deaths that occur following acute pancreatitis. Severe cases due to gallstones require urgent endoscopic sphincterotomy. Patients with pancreatic necrosis should be followed with serial contrast enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) and if infection is suspected fine needle aspiration of the necrotic area for bacteriology (FNAB) should be undertaken. Treatment of sterile necrosis should initially be non-operative. In the presence of infection necrosectomy is indicated. Although traditionally this has been by open surgery, minimally invasive procedures are a promising new alternative. There are many unresolved issues in the management of pancreatic necrosis. These include, the use of antibiotic prophylaxis, the precise indications for and frequency of repeat CE-CT and FNAB, and the role of enteral feeding. PMID:11819813

  2. Surgery for Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the abdomen. The surgeon can look at the pancreas and other organs for tumors and take biopsy ... pancreatic cancers appear to be confined to the pancreas at the time they are found. Even then, ...

  3. Pancreatic enzyme pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ferrone, Marcus; Raimondo, Massimo; Scolapio, James S

    2007-06-01

    Supplemental pancreatic enzyme preparations are provided to patients with conditions of pancreatic exocrine deficiency such as chronic pancreatitis and cystic fibrosis. These patients frequently experience steatorrhea, which occurs from inadequate fat absorption. The delivery of sufficient enzyme concentrations into the duodenal lumen simultaneously with meals can reduce nutrient malabsorption, improve the symptoms of steatorrhea, and in some cases alleviate the pain associated with chronic pancreatitis. Current clinical practices dictate administration of lipase 25,000-40,000 units/meal by using pH-sensitive pancrelipase microspheres, along with dosage increases, compliance checks, and differential diagnosis in cases of treatment failure. Despite the large number of specialty enzyme replacements available commercially, many patients remain dissatisfied with standard therapy, and future developments are needed to optimize treatment in these individuals.

  4. Pancreatic Islet Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... allo-transplantation?" For each pancreatic islet allo-transplant infusion, researchers use specialized enzymes to remove islets from ... in a lab. Transplant patients typically receive two infusions with an average of 400,000 to 500, ...

  5. Cytokines and acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Brady, M; Christmas, S; Sutton, R; Neoptolemos, J; Slavin, J

    1999-07-01

    Cytokines have been shown to play a pivotal role in multiple organ dysfunction, a major cause of death in severe acute pancreatitis. Moreover, the two-hit hypothesis of the cytokine-induced systemic inflammatory response syndrome explains the variable individual response to severe acute pancreatitis and the impact of secondary events such as sepsis or therapeutic intervention. Many experimental anti-cytokine therapies have been administered following induction of experimental pancreatitis, and have proved to be therapeutic. Patients with severe pancreatitis present early because of pain. Clearly then a window for therapeutic intervention is available between onset of symptoms and peak pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. It is this fundamental observation that convinces many in the field that the treatment of AP will be one of the first clinical successes for novel drugs or therapy that seek to modulate the inflammatory response.

  6. Perspectives in Pancreatic Pain

    PubMed Central

    1997-01-01

    This review describes some of the mechanisms which are thought to be important in the causation of pain in chronic pancreatitis. Both medical and surgical techniques for treating this pain are described. PMID:9298380

  7. [Hereditary aspects of pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Bak, Daniel; Sobczyńska-Tomaszewska, Agnieszka; Bal, Jerzy

    2003-01-01

    Pancreatitis presents clinically as acute and chronic form. A common characteristic of these two forms is enzymatic autodigestion of pancreas in the course of the disease. It results from premature activation of pancreatic digestive enzymes and disturbance of subtle balance between proteolytic enzymes and their inhibitors. The way to understand the character of mechanisms leading to development of pancreatitis has been simplified by discovery of genetic factors, which are able to initiate pathological changes at tissue level. Mutations in the PRSS1 gene (first of all R122H and N29I mutations), which encodes for cationic trypsin, cause trypsin to be protected from autodegradation. These mutations also cause precursor of trypsin - trypsinogen, to be activated easier. On the other hand mutations in the SPINK1 gene have been identified. SPINK1 gene encodes for the most important protease inhibitor of the pancreatic fluid. The most frequent mutation, namely N34S, decrease SPINK1 protein in its activity. The link between the genotype and phenotype is not clear in every case. It is probable that pancreatitis will be recognized as poligenic with many genes engaged in the disease development. Pancreatic cancer is a frequent consequence of pancreatitis. It is a very invasive cancer with high mortality. In the course of pancreatic inflammation intensive cell proliferation takes place for regeneration of pancreas damage. It is the chance for amplification of pathological changes in DNA, which have arisen as a ROS's (Reactive Oxygen Species) and RNOS's (Reactive Nitrogen Oxide Species) action effect. ROS and RNOS are generated in the course of pancreas inflammation.

  8. Tropical chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Barman, K; Premalatha, G; Mohan, V

    2003-01-01

    Tropical chronic pancreatitis (TCP) is a juvenile form of chronic calcific non-alcoholic pancreatitis, seen almost exclusively in the developing countries of the tropical world. The classical triad of TCP consists of abdominal pain, steatorrhoea, and diabetes. When diabetes is present, the condition is called fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes (FCPD) which is thus a later stage of TCP. Some of the distinctive features of TCP are younger age at onset, presence of large intraductal calculi, more aggressive course of the disease, and a high susceptibility to pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic calculi are the hallmark for the diagnosis of TCP and in non-calcific cases ductal dilation on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, computed tomography, or ultrasound helps to identify the disease. Diabetes is usually quite severe and of the insulin requiring type, but ketosis is rare. Microvascular complications of diabetes occur as frequently as in type 2 diabetes but macrovascular complications are uncommon. Pancreatic enzyme supplements are used for relief of abdominal pain and reducing the symptoms related to steatorrhoea. Early diagnosis and better control of the endocrine and exocrine dysfunction could help to ensure better survival and improve the prognosis and quality of life of TCP patients. PMID:14654569

  9. Hereditary pancreatitis: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Raphael, Kara L; Willingham, Field F

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is a rare cause of acute, recurrent acute, and chronic pancreatitis. It may present similarly to other causes of acute and chronic pancreatitis, and often there has been a protracted evaluation prior to the diagnosis of HP. Since it was first described in 1952, multiple genetic defects that affect the action of digestive enzymes in the pancreas have been implicated. The most common mutations involve the PRSS1, CFTR, SPINK1, and CTRC genes. New mutations in these genes and previously unrecognized mutations in other genes are being discovered due to the increasing use of next-generation genomic sequencing. While the inheritance pathways of these genetic mutations may be variable and complex, sometimes involving coinheritance of other mutations, the clinical presentation of patients tends to be similar. Interactions with environmental triggers often play a role. Patients tend to present at an early age (prior to the second decade of life) and have a significantly increased risk for the development of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients with HP may develop sequelae of chronic pancreatitis such as strictures and fluid collections as well as exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Management of patients with HP involves avoidance of environmental triggers, surveillance for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, medical therapy for endocrine and exocrine insufficiency, pain management, and endoscopic or surgical treatment for complications. Care for affected patients should be individualized, with an emphasis on early diagnosis and multidisciplinary involvement to develop a comprehensive treatment strategy. PMID:27555793

  10. Hereditary pancreatitis: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Raphael, Kara L; Willingham, Field F

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is a rare cause of acute, recurrent acute, and chronic pancreatitis. It may present similarly to other causes of acute and chronic pancreatitis, and often there has been a protracted evaluation prior to the diagnosis of HP. Since it was first described in 1952, multiple genetic defects that affect the action of digestive enzymes in the pancreas have been implicated. The most common mutations involve the PRSS1, CFTR, SPINK1, and CTRC genes. New mutations in these genes and previously unrecognized mutations in other genes are being discovered due to the increasing use of next-generation genomic sequencing. While the inheritance pathways of these genetic mutations may be variable and complex, sometimes involving coinheritance of other mutations, the clinical presentation of patients tends to be similar. Interactions with environmental triggers often play a role. Patients tend to present at an early age (prior to the second decade of life) and have a significantly increased risk for the development of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients with HP may develop sequelae of chronic pancreatitis such as strictures and fluid collections as well as exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Management of patients with HP involves avoidance of environmental triggers, surveillance for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, medical therapy for endocrine and exocrine insufficiency, pain management, and endoscopic or surgical treatment for complications. Care for affected patients should be individualized, with an emphasis on early diagnosis and multidisciplinary involvement to develop a comprehensive treatment strategy. PMID:27555793

  11. Nutrition in pancreatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Meier, Rémy F; Beglinger, Christoph

    2006-01-01

    The pancreas plays a major role in nutrient digestion. Therefore, in both acute and chronic pancreatitis, exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency can develop, impairing digestive and absorptive processes. These changes can lead to malnutrition over time. In parallel to these changes, decreased caloric intake and increased metabolic activity are often present. Nutritional deficiencies negatively affect outcome if they are not treated. Nutritional assessment and the clinical severity of the disease are important for planning any nutritional intervention. In severe acute pancreatitis, enteral nutrition with a naso-jejunal feeding tube and a low molecular diet displays clear advantages compared to parenteral nutrition. Infectious complications, length of hospital stay and the need for surgery are reduced. Furthermore, enteral nutrition is less costly than parenteral nutrition. Parenteral nutrition is reserved for patients who do not tolerate enteral nutrition. Abstinence from alcohol, dietary modifications and pancreatic enzyme supplementation is sufficient in over 80% of patients with chronic pancreatitis. In addition, oral supplements are helpful. Enteral nutrition can be necessary if weight loss continues. Parenteral nutrition is very seldom used in patients with chronic pancreatitis.

  12. Hereditary pancreatitis: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Raphael, Kara L; Willingham, Field F

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is a rare cause of acute, recurrent acute, and chronic pancreatitis. It may present similarly to other causes of acute and chronic pancreatitis, and often there has been a protracted evaluation prior to the diagnosis of HP. Since it was first described in 1952, multiple genetic defects that affect the action of digestive enzymes in the pancreas have been implicated. The most common mutations involve the PRSS1, CFTR, SPINK1, and CTRC genes. New mutations in these genes and previously unrecognized mutations in other genes are being discovered due to the increasing use of next-generation genomic sequencing. While the inheritance pathways of these genetic mutations may be variable and complex, sometimes involving coinheritance of other mutations, the clinical presentation of patients tends to be similar. Interactions with environmental triggers often play a role. Patients tend to present at an early age (prior to the second decade of life) and have a significantly increased risk for the development of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients with HP may develop sequelae of chronic pancreatitis such as strictures and fluid collections as well as exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Management of patients with HP involves avoidance of environmental triggers, surveillance for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, medical therapy for endocrine and exocrine insufficiency, pain management, and endoscopic or surgical treatment for complications. Care for affected patients should be individualized, with an emphasis on early diagnosis and multidisciplinary involvement to develop a comprehensive treatment strategy.

  13. Hereditary pancreatitis and secondary screening for early pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Vitone, L J; Greenhalf, W; Howes, N R; Neoptolemos, J P

    2005-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis is an autosomal dominant disease with incomplete penetrance (80%), accounting for approximately 1% of all cases of pancreatitis. It is characterized by the onset of recurrent attacks of acute pancreatitis in childhood and frequent progression to chronic pancreatitis. Whitcomb et al. identified the cationic trypsinogen gene (PRSS1) on chromosome 7q35 as the site of the mutation that causes hereditary pancreatitis. The European registry of hereditary pancreatitis and familial pancreatic cancer (EUROPAC) aims to identify and make provisions for those affected by hereditary pancreatitis and familial pancreatic cancer. The most common mutations in hereditary pancreatitis are R122H, N29I and A16V but many families have been described with clinically defined hereditary pancreatitis where there is no PRSS1 mutation. It is known that the cumulative lifetime risk (to age 70 years) of pancreatic cancer is 40% in individuals with hereditary pancreatitis. This subset of individuals form an ideal group for the development of a screening programme aimed at detecting pancreatic cancer at an early stage in an attempt to improve the presently poor long-term survival. Current screening strategies involve multimodality imaging (computed tomography, endoluminal ultrasound) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography for pancreatic juice collection followed by molecular analysis of the DNA extracted from the juice. The potential benefit of screening (curative resection) must be balanced against the associated morbidity and mortality of surgery. Philosophically, the individual's best interest must be sought in light of the latest advances in medicine and science following discussions with a multidisciplinary team in specialist pancreatic centres.

  14. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Zen, Yoh; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2011-12-07

    Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP) has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney) and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of regulatory T-cells are assumed

  15. Deletion of Apoptosis Signal-Regulating Kinase 1 (ASK1) Protects Pancreatic Beta-Cells from Stress-Induced Death but Not from Glucose Homeostasis Alterations under Pro-Inflammatory Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Pepin, Emilie; Higa, Arisa; Schuster-Klein, Carole; Bernard, Catherine; Sulpice, Thierry; Guardiola, Beatrice; Chevet, Eric; Alquier, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes is characterized by pancreatic beta-cell dysfunction and is associated with low-grade inflammation. Recent observations suggest that apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) is involved in beta-cell death in response to different stressors. In this study, we tested whether ASK1 deficiency protects beta-cells from glucolipotoxic conditions and cytokines treatment or from glucose homeostasis alteration induced by endotoxemia. Methodology/Principal Findings Insulin secretion was neither affected upon shRNA-mediated downregulation of ASK1 in MIN6 cells nor in islets from ASK1-deficient mice. ASK1 silencing in MIN6 cells and deletion in islets did not prevent the deleterious effect of glucolipotoxic conditions or cytokines on insulin secretion. However, it protected MIN6 cells from death induced by ER stress or palmitate and islets from short term caspase activation in response to cytokines. Moreover, endotoxemia induced by LPS infusion increased insulin secretion during hyperglycemic clamps but the response was similar in wild-type and ASK1-deficient mice. Finally, insulin sensitivity in the presence of LPS was not affected by ASK1-deficiency. Conclusions/Significance Our study demonstrates that ASK1 is not involved in beta-cell function and dysfunction but controls stress-induced beta-cell death. PMID:25383781

  16. Regulation of gene expression in the intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Camilla A; Breault, David T

    2010-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression within the intestinal epithelium is complex and controlled by various signaling pathways that regulate the balance between proliferation and differentiation. Proliferation is required both to grow and to replace cells lost through apoptosis and attrition, yet in all but a few cells, differentiation must take place to prevent uncontrolled growth (cancer) and to provide essential functions. In this chapter, we review the major signaling pathways underlying regulation of gene expression within the intestinal epithelium, based primarily on data from mouse models, as well as specific morphogens and transcription factor families that have a major role in regulating intestinal gene expression, including the Hedgehog family, Forkhead Box (FOX) factors, Homeobox (HOX) genes, ParaHox genes, GATA transcription factors, canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling, EPH/Ephrins, Sox9, BMP signaling, PTEN/PI3K, LKB1, K-RAS, Notch pathway, HNF, and MATH1. We also briefly highlight important emerging areas of gene regulation, including microRNA (miRNA) and epigenetic regulation. PMID:21075346

  17. REGULATION OF GENE EXPRESSION IN THE INTESTINAL EPITHELIUM

    PubMed Central

    Richmond, Camilla A.; Breault, David T.

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression within the intestinal epithelium is complex and controlled by various signaling pathways that regulate the balance between proliferation and differentiation. Proliferation is required both to grow and to replace cells lost through apoptosis and attrition, yet in all but a few cells, differentiation must take place to prevent uncontrolled growth (cancer) and to provide essential functions. In this chapter, we will review the major signaling pathways underlying regulation of gene expression within the intestinal epithelium, based primarily on data from mouse models, as well as specific morphogens and transcription factor families that have a major role in regulating intestinal gene expression, including: the Hedgehog family, Forkhead Box (FOX) factors, Homeobox (HOX) genes, ParaHox genes, GATA transcription factors, canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling, EPH/Ephrins, Sox9, BMP signaling, PTEN/PI3K, LKB1, K-RAS, Notch pathway, HNF and MATH1. We will also briefly highlight important emerging areas of gene regulation including microRNA and epigenetic regulation. PMID:21075346

  18. Idiopathic pancreatitis in a patient with a STAT3 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Peppers, Brian; Frith, John; Tcheurekdjian, Haig; Hostoffer, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome (HIES) is a rare primary immunodeficiency characterized by recurrent skin infections with abscesses, recurrent pneumonias with pneumatoceles, and immunoglobulin E levels of >10 times the upper limit of normal. Case: The patient described herein had a classic case of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) deficiency associated with HIES diagnosed several years before this particular presentation. He demonstrated extraimmune manifestations of the disease as well, including characteristic facies and a history of skeletal fractures. In addition, the patient had several distinct episodes of idiopathic pancreatitis for which a full gastrointestinal workup had been performed. STAT3 mutation was confirmed by genotyping at the time of diagnosis of HIES. Conclusions: STAT3, a mammalian protein that regulates cell growth, survival, and differentiation, has been linked to human pancreatic carcinogenesis as well as the above-mentioned immune deficiency. Mouse studies demonstrated that genetic ablation of STAT3 exacerbates the course of acute pancreatitis, whereas normal pancreatic STAT3 seems to have a protective effect against necrotizing pancreatitis. An association between STAT3 mutations and pancreatitis has not yet been revealed in humans. Here we describe a case of acute pancreatitis that presented in a patient with STAT3 mutation. PMID:27103560

  19. Deciphering the role of hedgehog signaling in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Dongsheng; Schlotman, Kelly E; Xie, Jingwu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pancreatic cancer, mostly pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), is a leading cause of cancer-related death in the US, with a dismal median survival of 6 months. Thus, there is an urgent unmet need to identify ways to diagnose and to treat this deadly cancer. Although a number of genetic changes have been identified in pancreatic cancer, their mechanisms of action in tumor development, progression and metastasis are not completely understood. Hedgehog signaling, which plays a major role in embryonic development and stem cell regulation, is known to be activated in pancreatic cancer; however, specific inhibitors targeting the smoothened molecule failed to improve the condition of pancreatic cancer patients in clinical trials. Furthermore, results regarding the role of Hh signaling in pancreatic cancer are controversial with some reporting tumor promoting activities whereas others tumor suppressive actions. In this review, we will summarize what we know about hedgehog signaling in pancreatic cancer, and try to explain the contradicting roles of hedgehog signaling as well as the reason(s) behind the failed clinical trials. In addition to the canonical hedgehog signaling, we will also discuss several non-canonical hedgehog signaling mechanisms. PMID:27346466

  20. Pain in chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Fasanella, Kenneth E; Davis, Brian; Lyons, John; Chen, Zongfu; Lee, Kenneth K; Slivka, Adam; Whitcomb, David C

    2007-06-01

    Chronic, debilitating abdominal pain is arguably the most important component of chronic pancreatitis, leading to significant morbidity and disability. Attempting to treat this pain, which is too often unsuccessful, is a frustrating experience for physician and patient. Multiple studies to improve understanding of the pathophysiology that causes pain in some patients but not in others have been performed since the most recent reviews on this topic. In addition, new treatment modalities have been developed and evaluated in this population. This review discusses new advances in neuroscience and the study of visceral pain mechanisms, as well as genetic factors that may play a role. Updates of established therapies, as well as new techniques used in addressing pain from chronic pancreatitis, are reviewed. Lastly, outcome measures, which have been highly variable in this field over the years, are addressed. PMID:17533083

  1. [The epidemiology of pancreatic cancer].

    PubMed

    Lakatos, Gábor; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2010-10-31

    Pancreatic cancer is a relatively uncommon tumor, but even with early diagnosis, mortality rates are high, explaining why this form of cancer has now become a common cause of cancer mortality. There are no screening tests for early detection of pancreatic cancer. It is more common in men than women and is predominantly a disease of elderly people. There is wide variation in the incidence of pancreatic cancer around the world, suggesting that environmental factors are important in the pathogenesis. Smoking is the major known risk factor for pancreatic cancer, while dietary factors seem to be less important. Other possible risk factors include chronic pancreatitis, obesity and type 2 diabetes. Numerous inherited germ line mutations are associated with pancreatic cancer. Of these, hereditary pancreatitis confers the greatest risk, while BRCA2 mutations are the commonest inherited disorder. Polymorphisms in genes that control detoxification of environmental carcinogens and metabolic pathways may alter the risk of pancreatic cancer.

  2. General Information about Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Pancreatic Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Pancreatic Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  3. Metabolic pancreatitis: Etiopathogenesis and management

    PubMed Central

    Kota, Sunil Kumar; Krishna, S.V.S.; Lakhtakia, Sandeep; Modi, Kirtikumar D.

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a medical emergency. Alcohol and gallstones are the most common etiologies accounting for 60%-75% cases. Other important causes include postendoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedure, abdominal trauma, drug toxicity, various infections, autoimmune, ischemia, and hereditary causes. In about 15% of cases the cause remains unknown (idiopathic pancreatitis). Metabolic conditions giving rise to pancreatitis are less common, accounting for 5%-10% cases. The causes include hypertriglyceridemia, hypercalcemia, diabetes mellitus, porphyria, and Wilson's disease. The episodes of pancreatitis tend to be more severe. In cases of metabolic pancreatitis, over and above the standard routine management of pancreatitis, careful management of the underlying metabolic abnormalities is of paramount importance. If not treated properly, it leads to recurrent life-threatening bouts of acute pancreatitis. We hereby review the pathogenesis and management of various causes of metabolic pancreatitis. PMID:24083160

  4. Pancreatic trauma: A concise review

    PubMed Central

    Debi, Uma; Kaur, Ravinder; Prasad, Kaushal Kishor; Sinha, Saroj Kant; Sinha, Anindita; Singh, Kartar

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic injury to the pancreas is rare and difficult to diagnose. In contrast, traumatic injuries to the liver, spleen and kidney are common and are usually identified with ease by imaging modalities. Pancreatic injuries are usually subtle to identify by different diagnostic imaging modalities, and these injuries are often overlooked in cases with extensive multiorgan trauma. The most evident findings of pancreatic injury are post-traumatic pancreatitis with blood, edema, and soft tissue infiltration of the anterior pararenal space. The alterations of post-traumatic pancreatitis may not be visualized within several hours following trauma as they are time dependent. Delayed diagnoses of traumatic pancreatic injuries are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Imaging plays an important role in diagnosis of pancreatic injuries because early recognition of the disruption of the main pancreatic duct is important. We reviewed our experience with the use of various imaging modalities for diagnosis of blunt pancreatic trauma. PMID:24379625

  5. Nutrition, Inflammation, and Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Max

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas. Nutrition has a number of anti-inflammatory effects that could affect outcomes of patients with pancreatitis. Further, it is the most promising nonspecific treatment modality in acute pancreatitis to date. This paper summarizes the best available evidence regarding the use of nutrition with a view of optimising clinical management of patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:24490104

  6. Targeting inflammation in pancreatic cancer: Clinical translation

    PubMed Central

    Steele, Colin William; Kaur Gill, Nina Angharad; Jamieson, Nigel Balfour; Carter, Christopher Ross

    2016-01-01

    Preclinical modelling studies are beginning to aid development of therapies targeted against key regulators of pancreatic cancer progression. Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive, stromally-rich tumor, from which few people survive. Within the tumor microenvironment cellular and extracellular components exist, shielding tumor cells from immune cell clearance, and chemotherapy, enhancing progression of the disease. The cellular component of this microenvironment consists mainly of stellate cells and inflammatory cells. New findings suggest that manipulation of the cellular component of the tumor microenvironment is possible to promote immune cell killing of tumor cells. Here we explore possible immunogenic therapeutic strategies. Additionally extracellular stromal elements play a key role in protecting tumor cells from chemotherapies targeted at the pancreas. We describe the experimental findings and the pitfalls associated with translation of stromally targeted therapies to clinical trial. Finally, we discuss the key inflammatory signal transducers activated subsequent to driver mutations in oncogenic Kras in pancreatic cancer. We present the preclinical findings that have led to successful early trials of STAT3 inhibitors in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:27096033

  7. Clinical pancreatic disorder I: Acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Andrén-Sandberg, Ake

    2011-07-01

    The Annual American Pancreas Club is an important event for communicating around clinical pancreatic disorders, just as the European, Japanese, Indian, and the International Pancreatic association. Even though the meeting is only 1½ day there were 169 different abstracts and a "How do I do it session." Among all these abstracts on the pancreas there are some real pearls, but they are almost always well hidden, never highlighted - all abstracts are similarly presented - and will too soon be forgotten. The present filing of the abstracts is one way (not the way) to get the pancreatic abstracts a little more read and a little more remembered - and perhaps a little more cited. It should also be understood that most of the abstracts are short summaries of hundreds of working hours (evenings, nights, weekends, holidays, you name them …) in the laboratory or in the clinic, often combined with blood, sweat and tears. The authors should be shown at least some respect, and their abstracts should not only be thought of as "just another little abstract" - and the best respect they can be shown are that they will be remembered to be another brick in our scientific wall.Now the pancreatic abstracts of American Pancreas Club 2011 are gathered and filed with the aim to give them a larger audience than they have had in their original abstract book. However, it is obvious that most of clinical fellows do not have time to read all the abstracts. For them I have made a "clinical highlight section" of 10 percent of all the pancreatic abstracts. If someone else should have done some collection of abstract, there should probably have been other selections, but as this is not the case, the editor's choices are the highlighted ones.The article as series I of clinical highlight section is present, and more series will be present in the following issues. If readers will remember some of the abstracts better after reading this "abstract of abstracts", it was worth the efforts - and without

  8. The role of nutraceuticals in pancreatic cancer prevention and therapy: Targeting cellular signaling, miRNAs and epigenome

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yiwei; Go, Vay Liang W.; Sarkar, Fazlul H.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive malignancies in US adults. The experimental studies have found that antioxidant nutrients could reduce oxidative DNA damage, suggesting that these antioxidants may protect against pancreatic carcinogenesis. Several epidemiologic studies showed that dietary intake of antioxidants was inversely associated with the risk of pancreatic cancer, demonstrating the inhibitory effects of antioxidants on pancreatic carcinogenesis. Moreover, nutraceuticals, the anti-cancer agents from diet or natural plants, have been found to inhibit the development and progression of pancreatic cancer through the regulation of cellular signaling pathways. Importantly, nutraceuticals also up-regulate the expression of tumor suppressive miRNAs and down-regulate the expression of oncogenic miRNAs, leading to the inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell growth and pancreatic Cancer Stem Cell (CSC) self-renewal through modulation of cellular signaling network. Furthermore, nutraceuticals also regulate epigenetically deregulated DNAs and miRNAs, leading to the normalization of altered cellular signaling in pancreatic cancer cells. Therefore, nutraceuticals could have much broader use in the prevention and/or treatment of pancreatic cancer in combination with conventional chemotherapeutics. However, more in vitro mechanistic experiments, in vivo animal studies, and clinical trials are needed to realize the true value of nutraceuticals in the prevention and/or treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:25493373

  9. Hepatobiliary and pancreatic ascariasis

    PubMed Central

    Khuroo, Mohammad S; Rather, Ajaz A; Khuroo, Naira S; Khuroo, Mehnaaz S

    2016-01-01

    Hepatobiliary and pancreatic ascariasis (HPA) was described as a clinical entity from Kashmir, India in 1985. HPA is caused by invasion and migration of nematode, Ascaris lumbricoides, in to the biliary tract and pancreatic duct. Patients present with biliary colic, cholangitis, cholecystitis, hepatic abscesses and acute pancreatitis. Ascarides traverse the ducts repeatedly, get trapped and die, leading to formation of hepatolithiasis. HPA is ubiquitous in endemic regions and in Kashmir, one such region, HPA is the etiological factor for 36.7%, 23%, 14.5% and 12.5% of all biliary diseases, acute pancreatitis, liver abscesses and biliary lithiasis respectively. Ultrasonography is an excellent diagnostic tool in visualizing worms in gut lumen and ductal system. The rational treatment for HPA is to give appropriate treatment for clinical syndromes along with effective anthelmintic therapy. Endotherapy in HPA is indicated if patients continue to have symptoms on medical therapy or when worms do not move out of ductal lumen by 3 wk or die within the ducts. The worms can be removed from the ductal system in most of the patients and such patients get regression of symptoms of hepatobiliary and pancreatic disease. PMID:27672273

  10. Hepatobiliary and pancreatic ascariasis.

    PubMed

    Khuroo, Mohammad S; Rather, Ajaz A; Khuroo, Naira S; Khuroo, Mehnaaz S

    2016-09-01

    Hepatobiliary and pancreatic ascariasis (HPA) was described as a clinical entity from Kashmir, India in 1985. HPA is caused by invasion and migration of nematode, Ascaris lumbricoides, in to the biliary tract and pancreatic duct. Patients present with biliary colic, cholangitis, cholecystitis, hepatic abscesses and acute pancreatitis. Ascarides traverse the ducts repeatedly, get trapped and die, leading to formation of hepatolithiasis. HPA is ubiquitous in endemic regions and in Kashmir, one such region, HPA is the etiological factor for 36.7%, 23%, 14.5% and 12.5% of all biliary diseases, acute pancreatitis, liver abscesses and biliary lithiasis respectively. Ultrasonography is an excellent diagnostic tool in visualizing worms in gut lumen and ductal system. The rational treatment for HPA is to give appropriate treatment for clinical syndromes along with effective anthelmintic therapy. Endotherapy in HPA is indicated if patients continue to have symptoms on medical therapy or when worms do not move out of ductal lumen by 3 wk or die within the ducts. The worms can be removed from the ductal system in most of the patients and such patients get regression of symptoms of hepatobiliary and pancreatic disease. PMID:27672273

  11. Pharmacogenetics in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Tourkantonis, Ioannis S; Peponi, Evangelia; Syrigos, Konstantinos N; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2014-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy with a poor overall survival rate. Given advances in pharmacogenomics, numerous gene mutations have been identified that could be potential targets for drug development. Therefore, future research strategies may identify prognostic and predictive markers aiming to improve outcome by maximizing efficacy whilst lowering toxicity. In this commentary, we summarize several interesting results regarding pancreatic cancer pharmacogenetics that have been presented in the 2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting. In particular, we focus on Abstract #4124, which investigated the potential predictive role of human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1) in patients treated with adjuvant gemcitabine for pancreatic cancer, on Abstract #4125, which examined the tolerability of a modified FOLFORINOX study based on UGT1A1*28 genotype guided dosing of IRI in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer, and on Abstract #4130, which confirmed the predictive role of circulating tumor and invasive cells (CTICs) from patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer in second-line chemotherapy treatment setting. PMID:25076337

  12. Borderline resectable pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Hackert, Thilo; Ulrich, Alexis; Büchler, Markus W

    2016-06-01

    Surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy remains the only treatment option for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) with the chance of long-term survival. If a radical tumor resection is possible, 5-year survival rates of 20-25% can be achieved. Pancreatic surgery has significantly changed during the past years and resection approaches have been extended beyond standard procedures, including vascular and multivisceral resections. Consequently, borderline resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (BR-PDAC), which has recently been defined by the International Study Group for Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS), has become a controversial issue with regard to its management in terms of upfront resection vs. neoadjuvant treatment and sequential resection. Preoperative diagnostic accuracy to define resectability of PDAC is a keypoint in this context as well as the surgical and interdisciplinary expertise to perform advanced pancreatic surgery and manage complications. The present mini-review summarizes the current state of definition, management and outcome of BR-PDAC. Furthermore, the topic of ongoing and future studies on neoadjuvant treatment which is closely related to borderline resectability in PDAC is discussed. PMID:26970276

  13. Hepatobiliary and pancreatic ascariasis

    PubMed Central

    Khuroo, Mohammad S; Rather, Ajaz A; Khuroo, Naira S; Khuroo, Mehnaaz S

    2016-01-01

    Hepatobiliary and pancreatic ascariasis (HPA) was described as a clinical entity from Kashmir, India in 1985. HPA is caused by invasion and migration of nematode, Ascaris lumbricoides, in to the biliary tract and pancreatic duct. Patients present with biliary colic, cholangitis, cholecystitis, hepatic abscesses and acute pancreatitis. Ascarides traverse the ducts repeatedly, get trapped and die, leading to formation of hepatolithiasis. HPA is ubiquitous in endemic regions and in Kashmir, one such region, HPA is the etiological factor for 36.7%, 23%, 14.5% and 12.5% of all biliary diseases, acute pancreatitis, liver abscesses and biliary lithiasis respectively. Ultrasonography is an excellent diagnostic tool in visualizing worms in gut lumen and ductal system. The rational treatment for HPA is to give appropriate treatment for clinical syndromes along with effective anthelmintic therapy. Endotherapy in HPA is indicated if patients continue to have symptoms on medical therapy or when worms do not move out of ductal lumen by 3 wk or die within the ducts. The worms can be removed from the ductal system in most of the patients and such patients get regression of symptoms of hepatobiliary and pancreatic disease.

  14. Histopathologically Proven Autoimmune Pancreatitis Mimicking Neuroendocrine Tumor or Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Onda, Shinji; Okamoto, Tomoyoshi; Kanehira, Masaru; Fujioka, Shuichi; Harada, Tohru; Hano, Hiroshi; Fukunaga, Masaharu; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) can be difficult to distinguish from pancreatic cancer. We report a case of histopathologically proven AIP mimicking neuroendocrine tumor (NET) or pancreatic cancer in a 53-year-old man. He was referred to our hospital for further evaluation of a pancreatic mass detected on ultrasonography at a medical check-up. Abdominal ultrasonography showed a 15-mm hypoechoic mass located in the pancreatic body. Computed tomography revealed a tumor without any contrast enhancement, and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated the mass to be hyperintense on diffusion-weighted image. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography revealed slight dilatation of a branch of the pancreatic duct without stricture of the main pancreatic duct. The common bile duct seemed intact. Under suspicion of a non-functioning NET or malignant neoplasm, laparotomy was performed. At laparotomy, an elastic firm and well-circumscribed mass was found suggestive of a non-functioning NET, thus enucleation was performed. Histopathologically, the lesion corresponded to AIP. PMID:22423237

  15. Primary Pancreatic Head Tuberculosis: Great Masquerader of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Dhaval; Patel, Jatin; Rathi, Chetan; Ingle, Meghraj; Sawant, Prabha

    2015-01-01

    Isolated pancreatic tuberculosis (TB) is considered an extremely rare condition, even in the developing countries. Most reported cases of pancreatic TB are diagnosed after exploratory laparotomy or autopsy. Pancreatic TB is a potential mimic of invasive pancreatic malignancy and the presence of vascular invasion does not distinguish one condition from the other. Every effort should be made for the earliest diagnosis of this condition as TB is a treatable condition and it avoids unnecessary management of pancreatic carcinoma. Here we report a rare case of primary pancreatic head TB in a 58-year-old male who presented with hypodense lesion in head of pancreas with double duct sign and portal vein invasion mimicking non-resectable pancreatic carcinoma.

  16. Pancreatic metastasis from mycosis fungoides mimicking primary pancreatic tumor.

    PubMed

    Ceriolo, Paola; Fausti, Valentina; Cinotti, Elisa; Bonadio, Silvia; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Bianchi, Giovanna; Orcioni, Giulio Fraternali; Fiocca, Roberto; Rongioletti, Franco; Pistoia, Vito; Borgonovo, Giacomo

    2016-03-28

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) is a cutaneous T-cell lymphoma that can undergo local progression with possible systemic dissemination. We report a case of a patient affected by MF with a pancreatic mass that was a diagnostic challenge between primitive tumor and pancreatic metastasis from MF. Clinical setting findings and imaging studies raised the suspicion of a pancreatic primary neoplasm. A diagnostic clue was provided by the combined histomorphologic/immunohistochemical study of pancreatic and cutaneous biopsies, which revealed a pancreatic localization of MF. Considering the rarity of metastatic localization of MF to the pancreas, we next investigated whether chemokine-chemokine receptor interactions could be involved in the phenomenon to provide new insight into the possible mechanisms underlying metastatic localization of MF to the pancreas. Histological analyses of archival pancreatic tissue demonstrated that glucagon-secreting cells of the pancreatic islets expressed the CCL27 chemokine, which may have attracted in our case metastatic MF cells expressing the complementary receptor CCR10.

  17. Pancreatic calculi superimposed upon slow growing pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Noda, A; Takeuchi, K; Ibuki, E; Murayama, H; Kobayashi, T; Nonogaki, T

    1996-01-01

    We report on a 59 year old male patient with cancer of the head of the pancreas, upon which pancreatic calculi were superimposed during the 3 year clinical course. Pancreatic calculi were noted in the main pancreatic duct (MPD) on both computed tomographic scans and ultrasonographs of the abdomen approximately 10 months after the recognizable dilatation of the MPD. Existence of the calculi was confirmed by autopsy. Elemental analysis and infrared spectrophotometry of the calculi demonstrated that the main constituent of the calculi was calcium carbonate. Histopathological examination showed that the pancreatic cancer was moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that pancreatic stone protein (lithostathine) was present in the cytoplasm of tumour cells. In this case, pancreatic cancer progressed to obstruct the MPD unusually slowly, resulting in stagnation of pancreatic secretion and subsequent formation of the calculi.

  18. [Acute pancreatitis in children].

    PubMed

    Rottier, B L; Holl, R A; Draaisma, J M

    1998-02-21

    Acute pancreatitis is probably commoner in children than was previously thought. In children it is most commonly associated with trauma or viral infection. The presentation may be subtler than in adults, requiring a high index of suspicion in the clinician. In three children, two boys aged 4 and 10 and a girl of 15 years, acute pancreatitis was suspected because of the findings at ultrasonography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography performed when the disease recurred (the boy aged 4), apathy and immobility without dehydration or other obvious causes (the boy aged 10), and severe abdominal pain in combination with vomiting (the girl). All three patients had severely increased (urinary) amylase levels. Most often, acute pancreatitis in children tends to be a self-limiting disease which responds well to conservative treatment.

  19. Nutrition support in pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Caitlin S; Kudsk, Kenneth A

    2007-12-01

    Nutrition support is especially important in patients who have pancreatitis, as these patients have high metabolic needs and are usually unable to ingest sufficient calories from an oral diet because of pain or intestinal dysfunction. Clinicians must assess severity of the disease carefully, as initiation and timing of nutrition support are crucial. Depending on the severity, early nutrition support may be unnecessary, while late support ultimately may lead to worse outcomes. Route of nutrition support also plays an important role in treatment. The clinician has many alternatives from which to choose, including enteral nutrition given nasogastrically or nasojejunally, or parenteral nutrition given through a central line. This article explores the role of nutrition support in the outcome of pancreatitis and provides guidelines to aid the clinician in caring for patients who have acute and chronic pancreatitis.

  20. [Acute pancreatitis and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Laraki, M; Harti, A; Bouderka, M A; Barrou, H; Matar, N; Benaguida, M

    1993-10-01

    Acute pancreatitis during pregnancy is a serious condition and diagnosis is often difficult. The authors report the case of a 32-year-old woman in the 32nd week of her fifth pregnancy, in which the outcome was fatal for both mother and child. The cause of pancreatitis during pregnancy has been attributed to many factors, chiefly cholelithiasis. A number of recent studies have shown the relationship existing between the role played by pregnancy in predisposing to gallbladder disease with lithiasis. Many diagnosis errors are made in this condition. Thus modern treatment methods have improved the prognosis in acute pancreatitis but, when it occurs during pregnancy, diagnostic delays often lead to a gloomy outlook. PMID:8248696

  1. Long-term high-fat diet induces pancreatic injuries via pancreatic microcirculatory disturbances and oxidative stress in rats with hyperlipidemia

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Mingxian; Li Yanqing . E-mail: mx8902@163.com; Meng Min; Ren Hongbo; Kou Yi

    2006-08-18

    Relations between hyperlipidemia and chronic pancreatitis remain unclear. Microcirculatory disturbances and oxidative stress are involved in pathogeneses of a high numbers of diseases. The objective of this study was to induce hyperlipidemia in rats by long-term high-fat diet intake, then investigate the biochemical, microcirculatory, and histological alterations in blood and pancreatic tissues of these animals, and discuss their potential significances. Pancreatic blood flow was detected by intravital microscope; malondialdehyde (MDA) content and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were measured in pancreatic tissues for assessment of oxidative stress and {alpha}-smooth muscle actin ({alpha}-SMA) expression was determined by immunohistochemical staining and RT-PCR. The results showed that the velocity of pancreatic microvascular blood flow of rats with hyperlipidemia decreased significantly as compared to control value (p = 0.008). Pancreatic MDA content increased whereas SOD activity decreased in these rats (p = 0.022; p = 0.039, respectively). Histologically, microvesicles in acinar and islet cells, dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum, swollen mitochondrion and modified vascular endothelial cells were observed under light microscope and transmission electron microscope. In addition, {alpha}-SMA expression was up-regulated significantly (p < 0.05). These results suggest that long-term high-fat diet can induce chronic pancreatic injuries which could be considered as 'nonalcoholic fatty pancreatic disease', and pancreatic microcirculatory disturbances and oxidative stress may play an important part in the underlying pathogenesis.

  2. In the absence of nutrients, pancreatic-biliary secretions in the jejunum do not exert feedback control of human pancreatic or gastric function.

    PubMed

    Krawisz, B R; Miller, L J; DiMagno, E P; Go, V L

    1980-01-01

    Feedback inhibition of basal pancreatic enzyme secretion by luminal pancreatic enzymes appears to be an important regulator of pancreatic secretion in some laboratory animals. To determine whether pancreatic enzymes in the jejunum influence pancreatic or gastric functions in healthy man, we intubated six subjects with a gastric sump tube and a four-lumen duodenal tube which provided (1) a duodenal perfusion site, (2) a duodenal aspiration site, (3) an inflatable balloon immediately distal to the aspiration site, and (4) a jejunal perfusion site immediately beyond the balloon. In this way, the gastroduodenal segment could be functionally separated from the remainder of the intestine. The jejunum was exposed to normal saline, active pancreatic-biliary secretions, or pancreatic-biliary secretions in which the enzymes had been inactivated by heat. Ten minutes after initiation of each jejunal perfusion, normal saline was instilled into the stomach. No differences in trypsin secretion, gastric acid secretion, or gastric emptying occurred with the different jejunal perfusates. We therefore conclude that normal man, in the absence of intraluminal nutrients, does not exhibit a jejunal pancreatic enzyme-dependent feedback control mechanism for pancreatic enzyme or gastric secretion. However, our study does not exclude the possibility of a duodenal feedback regulatory mechanism.

  3. Incidental isolated pancreatic hydatid cyst.

    PubMed

    Kısaoğlu, Abdullah; Özoğul, Bünyami; Atamanalp, Sabri Selçuk; Pirimoğlu, Berhan; Aydınlı, Bülent; Korkut, Ercan

    2015-03-01

    Isolated pancreatic hydatid cysts are a rare parasitic disease even in endemic areas. It is difficult to discriminate primary pancreatic hydatid cysts from other cystic and solid lesions of the pancreas. This is a case report of an incidental isolated pancreatic hydatid cyst. A heterogeneous cystic lesion in the body of the pancreas was identified on magnetic resonance imaging of a patient previously diagnosed patient with cholelithiasis, and because of the malignant possibility of the lesion, splenectomy with distal pancreatectomy and cholecystectomy was performed. The histopathologic diagnosis was reported as a hydatid cyst. Pancreatic hydatid cysts should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic pseudocysts and cystic malignancies.

  4. [Pancreatic abscess and infected pseudocyst].

    PubMed

    Trinidad, E E; Ramírez-Ronda, C H

    1994-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a sterile inflammatory process caused by a chemical auto digestion of the pancreas. The pancreatic abscess and infected pseudocyst are complications of acute pancreatitis of a high mortality rate that require a prompt diagnosis. The pseudocyst is defined as a localized collection of pancreatic juices confine to a retroperitoneal area by a fibrous membrane without epithelium; an abscess is a collection of pus and necrotic tissue. This illnesses should be suspected when patients with acute pancreatitis develop fever, tachycardia, abdominal distention or mass after 14-22 days after the initial attack. These entities require different treatment. The definite treatment is surgical intervention.

  5. Endotherapy in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Tandan, Manu; Nageshwar Reddy, D

    2013-10-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a progressive disease with irreversible changes in the pancreas. Patients commonly present with pain and with exocrine or endocrine insufficiency. All therapeutic efforts in CP are directed towards relief of pain as well as the management of associated complications. Endoscopic therapy offers many advantages in patients with CP who present with ductal calculi, strictures, ductal leaks, pseudocyst or associated biliary strictures. Endotherapy offers a high rate of success with low morbidity in properly selected patients. The procedure can be repeated and failed endotherapy is not a hindrance to subsequent surgery. Endoscopic pancreatic sphincterotomy is helpful in patients with CP with minimal ductal changes while minor papilla sphincterotomy provides relief in patients with pancreas divisum and chronic pancreatitis. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy is the standard of care in patients with large pancreatic ductal calculi. Long term follow up has shown pain relief in over 60% of patients. A transpapillary stent placed across the disruption provides relief in over 90% of patients with ductal leaks. Pancreatic ductal strictures are managed by single large bore stents. Multiple stents are placed for refractory strictures. CP associated benign biliary strictures (BBS) are best treated with multiple plastic stents, as the response to a single plastic stent is poor. Covered self expanding metal stents are increasingly being used in the management of BBS though further long term studies are needed. Pseudocysts are best drained endoscopically with a success rate of 80%-95% at most centers. Endosonography (EUS) has added to the therapeutic armamentarium in the management of patients with CP. Drainage of pseudcysts, cannulation of inaccessible pancreatic ducts and celiac ganglion block in patients with intractable pain are all performed using EUS. Endotherapy should be offered as the first line of therapy in properly selected patients with CP

  6. [Infectious complications in necrotizing pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Werner, J; Büchler, M W

    2007-10-01

    Patients with CT evidence of more than 50 % necrosis, or an increased CRP or procalcitonin are at risk of developing severe pancreatitis and septic complications and should be monitored in an intensive care unit. ERCP and sphincterotomy are indicated in patients with biliary pancreatitis and impacted gall stones, biliary sepsis, or obstructive jaundice. In septic patients with necrotizing pancreatitis, a FNA should be performed for differentiation of sterile and infected pancreatic necrosis. Adequate volume resuscitation and analgesic treatment are the most important treatment of acute pancreatitis. Antibiotic prophylaxis reduces septic complications in severe necrotizing pancreatitis and should be started early. Surgical therapy is indicated in patients with infected pancreatic necrosis. The surgical technique of choice is open necrosectomy with postoperative closed lavage of the lesser sac.

  7. Medical treatment of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Mayerle, Julia; Simon, Peter; Lerch, Markus M

    2004-12-01

    Eighty percent of all cases of acute pancreatitis are linked etiologically to gallstone disease or caused by immoderate alcohol consumption. No specific causal treatment for acute pancreatitis exists. Early prognostic factors that indicate severe disease are three or more signs on organ failure scores according to Ranson, Imrie, or Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) 11, extrapancreatic complications of the disease, or the detection of pancreatic necrosis on CT scans. Elevated CRP levels above 130 mg/L can also predict a severe course of acute pancreatitis. The essential medical treatment for acute pancreatitis is the correction of hypovolemia. Moreover, relief of often severe visceral pain is a high priority. Prophylactic antibiotics should be restricted to patients with necrotizing pancreatitis, infected necrosis, or other infectious complications. Enteral nutrition has no adverse effect compared with parenteral nutrition during the course of acute pancreatitis, and is probably beneficial in regard to outcome.

  8. Pancreatic disorders in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Antonini, Filippo; Pezzilli, Raffaele; Angelelli, Lucia; Macarri, Giampiero

    2016-01-01

    An increased incidence of pancreatic disorders either acute pancreatitis or chronic pancreatitis has been recorded in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) compared to the general population. Although most of the pancreatitis in patients with IBD seem to be related to biliary lithiasis or drug induced, in some cases pancreatitis were defined as idiopathic, suggesting a direct pancreatic damage in IBD. Pancreatitis and IBD may have similar presentation therefore a pancreatic disease could not be recognized in patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. This review will discuss the most common pancreatic diseases seen in patients with IBD. PMID:27574565

  9. Pancreatic disorders in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Antonini, Filippo; Pezzilli, Raffaele; Angelelli, Lucia; Macarri, Giampiero

    2016-08-15

    An increased incidence of pancreatic disorders either acute pancreatitis or chronic pancreatitis has been recorded in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) compared to the general population. Although most of the pancreatitis in patients with IBD seem to be related to biliary lithiasis or drug induced, in some cases pancreatitis were defined as idiopathic, suggesting a direct pancreatic damage in IBD. Pancreatitis and IBD may have similar presentation therefore a pancreatic disease could not be recognized in patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. This review will discuss the most common pancreatic diseases seen in patients with IBD. PMID:27574565

  10. Proteomic analysis of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia and pancreatic carcinoma in rat models

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Liu, Hai-Lin; Li, Ya; Yuan, Ping

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To detect the proteomic variabilities of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and pancreatic carcinoma (PC) induced by 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA) in rat models and to identify potential biomarkers. METHODS: Sixty adult male Sprague Dawley rats were randomized into three groups. The rats had DMBA implanted into their pancreas for one (n = 20) or two months (n = 20) or assigned to the normal group (n = 20). The rats were killed after one or two months, and were evaluated histopathologically. Three tissue samples from each group of rats with either normal pancreas, PanIN (PanIN-2) or PC were examined by 2D-DIGE. The different expression spot features were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight/time of flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) tandem mass spectrometry. The expression of enolase 1, a differentially expressed protein, was identified by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: There was significant difference in the proportions of neoplastic changes between the 1- and 2-mogroups (P = 0.0488). There was an increase in the frequency of adenocarcinomas in the 2-mo group compared with the 1-mo group (P = 0.0309). No neoplastic changes were observed in any of the animals in the normal group. Enolase 1, pancreatic ELA3B, necdin, Hbp23, CHD3, hnRNP A2/B1, Rap80, and Gnb2l1 were up-regulated in the PanIN and PC tissues, and CEL, TPT1, NME2, PCK2, an unnamed protein product, and glycine C-acetyltransferase were down-regulated in the PanIN and PC tissues. The immunohistochemical results showed that enolase 1 expression was up-regulated in the pancreatic cancer tissues of rats and humans. CONCLUSION: The pancreatic protein expression changes induced by DMBA suggest potential molecular targets for the early diagnosis and treatment of PC. PMID:21472101

  11. Negative correlation of ITCH E3 ubiquitin ligase and miRNA-106b dictates metastatic progression in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhu-Lin; Luo, Hui-Jun; Fang, Chen; Cheng, Long; Huang, Zhu; Dai, Ruiwu; Li, Kun; Tian, Fu-Zhou; Wang, Tao; Tang, Li-Jun

    2016-01-12

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the major malignancies and cause for mortality across the world, with recurrence and metastatic progression remaining the single largest cause of pancreatic cancer mortality. Hence it is imperative to develop novel biomarkers of pancreatic cancer prognosis. The E3 ubiquitin ligase ITCH has been previously reported to inhibit the tumor suppressive Hippo signaling by suppressing LATS1/2 in breast cancer and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. However, the role of ITCH in pancreatic cancer progression has not been described. Here we report that ITCH transcript and protein expression mimic metastatic trait in pancreatic cancer patients and cell lines. Loss-of-function studies of ITCH showed that the gene product is responsible for inducing metastasis in vivo. We furthermore show that hsa-miR-106b, which itself is down regulated in metastatic pancreatic cancer, directly interacts and inhibit ITCH expression. ITCH and hsa-miR-106b are thus potential biomarkers for pancreatic cancer prognosis.

  12. Octreotide acetate decreases pancreatic complications after pancreatic trauma.

    PubMed

    Amirata, E; Livingston, D H; Elcavage, J

    1994-10-01

    Octreotide acetate (Sandostatin) has been reported to decrease pancreatic related morbidity after pancreatic resections. This study examined the use of octreotide after pancreatic trauma. The charts of all patients treated for pancreatic injuries from June 1988 to February 1992 were reviewed (n = 28). The mean age of the patients was 29 years (range 16 to 61). The mechanism of injury was motor vehicle accident in 7 patients, gunshot wounds in 14, and stab wounds in 7. The mean (+/- SD) abdominal trauma index (ATI) was 33 +/- 14 and injury severity score (ISS) was 22 +/- 12. Pancreatic injuries were graded as grade I (contusion) in 6 patients, grade II (parenchymal injury) in 18, and grade III (ductal injury) in 4. Seven patients (6 grade II and 1 grade III) were treated with prophylactic octreotide acetate, 150 micrograms to 300 micrograms per day, beginning on day 1. There were no pancreatic complications in this group. Of the remaining 21 patients, 6 (29%) developed 9 pancreatic complications: fluid collections in 3, fistula in 4, pseudocyst in 1, and pancreatitis in 1. Three patients had grade III, 1 had grade II, and 2 had grade I injuries. There were no differences in ATI, ISS, or grade of pancreatic injury between patients who were treated with octreotide and those who were not. No complications were associated with the use of octreotide. In conclusion, pancreatic complications occurred frequently (21%) following pancreatic trauma and resulted in significant morbidity. In this nonrandomized series of patients with equivalent ATI, ISS, and pancreatic grade injuries, the prophylactic use of octreotide was associated with no pancreatic complications and no negative sequelae.

  13. Pancreatic and duodenal homeobox protein 1 (Pdx-1) maintains endoplasmic reticulum calcium levels through transcriptional regulation of sarco-endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase 2b (SERCA2b) in the islet β cell.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Justin S; Kono, Tatsuyoshi; Tong, Xin; Yamamoto, Wataru R; Zarain-Herzberg, Angel; Merrins, Matthew J; Satin, Leslie S; Gilon, Patrick; Evans-Molina, Carmella

    2014-11-21

    Although the pancreatic duodenal homeobox 1 (Pdx-1) transcription factor is known to play an indispensable role in β cell development and secretory function, recent data also implicate Pdx-1 in the maintenance of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) health. The sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase 2b (SERCA2b) pump maintains a steep Ca(2+) gradient between the cytosol and ER lumen. In models of diabetes, our data demonstrated loss of β cell Pdx-1 that occurs in parallel with altered SERCA2b expression, whereas in silico analysis of the SERCA2b promoter revealed multiple putative Pdx-1 binding sites. We hypothesized that Pdx-1 loss under inflammatory and diabetic conditions leads to decreased SERCA2b levels and activity with concomitant alterations in ER health. To test this, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Pdx-1 was performed in INS-1 cells. The results revealed reduced SERCA2b expression and decreased ER Ca(2+), which was measured using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. Cotransfection of human Pdx-1 with a reporter fused to the human SERCA2 promoter increased luciferase activity 3- to 4-fold relative to an empty vector control, and direct binding of Pdx-1 to the proximal SERCA2 promoter was confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation. To determine whether restoration of SERCA2b could rescue ER stress induced by Pdx-1 loss, Pdx1(+/-) mice were fed a high-fat diet. Isolated islets demonstrated an increased spliced-to-total Xbp1 ratio, whereas SERCA2b overexpression reduced the Xbp1 ratio to that of wild-type controls. Together, these results identify SERCA2b as a novel transcriptional target of Pdx-1 and define a role for altered ER Ca(2+) regulation in Pdx-1-deficient states.

  14. AMP-activated protein kinase: a key regulator of energy balance with many roles in human disease.

    PubMed

    Grahame Hardie, D

    2014-12-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a sensor of cellular energy status that regulates cellular and whole-body energy balance. A recently reported crystal structure has illuminated the complex regulatory mechanisms by which AMP and ADP cause activation of AMPK, involving phosphorylation by the upstream kinase LKB1. Once activated by falling cellular energy status, AMPK activates catabolic pathways that generate ATP whilst inhibiting anabolic pathways and other cellular processes that consume ATP. A role of AMPK is implicated in many human diseases. Mutations in the γ2 subunit cause heart disease due to excessive glycogen storage in cardiac myocytes, leading to ventricular pre-excitation. AMPK-activating drugs reverse many of the metabolic defects associated with insulin resistance, and recent findings suggest that the insulin-sensitizing effects of the widely used antidiabetic drug metformin are mediated by AMPK. The upstream kinase LKB1 is a tumour suppressor, and AMPK may exert many of its antitumour effects. AMPK activation promotes the oxidative metabolism typical of quiescent cells, rather than the aerobic glycolysis observed in tumour cells and cells involved in inflammation, explaining in part why AMPK activators have both antitumour and anti-inflammatory effects. Salicylate (the major in vivo metabolite of aspirin) activates AMPK, and this could be responsible for at least some of the anticancer and anti-inflammatory effects of aspirin. In addition to metformin and salicylates, novel drugs that modulate AMPK are likely to enter clinical trials soon. Finally, AMPK may be involved in viral infection: downregulation of AMPK during hepatitis C virus infection appears to be essential for efficient viral replication. PMID:24824502

  15. Chronic Pancreatitis in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... fewer than 10 grams of fat. About 20 potato chips contain 10 grams of fat, so it takes discipline to make sure to stay within this range. Patients who have lost the ability to digest food will be prescribed pills containing pancreatic enzymes to help with digestion. They may also be ...

  16. Pancreatic Cancer: A Review.

    PubMed

    Yabar, Cinthya S; Winter, Jordan M

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer is now the third leading cause of cancer related deaths in the United States, yet advances in treatment options have been minimal over the past decade. In this review, we summarize the evaluation and treatments for this disease. We highlight molecular advances that hopefully will soon translate into improved outcomes. PMID:27546841

  17. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 4

    MedlinePlus

    ... lung, liver, and peritoneal cavity. An inset shows cancer cells spreading from the pancreas, through the blood and lymph system, to another ... abdomen that contains the intestines, stomach, and liver). Cancer may also have spread to ... pancreas or to lymph nodes. Stage IV pancreatic cancer. ...

  18. Pancreatic Cystic Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Limaiem, Faten; Khalfallah, Tahar; Farhat, Leila Ben; Bouraoui, Saâdia; Lahmar, Ahlem; Mzabi, Sabeh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are rare and constitute approximately 0.5% of all pancreatic neoplasms. Aims: The study was to describe clinicopathological features of pancreatic cystic tumors. Patients and Methods: In our retrospective study, we reviewed 10 cases of pancreatic cystic neoplasms that were diagnosed at the pathology department of Mongi Slim hospital over a 14-year period (2000-2013). We adopted the latest World Health Organization (WHO) classification (2010) in grouping all tumors. Results: There were one male and nine female patients (sex ratio M/F = 1:9) aged between 21 and 68 years (mean = 37.5 years). The most common clinical presentation was epigastric and abdominal pain (n = 6) followed by vomiting (n = 3). Abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan disclosed a cystic lesion of the pancreas ranging in size between 2 and 10 cm (mean = 6.75 cm). All patients underwent surgical treatment. Histopathological examination of the surgical specimen established the diagnosis of solid pseudopapillary neoplasm (n = 2), serous cystic neoplasm (n = 2), mucinous cystadenoma (n = 4), mucinous cystadenocarcinoma (n = 1), and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm with invasive carcinoma (n = 1). Conclusion: Better understanding of pancreatic cystic neoplasms is essential for clinicians to make accurate diagnosis and to provide the best management for patients. PMID:25210676

  19. Acute and chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Vlodov, J; Tenner, S M

    2001-09-01

    Acute pancreatitis has multiple causes, an unpredictable course, and myriad complications. The diagnosis relies on a combination of history, physical examination, serologic markers, and radiologic findings. The mainstay of therapy includes aggressive hydration, maintenance of NPO, and adequate analgesia with narcotics. Antibiotic and nutritional support with total parenteral nutrition should be used when appropriate.

  20. Nutrition in chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Henrik Højgaard; Irtun, Øivind; Olesen, Søren Schou; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Holst, Mette

    2013-01-01

    The pancreas is a major player in nutrient digestion. In chronic pancreatitis both exocrine and endocrine insufficiency may develop leading to malnutrition over time. Maldigestion is often a late complication of chronic pancreatic and depends on the severity of the underlying disease. The severity of malnutrition is correlated with two major factors: (1) malabsorption and depletion of nut