Science.gov

Sample records for load limits

  1. Estimating turbine limit load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, Arthur J.

    1993-01-01

    A method for estimating turbine limit-load pressure ratio from turbine map information is presented and demonstrated. It is based on a mean line analysis at the last-rotor exit. The required map information includes choke flow rate at all speeds as well as pressure ratio and efficiency at the onset of choke at design speed. One- and two-stage turbines are analyzed to compare the results with those from a more rigorous off-design flow analysis and to show the sensitivities of the computed limit-load pressure ratios to changes in the key assumptions.

  2. Load limiting parachute inflation control

    SciTech Connect

    Redmond, J.; Hinnerichs, T.; Parker, G.

    1994-01-01

    Excessive deceleration forces experienced during high speed deployment of parachute systems can cause damage to the payload and the canopy fabric. Conventional reefing lines offer limited relief by temporarily restricting canopy inflation and limiting the peak deceleration load. However, the open-loop control provided by existing reefing devices restrict their use to a specific set of deployment conditions. In this paper, the sensing, processing, and actuation that are characteristic of adaptive structures form the basis of three concepts for active control of parachute inflation. These active control concepts are incorporated into a computer simulation of parachute inflation. Initial investigations indicate that these concepts promise enhanced performance as compared to conventional techniques for a nominal release. Furthermore, the ability of each controller to adapt to off-nominal release conditions is examined.

  3. 14 CFR 23.337 - Limit maneuvering load factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limit maneuvering load factors. 23.337... Flight Loads § 23.337 Limit maneuvering load factors. (a) The positive limit maneuvering load factor n... airplanes; or (3) 6.0 for acrobatic category airplanes. (b) The negative limit maneuvering load factor...

  4. 14 CFR 29.337 - Limit maneuvering load factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limit maneuvering load factor. 29.337... Limit maneuvering load factor. The rotorcraft must be designed for— (a) A limit maneuvering load factor... load factor not less than 2.0 and any negative limit maneuvering load factor of not less than −0.5...

  5. 14 CFR 27.337 - Limit maneuvering load factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limit maneuvering load factor. 27.337... Limit maneuvering load factor. The rotorcraft must be designed for— (a) A limit maneuvering load factor... load factor not less than 2.0 and any negative limit maneuvering load factor of not less than −0.5...

  6. 14 CFR 23.337 - Limit maneuvering load factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Limit maneuvering load factors. 23.337... Flight Loads § 23.337 Limit maneuvering load factors. (a) The positive limit maneuvering load factor n... not be less than— (1) 0.4 times the positive load factor for the normal utility and...

  7. Load limiting energy absorbing lightweight debris catcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Jon B. (Inventor); Schneider, William C. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    In the representative embodiment of the invention disclosed, a load limiting, energy absorbing net is arranged to overlay a normally-covered vent opening in the rear bulkhead of the space orbiter vehicle. Spatially-disposed flexible retainer straps are extended from the net and respectively secured to bulkhead brackets spaced around the vent opening. The intermediate portions of the straps are doubled over and stitched together in a pattern enabling the doubled-over portions to progressively separate at a predicable load designed to be well below the tensile capability of the straps as the stitches are successively torn apart by the forces imposed on the retainer members whenever the cover plate is explosively separated from the bulkhead and propelled into the net. By arranging these stitches to be successively torn away at a load below the strap strength in response to forces acting on the retainers that are less than the combined strength of the retainers, this tearing action serves as a predictable compact energy absorber for safely halting the cover plate as the retainers are extended as the net is deployed. The invention further includes a block of an energy-absorbing material positioned in the net for receiving loose debris produced by the explosive release of the cover plate.

  8. 14 CFR 23.681 - Limit load static tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Limit load static tests. 23.681 Section 23... Control Systems § 23.681 Limit load static tests. (a) Compliance with the limit load requirements of this... the main structure is included. (b) Compliance must be shown (by analyses or individual load...

  9. 14 CFR 23.681 - Limit load static tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limit load static tests. 23.681 Section 23... Control Systems § 23.681 Limit load static tests. (a) Compliance with the limit load requirements of this... the main structure is included. (b) Compliance must be shown (by analyses or individual load...

  10. Load-limiting parachute inflation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redmond, James M.; Hinnerichs, Terry D.; Parker, Gordon G.

    1994-05-01

    Excessive deceleration forces experienced during high speed deployment of parachute systems can cause damage to the payload and the canopy fabric. Conventional reefing lines offer limited relief by temporarily restricting canopy inflation and limiting the peak deceleration load. However, the open-loop control provided by existing reefing devices restrict their use to a specific set of deployment conditions. In this paper, the sensing, processing, and actuation that are characteristic of adaptive structures form the basis of three concepts for active control of parachute inflation. These active control concepts are incorporated into a computer simulation of parachute inflation. Initial investigations indicate that these concepts promise enhanced performance as compared to conventional techniques for a nominal release. Furthermore, the ability of each controller to adapt to off-nominal release conditions is examined.

  11. 14 CFR 29.681 - Limit load static tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limit load static tests. 29.681 Section 29... load static tests. (a) Compliance with the limit load requirements of this part must be shown by tests... included; (b) Compliance must be shown (by analyses or individual load tests) with the special...

  12. 14 CFR 29.681 - Limit load static tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Limit load static tests. 29.681 Section 29... load static tests. (a) Compliance with the limit load requirements of this part must be shown by tests... included; (b) Compliance must be shown (by analyses or individual load tests) with the special...

  13. 14 CFR 25.681 - Limit load static tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limit load static tests. 25.681 Section 25... load static tests. (a) Compliance with the limit load requirements of this Part must be shown by tests... included. (b) Compliance must be shown (by analyses or individual load tests) with the special...

  14. 14 CFR 25.681 - Limit load static tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Limit load static tests. 25.681 Section 25... load static tests. (a) Compliance with the limit load requirements of this Part must be shown by tests... included. (b) Compliance must be shown (by analyses or individual load tests) with the special...

  15. 14 CFR 25.337 - Limit maneuvering load factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limit maneuvering load factors. 25.337... Conditions § 25.337 Limit maneuvering load factors. (a) Except where limited by maximum (static) lift... maneuvering load factors prescribed in this section. Pitching velocities appropriate to the corresponding...

  16. 14 CFR 27.681 - Limit load static tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limit load static tests. 27.681 Section 27... static tests. (a) Compliance with the limit load requirements of this part must be shown by tests in.... (b) Compliance must be shown (by analyses or individual load tests) with the special...

  17. 14 CFR 27.681 - Limit load static tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Limit load static tests. 27.681 Section 27... static tests. (a) Compliance with the limit load requirements of this part must be shown by tests in.... (b) Compliance must be shown (by analyses or individual load tests) with the special...

  18. 14 CFR 27.337 - Limit maneuvering load factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Limit maneuvering load factor. 27.337 Section 27.337 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... ranging from a positive limit of 3.5 to a negative limit of −1.0; or (b) Any positive limit...

  19. 14 CFR 29.337 - Limit maneuvering load factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Limit maneuvering load factor. 29.337 Section 29.337 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... ranging from a positive limit of 3.5 to a negative limit of −1.0; or (b) Any positive limit...

  20. 29 CFR 1917.111 - Maintenance and load limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maintenance and load limits. 1917.111 Section 1917.111 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) MARINE TERMINALS Terminal Facilities § 1917.111 Maintenance and load...

  1. 14 CFR 25.23 - Load distribution limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) Ranges of weights and centers of gravity within which the airplane may be safely operated must be established. If a weight and center of gravity combination is allowable only within certain load distribution... and center of gravity combinations must be established. (b) The load distribution limits may...

  2. 14 CFR 25.23 - Load distribution limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) Ranges of weights and centers of gravity within which the airplane may be safely operated must be established. If a weight and center of gravity combination is allowable only within certain load distribution... and center of gravity combinations must be established. (b) The load distribution limits may...

  3. 14 CFR 25.23 - Load distribution limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) Ranges of weights and centers of gravity within which the airplane may be safely operated must be established. If a weight and center of gravity combination is allowable only within certain load distribution... and center of gravity combinations must be established. (b) The load distribution limits may...

  4. 14 CFR 25.23 - Load distribution limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) Ranges of weights and centers of gravity within which the airplane may be safely operated must be established. If a weight and center of gravity combination is allowable only within certain load distribution... and center of gravity combinations must be established. (b) The load distribution limits may...

  5. 14 CFR 25.23 - Load distribution limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) Ranges of weights and centers of gravity within which the airplane may be safely operated must be established. If a weight and center of gravity combination is allowable only within certain load distribution... and center of gravity combinations must be established. (b) The load distribution limits may...

  6. 36 CFR 1004.11 - Load, weight and size limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Load, weight and size limits. 1004.11 Section 1004.11 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY... limits when appropriate for traffic safety or protection of the road surface. The Board may require...

  7. NCAP test improvements with pretensioners and load limiters.

    PubMed

    Walz, Marie

    2004-03-01

    New Car Assessment Program (NCAP) test scores, measured by the United States Department of Transportation's (USDOT) National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), were analyzed in order to assess the benefits of equipping safety belt systems with pretensioners and load limiters. Safety belt pretensioners retract the safety belt almost instantly in a crash to remove excess slack. They tie the occupant to the vehicle's deceleration early during the crash, reducing the peak load experienced by the occupant. Load limiters and other energy management systems allow safety belts to yield in a crash, preventing the shoulder belt from directing too much energy on the chest of the occupant. In NCAP tests, vehicles are crashed into a fixed barrier at 35 mph. During the test, instruments measure the accelerations of the head and chest, as well as the force on the legs of anthropomorphic dummies secured in the vehicle by safety belts. NCAP data from model year 1998 through 2001 cars and light trucks were examined. The combination of pretensioners and load limiters is estimated to reduce Head Injury Criterion (HIC) by 232, chest acceleration by an average of 6.6 g's, and chest deflection (displacement) by 10.6 mm, for drivers and right front passengers. The unit used to measure chest acceleration (g) is defined as a unit of force equal to the force exerted by gravity. All of these reductions are statistically significant. When looked at individually, pretensioners are more effective in reducing HIC scores for both drivers and right front passengers, as well as chest acceleration and chest deflection scores for drivers. Load limiters show greater reductions in chest acceleration and chest deflection scores for right front passengers. By contrast, in make-models for which neither load limiters nor pretensioners have been added, there is little change during 1998 to 2001 in HIC, chest acceleration, or chest deflection values in NCAP tests. PMID:14754671

  8. Fatigue life prediction under service load considering strengthening effect of loads below fatigue limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lihui; Zheng, Songlin; Feng, Jinzhi

    2014-11-01

    Lightweight design requires an accurate life prediction for structures and components under service loading histories. However, predicted life with the existing methods seems too conservative in some cases, leading to a heavy structure. Because these methods are established on the basis that load cycles would only cause fatigue damage, ignore the strengthening effect of loads. Based on Palmgren-Miner Rule (PMR), this paper introduces a new method for fatigue life prediction under service loadings by taking into account the strengthening effect of loads below the fatigue limit. In this method, the service loadings are classified into three categories: damaging load, strengthening load and none-effect load, and the process for fatigue life prediction is divided into two stages: stage I and stage II, according to the best strengthening number of cycles. During stage I, fatigue damage is calculated considering both the strengthening and damaging effect of load cycles. While during stage II, only the damaging effect is considered. To validate this method, fatigue lives of automobile half shaft and torsion beam rear axle are calculated based on the new method and traditional methods, such as PMR and Modified Miner Rule (MMR), and fatigue tests of the two components are conducted under service loading histories. The tests results show that the percentage errors of the predicted life with the new method to mean life of tests for the two components are -3.78% and -1.76% separately, much lesser than that with PMR and MMR. By considering the strengthening effect of loads below the fatigue limit, the new method can significantly improve the accuracy for fatigue life prediction. Thus lightweight design can be fully realized in the design stage.

  9. Centaur Standard Shroud (CSS) static limit load structural tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastwood, C.

    1975-01-01

    The structural capabilities of the jettisonable metal shroud were tested and the interaction of the shroud with the Centaur stage was evaluated. A flight-configured shroud and the assemblies of the associated Centaur stage were tested for applied axial and shear loads to flight limit values. The tests included various thermal, pressure, and load conditions to verify localized strength capabilities, to evaluate subsystem performance, and to determine the aging effect on insulation system properties. The tests series verified the strength capabilities of the shroud and of all associated flight assembles. Shroud deflections were shown to remain within allowable limits so long as load sharing members were connected between the shroud and the Centaur stage.

  10. 14 CFR 23.23 - Load distribution limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... distribution limits. (a) Ranges of weights and centers of gravity within which the airplane may be safely operated must be established. If a weight and center of gravity combination is allowable only within... established for the corresponding weight and center of gravity combinations. (b) The load distribution...

  11. 14 CFR 23.23 - Load distribution limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... distribution limits. (a) Ranges of weights and centers of gravity within which the airplane may be safely operated must be established. If a weight and center of gravity combination is allowable only within... established for the corresponding weight and center of gravity combinations. (b) The load distribution...

  12. 14 CFR 23.23 - Load distribution limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... distribution limits. (a) Ranges of weights and centers of gravity within which the airplane may be safely operated must be established. If a weight and center of gravity combination is allowable only within... established for the corresponding weight and center of gravity combinations. (b) The load distribution...

  13. 14 CFR 23.23 - Load distribution limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... distribution limits. (a) Ranges of weights and centers of gravity within which the airplane may be safely operated must be established. If a weight and center of gravity combination is allowable only within... established for the corresponding weight and center of gravity combinations. (b) The load distribution...

  14. 14 CFR 23.23 - Load distribution limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... distribution limits. (a) Ranges of weights and centers of gravity within which the airplane may be safely operated must be established. If a weight and center of gravity combination is allowable only within... established for the corresponding weight and center of gravity combinations. (b) The load distribution...

  15. Load-limiting landing gear footpad energy absorption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Chris; Tsai, Ted

    1994-01-01

    As a precursor to future manned missions to the moon, an inexpensive, unmanned vehicle that could carry small, scientific payloads to the lunar surface was studied by NASA. The vehicle, called the Common Lunar Lander, required extremely optimized structural systems to increase the potential payload mass. A lightweight energy-absorbing system (LAGFEAS), which also acts as a landing load-limiter was designed to help achieve this optimized structure. Since the versatile and easily tailored system is a load-limiter, it allowed for the structure to be designed independently of the ever-changing landing energy predictions. This paper describes the LAGFEAS system and preliminary verification testing performed at NASA's Johnson Space Center for the Common Lunar Lander program.

  16. 14 CFR 25.337 - Limit maneuvering load factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... factor n for any speed up to Vn may not be less than 2.1+24,000/ (W +10,000) except that n may not be less than 2.5 and need not be greater than 3.8—where W is the design maximum takeoff weight. (c) The negative limit maneuvering load factor— (1) May not be less than −1.0 at speeds up to V C; and (2)...

  17. 14 CFR 25.337 - Limit maneuvering load factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... factor n for any speed up to Vn may not be less than 2.1+24,000/ (W +10,000) except that n may not be less than 2.5 and need not be greater than 3.8—where W is the design maximum takeoff weight. (c) The negative limit maneuvering load factor— (1) May not be less than −1.0 at speeds up to V C; and (2)...

  18. Improved Loading of Sulfate-Limited Waste in Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Aloy, A.; Soshnikov, R.; Trofimenko, A.V.; Vienna, J.D.; Elliott, M.L.; Holtzscheiter, E.W.

    2006-07-01

    The allowable sulfate concentration limits waste loading in borosilicate glasses (e.g., Hanford low-activity waste [LAW] and Idaho National Laboratory sodium-bearing waste. By the Hanford baseline formulation method, the tolerated amount of sulfate in LAW is 0.77 wt% (as SO{sub 3}) at the lowest soda contents, decreasing to 0.35 wt% at the highest soda contents. Roughly half of the Hanford LAW (on a glass mass basis) will be limited by sulfate tolerance of the glass melt. If the allowable concentrations of sulfate were to be increased only moderately, the cost and time required to vitrify the Hanford LAW would be significantly reduced A series of high-sulfate glass formulations were developed by Khlopin Radium Institute (Russian Federation) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. These glasses were tested at crucible, small melter, and larger test melter scales for not only sulfate retention but key product quality criteria as well. The key properties of the glasses to be disposed of at Hanford were measured (product consistency test and vapor hydration test), and processing-related properties (viscosity and electrical conductivity) were predicted using property composition models. The results for 28 glass compositions tested at crucible-scale, 6 glass compositions tested at small-melter-scale, and 4 glass compositions tested at larger melter scale are presented in this paper. The melter tests were all performed with waste composition and processing parameters (e.g., bubbling rate, melting rate, temperature) prototypic for the Hanford LAW melter design. The results show that sulfate loadings as high as 1.5 wt% with soda concentrations as high as 20 wt% are viable with improved formulation methods. These results suggest that the loading of sulfate-limited Hanford LAW may be increased by over 300%, relative to the current formulation. However, additional work is recommended before implementing the new formulations. (authors)

  19. Improved Loading of Sulfate-Limited Waste in Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Aloy, A. S.; Soshnikov, R. A.; Trofimenko, A. V.; Vienna, John D.; Elliott, Michael L.; Holtzscheiter, Earl W.

    2006-02-28

    The loading of many wastes in borosilicate glass are limited by the allowable sulfate concentration (e.g., Hanford low-activity waste [LAW] and Idaho National Laboratory [INL] sodium-bearing waste [SBW]). By the Hanford baseline formulation method, the tolerated amount of sulfate in LAW is 0.77 wt% (as SO3) at the lowest soda contents, decreasing to 0.35 wt% at the highest soda contents. Roughly half of the Hanford LAW (on a glass mass basis) will be limited by sulfate tolerance of the glass melt. If the allowable concentrations of sulfate were to be increased only moderately, the cost and time required to vitrify the Hanford LAW would be significantly reduced.

  20. Pushing the Limits: RF Field Control at High Loaded Q

    SciTech Connect

    M. Liepe; S.A. Belomestnykh; J. Dobbins; R.P.K. Kaplan; C.R. Strohman; B.K. Stuhl; C. Hovater; T. Plawski

    2005-05-16

    The superconducting cavities in an Energy-Recovery-Linac will be operated with a high loaded Q of several 10{sup 7}, possible up to 10{sup 8}. Not only has no prior control system ever stabilized the RF field in a linac cavity with such high loaded Q, but also highest field stability in amplitude and phase is required at this high loaded Q. Because of a resulting bandwidth of the cavity of only a few Hz, this presents a significant challenge: the field in the cavity extremely sensitive to any perturbation of the cavity resonance frequency due to microphonics and Lorentz force detuning. To prove that the RF field in a high loaded Q cavity can be stabilized, and that Cornell's newly developed digital control system is able to achieve this, the system was connected to a high loaded Q cavity at the JLab IR-FEL. Excellent cw field stability--about 10{sup -4} rms in relative amplitude and 0.02 deg rms in phase--was achieved at a loaded Q of 2.1 x 10{sup 7} and 1.2 x 10{sup 8}, setting a new record in high loaded Q operation of a linac cavity. Piezo tuner based cavity frequency control proved to be very effective in keeping the cavity on resonance and allowed reliable to ramp up to high gradients in less than 1 second.

  1. Limit load solution for electron beam welded joints with single edge weld center crack in tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wei; Shi, Yaowu; Li, Xiaoyan; Lei, Yongping

    2012-05-01

    Limit loads are widely studied and several limit load solutions are proposed to some typical geometry of weldments. However, there are no limit load solutions exist for the single edge crack weldments in tension (SEC(T)), which is also a typical geometry in fracture analysis. The mis-matching limit load for thick plate with SEC(T) are investigated and the special limit load solutions are proposed based on the available mis-matching limit load solutions and systematic finite element analyses. The real weld configurations are simplified as a strip, and different weld strength mis-matching ratio M, crack depth/width ratio a/ W and weld width 2H are in consideration. As a result, it is found that there exists excellent agreement between the limit load solutions and the FE results for almost all the mis-matching ration M, a/ W and ligament-to-weld width ratio ( W-a)/ H. Moreover, useful recommendations are given for evaluating the limit loads of the EBW structure with SEC(T). For the EBW joints with SEC(T), the mis-matching limit loads can be obtained assuming that the components are wholly made of base metal, when M changing from 1.6 to 0.6. When M decreasing to 0.4, the mis-matching limit loads can be obtained assuming that the components are wholly made of base metal only for large value of ( W-a)/ H. The recommendations may be useful for evaluating the limit loads of the EBW structures with SEC(T). The engineering simplifications are given for assessing the limit loads of electron beam welded structure with SEC(T).

  2. Limit Load and Buckling Analysis for Assessing Hanford Single-Shell Tank Dome Structural Integrity - 12278

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Ken I.; Deibler, John E.; Karri, Naveen K.; Pilli, Siva P.; Julyk, Larry J.

    2012-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection has commissioned a structural analysis of record for the Hanford single shell tanks to assess their structural integrity. The analysis used finite element techniques to predict the tank response to the historical thermal and operating loads. The analysis also addressed the potential tank response to a postulated design basis earthquake. The combined response to static and seismic loads was then evaluated against the design requirements of American Concrete Institute standard, ACI-349-06, for nuclear safety-related concrete structures. Further analysis was conducted to estimate the plastic limit load and the elastic-plastic buckling capacity of the tanks. The limit load and buckling analyses estimate the margin between the applied loads and the limiting load capacities of the tank structure. The potential for additional dome loads from waste retrieval equipment and the addition of large dome penetrations to accommodate retrieval equipment has generated additional interest in the limit load and buckling analyses. This paper summarizes the structural analysis methods that were used to evaluate the limit load and buckling of the single shell tanks. This paper summarizes the structural analysis methods that were used to evaluate the limit load and buckling limit states of the underground single shell tanks at the Hanford site. The limit loads were calculated using nonlinear finite element models that capture the progressive deformation and damage to the concrete as it approaches the limit load. Both uniform and concentrated loads over the tank dome were considered, and the analysis shows how adding a penetration in the center of the tank would affect the limit loads. For uniform surface loads, the penetration does not affect the limit load because concrete crushing and rebar yielding initiates first at the top of the wall, away from the penetration. For concentrated loads, crushing initiates at the center of the

  3. 76 FR 44245 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Limit Engine Torque Loads for Sudden Engine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-25

    ... transient dynamic loads resulting from: (a) The loss of any fan, compressor, or turbine blade; and (b... Administration 14 CFR Part 25 Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Limit Engine Torque Loads for... load imposed by sudden engine stoppage. These special conditions pertain to their effects on...

  4. Diffusion-Limited Cargo Loading of an Engineered Protein Container.

    PubMed

    Zschoche, Reinhard; Hilvert, Donald

    2015-12-30

    The engineered bacterial nanocompartment AaLS-13 is a promising artificial encapsulation system that exploits electrostatic interactions for cargo loading. In order to study its ability to take up and retain guests, a pair of fluorescent proteins was developed which allows spectroscopic determination of the extent of encapsulation by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). The encapsulation process is generally complete within a second, suggesting low energetic barriers for proteins to cross the capsid shell. Formation of intermediate aggregates upon mixing host and guest in vitro complicates capsid loading at low ionic strength, but can be sidestepped by increasing salt concentrations or diluting the components. Encapsulation of guests is completely reversible, and the position of the equilibrium is easily tuned by varying the ionic strength. These results, which challenge the notion that AaLS-13 is a continuous rigid shell, provide valuable information about cargo loading that will guide ongoing efforts to engineer functional host-guest complexes. Moreover, it should be possible to adapt the protein FRET pair described in this report to characterize functional capsid-cargo complexes generated by other encapsulation systems.

  5. Fatigue design of wind turbine blades: Load and resistance factors from limited data

    SciTech Connect

    Lange, C.H.; Winterstein, S.R.

    1996-10-01

    This paper considers the design of wind turbine blades to resist fatigue failures. It shows new models to reflect the impact of limited information, and applies these to several cases with notably different amounts of loads data. In each case separate load and resistance factors are developed for fatigue-resistant design. When load data are abundant, reliability is found to be driven almost solely by the resistance; e.g., by the conservatism implied in the design S-N curve. The case of sparse-load data is found to yield roughly equal contributions from load and resistance uncertainty, suggesting roughly equal conservatism should be assigned to load and resistance factors.

  6. 78 FR 28896 - Design Limits and Loading Combinations for Metal Primary Reactor Containment System Components

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ... COMMISSION Design Limits and Loading Combinations for Metal Primary Reactor Containment System Components... Regulatory Commission (NRC) is issuing Revision 2 to Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.57, ``Design Limits and Loading Combinations for Metal Primary Reactor Containment System Components,'' in which there are no...

  7. 49 CFR 393.108 - How is the working load limit of a tiedown, or the load restraining value of a friction mat...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... load restraining value of a friction mat, determined? 393.108 Section 393.108 Transportation Other... load restraining value of a friction mat, determined? (a) The working load limit (WLL) of a tiedown... load limits. (g) Friction mats which are not marked or rated by the manufacturer shall be considered...

  8. 49 CFR 393.108 - How is the working load limit of a tiedown, or the load restraining value of a friction mat...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... load restraining value of a friction mat, determined? 393.108 Section 393.108 Transportation Other... load restraining value of a friction mat, determined? (a) The working load limit (WLL) of a tiedown... load limits. (g) Friction mats which are not marked or rated by the manufacturer shall be considered...

  9. 49 CFR 393.108 - How is the working load limit of a tiedown, or the load restraining value of a friction mat...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... load restraining value of a friction mat, determined? 393.108 Section 393.108 Transportation Other... load restraining value of a friction mat, determined? (a) The working load limit (WLL) of a tiedown... load limits. (g) Friction mats which are not marked or rated by the manufacturer shall be considered...

  10. 49 CFR 393.108 - How is the working load limit of a tiedown, or the load restraining value of a friction mat...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... load restraining value of a friction mat, determined? 393.108 Section 393.108 Transportation Other... load restraining value of a friction mat, determined? (a) The working load limit (WLL) of a tiedown... load limits. (g) Friction mats which are not marked or rated by the manufacturer shall be considered...

  11. 49 CFR 393.108 - How is the working load limit of a tiedown, or the load restraining value of a friction mat...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... load restraining value of a friction mat, determined? 393.108 Section 393.108 Transportation Other... load restraining value of a friction mat, determined? (a) The working load limit (WLL) of a tiedown... load limits. (g) Friction mats which are not marked or rated by the manufacturer shall be considered...

  12. Rankine cycle load limiting through use of a recuperator bypass

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, Timothy C.

    2011-08-16

    A system for converting heat from an engine into work includes a boiler coupled to a heat source for transferring heat to a working fluid, a turbine that transforms the heat into work, a condenser that transforms the working fluid into liquid, a recuperator with one flow path that routes working fluid from the turbine to the condenser, and another flow path that routes liquid working fluid from the condenser to the boiler, the recuperator being configured to transfer heat to the liquid working fluid, and a bypass valve in parallel with the second flow path. The bypass valve is movable between a closed position, permitting flow through the second flow path and an opened position, under high engine load conditions, bypassing the second flow path.

  13. Limit Load and Buckling Analysis for Assessing Hanford Single-Shell Tank Dome Structural Integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Kenneth I.; Deibler, John E.; Julyk, Larry J.; Karri, Naveen K.; Pilli, Siva Prasad

    2012-12-07

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection has commissioned a structural analysis of record (AOR) for the Hanford single shell tanks (SSTs) to assess their structural integrity. The analysis used finite element techniques to predict the tank response to the historical thermal and operating loads. The analysis also addressed the potential tank response to a postulated design basis earthquake. The combined response to static and seismic loads was then evaluated against the design requirements of American Concrete Institute (ACI) standard, ACI-349-06, for nuclear safety-related concrete structures. Further analysis was conducted to estimate the plastic limit load and the elastic-plastic buckling capacity of the tanks. The limit load and buckling analyses estimate the margin between the applied loads and the limiting load capacities of the tank structure. The potential for additional dome loads from waste retrieval equipment and the addition of large dome penetrations to accommodate retrieval equipment has generated additional interest in the limit load and buckling analyses. This paper summarizes the structural analysis methods that were used to evaluate the limit load and buckling of the single shell tanks.

  14. Methods for combining payload parameter variations with input environment. [calculating design limit loads compatible with probabilistic structural design criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merchant, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    Methods are presented for calculating design limit loads compatible with probabilistic structural design criteria. The approach is based on the concept that the desired limit load, defined as the largest load occurring in a mission, is a random variable having a specific probability distribution which may be determined from extreme-value theory. The design limit load, defined as a particular of this random limit load, is the value conventionally used in structural design. Methods are presented for determining the limit load probability distributions from both time-domain and frequency-domain dynamic load simulations. Numerical demonstrations of the method are also presented.

  15. Gloeobacter Rhodopsin, Limitation of Proton Pumping at High Electrochemical Load

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Arend; Wietek, Jonas; Hegemann, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We studied the photocurrents of a cyanobacterial rhodopsin Gloeobacter violaceus (GR) in Xenopus laevis oocytes and HEK-293 cells. This protein is a light-driven proton pump with striking similarities to marine proteorhodopsins, including the D121-H87 cluster of the retinal Schiff base counterion and a glutamate at position 132 that acts as a proton donor for chromophore reprotonation during the photocycle. Interestingly, at low extracellular pHo and negative voltage, the proton flux inverted and directed inward. Using electrophysiological measurements of wild-type and mutant GR, we demonstrate that the electrochemical gradient limits outward-directed proton pumping and converts it into a purely passive proton influx. This conclusion contradicts the contemporary paradigm that at low pH, proteorhodopsins actively transport H+ into cells. We identified E132 and S77 as key residues that allow inward directed diffusion. Substitution of E132 with aspartate or S77 with either alanine or cysteine abolished the inward-directed current almost completely. The proton influx is likely caused by the pKa of E132 in GR, which is lower than that of other microbial ion pumping rhodopsins. The advantage of such a low pKa is an acceleration of the photocycle and high pump turnover at high light intensities. PMID:24209850

  16. Plastic Limit Load Analysis of Cylindrical Pressure Vessels with Different Nozzle Inclination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Anupam; Raval, Harit Kishorchandra; Gandhi, Anish; Pawar, Dipak Bapu

    2016-04-01

    Sudden change in geometry of pressure vessel due to nozzle cutout, leads to local stress concentration and deformation, decreasing its strength. Elastic plastic analysis of cylindrical pressure vessels with different inclination angles of nozzle is important to estimate plastic limit load. In the present study, cylindrical pressure vessels with combined inclination of nozzles (i.e. in longitudinal and radial plane) are considered for elastic plastic limit load analysis. Three dimensional static nonlinear finite element analyses of cylindrical pressure vessels with nozzle are performed for incremental pressure loading. The von Mises stress distribution on pressure vessel shows higher stress zones at shell-nozzle junction. Approximate plastic limit load is obtained by twice elastic slope method. Variation in limit pressure with different combined inclination angle of nozzle is analyzed and found to be distinct in nature. Reported results can be helpful in optimizing pressure vessel design.

  17. A platform for actively loading cargo RNA to elucidate limiting steps in EV-mediated delivery.

    PubMed

    Hung, Michelle E; Leonard, Joshua N

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) mediate intercellular communication through transfer of RNA and protein between cells. Thus, understanding how cargo molecules are loaded and delivered by EVs is of central importance for elucidating the biological roles of EVs and developing EV-based therapeutics. While some motifs modulating the loading of biomolecular cargo into EVs have been elucidated, the general rules governing cargo loading and delivery remain poorly understood. To investigate how general biophysical properties impact loading and delivery of RNA by EVs, we developed a platform for actively loading engineered cargo RNAs into EVs. In our system, the MS2 bacteriophage coat protein was fused to EV-associated proteins, and the cognate MS2 stem loop was engineered into cargo RNAs. Using this Targeted and Modular EV Loading (TAMEL) approach, we identified a configuration that substantially enhanced cargo RNA loading (up to 6-fold) into EVs. When applied to vesicles expressing the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSVG) - gesicles - we observed a 40-fold enrichment in cargo RNA loading. While active loading of mRNA-length (>1.5 kb) cargo molecules was possible, active loading was much more efficient for smaller (~0.5 kb) RNA molecules. We next leveraged the TAMEL platform to elucidate the limiting steps in EV-mediated delivery of mRNA and protein to prostate cancer cells, as a model system. Overall, most cargo was rapidly degraded in recipient cells, despite high EV-loading efficiencies and substantial EV uptake by recipient cells. While gesicles were efficiently internalized via a VSVG-mediated mechanism, most cargo molecules were rapidly degraded. Thus, in this model system, inefficient endosomal fusion or escape likely represents a limiting barrier to EV-mediated transfer. Altogether, the TAMEL platform enabled a comparative analysis elucidating a key opportunity for enhancing EV-mediated delivery to prostate cancer cells, and this technology should be of

  18. Backpack load limit recommendation for middle school students based on physiological and psychophysical measurements.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Denise H; Freivalds, Andris

    2009-01-01

    The load of student's backpacks has raised questions over the safety and health of schoolchildren everywhere. The purpose of this study is to use electromyography (EMG), posture evaluation, heart rate, and ratings of perceived exertion and perceptions of pain to find an acceptable backpack load limit for middle school students. Twenty middle school students aged 11 to 14 (10 female and 10 male) volunteered for the study. The subjects completed two tests, standing stationary and walking on a treadmill, where they carried 5% incremental loads from 0% body mass (BM) to 20% BM. The study indicated that the Borg-CR10 ratings and trunk flexion angle for the walking trial indicated a possible load limit of 10% BM due to the non-significant difference between 0 and 10% BM and the significant difference between 10 and 15% BM. PMID:19369726

  19. Load transmission characteristics of limited carpal fusions: a two-dimensional finite element study.

    PubMed

    Bicen, A C; Gokdemir, H; Seber, S; Aydin, R; Gunal, I

    2015-02-01

    Although limited carpal fusion is a choice of treatment in several wrist disorders, little is known about the biomechanics of these procedures, especially the loads carried by the ligaments. In a finite element study, four types of limited carpal fusions (scaphotrapeziotrapezoid, capitohamate, four corner fusion with and without scaphoid excision) were simulated and the loads carried by the ligaments were recorded. Measurements were repeated with and without implantation. The load transmission through the ligaments varied by the type of the fusion but, radioscaphoid and long radiolunate ligaments carried significantly more loads if not excised during the operation. Implantation did not affect the results in most cases. The model of the present study may be useful in preoperative planning.

  20. Loading Path Dependence of Forming Limit Diagram of a TRIP800 Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kyoo Sil; Soulami, Ayoub; Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-04-12

    In this paper, the microstructure-based finite element modeling method is used in investigating the loading path dependence of formability of transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) steels. For this purpose, the effects of different loading path on the forming limit diagrams (FLD) of TRIP steels are qualitatively examined using the representative volume element (RVE) of a commercial TRIP800 steel. First, the modeling method was introduced, where a combined isotropic/kinematic hardening rule is adopted for the constituent phases in order to rightly describe the cyclic deformation behaviors of TRIP steels during the forming process with combined loading paths which may include the unloading between the two consecutive loadings. Material parameters for the constituent phases remained the same as those in the authors’ previous study [1] except for some adjustments for the martensite phase due to the introduction of the new combined hardening rule. Based on the new material parameters and new hardening rule, the predicted deformation behaviors of the TRIP800 steel show quite similar qualitative trends to those reported in other experimental works. Pseudo-forming limit strain diagrams (Pseudo-FLD) for the TRIP800 steel were, then, obtained for various loading paths. The computational results show that, similar to other single phase materials, the TRIP800 steel shows very sensitive loading path dependence in the strain-based forming limit diagrams (strain-FLD), but does not in the stress-based forming limit diagrams (stress-FLD), and that the phase transformation does not have significant effects on the FLD for the TRIP800 steel. From the observations in this study, the current modeling methods can be used in examining the qualitative trends of FLD of TRIP steels under different loading paths/prestrains.

  1. The effects of backpack load carrying on dynamic balance as measured by limits of stability.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, Nicole; George, Brad; Johnson, Amanda; Cade, Dennis

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this research was to determine if standing dynamic balance was affected by carrying a backpack. SUBJECTS: Data was obtained from 50 healthy college students. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Limits of stability was assessed using the Smart Equitest Balance Master System(R). Reaction time, movement velocity, end point excursion, maximum excursion, and directional control were measured to evaluate movement, with and without a loaded backpack. DATA ANALYSIS: Reliability was established using an Intra-Class Correlation Coefficient (2,1). MANOVA was utilized to analyze the effect of the backpack. SUMMARY DATA: Movement velocity significantly decreased during backpack loaded trials (p=0.004). Directional control was significantly different with respect to direction (p=0.006). No significant difference in reaction time, maximum excursion, or end point excursion was observed with backpack loading (p=0.10-0.93). CONCLUSION: This study concludes that backpack load carrying has an effect on movement velocity and directional control. PMID:12441465

  2. Effect of crash pulse shape on seat stroke requirements for limiting loads on occupants of aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, Huey D.

    1992-01-01

    An analytical study was made to provide comparative information on various crash pulse shapes that potentially could be used to test seats under conditions included in Federal Regulations Part 23 Paragraph 23.562(b)(1) for dynamic testing of general aviation seats, show the effects that crash pulse shape can have on the seat stroke requirements necessary to maintain a specified limit loading on the seat/occupant during crash pulse loadings, compare results from certain analytical model pulses with approximations of actual crash pulses, and compare analytical seat results with experimental airplace crash data. Structural and seat/occupant displacement equations in terms of the maximum deceleration, velocity change, limit seat pan load, and pulse time for five potentially useful pulse shapes were derived; from these, analytical seat stroke data were obtained for conditions as specified in Federal Regulations Part 23 Paragraph 23.562(b)(1) for dynamic testing of general aviation seats.

  3. 76 FR 8778 - Construction Standards on Posting Emergency Telephone Numbers and Floor Load Limits; Extension of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ... Floor Load Limits; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) Approval of Information... extend OMB approval of the information collection requirements specified by the Construction Standards on... for the Information Collection Request (ICR) (OSHA-2011- 0032). All comments, including any...

  4. Effects of specimen size on limiting compressive loading for silicate, ceramic, and other materials

    SciTech Connect

    Okhrimenko, G.M.

    1995-06-01

    Published data are examined on the ultimate strength in uniaxial compression for glass, glass ceramics, porcelain, crystalline silicon, periclase - spinel - chromite material PSCM, and ferrite in relation to the specimen dimensions. Two methods are proposed for combined experimental and computational estimation of the effects from the volume on the limiting load, which are based only on the data obtained from testing specimens with one or two standard dimensions.

  5. 76 FR 10213 - Special Conditions: Embraer Model EMB-135BJ (Legacy 650) Airplanes, Limit Engine Torque Loads for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-24

    ... 650) Airplanes, Limit Engine Torque Loads for Sudden Engine Stoppage AGENCY: Federal Aviation... engine size and the potential torque load imposed by sudden engine-stoppage conditions. The applicable... incorporate novel or unusual design features involving engine size and the potential torque load imposed...

  6. Advances in developing HIV-1 viral load assays for resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Wang, ShuQi; Xu, Feng; Demirci, Utkan

    2010-01-01

    Commercial HIV-1 RNA viral load assays have been routinely used in developed countries to monitor antiretroviral treatment (ART). However, these assays require expensive equipment and reagents, well-trained operators, and established laboratory infrastructure. These requirements restrict their use in resource-limited settings where people are most afflicted with the HIV-1 epidemic. Inexpensive alternatives such as the Ultrasensitive p24 assay, the reverse transcriptase (RT) assay and in-house reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) have been developed. However, they are still time-consuming, technologically complex and inappropriate for decentralized laboratories as point-of-care (POC) tests. Recent advances in microfluidics and nanotechnology offer new strategies to develop low-cost, rapid, robust and simple HIV-1 viral load monitoring systems. We review state-of-the-art technologies used for HIV-1 viral load monitoring in both developed and developing settings. Emerging approaches based on microfluidics and nanotechnology, which have potential to be integrated into POC HIV-1 viral load assays, are also discussed.

  7. 3D edge transport analysis of ITER start-up configuration for limiter power load assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, M.; Feng, Y.; Loarte, A.; Federici, G.; Strohmayer, G.; Shimada, M.; Sardei, F.; Reiter, D.; Sugihara, M.

    2007-02-01

    The edge transport properties of the toroidally discrete limiter configuration in the ITER start-up phase has been analysed, using the 3D edge transport code, EMC3-EIRENE. Because of the finite magnetic shear in the edge, the interaction of the limiters with flux surfaces of different q-values introduces a complex 3D pattern in the connection length (LC) profiles, where long and short flux tubes co-exist in the scrape-off layer. The severity of problems associated with very long flux tubes in the edge, which could bring a large amount of energy (proportional to the square root of LC) and cause a hot spot on the limiter, was mitigated and no significant localized power load was found. This can be justified as follows. (i) For long flux tubes, the perpendicular energy transport time becomes shorter than the parallel energy transport time, resulting in no net energy input to the flux tube. (ii) Perpendicular transport was found to be very effective to smear out the difference in the parallel energy flux conducted by the various flux tubes, if they interact within a perpendicular transport scale, about a few cm, which is usually the case in high plasma current ITER start-up configuration. These two effects significantly reduce the dependence of energy deposition on LC. At the high plasma current (e.g. 6.5 MA), the peak power load is found to be close to the engineering limit, especially for lowest perpendicular transport coefficients and the highest input power. Comparing the results of the 3D modelling with a radial exponential decay model, it was found that by neglecting the 3D geometrical effects, the simple model overestimates the peak power load by ~30% for corresponding input power and radial decay of energy flux.

  8. Limitation of Finite Element Analysis of Poroelastic Behavior of Biological Tissues Undergoing Rapid Loading

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, Ian A.; Chegini, Salman; Ferguson, Stephen J.; Gardner-Morse, Mack G.; Iatridis, James C.; Laible, Jeffrey P.

    2010-01-01

    The finite element method is used in biomechanics to provide numerical solutions to simulations of structures having complex geometry and spatially differing material properties. Time-varying load deformation behaviors can result from solid viscoelasticity as well as viscous fluid flow through porous materials. Finite element poroelastic analysis of rapidly loaded slow-draining materials may be ill-conditioned, but this problem is not widely known in the biomechanics field. It appears as instabilities in the calculation of interstitial fluid pressures, especially near boundaries and between different materials. Accurate solutions can require impractical compromises between mesh size and time steps. This article investigates the constraints imposed by this problem on tissues representative of the intervertebral disc, subjected to moderate physiological rates of deformation. Two test cylindrical structures were found to require over 104 linear displacement-constant pressure elements to avoid serious oscillations in calculated fluid pressure. Fewer Taylor–Hood (quadratic displacement–linear pressure elements) were required, but with complementary increases in computational costs. The Vermeer–Verruijt criterion for 1D mesh size provided guidelines for 3D mesh sizes for given time steps. Pressure instabilities may impose limitations on the use of the finite element method for simulating fluid transport behaviors of biological soft tissues at moderately rapid physiological loading rates. PMID:20306136

  9. Behaviour of Silicon-Doped CFC Limiter under High Heat Load in TEXTOR-94

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, A.; Philipps, V.; Hirai, T.; Kirschner, A.; Lehnen, M.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Schweer, B.; Sergienko, G.

    In order to study the impurity production, recycling and power deposition a Si doped CFC test limiter (NS31) was used in TEXTOR-94. The release of impurities (C, Si, O, Cr, CD radicals) was measured spectroscopically. A reduced methane production was found in the Si doped graphite when compared to a pure graphite limiter. A smaller decrease of the carbon fluxes could also be observed. The limiter contained about 1%-1.5% of Si, but a relative Si flux (Si/D) from the Si doped CFC surface between 0.12% and 0.4% has been measured. A chemical erosion of Si due to formation of SiDx has not been observed. Silicon evaporated from the surface at temperatures above 1500°C. This led to an increase of Si concentration and total radiation losses from the plasma. Surface analysis shows the formation of microcracks and holes on the plasma exposed limiter surface. The released Si was deposited in the vicinity of the tangency point of the limiter. Whereas a Si depletion was observed in the area of highest power loading with values reaching in and in-between fibres values of 0.03% and 0.02% respectively.

  10. Effects of Hypotonic Saline Loading in Hydrated Dog: Evidence for a Saline-induced Limit on Distal Tubular Sodium Transport*

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Richard M.; Abramson, Ruth G.; Kahn, Thomas; Levitt, Marvin F.

    1967-01-01

    We performed studies on dogs under hydrated conditions, utilizing the rate of free water formation (CH2O) as an index of the rate of distal tubular sodium transport. Since CH2O could be progressively increased with no evidence of a maximal rate during loading with hypotonic (2.5%) mannitol, it was concluded that there is no limit on distal tubular sodium transport during mannitol loading. In contrast, during hypotonic (0.45%) saline loading CH2O rose initially, but as urine flow (V) exceeded 25% of the filtered load CH2O attained maximal levels (up to 20% of the filtered load) and remained stable as V increased to 50% of the filtered load. It was concluded that saline loading progressively inhibits proximal sodium reabsorption. Initially, the distal tubule absorbes a large fraction of the proximal rejectate and sodium excretion rises slightly. Eventually, an alteration in distal sodium transport appears which culminates in a maximal rate or transport limit. This distal transport limit provoked by saline loading could not be characterized by a classical Tm as seen with glucose and does not seem to be consequent to high rates of flow through the distal tubule. Regardless of the precise nature of this limit, the major increment in sodium excretion develops during saline loading only after saline alters the capacity of the distal tubule to transport sodium. PMID:6027084

  11. Developments in CD4 and viral load monitoring in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Christopher F

    2014-02-01

    CD4 counts and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) load testing are essential components of HIV care, and making these tests available in resource-limited settings is critical to the roll-out of HIV treatment globally. Until recently, the evidence supporting the importance of laboratory monitoring in resource-limited settings was lacking, but there is now a consensus emerging that testing should become routine to ensure the longevity of treatment programs. Low-cost, point-of-care testing offers the potential to fill this role as it potentially improves all aspects of HIV care, ranging from the diagnosis and staging of HIV infection in both infants and adults to monitoring for treatment failure once antiretroviral therapy has been initiated. It is imperative for low-cost solutions to become a reality, but it is equally imperative that close scrutiny be given to each new device that hits the market to ensure they perform optimally in all settings.

  12. Monitoring HIV Viral Load in Resource Limited Settings: Still a Matter of Debate?

    PubMed Central

    Arnedo, Mireia; Alonso, Elena; Eisenberg, Nell; Ibáñez, Laura; Ferreyra, Cecilia; Jaén, Angels; Flevaud, Laurence; Khamadi, Samuel; Roddy, Paul; Gatell, Jose Maria; Dalmau, David

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Consequences of lack of viral monitoring in predicting the effects of development of HIV drug resistance mutations during HAART in resource-limited settings (RLS) is still a matter of debate. Design To assess, among HIV+ patients receiving their first-line HAART, prevalence of virological failure and genotypic resistance mutations pattern in a Médécins Sans Frontières/Ministry of Health programme in Busia District (Kenya). Methods Patients with HAART treatment for ≥12 months were eligible for the study and those with HIV-RNA ≥5000 copies/ml underwent genotypic study. Total HIV-1 RNA from Dried Blood Spots was extracted using Nuclisens method. Results 926 patients were included. Among 274 (29.6%) patients with detectable viral load, 55 (5.9%) experienced treatment failure (viral load >5.000 copies/ml); 61.8% were female and 10 (18.2%) had clinical failure. Median CD4 cell count was 116 cell/mm3 (IQR: 54–189). Median HIV-RNA was 32,000 copies/ml (IQR: 11000–68000). Eighteen out of 55 (33%) samples could be sequenced on PR and RT genes, with resistance associated mutations (RAMs) in 15 out of 18 samples (83%). Among patients carrying RAMs, 12/15 (81%) harboured RAMs associated to thymidine analogues (TAMs). All of them (100%) showed M184V resistance associated mutation to lamivudine as well as NNRTI's RAMS. Conclusions Virological failure rate in resource-limited settings are similar to those observed in developed countries. Resistance mutation patterns were concordant with HAART received by failing patients. Long term detectable viral load confers greater probability of developing resistance and as a consequence, making difficult to find out a cost-effective subsequent treatment regimen. PMID:23236346

  13. Wind, Waves, and Wing Loading: Morphological Specialization May Limit Range Expansion of Endangered Albatrosses

    PubMed Central

    Suryan, Robert M.; Anderson, David J.; Shaffer, Scott A.; Roby, Daniel D.; Tremblay, Yann; Costa, Daniel P.; Sievert, Paul R.; Sato, Fumio; Ozaki, Kiyoaki; Balogh, Gregory R.; Nakamura, Noboru

    2008-01-01

    Among the varied adaptations for avian flight, the morphological traits allowing large-bodied albatrosses to capitalize on wind and wave energy for efficient long-distance flight are unparalleled. Consequently, the biogeographic distribution of most albatrosses is limited to the windiest oceanic regions on earth; however, exceptions exist. Species breeding in the North and Central Pacific Ocean (Phoebastria spp.) inhabit regions of lower wind speed and wave height than southern hemisphere genera, and have large intrageneric variation in body size and aerodynamic performance. Here, we test the hypothesis that regional wind and wave regimes explain observed differences in Phoebastria albatross morphology and we compare their aerodynamic performance to representatives from the other three genera of this globally distributed avian family. In the North and Central Pacific, two species (short-tailed P. albatrus and waved P. irrorata) are markedly larger, yet have the smallest breeding ranges near highly productive coastal upwelling systems. Short-tailed albatrosses, however, have 60% higher wing loading (weight per area of lift) compared to waved albatrosses. Indeed, calculated aerodynamic performance of waved albatrosses, the only tropical albatross species, is more similar to those of their smaller congeners (black-footed P. nigripes and Laysan P. immutabilis), which have relatively low wing loading and much larger foraging ranges that include central oceanic gyres of relatively low productivity. Globally, the aerodynamic performance of short-tailed and waved albatrosses are most anomalous for their body sizes, yet consistent with wind regimes within their breeding season foraging ranges. Our results are the first to integrate global wind and wave patterns with albatross aerodynamics, thereby identifying morphological specialization that may explain limited breeding ranges of two endangered albatross species. These results are further relevant to understanding past and

  14. Wind, waves, and wing loading: morphological specialization may limit range expansion of endangered albatrosses.

    PubMed

    Suryan, Robert M; Anderson, David J; Shaffer, Scott A; Roby, Daniel D; Tremblay, Yann; Costa, Daniel P; Sievert, Paul R; Sato, Fumio; Ozaki, Kiyoaki; Balogh, Gregory R; Nakamura, Noboru

    2008-01-01

    Among the varied adaptations for avian flight, the morphological traits allowing large-bodied albatrosses to capitalize on wind and wave energy for efficient long-distance flight are unparalleled. Consequently, the biogeographic distribution of most albatrosses is limited to the windiest oceanic regions on earth; however, exceptions exist. Species breeding in the North and Central Pacific Ocean (Phoebastria spp.) inhabit regions of lower wind speed and wave height than southern hemisphere genera, and have large intrageneric variation in body size and aerodynamic performance. Here, we test the hypothesis that regional wind and wave regimes explain observed differences in Phoebastria albatross morphology and we compare their aerodynamic performance to representatives from the other three genera of this globally distributed avian family. In the North and Central Pacific, two species (short-tailed P. albatrus and waved P. irrorata) are markedly larger, yet have the smallest breeding ranges near highly productive coastal upwelling systems. Short-tailed albatrosses, however, have 60% higher wing loading (weight per area of lift) compared to waved albatrosses. Indeed, calculated aerodynamic performance of waved albatrosses, the only tropical albatross species, is more similar to those of their smaller congeners (black-footed P. nigripes and Laysan P. immutabilis), which have relatively low wing loading and much larger foraging ranges that include central oceanic gyres of relatively low productivity. Globally, the aerodynamic performance of short-tailed and waved albatrosses are most anomalous for their body sizes, yet consistent with wind regimes within their breeding season foraging ranges. Our results are the first to integrate global wind and wave patterns with albatross aerodynamics, thereby identifying morphological specialization that may explain limited breeding ranges of two endangered albatross species. These results are further relevant to understanding past and

  15. Wind, waves, and wing loading: Morphological specialization may limit range expansion of endangered albatrosses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Suryan, R.M.; Anderson, D.J.; Shaffer, S.A.; Roby, D.D.; Tremblay, Y.; Costa, D.P.; Sievert, P.R.; Sato, F.; Ozaki, K.; Balogh, G.R.; Nakamura, N.

    2008-01-01

    Among the varied adaptations for avian flight, the morphological traits allowing large-bodied albatrosses to capitalize on wind and wave energy for efficient long-distance flight are unparalleled. Consequently, the biogeographic distribution of most albatrosses is limited to the windiest oceanic regions on earth; however, exceptions exist. Species breeding in the North and Central Pacific Ocean (Phoebastria spp.) inhabit regions of lower wind speed and wave height than southern hemisphere genera, and have large intrageneric variation in body size and aerodynamic performance. Here, we test the hypothesis that regional wind and wave regimes explain observed differences in Phoebastria albatross morphology and we compare their aerodynamic performance to representatives from the other three genera of this globally distributed avian family. In the North and Central Pacific, two species (short-tailed P. albatrus and waved P. irrorata) are markedly larger, yet have the smallest breeding ranges near highly productive coastal upwelling systems. Short-tailed albatrosses, however, have 60% higher wing loading (weight per area of lift) compared to waved albatrosses. Indeed, calculated aerodynamic performance of waved albatrosses, the only tropical albatross species, is more similar to those of their smaller congeners (black-footed P. nigripes and Laysan P. immutabilis), which have relatively low wing loading and much larger foraging ranges that include central oceanic gyres of relatively low productivity. Globally, the aerodynamic performance of short-tailed and waved albatrosses are most anomalous for their body sizes, yet consistent with wind regimes within their breeding season foraging ranges. Our results are the first to integrate global wind and wave patterns with albatross aerodynamics, thereby identifying morphological specialization that may explain limited breeding ranges of two endangered albatross species. These results are further relevant to understanding past and

  16. Characterization of Engine Control Authority on HCCI Combustion as the High Load Limit is Approached

    SciTech Connect

    Szybist, James P; Edwards, Kevin Dean; Foster, Matthew; Confer, Keith; Moore, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    While the potential emissions and efficiency benefits of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion are well known, realizing the potentials on a production intent engine presents numerous challenges. In this study we focus on characterizing the authority of the available engine controls as the high load limit of HCCI combustion is approached. The experimental work is performed on a boosted single-cylinder research engine equipped with direct injection (DI) fueling, cooled external exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), and a hydraulic valve actuation (HVA) valve train to enable the negative valve overlap (NVO) breathing strategy. Valve lift and duration are held constant while phasing is varied in an effort to make the results as relevant as possible to production intent cam-based variable valve actuation (VVA) systems on multi-cylinder engines. Results presented include engine loads from 350 to 650 kPa IMEPnet and manifold pressure from 98 to 190 kPaa at 2000 rpm. It is found that in order to increase engine load to 650 kPa IMEPnet, it is necessary to increase manifold pressure and external EGR while reducing the NVO duration. Both NVO duration and fuel injection timing are effective means of controlling combustion phasing, with NVO duration being a coarse control and fuel injection timing being a fine control. NOX emissions are low throughout the study, with emissions below 0.1 g/kW-h at all boosted HCCI conditions, while good combustion efficiency is maintained (>96.5%). Net indicated thermal efficiency increases with load up to 600 kPa IMEPnet, where a peak efficiency of 41% is achieved. Results of independent parametric investigations are presented on the effect of external EGR, intake effect of manifold pressure, and the effect of NVO duration. It is found that increasing EGR at a constant manifold pressure and increasing manifold pressure at a constant EGR rate both have the effect of retarding combustion phasing. It is also found that combustion

  17. Full-scale crash-test evaluation of two load-limiting subfloors for general aviation airframes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, H. D.

    1984-01-01

    Three six place, low wing, twin engine general aviation airplane test specimens were crash tested at the Langley Impact Dynamics Research Facility under controlled free flight conditions. One structurally unmodified airplane was the base line specimen for the test series. The other two airplanes were structurally modified to incorporate load limiting (energy absorbing) subfloor concepts into the structure for full scale crash test evaluation and for comparison with the unmodified airplane test results. Typically, the lowest floor accelerations, the lowest anthropomorphic dummy responses, and the least seat crushing of standard and load limiting seats occurred in the airplanes modified with load limiting subfloors, wherein the greatest structural crushing of the subfloor took place. The better performing of the two load limiting subfloor concepts reduced the peak airplane floor accelerations to -25g to -30g as compared with approximately -40g to -55g for the unmodified airplane structure.

  18. HCCI Load Expansion Opportunities Using a Fully Variable HVA Research Engine to Guide Developments of a Production Intent Cam-Based VVA Engine: The Low Load Limit

    SciTech Connect

    Weall, Adam J; Szybist, James P; Edwards, Kevin Dean; Foster, Matthew; Confer, Keith; Moore, Wayne

    2012-01-01

    While the potential emissions and efficiency benefits of HCCI combustion are well known, realizing the potentials on a production intent engine presents numerous challenges. In this study we focus on identifying challenges and opportunities associated with a production intent cam-based variable valve actuation (VVA) system on a multi-cylinder engine in comparison to a fully flexible, naturally aspirated, hydraulic valve actuation (HVA) system on a single-cylinder engine, with both platforms sharing the same GDI fueling system and engine geometry. The multi-cylinder production intent VVA system uses a 2-step cam technology with wide authority cam phasing, allowing adjustments to be made to the negative valve overlap (NVO) duration but not the valve opening durations. On the single cylinder HVA engine, the valve opening duration and lift are variable in addition to the NVO duration. The content of this paper is limited to the low-medium operating load region at 2000rpm. Using different injection strategies, including the NVO pilot injection approach, the single-cylinder engine is operated over a load range from 160-390 kPa net IMEP at 2000 rpm. Changes to valve opening duration on the single-cylinder HVA engine illustrate opportunities for load expansion and efficiency improvement at certain conditions. For instance, the low load limit can be extended on the HVA engine by reducing breathing and operating closer to a stoichiometric air fuel ratio (AFR) by using valve deactivation. The naturally aspirated engine used here without external EGR confirmed that as operating load increases the emissions of NOx increases due to combustion temperature. NOx emissions are found to be one limitation to the maximum load limitation, the other being high pressure rise rate. It is found that the configuration of the production intent cam-based system represents a good compromise between valve lift and duration in the low to medium load region. Changing the extent of charge motion

  19. HCCI Load Expansion Opportunities using a Fully Variable HVA Research Engine to Guide Development of a Production Intent Cam-based VVA Engine: The Low Load Limit

    SciTech Connect

    Weall, Adam J; Szybist, James P; Edwards, Kevin Dean; Foster, Matthew; Confer, Keith; Moore, Wayne

    2012-01-01

    While the potential emissions and efficiency benefits of HCCI combustion are well known, realizing the potentials on a production intent engine presents numerous challenges. In this study we focus on identifying challenges and opportunities associated with a production intent cam-based variable valve actuation (VVA) system on a multi-cylinder engine in comparison to a fully flexible, naturally aspirated, hydraulic valve actuation (HVA) system on a single-cylinder engine, with both platforms sharing the same GDI fueling system and engine geometry. The multi-cylinder production intent VVA system uses a 2-step cam technology with wide authority cam phasing, allowing adjustments to be made to the negative valve overlap (NVO) duration but not the valve opening durations. On the single cylinder HVA engine, the valve opening duration and lift are variable in addition to the NVO duration. The content of this paper is limited to the low-medium operating load region at 2000rpm. Using different injection strategies, including the NVO pilot injection approach, the single-cylinder engine is operated over a load range from 160-390 kPa net IMEP at 2000 rpm. Changes to valve opening duration on the single-cylinder HVA engine illustrate opportunities for load expansion and efficiency improvement at certain conditions. For instance, the low load limit can be extended on the HVA engine by reducing breathing and operating closer to a stoichiometric air fuel ratio (AFR) by using valve deactivation. The naturally aspirated engine used here without external EGR confirmed that as operating load increases the emissions of NOx increases due to combustion temperature. NOx emissions are found to be one limitation to the maximum load limitation, the other being high pressure rise rate. It is found that the configuration of the production intent cam-based system represents a good compromise between valve lift and duration in the low to medium load region. Changing the extent of charge motion

  20. 40 CFR 130.7 - Total maximum daily loads (TMDL) and individual water quality-based effluent limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... individual water quality-based effluent limitations. 130.7 Section 130.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS WATER QUALITY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT § 130.7 Total maximum daily loads (TMDL) and individual water quality-based effluent limitations. (a) General....

  1. 40 CFR 130.7 - Total maximum daily loads (TMDL) and individual water quality-based effluent limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... individual water quality-based effluent limitations. 130.7 Section 130.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS WATER QUALITY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT § 130.7 Total maximum daily loads (TMDL) and individual water quality-based effluent limitations. (a) General....

  2. 40 CFR 130.7 - Total maximum daily loads (TMDL) and individual water quality-based effluent limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... individual water quality-based effluent limitations. 130.7 Section 130.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS WATER QUALITY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT § 130.7 Total maximum daily loads (TMDL) and individual water quality-based effluent limitations. (a) General....

  3. 40 CFR 130.7 - Total maximum daily loads (TMDL) and individual water quality-based effluent limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... individual water quality-based effluent limitations. 130.7 Section 130.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS WATER QUALITY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT § 130.7 Total maximum daily loads (TMDL) and individual water quality-based effluent limitations. (a) General....

  4. Limitations of liquid nitrogen cooling of high heat load x-ray monochromators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khounsary, Ali; Strons, Philip; Kujala, Naresh; Macrander, Albert

    2012-10-01

    X-ray monochromators, made of single crystals or multilayer coatings, are the most common optical components on many synchrotron beamlines. They intercept the broad-spectrum x-ray (white or pink) beams generated by the radiation source and absorb all but select narrow spectral bands of x-rays, which are diffracted according to Bragg's Law. With some incident beam power in the kW range, minimizing thermally induced deformation detrimental to the performance of the device necessitates the design of optimally cooled monochromators. Monochromator substrate designs have evolved, in parallel with thermal loads of the incident beams, from simple blocks with no cooling, to water cooled (both contact -cooled and internally cooled), and to cryogenically cooled designs where the undesirable thermal distortions are kept in check by operating in a temperature range where the thermomechanical properties of the substrate materials are favorable. Fortuitously, single-crystal silicon at cryogenic temperatures has an exceptionally favorable combination of high thermal conductivity and low thermal expansion coefficient. With further increases in x-ray beam power, partly as a result of the upgrades to the existing synchrotron facilities, the question arises as to the ultimate limits of liquid-nitrogen-cooled silicon monochromators' ability to handle the increased thermal load. In this paper, we describe the difficulties and begin the investigation by using a simple geometric model for a monochromator and obtain analytical solutions for the temperature field. The temperature can be used as a proxy for thermally induced deformation. The significant role of the nonlinear material properties of silicon is examined.

  5. 76 FR 25648 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Limit Engine Torque Loads for Sudden Engine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-05

    ... dynamic loads resulting from: (a) The loss of any fan, compressor, or turbine blade; and (b) Separately... Engine Torque Loads for Sudden Engine Stoppage AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... design features include ] engine size and the potential torque load imposed by sudden engine...

  6. A criterion for high-cycle fatigue life and fatigue limit prediction in biaxial loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejkowski, Łukasz; Skibicki, Dariusz

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a criterion for high-cycle fatigue life and fatigue strength estimation under periodic proportional and non-proportional cyclic loading. The criterion is based on the mean and maximum values of the second invariant of the stress deviator. Important elements of the criterion are: function of the non-proportionality of fatigue loading and the materials parameter that expresses the materials sensitivity to non-proportional loading. The methods for the materials parameters determination uses three S-N curves: tension-compression, torsion, and any non-proportional loading proposed. The criterion has been verified using experimental data, and the results are included in the paper. These results should be considered as promising. The paper also includes a proposal for multiaxial fatigue models classification due to the approach for the non-proportionality of loading.

  7. 29 CFR 1919.75 - Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's data. 1919.75 Section 1919.75 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor... Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.75 Determination of crane or derrick safe...

  8. 29 CFR 1919.75 - Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's data. 1919.75 Section 1919.75 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor... Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.75 Determination of crane or derrick safe...

  9. 29 CFR 1919.75 - Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's data. 1919.75 Section 1919.75 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor... Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.75 Determination of crane or derrick safe...

  10. 29 CFR 1919.75 - Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's data. 1919.75 Section 1919.75 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor... Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.75 Determination of crane or derrick safe...

  11. 29 CFR 1919.75 - Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Determination of crane or derrick safe working loads and limitations in absence of manufacturer's data. 1919.75 Section 1919.75 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor... Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.75 Determination of crane or derrick safe...

  12. On the limits of quasi-static analysis for a simple Coulomb frictional oscillator in response to harmonic loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papangelo, A.; Ciavarella, M.

    2015-03-01

    Due to the nonlinearity of the Coulomb friction law, even the simplest models of interfaces in contact show a very rich dynamic solution. It is often desirable, especially if the frequency of loading is only a fraction of the first natural frequency of the system, to replace a full dynamic analysis with a quasi-static one, which obviously is much simpler to obtain. In this work, we study a simple Coulomb frictional oscillator with harmonic tangential load, but with constant normal load. It is found that the quasi-static solution (which has only 2 stops) captures approximately the displacement peak as long as the forcing frequency is low enough for the dynamic solution to have 2 or, even better, more than 2 stops. Instead, the velocity peak is not correctly estimated, since the velocity becomes highly irregular due to the stick-slip stops, whose number increases without limit for zero frequency. In this sense, the classical quasi-static solution, obtaining by cancelling inertia terms in the equilibrium equations, does not coincide with the limit of the full dynamic solution at low frequencies. The difference is not eliminated by adding a small amount of viscous damping, as only with critical damping, the dynamic solution is very close to the quasi-static one. Additional discrepancies arise above a limit frequency whose value depends on the ratio of the tangential load to the limit one for sliding, and correspond to when the dynamic solution turns from 2 to 0 stop per cycle.

  13. Estimation of fatigue and extreme load distributions from limited data with application to wind energy systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzwater, LeRoy M.

    2004-01-01

    An estimate of the distribution of fatigue ranges or extreme loads for wind turbines may be obtained by separating the problem into two uncoupled parts, (1) a turbine specific portion, independent of the site and (2) a site-specific description of environmental variables. We consider contextually appropriate probability models to describe the turbine specific response for extreme loads or fatigue. The site-specific portion is described by a joint probability distribution of a vector of environmental variables, which characterize the wind process at the hub-height of the wind turbine. Several approaches are considered for combining the two portions to obtain an estimate of the extreme load, e.g., 50-year loads or fatigue damage. We assess the efficacy of these models to obtain accurate estimates, including various levels of epistemic uncertainty, of the turbine response.

  14. Egg load dynamics and the risk of egg and time limitation experienced by an aphid parasitoid in the field.

    PubMed

    Dieckhoff, Christine; Theobald, Julian C; Wäckers, Felix L; Heimpel, George E

    2014-05-01

    Insect parasitoids and herbivores must balance the risk of egg limitation and time limitation in order to maximize reproductive success. Egg and time limitation are mediated by oviposition and egg maturation rates as well as by starvation risk and other determinants of adult lifespan. Here, we assessed egg load and nutritional state in the soybean aphid parasitoid Binodoxys communis under field conditions to estimate its risk of becoming either egg- or time-limited. The majority of female B. communis showed no signs of egg limitation. Experimental field manipulations of B. communis females suggested that an average of 4-8 eggs were matured per hour over the course of a day. Regardless, egg loads remained constant over the course of the day at approximately 80 eggs, suggesting that egg maturation compensates for oviposition. This is the first case of such "egg load buffering" documented for a parasitoid in the field. Despite this buffering, egg loads dropped slightly with increasing host (aphid) density. This suggests that egg limitation could occur at very high host densities as experienced in outbreak years in some locations in the Midwestern USA. Biochemical analyses of sugar profiles showed that parasitoids fed upon sugar in the field at a remarkably high rate. Time limitation through starvation thus seems to be very low and aphid honeydew is most likely a source of dietary sugar for these parasitoids. This latter supposition is supported by the fact that body sugar levels increase with host (aphid) density. Together, these results suggest that fecundity of B. communis benefits from both dynamic egg maturation strategies and sugar-feeding.

  15. Egg load dynamics and the risk of egg and time limitation experienced by an aphid parasitoid in the field

    PubMed Central

    Dieckhoff, Christine; Theobald, Julian C; Wäckers, Felix L; Heimpel, George E

    2014-01-01

    Insect parasitoids and herbivores must balance the risk of egg limitation and time limitation in order to maximize reproductive success. Egg and time limitation are mediated by oviposition and egg maturation rates as well as by starvation risk and other determinants of adult lifespan. Here, we assessed egg load and nutritional state in the soybean aphid parasitoid Binodoxys communis under field conditions to estimate its risk of becoming either egg- or time-limited. The majority of female B. communis showed no signs of egg limitation. Experimental field manipulations of B. communis females suggested that an average of 4–8 eggs were matured per hour over the course of a day. Regardless, egg loads remained constant over the course of the day at approximately 80 eggs, suggesting that egg maturation compensates for oviposition. This is the first case of such “egg load buffering” documented for a parasitoid in the field. Despite this buffering, egg loads dropped slightly with increasing host (aphid) density. This suggests that egg limitation could occur at very high host densities as experienced in outbreak years in some locations in the Midwestern USA. Biochemical analyses of sugar profiles showed that parasitoids fed upon sugar in the field at a remarkably high rate. Time limitation through starvation thus seems to be very low and aphid honeydew is most likely a source of dietary sugar for these parasitoids. This latter supposition is supported by the fact that body sugar levels increase with host (aphid) density. Together, these results suggest that fecundity of B. communis benefits from both dynamic egg maturation strategies and sugar-feeding. PMID:24963373

  16. Cellulose accessibility limits the effectiveness of minimum cellulase loading on the efficient hydrolysis of pretreated lignocellulosic substrates.

    PubMed

    Arantes, Valdeir; Saddler, Jack N

    2011-01-01

    A range of lignocellulosic feedstocks (including agricultural, softwood and hardwood substrates) were pretreated with either sulfur dioxide-catalyzed steam or an ethanol organosolv procedure to try to establish a reliable assessment of the factors governing the minimum protein loading that could be used to achieve efficient hydrolysis. A statistical design approach was first used to define what might constitute the minimum protein loading (cellulases and β-glucosidase) that could be used to achieve efficient saccharification (defined as at least 70% glucan conversion) of the pretreated substrates after 72 hours of hydrolysis. The likely substrate factors that limit cellulose availability/accessibility were assessed, and then compared with the optimized minimum amounts of protein used to obtain effective hydrolysis. The optimized minimum protein loadings to achieve efficient hydrolysis of seven pretreated substrates ranged between 18 and 63 mg protein per gram of glucan. Within the similarly pretreated group of lignocellulosic feedstocks, the agricultural residues (corn stover and corn fiber) required significantly lower protein loadings to achieve efficient hydrolysis than did the pretreated woody biomass (poplar, douglas fir and lodgepole pine). Regardless of the substantial differences in the source, structure and chemical composition of the feedstocks, and the difference in the pretreatment technology used, the protein loading required to achieve efficient hydrolysis of lignocellulosic substrates was strongly dependent on the accessibility of the cellulosic component of each of the substrates. We found that cellulose-rich substrates with highly accessible cellulose, as assessed by the Simons' stain method, required a lower protein loading per gram of glucan to obtain efficient hydrolysis compared with substrates containing less accessible cellulose. These results suggest that the rate-limiting step during hydrolysis is not the catalytic cleavage of the

  17. Effect of Large Scale Transmission Limitations on Renewable Energy Load Matching for Western U.S.: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Diakov, V.; Short, W.; Gilchrist, B.

    2012-06-01

    Based on the available geographically dispersed data for the Western U.S. (excluding Alaska), we analyze to what extent the geographic diversity of these resources can offset their variability. Without energy storage and assuming unlimited energy flows between regions, wind and PV can meet up to 80% of loads in Western U.S. while less than 10% of the generated power is curtailed. Limiting hourly energy flows by the aggregated transmission line carrying capacities decreases the fraction of the load that can be met with wind and PV generation to approximately 70%.

  18. Low Substrate Loading Limits Methanogenesis and Leads to High Coulombic Efficiency in Bioelectrochemical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Sleutels, Tom H. J. A.; Molenaar, Sam D.; Heijne, Annemiek Ter; Buisman, Cees J. N.

    2016-01-01

    A crucial aspect for the application of bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) as a wastewater treatment technology is the efficient oxidation of complex substrates by the bioanode, which is reflected in high Coulombic efficiency (CE). To achieve high CE, it is essential to give a competitive advantage to electrogens over methanogens. Factors that affect CE in bioanodes are, amongst others, the type of wastewater, anode potential, substrate concentration and pH. In this paper, we focus on acetate as a substrate and analyze the competition between methanogens and electrogens from a thermodynamic and kinetic point of view. We reviewed experimental data from earlier studies and propose that low substrate loading in combination with a sufficiently high anode overpotential plays a key-role in achieving high CE. Low substrate loading is a proven strategy against methanogenic activity in large-scale reactors for sulfate reduction. The combination of low substrate loading with sufficiently high overpotential is essential because it results in favorable growth kinetics of electrogens compared to methanogens. To achieve high current density in combination with low substrate concentrations, it is essential to have a high specific anode surface area. New reactor designs with these features are essential for BESs to be successful in wastewater treatment in the future. PMID:27681899

  19. Low Substrate Loading Limits Methanogenesis and Leads to High Coulombic Efficiency in Bioelectrochemical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Sleutels, Tom H. J. A.; Molenaar, Sam D.; Heijne, Annemiek Ter; Buisman, Cees J. N.

    2016-01-01

    A crucial aspect for the application of bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) as a wastewater treatment technology is the efficient oxidation of complex substrates by the bioanode, which is reflected in high Coulombic efficiency (CE). To achieve high CE, it is essential to give a competitive advantage to electrogens over methanogens. Factors that affect CE in bioanodes are, amongst others, the type of wastewater, anode potential, substrate concentration and pH. In this paper, we focus on acetate as a substrate and analyze the competition between methanogens and electrogens from a thermodynamic and kinetic point of view. We reviewed experimental data from earlier studies and propose that low substrate loading in combination with a sufficiently high anode overpotential plays a key-role in achieving high CE. Low substrate loading is a proven strategy against methanogenic activity in large-scale reactors for sulfate reduction. The combination of low substrate loading with sufficiently high overpotential is essential because it results in favorable growth kinetics of electrogens compared to methanogens. To achieve high current density in combination with low substrate concentrations, it is essential to have a high specific anode surface area. New reactor designs with these features are essential for BESs to be successful in wastewater treatment in the future.

  20. Low Substrate Loading Limits Methanogenesis and Leads to High Coulombic Efficiency in Bioelectrochemical Systems.

    PubMed

    Sleutels, Tom H J A; Molenaar, Sam D; Heijne, Annemiek Ter; Buisman, Cees J N

    2016-01-05

    A crucial aspect for the application of bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) as a wastewater treatment technology is the efficient oxidation of complex substrates by the bioanode, which is reflected in high Coulombic efficiency (CE). To achieve high CE, it is essential to give a competitive advantage to electrogens over methanogens. Factors that affect CE in bioanodes are, amongst others, the type of wastewater, anode potential, substrate concentration and pH. In this paper, we focus on acetate as a substrate and analyze the competition between methanogens and electrogens from a thermodynamic and kinetic point of view. We reviewed experimental data from earlier studies and propose that low substrate loading in combination with a sufficiently high anode overpotential plays a key-role in achieving high CE. Low substrate loading is a proven strategy against methanogenic activity in large-scale reactors for sulfate reduction. The combination of low substrate loading with sufficiently high overpotential is essential because it results in favorable growth kinetics of electrogens compared to methanogens. To achieve high current density in combination with low substrate concentrations, it is essential to have a high specific anode surface area. New reactor designs with these features are essential for BESs to be successful in wastewater treatment in the future.

  1. Low Substrate Loading Limits Methanogenesis and Leads to High Coulombic Efficiency in Bioelectrochemical Systems.

    PubMed

    Sleutels, Tom H J A; Molenaar, Sam D; Heijne, Annemiek Ter; Buisman, Cees J N

    2016-01-01

    A crucial aspect for the application of bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) as a wastewater treatment technology is the efficient oxidation of complex substrates by the bioanode, which is reflected in high Coulombic efficiency (CE). To achieve high CE, it is essential to give a competitive advantage to electrogens over methanogens. Factors that affect CE in bioanodes are, amongst others, the type of wastewater, anode potential, substrate concentration and pH. In this paper, we focus on acetate as a substrate and analyze the competition between methanogens and electrogens from a thermodynamic and kinetic point of view. We reviewed experimental data from earlier studies and propose that low substrate loading in combination with a sufficiently high anode overpotential plays a key-role in achieving high CE. Low substrate loading is a proven strategy against methanogenic activity in large-scale reactors for sulfate reduction. The combination of low substrate loading with sufficiently high overpotential is essential because it results in favorable growth kinetics of electrogens compared to methanogens. To achieve high current density in combination with low substrate concentrations, it is essential to have a high specific anode surface area. New reactor designs with these features are essential for BESs to be successful in wastewater treatment in the future. PMID:27681899

  2. Aggravated phosphorus limitation on biomass production under increasing nitrogen loading: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Niu, Shuli; Yu, Guirui

    2016-02-01

    Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), either individually or in combination, have been demonstrated to limit biomass production in terrestrial ecosystems. Field studies have been extensively synthesized to assess global patterns of N impacts on terrestrial ecosystem processes. However, to our knowledge, no synthesis has been done so far to reveal global patterns of P impacts on terrestrial ecosystems, especially under different nitrogen (N) levels. Here, we conducted a meta-analysis of impacts of P addition, either alone or with N addition, on aboveground (AGB) and belowground biomass production (BGB), plant and soil P concentrations, and N : P ratio in terrestrial ecosystems. Overall, our meta-analysis quantitatively confirmed existing notions: (i) colimitation of N and P on biomass production and (ii) more P limitation in tropical forest than other ecosystems. More importantly, our analysis revealed new findings: (i) P limitation on biomass production was aggravated by N enrichment and (ii) plant P concentration was a better indicator of P limitation than soil P availability. Specifically, P addition increased AGB and BGB by 34% and 13%, respectively. The effect size of P addition on biomass production was larger in tropical forest than grassland, wetland, and tundra and varied with P fertilizer forms, P addition rates, or experimental durations. The P-induced increase in biomass production and plant P concentration was larger under elevated than ambient N. Our findings suggest that the global limitation of P on biomass production will become severer under increasing N fertilizer and deposition in the future.

  3. Hydraulic mechanism to limit torsional loads between the IUS and space transportation system orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, James R.

    1986-01-01

    The Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) is a two-stage booster used by NASA and the Defense Department to insert payloads into geosynchronous orbit from low-Earth orbit. The hydraulic mechanism discussed here was designed to perform a specific dynamic and static interface function within the Space Transportation System's Orbiter. Requirements, configuration, and application of the hydraulic mechanism with emphasis on performance and methods of achieving zero external hydraulic leakage are discussed. The hydraulic load-leveler mechanism meets the established design requirements for operation in a low-Earth orbit. Considerable testing was conducted to demonstrate system performance and verification that external leakage had been reduced to zero. Following each flight use of an ASE, all hydraulic mechanism components are carefully inspected for leakage. The ASE, including the hydraulic mechanism, has performed without any anomalies during all IUS flights.

  4. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, S.A.; Hosea, J.C.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1984-10-19

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face is provided. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution. This limiter shape accommodates the various power scrape-off distances lambda p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V/sub parallel/, of the impacting particles.

  5. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, Samuel A.; Hosea, Joel C.; Timberlake, John R.

    1986-01-01

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face accommodates the various power scrape-off distances .lambda..sub.p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V.sub..parallel., of the impacting particles. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution.

  6. Suppression of plasma virus load below the detection limit of a human immunodeficiency virus kit is associated with longer virologic response than suppression below the limit of quantitation.

    PubMed

    Raboud, J M; Rae, S; Hogg, R S; Yip, B; Sherlock, C H; Harrigan, P R; O'Shaughnessy, M V; Montaner, J S

    1999-10-01

    Suppression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 plasma virus load (PVL) to <20 copies/mL is associated with a longer virologic response after initiation of antiretroviral therapy. The relationship between duration of virologic response and PVL nadir according to a less sensitive assay was explored. When compared with subjects with a PVL nadir >500 copies/mL, the relative risks of PVL rising above 1000 copies/mL for participants in the INCAS trial and the British Columbia Drug Treatment Program with a PVL nadir below the limit of detection (LOD) were 0.04 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.02-0.09) and 0.06 (95% CI, 0.03-0.12), respectively. The corresponding relative risks for persons with a detectable but not quantifiable PVL nadir were 0.25 (95% CI, 0.13-0.50) and 0.54 (95% CI, 0.25-1.19). The relative risks of virologic failure associated with a PVL nadir detectable but not quantifiable and a PVL nadir below the LOD were statistically different (P<.0001) in both data sets.

  7. SAMBA HIV semiquantitative test, a new point-of-care viral-load-monitoring assay for resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Allyson V; Ushiro-Lumb, Ines; Edemaga, Daniel; Joshi, Hrishikesh A; De Ruiter, Annemiek; Szumilin, Elisabeth; Jendrulek, Isabelle; McGuire, Megan; Goel, Neha; Sharma, Pia I; Allain, Jean-Pierre; Lee, Helen H

    2014-09-01

    Routine viral-load (VL) testing of HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy (ART) is used to monitor treatment efficacy. However, due to logistical challenges, implementation of VL has been difficult in resource-limited settings. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of the SAMBA semi-Q (simple amplification-based assay semiquantitative test for HIV-1) in London, Malawi, and Uganda. The SAMBA semi-Q can distinguish between patients with VLs above and below 1,000 copies/ml. The SAMBA semi-Q was validated with diluted clinical samples and blinded plasma samples collected from HIV-1-positive individuals. SAMBA semi-Q results were compared with results from the Roche COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan HIV-1 test, v2.0. Testing of 96 2- to 10-fold dilutions of four samples containing HIV-1 subtype C as well as 488 samples from patients in the United Kingdom, Malawi, and Uganda yielded an overall accuracy for the SAMBA semi-Q of 99% (95% confidence interval [CI], 93.8 to 99.9%) and 96.9% (95% CI 94.9 to 98.3%), respectively, compared to to the Roche test. Analysis of VL data from patients in Malawi and Uganda showed that the SAMBA cutoff of 1,000 copies/ml appropriately distinguished treated from untreated individuals. Furthermore, analysis of the viral loads of 232 patients on ART in Malawi and Uganda revealed similar patterns for virological control, defined as either <1,000 copies/ml (SAMBA cutoff) or <5,000 copies/ml (WHO 2010 criterion; WHO, Antiretroviral Therapy for HIV Infection in Adults and Adolescents: Recommendations for a Public Health Approach, 2010). This study suggests that the SAMBA semi-Q has adequate concurrency with the gold standard measurements for viral load. This test can allow VL monitoring of patients on ART at the point of care in resource-limited settings.

  8. SAMBA HIV Semiquantitative Test, a New Point-of-Care Viral-Load-Monitoring Assay for Resource-Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, Allyson V.; Ushiro-Lumb, Ines; Edemaga, Daniel; Joshi, Hrishikesh A.; De Ruiter, Annemiek; Szumilin, Elisabeth; Jendrulek, Isabelle; McGuire, Megan; Goel, Neha; Sharma, Pia I.; Allain, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Routine viral-load (VL) testing of HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy (ART) is used to monitor treatment efficacy. However, due to logistical challenges, implementation of VL has been difficult in resource-limited settings. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of the SAMBA semi-Q (simple amplification-based assay semiquantitative test for HIV-1) in London, Malawi, and Uganda. The SAMBA semi-Q can distinguish between patients with VLs above and below 1,000 copies/ml. The SAMBA semi-Q was validated with diluted clinical samples and blinded plasma samples collected from HIV-1-positive individuals. SAMBA semi-Q results were compared with results from the Roche COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan HIV-1 test, v2.0. Testing of 96 2- to 10-fold dilutions of four samples containing HIV-1 subtype C as well as 488 samples from patients in the United Kingdom, Malawi, and Uganda yielded an overall accuracy for the SAMBA semi-Q of 99% (95% confidence interval [CI], 93.8 to 99.9%) and 96.9% (95% CI 94.9 to 98.3%), respectively, compared to to the Roche test. Analysis of VL data from patients in Malawi and Uganda showed that the SAMBA cutoff of 1,000 copies/ml appropriately distinguished treated from untreated individuals. Furthermore, analysis of the viral loads of 232 patients on ART in Malawi and Uganda revealed similar patterns for virological control, defined as either <1,000 copies/ml (SAMBA cutoff) or <5,000 copies/ml (WHO 2010 criterion; WHO, Antiretroviral Therapy for HIV Infection in Adults and Adolescents: Recommendations for a Public Health Approach, 2010). This study suggests that the SAMBA semi-Q has adequate concurrency with the gold standard measurements for viral load. This test can allow VL monitoring of patients on ART at the point of care in resource-limited settings. PMID:25031444

  9. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Bbbbbb... - Applicability Criteria, Emission Limits, and Management Practices for Loading Racks

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the TOC vapors displaced from cargo tanks during product loading; and(b) Reduce emissions of TOC to...) Design and operate the vapor collection system to prevent any TOC vapors collected at one loading...

  10. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Bbbbbb... - Applicability Criteria, Emission Limits, and Management Practices for Loading Racks

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... loading rack(s) with a vapor collection system designed to collect the TOC vapors displaced from cargo tanks during product loading; and(b) Reduce emissions of TOC to less than or equal to 80 mg/l of... collection system to prevent any TOC vapors collected at one loading rack or lane from passing...

  11. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Bbbbbb... - Applicability Criteria, Emission Limits, and Management Practices for Loading Racks

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... loading rack(s) with a vapor collection system designed to collect the TOC vapors displaced from cargo tanks during product loading; and(b) Reduce emissions of TOC to less than or equal to 80 mg/l of... collection system to prevent any TOC vapors collected at one loading rack or lane from passing...

  12. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Bbbbbb... - Applicability Criteria, Emission Limits, and Management Practices for Loading Racks

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... loading rack(s) with a vapor collection system designed to collect the TOC vapors displaced from cargo tanks during product loading; and(b) Reduce emissions of TOC to less than or equal to 80 mg/l of... collection system to prevent any TOC vapors collected at one loading rack or lane from passing...

  13. Limitation of sludge biotic index application for control of a wastewater treatment plant working with shock organic and ammonium loadings.

    PubMed

    Drzewicki, Adam; Kulikowska, Dorota

    2011-11-01

    This study aimed to determine the relationship between activated sludge microfauna, the sludge biotic index (SBI) and the effluent quality of a full-scale municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) working with shock organic and ammonium loadings caused by periodic wastewater delivery from septic tanks. Irrespective of high/low effluent quality in terms of COD, BOD5, ammonium and suspended solids, high SBI values (8-10), which correspond to the first quality class of sludge, were observed. High SBI values were connected with abundant taxonomic composition and the domination of crawling ciliates with shelled amoebae and attached ciliates. High SBI values, even at a low effluent quality, limit the usefulness of the index for monitoring the status of an activated sludge system and the effluent quality in municipal WWTP-treated wastewater from septic tanks. It was shown that a more sensitive indicator of effluent quality was a change in the abundance of attached ciliates with a narrow peristome (Vorticella infusionum and Opercularia coarctata), small flagellates and crawling ciliates (Acineria uncinata) feeding on flagellates. PMID:21802913

  14. How the Impacts of N Loading on Resource Limitation, Functional Composition of Plankton, and Net Primary Production Influence Nitrate Uptake and Trophic Transfer in Lake Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballantyne, F.; Mellard, J.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) loading in aquatic ecosystems can have a multitude of effects. Increased N availability often elevates primary production, but typically also alters community composition and trophic structure. How all the myriad impacts of N loading conspire to produce whole ecosystem responses to perturbation is not well understood. To characterize how whole ecosystems response to perturbation along a gradient of N loading, we added nitrate (and phosphate) to large in situ aquatic mesocosms at different rates over the course of three months and quantified biomass distributions across multiple size classes, plankton community composition (including functional traits), and N flow among size classes in both the epilimnion and the hypolimnion prior and subsequent to a one week shading perturbation. Increased N loading resulted in greater rates of light attenuation with depth, which in turn selected for species with higher tolerance to light limitation and low inorganic C availability, but also resulted in increased rates of primary production and top-down grazing pressure. Different degrees of N loading resulted in different rates of nitrate uptake and trophic transfer, as calculated from 15N pulse-chase additions, both prior and subsequent to the shading pertubation, with the loading effect diminished after the perturbation. N loading was positively associated with the rate of N transfer between the epilimnion, where the N was added, and the hypolimnion. A complex picture of whole ecosystem response to perturbation along a gradient of N loading emerges. N loading appears to simplify resource competition among phytoplankton by alleviating N limitation to an extent, and at the same time supports elevated production across trophic levels. Nitrate uptake rate is contingent on standing stock phytoplankton biomass and resource limitation status. Rates of nitrate removal from the water column depend on how N loading alters the abiotic environment (primarily light availability

  15. Utility and limitation of calciuric response to oral calcium load as a measure of intestinal calcium absorption: comparison with isotopic fractional calcium absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Zerwekh, J.E.; Sakhaee, K.; Pak, C.Y.

    1981-11-01

    The intestinal absorption of calcium (Ca), indirectly measured from the calciuric response to oral Ca load (1g), was compared to the more directly obtained isotopic fractional absorption, alpha (from the fecal recovery of orally administered 47Ca). In 17 normal subjects and 30 patients with absorptive hypercalciuria (AH), there was a significant (P less than 0.001) correlation of alpha with the Ca load responses, (r . 0.81). However, this correlation was not observed in patients with renal hypercalciuria (RH), and those with AH receiving thiazide or orthophosphate. In RH, 38 per cent of patients had elevated Ca load responses, despite normal values for alpha. The point correlating the calciuric response and alpha in these patients was below the 95 per cent confidence limit of the line correlating alpha and the load response. Thus, Ca load response often overestimated intestinal Ca absorption, because of the high basal (fasting) urinary Ca. Thiazide therapy in RH improved the correlation between the two tests of Ca absorption. However, thiazide therapy in AH produced normal Ca load responses despite persistently high alpha in 60 per cent of patients. Similarly, 50 per cent of patients with AH receiving orthophosphate had normal Ca load response, although alpha remained elevated. Thus, Ca load response underestimated Ca absorption when patients with AH took thiazide or orthophosphate, probably because these drugs augment renal tubular reabsorption of Ca. These data support the Ca load test as a valid indirect measure of intestinal Ca absorption in normal subjects and patients with AH, in whom fasting urinary Ca is not elevated. In conditions of renal Ca, leak or with various drugs known to alter renal Ca handling, there seen to be large deviations of Ca load response from alpha. Care should be exercised before reaching conclusions regarding the intestinal Ca absorption in these situations.

  16. Can HIV reverse transcriptase activity assay be a low-cost alternative for viral load monitoring in resource-limited settings?

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Soham; Palchaudhuri, Riya; Neogi, Ujjwal; Srinivasa, Hiresave; Ashorn, Per; De Costa, Ayesha; Källander, Clas; Shet, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the performance and cost of an HIV reverse transcriptase-enzyme activity (HIV-RT) assay in comparison to an HIV-1 RNA assay for routine viral load monitoring in resource limited settings. Design A cohort-based longitudinal study. Setting Two antiretroviral therapy (ART) centres in Karnataka state, South India, providing treatment under the Indian AIDS control programme. Participants A cohort of 327 HIV-1-infected Indian adult patients initiating first-line ART. Outcome measures Performance and cost of an HIV-RT assay (ExaVir Load V3) in comparison to a gold standard HIV-1 RNA assay (Abbott m2000rt) in a cohort of 327 Indian patients before (WK00) and 4 weeks (WK04) after initiation of first-line therapy. Results Plasma viral load was determined by an HIV-1 RNA assay and an HIV-RT assay in 629 samples (302 paired samples and 25 single time point samples at WK00) obtained from 327 patients. Overall, a strong correlation of r=0.96 was observed, with good correlation at WK00 (r=0.84) and at WK04 (r=0.77). Bland-Altman analysis of all samples showed a good level of agreement with a mean difference (bias) of 0.22 log10copies/mL. The performance of ExaVir Load V3 was not negatively affected by a nevirapine/efavirenz based antiretroviral regimen. The per test cost of measuring plasma viral load by the Abbott m2000rt and ExaVir Load V3 assays in a basic lab setting was $36.4 and $16.8, respectively. Conclusions The strong correlation between the HIV-RT and HIV-1 RNA assays suggests that the HIV-RT assay can be an affordable alternative option for monitoring patients on antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings. Trial registration number ISRCTN79261738. PMID:26817634

  17. THE DEVELOPMENT OF EMPIRICAL LOAD-ECOLOGICAL RESPONSE MODELS TO DETERMINE NITROGEN LIMITS IN THE COASTAL ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA Atlantic Ecology Division (AED) has initiated a multi-year research program to develop empirical nitrogen load-response models. Our research on embayments in southern New England is part of a multi-regional effort to develop cause-effect models for the Gulf of Mexic...

  18. Exogenous DNA Loading into Extracellular Vesicles via Electroporation is Size-Dependent and Enables Limited Gene Delivery.

    PubMed

    Lamichhane, Tek N; Raiker, Rahul S; Jay, Steven M

    2015-10-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) hold immense promise for utilization as biotherapeutics and drug delivery vehicles due to their nature as biological nanoparticles that facilitate intercellular molecular transport. Specifically, EVs have been identified as natural carriers of nucleic acids, sparking interest in their use for gene therapy and RNA interference applications. So far, small RNAs (siRNA and miRNA) have been successfully loaded into EVs for a variety of delivery applications, but the potential use of EVs for DNA delivery has scarcely been explored. Here, we report that exogenous linear DNA can be associated with EVs via electroporation in quantities sufficient to yield an average of hundreds of DNA molecules per vesicle. We determined that loading efficiency and capacity of DNA in EVs is dependent on DNA size, with linear DNA molecules less than 1000 bp in length being more efficiently associated with EVs compared to larger linear DNAs and plasmid DNAs using this approach. We further showed that EV size is also determinant with regard to DNA loading, as larger microvesicles encapsulated more linear and plasmid DNA than smaller, exosome-like EVs. Additionally, we confirmed the ability of EVs to transfer foreign DNA loaded via electroporation into recipient cells, although functional gene delivery was not observed. These results establish critical parameters that inform the potential use of EVs for gene therapy and, in agreement with other recent results, suggest that substantial barriers must be overcome to establish EVs as broadly applicable DNA delivery vehicles.

  19. Limits on the prediction of helicopter rotor noise using thickness and loading sources: Validation of helicopter noise prediction techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Succi, G. P.

    1983-01-01

    The techniques of helicopter rotor noise prediction attempt to describe precisely the details of the noise field and remove the empiricisms and restrictions inherent in previous methods. These techniques require detailed inputs of the rotor geometry, operating conditions, and blade surface pressure distribution. The Farassat noise prediction techniques was studied, and high speed helicopter noise prediction using more detailed representations of the thickness and loading noise sources was investigated. These predictions were based on the measured blade surface pressures on an AH-1G rotor and compared to the measured sound field. Although refinements in the representation of the thickness and loading noise sources improve the calculation, there are still discrepancies between the measured and predicted sound field. Analysis of the blade surface pressure data indicates shocks on the blades, which are probably responsible for these discrepancies.

  20. Application Of A New Semi-Empirical Model For Forming Limit Prediction Of Sheet Material Including Superposed Loads Of Bending And Shearing

    SciTech Connect

    Held, Christian; Liewald, Mathias; Schleich, Ralf; Sindel, Manfred

    2010-06-15

    The use of lightweight materials offers substantial strength and weight advantages in car body design. Unfortunately such kinds of sheet material are more susceptible to wrinkling, spring back and fracture during press shop operations. For characterization of capability of sheet material dedicated to deep drawing processes in the automotive industry, mainly Forming Limit Diagrams (FLD) are used. However, new investigations at the Institute for Metal Forming Technology have shown that High Strength Steel Sheet Material and Aluminum Alloys show increased formability in case of bending loads are superposed to stretching loads. Likewise, by superposing shearing on in plane uniaxial or biaxial tension formability changes because of materials crystallographic texture. Such mixed stress and strain conditions including bending and shearing effects can occur in deep-drawing processes of complex car body parts as well as subsequent forming operations like flanging. But changes in formability cannot be described by using the conventional FLC. Hence, for purpose of improvement of failure prediction in numerical simulation codes significant failure criteria for these strain conditions are missing. Considering such aspects in defining suitable failure criteria which is easy to implement into FEA a new semi-empirical model has been developed considering the effect of bending and shearing in sheet metals formability. This failure criterion consists of the combination of the so called cFLC (combined Forming Limit Curve), which considers superposed bending load conditions and the SFLC (Shear Forming Limit Curve), which again includes the effect of shearing on sheet metal's formability.

  1. Application Of A New Semi-Empirical Model For Forming Limit Prediction Of Sheet Material Including Superposed Loads Of Bending And Shearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Held, Christian; Liewald, Mathias; Schleich, Ralf; Sindel, Manfred

    2010-06-01

    The use of lightweight materials offers substantial strength and weight advantages in car body design. Unfortunately such kinds of sheet material are more susceptible to wrinkling, spring back and fracture during press shop operations. For characterization of capability of sheet material dedicated to deep drawing processes in the automotive industry, mainly Forming Limit Diagrams (FLD) are used. However, new investigations at the Institute for Metal Forming Technology have shown that High Strength Steel Sheet Material and Aluminum Alloys show increased formability in case of bending loads are superposed to stretching loads. Likewise, by superposing shearing on in plane uniaxial or biaxial tension formability changes because of materials crystallographic texture. Such mixed stress and strain conditions including bending and shearing effects can occur in deep-drawing processes of complex car body parts as well as subsequent forming operations like flanging. But changes in formability cannot be described by using the conventional FLC. Hence, for purpose of improvement of failure prediction in numerical simulation codes significant failure criteria for these strain conditions are missing. Considering such aspects in defining suitable failure criteria which is easy to implement into FEA a new semi-empirical model has been developed considering the effect of bending and shearing in sheet metals formability. This failure criterion consists of the combination of the so called cFLC (combined Forming Limit Curve), which considers superposed bending load conditions and the SFLC (Shear Forming Limit Curve), which again includes the effect of shearing on sheet metal's formability.

  2. Identification of unknown spatial load distributions in a vibrating Euler-Bernoulli beam from limited measured data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasanov, Alemdar; Kawano, Alexandre

    2016-05-01

    Two types of inverse source problems of identifying asynchronously distributed spatial loads governed by the Euler-Bernoulli beam equation ρ (x){w}{tt}+μ (x){w}t+{({EI}(x){w}{xx})}{xx}-{T}r{u}{xx}={\\sum }m=1M{g}m(t){f}m(x), (x,t)\\in {{{Ω }}}T := (0,l)× (0,T), with hinged-clamped ends (w(0,t)={w}{xx}(0,t)=0,w(l,t) = {w}x(l,t)=0,t\\in (0,T)), are studied. Here {g}m(t) are linearly independent functions, describing an asynchronous temporal loading, and {f}m(x) are the spatial load distributions. In the first identification problem the values {ν }k(t),k=\\bar{1,K}, of the deflection w(x,t), are assumed to be known, as measured output data, in a neighbourhood of the finite set of points P:= \\{{x}k\\in (0,l),k=\\bar{1,K}\\}\\subset (0,l), corresponding to the internal points of a continuous beam, for all t\\in ]0,T[. In the second identification problem the values {θ }k(t),k=\\bar{1,K}, of the slope {w}x(x,t), are assumed to be known, as measured output data in a neighbourhood of the same set of points P for all t\\in ]0,T[. These inverse source problems will be defined subsequently as the problems ISP1 and ISP2. The general purpose of this study is to develop mathematical concepts and tools that are capable of providing effective numerical algorithms for the numerical solution of the considered class of inverse problems. Note that both measured output data {ν }k(t) and {θ }k(t) contain random noise. In the first part of the study we prove that each measured output data {ν }k(t) and {θ }k(t),k=\\bar{1,K} can uniquely determine the unknown functions {f}m\\in {H}-1(]0,l[),m=\\bar{1,M}. In the second part of the study we will introduce the input-output operators {{ K }}d :{L}2(0,T)\\mapsto {L}2(0,T),({{ K }}df)(t):= w(x,t;f),x\\in P, f(x) := ({f}1(x),\\ldots ,{f}M(x)), and {{ K }}s :{L}2(0,T)\\mapsto {L}2(0,T), ({{ K }}sf)(t):= {w}x(x,t;f), x\\in P , corresponding to the problems ISP1 and ISP2, and then reformulate these problems as the operator equations: {{ K

  3. Secondary Engineering Design Graphics Educator Service Load of Students with Identified Categorical Disabilities and Limited English Proficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ernst, Jeremy V.; Li, Songze; Williams, Thomas O.

    2014-01-01

    The ever-changing student population of engineering design graphics students necessitates broader sets of instructor adeptness. Specifically, preparedness to educate and provide adequate educational access to content for students with identified categorical disabilities and Limited English Proficiency (LEP) is now an essential readiness skill for…

  4. 40 CFR 130.7 - Total maximum daily loads (TMDL) and individual water quality-based effluent limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... account any lack of knowledge concerning the relationship between effluent limitations and water quality... margin of safety which takes into account any lack of knowledge concerning the development of thermal... consent decree, or commitment in a settlement agreement dated prior to January 1, 2000, expressly...

  5. Limit case analysis of the "stable indenter velocity" method for obtaining creep stress exponents from constant load indentation creep tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J.; Dean, J.; Clyne, T. W.

    2016-06-01

    This study concerns a commonly-used procedure for evaluating the steady state creep stress exponent, n, from indentation data. The procedure involves monitoring the indenter displacement history under constant load and making the assumption that, once its velocity has stabilised, the system is in a quasi-steady state, with stage II creep dominating the behaviour. The stress and strain fields under the indenter are represented by "equivalent stress" and "equivalent strain rate" values. The estimate of n is then obtained as the gradient of a plot of the logarithm of the equivalent strain rate against the logarithm of the equivalent stress. Concerns have, however, been expressed about the reliability of this procedure, and indeed it has already been shown to be fundamentally flawed. In the present paper, it is demonstrated, using a very simple analysis, that, for a genuinely stable velocity, the procedure always leads to the same, constant value for n (either 1.0 or 0.5, depending on whether the tip shape is spherical or self-similar). This occurs irrespective of the value of the measured velocity, or indeed of any creep characteristic of the material. It is now clear that previously-measured values of n, obtained using this procedure, have varied in a more or less random fashion, depending on the functional form chosen to represent the displacement-time history and the experimental variables (tip shape and size, penetration depth, etc.), with little or no sensitivity to the true value of n.

  6. Target cell limitation constrains chlamydial load in persistent infections: results from mathematical modelling applied to mouse genital tract infection data.

    PubMed

    Craig, Andrew P; Rank, Roger G; Bowlin, Anne K; Wand, Handan; Wilson, David P

    2015-02-01

    The interactions between chlamydial pathogens and their host contribute to the outcome of infection. Nonresolving infections in immunodeficient mice can provide insights into these mechanisms by allowing observation of a form of persistent infection. Using a mathematical model, we predict that in a nonresolving infection, the number of chlamydiae in the host will attain a stable equilibrium and that this equilibrium will be independent of the inoculum size. We test this hypothesis by infecting RAG(-/-) mice with 10(4)-10(7) inclusion-forming units (IFU) of Chlamydia muridarum and comparing the IFU levels at equilibrium. There were no statistically significant differences in equilibrium IFU levels between the reference group and other inoculation groups, supporting the hypothesis. Using the mathematical model, we estimated that at equilibrium just 3% of the chlamydiae infect a target cell. We predict that the equilibrium IFU level is highly sensitive to the rate of replenishment of healthy cells. The limitation of target cells is a key driver of infection dynamics, affecting both the peak of infection and the equilibrium level of persistent infections. Target cell limitation likely plays an important role in the dynamics of human infections as well.

  7. Limit of detection of genomic DNA by conventional PCR for estimating the load of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli associated with bovine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Chandrashekhar, K M; Isloor, Shrikrishna; Veeresh, B H; Hegde, Raveendra; Rathnamma, D; Murag, Shivaraj; Veeregowda, B M; Upendra, H A; Hegde, Nagendra R

    2015-11-01

    Detection of mastitis-associated bacteria can be accomplished by culturing or by molecular techniques. On the other hand, rapid and inexpensive methods to enumerate bacterial load without culturing can be better achieved by molecular methods. Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli are the predominant bacterial pathogens associated with bovine mastitis. Here, we describe the application of conventional PCR for the limit of detection (LOD) of genomic DNA of S. aureus and E. coli based on single-copy genes. The selected genes were thermonuclease (nuc), aureolysin (aur), and staphopain A (scpA) for S. aureus and β-D-glucuronidase A (uidA), cytochrome d oxidase (cyd), and rodA (a gene affecting cell shape and methicillin sensitivity) for E. coli. The LOD was 5.3, 15.9, and 143 pg for aur, nuc, and scpA genes, corresponding to S. aureus genomic copies of 1.75 × 10(3), 5.16 × 10(3), and 4.71 × 10(4), respectively. The LOD was 0.45, 12.3 and 109 pg for uidA, rodA and cyd genes, corresponding to E. coli genome copies of 8.91 × 10(1), 2.43 × 10(3), and 2.16 × 10(4), respectively. Application of uidA and aur PCRs to field strains revealed that as low as approximately 100 genome copies of E. coli and 1000-10,000 copies of S. aureus could be detected. This study is the first to report LOD of genomic DNA using conventional PCR for aur and scpA genes of S. aureus, and rodA and cyd genes of E. coli. The results should be useful for developing assays to assess bacterial load in milk and to determine the load that contributes to subclinical or clinical mastitis.

  8. Non-Mendelian, heritable blocks to DNA rearrangement are induced by loading the somatic nucleus of Tetrahymena thermophila with germ line-limited DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Chalker, D L; Yao, M C

    1996-01-01

    Site-specific DNA deletion occurs at thousands of sites within the genome during macronuclear development of Tetrahymena thermophila. These deletion elements are usually not detected in macronuclear chromosomes. We have interfered with the normal deletion of two of these elements, the adjacent M and R elements, by loading vegetative macronuclei with these elements prior to sexual conjugation. Transformed cell lines containing the exogenous M or R element, carried on high-copy-number vectors containing genes encoding rRNA within parental (old) macronuclei, consistently failed to excise chromosomal copies of the M or R element during formation of new macronuclei. Little or no interference with the deletions of adjacent elements or of unlinked elements was observed. The micronucleus (germ line)-limited region of each element was sufficient to inhibit specific DNA deletion. This interference with DNA deletion usually is manifested as a cytoplasmic dominant trait: deletion elements present in the old macronucleus of one partner of a mating pair were sufficient to inhibit deletion occurring in the other partner. Remarkably, the failure to excise these elements became a non-Mendelian, inheritable trait in the next generation and did not require the high copy number of exogenously introduced elements. The introduction of exogenous deletion elements into parental macronuclei provides us with an epigenetic means to establish a heritable pattern of DNA rearrangement. PMID:8668182

  9. Experimental Investigation of Spark-Ignited Combustion with High-Octane Biofuels and EGR. 2. Fuel and EGR Effects on Knock-Limited Load and Speed

    SciTech Connect

    Splitter, Derek A; Szybist, James P

    2013-01-01

    The present study experimentally investigates spark-ignited combustion with 87 AKI E0 gasoline in its neat form and in midlevel alcohol gasoline blends with 24% vol/vol isobutanol gasoline (IB24) and 30% vol/vol ethanol gasoline (E30). A single-cylinder research engine is used with an 11.85:1 compression ratio, hydraulically actuated valves, laboratory intake air, and was capable of external exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Experiments were conducted with all fuels to full-load conditions with = 1, using both 0% and 15% external-cooled EGR. Higher octane number biofuel blends exhibited increased stoichiometric torque capability at this compression ratio, where the unique properties of ethanol enabled a doubling of the stoichiometric torque capability with E30 as compared to that of 87AKI, up to 20 bar IMEPg (indicating mean effective pressure gross) at = 1. The results demonstrate that for all fuels, EGR is a key enabler for increasing engine efficiency but is less useful for knock mitigation with E30 than for 87AKI gasoline or IB24. Under knocking conditions, 15% EGR is found to offer 1 CA of CA50 timing advance with E30, whereas up to 5 CA of CA50 advance is possible with knock-limited 87AKI gasoline. Compared to 87AKI, both E30 and IB24 are found to have reduced adiabatic flame temperature and shorter combustion durations, which reduce knocking propensity beyond that indicated by the octane number. However, E30+0% EGR is found to exhibit the better antiknock properties than either 87AKI+15% EGR or IB24+15% EGR, expanding the knock limited operating range and engine stoichiometric torque capability at high compression ratio. Furthermore, the fuel sensitivity (S) of E30 was attributed to reduced speed sensitivity of E30, expanding the low-speed stoichiometric torque capability at high compression ratio. The results illustrate that intermediate alcohol gasoline blends exhibit exceptional antiknock properties and performance beyond that indicated by the octane

  10. Should viral load thresholds be lowered?: Revisiting the WHO definition for virologic failure in patients on antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Labhardt, Niklaus D; Bader, Joëlle; Lejone, Thabo Ishmael; Ringera, Isaac; Hobbins, Michael A; Fritz, Christiane; Ehmer, Jochen; Cerutti, Bernard; Puga, Daniel; Klimkait, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines on antiretroviral therapy (ART) define treatment failure as 2 consecutive viral loads (VLs) ≥1000 copies/mL. There is, however, little evidence supporting 1000 copies as an optimal threshold to define treatment failure. Objective of this study was to assess the correlation of the WHO definition with the presence of drug-resistance mutations in patients who present with 2 consecutive unsuppressed VL in a resource-limited setting.In 10 nurse-led clinics in rural Lesotho children and adults on first-line ART for ≥6 months received a first routine VL. Those with plasma VL ≥80 copies/mL were enrolled in a prospective study, receiving enhanced adherence counseling (EAC) and a follow-up VL after 3 months. After a second unsuppressed VL genotypic resistance testing was performed. Viruses with major mutations against ≥2 drugs of the current regimen were classified as "resistant".A total of 1563 adults and 191 children received a first routine VL. Of the 138 adults and 53 children with unsuppressed VL (≥80 copies/mL), 165 (116 adults; 49 children) had a follow-up VL after EAC; 108 (74 adults; 34 children) remained unsuppressed and resistance testing was successful. Ninety of them fulfilled the WHO definition of treatment failure (both VL ≥1000 copies/mL); for another 18 both VL were unsuppressed but with <1000 copies/mL. The positive predictive value (PPV) for the WHO failure definition was 81.1% (73/90) for the presence of resistant virus. Among the 18 with VL levels between 80 and 1000 copies/mL, thereby classified as "non-failures", 17 (94.4%) harbored resistant viruses. Lowering the VL threshold from 1000 copies/mL to 80 copies/mL at both determinations had no negative influence on the PPV (83.3%; 90/108).The current WHO-definition misclassifies patients who harbor resistant virus at VL below 1000 c/mL as "nonfailing." Lowering the threshold to VL ≥80 copies/mL identifies a significantly

  11. Load cell

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, B.L.

    1998-12-15

    A load cell combines the outputs of a plurality of strain gauges to measure components of an applied load. Combination of strain gauge outputs allows measurement of any of six load components without requiring complex machining or mechanical linkages to isolate load components. An example six axis load cell produces six independent analog outputs, each directly proportional to one of the six general load components. 16 figs.

  12. Load cell

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.

    2001-01-01

    A load cell combines the outputs of a plurality of strain gauges to measure components of an applied load. Combination of strain gauge outputs allows measurement of any of six load components without requiring complex machining or mechanical linkages to isolate load components. An example six axis load cell produces six independent analog outputs which can be combined to determine any one of the six general load components.

  13. Load cell

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.

    1998-01-01

    A load cell combines the outputs of a plurality of strain gauges to measure components of an applied load. Combination of strain gauge outputs allows measurement of any of six load components without requiring complex machining or mechanical linkages to isolate load components. An example six axis load cell produces six independent analog outputs, each directly proportional to one of the six general load components.

  14. Reduction of the hydraulic retention time at constant high organic loading rate to reach the microbial limits of anaerobic digestion in various reactor systems.

    PubMed

    Ziganshin, Ayrat M; Schmidt, Thomas; Lv, Zuopeng; Liebetrau, Jan; Richnow, Hans Hermann; Kleinsteuber, Sabine; Nikolausz, Marcell

    2016-10-01

    The effects of hydraulic retention time (HRT) reduction at constant high organic loading rate on the activity of hydrogen-producing bacteria and methanogens were investigated in reactors digesting thin stillage. Stable isotope fingerprinting was additionally applied to assess methanogenic pathways. Based on hydA gene transcripts, Clostridiales was the most active hydrogen-producing order in continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), fixed-bed reactor (FBR) and anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR), but shorter HRT stimulated the activity of Spirochaetales. Further decreasing HRT diminished Spirochaetales activity in systems with biomass retention. Based on mcrA gene transcripts, Methanoculleus and Methanosarcina were the predominantly active in CSTR and ASBR, whereas Methanosaeta and Methanospirillum activity was more significant in stably performing FBR. Isotope values indicated the predominance of aceticlastic pathway in FBR. Interestingly, an increased activity of Methanosaeta was observed during shortening HRT in CSTR and ASBR despite high organic acids concentrations, what was supported by stable isotope data.

  15. Reduction of the hydraulic retention time at constant high organic loading rate to reach the microbial limits of anaerobic digestion in various reactor systems.

    PubMed

    Ziganshin, Ayrat M; Schmidt, Thomas; Lv, Zuopeng; Liebetrau, Jan; Richnow, Hans Hermann; Kleinsteuber, Sabine; Nikolausz, Marcell

    2016-10-01

    The effects of hydraulic retention time (HRT) reduction at constant high organic loading rate on the activity of hydrogen-producing bacteria and methanogens were investigated in reactors digesting thin stillage. Stable isotope fingerprinting was additionally applied to assess methanogenic pathways. Based on hydA gene transcripts, Clostridiales was the most active hydrogen-producing order in continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), fixed-bed reactor (FBR) and anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR), but shorter HRT stimulated the activity of Spirochaetales. Further decreasing HRT diminished Spirochaetales activity in systems with biomass retention. Based on mcrA gene transcripts, Methanoculleus and Methanosarcina were the predominantly active in CSTR and ASBR, whereas Methanosaeta and Methanospirillum activity was more significant in stably performing FBR. Isotope values indicated the predominance of aceticlastic pathway in FBR. Interestingly, an increased activity of Methanosaeta was observed during shortening HRT in CSTR and ASBR despite high organic acids concentrations, what was supported by stable isotope data. PMID:26853042

  16. 14 CFR 23.421 - Balancing loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Balancing loads. 23.421 Section 23.421... Balancing Surfaces § 23.421 Balancing loads. (a) A horizontal surface balancing load is a load necessary to... balancing surfaces must be designed for the balancing loads occurring at any point on the limit...

  17. 14 CFR 23.421 - Balancing loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Balancing loads. 23.421 Section 23.421... Balancing Surfaces § 23.421 Balancing loads. (a) A horizontal surface balancing load is a load necessary to... balancing surfaces must be designed for the balancing loads occurring at any point on the limit...

  18. Anaerobic co-digestion of cheese whey and the screened liquid fraction of dairy manure in a single continuously stirred tank reactor process: Limits in co-substrate ratios and organic loading rate.

    PubMed

    Rico, Carlos; Muñoz, Noelia; Rico, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    Mesophilic anaerobic co-digestion of cheese whey and the screened liquid fraction of dairy manure was investigated with the aim of determining the treatment limits in terms of the cheese whey fraction in feed and the organic loading rate. The results of a continuous stirred tank reactor that was operated with a hydraulic retention time of 15.6 days showed that the co-digestion process was possible with a cheese whey fraction as high as 85% in the feed. The efficiency of the process was similar within the range of the 15-85% cheese whey fraction. To study the effect of the increasing loading rate, the HRT was progressively shortened with the 65% cheese whey fraction in the feed. The reactor efficiency dropped as the HRT decreased but enabled a stable operation over 8.7 days of HRT. At these operating conditions, a volumetric methane production rate of 1.37 m(3) CH4 m(-3) d(-1) was achieved. PMID:25911592

  19. Anaerobic co-digestion of cheese whey and the screened liquid fraction of dairy manure in a single continuously stirred tank reactor process: Limits in co-substrate ratios and organic loading rate.

    PubMed

    Rico, Carlos; Muñoz, Noelia; Rico, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    Mesophilic anaerobic co-digestion of cheese whey and the screened liquid fraction of dairy manure was investigated with the aim of determining the treatment limits in terms of the cheese whey fraction in feed and the organic loading rate. The results of a continuous stirred tank reactor that was operated with a hydraulic retention time of 15.6 days showed that the co-digestion process was possible with a cheese whey fraction as high as 85% in the feed. The efficiency of the process was similar within the range of the 15-85% cheese whey fraction. To study the effect of the increasing loading rate, the HRT was progressively shortened with the 65% cheese whey fraction in the feed. The reactor efficiency dropped as the HRT decreased but enabled a stable operation over 8.7 days of HRT. At these operating conditions, a volumetric methane production rate of 1.37 m(3) CH4 m(-3) d(-1) was achieved.

  20. 14 CFR 25.1531 - Maneuvering flight load factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maneuvering flight load factors. 25.1531... Operating Limitations § 25.1531 Maneuvering flight load factors. Load factor limitations, not exceeding the positive limit load factors determined from the maneuvering diagram in § 25.333(b), must be established....

  1. Force Limit System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawlik, Ralph; Krause, David; Bremenour, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The Force Limit System (FLS) was developed to protect test specimens from inadvertent overload. The load limit value is fully adjustable by the operator and works independently of the test system control as a mechanical (non-electrical) device. When a test specimen is loaded via an electromechanical or hydraulic test system, a chance of an overload condition exists. An overload applied to a specimen could result in irreparable damage to the specimen and/or fixturing. The FLS restricts the maximum load that an actuator can apply to a test specimen. When testing limited-run test articles or using very expensive fixtures, the use of such a device is highly recommended. Test setups typically use electronic peak protection, which can be the source of overload due to malfunctioning components or the inability to react quickly enough to load spikes. The FLS works independently of the electronic overload protection.

  2. METHODS OF ANALYSIS FOR WASTE LOAD ALLOCATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research has addressed several unresolved questions concerning the allocation of allowable waste loads among multiple wastewater dischargers within a water quality limited stream segment. First, the traditional assumptions about critical design conditions for waste load allo...

  3. LOADING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Ohlinger, L.A.

    1958-10-01

    A device is presented for loading or charging bodies of fissionable material into a reactor. This device consists of a car, mounted on tracks, into which the fissionable materials may be placed at a remote area, transported to the reactor, and inserted without danger to the operating personnel. The car has mounted on it a heavily shielded magazine for holding a number of the radioactive bodies. The magazine is of a U-shaped configuration and is inclined to the horizontal plane, with a cap covering the elevated open end, and a remotely operated plunger at the lower, closed end. After the fissionable bodies are loaded in the magazine and transported to the reactor, the plunger inserts the body at the lower end of the magazine into the reactor, then is withdrawn, thereby allowing gravity to roll the remaining bodies into position for successive loading in a similar manner.

  4. Use of Flexible Body Coupled Loads in Assessment of Day of Launch Flight Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, Brett R.; Yunis, Isam; Olds, Aaron D.

    2011-01-01

    A Day of Launch flight loads assessment technique that determines running loads calculated from flexible body coupled loads was developed for the Ares I-X Flight Test Vehicle. The technique was developed to quantify DOL flight loads in terms of structural load components rather than the typically used q-alpha metric to provide more insight into the DOL loads. In this technique, running loads in the primary structure are determined from the combination of quasi-static aerodynamic loads and dynamic loads. The aerodynamic loads are calculated as a function of time using trajectory parameters passed from the DOL trajectory simulation and are combined with precalculated dynamic loads using a load combination equation. The potential change in aerodynamic load due to wind variability during the countdown is included in the load combination. In the event of a load limit exceedance, the technique allows the identification of what load component is exceeded, a quantification of how much the load limit is exceeded, and where on the vehicle the exceedance occurs. This technique was used to clear the Ares I-X FTV for launch on October 28, 2009. This paper describes the use of coupled loads in the Ares I-X flight loads assessment and summarizes the Ares I-X load assessment results.

  5. Carbohydrate Loading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csernus, Marilyn

    Carbohydrate loading is a frequently used technique to improve performance by altering an athlete's diet. The objective is to increase glycogen stored in muscles for use in prolonged strenuous exercise. For two to three days, the athlete consumes a diet that is low in carbohydrates and high in fat and protein while continuing to exercise and…

  6. Shuttle car loading system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, E. R., Jr. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A system is described for loading newly mined material such as coal, into a shuttle car, at a location near the mine face where there is only a limited height available for a loading system. The system includes a storage bin having several telescoping bin sections and a shuttle car having a bottom wall that can move under the bin. With the bin in an extended position and filled with coal the bin sections can be telescoped to allow the coal to drop out of the bin sections and into the shuttle car, to quickly load the car. The bin sections can then be extended, so they can be slowly filled with more while waiting another shuttle car.

  7. 14 CFR 23.726 - Ground load dynamic tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Landing Gear § 23.726 Ground load dynamic tests. (a) If compliance with the ground load requirements of...); or (2) Sufficient to develop 1.5 times the limit load factor. (b) The critical landing condition...

  8. 14 CFR 23.726 - Ground load dynamic tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Landing Gear § 23.726 Ground load dynamic tests. (a) If compliance with the ground load requirements of...); or (2) Sufficient to develop 1.5 times the limit load factor. (b) The critical landing condition...

  9. 14 CFR 23.726 - Ground load dynamic tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Landing Gear § 23.726 Ground load dynamic tests. (a) If compliance with the ground load requirements of...); or (2) Sufficient to develop 1.5 times the limit load factor. (b) The critical landing condition...

  10. LOADED WAVEGUIDES

    DOEpatents

    Mullett, L.B.; Loach, B.G.; Adams, G.L.

    1958-06-24

    >Loaded waveguides are described for the propagation of electromagnetic waves with reduced phase velocities. A rectangular waveguide is dimensioned so as to cut-off the simple H/sub 01/ mode at the operating frequency. The waveguide is capacitance loaded, so as to reduce the phase velocity of the transmitted wave, by connecting an electrical conductor between directly opposite points in the major median plane on the narrower pair of waveguide walls. This conductor may take a corrugated shape or be an aperature member, the important factor being that the electrical length of the conductor is greater than one-half wavelength at the operating frequency. Prepared for the Second U.N. International ConferThe importance of nuclear standards is duscussed. A brief review of the international callaboration in this field is given. The proposal is made to let the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) coordinate the efforts from other groups. (W.D.M.)

  11. 14 CFR 31.23 - Flight load factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Flight load factor. 31.23 Section 31.23... STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Strength Requirements § 31.23 Flight load factor. In determining limit load, the limit flight load factor must be at least 1.4....

  12. 14 CFR 31.23 - Flight load factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight load factor. 31.23 Section 31.23... STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Strength Requirements § 31.23 Flight load factor. In determining limit load, the limit flight load factor must be at least 1.4....

  13. 46 CFR 44.05-10 - Load line markings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Load line markings. 44.05-10 Section 44.05-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES SPECIAL SERVICE LIMITED DOMESTIC VOYAGES Rules for Assigning Special Service Load Lines § 44.05-10 Load line markings. (a) The load...

  14. Limits to Open Class Performance?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H.

    2008-01-01

    This presentation discusses open or unlimited class aircraft performance limitations and design solutions. Limitations in this class of aircraft include slow climbing flight which requires low wing loading, high cruise speed which requires high wing loading, gains in induced or viscous drag alone which result in only half the gain overall and other structural problems (yaw inertia and spins, flutter and static loads integrity). Design solutions include introducing minimum induced drag for a given span (elliptical span load or winglets) and introducing minimum induced drag for a bell shaped span load. It is concluded that open class performance limits (under current rules and technologies) is very close to absolute limits, though some gains remain to be made from unexplored areas and new technologies.

  15. Load regulating latch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleberry, W. T. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A load regulating mechanical latch is described that has a pivotally mounted latch element having a hook-shaped end with a strike roller-engaging laterally open hook for engaging a stationary strike roller. The latch element or hook is pivotally mounted in a clevis end of an elongated latch stem that is adapted for axial movement through an opening in a support plate or bracket mounted to a structural member. A coil spring is disposed over and around the extending latch stem and the lower end of the coil spring engages the support bracket. A thrust washer is removably attached to the other end of the latch stem and engages the other end of the coil spring and compresses the coil spring thereby preloading the spring and the latch element carried by the latch stem. The hook-shaped latch element has a limited degree of axial travel for loading caused by structural distortion which may change the relative positions of the latch element hook and the strike roller. Means are also provided to permit limited tilt of the latch element due to loading of the hook.

  16. 14 CFR 125.383 - Load manifest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... airplane; (3) The maximum allowable takeoff and landing weights for that flight; (4) The center of gravity limits; (5) The center of gravity of the loaded airplane, except that the actual center of gravity need... that ensures that the center of gravity of the loaded airplane is within approved limits. In...

  17. 14 CFR 125.383 - Load manifest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... airplane; (3) The maximum allowable takeoff and landing weights for that flight; (4) The center of gravity limits; (5) The center of gravity of the loaded airplane, except that the actual center of gravity need... that ensures that the center of gravity of the loaded airplane is within approved limits. In...

  18. 14 CFR 125.383 - Load manifest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... airplane; (3) The maximum allowable takeoff and landing weights for that flight; (4) The center of gravity limits; (5) The center of gravity of the loaded airplane, except that the actual center of gravity need... that ensures that the center of gravity of the loaded airplane is within approved limits. In...

  19. 14 CFR 125.383 - Load manifest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... airplane; (3) The maximum allowable takeoff and landing weights for that flight; (4) The center of gravity limits; (5) The center of gravity of the loaded airplane, except that the actual center of gravity need... that ensures that the center of gravity of the loaded airplane is within approved limits. In...

  20. 14 CFR 125.383 - Load manifest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... airplane; (3) The maximum allowable takeoff and landing weights for that flight; (4) The center of gravity limits; (5) The center of gravity of the loaded airplane, except that the actual center of gravity need... that ensures that the center of gravity of the loaded airplane is within approved limits. In...

  1. Immediate loading of dental implants.

    PubMed

    Henry, P J; Liddelow, G J

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this review is to explore the concept of immediate loading as it pertains to dental implants and the indications for clinical practice. The definition of immediate loading will be considered together with a review of the relevant literature in an attempt to provide evidence-based guidelines for successful implementation into practice. A search of electronic databases including Medline, PubMed and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews was undertaken using the terms "immediate loading'', "dental implants'', "immediate function'', "early loading'', "oral implants'', "immediate restoration'' and "systematic review''. This was supplemented by handsearching in peer-reviewed journals and cross-referenced with the articles accessed. Emphasis was given to systematic reviews and controlled clinical trials. A definition of immediate loading was suggested pertinent to the realities of logistics in clinical practice with respect to application and time frame. The literature was evaluated and shown to be limited with significant shortcomings. Guidelines and recommendations for clinical protocols were suggested and illustrated by examples of case types with a minimum of 1-3 years follow-up. A list of additional references for further reading was provided. Within the limitations of this review, there is evidence to suggest that immediate loading protocols have demonstrated high implant survival rates and may be cautiously recommended for certain clinical situations. However, more high level evidence studies, preferably randomized controlled trials (RCTs), over a long time frame are required to show a clear benefit over more conventional loading protocols.

  2. National Launch System cycle 1 loads and models data book

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, F.; Brunty, J.; Ernsberger, G.; Mcghee, D.; Gagliano, L.; Harrington, F.; Meyer, D.; Blades, E.

    1992-01-01

    This document contains preliminary cycle 1 loads for the National Launch System (NLS) 1 and 2 vehicles. The loads provided and recommended as design loads represent the maximum load expected during prelaunch and flight regimes, i.e., limit loads, except that propellant tank ullage pressure has not been included. Ullage pressure should be added to the loads book values for cases where the addition results in higher loads. The loads must be multiplied by the appropriate factors of safety to determine the ultimate loads for which the structure must be capable.

  3. 14 CFR 25.511 - Ground load: unsymmetrical loads on multiple-wheel units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... tires— (1) The applied side or drag load factor, or both factors, at the center of gravity must be the most critical value up to 50 percent and 40 percent, respectively, of the limit side or drag load...)(2), the drag loads on each inflated tire may not be less than those at each tire for the...

  4. 14 CFR 25.511 - Ground load: unsymmetrical loads on multiple-wheel units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... tires— (1) The applied side or drag load factor, or both factors, at the center of gravity must be the most critical value up to 50 percent and 40 percent, respectively, of the limit side or drag load...)(2), the drag loads on each inflated tire may not be less than those at each tire for the...

  5. 14 CFR 25.511 - Ground load: unsymmetrical loads on multiple-wheel units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... tires— (1) The applied side or drag load factor, or both factors, at the center of gravity must be the most critical value up to 50 percent and 40 percent, respectively, of the limit side or drag load...)(2), the drag loads on each inflated tire may not be less than those at each tire for the...

  6. 46 CFR 44.05-30 - Load line certificate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Load line certificate. 44.05-30 Section 44.05-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES SPECIAL SERVICE LIMITED DOMESTIC VOYAGES Rules for Assigning Special Service Load Lines § 44.05-30 Load line certificate. (a)...

  7. 14 CFR 25.391 - Control surface loads: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.391 Control surface loads: General. The control surfaces must be designed for the limit loads... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Control surface loads: General....

  8. 14 CFR 25.391 - Control surface loads: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.391 Control surface loads: General. The control surfaces must be designed for the limit loads... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Control surface loads: General....

  9. 14 CFR 25.391 - Control surface loads: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.391 Control surface loads: General. The control surfaces must be designed for the limit loads... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Control surface loads: General....

  10. 24 CFR 3280.401 - Structural load tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... set in § 3280.305(d), rupture, fracture, or excessive yielding. Design live load deflection criteria... live load deflection greater than the limits set in § 3280.305(d), rupture, fracture, or...

  11. 24 CFR 3280.401 - Structural load tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... set in § 3280.305(d), rupture, fracture, or excessive yielding. Design live load deflection criteria... live load deflection greater than the limits set in § 3280.305(d), rupture, fracture, or...

  12. 24 CFR 3280.401 - Structural load tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... set in § 3280.305(d), rupture, fracture, or excessive yielding. Design live load deflection criteria... live load deflection greater than the limits set in § 3280.305(d), rupture, fracture, or...

  13. 24 CFR 3280.401 - Structural load tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... set in § 3280.305(d), rupture, fracture, or excessive yielding. Design live load deflection criteria... live load deflection greater than the limits set in § 3280.305(d), rupture, fracture, or...

  14. 14 CFR 23.423 - Maneuvering loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .../sec2) Nose-up pitching 1.0 +39nm÷V×(nm−1.5) Nose-down pitching nm −39nm÷V×(nm−1.5) where— (1) nm... exceeding the limit maneuvering load factor. The total horizontal surface load for both nose-up and...

  15. 14 CFR 23.423 - Maneuvering loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .../sec2) Nose-up pitching 1.0 +39nm÷V×(nm−1.5) Nose-down pitching nm −39nm÷V×(nm−1.5) where— (1) nm... exceeding the limit maneuvering load factor. The total horizontal surface load for both nose-up and...

  16. 14 CFR 23.423 - Maneuvering loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .../sec2) Nose-up pitching 1.0 +39nm÷V×(nm−1.5) Nose-down pitching nm −39nm÷V×(nm−1.5) where— (1) nm... exceeding the limit maneuvering load factor. The total horizontal surface load for both nose-up and...

  17. Maximizing TDRS Command Load Lifetime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Aaron J.

    2002-01-01

    The GNC software onboard ISS utilizes TORS command loads, and a simplistic model of TORS orbital motion to generate onboard TORS state vectors. Each TORS command load contains five "invariant" orbital elements which serve as inputs to the onboard propagation algorithm. These elements include semi-major axis, inclination, time of last ascending node crossing, right ascension of ascending node, and mean motion. Running parallel to the onboard software is the TORS Command Builder Tool application, located in the JSC Mission Control Center. The TORS Command Builder Tool is responsible for building the TORS command loads using a ground TORS state vector, mirroring the onboard propagation algorithm, and assessing the fidelity of current TORS command loads onboard ISS. The tool works by extracting a ground state vector at a given time from a current TORS ephemeris, and then calculating the corresponding "onboard" TORS state vector at the same time using the current onboard TORS command load. The tool then performs a comparison between these two vectors and displays the relative differences in the command builder tool GUI. If the RSS position difference between these two vectors exceeds the tolerable lim its, a new command load is built using the ground state vector and uplinked to ISS. A command load's lifetime is therefore defined as the time from when a command load is built to the time the RSS position difference exceeds the tolerable limit. From the outset of TORS command load operations (STS-98), command load lifetime was limited to approximately one week due to the simplicity of both the onboard propagation algorithm, and the algorithm used by the command builder tool to generate the invariant orbital elements. It was soon desired to extend command load lifetime in order to minimize potential risk due to frequent ISS commanding. Initial studies indicated that command load lifetime was most sensitive to changes in mean motion. Finding a suitable value for mean motion

  18. Current limiters

    SciTech Connect

    Loescher, D.H.; Noren, K.

    1996-09-01

    The current that flows between the electrical test equipment and the nuclear explosive must be limited to safe levels during electrical tests conducted on nuclear explosives at the DOE Pantex facility. The safest way to limit the current is to use batteries that can provide only acceptably low current into a short circuit; unfortunately this is not always possible. When it is not possible, current limiters, along with other design features, are used to limit the current. Three types of current limiters, the fuse blower, the resistor limiter, and the MOSFET-pass-transistor limiters, are used extensively in Pantex test equipment. Detailed failure mode and effects analyses were conducted on these limiters. Two other types of limiters were also analyzed. It was found that there is no best type of limiter that should be used in all applications. The fuse blower has advantages when many circuits must be monitored, a low insertion voltage drop is important, and size and weight must be kept low. However, this limiter has many failure modes that can lead to the loss of over current protection. The resistor limiter is simple and inexpensive, but is normally usable only on circuits for which the nominal current is less than a few tens of milliamperes. The MOSFET limiter can be used on high current circuits, but it has a number of single point failure modes that can lead to a loss of protective action. Because bad component placement or poor wire routing can defeat any limiter, placement and routing must be designed carefully and documented thoroughly.

  19. 46 CFR 153.806 - Loading information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Testing and... enables the master to load and ballast the tankship while keeping structural stresses within design limits....

  20. PLT rotating pumped limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, S.A.; Budny, R.V.; Corso, V.; Boychuck, J.; Grisham, L.; Heifetz, D.; Hosea, J.; Luyber, S.; Loprest, P.; Manos, D.

    1984-07-01

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face and the ability to rotate during tokamak discharges has been installed in a PLT pump duct. These features have been selected to handle the unique particle removal and heat load requirements of ICRF heating and lower-hybrid current-drive experiments. The limiter has been conditioned and commissioned in an ion-beam test stand by irradiation with 1 MW power, 200 ms duration beams of 40 keV hydrogen ions. Operation in PLT during ohmic discharges has proven the ability of the limiter to reduce localized heating caused by energetic electron bombardment and to remove about 2% of the ions lost to the PLT walls and limiters.

  1. 46 CFR 45.185 - Tow limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Tow limitations. 45.185 Section 45.185 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES GREAT LAKES LOAD LINES Unmanned River Barges on Lake Michigan Routes § 45.185 Tow limitations. (a) Barges must not be manned. (b) No more...

  2. 46 CFR 45.185 - Tow limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Tow limitations. 45.185 Section 45.185 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES GREAT LAKES LOAD LINES Unmanned River Barges on Lake Michigan Routes § 45.185 Tow limitations. (a) Barges must not be manned. (b) No more...

  3. 46 CFR 45.185 - Tow limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Tow limitations. 45.185 Section 45.185 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES GREAT LAKES LOAD LINES Unmanned River Barges on Lake Michigan Routes § 45.185 Tow limitations. (a) Barges must not be manned. (b) No more...

  4. 46 CFR 45.185 - Tow limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tow limitations. 45.185 Section 45.185 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES GREAT LAKES LOAD LINES Unmanned River Barges on Lake Michigan Routes § 45.185 Tow limitations. (a) Barges must not be manned. (b) No more...

  5. 46 CFR 45.185 - Tow limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Tow limitations. 45.185 Section 45.185 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES GREAT LAKES LOAD LINES Unmanned River Barges on Lake Michigan Routes § 45.185 Tow limitations. (a) Barges must not be manned. (b) No more...

  6. Updates on Force Limiting Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Scharton, Terry

    2013-01-01

    The following conventional force limiting methods currently practiced in deriving force limiting specifications assume one-dimensional translation source and load apparent masses: Simple TDOF model; Semi-empirical force limits; Apparent mass, etc.; Impedance method. Uncorrelated motion of the mounting points for components mounted on panels and correlated, but out-of-phase, motions of the support structures are important and should be considered in deriving force limiting specifications. In this presentation "rock-n-roll" motions of the components supported by panels, which leads to a more realistic force limiting specifications are discussed.

  7. 14 CFR 25.1583 - Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... distribution. The weight and center of gravity limitations established under § 25.1519 must be furnished in the... weight and center of gravity limits, and to maintain the loading within these limits in flight. (3) If certification for more than one center of gravity range is requested, the appropriate limitations, with...

  8. RTLS entry load relief parameter optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crull, T. J.

    1975-01-01

    The results are presented of a study of a candidate load relief control law for use during the pullup phase of Return-to-Launch-Site (RTLS) abort entries. The control law parameters and cycle time which optimized performance of the normal load factor limiting phase (load relief phase) of an RTLS entry are examined. A set of control law gains, a smoothing parameter, and a normal force coefficient curve fit are established which resulted in good load relief performance considering the possible aerodynamic coefficient uncertainties defined. Also, the examination of various guidance cycle times revealed improved load relief performance with decreasing cycle time. A .5 second cycle provided smooth and adequate load relief in the presence of all the aerodynamic uncertainties examined.

  9. Tendon fatigue in response to mechanical loading

    PubMed Central

    Andarawis-Puri, N.; Flatow, E. L.

    2015-01-01

    Tendinopathies are commonly attributable to accumulation of sub-rupture fatigue damage from repetitive use. Data is limited to late stage disease from patients undergoing surgery, motivating development of animal models, such as ones utilizing treadmill running or repetitive reaching, to investigate the progression of tendinopathies. We developed an in vivo model using the rat patellar tendon that allows control of the loading directly applied to the tendon. This manuscript discusses the response of tendons to fatigue loading and applications of our model. Briefly, the fatigue life of the tendon was used to define low, moderate and high levels of fatigue loading. Morphological assessment showed a progression from mild kinks to fiber disruption, for low to high level fatigue loading. Collagen expression, 1 and 3 days post loading, showed more modest changes for low and moderate than high level fatigue loading. Protein and mRNA expression of Ineterleukin-1β and MMP-13 were upregulated for moderate but not low level fatigue loading. Moderate level (7200 cycles) and 100 cycles of fatigue loading resulted in a catabolic and anabolic molecular profile respectively, at both 1 and 7 days post loading. Results suggest unique mechanisms for different levels of fatigue loading that are distinct from laceration. PMID:21625047

  10. Wash load and bed-material load transport in the Yellow River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yang, C.T.; Simoes, F.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    It has been the conventional assumption that wash load is supply limited and is only indirectly related to the hydraulics of a river. Hydraulic engineers also assumed that bed-material load concentration is independent of wash load concentration. This paper provides a detailed analysis of the Yellow River sediment transport data to determine whether the above assumptions are true and whether wash load concentration can be computed from the original unit stream power formula and the modified unit stream power formula for sediment-laden flows. A systematic and thorough analysis of 1,160 sets of data collected from 9 gauging stations along the Middle and Lower Yellow River confirmed that the method suggested by the conjunctive use of the two formulas can be used to compute wash load, bed-material load, and total load in the Yellow River with accuracy. Journal of Hydraulic Engineering ?? ASCE.

  11. Load sensing system

    DOEpatents

    Sohns, Carl W.; Nodine, Robert N.; Wallace, Steven Allen

    1999-01-01

    A load sensing system inexpensively monitors the weight and temperature of stored nuclear material for long periods of time in widely variable environments. The system can include an electrostatic load cell that encodes weight and temperature into a digital signal which is sent to a remote monitor via a coaxial cable. The same cable is used to supply the load cell with power. When multiple load cells are used, vast

  12. Load forecasting by ANN

    SciTech Connect

    Highley, D.D.; Hilmes, T.J. )

    1993-07-01

    This article discusses the use and training of artificial neural networks (ANNs) for load forecasting. The topics of the article include a brief overview of neural networks, interest in ANNs, training of neural networks, a case study in load forecasting, and the potential for using an artificial neural network to perform short-term load forecasting.

  13. Discharge circuits and loads

    SciTech Connect

    Sarjeant, W.J.

    1980-10-15

    This will be an overview in which some of the general properties of loads are examined: their interface with the energy storage and switching devices; general problems encountered with different types of loads; how load behavior and fault modes can impact on the design of a power conditioning system (PCS).

  14. 14 CFR 25.391 - Control surface loads: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Control surface loads: General. 25.391... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.391 Control surface loads: General. The control surfaces must be designed for the limit...

  15. 14 CFR 25.391 - Control surface loads: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Control surface loads: General. 25.391... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.391 Control surface loads: General. The control surfaces must be designed for the limit...

  16. Load Model Data Tool

    2013-04-30

    The LMDT software automates the process of the load composite model data preparation in the format supported by the major power system software vendors (GE and Siemens). Proper representation of the load composite model in power system dynamic analysis is very important. Software tools for power system simulation like GE PSLF and Siemens PSSE already include algorithms for the load composite modeling. However, these tools require that the input information on composite load to bemore » provided in custom formats. Preparation of this data is time consuming and requires multiple manual operations. The LMDT software enables to automate this process. Software is designed to generate composite load model data. It uses the default load composition data, motor information, and bus information as an input. Software processes the input information and produces load composition model. Generated model can be stored in .dyd format supported by GE PSLF package or .dyr format supported by Siemens PSSE package.« less

  17. Load Model Data Tool

    SciTech Connect

    David Chassin, Pavel Etingov

    2013-04-30

    The LMDT software automates the process of the load composite model data preparation in the format supported by the major power system software vendors (GE and Siemens). Proper representation of the load composite model in power system dynamic analysis is very important. Software tools for power system simulation like GE PSLF and Siemens PSSE already include algorithms for the load composite modeling. However, these tools require that the input information on composite load to be provided in custom formats. Preparation of this data is time consuming and requires multiple manual operations. The LMDT software enables to automate this process. Software is designed to generate composite load model data. It uses the default load composition data, motor information, and bus information as an input. Software processes the input information and produces load composition model. Generated model can be stored in .dyd format supported by GE PSLF package or .dyr format supported by Siemens PSSE package.

  18. Combined mechanical loading of composite tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derstine, Mark S.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Bowles, David E.

    1988-01-01

    An analytical/experimental investigation was performed to study the effect of material nonlinearities on the response of composite tubes subjected to combined axial and torsional loading. The effect of residual stresses on subsequent mechanical response was included in the investigation. Experiments were performed on P75/934 graphite-epoxy tubes with a stacking sequence of (15/0/ + or - 10/0/ -15), using pure torsion and combined axial/torsional loading. In the presence of residual stresses, the analytical model predicted a reduction in the initial shear modulus. Experimentally, coupling between axial loading and shear strain was observed in laminated tubes under combined loading. The phenomenon was predicted by the nonlinear analytical model. The experimentally observed linear limit of the global shear response was found to correspond to the analytically predicted first ply failure. Further, the failure of the tubes was found to be path dependent above a critical load level.

  19. Minimizing nonadiabaticities in optical-lattice loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolfi, Michele; Kantian, Adrian; Bauer, Bela; Troyer, Matthias

    2015-03-01

    In the quest to reach lower temperatures of ultracold gases in optical-lattice experiments, nonadiabaticities during lattice loading represent one of the limiting factors that prevent the same low temperatures being reached as in experiments without lattices. Simulating the loading of a bosonic quantum gas into a one-dimensional optical lattice with and without a trap, we find that the redistribution of atomic density inside a global confining potential is by far the dominant source of heating. Based on these results we propose adjusting the trapping potential during loading to minimize changes to the density distribution. Our simulations confirm that a very simple linear interpolation of the trapping potential during loading already significantly decreases the heating of a quantum gas, and we discuss how loading protocols minimizing density redistributions can be designed.

  20. Phalange Tactile Load Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Griffith, Bryan Kristian (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A tactile load cell that has particular application for measuring the load on a phalange in a dexterous robot system. The load cell includes a flexible strain element having first and second end portions that can be used to mount the load cell to the phalange and a center portion that can be used to mount a suitable contact surface to the load cell. The strain element also includes a first S-shaped member including at least three sections connected to the first end portion and the center portion and a second S-shaped member including at least three sections coupled to the second end portion and the center portion. The load cell also includes eight strain gauge pairs where each strain gauge pair is mounted to opposing surfaces of one of the sections of the S-shaped members where the strain gauge pairs provide strain measurements in six-degrees of freedom.

  1. 14 CFR 29.309 - Design limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., power on and power off. (c) The maximum forward speeds for each main rotor r.p.m. within the ranges determined under paragraph (b) of this section. (d) The maximum rearward and sideward flight speeds. (e) The... component. (g) The positive and negative limit maneuvering load factors. Flight Loads...

  2. 14 CFR 27.309 - Design limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .... (c) The maximum forward speeds for each main rotor r.p.m. within the ranges determined under paragraph (b) of this section. (d) The maximum rearward and sideward flight speeds. (e) The center of...) The positive and negative limit maneuvering load factors. Flight Loads...

  3. 14 CFR 29.309 - Design limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., power on and power off. (c) The maximum forward speeds for each main rotor r.p.m. within the ranges determined under paragraph (b) of this section. (d) The maximum rearward and sideward flight speeds. (e) The... component. (g) The positive and negative limit maneuvering load factors. Flight Loads...

  4. 14 CFR 27.309 - Design limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... (c) The maximum forward speeds for each main rotor r.p.m. within the ranges determined under paragraph (b) of this section. (d) The maximum rearward and sideward flight speeds. (e) The center of...) The positive and negative limit maneuvering load factors. Flight Loads...

  5. 14 CFR 27.309 - Design limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... (c) The maximum forward speeds for each main rotor r.p.m. within the ranges determined under paragraph (b) of this section. (d) The maximum rearward and sideward flight speeds. (e) The center of...) The positive and negative limit maneuvering load factors. Flight Loads...

  6. 14 CFR 29.309 - Design limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., power on and power off. (c) The maximum forward speeds for each main rotor r.p.m. within the ranges determined under paragraph (b) of this section. (d) The maximum rearward and sideward flight speeds. (e) The... component. (g) The positive and negative limit maneuvering load factors. Flight Loads...

  7. 46 CFR 45.179 - Cargo limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 148 of this chapter and 49 CFR chapter 1, subchapter C, may not be carried. ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo limitations. 45.179 Section 45.179 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES GREAT LAKES LOAD LINES Unmanned...

  8. 46 CFR 45.179 - Cargo limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 148 of this chapter and 49 CFR chapter 1, subchapter C, may not be carried. ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo limitations. 45.179 Section 45.179 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES GREAT LAKES LOAD LINES Unmanned...

  9. 46 CFR 45.179 - Cargo limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 148 of this chapter and 49 CFR chapter 1, subchapter C, may not be carried. ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cargo limitations. 45.179 Section 45.179 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES GREAT LAKES LOAD LINES Unmanned...

  10. 46 CFR 45.179 - Cargo limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 148 of this chapter and 49 CFR chapter 1, subchapter C, may not be carried. ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cargo limitations. 45.179 Section 45.179 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES GREAT LAKES LOAD LINES Unmanned...

  11. 46 CFR 45.179 - Cargo limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 148 of this chapter and 49 CFR chapter 1, subchapter C, may not be carried. ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo limitations. 45.179 Section 45.179 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES GREAT LAKES LOAD LINES Unmanned...

  12. 14 CFR 133.45 - Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... rotorcraft-load combination may be operated only within the weight and center of gravity limitations... external load weight exceeding that used in showing compliance with §§ 133.41 and 133.43. (c) The... A for the operating weight and provide hover capability with one engine inoperative at...

  13. 14 CFR 133.45 - Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... rotorcraft-load combination may be operated only within the weight and center of gravity limitations... external load weight exceeding that used in showing compliance with §§ 133.41 and 133.43. (c) The... A for the operating weight and provide hover capability with one engine inoperative at...

  14. 14 CFR 27.25 - Weight limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight General § 27.25 Weight limits. (a) Maximum weight. The maximum... rotorcraft, assuming for each crewmember a weight no more than 170 pounds, or any lower weight selected by... external load. A total weight for the rotorcraft with a jettisonable external load attached that is...

  15. 14 CFR 27.25 - Weight limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight General § 27.25 Weight limits. (a) Maximum weight. The maximum... rotorcraft, assuming for each crewmember a weight no more than 170 pounds, or any lower weight selected by... external load. A total weight for the rotorcraft with a jettisonable external load attached that is...

  16. 14 CFR 29.339 - Resultant limit maneuvering loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... velocity component in the plane of the rotor disc to the rotational tip speed of the rotor blades, and is... flight path (radians, positive when axis is pointing aft); Ω=The angular velocity of rotor (radians...

  17. 14 CFR 27.339 - Resultant limit maneuvering loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... velocity component in the plane of the rotor disc to the rotational tip speed of the rotor blades, and is... flight path (radians, positive when axis is pointing aft); omega= The angular velocity of rotor...

  18. 14 CFR 29.339 - Resultant limit maneuvering loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... velocity component in the plane of the rotor disc to the rotational tip speed of the rotor blades, and is... flight path (radians, positive when axis is pointing aft); Ω=The angular velocity of rotor (radians...

  19. 14 CFR 27.339 - Resultant limit maneuvering loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... velocity component in the plane of the rotor disc to the rotational tip speed of the rotor blades, and is... flight path (radians, positive when axis is pointing aft); omega= The angular velocity of rotor...

  20. 14 CFR 29.339 - Resultant limit maneuvering loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... velocity component in the plane of the rotor disc to the rotational tip speed of the rotor blades, and is... flight path (radians, positive when axis is pointing aft); Ω=The angular velocity of rotor (radians...

  1. 14 CFR 29.339 - Resultant limit maneuvering loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... velocity component in the plane of the rotor disc to the rotational tip speed of the rotor blades, and is... flight path (radians, positive when axis is pointing aft); Ω=The angular velocity of rotor (radians...

  2. 14 CFR 27.339 - Resultant limit maneuvering loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... velocity component in the plane of the rotor disc to the rotational tip speed of the rotor blades, and is... flight path (radians, positive when axis is pointing aft); omega= The angular velocity of rotor...

  3. 14 CFR 27.339 - Resultant limit maneuvering loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... velocity component in the plane of the rotor disc to the rotational tip speed of the rotor blades, and is... flight path (radians, positive when axis is pointing aft); omega= The angular velocity of rotor...

  4. Load sensing system

    DOEpatents

    Sohns, C.W.; Nodine, R.N.; Wallace, S.A.

    1999-05-04

    A load sensing system inexpensively monitors the weight and temperature of stored nuclear material for long periods of time in widely variable environments. The system can include an electrostatic load cell that encodes weight and temperature into a digital signal which is sent to a remote monitor via a coaxial cable. The same cable is used to supply the load cell with power. When multiple load cells are used, vast inventories of stored nuclear material can be continuously monitored and inventoried of minimal cost. 4 figs.

  5. Load regulating expansion fixture

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, L.M.; Strum, M.J.

    1998-12-15

    A free standing self contained device for bonding ultra thin metallic films, such as 0.001 inch beryllium foils is disclosed. The device will regulate to a predetermined load for solid state bonding when heated to a bonding temperature. The device includes a load regulating feature, whereby the expansion stresses generated for bonding are regulated and self adjusting. The load regulator comprises a pair of friction isolators with a plurality of annealed copper members located therebetween. The device, with the load regulator, will adjust to and maintain a stress level needed to successfully and economically complete a leak tight bond without damaging thin foils or other delicate components. 1 fig.

  6. Load regulating expansion fixture

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, Lawrence M.; Strum, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    A free standing self contained device for bonding ultra thin metallic films, such as 0.001 inch beryllium foils. The device will regulate to a predetermined load for solid state bonding when heated to a bonding temperature. The device includes a load regulating feature, whereby the expansion stresses generated for bonding are regulated and self adjusting. The load regulator comprises a pair of friction isolators with a plurality of annealed copper members located therebetween. The device, with the load regulator, will adjust to and maintain a stress level needed to successfully and economically complete a leak tight bond without damaging thin foils or other delicate components.

  7. FUEL CASK IMPACT LIMITER VULNERABILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Leduc, D; Jeffery England, J; Roy Rothermel, R

    2009-02-09

    Cylindrical fuel casks often have impact limiters surrounding just the ends of the cask shaft in a typical 'dumbbell' arrangement. The primary purpose of these impact limiters is to absorb energy to reduce loads on the cask structure during impacts associated with a severe accident. Impact limiters are also credited in many packages with protecting closure seals and maintaining lower peak temperatures during fire events. For this credit to be taken in safety analyses, the impact limiter attachment system must be shown to retain the impact limiter following Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT) and Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) impacts. Large casks are often certified by analysis only because of the costs associated with testing. Therefore, some cask impact limiter attachment systems have not been tested in real impacts. A recent structural analysis of the T-3 Spent Fuel Containment Cask found problems with the design of the impact limiter attachment system. Assumptions in the original Safety Analysis for Packaging (SARP) concerning the loading in the attachment bolts were found to be inaccurate in certain drop orientations. This paper documents the lessons learned and their applicability to impact limiter attachment system designs.

  8. A review of research in rotor loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bousman, William G.; Mantay, Wayne R.

    1988-01-01

    The research accomplished in the area of rotor loads over the last 13 to 14 years is reviewed. The start of the period examined is defined by the 1973 AGARD Milan conference and the 1974 hypothetical rotor comparison. The major emphasis of the review is research performed by the U.S. Army and NASA at their laboratories and/or by the industry under government contract. For the purpose of this review, two main topics are addressed: rotor loads prediction and means of rotor loads reduction. A limited discussion of research in gust loads and maneuver loads is included. In the area of rotor loads predictions, the major problem areas are reviewed including dynamic stall, wake induced flows, blade tip effects, fuselage induced effects, blade structural modeling, hub impedance, and solution methods. It is concluded that the capability to predict rotor loads has not significantly improved in this time frame. Future progress will require more extensive correlation of measurements and predictions to better understand the causes of the problems, and a recognition that differences between theory and measurement have multiple sources, yet must be treated as a whole. There is a need for high-quality data to support future research in rotor loads, but the resulting data base must not be seen as an end in itself. It will be useful only if it is integrated into firm long-range plans for the use of the data.

  9. Microbial load monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caplin, R. S.; Royer, E. R.

    1977-01-01

    Design analysis of a microbial load monitor system flight engineering model was presented. Checkout of the card taper and media pump system was fabricated as well as the final two incubating reading heads, the sample receiving and card loading device assembly, related sterility testing, and software. Progress in these areas was summarized.

  10. Combined Load Test Fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Donald J.

    2010-01-01

    A test fixture has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center that has the capability of applying compression load and shear load simultaneously to a test specimen. The test specimen size is 24-inches by 28-inches. This report describes the test specimen design, test specimen preparation, fixture assembly in the test machine, and a test operation plan.

  11. CRITICAL LOADS METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    I summarize the results of an interagency project that 1) defines a generic approach to quantifying and reporting critical loads, and 2) exercises that generic approach by examining a data rich system -- the critical loads of sulfur deposition and it's effect on the chronic acidi...

  12. Load Induced Blindness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macdonald, James S. P.; Lavie, Nilli

    2008-01-01

    Although the perceptual load theory of attention has stimulated a great deal of research, evidence for the role of perceptual load in determining perception has typically relied on indirect measures that infer perception from distractor effects on reaction times or neural activity (see N. Lavie, 2005, for a review). Here we varied the level of…

  13. Transportation and handling loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostrem, F. E.

    1971-01-01

    Criteria and recommended practices are presented for the prediction and verification of transportation and handling loads for the space vehicle structure and for monitoring these loads during transportation and handling of the vehicle or major vehicle segments. Elements of the transportation and handling systems, and the forcing functions and associated loads are described. The forcing functions for common carriers and typical handling devices are assessed, and emphasis is given to the assessment of loads at the points where the space vehicle is supported during transportation and handling. Factors which must be considered when predicting the loads include the transportation and handling medium; type of handling fixture; transport vehicle speed; types of terrain; weather (changes in pressure of temperature, wind, etc.); and dynamics of the transportation modes or handling devices (acceleration, deceleration, and rotations of the transporter or handling device).

  14. Current limiting remote power control module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, Douglas C.

    1990-01-01

    The power source for the Space Station Freedom will be fully utilized nearly all of the time. As such, any loads on the system will need to operate within expected limits. Should any load draw an inordinate amount of power, the bus voltage for the system may sag and disrupt the operation of other loads. To protect the bus and loads some type of power interface between the bus and each load must be provided. This interface is most crucial when load faults occur. A possible system configuration is presented. The proposed interface is the Current Limiting Remote Power Controller (CL-RPC). Such an interface should provide the following power functions: limit overloading and resulting undervoltage; prevent catastrophic failure and still provide for redundancy management within the load; minimize cable heating; and provide accurate current measurement. A functional block diagram of the power processing stage of a CL-RPC is included. There are four functions that drive the circuit design: rate control of current; current sensing; the variable conductance switch (VCS) technology; and the algorithm used for current limiting. Each function is discussed separately.

  15. Cable load sensing device

    DOEpatents

    Beus, Michael J.; McCoy, William G.

    1998-01-01

    Apparatus for sensing the magnitude of a load on a cable as the cable is employed to support the load includes a beam structure clamped to the cable so that a length of the cable lies along the beam structure. A spacer associated with the beam structure forces a slight curvature in a portion of the length of cable under a cable "no-load" condition so that the portion of the length of cable is spaced from the beam structure to define a cable curved portion. A strain gauge circuit including strain gauges is secured to the beam structure by welding. As the cable is employed to support a load the load causes the cable curved portion to exert a force normal to the cable through the spacer and on the beam structure to deform the beam structure as the cable curved portion attempts to straighten under the load. As this deformation takes place, the resistance of the strain gauges is set to a value proportional to the magnitude of the normal strain on the beam structure during such deformation. The magnitude of the normal strain is manipulated in a control device to generate a value equal to the magnitude or weight of the load supported by the cable.

  16. Load Balancing Scientific Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pearce, Olga Tkachyshyn

    2014-12-01

    The largest supercomputers have millions of independent processors, and concurrency levels are rapidly increasing. For ideal efficiency, developers of the simulations that run on these machines must ensure that computational work is evenly balanced among processors. Assigning work evenly is challenging because many large modern parallel codes simulate behavior of physical systems that evolve over time, and their workloads change over time. Furthermore, the cost of imbalanced load increases with scale because most large-scale scientific simulations today use a Single Program Multiple Data (SPMD) parallel programming model, and an increasing number of processors will wait for the slowest one at the synchronization points. To address load imbalance, many large-scale parallel applications use dynamic load balance algorithms to redistribute work evenly. The research objective of this dissertation is to develop methods to decide when and how to load balance the application, and to balance it effectively and affordably. We measure and evaluate the computational load of the application, and develop strategies to decide when and how to correct the imbalance. Depending on the simulation, a fast, local load balance algorithm may be suitable, or a more sophisticated and expensive algorithm may be required. We developed a model for comparison of load balance algorithms for a specific state of the simulation that enables the selection of a balancing algorithm that will minimize overall runtime.

  17. Final Project Report Load Modeling Transmission Research

    SciTech Connect

    Lesieutre, Bernard; Bravo, Richard; Yinger, Robert; Chassin, Dave; Huang, Henry; Lu, Ning; Hiskens, Ian; Venkataramanan, Giri

    2012-03-31

    The research presented in this report primarily focuses on improving power system load models to better represent their impact on system behavior. The previous standard load model fails to capture the delayed voltage recovery events that are observed in the Southwest and elsewhere. These events are attributed to stalled air conditioner units after a fault. To gain a better understanding of their role in these events and to guide modeling efforts, typical air conditioner units were testing in laboratories. Using data obtained from these extensive tests, new load models were developed to match air conditioner behavior. An air conditioner model is incorporated in the new WECC composite load model. These models are used in dynamic studies of the West and can impact power transfer limits for California. Unit-level and systemlevel solutions are proposed as potential solutions to the delayed voltage recovery problem.

  18. Nature limits filarial transmission

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Goutam

    2008-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis, caused by Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi and B. timori is a public health problem of considerable magnitude of the tropics and subtropics. Presently 1.3 billion people are at risk of lymphatic filariasis (LF) infection and about 120 million people are affected in 83 countries. In this context it is worth mentioning that 'nature' itself limits filarial transmission to a great extent in a number of ways such as by reducing vector populations, parasitic load and many other bearings. Possibilities to utilize these bearings of natural control of filariasis should be searched and if manipulations on nature, like indiscriminate urbanization and deforestation, creating sites favourable for the breeding of filarial vectors and unsanitary conditions, water pollution with organic matters etc., are reduced below the threshold level, we will be highly benefited. Understandings of the factors related to natural phenomena of control of filariasis narrated in this article may help to adopt effective control strategies. PMID:18500974

  19. LOADING MACHINE FOR REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Simon, S.L.

    1959-07-01

    An apparatus is described for loading or charging slugs of fissionable material into a nuclear reactor. The apparatus of the invention is a "muzzle loading" type comprising a delivery tube or muzzle designed to be brought into alignment with any one of a plurality of fuel channels. The delivery tube is located within the pressure shell and it is also disposed within shielding barriers while the fuel cantridges or slugs are forced through the delivery tube by an externally driven flexible ram.

  20. Load research manual. Volume 3. Load research for advanced technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenburg, L.; Clarkson, G.; Grund, Jr., C.; Leo, J.; Asbury, J.; Brandon-Brown, F.; Derderian, H.; Mueller, R.; Swaroop, R.

    1980-11-01

    This three-volume manual presents technical guidelines for electric utility load research. Special attention is given to issues raised by the load data reporting requirements of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 and to problems faced by smaller utilities that are initiating load research programs. The manual includes guides to load research literature and glossaries of load research and statistical terms. In Volume 3, special load research procedures are presented for solar, wind, and cogeneration technologies.

  1. 14 CFR 29.1589 - Loading information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Loading information. 29.1589 Section 29.1589 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Operating Limitations and Information Rotorcraft...

  2. 14 CFR 27.1589 - Loading information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Loading information. 27.1589 Section 27.1589 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Operating Limitations and Information Rotorcraft...

  3. 14 CFR 29.1589 - Loading information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Loading information. 29.1589 Section 29.1589 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Operating Limitations and Information Rotorcraft...

  4. 14 CFR 27.1589 - Loading information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Loading information. 27.1589 Section 27.1589 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Operating Limitations and Information Rotorcraft...

  5. Modelling Continuing Load at Disaggregated Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidel, Ewa

    2014-01-01

    The current methodology of estimating load in the following year at Flinders University has achieved reasonable accuracy in the previous capped funding environment, particularly at the university level, due largely to our university having stable intakes and student profiles. While historically within reasonable limits, variation in estimates at…

  6. Fracture mechanics validity limits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Dennis M.; Ernst, Hugo A.

    1994-01-01

    Fracture behavior is characteristics of a dramatic loss of strength compared to elastic deformation behavior. Fracture parameters have been developed and exhibit a range within which each is valid for predicting growth. Each is limited by the assumptions made in its development: all are defined within a specific context. For example, the stress intensity parameters, K, and the crack driving force, G, are derived using an assumption of linear elasticity. To use K or G, the zone of plasticity must be small as compared to the physical dimensions of the object being loaded. This insures an elastic response, and in this context, K and G will work well. Rice's J-integral has been used beyond the limits imposed on K and G. J requires an assumption of nonlinear elasticity, which is not characteristic of real material behavior, but is thought to be a reasonable approximation if unloading is kept to a minimum. As well, the constraint cannot change dramatically (typically, the crack extension is limited to ten-percent of the initial remaining ligament length). Rice, et al investigated the properties required of J-type parameters, J(sub x), and showed that the time rate, dJ(sub x)/dt, must not be a function of the crack extension rate, da/dt. Ernst devised the modified-J parameter, J(sub M), that meets this criterion. J(sub M) correlates fracture data to much higher crack growth than does J. Ultimately, a limit of the validity of J(sub M) is anticipated, and this has been estimated to be at a crack extension of about 40-percent of the initial remaining ligament length. None of the various parameters can be expected to describe fracture in an environment of gross plasticity, in which case the process is better described by deformation parameters, e.g., stress and strain. In the current study, various schemes to identify the onset of the plasticity-dominated behavior, i.e., the end of fracture mechanics validity, are presented. Each validity limit parameter is developed in

  7. Compressive failure of fiber composites under multi-axial loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Shiladitya; Waas, Anthony M.; Ambur, Damodar R.

    2006-03-01

    This paper examines the compressive strength of a fiber reinforced lamina under multi-axial stress states. An equilibrium analysis is carried out in which a kinked band of rotated fibers, described by two angles, is sandwiched between two regions in which the fibers are nominally straight. Proportional multi-axial stress states are examined. The analysis includes the possibility of bifurcation from the current equilibrium state. The compressive strength of the lamina is contingent upon either attaining a load maximum in the equilibrium response or satisfaction of a bifurcation condition, whichever occurs first. The results show that for uniaxial loading a non-zero kink band angle β produces the minimum limit load. For multi-axial loading, different proportional loading paths show regimes of bifurcation dominated and limit load dominated behavior. The present results are able to capture the beneficial effect of transverse compression in raising the composite compressive strength as observed in experiments.

  8. Optimization of Nanowire-Resistance Load Logic Inverter.

    PubMed

    Hashim, Yasir; Sidek, Othman

    2015-09-01

    This study is the first to demonstrate characteristics optimization of nanowire resistance load inverter. Noise margins and inflection voltage of transfer characteristics are used as limiting factors in this optimization. Results indicate that optimization depends on resistance value. Increasing of load resistor tends to increasing in noise margins until saturation point, increasing load resistor after this point will not improve noise margins significantly. PMID:26716253

  9. A load factor formula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Roy G

    1927-01-01

    The ultimate test of a load factor formula is experience. The chief advantages of a semi rational formula over arbitrary factors are that it fairs in between points of experience and it differentiates according to variables within a type. Structural failure of an airplane apparently safe according to the formula would call for a specific change in the formula. The best class of airplanes with which to check a load factor formula seems to be those which have experienced structural failure. Table I comprises a list of the airplanes which have experienced failure in flight traceable to the wing structure. The load factor by formula is observed to be greater than the designed strength in each case, without a single exception. Table II comprises the load factor by formula with the designed strength of a number of well-known service types. The formula indicates that by far the majority of these have ample structural strength. One case considered here in deriving a suitable formula is that of a heavy load carrier of large size and practically no reserve power.

  10. Fatigue Tests with Random Flight Simulation Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schijve, J.

    1972-01-01

    Crack propagation was studied in a full-scale wing structure under different simulated flight conditions. Omission of low-amplitude gust cycles had a small effect on the crack rate. Truncation of the infrequently occurring high-amplitude gust cycles to a lower level had a noticeably accelerating effect on crack growth. The application of fail-safe load (100 percent limit load) effectively stopped subsequent crack growth under resumed flight-simulation loading. In another flight-simulation test series on sheet specimens, the variables studied are the design stress level and the cyclic frequency of the random gust loading. Inflight mean stresses vary from 5.5 to 10.0 kg/sq mm. The effect of the stress level is larger for the 2024 alloy than for the 7075 alloy. Three frequencies were employed: namely, 10 cps, 1 cps, and 0.1 cps. The frequency effect was small. The advantages and limitations of flight-simulation tests are compared with those of alternative test procedures such as constant-amplitude tests, program tests, and random-load tests. Various testing purposes are considered. The variables of flight-simulation tests are listed and their effects are discussed. A proposal is made for performing systematic flight-simulation tests in such a way that the compiled data may be used as a source of reference.

  11. Modeling and Simulation of a Helicopter Slung Load Stabilization Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cicolani, Luigi S.; Ehlers, George E.

    2002-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of simulation and stabilization of the yaw motions of a cargo container slung load. The study configuration is a UH-60 helicopter carrying a 6ft x 6 ft x 8 ft CONEX container. This load is limited to 60 KIAS in operations and flight testing indicates that it starts spinning in hover and that spin rate increases with airspeed. The simulation reproduced the load yaw motions seen in the flight data after augmenting the load model with terms representing unsteady load yaw moment effects acting to reinforce load oscillations, and augmenting the hook model to include yaw resistance at the hook. The use of a vertical fin to stabilize the load is considered. Results indicate that the CONEX airspeed can be extended to 110 kts using a 3x5 ft fin.

  12. E-2C Loads Calibration in DFRC Flight Loads Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, Lawrence S.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: a) Safely and efficiently perform structural load tests on NAVAIR E-2C aircraft to calibrate strain gage instrumentation installed by NAVAIR; b) Collect load test data and derive loads equations for use in NAVAIR flight tests; and c) Assist flight test team with use of loads equations measurements at PAX River.

  13. Optimal load scheduling in commercial and residential microgrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganji Tanha, Mohammad Mahdi

    Residential and commercial electricity customers use more than two third of the total energy consumed in the United States, representing a significant resource of demand response. Price-based demand response, which is in response to changes in electricity prices, represents the adjustments in load through optimal load scheduling (OLS). In this study, an efficient model for OLS is developed for residential and commercial microgrids which include aggregated loads in single-units and communal loads. Single unit loads which include fixed, adjustable and shiftable loads are controllable by the unit occupants. Communal loads which include pool pumps, elevators and central heating/cooling systems are shared among the units. In order to optimally schedule residential and commercial loads, a community-based optimal load scheduling (CBOLS) is proposed in this thesis. The CBOLS schedule considers hourly market prices, occupants' comfort level, and microgrid operation constraints. The CBOLS' objective in residential and commercial microgrids is the constrained minimization of the total cost of supplying the aggregator load, defined as the microgrid load minus the microgrid generation. This problem is represented by a large-scale mixed-integer optimization for supplying single-unit and communal loads. The Lagrangian relaxation methodology is used to relax the linking communal load constraint and decompose the independent single-unit functions into subproblems which can be solved in parallel. The optimal solution is acceptable if the aggregator load limit and the duality gap are within the bounds. If any of the proposed criteria is not satisfied, the Lagrangian multiplier will be updated and a new optimal load schedule will be regenerated until both constraints are satisfied. The proposed method is applied to several case studies and the results are presented for the Galvin Center load on the 16th floor of the IIT Tower in Chicago.

  14. Microbial load monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caplin, R. S.; Royer, E. R.

    1978-01-01

    Attempts are made to provide a total design of a Microbial Load Monitor (MLM) system flight engineering model. Activities include assembly and testing of Sample Receiving and Card Loading Devices (SRCLDs), operator related software, and testing of biological samples in the MLM. Progress was made in assembling SRCLDs with minimal leaks and which operate reliably in the Sample Loading System. Seven operator commands are used to control various aspects of the MLM such as calibrating and reading the incubating reading head, setting the clock and reading time, and status of Card. Testing of the instrument, both in hardware and biologically, was performed. Hardware testing concentrated on SRCLDs. Biological testing covered 66 clinical and seeded samples. Tentative thresholds were set and media performance listed.

  15. 14 CFR 23.535 - Auxiliary float loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... symmetry of the float at a point three-fourths of the distance from the bow to the step and must be... symmetry of the float to the radius of gyration in roll. (c) Bow loading. The resultant limit load must be applied in the plane of symmetry of the float at a point one-fourth of the distance from the bow to...

  16. 14 CFR 23.535 - Auxiliary float loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... symmetry of the float at a point three-fourths of the distance from the bow to the step and must be... symmetry of the float to the radius of gyration in roll. (c) Bow loading. The resultant limit load must be applied in the plane of symmetry of the float at a point one-fourth of the distance from the bow to...

  17. 14 CFR 25.1531 - Maneuvering flight load factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Maneuvering flight load factors. 25.1531 Section 25.1531 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... positive limit load factors determined from the maneuvering diagram in § 25.333(b), must be established....

  18. 14 CFR 25.1531 - Maneuvering flight load factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Maneuvering flight load factors. 25.1531 Section 25.1531 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... positive limit load factors determined from the maneuvering diagram in § 25.333(b), must be established....

  19. 46 CFR 154.1809 - Loading and stability manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... manual. (b) The loading and stability manual must contain: (1) Information that enables the master to load and ballast the vessel while keeping structural stresses within design limits; and (2) The information required by § 170.110 of this chapter....

  20. 14 CFR 25.397 - Control system loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., are assumed to act at the appropriate control grips or pads (in a manner simulating flight conditions... effort effects. In the control surface flight loading condition, the air loads on movable surfaces and... aileron control system must be designed for a single tangential force with a limit value equal to...

  1. 14 CFR 25.397 - Control system loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., are assumed to act at the appropriate control grips or pads (in a manner simulating flight conditions... effort effects. In the control surface flight loading condition, the air loads on movable surfaces and... aileron control system must be designed for a single tangential force with a limit value equal to...

  2. Ocean Tide Loading Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agnew, Duncan Carr

    2005-01-01

    September 15,2003 through May 15,2005 This grant funds the maintenance, updating, and distribution of programs for computing ocean tide loading, to enable the corrections for such loading to be more widely applied in space- geodetic and gravity measurements. These programs, developed under funding from the CDP and DOSE programs, incorporate the most recent global tidal models developed from Topex/Poscidon data, and also local tide models for regions around North America; the design of the algorithm and software makes it straightforward to combine local and global models.

  3. On the simulation of ballistic shock loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollburg, Uwe

    1987-01-01

    Blast or penetrator-impact induced shocks are characterized by high acceleration levels, particularily in the higher frequency range and for a short time duration. These shocks are dangerous for the equipment of ships, combat vehicles, airplanes or spacecraft structures. As ballistic shock loads are insufficiently simulated by laboratory test machines, researchers designed a ballistic shock simulator. The impact induced shocks are simulated by an explosive and the vehicle to be bombarded is replaced by a simplified structure. This structure is suitable to accommodate any equipment which can be tested up to their load limits.

  4. 14 CFR 23.485 - Side load conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... positions. (b) The limit vertical load factor must be 1.33, with the vertical ground reaction divided... reaction divided between the main wheels so that— (1) 0.5 (W) is acting inboard on one side; and (2)...

  5. 14 CFR 23.535 - Auxiliary float loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... where— L=limit load (lbs.); C5=0.0053; VS0=seaplane stalling speed (knots) with landing flaps extended... Vso in normal operations; Vso=seaplane stalling speed (knots) with landing flaps extended in...

  6. Mechanical Predictors of Discomfort during Load Carriage.

    PubMed

    Wettenschwiler, Patrick D; Lorenzetti, Silvio; Stämpfli, Rolf; Rossi, René M; Ferguson, Stephen J; Annaheim, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Discomfort during load carriage is a major issue for activities using backpacks (e.g. infantry maneuvers, children carrying school supplies, or outdoor sports). It is currently unclear which mechanical parameters are responsible for subjectively perceived discomfort. The aim of this study was to identify objectively measured mechanical predictors of discomfort during load carriage. We compared twelve different configurations of a typical load carriage system, a commercially available backpack with a hip belt. The pressure distribution under the hip belt and the shoulder strap, as well as the tensile force in the strap and the relative motion of the backpack were measured. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to investigate possible predictors of discomfort. The results demonstrate that static peak pressure, or alternatively, static strap force is a significant (p<0.001) predictor of discomfort during load carriage in the shoulder and hip region, accounting for 85% or more of the variation in discomfort. As an additional finding, we discovered that the regression coefficients of these predictors are significantly smaller for the hip than for the shoulder region. As static peak pressure is measured directly on the body, it is less dependent on the type of load carriage system than static strap force. Therefore, static peak pressure is well suited as a generally applicable, objective mechanical parameter for the optimization of load carriage system design. Alternatively, when limited to load carriage systems of the type backpack with hip belt, static strap force is the most valuable predictor of discomfort. The regionally differing regression coefficients of both predictors imply that the hip region is significantly more tolerant than the shoulder region. In order to minimize discomfort, users should be encouraged to shift load from the shoulders to the hip region wherever possible, at the same time likely decreasing the risk of low back pain or injury

  7. Mechanical Predictors of Discomfort during Load Carriage

    PubMed Central

    Wettenschwiler, Patrick D.; Lorenzetti, Silvio; Stämpfli, Rolf; Rossi, René M.; Ferguson, Stephen J.; Annaheim, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Discomfort during load carriage is a major issue for activities using backpacks (e.g. infantry maneuvers, children carrying school supplies, or outdoor sports). It is currently unclear which mechanical parameters are responsible for subjectively perceived discomfort. The aim of this study was to identify objectively measured mechanical predictors of discomfort during load carriage. We compared twelve different configurations of a typical load carriage system, a commercially available backpack with a hip belt. The pressure distribution under the hip belt and the shoulder strap, as well as the tensile force in the strap and the relative motion of the backpack were measured. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to investigate possible predictors of discomfort. The results demonstrate that static peak pressure, or alternatively, static strap force is a significant (p<0.001) predictor of discomfort during load carriage in the shoulder and hip region, accounting for 85% or more of the variation in discomfort. As an additional finding, we discovered that the regression coefficients of these predictors are significantly smaller for the hip than for the shoulder region. As static peak pressure is measured directly on the body, it is less dependent on the type of load carriage system than static strap force. Therefore, static peak pressure is well suited as a generally applicable, objective mechanical parameter for the optimization of load carriage system design. Alternatively, when limited to load carriage systems of the type backpack with hip belt, static strap force is the most valuable predictor of discomfort. The regionally differing regression coefficients of both predictors imply that the hip region is significantly more tolerant than the shoulder region. In order to minimize discomfort, users should be encouraged to shift load from the shoulders to the hip region wherever possible, at the same time likely decreasing the risk of low back pain or injury

  8. Composite Materials and Meta Materials for a New Approach to ITER ICRH Loads

    SciTech Connect

    Bottollier-Curtet, H.; Argouarch, A.; Vulliez, K.; Becoulet, A.; Litaudon, X.; Magne, R.; Champeaux, S.; Gouard, Ph.; Primout, M.; Le Gallou, J.-H.

    2009-11-26

    Preliminary laboratory testing of ICRH antennas is a very useful step before their commissioning. Traditionally, pure water, salt water or baking soda water loads are used. These 'water' loads are convenient but strongly limited in terms of performance testing. We have started two feasibility studies for advanced ICRH loads made of ferroelectric ceramics (passive loads) and meta materials (active loads). Preliminary results are very encouraging.

  9. Composite Materials and Meta Materials for a New Approach to ITER ICRH Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottollier-Curtet, H.; Argouarch, A.; Champeaux, S.; Gouard, Ph.; Le Gallou, J.-H.; Primout, M.; Vulliez, K.; Bécoulet, A.; Litaudon, X.; Magne, R.

    2009-11-01

    Preliminary laboratory testing of ICRH antennas is a very useful step before their commissioning. Traditionally, pure water, salt water or baking soda water loads are used. These "water" loads are convenient but strongly limited in terms of performance testing. We have started two feasibility studies for advanced ICRH loads made of ferroelectric ceramics (passive loads) and meta materials (active loads) [1]. Preliminary results are very encouraging.

  10. Strain limit criteria to predict failure

    SciTech Connect

    Flanders, H.E.

    1995-12-31

    In recent years extensive effort has been expended to qualify existing structures for conditions that are beyond the original design basis. Determination of the component failure load is useful for this type of evaluation. This paper presents criteria based upon strain limits to predict the load at failure. The failure modes addressed are excessive plastic deformations, localized plastic strains, and structural instability. The effects of analytical method sophistication, as built configurations, material properties degradation, and stress state are addressed by the criteria.

  11. LOADING AND UNLOADING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1960-08-16

    A device for loading and unloading fuel rods into and from a reactor tank through an access hole includes parallel links carrying a gripper. These links enable the gripper to go through the access hole and then to be moved laterally from the axis of the access hole to the various locations of the fuel rods in the reactor tank.

  12. Multidimensional spectral load balancing

    DOEpatents

    Hendrickson, Bruce A.; Leland, Robert W.

    1996-12-24

    A method of and apparatus for graph partitioning involving the use of a plurality of eigenvectors of the Laplacian matrix of the graph of the problem for which load balancing is desired. The invention is particularly useful for optimizing parallel computer processing of a problem and for minimizing total pathway lengths of integrated circuits in the design stage.

  13. Shear wall ultimate drift limits

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, T.A.; Goldman, A.; Farrar, C.R.

    1994-04-01

    Drift limits for reinforced-concrete shear walls are investigated by reviewing the open literature for appropriate experimental data. Drift values at ultimate are determined for walls with aspect ratios ranging up to a maximum of 3.53 and undergoing different types of lateral loading (cyclic static, monotonic static, and dynamic). Based on the geometry of actual nuclear power plant structures exclusive of containments and concerns regarding their response during seismic (i.e.,cyclic) loading, data are obtained from pertinent references for which the wall aspect ratio is less than or equal to approximately 1, and for which testing is cyclic in nature (typically displacement controlled). In particular, lateral deflections at ultimate load, and at points in the softening region beyond ultimate for which the load has dropped to 90, 80, 70, 60, and 50 percent of its ultimate value, are obtained and converted to drift information. The statistical nature of the data is also investigated. These data are shown to be lognormally distributed, and an analysis of variance is performed. The use of statistics to estimate Probability of Failure for a shear wall structure is illustrated.

  14. Evaluation of approaches to calculate critical metal loads for forest ecosystems.

    PubMed

    de Vries, W; Groenenberg, J E

    2009-12-01

    This paper evaluates approaches to calculate acceptable loads for metal deposition to forest ecosystems, distinguishing between critical loads, stand-still loads and target loads. We also evaluated the influence of including the biochemical metal cycle on the calculated loads. Differences are illustrated by examples of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn for a deciduous forest on five major soil types in the Netherlands. Stand-still loads are generally lower than critical loads, which in turn are lower than the target loads indicating that present levels are below critical levels. Uncertainties in the calculated critical loads are mainly determined by the uncertainty in the critical limits and the chemical speciation model. Including the metal cycle has a small effect on the calculated critical loads. Results are discussed in view of the applicability of the critical load concept for metals in future protocols on the reduction in metal emissions.

  15. Measuring alignment of loading fixture

    DOEpatents

    Scavone, Donald W.

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus and method for measuring the alignment of a clevis and pin type loading fixture for compact tension specimens include a pair of substantially identical flat loading ligaments. Each loading ligament has two apertures for the reception of a respective pin of the loading fixture and a thickness less than one-half of a width of the clevis opening. The pair of loading ligaments are mounted in the clevis openings at respective sides thereof. The loading ligaments are then loaded by the pins of the loading fixture and the strain in each loading ligament is measured. By comparing the relative strain of each loading ligament, the alignment of the loading fixture is determined. Preferably, a suitable strain gage device is located at each longitudinal edge of a respective loading ligament equidistant from the two apertures in order to determine the strain thereat and hence the strain of each ligament. The loading ligaments are made substantially identical by jig grinding the loading ligaments as a matched set. Each loading ligament can also be individually calibrated prior to the measurement.

  16. Test load verification through strain data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verderaime, V.; Harrington, F.

    1995-01-01

    A traditional binding acceptance criterion on polycrystalline structures is the experimental verification of the ultimate factor of safety. At fracture, the induced strain is inelastic and about an order-of-magnitude greater than designed for maximum expected operational limit. At this extreme strained condition, the structure may rotate and displace at the applied verification load such as to unknowingly distort the load transfer into the static test article. Test may result in erroneously accepting a submarginal design or rejecting a reliable one. A technique was developed to identify, monitor, and assess the load transmission error through two back-to-back surface-measured strain data. The technique is programmed for expediency and convenience. Though the method was developed to support affordable aerostructures, the method is also applicable for most high-performance air and surface transportation structural systems.

  17. The nature of operating flight loads and their effect on propulsion system structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickenson, K. H.; Martin, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    Past diagnostics studies revealed the primary causes of performance deterioration of high by-pass turbofan engines to be flight loads, erosion, and thermal distortion. The various types of airplane loads that are imposed on the engine throughout the lifetime of an airplane are examined. These include flight loads from gusts and maneuvers and ground loads from takeoff, landing, and taxi conditions. Clarification is made in definitions of the airframer's limit and ultimate design loads and the engine manufacturer's operating design loads. Finally, the influence of these loads on the propulsion system structures is discussed.

  18. ITER Experts' meeting on density limits

    SciTech Connect

    Borrass, K.; Igitkhanov, Y.L.; Uckan, N.A.

    1989-12-01

    The necessity of achieving a prescribed wall load or fusion power essentially determines the plasma pressure in a device like ITER. The range of operation densities and temperatures compatible with this condition is constrained by the problems of power exhaust and the disruptive density limit. The maximum allowable heat loads on the divertor plates and the maximum allowable sheath edge temperature practically impose a lower limit on the operating densities, whereas the disruptive density limit imposes an upper limit. For most of the density limit scalings proposed in the past an overlap of the two constraints or at best a very narrow accessible density range is predicted for ITER. Improved understanding of the underlying mechanisms is therefore a crucial issue in order to provide a more reliable basis for extrapolation to ITER and to identify possible ways of alleviating the problem.

  19. Load measurement system with load cell lock-out mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Thang; Carroll, Monty; Liu, Jonathan

    1995-05-01

    In the frame work of the project Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment (SPIFEX), a Load Measurement System was developed and fabricated to measure the impingement force of Shuttle Reaction Control System (RCS) jets. The Load Measurement System is a force sensing system that measures any combination of normal and shear forces up to 40 N (9 lbf) in the normal direction and 22 N (5 lbf) in the shear direction with an accuracy of +/- 0.04 N (+/- 0.01 lbf) Since high resolution is required for the force measurement, the Load Measurement System is built with highly sensitive load cells. To protect these fragile load cells in the non-operational mode from being damaged due to flight loads such as launch and landing loads of the Shuttle vehicle, a motor driven device known as the Load Cell Lock-Out Mechanism was built. This Lock-Out Mechanism isolates the load cells from flight loads and re-engages the load cells for the force measurement experiment once in space. With this highly effective protection system, the SPIFEX load measurement experiment was successfully conducted on STS-44 in September 1994 with all load cells operating properly and reading impingement forces as expected.

  20. Plutonium Immobilization Canister Loading

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, E.L.

    1999-01-26

    This disposition of excess plutonium is determined by the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Environmental Impact Statement (SPD-EIS) being prepared by the Department of Energy. The disposition method (Known as ''can in canister'') combines cans of immobilized plutonium-ceramic disks (pucks) with vitrified high-level waste produced at the SRS Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). This is intended to deter proliferation by making the plutonium unattractive for recovery or theft. The envisioned process remotely installs cans containing plutonium-ceramic pucks into storage magazines. Magazines are then remotely loaded into the DWPF canister through the canister neck with a robotic arm and locked into a storage rack inside the canister, which holds seven magazines. Finally, the canister is processed through DWPF and filled with high-level waste glass, thereby surrounding the product cans. This paper covers magazine and rack development and canister loading concepts.

  1. Low-Load Space Conditioning Needs Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Puttagunta, Srikanth

    2015-05-01

    With limited low-load options in the HVAC market, many new-construction housing units are being fitted with oversized equipment - thus facing penalties in system efficiency, comfort, and cost. To bridge the gap between currently available HVAC equipment and the rising demand for low-load HVAC equipment in the marketplace, HVAC equipment manufacturers need to be fully aware of multifamily buildings and single-family homes market needs. Over the past decade, Steven Winter Associates, Inc. (SWA) has provided certification and consulting services on hundreds of housing projects and has accrued a large pool of data. CARB compiled and analyzed these data to see what the thermal load ranges are in various multifamily apartments and attached single-family home types (duplex and townhouse). In total, design loads from 941 dwellings from SWA's recent multifamily and attached single-family work across the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic were analyzed. Information on the dwelling characteristics, design loads, and the specifications of installed mechanical equipment were analyzed to determine any trends that exist within the dataset.

  2. Mechanical stability of trees under dynamic loads.

    PubMed

    James, Kenneth R; Haritos, Nicholas; Ades, Peter K

    2006-10-01

    Tree stability in windstorms and tree failure are important issues in urban areas where there can be risks of damage to people and property and in forests where wind damage causes economic loss. Current methods of managing trees, including pruning and assessment of mechanical strength, are mainly based on visual assessment or the experience of people such as trained arborists. Only limited data are available to assess tree strength and stability in winds, and most recent methods have used a static approach to estimate loads. Recent research on the measurement of dynamic wind loads and the effect on tree stability is giving a better understanding of how different trees cope with winds. Dynamic loads have been measured on trees with different canopy shapes and branch structures including a palm (Washingtonia robusta), a slender Italian cypress (Cupressus sempervirens) and trees with many branches and broad canopies including hoop pine (Araucaria cunninghamii) and two species of eucalypt (Eucalyptus grandis, E. teretecornus). Results indicate that sway is not a harmonic, but is very complex due to the dynamic interaction of branches. A new dynamic model of a tree is described, incorporating the dynamic structural properties of the trunk and branches. The branch mass contributes a dynamic damping, termed mass damping, which acts to reduce dangerous harmonic sway motion of the trunk and so minimizes loads and increases the mechanical stability of the tree. The results from 12 months of monitoring sway motion and wind loading forces are presented and discussed.

  3. Lubricant effect of rate-of-loading

    SciTech Connect

    Gleeson, J.B.

    1995-11-01

    A series of tests were conducted to establish the performance of a motor operated valve (MOV) stem lubricant. Battelle has assembled a MOV test stand to provide a means to test valve actuators and stems with representative valve load profiles and to accurately measure the actuator performance. The facility duplicates an actual MOV except that the stem thrust loads are generated hydraulically and seating loads are generated by mechanical stops. These tests were conducted at a high torque switch setting on a Limitorque SMB-0. Stem-stemnut pairs with known rate-of-loading (ROL) effects ranging from approximately zero to 30% were tested. The stems were lubricated with Mobil 28; a nuclear-grade synthetic grease. A test with a slow, linearly increasing load profile with torque switch trip occurring prior to seating (ramp test), was used to establish the magnitude of the ROL effect for a particular stem-stemnut. Data from these experiments were compared with results of similar EPRI tests which used different stem lubricants. Results with Mobil 28 yielded unexpected, consistent reduced ROL effects. In addition, the thread pressure threshold for limiting ROL effects was significantly reduced. A model of the squeeze film phenomena was developed to explain the experimental results. The model shows that the basic rheological properties of the lubricant, the thread composite surface roughness, and the thread type all have a significant influence on the magnitude of ROL effects.

  4. Fruit load governs transpiration of olive trees.

    PubMed

    Bustan, Amnon; Dag, Arnon; Yermiyahu, Uri; Erel, Ran; Presnov, Eugene; Agam, Nurit; Kool, Dilia; Iwema, Joost; Zipori, Isaac; Ben-Gal, Alon

    2016-03-01

    We tested the hypothesis that whole-tree water consumption of olives (Olea europaea L.) is fruit load-dependent and investigated the driving physiological mechanisms. Fruit load was manipulated in mature olives grown in weighing-drainage lysimeters. Fruit was thinned or entirely removed from trees at three separate stages of growth: early, mid and late in the season. Tree-scale transpiration, calculated from lysimeter water balance, was found to be a function of fruit load, canopy size and weather conditions. Fruit removal caused an immediate decline in water consumption, measured as whole-plant transpiration normalized to tree size, which persisted until the end of the season. The later the execution of fruit removal, the greater was the response. The amount of water transpired by a fruit-loaded tree was found to be roughly 30% greater than that of an equivalent low- or nonyielding tree. The tree-scale response to fruit was reflected in stem water potential but was not mirrored in leaf-scale physiological measurements of stomatal conductance or photosynthesis. Trees with low or no fruit load had higher vegetative growth rates. However, no significant difference was observed in the overall aboveground dry biomass among groups, when fruit was included. This case, where carbon sources and sinks were both not limiting, suggests that the role of fruit on water consumption involves signaling and alterations in hydraulic properties of vascular tissues and tree organs.

  5. Shot loading trainer analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, T.K.

    1995-02-15

    This document presents the results from the analysis of the shot loading trainer (SLT). This device will be used to test the procedure for installing shot into the annulus of the Project W-320 shipping container. To ensure that the shot is installed uniformly around the container, vibrators will be used to settle the shot. The SLT was analyzed to ensure that it would not jeopardize worker safety during operation. The results from the static analysis of the SLT under deadweight and vibrator operating loads show that the stresses in the SLT are below code allowables. The results from the modal analysis show that the natural frequencies of the SLT are far below the operating frequencies of the vibrators, provided the SLT is mounted on pneumatic tires. The SLT was also analyzed for wind, seismic, deadweight, and moving/transporting loads. Analysis of the SLT is in accordance with SDC-4.1 for safety class 3 structures (DOE-RL 1993) and the American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC) Manual of Steel Construction (AISC 1989).

  6. Load responsive hydrodynamic bearing

    DOEpatents

    Kalsi, Manmohan S.; Somogyi, Dezso; Dietle, Lannie L.

    2002-01-01

    A load responsive hydrodynamic bearing is provided in the form of a thrust bearing or journal bearing for supporting, guiding and lubricating a relatively rotatable member to minimize wear thereof responsive to relative rotation under severe load. In the space between spaced relatively rotatable members and in the presence of a liquid or grease lubricant, one or more continuous ring shaped integral generally circular bearing bodies each define at least one dynamic surface and a plurality of support regions. Each of the support regions defines a static surface which is oriented in generally opposed relation with the dynamic surface for contact with one of the relatively rotatable members. A plurality of flexing regions are defined by the generally circular body of the bearing and are integral with and located between adjacent support regions. Each of the flexing regions has a first beam-like element being connected by an integral flexible hinge with one of the support regions and a second beam-like element having an integral flexible hinge connection with an adjacent support region. A least one local weakening geometry of the flexing region is located intermediate the first and second beam-like elements. In response to application of load from one of the relatively rotatable elements to the bearing, the beam-like elements and the local weakening geometry become flexed, causing the dynamic surface to deform and establish a hydrodynamic geometry for wedging lubricant into the dynamic interface.

  7. Buffet Load Alleviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryall, T. G.; Moses, R. W.; Hopkins, M. A.; Henderson, D.; Zimcik, D. G.; Nitzsche, F.

    2004-01-01

    High performance aircraft are, by their very nature, often required to undergo maneuvers involving high angles of attack. Under these conditions unsteady vortices emanating from the wing and the fuselage will impinge on the twin fins (required for directional stability) causing excessive buffet loads, in some circumstances, to be applied to the aircraft. These loads result in oscillatory stresses, which may cause significant amounts of fatigue damage. Active control is a possible solution to this important problem. A full-scale test was carried out on an F/A-18 fuselage and fins using piezoceramic actuators to control the vibrations. Buffet loads were simulated using very powerful electromagnetic shakers. The first phase of this test was concerned with the open loop system identification whereas the second stage involved implementing linear time invariant control laws. This paper looks at some of the problems encountered as well as the corresponding solutions and some results. It is expected that flight trials of a similar control system to alleviate buffet will occur as early as 2001.

  8. Electrical Load Modeling and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Chassin, David P.

    2013-01-01

    Electricity consumer demand response and load control are playing an increasingly important role in the development of a smart grid. Smart grid load management technologies such as Grid FriendlyTM controls and real-time pricing are making their way into the conventional model of grid planning and operations. However, the behavior of load both affects, and is affected by load control strategies that are designed to support electric grid planning and operations. This chapter discussed the natural behavior of electric loads, how it interacts with various load control and demand response strategies, what the consequences are for new grid operation concepts and the computing issues these new technologies raise.

  9. 32. VAL, DETAIL SHOWING LOADING PLATFORM, PROJECTILE LOADING CAR, LAUNCHER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. VAL, DETAIL SHOWING LOADING PLATFORM, PROJECTILE LOADING CAR, LAUNCHER SLAB AND UNDERSIDE OF LAUNCHER BRIDGE LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  10. Passive fault current limiting device

    DOEpatents

    Evans, D.J.; Cha, Y.S.

    1999-04-06

    A passive current limiting device and isolator is particularly adapted for use at high power levels for limiting excessive currents in a circuit in a fault condition such as an electrical short. The current limiting device comprises a magnetic core wound with two magnetically opposed, parallel connected coils of copper, a high temperature superconductor or other electrically conducting material, and a fault element connected in series with one of the coils. Under normal operating conditions, the magnetic flux density produced by the two coils cancel each other. Under a fault condition, the fault element is triggered to cause an imbalance in the magnetic flux density between the two coils which results in an increase in the impedance in the coils. While the fault element may be a separate current limiter, switch, fuse, bimetal strip or the like, it preferably is a superconductor current limiter conducting one-half of the current load compared to the same limiter wired to carry the total current of the circuit. The major voltage during a fault condition is in the coils wound on the common core in a preferred embodiment. 6 figs.

  11. Passive fault current limiting device

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Daniel J.; Cha, Yung S.

    1999-01-01

    A passive current limiting device and isolator is particularly adapted for use at high power levels for limiting excessive currents in a circuit in a fault condition such as an electrical short. The current limiting device comprises a magnetic core wound with two magnetically opposed, parallel connected coils of copper, a high temperature superconductor or other electrically conducting material, and a fault element connected in series with one of the coils. Under normal operating conditions, the magnetic flux density produced by the two coils cancel each other. Under a fault condition, the fault element is triggered to cause an imbalance in the magnetic flux density between the two coils which results in an increase in the impedance in the coils. While the fault element may be a separate current limiter, switch, fuse, bimetal strip or the like, it preferably is a superconductor current limiter conducting one-half of the current load compared to the same limiter wired to carry the total current of the circuit. The major voltage during a fault condition is in the coils wound on the common core in a preferred embodiment.

  12. Modeling Aircraft Wing Loads from Flight Data Using Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Michael J.; Dibley, Ryan P.

    2003-01-01

    Neural networks were used to model wing bending-moment loads, torsion loads, and control surface hinge-moments of the Active Aeroelastic Wing (AAW) aircraft. Accurate loads models are required for the development of control laws designed to increase roll performance through wing twist while not exceeding load limits. Inputs to the model include aircraft rates, accelerations, and control surface positions. Neural networks were chosen to model aircraft loads because they can account for uncharacterized nonlinear effects while retaining the capability to generalize. The accuracy of the neural network models was improved by first developing linear loads models to use as starting points for network training. Neural networks were then trained with flight data for rolls, loaded reversals, wind-up-turns, and individual control surface doublets for load excitation. Generalization was improved by using gain weighting and early stopping. Results are presented for neural network loads models of four wing loads and four control surface hinge moments at Mach 0.90 and an altitude of 15,000 ft. An average model prediction error reduction of 18.6 percent was calculated for the neural network models when compared to the linear models. This paper documents the input data conditioning, input parameter selection, structure, training, and validation of the neural network models.

  13. Plug Loads Conservation Measures

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple plug loads inventory information and calculates the energy and cost benefits of various retrofit opportunities. This tool includes energy conservation measures for: Vending Machine Misers, Delamp Vending Machine, Desktop to Laptop retrofit, CRT to LCD monitors retrofit, Computer Power Management Settings, and Energy Star Refrigerator retrofit. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, building life cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings tomore » investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.« less

  14. Microbial Load Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, S. F.; Royer, E. R.

    1979-01-01

    The Microbial Load Monitor (MLM) is an automated and computerized system for detection and identification of microorganisms. Additionally, the system is designed to enumerate and provide antimicrobic susceptibility profiles for medically significant bacteria. The system is designed to accomplish these tasks in a time of 13 hours or less versus the traditional time of 24 hours for negatives and 72 hours or more for positives usually required for standard microbiological analysis. The MLM concept differs from other methods of microbial detection in that the system is designed to accept raw untreated clinical samples and to selectively identify each group or species that may be present in a polymicrobic sample.

  15. Variable loading roller

    DOEpatents

    Williams, D.M.

    1988-01-21

    An automatic loading roller for transmitting torque in traction drive devices in manipulator arm joints includes a two-part camming device having a first cam portion rotatable in place on a shaft by an input torque and a second cam portion coaxially rotatable and translatable having a rotating drive surface thereon for engaging the driven surface of an output roller with a resultant force proportional to the torque transmitted. Complementary helical grooves in the respective cam portions interconnected through ball bearings interacting with those grooves effect the rotation and translation of the second cam portion in response to rotation of the first. 14 figs.

  16. Variable loading roller

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Daniel M.

    1989-01-01

    An automatic loading roller for transmitting torque in traction drive devices in manipulator arm joints includes a two-part camming device having a first cam portion rotatable in place on a shaft by an input torque and a second cam portion coaxially rotatable and translatable having a rotating drive surface thereon for engaging the driven surface of an output roller with a resultant force proportional to the torque transmitted. Complementary helical grooves on the respective cam portions interconnected through ball bearings interacting with those grooves effect the rotation and translation of the second cam portion in response to rotation of the first.

  17. Multidimensional spectral load balancing

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, B.; Leland, R.

    1993-01-01

    We describe an algorithm for the static load balancing of scientific computations that generalizes and improves upon spectral bisection. Through a novel use of multiple eigenvectors, our new spectral algorithm can divide a computation into 4 or 8 pieces at once. These multidimensional spectral partitioning algorithms generate balanced partitions that have lower communication overhead and are less expensive to compute than those produced by spectral bisection. In addition, they automatically work to minimize message contention on a hypercube or mesh architecture. These spectral partitions are further improved by a multidimensional generalization of the Kernighan-Lin graph partitioning algorithm. Results on several computational grids are given and compared with other popular methods.

  18. RNAi: RISC gets loaded.

    PubMed

    Preall, Jonathan B; Sontheimer, Erik J

    2005-11-18

    When an siRNA or miRNA proceeds through the RNA-induced silencing complex assembly pathway, only one of the two approximately 21-nucleotide RNA strands survives in the final, active complex. In this issue of Cell, Matranga et al. (2005) and Rand et al. (2005) reveal the fate of the rejected passenger siRNA strand. Additionally, Gregory et al. (2005) define a heterotrimeric complex from humans that appears to execute dsRNA loading, strand selection, and target mRNA cleavage activities.

  19. Plug Loads Conservation Measures

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Metzger, Jesse Dean

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple plug loads inventory information and calculates the energy and cost benefits of various retrofit opportunities. This tool includes energy conservation measures for: Vending Machine Misers, Delamp Vending Machine, Desktop to Laptop retrofit, CRT to LCD monitors retrofit, Computer Power Management Settings, and Energy Star Refrigerator retrofit. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, building life cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.

  20. Decreasing Cognitive Load for Learners: Strategy of Web-Based Foreign Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jianfeng

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive load is one of the important factors that influence the effectiveness and efficiency of web-based foreign language learning. Cognitive load theory assumes that human's cognitive capacity in working memory is limited and if it overloads, learning will be hampered, so that high level of cognitive load can affect the performance of learning…

  1. 46 CFR 44.01-1 - Establishment of load lines for special services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Establishment of load lines for special services. 44.01-1 Section 44.01-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES SPECIAL SERVICE LIMITED DOMESTIC VOYAGES Administration § 44.01-1 Establishment of load lines for...

  2. 46 CFR 44.01-11 - Assignment and marking load lines; special service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Assignment and marking load lines; special service. 44.01-11 Section 44.01-11 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES SPECIAL SERVICE LIMITED DOMESTIC VOYAGES Administration § 44.01-11 Assignment and marking load...

  3. LabVIEW Serial Driver Software for an Electronic Load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scullin, Vincent; Garcia, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    A LabVIEW-language computer program enables monitoring and control of a Transistor Devices, Inc., Dynaload WCL232 (or equivalent) electronic load via an RS-232 serial communication link between the electronic load and a remote personal computer. (The electronic load can operate at constant voltage, current, power consumption, or resistance.) The program generates a graphical user interface (GUI) at the computer that looks and acts like the front panel of the electronic load. Once the electronic load has been placed in remote-control mode, this program first queries the electronic load for the present values of all its operational and limit settings, and then drops into a cycle in which it reports the instantaneous voltage, current, and power values in displays that resemble those on the electronic load while monitoring the GUI images of pushbuttons for control actions by the user. By means of the pushbutton images and associated prompts, the user can perform such operations as changing limit values, the operating mode, or the set point. The benefit of this software is that it relieves the user of the need to learn one method for operating the electronic load locally and another method for operating it remotely via a personal computer.

  4. 14 CFR 23.473 - Ground load conditions and assumptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... descent velocity) allowed under paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section. (b) The design landing weight may... velocity (V), in feet per second, equal to 4.4 (W/S)1/4, except that this velocity need not be more than 10... are made to determine the limit load factor corresponding to the required limit descent...

  5. 14 CFR 23.473 - Ground load conditions and assumptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... descent velocity) allowed under paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section. (b) The design landing weight may... velocity (V), in feet per second, equal to 4.4 (W/S)1/4, except that this velocity need not be more than 10... are made to determine the limit load factor corresponding to the required limit descent...

  6. 14 CFR 23.473 - Ground load conditions and assumptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... descent velocity) allowed under paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section. (b) The design landing weight may... velocity (V), in feet per second, equal to 4.4 (W/S)1/4, except that this velocity need not be more than 10... are made to determine the limit load factor corresponding to the required limit descent...

  7. 14 CFR 23.473 - Ground load conditions and assumptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... descent velocity) allowed under paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section. (b) The design landing weight may... velocity (V), in feet per second, equal to 4.4 (W/S)1/4, except that this velocity need not be more than 10... are made to determine the limit load factor corresponding to the required limit descent...

  8. Foot Loading Characteristics of Different Graduations of Partial Weight Bearing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gusinde, Johannes; Pauser, Johannes; Swoboda, Bernd; Gelse, Kolja; Carl, Hans-Dieter

    2011-01-01

    Limited weight bearing of the lower extremity is a commonly applied procedure in orthopaedic rehabilitation after reconstructive forefoot surgery, trauma surgery and joint replacement. The most frequent limitations are given as percentage of body weight (BW) and represent 10 or 50% BW. The extent of foot loading under these graduations of partial…

  9. Load Control System Reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Trudnowski, Daniel

    2015-04-03

    This report summarizes the results of the Load Control System Reliability project (DOE Award DE-FC26-06NT42750). The original grant was awarded to Montana Tech April 2006. Follow-on DOE awards and expansions to the project scope occurred August 2007, January 2009, April 2011, and April 2013. In addition to the DOE monies, the project also consisted of matching funds from the states of Montana and Wyoming. Project participants included Montana Tech; the University of Wyoming; Montana State University; NorthWestern Energy, Inc., and MSE. Research focused on two areas: real-time power-system load control methodologies; and, power-system measurement-based stability-assessment operation and control tools. The majority of effort was focused on area 2. Results from the research includes: development of fundamental power-system dynamic concepts, control schemes, and signal-processing algorithms; many papers (including two prize papers) in leading journals and conferences and leadership of IEEE activities; one patent; participation in major actual-system testing in the western North American power system; prototype power-system operation and control software installed and tested at three major North American control centers; and, the incubation of a new commercial-grade operation and control software tool. Work under this grant certainly supported the DOE-OE goals in the area of “Real Time Grid Reliability Management.”

  10. Electropneumatic transducer automatically limits motor current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovitt, T. F.

    1966-01-01

    Pneumatic controller regulates the load on a centrifugal freon compressor in a water cooling system, thus limiting the current input to an electric motor driving it. An electromechanical transducer monitoring the motor input current sends out air signals which indicate changes in the current to the pneumatic controller.

  11. Schoolbag Weight Limit: Can It Be Defined?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dockrell, Sara; Simms, Ciaran; Blake, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Background: Carrying a schoolbag is a daily activity for most children and much research has been conducted in an effort to identify a safe load limit for children to carry in their schoolbags. Despite this, there is still no consensus about guideline weight and other factors associated with carrying a schoolbag. The objective of this article is…

  12. 46 CFR 151.03-35 - Limiting draft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Limiting draft. 151.03-35 Section 151.03-35 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-35 Limiting draft. Maximum allowable draft to which a barge may be loaded. Limiting...

  13. 46 CFR 151.03-35 - Limiting draft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Limiting draft. 151.03-35 Section 151.03-35 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-35 Limiting draft. Maximum allowable draft to which a barge may be loaded. Limiting...

  14. 46 CFR 151.03-35 - Limiting draft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Limiting draft. 151.03-35 Section 151.03-35 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-35 Limiting draft. Maximum allowable draft to which a barge may be loaded. Limiting...

  15. 14 CFR 29.397 - Limit pilot forces and torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Limit pilot forces and torques. 29.397... System Loads § 29.397 Limit pilot forces and torques. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, the limit pilot forces are as follows: (1) For foot controls, 130 pounds. (2) For stick...

  16. 14 CFR 27.397 - Limit pilot forces and torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Limit pilot forces and torques. 27.397... System Loads § 27.397 Limit pilot forces and torques. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, the limit pilot forces are as follows: (1) For foot controls, 130 pounds. (2) For stick...

  17. 14 CFR 29.397 - Limit pilot forces and torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limit pilot forces and torques. 29.397... System Loads § 29.397 Limit pilot forces and torques. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, the limit pilot forces are as follows: (1) For foot controls, 130 pounds. (2) For stick...

  18. 14 CFR 27.397 - Limit pilot forces and torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limit pilot forces and torques. 27.397... System Loads § 27.397 Limit pilot forces and torques. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, the limit pilot forces are as follows: (1) For foot controls, 130 pounds. (2) For stick...

  19. 14 CFR 29.397 - Limit pilot forces and torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Limit pilot forces and torques. 29.397... System Loads § 29.397 Limit pilot forces and torques. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, the limit pilot forces are as follows: (1) For foot controls, 130 pounds. (2) For stick...

  20. 14 CFR 27.397 - Limit pilot forces and torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Limit pilot forces and torques. 27.397... System Loads § 27.397 Limit pilot forces and torques. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, the limit pilot forces are as follows: (1) For foot controls, 130 pounds. (2) For stick...

  1. 14 CFR 29.397 - Limit pilot forces and torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Limit pilot forces and torques. 29.397... System Loads § 29.397 Limit pilot forces and torques. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, the limit pilot forces are as follows: (1) For foot controls, 130 pounds. (2) For stick...

  2. 14 CFR 27.397 - Limit pilot forces and torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Limit pilot forces and torques. 27.397... System Loads § 27.397 Limit pilot forces and torques. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, the limit pilot forces are as follows: (1) For foot controls, 130 pounds. (2) For stick...

  3. 14 CFR 27.397 - Limit pilot forces and torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Limit pilot forces and torques. 27.397... System Loads § 27.397 Limit pilot forces and torques. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, the limit pilot forces are as follows: (1) For foot controls, 130 pounds. (2) For stick...

  4. 14 CFR 29.397 - Limit pilot forces and torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Limit pilot forces and torques. 29.397... System Loads § 29.397 Limit pilot forces and torques. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, the limit pilot forces are as follows: (1) For foot controls, 130 pounds. (2) For stick...

  5. Gender-Specific Effects of Cognitive Load on Social Discounting

    PubMed Central

    Strombach, Tina; Margittai, Zsofia; Gorczyca, Barbara; Kalenscher, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    We live busy, social lives, and meeting the challenges of our complex environments puts strain on our cognitive systems. However, cognitive resources are limited. It is unclear how cognitive load affects social decision making. Previous findings on the effects of cognitive load on other-regarding preferences have been ambiguous, allowing no coherent opinion whether cognitive load increases, decreases or does not affect prosocial considerations. Here, we suggest that social distance between individuals modulates whether generosity towards a recipient increases or decreases under cognitive load conditions. Participants played a financial social discounting task with several recipients at variable social distance levels. In this task, they could choose between generous alternatives, yielding medium financial rewards for the participant and recipient at variable social distances, or between a selfish alternative, yielding larger rewards for the participant alone. We show that the social discount function of male participants was significantly flattened under high cognitive load conditions, suggesting they distinguished less between socially close and socially distant recipients. Unexpectedly, the cognitive-load effect on social discounting was gender-specific: while social discounting was strongly dependent on cognitive load in men, women were nearly unaffected by cognitive load manipulations. We suggest that cognitive load leads men, but not women to simplify the decision problem by neglecting the social distance information. We consider our study a good starting point for further experiments exploring the role of gender in prosocial choice. PMID:27788192

  6. Lower limb loading in step aerobic dance.

    PubMed

    Wu, H-W; Hsieh, H-M; Chang, Y-W; Wang, L-H

    2012-11-01

    Participation in aerobic dance is associated with a number of lower extremity injuries, and abnormal joint loading seems to be a factor in these. However, information on joint loading is limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate the kinetics of the lower extremity in step aerobic dance and to compare the differences of high-impact and low-impact step aerobic dance in 4 aerobic movements (mambo, kick, L step and leg curl). 18 subjects were recruited for this study. High-impact aerobic dance requires a significantly greater range of motion, joint force and joint moment than low-impact step aerobic dance. The peak joint forces and moments in high-impact step aerobic dance were found to be 1.4 times higher than in low-impact step aerobic dance. Understanding the nature of joint loading may help choreographers develop dance combinations that are less injury-prone. Furthermore, increased knowledge about joint loading may be helpful in lowering the risk of injuries in aerobic dance instructors and students.

  7. Low-Load Space Conditioning Needs Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Puttagunta, Srikanth

    2015-05-19

    Heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) equipment must be right-sized to ensure energy performance and comfort. With limited low-load options in the HVAC market, many new-construction housing units are being fitted with oversized equipment that creates system efficiency, comfort, and cost penalties. To bridge the gap between currently available HVAC equipment that is oversized or inefficient and the rising demand for low-load HVAC equipment in the marketplace, HVAC equipment manufacturers need to be fully aware of the needs of the multifamily building and attached single-family (duplex and townhouse) home market. Over the past decade, Steven Winter Associates, Inc. (SWA) has provided certification and consulting services for hundreds of housing projects and has accrued a large pool of data that describe multifamily and attached single-family home characteristics. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Building America research team Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) compiled and analyzed these data to outline the characteristics of low-load dwellings such as the heating and cooling design loads.

  8. Cable load transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Scott E.; Abdow, David A.

    1994-10-01

    An apparatus for measuring the loads, moments and torque at a constrained end of a cable created by the action of the cable in a fluid medium in which the cable is suspended. The cable is suspended in the medium by means of a strut. The apparatus connects the cable to the strut. The apparatus includes two flexure members, one rigidly connected to the strut, the other to the cable. A universal joint couples the two flexure members so that the flexure member connected to the strut can be fitted with strain gages to measure bending while the other flexure member has strain gages to measure axial force and torque. The universal joint enables the isolation of axial and torsional strains at the flexure member connected to the cable.

  9. Towards establishing practical multi-hazard bridge design limit states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zach; Lee, George C.

    2013-09-01

    In the U.S., the current Load and Resistance Factor Design (LRFD) Specifications for highway bridges is a reliability-based formulation that considers failure probabilities of bridge components due to the actions of typical dead load and frequent vehicular loads. Various extreme load effects, such as earthquake and vessel collision, are not considered on the same reliability-based platform. Since these extreme loads are time variables, combining them with frequent, nonextreme loads is a significant challenge. The number of design limit state equations based on these failure probabilities can be unrealistically large and unnecessary from the view point of practical applications. Based on the opinion of AASHTO State Bridge Engineers, many load combinations are insignificant in their states. This paper describes the formulation of a criterion to include only the necessary load combinations to establish the design limit states. This criterion is established by examining the total failure probabilities for all possible time-invariant and time varying load combinations and breaking them down into partial terms. Then, important load combinations can be readily determined quantitatively.

  10. Offshore tanker loading system

    SciTech Connect

    Baan, J. de; Heijst, W.J. van.

    1994-01-04

    The present invention relates to an improved flexible loading system which provides fluid communication between a subsea pipeline and a surface vessel including a hose extending from the subsea pipeline to a first buoyancy tank, a second hose extending from the first buoyancy tank to a central buoyancy tank, a second buoyancy tank, means connecting said second buoyancy tank to the sea floor and to the central buoyancy tank whereby the forces exerted on said central buoyant tank by said second hose and said connecting means are balanced to cause said central buoyancy tank to maintain a preselected position, a riser section extending upwardly from said central buoyancy tank and means on the upper termination for engagement by a vessel on the surface to raise said upper termination onto the vessel to complete the communication for moving fluids between the subsea pipeline and the vessel. In one form the means for connecting between the sea floor to the second buoyancy tank includes an anchor on the sea floor and lines extending from the anchor to the second buoyancy tank and from the second buoyancy tank to the central buoyancy tank. In another form of the invention the means for connecting is a third hose extending from a second subsea pipeline to the second buoyancy tank and a fourth hose extending from the second buoyancy tank to the central buoyancy tank. The central buoyancy tank is preferred to be maintained at a level below the water surface which allows full movement of the vessel while connected to the riser section. A swivel may be positioned in the riser section and a pressure relief system may be included in the loading system to protect it from sudden excess pressures. 17 figs.

  11. Report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Piping Review Committee. Volume 4. Evaluation of other loads and load combinations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    Six topical areas were covered by the Task Group on Other Dynamic Loads and Load Combinations as described below: Event Combinations - dealing with the potential simultaneous occurrence of earthquakes, pipe ruptures, and water hammer events in the piping design basis; Response Combinations - dealing with multiply supported piping with independent inputs, the sequence of combinations between spacial and modal components of response, and the treatment of high frequency modes in combination with low frequency modal responses; Stress Limits/Dynamic Allowables - dealing with inelastic allowables for piping and strain rate effects; Water Hammer Loadings - dealing with code and design specifications for these loadings and procedures for identifying potential water hammer that could affect safety; Relief Valve Opening and Closing Loads - dealing with the adequacy of analytical tools for predicting the effects of these events and, in addition, with estimating effective cycles for fatigue evaluations; and Piping Vibration Loads - dealing with evaluation procedures for estimating other than seismic vibratory loads, the need to consider reciprocating and rotary equipment vibratory loads, and high frequency vibratory loads. NRC staff recommendations or regulatory changes and additional study appear in this report.

  12. Centaur Standard Shroud (CSS) static ultimate load structural tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A series of tests were conducted on the jettisonable metallic shroud used on the Titan/Centaur launch vehicle to verify its structural capabilities and to evaluate its structural interaction with the Centaur stage. A flight configured shroud and the interfacing Titan/Centaur structural assemblies were subjected to tests consisting of combinations of applied axial and shear loads to design ultimate values, including a set of tests on thermal conditions and two dynamic response tests to verify the analytical stiffness model. The strength capabilities were demonstrated at ultimate (125 percent of design limit) loads. It was also verified that the spring rate of the flight configured shroud-to-Centaur forward structural deflections of the specimen became nonlinear, as expected, above limit load values. This test series qualification program verified that the Titan/Centaur shroud and the Centaur and Titan interface components are qualified structurally at design ultimate loads.

  13. Predicting physiological capacity of human load carriage - a review.

    PubMed

    Drain, Jace; Billing, Daniel; Neesham-Smith, Daniel; Aisbett, Brad

    2016-01-01

    This review article aims to evaluate a proposed maximum acceptable work duration model for load carriage tasks. It is contended that this concept has particular relevance to physically demanding occupations such as military and firefighting. Personnel in these occupations are often required to perform very physically demanding tasks, over varying time periods, often involving load carriage. Previous research has investigated concepts related to physiological workload limits in occupational settings (e.g. industrial). Evidence suggests however, that existing (unloaded) workload guidelines are not appropriate for load carriage tasks. The utility of this model warrants further work to enable prediction of load carriage durations across a range of functional workloads for physically demanding occupations. If the maximum duration for which personnel can physiologically sustain a load carriage task could be accurately predicted, commanders and supervisors could better plan for and manage tasks to ensure operational imperatives were met whilst minimising health risks for their workers. PMID:26360198

  14. Metal-loaded organic scintillators for neutrino physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, Christian; Yeh, Minfang

    2016-09-01

    Organic liquid scintillators are used in many neutrino physics experiments of the past and present. In particular for low energy neutrinos when realtime and energy information are required, liquid scintillators have several advantages compared to other technologies. In many cases the organic liquid needs to be loaded with metal to enhance the neutrino signal over background events. Several metal loaded scintillators of the past suffered from chemical and optical instabilities, limiting the performance of these neutrino detectors. Different ways of metal loading are described in the article with a focus on recent techniques providing metal loaded scintillators that can be used under stable conditions for many years even in ton scale experiments. Applications of metal loaded scintillators in neutrino experiments are reviewed and the performance as well as the prospects of different scintillator types are compared.

  15. Capillary Limit in a Loop Heat Pipe with Dual Evaporators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Birur, Gajanana; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes a study on the capillary limit of a loop heat pipe (LHP) with two evaporators and two condensers. Both theoretical analysis and experimental investigation are conducted. Tests include heat load to one evaporator only, even heat loads to both evaporators and uneven heat load to both evaporators. Results show that after the capillary limit is exceeded, vapor will penetrate through the wick of the weaker evaporator and the compensation chamber (CC) of that evaporator will control the loop operating temperature regardless of which CC has been in control prior to the event Because the evaporator can tolerate vapor bubbles, the loop may continue to work and reach a new steady state at a higher operating temperature. The loop may even function with a modest increase in the heat load past the capillary limit With a heat load to only one evaporator, the capillary limit can be identified by rapid increases in the operating temperature and in the temperature difference between the evaporator and the CC. However, it is more difficult to tell when the capillary limit is exceeded if heat loads are applied to both evaporators. In all cases, the loop can recover by reducing the heat load to the loop.

  16. Preliminary analysis of performance and loads data from the 2-megawatt mod-1 wind turbine generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, D. A.; Viterna, L. A.; Richards, T. R.; Neustadter, H. E.

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary test data on output power versus wind speed, rotor blade loads, system dynamic behavior, and start-stop characteristics on the Mod-1 wind turbine generator are presented. These data were analyzed statistically and are compared with design predictions of system performance and loads. To date, the Mod-1 wind turbine generator has produced up to 1.5 MW of power, with a measured power versus wind speed curve which agrees closely with design. Blade loads were measured at wind speeds up to 14 m/s and also during rapid shutdowns. Peak transient loads during the most severe shutdowns are less than the design limit loads. On the inboard blade sections, fatigue loads are approximately equal to the design cyclic loads. On the outboard blade sections, however, measured cyclic loads are significantly larger than design values, but they do not appear to exceed fatigue allowable loads as yet.

  17. Incremental cooling load determination for passive direct gain heating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, P. W.; Mahone, D.; Fuller, W.; Gruber, J.; Kammerud, R.; Place, W.; Anderson, B.

    1981-05-01

    The applicability of the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) full load compressor hour method for predicting the cooling load increase in a residence attributable to direct gain passive heating systems is examined. The NAHB method predictions are compared with the results of 200 hour-by-hour simulations using BLAST, and the two methods show reasonable agreement. The degree of agreement and the limitations of the NAHB method are discussed.

  18. Robinson instability and beam loading

    SciTech Connect

    Craft, B.C. III

    1985-01-01

    The Robinson instability problem is developed in three stages. The first step is to derive the synchrotron oscillation equations in the absence of beam loading (unloaded case). Next, the equations are evaluated in the presence of beam loading at the fundamental rf frequency (statically loaded case). Finally, the system is redeveloped taking into account beam loading at the synchrotron sidebands (dynamically loaded case). Following the theoretical development, the results are applied to calculate the synchrotron frequency in the presence of beam-loading, automatic-gain-control, and automatic-tune-control. The results of this calculation are compared with data from the NSLS vuv-ring, a 750 MeV electron storage ring. 1 ref., 3 figs.

  19. Portable 90 degree proof loading device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, R. G.; Berson, L. A. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A hydraulically actuated device is described for applying a test load to a bearing or the like to prove the integrity of its mounting or staking within a bore in a housing such as gear case. To accommodate limited access situations, the device is constructed in a right angle configuration in which a hydraulic cylinder applies axial pressure to a first thrust rod assemly which includes a first thrust rod through a threated spindle driving a linearly translated cam. Cam follower wheel transfers the translation to a second thrust rod assembly which includes a horizontal shaft and a spindle within a cross-arm housing portion and a tubular housing portion. The same second thrust direction applies the bearing loading in either of two directions depending upon the shape of the interface parts. The interface parts can bear on the bearing from either side with respect to the bearing mounting structural part.

  20. Dynamic Strength Ceramic Nanocomposites Under Pulse Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skripnyak, Evgeniya G.; Skripnyak, Vladimir V.; Vaganova, Irina K.; Skripnyak, Vladimir A.

    2015-06-01

    Multi-scale computer simulation approach has been applied to research of strength of nanocomposites under dynamic loading. The influence of mesoscopic substructures on the dynamic strength of ceramic and hybrid nanocomposites, which can be formed using additive manufacturing were numerically investigated. At weak shock wave loadings the shear strength and the spall strength of ceramic and hybrid nanocomposites depends not only phase concentration and porosity, but size parameters of skeleton substructures. The influence of skeleton parameter on the shear strength and the spall strength of ceramic nanocomposites with the same concentration of phases decreases with increasing amplitude of the shock pulse of microsecond duration above the double amplitude of the Hugoniot elastic limit of nanocomposites. This research carried out in 2014 -2015 was supported by grant from The Tomsk State University Academic D.I. Mendeleev Fund Program and also Ministry of Sciences and Education of Russian Federation (State task 2014/223, project 1943, Agreement 14.132.

  1. Evaluation of Limb Load Asymmetry Using Two New Mathematical Models

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Senthil NS; Omar, Baharudin; Joseph, Leonard H.; Htwe, Ohnmar; Jagannathan, K.; Hamdan, Nor M Y; Rajalakshmi, D.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative measurement of limb loading is important in orthopedic and neurological rehabilitation. In current practice, mathematical models such as Symmetry index (SI), Symmetry ratio (SR), and Symmetry angle (SA) are used to quantify limb loading asymmetry. Literatures have identified certain limitations with the above mathematical models. Hence this study presents two new mathematical models Modified symmetry index (MSI) and Limb loading error (LLE) that would address these limitations. Furthermore, the current mathematical models were compared against the new model with the goal of achieving a better model. This study uses hypothetical data to simulate an algorithmic preliminary computational measure to perform with all numerical possibilities of even and uneven limb loading that can occur in human legs. Descriptive statistics are used to interpret the limb loading patterns: symmetry, asymmetry and maximum asymmetry. The five mathematical models were similar in analyzing symmetry between limbs. However, for asymmetry and maximum asymmetry data, the SA and SR values do not give any meaningful interpretation, and SI gives an inflated value. The MSI and LLE are direct, easy to interpret and identify the loading patterns with the side of asymmetry. The new models are notable as they quantify the amount and side of asymmetry under different loading patterns. PMID:25716372

  2. System ID modern control algorithms for active aerodynamic load control and impact on gearbox loading.

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Jonathan Charles; Halse, Chris; Crowther, Ashley; Barlas, Thanasis; Wilson, David Gerald; Berg, Dale E.; Resor, Brian Ray

    2010-06-01

    Prior work on active aerodynamic load control (AALC) of wind turbine blades has demonstrated that appropriate use of this technology has the potential to yield significant reductions in blade loads, leading to a decrease in wind cost of energy. While the general concept of AALC is usually discussed in the context of multiple sensors and active control devices (such as flaps) distributed over the length of the blade, most work to date has been limited to consideration of a single control device per blade with very basic Proportional Derivative controllers, due to limitations in the aeroservoelastic codes used to perform turbine simulations. This work utilizes a new aeroservoelastic code developed at Delft University of Technology to model the NREL/Upwind 5 MW wind turbine to investigate the relative advantage of utilizing multiple-device AALC. System identification techniques are used to identify the frequencies and shapes of turbine vibration modes, and these are used with modern control techniques to develop both Single-Input Single-Output (SISO) and Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) LQR flap controllers. Comparison of simulation results with these controllers shows that the MIMO controller does yield some improvement over the SISO controller in fatigue load reduction, but additional improvement is possible with further refinement. In addition, a preliminary investigation shows that AALC has the potential to reduce off-axis gearbox loads, leading to reduced gearbox bearing fatigue damage and improved lifetimes.

  3. SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT COST COMPARISON BETWEEN HYDRAULIC LOADING AND SMALL CANISTER LOADING CONCEPTS

    SciTech Connect

    GEUTHER J; CONRAD EA; RHOADARMER D

    2009-08-24

    The Sludge Treatment Project (STP) is considering two different concepts for the retrieval, loading, transport and interim storage of the K Basin sludge. The two design concepts under consideration are: (1) Hydraulic Loading Concept - In the hydraulic loading concept, the sludge is retrieved from the Engineered Containers directly into the Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSC) while located in the STS cask in the modified KW Basin Annex. The sludge is loaded via a series of transfer, settle, decant, and filtration return steps until the STSC sludge transportation limits are met. The STSC is then transported to T Plant and placed in storage arrays in the T Plant canyon cells for interim storage. (2) Small Canister Concept - In the small canister concept, the sludge is transferred from the Engineered Containers (ECs) into a settling vessel. After settling and decanting, the sludge is loaded underwater into small canisters. The small canisters are then transferred to the existing Fuel Transport System (FTS) where they are loaded underwater into the FTS Shielded Transfer Cask (STC). The STC is raised from the basin and placed into the Cask Transfer Overpack (CTO), loaded onto the trailer in the KW Basin Annex for transport to T Plant. At T Plant, the CTO is removed from the transport trailer and placed on the canyon deck. The CTO and STC are opened and the small canisters are removed using the canyon crane and placed into an STSC. The STSC is closed, and placed in storage arrays in the T Plant canyon cells for interim storage. The purpose of the cost estimate is to provide a comparison of the two concepts described.

  4. Dynamic load balancing of applications

    DOEpatents

    Wheat, Stephen R.

    1997-01-01

    An application-level method for dynamically maintaining global load balance on a parallel computer, particularly on massively parallel MIMD computers. Global load balancing is achieved by overlapping neighborhoods of processors, where each neighborhood performs local load balancing. The method supports a large class of finite element and finite difference based applications and provides an automatic element management system to which applications are easily integrated.

  5. Dynamic load balancing of applications

    DOEpatents

    Wheat, S.R.

    1997-05-13

    An application-level method for dynamically maintaining global load balance on a parallel computer, particularly on massively parallel MIMD computers is disclosed. Global load balancing is achieved by overlapping neighborhoods of processors, where each neighborhood performs local load balancing. The method supports a large class of finite element and finite difference based applications and provides an automatic element management system to which applications are easily integrated. 13 figs.

  6. Structural dynamics payload loads estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engels, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    Methods for the prediction of loads on large space structures are discussed. Existing approaches to the problem of loads calculation are surveyed. A full scale version of an alternate numerical integration technique to solve the response part of a load cycle is presented, and a set of short cut versions of the algorithm developed. The implementation of these techniques using the software package developed is discussed.

  7. ALFA: Automated load forecasting assistant

    SciTech Connect

    Jabbour, K.; Riveros, J.F.V.; Landsbergen, D.; Meyer, W.

    1988-08-01

    ALFA, an expert system for forecasting short term demand for electricity is presented. ALFA is in operation at the new Energy Management System center at Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation in Upstate New York, generating the real time hourly load forecasts up to 48 hours in advance. ALFA uses an extensive 10 year historical data base of hourly observations of 12 weather variables and load, and a rule base that takes into account daily, weekly, and seasonal variations of load, as well as holidays, special events, and load growth. A satellite interface for the real-time acquisition of weather data, and the machine-operator interface are also discussed.

  8. Residential-appliance load characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, J.

    1982-04-01

    The performance of residential photovoltaic systems in combination with energy efficient appliances is examined. The load characteristics are presented for several types of major residential appliances. Load characteristics consist of the average energy use of each appliance, the power demand while the appliance is operating, and a typical use schedule. Potential energy conserving features are investigated for each appliance and used to identify a best available model and maximum feasible energy efficient appliance. Load characteristics of these energy conserving designs are then compared with the load characteristics of a standard model. The feasibility of converting appliances to dc power for use with photovoltaic systems is also discussed.

  9. Estimating Nitrogen Loads, BMPs, and Target Loads Exceedance Risks

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Wabash River (WR) watershed, IN, drains two-thirds of the state’s 92 counties and has primarily agricultural land use. The nutrient and sediment loads of the WR significantly increase loads of the Ohio River ultimately polluting the Gulf of Mexico. The objective of this study...

  10. Crane-Load Contact Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert; Mata, Carlos; Cox, Robert

    2005-01-01

    An electronic instrument has been developed as a prototype of a portable crane-load contact sensor. Such a sensor could be helpful in an application in which the load rests on a base in a horizontal position determined by vertical alignment pins (see Figure 1). If the crane is not positioned to lift the load precisely vertically, then the load can be expected to swing once it has been lifted clear of the pins. If the load is especially heavy, large, and/or fragile, it could hurt workers and/or damage itself and nearby objects. By indicating whether the load remains in contact with the pins when it has been lifted a fraction of the length of the pins, the crane-load contact sensor helps the crane operator determine whether it is safe to lift the load clear of the pins: If there is contact, then the load is resting against the sides of the pins and, hence, it may not be safe to lift; if contact is occasionally broken, then the load is probably not resting against the pins, so it should be safe to lift. It is assumed that the load and base, or at least the pins and the surfaces of the alignment holes in the load, are electrically conductive, so the instrument can use electrical contact to indicate mechanical contact. However, DC resistance cannot be used as an indicator of contact for the following reasons: The load and the base are both electrically grounded through cables (the load is grounded through the lifting cable of the crane) to prevent discharge of static electricity. In other words, the DC resistance between the load and the pins is always low, as though they were always in direct contact. Therefore, instead of DC resistance, the instrument utilizes the AC electrical impedance between the pins and the load. The signal frequency used in the measurement is high enough (.1 MHz) that the impedance contributed by the cables and the electrical ground network of the building in which the crane and the base are situated is significantly greater than the contact

  11. Overview of High Power Vacuum Dry RF Load Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnykh, Anatoly

    2015-08-27

    A specific feature of RF linacs based on the pulsed traveling wave (TW) mode of operation is that only a portion of the RF energy is used for the beam acceleration. The residual RF energy has to be terminated into an RF load. Higher accelerating gradients require higher RF sources and RF loads, which can stably terminate the residual RF power. RF feeders (from the RF source though the accelerating section to the load) are vacuumed to transmit multi-megawatt high power RF. This overview will outline vacuumed RF loads only. A common method to terminate multi-MW RF power is to use circulated water (or other liquid) as an absorbing medium. A solid dielectric interface (a high quality ceramic) is required to separate vacuum and liquid RF absorber mediums. Using such RF load approaches in TW linacs is troubling because there is a fragile ceramic window barrier and a failure could become catastrophic for linac vacuum and RF systems. Traditional loads comprising of a ceramic disk have limited peak and average power handling capability and are therefore not suitable for high gradient TW linacs. This overview will focus on ''vacuum dry'' or ''all-metal'' loads that do not employ any dielectric interface between vacuum and absorber. The first prototype is an original design of RF loads for the Stanford Two-Mile Accelerator.

  12. Strain gage selection in loads equations using a genetic algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Traditionally, structural loads are measured using strain gages. A loads calibration test must be done before loads can be accurately measured. In one measurement method, a series of point loads is applied to the structure, and loads equations are derived via the least squares curve fitting algorithm using the strain gage responses to the applied point loads. However, many research structures are highly instrumented with strain gages, and the number and selection of gages used in a loads equation can be problematic. This paper presents an improved technique using a genetic algorithm to choose the strain gages used in the loads equations. Also presented are a comparison of the genetic algorithm performance with the current T-value technique and a variant known as the Best Step-down technique. Examples are shown using aerospace vehicle wings of high and low aspect ratio. In addition, a significant limitation in the current methods is revealed. The genetic algorithm arrived at a comparable or superior set of gages with significantly less human effort, and could be applied in instances when the current methods could not.

  13. Airworthiness Qualification Criteria for Rotorcraft with External Sling Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Key, David L.

    2002-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study to develop airworthiness requirements for rotorcraft with external sling loads. The report starts with a review of the various phenomena that limit external sling load operations. Specifically discussed are the rotorcraft-load aeroservoelastic stability, load-on handling qualities, effects of automatic flight control system failure, load suspension system failure, and load stability at speed. Based on past experience and treatment of these phenomena, criteria are proposed to form a package for airworthiness qualification. The desired end objective is a set of operational flight envelopes for the rotorcraft with intended loads that can be provided to the user to guide operations in the field. The specific criteria proposed are parts of ADS-33E-PRF; MIL-F-9490D, and MIL-STD-913A all applied in the context of external sling loads. The study was performed for the Directorate of Engineering, U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command (AMCOM), as part of the contract monitored by the Aerothermodynamics Directorate, U.S. Army AMCOM.

  14. Optimal load shedding and restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ding

    Load shedding is an emergency control action in power systems that can save systems from a wide-area blackout. Underfrequency load shedding, steady state load shedding, and voltage load shedding are widely used in power systems. These methods utilize either the steady state model or a simplified dynamic model to represent a power systems. In this dissertation, a general optimal load shedding method that considers both the dynamic process and load distribution is proposed. The unfavorable load shedding is then formulated as an optimization problem with the objective function of cost minimization. This objective function is subjected to system, security, and operation constraints. The entire problem becomes a question of optimization with differential and nonlinear equations as constraints. To solve this problem, discretization is used to change the differential equations into algebraic equations. The original problem is thus reformulated as an optimization problem and can be solved by a standard mathematical program. The general idea is then applied to traditional power systems, deregulated power systems, power systems with distributed generation, and load restoration. In the traditional power system, the method shows that governor action, generation dynamic, disturbance location, and economic factors can be taken into consideration. In the deregulated power system, two power market models are developed and incorporated into the load shedding scheme. In power systems with multiple distributed generations, the different cases of disturbances are analyzed and models of different distributed generation developed. The general idea is then applied. Finally, the load restoration problem is studied, and it is proposed that an optimization method be applied to it. This dissertation provides a comprehensive solution for load shedding problem in power systems. The models developed in this research can also be used to study other power system problems.

  15. Low cost electronic ultracapacitor interface technique to provide load leveling of a battery for pulsed load or motor traction drive applications

    DOEpatents

    King, Robert Dean; DeDoncker, Rik Wivina Anna Adelson

    1998-01-01

    A battery load leveling arrangement for an electrically powered system in which battery loading is subject to intermittent high current loading utilizes a passive energy storage device and a diode connected in series with the storage device to conduct current from the storage device to the load when current demand forces a drop in battery voltage. A current limiting circuit is connected in parallel with the diode for recharging the passive energy storage device. The current limiting circuit functions to limit the average magnitude of recharge current supplied to the storage device. Various forms of current limiting circuits are disclosed, including a PTC resistor coupled in parallel with a fixed resistor. The current limit circuit may also include an SCR for switching regenerative braking current to the device when the system is connected to power an electric motor.

  16. Assessment of New Load Schedules for the Machine Calibration of a Force Balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulbrich, N.; Gisler, R.; Kew, R.

    2015-01-01

    New load schedules for the machine calibration of a six-component force balance are currently being developed and evaluated at the NASA Ames Balance Calibration Laboratory. One of the proposed load schedules is discussed in the paper. It has a total of 2082 points that are distributed across 16 load series. Several criteria were applied to define the load schedule. It was decided, for example, to specify the calibration load set in force balance format as this approach greatly simplifies the definition of the lower and upper bounds of the load schedule. In addition, all loads are assumed to be applied in a calibration machine by using the one-factor-at-a-time approach. At first, all single-component loads are applied in six load series. Then, three two-component load series are applied. They consist of the load pairs (N1, N2), (S1, S2), and (RM, AF). Afterwards, four three-component load series are applied. They consist of the combinations (N1, N2, AF), (S1, S2, AF), (N1, N2, RM), and (S1, S2, RM). In the next step, one four-component load series is applied. It is the load combination (N1, N2, S1, S2). Finally, two five-component load series are applied. They are the load combination (N1, N2, S1, S2, AF) and (N1, N2, S1, S2, RM). The maximum difference between loads of two subsequent data points of the load schedule is limited to 33 % of capacity. This constraint helps avoid unwanted load "jumps" in the load schedule that can have a negative impact on the performance of a calibration machine. Only loadings of the single- and two-component load series are loaded to 100 % of capacity. This approach was selected because it keeps the total number of calibration points to a reasonable limit while still allowing for the application of some of the more complex load combinations. Data from two of NASA's force balances is used to illustrate important characteristics of the proposed 2082-point calibration load schedule.

  17. Inexpensive Bolt-Load Gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    "Built-in" gage determines whether large bolt or stud has been torqued to desired load and provides for continuous inspection to ensure proper load is being maintained. Gage detects longitudinal stress/strain bolt; requires no electronic or sonic test equipment.

  18. Spring loaded locator pin assembly

    DOEpatents

    Groll, Todd A.; White, James P.

    1998-01-01

    This invention deals with spring loaded locator pins. Locator pins are sometimes referred to as captured pins. This is a mechanism which locks two items together with the pin that is spring loaded so that it drops into a locator hole on the work piece.

  19. Spring loaded locator pin assembly

    DOEpatents

    Groll, T.A.; White, J.P.

    1998-03-03

    This invention deals with spring loaded locator pins. Locator pins are sometimes referred to as captured pins. This is a mechanism which locks two items together with the pin that is spring loaded so that it drops into a locator hole on the work piece. 5 figs.

  20. Perceptual Load Alters Visual Excitability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmel, David; Thorne, Jeremy D.; Rees, Geraint; Lavie, Nilli

    2011-01-01

    Increasing perceptual load reduces the processing of visual stimuli outside the focus of attention, but the mechanism underlying these effects remains unclear. Here we tested an account attributing the effects of perceptual load to modulations of visual cortex excitability. In contrast to stimulus competition accounts, which propose that load…

  1. Bolt preload selection for pulsed-loaded vessel closures

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, T.A.; Lewis, B.B.; Bowers, S.M.

    1995-02-01

    Bounding, closed-form solutions are developed for selecting the bolt preload for a square, flat plate closure subjected to a pressure pulse load. The solutions consider the limiting case in which preload is primarily dependent on closure bending response as well as the limiting case in which preload depends on elastic bolt response. The selection of bolt preload is illustrated. Also presented in the paper is a detailed finite element analysis of dynamically loaded, bolted circular closure. The responses of the structure, closure, and bolts are included, and results are obtained for various preloads. The analysis illustrates a method of bolt preload modeling for use in general finite element computer programs.

  2. Delayed Failure in a Shock Loaded Alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, G. A.; Millett, J. C. F.; Bourne, N. K.; Dandekar, D. P.

    2006-07-28

    Manganin stress gauges have been used to measure the lateral stress in a shock-loaded alumina. In combination with known longitudinal stresses, these have been used to determine the shear strength of this material, behind the shock front. The two-step nature of the lateral stress traces shows a slow moving front behind the main shock, behind which shear strength undergoes a significant decrease. Results also show that this front decreases markedly in velocity as the HEL is crossed, suggesting that limited plasticity occurs during inelastic deformation. Finally, comparison of measured shear strengths with other aluminas shows a high degree of agreement.

  3. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Jjjjjj... - Operating Limits for Boilers With Emission Limits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... boilers that demonstrate compliance with a performance stack test, maintain the operating load of each... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Operating Limits for Boilers With..., Commercial, and Institutional Boilers Area Sources Pt. 63, Subpt. JJJJJJ, Table 3 Table 3 to Subpart...

  4. Impact limiter tests of four commonly used materials and establishment of an impact limiter data base

    SciTech Connect

    McMurtry, W.M.; Hohnstreiter, G.F.

    1995-12-31

    In designing a package for transporting hazardous or radioactive materials, there are a number of components whose design can lead to the success or failure to meet regulatory requirements for Type B packages. One of these components is the impact limiter. The primary purpose of the impact limiter is to protect the package and its contents from sudden deceleration. It can also act as a thermal barrier. The package is protected by the impact limiter`s ability to act as an energy absorber. The crush strength of most impact limiting materials is determined by a standard quasistatic (QS) method. However it has been observed that there are a number of factors that affect crush strength. The material being used as an impact limiter may appear incompressible because of one or more of these factors. Factors that determine compressive strength of impact limiter materials are; the material density; the thickness of the impact limiter material. There must be adequate material to absorb the impact and not go into lockup, lockup up occurs when the free volume of the material is eliminated and the crush strength sharply increases; the angle of impact; and the loading rate and operating temperature. All of these are interactive and therefore difficult to model. It is the intent of tests discussed in this paper to determine the dependency of crush strength to loading rate and angle of impact to the basic grain direction of two different densities of four impact limiting materials.

  5. Loading clamps for DNA replication and repair.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Linda B

    2009-05-01

    Sliding clamps and clamp loaders were initially identified as DNA polymerase processivity factors. Sliding clamps are ring-shaped protein complexes that encircle and slide along duplex DNA, and clamp loaders are enzymes that load these clamps onto DNA. When bound to a sliding clamp, DNA polymerases remain tightly associated with the template being copied, but are able to translocate along DNA at rates limited by rates of nucleotide incorporation. Many different enzymes required for DNA replication and repair use sliding clamps. Clamps not only increase the processivity of these enzymes, but may also serve as an attachment point to coordinate the activities of enzymes required for a given process. Clamp loaders are members of the AAA+ family of ATPases and use energy from ATP binding and hydrolysis to catalyze the mechanical reaction of loading clamps onto DNA. Many structural and functional features of clamps and clamp loaders are conserved across all domains of life. Here, the mechanism of clamp loading is reviewed by comparing features of prokaryotic and eukaryotic clamps and clamp loaders.

  6. Thermal loading considerations for synchrotron radiation mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Holdener, F.R.; Berglin, E.J.; Fuchs, B.A.; Humpal, H.H.; Karpenko, V.P.; Martin, R.W.; Tirsell, K.G.

    1986-03-26

    Grazing incidence mirrors used to focus synchrotron radiation beams through small distant apertures have severe optical requirements. The surface distortion due to heat loading of the first mirror in a bending magnet beam line is of particular concern when a large fraction of the incident beam is absorbed. In this paper we discuss mirror design considerations involved in minimizing the thermal/mechanical loading on vertically deflecting first surface mirrors required for SPEAR synchrotron radiation beam lines. Topics include selection of mirror material and cooling method, the choice of SiC for the substrate, optimization of the thickness, and the design of the mirror holder and cooling mechanism. Results obtained using two-dimensional, finite-element thermal/mechanical distortion analysis are presented for the case of a 6/sup 0/ grazing incidence SiC mirror absorbing up to 260 W at Beam Line VIII on the SPEAR ring. Test descriptions and results are given for the material used to thermally couple this SiC mirror to a water-cooled block. The interface material is limited to applications for which the equivalent normal heat load is less than 20 W/cm/sup 2/.

  7. Investigation of Optimal Control Allocation for Gust Load Alleviation in Flight Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Susan A.; Taylor, Brian R.; Bodson, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Advances in sensors and avionics computation power suggest real-time structural load measurements could be used in flight control systems for improved safety and performance. A conventional transport flight control system determines the moments necessary to meet the pilot's command, while rejecting disturbances and maintaining stability of the aircraft. Control allocation is the problem of converting these desired moments into control effector commands. In this paper, a framework is proposed to incorporate real-time structural load feedback and structural load constraints in the control allocator. Constrained optimal control allocation can be used to achieve desired moments without exceeding specified limits on monitored load points. Minimization of structural loads by the control allocator is used to alleviate gust loads. The framework to incorporate structural loads in the flight control system and an optimal control allocation algorithm will be described and then demonstrated on a nonlinear simulation of a generic transport aircraft with flight dynamics and static structural loads.

  8. Space Shuttle fatigue loads spectra for prelaunch and liftoff loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldish, Judith; Ortasse, Raphael

    1994-01-01

    Fatigue loads spectra for the prelaunch and liftoff flight segments of the Space Shuttle were developed. A variety o methods were used to determine the distributions of several important parameters, such as time of exposure on the launch, pad, month of launch, and wind speed. Also, some lessons learned that would be applicable to development of fatigue loads spectra for other reusable space vehicles are presented.

  9. Comparison of computer codes for calculating dynamic loads in wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, D. A.

    1977-01-01

    Seven computer codes for analyzing performance and loads in large, horizontal-axis wind turbines were used to calculate blade bending moment loads for two operational conditions of the 100 kW Mod-O wind turbine. Results are compared with test data on the basis of cyclic loads, peak loads, and harmonic contents. Four of the seven codes include rotor-tower interaction and three are limited to rotor analysis. With a few exceptions, all calculated loads were within 25% of nominal test data.

  10. Comparison of computer codes for calculating dynamic loads in wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, D. A.

    1977-01-01

    Seven computer codes for analyzing performance and loads in large, horizontal axis wind turbines were used to calculate blade bending moment loads for two operational conditions of the 100 kW Mod-0 wind turbine. Results were compared with test data on the basis of cyclic loads, peak loads, and harmonic contents. Four of the seven codes include rotor-tower interaction and three were limited to rotor analysis. With a few exceptions, all calculated loads were within 25 percent of nominal test data.

  11. Hydrodynamic loading of tensegrity structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wroldsen, Anders S.; Johansen, Vegar; Skelton, Robert E.; Sørensen, Asgeir J.

    2006-03-01

    This paper introduces hydrodynamic loads for tensegrity structures, to examine their behavior in marine environments. Wave compliant structures are of general interest when considering large marine structures, and we are motivated by the aquaculture industry where new concepts are investigated in order to make offshore installations for seafood production. This paper adds to the existing models and software simulations of tensegrity structures exposed to environmental loading from waves and current. A number of simulations are run to show behavior of the structure as a function of pretension level and string stiffness for a given loading condition.

  12. Spinning Reserve from Responsive Load

    SciTech Connect

    Kueck, John D; Kirby, Brendan J; Laughner, T; Morris, K

    2009-01-01

    As power system costs rise and capacity is strained demand response can provide a significant system reliability benefit at a potentially attractive cost. The 162 room Music Road Hotel in Pigeon Forge Tennessee agreed to host a spinning reserve test. The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) supplied real-time metering and monitoring expertise to record total hotel load during both normal operations and testing. Preliminary testing showed that hotel load can be curtailed by 22% to 37% depending on the outdoor temperature and the time of day. The load drop was very rapid, essentially as fast as the 2 second metering could detect.

  13. 40 CFR 60.2110 - What operating limits must I meet and by when?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... with the hydrogen chloride emission limitations. For energy recovery units, when your unit operates at... mercury emission limitations. For energy recovery units, when your unit operates at lower loads,...

  14. Load Carriage: An Integrated Risk Management Approach.

    PubMed

    Orr, Robin M; Pope, Rodney R

    2015-11-01

    Military load carriage (LC) gives rise to substantial risks to soldier health, tactical performance, and mission success. The aim of this article was to extract and synthesize the key findings of a series of LC research reports previously published by the authors. Five reviews and 6 studies were included, with key findings extracted and synthesized in tabulated and critical narrative form. The weight of a soldier's load is a source of risk for soldier's injuries and tactical task performance. The resulting level of risk is influenced by risk modifiers (like speed of march, terrain grade, and task type and duration) and risk controls (like administrative controls and physical conditioning). In the Australian context, these risk controls were limited, with soldiers carrying heavier loads than those mandated by doctrine and policy, and LC conditioning not meeting best practice. The diversity of LC contexts, combined with the influence of risk modifiers and risk controls, means that levels of risk associated with LC are not consistent and must be assessed on a case-by-case basis. Load weight and marching routes (terrains, gradients), distances, speed, and duration are all potentially treatable sources of LC-related risk. Potential risk treatments include not only commanders directly addressing these specific sources of risk to the extent feasible, on a case-by-case basis, when planning or conducting LC tasks but also improving administration controls (i.e., doctrine and policies) and personal protection (i.e., the physical conditioning of the soldier) as part of the hierarchy of controls. Practical application would involve commanders developing and implementing dedicated LC doctrine and policies and implementing and enforcing LC conditioning programs that meets best practice. PMID:26506174

  15. Loading-unloading hysteresis loop of randomly rough adhesive contacts.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Giuseppe; Pierro, Elena; Recchia, Giuseppina

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the loading and unloading behavior of soft solids in adhesive contact with randomly rough profiles. The roughness is assumed to be described by a self-affine fractal on a limited range of wave vectors. A spectral method is exploited to generate such randomly rough surfaces. The results are statistically averaged, and the calculated contact area and applied load are shown as a function of the penetration, for loading and unloading conditions. We found that the combination of adhesion forces and roughness leads to a hysteresis loading-unloading loop. This shows that energy can be lost simply as a consequence of roughness and van der Waals forces, as in this case a large number of local energy minima exist and the system may be trapped in metastable states. We numerically quantify the hysteretic loss and assess the influence of the surface statistical properties and the energy of adhesion on the hysteresis process.

  16. Loading-unloading hysteresis loop of randomly rough adhesive contacts.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Giuseppe; Pierro, Elena; Recchia, Giuseppina

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the loading and unloading behavior of soft solids in adhesive contact with randomly rough profiles. The roughness is assumed to be described by a self-affine fractal on a limited range of wave vectors. A spectral method is exploited to generate such randomly rough surfaces. The results are statistically averaged, and the calculated contact area and applied load are shown as a function of the penetration, for loading and unloading conditions. We found that the combination of adhesion forces and roughness leads to a hysteresis loading-unloading loop. This shows that energy can be lost simply as a consequence of roughness and van der Waals forces, as in this case a large number of local energy minima exist and the system may be trapped in metastable states. We numerically quantify the hysteretic loss and assess the influence of the surface statistical properties and the energy of adhesion on the hysteresis process. PMID:26764700

  17. Estimation of Local Bone Loads for the Volume of Interest.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Jin; Kim, Youkyung; Jang, In Gwun

    2016-07-01

    Computational bone remodeling simulations have recently received significant attention with the aid of state-of-the-art high-resolution imaging modalities. They have been performed using localized finite element (FE) models rather than full FE models due to the excessive computational costs of full FE models. However, these localized bone remodeling simulations remain to be investigated in more depth. In particular, applying simplified loading conditions (e.g., uniform and unidirectional loads) to localized FE models have a severe limitation in a reliable subject-specific assessment. In order to effectively determine the physiological local bone loads for the volume of interest (VOI), this paper proposes a novel method of estimating the local loads when the global musculoskeletal loads are given. The proposed method is verified for the three VOI in a proximal femur in terms of force equilibrium, displacement field, and strain energy density (SED) distribution. The effect of the global load deviation on the local load estimation is also investigated by perturbing a hip joint contact force (HCF) in the femoral head. Deviation in force magnitude exhibits the greatest absolute changes in a SED distribution due to its own greatest deviation, whereas angular deviation perpendicular to a HCF provides the greatest relative change. With further in vivo force measurements and high-resolution clinical imaging modalities, the proposed method will contribute to the development of reliable patient-specific localized FE models, which can provide enhanced computational efficiency for iterative computing processes such as bone remodeling simulations. PMID:27109554

  18. Transient/structural analysis of a combustor under explosive loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Peyton B.; Holland, Anne D.

    1992-01-01

    The 8-Foot High Temperature Tunnel (HTT) at NASA Langley Research Center is a combustion-driven blow-down wind tunnel. A major potential failure mode that was considered during the combustor redesign was the possibility of a deflagration and/or detonation in the combustor. If a main burner flame-out were to occur, then unburned fuel gases could accumulate and, if reignited, an explosion could occur. An analysis has been performed to determine the safe operating limits of the combustor under transient explosive loads. The failure criteria was defined and the failure mechanisms were determined for both peak pressures and differential pressure loadings. An overview of the gas dynamics analysis was given. A finite element model was constructed to evaluate 13 transient load cases. The sensitivity of the structure to the frequency content of the transient loading was assessed. In addition, two closed form dynamic analyses were conducted to verify the finite element analysis. It was determined that the differential pressure load or thrust load was the critical load mechanism and that the nozzle is the weak link in the combustor system.

  19. Intra- and inter-annual trends in phosphorus loads and comparison with nitrogen loads to Rehoboth Bay, Delaware (USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Volk, J.A.; Scudlark, J.R.; Savidge, K.B.; Andres, A.S.; Stenger, R.J.; Ullman, W.J.

    2012-01-01

    Monthly phosphorus loads from uplands, atmospheric deposition, and wastewater to Rehoboth Bay (Delaware) were determined from October 1998 to April 2002 to evaluate the relative importance of these three sources of P to the Bay. Loads from a representative subwatershed were determined and used in an areal extrapolation to estimate the upland load from the entire watershed. Soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) and dissolved organic P (DOP) are the predominant forms of P in baseflow and P loads from the watershed are highest during the summer months. Particulate phosphorus (PP) becomes more significant in stormflow and during periods with more frequent or larger storms. Atmospheric deposition of P is only a minor source of P to Rehoboth Bay. During the period of 1998-2002, wastewater was the dominant external source of P to Rehoboth Bay, often exceeding all other P sources combined. Since 2002, however, due to technical improvements to the sole wastewater plant discharging directly to the Bay, the wastewater contribution of P has been significantly reduced and upland waters are now the principal source of P on an annualized basis. Based on comparison of N and P loads, primary productivity and biomass carrying capacity in Rehoboth Bay should be limited by P availability. However, due to the contrasting spatial and temporal patterns of N and P loading and perhaps internal cycling within the ecosystem, spatial and temporal variations in N and P-limitation within Rehoboth Bay are likely. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Fatigue loading of tendon

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Jennifer H; Screen, Hazel R C

    2013-01-01

    Tendon injuries, often called tendinopathies, are debilitating and painful conditions, generally considered to develop as a result of tendon overuse. The aetiology of tendinopathy remains poorly understood, and whilst tendon biopsies have provided some information concerning tendon appearance in late-stage disease, there is still little information concerning the mechanical and cellular events associated with disease initiation and progression. Investigating this in situ is challenging, and numerous models have been developed to investigate how overuse may generate tendon fatigue damage and how this may relate to tendinopathy conditions. This article aims to review these models and our current understanding of tendon fatigue damage. We review the strengths and limitations of different methodologies for characterizing tendon fatigue, considering in vitro methods that adopt both viable and non-viable samples, as well as the range of different in vivo approaches. By comparing data across model systems, we review the current understanding of fatigue damage development. Additionally, we compare these findings with data from tendinopathic tissue biopsies to provide some insights into how these models may relate to the aetiology of tendinopathy. Fatigue-induced damage consistently highlights the same microstructural, biological and mechanical changes to the tendon across all model systems and also correlates well with the findings from tendinopathic biopsy tissue. The multiple testing routes support matrix damage as an important contributor to tendinopathic conditions, but cellular responses to fatigue appear complex and often contradictory. PMID:23837793

  1. 14 CFR 23.397 - Limit control forces and -torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limit control forces and -torques. 23.397... Control Surface and System Loads § 23.397 Limit control forces and -torques. (a) In the control surface... exceed those that would result in flight from the application of any pilot force within the...

  2. 14 CFR 23.397 - Limit control forces and -torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Limit control forces and -torques. 23.397... Control Surface and System Loads § 23.397 Limit control forces and -torques. (a) In the control surface... exceed those that would result in flight from the application of any pilot force within the...

  3. 14 CFR 23.397 - Limit control forces and -torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Limit control forces and -torques. 23.397... Control Surface and System Loads § 23.397 Limit control forces and -torques. (a) In the control surface... exceed those that would result in flight from the application of any pilot force within the...

  4. 14 CFR 23.397 - Limit control forces and -torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Limit control forces and -torques. 23.397... Control Surface and System Loads § 23.397 Limit control forces and -torques. (a) In the control surface... exceed those that would result in flight from the application of any pilot force within the...

  5. 14 CFR 23.397 - Limit control forces and -torques.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Limit control forces and -torques. 23.397... Control Surface and System Loads § 23.397 Limit control forces and -torques. (a) In the control surface... exceed those that would result in flight from the application of any pilot force within the...

  6. 14 CFR 23.425 - Gust loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Balancing Surfaces § 23.425 Gust loads. (a) Each horizontal surface, other than a main wing, must be... for the conditions specified in paragraph (a) of this section, the initial balancing loads for steady... load resulting from the gusts must be added to the initial balancing load to obtain the total load....

  7. An Adaptive TVD Limiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeng, Yih Nen; Payne, Uon Jan

    1995-05-01

    An adaptive TVD limiter, based on a limiter approximating the upper boundary of the TVD range and that of the third-order upwind TVD scheme, is developed in this work. The limiter switches to the comprressive limiter near a discontinuity, to the third-order TVD scheme's limiter in the smooth region, and to a weighted averaged scheme in the transition region between smooth and high gradient solutions. Numerical experiments show that the proposed scheme works very well for one-dimensional scalar equation problems but becomes less effective in one- and two-dimensional Euler equation problems. Further study is required for the two-dimensional scalar equation problems.

  8. Loading and conjugating cavity biostructures

    DOEpatents

    Hainfeld, J.F.

    1995-08-22

    Methods for the preparation and use of a biological delivery system are disclosed. The method of preparation includes the loading of a non-biological material into a biostructure having a load-bearing structure. The method also includes the removal of some of the biostructure`s contents and the loading of a non-biological material into the biostructure. The biostructure is biologically compatible with the host, and preferably is derived from the host, the host`s species or a related species. The loaded biostructure is used directly, or it can be targeted to specific cells, tissues and/or organs within a host. The targeted biostructure can be used to deliver the non-biological material to a specified tissue, organ or cell within a host for diagnostic, therapeutic or other purposes. 11 figs.

  9. Loading and conjugating cavity biostructures

    DOEpatents

    Hainfeld, James F.

    1997-11-25

    Methods for the preparation and use of a biological delivery system are disclosed. The method of preparation includes the loading of a non-biological material into a biostructure having a load-bearing structure. The method also includes the removal of some of the biostructure's contents and the loading of a non-biological material into the biostructure. The biostructure is biologically compatible with the host, and preferably is derived from the host, the host's species or a related species. The loaded biostructure is used directly, or it can be targeted to specific cells, tissues and/or organs within a host. The targeted biostructure can be used to deliver the non-biological material to a specified tissue, organ or cell within a host for diagnostic, therapeutic or other purposes.

  10. Loading and conjugating cavity biostructures

    DOEpatents

    Hainfeld, James F.

    1995-08-22

    Methods for the preparation and use of a biological delivery system are disclosed. The method of preparation includes the loading of a non-biological material into a biostructure having a load-bearing structure. The method also includes the removal of some of the biostructure's contents and the loading of a non-biological material into the biostructure. The biostructure is biologically compatible with the host, and preferably is derived from the host, the host's species or a related species. The loaded biostructure is used directly, or it can be targeted to specific cells, tissues and/or organs within a host. The targeted biostructure can be used to deliver the non-biological material to a specified tissue, organ or cell within a host for diagnostic, therapeutic or other purposes.

  11. Loading and conjugating cavity biostructures

    DOEpatents

    Hainfeld, J.F.

    1997-11-25

    Methods for the preparation and use of a biological delivery system are disclosed. The method of preparation includes the loading of a non-biological material into a biostructure having a load-bearing structure. The method also includes the removal of some of the biostructure`s contents and the loading of a non-biological material into the biostructure. The biostructure is biologically compatible with the host, and preferably is derived from the host, the host`s species or a related species. The loaded biostructure is used directly, or it can be targeted to specific cells, tissues and/or organs within a host. The targeted biostructure can be used to deliver the non-biological material to a specified tissue, organ or cell within a host for diagnostic, therapeutic or other purposes. 11 figs.

  12. Sandia Wind Turbine Loads Database

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Sandia Wind Turbine Loads Database is divided into six files, each corresponding to approximately 16 years of simulation. The files are text files with data in columnar format. The 424MB zipped file containing six data files can be downloaded by the public. The files simulate 10-minute maximum loads for the NREL 5MW wind turbine. The details of the loads simulations can be found in the paper: “Decades of Wind Turbine Loads Simulations”, M. Barone, J. Paquette, B. Resor, and L. Manuel, AIAA2012-1288 (3.69MB PDF). Note that the site-average wind speed is 10 m/s (class I-B), not the 8.5 m/s reported in the paper.

  13. NASA Dryden Flight Loads Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horn, Tom

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the work of the Dryden Flight Loads Laboratory. The capabilities and research interests of the lab are: Structural, thermal, & dynamic analysis; Structural, thermal, & dynamic ground-test techniques; Advanced structural instrumentation; and Flight test support.

  14. Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Kriikku, E.; Ward, C.; Stokes, M.; Randall, B.; Steed, J.; Jones, R.; Hamilton, L.; Rogers, L.; Fiscus, J.; Dyches, G.

    1998-05-01

    The Plutonium Immobilization Facility will encapsulate plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with glass for permanent storage. This report discusses five can loading conceptual designs and the lists the advantages and disadvantages for each concept. This report identifies loading pucks into cans and backfilling cans with helium as the top priority can loading development areas. The can loading welder and cutter are very similar to the existing Savannah River Site (SRS) FB-Line bagless transfer welder and cutter and thus they are a low priority development item.

  15. Thermal-structural combined loads design criteria study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deriugin, V.; Brogren, E. W.; Jaeck, C. L.; Brown, A. L.; Clingan, B. E.

    1972-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine methodology for combining thermal structural loads and assessing the effects of the combined loads on the design of a thermal protection system and a hot structure of a high cross range delta wing space shuttle orbiter vehicle. The study presents guidelines for establishing a basis for predicting thermal and pressure environments and for determining limit and ultimate design loads on the vehicle during reentry. Limit trajectories were determined by using dispersions on a representative nominal mission and system parameters expected during the life of the vehicle. Nine chosen locations on the vehicle surface having TPS or hot structures were examined, and weight sensitivity analyses were performed for each location.

  16. Estimated Muscle Loads During Squat Exercise in Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fregly, Christopher D.; Kim, Brandon T.; Li, Zhao; DeWitt, John K.; Fregly, Benjamin J.

    2012-01-01

    Loss of muscle mass in microgravity is one of the primary factors limiting long-term space flight. NASA researchers have developed a number of exercise devices to address this problem. The most recent is the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED), which is currently used by astronauts on the International Space Station (ISS) to emulate typical free-weight exercises in microgravity. ARED exercise on the ISS is intended to reproduce Earth-level muscle loads, but the actual muscle loads produced remain unknown as they cannot currently be measured directly. In this study we estimated muscle loads experienced during squat exercise on ARED in microgravity conditions representative of Mars, the moon, and the ISS. The estimates were generated using a subject-specific musculoskeletal computer model and ARED exercise data collected on Earth. The results provide insight into the capabilities and limitations of the ARED machine.

  17. Split torque transmission load sharing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krantz, T. L.; Rashidi, M.; Kish, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    Split torque transmissions are attractive alternatives to conventional planetary designs for helicopter transmissions. The split torque designs can offer lighter weight and fewer parts but have not been used extensively for lack of experience, especially with obtaining proper load sharing. Two split torque designs that use different load sharing methods have been studied. Precise indexing and alignment of the geartrain to produce acceptable load sharing has been demonstrated. An elastomeric torque splitter that has large torsional compliance and damping produces even better load sharing while reducing dynamic transmission error and noise. However, the elastomeric torque splitter as now configured is not capable over the full range of operating conditions of a fielded system. A thrust balancing load sharing device was evaluated. Friction forces that oppose the motion of the balance mechanism are significant. A static analysis suggests increasing the helix angle of the input pinion of the thrust balancing design. Also, dynamic analysis of this design predicts good load sharing and significant torsional response to accumulative pitch errors of the gears.

  18. Drug Loading of Mesoporous Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffitt, Anne; Coffer, Jeff; Wang, Mengjia

    2011-03-01

    The nanostructuring of crystalline solids with low aqueous solubilities by their incorporation into mesoporous host materials is one route to improve the bioavailability of such solids. Earlier studies suggest that mesoporous Si (PSi), with pore widths in the range of 5-50 nm, is a candidate for such an approach. In this presentation, we describe efforts to load curcumin into free-standing microparticles of PSi. Curcumin is a compound extracted from turmeric root, which is an ingredient of curry. Curucmin has shown activity against selected cancer cell lines, bacteria, and other medical conditions. However, curcumin has a very low bioavailability due to its extremely low water solubility (0.6 μ g/mL). Incorporation of curcumin was achieved by straightforward loading of the molten solid at 185circ; C. Loading experiments were performed using PSi particles of two different size ranges, 45-75 μ m and 150-250 μ m. Longer loading times and ratio of curcumin to PSi leads to a higher percentage of loaded curcumin in both PSi particle sizes (as determined by weight difference). The extent of curcumin crystallinity was assessed by x-ray diffraction (XRD). The solubility and release kinetics of loaded curcumin from the PSi was determined by extraction into water at 37circ; C, with analysis using UV-VIS spectrometry. NSF-REU and TCU.

  19. Sources and Loading of Nitrogen to U.S. Estuaries

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous assessments of land-based nitrogen loading and sources to U.S. estuaries have been limited to estimates for larger systems with watersheds at the scale of 8-digit HUCs and larger, in part due to the coarse resolution of available data, including estuarine watershed bound...

  20. Cognitive Load Theory--Sometimes Less Is More

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Cody

    2013-01-01

    The following paper represents review of the literature examining the current research related to cognitive load theory and more specifically the negative aspects of the redundant on-screen text. The authors describe working and long-term memory and how both factor into human learning through the facilitation of knowledge transfer. Limited working…

  1. Controllable Bidirectional dc Power Sources For Large Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripp, John S.; Daniels, Taumi S.

    1995-01-01

    System redesigned for greater efficiency, durability, and controllability. Modern electronically controlled dc power sources proposed to supply currents to six electromagnets used to position aerodynamic test model in wind tunnel. Six-phase bridge rectifier supplies load with large current at voltage of commanded magnitude and polarity. Current-feedback circuit includes current-limiting feature giving some protection against overload.

  2. Plastic instabilities in statically and dynamically loaded spherical vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, Thomas A; Rodriguez, Edward A

    2010-01-01

    Significant changes were made in design limits for pressurized vessels in the 2007 version of the ASME Code (Section VIII, Div. 3) and 2008 and 2009 Addenda. There is now a local damage-mechanics based strain-exhaustion limit as well as the well-known global plastic collapse limit. Moreover, Code Case 2564 (Section VIII, Div. 3) has recently been approved to address impulsively loaded vessels. It is the purpose of this paper to investigate the plastic collapse limit as it applies to dynamically loaded spherical vessels. Plastic instabilities that could potentially develop in spherical shells under symmetric loading conditions are examined for a variety of plastic constitutive relations. First, a literature survey of both static and dynamic instabilities associated with spherical shells is presented. Then, a general plastic instability condition for spherical shells subjected to displacement controlled and impulsive loading is given. This instability condition is evaluated for six plastic and visco-plastic constitutive relations. The role of strain-rate sensitivity on the instability point is investigated. Calculations for statically and dynamically loaded spherical shells are presented, illustrating the formation of instabilities as well as the role of imperfections. Conclusions of this work are that there are two fundamental types of instabilities associated with failure of spherical shells. In the case of impulsively loaded vessels, where the pulse duration is short compared to the fundamental period of the structure, one instability type is found not to occur in the absence of static internal pressure. Moreover, it is found that the specific role of strain-rate sensitivity on the instability strain depends on the form of the constitutive relation assumed.

  3. Is the wash-off process of road-deposited sediment source limited or transport limited?

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongtao; Chen, Xuefei; Hao, Shaonan; Jiang, Yan; Zhao, Jiang; Zou, Changliang; Xie, Wenxia

    2016-09-01

    An in-depth understanding of the road-deposited sediments (RDS) wash-off process is essential to estimation of urban surface runoff pollution load and to designing methods to minimize the adverse impacts on the receiving waters. There are two debatable RDS wash-off views: source limited and transport limited. The RDS build-up and wash-off process was characterized to explore what determines the wash-off process to be source limited or transport limited based on twelve RDS sampling activities on an urban road in Beijing. The results showed that two natural rain events (2.0mm and 23.2mm) reduced the total RDS mass by 30%-40%, and that finer particles (<105μm) contributed 60%-80% of the wash-off load. Both single- and multi-rain events caused the RDS particle grain size to become coarser, while dry days made the RDS particle grain size finer. These findings indicated that the bulk RDS particles wash-off tends to be transport limited, but that finer particles tend to be source limited. To further explore and confirm the results of the field experiment, a total of 40 simulated rain events were designed to observe the RDS wash-off with different particle size fractions. The finer particles have a higher wash-off percentage (Fw) than the coarser particles, and the Fw values provide a good view to characterize the wash-off process. The key conclusions drawn from the combined field and simulated experiments data are: (i) Finer and coarser particle wash-off processes tend to be source limited and transport limited, respectively. (ii) The source and transport limited processes occur during the initial period (the first flush) and later periods, respectively. (iii) The smaller and larger rain events tend to be transport limited and source limited, respectively. Overall, the wash-off process is generally a combination of source and transport limited processes.

  4. Is the wash-off process of road-deposited sediment source limited or transport limited?

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongtao; Chen, Xuefei; Hao, Shaonan; Jiang, Yan; Zhao, Jiang; Zou, Changliang; Xie, Wenxia

    2016-09-01

    An in-depth understanding of the road-deposited sediments (RDS) wash-off process is essential to estimation of urban surface runoff pollution load and to designing methods to minimize the adverse impacts on the receiving waters. There are two debatable RDS wash-off views: source limited and transport limited. The RDS build-up and wash-off process was characterized to explore what determines the wash-off process to be source limited or transport limited based on twelve RDS sampling activities on an urban road in Beijing. The results showed that two natural rain events (2.0mm and 23.2mm) reduced the total RDS mass by 30%-40%, and that finer particles (<105μm) contributed 60%-80% of the wash-off load. Both single- and multi-rain events caused the RDS particle grain size to become coarser, while dry days made the RDS particle grain size finer. These findings indicated that the bulk RDS particles wash-off tends to be transport limited, but that finer particles tend to be source limited. To further explore and confirm the results of the field experiment, a total of 40 simulated rain events were designed to observe the RDS wash-off with different particle size fractions. The finer particles have a higher wash-off percentage (Fw) than the coarser particles, and the Fw values provide a good view to characterize the wash-off process. The key conclusions drawn from the combined field and simulated experiments data are: (i) Finer and coarser particle wash-off processes tend to be source limited and transport limited, respectively. (ii) The source and transport limited processes occur during the initial period (the first flush) and later periods, respectively. (iii) The smaller and larger rain events tend to be transport limited and source limited, respectively. Overall, the wash-off process is generally a combination of source and transport limited processes. PMID:27135567

  5. Effects of military load carriage on kinematics of gait.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Deepti; Pal, Madhu Sudan; Majumdar, Dhurjati

    2010-06-01

    changes at trunk and limb joints during military load carriage of relatively lighter magnitude. Studies on similar aspects on the specific population are limited. These data can be used for optimising load carriage and designing ensembles, especially a heavy BP, for military operations.

  6. Postural load and the development of musculo-skeletal illness.

    PubMed

    Aarås, A

    1987-01-01

    workers without continuous work load. This suggests that a static trapezius load level of about 1% MVC is acceptable for the major part of the work day if adequate breaks in the load pattern are allowed when needed. At the same time, a median arm flexion of 15 degrees and a median arm abduction less than 10 degrees indicate the amplitude of these angles for 50% of the recording time. No details about the work-pause pattern was obtained, therefore these limits are only a rough indication of an acceptable arm position.

  7. 14 CFR 23.507 - Jacking loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) Vertical-load factor of 1.35 times the static reactions. (2) Fore, aft, and lateral load factors of 0.4 times the vertical static reactions. (b) The horizontal loads at the jack points must be reacted...

  8. 14 CFR 23.507 - Jacking loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) Vertical-load factor of 1.35 times the static reactions. (2) Fore, aft, and lateral load factors of 0.4 times the vertical static reactions. (b) The horizontal loads at the jack points must be reacted...

  9. 14 CFR 23.507 - Jacking loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) Vertical-load factor of 1.35 times the static reactions. (2) Fore, aft, and lateral load factors of 0.4 times the vertical static reactions. (b) The horizontal loads at the jack points must be reacted...

  10. 14 CFR 23.507 - Jacking loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) Vertical-load factor of 1.35 times the static reactions. (2) Fore, aft, and lateral load factors of 0.4 times the vertical static reactions. (b) The horizontal loads at the jack points must be reacted...

  11. 14 CFR 23.537 - Seawing loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Water Loads § 23.537 Seawing loads. Seawing design loads must be based on applicable test data. Emergency Landing Conditions...

  12. 14 CFR 23.537 - Seawing loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Water Loads § 23.537 Seawing loads. Seawing design loads must be based on applicable test data. Emergency Landing Conditions...

  13. 14 CFR 23.507 - Jacking loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) Vertical-load factor of 1.35 times the static reactions. (2) Fore, aft, and lateral load factors of 0.4 times the vertical static reactions. (b) The horizontal loads at the jack points must be reacted...

  14. The effects of load drop, uniform load and concentrated loads on waste tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Marusich, R.M., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-09-06

    This document provides the supporting calculations performed by others specifically for the TWRS FSAR and more detailed summaries of the important references issued in the past regarding the effects of various loads.

  15. The effects of load drop, uniform load and concentrated loads on waste tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Marusich, R.M.

    1996-09-27

    This document provides the supporting calculations performed by others specifically for the TWRS FSAR and more detailed summaries of the important references issued in the past regarding the effects of various loads.

  16. Guidelines for transmission line structural loading

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This guide provides methods for the selection of design loads and load factors. This is accomplished by the presentation of a Load Resistance Factor Design (LRFD) procedure. The basic formula for wind force is discussed. This include basic wind speed, terrain and height coefficients, gust response factors, and pressure coefficients. Information is also provided on ice loads, tornadoes, hurricanes, longitudinal loads, construction, and maintenance loads.

  17. [Structure of allostatic load in railway workers].

    PubMed

    Gorokhova, S G; Pfaf, V F; Muraseyeva, E V; Akhsanova, E R; Prigorovskaya, T S; At'kov, O Yu

    2016-01-01

    The authors studied allostatic load in railway workers, as an indicator of stress effect. Analysis covered biomarkers that form allostatic load index, and their ratio for variable allostatic load index levels. Moderate allostatic load appeared to prevail in the examinees group. Findings are that systolic and diastolic blood pressure, general cholesterol and hemoglobin make major contribution into allostatic load index. Comparison covered models of allostatic load index calculation for variable biomarkers sets.

  18. [Structure of allostatic load in railway workers].

    PubMed

    Gorokhova, S G; Pfaf, V F; Muraseyeva, E V; Akhsanova, E R; Prigorovskaya, T S; At'kov, O Yu

    2016-01-01

    The authors studied allostatic load in railway workers, as an indicator of stress effect. Analysis covered biomarkers that form allostatic load index, and their ratio for variable allostatic load index levels. Moderate allostatic load appeared to prevail in the examinees group. Findings are that systolic and diastolic blood pressure, general cholesterol and hemoglobin make major contribution into allostatic load index. Comparison covered models of allostatic load index calculation for variable biomarkers sets. PMID:27396144

  19. Detector limitations, STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, D. G.

    1998-07-13

    Every detector has limitations in terms of solid angle, particular technologies chosen, cracks due to mechanical structure, etc. If all of the presently planned parts of STAR [Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC] were in place, these factors would not seriously limit our ability to exploit the spin physics possible in RHIC. What is of greater concern at the moment is the construction schedule for components such as the Electromagnetic Calorimeters, and the limited funding for various levels of triggers.

  20. Systematics and limit calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Wade; /Fermilab

    2006-12-01

    This note discusses the estimation of systematic uncertainties and their incorporation into upper limit calculations. Two different approaches to reducing systematics and their degrading impact on upper limits are introduced. An improved {chi}{sup 2} function is defined which is useful in comparing Poisson distributed data with models marginalized by systematic uncertainties. Also, a technique using profile likelihoods is introduced which provides a means of constraining the degrading impact of systematic uncertainties on limit calculations.

  1. Modular pump limiter systems for large tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uckan, T.; Klepper, C. C.; Mioduszewski, P. K.; McGrath, R. T.

    1987-09-01

    Long-pulse (greater than 10-s) operation of large tokamaks with high-power (greater than 10-MW) heating and extensive external fueling will require correspondingly efficient particle exhaust for density control. A pump limiter can provide the needed exhaust capability by removing a small percentage of the particles, which would otherwise be recycled. Single pump limiter modules have been operated successfully on ISX-B, PDX, TEXTOR, and PLT. An axisymmetric pump limiter is now being installed and will be studied in TEXTOR. A third type of pump limiter is a system that consists of several modules and exhibits performance different from that of a single module. To take advantage of the flexibility of a modular pump limiter system in a high-power, long-pulse device, the power load must be distributed among a number of modules. Because each added module changes the performance of all the others, a set of design criteria must be defined for the overall limiter system. The design parameters for the modules are then determined from the system requirements for particle and power removal. Design criteria and parameters are presented, and the impact on module design of the state of the art in engineering technolgy is discussed. The relationship between modules is considered from the standpoint of flux coverage and shadowing effects. The results are applied to the Tore Supra tokamak. A preliminary conceptual design for the Tore Supra pump limiter system is discussed, and the design parameters of the limiter modules are presented.

  2. Modular pump limiter systems for large tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Uckan, T.; Klepper, C.C.; Mioduszewski, P.K.; McGrath, R.T.

    1987-09-01

    Long-pulse (>10-s) operation of large tokamaks with high-power (>10-MW) heating and extensive external fueling will require correspondingly efficient particle exhaust for density control. A pump limiter can provide the needed exhaust capability by removing a small percentage of the particles, which would otherwise be recycled. Single pump limiter modules have been operated successfully on ISX-B, PDX, TEXTOR, and PLT. An axisymmetric pump limiter is now being installed and will be studied in TEXTOR. A third type of pump limiter is a system that consists of several modules and exhibits performance different from that of a single module. To take advantage of the flexibility of a modular pump limiter system in a high-power, long-pulse device, the power load must be distributed among a number of modules. Because each added module changes the performance of all the others, a set of design criteria must be defined for the overall limiter system. The design parameters for the modules are then determined from the system requirements for particle and power removal. Design criteria and parameters are presented, and the impact on module design of the state of the art in engineering technology is discussed. The relationship between modules are considered from the standpoint of flux coverage and shadowing effects. The results are applied to the Tore Supra tokamak. A preliminary conceptual design for the Tore Supra pump limiter system is discussed, and the design parameters of the limiter modules are presented. 21 refs., 12 figs.

  3. Peak load management: Potential options

    SciTech Connect

    Englin, J.E.; De Steese, J.G.; Schultz, R.W.; Kellogg, M.A.

    1989-10-01

    This report reviews options that may be alternatives to transmission construction (ATT) applicable both generally and at specific locations in the service area of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Some of these options have potential as specific alternatives to the Shelton-Fairmount 230-kV Reinforcement Project, which is the focus of this study. A listing of 31 peak load management (PLM) options is included. Estimated costs and normalized hourly load shapes, corresponding to the respective base load and controlled load cases, are considered for 15 of the above options. A summary page is presented for each of these options, grouped with respect to its applicability in the residential, commercial, industrial, and agricultural sectors. The report contains comments on PLM measures for which load shape management characteristics are not yet available. These comments address the potential relevance of the options and the possible difficulty that may be encountered in characterizing their value should be of interest in this investigation. The report also identifies options that could improve the efficiency of the three customer utility distribution systems supplied by the Shelton-Fairmount Reinforcement Project. Potential cogeneration options in the Olympic Peninsula are also discussed. These discussions focus on the options that appear to be most promising on the Olympic Peninsula. Finally, a short list of options is recommended for investigation in the next phase of this study. 9 refs., 24 tabs.

  4. A gravity loading countermeasure skinsuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldie, James M.; Newman, Dava J.

    2011-04-01

    Despite the use of several countermeasures, significant physiological deconditioning still occurs during long duration spaceflight. Bone loss - primarily due to the absence of loading in microgravity - is perhaps the greatest challenge to resolve. This paper describes a conceptual Gravity Loading Countermeasure Skinsuit (GLCS) that induces loading on the body to mimic standing and - when integrated with other countermeasures - exercising on Earth. Comfort, mobility and other operational issues were explored during a pilot study carried out in parabolic flight for prototype suits worn by three subjects. Compared to the 1- or 2-stage Russian Pingvin Suits, the elastic mesh of the GLCS can create a loading regime that gradually increases in hundreds of stages from the shoulders to the feet, thereby reproducing the weight-bearing regime normally imparted by gravity with much higher resolution. Modelling shows that the skinsuit requires less than 10 mmHg (1.3 kPa) of compression for three subjects of varied gender, height and mass. Negligible mobility restriction and excellent comfort properties were found during the parabolic flights, which suggests that crewmembers should be able to work normally, exercise or sleep while wearing the suit. The suit may also serve as a practical 1 g harness for exercise countermeasures and vibration applications to improve dynamic loading.

  5. Friction and anchorage loading revisited.

    PubMed

    Dholakia, Kartik D

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary concepts of sliding mechanics explain that friction is inevitable. To overcome this frictional resistance, excess force is required to retract the tooth along the archwire (ie, individual retraction of canines, en masse retraction of anterior teeth), in addition to the amount of force required for tooth movement. The anterior tooth retraction force, in addition to excess force (to overcome friction), produces reciprocal protraction force on molars, thereby leading to increased anchorage loading. However, this traditional concept was challenged in recent literature, which was based on the finite element model, but did not bear correlation to the clinical scenario. This article will reinforce the fact that clinically, friction increases anchorage loading in all three planes of space, considering the fact that tooth movement is a quasistatic process rather than a purely continuous or static one, and that conventional ways of determining the effects of static or dynamic friction on anchorage load cannot be applied to clinical situations (which consist of anatomical resistance units and a complex muscular force system). The article does not aim to quantify friction and its effect on the amount of anchorage load. Rather, a new perspective regarding the role of various additional factors (which is not explained by contemporary concept) that may influence friction and anchorage loading is provided..

  6. Thermal loading study for FY 1996. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-08

    The primary objective of this study was to provide recommendations for Mined Geologic Disposal System requirements affected by thermal loading that will provide sufficient definition to facilitate development of design concepts and support life cycle cost determinations. The study reevaluated and/or redefined selected thermal goals used for design and are currently contained in the requirements documents or the Controlled Design Assumption Document. The study provided recommendations as to what, if any, actions (such as edge loading and limiting of the heat variability between waste packages) are needed and must be accommodated in the design. Additionally, the study provided recommendations as to what alternative thermal loads should be maintained for continued flexibility. Section 1 provides the study objective, background, scope, and organization of the report. Section 2 documents the requirements and standards to include quality assurance (QA) requirements, any requirements used or evaluated, and the inputs and assumptions considered. Section 3 provides the analysis and recommendations for the thermal goals reevaluation. Section 4 discusses the evaluation of edge loading and provides conclusions. Section 5 provides the analyses done to establish recommendations as to what requirements need to be implemented to either limit or manage the amount of heat output variability that may occur. Section 6 discusses alternate thermal loadings; Section 7 provides the study conclusions and recommendations; Section 8 provides the references, standards, and regulations; and Section 9 contains the acronym list.

  7. Limits to Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Janne Hedegaard

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I will argue that a theoretical identification of the limit to inclusion is needed in the conceptual identification of inclusion. On the one hand, inclusion is formulated as a vision that is, in principle, limitless. On the other hand, there seems to be an agreement that inclusion has a limit in the pedagogical practice. However,…

  8. Dose limits for astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, W. K.

    2000-01-01

    Radiation exposures to individuals in space can greatly exceed natural radiation exposure on Earth and possibly normal occupational radiation exposures as well. Consequently, procedures limiting exposures would be necessary. Limitations were proposed by the Radiobiological Advisory Panel of the National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council in 1970. This panel recommended short-term limits to avoid deterministic effects and a single career limit (of 4 Sv) based on a doubling of the cancer risk in men aged 35 to 55. Later, when risk estimates for cancer had increased and were recognized to be age and sex dependent, the NCRP, in Report No. 98 in 1989, recommended a range of career limits based on age and sex from 1 to 4 Sv. NCRP is again in the process of revising recommendations for astronaut exposure, partly because risk estimates have increased further and partly to recognize trends in limiting radiation exposure occupationally on the ground. The result of these considerations is likely to be similar short-term limits for deterministic effects but modified career limits.

  9. Dose limits for astronauts.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, W K

    2000-11-01

    Radiation exposures to individuals in space can greatly exceed natural radiation exposure on Earth and possibly normal occupational radiation exposures as well. Consequently, procedures limiting exposures would be necessary. Limitations were proposed by the Radiobiological Advisory Panel of the National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council in 1970. This panel recommended short-term limits to avoid deterministic effects and a single career limit (of 4 Sv) based on a doubling of the cancer risk in men aged 35 to 55. Later, when risk estimates for cancer had increased and were recognized to be age and sex dependent, the NCRP, in Report No. 98 in 1989, recommended a range of career limits based on age and sex from 1 to 4 Sv. NCRP is again in the process of revising recommendations for astronaut exposure, partly because risk estimates have increased further and partly to recognize trends in limiting radiation exposure occupationally on the ground. The result of these considerations is likely to be similar short-term limits for deterministic effects but modified career limits. PMID:11045534

  10. Tokamak pump limiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conn, Robert W.

    1984-12-01

    Experiments with pump limiters on several operating tokamaks have established them as efficient collectors of particles. The gas pressure rise within the chamber behind the limiters has been as high as 50 mTorr when there is no internal chamber pumping. Observations of the plasma power distribution over the front face of these limiter modules yield estimates for the scale length of radial power decay consistent with predictions of relatively simple theory. Interaction of the in-flowing plasma with recycling neutral gas near the limiter deflector plate is predicted to become important when the effective ionization mean free path is comparable to or less than the neutral atom mean path length within the throat structure of the limiter. Recent experiments with a scoop limiter without active internal pumping have been carried out in the PDX tokamak with up to 6 MW of auxiliary neutral beam heating. Experiments have also been performed with a rotating head pump limiter in the PLT tokamak in conjunction with RF plasma heating. Extensive experiments have been done in the ISX-B tokamak and first experiments have been completed with the ALT-I limiter in TEXTOR. The pump limiter modules in these latter two machines have internal getter pumping. Experiments in ISX-B are with ohmic and auxiliary neutral beam heating. The results in ISX-B and TEXTOR show that active density control and particle removal is achieved with pump limiters. In ISX-B, the boundary layer (or scape-off layer) plasma partially screens the core plasma from gas injection. In both ISX-B and TEXTOR, the pressure internal to the module scales linearly with plasma density but in ISX-B, with neutral beam injection, a nonlinear increase is observed at the highest densities studied. Plasma plugging is the suspected cause. Results from PDX suggest that a regime may exist in which core plasma energy confinement improves using a pump limiter during neutral beam injection. Asymmetric radial profiles and an increased

  11. Characterizing limit order prices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withanawasam, R. M.; Whigham, P. A.; Crack, Timothy Falcon

    2013-11-01

    A computational model of a limit order book is used to study the effect of different limit order distribution offsets. Reference prices such as same side/contra side best market prices and last traded price are considered in combination with different price offset distributions. We show that when characterizing limit order prices, varying the offset distribution only produces different behavior when the reference price is the contra side best price. Irrespective of the underlying mechanisms used in computing the limit order prices, the shape of the price graph and the behavior of the average order book profile distribution are strikingly similar in all the considered reference prices/offset distributions. This implies that existing averaging methods can cancel variabilities in limit order book shape/attributes and may be misleading.

  12. Viral load of patients with hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Bellomo, Carla María; Pires-Marczeski, Fanny Clara; Padula, Paula Julieta

    2015-11-01

    Hantavirus causes severe illness including pneumonia, which leads to hospitalization and often death. At present, there is no specific treatment available. The hantavirus pathogenesis is not well understood, but most likely both virus-mediated and host-mediated mechanisms, are involved. The aim of this study was to correlate viral load in samples of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome cases and hantavirus infected individuals, with clinical epidemiological parameters and disease outcome. The variables that could potentially be related with viral load were analyzed. The retrospective study included 73 cases or household contacts, with different clinical evolution. Viral load was measured by reverse-transcription and real time polymerase chain reaction. There was no statistically significant association between blood viral RNA levels and severity of disease. However, viral load was inversely correlated with IgG response in a statistically significant manner. The level of viral RNA was significantly higher in patients infected with Andes virus South lineage, and was markedly low in persons infected with Laguna Negra virus. These results suggest that the infecting viral genotype is associated with disease severity, and that high viral load is associated with a low specific IgG response. Sex, age and disease severity were not related with viral load. Further investigations increasing strikingly the number of cases and also limiting the variables to be studied are necessary.

  13. Viral load of patients with hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Bellomo, Carla María; Pires-Marczeski, Fanny Clara; Padula, Paula Julieta

    2015-11-01

    Hantavirus causes severe illness including pneumonia, which leads to hospitalization and often death. At present, there is no specific treatment available. The hantavirus pathogenesis is not well understood, but most likely both virus-mediated and host-mediated mechanisms, are involved. The aim of this study was to correlate viral load in samples of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome cases and hantavirus infected individuals, with clinical epidemiological parameters and disease outcome. The variables that could potentially be related with viral load were analyzed. The retrospective study included 73 cases or household contacts, with different clinical evolution. Viral load was measured by reverse-transcription and real time polymerase chain reaction. There was no statistically significant association between blood viral RNA levels and severity of disease. However, viral load was inversely correlated with IgG response in a statistically significant manner. The level of viral RNA was significantly higher in patients infected with Andes virus South lineage, and was markedly low in persons infected with Laguna Negra virus. These results suggest that the infecting viral genotype is associated with disease severity, and that high viral load is associated with a low specific IgG response. Sex, age and disease severity were not related with viral load. Further investigations increasing strikingly the number of cases and also limiting the variables to be studied are necessary. PMID:26087934

  14. Locomotion while load-carrying in reduced gravities.

    PubMed

    Wickman, L A; Luna, B

    1996-10-01

    Supporting the mass of a protective suit and portable life support system (PLSS) will impose an energy requirement on planetary astronauts. To design extravehicular protective equipment for planetary missions, scientists must learn more about human physical capabilities while load-carrying in reduced gravities. In this study, an underwater treadmill and weighting system were used to simulate reduced-gravity locomotion while load-carrying. The test matrix included 3 gravity levels, 6 subjects, 2 locomotion speeds, and a range of load sizes. Energy expenditure, calculated from measured oxygen consumption, is positively correlated with gravity level, speed, and load size. The data are used to project that individuals in average physical condition will be able to walk for 8 h on the Moon while carrying up to 170% of their body mass without undue fatigue, and on Mars with up to 50% of their body mass. These approximate limits, especially for Martian gravity, may prove quite a challenge for designers of advanced protective systems. Requirements for regenerable and non-venting PLSS components have been driving the total projected masses of advanced PLSSs increasingly higher, perhaps beyond what is reasonable to carry. However, the larger mass can be beneficial in maintaining bone mass. Using Whalen's model (1988), the daily planetary walking times required to maintain bone mass were calculated for a range of carried load sizes. The calculated times were unattainably high, suggesting that some combination of loads carrying and supplemental bone maintenance measures will likely be required to maintain bone mass in reduced gravity environments.

  15. Insentropic compression of solid using pulsed magnetic loading

    SciTech Connect

    HALL,CLINT A.; ASAY,JAMES R.; STYGAR,WILLIAM A.; SPIELMAN,RICK B.; ROSENTHAL,STEPHEN E.; KNUDSON,MARCUS D.; REISMAN,D.; TOOR,A.; CAUBLE,R.; HAYES,D.B.

    2000-04-18

    Shock loading techniques are often used to determine material response along a specific pressure loading curve referred to as the Hugoniot. However, many technological and scientific applications require accurate determination of dynamic material response that is off-Hugoniot, covering large regions of the equation-of-state surface. Unloading measurements from the shocked state provide off-Hugoniot information, but experimental techniques for measuring compressive off-Hugoniot response have been limited. A new pulsed magnetic loading technique is presented which provides previously unavailable information on isentropic loading of materials to pressures of several hundred kbar. This smoothly increasing pressure loading provides a good approximation to the high-pressure material isentrope centered at ambient conditions. The approach uses high current densities to create ramped magnetic loading to a few hundred kbar over time intervals of 100--200 ns. The method has successfully determined the isentropic mechanical response of copper to about 200 kbar and has been used to evaluate the kinetics of the alpha-epsilon phase transition occurring in iron at 130 kbar. With refinements in progress, the method shows promise for performing isentropic compression experiments to multi-Mbar pressures.

  16. Scientific ballooning payload termination loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, E.

    1993-02-01

    NASA's high altitude balloon borne scientific payloads are typically suspended from a deployed flat circular parachute. At flight termination, the recovery train is pyrotechnically separated at the parachute apex and balloon nadir interface. The release of elastic energy stored in the parachute at zero initial virtical velocity in the rarefied atmosphere produces high canopy opening forces that subject the gondola to potentially damaging shock loads. Data from terminations occuring at altitudes to 40 km with payloads up to 2500 kg on parachutes up to 40 m in diameter are presented. Measured loads are markedly larger than encountered via packed parachute deployment for similar canopy loadings. Canopy inflation is significantly surpressed in the early stages and then accelerated during final blossoming. Data interpretation and behavioral phenomena are discussed along with proposed shock attenuation techniques.

  17. Load Diffusion in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horgan, Cornelius O.; Simmonds, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    This research has been concerned with load diffusion in composite structures. Fundamental solid mechanics studies were carried out to provide a basis for assessing the complicated modeling necessary for large scale structures used by NASA. An understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of load diffusion in composite subcomponents is essential in developing primary composite structures. Analytical models of load diffusion behavior are extremely valuable in building an intuitive base for developing refined modeling strategies and assessing results from finite element analyses. The decay behavior of stresses and other field quantities provides a significant aid towards this process. The results are also amendable to parameter study with a large parameter space and should be useful in structural tailoring studies.

  18. Fifty years of genetic load

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, B.

    1991-01-01

    This book discusses the radiation effects on Drosophila. It was originally thought that irradiating Drosophila would decrease the average fitness of the population, thereby leading to information about the detrimental effects of mutations. Surprisingly, the fitness of the irradiated population turned out to be higher than that of the control population. The original motivation for the experiment was as a test of genetic load theory. The average fitness of a population is depressed by deleterious alleles held in the population by the balance between mutation and natural selection. The depression is called the genetic load of the population. The load dose not depend on the magnitude of the deleterious effect of alleles, but only on the mutation rate.

  19. Plutonium Immobilization Project -- Can loading

    SciTech Connect

    Kriikku, E.

    2000-01-18

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) will immobilize excess plutonium in the proposed Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP). The PIP scope includes unloading transportation containers, preparing the feed streams, converting the metal feed to an oxide, adding the ceramic precursors, pressing the pucks, inspecting pucks, and sintering pucks. The PIP scope also includes loading the pucks into metal cans, sealing the cans, inspecting the cans, loading the cans into magazines, loading magazines into Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canisters, and transporting the canisters to the DWPF. The DWPF fills the canister with a mixture of high level radioactive waste and glass for permanent storage. Due to the radiation, remote equipment must perform PIP operations in a contained environment.

  20. Cognitive Load Theory, Educational Research, and Instructional Design: Some Food for Thought

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Jong, Ton

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive load is a theoretical notion with an increasingly central role in the educational research literature. The basic idea of cognitive load theory is that cognitive capacity in working memory is limited, so that if a learning task requires too much capacity, learning will be hampered. The recommended remedy is to design instructional systems…

  1. Load Leveling Battery System Costs

    1994-10-12

    SYSPLAN evaluates capital investment in customer side of the meter load leveling battery systems. Such systems reduce the customer's monthly electrical demand charge by reducing the maximum power load supplied by the utility during the customer's peak demand. System equipment consists of a large array of batteries, a current converter, and balance of plant equipment and facilities required to support the battery and converter system. The system is installed on the customer's side of themore » meter and controlled and operated by the customer. Its economic feasibility depends largely on the customer's load profile. Load shape requirements, utility rate structures, and battery equipment cost and performance data serve as bases for determining whether a load leveling battery system is economically feasible for a particular installation. Life-cycle costs for system hardware include all costs associated with the purchase, installation, and operation of battery, converter, and balance of plant facilities and equipment. The SYSPLAN spreadsheet software is specifically designed to evaluate these costs and the reduced demand charge benefits; it completes a 20 year period life cycle cost analysis based on the battery system description and cost data. A built-in sensitivity analysis routine is also included for key battery cost parameters. The life cycle cost analysis spreadsheet is augmented by a system sizing routine to help users identify load leveling system size requirements for their facilities. The optional XSIZE system sizing spreadsheet which is included can be used to identify a range of battery system sizes that might be economically attractive. XSIZE output consisting of system operating requirements can then be passed by the temporary file SIZE to the main SYSPLAN spreadsheet.« less

  2. Material behavior under complex loading

    SciTech Connect

    Breuer, H.J.; Raule, G.; Rodig, M.

    1984-09-01

    Studies of material behavior under complex loading form a bridge between standard material testing methods and the stress analysis calculations for reactor components at high temperatures. The aim of these studies is to determine the influence of typical load change sequences on material properties, to derive the equations required for stress analyses, to carry out tests under multiaxial conditions, and to investigate the structural deformation mechanisms of creep buckling and ratcheting. The present state of the investigations within the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor materials program is described, with emphasis on the experimental apparatus, the scope of the program, and the initial results obtained.

  3. Analysis of high load dampers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, S. T.; Buono, D. F.; Hibner, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    High load damping requirements for modern jet engines are discussed. The design of damping systems which could satisfy these requirements is also discusseed. In order to evaluate high load damping requirements, engines in three major classes were studied; large transport engines, small general aviation engines, and military engines. Four damper concepts applicable to these engines were evaluated; multi-ring, cartridge, curved beam, and viscous/friction. The most promising damper concept was selected for each engine and performance was assessed relative to conventional dampers and in light of projected damping requirements for advanced jet engines.

  4. Limiting Speed of the Bacterial Flagellar Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirody, Jasmine; Berry, Richard; Oster, George

    The bacterial flagellar motor (BFM) drives swimming in a wide variety of bacterial species, making it crucial for several fundamental biological processes including chemotaxis and community formation. Recent experiments have shown that the structure of this nanomachine is more dynamic than previously believed. Specifically, the number of active torque-generating units (stators) was shown to vary across applied loads. This finding invalidates the experimental evidence reporting that limiting (zero-torque) speed is independent of the number of active stators. Here, we put forward a model for the torque generation mechanism of this motor and propose that the maximum speed of the motor increases as additional torque-generators are recruited. This is contrary to the current widely-held belief that there is a universal upper limit to the speed of the BFM. Our result arises from the assumption that stators disengage from the motor for a significant portion of their mechanochemical cycles at low loads. We show that this assumption is consistent with current experimental evidence and consolidate our predictions with arguments that a processive motor must have a high duty ratio at high loads.

  5. Power transport to the PDX scoop limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Kugel, H.W.; Bol, K.; Budny, R.; Fonck, R.; Goldston, R.; Grek, B.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Knize, R.J.; Manos, D.

    1986-07-01

    Power transport to the PDX graphite scoop limiter was measured during both ohmic- and neutral-beam-heated discharges by observing its front face temperatures using an infrared camera. Measurements were made as a function of plasma density, current, position, fueling mode, and heating power for both co- and counter-neutral beam injection. The measured thermal load on the scoop limiter was 25 to 50% of the total plasma heating power. The measured peak front face midplane temperature was 1500/sup 0/C corresponding to a peak surface power density of 3 kW/cm/sup 2/. This power density implies an effective parallel power flow of 54 kW/cm/sup 2/ in agreement with the radial power distribution extrapolated from TVTS and calorimetry measurements. Symmetric and asymmetric thermal loads were observed. The asymmetric heat loads were predominantly skewed toward the respective ion drift directions for both co- and counter-injected beams. The results of transport calculations are consistent with the direction and magnitude of the observed asymmetries.

  6. 44-BWR WASTE PACKAGE LOADING CURVE EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Scaglione

    2004-08-25

    The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the required minimum burnup as a function of initial boiling water reactor (BWR) assembly enrichment that would permit loading of spent nuclear fuel into the 44 BWR waste package configuration as provided in Attachment IV. This calculation is an application of the methodology presented in ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003). The scope of this calculation covers a range of enrichments from 0 through 5.0 weight percent (wt%) U-235, and a burnup range of 0 through 40 GWd/MTU. This activity supports the validation of the use of burnup credit for commercial spent nuclear fuel applications. The intended use of these results will be in establishing BWR waste package configuration loading specifications. Limitations of this evaluation are as follows: (1) The results are based on burnup credit for actinides and selected fission products as proposed in YMP (2003, Table 3-1) and referred to as the ''Principal Isotopes''. Any change to the isotope listing will have a direct impact on the results of this report. (2) The results of 100 percent of the current BWR projected waste stream being able to be disposed of in the 44-BWR waste package with Ni-Gd Alloy absorber plates is contingent upon the referenced waste stream being sufficiently similar to the waste stream received for disposal. (3) The results are based on 1.5 wt% Gd in the Ni-Gd Alloy material and having no tuff inside the waste package. If the Gd loading is reduced or a process to introduce tuff inside the waste package is defined, then this report would need to be reevaluated based on the alternative materials.

  7. 3D Printing and Biofabrication for Load Bearing Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Claire G; Atala, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based direct biofabrication and 3D bioprinting is becoming a dominant technological platform and is suggested as a new paradigm for twenty-first century tissue engineering. These techniques may be our next step in surpassing the hurdles and limitations of conventional scaffold-based tissue engineering, and may offer the industrial potential of tissue engineered products especially for load bearing tissues. Here we present a topically focused review regarding the fundamental concepts, state of the art, and perspectives of this new technology and field of biofabrication and 3D bioprinting, specifically focused on tissue engineering of load bearing tissues such as bone, cartilage, osteochondral and dental tissue engineering.

  8. 3D Printing and Biofabrication for Load Bearing Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Claire G; Atala, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based direct biofabrication and 3D bioprinting is becoming a dominant technological platform and is suggested as a new paradigm for twenty-first century tissue engineering. These techniques may be our next step in surpassing the hurdles and limitations of conventional scaffold-based tissue engineering, and may offer the industrial potential of tissue engineered products especially for load bearing tissues. Here we present a topically focused review regarding the fundamental concepts, state of the art, and perspectives of this new technology and field of biofabrication and 3D bioprinting, specifically focused on tissue engineering of load bearing tissues such as bone, cartilage, osteochondral and dental tissue engineering. PMID:26545741

  9. The mechanics of elastic loading and recoil in anuran jumping.

    PubMed

    Astley, Henry C; Roberts, Thomas J

    2014-12-15

    Many animals use catapult mechanisms to produce extremely rapid movements for escape or prey capture, resulting in power outputs far beyond the limits of muscle. In these catapults, muscle contraction loads elastic structures, which then recoil to release the stored energy extremely rapidly. Many arthropods employ anatomical 'catch mechanisms' to lock the joint in place during the loading period, which can then be released to allow joint motion via elastic recoil. Jumping vertebrates lack a clear anatomical catch, yet face the same requirement to load the elastic structure prior to movement. There are several potential mechanisms to allow loading of vertebrate elastic structures, including the gravitational load of the body, a variable mechanical advantage, and moments generated by the musculature of proximal joints. To test these hypothesized mechanisms, we collected simultaneous 3D kinematics via X-ray Reconstruction of Moving Morphology (XROMM) and single-foot forces during the jumps of three Rana pipiens. We calculated joint mechanical advantage, moment and power using inverse dynamics at the ankle, knee, hip and ilio-sacral joints. We found that the increasing proximal joint moments early in the jump allowed for high ankle muscle forces and elastic pre-loading, and the subsequent reduction in these moments allowed the ankle to extend using elastic recoil. Mechanical advantage also changed throughout the jump, with the muscle contracting against a poor mechanical advantage early in the jump during loading and a higher mechanical advantage late in the jump during recoil. These 'dynamic catch mechanisms' serve to resist joint motion during elastic loading, then allow it during elastic recoil, functioning as a catch mechanism based on the balance and orientation of forces throughout the limb rather than an anatomical catch. PMID:25520385

  10. The mechanics of elastic loading and recoil in anuran jumping.

    PubMed

    Astley, Henry C; Roberts, Thomas J

    2014-12-15

    Many animals use catapult mechanisms to produce extremely rapid movements for escape or prey capture, resulting in power outputs far beyond the limits of muscle. In these catapults, muscle contraction loads elastic structures, which then recoil to release the stored energy extremely rapidly. Many arthropods employ anatomical 'catch mechanisms' to lock the joint in place during the loading period, which can then be released to allow joint motion via elastic recoil. Jumping vertebrates lack a clear anatomical catch, yet face the same requirement to load the elastic structure prior to movement. There are several potential mechanisms to allow loading of vertebrate elastic structures, including the gravitational load of the body, a variable mechanical advantage, and moments generated by the musculature of proximal joints. To test these hypothesized mechanisms, we collected simultaneous 3D kinematics via X-ray Reconstruction of Moving Morphology (XROMM) and single-foot forces during the jumps of three Rana pipiens. We calculated joint mechanical advantage, moment and power using inverse dynamics at the ankle, knee, hip and ilio-sacral joints. We found that the increasing proximal joint moments early in the jump allowed for high ankle muscle forces and elastic pre-loading, and the subsequent reduction in these moments allowed the ankle to extend using elastic recoil. Mechanical advantage also changed throughout the jump, with the muscle contracting against a poor mechanical advantage early in the jump during loading and a higher mechanical advantage late in the jump during recoil. These 'dynamic catch mechanisms' serve to resist joint motion during elastic loading, then allow it during elastic recoil, functioning as a catch mechanism based on the balance and orientation of forces throughout the limb rather than an anatomical catch.

  11. Loading the problem loader: the effects of target training and shaping on trailer-loading behavior of horses.

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, D L; Rosales-Ruiz, J

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an effective method for trailer loading horses based on principles of positive reinforcement. Target training and shaping were used to teach trailer-loading behavior to 5 quarter horse mares in a natural setting. All 5 had been trailer loaded before through the use of aversive stimulation. Successive approximations to loading and inappropriate behaviors were the dependent variables. After training a horse to approach a target, the target was moved to various locations inside the trailer. Horses started training on the left side of a two-horse trailer. After a horse was loading on the left side, she was moved to the right side, then to loading half on the right and half on the left. A limited-hold procedure and the presence of a companion horse seemed to facilitate training for 1 horse. Inappropriate behaviors fell to zero immediately after target training, and all the horses successfully completed the shaping sequence. Finally, these effects were observed to generalize to novel conditions (a different trainer and a different trailer). PMID:11800182

  12. Optical limiting materials

    DOEpatents

    McBranch, Duncan W.; Mattes, Benjamin R.; Koskelo, Aaron C.; Heeger, Alan J.; Robinson, Jeanne M.; Smilowitz, Laura B.; Klimov, Victor I.; Cha, Myoungsik; Sariciftci, N. Serdar; Hummelen, Jan C.

    1998-01-01

    Optical limiting materials. Methanofullerenes, fulleroids and/or other fullerenes chemically altered for enhanced solubility, in liquid solution, and in solid blends with transparent glass (SiO.sub.2) gels or polymers, or semiconducting (conjugated) polymers, are shown to be useful as optical limiters (optical surge protectors). The nonlinear absorption is tunable such that the energy transmitted through such blends saturates at high input energy per pulse over a wide range of wavelengths from 400-1100 nm by selecting the host material for its absorption wavelength and ability to transfer the absorbed energy into the optical limiting composition dissolved therein. This phenomenon should be generalizable to other compositions than substituted fullerenes.

  13. CONTROL LIMITER DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    DeShong, J.A.

    1960-03-01

    A control-limiting device for monltoring a control system is described. The system comprises a conditionsensing device, a condition-varying device exerting a control over the condition, and a control means to actuate the condition-varying device. A control-limiting device integrates the total movement or other change of the condition-varying device over any interval of time during a continuum of overlapping periods of time, and if the tothl movement or change of the condition-varying device exceeds a preset value, the control- limiting device will switch the control of the operated apparatus from automatic to manual control.

  14. Force Limited Vibration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry; Chang, Kurng Y.

    2005-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the concept and applications of Force Limited Vibration Testing. The goal of vibration testing of aerospace hardware is to identify problems that would result in flight failures. The commonly used aerospace vibration tests uses artificially high shaker forces and responses at the resonance frequencies of the test item. It has become common to limit the acceleration responses in the test to those predicted for the flight. This requires an analysis of the acceleration response, and requires placing accelerometers on the test item. With the advent of piezoelectric gages it has become possible to improve vibration testing. The basic equations have are reviewed. Force limits are analogous and complementary to the acceleration specifications used in conventional vibration testing. Just as the acceleration specification is the frequency spectrum envelope of the in-flight acceleration at the interface between the test item and flight mounting structure, the force limit is the envelope of the in-flight force at the interface . In force limited vibration tests, both the acceleration and force specifications are needed, and the force specification is generally based on and proportional to the acceleration specification. Therefore, force limiting does not compensate for errors in the development of the acceleration specification, e.g., too much conservatism or the lack thereof. These errors will carry over into the force specification. Since in-flight vibratory force data are scarce, force limits are often derived from coupled system analyses and impedance information obtained from measurements or finite element models (FEM). Fortunately, data on the interface forces between systems and components are now available from system acoustic and vibration tests of development test models and from a few flight experiments. Semi-empirical methods of predicting force limits are currently being developed on the basis of the limited flight and system test

  15. Novel limiter pump topologies

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    The use of limiter pumps as the principle plasma exhaust system of a magnetic confinement fusion device promises significant simplification, when compared to previously investigating divertor based systems. Further simplifications, such as the integration of the exhaust system with a radio frequency heating system and with the main reactor shield and structure are investigated below. The integrity of limiters in a reactor environment is threatened by many mechanisms, the most severe of which may be erosion by sputtering. Two novel topolgies are suggested which allow high erosion without limiter failure.

  16. 14 CFR 23.509 - Towing loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... on the landing gear but near the plane of symmetry of the airplane, the drag and side tow load... drag and side tow load components specified for the main gear apply. Where the specified angle of... applied. (2) The towing loads at the auxiliary gear and the drag components of the towing loads at...

  17. 14 CFR 23.509 - Towing loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... on the landing gear but near the plane of symmetry of the airplane, the drag and side tow load... drag and side tow load components specified for the main gear apply. Where the specified angle of... applied. (2) The towing loads at the auxiliary gear and the drag components of the towing loads at...

  18. Synthetic jet actuation for load control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, H.; van der Weide, E. T. A.; Hoeijmakers, H. W. M.

    2014-12-01

    The reduction of wind turbine blade loads is an important issue in the reduction of the costs of energy production. Reduction of the loads of a non-cyclic nature requires so-called smart rotor control, which involves the application of distributed actuators and sensors to provide fast and local changes in aerodynamic performance. This paper investigates the use of synthetic jets for smart rotor control. Synthetic jets are formed by ingesting low-momentum fluid from the boundary layer along the blade into a cavity and subsequently ejecting this fluid with a higher momentum. We focus on the observed flow phenomena and the ability to use these to obtain the desired changes of the aerodynamic properties of a blade section. To this end, numerical simulations and wind tunnel experiments of synthetic jet actuation on a non-rotating NACA0018 airfoil have been performed. The synthetic jets are long spanwise slits, located close to the trailing edge and directed perpendicularly to the surface of the airfoil. Due to limitations of the present experimental setup in terms of performance of the synthetic jets, the main focus is on the numerical flow simulations. The present results show that high-frequency synthetic jet actuation close to the trailing edge can induce changes in the effective angle of attack up to approximately 2.9°.

  19. Porphyrin-loaded nanoparticles for cancer theranostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yiming; Liang, Xiaolong; Dai, Zhifei

    2016-06-01

    Porphyrins have been used as pioneering theranostic agents not only for the photodynamic therapy, sonodynamic therapy and radiotherapy of cancer, but also for diagnostic fluorescence imaging, magnetic resonance imaging and photoacoustic imaging. A variety of porphyrins have been developed but very few of them have actually been employed in clinical trials due to their poor selectivity to tumorous tissue and high accumulation rates in the skin. In addition, most porphyrin molecules are hydrophobic and form aggregates in aqueous media. Nevertheless, the use of nanoparticles as porphyrin carriers shows great promise to overcome these shortcomings. Encapsulating or attaching porphyrins to nanoparticles makes them more suitable for tissue delivery because we can create materials with a conveniently specific tissue lifetime, specific targeting, immune tolerance, and hydrophilicity as well as other characteristics through rational design. In addition, various functional components (e.g. for targeting, imaging or therapeutic functions) can be easily introduced into a single nanoparticle platform for cancer theranostics. This review presents the current state of knowledge on porphyrin-loaded nanoparticles for the interwined imaging and therapy of cancer. The future trends and limitations of prophyrin-loaded nanoparticles are also outlined.

  20. Compressed magnetic flux amplifier with capacitive load

    SciTech Connect

    Stuetzer, O.M.

    1980-03-01

    A first-order analysis is presented for a compressed magnetic flux (CMF) current amplifier working into a load with a capacitive component. Since the purpose of the investigation was to gain a general understanding of the arrangement, a number of approximations and limitations were accepted. The inductance of the transducer varies with time; the inductance/resistance/capacitance (LRC) circuit therefore is parametric and solutions are different for the stable regime (high C), the oscillation regime (low C), and the transition case. Solutions and performance depend strongly on circuit boundary conditions, i.e., energization of the circuit by either an injected current or by an applied capacitor charge. The behavior of current and energy amplification for the various cases are discussed in detail. A number of experiments with small CMF devices showed that the first-order theory presented predicts transducer performance well in the linear regime.

  1. Jerky loads on surface-hardened gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rettig, H.; Wirth, X.

    1978-01-01

    Damage occurs again and again in practice in the form of transmissions with surface hardened gears which break after a very long operating time (explained by seldom occurring jerky loads). Gear drives are frequently exposed to jerky stresses which are greater than their fatigue limit. These stresses are considered in gear calculations, first, by shock factors when the transmission is to be designed as high endurance with regard to overloads and, second, in the form of operating ratios when the design is to be time enduring with regard to overloads. The size of the operating ratio depends not only on torque characteristics, drive and processing machine, but also on the material and heat treatment.

  2. Behavior of soil anchors under dynamic loads

    SciTech Connect

    Picornell, M.; Olague, B.

    1997-07-01

    Helical anchors placed in a cohesionless soil in a laboratory setting were tested under static and dynamic loads. The dynamic tests were performed after subjecting the anchors to a seating load. The dynamic load had an intensity that changed in sinusoidal fashion and was superimposed to the static seating loads. Although, the anchors have a static pull-out capacity, when the dynamic loads are applied the anchor experiences additional deformations for each load cycle. The deformations per cycle are initially high but then decrease to a nearly constant rate. Eventually, the constant rate increases suddenly accelerating until failure. This failure can take place even at small fractions of the static pull-out capacity. The rate of deformation per load cycle is found to increase for larger seating loads and for larger dynamic pulsating loads. The results of this study shows that the designer can only adjust loads to decrease the deformation rate to suit the design life of the structure.

  3. PEAK LIMITING AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Goldsworthy, W.W.; Robinson, J.B.

    1959-03-31

    A peak voltage amplitude limiting system adapted for use with a cascade type amplifier is described. In its detailed aspects, the invention includes an amplifier having at least a first triode tube and a second triode tube, the cathode of the second tube being connected to the anode of the first tube. A peak limiter triode tube has its control grid coupled to thc anode of the second tube and its anode connected to the cathode of the second tube. The operation of the limiter is controlled by a bias voltage source connected to the control grid of the limiter tube and the output of the system is taken from the anode of the second tube.

  4. Factor reliability into load management

    SciTech Connect

    Feight, G.R.

    1983-07-01

    Hardware reliability is a major factor to consider when selecting a direct-load-control system. The author outlines a method of estimating present-value costs associated with system reliability. He points out that small differences in receiver reliability make a significant difference in owning cost. 4 figures.

  5. Predicted Rupture Force of a Single Molecular Bond Becomes Rate Independent at Ultralow Loading Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dechang; Ji, Baohua

    2014-02-01

    We present for the first time a theoretical model of studying the saturation of the rupture force of a single molecular bond that causes the rupture force to be rate independent under an ultralow loading rate. This saturation will obviously bring challenges to understanding the rupture behavior of the molecular bond using conventional methods. This intriguing feature implies that the molecular bond has a nonzero strength at a vanishing loading rate. We find that the saturation behavior is caused by bond rebinding when the loading rate is lower than a limiting value depending on the loading stiffness.

  6. A Framework for Optimal Control Allocation with Structural Load Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Susan A.; Taylor, Brian R.; Jutte, Christine V.; Burken, John J.; Trinh, Khanh V.; Bodson, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Conventional aircraft generally employ mixing algorithms or lookup tables to determine control surface deflections needed to achieve moments commanded by the flight control system. Control allocation is the problem of converting desired moments into control effector commands. Next generation aircraft may have many multipurpose, redundant control surfaces, adding considerable complexity to the control allocation problem. These issues can be addressed with optimal control allocation. Most optimal control allocation algorithms have control surface position and rate constraints. However, these constraints are insufficient to ensure that the aircraft's structural load limits will not be exceeded by commanded surface deflections. In this paper, a framework is proposed to enable a flight control system with optimal control allocation to incorporate real-time structural load feedback and structural load constraints. A proof of concept simulation that demonstrates the framework in a simulation of a generic transport aircraft is presented.

  7. Preliminary Investigation of Sulfur Loading in Hanford LAW Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Vienna, John D.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Buchmiller, William C.; Ricklefs, Joel S.

    2004-04-01

    A preliminary estimate was developed for loading limits for high-sulfur low-activity waste (LAW) feeds that will be vitrified into borosilicate glass at the Hanford Site in the waste-cleanup effort. Previous studies reported in the literature were consulted to provide a basis for the estimate. The examination of previous studies led to questions about sulfur loading in Hanford LAW glass, and scoping tests were performed to help answer these questions. These results of these tests indicated that a formulation approach developed by Vienna and colleagues shows promise for maximizing LAW loading in glass. However, there is a clear need for follow-on work. The potential for significantly lowering the amount of LAW glass produced at Hanford (after the initial phase of processing) because of higher sulfur tolerances may outweigh the cost and effort required to perform the necessary testing.

  8. Impulsive Loading of Cellular Media in Sandwich Construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Main, Joseph A.; Gazonas, George A.

    2006-07-01

    Motivated by recent efforts to mitigate blast loading using energy-absorbing materials, this paper investigates the uniaxial crushing of cellular media in sandwich construction under impulsive pressure loading. The cellular core is modeled using a rigid, perfectly-plastic, locking idealization, as in previous studies, and the front and back faces are modeled as rigid, with pressure loading applied to the front face and the back face unrestrained. Predictions of this analytical model show excellent agreement with explicit finite element computations, and the model is used to investigate the influence of the mass distribution between the core and the faces. Increasing the mass fraction in the front face is found to increase the impulse required for complete crushing of the cellular core but also to produce undesirable increases in back-face accelerations. Optimal mass distributions are investigated by maximizing the impulse capacity while limiting the back-face accelerations to a specified level.

  9. Mesoscale studies of mixing in reactive materials during shock loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomov, Ilya; Herbold, Eric B.; Austin, Ryan A.

    2012-03-01

    One of the requisite processes for chemical reactions between solid powder particles resulting from shock loading is that the particles undergo large deformations, exposing new surfaces while mixing with surrounding material. Reactions under shock loading occur in a reaction zone, the extent of which is defined by the interfacial surface area and the depth of the diffusion layer. The former depends on the level of hydrodynamic mixing of heterogeneous material under shock, while the latter depends on temperaturedependent species diffusion. To investigate diffusion-limited reactions at the grain scale level, mass diffusion and simple reaction kinetics depending on the interfacial surface area have been implemented in an Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN. Diffusion-reaction processes that are initiated by rapid heating of a Ni/Al nanolaminate and by shock loading of a micron-scale Ni/Al powder mixture are considered.

  10. 14 CFR 29.511 - Ground load: unsymmetrical loads on multiple-wheel units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ground load: unsymmetrical loads on multiple-wheel units. 29.511 Section 29.511 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Requirements Ground Loads § 29.511 Ground load: unsymmetrical loads on multiple-wheel units. (a) In...

  11. 14 CFR 23.511 - Ground load; unsymmetrical loads on multiple-wheel units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ground load; unsymmetrical loads on multiple-wheel units. 23.511 Section 23.511 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Ground Loads § 23.511 Ground load; unsymmetrical loads on multiple-wheel...

  12. 46 CFR 154.1730 - Ethylene oxide: Loading and off loading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ethylene oxide: Loading and off loading. 154.1730... Operating Requirements § 154.1730 Ethylene oxide: Loading and off loading. (a) The master shall ensure that before ethylene oxide is loaded into a cargo tank: (1) The tank is thoroughly clean, dry, and free...

  13. 46 CFR 154.1730 - Ethylene oxide: Loading and off loading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ethylene oxide: Loading and off loading. 154.1730... Operating Requirements § 154.1730 Ethylene oxide: Loading and off loading. (a) The master shall ensure that before ethylene oxide is loaded into a cargo tank: (1) The tank is thoroughly clean, dry, and free...

  14. 46 CFR 154.1730 - Ethylene oxide: Loading and off loading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ethylene oxide: Loading and off loading. 154.1730... Operating Requirements § 154.1730 Ethylene oxide: Loading and off loading. (a) The master shall ensure that before ethylene oxide is loaded into a cargo tank: (1) The tank is thoroughly clean, dry, and free...

  15. Evaluation of the Hinge Moment and Normal Force Aerodynamic Loads from a Seamless Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge Flap in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Eric J.; Cruz, Josue; Lung, Shun-Fat; Kota, Sridhar; Ervin, Gregory; Lu, Kerr-Jia; Flick, Pete

    2016-01-01

    A seamless adaptive compliant trailing edge (ACTE) flap was demonstrated in flight on a Gulfstream III aircraft at the NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center. The trailing edge flap was deflected between minus 2 deg up and plus 30 deg down in flight. The safety-of-flight parameters for the ACTE flap experiment require that flap-to-wing interface loads be sensed and monitored in real time to ensure that the structural load limits of the wing are not exceeded. The attachment fittings connecting the flap to the aircraft wing rear spar were instrumented with strain gages and calibrated using known loads for measuring hinge moment and normal force loads in flight. The safety-of-flight parameters for the ACTE flap experiment require that flap-to-wing interface loads be sensed and monitored in real time to ensure that the structural load limits of the wing are not exceeded. The attachment fittings connecting the flap to the aircraft wing rear spar were instrumented with strain gages and calibrated using known loads for measuring hinge moment and normal force loads in flight. The interface hardware instrumentation layout and load calibration are discussed. Twenty-one applied calibration test load cases were developed for each individual fitting. The 2-sigma residual errors for the hinge moment was calculated to be 2.4 percent, and for normal force was calculated to be 7.3 percent. The hinge moment and normal force generated by the ACTE flap with a hinge point located at 26-percent wing chord were measured during steady state and symmetric pitch maneuvers. The loads predicted from analysis were compared to the loads observed in flight. The hinge moment loads showed good agreement with the flight loads while the normal force loads calculated from analysis were over-predicted by approximately 20 percent. Normal force and hinge moment loads calculated from the pressure sensors located on the ACTE showed good agreement with the loads calculated from the installed strain gages.

  16. Mass loading of soil particles on plant surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Pinder, J.E. III; McLeod, K.W. )

    1989-12-01

    Radionuclide-bearing soil particles on plant surfaces can be ingested and contribute to human dose, but evaluating the potential dose is limited by the relatively few data available on the masses of soil particles present on plant surfaces. This report summarizes mass loading data (i.e., mass of soil per unit of vegetation) for crops in the southeastern United States and compares these data to (1) those from other regions and (2) the mass loadings used in radionuclide transfer models to predict soil contamination of plant surfaces. Mass loadings were estimated using the 238Pu content of crops as an indicator of soil on plant surfaces. Crops were grown in two soils: a sandy clay loam soil and a loamy sand soil. Concentrations of soil on southeastern crops (i.e., mg soil g-1 plant) differed by more than a factor of 100 due to differences in crop growth form and biomass. Mean concentrations ranged from 1.7 mg g-1 for corn to 260 mg g-1 for lettuce. Differences in mass loadings between soils were less than those among crops. Concentrations differed by less than a factor of two between the two soil types. Because of (1) the differences among crops and (2) the limited data available from other systems, it is difficult to draw conclusions regarding regional or climatic variation in mass loadings. There is, however, little evidence to suggest large differences among regions. The mass loadings used to predict soil contamination in current radionuclide transfer models appear to be less than those observed for most crops.

  17. MH Test Filler Force Limitations

    SciTech Connect

    Primdahl, K.A.; /Fermilab

    1990-10-02

    The OH modules for the DO end calorimeter are being tested by supporting a load to simulate the MH, IH, and EM modules. This test structure, the MH filler, is inserted into the previously assembled OH modules, and then loaded with hydraulic jacks. The maximum test load applied by the jacks is 78,600 lb, which is via the two downstream jacks at 130% of the nominal load. Bill Cooper's memo of 9/10/90 is include as appendix C. This note presents calculations for the AISC maximum allowable stresses/loads of the various parts of the testing assembly. Furthermore, calculations show that the actual test load is less than the AISC allowable.

  18. Controlled Loading of Building Blocks into Temporary Self-Assembled Scaffolds for Directed Assembly of Organic Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Banner, L. Todd; Danila, Delia C.; Sharpe, Katie; Durkin, Melissa; Clayton, Benjamin; Anderson, Ben; Richter, Andrew; Pinkhassik, Eugene

    2008-12-08

    Using temporary self-assembled scaffolds to preorganize building blocks is a potentially powerful method for the synthesis of organic nanostructures with programmed shapes. We examined the underlying phenomena governing the loading of hydrophobic monomers into lipid bilayer interior and demonstrated successful control of the amount and ratio of loaded monomers. When excess styrene derivatives or acrylates were added to the aqueous solution of unilamellar liposomes made from saturated phospholipids, most loading occurs within the first few hours. Dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy revealed no evidence of aggregation caused by monomers. Bilayers appeared to have a certain capacity for accommodating monomers. The total volume of loaded monomers is independent of monomer structure. X-ray scattering showed the increase in bilayer thickness consistent with loading monomers into bilayer interior. Loading kinetics is inversely proportional to the hydrophobicity and size of monomers. Loading and extraction kinetic data suggest that crossing the polar heads region is the rate limiting step. Consideration of loading kinetics and multiple equilibria are important for achieving reproducible monomer loading. The total amount of monomers loaded into the bilayer can be controlled by the loading time or length of hydrophobic lipid tails. The ratio of loaded monomers can be varied by changing the ratio of monomers used for loading or by the time-controlled replacement of a preloaded monomer. Understanding and controlling the loading of monomers into bilayers contributes to the directed assembly of organic nanostructures.

  19. Controlled loading of building blocks into temporary self-assembled scaffolds for directed assembly of organic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Banner, L Todd; Danila, Delia C; Sharpe, Katie; Durkin, Melissa; Clayton, Benjamin; Anderson, Ben; Richter, Andrew; Pinkhassik, Eugene

    2008-10-21

    Using temporary self-assembled scaffolds to preorganize building blocks is a potentially powerful method for the synthesis of organic nanostructures with programmed shapes. We examined the underlying phenomena governing the loading of hydrophobic monomers into lipid bilayer interior and demonstrated successful control of the amount and ratio of loaded monomers. When excess styrene derivatives or acrylates were added to the aqueous solution of unilamellar liposomes made from saturated phospholipids, most loading occurs within the first few hours. Dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy revealed no evidence of aggregation caused by monomers. Bilayers appeared to have a certain capacity for accommodating monomers. The total volume of loaded monomers is independent of monomer structure. X-ray scattering showed the increase in bilayer thickness consistent with loading monomers into bilayer interior. Loading kinetics is inversely proportional to the hydrophobicity and size of monomers. Loading and extraction kinetic data suggest that crossing the polar heads region is the rate limiting step. Consideration of loading kinetics and multiple equilibria are important for achieving reproducible monomer loading. The total amount of monomers loaded into the bilayer can be controlled by the loading time or length of hydrophobic lipid tails. The ratio of loaded monomers can be varied by changing the ratio of monomers used for loading or by the time-controlled replacement of a preloaded monomer. Understanding and controlling the loading of monomers into bilayers contributes to the directed assembly of organic nanostructures.

  20. Strain Gage Load Calibration of the Wing Interface Fittings for the Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge Flap Flight Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Eric J.; Holguin, Andrew C.; Cruz, Josue; Lokos, William A.

    2014-01-01

    The safety-of-flight parameters for the Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge (ACTE) flap experiment require that flap-to-wing interface loads be sensed and monitored in real time to ensure that the structural load limits of the wing are not exceeded. This paper discusses the strain gage load calibration testing and load equation derivation methodology for the ACTE interface fittings. Both the left and right wing flap interfaces were monitored; each contained four uniquely designed and instrumented flap interface fittings. The interface hardware design and instrumentation layout are discussed. Twenty-one applied test load cases were developed using the predicted in-flight loads. Pre-test predictions of strain gage responses were produced using finite element method models of the interface fittings. Predicted and measured test strains are presented. A load testing rig and three hydraulic jacks were used to apply combinations of shear, bending, and axial loads to the interface fittings. Hardware deflections under load were measured using photogrammetry and transducers. Due to deflections in the interface fitting hardware and test rig, finite element model techniques were used to calculate the reaction loads throughout the applied load range, taking into account the elastically-deformed geometry. The primary load equations were selected based on multiple calibration metrics. An independent set of validation cases was used to validate each derived equation. The 2-sigma residual errors for the shear loads were less than eight percent of the full-scale calibration load; the 2-sigma residual errors for the bending moment loads were less than three percent of the full-scale calibration load. The derived load equations for shear, bending, and axial loads are presented, with the calculated errors for both the calibration cases and the independent validation load cases.

  1. Optimal Limited Contingency Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meuleau, Nicolas; Smith, David E.

    2003-01-01

    For a given problem, the optimal Markov policy over a finite horizon is a conditional plan containing a potentially large number of branches. However, there are applications where it is desirable to strictly limit the number of decision points and branches in a plan. This raises the question of how one goes about finding optimal plans containing only a limited number of branches. In this paper, we present an any-time algorithm for optimal k-contingency planning. It is the first optimal algorithm for limited contingency planning that is not an explicit enumeration of possible contingent plans. By modelling the problem as a partially observable Markov decision process, it implements the Bellman optimality principle and prunes the solution space. We present experimental results of applying this algorithm to some simple test cases.

  2. Improved limited discrepancy search

    SciTech Connect

    Korf, R.E.

    1996-12-31

    We present an improvement to Harvey and Ginsberg`s limited discrepancy search algorithm, which eliminates much of the redundancy in the original, by generating each path from the root to the maximum search depth only once. For a complete binary tree of depth d this reduces the asymptotic complexity from O(d+2/2 2{sup d}) to O(2{sup d}). The savings is much less in a partial tree search, or in a heavily pruned tree. The overhead of the improved algorithm on a complete binary tree is only a factor of b/(b - 1) compared to depth-first search. While this constant factor is greater on a heavily pruned tree, this improvement makes limited discrepancy search a viable alternative to depth-first search, whenever the entire tree may not be searched. Finally, we present both positive and negative empirical results on the utility of limited discrepancy search, for the problem of number partitioning.

  3. Limitations of angiotensin inhibition.

    PubMed

    Nobakht, Niloofar; Kamgar, Mohammad; Rastogi, Anjay; Schrier, Robert W

    2011-06-01

    Angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin-receptor blockers (ARBs) have beneficial effects in patients with cardiovascular disease and in those with diabetes-related and diabetes-independent chronic kidney diseases. These beneficial effects are independent of the antihypertensive properties of these drugs. However, ACE inhibitors, ARBs, and combinations of agents in these two classes are limited in the extent to which they inhibit the activity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). Angiotensin breakthrough and aldosterone breakthrough may be important mechanisms involved in limiting the effects of ACE inhibitors and ARBs. Whether direct renin inhibitors will overcome some of the limitations of ACE-inhibitor and ARB therapy by blocking the deleterious effects of the RAAS remains to be proven. This important area is, however, in need of further investigation.

  4. Random spectrum loading of dental implants: An alternative approach to functional performance assessment.

    PubMed

    Shemtov-Yona, K; Rittel, D

    2016-09-01

    The fatigue performance of dental implants is usually assessed on the basis of cyclic S/N curves. This neither provides information on the anticipated service performance of the implant, nor does it allow for detailed comparisons between implants unless a thorough statistical analysis is performed, of the kind not currently required by certification standards. The notion of endurance limit is deemed to be of limited applicability, given unavoidable stress concentrations and random load excursions, that all characterize dental implants and their service conditions. We propose a completely different approach, based on random spectrum loading, as long used in aeronautical design. The implant is randomly loaded by a sequence of loads encompassing all load levels it would endure during its service life. This approach provides a quantitative and comparable estimate of its performance in terms of lifetime, based on the very fact that the implant will fracture sooner or later, instead of defining a fatigue endurance limit of limited practical application. Five commercial monolithic Ti-6Al-4V implants were tested under cyclic, and another 5 under spectrum loading conditions, at room temperature and dry air. The failure modes and fracture planes were identical for all implants. The approach is discussed, including its potential applications, for systematic, straightforward and reliable comparisons of various implant designs and environments, without the need for cumbersome statistical analyses. It is believed that spectrum loading can be considered for the generation of new standardization procedures and design applications. PMID:27161957

  5. Spinning Reserve From Responsive Loads

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, B.J.

    2003-04-08

    Responsive load is the most underutilized reliability resource available to the power system today. It is currently not used at all to provide spinning reserve. Historically there were good reasons for this, but recent technological advances in communications and controls have provided new capabilities and eliminated many of the old obstacles. North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC), Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Northeast Power Coordinating Council (NPCC), New York State Reliability Council (NYSRC), and New York Independent System Operator (NYISO) rules are beginning to recognize these changes and are starting to encourage responsive load provision of reliability services. The Carrier ComfortChoice responsive thermostats provide an example of these technological advances. This is a technology aimed at reducing summer peak demand through central control of residential and small commercial air-conditioning loads. It is being utilized by Long Island Power Authority (LIPA), Consolidated Edison (ConEd), Southern California Edison (SCE), and San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E). The technology is capable of delivering even greater response in the faster spinning reserve time frame (while still providing peak reduction). Analysis of demand reduction testing results from LIPA during the summer of 2002 provides evidence to back up this claim. It also demonstrates that loads are different from generators and that the conventional wisdom, which advocates for starting with large loads as better ancillary service providers, is flawed. The tempting approach of incrementally adapting ancillary service requirements, which were established when generators were the only available resources, will not work. While it is easier for most generators to provide replacement power and non-spinning reserve (the slower response services) than it is to supply spinning reserve (the fastest service), the opposite is true for many loads. Also, there is more financial

  6. Marine loading vapor control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Babet, F.H.

    1996-09-01

    The EPA and State air quality control boards have mandated the collection and destruction or recovery of vapors generated by the loading of some hydrocarbons and chemicals into marine vessels. This is a brief overview of the main US Coast Guard requirements for marine vapor control systems. As with most regulations, they are open to interpretation. In an attempt to more clearly define the intent of the regulations, the US Coast Guard has issued guidelines to assist the certifying entities in ensuring compliance with intended regulations. If a company is contemplating the installation of a marine loading vapor control system, the authors strongly recommend that one engage the services of a certifying entity, either as the designer, or an advisor and ultimately the certifier of the system. This should be done well up front in the design of the system to avoid costly mistakes which can occur as a result of lack of knowledge or misinterpretation of the regulations and guidelines.

  7. Thermal loading of natural streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackman, Alan P.; Yotsukura, Nobuhiro

    1977-01-01

    The impact of thermal loading on the temperature regime of natural streams is investigated by mathematical models, which describe both transport (convection-diffusion) and decay (surface dissipation) of waste heat over 1-hour or shorter time intervals. The models are derived from the principle of conservation of thermal energy for application to one- and two-dimensional spaces. The basic concept in these models is to separate water temperature into two parts, (1) excess temperature due to thermal loading and (2) natural (ambient) temperature. This separation allows excess temperature to be calculated from the models without incoming radiation data. Natural temperature may either be measured in prototypes or calculated from the model. If use is made of the model, however, incoming radiation is required as input data. Comparison of observed and calculated temperatures in seven natural streams shows that the models are capable of predicting transient temperature regimes satisfactorily in most cases. (Woodard-USGS)

  8. Understanding HIV-1 viral load.

    PubMed

    Paxton, W B

    1995-01-01

    HIV viral markers, such as p24 antigen and viral RNA, measure how much virus is present. Studies are showing a relationship between RNA levels and clinical outcomes, which can help doctors evaluate the efficacy of drug therapy. Eventually, it is believed, RNA will replace T-cell counts as the marker of choice. The challenge is to interpret what the results of a viral load test mean for a specific patient. Currently, the two main viral load tests commercially available do not have a one-to-one linear relationship, so tests should not be switched. Doctors are advised not to over-interpret minor changes because of the ten to thirty percent variation in individual test results. These tests are not FDA-approved but are available at commercial reference labs. PMID:11362660

  9. Estimating Load-Sharing Properties in a Dynamic Reliability System

    PubMed Central

    Kvam, Paul H.; Peña, Edsel A.

    2005-01-01

    An estimator for the load share parameters in an equal load-share model is derived based on observing k-component parallel systems of identical components that have a continuous distribution function F (·) and failure rate r(·). In an equal load share model, after the first of k components fails, failure rates for the remaining components change from r(t) to γ1 r(t), then to γ2 r(t) after the next failure, and so on. On the basis of observations on n independent and identical systems, a semiparametric estimator of the component baseline cumulative hazard function R = − log(1 − F) is presented, and its asymptotic limit process is established to be a Gaussian process. The effect of estimation of the load-share parameters is considered in the derivation of the limiting process. Potential applications can be found in diverse areas, including materials testing, software reliability and power plant safety assessment. PMID:19838312

  10. Solid Rocket Booster Hydraulic Pump Port Cap Joint Load Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamwell, W. R.; Murphy, N. C.

    2004-01-01

    The solid rocket booster uses hydraulic pumps fabricated from cast C355 aluminum alloy, with 17-4 PH stainless steel pump port caps. Corrosion-resistant steel, MS51830 CA204L self-locking screw thread inserts are installed into C355 pump housings, with A286 stainless steel fasteners installed into the insert to secure the pump port cap to the housing. In the past, pump port cap fasteners were installed to a torque of 33 Nm (300 in-lb). However, the structural analyses used a significantly higher nut factor than indicated during tests conducted by Boeing Space Systems. When the torque values were reassessed using Boeing's nut factor, the fastener preload had a factor of safety of less than 1, with potential for overloading the joint. This paper describes how behavior was determined for a preloaded joint with a steel bolt threaded into steel inserts in aluminum parts. Finite element models were compared with test results. For all initial bolt preloads, bolt loads increased as external applied loads increased. For higher initial bolt preloads, less load was transferred into the bolt, due to external applied loading. Lower torque limits were established for pump port cap fasteners and additional limits were placed on insert axial deformation under operating conditions after seating the insert with an initial preload.

  11. Full Body Loading for Small Exercise Devices Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downs, Meghan; Hanson, Andrea; Newby, Nathaniel

    2015-01-01

    Protecting astronauts' spine, hip, and lower body musculoskeletal strength will be critical to safely and efficiently perform physically demanding vehicle egress, exploration, and habitat building activities necessary to expand human presence in the solar system. Functionally limiting decrements in musculoskeletal health are likely during Mars proving-ground and Earth-independent missions given extended transit times and the vehicle limitations for exercise devices (low-mass, small volume). Most small exercise device concepts are designed with single-cable loading, which inhibits the ability to perform full body exercises requiring two-point loading at the shoulders. Shoulder loading is critical to protect spine, hip, and lower body musculoskeletal strength. We propose a novel low-mass, low-maintenance, and rapid deploy pulley-based system that can attach to a single-cable small exercise device to enable two-point loading at the shoulders. This attachment could protect astronauts' health and save cost, space, and energy during all phases of the Journey to Mars.

  12. [Evaluation of diving stress implication of analysis of work loads].

    PubMed

    Mano, Y

    1987-05-01

    An investigation was conducted on the actual diving conditions of 2,996 divers in Japan except those engaged in fishery. Results of analysis made on the diving profiles and actual working conditions showed that some of their jobs required heavy load and that the burden was excessively large. Little study has been made for the proper evaluation of diving stress or work loads, but it has been assumed from these limited studies that the load is not so heavy. The load has been generally estimated to be about 1.8l/min STPD of oxygen consumption (VO2) during 40 l/min STPD of expiratory gas volume/min (VE). In our examination of their actual diving work, their work load was far greater than our expectation. It was in practice not only difficult to obtain the actual VO2 but also very difficult to determine their actual fatigue. Instead of these, it is necessary to establish an adequate index for evaluating diving work load. Studies have been made in our laboratory since 1981 and regression equations have been finally obtained, by which load during diving work can be determined using heart rate as index. Seven healthy males were chosen as subjects of the present study having a mean age of 34.4 yr and a mean diving history of 7.3 yr. First, performance time was acquired in each subject by bicycle ergometer exercise and the maximalen oxygen consumption (VO2-max) was obtained. In the second step, VO2-max was obtained by using the regulator apparatus for breathing during SCUBA diving. This value was 86.1% of the first step. The third step was made in a swimming pool.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Missing a trick: Auditory load modulates conscious awareness in audition.

    PubMed

    Fairnie, Jake; Moore, Brian C J; Remington, Anna

    2016-07-01

    In the visual domain there is considerable evidence supporting the Load Theory of Attention and Cognitive Control, which holds that conscious perception of background stimuli depends on the level of perceptual load involved in a primary task. However, literature on the applicability of this theory to the auditory domain is limited and, in many cases, inconsistent. Here we present a novel "auditory search task" that allows systematic investigation of the impact of auditory load on auditory conscious perception. An array of simultaneous, spatially separated sounds was presented to participants. On half the trials, a critical stimulus was presented concurrently with the array. Participants were asked to detect which of 2 possible targets was present in the array (primary task), and whether the critical stimulus was present or absent (secondary task). Increasing the auditory load of the primary task (raising the number of sounds in the array) consistently reduced the ability to detect the critical stimulus. This indicates that, at least in certain situations, load theory applies in the auditory domain. The implications of this finding are discussed both with respect to our understanding of typical audition and for populations with altered auditory processing. (PsycINFO Database Record

  14. Evaluation of well head loads: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Roveri, F.E.; Mourelle, M.M.; Souza, L.F.A.; Ellwanger, G.B.

    1995-12-31

    The determination of wellhead loads due to the drilling and completion phases for a subsea well has been a concern for the oil industry considering the move towards deeper waters (McIver (1991), Valka and Fowler (1985), March and Smith (1984)). Thorough study of the behavior of the wellhead system, blow-out preventer (BOP), lower marine riser package (LMRP) and riser when submitted to a variety of loads of different nature, is required in order to have an appropriate evaluation of the loads transmitted to the wellhead body by the upper part of the structure. To overcome part of this limitation, an approach to evaluate the wellhead extreme static loads without the need of performing a detailed riser analysis is presented. The objective of the analysis is to validate the methodology for a given wellhead and soil configuration rather than study the effects of variables such as casing/conductor and conductor/soil annulus cement shortfall, gaps between the wellhead body and conductor housing or load paths into the casing and conductor.

  15. The feasibility of immediately loading dental implants in edentulous jaws

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Immediate loading of dental implants has been proved to be feasible in partially edentulous jaws. The purpose of this retrospective investigation was to assess the feasibility of immediately loading dental implants in fully edentulous jaws. Methods A total of 24 patients aged between 53 and 89 years received a total of 154 implants in their edentulous maxillae or mandibles. Among the implants, 45 were set in fresh extracted sockets and 109 in consolidated alveolar bones. The implants were provisionally managed with chair-side made provisional resin bridges and exposed to immediate loading. Implants were followed up for 1–8 years, including radiographic imaging. Marginal bone levels were evaluated based on radiographic imaging. Results A total of 148 out of the 154 implants survived over the follow-up period of 1 to 8 years, giving a survival rate of 96%. The time or region of the implantation, the pre-implant augmentation, and the length and diameter of the implants had no statistically significant influence on the survival or the success rate. The marginal bone level remained stable with only minimal loss of 0.3 mm after 60 months of loading. Conclusions Within the limitations of this study, immediate loading is feasible for dental implants in edentulous jaws. PMID:27588213

  16. Integration of MHD load models with circuit representations the Z generator.

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, Christopher A.; Ampleford, David J.; Jones, Brent Manley; McBride, Ryan D.; Bailey, James E.; Jones, Michael C.; Gomez, Matthew Robert.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Nakhleh, Charles; Stygar, William A.; Savage, Mark Edward; Wagoner, Timothy C.; Moore, James K.

    2013-03-01

    MHD models of imploding loads fielded on the Z accelerator are typically driven by reduced or simplified circuit representations of the generator. The performance of many of the imploding loads is critically dependent on the current and power delivered to them, so may be strongly influenced by the generators response to their implosion. Current losses diagnosed in the transmission lines approaching the load are further known to limit the energy delivery, while exhibiting some load dependence. Through comparing the convolute performance of a wide variety of short pulse Z loads we parameterize a convolute loss resistance applicable between different experiments. We incorporate this, and other current loss terms into a transmission line representation of the Z vacuum section. We then apply this model to study the current delivery to a wide variety of wire array and MagLif style liner loads.

  17. Aggregated Modeling of Thermostatic Loads in Demand Response: A Systems and Control Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Kalsi, Karanjit; Chassin, Forrest S.; Chassin, David P.

    2011-12-12

    Demand response is playing an increasingly important role in smart grid research and technologies being examined in recently undertaken demonstration projects. The behavior of load as it is affected by various load control strategies is important to understanding the degree to which different classes of end-use load can contribute to demand response programs at various times. This paper focuses on developing aggregated models for a homogeneous population of thermostatically controlled loads. The different types of loads considered in this paper include, but are not limited to, water heaters and HVAC units. The effects of demand response and user over-ride on the load population dynamics are investigated. The controllability of the developed lumped models is validated which forms the basis for designing different control strategies.

  18. Strain-Gage Measurements of Buffeting Loads on a Jet-Powered Bomber Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aiken, William S., Jr.; See, John A.

    1951-01-01

    Buffet boundaries, buffeting-load increments for the stabilizers and elevators, and buffeting bending-moment increments for the stabilizers and wings as measured in gradual maneuvers for a jet-powered bomber airplane are presented. The buffeting-load increments were determined from strain-gage measurements at the roots or hinge supports of the various surfaces considered. The Mach numbers of the tests ranged from 0.19 to 0.78 at altitudes close to 30,000 feet. The predominant buffet frequencies were close to the natural frequencies of the structural components. The buffeting-load data, when extrapolated to low-altitude conditions, indicated loads on the elevators and stabilizers near the design limit loads. When the airplane was held in buffeting, the load increments were larger than when recovery was made immediately.

  19. Sediment load from major rivers into Puget Sound and its adjacent waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czuba, Jonathan A.; Magirl, Christopher S.; Czuba, Christiana R.; Grossman, Eric E.; Curran, Christopher A.; Gendaszek, Andrew S.; Dinicola, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    Each year, an estimated load of 6.5 million tons of sediment is transported by rivers to Puget Sound and its adjacent waters—enough to cover a football field to the height of six Space Needles. This estimated load is highly uncertain because sediment studies and available sediment-load data are sparse and historically limited to specific rivers, short time frames, and a narrow range of hydrologic conditions. The largest sediment loads are carried by rivers with glaciated volcanoes in their headwaters. Research suggests 70 percent of the sediment load delivered to Puget Sound is from rivers and 30 percent is from shoreline erosion, but the magnitude of specific contributions is highly uncertain. Most of a river's sediment load occurs during floods.

  20. Passive detection of vehicle loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, Troy R.; Salvaggio, Carl; Faulring, Jason W.; Salvaggio, Philip S.; McKeown, Donald M.; Garrett, Alfred J.; Coleman, David H.; Koffman, Larry D.

    2012-01-01

    The Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Laboratory (DIRS) at the Rochester Institute of Technology, along with the Savannah River National Laboratory is investigating passive methods to quantify vehicle loading. The research described in this paper investigates multiple vehicle indicators including brake temperature, tire temperature, engine temperature, acceleration and deceleration rates, engine acoustics, suspension response, tire deformation and vibrational response. Our investigation into these variables includes building and implementing a sensing system for data collection as well as multiple full-scale vehicle tests. The sensing system includes; infrared video cameras, triaxial accelerometers, microphones, video cameras and thermocouples. The full scale testing includes both a medium size dump truck and a tractor-trailer truck on closed courses with loads spanning the full range of the vehicle's capacity. Statistical analysis of the collected data is used to determine the effectiveness of each of the indicators for characterizing the weight of a vehicle. The final sensing system will monitor multiple load indicators and combine the results to achieve a more accurate measurement than any of the indicators could provide alone.