Science.gov

Sample records for load calculation procedures

  1. A review of the calculation procedure for critical acid loads for terrestrial ecosystems.

    PubMed

    van der Salm, C; de Vries, W

    2001-04-23

    Target loads for acid deposition in the Netherlands, as formulated in the Dutch environmental policy plan, are based on critical load calculations at the end of the 1980s. Since then knowledge on the effect of acid deposition on terrestrial ecosystems has substantially increased. In the early 1990s a simple mass balance model was developed to calculate critical loads. This model was evaluated and the methods were adapted to represent the current knowledge. The main changes in the model are the use of actual empirical relationships between Al and H concentrations in the soil solution, the addition of a constant base saturation as a second criterion for soil quality and the use of tree species-dependant critical Al/base cation (BC) ratios for Dutch circumstances. The changes in the model parameterisation and in the Al/BC criteria led to considerably (50%) higher critical loads for root damage. The addition of a second criterion in the critical load calculations for soil quality caused a decrease in the critical loads for soils with a median to high base saturation such as loess and clay soils. The adaptation hardly effected the median critical load for soil quality in the Netherlands, since only 15% of the Dutch forests occur on these soils. On a regional scale, however, critical loads were (much) lower in areas where those soils are located.

  2. Refining the calculation procedure for estimating the influence of flashing steam in steam turbine heaters on the increase of rotor rotation frequency during rejection of electric load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselov, V. B.; Shekhter, M. V.

    2012-12-01

    A refined procedure for estimating the effect the flashing of condensate in a steam turbine's regenerative and delivery-water heaters on the increase of rotor rotation frequency during rejection of electric load is presented. The results of calculations carried out according to the proposed procedure as applied to the delivery-water and regenerative heaters of a T-110/120-12.8 turbine are given.

  3. Comparison of energy calculation procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Kusuda, T.

    1981-08-01

    ASHRAE has developed a simplified energy-calculation procedure suitable for small calculators that applied to nonresidential buildings and includes all the essential calculation elements - climatic data, buildings construction, operational characteristics, utility system and equipment performance, and internal heat gain due to lighting, occupancy, cooking, etc. A comparison of the results predicted by the proposed method for four typical HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning) systems in an office building in Washington, DC, against the predictions of seven detailed computer-simulation programs - AXCESS, BLAST, BLDSIM, DOE-2, E-CUBE, ESAS, and TRACE - revealed that the similarity of the results depended more on which analyst employed the methods than on which methods were used.

  4. Verification Calculation Results to Validate the Procedures and Codes for Pin-by-Pin Power Computation in VVER Type Reactors with MOX Fuel Loading

    SciTech Connect

    Chizhikova, Z.N.; Kalashnikov, A.G.; Kapranova, E.N.; Korobitsyn, V.E.; Manturov, G.N.; Tsiboulia, A.A.

    1998-12-01

    One of the important problems for ensuring the VVER type reactor safety when the reactor is partially loaded with MOX fuel is the choice of appropriate physical zoning to achieve the maximum flattening of pin-by-pin power distribution. When uranium fuel is replaced by MOX one provided that the reactivity due to fuel assemblies is kept constant, the fuel enrichment slightly decreases. However, the average neutron spectrum fission microscopic cross-section for {sup 239}Pu is approximately twice that for {sup 235}U. Therefore power peaks occur in the peripheral fuel assemblies containing MOX fuel which are aggravated by the interassembly water. Physical zoning has to be applied to flatten the power peaks in fuel assemblies containing MOX fuel. Moreover, physical zoning cannot be confined to one row of fuel elements as is the case with a uniform lattice of uranium fuel assemblies. Both the water gap and the jump in neutron absorption macroscopic cross-sections which occurs at the interface of fuel assemblies with different fuels make the problem of calculating space-energy neutron flux distribution more complicated since it increases nondiffusibility effects. To solve this problem it is necessary to update the current codes, to develop new codes and to verify all the codes including nuclear-physical constants libraries employed. In so doing it is important to develop and validate codes of different levels--from design codes to benchmark ones. This paper presents the results of the burnup calculation for a multiassembly structure, consisting of MOX fuel assemblies surrounded by uranium dioxide fuel assemblies. The structure concerned can be assumed to model a fuel assembly lattice symmetry element of the VVER-1000 type reactor in which 1/4 of all fuel assemblies contains MOX fuel.

  5. Calibration procedure of measuring system for vehicle wheel load estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluziewicz, M.; Maniowski, M.

    2016-09-01

    The calibration procedure of wheel load measuring system is presented. Designed method allows estimation of selected wheel load components while the vehicle is in motion. Mentioned system is developed to determine friction forces between tire and road surface, basing on measured internal reaction forces in wheel suspension mechanism. Three strain gauge bridges and three-component piezoelectric load cell are responsible for internal force measurement in suspension components, two wire sensors are measuring displacements. External load is calculated via kinematic model of suspension mechanism implemented in Matlab environment. In the described calibration procedure, internal reactions are measured on a test stand while the system is loaded by a force of known direction and value.

  6. Development of procedures for calculating stiffness and damping properties of elastomers in engineering applications. Part 4: Testing of elastomers under a rotating load. [resonance testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darlow, M. S.; Smalley, A. J.

    1977-01-01

    A test rig designed to measure stiffness and damping of elastomer cartridges under a rotating load excitation is described. The test rig employs rotating unbalance in a rotor which runs to 60,000 RPM as the excitation mechanism. A variable resonant mass is supported on elastomer elements and the dynamic characteristics are determined from measurements of input and output acceleration. Five different cartridges are considered: three of these are buttons cartridges having buttons located in pairs, with 120 between each pair. Two of the cartridges consist of 360 elastomer rings with rectangular cross-sections. Dynamic stiffness and damping are measured for each cartridge and compared with predictions at different frequencies and different strains.

  7. Simultaneous calculation of aircraft design loads and structural member sizes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, G. L.; Mccullers, L. A.

    1975-01-01

    A design process which accounts for the interaction between aerodynamic loads and changes in member sizes during sizing of aircraft structures is described. A simultaneous iteration procedure is used wherein both design loads and member sizes are updated during each cycle yielding converged, compatible loads and member sizes. A description is also given of a system of programs which incorporates this process using lifting surface theory to calculate aerodynamic pressure distributions, using a finite-element method for structural analysis, and using a fully stressed design technique to size structural members. This system is tailored to perform the entire process with computational efficiency in a single computer run so that it can be used effectively during preliminary design. Selected results, considering maneuver, taxi, and fatigue design conditions, are presented to illustrate convergence characteristics of this iterative procedure.

  8. New unifying procedure for PC index calculations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauning, P.

    2012-04-01

    The Polar Cap (PC) index is a controversial topic within the IAGA scientific community. Since 1997 discussions of the validity of the index to be endorsed as an official IAGA index have ensued. Currently, there are now the three separate PC index versions constructed from the different procedures used at the three institutes: the Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute (AARI), the Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI), and the Danish National Space Institute (DTU Space). It is demonstrated in this presentation, that two consistent unifying procedures can be built from the best elements of the three different versions. One procedure uses a set of coefficients aimed at the calculation of final PC index values to be accepted by IAGA. The other procedure uses coefficients aimed at on-line real-time production of preliminary PC index values for Space Weather monitoring applications. For each of the two cases the same procedure is used for the northern (PCN) and the southern (PCS) polar cap indices, and the derived PCN and PCS coefficients are similar.

  9. Space Heating Load Estimation Procedure for CHP Systems sizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vocale, P.; Pagliarini, G.; Rainieri, S.

    2015-11-01

    Due to its environmental and energy benefits, the Combined Heat and Power (CHP) represents certainly an important measure to improve energy efficiency of buildings. Since the energy performance of the CHP systems strongly depends on the fraction of the useful cogenerated heat (i.e. the cogenerated heat that is actually used to meet building thermal demand), in building applications of CHP, it is necessary to know the space heating and cooling loads profile to optimise the system efficiency. When the heating load profile is unknown or difficult to calculate with a sufficient accuracy, as may occur for existing buildings, it can be estimated from the cumulated energy uses by adopting the loads estimation procedure (h-LEP). With the aim to evaluate the useful fraction of the cogenerated heat for different operating conditions in terms of buildings characteristics, weather data and system capacity, the h-LEP is here implemented with a single climate variable: the hourly average dry- bulb temperature. The proposed procedure have been validated resorting to the TRNSYS simulation tool. The results, obtained by considering a building for hospital use, reveal that the useful fraction of the cogenerated heat can be estimated with an average accuracy of ± 3%, within the range of operative conditions considered in the present study.

  10. 40 CFR 53.65 - Test procedure: Loading test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... operating manual referred to in section 7.4.18 of 40 CFR part 50, appendix L. (3) Determine the preweight of... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test procedure: Loading test. 53.65... Characteristics of Class II Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 § 53.65 Test procedure: Loading test. (a) Overview....

  11. Development of an efficient procedure for calculating the aerodynamic effects of planform variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, J. E.; Geller, E. W.

    1981-01-01

    Numerical procedures to compute gradients in aerodynamic loading due to planform shape changes using panel method codes were studied. Two procedures were investigated: one computed the aerodynamic perturbation directly; the other computed the aerodynamic loading on the perturbed planform and on the base planform and then differenced these values to obtain the perturbation in loading. It is indicated that computing the perturbed values directly can not be done satisfactorily without proper aerodynamic representation of the pressure singularity at the leading edge of a thin wing. For the alternative procedure, a technique was developed which saves most of the time-consuming computations from a panel method calculation for the base planform. Using this procedure the perturbed loading can be calculated in about one-tenth the time of that for the base solution.

  12. Strategy Guideline. Accurate Heating and Cooling Load Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Burdick, Arlan

    2011-06-01

    This guide presents the key criteria required to create accurate heating and cooling load calculations and offers examples of the implications when inaccurate adjustments are applied to the HVAC design process. The guide shows, through realistic examples, how various defaults and arbitrary safety factors can lead to significant increases in the load estimate. Emphasis is placed on the risks incurred from inaccurate adjustments or ignoring critical inputs of the load calculation.

  13. Strategy Guideline: Accurate Heating and Cooling Load Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Burdick, A.

    2011-06-01

    This guide presents the key criteria required to create accurate heating and cooling load calculations and offers examples of the implications when inaccurate adjustments are applied to the HVAC design process. The guide shows, through realistic examples, how various defaults and arbitrary safety factors can lead to significant increases in the load estimate. Emphasis is placed on the risks incurred from inaccurate adjustments or ignoring critical inputs of the load calculation.

  14. 49 CFR 533.6 - Measurement and calculation procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Measurement and calculation procedures. 533.6 Section 533.6 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY... Measurement and calculation procedures. (a) Any reference to a class of light trucks manufactured by...

  15. 49 CFR 531.6 - Measurement and calculation procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the Act and set forth in 40 CFR part 600. (b) A manufacturer that is eligible to elect a model year in... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Measurement and calculation procedures. 531.6... STANDARDS § 531.6 Measurement and calculation procedures. (a) The average fuel economy of all...

  16. 49 CFR 533.6 - Measurement and calculation procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Measurement and calculation procedures. 533.6 Section 533.6 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY... Measurement and calculation procedures. (a) Any reference to a class of light trucks manufactured by...

  17. 49 CFR 533.6 - Measurement and calculation procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Measurement and calculation procedures. 533.6 Section 533.6 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY... Measurement and calculation procedures. (a) Any reference to a class of light trucks manufactured by...

  18. Load research manual. Volume 2. Fundamentals of implementing load research procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenburg, L.; Clarkson, G.; Grund, Jr., C.; Leo, J.; Asbury, J.; Brandon-Brown, F.; Derderian, H.; Mueller, R.; Swaroop, R.

    1980-11-01

    This three-volume manual presents technical guidelines for electric utility load research. Special attention is given to issues raised by the load data reporting requirements of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 and to problems faced by smaller utilities that are initiating load research programs. In Volumes 1 and 2, procedures are suggested for determining data requirements for load research, establishing the size and customer composition of a load survey sample, selecting and using equipment to record customer electricity usage, processing data tapes from the recording equipment, and analyzing the data. Statistical techniques used in customer sampling are discussed in detail. The costs of load research also are estimated, and ongoing load research programs at three utilities are described. The manual includes guides to load research literature and glossaries of load research and statistical terms.

  19. A Procedure Using Calculators to Express Answers in Fractional Form.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlisle, Earnest

    A procedure is described that enables students to perform operations on fractions with a calculator, expressing the answer as a fraction. Patterns using paper-and-pencil procedures for each operation with fractions are presented. A microcomputer software program illustrates how the answer can be found using integer values of the numerators and…

  20. Prosthetic procedure for simultaneous immediate loading of opposing edentulous arches.

    PubMed

    Biscaro, Leonello; Ferlin, Paolo; Becattelli, Alberto; Vigolo, Paolo

    2014-10-01

    For patients with complete edentulism, a significant problem is the transfer of diagnostic data to the definitive casts when an immediate loading technique is used. This article presents a prosthetic procedure to allow simultaneous treatment of opposing edentulous arches with immediate implant loading. This technique uses 2 occlusal acrylic resin devices to transfer the diagnostic cast information to the definitive casts. Esthetic and functional fixed dental prostheses are fabricated from diagnostic information acquired in the presurgical phase without any impression or recording of the maxillomandibular relationship during or after surgery. This methodology is applicable when the simultaneous immediate loading of implants in 2 edentulous arches is indicated.

  1. A procedure for calculation of boundary layer trip protuberances in overexpanded rocket nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmucker, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    A procedure is described for sizing, scaling, positioning and performance loss calculation of a boundary layer trip protuberance. The theoretical results are compared with some experimental data. The application of boundary layer trips, such as secondary injection, wall angle discontinuities, circumferential grooves, and circumferential trip protuberances for reducing side loads on rocket nozzle walls is discussed.

  2. Hanford Apatite Treatability Test Report Errata: Apatite Mass Loading Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Szecsody, James E.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Williams, Mark D.; Truex, Michael J.

    2014-05-19

    The objective of this errata report is to document an error in the apatite loading (i.e., treatment capacity) estimate reported in previous apatite treatability test reports and provide additional calculation details for estimating apatite loading and barrier longevity. The apatite treatability test final report (PNNL-19572; Vermeul et al. 2010) documents the results of the first field-scale evaluation of the injectable apatite PRB technology. The apatite loading value in units of milligram-apatite per gram-sediment is incorrect in this and some other previous reports. The apatite loading in units of milligram phosphate per gram-sediment, however, is correct, and this is the unit used for comparison to field core sample measurements.

  3. Numerical procedures for the calculation of the stresses in monocoques III : calculation of the bending moments in fuselage frames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoff, N J; Libby, Paul A; Klein, Bertran

    1946-01-01

    This report deals with the calculation of the bending moments in and the distortions of fuselage rings upon which known concentrated and distributed loads are acting. In the procedure suggested, the ring is divided into a number of beams each having a constant radius of curvature. The forces and moments caused in the end sections of the beams by individual unit displacements of the end sections are listed in a table designated as the operations table in conformity with Southwell's nomenclature. The operations table and the external loads are equivalent to a set of linear equations. For their solution the following three procedures are presented: 1) Southwell's method of systematic relaxations. This is a step-by-step approximation procedure guided by the physical interpretation of the changes in the values of the unknown. 2) The growing unit procedure in which the individual beams are combined successively into beams of increasing length until finally the entire ring becomes a single beam. In each step of the procedure a set of not more than three simultaneous linear equations is solved. 3) Solution of the entire set of simultaneous equations by the methods of the matrix calculus. In order to demonstrate the manner in which the calculations may be carried out, the following numerical examples are worked out: 1) Curved beam with both its end sections rigidly fixed. The load is a concentrated force. 2) Egg-shape ring with symmetric concentrated loads. 3) Circular ring with antisymmetric concentrated loads and shear flow (torsion of the fuselage). 4) Same with V-braces incorporated in the ring. 5) Egg-shape ring with antisymmetric concentrated loads and shear flow (torsion of the fuselage). 6) Same with V-braces incorporated in the ring. The results of these calculations are checked, whenever possible, by calculations carried out according to known methods of analysis. The agreement is found to be good. The amount of work necessary for the solution of ring problems by

  4. Efficient Load Balancing and Data Remapping for Adaptive Grid Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliker, Leonid; Biswas, Rupak

    1997-01-01

    Mesh adaption is a powerful tool for efficient unstructured- grid computations but causes load imbalance among processors on a parallel machine. We present a novel method to dynamically balance the processor workloads with a global view. This paper presents, for the first time, the implementation and integration of all major components within our dynamic load balancing strategy for adaptive grid calculations. Mesh adaption, repartitioning, processor assignment, and remapping are critical components of the framework that must be accomplished rapidly and efficiently so as not to cause a significant overhead to the numerical simulation. Previous results indicated that mesh repartitioning and data remapping are potential bottlenecks for performing large-scale scientific calculations. We resolve these issues and demonstrate that our framework remains viable on a large number of processors.

  5. Operational Control Procedures for the Activated Sludge Process, Part III-A: Calculation Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Alfred W.

    This is the second in a series of documents developed by the National Training and Operational Technology Center describing operational control procedures for the activated sludge process used in wastewater treatment. This document deals exclusively with the calculation procedures, including simplified mixing formulas, aeration tank…

  6. 49 CFR 531.6 - Measurement and calculation procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the Act and set forth in 40 CFR part 600. (b) A manufacturer that is eligible to elect a model year in... TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PASSENGER AUTOMOBILE AVERAGE FUEL ECONOMY STANDARDS § 531.6 Measurement and calculation procedures. (a) The average fuel economy of all...

  7. 10 CFR 434.510 - Standard calculation procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Standard calculation procedure. 434.510 Section 434.510 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Building Energy Cost Compliance Alternative § 434.510...

  8. 10 CFR 434.507 - Calculation procedure and simulation tool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Calculation procedure and simulation tool. 434.507 Section 434.507 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Building Energy Cost Compliance Alternative §...

  9. 10 CFR 434.605 - Standard Calculation Procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Standard Calculation Procedure. 434.605 Section 434.605 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Building Energy Compliance Alternative § 434.605 Standard...

  10. 10 CFR 434.510 - Standard calculation procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Standard calculation procedure. 434.510 Section 434.510 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Building Energy Cost Compliance Alternative § 434.510...

  11. 10 CFR 434.605 - Standard Calculation Procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Standard Calculation Procedure. 434.605 Section 434.605 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Building Energy Compliance Alternative § 434.605 Standard...

  12. 10 CFR 434.510 - Standard calculation procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Standard calculation procedure. 434.510 Section 434.510 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Building Energy Cost Compliance Alternative § 434.510...

  13. 10 CFR 434.605 - Standard Calculation Procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Standard Calculation Procedure. 434.605 Section 434.605 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Building Energy Compliance Alternative § 434.605 Standard...

  14. 10 CFR 434.507 - Calculation procedure and simulation tool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Calculation procedure and simulation tool. 434.507 Section 434.507 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Building Energy Cost Compliance Alternative §...

  15. 10 CFR 434.510 - Standard calculation procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Standard calculation procedure. 434.510 Section 434.510 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Building Energy Cost Compliance Alternative § 434.510...

  16. 10 CFR 434.507 - Calculation procedure and simulation tool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Calculation procedure and simulation tool. 434.507 Section 434.507 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Building Energy Cost Compliance Alternative §...

  17. 10 CFR 434.605 - Standard Calculation Procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Standard Calculation Procedure. 434.605 Section 434.605 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Building Energy Compliance Alternative § 434.605 Standard...

  18. 10 CFR 434.507 - Calculation procedure and simulation tool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Calculation procedure and simulation tool. 434.507 Section 434.507 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Building Energy Cost Compliance Alternative §...

  19. 10 CFR 434.507 - Calculation procedure and simulation tool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Calculation procedure and simulation tool. 434.507 Section 434.507 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Building Energy Cost Compliance Alternative §...

  20. 10 CFR 434.605 - Standard Calculation Procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Standard Calculation Procedure. 434.605 Section 434.605 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Building Energy Compliance Alternative § 434.605 Standard...

  1. 10 CFR 434.510 - Standard calculation procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Standard calculation procedure. 434.510 Section 434.510 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI-FAMILY HIGH RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Building Energy Cost Compliance Alternative § 434.510...

  2. Monte Carlo shipping cask calculations using an automated biasing procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, J.S.; Hoffman, T.J.; Childs, R.L.; Parks, C.V.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes an automated biasing procedure for Monte Carlo shipping cask calculations within the SCALE system - a modular code system for Standardized Computer Analysis for Licensing Evaluation. The SCALE system was conceived and funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to satisfy a strong need for performing standardized criticality, shielding, and heat transfer analyses of nuclear systems.

  3. Calculating Nozzle Side Loads using Acceleration Measurements of Test-Based Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Andrew M.; Ruf, Joe

    2007-01-01

    As part of a NASA/MSFC research program to evaluate the effect of different nozzle contours on the well-known but poorly characterized "side load" phenomena, we attempt to back out the net force on a sub-scale nozzle during cold-flow testing using acceleration measurements. Because modeling the test facility dynamics is problematic, new techniques for creating a "pseudo-model" of the facility and nozzle directly from modal test results are applied. Extensive verification procedures were undertaken, resulting in a loading scale factor necessary for agreement between test and model based frequency response functions. Side loads are then obtained by applying a wide-band random load onto the system model, obtaining nozzle response PSD's, and iterating both the amplitude and frequency of the input until a good comparison of the response with the measured response PSD for a specific time point is obtained. The final calculated loading can be used to compare different nozzle profiles for assessment during rocket engine nozzle development and as a basis for accurate design of the nozzle and engine structure to withstand these loads. The techniques applied within this procedure have extensive applicability to timely and accurate characterization of all test fixtures used for modal test.A viewgraph presentation on a model-test based pseudo-model used to calculate side loads on rocket engine nozzles is included. The topics include: 1) Side Loads in Rocket Nozzles; 2) Present Side Loads Research at NASA/MSFC; 3) Structural Dynamic Model Generation; 4) Pseudo-Model Generation; 5) Implementation; 6) Calibration of Pseudo-Model Response; 7) Pseudo-Model Response Verification; 8) Inverse Force Determination; 9) Results; and 10) Recent Work.

  4. Comparison of analytical methods for calculation of wind loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minderman, Donald J.; Schultz, Larry L.

    1989-01-01

    The following analysis is a comparison of analytical methods for calculation of wind load pressures. The analytical methods specified in ASCE Paper No. 3269, ANSI A58.1-1982, the Standard Building Code, and the Uniform Building Code were analyzed using various hurricane speeds to determine the differences in the calculated results. The winds used for the analysis ranged from 100 mph to 125 mph and applied inland from the shoreline of a large open body of water (i.e., an enormous lake or the ocean) a distance of 1500 feet or ten times the height of the building or structure considered. For a building or structure less than or equal to 250 feet in height acted upon by a wind greater than or equal to 115 mph, it was determined that the method specified in ANSI A58.1-1982 calculates a larger wind load pressure than the other methods. For a building or structure between 250 feet and 500 feet tall acted upon by a wind rangind from 100 mph to 110 mph, there is no clear choice of which method to use; for these cases, factors that must be considered are the steady-state or peak wind velocity, the geographic location, the distance from a large open body of water, and the expected design life and its risk factor.

  5. Experimental Verification of Buffet Calculation Procedure Using Unsteady PSP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, Jayanta

    2016-01-01

    Typically a limited number of dynamic pressure sensors are employed to determine the unsteady aerodynamic forces on large, slender aerospace structures. The estimated forces are known to be very sensitive to the number of the dynamic pressure sensors and the details of the integration scheme. This report describes a robust calculation procedure, based on frequency-specific correlation lengths, that is found to produce good estimation of fluctuating forces from a few dynamic pressure sensors. The validation test was conducted on a flat panel, placed on the floor of a wind tunnel, and was subjected to vortex shedding from a rectangular bluff-body. The panel was coated with fast response Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP), which allowed time-resolved measurements of unsteady pressure fluctuations on a dense grid of spatial points. The first part of the report describes the detail procedure used to analyze the high-speed, PSP camera images. The procedure includes steps to reduce contamination by electronic shot noise, correction for spatial non-uniformities, and lamp brightness variation, and finally conversion of fluctuating light intensity to fluctuating pressure. The latter involved applying calibration constants from a few dynamic pressure sensors placed at selective points on the plate. Excellent comparison in the spectra, coherence and phase, calculated via PSP and dynamic pressure sensors validated the PSP processing steps. The second part of the report describes the buffet validation process, for which the first step was to use pressure histories from all PSP points to determine the "true" force fluctuations. In the next step only a selected number of pixels were chosen as "virtual sensors" and a correlation-length based buffet calculation procedure was applied to determine "modeled" force fluctuations. By progressively decreasing the number of virtual sensors it was observed that the present calculation procedure was able to make a close estimate of the "true

  6. Gold weight lid load as a secondary procedure.

    PubMed

    Liu, D

    1991-05-01

    This paper discusses the use of gold weight lid load as a secondary procedure. By using three representative patients, I emphasize the following points: First, the dominance of the eye must be determined so that postoperative changes in the eyelid height can be anticipated. Second, in order to obtain an accurate weight of the implant needed, the restrictive effect on the eyelid from the previous surgery (a tarsorrhaphy or an encircling band) must first be eliminated. Third, to ensure the best result and the patient's comfort, lacrimal function, Bell's phenomenon, and levator function must be assessed.

  7. WINDOW 4.0: Documentation of calculation procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Finlayson, E.U.; Arasteh, D.K.; Huizenga, C.; Rubin, M.D.; Reilly, M.S.

    1993-07-01

    WINDOW 4.0 is a publicly available IBM PC compatible computer program developed by the Building Technologies Group at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for calculating the thermal and optical properties necessary for heat transfer analyses of fenestration products. This report explains the calculation methods used in WINDOW 4.0 and is meant as a tool for those interested in understanding the procedures contained in WINDOW 4.0. All the calculations are discussed in the International System of units (SI). WINDOW 4.0 is the latest in a series of programs released by the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The WINDOW program has its roots in a paper detailing a method for calculating heat transfer through windows [Rubin, 1982]. WINDOW 4.0 replaces the widely used 3.1 version. Although WINDOW 4.0 is a major revision, many of the algorithms used in WINDOW 4.0 build upon those previously documented [Arasteh, 1989b], [Furler, 1991]. This report documents the calculations that are unchanged from WINDOW 3.1, as well as those calculations that are new to WINDOW 4.0. This report uses the organization of the WINDOW 4.0 program. Results displayed on a WINDOW 4.0 screen are discussed in a section describing that screen. In the conclusion the aspects of the calculation method currently slated for revision are discussed. A glossary of variables used throughout the report is found in Section 11.

  8. Load calculation and system evaluation for electric vehicle climate control

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves-Saborio, S.; Comfort, W.J. III

    1993-10-27

    Providing air conditioning for electric vehicles (EVs) represents an important challenge, because vapor compression air conditioners, which are common in gasoline powered vehicles, may consume a substantial part of the total energy stored in the EV battery. This report consists of two major parts. The first part is a cooling and heating load calculation for electric vehicles. The second part is an evaluation of several systems that can be used to provide the desired cooling and heating in EVs. Four cases are studied. Short range and full range EVs are each analyzed twice, first with the regular vehicle equipment, and then with a fan and heat reflecting windows, to reduce hot soak. Recent legislation has allowed the use of combustion heating whenever the ambient temperature drops below 5{degrees}C. This has simplified the problem of heating, and made cooling the most important problem. Therefore, systems described in this project are designed for cooling, and their applicability to heating at temperatures above 5{degrees}C is described. If the air conditioner systems cannot be used to cover the whole heating load at 5{degrees}C, then the vehicle requires a complementary heating system (most likely a heat recovery system or electric resistance heating). Air conditioners are ranked according to their overall weight. The overall weight is calculated by adding the system weight and the weight of the battery necessary to provide energy for system operation.

  9. An engineering procedure for calculating compressive strength of isogrid cylindrical shells with buckled skin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heard, W. L., Jr.; Anderson, M. S.; Slysh, P.

    1976-01-01

    An engineering procedure is presented for calculating the compressive buckling strength of isogrid cylinders using shell of revolution techniques and accounting for loading beyond the material proportional limit and/or local buckling of the skin prior to general buckling. A general nondimensional chart is presented which can be used in conjunction with formulas based on simple deformation plasticity theory to calculate postbuckling stiffnesses of the skin. The stiffening grid system is treated as an equivalent isotropic grid layer. Stiffnesses are determined for this grid layer, when loaded beyond the proportional limit, by the same plasticity theory used for the skin and a nonlinear stress-strain curve constructed from simple isogrid-handbook formulas and standard-reference-manual stress-strain curves for the material involved. Comparison of prebuckling strains and buckling results obtained by this procedure with data from a large isogrid-cylinder test is excellent with the calculated buckling load no more than 4 percent greater than the test value.

  10. Design procedure for pollutant loadings and impacts for highway stormwater runoff (IBM version) (for microcomputers). Software

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The interactive computer program was developed to make a user friendly procedure for the personal computer for calculations and guidance to make estimations of pollutant loadings and impacts from highway stormwater runoff which are presented in the Publication FHWA-RD-88-006, Pollutant Loadings and Impacts from Highway Stormwater Runoff, Volume I: Design Procedure. The computer program is for the evaluation of the water quality impact from highway stormwater runoff to a lake or a stream from a specific highway site considering the necessary rainfall data and geographic site situation. The evaluation considers whether or not the resulting water quality conditions can cause a problem as indicated by the violations of water quality criteria or objectives.

  11. Design procedure for pollutant loadings and impacts for highway stormwater runoff (Macintosh version) (for microcomputers). Software

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The interactive computer program was developed to make a user friendly procedure for the personal computer for calculations and guidance to make estimations of pollutant loadings and impacts from highway stormwater runoff which are presented in the Publication FHWA-RD-88-006, Pollutant Loadings and Impacts from Highway Stormwater Runoff, Volume I: Design Procedure. The computer program is for the evaluation of the water quality impact from highway stormwater runoff to a lake or a stream from a specific highway site considering the necessary rainfall data and geographic site situation. The evaluation considers whether or not the resulting water quality conditions can cause a problem as indicated by the violations of water quality criteria or objectives.

  12. Calculation of Rotor Performance and Loads Under Stalled Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeo, Hyeonsoo

    2003-01-01

    Rotor behavior in stalled conditions is investigated using wind tunnel test data of a l/l0-scale CH-47B/C type rotor, which provides a set of test conditions extending from unstalled to light stall to some deep stall conditions over a wide range of advance ratios. The rotor performance measured in the wind tunnel is similar to the main rotor performance measured during the NASA/Army UH-60A Airloads Program, although the two rotors are quite different. The analysis CAMRAD II has been used to predict the rotor performance and loads. Full-scale airfoil test data are corrected for Reynolds number effects for comparison with the model-scale rotor test. The calculated power coefficient shows good correlation with the measurements below stall with the Reynolds number-corrected airfoil table. Various dynamic stall models are used in the calculations. The Boeing model shows the lift augmentation at low advance ratios and the Leishman-Beddoes model shows better correlation of torsion moment than the other models at mu = 0.2. However, the dynamic stall models, in general, show only a small influence on the rotor power and torsion moment predictions especially at higher advance ratios.

  13. Evaluation of approaches to calculate critical metal loads for forest ecosystems.

    PubMed

    de Vries, W; Groenenberg, J E

    2009-12-01

    This paper evaluates approaches to calculate acceptable loads for metal deposition to forest ecosystems, distinguishing between critical loads, stand-still loads and target loads. We also evaluated the influence of including the biochemical metal cycle on the calculated loads. Differences are illustrated by examples of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn for a deciduous forest on five major soil types in the Netherlands. Stand-still loads are generally lower than critical loads, which in turn are lower than the target loads indicating that present levels are below critical levels. Uncertainties in the calculated critical loads are mainly determined by the uncertainty in the critical limits and the chemical speciation model. Including the metal cycle has a small effect on the calculated critical loads. Results are discussed in view of the applicability of the critical load concept for metals in future protocols on the reduction in metal emissions.

  14. Inverse Load Calculation of Wind Turbine Support Structures - A Numerical Verification Using the Comprehensive Simulation Code FAST: Preprint (Revised)

    SciTech Connect

    Pahn, T.; Jonkman, J.; Rolges, R.; Robertson, A.

    2012-11-01

    Physically measuring the dynamic responses of wind turbine support structures enables the calculation of the applied loads using an inverse procedure. In this process, inverse means deriving the inputs/forces from the outputs/responses. This paper presents results of a numerical verification of such an inverse load calculation. For this verification, the comprehensive simulation code FAST is used. FAST accounts for the coupled dynamics of wind inflow, aerodynamics, elasticity and turbine controls. Simulations are run using a 5-MW onshore wind turbine model with a tubular tower. Both the applied loads due to the instantaneous wind field and the resulting system responses are known from the simulations. Using the system responses as inputs to the inverse calculation, the applied loads are calculated, which in this case are the rotor thrust forces. These forces are compared to the rotor thrust forces known from the FAST simulations. The results of these comparisons are presented to assess the accuracy of the inverse calculation. To study the influences of turbine controls, load cases in normal operation between cut-in and rated wind speed, near rated wind speed and between rated and cut-out wind speed are chosen. The presented study shows that the inverse load calculation is capable of computing very good estimates of the rotor thrust. The accuracy of the inverse calculation does not depend on the control activity of the wind turbine.

  15. A new procedure for calculating contact stresses in gear teeth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somprakit, Paisan; Huston, Ronald L.

    1991-01-01

    A numerical procedure for evaluating and monitoring contact stresses in meshing gear teeth is discussed. The procedure is intended to extend the range of applicability and to improve the accuracy of gear contact stress analysis. The procedure is based upon fundamental solution from the theory of elasticity. It is an iterative numerical procedure. The method is believed to have distinct advantages over the classical Hertz method, the finite-element method, and over existing approaches with the boundary element method. Unlike many classical contact stress analyses, friction effects and sliding are included. Slipping and sticking in the contact region are studied. Several examples are discussed. The results are in agreement with classical results. Applications are presented for spur gears.

  16. The Io mass-loading disk: Model calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongli; Russell, Christopher T.; Raeder, Joachim

    2001-11-01

    The observations of ion cyclotron waves up to 0.5 RJ beyond the orbit of Io are best explained by the presence of a thin disk of fast neutrals whose ionization and pickup provide the free energy for the waves. We extend the model of Wilson and Schneider [1999] in order to explain the observed properties of this mass-loading region, especially the most recent Galileo observations near Io. In the extended model, some of the molecules of sulfur compounds in Io's exobase are first ionized by photoionization, impact ionization, and charge exchange. These charged particles are accelerated in the corotation electric field associated with the motion of the magnetized Io torus plasma that is moving through its exosphere. After a period of acceleration the heavy ions are neutralized by charge exchange with other exospheric neutral particles or combined with local electrons. These newly neutralized particles continue with high velocities similar to those of their former charged state, moving only under the influence of the gravity fields of Jupiter and Io, not affected by the electric and magnetic field. If they do not impact Io or its atmosphere, these neutral particles can propagate large distances across the magnetic field before they are reionized. Eventually, the reionized particles are lost by dissociation. Characteristic Io mass-loading particle distributions, such as high torus plasma density outside Io's orbit and the lower density inside, and the directional feature of the mass-loading neutral cloud, are qualitatively reproduced in the model. Meanwhile, the configuration of the mass-loading region, in which the ion cyclotron waves are observed, is obtained, and the results are consistent with Galileo wave observations. Three parameters are found to control the structure of the neutral and ion loading disks: the characteristic lifetimes of the initially created ions, of the neutral molecules, and of the ions generated by neutral particle reionization. In addition

  17. Comparison of computer codes for calculating dynamic loads in wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, D. A.

    1977-01-01

    Seven computer codes for analyzing performance and loads in large, horizontal-axis wind turbines were used to calculate blade bending moment loads for two operational conditions of the 100 kW Mod-O wind turbine. Results are compared with test data on the basis of cyclic loads, peak loads, and harmonic contents. Four of the seven codes include rotor-tower interaction and three are limited to rotor analysis. With a few exceptions, all calculated loads were within 25% of nominal test data.

  18. Comparison of computer codes for calculating dynamic loads in wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, D. A.

    1977-01-01

    Seven computer codes for analyzing performance and loads in large, horizontal axis wind turbines were used to calculate blade bending moment loads for two operational conditions of the 100 kW Mod-0 wind turbine. Results were compared with test data on the basis of cyclic loads, peak loads, and harmonic contents. Four of the seven codes include rotor-tower interaction and three were limited to rotor analysis. With a few exceptions, all calculated loads were within 25 percent of nominal test data.

  19. Continuous damage parameter calculation under thermo-mechanical random loading

    PubMed Central

    Nagode, Marko

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents a method on how the mean stress effect on fatigue damage can be taken into account under an arbitrary low cycle thermo-mechanical loading. From known stress, elastoplastic strain and temperature histories the cycle amplitudes and cycle mean values are extracted and the damage parameter is computed. In contrast to the existing methods the proposed method enables continuous damage parameter computation without the need of waiting for the cycles to close. The limitations of the standardized damage parameters are thus surpassed. The damage parameters derived initially for closed and isothermal cycles assuming that the elastoplastic stress–strain response follows the Masing and memory rules can now be used to take the mean stress effect into account under an arbitrary low cycle thermo-mechanical loading. The method includes:•stress and elastoplastic strain history transformation into the corresponding amplitude and mean values;•stress and elastoplastic strain amplitude and mean value transformation into the damage parameter amplitude history;•damage parameter amplitude history transformation into the damage parameter history. PMID:26150939

  20. Calculation of design load for the MOD-5A 7.3 mW wind turbine system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirandy, L.; Strain, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    Design loads are presented for the General Electric MOD-SA wind turbine. The MOD-SA system consists of a 400 ft. diameter, upwind, two-bladed, teetered rotor connected to a 7.3 mW variable-speed generator. Fatigue loads are specified in the form of histograms for the 30 year life of the machine, while limit (or maximum) loads have been derived from transient dynamic analysis at critical operating conditions. Loads prediction was accomplished using state of the art aeroelastic analyses developed at General Electric. Features of the primary predictive tool - the Transient Rotor Analysis Code (TRAC) are described in the paper. Key to the load predictions are the following wind models: (1) yearly mean wind distribution; (2) mean wind variations during operation; (3) number of start/shutdown cycles; (4) spatially large gusts; and (5) spatially small gusts (local turbulence). The methods used to develop statistical distributions from load calculations represent an extension of procedures used in past wind programs and are believed to be a significant contribution to Wind Turbine Generator analysis. Test/theory correlations are presented to demonstrate code load predictive capability and to support the wind models used in the analysis. In addition MOD-5A loads are compared with those of existing machines. The MOD-5A design was performed by the General Electric Company, Advanced Energy Program Department, under Contract DEN3-153 with NASA Lewis Research Center and sponsored by the Department of Energy.

  1. Calculation of design load for the MOD-5A 7.3 mW wind turbine system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirandy, L.; Strain, J. C.

    1995-05-01

    Design loads are presented for the General Electric MOD-SA wind turbine. The MOD-SA system consists of a 400 ft. diameter, upwind, two-bladed, teetered rotor connected to a 7.3 mW variable-speed generator. Fatigue loads are specified in the form of histograms for the 30 year life of the machine, while limit (or maximum) loads have been derived from transient dynamic analysis at critical operating conditions. Loads prediction was accomplished using state of the art aeroelastic analyses developed at General Electric. Features of the primary predictive tool - the Transient Rotor Analysis Code (TRAC) are described in the paper. Key to the load predictions are the following wind models: (1) yearly mean wind distribution; (2) mean wind variations during operation; (3) number of start/shutdown cycles; (4) spatially large gusts; and (5) spatially small gusts (local turbulence). The methods used to develop statistical distributions from load calculations represent an extension of procedures used in past wind programs and are believed to be a significant contribution to Wind Turbine Generator analysis. Test/theory correlations are presented to demonstrate code load predictive capability and to support the wind models used in the analysis. In addition MOD-5A loads are compared with those of existing machines. The MOD-5A design was performed by the General Electric Company, Advanced Energy Program Department, under Contract DEN3-153 with NASA Lewis Research Center and sponsored by the Department of Energy.

  2. Boundary condition computational procedures for inviscid, supersonic steady flow field calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbett, M. J.

    1971-01-01

    Results are given of a comparative study of numerical procedures for computing solid wall boundary points in supersonic inviscid flow calculatons. Twenty five different calculation procedures were tested on two sample problems: a simple expansion wave and a simple compression (two-dimensional steady flow). A simple calculation procedure was developed. The merits and shortcomings of the various procedures are discussed, along with complications for three-dimensional and time-dependent flows.

  3. A flux-split solution procedure for unsteady flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pordal, H. S.; Khosla, P. K.; Rubin, S. G.

    1990-01-01

    The solution of reduced Navier Stokes (RNS) equations is considered using a flux-split procedure. Unsteady flow in a two dimensional engine inlet is computed. The problems of unstart and restart are investigated. A sparse matrix direct solver combined with domain decomposition strategy is used to compute the unsteady flow field at each instant of time. Strong shock-boundary layer interaction, time varying shocks and time varying recirculation regions are efficiently captured.

  4. Assessment of Comprehensive Analysis Calculation of Structural Loads on Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeo, Hyeonsoo; Johnson, Wayne

    2004-01-01

    Blade flap bending moments are investigated for six rotors operating at transition and high speeds: H-34 in flight and wind tunnel, SA 330 (research Puma), SA 349/2, UH-60A full-scale, and BO-105 model (HART-I). The measured data from flight and wind tunnel tests are compared with calculations obtained using the comprehensive analysis CAMRAD II. The calculations mere made using two free wake models: rolled-up and multiple-trailer with consolidation models. At transition speed, there is fair to good agreement for the flap bending moment between the test data and analysis for the H-34, research Puma, and SA 349/2 with the rolled-up wake. The calculated flap bending moments differ significantly from measurements for the UH-60A and BO-105. Better correlation is obtained for the UH-60A by using the multiple-trailer with consolidation wake model. Although the multiple-trailer with consolidation wake model shows good correlation on the normal force for the BO-105, the same analysis shows poor correlation on the flap bending moment. In the high speed condition, the analysis shows generally good agreement with the research Puma flight data in both magnitude and phase. However, poor agreement is obtained for the other rotors examined. Although the analysis significantly underpredicts the vibratory normal force on the advancing side for the H-34, the vibratory bending moment correlation is fair to good on both magnitude and phase.

  5. Load effects calculation according to EN 1991-2 Load Model 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavchev, V.

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, fast calculation method for determination the effects of EN 1991-2 LM1 is presented. The influence lines method was used for calculation. Both bending moments and shear forces at typical section can be easy calculated by using one table.

  6. Comparison of Rotor Structural Loads Calculated using Comprehensive Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wayne; Yeo, Hyeonsoo

    2005-01-01

    Blade flap and chord bending and torsion moments are investigated for six rotors operating at transition and high speed: H-34 in flight and wind tunnel, SA 330 (research Puma), SA 349/2, UH-60A full-scale, and BO- 105 model (HART-I). The measured data from flight and wind tunnel tests are compared with calculations obtained using the comprehensive analysis CAMRAD II. The calculations were made using two free wake models: rolled-up and multiple-trailer with consolidation models. At transition speed, there is fair to good agreement for the flap and chord bending moments between the test data and analysis for the H-34, research Puma, and SA 349/2. Torsion moment correlation, in general, is fair to good for all the rotors investigated. Better flap bending and torsion moment correlation is obtained for the UH-60A and BO-105 rotors by using the multiple-trailer with consolidation wake model. In the high speed condition, the analysis shows generally better correlation in magnitude than in phase for the flap bending and torsion moments. However, a significant underprediction of chord bending moment is observed for the research Puma and UH-60A. The poor chord bending moment correlation appears to be caused by the airloads model, not the structural dynamics.

  7. Rapid response calculation of LNG cargo containment system under sloshing load using wavelet transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yooil

    2013-06-01

    Reliable strength assessment of the Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) cargo containment system under the sloshing impact load is very difficult task due to the complexity of the physics involved in, both in terms of the hydrodynamics and structural mechanics. Out of all those complexities, the proper selection of the design sloshing load which is applied to the structural model of the LNG cargo containment system, is one of the most challenging one due to its inherent randomness as well as the statistical analysis which is tightly linked to the design sloshing load selection. In this study, the response based strength assessment procedure of LNG cargo containment system has been developed and proposed as an alternative design methodology. Sloshing pressure time history, measured from the model test, is decomposed into wavelet basis function targeting the minimization of the number of the basis function together with the maximization of the numerical efficiency. Then the response of the structure is obtained using the finite element method under each wavelet basis function of different scale. Finally, the response of the structure under entire sloshing impact time history is rapidly calculated by synthesizing the structural response under wavelet basis function. Through this analysis, more realistic response of the system under sloshing impact pressure can be obtained without missing the details of pressure time history such as rising pattern, oscillation due to air entrapment and decay pattern and so on. The strength assessment of the cargo containment system is then performed based on the statistical analysis of the stress peaks selected out of the obtained stress time history.

  8. A Procedure for Calculating Logic Programs by Replacement of Formulae and Transformation to Disjunctive Normal Form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiba, Sumitaka; Sato, Taisuke; Motoyoshi, Fumio

    In this paper, we describe an improvement of a calculation procedure of logic programs. The procedure proposed before is the combination of a replacement procedure of logical formulae and a transformation procedure of equations to disjunctive normal form, and it can calculate logical consequences of the completion of any given first-order logic program (FLP), which is equivalent to the FLP in two-valued logic, soundly and completely in three-valued logic. The new procedure is also the combination of them, but the transformation procedure is improved to be able to calculate two-valued logical consequences of the FLP more than the old one. We prove that it can calculate logical consequences of a completed program, which is not equivalent to the completion of the FLP, soundly and completely in three-valued logic.

  9. An improved procedure for calculating effective interactions and operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Chang Liang

    1998-12-01

    Most modern microscopic nuclear structure calculations for finite nuclei are based on the shell model. As usually implemented, the model involves a number of uncontrolled approximations that destroy the connections with rigorous many-body theory, including those that tell one how to construct the corresponding effective operators. In this thesis, we introduce a new approach for calculating the effective interaction, which is formally exact if evaluated to all orders and preserves both the connections to the effective operators and the important symmetries, such as translational invariance and hermiticity. It is based on the Bloch-Horowitz equation and an expansion in which successive levels of approximation involve an exact summation of ladder diagrams for two-body clusters, three-body clusters and so on, that is, a summation of all diagrams through order (density)0,/ (density)1, etc, in the effective interaction and effective operator. The approach is free of fictitious parameters such as starting energies. The crucial numerical trick is solving the Bloch-Horowitz equation, which requires knowledge of the exact eigenvalue, by a powerful Lanczos Green's function method that allows one to iterate quickly to convergence for each desired eigenvalue and eigenfunction. In other words, the Bloch-Horowitz equation must be solved self- consistently and state-by-state. We use a full N/hbar/Omega multi-configuration basis as the shell- model space. The model spaces are large to avoid the intruder state problems that frustrated early investigators. We derive a possible formulation for the effective interaction and test it by calculating the properties of the simplest nuclei-the deuteron and 3He. The evolution of the effective interaction towards the bare interaction as the included space is enlarged is discussed. The same strategies and numerical tools can be applied to the effective operator, that is, the operator that, when evaluated with model space wave functions, will

  10. Comparison of computer codes for calculating dynamic loads in wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    The development of computer codes for calculating dynamic loads in horizontal axis wind turbines was examined, and a brief overview of each code was given. The performance of individual codes was compared against two sets of test data measured on a 100 KW Mod-0 wind turbine. All codes are aeroelastic and include loads which are gravitational, inertial and aerodynamic in origin.

  11. Including Aeroelastic Effects in the Calculation of X-33 Loads and Control Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeiler, Thomas A.

    1998-01-01

    Up until now, loads analyses of the X-33 RLV have been done at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) using aerodynamic loads derived from CFD and wind tunnel models of a rigid vehicle. Control forces and moments are determined using a rigid vehicle trajectory analysis and the detailed control load distributions for achieving the desired control forces and moments, again on the rigid vehicle, are determined by Lockheed Martin Skunk Works. However, static aeroelastic effects upon the load distributions are not known. The static aeroelastic effects will generally redistribute external loads thereby affecting both the internal structural loads as well as the forces and moments generated by aerodynamic control surfaces. Therefore, predicted structural sizes as well as maneuvering requirements can be altered by consideration of static aeroelastic effects. The objective of the present work is the development of models and solutions for including static aeroelasticity in the calculation of X-33 loads and in the determination of stability and control derivatives.

  12. Acceptance test procedure, 241-SY-101/241-C-106 shot loading system

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrom, M.J.

    1994-11-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure is for the 241-SY-101/241-C-106 Shot Loading System. The procedure will test the components of the Shot Loading System and its capability of adequately loading shot into the annular space of the Container. The loaded shot will provide shielding as required for transporting and storage of a contaminated pump after removal from the tank. This test serves as verification that the SLS is acceptable for use in the pump removal operations for Tanks 241-SY-101, 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102. The pump removal operation for these three tanks will be performed by two different organizations with different equipment, but the Shot Loading System will be compatible between the two operations.

  13. A procedure and program to calculate shuttle mask advantage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasinski, A.; Cetin, J.; Kahng, A.; Xu, X.

    2006-10-01

    A well-known recipe for reducing mask cost component in product development is to place non-redundant elements of layout databases related to multiple products on one reticle plate [1,2]. Such reticles are known as multi-product, multi-layer, or, in general, multi-IP masks. The composition of the mask set should minimize not only the layout placement cost, but also the cost of the manufacturing process, design flow setup, and product design and introduction to market. An important factor is the quality check which should be expeditious and enable thorough visual verification to avoid costly modifications once the data is transferred to the mask shop. In this work, in order to enable the layer placement and quality check procedure, we proposed an algorithm where mask layers are first lined up according to the price and field tone [3]. Then, depending on the product die size, expected fab throughput, and scribeline requirements, the subsequent product layers are placed on the masks with different grades. The actual reduction of this concept to practice allowed us to understand the tradeoffs between the automation of layer placement and setup related constraints. For example, the limited options of the numbers of layer per plate dictated by the die size and other design feedback, made us consider layer pairing based not only on the final price of the mask set, but also on the cost of mask design and fab-friendliness. We showed that it may be advantageous to introduce manual layer pairing to ensure that, e.g., all interconnect layers would be placed on the same plate, allowing for easy and simultaneous design fixes. Another enhancement was to allow some flexibility in mixing and matching of the layers such that non-critical ones requiring low mask grade would be placed in a less restrictive way, to reduce the count of orphan layers. In summary, we created a program to automatically propose and visualize shuttle mask architecture for design verification, with

  14. Calculation of multi-layer plate damper under one-axial load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Yan; Lu, Zhang; Hong-Yuan, Jiang; Alexander, M. Ulanov

    2016-02-01

    A multi-layer damper with waved plates under one-axial load is considered. A method of theoretical calculation of its energy dissipation coefficient is proposed. An experimental research of own frequencies and vibration transfer ratios for different parameters of damper structure, harmonic vibration load and random load is performed. Results of this research are approximated by functions; it is possible to use these functions for the calculation of the damper too. Project supported by the Programme of Introducing Talents of Discipline to Universities (Grant No. B07018).

  15. 40 CFR 75.75 - Additional ozone season calculation procedures for special circumstances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Additional ozone season calculation... § 75.75 Additional ozone season calculation procedures for special circumstances. (a) The owner or operator of a unit that is required to calculate ozone season heat input for purposes of providing...

  16. 40 CFR 75.75 - Additional ozone season calculation procedures for special circumstances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Additional ozone season calculation... § 75.75 Additional ozone season calculation procedures for special circumstances. (a) The owner or operator of a unit that is required to calculate ozone season heat input for purposes of providing...

  17. 40 CFR 75.75 - Additional ozone season calculation procedures for special circumstances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Additional ozone season calculation... § 75.75 Additional ozone season calculation procedures for special circumstances. (a) The owner or operator of a unit that is required to calculate ozone season heat input for purposes of providing...

  18. 40 CFR 75.75 - Additional ozone season calculation procedures for special circumstances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Additional ozone season calculation... § 75.75 Additional ozone season calculation procedures for special circumstances. (a) The owner or operator of a unit that is required to calculate ozone season heat input for purposes of providing...

  19. 40 CFR 75.75 - Additional ozone season calculation procedures for special circumstances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Additional ozone season calculation... § 75.75 Additional ozone season calculation procedures for special circumstances. (a) The owner or operator of a unit that is required to calculate ozone season heat input for purposes of providing...

  20. 24 CFR 3280.508 - Heat loss, heat gain and cooling load calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Thermal Protection § 3280.508 Heat loss, heat gain and cooling load calculations. (a) Information, values... Loads—Manufactured Homes—February 1992-PNL 8006, HUD User No. 0005945. (c) Areas where the insulation... heat-flow paths (“thermal shorts”) shall be explicitly accounted for in the calculation of...

  1. Comparison of Iterative and Non-Iterative Strain-Gage Balance Load Calculation Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulbrich, N.

    2010-01-01

    The accuracy of iterative and non-iterative strain-gage balance load calculation methods was compared using data from the calibration of a force balance. Two iterative and one non-iterative method were investigated. In addition, transformations were applied to balance loads in order to process the calibration data in both direct read and force balance format. NASA's regression model optimization tool BALFIT was used to generate optimized regression models of the calibration data for each of the three load calculation methods. This approach made sure that the selected regression models met strict statistical quality requirements. The comparison of the standard deviation of the load residuals showed that the first iterative method may be applied to data in both the direct read and force balance format. The second iterative method, on the other hand, implicitly assumes that the primary gage sensitivities of all balance gages exist. Therefore, the second iterative method only works if the given balance data is processed in force balance format. The calibration data set was also processed using the non-iterative method. Standard deviations of the load residuals for the three load calculation methods were compared. Overall, the standard deviations show very good agreement. The load prediction accuracies of the three methods appear to be compatible as long as regression models used to analyze the calibration data meet strict statistical quality requirements. Recent improvements of the regression model optimization tool BALFIT are also discussed in the paper.

  2. Calculation and mapping of critical loads of sulfur and nitrogen in Flanders, Belgium.

    PubMed

    Craenen, H; Van Ranst, E; Tack, F M; Verloo, M G

    2000-05-24

    Up to now, critical loads calculations for the Flemish Region were based on European background data of surrounding countries. A first attempt has been made to calculate and map critical loads for forest ecosystems in Flanders using available site-specific information. Values of current deposition were used to calculate and map exceedances. The lowest critical loads for acidification (697 eq ha(-1)year(-1)) occur in the Campine and the north of Limburg where ecosystems largely consist of coniferous forests on poor sandy soils. The dominance of coniferous forest types in the Campine is also responsible for low critical load values for eutrophication (between 536 and 971 eq ha(-1)year(-1)). In 75% of the receptor points that have been considered an exceedance of the critical load for acidification is noted, primarily in areas with high SO2 and NOx depositions, such as the north of the provinces East and West Flanders and Antwerp. The critical load for eutrophication is exceeded in all points considered. Exceedances are particularly high in coniferous forests in West Flanders, and in the north of the provinces of Antwerp and Limburg, where especially NHx depositions amount to high values. Data needed for the calculation of critical loads are still sparse in Flanders, e.g. for: (1) weathering rates of soil minerals; (2) interception and evaporation of forest ecosystems; and (3) uptake of N and basic cations by vegetation. This supplementary information will contribute to a further refining of the calculated critical loads, which constitute indispensable information in developing an emission abatement policy.

  3. The results of near-field thermal and mechanical calculations of thermal loading schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, J.F.

    1992-12-31

    Two waste emplacement schemes,borehole and in-drift are under evaluation as potential repository drift geometries for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Calculations were performed to examinethe systems implications of various thermal loadings on the near- and far-field repository environments. Ms paper reports the results of two-dimensional finite element analyses of the near-field thermal and structural response of the potential repository. Thermal calculations were run to 1000 years and mechanical calculations were run to 75 years. the time when the drifts will be backfilled. Local areal power densities (LAPDs) of 57, 80, and 100 kW/acre were used in the calculations. Both emplacement schemes meet current near-field thermal performance goals for all loadings examined. The mechanical calculations predict no intact rock failure, limited joint slippage around the drifts, and closure of apertures for vertical fractures above and below the drifts.

  4. 19 CFR 351.224 - Disclosure of calculations and procedures for the correction of ministerial errors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Disclosure of calculations and procedures for the correction of ministerial errors. 351.224 Section 351.224 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Procedures § 351.224 Disclosure...

  5. 19 CFR 351.224 - Disclosure of calculations and procedures for the correction of ministerial errors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Disclosure of calculations and procedures for the correction of ministerial errors. 351.224 Section 351.224 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Procedures § 351.224 Disclosure...

  6. Validation of IEEE P1547.1 Interconnection Test Procedures: ASCO 7000 Soft Load Transfer System

    SciTech Connect

    Kroposki, B.; Englebretson, S.; Pink, C.; Daley, J.; Siciliano, R.; Hinton, D.

    2003-09-01

    This report presents the preliminary results of testing the ASCO 7000 Soft Load Transfer System according to IEEE P1547.1 procedures. The ASCO system interconnects synchronous generators with the electric power system and provides monitoring and control for the generator and grid connection through extensive protective functions. The purpose of this testing is to evaluate and give feedback on the contents of IEEE Draft Standard P1547.1 Conformance Tests Procedures for Equipment Interconnecting Distributed Resources With Electric Power Systems.

  7. Comparison of three methods of calculating strain in the mouse ulna in exogenous loading studies.

    PubMed

    Norman, Stephanie C; Wagner, David W; Beaupre, Gary S; Castillo, Alesha B

    2015-01-01

    Axial compression of mouse limbs is commonly used to induce bone formation in a controlled, non-invasive manner. Determination of peak strains caused by loading is central to interpreting results. Load-strain calibration is typically performed using uniaxial strain gauges attached to the diaphyseal, periosteal surface of a small number of sacrificed animals. Strain is measured as the limb is loaded to a range of physiological loads known to be anabolic to bone. The load-strain relationship determined by this subgroup is then extrapolated to a larger group of experimental mice. This method of strain calculation requires the challenging process of strain gauging very small bones which is subject to variability in placement of the strain gauge. We previously developed a method to estimate animal-specific periosteal strain during axial ulnar loading using an image-based computational approach that does not require strain gauges. The purpose of this study was to compare the relationship between load-induced bone formation rates and periosteal strain at ulnar midshaft using three different methods to estimate strain: (A) Nominal strain values based solely on load-strain calibration; (B) Strains calculated from load-strain calibration, but scaled for differences in mid-shaft cross-sectional geometry among animals; and (C) An alternative image-based computational method for calculating strains based on beam theory and animal-specific bone geometry. Our results show that the alternative method (C) provides comparable correlation between strain and bone formation rates in the mouse ulna relative to the strain gauge-dependent methods (A and B), while avoiding the need to use strain gauges. PMID:25443882

  8. [Calculating critical loads of acid deposition with different percentiles in China].

    PubMed

    Duan, Lei; Hao, Jiming; Zhou, Zhongping; Xie, Shaodong

    2002-09-01

    While mapping critical loads of acid deposition in China, the 1 degree (latitude) x 1 degree (longitude) resolution was always adopted in critical load calculation. However, the results of mapping can not show the difference of sensitivity of ecosystems to acid deposition within a 1 degree x 1 degree grid. For the convenience of policy-makers to formulate acid deposition control strategies based on critical loads, and to improve the representation and practicability of 1 degree x 1 degree results, a series of critical load maps with different percentiles were compiled, which may be accordance with a given economic or technological level, and allows some degree of damage. Based on the cumulative distribution function, the critical load exceedance maps with different percentiles and the maximum allowable deposition of each province was also derived.

  9. Fire loading calculations for 300 Area N Reactor Fuel Fabrication and Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Myott, C.F.

    1994-01-24

    Fire loading analyses were provided for the N Reactor Fuel Supply Buildings 3712, 3716, 303A, 303B, 303E, 303G, and 303K. Fire loading calculations, maximum temperatures, and fire durations were provided to support the safety analyses documentation. The ``combustibles`` for this document include: wood, cardboard, cloth, and plastic, and does not include the uranium and fuel assembly loading. The information in this document will also be used to support the fire hazard analysis for the same buildings, therefore, it is assumed that sprinkler systems do not work, or the maximum possible fire loss is assumed.

  10. A Method for Calculating Strain Energy Release Rates in Preliminary Design of Composite Skin/Stringer Debonding Under Multi-Axial Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Minguet, Pierre J.; OBrien, T. Kevin

    1999-01-01

    Three simple procedures were developed to determine strain energy release rates, G, in composite skin/stringer specimens for various combinations of unaxial and biaxial (in-plane/out-of-plane) loading conditions. These procedures may be used for parametric design studies in such a way that only a few finite element computations will be necessary for a study of many load combinations. The results were compared with mixed mode strain energy release rates calculated directly from nonlinear two-dimensional plane-strain finite element analyses using the virtual crack closure technique. The first procedure involved solving three unknown parameters needed to determine the energy release rates. Good agreement was obtained when the external loads were used in the expression derived. This superposition technique was only applicable if the structure exhibits a linear load/deflection behavior. Consequently, a second technique was derived which was applicable in the case of nonlinear load/deformation behavior. The technique involved calculating six unknown parameters from a set of six simultaneous linear equations with data from six nonlinear analyses to determine the energy release rates. This procedure was not time efficient, and hence, less appealing. A third procedure was developed to calculate mixed mode energy release rates as a function of delamination lengths. This procedure required only one nonlinear finite element analysis of the specimen with a single delamination length to obtain a reference solution for the energy release rates and the scale factors. The delamination was extended in three separate linear models of the local area in the vicinity of the delamination subjected to unit loads to obtain the distribution of G with delamination lengths. This set of sub-problems was Although additional modeling effort is required to create the sub- models, this local technique is efficient for parametric studies.

  11. STRUCTURAL CALCULATION OF AN EMPLACEMENT PALLET STATICALLY LOADED BY A WASTE PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect

    S. Mastilovic

    2000-02-02

    The purpose of this calculation is to determine the structural response of the emplacement pallet (EP) subjected to static load from the mounted waste package (WP). The scope of this document is limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of stress intensity magnitudes. This calculation is associated with the waste emplacement systems design; calculations are performed by the Waste Package Design group. AP-3.12Q, Revision 0, ICN 0, Calculations, is used to perform the calculation and develop the document. The finite element solutions are performed by using the commercially available ANSYS Version (V) 5.4 finite element code. The results of these calculations are provided in terms of maximum stress intensity magnitudes.

  12. Calibration of quartz load cells: An in-situ procedure for instrumented falling weight impact machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Money, M. W.; Sims, G. D.

    1988-03-01

    A procedure that may be used as a routine check in-situ on the complete system of quartz cell, amplifier, recording device, and data processing unit is suggested. It involves loading and unloading a quartz cell with a known mass, recording the output on a suitable storage device, and manipulating the data with a computer program to provide a permanent record. A quartz cell and amplifier system considered was calibrated to better than 0.1 percent accuracy. Results suggest that providing there is correct alignment of load cell and calibrating force then there is no difference between loading in tension or compression and either method can be used. This is not unexpected as the tension/compression boundary is arbitrary, depending on the degree of preload employed. For instrumented falling weight impact tests a tensile force is much easier to apply to the cell while it remains in the machine. Direct compression loading produces large negative errors. The procedure can be used in the manner required for British standard 1610 but does not meet the standard in full as load removal rather than load application is specified.

  13. [Use of the EC 1010 computer to calculate dosimetric parameters for irradiation procedures in gamma teletherapy].

    PubMed

    Likhovetskaia, R B; Dvorova, E V

    1983-05-01

    An ever growing flow of patients requires a good deal of time for the planning of irradiation procedures of patients and causes errors during manual calculations. A small-size computer EC 1010 is proposed for the calculation of dosimetric parameters of irradiation procedures on gamma-beam therapeutic units. A specially designed program is intended for the calculation of dosimetric parameters for different methods of moving and static irradiation taking into account tissue heterogeneity: multifield static irradiation, multizone rotation irradiation, irradiation using dose field forming devices (V-shaped filters, edge blocks, a grid diaphragm). In addition to the main calculated values, the listing contains in a suitable form all necessary information: the patient's name, date of calculation, a unit type for irradiation, irradiation procedure parameters. The computation of output parameters according to each preset program of irradiation takes no more than 1 min. The use of the computer EC 1010 for the calculation of dosimetric parameters of irradiation procedures gives an opportunity to considerably reduce calculation time, to avoid possible errors and to simplify the drawing up of documents.

  14. Calculation of Dynamic Loads Due to Random Vibration Environments in Rocket Engine Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, Eric R.; Brown, Andrew M.; Frady, Greg P.

    2007-01-01

    An important part of rocket engine design is the calculation of random dynamic loads resulting from internal engine "self-induced" sources. These loads are random in nature and can greatly influence the weight of many engine components. Several methodologies for calculating random loads are discussed and then compared to test results using a dynamic testbed consisting of a 60K thrust engine. The engine was tested in a free-free condition with known random force inputs from shakers attached to three locations near the main noise sources on the engine. Accelerations and strains were measured at several critical locations on the engines and then compared to the analytical results using two different random response methodologies.

  15. Calculating mercury loading to the tidal Hudson River, New York, using rating curve and surrogate methodologies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wall, G.R.; Ingleston, H.H.; Litten, S.

    2005-01-01

    Total mercury (THg) load in rivers is often calculated from a site-specific "rating-curve" based on the relation between THg concentration and river discharge along with a continuous record of river discharge. However, there is no physical explanation as to why river discharge should consistently predict THg or any other suspended analyte. THg loads calculated by the rating-curve method were compared with those calculated by a "continuous surrogate concentration" (CSC) method in which a relation between THg concentration and suspended-sediment concentration (SSC) is constructed; THg loads then can be calculated from the continuous record of SSC and river discharge. The rating-curve and CSC methods, respectively, indicated annual THg loads of 46.4 and 75.1 kg for the Mohawk River, and 52.9 and 33.1 kg for the upper Hudson River. Differences between the results of the two methods are attributed to the inability of the rating-curve method to adequately characterize atypical high flows such as an ice-dam release, or to account for hysteresis, which typically degrades the strength of the relation between stream discharge and concentration of material in suspension. ?? Springer 2005.

  16. 24 CFR 3280.508 - Heat loss, heat gain and cooling load calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Heat loss, heat gain and cooling... Thermal Protection § 3280.508 Heat loss, heat gain and cooling load calculations. (a) Information, values and data necessary for heat loss and heat gain determinations must be taken from the 1997...

  17. 24 CFR 3280.508 - Heat loss, heat gain and cooling load calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Heat loss, heat gain and cooling... Thermal Protection § 3280.508 Heat loss, heat gain and cooling load calculations. (a) Information, values and data necessary for heat loss and heat gain determinations must be taken from the 1997...

  18. A design procedure for the phase-controlled parallel-loaded resonant inverter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Roger J.

    1989-01-01

    High-frequency-link power conversion and distribution based on a resonant inverter (RI) has been recently proposed. The design of several topologies is reviewed, and a simple approximate design procedure is developed for the phase-controlled parallel-loaded RI. This design procedure seeks to ensure the benefits of resonant conversion and is verified by data from a laboratory 2.5 kVA, 20-kHz converter. A simple phasor analysis is introduced as a useful approximation for design purposes. The load is considered to be a linear impedance (or an ac current sink). The design procedure is verified using a 2.5-kVA 20-kHz RI. Also obtained are predictable worst-case ratings for each component of the resonant tank circuit and the inverter switches. For a given load VA requirement, below-resonance operation is found to result in a significantly lower tank VA requirement. Under transient conditions such as load short-circuit, a reversal of the expected commutation sequence is possible.

  19. Calculations of the stress tensor under Symmetric cylindrical shock wave loading

    SciTech Connect

    Chikhradze, N. M.; Lomidze, I.; Marquis, F. D. S.; Staudhammer, Karl P.; Japaridze, L. A.; Peikrishvili, A. B.

    2001-01-01

    The calculation of the components of the stress tensor under symmetric cylindrical shock wave loading, when the pressure impulse of cylindrical symmetry is being spread uniformly along the surface of an infinite cylindrical elastic body, have been carried out. The objective of these calculations is to assess with a sufficient approximation the stress-deformed state in samples during low intensity axis-symmetric shock wave loading. The necessity of such an assessment is grounded on a wide utilization and practical applications of shock wave axis-symmetric loading used in the explosive processing of advanced materials. Tile main assumptions made at the initial stage of these calculations are: elasticity and isotropy of medium, constancy of the sound speed and Lame elasticity constants, and medium boundary conditions of cylindrical symmetry. Subsequently, the removal of some assumptions during the investigation process makes possible to take into account effects engendered by boundary conditions' asymmetry and changes in the sound speed and Lame constants These changes are caused by irreversible thermal transformations going on in the medium. Well known methods for solving differential equations, such as the Fourier method, functions of Bessel, Neumann, and Hankel, equations of Helmholtz, are used in these calculations. These calculations, assuming axial symmetry, are presented as a set of simple equations where the arguments are components of the stress tensor and the solution of this set, for this specific case, gives all the components of the stress tensor.

  20. An assessment of the capability to calculate tilting prop-rotor aircraft performance, loads and stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.

    1984-01-01

    Calculated performance, loads, and stability of the XV-15 tilt rotor research aircraft are compared with wind tunnel and flight measurements, to define the level of the current analytical capability for tilting prop rotor aircraft, and to define the requirements for additional experimental data and further analysis development. The correlation between calculated and measured behavior is generally good, although there are some significant discrepancies. Based on this correlation, the analysis is assessed overall as being adequate for the design, evaluation, and testing of tilting prop rotor aircraft. A general assessment of the state of the art of tilt rotor predictive capability is given. Specific areas are identified where improvements in the capability to calculate performance, loads, and stability are desirable. Requirements for more accurate and detailed data which support the development of improved analytical models are identified as well.

  1. Technology Solutions Case Study: Calculating Design Heating Loads for Superinsulated Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    2015-08-01

    Designing a superinsulated home has many benefits including improved comfort, reduced exterior noise penetration, lower energy bills, and the ability to withstand power and fuel outages under much more comfortable conditions than a typical home. Extremely low heating and cooling loads equate to much smaller HVAC equipment than conventionally required. Sizing the mechanical system to these much lower loads reduces first costs and the size of the distribution system needed. While these homes aren't necessarily constructed with excessive mass in the form of concrete floors and walls, the amount of insulation and the increase in the thickness of the building envelope can lead to a mass effect, resulting in the structures ability to store much more heat than a code built home. This results in a very low thermal inertia making the building much less sensitive to drastic temperature swings thereby decreasing the peak heating load demand. Alternative methods that take this inertia into account along with solar and internal gains result in smaller more appropriate design loads than those calculated using Manual J version 8. During the winter of 2013/2014, the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings team monitored the energy use of three homes in climate zone 6 in an attempt to evaluate the accuracy of two different mechanical system sizing methods for low load homes. Based on the results, it is recommended that internal and solar gains be included and some credit for thermal inertia be used in sizing calculations for superinsulated homes.

  2. A least squares procedure for calculating the calibration constants of a portable gamma-ray spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, F B; Carlos, D U; Hiodo, F Y; Strobino, E F

    2005-01-01

    In this study, a least squares procedure for calculating the calibration constants of a portable gamma-ray spectrometer using the general inverse matrix method is presented. The procedure weights the model equations fitting to the calibration data, taking into account the variances in the counting rates and in the radioactive standard concentrations. The application of the described procedure is illustrated by calibrating twice the same gamma-ray spectrometer, with two independent data sets collected approximately 18 months apart in the same calibration facility.

  3. Real-time POD-CFD Wind-Load Calculator for PV Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Huayamave, Victor; Divo, Eduardo; Ceballos, Andres; Barriento, Carolina; Stephen, Barkaszi; Hubert, Seigneur

    2014-03-21

    The primary objective of this project is to create an accurate web-based real-time wind-load calculator. This is of paramount importance for (1) the rapid and accurate assessments of the uplift and downforce loads on a PV mounting system, (2) identifying viable solutions from available mounting systems, and therefore helping reduce the cost of mounting hardware and installation. Wind loading calculations for structures are currently performed according to the American Society of Civil Engineers/ Structural Engineering Institute Standard ASCE/SEI 7; the values in this standard were calculated from simplified models that do not necessarily take into account relevant characteristics such as those from full 3D effects, end effects, turbulence generation and dissipation, as well as minor effects derived from shear forces on installation brackets and other accessories. This standard does not include provisions that address the special requirements of rooftop PV systems, and attempts to apply this standard may lead to significant design errors as wind loads are incorrectly estimated. Therefore, an accurate calculator would be of paramount importance for the preliminary assessments of the uplift and downforce loads on a PV mounting system, identifying viable solutions from available mounting systems, and therefore helping reduce the cost of the mounting system and installation. The challenge is that although a full-fledged three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis would properly and accurately capture the complete physical effects of air flow over PV systems, it would be impractical for this tool, which is intended to be a real-time web-based calculator. CFD routinely requires enormous computation times to arrive at solutions that can be deemed accurate and grid-independent even in powerful and massively parallel computer platforms. This work is expected not only to accelerate solar deployment nationwide, but also help reach the SunShot Initiative goals

  4. Use of continuous and grab sample data for calculating total maximum daily load (TMDL) in agricultural watersheds.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Shelly; Stubblefield, Ashley A; Hanlon, Jeremy S; Spier, Chelsea L; Stringfellow, William T

    2014-03-01

    Measuring the discharge of diffuse pollution from agricultural watersheds presents unique challenges. Flows in agricultural watersheds, particularly in Mediterranean climates, can be predominately irrigation runoff and exhibit large diurnal fluctuation in both volume and concentration. Flow and pollutant concentrations in these smaller watersheds dominated by human activity do not conform to a normal distribution and it is not clear if parametric methods are appropriate or accurate for load calculations. The objective of this study was to compare the accuracy of five load estimation methods to calculate pollutant loads from agricultural watersheds. Calculation of loads using results from discrete (grab) samples was compared with the true-load computed using in situ continuous monitoring measurements. A new method is introduced that uses a non-parametric measure of central tendency (the median) to calculate loads (median-load). The median-load method was compared to more commonly used parametric estimation methods which rely on using the mean as a measure of central tendency (mean-load and daily-load), a method that utilizes the total flow volume (volume-load), and a method that uses measure of flow at the time of sampling (instantaneous-load). Using measurements from ten watersheds in the San Joaquin Valley of California, the average percent error compared to the true-load for total dissolved solids (TDS) was 7.3% for the median-load, 6.9% for the mean-load, 6.9% for the volume-load, 16.9% for the instantaneous-load, and 18.7% for the daily-load methods of calculation. The results of this study show that parametric methods are surprisingly accurate, even for data that have starkly non-normal distributions and are highly skewed.

  5. Methods for combining payload parameter variations with input environment. [calculating design limit loads compatible with probabilistic structural design criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merchant, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    Methods are presented for calculating design limit loads compatible with probabilistic structural design criteria. The approach is based on the concept that the desired limit load, defined as the largest load occurring in a mission, is a random variable having a specific probability distribution which may be determined from extreme-value theory. The design limit load, defined as a particular of this random limit load, is the value conventionally used in structural design. Methods are presented for determining the limit load probability distributions from both time-domain and frequency-domain dynamic load simulations. Numerical demonstrations of the method are also presented.

  6. 40 CFR 63.11980 - What are the test methods and calculation procedures for process wastewater?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... performance tests during worst-case operating conditions for the PVCPU when the process wastewater treatment process is operating as close as possible to maximum operating conditions. If the wastewater treatment... calculation procedures for process wastewater? 63.11980 Section 63.11980 Protection of...

  7. 40 CFR 63.11980 - What are the test methods and calculation procedures for process wastewater?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... performance tests during worst-case operating conditions for the PVCPU when the process wastewater treatment process is operating as close as possible to maximum operating conditions. If the wastewater treatment... calculation procedures for process wastewater? 63.11980 Section 63.11980 Protection of...

  8. 40 CFR 63.11980 - What are the test methods and calculation procedures for process wastewater?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... performance tests during worst-case operating conditions for the PVCPU when the process wastewater treatment process is operating as close as possible to maximum operating conditions. If the wastewater treatment... calculation procedures for process wastewater? 63.11980 Section 63.11980 Protection of...

  9. Calculating frequency at loads in simulations of electro-mechanical transients

    SciTech Connect

    Nutaro, James J; Protopopescu, Vladimir A

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces a new method for calculating frequency at an electrical load in simulations of electro-mechanical transients. The method is designed for simulation studies that require accurate models of sensors such as phasor measurement units and F-Net devices, which measure frequency at locations away from generating plants. These sensors are poised to become critical components in the control systems of electrical power grids, and therefore simulation tools that incorporate accurate models of these devices are essential. The method proposed here corrects two drawbacks of using numerically computed phase angle derivatives to approximate frequency. First, it eliminates spurious spikes in frequencies calculated at loads. Second, it eliminates instabilities induced by the simulator in studies of frequency responsive loads. The proposed method is derived from a simplified model of the generators and loads in an electrical system, but in the final analysis does not depend critically on these simplifications and is therefore applicable to more sophisticated models. The method is demonstrated with the simplified model applied to the IEEE 14 and 300 bus systems.

  10. The effect of varying the radiative/convective split for internal gains on cooling load calculations: A case study for the Pentagon

    SciTech Connect

    Liesen, R.J.; Strand, R.K.; Pedersen, C.O.

    1998-10-01

    Two new methods for calculating cooling loads have just been introduced. The first algorithm, called the heat balance (HB) method, is a complete formulation of fundamental heat balance principles. The second is called the radiant time series (RTS) method. While based on the HB method, the RTS method is an approximate procedure that separates some of the processes to better show the influence of individual heat gain components. In the HB method, all of the heat transfer mechanisms participate in three simultaneous heat balances: the balance on the outside face of all the building elements that enclose the space, the balance on the inside face of the building elements, and the balance between the surfaces inside the space and the zone air. The focus of this paper is on the second heat balance. It has been customary to define a radiative/convective split for the heat introduced into a zone from such sources as equipment, lights, people, etc. The radiative part is then distributed over the surfaces within the zone in some prescribed manner, and the convective part is assumed to go immediately into the air. Simplified techniques simply cannot accurately portray the complex interaction of building surfaces, so previously used load calculation procedures were not up to the task of analyzing the effect of internal load radiant/convective split variation. This paper will present an investigation of the influence of the radiative/convective split on cooling loads obtained using the heat balance procedure. It will begin with an overview of the model used for a heat balance procedure and then present an exhaustive case study of the effects of changing the mode split on load calculations for Wedge 1 of the Pentagon building.

  11. 40 CFR Appendix Xvi to Part 86 - Pollutant Mass Emissions Calculation Procedure for Gaseous-Fueled Vehicles and for Vehicles...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pollutant Mass Emissions Calculation... Mass Emissions Calculation Procedure for Gaseous-Fueled Vehicles and for Vehicles Equipped With...-Fueled Vehicle Pollutant Mass Emission Calculation Procedure. (1) For all TLEVs, LEVs, and ULEVs,...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix Xvi to Part 86 - Pollutant Mass Emissions Calculation Procedure for Gaseous-Fueled Vehicles and for Vehicles...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pollutant Mass Emissions Calculation... Mass Emissions Calculation Procedure for Gaseous-Fueled Vehicles and for Vehicles Equipped With...-Fueled Vehicle Pollutant Mass Emission Calculation Procedure. (1) For all TLEVs, LEVs, and ULEVs,...

  13. [Bivariate statistical model for calculating phosphorus input loads to the river from point and nonpoint sources].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ding-Jiang; Sun, Si-Yang; Jia, Ying-Na; Chen, Jia-Bo; Lü, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Based on the hydrological difference between the point source (PS) and nonpoint source (NPS) pollution processes and the major influencing mechanism of in-stream retention processes, a bivariate statistical model was developed for relating river phosphorus load to river water flow rate and temperature. Using the calibrated and validated four model coefficients from in-stream monitoring data, monthly phosphorus input loads to the river from PS and NPS can be easily determined by the model. Compared to current hydrologica methods, this model takes the in-stream retention process and the upstream inflow term into consideration; thus it improves the knowledge on phosphorus pollution processes and can meet the requirements of both the district-based and watershed-based wate quality management patterns. Using this model, total phosphorus (TP) input load to the Changle River in Zhejiang Province was calculated. Results indicated that annual total TP input load was (54.6 +/- 11.9) t x a(-1) in 2004-2009, with upstream water inflow, PS and NPS contributing to 5% +/- 1%, 12% +/- 3% and 83% +/- 3%, respectively. The cumulative NPS TP input load during the high flow periods (i. e. , June, July, August and September) in summer accounted for 50% +/- 9% of the annual amount, increasing the alga blooming risk in downstream water bodies. Annual in-stream TP retention load was (4.5 +/- 0.1) t x a(-1) and occupied 9% +/- 2% of the total input load. The cumulative in-stream TP retention load during the summer periods (i. e. , June-September) accounted for 55% +/- 2% of the annual amount, indicating that in-stream retention function plays an important role in seasonal TP transport and transformation processes. This bivariate statistical model only requires commonly available in-stream monitoring data (i. e. , river phosphorus load, water flow rate and temperature) with no requirement of special software knowledge; thus it offers researchers an managers with a cost-effective tool for

  14. Monitoring procedures for fugitive hydrocarbon emissions from gasoline tank truck loading

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, R.; Mclaughlin, N.D.

    1980-01-01

    To evaluate and select an appropriate test procedure and regulatory approach that would include a reliable test method to determine the leak-tightness of a tank on a gasoline delivery truck and a quick leak-tightness monitoring technique as an enforcement tool, field tests of nine candidate methods were conducted for the EPA in Los Angeles, California, at bottom and top loading terminals in which over 200 tank loadings were monitored over ten days. For a performance or compliance test, the static pressure/vacuum test and the volume leakage tests were considered accurated, repeatable, and reliable. For a monitoring procedure, the explosimeter, bag capture, and ''quick''-pressure-decay test methods showed promise. Descriptions of each test including those not found acceptable, and of the field test program are given, and the effectiveness of annual pressure/vacuum tests, the effects of pressure in delivery tanks during loading, and the importance of degassing tanks prior to the pressure/vacuum certification test are discussed.

  15. On a High-Fidelity Hierarchical Approach to Buckling Load Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbocz, Johann; Starnes, James H.; Nemeth, Michael P.

    2001-01-01

    As a step towards developing a new design philosophy, one that moves away from the traditional empirical approach used today in design towards a science-based design technology approach, a recent test series of 5 composite shells carried out by Waters at NASA Langley Research Center is used. It is shown how the hierarchical approach to buckling load calculations proposed by Arbocz et al can be used to perform an approach often called "high fidelity analysis", where the uncertainties involved in a design are simulated by refined and accurate numerical methods. The Delft Interactive Shell DEsign COde (short, DISDECO) is employed for this hierarchical analysis to provide an accurate prediction of the critical buckling load of the given shell structure. This value is used later as a reference to establish the accuracy of the Level-3 buckling load predictions. As a final step in the hierarchical analysis approach, the critical buckling load and the estimated imperfection sensitivity of the shell are verified by conducting an analysis using a sufficiently refined finite element model with one of the current generation two-dimensional shell analysis codes with the advanced capabilities needed to represent both geometric and material nonlinearities.

  16. Buckling Load Calculations of the Isotropic Shell A-8 Using a High-Fidelity Hierarchical Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbocz, Johann; Starnes, James H.

    2002-01-01

    As a step towards developing a new design philosophy, one that moves away from the traditional empirical approach used today in design towards a science-based design technology approach, a test series of 7 isotropic shells carried out by Aristocrat and Babcock at Caltech is used. It is shown how the hierarchical approach to buckling load calculations proposed by Arbocz et al can be used to perform an approach often called 'high fidelity analysis', where the uncertainties involved in a design are simulated by refined and accurate numerical methods. The Delft Interactive Shell DEsign COde (short, DISDECO) is employed for this hierarchical analysis to provide an accurate prediction of the critical buckling load of the given shell structure. This value is used later as a reference to establish the accuracy of the Level-3 buckling load predictions. As a final step in the hierarchical analysis approach, the critical buckling load and the estimated imperfection sensitivity of the shell are verified by conducting an analysis using a sufficiently refined finite element model with one of the current generation two-dimensional shell analysis codes with the advanced capabilities needed to represent both geometric and material nonlinearities.

  17. Calculation procedures for potential and viscous flow solutions for engine inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, J. A.; Stockman, N. O.

    1973-01-01

    The method and basic elements of computer solutions for both potential flow and viscous flow calculations for engine inlets are described. The procedure is applicable to subsonic conventional (CTOL), short-haul (STOL), and vertical takeoff (VTOL) aircraft engine nacelles operating in a compressible viscous flow. The calculated results compare well with measured surface pressure distributions for a number of model inlets. The paper discusses the uses of the program in both the design and analysis of engine inlets, with several examples given for VTOL lift fans, acoustic splitters, and for STOL engine nacelles. Several test support applications are also given.

  18. Load weight determination during dynamic working procedures using the pedar foot pressure distribution measuring system.

    PubMed

    Ellegast, R; Kupfer, J; Reinert, D

    1997-04-01

    INTRODUCTION:: In 1994 a new BIA research project was launched, which deals with the development of a portable measuring system for recording of external stress parameters (e.g. body postures and handled load weights) at different places of employment. The investigations are carried out against the background of a newly recognized occupational disease (since 1993), which is that of damage of the spine following long-term repetitive lifting and carrying of heavy loads as well as working in an extreme trunk bending posture. As a part of the study it should be clarified if the worker's handled load weight can be determined by using a foot pressure distribution measuring system. METHODS:: In the case of a static working posture the handled load weight can simply be calculated by taking the difference of the measured weight and the known body rest weight of the worker. In dynamic situations the measured total foot reaction force consists of a static and a dynamic component, which is caused by the body movement and which is normally bigger than the load gravitational force. For load weight determination it is important to separate the dynamic forces from the measured total force to get an idea about its gravitational rest part. Therefore the body dynamics are measured synchronously to the foot pressure by using angle and angular velocity sensors. The herewith received data are used as input values for a developed biomechanical link segment model, with which it is possible to predict the foot reaction force. So even in dynamic situations an estimation of the handled load weight can be made by comparison of the predicted with the measured foot reaction force. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION:: In laboratory tests the load weight could be determinated reliably for different working processes over a total measuring time of 40 seconds. During the measurements the Pedar insoles were placed directly under the foot so that the accuracy of the static force measurement was reasonably high

  19. Calculation of conversion factors for effective dose for various interventional radiology procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Compagnone, Gaetano; Giampalma, Emanuela; Domenichelli, Sara; Renzulli, Matteo; Golfieri, Rita

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: To provide dose-area-product (DAP) to effective dose (E) conversion factors for complete interventional procedures, based on in-the-field clinical measurements of DAP values and using tabulated E/DAP conversion factors for single projections available from the literature. Methods: Nine types of interventional procedures were performed on 84 patients with two angiographic systems. Different calibration curves (with and without patient table attenuation) were calculated for each DAP meter. Clinical and dosimetric parameters were recorded in-the-field for each projection and for all patients, and a conversion factor linking DAP and effective doses was derived for each complete procedure making use of published, Monte Carlo calculated conversion factors for single static projections. Results: Fluoroscopy time and DAP values for the lowest-dose procedure (biliary drainage) were approximately 3-fold and 13-fold lower, respectively, than those for the highest-dose examination (transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt, TIPS). Median E/DAP conversion factors from 0.12 (abdominal percutaneous transluminal angioplasty) to 0.25 (Nephrostomy) mSvGy{sup -1} cm{sup -2} were obtained and good correlations between E and DAP were found for all procedures, with R{sup 2} coefficients ranging from 0.80 (abdominal angiography) to 0.99 (biliary stent insertion, Nephrostomy and TIPS). The DAP values obtained in this study showed general consistency with the values provided in the literature and median E values ranged from 4.0 mSv (biliary drainage) to 49.6 mSv (TIPS). Conclusions: Values of E/DAP conversion factors were derived for each procedure from a comprehensive analysis of projection and dosimetric data: they could provide a good evaluation for the stochastic effects. These results can be obtained by means of a close cooperation between different interventional professionals involved in patient care and dose optimization.

  20. Minimum-mass design of filamentary composite panels under combined loads: Design procedure based on a rigorous buckling analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroud, W. J.; Agranoff, N.; Anderson, M. S.

    1977-01-01

    A procedure is presented for designing uniaxially stiffened panels made of composite material and subjected to combined inplane loads. The procedure uses a rigorous buckling analysis and nonlinear mathematical programing techniques. Design studies carried out with the procedure consider hat-stiffened and corrugated panels made of graphite-epoxy material. Combined longitudinal compression and shear and combined longitudinal and transverse compression are the loadings used in the studies. The capability to tailor the buckling response of a panel is also explored. Finally, the adequacy of another, simpler, analysis-design procedure is examined.

  1. Importance of loading and unloading procedures for gecko-inspired controllable adhesives.

    PubMed

    Tamelier, John; Chary, Sathya; Turner, Kimberly L

    2013-08-27

    The importance of loading and unloading procedures has been shown in a variety of different methods for biological dry adhesives, such as the fibers on the feet of the Tokay gecko, but biomimetic dry adhesives have yet to be explored in a similar manner. To date, little work has systematically varied multiple parameters to discern the influence of the testing procedure, and the effect of the approach angle remains uncertain. In this study, a synthetic adhesive is moved in 13 individual approach and retraction angles relative to a flat substrate as well as 9 different shear lengths to discern how loading and unloading procedures influence the preload, adhesion, and shear/friction forces supported. The synthetic adhesive, composed of vertical 10 μm diameter semicircular poly(dimethylsiloxane) fibers, is tested against a 4 mm diameter flat glass puck on a home-built microtribometer using both vertical approach and retraction tests and angled approach and retraction tests. The results show that near maximum adhesion and friction can be obtained for most approach and retraction angles, provided that a sufficient shear length is performed. The results also show that the reaction forces during adhesive placement can be significantly reduced by using specific approach angles, resulting for the vertical fibers in a 38-fold increase in the ratio of adhesion force to preload force, μ', when compared to that when using a vertical approach. These results can be of use to those currently researching gecko-inspired adhesives when designing their testing procedures and control algorithms for climbing and perching robots.

  2. [Calculation of radiation loads in a space station compartment with a secondary shielding].

    PubMed

    Kartashov, D A; Tolochek, R V; Shurshakov, V A; Yarmanova, E N

    2013-01-01

    Doses from space ionizing radiation were estimated using a model of ISS cosmonaut's quarters (CQ) outfitted with secondary shielding ("Protective shutter" (PS) as part of experiment MATRYOSHKA-R). Protective shutter is a "blanket" of water-containing material with mass thickness of - 6 g/cm2 covering the CQ exterior wall. Calculation was performed specifically for locations of experimental dosimetry assemblies. Agreement of calculations and experimental data reaching accuracy - 15% proves model applicability to estimating protective effectiveness of secondary shielding in the present-day and future space vehicles. This shielding may reduce radiation loading onto crewmembers as an equivalent dose by more than 40% within a broad range of orbit altitudes equally during the solar minimum and maximum.

  3. [Calculation of radiation loads in a space station compartment with a secondary shielding].

    PubMed

    Kartashov, D A; Tolochek, R V; Shurshakov, V A; Yarmanova, E N

    2013-01-01

    Doses from space ionizing radiation were estimated using a model of ISS cosmonaut's quarters (CQ) outfitted with secondary shielding ("Protective shutter" (PS) as part of experiment MATRYOSHKA-R). Protective shutter is a "blanket" of water-containing material with mass thickness of - 6 g/cm2 covering the CQ exterior wall. Calculation was performed specifically for locations of experimental dosimetry assemblies. Agreement of calculations and experimental data reaching accuracy - 15% proves model applicability to estimating protective effectiveness of secondary shielding in the present-day and future space vehicles. This shielding may reduce radiation loading onto crewmembers as an equivalent dose by more than 40% within a broad range of orbit altitudes equally during the solar minimum and maximum. PMID:24660246

  4. A reevaluaion of data on atmospheric turbulence and airplane gust loads for application in spectral calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Press, Harry; Meadows, May T; Hadlock, Ivan

    1956-01-01

    The available information on the spectrum of atmospheric turbulence is first briefly reviewed. On the basis of these results, methods are developed for the conversion of available gust statistics normally given in terms of counts of gusts or acceleration peaks into a form appropriate for use in spectral calculations. The fundamental quantity for this purpose appears to be the probability distribution of the root-mean-square gust velocity. Estimates of this distribution are derived from data for a number of load histories of transport operations; also, estimates of the variation of this distribution with altitude and weather condition are derived from available data and the method of applying these results to the calculation of airplane gust-response histories in operations is also outlined. (author)

  5. Calculation procedures for the analysis of integral experiments for fusion-reactor design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoro, R. T.; Barnes, J. M.; Alsmiller, R. G., Jr.; Oblow, E. M.

    1981-07-01

    The calculational models, nuclear data, and radiation transport codes that are used in the analysis of integral measurements of the transport of approxmately 14 MeV neutrons through laminated slabs of materials typical of those found in fusion reactor shields are described. The two dimensional discrete ordinates calculations to optimize the experimental configuration of reducing the neutron and gamma ray background levels and for obtaining and equivalent, reduced geometry of the calculational model to reduce computer core storage and running times are also presented. The equations and data to determine the energy-angle relations to neutrons produced in the reactions of 250 keV deuterons in a titanium tritide target are given. The procedures used to collapse the 17ln 36gamma VATAMIN C cross section library to a 53n 21 gamma broad group library are described.

  6. Pollution load calculation and control measures of nitrogen and phosphorus in Huangshi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haiyan; Wang, Qian; Shi, Youhui

    2011-02-01

    On the basis of the agricultural non-point source pollution data survey to Daye and Yangxin, the main pollution loads and main pollution factors is calculated through the relevant formulas. Some conclusions are drawn as follow: The emissions of Nitrogen and phosphorus pollutants from chemical fertilizers poultry and aquaculture are 6043.32t/a, 1044.81 t/a. The emissions in Yangxin (2511.88 t/a, 464.68 t/a) was higher than that in Daye (3531.44 t/a, 580.13 t/a). The Pollutants emissions and pollution load are characterized by Poultry> Chemical fertilizers > Aquaculture in Yangxin. But the features of Daye is aquaculture > poultry> synthetic fertilizer. Thought the comparison of the equivalent load, Nitrogen and phosphorus pollutants from aquaculture are identified as the main pollution factors. The results show that Phosphorus is the main controlling factor from Poultry. The emissions concentration of Nitrogen and phosphorus is above the requirements of Grade III on surface water(TN1.0mg/l, TP0.2mg/l). Appropriate control measures are put forward against main pollution sources and main pollution factors.

  7. Efficient Procedure for the Numerical Calculation of Harmonic Vibrational Frequencies Based on Internal Coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Miliordos, Evangelos; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2013-08-15

    We propose a general procedure for the numerical calculation of the harmonic vibrational frequencies that is based on internal coordinates and Wilson’s GF methodology via double differentiation of the energy. The internal coordinates are defined as the geometrical parameters of a Z-matrix structure, thus avoiding issues related to their redundancy. Linear arrangements of atoms are described using a dummy atom of infinite mass. The procedure has been automated in FORTRAN90 and its main advantage lies in the nontrivial reduction of the number of single-point energy calculations needed for the construction of the Hessian matrix when compared to the corresponding number using double differentiation in Cartesian coordinates. For molecules of C1 symmetry the computational savings in the energy calculations amount to 36N – 30, where N is the number of atoms, with additional savings when symmetry is present. Typical applications for small and medium size molecules in their minimum and transition state geometries as well as hydrogen bonded clusters (water dimer and trimer) are presented. Finally, in all cases the frequencies based on internal coordinates differ on average by <1 cm–1 from those obtained from Cartesian coordinates.

  8. Efficient procedure for the numerical calculation of harmonic vibrational frequencies based on internal coordinates.

    PubMed

    Miliordos, Evangelos; Xantheas, Sotiris S

    2013-08-15

    We propose a general procedure for the numerical calculation of the harmonic vibrational frequencies that is based on internal coordinates and Wilson's GF methodology via double differentiation of the energy. The internal coordinates are defined as the geometrical parameters of a Z-matrix structure, thus avoiding issues related to their redundancy. Linear arrangements of atoms are described using a dummy atom of infinite mass. The procedure has been automated in FORTRAN90 and its main advantage lies in the nontrivial reduction of the number of single-point energy calculations needed for the construction of the Hessian matrix when compared to the corresponding number using double differentiation in Cartesian coordinates. For molecules of C1 symmetry the computational savings in the energy calculations amount to 36N - 30, where N is the number of atoms, with additional savings when symmetry is present. Typical applications for small and medium size molecules in their minimum and transition state geometries as well as hydrogen bonded clusters (water dimer and trimer) are presented. In all cases the frequencies based on internal coordinates differ on average by <1 cm(-1) from those obtained from Cartesian coordinates.

  9. Calculation of reinforced-concrete frame strength under a simultaneous static cross section load and a column lateral impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, Nikolay; Yugov, Nikolay; Kopanitsa, Dmitry; Kopanitsa, Georgy; Yugov, Alexey; Kaparulin, Sergey; Plyaskin, Andrey; Kalichkina, Anna; Ustinov, Artyom

    2016-01-01

    When designing buildings with reinforced concrete that are planned to resist dynamic loads it is necessary to calculate this structural behavior under operational static and emergency impact and blast loads. Calculations of the structures under shock-wave loads can be performed by solving dynamic equations that do not consider static loads. Due to this fact the calculation of reinforced concrete frame under a simultaneous static and dynamic load in full 3d settings becomes a very non trivial and resource consuming problem. This problem can be split into two tasks. The first one is a shock-wave problem that can be solved using software package RANET-3, which allows solving the problem using finite elements method adapted for dynamic task. This method calculates strain-stress state of the material and its dynamic destruction, which is considered as growth and consolidation of micro defects under loading. On the second step the results of the first step are taken as input parameters for quasi static calculation of simultaneous static and dynamic load using finite elements method in AMP Civil Engineering-11.

  10. Comparison of calculated and measured blade loads on a full-scale tilting proprotor in a wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.

    1980-01-01

    The loads measured in a wind tunnel on a full-scale tilting proprotor are compared with calculated results. The data consists primarily of oscillatory beamwise bending moments at 35% radial station, oscillatory spindle chord bending moments, and oscillatory pitch link loads. The measured and calculated results as a function of thrust are compared over a range of nacelle angles from 0 to 75 deg, and a range of speeds from 80 to 185 knots.

  11. A Procedure to Calculate Logic Programs by Replacement with the Bodies of Rules and Transformation to Disjunctive Normal Forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiba, Sumitaka; Sato, Taisuke

    In this paper, we describe the completeness of a calculation procedure of logic programs. The procedure is the combination of two procedures, a replacement procedure of atoms in the goal by the bodies or the negation of the bodies of rules in the program, and a transformation procedure of equations to disjunctive normal forms (DNF) equivalent under Clark's Equational Theory (CET). To combine replacement of atoms in the goal to logical formulae determined from the program and transformation of equations to DNF equivalent under CET is a method by which procedures with the capability of expressing answers in DNF can be build, so it is a leading method for expressing answers in a form including negation. Some procedures based on the method are devised, and their calculation capabilities are shown by applying the theory of completed programs. However, the procedure that uses the bodies or the negation of the bodies of rules for replacement has higher calculation capability, and is intuitively more natural than they. Therefore, to clarify the calculation capability of the procedure is considered an important subject for research into calculation procedures of logic programs with the capability for expressing answers in a form including negation. Moreover, since the completeness is realized by standing on the viewpoint of treating the implication symbol as a different implication symbol from usual, and interpreting logic programs in three-valued logic, examples which support the viewpoint are also described.

  12. Procedure of Calculating the Parameters of the Inter-Pulse Period in Pulsed Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krampit, A. G.; Krampit, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    The procedure of calculating the parameters of the inter-pulse period such as current strength, electrode supply speed and time length is presented in the paper. Their importance for the stable arc burning is demonstrated. The authors address to the inter-pulse period parameters, influencing on the temperature of the electrode in the device, where the inter-pulse current is used for heating the electrode. The data of calculations are confirmed in the process of experiments. The appropriate parameters of pulsed arc welding with preheated electrode extension are identified; the stability of the process is tested experimentally: impulse frequency, inter-pulse period, arc voltage during the inter-pulse period, speed of electrode supply, current of the inter-pulse period.

  13. A Monte Carlo-based procedure for independent monitor unit calculation in IMRT treatment plans.

    PubMed

    Pisaturo, O; Moeckli, R; Mirimanoff, R-O; Bochud, F O

    2009-07-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment plan verification by comparison with measured data requires having access to the linear accelerator and is time consuming. In this paper, we propose a method for monitor unit (MU) calculation and plan comparison for step and shoot IMRT based on the Monte Carlo code EGSnrc/BEAMnrc. The beamlets of an IMRT treatment plan are individually simulated using Monte Carlo and converted into absorbed dose to water per MU. The dose of the whole treatment can be expressed through a linear matrix equation of the MU and dose per MU of every beamlet. Due to the positivity of the absorbed dose and MU values, this equation is solved for the MU values using a non-negative least-squares fit optimization algorithm (NNLS). The Monte Carlo plan is formed by multiplying the Monte Carlo absorbed dose to water per MU with the Monte Carlo/NNLS MU. Several treatment plan localizations calculated with a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) are compared with the proposed method for validation. The Monte Carlo/NNLS MUs are close to the ones calculated by the TPS and lead to a treatment dose distribution which is clinically equivalent to the one calculated by the TPS. This procedure can be used as an IMRT QA and further development could allow this technique to be used for other radiotherapy techniques like tomotherapy or volumetric modulated arc therapy.

  14. Double-step truncation procedure for large-scale shell-model calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coraggio, L.; Gargano, A.; Itaco, N.

    2016-06-01

    We present a procedure that is helpful to reduce the computational complexity of large-scale shell-model calculations, by preserving as much as possible the role of the rejected degrees of freedom in an effective approach. Our truncation is driven first by the analysis of the effective single-particle energies of the original large-scale shell-model Hamiltonian, in order to locate the relevant degrees of freedom to describe a class of isotopes or isotones, namely the single-particle orbitals that will constitute a new truncated model space. The second step is to perform a unitary transformation of the original Hamiltonian from its model space into the truncated one. This transformation generates a new shell-model Hamiltonian, defined in a smaller model space, that retains effectively the role of the excluded single-particle orbitals. As an application of this procedure, we have chosen a realistic shell-model Hamiltonian defined in a large model space, set up by seven proton and five neutron single-particle orbitals outside 88Sr. We study the dependence of shell-model results upon different truncations of the original model space for the Zr, Mo, Ru, Pd, Cd, and Sn isotopic chains, showing the reliability of this truncation procedure.

  15. Comparison of the calculation of HDR RPV-1 blowdown loads for test V32 with the experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Mortensen, G.A.; Santee, G.E. Jr.; Chang, F.H.; Brockett, G.F.; Gross, M.; Belytschko, T.

    1984-08-01

    Using the three-dimensional STEALTH/WHAMSE computer program, researchers calculated blowdown loads for HDR test V32 on a large-scale reactor vessel. The calculation, which compared well with test results, provides a good example of the predictive capability of the computer program. The program can be applied to nuclear and nonnuclear fluid-structure interaction problems.

  16. Use of radial symmetry for the calculation of cylindrical absorption coefficients and optimal capillary loadings

    DOE PAGES

    Khalifah, Peter

    2015-02-01

    The problem of numerically evaluating absorption correction factors for cylindrical samples has been revisited using a treatment that fully takes advantage of the sample symmetry. It is shown that the path lengths for all points within the sample at all possible diffraction angles can be trivially determined once the angle-dependent distance distribution for a single line of points is calculated. This provides advantages in both computational efficiency and in gaining an intuitive understanding of the effects of absorption on diffraction data. A matrix of absorption coefficients calculated for µR products between 0 and 20 for diffraction angles θD of 0°more » to 90° were used to examine the influence of (1) capillary diameter and of (2) sample density on the overall scattered intensity as a function of diffraction angle, where µ is the linear absorption coefficient for the sample and R is the capillary radius. Based on this analysis, the optimal sample loading for a capillary experiment to maximize diffraction at angles of 0 – 50° is in general expected to be achieved when the maximum radius capillary compatible with the beam is used, and when the sample density is adjusted to be 3/(4µR) of its original density.« less

  17. Use of radial symmetry for the calculation of cylindrical absorption coefficients and optimal capillary loadings

    SciTech Connect

    Khalifah, Peter

    2015-01-30

    The problem of numerically evaluating absorption correction factors for cylindrical samples has been revisited using a treatment that fully takes advantage of the sample symmetry. It is shown that the path lengths for all points within the sample at all possible diffraction angles can be trivially determined once the angle-dependent distance distribution for a single line of points is calculated. This provides advantages both in computational efficiency and in gaining an intuitive understanding of the effects of absorption on the diffraction data. A matrix of absorption coefficients calculated for μRproducts between 0 and 20 for diffraction angles θDof 0–90° were used to examine the influence of (1) capillary diameter and (2) sample density on the overall scattered intensity as a function of diffraction angle, where μ is the linear absorption coefficient for the sample andRis the capillary radius. On the basis of this analysis, the optimal sample loading for a capillary experiment to maximize diffraction at angles of 0–50° is in general expected to be achieved when the maximum radius capillary compatible with the beam is used and when the sample density is adjusted to be 3/(4μR) of its original density.

  18. Use of radial symmetry for the calculation of cylindrical absorption coefficients and optimal capillary loadings

    SciTech Connect

    Khalifah, Peter

    2015-02-01

    The problem of numerically evaluating absorption correction factors for cylindrical samples has been revisited using a treatment that fully takes advantage of the sample symmetry. It is shown that the path lengths for all points within the sample at all possible diffraction angles can be trivially determined once the angle-dependent distance distribution for a single line of points is calculated. This provides advantages in both computational efficiency and in gaining an intuitive understanding of the effects of absorption on diffraction data. A matrix of absorption coefficients calculated for µR products between 0 and 20 for diffraction angles θD of 0° to 90° were used to examine the influence of (1) capillary diameter and of (2) sample density on the overall scattered intensity as a function of diffraction angle, where µ is the linear absorption coefficient for the sample and R is the capillary radius. Based on this analysis, the optimal sample loading for a capillary experiment to maximize diffraction at angles of 0 – 50° is in general expected to be achieved when the maximum radius capillary compatible with the beam is used, and when the sample density is adjusted to be 3/(4µR) of its original density.

  19. Uncertainty in nutrient loads from tile-drained landscapes: Effect of sampling frequency, calculation algorithm, and compositing strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Mark R.; King, Kevin W.; Macrae, Merrin L.; Ford, William; Van Esbroeck, Chris; Brunke, Richard I.; English, Michael C.; Schiff, Sherry L.

    2015-11-01

    Accurate estimates of annual nutrient loads are required to evaluate trends in water quality following changes in land use or management and to calibrate and validate water quality models. While much emphasis has been placed on understanding the uncertainty of nutrient load estimates in large, naturally drained watersheds, few studies have focused on tile-drained fields and small tile-drained headwater watersheds. The objective of this study was to quantify uncertainty in annual dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) and nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) load estimates from four tile-drained fields and two small tile-drained headwater watersheds in Ohio, USA and Ontario, Canada. High temporal resolution datasets of discharge (10-30 min) and nutrient concentration (2 h to 1 d) were collected over a 1-2 year period at each site and used to calculate a reference nutrient load. Monte Carlo simulations were used to subsample the measured data to assess the effects of sample frequency, calculation algorithm, and compositing strategy on the uncertainty of load estimates. Results showed that uncertainty in annual DRP and NO3-N load estimates was influenced by both the sampling interval and the load estimation algorithm. Uncertainty in annual nutrient load estimates increased with increasing sampling interval for all of the load estimation algorithms tested. Continuous discharge measurements and linear interpolation of nutrient concentrations yielded the least amount of uncertainty, but still tended to underestimate the reference load. Compositing strategies generally improved the precision of load estimates compared to discrete grab samples; however, they often reduced the accuracy. Based on the results of this study, we recommended that nutrient concentration be measured every 13-26 h for DRP and every 2.7-17.5 d for NO3-N in tile-drained fields and small tile-drained headwater watersheds to accurately (±10%) estimate annual loads.

  20. Minimum-mass design of filamentary composite panels under combined loads: Design procedure based on simplified buckling equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroud, W. J.; Agranoff, N.

    1976-01-01

    An analytical procedure is presented for designing hat stiffened and corrugated panels made of composite material and subjected to longitudinal (in the direction of the stiffeners) compression and shear loadings. The procedure is based on nonlinear mathematical programming techniques and a simplified set of buckling equations. Design requirements considered are buckling, strength, and extensional and shear stiffness. The effects of specified thickness, variation of cross-section dimensions, stiffness requirements, local buckling boundary conditions, and the effect of combined compression and shear loadings are shown.

  1. Subtractive procedure for calculating the anomalous electron magnetic moment in QED and its application for numerical calculation at the three-loop level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    A new subtractive procedure for canceling ultraviolet and infrared divergences in the Feynman integrals described here is developed for calculating QED corrections to the electron anomalous magnetic moment. The procedure formulated in the form of a forest expression with linear operators applied to Feynman amplitudes of UV-diverging subgraphs makes it possible to represent the contribution of each Feynman graph containing only electron and photon propagators in the form of a converging integral with respect to Feynman parameters. The application of the developed method for numerical calculation of two- and threeloop contributions is described.

  2. A procedure for calculation of monitor units for passively scattered proton radiotherapy beams

    SciTech Connect

    Sahoo, Narayan; Zhu, X. Ronald; Arjomandy, Bijan; Ciangaru, George; Lii, MingFwu; Amos, Richard; Wu, Richard; Gillin, Michael T.

    2008-11-15

    The purpose of this study is to validate a monitor unit (MU) calculation procedure for passively scattered proton therapy beams. The output dose per MU (d/MU) of a therapeutic radiation beam is traditionally calibrated under specific reference conditions. These conditions include beam energy, field size, suitable depth in water or water equivalent phantom in a low dose gradient region with known relative depth dose, and source to point of calibration distance. Treatment field settings usually differ from these reference conditions leading to a different d/MU that needs to be determined for delivering the prescribed dose. For passively scattered proton beams, the proton specific parameters, which need to be defined, are related to the energy, lateral scatterers, range modulating wheel, spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) width, thickness of any range shifter, the depth dose value relative to the normalization point in the SOBP, and scatter both from the range compensator and inhomogeneity in the patient. Following the custom for photons or electrons, a set of proton dosimetry factors, representing the changes in the d/MU relative to a reference condition, can be defined as the relative output factor (ROF), SOBP factor (SOBPF), range shifter factor (RSF), SOBP off-center factor (SOBPOCF), off-center ratio (OCR), inverse square factor (ISF), field size factor (FSF), and compensator and patient scatter factor (CPSF). The ROF, SOBPF, and RSF are the major contributors to the d/MU and were measured using an ion chamber in water tank during the clinical commissioning of each beam to create a dosimetry beam data table to be used for calculating the monitor units. The following simple formula is found to provide an independent method to determine the d/MU at the point of interest (POI) in the patient, namely, (d/MU)=ROF{center_dot}SOBPF{center_dot}RSF{center_dot}SOBPOCF{center_dot}OCR{center_dot}FSF{center_dot}ISF{center_dot}CPSF. The monitor units for delivering the intended dose

  3. Probabilistic analysis of local ice pressures. [Calculation of ice load and impact effects on offshore platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Jordaan, I.J.; Brown, P.W. ); Maes, M.A.; Hermans, I.P. . Dept. of Mathematics and Statistics)

    1993-02-01

    Extensive work in recent years has been carried out on the calculation of global ice loads on a probabilistic basis. An analysis method is presented for local ice pressures, which yields values of pressure for specific values of exceedance probability. In developing this method, particular attention has been paid to problems of exposure (length, position and number of impacts), as well as the area of exposure (area within area versus nominal contact area). The solution has been formulated for a series of discrete impacts, e.g., rams by a vessel, or a series of periods of continuous interactions. Data for the MV CANMAR Kigoriak and USCGC Polar Sea were ranked and curves were fitted through the tail of probability plots for three panel sizes. This allowed determination of exceedance probabilities of the design coefficients for pressure as a junction of area. The method developed was then applied to an example for a ship based on the data and expected number of rams per year. Formulas useful in the design of structures in ice are presented.

  4. Calculation and Optimization of ITER Upper VS Feeder Under an Electromagnetic Load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianwei; Xie, Fei; Jin, Huan

    2014-11-01

    The upper vertical stability (VS) feeder is a part connected to the upper VS coil by a welding joint. The function of the feeder is to transfer current and coolant water to the VS coil. A giant electromagnetic force will be generated during normal operation by the current flowing in the VS coils, interacting with the external background field. The Lorentz force will induce Tresca stress in the feeder. The amplitudes of the magnetic field and Lorentz force along the conductor running direction have been calculated based on Maxwell's equations. To extract the Tresca stress in the feeder, a finite element model was created using the software ANSYS and an electromagnetic load was applied on the model. According to the analytical design, the stresses were classified and evaluated based on ASME. In order to reduce the Tresca stress, some optimization works have been done and the Tresca stress has had a significant reduction in the optimized model. This analytical work figured out the stress distribution in the feeder and checked the feasibility of the prototype design model. The ANSYS analysis results will provide a guidance for later improvement and fabrication.

  5. Development of a wind energy converter and investigation of its operational function. Part 2: Aerodynamics and calculation of loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kussmann, A.; Storm, O.; Weber, W.

    1982-12-01

    The optimum design approach to wind rotor blades, and the special blade design to fit with a 10 kW horizontal axis wind energy converter are shown. The calculated performance data are given in power/blade pitch angle and c sub p/lambda diagrams. According to a set of defined load cases, critical load conditions were considered. Results of these load computations are presented as time history graphs and as wind velocity related diagrams, serving as basic data in component structural design.

  6. Development of transmucosal patch loaded with anesthetic and analgesic for dental procedures and in vivo evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Nidhi, Malviya; Patro, M Nagaraju; Kusumvalli, Somisetty; Kusumdevi, Vemula

    2016-01-01

    Most of the dental surgeries require preoperative anesthetic and postoperative analgesic for painless procedures. A multidrug transmucosal drug delivery system loaded with lignocaine (Lig) base for immediate release and solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) of diclofenac (Dic) diethylamine for prolonged release was developed. SLNs were prepared by solvent emulsion–evaporation method with Precirol ATO 5 and Geleol as lipids and Pluronic F 68 as surfactant and optimized with Box–Behnken design for particle size and entrapment efficiency. SLNs were incorporated into the transmucosal patch (TP) prepared with hydroxypropyl cellulose-LF (HPC-LF) and with a backing layer of ethyl cellulose. Optimized SLNs and TP were characterized for Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry, differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, in vitro release, ex vivo permeation through porcine buccal mucosa, Caco-2 permeability, and residual solvent analysis by gas chromatography. The TP was also evaluated for swelling index, in vitro residence time, tensile strength, and mucoadhesive strength. Preclinical pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and histopathological studies by application of TP on the gingiva of New Zealand rabbits were carried out. Particle size and entrapment efficiency of the optimized SLN “S8” were determined as 98.23 nm and 84.36%, respectively. The gingival crevicular fluid and tissue concentrations were greater than plasma concentrations with increase in Cmax and area under the curve (AUC) of Lig and Dic when compared to the control group. Pain perception by needle prick showed prolonged combined anesthetic and analgesic effect. The developed TP loaded with Lig base and Dic diethylamine-SLNs exhibited immediate and complete permeation with tissue accumulation of Lig followed by controlled prolonged release and tissue accumulation of Dic at the site of application. Thus, it could be anticipated from the in vivo studies that the

  7. Deformed Shape Calculation of a Full-Scale Wing Using Fiber Optic Strain Data from a Ground Loads Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jutte, Christine V.; Ko, William L.; Stephens, Craig A.; Bakalyar, John A.; Richards, W. Lance

    2011-01-01

    A ground loads test of a full-scale wing (175-ft span) was conducted using a fiber optic strain-sensing system to obtain distributed surface strain data. These data were input into previously developed deformed shape equations to calculate the wing s bending and twist deformation. A photogrammetry system measured actual shape deformation. The wing deflections reached 100 percent of the positive design limit load (equivalent to 3 g) and 97 percent of the negative design limit load (equivalent to -1 g). The calculated wing bending results were in excellent agreement with the actual bending; tip deflections were within +/- 2.7 in. (out of 155-in. max deflection) for 91 percent of the load steps. Experimental testing revealed valuable opportunities for improving the deformed shape equations robustness to real world (not perfect) strain data, which previous analytical testing did not detect. These improvements, which include filtering methods developed in this work, minimize errors due to numerical anomalies discovered in the remaining 9 percent of the load steps. As a result, all load steps attained +/- 2.7 in. accuracy. Wing twist results were very sensitive to errors in bending and require further development. A sensitivity analysis and recommendations for fiber implementation practices, along with, effective filtering methods are included

  8. Calculation and mapping of critical loads of sulphur and nitrogen for forest soils in Galicia (NW Spain).

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Lado, L; Macías, F

    2006-08-01

    Calculations of critical loads of acidity within Europe have shown Galicia to be one of the regions in Spain with the highest risk of soil acidification by deposition of atmospheric pollutants. We used the simple mass balance method (SMB) to derive critical loads of sulphur and nitrogen for forest soils in Galicia using available site-specific information. Exceedance of acidic deposition was calculated using the deposition levels of N and S registered in 2001. Most forest ecosystems analysed can support acid loads of more than 2000 eq N ha(-1) year(-1). The lowest critical loads of acidity (1483 eq ha(-1) year(-1)) occurred in coniferous forest stands growing on shallow soils developed on slates, in the interior zone. The highest critical load values (9386 eq ha(-1) year(-1)) were observed in coniferous stands in zones with elevated precipitation rates, in the littoral area. The critical load for acidity was exceeded in 5% of the forest soils. Such exceedances were mainly caused by deposition of nitrogen compounds. The contribution of sulphur deposition to acid exceedance was important in the surroundings of the city of A Coruña. Analysis of rainfall bulk composition revealed that N deposition in Galicia was mainly due to ammonium emissions, probably derived from agricultural and cattle breeding activities.

  9. On the thermodynamics of carbon nanotube single-file water loading: free energy, energy and entropy calculations.

    PubMed

    Garate, Jose Antonio; Perez-Acle, Tomas; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2014-03-21

    Single-file water chains confined in carbon nanotubes have been extensively studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Specifically, the pore loading process of periodic (6,6) and (5,5) single-walled carbon nanotubes was thermodynamically characterized by means of free-energy calculations at every loading state and compared to bulk water employing thermodynamic cycles. Long simulations of each end-state allowed for the partitioning of the free energy into its energetic and entropic components. The calculations revealed that the initial loading states are dominated by entropic (both translational and rotational) components, whereas the latter stages are energetically driven by strong dipolar interactions among the water molecules in the file.

  10. [CALCULATION OF RADIATION LOADS ON THE ANTHROPOMORPHIC PHANTOM ONBOARD THE SPACE STATION IN THE CASE OF ADDITIONAL SHIELDING].

    PubMed

    Kartashov, D A; Shurshakov, V A

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the results of calculating doses from space ionizing radiation for a modeled orbital station cabin outfitted with an additional shield aimed to reduce radiation loads on cosmonaut. The shield is a layer with the mass thickness of -6 g/cm2 (mean density = 0.62 g/cm3) that covers the outer cabin wall and consists of wet tissues and towels used by cosmonauts for hygienic purposes. A tissue-equivalent anthropomorphic phantom imitates human body. Doses were calculated for the standard orbit of the International space station (ISS) with consideration of the longitudinal and transverse phantom orientation relative to the wall with or without the additional shield. Calculation of dose distribution in the human body improves prediction of radiation loads. The additional shield reduces radiation exposure of human critical organs by -20% depending on their depth and body spatial orientation in the ISS compartment.

  11. [CALCULATION OF RADIATION LOADS ON THE ANTHROPOMORPHIC PHANTOM ONBOARD THE SPACE STATION IN THE CASE OF ADDITIONAL SHIELDING].

    PubMed

    Kartashov, D A; Shurshakov, V A

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the results of calculating doses from space ionizing radiation for a modeled orbital station cabin outfitted with an additional shield aimed to reduce radiation loads on cosmonaut. The shield is a layer with the mass thickness of -6 g/cm2 (mean density = 0.62 g/cm3) that covers the outer cabin wall and consists of wet tissues and towels used by cosmonauts for hygienic purposes. A tissue-equivalent anthropomorphic phantom imitates human body. Doses were calculated for the standard orbit of the International space station (ISS) with consideration of the longitudinal and transverse phantom orientation relative to the wall with or without the additional shield. Calculation of dose distribution in the human body improves prediction of radiation loads. The additional shield reduces radiation exposure of human critical organs by -20% depending on their depth and body spatial orientation in the ISS compartment. PMID:26554132

  12. Rational basis for the use of a new clinical procedure in immediately loaded implant rehabilitations: a case report.

    PubMed

    Garocchio, Santo; Camaioni, Emanuele; Di Felice, Roberto; De Dominicis, Alessandro; D'Amario, Maurizio; D'Arcangelo, Camillo; Giannoni, Mario

    2011-01-01

    This report presents a new clinical protocol that facilitates the diagnostic, surgical, and prosthetic phases of immediately loaded implant rehabilitations. The proposed technique aims to simplify recording of the centric relation, which is usually done immediately after surgery, during the surgical impression phase. This shortens operative time while meeting requirements for an accurate impression and is thus simple and cost effective. The case report of a maxillary full-arch immediately loaded implant rehabilitation in a 45-year-old patient illustrates the clinical steps in the proposed procedure and confirms its repeatability.

  13. Theory and procedure for determining loads and motions in chine-immersed hydrodynamic impacts of prismatic bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnitzer, Emanuel

    1953-01-01

    A theoretical method is derived for the determination of the motions and loads during chine-immersed water landings of prismatic bodies. This method makes use of a variation of two-dimensional deflected water mass over the complete range of immersion, modified by a correction for three-dimensional flow. Equations are simplified through omission of the term proportional to the acceleration of the deflected mass for use in calculation of loads on hulls having moderate and heavy beam loading. The effects of water rise at the keel are included in these equations. In order to make a direct comparison of theory with experiment, a modification of the equations was made to include the effect of finite test-carriage mass. A simple method of computation which can be applied without reading the body of this report is presented as an appendix along with the required theoretical plots for determination of loads and motions in chine-immersed landings.

  14. Improvements in sparse matrix/vector technique applications for on-line load flow calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Ristanovic, P.; Bjelogrlic, M.; Babic, B.S.

    1989-02-01

    Sparsity technique is applied to a wide range of problems in power systems analysis. In this paper the authors propose several analytical and computational improvements in sparsity applications. The new partial matrix refactorization method and ordering algorithm are presented. The proposed method is very efficient when applied to various kinds of programs, such as: on-line load flow, optimal power flow and steady-state security analysis. The proposed methodology is applied in a fast decoupled load flow program which include the treatment of tap violations on under-load tap changing (ULTC) transformers and reactive power generation on PV buses. Effects of proposed improvements are well tested and documented on the three networks: 118 bus IEEE test network and two utility networks with 209 and 519 buses, respectively. Keywords: sparsity technique, load flow analysis, security analysis.

  15. A Bayesian approach for calculating variable total maximum daily loads and uncertainty assessment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dingjiang; Dahlgren, Randy A; Shen, Yena; Lu, Jun

    2012-07-15

    To account for both variability and uncertainty in nonpoint source pollution, one dimensional water quality model was integrated with Bayesian statistics and load duration curve methods to develop a variable total maximum daily load (TMDL) for total nitrogen (TN). Bayesian statistics was adopted to inversely calibrate the unknown parameters in the model, i.e., area-specific export rate (E) and in-stream loss rate coefficient (K) for TN, from the stream monitoring data. Prior distributions for E and K based on published measurements were developed to support Bayesian parameter calibration. Then the resulting E and K values were used in water quality model for simulation of catchment TN export load, TMDL and required load reduction along with their uncertainties in the ChangLe River agricultural watershed in eastern China. Results indicated that the export load, TMDL and required load reduction for TN synchronously increased with increasing stream water discharge. The uncertainties associated with these estimates also presented temporal variability with higher uncertainties for the high flow regime and lower uncertainties for the low flow regime. To assure 90% compliance with the targeted in-stream TN concentration of 2.0mgL(-1), the required load reduction was determined to be 1.7 × 10(3), 4.6 × 10(3), and 14.6 × 10(3)kg TNd (-1) for low, median and high flow regimes, respectively. The integrated modeling approach developed in this study allows decision makers to determine the required load reduction for different TN compliance levels while incorporating both flow-dependent variability and uncertainty assessment to support practical adaptive implementation of TMDL programs.

  16. General Procedure for the Easy Calculation of pH in an Introductory Course of General or Analytical Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cepriá, Gemma; Salvatella, Luis

    2014-01-01

    All pH calculations for simple acid-base systems used in introductory courses on general or analytical chemistry can be carried out by using a general procedure requiring the use of predominance diagrams. In particular, the pH is calculated as the sum of an independent term equaling the average pK[subscript a] values of the acids involved in the…

  17. A revised load estimation procedure for the Susquehanna, Potomac, Patuxent, and Choptank rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yochum, Steven E.

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey?s Chesapeake Bay River Input Program has updated the nutrient and suspended-sediment load data base for the Susquehanna, Potomac, Patuxent, and Choptank Rivers using a multiple-window, center-estimate regression methodology. The revised method optimizes the seven-parameter regression approach that has been used historically by the program. The revised method estimates load using the fifth or center year of a sliding 9-year window. Each year a new model is run for each site and constituent, the most recent year is added, and the previous 4 years of estimates are updated. The fifth year in the 9-year window is considered the best estimate and is kept in the data base. The last year of estimation shows the most change from the previous year?s estimate and this change approaches a minimum at the fifth year. Differences between loads computed using this revised methodology and the loads populating the historical data base have been noted but the load estimates do not typically change drastically. The data base resulting from the application of this revised methodology is populated by annual and monthly load estimates that are known with greater certainty than in the previous load data base.

  18. Lens of the eye dose calculation for neuro-interventional procedures and CBCT scans of the head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Zhenyu; Vijayan, Sarath; Rana, Vijay; Jain, Amit; Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a method to calculate lens dose for fluoroscopically-guided neuro-interventional procedures and for CBCT scans of the head. EGSnrc Monte Carlo software is used to determine the dose to the lens of the eye for the projection geometry and exposure parameters used in these procedures. This information is provided by a digital CAN bus on the Toshiba Infinix C-Arm system which is saved in a log file by the real-time skin-dose tracking system (DTS) we previously developed. The x-ray beam spectra on this machine were simulated using BEAMnrc. These spectra were compared to those determined by SpekCalc and validated through measured percent-depth-dose (PDD) curves and half-value-layer (HVL) measurements. We simulated CBCT procedures in DOSXYZnrc for a CTDI head phantom and compared the surface dose distribution with that measured with Gafchromic film, and also for an SK150 head phantom and compared the lens dose with that measured with an ionization chamber. Both methods demonstrated good agreement. Organ dose calculated for a simulated neuro-interventional-procedure using DOSXYZnrc with the Zubal CT voxel phantom agreed within 10% with that calculated by PCXMC code for most organs. To calculate the lens dose in a neuro-interventional procedure, we developed a library of normalized lens dose values for different projection angles and kVp's. The total lens dose is then calculated by summing the values over all beam projections and can be included on the DTS report at the end of the procedure.

  19. Containment loads due to direct containment heating and associated hydrogen behavior: Analysis and calculations with the CONTAIN code

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D C; Bergeron, K D; Carroll, D E; Gasser, R D; Tills, J L; Washington, K E

    1987-05-01

    One of the most important unresolved issues governing risk in many nuclear power plants involves the phenomenon called direct containment heating (DCH), in which it is postulated that molten corium ejected under high pressure from the reactor vessel is dispersed into the containment atmosphere, thereby causing sufficient heating and pressurization to threaten containment integrity. Models for the calculation of potential DCH loads have been developed and incorporated into the CONTAIN code for severe accident analysis. Using CONTAIN, DCH scenarios in PWR plants having three different representative containment types have been analyzed: Surry (subatmospheric large dry containment), Sequoyah (ice condenser containment), and Bellefonte (atmospheric large dry containment). A large number of parameter variation and phenomenological uncertainty studies were performed. Response of DCH loads to these variations was found to be quite complex; often the results differ substantially from what has been previously assumed concerning DCH. Containment compartmentalization offers the potential of greatly mitigating DCH loads relative to what might be calculated using single-cell representations of containments, but the actual degree of mitigation to be expected is sensitive to many uncertainties. Dominant uncertainties include hydrogen combustion phenomena in the extreme environments produced by DCH scenarios, and factors which affect the rate of transport of DCH energy to the upper containment. In addition, DCH loads can be aggravated by rapid blowdown of the primary system, co-dispersal of moderate quantities of water with the debris, and quenching of de-entrained debris in water; these factors act by increasing steam flows which, in turn, accelerates energy transport. It may be noted that containment-threatening loads were calculated for a substantial portion of the scenarios treated for some of the plants considered.

  20. A GIS-based procedure for automatically calculating soil loss from the Universal Soil Loss Equation: GISus-M

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The integration of methods for calculating soil loss caused by water erosion using a geoprocessing system is important to enable investigations of soil erosion over large areas. GIS-based procedures have been used in soil erosion studies; however in most cases it is difficult to integrate the functi...

  1. Calculating critical loads for acidification for five forested catchments in China using an extended steady state function.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu; Duan, Lei; Larssen, Thorjorn; Mulder, Jan; Hu, Lanhua; Hao, Jiming

    2007-11-15

    The critical load concept has become widely accepted as an important theoretical basis for establishing effective acid deposition control strategies. In the critical load calculations, the influence of variation in base cation (BC) deposition, which plays an important role in mitigating acidification, was seldom considered. In this manner, high uncertainty and over-estimation might be caused in those areas where current BC deposition is very high and of significant anthropogenic origin since anthropogenic deposition can change due to human activity. In this study, an extended sulfur(S)-nitrogen (N)-BC function based on the Steady State Mass Balance (SSMB) method is applied to calculate the critical loads for five sampled catchments in southern China under variable S, N, and BC deposition. The ceiling of S deposition (when N deposition is zero; CL(max)(S)) under current BC deposition varies from 4.5 to 10.8 keq ha(-1) yr(-1) among the five catchments, and the ceiling of N deposition (when S deposition is zero; CL(max)(N)) varies from 23.2 to 54.5 keq ha(-1) yr(-1). A 75% reduction in BC deposition is estimated to cause a 46%-86% decrease of CL(max)(S) and 45%-81% decrease of CL(max)(N). The critical loads for acidification are not exceeded in any of the five catchments under the current base cation deposition, despite extremely high S deposition in some places. However, if the BC deposition decreases to 25% of current while S remains unchanged, critical loads will be exceeded at all sites except one. A sensitivity analysis confirms that the long-term future BC deposition is among the most important parameters to the uncertainty of critical load, together with the dose-response relationship between ecosystem health and soil solution chemistry.

  2. Criteria of evaluation of anthropogenic changes and calculation of the anthropogenic component of the dissolved load of rivers

    SciTech Connect

    Maksimova, M.P.

    1986-03-01

    Considerable amounts of chlorine and sodium enter river waters during exploration and operation of oil and gas fields due to lifting highly mineralized formation waters to the surface (the Volga-Ural gas and oil region). Urban and agricultural wastewaters are sources of entry for the components of a salt composition. Magnesium and sulfate ions are considerably inferior to chlorine and sodium with respect to the intensity of involvement in technogenic geochemical flows. Criteria of anthropogenic eutrophication at an early state, methods of separating natural and anthropogenic components of the biogenic runoff (nitrogen and phosphorus compounds) of rivers, and methods of their quantitative calculation have been developed. The results of the calculations for all ions are given. The anthropogenic component of the dissolved load successfully increased. Total dissolved load of the Volga reaches 22%.

  3. Classical scattering calculations for diatomic molecules: A general procedure and application to the microwave spectrum O2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mingelgrin, U.

    1972-01-01

    Many properties of gaseous systems such as electromagnetic absorption and emission, sound dispersion and absorption, may be elucidated if the nature of collisions between the particles in the system is understood. A procedure for the calculation of the classical trajectories of two interacting diatomic molecules is described. The dynamics of the collision will be assumed to be that of two rigid rotors moving in a specified potential. The actual outcome of a representative sample of many trajectories at 298K was computed, and the use of these values at any temperature for calculations of various molecular properties will be described. Calculations performed for the O2 microwave spectrum are given to demonstrate the use of the procedure described.

  4. Selecting a calculation method to estimate sediment and nutrient loads in streams: application to the Beaurivage River (Quebec, Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, A. N.; Quilbé, R.

    2005-12-01

    Estimation of sediment and contaminant loads is based on streamflow and concentration data. In general, stream gauges continuously monitor streamflow, while contaminant concentrations are measured less frequently because of high costs of sampling and laboratory analyses. The classical question is: how to accurately estimate seasonal or annual loads when the only available concentration data are from a weekly or even monthly sampling? To do so, different calculation approaches have been developed over the last decades. The classical approaches are deterministic: averaging methods, ratio estimators, regression methods (rating curves) and planning level load estimation methods. This presentation proposes a rapid overview of these methods as well as a framework to select the most suited with respect to available data. First, correlations between contaminant concentration and streamflow should be checked. If correlations are strong enough, regression methods should be used in priority. Otherwise, averaging methods or ratio estimators are more appropriate. In a case study involving a six-year data set (1989 to 1995) from the Beaurivage River (Quebec, Canada), we used the ratio estimator to estimate annual and seasonal loads of sediments and nutrients (N and P). Results show relatively steady annual loads (on average 8.1 kg.ha.yr-1 and 1.1 kg.ha.yr-1 for total dissolved N and total P respectively) and a low erosion rate (0.23 t.ha.yr-1). The results also confirm that nutrient and sediment transport via runoff is essentially a springtime process in this region, and they indicate that dissolved P represents the bulk of the total P load, most likely due to artificial subsurface drainage systems in the watershed. These results are compared to loads obtained with other averaging methods and with data from literature, confirming the order of magnitude but highlighting the large uncertainties that remain with such deterministic methods. Finally, some research avenues are

  5. Resizing procedure for optimum design of structures under combined mechanical and thermal loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, H. M.; Narayanaswami, R.

    1976-01-01

    An algorithm is reported for resizing structures subjected to combined thermal and mechanical loading. The algorithm is applicable to uniaxial stress elements (rods) and membrane biaxial stress members. Thermal Fully Stressed Design (TFSD) is based on the basic difference between mechanical and thermal stresses in their response to resizing. The TFSD technique is found to converge in fewer iterations than ordinary fully stressed design for problems where thermal stresses are comparable to the mechanical stresses. The improved convergence is demonstrated by example with a study of a simplified wing structure, built-up with rods and membranes and subjected to a combination of mechanical loads and a three dimensional temperature distribution.

  6. Impact of biplane versus single-plane imaging on radiation dose, contrast load and procedural time in coronary angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Sadick, V; Reed, W; Collins, L; Sadick, N; Heard, R; Robinson, J

    2010-05-01

    Coronary angioplasties can be performed with either single-plane or biplane imaging techniques. The aim of this study was to determine whether biplane imaging, in comparison to single-plane imaging, reduces radiation dose and contrast load and shortens procedural time during (i) primary and elective coronary angioplasty procedures, (ii) angioplasty to the main vascular territories and (iii) procedures performed by operators with various levels of experience. This prospective observational study included a total of 504 primary and elective single-vessel coronary angioplasty procedures utilising either biplane or single-plane imaging. Radiographic and clinical parameters were collected from clinical reports and examination protocols. Radiation dose was measured by a dose-area-product (DAP) meter intrinsic to the angiography system. Our results showed that biplane imaging delivered a significantly greater radiation dose (181.4+/-121.0 Gycm(2)) than single-plane imaging (133.6+/-92.8 Gycm(2), p<0.0001). The difference was independent of case type (primary or elective) (p = 0.862), vascular territory (p = 0.519) and operator experience (p = 0.903). No significant difference was found in contrast load between biplane (166.8+/-62.9 ml) and single-plane imaging (176.8+/-66.0 ml) (p = 0.302). This non-significant difference was independent of case type (p = 0.551), vascular territory (p = 0.308) and operator experience (p = 0.304). Procedures performed with biplane imaging were significantly longer (55.3+/-27.8 min) than those with single-plane (48.9+/-24.2 min, p = 0.010) and, similarly, were not dependent on case type (p = 0.226), vascular territory (p = 0.642) or operator experience (p = 0.094). Biplane imaging resulted in a greater radiation dose and a longer procedural time and delivered a non-significant reduction in contrast load than single-plane imaging. These findings did not support the commonly perceived advantages of using biplane imaging in single

  7. Increased Memory Load during Task Completion when Procedures Are Presented on Mobile Screens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, Keena S.; Caldwell, Barrett S.

    2011-01-01

    The primary objective of this research was to compare procedure-based task performance using three common mobile screen sizes: ultra mobile personal computer (7 in./17.8 cm), personal data assistant (3.5 in./8.9 cm), and SmartPhone (2.8 in./7.1 cm). Subjects used these three screen sizes to view and execute a computer maintenance procedure.…

  8. 40 CFR 86.164-00 - Supplemental Federal Test Procedure calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... (B) YFTP=Weighted mass emissions per mile (Ywm) based on the measured driving distance of the FTP test schedule. (C) YSC03=Calculated mass emissions per mile based on the measured driving distance of the SC03 test schedule. (D) YUS06=Calculated mass emissions per mile based on the measured...

  9. 33 CFR 138.240 - Procedure for calculating limit of liability adjustments for inflation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... (d) 33 CFR Ch. I (7-1-10 Edition) Coast Guard, DHS ... of liability adjustments for inflation. 138.240 Section 138.240 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... calculating limit of liability adjustments for inflation. (a) Formula for calculating a cumulative...

  10. 33 CFR 138.240 - Procedure for calculating limit of liability adjustments for inflation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... (d) 33 CFR Ch. I (7-1-11 Edition) Coast Guard, DHS ... of liability adjustments for inflation. 138.240 Section 138.240 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... calculating limit of liability adjustments for inflation. (a) Formula for calculating a cumulative...

  11. 33 CFR 138.240 - Procedure for calculating limit of liability adjustments for inflation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... (d) 33 CFR Ch. I (7-1-12 Edition) Coast Guard, DHS ... of liability adjustments for inflation. 138.240 Section 138.240 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... calculating limit of liability adjustments for inflation. (a) Formula for calculating a cumulative...

  12. 33 CFR 138.240 - Procedure for calculating limit of liability adjustments for inflation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... (d) 33 CFR Ch. I (7-1-14 Edition) Coast Guard, DHS ... of liability adjustments for inflation. 138.240 Section 138.240 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... calculating limit of liability adjustments for inflation. (a) Formula for calculating a cumulative...

  13. 33 CFR 138.240 - Procedure for calculating limit of liability adjustments for inflation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... (d) 33 CFR Ch. I (7-1-13 Edition) Coast Guard, DHS ... of liability adjustments for inflation. 138.240 Section 138.240 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... calculating limit of liability adjustments for inflation. (a) Formula for calculating a cumulative...

  14. 24 CFR 3280.508 - Heat loss, heat gain and cooling load calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ....18Mechanical and Industrial Systems 25.19Commercial Building Envelope Leakage 27.9Calculation of Heat Loss from... generally accepted engineering practices. The general requirement is to demonstrate that the home...

  15. Development of an Energy-Savings Calculation Methodology for Residential Miscellaneous Electric Loads: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Hendron, R.; Eastment, M.

    2006-08-01

    In order to meet whole-house energy savings targets beyond 50% in residential buildings, it will be essential that new technologies and systems approaches be developed to address miscellaneous electric loads (MELs). These MELs are comprised of the small and diverse collection of energy-consuming devices found in homes, including what are commonly known as plug loads (televisions, stereos, microwaves), along with all hard-wired loads that do not fit into other major end-use categories (doorbells, security systems, garage door openers). MELs present special challenges because their purchase and operation are largely under the control of the occupants. If no steps are taken to address MELs, they can constitute 40-50% of the remaining source energy use in homes that achieve 60-70% whole-house energy savings, and this percentage is likely to increase in the future as home electronics become even more sophisticated and their use becomes more widespread. Building America (BA), a U.S. Department of Energy research program that targets 50% energy savings by 2015 and 90% savings by 2025, has begun to identify and develop advanced solutions that can reduce MELs.

  16. Study made of procedures for externally loading and corrosion testing stress corrosion specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.

    1967-01-01

    Study was initiated to determine methods or test specimens for evaluating stress corrosion cracking characteristics of common structural materials. It was found that the methods of externally loading and corrosion testing were reliable in yielding reproducible results for stress corrosion evaluation.

  17. Calculation of theoretical and empirical nutrient N critical loads in the mixed conifer ecosystems of southern California.

    PubMed

    Breiner, Joan; Gimeno, Benjamin S; Fenn, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Edaphic, foliar, and hydrologic forest nutrient status indicators from 15 mixed conifer forest stands in the Sierra Nevada, San Gabriel Mountains, and San Bernardino National Forest were used to estimate empirical or theoretical critical loads (CL) for nitrogen (N) as a nutrient. Soil acidification response to N deposition was also evaluated. Robust empirical relationships were found relating N deposition to plant N uptake (N in foliage), N fertility (litter C/N ratio), and soil acidification. However, no consistent empirical CL were obtained when the thresholds for parameters indicative of N excess from other types of ecosystems were used. Similarly, the highest theoretical CL for nutrient N calculated using the simple mass balance steady state model (estimates ranging from 1.4-8.8 kg N/ha/year) was approximately two times lower than the empirical observations. Further research is needed to derive the thresholds for indicators associated with the impairment of these mixed conifer forests exposed to chronic N deposition within a Mediterranean climate. Further development or parameterization of models for the calculation of theoretical critical loads suitable for these ecosystems will also be an important aspect of future critical loads research. PMID:17450298

  18. Alternative Methods for Calculating Intercoder Reliability in Content Analysis: Kappa, Weighted Kappa and Agreement Charts Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Namjun

    If content analysis is to satisfy the requirement of objectivity, measures and procedures must be reliable. Reliability is usually measured by the proportion of agreement of all categories identically coded by different coders. For such data to be empirically meaningful, a high degree of inter-coder reliability must be demonstrated. Researchers in…

  19. A Finite Element Procedure for Calculating Fluid-Structure Interaction Using MSC/NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chargin, Mladen; Gartmeier, Otto

    1990-01-01

    This report is intended to serve two purposes. The first is to present a survey of the theoretical background of the dynamic interaction between a non-viscid, compressible fluid and an elastic structure is presented. Section one presents a short survey of the application of the finite element method (FEM) to the area of fluid-structure-interaction (FSI). Section two describes the mathematical foundation of the structure and fluid with special emphasis on the fluid. The main steps in establishing the finite element (FE) equations for the fluid structure coupling are discussed in section three. The second purpose is to demonstrate the application of MSC/NASTRAN to the solution of FSI problems. Some specific topics, such as fluid structure analogy, acoustic absorption, and acoustic contribution analysis are described in section four. Section five deals with the organization of the acoustic procedure flowchart. Section six includes the most important information that a user needs for applying the acoustic procedure to practical FSI problems. Beginning with some rules concerning the FE modeling of the coupled system, the NASTRAN USER DECKs for the different steps are described. The goal of section seven is to demonstrate the use of the acoustic procedure with some examples. This demonstration includes an analytic verification of selected FE results. The analytical description considers only some aspects of FSI and is not intended to be mathematically complete. Finally, section 8 presents an application of the acoustic procedure to vehicle interior acoustic analysis with selected results.

  20. A factorization procedure for calculations of gamma exposure from radioactive clouds.

    PubMed

    Tarasov, V I

    1993-11-01

    A procedure is proposed to factor the integrand in the expression for dose characteristics of gamma emission of radioactive clouds. This method permits a reduction of the multiplicity of the integration for conventional models with an arbitrary collocation of a source and a receptor. This can result in more economic numerical schemes for analyzing the consequences of radioactive releases into the atmosphere.

  1. 40 CFR 86.164-08 - Supplemental Federal Test Procedure calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... New Otto-Cycle Complete Heavy-Duty Vehicles; Test Procedures § 86.164-08 Supplemental Federal Test... environmental test cell NOX results to 100 grains of water according to paragraph (d) of this section. These... results to the environmental test cell air conditioning ambient condition of 100 grains of water/pound...

  2. An explicit finite-volume time-marching procedure for turbulent flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholson, Stephen; Moore, Joan G.; Moore, John

    1986-01-01

    A method was developed which calculates two-dimensional, transonic, viscous flow in ducts. The finite-volume, time-marching formulation is used to obtain steady flow solutions of the Reynolds-averaged form of the Navier-Stokes equations. The entire calculation is performed in the physical domain. Control volumes are chosen so that smoothing of flow properties, typically required for stability, is not required. Different time steps are used in the different governing equations. A new pressure interpolation scheme is introduced which improves the shock capturing ability of the method. A multi-volume method for pressure changes in the boundary layer allows calculations which use very long and thin control volumes (length/height - 1000). The method is compared with two test cases. Essentially incompressible turbulent boundary layer flow in an adverse pressure gradient is calculated and the computed distributions of mean velocity and shear are in good agreement with the measurements. Transonic viscous flow in a converging diverging nozzle is calculated; the Mach number upstream of the shock is approximately 1.25. The agreement between the calculated and measured shock strength and total pressure losses is good.

  3. Fast approach for calculating film thicknesses and pressures in elastohydrodynamically lubricated contacts at high loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houpert, L. G.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1985-01-01

    The film thicknesses and pressures in elastohydrodynamically lubricated contacts have been calculated for a line contact by using an improved version of Okamura's approach. The new approach allows for lubricant compressibility, the use of Roelands' viscosity, a general mesh (nonconstant step), and accurate calculations of the elastic deformation. The new approach is described, and the effects on film thickness, pressure, and pressure spike of each of the improvements are discussed. Successful runs have been obtained at high pressure (to 4.8 GPa) with low CPU times.

  4. WASTE{_}MGMT: A computer model for calculation of waste loads, profiles, and emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Kotek, T.J.; Avci, H.I.; Koebnick, B.L.

    1996-12-01

    Waste{_}MGMT is a computational model developed to provide waste loads, profiles, and emissions for the US Department of Energy`s Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WP PEIS). The model was developed to account for the considerable variety of waste types and processing alternatives evaluated for the WM PEIS. The model is table-driven, with three types of fundamental waste management data defining the input: (1) waste inventories and characteristics; (2) treatment, storage, and disposal facility characteristics; and (3) alternative definition. The primary output of the model consists of tables of waste loads and contaminant profiles at facilities, as well as contaminant air releases for each treatment and storage facility at each site for each waste stream. The model is implemented in Microsoft{reg_sign} FoxPro{reg_sign} for MS-DOS{reg_sign} version 2.5 and requires a microcomputer with at least a 386 processor and a minimum 6 Mbytes of memory and 10 Mbytes of disk space for temporary storage.

  5. An automated procedure for calculating system matrices from perturbation data generated by an EAI Pacer and 100 hybrid computer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milner, E. J.; Krosel, S. M.

    1977-01-01

    Techniques are presented for determining the elements of the A, B, C, and D state variable matrices for systems simulated on an EAI Pacer 100 hybrid computer. An automated procedure systematically generates disturbance data necessary to linearize the simulation model and stores these data on a floppy disk. A separate digital program verifies this data, calculates the elements of the system matrices, and prints these matrices appropriately labeled. The partial derivatives forming the elements of the state variable matrices are approximated by finite difference calculations.

  6. Time Savings and Surgery Task Load Reduction in Open Intraperitoneal Onlay Mesh Fixation Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sanjoy; Hammond, Jeffrey; Panish, Jessica; Shnoda, Pullen; Savidge, Sandy; Wilson, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Background. This study assessed the reduction in surgeon stress associated with savings in procedure time for mechanical fixation of an intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM) compared to a traditional suture fixation in open ventral hernia repair. Study Design. Nine general surgeons performed 36 open IPOM fixation procedures in porcine model. Each surgeon conducted two mechanical (using ETHICON SECURESTRAPTM Open) and two suture fixation procedures. Fixation time was measured using a stopwatch, and related surgeon stress was assessed using the validated SURG-TLX questionnaire. T-tests were used to compare between-group differences, and a two-sided 95% confidence interval for the difference in stress levels was established using nonparametric methodology. Results. The mechanical fixation group demonstrated an 89.1% mean reduction in fixation time, as compared to the suture group (p < 0.00001). Surgeon stress scores measured using SURG-TLX were 55.5% lower in the mechanical compared to the suture fixation group (p < 0.001). Scores in five of the six sources of stress were significantly lower for mechanical fixation. Conclusions. Mechanical fixation with ETHICON SECURESTRAPTM Open demonstrated a significant reduction in fixation time and surgeon stress, which may translate into improved operating efficiency, improved performance, improved surgeon quality of life, and reduced overall costs of the procedure. PMID:26240834

  7. High-speed propeller noise predictions: Effects of boundary conditions used in blade loading calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nallasamy, M.; Clark, B. J.; Groeneweg, J. F.

    1987-01-01

    The acoustics of an advanced single rotation SR-3 propeller at cruise conditions are studied employing a time-domain approach. The study evaluates the acoustic significance of the differences in blade pressures computed using nonreflecting rather than hard wall boundary conditions in the three-dimensional Euler code solution. The directivities of the harmonics of the blade passing frequency tone and the effects of chordwise loading on tone directivity are examined. The results show that the maximum difference in the computed sound pressure levels due to the use of blade pressure distributions obtained with the nonreflecting rather than the hard wall boundary conditions is about 1.5 dB. The blade passing frequency tone directivity obtained in the present study shows good agreement with jetstar flight data.

  8. 40 CFR 86.164-08 - Supplemental Federal Test Procedure calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and CO. (B) YFTP = Weighted mass emissions per mile (YWM) based on the measured driving distance of the FTP test schedule. (C) YSC03 = Calculated mass emissions per mile based on the measured driving... CO. (B) YFTP = Weighted mass emissions per mile (Ywm) based on the measured driving distance of...

  9. 40 CFR 86.164-08 - Supplemental Federal Test Procedure calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and CO. (B) YFTP = Weighted mass emissions per mile (YWM) based on the measured driving distance of the FTP test schedule. (C) YSC03 = Calculated mass emissions per mile based on the measured driving... CO. (B) YFTP = Weighted mass emissions per mile (Ywm) based on the measured driving distance of...

  10. 19 CFR 351.224 - Disclosure of calculations and procedures for the correction of ministerial errors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... determination may submit comments concerning a significant ministerial error in such calculations. A party to... determination or the final results of a review may submit comments concerning any ministerial error in such... the time limit for filing comments concerning a ministerial error in a final determination or...

  11. 19 CFR 351.224 - Disclosure of calculations and procedures for the correction of ministerial errors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... determination may submit comments concerning a significant ministerial error in such calculations. A party to... determination or the final results of a review may submit comments concerning any ministerial error in such... the time limit for filing comments concerning a ministerial error in a final determination or...

  12. 19 CFR 351.224 - Disclosure of calculations and procedures for the correction of ministerial errors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... determination may submit comments concerning a significant ministerial error in such calculations. A party to... determination or the final results of a review may submit comments concerning any ministerial error in such... the time limit for filing comments concerning a ministerial error in a final determination or...

  13. Practical preparation procedures for docetaxel-loaded nanoparticles using polylactic acid-co-glycolic acid

    PubMed Central

    Keum, Chang-Gu; Noh, Young-Wook; Baek, Jong-Suep; Lim, Ji-Ho; Hwang, Chan-Ju; Na, Young-Guk; Shin, Sang-Chul; Cho, Cheong-Weon

    2011-01-01

    Background Nanoparticles fabricated from the biodegradable and biocompatible polymer, polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA), are the most intensively investigated polymers for drug delivery systems. The objective of this study was to explore fully the development of a PLGA nanoparticle drug delivery system for alternative preparation of a commercial formulation. In our nanoparticle fabrication, our purpose was to compare various preparation parameters. Methods Docetaxel-loaded PLGA nanoparticles were prepared by a single emulsion technique and solvent evaporation. The nanoparticles were characterized by various techniques, including scanning electron microscopy for surface morphology, dynamic light scattering for size and zeta potential, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for surface chemistry, and high-performance liquid chromatography for in vitro drug release kinetics. To obtain a smaller particle, 0.2% polyvinyl alcohol, 0.03% D-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS), 2% Poloxamer 188, a five-minute sonication time, 130 W sonication power, evaporation with magnetic stirring, and centrifugation at 8000 rpm were selected. To increase encapsulation efficiency in the nanoparticles, certain factors were varied, ie, 2–5 minutes of sonication time, 70–130 W sonication power, and 5–25 mg drug loading. Results A five-minute sonication time, 130 W sonication power, and a 10 mg drug loading amount were selected. Under these conditions, the nanoparticles reached over 90% encapsulation efficiency. Release kinetics showed that 20.83%, 40.07%, and 51.5% of the docetaxel was released in 28 days from nanoparticles containing Poloxamer 188, TPGS, or polyvinyl alcohol, respectively. TPGS and Poloxamer 188 had slower release kinetics than polyvinyl alcohol. It was predicted that there was residual drug remaining on the surface from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Conclusion Our research shows that the choice of surfactant is important for controlled release of

  14. Calculation of Shallow Shell Subject to Influence of Load Local Effect by the Difference Technique on Irregular Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran Duc, Chinh

    1997-05-01

    In this paper, a methodology for the calculation of shallow shell with positive Gauss radius, and boundaries supported on the rectangular plane subject to influence of uniform load and concentrated forces has been considered. In order to solve differential equations (written in the form that assumes deflections as unknowns) of bending shallow shell theory, the author has used the finite difference technique on irregular networks. A detailed algorithm has been formulated that enables to solve the problem by computer. By the above algorithm, the author has obtained numerical results in the form of internal forces and deflections diagrams.

  15. Shear and Turbulence Estimates for Calculation of Wind Turbine Loads and Responses Under Hurricane Strength Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosovic, B.; Bryan, G. H.; Haupt, S. E.

    2012-12-01

    Schwartz et al. (2010) recently reported that the total gross energy-generating offshore wind resource in the United States in waters less than 30m deep is approximately 1000 GW. Estimated offshore generating capacity is thus equivalent to the current generating capacity in the United States. Offshore wind power can therefore play important role in electricity production in the United States. However, most of this resource is located along the East Coast of the United States and in the Gulf of Mexico, areas frequently affected by tropical cyclones including hurricanes. Hurricane strength winds, associated shear and turbulence can affect performance and structural integrity of wind turbines. In a recent study Rose et al. (2012) attempted to estimate the risk to offshore wind turbines from hurricane strength winds over a lifetime of a wind farm (i.e. 20 years). According to Rose et al. turbine tower buckling has been observed in typhoons. They concluded that there is "substantial risk that Category 3 and higher hurricanes can destroy half or more of the turbines at some locations." More robust designs including appropriate controls can mitigate the risk of wind turbine damage. To develop such designs good estimates of turbine loads under hurricane strength winds are essential. We use output from a large-eddy simulation of a hurricane to estimate shear and turbulence intensity over first couple of hundred meters above sea surface. We compute power spectra of three velocity components at several distances from the eye of the hurricane. Based on these spectra analytical spectral forms are developed and included in TurbSim, a stochastic inflow turbulence code developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL, http://wind.nrel.gov/designcodes/preprocessors/turbsim/). TurbSim provides a numerical simulation including bursts of coherent turbulence associated with organized turbulent structures. It can generate realistic flow conditions that an operating turbine

  16. Simulation of three-dimensional liquid sloshing flows using a strongly implicit calculation procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, K.-H.; Pletcher, R. H.

    1991-01-01

    A coupled strongly implicit solution strategy for unsteady three-dimensional free surface flows has been developed based on an artificial compressibility formulation for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. A pseudotime term has been used in the continuity equation to permit time accurate calculations to be achieved. The scheme appears capable of tracking the free surface reasonably accurately inside a partially-filled spherical container undergoing a general rotating motion characteristic of that experienced by a spin-stabilized satellite. Five different free surface calculations have been presented. Some of the results exhibit an interesting Reynolds number dependent oscillatory behavior which is believed to be physical although no experimental results appears to be available for verification to date.

  17. SEASONAL VARIATION IN PESTICIDE LOADS AND TRENDS IN THE CENTRAL VALLEY, CALIFORNIA: CALCULATED USING TWO PARAMETRIC METHODS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, D.; Domagalski, J. L.; Johnson, H. M.; Lorenz, D. J.

    2009-12-01

    Mass loading and trends in concentration were calculated for four pesticides in two watersheds with different land uses in the Central Valley, California, by using two parametric models: (1) the Seasonal Wave model (SeaWave), in which a pulse signal is used to describe the annual cycle of pesticide occurrence in a stream; and, (2) the Sine Wave model (SineWave), in which first-order Fourier series sine and cosine terms are used to simulate seasonal loading patterns. The models were applied to data for water years 1997 through 2005 provided by the National Water Quality Assessment Program (NAWQA). The pesticides considered in this study were carbaryl, diazinon, metolachlor, and molinate. Data were analyzed for two seasons: precipitation season (October through March), and the irrigation season (April through September). Results from the two models show that the ability to capture seasonal variations in pesticide concentrations was affected by pesticide use patterns and the methods by which pesticides are transported to streams. When compared with results from previous studies, both models well estimated seasonal loads and trends in concentrations. It is important to point out that loads estimated by the two models did not differ substantially from each other, with the exceptions of carbaryl and molinate during the precipitation season, where loads were affected by application patterns and precipitation. At the same time, trends in pesticide concentrations over time, as estimated by both models, were nearly identical indicating that either model can be used equally for calculating trends in concentrations. However, in watersheds where pesticides are applied in specific patterns— involving multiple applications of various amounts—the SeaWave model might be a better model to use due to its robust capability to describe seasonal variations in pesticide concentrations. As a case study, trends in pesticide concentrations for streams in the Central Valley were

  18. Subject-specific geometrical detail rather than cost function formulation affects hip loading calculation.

    PubMed

    Wesseling, Mariska; De Groote, Friedl; Bosmans, Lode; Bartels, Ward; Meyer, Christophe; Desloovere, Kaat; Jonkers, Ilse

    2016-11-01

    This study assessed the relative importance of introducing an increasing level of medical image-based subject-specific detail in bone and muscle geometry in the musculoskeletal model, on calculated hip contact forces during gait. These forces were compared to introducing minimization of hip contact forces in the optimization criterion. With an increasing level of subject-specific detail, specifically MRI-based geometry and wrapping surfaces representing the hip capsule, hip contact forces decreased and were more comparable to contact forces measured using instrumented prostheses (average difference of 0.69 BW at the first peak compared to 1.04 BW for the generic model). Inclusion of subject-specific wrapping surfaces in the model had a greater effect than altering the cost function definition.

  19. Adding glycaemic index and glycaemic load functionality to DietPLUS, a Malaysian food composition database and diet intake calculator.

    PubMed

    Shyam, Sangeetha; Wai, Tony Ng Kock; Arshad, Fatimah

    2012-01-01

    This paper outlines the methodology to add glycaemic index (GI) and glycaemic load (GL) functionality to food DietPLUS, a Microsoft Excel-based Malaysian food composition database and diet intake calculator. Locally determined GI values and published international GI databases were used as the source of GI values. Previously published methodology for GI value assignment was modified to add GI and GL calculators to the database. Two popular local low GI foods were added to the DietPLUS database, bringing up the total number of foods in the database to 838 foods. Overall, in relation to the 539 major carbohydrate foods in the Malaysian Food Composition Database, 243 (45%) food items had local Malaysian values or were directly matched to International GI database and another 180 (33%) of the foods were linked to closely-related foods in the GI databases used. The mean ± SD dietary GI and GL of the dietary intake of 63 women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus, calculated using DietPLUS version3 were, 62 ± 6 and 142 ± 45, respectively. These values were comparable to those reported from other local studies. DietPLUS version3, a simple Microsoft Excel-based programme aids calculation of diet GI and GL for Malaysian diets based on food records.

  20. A variational centroid density procedure for the calculation of transmission coefficients for asymmetric barriers at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Messina, M.; Schenter, G.K.; Garrett, B.C.

    1995-09-01

    The low temperature behavior of the centroid density method of Voth, Chandler, and Miller (VCM) [J. Chem. Phys. {bold 91}, 7749 (1989)] is investigated for tunneling through a one-dimensional barrier. We find that the bottleneck for a quantum activated process as defined by VCM does not correspond to the classical bottleneck for the case of an asymmetric barrier. If the centroid density is constrained to be at the classical bottleneck for an asymmetric barrier, the centroid density method can give transmission coefficients that are too large by as much as five orders of magnitude. We follow a variational procedure, as suggested by VCM, whereby the best transmission coefficient is found by varying the position of the centroid until the minimum value for this transmission coefficient is obtained. This is a procedure that is readily generalizable to multidimensional systems. We present calculations on several test systems which show that this variational procedure greatly enhances the accuracy of the centroid density method compared to when the centroid is constrained to be at the barrier top. Furthermore, the relation of this procedure to the low temperature periodic orbit or ``instanton`` approach is discussed. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  1. Calculation of helicopter rotor blade/vortex interaction by Navier-Stokes procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Y.-N.; Shamroth, S. J.; Buggeln, R. C.

    1987-01-01

    Interactions of a modern rotor blade with concentrated tip vortices from the previous blades can have a significant influence on the airloads and the aeroacoustics of a helicopter. A better understanding of the blade/vortex interaction process and a method of analyzing its flow field would provide valuable help in the design of helicopters. The work discussed herein represents an initial effort in applying a 3-D, time-dependent Navier-Stokes simulation to the blade vortex interaction problem. The numerical approach is the Linearized Block Implicit (LBI) technique. In this initial effort, consideration is given to the interaction of a wing of idealized geometry and a vortex whose axis is aligned at an arbitrary angle to the wing. The calculations are made for laminar, subsonic flow, and show the time dependent pressure distribution and flow fields resulting from the interaction.

  2. Extension of a GIS procedure for calculating the RUSLE equation LS factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongming; Yang, Qinke; Li, Rui; Liu, Qingrui; Moore, Demie; He, Peng; Ritsema, Coen J.; Geissen, Violette

    2013-03-01

    The Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) and revised USLE (RUSLE) are often used to estimate soil erosion at regional landscape scales, however a major limitation is the difficulty in extracting the LS factor. The geographic information system-based (GIS-based) methods which have been developed for estimating the LS factor for USLE and RUSLE also have limitations. The unit contributing area-based estimation method (UCA) converts slope length to unit contributing area for considering two-dimensional topography, however is not able to predict the different zones of soil erosion and deposition. The flowpath and cumulative cell length-based method (FCL) overcomes this disadvantage but does not consider channel networks and flow convergence in two-dimensional topography. The purpose of this research was to overcome these limitations and extend the FCL method through inclusion of channel networks and convergence flow. We developed LS-TOOL in Microsoft's.NET environment using C♯ with a user-friendly interface. Comparing the LS factor calculated with the three methodologies (UCA, FCL and LS-TOOL), LS-TOOL delivers encouraging results. In particular, LS-TOOL uses breaks in slope identified from the DEM to locate soil erosion and deposition zones, channel networks and convergence flow areas. Comparing slope length and LS factor values generated using LS-TOOL with manual methods, LS-TOOL corresponds more closely with the reality of the Xiannangou catchment than results using UCA or FCL. The LS-TOOL algorithm can automatically calculate slope length, slope steepness, L factor, S factor, and LS factors, providing the results as ASCII files which can be easily used in some GIS software. This study is an important step forward in conducting more accurate large area erosion evaluation.

  3. Monte Carlo calculations on extremity and eye lens dosimetry for medical staff at interventional radiology procedures.

    PubMed

    Carinou, E; Ferrari, P; Koukorava, C; Krim, S; Struelens, L

    2011-03-01

    There are many factors that can influence the extremity and eye lens doses of the medical staff during interventional radiology and cardiology procedures. Numerical simulations can play an important role in evaluating extremity and eye lens doses in correlation with many different parameters. In the present study, the first results of the ORAMED (Optimisation of Radiation protection of MEDical staff) simulation campaign are presented. The parameters investigated for their influence on eye lens, hand, wrist and leg doses are: tube voltage, filtration, beam projection, field size and irradiated part of the patient's body. The tube voltage ranged from 60 to 110 kV(p), filtration from 3 to 6 mm Al and from 0 to 0.9 mm Cu. For all projections, the results showed that doses received by the operator decreased with increasing tube voltage and filtration. The magnitude of the influence of the tube voltage and the filtration on the doses depends on the beam projection and the irradiated part of the patient's body. Finally, the influence of the field size is significant in decreasing the doses.

  4. Measurement of diffusion coefficients of VOCs for building materials: review and development of a calculation procedure.

    PubMed

    Haghighat, F; Lee, C S; Ghaly, W S

    2002-06-01

    The measurement and prediction of building material emission rates have been the subject of intensive research over the past decade, resulting in the development of advanced sensory and chemical analysis measurement techniques as well as the development of analytical and numerical models. One of the important input parameters for these models is the diffusion coefficient. Several experimental techniques have been applied to estimate the diffusion coefficient. An extensive literature review of the techniques used to measure this coefficient was carried out, for building materials exposed to volatile organic compounds (VOC). This paper reviews these techniques; it also analyses the results and discusses the possible causes of difference in the reported data. It was noted that the discrepancy between the different results was mainly because of the assumptions made in and the techniques used to analyze the data. For a given technique, the results show that there can be a difference of up to 700% in the reported data. Moreover, the paper proposes what is referred to as the mass exchanger method, to calculate diffusion coefficients considering both diffusion and convection. The results obtained by this mass exchanger method were compared with those obtained by the existing method considering only diffusion. It was demonstrated that, for porous materials, the convection resistance could not be ignored when compared with the diffusion resistance.

  5. Analyzing astrophysical neutrino signals using realistic nuclear structure calculations and the convolution procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsakstara, V.; Kosmas, T. S.

    2011-12-01

    Convoluted differential and total cross sections of inelastic ν scattering on 128,130Te isotopes are computed from the original cross sections calculated previously using the quasiparticle random-phase approximation. We adopt various spectral distributions for the neutrino energy spectra such as the common two-parameter Fermi-Dirac and power-law distributions appropriate to explore nuclear detector responses to supernova neutrino spectra. We also concentrate on the use of low-energy β-beam neutrinos, originating from boosted β--radioactive 6He ions, to decompose original supernova (anti)neutrino spectra that are subsequently employed to simulate total cross sections of the reactions 130Te(ν˜,ν˜')130Te*. The concrete nuclear regimes selected, 128,130Te, are contents of the multipurpose CUORE and COBRA rare event detectors. Our present investigation may provide useful information about the efficiency of the Te detector medium of the above experiments in their potential use in supernova neutrino searches.

  6. Fatigue Damage Spectrum calculation in a Mission Synthesis procedure for Sine-on-Random excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeli, Andrea; Cornelis, Bram; Troncossi, Marco

    2016-09-01

    In many real-life environments, certain mechanical and electronic components may be subjected to Sine-on-Random vibrations, i.e. excitations composed of random vibrations superimposed on deterministic (sinusoidal) contributions, in particular sine tones due to some rotating parts of the system (e.g. helicopters, engine-mounted components,...). These components must be designed to withstand the fatigue damage induced by the “composed” vibration environment, and qualification tests are advisable for the most critical ones. In the case of an accelerated qualification test, a proper test tailoring which starts from the real environment (measured vibration signals) and which preserves not only the accumulated fatigue damage but also the “nature” of the excitation (i.e. sinusoidal components plus random process) is important to obtain reliable results. In this paper, the classic time domain approach is taken as a reference for the comparison of different methods for the Fatigue Damage Spectrum (FDS) calculation in case of Sine-on-Random vibration environments. Then, a methodology to compute a Sine-on-Random specification based on a mission FDS is proposed.

  7. A Fuzzy Goal Programming Procedure for Solving Multiobjective Load Flow Problems via Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Papun; Chakraborti, Debjani

    2010-10-01

    This paper describes how the genetic algorithms (GAs) can be efficiently used to fuzzy goal programming (FGP) formulation of optimal power flow problems having multiple objectives. In the proposed approach, the different constraints, various relationships of optimal power flow calculations are fuzzily described. In the model formulation of the problem, the membership functions of the defined fuzzy goals are characterized first for measuring the degree of achievement of the aspiration levels of the goals specified in the decision making context. Then, the achievement function for minimizing the regret for under-deviations from the highest membership value (unity) of the defined membership goals to the extent possible on the basis of priorities is constructed for optimal power flow problems. In the solution process, the GA method is employed to the FGP formulation of the problem for achievement of the highest membership value (unity) of the defined membership functions to the extent possible in the decision making environment. In the GA based solution search process, the conventional Roulette wheel selection scheme, arithmetic crossover and random mutation are taken into consideration to reach a satisfactory decision. The developed method has been tested on IEEE 6-generator 30-bus System. Numerical results show that this method is promising for handling uncertain constraints in practical power systems.

  8. A procedure for the estimation of the numerical uncertainty of CFD calculations based on grid refinement studies

    SciTech Connect

    Eça, L.; Hoekstra, M.

    2014-04-01

    This paper offers a procedure for the estimation of the numerical uncertainty of any integral or local flow quantity as a result of a fluid flow computation; the procedure requires solutions on systematically refined grids. The error is estimated with power series expansions as a function of the typical cell size. These expansions, of which four types are used, are fitted to the data in the least-squares sense. The selection of the best error estimate is based on the standard deviation of the fits. The error estimate is converted into an uncertainty with a safety factor that depends on the observed order of grid convergence and on the standard deviation of the fit. For well-behaved data sets, i.e. monotonic convergence with the expected observed order of grid convergence and no scatter in the data, the method reduces to the well known Grid Convergence Index. Examples of application of the procedure are included. - Highlights: • Estimation of the numerical uncertainty of any integral or local flow quantity. • Least squares fits to power series expansions to handle noisy data. • Excellent results obtained for manufactured solutions. • Consistent results obtained for practical CFD calculations. • Reduces to the well known Grid Convergence Index for well-behaved data sets.

  9. Timber Harvest Effects on Sediment and Water Yields and Analysis of Sediment Load Calculation Methods in the Interior Pacific Northwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elverson, C.; Karwan, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    Timber harvest practices have a long-standing association with changes in water and sediment yields. We quantify the trends in water and sediment yields in the Mica Creek Experimental Watershed (MCEW) in relation to management practices with linear regression and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). From 1991 to 2013, an increase in water yield resulted from both clearcutting and thinning treatments, with monthly water yield rate increases of 13-57% and annual water yield increases up to 210 mm (40%) in the clearcut watershed. Following treatment, annual sediment yields increased in the clearcut watershed by 40-131% and the thinned watershed by 33-163%, both relative to the control watershed, with statistically-significant monthly load increases in the year immediately following treatment. Water and sediment yield changes do not follow the same post-treatment patterns. Water yields increased immediately following treatment and, over time, gradually dropped towards pre-harvest levels. Annual sediment yields increased in some years after the harvest, but in some cases the increase was years after treatment. Monthly sediment yields increased in the first year following the clearcut harvest, but elevated monthly loads following the partial cut harvest came years later. Hence, we investigate the changes in sediment yield through an examination of water yield and sediment concentration and in response to events. We test the sensitivity of our results to different methods for computing sediment yields based on total suspended solids concentration and continuous discharge measurements. Flow-weighted sediment yield averaged 24% higher than sediment yield computed from linear-interpolated total suspended solids concentration values. During typical summer and fall conditions, flow-weighting was found to overweight storm measurements and produce large sediment yield estimates. Further work is suggested to test methods of calculating monthly sediment yields with irregularly

  10. A procedure for the calculation of alpha function coefficients for the attraction parameter of Van der Waals equations of state

    SciTech Connect

    Stamateris, B.; Olivera-Fuentes, C.

    1996-12-31

    A new procedure is proposed for the calculation and correlation of cohesion parameters in cubic equations of state of the Van der Waals type. In this method, the derivative (rather than the function itself) is computed subject to the Maxwell (equal area) and Clapeyron equations. Strong experimental evidence indicates that properly formulated a functions must generate negative values at high temperatures. A theoretical analysis demonstrates the correct, hard-body limiting behavior of the cohesion function at infinite temperatures. From this, the simplest possible form of the cohesion function follows as a two-constant expression that can be considered an extension of a functional form previously proposed by Martin. The proposed function`s performance is comparable to more complex expressions previously presented in the literature, predicting vapor pressures of polar and nonpolar fluids with relative deviations (i) of {+-} 1%. 14 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. A new simplified volume-loaded heterotopic rabbit heart transplant model with improved techniques and a standard operating procedure

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wei; Zheng, Jun; Pan, Xu-Dong; Li, Bing; Zhang, Jin-Wei; Wang, Long-Fei

    2015-01-01

    Background The classic non-working (NW) heterotopic heart transplant (HTX) model in rodents had been widely used for researches related to immunology, graft rejection, evaluation of immunosuppressive therapies and organ preservation. But unloaded models are considered not suitable for some researches. Accordingly, We have constructed a volume-loaded (VL) model by a new and simple technique. Methods Thirty male New Zealand White rabbits were randomly divided into two groups, group NW with 14 rabbits and group VL with 16 rabbits, which served as donors and recipients. We created a large and nonrestrictive shunt to provide left heart a sufficient preload. The donor superior vena cave and ascending aorta (AO) were anastomosed to the recipient abdominal aorta (AAO) and inferior vena cava (IVC), respectively. Results No animals suffered from paralysis, pneumonia and lethal bleeding. Recipients’ mortality and morbidity were 6.7% (1/15) and 13.3% (2/15), respectively. The cold ischemia time in group VL is slight longer than that in group NW. The maximal aortic velocity (MAV) of donor heart was approximately equivalent to half that of native heart in group VL. Moreover, the similar result was achieved in the parameter of late diastolic mitral inflow velocity between donor heart and native heart in group VL. The echocardiography (ECHO) showed a bidirectional flow in donor SVC of VL model, inflow during diastole and outflow during systole. PET-CT imaging showed the standard uptake value (SUV) of allograft was equal to that of native heart in both groups on the postoperative day 3. Conclusions We have developed a new VL model in rabbits, which imitates a native heart hemodynamically while only requiring a minor additional procedure. Surgical technique is simple compared with currently used HTX models. We also developed a standard operating procedure that significantly improved graft and recipient survival rate. This study may be useful for investigations in transplantation

  12. Total maximum allocated load calculation of nitrogen pollutants by linking a 3D biogeochemical-hydrodynamic model with a programming model in Bohai Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Aiquan; Li, Keqiang; Ding, Dongsheng; Li, Yan; Liang, Shengkang; Li, Yanbin; Su, Ying; Wang, Xiulin

    2015-12-01

    The equal percent removal (EPR) method, in which pollutant reduction ratio was set as the same in all administrative regions, failed to satisfy the requirement for water quality improvement in the Bohai Sea. Such requirement was imposed by the developed Coastal Pollution Total Load Control Management. The total maximum allocated load (TMAL) of nitrogen pollutants in the sea-sink source regions (SSRs) around the Bohai Rim, which is the maximum pollutant load of every outlet under the limitation of water quality criteria, was estimated by optimization-simulation method (OSM) combined with loop approximation calculation. In OSM, water quality is simulated using a water quality model and pollutant load is calculated with a programming model. The effect of changes in pollutant loads on TMAL was discussed. Results showed that the TMAL of nitrogen pollutants in 34 SSRs was 1.49×105 ton/year. The highest TMAL was observed in summer, whereas the lowest in winter. TMAL was also higher in the Bohai Strait and central Bohai Sea and lower in the inner area of the Liaodong Bay, Bohai Bay and Laizhou Bay. In loop approximation calculation, the TMAL obtained was considered satisfactory for water quality criteria as fluctuation of concentration response matrix with pollutant loads was eliminated. Results of numerical experiment further showed that water quality improved faster and were more evident under TMAL input than that when using the EPR method

  13. 40 CFR 201.27 - Procedures for: (1) Determining applicability of the locomotive load cell test stand standard and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... applicability of the locomotive load cell test stand standard and switcher locomotive standard by noise measurement on a receiving property; (2) measurement of locomotive load cell test stands more than 120 meters... locomotive load cell test stand standard and switcher locomotive standard by noise measurement on a...

  14. 40 CFR 201.27 - Procedures for: (1) Determining applicability of the locomotive load cell test stand standard and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... applicability of the locomotive load cell test stand standard and switcher locomotive standard by noise measurement on a receiving property; (2) measurement of locomotive load cell test stands more than 120 meters... locomotive load cell test stand standard and switcher locomotive standard by noise measurement on a...

  15. 40 CFR 201.27 - Procedures for: (1) Determining applicability of the locomotive load cell test stand standard and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... applicability of the locomotive load cell test stand standard and switcher locomotive standard by noise measurement on a receiving property; (2) measurement of locomotive load cell test stands more than 120 meters... locomotive load cell test stand standard and switcher locomotive standard by noise measurement on a...

  16. 40 CFR 201.27 - Procedures for: (1) Determining applicability of the locomotive load cell test stand standard and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... applicability of the locomotive load cell test stand standard and switcher locomotive standard by noise measurement on a receiving property; (2) measurement of locomotive load cell test stands more than 120 meters... locomotive load cell test stand standard and switcher locomotive standard by noise measurement on a...

  17. 40 CFR 201.27 - Procedures for: (1) Determining applicability of the locomotive load cell test stand standard and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... applicability of the locomotive load cell test stand standard and switcher locomotive standard by noise measurement on a receiving property; (2) measurement of locomotive load cell test stands more than 120 meters... locomotive load cell test stand standard and switcher locomotive standard by noise measurement on a...

  18. Development of procedures for calculating stiffness and damping properties of elastomers in engineering applications. Part 1: Verification of basic methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, T.; Tessarzik, J. M.; Badgley, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    The primary aim of this investigation was verification of basic methods which are to be used in cataloging elastomer dynamic properties (stiffness and damping) in terms of viscoelastic model constants. These constants may then be used to predict dynamic properties for general elastomer shapes and operating conditions, thereby permitting optimum application of elastomers as energy absorption and/or energy storage devices in the control of vibrations in a broad variety of applications. The efforts reported involved: (1) literature search; (2) the design, fabrication and use of a test rig for obtaining elastomer dynamic test data over a wide range of frequencies, amplitudes, and preloads; and (3) the reduction of the test data, by means of a selected three-element elastomer model and specialized curve fitting techniques, to material properties. Material constants thus obtained have been used to calculate stiffness and damping for comparison with measured test data. These comparisons are excellent for a number of test conditions and only fair to poor for others. The results confirm the validity of the basic approach of the overall program and the mechanics of the cataloging procedure, and at the same time suggest areas in which refinements should be made.

  19. Uncertainty in nutrient loads from tile drained landscapes: Effect of sampling frequency, calculation algorithm, and compositing strategies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate estimates of annual nutrient loads are required to evaluate trends in water quality following changes in land use or management and to calibrate and validate water quality models. While much emphasis has been placed on understanding the uncertainty of watershed-scale nutrient load estimates...

  20. Building America Case Study: Calculating Design Heating Loads for Superinsulated Buildings, Ithaca, New York; Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-08-01

    Designing a superinsulated home has many benefits including improved comfort, reduced exterior noise penetration, lower energy bills, and the ability to withstand power and fuel outages under much more comfortable conditions than a typical home. Extremely low heating and cooling loads equate to much smaller HVAC equipment than conventionally required. Sizing the mechanical system to these much lower loads reduces first costs and the size of the distribution system needed. While these homes aren't necessarily constructed with excessive mass in the form of concrete floors and walls, the amount of insulation and the increase in the thickness of the building envelope can lead to a mass effect, resulting in the structures ability to store much more heat than a code built home. This results in a very low thermal inertia making the building much less sensitive to drastic temperature swings thereby decreasing the peak heating load demand. Alternative methods that take this inertia into account along with solar and internal gains result in smaller more appropriate design loads than those calculated using Manual J version 8. During the winter of 2013/2014, CARB monitored the energy use of three homes in climate zone 6 in an attempt to evaluate the accuracy of two different mechanical system sizing methods for low load homes. Based on the results, it is recommended that internal and solar gains be included and some credit for thermal inertia be used in sizing calculations for superinsulated homes.

  1. Comparison of measured and calculated dynamic loads for the Mod-2 2.5 mW wind turbine system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, D. K.; Shipley, S. A.; Miller, R. D.

    1995-01-01

    The Boeing Company, under contract to the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), has completed a test program on the Mod-2 wind turbines at Goodnoe Hills, Washington. The objectives were to update fatigue load spectra, discern site and machine differences, measure vortex generator effects, and to evaluate rotational sampling techniques. This paper shows the test setup and loads instrumentation, loads data comparisons and test/analysis correlations. Test data are correlated with DYLOSAT predictions using both the NASA interim turbulence model and rotationally sampled winds as inputs. The latter is demonstrated to have the potential to improve the test/analysis correlations. The paper concludes with an assessment of the importance of vortex generators, site dependence, and machine differences on fatigue loads. The adequacy of prediction techniques used are evaluated and recommendations are made for improvements to the methodology.

  2. [Have Case Loads of Radical Surgery for Prostate Cancer Been Concentrated in Hospitals with Robotic Equipment ?--Analyses with Questionnaire Survey and Diagnostic Procedure Combination (DPC) Data].

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Taiji; Tanaka, Shigeru

    2016-04-01

    We investigated whether installation of robot-assisted surgical equipment in hospitals resulted in concentration of the case loads of radical prostatectomy. We selected 11 areas with populations of around 1 million or more where there were one or more hospitals with robotic equipment and 4 or more without it. In addition, annual changes of case loads for prostatectomy over 4 years from 2010 to 2013 were clearly determined in these areas. The case loads were determined based on the results of a questionnaire survey for the hospitals with robots and on the Diagnostic Procedures Combination data provided by the Ministry of Health, Labor and Wealth for those without such equipment. The concentration of the case loads was principally defined as when hospitals with robots had more predominant proportion of cases than those without them in the comparison between case loads prior to instillation of robots (or in the initial year of the study) and those in the final years. The 11 selected areas included 44 hospitals with robots and 156 without them. Concentration of case loads was found in 5 areas. In 4 areas, installation of robots did not have a specific relation to the distribution pattern s of case loads in hospitals with or without the equipment. The remaining 2 areas tended to have a weak but not definite concentration of case loads. In the areas in which installation did not influence case loads the further analysis revealed that their case loads had already been concentrated in the initial year (2010) of the study. Although the current results were found in a single department of the hospital, robotic installation may result in concentration of prostatectomy case loads for such hospitals in some areas. The current results are intriguing when we consider the future roles of acute care hospitals and beds in our country where the number of aged patients having chronic diseases will increase. In conclusion, installation of robotic equipment may result in concentration

  3. The risk of needle stick accidents during surgical procedures: HIV-1 viral load in blood and bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Regez, Rosa M; Kleipool, Arthur E; Speekenbrink, Ron G; Frissen, P H Jos

    2005-10-01

    Health-care workers are at risk to acquire HIV through occupational exposure to blood of HIV-infected patients. The mean risk after a percutaneous exposure is approximately 0.3%. A large inoculum and a source patient with a high plasma viral load increases the transmission risk. To ensure the safety of the operating team, we try to reduce HIV viral load in plasma prior to high-risk interventions (cardiothoracic and orthopaedic surgery). However, in 15.7% of the exposures occurring in the operating room, the possible source material is bone marrow. To make more accurate exposure risk assessments, we measured HIV-1 RNA in both plasma and bone marrow of five HIV-infected patients undergoing surgery. We found that the plasma viral load was not different from the viral load in bone marrow.

  4. 47 CFR Appendix I to Subpart E of... - A Procedure for Calculating PCS Signal Levels at Microwave Receivers (Appendix E of the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... at Microwave Receivers (Appendix E of the Memorandum Opinion and Order) I Appendix I to Subpart E of... PERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Broadband PCS Pt. 24, Subpt. E, App. I Appendix I to Subpart E of Part 24—A Procedure for Calculating PCS Signal Levels at Microwave Receivers (Appendix E of the...

  5. A user`s guide to LUGSAN 1.1: A computer program to calculate and archive lug and sway brace loads for aircraft-carried stores

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, W.N.

    1994-07-01

    LUGSAN (LUG and Sway brace ANalysis) is a analysis and database computer program designed to calculate store lug and sway brace loads from aircraft captive carriage. LUGSAN combines the rigid body dynamics code, SWAY85 and the maneuver calculation code, MILGEN, with an INGRES database to function both as an analysis and archival system. This report describes the operation of the LUGSAN application program, including function description, layout examples, and sample sessions. This report is intended to be a user`s manual for version 1.1 of LUGSAN operating on the VAX/VMS system. The report is not intended to be a programmer or developer`s manual.

  6. Aerodynamic characteristics of a wing with Fowler flaps including flap loads, downwash, and calculated effect on take-off

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, Robert C

    1936-01-01

    This report presents the results of wind tunnel tests of a wing in combination with each of three sizes of Fowler flap. The purpose of the investigation was to determine the aerodynamic characteristics as affected by flap chord and position, the air loads on the flaps, and the effect of flaps on the downwash.

  7. Water quality of storm runoff and comparison of procedures for estimating storm-runoff loads, volume, event-mean concentrations, and the mean load for a storm for selected properties and constituents for Colorado Springs, southeastern Colorado, 1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Von Guerard, Paul; Weiss, W.B.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency requires that municipalities that have a population of 100,000 or greater obtain National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permits to characterize the quality of their storm runoff. In 1992, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Colorado Springs City Engineering Division, began a study to characterize the water quality of storm runoff and to evaluate procedures for the estimation of storm-runoff loads, volume and event-mean concentrations for selected properties and constituents. Precipitation, streamflow, and water-quality data were collected during 1992 at five sites in Colorado Springs. Thirty-five samples were collected, seven at each of the five sites. At each site, three samples were collected for permitting purposes; two of the samples were collected during rainfall runoff, and one sample was collected during snowmelt runoff. Four additional samples were collected at each site to obtain a large enough sample size to estimate storm-runoff loads, volume, and event-mean concentrations for selected properties and constituents using linear-regression procedures developed using data from the Nationwide Urban Runoff Program (NURP). Storm-water samples were analyzed for as many as 186 properties and constituents. The constituents measured include total-recoverable metals, vola-tile-organic compounds, acid-base/neutral organic compounds, and pesticides. Storm runoff sampled had large concentrations of chemical oxygen demand and 5-day biochemical oxygen demand. Chemical oxygen demand ranged from 100 to 830 milligrams per liter, and 5.-day biochemical oxygen demand ranged from 14 to 260 milligrams per liter. Total-organic carbon concentrations ranged from 18 to 240 milligrams per liter. The total-recoverable metals lead and zinc had the largest concentrations of the total-recoverable metals analyzed. Concentrations of lead ranged from 23 to 350 micrograms per liter, and concentrations of zinc ranged from 110

  8. Calculation of the chordwise load distribution over airfoil sections with plain, split, or serially hinged trailing-edge flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, H Julian

    1938-01-01

    A method is presented for the rapid calculation of the incremental chordwise normal-force distribution over an airfoil section due to the deflection of a plain flap or tab, a split flap, or a serially hinged flap. This report is intended as a supplement to NACA Report no. 631, wherein a method is presented for the calculation of the chordwise normal-force distribution over an airfoil without a flap or, as it may be considered, an airfoil with flap (or flaps) neutral. The method enables the determination of the form and magnitude of the incremental normal-force distribution to be made for an airfoil-flap combination for which the section characteristics have been determined. A method is included for the calculation of the flap normal-force and hinge-moment coefficients without necessitating a determination of the normal-force distribution.

  9. A balance procedure for calculating the model fuel assemblies reflooding during design basis accident and its verification on PARAMETER test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazyuk, S. S.; Ignat'ev, D. N.; Parshin, N. Ya.; Popov, E. B.; Soldatkin, D. M.; Kuzma-Kichta, Yu. A.

    2013-05-01

    A balance procedure is proposed for estimating the main parameters characterizing the process of model fuel assemblies reflooding of a VVER reactor made on different scales under the conditions of a design basis accident by subjecting them to bottom reflooding1. The proposed procedure satisfactorily describes the experimental data obtained on PARAMETER test facility in the temperature range up to 1200°C. The times of fuel assemblies quenching by bottom reflooding calculated using the proposed procedure are in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data obtained on model fuel assemblies of VVER- and PWR-type reactors and can be used in developing measures aimed at enhancing the safety of nuclear power stations.

  10. Three-dimensional mapping of salt stores in the Murray-Darling Basin, Australia. 2. Calculating landscape salt loads from airborne electromagnetic and laboratory data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullen, I. C.; Wilkinson, K. E.; Cresswell, R. G.; Kellett, J.

    2007-05-01

    Salt is widespread in the Australian landscape - in soil, regolith and groundwater - leading to concerns that land management practices may be putting much agricultural land and important water resources at risk of salinisation. Defining the location and nature of salt stores is an important first step in understanding the processes leading to salinity of soils, streams and groundwater resources, and predicting areas that may be at risk. Airborne geophysics can define subsurface salt stores and mobilisation pathways. Airborne electromagnetics (AEM) can map the three-dimensional conductivity structure of the landscape but does not, intrinsically, quantify the amount of salt. Salinity, moisture content, porosity and mineralogy all contribute to the electromagnetic signal, and each can vary significantly throughout the landscape. In the Lower Balonne catchment, Queensland, the relationship between AEM and the amount of salt in the landscape was quantified using laboratory analyses of pore fluids from core samples. A general statistical relationship was established between AEM conductivity and salt load (defined as the product of pore fluid salinity, porosity and moisture content)—with a significant positive correlation although data were generally widely dispersed. Comparison of calculated salt load with borehole electromagnetic logs gives insight into the factors contributing to dispersion in the AEM data. The relationship transforms bulk conductivity to salt load in 5 m layers, allowing the generation of a three-dimensional map of the salt load. This is a powerful tool for identifying areas that may require monitoring and management interventions to reduce salinity risk. An example is given of salt loads beneath an established irrigation area in the Lower Balonne catchment, Queensland.

  11. Mechanical effects of surgical procedures on osteochondral grafts elucidated by osmotic loading and real-time ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Osteochondral grafts have become popular for treating small, isolated and full-thickness cartilage lesions. It is recommended that a slightly oversized, rather than an exact-sized, osteochondral plug is transplanted to achieve a tight fit. Consequently, impacting forces are required to insert the osteochondral plug into the recipient site. However, it remains controversial whether these impacting forces affect the biomechanical condition of the grafted articular cartilage. The present study aimed to investigate the mechanical effects of osteochondral plug implantation using osmotic loading and real-time ultrasound. Methods A full-thickness cylindrical osteochondral defect (diameter, 3.5 mm; depth, 5 mm) was created in the lateral lower quarter of the patella. Using graft-harvesting instruments, an osteochondral plug (diameter, 3.5 mm as exact-size or 4.5 mm as oversize; depth, 5 mm) was harvested from the lateral upper quarter of the patella and transplanted into the defect. Intact patella was used as a control. The samples were monitored by real-time ultrasound during sequential changes of the bathing solution from 0.15 M to 2 M saline (shrinkage phase) and back to 0.15 M saline (swelling phase). For cartilage sample assessment, three indices were selected, namely the change in amplitude from the cartilage surface (amplitude recovery rate: ARR) and the maximum echo shifts from the cartilage surface and the cartilage-bone interface. Results The ARR is closely related to the cartilage surface integrity, while the echo shifts from the cartilage surface and the cartilage-bone interface are closely related to tissue deformation and NaCl diffusion, respectively. The ARR values of the oversized plugs were significantly lower than those of the control and exact-sized plugs. Regarding the maximum echo shifts from the cartilage surface and the cartilage-bone interface, no significant differences were observed among the three groups. Conclusions These findings

  12. A user`s guide to LUGSAN II. A computer program to calculate and archive lug and sway brace loads for aircraft-carried stores

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, W.N.

    1998-03-01

    LUG and Sway brace ANalysis (LUGSAN) II is an analysis and database computer program that is designed to calculate store lug and sway brace loads for aircraft captive carriage. LUGSAN II combines the rigid body dynamics code, SWAY85, with a Macintosh Hypercard database to function both as an analysis and archival system. This report describes the LUGSAN II application program, which operates on the Macintosh System (Hypercard 2.2 or later) and includes function descriptions, layout examples, and sample sessions. Although this report is primarily a user`s manual, a brief overview of the LUGSAN II computer code is included with suggested resources for programmers.

  13. Tadalafil inclusion in microporous silica as effective dissolution enhancer: optimization of loading procedure and molecular state characterization.

    PubMed

    Mehanna, Mohammed M; Motawaa, Adel M; Samaha, Magda W

    2011-05-01

    Tadalafil is an efficient drug used to treat erectile dysfunction characterized by poor water solubility, which has a negative influence on its bioavailability. Utilization of microporous silica represents an effective and facile technology to increase the dissolution rate of poorly soluble drugs. Our strategy involved directly introducing tadalafil as guest molecule into microporous silica as host material by incipient wetness impregnation method. To optimize tadalafil inclusion, response surface methodology (RSM) using 3(3) factorial design was utilized. Furthermore, to investigate the molecular state of tadalafil, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetery, thermal gravimetrical analysis, nitrogen adsorption, and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) were carried out. The results obtained pointed out that the quantity of microporous silica was the predominant factor that increased the loading efficiency. For the optimized formula, the loading efficiency was 42.50 wt %. Adsorption-desorption experiments indicated that tadalafil has been introduced into the micropores. Powder XRD and differential scanning calorimetry analyses revealed that tadalafil is arranged in amorphous form. In addition, the dissolution rate of tadalafil from the microporous silica was faster than that of free drug. Amorphous tadalafil occluded in microporous silica did not crystallize over 3 months. These findings contributed in opening a new strategy concerning the utilization of porous silica for the dissolution rate enhancement. PMID:21374616

  14. The procedure and results of calculations of the equilibrium isotopic composition of a demonstration subcritical molten salt reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevinitsa, V. A.; Dudnikov, A. A.; Blandinskiy, V. Yu.; Balanin, A. L.; Alekseev, P. N.; Titarenko, Yu. E.; Batyaev, V. F.; Pavlov, K. V.; Titarenko, A. Yu.

    2015-12-01

    A subcritical molten salt reactor with an external neutron source is studied computationally as a facility for incineration and transmutation of minor actinides from spent nuclear fuel of reactors of VVER-1000 type and for producing 233U from 232Th. The reactor configuration is chosen, the requirements to be imposed on the external neutron source are formulated, and the equilibrium isotopic composition of heavy nuclides and the key parameters of the fuel cycle are calculated.

  15. The procedure and results of calculations of the equilibrium isotopic composition of a demonstration subcritical molten salt reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Nevinitsa, V. A. Dudnikov, A. A.; Blandinskiy, V. Yu.; Balanin, A. L.; Alekseev, P. N.; Titarenko, Yu. E.; Batyaev, V. F.; Pavlov, K. V.; Titarenko, A. Yu.

    2015-12-15

    A subcritical molten salt reactor with an external neutron source is studied computationally as a facility for incineration and transmutation of minor actinides from spent nuclear fuel of reactors of VVER-1000 type and for producing {sup 233}U from {sup 232}Th. The reactor configuration is chosen, the requirements to be imposed on the external neutron source are formulated, and the equilibrium isotopic composition of heavy nuclides and the key parameters of the fuel cycle are calculated.

  16. Calculation of relative tube/tube support plate displacements in steam generators under accident condition loads using non-linear dynamic analysis methodologies

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.E.; Waisman, R.; Hu, M.H.; Frick, T.M.

    1995-12-01

    A non-linear analysis has been performed to determine relative motions between tubes and tube support plates (TSP) during a steam line break (SLB) event for steam generators. The SLB event results in blowdown of steam and water out of the steam generator. The fluid blowdown generates pressure drops across the TSPS, resulting in out-of-plane motion. The SLB induced pressure loads are calculated with a computer program that uses a drift-flux modeling of the two-phase flow. In order to determine the relative tube/TSP motions, a nonlinear dynamic time-history analysis is performed using a structural model that considers all of the significant component members relative to the tube support system. The dynamic response of the structure to the pressure loads is calculated using a special purpose computer program. This program links the various substructures at common degrees of freedom into a combined mass and stiffness matrix. The program accounts for structural non-linearities, including potential tube and TSP interaction at any given tube position. The program also accounts for structural damping as part of the dynamic response. Incorporating all of the above effects, the equations of motion are solved to give TSP displacements at the reduced set of DOF. Using the displacement results from the dynamic analysis, plate stresses are then calculated using the detailed component models. Displacements form the dynamic analysis are imposed as boundary conditions at the DOF locations, and the finite element program then solves for the overall distorted geometry. Calculations are also performed to assure that assumptions regarding elastic response of the various structural members and support points are valid.

  17. Demonstrate Scale-up Procedure for Glass Composite Material (GCM) for Incorporation of Iodine Loaded AgZ.

    SciTech Connect

    Nenoff, Tina M.; Garino, Terry J.; Croes, Kenneth James; Rodriguez, Mark A.

    2015-07-01

    Two large size Glass Composite Material (GCM) waste forms containing AgI-MOR were fabricated. One contained methyl iodide-loaded AgI-MOR that was received from Idaho National Laboratory (INL, Test 5, Beds 1 – 3) and the other contained iodine vapor loaded AgIMOR that was received from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL, SHB 2/9/15 ). The composition for each GCM was 20 wt% AgI-MOR and 80 wt% Ferro EG2922 low sintering temperature glass along with enough added silver flake to prevent any I2 loss during the firing process. The silver flake amounts were 1.2 wt% for the GCM with the INL AgI-MOR and 3 wt% for the GCM contained the ORNL AgI-MOR. The GCMs, nominally 100 g, were first uniaxially pressed to 6.35 cm (2.5 inch) diameter disks then cold isostatically pressed, before firing in air to 550°C for 1hr. They were cooled slowly (1°C/min) from the firing temperature to avoid any cracking due to temperature gradients. The final GCMs were ~5 cm in diameter (~2 inches) and non-porous with densities of ~4.2 g/cm³. X-ray diffraction indicated that they consisted of the amorphous glass phase with small amounts of mordenite and AgI. Furthermore, the presence of the AgI was confirmed by X-ray fluorescence. Methodology for the scaled up production of GCMs to 6 inch diameter or larger is also presented.

  18. An analytical study and systematic monitoring procedure developed for the load-out operation of the North Rankin Jacket 'A'

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, N.; Inokoshi, O.; Kitani, T.; Masuda, S.; Zarate, H.

    1983-05-01

    The loadout of the 22,000 tonnes North Rankin Jacket 'A' onto a floating barge was successfully accomplished in April, 1982. During the loadout the barge ballast was continually adjusted to compensate for both jacket weight transfer onto the barge and full tide variation. The preparation for the loadout and the operation itself was characterized by newly developed integrated techniques. The techniques included: the development of a barge, jacket and quayside three-dimensional computer model to check the validity of conventional and simple ballast system software. The model was also used to evaluate the control parameters of the operation in a series of analyses which determine the sensitivity of critical steps of the operation to human or equipment errors: the development and operation of an integrated control system for jacket load transfer that relates jacket position to barge level and ballast pump requirements; the development and operation of a tide-expectation computer programme and associated ballast pump time scheduling software to compensate for differences between actual water level and that determined from standard tide tables, and to minimize the effect of short-term, local tide variations that are not forecast; and the incorporation of fail-safe concepts and measures into the operation.

  19. Procedure for calculating estimated ultimate recoveries of Bakken and Three Forks Formations horizontal wells in the Williston Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cook, Troy A.

    2013-01-01

    Estimated ultimate recoveries (EURs) are a key component in determining productivity of wells in continuous-type oil and gas reservoirs. EURs form the foundation of a well-performance-based assessment methodology initially developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS; Schmoker, 1999). This methodology was formally reviewed by the American Association of Petroleum Geologists Committee on Resource Evaluation (Curtis and others, 2001). The EUR estimation methodology described in this paper was used in the 2013 USGS assessment of continuous oil resources in the Bakken and Three Forks Formations and incorporates uncertainties that would not normally be included in a basic decline-curve calculation. These uncertainties relate to (1) the mean time before failure of the entire well-production system (excluding economics), (2) the uncertainty of when (and if) a stable hyperbolic-decline profile is revealed in the production data, (3) the particular formation involved, (4) relations between initial production rates and a stable hyperbolic-decline profile, and (5) the final behavior of the decline extrapolation as production becomes more dependent on matrix storage.

  20. Saturn's infrared spots at the southern and northern polar regions and calculation of their sizes by a wave modulation procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G.

    2007-08-01

    -concave dichotomous shape. After asteroids the warping wave is too long to be detected in a body. So, one has to look for a shorter waves. Saturn's atmosphere rotates too rapidly (or orbits the center of the Saturnian system in π10 h.) and corresponding grains (πR/3448) are too small and difficult (or impossible at present) to see. However, a wave modulation helps us. Multiplying and dividing the higher frequency (1/10 hours) by the lower one (1/30 y.) one gets side frequencies and corresponding them granule sizes. They are [1/3448 : 7.5] πR and [1/3448 x 7.5]πR or 7 and 410 km across. So, detected are calculated granules 410 km across, in the real field they are on average 450 and 580 km in diameter. Somewhat larger grains in the north are attributed to the Saturnian dichotomy: squeezed south and expanded north. The overall expansion of the northern hemisphere makes structural features to manifest themselves (hexagon) and granules to enlarge. References: [1] Kochemasov G.G. Calculating size of the Saturn's "leopard skin" spots // Lunar and Planetary Science Conference XXXVIII, 2007, Abstr. #1040, CD-ROM. [2] Kochemasov G.G. Concerted wave supergranulation of the solar system bodies // 16th Russian-American microsymposium on planetology, Abstracts, Moscow, Vernadsky Inst. (GEOKHI), 1992, 36-37.[3] Kochemasov G.G. Theorems of wave planetary tectonics // Geophys. Res. Abstr.1999. V.1, ´z3, p.700 ;

  1. Saturn's infrared spots at the southern and northern polar regions and calculation of their sizes by a wave modulation procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G.

    2007-08-01

    -concave dichotomous shape. After asteroids the warping wave is too long to be detected in a body. So, one has to look for a shorter waves. Saturn's atmosphere rotates too rapidly (or orbits the center of the Saturnian system in ~ 10 h.) and corresponding grains (πR/3448) are too small and difficult (or impossible at present) to see. However, a wave modulation helps us. Multiplying and dividing the higher frequency (1/10 hours) by the lower one (1/30 y.) one gets side frequencies and corresponding them granule sizes. They are [1/3448 : 7.5] πR and [1/3448 x 7.5]πR or 7 and 410 km across. So, detected are calculated granules 410 km across, in the real field they are on average 450 and 580 km in diameter. Somewhat larger grains in the north are attributed to the Saturnian dichotomy: squeezed south and expanded north. The overall expansion of the northern hemisphere makes structural features to manifest themselves (hexagon) and granules to enlarge. References: [1] Kochemasov G.G. Calculating size of the Saturn's "leopard skin" spots // Lunar and Planetary Science Conference XXXVIII, 2007, Abstr. #1040, CD-ROM. [2] Kochemasov G.G. Concerted wave supergranulation of the solar system bodies // 16th Russian-American microsymposium on planetology, Abstracts, Moscow, Vernadsky Inst. (GEOKHI), 1992, 36-37.[3] Kochemasov G.G. Theorems of wave planetary tectonics // Geophys. Res. Abstr.1999. V.1, ´z3, p.700 ;

  2. Quantum molecular mechanics-a noniterative procedure for the fast ab Initio calculation of closed shell systems.

    PubMed

    Moura, Gustavo L C; Simas, Alfredo M

    2012-04-01

    In this article, we advance the foundations of a strategy to develop a molecular mechanics method based not on classical mechanics and force fields but entirely on quantum mechanics and localized electron-pair orbitals, which we call quantum molecular mechanics (QMM). Accordingly, we introduce a new manner of calculating Hartree-Fock ab initio wavefunctions of closed shell systems based on variationally preoptimized nonorthogonal electron pair orbitals constructed by linear combinations of basis functions centered on the atoms. QMM is noniterative and requires only one extremely fast inversion of a single sparse matrix to arrive to the one-particle density matrix, to the electron density, and consequently, to the ab initio electrostatic potential around the molecular system, or cluster of molecules. Although QMM neglects the smaller polarization effects due to intermolecular interactions, it fully takes into consideration polarization effects due to the much stronger intramolecular geometry distortions. For the case of methane, we show that QMM was able to reproduce satisfactorily the energetics and polarization effects of all distortions of the molecule along the nine normal modes of vibration, well beyond the harmonic region. We present the first practical applications of the QMM method by examining, in detail, the cases of clusters of helium atoms, hydrogen molecules, methane molecules, as well as one molecule of HeH(+) surrounded by several methane molecules. We finally advance and discuss the potentialities of an exact formula to compute the QMM total energy, in which only two center integrals are involved, provided that the fully optimized electron-pair orbitals are known.

  3. A two-step load-deflection procedure applicable to extract the Young's modulus and the residual tensile stress of circularly shaped thin-film diaphragms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beigelbeck, Roman; Schneider, Michael; Schalko, Johannes; Bittner, Achim; Schmid, Ulrich

    2014-09-01

    We report on a novel two-step load-deflection (LD) formula and technique that enables an accurate extraction of the Young's modulus and the residual tensile stress from LD measurements on circularly shaped thin-film diaphragms. This LD relationship is derived from an adaptation of Timoshenko's plate bending theory, where the in-plane and out-of-plane deflections are approximated by series expansions. Utilizing the minimum total potential energy principle yields an infinite-dimensional system of equations which is solved analytically resulting in a compact closed-form solution. In the appendant measurement procedure, the whole transverse bending characteristic of the diaphragm as a function of the radial coordinate is recorded for different pressure loads and introduced into the novel LD equation in order to determine the elastomechanical parameters of interest. The flexibility of this approach is demonstrated by ascertaining the Young's modulus and the residual tensile stress of two disparate diaphragm materials made of either micromachined silicon or microfiltered buckypapers composed of carbon nanotube compounds.

  4. Calculation methods for steadily loaded, off-set pivot, tilting pad thrust bearings. (Guide to use of computer program A9235.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-12-01

    ESDU 92035 provides details of a FORTRAN program that implements the calculation method of ESDU 83004. It allows performance analysis of an existing design, or the design of a bearing dimensions, subject to any space constraint, are recommended. The predicted performance includes the lubricant film thickness under load, its temperature and flow rate, the power loss, and the bearing temperature. Recommendations are also made on surface finish. Warning messages are output in the following cases, for each of which possible remedial actions are suggested: drain or pad temperature too high, churning losses too great, film thickness too small, pad number too high, ratio or inner to outer pad radius too large, flow rate too great, lubricant or pad temperature outside usable range. A lubricant database is provided that may be extended or edited. The program applies to Newtonian lubricants in laminar flow. Worked examples illustrate the use of the program.

  5. Introducing a Method for Calculating the Allocation of Attention in a Cognitive “Two-Armed Bandit” Procedure: Probability Matching Gives Way to Maximizing

    PubMed Central

    Heyman, Gene M.; Grisanzio, Katherine A.; Liang, Victor

    2016-01-01

    We tested whether principles that describe the allocation of overt behavior, as in choice experiments, also describe the allocation of cognition, as in attention experiments. Our procedure is a cognitive version of the “two-armed bandit choice procedure.” The two-armed bandit procedure has been of interest to psychologistsand economists because it tends to support patterns of responding that are suboptimal. Each of two alternatives provides rewards according to fixed probabilities. The optimal solution is to choose the alternative with the higher probability of reward on each trial. However, subjects often allocate responses so that the probability of a response approximates its probability of reward. Although it is this result which has attracted most interest, probability matching is not always observed. As a function of monetary incentives, practice, and individual differences, subjects tend to deviate from probability matching toward exclusive preference, as predicted by maximizing. In our version of the two-armed bandit procedure, the monitor briefly displayed two, small adjacent stimuli that predicted correct responses according to fixed probabilities, as in a two-armed bandit procedure. We show that in this setting, a simple linear equation describes the relationship between attention and correct responses, and that the equation’s solution is the allocation of attention between the two stimuli. The calculations showed that attention allocation varied as a function of the degree to which the stimuli predicted correct responses. Linear regression revealed a strong correlation (r = 0.99) between the predictiveness of a stimulus and the probability of attending to it. Nevertheless there were deviations from probability matching, and although small, they were systematic and statistically significant. As in choice studies, attention allocation deviated toward maximizing as a function of practice, feedback, and incentives. Our approach also predicts the

  6. The lithospheric-scale 3D structural configuration of the North Alpine Foreland Basin constrained by gravity modelling and the calculation of the 3D load distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybycin, Anna M.; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena; Schneider, Michael

    2014-05-01

    The North Alpine Foreland Basin is situated in the northern front of the European Alps and extends over parts of France, Switzerland, Germany and Austria. It formed as a wedge shaped depression since the Tertiary in consequence of the Euro - Adriatic continental collision and the Alpine orogeny. The basin is filled with clastic sediments, the Molasse, originating from erosional processes of the Alps and underlain by Mesozoic sedimentary successions and a Paleozoic crystalline crust. For our study we have focused on the German part of the basin. To investigate the deep structure, the isostatic state and the load distribution of this region we have constructed a 3D structural model of the basin and the Alpine area using available depth and thickness maps, regional scale 3D structural models as well as seismic and well data for the sedimentary part. The crust (from the top Paleozoic down to the Moho (Grad et al. 2008)) has been considered as two-parted with a lighter upper crust and a denser lower crust; the partition has been calculated following the approach of isostatic equilibrium of Pratt (1855). By implementing a seismic Lithosphere-Asthenosphere-Boundary (LAB) (Tesauro 2009) the crustal scale model has been extended to the lithospheric-scale. The layer geometry and the assigned bulk densities of this starting model have been constrained by means of 3D gravity modelling (BGI, 2012). Afterwards the 3D load distribution has been calculated using a 3D finite element method. Our results show that the North Alpine Foreland Basin is not isostatically balanced and that the configuration of the crystalline crust strongly controls the gravity field in this area. Furthermore, our results show that the basin area is influenced by varying lateral load differences down to a depth of more than 150 km what allows a first order statement of the required compensating horizontal stress needed to prevent gravitational collapse of the system. BGI (2012). The International

  7. SU-E-I-22: Dependence On Calibration Phantom and Field Area of the Conversion Factor Used to Calculate Skin Dose During Neuro-Interventional Fluoroscopic Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Rana, V K; Vijayan, S; Rudin, S R; Bednarek, D R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the appropriate calibration factor to use when calculating skin dose with our real-time dose-tracking system (DTS) during neuro-interventional fluoroscopic procedures by evaluating the difference in backscatter from different phantoms and as a function of entrance-skin field area. Methods: We developed a dose-tracking system to calculate and graphically display the cumulative skin-dose distribution in real time. To calibrate the DTS for neuro-interventional procedures, a phantom is needed that closely approximates the scattering properties of the head. We compared the x-ray backscatter from eight phantoms: 20-cm-thick solid water, 16-cm diameter water-filled container, 16-cm CTDI phantom, modified-ANSI head phantom, 20-cm-thick PMMA, Kyoto-Kagaku PBU- 50 head, Phantom-Labs SK-150 head, and RSD RS-240T head. The phantoms were placed on the patient table with the entrance surface at 15 cm tube-side from the isocenter of a Toshiba Infinix C-arm, and the entrance-skin exposure was measured with a calibrated 6-cc PTW ionization chamber. The measurement included primary radiation, backscatter from the phantom and forward scatter from the table and pad. The variation in entrance-skin exposure was also measured as a function of the skin-entrance area for a 30x30 cm by 20-cm-thick PMMA phantom and the SK-150 head phantom using four different added beam filters. Results: The entranceskin exposure values measured for eight different phantoms differed by up to 12%, while the ratio of entrance exposure of all phantoms relative to solid water showed less than 3% variation with kVp. The change in entrance-skin exposure with entrance-skin area was found to differ for the SK-150 head compared to the 20-cm PMMA phantom and the variation with field area was dependent on the added beam filtration. Conclusion: To accurately calculate skin dose for neuro-interventional procedures with the DTS, the phantom for calibration should be carefully chosen since different

  8. Use of quadratic components for buckling calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Dohrmann, C.R.; Segalman, D.J.

    1996-12-31

    A buckling calculation procedure based on the method of quadratic components is presented. Recently developed for simulating the motion of rotating flexible structures, the method of quadratic components is shown to be applicable to buckling problems with either conservative or nonconservative loads. For conservative loads, stability follows from the positive definiteness of the system`s stiffness matrix. For nonconservative loads, stability is determined by solving a nonsymmetric eigenvalue problem, which depends on both the stiffness and mass distribution of the system. Buckling calculations presented for a cantilevered beam are shown to compare favorably with classical results. Although the example problem is fairly simple and well-understood, the procedure can be used in conjunction with a general-purpose finite element code for buckling calculations of more complex systems.

  9. Updates in the real-time Dose Tracking System (DTS) to improve the accuracy in calculating the radiation dose to the patients skin during fluoroscopic procedures

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Vijay K.; Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a dose-tracking system (DTS) to manage the risk of deterministic skin effects to the patient during fluoroscopic image-guided interventional cardiac procedures. The DTS calculates the radiation dose to the patient’s skin in real-time by acquiring exposure parameters and imaging-system geometry from the digital bus on a Toshiba C-arm unit and displays the cumulative dose values as a color map on a 3D graphic of the patient for immediate feedback to the interventionalist. Several recent updates have been made to the software to improve its function and performance. Whereas the older system needed manual input of pulse rate for dose-rate calculation and used the CPU clock with its potential latency to monitor exposure duration, each x-ray pulse is now individually processed to determine the skin-dose increment and to automatically measure the pulse rate. We also added a correction for the table pad which was found to reduce the beam intensity to the patient for under-table projections by an additional 5–12% over that of the table alone at 80 kVp for the x-ray filters on the Toshiba system. Furthermore, mismatch between the DTS graphic and the patient skin can result in inaccuracies in dose calculation because of inaccurate inverse-square-distance calculation. Therefore, a means for quantitative adjustment of the patient-graphic-model position and a parameterized patient-graphic library have been developed to allow the graphic to more closely match the patient. These changes provide more accurate estimation of the skin-dose which is critical for managing patient radiation risk. PMID:24817801

  10. Updates in the real-time Dose Tracking System (DTS) to improve the accuracy in calculating the radiation dose to the patients skin during fluoroscopic procedures.

    PubMed

    Rana, Vijay K; Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R

    2013-03-01

    We have developed a dose-tracking system (DTS) to manage the risk of deterministic skin effects to the patient during fluoroscopic image-guided interventional cardiac procedures. The DTS calculates the radiation dose to the patient's skin in real-time by acquiring exposure parameters and imaging-system geometry from the digital bus on a Toshiba C-arm unit and displays the cumulative dose values as a color map on a 3D graphic of the patient for immediate feedback to the interventionalist. Several recent updates have been made to the software to improve its function and performance. Whereas the older system needed manual input of pulse rate for dose-rate calculation and used the CPU clock with its potential latency to monitor exposure duration, each x-ray pulse is now individually processed to determine the skin-dose increment and to automatically measure the pulse rate. We also added a correction for the table pad which was found to reduce the beam intensity to the patient for under-table projections by an additional 5-12% over that of the table alone at 80 kVp for the x-ray filters on the Toshiba system. Furthermore, mismatch between the DTS graphic and the patient skin can result in inaccuracies in dose calculation because of inaccurate inverse-square-distance calculation. Therefore, a means for quantitative adjustment of the patient-graphic-model position and a parameterized patient-graphic library have been developed to allow the graphic to more closely match the patient. These changes provide more accurate estimation of the skin-dose which is critical for managing patient radiation risk.

  11. PROCEDURES FOR CALCULATING CESSATION LAG

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental regulations aimed at reducing cancer risks usually have the effect of reducing exposure to a carcinogen at the time the regulation is implemented. The reduction of cancer risk may occur shortly after the reduced exposure or after a considerable period of time. The t...

  12. SU-E-I-42: Normalized Embryo/fetus Doses for Fluoroscopically Guided Pacemaker Implantation Procedures Calculated Using a Monte Carlo Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Damilakis, J; Stratakis, J; Solomou, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: It is well known that pacemaker implantation is sometimes needed in pregnant patients with symptomatic bradycardia. To our knowledge, there is no reported experience regarding radiation doses to the unborn child resulting from fluoroscopy during pacemaker implantation. The purpose of the current study was to develop a method for estimating embryo/fetus dose from fluoroscopically guided pacemaker implantation procedures performed on pregnant patients during all trimesters of gestation. Methods: The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code was employed in this study. Three mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms representing the average pregnant patient at the first, second and third trimesters of gestation were generated using Bodybuilder software (White Rock science, White Rock, NM). The normalized embryo/fetus dose from the posteroanterior (PA), the 30° left-anterior oblique (LAO) and the 30° right-anterior oblique (RAO) projections were calculated for a wide range of kVp (50–120 kVp) and total filtration values (2.5–9.0 mm Al). Results: The results consist of radiation doses normalized to a) entrance skin dose (ESD) and b) dose area product (DAP) so that the dose to the unborn child from any fluoroscopic technique and x-ray device used can be calculated. ESD normalized doses ranged from 0.008 (PA, first trimester) to 2.519 μGy/mGy (RAO, third trimester). DAP normalized doses ranged from 0.051 (PA, first trimester) to 12.852 μGy/Gycm2 (RAO, third trimester). Conclusion: Embryo/fetus doses from fluoroscopically guided pacemaker implantation procedures performed on pregnant patients during all stages of gestation can be estimated using the method developed in this study. This study was supported by the Greek Ministry of Education and Religious Affairs, General Secretariat for Research and Technology, Operational Program ‘Education and Lifelong Learning’, ARISTIA (Research project: CONCERT)

  13. Pressure vessel calculations for VVER-440 reactors.

    PubMed

    Hordósy, G; Hegyi, Gy; Keresztúri, A; Maráczy, Cs; Temesvári, E; Vértes, P; Zsolnay, E

    2005-01-01

    For the determination of the fast neutron load of the reactor pressure vessel a mixed calculational procedure was developed. The procedure was applied to the Unit II of Paks NPP, Hungary. The neutron source on the outer surfaces of the reactor was determined by a core design code, and the neutron transport calculations outside the core were performed by the Monte Carlo code MCNP. The reaction rate in the activation detectors at surveillance positions and at the cavity were calculated and compared with measurements. In most cases, fairly good agreement was found.

  14. SU-E-T-615: Investigation of the Dosimetric Impact of Tandem Loading in the Treatment of Cervical Cancer for HDR Brachytherapy Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Esquivel, C; Patton, L; Nelson, K; Lin, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric impact of the tandem loading in the treatment of cervical cancer for HDR brachytherapy procedures. Methods: Ten patients were evaluated, each of whom received 5 fractions of treatment. Tandem and ovoid sets were inserted into the uterine cavity based on institutional protocols and procedures. Following insertion and stabilization, CT image sets of 1.5mm slice thickness were acquired and sent to the Oncentra V4.3 Treatment Planning System. Critical structures such as the CTV, bladder, rectum, sigmoid, and bowel were contoured and a fractional dose of 5.5Gy was prescribed to Point A for each patient. Six different treatment plans were created for each fraction using varying tandem weightings; from 0.5 to 1.4 times that of the ovoids. Surface dose evaluation of various ovoid diameters, 2.0-3.5cm, at the vaginal fornices was also investigated. Results: Critical structures were evaluated based on varying dose and volume constraints, in particular the 2.0 cc volume recommendation cited by the gynecological GEC-ESTRO working group. Based on dose volume histogram evaluation, a reduction of dose to the critical structures was most often discovered when the tandem weighting was increased. CTV coverage showed little change as the tandem weighting was varied. Ovoid surface dose decreased by 50-65% as the tandem weighting increased. Conclusion: The advantage of 3D planning with HDR brachytherapy is the dose optimization for each individual treatment plan. This investigation shows that by utilizing large tandem weightings, 1.4 times greater than the ovoid, one can still achieve adequate coverage of the CTV and relatively low doses to the critical structures. In some cases, one would still have to optimize further per individual case. In addition, the ovoid surface dose was greatly decreased when large tandem weighting was utilized; especially for small ovoid diameters.

  15. Use of the reciprocal calculation procedure for setting workplace emergency action levels for hydrocarbon mixtures and their relationship to lower explosive limits.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Ron

    2012-04-01

    This paper proposes a novel use of the reciprocal calculation procedure (RCP) to calculate workplace emergency action levels (WEALs) for accidental releases of hydrocarbon mixtures. WEALs are defined here as the concentration in air that area monitors should alarm at to provide adequate warning and be sufficiently protective of health to allow at least enough time to don respiratory protective equipment (RPE) and escape. The rationale for the approach is analysed, and ways of defining suitable substance group guidance values (GVs) for input into the RCP are considered and compared. WEAL GVs could be based on: 3× RCP GVs (i.e. using the 3× rule), the 5× RCP GVs (i.e. using the 5× rule for calculating ceiling values), emergency exposure limits, or immediately dangerous to life or health values (IDLHs). Of these, the method of choice is to base WEAL GVs on health-based IDLH values, which were developed for emergency situations in the workplace. However, IDLHs have only been set for 11 hydrocarbons, so the choice of GVs is also informed by comparison with possible GVs based on the other approaches. Using the proposed GVs, WEALs were calculated for various hydrocarbon mixtures, and the way they vary with the composition of the mixture was examined. Also, the level of health protection given by the current practice of setting emergency area alarms in the oil and gas industry at 10% of the lower explosive limit (LEL) was tested by comparing this with the WEAL. In the event of an accidental release, this comparison suggests that, provided that aromatics constitute <50% of the mixture, an alarm set at 10% LEL should provide adequate warning and be sufficiently protective of health to at allow at least enough time to don RPE and escape. In the absence of better information or specific acute toxicity concerns (such as the presence of hydrogen sulphide), it is proposed that the WEALs be used as a guide for assessing the adequacy of area alarm levels in respect of warning

  16. A numerical model for calculating vibration due to a harmonic moving load on a floating-slab track with discontinuous slabs in an underground railway tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, M. F. M.; Hunt, H. E. M.

    2009-03-01

    This paper presents a new method for modelling floating-slab tracks with discontinuous slabs in underground railway tunnels. The track is subjected to a harmonic load moving with a constant velocity. The model consists of two sub-models. The first is an infinite track with periodic double-beam unit formulated as a periodic infinite structure. The second is modelled with a new version of the Pipe-in-Pipe (PiP) model that accounts for a tunnel wall embedded in a half-space. The two sub-models are coupled by writing the force transmitted from the track to the tunnel as a continuous function using Fourier series representation and satisfying the compatibility condition. The displacements at the free surface are calculated for a track with discontinuous slab and compared with those of a track with continuous slab. The results show that the far-field vibration can be significantly increased due to resonance frequencies of slabs for tracks with discontinuous slabs.

  17. 40 CFR 204.54 - Test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... operated at the design full speed with the compressor on load, delivering its rated flow and output... STANDARDS FOR CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT Portable Air Compressors § 204.54 Test procedures. (a) General. This... to measure the sound level and to calculate the average sound level of portable air compressors...

  18. 40 CFR 204.54 - Test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... operated at the design full speed with the compressor on load, delivering its rated flow and output... STANDARDS FOR CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT Portable Air Compressors § 204.54 Test procedures. (a) General. This... to measure the sound level and to calculate the average sound level of portable air compressors...

  19. 40 CFR 204.54 - Test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... operated at the design full speed with the compressor on load, delivering its rated flow and output... STANDARDS FOR CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT Portable Air Compressors § 204.54 Test procedures. (a) General. This... to measure the sound level and to calculate the average sound level of portable air compressors...

  20. 40 CFR 204.54 - Test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... operated at the design full speed with the compressor on load, delivering its rated flow and output... STANDARDS FOR CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT Portable Air Compressors § 204.54 Test procedures. (a) General. This... to measure the sound level and to calculate the average sound level of portable air compressors...

  1. Calculating salt loads to Great Salt Lake and the associated uncertainties for water year 2013; updating a 48 year old standard

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shope, Christopher L.; Angeroth, Cory E.

    2015-01-01

    Effective management of surface waters requires a robust understanding of spatiotemporal constituent loadings from upstream sources and the uncertainty associated with these estimates. We compared the total dissolved solids loading into the Great Salt Lake (GSL) for water year 2013 with estimates of previously sampled periods in the early 1960s.We also provide updated results on GSL loading, quantitatively bounded by sampling uncertainties, which are useful for current and future management efforts. Our statistical loading results were more accurate than those from simple regression models. Our results indicate that TDS loading to the GSL in water year 2013 was 14.6 million metric tons with uncertainty ranging from 2.8 to 46.3 million metric tons, which varies greatly from previous regression estimates for water year 1964 of 2.7 million metric tons. Results also indicate that locations with increased sampling frequency are correlated with decreasing confidence intervals. Because time is incorporated into the LOADEST models, discrepancies are largely expected to be a function of temporally lagged salt storage delivery to the GSL associated with terrestrial and in-stream processes. By incorporating temporally variable estimates and statistically derived uncertainty of these estimates,we have provided quantifiable variability in the annual estimates of dissolved solids loading into the GSL. Further, our results support the need for increased monitoring of dissolved solids loading into saline lakes like the GSL by demonstrating the uncertainty associated with different levels of sampling frequency.

  2. Calculating salt loads to Great Salt Lake and the associated uncertainties for water year 2013; updating a 48 year old standard.

    PubMed

    Shope, Christopher L; Angeroth, Cory E

    2015-12-01

    Effective management of surface waters requires a robust understanding of spatiotemporal constituent loadings from upstream sources and the uncertainty associated with these estimates. We compared the total dissolved solids loading into the Great Salt Lake (GSL) for water year 2013 with estimates of previously sampled periods in the early 1960s. We also provide updated results on GSL loading, quantitatively bounded by sampling uncertainties, which are useful for current and future management efforts. Our statistical loading results were more accurate than those from simple regression models. Our results indicate that TDS loading to the GSL in water year 2013 was 14.6 million metric tons with uncertainty ranging from 2.8 to 46.3 million metric tons, which varies greatly from previous regression estimates for water year 1964 of 2.7 million metric tons. Results also indicate that locations with increased sampling frequency are correlated with decreasing confidence intervals. Because time is incorporated into the LOADEST models, discrepancies are largely expected to be a function of temporally lagged salt storage delivery to the GSL associated with terrestrial and in-stream processes. By incorporating temporally variable estimates and statistically derived uncertainty of these estimates, we have provided quantifiable variability in the annual estimates of dissolved solids loading into the GSL. Further, our results support the need for increased monitoring of dissolved solids loading into saline lakes like the GSL by demonstrating the uncertainty associated with different levels of sampling frequency. PMID:26231769

  3. Impedance matching between ventricle and load.

    PubMed

    Piene, H

    1984-01-01

    Impedance matching in the cardiovascular system is discussed in light of two models of ventricle and load: a Thevenin equivalent consisting of a hydromotive pressure source and an internal, source resistance and compliance in parallel; and a time-varying compliance filled from a constant pressure source and ejecting into a load of three components, a central resistor, a compliance, and a peripheral resistance. According to the Thevenin analog, the energy source and the load are matched when the load resistance is T/t times the internal source resistance (T is total cycle length, t is systolic time interval). Both from this model and from the variable compliance model it appears that optimum matching between source and load depends on the compliance of the Windkessel, as low compliance shifts the matching load resistance to a low value. Animal experiments (isolated cat hearts) indicated that both left and right ventricles at normal loads work close to their maxima of output hydraulic power, and, according to experiments in the right ventricle, maximum power output is related to load resistance and compliance as predicted by the above models. From an experimentally determined relationship among instantaneous ventricular pressure and volume (right ventricle of isolated cat hearts), an optimum load impedance was calculated on the basis of the assumption that the ratio between stroke work and static, potential energy developed in the ventricular cavity is maximum. The optimum load impedance found by this procedure closely resembles the normal input impedance of the cat lung vessel bed. PMID:6507966

  4. Summary of calculation procedures for nonsimilar two- and three-dimensional compressible turbulent boundary layers (finite difference, finite element and weighted residual methods), appendix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    This numerical prediction summary indicates the wide variety of such procedures which are available. Most procedures have detailed user manuals, and in many cases the codes are available. Many of the special effects treated by various methods (such as nonequilibrium or equilibrium chemistry, transition, roughness etc.) are indicated.

  5. A comparison of total maximum daily load (TMDL) calculations in urban streams using near real-time and periodic sampling data.

    PubMed

    Henjum, Michael B; Hozalski, Raymond M; Wennen, Christine R; Novak, Paige J; Arnold, William A

    2010-01-01

    A network of in situ sensors and nutrient analyzers was deployed to measure nitrate, specific conductance (surrogate for chloride), and turbidity (surrogate for total suspended solids (TSS)) for 28 days in two urban streams near Minneapolis, MN. The primary objectives of the study were: (1) to determine the accuracy associated with quantifying pollutant loading using periodic discrete (i.e., grab) samples in comparison to in situ near real-time monitoring and (2) to identify pollutant sources. Within a highly impervious drainage area (>35%) the majority of pollutant load (>90% for nitrate, chloride, and TSS) was observed to be discharged in a small percentage of time (<20%). Consequently, periodic sampling is prone to underestimate pollutant loads. Additionally, when compared to loads based on near real-time sampling, average errors of 19-200% were associated with sampling 1-2 times a month. There are also limitations of periodic sampling with respect to pollutant source determination. Resulting implications with regard to total maximum daily load (TMDL) assessments are discussed.

  6. The profound effects of patient arm positioning on organ doses from CT procedures calculated using Monte Carlo simulations and deformable phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haikuan; Gao, Yiming; Ding, Aiping; Caracappa, Peter F.; Xu, X. George

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the organ dose differences caused by the arms-raised and arms-lowered postures for multidetector computed tomography procedures. Organ doses were calculated using computational phantoms and Monte Carlo simulations. The arm position in two previously developed adult male and female human phantoms was adjusted to represent ‘raised’ and ‘lowered’ postures using advanced BREP-based mesh surface geometries. Organ doses from routine computed tomography (CT) scan protocols, including the chest, abdomen–pelvis, and chest–abdomen–pelvis scans, were simulated at various tube voltages and reported in the unit of mGy per 100 mAs. The CT scanner model was based on previously tested work. The differences in organ dose per unit tube current between raised and lowered arm postures were studied. Furthermore, the differences due to the tube current modulation (TCM) for these two different postures and their impact on organ doses were also investigated. For a given scan parameter, a patient having lowered arms received smaller doses to organs located within the chest, abdomen or pelvis when compared with the patient having raised arms. As expected, this is caused by the attenuation of the primary X rays by the arms. However, the skin doses and bone surface doses in the patient having lowered arms were found to be 3.97–32.12 % larger than those in a patient having raised arms due to the fact that more skin and spongiosa were covered in the scan range when the arms are lowered. This study also found that dose differences become smaller with the increase in tube voltage for most of organs or tissues except the skin. For example, the liver dose differences decreased from −15.01 to −11.33 % whereas the skin dose differences increased from 21.53 to 25.24 % with tube voltage increased from 80 to 140 kVp. With TCM applied, the organ doses of all the listed organs in patient having lowered arms are larger due to the additional tube

  7. Selecting a calculation method to estimate sediment and nutrient loads in streams: Application to the Beaurivage River (Québec, Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quilbé, Renaud; Rousseau, Alain N.; Duchemin, Marc; Poulin, Annie; Gangbazo, Georges; Villeneuve, Jean-Pierre

    2006-07-01

    Estimation of sediment and nutrient loads is of crucial interest for a good assessment of water pollution. This paper proposes an overview of existing estimation methods and a framework to select the most suited one given available streamflow and concentration data. Correlations between contaminant concentration and streamflow should first be checked to generate missing concentration values by regression. However, correlations are not always strong, in which case the ratio estimator method is more appropriate. Given a 6-year data set (1989-1995) from the Beaurivage River (Québec, Canada) with, at best, a weekly sampling, the ratio estimator method was selected to estimate annual and seasonal loads of sediments and nutrients (N and P). Results show relatively steady annual loads (on average 8.1 and 1.1 kg ha yr -1 for total dissolved N and total P, respectively) and a low erosion rate (0.23 t ha yr -1). The results also confirm that nutrient and sediment transport via runoff is essentially a springtime process in this region, and they indicate that dissolved P represents the bulk of the total P load, most likely due to artificial subsurface drainage systems in the watershed. These results are compared to the results obtained by using averaging methods and to several other sources of information from literature, confirming the order of magnitude but highlighting some remaining uncertainties. Finally, some research avenues are proposed to improve the proposed framework and to investigate other estimation methods adapted to data characteristics.

  8. Comment on "A procedure for the estimation of the numerical uncertainty of CFD calculations based on grid refinement studies" (L. Eça and M. Hoekstra, Journal of Computational Physics 262 (2014) 104-130)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Tao; Stern, Frederick

    2015-11-01

    Eça and Hoekstra [1] proposed a procedure for the estimation of the numerical uncertainty of CFD calculations based on the least squares root (LSR) method. We believe that the LSR method has potential value for providing an extended Richardson-extrapolation solution verification procedure for mixed monotonic and oscillatory or only oscillatory convergent solutions (based on the usual systematic grid-triplet convergence condition R). Current Richardson-extrapolation solution verification procedures [2-7] are restricted to monotonic convergent solutions 0 < R < 1. Procedures for oscillatory convergence simply either use uncertainty estimate based on average maximum minus minimum solutions [8,9] or arbitrarily large factors of safety (FS) [2]. However, in our opinion several issues preclude the usefulness of the presented LSR method: five criticisms follow. The solution verification literature needs technical discussion in order to put the LSR method in context. The LSR method has many options making it very difficult to follow. Fig. 1 provides a block diagram, which summarizes the LSR procedure and options, including some of which we are in disagreement. Compared to the grid-triplet and three-step procedure followed by most solution verification methods (convergence condition followed by error and uncertainty estimates), the LSR method follows a four-grid (minimum) and four-step procedure (error estimate, data range parameter Δϕ, FS, and uncertainty estimate).

  9. Load research manual. Volume 3. Load research for advanced technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenburg, L.; Clarkson, G.; Grund, Jr., C.; Leo, J.; Asbury, J.; Brandon-Brown, F.; Derderian, H.; Mueller, R.; Swaroop, R.

    1980-11-01

    This three-volume manual presents technical guidelines for electric utility load research. Special attention is given to issues raised by the load data reporting requirements of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 and to problems faced by smaller utilities that are initiating load research programs. The manual includes guides to load research literature and glossaries of load research and statistical terms. In Volume 3, special load research procedures are presented for solar, wind, and cogeneration technologies.

  10. Composite load spectra for select space propulsion structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newell, J. F.; Ho, H. W.; Kurth, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    The work performed to develop composite load spectra (CLS) for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) using probabilistic methods. The three methods were implemented to be the engine system influence model. RASCAL was chosen to be the principal method as most component load models were implemented with the method. Validation of RASCAL was performed. High accuracy comparable to the Monte Carlo method can be obtained if a large enough bin size is used. Generic probabilistic models were developed and implemented for load calculations using the probabilistic methods discussed above. Each engine mission, either a real fighter or a test, has three mission phases: the engine start transient phase, the steady state phase, and the engine cut off transient phase. Power level and engine operating inlet conditions change during a mission. The load calculation module provides the steady-state and quasi-steady state calculation procedures with duty-cycle-data option. The quasi-steady state procedure is for engine transient phase calculations. In addition, a few generic probabilistic load models were also developed for specific conditions. These include the fixed transient spike model, the poison arrival transient spike model, and the rare event model. These generic probabilistic load models provide sufficient latitude for simulating loads with specific conditions. For SSME components, turbine blades, transfer ducts, LOX post, and the high pressure oxidizer turbopump (HPOTP) discharge duct were selected for application of the CLS program. They include static pressure loads and dynamic pressure loads for all four components, centrifugal force for the turbine blade, temperatures of thermal loads for all four components, and structural vibration loads for the ducts and LOX posts.

  11. Understanding the economic impact of introducing a new procedure: calculating downstream revenue of endobronchial ultrasound with transbronchial needle aspiration as a model.

    PubMed

    Pastis, Nicholas J; Simkovich, Suzanne; Silvestri, Gerard A

    2012-02-01

    Over the last decade, endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) evolved into a validated and powerful diagnostic tool. Although it is integral to medical care in some health-care systems, others struggle to justify its purchase based on diminishing reimbursement. In analyzing its value to a health-care system, looking at procedural reimbursement alone will grossly underestimate its economic impact. Downstream revenue has been defined by administrators as revenue captured after patients use one hospital service and then use others. By analyzing consecutive EBUS cases and taking downstream revenue into account, $2.4 million in collections was attributed to 97 patients who were newly referred for this procedure.

  12. Using Repeated Practice and Error Correction Procedures Combined with Precision Teaching Measurement Approaches to Improve the Math Calculation Fluency of Middle School Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oskar-Groen, Kristi Ann

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to demonstrate improvements in celerations, performance changes, and fluency of digits written correctly using repeated drill and practice procedures with Precision Teaching measurement approaches during one-minute timings among middle school students who also exhibit identified emotional and/or behavioral disabilities…

  13. The Costs and Benefits of Graduate Education: Estimation of Graduate Degree Program Costs. Report and Supplement with Detailed Procedures and Illustrative Calculations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Joseph L.; Garrison, William D.

    In the "Gradcost III" study, relatively simple procedures have been developed for estimating the costs of graduate degree programs based on use of definitions and data generally available in U.S. graduate schools. Graduate degree program costs are taken to be the sum of three elements: departmental costs, allocated from departmental budgets;…

  14. Use of the USEPA Estuary Nitrogen Model to Estimate Concentrations of Total Nitrogen in Estuaries Using Loads Calculated by Watershed Models and Monitoring Data

    EPA Science Inventory

    We use USEPA’s Estuary Nitrogen Model (ENM) to calculate annual average concentrations of total nitrogen (TN) in ten estuaries or sub-estuaries along the Atlantic coast from New Hampshire to Florida. These include a variety of systems, ranging from strongly-flushed bays to weakly...

  15. A Procedure for Calculating the Vertical Space Height of the Sacrum When Determining Skeletal Height for Use in the Anatomical Method of Adult Stature Estimation.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Atsuko; Emanovsky, Paul D; Pietrusewsky, Michael; Holland, Thomas D

    2016-03-01

    Estimating stature from skeletonized remains is one of the essential parameters in the development of a biological profile. A new procedure for determining skeletal height (SKH) incorporating the vertical space height (VSH) from the anterior margin of the sacral promontory to the superior margins of the acetabulae for use in the anatomical method of stature estimation is introduced. Regression equations for stature estimation were generated from measurements of 38 American males of European ancestry from the William M. Bass Donated Skeletal Collection. The modification to the procedure results in a SKH that is highly correlated with stature (r = 0.925-0.948). Stature estimates have low standard errors of the estimate ranging from 21.79 to 25.95 mm, biases from to 0.50 to 0.94 mm, and accuracy rates from 17.71 mm to 19.45 mm. The procedure for determining the VSH, which replaces "S1 height" in traditional anatomical method models, is a key improvement to the method. PMID:27404615

  16. Guidelines and Procedures for Computing Time-Series Suspended-Sediment Concentrations and Loads from In-Stream Turbidity-Sensor and Streamflow Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rasmussen, Patrick P.; Gray, John R.; Glysson, G. Douglas; Ziegler, Andrew C.

    2009-01-01

    In-stream continuous turbidity and streamflow data, calibrated with measured suspended-sediment concentration data, can be used to compute a time series of suspended-sediment concentration and load at a stream site. Development of a simple linear (ordinary least squares) regression model for computing suspended-sediment concentrations from instantaneous turbidity data is the first step in the computation process. If the model standard percentage error (MSPE) of the simple linear regression model meets a minimum criterion, this model should be used to compute a time series of suspended-sediment concentrations. Otherwise, a multiple linear regression model using paired instantaneous turbidity and streamflow data is developed and compared to the simple regression model. If the inclusion of the streamflow variable proves to be statistically significant and the uncertainty associated with the multiple regression model results in an improvement over that for the simple linear model, the turbidity-streamflow multiple linear regression model should be used to compute a suspended-sediment concentration time series. The computed concentration time series is subsequently used with its paired streamflow time series to compute suspended-sediment loads by standard U.S. Geological Survey techniques. Once an acceptable regression model is developed, it can be used to compute suspended-sediment concentration beyond the period of record used in model development with proper ongoing collection and analysis of calibration samples. Regression models to compute suspended-sediment concentrations are generally site specific and should never be considered static, but they represent a set period in a continually dynamic system in which additional data will help verify any change in sediment load, type, and source.

  17. A finite difference Davidson procedure to sidestep full ab initio hessian calculation: application to characterization of stationary points and transition state searches.

    PubMed

    Sharada, Shaama Mallikarjun; Bell, Alexis T; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2014-04-28

    The cost of calculating nuclear hessians, either analytically or by finite difference methods, during the course of quantum chemical analyses can be prohibitive for systems containing hundreds of atoms. In many applications, though, only a few eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and not the full hessian, are required. For instance, the lowest one or two eigenvalues of the full hessian are sufficient to characterize a stationary point as a minimum or a transition state (TS), respectively. We describe here a method that can eliminate the need for hessian calculations for both the characterization of stationary points as well as searches for saddle points. A finite differences implementation of the Davidson method that uses only first derivatives of the energy to calculate the lowest eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the hessian is discussed. This method can be implemented in conjunction with geometry optimization methods such as partitioned-rational function optimization (P-RFO) to characterize stationary points on the potential energy surface. With equal ease, it can be combined with interpolation methods that determine TS guess structures, such as the freezing string method, to generate approximate hessian matrices in lieu of full hessians as input to P-RFO for TS optimization. This approach is shown to achieve significant cost savings relative to exact hessian calculation when applied to both stationary point characterization as well as TS optimization. The basic reason is that the present approach scales one power of system size lower since the rate of convergence is approximately independent of the size of the system. Therefore, the finite-difference Davidson method is a viable alternative to full hessian calculation for stationary point characterization and TS search particularly when analytical hessians are not available or require substantial computational effort. PMID:24784261

  18. A finite difference Davidson procedure to sidestep full ab initio hessian calculation: Application to characterization of stationary points and transition state searches

    SciTech Connect

    Sharada, Shaama Mallikarjun; Bell, Alexis T. E-mail: bell@cchem.berkeley.edu; Head-Gordon, Martin E-mail: bell@cchem.berkeley.edu

    2014-04-28

    The cost of calculating nuclear hessians, either analytically or by finite difference methods, during the course of quantum chemical analyses can be prohibitive for systems containing hundreds of atoms. In many applications, though, only a few eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and not the full hessian, are required. For instance, the lowest one or two eigenvalues of the full hessian are sufficient to characterize a stationary point as a minimum or a transition state (TS), respectively. We describe here a method that can eliminate the need for hessian calculations for both the characterization of stationary points as well as searches for saddle points. A finite differences implementation of the Davidson method that uses only first derivatives of the energy to calculate the lowest eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the hessian is discussed. This method can be implemented in conjunction with geometry optimization methods such as partitioned-rational function optimization (P-RFO) to characterize stationary points on the potential energy surface. With equal ease, it can be combined with interpolation methods that determine TS guess structures, such as the freezing string method, to generate approximate hessian matrices in lieu of full hessians as input to P-RFO for TS optimization. This approach is shown to achieve significant cost savings relative to exact hessian calculation when applied to both stationary point characterization as well as TS optimization. The basic reason is that the present approach scales one power of system size lower since the rate of convergence is approximately independent of the size of the system. Therefore, the finite-difference Davidson method is a viable alternative to full hessian calculation for stationary point characterization and TS search particularly when analytical hessians are not available or require substantial computational effort.

  19. Explicitly correlated benchmark calculations on C8H8 isomer energy separations: how accurate are DFT, double-hybrid, and composite ab initio procedures?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karton, Amir; Martin, Jan M. L.

    2012-10-01

    Accurate isomerization energies are obtained for a set of 45 C8H8 isomers by means of the high-level, ab initio W1-F12 thermochemical protocol. The 45 isomers involve a range of hydrocarbon functional groups, including (linear and cyclic) polyacetylene, polyyne, and cumulene moieties, as well as aromatic, anti-aromatic, and highly-strained rings. Performance of a variety of DFT functionals for the isomerization energies is evaluated. This proves to be a challenging test: only six of the 56 tested functionals attain root mean square deviations (RMSDs) below 3 kcal mol-1 (the performance of MP2), namely: 2.9 (B972-D), 2.8 (PW6B95), 2.7 (B3PW91-D), 2.2 (PWPB95-D3), 2.1 (ωB97X-D), and 1.2 (DSD-PBEP86) kcal mol-1. Isomers involving highly-strained fused rings or long cumulenic chains provide a 'torture test' for most functionals. Finally, we evaluate the performance of composite procedures (e.g. G4, G4(MP2), CBS-QB3, and CBS-APNO), as well as that of standard ab initio procedures (e.g. MP2, SCS-MP2, MP4, CCSD, and SCS-CCSD). Both connected triples and post-MP4 singles and doubles are important for accurate results. SCS-MP2 actually outperforms MP4(SDQ) for this problem, while SCS-MP3 yields similar performance as CCSD and slightly bests MP4. All the tested empirical composite procedures show excellent performance with RMSDs below 1 kcal mol-1.

  20. A field studies and modeling approach to develop organochlorine pesticide and PCB total maximum daily load calculations: case study for Echo Park Lake, Los Angeles, CA.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, V R; Curren, J; Lau, S-L; Stenstrom, M K; Suffet, I H

    2011-09-01

    Echo Park Lake is a small lake in Los Angeles, CA listed on the USA Clean Water Act Section 303(d) list of impaired water bodies for elevated levels of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in fish tissue. A lake water and sediment sampling program was completed to support the development of total maximum daily loads (TMDL) to address the lake impairment. The field data indicated quantifiable levels of OCPs and PCBs in the sediments, but lake water data were all below detection levels. The field sediment data obtained may explain the contaminant levels in fish tissue using appropriate sediment-water partitioning coefficients and bioaccumulation factors. A partition-equilibrium fugacity model of the whole lake system was used to interpret the field data and indicated that half of the total mass of the pollutants in the system are in the sediments and the other half is in soil; therefore, soil erosion could be a significant pollutant transport mode into the lake. Modeling also indicated that developing and quantifying the TMDL depends significantly on the analytical detection level for the pollutants in field samples and on the choice of octanol-water partitioning coefficient and bioaccumulation factors for the model. PMID:21764423

  1. Development and application of a program to calculate transonic flow around an oscillating three-dimensional wing using finite difference procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weatherill, Warren H.; Ehlers, F. Edward

    1989-01-01

    A finite difference method for solving the unsteady transonic flow about harmonically oscillating wings is investigated. The procedure is based on separating the velocity potential into steady and unsteady parts and linearizing the resulting unsteady differential equation for small disturbances. The differential equation for the unsteady potential is linear with spatially varying coefficients and with the time variable eliminated by assuming harmonic motion. Difference equations are derived for harmonic transonic flow to include a coordinate transformation for swept and tapered planforms. A pilot program is developed for three-dimensional planar lifting surface configurations (including thickness) for the CRAY-XMP at Boeing Commercial Airplanes and for the CYBER VPS-32 at the NASA Langley Research Center. An investigation is made of the effect of the location of the outer boundaries on accuracy for very small reduced frequencies. Finally, the pilot program is applied to the flutter analysis of a rectangular wing.

  2. Temperature rise tests on a forced-oil-air cooled (FOA) (OFAF) core-form transformer, including loading beyond nameplate

    SciTech Connect

    Thaden, M.V.; Mehta, S.P.; Tuli, S.C.; Grubb, R.L.

    1995-04-01

    Results of temperature rise tests performed in accordance with PC57.119/ Draft 12, recommended Procedures for Performing Temperature Rise Tests on Oil-Immersed Power Transformers at Loads Beyond Nameplate Ratings, are presented. Tested data is compared with calculated values using IEEE and IEC loading guide equations and exponential power constants are determined and are compared with those given in the loading guide. Discussion is offered that may be useful in future drafts of the procedure and to the users of the proposed test procedure.

  3. Calculating specific denitrification rates in pre-denitrification by assessing the influence of dissolved oxygen, sludge loading and mixed-liquor recycle.

    PubMed

    Raboni, Massimo; Torretta, Vincenzo; Viotti, Paolo; Urbini, Giordano

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the results of an experimental study on the correlation among the specific denitrification rate (SDNR), the dissolved oxygen concentration (DO), the F:M ratio (F:M) and the mixed-liquor (ML) recycle in the pre-denitrification reactors fed by domestic sewage. The experimental curves reveal a 28.8-32.0% reduction in the SDNR at 20 degrees C (SDNR(20 degrees C)) with DO equal to 0.1 mgO2 L(-1) and F:M in the range 0.2-0.4 kgBOD5 kgMLVSS(-1) d(-1). The SDNR reduction increases to 50.0-55.9% with DO = 0.3 mgO2 L(-1). A mathematical correlation of these results and an equation for calculating SDNR(20 degrees C) as function of the F:M as well as the average DO and BOD5 in the total flow rate fed in the denitrification stage are proposed. The conducted experience gives useful suggestions for practical usage, in particular regarding the denitrification reactor design, and represents a good starting point for future applications with the aim to optimize the biological process in domestic sewage treatment plants.

  4. Multiplexer/Demultiplexer Loading Tool (MDMLT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, Lenox Allen; Hale, Elizabeth; Martella, Robert; Gyorfi, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the MDMLT is to improve the reliability and speed of loading multiplexers/demultiplexers (MDMs) in the Software Development and Integration Laboratory (SDIL) by automating the configuration management (CM) of the loads in the MDMs, automating the loading procedure, and providing the capability to load multiple or all MDMs concurrently. This loading may be accomplished in parallel, or single MDMs (remote). The MDMLT is a Web-based tool that is capable of loading the entire International Space Station (ISS) MDM configuration in parallel. It is able to load Flight Equivalent Units (FEUs), enhanced, standard, and prototype MDMs as well as both EEPROM (Electrically Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory) and SSMMU (Solid State Mass Memory Unit) (MASS Memory). This software has extensive configuration management to track loading history, and the performance improvement means of loading the entire ISS MDM configuration of 49 MDMs in approximately 30 minutes, as opposed to 36 hours, which is what it took previously utilizing the flight method of S-Band uplink. The laptop version recently added to the MDMLT suite allows remote lab loading with the CM of information entered into a common database when it is reconnected to the network. This allows the program to reconfigure the test rigs quickly between shifts, allowing the lab to support a variety of onboard configurations during a single day, based on upcoming or current missions. The MDMLT Computer Software Configuration Item (CSCI) supports a Web-based command and control interface to the user. An interface to the SDIL File Transfer Protocol (FTP) server is supported to import Integrated Flight Loads (IFLs) and Internal Product Release Notes (IPRNs) into the database. An interface to the Monitor and Control System (MCS) is supported to control the power state, and to enable or disable the debug port of the MDMs to be loaded. Two direct interfaces to the MDM are supported: a serial interface (debug port) to

  5. A general approach for the calculation of intermodulation distortion in cavities with superconducting endplates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateu, J.; Collado, C.; Menéndez, O.; O'Callaghan, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    We report on a general procedure to calculate intermodulation distortion in cavities with superconducting endplates that is applicable to the dielectric-loaded cavities currently used for measurement of surface resistance in high-temperature superconductors. The procedure would enable the use such cavities for intermodulation characterization of unpatterned superconducting films, and would remove the uncertainty of measuring intermodulation on patterned devices, in which the effect of patterning damage might influence the outcome of the measurements. We have verified the calculation method by combining superconducting and copper endplates in a rutile-loaded cavity.

  6. Studies of cyclization reactions of linear cumulenes and heterocumulenes using the neutralization-reionization procedure and/or ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianfang; Bowie, John H

    2011-01-01

    A number of linear cumulenes and heterocumulenes have been made by charge stripping of anions of known bond connectivity in the source of a mass spectrometer. Some of these reactive molecules have been identified in interstellar molecular clouds. The structures of these neutrals may be investigated by reionization to a decomposing positive ion [the neutralization-reionization technique ((-)NR(+))], and/or by ab initio calculations. Energized linear cumulenes and heterocumulenes may undergo cyclization to form stable cyclic isomers. To cite a selection of the examples described in this review: (i) four-atom systems CCCC and some heterocumulenes CCCX (X=B, N, Al, Si, P) involve the formation of stable four-membered ring rhombic (also called kite and fan) structures. One of the cyclic molecules, cyclo-C(3) Si, has been detected in interstellar molecular clouds, (ii) five-atom cumulene and heterocumulene systems are more complex. Linear CCCCC rearranges the carbon skeleton by forming a C substituted rhomboid system, CCCCO forms a three-membered cyclic isomer, while nitrogen containing five-atom cumulenes effect nitrile to isonitrile interconversion via three-centered cyclized intermediates, and (iii) CCCCCC and CCCCBO cyclize to give unique six-membered ring systems.

  7. Maximum von Mises Stress in the Loading Environment of Mass Acceleration Curve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, Robert J.; Chen, Long Y.

    2006-01-01

    Method for calculating stress due to acceleration loading: 1) Part has been designed by FEA and hand calculation in one critical loading direction judged by the analyst; 2) Maximum stress can be due to loading in another direction; 3) Analysis procedure to be presented determines: a) The maximum Mises stress at any point; and b) The direction of maximum loading associated with the "stress". Concept of Mass Acceleration Curves (MAC): 1) Developed by JPL to perform preliminary structural sizing (i.e. Mariners, Voyager, Galileo, Pathfinder, MER,...MSL); 2) Acceleration of physical masses are bounded by a curve; 3) G-levels of vibro-acoustic and transient environments; 4) Convergent process before the couple loads cycle; and 5) Semi-empirical method to effectively bound the loads, not a simulation of the actual response.

  8. Load cell

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, B.L.

    1998-12-15

    A load cell combines the outputs of a plurality of strain gauges to measure components of an applied load. Combination of strain gauge outputs allows measurement of any of six load components without requiring complex machining or mechanical linkages to isolate load components. An example six axis load cell produces six independent analog outputs, each directly proportional to one of the six general load components. 16 figs.

  9. Load cell

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.

    2001-01-01

    A load cell combines the outputs of a plurality of strain gauges to measure components of an applied load. Combination of strain gauge outputs allows measurement of any of six load components without requiring complex machining or mechanical linkages to isolate load components. An example six axis load cell produces six independent analog outputs which can be combined to determine any one of the six general load components.

  10. Load cell

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.

    1998-01-01

    A load cell combines the outputs of a plurality of strain gauges to measure components of an applied load. Combination of strain gauge outputs allows measurement of any of six load components without requiring complex machining or mechanical linkages to isolate load components. An example six axis load cell produces six independent analog outputs, each directly proportional to one of the six general load components.

  11. Some Tests and Calculations Pertaining to the Dive Path and to Wing and Tail Loads in the Accident to Eastern Airlines C54B Airplane, NC-88814, Near Bainbridge, Maryland, May 30, 1947

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhode, Richard V.; Stokke, Allen R.; Rogin, Leo

    1947-01-01

    Several dive paths were calculated for a C54 airplane starting from level flight at an altitude of 4000 feet and from an initial indicated airspeed of 200 miles per hour. The results show that, within the limits of the possible paths permitted by the evidence of the crash at Bainbridge, the speed of impact would be about 370 miles per hour and the time to crash would be between 12 1/2 and 15 1/2 seconds. Tail load calculations indicate that, with moderate negative acceleration of the airplane, the tail would fail near the end of the dive in a manner consistent in several important respects with the evidence. A number of tests were made of the elevator tab control system to determine whether the tab would move by an amount sufficient to have caused the observed dive if the stored energy in the tab control cable were suddenly released. The results of these tests indicated that the probable tab movement is such as to be capable of causing a dive similar to the one observed at Bainbridge.

  12. The CIPW Normative Calculation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickel, Charles

    1979-01-01

    The author has rewritten rules for CIPW norm calculation and has written FORTRAN IV programs to assist the student in this procedure. Includes a set of problems utilizing the CIPW norm to illustrate principles of chemical petrology. (MA)

  13. Interactive calculation procedures for mixed compression inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reshotko, Eli

    1983-01-01

    The proper design of engine nacelle installations for supersonic aircraft depends on a sophisticated understanding of the interactions between the boundary layers and the bounding external flows. The successful operation of mixed external-internal compression inlets depends significantly on the ability to closely control the operation of the internal compression portion of the inlet. This portion of the inlet is one where compression is achieved by multiple reflection of oblique shock waves and weak compression waves in a converging internal flow passage. However weak these shocks and waves may seem gas-dynamically, they are of sufficient strength to separate a laminar boundary layer and generally even strong enough for separation or incipient separation of the turbulent boundary layers. An understanding was developed of the viscous-inviscid interactions and of the shock wave boundary layer interactions and reflections.

  14. Guidelines for transmission line structural loading

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This guide provides methods for the selection of design loads and load factors. This is accomplished by the presentation of a Load Resistance Factor Design (LRFD) procedure. The basic formula for wind force is discussed. This include basic wind speed, terrain and height coefficients, gust response factors, and pressure coefficients. Information is also provided on ice loads, tornadoes, hurricanes, longitudinal loads, construction, and maintenance loads.

  15. Patient-Specific MRI-Based Right Ventricle Models Using Different Zero-Load Diastole and Systole Geometries for Better Cardiac Stress and Strain Calculations and Pulmonary Valve Replacement Surgical Outcome Predictions

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Heng; Huang, Xueying; Rathod, Rahul H.; Gooty, Vasu; Tang, Alexander; Wu, Zheyang; Billiar, Kristen L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Accurate calculation of ventricular stress and strain is critical for cardiovascular investigations. Sarcomere shortening in active contraction leads to change of ventricular zero-stress configurations during the cardiac cycle. A new model using different zero-load diastole and systole geometries was introduced to provide more accurate cardiac stress/strain calculations with potential to predict post pulmonary valve replacement (PVR) surgical outcome. Methods Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) data were obtained from 16 patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot prior to and 6 months after pulmonary valve replacement (8 male, 8 female, mean age 34.5 years). Patients were divided into Group 1 (n = 8) with better post PVR outcome and Group 2 (n = 8) with worse post PVR outcome based on their change in RV ejection fraction (EF). CMR-based patient-specific computational RV/LV models using one zero-load geometry (1G model) and two zero-load geometries (diastole and systole, 2G model) were constructed and RV wall thickness, volume, circumferential and longitudinal curvatures, mechanical stress and strain were obtained for analysis. Pairwise T-test and Linear Mixed Effect (LME) model were used to determine if the differences from the 1G and 2G models were statistically significant, with the dependence of the pair-wise observations and the patient-slice clustering effects being taken into consideration. For group comparisons, continuous variables (RV volumes, WT, C- and L- curvatures, and stress and strain values) were summarized as mean ± SD and compared between the outcome groups by using an unpaired Student t-test. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify potential morphological and mechanical predictors for post PVR surgical outcome. Results Based on results from the 16 patients, mean begin-ejection stress and strain from the 2G model were 28% and 40% higher than that from the 1G model, respectively. Using the 2G model results, RV EF changes

  16. Celecoxib-loaded poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles prepared using a novel and controllable combination of diffusion and emulsification steps as part of the salting-out procedure.

    PubMed

    McCarron, Paul A; Donnelly, Ryan F; Marouf, Waleed

    2006-08-01

    A novel procedure for the manufacture of celecoxib-loaded poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles is described that is based upon combining salting out and emulsion-evaporation steps. An entrapment efficiency, a measure of the actual to theoretical drug content, of 97.3% was achieved, being superior to that achieved when these popular techniques were used separately (emulsion evaporation, 40.1%; salting out, 10.0%). The ratio of a water miscible solvent (acetone) to a non water-miscible solvent (dichloromethane) was shown to be the primary determinants of size and drug loading. Once optimized, using an organic phase of 3 : 1 acetone : dichloromethane vol : vol ratio, further control on particle parameters could be exerted using modification of acetone diffusion by alterations in MgCl2 x 6H2O concentration. This step was shown to have a small effect on both the mean nanoparticle size and entrapment efficiency, but found to reduce the polydispersity considerably. Diffusion control using a 45% w/v MgCl2 x 6H2O solution produced nanoparticles with a mean size of 151.4 nm, a polydispersity index of 0.023 and 98.1% entrapment efficiency. Electron microscopy showed the particles to be smooth and spherical. Sheer homogenization during the emulsification step was shown to be not as effective as sonication, with the latter technique able to produce nanoparticles after 1 min of application. Drug release studies across a semi-permeable membrane demonstrated a reduction in the burst effect as the ratio of acetone in the organic phase was increased. Calorimetry studies suggested that celecoxib existed in the nanoparticle as a molecular dispersion, with additional evidence for a strong interaction between the PLGA and the absorbed poly(vinyl alcohol) stabilizer. Formation of a strong interaction between celecoxib and PLGA, together with the formation of a radial drug gradient give a release profile that does not possess the prevalent burst effect seen with other

  17. A multi-purpose method for analysis of spur gear tooth loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasuba, R.; Evans, J. W.; August, R.; Frater, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    A large digitized approach was developed for the static and dynamic load analysis of spur gearing. An iterative procedure was used to calculate directly the "variable-variable" gear mesh stiffness as a function of transmitted load, gear tooth profile errors, gear tooth deflections and gear hub torsional deformation, and position of contacting profile points. The developed approach can be used to analyze the loads, Hertz stresses, and PV for the normal and high contrast ratio gearing, presently the modeling is limited to the condition that for a given gear all teeth have identical spacing and profiles (with or without surface imperfections). Certain types of simulated sinusoidal profile errors and pitting can cause interruptions of the gear mesh stiffness function and, thus, increase the dynamic loads in spur gearing. In addition, a finite element stress and mesh subprogram was developed for future introduction into the main program for calculating the gear tooth bending stresses under dynamic loads.

  18. ESTIMATING URBAN WET-WEATHER POLLUTANT LOADING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents procedures for estimating pollutant loads in urban watersheds emanating from wet-weather flow discharge. Equations for pollutant loading estimates will focus on the effects of wastewater characteristics, sewer flow carrying velocity, and sewer-solids depositi...

  19. An Analysis of Once-per-revolution Oscillating Aerodynamic Thrust Loads on Single-Rotation Propellers on Tractor Airplanes at Zero Yaw

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogallo, Vernon L; Yaggy, Paul F; Mccloud, John L , III

    1956-01-01

    A simplified procedure is shown for calculating the once-per-revolution oscillating aerodynamic thrust loads on propellers of tractor airplanes at zero yaw. The only flow field information required for the application of the procedure is a knowledge of the upflow angles at the horizontal center line of the propeller disk. Methods are presented whereby these angles may be computed without recourse to experimental survey of the flow field. The loads computed by the simplified procedure are compared with those computed by a more rigorous method and the procedure is applied to several airplane configurations which are believed typical of current designs. The results are generally satisfactory.

  20. Analysis of Stub Loaded Microstrip Patch Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, M. D.; Bailey, M. C.

    1997-01-01

    A microstrip patch antenna fed by a coaxial probe and reactively loaded by a open circuited microstrip line has been used previously to produce circular polarization and also as a building block for a series fed microstrip patch array. Rectangular and circular patch antennas loaded with a microstrip stub were previously analyzed using the generalized Thevenin theorem. In the Thevenin theorem approach, the mutual coupling between the patch current and the surface current on the stub was not taken into account. Also, the Thevenin theorem approach neglects continuity of current at the patch-stub junction. The approach in this present paper includes the coupling between the patch and stub currents as well as continuity at the patch-stub junction. The input impedance for a stub loaded microstrip patch is calculated by the general planar dielectric dyadic Green's function approach in the spectral domain, as was initiated much earlier and has been extensively expanded upon and utilized successfully throughout the literature for microstrip antenna configurations. Using the spectral domain dyadic Green s function derived earlier with the electric field integral equation (EFIE), the problem is formulated by using entire domain basis functions to represent the surface current densities on the patch, the loading stub and the attachment mode at the junction. Galerkin's procedure is used to reduce the EFIE to a matrix equation, which is then solved to obtain the amplitudes of the surface currents. These surface currents are then used for calculating the input impedance of stub loaded rectangular and circular microstrip patches. Numerical results are compared with measured results and with previous results calculated by the Thevenin's theorem approach.

  1. [Structure of allostatic load in railway workers].

    PubMed

    Gorokhova, S G; Pfaf, V F; Muraseyeva, E V; Akhsanova, E R; Prigorovskaya, T S; At'kov, O Yu

    2016-01-01

    The authors studied allostatic load in railway workers, as an indicator of stress effect. Analysis covered biomarkers that form allostatic load index, and their ratio for variable allostatic load index levels. Moderate allostatic load appeared to prevail in the examinees group. Findings are that systolic and diastolic blood pressure, general cholesterol and hemoglobin make major contribution into allostatic load index. Comparison covered models of allostatic load index calculation for variable biomarkers sets.

  2. [Structure of allostatic load in railway workers].

    PubMed

    Gorokhova, S G; Pfaf, V F; Muraseyeva, E V; Akhsanova, E R; Prigorovskaya, T S; At'kov, O Yu

    2016-01-01

    The authors studied allostatic load in railway workers, as an indicator of stress effect. Analysis covered biomarkers that form allostatic load index, and their ratio for variable allostatic load index levels. Moderate allostatic load appeared to prevail in the examinees group. Findings are that systolic and diastolic blood pressure, general cholesterol and hemoglobin make major contribution into allostatic load index. Comparison covered models of allostatic load index calculation for variable biomarkers sets. PMID:27396144

  3. Photovoltaic module energy rating procedure. Final subcontract report

    SciTech Connect

    Whitaker, C.M.; Newmiller, J.D.

    1998-01-01

    This document describes testing and computation procedures used to generate a photovoltaic Module Energy Rating (MER). The MER consists of 10 estimates of the amount of energy a single module of a particular type (make and model) will produce in one day. Module energy values are calculated for each of five different sets of weather conditions (defined by location and date) and two load types. Because reproduction of these exact testing conditions in the field or laboratory is not feasible, limited testing and modeling procedures and assumptions are specified.

  4. Pressure Vessel Fluence Calculations for the Hungarian VVER-440 Units for the Power Uprate and the Llifetime Extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hordósy, Gábor; Hegyi, György; Keresztúri, András; Maráczy, Csaba; Temesvári, Emese; Zsolnay, Éva M.

    2016-02-01

    A major project was launched at Paks NPP, Hungary, to investigate the possibility of lifetime extension up to 60 years. At the same time, new fuel types with higher enrichment and containing pins with gadolinium have been introduced. Due to these plans, the radiation load of the pressure vessel was evaluated up to 60 years irradiation, taking into account the past and planned future cycles. The computational procedure, elaborated and validated earlier for the fast flux calculation in the pressure vessel was modified for the new fuel types. The neutron source at the core boundaries was taken from core design calculations and the neutron transport from the source to and through the pressure vessel was followed by Monte Carlo calculations. A number of calculations were performed to adequately follow the change of the neutron source. The paper details this procedure, the used Monte Carlo model, the influence of the different reloading schemes on the radiation load and the calculated results.

  5. 47 CFR 1.1623 - Probability calculation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Probability calculation. 1.1623 Section 1.1623 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Random Selection Procedures for Mass Media Services General Procedures § 1.1623 Probability calculation. (a) All calculations shall...

  6. Waste Package Lifting Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    H. Marr

    2000-05-11

    The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the structural response of the waste package during the horizontal and vertical lifting operations in order to support the waste package lifting feature design. The scope of this calculation includes the evaluation of the 21 PWR UCF (pressurized water reactor uncanistered fuel) waste package, naval waste package, 5 DHLW/DOE SNF (defense high-level waste/Department of Energy spent nuclear fuel)--short waste package, and 44 BWR (boiling water reactor) UCF waste package. Procedure AP-3.12Q, Revision 0, ICN 0, calculations, is used to develop and document this calculation.

  7. [A new approach to shielding function calculation: radiation dose estimation for a phantome inside space station compartment].

    PubMed

    Kartashov, D A; Shurshakov, V A

    2012-01-01

    The article presents a new procedure of calculating the shielding functions for irregular objects formed from a set of nonintersecting (adjacent) triangles covering completely the surface of each object. Calculated and experimentally derived distributions of space ionizing radiation doses in the spherical tissue-equivalent phantom (experiment MATRYOSHKA-R) inside the International space station were in good agreement in the mass of phantom depths with allowance for measurement error (-10%). The procedure can be applied in modeling radiation loads on cosmonauts, calculating effectiveness of secondary protection in spacecraft, and design review of radiation protection for future space exploration missions. PMID:23457971

  8. Robinson instability and beam loading

    SciTech Connect

    Craft, B.C. III

    1985-01-01

    The Robinson instability problem is developed in three stages. The first step is to derive the synchrotron oscillation equations in the absence of beam loading (unloaded case). Next, the equations are evaluated in the presence of beam loading at the fundamental rf frequency (statically loaded case). Finally, the system is redeveloped taking into account beam loading at the synchrotron sidebands (dynamically loaded case). Following the theoretical development, the results are applied to calculate the synchrotron frequency in the presence of beam-loading, automatic-gain-control, and automatic-tune-control. The results of this calculation are compared with data from the NSLS vuv-ring, a 750 MeV electron storage ring. 1 ref., 3 figs.

  9. Structural dynamics payload loads estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engels, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    Methods for the prediction of loads on large space structures are discussed. Existing approaches to the problem of loads calculation are surveyed. A full scale version of an alternate numerical integration technique to solve the response part of a load cycle is presented, and a set of short cut versions of the algorithm developed. The implementation of these techniques using the software package developed is discussed.

  10. The effects of load drop, uniform load and concentrated loads on waste tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Marusich, R.M., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-09-06

    This document provides the supporting calculations performed by others specifically for the TWRS FSAR and more detailed summaries of the important references issued in the past regarding the effects of various loads.

  11. The effects of load drop, uniform load and concentrated loads on waste tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Marusich, R.M.

    1996-09-27

    This document provides the supporting calculations performed by others specifically for the TWRS FSAR and more detailed summaries of the important references issued in the past regarding the effects of various loads.

  12. Use of Flexible Body Coupled Loads in Assessment of Day of Launch Flight Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, Brett R.; Yunis, Isam; Olds, Aaron D.

    2011-01-01

    A Day of Launch flight loads assessment technique that determines running loads calculated from flexible body coupled loads was developed for the Ares I-X Flight Test Vehicle. The technique was developed to quantify DOL flight loads in terms of structural load components rather than the typically used q-alpha metric to provide more insight into the DOL loads. In this technique, running loads in the primary structure are determined from the combination of quasi-static aerodynamic loads and dynamic loads. The aerodynamic loads are calculated as a function of time using trajectory parameters passed from the DOL trajectory simulation and are combined with precalculated dynamic loads using a load combination equation. The potential change in aerodynamic load due to wind variability during the countdown is included in the load combination. In the event of a load limit exceedance, the technique allows the identification of what load component is exceeded, a quantification of how much the load limit is exceeded, and where on the vehicle the exceedance occurs. This technique was used to clear the Ares I-X FTV for launch on October 28, 2009. This paper describes the use of coupled loads in the Ares I-X flight loads assessment and summarizes the Ares I-X load assessment results.

  13. A method for variable pressure load estimation in spur and helical gear pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battarra, M.; Mucchi, E.

    2016-08-01

    A systematic procedure is proposed to determine variable excitation loads coming from pressure evolution inside tooth spaces in external gear pumps. Pressure force and torque are estimated with respect to the angular position of the gears, taking into account the phenomena that occur during the meshing course. In particular, the paper proposes a general methodology aiming at determining pressure force and torque components along the three coordinate axes and suitable to be applied on both spur and helical gear configuration. Firstly, the method to calculate pressure loads acting on a single tooth space during a complete revolution is given, then the total pressure force and torque loading each gear is obtained. Particular attention is addressed on the description of the helical gear scenario. As an example, the method is applied to a tandem gear pump, characterized by the presence of two stages, one with spur gears and one with helical gears. An experimentally assessed model to calculate the pressure ripple inside the tandem pump is described and the proposed procedure for pressure load estimation is applied. Eventually, the pressure loads estimated with the present procedure are compared with other estimation methods already described in the literature. The comparison shows that the present methodology is able to describe a wider range of phenomena involved in the meshing evolution and to determine all the pressure force and torque components applied to helical gears. The method gives suitable results to study the balancing and the dynamic behavior of gear pumps.

  14. Loading-unloading response of circular GLARE fiber-metal laminates under lateral indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsamasphyros, George J.; Bikakis, George S.

    2015-01-01

    GLARE is a Fiber-Metal laminated material used in aerospace structures which are frequently subjected to various impact damages. Hence, the response of GLARE plates subjected to lateral indentation is very important. In this paper, analytical expressions are derived and a non-linear finite element modeling procedure is proposed in order to predict the static load-indentation curves of circular GLARE plates during loading and unloading by a hemispherical indentor. We have recently published analytical formulas and a finite element procedure for the static indentation of circular GLARE plates which are now used during the loading stage. Here, considering that aluminum layers are in a state of membrane yield and employing energy balance during unloading, the unloading path is determined. Using this unloading path, an algebraic equation is derived for calculating the permanent dent depth of the GLARE plate after the indentor's withdrawal. Furthermore, our finite element procedure is modified in order to simulate the unloading stage as well. The derived formulas and the proposed finite element modeling procedure are applied successfully to GLARE 2-2/1-0.3 and to GLARE 3-3/2-0.4 circular plates. The analytical results are compared with corresponding FEM results and a good agreement is found. The analytically calculated permanent dent depth is within 6 % for the GLARE 2 plate, and within 7 % for the GLARE 3 plate, of the corresponding numerically calculated result. No other solution of this problem is known to the authors.

  15. Design Calculations for Thermoelectric Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeldin, B.

    1983-01-01

    Nine simplified analytic models based on average properties accurately predict heat rates for silicon/germanium thermoelectric generators. Solutions from simplified models were compared with those obtained using sophisticated numerical analysis. Maximum errors in calculated heat rate range from about 4 percent to about 0.2 percent. Models also used to calculate power delivered to load and thermodynamic efficiency.

  16. LOADING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Ohlinger, L.A.

    1958-10-01

    A device is presented for loading or charging bodies of fissionable material into a reactor. This device consists of a car, mounted on tracks, into which the fissionable materials may be placed at a remote area, transported to the reactor, and inserted without danger to the operating personnel. The car has mounted on it a heavily shielded magazine for holding a number of the radioactive bodies. The magazine is of a U-shaped configuration and is inclined to the horizontal plane, with a cap covering the elevated open end, and a remotely operated plunger at the lower, closed end. After the fissionable bodies are loaded in the magazine and transported to the reactor, the plunger inserts the body at the lower end of the magazine into the reactor, then is withdrawn, thereby allowing gravity to roll the remaining bodies into position for successive loading in a similar manner.

  17. 47 CFR 1.1623 - Probability calculation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Probability calculation. 1.1623 Section 1.1623 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Grants by Random Selection Random Selection Procedures for Mass Media Services General Procedures § 1.1623 Probability calculation. (a)...

  18. 47 CFR 1.1623 - Probability calculation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Probability calculation. 1.1623 Section 1.1623 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Grants by Random Selection Random Selection Procedures for Mass Media Services General Procedures § 1.1623 Probability calculation. (a)...

  19. 47 CFR 1.1623 - Probability calculation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Probability calculation. 1.1623 Section 1.1623 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Grants by Random Selection Random Selection Procedures for Mass Media Services General Procedures § 1.1623 Probability calculation. (a)...

  20. Terrestrial photovoltaic measurement procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Procedures for obtaining cell and array current-voltage measurements both outdoors in natural sunlight and indoors in simulated sunlight are presented. A description of the necessary apparatus and equipment is given for the calibration and use of reference solar cells. Some comments relating to concentration cell measurements, and a revised terrestrial solar spectrum for use in theoretical calculations, are included.

  1. Plug Loads Conservation Measures

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple plug loads inventory information and calculates the energy and cost benefits of various retrofit opportunities. This tool includes energy conservation measures for: Vending Machine Misers, Delamp Vending Machine, Desktop to Laptop retrofit, CRT to LCD monitors retrofit, Computer Power Management Settings, and Energy Star Refrigerator retrofit. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, building life cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings tomore » investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.« less

  2. Plug Loads Conservation Measures

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Metzger, Jesse Dean

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple plug loads inventory information and calculates the energy and cost benefits of various retrofit opportunities. This tool includes energy conservation measures for: Vending Machine Misers, Delamp Vending Machine, Desktop to Laptop retrofit, CRT to LCD monitors retrofit, Computer Power Management Settings, and Energy Star Refrigerator retrofit. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, building life cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.

  3. Carbohydrate Loading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csernus, Marilyn

    Carbohydrate loading is a frequently used technique to improve performance by altering an athlete's diet. The objective is to increase glycogen stored in muscles for use in prolonged strenuous exercise. For two to three days, the athlete consumes a diet that is low in carbohydrates and high in fat and protein while continuing to exercise and…

  4. MEMS Calculator

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 166 MEMS Calculator (Web, free access)   This MEMS Calculator determines the following thin film properties from data taken with an optical interferometer or comparable instrument: a) residual strain from fixed-fixed beams, b) strain gradient from cantilevers, c) step heights or thicknesses from step-height test structures, and d) in-plane lengths or deflections. Then, residual stress and stress gradient calculations can be made after an optical vibrometer or comparable instrument is used to obtain Young's modulus from resonating cantilevers or fixed-fixed beams. In addition, wafer bond strength is determined from micro-chevron test structures using a material test machine.

  5. Chaotic Calculations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenery, Gordon

    1991-01-01

    Uses chaos theory to investigate the nonlinear phenomenon of population growth fluctuation. Illustrates the use of computers and computer programs to make calculations in a nonlinear difference equation system. (MDH)

  6. LOADED WAVEGUIDES

    DOEpatents

    Mullett, L.B.; Loach, B.G.; Adams, G.L.

    1958-06-24

    >Loaded waveguides are described for the propagation of electromagnetic waves with reduced phase velocities. A rectangular waveguide is dimensioned so as to cut-off the simple H/sub 01/ mode at the operating frequency. The waveguide is capacitance loaded, so as to reduce the phase velocity of the transmitted wave, by connecting an electrical conductor between directly opposite points in the major median plane on the narrower pair of waveguide walls. This conductor may take a corrugated shape or be an aperature member, the important factor being that the electrical length of the conductor is greater than one-half wavelength at the operating frequency. Prepared for the Second U.N. International ConferThe importance of nuclear standards is duscussed. A brief review of the international callaboration in this field is given. The proposal is made to let the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) coordinate the efforts from other groups. (W.D.M.)

  7. Confidence Calculation with AMV+

    SciTech Connect

    Fossum, A.F.

    1999-02-19

    The iterative advanced mean value algorithm (AMV+), introduced nearly ten years ago, is now widely used as a cost-effective probabilistic structural analysis tool when the use of sampling methods is cost prohibitive (Wu et al., 1990). The need to establish confidence bounds on calculated probabilities arises because of the presence of uncertainties in measured means and variances of input random variables. In this paper an algorithm is proposed that makes use of the AMV+ procedure and analytically derived probability sensitivities to determine confidence bounds on calculated probabilities.

  8. Fuzzy modelling of power system optimal load flow

    SciTech Connect

    Miranda, V.; Saraiva, J.T. )

    1992-05-01

    In this paper, a fuzzy model for power system operation is presented. Uncertainties in loads and generations are modeled as fuzzy numbers. System behavior under known (while uncertain) injections is dealt with by a DC fuzzy power flow model. System optimal (while uncertain) operation is calculated with linear programming procedures where the problem nature and structure allows some efficient techniques such as Dantzig Wolfe decomposition and dual simplex to be used. Among the results, one obtains a fuzzy cost value for system operation and possibility distributions for branch power flows and power generations. Some risk analysis is possible, as system robustness and exposure indices can be derived and hedging policies can be investigated.

  9. Calculation of the Aerodynamic Behavior of the Tilt Rotor Aeroacoustic Model (TRAM) in the DNW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wayne

    2001-01-01

    Comparisons of measured and calculated aerodynamic behavior of a tiltrotor model are presented. The test of the Tilt Rotor Aeroacoustic Model (TRAM) with a single, 1/4-scale V- 22 rotor in the German-Dutch Wind Tunnel (DNW) provides an extensive set of aeroacoustic, performance, and structural loads data. The calculations were performed using the rotorcraft comprehensive analysis CAMRAD II. Presented are comparisons of measured and calculated performance and airloads for helicopter mode operation, as well as calculated induced and profile power. An aerodynamic and wake model and calculation procedure that reflects the unique geometry and phenomena of tiltrotors has been developed. There are major differences between this model and the corresponding aerodynamic and wake model that has been established for helicopter rotors. In general, good correlation between measured and calculated performance and airloads behavior has been shown. Two aspects of the analysis that clearly need improvement are the stall delay model and the trailed vortex formation model.

  10. Fracture Behaviour of Glass Columns Experimental Study of Axial Loaded Glass Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakab, A.; Nehme, K.; Nehme, S. G.

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays supporting structures can be transparent due to the development of glass strengthening procedures. The building glass as a versatile building material enables the efforts of the architects due to its transparency. This paper focuses on glass columns in the topic of load-bearing glasses and also on the design and load bearing capacity of fins and stability issues. Laboratory experiments were carried out at the BME, Department of Building Materials and Engineering Geology on the fracture behaviour of centrally compressed glass columns. More than 120 specimens where loaded until fracture. The load and deformations were measured. Based on the experimental results the critical force was determined and with force-deflection diagrams were illustrated the fracture and stability processes. Authors are going to compare the results of the laboratory experiments and theoretical calculations.

  11. Dental Procedures.

    PubMed

    Ramponi, Denise R

    2016-01-01

    Dental problems are a common complaint in emergency departments in the United States. There are a wide variety of dental issues addressed in emergency department visits such as dental caries, loose teeth, dental trauma, gingival infections, and dry socket syndrome. Review of the most common dental blocks and dental procedures will allow the practitioner the opportunity to make the patient more comfortable and reduce the amount of analgesia the patient will need upon discharge. Familiarity with the dental equipment, tooth, and mouth anatomy will help prepare the practitioner for to perform these dental procedures. PMID:27482994

  12. Regularities of heat transfer in the gas layers of a steam boiler furnace flame. Part II. Gas layer radiation laws and the procedure for calculating heat transfer in furnaces, fire boxes, and combustion chambers developed on the basis of these laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, A. N.

    2014-10-01

    The article presents the results stemming from the scientific discovery of laws relating to radiation from the gas layers generated during flame combustion of fuel and when electric arc burns in electric-arc steel-melting furnaces. The procedure for calculating heat transfer in electric-arc and torch furnaces, fire-boxes, and combustion chambers elaborated on the basis of this discovery is described.

  13. 40 CFR 1065.940 - Emission calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emission calculations. 1065.940... CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Field Testing and Portable Emission Measurement Systems § 1065.940 Emission calculations. Perform emission calculations as described in § 1065.650 to calculate...

  14. 40 CFR 1065.940 - Emission calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Emission calculations. 1065.940... CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Field Testing and Portable Emission Measurement Systems § 1065.940 Emission calculations. (a) Perform emission calculations as described in § 1065.650 to calculate...

  15. Shot loading trainer analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, T.K.

    1995-02-15

    This document presents the results from the analysis of the shot loading trainer (SLT). This device will be used to test the procedure for installing shot into the annulus of the Project W-320 shipping container. To ensure that the shot is installed uniformly around the container, vibrators will be used to settle the shot. The SLT was analyzed to ensure that it would not jeopardize worker safety during operation. The results from the static analysis of the SLT under deadweight and vibrator operating loads show that the stresses in the SLT are below code allowables. The results from the modal analysis show that the natural frequencies of the SLT are far below the operating frequencies of the vibrators, provided the SLT is mounted on pneumatic tires. The SLT was also analyzed for wind, seismic, deadweight, and moving/transporting loads. Analysis of the SLT is in accordance with SDC-4.1 for safety class 3 structures (DOE-RL 1993) and the American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC) Manual of Steel Construction (AISC 1989).

  16. 40 CFR 98.165 - Procedures for estimating missing data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Hydrogen Production § 98.165 Procedures for...., hydrogen production, electrical load, and operating hours). You must document and keep records of...

  17. 40 CFR 98.165 - Procedures for estimating missing data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Hydrogen Production § 98.165 Procedures for...., hydrogen production, electrical load, and operating hours). You must document and keep records of...

  18. 40 CFR 98.165 - Procedures for estimating missing data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Hydrogen Production § 98.165 Procedures for...., hydrogen production, electrical load, and operating hours). You must document and keep records of...

  19. 40 CFR 98.165 - Procedures for estimating missing data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Hydrogen Production § 98.165 Procedures for...., hydrogen production, electrical load, and operating hours). You must document and keep records of...

  20. 40 CFR 98.165 - Procedures for estimating missing data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Hydrogen Production § 98.165 Procedures for...., hydrogen production, electrical load, and operating hours). You must document and keep records of...

  1. WBGT Calculator

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Charles H.

    2000-05-22

    This software calculates a Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT) using standard measurements from a meteorological station. WBGT is used by Industrial Hygenists (IH) to determine heat stress potential to outdoor workers. Through the mid 1990''s, SRS technicians were dispatched several times daily to measure WBGT with a custom hand held instrument and results were dessiminated via telephone. Due to workforce reductions, the WSRC IH Department asked for the development of an automated method to simulate the WBGT measurement using existing real time data from the Atmospheric Technologies Group''s meteorological monitoring network.

  2. WBGT Calculator

    2000-05-22

    This software calculates a Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT) using standard measurements from a meteorological station. WBGT is used by Industrial Hygenists (IH) to determine heat stress potential to outdoor workers. Through the mid 1990''s, SRS technicians were dispatched several times daily to measure WBGT with a custom hand held instrument and results were dessiminated via telephone. Due to workforce reductions, the WSRC IH Department asked for the development of an automated method to simulatemore » the WBGT measurement using existing real time data from the Atmospheric Technologies Group''s meteorological monitoring network.« less

  3. LOADS: a computer program for determining the shear, bending moment and axial loads for fuselage type structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolte, W. E.

    1976-01-01

    LOADS determines rigid body vehicle shears, bending moments and axial loads on a space vehicle due to aerodynamic loads and propellant inertial loads. An example hand calculation is presented and was used to check LOADS. A brief description of the program and the equations used are presented. LOADS is operational on the Univac 1110, occupies 10505 core and typically takes less than one(1) second of CAU time to execute.

  4. 10 CFR 766.102 - Calculation methodology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Calculation methodology. 766.102 Section 766.102 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY URANIUM ENRICHMENT DECONTAMINATION AND DECOMMISSIONING FUND; PROCEDURES FOR SPECIAL ASSESSMENT OF DOMESTIC UTILITIES Procedures for Special Assessment § 766.102 Calculation methodology....

  5. 10 CFR 766.102 - Calculation methodology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Calculation methodology. 766.102 Section 766.102 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY URANIUM ENRICHMENT DECONTAMINATION AND DECOMMISSIONING FUND; PROCEDURES FOR SPECIAL ASSESSMENT OF DOMESTIC UTILITIES Procedures for Special Assessment § 766.102 Calculation methodology....

  6. 10 CFR 766.102 - Calculation methodology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Calculation methodology. 766.102 Section 766.102 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY URANIUM ENRICHMENT DECONTAMINATION AND DECOMMISSIONING FUND; PROCEDURES FOR SPECIAL ASSESSMENT OF DOMESTIC UTILITIES Procedures for Special Assessment § 766.102 Calculation methodology....

  7. 10 CFR 766.102 - Calculation methodology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Calculation methodology. 766.102 Section 766.102 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY URANIUM ENRICHMENT DECONTAMINATION AND DECOMMISSIONING FUND; PROCEDURES FOR SPECIAL ASSESSMENT OF DOMESTIC UTILITIES Procedures for Special Assessment § 766.102 Calculation methodology....

  8. Irrigation customer survey procedures and results

    SciTech Connect

    Harrer, B.J.; Johnston, J.W.; Dase, J.E.; Hattrup, M.P.; Reed, G.

    1987-03-01

    This report describes the statistical procedures, administrative procedures, and results of a telephone survey designed to collect primary data from individuals in the Pacific Northwest region who use electricity in irrigating agricultural crops. The project was intended to collect data useful for a variety of purposes, including conservation planning, load forecasting, and rate design.

  9. Procedural knowledge

    SciTech Connect

    Georgeff, M.P.; Lansky, A.L.

    1986-10-01

    Much of commonsense knowledge about the real world is in the form of procedures or sequences of actions for achieving particular goals. In this paper, a formalism is presented for representing such knowledge using the notion of process. A declarative semantics for the representation is given, which allows a user to state facts about the effects of doing things in the problem domain of interest. An operational semantics is also provided, which shows how this knowledge can be used to achieve particular goals or to form intentions regarding their achievement. Given both semantics, our formalism additionally serves as an executable specification language suitable for constructing complex systems. A system based on this formalism is described, and examples involving control of an autonomous robot and fault diagnosis for NASA's space shuttle are provided.

  10. The theoretical tensile strength of fcc crystals predicted from shear strength calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Černý, M.; Pokluda, J.

    2009-04-01

    This work presents a simple way of estimating uniaxial tensile strength on the basis of theoretical shear strength calculations, taking into account its dependence on a superimposed normal stress. The presented procedure enables us to avoid complicated and time-consuming analyses of elastic stability of crystals under tensile loading. The atomistic simulations of coupled shear and tensile deformations in cubic crystals are performed using first principles computational code based on pseudo-potentials and the plane wave basis set. Six fcc crystals are subjected to shear deformations in convenient slip systems and a special relaxation procedure controls the stress tensor. The obtained dependence of the ideal shear strength on the normal tensile stress seems to be almost linearly decreasing for all investigated crystals. Taking these results into account, the uniaxial tensile strength values in three crystallographic directions were evaluated by assuming a collapse of the weakest shear system. Calculated strengths for \\langle 001\\rangle and \\langle 111\\rangle loading were found to be mostly lower than previously calculated stresses related to tensile instability but rather close to those obtained by means of the shear instability analysis. On the other hand, the strengths for \\langle 110\\rangle loading almost match the stresses related to tensile instability.

  11. 46 CFR 170.090 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... for the weight of all loads carried aboard the vessel. (b) If it is necessary to compute and plot any of the following curves as part of the calculations required in this subchapter, these plots...

  12. 46 CFR 170.090 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... for the weight of all loads carried aboard the vessel. (b) If it is necessary to compute and plot any of the following curves as part of the calculations required in this subchapter, these plots...

  13. Numerical Loading of a Maxwellian Probability Distribution Function

    SciTech Connect

    J. L. V. Lewandowski

    2003-03-24

    A renormalization procedure for the numerical loading of a Maxwellian probability distribution function (PDF) is formulated. The procedure, which involves the solution of three coupled nonlinear equations, yields a numerically loaded PDF with improved properties for higher velocity moments. This method is particularly useful for low-noise particle-in-cell simulations with electron dynamics.

  14. A study of environmental characterization of conventional and advanced aluminum alloys for selection and design. Phase 2: The breaking load test method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprowls, D. O.; Bucci, R. J.; Ponchel, B. M.; Brazill, R. L.; Bretz, P. E.

    1984-01-01

    A technique is demonstrated for accelerated stress corrosion testing of high strength aluminum alloys. The method offers better precision and shorter exposure times than traditional pass fail procedures. The approach uses data from tension tests performed on replicate groups of smooth specimens after various lengths of exposure to static stress. The breaking strength measures degradation in the test specimen load carrying ability due to the environmental attack. Analysis of breaking load data by extreme value statistics enables the calculation of survival probabilities and a statistically defined threshold stress applicable to the specific test conditions. A fracture mechanics model is given which quantifies depth of attack in the stress corroded specimen by an effective flaw size calculated from the breaking stress and the material strength and fracture toughness properties. Comparisons are made with experimental results from three tempers of 7075 alloy plate tested by the breaking load method and by traditional tests of statistically loaded smooth tension bars and conventional precracked specimens.

  15. Sub-wavelength waveguide loaded by a complementary electric metamaterial for vacuum electron devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Zhaoyun; Hummelt, Jason S.; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2014-10-01

    We report the electromagnetic properties of a waveguide loaded by complementary electric split ring resonators (CeSRRs) and the application of the waveguide in vacuum electronics. The S-parameters of the CeSRRs in free space are calculated using the HFSS code and are used to retrieve the effective permittivity and permeability in an effective medium theory. The dispersion relation of a waveguide loaded with the CeSRRs is calculated by two approaches: by direct calculation with HFSS and by calculation with the effective medium theory; the results are in good agreement. An improved agreement is obtained using a fitting procedure for the permittivity tensor in the effective medium theory. The gain of a backward wave mode of the CeSRR-loaded waveguide interacting with an electron beam is calculated by two methods: by using the HFSS model and traveling wave tube theory; and by using a dispersion relation derived in the effective medium model. Results of the two methods are in very good agreement. The proposed all-metal structure may be useful in miniaturized vacuum electron devices.

  16. Cascade failure analysis of power grid using new load distribution law and node removal rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hai-Peng; Song, Jihong; Yang, Rong; Baptista, Murilo S.; Grebogi, Celso

    2016-01-01

    The power grid is a directional complex network of generators, substations, and consumers. We propose a new load distribution law to emulate the power grid. We assume that the power flow is transferred through all the paths connecting generators and consumers according to their efficiency. The initial generation of generators and the initial loads of substations are calculated according to the path efficiency and the load of the consumers. If a node fails, it is removed from the power grid, and all paths passing through it will fail to transfer power. In that case, the loads of the corresponding consumers are redistributed within the whole network. During the failure cascading and propagation procedure, our node removal rule is to remove the first overload node along the opposite direction of power flow, then the network distributes load and goes on the cascade procedure. Our new removal rule for nodes does suppress the large scale cascading failures. This work would be very helpful for designing the protective relay system and the tolerant parameters of the grid.

  17. Thermal loading of natural streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackman, Alan P.; Yotsukura, Nobuhiro

    1977-01-01

    The impact of thermal loading on the temperature regime of natural streams is investigated by mathematical models, which describe both transport (convection-diffusion) and decay (surface dissipation) of waste heat over 1-hour or shorter time intervals. The models are derived from the principle of conservation of thermal energy for application to one- and two-dimensional spaces. The basic concept in these models is to separate water temperature into two parts, (1) excess temperature due to thermal loading and (2) natural (ambient) temperature. This separation allows excess temperature to be calculated from the models without incoming radiation data. Natural temperature may either be measured in prototypes or calculated from the model. If use is made of the model, however, incoming radiation is required as input data. Comparison of observed and calculated temperatures in seven natural streams shows that the models are capable of predicting transient temperature regimes satisfactorily in most cases. (Woodard-USGS)

  18. Calculating Buckling And Vibrations Of Lattice Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, M. S.; Durling, B. J.; Herstrom, C. L.; Williams, F. W.; Banerjee, J. R.; Kennedy, D.; Warnaar, D. B.

    1989-01-01

    BUNVIS-RG computer program designed to calculate vibration frequencies or buckling loads of prestressed lattice structures used in outer space. For buckling and vibration problems, BUNVIS-RG calculates deadload axial forces caused in members by any combination of externally-applied static point forces and moments at nodes, axial preload or prestrain in members, and such acceleration loads as those due to gravity. BUNVIS-RG is FORTRAN 77 computer program implemented on CDC CYBER and VAX computer.

  19. Loads calibrations of strain gage bridges on the DAST project Aeroelastic Research Wing (ARW-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckstrom, C. V.

    1980-01-01

    The details of and results from the procedure used to calibrate strain gage bridges for measurement of wing structural loads for the DAST project ARW-1 wing are presented. Results are in the form of loads equations and comparison of computed loads vs. actual loads for two simulated flight loading conditions.

  20. An algorithmic scheme for the automated calculation of fiber orientations in arterial walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fausten, Simon; Balzani, Daniel; Schröder, Jörg

    2016-08-01

    We propose an algorithmic scheme for the numerical calculation of fiber orientations in arterial walls. The basic assumption behind the procedure is that the fiber orientations are mainly governed by the principal tensile stress directions resulting in an improved load transfer within the artery as a consequence of the redistribution of stresses. This reflects the biological motivation that soft tissues continuously adapt to their mechanical environment in order to optimize their load-bearing capacities. The algorithmic scheme proposed here enhances efficiency of the general procedure given in Hariton et al. (Biomech Model Mechanobiol 6(3):163-175, 2007), which consists of repeatedly identifying a favored fiber orientation based on the principal tensile stresses under a certain loading scenario, and then re-calculating the stresses for that loading scenario with the modified favored fiber orientation. Since the method still depends on a highly accurate stress approximation of the finite element formulation, which is not straightforward to obtain in particular for incompressible and highly anisotropic materials, furthermore, a modified model is introduced. This model defines the favored fiber orientation not only in terms of the local principal stresses, but in terms of the volume averages of the principal stresses computed over individual finite elements. Thereby, the influence of imperfect stress approximations can be weakened leading to a stabilized convergence of the reorientation procedure and a more reasonable fiber orientation with less numerical noise. The performance of the proposed fiber reorientation scheme is investigated with respect to different finite element formulations and different favored fiber orientation models, Hariton et al. (Biomech Model Mechanobiol 6(3):163-175, 2007) and Cyron and Humphrey (Math Mech Solids 1-17, 2014). In addition, it is applied to calculate the fiber orientation in a patient-specific arterial geometry.

  1. An algorithmic scheme for the automated calculation of fiber orientations in arterial walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fausten, Simon; Balzani, Daniel; Schröder, Jörg

    2016-11-01

    We propose an algorithmic scheme for the numerical calculation of fiber orientations in arterial walls. The basic assumption behind the procedure is that the fiber orientations are mainly governed by the principal tensile stress directions resulting in an improved load transfer within the artery as a consequence of the redistribution of stresses. This reflects the biological motivation that soft tissues continuously adapt to their mechanical environment in order to optimize their load-bearing capacities. The algorithmic scheme proposed here enhances efficiency of the general procedure given in Hariton et al. (Biomech Model Mechanobiol 6(3):163-175, 2007), which consists of repeatedly identifying a favored fiber orientation based on the principal tensile stresses under a certain loading scenario, and then re-calculating the stresses for that loading scenario with the modified favored fiber orientation. Since the method still depends on a highly accurate stress approximation of the finite element formulation, which is not straightforward to obtain in particular for incompressible and highly anisotropic materials, furthermore, a modified model is introduced. This model defines the favored fiber orientation not only in terms of the local principal stresses, but in terms of the volume averages of the principal stresses computed over individual finite elements. Thereby, the influence of imperfect stress approximations can be weakened leading to a stabilized convergence of the reorientation procedure and a more reasonable fiber orientation with less numerical noise. The performance of the proposed fiber reorientation scheme is investigated with respect to different finite element formulations and different favored fiber orientation models, Hariton et al. (Biomech Model Mechanobiol 6(3):163-175, 2007) and Cyron and Humphrey (Math Mech Solids 1-17, 2014). In addition, it is applied to calculate the fiber orientation in a patient-specific arterial geometry.

  2. SSME-HAS dynamic load simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The space shuttle main engine propellant valve actuators (SSME) were designed to simulate the loads reflected into the SSME by the chamber coolant valve, the fuel preburner, and the oxidizer. The design, and functional description are included along with a list of the drawings. The load fixture control transform, friction torque, and flow calculations are reported.

  3. Regression model development and computational procedures to support estimation of real-time concentrations and loads of selected constituents in two tributaries to Lake Houston near Houston, Texas, 2005-9

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Michael T.; Asquith, William H.; Oden, Timothy D.

    2012-01-01

    from .582–.922 (dimensionless). The residual standard errors ranged from .073–.447 (base-10 logarithm). Adjusted R-squared values for the East Fork San Jacinto River models ranged from .253–.853 (dimensionless). The residual standard errors ranged from .076–.388 (base-10 logarithm). In conjunction with estimated concentrations, constituent loads can be estimated by multiplying the estimated concentration by the corresponding streamflow and by applying the appropriate conversion factor. The regression models presented in this report are site specific, that is, they are specific to the Spring Creek and East Fork San Jacinto River streamflow-gaging stations; however, the general methods that were developed and documented could be applied to most perennial streams for the purpose of estimating real-time water quality data.

  4. 24 CFR 3280.402 - Test procedure for roof trusses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Testing § 3280.402 Test procedure for roof trusses. (a) Roof load tests. The following is an acceptable test procedure, consistent... loads. Where roof trusses act as support for other members, act as cantilevers, or support...

  5. 24 CFR 3280.402 - Test procedure for roof trusses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Testing § 3280.402 Test procedure for roof trusses. (a) Roof load tests. The following is an acceptable test procedure, consistent... loads. Where roof trusses act as support for other members, act as cantilevers, or support...

  6. Effects of random member length errors on the accuracy and internal loads of truss antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, W. H.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of random member length errors on the surface accuracy, the defocus, and the residual, internal loads of tetrahedral truss antenna reflectors have been studied analytically. The analytical procedure involves performing multiple, deterministic finite element structural analyses for a particular truss. For each analysis, the normally distributed, random member length errors are selected by random number generator. A best fit paraboloid analysis is used to determine a root mean square error and defocus from each analysis. The statistical properties of these quantities as well as the internal loads are calculated from the results of many independent analyses. Results indicate that the number of members in a tetrahedral truss antenna of a given diameter has a significant effect on surface accuracy, defocus and internal loads. It was also found that the member axial stiffnesses and antenna focal length have a very small effect on reflector surface accuracy.

  7. Flaw assessment guide for high-temperature reactor components subject to creep-fatigue loading

    SciTech Connect

    Ainsworth, R.A. . Berkeley Nuclear Labs.); Ruggles, M.B. ); Takahashi, Y. . Komae Research Lab.)

    1990-10-01

    A high-temperature flaw assessment procedure is described. This procedure is a result of a collaborative effort between Electric Power Research Institute in the United States, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry in Japan, and Nuclear Electric plc in the United Kingdom. The procedure addresses preexisting defects subject to creep-fatigue loading conditions. Laws employed to calculate the crack growth per cycle are defined in terms of fracture mechanics parameters and constants related to the component material. The crack-growth laws can be integrated to calculate the remaining life of a component or to predict the amount of crack extension in a given period. Fatigue and creep crack growth per cycle are calculated separately, and the total crack extension is taken as the simple sum of the two contributions. An interaction between the two propagation modes is accounted for in the material properties in the separate calculations. In producing the procedure, limitations of the approach have been identified. 25 refs., 1 fig.

  8. 40 CFR 1066.315 - Dynamometer road-load setting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Dynamometer road-load setting. 1066... POLLUTION CONTROLS VEHICLE-TESTING PROCEDURES Coastdown § 1066.315 Dynamometer road-load setting. Determine dynamometer road-load settings for chassis testing by following SAE J2264 (incorporated by reference in §...

  9. Fatigue life estimates for helicopter loading spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khosrovaneh, A. K.; Dowling, N. E.; Berens, A. P.; Gallagher, J. P.

    1990-01-01

    Helicopter loading histories applied to notch metal samples are used as examples, and their fatigue lives are calculated by using a simplified version of the local strain approach. This simplified method has the advantage that it requires knowing the loading history in only the reduced form of ranges and means and number of cycles from the rain-flow cycle counting method. The calculated lives compare favorably with test data.

  10. Fatigue life estimates for helicopter loading spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khosrovaneh, A. K.; Dowling, N. E.; Berens, A. P.; Gallagher, J. P.

    1989-01-01

    Helicopter loading histories applied to notch metal samples are used as examples, and their fatigue lives are calculated by using a simplified version of the local strain approach. This simplified method has the advantage that it requires knowing the loading history in only the reduced form of ranges and means and number of cycles from the rain-flow cycle counting method. The calculated lives compare favorably with test data.

  11. Planetary gear profile modification design based on load sharing modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias, Miguel; Fernández Del Rincón, Alfonso; De-Juan, Ana Magdalena; Garcia, Pablo; Diez, Alberto; Viadero, Fernando

    2015-07-01

    In order to satisfy the increasing demand on high performance planetary transmissions, an important line of research is focused on the understanding of some of the underlying phenomena involved in this mechanical system. Through the development of models capable of reproduce the system behavior, research in this area contributes to improve gear transmission insight, helping developing better maintenance practices and more efficient design processes. A planetary gear model used for the design of profile modifications ratio based on the levelling of the load sharing ratio is presented. The gear profile geometry definition, following a vectorial approach that mimics the real cutting process of gears, is thoroughly described. Teeth undercutting and hypotrochoid definition are implicitly considered, and a procedure for the incorporation of a rounding arc at the tooth tip in order to deal with corner contacts is described. A procedure for the modeling of profile deviations is presented, which can be used for the introduction of both manufacturing errors and designed profile modifications. An easy and flexible implementation of the profile deviation within the planetary model is accomplished based on the geometric overlapping. The contact force calculation and dynamic implementation used in the model are also introduced, and parameters from a real transmission for agricultural applications are presented for the application example. A set of reliefs is designed based on the levelling of the load sharing ratio for the example transmission, and finally some other important dynamic factors of the transmission are analyzed to assess the changes in the dynamic behavior with respect to the non-modified case. Thus, the main innovative aspect of the proposed planetary transmission model is the capacity of providing a simulated load sharing ratio which serves as design variable for the calculation of the tooth profile modifications.

  12. Load controller and method to enhance effective capacity of a photovoltaic power supply using a dynamically determined expected peak loading

    DOEpatents

    Perez, Richard

    2005-05-03

    A load controller and method are provided for maximizing effective capacity of a non-controllable, renewable power supply coupled to a variable electrical load also coupled to a conventional power grid. Effective capacity is enhanced by monitoring power output of the renewable supply and loading, and comparing the loading against the power output and a load adjustment threshold determined from an expected peak loading. A value for a load adjustment parameter is calculated by subtracting the renewable supply output and the load adjustment parameter from the current load. This value is then employed to control the variable load in an amount proportional to the value of the load control parameter when the parameter is within a predefined range. By so controlling the load, the effective capacity of the non-controllable, renewable power supply is increased without any attempt at operational feedback control of the renewable supply.

  13. 40 CFR 92.132 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.132 Calculations. (a) Duty-cycle emissions. This section describes the calculation of duty-cycle emissions, in terms of grams per brake... duty-cycle emission test results are calculated as follows: (1)(i)...

  14. 40 CFR 92.132 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.132 Calculations. (a) Duty-cycle emissions. This section describes the calculation of duty-cycle emissions, in terms of grams per brake... duty-cycle emission test results are calculated as follows: (1)(i)...

  15. 40 CFR 92.132 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.132 Calculations. (a) Duty-cycle emissions. This section describes the calculation of duty-cycle emissions, in terms of grams per brake... duty-cycle emission test results are calculated as follows: (1)(i)...

  16. 40 CFR 92.132 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.132 Calculations. (a) Duty-cycle emissions. This section describes the calculation of duty-cycle emissions, in terms of grams per brake... duty-cycle emission test results are calculated as follows: (1)(i)...

  17. Material behavior under complex loading

    SciTech Connect

    Breuer, H.J.; Raule, G.; Rodig, M.

    1984-09-01

    Studies of material behavior under complex loading form a bridge between standard material testing methods and the stress analysis calculations for reactor components at high temperatures. The aim of these studies is to determine the influence of typical load change sequences on material properties, to derive the equations required for stress analyses, to carry out tests under multiaxial conditions, and to investigate the structural deformation mechanisms of creep buckling and ratcheting. The present state of the investigations within the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor materials program is described, with emphasis on the experimental apparatus, the scope of the program, and the initial results obtained.

  18. 24 CFR 3280.402 - Test procedures for roof trusses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... uplift load in paragraph (d)(3)(i) for Wind Zone I and to 2.0 times the uplift load minus the dead load... procedures are required for new truss designs in all three wind zones and for existing truss designs used in Wind Zones II and III. (b) General. Trusses must be tested in a truss test fixture that replicates...

  19. Resonant loading of aircraft secondary structure panels for use with thermoelastic stress analysis and digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waugh, Rachael C.; Dulieu-Barton, Janice M.; Quinn, S.

    2015-03-01

    Thermoelastic stress analysis (TSA) is an established active thermographic approach which uses the thermoelastic effect to correlate the temperature change that occurs as a material is subjected to elastic cyclic loading to the sum of the principal stresses on the surface of the component. Digital image correlation (DIC) tracks features on the surface of a material to establish a displacement field of a component subjected to load, which can then be used to calculate the strain field. The application of both DIC and TSA on a composite plate representative of aircraft secondary structure subject to resonant frequency loading using a portable loading device, i.e. `remote loading' is described. Laboratory based loading for TSA and DIC is typically imparted using a test machine, however in the current work a vibration loading system is used which is able to excite the component of interest at resonant frequency which enables TSA and DIC to be carried out. The accuracy of the measurements made under remote loading of both of the optical techniques applied is discussed. The data are compared to extract complimentary information from the two techniques. This work forms a step towards a combined strain based non-destructive evaluation procedure able to identify and quantify the effect of defects more fully, particularly when examining component performance in service applications.

  20. Maximizing TDRS Command Load Lifetime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Aaron J.

    2002-01-01

    The GNC software onboard ISS utilizes TORS command loads, and a simplistic model of TORS orbital motion to generate onboard TORS state vectors. Each TORS command load contains five "invariant" orbital elements which serve as inputs to the onboard propagation algorithm. These elements include semi-major axis, inclination, time of last ascending node crossing, right ascension of ascending node, and mean motion. Running parallel to the onboard software is the TORS Command Builder Tool application, located in the JSC Mission Control Center. The TORS Command Builder Tool is responsible for building the TORS command loads using a ground TORS state vector, mirroring the onboard propagation algorithm, and assessing the fidelity of current TORS command loads onboard ISS. The tool works by extracting a ground state vector at a given time from a current TORS ephemeris, and then calculating the corresponding "onboard" TORS state vector at the same time using the current onboard TORS command load. The tool then performs a comparison between these two vectors and displays the relative differences in the command builder tool GUI. If the RSS position difference between these two vectors exceeds the tolerable lim its, a new command load is built using the ground state vector and uplinked to ISS. A command load's lifetime is therefore defined as the time from when a command load is built to the time the RSS position difference exceeds the tolerable limit. From the outset of TORS command load operations (STS-98), command load lifetime was limited to approximately one week due to the simplicity of both the onboard propagation algorithm, and the algorithm used by the command builder tool to generate the invariant orbital elements. It was soon desired to extend command load lifetime in order to minimize potential risk due to frequent ISS commanding. Initial studies indicated that command load lifetime was most sensitive to changes in mean motion. Finding a suitable value for mean motion

  1. 46 CFR 172.225 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... condition of loading and operation, assuming the damage specified in § 172.230. (b) When doing the calculations required by paragraph (a) of this section, the virtual increase in the vertical center of gravity... center of gravity of the liquid by the moment of transference method. (c) In calculating the free...

  2. 46 CFR 172.225 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... condition of loading and operation, assuming the damage specified in § 172.230. (b) When doing the calculations required by paragraph (a) of this section, the virtual increase in the vertical center of gravity... center of gravity of the liquid by the moment of transference method. (c) In calculating the free...

  3. Standardized loads acting in knee implants.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Georg; Bender, Alwina; Graichen, Friedmar; Dymke, Jörn; Rohlmann, Antonius; Trepczynski, Adam; Heller, Markus O; Kutzner, Ines

    2014-01-01

    The loads acting in knee joints must be known for improving joint replacement, surgical procedures, physiotherapy, biomechanical computer simulations, and to advise patients with osteoarthritis or fractures about what activities to avoid. Such data would also allow verification of test standards for knee implants. This work analyzes data from 8 subjects with instrumented knee implants, which allowed measuring the contact forces and moments acting in the joint. The implants were powered inductively and the loads transmitted at radio frequency. The time courses of forces and moments during walking, stair climbing, and 6 more activities were averaged for subjects with I) average body weight and average load levels and II) high body weight and high load levels. During all investigated activities except jogging, the high force levels reached 3,372-4,218N. During slow jogging, they were up to 5,165N. The peak torque around the implant stem during walking was 10.5 Nm, which was higher than during all other activities including jogging. The transverse forces and the moments varied greatly between the subjects, especially during non-cyclic activities. The high load levels measured were mostly above those defined in the wear test ISO 14243. The loads defined in the ISO test standard should be adapted to the levels reported here. The new data will allow realistic investigations and improvements of joint replacement, surgical procedures for tendon repair, treatment of fractures, and others. Computer models of the load conditions in the lower extremities will become more realistic if the new data is used as a gold standard. However, due to the extreme individual variations of some load components, even the reported average load profiles can most likely not explain every failure of an implant or a surgical procedure.

  4. Standardized loads acting in knee implants.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Georg; Bender, Alwina; Graichen, Friedmar; Dymke, Jörn; Rohlmann, Antonius; Trepczynski, Adam; Heller, Markus O; Kutzner, Ines

    2014-01-01

    The loads acting in knee joints must be known for improving joint replacement, surgical procedures, physiotherapy, biomechanical computer simulations, and to advise patients with osteoarthritis or fractures about what activities to avoid. Such data would also allow verification of test standards for knee implants. This work analyzes data from 8 subjects with instrumented knee implants, which allowed measuring the contact forces and moments acting in the joint. The implants were powered inductively and the loads transmitted at radio frequency. The time courses of forces and moments during walking, stair climbing, and 6 more activities were averaged for subjects with I) average body weight and average load levels and II) high body weight and high load levels. During all investigated activities except jogging, the high force levels reached 3,372-4,218N. During slow jogging, they were up to 5,165N. The peak torque around the implant stem during walking was 10.5 Nm, which was higher than during all other activities including jogging. The transverse forces and the moments varied greatly between the subjects, especially during non-cyclic activities. The high load levels measured were mostly above those defined in the wear test ISO 14243. The loads defined in the ISO test standard should be adapted to the levels reported here. The new data will allow realistic investigations and improvements of joint replacement, surgical procedures for tendon repair, treatment of fractures, and others. Computer models of the load conditions in the lower extremities will become more realistic if the new data is used as a gold standard. However, due to the extreme individual variations of some load components, even the reported average load profiles can most likely not explain every failure of an implant or a surgical procedure. PMID:24465856

  5. Factory Acceptance Test Procedure Westinghouse 100 ton Hydraulic Trailer

    SciTech Connect

    Aftanas, B.L.

    1994-11-16

    This Factory Acceptance Test Procedure (FAT) is for the Westinghouse 100 Ton Hydraulic Trailer. The trailer will be used for the removal of the 101-SY pump. This procedure includes: safety check and safety procedures; pre-operation check out; startup; leveling trailer; functional/proofload test; proofload testing; and rolling load test.

  6. Noninvasive Failure Load Prediction of Vertebrae with Simulated Lytic Defects and Biomaterial Augmentation.

    PubMed

    Giambini, Hugo; Fang, Zhong; Zeng, Heng; Camp, Jon J; Yaszemski, Michael J; Lu, Lichun

    2016-08-01

    The spine is the most common site for secondary bone metastases, and clinical management for fractures is based on size and geometry of the defect. About 75% of the bone needs to be damaged before lesions are detectable, so clinical tools should measure changes in both geometry and material properties. We have developed an automated, user-friendly, Spine Cancer Assessment (SCA) image-based analysis method that builds on a platform designed for clinical practice providing failure characteristics of vertebrae. The objectives of this study were to (1) validate SCA predictions with experimental failure load outcomes; (2) evaluate the planning capabilities for prophylactic vertebroplasty procedures; and (3) investigate the effect of computed tomography (CT) protocols on predicted failure loads. Twenty-one vertebrae were randomly divided into two groups: (1) simulated defect without treatment (negative control) [n = 9] and (2) with treatment [n = 12]. Defects were created and a polymeric biomaterial was injected into the vertebrae in the treated-defect group. Spines were scanned, reconstructed with two algorithms, and analyzed for fracture loads. To virtually plan for prophylactic intervention, vertebrae with empty lesions were simulated to be augmented with either poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) or a novel bone replacement copolymer, poly(propylene fumarate-co-caprolactone) [P(PF-co-CL)]. Axial rigidities were calculated from the CT images. Failure loads, determined from the cross section with the lowest axial rigidity, were compared with experimental values. Predicted loads correlated well with experimental outcomes (R(2) = 0.73, p < 0.0001). Predictions from negative control specimens highly correlated with measured values (R(2) = 0.90, p < 0.0001). Although a similar correlation was obtained using both algorithms, the smooth reconstruction (B30) tended to underestimate predicted failure loads by ∼50% compared with the ∼10% underestimate

  7. Noninvasive Failure Load Prediction of Vertebrae with Simulated Lytic Defects and Biomaterial Augmentation.

    PubMed

    Giambini, Hugo; Fang, Zhong; Zeng, Heng; Camp, Jon J; Yaszemski, Michael J; Lu, Lichun

    2016-08-01

    The spine is the most common site for secondary bone metastases, and clinical management for fractures is based on size and geometry of the defect. About 75% of the bone needs to be damaged before lesions are detectable, so clinical tools should measure changes in both geometry and material properties. We have developed an automated, user-friendly, Spine Cancer Assessment (SCA) image-based analysis method that builds on a platform designed for clinical practice providing failure characteristics of vertebrae. The objectives of this study were to (1) validate SCA predictions with experimental failure load outcomes; (2) evaluate the planning capabilities for prophylactic vertebroplasty procedures; and (3) investigate the effect of computed tomography (CT) protocols on predicted failure loads. Twenty-one vertebrae were randomly divided into two groups: (1) simulated defect without treatment (negative control) [n = 9] and (2) with treatment [n = 12]. Defects were created and a polymeric biomaterial was injected into the vertebrae in the treated-defect group. Spines were scanned, reconstructed with two algorithms, and analyzed for fracture loads. To virtually plan for prophylactic intervention, vertebrae with empty lesions were simulated to be augmented with either poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) or a novel bone replacement copolymer, poly(propylene fumarate-co-caprolactone) [P(PF-co-CL)]. Axial rigidities were calculated from the CT images. Failure loads, determined from the cross section with the lowest axial rigidity, were compared with experimental values. Predicted loads correlated well with experimental outcomes (R(2) = 0.73, p < 0.0001). Predictions from negative control specimens highly correlated with measured values (R(2) = 0.90, p < 0.0001). Although a similar correlation was obtained using both algorithms, the smooth reconstruction (B30) tended to underestimate predicted failure loads by ∼50% compared with the ∼10% underestimate

  8. Practical Power System Aggregation Considering Dynamic Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagishi, Yoshio; Komami, Shintaro

    This paper presents a practical method for creating power system equivalents that can be used in power system stability analysis. The proposed method uses three branches to connect the boundary bus, generator, and load. The method is suitable to consider reactance from the boundary bus to the load for power system stability studies using a dynamic load model. Furthermore, this paper presents a practical procedure to determine the parameters of the aggregated generator, including control devices such as excitation systems, PSS (power system stabilizer), and speed governors. The quality of the various aggregation models is verified using power system stability simulations.

  9. 46 CFR 154.408 - Cargo tank external pressure load.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo tank external pressure load. 154.408 Section 154... Equipment Cargo Containment Systems § 154.408 Cargo tank external pressure load. For the calculation required under § 154.406 (a)(2) and (b), the external pressure load must be the difference between...

  10. 46 CFR 154.408 - Cargo tank external pressure load.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo tank external pressure load. 154.408 Section 154... Equipment Cargo Containment Systems § 154.408 Cargo tank external pressure load. For the calculation required under § 154.406 (a)(2) and (b), the external pressure load must be the difference between...

  11. 46 CFR 154.411 - Cargo tank thermal loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo tank thermal loads. 154.411 Section 154.411... Containment Systems § 154.411 Cargo tank thermal loads. For the calculations required under § 154.406(a)(4... thermal loads for the cooling down periods of cargo tanks for design temperatures lower than −55 °C...

  12. 46 CFR 154.411 - Cargo tank thermal loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cargo tank thermal loads. 154.411 Section 154.411... Containment Systems § 154.411 Cargo tank thermal loads. For the calculations required under § 154.406(a)(4... thermal loads for the cooling down periods of cargo tanks for design temperatures lower than −55 °C...

  13. 46 CFR 154.411 - Cargo tank thermal loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cargo tank thermal loads. 154.411 Section 154.411... Containment Systems § 154.411 Cargo tank thermal loads. For the calculations required under § 154.406(a)(4... thermal loads for the cooling down periods of cargo tanks for design temperatures lower than −55 °C...

  14. 46 CFR 154.411 - Cargo tank thermal loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo tank thermal loads. 154.411 Section 154.411... Containment Systems § 154.411 Cargo tank thermal loads. For the calculations required under § 154.406(a)(4... thermal loads for the cooling down periods of cargo tanks for design temperatures lower than −55 °C...

  15. 46 CFR 154.411 - Cargo tank thermal loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo tank thermal loads. 154.411 Section 154.411... Containment Systems § 154.411 Cargo tank thermal loads. For the calculations required under § 154.406(a)(4... thermal loads for the cooling down periods of cargo tanks for design temperatures lower than −55 °C...

  16. 46 CFR 154.410 - Cargo tank sloshing loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo tank sloshing loads. 154.410 Section 154.410... Containment Systems § 154.410 Cargo tank sloshing loads. (a) For the calculation required under § 154.406 (a... be specially approved by the Commandant (CG-522). (b) If the sloshing loads affect the cargo...

  17. 49 CFR 533.6 - Measurement and calculation procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... set forth in 40 CFR part 600. For model years 2017 to 2025, a manufacturer is eligible to increase the... 40 CFR part 600, including any adjustments to fuel economy EPA allows, such as for fuel consumption... made to EPA in accordance with 40 CFR Part 86.1869-12 and an approval granted by EPA made...

  18. 49 CFR 531.6 - Measurement and calculation procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... under 49 U.S.C. 32904 and set forth in 40 CFR part 600. For model years 2017 to 2025, a manufacturer is... established by EPA set forth in 40 CFR part 600, including any adjustments to fuel economy EPA allows, such as...-cycle technology requires an application request made to EPA in accordance with 40 CFR Part...

  19. A calculation procedure for viscous flow in turbomachines, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khalil, J.; Tabakoff, W.

    1980-01-01

    Turbulent flow within turbomachines having arbitrary blade geometries is examined. Effects of turbulence are modeled using two equations, one expressing the development of the turbulence kinetic energy and the other its dissipation rate. To account for complicated blade geometries, the flow equations are formulated in terms of a nonorthogonal boundary fitted coordinate system. The analysis is applied to a radial inflow turbine. The solution obtained indicates the severity of the complex interaction mechanism that occurs between the different flow regimes (i.e., boundary layers, recirculating eddies, separation zones, etc.). Comparison with nonviscous flow solutions tend to justify strongly the inadequacy of using the latter with standard boundary layer techniques to obtain viscous flow details within turbomachine rotors. Capabilities and limitations of the present method of analysis are discussed.

  20. 49 CFR 535.6 - Measurement and calculation procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... of aerodynamic drag in accordance with 40 CFR 1037.520 and 1037.521. Do not use for vocational... fleet should be divided into test groups or subconfigurations according to EPA in 40 CFR part 86, subpart S, and 40 CFR 1037.104. (3) Test and measure the CO2 emissions test results for the...

  1. 49 CFR 531.6 - Measurement and calculation procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... under 49 U.S.C. 32904 and set forth in 40 CFR part 600. For model years 2017 to 2025, a manufacturer is... established by EPA set forth in 40 CFR part 600, including any adjustments to fuel economy EPA allows, such as...-cycle technology requires an application request made to EPA in accordance with 40 CFR Part...

  2. 49 CFR 533.6 - Measurement and calculation procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... under the CAFE program for those technologies. For off-cycle technologies which are covered under 40 CFR... set forth in 40 CFR part 600. For model years 2017 to 2025, a manufacturer is eligible to increase the... 40 CFR part 600, including any adjustments to fuel economy EPA allows, such as for fuel...

  3. 49 CFR 535.6 - Measurement and calculation procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... manufacturer's fleet includes conventional and advanced technology heavy-duty pickup trucks and vans, the fleet... fleet and all of the advanced technology vehicles in the other fleet. (2) Vehicles in each fleet should... consumption results for all vehicle chassis (conventional, alternative fueled and advanced technology...

  4. 49 CFR 535.6 - Measurement and calculation procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... manufacturer's fleet includes conventional and advanced technology heavy-duty pickup trucks and vans, the fleet... fleet and all of the advanced technology vehicles in the other fleet. (2) Vehicles in each fleet should... consumption results for all vehicle chassis (conventional, alternative fueled and advanced technology...

  5. 49 CFR 535.6 - Measurement and calculation procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... manufacturer's fleet includes conventional and advanced technology heavy-duty pickup trucks and vans, the fleet... fleet and all of the advanced technology vehicles in the other fleet. (2) Vehicles in each fleet should... consumption results for all vehicle chassis (conventional, alternative fueled and advanced technology...

  6. 49 CFR 531.6 - Measurement and calculation procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the Act and set forth in 40 CFR part 600. (b) A manufacturer that is eligible to elect a model year in... TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PASSENGER AUTOMOBILE AVERAGE FUEL ECONOMY... automobiles that are manufactured by a manufacturer in a model year shall be determined in accordance...

  7. 49 CFR 1141.1 - Procedures to calculate interest rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... Prime Rate as published by The Wall Street Journal. The rate levels will be determined as follows: (1... Street Journal in effect on the date the statement is filed accounting for all amounts received under the... by The Wall Street Journal in effect on the day when the unlawful charge is paid. The interest...

  8. Global Earth Response to Loading by Ocean Tide Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, R. H.; Strayer, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    Mathematical and programming techniques to numerically calculate Earth response to global semidiurnal and diurnal ocean tide models were developed. Global vertical crustal deformations were evaluated for M sub 2, S sub 2, N sub 2, K sub 2, K sub 1, O sub 1, and P sub 1 ocean tide loading, while horizontal deformations were evaluated for the M sub 2 tidal load. Tidal gravity calculations were performed for M sub 2 tidal loads, and strain tensor elements were evaluated for M sub 2 loads. The M sub 2 solution used for the ocean tide included the effects of self-gravitation and crustal loading.

  9. Proposed design procedure for transmission shafting under fatigue loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, S. H.

    1978-01-01

    A new standard for the design of transmission shafting is reported. Computed was the diameter of rotating solid steel shafts under combined cyclic bending and steady torsion is presented. The formula is based on an elliptical variation of endurance strength with torque exhibited by combined stress fatigue data. Fatigue factors are cited to correct specimen bending endurance strength data for use in the shaft formula. A design example illustrates how the method is to be applied.

  10. 40 CFR 53.65 - Test procedure: Loading test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... operating manual referred to in section 7.4.18 of 40 CFR part 50, appendix L. (3) Determine the preweight of... used to efficiently deagglomerate the bulk test dust and transform it into an aerosol cloud. Other dust... dust cloud. (i) Generate a dust cloud composed of Arizona test dust. (ii) Introduce the dust cloud...

  11. 40 CFR 53.65 - Test procedure: Loading test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... operating manual referred to in section 7.4.18 of 40 CFR part 50, appendix L. (3) Determine the preweight of... Incorporated (Burnsville, MN). A fluidized bed aerosol generator, Wright dust feeder, or sonic nozzle shall...

  12. 40 CFR 53.65 - Test procedure: Loading test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... operating manual referred to in section 7.4.18 of 40 CFR part 50, appendix L. (3) Determine the preweight of... Incorporated (Burnsville, MN). A fluidized bed aerosol generator, Wright dust feeder, or sonic nozzle shall...

  13. 40 CFR 53.65 - Test procedure: Loading test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... operating manual referred to in section 7.4.18 of 40 CFR part 50, appendix L. (3) Determine the preweight of... Incorporated (Burnsville, MN). A fluidized bed aerosol generator, Wright dust feeder, or sonic nozzle shall...

  14. 10 CFR 474.4 - Test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ELECTRIC AND HYBRID VEHICLE RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, AND DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM; PETROLEUM-EQUIVALENT FUEL ECONOMY CALCULATION § 474.4 Test procedures. (a) The electric vehicle energy... required for testing the energy consumption of electric vehicles....

  15. 10 CFR 474.4 - Test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ELECTRIC AND HYBRID VEHICLE RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, AND DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM; PETROLEUM-EQUIVALENT FUEL ECONOMY CALCULATION § 474.4 Test procedures. (a) The electric vehicle energy... required for testing the energy consumption of electric vehicles....

  16. 10 CFR 474.4 - Test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ELECTRIC AND HYBRID VEHICLE RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, AND DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM; PETROLEUM-EQUIVALENT FUEL ECONOMY CALCULATION § 474.4 Test procedures. (a) The electric vehicle energy... required for testing the energy consumption of electric vehicles....

  17. Prediction of contact path and load sharing in spiral bevel gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bibel, George D.; Tiku, Karuna; Kumar, Ashok

    1994-01-01

    A procedure is presented to perform a contact analysis of spiral bevel gears in order to predict the contact path and the load sharing as the gears roll through mesh. The approach utilizes recent advances in automated contact methods for nonlinear finite element analysis. A sector of the pinion and gear is modeled consisting of three pinion teeth and four gear teeth in mesh. Calculation of the contact force and stresses through the gear meshing cycle are demonstrated. Summary of the results are presented using three dimensional plots and tables. Issues relating to solution convergence and requirements for running large finite element analysis on a supercomputer are discussed.

  18. HENRY'S LAW CALCULATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    On-Site was developed to provide modelers and model reviewers with prepackaged tools ("calculators") for performing site assessment calculations. The philosophy behind OnSite is that the convenience of the prepackaged calculators helps provide consistency for simple calculations,...

  19. Calculation methods for compressible turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.; Cary, A. M., Jr.; Harris, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    Calculation procedures for non-reacting compressible two- and three-dimensional turbulent boundary layers were reviewed. Integral, transformation and correlation methods, as well as finite difference solutions of the complete boundary layer equations summarized. Alternative numerical solution procedures were examined, and both mean field and mean turbulence field closure models were considered. Physics and related calculation problems peculiar to compressible turbulent boundary layers are described. A catalog of available solution procedures of the finite difference, finite element, and method of weighted residuals genre is included. Influence of compressibility, low Reynolds number, wall blowing, and pressure gradient upon mean field closure constants are reported.

  20. Development of a simplified procedure for cyclic structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.

    1984-01-01

    Development was extended of a simplified inelastic analysis computer program (ANSYMP) for predicting the stress-strain history at the critical location of a thermomechanically cycled structure from an elastic solution. The program uses an iterative and incremental procedure to estimate the plastic strains from the material stress-strain properties and a plasticity hardening model. Creep effects can be calculated on the basis of stress relaxation at constant strain, creep at constant stress, or a combination of stress relaxation and creep accumulation. The simplified method was exercised on a number of problems involving uniaxial and multiaxial loading, isothermal and nonisothermal conditions, dwell times at various points in the cycles, different materials, and kinematic hardening. Good agreement was found between these analytical results and nonlinear finite-element solutions for these problems. The simplified analysis program used less than 1 percent of the CPU time required for a nonlinear finite-element analysis.

  1. SURFACE FACILITY CRITICALITY SAFETY CALCULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    C.E. Sanders

    2004-03-02

    The purpose of this design calculation is to revise and update the previous criticality evaluation for the fuel handling, transfer and storage operations to be performed in the Surface Facility documented in BSC 2003c. The scope of this design calculation covers the operations in the Dry Transfer Facility (DTF) and Remediation Building (RB) and their processes as established at the date of this calculation. Also, this design calculation focuses on intact commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies, i.e., pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) SNF. A description of the changes is as follows: (1) Update the supporting calculations for the various Category 1 and 2 event sequences as identified in the ''Preliminary Categorization of Event Sequences for License Application'' (BSC 2003a, Section 7). (2) Include comments from an informal review conducted by Y-12, located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Su 2004). (3) Revise the BWR calculations to reflect a different Boral loading. (4) Assess effects of potential moderator intrusion into the storage rack area with various water levels for defense in depth based on the new design of the DTF and RB.

  2. Development of Fast-Running Simulation Methodology Using Neural Networks for Load Follow Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Seong, Seung-Hwan; Park, Heui-Youn; Kim, Dong-Hoon; Suh, Yong-Suk; Hur, Seop; Koo, In-Soo; Lee, Un-Chul; Jang, Jin-Wook; Shin, Yong-Chul

    2002-05-15

    A new fast-running analytic model has been developed for analyzing the load follow operation. The new model was based on the neural network theory, which has the capability of modeling the input/output relationships of a nonlinear system. The new model is made up of two error back-propagation neural networks and procedures to calculate core parameters, such as the distributions and density of xenon in a quasi-steady-state core like load follow operation. One neural network is designed to retrieve the axial offset of power distribution, and the other is for reactivity corresponding to a given core condition. The training data sets for learning the neural networks in the new model are generated with a three-dimensional nodal code and, also, the measured data of the first-day test of load follow operation. Using the new model, the simulation results of the 5-day load follow test in a pressurized water reactor show a good agreement between the simulation data and the actual measured data. Required computing time for simulating a load follow operation is comparable to that of a fast-running lumped model. Moreover, the new model does not require additional engineering factors to compensate for the difference between the actual measurements and analysis results because the neural network has the inherent learning capability of neural networks to new situations.

  3. A NASTRAN DMAP alter for linear buckling analysis under dynamic loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aiello, Robert A.; Grady, Joseph E.

    1989-01-01

    A modification to the NASTRAN solution sequence for transient analysis with direct time integration (COSMIC NASTRAN rigid format 9) was developed and incorporated into a DMAP alter. This DMAP alter calculates the buckling stability of a dynamically loaded structure, and is used to predict the onset of structural buckling under stress-wave loading conditions. The modified solution sequence incorporates the linear buckling analysis capability (rigid format 5) of NASTRAN into the existing Transient solution rigid format in such a way as to provide a time dependent eigensolution which is used to assess the buckling stability of the structure as it responds to the impulsive load. As a demonstration of the validity of this modified solution procedure, the dynamic buckling of a prismatic bar subjected to an impulsive longitudinal compression is analyzed and compared to the known theoretical solution. In addition, a dynamic buckling analysis is performed for the analytically less tractable problem of the localized dynamic buckling of an initially flawed composite laminate under transverse impact loading. The addition of this DMAP alter to the transient solution sequence in NASTRAN facilitates the computational prediction of both the time at which the onset of dynamic buckling occurs in an impulsively loaded structure, and the dynamic buckling mode shapes of that structure.

  4. 40 CFR 1065.850 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Calculations. 1065.850 Section 1065.850 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Testing With Oxygenated Fuels § 1065.850 Calculations. Use the...

  5. 40 CFR 1065.850 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Calculations. 1065.850 Section 1065.850 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Testing With Oxygenated Fuels § 1065.850 Calculations. Use the...

  6. 40 CFR 1065.850 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Calculations. 1065.850 Section 1065.850 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Testing With Oxygenated Fuels § 1065.850 Calculations. Use the...

  7. 40 CFR 1065.850 - Calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Calculations. 1065.850 Section 1065.850 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Testing With Oxygenated Fuels § 1065.850 Calculations. Use the...

  8. 47 CFR 65.306 - Calculation accuracy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Calculation accuracy. 65.306 Section 65.306 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERSTATE RATE OF RETURN PRESCRIPTION PROCEDURES AND METHODOLOGIES Exchange Carriers § 65.306 Calculation...

  9. Unravelling the Mysteries of Expert Mental Calculation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hope, Jack A.

    1985-01-01

    The processes and procedures used by expert mental calculators are identified from a literature review. Experts are characterized by knowledge of a variety of methods, ability to recall numerical equivalents, and ability to remember the numbers involved in various stages of calculations. (MNS)

  10. Immediate loading of implants in the edentulous maxilla.

    PubMed

    Bergkvist, Göran

    2008-01-01

    The overall aim of this thesis was to investigate different therapeutic strategies in treatment of the edentulous maxilla with dental implants and their importance for treatment outcome. The introduction of one-stage surgery, in place of two-stage surgery, was a paradigm shift in the area of implant treatment since submerged implant healing underneath the mucosa was considered a prerequisite for healing in the original concept. The advantages of a one-stage method are that a second surgery is unnecessary, costs are lower, and patients complain less about the surgical procedures. The development of implant treatment, regardless of whether it is performed in the mandible or the maxilla, strives to shorten the period from implant placement to implant loading. For the edentulous patient--due to esthetic, economical, or psychological reasons--shortening this time and thus avoiding a long period of wearing a transitional removable prosthesis is advantageous. Use of conventional one-stage surgery makes possible and is a prerequisite for immediate loading of implants. Successful treatment outcome has been demonstrated for immediate loading of implants in the mandible, but documentation of the method in the maxilla is still sparse. Two prospective clinical studies compared (i) one- and two-stage surgery and (ii) immediate and conventional loading in patients consecutively treated in the edentulous maxilla with implant-supported fixed prostheses. The first study found that the cumulative survival rate (CSR) after one-stage surgery performed according to a conventional protocol was consistent with two-stage protocol CSRs reported in previous studies. The second study evaluated an immediate loading protocol that provided patients with interim fixed prostheses within 24 hours after implant placement. A comparison of the studies found no significant difference in CSRs. But it was found that when a conventional protocol was used, transitional removable prostheses could traumatize

  11. ESTIMATING URBAN WET WEATHER POLLUTANT LOADING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents procedures for estimating pollutant loads emanating from wet-weather flow discharge in urban watersheds. Equations are presented for: annual volume of litter and floatables; the quantity of sand from highway runoff; the quantity of dust-and-dirt accumulation ...

  12. Closure and Sealing Design Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    T. Lahnalampi; J. Case

    2005-08-26

    The purpose of the ''Closure and Sealing Design Calculation'' is to illustrate closure and sealing methods for sealing shafts, ramps, and identify boreholes that require sealing in order to limit the potential of water infiltration. In addition, this calculation will provide a description of the magma that can reduce the consequences of an igneous event intersecting the repository. This calculation will also include a listing of the project requirements related to closure and sealing. The scope of this calculation is to: summarize applicable project requirements and codes relating to backfilling nonemplacement openings, removal of uncommitted materials from the subsurface, installation of drip shields, and erecting monuments; compile an inventory of boreholes that are found in the area of the subsurface repository; describe the magma bulkhead feature and location; and include figures for the proposed shaft and ramp seals. The objective of this calculation is to: categorize the boreholes for sealing by depth and proximity to the subsurface repository; develop drawing figures which show the location and geometry for the magma bulkhead; include the shaft seal figures and a proposed construction sequence; and include the ramp seal figure and a proposed construction sequence. The intent of this closure and sealing calculation is to support the License Application by providing a description of the closure and sealing methods for the Safety Analysis Report. The closure and sealing calculation will also provide input for Post Closure Activities by describing the location of the magma bulkhead. This calculation is limited to describing the final configuration of the sealing and backfill systems for the underground area. The methods and procedures used to place the backfill and remove uncommitted materials (such as concrete) from the repository and detailed design of the magma bulkhead will be the subject of separate analyses or calculations. Post-closure monitoring will not

  13. Load sensing system

    DOEpatents

    Sohns, Carl W.; Nodine, Robert N.; Wallace, Steven Allen

    1999-01-01

    A load sensing system inexpensively monitors the weight and temperature of stored nuclear material for long periods of time in widely variable environments. The system can include an electrostatic load cell that encodes weight and temperature into a digital signal which is sent to a remote monitor via a coaxial cable. The same cable is used to supply the load cell with power. When multiple load cells are used, vast

  14. The procedure safety system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, Maureen E.

    1990-01-01

    Telerobotic operations, whether under autonomous or teleoperated control, require a much more sophisticated safety system than that needed for most industrial applications. Industrial robots generally perform very repetitive tasks in a controlled, static environment. The safety system in that case can be as simple as shutting down the robot if a human enters the work area, or even simply building a cage around the work space. Telerobotic operations, however, will take place in a dynamic, sometimes unpredictable environment, and will involve complicated and perhaps unrehearsed manipulations. This creates a much greater potential for damage to the robot or objects in its vicinity. The Procedural Safety System (PSS) collects data from external sensors and the robot, then processes it through an expert system shell to determine whether an unsafe condition or potential unsafe condition exists. Unsafe conditions could include exceeding velocity, acceleration, torque, or joint limits, imminent collision, exceeding temperature limits, and robot or sensor component failure. If a threat to safety exists, the operator is warned. If the threat is serious enough, the robot is halted. The PSS, therefore, uses expert system technology to enhance safety thus reducing operator work load, allowing him/her to focus on performing the task at hand without the distraction of worrying about violating safety criteria.

  15. Load forecasting by ANN

    SciTech Connect

    Highley, D.D.; Hilmes, T.J. )

    1993-07-01

    This article discusses the use and training of artificial neural networks (ANNs) for load forecasting. The topics of the article include a brief overview of neural networks, interest in ANNs, training of neural networks, a case study in load forecasting, and the potential for using an artificial neural network to perform short-term load forecasting.

  16. Discharge circuits and loads

    SciTech Connect

    Sarjeant, W.J.

    1980-10-15

    This will be an overview in which some of the general properties of loads are examined: their interface with the energy storage and switching devices; general problems encountered with different types of loads; how load behavior and fault modes can impact on the design of a power conditioning system (PCS).

  17. Heat Load Estimator for Smoothing Pulsed Heat Loads on Supercritical Helium Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoa, C.; Lagier, B.; Rousset, B.; Bonnay, P.; Michel, F.

    Superconducting magnets for fusion are subjected to large variations of heat loads due to cycling operation of tokamaks. The cryogenic system shall operate smoothly to extract the pulsed heat loads by circulating supercritical helium into the coils and structures. However the value of the total heat loads and its temporal variation are not known before the plasma scenario starts. A real-time heat load estimator is of interest for the process control of the cryogenic system in order to anticipate the arrival of pulsed heat loads to the refrigerator and finally to optimize the operation of the cryogenic system. The large variation of the thermal loads affects the physical parameters of the supercritical helium loop (pressure, temperature, mass flow) so those signals can be used for calculating instantaneously the loads deposited into the loop. The methodology and algorithm are addressed in the article for estimating the heat load deposition before it reaches the refrigerator. The CEA patented process control has been implemented in a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) and has been successfully validated on the HELIOS test facility at CEA Grenoble. This heat load estimator is complementary to pulsed load smoothing strategies providing an estimation of the optimized refrigeration power. It can also effectively improve the process control during the transient between different operating modes by adjusting the refrigeration power to the need. This way, the heat load estimator participates to the safe operation of the cryogenic system.

  18. Probabilistic load model development and validation for composite load spectra for select space propulsion engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, R.; Newell, J. F.

    1987-01-01

    A major task of the program to develop an expert system to predict the loads on selected components of a generic space propulsion engine is the design development and application of a probabilitic loads model. This model is being developed in order to account for the random nature of the loads and assess the variable load ranges' effect on the engine performance. A probabilistic model has been developed. The model is based primarily on simulation methods, but also has a Gaussian algebra method (if all variables are near normal), a fast probability integrator routine (for the calculation of low probability events), and a separate, stand alone program for performing barrier crossing calculations. Each of these probabilistic methods has been verified with theoretical calculations using assumed distributional forms.

  19. 40 CFR 86.244-94 - Calculations; exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... New Medium-Duty Passenger Vehicles; Cold Temperature Test Procedures § 86.244-94 Calculations; exhaust.... Should NOX measurements be calculated, note that the humidity correction factor is not valid at...

  20. 40 CFR 86.244-94 - Calculations; exhaust emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... New Medium-Duty Passenger Vehicles; Cold Temperature Test Procedures § 86.244-94 Calculations; exhaust.... Should NOX measurements be calculated, note that the humidity correction factor is not valid at...

  1. G&T adds versatile load management system

    SciTech Connect

    Nickel, J.R.; Baker, E.D.; Holt, J.W.; Chan, M.L.

    1995-04-01

    Wolverine`s load management system was designed in response to the need to reduce peak demand. The Energy Management System (EMS) prepares short term (seven day) load forecasts, based on a daily peak demand forecst, augmented by a similar day profile based on weather conditions. The software combines the similar day profile with the daily peak demand forecast to yield an hourly load forecast for an entire week. The software uses the accepted load forecast case in many application functions, including interchange scheduling, unit commitment, and transaction evaluation. In real time, the computer updates the accepted forecast hourly, based in actual changes in the weather and load. The load management program executes hourly. The program uses impact curves to calculate a load management strategy that reduces the load forecast below a desired load threshold.

  2. Strength of concrete structures under dynamic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumpyak, O. G.; Galyautdinov, Z. R.; Kokorin, D. N.

    2016-01-01

    The use of elastic supports is one the efficient methods of decreasing the dynamic loading. The paper describes the influence of elastic supports on the stress-strain state of steel concrete structures exposed to one-time dynamic loading resulting in failure. Oblique bending beams on elastic supports and their elastic, elastoplastic, and elastoplastic consolidation behavior are considered in this paper. For numerical calculations the developed computer program is used based on the finite element method. Research findings prove high efficiency of elastic supports under dynamic loading conditions. The most effective behavior of elastic supports is demonstrated at the elastoplastic stage. A good agreement is observed between the theoretical and experimental results.

  3. 23 CFR 650.313 - Inspection procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... member and underwater inspection. (c) Rate each bridge as to its safe load-carrying capacity in... standard State or Federal agency forms. (e) Identify bridges with FCMs, bridges requiring underwater.... Inspect FCMs according to these procedures. (2) Bridges requiring underwater inspections. Identify...

  4. Load interaction effects on fatigue crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoychev, Stoyan Ivanov

    The fatigue crack propagation rate can be either increased or decreased by the previous load history (overload, block loading, different load ratio, etc.). Currently, these load sequence effects can be explained either by using crack closure or internal stress concepts. They are studied in Part I and II of the dissertation accordingly. In Part I, the last 35 years of research in the crack closure area were carefully reviewed. A new Quadrature (Q) method for crack closure estimation, based on integration rather than differentiation of the load-displacement data, was developed and compared to the 'best' methods from the literature. The new method was able to reduce the scatter in the opening load estimations to a negligible level, but does not collapse the results for different load ratios (0.1 and 0.9). In Part II a general relationship between fatigue crack growth rate (da/dN) and the two-parameter (DeltaKtip and tipKmax) crack driving force was derived using fundamental fatigue (ε-N curve) properties. Based on this analysis, a new way of representing the da/dN data by means of the crack propagation (CP) table was proposed. In order to make the CP table sensitive to the load history effects, it was scaled using the applied and internal stresses and the corresponding stress intensity factors, characteristic for the crack tip. Two methods for calculating the internal stress intensity factors were developed, adopting the weight function and the new clamping force concepts accordingly. Finally, the CP table at the crack tip was successfully used together with the two-parameter crack driving force equation to predict da/dN for different load ratios, block loading and a single overload. Calculation of the crack closure was not needed in order to predict the experimental data accurately.

  5. Program Implements Variable-Sampling Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Zhaofeng

    1995-01-01

    MIL-STD-414 Variable Sampling Procedures (M414) computer program developed to automate calculations and acceptance/rejection procedures of MIL-STD-414, "Sampling Procedures and Tables for Inspection by Variables for Percent Defective." M414 automates entire calculation-and-decision process by use of computational algorithms determining threshold acceptability values for lots. Menu-driven and user-friendly. Reduces burden of manual operations, promoting variable-sampling practice in industry in lieu of "go/no-go" inspection. Written in BASIC.

  6. Load Model Data Tool

    2013-04-30

    The LMDT software automates the process of the load composite model data preparation in the format supported by the major power system software vendors (GE and Siemens). Proper representation of the load composite model in power system dynamic analysis is very important. Software tools for power system simulation like GE PSLF and Siemens PSSE already include algorithms for the load composite modeling. However, these tools require that the input information on composite load to bemore » provided in custom formats. Preparation of this data is time consuming and requires multiple manual operations. The LMDT software enables to automate this process. Software is designed to generate composite load model data. It uses the default load composition data, motor information, and bus information as an input. Software processes the input information and produces load composition model. Generated model can be stored in .dyd format supported by GE PSLF package or .dyr format supported by Siemens PSSE package.« less

  7. Load Model Data Tool

    SciTech Connect

    David Chassin, Pavel Etingov

    2013-04-30

    The LMDT software automates the process of the load composite model data preparation in the format supported by the major power system software vendors (GE and Siemens). Proper representation of the load composite model in power system dynamic analysis is very important. Software tools for power system simulation like GE PSLF and Siemens PSSE already include algorithms for the load composite modeling. However, these tools require that the input information on composite load to be provided in custom formats. Preparation of this data is time consuming and requires multiple manual operations. The LMDT software enables to automate this process. Software is designed to generate composite load model data. It uses the default load composition data, motor information, and bus information as an input. Software processes the input information and produces load composition model. Generated model can be stored in .dyd format supported by GE PSLF package or .dyr format supported by Siemens PSSE package.

  8. [Hygienic assessment of innovation procedures for lesson scheduling at school].

    PubMed

    Stepanova, M I; Sazaniuk, Z I; Polenova, M A

    2012-01-01

    Hygienic assessment has established that education, by using innovation procedures for school lesson scheduling, diminishes the weariness of a schooling load and optimizes the pupils' psychosomatic status and school routine.

  9. [Hygienic assessment of innovation procedures for lesson scheduling at school].

    PubMed

    Stepanova, M I; Sazaniuk, Z I; Polenova, M A

    2012-01-01

    Hygienic assessment has established that education, by using innovation procedures for school lesson scheduling, diminishes the weariness of a schooling load and optimizes the pupils' psychosomatic status and school routine. PMID:22712330

  10. Modelling of heavily loaded lubricated contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, Farshid; McClug, William D., Jr.; Kim, Kyung-Hoon; Osborn, Kevin; Lance, Brian

    1992-02-01

    Thermal elastohydrodynamic (EHD) lubrication of rolling/sliding line contacts is investigated to develop an interactive computer program for prediction of lubrication system performance. The user inputs lubricant and mechanical system physical properties as well as operating conditions of load and speed for calculation of contact zone pressure, temperature, traction, and stresses. This program is one of the first to include thermal effects in calculations and, therefore, can more accurately assess the critical tribological performance parameters at high load and speed conditions than previous prediction models. The program is written in the FORTRAN language and utilizes a UNIX operating system for high quality graphic output allowing easy visualization of results.

  11. 40 CFR 85.2216 - Loaded test-EPA 81.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Loaded test-EPA 81. 85.2216 Section 85...) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM MOBILE SOURCES Emission Control System Performance Warranty Short Tests § 85.2216 Loaded test—EPA 81. (a)(1) General calendar year applicability. The test procedure described...

  12. 40 CFR 92.106 - Equipment for loading the engine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....106 Section 92.106 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.106...: electrical resistance load bank; fans or other means for cooling of the load bank; wattmeter, including...

  13. 40 CFR 92.106 - Equipment for loading the engine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....106 Section 92.106 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.106...: electrical resistance load bank; fans or other means for cooling of the load bank; wattmeter, including...

  14. 40 CFR 92.106 - Equipment for loading the engine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....106 Section 92.106 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.106...: electrical resistance load bank; fans or other means for cooling of the load bank; wattmeter, including...

  15. Fatigue life prediction under service load considering strengthening effect of loads below fatigue limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lihui; Zheng, Songlin; Feng, Jinzhi

    2014-11-01

    Lightweight design requires an accurate life prediction for structures and components under service loading histories. However, predicted life with the existing methods seems too conservative in some cases, leading to a heavy structure. Because these methods are established on the basis that load cycles would only cause fatigue damage, ignore the strengthening effect of loads. Based on Palmgren-Miner Rule (PMR), this paper introduces a new method for fatigue life prediction under service loadings by taking into account the strengthening effect of loads below the fatigue limit. In this method, the service loadings are classified into three categories: damaging load, strengthening load and none-effect load, and the process for fatigue life prediction is divided into two stages: stage I and stage II, according to the best strengthening number of cycles. During stage I, fatigue damage is calculated considering both the strengthening and damaging effect of load cycles. While during stage II, only the damaging effect is considered. To validate this method, fatigue lives of automobile half shaft and torsion beam rear axle are calculated based on the new method and traditional methods, such as PMR and Modified Miner Rule (MMR), and fatigue tests of the two components are conducted under service loading histories. The tests results show that the percentage errors of the predicted life with the new method to mean life of tests for the two components are -3.78% and -1.76% separately, much lesser than that with PMR and MMR. By considering the strengthening effect of loads below the fatigue limit, the new method can significantly improve the accuracy for fatigue life prediction. Thus lightweight design can be fully realized in the design stage.

  16. A universal procedure for evaluation and application of surge-protective devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The source, nature, and frequency of occurrence of transients must be identified and a representative standard test wave chosen for proof testing. The performance of candidate suppressor devices then can be evaluated against the withstand goals set for the equipment. The various suppressors divide into two classes of generic behavior. The key to a universal procedure for evaluating both classes lies in representing transients as quasi-current sources of defined current impulse duration. The available surge current is established by the Thevenin equivalent transient voltage and source impedance. A load line drawn on the V-I characteristic graph of the suppressor quickly determines the clamping voltage and peak current. These values then can be compared to the requirement. The deposited energy and average power dissipation for multiple transients also can be calculated. The method is illustrated with a design example for motor vehicle alternator load dump suppression.

  17. Practical applications of the R6 leak-before-break procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchard, P.J.

    1997-04-01

    A forthcoming revision to the R6 Leak-before-Break Assessment Procedure is briefly described. Practical application of the LbB concepts to safety-critical nuclear plant is illustrated by examples covering both low temperature and high temperature (>450{degrees}C) operating regimes. The examples highlight a number of issues which can make the development of a satisfactory LbB case problematic: for example, coping with highly loaded components, methodology assumptions and the definition of margins, the effect of crack closure owing to weld residual stresses, complex thermal stress fields or primary bending fields, the treatment of locally high stresses at crack intersections with free surfaces, the choice of local limit load solution when predicting ligament breakthrough, and the scope of calculations required to support even a simplified LbB case for high temperature steam pipe-work systems.

  18. Load controller and method to enhance effective capacity of a photovotaic power supply using a dynamically determined expected peak loading

    DOEpatents

    Perez, Richard

    2003-04-01

    A load controller and method are provided for maximizing effective capacity of a non-controllable, renewable power supply coupled to a variable electrical load also coupled to a conventional power grid. Effective capacity is enhanced by monitoring power output of the renewable supply and loading, and comparing the loading against the power output and a load adjustment threshold determined from an expected peak loading. A value for a load adjustment parameter is calculated by subtracting the renewable supply output and the load adjustment parameter from the current load. This value is then employed to control the variable load in an amount proportional to the value of the load control parameter when the parameter is within a predefined range. By so controlling the load, the effective capacity of the non-controllable, renewable power supply is increased without any attempt at operational feedback control of the renewable supply. The expected peak loading of the variable load can be dynamically determined within a defined time interval with reference to variations in the variable load.

  19. Truck loading positions for maximum live load girder moment in skewed integral bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalcin, O. Fatih

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the effect of the longitudinal and transverse truck positions on the distribution of live load moment among the girders of skewed integral abutment bridges (SIBs) is investigated. For this purpose, three dimensional finite element models (FEMs) of several single-span SIBs are built and analyzed. In the analyses, bridges with various skew angles under all possible single and double truck loading positions both in longitudinal and transverse directions are considered. An automated analysis procedure managed by a visual basic program is developed to obtain the structural models and apply the wheel loads of trucks. The finite element analyses (FEA) results are then used to find the most critical loading cases of single truck and adjacent two trucks for the live load moment in the girders of SIBs. The results revealed that, the trucks should be placed nearby the midline of the bridge deck in a diagonal manner.

  20. Calculator program speeds rod pump design

    SciTech Connect

    Engineer, R.; Davis, C.L.

    1984-02-01

    Matching sucker rod pump characteristics to a specific application is greatly simplified with this program, intended for use with an HP-41CV hand-held computer. The user inputs application data and the program calculates all necessary design criteria, including Mill's acceleration factor, peak and minimum polish rod loads and horsepower required. Sample calculations are provided, together with a thorough discussion of special design considerations involved in huff-and-puff applications.

  1. Analysis and Insights About FE-Calculations of the EC-Forever-Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Willschuetz, H.G.; Altstadt, E.; Weiss, F.P.; Sehgal, B.R.

    2002-07-01

    To get an improved understanding and knowledge of the melt pool convection and the vessel creep and possible failure processes and modes occurring during the late phase of a core melt down accident the FOREVER-experiments are currently underway at the Division of Nuclear Power Safety of the Royal Institute of Technology Stockholm. These experiments are simulating the behaviour of the lower head of the RPV under the thermal loads of a convecting melt pool with decay heating, and under the pressure loads that the vessel experiences in a depressurization scenario. Due to the multi axial creep deformation of the vessel with a non-uniform temperature field these experiments are on the one hand an excellent source of data to validate numerical creep models which are developed on the basis of uniaxial creep tests. On the other hand the results of pre-test calculations can be used to optimize the experimental procedure and by supporting decision making during the experiment. For that, a Finite Element model is developed based on a multi-purpose code. After post-test calculations for the FOREVER-C2 experiment, pre-test calculations for the forthcoming experiments are performed. Additionally metallographic post test investigations of the experiments are conducted to improve the numerical damage model and to adjust the correlation between the metallographic observations and the calculated damage. Taking into account both - experimental and numerical results - gives a good opportunity to improve the simulation and understanding of real accident scenarios. After analysing the calculations, it seems to be advantageous to introduce a vessel support which can unburden the vessel from a part of the mechanical load and, therefore, avoid the vessel failure or at least prolong the time to failure. This can be a possible accident mitigation strategy. Additionally, it is possible to install an absolutely passive automatic control device to initiate the flooding of the reactor pit to

  2. Transfer Area Mechanical Handling Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    B. Dianda

    2004-06-23

    This calculation is intended to support the License Application (LA) submittal of December 2004, in accordance with the directive given by DOE correspondence received on the 27th of January 2004 entitled: ''Authorization for Bechtel SAX Company L.L. C. to Include a Bare Fuel Handling Facility and Increased Aging Capacity in the License Application, Contract Number DE-AC28-01R W12101'' (Arthur, W.J., I11 2004). This correspondence was appended by further Correspondence received on the 19th of February 2004 entitled: ''Technical Direction to Bechtel SAIC Company L.L. C. for Surface Facility Improvements, Contract Number DE-AC28-OIRW12101; TDL No. 04-024'' (BSC 2004a). These documents give the authorization for a Fuel Handling Facility to be included in the baseline. The purpose of this calculation is to establish preliminary bounding equipment envelopes and weights for the Fuel Handling Facility (FHF) transfer areas equipment. This calculation provides preliminary information only to support development of facility layouts and preliminary load calculations. The limitations of this preliminary calculation lie within the assumptions of section 5 , as this calculation is part of an evolutionary design process. It is intended that this calculation is superseded as the design advances to reflect information necessary to support License Application. The design choices outlined within this calculation represent a demonstration of feasibility and may or may not be included in the completed design. This calculation provides preliminary weight, dimensional envelope, and equipment position in building for the purposes of defining interface variables. This calculation identifies and sizes major equipment and assemblies that dictate overall equipment dimensions and facility interfaces. Sizing of components is based on the selection of commercially available products, where applicable. This is not a specific recommendation for the future use of these components or their related

  3. Supersonic flutter of panels loaded with inplane shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    A modal flutter analysis for biaxially loaded, orthotropic panels, using linear piston-theory aerodynamics, was extended in order to include the effects of inplane shear loading. Flutter boundaries for shear loads up to buckling are calculated for simply supported, isotropic panels of various length-width ratios and for a square, isotropic panel with elastic boundary conditions along the leading and trailing edges. These flutter boundaries are used to define conservative design curves. Sample calculations made using these design curves indicate that practical panels, which have otherwise been adequately designed, could become flutter critical if the inplane shear loads approach the buckling value.

  4. Phalange Tactile Load Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Griffith, Bryan Kristian (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A tactile load cell that has particular application for measuring the load on a phalange in a dexterous robot system. The load cell includes a flexible strain element having first and second end portions that can be used to mount the load cell to the phalange and a center portion that can be used to mount a suitable contact surface to the load cell. The strain element also includes a first S-shaped member including at least three sections connected to the first end portion and the center portion and a second S-shaped member including at least three sections coupled to the second end portion and the center portion. The load cell also includes eight strain gauge pairs where each strain gauge pair is mounted to opposing surfaces of one of the sections of the S-shaped members where the strain gauge pairs provide strain measurements in six-degrees of freedom.

  5. Distillation Calculations with a Programmable Calculator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Charles A.; Halpern, Bret L.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a three-step approach for teaching multicomponent distillation to undergraduates, emphasizing patterns of distribution as an aid to understanding the separation processes. Indicates that the second step can be carried out by programmable calculators. (A more complete set of programs for additional calculations is available from the…

  6. Project W-320, 241-C-106 sluicing master calculation list

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, J.W.

    1998-08-07

    This supporting document has been prepared to make the Master Calculation List readily retrievable. The list gives the status of the calculation (as-built, not used, applied, etc.), the calculation title, its originator, comments, and report number under which it was issued. Tank 241-C-106 has been included on the High Heat Load Watch List.

  7. The stress distribution in pin-loaded orthotropic plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klang, E. C.; Hyer, M. W.

    1985-01-01

    The performance of mechanically fastened composite joints was studied. Specially, a single-bolt connector was modeled as a pin-loaded, infinite plate. The model that was developed used two dimensional, complex variable, elasticity techniques combined with a boundary collocation procedure to produce solutions for the problem. Through iteration, the boundary conditions were satisfied and the stresses in the plate were calculated. Several graphite epoxy laminates were studied. In addition, parameters such as the pin modulus, coefficient of friction, and pin-plate clearance were varied. Conclusions drawn from this study indicate: (1) the material properties (i.e., laminate configuration) of the plate alter the stress state and, for highly orthotropic materials, the contact stress deviates greatly from the cosinusoidal distribution often assumed; (2) friction plays a major role in the distribution of stresses in the plate; (3) reversing the load direction also greatly effects the stress distribution in the plate; (4) clearance (or interference) fits change the contact angle and thus the location of the peak hoop stress; and (5) a rigid pin appears to be a good assumption for typical material systems.

  8. 44 BWR Waste Package Loading Curve Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Scaglione

    2001-11-05

    The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the required minimum burnup as a function of average initial boiling water reactor (BWR) assembly enrichment that would permit loading of fuel into a potential 44 BWR waste package (WP). The potential WP design is illustrated in Attachment I. The scope of this calculation covers a range of initial enrichments from 1.5 through 5.0 weight percent U-235, and a burnup range of 0 through 50 GWd/mtU.

  9. Load sensing system

    DOEpatents

    Sohns, C.W.; Nodine, R.N.; Wallace, S.A.

    1999-05-04

    A load sensing system inexpensively monitors the weight and temperature of stored nuclear material for long periods of time in widely variable environments. The system can include an electrostatic load cell that encodes weight and temperature into a digital signal which is sent to a remote monitor via a coaxial cable. The same cable is used to supply the load cell with power. When multiple load cells are used, vast inventories of stored nuclear material can be continuously monitored and inventoried of minimal cost. 4 figs.

  10. Load regulating expansion fixture

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, L.M.; Strum, M.J.

    1998-12-15

    A free standing self contained device for bonding ultra thin metallic films, such as 0.001 inch beryllium foils is disclosed. The device will regulate to a predetermined load for solid state bonding when heated to a bonding temperature. The device includes a load regulating feature, whereby the expansion stresses generated for bonding are regulated and self adjusting. The load regulator comprises a pair of friction isolators with a plurality of annealed copper members located therebetween. The device, with the load regulator, will adjust to and maintain a stress level needed to successfully and economically complete a leak tight bond without damaging thin foils or other delicate components. 1 fig.

  11. Load regulating expansion fixture

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, Lawrence M.; Strum, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    A free standing self contained device for bonding ultra thin metallic films, such as 0.001 inch beryllium foils. The device will regulate to a predetermined load for solid state bonding when heated to a bonding temperature. The device includes a load regulating feature, whereby the expansion stresses generated for bonding are regulated and self adjusting. The load regulator comprises a pair of friction isolators with a plurality of annealed copper members located therebetween. The device, with the load regulator, will adjust to and maintain a stress level needed to successfully and economically complete a leak tight bond without damaging thin foils or other delicate components.

  12. 40 CFR 86.1380-2004 - Load response test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Regulations for New Otto-Cycle and Diesel Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous and Particulate Exhaust Test Procedures... heavy-duty diesel engines. The purpose of this test procedure is to measure the brake-specific gaseous and particulate emissions from a heavy-duty diesel engine as it is suddenly loaded, with its...

  13. 40 CFR 86.1380-2004 - Load response test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Regulations for New Otto-Cycle and Diesel Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous and Particulate Exhaust Test Procedures... heavy-duty diesel engines. The purpose of this test procedure is to measure the brake-specific gaseous and particulate emissions from a heavy-duty diesel engine as it is suddenly loaded, with its...

  14. 40 CFR 86.1380-2004 - Load response test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Regulations for New Otto-Cycle and Diesel Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous and Particulate Exhaust Test Procedures... heavy-duty diesel engines. The purpose of this test procedure is to measure the brake-specific gaseous and particulate emissions from a heavy-duty diesel engine as it is suddenly loaded, with its...

  15. 40 CFR 86.1380-2004 - Load response test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Regulations for New Otto-Cycle and Diesel Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous and Particulate Exhaust Test Procedures... heavy-duty diesel engines. The purpose of this test procedure is to measure the brake-specific gaseous and particulate emissions from a heavy-duty diesel engine as it is suddenly loaded, with its...

  16. 40 CFR 92.106 - Equipment for loading the engine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... description of the procedures used to establish the alternator/generator efficiency. (b) Engine testing. (1... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment for loading the engine. 92... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Test Procedures §...

  17. Development of a thermal and structural analysis procedure for cooled radial turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ganesh N.; Deanna, Russell G.

    1988-06-01

    A procedure for computing the rotor temperature and stress distributions in a cooled radial turbine is considered. Existing codes for modeling the external mainstream flow and the internal cooling flow are used to compute boundary conditions for the heat transfer and stress analyses. An inviscid, quasi three-dimensional code computes the external free stream velocity. The external velocity is then used in a boundary layer analysis to compute the external heat transfer coefficients. Coolant temperatures are computed by a viscous one-dimensional internal flow code for the momentum and energy equation. These boundary conditions are input to a three-dimensional heat conduction code for calculation of rotor temperatures. The rotor stress distribution may be determined for the given thermal, pressure and centrifugal loading. The procedure is applied to a cooled radial turbine which will be tested at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Representative results from this case are included.

  18. Development of a thermal and structural analysis procedure for cooled radial turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Ganesh N.; Deanna, Russell G.

    1988-01-01

    A procedure for computing the rotor temperature and stress distributions in a cooled radial turbine are considered. Existing codes for modeling the external mainstream flow and the internal cooling flow are used to compute boundary conditions for the heat transfer and stress analysis. The inviscid, quasi three dimensional code computes the external free stream velocity. The external velocity is then used in a boundary layer analysis to compute the external heat transfer coefficients. Coolant temperatures are computed by a viscous three dimensional internal flow cade for the momentum and energy equation. These boundary conditions are input to a three dimensional heat conduction code for the calculation of rotor temperatures. The rotor stress distribution may be determined for the given thermal, pressure and centrifugal loading. The procedure is applied to a cooled radial turbine which will be tested at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Representative results are given.

  19. Development of a thermal and structural analysis procedure for cooled radial turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Ganesh N.; Deanna, Russell G.

    1988-01-01

    A procedure for computing the rotor temperature and stress distributions in a cooled radial turbine is considered. Existing codes for modeling the external mainstream flow and the internal cooling flow are used to compute boundary conditions for the heat transfer and stress analyses. An inviscid, quasi three-dimensional code computes the external free stream velocity. The external velocity is then used in a boundary layer analysis to compute the external heat transfer coefficients. Coolant temperatures are computed by a viscous one-dimensional internal flow code for the momentum and energy equation. These boundary conditions are input to a three-dimensional heat conduction code for calculation of rotor temperatures. The rotor stress distribution may be determined for the given thermal, pressure and centrifugal loading. The procedure is applied to a cooled radial turbine which will be tested at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Representative results from this case are included.

  20. Calculation of tubular joints as compound shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovanov, A. I.

    A scheme for joining isoparametric finite shell elements with a bend in the middle surface is described. A solution is presented for the problem of the stress-strain state of a T-joint loaded by internal pressure. A refined scheme is proposed for calculating structures of this kind with allowance for the stiffness of the welded joint.

  1. On the relationship between wind profiles and the STS ascent structural loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Orvel E.; Adelfang, Stanley I.; Whitehead, Douglas S.

    1989-01-01

    The response of STS ascent structural load indicators to the wind profile is analyzed. The load indicator values versus Mach numbers are calculated with algorithms using trajectory information. The ascent load minimum margin concept is used to show that the detailed wind profile structure measured by the Jimsphere wind system is not needed to assess the STS rigid body structural wind loads.

  2. Modeling of Closed-Die Forging for Estimating Forging Load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Debashish; Das, Santanu; Chatterjee, Avik; Bhattacharya, Anirban

    2016-05-01

    Closed die forging is one common metal forming process used for making a range of products. Enough load is to exert on the billet for deforming the material. This forging load is dependent on work material property and frictional characteristics of the work material with the punch and die. Several researchers worked on estimation of forging load for specific products under different process variables. Experimental data on deformation resistance and friction were used to calculate the load. In this work, theoretical estimation of forging load is made to compare this value with that obtained through LS-DYNA model facilitating the finite element analysis. Theoretical work uses slab method to assess forging load for an axi-symmetric upsetting job made of lead. Theoretical forging load estimate shows slightly higher value than the experimental one; however, simulation shows quite close matching with experimental forging load, indicating possibility of wide use of this simulation software.

  3. A novel concept for a combined-load test apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Carl J.; Mcwithey, Robert R.

    1991-01-01

    An original concept for a combined-load test machine is presented in the paper. The concept employs a circular test specimen which may be rotated with respect to the biaxially applied loads. The ability to rotate the specimen and to vary the applied loads allows for limitless combinations of in-plane normal and shear loads. The loads generated in the test section reference frame are calculated from simple Mohr's circle relationships. In this paper, the concept is evaluated for isotropic, orthotropic, and discretely stiffened panels using elasticity and finite element methods. Strengths and weaknesses of the test machine concept are also discussed and evaluated.

  4. Approaches to Accounting and Prediction of Fast Neutron Fluence on VVER Pressure Vessels for Estimation of RPV Residual Lifetime in Compliance with Russian Utility's Procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodkin, Gennady; Borodkin, Pavel; Khrennikov, Nikolay; Ryabinin, Yuriy; Adeev, Valeriy

    2016-02-01

    The Paper describes a new Russian Utility's regulatory document (RD EO) which has been recently developed and implemented since the beginning of 2013. This RD EO includes the procedure of RPV FNF monitoring and provides recommendations on how to predict fluence over the design lifetime taking into account results of FNF monitoring. The basic method of RPV neutron fluence monitoring is neutron transport calculations of FR in the vicinity of the RPV. Reliability of the calculation results should be validated by ex-vessel neutron-activation measurements, which were performed during different fuel cycles with different core loadings including new types of fuel.

  5. Airloads and Wake Geometry Calculations for an Isolated Tiltrotor Model in a Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wayne

    2001-01-01

    Comparisons of measured and calculated aerodynamic behavior of a tiltrotor model are presented. The test of the Tilt Rotor Aeroacoustic Model (TRAM) with a single, 0.25-scale V-22 rotor in the German-Dutch Wind Tunnel (DNW) provides an extensive set of aeroacoustic, performance, and structural loads data. The calculations were performed using the rotorcraft comprehensive analysis CAMRAD II. Presented are comparisons of measured and calculated performance for hover and helicopter mode operation, and airloads for helicopter mode. Calculated induced power, profile power, and wake geometry provide additional information about the aerodynamic behavior. An aerodynamic and wake model and calculation procedure that reflects the unique geometry and phenomena of tiltrotors has been developed. There are major differences between this model and the corresponding aerodynamic and wake model that has been established for helicopter rotors. In general, good correlation between measured and calculated performance and airloads behavior has been shown. Two aspects of the analysis that clearly need improvement are the stall delay model and the trailed vortex formation model.

  6. Designing Flightdeck Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barshi, Immanuel; Mauro, Robert; Degani, Asaf; Loukopoulou, Loukia

    2016-01-01

    The primary goal of this document is to provide guidance on how to design, implement, and evaluate flight deck procedures. It provides a process for developing procedures that meet clear and specific requirements. This document provides a brief overview of: 1) the requirements for procedures, 2) a process for the design of procedures, and 3) a process for the design of checklists. The brief overview is followed by amplified procedures that follow the above steps and provide details for the proper design, implementation and evaluation of good flight deck procedures and checklists.

  7. Computerized procedures system

    DOEpatents

    Lipner, Melvin H.; Mundy, Roger A.; Franusich, Michael D.

    2010-10-12

    An online data driven computerized procedures system that guides an operator through a complex process facility's operating procedures. The system monitors plant data, processes the data and then, based upon this processing, presents the status of the current procedure step and/or substep to the operator. The system supports multiple users and a single procedure definition supports several interface formats that can be tailored to the individual user. Layered security controls access privileges and revisions are version controlled. The procedures run on a server that is platform independent of the user workstations that the server interfaces with and the user interface supports diverse procedural views.

  8. Autistic Savant Calendar Calculators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patti, Paul J.

    This study identified 10 savants with developmental disabilities and an exceptional ability to calculate calendar dates. These "calendar calculators" were asked to demonstrate their abilities, and their strategies were analyzed. The study found that the ability to calculate dates into the past or future varied widely among these calculators. Three…

  9. Assessment of total uncertainty in cocaine and benzoylecgonine wastewater load measurements.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Christoph; Rieckermann, Jörg; Berset, Jean-Daniel; Schürch, Stefan; Brenneisen, Rudolf

    2011-12-15

    To check the effectiveness of campaigns preventing drug abuse or indicating local effects of efforts against drug trafficking, it is beneficial to know consumed amounts of substances in a high spatial and temporal resolution. The analysis of drugs of abuse in wastewater (WW) has the potential to provide this information. In this study, the reliability of WW drug consumption estimates is assessed and a novel method presented to calculate the total uncertainty in observed WW cocaine (COC) and benzoylecgonine (BE) loads. Specifically, uncertainties resulting from discharge measurements, chemical analysis and the applied sampling scheme were addressed and three approaches presented. These consist of (i) a generic model-based procedure to investigate the influence of the sampling scheme on the uncertainty of observed or expected drug loads, (ii) a comparative analysis of two analytical methods (high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry), including an extended cross-validation by influent profiling over several days, and (iii) monitoring COC and BE concentrations in WW of the largest Swiss sewage treatment plants. In addition, the COC and BE loads observed in the sewage treatment plant of the city of Berne were used to back-calculate the COC consumption. The estimated mean daily consumed amount was 107 ± 21 g of pure COC, corresponding to 321 g of street-grade COC.

  10. Heat Treatment Procedure Qualification for Steel Castings

    SciTech Connect

    Mariol Charles; Nicholas Deskevich; Vipin Varkey; Robert Voigt; Angela Wollenburg

    2004-04-29

    Heat treatment practices used by steel foundries have been carefully studied as part of comprehensive heat treatment procedure qualification development trials. These studies highlight the relationships between critical heat treatment process control parameters and heat treatment success. Foundry heat treatment trials to develop heat treatment procedure qualifications have shed light on the relationship between heat treatment theory and current practices. Furnace load time-temperature profiles in steel foundries exhibit significant differences depending on heat treatment equipment, furnace loading practice, and furnace maintenance. Time-temperature profiles of furnace control thermocouples can be very different from the time-temperature profiles observed at the center of casting loads in the furnace. Typical austenitization temperatures and holding times used by steel foundries far exceed what is required for transformation to austenite. Quenching and hardenability concepts were also investigated. Heat treatment procedure qualification (HTPQ) schema to demonstrate heat treatment success and to pre-qualify other alloys and section sizes requiring lesser hardenability have been developed. Tempering success is dependent on both tempering time and temperature. As such, furnace temperature uniformity and control of furnace loading during tempering is critical to obtain the desired mechanical properties. The ramp-up time in the furnace prior to the establishment of steady state heat treatment conditions contributes to the extent of heat treatment performed. This influence of ramp-up to temperature during tempering has been quantified.

  11. Heat Treatment Procedure Qualification -- Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Voigt

    2004-10-15

    Heat treatment practices used by steel foundries have been carefully studied as part of comprehensive heat treatment procedure development trials. These studies highlight the relationships between critical heat treatment process control parameters and heat treatment success. Foundry heat treatment trials to develop heat treatment procedure qualification have shed light on the relationship between heat treatment theory and current practices. Furnace load time-temperature profiles in steel foundries exhibit significant differences depending on heat treatment equipment, furnace loading practice, and furnace maintenance. Time-temperature profiles of the furnace control thermocouples can be very different from the time-temperature profiles observed at the center of casting loads in the furnace. Typical austenitrization temperatures and holding times used by steel foundries far exceed what is required for transformation to austenite. Quenching and hardenability concepts were also investigated. Heat treatment procedure qualification (HTPQ) schema to demonstrate heat treatment success and to pre-qualify other alloys and section sizes requiring lesser hardenability have been developed. Tempering success is dependent on both tempering time and temperature. As such, furnace temperature uniformity and control of furnace loading during tempering is critical to obtain the desired mechanical properties. The ramp-up time in the furnace prior to the establishment of steady state heat treatment conditions contributes to the extent of heat treatment performed. This influence of ramp-up to temperature during tempering has been quantified.

  12. Local strain redistribution corrections for a simplified inelastic analysis procedure based on an elastic finite-element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.; Hwang, S. Y.

    1985-01-01

    Strain redistribution corrections were developed for a simplified inelastic analysis procedure to economically calculate material cyclic response at the critical location of a structure for life prediction proposes. The method was based on the assumption that the plastic region in the structure is local and the total strain history required for input can be defined from elastic finite-element analyses. Cyclic stress-strain behavior was represented by a bilinear kinematic hardening model. The simplified procedure predicts stress-strain response with reasonable accuracy for thermally cycled problems but needs improvement for mechanically load-cycled problems. Neuber-type corrections were derived and incorporated in the simplified procedure to account for local total strain redistribution under cyclic mechanical loading. The corrected simplified method was used on a mechanically load-cycled benchmark notched-plate problem. The predicted material response agrees well with the nonlinear finite-element solutions for the problem. The simplified analysis computer program was 0.3% of the central processor unit time required for a nonlinear finite-element analysis.

  13. 30 CFR 57.12007 - Junction box connection procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Junction box connection procedures. 57.12007... Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12007 Junction box connection procedures. Trailing cable and power-cable connections to junction boxes shall not be made or broken under load....

  14. 30 CFR 57.12007 - Junction box connection procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Junction box connection procedures. 57.12007... Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12007 Junction box connection procedures. Trailing cable and power-cable connections to junction boxes shall not be made or broken under load....

  15. 30 CFR 57.12007 - Junction box connection procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Junction box connection procedures. 57.12007... Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12007 Junction box connection procedures. Trailing cable and power-cable connections to junction boxes shall not be made or broken under load....

  16. 30 CFR 57.12007 - Junction box connection procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Junction box connection procedures. 57.12007... Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12007 Junction box connection procedures. Trailing cable and power-cable connections to junction boxes shall not be made or broken under load....

  17. 30 CFR 57.12007 - Junction box connection procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Junction box connection procedures. 57.12007... Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12007 Junction box connection procedures. Trailing cable and power-cable connections to junction boxes shall not be made or broken under load....

  18. Investigation of Anomalous Behavior in Metallic-Based Materials Under Compressive Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gil, Christopher M.; Lissenden, Cliff J.; Lerch, Bradley A.

    1998-01-01

    An anomalous material response has been observed under the action of applied compressive loads in fibrous SiC/Ti (both Ti-6242 and Ti-15-3 alloys) and the monolithic nickel-base alloy IN-718 in the aged condition. The observed behavior is an increase, rather than a decrease, in the instantaneous Young's modulus with increasing load. This increase is small, but can be significant in yield surface determination tests, where an equivalent offset strain on the order of 10 micron(1 x 10(exp -6) m/m) is being used. Stiffening has been quantified by calculating offset strains from the linear elastic loading line. The offset strains associated with stiffening during compressive loading are positive and of the same order as the target offset strains in yield surface determination tests. At this time we do not have a reasonable explanation for this response nor can we identify a deformation mechanism that might cause it. On the other hand, we are not convinced that it is an artifact of the experimental procedure because a number of issues have been identified and seemingly ruled out. In fact, stiffening appears to be temperature dependent, since it decreases as the temperature increases.

  19. A NASTRAN DMAP alter for linear buckling analysis under dynamic loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aiello, Robert A.; Grady, Joseph E.

    1988-01-01

    A unique modification to the NASTRAN solution sequence for transient analysis with direct time integration (COSMIC NASTRAN rigid format 9) was developed and incorporated into a DMAP alter. This DMAP alter calculates the buckling stability of a dynamically loaded structure, and is used to predict the onset of structural buckling under stress wave loading conditions. The modified solution sequence incorporates the linear buckling analysis capability (rigid format 5) of NASTRAN into the existing Transient solution rigid format in such a way as to provide a time dependent eigensolution which is used to assess the buckling stability of the structure as it responds to the impulsive load. As a demonstration of the validity of this modified solution procedure, the dynamic buckling of a prismatic bar subjected to an impulsive longitudinal compression is analyzed and compared to the known theoretical solution. In addition, a dynamic buckling analysis is performed for the analytically less tractable problem of the localized dynamic buckling of an initially flawed composite laminate under transverse impact loading. The addition of this DMAP alter to the transient solution sequence in NASTRAN facilitates the prediction of both time and mode of buckling.

  20. Core loading pattern optimization of thorium fueled heavy water breeder reactor using genetic algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Soewono, C. N.; Takaki, N.

    2012-07-01

    In this work genetic algorithm was proposed to solve fuel loading pattern optimization problem in thorium fueled heavy water reactor. The objective function of optimization was to maximize the conversion ratio and minimize power peaking factor. Those objectives were simultaneously optimized using non-dominated Pareto-based population ranking optimal method. Members of non-dominated population were assigned selection probabilities based on their rankings in a manner similar to Baker's single criterion ranking selection procedure. A selected non-dominated member was bred through simple mutation or one-point crossover process to produce a new member. The genetic algorithm program was developed in FORTRAN 90 while neutronic calculation and analysis was done by COREBN code, a module of core burn-up calculation for SRAC. (authors)