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Sample records for llfdi questionnaire items

  1. Grouping of Items in Mobile Web Questionnaires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mavletova, Aigul; Couper, Mick P.

    2016-01-01

    There is some evidence that a scrolling design may reduce breakoffs in mobile web surveys compared to a paging design, but there is little empirical evidence to guide the choice of the optimal number of items per page. We investigate the effect of the number of items presented on a page on data quality in two types of questionnaires: with or…

  2. ITEM RESPONSE ANALYSES OF THE EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES SURVEY PRINCIPAL QUESTIONNAIRE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MAYESKE, GEORGE W.; AND OTHERS

    THIS REPORT PRESENTS THE TABULATIONS AND ANALYSES OF RESPONSES TO EACH ITEM OF THE PRINCIPAL QUESTIONNAIRE THAT WAS ADMINISTERED AS PART OF THE EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES SURVEY. THE ITEM ANALYSES OF THESE DATA WERE CONDUCTED (1) TO PRESENT THE NUMBER AND PERCENTAGE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOL PRINCIPALS RESPONDING TO EACH ITEM ALTERNATIVE,…

  3. Reliability and Validity of 39-Item Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire and Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Jesus-Ribeiro, Joana; Vieira, Elsa; Ferreira, Pedro; Januário, Cristina; Freire, António

    2017-05-31

    Parkinson's disease has a significant impact in quality of life, which can be assessed with 39-item Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire and Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire. This study aimed to evaluate the reliability and validity of these scales in Portuguese patients. Reliability was assessed through internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha) and reproducibility (intraclass correlation coefficient). Regarding construct validity, we performed one-way analysis of variance across different groups according to modified Hoehn and Yahr scale. For criterion validity, we compared both scales with each other and with the Short Form 36-item Health Survey. In a total of 100 patients with Parkinson's disease, Cronbach's alpha ranged for 39-item Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire between 0.66 - 0.98, and for Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire, between 0.78 - 0.98. Intraclass correlation coefficient for 39-item Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire ranged between 0.49 - 0.96, and for Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire, ranged between 0.65 - 0.96. Both scales showed, in general, capacity to discriminate differences among patients in the different stages of disease. The scales presented moderate to strong magnitude correlations with some Short Form 36-item Health Survey domains. Cronbach's alpha coefficients for most domains were satisfactory. Overall, it has been demonstrated good reproducibility, as well as construct and criterion validity. The Portuguese versions of both scales showed to be valid and reliable.

  4. Testing psychometric properties of the 30-item general health questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Klainin-Yobas, Piyanee; He, Hong-Gu

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the psychometric properties of the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-30) given conflicting findings in the literature. A cross-sectional, nonexperimental research was used with a convenience sample of 271 American female health care professionals. Data were collected by using self-reported questionnaires. A series of exploratory factor analyses (EFAs), confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs), and structural equation modeling (SEM) were performed to examine underlying dimensions of the GHQ-30. Results from EFAs and CFAs revealed the three-factor composition (positive affect, anxiety, and depressed mood). All factor loadings were statistically significant, and one pair of error variance was allowed to be correlated. All factors contained questionnaire items with acceptable face validity and demonstrated good internal consistency reliability. Results from SEM further confirmed underlying constructs of the scale. To our knowledge, this is the first study that extensively tested the psychometric properties of the GHQ-30, taking both statistical and substantive issues into consideration.

  5. 15 CFR Supplement No. 6 to Part 742 - Technical Questionnaire for Encryption Items

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Technical Questionnaire for Encryption Items No. Supplement No. 6 to Part 742 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and... Questionnaire for Encryption Items (a) For all encryption items: (1) State the name(s) of each product...

  6. A Comparison of Item-Level and Scale-Level Multiple Imputation for Questionnaire Batteries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottschall, Amanda C.; West, Stephen G.; Enders, Craig K.

    2012-01-01

    Behavioral science researchers routinely use scale scores that sum or average a set of questionnaire items to address their substantive questions. A researcher applying multiple imputation to incomplete questionnaire data can either impute the incomplete items prior to computing scale scores or impute the scale scores directly from other scale…

  7. A Comparison of Item-Level and Scale-Level Multiple Imputation for Questionnaire Batteries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottschall, Amanda C.; West, Stephen G.; Enders, Craig K.

    2012-01-01

    Behavioral science researchers routinely use scale scores that sum or average a set of questionnaire items to address their substantive questions. A researcher applying multiple imputation to incomplete questionnaire data can either impute the incomplete items prior to computing scale scores or impute the scale scores directly from other scale…

  8. Affective Outcomes of Schooling: Full-Information Item Factor Analysis of a Student Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muraki, Eiji; Engelhard, George, Jr.

    Recent developments in dichotomous factor analysis based on multidimensional item response models (Bock and Aitkin, 1981; Muthen, 1978) provide an effective method for exploring the dimensionality of questionnaire items. Implemented in the TESTFACT program, this "full information" item factor analysis accounts not only for the pairwise joint…

  9. Differential Item Functioning Analysis of the 2003-04 NHANES Physical Activity Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Yong; Zhu, Weimo

    2011-01-01

    Using differential item functioning (DIF) analyses, this study examined whether there were any DIF items in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) physical activity (PA) questionnaire. A subset of adult data from the 2003-04 NHANES study (n = 3,083) was used. PA items related to respondents' occupational, transportation,…

  10. Differential Item Functioning Analysis of the 2003-04 NHANES Physical Activity Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Yong; Zhu, Weimo

    2011-01-01

    Using differential item functioning (DIF) analyses, this study examined whether there were any DIF items in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) physical activity (PA) questionnaire. A subset of adult data from the 2003-04 NHANES study (n = 3,083) was used. PA items related to respondents' occupational, transportation,…

  11. Preliminary reliability of the five item physical activity questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Min-Haeng

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to design a physical activity questionnaire reflecting on the basic principles and recommendations of exercise and to examine its reliability. [Subjects and Methods] 342 males and 374 females from the community centers (senior center, residential culture center, sport center, and YWCA center) participated in this study. [Results] The test-retest reliability of the physical activity questionnaire, measured with an interval of three months, being between 0.61 and 0.91 signifies that the questionnaire was useful instrument for assessing physical activity levels. [Conclusion] This study found that the simple physical activity questionnaire containing the frequency, duration, intensity, overall length, and type of activities that the person performed during their leisure time was reliable. PMID:28174459

  12. Preliminary reliability of the five item physical activity questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Cho, Min-Haeng

    2016-12-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to design a physical activity questionnaire reflecting on the basic principles and recommendations of exercise and to examine its reliability. [Subjects and Methods] 342 males and 374 females from the community centers (senior center, residential culture center, sport center, and YWCA center) participated in this study. [Results] The test-retest reliability of the physical activity questionnaire, measured with an interval of three months, being between 0.61 and 0.91 signifies that the questionnaire was useful instrument for assessing physical activity levels. [Conclusion] This study found that the simple physical activity questionnaire containing the frequency, duration, intensity, overall length, and type of activities that the person performed during their leisure time was reliable.

  13. Item Response Modeling of Forced-Choice Questionnaires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Anna; Maydeu-Olivares, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Multidimensional forced-choice formats can significantly reduce the impact of numerous response biases typically associated with rating scales. However, if scored with classical methodology, these questionnaires produce ipsative data, which lead to distorted scale relationships and make comparisons between individuals problematic. This research…

  14. Item Response Modeling of Forced-Choice Questionnaires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Anna; Maydeu-Olivares, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Multidimensional forced-choice formats can significantly reduce the impact of numerous response biases typically associated with rating scales. However, if scored with classical methodology, these questionnaires produce ipsative data, which lead to distorted scale relationships and make comparisons between individuals problematic. This research…

  15. Why item response theory should be used for longitudinal questionnaire data analysis in medical research.

    PubMed

    Gorter, Rosalie; Fox, Jean-Paul; Twisk, Jos W R

    2015-07-30

    Multi-item questionnaires are important instruments for monitoring health in epidemiological longitudinal studies. Mostly sum-scores are used as a summary measure for these multi-item questionnaires. The objective of this study was to show the negative impact of using sum-score based longitudinal data analysis instead of Item Response Theory (IRT)-based plausible values. In a simulation study (varying the number of items, sample size, and distribution of the outcomes) the parameter estimates resulting from both modeling techniques were compared to the true values. Next, the models were applied to an example dataset from the Amsterdam Growth and Health Longitudinal Study (AGHLS). The results show that using sum-scores leads to overestimation of the within person (repeated measurement) variance and underestimation of the between person variance. We recommend using IRT-based plausible value techniques for analyzing repeatedly measured multi-item questionnaire data.

  16. The Random Response Technique as an Indicator of Questionnaire Item Social Desirability/Personal Sensitivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crino, Michael D.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The random response technique was compared to a direct questionnaire, administered to college students, to investigate whether or not the responses predicted the social desirability of the item. Results suggest support for the hypothesis. A 33-item version of the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale which was used is included. (GDC)

  17. Background and Attitude Questionnaire Items and A Priori Weights. Table 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Dept. of Education, Lansing. Research, Evaluation, and Assessment Services.

    Background and attitude questionnaire items used in the Michigan Educational Assessment battery to measure socioeconomic status and attitudes toward self, school, and the importance of school achievement are presented. A priori weights for item responses are provided. (For related document, see TM 002 329.) (KM)

  18. Item Response Modeling: An Evaluation of the Children's Fruit and Vegetable Self-Efficacy Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Kathy; Baranowski, Tom; Thompson, Debbe

    2006-01-01

    Perceived self-efficacy (SE) for eating fruit and vegetables (FV) is a key variable mediating FV change in interventions. This study applies item response modeling (IRM) to a fruit, juice and vegetable self-efficacy questionnaire (FVSEQ) previously validated with classical test theory (CTT) procedures. The 24-item (five-point Likert scale) FVSEQ…

  19. Item Response Modeling: An Evaluation of the Children's Fruit and Vegetable Self-Efficacy Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Kathy; Baranowski, Tom; Thompson, Debbe

    2006-01-01

    Perceived self-efficacy (SE) for eating fruit and vegetables (FV) is a key variable mediating FV change in interventions. This study applies item response modeling (IRM) to a fruit, juice and vegetable self-efficacy questionnaire (FVSEQ) previously validated with classical test theory (CTT) procedures. The 24-item (five-point Likert scale) FVSEQ…

  20. Catquest-9SF patient outcomes questionnaire: nine-item short-form Rasch-scaled revision of the Catquest questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Lundström, Mats; Pesudovs, Konrad

    2009-03-01

    To assess and optimize the Catquest questionnaire for measuring patient-reported outcomes of cataract surgery using Rasch analysis. Fifty-eight ophthalmic surgical units in Sweden. Catquest questionnaires (n = 21364) from the Swedish National Cataract Register were selected and randomized to 2 groups. Data from 10486 questionnaires were comprehensively Rasch analyzed using a 4-Andrich rating scale model in Winsteps software. A revised version of Catquest was developed (Catquest-9SF) and tested in 10886 patients for validity and responsiveness to cataract surgery. Only the visual disability subscale formed a valid measurement scale. This could be enhanced through the addition of the 2 global assessment items; however, the symptoms and frequency of performing the activities items did not contribute to the measurement. The 9-item short-form version (Catquest-9SF) had ordered response thresholds and good person separation (2.65) and was largely free from differential item functioning. All items fit a single overall construct (infit range, 0.75 to 1.29; outfit range, 0.70 to 1.39) and unidimensional by principal components analysis. The items were well targeted to the preoperative participants (0.34 logit difference in means). The score correlated with visual acuity (r = 0.43 preoperatively; r = 0.48 postoperatively) and was highly responsive to cataract surgery (preoperatively -0.32 +/- 2.15 logits; postoperatively -3.21 +/- 2.50 logits (P<.0001). The 9-item Rasch-scaled Catquest-9SF was highly valid in measuring visual disability outcomes of cataract surgery. Its brevity makes it suited to routine clinical use, and a raw-data to Rasch-measure conversion simplifies application.

  1. ITEM RESPONSE ANALYSES OF THE EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES SURVEY 9TH GRADE STUDENT QUESTIONNAIRE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WEINFELD, FREDERIC D.; AND OTHERS

    THIS REPORT PRESENTS THE ANALYSIS OF QUESTIONNAIRE ITEM RESPONSES FROM THE NINTH-GRADE STUDENT QUESTIONNAIRE ADMINISTERED AS PART OF THE EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES SURVEY. THE ANALYSES WERE PERFORMED TO DOCUMENT SOME OF THE BASIC DATA FROM THE SURVEY, TO MAKE THEM AVAILABLE TO INTERESTED EDUCATIONAL RESEARCHERS, AND TO REWORK THE BASIC DATA FOR…

  2. Development of the Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire: constructing an item pool

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Laura; Jenkinson, Crispin; Dummett, Sarah; Dawson, Jill; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Morley, David

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire is a patient-reported outcome measure in development that is grounded on the World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF). The study reported here aimed to inform and generate an item pool for the new measure, which is specifically designed for the assessment of participation and activity in patients experiencing a range of health conditions. Methods Items were informed through in-depth interviews conducted with 37 participants spanning a range of conditions. Interviews aimed to identify how their condition impacted their ability to participate in meaningful activities. Conditions included arthritis, cancer, chronic back pain, diabetes, motor neuron disease, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, and spinal cord injury. Transcripts were analyzed using the framework method. Statements relating to ICF themes were recast as questionnaire items and shown for review to an expert panel. Cognitive debrief interviews (n=13) were used to assess items for face and content validity. Results ICF themes relevant to activities and participation in everyday life were explored, and a total of 222 items formed the initial item pool. This item pool was refined by the research team and 28 generic items were mapped onto all nine chapters of the ICF construct, detailing activity and participation. Cognitive interviewing confirmed the questionnaire instructions, items, and response options were acceptable to participants. Conclusion Using a clear conceptual basis to inform item generation, 28 items have been identified as suitable to undergo further psychometric testing. A large-scale postal survey will follow in order to refine the instrument further and to assess its psychometric properties. The final instrument is intended for use in clinical trials and interventions targeted at maintaining or improving activity and participation. PMID:26056503

  3. The effect of item content overlap on organizational commitment questionnaire--turnover cognitions relationships.

    PubMed

    Bozeman, D P; Perrewé, P L

    2001-02-01

    This study examined the effect of overlapping scale content when certain items in the Organizational Commitment Questionnaire (OCQ) are used to predict turnover cognition measures. Analyses of judgmental data collected from 25 subject matter experts suggested that 6 OCQ items reflected a desire or an intent to retain membership in one's organization. Confirmatory factor analyses of survey data from 172 master of business administration alumni showed that the 6 OCQ retention items shared overlapping content with turnover cognitions items. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses of survey data from 330 hotel managers showed that (a) removing the 6 OCQ retention items caused a significant decrease in the variance explained in a measure of turnover cognitions and (b) the size of this effect is larger than that suggested by previous work.

  4. Factor structure of the 12-item General Health Questionnaire in the Japanese general adult population.

    PubMed

    Doi, Yuriko; Minowa, Masumi

    2003-08-01

    The 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) has been extensively used in a variety of settings across countries. The main aim of the present study was to assess the factor structure of the GHQ-12 for the Japanese general adult population. Data came from a sample of 1808 Japanese aged 20 years or older who were randomly selected based on the 1995 census (897 men and 911 women). Cronbach's alpha coefficients were 0.83 for men and 0.85 for women. Overall, the corrected item-total correlation coefficients were >0.20 for both genders. The GHQ-12 yielded a two-factor solution of psychological distress (items 2, 5, 6, 9, 10 and 11) and social dysfunction (items 1, 3, 4, 7 and 8), which jointly accounted for 49.1% of the total variance, for women. Item 12 on happiness was not discernable. For men, item 12 was separated from a social dysfunction factor and yielded the third factor with item 3 on social role, and the three factors jointly accounted for 57.6%. The results of the present study suggest that the GHQ-12 can be used as an internally reliable and homogeneous scale that produces mainly the factors of psychological distress and social dysfunction. Item 12 may be structurally different in the case of Japanese adults.

  5. The Dimensionality and Gender Differential Item Functioning of the Mini Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelin, Michaela N.; Carleton, Bruce C.; Smith, M. Anne; Zumbo, Bruno D.

    2004-01-01

    The present study investigated the factor structure and item analysis of the Mini Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (MiniAQLQ) in a sample of 258 community-dwelling asthmatic adults between the ages of 16 and 87 years. The mean age was 56 years for males (N = 99) and 50 years for females (N = 159). This study compared the fit of three factor…

  6. The Dimensionality and Gender Differential Item Functioning of the Mini Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelin, Michaela N.; Carleton, Bruce C.; Smith, M. Anne; Zumbo, Bruno D.

    2004-01-01

    The present study investigated the factor structure and item analysis of the Mini Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (MiniAQLQ) in a sample of 258 community-dwelling asthmatic adults between the ages of 16 and 87 years. The mean age was 56 years for males (N = 99) and 50 years for females (N = 159). This study compared the fit of three factor…

  7. Mind Your Words: Positive and Negative Items Create Method Effects on the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Dam, Nicholas T.; Hobkirk, Andrea L.; Danoff-Burg, Sharon; Earleywine, Mitch

    2012-01-01

    Mindfulness, a construct that entails moment-to-moment effort to be aware of present experiences and positive attitudinal features, has become integrated into the sciences. The Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ), one popular measure of mindfulness, exhibits different responses to positively and negatively worded items in nonmeditating…

  8. Mind Your Words: Positive and Negative Items Create Method Effects on the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Dam, Nicholas T.; Hobkirk, Andrea L.; Danoff-Burg, Sharon; Earleywine, Mitch

    2012-01-01

    Mindfulness, a construct that entails moment-to-moment effort to be aware of present experiences and positive attitudinal features, has become integrated into the sciences. The Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ), one popular measure of mindfulness, exhibits different responses to positively and negatively worded items in nonmeditating…

  9. Item wording and internal consistency of a measure of cohesion: the group environment questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Eys, Mark A; Carron, Albert V; Bray, Steven R; Brawley, Lawrence R

    2007-06-01

    A common practice for counteracting response acquiescence in psychological measures has been to employ both negatively and positively worded items. However, previous research has highlighted that the reliability of measures can be affected by this practice (Spector, 1992). The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect that the presence of negatively worded items has on the internal reliability of the Group Environment Questionnaire (GEQ). Two samples (N = 276) were utilized, and participants were asked to complete the GEQ (original and revised) on separate occasions. Results demonstrated that the revised questionnaire (containing all positively worded items) had significantly higher Cronbach alpha values for three of the four dimensions of the GEQ. Implications, alternatives, and future directions are discussed.

  10. Factorial structure of the Chinese version of the 12-item General Health Questionnaire in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Li, William H C; Chung, Joyce O K; Chui, Maureen M L; Chan, Polly S L

    2009-12-01

    To evaluate the underlying factor structure of the Chinese version of General Health Questionnaire-12 using exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses in Chinese adolescents and find out which factor model proposed by previous empirical research is the best-fit model. The 12-item General Health Questionnaire has been extensively used with adolescents in the West. Yet, it has not been used with adolescents in a Hong Kong Chinese context. A cross-sectional study was employed. Chinese students between the ages of 12-19 from four secondary schools were invited to participate in the study using the multiple-stage stratified random sampling method during the period from December 2007-February, 2008. The total sample size included in the final analysed was 1883. The General Health Questionnaire-12 was found to be internally consistent. The results of exploratory factor analysis showed that there are two factors underlying the General Health Questionnaire-12. Of nine factor models were tested by means of confirmatory factor analysis, only three factor model: the eight-item two-factor model, 12-item three-factor model and 10-item two-factor model, demonstrated good model fit across all model fit indices. This study addressed a gap in the literature by evaluating the factorial structure of the Chinese version of General Health Questionnaire-12 using exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses in Chinese adolescents. The findings revealed that the eight-item two-factor model is the best-fit model. The adolescent mental health problem is alarming and aggravating and warrants special attention. It is essential for community nurses to differentiate psychological distress in adolescents and to identify those adolescents who are at a higher risk of suffering from mental health problems. The availability of a valid and reliable instrument that measures adolescents' psychological distress is crucial before any nursing interventions to promote their mental health can be

  11. The Long-Term Conditions Questionnaire: conceptual framework and item development

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Michele; Potter, Caroline M; Kelly, Laura; Hunter, Cheryl; Gibbons, Elizabeth; Jenkinson, Crispin; Coulter, Angela; Forder, Julien; Towers, Ann-Marie; A’Court, Christine; Fitzpatrick, Ray

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To identify the main issues of importance when living with long-term conditions to refine a conceptual framework for informing the item development of a patient-reported outcome measure for long-term conditions. Materials and methods Semi-structured qualitative interviews (n=48) were conducted with people living with at least one long-term condition. Participants were recruited through primary care. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed by thematic analysis. The analysis served to refine the conceptual framework, based on reviews of the literature and stakeholder consultations, for developing candidate items for a new measure for long-term conditions. Results Three main organizing concepts were identified: impact of long-term conditions, experience of services and support, and self-care. The findings helped to refine a conceptual framework, leading to the development of 23 items that represent issues of importance in long-term conditions. The 23 candidate items formed the first draft of the measure, currently named the Long-Term Conditions Questionnaire. Conclusion The aim of this study was to refine the conceptual framework and develop items for a patient-reported outcome measure for long-term conditions, including single and multiple morbidities and physical and mental health conditions. Qualitative interviews identified the key themes for assessing outcomes in long-term conditions, and these underpinned the development of the initial draft of the measure. These initial items will undergo cognitive testing to refine the items prior to further validation in a survey. PMID:27621678

  12. The Dysexecutive Questionnaire advanced: item and test score characteristics, 4-factor solution, and severity classification.

    PubMed

    Bodenburg, Sebastian; Dopslaff, Nina

    2008-01-01

    The Dysexecutive Questionnaire (DEX, , Behavioral assessment of the dysexecutive syndrome, 1996) is a standardized instrument to measure possible behavioral changes as a result of the dysexecutive syndrome. Although initially intended only as a qualitative instrument, the DEX has also been used increasingly to address quantitative problems. Until now there have not been more fundamental statistical analyses of the questionnaire's testing quality. The present study is based on an unselected sample of 191 patients with acquired brain injury and reports on the data relating to the quality of the items, the reliability and the factorial structure of the DEX. Item 3 displayed too great an item difficulty, whereas item 11 was not sufficiently discriminating. The DEX's reliability in self-rating is r = 0.85. In addition to presenting the statistical values of the tests, a clinical severity classification of the overall scores of the 4 found factors and of the questionnaire as a whole is carried out on the basis of quartile standards.

  13. Assessment of dietary fish consumption in pregnancy: comparing one-, four- and thirty-six-item questionnaires.

    PubMed

    Oken, Emily; Guthrie, Lauren B; Bloomingdale, Arienne; Gillman, Matthew W; Olsen, Sjurdur F; Amarasiriwardena, Chitra J; Platek, Deborah N; Bellinger, David C; Wright, Robert O

    2014-09-01

    Fish consumption influences a number of health outcomes. Few studies have directly compared dietary assessment methods to determine the best approach to estimating intakes of fish and its component nutrients, including DHA, and toxicants, including methylmercury. Our objective was to compare three methods of assessing fish intake. We assessed 30 d fish intake using three approaches: (i) a single question on total fish consumption; (ii) a brief comprehensive FFQ that included four questions about fish; and (iii) a focused FFQ with thirty-six questions about different finfish and shellfish. Obstetrics practices in Boston, MA, USA. Fifty-nine pregnant women who consumed ≤2 monthly fish servings. Estimated intakes of fish, DHA and Hg were lowest with the one-question screener and highest with the thirty-six-item fish questionnaire. Estimated intake of DHA with the thirty-six-item questionnaire was 4·4-fold higher (97 v. 22 mg/d), and intake of Hg was 3·8-fold higher (1·6 v. 0·42 μg/d), compared with the one-question screener. Plasma DHA concentration was correlated with fish intake assessed with the one-question screener (Spearman r = 0·27, P = 0·04), but not with the four-item FFQ (r = 0·08, P = 0·54) or the thirty-six-item fish questionnaire (r = 0·01, P = 0·93). In contrast, blood and hair Hg concentrations were similarly correlated with fish and Hg intakes regardless of the assessment method (r = 0·35 to 0·52). A longer questionnaire provides no advantage over shorter questionnaires in ranking intakes of fish, DHA and Hg compared with biomarkers, but estimates of absolute intakes can vary by as much as fourfold across methods.

  14. An analysis of differential item functioning by gender in the Learning Disability Screening Questionnaire (LDSQ).

    PubMed

    Murray, Aja Louise; Booth, Tom; McKenzie, Karen

    2015-04-01

    The Learning Disability Screening Questionnaire (LDSQ; McKenzie & Paxton, 2006) was developed as a brief screen for intellectual disability. Although several previous studies have evaluated the LDSQ with respect to its utility as a clinical and research tool, no studies have considered the fairness of the test across males and females. In the current study we, therefore, used a multi-group item response theory approach to assess differential item functioning across gender in a sample of 211 males and 132 females assessed in clinical and forensic settings. Although the test did not show evidence of differential item functioning by gender, it was necessary to exclude one item due to estimation problems and to combine two very highly related items (concerning reading and writing ability) into a single literacy item Thus, in addition to being generally supportive of the utility of the LDSQ, our results also highlight possible areas of weakness in the tool and suggest possible amendments that could be made to test content to improve the test in future revisions.

  15. Statistical power as a function of Cronbach alpha of instrument questionnaire items.

    PubMed

    Heo, Moonseong; Kim, Namhee; Faith, Myles S

    2015-10-14

    In countless number of clinical trials, measurements of outcomes rely on instrument questionnaire items which however often suffer measurement error problems which in turn affect statistical power of study designs. The Cronbach alpha or coefficient alpha, here denoted by C(α), can be used as a measure of internal consistency of parallel instrument items that are developed to measure a target unidimensional outcome construct. Scale score for the target construct is often represented by the sum of the item scores. However, power functions based on C(α) have been lacking for various study designs. We formulate a statistical model for parallel items to derive power functions as a function of C(α) under several study designs. To this end, we assume fixed true score variance assumption as opposed to usual fixed total variance assumption. That assumption is critical and practically relevant to show that smaller measurement errors are inversely associated with higher inter-item correlations, and thus that greater C(α) is associated with greater statistical power. We compare the derived theoretical statistical power with empirical power obtained through Monte Carlo simulations for the following comparisons: one-sample comparison of pre- and post-treatment mean differences, two-sample comparison of pre-post mean differences between groups, and two-sample comparison of mean differences between groups. It is shown that C(α) is the same as a test-retest correlation of the scale scores of parallel items, which enables testing significance of C(α). Closed-form power functions and samples size determination formulas are derived in terms of C(α), for all of the aforementioned comparisons. Power functions are shown to be an increasing function of C(α), regardless of comparison of interest. The derived power functions are well validated by simulation studies that show that the magnitudes of theoretical power are virtually identical to those of the empirical power. Regardless

  16. Psychometrical assessment and item analysis of the General Health Questionnaire in victims of terrorism.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Gomez, David; Lopez-Castroman, Jorge; de Leon-Martinez, Victoria; Baca-Garcia, Enrique; Cabanas-Arrate, Maria Luisa; Sanchez-Gonzalez, Antonio; Aguado, David

    2013-03-01

    There is a need to assess the psychiatric morbidity that appears as a consequence of terrorist attacks. The General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) has been used to this end, but its psychometric properties have never been evaluated in a population affected by terrorism. A sample of 891 participants included 162 direct victims of terrorist attacks and 729 relatives of the victims. All participants were evaluated using the 28-item version of the GHQ (GHQ-28). We examined the reliability and external validity of scores on the scale using Cronbach's alpha and Pearson correlation with the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), respectively. The factor structure of the scale was analyzed with varimax rotation. Samejima's (1969) graded response model was used to explore the item properties. The GHQ-28 scores showed good reliability and item-scale correlations. The factor analysis identified 3 factors: anxious-somatic symptoms, social dysfunction, and depression symptoms. All factors showed good correlation with the STAI. Before rotation, the first, second, and third factor explained 44.0%, 6.4%, and 5.0% of the variance, respectively. Varimax rotation redistributed the percentages of variance accounted for to 28.4%, 13.8%, and 13.2%, respectively. Items with the highest loadings in the first factor measured anxiety symptoms, whereas items with the highest loadings in the third factor measured suicide ideation. Samejima's model found that high scores in suicide-related items were associated with severe depression. The factor structure of the GHQ-28 found in this study underscores the preeminence of anxiety symptoms among victims of terrorism and their relatives. Item response analysis identified the most difficult and significant items for each factor.

  17. Self-administered semiquantitative food frequency questionnaires: patterns, predictors, and interpretation of omitted items

    PubMed Central

    Michels, Karin B.; Willett, Walter C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Food items on a self-administered food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) may be left blank because the food was not consumed, because of difficulties remembering the frequency or amount of intake, or due to an oversight. Methods We explored the predictors and frequency of consumption of omitted food items on an FFQ used in the Nurses’ Health Study II. Of 87,676 women who returned a mailed 147-item FFQ in 1999, 34% completed the entire questionnaire, whereas 66% left at least 1 food item blank. Ten or more foods were omitted by 5% of participants. Foods were more likely omitted by women who were older, more physically active, and had more children. We resurveyed 2876 participants who had left between 1 and 70 food items blank and asked them to fill in the blanks. Overall, 2485 participants provided complete responses. Results In the resurvey, 64% of the formerly omitted foods were marked as consumed never or less than once per month, 20% as 1–3 times per month, 8% as once per week, and 9% as more than once per week. Commonly consumed foods and beverages were less likely omitted because they were not consumed than rarely consumed foods. The best estimate for the true intake value of an omitted food was 0.82 times the average population intake. Conclusions When calculating nutrient intake, the assumption that items missing represent zero intake is reasonable. However, foods consumed more often in the population at large are less likely than rarely consumed foods to be left blank because they were not consumed. PMID:19106799

  18. Use of differential item functioning analysis to assess the equivalence of translations of a questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Morten Aa; Groenvold, Mogens; Bjorner, Jakob B; Aaronson, Neil; Conroy, Thierry; Cull, Ann; Fayers, Peter; Hjermstad, Marianne; Sprangers, Mirjam; Sullivan, Marianne

    2003-06-01

    In cross-national comparisons based on questionnaires, accurate translations are necessary to obtain valid results. Differential item functioning (DIF) analysis can be used to test whether translations of items in multi-item scales are equivalent to the original. In data from 10,815 respondents representing 10 European languages we tested for DIF in the nine translations of the EORTC QLQ-C30 emotional function scale when compared to the original English version. We tested for DIF using two different methods in parallel, a contingency table method and logistic regression. The DIF results obtained with the two methods were similar. We found indications of DIF in seven of the nine translations. At least two of the DIF findings seem to reflect linguistic problems in the translation. 'Imperfect' translations can affect conclusions drawn from cross-national comparisons. Given that translations can never be identical to the original we discuss how findings of DIF can be interpreted and discuss the difference between linguistic DIF and DIF caused by confounding, cross-cultural differences, or DIF in other items in the scale. We conclude that testing for DIF is a useful way to validate questionnaire translations.

  19. Validation of 5-item and 2-item questionnaires in Chinese version of Dizziness Handicap Inventory for screening objective benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Shu, Liang; Wang, Qian; Pan, Hui; Wu, Jing; Fang, Jie; Sun, Xu-Hong; Zhai, Yu; Dong, You-Rong; Liu, Jian-Ren

    2016-08-01

    As possible candidate screening instruments for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), studies to validate the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) sub-scale (5-item and 2-item) and total scores are rare in China. From May 2014 to December 2014, 108(55 with and 53 without BPPV) patients complaining of episodic vertigo in the past week from a vertigo outpatient clinic were enrolled for DHI evaluation, as well as demographic and other clinical data. Objective BPPV was subsequently determined by positional evoking maneuvers under the record of optical Frenzel glasses. Cronbach's coefficient α was used to evaluate the reliability of psychometric scales. The validity of DHI total, 5-item and 2-item questionnaires to screen for BPPV was assessed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. It revealed that the DHI 5-item questionnaire had good internal consistency (Cronbach's coefficient α = 0.72). Area under the curve of total DHI, 5-item and 2-item scores for discriminating BPPV from those without was 0.678 (95 % CI 0.578-0.778), 0.873(95 % CI 0.807-0.940) and 0.895(95 % CI 0.836-0.953), respectively. It revealed 74.5 % sensitivity and 88.7 % specificity in separating BPPV and those without, with a cutoff value of 12 in the 5-item questionnaire. The corresponding rate of sensitivity and specificity was 78.2 and 88.7 %, respectively, with a cutoff value of 6 in 2-item questionnaire. The present study indicated that both 5-item and 2-item questionnaires in the Chinese version of DHI may be more valid than DHI total score for screening objective BPPV and merit further application in clinical practice in China.

  20. Development of a Short Version of the Visual Function Questionnaire Using Item-Response Theory

    PubMed Central

    Fukuhara, Shunichi; Wakita, Takafumi; Yamada, Masakazu; Hiratsuka, Yoshimune; Green, Joseph; Oki, Kotaro

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In clinical ophthalmology as in other fields, measuring patient-reported outcomes imposes a burden on patients. To decrease that burden, we used item-response theory (IRT) to develop and test a short version of the National Eye Institute's Visual Function Questionnaire (VFQ). Methods We analyzed VFQ data from 276 adults in Japan. Most of them had glaucoma, cataract, or macular degeneration. Their visual acuity (Snellen fraction) averaged 20/120 (range: 20/13 to 20/2000) for the better eye, and 20/200 (range: 20/13 to 20/2000) for the worse eye. We used a polytomous IRT model, the Generalized Partial Credit Model as implemented in software for parameter scaling of rating data (PARSCALE). To select items for inclusion in the short version we examined each item's location on the latent-trait continuum, its slope, and its frequency of missing data. We also ensured representation of all 7 domains that are important in Japan. To examine the characteristics of the resulting scale, we computed its test information (an index of precision that can vary with the value of the latent trait), and carried out validation testing. Results From 32 of the original VFQ items, we selected 11. The scale comprising those 11 items (the VFQ-J11) had test information greater than 9 for values of the latent trait between −2.0 and +0.8. The item thresholds were well-targeted for patients with vision problems. Scores on the VFQ-J11 correlated strongly and in the expected direction with measures of visual field and corrected visual acuity. As expected for a valid measure, those scores also improved by a large amount (almost one standard deviation) after cataract surgery. Conclusion This 11-item instrument can provide reliable and the valid data on visual functioning in patients with ophthalmic problems. It is expected to be less of a burden on respondents, while it maintains good psychometric properties. PMID:24069172

  1. Reliability, Validity and Factor Structure of the 12-Item General Health Questionnaire among General Population

    PubMed Central

    Petkovska, Miodraga Stefanovska; Bojadziev, Marjan I.; Stefanovska, Vesna Velikj

    2015-01-01

    AIM: The aim of the study is to analyze the internal consistency; validity and factor structure of the twelve item General Health Questionnaire for the Macedonian general population. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Data came from nationally representative sample of 1603 randomly selected Macedonians all aged 18 years or older. RESULTS: The mean GHQ score in the general sample was found to be 7.9 (SD = 4.3). The results revealed a higher GHQ score among women (M = 8.91, SD = 4.5) compared to men (M = 6.89; SD = 4.2). The participants from the rural areas obtained a lower GHQ score (M = 7.55, SD = 3.8) compared to participants coming from the urban areas (M = 9.37, SD = 4.1). The principal component analysis with oblique rotation (direct oblimin) with maximum likelihood procedure solution was performed and the results yielded a three factor solution which jointly accounted for 57.17% of the total variance: Factor I named social management (items 1, 3, 4, 6, 7 and 8); Factor II stress (items 2, 5 and 9) and Factor III named self-confidence (items 10, 11 and 12). Its factor structure is in line with representative research from other population groups. CONCLUSION: The GHQ-12 can be used effectively for assessment of the overall psychological well-being and detection of non-psychotic psychiatric problems among the Macedonian population. PMID:27275274

  2. The Patient Health Questionnaire-2: validity of a two-item depression screener.

    PubMed

    Kroenke, Kurt; Spitzer, Robert L; Williams, Janet B W

    2003-11-01

    A number of self-administered questionnaires are available for assessing depression severity, including the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire depression module (PHQ-9). Because even briefer measures might be desirable for use in busy clinical settings or as part of comprehensive health questionnaires, we evaluated a 2-item version of the PHQ depression module, the PHQ-2. The PHQ-2 inquires about the frequency of depressed mood and anhedonia over the past 2 weeks, scoring each as 0 ("not at all") to 3 ("nearly every day"). The PHQ-2 was completed by 6000 patients in 8 primary care clinics and 7 obstetrics-gynecology clinics. Construct validity was assessed using the 20-item Short-Form General Health Survey, self-reported sick days and clinic visits, and symptom-related difficulty. Criterion validity was assessed against an independent structured mental health professional (MHP) interview in a sample of 580 patients. As PHQ-2 depression severity increased from 0 to 6, there was a substantial decrease in functional status on all 6 SF-20 subscales. Also, symptom-related difficulty, sick days, and healthcare utilization increased. Using the MHP reinterview as the criterion standard, a PHQ-2 score > or =3 had a sensitivity of 83% and a specificity of 92% for major depression. Likelihood ratio and receiver operator characteristic analysis identified a PHQ-2 score of 3 as the optimal cutpoint for screening purposes. Results were similar in the primary care and obstetrics-gynecology samples. The construct and criterion validity of the PHQ-2 make it an attractive measure for depression screening.

  3. Item Response Models for Forced-Choice Questionnaires: A Common Framework.

    PubMed

    Brown, Anna

    2016-03-01

    In forced-choice questionnaires, respondents have to make choices between two or more items presented at the same time. Several IRT models have been developed to link respondent choices to underlying psychological attributes, including the recent MUPP (Stark et al. in Appl Psychol Meas 29:184-203, 2005) and Thurstonian IRT (Brown and Maydeu-Olivares in Educ Psychol Meas 71:460-502, 2011) models. In the present article, a common framework is proposed that describes forced-choice models along three axes: (1) the forced-choice format used; (2) the measurement model for the relationships between items and psychological attributes they measure; and (3) the decision model for choice behavior. Using the framework, fundamental properties of forced-choice measurement of individual differences are considered. It is shown that the scale origin for the attributes is generally identified in questionnaires using either unidimensional or multidimensional comparisons. Both dominance and ideal point models can be used to provide accurate forced-choice measurement; and the rules governing accurate person score estimation with these models are remarkably similar.

  4. Adequacy of Using a Three-Item Questionnaire to Determine Zygosity in Chinese Young Twins.

    PubMed

    Ho, Connie Suk-Han; Zheng, Mo; Chow, Bonnie Wing-Yin; Wong, Simpson W L; Lim, Cadmon K P; Waye, Mary M Y

    2017-03-01

    The present study examined the adequacy of a three-item parent questionnaire in determining the zygosity of young Chinese twins and whether there was any association between parent response accuracy and some demographic variables. The sample consisted of 334 pairs of same-sex Chinese twins aged from 3 to 11 years. Three scoring methods, namely the summed score, logistic regression, and decision tree, were employed to evaluate parent response accuracy of twin zygosity based on single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) information. The results showed that all three methods achieved high level of accuracy ranging from 91 to 93 % which was comparable to the accuracy rates in previous Chinese twin studies. Correlation results also showed that the higher the parents' education level or the family income was, the more likely parents were able to tell correctly that their twins are identical or fraternal. The present findings confirmed the validity of using a three-item parent questionnaire to determine twin zygosity in a Chinese school-aged twin sample.

  5. Development and validation of a 6-item working alliance questionnaire for repeated administrations during psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Falkenström, Fredrik; Hatcher, Robert L; Skjulsvik, Tommy; Larsson, Mattias Holmqvist; Holmqvist, Rolf

    2015-03-01

    Recently, researchers have started to measure the working alliance repeatedly across sessions of psychotherapy, relating the working alliance to symptom change session by session. Responding to questionnaires after each session can become tedious, leading to careless responses and/or increasing levels of missing data. Therefore, assessment with the briefest possible instrument is desirable. Because previous research on the Working Alliance Inventory has found the separation of the Goal and Task factors problematic, the present study examined the psychometric properties of a 2-factor, 6-item working alliance measure, adapted from the Working Alliance Inventory, in 3 patient samples (ns = 1,095, 235, and 234). Results showed that a bifactor model fit the data well across the 3 samples, and the factor structure was stable across 10 sessions of primary care counseling/psychotherapy. Although the bifactor model with 1 general and 2 specific factors outperformed the 1-factor model in terms of model fit, dimensionality analyses based on the bifactor model results indicated that in practice the instrument is best treated as unidimensional. Results support the use of composite scores of all 6 items. The instrument was validated by replicating previous findings of session-by-session prediction of symptom reduction using the Autoregressive Latent Trajectory model. The 6-item working alliance scale, called the Session Alliance Inventory, is a promising alternative for researchers in search for a brief alliance measure to administer after every session.

  6. Item generation in the development of an inpatient experience questionnaire: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Patient experience is a key feature of quality improvement in modern health-care delivery. Measuring patient experience is one of several tools used to assess and monitor the quality of health services. This study aims to develop a tool for assessing patient experience with inpatient care in public hospitals in Hong Kong. Methods Based on the General Inpatient Questionnaire (GIQ) framework of the Care Quality Commission as a discussion guide, a qualitative study involving focus group discussions and in-depth individual interviews with patients was employed to develop a tool for measuring inpatient experience in Hong Kong. Results All participants agreed that a patient satisfaction survey is an important platform for collecting patients’ views on improving the quality of health-care services. Findings of the focus group discussions and in-depth individual interviews identified nine key themes as important hospital quality indicators: prompt access, information provision, care and involvement in decision making, physical and emotional needs, coordination of care, respect and privacy, environment and facilities, handling of patient feedback, and overall care from health-care professionals and quality of care. Privacy, complaint mechanisms, patient involvement, and information provision were further highlighted as particularly important areas for item revision by the in-depth individual interviews. Thus, the initial version of the Hong Kong Inpatient Experience Questionnaire (HKIEQ), comprising 58 core items under nine themes, was developed. Conclusions A set of dimensions and core items of the HKIEQ was developed and the instrument will undergo validity and reliability tests through a validation survey. A valid and reliable tool is important in accurately assessing patient experience with care delivery in hospitals to improve the quality of health-care services. PMID:23835186

  7. The Children’s Behavior Questionnaire very short scale: Psychometric properties and development of a one-item temperament scale

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Little research has been conducted on the psychometrics of the very short scale (36 items) of the Children’s Behavior Questionnaire, and no one-item temperament scale has been tested for use in applied work. In this study, 237 United States caregivers completed a survey to define their child’s behav...

  8. Comparison of the functional rating index and the 18-item Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire: responsiveness and reliability.

    PubMed

    Chansirinukor, Wunpen; Maher, Christopher G; Latimer, Jane; Hush, Julia

    2005-01-01

    Retrospective design. To compare the responsiveness and test-retest reliability of the Functional Rating Index and the 18-item version of the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire in detecting change in disability in patients with work-related low back pain. Many low back pain-specific disability questionnaires are available, including the Functional Rating Index and the 18-item version of the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire. No previous study has compared the responsiveness and reliability of these questionnaires. Files of patients who had been treated for work-related low back pain at a physical therapy clinic were reviewed, and those containing initial and follow-up Functional Rating Index and 18-item Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaires were selected. The responsiveness of both questionnaires was compared using two different methods. First, using the assumption that patients receiving treatment improve over time, various responsiveness coefficients were calculated. Second, using change in work status as an external criterion to identify improved and nonimproved patients, Spearman's rho and receiver operating characteristic curves were calculated. Reliability was estimated from the subset of patients who reported no change in their condition over this period and expressed with the intraclass correlation coefficient and the minimal detectable change. One hundred and forty-three patient files were retrieved. The responsiveness coefficients for the Functional Rating Index were greater than for the 18-item Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire. The intraclass correlation coefficient values for both questionnaires calculated from 96 patient files were similar, but the minimal detectable change for the Functional Rating Index was less than for the 18-item Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire. The Functional Rating Index seems preferable to the 18-item Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire for use in clinical trials and clinical practice.

  9. The Loneliness Questionnaire-Short Version: an evaluation of reverse-worded and non-reverse-worded items via item response theory.

    PubMed

    Ebesutani, Chad; Drescher, Christopher F; Reise, Steven P; Heiden, Laurie; Hight, Terry L; Damon, John D; Young, John

    2012-01-01

    Although reverse-worded items have often been incorporated in scale construction to minimize the effects of acquiescent reporting biases, some researchers have more recently begun questioning this approach and wondering whether the advantages associated with incorporating reverse-worded items is worth the complexities that they bring to measures (e.g., Brown, 2003 ; Marsh, 1996 ). In this study, we used item response theory (IRT) to determine whether there is statistical justification to eliminate the reverse-worded items (e.g., "I have lots of friends") from the Loneliness Questionnaire (LQ; Asher, Hymel, & Renshaw, 1984) and retain only the non-reverse-worded items (e.g., "I'm lonely") to inform the provision of a shortened LQ version. Using a large sample of children (Grades 2-7; n = 6,784) and adolescents (Grades 8-12; n = 4,941), we examined the psychometric properties of the 24-item LQ and found support for retaining the 9 non-reverse-worded LQ items to make up a shortened measure of loneliness in youth. We found that the non-reverse-worded items were associated with superior psychometric properties relative to the reverse-worded items with respect to reliability and IRT parameters (e.g., discrimination and item information). A 3-point Likert-type scale was also found to be more suitable for measuring loneliness across both children and adolescents compared to the original 5-point scale. The relative contributions of reverse-worded and non-reverse-worded items in scale development for youth instruments are also discussed.

  10. ITEM ANALYSIS OF THE DEVELOPMENT POOL OF ITEMS FOR THE YOUTH OPINION QUESTIONNAIRE. MINNESOTA STUDIES IN WORK ATTITUDES TECHNICAL REPORT NO. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GRAEN, GEORGE B.; AND OTHERS

    THE YOUTH OPINION QUESTIONNAIRE WAS DEVELOPED TO DETERMINE THE ATTITUDES, NEEDS, EXPECTATIONS, BELIEFS, AND PERCEPTIONS OF THRESHOLD WORKERS WITH REGARD TO THE WORLD OF WORK, THE DEMOGRAPHIC AND SOCIOECONOMIC FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH THEM, AND THEIR RELATIONSHIP TO ENTRY WORK EXPERIENCE. AN INITIAL POOL OF APPROXIMATELY 600 ITEMS WAS COMPILED FROM…

  11. Experimentally Manipulating Items Informs on the (Limited) Construct and Criterion Validity of the Humor Styles Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Ruch, Willibald; Heintz, Sonja

    2017-01-01

    How strongly does humor (i.e., the construct-relevant content) in the Humor Styles Questionnaire (HSQ; Martin et al., 2003) determine the responses to this measure (i.e., construct validity)? Also, how much does humor influence the relationships of the four HSQ scales, namely affiliative, self-enhancing, aggressive, and self-defeating, with personality traits and subjective well-being (i.e., criterion validity)? The present paper answers these two questions by experimentally manipulating the 32 items of the HSQ to only (or mostly) contain humor (i.e., construct-relevant content) or to substitute the humor content with non-humorous alternatives (i.e., only assessing construct-irrelevant context). Study 1 (N = 187) showed that the HSQ affiliative scale was mainly determined by humor, self-enhancing and aggressive were determined by both humor and non-humorous context, and self-defeating was primarily determined by the context. This suggests that humor is not the primary source of the variance in three of the HQS scales, thereby limiting their construct validity. Study 2 (N = 261) showed that the relationships of the HSQ scales to the Big Five personality traits and subjective well-being (positive affect, negative affect, and life satisfaction) were consistently reduced (personality) or vanished (subjective well-being) when the non-humorous contexts in the HSQ items were controlled for. For the HSQ self-defeating scale, the pattern of relationships to personality was also altered, supporting an positive rather than a negative view of the humor in this humor style. The present findings thus call for a reevaluation of the role that humor plays in the HSQ (construct validity) and in the relationships to personality and well-being (criterion validity).

  12. Experimentally Manipulating Items Informs on the (Limited) Construct and Criterion Validity of the Humor Styles Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Ruch, Willibald; Heintz, Sonja

    2017-01-01

    How strongly does humor (i.e., the construct-relevant content) in the Humor Styles Questionnaire (HSQ; Martin et al., 2003) determine the responses to this measure (i.e., construct validity)? Also, how much does humor influence the relationships of the four HSQ scales, namely affiliative, self-enhancing, aggressive, and self-defeating, with personality traits and subjective well-being (i.e., criterion validity)? The present paper answers these two questions by experimentally manipulating the 32 items of the HSQ to only (or mostly) contain humor (i.e., construct-relevant content) or to substitute the humor content with non-humorous alternatives (i.e., only assessing construct-irrelevant context). Study 1 (N = 187) showed that the HSQ affiliative scale was mainly determined by humor, self-enhancing and aggressive were determined by both humor and non-humorous context, and self-defeating was primarily determined by the context. This suggests that humor is not the primary source of the variance in three of the HQS scales, thereby limiting their construct validity. Study 2 (N = 261) showed that the relationships of the HSQ scales to the Big Five personality traits and subjective well-being (positive affect, negative affect, and life satisfaction) were consistently reduced (personality) or vanished (subjective well-being) when the non-humorous contexts in the HSQ items were controlled for. For the HSQ self-defeating scale, the pattern of relationships to personality was also altered, supporting an positive rather than a negative view of the humor in this humor style. The present findings thus call for a reevaluation of the role that humor plays in the HSQ (construct validity) and in the relationships to personality and well-being (criterion validity). PMID:28473794

  13. Validation of the 10-Item Orientation Questionnaire: A New Tool for Monitoring Post-Electroconvulsive Therapy Disorientation.

    PubMed

    Martin, Donel M; Wong, Ada; Kumar, Divya R; Loo, Colleen K

    2017-10-03

    Assessment of post-electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) disorientation at a single time point after ECT treatment may prove an effective and clinically useful method for monitoring the severity of disorientation and predicting ECT-induced retrograde amnesia. In this study, we aimed to validate a novel instrument (10-Item Orientation Questionnaire) developed to assess the level of disorientation after ECT. Twenty-four depressed inpatients who were prescribed an acute course of ECT were administered the 10-Item Orientation Questionnaire at 30 minutes after ECT and had time to reorientation assessed at 3 time points after ECT (10, 30, and 60 minutes) at ECT treatments 1 to 3. The association between average performance of the 10-Item Orientation Questionnaire across the acute ECT course and retrograde amnesia at post-ECT was examined using the Autobiographical Memory Interview-Short Form. Mean performance on the 10-Item Orientation Questionnaire across treatments 1 to 3 was moderately correlated with average time to reorientation (r = -0.52, P = 0.02, n = 20). Across the acute ECT course, poorer performance on the 10-Item Orientation Questionnaire was associated with greater retrograde amnesia at post-ECT (r = 0.53, P = 0.03, n = 16). The 10-Item Orientation Questionnaire when administered at 30 minutes after ECT is sensitive for detecting patients with slow recovery of orientation after ECT. Use of this instrument therefore has potential for improving routine patient monitoring in clinical practice and identifying patients at increased risk of retrograde memory adverse effects following treatment.

  14. Item generation and design testing of a questionnaire to assess degenerative joint disease-associated pain in cats.

    PubMed

    Zamprogno, Helia; Hansen, Bernie D; Bondell, Howard D; Sumrell, Andrea Thomson; Simpson, Wendy; Robertson, Ian D; Brown, James; Pease, Anthony P; Roe, Simon C; Hardie, Elizabeth M; Wheeler, Simon J; Lascelles, B Duncan X

    2010-12-01

    To determine the items (question topics) for a subjective instrument to assess degenerative joint disease (DJD)-associated chronic pain in cats and determine the instrument design most appropriate for use by cat owners. 100 randomly selected client-owned cats from 6 months to 20 years old. Cats were evaluated to determine degree of radiographic DJD and signs of pain throughout the skeletal system. Two groups were identified: high DJD pain and low DJD pain. Owner-answered questions about activity and signs of pain were compared between the 2 groups to define items relating to chronic DJD pain. Interviews with 45 cat owners were performed to generate items. Fifty-three cat owners who had not been involved in any other part of the study, 19 veterinarians, and 2 statisticians assessed 6 preliminary instrument designs. 22 cats were selected for each group; 19 important items were identified, resulting in 12 potential items for the instrument; and 3 additional items were identified from owner interviews. Owners and veterinarians selected a 5-point descriptive instrument design over 11-point or visual analogue scale formats. Behaviors relating to activity were substantially different between healthy cats and cats with signs of DJD-associated pain. Fifteen items were identified as being potentially useful, and the preferred instrument design was identified. This information could be used to construct an owner-based questionnaire to assess feline DJD-associated pain. Once validated, such a questionnaire would assist in evaluating potential analgesic treatments for these patients.

  15. Ineffectiveness of reverse wording of questionnaire items: let's learn from cows in the rain.

    PubMed

    van Sonderen, Eric; Sanderman, Robbert; Coyne, James C

    2013-01-01

    We examined the effectiveness of reverse worded items as a means of reducing or preventing response bias. We first distinguished between several types of response bias that are often confused in literature. We next developed arguments why reversing items is probably never a good way to address response bias. We proposed testing whether reverse wording affects response bias with item-level data from the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI-20), an instrument that contains reversed worded items. With data from 700 respondents, we compared scores on items that were similar with respect either to content or to direction of wording. Psychometric properties of sets of these items worded in the same direction were compared with sets consisting of both straightforward and reversed worded items. We did not find evidence that ten reverse-worded items prevented response bias. Instead, the data suggest scores were contaminated by respondent inattention and confusion. Using twenty items, balanced for scoring direction, to assess fatigue did not prevent respondents from inattentive or acquiescent answering. Rather, fewer mistakes are made with a 10-item instrument with items posed in the same direction. Such a format is preferable for both epidemiological and clinical studies.

  16. Ineffectiveness of Reverse Wording of Questionnaire Items: Let’s Learn from Cows in the Rain

    PubMed Central

    van Sonderen, Eric; Sanderman, Robbert; Coyne, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective We examined the effectiveness of reverse worded items as a means of reducing or preventing response bias. We first distinguished between several types of response bias that are often confused in literature. We next developed arguments why reversing items is probably never a good way to address response bias. We proposed testing whether reverse wording affects response bias with item-level data from the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI-20), an instrument that contains reversed worded items. Methods With data from 700 respondents, we compared scores on items that were similar with respect either to content or to direction of wording. Psychometric properties of sets of these items worded in the same direction were compared with sets consisting of both straightforward and reversed worded items. Results We did not find evidence that ten reverse-worded items prevented response bias. Instead, the data suggest scores were contaminated by respondent inattention and confusion. Conclusions Using twenty items, balanced for scoring direction, to assess fatigue did not prevent respondents from inattentive or acquiescent answering. Rather, fewer mistakes are made with a 10-item instrument with items posed in the same direction. Such a format is preferable for both epidemiological and clinical studies. PMID:23935915

  17. Examining Dual Meanings of Items in 2 x 2 Achievement Goal Questionnaires through MTMM Modeling and MDS Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Chia-Huei; Chen, Lung Hung

    2010-01-01

    In 2001, Elliot and McGregor proposed a 2 x 2 (mastery-performance x approach- avoidance) achievement goal frameworks and developed a questionnaire to measure four goals (mastery-approach, mastery-avoidance, performance-approach, and performance-avoidance goals). This study examines the dual meanings of items in 2 x 2 achievement goal…

  18. Examining Dual Meanings of Items in 2 x 2 Achievement Goal Questionnaires through MTMM Modeling and MDS Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Chia-Huei; Chen, Lung Hung

    2010-01-01

    In 2001, Elliot and McGregor proposed a 2 x 2 (mastery-performance x approach- avoidance) achievement goal frameworks and developed a questionnaire to measure four goals (mastery-approach, mastery-avoidance, performance-approach, and performance-avoidance goals). This study examines the dual meanings of items in 2 x 2 achievement goal…

  19. Analysis of the Gender Variable in the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire--Revised Scales Using Differential Item Functioning Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Escorial, Sergio; Navas, Maria J.

    2007-01-01

    Studies in the field of personality have systematically found gender differences in two of the three dimensions of the Eysenck model: neuroticism and psychoticism. This study aims to analyze these differences in the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire--Revised (EPQ-R) scales using differential item functioning (DIF) techniques to determine whether…

  20. Examining the Factor Structure and Discriminant Validity of the 12-Item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) Among Spanish Postpartum Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguado, Jaume; Campbell, Alistair; Ascaso, Carlos; Navarro, Purificacion; Garcia-Esteve, Lluisa; Luciano, Juan V.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the authors tested alternative factor models of the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) in a sample of Spanish postpartum women, using confirmatory factor analysis. The authors report the results of modeling three different methods for scoring the GHQ-12 using estimation methods recommended for categorical and binary data.…

  1. Examining the Factor Structure and Discriminant Validity of the 12-Item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) Among Spanish Postpartum Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguado, Jaume; Campbell, Alistair; Ascaso, Carlos; Navarro, Purificacion; Garcia-Esteve, Lluisa; Luciano, Juan V.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the authors tested alternative factor models of the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) in a sample of Spanish postpartum women, using confirmatory factor analysis. The authors report the results of modeling three different methods for scoring the GHQ-12 using estimation methods recommended for categorical and binary data.…

  2. A psychometric analysis of the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire-Short Form (TEIQue-SF) using item response theory.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Andrew; Petrides, K V

    2010-09-01

    Trait emotional intelligence refers to a constellation of emotional self-perceptions located at the lower levels of personality hierarchies. In 2 studies, we sought to examine the psychometric properties of the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire-Short Form (TEIQue-SF; Petrides, 2009) using item response theory (IRT). Study 1 (N= 1,119, 455 men) showed that most items had good discrimination and threshold parameters and high item information values. At the global level, the TEIQue-SF showed very good precision across most of the latent trait range. Study 2 (N= 866, 432 men) used similar IRT techniques in a new sample based on the latest version of the TEIQue-SF (version 1.50). Results replicated Study 1, with the instrument showing good psychometric properties at the item and global level. Overall, the 2 studies suggest the TEIQue-SF can be recommended when a rapid assessment of trait emotional intelligence is required.

  3. Differences in Patient Health Questionnaire and Aachen Depression Item Bank scores between tablet versus paper-and-pencil administration.

    PubMed

    Spangenberg, Lena; Glaesmer, Heide; Boecker, Maren; Forkmann, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    To extend knowledge about measurement equivalence of depression measures assessed by tablet and paper-pencil administration, the present study evaluated the effect of mode of administration (MoA) on scale and item level for the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and the Aachen Depression Item Bank (ADIB) in elderly patients. Primary care patients (N = 193, ≥60 years) were assessed following a crossover design in Leipzig, Germany. All participants filled out the PHQ-9 and the ADIB in both MoAs under study. Effects of MoA were analyzed by intra-class correlation, mixed-effects regression, and differential item functioning (DIF). Additionally, detection rates between both MoAs were compared using receiver operating characteristics analysis compared to a diagnostic interview (SCID-I, N = 163). No effect of MoA was found in the PHQ-9 on scale score or item level. Two ADIB items showed DIF according to MoA. In terms of discriminatory power, MoA did not influence detection rates of both instruments. In summary, our findings suggest that no severe effect of mode of administration on self-report assessments of depression should be expected. It can be concluded that tablets provide a valid way to electronically assess depressive symptoms in elderly patients. Yet changes in item presentation can influence the psychometric properties and require equivalence testing using sophisticated analyses on item level such as DIF.

  4. 15 CFR Supplement No. 6 to Part 742 - Technical Questionnaire for Encryption Items

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... submitted for classification or other consideration (as a result of a request by BIS) and provide a brief... describes the item(s). (2) Indicate whether there have been any prior classifications or registrations of... (Commodity Classification Automated Tracking System (CCATS) number, Encryption Registration Number (ERN...

  5. 15 CFR Supplement No. 6 to Part 742 - Technical Questionnaire for Encryption Items

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... submitted for classification or other consideration (as a result of a request by BIS) and provide a brief... describes the item(s). (2) Indicate whether there have been any prior classifications or registrations of... (Commodity Classification Automated Tracking System (CCATS) number, Encryption Registration Number (ERN...

  6. A new ten-item questionnaire for assessing sensitive skin: the Sensitive Scale-10.

    PubMed

    Misery, Laurent; Jean-Decoster, Catherine; Mery, Sophie; Georgescu, Victor; Sibaud, Vincent

    2014-11-01

    Sensitive skin is common but until now there has been no scale for measuring its severity. The Sensitive Scale is a new scale with a 14-item and a 10-item version that was tested in 11 countries in different languages on 2,966 participants. The aim of this study was to validate the pertinence of using the Sensitive Scale to measure the severity of sensitive skin. The internal consistency was high. Correlations with the dry skin type, higher age, female gender, fair phototypes and Dermatology Life Quality Index were found. Using the 10-item version appeared to be preferable because it was quicker and easier to complete, with the same internal consistency and the 4 items that were excluded were very rarely observed in patients. The mean initial scores were around 44/140 and 37/100. The use of a cream for sensitive skin showed the pertinence of the scale before and after treatment.

  7. Validities of the Signed and Unsigned Lecture Questionnaires Using the Item Response Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirose, Hideo

    2011-01-01

    Teachers often raise a question that whether the lecture questionnaires are necessary or not. In this paper, we first show the recent statistical analysis for the official unsigned questionnaire evaluation results took in our faculty. We have found that: (1) the evaluation scores of lectures by students have been rising up year by year, which…

  8. The Childhood Cancer Survivor Study-Neurocognitive Questionnaire (CCSS-NCQ) Revised: Item Response Analysis and Concurrent Validity

    PubMed Central

    Kenzik, Kelly M.; Huang, I-Chan; Brinkman, Tara M.; Baughman, Brandon; Ness, Kirsten K.; Shenkman, Elizabeth A.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Robison, Leslie L.; Krull, Kevin R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Childhood cancer survivors are at risk for neurocognitive impairment related to cancer diagnosis or treatment. This study refined and further validated the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study Neurocognitive Questionnaire (CCSS-NCQ), a scale developed to screen for impairment in long-term survivors of childhood cancer. Method Items related to task efficiency, memory, organization and emotional regulation domains were examined using item response theory (IRT). Data were collected from 833 adult survivors of childhood cancer in the St. Jude Lifetime Cohort Study who completed self-report and direct neurocognitive testing. The revision process included: 1) content validity mapping of items to domains, 2) constructing a revised CCSS-NCQ, 3) selecting items within specific domains using IRT, and 4) evaluating concordance between the revised CCSS-NCQ and direct neurocognitive assessment. Results Using content and measurement properties, 32 items were retained (8 items in 4 domains). Items captured low to middle levels of neurocognitive concerns. The latent domain scores demonstrated poor convergent/divergent validity with the direct assessments. Adjusted effect sizes (Cohen's d) for agreement between self-reported memory and direct memory assessment were moderate for total recall (ES=0.66), long-term memory (ES=0.63), and short-term memory (ES=0.55). Effect sizes between self-rated task efficiency and direct assessment of attention were moderate for focused attention (ES=0.70) and attention span (ES=0.50), but small for sustained attention (ES=0.36). Cranial radiation therapy and female gender were associated with lower self-reported neurocognitive function. Conclusion The revised CCSS-NCQ demonstrates adequate measurement properties for assessing day-to-day neurocognitive concerns in childhood cancer survivors, and adds useful information to direct assessment. PMID:24933482

  9. The Relation between Information-Processing Variables and Test-Retest Stability for Questionnaire Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otter, Martha E.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    The ability of 2 components, interpretation of a question and memory, to forecast the test-retest association coefficients of reading test items was studied with initial samples of 916 elementary and 949 secondary school students. For both populations, both components forecast the relative sizes of test-retest correlation coefficients. (SLD)

  10. Investigation and Treatment of Missing Item Scores in Test and Questionnaire Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sijtsma, Klaas; van der Ark, L. Andries

    2003-01-01

    This article first discusses a statistical test for investigating whether or not the pattern of missing scores in a respondent-by-item data matrix is random. Since this is an asymptotic test, we investigate whether it is useful in small but realistic sample sizes. Then, we discuss two known simple imputation methods, person mean (PM) and two-way…

  11. Multiple Imputation of Item Scores in Test and Questionnaire Data, and Influence on Psychometric Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Ginkel, Joost R.; van der Ark, L. Andries; Sijtsma, Klaas

    2007-01-01

    The performance of five simple multiple imputation methods for dealing with missing data were compared. In addition, random imputation and multivariate normal imputation were used as lower and upper benchmark, respectively. Test data were simulated and item scores were deleted such that they were either missing completely at random, missing at…

  12. Development and validation of a 30-item short adaptation of the Mood and Anxiety Symptoms Questionnaire (MASQ).

    PubMed

    Wardenaar, Klaas J; van Veen, Tineke; Giltay, Erik J; de Beurs, Edwin; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Zitman, Frans G

    2010-08-30

    The original Mood and Anxiety Symptoms Questionnaire (MASQ) is a 90-item self-report, designed to measure the dimensions of Clark and Watson's tripartite model. We developed and validated a 30-item short adaptation of the MASQ: the MASQ-D30, which is more suitable for large-scale psychopathology research and has a clearer factor structure. The MASQ-D30 was developed through a process of item reduction and grouping of the appropriate subscales in a sample of 489 psychiatric outpatients, using a validated Dutch translation, based on the original English MASQ, as a starting point. Validation was done in two other large samples of 1461 and 2471 subjects, respectively, with an anxiety, somatoform and/or depression diagnosis or no psychiatric diagnosis. Psychometric properties were investigated and compared between the MASQ-D30 and the full (adapted) MASQ. A three-dimensional model (negative affect, positive affect and somatic arousal) was found to represent the data well, indicating good construct validity. The scales of the MASQ-D30 showed good internal consistency (all alphas>0.87) in patient samples. Correlations of the subscales with other instruments indicated acceptable convergent validity. Psychometric properties were similar for the MASQ-D30 and the full questionnaire. In conclusion, the MASQ-D30 is a valid instrument to assess dimensional aspects of depression and anxiety and can easily be implemented in psychopathology studies.

  13. Psychometrical Assessment and Item Analysis of the General Health Questionnaire in Victims of Terrorism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delgado-Gomez, David; Lopez-Castroman, Jorge; de Leon-Martinez, Victoria; Baca-Garcia, Enrique; Cabanas-Arrate, Maria Luisa; Sanchez-Gonzalez, Antonio; Aguado, David

    2013-01-01

    There is a need to assess the psychiatric morbidity that appears as a consequence of terrorist attacks. The General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) has been used to this end, but its psychometric properties have never been evaluated in a population affected by terrorism. A sample of 891 participants included 162 direct victims of terrorist attacks and…

  14. Psychometrical Assessment and Item Analysis of the General Health Questionnaire in Victims of Terrorism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delgado-Gomez, David; Lopez-Castroman, Jorge; de Leon-Martinez, Victoria; Baca-Garcia, Enrique; Cabanas-Arrate, Maria Luisa; Sanchez-Gonzalez, Antonio; Aguado, David

    2013-01-01

    There is a need to assess the psychiatric morbidity that appears as a consequence of terrorist attacks. The General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) has been used to this end, but its psychometric properties have never been evaluated in a population affected by terrorism. A sample of 891 participants included 162 direct victims of terrorist attacks and…

  15. Validation of a Six Item Questionnaire for Assessing Type A Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlman, Baron; And Others

    Type A behavior is an aggregate of behaviors associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease. Two self-administered questionnaires used to determine the presence of Type A behavior, the Jenkins Activity Survey and Framingham Type A Behavior Pattern Scale, were administered to 150 undergraduate students at a midwestern university, along…

  16. Validity and diagnostic accuracy of the Luganda version of the 9-item and 2-item Patient Health Questionnaire for detecting major depressive disorder in rural Uganda.

    PubMed

    Nakku, J E M; Rathod, S D; Kizza, D; Breuer, E; Mutyaba, K; Baron, E C; Ssebunnya, J; Kigozi, F

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of depression in rural Ugandan communities is high and yet detection and treatment of depression in the primary care setting is suboptimal. Short valid depression screening measures may improve detection of depression. We describe the validation of the Luganda translated nine- and two-item Patient Health Questionnaires (PHQ-9 and PHQ-2) as screening tools for depression in two rural primary care facilities in Eastern Uganda. A total of 1407 adult respondents were screened consecutively using the nine-item Luganda PHQ. Of these 212 were randomly selected to respond to the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview diagnostic questionnaire. Descriptive statistics for respondents' demographic characteristics and PHQ scores were generated. The sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive values (PPVs), and area under the ROC curve were determined for both the PHQ-9 and PHQ-2. The optimum trade-off between sensitivity and PPV was at a cut-off of ≧5. The weighted area under the receiver Operating Characteristic curve was 0.74 (95% CI 0.60-0.89) and 0.68 (95% CI 0.54-0.82) for PHQ-9 and PHQ-2, respectively. The Luganda translation of the PHQ-9 was found to be modestly useful in detecting depression. The PHQ-9 performed only slightly better than the PHQ-2 in this rural Ugandan Primary care setting. Future research could improve on diagnostic accuracy by considering the idioms of distress among Luganda speakers, and revising the PHQ-9 accordingly. The usefulness of the PHQ-2 in this rural population should be viewed with caution.

  17. Psychometric Properties of the International Personality Item Pool Big-Five Personality Questionnaire for the Greek population

    PubMed Central

    Ypofanti, Maria; Zisi, Vasiliki; Zourbanos, Nikolaos; Mouchtouri, Barbara; Tzanne, Pothiti; Theodorakis, Yannis; Lyrakos, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    Goldberg’s International Personality Item Pool (IPIP) big-five personality factor markers currently lack validating evidence. The structure of the 50-item IPIP was examined in two different adult samples (total N=811), in each case justifying a 5-factor solution, with only minor discrepancies. Age differences were comparable to previous findings using other inventories. One sample (N=193) also completed additionally another personality measure (the TIPI Short Form). Conscientiousness, extraversion and emotional stability/neuroticism scales of the IPIP were highly correlated with those of the TIPI (r=0.62 to 0.65, P=0.01). Agreeableness and Intellect/Openness scales correlated less strongly (r=0.54 and 0.58 respectively, P=0.01). The IPIP scales have good internal consistency (a=0.88) and relate strongly to major dimensions of personality assessed by the two questionnaires. PMID:26973962

  18. Psychometric Validation of the 14 items ChronIc Venous Insufficiency Quality of Life Questionnaire (CIVIQ-14): Confirmatory Factor Analysis.

    PubMed

    Le Moine, J-G; Fiestas-Navarrete, L; Katumba, K; Launois, R

    2016-02-01

    The study aim was to confirm the factorial structure of the short (14 item) version of the ChronIc Venous Insufficiency quality of life Questionnaire (CIVIQ-14) using the Vein Consult Program (VCP) results. The international VCP study sought to evaluate the impact of chronic venous disease (CVD) on health care costs and quality of life (QoL). The factorial structure of the CIVIQ-14 was evaluated using two methods: exploratory factor analysis (EFA) to calculate the probabilities of items and dimensions remaining stable and to study the dimensionality of the scale using explained variance criteria, followed by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) to confirm the original three dimensional structure and investigate alternative models that may have arisen from the dimensionality analysis. We also used the VCP results to evaluate the psychometric properties of the questionnaire and conducted subgroup analyses on countries with validated translations. A total of 47,149 questionnaires from 17 countries were available in the VCP. EFA revealed both items and dimensions as 100% stable. Dimensionality analysis showed that a two factor approach could be considered. CFA revealed the CIVIQ-14 three dimensional structure to be acceptable while rejecting the two dimensional model. Psychometric analysis confirmed the construct validity, internal consistency, and known groups validity of the CIVIQ-14. The results of subgroup analyses were consistent with those of the primary analysis. CFA of VCP data supported the factorial structure of the CIVIQ-14. The analysis corroborates the wide use of CIVIQ-14 as a valid instrument for reporting QoL in CVD patients. Copyright © 2015 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. General health questionnaire--12 items: adaptation study to the Portuguese population.

    PubMed

    Laranjeira, Carlos António

    2008-01-01

    To assess the validity and reliability of the GHQ-12 in Portugal. Using a standard 'forward-backward' translation procedure, the English language version of the questionnaire was translated into Portuguese. To test reliability the internal consistency was assessed by Cronbach's alpha coefficient. Validity was performed using convergent validity. Finally, the factor structure of the questionnaire was extracted by performing principal component analysis using varimax rotation. In all 790 undergraduates entered into the study. Reliability analysis showed satisfactory result (Cronbach's alpha coefficient = 0.91). Convergent validity indicated a significant negative correlation between the GHQ-12 and social support scores as expected (r = -0.54, P < 0.001). The principal component analysis showed that the GHQ-12 was a measure with two-factor structure. The Portuguese version of the GHQ-12 has a good structural characteristic for measuring psychological well being.

  20. The health literate health care organization 10 item questionnaire (HLHO-10): development and validation.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Christoph; Lee, Shoou-Yih D; Schmidt, Anna; Wesselmann, Simone; Wirtz, Markus A; Pfaff, Holger; Ernstmann, Nicole

    2015-02-01

    While research on individual health literacy is steadily increasing, less attention has been paid to the context of care that may help to increase the patient's ability to navigate health care or to compensate for their limited health literacy. In 2012, Brach et al. introduced the concept of health literate health care organizations (HLHOs) to describe the organizational context of care. This paper presents our effort in developing and validating an HLHO instrument. Ten items were developed to represent the ten attributes of HLHO (HLHO-10) based on a literature review, an expert workshop, a focus group discussion, and qualitative interviews. The instrument was applied in a key informant survey in 51 German hospitals as part of a larger study on patient information and training needs (PIAT-study). Item properties were analyzed and a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was conducted to test the instrument's unidimensionality. To investigate the instrument's predictive validity, a multilevel analysis was performed that used the HLHO-10 score to predict the adequacy of information provided to 1,224 newly-diagnosed breast cancer patients treated at the sample hospitals. Cronbach's α of the resulting scale was 0.89. CFA verified the one-factor structure after allowing for the correlation for four pairs of error terms. In the multilevel model, HLHO-10 significantly predicted the adequacy of information as perceived by patients. The instrument has satisfactory reliability and validity. It provides a useful tool to assess the degree to which health care organizations help patients to navigate, understand, and use information and services. Further validation should include participant observation in health care organizations and a sample that is not limited to breast cancer care.

  1. The 9-item Shared Decision Making Questionnaire (SDM-Q-9). Development and psychometric properties in a primary care sample.

    PubMed

    Kriston, Levente; Scholl, Isabelle; Hölzel, Lars; Simon, Daniela; Loh, Andreas; Härter, Martin

    2010-07-01

    To develop and psychometrically test a brief patient-report instrument for measuring Shared Decision Making (SDM) in clinical encounters. We revised an existing instrument (Shared Decision Making Questionnaire; SDM-Q), including the generation of new items and changing the response format. A 9-item version (SDM-Q-9) was developed and tested in a German primary care sample of 2351 patients via face validity ratings, investigation of acceptance, as well as factor and reliability analysis. Findings were cross-validated in a randomly selected subsample. The SDM-Q-9 showed face validity and high acceptance. Factor analysis revealed a clearly one-dimensional nature of the underlying construct. Both item difficulties and discrimination indices proved to be appropriate. Internal consistency yielded a Cronbach's alpha of 0.938 in the test sample. The SDM-Q-9 is a reliable and well accepted instrument. Generalizability of the findings is limited by the elderly sample living in rural areas of Germany. While the current results are promising, further testing of criterion validity and administration in other populations is necessary. The SDM-Q-9 can be used in studies investigating the effectiveness of interventions aimed at the implementation of SDM and as a quality indicator in health services assessments. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. An 8-item short form of the Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire adapted for children (ChEDE-Q8).

    PubMed

    Kliem, Sören; Schmidt, Ricarda; Vogel, Mandy; Hiemisch, Andreas; Kiess, Wieland; Hilbert, Anja

    2017-01-25

    Eating disturbances are common in children placing a vulnerable group of them at risk for full-syndrome eating disorders and adverse health outcomes. To provide a valid self-report assessment of eating disorder psychopathology in children, a short form of the child version of the Eating Disorder Examination (ChEDE-Q) was psychometrically evaluated. Similar to the EDE-Q, the ChEDE-Q provides assessment of eating disorder psychopathology related to anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge-eating disorder; however, the ChEDE-Q does not assess symptoms of avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder, pica, or rumination disorder. In 1,836 participants ages 7 to 18 years, recruited from two independent population-based samples, the factor structure of the recently established 8-item short form EDE-Q8 for adults was examined, including measurement invariance analyses on age, gender, and weight status derived from objectively measured weight and height. For convergent validity, the ChEDE-Q global score, body esteem scale, strengths and difficulties questionnaire, and sociodemographic characteristics were used. Item characteristics and age- and gender-specific norms were calculated. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed good model fit for the 8-item ChEDE-Q. Measurement invariance analyses indicated strict invariance for all analyzed subgroups. Convergent validity was provided through associations with well-established questionnaires and age, gender, and weight status, in expected directions. The newly developed ChEDE-Q8 proved to be a psychometrically sound and economical self-report assessment tool of eating disorder psychopathology in children. Further validation studies are needed, particularly concerning discriminant and predictive validity.

  3. Item Selection and Content Validity of the Risk Factors of Post-Intubation Tracheal Stenosis Observation Questionnaire for ICU-Admitted Patients

    PubMed Central

    Farzanegan, Roya; Farzanegan, Behrooz; Alehashem, Maryam; Zangi, Mahdi; Niakan Kalhori, Sharareh R.; Sheikhy, Kambiz; Emami, Habib

    2017-01-01

    Background: Laryngotracheal stenosis as a late complication of prolonged endotracheal intubation is a life-threatening event. In order to determine the related risk factors for this complication, which may vary among different countries, designing a valid questionnaire is necessary. The aim of this study was to select the items and evaluate the face and content validities of a questionnaire developed for assessment of risk factors of post-intubation tracheal stenosis (PITS) in patients admitted in the intensive care unit. Materials and Methods: A mixed method study design was used in four steps in 2015, i.e., 1) a literature review, 2) focus groups with five experts in the field, 3) consultations with intensive care unit (ICU) specialists and thoracic surgeons, and 4) evaluation of content and face validity with 15 experts in a scientific panel using two self-administered questionnaires. Content validity index (CVI) was computed for individual items as well as the overall scale. Results: We extracted the items from different sources of information. An initial version of the 52-item questionnaire was developed and classified into four domains including patient characteristics, intubation features, equipment-drugs, and complications. The items with an excellent modified kappa were included in the questionnaire. Five questions received more criticism instead of support and were removed (Item-CVI<0.55, fair modified kappa). The ones with an Item-CVI > 0.60 and a good modified kappa were revised, merged, or retained. The new 43-item questionnaire found a scale-level CVI, averaging (Scale-CVI/Ave) of 0.91. Conclusion: The PITS risk factors questionnaire was developed and validated through item selection, expert opinions, and content validity index. PMID:28638421

  4. Item response theory analysis of the modified Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire in a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Mielenz, Thelma J; Carey, Timothy S; Edwards, Michael C

    2015-03-15

    This is a secondary analysis of a cross-sectional population-based survey. Shorten the modified 23-item Roland (mRoland) scale using item response theory (IRT) methods and describe where in the functional disability range each scale is the most precise. The Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire is recommended for a functional disability outcome measure in patients with low back pain (LBP). One commonly used version is the Roland. It is unknown where in the functional disability range the Roland measures. One candidate individual with LBP in randomly selected households was interviewed, identifying 694 adults with chronic LBP. To justify the use of a unidimensional 2-parameter logistic IRT model, we performed both exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. Exploratory factor analysis revealed one dominant eigenvalue. Confirmatory factor analysis results indicate that the 1-factor model fit well. IRT analysis revealed variability in the slopes, in the range from 1.07 to 3.10. The marginal reliability, an IRT-based analog to coefficient α, was 0.88. The mRoland produces reliable scores (i.e., with a standard error <0.3) from 1.4 standard deviations below the mean to roughly 0.2 above the mean. The mRoland measures one construct. The mRoland seems to be an excellent tool for measuring just-below-average levels of functional disability. The mRoland measures high levels of functional disability with relatively poor reliability and may be more appropriate for a less-disabled population with LBP. We demonstrate that the mRoland can be shortened to 11 items with minimal loss of information. We show that there are different ways to go about selecting the set of 11 items that yield short forms with different strengths. 3.

  5. The Revised Two-Factor Study Process Questionnaire (R-SPQ-2F): Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor Analyses at Item Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Justicia, Fernando; Pichardo, M. Carmen; Cano, Francisco; Berben, A. B. G.; De la Fuente, Jesus

    2008-01-01

    The underlying structure of the Revised Two Factor version of the Study Process Questionnaire (R-SPQ-2F), a 20-item instrument for the evaluation of students' approaches to learning (SAL), was examined at item level using two independent groups of undergraduate students enrolled in the first (n = 314) and last (n = 522) years of their studies. The…

  6. The Revised Two-Factor Study Process Questionnaire (R-SPQ-2F): Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor Analyses at Item Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Justicia, Fernando; Pichardo, M. Carmen; Cano, Francisco; Berben, A. B. G.; De la Fuente, Jesus

    2008-01-01

    The underlying structure of the Revised Two Factor version of the Study Process Questionnaire (R-SPQ-2F), a 20-item instrument for the evaluation of students' approaches to learning (SAL), was examined at item level using two independent groups of undergraduate students enrolled in the first (n = 314) and last (n = 522) years of their studies. The…

  7. An Investigation of the Correctness of Item Assignment on the Subscales of the Student Adaptation to College Questionnaire and Its Temporal Stability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roszkowski, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The Student Adaptation to College Questionnaire (SACQ) was administered to first year students during the fifth week of their first semester and then again at the end of the semester. The primary purpose was to examine item-remainder correlations to determine if the items are placed correctly into their respective domains. A secondary aim was to…

  8. The Necessary Items for Inclusion in a Questionnaire for Assessing the Nutrition Knowledge of Young Japanese Children.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Mai; Ikemoto, Shinji

    2017-01-01

    It is well known nutrition education for 3- to 5-y-old children is important, and it is necessary to assess their nutrition knowledge before and after nutrition education to evaluate the effectiveness of an educational program. This study aimed to determine the necessary questions for inclusion in a questionnaire designed to assess the nutrition knowledge of young Japanese children in order to assess the effectiveness of the Shokuiku nutrition education program. Eighty and 124 children from 9 nursery schools in Japan participated in the intervention and control groups, respectively. A 15-item questionnaire was completed by the intervention group before and after total of 16 nutrition education lessons. The control group completed the questionnaire only once. The necessary questions for inclusion in the questionnaire were evaluated by comparing the frequency of correct answers given by the pre- and post-intervention groups using McNemar and Wilcoxon's signed rank sum tests, and by the post-intervention and control groups using Chi-square and Mann-Whitney tests. The frequency of correct answers given to questions in all categories except "Breakfast and life rhythm" significantly differed between the pre- and post-intervention groups (p<0.05). The frequency of correct answers given by the post-intervention group was significantly higher than that of the control group only in the category of "Three colors food groups" (p<0.05). The results suggest that it is necessary to include questions about functions of food and nutrients such as the role of food groups to assess the nutrition knowledge of young Japanese children in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the Shokuiku program.

  9. The factor structure of the 12-item general health questionnaire (GHQ-12) in young Chinese civil servants.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ying; Wang, Lei; Yin, Xican

    2016-09-26

    The 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) is a commonly used screening instrument for measuring mental disorders. However, few studies have measured the mental health of Chinese professionals or explored the factor structure of the GHQ-12 through investigations of young Chinese civil servants. This study analyses the factor structure of the GHQ-12 on young Chinese civil servants. Respondents include 1051 participants from six cities in eastern China. Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) is used to identify the potential factor structure of the GHQ-12. Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) models of previous studies are referred to for model fitting. The results indicate the GHQ-12 has very good reliability and validity. All ten CFA models are well fitted with the actual data. All the ten models are feasible and fit the data equally well. The Chinese version of the GHQ-12 is suitable for professional groups and can serve as a screening tool to detect anxiety and psychiatric disorders.

  10. Letting the CAT out of the Bag: Comparing Computer Adaptive Tests and an Eleven-Item Short Form of the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Karon F.; Choi, Seung W.; Crane, Paul K.; Deyo, Richard A.; Johnson, Kurt L.; Amtmann, Dagmar

    2009-01-01

    Study Design A post-hoc simulation of a computer adaptive administration of the items of a modified version of the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire. Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of adaptive administration of back pain-related disability items compared to a fixed 11-item short form. Summary of Background Data Short form versions of the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire have been developed. An alternative to paper-and -pencil short forms is to administer items adaptively so that items are presented based on a person’s responses to previous items. Theoretically, this allows precise estimation of back pain disability with administration of only a few items. Materials and Methods Data were gathered from two previously conducted studies of persons with back pain. An item response theory model was used to calibrate scores based on all items, items of a paper-and-pencil short form, and several computer adaptive tests (CATs). Results Correlations between each CAT condition and scores based on a 23-item version of the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire ranged from 0.93 to 0.98. Compared to an 11-item short form, an 11-item CAT produced scores that were significantly more highly correlated with scores based on the 23-item scale. CATs with even fewer items also produced scores that were highly correlated with scores based on all items. For example, scores from a five-item CAT had a correlation of 0.93 with full scale scores. Seven- and nine-item CATs correlated at 0.95 and 0.97, respectively. A CAT with a standard-error-based stopping rule produced scores that correlated at 0.95 with full scale scores. Conclusions A CAT-based back pain-related disability measure may be a valuable tool for use in clinical and research contexts. Use of CAT for other common measures in back pain research, such as other functional scales or measures of psychological distress, may offer similar advantages. PMID:18496352

  11. Psychometric Properties and Responsiveness to Change of 15- and 28-Item Versions of the SCORE: A Family Assessment Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Elena; Carr, Alan; Cahill, Paul; Cassells, Ciara; Hartnett, Dan

    2015-09-01

    The SCORE (Systemic Clinical Outcome and Routine Evaluation) is a 40-item questionnaire for completion by family members 12 years and older to assess outcome in systemic therapy. This study aimed to investigate psychometric properties of two short versions of the SCORE and their responsiveness to therapeutic change. Data were collected at 19 centers from 701 families at baseline and from 433 of these 3-5 months later. Results confirmed the three-factor structure (strengths, difficulties, and communication) of the 15- and 28-item versions of the SCORE. Both instruments had good internal consistency and test-retest reliability. They also showed construct and criterion validity, correlating with measures of parent, child, and family adjustment, and discriminating between clinical and nonclinical cases. Total and factor scales of the SCORE-15 and -28 were responsive to change over 3-5 months of therapy. The SCORE-15 and SCORE-28 are brief psychometrically robust family assessment instruments which may be used to evaluate systemic therapy.

  12. Mokken scale analysis of mental health and well-being questionnaire item responses: a non-parametric IRT method in empirical research for applied health researchers.

    PubMed

    Stochl, Jan; Jones, Peter B; Croudace, Tim J

    2012-06-11

    Mokken scaling techniques are a useful tool for researchers who wish to construct unidimensional tests or use questionnaires that comprise multiple binary or polytomous items. The stochastic cumulative scaling model offered by this approach is ideally suited when the intention is to score an underlying latent trait by simple addition of the item response values. In our experience, the Mokken model appears to be less well-known than for example the (related) Rasch model, but is seeing increasing use in contemporary clinical research and public health. Mokken's method is a generalisation of Guttman scaling that can assist in the determination of the dimensionality of tests or scales, and enables consideration of reliability, without reliance on Cronbach's alpha. This paper provides a practical guide to the application and interpretation of this non-parametric item response theory method in empirical research with health and well-being questionnaires. Scalability of data from 1) a cross-sectional health survey (the Scottish Health Education Population Survey) and 2) a general population birth cohort study (the National Child Development Study) illustrate the method and modeling steps for dichotomous and polytomous items respectively. The questionnaire data analyzed comprise responses to the 12 item General Health Questionnaire, under the binary recoding recommended for screening applications, and the ordinal/polytomous responses to the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale. After an initial analysis example in which we select items by phrasing (six positive versus six negatively worded items) we show that all items from the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12)--when binary scored--were scalable according to the double monotonicity model, in two short scales comprising six items each (Bech's "well-being" and "distress" clinical scales). An illustration of ordinal item analysis confirmed that all 14 positively worded items of the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental

  13. Mokken scale analysis of mental health and well-being questionnaire item responses: a non-parametric IRT method in empirical research for applied health researchers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mokken scaling techniques are a useful tool for researchers who wish to construct unidimensional tests or use questionnaires that comprise multiple binary or polytomous items. The stochastic cumulative scaling model offered by this approach is ideally suited when the intention is to score an underlying latent trait by simple addition of the item response values. In our experience, the Mokken model appears to be less well-known than for example the (related) Rasch model, but is seeing increasing use in contemporary clinical research and public health. Mokken's method is a generalisation of Guttman scaling that can assist in the determination of the dimensionality of tests or scales, and enables consideration of reliability, without reliance on Cronbach's alpha. This paper provides a practical guide to the application and interpretation of this non-parametric item response theory method in empirical research with health and well-being questionnaires. Methods Scalability of data from 1) a cross-sectional health survey (the Scottish Health Education Population Survey) and 2) a general population birth cohort study (the National Child Development Study) illustrate the method and modeling steps for dichotomous and polytomous items respectively. The questionnaire data analyzed comprise responses to the 12 item General Health Questionnaire, under the binary recoding recommended for screening applications, and the ordinal/polytomous responses to the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale. Results and conclusions After an initial analysis example in which we select items by phrasing (six positive versus six negatively worded items) we show that all items from the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) – when binary scored – were scalable according to the double monotonicity model, in two short scales comprising six items each (Bech’s “well-being” and “distress” clinical scales). An illustration of ordinal item analysis confirmed that all 14

  14. Testing whether patients with diabetes and healthy people perceive the meaning of the items in the Persian version of the SF-36 questionnaire similarly: a differential item functioning analysis.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Zahra; Jafari, Peyman; Mahmoodi, Marzieh; Dabbaghmanesh, Mohammad Hossein

    2017-04-01

    It has been rarely studied whether observed disparity in health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) scores between patients with diabetes and healthy individuals is due to differential item functioning (DIF) or a true difference in the underlying construct. This study aimed to examine DIF in the SF-36 questionnaire and its effect on comparing HRQoL scores between patients with diabetes and healthy people. The sample consisted of 230 patients with type 2 diabetes and 642 healthy individuals who filled out the Persian version of the SF-36 questionnaire. To detect DIF across patients with diabetes and healthy individuals, multiple-group multiple-indicator multiple-causes model was used. In addition, item calibration strategy was used to determine whether the effect of item-level DIF was transferred to the scale level. Nine out of thirty-six (25 %) items were detected as DIF, of which one item (11 %) was flagged as uniform and eight items (89 %) as non-uniform DIF. Most of the DIF items were detected in the mental health component which includes vitality, perceived mental health and social functioning subscales rather than in physical health component. Moreover, nonsignificant latent mean differences for general health perception and social functioning subscales became significant after DIF calibration. The findings of the present study show that patients with diabetes and healthy individuals perceived some items in the SF-36 questionnaire differently. More importantly, in some subscales, the effect of item-level DIF was transferred to the scale level. Consequently, considerable caution should be taken in comparing HRQoL scores between patients with diabetes and healthy individuals.

  15. [Exploration and validation of working conditions questionnaire items included in the Spanish Household Survey on Alcohol and Drugs (EDADES)].

    PubMed

    Colell, Esther; Sánchez-Niubò, Albert; Benavides, Fernando G; Domingo-Salvany, Antònia

    2013-01-01

    To identify and validate a factor structure from items on working conditions included in the 2007 edition of Spanish Household Survey on Alcohol and Drugs (EDADES-2007) for use in research on consumption of addictive substances with this survey. We performed a factor analysis of the questionnaire items using a cross-validation technique with a subsample of EDADES 2007 (N=13,005). Exploratory factor analysis with half of this sample yielded a latent factor structure. This structure was subsequently validated via confirmatory factor analysis with the remaining half of the sample. Standard criteria were used to test the model's goodness of fit, and a model-based internal consistency index was used to test the reliability of the structure. The structure obtained showed an adequate confirmatory fit and involved four factors related to the dimensions environmental conditions (F1), workload (F2), precariousness (F3) and social support (F4). The internal consistency index confirmed the reliability for the total structure (0.755) as well as for each of the factors (F1=0.755, F2=0.661, F3=0.529 and F4=0.680). The structure obtained represents a valid tool for assessing the relationship between use of addictive substances and certain work and employment conditions in the context of the EDADES survey. However, the inclusion of a more comprehensive and validated tool for the measurement of these conditions should be considered in future editions of the survey. Copyright belongs to the Societat Catalana de Seguretat i Medicina del Treball.

  16. Reliability and validity of the adapted Dutch version of the revised Scoliosis Research Society 22-item questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Schlösser, Tom P C; Stadhouder, Agnita; Schimmel, Janneke J P; Lehr, A Mechteld; van der Heijden, Geert J M G; Castelein, René M

    2014-08-01

    As in other fields of medicine, there is an increasing interest among orthopedic surgeons to measure health-related quality of life in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients and to evaluate the burden of disease and the effectiveness of different treatment strategies. The development of the revised Scoliosis Research Society 22-item patient questionnaire (SRS-22r) enabled a comprehensive evaluation of health-related quality of life of these patients. Over the years, the SRS-22r gained wide acceptance and has been used in several different countries, languages, and cultures. The SRS-22r has not been translated into Dutch to date. To translate the SRS-22r into Dutch and adapt it cross-culturally as outlined by international guidelines and to test its psychometric properties to measure health-related quality of life of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients in the Netherlands. A cross-sectional, multicenter validation study. A total of 135 adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients (mean age 15.1 years old) of three major scoliosis centers in the Netherlands were enrolled in this study. Ninety-two (68%) subjects completed the Dutch SRS-22r, Child Health Questionnaire (CHQ)-CF87 (golden standard for adolescents), and Short Form (SF)-36 (golden standard for adults). Two weeks later, 73 (79%) of 92 respondents returned a second SRS-22r. Demographics, curve type, Risser stage, and treatment status were documented. Floor and ceiling effects, internal consistency, reproducibility, concurrent validity, and discriminative ability of the Dutch version of the SRS-22r questionnaire. For content analysis, SRS-22r domain scores (function, pain, self-image, mental health, and satisfaction with management) were explored and floor and ceiling effects were determined. Cronbach's α was calculated for internal consistency of each domain of the questionnaires and reproducibility was assessed by test-retest reliability analysis. Using Pearson's correlation coefficient, comparison of

  17. Validity and reliability of the TED-QOL: a new three-item questionnaire to assess quality of life in thyroid eye disease.

    PubMed

    Fayers, Tessa; Dolman, Peter J

    2011-12-01

    To develop and test a user-friendly questionnaire for rapidly assessing quality of life (QOL) in thyroid eye disease (TED). A three-item questionnaire, the TED-QOL, was designed and compared to the 16-item Graves Ophthalmopathy (GO)-QOL and the nine-item GO-Quality of Life Scale (QLS). 100 patients with TED were administered all three questionnaires on two occasions. Results were compared to clinical severity scores (Vision, Inflammation, Strabismus, Appearance (VISA) classification). Main outcomes were construct and criterion validity, test-retest reliability, duration, comprehension and completion rates. TED-QOL correlated strongly with the other questionnaires for corresponding items (Pearson correlation: appearance 0.71, 0.62; functioning 0.69, 0.66; overall QOL 0.53). Test-retest analysis demonstrated good reliability for all three questionnaires (intraclass correlations: TED-QOL 0.81, 0.74, 0.87; GO-QOL 0.81, 0.82; GO-QLS 0.74, 0.86, 0.67). TED-QOL was significantly faster to complete (1.6 min vs GO-QOL 3.1 min, GO-QLS 2.7 min, p<0.0001) and had a higher completion rate (100% vs GO-QOL 78%, GO-QLS 94%). There was only moderate correlation between items on all three questionnaires and VISA scores. The TED-QOL is rapid and easy to complete and analyse and has similar validity and reliability to longer questionnaires. All questionnaires showed only moderate correlation with disease severity, emphasising the discrepancy between objective and subjective assessments and the importance of measuring both.

  18. Development of a questionnaire to assess patient satisfaction with allergen-specific immunotherapy in adults: item generation, item reduction, and preliminary validation

    PubMed Central

    Justícia, Jose Luis; Baró, Eva; Cardona, Victoria; Guardia, Pedro; Ojeda, Pedro; Olaguíbel, José Maria; Vega, José Maria; Vidal, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    Background: Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) is a treatment capable of modifying the natural course of allergy, so ensuring good adherence to SIT is fundamental. Up until now there has not existed an instrument specifically developed to measure patient satisfaction with SIT, although its assessment could help us to comprehend better and improve treatment adherence and effectiveness. The aim of this study was to develop an instrument to measure adult patient satisfaction with SIT. Methods: Items were generated from a literature review, focus groups with allergic adult patients undergoing SIT, and a meeting with experts. Potential items were administered to allergic patients undergoing SIT in an observational, cross-sectional, multicenter study. Item reduction was based on quantitative and qualitative criteria. A preliminary assessment of feasibility, reliability, and validity of the retained items was performed. Results: An initial pool of 70 items was administered to 257 patients undergoing SIT. Fifty-four items were eliminated resulting in a provisional instrument with 16 items. Factor analysis yielded four factors that were identified as perceived efficacy, activities and environment, cost-benefit balance, and overall satisfaction, explaining 74.8% of variance. Ceiling and floor effects were negligible for overall score. Overall score was associated with the type and intensity of symptoms. Conclusion: This is the first attempt to develop a satisfaction with SIT measure from the perspective of the allergic patient, and evidence has been found in favor of its reliability and validity. PMID:21660106

  19. Development of a questionnaire to assess patient satisfaction with allergen-specific immunotherapy in adults: item generation, item reduction, and preliminary validation.

    PubMed

    Justícia, Jose Luis; Baró, Eva; Cardona, Victoria; Guardia, Pedro; Ojeda, Pedro; Olaguíbel, José Maria; Vega, José Maria; Vidal, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) is a treatment capable of modifying the natural course of allergy, so ensuring good adherence to SIT is fundamental. Up until now there has not existed an instrument specifically developed to measure patient satisfaction with SIT, although its assessment could help us to comprehend better and improve treatment adherence and effectiveness. The aim of this study was to develop an instrument to measure adult patient satisfaction with SIT. Items were generated from a literature review, focus groups with allergic adult patients undergoing SIT, and a meeting with experts. Potential items were administered to allergic patients undergoing SIT in an observational, cross-sectional, multicenter study. Item reduction was based on quantitative and qualitative criteria. A preliminary assessment of feasibility, reliability, and validity of the retained items was performed. An initial pool of 70 items was administered to 257 patients undergoing SIT. Fifty-four items were eliminated resulting in a provisional instrument with 16 items. Factor analysis yielded four factors that were identified as perceived efficacy, activities and environment, cost-benefit balance, and overall satisfaction, explaining 74.8% of variance. Ceiling and floor effects were negligible for overall score. Overall score was associated with the type and intensity of symptoms. This is the first attempt to develop a satisfaction with SIT measure from the perspective of the allergic patient, and evidence has been found in favor of its reliability and validity.

  20. [Assessment of severity of neurogenic bowel dysfunction in chronic patients with a simple 1-item questionnaire (PGI-S)].

    PubMed

    Prévinaire, J G; Soler, J M; Bordji, H; Fiolet, M C; Navaux, M A; Mortier, P E

    2016-09-01

    Bowel symptoms (constipation and incontinence) are frequent in patients with a neurologic disease, but rarely assessed in rehabilitation centres. To study the prevalence of neurogenic bowel dysfunction (NBD) in those patients, and to assess its severity with the Patient Global Impression of Severity (PGI-S). Prospective study by questionnaires, with the Neurogenic Bowel Dysfunction Score (0-47) and the PGI-S, a 1-item questionnaire (absent, mild, moderate, severe) for the severity of the bowel symptoms, and the Bristol Stool Chart for stool consistency. All patients presenting a chronic (>2months) neurological disease were included. Inclusion of 169 patients, 97 with spinal cord injury, 42 with multiple sclerosis and 30 with hemiplegia. In each population, prevalence of constipation was 67 %, 45 % and 17 %, of pelvic floor dyssynergia 82 %, 45 % and 27 %, and leakages (gas or stools) de 74 %, 48 % and 43 %, respectively. Moderate to severe bowel symptoms were seen in 61 % of spinal cord injury, 43 % of multiple sclerosis and 23 % of hemiplegic patients, with NBD scores of 11.9±6.5, 5.7±4.9 and 3.7±4.2, respectively (P<0.01). There was a significant relation between PGI-S and NBD score (P<0.01). Significant lower NBD scores were associated with normal stool consistency (Bristol type 3 or 4) (P<0.01). In case of severe bowel symptoms, the use of transanal irrigation was hampered by patients' motivation and acceptation, and their autonomy. PGI-S and Bristol Stool Chart are reliable tools to assess the presence of bowel symptoms in clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. A structural assessment of the 30-item Metacognitions Questionnaire for Children and its relations to anxiety symptoms.

    PubMed

    Esbjørn, Barbara H; Sømhovd, Mikael J; Holm, Jon M; Lønfeldt, Nicole N; Bender, Patrick K; Nielsen, Sara K; Reinholdt-Dunne, Marie Louise

    2013-12-01

    Theoretical models of anxiety have been developed in adult populations. The applicability of these models in child samples has been assessed using downward extensions of the questionnaires developed to assess the proposed theoretical mechanisms. This poses a challenge, as children are still in the process of developing the skills that are being assessed. Psychometrically sound assessment tools are therefore needed for this developing population, in order to ensure the early detection of mechanisms leading to anxiety disorders in children. This study examined if metacognitions, which play a key role in generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) in adults, can also be reliably assessed in childhood. The study investigated the psychometric properties of the 30-item Metacognitions Questionnaire for Children (MCQ-C₃₀; Gerlach, Adam, Marschke, & Melfsen, 2008) in a national sample of 974 children and adolescents (538 girls) ages 9-17 years. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the 5-factor subscale structure and a 2nd-order total scale factor, which corresponds with previous versions of the scale. MCQ-C₃₀ expectedly correlated significantly with anxiety symptoms and worry. Structural equation modeling revealed that both obsessive-compulsive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder symptoms regressed significantly onto the MCQ-C₃₀. We fitted separate models for children and adolescents, and no noticeable differences are suggested between the models. Female gender was, expectedly, associated with increased levels of general metacognitions. This gender effect was mediated by level of anxiety. Overall, the MCQ-C₃₀ exhibited acceptable psychometric properties in our community sample of children ages 9-17 years. Future studies should investigate the psychometric properties of the instrument in clinical samples and samples of younger children. (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  2. Measurement of health-related quality of life with glaucoma: validation of the Glau-QoL 36-item questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Béchetoille, Alain; Arnould, Benoit; Bron, Alain; Baudouin, Christophe; Renard, Jean-Paul; Sellem, Eric; Brouquet, Yves; Denis, Philippe; Nordmann, Jean-Philippe; Rigeade, Marie-Claude; Bassols, Ana; Benmedjahed, Khadra; Guillemin, Isabelle; Rouland, Jean-François

    2008-02-01

    To validate a glaucoma-specific health-related quality of life (HRQoL) questionnaire: the Glau-QoL. Patients with ocular hypertension (OHT) or glaucoma took part in a cross-sectional psychometric validation study (n = 573) and a separate reproducibility study (n = 244). Patients answered the 36-item Glau-QoL, designed from in-depth patient interviews. The clinical validity of the Glau-QoL was excellent and clearly demonstrated that as disease severity and visual field impairment increased, HRQoL scores for the Psychological Wellbeing, Self-image, Daily Life, Driving, Anxiety and Burden of Treatment domains were negatively affected. Increased age and lower visual acuity were also associated with lower HRQoL scores, although to a lesser extent than the previously mentioned criteria. Worsening of HRQoL domains correlated with the clinical stage of glaucoma: Anxiety and Burden of Treatment scores dropped noticeably when patients were first diagnosed and started treatment, followed by a decrease in scores for Driving, Daily Life, Psychological Wellbeing, and Self-image as clinical conditions worsened. Psychometric validation showed acceptable convergent and discriminant validity of the Glau-QoL, and good reproducibility, with intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and concordance correlation coefficients (CCC) > or = 0.69. Internal consistency reliability was high (Cronbach's alpha coefficients > 0.70) for the Daily Life, Psychological Wellbeing, Burden of Treatment and Driving domains; acceptable (coefficients of 0.65 and 0.68, respectively) for the Self-image and Anxiety domains; and weak (coefficient = 0.58) for the Confidence in Health Care domain. The Glau-QoL questionnaire is a valid and specific HRQoL instrument that demonstrates excellent correlations with disease progression in patients with glaucoma and/or OHT.

  3. Identifying type and determinants of missing items in quality of life questionnaires: Application to the SF-36 French version of the 2003 Decennial Health Survey

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Missing items are common in quality of life (QoL) questionnaires and present a challenge for research in this field. The development of sound strategies of replacement and prevention requires accurate knowledge of their type and determinants. Methods We used the 2003 French Decennial Health Survey of a representative sample of the general population -- including 22,620 adult subjects who completed the SF-36 questionnaire-- to test various socio-demographic, health status and QoL variables as potential predictors of missingness. We constructed logistic regression models for each SF-36 item to identify independent predictors and classify them according to Little and Rubin ("missing completely at random", "missing at random" and "missing not at random"). Results The type of missingness was missing at random for half of the items of the SF-36 and missing not at random for the others. None of the items were missing completely at random. Independent predictors of missingness were age, female sex, low scores on the SF-36 subscales and in some cases low educational level, occupation, nationality and poor health status. Conclusion This study of the SF-36 shows that imputation of missing items is necessary and emphasizes several factors for missingness that should be considered in prevention strategies of missing data. Similar methodologies could be applied to item missingness in other QoL questionnaires. PMID:20128899

  4. The Italian version of the 25-item National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire: translation, validity, and reliability.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Gemma Caterina Maria; Milano, Giovanni; Tinelli, Carmine

    2003-06-01

    To test the Italian adaptation of the 25-item National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire (NEI-VFQ 25) and to investigate its validity and reliability. This prospective observational study enrolled nonhospitalized patients with 1 of 5 chronic eye diseases, and a reference sample of subjects without eye diseases. Eligible participants had to be cognitively able to respond to a health status interview and be affected by 1 of the following eye conditions: senile cataract, age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and cytomegalovirus retinitis or low vision. A control group was composed of subjects with no evidence of underlying eye diseases. The Italian self-administered versions of Medical Outcomes Study Short Form and of the NEI-VFQ 25 were administered to all participants. Reliability and validity of the Italian translation of the NEI-VFQ 25 were tested using statistical methods. Statistical analysis points out that the Italian version of the NEI-VFQ 25 has good validity, discriminatory power, internal consistency, and reliability. This Italian version of the NEI-VFQ 25 shows psychometric properties comparable to those of the American version, and thus can be used in clinical research as a specific measure of quality of life in patients with chronic eye diseases.

  5. Validity of the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) in detecting depressive and anxiety disorders among high school students.

    PubMed

    Baksheev, Gennady Nickolaevich; Robinson, Jo; Cosgrave, Elizabeth Mary; Baker, Kathryn; Yung, Alison Ruth

    2011-05-15

    Despite the common use of the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) with adolescents, there is limited data supporting its validity with this population. The aims of the study were to investigate the psychometric properties of the GHQ-12 among high school students, to validate the GHQ-12 against the gold standard of a diagnostic interview, and to suggest a threshold score for detecting depressive and anxiety disorders. Six hundred and fifty-four high school students from years 10 to 12 (ages 15-18) completed the GHQ-12 (Likert scored) and the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV-Test Revision (DSM-IV-TR). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were plotted. The mean GHQ-12 score for the total sample was 9.9 (S.D.=5.4). Results from the ROC curve indicated that the GHQ-12 performed better than chance at identifying depressive and anxiety disorders (area under the curve (AUC)=0.781). A GHQ-12 threshold score of 9/10 for males and 10/11 for females was found to be optimal. Given the significant proportion of mental illness among high school students, there may be a need to introduce screening for mental illnesses as part of the school curriculum. This can assist with the early identification and enable low stigma preventive intervention within the school environment.

  6. The importance of rating scale design in the measurement of patient-reported outcomes using questionnaires or item banks.

    PubMed

    Khadka, Jyoti; McAlinden, Colm; Gothwal, Vijaya K; Lamoureux, Ecosse L; Pesudovs, Konrad

    2012-06-26

    To investigate the effect of rating scale designs (question formats and response categories) on item difficulty calibrations and assess the impact that rating scale differences have on overall vision-related activity limitation (VRAL) scores. Sixteen existing patient-reported outcome instruments (PROs) suitable for cataract assessment, with different rating scales, were self-administered by patients on a cataract surgery waiting list. A total of 226 VRAL items from these PROs in their native rating scales were included in an item bank and calibrated using Rasch analysis. Fifteen item/content areas (e.g., reading newspapers) appearing in at least three different PROs were identified. Within each content area, item calibrations were compared and their range calculated. Similarly, five PROs having at least three items in common with the Visual Function (VF-14) were compared in terms of average item measures. A total of 614 patients (mean age ± SD, 74.1 ± 9.4 years) participated. Items with the same content varied in their calibration by as much as two logits; "reading the small print" had the largest range (1.99 logits) followed by "watching TV" (1.60). Compared with the VF-14 (0.00 logits), the rating scale of the Visual Disability Assessment (1.13 logits) produced the most difficult items and the Cataract Symptom Scale (0.24 logits) produced the least difficult items. The VRAL item bank was suboptimally targeted to the ability level of the participants (2.00 logits). Rating scale designs have a significant effect on item calibrations. Therefore, constructing item banks from existing items in their native formats carries risks to face validity and transmission of problems inherent in existing instruments, such as poor targeting.

  7. The British Sign Language Versions of the Patient Health Questionnaire, the Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-Item Scale, and the Work and Social Adjustment Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Katherine D.; Young, Alys; Lovell, Karina; Campbell, Malcolm; Scott, Paul R.; Kendal, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    The present study is aimed to translate 3 widely used clinical assessment measures into British Sign Language (BSL), to pilot the BSL versions, and to establish their validity and reliability. These were the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), the Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-item (GAD-7) scale, and the Work and Social Adjustment Scale (WSAS).…

  8. The British Sign Language Versions of the Patient Health Questionnaire, the Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-Item Scale, and the Work and Social Adjustment Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Katherine D.; Young, Alys; Lovell, Karina; Campbell, Malcolm; Scott, Paul R.; Kendal, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    The present study is aimed to translate 3 widely used clinical assessment measures into British Sign Language (BSL), to pilot the BSL versions, and to establish their validity and reliability. These were the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), the Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-item (GAD-7) scale, and the Work and Social Adjustment Scale (WSAS).…

  9. Mapping the 25-item National Eye Institute Visual Functioning Questionnaire (NEI VFQ-25) to EQ-5D utility scores.

    PubMed

    Kay, Stephen; Ferreira, Alberto

    2014-04-01

    To develop a mapping algorithm for the estimation of EQ-5D-based utility scores from observed 25-item National Eye Institute Visual Functioning Questionnaire (NEI VFQ-25) scores, a disease-specific, patient-reported outcome measure used in several retinal disorders to evaluate vision-specific functioning. The dataset comprised 951 paired EQ-5D/NEI VFQ-25 observations from 344 patients in RESTORE, a 12-month, randomized, double-blind trial in individuals with visual impairment due to diabetic macular edema. EQ-5D index scores (utilities) were calculated based on the UK tariff. We evaluated 11 models using predictor sets based on the NEI VFQ-25 subscales to estimate utility as a function of NEI VFQ-25 score, based on four modeling techniques. Model performance was assessed by 10-fold cross-validation comparing root mean squared error (RMSE), mean absolute error (MAE) and correlation with EQ-5D score (Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficients). Mapping results were similar across all techniques and predictor sets. The reverse two-part generalized estimating equation model used fewest predictors and had the best predictive performance (RMSE 0.200, MAE 0.140). Predicted and original EQ-5D values were not strongly correlated (squared Spearman correlation coefficient, 0.34). Although mapping disease-specific instruments to EQ-5D utilities is a preferred method by some reimbursement bodies, finding an appropriate mapping equation is not straightforward. In this study, mapping NEI VFQ-25 scores to EQ-5D utilities provided low predictive power, independent of the modeling methodology applied, suggesting an inability of the EQ-5D to discriminate vision-related activities, and highlighting that mapping exercises may lead to inaccurate utility values that do not represent patients' preferences.

  10. Translation and Cross-Cultural Adaptation of the 6-Item Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Symptoms Scale and Palmar Pain Scale Questionnaire Into Brazilian Portuguese

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Rodrigo Pires; Fernandes, Carlos Henrique; Meirelles, Lia Miyamoto; Raduan Neto, Jorge; dos Santos, João Baptista Gomes; Fallopa, Flávio

    2016-01-01

    Background: There are several medical questionnaires to evaluate the quality of life of carpal tunnel syndrome patients. However, most measures are only available in English. We chose to translate and culturally adapt to Portuguese the Six-Item Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Symptoms Scale and Palmar Pain Scale (CTS-6) questionnaire because it provides objective assessment using a small number of questions. Methods: The translation and cultural adaptation were carried out according to the medical literature and consisted of five steps: (1) initial translation by two translators fluent in both languages, (2) association of initial translations, (3) back translation to Portuguese by two native speakers of English, (4) association of back translation and (5) comparison with the original version. Results: The Portuguese version was administered to patients with carpal tunnel syndrome and difficulties were noted concerning the comprehension and completion of the translated questionnaire. Patients had difficulty in understanding the horizontal layout of the response choices. Without altering the content, we changed the response choices to a vertical layout and re-administered the questionnaire to a new sample of patients followed up in the same ambulatory care service. We noted a substantial improvement in comprehension and completion of the questionnaire after the modifications. Conclusions: Availability of a Portuguese version of the Six-Item Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Symptoms Scale and Palmar Pain Scale (CTS-6) questionnaire will allow an objective evaluation of the treatment of a syndrome that is very prominent in medical practice. PMID:27390557

  11. Assessing Psycho-social Barriers to Rehabilitation in Injured Workers with Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain: Development and Item Properties of the Yellow Flag Questionnaire (YFQ).

    PubMed

    Salathé, Cornelia Rolli; Trippolini, Maurizio Alen; Terribilini, Livio Claudio; Oliveri, Michael; Elfering, Achim

    2017-09-08

    Purpose To develop a multidimensional scale to asses psychosocial beliefs-the Yellow Flag Questionnaire (YFQ)-aimed at guiding interventions for workers with chronic musculoskeletal (MSK) pain. Methods Phase 1 consisted of item selection based on literature search, item development and expert consensus rounds. In phase 2, items were reduced with calculating a quality-score per item, using structure equation modeling and confirmatory factor analysis on data from 666 workers. In phase 3, Cronbach's α, and Pearson correlations coefficients were computed to compare YFQ with disability, anxiety, depression and self-efficacy and the YFQ score based on data from 253 injured workers. Regressions of YFQ total score on disability, anxiety, depression and self-efficacy were calculated. Results After phase 1, the YFQ included 116 items and 15 domains. Further reductions of items in phase 2 by applying the item quality criteria reduced the total to 48 items. Phase factor analysis with structural equation modeling confirmed 32 items in seven domains: activity, work, emotions, harm & blame, diagnosis beliefs, co-morbidity and control. Cronbach α was 0.91 for the total score, between 0.49 and 0.81 for the 7 distinct scores of each domain, respectively. Correlations between YFQ total score ranged with disability, anxiety, depression and self-efficacy was .58, .66, .73, -.51, respectively. After controlling for age and gender the YFQ total score explained between R2 27% and R2 53% variance of disability, anxiety, depression and self-efficacy. Conclusions The YFQ, a multidimensional screening scale is recommended for use to assess psychosocial beliefs of workers with chronic MSK pain. Further evaluation of the measurement properties such as the test-retest reliability, responsiveness and prognostic validity is warranted.

  12. Evaluating HIV Knowledge Questionnaires Among Men Who Have Sex with Men: A Multi-Study Item Response Theory Analysis.

    PubMed

    Janulis, Patrick; Newcomb, Michael E; Sullivan, Patrick; Mustanski, Brian

    2017-05-09

    Knowledge about the transmission, prevention, and treatment of HIV remains a critical element in psychosocial models of HIV risk behavior and is commonly used as an outcome in HIV prevention interventions. However, most HIV knowledge questions have not undergone rigorous psychometric testing such as using item response theory. The current study used data from six studies of men who have sex with men (MSM; n = 3565) to (1) examine the item properties of HIV knowledge questions, (2) test for differential item functioning on commonly studied characteristics (i.e., age, race/ethnicity, and HIV risk behavior), (3) select items with the optimal item characteristics, and (4) leverage this combined dataset to examine the potential moderating effect of age on the relationship between condomless anal sex (CAS) and HIV knowledge. Findings indicated that existing questions tend to poorly differentiate those with higher levels of HIV knowledge, but items were relatively robust across diverse individuals. Furthermore, age moderated the relationship between CAS and HIV knowledge with older MSM having the strongest association. These findings suggest that additional items are required in order to capture a more nuanced understanding of HIV knowledge and that the association between CAS and HIV knowledge may vary by age.

  13. Psychometric properties of the SDM-Q-9 questionnaire for shared decision-making in multiple sclerosis: item response theory modelling and confirmatory factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, Javier; Moral, Ester; Brieva, Luis; Ruiz-Beato, Elena; Prefasi, Daniel; Maurino, Jorge

    2017-04-22

    Shared decision-making is a cornerstone of patient-centred care. The 9-item Shared Decision-Making Questionnaire (SDM-Q-9) is a brief self-assessment tool for measuring patients' perceived level of involvement in decision-making related to their own treatment and care. Information related to the psychometric properties of the SDM-Q-9 for multiple sclerosis (MS) patients is limited. The objective of this study was to assess the performance of the items composing the SDM-Q-9 and its dimensional structure in patients with relapsing-remitting MS. A non-interventional, cross-sectional study in adult patients with relapsing-remitting MS was conducted in 17 MS units throughout Spain. A nonparametric item response theory (IRT) analysis was used to assess the latent construct and dimensional structure underlying the observed responses. A parametric IRT model, General Partial Credit Model, was fitted to obtain estimates of the relationship between the latent construct and item characteristics. The unidimensionality of the SDM-Q-9 instrument was assessed by confirmatory factor analysis. A total of 221 patients were studied (mean age = 42.1 ± 9.9 years, 68.3% female). Median Expanded Disability Status Scale score was 2.5 ± 1.5. Most patients reported taking part in each step of the decision-making process. Internal reliability of the instrument was high (Cronbach's α = 0.91) and the overall scale scalability score was 0.57, indicative of a strong scale. All items, except for the item 1, showed scalability indices higher than 0.30. Four items (items 6 through to 9) conveyed more than half of the SDM-Q-9 overall information (67.3%). The SDM-Q-9 was a good fit for a unidimensional latent structure (comparative fit index = 0.98, root-mean-square error of approximation = 0.07). All freely estimated parameters were statistically significant (P < 0.001). All items presented standardized parameter estimates with salient loadings (>0.40) with the

  14. Measuring maternal mental health using the Dutch Four-Dimensional Symptom Questionnaire (4DSQ): Pregnancy-related item bias across the perinatal period.

    PubMed

    Tebbe, Brigitte B M; Terluin, Berend; van Poppel, Mireille N M

    2016-09-01

    the Four-Dimensional Symptom Questionnaire (4DSQ) measures four dimensions of common psychopathology: distress, depression, anxiety and somatization. The instrument is developed and validated for general practice. A previous validation study of the 4DSQ for midwifery practice indicated that pregnant women respond differently to the items of the 4DSQ. This phenomenon is called item bias. The present study is a followup validation study in which pregnant women were followed up until one year post partum, to assess pregnancy-related item bias. cohort study with repeated measurements. the research group consisted of participants of the Mom@Work study, a study concerning mental health in a group of 574 working pregnant women and young mothers, recruited between 2004 and 2006. Measurements in the research group took place at 33 weeks of pregnancy and post partum at 7, 13, 25 and 52 weeks. The comparison group consisted of female general practice patients, matched for age (N=835). pregnancy-related item bias was assessed by two methods of differential item functioning (DIF) analysis: ordinal logistic regression (OLR) and the Mantel-Haenszel (MH) method. The impact of item bias on total scale scores was estimated by linear regression. Impact of item bias was found in the somatization-, distress- and anxiety scales of the 4DSQ across the perinatal period up until 13 weeks post partum. The depression scale remained free of item bias. pregnant and postpartum women responded differently to the 4DSQ than the women in the comparison group up until 13 weeks post partum. Pregnancy-related item bias lead to overestimation of distress and underestimation of somatization and anxiety. The depression scale was free of bias. The 4DSQ is a valid tool for case-finding and assessment of psychological conditions in the perinatal period, provided cut-off points are adapted up until 13 weeks post partum. Validation of generic questionnaires is recommended before using them in the perinatal

  15. Development of new physical activity and sedentary behavior change self-efficacy questionnaires using item response modeling

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Theoretically, increased levels of physical activity self-efficacy (PASE) should lead to increased physical activity, but few studies have reported this effect among youth. This failure may be at least partially attributable to measurement limitations. In this study, Item Response Modeling (IRM) was...

  16. Fitting a Mixture Item Response Theory Model to Personality Questionnaire Data: Characterizing Latent Classes and Investigating Possibilities for Improving Prediction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maij-de Meij, Annette M.; Kelderman, Henk; van der Flier, Henk

    2008-01-01

    Mixture item response theory (IRT) models aid the interpretation of response behavior on personality tests and may provide possibilities for improving prediction. Heterogeneity in the population is modeled by identifying homogeneous subgroups that conform to different measurement models. In this study, mixture IRT models were applied to the…

  17. Fitting a Mixture Item Response Theory Model to Personality Questionnaire Data: Characterizing Latent Classes and Investigating Possibilities for Improving Prediction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maij-de Meij, Annette M.; Kelderman, Henk; van der Flier, Henk

    2008-01-01

    Mixture item response theory (IRT) models aid the interpretation of response behavior on personality tests and may provide possibilities for improving prediction. Heterogeneity in the population is modeled by identifying homogeneous subgroups that conform to different measurement models. In this study, mixture IRT models were applied to the…

  18. Are Hip-Specific Items Useful in a Quality of Life Questionnaire for Patients with Hip Fractures?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yao, Kai-Ping Grace; Lee, Hsin-Yi; Tsauo, Jau-Yih

    2009-01-01

    Researchers measure the significance of hip fracture by the patient's impairment. The patient's quality of life (QOL) is usually also substantially affected. However, there is no specific quality of life (QOL) questionnaire for patients with hip fractures. This study was designed to determine whether adding a new set of specific questions about…

  19. The Relation of the Response Distribution to Self-Report Questionnaire Items and Cognitive Ability among School-Aged Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stapleton, Laura M.; Reiner, Laura S.; Aluvathingal, Anu J.

    2010-01-01

    This proposed research is part of an on-going line of research of developing questionnaire instruments for use at the elementary school level. Because field trials often use child self-report as outcome measures and sometimes determine implementation fidelity using such measures, evaluation of the validity of the use of such measures with…

  20. Are Hip-Specific Items Useful in a Quality of Life Questionnaire for Patients with Hip Fractures?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yao, Kai-Ping Grace; Lee, Hsin-Yi; Tsauo, Jau-Yih

    2009-01-01

    Researchers measure the significance of hip fracture by the patient's impairment. The patient's quality of life (QOL) is usually also substantially affected. However, there is no specific quality of life (QOL) questionnaire for patients with hip fractures. This study was designed to determine whether adding a new set of specific questions about…

  1. Using Rasch-models to compare the 30-, 20-, and 12-items version of the general health questionnaire taking four recoding schemes into account.

    PubMed

    Alexandrowicz, Rainer W; Friedrich, Fabian; Jahn, Rebecca; Soulier, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    The present study compares the 30-, 20-, and 12-items versions of the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) in the original coding and four different recoding schemes (Bimodal, Chronic, Modified Likert and a newly proposed Modified Chronic) with respect to their psychometric qualities. The dichotomized versions (i.e. Bimodal, Chronic and Modified Chronic) were evaluated with the Rasch-Model and the polytomous original version and the Modified Likert version were evaluated with the Partial Credit Model. In general, the versions under consideration showed agreement with the model assumption. However, the recoded versions exhibited some deficits with respect to the Outfit index. Because of the item deficits and for theoretical reasons we argue in favor of using the any of the three length versions with the original four-categorical coding scheme. Nevertheless, any of the versions appears apt for clinical use from a psychometric perspective.

  2. How to compare scores from different depression scales: equating the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ) and the ICD-10-Symptom Rating (ISR) using Item Response Theory.

    PubMed

    Fischer, H Felix; Tritt, Karin; Klapp, Burghard F; Fliege, Herbert

    2011-12-01

    A wide range of questionnaires for measuring depression are available. Item Response Theory models can help to evaluate the questionnaires exceeding the boundaries of Classical Test Theory and provide an opportunity to equate the questionnaires. In this study after checking for unidimensionality, a General Partial Credit Model was applied to data from two different depression scales [Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and ICD-10-Symptom Rating (ISR)] obtained in clinical settings from a consecutive sample, including 4517 observations from a total of 2999 inpatients and outpatients of a psychosomatic clinic. The precision of each questionnaire was compared and the model was used to transform scores based on the assumed underlying latent trait. Both instruments were constructed to measure the same construct and their estimates of depression severity are highly correlated. Our analysis showed that the predicted scores provided by the conversion tables are similar to the observed scores in a validation sample. The PHQ-9 and ISR depression scales measure depression severity across a broad range with similar precision. While the PHQ-9 shows advantages in measuring low or high depression severity, the ISR is more parsimonious and also suitable for clinical purposes. Furthermore, the equation tables derived in this study enhance the comparability of studies using either one of the instruments, but due to substantial statistical spread the comparison of individual scores is imprecise. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Psychometric properties of the 25-item Work Limitations Questionnaire in Japan: factor structure, validity, and reliability in information and communication technology company employees.

    PubMed

    Kono, Yuko; Matsushima, Eisuke; Uji, Masayo

    2014-02-01

    The 25-item Work Limitations Questionnaire (WLQ-25) measures presenteeism but has not been sufficiently validated in a Japanese population. A total of 451 employees from four information technology companies in Tokyo completed the WLQ-25 and questionnaires of other variables on two occasions, 2 weeks apart. The WLQ-25 yielded a two-factor structure: Cognitive Demand and Physical Demand. These subscales showed good internal consistency, and both were associated with adverse working conditions, greater perceived job strain, lower skill use, poorer workplace social support, and less satisfactory psychological adjustment. Intraclass correlation coefficients of the two WLQ-25 subscales between time 1 and time 2 were 0.78 and 0.55, respectively. This study suggests acceptable psychometric properties of the WLQ-25 in Japan.

  4. Potential triaging of referrals for lumbar spinal surgery consultation: a comparison of referral accuracy from pain specialists, findings from advanced imaging and a 3-item questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Simon, David; Coyle, Matt; Dagenais, Simon; O'Neil, Joseph; Wai, Eugene K

    2009-12-01

    Waiting times to see a spinal surgeon are among the highest in Canada. However, most patients who are referred would not benefit from surgical care. Effective triaging of surgical candidates may reduce morbidity related to prolonged waiting times and optimize use of limited resources. We administered a questionnaire consisting of 3 items identifying leg-dominant or back-dominant pain among 119 consecutive patients who presented at a community spinal pain centre or a spinal surgical unit for assessment of an elective lumbar problem. We analyzed the questionnaire under 2 different scenarios: 1 hypothesized to be more sensitive and 1 hypothesized to be more specific. For the "sensitive" scenario of clearly back-dominant pain, the sensitivity of the questionnaire was 100% in identifying appropriate surgical candidates. For the "specific" scenario of leg-dominant pain, the questionnaire had a sensitivity of 83% and specificity of 73% in identifying appropriate surgical candidates, which was significantly superior to findings on computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging (i.e., presence of neurocompressive lesions). When comparing the accuracy of the questionnaire in identifying appropriate surgical candidates to that of an assessment performed by a pain specialist at an acute spinal pain clinic, we found no statistically significant differences between the 2 methods. Use of the questionnaire when triaging patients may decrease the number of unnecessary referrals to spine surgeons. Adopting such a method of triaging could reduce waiting times for appropriate surgical candidates and potentially improve the outcomes of any resulting spinal surgery performed in a timely fashion.

  5. Potential triaging of referrals for lumbar spinal surgery consultation: a comparison of referral accuracy from pain specialists, findings from advanced imaging and a 3-item questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Simon, David; Coyle, Matt; Dagenais, Simon; O’Neil, Joseph; Wai, Eugene K.

    2009-01-01

    Background Waiting times to see a spinal surgeon are among the highest in Canada. However, most patients who are referred would not benefit from surgical care. Effective triaging of surgical candidates may reduce morbidity related to prolonged waiting times and optimize use of limited resources. Methods We administered a questionnaire consisting of 3 items identifying leg-dominant or back-dominant pain among 119 consecutive patients who presented at a community spinal pain centre or a spinal surgical unit for assessment of an elective lumbar problem. We analyzed the questionnaire under 2 different scenarios: 1 hypothesized to be more sensitive and 1 hypothesized to be more specific. Results For the “sensitive” scenario of clearly back-dominant pain, the sensitivity of the questionnaire was 100% in identifying appropriate surgical candidates. For the “specific” scenario of leg-dominant pain, the questionnaire had a sensitivity of 83% and specificity of 73% in identifying appropriate surgical candidates, which was significantly superior to findings on computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging (i.e., presence of neurocompressive lesions). When comparing the accuracy of the questionnaire in identifying appropriate surgical candidates to that of an assessment performed by a pain specialist at an acute spinal pain clinic, we found no statistically significant differences between the 2 methods. Conclusion Use of the questionnaire when triaging patients may decrease the number of unnecessary referrals to spine surgeons. Adopting such a method of triaging could reduce waiting times for appropriate surgical candidates and potentially improve the outcomes of any resulting spinal surgery performed in a timely fashion. PMID:20011183

  6. The Parent Psychological Flexibility Questionnaire (PPFQ): Item Reduction and Validation in a Clinical Sample of Swedish Parents of Children with Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Wiwe Lipsker, Camilla; Kanstrup, Marie; Holmström, Linda; Kemani, Mike; Wicksell, Rikard K.

    2016-01-01

    In pediatric chronic pain, research indicates a positive relation between parental psychological flexibility (i.e., the parent’s willingness to experience distress related to the child’s pain in the service of valued behavior) and level of functioning in the child. This points to the utility of targeting parental psychological flexibility in pediatric chronic pain. The Parent Psychological Flexibility Questionnaire (PPFQ) is currently the only instrument developed for this purpose, and two previous studies have indicated its reliability and validity. The current study sought to validate the Swedish version of the 17-item PPFQ (PPFQ-17) in a sample of parents (n = 263) of children with chronic pain. Factor structure and internal reliability were evaluated by means of principal component analysis (PCA) and Cronbach’s alpha. Concurrent criterion validity was examined by hierarchical multiple regression analyses with parental anxiety and depression as outcomes. The PCA supported a three-factor solution with 10 items explaining 69.5% of the total variance. Cronbach’s alpha (0.86) indicated good internal consistency. The 10-item PPFQ (PPFQ-10) further explained a significant amount of variance in anxiety (29%), and depression (35.6%), confirming concurrent validity. In conclusion, results support the reliability and validity of the PPFQ-10, and suggest its usefulness in assessing psychological flexibility in parents of children with chronic pain. PMID:27869780

  7. Evaluating the cross-cultural validity of the Polish version of the Four-Dimensional Symptom Questionnaire (4DSQ) using differential item functioning (DIF) analysis.

    PubMed

    Czachowski, Sławomir; Terluin, Berend; Izdebski, Adam; Izdebski, Paweł

    2012-10-01

    The original Dutch Four-Dimensional Symptom Questionnaire (4DSQ), which measures distress, depression, anxiety and somatization, has been translated into Polish with the aim of providing primary health care with a good screening instrument for the detection of the most prevalent mental health problems (anxiety, somatization, depression and distress). To check if the Polish version is cross-culturally valid so that the scores of Polish subjects can be compared with the scores of Dutch subjects and the Dutch cut-off points can be used in Polish subjects. 4DSQ data were collected from a mixed sample of students and primary care attendees. The Polish data were compared with the 4DSQ data of a matched sample of Dutch students and primary care attendees. Two methods of differential item functioning (DIF) analysis, ordinal logistic regression and generalized Mantel-Haenszel, were used to detect items with DIF, and linear regression analysis was used to estimate the scale-level impact of DIF. Four items showing DIF were detected in the distress scale, one in the somatization scale and one in the anxiety scale. The DIF in distress caused Polish subjects with moderate scores to score circa 1 point less than their Dutch counterparts. The results of the DIF analyses suggest that the Polish 4DSQ measures the same constructs as the Dutch 4DSQ and that the Dutch norms can be used for the Polish subjects, except for distress: the first cut-off point should be one point lower.

  8. Distinguishing Dispositional and Cultivated Forms of Mindfulness: Item-Level Factor Analysis of Five-Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire and Construction of Short Inventory of Mindfulness Capability

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Wenjie; Li, Jinxia

    2016-01-01

    The widely used Five-Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ) mixes the dispositional and cultivated forms of mindfulness, thereby resulting in factor issues in previous studies. The present study distinguished the two forms of mindfulness and developed a Short Inventory of Mindfulness Capability at the item level of FFMQ. Three facets of mindfulness, namely, Describing, Acting with Awareness, and Non-judging of Experience, were assessed using community (n = 433) and student (n = 347) samples. Both meditators and non-meditators participated. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) revealed a three-factor model of mindfulness with 12 items (four items per subscale). Psychometric evaluation demonstrated the solid factor structure of the measurement with high factor loadings, good internal consistency, and convergent validities. Longitudinal analysis indicated that the Acting with Awareness facet was a significant predictor of depression and anxiety symptoms 6 months later. Discussions focused on the roles of mindfulness capability on mental health as well as the relationship between them. A higher-order factor of mindfulness should be used to examine the efficacy of intervention or monitor the changes. Researchers who need to study the specific role or efficacy of each facet should calculate the scores of different facets. PMID:27667978

  9. Shared decision making in psychiatric practice and the primary care setting is unique, as measured using a 9-item Shared Decision Making Questionnaire (SDM-Q-9).

    PubMed

    De Las Cuevas, Carlos; Peñate, Wenceslao; Perestelo-Pérez, Lilisbeth; Serrano-Aguilar, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    To measure and compare the extent to which shared a decision making (SDM) process is implemented both in psychiatric outpatient clinical encounters and in the primary care setting from the patient's perspective. A total of 1,477 patients recruited from the Canary Islands Health Service mental health and primary care departments were invited to complete the nine-item Shared Decision Making Questionnaire (SDM-Q-9) immediately after their consultation. MANCOVA, Student's t-test, and Pearson correlations were used to assess the relationship and differences between SDM-Q-9 scores in patient samples. No differences were found in SDM-Q-9 total scores between the two patient samples, but there were relevant differences when item by item analysis was applied; differences were observed according to the different steps of the SDM process. SDM is present to a very limited extent in the routine psychiatric setting compared to primary care. Patients' age, education, type of appointment, and treatment decision all play a specific role in predicting SDM. The study provides evidence that SDM is a complex process that needs to be analyzed according to its different steps. SDM patterns were different in the primary care and psychiatric outpatient care settings and reflect quite a different perspective of the decision making process.

  10. Validation of a Dutch version of the Actionable 8-item screening questionnaire for neurogenic bladder overactivity in multiple sclerosis: an observational web-based study.

    PubMed

    Jongen, Peter Joseph; Blok, Bertil F M; Heesakkers, John P; Heerings, Marco; Lemmens, Wim A; Donders, Rogier

    2015-10-30

    In patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) the impact of urological symptoms on quality of life and daily activities is considerable. Yet, a substantial percentage of patients may not be urologically evaluated and thus fail to be treated concordantly. The 8-item Actionable questionnaire is a validated English screening tool for the detection of neurogenic bladder overactivity in MS. To enable the use of the 8-item Actionable in The Netherlands and Belgium we translated the questionnaire into the Dutch language and investigated the test-retest reliability and the concurrent validity of the Dutch version. The process of translating the English Actionable questionnaire into the Dutch language included forward translations and back-translations. Then, in an online observational study, MS patients completed the Dutch Actionable at Days 1 and 8, and the Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life 54-Items (MSQoL-54) and Multiple Sclerosis Impact Profile (MSIP) questionnaires at Day 1; the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score was assessed by phone at Day 1. For assessment of the test-retest reliability Pearson's correlation coefficient (r) between the Day 1 and Day 8 Actionable scores was calculated. For assessment of the concurrent validity r values were calculated between the Day 1 Actionable score and the EDSS score, the Physical and Mental MSQoL-54 composites, and the MSIP domain and symptom disability scores. N = 141 (106 female, 35 male) (80 relapsing remitting, 48 progressive, 13 unknown), mean age 47.8 (standard deviation [SD] 10.4) years, mean EDSS score 4.7 (SD 1.8); 137 patients completed the Day 8 assessment. Pearson's r between Actionable scores Day 1 and Day 8: 0.85 (P < .0001). Pearson's r between Actionable score Day 1 and scores for EDSS 0.41 (P < 0.0001), MSQoL-54 Physical -0.31 (P = 0.0002), MSQoL-54 Mental -0.29 (P = 0.0005), MSIP Excretion and Reproductive Functions 0.44 (P < 0.0001), Muscle and Movement Functions 0.39 (P

  11. Construct validity and internal consistency of three factor structures and two scoring methods of the 12-item General Health Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Simancas-Pallares, Miguel; Arrieta, Katherine Margarita; Arévalo, Luisa Leonor

    2017-09-01

    The analysis of the psychometric properties of an instrument is important for the control of measurement bias. To compare the construct validity and internal consistency of three factorial structures of the General Health Questionnaire-12. We conducted a validation study in a nested sample of 483 dentistry students from Cartagena, Colombia. The instrument was applied along with questions about personal factors. The construct validity of the following structures was evaluated: one-dimensional, one-dimensional with correction of response bias, and the two and three-factor structure, and these scoring systems: Likert scale (0-1-2-3) and dichotomous (0-0-1-1) scoring method. Validity was determined by confirmatory factorial analysis, and the internal consistency with Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the Likert scale and the Kuder-Richardson Formula 20 for the dichotomous scoring using the Stata™, v. 13.2 (Stata Corp, USA) and Mplus™, v.7.11 (Muthen and Muthen, USA) software. Adjustment indexes revealed that the best model was the one-dimensional one with correction of response bias based on a dichotomous scoring (degrees of freedom=36; chi square=52.432; root mean square error of approximation=0.03; 90% CI: 0.008-0.048; comparative fit index=0.982; Tucker-Lewis index=0.966). The internal consistency was 0.70. The adjustment of the model in this study allowed for the control of measurement bias and guaranteed external validity of results when using the General Health Questionnaire-12 to evaluate mental conditions in this population. The psychometric properties of the scales should be critically evaluated before results analysis.

  12. End-of-life decision making in respiratory failure. The therapeutic choices in chronic respiratory failure in a 7-item questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Rinnenburger, Dagmar; Alma, Mario Giuseppe; Bigioni, Domenico; Brunetti, Giuseppe; Liberati, Carlo; Magliacani, Vinicio; Monaco, Gianluca; Reggiani, Lino; Taronna, Giovanni; Cecchini, Luca

    2012-01-01

    The transition from paternalistic medicine to a healthcare culture centred on the patient's decision making autonomy presents problems of communication and understanding. Chronic respiratory failure challenges patients, their families and caregivers with important choices, such as invasive and non-invasive mechanical ventilation and tracheostomy, which, especially in the case of neuromuscular diseases, can significantly postpone the end of life. A 7-item questionnaire was administered to 100 patients with advanced COPD, neuromuscular diseases and pulmonary fibrosis, all of them on oxygen therapy and receiving day-hospital treatment for respiratory failure. The objective was to find out whether or not patients, if faced with a deterioration of their health condition, would want to take part in the decision making process and, if so, how and with whom. Results showed that: 90% of patients wanted to be interviewed, 10% preferred not to be interviewed, 82% wanted to be regularly updated on their clinical situation, 75% wanted to be intubated, if necessary, and 56% would also agree to have a tracheostomy. These choices have been confirmed one year later, with 93% of respondents accepting the questionnaire and considering it useful. It is possible to conclude that a simple questionnaire can be a useful tool contributing to therapeutic decision making in respiratory failure.

  13. A 4-item measure of depression and anxiety: validation and standardization of the Patient Health Questionnaire-4 (PHQ-4) in the general population.

    PubMed

    Löwe, Bernd; Wahl, Inka; Rose, Matthias; Spitzer, Carsten; Glaesmer, Heide; Wingenfeld, Katja; Schneider, Antonius; Brähler, Elmar

    2010-04-01

    The 4-item Patient Health Questionnaire-4 (PHQ-4) is an ultra-brief self-report questionnaire that consists of a 2-item depression scale (PHQ-2) and a 2-item anxiety scale (GAD-2). Given that PHQ-4, PHQ-2, and GAD-2 have not been validated in the general population, this study aimed to investigate their reliability and validity in a large general population sample and to generate normative data. A nationally representative face-to-face household survey was conducted in Germany in 2006. The survey questionnaire consisted of the PHQ-4, other self-report instruments, and demographic characteristics. Of the 5030 participants (response rate=72.9%), 53.6% were female and mean (SD) age was 48.4 (18.0) years. The sociodemographic characteristics of the study sample closely match those of the total populations in Germany as well as those in the United States. Confirmatory factor analyses showed very good fit indices for a two-factor solution (RMSEA .027; 90% CI .023-.032). All models tested were structurally invariant between different age and gender groups. Construct validity of the PHQ-4, PHQ-2, and GAD-2 was supported by intercorrelations with other self-report scales and with demographic risk factors for depression and anxiety. PHQ-2 and GAD-2 scores of 3 corresponded to percentile ranks of 93.4% and 95.2%, respectively, whereas PHQ-2 and GAD-2 scores of 5 corresponded to percentile ranks of 99.0% and 99.2%, respectively. A criterion standard diagnostic interview for depression and anxiety was not included. Results from this study support the reliability and validity of the PHQ-4, PHQ-2, and GAD-2 as ultra-brief measures of depression and anxiety in the general population. The normative data provided in this study can be used to compare a subject's scale score with those determined from a general population reference group. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Relation of the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group rating scale with the Clinical Global Impression severity scale, the restless legs syndrome 6-item questionnaire, and the restless legs syndrome-quality of life questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Allen, Richard; Oertel, Wolfgang; Walters, Arthur; Benes, Heike; Schollmayer, Erwin; Grieger, Frank; Moran, Kimberly; Kohnen, Ralf

    2013-12-01

    The SP790 study (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00136045) showed benefits of rotigotine over placebo in improving symptom severity of restless legs syndrome (RLS), also known as Willis-Ekbom disease, on the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group rating scale (IRLS), Clinical Global Impression item 1 (CGI-1), RLS 6-item questionnaire (RLS-6), and the RLS-quality of life questionnaire (RLS-QoL) in patients with moderate to severe idiopathic RLS. To provide clinical context for the IRLS and to guide the choice of assessment scales for RLS studies, our post hoc analysis of SP790 data evaluated associations between the IRLS and the CGI-1, IRLS and RLS-6, and the IRLS and RLS-QoL. Scale associations were analyzed at baseline and at the end of maintenance (EoM) using data from the safety set (rotigotine and placebo groups combined [n=458]). Changes from baseline to EoM in IRLS score vs comparator scale scores also were analyzed. There was a trend towards increasing IRLS severity category with increasing CGI-1, RLS-6, and RLS-QoL score. Pearson product moment correlation coefficients showed correlations between IRLS and comparator scale scores at baseline and EoM as well as correlations for change from baseline to EoM. Correlations between the IRLS and comparator scales were substantial. These data indicate that the IRLS is clinically meaningful. The IRLS and CGI-1 are generally sufficient to evaluate the overall severity and impact of RLS symptoms in clinical trials. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Development and Psychometric Validation of the EDE-QS, a 12 Item Short Form of the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q)

    PubMed Central

    Gideon, Nicole; Hawkes, Nick; Mond, Jonathan; Saunders, Rob; Tchanturia, Kate; Serpell, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to develop and validate a short form of the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q) for routine, including session by session, outcome assessment. Method The current, 28-item version (6.0) of the EDE-Q was completed by 489 individuals aged 18–72 with various eating disorders recruited from three UK specialist eating disorder services. Rasch analysis was carried out on factors identified by means of principal component analysis, which in combination with expert ratings informed the development of an EDE-Q short form. The shortened questionnaire’s reliability, validity and sensitivity was assessed based on online data collected from students of a UK university and volunteers with a history of eating disorders recruited from a national eating disorders charity aged 18–74 (N = 559). Results A 12-item short form, the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire Short (EDE-QS) was derived. The new measure showed high internal consistency (Cronbach’s α = .913) and temporal stability (ICC = .93; p < .001). It was highly correlated with the original EDE-Q (r = .91 for people without ED; r = .82 for people with ED) and other measures of eating disorder and comorbid psychopathology. It was sufficiently sensitive to distinguish between people with and without eating disorders. Discussion The EDE-QS is a brief, reliable and valid measure of eating disorder symptom severity that performs similarly to the EDE-Q and that lends itself for the use of sessional outcome monitoring in treatment and research. PMID:27138364

  16. Item response theory methods can improve the measurement of physical function by combining the modified health assessment questionnaire and the SF-36 physical function scale.

    PubMed

    Martin, Marie; Kosinski, Mark; Bjorner, Jakob B; Ware, John E; Maclean, Ross; Li, Tracy

    2007-05-01

    To compare the measurement properties of the Modified Health Assessment Questionnaire [MHAQ], the SF-36((R)) Health Survey 10 item Physical Functioning scale [PF10], and scores from an item response theory (IRT) based scale combining the two measures. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients (n = 339) enrolled in a multi-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial completed the MHAQ and the SF-36 pre- and post-treatment. Psychometric analyses used confirmatory factor analysis and IRT models. Analyses of variance were used to assess sensitivity to changes in disease severity (defined by the American College of Rheumatism (ACR)) using change scores in MHAQ, PF10, and IRT scales. Analyses of covariance were used to assess treatment responsiveness. For the entire score range, the 95% confidence interval around individual patient scores was smaller for the combined (total) IRT based scale than for other measures. The MHAQ and PF10 were about 70% and 50% as efficient as the total IRT score of physical functioning in discriminating among ACR groups, respectively. The MHAQ and PF10 were also less efficient than the total IRT score in discriminating among treatment groups. Combining scales from the two short forms yields a more powerful tool with greater sensitivity to treatment response.

  17. The Psoriatic Arthritis Impact of Disease 12-item questionnaire: equivalence, reliability, validity, and feasibility of the touch-screen administration versus the paper-and-pencil version.

    PubMed

    Salaffi, Fausto; Di Carlo, Marco; Carotti, Marina; Farah, Sonia; Gutierrez, Marwin

    2016-01-01

    Over the last few years, there has been a shift toward a more patient-centered perspective of the disease by adopting patient-reported outcomes. Touch-screen formats are increasingly being used for data collection in routine care and research. The aim of this study is to examine the equivalence, reliability, validity and respondent preference for a computerized touch-screen version of the Psoriatic Arthritis Impact of Disease 12-item (PsAID-12) questionnaire in comparison with the original paper-and-pencil version, in a cohort of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). One hundred and fifty-nine patients with PsA completed both the touch screen- and the conventional paper-and-pencil administered PsAID-12 questionnaire. Agreement between formats was assessed by intraclass correlation coefficients. Spearman's rho correlation coefficient was used to test convergent validity of the touch screen format of PsAID-12, while receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to test discriminant validity. In order to assess the patient's preference, the participants filled in an additional questionnaire. The time taken to complete both formats was measured. A high concordance between the responses to the two modes of the PsAID-12 tested was found, with no significant mean differences. Intraclass correlation coefficients between data obtained for touch-screen and paper versions ranged from 0.801 to 0.962. There was a very high degree of correlation between the touch-screen format of PsAID-12 and composite disease activity indices (all at a P level <0.0001), Health Assessment Questionnaire, and Physician Assessment of disease activity. The discriminatory power of the touch-screen format of PsAID-12, assessed using the minimal disease activity - Outcome Measurements in Rheumatology Clinical Trials criteria, was very good, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.937 and a resulting cutoff value of 2.5. The touch-screen questionnaire was

  18. The Psoriatic Arthritis Impact of Disease 12-item questionnaire: equivalence, reliability, validity, and feasibility of the touch-screen administration versus the paper-and-pencil version

    PubMed Central

    Salaffi, Fausto; Di Carlo, Marco; Carotti, Marina; Farah, Sonia; Gutierrez, Marwin

    2016-01-01

    Background Over the last few years, there has been a shift toward a more patient-centered perspective of the disease by adopting patient-reported outcomes. Touch-screen formats are increasingly being used for data collection in routine care and research. Objectives The aim of this study is to examine the equivalence, reliability, validity and respondent preference for a computerized touch-screen version of the Psoriatic Arthritis Impact of Disease 12-item (PsAID-12) questionnaire in comparison with the original paper-and-pencil version, in a cohort of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Methods One hundred and fifty-nine patients with PsA completed both the touch screen- and the conventional paper-and-pencil administered PsAID-12 questionnaire. Agreement between formats was assessed by intraclass correlation coefficients. Spearman’s rho correlation coefficient was used to test convergent validity of the touch screen format of PsAID-12, while receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to test discriminant validity. In order to assess the patient’s preference, the participants filled in an additional questionnaire. The time taken to complete both formats was measured. Results A high concordance between the responses to the two modes of the PsAID-12 tested was found, with no significant mean differences. Intraclass correlation coefficients between data obtained for touch-screen and paper versions ranged from 0.801 to 0.962. There was a very high degree of correlation between the touch-screen format of PsAID-12 and composite disease activity indices (all at a P level <0.0001), Health Assessment Questionnaire, and Physician Assessment of disease activity. The discriminatory power of the touch-screen format of PsAID-12, assessed using the minimal disease activity – Outcome Measurements in Rheumatology Clinical Trials criteria, was very good, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.937 and a resulting cutoff value

  19. Correspondence between the RAND-Negative Impact of Asthma on Quality of Life item bank and the Marks Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Edelen, Maria Orlando; Stucky, Brian D; Sherbourne, Cathy; Eberhart, Nicole; Lara, Marielena

    2014-05-01

    In many research and clinical settings in which patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures are used, it is often desirable to link scores across disparate measures or to use scores from 1 measure to describe scores on a separate measure. However, PRO measures are scored by using a variety of metrics, making such comparisons difficult. The objective of this article was to provide an example of how to transform scores across disparate measures (the Marks Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire [AQLQ-Marks] and the newly developed RAND-Negative Impact of Asthma on Quality of Life item bank [RAND-IAQL-Bank]) by using an item response theory (IRT)-based linking method. Our sample of adults with asthma (N = 2032) completed 2 measures of asthma-specific quality of life: the AQLQ-Marks and the RAND-IAQL-Bank. We use IRT-based co-calibration of the 2 measures to provide a linkage, or a common metric, between the 2 measures. Co-calibration refers to the process of using IRT to estimate item parameters that describe the responses to the scales' items according to a common metric; in this case, a normal distribution transformed to a T scale with a mean of 50 and an SD of 10. Respondents had an average age of 43 (15), were 60% female, and predominantly non-Hispanic White (56%), with 19% African American, 14% Hispanic, and 11% Asian. Most had at least some college education (83%), and 90% had experienced an asthma attack during the last 12 months. Our results indicate that the AQLQ-Marks and RAND-IAQL-Bank scales measured highly similar constructs and were sufficiently unidimensional for IRT co-calibration. Once linked, scores from the 2 measures were invariant across subgroups. A crosswalk is provided that allows researchers and clinicians using AQLQ-Marks to crosswalk to the RAND-IAQL toolkit. The ability to translate scores from the RAND-IAQL toolkit to other "legacy" (ie, commonly used) measures increases the value of the new toolkit, aids in interpretation, and will hopefully

  20. Examining the factor structure of the 39-item and 15-item versions of the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire before and after mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for people with recurrent depression.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jenny; Strauss, Clara; Crane, Catherine; Barnhofer, Thorsten; Karl, Anke; Cavanagh, Kate; Kuyken, Willem

    2016-07-01

    Research into the effectiveness and mechanisms of mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) requires reliable and valid measures of mindfulness. The 39-item Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ-39) is a measure of mindfulness commonly used to assess change before and after MBIs. However, the stability and invariance of the FFMQ factor structure have not yet been tested before and after an MBI; pre to post comparisons may not be valid if the structure changes over this period. Our primary aim was to examine the factor structure of the FFMQ-39 before and after mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) in adults with recurrent depression in remission using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Additionally, we examined whether the factor structure of the 15-item version (FFMQ-15) was consistent with that of the FFMQ-39, and whether it was stable over MBCT. Our secondary aim was to assess the general psychometric properties of both versions. CFAs showed that pre-MBCT, a 4-factor hierarchical model (excluding the "observing" facet) best fit the FFMQ-39 and FFMQ-15 data, whereas post-MBCT, a 5-factor hierarchical model best fit the data for both versions. Configural invariance across the time points was not supported for both versions. Internal consistency and sensitivity to change were adequate for both versions. Both FFMQ versions did not differ significantly from each other in terms of convergent validity. Researchers should consider excluding the Observing subscale from comparisons of total scale/subscale scores before and after mindfulness interventions. Current findings support the use of the FFMQ-15 as an alternative measure in research where briefer forms are needed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Examining the Factor Structure of the 39-Item and 15-Item Versions of the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire Before and After Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for People With Recurrent Depression

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Research into the effectiveness and mechanisms of mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) requires reliable and valid measures of mindfulness. The 39-item Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ-39) is a measure of mindfulness commonly used to assess change before and after MBIs. However, the stability and invariance of the FFMQ factor structure have not yet been tested before and after an MBI; pre to post comparisons may not be valid if the structure changes over this period. Our primary aim was to examine the factor structure of the FFMQ-39 before and after mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) in adults with recurrent depression in remission using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Additionally, we examined whether the factor structure of the 15-item version (FFMQ-15) was consistent with that of the FFMQ-39, and whether it was stable over MBCT. Our secondary aim was to assess the general psychometric properties of both versions. CFAs showed that pre-MBCT, a 4-factor hierarchical model (excluding the “observing” facet) best fit the FFMQ-39 and FFMQ-15 data, whereas post-MBCT, a 5-factor hierarchical model best fit the data for both versions. Configural invariance across the time points was not supported for both versions. Internal consistency and sensitivity to change were adequate for both versions. Both FFMQ versions did not differ significantly from each other in terms of convergent validity. Researchers should consider excluding the Observing subscale from comparisons of total scale/subscale scores before and after mindfulness interventions. Current findings support the use of the FFMQ-15 as an alternative measure in research where briefer forms are needed. PMID:27078186

  2. Defining surgical criteria for empty nose syndrome: Validation of the office-based cotton test and clinical interpretability of the validated Empty Nose Syndrome 6-Item Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Thamboo, Andrew; Velasquez, Nathalia; Habib, Al-Rahim R; Zarabanda, David; Paknezhad, Hassan; Nayak, Jayakar V

    2017-08-01

    The validated Empty Nose Syndrome 6-Item Questionnaire (ENS6Q) identifies empty nose syndrome (ENS) patients. The unvalidated cotton test assesses improvement in ENS-related symptoms. By first validating the cotton test using the ENS6Q, we define the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) score for the ENS6Q. Individual case-control study. Fifteen patients diagnosed with ENS and 18 controls with non-ENS sinonasal conditions underwent office cotton placement. Both groups completed ENS6Q testing in three conditions-precotton, cotton in situ, and postcotton-to measure the reproducibility of ENS6Q scoring. Participants also completed a five-item transition scale ranging from "much better" to "much worse" to rate subjective changes in nasal breathing with and without cotton placement. Mean changes for each transition point, and the ENS6Q MCID, were then calculated. In the precotton condition, significant differences (P < .001) in all ENS6Q questions between ENS and controls were noted. With cotton in situ, nearly all prior ENS6Q differences normalized between ENS and control patients. For ENS patients, the changes in the mean differences between the precotton and cotton in situ conditions compared to postcotton versus cotton in situ conditions were insignificant among individuals. Including all 33 participants, the mean change in the ENS6Q between the parameters "a little better" and "about the same" was 4.25 (standard deviation [SD] = 5.79) and -2.00 (SD = 3.70), giving an MCID of 6.25. Cotton testing is a validated office test to assess for ENS patients. Cotton testing also helped to determine the MCID of the ENS6Q, which is a 7-point change from the baseline ENS6Q score. 3b. Laryngoscope, 127:1746-1752, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  3. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) as screening instruments for depression in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Hartung, Tim J; Friedrich, Michael; Johansen, Christoffer; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Faller, Herman; Koch, Uwe; Brähler, Elmar; Härter, Martin; Keller, Monika; Schulz, Holger; Wegscheider, Karl; Weis, Joachim; Mehnert, Anja

    2017-06-27

    Depression screening in patients with cancer is recommended by major clinical guidelines, although the evidence on individual screening tools is limited for this population. Here, the authors assess and compare the diagnostic accuracy of 2 established screening instruments: the depression modules of the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D), in a representative sample of patients with cancer. This multicenter study was conducted with a proportional, stratified, random sample of 2141 patients with cancer across all major tumor sites and treatment settings. The PHQ-9 and HADS-D were assessed and compared in terms of diagnostic accuracy and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition diagnosis of major depressive disorder using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview for Oncology as the criterion standard. The diagnostic accuracy of the PHQ-9 and HADS-D was fair for diagnosing major depressive disorder, with areas under the ROC curves of 0.78 (95% confidence interval, 0.76-0.79) and 0.75 (95% confidence interval, 0.74-0.77), respectively. The 2 questionnaires did not differ significantly in their areas under the ROC curves (P = .15). The PHQ-9 with a cutoff score ≥7 had the best screening performance, with a sensitivity of 83% (95% confidence interval, 78%-89%) and a specificity of 61% (95% confidence interval, 59%-63%). The American Society of Clinical Oncology guideline screening algorithm had a sensitivity of 44% (95% confidence interval, 36%-51%) and a specificity of 84% (95% confidence interval, 83%-85%). In patients with cancer, the screening performance of both the PHQ-9 and the HADS-D was limited compared with a standardized diagnostic interview. Costs and benefits of routinely screening all patients with cancer should be weighed carefully. Cancer 2017. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  4. The British Sign Language versions of the Patient Health Questionnaire, the Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-item Scale, and the Work and Social Adjustment Scale.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Katherine D; Young, Alys; Lovell, Karina; Campbell, Malcolm; Scott, Paul R; Kendal, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    The present study is aimed to translate 3 widely used clinical assessment measures into British Sign Language (BSL), to pilot the BSL versions, and to establish their validity and reliability. These were the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), the Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-item (GAD-7) scale, and the Work and Social Adjustment Scale (WSAS). The 3 assessment measures were translated into BSL and piloted with the Deaf signing population in the United Kingdom (n = 113). Participants completed the PHQ-9, GAD-7, WSAS, and Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation-Outcome Measure (CORE-OM) online. The reliability and validity of the BSL versions of PHQ-9, GAD-7, and WSAS have been examined and were found to be good. The construct validity for the PHQ-9 BSL version did not find the single-factor solution as found in the hearing population. The BSL versions of PHQ-9, GAD-7, and WSAS have been produced in BSL and can be used with the signing Deaf population in the United Kingdom. This means that now there are accessible mental health assessments available for Deaf people who are BSL users, which could assist in the early identification of mental health difficulties.

  5. The British Sign Language Versions of the Patient Health Questionnaire, the Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-Item Scale, and the Work and Social Adjustment Scale

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Katherine D.

    2013-01-01

    The present study is aimed to translate 3 widely used clinical assessment measures into British Sign Language (BSL), to pilot the BSL versions, and to establish their validity and reliability. These were the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), the Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-item (GAD-7) scale, and the Work and Social Adjustment Scale (WSAS). The 3 assessment measures were translated into BSL and piloted with the Deaf signing population in the United Kingdom (n = 113). Participants completed the PHQ-9, GAD-7, WSAS, and Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation–Outcome Measure (CORE-OM) online. The reliability and validity of the BSL versions of PHQ-9, GAD-7, and WSAS have been examined and were found to be good. The construct validity for the PHQ-9 BSL version did not find the single-factor solution as found in the hearing population. The BSL versions of PHQ-9, GAD-7, and WSAS have been produced in BSL and can be used with the signing Deaf population in the United Kingdom. This means that now there are accessible mental health assessments available for Deaf people who are BSL users, which could assist in the early identification of mental health difficulties. PMID:23197315

  6. Schizotypal personality questionnaire--brief revised (updated): An update of norms, factor structure, and item content in a large non-clinical young adult sample.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Charlie A; Hoffman, Lesa; Spaulding, William D

    2016-04-30

    This study updates and provides evidence for the dimensionality, reliability, and validity of a standard instrument for detection and measurement of schizotypy in non-clinical young adults. Schizotypy represents a set of traits on which both nonclinical and schizophrenia-spectrum populations vary meaningfully. These traits are linked to biological, cognitive, and social dimensions of serious mental illness (SMI), to clinical and subclinical variation in personal and social functioning, and to risk for SMI. Reliable and valid identification of schizotypal traits has important implications for clinical practice and research. Four consecutive independent samples of undergraduates were administered the SPQ-BR (N=2552). Confirmatory factor analyses suggested a minor item wording change improved reliability, and this Updated questionnaire was implemented for three-quarters of the sample (SPQ-BRU). A, single-order, nine-factor structure had acceptable psychometric properties. The best fitting second-order structure included four higher-order factors that distinguished Social Anxiety and Interpersonal factors. This differentiation was supported by differential relationships with treatment history. The Disorganized factor had the greatest unique relationship with personal and family treatment history. With few exceptions, factor loadings showed stability across samples. Overall, the higher-order and lower-order factors of schizotypy demonstrated reliability and convergent and discriminant validity; detailed psychometric data are presented in a supplement.

  7. Validation of Portuguese version of Quality of Erection Questionnaire (QEQ) and comparison to International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) and RAND 36-Item Health Survey

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Ana Luiza; Reis, Leonardo Oliveira; Saade, Ricardo Destro; Santos, Carlos Alberto; de Lima, Marcelo Lopes; Fregonesi, Adriano

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To validate the Quality of Erection Questionnaire (QEQ) considering Brazilian social-cultural aspects. Materials and Methods To determine equivalence between the Portuguese and the English QEQ versions, the Portuguese version was back-translated by two professors who are native English speakers. After language equivalence had been determined, urologists considered the QEQ Portuguese version suitable. Men with self-reported erectile dysfunction (ED) and infertile men who had a stable sexual relationship for at least 6 months were invited to answer the QEQ, the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) and the RAND 36-Item Health Survey (RAND-36). The questionnaires were presented together and answered without help in a private room. Internal consistency (Cronbach’s α), test-retest reliability (Spearman), convergent validity (Spearman correlation) coefficients and known-groups validity (the ability of the QEQ Portuguese version to differentiate erectile dysfunction severity groups) were assessed. Results We recruited 197 men (167 ED patients and 30 non-ED patients), mean age of 53.3 and median of 55.5 years (23-82 years). The Portuguese version of the QEQ had high internal consistency (Cronbach α=0.93), high stability between test and retest (ICC 0.83, with IC 95%: 0.76-0.88, p<0.001) and Spearman correlation coefficient r=0.82 (p<0.001), which demonstrated the high correlation between the QEQ and IIEF results. The correlations between the QEQ and RAND-36 were significantly low in ED (r=0.20, p=0.01) and non-ED patients (r=0.37, p=0.04). Conclusion The QEQ Portuguese version presented good psychometric properties and high convergent validity in relation to IIEF. The low correlations between the QEQ and the RAND-36, as well as between the IIEF and the RAND-36 indicated IIEF and QEQ specificity, which may have resulted from the patients’ psychological adaptations that minimized the impact of ED on Quality of Life (QoL) and reestablished the well

  8. Validation of Portuguese version of Quality of Erection Questionnaire (QEQ) and comparison to International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) and RAND 36-Item Health Survey.

    PubMed

    Reis, Ana Luiza; Reis, Leonardo Oliveira; Saade, Ricardo Destro; Santos, Carlos Alberto; Lima, Marcelo Lopes de; Fregonesi, Adriano

    2015-01-01

    To validate the Quality of Erection Questionnaire (QEQ) considering Brazilian social-cultural aspects. To determine equivalence between the Portuguese and the English QEQ versions, the Portuguese version was back-translated by two professors who are native English speakers. After language equivalence had been determined, urologists considered the QEQ Portuguese version suitable. Men with self-reported erectile dysfunction (ED) and infertile men who had a stable sexual relationship for at least 6 months were invited to answer the QEQ, the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) and the RAND 36-Item Health Survey (RAND-36). The questionnaires were presented together and answered without help in a private room. Internal consistency (Cronbach's α), test-retest reliability (Spearman), convergent validity (Spearman correlation) coefficients and known-groups validity (the ability of the QEQ Portuguese version to differentiate erectile dysfunction severity groups) were assessed. We recruited 197 men (167 ED patients and 30 non-ED patients), mean age of 53.3 and median of 55.5 years (23-82 years). The Portuguese version of the QEQ had high internal consistency (Cronbach α=0.93), high stability between test and retest (ICC 0.83, with IC 95%: 0.76-0.88, p<0.001) and Spearman correlation coefficient r=0.82 (p<0.001), which demonstrated the high correlation between the QEQ and IIEF results. The correlations between the QEQ and RAND-36 were significantly low in ED (r=0.20, p=0.01) and non-ED patients (r=0.37, p=0.04). The QEQ Portuguese version presented good psychometric properties and high convergent validity in relation to IIEF. The low correlations between the QEQ and the RAND-36, as well as between the IIEF and the RAND-36 indicated IIEF and QEQ specificity, which may have resulted from the patients' psychological adaptations that minimized the impact of ED on Quality of Life (QoL) and reestablished the well-being feeling.

  9. Development and Validation of the 34-Item Disability Screening Questionnaire (DSQ-34) for Use in Low and Middle Income Countries Epidemiological and Development Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Trani, Jean-François; Babulal, Ganesh Muneshwar; Bakhshi, Parul

    2015-01-01

    Background Although 80% of persons with disabilities live in low and middle-income countries, there is still a lack of comprehensive, cross-culturally validated tools to identify persons facing activity limitations and functioning difficulties in these settings. In absence of such a tool, disability estimates vary considerably according to the methodology used, and policies are based on unreliable estimates. Methods and Findings The Disability Screening Questionnaire composed of 27 items (DSQ-27) was initially designed by a group of international experts in survey development and disability in Afghanistan for a national survey. Items were selected based on major domains of activity limitations and functioning difficulties linked to an impairment as defined by the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Face, content and construct validity, as well as sensitivity and specificity were examined. Based on the results obtained, the tool was subsequently refined and expanded to 34 items, tested and validated in Darfur, Sudan. Internal consistency for the total DSQ-34 using a raw and standardized Cronbach’s Alpha and within each domain using a standardized Cronbach’s Alpha was examined in the Asian context (India and Nepal). Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) using principal axis factoring (PAF) evaluated the lowest number of factors to account for the common variance among the questions in the screen. Test-retest reliability was determined by calculating intraclass correlation (ICC) and inter-rater reliability by calculating the kappa statistic; results were checked using Bland-Altman plots. The DSQ-34 was further tested for standard error of measurement (SEM) and for the minimum detectable change (MDC). Good internal consistency was indicated by Cronbach’s Alpha of 0.83/0.82 for India and 0.76/0.78 for Nepal. We confirmed our assumption for EFA using the Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin measure of sampling well above the accepted cutoff of 0.40 for

  10. Use of the 9-item Shared Decision Making Questionnaire (SDM-Q-9 and SDM-Q-Doc) in intervention studies-A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Doherr, Hanna; Christalle, Eva; Kriston, Levente; Härter, Martin; Scholl, Isabelle

    2017-01-01

    The Shared Decision Making Questionnaire (SDM-Q-9 and SDM-Q-Doc) is a 9-item measure of the decisional process in medical encounters from both patients' and physicians' perspectives. It has good acceptance, feasibility, and reliability. This systematic review aimed to 1) evaluate the use of the SDM-Q-9 and SDM-Q-Doc in intervention studies on shared decision making (SDM) in clinical settings, 2) describe how the SDM-Q-9 and SDM-Q-Doc performed regarding sensitivity to change, and 3) assess the methodological quality of studies and study protocols that use the measure. We conducted a systematic review of studies published between 2010 and October 2015 that evaluated interventions to facilitate SDM. The search strategy comprised three databases (EMBASE, PsycINFO, and Medline), reference tracking, citation tracking, and personal knowledge. Two independent reviewers screened titles and abstracts as well as full texts of potentially relevant records. We extracted the data using a pilot tested sheet, and we assessed the methodological quality of included studies using the Quality Assessment Tools from the U.S. National Institute of Health (NIH). Five completed studies and six study protocols fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The measure was used in a variety of health care settings, mainly in Europe, to evaluate several types of interventions. The reported mean sum scores ranged from 42 to 75 on a scale from 0 to 100. In four studies no significant change was detected in the mean-differences between main groups. In the fifth study the difference was small. Quality assessment revealed a high risk of bias in four of the five completed studies, while the study protocols received moderate quality ratings. We found a wide range of areas in which the SDM-Q-9 and SDM-Q-Doc were applied. In the future this review may help researchers decide whether the measure fits their purposes. Furthermore, the review revealed risk of bias in previous trials that used the measure, and may

  11. Use of the 9-item Shared Decision Making Questionnaire (SDM-Q-9 and SDM-Q-Doc) in intervention studies—A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Doherr, Hanna; Christalle, Eva; Kriston, Levente; Härter, Martin; Scholl, Isabelle

    2017-01-01

    Background The Shared Decision Making Questionnaire (SDM-Q-9 and SDM-Q-Doc) is a 9-item measure of the decisional process in medical encounters from both patients’ and physicians’ perspectives. It has good acceptance, feasibility, and reliability. This systematic review aimed to 1) evaluate the use of the SDM-Q-9 and SDM-Q-Doc in intervention studies on shared decision making (SDM) in clinical settings, 2) describe how the SDM-Q-9 and SDM-Q-Doc performed regarding sensitivity to change, and 3) assess the methodological quality of studies and study protocols that use the measure. Methods We conducted a systematic review of studies published between 2010 and October 2015 that evaluated interventions to facilitate SDM. The search strategy comprised three databases (EMBASE, PsycINFO, and Medline), reference tracking, citation tracking, and personal knowledge. Two independent reviewers screened titles and abstracts as well as full texts of potentially relevant records. We extracted the data using a pilot tested sheet, and we assessed the methodological quality of included studies using the Quality Assessment Tools from the U.S. National Institute of Health (NIH). Results Five completed studies and six study protocols fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The measure was used in a variety of health care settings, mainly in Europe, to evaluate several types of interventions. The reported mean sum scores ranged from 42 to 75 on a scale from 0 to 100. In four studies no significant change was detected in the mean-differences between main groups. In the fifth study the difference was small. Quality assessment revealed a high risk of bias in four of the five completed studies, while the study protocols received moderate quality ratings. Conclusions We found a wide range of areas in which the SDM-Q-9 and SDM-Q-Doc were applied. In the future this review may help researchers decide whether the measure fits their purposes. Furthermore, the review revealed risk of bias in

  12. Using existing questionnaires in latent class analysis: should we use summary scores or single items as input? A methodological study using a cohort of patients with low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Anne Molgaard; Vach, Werner; Kent, Peter; Hestbaek, Lise; Kongsted, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Background Latent class analysis (LCA) is increasingly being used in health research, but optimal approaches to handling complex clinical data are unclear. One issue is that commonly used questionnaires are multidimensional, but expressed as summary scores. Using the example of low back pain (LBP), the aim of this study was to explore and descriptively compare the application of LCA when using questionnaire summary scores and when using single items to subgrouping of patients based on multidimensional data. Materials and methods Baseline data from 928 LBP patients in an observational study were classified into four health domains (psychology, pain, activity, and participation) using the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health framework. LCA was performed within each health domain using the strategies of summary-score and single-item analyses. The resulting subgroups were descriptively compared using statistical measures and clinical interpretability. Results For each health domain, the preferred model solution ranged from five to seven subgroups for the summary-score strategy and seven to eight subgroups for the single-item strategy. There was considerable overlap between the results of the two strategies, indicating that they were reflecting the same underlying data structure. However, in three of the four health domains, the single-item strategy resulted in a more nuanced description, in terms of more subgroups and more distinct clinical characteristics. Conclusion In these data, application of both the summary-score strategy and the single-item strategy in the LCA subgrouping resulted in clinically interpretable subgroups, but the single-item strategy generally revealed more distinguishing characteristics. These results 1) warrant further analyses in other data sets to determine the consistency of this finding, and 2) warrant investigation in longitudinal data to test whether the finer detail provided by

  13. Questionnaire Translation and Questionnaire Validation: Are They the Same?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffee, Dale T.

    The purpose of this paper is to give evidence for the thesis that if teachers using a questionnaire as a data collection instrument have the questionnaire items translated from one language into another, they cannot assume that the translated items are valid simply because they were translated. Even if the original questionnaire items were…

  14. Database of Standardized Questionnaires About Walking & Bicycling

    Cancer.gov

    This database contains questionnaire items and a list of validation studies for standardized items related to walking and biking. The items come from multiple national and international physical activity questionnaires.

  15. How French subjects describe well-being from food and eating habits? Development, item reduction and scoring definition of the Well-Being related to Food Questionnaire (Well-BFQ©).

    PubMed

    Guillemin, I; Marrel, A; Arnould, B; Capuron, L; Dupuy, A; Ginon, E; Layé, S; Lecerf, J-M; Prost, M; Rogeaux, M; Urdapilleta, I; Allaert, F-A

    2016-01-01

    Providing well-being and maintaining good health are main objectives subjects seek from diet. This manuscript describes the development and preliminary validation of an instrument assessing well-being associated with food and eating habits in a general healthy population. Qualitative data from 12 groups of discussion (102 subjects) conducted with healthy subjects were used to develop the core of the Well-being related to Food Questionnaire (Well-BFQ). Twelve other groups of discussion with subjects with joint (n = 34), digestive (n = 32) or repetitive infection complaints (n = 30) were performed to develop items specific to these complaints. Five main themes emerged from the discussions and formed the modular backbone of the questionnaire: "Grocery shopping", "Cooking", "Dining places", "Commensality", "Eating and drinking". Each module has a common structure: items about subject's food behavior and items about immediate and short-term benefits. An additional theme - "Eating habits and health" - assesses subjects' beliefs about expected benefits of food and eating habits on health, disease prevention and protection, and quality of ageing. A preliminary validation was conducted with 444 subjects with balanced diet; non-balanced diet; and standard diet. The structure of the questionnaire was further determined using principal component analyses exploratory factor analyses, with confirmation of the sub-sections food behaviors, immediate benefits (pleasure, security, relaxation), direct short-term benefits (digestion and satiety, energy and psychology), and deferred long-term benefits (eating habits and health). Thirty-three subscales and 14 single items were further defined. Confirmatory analyses confirmed the structure, with overall moderate to excellent convergent and divergent validity and internal consistency reliability. The Well-BFQ is a unique, modular tool that comprehensively assesses the full picture of well-being related to food and eating habits in

  16. Dutch Translation and Psychometric Testing of the 9-Item Shared Decision Making Questionnaire (SDM-Q-9) and Shared Decision Making Questionnaire-Physician Version (SDM-Q-Doc) in Primary and Secondary Care

    PubMed Central

    Rodenburg-Vandenbussche, Sumayah; Pieterse, Arwen H.; Kroonenberg, Pieter M.; Scholl, Isabelle; van der Weijden, Trudy; Luyten, Gre P. M.; Kruitwagen, Roy F. P. M.; den Ouden, Henk; Carlier, Ingrid V. E.; van Vliet, Irene M.; Zitman, Frans G.; Stiggelbout, Anne M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The SDM-Q-9 and SDM-Q-Doc measure patient and physician perception of the extent of shared decision making (SDM) during a physician-patient consultation. So far, no self-report instrument for SDM was available in Dutch, and validation of the scales in other languages has been limited. The aim of this study was to translate both scales into Dutch and assess their psychometric characteristics. Methods Participants were patients and their treating physicians (general practitioners and medical specialists). Patients (N = 182) rated their consultation using the SDM-Q-9, 43 physicians rated their consultations using the SDM-Q-Doc (N = 201). Acceptability, reliability (internal consistency), and the factorial structure of the instruments were determined. For convergent validity the CPSpost was used. Results Reliabilities of both scales were high (alpha SDM-Q-9 0.88; SDM-Q-Doc 0.87). The SDM-Q-9 and SDM-Q-Doc total scores correlated as expected with the CPSpost (SDM-Q-9: r = 0.29; SDM-Q-Doc: r = 0.48) and were significantly different between the CPSpost categories, with lowest mean scores when the physician made the decision alone. Principal Component Analyses showed a two-component model for each scale. A confirmatory factor analysis yielded a mediocre, but acceptable, one-factor model, if Item 1 was excluded; for both scales the best indices of fit were obtained for a one-factor solution, if both Items 1 and 9 were excluded. Conclusion The Dutch SDM-Q-9 and SDM-Q-Doc demonstrate good acceptance and reliability; they correlated as expected with the CPSpost and are suitable for use in Dutch primary and specialised care. Although the best model fit was found when excluding Items 1 and 9, we believe these items address important aspects of SDM. Therefore, also based on the coherence with theory and comparability with other studies, we suggest keeping all nine items of the scale. Further research on the SDM-concept in patients and physicians, in different clinical

  17. Dutch Translation and Psychometric Testing of the 9-Item Shared Decision Making Questionnaire (SDM-Q-9) and Shared Decision Making Questionnaire-Physician Version (SDM-Q-Doc) in Primary and Secondary Care.

    PubMed

    Rodenburg-Vandenbussche, Sumayah; Pieterse, Arwen H; Kroonenberg, Pieter M; Scholl, Isabelle; van der Weijden, Trudy; Luyten, Gre P M; Kruitwagen, Roy F P M; den Ouden, Henk; Carlier, Ingrid V E; van Vliet, Irene M; Zitman, Frans G; Stiggelbout, Anne M

    2015-01-01

    The SDM-Q-9 and SDM-Q-Doc measure patient and physician perception of the extent of shared decision making (SDM) during a physician-patient consultation. So far, no self-report instrument for SDM was available in Dutch, and validation of the scales in other languages has been limited. The aim of this study was to translate both scales into Dutch and assess their psychometric characteristics. Participants were patients and their treating physicians (general practitioners and medical specialists). Patients (N = 182) rated their consultation using the SDM-Q-9, 43 physicians rated their consultations using the SDM-Q-Doc (N = 201). Acceptability, reliability (internal consistency), and the factorial structure of the instruments were determined. For convergent validity the CPSpost was used. Reliabilities of both scales were high (alpha SDM-Q-9 0.88; SDM-Q-Doc 0.87). The SDM-Q-9 and SDM-Q-Doc total scores correlated as expected with the CPSpost (SDM-Q-9: r = 0.29; SDM-Q-Doc: r = 0.48) and were significantly different between the CPSpost categories, with lowest mean scores when the physician made the decision alone. Principal Component Analyses showed a two-component model for each scale. A confirmatory factor analysis yielded a mediocre, but acceptable, one-factor model, if Item 1 was excluded; for both scales the best indices of fit were obtained for a one-factor solution, if both Items 1 and 9 were excluded. The Dutch SDM-Q-9 and SDM-Q-Doc demonstrate good acceptance and reliability; they correlated as expected with the CPSpost and are suitable for use in Dutch primary and specialised care. Although the best model fit was found when excluding Items 1 and 9, we believe these items address important aspects of SDM. Therefore, also based on the coherence with theory and comparability with other studies, we suggest keeping all nine items of the scale. Further research on the SDM-concept in patients and physicians, in different clinical settings and different countries, is

  18. The Validity of the 16-Item Version of the Prodromal Questionnaire (PQ-16) to Screen for Ultra High Risk of Developing Psychosis in the General Help-Seeking Population

    PubMed Central

    Ising, Helga K.; Veling, Wim; Loewy, Rachel L.; Rietveld, Marleen W.; Rietdijk, Judith; Dragt, Sara; Klaassen, Rianne M. C.; Nieman, Dorien H.; Wunderink, Lex; Linszen, Don H.; van der Gaag, Mark

    2012-01-01

    In order to bring about implementation of routine screening for psychosis risk, a brief version of the Prodromal Questionnaire (PQ; Loewy et al., 2005) was developed and tested in a general help-seeking population. We assessed a consecutive patient sample of 3533 young adults who were help-seeking for nonpsychotic disorders at the secondary mental health services in the Hague with the PQ. We performed logistic regression analyses and CHi-squared Automatic Interaction Detector decision tree analysis to shorten the original 92 items. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to examine the psychometric properties of the PQ-16. In the general help-seeking population, a cutoff score of 6 or more positively answered items on the 16-item version of the PQ produced correct classification of Comprehensive Assessment of At-Risk Mental State (Yung et al., 2005) psychosis risk/clinical psychosis in 44% of the cases, distinguishing Comprehensive Assessment of At-Risk Mental States (CAARMS) diagnosis from no CAARMS diagnosis with high sensitivity (87%) and specificity (87%). These results were comparable to the PQ-92. The PQ-16 is a good self-report screen for use in secondary mental health care services to select subjects for interviewing for psychosis risk. The low number of items makes it quite appropriate for screening large help-seeking populations, thus enhancing the feasibility of detection and treatment of ultra high-risk patients in routine mental health services. PMID:22516147

  19. Screening for psychosis risk among adolescents in Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services: a description of the first step with the 16-item version of the Prodromal Questionnaire (PQ-16).

    PubMed

    de Jong, Yvonne; Mulder, Cornelis L; Boon, Albert E; Deen, Mathijs; van 't Hof, Maarten; van der Gaag, Mark

    2016-11-09

    Although the 16-item version of the Prodromal Questionnaire (PQ-16) is used as a screener in the early detection of psychosis risk, little is known about PQ-16 scores among adolescents referred to the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services. We assessed such scores in adolescents referred to these services in the Netherlands, and also their associations with age, gender, diagnosis and level of functioning. The PQ-16 was added to regular intake procedures. The PQ-16 was completed by 176 adolescents (mean age 14.58 years; standard deviation = 1.50; 55.1% females), 34.7% of whom scored above the current cut-off score of ≥6 items. Positive item scores with the highest odds ratio for scoring above the cut-off were related to tasting or smelling things, seeing things and hearing thoughts out aloud. There were no age-, gender- or disorder-related differences in total scores on the PQ-16. Lower Global Assessment of Functioning scores were associated with higher total scores on the PQ-16. The PQ-16 is easy to implement in routine assessment and can be useful to bring up potential psychotic symptoms for further exploration in an early stage, especially in adolescents with low Global Assessment of Functioning scores. The PQ-16 total scores were not confounded by differences in age, gender or disorder. Future research should investigate the true nature of PQ-16 items and whether the item scores and cut-off scores of the PQ-16 in adolescence have any predictive value regarding the development of an ultra high-risk status, a psychotic disorder or other mental disorders. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  20. Validation of a 16-Item Short Form of the Czech Version of the Experiences in Close Relationships Revised Questionnaire in a Representative Sample.

    PubMed

    Kaščáková, Natália; Husárová, Daniela; Hašto, Jozef; Kolarčik, Peter; Šolcová, Iva Poláčková; Gecková, Andrea Madarasová; Tavel, Peter

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to create a shorter Czech version (ECR-R-16) of the Revised Experiences in Close Relationships (ECR-R) questionnaire and to assess its psychometric properties. Data from a representative sample of the Czech population from 15 to 90 years old (N = 1000, M age = 46.0 years, SD = 17.3) were collected using a face-to-face structured interview in 2014. The developed short form of the Czech version of the ECR-R showed good internal consistency (alphas varied from .84 to .90), and both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses replicated the two-dimensional model. The results also demonstrated concurrent validity with measures of neuroticism, self-esteem, and positive and negative affect. People living with a partner and people with higher educational levels had significantly lower Avoidance scores than people living alone and people with lower educational levels. It was concluded that the ECR-R-16 questionnaire has good psychometric properties and is a valid assessment method in the Czech cultural context, suitable for research and clinical studies, when the shorter form of a measure is desirable. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. Questionnaire Construction Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-07-01

    Questionnaire Results A. Overview 8. Social De ■* ability and Acquiescence Response Sets C. Other Response Sets or Errors D. Effects of General Pretest...Attitudes of Respondents E. Effects of Demographic Characteristics of Responses XIII. Evaluating Questionnaire Results A. Overview B. Scoring...34questionnaire" refers to an ordered arrangement of items (questions, in effect ) intended to elicit the evaluations, judgments, comparisons, attitudes

  2. The 27-item Coping Strategies Questionnaire – Revised: Confirmatory factor analysis, reliability and validity in Italian-speaking subjects with chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Monticone, Marco; Ferrante, Simona; Giorgi, Ines; Galandra, Caterina; Rocca, Barbara; Foti, Calogero

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increasing attention is being devoted to cognitive-behavioural measures to improve interventions for chronic pain. OBJECTIVE: To develop an Italian version of the Coping Strategies Questionnaire – Revised (CSQ-R), and to validate it in a study involving 345 Italian subjects with chronic pain. METHODS: The questionnaire was developed following international recommendations. The psychometric analyses included confirmatory factor analysis; reliability, assessed by internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha) and test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficients); and construct validity, assessed by calculating the correlations between the subscales of the CSQ-R and measures of pain (numerical rating scale), disability (Sickness Impact Profile – Roland Scale), depression (Center for Epidemiological Studies – Depression Scale) and coping (Chronic Pain Coping Inventory) (Pearson’s correlation). RESULTS: Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the CSQ-R model had an acceptable data-model fit (comparative fit index and normed fit index ≤0.90, root mean square error of approximation ≥0.08). Cronbach’s alpha was satisfactory (CSQ-R 0.914 to 0.961), and the intraclass correlation coefficients were good/excellent (CSQ-R 0.850 to 0.918). As expected, the correlations with the numerical rating scale, Sickness Impact Profile – Roland Scale, Center for Epidemiological Studies – Depression Scale and Chronic Pain Coping Inventory highlighted the adaptive and maladaptive properties of most of the CSQ-R subscales. CONCLUSION: The CSQ-R was successfully translated into Italian. The translation proved to have good factorial structure, and its psychometric properties are similar to those of the original and other adapted versions. Its use is recommended for clinical and research purposes in Italy and abroad. PMID:24761430

  3. Evaluation of Item Candidates: The PROMIS Qualitative Item Review

    PubMed Central

    DeWalt, Darren A.; Rothrock, Nan; Yount, Susan; Stone, Arthur A.

    2009-01-01

    One of the PROMIS (Patient-Reported Outcome Measurement Information System) network's primary goals is the development of a comprehensive item bank for patient-reported outcomes of chronic diseases. For its first set of item banks, PROMIS chose to focus on pain, fatigue, emotional distress, physical function, and social function. An essential step for the development of an item pool is the identification, evaluation, and revision of extant questionnaire items for the core item pool. In this work, we also describe the systematic process wherein items are classified for subsequent statistical processing by the PROMIS investigators. Six phases of item development are documented: identification of extant items, item classification and selection, item review and revision, focus group input on domain coverage, cognitive interviews with individual items, and final revision before field testing. Identification of items refers to the systematic search for existing items in currently available scales. Expert item review and revision was conducted by trained professionals who reviewed the wording of each item and revised as appropriate for conventions adopted by the PROMIS network. Focus groups were used to confirm domain definitions and to identify new areas of item development for future PROMIS item banks. Cognitive interviews were used to examine individual items. Items successfully screened through this process were sent to field testing and will be subjected to innovative scale construction procedures. PMID:17443114

  4. Item response theory analysis to evaluate reliability and minimal clinically important change of the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire in patients with severe disability due to back pain from vertebral compression fractures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Minji K; Yost, Kathleen J; McDonald, Jennifer S; Dougherty, Ryne W; Vine, Roanna L; Kallmes, David F

    2017-06-01

    The majority of validation done on the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) has been in patients with mild or moderate disability. There is paucity of research focusing on the psychometric quality of the RMDQ in patients with severe disability. To evaluate the psychometric quality of the RMDQ in patients with severe disability. Observational clinical study. The sample consisted of 214 patients with painful vertebral compression fractures who underwent vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty. The 23-item version of the RMDQ was completed at two time points: baseline and 30-day postintervention follow-up. With the two-parameter logistic unidimensional item response theory (IRT) analyses, we derived the range of scores that produced reliable measurement and investigated the minimal clinically important difference (MCID). Scores for 214 (100%) patients at baseline and 108 (50%) patients at follow-up did not meet the reliability criterion of 0.90 or higher, with the majority of patients having disability due to back pain that was too severe to be reliably measured by the RMDQ. Depending on methodology, MCID estimates ranged from 2 to 8 points and the proportion of patients classified as having experienced meaningful improvement ranged from 26% to 68%. A greater change in score was needed at the extreme ends of the score scale to be classified as having achieved MCID using IRT methods. Replacing items measuring moderate disability with items measuring severe disability could yield a version of the RMDQ that better targets patients with severe disability due to back pain. Improved precision in measuring disability would be valuable to clinicians who treat patients with greater functional impairments. Caution is needed when choosing criteria for interpreting meaningful change using the RMDQ. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The associations between lifestyles and mental health using the General Health Questionnaire 12-items are different dependently on age and sex: a population-based cross-sectional study in Kanazawa, Japan.

    PubMed

    Hori, Daisuke; Tsujiguchi, Hiromasa; Kambayashi, Yasuhiro; Hamagishi, Toshio; Kitaoka, Masami; Mitoma, Junko; Asakura, Hiroki; Suzuki, Fumihiko; Anyenda, Enoch Olando; Nguyen, Thao Thi Thu; Hibino, Yuri; Shibata, Aki; Hayashi, Koichi; Sagara, Takiko; Sasahara, Shinichiro; Matsuzaki, Ichiyo; Hatta, Kotaro; Konoshita, Tadashi; Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine potential differences of the associations between mental health and lifestyle factors across a wide range of age. In August/September 2011, data were collected from 4693 males (age 51.6 ± 19.5) and 5678 females (age 52.4 ± 19.4) living in Kanazawa, Japan. A cross-sectional community-based survey was conducted with self-administered questionnaire including the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) 12-item version, sociodemographic, and lifestyle factors. Associations between the GHQ scores and other variables were examined using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by multiple comparisons and logistic regression stratified by age and gender. Multiple comparisons indicated that people aged 20-39 or 40-64 had higher GHQ scores than older aged. The two-way ANOVA revealed significant interaction between body mass index and age group, and between exercise and age group. Overweight or underweight males aged 40-64 had poorer mental health than those at normal weight. In the elderly, being underweight was significantly associated with poor mental health. There were no significant effects of exercise on mental health for young adults. The logistic regression showed significant negative effects of short-time sleep in adults. The associations between mental health and lifestyles differ across age groups. Further study is needed to reveal effects of aging on lifestyle and mental health with a longitudinal design.

  6. Wesleyan University Student Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haagen, C. Hess

    This questionnaire assesses marijuana use practices in college students. The 30 items (multiple choice or free response) are concerned with personal and demographic data, marijuana smoking practices, use history, effects from smoking marijuana, present attitude toward the substance, and use of other drugs. The Questionnaire is untimed and…

  7. Utah Drug Use Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Governor's Citizen Advisory Committee on Drugs, Salt Lake City, UT.

    This questionnaire assesses drug use practices in junior and senior high school students. The 21 multiple choice items pertain to drug use practices, use history, available of drugs, main reason for drug use, and demographic data. The questionnaire is untimed, group administered, and may be given by the classroom teacher in about 10 minutes. Item…

  8. Questionnaire for Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN. Educational Research Center.

    The 116-item parent questionnaire is designed for parents of elementary school children. It is intended to be used with the child's mother, or the person acting as the child's mother. The questionnaire consists of a section devoted to demographic variables and scales measuring 14 parent variables: (1) parent's achievement aspirations for the…

  9. Establishing utility values for the 22-item Sino-Nasal Outcome Test (SNOT-22) using a crosswalk to the EuroQol-five-dimensional questionnaire-three-level version (EQ-5D-3L).

    PubMed

    Crump, R Trafford; Lai, Ernest; Liu, Guiping; Janjua, Arif; Sutherland, Jason M

    2017-05-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a common condition for which there are numerous medical and surgical treatments. The 22-item Sino-Nasal Outcome Test (SNOT-22) is a patient-reported outcome measure often used with patients diagnosed with CRS. However, there are no utility values associated with the SNOT-22, limiting its use in comparative effectiveness research. The purpose of this study was to establish utilities for the SNOT-22 by mapping responses to utility values associated with the EuroQol-5-dimensional questionnaire-3-level version (EQ-5D-3L). This study used data collected from patients diagnosed with CRS awaiting bilateral endoscopic sinus surgery in Vancouver, Canada. Study participants completed both the SNOT-22 and the EQ-5D-3L. Ordinary least squares was used for 3 models that estimated the EQ-5D-3L utility values as a function of the SNOT-22 items. A total of 232 participants completed both the SNOT-22 and the EQ-5D-3L. As expected, there was a negative relationship between the SNOT-22 global scores and EQ-5D-3L utility values. Adjusted R(2) for the 3 models ranged from 0.28 to 0.33, and root mean squared errors between 0.23 and 0.24. A nonparametric bootstrap analysis demonstrated robustness of the findings. This study successfully developed a mapping model to associate utility values with responses to the SNOT-22. This model could be used to conduct comparative effectiveness research in CRS to evaluate the various interventions available for treating this condition. © 2017 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  10. The heterogeneous structure of schizotypal personality disorder: item-level factors of the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire and their associations with obsessive-compulsive disorder symptoms, dissociative tendencies, and normal personality.

    PubMed

    Chmielewski, Michael; Watson, David

    2008-05-01

    A. Raine et al.'s (1994) 3-factor scheme is currently the most widely accepted model of schizotypal personality disorder (SPD). Factor analytic studies of the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire (SPQ; A. Raine, 1991) subscales, which represent the 9 Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) criteria for SPD, have provided the model's primary support. The use of only 9 modeled variables, however, limits the number of factors that can be extracted. To explicate this structure more fully, the authors conducted item-level factor analyses of the SPQ in a large student sample that completed the instrument twice within a 2-week interval. The authors' analyses failed to support either the 3-factor model of SPD or the 9 existing DSM-based subscales of the SPQ. Instead, 5 replicable dimensions emerged that capture recurrent symptom pairings found in the broader SPD literature: Social Anhedonia, Unusual Beliefs and Experiences, Social Anxiety, Mistrust, and Eccentricity/Oddity. These factors are only weakly correlated with each other and show differential correlational patterns with the Big Five personality traits, dissociative tendencies, and symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder. Moreover, they are congruent with dimensional models of personality psychopathology. Implications for SPD in DSM-V are discussed.

  11. Markov blanket-based approach for learning multi-dimensional Bayesian network classifiers: an application to predict the European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) from the 39-item Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39).

    PubMed

    Borchani, Hanen; Bielza, Concha; Martı Nez-Martı N, Pablo; Larrañaga, Pedro

    2012-12-01

    Multi-dimensional Bayesian network classifiers (MBCs) are probabilistic graphical models recently proposed to deal with multi-dimensional classification problems, where each instance in the data set has to be assigned to more than one class variable. In this paper, we propose a Markov blanket-based approach for learning MBCs from data. Basically, it consists of determining the Markov blanket around each class variable using the HITON algorithm, then specifying the directionality over the MBC subgraphs. Our approach is applied to the prediction problem of the European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) from the 39-item Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39) in order to estimate the health-related quality of life of Parkinson's patients. Fivefold cross-validation experiments were carried out on randomly generated synthetic data sets, Yeast data set, as well as on a real-world Parkinson's disease data set containing 488 patients. The experimental study, including comparison with additional Bayesian network-based approaches, back propagation for multi-label learning, multi-label k-nearest neighbor, multinomial logistic regression, ordinary least squares, and censored least absolute deviations, shows encouraging results in terms of predictive accuracy as well as the identification of dependence relationships among class and feature variables.

  12. Evaluation of mode equivalence of the MSKCC Bowel Function Instrument, LASA Quality of Life, and Subjective Significance Questionnaire items administered by Web, interactive voice response system (IVRS), and paper.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Antonia V; Keenoy, Kathleen; Shouery, Marwan; Basch, Ethan; Temple, Larissa K

    2016-05-01

    To assess the equivalence of patient-reported outcome (PRO) survey responses across Web, interactive voice response system (IVRS), and paper modes of administration. Postoperative colorectal cancer patients with home Web/e-mail and phone were randomly assigned to one of the eight study groups: Groups 1-6 completed the survey via Web, IVRS, and paper, in one of the six possible orders; Groups 7-8 completed the survey twice, either by Web or by IVRS. The 20-item survey, including the MSKCC Bowel Function Instrument (BFI), the LASA Quality of Life (QOL) scale, and the Subjective Significance Questionnaire (SSQ) adapted to bowel function, was completed from home on consecutive days. Mode equivalence was assessed by comparison of mean scores across modes and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and was compared to the test-retest reliability of Web and IVRS. Of 170 patients, 157 completed at least one survey and were included in analysis. Patients had mean age 56 (SD = 11), 53% were male, 81% white, 53% colon, and 47% rectal cancer; 78% completed all assigned surveys. Mean scores for BFI total score, BFI subscale scores, LASA QOL, and adapted SSQ varied by mode by less than one-third of a score point. ICCs across mode were: BFI total score (Web-paper = 0.96, Web-IVRS = 0.97, paper-IVRS = 0.97); BFI subscales (range = 0.88-0.98); LASA QOL (Web-paper = 0.98, Web-IVRS = 0.78, paper-IVRS = 0.80); and SSQ (Web-paper = 0.92, Web-IVRS = 0.86, paper-IVRS = 0.79). Mode equivalence was demonstrated for the BFI total score, BFI subscales, LASA QOL, and adapted SSQ, supporting the use of multiple modes of PRO data capture in clinical trials.

  13. Missing data methods for dealing with missing items in quality of life questionnaires. A comparison by simulation of personal mean score, full information maximum likelihood, multiple imputation, and hot deck techniques applied to the SF-36 in the French 2003 decennial health survey.

    PubMed

    Peyre, Hugo; Leplège, Alain; Coste, Joël

    2011-03-01

    Missing items are common in quality of life (QoL) questionnaires and present a challenge for research in this field. It remains unclear which of the various methods proposed to deal with missing data performs best in this context. We compared personal mean score, full information maximum likelihood, multiple imputation, and hot deck techniques using various realistic simulation scenarios of item missingness in QoL questionnaires constructed within the framework of classical test theory. Samples of 300 and 1,000 subjects were randomly drawn from the 2003 INSEE Decennial Health Survey (of 23,018 subjects representative of the French population and having completed the SF-36) and various patterns of missing data were generated according to three different item non-response rates (3, 6, and 9%) and three types of missing data (Little and Rubin's "missing completely at random," "missing at random," and "missing not at random"). The missing data methods were evaluated in terms of accuracy and precision for the analysis of one descriptive and one association parameter for three different scales of the SF-36. For all item non-response rates and types of missing data, multiple imputation and full information maximum likelihood appeared superior to the personal mean score and especially to hot deck in terms of accuracy and precision; however, the use of personal mean score was associated with insignificant bias (relative bias <2%) in all studied situations. Whereas multiple imputation and full information maximum likelihood are confirmed as reference methods, the personal mean score appears nonetheless appropriate for dealing with items missing from completed SF-36 questionnaires in most situations of routine use. These results can reasonably be extended to other questionnaires constructed according to classical test theory.

  14. Action Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Mark; Keane, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Maximizing school resources and managing a shrinking budget--these are two important items affected when a building's roofing system does not perform properly. Rather than acting in haste, school and university administrators should do what every teacher tells a student prior to answering any question: think through the research and studies to…

  15. Effects of Including Humor in Test Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMorris, Robert F.; And Others

    Two 50-item multiple-choice forms of a grammar test were developed differing only in humor being included in 20 items of one form. One hundred twenty-six (126) eighth graders received the test plus alternate forms of a questionnaire. Humor inclusion did not affect grammar scores on matched humorous/nonhumorous items nor on common post-treatment…

  16. Ramsay-Curve Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Carol M.

    2011-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) occurs when an item on a test, questionnaire, or interview has different measurement properties for one group of people versus another, irrespective of true group-mean differences on the constructs being measured. This article is focused on item response theory based likelihood ratio testing for DIF (IRT-LR or…

  17. Preanesthesia Questionnaire

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask Brochures and Resources Videos AANA / Patients Pre-Anesthesia Questionnaire Page Content The information you supply below ... supplements; complementary or ... Pre-Anesthesia Questionnaire Please answer the following questions. These responses ...

  18. Methodological Issues in Questionnaire Design.

    PubMed

    Song, Youngshin; Son, Youn Jung; Oh, Doonam

    2015-06-01

    The process of designing a questionnaire is complicated. Many questionnaires on nursing phenomena have been developed and used by nursing researchers. The purpose of this paper was to discuss questionnaire design and factors that should be considered when using existing scales. Methodological issues were discussed, such as factors in the design of questions, steps in developing questionnaires, wording and formatting methods for items, and administrations methods. How to use existing scales, how to facilitate cultural adaptation, and how to prevent socially desirable responding were discussed. Moreover, the triangulation method in questionnaire development was introduced. Steps were recommended for designing questions such as appropriately operationalizing key concepts for the target population, clearly formatting response options, generating items and confirming final items through face or content validity, sufficiently piloting the questionnaire using item analysis, demonstrating reliability and validity, finalizing the scale, and training the administrator. Psychometric properties and cultural equivalence should be evaluated prior to administration when using an existing questionnaire and performing cultural adaptation. In the context of well-defined nursing phenomena, logical and systematic methods will contribute to the development of simple and precise questionnaires.

  19. PREDICTION OF RELIABILITY IN BIOGRAPHICAL QUESTIONNAIRES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    STARRY, ALLAN R.

    THE OBJECTIVES OF THIS STUDY WERE (1) TO DEVELOP A GENERAL CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM FOR LIFE HISTORY ITEMS, (2) TO DETERMINE TEST-RETEST RELIABILITY ESTIMATES, AND (3) TO ESTIMATE RESISTANCE TO EXAMINEE FAKING, FOR REPRESENTATIVE BIOGRAPHICAL QUESTIONNAIRES. TWO 100-ITEM QUESTIONNAIRES WERE CONSTRUCTED THROUGH RANDOM ASSIGNMENT BY CONTENT AREA OF 200…

  20. PREDICTION OF RELIABILITY IN BIOGRAPHICAL QUESTIONNAIRES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    STARRY, ALLAN R.

    THE OBJECTIVES OF THIS STUDY WERE (1) TO DEVELOP A GENERAL CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM FOR LIFE HISTORY ITEMS, (2) TO DETERMINE TEST-RETEST RELIABILITY ESTIMATES, AND (3) TO ESTIMATE RESISTANCE TO EXAMINEE FAKING, FOR REPRESENTATIVE BIOGRAPHICAL QUESTIONNAIRES. TWO 100-ITEM QUESTIONNAIRES WERE CONSTRUCTED THROUGH RANDOM ASSIGNMENT BY CONTENT AREA OF 200…

  1. Revalidation of the Perceptions of Conscience Questionnaire (PCQ) and the Stress of Conscience Questionnaire (SCQ).

    PubMed

    Ahlin, Johan; Ericson-Lidman, Eva; Norberg, Astrid; Strandberg, Gunilla

    2012-03-01

    The Perceptions of Conscience Questionnaire (PCQ) and the Stress of Conscience Questionnaire (SCQ) have previously been developed and validated within the 'Stress of Conscience Study'. The aim was to revalidate these two questionnaires, including two additional, theoretically and empirically significant items, on a sample of healthcare personnel working in direct contact with patients. The sample consisted of 503 healthcare personnel. To test variation and distribution among the answers, descriptive statistics, item analysis and principal component analysis (PCA) were used to examine the underlying factor structure of the questionnaires. Support for adding the new item to the PCQ was found. No support was found for adding the new item to the SCQ. Both questionnaires can be regarded as valid for Swedish settings but can be improved by rephrasing some of the PCQ items and by adding items about private life to the SCQ.

  2. Brief Report: Accuracy of a 16-Item Questionnaire Based on the HEADSS Approach (QBH-16) in the Screening of Mental Disorders in Adolescents with Behavioral Problems in Secondary Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagel, Lilian Day; Mainieri, Alberto Scolfano; Zeni, Cristian Patrick; Wagner, Mario Bernardes

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Compare a questionnaire based on the HEADSS approach (QBH-16) and the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) in the screening of mental disorder in adolescents with behavioral problems. Methods: Adolescents from both genders 12-17 years-old presenting behavioral problems without a previous diagnosis of mental disorder were referred from…

  3. Item Difficulty Modeling of Paragraph Comprehension Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorin, Joanna S.; Embretson, Susan E.

    2006-01-01

    Recent assessment research joining cognitive psychology and psychometric theory has introduced a new technology, item generation. In algorithmic item generation, items are systematically created based on specific combinations of features that underlie the processing required to correctly solve a problem. Reading comprehension items have been more…

  4. Item Difficulty Modeling of Paragraph Comprehension Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorin, Joanna S.; Embretson, Susan E.

    2006-01-01

    Recent assessment research joining cognitive psychology and psychometric theory has introduced a new technology, item generation. In algorithmic item generation, items are systematically created based on specific combinations of features that underlie the processing required to correctly solve a problem. Reading comprehension items have been more…

  5. Rasch analysis of the Roland disability questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Garratt, Andrew M

    2003-01-01

    A cross-sectional survey using patient questionnaires was conducted. OBJECTIVE To assess whether the Roland Disability Questionnaire satisfies the Rasch model including unidimensionality and item separation. The Roland Disability Questionnaire, the most widely used patient-assessed measure of health outcome for back pain, has undergone several evaluations for its measurement properties including reliability, validity, and responsiveness. However, there is no published work relating to the underlying dimensionality of the instrument and the extent to which individual items contribute to the construct of physical disability resulting from low back pain. Patients entering a randomized controlled trial of exercise, manipulation, and usual management for back pain completed a questionnaire that included the Roland Disability Questionnaire. The Winsteps program was used to assess whether the Roland Disability Questionnaire fits the Rasch model. Item fit was assessed using the Infit and Outfit statistics. The Roland Disability Questionnaire was completed by 1008 (90%) of the patients taking part in the trial. Most of the items in the Roland Disability Questionnaire contribute to a single underlying construct. However, four items had poor Outfit statistics, suggesting that they do not contribute sufficiently to the scale hierarchy. Several items positioned around the middle of the hierarchy are not sufficiently distinct in terms of difficulty. There were very few items positioned at the extremes of the hierarchy. The Roland Disability Questionnaire largely satisfies the Rasch model for unidimensionality. However, the instrument could be improved through the removal of poorly fitting items and the addition of items at the upper and lower points of the scale hierarchy. The distribution of Roland Disability Questionnaire scores should be carefully considered before statistical testing is undertaken. Rasch transformed scores can be used to deal with deficiencies in the scale

  6. [Questionnaires in sexual medicine].

    PubMed

    Giuliano, F

    2013-07-01

    Screening, diagnosis and assessment of the management of male and female sexual dysfunctions have been greatly improved by the scientific development of self-administered questionnaires. Their use became the rule in clinical trials and epidemiological surveys. Nevertheless, their routine use has not yet become part of daily urological practice. Even if these tools replace neither the patient interview and medical history and the psychological and social context of the sexual behavior, nor clinical examination, they are of great assistance for determining management and are also highly reliable. Medical literature was reviewed and combined with expert opinion of the author. We present here several questionnaires which have been validated in their French version with the methodology for the calculation of the scores. The International Index of Erectile Function (15 items) and two abbreviated versions, the Erectile Function domain (six items) and the Sexual Health Inventory for Men (five questions) are mainly of use for patients with erectile dysfunction. They provide a robust classification of the severity of the condition. The Premature Ejaculation Profile (four questions) is used for patients with premature ejaculation. It describes premature ejaculation with the following criteria: time to ejaculation, control over ejaculation, the level of distress. The Male Health Sexual Questionnaire (25 questions) provides with a wider and more comprehensive approach to male sexuality of male sexuality including: erection, ejaculation, desire and satisfaction. This questionnaire is particularly useful to investigate ejaculatory disorders. Lastly, the Female Sexual Function Index (19 questions) is the tool of choice for female sexuality with questions regarding desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, satisfaction and pain. Validated, user-friendly questionnaires are available in French language for the diagnosis and the follow-up of sexual dysfunctions in both men and women

  7. Validity and reliability of the 19-item Audit of Diabetes-Dependent Quality of Life (ADDQoL-19) questionnaire in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in primary care.

    PubMed

    Fung, Colman S C; Wan, Eric Y F; Yu, Charlotte L Y; Wong, Carlos K H

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to determine the psychometric properties of the 19-item Audit of Diabetes-Dependent Quality of Life (ADDQoL-19) in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in primary care setting. The ADDQoL-19 and SF-12v2 were administered to 386 Chinese patients with T2DM in public primary outpatient clinic in Hong Kong. Internal consistency reliability was determined by Cronbach's alpha, whereas construct validity was assessed by the Spearman's correlations between the scores of the ADDQoL-19 and SF-12v2. Independent t tests were used in known-group comparisons to identify the differences in the ADDQoL-19 scores between respondents with different duration of diabetes, treatment modalities, body mass index and glycemic control. The ADDQoL-19 had a moderate to weak correlation with SF-12v2 in convergent validity but with statistically significant results in known-group comparisons. Good internal consistency was generated with an acceptable value of 0.81, which was comparable to original English version. Construct validity was proven except the convergent validity is found to be weak with the generic SF-12v2, which was similar to the results in prior psychometric studies. Despite weak convergent validity, the ADDQoL-19 was found to have a satisfactory psychometric property, especially known-group comparisons and internal consistency reliability in the primary care setting.

  8. Reversed item bias: an integrative model.

    PubMed

    Weijters, Bert; Baumgartner, Hans; Schillewaert, Niels

    2013-09-01

    In the recent methodological literature, various models have been proposed to account for the phenomenon that reversed items (defined as items for which respondents' scores have to be recoded in order to make the direction of keying consistent across all items) tend to lead to problematic responses. In this article we propose an integrative conceptualization of three important sources of reversed item method bias (acquiescence, careless responding, and confirmation bias) and specify a multisample confirmatory factor analysis model with 2 method factors to empirically test the hypothesized mechanisms, using explicit measures of acquiescence and carelessness and experimentally manipulated versions of a questionnaire that varies 3 item arrangements and the keying direction of the first item measuring the focal construct. We explain the mechanisms, review prior attempts to model reversed item bias, present our new model, and apply it to responses to a 4-item self-esteem scale (N = 306) and the 6-item Revised Life Orientation Test (N = 595). Based on the literature review and the empirical results, we formulate recommendations on how to use reversed items in questionnaires.

  9. Consensus on Desirable Characteristics of Mail Questionnaires: Illusion or Reality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boser, Judith A.; Clark, Sheldon B.

    This study of survey research experts was conducted to determine desirable characteristics of mail questionnaires. The 82-item Likert-scale instrument used in the study covered general appearance, instructions, choice of items, choice of response options, wording, order of items, and item format. The instrument was administered to: 8 subjects who…

  10. Factoring handedness data: I. Item analysis.

    PubMed

    Messinger, H B; Messinger, M I

    1995-12-01

    Recently in this journal Peters and Murphy challenged the validity of factor analyses done on bimodal handedness data, suggesting instead that right- and left-handers be studied separately. But bimodality may be avoidable if attention is paid to Oldfield's questionnaire format and instructions for the subjects. Two characteristics appear crucial: a two-column LEFT-RIGHT format for the body of the instrument and what we call Oldfield's Admonition: not to indicate strong preference for handedness item, such as write, unless "... the preference is so strong that you would never try to use the other hand unless absolutely forced to...". Attaining unimodality of an item distribution would seem to overcome the objections of Peters and Murphy. In a 1984 survey in Boston we used Oldfield's ten-item questionnaire exactly as published. This produced unimodal item distributions. With reflection of the five-point item scale and a logarithmic transformation, we achieved a degree of normalization for the items. Two surveys elsewhere based on Oldfield's 20-item list but with changes in the questionnaire format and the instructions, yielded markedly different item distributions with peaks at each extreme and sometimes in the middle as well.

  11. Screening Test Items for Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longford, Nicholas T.

    2014-01-01

    A method for medical screening is adapted to differential item functioning (DIF). Its essential elements are explicit declarations of the level of DIF that is acceptable and of the loss function that quantifies the consequences of the two kinds of inappropriate classification of an item. Instead of a single level and a single function, sets of…

  12. Dissecting Item Misfit on Vocabulary Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gershon, Richard C.

    The Johnson O'Connor Research Foundation, which produces vocabulary instructional materials for test takers, is in the process of determining the difficulty values of nontechnical words in the English language. To this end, the Foundation writes test items for vocabulary words and tests them in schools. The items are then calibrated using the…

  13. Screening Test Items for Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longford, Nicholas T.

    2014-01-01

    A method for medical screening is adapted to differential item functioning (DIF). Its essential elements are explicit declarations of the level of DIF that is acceptable and of the loss function that quantifies the consequences of the two kinds of inappropriate classification of an item. Instead of a single level and a single function, sets of…

  14. Utility of the Late Life Function and Disability Instrument as an Outcome Measure in Patients Participating in Outpatient Cardiac Rehabilitation: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the concurrent validity of the Late Life Function and Disability Instrument (LLFDI) in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) and to evaluate the accuracy of information obtained through self-report questionnaire versus interview formats. Methods: The study included 29 patients older than 60 years attending an outpatient cardiac rehabilitation program. Participants completed the LLFDI, three additional self-report criterion measures, and six performance-based tests; they completed the LLFDI a second time via interview. We used descriptive statistics, correlations, and t-tests to analyze the data. Results: All LLFDI components were correlated (rs=0.36–0.83) with the self-report criterion measures. The Function Component of the LLFDI was moderately correlated with the 6-Minute Walk Test (r=0.62), timed up-and-go (r=−0.58), walking speed (r=−0.57), and timed sit-to-stand (r=−0.56) scores. The LLFDI demonstrated a ceiling effect (10%) only in the Disability Limitation component. All LLFDI component scores obtained via self-report questionnaire were correlated with scores obtained via interview; except in a single subcategory, there was no difference between LLFDI scores obtained through self-report questionnaire and those obtained through interview. Conclusions: Results indicate that the LLFDI has appropriate validity for older patients (>60 years) with CHD and can be completed independently by patients rather than administered by clinicians. PMID:23277685

  15. A Permutation Test for Correlated Errors in Adjacent Questionnaire Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hildreth, Laura A.; Genschel, Ulrike; Lorenz, Frederick O.; Lesser, Virginia M.

    2013-01-01

    Response patterns are of importance to survey researchers because of the insight they provide into the thought processes respondents use to answer survey questions. In this article we propose the use of structural equation modeling to examine response patterns and develop a permutation test to quantify the likelihood of observing a specific…

  16. Blocked versus Randomized Format of Questionnaires: A Confirmatory Multigroup Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparfeldt, Jorn R.; Schilling, Susanne R.; Rost, Detlef H.; Thiel, Alexandra

    2006-01-01

    The notion of item context effects implies that psychometric properties of an item or scale are altered by the presentation format, for example, blocked versus randomized. In an experimental study with high school students, the experimental group (n = 407) answered a four-dimensional academic self-concept questionnaire, in which the items were…

  17. [Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire--description and application].

    PubMed

    Ciałkowska, Magdalena; Hadryś, Tomasz; Kiejna, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    Long-term mental illnesses such as schizophrenia or affective disorders often impose a burden on the patients who suffer from it, as well as on their carers (relatives or friends). There are many instruments measuring family or caregiver burden. One of these instruments is the Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire (IEQ). The IEQ is a 31-item questionnaire which is completed by the caregiver. The IEQ contains 27 items that can be divided into four subscales (domains): tension (nine items), worrying (six items), supervision (six items) and urging (eight items). Two items appear in more than one domain. The items are scored on a 5-point Likert scale (never, sometimes, regularly, often and always). There is no full Polish adaptation of IEQ so far. The psychometric properties of the IEQ and its culture-profiled versions are satisfying and comparable. The IEQ, as a self-assessment instrument, is easy to administer and not time-consuming. The IEQ proved to be a reliable instrument for measuring caregiver consequences in mental healthcare.

  18. Writing better test items.

    PubMed

    Aucoin, Julia W

    2005-01-01

    Professional development specialists have had little opportunity to learn how to write test items to meet the expectations of today's graduate nurse. Schools of nursing have moved away from knowledge-level test items and have had to develop more application and analysis items to prepare graduates for the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX). This same type of question can be used effectively to support a competence assessment system and document critical thinking skills.

  19. 48 CFR 852.214-72 - Alternate item(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Alternate item(s). 852.214-72 Section 852.214-72 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS CLAUSES... Alternate item(s). As prescribed in 814.201-6(b)(2), insert the following provision: Alternate Item(s) (JAN...

  20. 48 CFR 852.214-72 - Alternate item(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Alternate item(s). 852.214-72 Section 852.214-72 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS CLAUSES... Alternate item(s). As prescribed in 814.201-6(b)(2), insert the following provision: Alternate Item(s) (JAN...

  1. Testing Three-Item Versions for Seven of Young's Maladaptive Schema

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blau, Gary; DiMino, John; Sheridan, Natalie; Pred, Robert S.; Beverly, Clyde; Chessler, Marcy

    2015-01-01

    The Young Schema Questionnaire (YSQ) in either long-form (205- item) or short-form (75-item or 90-item) versions has demonstrated its clinical usefulness for assessing early maladaptive schemas. However, even a 75 or 90-item "short form", particularly when combined with other measures, can represent a lengthy…

  2. Testing Three-Item Versions for Seven of Young's Maladaptive Schema

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blau, Gary; DiMino, John; Sheridan, Natalie; Pred, Robert S.; Beverly, Clyde; Chessler, Marcy

    2015-01-01

    The Young Schema Questionnaire (YSQ) in either long-form (205- item) or short-form (75-item or 90-item) versions has demonstrated its clinical usefulness for assessing early maladaptive schemas. However, even a 75 or 90-item "short form", particularly when combined with other measures, can represent a lengthy…

  3. Confirmatory factor analysis of The Aggression Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Harris, J A

    1995-11-01

    A confirmatory factor analysis of the factor structure of The Aggression Questionnaire created by Buss and Perry (1992) [Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 63, 452-459] was conducted to assess whether the scale's purported 4 factors emerged. The results generally supported the 4-factor model. However, the hostility factor may be improved if 2 items pertaining to suspicion are removed from the scale. These items had relatively low loadings on that factor and decreased the hostility scale's internal reliability.

  4. Relationship between Item Responses of Negative Affect Items and the Distribution of the Sum of the Item Scores in the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Yohei; Ide, Kazuki; Akutagawa, Maiko; Yamada, Hiroshi; Furukawa, Toshiaki A.; Ono, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Background Several studies have shown that total depressive symptom scores in the general population approximate an exponential pattern, except for the lower end of the distribution. The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) consists of 20 items, each of which may take on four scores: “rarely,” “some,” “occasionally,” and “most of the time.” Recently, we reported that the item responses for 16 negative affect items commonly exhibit exponential patterns, except for the level of “rarely,” leading us to hypothesize that the item responses at the level of “rarely” may be related to the non-exponential pattern typical of the lower end of the distribution. To verify this hypothesis, we investigated how the item responses contribute to the distribution of the sum of the item scores. Methods Data collected from 21,040 subjects who had completed the CES-D questionnaire as part of a Japanese national survey were analyzed. To assess the item responses of negative affect items, we used a parameter r, which denotes the ratio of “rarely” to “some” in each item response. The distributions of the sum of negative affect items in various combinations were analyzed using log-normal scales and curve fitting. Results The sum of the item scores approximated an exponential pattern regardless of the combination of items, whereas, at the lower end of the distributions, there was a clear divergence between the actual data and the predicted exponential pattern. At the lower end of the distributions, the sum of the item scores with high values of r exhibited higher scores compared to those predicted from the exponential pattern, whereas the sum of the item scores with low values of r exhibited lower scores compared to those predicted. Conclusions The distributional pattern of the sum of the item scores could be predicted from the item responses of such items. PMID:27806132

  5. The pornography craving questionnaire: psychometric properties.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Shane; Rosenberg, Harold

    2014-04-01

    Despite the prevalence of pornography use, and recent conceptualization of problematic use as an addiction, we could find no published scale to measure craving for pornography. Therefore, we conducted three studies employing young male pornography users to develop and evaluate such a questionnaire. In Study 1, we had participants rate their agreement with 20 potential craving items after reading a control script or a script designed to induce craving to watch pornography. We dropped eight items because of low endorsement. In Study 2, we revised both the questionnaire and cue exposure stimuli and then evaluated several psychometric properties of the modified questionnaire. Item loadings from a principal components analysis, a high internal consistency reliability coefficient, and a moderate mean inter-item correlation supported interpreting the 12 revised items as a single scale. Correlations of craving scores with preoccupation with pornography, sexual history, compulsive internet use, and sensation seeking provided support for convergent validity, criterion validity, and discriminant validity, respectively. The enhanced imagery script did not impact reported craving; however, more frequent users of pornography reported higher craving than less frequent users regardless of script condition. In Study 3, craving scores demonstrated good one-week test-retest reliability and predicted the number of times participants used pornography during the following week. This questionnaire could be applied in clinical settings to plan and evaluate therapy for problematic users of pornography and as a research tool to assess the prevalence and contextual triggers of craving among different types of pornography users.

  6. Development of a Brief Questionnaire to Assess Contraceptive Intent

    PubMed Central

    Raine-Bennett, Tina R; Rocca, Corinne H

    2015-01-01

    Objective We sought to develop and validate an instrument that can enable providers to identify young women who may be at risk of contraceptive non-adherence. Methods Item response theory based methods were used to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Contraceptive Intent Questionnaire, a 15-item self-administered questionnaire, based on theory and prior qualitative and quantitative research. The questionnaire was administered to 200 women aged 15–24 years who were initiating contraceptives. We assessed item fit to the item response model, internal consistency, internal structure validity, and differential item functioning. Results All items fit a one-dimensional model. The separation reliability coefficient was 0.73. Participants’ overall scores covered the full range of the scale (0–15), and items appropriately matched the range of participants’ contraceptive intent. Items met the criteria for internal structure validity and most items functioned similarly between groups of women. Conclusion The Contraceptive Intent Questionnaire appears to be a reliable and valid tool. Future testing is needed to assess predictive ability and clinical utility. Practice Implications The Contraceptive Intent Questionnaire may serve as a valid tool to help providers identify women who may have problems with contraceptive adherence, as well as to pinpoint areas in which counseling may be directed. PMID:26104994

  7. Dimensional structure of the Frankfurt Complaint Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Loas, Gwenolé; Yon, Valérie; Brien, Denis

    2002-01-01

    The Frankfurt Complaint Questionnaire (FCQ) was designed to evaluate the subjective symptoms of schizophrenics. Several validation studies of the FCQ using principal components analyses (PCA) have shown one-, two-, or four-factor solutions. The present study was conducted using FCQ data on 310 schizophrenics who met the ICD-10 criteria for F20 (schizophrenia) disorder. Using several guidelines to select the number of factors, the PCA yielded one factor. This result suggests a unidimensionality underlying FCQ items. A new scale comprising 24 items was derived from those items with higher weights in the first factor.

  8. Development and assessment of floor and ceiling items for the PROMIS physical function item bank

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Disability and Physical Function (PF) outcome assessment has had limited ability to measure functional status at the floor (very poor functional abilities) or the ceiling (very high functional abilities). We sought to identify, develop and evaluate new floor and ceiling items to enable broader and more precise assessment of PF outcomes for the NIH Patient-Reported-Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS). Methods We conducted two cross-sectional studies using NIH PROMIS item improvement protocols with expert review, participant survey and focus group methods. In Study 1, respondents with low PF abilities evaluated new floor items, and those with high PF abilities evaluated new ceiling items for clarity, importance and relevance. In Study 2, we compared difficulty ratings of new floor items by low functioning respondents and ceiling items by high functioning respondents to reference PROMIS PF-10 items. We used frequencies, percentages, means and standard deviations to analyze the data. Results In Study 1, low (n = 84) and high (n = 90) functioning respondents were mostly White, women, 70 years old, with some college, and disability scores of 0.62 and 0.30. More than 90% of the 31 new floor and 31 new ceiling items were rated as clear, important and relevant, leaving 26 ceiling and 30 floor items for Study 2. Low (n = 246) and high (n = 637) functioning Study 2 respondents were mostly White, women, 70 years old, with some college, and Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) scores of 1.62 and 0.003. Compared to difficulty ratings of reference items, ceiling items were rated to be 10% more to greater than 40% more difficult to do, and floor items were rated to be about 12% to nearly 90% less difficult to do. Conclusions These new floor and ceiling items considerably extend the measurable range of physical function at either extreme. They will help improve instrument performance in populations with broad functional ranges and those concentrated at

  9. Individuality of Item Interpretation in Interchangeable ACL Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiske, Donald W.; Barack, Leonard I.

    1976-01-01

    The diversity among interpretations of single items in personality questionnaires has been noted previously. Using adjectives from the Adjective Check List (ACL), the study sought evidence bearing on these questions: Does such diversity make the responses to an item not comparable across subjects? If so, what are the implications for scores based…

  10. Individuality of Item Interpretation in Interchangeable ACL Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiske, Donald W.; Barack, Leonard I.

    1976-01-01

    The diversity among interpretations of single items in personality questionnaires has been noted previously. Using adjectives from the Adjective Check List (ACL), the study sought evidence bearing on these questions: Does such diversity make the responses to an item not comparable across subjects? If so, what are the implications for scores based…

  11. Testing for Differential Item Functioning with Measures of Partial Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Carol M.

    2009-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) occurs when an item on a test or questionnaire has different measurement properties for one group of people versus another, irrespective of mean differences on the construct. There are many methods available for DIF assessment. The present article is focused on indices of partial association. A family of average…

  12. Empirical Selection of Anchors for Tests of Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Carol M.

    2009-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) occurs when items on a test or questionnaire have different measurement properties for one group of people versus another, irrespective of group-mean differences on the construct. Methods for testing DIF require matching members of different groups on an estimate of the construct. Preferably, the estimate is…

  13. Development and Validation of a Brief Screening Version of the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernstein, David P.; Stein, Judith A.; Newcomb, Michael D.; Walker, Edward; Pogge, David; Ahluvalia, Taruna; Stokes, John; Handelsman, Leonard; Medrano, Martha; Desmond, David; Zule, William

    2003-01-01

    Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses of 70 Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) items were used to create a shorter 28-item version and test the measurement invariance of the 25 clinical items across adult substance abusing patients, adolescent psychiatric inpatients, and control populations (n=1,978). Items performed equivalently across…

  14. Novelty and Promotional Items

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Small novelty or promotional products, primarily used for outreach and educational purposes, must effectively convey a message, and their purchase will only be allowed if the item will contribute to the accomplishment of the Agency's mission.

  15. Item Banking. Basic Testing Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childs, Roy

    This pamphlet describes the exciting potential of item banking--a new approach to testing which combines both comparability of scores with flexibility of test format. Item banks are collections of items where the characteristics of each item is known and these characteristics can be summated to described a test made from such items. The principle…

  16. Evolution of a Test Item

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spaan, Mary

    2007-01-01

    This article follows the development of test items (see "Language Assessment Quarterly", Volume 3 Issue 1, pp. 71-79 for the article "Test and Item Specifications Development"), beginning with a review of test and item specifications, then proceeding to writing and editing of items, pretesting and analysis, and finally selection of an item for a…

  17. OVERSEAS EDUCATION ASSOCIATION QUESTIONNAIRE. (TITLE SUPPLIED).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overseas Education Association, New York, NY.

    AS A BASIS FOR IMPROVING THE EDUCATION OF THE 160,000 CHILDREN OF OVERSEAS AMERICAN MILITARY AND CIVILIAN PERSONNEL, 1,639 TEACHERS IN 285 OF THE 327 DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE OVERSEAS DEPENDENTS SCHOOLS IN 28 COUNTRIES RESPONDED TO A 19-ITEM QUESTIONNAIRE COVERING TEACHING EXPERIENCE, EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND, PERSONNEL PRACTICES, CLASSROOM MATERIALS,…

  18. Outlier Detection in Test and Questionnaire Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zijlstra, Wobbe P.; Van Der Ark, L. Andries; Sijtsma, Klaas

    2007-01-01

    Classical methods for detecting outliers deal with continuous variables. These methods are not readily applicable to categorical data, such as incorrect/correct scores (0/1) and ordered rating scale scores (e.g., 0,..., 4) typical of multi-item tests and questionnaires. This study proposes two definitions of outlier scores suited for categorical…

  19. Utah Drop-Out Drug Use Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Governor's Citizen Advisory Committee on Drugs, Salt Lake City, UT.

    This questionnaire assesses drug use practices in high school drop-outs. The 79 items (multiple choice or apply/not apply) are concerned with demographic data and use, use history, reasons for use/nonuse, attitudes toward drugs, availability of drugs, and drug information with respect to narcotics, amphetamines, LSD, Marijuana, and barbiturates.…

  20. Utah Drop-Out Drug Use Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Governor's Citizen Advisory Committee on Drugs, Salt Lake City, UT.

    This questionnaire assesses drug use practices in high school drop-outs. The 79 items (multiple choice or apply/not apply) are concerned with demographic data and use, use history, reasons for use/nonuse, attitudes toward drugs, availability of drugs, and drug information with respect to narcotics, amphetamines, LSD, Marijuana, and barbiturates.…

  1. Item Writer Judgments of Item Difficulty versus Actual Item Difficulty: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sydorenko, Tetyana

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates how accurate one item writer can be on item difficulty estimates and whether factors affecting item writer judgments correspond to predictors of actual item difficulty. The items were based on conversational dialogs (presented as videos online) that focus on pragmatic functions. Thirty-five 2nd-, 3rd-, and 4th-year learners…

  2. Development and validation of a questionnaire assessing fears and beliefs of patients with knee osteoarthritis: the Knee Osteoarthritis Fears and Beliefs Questionnaire (KOFBeQ).

    PubMed

    Benhamou, Mathilde; Baron, Gabriel; Dalichampt, Marie; Boutron, Isabelle; Alami, Sophie; Rannou, François; Ravaud, Philippe; Poiraudeau, Serge

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to develop a questionnaire assessing fears and beliefs of patients with knee OA. We sent a detailed document reporting on a qualitative analysis of interviews of patients with knee OA to experts, and a Delphi procedure was adopted for item generation. Then, 80 physicians recruited 566 patients with knee OA to test the provisional questionnaire. Items were reduced according to their metric properties and exploratory factor analysis. Reliability was tested by the Cronbach α coefficient. Construct validity was tested by divergent validity and confirmatory factor analysis. Test-retest reliability was assessed by the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and the Bland and Altman technique. 137 items were extracted from analysis of the interview data. Three Delphi rounds were needed to obtain consensus on a 25-item provisional questionnaire. The item-reduction process resulted in an 11-item questionnaire. Selected items represented fears and beliefs about daily living activities (3 items), fears and beliefs about physicians (4 items), fears and beliefs about the disease (2 items), and fears and beliefs about sports and leisure activities (2 items). The Cronbach α coefficient of global score was 0.85. We observed expected divergent validity. Confirmation factor analyses confirmed higher intra-factor than inter-factor correlations. Test-retest reliability was good, with an ICC of 0.81, and Bland and Altman analysis did not reveal a systematic trend. We propose an 11-item questionnaire assessing patients' fears and beliefs concerning knee OA with good content and construct validity.

  3. The brief experiential avoidance questionnaire: development and initial validation.

    PubMed

    Gámez, Wakiza; Chmielewski, Michael; Kotov, Roman; Ruggero, Camilo; Suzuki, Nadia; Watson, David

    2014-03-01

    The 62-item Multidimensional Experiential Avoidance Questionnaire (MEAQ) was recently developed to assess a broad range of experiential avoidance (EA) content. However, practical clinical and research considerations made a briefer measure of EA desirable. Using items from the original 62-item MEAQ, a 15-item scale was created that tapped content from each of the MEAQ's six dimensions. Items were selected on the basis of their performance in 3 samples: undergraduates (n = 363), psychiatric outpatients (n = 265), and community adults (n = 215). These items were then evaluated using 2 additional samples (314 undergraduates and 201 psychiatric outpatients) and cross-validated in 2 new, independent samples (283 undergraduates and 295 community adults). The resulting measure (Brief Experiential Avoidance Questionnaire; BEAQ) demonstrated good internal consistency. It also exhibited strong convergence with respect to each of the MEAQ's 6 dimensions. The BEAQ demonstrated expected associations with measures of avoidance, psychopathology, and quality of life and was distinguishable from negative affectivity and neuroticism.

  4. The Survey Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, Lois A. Ed.; Sue, Valerie M., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    Internet-based surveys are still relatively new, and researchers are just beginning to articulate best practices for questionnaire design. Online questionnaire design has generally been guided by the principles applying to other self-administered instruments, such as paper-based questionnaires. Web-based questionnaires, however, have the potential…

  5. Development of a cohesion questionnaire for youth: the Youth Sport Environment Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Eys, Mark; Loughead, Todd; Bray, Steven R; Carron, Albert V

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of the current study was to initiate the development of a psychometrically sound measure of cohesion for youth sport groups. A series of projects were undertaken in a four-phase research program. The initial phase was designed to garner an understanding of how youth sport group members perceived the concept of cohesion through focus groups (n = 56), open-ended questionnaires (n = 280), and a literature review. In Phase 2, information from the initial projects was used in the development of 142 potential items and content validity was assessed. In Phase 3, 227 participants completed a revised 87-item questionnaire. Principal components analyses further reduced the number of items to 17 and suggested a two-factor structure (i.e., task and social cohesion dimensions). Finally, support for the factorial validity of the resultant questionnaire was provided through confirmatory factor analyses with an independent sample (n = 352) in Phase 4. The final version of the questionnaire contains 16 items that assess task and social cohesion in addition to 2 negatively worded spurious items. Specific issues related to assessing youth perceptions of cohesion are discussed and future research directions are suggested.

  6. Which kind of psychometrics is adequate for patient satisfaction questionnaires?

    PubMed Central

    Konerding, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    The construction and psychometric analysis of patient satisfaction questionnaires are discussed. The discussion is based upon the classification of multi-item questionnaires into scales or indices. Scales consist of items that describe the effects of the latent psychological variable to be measured, and indices consist of items that describe the causes of this variable. Whether patient satisfaction questionnaires should be constructed and analyzed as scales or as indices depends upon the purpose for which these questionnaires are required. If the final aim is improving care with regard to patients’ preferences, then these questionnaires should be constructed and analyzed as indices. This implies two requirements: 1) items for patient satisfaction questionnaires should be selected in such a way that the universe of possible causes of patient satisfaction is covered optimally and 2) Cronbach’s alpha, principal component analysis, exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, and analyses with models from item response theory, such as the Rasch Model, should not be applied for psychometric analyses. Instead, multivariate regression analyses with a direct rating of patient satisfaction as the dependent variable and the individual questionnaire items as independent variables should be performed. The coefficients produced by such an analysis can be applied for selecting the best items and for weighting the selected items when a sum score is determined. The lower boundaries of the validity of the unweighted and the weighted sum scores can be estimated by their correlations with the direct satisfaction rating. While the first requirement is fulfilled in the majority of the previous patient satisfaction questionnaires, the second one deviates from previous practice. Hence, if patient satisfaction is actually measured with the final aim of improving care with regard to patients’ preferences, then future practice should be changed so that the second

  7. The Role of Item Models in Automatic Item Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gierl, Mark J.; Lai, Hollis

    2012-01-01

    Automatic item generation represents a relatively new but rapidly evolving research area where cognitive and psychometric theories are used to produce tests that include items generated using computer technology. Automatic item generation requires two steps. First, test development specialists create item models, which are comparable to templates…

  8. The Role of Item Models in Automatic Item Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gierl, Mark J.; Lai, Hollis

    2012-01-01

    Automatic item generation represents a relatively new but rapidly evolving research area where cognitive and psychometric theories are used to produce tests that include items generated using computer technology. Automatic item generation requires two steps. First, test development specialists create item models, which are comparable to templates…

  9. Australian Item Bank Program: Handbook for Science Item Bank.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Council for Educational Research, Hawthorn.

    This handbook is designed to assist teachers in using the Science Item Bank to construct diagnostic tests and end-of-course achievement tests. The item bank consists of over 2,800 multiple-choice items, and teachers are encouraged to supplement this source of test items with other forms of test questions. Key answers to these questions are arrived…

  10. Investigating an Invariant Item Ordering for Polytomously Scored Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ligtvoet, Rudy; van der Ark, L. Andries; te Marvelde, Janneke M.; Sijtsma, Klaas

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the concept of an invariant item ordering (IIO) for polytomously scored items and proposes methods for investigating an IIO in real test data. Method manifest IIO is proposed for assessing whether item response functions intersect. Coefficient H[superscript T] is defined for polytomously scored items. Given that an IIO…

  11. The Motherhood Inventory: A Questionnaire for Studying Attitudes Toward Motherhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hare-Mustin, Rachel T.; Broderick, Patricia C.

    The Motherhood Inventory (MI) is a 40-item questionnaire developed to study attitudes toward motherhood and the motherhood myth. It includes items related to the control of reproduction, abortion, adoption, single motherhood, male-female relationships, and idealized and punitive attitudes toward mothers. The MI was investigated using 301 subjects…

  12. Development and validation of the Domestic Violence Questionnaire in married women aged 18-55 years.

    PubMed

    Indu, P V; Remadevi, S; Vidhukumar, K; Anilkumar, T V; Subha, N

    2011-07-01

    Intimate partner violence against women is seen in all cultures. It has wide-ranging effects on the physical and psychological health of women. In the local language, available questionnaires are either too exhaustive or inadequate to assess domestic violence comprehensively. To develop a Domestic Violence Questionnaire in Malayalam and validate it for married women aged 18-55 years in the local population. Descriptive study - Validation of questionnaire. A 29-item questionnaire, to identify domestic violence over the past 1 year, was developed in the local language, by selecting items from two other questionnaires and based on expert opinion. Item reduction was done after pilot testing. Then, this 25-item questionnaire was administered to 276 married women aged 18-55 years. Reliability and validity were estimated. Factor analysis was done for item reduction. Poor-loading, wrong-loading and cross-loading items were removed from the questionnaire. Taking the subjective perception of the participants regarding themselves experiencing domestic violence as the gold standard, a Receiver Operator Characteristic curve was drawn to decide the cut-off score with optimum sensitivity and specificity. The final questionnaire had 20 items - 13 items for psychological and 7 items for physical violence. Internal consistency reliability was 0.92. At a cut-off score of 5, sensitivity was 89.5% and specificity 87.2%. The Domestic Violence Questionnaire in Malayalam has adequate psychometric properties to identify intimate partner violence against women in the local population.

  13. Vegetable parenting practices scale. Item response modeling analyses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tzu-An; O'Connor, Teresia M; Hughes, Sheryl O; Beltran, Alicia; Baranowski, Janice; Diep, Cassandra; Baranowski, Tom

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the psychometric properties of a vegetable parenting practices scale using multidimensional polytomous item response modeling which enables assessing item fit to latent variables and the distributional characteristics of the items in comparison to the respondents. We also tested for differences in the ways item function (called differential item functioning) across child's gender, ethnicity, age, and household income groups. Parents of 3-5 year old children completed a self-reported vegetable parenting practices scale online. Vegetable parenting practices consisted of 14 effective vegetable parenting practices and 12 ineffective vegetable parenting practices items, each with three subscales (responsiveness, structure, and control). Multidimensional polytomous item response modeling was conducted separately on effective vegetable parenting practices and ineffective vegetable parenting practices. One effective vegetable parenting practice item did not fit the model well in the full sample or across demographic groups, and another was a misfit in differential item functioning analyses across child's gender. Significant differential item functioning was detected across children's age and ethnicity groups, and more among effective vegetable parenting practices than ineffective vegetable parenting practices items. Wright maps showed items only covered parts of the latent trait distribution. The harder- and easier-to-respond ends of the construct were not covered by items for effective vegetable parenting practices and ineffective vegetable parenting practices, respectively. Several effective vegetable parenting practices and ineffective vegetable parenting practices scale items functioned differently on the basis of child's demographic characteristics; therefore, researchers should use these vegetable parenting practices scales with caution. Item response modeling should be incorporated in analyses of parenting practice questionnaires to better assess

  14. Vegetable parenting practices scale. Item response modeling analyses

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tzu-An; O’Connor, Teresia; Hughes, Sheryl; Beltran, Alicia; Baranowski, Janice; Diep, Cassandra; Baranowski, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the psychometric properties of a vegetable parenting practices scale using multidimensional polytomous item response modeling which enables assessing item fit to latent variables and the distributional characteristics of the items in comparison to the respondents. We also tested for differences in the ways item function (called differential item functioning) across child’s gender, ethnicity, age, and household income groups. Method Parents of 3–5 year old children completed a self-reported vegetable parenting practices scale online. Vegetable parenting practices consisted of 14 effective vegetable parenting practices and 12 ineffective vegetable parenting practices items, each with three subscales (responsiveness, structure, and control). Multidimensional polytomous item response modeling was conducted separately on effective vegetable parenting practices and ineffective vegetable parenting practices. Results One effective vegetable parenting practice item did not fit the model well in the full sample or across demographic groups, and another was a misfit in differential item functioning analyses across child’s gender. Significant differential item functioning was detected across children’s age and ethnicity groups, and more among effective vegetable parenting practices than ineffective vegetable parenting practices items. Wright maps showed items only covered parts of the latent trait distribution. The harder- and easier-to-respond ends of the construct were not covered by items for effective vegetable parenting practices and ineffective vegetable parenting practices, respectively. Conclusions Several effective vegetable parenting practices and ineffective vegetable parenting practices scale items functioned differently on the basis of child’s demographic characteristics; therefore, researchers should use these vegetable parenting practices scales with caution. Item response modeling should be incorporated in analyses of parenting

  15. Construction and Validation of Attitudes Toward Plagiarism Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Mavrinac, Martina; Brumini, Gordana; Bilić-Zulle, Lidija; Petrovečki, Mladen

    2010-01-01

    Aim To develop and test the psychometric characteristics of a questionnaire measuring attitudes toward plagiarism. Methods Participants were 227 undergraduates and graduate students from three Croatian universities, with a median age of 21 years (range 18 to 48). Research was conducted from March to June 2009. For the purpose of construction of the first version of the questionnaire, 67 statements (items) were developed. The statements were based on the relevant literature and were developed following rules and recommendations for questionnaire writing, and 36 items were chosen for final validation. Factor analysis was used to find out the factor structure of the questionnaire and to measure construct validity. Results The final version of the questionnaire consisted of 29 items divided into a three-factor structure: factor I – positive attitude toward plagiarism (12 items); factor II – negative attitude toward plagiarism (7 items); and factor III – subjective norms toward plagiarism (10 items). Cronbach α was calculated to confirm the reliability of the scale: factor I – α = 0.83; factor II – α = 0.79; and factor III – α = 0.85. Correlations between factors were: -0.37 between I and II, -0.41 between I and III, and +0.31 between II and III. Conclusion Attitudes Toward Plagiarism questionnaire was developed, with good psychometric characteristics. It will be used in future research as a standardized tool for measuring attitudes toward plagiarism. PMID:20564761

  16. Construction and validation of attitudes toward plagiarism questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Mavrinac, Martina; Brumini, Gordana; Bilić-Zulle, Lidija; Petrovecki, Mladen

    2010-06-01

    To develop and test the psychometric characteristics of a questionnaire measuring attitudes toward plagiarism. Participants were 227 undergraduates and graduate students (128 women and 99 men) from three Croatian universities, with a median age of 21 years (range 18 to 48). Research was conducted from March to June 2009. For the purpose of construction of the first version of the questionnaire, 67 statements (items) were developed. The statements were based on the relevant literature and were developed following rules and recommendations for questionnaire writing, and 36 items were chosen for final validation. Factor analysis was used to find out the factor structure of the questionnaire and to measure construct validity. The final version of the questionnaire consisted of 29 items divided into a three-factor structure: factor I - positive attitude toward plagiarism (12 items); factor II - negative attitude toward plagiarism (7 items); and factor III - subjective norms toward plagiarism (10 items). Cronbach alpha was calculated to confirm the reliability of the scale: factor I - alpha=0.83; factor II - alpha=0.79; and factor III - alpha=0.85. Correlations between factors were: -0.37 between I and II, -0.41 between I and III, and +0.31 between II and III. Attitudes Toward Plagiarism questionnaire was developed, with good psychometric characteristics. It will be used in future research as a standardized tool for measuring attitudes toward plagiarism.

  17. Limited life item management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaglen, R. L.

    1971-01-01

    Plans are available for age-sensitive hardware management. Control plan identifies shelf life or age control requirements for materials considered age sensitive, use sensitive, or time service or shelf life controlled items, and describes methods of arriving at age controls through adherence to detailed specifications.

  18. Reading Current Events Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    People who live in a democracy should be well informed of local, state, national, and international happenings. Students should become curious about news items and relate current happenings to the personal self. They must possess skills in word recognition and in diverse kinds of comprehension since reading is an important way to glean current…

  19. Cataloging Green Items

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-15

    Federal Logistics Information System, Asset Visibility, DOD EMALL , Item Unique Identification Registry, and DRMS Automated Information System... Marketing Service (DRMS) in the CONUS • DLA Customer Interaction Center – 642K Service Tickets in FY09 • U.S. Codification Bureau / International

  20. The Communicative Participation Item Bank (CPIB): item bank calibration and development of a disorder-generic short form.

    PubMed

    Baylor, Carolyn; Yorkston, Kathryn; Eadie, Tanya; Kim, Jiseon; Chung, Hyewon; Amtmann, Dagmar

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to calibrate the items for the Communicative Participation Item Bank (CPIB; Baylor, Yorkston, Eadie, Miller, & Amtmann, 2009; Yorkston et al., 2008) using item response theory (IRT). One overriding objective was to examine whether the IRT item parameters would be consistent across different diagnostic groups, thereby allowing creation of a disorder-generic instrument. The intended outcomes were the final item bank and a short form ready for clinical and research applications. Self-report data were collected from 701 individuals representing 4 diagnoses: multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and head and neck cancer. Participants completed the CPIB and additional self-report questionnaires. CPIB data were analyzed using the IRT graded response model. The initial set of 94 candidate CPIB items were reduced to an item bank of 46 items demonstrating unidimensionality, local independence, good item fit, and good measurement precision. Differential item functioning analyses detected no meaningful differences across diagnostic groups. A 10-item, disorder-generic short form was generated. The CPIB provides speech-language pathologists with a unidimensional, self-report outcomes measurement instrument dedicated to the construct of communicative participation. This instrument may be useful to clinicians and researchers wanting to implement measures of communicative participation in their work.

  1. The Communicative Participation Item Bank (CPIB): Item bank calibration and development of a disorder-generic short form

    PubMed Central

    Baylor, Carolyn; Yorkston, Kathryn; Eadie, Tanya; Kim, Jiseon; Chung, Hyewon; Amtmann, Dagmar

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to calibrate the items for the Communicative Participation Item Bank (CPIB) using Item Response Theory (IRT). One overriding objective was to examine if the IRT item parameters would be consistent across different diagnostic groups, thereby allowing creation of a disorder-generic instrument. The intended outcomes were the final item bank and a short form ready for clinical and research applications. Methods Self-report data were collected from 701 individuals representing four diagnoses: multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and head and neck cancer. Participants completed the CPIB and additional self-report questionnaires. CPIB data were analyzed using the IRT Graded Response Model (GRM). Results The initial set of 94 candidate CPIB items were reduced to an item bank of 46 items demonstrating unidimensionality, local independence, good item fit, and good measurement precision. Differential item function (DIF) analyses detected no meaningful differences across diagnostic groups. A 10-item, disorder-generic short form was generated. Conclusions The CPIB provides speech-language pathologists with a unidimensional, self-report outcomes measurement instrument dedicated to the construct of communicative participation. This instrument may be useful to clinicians and researchers wanting to implement measures of communicative participation in their work. PMID:23816661

  2. Item Banking with Embedded Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacCann, Robert G.; Stanley, Gordon

    2009-01-01

    An item banking method that does not use Item Response Theory (IRT) is described. This method provides a comparable grading system across schools that would be suitable for low-stakes testing. It uses the Angoff standard-setting method to obtain item ratings that are stored with each item. An example of such a grading system is given, showing how…

  3. The Identification of Biased Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinnott, Loraine T.

    A standard method for exploring item bias is the intergroup comparison of item difficulties. This paper describes a refinement and generalization of this technique. In contrast to prior approaches, the proposed method deletes outlying items from the formulation of a criterion for identifying items as deviant. It also extends the mathematical…

  4. Assessment of differential item functioning.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Chung

    2008-01-01

    This study addresses several important issues in assessment of differential item functioning (DIF). It starts with the definition of DIF, effectiveness of using item fit statistics to detect DIF, and linear modeling of DIF in dichotomous items, polytomous items, facets, and testlet-based items. Because a common metric over groups of test-takers is a prerequisite in DIF assessment, this study reviews three such methods of establishing a common metric: the equal-mean-difficulty method, the all-other-item method, and the constant-item (CI) method. A small simulation demonstrates the superiority of the CI method over the others. As the CI method relies on a correct specification of DIF-free items to serve as anchors, a method of identifying such items is recommended and its effectiveness is illustrated through a simulation. Finally, this study discusses how to assess practical significance of DIF at both item and test levels.

  5. Translation of questionnaires and issues of equivalence.

    PubMed

    Chang, A M; Chau, J P; Holroyd, E

    1999-02-01

    The validity of studies using translated instruments may be questioned when there is a lack of attention to and/or minimal explanation of the procedures used for determining the equivalence between the primary and secondary language tool. Ensuring equivalence of a translated Chinese version of the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire is an important prerequisite for identifying culturally specific expressions of concepts under investigation and for cross-cultural comparisons. This paper examines the principles and procedures for determining equivalence of translated tools and their application to the development of an equivalent Chinese version of the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire. Translation and back-translation were used to develop a Chinese version of the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire. Bilingual university students completed both versions of the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire. Most of the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire items had an acceptable Kappa of >0.4. Intraclass correlation coefficients indicated moderate to high levels of equivalence for total scores and all scales. Improvement in the translation of some items is needed to further enhance the equivalence of the Chinese version of the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire.

  6. Behavioral Assessment: Questionnaires.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, C. Chrisman

    1980-01-01

    This is a general discussion of the validity, reliability, function, and format of questionnaires designed to measure problem behavior, noncompliance, anxiety, social interaction, hyperactivity, drug use, and sexual behavior. Commonly used questionnaires are cited. (CP)

  7. Examining Differential Item Functions of Different Item Ordered Test Forms According to Item Difficulty Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çokluk, Ömay; Gül, Emrah; Dogan-Gül, Çilem

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to examine whether differential item function is displayed in three different test forms that have item orders of random and sequential versions (easy-to-hard and hard-to-easy), based on Classical Test Theory (CTT) and Item Response Theory (IRT) methods and bearing item difficulty levels in mind. In the correlational research, the…

  8. The measurement artifact in the Organizational Commitment Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Caught, K; Shadur, M A; Rodwell, J J

    2000-12-01

    This study empirically examined the debate in the literature regarding the dimensionality of the Organizational Commitment Questionnaire. The sample comprised 803 employees from organizations in the information technology and hospitality industries. Confirmatory factor analysis showed that the Organizational Commitment Questionnaire appears to have a two-factor structure, with one factor consisting of positively worded items and the other factor, negatively worded items. Scores on both factors correlated significantly with job satisfaction, suggesting that both factors appear to be measuring a similar aspect of organizational commitment and that they present as two factors given as measurement artifacts of the item wording.

  9. Measuring Experiential Avoidance in Adults: The Avoidance and Fusion Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmalz, Jonathan E.; Murrell, Amy R.

    2010-01-01

    To date, general levels of experiential avoidance are primarily measured by the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-II (AAQ-II), but it includes items of questionable comprehensibility. The Avoidance and Fusion Questionnaire for Youth (AFQ-Y), previously validated as a measure of experiential avoidance with children and adolescents, was…

  10. Study Process Questionnaire Manual. Student Approaches to Learning and Studying.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggs, John B.

    This manual describes the theory behind the Study Process Questionnaire (SPQ) and explains what the subscale and scale scores mean. The SPQ is a 42-item self-report questionnaire used in Australia to assess the extent to which a tertiary student at a college or university endorses different approaches to learning and the motives and strategies…

  11. Learning Process Questionnaire Manual. Student Approaches to Learning and Studying.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggs, John B.

    This manual describes the theory behind the Learning Process Questionnaire (LPQ) used in Australia and defines what the subscale and scale scores mean. The LPQ is a 36-item self-report questionnaire that yields scores on three basic motives for learning and three learning strategies, and on the approaches to learning that are formed by these…

  12. Investigation of Multiple Imputation in Low-Quality Questionnaire Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Ginkel, Joost R.

    2010-01-01

    The performance of multiple imputation in questionnaire data has been studied in various simulation studies. However, in practice, questionnaire data are usually more complex than simulated data. For example, items may be counterindicative or may have unacceptably low factor loadings on every subscale, or completely missing subscales may…

  13. Development and Initial Validation of the Environmental Restriction Questionnaire (ERQ)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Limor; Ratzon, Nava Z.; Jarus, Tal; Bart, Orit

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript was to develop and test the psychometric properties of the Environmental Restriction Questionnaire (ERQ) a parent-reported questionnaire for measuring perceived environmental restrictions for young children participation. Reliability and homogeneity were tested by Cronbach's alpha and inter-item correlations.…

  14. Investigation of Multiple Imputation in Low-Quality Questionnaire Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Ginkel, Joost R.

    2010-01-01

    The performance of multiple imputation in questionnaire data has been studied in various simulation studies. However, in practice, questionnaire data are usually more complex than simulated data. For example, items may be counterindicative or may have unacceptably low factor loadings on every subscale, or completely missing subscales may…

  15. Prevention of retained surgical items.

    PubMed

    Feldman, David L

    2011-01-01

    Reduction in retained surgical items is an important part of any operating room patient-safety effort. Any item used in an operation can result in a retained surgical item, but sponges are the most frequent and the abdomen is the most common location. Retained sponges can cause significant morbidity, and the costs associated with both prevention and treatment of retained surgical items, including legal costs, can be considerable. This review will examine counting, teamwork, radiography, and new technology as methods used to prevent retained surgical items. Even though none of these techniques individually is likely to completely prevent retained surgical items, when used together the numbers can be reduced.

  16. Component Identification and Item Difficulty of Raven's Matrices Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Kathy E.; Kluever, Raymond C.

    Item components that might contribute to the difficulty of items on the Raven Colored Progressive Matrices (CPM) and the Standard Progressive Matrices (SPM) were studied. Subjects providing responses to CPM items were 269 children aged 2 years 9 months to 11 years 8 months, most of whom were referred for testing as potentially gifted. A second…

  17. Real and Artificial Differential Item Functioning in Polytomous Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrich, David; Hagquist, Curt

    2015-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) for an item between two groups is present if, for the same person location on a variable, persons from different groups have different expected values for their responses. Applying only to dichotomously scored items in the popular Mantel-Haenszel (MH) method for detecting DIF in which persons are classified by…

  18. The Impact of Item Characteristics on Item and Scale Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, John A.

    2004-01-01

    This study describes the relation between personality items' validities, defined as the items' correlations with acquaintance ratings on the Big 5 personality factors, and other itemmetric properties including ambiguity, syntactic complexity, social desirability, content, and trait indicativity. Five external validity coefficients for each item on…

  19. Item Context Factors Affecting Students' Performance on Mathematics Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salgado, Felipe Almuna; Stacey, Kaye

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports how the context in which a mathematics item is embedded impacts on students' performance. The performance of Year 10 students on four PISA items was compared with performance on variants with more familiar contexts. Performance was not better when they solved items with more familiar contexts but there was some evidence that…

  20. The Impact of Item Characteristics on Item and Scale Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, John A.

    2004-01-01

    This study describes the relation between personality items' validities, defined as the items' correlations with acquaintance ratings on the Big 5 personality factors, and other itemmetric properties including ambiguity, syntactic complexity, social desirability, content, and trait indicativity. Five external validity coefficients for each item on…

  1. IRT Item Parameter Scaling for Developing New Item Pools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Hyeon-Ah; Lu, Ying; Chang, Hua-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Increasing use of item pools in large-scale educational assessments calls for an appropriate scaling procedure to achieve a common metric among field-tested items. The present study examines scaling procedures for developing a new item pool under a spiraled block linking design. The three scaling procedures are considered: (a) concurrent…

  2. Real and Artificial Differential Item Functioning in Polytomous Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrich, David; Hagquist, Curt

    2015-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) for an item between two groups is present if, for the same person location on a variable, persons from different groups have different expected values for their responses. Applying only to dichotomously scored items in the popular Mantel-Haenszel (MH) method for detecting DIF in which persons are classified by…

  3. IRT Item Parameter Scaling for Developing New Item Pools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Hyeon-Ah; Lu, Ying; Chang, Hua-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Increasing use of item pools in large-scale educational assessments calls for an appropriate scaling procedure to achieve a common metric among field-tested items. The present study examines scaling procedures for developing a new item pool under a spiraled block linking design. The three scaling procedures are considered: (a) concurrent…

  4. Cognitive interviews to test and refine questionnaires.

    PubMed

    García, Alexandra A

    2011-01-01

    Survey data are compromised when respondents do not interpret questions in the way researchers expect. Cognitive interviews are used to detect problems respondents have in understanding survey instructions and items, and in formulating answers. This paper describes methods for conducting cognitive interviews and describes the processes and lessons learned with an illustrative case study. The case study used cognitive interviews to elicit respondents' understanding and perceptions of the format, instructions, items, and responses that make up the Diabetes Symptom Self-Care Inventory (DSSCI), a questionnaire designed to measure Mexican Americans' symptoms of type 2 diabetes and their symptom management strategies. Responses to cognitive interviews formed the basis for revisions in the format, instructions, items, and translation of the DSSCI. All those who develop and revise surveys are urged to incorporate cognitive interviews into their instrumentation methods so that they may produce more reliable and valid measurements.

  5. Assessment of health-related quality of life in arthritis: conceptualization and development of five item banks using item response theory

    PubMed Central

    Kopec, Jacek A; Sayre, Eric C; Davis, Aileen M; Badley, Elizabeth M; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Sherlock, Lesley; Williams, J Ivan; Anis, Aslam H; Esdaile, John M

    2006-01-01

    Background Modern psychometric methods based on item response theory (IRT) can be used to develop adaptive measures of health-related quality of life (HRQL). Adaptive assessment requires an item bank for each domain of HRQL. The purpose of this study was to develop item banks for five domains of HRQL relevant to arthritis. Methods About 1,400 items were drawn from published questionnaires or developed from focus groups and individual interviews and classified into 19 domains of HRQL. We selected the following 5 domains relevant to arthritis and related conditions: Daily Activities, Walking, Handling Objects, Pain or Discomfort, and Feelings. Based on conceptual criteria and pilot testing, 219 items were selected for further testing. A questionnaire was mailed to patients from two hospital-based clinics and a stratified random community sample. Dimensionality of the domains was assessed through factor analysis. Items were analyzed with the Generalized Partial Credit Model as implemented in Parscale. We used graphical methods and a chi-square test to assess item fit. Differential item functioning was investigated using logistic regression. Results Data were obtained from 888 individuals with arthritis. The five domains were sufficiently unidimensional for an IRT-based analysis. Thirty-one items were deleted due to lack of fit or differential item functioning. Daily Activities had the narrowest range for the item location parameter (-2.24 to 0.55) and Handling Objects had the widest range (-1.70 to 2.27). The mean (median) slope parameter for the items ranged from 1.15 (1.07) in Feelings to 1.73 (1.75) in Walking. The final item banks are comprised of 31–45 items each. Conclusion We have developed IRT-based item banks to measure HRQL in 5 domains relevant to arthritis. The items in the final item banks provide adequate psychometric information for a wide range of functional levels in each domain. PMID:16749932

  6. Generic ABILHAND Questionnaire Can Measure Manual Ability across a Variety of Motor Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simone, Anna; Rota, Viviana; Tesio, Luigi; Perucca, Laura

    2011-01-01

    ABILHAND is, in its original version, a 46-item, 4-level questionnaire. It measures the difficulty perceived by patients with rheumatoid arthritis as they do various daily manual tasks. ABILHAND was originally built through Rasch analysis. In a later study, it was simplified to a generic 23-item, three-level questionnaire, showing both…

  7. Generic ABILHAND Questionnaire Can Measure Manual Ability across a Variety of Motor Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simone, Anna; Rota, Viviana; Tesio, Luigi; Perucca, Laura

    2011-01-01

    ABILHAND is, in its original version, a 46-item, 4-level questionnaire. It measures the difficulty perceived by patients with rheumatoid arthritis as they do various daily manual tasks. ABILHAND was originally built through Rasch analysis. In a later study, it was simplified to a generic 23-item, three-level questionnaire, showing both…

  8. Does Participation in an Intervention Affect Responses on Self-Report Questionnaires?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baranowski, Tom; Allen, Diane D.; Masse, Louise C.; Wilson, Mark

    2006-01-01

    There has been some concern that participation in an intervention and exposure to a measurement instrument can change participants' interpretation of the items on a self-report questionnaire thereby distorting subsequent responses and biasing results. Differential item functioning (DIF) analysis using item response modeling can ascertain possible…

  9. How IRT Can Solve Problems of Ipsative Data in Forced-Choice Questionnaires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Anna; Maydeu-Olivares, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    In multidimensional forced-choice (MFC) questionnaires, items measuring different attributes are presented in blocks, and participants have to rank order the items within each block (fully or partially). Such comparative formats can reduce the impact of numerous response biases often affecting single-stimulus items (aka rating or Likert scales).…

  10. Examining the Validity of a Swedish Version of the Self-Presentation in Exercise Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindwall, Magnus

    2005-01-01

    This study examines the factorial validity, factorial invariance across gender, and construct validity of a Swedish version of the Self-Presentation in Exercise Questionnaire (SPEQ; Conroy, Motl, & Hall, 2000). The a priori two-factor 14-item, 11-item, and 9-item models fail to reach acceptable levels of fit in a calibration sample. A modified…

  11. [Development of rheumatoid arthritis functional handicap assessment questionnaire: preliminary study].

    PubMed

    Guermazi, M; Poiraudeau, S; Lefevre-Colau, M M; Revel, M

    2003-06-01

    To construct a handicap assessment questionnaire for rheumatoid arthritis and to determine if the concept of "participation" can replace the one of "handicap". Selection of daily life domains and items was based on the International Classification of Impairment Disability and Handicap "ICIDH" and on some others handicap epidemiological studies. The questionnaire was tested among rheumatoid arthritis patients. The relation between handicap and participation was investigated. Statistics analysis was performed with Systat.9 program. Spearman's correlation coefficient between 2 quantitative variables was examined. Six among the 7 "ICIDH" domains were included in the questionnaire. Each of them was explored with many items. Forty-six items were included; each item was explored in 4 chapters:participation assessment with VAS (Visual Analogical Scale) before rheumatoid arthritis and during the study; difficulties: need of help, environment accessibility, patient's satisfaction, feeling of devalorization; patient's propositions;handicap assessment with VAS; other questions were added in some particular items. Thirty patients were included in the study (23 women), the average age was 51 years. Five patients didn't understand the meaning of "Handicap".This study allows us to eliminate 2 items, to add 2 others and to ameliorate 1 of them. Correlation between handicap and participation was moderate to bad. This questionnaire allows to explore rheumatoid arthritis handicap. Each domain of the daily life can be assessed separately. The main difficulties are the length and the impossibility to be self-administered. Handicap and participation probably assess different concepts or are differently understood by patients.

  12. [Evaluation study of the chronic headache questionnaire].

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Farjas, E; Morales, F; Bernal, E; López del Val, J

    1998-03-01

    Semi-structured questionnaires, based on clinical criteria are used in the diagnosis of headache, but none has been used to study the two commonest types of chronic headache. The first step, before clinical application, is to carry out a study of the questionnaire's validity and predictive value. The objectives of our study were to evaluate the validity and determine the effectiveness of the ZZA questionnaire in the differential diagnosis between transformed migraine (TM) and chronic tension headache (CTH), in a specialist Neurology Clinic. The ZZA questionnaire, elaborated by one of the investigators, was made up of 20 questions aimed at TM, CTH or the chronicity of the headache. An observer, who did not know the diagnosis, gave the questionnaire to patients who had previously been diagnosed by the head of the Headache Clinic as having TM or CTH. The process of validation of the questionnaire consisted in showing that it was reliable, with valid contents and valid criteria. On analysis of reliability, the items ZZA1, ZZA15, ZZA16 and ZZA18 gave the highest indices. The Cochran Q test showed lack of uniformity of replies. Only ZZA1, ZZA15 and ZZA18 were predictive items showing MT. None of the questions to show CTH were predictive. After final adjustment the definitive model was made up of ZZA1, ZZA15 and ZZA18. The proposed questionnaire was not found to be useful for differential diagnosis between TM and CTH. Only 3 of the 20 questions were accepted as having some degree of validity and effectiveness. Two of these 3 questions, based on clinical impressions of the author, might well be included in the diagnostic criteria of TM.

  13. Reliability and validity of a safety climate questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Arghami, Shirazeh; Nouri Parkestani, Hakimeh; Alimohammadi, Iraj

    2014-01-01

    It is believed that improved safety culture/climate is a fundamental element to accident prevention. Therefore, development a scale to assess safety climate is a step towards accident control. The purpose of this study was to construct a Persian safety climate questionnaire. The study took place in Tehran and Esfahan oil refineries in Iran in 2010. An initial questionnaire was formed from two previous studies. This tool was translated to Persian based on back translation. The 61-item questionnaire was tested on operational staffs (N=324). Principle component analysis and Varimax with Kaiser Normalization was used to extract factors, in statistical software package SPSS 11.0. The factors were obtained as Management Commitment to Safety and personnel collaboration 23 variables, 17.33 % of the variance, Safety communication five items, 6.97% of the variance, Supportive environment five items, 6.245% of the variance, Work Environment six items, 5.590% of the variance, Formal Training four items, 4.581% of the variance, Priority of Safety five items, 4.177% of the variance, Personal Priorities and Need for Safety three items, 3.333% of the variance. Achievement of a valid and reliable safety climate tool may bring enormous benefits to the refineries. However, a reliable and valid tool to measure safety climate could be useful in other refineries. Moreover, the generic nature of the safety climate scale may grant its use for other workplaces.

  14. Development of a questionnaire for assessing the childbirth experience (QACE).

    PubMed

    Carquillat, Pierre; Vendittelli, Françoise; Perneger, Thomas; Guittier, Marie-Julia

    2017-08-30

    Due to its potential impact on women's psychological health, assessing perceptions of their childbirth experience is important. The aim of this study was to develop a multidimensional self-reporting questionnaire to evaluate the childbirth experience. Factors influencing the childbirth experience were identified from a literature review and the results of a previous qualitative study. A total of 25 items were combined from existing instruments or were created de novo. A draft version was pilot tested for face validity with 30 women and submitted for evaluation of its construct validity to 477 primiparous women at one-month post-partum. The recruitment took place in two obstetric clinics from Swiss and French university hospitals. To evaluate the content validity, we compared item responses to general childbirth experience assessments on a numeric, 0 to 10 rating scale. We dichotomized two group assessment scores: "0 to 7" and "8 to 10". We performed an exploratory factor analysis to identify underlying dimensions. In total, 291 women completed the questionnaire (response rate = 61%). The responses to 22 items were statistically significant between the 0 to 7 and 8 to 10 groups for the general childbirth experience assessments. An exploratory factor analysis yielded four sub-scales, which were labelled "relationship with staff" (4 items), "emotional status" (3 items), "first moments with the new born," (3 items) and "feelings at one month postpartum" (3 items). All 4 scales had satisfactory internal consistency levels (alpha coefficients from 0.70 to 0.85). The full 25-item version can be used to analyse each item by itself, and the short 4-dimension version can be scored to summarize the general assessment of the childbirth experience. The Questionnaire for Assessing the Childbirth Experience (QACE) could be useful as a screening instrument to identify women with negative childbirth experiences. It can be used as both a research instrument in its short version

  15. Effects of Ignoring Item Interaction on Item Parameter Estimation and Detection of Interacting Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Cheng-Te; Wang, Wen-Chung

    2007-01-01

    This study explores the effects of ignoring item interaction on item parameter estimation and the efficiency of using the local dependence index Q[subscript 3] and the SAS NLMIXED procedure to detect item interaction under the three-parameter logistic model and the generalized partial credit model. Through simulations, it was found that ignoring…

  16. Development and validation of the Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Satisfaction Questionnaire (GESQ).

    PubMed

    Hutchings, Hayley A; Cheung, Wai-Yee; Alrubaiy, Laith; Durai, Dharmaraj; Russell, Ian T; Williams, John G

    2015-12-01

    Patient satisfaction is a key indicator of the quality of gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a specific patient satisfaction questionnaire for patients undergoing GI endoscopy--the Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Satisfaction Questionnaire (GESQ). We developed and validated the GESQ within the context of a national multi-institution nurse endoscopy trial, based in secondary care, in three stages: (1) item generation with a panel of patients and professionals following a detailed literature review to identify the most relevant items from existing scales; (2) development and piloting of a draft questionnaire on a sample of patients referred for GI endoscopy; and (3) testing of the questionnaire within a large multicenter pragmatic randomized trial. We undertook psychometric analysis of the questionnaire to identify the underlying dimensions and assessed the questionnaire for reliability and validity. The final version of the GESQ contains 21 items. Principal components analysis revealed four subscales with high internal consistency: skills and hospital (seven items; Cronbach's alpha 0.83), pain and discomfort during and after endoscopy (four items; Cronbach's alpha 0.84), information before endoscopy (five items; Cronbach's alpha 0.80), and information after endoscopy (five items; Cronbach's alpha 0.76). The four identified subscales are clinically relevant and correspond to domains of patient satisfaction identified in previous studies. Our development and validation of the GESQ confirmed that it is a valid, reliable, interpretable, and acceptable tool to measure satisfaction in patients who have undergone a GI endoscopy. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Write Your Own Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, David I.

    1975-01-01

    Contends that student evaluative questionnaires should be designed by instructors themselves to help improve their classroom performance and therefore should contain only questions that students are capable of answering objectively and not, for instance, questions about the relevancy of the course. Contains a sample questionnaire. (GH)

  18. Development and Preliminary Validation of Chinese Preschoolers’ Eating Behavior Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuhai; Wang, Baoxi; Sun, Lijun; Shang, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to develop a questionnaire for caregivers to assess the eating behavior of Chinese preschoolers. Methods To assess children’s eating behaviors, 152 items were derived from a broad review of the literature related to epidemiology surveys and the assessment of children’s eating behaviors. All of these items were reviewed by 50 caregivers of preschoolers and 10 experienced pediatricians. Seventy-seven items were selected for use in a primary questionnaire. After conducting an exploratory factor analysis and a variability analysis on the data from 313 preschoolers used to evaluate this primary questionnaire, we deleted 39 of these 77 items. A Chinese Preschoolers’ Eating Behavior Questionnaire (CPEBQ) was finally established from the remaining 38 items. The structure of this questionnaire was explored by factor analysis, and its reliability, validity and discriminative ability were evaluated with data collected from caregivers of 603 preschoolers. Results The CPEBQ consisted of 7 dimensions and 38 items. The 7 dimensions were food fussiness, food responsiveness, eating habit, satiety responsiveness, exogenous eating, emotional eating and initiative eating. The Cronbach’s α coefficient for the questionnaire was 0.92, and the test-retest reliability was 0.72. There were significant differences between the scores of normal-weight, overweight and obese preschoolers when it was referred to food fussiness, food responsiveness, eating habits, satiety responsiveness and emotional eating (p<0.05). Differences in caregiver’s education levels also had significant effects on scores for food fussiness, eating habits and exogenous eating (p<0.05). Conclusions The CPEBQ satisfies the conditions of reliability and validity, in accordance with psychometric demands. The questionnaire can be employed to evaluate the characteristics of Chinese preschoolers’ eating behaviors; therefore, it can be used in child health care practice and

  19. Evaluation of the Intermittent Exotropia Questionnaire Using Rasch Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Leske, David A.; Holmes, Jonathan M.; Melia, B. Michele

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The Intermittent Exotropia Questionnaire (IXTQ) is a patient, proxy, and parental report of quality of life specific to children with intermittent exotropia. We refine the IXTQ using Rasch analysis to improve reliability and validity. OBSERVATION Rasch analysis was performed on responses of 575 patients with intermittent exotropia enrolled from May 15, 2008, through July 24, 2013, and their parents from each of the 4 IXTQ health-related quality-of-life questionnaires (child 5 through 7 years of age and child 8 through 17 years of age, proxy, and parent questionnaires). Questionnaire performance and structure were confirmed in a separate cohort of 379 patients with intermittent exotropia. One item was removed from the 12-item child and proxy questionnaires, and response options in the 8- to 17-year-old child IXTQ and proxy IXTQ were combined into 3 response options for both questionnaires. Targeting was relatively poor for the child and proxy questionnaires. For the parent questionnaire, 3 subscales (psychosocial, function, and surgery) were evident. One item was removed from the psychosocial subscale. Resulting subscales had appropriate targeting. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE The Rasch-revised IXTQ may be a useful instrument for determining how intermittent exotropia affects health-related quality of life of children with intermittent exotropia and their parents, particularly for cohort studies. PMID:25634146

  20. Diagnostic utility of craving in predicting nicotine dependence: impact of craving content and item stability.

    PubMed

    Germeroth, Lisa J; Wray, Jennifer M; Gass, Julie C; Tiffany, Stephen T

    2013-12-01

    Craving is useful in the diagnosis of drug dependence, but it is unclear how various items used to assess craving might influence the diagnostic performance of craving measures. This study determined the diagnostic performance of individual items and item subgroups of the 32-item Questionnaire on Smoking Urges (QSU) as a function of item wording, level of craving intensity, and item stability. Nondaily and daily smokers (n = 222) completed the QSU on 6 separate occasions, and item responses were averaged across the administrations. Nicotine dependence was assessed with the Wisconsin Inventory of Smoking Dependence Motives. The discriminative performance of the QSU items was evaluated with receiver-operating characteristic curves and area under the curve statistics. Although each of the QSU items and selected subgroups of items significantly discriminated dependent from nondependent smokers, certain item subgroups outperformed others. There was no difference in discriminative performance between use of the specific terms urge and crave or between items assessing intention to smoke relative to those assessing desire to smoke, but there were significant differences in the two major factors represented on the QSU and in craving items reflecting more intense relative to less intense craving. Stability of the item scores was strongly related to the discriminative performance of craving. Items indexing stable, high-intensity aspects of craving that reflect the negative reinforcing effects of smoking will likely be most useful for diagnostic purposes. Future directions and implications are discussed.

  1. Development of the young spine questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Back pain in children is common and early onset of back pain has been shown to increase the risk of back pain significantly in adulthood. Consequently, preventive efforts must be targeted the young population but research relating to spinal problems in this age group is scarce. Focus has primarily been on the working age population, and therefore specific questionnaires to measure spinal pain and its consequences, specifically aimed at children and adolescents are absent. The purpose of this study was to develop a questionnaire for schoolchildren filling this gap. Methods The Young Spine Questionnaire (YSQ) was developed in three phases – a conceptualisation, development and testing phase. The conceptualisation phase followed the Wilson and Cleary model and included questions regarding spinal prevalence estimates, pain frequency and intensity, activity restrictions, care seeking behaviour and influence of parental back trouble. Items from existing questionnaires and the “Revised Faces Pain Scale” (rFPS) were included during the development phase. The testing phase consisted of a mixed quantitative and qualitative iterative method carried out in two pilot tests using 4th grade children and focusing on assessment of spinal area location and item validity. Results The testing phase resulted in omission of the pain drawings and the questions and answer categories were simplified in several questions. Agreement between the questionnaire prevalence estimates and the interviews ranged between 83.7% (cervical pain today) and 97.9% (thoracic pain today). To improve the understanding of the spinal boundaries we added bony landmarks to the spinal drawings after pilot test I. This resulted in an improved sense of spinal boundary location in pilot test II. Correlations between the rFPS and the interview pain score ranged between 0.67 (cervical spine) and 0.79 (lumbar spine). Conclusions The Young Spine Questionnaire contains questions that assess spinal pain

  2. Orthorexia nervosa: validation of a diagnosis questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Donini, L M; Marsili, D; Graziani, M P; Imbriale, M; Cannella, C

    2005-06-01

    To validate a questionnaire for the diagnosis of orhorexia oervosa, an eating disorder defined as "maniacal obsession for healthy food". 525 subjects were enrolled. Then they were randomized into two samples (sample of 404 subjects for the construction of the test for the diagnosis of orthorexia ORTO-15; sample of 121 subjects for the validation of the test). The ORTO-15 questionnaire, validated for the diagnosis of orthorexia, is made-up of 15 multiple-choice items. The test we proposed for the diagnosis of orthorexia (ORTO 15) showed a good predictive capability at a threshold value of 40 (efficacy 73.8%, sensitivity 55.6% and specificity 75.8%) also on verification with a control sample. However, it has a limit in identifying the obsessive disorder. For this reason we maintain that further investigation is necessary and that new questions useful for the evaluation of the obsessive-compulsive behavior should be added to the ORTO-15 questionnaire.

  3. Validation of the burns itch questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Van Loey, N E; Hofland, H W; Hendrickx, H; Van de Steenoven, J; Boekelaar, A; Nieuwenhuis, M K

    2016-05-01

    Itch (pruritus) is a common multidimensional complaint after burn that can persist for months to years. A questionnaire able to investigate itch and its consequences is imperative for clinical and research purposes. The current study investigated the factor structure, internal consistency and construct validity of the Burns Itch Questionnaire (BIQ), a questionnaire particularly focusing on itch in the burns population. The BIQ was completed by 195 respondents at 3 months after burn. An exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was performed to investigate the factor structure. EFA showed the BIQ comprised three latent factors: itch severity, sleep interference and daily life interference. This was re-evaluated in a confirmatory factor analysis that yielded good fit indices after removing two items. The three subscales showed to have high internal consistency (.89) and were able to distinguish between patients with severe and less severe complaints. In conclusion, the BIQ showed to be useful in persons suffering from itch following burns.

  4. Questionnaire Construction Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    the small development requirement ( SOR ) or qualitative materiel requirement (QMR) which led to the development of the item being tested. Analysis of...might be caused oy the use of too much alcohol, mari- Juana , or hard drugs by upper-ranking officers, senior NCOs, or supervisors. h. Questions that

  5. Mexican Parenting Questionnaire (MPQ)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halgunseth, Linda C.; Ispa, Jean M.

    2012-01-01

    The present study was conducted in four phases and constructed a self-report parenting instrument for use with Mexican immigrant mothers of children aged 6 to 10. The 14-item measure was based on semistructured qualitative interviews with Mexican immigrant mothers (N = 10), was refined by a focus group of Mexican immigrant mothers (N = 5), and was…

  6. Mexican Parenting Questionnaire (MPQ)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halgunseth, Linda C.; Ispa, Jean M.

    2012-01-01

    The present study was conducted in four phases and constructed a self-report parenting instrument for use with Mexican immigrant mothers of children aged 6 to 10. The 14-item measure was based on semistructured qualitative interviews with Mexican immigrant mothers (N = 10), was refined by a focus group of Mexican immigrant mothers (N = 5), and was…

  7. Electromechanical Technician Skills Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anoka-Hennepin Technical Coll., Minneapolis, MN.

    This document contains test items to measure the job skills of electromechanical technicians. Questions are organized in four sections that cover the following topics: (1) shop math; (2) electricity and electronics; (3) mechanics and machining; and (4) plumbing, heating, ventilation and air conditioning, and welding skills. Questions call for…

  8. Is the Gambling Motives Questionnaire really three-dimensional? A proposition of a four-dimensional Gambling Motives Questionnaire - Revised.

    PubMed

    Myrseth, Helga; Notelaers, Guy

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to improve the weaknesses of the three-dimensional Gambling Motives Questionnaire and to examine the psychometric properties and factor structure of the Gambling Motives Questionnaire-Revised. The Gambling Motives Questionnaire was administered to a sample of 418 gamblers (92% men, mean age 19.5years). Participants completed the Gambling Motives Questionnaire and an additional item tapping boredom, as well as a variety of measures of gambling behavior and gambling problems as criterion measures. Results showed that the Gambling Motives Questionnaire-Revised is better represented as a four-factor structure tapping the following four gambling motives factors; enhancement, coping, social, and self-gratification, Δχ(2) Δ(df)=24.76 (3), p<0.001. Removing two problematic items from the Gambling Motives Questionnaire and adding an extra item tapping boredom also improved the fit of the Gambling Motives Questionnaire-Revised. The subscales enhancement, social, and coping were all significant predictors of variety of gambling behaviors (p<0.05), whereas enhancement, coping, and self-gratification predicted frequency of gambling behaviors (p<0.01). Coping and self-gratification predicted loss of control (p<0.01), whereas self-gratification predicted gambling problems (p<0.001). The Gambling Motives Questionnaire - Revised, consisting of the four dimensions enhancement motives, social motives, coping motives and self-gratification motives, is a reliable and valid instrument to measuring gambling motives.

  9. Development of a Keratoconus-Specific Questionnaire Using Rasch Analysis.

    PubMed

    Khadka, Jyoti; Schoneveld, Paul G; Pesudovs, Konrad

    2017-03-01

    To develop and validate a keratoconus-specific quality of life (QoL) questionnaire: the Keratoconus Outcomes Research Questionnaire (KORQ). The study was carried out in three phases. Phase I: content identifications: items were identified based on an extensive literature review, open-ended patient mail survey, and expert consultations. Each item was scored on a visual analog scale (VAS). Phase II: pilot testing using Rasch analysis. Phase III: testing psychometric properties of the final version of the KORQ. Phase I identified 44 items across 3 different content areas: activity limitation (26), symptoms (20), and convenience (8). The 44-item KORQ was self-administered to 158 people with keratoconus. The 44-item KORQ was multidimensional. Unidimensionality was restored by separating items across three content areas (subscales) as identified in phase I. The activity limitation and symptoms subscales demonstrated adequate measurement precision, but convenience (precision, 1.01) did not. Hence, the convenience subscale was discarded. Rasch analysis revealed that the VAS was disordered. The ordering of the VAS was restored by collapsing categories into 4. An iterative Rasch analysis guided item-removal resulted into a 29-item KORQ (18-item activity limitation and 11-item symptoms). The VAS was replaced by a discrete 4-option labeled categorical rating scale, and it was self-administered by 169 people with keratoconus. Both the subscales demonstrated good psychometric properties. The KORQ scores strongly correlated with visual acuity and contrast sensitivity demonstrating its construct validity. The 29-item KORQ was a psychometrically robust and valid instrument to assess the impact of keratoconus on activity limitation and symptoms.

  10. Haemangioma family burden: creation of a specific questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Boccara, Olivia; Méni, Cecile; Léauté-Labreze, Christine; Bodemer, Christine; Voisard, Jean-Jacques; Dufresne, Hélène; Brauchoux, Sébastien; Taieb, Charles

    2015-01-01

    To develop and validate a specific questionnaire to assess burden on families of children with infantile haemangioma (IH): the Haemangioma Family Burden questionnaire (HFB). Items were generated from a literature review and a verbatim report from parents. Subsequently, a study was implemented at the Necker Hospital and the Pellegrin Children's Hospital for psychometric analysis. The HFB was refined via item reduction according to inter-question correlations, consensus among experts and exploratory factor analysis. A 20-item questionnaire, grouped into 5 dimensions, was obtained. Construct validity was demonstrated and HFB showed good internal coherence (Cronbach's α: 0.93). The HFB was significantly correlated with the mental dimension of the Short-Form-12 (r = -0.75), and the Psychological General Well-Being Index (r = -0.61). HFB scores differed significantly according to the size and localization of the IH. A validated tool for assessing the burden on families of children with IH is now available.

  11. Exploring the Relevance of Items in the Communicative Participation Item Bank (CPIB) for Individuals With Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Baylor, Carolyn R.; Birch, Kristen; Yorkston, Kathryn M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The Communicative Participation Item Bank (CPIB) was developed to evaluate participation restrictions in communication situations for individuals with speech and language disorders. This study evaluated the potential relevance of CPIB items for individuals with hearing loss. Method Cognitive interviews were conducted with 17 adults with a range of treated and untreated hearing loss, who responded to 46 items. Interviews were continued until saturation was reached and prevalent trends emerged. A focus group was also conducted with 3 experienced audiologists to seek their views on the CPIB. Analysis of data included qualitative and quantitative approaches. Results The majority of the items were applicable to individuals with hearing loss; however, 12 items were identified as potentially not relevant. This was largely attributed to the items' focus on speech production rather than hearing. The results from the focus group were in agreement for a majority of items. Conclusions The next step in validating the CPIB for individuals with hearing loss is a psychometric analysis on a large sample. Possible outcomes could be that the CPIB is considered valid in its entirety or the creation of a new questionnaire or a hearing loss–specific short form with a subset of items is necessary. PMID:28114665

  12. Children's Understandings Related to Hazardous Household Items and Waste

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malandrakis, George N.

    2008-01-01

    This study focuses on children's understanding of hazardous household items (HHI) and waste (HHW). Children from grades 4, 5 and 6 (n=173) participated in a questionnaire and interview research design. The results indicate that: (a) on a daily basis the children used HHI and disposed of HHW, (b) the children did not realize the danger of these…

  13. Children's Understandings Related to Hazardous Household Items and Waste

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malandrakis, George N.

    2008-01-01

    This study focuses on children's understanding of hazardous household items (HHI) and waste (HHW). Children from grades 4, 5 and 6 (n=173) participated in a questionnaire and interview research design. The results indicate that: (a) on a daily basis the children used HHI and disposed of HHW, (b) the children did not realize the danger of these…

  14. Assessing Personality Traits through Response Latencies Using Item Response Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranger, Jochen; Ortner, Tuulia M.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed a relation between the given response and the response latency for personality questionnaire items in the form of an inverted-U effect, which has been interpreted in light of schema-driven behavior. In general, more probable responses are given faster. In the present study, the relationship between the probability of…

  15. Development and validation of the Eating Maturity Questionnaire: Preliminary findings.

    PubMed

    Potocka, Adrianna; Najder, Anna

    2016-10-01

    This article describes the development of the Eating Maturity Questionnaire, a self-reported measurement of eating maturity that initiates and gives direction to human eating behaviors. The Eating Maturity Questionnaire was designed to study individuals' biological and psychosocial motives for eating. The Eating Maturity Questionnaire is a 21-item tool with satisfactory psychometric values (Cronbach's α coefficients between 0.83 and 0.88) consisting of two subscales: Rational Eating and Psychosocial Maturity Eating Maturity Questionnaire results may be used to design programs that target eating behaviors and body mass modification. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Differential item functioning (DIF) of SF-12 and Q-LES-Q-SF items among french substance users.

    PubMed

    Bourion-Bédès, Stéphanie; Schwan, Raymund; Laprevote, Vincent; Bédès, Alex; Bonnet, Jean-Louis; Baumann, Cédric

    2015-10-24

    Differential Item Functioning (DIF) is investigated to ensure that each item displays a consistent pattern of responses irrespective of the characteristics of the respondents. Assessing DIF helps to understand the nature of instruments, to assess the quality of a measure and to interpret results. This study aimed to examine whether the items of the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire-Short Form (Q-LES-Q-SF) and Short-Form 12 (SF-12) exhibit DIF. A total of 124 outpatients diagnosed with substance dependence participated in a cross-sectional, multicenter study. In addition to the Q-LES-Q-SF and SF-12 results, demographic data such as age, sex, type of substance dependence and education level were collected. Rasch analysis was conducted (using RUMM2020 software) to assess DIF of the Q-LES-Q-SF and SF-12 items. For SF-12, significant age-related uniform DIF was found in two of the 12 items, and sex-related DIF was found in one of the 12 items. All of the observed DIF effects in SF-12 were found among the mental health items. Three items showed DIF on the Q-LES-Q-SF; however, the impact of DIF item on the delta score calculation for the comparisons of self-reported health status between the groups was minimal in the SF-12 and small in the Q-LES-Q-SF. These results indicated that no major measurement bias affects the validity of the self-reported health status assessed using the Q-LES-Q-SF or SF-12. Thus, these questionnaires are largely robust measures of self-reported health status among substance users.

  17. Development and Initial Testing of the Penn Parkinson's Daily Activities Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Laura; Siderowf, Andrew; Rubright, Jonathan D.; Rick, Jacqueline; Dahodwala, Nabila; Duda, John E.; Hurtig, Howard; Stern, Matthew; Xie, Sharon X.; Rennert, Lior; Karlawish, Jason; Shea, Judy A.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Weintraub, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this work was to describe the development and psychometric analysis of the Penn Parkinson's Daily Activities Questionnaire. The questionnaire is an item response theory-based tool for rating cognitive instrumental activities of daily living in PD. Methods Candidate items for the Penn Parkinson's Daily Activities Questionnaire were developed through literature review and focus groups of patients and knowledgeable informants. Item selection and calibration of item-response theory parameters were performed using responses from a cohort of PD patients and knowledgeable informants (n = 388). In independent cohorts of PD patients and knowledgeable informants, assessments of test-retest reliability (n = 50), and construct validity (n = 68) of the questionnaire were subsequently performed. Construct validity was assessed by correlating questionnaire scores with measures of motor function, cognition, an existing activities of daily living measure, and directly observed daily function. Results Fifty items were retained in the final questionnaire item bank. Items were excluded owing to redundancy, difficult reading level, and when item-response theory parameters could not be calculated. Test-retest reliability was high (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.97; P < 0.001). The questionnaire correlated strongly with cognition (r = 0.68; P < 0.001) and directly observed daily function (r = 0.87; P < 0.001), but not with motor impairment (r = 0.08; P = 0.53). The questionnaire score accurately discriminated between PD patients with and without dementia (receiver operating characteristic curve = 0.91; 95% confidence interval: 0.85–0.97). Conclusions The Penn Parkinson's Daily Activities Questionnaire shows strong evidence of reliability and validity. Item response theory-based psychometric analysis suggests that this questionnaire can discriminate across a range of daily functions. PMID:26249849

  18. Differential Item Functioning Analysis Using Rasch Item Information Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyse, Adam E.; Mapuranga, Raymond

    2009-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) analysis is a statistical technique used for ensuring the equity and fairness of educational assessments. This study formulates a new DIF analysis method using the information similarity index (ISI). ISI compares item information functions when data fits the Rasch model. Through simulations and an international…

  19. MIMIC Methods for Assessing Differential Item Functioning in Polytomous Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Wen-Chung; Shih, Ching-Lin

    2010-01-01

    Three multiple indicators-multiple causes (MIMIC) methods, namely, the standard MIMIC method (M-ST), the MIMIC method with scale purification (M-SP), and the MIMIC method with a pure anchor (M-PA), were developed to assess differential item functioning (DIF) in polytomous items. In a series of simulations, it appeared that all three methods…

  20. GRE Verbal Analogy Items: Examinee Reasoning on Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duran, Richard P.; And Others

    Information about how Graduate Record Examination (GRE) examinees solve verbal analogy problems was obtained in this study through protocol analysis. High- and low-ability subjects who had recently taken the GRE General Test were asked to "think aloud" as they worked through eight analogy items. These items varied factorially on the…

  1. Comparison of CAT Item Selection Criteria for Polytomous Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Seung W.; Swartz, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    Item selection is a core component in computerized adaptive testing (CAT). Several studies have evaluated new and classical selection methods; however, the few that have applied such methods to the use of polytomous items have reported conflicting results. To clarify these discrepancies and further investigate selection method properties, six…

  2. Differential Item Functioning Analysis Using Rasch Item Information Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyse, Adam E.; Mapuranga, Raymond

    2009-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) analysis is a statistical technique used for ensuring the equity and fairness of educational assessments. This study formulates a new DIF analysis method using the information similarity index (ISI). ISI compares item information functions when data fits the Rasch model. Through simulations and an international…

  3. Evaluating Item Fit for Multidimensional Item Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Bo; Stone, Clement A.

    2008-01-01

    This research examines the utility of the s-x[superscript 2] statistic proposed by Orlando and Thissen (2000) in evaluating item fit for multidimensional item response models. Monte Carlo simulation was conducted to investigate both the Type I error and statistical power of this fit statistic in analyzing two kinds of multidimensional test…

  4. Analysis of internal construct validity of the SRS-24 questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Rothenfluh, Dominique A; Neubauer, Georg; Klasen, Juergen; Min, Kan

    2012-08-01

    The SRS-24 questionnaire was originally validated using methods of classical test theory, but internal construct validity has never been shown. Internal construct validity, i.e. unidimensionality and linearity, is a fundamental arithmetic requirement and needs to be shown for a scale for summating any set of Likert-type items. Here, internal construct validity of the SRS-24 questionnaire in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) patients is analyzed. 232 SRS-24 questionnaires distributed to 116 patients with AIS pre-operatively and at postoperative follow-up were analyzed. 103 patients were females; the average age was 16.5 ± 7.1 years. The questionnaires were subjected to Rasch analysis using the RUMM2020 software package. All seven domains of the SRS-24 showed misfit to the Rasch model, and three of seven were unidimensional. Unidimensionality and linearity could only be achieved for an aggregate score by separating pre- and postoperative items and omitting items which caused model misfit. Reducing the questionnaire to six pre-operative items (p = 0.098; 2.25% t tests) and five postoperative items (p = 0.267; 3.70% t tests) yields model fit and unidimensionality for both summated scores. The person-separation indices (PSI) were 0.67 and 0.69, respectively, for the pre- and postoperative patients. The SRS-24 score is a non-linear and multidimensional construct. Adding the items into a single value is therefore not supported and invalid in principle. Making profound changes to the questionnaire yields a score which fulfills the properties of internal construct validity and supports its use a change score for outcome measurement.

  5. DIF Testing for Ordinal Items with Poly-SIBTEST, the Mantel and GMH Tests, and IRT-LR-DIF when the Latent Distribution Is Nonnormal for Both Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Carol M.

    2011-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) occurs when an item on a test, questionnaire, or interview has different measurement properties for one group of people versus another. One way to test items with ordinal response scales for DIF is likelihood ratio (LR) testing using item response theory (IRT), or IRT-LR-DIF. Despite the various advantages of…

  6. DIF Testing for Ordinal Items with Poly-SIBTEST, the Mantel and GMH Tests, and IRT-LR-DIF when the Latent Distribution Is Nonnormal for Both Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Carol M.

    2011-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) occurs when an item on a test, questionnaire, or interview has different measurement properties for one group of people versus another. One way to test items with ordinal response scales for DIF is likelihood ratio (LR) testing using item response theory (IRT), or IRT-LR-DIF. Despite the various advantages of…

  7. 10 CFR 74.55 - Item monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... days for Category IA items and 60 calendar days for Category IB items contained in a vault or in a... days for Category IA items and seven calendar days for Category BI items located elsewhere in the...

  8. 10 CFR 74.55 - Item monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... days for Category IA items and 60 calendar days for Category IB items contained in a vault or in a... days for Category IA items and seven calendar days for Category BI items located elsewhere in the...

  9. 10 CFR 74.55 - Item monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... days for Category IA items and 60 calendar days for Category IB items contained in a vault or in a... days for Category IA items and seven calendar days for Category BI items located elsewhere in the...

  10. 10 CFR 74.55 - Item monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... days for Category IA items and 60 calendar days for Category IB items contained in a vault or in a... days for Category IA items and seven calendar days for Category BI items located elsewhere in the...

  11. 10 CFR 74.55 - Item monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... days for Category IA items and 60 calendar days for Category IB items contained in a vault or in a... days for Category IA items and seven calendar days for Category BI items located elsewhere in the...

  12. Development and Validation of the Bicultural Youth Acculturation Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Kukaswadia, Atif; Janssen, Ian; Pickett, William; Bajwa, Jasmine; Georgiades, Katholiki; Lalonde, Richard N; Quon, Elizabeth C; Safdar, Saba; Pike, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Acculturation is a multidimensional process involving changes in behaviour and beliefs. Questionnaires developed to measure acculturation are typically designed for specific ethnic populations and adult experiences. This study developed a questionnaire that measures acculturation among ethnically diverse populations of youth that can be included as a module in population surveys. Questionnaires measuring acculturation in youth were identified in the literature. The importance of items from the existing questionnaires was determined using a Delphi process and this informed the development of our questionnaire. The questionnaire was then pilot tested using a sample of 248 Canadians aged 18-25 via an online system. Participants identified as East and South East Asian (27.8%), South Asian (17.7%) and Black (13.7%). The majority were 1st (33.5%) or 2nd generation immigrants (52.0%). After redundant items were eliminated, exploratory factor analysis grouped items into domains, and, for each domain, internal consistency, and convergent validity with immigrant generation then age at immigration estimated. A subset of participants re-completed the questionnaire for reliability estimation. The literature review yielded 117 articles that used 13 questionnaires with a total of 440 questions. The Delphi process reduced these to 32 questions. Pilot testing occurred in 248 Canadians aged 18-25. Following item reduction, 16 questions in three domains remained: dominant culture, heritage language, and heritage culture. All had good internal consistency (Cronbach's alphas > .75). The mean dominant domain score increased with immigrant generation (1st generation: 3.69 (95% CI: 3.49-3.89), 2nd: 4.13 (4.00-4.26), 3rd: 4.40 (4.19-4.61)), and mean heritage language score was higher among those who immigrated after age 12 than before (p = .0001), indicative of convergent validity. This Bicultural Youth Acculturation Questionnaire has demonstrated validity. It can be incorporated into

  13. A Mixed Effects Randomized Item Response Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, J.-P.; Wyrick, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    The randomized response technique ensures that individual item responses, denoted as true item responses, are randomized before observing them and so-called randomized item responses are observed. A relationship is specified between randomized item response data and true item response data. True item response data are modeled with a (non)linear…

  14. Acromegaly Quality of Life Questionnaire (AcroQoL)

    PubMed Central

    Badia, Xavier; Webb, Susan M; Prieto, Luis; Lara, Nuria

    2004-01-01

    Acromegaly is a chronic disease with an important impact on patients, Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL). The ability to effectively measure Health Related Quality of Life is central to describing the impacts of disease or treatment upon the patient, therefore the importance of having a disease specific questionnaire for acromegaly. For the development of the AcroQoL questionnaire different sources of information were used: first a literature search was performed to identify relevant papers describing the impact of acromegaly in HRQoL, second the main domains of impact on HRQoL were identified by 10 experts endocrinologists, and third ten in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted in acromegalic patients to identify domains and items related to the self-perceived impact of acromegaly in patients' life. After a proper qualitative analysis a preliminary 38 item questionnaire was obtained. Rasch analysis concluded with a final 22 item questionnaire. The measurement properties (validity and reliability) of the resulting final questionnaire were tested and compared using standard procedures (Cronbach's Alpha and item-total correlation). The evaluation of the item parameters confirmed the construct validity of the new instrument. Responsiveness to change was assessed in a small sample of 32 acromegalic patients with active disease in Spain who were administered the AcroQoL and the generic questionnaire EuroQoL 5-D. The results showed a statistically significant relationship between all the dimensions of AcroQoL and the VAS (visual analogic scale) of EQ-5D. An improvement in the global score of AcroQoL was related to a global improvement in the VAS of the EQ-5D. Following the current recommended standard methodology the Spanish questionnaire was translated into eleven other languages. PMID:14987332

  15. [An extended version of the Font-Roja job satisfaction questionnaire].

    PubMed

    Núñez González, Eduardo; Estévez Guerra, Gabriel J; Hernández Marrero, Pablo; Marrero Medina, Carmen Delia

    2007-01-01

    Several studies have shown the need to include the physical work environment among the dimensions included in job satisfaction evaluation. However, this dimension was not included in the Font-Roja questionnaire. The present study introduces two items exploring this dimension and adheres to the hypothesis that physical work environment has a significant impact on job satisfaction evaluation. A total of 227 geriatric workers participated in this study. The participants completed the Font-Roja job satisfaction questionnaire with 2 additional items exploring the physical work environment. Factor analysis and principal components analysis with rotation varimax were used to determine the diverse components of job satisfaction. To determine the coherence of the scales and the consistency of the added items, Cronbach's a was used. These methods were applied to both questionnaires, the classical 24-item questionnaire and the extended 26-item questionnaire. The classical Font-Roja questionnaire was composed of 8 factors, explaining 60.02% of the variance. The extended questionnaire was structured into 9 factors, explaining 61.81% of the variance. The new factor was composed of both added items. The internal consistency of the Font-Roja classical scale was alpha = 0.773 and that of the extended scale was alpha = 0.791. The extended scale is superior to the classical scale. The results obtained seem to support the hypothesis that, for analysis of job satisfaction, the instruments used should contain items on the physical work environment.

  16. Validity and Reliability of General Nutrition Knowledge Questionnaire for Adults in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Bukenya, Richard; Ahmed, Abhiya; Andrade, Jeanette M.; Grigsby-Toussaint, Diana S.; Muyonga, John; Andrade, Juan E.

    2017-01-01

    This study sought to develop and validate a general nutrition knowledge questionnaire (GNKQ) for Ugandan adults. The initial draft consisted of 133 items on five constructs associated with nutrition knowledge; expert recommendations (16 items), food groups (70 items), selecting food (10 items), nutrition and disease relationship (23 items), and food fortification in Uganda (14 items). The questionnaire validity was evaluated in three studies. For the content validity (study 1), a panel of five content matter nutrition experts reviewed the GNKQ draft before and after face validity. For the face validity (study 2), head teachers and health workers (n = 27) completed the questionnaire before attending one of three focus groups to review the clarity of the items. For the construct and test-rest reliability (study 3), head teachers (n = 40) from private and public primary schools and nutrition (n = 52) and engineering (n = 49) students from Makerere University took the questionnaire twice (two weeks apart). Experts agreed (content validity index, CVI > 0.9; reliability, Gwet’s AC1 > 0.85) that all constructs were relevant to evaluate nutrition knowledge. After the focus groups, 29 items were identified as unclear, requiring major (n = 5) and minor (n = 24) reviews. The final questionnaire had acceptable internal consistency (Cronbach α > 0.95), test-retest reliability (r = 0.89), and differentiated (p < 0.001) nutrition knowledge scores between nutrition (67 ± 5) and engineering (39 ± 11) students. Only the construct on nutrition recommendations was unreliable (Cronbach α = 0.51, test-retest r = 0.55), which requires further optimization. The final questionnaire included topics on food groups (41 items), selecting food (2 items), nutrition and disease relationship (14 items), and food fortification in Uganda (22 items) and had good content, construct, and test-retest reliability to evaluate nutrition knowledge among Ugandan adults. PMID:28230779

  17. Development of the client-centred care questionnaire.

    PubMed

    de Witte, Luc; Schoot, Tineke; Proot, Ireen

    2006-10-01

    This paper reports the development and testing of the Client-Centred Care Questionnaire, aimed at evaluating the client-centredness of professional home nursing care from a client perspective. Client-centred care has become an important theme in health care. To evaluate the client-centredness of care and services from a client's perspective, there is a need for measurement instruments. The questionnaire was developed on the basis of a qualitative study into client perspectives on home nursing care. Items were formulated that closely followed the aspects clients mentioned as central to client-centred home care. A pilot study was conducted with a sample of 107 clients in three home care organizations in 2003 and 2004. These clients had chronic diseases and were expected to receive care for at least another 6 months. The questionnaire comprises 15 items. Principal components analysis and internal consistency analysis show strong internal consistency of the items. All items had strong factor loadings on one dimension, and Cronbach's alpha was 0.94. Clients tended to be most critical about their say in the practical arrangements and organization of care: which person came, how often and when? Clients of the three organizations differed in their perceptions of client-centredness, which may indicate that the questionnaire is capable of differentiating between respondents. The results of this pilot study are promising. The validity of the questionnaire needs further testing.

  18. Validation of a questionnaire to screen for shift work disorder.

    PubMed

    Barger, Laura K; Ogeil, Rowan P; Drake, Christopher L; O'Brien, Conor S; Ng, Kim T; Rajaratnam, Shantha M W

    2012-12-01

    At least 15% of the full-time work force is shift workers. Working during the overnight hours, early morning start times, and variable or rotating schedules present a challenge to the circadian system, and these shifts are associated with adverse health and safety consequences. Shift work disorder (SWD), a primary (circadian rhythm) sleep disorder indicated by excessive daytime sleepiness and/or insomnia associated with a shiftwork schedule, is under-recognized by primary care physicians. We sought to develop and validate a questionnaire to screen for high risk of SWD in a shift working population. Shift workers completed a 26-item questionnaire and were evaluated by a sleep specialist (physician) who diagnosed them as either positive or negative for SWD. The physician assessment of SWD was guided by a flow chart that operationalized the ICSD-2 criteria for SWD. 18 sleep clinics in the USA. 311 shift workers. Not applicable. Responses to the items in the questionnaire were entered into a series of discrimination function analyses to determine the diagnostic value of the items and the fewest number of questions with the best predictive value. The function was then cross-validated. A final 4-item questionnaire has 89% positive predictive value and 62% negative predictive value (sensitivity = 0.74; specificity = 0.82). This Shiftwork Disorder Screening Questionnaire may be appropriate for use in primary care settings to aid in the diagnosis of SWD.

  19. Methods for Linking Item Parameters.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    of Linking Adequacy ... ........... ... 27 Evaluation of Linking Techniques .. ......... ... 28 Rasch model . ................. 28 Three-parameter...class are models for use when the response is dichotomous (Lord & Novick, 1968; lirnbaum, 1968), models for use when the response is polychotomous... dichotomous ability items of a multiple-choice nature. Two IRT models are appropriate for such items: the three-parameter normal and logistic ogive models

  20. Item Veto: Dangerous Constitutional Tinkering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellamy, Calvin

    1989-01-01

    In theory, the item veto would empower the President to remove wasteful and unnecessary projects from legislation. Yet, despite its history at the state level, the item veto is a loosely defined concept that may not work well at the federal level. Much more worrisome is the impact on the balance of power. (Author/CH)

  1. Generalizability in Item Response Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Derek C.; Wilson, Mark

    2007-01-01

    An approach called generalizability in item response modeling (GIRM) is introduced in this article. The GIRM approach essentially incorporates the sampling model of generalizability theory (GT) into the scaling model of item response theory (IRT) by making distributional assumptions about the relevant measurement facets. By specifying a random…

  2. Generalizability in Item Response Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Derek C.; Wilson, Mark

    2007-01-01

    An approach called generalizability in item response modeling (GIRM) is introduced in this article. The GIRM approach essentially incorporates the sampling model of generalizability theory (GT) into the scaling model of item response theory (IRT) by making distributional assumptions about the relevant measurement facets. By specifying a random…

  3. Career and Occupational Development Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO. National Assessment of Educational Progress.

    The career and occupational development items contained in this document are part of a kit consisting of four documents which bring together different types of items that measure a number of career and occupational development (COD) objectives developed by the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). (NAEP--which completed a national…

  4. Career and Occupational Development Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO. National Assessment of Educational Progress.

    The career and occupational development items contained in this document are part of a kit consisting of four documents which bring together different types of items that measure a number of career and occupational development (COD) objectives developed by the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). (NAEP--which completed a national…

  5. Brief Sensation Seeking Scale: Latent structure of 8-item and 4-item versions in Peruvian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Merino-Soto, Cesar; Salas Blas, Edwin

    2017-07-14

    This research intended to validate two brief scales of sensations seeking with Peruvian adolescents: the eight item scale (BSSS8; Hoyle, Stephenson, Palmgreen, Lorch, y Donohew, 2002) and the four item scale (BSSS4; Stephenson, Hoyle, Slater, y Palmgreen, 2003). Questionnaires were administered to 618 voluntary participants, with an average age of 13.6 years, from different levels of high school, state and private school in a district in the south of Lima. It analyzed the internal structure of both short versions using three models: a) unidimensional (M1), b) oblique or related dimensions (M2), and c) the bifactor model (M3). Results show that both instruments have a single dimension which best represents the variability of the items; a fact that can be explained both by the complexity of the concept and by the small number of items representing each factor, which is more noticeable in the BSSS4. Reliability is within levels found by previous studies: alpha: .745 = BSSS8 and BSSS4 =. 643; omega coefficient: .747 in BSSS8 and .651 in BSSS4. These are considered suitable for the type of instruments studied. Based on the correlation between the two instruments, it was found that there are satisfactory levels of equivalence between the BSSS8 and BSSS4. However, it is recommended that the BSSS4 is mainly used for research and for the purpose of describing populations.

  6. Continuous Online Item Calibration: Parameter Recovery and Item Utilization.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hao; van der Linden, Wim J; Diao, Qi

    2017-06-01

    Parameter recovery and item utilization were investigated for different designs for online test item calibration. The design was adaptive in a double sense: it assumed both adaptive testing of examinees from an operational pool of previously calibrated items and adaptive assignment of field-test items to the examinees. Four criteria of optimality for the assignment of the field-test items were used, each of them based on the information in the posterior distributions of the examinee's ability parameter during adaptive testing as well as the sequentially updated posterior distributions of the field-test item parameters. In addition, different stopping rules based on target values for the posterior standard deviations of the field-test parameters and the size of the calibration sample were used. The impact of each of the criteria and stopping rules on the statistical efficiency of the estimates of the field-test parameters and on the time spent by the items in the calibration procedure was investigated. Recommendations as to the practical use of the designs are given.

  7. Using polytomous item response models to assess death anxiety.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Juana; Hidalgo, M Dolores; Tomás-Sábado, Joaquín

    2007-01-01

    : The study of human attitudes toward death has given rise to a substantial body of empirical research. Psychometric instruments have been developed to measure fear of death, or death anxiety, and its psychological consequences in people who continually come into contact with stimuli related to mortality. : To analyze the 20-item Death Anxiety Inventory (DAI) within the framework of item response theory (IRT) and using the generalized partial credit model. : The sample comprised 154 men and 550 women and was drawn from nurses, doctors, industrial workers, teachers, undergraduates, and retired persons. Subjects completed the DAI, a self-administered, Likert-type questionnaire of 20 items, each with six response options. : The DAI showed a relatively adequate fit to the generalized partial credit model. Thus, 4 of the 20 items presented a poor fit to the model. The analysis of item information and test information functions revealed that the 20-item test was appropriate for differentiating subjects with medium or high levels of death anxiety. The test information function was higher in this range of scores, indicating greater precision in the estimate of death anxiety for these subjects. : The generalized partial credit model can be used to obtain detailed information about a clinical test and its items, and there are advantages to this approach when working with polytomous tests.

  8. The Development of a Screening Questionnaire for Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Children with Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Emma; Hill, Catherine Mary; Evans, Hazel Jean; Tuffrey, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is a condition which affects an estimated 50% of children with Down syndrome, particularly in their early years. It can cause serious sequelae in affected children but may not be recognized by parents or health professionals. Routine screening has been recommended in some countries, but is not standard practice. There are no validated questionnaire-based tools available to screen this population of children for this particular sleep-related disorder. Using existing validated sleep questionnaire items, we have developed a questionnaire to screen children with Down syndrome up to 6 years of age for obstructive sleep apnea, which corresponds with the recommendations made in UK national guidelines. This paper describes these first steps in demonstrating content validity for a new questionnaire, which will be subject to further in-depth psychometric analysis. Relevance, clarity, and age appropriateness were rated for 33 items using a content review questionnaire by a group of 18 health professionals with expertise in respiratory pediatrics, neurodevelopmental pediatrics, and sleep physiology. The content validity index was calculated for individual items and contributed to decisions about item inclusion. Scale level content validity index for the modified questionnaire of 14 items was at an accepted level of 0.78. Two parents of children with Down syndrome took part in cognitive interviews after completing the modified questionnaire. We describe the development of this 14 item questionnaire to screen for OSA in children with DS from infancy to 6 years. PMID:26539127

  9. The Wisconsin Predicting Patients' Relapse questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Bolt, Daniel M.; McCarthy, Danielle E.; Japuntich, Sandra J.; Fiore, Michael C.; Smith, Stevens S.; Baker, Timothy B.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Relapse is the most common smoking cessation outcome. Accurate prediction of relapse likelihood could be an important clinical tool used to influence treatment selection or duration. The aim of this research was to develop a brief clinical relapse proneness questionnaire to be used with smokers interested in quitting in a clinical setting where time is at a premium. Methods: Diverse items assessing constructs shown in previous research to be related to relapse risk, such as nicotine dependence and self-efficacy, were evaluated to determine their independent contributions to relapse prediction. In an exploratory dataset, candidate items were assessed among smokers motivated to quit smoking who enrolled in one of three randomized controlled smoking cessation trials. A cross-validation dataset was used to compare the relative predictive power of the new instrument against the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND) at 1-week, 8-week, and 6-month postquit assessments. Results: We selected seven items with relatively nonoverlapping content for the Wisconsin Predicting Patient's Relapse (WI-PREPARE) measure, a brief, seven-item questionnaire that taps physical dependence, environmental factors, and individual difference characteristics. Cross-validation analyses suggested that the WI-PREPARE demonstrated a stronger prediction of relapse at 1-week and 8-week postquit assessments than the FTND and comparable prediction to the FTND at a 6-month postquit assessment. Discussion: The WI-PREPARE is easy to score, suggests the nature of a patient's relapse risk, and predicts short- and medium-term relapse better than the FTND. PMID:19372573

  10. Too Reliable to Be True? Response Bias as a Potential Source of Inflation in Paper-and-Pencil Questionnaire Reliability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peer, Eyal; Gamliel, Eyal

    2011-01-01

    When respondents answer paper-and-pencil (PP) questionnaires, they sometimes modify their responses to correspond to previously answered items. As a result, this response bias might artificially inflate the reliability of PP questionnaires. We compared the internal consistency of PP questionnaires to computerized questionnaires that presented a…

  11. Assessing item fit for unidimensional item response theory models using residuals from estimated item response functions.

    PubMed

    Haberman, Shelby J; Sinharay, Sandip; Chon, Kyong Hee

    2013-07-01

    Residual analysis (e.g. Hambleton & Swaminathan, Item response theory: principles and applications, Kluwer Academic, Boston, 1985; Hambleton, Swaminathan, & Rogers, Fundamentals of item response theory, Sage, Newbury Park, 1991) is a popular method to assess fit of item response theory (IRT) models. We suggest a form of residual analysis that may be applied to assess item fit for unidimensional IRT models. The residual analysis consists of a comparison of the maximum-likelihood estimate of the item characteristic curve with an alternative ratio estimate of the item characteristic curve. The large sample distribution of the residual is proved to be standardized normal when the IRT model fits the data. We compare the performance of our suggested residual to the standardized residual of Hambleton et al. (Fundamentals of item response theory, Sage, Newbury Park, 1991) in a detailed simulation study. We then calculate our suggested residuals using data from an operational test. The residuals appear to be useful in assessing the item fit for unidimensional IRT models.

  12. The Depression Coping Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinke, Chris L.

    College students (N=396), chronic pain patients (N=319), and schizophrenic veterans (N=43) completed the Depression Coping Questionnaire (DCQ) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Factor analysis of the DCQ identified eleven coping responses: social support, problem solving, self-blame/escape, aggression, indulgence, activities, medication,…

  13. Questionnaire typography and production.

    PubMed

    Gray, M

    1975-06-01

    This article describes the typographic principles and practice which provide the basis of good design and print, the relevant printing processes which can be used, and the graphic designer's function in questionnaire production. As they impose constraints on design decisions to be discussed later in the text, the various methods of printing and production are discussed first.

  14. Using the Evaluative Linguistic Framework for Questionnaires to Assess Comprehensibility of Self-Report Health Questionnaires.

    PubMed

    Clerehan, Rosemary; Guillemin, Francis; Epstein, Jonathan; Buchbinder, Rachelle

    2016-06-01

    The Evaluative Linguistic Framework (ELF) was developed to judge the quality of health care texts for patients, based on systemic functional linguistic theory. This approach considers key variables such as context and structure, known to be important for communication. Our objective was to adapt the ELF to evaluate the quality of self-report questionnaires. We reviewed the Health Literacy Questionnaire using the ELF. On the basis of these data, we drafted the preliminary version of the Evaluative Linguistic Framework for Questionnaires (ELF-Q) and applied it to English- and French-language versions of two arthritis self-report questionnaires and to Spanish, Dutch, and Turkish versions of an arthritis questionnaire. The developed ELF-Q was found to be effective for evaluating questionnaires in English and in four other languages. It contains nine items with new descriptions and assessment probes. These include overall organizational or generic structure of the questionnaire, metadiscourse (or text about the text), headings, rhetorical elements (function of each "move" or stage of the text in relation to the reader), the writer-reader relationship, technicality of vocabulary, lexical density (proportion of content words in the text), format, and overall judgment. We added assessment responses on a two- or three-point Likert scale to complement the assessment probes and make the intent and meaning of the probes fully explicit for the questionnaire developer or assessor. The ELF-Q is a framework practical to use for the development or assessment of any type of self-report questionnaire. Its application can identify features of a self-report questionnaire that could be improved to optimize its comprehensibility. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A Randomized Experiment to Compare Conventional, Computerized, and Computerized Adaptive Administration of Ordinal Polytomous Attitude Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hol, A. Michiel; Vorst, Harrie C. M.; Mellenbergh, Gideon J.

    2005-01-01

    A total of 520 high school students were randomly assigned to a paper-and-pencil test (PPT), a computerized standard test (CST), or a computerized adaptive test (CAT) version of the Dutch School Attitude Questionnaire (SAQ), consisting of ordinal polytomous items. The CST administered items in the same order as the PPT. The CAT administered all…

  16. A Randomized Experiment to Compare Conventional, Computerized, and Computerized Adaptive Administration of Ordinal Polytomous Attitude Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hol, A. Michiel; Vorst, Harrie C. M.; Mellenbergh, Gideon J.

    2005-01-01

    A total of 520 high school students were randomly assigned to a paper-and-pencil test (PPT), a computerized standard test (CST), or a computerized adaptive test (CAT) version of the Dutch School Attitude Questionnaire (SAQ), consisting of ordinal polytomous items. The CST administered items in the same order as the PPT. The CAT administered all…

  17. Comparison of single questions and brief questionnaire with longer validated food frequency questionnaire to assess adequate fruit and vegetable intake.

    PubMed

    Cook, Amelia; Roberts, Kia; O'Leary, Fiona; Allman-Farinelli, Margaret Anne

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if a single question (SQ) for fruit and a SQ or five-item questionnaire for vegetable consumption (VFQ) could replace a longer food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) to screen for inadequate versus adequate intakes in populations. Participants (109) completed three test screeners: fruit SQ, vegetable SQ, and a five-item VFQ followed by the reference 74-item FFQ (version 2 of the Dietary Questionnaire for Epidemiological Studies [DQESv2]) including 13 fruit and 25 vegetable items. The five-item VFQ asked about intake of salad vegetables, cooked vegetables, white potatoes, legumes, and vegetable juice. The screeners were compared with the reference (DQESv2 FFQ) for sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive powers (PPV, NPV) to detect intakes of two or more servings of fruit and three or more servings of vegetables. Relative validity was examined using Bland-Altman statistics. The fruit SQ showed a PPV of 56% and an NPV of 83%. The PPV for the vegetable SQ was 30% and the NPV was 89%. For the five-item VFQ, the PPV was 39% and the NPV was 85%. Bland-Altman plots and linear regression equations showed that although the screener showed good agreement for fruit (unstandardized b1 coefficient = 0.04) for vegetable intake the difference between methods increased at higher intake levels (unstandardized b1 coefficients = -0.3 for the SQ, b1 = -0.6 for five-item VFQ). The fruit SQ and the five-item VFQ are suitable replacements for longer FFQs to detect inadequate intake and assess population mean but not individual intakes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Validation of the Mayo Dysphagia Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Grudell, A B M; Alexander, J A; Enders, F B; Pacifico, R; Fredericksen, M; Wise, J L; Locke, G R; Arora, A; Zais, T; Talley, N J; Romero, Y

    2007-01-01

    While multiple instruments characterize upper gastrointestinal symptoms, a validated instrument devoted to the measurement of a spectrum of esophageal dysphagia attributes is not available. Therefore, we constructed and validated the Mayo Dysphagia Questionnaire (MDQ). The 27 items of the MDQ underwent content validity, feasibility, concurrent validity, reproducibility, internal consistency, and construct validity testing. To assess content validity, five esophageal subspecialty gastroenterologists reviewed the items to ensure inclusion of pertinent domains. Feasibility testing was done with eight outpatients who refined problematic items. To assess concurrent validity, 70 patient responses on the MDQ were compared to responses gathered in a structured patient-physician interview. A separate group of 70 outpatients completed the MDQ twice to assess the reproducibility of each item. A total of 148 patients participated in the validation process (78 [53%] men; mean age 62). On average, the MDQ took 6 minutes to complete. A single item (odynophagia) tested poorly with a kappa value of <0.4. Otherwise, the majority of concurrent validity kappa values were in the good to excellent range with a mean of 0.63 (95% CI 0.22-0.89). The majority of reproducibility kappa values were also in the good to excellent range with a median kappa value of 0.76 (interquartile range: 0.67-0.81). Cronbach's alpha values were excellent in the range of 0.86-0.88. Spearman rank correlation coefficients to assess construct validity were also excellent in the range of 0.87-0.98. Thus, the MDQ is a concise instrument that demonstrates overall excellent concurrent validity, reproducibility, internal consistency, and construct validity for the features of esophageal dysphagia.

  19. [Acceptability, reliability and validity of the Corney and Clare social problems questionnaire].

    PubMed

    Molina Habas, A; Manjón Arce, P; Puerto Barber, J; Girón Giménez, M

    1993-11-15

    To evaluate the acceptability, reliability and concurrent validity of the CORNEY and CLARE self-administered social problems questionnaire. Reliability was studied by a test-retest (24 hours). Validity (concordance) was studied through comparison with a standard social adaptation interview. Primary Health Care. Consecutive patients attached to a long-treatment nursing station and 4 medical clinics. The questionnaire consisted of 33 items and evaluated 9 areas of social functioning. In each area, the items covered 2 types of evaluation: problems in objective circumstances or in functioning and level of satisfaction. There were no significant difficulties in the questionnaire's administration. In the test-retest evaluation, there was adequate concordance of the average scores of the items evaluating difficulties and problems. This was not the case for the average scores of the items which evaluated satisfaction. The validity of 28 of the questionnaire's 33 items was examined. A moderate concordance level was found for 11 items on the questionnaire. An average score taken from these items provided a sufficient measurement of tendency regarding the overall seriousness of the subjects' social problems. The results do not favour the use of this questionnaire as a substitute for standard interviews in the evaluation of specific social problems, but do support the use of part of it in order to obtain a valid tendency measurement.

  20. How and Why Students Learn: Development and Validation of the Learner Awareness Levels Questionnaire for Higher Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choy, S. Chee; Goh, Pauline Swee Choo; Sedhu, Daljeet Singh

    2016-01-01

    The development of the 21-item Learner Awareness Levels Questionnaire (LALQ) was carried out using data from three separate studies. The LALQ is a self-reporting questionnaire assessing how and why students learn. Study 1 refined the initial pool of items to 21 using exploratory factor analysis. In Study 2, the analysis showed evidence for a…

  1. Adolescents at Risk for Violence: An Initial Validation of the Life Challenges Questionnaire and Risk Assessment Index

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grinberg, Ilyse; Dawkins, Marva; Dawkins, Marvin P.; Fullilove, Constance

    2005-01-01

    Initial validation was sought for the Life-Challenges Questionnaire-Teen Form, a 120-item youth-risk assessment tool. The questionnaire was administered to 99 students enrolled in an adolescent detention facility and a comparison group of 305 students attending high school. The survey items included correlates of youth violence and categorized…

  2. Adolescents at Risk for Violence: An Initial Validation of the Life Challenges Questionnaire and Risk Assessment Index

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grinberg, Ilyse; Dawkins, Marva; Dawkins, Marvin P.; Fullilove, Constance

    2005-01-01

    Initial validation was sought for the Life-Challenges Questionnaire-Teen Form, a 120-item youth-risk assessment tool. The questionnaire was administered to 99 students enrolled in an adolescent detention facility and a comparison group of 305 students attending high school. The survey items included correlates of youth violence and categorized…

  3. Printed Comments With Item Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, J. Christopher

    1970-01-01

    The author suggests that a computer program be designed which not only computes item statistics, but also provides a running commetary in English to assist teachers in their analysis of test results. (PR)

  4. Development and Initial Validation of the Five-Factor Model Adolescent Personality Questionnaire (FFM-APQ).

    PubMed

    Rogers, Mary E; Glendon, A Ian

    2017-04-18

    This research reports on the 4-phase development of the 25-item Five-Factor Model Adolescent Personality Questionnaire (FFM-APQ). The purpose was to develop and determine initial evidence for validity of a brief adolescent personality inventory using a vocabulary that could be understood by adolescents up to 18 years old. Phase 1 (N = 48) consisted of item generation and expert (N = 5) review of items; Phase 2 (N = 179) involved item analyses; in Phase 3 (N = 496) exploratory factor analysis assessed the underlying structure; in Phase 4 (N = 405) confirmatory factor analyses resulted in a 25-item inventory with 5 subscales.

  5. Food frequency questionnaires.

    PubMed

    Pérez Rodrigo, Carmen; Aranceta, Javier; Salvador, Gemma; Varela-Moreiras, Gregorio

    2015-02-26

    Food Frequency Questionnaires are dietary assessment tools widely used in epidemiological studies investigating the relationship between dietary intake and disease or risk factors since the early '90s. The three main components of these questionnaires are the list of foods, frequency of consumption and the portion size consumed. The food list should reflect the food habits of the study population at the time the data is collected. The frequency of consumption may be asked by open ended questions or by presenting frequency categories. Qualitative Food Frequency Questionnaires do not ask about the consumed portions; semi-quantitative include standard portions and quantitative questionnaires ask respondents to estimate the portion size consumed either in household measures or grams. The latter implies a greater participant burden. Some versions include only close-ended questions in a standardized format, while others add an open section with questions about some specific food habits and practices and admit additions to the food list for foods and beverages consumed which are not included. The method can be self-administered, on paper or web-based, or interview administered either face-to-face or by telephone. Due to the standard format, especially closed-ended versions, and method of administration, FFQs are highly cost-effective thus encouraging its widespread use in large scale epidemiological cohort studies and also in other study designs. Coding and processing data collected is also less costly and requires less nutrition expertise compared to other dietary intake assessment methods. However, the main limitations are systematic errors and biases in estimates. Important efforts are being developed to improve the quality of the information. It has been recommended the use of FFQs with other methods thus enabling the adjustments required.

  6. Psychometric Properties of the Revised Developmental Coordination Disorder Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Brenda N.; Crawford, Susan G.; Green, Dido; Roberts, Gwen; Aylott, Alice; Kaplan, Bonnie J.

    2009-01-01

    The Developmental Coordination Disorder Questionnaire (DCDQ) is a parent-completed measure designed to identify subtle motor problems in children of 8 to 14.6 years of age. The purpose of this study was to extend the lower age range to children aged 5 to 7 years, revise items to ensure clarity, develop new scoring, and evaluate validity of the…

  7. Michigan High School Student Drug Attitudes and Behavior Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogg, Richard A.; And Others

    This questionnaire assesses drug use practices and attitudes toward drugs in high school students. The instrument has 59 items (multiple choice or completion), some with several parts. The question pertain to aspirations for the future, general attitudes and opinions, biographic and demographic data, family background and relationships, alcohol…

  8. The Development and Psychometric Properties of the Selective Mutism Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, R. Lindsey; Keller, Melody L.; Piacentini, John; Bergman, Andrea J.

    2008-01-01

    Research on selective mutism (SM) has been limited by the absence of standardized, psychometrically sound assessment measures. The purpose of our investigation was to present two studies that examined the factor structure and initial reliability and validity of the Selective Mutism Questionnaire (SMQ), a 17-item parent report measure of failure to…

  9. A Rasch Analysis of the Academic Self-Concept Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joyce, Tan Bei Yu; Yates, Shirley M.

    2007-01-01

    This study used the Rasch model to assess the unidimensionality and item-person fit of an Academic Self-Concept Questionnaire (ASCQ) that is based on the Confucian Heritage Culture (CHC) perspective. Knowledge of the relationship between academic achievement and academic self-concept is particularly useful because academic achievement is…

  10. A Structural Examination of the Learning Experiences Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tokar, David M.; Buchanan, Taneisha S.; Subich, Linda M.; Hall, Rosalie J.; Williams, Christine M.

    2012-01-01

    The underlying factor structure of the Learning Experiences Questionnaire (LEQ; Schaub, 2004) was examined using data from 742 male and female college-age respondents. The LEQ items reflect a variety of learning experiences (generated based on Bandura's (1986, 1997) four sources of self-efficacy perceptions) that might occur in each of Holland's…

  11. Questionnaire Response Scales: Design Factors That Influence Respondent Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Eric S.; Rife, Frank N.

    The goal of this study was to assess the relative merit of various ranges and types of response scales in terms of respondent satisfaction and comfort and the nature of the elicited information in a population of seventh grade students. Three versions of an attitudinal questionnaire, each containing the same items but employing a different…

  12. Racial Differences in Responses to the Caregiver Strain Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Eunjeong; Brannan, Ana Maria; Heflinger, Craig Anne

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine differences in responses to the Caregiver Strain Questionnaire (CGSQ) between African American and White caregivers of children with emotional and behavioral challenges. Significant item- and scale-level differences were detected across groups with African Americans consistently reporting less strain. We…

  13. A Guide to Questionnaire Development. Working Paper No. 33.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stacey, Susan E.

    The basic steps to be followed in the development of a questionnaire are as follows: (1) specify the goals of the study by listing all the questions the investigation is to answer; (2) review the literature related to topics being studied; (3) define all abstract concepts included in the list of objectives; (4) decide what type of item format will…

  14. A Structural Examination of the Learning Experiences Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tokar, David M.; Buchanan, Taneisha S.; Subich, Linda M.; Hall, Rosalie J.; Williams, Christine M.

    2012-01-01

    The underlying factor structure of the Learning Experiences Questionnaire (LEQ; Schaub, 2004) was examined using data from 742 male and female college-age respondents. The LEQ items reflect a variety of learning experiences (generated based on Bandura's (1986, 1997) four sources of self-efficacy perceptions) that might occur in each of Holland's…

  15. Science Motivation Questionnaire: Construct Validation with Nonscience Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glynn, Shawn M.; Taasoobshirazi, Gita; Brickman, Peggy

    2009-01-01

    This study examined how 770 nonscience majors, enrolled in a core-curriculum science course, conceptualized their motivation to learn science. The students responded to the Science Motivation Questionnaire, a 30-item Likert-type instrument designed to provide science education researchers and science instructors with information about students'…

  16. Michigan High School Student Drug Attitudes and Behavior Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogg, Richard A.; And Others

    This questionnaire assesses drug use practices and attitudes toward drugs in high school students. The instrument has 59 items (multiple choice or completion), some with several parts. The question pertain to aspirations for the future, general attitudes and opinions, biographic and demographic data, family background and relationships, alcohol…

  17. Social Support Questionnaire for Children: Development and Initial Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon-Hollingsworth, Arlene T.; Thompson, Julia E.; Geary, Meghan A.; Schexnaildre, Mark A.; Lai, Betty S.; Kelley, Mary Lou

    2016-01-01

    The Social Support Questionnaire for Children (SSQC) is a 50-item scale that assesses children's social support from parents, relatives, nonrelative adults, siblings, and peers. The SSQC demonstrates good psychometric properties (e.g., internal consistency, factorial validity). Furthermore, the SSQC appears to be an ethnically sensitive measure of…

  18. [Validation of a school children addictive behaviors questionnaire].

    PubMed

    Melki, Wahid; Letaief, Mondher; Mechri, Anwar; Kachouri, Radhouane; El May, Wahiba; Corten, Philippe; Mahjoub, Alya; Soltani, Mohamed S; Pelc, Isidore; Gaha, Lotfi

    2006-10-01

    The aim was to develop and validate an addictive behaviors screening tool in school children. A cross sectional study including a self administrated 223 item questionnaire developed in Arabic language. The questionnaire included identification of the student and seven life domains: school, family, addiction, relationships with peers, leisure and well being, risky behaviors and personality traits. N=854 high school children. of Monastir City. the questionnaire Alpha Cronbach's Coefficient ranged between 0.3 and 0.8. Only items with a coefficient higher than 0.6 were maintained in the final version. The time reliability by using the Bland and Altman method 15 days after the first measure showed a Pearson's coefficient of 0.81. Validity evaluated by principal components analysis led to 3 independent factors consisting respectively in 20, 4 and 3 well correlated items: family, school and risky behaviors. validated version of the questionnaire consisted in 102 items, easy to read and understand. This version doesn't require much time to be filled in and takes into consideration cultural particularities of the school children of Monastir. It could be considered as an interesting tool for both the assessment and the prevention of addictive behaviors in school.

  19. Revisiting the Factor Structure of the Questionnaire on Smoking Urges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toll, Benjamin A.; McKee, Sherry A.; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra; O'Malley, Stephanie S.

    2004-01-01

    This study assessed the factor structure of the Questionnaire on Smoking Urges (QSU), a commonly used assessment of cravings for cigarettes, with a sample of smokers presenting for treatment in a smoking cessation trial. On the basis of previous research, three confirmatory factor analytic models were tested. Model 1 hypothesized a 26-item,…

  20. Social Support Questionnaire for Children: Development and Initial Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon-Hollingsworth, Arlene T.; Thompson, Julia E.; Geary, Meghan A.; Schexnaildre, Mark A.; Lai, Betty S.; Kelley, Mary Lou

    2016-01-01

    The Social Support Questionnaire for Children (SSQC) is a 50-item scale that assesses children's social support from parents, relatives, nonrelative adults, siblings, and peers. The SSQC demonstrates good psychometric properties (e.g., internal consistency, factorial validity). Furthermore, the SSQC appears to be an ethnically sensitive measure of…

  1. Validation of the Marijuana Effect Expectancy Questionnaire-Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torrealday, O.; Stein, L. A. R.; Barnett, N.; Golembeske, C.; Lebeau, R.; Colby, S. M.; Monti, P. M.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a brief version of the Marijuana Effect Expectancy Questionnaire (MEEQ; Schafer & Brown, 1991). The original MEEQ was reduced to 6 items (MEEQ-B). Principal component analysis (PCA) was performed and two factors were identified (positive effects and negative effects) accounting for 52.3% of the variance.…

  2. [Development of knowledge, attitude and practice questionnaire on prevention and control of occupational diseases].

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Feng, Yuchao; Wang, Min; Su, Yiwei; Li, Yanhua; Wang, Zhi; Tang, Shihao

    2015-04-01

    To develop the knowledge, attitude and practice questionnaire on the prevention and control of occupational diseases for occupational groups, and to provide a convenient and effective tool for the survey of knowledge, attitude, and behavior on the prevention and control of occupational diseases in occupational groups and the evaluation of intervention effect. The initial questionnaire which was evaluated by the experts was used to carry out a pre-survey in Guangzhou, China. The survey results were statistically analyzed by t test, identification index method, correlation analysis, and Cronbach's a coefficient method. And then the questionnaire was further modified, and the content of the questionnaire was determined finally. After modification, there were 18 items on knowledge, 16 items on attitude, and 12 items on behavior in the "Knowledge, attitude and practice questionnaire on the prevention and control of occupational diseases for enterprise managers"; there were 19 items on knowledge, 10 items on attitude, and 11 items on behavior in the "Knowledge, attitude and practice questionnaire on the prevention and control of occupational diseases for workers". The knowledge, attitude and practice questionnaire on the prevention and control of occupational diseases for occupational groups is developed successfully, and it is a convenient and effective tool for the survey of knowledge, attitude, and behavior on the prevention and control of occupational diseases in occupational groups and the evaluation of intervention effect.

  3. Evaluation of complementary-alternative medicine (CAM) questionnaire development for Indonesian clinical psychologists: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Liem, Andrian; Newcombe, Peter A; Pohlman, Annie

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate questionnaire development to measure the knowledge of Complementary-Alternative Medicine (CAM), attitudes towards CAM, CAM experiences, and CAM educational needs of clinical psychologists in Indonesia. A 26-item questionnaire was developed through an extensive literature search. Data was obtained from provisional psychologists from the Master of Professional Clinical Psychology programs at two established public universities in urban areas of Indonesia. To validate the questionnaire, panel reviews by executive members of the Indonesian Clinical Psychology Association (ICPA), experts in health psychology, and experts in public health and CAM provided their professional judgements. The self-reporting questionnaire consisted of four scales including: knowledge of CAM (6 items), attitudes towards CAM (10 items), CAM experiences (4 items), and CAM educational needs (6 items). All scales, except CAM Experiences, were assessed on a 7-point Likert scale. Sixty provisional psychologists were eligible to complete the questionnaire with a response rate of 73% (N=44). The results showed that the CAM questionnaire was reliable (Cronbach's coefficient alpha range=0.62-0.96; item-total correlation range=0.14-0.92) and demonstrated content validity. Following further psychometric evaluation, the CAM questionnaire may provide the evidence-based information to inform the education and practice of Indonesian clinical psychologists. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Item Banking. ERIC/AE Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudner, Lawrence

    This digest discusses the advantages and disadvantages of using item banks, and it provides useful information for those who are considering implementing an item banking project in their school districts. The primary advantage of item banking is in test development. Using an item response theory method, such as the Rasch model, items from multiple…

  5. Multilevel Modeling of Item Position Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albano, Anthony D.

    2013-01-01

    In many testing programs it is assumed that the context or position in which an item is administered does not have a differential effect on examinee responses to the item. Violations of this assumption may bias item response theory estimates of item and person parameters. This study examines the potentially biasing effects of item position. A…

  6. Computerized Adaptive Testing with Item Cloning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glas, Cees A. W.; van der Linden, Wim J.

    2003-01-01

    Developed a multilevel item response (IRT) model that allows for differences between the distributions of item parameters of families of item clones. Results from simulation studies based on an item pool from the Law School Admission Test illustrate the accuracy of the item pool calibration and adaptive testing procedures based on the model. (SLD)

  7. 7 CFR 2902.5 - Item designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... availability of such items and the economic and technological feasibility of using such items, including life cycle costs. USDA will gather information on individual products within an item and extrapolate that product information to the item level for consideration in designating items. In considering these...

  8. Computerized Adaptive Testing with Item Cloning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glas, Cees A. W.; van der Linden, Wim J.

    2003-01-01

    Developed a multilevel item response (IRT) model that allows for differences between the distributions of item parameters of families of item clones. Results from simulation studies based on an item pool from the Law School Admission Test illustrate the accuracy of the item pool calibration and adaptive testing procedures based on the model. (SLD)

  9. Effects of Incorporating Humor in Test Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMorris, Robert F.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Two matched forms of a 50 item grammar test were developed. Twenty items designed to be humorous were included in one form. Inclusion of humorous items did not affect grammar scores on matched humorous/nonhumorous items, nor on commmon post-treatment items. Inclusion did not affect results of anxiety measures. (Author/DWH)

  10. Multilevel Modeling of Item Position Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albano, Anthony D.

    2013-01-01

    In many testing programs it is assumed that the context or position in which an item is administered does not have a differential effect on examinee responses to the item. Violations of this assumption may bias item response theory estimates of item and person parameters. This study examines the potentially biasing effects of item position. A…

  11. The Virtual Care Climate Questionnaire: Development and Validation of a Questionnaire Measuring Perceived Support for Autonomy in a Virtual Care Setting.

    PubMed

    Smit, Eline Suzanne; Dima, Alexandra Lelia; Immerzeel, Stephanie Annette Maria; van den Putte, Bas; Williams, Geoffrey Colin

    2017-05-08

    Web-based health behavior change interventions may be more effective if they offer autonomy-supportive communication facilitating the internalization of motivation for health behavior change. Yet, at this moment no validated tools exist to assess user-perceived autonomy-support of such interventions. The aim of this study was to develop and validate the virtual climate care questionnaire (VCCQ), a measure of perceived autonomy-support in a virtual care setting. Items were developed based on existing questionnaires and expert consultation and were pretested among experts and target populations. The virtual climate care questionnaire was administered in relation to Web-based interventions aimed at reducing consumption of alcohol (Study 1; N=230) or cannabis (Study 2; N=228). Item properties, structural validity, and reliability were examined with item-response and classical test theory methods, and convergent and divergent validity via correlations with relevant concepts. In Study 1, 20 of 23 items formed a one-dimensional scale (alpha=.97; omega=.97; H=.66; mean 4.9 [SD 1.0]; range 1-7) that met the assumptions of monotonicity and invariant item ordering. In Study 2, 16 items fitted these criteria (alpha=.92; H=.45; omega=.93; mean 4.2 [SD 1.1]; range 1-7). Only 15 items remained in the questionnaire in both studies, thus we proceeded to the analyses of the questionnaire's reliability and construct validity with a 15-item version of the virtual climate care questionnaire. Convergent validity of the resulting 15-item virtual climate care questionnaire was confirmed by positive associations with autonomous motivation (Study 1: r=.66, P<.001; Study 2: r=.37, P<.001) and perceived competence for reducing alcohol intake (Study 1: r=.52, P<.001). Divergent validity could only be confirmed by the nonsignificant association with perceived competence for learning (Study 2: r=.05, P=.48). The virtual climate care questionnaire accurately assessed participants' perceived

  12. Multicultural personality questionnaire: development of a short form.

    PubMed

    van der Zee, Karen; van Oudenhoven, Jan Pieter; Ponterotto, Joseph G; Fietzer, Alexander W

    2013-01-01

    This study reports on the development of the Multicultural Personality Questionnaire-Short Form among 511 participants. Using a split-sample scale validation design, Study 1 (N = 260) employed a principal component analysis and rigorous item selection criteria to extract a 40-item short form (MPQ-SF) from the original 91-item Multicultural Personality Questionnaire (MPQ; van der Zee & van Oudenhoven, 2000, 2001). In Study 2 (N = 251), the MPQ-SF was subjected to confirmatory factor analysis and resulted in a reasonably good fit to the data (comparative fit index = .94; root mean squared error of approximation = .066). Satisfactory coefficient alphas and high correlations with the original scales were found. Moreover, relationships with related scales were largely in the predicted direction. Specific directions for follow-up research are posited.

  13. Validation of questionnaire on the Spiritual Needs Assessment for Patients (SNAP) questionnaire in Brazilian Portuguese

    PubMed Central

    de Araujo Toloi, Diego; Uema, Deise; Matsushita, Felipe; da Silva Andrade, Paulo Antonio; Branco, Tiago Pugliese; de Carvalho Chino, Fabiana Tomie Becker; Guerra, Raquel Bezerra; Pfiffer, Túlio Eduardo Flesch; Chiba, Toshio; Guindalini, Rodrigo Santa Cruz; Sulmasy, Daniel P; Riechelmann, Rachel P

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objectives Spirituality is related to the care and the quality of life of cancer patients. Thus, it is very important to assess their needs. The objective of this study was the translation and cultural adjustment of the Spiritual Needs Assessment for Patients (SNAP) questionnaire to the Brazilian Portuguese language. Methodology The translation and cultural adjustment of the SNAP questionnaire involved six stages: backtranslation, revision of backtranslation, translation to the original language and adjustments, pre-test on ten patients, and test and retest with 30 patients after three weeks. Adult patients, with a solid tumour and literate with a minimum of four years schooling were included. For analysis and consistency we used the calculation of the Cronbach alpha coefficient and the Pearson linear correlation. Results The final questionnaire had some language and content adjustments compared to the original version in English. The correlation analysis of each item with the total score of the questionnaire showed coefficients above 0.99. The calculation of the Cronbach alpha coefficient was 0.9. The calculation of the Pearson linear correlation with the test and retest of the questionnaire was equal to 0.95. Conclusion The SNAP questionnaire translated into Brazilian Portuguese is adequately reliable and consistent. This instrument allows adequate access to spiritual needs and can help patient care. PMID:28101137

  14. Test-retest reliability of the Frankfurt Complaint Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Loas, Gwenolé; Yon, Valerie; Monestès, Jean Louis; Cuesta, Manuel J

    2011-04-01

    Long-term reliability of the Frankfurt Complaint Questionnaire (FCQ) was investigated in two follow-up studies of participants with psychosis using a test-retest method. In the first study (N = 56), the duration of the follow-up ranged from 6 months to 2 years; Spearman rho was .62 for the abridged (18 items) Spanish version of the questionnaire. In Study 2 (N = 21), in participants with stable schizophrenia, the follow-up ranged from 8 to 11 years; test-retest Spearman rho was .83 for the French version of the questionnaire. Subjective experiences could constitute, in psychosis-prone people, traits or markers of psychotic vulnerability.

  15. Validation of Gujarati Version of ABILOCO-Kids Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Diwan, Jasmin; Patel, Pankaj; Bansal, Ankita B.

    2015-01-01

    Background ABILOCO-Kids is a measure of locomotion ability for children with cerebral palsy (CP) aged 6 to 15 years & is available in English & French. Aim To validate the Gujarati version of ABILOCO-Kids questionnaire to be used in clinical research on Gujarati population. Materials and Methods ABILOCO-Kids questionnaire was translated into Gujarati from English using forward-backward-forward method. To ensure face & content validity of Gujarati version using group consensus method, each item was examined by group of experts having mean experience of 24.62 years in field of paediatric and paediatric physiotherapy. Each item was analysed for content, meaning, wording, format, ease of administration & scoring. Each item was scored by expert group as either accepted, rejected or accepted with modification. Procedure was continued until 80% of consensus for all items. Concurrent validity was examined on 55 children with Cerebral Palsy (6-15 years) of all Gross Motor Functional Classification System (GMFCS) level & all clinical types by correlating score of ABILOCO-Kids with Gross Motor Functional Measure & GMFCS. Result In phase 1 of validation, 16 items were accepted as it is; 22 items accepted with modification & 3 items went for phase 2 validation. For concurrent validity, highly significant positive correlation was found between score of ABILOCO-Kids & total GMFM (r=0.713, p<0.005) & highly significant negative correlation with GMFCS (r= -0.778, p<0.005). Conclusion Gujarati translated version of ABILOCO-Kids questionnaire has good face & content validity as well as concurrent validity which can be used to measure caregiver reported locomotion ability in children with CP. PMID:26557603

  16. Validation of Gujarati Version of ABILOCO-Kids Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Diwan, Shraddha; Diwan, Jasmin; Patel, Pankaj; Bansal, Ankita B

    2015-10-01

    ABILOCO-Kids is a measure of locomotion ability for children with cerebral palsy (CP) aged 6 to 15 years & is available in English & French. To validate the Gujarati version of ABILOCO-Kids questionnaire to be used in clinical research on Gujarati population. ABILOCO-Kids questionnaire was translated into Gujarati from English using forward-backward-forward method. To ensure face & content validity of Gujarati version using group consensus method, each item was examined by group of experts having mean experience of 24.62 years in field of paediatric and paediatric physiotherapy. Each item was analysed for content, meaning, wording, format, ease of administration & scoring. Each item was scored by expert group as either accepted, rejected or accepted with modification. Procedure was continued until 80% of consensus for all items. Concurrent validity was examined on 55 children with Cerebral Palsy (6-15 years) of all Gross Motor Functional Classification System (GMFCS) level & all clinical types by correlating score of ABILOCO-Kids with Gross Motor Functional Measure & GMFCS. In phase 1 of validation, 16 items were accepted as it is; 22 items accepted with modification & 3 items went for phase 2 validation. For concurrent validity, highly significant positive correlation was found between score of ABILOCO-Kids & total GMFM (r=0.713, p<0.005) & highly significant negative correlation with GMFCS (r= -0.778, p<0.005). Gujarati translated version of ABILOCO-Kids questionnaire has good face & content validity as well as concurrent validity which can be used to measure caregiver reported locomotion ability in children with CP.

  17. The OnyCOE-t™ questionnaire: responsiveness and clinical meaningfulness of a patient-reported outcomes questionnaire for toenail onychomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Lori P; Mathias, Susan D; Raut, Monika; Kianifard, Farid; Tavakkol, Amir

    2006-01-01

    Background This research was conducted to confirm the validity and reliability and to assess the responsiveness and clinical meaningfulness of the OnyCOE-t™, a questionnaire specifically designed to measure patient-reported outcomes (PRO) associated with toenail onychomycosis. Methods 504 patients with toenail onychomycosis randomized to receive 12 weeks of terbinafine 250 mg/day with or without target toenail debridement in the IRON-CLAD® trial completed the OnyCOE-t™ at baseline, weeks 6, 12, 24, and 48. The OnyCOE-t™ is composed of 6 multi-item scales and 1 single-item scale. These include a 7-item Toenail Symptom assessment, which comprises both Symptom Frequency and Symptom Bothersomeness scales; an 8-item Appearance Problems scale; a 7-item Physical Activities Problems scale; a 1-item Overall Problem scale; a 7-item Stigma scale; and a 3-item Treatment Satisfaction scale. In total, 33 toenail onychomycosis-specific items are included in the OnyCOE-t™. Clinical data, in particular the percent clearing of mycotic involvement in the target toenail, and OnyCOE-t™ responses were used to evaluate the questionnaire's reliability, validity, responsiveness, and the minimally clinical important difference (MCID). Results The OnyCOE-t™ was shown to be reliable and valid. Construct validity and known groups validity were acceptable. Internal consistency reliability of multi-item scales was demonstrated by Cronbach's alpha > .84. Responsiveness was good, with the Treatment Satisfaction, Symptom Frequency, Overall Problem, and Appearance Problem scales demonstrating the most responsiveness (Guyatt's statistic of 1.72, 1.31, 1.13, and 1.11, respectively). MCID was evaluated for three different clinical measures, and indicated that approximately an 8.5-point change (on a 0 to 100 scale) was clinically meaningful based on a 25% improvement in target nail clearing. Conclusion The OnyCOE-t™ questionnaire is a unique, toenail-specific PRO questionnaire that can be

  18. The development and validation of the Bronchiectasis Health Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Spinou, Arietta; Siegert, Richard J; Guan, Wei-Jie; Patel, Amit S; Gosker, Harry R; Lee, Kai K; Elston, Caroline; Loebinger, Michael R; Wilson, Robert; Garrod, Rachel; Birring, Surinder S

    2017-05-01

    Health-related quality of life or health status is significantly impaired in bronchiectasis. There is a paucity of brief, simple-to-use, disease-specific health status measures. The aim of this study was to develop and validate the Bronchiectasis Health Questionnaire (BHQ), a new health status measure that is brief and generates a single overall score.Patients with bronchiectasis were recruited from two outpatient clinics, during a clinically stable stage. The development of the questionnaire followed three phases: item generation and item reduction using Rasch analysis, validation, and repeatability testing. The BHQ was translated into 11 languages using standardised methodology.206 patients with bronchiectasis completed a preliminary 65-item questionnaire. 55 items were removed due to redundancy or poor fit to the Rasch model. The final version of the BHQ consisted of 10 items. Internal consistency was good (Cronbach's α=0.85). Convergent validity of the BHQ with the St George's Respiratory Questionnaire was high (r= -0.82; p<0.001) and moderate with lung function (forced expiratory volume in 1 s % predicted r= -0.27; p=0.001). There was a significant association between BHQ scores and number of exacerbations of bronchiectasis in the last 12 months (p<0.001), hospital admissions (p=0.001) and computed tomography scan bronchiectasis pulmonary lobe counts (p<0.001). BHQ scores were significantly worse in patients with sputum bacterial colonisation versus no colonisation (p=0.048). The BHQ was highly repeatable after 2 weeks (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.89).The BHQ is a brief, valid and repeatable, self-completed health status questionnaire for bronchiectasis that generates a single total score. It can be used in the clinic to assess bronchiectasis from the patient's perspective. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  19. Binding agent for molding ceramic items

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beshentsev, B. D.; Vityuk, N. P.; Volkov, A. V.; Yevdokimov, A. I.; Novikov, M. N.; Piskunov, Y. G.; Pobortsev, E. P.; Sadovnichaya, L. M.

    1983-01-01

    The invention refers to the fabrication of ceramic items by the molding method. It can be used to produce items of complicated configuration, in particular composition of binding agent for electroceramic items.

  20. Dimensionality of the Latent Structure and Item Selection via Latent Class Multidimensional IRT Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartolucci, F.; Montanari, G. E.; Pandolfi, S.

    2012-01-01

    With reference to a questionnaire aimed at assessing the performance of Italian nursing homes on the basis of the health conditions of their patients, we investigate two relevant issues: dimensionality of the latent structure and discriminating power of the items composing the questionnaire. The approach is based on a multidimensional item…

  1. Dimensionality of the Latent Structure and Item Selection via Latent Class Multidimensional IRT Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartolucci, F.; Montanari, G. E.; Pandolfi, S.

    2012-01-01

    With reference to a questionnaire aimed at assessing the performance of Italian nursing homes on the basis of the health conditions of their patients, we investigate two relevant issues: dimensionality of the latent structure and discriminating power of the items composing the questionnaire. The approach is based on a multidimensional item…

  2. The aggression questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Buss, A H; Perry, M

    1992-09-01

    A new questionnaire on aggression was constructed. Replicated factor analyses yielded 4 scales: Physical Aggression, Verbal Aggression, Anger, and Hostility. Correlational analysis revealed that anger is the bridge between both physical and verbal aggression and hostility. The scales showed internal consistency and stability over time. Men scored slightly higher on Verbal Aggression and Hostility and much higher on Physical Aggression. There was no sex difference for Anger. The various scales correlated differently with various personality traits. Scale scores correlated with peer nominations of the various kinds of aggression. These findings suggest the need to assess not only overall aggression but also its individual components.

  3. Conversion of Questionnaire Data

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Danny H; Elwood Jr, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    During the survey, respondents are asked to provide qualitative answers (well, adequate, needs improvement) on how well material control and accountability (MC&A) functions are being performed. These responses can be used to develop failure probabilities for basic events performed during routine operation of the MC&A systems. The failure frequencies for individual events may be used to estimate total system effectiveness using a fault tree in a probabilistic risk analysis (PRA). Numeric risk values are required for the PRA fault tree calculations that are performed to evaluate system effectiveness. So, the performance ratings in the questionnaire must be converted to relative risk values for all of the basic MC&A tasks performed in the facility. If a specific material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) task is being performed at the 'perfect' level, the task is considered to have a near zero risk of failure. If the task is performed at a less than perfect level, the deficiency in performance represents some risk of failure for the event. As the degree of deficiency in performance increases, the risk of failure increases. If a task that should be performed is not being performed, that task is in a state of failure. The failure probabilities of all basic events contribute to the total system risk. Conversion of questionnaire MPC&A system performance data to numeric values is a separate function from the process of completing the questionnaire. When specific questions in the questionnaire are answered, the focus is on correctly assessing and reporting, in an adjectival manner, the actual performance of the related MC&A function. Prior to conversion, consideration should not be given to the numeric value that will be assigned during the conversion process. In the conversion process, adjectival responses to questions on system performance are quantified based on a log normal scale typically used in human error analysis (see A.D. Swain and H.E. Guttmann

  4. The Toronto Empathy Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Spreng, R. Nathan; McKinnon, Margaret C.; Mar, Raymond A.; Levine, Brian

    2008-01-01

    In order to formulate a parsimonious tool to assess empathy, we used factor analysis on a combination of self-report measures to examine consensus and developed a brief self-report measure of this common factor. The Toronto Empathy Questionnaire (TEQ) represents empathy as a primarily emotional process. In three studies, the TEQ demonstrated strong convergent validity, correlating positively with behavioral measures of social decoding, self-report measures of empathy, and negatively with a measure of Autism symptomatology. Moreover, it exhibited good internal consistency and high test-retest reliability. The TEQ is a brief, reliable, and valid instrument for the assessment of empathy. PMID:19085285

  5. Syntax for calculation of discounting indices from the monetary choice questionnaire and probability discounting questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Gray, Joshua C; Amlung, Michael T; Palmer, Abraham A; MacKillop, James

    2016-09-01

    The 27-item Monetary Choice Questionnaire (MCQ; Kirby, Petry, & Bickel, 1999) and 30-item Probability Discounting Questionnaire (PDQ; Madden, Petry, & Johnson, 2009) are widely used, validated measures of preferences for immediate versus delayed rewards and guaranteed versus risky rewards, respectively. The MCQ measures delayed discounting by asking individuals to choose between rewards available immediately and larger rewards available after a delay. The PDQ measures probability discounting by asking individuals to choose between guaranteed rewards and a chance at winning larger rewards. Numerous studies have implicated these measures in addiction and other health behaviors. Unlike typical self-report measures, the MCQ and PDQ generate inferred hyperbolic temporal and probability discounting functions by comparing choice preferences to arrays of functions to which the individual items are preconfigured. This article provides R and SPSS syntax for processing the MCQ and PDQ. Specifically, for the MCQ, the syntax generates k values, consistency of the inferred k, and immediate choice ratios; for the PDQ, the syntax generates h indices, consistency of the inferred h, and risky choice ratios. The syntax is intended to increase the accessibility of these measures, expedite the data processing, and reduce risk for error.

  6. SYNTAX FOR CALCULATION OF DISCOUNTING INDICES FROM THE MONETARY CHOICE QUESTIONNAIRE AND PROBABILITY DISCOUNTING QUESTIONNAIRE

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Joshua C.; Amlung, Michael T.; Palmer, Abraham A.; MacKillop, James

    2016-01-01

    The 27-item Monetary Choice Questionnaire (MCQ; Kirby, Petry, & Bickel, 1999) and 30-item Probability Discounting Questionnaire (PDQ; Madden, Petry, & Johnson, 2009) are widely used, validated measures of preferences for immediate versus delayed rewards and guaranteed versus risky rewards, respectively. The MCQ measures delayed discounting by asking individuals to choose between rewards available immediately and larger rewards available after a delay. The PDQ measures probability discounting by asking individuals to choose between guaranteed rewards and a chance at winning larger rewards. Numerous studies have implicated these measures in addiction and other health behaviors. Unlike typical self-report measures, the MCQ and PDQ generate inferred hyperbolic temporal and probability discounting functions by comparing choice preferences to arrays of functions to which the individual items are preconfigured. This article provides R and SPSS syntax for processing the MCQ and PDQ. Specifically, for the MCQ, the syntax generates k values, consistency of the inferred k, and immediate choice ratios; for the PDQ, the syntax generates h indices, consistency of the inferred h, and risky choice ratios. The syntax is intended to increase the accessibility of these measures, expedite the data processing, and reduce risk for error. PMID:27644448

  7. [A questionnaire on Satisfaction from psychiatric Training].

    PubMed

    Giaglis, G; Angelidis, G

    2008-01-01

    In the context of the psychiatric reform, as well as of the lifelong education, a Questionnaire for the evaluation of "Satisfaction from Psychiatric Training" has been constructed. It consists of 4 subscales (Satisfaction from Materials, Trainers, Program Organization, and General Satisfaction) and a total of 19 closed-ended items, evaluated in 5-point Likert scales, and an open-ended question for general remarks. One hundred and seventy six subjects, who participated in 8 consecutive training programs in psychiatry, organized by the Vocational Training Center of the Psychiatric Hospital of Petra Olympus, Greece, completed the questionnaire anonymously. The sample was divided into two groups: group A (N=112, from the first 5 programs), for the evaluation of the questionnaire's properties, and group B (N=65, from the next 3 programs) for the validation of the results. Principal component analysis in group A showed the existence of 4 factors corresponding to the 4 subscales and accounted for 67.4% of the questionnaire's variability, which were also confirmed in group B. Internal consistency was high in both groups for the overall questionnaire (Cronbach α>0.92) and for each subscale. Test-retest reliability of every subscale was also high (Pearson's r>0.90). The answers in the open-ended remark question were graded by two independent judges in a 5-point Likert scale, in relation to the satisfaction they revealed, which was highly correlated with all questionnaire subscales but one. For the total sample, the questionnaire subscales showed moderately high correlation with one another (r from 0.629 to 0.706) and even higher with the overall score (from 0.820 to 0.892). The questionnaire's sensitivity was demonstrated by the statistically significant differences observed in the satisfaction experienced from the various programs. None of the subscales was significantly correlated with age (r<0.134), with years in work (r<0.059) or was differentiated by gender. In general

  8. Lower-fat menu items in restaurants satisfy customers.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, M P; Chapman, G E; Barr, S I

    1997-05-01

    To evaluate a restaurant-based nutrition program by measuring customer satisfaction with lower-fat menu items and assessing patrons' reactions to the program. Questionnaires to assess satisfaction with menu items were administered to patrons in eight of the nine restaurants that volunteered to participate in the nutrition program. One patron from each participating restaurant was randomly selected for a semistructured interview about nutrition programming in restaurants. Persons dining in eight participating restaurants over a 1-week period (n = 686). Independent samples t tests were used to compare respondents' satisfaction with lower-fat and regular menu items. Two-way analysis of variance tests were completed using overall satisfaction as the dependent variable and menu-item classification (ie, lower fat or regular) and one of eight other menu item and respondent characteristics as independent variables. Qualitative methods were used to analyze interview transcripts. Of 1,127 menu items rated for satisfaction, 205 were lower fat, 878 were regular, and 44 were of unknown classification. Customers were significantly more satisfied with lower-fat than with regular menu items (P < .001). Overall satisfaction did not vary by any of the other independent variables. Interview results indicate the importance of restaurant during as an indulgent experience. High satisfaction with lower-fat menu items suggests that customers will support restaurant providing such choices. Dietitians can use these findings to encourage restaurateurs to include lower-fat choices on their menus, and to assure clients that their expectations of being indulged are not incompatible with these choices.

  9. Development and Initial Test of the Safety Behaviors in Test Anxiety Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Ross W; Valentiner, David P; Holzman, Jacob B

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of the current studies is to identify safety behavior dimensions relevant to test anxiety, to develop a questionnaire to assess those dimensions, and to examine the validity of that questionnaire. Items were generated from interviews with college students ( N = 24). Another sample ( N = 301) completed an initial 33-item measure. Another sample ( N = 151) completed the final 19-item version the Safety Behaviors in Test Anxiety Questionnaire and provided access to their academic records. Interviews and expert evaluations were used to select items for the initial pool. An examination of item distributions and exploratory factor analysis were used to identify dimensions and reduce the item pool. Confirmatory factor analyses were used to validate the factorial structure. Correlational analyses were used to examine criterion validity of the final measure. The Safety Behaviors in Test Anxiety Questionnaire consists of a 9-item "Superstitious Behaviors" scale and a 10-item "Reassurance Seeking." The measure shows good content validity, factorial validity, internal consistency, and convergent and discriminant validity. Only the Reassurance Seeking scale showed good incremental criterion validity. Overall, these findings suggest that reassurance seeking may be a neglected target for interventions that might increase performance on high stakes tests.

  10. Development and Validation of the Groupwork Skills Questionnaire (GSQ) for Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cumming, Jennifer; Woodcock, Charlotte; Cooley, Sam J.; Holland, Mark J. G.; Burns, Victoria E.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop and provide psychometric evidence in support of the groupwork skills questionnaire (GSQ) for measuring task and interpersonal groupwork skills. A 46-item version of the GSQ was initially completed by 672 university students. The number of items was reduced to 15 following exploratory factor analyses, and…

  11. Does participation in an intervention affect responses on self-reported questionnaires?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There has been some concern that participation in an intervention and exposure to a measurement instrument can change participants' interpretation of the items on a self-report questionnaire, thereby distorting subsequent responses and biasing results. Differential item functioning (DIF) analysis us...

  12. Development of Sheveland Vividness of Imagery Questionnaire in Grades 3-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheveland, Dawn E.

    A study investigated the reliability and validity of a measure of imagery vividness appropriate for young children. A questionnaire instrument consisting of 21 Likert-type items was developed and administered to 380 third- through sixth-grade children in a lower-middle to upper-middle socioeconomic population in southern California. Items in the…

  13. Development and Validation of the Groupwork Skills Questionnaire (GSQ) for Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cumming, Jennifer; Woodcock, Charlotte; Cooley, Sam J.; Holland, Mark J. G.; Burns, Victoria E.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop and provide psychometric evidence in support of the groupwork skills questionnaire (GSQ) for measuring task and interpersonal groupwork skills. A 46-item version of the GSQ was initially completed by 672 university students. The number of items was reduced to 15 following exploratory factor analyses, and…

  14. A General Factor-Analytic Procedure for Assessing Response Bias in Questionnaire Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrando, Pere J.; Lorenzo-Seva, Urbano; Chico, Eliseo

    2009-01-01

    This article proposes procedures for simultaneously assessing and controlling acquiescence and social desirability in questionnaire items. The procedures are based on a semi-restricted factor-analytic tridimensional model, and can be used with binary, graded-response, or more continuous items. We discuss procedures for fitting the model (item…

  15. The Early Maladaptive Schema Questionnaire-Short Form: A Construct Validity Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaser, Brian A.; Campbell, Linda F.; Calhoun, Georgia B.; Bates, Jeffrey M.; Petrocelli, John V.

    2002-01-01

    N.B. Schmidt, T.E. Joiner, J.E. Young, and M.J. Telch (1995) provided preliminary construct validity for scores from J.E. Young's (1990) 205-item Early Maladaptive Schema Questionnaire. The present study extends this work by examining the construct validity of scores from the shorter 75-item version of this instrument-the Early Maladaptive Schema…

  16. A General Factor-Analytic Procedure for Assessing Response Bias in Questionnaire Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrando, Pere J.; Lorenzo-Seva, Urbano; Chico, Eliseo

    2009-01-01

    This article proposes procedures for simultaneously assessing and controlling acquiescence and social desirability in questionnaire items. The procedures are based on a semi-restricted factor-analytic tridimensional model, and can be used with binary, graded-response, or more continuous items. We discuss procedures for fitting the model (item…

  17. [Questionnaire for the mobbing risk: CDL2.0].

    PubMed

    Gilioli, R; Cassitto, M G; Campanini, P; Punzi, S; Consonni, D; Rengo, C; Fattorini, E; Foá, V

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study is to develop and validate a questionnaire able to evaluate the risk of mobbing at the workplace. A multiple-choice questionnaire has been developed which contains, among the different items, only one revealing a mobbing situation. The questionnaire has been administered to two groups (group A--243 subjects in a mobbing situation and group B--63 subjects without exposure to mobbing) and the differences in the scores obtained have been analysed. The questionnaire has proved to be valid and reliable. The results show that the presence of five mobbing actions is sufficient to define the workplace situation as potentially at risk for mobbing. The study reveals some limits in the selection of the two samples thus needing some adjustment. However, the questionnaire, also in the present form, can be considered a tool able to detect the mobbing situations.

  18. Validation of a persian version of motorcycle rider behavior questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Motevalian, Seyed Abbas; Asadi-Lari, Mohsen; Rahimi, Habibollah; Eftekhar, Mehrdad

    2011-01-01

    In Iran, road traffic injuries are the first cause of burden of disease and motorcyclists are the most vulnerable road users. Elliot and colleagues developed the "Motorcycle Rider Behavior Questionnaire" (MRBQ), on the basis of Reason's "Driver Behavior Questionnaire" (DBQ) in 2007. The purpose of this study was to assess the validity and reliability of a Persian version of MRBQ. The 43-item MRBQ was adapted to Persian according to translation-back translation method. The questionnaire was significantly revised after assessment of content validity. In the revised version, 10 items of original MRBQ were deleted and 15 new items were added. The revised MRBQ was used in a survey of 518 motorcyclists. To assess the construct validity of MRBQ, we used Buss-Perry Aggression questionnaire concurrently on all of the subjects. After three weeks, we carried out the retest study on 119 out of 518 subjects. The mean age of the subjects was 32.5 years (SD=8.8). All of the participants were male with mean of 9.3 years of motorcycle riding experience (SD=7.3). Principal Components Analysis (PCA) showed six subscales: "Speed Violations", "Traffic Errors", "Safety Violations", "Traffic Violations", "Stunts" and "Control Errors", which accounted for 36.44% of total variance together. For each of these subscales, Cronbach's Alpha was between 0.79 to 0.91. Intraclass Correlation Coefficient for six subscales and total questionnaire were from 0.73 to 0.91. There were significant correlations between MRBQ subscales and subscales of Buss-Perry aggression questionnaire. The results indicated that the 48-item Persian version of MRBQ is a suitable measure for studying motorcyclists' behavior.

  19. Validation of a Questionnaire to Screen for Shift Work Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Barger, Laura K.; Ogeil, Rowan P.; Drake, Christopher L.; O'Brien, Conor S.; Ng, Kim T.; Rajaratnam, Shantha M. W.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objective: At least 15% of the full-time work force is shift workers. Working during the overnight hours, early morning start times, and variable or rotating schedules present a challenge to the circadian system, and these shifts are associated with adverse health and safety consequences. Shift work disorder (SWD), a primary (circadian rhythm) sleep disorder indicated by excessive daytime sleepiness and/or insomnia associated with a shiftwork schedule, is under-recognized by primary care physicians. We sought to develop and validate a questionnaire to screen for high risk of SWD in a shift working population. Design: Shift workers completed a 26-item questionnaire and were evaluated by a sleep specialist (physician) who diagnosed them as either positive or negative for SWD. The physician assessment of SWD was guided by a flow chart that operationalized the ICSD-2 criteria for SWD. Setting: 18 sleep clinics in the USA. Patients or Participants: 311 shift workers. Interventions: Not applicable. Measurements and Results: Responses to the items in the questionnaire were entered into a series of discrimination function analyses to determine the diagnostic value of the items and the fewest number of questions with the best predictive value. The function was then cross-validated. A final 4-item questionnaire has 89% positive predictive value and 62% negative predictive value (sensitivity = 0.74; specificity = 0.82). Conclusions: This Shiftwork Disorder Screening Questionnaire may be appropriate for use in primary care settings to aid in the diagnosis of SWD. Citation: Barger LK; Ogeil RP; Drake CL; O'Brien CS; Ng KT; Rajaratnam SMW. Validation of a questionnaire to screen for shift work disorder. SLEEP 2012;35(12):1693–1703. PMID:23204612

  20. A Study of the Homogeneity of Items Produced From Item Forms Across Different Taxonomic Levels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Margaret B.; Argo, Jana K.

    This study determined whether item forms ( rules for constructing items related to a domain or set of tasks) would enable naive item writers to generate multiple-choice items at three taxonomic levels--knowledge, comprehension, and application. Students wrote 120 multiple-choice items from 20 item forms, corresponding to educational objectives…

  1. A Study of the Homogeneity of Items Produced From Item Forms Across Different Taxonomic Levels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Margaret B.; Argo, Jana K.

    This study determined whether item forms ( rules for constructing items related to a domain or set of tasks) would enable naive item writers to generate multiple-choice items at three taxonomic levels--knowledge, comprehension, and application. Students wrote 120 multiple-choice items from 20 item forms, corresponding to educational objectives…

  2. Thermal response based item identification.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M. K.; Hypes, P. A.; Bracken, D. S.

    2001-01-01

    One of the most difficult problems in NDA of nuclear materials is identifying the chemical form of the nuclear material and the surrounding matrix. Recent work analyzing the calorimeter response of sources embedded in a variety of matrices has led to a possible solution to this problem. The wide range of thermal time constants exhibited by typical matrix materials lends itself to permitting the differentiation between materials, based on time constants extracted from the measured response. Potential applications include simple item identification, item fingerprinting as part of shipper-receiver measurements, and distinguishing between Pu metal and Pu oxide as required under certain proposed attribute measurements. The results of applying this technique to a variety of items will be presented and discussed.

  3. Caries Risk Assessment Item Importance

    PubMed Central

    Chaffee, B.W.; Featherstone, J.D.B.; Gansky, S.A.; Cheng, J.; Zhan, L.

    2016-01-01

    Caries risk assessment (CRA) is widely recommended for dental caries management. Little is known regarding how practitioners use individual CRA items to determine risk and which individual items independently predict clinical outcomes in children younger than 6 y. The objective of this study was to assess the relative importance of pediatric CRA items in dental providers’ decision making regarding patient risk and in association with clinically evident caries, cross-sectionally and longitudinally. CRA information was abstracted retrospectively from electronic patient records of children initially aged 6 to 72 mo at a university pediatric dentistry clinic (n = 3,810 baseline; n = 1,315 with follow-up). The 17-item CRA form included caries risk indicators, caries protective items, and clinical indicators. Conditional random forests classification trees were implemented to identify and assign variable importance to CRA items independently associated with baseline high-risk designation, baseline evident tooth decay, and follow-up evident decay. Thirteen individual CRA items, including all clinical indicators and all but 1 risk indicator, were independently and statistically significantly associated with student/resident providers’ caries risk designation. Provider-assigned baseline risk category was strongly associated with follow-up decay, which increased from low (20.4%) to moderate (30.6%) to high/extreme risk patients (68.7%). Of baseline CRA items, before adjustment, 12 were associated with baseline decay and 7 with decay at follow-up; however, in the conditional random forests models, only the clinical indicators (evident decay, dental plaque, and recent restoration placement) and 1 risk indicator (frequent snacking) were independently and statistically significantly associated with future disease, for which baseline evident decay was the strongest predictor. In this predominantly high-risk population under caries-preventive care, more individual CRA items

  4. Multidimensional Item Response Theory Parameter Estimation with Nonsimple Structure Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finch, Holmes

    2011-01-01

    Estimation of multidimensional item response theory (MIRT) model parameters can be carried out using the normal ogive with unweighted least squares estimation with the normal-ogive harmonic analysis robust method (NOHARM) software. Previous simulation research has demonstrated that this approach does yield accurate and efficient estimates of item…

  5. Evaluating the Magnitude of Differential Item Functioning in Polytomous Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwick, Rebecca; Thayer, Dorothy T.

    1996-01-01

    Two possible standard error formulas for the polytomous differential item functioning index proposed by N. J. Dorans and A. P. Schmitt (1991) were derived. These standard errors, and associated hypothesis-testing procedures, were evaluated through simulated data. The standard error that performed better is based on N. Mantel's (1963)…

  6. Australian Item Bank Program: Social Science Item Bank.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Council for Educational Research, Hawthorn.

    After vigorous review, editing, and trial testing, this item bank was compiled to help secondary school teachers construct objective tests in the social sciences. Anthropology, economics, ethnic and cultural studies, geography, history, legal studies, politics, and sociology are among the topics represented. The bank consists of multiple choice…

  7. Multidimensional Item Response Theory Parameter Estimation with Nonsimple Structure Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finch, Holmes

    2011-01-01

    Estimation of multidimensional item response theory (MIRT) model parameters can be carried out using the normal ogive with unweighted least squares estimation with the normal-ogive harmonic analysis robust method (NOHARM) software. Previous simulation research has demonstrated that this approach does yield accurate and efficient estimates of item…

  8. Development of a questionnaire to assess university students’ intentions to use behavioral alcohol reduction strategies

    PubMed Central

    Bonar, Erin E.; Hoffmann, Erica; Rosenberg, Harold; Kryszak, Elizabeth; Young, Kathleen M.; Ashrafioun, Lisham; Kraus, Shane W.; Bannon, Erin E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the psychometric properties of a new self-report questionnaire designed to assess college students’ intentions to employ 31 specific alcohol-reduction strategies. Method Students attending a large public university were recruited to complete alcohol-reduction, drinking history, and personality questionnaires online. Results Based on item-total correlations and principal components analysis, we eliminated three items and calculated average intention ratings across the remaining 28 items. The resulting scale had appropriate unidimensionality and excellent internal consistency. Correlations of intention questionnaire scores with measures of drinking history, alcohol outcome expectancies, sensation seeking, and impression management provided some support for criterion and discriminant validity of the questionnaire. Conclusion This questionnaire could be employed as an outcome measure to evaluate prevention programs and as a clinical tool to identify clients who have little intention to employ drinking reduction strategies in heavy drinking situations. PMID:22686362

  9. Development and Validation of the Diabetes Adolescent Problem Solving Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Mulvaney, Shelagh A.; Jaser, Sarah S.; Rothman, Russell L.; Russell, William; Pittel, Eric J.; Lybarger, Cindy; Wallston, Kenneth A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Problem solving is a critical diabetes self-management skill. Because of a lack of clinically feasible measures, our aim was to develop and validate a self-report self-management problem solving questionnaire for adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Methods A multidisciplinary team of diabetes experts generated questionnaire items that addressed diabetes self-management problem solving. Iterative feedback from parents and adolescents resulted in 27 items. Adolescents from two studies (N=156) aged 13–17 were recruited through a pediatric diabetes clinic and completed measures through an online survey. Glycemic control was measured by HbA1c recorded in the medical record. Results Empirical elimination of items using Principal Components Analyses resulted in a 13-item unidimensional measure, the Diabetes Adolescent Problem Solving Questionnaire (DAPSQ) that explained 57% of the variance. The DAPSQ demonstrated internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.92) and was correlated with diabetes self-management (r=0.53, p<.001), self-efficacy (r=0.54, p<.001), and glycemic control (r= −0.24, p<.01). Conclusion The DAPSQ is a brief instrument for assessment of diabetes self-management problem solving in youth with T1D associated with better self-management behaviors and glycemic control. Practice Implications The DAPSQ is a clinically feasible self-report measure that can provide valuable information regarding level of self-management problem solving and guide patient education. PMID:25063715

  10. Derivation and assessment of a hypermasculine values questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Archer, John

    2010-09-01

    Four studies are reported on the derivation and assessment of a hypermasculinity scale. In Study 1, a questionnaire measure of hypermasculine values was derived from an initial 122 items, rated on a seven-point scale by 600 men from eight categories, based on occupation or sport interest. Factor analysis and item reduction produced 26- and 16- item scales (Hypermasculine Values Questionnaire, HVQ and Short Hypermasculine Values Questionnaire) with high internal consistencies. There were substantial differences between categories, consistent with predictions based on their gender-stereotypic connotations. Study 2 involved the scales being administered to another similarly composed sample: again high internal consistency and unidimensionality (in a confirmatory factor analysis) were found, and a similar association with category membership. Test-retest reliability was high. In Study 3, the concurrent and discriminative validity of the HVQ was studied, by comparing it with an existing measure of hypermasculinity, male role norms, attitudes to women's rights, gender-related traits, and trait aggression. Associations were found with other gender scales, and there was a moderate association with trait physical aggression. The range of associations reflected the items on the scale, which involve toughness, the need to avoid femininity, and control of women's sexuality, themes familiar from ethnographic accounts of masculinity. Study 4 showed that the HVQ was associated with hostile but not benevolent sexism, and replicated its association with trait aggression.

  11. [Development of a professional social responsibility questionnaire for physicians].

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Débora F; Pérez, Cristhian V; Navarro, Gracia S

    2014-01-01

    Professional Social Responsibility is now imperative for the practice of medicine. However, there are no instruments to assess it among physicians. To construct and evaluate the factorial structure and reliability of a questionnaire designed to measure socially responsible behavior in physicians. The Questionnaire on Medical Socially Responsible Behavior, consisting of 34 items, was constructed. It was applied to 284 physicians and medical students. After eliminating respondents who omitted questions, a valid sample of 214 individuals aged 23 to 67 years (51.4% males) was obtained. We assessed the factorial structure, reliability, discriminative ability of the items and correlation between factors. Exploratory factorial analysis, conducted using the principal axis method, identified the presence of three factors and considered 30 items. The reliability of the factors, assessed using Cronbach's alpha, ranged from 0.73 to 0.89. Only one item had a low correlation of 0.3. Correlations between the three factors were direct and high. The developed questionnaire presents a definite factorial structure, with internally consistent and correlated factors and with adequate psychometric properties.

  12. Development and validation of the diabetes adolescent problem solving questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Mulvaney, Shelagh A; Jaser, Sarah S; Rothman, Russell L; Russell, William E; Pittel, Eric J; Lybarger, Cindy; Wallston, Kenneth A

    2014-10-01

    Problem solving is a critical diabetes self-management skill. Because of a lack of clinically feasible measures, our aim was to develop and validate a self-report self-management problem solving questionnaire for adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D). A multidisciplinary team of diabetes experts generated questionnaire items that addressed diabetes self-management problem solving. Iterative feedback from parents and adolescents resulted in 27 items. Adolescents from two studies (N=156) aged 13-17 were recruited through a pediatric diabetes clinic and completed measures through an online survey. Glycemic control was measured by HbA1c recorded in the medical record. Empirical elimination of items using principal components analyses resulted in a 13-item unidimensional measure, the diabetes adolescent problem solving questionnaire (DAPSQ) that explained 56% of the variance. The DAPSQ demonstrated internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha=0.92) and was correlated with diabetes self-management (r=0.53, p<.001), self-efficacy (r=0.54, p<.001), and glycemic control (r=-0.24, p<.01). The DAPSQ is a brief instrument for assessment of diabetes self-management problem solving in youth with T1D and is associated with better self-management behaviors and glycemic control. The DAPSQ is a clinically feasible self-report measure that can provide valuable information regarding level of self-management problem solving and guide patient education. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Reliability and validity of communication skills questionnaire (CSQ).

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Megumi; Tanaka, Katsutoshi; Miyaoka, Hitoshi

    2006-04-01

    A new and easy evaluation method of communication skills has been developed using the Communication Skills Questionnaire (CSQ), which can be self-administered or administered by family members and medical staff. The reliability and validity of this CSQ were evaluated. Eighty-seven patients with mental disorders and 100 normal controls participated in a self-rating evaluation of the CSQ, and 55 family members and four medical personnel also participated in objective rating. The CSQ contained 29 items and these items were divided into three categories: cooperative skills (17 items), assertive skills (six items) and general communication skills (six items, mainly non-verbal skills). Internal consistencies of all groups were between 0.91 and 0.97. Test-retest reliability values for patients, family members and medical staff were between 0.90 and 0.95. Interrater reliability of medical staff was 0.73. The total scores had a moderate positive correlation with Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) score and doctor's impression of communication skill evaluated on a 10-point scale. The patient group had a lower CSQ score than that of controls and the score differences between controls and patients with schizophrenia, mood disorders or eating disorders were statistically significant. This questionnaire is a good psychometric method of evaluating the communication skills of patients.

  14. Instrument validation process: a case study using the Paediatric Pain Knowledge and Attitudes Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Peirce, Deborah; Brown, Janie; Corkish, Victoria; Lane, Marguerite; Wilson, Sally

    2016-06-01

    To compare two methods of calculating interrater agreement while determining content validity of the Paediatric Pain Knowledge and Attitudes Questionnaire for use with Australian nurses. Paediatric pain assessment and management documentation was found to be suboptimal revealing a need to assess paediatric nurses' knowledge and attitude to pain. The Paediatric Pain Knowledge and Attitudes Questionnaire was selected as it had been reported as valid and reliable in the United Kingdom with student nurses. The questionnaire required content validity determination prior to use in the Australian context. A two phase process of expert review. Ten paediatric nurses completed a relevancy rating of all 68 questionnaire items. In phase two, five pain experts reviewed the items of the questionnaire that scored an unacceptable item level content validity. Item and scale level content validity indices and intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated. In phase one, 31 items received an item level content validity index <0·78 and the scale level content validity index average was 0·80 which were below levels required for acceptable validity. The intraclass correlation coefficient was 0·47. In phase two, 10 items were amended and four items deleted. The revised questionnaire provided a scale level content validity index average >0·90 and an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0·94 demonstrating excellent agreement between raters therefore acceptable content validity. Equivalent outcomes were achieved using the content validity index and the intraclass correlation coefficient. To assess content validity the content validity index has the advantage of providing an item level score and is a simple calculation. The intraclass correlation coefficient requires statistical knowledge, or support, and has the advantage of accounting for the possibility of chance agreement. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. The role of questionnaires in the assessment of asthma control.

    PubMed

    Przybyszowski, Marek; Bochenek, Grażyna

    2015-01-01

    The achievement and the maintenance of asthma control is currently considered the main goal of asthma treatment. Recent guidelines recommend regular assessment of asthma control and indicate questionnaires as important tools that can facilitate its evaluation. Questionnaires relate to GINA or NAEPP guidelines. Questionnaires constitute complex numerical or categorical scales and consist of several to over a dozen questions relating to the patient's symptoms of asthma, limitations in daily activities and usage of rescue medications within a period of time. Each questionnaire is characterized by the features that affect its reliability and usefulness. In the following paper we discuss most of the questionnaires which assess asthma control. We focus on the items they include and present the results of studies that prove the effectiveness of individual questionnaires in assessment of asthma control. Attention was drawn to the patient groups to which the questionnaires are addressed. We list the features of the questionnaire which should be considered before choosing a test, so that it satisfies both the doctor's and the patient's needs. The role of questionnaires as the easy-to-use tools is growing steadily. Unfortunately, not all are available in Polish language. Conducting appropriate validation studies may allow to use many of them in Polish conditions.

  16. Filtering for Medical News Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watters, Carolyn; Zheng, Wanhong; Milios, Evangelos

    2002-01-01

    Describes recent work to provide a filtering service for readers interested in medically related news articles from online news sources. The first task is to filter out nonmedical news items; the remaining articles are then assigned MeSH headings for context and then further categorized by intended audience level. (Author/LRW)

  17. Paradoxical Results and Item Bundles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooker, Giles; Finkelman, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Hooker, Finkelman, and Schwartzman ("Psychometrika," 2009, in press) defined a paradoxical result as the attainment of a higher test score by changing answers from correct to incorrect and demonstrated that such results are unavoidable for maximum likelihood estimates in multidimensional item response theory. The potential for these results to…

  18. Paradoxical Results and Item Bundles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooker, Giles; Finkelman, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Hooker, Finkelman, and Schwartzman ("Psychometrika," 2009, in press) defined a paradoxical result as the attainment of a higher test score by changing answers from correct to incorrect and demonstrated that such results are unavoidable for maximum likelihood estimates in multidimensional item response theory. The potential for these results to…

  19. Likert and Guttman scaling of visual function rating scale questionnaires.

    PubMed

    Massof, Robert W

    2004-12-01

    To test the assumptions underlying Likert scoring of visual function questionnaires. Questionnaires were administered to 284 low-vision subjects by telephone. Each subject was administered two of four questionnaires: ADVS, NEI VFQ-25 plus supplement, expanded VAQ, and VF-14. Z-scores for cumulative frequency of using each rating category across subjects are not linear with rating category rank and items are not the same difficulty for any of the questionnaires. Guttmann coefficients of reproducibility ranged from 57% for the ADVS to 51% for the NEI VFQ-25. Cronbach alphas ranged from 0.92 for the VF-14 to 0.96 for the NEI VFQ; however, inter-item consistency coefficients ranged from 0.24 for the VAQ to 0.45 for the NEI VFQ. Likert scores were significantly correlated between instruments, ranging from 0.66 for NEI VFQ vs ADVS to 0.90 for the VF-14 vs. ADVS. The rating scales of all four questionnaires fail to satisfy Likert's assumptions. Also, ratings are probabilistic, rather than deterministic, which means that the Likert model is not valid for these questionnaires. However, Likert scores for all four instruments are intercorrelated, suggesting that they are monotonic with the latent subject trait distributed in the low vision sample.

  20. A family psychosocial risk questionnaire for use in pediatric practice.

    PubMed

    Pati, Susmita; Guevara, James; Zhang, Guangxiang; Bhatt, Suraj K; Kavanagh, Jane; Gerdes, Marsha; Localio, Russell; Forrest, Christopher B

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study is to develop new methods to better identify psychosocial risk such that children with the greatest risk of poor future outcomes receive more intensive preventive health services. Based on structured literature review and secondary data analysis, a 52-item psychosocial risk questionnaire was administered to 2,083 families of children (<36 months). To quantify the questionnaire's construct validity, developmental concern was assessed with the Ages and Stages Questionnaire version II (ASQ) [n = 1,163]. An iterative model selection process was used to produce the most parsimonious predictive model. Model fit was examined using c-statistics, the Hosmer-Lemeshow test, and a heuristic measure of model overfit based on the fitted log-likelihood values and associated number of degrees of freedom. We found 13 items easily obtained from parental report produced a regression model with a c-statistic of 0.70. Using an integer scoring system derived from the regression model, we calculated stratum specific likelihood ratios to revise a given prior probability of ASQ failure. The posterior probability of ASQ failure was 44.9 % for a child in the highest risk group (score >25) on the questionnaire, more than double our observed average failure rate of 19.5 %, while it was less than 7 % for a child with the lowest possible score on the questionnaire. Thirteen parent-reported items can be compiled into a summary psychosocial risk questionnaire that predicts failure on developmental screening among preschool children. With further validation, this questionnaire could conceivably be used by clinicians to tailor pediatric preventive care to children at varying levels of risk.

  1. Item-Writing Guidelines for Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regan, Tom

    2015-01-01

    A teacher learning how to write test questions (test items) will almost certainly encounter item-writing guidelines--lists of item-writing do's and don'ts. Item-writing guidelines usually are presented as applicable across all assessment settings. Table I shows some guidelines that I believe to be generally applicable and two will be briefly…

  2. Psychometric Consequences of Subpopulation Item Parameter Drift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins-Manley, Anne Corinne

    2017-01-01

    This study defines subpopulation item parameter drift (SIPD) as a change in item parameters over time that is dependent on subpopulations of examinees, and hypothesizes that the presence of SIPD in anchor items is associated with bias and/or lack of invariance in three psychometric outcomes. Results show that SIPD in anchor items is associated…

  3. Psychometric Consequences of Subpopulation Item Parameter Drift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins-Manley, Anne Corinne

    2017-01-01

    This study defines subpopulation item parameter drift (SIPD) as a change in item parameters over time that is dependent on subpopulations of examinees, and hypothesizes that the presence of SIPD in anchor items is associated with bias and/or lack of invariance in three psychometric outcomes. Results show that SIPD in anchor items is associated…

  4. A Monte Carlo Study Investigating the Influence of Item Discrimination, Category Intersection Parameters, and Differential Item Functioning Patterns on the Detection of Differential Item Functioning in Polytomous Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurman, Carol

    2009-01-01

    The increased use of polytomous item formats has led assessment developers to pay greater attention to the detection of differential item functioning (DIF) in these items. DIF occurs when an item performs differently for two contrasting groups of respondents (e.g., males versus females) after controlling for differences in the abilities of the…

  5. Adaptable Learning Assistant for Item Bank Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuntiyagul, Atorn; Naruedomkul, Kanlaya; Cercone, Nick; Wongsawang, Damras

    2008-01-01

    We present PKIP, an adaptable learning assistant tool for managing question items in item banks. PKIP is not only able to automatically assist educational users to categorize the question items into predefined categories by their contents but also to correctly retrieve the items by specifying the category and/or the difficulty level. PKIP adapts…

  6. Item-Writing Guidelines for Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regan, Tom

    2015-01-01

    A teacher learning how to write test questions (test items) will almost certainly encounter item-writing guidelines--lists of item-writing do's and don'ts. Item-writing guidelines usually are presented as applicable across all assessment settings. Table I shows some guidelines that I believe to be generally applicable and two will be briefly…

  7. Unidimensional Interpretations for Multidimensional Test Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahraman, Nilufer

    2013-01-01

    This article considers potential problems that can arise in estimating a unidimensional item response theory (IRT) model when some test items are multidimensional (i.e., show a complex factorial structure). More specifically, this study examines (1) the consequences of model misfit on IRT item parameter estimates due to unintended minor item-level…

  8. Adaptable Learning Assistant for Item Bank Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuntiyagul, Atorn; Naruedomkul, Kanlaya; Cercone, Nick; Wongsawang, Damras

    2008-01-01

    We present PKIP, an adaptable learning assistant tool for managing question items in item banks. PKIP is not only able to automatically assist educational users to categorize the question items into predefined categories by their contents but also to correctly retrieve the items by specifying the category and/or the difficulty level. PKIP adapts…

  9. Experimental Item Types to Measure Judgment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northrop, Lois C.

    The Professional and Administrative Career Examination measures judgment ability using comprehension and logical order of events item types. Since the verbal component of comprehension items is high, and since these items are extremely difficult to write and document, a search was conducted for a simpler item type for assessing judgment. Three…

  10. 7 CFR 2902.5 - Item designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE GUIDELINES FOR DESIGNATING BIOBASED PRODUCTS FOR FEDERAL PROCUREMENT General § 2902.5 Item... designate items composed of generic groupings of specific products and will identify the minimum biobased content for each listed item. As items are designated for procurement preference, they will be added to...

  11. Defining a Standard for Reporting Digital Evidence Items in Computer Forensic Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bariki, Hamda; Hashmi, Mariam; Baggili, Ibrahim

    Due to the lack of standards in reporting digital evidence items, investigators are facing difficulties in efficiently presenting their findings. This paper proposes a standard for digital evidence to be used in reports that are generated using computer forensic software tools. The authors focused on developing a standard digital evidence items by surveying various digital forensic tools while keeping in mind the legal integrity of digital evidence items. Additionally, an online questionnaire was used to gain the opinion of knowledgeable and experienced stakeholders in the digital forensics domain. Based on the findings, the authors propose a standard for digital evidence items that includes data about the case, the evidence source, evidence item, and the chain of custody. Research results enabled the authors in creating a defined XML schema for digital evidence items.

  12. Development of a questionnaire to measure heart disease risk knowledge in people with diabetes: the Heart Disease Fact Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Julie; Lacey, Kimberly; Chyun, Deborah; Abbott, Gina

    2005-07-01

    This paper describes a paper and pencil questionnaire that measures heart disease risk knowledge in people with diabetes. The Heart Disease Fact Questionnaire (HDFQ) is a 25-item questionnaire that was developed to tap into respondents' knowledge of major risk factors for the development of CHD. Approximately half of these items specifically address diabetes-related CHD risk factors. Based on extensive pilot data, the current study analyzed responses from 524 people with diabetes to assess the psychometric properties. The HDFQ is readable to an average 13-year old and imposes little burden. It shows good content and face validity. It demonstrates adequate internal consistency, with Kuder-Richardson-20 formula = 0.77 and good item-total correlations. Item analysis showed a desirable range in P-values. In discriminant function analyses, HDFQ scores differentiated respondents by knowledge of their own cardiovascular health, use of lipid lowering medications, health insurance status, and educational attainment, thus indicating good criterion related validity. This measure of heart disease risk knowledge is brief, understandable to respondents, and easy to administer and score. Its potential for use in research and practice is discussed. Future research should establish norms as well as investigate its test-retest reliability and predictive validity.

  13. Diet History Questionnaire: International Applications

    Cancer.gov

    ARP staff adapted the Diet History Questionnaire (DHQ) for use by Canadian populations in collaboration with the Alberta Cancer Board. This questionnaire takes into account the different food fortification polices of the U.S. and Canada.

  14. Diet History Questionnaire: Suggested Citations

    Cancer.gov

    Use of the Diet History Questionnaire and Diet*Calc Analysis Software for publication purposes should contain a citation which includes version information for the software, questionnaire, and nutrient database.

  15. Questionnaire Surveys in Educational Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Psacharopoulos, George

    1980-01-01

    This paper reviews and discusses some critical issues related to the use of questionnaire surveys in educational planning. Ten brief sections discuss survey objectives, coverage, questionnaire design, administration, validity, nonresponse, cost considerations, coding, statistical analysis, and interpretation. Five illustrative questionnaire…

  16. Application of Optimal Designs to Item Calibration

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hung-Yi

    2014-01-01

    In computerized adaptive testing (CAT), examinees are presented with various sets of items chosen from a precalibrated item pool. Consequently, the attrition speed of the items is extremely fast, and replenishing the item pool is essential. Therefore, item calibration has become a crucial concern in maintaining item banks. In this study, a two-parameter logistic model is used. We applied optimal designs and adaptive sequential analysis to solve this item calibration problem. The results indicated that the proposed optimal designs are cost effective and time efficient. PMID:25188318

  17. Development and validation of the Gothenburg Trismus Questionnaire (GTQ)

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Joakim; Carlsson, Sigrid; Johansson, Mia; Pauli, Nina; Rydén, Anna; Fagerberg-Mohlin, Bodil; Finizia, Caterina

    2017-01-01

    Objective To develop and validate a comprehensive, self-administered questionnaire for patients with limited ability to open the mouth, trismus. Materials and methods We derived the Gothenburg Trismus Questionnaire (GTQ) from empirical evidence in the medical literature and interviews with medical experts as well as patients. The draft version was tested in a pilot study (n=18). Patients with a maximal incisal opening (MIO) of ≤ 35 mm were included. The study comprised patients with benign jaw-related conditions (n=51), patients treated for head and neck (H&N) cancer (n=78) and an age- and gender-matched control group without trismus (n=129). Results The GTQ instrument was well accepted by the patients, with satisfactory compliance and low rates of missing items. After item reduction, due to items not being conceptually relevant and/or low factor loadings, the GTQ demonstrated high internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha 0.72–0.90), good construct validity and known-group validity. Conclusion We developed a trismus-specific self-administered questionnaire, the GTQ, that showed good psychometric properties. We suggest this questionnaire, that has clear clinical relevance, to be adopted and used in clinical practice and in research, acting as a screening tool as well as an endpoint in intervention and jaw physiotherapy/rehabilitation studies. PMID:22418239

  18. Development and validation of the Gothenburg Trismus Questionnaire (GTQ).

    PubMed

    Johnson, Joakim; Carlsson, Sigrid; Johansson, Mia; Pauli, Nina; Rydén, Anna; Fagerberg-Mohlin, Bodil; Finizia, Caterina

    2012-08-01

    To develop and validate a comprehensive, self-administered questionnaire for patients with limited ability to open the mouth, trismus. We derived the Gothenburg Trismus Questionnaire (GTQ) from empirical evidence in the medical literature and interviews with medical experts as well as patients. The draft version was tested in a pilot study (n=18). Patients with a maximal incisal opening (MIO) of ⩽35mm were included. The study comprised patients with benign jaw-related conditions (n=51), patients treated for head and neck (H&N) cancer (n=78) and an age- and gender-matched control group without trismus (n=129). The GTQ instrument was well accepted by the patients, with satisfactory compliance and low rates of missing items. After item reduction, due to items not being conceptually relevant and/or low factor loadings, the GTQ demonstrated high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha 0.72-0.90), good construct validity and known-group validity. We developed a trismus-specific self-administered questionnaire, the GTQ, that showed good psychometric properties. We suggest this questionnaire, that has clear clinical relevance, to be adopted and used in clinical practice and in research, acting as a screening tool as well as an endpoint in intervention and jaw physiotherapy/rehabilitation studies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Validation of the Gambling Motives Questionnaire in Emerging Adults.

    PubMed

    Lambe, Laura; Mackinnon, Sean P; Stewart, Sherry H

    2015-09-01

    People engage in gambling behaviour for a variety of different reasons, some of which are riskier than others in terms of associations with heavy and problem gambling. Stewart and Zack (Addiction 103:1110-1117, 2008) developed a measure called the Gambling Motives Questionnaire (GMQ) that assesses levels of three distinct gambling motives: enhancement (to increase positive emotions), coping (to decrease negative emotions), and social (to increase affiliation). While this measure has been validated in a community-recruited sample of middle-aged gamblers, the GMQ has yet to be validated in emerging adulthood (ages 18-25 years)—a developmental period associated with increased risk for heavy and problematic gambling. The current project tested the psychometric properties of the GMQ in a community sample of emerging adult gamblers using archival data from the Manitoba Longitudinal Study of Young Adults. Participants (N = 487; 73.9% Caucasian; 52.6% female; mean age 22.23 years) completed the GMQ and questionnaire measures of gambling behaviour and problems. Exploratory factor analysis revealed that a three-factor model adequately fit the data; however, problematic items were identified. A modified 9-item version of the GMQ with the problem items removed fit the data well. Both the original 15-item and the 9-item versions had acceptable subscale alpha reliabilities (αs >.78). While all three subscales (from both the 9-item and 15-item versions) were positively correlated with problem gambling, only enhancement motives emerged as a significant independent predictor when the other motives and gambling behaviours were entered as simultaneous predictors. These results suggest the GMQ is a valid measure for tapping motives in emerging adults, and that high enhancement motives are particularly predictive of gambling problems in this developmental period. Future intervention efforts might specifically target enhancement motives in emerging adults.

  20. Development and Validation of the Athlete Fear Avoidance Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Dover, Geoffrey; Amar, Vanessa

    2015-06-01

    The fear-avoidance model was developed in an attempt to explain the process by which "pain experience" and "pain behavior" become dissociated from the actual pain sensation in individuals who manifest the phenomenon of exaggerated pain perception. High levels of fear avoidance can lead to chronic pain and disability and have successfully predicted rehabilitation time in the work-related-injury population. Existing fear-avoidance questionnaires have all been developed for the general population, but these questionnaires may not be specific enough to fully assess fear avoidance in an athletic population that copes with pain differently than the general population. To develop and validate the Athlete Fear Avoidance Questionnaire (AFAQ). Qualitative research to develop the AFAQ and a cross-sectional study to validate the scale. For questionnaire development, a total of 8 experts in the fields of athletic therapy, sport psychology, and fear avoidance were called upon to generate and rate items for the AFAQ. For determining concurrent validity, 99 varsity athletes from various sports participated. A total of 99 varsity athletes completed the AFAQ, the Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire, and the Pain Catastrophizing Scale. We used Pearson correlations to establish concurrent validity. Concurrent validity was established with significant correlations between the AFAQ and the Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire-Physical Activity (r = 0.352, P > .001) as well as with the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (r = 0.587, P > .001). High internal consistency of our questionnaire was established with a Cronbach α coefficient of 0.805. The final version of the questionnaire includes 10 items with good internal validity (P < .05). We developed a questionnaire with good internal and external validity. The AFAQ is a scale that measures sport-injury-related fear avoidance in athletes and could be used to identify potential psychological barriers to rehabilitation.

  1. The impact of item-writing flaws and item complexity on examination item difficulty and discrimination value.

    PubMed

    Rush, Bonnie R; Rankin, David C; White, Brad J

    2016-09-29

    Failure to adhere to standard item-writing guidelines may render examination questions easier or more difficult than intended. Item complexity describes the cognitive skill level required to obtain a correct answer. Higher cognitive examination items promote critical thinking and are recommended to prepare students for clinical training. This study evaluated faculty-authored examinations to determine the impact of item-writing flaws and item complexity on the difficulty and discrimination value of examination items used to assess third year veterinary students. The impact of item-writing flaws and item complexity (cognitive level I-V) on examination item difficulty and discrimination value was evaluated on 1925 examination items prepared by clinical faculty for third year veterinary students. The mean (± SE) percent correct (83.3 % ± 17.5) was consistent with target values in professional education, and the mean discrimination index (0.18 ± 0.17) was slightly lower than recommended (0.20). More than one item-writing flaw was identified in 37.3 % of questions. The most common item-writing flaws were awkward stem structure, implausible distractors, longest response is correct, and responses are series of true-false statements. Higher cognitive skills (complexity level III-IV) were required to correctly answer 38.4 % of examination items. As item complexity increased, item difficulty and discrimination values increased. The probability of writing discriminating, difficult examination items decreased when implausible distractors and all of the above were used, and increased if the distractors were comprised of a series of true/false statements. Items with four distractors were not more difficult or discriminating than items with three distractors. Preparation of examination questions targeting higher cognitive levels will increase the likelihood of constructing discriminating items. Use of implausible distractors to complete a five-option multiple choice

  2. A nurses' alarm fatigue questionnaire: development and psychometric properties.

    PubMed

    Torabizadeh, Camellia; Yousefinya, Amirhossein; Zand, Farid; Rakhshan, Mahnaz; Fararooei, Mohammad

    2016-11-15

    Alarm fatigue can adversely affect nurses' efficiency and concentration on their tasks, which is a threat to patients' safety. The purpose of the present study was to develop and test the psychometric accuracy of an alarm fatigue questionnaire for nurses. This study was conducted in two stages: in stage one, in order to establish the different aspects of the concept of alarm fatigue, the researchers reviewed the available literature-articles and books-on alarm fatigue, and then consulted several experts in a meeting to define alarm fatigue and develop statements for the questionnaire. In stage two, after the final draft had been approved, the validity of the instrument was measured using the two methods of face validity (the quantitative and qualitative approaches) and content validity (the qualitative and quantitative approaches). Test-retest, Cronbach's alpha, and Principal Component Analysis were used for item reduction and reliability analysis. Based on the results of stage one, the researchers extracted 30 statements based on a 5-point Likert scale. In stage two, after the face and content validity of the questionnaire had been established, 19 statements were left in the instrument. Based on factor loadings of the items and "alpha if item deleted" and after the second round of consultation with the expert panel, six items were removed from the scale. The test of the reliability of nurses' alarm fatigue questionnaire based on the internal homogeneity and retest methods yielded the following results: test-retest correlation coefficient = 0.99; Guttman split-half correlation coefficient = 0.79; Cronbach's alpha = 0.91. Regarding the importance of recognizing alarm fatigue in nurses, there is need for an instrument to measure the phenomenon. The results of the study show that the developed questionnaire is valid and reliable enough for measuring alarm fatigue in nurses.

  3. Development and Validation of the Eyelash Satisfaction Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Jeff; Cole, Jason C.; Burgess, Somali M.; Yang, Min; Daniels, Selena R.; Walt, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures have been used to assess treatment benefit in a variety of therapeutic areas and are now becoming increasingly important in aesthetic research. Objectives The objective of the current study was to develop and validate a new PRO measure (Eyelash Satisfaction Questionnaire [ESQ]) to assess satisfaction with eyelash prominence. Methods The content of the questionnaire (including conceptual framework and questionnaire items) was generated by review of literature, participant interviews, and expert opinion. Cognitive interviews were conducted to pilot test the questionnaire. Psychometric properties of the questionnaire were examined in a combined sample of participants (n = 970) completing Internet- (n = 909) and paper-based (n = 61) versions. Item- and domain-level properties were examined using modern and classical psychometrics. Results Content-based analysis of qualitative data demonstrated the presence of 3 distinct domains (Length, Fullness, Overall Satisfaction; Confidence, Attractiveness, and Professionalism; and Daily Routine). Initial confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) results of 23 items revealed insufficient model-data fit (comparative fit index [CFI] of 0.86 and a non-normed fit index [NNFI] of 0.82). A revised model using 9 items (3 per domain) achieved appropriate fit (CFI of 0.99 and NNFI of 0.97). Analyses revealed measurement equivalence across the Internet- and paper-based versions. The 3 ESQ domains had strong internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's α [range] = 0.919-0.976) and adequate convergent and discriminant validity. Conclusions The ESQ was found to be a reliable and valid PRO measure for assessing satisfaction with eyelash prominence. Level of Evidence: 3 Therapeutic PMID:26691738

  4. Development and Validation of the Eyelash Satisfaction Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Dang, Jeff; Cole, Jason C; Burgess, Somali M; Yang, Min; Daniels, Selena R; Walt, John G

    2016-02-01

    Patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures have been used to assess treatment benefit in a variety of therapeutic areas and are now becoming increasingly important in aesthetic research. The objective of the current study was to develop and validate a new PRO measure (Eyelash Satisfaction Questionnaire [ESQ]) to assess satisfaction with eyelash prominence. The content of the questionnaire (including conceptual framework and questionnaire items) was generated by review of literature, participant interviews, and expert opinion. Cognitive interviews were conducted to pilot test the questionnaire. Psychometric properties of the questionnaire were examined in a combined sample of participants (n = 970) completing Internet- (n = 909) and paper-based (n = 61) versions. Item- and domain-level properties were examined using modern and classical psychometrics. Content-based analysis of qualitative data demonstrated the presence of 3 distinct domains (Length, Fullness, Overall Satisfaction; Confidence, Attractiveness, and Professionalism; and Daily Routine). Initial confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) results of 23 items revealed insufficient model-data fit (comparative fit index [CFI] of 0.86 and a non-normed fit index [NNFI] of 0.82). A revised model using 9 items (3 per domain) achieved appropriate fit (CFI of 0.99 and NNFI of 0.97). Analyses revealed measurement equivalence across the Internet- and paper-based versions. The 3 ESQ domains had strong internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's α [range] = 0.919-0.976) and adequate convergent and discriminant validity. The ESQ was found to be a reliable and valid PRO measure for assessing satisfaction with eyelash prominence. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE 3: Therapeutic. © 2015 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc.

  5. The Perceived Deficits Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Allison; Nikelshpur, Olga M.; Chiaravalloti, Nancy; DeLuca, John

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cognitive dysfunction affects approximately 43% to 70% of individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) and is an important determinant of several functional outcomes in MS and quality of life. Brief neuropsychological test batteries have been developed specifically for use in MS and are widely used to aid clinicians in assessing levels of cognitive impairment in MS. Neuropsychologists and neurologists also frequently use briefer screening measures, such as the Perceived Deficits Questionnaire (PDQ), to assist in determining whether a more extensive neuropsychological evaluation is warranted. However, despite the ease of such measures, the relationship between self-report and objective cognitive impairment has been inconsistent, at best. Moreover, factors such as depression, fatigue, anxiety, and personality have been found to be more related to reports of cognitive difficulties. The purpose of the present study was to clarify the relationship between subjective cognitive concerns and objective cognitive impairment while accounting for related symptoms. Methods: We examined the association of self-reported cognitive concerns on the PDQ with objective cognitive measures, as well as depression, anxiety, fatigue, and self-efficacy. Results: There was no relationship between self-reported cognitive concerns and objective performance. Rather, reports on the PDQ were more correlated with reports of depression, anxiety, fatigue, and self-efficacy. Conclusions: Depression and poor self-efficacy can contribute to reports of cognitive difficulties. Effective treatment to improve these factors seems warranted given the impact of perceived cognitive impairment on outcomes in MS and the potential for more accurate self-reports. PMID:27551243

  6. The Drug-Abuse Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferneau, E.; Mueller, S.

    The drug-abuse questionnaire used to survey college student attitudes on the subject is provided. It is identical to the alcoholism questionnaire except for word changes appropriate to the subject matter. The questionnaire consists of 40 statements about drug abuse and drug abusers, with 7 possible responses: (1) completely disagree; (2) mostly…

  7. Development and Validation of the Bicultural Youth Acculturation Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Kukaswadia, Atif; Janssen, Ian; Pickett, William; Bajwa, Jasmine; Georgiades, Katholiki; Lalonde, Richard N.; Quon, Elizabeth C.; Safdar, Saba; Pike, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Acculturation is a multidimensional process involving changes in behaviour and beliefs. Questionnaires developed to measure acculturation are typically designed for specific ethnic populations and adult experiences. This study developed a questionnaire that measures acculturation among ethnically diverse populations of youth that can be included as a module in population surveys. Methods Questionnaires measuring acculturation in youth were identified in the literature. The importance of items from the existing questionnaires was determined using a Delphi process and this informed the development of our questionnaire. The questionnaire was then pilot tested using a sample of 248 Canadians aged 18–25 via an online system. Participants identified as East and South East Asian (27.8%), South Asian (17.7%) and Black (13.7%). The majority were 1st (33.5%) or 2nd generation immigrants (52.0%). After redundant items were eliminated, exploratory factor analysis grouped items into domains, and, for each domain, internal consistency, and convergent validity with immigrant generation then age at immigration estimated. A subset of participants re-completed the questionnaire for reliability estimation. Results The literature review yielded 117 articles that used 13 questionnaires with a total of 440 questions. The Delphi process reduced these to 32 questions. Pilot testing occurred in 248 Canadians aged 18–25. Following item reduction, 16 questions in three domains remained: dominant culture, heritage language, and heritage culture. All had good internal consistency (Cronbach’s alphas > .75). The mean dominant domain score increased with immigrant generation (1st generation: 3.69 (95% CI: 3.49–3.89), 2nd: 4.13 (4.00–4.26), 3rd: 4.40 (4.19–4.61)), and mean heritage language score was higher among those who immigrated after age 12 than before (p = .0001), indicative of convergent validity. Conclusions This Bicultural Youth Acculturation Questionnaire has

  8. A Mixed-effects Location-Scale Model for Ordinal Questionnaire Data.

    PubMed

    Hedeker, Donald; Mermelstein, Robin J; Demirtas, Hakan; Berbaum, Michael L

    2016-09-01

    In health studies, questionnaire items are often scored on an ordinal scale, for example on a Likert scale. For such questionnaires, item response theory (IRT) models provide a useful approach for obtaining summary scores for subjects (i.e., the model's random subject effect) and characteristics of the items (e.g., item difficulty and discrimination). In this article, we describe a model that allows the items to additionally exhibit different within-subject variance, and also includes a subject-level random effect to the within-subject variance specification. This permits subjects to be characterized in terms of their mean level, or location, and their variability, or scale, and the model allows item difficulty and discrimination in terms of both random subject effects (location and scale). We illustrate application of this location-scale mixed model using data from the Social Subscale of the Drinking Motives Questionnaire (SS-DMQ) assessed in an adolescent study. We show that the proposed model fits the data significantly better than simpler IRT models, and is able to identify items and subjects that are not well-fit by the simpler models. The proposed model has useful applications in many areas where questionnaires are often rated on an ordinal scale, and there is interest in characterizing subjects in terms of both their mean and variability.

  9. The Validation of a Food Label Literacy Questionnaire for Elementary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Jesse S.; Treu, Judith A.; Njike, Valentine; Walker, Jennifer; Smith, Erica; Katz, Catherine S.; Katz, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the reliability and validity of a 10-item questionnaire, the Food Label Literacy for Applied Nutrition Knowledge questionnaire. Methods: Participants were elementary school children exposed to a 90-minute school-based nutrition program. Reliability was assessed via Cronbach alpha and intraclass correlation coefficient…

  10. The Conceptions about Teamwork Questionnaire: Design, Reliability and Validity with Secondary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez-Fernandez, J. Reinaldo; Corcelles, Mariona; Cerrato-Lara, Maria

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we present the conceptions about teamwork questionnaire designed to evaluate the conceptions that secondary students have about teamwork. Participants were 309 students aged 15-16 from eight secondary schools, seven from Barcelona and one from Girona (Spain). The original 27-item questionnaire was reduced according to expert…

  11. Development and Preliminary Validation of the Collective Efficacy Questionnaire for Sports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Short, Sandra E.; Sullivan, Philip; Feltz, Deborah L.

    2005-01-01

    This study presents the development and preliminary validation of the Collective Efficacy Questionnaire for Sports (CEQS). The study was conducted in 3 phases. In Phase 1, a 42-item questionnaire was developed and tested with 271 college-aged student-athletes. An exploratory factor analysis revealed 5 collective efficacy factors with 27 items…

  12. Bullying and Cyberbullying in Portugal: Validation of a Questionnaire and Analysis of Prevalence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coelho, Vítor Alexandre; Sousa, Vanda; Marchante, Marta; Brás, Patrícia; Romão, Ana Maria

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to validate the Bullying and Cyberbullying Behaviors Questionnaire, to examine the prevalence of bullying and victimization behaviors in Portuguese middle school students, and to analyse the differences in victimization and bullying between genders and across school grades. The questionnaire is composed of 36 items, allowing for…

  13. Development and Validation of the Drinking Motive Questionnaire Revised Short Form (DMQ-R SF)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuntsche, Emmanuel; Kuntsche, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    A short form of the Drinking Motive Questionnaire Revised (DMQ-R; Cooper, 1994) was developed, using different item selection strategies based on a national representative sample of 5,617 12- to 18-year-old students in Switzerland. To confirm the concurrent validity of the short-form questionnaire, or DMQ-R SF, data from a second national sample…

  14. [The validation of a questionnaire for measuring the organizational climate in health centers].

    PubMed

    Menárguez Puche, J F; Saturno Hernández, P J; López Santiago, A

    1999-03-15

    To check the reliability and to analyse the validity of a questionnaire on organisational atmosphere (OA). Crossover and observational. Primary care teams (PCTs). Two questionnaires were offered to all the doctors, nurses and social workers (548 professionals) from the 29 PCTs in an autonomous community. One questionnaire was on the OA and the other was a subjective assessment of satisfaction with the structure and functioning of their own team. When the results were analysed (initial factorial analysis), 3 items with only slight discrimination were eliminated from the OA questionnaire. Construction validity (factorial analysis with varimax method), reliability of the questionnaire (Cronbach's alpha and Spearman-Brown coefficient) and of criterion (correlation between OA and variables in the subjective assessment questionnaire) were calculated. The overall response rate was 77.5% (402 professionals). Three dimensions which explained 57% of total variability and which confirmed adequate construction validity were identified: team-work, cohesion and commitment. "Team-work" comprised 9 items and explained 27.18% of total variability. "Cohesion" had 7 items, which explained 16.55% of variability. Lastly, "Commitment" explained 13.47% of variability, with 5 items. The validity of criterion was adequate (close correlation between OA and subjective assessment of structure and operation). Reliability was high (0.89 alpha and 0.92 Spearman-Brown for the entire questionnaire and > 0.7 for the dimensions). The reliability and validity of the adapted questionnaire are sufficient and permit its routine primary care use in our health system to be recommended.

  15. Mathematics Education Values Questionnaire for Turkish Preservice Mathematics Teachers: Design, Validation, and Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dede, Yuksel

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a questionnaire that could measure preservice mathematics teachers' mathematics educational values. Development and validation of the questionnaire involved a sequential inquiry in which design principles were established from the existing literature and a pool of items was constructed then submitted to…

  16. Development and Validation of the Drinking Motive Questionnaire Revised Short Form (DMQ-R SF)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuntsche, Emmanuel; Kuntsche, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    A short form of the Drinking Motive Questionnaire Revised (DMQ-R; Cooper, 1994) was developed, using different item selection strategies based on a national representative sample of 5,617 12- to 18-year-old students in Switzerland. To confirm the concurrent validity of the short-form questionnaire, or DMQ-R SF, data from a second national sample…

  17. Bullying and Cyberbullying in Portugal: Validation of a Questionnaire and Analysis of Prevalence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coelho, Vítor Alexandre; Sousa, Vanda; Marchante, Marta; Brás, Patrícia; Romão, Ana Maria

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to validate the Bullying and Cyberbullying Behaviors Questionnaire, to examine the prevalence of bullying and victimization behaviors in Portuguese middle school students, and to analyse the differences in victimization and bullying between genders and across school grades. The questionnaire is composed of 36 items, allowing for…

  18. The Conceptions about Teamwork Questionnaire: Design, Reliability and Validity with Secondary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez-Fernandez, J. Reinaldo; Corcelles, Mariona; Cerrato-Lara, Maria

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we present the conceptions about teamwork questionnaire designed to evaluate the conceptions that secondary students have about teamwork. Participants were 309 students aged 15-16 from eight secondary schools, seven from Barcelona and one from Girona (Spain). The original 27-item questionnaire was reduced according to expert…

  19. Development of a Questionnaire to Measure Secondary School Pupils' Attitudes to Computers and Robots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    The development, testing, and characteristics of an instrument--Computers and Robots Attitude Questionnaire--that can be used to measure the attitudes of secondary students towards computers and robots are described. Individual questionnaire items are largely content-free and may be answered by students with no specialist knowledge of…

  20. The Validation of a Food Label Literacy Questionnaire for Elementary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Jesse S.; Treu, Judith A.; Njike, Valentine; Walker, Jennifer; Smith, Erica; Katz, Catherine S.; Katz, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the reliability and validity of a 10-item questionnaire, the Food Label Literacy for Applied Nutrition Knowledge questionnaire. Methods: Participants were elementary school children exposed to a 90-minute school-based nutrition program. Reliability was assessed via Cronbach alpha and intraclass correlation coefficient…

  1. Do people with and without medical conditions respond similarly to the short health anxiety inventory? An assessment of differential item functioning using item response theory.

    PubMed

    LeBouthillier, Daniel M; Thibodeau, Michel A; Alberts, Nicole M; Hadjistavropoulos, Heather D; Asmundson, Gordon J G

    2015-04-01

    Individuals with medical conditions are likely to have elevated health anxiety; however, research has not demonstrated how medical status impacts response patterns on health anxiety measures. Measurement bias can undermine the validity of a questionnaire by overestimating or underestimating scores in groups of individuals. We investigated whether the Short Health Anxiety Inventory (SHAI), a widely-used measure of health anxiety, exhibits medical condition-based bias on item and subscale levels, and whether the SHAI subscales adequately assess the health anxiety continuum. Data were from 963 individuals with diabetes, breast cancer, or multiple sclerosis, and 372 healthy individuals. Mantel-Haenszel tests and item characteristic curves were used to classify the severity of item-level differential item functioning in all three medical groups compared to the healthy group. Test characteristic curves were used to assess scale-level differential item functioning and whether the SHAI subscales adequately assess the health anxiety continuum. Nine out of 14 items exhibited differential item functioning. Two items exhibited differential item functioning in all medical groups compared to the healthy group. In both Thought Intrusion and Fear of Illness subscales, differential item functioning was associated with mildly deflated scores in medical groups with very high levels of the latent traits. Fear of Illness items poorly discriminated between individuals with low and very low levels of the latent trait. While individuals with medical conditions may respond differentially to some items, clinicians and researchers can confidently use the SHAI with a variety of medical populations without concern of significant bias. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Questionnaire about psychology/disease correlation-I.

    PubMed

    Dragoş, D; Ojog, D G; Pănescu, O M; Rusu, E C; Tănăsescu, M D

    2011-01-01

    The existing personality inventories are exploring too general psychological features so that the possible psychology/disease associations might be leveled out. We attempt to build a tool to explore the possible correlation between certain psychological features and the most common internal disorders. We have used two questionnaires containing many pairs of synonymous items (necessary for assessing the consistency of the answers). The items are divided into four main domains: preoccupation for the basal conditions of existence (health/ disease/ death, fear, money, lodging); interaction with other people; action, will/ volition, self-assertion; and preoccupation with the exterior. In this first article we are presenting the correlations between items of the first domain, based on the answers from our first 3138 respondents. The concern about health is best reflected by general formulations. The desire for security is best expressed by items combining the worry about money and dwelling, and worst by items reflecting the eagerness to gain, keep or judiciously spend money. Among the various fears, those of future, darkness, and loneliness are better indicators of security concern. In assessing the anxiety about safety/ security, specific worries are more revelatory than the general ones. Precaution and inclination for order are the best indicators for the aspiration to stability. Poorer ones are the desire for cleanliness and the tendency to attachment. Health and security concerns seem to be consistently linked. The consistency evaluating system will be based upon pairs of synonymous items correlated with a10(-200) or less error probability.

  3. Development of an item bank for computerized adaptive test (CAT) measurement of pain.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Morten Aa; Aaronson, Neil K; Chie, Wei-Chu; Conroy, Thierry; Costantini, Anna; Hammerlid, Eva; Hjermstad, Marianne J; Kaasa, Stein; Loge, Jon H; Velikova, Galina; Young, Teresa; Groenvold, Mogens

    2016-01-01

    Patient-reported outcomes should ideally be adapted to the individual patient while maintaining comparability of scores across patients. This is achievable using computerized adaptive testing (CAT). The aim here was to develop an item bank for CAT measurement of the pain domain as measured by the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire. The development process consisted of four steps: (1) literature search, (2) formulation of new items and expert evaluations, (3) pretesting and (4) field-testing and psychometric analyses for the final selection of items. In step 1, we identified 337 pain items from the literature. Twenty-nine new items fitting the QLQ-C30 item style were formulated in step 2 that were reduced to 26 items by expert evaluations. Based on interviews with 31 patients from Denmark, France and the UK, the list was further reduced to 21 items in step 3. In phase 4, responses were obtained from 1103 cancer patients from five countries. Psychometric evaluations showed that 16 items could be retained in a unidimensional item bank. Evaluations indicated that use of the CAT measure may reduce sample size requirements with 15-25% compared to using the QLQ-C30 pain scale. We have established an item bank of 16 items suitable for CAT measurement of pain. While being backward compatible with the QLQ-C30, the new item bank will significantly improve measurement precision of pain. We recommend initiating CAT measurement by screening for pain using the two original QLQ-C30 pain items. The EORTC pain CAT is currently available for "experimental" purposes.

  4. Practical methods for dealing with 'not applicable' item responses in the AMC Linear Disability Score project

    PubMed Central

    Holman, Rebecca; Glas, Cees AW; Lindeboom, Robert; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; de Haan, Rob J

    2004-01-01

    Background Whenever questionnaires are used to collect data on constructs, such as functional status or health related quality of life, it is unlikely that all respondents will respond to all items. This paper examines ways of dealing with responses in a 'not applicable' category to items included in the AMC Linear Disability Score (ALDS) project item bank. Methods The data examined in this paper come from the responses of 392 respondents to 32 items and form part of the calibration sample for the ALDS item bank. The data are analysed using the one-parameter logistic item response theory model. The four practical strategies for dealing with this type of response are: cold deck imputation; hot deck imputation; treating the missing responses as if these items had never been offered to those individual patients; and using a model which takes account of the 'tendency to respond to items'. Results The item and respondent population parameter estimates were very similar for the strategies involving hot deck imputation; treating the missing responses as if these items had never been offered to those individual patients; and using a model which takes account of the 'tendency to respond to items'. The estimates obtained using the cold deck imputation method were substantially different. Conclusions The cold deck imputation method was not considered suitable for use in the ALDS item bank. The other three methods described can be usefully implemented in the ALDS item bank, depending on the purpose of the data analysis to be carried out. These three methods may be useful for other data sets examining similar constructs, when item response theory based methods are used. PMID:15200681

  5. Physician Enabling Skills Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Hudon, Catherine; Lambert, Mireille; Almirall, José

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the reliability and validity of the newly developed Physician Enabling Skills Questionnaire (PESQ) by assessing its internal consistency, test-retest reliability, concurrent validity with patient-centred care, and predictive validity with patient activation and patient enablement. Design Validation study. Setting Saguenay, Que. Participants One hundred patients with at least 1 chronic disease who presented in a waiting room of a regional health centre family medicine unit. Main outcome measures Family physicians’ enabling skills, measured with the PESQ at 2 points in time (ie, while in the waiting room at the family medicine unit and 2 weeks later through a mail survey); patient-centred care, assessed with the Patient Perception of Patient-Centredness instrument; patient activation, assessed with the Patient Activation Measure; and patient enablement, assessed with the Patient Enablement Instrument. Results The internal consistency of the 6 subscales of the PESQ was adequate (Cronbach α = .69 to .92). The test-retest reliability was very good (r = 0.90; 95% CI 0.84 to 0.93). Concurrent validity with the Patient Perception of Patient-Centredness instrument was good (r = −0.67; 95% CI −0.78 to −0.53; P < .001). The PESQ accounts for 11% of the total variance with the Patient Activation Measure (r2 = 0.11; P = .002) and 19% of the variance with the Patient Enablement Instrument (r2 = 0.19; P < .001). Conclusion The newly developed PESQ presents good psychometric properties, allowing for its use in practice and research. PMID:26889507

  6. Applying the revised Chinese Job Content Questionnaire to assess psychosocial work conditions among Taiwan's hospital workers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background For hospital accreditation and health promotion reasons, we examined whether the 22-item Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ) could be applied to evaluate job strain of individual hospital employees and to determine the number of factors extracted from JCQ. Additionally, we developed an Excel module of self-evaluation diagnostic system for consultation with experts. Methods To develop an Excel-based self-evaluation diagnostic system for consultation to experts to make job strain assessment easier and quicker than ever, Rasch rating scale model was used to analyze data from 1,644 hospital employees who enrolled in 2008 for a job strain survey. We determined whether the 22-item Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ) could evaluate job strain of individual employees in work sites. The respective item responding to specific groups' occupational hazards causing job stress was investigated by using skewness coefficient with its 95% CI through item-by-item analyses. Results Each of those 22 items on the questionnaire was examined to have five factors. The prevalence rate of Chinese hospital workers with high job strain was 16.5%. Conclusions Graphical representations of four quadrants, item-by-item bar chart plots and skewness 95% CI comparison generated in Excel can help employers and consultants of an organization focusing on a small number of key areas of concern for each worker in job strain. PMID:21682912

  7. Applying the revised Chinese Job Content Questionnaire to assess psychosocial work conditions among Taiwan's hospital workers.

    PubMed

    Chien, Tsair-Wei; Lai, Wen-Pin; Wang, Hsien-Yi; Hsu, Sen-Yen; Castillo, Roberto Vasquez; Guo, How-Ran; Chen, Shih-Chung; Su, Shih-Bin

    2011-06-18

    For hospital accreditation and health promotion reasons, we examined whether the 22-item Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ) could be applied to evaluate job strain of individual hospital employees and to determine the number of factors extracted from JCQ. Additionally, we developed an Excel module of self-evaluation diagnostic system for consultation with experts. To develop an Excel-based self-evaluation diagnostic system for consultation to experts to make job strain assessment easier and quicker than ever, Rasch rating scale model was used to analyze data from 1,644 hospital employees who enrolled in 2008 for a job strain survey. We determined whether the 22-item Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ) could evaluate job strain of individual employees in work sites. The respective item responding to specific groups' occupational hazards causing job stress was investigated by using skewness coefficient with its 95% CI through item-by-item analyses. Each of those 22 items on the questionnaire was examined to have five factors. The prevalence rate of Chinese hospital workers with high job strain was 16.5%. Graphical representations of four quadrants, item-by-item bar chart plots and skewness 95% CI comparison generated in Excel can help employers and consultants of an organization focusing on a small number of key areas of concern for each worker in job strain.

  8. Developing the Communicative Participation Item Bank: Rasch Analysis Results From a Spasmodic Dysphonia Sample

    PubMed Central

    Baylor, Carolyn R.; Yorkston, Kathryn M.; Eadie, Tanya L.; Miller, Robert M.; Amtmann, Dagmar

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to conduct the initial psychometric analyses of the Communicative Participation Item Bank—a new self-report instrument designed to measure the extent to which communication disorders interfere with communicative participation. This item bank is intended for community-dwelling adults across a range of communication disorders. Method A set of 141 candidate items was administered to 208 adults with spasmodic dysphonia. Participants rated the extent to which their condition interfered with participation in various speaking communication situations. Questionnaires were administered online or in a paper version per participant preference. Participants also completed the Voice Handicap Index (B. H. Jacobson et al., 1997) and a demographic questionnaire. Rasch analyses were conducted using Winsteps software (J. M. Linacre, 1991). Results The results show that items functioned better when the 5-category response format was recoded to a 4-category format. After removing 8 items that did not fit the Rasch model, the remaining 133 items demonstrated strong evidence of sufficient unidimensionality, with the model accounting for 89.3% of variance. Item location values ranged from −2.73 to 2.20 logits. Conclusions Preliminary Rasch analyses of the Communicative Participation Item Bank show strong psychometric properties. Further testing in populations with other communication disorders is needed. PMID:19717652

  9. Developing the communicative participation item bank: Rasch analysis results from a spasmodic dysphonia sample.

    PubMed

    Baylor, Carolyn R; Yorkston, Kathryn M; Eadie, Tanya L; Miller, Robert M; Amtmann, Dagmar

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct the initial psychometric analyses of the Communicative Participation Item Bank-a new self-report instrument designed to measure the extent to which communication disorders interfere with communicative participation. This item bank is intended for community-dwelling adults across a range of communication disorders. A set of 141 candidate items was administered to 208 adults with spasmodic dysphonia. Participants rated the extent to which their condition interfered with participation in various speaking communication situations. Questionnaires were administered online or in a paper version per participant preference. Participants also completed the Voice Handicap Index (B. H. Jacobson et al., 1997) and a demographic questionnaire. Rasch analyses were conducted using Winsteps software (J. M. Linacre, 1991). The results show that items functioned better when the 5-category response format was recoded to a 4-category format. After removing 8 items that did not fit the Rasch model, the remaining 133 items demonstrated strong evidence of sufficient unidimensionality, with the model accounting for 89.3% of variance. Item location values ranged from -2.73 to 2.20 logits. Preliminary Rasch analyses of the Communicative Participation Item Bank show strong psychometric properties. Further testing in populations with other communication disorders is needed.

  10. Approaches to learning: psychometric testing of a study process questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Snelgrove, Sherrill; Slater, Julie

    2003-09-01

    One method of evaluating students' learning is to measure surface, deep and achieving approaches to learning using a questionnaire. In comparison with research on student nurses' learning styles, there has been little examination of their 'approaches to learning'. Much of the 'approaches to learning' research has been conducted with higher education students in Australia and Hong Kong and this kind of measurement is viewed as a valid and reliable way to assess learning. The aim of study reported here was to establish the validity of an 'approaches to learning' questionnaire, the study process questionnaire, for use with student nurses by undertaking psychometrical testing, including exploratory factor analysis. The study process questionnaire is a 42-item questionnaire measuring surface, deep and achieving approaches to learning. It was distributed to 300 student nurses attending a common foundation programme in a higher education establishment in the United Kingdom (UK) in July 2000. Principal components analysis was conducted to determine the validity of the deep, surface and achievement scales in the questionnaire. A new factor structure was identified comprising three main scales which were similar in content but not identical to the original questionnaire. The deep factor correlated positively and significantly with grade performance average and sociology examination results. The study process questionnaire is a valid and useful tool for nurse teachers to gain knowledge about student nurses' approaches to learning. Deep learning appears to influence academic performance. More work is required to elucidate the complex nature of deep learning.

  11. A New Item Selection Procedure for Mixed Item Type in Computerized Classification Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lau, C. Allen; Wang, Tianyou

    This paper proposes a new Information-Time index as the basis for item selection in computerized classification testing (CCT) and investigates how this new item selection algorithm can help improve test efficiency for item pools with mixed item types. It also investigates how practical constraints such as item exposure rate control, test…

  12. Development of an Elderly Low Vision Quality of Life Questionnaire for less-developed areas of China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoman; Chen, Jie; Xu, Gengui; Zhong, Yin; Jang, Longfei; Lin, Li; Lu, Fan

    2015-10-01

    To develop a quality of life questionnaire appropriate for elderly low-vision patients in less-developed areas of China. The study was conducted at the Wenzhou Medical University Affiliated Eye Hospital. In the initial development of the questionnaire, we identified visual function concerns with individual interviews and designed a questionnaire and an empirical assessment of the questionnaire. Each individual visual function concern was then transformed into a question and put into a rating scale from 0 to 4. Then, questionnaire interviews were conducted on 188 low-vision patients and 63 normal control patients for item reduction and evaluation of psychometric properties. We first identified 24 concerns that older adults with serious vision loss thought most affected their daily lives. The initial item list of the Elderly Low Vision Quality of Life Questionnaire (ELVQoL) consisted of 28 items, including the 24 identified items and 4 additional concerns about general vision. Psychometric item reduction removed 9 items, and a 19-item questionnaire was generated. Assessment showed that the resulting questionnaire had acceptable internal consistency, reliability, and validity (Cronbach's α > 0.9, mean item-total correlations >0.6, test-retest reliability >0.9, and concurrent validity range from 0.6 to 0.9). Low education level, need for a full range of working distances, and retinal diseases were all predictors of reduced visually related quality of life. A patient-derived ELVQoL Questionnaire was developed specifically for elderly, uneducated, rural Chinese. All the psychometric properties met accepted levels for a disease-specific Qol Questionnaire.

  13. Validation of a New Arabic Version of the Neuropathic Pain Diagnostic Questionnaire (DN4).

    PubMed

    Chatila, Nadwa; Pereira, Bruno; Maarrawi, Joseph; Dallel, Radhouane

    2017-01-01

    The "Douleur Neuropathique 4 (DN4) questionnaire" was developed for screening neuropathic pain. The purpose of this work was to validate the DN4 questionnaire in the standard Arabic language. First, the questionnaire was translated and semantically adapted to Arabic according to the international guidelines for cross-cultural adaptation. Second, a prospective observational study was performed to validate this questionnaire. A total of 195 patients with chronic pain (n = 99 with neuropathic pain and n = 96 without neuropathic pain) were enrolled in the study. The internal consistency Kuder-Richardson's Formula 20 for the whole DN4 questionnaire was 0.86 (P < 0.001) and the intraclass correlation coefficient 0.99 (95% CI: 0.99 to 1.00). The test-retest reliability kappa coefficient for each item ranged from 0.92 to 1.00. Using a receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, the areas under the curve were 0.94 and 0.97 for the 7-item DN4 and 10-item DN4, respectively. A cut-off score of 3 resulted in a sensitivity of 97.0% and a specificity of 82.3% for the 7-item DN4, while a cut-off score of 5 for the 10-item DN4 resulted in a sensitivity of 93.0% and a specificity of 95.8%. Tingling, numbness, and hypoesthesia to touch and to pricking were the most discriminating pain items. The sensitivity and specificity of the 7-item DN4 and 10-item DN4 were not influenced by either pain severity or educational level. In conclusion, this new Arabic version DN4 questionnaire is a simple, reliable, and valid tool for discriminating between neuropathic and non-neuropathic pain. It represents a useful tool in clinical setting and population-based studies. © 2016 World Institute of Pain.

  14. Psychometric properties of the persian version of the youth risk behavior survey questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Baheiraei, A; Hamzehgardeshi, Z; Mohammadi, M R; Nedjat, S; Mohammadi, E

    2012-06-01

    Adolescents may get involved in high-risk behaviors. Surveys are the primary, and sometimes the sole source of data collection for many high-risk health behaviours. We examined the reliability and validity of the psychometric properties of the self-administered Persian version of the 2009 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS) questionnaire. In a methodological study in summer 2010, 100 Iranian adolescents aged 15-18 years were recruited through convenience sampling. The face and content validity were used for the questionnaire validity. In order to evaluate the questionnaire's reliability, the Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) and Cronbach's α were calculated for domains and 89 items. Among 89 items, the ICC values were below 0.4 (weak reliability) for 2 items (2.25%), 0.4-0.6 (moderate reliability) for 10 items (11.24%), 0.6-0.8 (good reliability) for 32 items (35.96%) and 0.8-1 (excellent reliability) for 45 items (50.56%). The prevalence of most high-risk behaviors was constant in the first and second survey. The value of Cronbach's α was 0.73 for intentional and unintentional injuries, 0.77 for tobacco use, 0.86 for alcohol and other drug use, and 0.79 for unsafe sexual behaviors. No domain had a mean ICC of below 0.6. Furthermore, 97.75% of the items had moderate to excellent reliability. Thus, the Persian YRBSS questionnaire had an acceptable reliability. Over the 2-week period, sexual behaviors were reported with less consistency compared to other behaviors. In any case, researchers must be aware of the limitation of the data collected through this questionnaire, particularly in comparison to the domain of sexual behaviors. Overall, 97.75% of the items had moderate to excellent reliability. Thus, the Persian YRBSS questionnaire had an acceptable reliability.

  15. Development of a psychosocial adaptation questionnaire for Chinese patients with visual impairments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiu-jie; Wang, Ai-ping

    2011-10-01

    To develop a psychosocial adaptation questionnaire for Chinese patients with visual impairments and to examine its reliability and validity. Psychosocial adaptation with disease has been studied, however, there have been few reports on the impact of visual impairment on psychosocial adaptation. An instrument has not been developed to assess psychosocial adaptation with visual impairment specifically for patients in China. Both qualitative and quantitative research methods were used. A questionnaire was developed based on the concept of psychosocial adaptation with visual impairment. Items for the questionnaire were developed by reviewing the literature and carrying out a semi-structured interview with 12 visually impaired patients. Five ophthalmologists and ten patients evaluated the content validity and face validity of the questionnaire, respectively. The method of convenient sampling was used to select 213 visually impaired patients in the Ophthalmology Department of the First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University to participate in the study. Discriminative index and item-total correlation analyses were used to delete items that were lower than a set criterion. Regarding construct validity, factor analysis was performed. The Self-rating Anxiety Scale (SAS), General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES) and Self Acceptance Questionnaire (SAQ) were used to evaluate criterion validity. Cronbach's alpha coefficient was used as an index of internal consistency. To evaluate test-retest reliability, 50 patients were re-evaluated after 24 hours. A total of 204 questionnaire items were created. 22 items were deleted by discriminative index and item-total correlation before factor analysis; 38 items were entered into the model for factor analysis. Seven factors were extracted by using principal factor analysis and varimax rotation, with a cumulative contribution of 59·18%. The correlation coefficients between the psychosocial adaptation questionnaire for visual impairment

  16. A comparison of 4 questionnaires to measure fatigue in postpoliomyelitis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Horemans, Herwin L; Nollet, Frans; Beelen, Anita; Lankhorst, Gustaaf J

    2004-03-01

    To assess the comparability and reproducibility of 4 questionnaires used to measure fatigue in postpoliomyelitis syndrome (PPS). Repeated-measures at a 3-week interval. University hospital. Convenience sample of 65 patients with PPS. Not applicable. The Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS), the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) energy category, the Polio Problem List (PPL) fatigue item, and the Dutch Short Fatigue Questionnaire (SFQ). Correlations of scores between questionnaires were all significant (P<.01) and ranged from.43 (between the NHP energy category and the PPL fatigue item) to.68 (between the PPL fatigue item and the SFQ). Scores on the second visit, normalized to a 0 to 100 scale, were: FSS, 78+/-15; NHP energy category, 47+/-35; PPL fatigue item, 81+/-17; and SFQ, 65+/-22. Except for the difference between the FSS and the PPL fatigue item, the differences in scores between the questionnaires were significant (P<.01). Scale analysis indicated that all questionnaires measured the same unidimensional construct. The reproducibility of the FSS, the PPL fatigue item, and the SFQ was moderate. The smallest detectable change was 1.5 points for the FSS, 2.0 points for the PPL fatigue item, and 1.9 points for the SFQ. Although the questionnaires measure the same fatigue construct in PPS, the results are not interchangeable because the ranges of measurement differ. The NHP energy category, in particular, appeared to have a high detection threshold. The moderate reproducibility of the questionnaires indicates a lack of precision, especially when applied at the individual patient level.

  17. Social Reward Questionnaire (SRQ): development and validation

    PubMed Central

    Foulkes, Lucy; Viding, Essi; McCrory, Eamon; Neumann, Craig S.

    2014-01-01

    Human beings seek out social interactions as a source of reward. To date, there have been limited attempts to identify different forms of social reward, and little is known about how the value of social rewards might vary between individuals. This study aimed to address both these issues by developing the Social Reward Questionnaire (SRQ), a measure of individual differences in the value of different social rewards. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was run on an initial set of 75 items (N = 305). Based on this analysis, confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was then conducted on a second sample (N = 505) with a refined 23-item scale. This analysis was used to test a six-factor structure, which resulted in good model fit (CFI = 0.96, RSMEA = 0.07). The factors represent six subscales of social reward defined as follows: Admiration; Negative Social Potency; Passivity; Prosocial Interactions; Sexual Reward; and Sociability. All subscales demonstrated good test-retest reliability and internal consistency. Each subscale also showed a distinct pattern of associations with external correlates measuring personality traits, attitudes, and goals, thus demonstrating construct validity. Taken together, the findings suggest that the SRQ is a reliable, valid measure that can be used to assess individual differences in the value experienced from different social rewards. PMID:24653711

  18. Social Reward Questionnaire (SRQ): development and validation.

    PubMed

    Foulkes, Lucy; Viding, Essi; McCrory, Eamon; Neumann, Craig S

    2014-01-01

    Human beings seek out social interactions as a source of reward. To date, there have been limited attempts to identify different forms of social reward, and little is known about how the value of social rewards might vary between individuals. This study aimed to address both these issues by developing the Social Reward Questionnaire (SRQ), a measure of individual differences in the value of different social rewards. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was run on an initial set of 75 items (N = 305). Based on this analysis, confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was then conducted on a second sample (N = 505) with a refined 23-item scale. This analysis was used to test a six-factor structure, which resulted in good model fit (CFI = 0.96, RSMEA = 0.07). The factors represent six subscales of social reward defined as follows: Admiration; Negative Social Potency; Passivity; Prosocial Interactions; Sexual Reward; and Sociability. All subscales demonstrated good test-retest reliability and internal consistency. Each subscale also showed a distinct pattern of associations with external correlates measuring personality traits, attitudes, and goals, thus demonstrating construct validity. Taken together, the findings suggest that the SRQ is a reliable, valid measure that can be used to assess individual differences in the value experienced from different social rewards.

  19. Introducing the Occupational Balance Questionnaire (OBQ).

    PubMed

    Wagman, Petra; Håkansson, Carita

    2014-05-01

    The concept of occupational balance is frequently used in occupational therapy but the fact that it has been defined and measured differently is a limitation. This article introduces the Occupational Balance Questionnaire (OBQ), which focuses on satisfaction with the amount and variation of occupations. It consists of 13 items measured on six-step ordinal scales. It has shown good content validity in a sample of 21 occupational therapists but other psychometric properties have not been investigated. The aim was to investigate the OBQ regarding internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and floor/ceiling effects. The OBQ was administered twice to a sample selected through convenience sampling. Internal consistency was investigated by Cronbach's alpha and test-retest reliability analysed with Spearman's Rho correlation for the total score and weighted kappa on each item. Potential floor/ceiling effects were explored by checking for the percentage of participants who scored lowest and highest. The results demonstrated that the OBQ has good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha 0.936) and sufficient test-retest reliability (Spearman's Rho for the total score was 0.926) and, thus, seems stable over time. No floor or ceiling effect was detected. The OBQ therefore showed promising reliability, although further instrument development studies to examine its construct validity are required.

  20. The QCAE: a Questionnaire of Cognitive and Affective Empathy.

    PubMed

    Reniers, Renate L E P; Corcoran, Rhiannon; Drake, Richard; Shryane, Nick M; Völlm, Birgit A

    2011-01-01

    Empathy has been inconsistently defined and inadequately measured. This research aimed to produce a new and rigorously developed questionnaire. Exploratory (n₁ = 640) and confirmatory (n₂ = 318) factor analyses were employed to develop the Questionnaire of Cognitive and Affective Empathy (QCAE). Principal components analysis revealed 5 factors (31 items). Confirmatory factor analysis confirmed this structure in an independent sample. The hypothesized 2-factor structure (cognitive and affective empathy) was tested and provided the best and most parsimonious fit to the data. Gender differences, convergent validity, and construct validity were examined. The QCAE is a valid tool for assessing cognitive and affective empathy.

  1. Detecting Gender Bias Through Test Item Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Espada, Wilson J.

    2009-03-01

    Many physical science and physics instructors might not be trained in pedagogically appropriate test construction methods. This could lead to test items that do not measure what they are intended to measure. A subgroup of these items might show bias against some groups of students. This paper describes how the author became aware of potentially biased items against females in his examinations, which led to the exploration of fundamental issues related to item validity, gender bias, and differential item functioning, or DIF. A brief discussion of DIF in the context of university courses, as well as practical suggestions to detect possible gender-biased items, follows.

  2. Development and validation of the Self-Esteem And Relationship (SEAR) questionnaire in erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Cappelleri, J C; Althof, S E; Siegel, R L; Shpilsky, A; Bell, S S; Duttagupta, S

    2004-02-01

    Development and validation of a patient-reported measure of psychosocial variables in men with erectile dysfunction (ED) is described. Literature review, focus groups, and medical specialists identified 86 potential items. Redundant, ambiguous, or low item-to-total correlation items were removed. Data from 98 men reporting diagnosed ED and 94 controls assisted in final item selection and psychometric evaluation. Treatment responsiveness was evaluated in 93 men with ED in a 10-week open-label trial of sildenafil citrate (Viagra). The 14 chosen items resolved into two domains: Sexual Relationship (eight items) and Confidence (six items), the latter comprising Self-Esteem (four items) and Overall Relationship (two items) subscales. The resulting Self-Esteem And Relationship (SEAR) questionnaire demonstrated validity and reliability. The intervention study demonstrated responsiveness to beneficial treatment with significant improvement in scores (P=0.0001). The SEAR questionnaire possesses strong psychometric properties that support its validity and reliability for measuring sexual relationship, confidence, and particularly self-esteem.

  3. The Unique Correspondence of the Item Response Function and the Item Category Response Functions in Polytomously Scored Item Response Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Hua-Hua; Mazzeo, John

    1994-01-01

    This paper establishes the correspondence between an item response function and a unique set of item category response functions for the partial credit model and the graded response model. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed. (SLD)

  4. Introduction to bifactor polytomous item response theory analysis.

    PubMed

    Toland, Michael D; Sulis, Isabella; Giambona, Francesca; Porcu, Mariano; Campbell, Jonathan M

    2017-02-01

    A bifactor item response theory model can be used to aid in the interpretation of the dimensionality of a multifaceted questionnaire that assumes continuous latent variables underlying the propensity to respond to items. This model can be used to describe the locations of people on a general continuous latent variable as well as on continuous orthogonal specific traits that characterize responses to groups of items. The bifactor graded response (bifac-GR) model is presented in contrast to a correlated traits (or multidimensional GR model) and unidimensional GR model. Bifac-GR model specification, assumptions, estimation, and interpretation are demonstrated with a reanalysis of data (Campbell, 2008) on the Shared Activities Questionnaire. We also show the importance of marginalizing the slopes for interpretation purposes and we extend the concept to the interpretation of the information function. To go along with the illustrative example analyses, we have made available supplementary files that include command file (syntax) examples and outputs from flexMIRT, IRTPRO, R, Mplus, and STATA. Supplementary data to this article can be found online at http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jsp.2016.11.001. Data needed to reproduce analyses in this article are available as supplemental materials (online only) in the Appendix of this article.

  5. [Adaptation of a questionnaire measuring representations related to work disability].

    PubMed

    Albert, V; Coutu, M-F; Durand, M-J

    2013-06-01

    Health, illness and treatment representations have been described as key factors for return to work. The Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ-R) is a quantitative tool available to assess these factors. However, an adaptation is necessary before its use with workers on prolonged work disability presenting musculoskeletal disorders (MSD). Two distinct phases were carried out, firstly, by adapting the IPQ-R for a population of workers in prolonged work disability related to an MSD and, secondly, by conducting a pre-test on the adapted questionnaire to assess item clarity. PHASE 1: The Technique for Research of Information by the Animation of a Group of Experts (TRIAGE) was selected to proceed with the adaptation. TRIAGE is an inductive and structured method aiming at the attainment of group consensus. Consensus was obtained in two steps: for the individual production, each expert had to judge the pertinence of the questioned elements and suggested new elements if needed; for the group production, all suggestions submitted were sorted according to TRIAGE systematic procedure, in order to retain the most pertinent ones by group consensus. Analysis was done simultaneously to data collection, by the attainment of group consensus. The group of experts consisted of six clinicians and two researchers. For the clinicians, selection criteria consisted of: being an occupational therapist or a psychologist and working for at least 2 years in a vocational rehabilitation setting for workers in prolonged work disability; for the researchers, being affiliated to a university and to have pursued a least one research project regarding prolonged work disability following MSD and development/validation of assessment tools. As a result of the adaptation process eight items were excluded because they were not considered pertinent by the experts. The label "illness" was changed for "current health condition" and 26 new items have been added to the questionnaire to better account

  6. Validation of a Persian Version of Motorcycle Rider Behavior Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Motevalian, Seyed Abbas; Asadi-Lari, Mohsen; Rahimi, Habibollah; Eftekhar, Mehrdad

    2011-01-01

    In Iran, road traffic injuries are the first cause of burden of disease and motorcyclists are the most vulnerable road users. Elliot and colleagues developed the “Motorcycle Rider Behavior Questionnaire” (MRBQ), on the basis of Reason’s “Driver Behavior Questionnaire” (DBQ) in 2007. The purpose of this study was to assess the validity and reliability of a Persian version of MRBQ. The 43-item MRBQ was adapted to Persian according to translation-back translation method. The questionnaire was significantly revised after assessment of content validity. In the revised version, 10 items of original MRBQ were deleted and 15 new items were added. The revised MRBQ was used in a survey of 518 motorcyclists. To assess the construct validity of MRBQ, we used Buss-Perry Aggression questionnaire concurrently on all of the subjects. After three weeks, we carried out the retest study on 119 out of 518 subjects. The mean age of the subjects was 32.5 years (SD=8.8). All of the participants were male with mean of 9.3 years of motorcycle riding experience (SD=7.3). Principal Components Analysis (PCA) showed six subscales: “Speed Violations”, “Traffic Errors”, “Safety Violations”, “Traffic Violations”, “Stunts” and “Control Errors”, which accounted for 36.44% of total variance together. For each of these subscales, Cronbach’s Alpha was between 0.79 to 0.91. Intraclass Correlation Coefficient for six subscales and total questionnaire were from 0.73 to 0.91. There were significant correlations between MRBQ subscales and subscales of Buss-Perry aggression questionnaire. The results indicated that the 48-item Persian version of MRBQ is a suitable measure for studying motorcyclists’ behavior. PMID:22105387

  7. Reliability and validity of television food advertising questionnaire in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Zalma, Abdul Razak; Safiah, Md Yusof; Ajau, Danis; Khairil Anuar, Md Isa

    2015-09-01

    Interventions to counter the influence of television food advertising amongst children are important. Thus, reliable and valid instrument to assess its effect is needed. The objective of this study was to determine the reliability and validity of such a questionnaire. The questionnaire was administered twice on 32 primary schoolchildren aged 10-11 years in Selangor, Malaysia. The interval between the first and second administration was 2 weeks. Test-retest method was used to examine the reliability of the questionnaire. Intra-rater reliability was determined by kappa coefficient and internal consistency by Cronbach's alpha coefficient. Construct validity was evaluated using factor analysis. The test-retest correlation showed moderate-to-high reliability for all scores (r = 0.40*, p = 0.02 to r = 0.95**, p = 0.00), with one exception, consumption of fast foods (r = 0.24, p = 0.20). Kappa coefficient showed acceptable-to-strong intra-rater reliability (K = 0.40-0.92), except for two items under knowledge on television food advertising (K = 0.26 and K = 0.21) and one item under preference for healthier foods (K = 0.33). Cronbach's alpha coefficient indicated acceptable internal consistency for all scores (0.45-0.60). After deleting two items under Consumption of Commonly Advertised Food, the items showed moderate-to-high loading (0.52, 0.84, 0.42 and 0.42) with the Scree plot showing that there was only one factor. The Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin was 0.60, showing that the sample was adequate for factor analysis. The questionnaire on television food advertising is reliable and valid to assess the effect of media literacy education on television food advertising on schoolchildren. © The Author (2013). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Development and Validation of the Behavioral Tendencies Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Van Dam, Nicholas T.; Brown, Anna; Mole, Tom B.; Davis, Jake H.; Britton, Willoughby B.; Brewer, Judson A.

    2015-01-01

    At a fundamental level, taxonomy of behavior and behavioral tendencies can be described in terms of approach, avoid, or equivocate (i.e., neither approach nor avoid). While there are numerous theories of personality, temperament, and character, few seem to take advantage of parsimonious taxonomy. The present study sought to implement this taxonomy by creating a questionnaire based on a categorization of behavioral temperaments/tendencies first identified in Buddhist accounts over fifteen hundred years ago. Items were developed using historical and contemporary texts of the behavioral temperaments, described as “Greedy/Faithful”, “Aversive/Discerning”, and “Deluded/Speculative”. To both maintain this categorical typology and benefit from the advantageous properties of forced-choice response format (e.g., reduction of response biases), binary pairwise preferences for items were modeled using Latent Class Analysis (LCA). One sample (n1 = 394) was used to estimate the item parameters, and the second sample (n2 = 504) was used to classify the participants using the established parameters and cross-validate the classification against multiple other measures. The cross-validated measure exhibited good nomothetic span (construct-consistent relationships with related measures) that seemed to corroborate the ideas present in the original Buddhist source documents. The final 13-block questionnaire created from the best performing items (the Behavioral Tendencies Questionnaire or BTQ) is a psychometrically valid questionnaire that is historically consistent, based in behavioral tendencies, and promises practical and clinical utility particularly in settings that teach and study meditation practices such as Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR). PMID:26535904

  9. 15 CFR Supplement No. 6 to Part 742 - Technical Questionnaire for Encryption Items

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... software, provide the following information: (1) Description of all the symmetric and asymmetric encryption... third-party hardware or software encryption components (if any). Identify the manufacturers of the hardware or software components, including specific part numbers and version information as needed...

  10. Why the Item "23 + 1" Is Not in a Depression Questionnaire: Validity from a Network Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Angelique O. J.

    2012-01-01

    What is validity? A simple question but apparently one with many answers, as Paul Newton highlights in his review of the history of validity. The current definition of validity, as entertained in the 1999 "Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing" is indeed a consensus, one between the classical notion of attributes, and measures…

  11. Students' Interpretations of the Meanings of Questionnaire Items in the National Student Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Roger; Kane, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    In many countries the outputs from university student satisfaction surveys are used for a variety of educational management purposes. Within the United Kingdom, the main instrument employed by state authorities to measure student satisfaction is the National Student Survey (NSS). The issue investigated by the current research related to whether…

  12. Students' Interpretations of the Meanings of Questionnaire Items in the National Student Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Roger; Kane, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    In many countries the outputs from university student satisfaction surveys are used for a variety of educational management purposes. Within the United Kingdom, the main instrument employed by state authorities to measure student satisfaction is the National Student Survey (NSS). The issue investigated by the current research related to whether…

  13. Why the Item "23 + 1" Is Not in a Depression Questionnaire: Validity from a Network Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Angelique O. J.

    2012-01-01

    What is validity? A simple question but apparently one with many answers, as Paul Newton highlights in his review of the history of validity. The current definition of validity, as entertained in the 1999 "Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing" is indeed a consensus, one between the classical notion of attributes, and measures…

  14. The Attitudes to Ageing Questionnaire: Mokken Scaling Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shenkin, Susan D.; Watson, Roger; Laidlaw, Ken; Starr, John M.; Deary, Ian J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Hierarchical scales are useful in understanding the structure of underlying latent traits in many questionnaires. The Attitudes to Ageing Questionnaire (AAQ) explored the attitudes to ageing of older people themselves, and originally described three distinct subscales: (1) Psychosocial Loss (2) Physical Change and (3) Psychological Growth. This study aimed to use Mokken analysis, a method of Item Response Theory, to test for hierarchies within the AAQ and to explore how these relate to underlying latent traits. Methods Participants in a longitudinal cohort study, the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936, completed a cross-sectional postal survey. Data from 802 participants were analysed using Mokken Scaling analysis. These results were compared with factor analysis using exploratory structural equation modelling. Results Participants were 51.6% male, mean age 74.0 years (SD 0.28). Three scales were identified from 18 of the 24 items: two weak Mokken scales and one moderate Mokken scale. (1) ‘Vitality’ contained a combination of items from all three previously determined factors of the AAQ, with a hierarchy from physical to psychosocial; (2) ‘Legacy’ contained items exclusively from the Psychological Growth scale, with a hierarchy from individual contributions to passing things on; (3) ‘Exclusion’ contained items from the Psychosocial Loss scale, with a hierarchy from general to specific instances. All of the scales were reliable and statistically significant with ‘Legacy’ showing invariant item ordering. The scales correlate as expected with personality, anxiety and depression. Exploratory SEM mostly confirmed the original factor structure. Conclusions The concurrent use of factor analysis and Mokken scaling provides additional information about the AAQ. The previously-described factor structure is mostly confirmed. Mokken scaling identifies a new factor relating to vitality, and a hierarchy of responses within three separate scales, referring to

  15. The Unique Correspondence of Item Response Functions and Item Category Response Functions in Polytomously Scored Item Response Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Hua-Hua; Mazzeo, John

    The item response function (IRF) for a polytomously scored item is defined as a weighted sum of the item category response functions (ICRF, the probability of getting a particular score for a randomly sampled examinee of ability theta). This paper establishes the correspondence between an IRF and a unique set of ICRFs for two of the most commonly…

  16. A Bifactor Multidimensional Item Response Theory Model for Differential Item Functioning Analysis on Testlet-Based Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fukuhara, Hirotaka; Kamata, Akihito

    2011-01-01

    A differential item functioning (DIF) detection method for testlet-based data was proposed and evaluated in this study. The proposed DIF model is an extension of a bifactor multidimensional item response theory (MIRT) model for testlets. Unlike traditional item response theory (IRT) DIF models, the proposed model takes testlet effects into…

  17. A Bifactor Multidimensional Item Response Theory Model for Differential Item Functioning Analysis on Testlet-Based Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fukuhara, Hirotaka; Kamata, Akihito

    2011-01-01

    A differential item functioning (DIF) detection method for testlet-based data was proposed and evaluated in this study. The proposed DIF model is an extension of a bifactor multidimensional item response theory (MIRT) model for testlets. Unlike traditional item response theory (IRT) DIF models, the proposed model takes testlet effects into…

  18. Validation of Health Behavior and Stages of Change Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Ramirez, Leivy Patricia; De la Roca-Chiapas, Jose Maria; Colunga-Rodriguez, Cecilia; Preciado-Serrano, Maria de Lourdes; Daneri-Navarro, Adrian; Pedroza-Cabrera, Francisco Javier; Martinez-Arriaga, Reyna Jazmin

    2017-01-01

    Background The transtheoretical model (TTM) has been widely used to promote healthy behaviors in different groups. However, a questionnaire has not yet been developed to evaluate the health behaviors that medical practitioners often consider in individuals with cancer or at a high risk of developing cancer. Purpose The aim of this study was to construct and validate the Health Behavior and Stages of Change Questionnaire (HBSCQ), which is based on the TTM and health recommendations related to risk and factors that protect against cancer. Methods Content validity was conducted in two phases (qualitative and quantitative). Item difficulty index, item discrimination index, and discrimination coefficient were obtained based on the classical test theory. Finally, Cronbach’s alpha was used. Results Measure of concordance showed scores considered adequate and excellent. The item discrimination index obtained a rating of “excellent” and suggested the preservation of all items. The discrimination coefficient scores are >0.74. The global internal consistency of the HBSCQ was 0.384. HBSCQ specification between groups of internal consistency for the sample of men was 0.712 and that for the sample of women was 0.378. Conclusion/implications for practice The HBSCQ represents a proposal for a fast, simple, and innovative screening test, which aims to identify persons who may benefit from interventions to promote health behaviors delimited to the stage of change. PMID:28356769

  19. Development and validation of a lifetime exposure questionnaire for use among Chinese populations

    PubMed Central

    Wu, ShengHui; Ho, Suzanne C.; Lam, Tsz-ping; Woo, Jean; Yuen, P. Y.; Qin, Ling; Ku, Susanna

    2013-01-01

    The sunlight exposure questionnaire for use in the Chinese population was constructed based on extensive literature review and item suitability for measuring life-time exposure. The content validity index (CVI) was derived from ratings by, an expert panel to assess the item content and relevance. 650 population-based Chinese women completed the sunlight exposure questionnaire through telephone interview. To assess the questionnaire reliability, 94 women were re-interviewed after 2 weeks. 98.4% of the sunlight exposure questionnaire items were found to have valid CVI (>0.83). The Scree plot and the Principal Components Factor Analysis showed a two-factor construct was appropriate and no questionnaire item needed to be excluded. The questionnaire also had a good test-retest reliability (ICC: 0.59–0.93; k: 0.51–100). This sunlight exposure questionnaire was found to be adequate for measurement of life-time sunlight exposure among Hong Kong Chinese women. PMID:24077356

  20. A comparison of data quality and practicality of online versus postal questionnaires in a sample of testicular cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Smith, Allan Ben; King, Madeleine; Butow, Phyllis; Olver, Ian

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to compare data quality from online and postal questionnaires and to evaluate the practicality of these different questionnaire modes in a cancer sample. Participants in a study investigating the psychosocial sequelae of testicular cancer could choose to complete a postal or online version of the study questionnaire. Data quality was evaluated by assessing sources of nonobservational errors such as participant nonresponse, item nonresponse and sampling bias. Time taken and number of reminders required for questionnaire return were used as indicators of practicality. Participant nonresponse was significantly higher among participants who chose the postal questionnaire. The proportion of questionnaires with missing items and the mean number of missing items did not differ significantly by mode. A significantly larger proportion of tertiary-educated participants and managers/professionals completed the online questionnaire. There were no significant differences in age, relationship status, employment status, country of birth or language spoken by completion mode. Compared with postal questionnaires, online questionnaires were returned significantly more quickly and required significantly fewer reminders. These results demonstrate that online questionnaire completion can be offered in a cancer sample without compromising data quality. In fact, data quality from online questionnaires may be superior due to lower rates of participant nonresponse. Investigators should be aware of potential sampling bias created by more highly educated participants and managers/professionals choosing to complete online questionnaires. Besides this issue, online questionnaires offer an efficient method for collecting high-quality data, with faster return and fewer reminders. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.