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Sample records for local anesthetic concentration

  1. Methylparaben concentration in commercial Brazilian local anesthetics solutions

    PubMed Central

    da SILVA, Gustavo Henrique Rodriguez; BOTTOLI, Carla Beatriz Grespan; GROPPO, Francisco Carlos; VOLPATO, Maria Cristina; RANALI, José; RAMACCIATO, Juliana Cama; MOTTA, Rogério Heládio Lopes

    2012-01-01

    Objective To detect the presence and concentration of methylparaben in cartridges of commercial Brazilian local anesthetics. Material and methods Twelve commercial brands (4 in glass and 8 in plastic cartridges) of local anesthetic solutions for use in dentistry were purchased from the Brazilian market and analyzed. Different lots of the commercial brands were obtained in different Brazilian cities (Piracicaba, Campinas and São Paulo). Separation was performed using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with UV-Vis detector. The mobile phase used was acetonitrile:water (75:25 - v/v), pH 4.5, adjusted with acetic acid at a flow rate of 1.0 ml.min-1. Results When detected in the solutions, the methylparaben concentration ranged from 0.01% (m/v) to 0.16% (m/v). One glass and all plastic cartridges presented methylparaben. Conclusion 1. Methylparaben concentration varied among solutions from different manufacturers, and it was not indicated in the drug package inserts; 2. Since the presence of methylparaben in dental anesthetics is not regulated by the Brazilian National Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA) and this substance could cause allergic reactions, it is important to alert dentists about its possible presence. PMID:23032206

  2. Comparative study on anesthetic potency depending on concentrations of lidocaine and epinephrine: assessment of dental local anesthetics using the jaw-opening reflex.

    PubMed Central

    Ohkado, S.; Ichinohe, T.; Kaneko, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Anesthetic potency of a local anesthetic on the dental pulp was investigated by increasing or decreasing the concentration of lidocaine and that of epinephrine. An electromyogram of the digastric muscle in Japan White male rabbits was recorded during the jaw-opening reflex induced by electrical stimulation of the dental pulp. Probit analysis was used for the determination of the 50% effective volume (ED50) values of the anesthetic. The anesthetics used were plain 2% lidocaine solution (2Lid-0 group), 2% lidocaine solution with 12.5 microgram/mL of epinephrine (2Lid-1/8 group), 2% lidocaine solution with 6.25 microgram/mL of epinephrine (2Lid-1/16 group), and 4% lidocaine solution with 5 microgram/mL of epinephrine (4Lid-1/20 group). No anesthetic effect was shown in the 2Lid-0 group. The 2Lid-1/8 group indicated adequate anesthetic potency with the smallest dosage at all observation periods. The potency in the 2Lid-1/16 group was 0.3-0.5 times, and that in the 4Lid-1/20 group was 0.3-0.4 times as much as the 2Lid-1/8 group. The decrease in epinephrine concentration produced the decrease in the anesthetic potency on the dental pulp independent of lidocaine concentration. These results suggest that the increase in lidocaine concentration may not compensate the decrease in epinephrine concentration. PMID:11495400

  3. Do the Concentration and Volume of Local Anesthetics Affect the Onset and Success of Infraclavicular Anesthesia?

    PubMed Central

    Mosaffa, Faramarz; Gharaei, Babak; Qoreishi, Mohammad; Razavi, Sajjad; Safari, Farhad; Fathi, Mohammad; Mohseni, Gholamreza; Elyasi, Hedayatollah; Hosseini, Fahimeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although local anesthesia is a suitable method for upper limb surgeries, there is debate regarding the effects of appropriate dosing. Objectives: In the current study, we investigated the effects of the concentration and volume of a local anesthetic on the beginning and quality of anesthesia during upper limb orthopedic surgeries. Patients and Methods: This double-blinded, randomized, clinical trial was conducted on 60 patients aged between 18 and 85 years candidated for upper limb orthopedic operations. The patients were equally and randomly distributed into two groups (n = 30). Under ultrasound imaging guidance, the first group received 7 mL of 2% lidocaine and the second group 10 mL of 1.3% lidocaine into the brachial plexus cords. The onset of block and the level of sensory and motor block were documented for each nerve territory. Results: The onset of sensory and motor block was significantly shorter in the 1.3% lidocaine group than in the 2% lidocaine group (P ≤ 0.05). The success rate of sensory and motor block was not different. The quality (completeness) of sensory block for the musculocutaneous nerve and that of motor block for the radial nerve were significantly better in the 1.3% lidocaine group than in the 2% lidocaine group. Conclusions: The volume of the injected anesthetic accelerated the onset of sensory and motor block without affecting the rate of success in our patients. PMID:26473102

  4. Local anesthetics: pharmacology and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Moore, Paul A; Hersh, Elliot V

    2010-10-01

    The development of safe and effective local anesthetic agents has possibly been the most important advancement in dental science to occur in the last century. The agents currently available in dentistry are extremely safe and fulfill most of the characteristics of an ideal local anesthetic. These local anesthetic agents can be administered with minimal tissue irritation and with little likelihood of inducing allergic reactions. A variety of agents are available that provide rapid onset and adequate duration of surgical anesthesia. This introductory article provides a brief update of the clinical pharmacology of local anesthetic agents and formulations used in dentistry at present.

  5. Local Anesthetic-Induced Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Verlinde, Mark; Hollmann, Markus W.; Stevens, Markus F.; Hermanns, Henning; Werdehausen, Robert; Lirk, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes current knowledge concerning incidence, risk factors, and mechanisms of perioperative nerve injury, with focus on local anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity. Perioperative nerve injury is a complex phenomenon and can be caused by a number of clinical factors. Anesthetic risk factors for perioperative nerve injury include regional block technique, patient risk factors, and local anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity. Surgery can lead to nerve damage by use of tourniquets or by direct mechanical stress on nerves, such as traction, transection, compression, contusion, ischemia, and stretching. Current literature suggests that the majority of perioperative nerve injuries are unrelated to regional anesthesia. Besides the blockade of sodium channels which is responsible for the anesthetic effect, systemic local anesthetics can have a positive influence on the inflammatory response and the hemostatic system in the perioperative period. However, next to these beneficial effects, local anesthetics exhibit time and dose-dependent toxicity to a variety of tissues, including nerves. There is equivocal experimental evidence that the toxicity varies among local anesthetics. Even though the precise order of events during local anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity is not clear, possible cellular mechanisms have been identified. These include the intrinsic caspase-pathway, PI3K-pathway, and MAPK-pathways. Further research will need to determine whether these pathways are non-specifically activated by local anesthetics, or whether there is a single common precipitating factor. PMID:26959012

  6. [Transdermal Local Anesthetics].

    PubMed

    Hanaoka, Kazuo; Arita, Hideko; Nagase, Masaki; Suzuki, Takashi; Ogawa, Sestsuro

    2015-11-01

    Taking EMLA cream and Penles tape 18 mg as examples, this article describes the conditions for skin penetration of topical anesthetics, with their onset time of action, duration of effect and a precautions for their use. EMLA cream is a unique cream for topical anesthesia which is the eutectic mixture of lidocaine and propitocaine to increase skin penetration. The safety study demonstrated that blood concentrations of active ingredients of EMLA cream were below toxic levels. EMLA cream, with confirmed high skin penetrability and safety, should be used for pain reduction of various treatments for many diseases. Here in Japan, EMLA cream has indications not only for pain reduction of skin laser therapy but also for reduction of needle puncture pain. This means the use of topical anesthesia would be expanded to wider ranges of treatments. PMID:26689066

  7. Allergy to local anesthetics: Reality or myth?

    PubMed

    Malinovsky, Jean-Marc; Chiriac, Anca M; Tacquard, Charles; Mertes, Paul Michel; Demoly, Pascal

    2016-09-01

    The incidence of allergic reactions to local anesthetics is low. Most cases involve a psychogenic reaction rather than an allergic reaction. Additives and preservatives added to local anesthetics may cause allergic reactions. Vascular resorption of epinephrine-containing local anesthetics may produce cardiovascular signs similar to an allergic reaction. Diagnosis of allergy to local anesthetics must be established by skin testing and provocative challenge.

  8. Dentistry's wonder drugs: local anesthetics and vasoconstrictors.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Michael J; Brown, Ronald S

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews recent developments concerning local anesthetics, including the amount of pain resulting from injection, which drugs achieve anesthesia most effectively, proper dosing for anesthetizing children and adults, the maximum recommended doses of lidocaine 2% with epinephrine for cardiac patients, and which drugs can be used for patients taking monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants, or nonselective beta blockers. Dentists should be familiar with all aspects of local anesthetics, especially anesthetic toxicity and maximum recommended doses. PMID:20236919

  9. Strabismus complications from local anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Guyton, David L

    2008-01-01

    Strabismus developing after retrobulbar or peribulbar anesthesia for both anterior and posterior segment eye surgery may be due to myotoxicity to an extraocular muscle from the local anesthetic agent. Initial paresis often causes diplopia immediately after surgery, but later progressive segmental fibrosis occurs, and/or hypertrophy of the muscle, producing diplopia in the opposite direction from the direction of the initial diplopia. The inferior rectus muscle is most commonly affected. Usually a large recession on an adjustable suture of the involved muscle(s) yields good alignment. Using topical anesthesia or sub-Tenon's anesthesia can avoid this complication.

  10. Differential membrane effects of general and local anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Diamond, B I; Havdala, H S; Sabelli, H C

    1975-12-01

    The authors studied the effects of varying Na+ and Ca++ concentrations and of replacing H2O with D2O in Ringer's solution upon the actions of general and local anesthetics on isolated frog sciatic nerves. This experimental model was used to study whether general anesthetics affect excitable membranes in a manner similar to that of typical membrane stabilizers (local anesthetics). Procaine (2.5-7.5 mM), halothane (9, 18, and 36 mM), enflurane (8 mM), and ketamine (0.15 and 0.73 mM) raised threshold and lowered spike amplitude, and their effects were facilitated by reducing Na+ concentration in the Ringer's solution. The local anesthetic effects of procaine (2.5-7.5 mM) and ketamine (0.73 mM) were antagonized by Ca++, while the axonal depressant effect of halothane was facilitated by increasing Ca++ concentration in the Ringer's solution, indicating a different mode of action. General anesthetics also differed from local anesthetics in their interaction with water: replacement by D2O of H2O in the Ringer's solution selectively increased the axonal depressant effects of halothane and enflurane but not those of ketamine or procaine. Since D2O differs from H2O in its greater ice-likeness, these results are consistent with the view that general anesthetics stabilize excitable membranes via stabilization of the water-biopolymer lattice, as predicted by the hydrate-microcrystal theory of anesthesia. In contrast, local anesthetics may stabilize excitable tissues by binding to the same fixed negative charges of the membrane to which Ca++ is normally bound. (Key words: Theories of anesthesia, hydrate-microcrystal; Nerve, mode of action of anesthetics; Anesthetics, volatile, halothane; Anesthetics, volatile, enflurane; Anesthetics, local, procaine; Anesthetics, intravenous, ketamine.)

  11. Effect of Local and General Anesthetics on Interfacial Water

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Water undergoes structural change as it interfaces with hydrophilic surfaces, including the many hydrophilic surfaces within the cell. This interfacial water has become known as “Exclusion Zone (EZ) water” or “fourth-phase water” [1]. Methods We tested the hypothesis that anesthetics diminish the amount of EZ water, and that this change may correlate with functional changes in anesthesia. By using the local anesthetics Lidocaine and Bupivacaine as well as a general inhalational anesthetic, Isoflurane, we tracked the EZ size as these anesthetics were introduced. Results All three anesthetics diminished EZ size in a concentration-dependent manner at concentrations of 0.18 mM and greater for Bupivacaine, 0.85 mM and greater for Lidocaine, and 0.2% for Isoflurane. At extremely low (micromolar) concentrations, however, all three anesthetics increased EZ size. Conclusions The sharp increase of EZ size associated with micromolar anesthetic concentrations follows a similar pattern to induction of general anesthesia, from the excitation stage (Stage II) to the depression and overdose stages of surgical anesthesia (Stages III and IV). The results are consistent with the hypothesis that anesthetics may act on water, a fundamental organizational component common to all cells. PMID:27054588

  12. An update on local anesthetics in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Haas, Daniel A

    2002-10-01

    Local anesthetics are the most commonly used drugs in dentistry. This article provides a brief update on the pharmacology, adverse effects and clinical applications of these drugs, as well as the role of vasoconstrictors. PMID:12366885

  13. Local anesthetics: dentistry's most important drugs.

    PubMed

    Malamed, S F

    1994-12-01

    One hundred and fifty years ago, Horace Wells opened the door to local anesthetics. Since then, many advances have been made in pain control. The development of dentistry's most important drugs is highlighted here.

  14. Crystallization of Local Anesthetics When Mixed With Corticosteroid Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Hyeoncheol; Park, Jihong; Lee, Won Kyung; Lee, Woo Hyung; Leigh, Ja-Ho; Lee, Jin Joo; Chung, Sun G.; Lim, Chaiyoung; Park, Sang Jun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate at which pH level various local anesthetics precipitate, and to confirm which combination of corticosteroid and local anesthetic crystallizes. Methods Each of ropivacaine-HCl, bupivacaine-HCl, and lidocaine-HCl was mixed with 4 different concentrations of NaOH solutions. Also, each of the three local anesthetics was mixed with the same volume of 3 corticosteroid solutions (triamcinolone acetonide, dexamethasone sodium phosphate, and betamethasone sodium phosphate). Precipitation of the local anesthetics (or not) was observed, by the naked eye and by microscope. The pH of each solution and the size of the precipitated crystal were measured. Results Alkalinized with NaOH to a certain value of pH, local anesthetics precipitated (ropivacaine pH 6.9, bupivacaine pH 7.7, and lidocaine pH 12.9). Precipitation was observed as a cloudy appearance by the naked eye and as the aggregation of small particles (<10 µm) by microscope. The amount of particles and aggregation increased with increased pH. Mixed with betamethasone sodium phosphate, ropivacaine was precipitated in the form of numerous large crystals (>300 µm, pH 7.5). Ropivacaine with dexamethasone sodium phosphate also precipitated, but it was only observable by microscope (a few crystals of 10–100 µm, pH 7.0). Bupivacaine with betamethasone sodium phosphate formed precipitates of non-aggregated smaller particles (<10 µm, pH 7.7). Lidocaine mixed with corticosteroids did not precipitate. Conclusion Ropivacaine and bupivacaine can precipitate by alkalinization at a physiological pH, and therefore also produce crystals at a physiological pH when they are mixed with betamethasone sodium phosphate. Thus, the potential risk should be noted for their use in interventions, such as epidural steroid injections. PMID:26949665

  15. Dual effect of local anesthetics on the function of excitable rod outer segment disk membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Mashimo, T.; Abe, K.; Yoshiya, I.

    1986-04-01

    The effects of local anesthetics and a divalent cation, Ca2+, on the function of rhodopsin were estimated from the measurements of light-induced proton uptake. The light-induced proton uptake by rhodopsin in the rod outer segment disk membrane was enhanced at lower pH (4) but depressed at higher pHs (6 to 8) by the tertiary amine local anesthetics lidocaine, bupivacaine, tetracaine, and dibucaine. The order of local anesthetic-induced depression of the proton uptake followed that of their clinical anesthetic potencies. The depression of the proton uptake versus the concentration of the uncharged form of local anesthetic nearly describes the same curve for small and large dose of added anesthetic. Furthermore, a neutral local anesthetic, benzocaine, depressed the proton uptake at all pHs between 4 and 7. These results indicate that the depression of the proton uptake is due to the effect of only the uncharged form. It is hypothesized that the uncharged form of local anesthetics interacts hydrophobically with the rhodopsin in the disk membrane. The dual effect of local anesthetics on the proton uptake, on the other hand, suggests that the activation of the function of rhodopsin may be caused by the charged form. There was no significant change in the light-induced proton uptake by rhodopsin when 1 mM of Ca2+ was introduced into the disk membrane at varying pHs in the absence or presence of local anesthetics. This fact indicates that Ca2+ ion does not influence the diprotonating process of metarhodopsin; neither does it interfere with the local anesthetic-induced changes in the rhodopsin molecule.

  16. The local anesthetic potency of norcocaine, a metabolite of cocaine.

    PubMed

    Just, W W; Hoyer, J

    1977-01-15

    The local anesthetic effects of cocaine and one of its main metabolites norcocaine, were investigated comparatively on isolated ganglion cells of the marine gastropod, Aplysia californica. During a 4-hour-period, different action potential parameters such as amplitude, duration, maximum rate of rise were observed, which demonstrated that norcocaine exhibits a higher local anesthetic potency than cocaine.

  17. 21 CFR 346.10 - Local anesthetic active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Local anesthetic active ingredients. 346.10 Section 346.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... § 346.10 Local anesthetic active ingredients. The active ingredient of the product consists of any...

  18. 21 CFR 346.10 - Local anesthetic active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Local anesthetic active ingredients. 346.10 Section 346.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... § 346.10 Local anesthetic active ingredients. The active ingredient of the product consists of any...

  19. Pain management via local anesthetics and responsive hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Bagshaw, Kyle R; Hanenbaum, Curt L; Carbone, Erica J; Lo, Kevin WH; Laurencin, Cato T; Walker, Joseph; Nair, Lakshmi S

    2015-01-01

    Acute and chronic pain control is a significant clinical challenge that has been largely unmet. Local anesthetics are widely used for the control of post-operative pain and in the therapy of acute and chronic pain. While a variety of approaches are currently used to prolong the duration of action of local anesthetics, an optimal strategy to achieve neural blockage for several hours to days with minimal toxicity has yet to be identified. Several drug delivery systems such as liposomes, microparticles and nanoparticles have been investigated as local anesthetic delivery vehicles to achieve prolonged anesthesia. Recently, injectable responsive hydrogels raise significant interest for the localized delivery of anesthetic molecules. This paper discusses the potential of injectable hydrogels to prolong the action of local anesthetics. PMID:25690085

  20. Development of prilocaine gels for enhanced local anesthetic action.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chung; Shin, Sang-Chul

    2012-07-01

    Prilocaine, one of local anesthetics, has been used for regional pain relief. When applied as an ointments or creams, it is hard to expect their effects to last for long time, because they are easily removed by wetting, movement and contacting. For more comfortable and better application, we developed a prilocaine gel system using a bioadhesive polymer, carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC). For suitable bioadhesion, the bioadhesive force of various polymers was tested using an auto-peeling tester. The bioadhesive force of various types of CMC such as 100MC, 150MC and 300MC, was 0.0264, 0.0461 and 0.0824 N, at 1.5% concentration, respectively. The CMC-300MC gels showed the most suitable bioadhesive forces. The effect of drug concentration on drug release was studied from the prepared 1.5% CMC gels using a synthetic cellulose membrane at 37 ± 0.5°C. As the concentration of drug increased, the drug release increased. The effects of temperature on drug release from the 1.0% prilocaine gels were evaluated at 27, 32, 37 and 42°C. As the temperature of the drug gels increased, drug release increased. The enhancing effects of penetration enhancers such as pyrrolidones, non-ionic surfactants, fatty acids and propylene glycol derivatives were studied. Among the enhancers used, polyoxyethylene 2-oleyl ether was superior. The anesthetic effects were studied by a tail flick analgesic meter. In the rat tailflick test, 1.0% prilocaine gels containing polyoxyethylene 2-oleyl ether showed the most prolonged local analgesic effects. The results support the view that prilocaine gels with enhanced local anesthetic action could be developed using CMC bioadhesive polymer.

  1. Molecular mechanisms of nerve block by local anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Strichartz, G

    1976-10-01

    Local anesthetics block nerve conduction by preventing the increase in membrane permeability to sodium ions that normally leads to a nerve impulse. Among anesthetics containing tertiary amine groups, the cationic, protonated form appears to be more active than the neutral form. However, the neutral forms, as well as uncharged molecules like benzocaine and the aliphatic alcohols, also depress sodium permeability. Studies of single myelinated nerves and squid axons show no direct interaction between calcium ions and local anesthetics, thus disproving theories based on competition between these two agents. Likewise, hypotheses attributing local anesthesia to changes in electrical potentials at the membrane-water interface are disproven by the demonstrated potencies of electrically uncharged anesthetics. Hypotheses that propose that local anesthetics act by expanding the nerve membrane and causing a change in protein conformation that blocks sodium permeability are vague in conception and difficult to test experimentally. Evidence from voltage-clamp studies of single nerve fibers indicates that anesthetic molecules interact with the sodium channels directly, from the inner side of the nerve membrane. Anesthetics bind within sodium channels which have opened during membrane depolarization, preventing the normal sodium ion flux. Anesthetic molecules can dissociate from open channels, but not from channels that remain closed when the nerve is kept at rest. The "gating" properties that regulate the opening and closing of sodium channels are reversibly modified during anesthesia. Specifically, the inactivation function responds more slowly and requires more negative membrane potential changes to reach the same values as in unanesthetized nerves. A second, slow inactivation is observed following external application of tertiary amine anesthetics. The selective binding of anesthetics to open sodium channels provides a simple explanation for Wedenski inhibition, in which the

  2. Local anesthetics structure-dependently interact with anionic phospholipid membranes to modify the fluidity.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Hironori; Ueno, Takahiro; Mizogami, Maki; Takakura, Ko

    2010-01-01

    While bupivacaine is more cardiotoxic than other local anesthetics, the mechanistic background for different toxic effects remains unclear. Several cardiotoxic compounds act on lipid bilayers to change the physicochemical properties of membranes. We comparatively studied the interaction of local anesthetics with lipid membranous systems which might be related to their structure-selective cardiotoxicity. Amide local anesthetics (10-300 microM) were reacted with unilamellar vesicles which were prepared with different phospholipids and cholesterol of varying lipid compositions. They were compared on the potencies to modify membrane fluidity by measuring fluorescence polarization. Local anesthetics interacted with liposomal membranes to increase the fluidity. Increasing anionic phospholipids in membranes enhanced the membrane-fluidizing effects of local anesthetics with the potency being cardiolipin>phosphatidic acid>phosphatidylglycerol>phosphatidylserine. Cardiolipin was most effective on bupivacaine, followed by ropivacaine. Local anesthetics interacted differently with biomimetic membranes consisting of 10mol% cardiolipin, 50mol% other phospholipids and 40mol% cholesterol with the potency being bupivacaine>ropivacaine>lidocaine>prilocaine, which agreed with the rank order of cardiotoxicity. Bupivacaine significantly fluidized 2.5-12.5mol% cardiolipin-containing membranes at cardiotoxicologically relevant concentrations. Bupivacaine is considered to affect lipid bilayers by interacting electrostatically with negatively charged cardiolipin head groups and hydrophobically with phospholipid acyl chains. The structure-dependent interaction with lipid membranes containing cardiolipin, which is preferentially localized in cardiomyocyte mitochondrial membranes, may be a mechanistic clue to explain the structure-selective cardiotoxicity of local anesthetics.

  3. Local anesthetics: dentistry's most important drugs, clinical update 2006.

    PubMed

    Malamed, Stanley F

    2006-12-01

    Local anesthetics are the safest most effective drugs in medicine for the control and management of pain. They also represent the most important drugs in dentistry. Today, dentistry has a spectrum of local anesthetics that permit pain control to be tailored to the specific needs of the patient: short-, intermediate-, and long-acting drugs. Bupivacaine has become a standard part of the armamentarium for postsurgical pain control while articaine has become the second-most used local anesthetic in the United States since its introduction in 2000. Despite an increase in anecdotal reports of paresthesia since articaine's introduction there is yet, no supporting scientific evidence.

  4. Use of eutectic mixture of local anesthetics in children.

    PubMed

    Dutta, S

    1999-01-01

    The Eutectic Mixture of Local Anesthetics (EMLA) is a topical application, which has proved to be a useful medication for providing pain relief among children. It is an emulsion containing a 1:1 mixture of lidocaine and prilocaine. The high concentration of the uncharged anesthetic base in the microdroplets of the emulsion ensure effective skin penetration. In the pediatric population EMLA has been shown to be efficacious when it is used prior to venipuncture, cannulation, lumbar puncture, laser treatment of port wine stains, curettage of molluscum contagiosum or vaccination. For several of these indications, the efficacy has been documented by double blind controlled trials, that have used objective and quasi-objective scales for assessing pain relief. The dose of EMLA is between 0.5 to 1 gram, and the cream should be applied half to one hour prior to the procedure. Local side effects are very mild, and the only systemic side effect of importance is the risk of methemoglobinemia in young infants. The literature has conflicting reports about the safety of EMLA in neonates.

  5. Inhibition of murine cardiomyocyte respiration by amine local anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Aburawi, Elhadi H; Souid, Abdul-Kader

    2014-12-01

    The hydrophobic amino acyl amide-linked local anesthetics (e.g., lidocaine and bupivacaine) impose potent cardiac toxicity and direct mitochondrial dysfunction. To investigate these adverse events, an in vitro system was employed to measure their effects on O2 consumption (cellular respiration) by murine myocardium. Specimens were collected from the ventricular myocardium and immediately immersed in ice-cold Krebs-Henseleit buffer saturated with 95 % O2:5 % CO2. O2 concentration was determined as a function of time from the phosphorescence decay rates of Pd(II)-meso-tetra-(4-sulfonatophenyl)-tetrabenzoporphyrin. Myocardial O2 consumption was linear with time (zero-order kinetics); its rate (k, in μM O2 min(-1)), thus, was the negative of the slope of [O2] vs. time. Cyanide inhibited O2 consumption, confirming the oxidation occurred in the respiratory chain. Lidocaine and bupivacaine produced immediate and sustained inhibition of cellular respiration at plasma concentrations of the drugs (low micromolar range). Bupivacaine was twice as potent as lidocaine. The inhibition was dose-dependent, saturating at concentrations ≥30 μM. At saturating doses, lidocaine produced ~20 % inhibition and bupivacaine ~40 % inhibition. Cellular ATP was also decreased in the presence of 30 μM lidocaine or bupivacaine. The studied amines inhibited myocardial cellular respiration. This effect is consistent with their known adverse events on mitochondrial function. The described approach allows accurate assessments and comparisons of the toxic effects of local anesthetics on heart tissue bioenergetics. PMID:24254523

  6. Adverse reactions triggered by dental local anesthetics: a clinical survey.

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, E.; Goharian, S.; Katz, Y.

    2000-01-01

    One hundred and seventy-nine patients completed a questionnaire focusing on adverse reactions to dental local anesthetics as manifested by 16 signs and symptoms. Twenty-six percent of the participants reported having at least 1 adverse reaction. It was found that most of the adverse reactions occurred within the first 2 hours following the injection of local anesthetics. Pallor, palpitations, diaphoresis, and dizziness were the most common adverse reactions reported in the study. The results pointed to a significant relationship between anxiety, gender, injection technique, and procedure with a higher incidence of adverse reactions. PMID:11432179

  7. 21 CFR 346.10 - Local anesthetic active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Local anesthetic active ingredients. 346.10 Section 346.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE ANORECTAL DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Active...

  8. 21 CFR 346.10 - Local anesthetic active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Local anesthetic active ingredients. 346.10 Section 346.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE ANORECTAL DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Active...

  9. 21 CFR 346.10 - Local anesthetic active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Local anesthetic active ingredients. 346.10 Section 346.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE ANORECTAL DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE Active...

  10. [Effect of local anesthetics on the postoperative inflammatory response].

    PubMed

    Beloeil, H; Mazoit, J-X

    2009-03-01

    Current knowledge suggests that peripheral inflammation following surgery activates and sensitizes both peripheral and central nervous system. These phenomena involved in the maintenance of the inflammatory response lead to hypersensibility, hyperalgesia and allodynia. Hyperalgesia participates in the general experience of postoperative pain and ALo in the development of chronic pain. A correlation between the ability of treatments to reduce areas of hypersensitivity surrounding the wound after surgery and their ability to reduce the incidence of chronic pain has been shown. For a long time, local anaesthetics have been used for their capacity to block nociceptive input. They can ALo modulate the inflammatory response following a surgical trauma. By inhibiting the nervous conductivity at the site of the trauma, local anesthetics attenuate the sensitization of the nervous system and therefore the inflammatory phenomena. They ALo exert intrinsic anti-inflammatory properties by modulating the local and systemic liberation of inflammatory mediators. The mechanisms involved are not clearly elucidated. Local, systemic, and spinal inflammatory mechanisms may be influenced by local anesthetics through multiple different mechanisms. The therapeutic implications of effects of local anesthetics on local, systemic, and spinal inflammatory responses merit further study. PMID:19297121

  11. [Intravenous regional anesthesia with long-acting local anesthetics. An update].

    PubMed

    Atanassoff, P G; Lobato, A; Aguilar, J L

    2014-02-01

    Intravenous regional anesthesia is a widely used technique for brief surgical interventions, primarily on the upper limbs and less frequently, on the lower limbs. It began being used at the beginning of the 20th century, when Bier injected procaine as a local anesthetic. The technique to accomplish anesthesia has not changed much since then, although different drugs, particularly long-acting local anesthetics, such as ropivacaine and levobupivacaine in low concentrations, were introduced. Additionally, drugs like opioids, muscle relaxants, paracetamol, neostigmine, magnesium, ketamine, clonidine, and ketorolac, have all been investigated as adjuncts to intravenous regional anesthesia, and were found to be fairly useful in terms of an increased onset of operative anesthesia and longer lasting perioperative analgesia. The present article provides an overview of current knowledge with emphasis on long-acting local anesthetic drugs. PMID:24156887

  12. Hypersensitivity to the local anesthetic articaine hydrochloride.

    PubMed Central

    Malanin, K.; Kalimo, K.

    1995-01-01

    A patient developed skin erythema and wheals within 1 h after local dental anesthesia with articaine hydrochloride. Pretreatment with oral terfenadine or topical betamethasone dipropionate prevented her reaction to articaine. In contrast, neither pretreatment with oral aspirin nor topical capsaicin affected her reaction to articaine. The results of radioallergosorbent tests (RAST) to articaine and a passive transfer test were negative. The reaction was probably caused by a complement-mediated mechanism leading to the degranulation of mast cells. The patient tolerated local anesthesia with lidocaine. PMID:8934983

  13. Carborane-derived local anesthetics are isomer dependent.

    PubMed

    Kracke, George R; VanGordon, Monika R; Sevryugina, Yulia V; Kueffer, Peter J; Kabytaev, Kuanysh; Jalisatgi, Satish S; Hawthorne, M Frederick

    2015-01-01

    Clinically there is a need for local anesthetics with a greater specificity of action on target cells and longer duration. We have synthesized a series of local anesthetic derivatives we call boronicaines in which the aromatic phenyl ring of lidocaine was replaced with ortho-, meta-, C,C'-dimethyl meta- and para-carborane clusters. The boronicaine derivatives were tested for their analgesic activity and compared with lidocaine using standard procedures in mice following a plantar injection. The compounds differed in their analgesic activity in the following order: ortho-carborane = C,C'-dimethyl meta-carborane > para-carborane > lidocaine > meta-carborane derivative. Both ortho-boronicaine and C,C'-dimethyl meta-boronicaine had longer durations of analgesia than lidocaine. Differences in analgesic efficacies are rationalized by variations in chemical structure and protein binding characteristics.

  14. Local anesthetic cream prepared from lidocaine-tetracaine eutectic mixture.

    PubMed

    Ohzeki, Keiichi; Kitahara, Masaki; Suzuki, Noriko; Taguchi, Kyoji; Yamazaki, Yuki; Akiyama, Shinji; Takahashi, Kentaro; Kanzaki, Yasushi

    2008-04-01

    Local anesthetic creams for the clinical treatment of conditions such as postherpetic neuralgia were prepared as an in-house formulation from the eutectic mixture of lidocaine-tetracaine (LT cream) using two eutectic mixtures of local anesthetic (EMLA) type bases. The LT formulation was compared with a lidocaine-prilocaine (LP cream) eutectic mixture formulated using the same base as EMLA. The chemical stability of lidocaine was examined in advance and was found to be stable for more than 3 months either in LT cream or in LP cream. The release rate of lidocaine from the formulated creams was examined using a cellulose ester membrane. The release rate of lidocaine from LT cream was similar to that from LP cream. The release rate of tetracaine was slightly slower than that of lidocaine in LT cream reflecting the larger molecular size of tetracaine. The penetration rate was examined in vitro using a Yucatan micropig skin. The penetration rate of lidocaine was similar between LT and LP creams. Infiltration anesthesia action examined in guinea pigs indicated that the difference between the two creams was statistically insignificant. The present study suggests the equivalence of the LT and LP creams as a local anesthetic and the potential of LT cream for clinical use either in the easy formulation or in the low-cost formulation.

  15. The efficacy of eutectic mixture of local anesthetics as a topical anesthetic agent used for dental procedures: A brief review

    PubMed Central

    Daneshkazemi, Alireza; Abrisham, Seyyed Mohammad; Daneshkazemi, Pedram; Davoudi, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Dental pain management is one of the most critical aspects of modern dentistry which might affect patient's quality of life. Several methods are suggested to provide a painless situation for patients. Desensitization of the oral site using topical anesthetics is one of those methods. The improvements of topical anesthetic agents are probably one of the most important advances in dental science in the past 100 years. Most of them are safe and can be applied on oral mucosa with minimal irritation and allergic reactions. At present, these agents are various with different potent and indications. Eutectic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA) (lidocaine + prilocaine) is a commercial anesthetic agent which has got acceptance among dental clinicians. This article provides a brief review about the efficacy of EMLA as a topical anesthetic agent when used during dental procedures. PMID:27746520

  16. From cocaine to ropivacaine: the history of local anesthetic drugs.

    PubMed

    Ruetsch, Y A; Böni, T; Borgeat, A

    2001-08-01

    In 1850, about three centuries after the conquest of Peru by Pizzaro, the Austrian von Scherzer brought a sufficient quantum of coca leaves to Europe to permit the isolation of cocaine. As suggested by his friend Sigmund Freud, descriptions of the properties of the coca prompted the Austrian Koller to perform in 1884 the first clinical operation under local anesthesia, by administration of cocaine on the eye. The use of cocaine for local and regional anesthesia rapidly spread throughout Europe and America. The toxic effects of cocaine were soon identified resulting in many deaths among both patients and addicted medical staff. Local anesthesia was in a profound crisis until the development of modern organic chemistry which led to the synthesis of pure cocaine in 1891. New amino ester local anesthetics were synthesized between 1891 and 1930, such as tropocaine, eucaine, holocaine, orthoform, benzocaine, and tetracaine. In addition, amino amide local anesthetics were prepared between 1898 and 1972 including nirvaquine, procaine, chloroprocaine, cinchocaine, lidocaine, mepivacaine, prilocaine, efocaine, bupivacaine, etidocaine, and articaine. All of these drugs were ostensibly less toxic than cocaine, but they had differing amounts of central nervous system (CNS) and cardiovascular (CV) toxicity. Bupivacaine is of special interest because of its long duration of action and history of clinical application. Synthesized in 1957, the introduction of bupivacaine on the market in 1965 paralleled the progressive and cumulative reports of CNS and CV toxicity, leading to the restriction of its use and the identification of a special therapy-resistant CV toxicity. Numerous experimental studies were conducted to identify the fine cellular mechanism of this toxicity, which refines our understanding of the action of local anesthetics. The identification of optically active isomers of the mepivacaine family led to the selection of ropivacaine, a pure S-(-) enantiomer, whose

  17. Effect of adjuvants on the action of local anesthetics in isolated rat sciatic nerves

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Eser; Gold, Michael S.; Hough, Karen A.; Gebhart, G.F.; Williams, Brian A.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives There is increasing clinical use of adjuvant drugs to prolong the duration of local anesthetic-induced block of peripheral nerves. However, the mechanistic understanding regarding drug interactions between these compounds in the periphery is quite limited. Accordingly, we undertook this study to determine whether selected adjuvants are efficacious in blocking action potential propagation in peripheral nerves at concentrations used clinically, and whether these drugs influence peripheral nerve block produced by local anesthetics. Methods Isolated rat sciatic nerves were used to assess (1) the efficacy of buprenorphine, clonidine, dexamethasone, or midazolam, alone and in combination, on action potential propagation; and (2) their influence on the blocking actions of local anesthetics ropivacaine and lidocaine. Compound action potentials (CAPs) from A- and C-fibers were studied before and after drug application. Results At estimated clinical concentrations, neither buprenorphine nor dexamethasone affected either A- or C-waves of the CAP. Clonidine produced a small, but significant attenuation of the C-wave amplitude. Midazolam attenuated both A- and C-wave amplitudes, but with greater potency on the C-wave. The combination of clonidine, buprenorphine, and dexamethasone had no influence on the potency or duration of local anesthetic- or midazolam-induced block of A-and C-waves of the CAP. Conclusions These results suggest that the reported clinical efficacy of clonidine, buprenorphine, and dexamethasone influence the actions of local anesthetics via indirect mechanisms. Further identification of these indirect mechanisms may enable the development of novel approaches to achieve longer duration, modality-specific peripheral nerve block. PMID:22430023

  18. State-Dependent Inhibition of Sodium Channels by Local Anesthetics: A 40-Year Evolution.

    PubMed

    Wang, G-K; Strichartz, G R

    2012-04-01

    Knowledge about the mechanism of impulse blockade by local anesthetics has evolved over the past four decades, from the realization that Na(+) channels were inhibited to affect the impulse blockade to an identification of the amino acid residues within the Na(+) channel that bind the local anesthetic molecule. Within this period appreciation has grown of the state-dependent nature of channel inhibition, with rapid binding and unbinding at relatively high affinity to the open state, and weaker binding to the closed resting state. Slow binding of high affinity for the inactivated state accounts for the salutary therapeutic as well as the toxic actions of diverse class I anti-arrhythmic agents, but may have little importance for impulse blockade, which requires concentrations high enough to block the resting state. At the molecular level, residues on the S6 transmembrane segments in three of the homologous domains of the channel appear to contribute to the binding of local anesthetics, with some contribution also from parts of the selectivity filter. Binding to the inactivated state, and perhaps the open state, involves some residues that are not identical to those that bind these drugs in the resting state, suggesting spatial flexibility in the "binding site". Questions remaining include the mechanism that links local anesthetic binding with the inhibition of gating charge movements, and the molecular nature of the theoretical "hydrophobic pathway" that may be critical for determining the recovery rates from blockade of closed channels, and thus account for both therapeutic and cardiotoxic actions. PMID:23710324

  19. Concentrations of anesthetics across the water-membrane interface; the Meyer-Overton hypothesis revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, A.; Wilson, M. A.; New, M. H.; Chipot, C.

    1998-01-01

    The free energies of transferring a variety of anesthetic and nonanesthetic compounds across water-oil and water-membrane interfaces were obtained using computer simulations. Anesthetics exhibit greatly enhanced concentrations at these interfaces, compared to nonanesthetics. The substitution of the interfacial solubilites of the anesthetics for their bulk lipid solubilities in the Meyer-Overton relation, was found to give a better correlation, indicating that the potency of an anesthetic is directly proportional to its solubility at the interface.

  20. Randomized clinical trial of local anesthetic versus a combination of local anesthetic with self-hypnosis in the management of pediatric procedure-related pain.

    PubMed

    Liossi, Christina; White, Paul; Hatira, Popi

    2006-05-01

    A prospective controlled trial was conducted to compare the efficacy of an analgesic cream (eutectic mixture of local anesthetics, or EMLA) with a combination of EMLA with hypnosis in the relief of lumbar puncture-induced pain and anxiety in 45 pediatric cancer patients (age 6-16 years). The study also explored whether young patients can be taught and can use hypnosis independently as well as whether the therapeutic benefit depends on hypnotizability. Patients were randomized to 1 of 3 groups: local anesthetic, local anesthetic plus hypnosis, and local anesthetic plus attention. Results confirmed that patients in the local anesthetic plus hypnosis group reported less anticipatory anxiety and less procedure-related pain and anxiety and that they were rated as demonstrating less behavioral distress during the procedure. The level of hypnotizability was significantly associated with the magnitude of treatment benefit, and this benefit was maintained when patients used hypnosis independently. PMID:16719602

  1. Local anesthetic wound infiltration for pain management after periacetabular osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose To our knowledge, there is no evidence to support the use of local infiltration analgesia (LIA) for postoperative pain relief after periacetabular osteotomy (PAO). We investigated the effect of wound infiltration with a long-acting local anesthetic (ropivacaine) for postoperative analgesia after PAO. Patients and methods We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00815503) in 53 patients undergoing PAO to evaluate the effect of local anesthetic infiltration on postoperative pain and on postoperative opioid consumption. All subjects received intraoperative infiltration followed by 5 postoperative injections in 10-hour intervals through a multi-holed catheter placed at the surgical site. 26 patients received ropivacaine and 27 received saline. The intervention period was 2 days and the observational period was 4 days. All subjects received patient-controlled opioid analgesia without any restrictions on the total daily dose. Pain was assessed at specific postoperative time points and the daily opioid usage was registered. Results Infiltration with 75 mL (150 mg) of ropivacaine did not reduce postoperative pain or opioid requirements during the first 4 days. Interpretation The clinical importance of ropivacaine as single component in postoperative treatment of pain is questionable, and we are planning further studies to explore the potential of LIA in larger volume—and also a multimodal regimen—to treat pain in this category of patients. PMID:24650022

  2. From micro- to nanostructured implantable device for local anesthetic delivery.

    PubMed

    Zorzetto, Laura; Brambilla, Paola; Marcello, Elena; Bloise, Nora; De Gregori, Manuela; Cobianchi, Lorenzo; Peloso, Andrea; Allegri, Massimo; Visai, Livia; Petrini, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Local anesthetics block the transmission of painful stimuli to the brain by acting on ion channels of nociceptor fibers, and find application in the management of acute and chronic pain. Despite the key role they play in modern medicine, their cardio and neurotoxicity (together with their short half-life) stress the need for developing implantable devices for tailored local drug release, with the aim of counterbalancing their side effects and prolonging their pharmacological activity. This review discusses the evolution of the physical forms of local anesthetic delivery systems during the past decades. Depending on the use of different biocompatible materials (degradable polyesters, thermosensitive hydrogels, and liposomes and hydrogels from natural polymers) and manufacturing processes, these systems can be classified as films or micro- or nanostructured devices. We analyze and summarize the production techniques according to this classification, focusing on their relative advantages and disadvantages. The most relevant trend reported in this work highlights the effort of moving from microstructured to nanostructured systems, with the aim of reaching a scale comparable to the biological environment. Improved intracellular penetration compared to microstructured systems, indeed, provides specific drug absorption into the targeted tissue and can lead to an enhancement of its bioavailability and retention time. Nanostructured systems are realized by the modification of existing manufacturing processes (interfacial deposition and nanoprecipitation for degradable polyester particles and high- or low-temperature homogenization for liposomes) or development of novel strategies (electrospun matrices and nanogels). The high surface-to-volume ratio that characterizes nanostructured devices often leads to a burst drug release. This drawback needs to be addressed to fully exploit the advantage of the interaction between the target tissues and the drug: possible strategies

  3. From micro- to nanostructured implantable device for local anesthetic delivery.

    PubMed

    Zorzetto, Laura; Brambilla, Paola; Marcello, Elena; Bloise, Nora; De Gregori, Manuela; Cobianchi, Lorenzo; Peloso, Andrea; Allegri, Massimo; Visai, Livia; Petrini, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Local anesthetics block the transmission of painful stimuli to the brain by acting on ion channels of nociceptor fibers, and find application in the management of acute and chronic pain. Despite the key role they play in modern medicine, their cardio and neurotoxicity (together with their short half-life) stress the need for developing implantable devices for tailored local drug release, with the aim of counterbalancing their side effects and prolonging their pharmacological activity. This review discusses the evolution of the physical forms of local anesthetic delivery systems during the past decades. Depending on the use of different biocompatible materials (degradable polyesters, thermosensitive hydrogels, and liposomes and hydrogels from natural polymers) and manufacturing processes, these systems can be classified as films or micro- or nanostructured devices. We analyze and summarize the production techniques according to this classification, focusing on their relative advantages and disadvantages. The most relevant trend reported in this work highlights the effort of moving from microstructured to nanostructured systems, with the aim of reaching a scale comparable to the biological environment. Improved intracellular penetration compared to microstructured systems, indeed, provides specific drug absorption into the targeted tissue and can lead to an enhancement of its bioavailability and retention time. Nanostructured systems are realized by the modification of existing manufacturing processes (interfacial deposition and nanoprecipitation for degradable polyester particles and high- or low-temperature homogenization for liposomes) or development of novel strategies (electrospun matrices and nanogels). The high surface-to-volume ratio that characterizes nanostructured devices often leads to a burst drug release. This drawback needs to be addressed to fully exploit the advantage of the interaction between the target tissues and the drug: possible strategies

  4. From micro- to nanostructured implantable device for local anesthetic delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zorzetto, Laura; Brambilla, Paola; Marcello, Elena; Bloise, Nora; De Gregori, Manuela; Cobianchi, Lorenzo; Peloso, Andrea; Allegri, Massimo; Visai, Livia; Petrini, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Local anesthetics block the transmission of painful stimuli to the brain by acting on ion channels of nociceptor fibers, and find application in the management of acute and chronic pain. Despite the key role they play in modern medicine, their cardio and neurotoxicity (together with their short half-life) stress the need for developing implantable devices for tailored local drug release, with the aim of counterbalancing their side effects and prolonging their pharmacological activity. This review discusses the evolution of the physical forms of local anesthetic delivery systems during the past decades. Depending on the use of different biocompatible materials (degradable polyesters, thermosensitive hydrogels, and liposomes and hydrogels from natural polymers) and manufacturing processes, these systems can be classified as films or micro- or nanostructured devices. We analyze and summarize the production techniques according to this classification, focusing on their relative advantages and disadvantages. The most relevant trend reported in this work highlights the effort of moving from microstructured to nanostructured systems, with the aim of reaching a scale comparable to the biological environment. Improved intracellular penetration compared to microstructured systems, indeed, provides specific drug absorption into the targeted tissue and can lead to an enhancement of its bioavailability and retention time. Nanostructured systems are realized by the modification of existing manufacturing processes (interfacial deposition and nanoprecipitation for degradable polyester particles and high- or low-temperature homogenization for liposomes) or development of novel strategies (electrospun matrices and nanogels). The high surface-to-volume ratio that characterizes nanostructured devices often leads to a burst drug release. This drawback needs to be addressed to fully exploit the advantage of the interaction between the target tissues and the drug: possible strategies

  5. Preliminary studies on local anesthetic and antipyretic activities of Spilanthes acmella Murr. in experimental animal models

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, A.; Devi, B.R.K.; Sanjebam, R.; Khumbong, S.; Thokchom, I.S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Spilanthes acmella Murr. (Family: Compositae) is a herb that grows throughout the tropics. It is used in the treatment of rheumatism, fever, sore throat, and hemorrhoids. A tincture of the flowers is used to relieve toothache. The leaves and flowers produce numbness of the tongue when eaten as salad. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the local anesthetic and antipyretic activities of S. acmella in experimental animal models. Materials and Methods: Aqueous extract of S. acmella Murr. (SAM) was tested for local anesthetic action by (i) intracutaneous wheal in guinea pigs and (ii) plexus anesthesia in frogs. In both the models, 2% xylocaine was used as the standard drug. The anti-pyretic activity was determined by yeast-induced pyrexia in rats. Aspirin 300 mg/kg was used as the standard drug. Result: The test drug in concentrations of 10% and 20% produced 70.36% and 87.02% anesthesia respectively by the intracutaneous wheal compared to 97.22% anesthetic effect produced by 2% xylocaine (P<0.001). The mean onset of anesthesia with the test drug was 5.33±0.57 min compared to 2.75±0.31 min (P<0.001) for the standard drug in the plexus anesthesia model. In the anti-pyretic model, ASA in doses of 100, 200, and 400 mg produced dose-dependent reduction in mean temperature at various hours of observation. Conclusion: The present study shows that SAM has significant local anesthetic and antipyretic activities. PMID:21206617

  6. Extended duration local anesthetic agent in a rat paw model.

    PubMed

    Ickowicz, D E; Golovanevski, L; Domb, A J; Weiniger, C F

    2014-07-01

    Encapsulated local anesthetics extend postoperative analgesic effect following site-directed nerve injection; potentially reducing postoperative complications. Our study aim was to investigate efficacy of our improved extended duration formulation - 15% bupivacaine in poly(DL-lactic acid co castor oil) 3:7 synthesized by ring opening polymerization. In vitro, around 70% of bupivacaine was released from the p(DLLA-CO) 3:7 after 10 days. A single injection of the optimal formulation of 15% bupivacaine-polymer or plain (0.5%) bupivacaine (control), was injected via a 22G needle beside the sciatic nerve of Sprague-Dawley rats under anesthesia; followed (in some animals) by a 1cm longitudinal incision through the skin and fascia of the paw area. Behavioral tests for sensory and motor block assessment were done using Hargreave's hot plate score, von Frey filaments and rearing count. The 15% bupivacaine formulation significantly prolonged sensory block duration up to at least 48 h. Following surgery, motor block was observed for 48 h following administration of bupivacaine-polymer formulation and rearing was reduced (returning to baseline after 48 h). No significant differences in mechanical nociceptive response were observed. The optimized bupivacaine-polymer formulation prolonged duration of local anesthesia effect in our animal model up to at least 48 h. PMID:24726301

  7. Comparative study on anesthetic potency of dental local anesthetics assessed by the jaw-opening reflex in rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Miyoshi, T.; Aida, H.; Kaneko, Y.

    2000-01-01

    The potency of 4 local anesthetics to dental pulp was compared. Drugs were 4% articaine with 12 microgram/mL epinephrine (A12), 4% articaine with 6 microgram/mL epinephrine (A6), 2% lidocaine with 12.5 microgram/mL epinephrine (L), and 3% propitocaine with 0.03 IU/mL felypressin (P). Local anesthetics were injected into the dental root of the mandibular incisor. Electromyogram (EMG) of the digastric muscle was measured during the jaw-opening reflex induced by electrical stimulation. The disappearance of the EMG wave was judged as positive evidence of anesthesia. The determination of ED50 of the anesthetic was made by probit analysis. The ED50 of the A12 was minimal in all the tested anesthetics throughout the entire course. The potency in the A6 was 2.8 times that of the L. The potency of the A12 at the 15-minute measurement was 3.8 times that of the A6. The ED50 of the P was higher compared with those of the other 3 groups. It was concluded that articaine showed quicker onset than lidocaine and propitocaine and that there was a need to increase the dosage to attain a quick onset or to extend the duration. PMID:11881694

  8. Following the north star: radial marker lines help preserve anatomic landmarks after local injection of anesthetic.

    PubMed

    Krakowski, Andrew C; Admani, Shehla; Eichenfield, Lawrence F

    2015-01-01

    Injection of local anesthetic can result in distortion of local anatomic architecture. "Following the North Star" is a technique that uses radial markings to aid in better preservation of surgical landmarks.

  9. Local anesthetics, pulpal blood flow and C. Edmund Kells.

    PubMed

    Gutmann, James L

    2011-01-01

    Historically there was an attempt by many dental practitioners to implicate anesthetic solutions in the death of the dental pulp. However, their implications may or may not have been valid, as damage to the dental pulp may have resulted from excessive and deleterious restorative procedures on teeth that were anesthetized. Unfortunately little was known about the anesthetic solutions at that time, their composition, which included vasoconstrictors, and their potential to alter pulpal blood flow. This paper will explore both the historical perspectives and concerns regarding the impact of anesthetic solutions on the dental pulp through the eyes of Dr. C. Edmund Kells, along with the contemporary perspectives and realities through the eyes of science, sound research data and clinical practice.

  10. New Updates Pertaining to Drug Delivery of Local Anesthetics in Particular Bupivacaine Using Lipid Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Beiranvand, Siavash; Eatemadi, Ali; Karimi, Arash

    2016-12-01

    Lipid nanoparticles (liposomes) were first described in 1965, and several work have led to development of important technical advances like triggered release liposomes and drug-loaded liposomes. These advances have led to numerous clinical trials in such diverse areas such as the delivery of anti-cancer, antifungal, and antibiotic drugs; the delivery of gene medicines; and most importantly the delivery of anesthesia drugs. Quite a number of liposomes are on the market, and many more are still in developmental stage. Lipid nanoparticles are the first nano-medicine delivery system to be advanced from laboratory concept to clinical application with high considerable clinical acceptance. Drug delivery systems for local anesthetics (LAs) have caught the interest of many researchers because there are many biomedical advantages connected to their application. There have been several formulation techniques to systemically deliver LA that include encapsulation in liposomes and complexation in cyclodextrins, nanoparticles, and to a little extent gold nanoparticles. The proposed formulations help to decrease the LA concentration utilized, increase its permeability, and most importantly increase the localization of the LA for a long period of time thereby leading to increase in the duration of the LA effect and finally to reduce any local and systemic toxicity. In this review, we will highlight on new updates pertaining to drug delivery of local anesthetics in particular bupivacaine using lipid nanoparticles. PMID:27342601

  11. New Updates Pertaining to Drug Delivery of Local Anesthetics in Particular Bupivacaine Using Lipid Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiranvand, Siavash; Eatemadi, Ali; Karimi, Arash

    2016-06-01

    Lipid nanoparticles (liposomes) were first described in 1965, and several work have led to development of important technical advances like triggered release liposomes and drug-loaded liposomes. These advances have led to numerous clinical trials in such diverse areas such as the delivery of anti-cancer, antifungal, and antibiotic drugs; the delivery of gene medicines; and most importantly the delivery of anesthesia drugs. Quite a number of liposomes are on the market, and many more are still in developmental stage. Lipid nanoparticles are the first nano-medicine delivery system to be advanced from laboratory concept to clinical application with high considerable clinical acceptance. Drug delivery systems for local anesthetics (LAs) have caught the interest of many researchers because there are many biomedical advantages connected to their application. There have been several formulation techniques to systemically deliver LA that include encapsulation in liposomes and complexation in cyclodextrins, nanoparticles, and to a little extent gold nanoparticles. The proposed formulations help to decrease the LA concentration utilized, increase its permeability, and most importantly increase the localization of the LA for a long period of time thereby leading to increase in the duration of the LA effect and finally to reduce any local and systemic toxicity. In this review, we will highlight on new updates pertaining to drug delivery of local anesthetics in particular bupivacaine using lipid nanoparticles.

  12. [The influence of local anesthetics on corneal epithelium. A scanning electron microscopic study (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Brewitt, H; Honegger, H

    1978-09-01

    The effect of different local anesthetics (Cocain 4%, Lidocaine 2%, Proparacain) on the corneal epithelium in rabbits was examined under scanning electron microscope. The experiment was divided into three groups. Group 1 received one application of two drops of the given local anesthetic for a reaction time of 5 minutes. Group 2 received two drops of the given anesthetic after 0, 5 and 10 minutes. The cornea was excised after 15 minutes. Group 3 were measured after a single application of Proparacain using a Schiötz or hand applanation tonometer according to Draeger. After a single dose of a local anesthetic principally the same changes in the surface of the cornea were observed with all the preparations used: a distinct decrease in the number of microvilli and microplicae, disruption of the intercellular spaces and the prominence of the cell nuclei which under normal conditions are not visible. After several applications the greater toxicity of Cocain compared with the other preparations was clearly seen through the disruption of the plasma membrane and the cytoplasm. The damage effected several layers of cells. Tonometry when correctly performed causes no additional damage to the cell surface.- The effect of local anesthetics on the cell membrane can only take place after the disruption of the tear film. The results emphasize that local anesthetics should only be applied when absolutely essential.

  13. Computer simulations of local anesthetic mechanisms: Quantum chemical investigation of procaine

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jeremy C; Bondar, A.N.; Suhai, Sandor; Frangopol, P.T.

    2007-02-01

    A description at the atomic level of detail of the interaction between local anesthetics, lipid membranes and membrane proteins, is essential for understanding the mechanism of local anesthesia. The importance of performing computer simulations to decipher the mechanism of local anesthesia is discussed here in the context of the current status of understanding of the local anesthetics action. As a first step towards accurate simulations of the interaction between local anesthetics, proteins, lipid and water molecules, here we use quantum mechanical methods to assess the charge distribution and structural properties of procaine in the presence and in the absence of water molecules. The calculations indicate that, in the absence of hydrogen-bonding water molecules, protonated procaine strongly prefers a compact structure enabled by intramolecular hydrogen bonding. In the presence of water molecules the torsional energy pro?le of procaine is modified, and hydrogen bonding to water molecules is favored relative to intra-molecular hydrogen bonding.

  14. Fluidizing the membrane by a local anesthetic: phenylethanol affects membrane protein oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Anbazhagan, Veerappan; Munz, Carmen; Tome, Lydia; Schneider, Dirk

    2010-12-17

    The exact mechanism of action of anesthetics is still an open question. While some observations suggest specific anesthetic-protein interactions, nonspecific perturbation of the lipid bilayer has also been suggested. Perturbations of bilayer properties could subsequently affect the structure and function of membrane proteins. Addition of the local anesthetic phenylethanol (PEtOH) to model membranes and intact Escherichia coli cells not only affected membrane fluidity but also severely altered the defined helix-helix interaction within the membrane. This experimental observation suggests that certain anesthetics modulate membrane physical properties and thereby indirectly affect transmembrane (TM) helix-helix interactions, which are not only involved in membrane protein folding and assembly but also important for TM signaling.

  15. History of T-cain: a local anesthetic developed and manufactured in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tobe, Masaru; Saito, Shigeru

    2015-10-01

    In many anesthesia textbooks written in English, lidocaine, tetracaine, bupivacaine, ropivacaine, and chloroprocaine are listed as useful local anesthetics for spinal anesthesia. In contrast, T-cain is not included in these lists, even though it has been reported to be suitable for spinal anesthesia in Japan. T-cain was developed as a local anesthetic in the early 1940s by Teikoku Kagaku Sangyo Inc. in Itami, Japan, by replacing a methyl group on tetracaine (Pantocaine(®)) with an ethyl group. T-cain was clinically approved for topical use in Japan in November 1949, and a mixture of dibucaine and T-cain (Neo-Percamin S(®)) was approved for spinal use in May 1950. Simply because of a lack of foreign marketing strategy, T-cain has never attracted global attention as a local anesthetic. However, in Japan, T-cain has been used topically or intrathecally (as Neo-Percamin S(®)) for more than 60 years. Other than the side effects generally known for all local anesthetics, serious side effects have not been reported for T-cain. In fact, several articles have reported that T-cain decreases the neurotoxicity of dibucaine. In this historical review, the characteristics of T-cain and its rise to become a major spinal anesthetic in Japan are discussed. PMID:26302690

  16. History of T-cain: a local anesthetic developed and manufactured in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tobe, Masaru; Saito, Shigeru

    2015-10-01

    In many anesthesia textbooks written in English, lidocaine, tetracaine, bupivacaine, ropivacaine, and chloroprocaine are listed as useful local anesthetics for spinal anesthesia. In contrast, T-cain is not included in these lists, even though it has been reported to be suitable for spinal anesthesia in Japan. T-cain was developed as a local anesthetic in the early 1940s by Teikoku Kagaku Sangyo Inc. in Itami, Japan, by replacing a methyl group on tetracaine (Pantocaine(®)) with an ethyl group. T-cain was clinically approved for topical use in Japan in November 1949, and a mixture of dibucaine and T-cain (Neo-Percamin S(®)) was approved for spinal use in May 1950. Simply because of a lack of foreign marketing strategy, T-cain has never attracted global attention as a local anesthetic. However, in Japan, T-cain has been used topically or intrathecally (as Neo-Percamin S(®)) for more than 60 years. Other than the side effects generally known for all local anesthetics, serious side effects have not been reported for T-cain. In fact, several articles have reported that T-cain decreases the neurotoxicity of dibucaine. In this historical review, the characteristics of T-cain and its rise to become a major spinal anesthetic in Japan are discussed.

  17. Inhibition of fast axonal transport in vitro by the local anesthetics prilocaine, mepivacaine, and bupivacaine.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, P A

    1983-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to establish the concentrations of prilocaine, mepivacaine, and bupivacaine which are effective at blocking fast axonal transport, to determine whether prilocaine and mepivacaine offer a better prospect of dissociating conduction block and transport block in vivo than does lidocaine and whether bupivacaine offers a better prospect than etidocaine in the same context. Fast axonal transport of [3H]leucine-labeled proteins was studied in vitro in bullfrog spinal nerves and quantitated by liquid scintillation counting. Exposure of spinal nerves to 14 mM prilocaine reduced the quantity of 3H-labeled proteins which accumulated at a ligature by 86%, and exposure to 14 mM mepivacaine reduced it by 70%; 10 mM prilocaine reduced this same parameter by 54%, a degree of inhibition close to the 44% reduction caused by 14 mM lidocaine. The D(-) and L(+) stereoisomers of mepivacaine each reduced transport to the ligature by approximately 50% at a concentration of 14 mM. Bupivacaine reduced the accumulation of 3H-labeled proteins at the ligature by 49% at a 10 mM concentration (pH 6.2); its potency is close to that found for etidocaine in a previous study. Since prilocaine and mepivacaine are at least as potent as lidocaine as transport inhibitors and at blocking impulse conduction, these two anesthetics offer no advantage over lidocaine to achieve dissociation of conduction block from transport block in vivo. Bupivacaine appears to offer no advantage over etidocaine in the same context, as the two agents have a similar potency as local anesthetics and a similar potency as inhibitors of fast axonal transport.

  18. Local anesthetic anchoring to cardiac sodium channels. Implications into tissue-selective drug targeting.

    PubMed

    Li, R A; Tsushima, R G; Himmeldirk, K; Dime, D S; Backx, P H

    1999-07-01

    Local anesthetics inhibit Na+ channels in a variety of tissues, leading to potentially serious side effects when used clinically. We have created a series of novel local anesthetics by connecting benzocaine (BZ) to the sulfhydryl-reactive group methanethiosulfonate (MTS) via variable-length polyethylether linkers (L) (MTS-LX-BZ [X represents 0, 3, 6, or 9]). The application of MTS-LX-BZ agents modified native rat cardiac as well as heterologously expressed human heart (hH1) and rat skeletal muscle (rSkM1) Na+ channels in a manner resembling that of free BZ. Like BZ, the effects of MTS-LX-BZ on rSkM1 channels were completely reversible. In contrast, MTS-LX-BZ modification of heart and mutant rSkM1 channels, containing a pore cysteine at the equivalent location as cardiac Na+ channels (ie, Y401C), persisted after drug washout unless treated with DTT, which suggests anchoring to the pore via a disulfide bond. Anchored MTS-LX-BZ competitively reduced the affinity of cardiac Na+ channels for lidocaine but had minimal effects on mutant channels with disrupted local anesthetic modification properties. These results establish that anchored MTS-LX-BZ compounds interact with the local anesthetic binding site (LABS). Variation in the linker length altered the potency of channel modification by the anchored drugs, thus providing information on the spatial relationship between the anchoring site and the LABS. Our observations demonstrate that local anesthetics can be anchored to the extracellular pore cysteine in cardiac Na+ channels and dynamically interact with the intracellular LABS. These results suggest that nonselective agents, such as local anesthetics, might be made more selective by linking these agents to target-specific anchors.

  19. [Pain perception, mechanisms of action of local anesthetics and possible causes of failure].

    PubMed

    Vandermeulen, E

    2000-01-01

    First, the fundamentals of impulse transmission and pain perception are revised. The role of the primary afferent nociceptors is explained. Dental pain is described as a form of acute pain and the mechanism of nociception is fundamental. Peripheral and central sensitization can evolve. The second part covers the pharmacological aspects. Local anesthetics reduce impulse transmission by interfering with the mechanism of normal depolarisation. Binding to specific receptors located at the nerve membrane, more specifically on the sodium channel, results in decreased or eliminated permeability to sodium ions and leads to interruption of nerve conduction. The different types of local anesthetics used in dentistry are discussed in more detail with respect to their physico-chemical characteristics and analgetic properties. The importance of factors such as lipophilicity, degree of protein binding and dissociation constant pKa are explained together with the clinical implications of pH and possible toxic effects. Failure of local anesthesia can be the result of problems with the administration of the product or can have a pharmacological basis. Injection of the anesthetic should take place in amounts large enough, with suitable volume and as close as possible to the nerve. When infection and inflammation are present, the intravascular resorption of the anesthetic will accelerate and the lowered pH influences diffusion negatively. Repetitive administration can induce the phenomenon of tachyfylaxis (decreased anesthetic effect).

  20. Nanogel scavengers for drugs: Local anesthetic uptake by thermoresponsive nanogels

    PubMed Central

    Hoare, Todd; Sivakumaran, Daryl; Stefanescu, Cristina; Lawlor, Michael W.; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2012-01-01

    The use of functional nanogels based on poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) for effectively scavenging compounds (here, the model drug bupivacaine) is demonstrated using an in vitro cell-based assay. Nanogels containing higher loadings of acidic functional groups or more core-localized functional group distributions bound more bupivacaine, while nanogel size had no significant effect on drug binding. Increasing the dose of nanogel applied also facilitated more bupivacaine binding for all nanogel compositions tested. Binding was driven predominantly by acid-base interactions between the nanogels (anionic) and bupivacaine (cationic) at physiological pH, although both non-specific absorption and hydrophobic partitioning also contributed to drug scavenging. Nanogels exhibited minimal cytotoxicity to multiple cell types and were well-tolerated in vivo via peritoneal injections, although larger nanogels caused limited splenic toxicity at higher concentrations. The cell-based assay described herein is found to facilitate more robust drug uptake measurements for nanogels than conventional centrifugation-based assays, in which nanogels can be compressed (and thus drug released) during the measurement. PMID:22244983

  1. The use of amide local anesthetics in patients susceptible to malignant hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Minasian, A; Yagiela, J A

    1988-10-01

    The use of amide local anesthetics in dental patients presumed to be susceptible to malignant hyperthermia (MH) is controversial. A literature review of 17 recent dental publications and their reference citations revealed that the recommendation to avoid local anesthetics of the amide type in dental treatment of MH-susceptible (MHS) patients is based on in vitro muscle investigations, unpublished communications, and a single case report suggestive of MH. Therefore, a survey of members of the Malignant Hyperthermia Association of the United States designed to determine what, if any, MH-like reactions have occurred in patients with MHS receiving dental treatment was conducted. Of a total of 307 MHS respondents, 36 (12%) reported adverse reactions to dental care. Only one respondent, however, reported symptoms suspicious of MH (fever, muscle pain) in which the administration of amide local anesthetics appeared to be closely linked. Fifty-six (18%) of the respondents have had difficulty obtaining routine dental care since being identified as MHS; this includes 27 who have been refused dental treatment or have had to undergo operative procedures without the benefit of local anesthesia. These results support the conclusions that amide local anesthetics may be administered to MHS patients without significant risk and that currently the diagnosis of MH susceptibility can adversely affect the quality of dental care. PMID:3054689

  2. Hypersensitive reactions to local dental anesthetics and patient information: critical review of a drug leaflet

    PubMed Central

    Simonet, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the case of a patient who experienced adverse reactions to a local anesthetic. It reviews symptoms of adverse reactions, possible causes, patient management, and alternative anesthesia modes. The second part of the paper discusses the product leaflet information and the associated legal issues. PMID:22915891

  3. The Effect and Safety of Steroid Injection in Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: With or Without Local Anesthetics

    PubMed Central

    Song, Sung Hyuk; Ryu, Gi Hyeong; Park, Jin Woo; Lee, Ho Jun; Nam, Ki Yeun; Kim, Hyojun; Kim, Seung Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the long-term effect and safety of an epidural steroid injection in spinal stenosis patients, with or without local anesthetics. Methods Twenty-nine patients diagnosed with spinal stenosis were included and randomly divided into two groups. Translaminar epidural and selective nerve root spinal injection procedures were performed using steroids mixed with local anesthetics or normal saline. The effects of spinal injection procedures were measured with visual analogue scale (VAS) and functional rate index (FRI). These measurements were performed before injection, at 1 month after injection and at 3 months after injection. The occurrence of side effects was investigated each time. Results The VAS and FRI scores were significantly reduced in both the local anesthetics group and normal saline group at 1 and 3 months after the injection. However, there was no significant difference in VAS and FRI score reduction between the two groups each time. Side effects are not noted in both groups. Conclusion The spinal injection procedures using steroids mixed either with local anesthetics or normal saline have an effect in reducing pain and improving functional activities. However, there was no significant difference between the two groups in relation to side effects and the long-term effects of pain and function. PMID:26949664

  4. [Ultrasound-guided peripheral regional anesthesia : placement and dosage of local anesthetics].

    PubMed

    Gorsewski, G; Dinse-Lambracht, A; Tugtekin, I; Gauss, A

    2012-08-01

    Ever since the use of ultrasound guidance in regional anesthesia became more and more popular in recent years, it seemed obvious that so-called intraneural puncture and injection of local anesthetics was much more common than previously assumed. However, neurologic damage was not seen very often. The ultrasound-guided imaging of the nerves showed that intraneural injection has to be seen as an overall term. This term must be characterized in more detail in accordance with nerve anatomy and morphology. Various studies demonstrated that if intraneural puncture occured the needle usually took a path away from the fascicles (intraneural perifascicular), while intraneural transfascicular puncture seemed relatively rare and intraneural intrafascicular placement of the needle even more uncommon. As long as the needle is placed intraneurally but in an extrafascicular fashion a safe injection and the absence of neurologic damage can be assumed. However, if nerve fascicles are affected neurologic dysfunction can occur. In studies investigating the minimal effective local anesthetic volume needed for successful nerve block, a relevant reduction of injected volume was still achieved by intentionally applying the local anesthetic circumferentially around the outermost nerve layer rather than injecting it into neural structures. As an intraneural -intrafascicular injection carries the risk of nerve injury associated with a decrease in quality of life, the potential of ultrasound guidance in regional anesthesia should be considered. Circumferential administration of local anesthetic rather than creating a single point injection appears to be advantageous. PMID:22790475

  5. [Pregnancy and lactation period: Which local anesthetics and analgesics?].

    PubMed

    Fatori Popovic, Sandra; Lübbers, Heinz-Theo; von Mandach, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show relevant aspects of dental treatment in pregnancy. Common medication used in dental offices should be highlighted in special regard to the pregnant patient during dental treatment. The reader should gain more security in the election of the proper drugs for local anesthesia and oral analgesics. Local anaesthetics such as articain with adrenalin in a dilution of 1 : 200 000 can be used for dental treatment at any time. Paracetamol should be used as first line oral analgesic. Elective dental procedures should be postponed after delivery and after lactation period. PMID:27142442

  6. Structural effects of the local anesthetic bupivacaine hydrochloride on the human erythrocyte membrane and molecular models.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, Mario; Schneider, Carlos; Villena, Fernando; Norris, Beryl; Cárdenas, Hernán; Cuevas, Francisco; Sotomayor, Carlos P

    2002-01-01

    The interaction of the local anesthetic bupivacaine with the human erythrocyte membrane and molecular models is described. The latter consisted of isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes (IUM), large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), and phospholipid multilayers built-up of DMPC and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), representatives of phospholipid classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the human erythrocyte membrane, respectively. Optical and scanning electron microscopy revealed that bupivacaine induced erythrocyte spheroechinocytosis. According to the bilayer couple hypothesis, this result implied that bupivacaine inserted in the outer monolayer of the erythrocyte membrane. Experiments performed on IUM and DMPC LUV by fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction on DMPC and DMPE multilayers confirmed this result. Changes in the molecular organization of membranes alter lipid-protein interactions and induce functional perturbation of membrane proteins such as Na(+) channels. Since local anesthetics may control the influx of Na(+) into the human erythrocyte, in order to relate the structural perturbations induced by bupivacaine in these systems to Na(+) transport, the interaction of this anesthetic with isolated toad skin was also studied. Electrophysiological measurements indicated a significant decrease in the potential difference and in the short-circuit current of the skin after the application of the anesthetic, reflecting inhibition of the active transport of ions. These results suggest that bupivacaine-induced conformational changes of the lipid molecules alter the lipid-protein boundaries of the outer moiety of the erythrocyte membrane, thus interfering with the function of neighboring sodium channels. PMID:12482399

  7. Bupivacaine versus lignocaine as the choice of locall anesthetic agent for impacted third molar surgery a review

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, K.; Ebenezer, Vijay; Dakir, Abu; Kumar, Saravana; Prakash, D.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important goal in minor surgical procedures is to achieve proper and sufficient anesthesia and analgesia preoperatively, intraoperatively and in the immediate postoperative period. Several local anesthetic agents have been cited in the literature and studied. Bupivacaine is one of the most common long-acting anesthetic agents being used for surgical removal of impacted third molars. Lignocaine is one of the commonest short-acting anesthetic agents being used for the same procedure. In this review article, the analgesic and anesthetic abilities of the bupivacaine versus lignocaine have been reviewed while surgical removal of impacted third molars. PMID:26015720

  8. Calcium-Binding Properties of Sarcoplasmic Reticulum As Influenced by ATP, Caffeine, Quinine, and Local Anesthetics

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Arselio P.

    1968-01-01

    Calcium retained at binding sites of the sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes isolated from rabbit skeletal muscle requires 10-5 - 10-4 M ATP to exchange with 45Ca added to the medium. The ATP requirement for Ca exchangeability was observed with respect to the "intrinsic" Ca of the reticulum membranes and the fraction of Ca that is "actively" bound in the presence of ATP. Furthermore, a concentration of free Ca in the medium higher than 10-8 M is required for ATP to promote Ca exchangeability. This exchangeability is not influenced by caffeine, quinine, procaine, and tetracaine, and Ca that is either nonexchangeable (in the absence of ATP) or exchangeable (in the presence of ATP) is released by 1–5 mM quinine or tetracaine, but neither caffeine (6 mM) nor procaine (2–5 mM) has this effect. Quinine or tetracaine also releases Ca and Mg bound passively to the reticulum membranes. A possible role of ATP in maintaining the integrity of cellular membranes is discussed, and the effects of caffeine, quinine, and of local anesthetics on the binding of Ca by the isolated reticulum are related to the effects of these agents on 45Ca fluxes and on the twitch output observed in whole muscles. PMID:5682486

  9. Actions of bupivacaine, a widely used local anesthetic, on NMDA receptor responses.

    PubMed

    Paganelli, Meaghan A; Popescu, Gabriela K

    2015-01-14

    NMDA receptors mediate excitatory neurotransmission in brain and spinal cord and play a pivotal role in the neurological disease state of chronic pain, which is caused by central sensitization. Bupivacaine is the indicated local anesthetic in caudal, epidural, and spinal anesthesia and is widely used clinically to manage acute and chronic pain. In addition to blocking Na(+) channels, bupivacaine affects the activity of many other channels, including NMDA receptors. Importantly, bupivacaine inhibits NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, an area critically involved in central sensitization. We used recombinant NMDA receptors expressed in HEK293 cells and found that increasing concentrations of bupivacaine decreased channel open probability in GluN2 subunit- and pH-independent manner by increasing the mean duration of closures and decreasing the mean duration of openings. Using kinetic modeling of one-channel currents, we attributed the observed current decrease to two main mechanisms: a voltage-dependent "foot-in-the-door" pore block and an allosteric gating effect. Further, the inhibition was state-independent because it occurred to the same degree whether the drug was applied before or after glutamate stimulation and was mediated by extracellular and intracellular inhibitory sites, via hydrophilic and hydrophobic pathways. These results predict that clinical doses of bupivacaine would decrease the peak and accelerate the decay of synaptic NMDA receptor currents during normal synaptic transmission. These quantitative predictions inform possible applications of bupivacaine as preventative and therapeutic approaches in chronic pain.

  10. Correlation between the increased release of catecholamines evoked by local anesthetics and their analgesic and adverse effects: Role of K(+) channel inhibition.

    PubMed

    Sircuta, Carmen; Lazar, Alexandra; Azamfirei, Leonard; Baranyi, Mária; Vizi, E Sylvester; Borbély, Zoltán

    2016-06-01

    Because local anesthetics are known to inhibit both sodium and potassium channels, and anesthetic properties have been attributed to the former effect, we compared their effects with those of tetrodotoxin (TTX), a selective Na(+) channel inhibitor with anesthetic activity, and 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), a selective potassium channel blocker with convulsive activity, on transmitter release during rest and in response to field (axonal) stimulation using the microvolume perfusion method and isolated prefrontal cortex and spinal cord slice preparations loaded with the radioactive transmitters [(3)H]dopamine ([(3)H]DA) and [(3)H]noradrenaline ([(3)H]NA). It is also known that local anesthetics may exert analgesic effect and, rarely, some adverse effects on the central nervous system (CNS). Neurochemical evidence demonstrated that local anesthetics administered at concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 5mM, which might have been intentionally or accidentally achieved in clinical practice (e.g., during spinal and epidural anesthesia or peripheral nerve block), led to presynaptic failures during neurochemical transmission, including inhibited transmitter release associated with axonal firing and markedly enhanced extraneuronal concentrations of transmitters due to increased resting, [Ca(2+)]o-independent release. Tetrodotoxin, a toxin with selective Na(+) channel-blocking properties, inhibited the stimulation-evoked release but failed to affect the resting release. In contrast, the potassium channel inhibitor 4-AP enhanced both the resting- and action potential-evoked transmitter releases. It is concluded that effects of local anesthetics on resting catecholamine release in the spinal cord may contribute to their action during neuropathic pain relief and spinal analgesia as well as to their side effects in the CNS. PMID:26996722

  11. Correlation between the increased release of catecholamines evoked by local anesthetics and their analgesic and adverse effects: Role of K(+) channel inhibition.

    PubMed

    Sircuta, Carmen; Lazar, Alexandra; Azamfirei, Leonard; Baranyi, Mária; Vizi, E Sylvester; Borbély, Zoltán

    2016-06-01

    Because local anesthetics are known to inhibit both sodium and potassium channels, and anesthetic properties have been attributed to the former effect, we compared their effects with those of tetrodotoxin (TTX), a selective Na(+) channel inhibitor with anesthetic activity, and 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), a selective potassium channel blocker with convulsive activity, on transmitter release during rest and in response to field (axonal) stimulation using the microvolume perfusion method and isolated prefrontal cortex and spinal cord slice preparations loaded with the radioactive transmitters [(3)H]dopamine ([(3)H]DA) and [(3)H]noradrenaline ([(3)H]NA). It is also known that local anesthetics may exert analgesic effect and, rarely, some adverse effects on the central nervous system (CNS). Neurochemical evidence demonstrated that local anesthetics administered at concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 5mM, which might have been intentionally or accidentally achieved in clinical practice (e.g., during spinal and epidural anesthesia or peripheral nerve block), led to presynaptic failures during neurochemical transmission, including inhibited transmitter release associated with axonal firing and markedly enhanced extraneuronal concentrations of transmitters due to increased resting, [Ca(2+)]o-independent release. Tetrodotoxin, a toxin with selective Na(+) channel-blocking properties, inhibited the stimulation-evoked release but failed to affect the resting release. In contrast, the potassium channel inhibitor 4-AP enhanced both the resting- and action potential-evoked transmitter releases. It is concluded that effects of local anesthetics on resting catecholamine release in the spinal cord may contribute to their action during neuropathic pain relief and spinal analgesia as well as to their side effects in the CNS.

  12. In vivo comparison of the reinforcing and dopamine transporter effects of local anesthetics in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Kristin M; Kimmel, Heather L; Lindsey, Kimberly P; Votaw, John R; Goodman, Mark M; Howell, Leonard L

    2005-12-15

    Dopaminergic mechanisms are thought to play a central role in the reinforcing effects of cocaine. Similar to cocaine, other local anesthetics bind to the dopamine transporter (DAT) and inhibit DA uptake in rodent and monkey brain. Additionally, local anesthetics are self-administered in rhesus monkeys, indicative of abuse liability. The present study examined the reinforcing and DAT effects of the local anesthetics dimethocaine, procaine and cocaine using in vivo techniques. Monkeys were trained to respond under a second-order schedule for i.v. cocaine administration (0.10 or 0.30 mg/kg/infusion). When responding was stable, dimethocaine (0.030-1.7 mg/kg/ infusion) or procaine (0.10-10 mg/kg/ infusion) was substituted for the cocaine training dose. Dimethocaine administration produced higher response rates compared with that of procaine, and was a more potent reinforcer. Drug effects on behavior were related to DAT occupancy in monkey striatum during neuroimaging with positron emission tomography (PET). DAT occupancy was determined by displacement of 8-(2-[(18)F]fluroethyl)2beta-carbomethoxy-3beta-(4-chlorophenyl)nortropane (FECNT). DAT occupancy was between 66 and 82% and <10-41% for doses of dimethocaine and procaine that maintained maximum response rates, respectively. Finally, in vivo microdialysis in awake subjects determined drug-induced changes in extracellular DA in the caudate nucleus. There was close correspondence between peak increases in DA and DAT occupancy. Overall, reinforcing effects were consistent with DAT effects determined with in vivo techniques. The results further support a role for the DAT in the abuse liability of local anesthetics. PMID:16206183

  13. Isoflurane waste anesthetic gas concentrations associated with the open-drop method.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Douglas K; Mook, Deborah M

    2009-01-01

    The open-drop technique is used frequently for anesthetic delivery to small rodents. Operator exposure to waste anesthetic gas (WAG) is a potential occupational hazard if this method is used without WAG scavenging. This study was conducted to determine whether administration of isoflurane by the open-drop technique without exposure controls generates significant WAG concentrations. We placed 0.1, 0.2, or 0.3 ml of liquid isoflurane into screw-top 500 or 1000 ml glass jars. WAG concentration was measured at the opening of the container and 20 and 40 cm from the opening, a distance at which users likely would operate, at 1, 2, or 3 min WAG was measured by using a portable infrared gas analyzer. Mean WAG concentrations at the vessel opening were as high as 662 +/- 168 ppm with a 500 ml jar and 122 +/- 87 ppm with a 1000 ml jar. At operator levels, WAG concentrations were always at or near 0 ppm. For measurements made at the vessel opening, time was the only factor that significantly affected WAG concentration when using the 500 ml jar. Neither time nor liquid volume were significant factors when using 1000 ml jar. At all liquid volumes and time points, the WAG concentration associated with using the 500 ml container was marginally to significantly greater than that for the 1000 ml jar. PMID:19245753

  14. Efficacy of epidural local anesthetic and dexamethasone in providing postoperative analgesia: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jebaraj, B; Khanna, P; Baidya, DK; Maitra, S

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dexamethasone is a potent anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antiemetic drug. Individual randomized controlled trials found a possible benefit of epidural dexamethasone. The purpose of this meta-analysis is to estimate the benefit of epidural dexamethasone on postoperative pain and opioid consumption and to formulate a recommendation for evidence-based practice. Materials and Methods: Prospective, randomized controlled trials comparing the analgesic efficacy of epidural local anesthetic and dexamethasone combination, with local anesthetic alone for postoperative pain management after abdominal surgery, were planned to be included in this meta-analysis. PubMed, PubMed Central, Scopus, and Central Register of Clinical Trials of the Cochrane Collaboration (CENTRAL) databases were searched for eligible controlled trials using the following search words: “Epidural”, “dexamethasone”, and “postoperative pain”, until February 20, 2015. Results: Data from five randomized control trials have been included in this meta-analysis. Epidural dexamethasone significantly decreased postoperative morphine consumption (mean difference −7.89 mg; 95% confidence interval [CI]: −11.66 to −3.71) and number of patients required postoperative rescue analgesic boluses (risk ratio: 0.51; 95% CI: 0.41-0.63). Conclusion: The present data shows that the addition of dexamethasone to local anesthetic in epidural is beneficial for postoperative pain management. PMID:27375389

  15. Membrane permeable local anesthetics modulate Na(V)1.5 mechanosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Beyder, Arthur; Strege, Peter R; Bernard, Cheryl; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium selective ion channel Na(V)1.5 is expressed in the heart and the gastrointestinal tract, which are mechanically active organs. Na(V)1.5 is mechanosensitive at stimuli that gate other mechanosensitive ion channels. Local anesthetic and antiarrhythmic drugs act upon Na(V)1.5 to modulate activity by multiple mechanisms. This study examined whether Na(V)1.5 mechanosensitivity is modulated by local anesthetics. Na(V)1.5 channels were expressed in HEK-293 cells, and mechanosensitivity was tested in cell-attached and excised inside-out configurations. Using a novel protocol with paired voltage ladders and short pressure pulses, negative patch pressure (-30 mmHg) in both configurations produced a hyperpolarizing shift in the half-point of the voltage-dependence of activation (V(1/2a)) and inactivation (V(1/2i)) by about -10 mV. Lidocaine (50 µM) inhibited the pressure-induced shift of V(1/2a) but not V(1/2i). Lidocaine inhibited the tonic increase in pressure-induced peak current in a use-dependence protocol, but it did not otherwise affect use-dependent block. The local anesthetic benzocaine, which does not show use-dependent block, also effectively blocked a pressure-induced shift in V(1/2a). Lidocaine inhibited mechanosensitivity in Na(V)1.5 at the local anesthetic binding site mutated (F1760A). However, a membrane impermeable lidocaine analog QX-314 did not affect mechanosensitivity of F1760A Na(V)1.5 when applied from either side of the membrane. These data suggest that the mechanism of lidocaine inhibition of the pressure-induced shift in the half-point of voltage-dependence of activation is separate from the mechanisms of use-dependent block. Modulation of Na(V)1.5 mechanosensitivity by the membrane permeable local anesthetics may require hydrophobic access and may involve membrane-protein interactions.

  16. Adjuvants to prolong the local anesthetic effects of coated microneedle products.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Siebenaler, Kris; Brown, Ken; Dohmeier, Daniel; Hansen, Kris

    2012-12-15

    The objective of this study was to identify an adjuvant for anesthetics coated on microneedles to provide rapid onset and prolonged analgesic action with minimal skin tissue reaction. Aqueous lidocaine or prilocaine formulations with or without clonidine or the related analogs, guanfacine and apraclonidine, were dip-coated onto polymeric microneedles. The amount of lidocaine or prilocaine coated onto the microneedles was assessed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Delivery efficiency and dermal pharmacokinetics associated with lidocaine or prilocaine delivered via the microneedles were characterized in vivo using domestic swine. Skin punch biopsies were collected and analyzed to determine the anesthetic concentrations in the skin using HPLC-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Addition of clonidine to the formulations decreased the systemic absorption rate of the anesthetics from the patch application site without impacting the coating performance or the rapid onset of anesthesia. Formulations with 0.3 wt.% clonidine, identified as the optimal dose for lidocaine-delivery via microneedles, maintained the lidocaine skin concentration above the estimated therapeutic level (100 ng/mg) for 1 h without causing any skin irritation or color change. The other two clonidine analogs, guanfacine and apraclonidine, also led to delayed systemic absorption of lidocaine from the skin, indicating utility in providing prolonged analgesia.

  17. Effect of needle design on pain from dental local anesthetic injections.

    PubMed

    McPherson, Joanna Saenz; Dixon, Sara A; Townsend, Richard; Vandewalle, Kraig S

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this randomized, double-blind clinical study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a larger-bore compared with a standard-bore dental local anesthetic needle of the same gauge in reducing pain during inferior alveolar (IA) and long buccal (LB) nerve block injections. Twenty active duty military or Department of Defense beneficiaries undergoing dental treatment were anesthetized using a split-mouth design with 4 anesthetic dental injections. Both sides of the mouth received IA nerve block and LB nerve injections, one using the 27-gauge large-bore Septoject XL needle and other using a 27-gauge standard-bore Septoject needle. Patients rated the pain experienced with each method using a visual analogue scale (VAS). The IA injection mean VAS score and standard deviation were 38.9 ± 22.7 mm and 37.1 ± 22.4 mm, respectively, for the larger and standard-bore needles. The LB injection mean VAS score and standard deviation were 33.5 ± 22.8 mm and 35.1 ± 19.6 mm, respectively, for the larger and standard-bore needles. The data were analyzed with a paired t test (α = .05). No significant difference was found between the IA (P = .70) or LB injections (P = .73). The use of a larger-bore 27-gauge needle did not reduce pain on injection compared with the standard-bore 27-gauge needle. PMID:25849467

  18. Effect of Needle Design on Pain From Dental Local Anesthetic Injections

    PubMed Central

    McPherson, Joanna Saenz; Dixon, Sara A.; Townsend, Richard; Vandewalle, Kraig S.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this randomized, double-blind clinical study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a larger-bore compared with a standard-bore dental local anesthetic needle of the same gauge in reducing pain during inferior alveolar (IA) and long buccal (LB) nerve block injections. Twenty active duty military or Department of Defense beneficiaries undergoing dental treatment were anesthetized using a split-mouth design with 4 anesthetic dental injections. Both sides of the mouth received IA nerve block and LB nerve injections, one using the 27-gauge large-bore Septoject XL needle and other using a 27-gauge standard-bore Septoject needle. Patients rated the pain experienced with each method using a visual analogue scale (VAS). The IA injection mean VAS score and standard deviation were 38.9 ± 22.7 mm and 37.1 ± 22.4 mm, respectively, for the larger and standard-bore needles. The LB injection mean VAS score and standard deviation were 33.5 ± 22.8 mm and 35.1 ± 19.6 mm, respectively, for the larger and standard-bore needles. The data were analyzed with a paired t test (α = .05). No significant difference was found between the IA (P = .70) or LB injections (P = .73). The use of a larger-bore 27-gauge needle did not reduce pain on injection compared with the standard-bore 27-gauge needle. PMID:25849467

  19. Effect of needle design on pain from dental local anesthetic injections.

    PubMed

    McPherson, Joanna Saenz; Dixon, Sara A; Townsend, Richard; Vandewalle, Kraig S

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this randomized, double-blind clinical study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a larger-bore compared with a standard-bore dental local anesthetic needle of the same gauge in reducing pain during inferior alveolar (IA) and long buccal (LB) nerve block injections. Twenty active duty military or Department of Defense beneficiaries undergoing dental treatment were anesthetized using a split-mouth design with 4 anesthetic dental injections. Both sides of the mouth received IA nerve block and LB nerve injections, one using the 27-gauge large-bore Septoject XL needle and other using a 27-gauge standard-bore Septoject needle. Patients rated the pain experienced with each method using a visual analogue scale (VAS). The IA injection mean VAS score and standard deviation were 38.9 ± 22.7 mm and 37.1 ± 22.4 mm, respectively, for the larger and standard-bore needles. The LB injection mean VAS score and standard deviation were 33.5 ± 22.8 mm and 35.1 ± 19.6 mm, respectively, for the larger and standard-bore needles. The data were analyzed with a paired t test (α = .05). No significant difference was found between the IA (P = .70) or LB injections (P = .73). The use of a larger-bore 27-gauge needle did not reduce pain on injection compared with the standard-bore 27-gauge needle.

  20. Intraosseous injection as an adjunct to conventional local anesthetic techniques: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Idris, Mohamed; Sakkir, Nasil; Naik, Kishore Gopalakrishna; Jayaram, Nandakishore Kunijal

    2014-01-01

    Background: The achievement of successful local anesthesia is a continual challenge in dentistry. Adjunctive local anesthetic techniques and their armamentaria, such as intraosseous injection (the Stabident system and the X-tip system) have been proposed to be advantageous in cases where the conventional local anesthetic techniques have failed. Aim: A clinical study was undertaken using intraosseous injection system by name X-tip to evaluate its effectiveness in cases where inferior alveolar nerve block has failed to provide pulpal anesthesia. Materials and Methods: Sixty adult patients selected were to undergo endodontic treatment for a mandibular molar tooth. Inferior alveolar nerve block was given using 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine. Twenty-four patients (40%) had pain even after administration of IAN block; intraosseous injection was administered using 4% articaine containing 1:100,000 epinephrine, using the X-tip system. The success of X-tip intraosseous injection was defined as none or mild pain (Heft-Parker visual analog scale ratings ≤ 54 mm) on endodontic access or initial instrumentation. Results: Intraosseous injection technique was successful in 21 out of 24 patients (87.5%), except three patients who had pain even after supplemental X-tip injection. Conclusion: Within the limits of this study, we can conclude that supplemental intraosseous injection using 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine has a statistically significant influence in achieving pulpal anesthesia in patients with irreversible pulpitis. PMID:25298642

  1. Mutant bacterial sodium channels as models for local anesthetic block of eukaryotic proteins.

    PubMed

    Smith, Natalie E; Corry, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Voltage gated sodium channels are the target of a range of local anesthetic, anti-epileptic and anti-arrhythmic compounds. But, gaining a molecular level understanding of their mode of action is difficult as we only have atomic resolution structures of bacterial sodium channels not their eukaryotic counterparts. In this study we used molecular dynamics simulations to demonstrate that the binding sites of both the local anesthetic benzocaine and the anti-epileptic phenytoin to the bacterial sodium channel NavAb can be altered significantly by the introduction of point mutations. Free energy techniques were applied to show that increased aromaticity in the pore of the channel, used to emulate the aromatic residues observed in eukaryotic Nav1.2, led to changes in the location of binding and dissociation constants of each drug relative to wild type NavAb. Further, binding locations and dissociation constants obtained for both benzocaine (660 μM) and phenytoin (1 μM) in the mutant channels were within the range expected from experimental values obtained from drug binding to eukaryotic sodium channels, indicating that these mutant NavAb may be a better model for drug binding to eukaryotic channels than the wild type.

  2. The rates of interaction of local anesthetics with sodium channels in nerve.

    PubMed

    Courtney, K R; Kendig, J J; Cohen, E N

    1978-11-01

    Voltage clamp experiments were carried out on Rana catesbiana nodes of Ranvier in order to test predictions regarding the relationship between local anesthetic lipid solubility and the rate of development of and recovery from frequency-dependent increments of sodium channel block. Contrary to expectations, the drugs of greater lipid solubility than lidocaine showed slower rates of development of frequency-dependent block and, in addition, induced longer rather than shorter memories for recent frequency-depent increments in channel block. Relaxation time constants for bupivacaine (50 micrometer), etidocaine (15 micrometer) and tetracaine (0.7 micrometer) measured 50, 8 and 8 sec, respectively, compared to shorter time constant of 2 sec for lidocaine (250 micrometer). Rate constants were calculated for binding to channels in both open and closed states. Open channels displayed a 130- to 6000-fold greater affinity for the local anesthetics than did closed channels, verifying an important feature of the "modulated receptor" hypothesis. In addition, binding to closed channels was enhanced by holding the membrane at more depolarizing potentials, which favored the development of inactive channel states. The exceptionally large binding constants of lidocaine for interactions with both closed and open channels cannot be attributed to its lipid solubility characteristics alone. PMID:712641

  3. Analysis of clinical records of dental patients attending Jordan University Hospital: Documentation of drug prescriptions and local anesthetic injections

    PubMed Central

    Dar-Odeh, Najla; Ryalat, Soukaina; Shayyab, Mohammad; Abu-Hammad, Osama

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to analyze clinical records of dental patients attending the Dental Department at the University of Jordan Hospital: a teaching hospital in Jordan. Analysis aimed at determining whether dental specialists properly documented the drug prescriptions and local anesthetic injections given to their patients. Methods: Dental records of the Dental Department at the Jordan University Hospital were reviewed during the period from April 3rd until April 26th 2007 along with the issued prescriptions during that period. Results: A total of 1000 records were reviewed with a total of 53 prescriptions issued during that period. Thirty records documented the prescription by stating the category of the prescribed drug. Only 13 records stated the generic or the trade names of the prescribed drugs. Of these, 5 records contained the full elements of a prescription. As for local anesthetic injections, the term “LA used” was found in 22 records while the names and quantities of the local anesthetics used were documented in only 13 records. Only 5 records documented the full elements of a local anesthetic injection. Conclusion: The essential data of drug prescriptions and local anesthetic injections were poorly documented by the investigated group of dental specialists. It is recommended that the administration of the hospital and the dental department implement clear and firm guidelines for dental practitioners in particular to do the required documentation procedure. PMID:19209291

  4. Plasma concentration and cardiovascular effects of lidocaine during continuous epidural administration in dogs anesthetized with isoflurane.

    PubMed

    Sakonju, Iwao; Maeda, Kenichi; Karasawa, Koichi; Tadokoro, Toshiyuki; Kakuta, Tomoko; Takase, Katsuaki

    2011-03-01

    The cardiovascular effects of continuous epidural administration (CEA) of lidocaine were investigated in anesthetized dogs. Loading epidural injections of 2, 4, or 6 mg/kg of lidocaine were followed by CEA with 1, 2, or 3 mg/kg/hr lidocaine, respectively, for 2 hr under 2.0% isoflurane anesthesia. Heart rate, direct blood pressure, cardiac index, and stroke volume decreased dose-dependently during CEA, whereas systemic vascular resistance did not significantly differ with dose, and no characteristic changes were observed in any groups. Plasma lidocaine concentration reached a steady state during CEA and increased in a dose-dependent manner. Circulatory suppression caused by lidocaine CEA was not attributable to peripheral vasodilation, but rather to the direct cardiac action of systemic lidocaine absorption from the peridural space. PMID:21048393

  5. [New anesthetics].

    PubMed

    Malamed, S F

    2000-01-01

    Since the introduction of cocaine local analgesia in 1886, and the subsequent development of procaine (1904) and other closely related ester-type compounds, dentistry has prided itself on being as close to 'painless' as possible. In the late 1940s the newest group of the local anesthetic compounds, the amides, was introduced. The initial amide local analgesic, lignocaine (Xylocaine), revolutionised pain control in dentistry worldwide. In succeeding years other amide-type local anesthetics, mepivacaine, prilocaine, bupivacaine and etidocaine, were introduced. They gave the dental practitioner a local anesthetic armamentarium which provided pulpal analgesia for periods of from 20 minutes (mepivacaine) to as long as three hours (bupivacaine and etidocaine with adrenaline). In addition these popular drugs proved to be more rapid-acting than the older ester-type drug and, at least from the perspective of allergenicity, more safe. In 1976, in Germany, the newest amide local analgesic, carticaine HCl was introduced into dentistry. Articaine (the generic name was changed) possesses properties similar to lignocaine but has additional properties which made the drug quite attractive to the general dental practitioner. In 1986 articaine was introduced in North America (Canada) where it has become the most used local anesthetic, supplanting lignocaine. Articaine has been approved for use in the United Kingdom. In this introductory discussion we review the development of articaine and discuss its place in the dental local analgesic armamentarium.

  6. Effects of tertiary amine local anesthetics on the assembly and disassembly of brain microtubules in vitro.

    PubMed

    Genna, J M; Coffe, G; Pudles, J

    1980-09-01

    From kinetic and electron microscopy studies on the effects of procaine, tetracaine and dibucaine on the polymerization and depolymerization of the microtubules isolated from pig and rat brains the following results were obtained. 1. Procaine or tetracaine, at the concentration range of 0.5--20 mM and of 0.5--5 mM respectively, increases the rate of tubulin polymerization (24 degrees C or 37 degrees C) and of microtubule depolymerization (4 degrees C) as a linear function of the concentration of the anesthetics, while identical amounts of microtubules are formed. In the absence of microtubule-associated proteins the polymerization of tubulin is not induced by 10 mM procaine, furthermore, the critical concentration of microtubule proteins necessary for assembly into microtubules is not affected at this concentration level of the anesthetic. This suggests that procaine affects not the nucleation, but rather the elongation process. 2. Dibucaine, from 0.5 mM to 3 mM increases the lag time of the polymerization reaction, while from 0.5 mM to 2 mM it linearly decreases both tubulin polymerization (24 degrees C) and microtubule depolymerization (4 degrees C) rates. Dibucaine, up to mM concentration, does not affect the extent of tubulin polymerization; however, above this concentration it induces the formation of amorphous aggregates. 3. Procaine or tetracaine enhances the depolymerizing effect of calcium on microtubules. The half-maximal values for the depolymerizing effect of calcium were 0.96, 0.71 and 0.51 mM for the control, in the presence of 10 mM procaine and 5 mM tetracaine respectively. PMID:7439170

  7. Guidelines for the use of local anesthetics in the dental treatment of patients who are susceptible to malignant hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    D'Ambrosio, J; Adragna, M G

    1988-01-01

    There is controversy regarding the safe use of local anesthetics in patients who are susceptible to malignant hyperthermia undergoing dental treatment. This article reviews the literature for reports of malignant hyperthermia reactions under local and general anesthesia, and suggests a protocol for the management of these patients in the dental office. PMID:2978768

  8. Effect of pH of bupivacaine on duration of repeated sciatic nerve blocks in the albino rat. Local Anesthetics for Neuralgia Study Group.

    PubMed

    Baker, C E; Berry, R L; Elston, R C

    1991-06-01

    Tachyphylaxis has been ascribed to tissue acidification after repeated injections of acidic local anesthetic solutions. We studied the effect of pH on the duration of action of bupivacaine to determine the validity of this proposed mechanism of tachyphylaxis by injecting bupivacaine solutions adjusted to pH 4.2 or 6.8 into a surgically implanted system created to permit in vivo irrigation of rat sciatic nerves with local anesthetic. Tachyphylaxis developed at both pH values. The results fail to support the acidification hypothesis as there was no statistically significant effect of a 400-fold difference in hydrogen ion concentration on the development of tachyphylaxis or the duration of motor dysfunction.

  9. Simultaneous determination of four local anesthetics by CE with ECL and study on interaction between procainamide and human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Duan, Hong-Bing; Cao, Jun-Tao; Yang, Jiu-Jun; Wang, Hui; Liu, Yan-Ming

    2016-07-01

    A new method of capillary electrophoresis (CE) coupled with tris(2, 2'-bipyridyl) ruthenium(II) electrochemiluminescence (ECL) detection has been developed to detect four local anesthetics procainamide (PAH), tetracaine (TCH), proparacaine (PCH) and cinchocaine (CIN) simultaneously. An europium (III)-doped prussian blue analogue film (Eu-PB) modified platinum electrode was prepared and applied to improve the detection sensitivity. The parameters including additives, concentration and pH of the running buffer, separation voltage and detection potential that affect CE separation and ECL detection were optimized in detail. The four local anesthetics were baseline separated and detected within 10min under the optimized conditions. The detection limits (LOD) of PAH, TCH, PCH and CIN are 5.5×10(-8), 9.6×10(-8), 2.5×10(-8) and 3.5×10(-8)molL(-1) (S/N=3), respectively. RSDs of the migration time for four analytes range from 1.2% to 2.5% within intraday and from 2.4% to 4.9% in interday, RSDs of the peak area for four analytes are from 1.7% to 3.3% within intraday and from 2.2% to 5.6% in interday, respectively. The limits of quantitation (LOQ) (S/N=10) for PAH, TCH, PCH and CIN in human urine sample are 5.9×10(-7), 9.2×10(-7), 8.3×10(-7) and 5.0×10(-7)molL(-1), separately. The recoveries (n=3) of four analytes in human urine are from 87.6% to 107.7% with less than 5.9% in RSDs. The developed method was used to determine four local anesthetics in human urine samples and investigate the interaction between PAH and human serum albumin (HSA). The number of binding sites and the binding constant of PAH with HSA were calculated to be 1.03 and 2.4×10(4)Lmol(-1), respectively.

  10. Simultaneous determination of four local anesthetics by CE with ECL and study on interaction between procainamide and human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Duan, Hong-Bing; Cao, Jun-Tao; Yang, Jiu-Jun; Wang, Hui; Liu, Yan-Ming

    2016-07-01

    A new method of capillary electrophoresis (CE) coupled with tris(2, 2'-bipyridyl) ruthenium(II) electrochemiluminescence (ECL) detection has been developed to detect four local anesthetics procainamide (PAH), tetracaine (TCH), proparacaine (PCH) and cinchocaine (CIN) simultaneously. An europium (III)-doped prussian blue analogue film (Eu-PB) modified platinum electrode was prepared and applied to improve the detection sensitivity. The parameters including additives, concentration and pH of the running buffer, separation voltage and detection potential that affect CE separation and ECL detection were optimized in detail. The four local anesthetics were baseline separated and detected within 10min under the optimized conditions. The detection limits (LOD) of PAH, TCH, PCH and CIN are 5.5×10(-8), 9.6×10(-8), 2.5×10(-8) and 3.5×10(-8)molL(-1) (S/N=3), respectively. RSDs of the migration time for four analytes range from 1.2% to 2.5% within intraday and from 2.4% to 4.9% in interday, RSDs of the peak area for four analytes are from 1.7% to 3.3% within intraday and from 2.2% to 5.6% in interday, respectively. The limits of quantitation (LOQ) (S/N=10) for PAH, TCH, PCH and CIN in human urine sample are 5.9×10(-7), 9.2×10(-7), 8.3×10(-7) and 5.0×10(-7)molL(-1), separately. The recoveries (n=3) of four analytes in human urine are from 87.6% to 107.7% with less than 5.9% in RSDs. The developed method was used to determine four local anesthetics in human urine samples and investigate the interaction between PAH and human serum albumin (HSA). The number of binding sites and the binding constant of PAH with HSA were calculated to be 1.03 and 2.4×10(4)Lmol(-1), respectively. PMID:27154684

  11. Acute physiological responses to castration-related pain in piglets: the effect of two local anesthetics with or without meloxicam.

    PubMed

    Bonastre, C; Mitjana, O; Tejedor, M T; Calavia, M; Yuste, A G; Úbeda, J L; Falceto, M V

    2016-09-01

    Methods to reduce castration-related pain in piglets are still issues of concern and interest for authorities and producers. Our objectives were to estimate the effectiveness of two protocols of local anesthesia (lidocaine and the combination of lidocaine+bupivacaine) as well as the use of meloxicam as a postoperative analgesic in alleviating castration-related pain, measured by acute physiological responses. Eight groups (15 piglets/group) were included in the study: (1) castration without anesthesia or analgesia, without meloxicam (TRAD WITHOUT), (2) castration without anesthesia or analgesia, but with meloxicam (TRAD WITH), (3) handling without meloxicam (SHAM WITHOUT), (4) handling with meloxicam (SHAM WITH), (5) castration after local anesthesia with lidocaine but without meloxicam (LIDO WITHOUT), (6) castration after local anesthesia with lidocaine and meloxicam (LIDO WITH), (7) castration after local anesthesia with lidocaine+bupivacaine without meloxicam (LIDO+BUPI WITHOUT), (8) castration after local anesthesia with lidocaine+bupivacaine and meloxicam (LIDO+BUPI WITH). Acute physiological responses measured included skin surface temperature and serum glucose and cortisol concentrations. On days 4 and 11 post-castration BW was recorded and average daily gain was calculated over this period. Furthermore, piglet mortality was recorded over the 11-day post-castration period. Administration of local anesthetic or meloxicam did not prevent the decrease in skin surface temperature associated with castration. Lidocaine reduced the increase in glucose concentration associated with castration. For castrated pigs, the joint use of lidocaine and meloxicam caused a significant decrease in cortisol concentration; the combination of intratesticular lidocaine and bupivacaine did not seem to be more effective than lidocaine alone. No effect of treatments on mortality and growth were detected. PMID:27080170

  12. Is transverse abdominis plane block effective following local anesthetic infiltration in laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal hernia repair?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mun Gyu; Ok, Si Young; Kim, Sang Ho; Lee, Se-Jin; Park, Sun Young; Yoo, Jae-Hwa; Cho, Ana; Hur, Kyung Yul; Kim, Myung Jin

    2014-01-01

    Background Transverse abdominis plane (TAP) block can be recommended as a multimodal method to reduce postoperative pain in laparoscopic abdominal surgery. However, it is unclear whether TAP block following local anesthetic infiltration is effective. We planned this study to evaluate the effectiveness of the latter technique in laparoscopic totally extraperitoneal hernia repair (TEP). Methods We randomly divided patients into two groups: the control group (n = 37) and TAP group (n = 37). Following the induction of general anesthesia, as a preemptive method, all of the patients were subjected to local anesthetic infiltration at the trocar sites, and the TAP group was subjected to ultrasound-guided bilateral TAP block with 30 ml of 0.375% ropivacaine in addition before TEP. Pain was assessed in the recovery room and post-surgery at 4, 8, and 24 h. Additionally, during the postoperative 24 h, the total injected dose of analgesics and incidence of nausea were recorded. Results: On arrival in the recovery room, the pain score of the TAP group (4.33 ± 1.83) was found to be significantly lower than that of the control group (5.73 ± 2.04). However, the pain score was not significantly different between the TAP group and control group at 4, 8, and 24 h post-surgery. The total amounts of analgesics used in the TAP group were significantly less than in the control group. No significant difference was found in the incidence of nausea between the two groups. Conclusions TAP block following local infiltration had a clinical advantage only in the recovery room. PMID:25558340

  13. Minimum anesthetic concentration and cardiovascular dose-response relationship of isoflurane in cinereous vultures (Aegypius monachus).

    PubMed

    Kim, Young K; Lee, Scott S; Suh, Euy H; Lee, Lyon; Lee, Hee C; Lee, Hyo J; Yeon, Seong C

    2011-09-01

    This study aimed to determine the minimum anesthetic concentration (MAC) and dose-related cardiovascular effects of isoflurane during controlled ventilation in cinereous vultures (Aegypius monachus). The MAC was determined for 10 cinereous vultures as the midpoint between the end-tidal isoflurane concentration that allows gross purposeful movement and that which prevents the movement in response to clamping a pedal digit. Immediately after the MAC was determined, the cardiovascular effects of isoflurane at 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 times the MAC were investigated in seven of the 10 birds. The MAC of isoflurane for 10 cinereous vultures during controlled ventilation was 1.06 +/- 0.07% (mean +/- SD). When the isoflurane concentration was increased to 1.5 and 2.0 times the MAC, there was significant dose-dependent decrease in the arterial blood pressure. However, the heart rate did not change over a range of 1.0 to 2.0 times the MAC.

  14. Choice of anesthetic technique on plasma concentrations of interleukins and cell adhesion molecules

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Whether inflammatory responses to surgery are comparably activated during total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) and during volatile anesthesia remains unclear. We thus compared the perioperative effects of TIVA and isoflurane anesthesia on plasma concentrations of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory interleukins and cell adhesion molecules. Methods Patients having laparoscopic cholecystectomies were randomly allocated to two groups: 44 were assigned to TIVA and 44 to isoflurane anesthesia. IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-13, and the cellular adhesion molecules intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 were determined preoperatively, before incision, and at 2 and 24 hours postoperatively. Our primary outcomes were area-under-the-curve cytokine and adhesion molecule concentrations over 24 postoperative hours. Results The only statistically significant difference in area-under-the-curve concentrations was for IL-6, which was greater in patients given isoflurane:78 (95% confidence interval (CI): 52 to 109) pg/ml versus 33 (22 to 50) pg/ml, P= 0.006. Two hours after surgery, IL-6 was significantly greater than baseline in patients assigned to isoflurane: 47 (95% CI: 4 to 216, P<0.001) pg/ml versus 18 (95%CI: 4 to 374, P<0.001) pg/ml in the TIVA group. In contrast, IL-10 was significantly greater in patients assigned to TIVA: 20 (95% CI: 2 to 140, P<0.001) pg/ml versus 12 (95% CI: 3 to 126, P<0.001) pg/ml. By 24 hours after surgery, concentrations were generally similar between study groups and similar to baseline values. Conclusion The only biomarker whose postoperative area-under-the-curve concentrations differed significantly as a function of anesthetic management was IL-6. Two hours after surgery, IL-6 concentrations were significantly greater in patients given isoflurane than TIVA. However, the differences were modest and seem unlikely to prove clinically important. Further studies are needed. PMID:24472144

  15. Dissociation of the vacuolar and macroautophagic cytopathology from the cytotoxicity induced by the lipophilic local anesthetic bupivacaine.

    PubMed

    Morissette, Guillaume; Bawolak, Marie-Thérèse; Marceau, François

    2011-07-01

    Local anesthetics, like many other cationic drugs, induce a vacuolar and macroautophagic cytopathology that has been observed in vivo and in various cell types; some also induce cytotoxicity of mitochondrial origin (apoptosis and necrosis) and it is not known whether the 2 types of toxicity overlap or interact. We compared bupivacaine with a more hydrophilic agent, lidocaine, for morphological, functional, and toxicological responses in a previously exploited nonneuronal system, primary smooth muscle cells. Bupivacaine induced little vacuolization (≥2.5 mmol/L, 4 h), but elicited autophagic accumulation (≥0.5 mmol/L, 4 h) and was massively cytotoxic at 2.5-5 mmol/L (4-24 h), the latter effect being unabated by the V-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1. Lidocaine exerted little cytotoxicity at and below 5 mmol/L for 24 h, but intensely induced the V-ATPase-dependent vacuolar and autophagic cytopathology. Bupivacaine was more potent than lidocaine in disrupting mitochondrial potential, as judged by Mitotracker staining (significant proportions of cells affected in the 1-5 and 5-10 mmol/L concentration ranges, respectively). The addition of mitochondrial-inactivating toxins antimycin A and oligomycin to lidocaine (2.5 mmol/L) reproduced the profile of bupivacaine action (low intensity of vacuolization and retained autophagic accumulation). The high potency of bupivacaine as a mitochondrial toxicant eclipses the benign vacuolar and autophagic response seen with more hydrophilic local anesthetics. PMID:21812528

  16. Dissociation of the vacuolar and macroautophagic cytopathology from the cytotoxicity induced by the lipophilic local anesthetic bupivacaine.

    PubMed

    Morissette, Guillaume; Bawolak, Marie-Thérèse; Marceau, François

    2011-07-01

    Local anesthetics, like many other cationic drugs, induce a vacuolar and macroautophagic cytopathology that has been observed in vivo and in various cell types; some also induce cytotoxicity of mitochondrial origin (apoptosis and necrosis) and it is not known whether the 2 types of toxicity overlap or interact. We compared bupivacaine with a more hydrophilic agent, lidocaine, for morphological, functional, and toxicological responses in a previously exploited nonneuronal system, primary smooth muscle cells. Bupivacaine induced little vacuolization (≥2.5 mmol/L, 4 h), but elicited autophagic accumulation (≥0.5 mmol/L, 4 h) and was massively cytotoxic at 2.5-5 mmol/L (4-24 h), the latter effect being unabated by the V-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1. Lidocaine exerted little cytotoxicity at and below 5 mmol/L for 24 h, but intensely induced the V-ATPase-dependent vacuolar and autophagic cytopathology. Bupivacaine was more potent than lidocaine in disrupting mitochondrial potential, as judged by Mitotracker staining (significant proportions of cells affected in the 1-5 and 5-10 mmol/L concentration ranges, respectively). The addition of mitochondrial-inactivating toxins antimycin A and oligomycin to lidocaine (2.5 mmol/L) reproduced the profile of bupivacaine action (low intensity of vacuolization and retained autophagic accumulation). The high potency of bupivacaine as a mitochondrial toxicant eclipses the benign vacuolar and autophagic response seen with more hydrophilic local anesthetics.

  17. Buffered lidocaine and bupivacaine mixture – the ideal local anesthetic solution?

    PubMed Central

    Best, Corliss A; Best, Alyssa A; Best, Timothy J; Hamilton, Danielle A

    2015-01-01

    The use of injectable local anesthetic solutions to facilitate pain-free surgery is an integral component of many procedures performed by the plastic surgeon. In many instances, a solution that has both rapid onset and prolonged duration of analgesia is optimal. A combination of lidocaine and bupivacaine, plain or with epinephrine, is readily available in most Canadian health care settings where such procedures are performed, and fulfills these criteria. However, commercially available solutions of both medications are acidic and cause a burning sensation on injection. Buffering to neutral pH with sodium bicarbonate is a practical method to mitigate the burning sensation, and has the added benefit of increasing the fraction of nonionized lipid soluble drug available. The authors report on the proportions of the three drugs to yield a neutral pH, and the results of an initial survey regarding the use of the combined solution with epinephrine in hand surgery. PMID:26090348

  18. Effects of the local anesthetic benzocaine on the human erythrocyte membrane and molecular models.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, Mario; Schneider, Carlos; Villena, Fernando; Norris, Beryl; Cárdenas, Hernán; Cuevas, Francisco; Sotomayor, Carlos P

    2004-04-01

    The interaction of the local anesthetic benzocaine with the human erythrocyte membrane and molecular models is described. The latter consisted of isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes (IUM), large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) of dimyristoylphospatidylcholine (DMPC), and phospholipid multilayers of DMPC and dimyristoylphospatidyletanolamine (DMPE), representatives of phospholipid classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the human erythrocyte membrane, respectively. Optical and scanning electron microscopy of human erythrocytes revealed that benzocaine induced the formation of echinocytes. Experiments performed on IUM and DMPC LUV by fluorescence spectroscopy showed that benzocaine interacted with the phospholipid bilayer polar groups and hydrophobic acyl chains. X-ray diffraction analysis of DMPC confirmed these results and showed that benzocaine had no effects on DMPE. The effect on sodium transport was also studied using the isolated toad skin. Electrophysiological measurements indicated a significant decrease in the potential difference (PD) and in the short-circuit current (Isc) after the application of benzocaine, reflecting inhibition of active ion transport. PMID:15059670

  19. Local Anesthetic Peripheral Nerve Block Adjuvants for Prolongation of Analgesia: A Systematic Qualitative Review

    PubMed Central

    Kirksey, Meghan A.; Haskins, Stephen C.; Cheng, Jennifer; Liu, Spencer S.

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of peripheral nerve blocks for anesthesia and postoperative analgesia has increased significantly in recent years. Adjuvants are frequently added to local anesthetics to prolong analgesia following peripheral nerve blockade. Numerous randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses have examined the pros and cons of the use of various individual adjuvants. Objectives To systematically review adjuvant-related randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses and provide clinical recommendations for the use of adjuvants in peripheral nerve blocks. Methods Randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses that were published between 1990 and 2014 were included in the initial bibliographic search, which was conducted using Medline/PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and EMBASE. Only studies that were published in English and listed block analgesic duration as an outcome were included. Trials that had already been published in the identified meta-analyses and included adjuvants not in widespread use and published without an Investigational New Drug application or equivalent status were excluded. Results Sixty one novel clinical trials and meta-analyses were identified and included in this review. The clinical trials reported analgesic duration data for the following adjuvants: buprenorphine (6), morphine (6), fentanyl (10), epinephrine (3), clonidine (7), dexmedetomidine (7), dexamethasone (7), tramadol (8), and magnesium (4). Studies of perineural buprenorphine, clonidine, dexamethasone, dexmedetomidine, and magnesium most consistently demonstrated prolongation of peripheral nerve blocks. Conclusions Buprenorphine, clonidine, dexamethasone, magnesium, and dexmedetomidine are promising agents for use in prolongation of local anesthetic peripheral nerve blocks, and further studies of safety and efficacy are merited. However, caution is recommended with use of any perineural adjuvant, as none have Food and Drug Administration approval, and

  20. In Vivo Toxicity of Local Anesthetics and Corticosteroids on Chondrocyte and Synoviocyte Viability and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    James, Christopher; Stoker, Aaron M.; Cook, Cristi R.; Khazai, Ravand S.; Flood, David L.; Cook, James L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Intra-articular injection of local anesthetic and/or corticosteroid is an adjunct treatment for arthritic and inflammatory orthopedic conditions. Despite potential benefits, there is growing concern that these medications may cause significant morbidity, including potential toxicity to intra-articular chondrocytes and synoviocytes. Design: Twenty dogs underwent intra-articular injection of the shoulder joint using ultrasound guidance, with the following injectates (n = 5 each): negative control (saline), methylprednisolone/1.0% lidocaine, triamcinolone/1.0% lidocaine, and triamcinolone/0.0625% bupivacaine. The dogs were euthanized 24 hours postinjection for reasons unrelated to this study. Synovium/cartilage explants were harvested under sterile conditions and assessed immediately or cultured for 7 days. Synoviocyte and chondrocyte viability was determined on day 1 and day 7 using Calcien AM and Sytox Blue live/dead fluorescent stains, and cell metabolism determined on day 2 using the alamar blue additive test. Results were compared statistically. Results: On day 1 synovium exposed to 1%L/M demonstrated a significant decrease in cell metabolism (P = 0.0107) and subjective synoviocyte viability scores (P = 0.013) compared with the negative control. Cartilage exposed to 1%L/M demonstrated decreased chondrocyte viability and cell metabolism versus all other groups, although not significantly. After 7 days of culture, cartilage viable cell density in the 1%L/M group was significantly (P ≤ 0.001) lower than the negative control. Subjective synoviocyte viability scores was significantly lower in the 1%L/M (P = 0.013), 1%L/T (P ≤ 0.001), and 0.0625%B/T groups (P = 0.006) compared with the negative control. Conclusions: This study suggests potential negative effects of combination local anesthetic/corticosteroid on intra-articular cell viability and cell metabolism. Further study is needed before determining definitive clinical recommendations. PMID:26069713

  1. Bisphenol A binds to the local anesthetic receptor site to block the human cardiac sodium channel.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Andrias O; Eberhardt, Esther; Weidner, Christian; Alzheimer, Christian; Wallace, B A; Lampert, Angelika

    2012-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) has attracted considerable public attention as it leaches from plastic used in food containers, is detectable in human fluids and recent epidemiologic studies link BPA exposure with diseases including cardiovascular disorders. As heart-toxicity may derive from modified cardiac electrophysiology, we investigated the interaction between BPA and hNav1.5, the predominant voltage-gated sodium channel subtype expressed in the human heart. Electrophysiology studies of heterologously-expressed hNav1.5 determined that BPA blocks the channel with a K(d) of 25.4±1.3 µM. By comparing the effects of BPA and the local anesthetic mexiletine on wild type hNav1.5 and the F1760A mutant, we demonstrate that both compounds share an overlapping binding site. With a key binding determinant thus identified, an homology model of hNav1.5 was generated based on the recently-reported crystal structure of the bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel NavAb. Docking predictions position both ligands in a cavity delimited by F1760 and contiguous with the DIII-IV pore fenestration. Steered molecular dynamics simulations used to assess routes of ligand ingress indicate that the DIII-IV pore fenestration is a viable access pathway. Therefore BPA block of the human heart sodium channel involves the local anesthetic receptor and both BPA and mexiletine may enter the closed-state pore via membrane-located side fenestrations. PMID:22848561

  2. Local anesthetic infusion pumps improve postoperative pain after inguinal hernia repair: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Barry; Waxman, Kenneth; Tatevossian, Raymond; Gamberdella, Marla; Read, Bruce

    2004-11-01

    Pain after an open inguinal hernia repair may be significant. In fact, some surgeons feel that the pain after open repair justifies a laparoscopic approach. The purpose of this study was to determine if the use of local anesthetic infusion pumps would reduce postoperative pain after open inguinal hernia repair. We performed a prospective, double-blind randomized study of 45 open plug and patch inguinal hernia repairs. Patients were randomized to receive either 0.25 per cent bupivicaine or saline solution via an elastomeric infusion pump (ON-Q) for 48 hours, at 2 cc/h. The catheters were placed in the subcutaneous tissue and removed on postoperative day 3. Both groups were prescribed hydrocodone to use in the postoperative period at the prescribed dosage as needed for pain. Interviews were conducted on postoperative days 3 and 7, and patient's questionnaires, including pain scores, amount of pain medicine used, and any complications, were collected accordingly. During the first 5 postoperative days, postoperative pain was assessed using a visual analog scale. Twenty-three repairs were randomized to the bupivicaine group and 22 repairs randomized to the placebo group. In the bupivicaine group, there was a significant decrease in postoperative pain on postoperative days 2 through 5 with P values <0.05. This significant difference continued through postoperative day 5, 2 days after the infusion pumps were removed. Patients who had bupivicaine instilled in their infusion pump had statistically significant lower subjective pain scores on postoperative days 2 through 5. This significant difference continued even after the infusion pumps were removed. Local anesthetic infusion pumps significantly decreased the amount of early postoperative pain. Pain relief persisted for 2 days after catheter and pump removal. PMID:15586515

  3. Physiological responses of great sturgeon (Huso huso) to different concentrations of 2-phenoxyethanol as an anesthetic.

    PubMed

    Shaluei, Fardin; Hedayati, Aliakbar; Jahanbakhshi, Abdolreza; Baghfalaki, Maryam

    2012-12-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of 2-phenoxyethanol (2-PE) as an anesthetic in great sturgeon under two experiments. First, fish were exposed to 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7 and 0.9 mL/L 2-PE, and time to induction (deep anesthesia) and recovery from anesthesia were measured. At concentration of 0.1 mL/L, 2-PE failed to induce deep anesthesia in fish, whereas at concentrations of 0.7 and 0.9 mL/L, all the fish were anaesthetized within 3 min of exposure. For assessing the impact of effective concentrations of 2-PE on physiological responses of great sturgeon, hematological indices, plasma metabolites, electrolytes, enzymes and cortisol levels were measured. The use of 2-PE induces a significant increase in RBC values at 0.3 mL/L concentration and a parallel increase in hemoglobin and hematocrit values. 2-PE anesthesia had no effect on WBC, MCV, MCH and MCHC levels when compared to control group. Serum glucose, cholesterol and cortisol levels were significantly high in 0.3 and 0.5 mL/L 2-PE. Moreover, AST levels were increased in fish exposed to the 0.3 mL/L 2-PE comparing with the control group (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in serum levels of total protein, triglycerides, ALP, ALT, Cl(-), Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+). In this study, alteration in hematological and serum biochemical indices was time-dependent. This study demonstrates that rapid induction of deep anesthesia with a relatively high concentration of 2-PE (0.7 and 0.9 mL/L) was associated with the lowest effects on the hematological and serum biochemical indices in great sturgeon and therefore would be recommended as eligible doses for hematological studies in this species.

  4. Use of continuous local anesthetic infusion in the management of postoperative split-thickness skin graft donor site pain.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Jorge L Reguero; Savetamal, Alisa; Crombie, Roselle E; Cholewczynski, Walter; Atweh, Nabil; Possenti, Paul; Schulz, John T

    2013-01-01

    Donor sites from split-thickness skin grafts (STSG) impose significant pain on patients in the early postoperative period. We report the use of continuous local anesthetic infusion as a method for the management of postoperative STSG donor site pain. Patients undergoing single or dual, adjacent STSG harvest from the thigh (eight patients) or back (one patient) were included in this study. Immediately after STSG harvest, subcutaneous catheters were placed for continuous infusion of local anesthetic. Daily donor site-specific pain severity scores were prospectively recorded in nine patients receiving local anesthetic infusion. Patient characteristics, technical aspects, and postoperative complications were identified in the study. The thigh was the anatomic location chosen for most donor sites. A single catheter was placed for donor sites limited to 4 inches in width or less. A dual catheter system was used for those wider than 4 inches. An elastomeric pump delivered continuously a total of 4 ml/hr of a solution of 0.5% bupivacaine. The average anesthetic infusion duration was 3.1 days. A substantial decrease in worst, least, and average donor site pain scores was found from the first 24 hours to the second postoperative day in our patients, a treatment trend that continued through postoperative day 3. One patient developed minor anesthetic leakage from the catheter insertion site; and in three cases, accidental dislodgement of the catheters occurred. There were no cases of donor site secondary infection. All donor sites were completely epithelialized at 1-month follow-up. Continuous local anesthetic infusion is technically feasible and may represent an option for postoperative donor site pain control after STSG harvesting. Relative cost-benefit of the technique remains to be determined. PMID:23271060

  5. Synthesis of Two Local Anesthetics from Toluene: An Organic Multistep Synthesis in a Project-Oriented Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demare, Patricia; Regla, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    This article describes one of the projects in the advanced undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory course concerning the synthesis of two local anesthetic drugs, prilocaine and benzocaine, with a common three-step sequence starting from toluene. Students undertake, in a several-week independent project, the multistep synthesis of a…

  6. Comparison of topical lidocaine/prilocaine anesthetic cream and local infiltration of 2% lidocaine for episioplasty in mares.

    PubMed

    Erkert, R S; Macallister, C G; Campbell, G; Payton, M E; Shawley, R; Clarke, C R

    2005-06-01

    Local anesthesia and tissue inflammation associated with lidocaine infiltration and lidocaine/prilocaine topical anesthetic cream for episioplasty in mares were compared. Twenty-two mares were randomly assigned to lidocaine or lidocaine/prilocaine topical anesthetic cream treatment groups. Perineum and vulva were cleaned, 8-12 g (approximately 1 g/cm per side of vulva) of topical anesthetic cream was applied, and the area was covered by plastic wrap 30 min prior to beginning procedure. Alternately, lidocaine was injected (1 mL) every centimeter just prior to the procedure. Episioplasty was conducted using standard methods, but employing simple interrupted sutures. Horses were not sedated and use of a twitch was recorded. Four millimeter punch biopsies were harvested 1, 3, and 10 days following episioplasty and scored for degree of inflammation by a blinded pathologist. Clinical inflammation scores were assigned when biopsies were obtained. Seven of 11 horses receiving lidocaine infiltration required twitching, but none of the horses that received the anesthetic cream required twitching. Six of 11 and seven of 11 of the lidocaine and anesthetic cream groups, respectively, required twitching for episioplasty. Except for the clinical scores on day 3, no statistical differences for clinical and histopathologic scores between samples from the two treatment groups for a given day were identified. Use of lidocaine/prilocaine topical anesthetic cream was as effective as lidocaine infiltration in providing local anesthesia when performing episioplasty in mares. Its use decreased the need for twitching horses as well as the risk of deformation of the labia caused by lidocaine infiltration.

  7. Mass-spectrometric monitoring of the intravenous anesthetic concentration in the breathing circuit of an anesthesia machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizarov, A. Yu.; Levshankov, A. I.

    2011-04-01

    Interaction between inhalational anesthetic sevoflurane and an absorber of CO2 (soda lime) in the breathing circuit of an anesthesia machine during low-flow anesthesia (0.5 l of a fresh gaseous mixture per minute) is studied with the mass-spectrometric method. Monitoring data for the concentration of sevoflurane and three toxic products of sevoflurane decompositions (substances A, B, and C) during anesthesia in the inspiration-expiration regime are presented. The highest concentration of substance A is found to be 65 ppm. The biochemical blood analysis before and after anesthesia shows that nephropathy is related to the function of liver toxicity. It is found that inhalational anesthetic sevoflurane influences the concentration of intravenous hypnotic propofol in blood.

  8. Antioxidant's cytoprotective effects on rotator cuff tenofibroblasts exposed to aminoamide local anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ra Jeong; Hah, Young-Sool; Kang, Jae-Ran; Park, Hyung Bin

    2015-07-01

    Local anesthetics (LA) are among the drugs most frequently used for musculoskeletal problems, in procedures ranging from diagnosis to postoperative pain control. The cytotoxicity of LA is an emerging area of concern. The purpose of this study was to determine whether cyanidin, an antioxidant, exerts cytoprotective effects against tenofibroblast death induced by LA. Primary cultured human rotator cuff tenofibroblasts were used to evaluate the cytotoxicity of these LA: Ropivacaine (0.075%), Bupivacaine (0.05%), and Lidocaine (0.2%). The effects of cyanidin (100 μg/ml) on the cytotoxicity induced by these LA were investigated. Cell viability, ROS production, caspase-3/7 activity, and expressions of phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), phospho-p38, phospho-c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and cleaved PARP-1 were evaluated. Exposure to LA significantly induced cell death (p < 0.001), ROS production (p ≤ 0.04), the activation of caspase-3/7 (p < 0.001), and the increased expressions of phospho-ERK, phospho-p38, phospho-JNK, and cleaved PARP-1. These LA-induced cytotoxic effects were reduced by cyanidin. These data indicate that cyanidin, an antioxidant, has cytoprotective effects against LA-induced cytotoxicity to rotator cuff tenofibroblasts. PMID:25639557

  9. Investigation of local anesthetic and antimycobacterial activity of Ottonia martiana Miq. (Piperaceae).

    PubMed

    Cunico, Miriam M; Trebien, Herbert A; Galetti, Fábio C; Miguel, Obdulio G; Miguel, Marilis D; Auer, Celso G; Silva, Célio L; de Souza, Ana Olívia

    2015-01-01

    Ottonia martiana is a plant popularly known in Brazil by the use for toothache. Ethanolic extract (EE), hexane fraction (HF), dichloromethane fraction (DF) and piperovatine obtained from O. martiana were assayed in vitro and in vivo. The acute toxicity of EE was determined, and LD50 values of 164.5 and 65.0 mg/kg by the oral and intraperitoneal routes, respectively, indicated a high toxicity for EE in vivo, explaining its popular use by topical administration only. A local anesthetic-like effect of EE and its fractions was observed in experimental models using pain induction, and such effect involved an analgesic action. The antimycobacterial activity of EE, HF, DF and piperovatine was evaluated against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv ATCC 27924. EE, HF, DF, and piperovatine showed a potential antimycobacterial effect with MICs of 16.0, 62.0, 62.0 and 8.0 μg/mL, respectively. Piperovatine was more effective than the EE or the other fractions. The selectivity index (SI=IC50/MIC) values calculated for EE, HF, DF and piperovatine based on the MICs and the cytotoxicity against J774 macrophages (IC50 by MTT assay) revealed values of 6.43, 2.34, 1.5 and 9.66, respectively.

  10. Local anesthetic and antiepileptic drug access and binding to a bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Boiteux, Céline; Vorobyov, Igor; French, Robert J; French, Christopher; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Allen, Toby W

    2014-09-01

    Voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels are important targets in the treatment of a range of pathologies. Bacterial channels, for which crystal structures have been solved, exhibit modulation by local anesthetic and anti-epileptic agents, allowing molecular-level investigations into sodium channel-drug interactions. These structures reveal no basis for the "hinged lid"-based fast inactivation, seen in eukaryotic Nav channels. Thus, they enable examination of potential mechanisms of use- or state-dependent drug action based on activation gating, or slower pore-based inactivation processes. Multimicrosecond simulations of NavAb reveal high-affinity binding of benzocaine to F203 that is a surrogate for FS6, conserved in helix S6 of Domain IV of mammalian sodium channels, as well as low-affinity sites suggested to stabilize different states of the channel. Phenytoin exhibits a different binding distribution owing to preferential interactions at the membrane and water-protein interfaces. Two drug-access pathways into the pore are observed: via lateral fenestrations connecting to the membrane lipid phase, as well as via an aqueous pathway through the intracellular activation gate, despite being closed. These observations provide insight into drug modulation that will guide further developments of Nav inhibitors. PMID:25136136

  11. Drug binding to the acetylcholine receptor: Nitroxide analogs of phencyclidine and a local anesthetic

    SciTech Connect

    Palma, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    The interaction of noncompetitive inhibitors (NCIs) with Torpedo californica native nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) membranes was examined primarily by the technique of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The goal of this work being to define some of the physical characteristics for the site(s) of association between an NCI and the nAChR membrane. A nitroxide labeled analog of a quaternary amine local anesthetic, 2-(N,N-dimethyl-N-4-(2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinoxyl)amino)-ethyl 4-hexyloxybenzoate iodide (C6SLMeI), displays a strongly immobilized EPR component when added to nAChR membranes in the presence of carbamylcholine (carb). To further this work, a nitroxide labeled analog of phencyclidine (PCP), a potent NCI, was synthesized. 4-phenyl-4-(1-piperidinyl)-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinoxyl (PPT) exhibited one-third the potency of PCP in inhibiting nAChR mediated ion flux, and from competition binding studies with ({sup 3}H)PCP displayed a K{sub D} of 0.21 {mu}M towards a carb desensitized nAChR and a K{sub 0.5} of 18 {mu}M for a resting {alpha}-bungarotoxin treated nAChR.

  12. Effect of Washes and Centrifugation on the Efficacy of Lipofilling With or Without Local Anesthetic

    PubMed Central

    Mirbeau, Sophie; Gence, Lydie; Hivernaud, Vincent; Delarue, Pierre; Hulard, Olivier; Festy, Franck; Roche, Regis

    2015-01-01

    Background: Among the different parameters that influence fat graft survival and lipofilling success, the use of local anesthetic and the way to process the fat before injection have often been pointed out. Likewise, we evaluated different techniques for processing adipose tissue before its injection and analyzed the quality of the grafts. Methods: Adipose tissue from the same patient was gently harvested from one side of the abdomen after infiltration of a tumescent solution without lidocaine and from the other side of the abdomen using a tumescent solution containing lidocaine 2%. Harvested tissue was prepared with different protocols, from simple decantation to advanced protocols including single or multiple washes and centrifugations. Each type of processed adipose tissue was then injected subcutaneously into immunodeficient mice. Adipose grafts were collected after 1 month and analyzed by histology with a detailed scoring method. Results: After lidocaine use, decantation protocol led to adipose grafts of poor quality with high resorption rate and oil vacuole formation. Larger grafts were obtained after centrifugation, but centrifugation alone resulted in increased fibrosis and necrosis, with or without the use of lidocaine. Finally, multiple washes and centrifugations greatly improved the quality of the lipografts. Conclusions: Centrifugation alone is not sufficient and must be associated with multiple washes to improve graft quality. This article aims to provide further evidence of lidocaine and washing/centrifugation effects in fat grafting to provide easy tips aimed at ensuring graft efficiency with a long-term clinical outcome. PMID:26495209

  13. Investigation of local anesthetic and antimycobacterial activity of Ottonia martiana Miq. (Piperaceae).

    PubMed

    Cunico, Miriam M; Trebien, Herbert A; Galetti, Fábio C; Miguel, Obdulio G; Miguel, Marilis D; Auer, Celso G; Silva, Célio L; de Souza, Ana Olívia

    2015-01-01

    Ottonia martiana is a plant popularly known in Brazil by the use for toothache. Ethanolic extract (EE), hexane fraction (HF), dichloromethane fraction (DF) and piperovatine obtained from O. martiana were assayed in vitro and in vivo. The acute toxicity of EE was determined, and LD50 values of 164.5 and 65.0 mg/kg by the oral and intraperitoneal routes, respectively, indicated a high toxicity for EE in vivo, explaining its popular use by topical administration only. A local anesthetic-like effect of EE and its fractions was observed in experimental models using pain induction, and such effect involved an analgesic action. The antimycobacterial activity of EE, HF, DF and piperovatine was evaluated against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv ATCC 27924. EE, HF, DF, and piperovatine showed a potential antimycobacterial effect with MICs of 16.0, 62.0, 62.0 and 8.0 μg/mL, respectively. Piperovatine was more effective than the EE or the other fractions. The selectivity index (SI=IC50/MIC) values calculated for EE, HF, DF and piperovatine based on the MICs and the cytotoxicity against J774 macrophages (IC50 by MTT assay) revealed values of 6.43, 2.34, 1.5 and 9.66, respectively. PMID:26628019

  14. Molecular determinants of prokaryotic voltage-gated sodium channels for recognition of local anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Takushi; Irie, Katsumasa; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2016-08-01

    Local anesthetics (LAs) inhibit mammalian voltage-gated Na(+) channels (Navs) and are thus clinically important. LAs also inhibit prokaryotic Navs (BacNavs), which have a simpler structure than mammalian Navs. To elucidate the detailed mechanisms of LA inhibition to BacNavs, we used NavBh, a BacNav from Bacillus halodurans, to analyze the interactions of several LAs and quaternary ammoniums (QAs). Based on the chemical similarity of QA with the tertiary-alkylamine (TAA) group of LAs, QAs were used to determine the residues required for the recognition of TAA by NavBh. We confirmed that two residues, Thr220 and Phe227, are important for LA binding; a methyl group of Thr220 is important for recognizing both QAs and LAs, whereas Phe227 is involved in holding blockers at the binding site. In addition, we found that NavBh holds blockers in a closed state, consistent with the large inner cavity observed in the crystal structures of BacNavs. These findings reveal the inhibition mechanism of LAs in NavBh, where the methyl group of Thr220 provides the main receptor site for the TAA group and the bulky phenyl group of Phe227 holds the blockers inside the large inner cavity. These two residues correspond to the two LA recognition residues in mammalian Navs, which suggests the relevance of the LA recognition between BacNavs and mammalian Navs. PMID:27273848

  15. [The effect of charged local anesthetics on the inactivation of Ca2+-activated Cl-channels of characean algae].

    PubMed

    Kataev, A A; Zherelova, O M; Berestovskiĭ, G N

    1988-01-01

    Effects of local anesthetics (LA) and a number of organic cations on Ca2+-activated Cl-channels in plasmalemma of intracellularly perfused giant algae Nitellopsis obtusa were studied using voltage-clamp technique. It was shown earlier that Ca2+ ions cause irreversible inactivation of Cl-channels with a characteristic time equal to a few minutes, but not only activate Cl-channels. It has been found that amphiphilic cations (AC), including LA+, introduced intracellularly together with Ca2+ produced delayed action on the beginning of the inactivation process (approximately ten minutes) producing no effect on activation during this period. The time of delayed action was linearly dependent on the concentrations ratio alpha = [AC]/[Ca2+]. Procaine is the most effective agent in this respect, the time of its delayed action on the inactivation process being 20 min at alpha = 1. LA in the neural form, hydrophilic AC of tetraethylammonium, as well as LA+ from the outside had no effect on Cl-channels. Cl-channels inactivated "irreversibly" by Ca2+ ions may be restored after addition of AC in Ca2+-containing perfusion medium. PMID:2470412

  16. Conformational states of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica induced by the binding of agonists, antagonists, and local anesthetics. Equilibrium measurements using tritium-hydrogen exchange

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, M.P.; Stroud, R.M.

    1989-01-10

    The tritium-hydrogen exchange kinetics of Torpedo californica AChR, in native membrane vesicles at pH 7.4 and 0 degrees C, have been analyzed in the presence of agonists, partial agonists, local anesthetics, and competitive antagonists. The agonists carbamylcholine (10 microM-1 mM) and suberyldicholine (10 microM) and the partial agonists decamethonium (25 microM and 1 mM) and hexamethonium (1 mM) have no effect on the exchange kinetics, although at lower concentration carbamylcholine may slightly accelerate exchange. Nondesensitizing local anesthetics do affect the exchange behavior, dependent on concentration. Procaine at 500 microM moderately retards exchange while procaine at 10 mM and tetracaine at 5 mM slightly accelerate exchange. The competitive antagonist alpha-bungarotoxin retards exchange significantly, as does d-tubocurarine although to a lesser extent. These results suggest that the resting and desensitized conformations of the AChR are very similar in overall solvent accessibility and that at lower concentrations noncompetitive blockers such as procaine may stabilize a less solvent-accessible state of the AChR. The competitive antagonists alpha-bungarotoxin and d-tubocurare also stabilize a dynamically restricted, less solvent-accessible conformation of the acetylcholine receptor, demonstrating that a large conformational change accompanies binding of these toxins. Any change in conformation which may accompany desensitization is very different from these effects.

  17. Analysis of Efficacy Differences between Caudal and Lumbar Interlaminar Epidural Injections in Chronic Lumbar Axial Discogenic Pain: Local Anesthetic Alone vs. Local Combined with Steroids

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Benyamin, Ramsin M.; Boswell, Mark V.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design: Comparative assessment of randomized controlled trials of caudal and lumbar interlaminar epidural injections in chronic lumbar discogenic pain. Objective: To assess the comparative efficacy of caudal and lumbar interlaminar approaches of epidural injections in managing axial or discogenic low back pain. Summary of Background Data: Epidural injections are commonly performed utilizing either a caudal or lumbar interlaminar approach to treat chronic lumbar axial or discogenic pain, which is pain exclusive of that associated with a herniated intervertebral disc, or that is due to degeneration of the zygapophyseal joints, or due to dysfunction of the sacroiliac joints, respectively. The literature on the efficacy of epidural injections in managing chronic axial lumbar pain of presumed discogenic origin is limited. Methods: The present analysis is based on 2 randomized controlled trials of chronic axial low back pain not caused by disc herniation, radiculitis, or facet joint pain, utilizing either a caudal or lumbar interlaminar approach, with a total of 240 patients studied, and a 24-month follow-up. Patients were assigned to receive either local anesthetic only or local anesthetic with a steroid in each 60 patient group. Results: The primary outcome measure was significant improvement, defined as pain relief and functional status improvement of at least 50% from baseline, which was reported at 24-month follow-ups in 72% who received local anesthetic only with a lumbar interlaminar approach and 54% who received local anesthetic only with a caudal approach. In patients receiving local anesthetic with a steroid, the response rate was 67% for those who had a lumbar interlaminar approach and 68% for those who had a caudal approach at 12 months. The response was significantly better in the lumbar interlaminar group who received local anesthetic only, 77% versus 56% at 12 months and 72% versus 54% at 24 months. Conclusion: This assessment shows that in patients

  18. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor: Binding of nitroxide analogs of a local anesthetic and a photoactivatable analog of phosphatidylserine

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    Electron spin resonance was used to contrast the accessibility of tertiary and quaternary amine local anesthetics to their high affinity binding site in the desensitized Torpedo californica acetylcholine receptor (AchR). Preincubation of AchR-rich membranes with agonist resulted in a substantial reduction in the initial association of the quaternary amine local anesthetic C6SLMEI with the receptor. The time-dependent reduction in association follows a biphasic exponential function having rate constants of 0.19 min{sup {minus}1} and 0.03 min{sup {minus}1}. In contrast, agonist preincubation did not produce a comparable decrease in the association of C6SL, a tertiary amine analog, with the AchR. The results are modeled in two ways: (1) A charge gate near the channel mouth in the desensitized receptor limits access of the permanently charged cationic local anesthetic (C6SLMEI), but not for the uncharged form of the tertiary amine anesthetic C6SL. (2) A hydrophobic pathway, possibly through a corridor in the annular lipid surrounding receptor subunits, allows the uncharged form of C6SL to reach the high affinity binding site in the AchR. A photoactivatable analog of phosphatidylserine {sup 125}I 4-azido salicylic acid-phosphatidylserine ({sup 125}I ASA-PS) was use to label both Torpedo californica acetylcholine receptor-rich membranes and reconstituted AchR membranes. All four subunits of the AchR were found to incorporate label, with the {alpha} subunit incorporating approximately twice as much as each of the other subunits on a per mole basis. The regions of the AchR {alpha} subunit that incorporate {sup 125}I ASA-PS were mapped by Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease digestion. Eighty-one per cent of the incorporated label was localized to 11.7 and 10.1 kdal V8 cleavage fragments.

  19. Chronic Cancer-Related Pain: Continuous Perineural Infusion of Local Anesthetics as Alternative to Systemic Analgesic Drugs.

    PubMed

    Fuzier, Regis; Izard, Philippe; Cabos, Claire; Chaminade, Brigitte; Pouymayou, Jacques

    2016-09-01

    Pain is a major concern for patients suffering from cancer. Although opioid drugs remain the gold standard for treatment of pain, little is known about the interest of continuous analgesia techniques as alternative. The aim of the present article is to detail the feasibility and to present the diversity of continuous perineural infusion of local anesthetic. A series of five patients suffering from different cancer-related pain is presented. A continuous perineural block was proposed to patients presenting with unbearable pain in an area innervated by a plexus or a nerve despite parenteral analgesic pharmacotherapy. All blocks were performed in a surgical theatre under sterile conditions. An initial bolus dose with 3.75 mg/mL ropivacaine was injected followed by a continuous infusion of 2 mg/mL of ropivacaine. Patient-controlled perineural analgesia was started at home by a nursing network. The technique, the efficacy, and the side effects were reported. Complete pain relief was noted 15 minutes after local anesthetic injection in the five cases, and efficacy was maintained during the following days at home, with no other analgesic treatment required. One patient restarted working a few weeks after catheter insertion. The catheter duration lasted for 12 to 110 days. One catheter was removed because of local anesthetic leak at the puncture point. Some paresthesia was noted in one patient. No other side effect was noted. No infection was reported. In selected patients, continuous perineural infusion of local anesthetics appears to be an attractive alternative to parenteral opioids for cancer-related pain. Further investigation is warranted to better define the place of these techniques in the armamentarium of cancer-related pain treatment. PMID:27322898

  20. Efficacy of postoperative continuous wound infiltration with local anesthetic after major abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Abadir, Adel R; Nicolas, Fred; Gharabawy, Ramiz; Shah, Trusha; Michael, Rafik

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the analgesic efficacy, safety, opioid sparing effects and improvement of respiratory function when using 0.2% ropivacaine continuous wound infiltration after major intra-abdominal surgery. Forty patients undergoing major intra-abdominal surgery requiring a midline incision of > or = 20 cm were enrolled into this IRB-approved, randomized, prospective controlled study. Group 1: 20 patients, parenteral analgesia (control group). Group II: 20 patients, with local anesthetic wound infiltration (pain pump group). At the end of the procedure, in the pain pump group of patients, a multi hole, 20-gauge catheter was inserted percutaneously, above the fascia. An initial dose of 10 ml of 0.2% ropivacaine was injected in the wound through the catheter. A device provided continuous delivery of 0.2% ropivacaine; the infusion was initiated at 6 ml/h for the following two days. The total "rescue" morphine and oxycodone/acetaminophen tablets administered were significantly lower in the pain pump group. At all time intervals, resting pain scores were significantly lower in the pain pump group when compared with the control group. However, at the 4-48 and 12-48 hours pain scores generated after leg raise and coughing, respectively, were significantly lower in group II. The patient vital capacities were insignificantly higher in group II. We conclude that after major abdominal surgery, infiltration and continuous wound instillation with 0.2% ropivacaine decreases postoperative pain, opioid requirements and oral analgesia. Early patient rehabilitation, hastening convalescence, and preventing respiratory complications are expected outcomes of this approach.

  1. Local Anesthetics in the Gas-Phase the Rotational Spectrum of Butamben and Isobutamben

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallejo-López, Montserrat; Ecija, Patricia; Caminati, Walther; Grabow, Jens-Uwe; Lesarri, Alberto; Cocinero, Emilio J.

    2016-06-01

    Benzocaine (BZ), butamben (BTN) and isobutamben (BTI) are local anesthetics characterized by a hydrophilic head and a lipophilic aliphatic tail linked by an aminobenzoate group. Previous rotational work on BZ (H2N-C6H4-COO-Et) showed that its ethyl aliphatic tail may adopt either in-plane (trans) or out of plane (gauche) conformations, with a low interconversion barrier below 50 cm-1. Here we extend the rotational study to BTN and BTI, isolated in a supersonic jet expansion and vaporized either by heating or UV ps-laser ablation methods. Both molecules share a 14 heavy-atoms skeleton, differing in their butyl (-(CH2)3-CH3) or isobutyl (-CH2-CH(CH3)2) four-carbon tail. We detected a single conformer for BTN and two conformers for BTI. The two molecules do not adopt an all-trans carbon skeleton. Conversely, the β-ethyl carbon in BTN is gauche. For BTI the β-carbon may be either trans or gauche. The microwave spectrum covered the cm- (BTN, BTI, 6-18 GHz) and mm-wave (BTW, 50-75 GHz) frequency ranges.In all the cases, rotational and centrifugal distortion constants as well as the diagonal elements of the 14N nuclear quadrupole coupling tensor were accurate determined and compared to the theoretical results (ab initio and DFT). No transitions belonging to configurations predicted as higher minima of the PES were found, pointing out that conformational interconversions may take place in the jet. A. Lesarri, S. T. Shipman, G. G. Brown, L. Alvarez-Valtierra, R. D. Suenram, B. H. Pate, Int. Symp. Mol. Spectrosc., 2008, Comm. RH07. E. Aguado, A. Longarte, E. Alejandro, J. A. Fernández, F. Castaño, J. Phys. Chem. A, 2006, 110, 6010.

  2. Survey of responsible handling of local anesthetic in Indian dental operatory

    PubMed Central

    Rooban, Thavarajah; Rao, Umadevi Krishnamohan; Joshua, Elizabeth; Ranganathan, Kannan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Dental operatory requires handling of numerous toxic fluids such as denture acrylic monomer, alcohol and formalin for effective oral care delivery. The efficacy and responsible handling of such fluids has not been analyzed among Indian dentists and this study aims to address this lacunae. Materials and Methods: Closed ended questionnaire was distributed through email to Indian dentists in July 2012. After inclusion/exclusion criteria, 1484 practitioners constituted the study group with a response rate of 52%. Statistics: SPSS® Version 17.0 (SPSS-IBM Inc., IL, USA) was used to carry out statistical analysis. Descriptive statistics were presented. Chi square test was used to identify the association between the parameters; P ≤ 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: Males (80.8%), undergraduates (78%), exclusive practitioners (81.2%), urban practitioners (68.5%) were the predominant respondents. Predominant of the respondents (97%) used local anesthetic (LA) from bottles. Eight percent have encountered instances of injecting formalin instead of LA in their settings. Safe disposal rules and regulations (P ≤ 0.05), opinion on injecting the other fluids instead of LA as a severe negligent act (P ≤ 0.05) were statistically significant between age groups. Educational status did not appear to influence the outcome. Only a third of the respondents were aware of the rules and regulations for safe disposal of empty LA bottles while 49.1% were not aware of them and willing to learn. Discussion: The lacunae in responsible handling of toxic fluids need to be addressed to prevent inadvertent and negligence suits against dentists, highlighting the need through continuing dental education programmes. PMID:24255564

  3. Cytotoxicity of solid lipid nanoparticles and nanostructured lipid carriers containing the local anesthetic dibucaine designed for topical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, R. M.; da Silva, C. M. G.; Bella, T. S.; de Araújo, D. R.; Marcato, P. D.; Durán, N.; de Paula, E.

    2013-04-01

    Dibucaine (DBC) is powerful long-lasting local anesthetic, but it is also considered fairly toxic to the CNS. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) and nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) have attracted attention as carriers for drug delivery. The aim of this study was to develop and to evaluate the cytotoxic activity of DBC-loaded SLN and NLC against 3T3 fibroblast and HaCat keratinocyte cells. The SLN and NLC had myristyl myristate and Liponate®GC as their lipid matrices, respectively, plus a surfactant. SLN and NLC were characterized in terms in their diameter, size distribution, surface charge and DBC encapsulation efficiency. The particle size of SLN and NLC were around 234.33 and 166.62 nm, respectively. The polydispersity index was kept below 0.2 for both nanomaterials. Negative surface charges were observed for both nanoparticles, which decreased in the presence of the anesthetic. Encapsulation efficiency reached 76% and 90%, respectively, in SLN and NLC. DBC alone was found to be toxic to 3T3 and HaCat cells in culture. However, NLC and SLN loaded DBC decreased its intrinsic cytotoxic effect against 3T3 and HaCat cells. In conclusion, encapsulation of DBC in SLN and NLC decreased the in vitro toxicity of the local anesthetic, indicating the potential of these nanocarriers for clinical applications.

  4. Evaluation of cerebrospinal fluid lactate and plasma lactate concentrations in anesthetized dogs with and without intracranial disease.

    PubMed

    Caines, Deanne; Sinclair, Melissa; Wood, Darren; Valverde, Alexander; Dyson, Doris; Gaitero, Luis; Nykamp, Stephanie

    2013-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to establish a reference interval for canine cerebrospinal fluid lactate (CSFL) and to compare CSFL and plasma lactate (PL) concentrations in anesthetized dogs with and without intracranial disease. Using a prospective study, canine blood and cerebrospinal fluid were collected for lactate analysis in 11 dogs with intracranial disease after undergoing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (Group ID-MRI), in 10 healthy dogs post-MRI (Group H-MRI), and in 39 healthy dogs after induction of anesthesia (Group H-Sx). Dogs were anesthetized for the procedures using different anesthetic protocols. Neurological scores (NS) and sedation scores (SS) were assessed pre-anesthesia in ID-MRI dogs. The CSFL reference interval [90% confidence interval (CI) for lower and upper limits] was 1.1 (1.0 to 1.2) to 2.0 (2.0 to 2.1) mmol/L. Mean ± SD CSFL concentrations were: ID-MRI, 2.1 ± 0.8; H-MRI, 1.6 ± 0.4; and H-Sx, 1.6 ± 0.2 mmol/L. There was a tendency for higher CSFL in dogs in the ID-MRI group than in those in the H-MRI or H-Sx groups (P = 0.12). There was agreement between CSFL and PL in ID-MRI dogs (P = 0.007), but not in dogs in H-MRI (P = 0.5) or H-Sx (P = 0.2). Of the ID-MRI dogs, those with worse NS had higher CSFL (r (2) = 0.44). The correlation between CSFL and PL in dogs with intracranial disease and between worse NS and higher CSFL warrants further investigation into the use of CSFL and PL for diagnostic and prognostic purposes.

  5. Development of a minimum-anesthetic-concentration depression model to study the effects of various analgesics in goldfish (Carassius auratus).

    PubMed

    Ward, Jessica L; McCartney, Sean P; Chinnadurai, Sathya K; Posner, Lysa P

    2012-06-01

    Teleost fish demonstrate the neurophysiologic capacity to experience pain and analgesia. A common model for assessing analgesic effect is the reduction of minimum anesthetic concentration (MAC). The present study adapted the model of MAC depression to evaluate the analgesic effects of morphine, butorphanol, medetomidine, and ketoprofen in goldfish (Carassius auratus). MAC was determined by an up-down method of sequential population sampling, anesthetizing fish with tricaine methanesulfonate (MS-222) in concentration increments of 10 parts per million (ppm), and using intramuscular needle insertion as a supramaximal noxious stimulus. Baseline MAC was determined in triplicate at the beginning (MACi) and conclusion (MACe) of the experiment (approximately 60 days). For drug trials, MAC was redetermined 1 hr after administration of morphine (10, 20, 40 mg/kg i.m.), butorphanol (0.1, 0.2, 0.4 mg/kg i.m.), medetomidine (0.01, 0.015, 0.025 mg/kg i.m.), ketoprofen (0.5, 1.0, 2.0 mg/kg i.m.), or saline control. Each drug/dose was tested in random order with a > 6-day washout period. MACi and MACf were 163 and 182 ppm, respectively, and were significantly different from each other (P = 0.02). All doses of morphine and ketoprofen decreased MAC below MACi. The highest dose of medetomidine decreased MAC below MACi. The lowest dose of butorphanol decreased MAC below MACi, but higher doses increased MAC above MACf. The authors conclude that MAC determination in fish using MS-222 was feasible and reproducible in the short term. The fact that MAC increased over time and/or exposure may limit the usefulness of MS-222 in MAC depression studies. Morphine and ketoprofen decrease anesthetic needs in goldfish and may provide analgesia. PMID:22779222

  6. Efficacy of Benzocaine 20% Topical Anesthetic Compared to Placebo Prior to Administration of Local Anesthesia in the Oral Cavity: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    de Freiras, Guilherme Camponogara; Pozzobon, Roselaine Terezinha; Blaya, Diego Segatto; Moreira, Carlos Heitor

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of a topical anesthetic to a placebo on pain perception during administration of local anesthesia in 2 regions of the oral cavity. A split-mouth, double-blind, randomized clinical trial design was used. Thirty-eight subjects, ages 18–50 years, American Society of Anesthesiologists I and II, received 4 anesthetic injections each in regions corresponding to the posterior superior alveolar nerve (PSA) and greater palatine nerve (GPN), totaling 152 sites analyzed. The side of the mouth where the topical anesthetic (benzocaine 20%) or the placebo was to be applied was chosen by a flip of a coin. The needle used was 27G, and the anesthetic used for administration of local anesthesia was 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine. After receiving the administration of local anesthesia, each patient reported pain perception on a visual analog scale (VAS) of 100-mm length. The results showed that the topical anesthetic and the placebo had similar effects: there was no statistically significant VAS difference between the PSA and the GPN pain ratings. A higher value on the VAS for the anesthesia of the GPN, relative to the PSA, was observed for both groups. Regarding gender, male patients had higher values on the VAS compared with female patients, but these differences were not meaningful. The topical anesthetic and the placebo had similar effects on pain perception for injection of local anesthesia for the PSA and GPN. PMID:26061572

  7. Efficacy of Benzocaine 20% Topical Anesthetic Compared to Placebo Prior to Administration of Local Anesthesia in the Oral Cavity: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    de Freiras, Guilherme Camponogara; Pozzobon, Roselaine Terezinha; Blaya, Diego Segatto; Moreira, Carlos Heitor

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of a topical anesthetic to a placebo on pain perception during administration of local anesthesia in 2 regions of the oral cavity. A split-mouth, double-blind, randomized clinical trial design was used. Thirty-eight subjects, ages 18-50 years, American Society of Anesthesiologists I and II, received 4 anesthetic injections each in regions corresponding to the posterior superior alveolar nerve (PSA) and greater palatine nerve (GPN), totaling 152 sites analyzed. The side of the mouth where the topical anesthetic (benzocaine 20%) or the placebo was to be applied was chosen by a flip of a coin. The needle used was 27G, and the anesthetic used for administration of local anesthesia was 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine. After receiving the administration of local anesthesia, each patient reported pain perception on a visual analog scale (VAS) of 100-mm length. The results showed that the topical anesthetic and the placebo had similar effects: there was no statistically significant VAS difference between the PSA and the GPN pain ratings. A higher value on the VAS for the anesthesia of the GPN, relative to the PSA, was observed for both groups. Regarding gender, male patients had higher values on the VAS compared with female patients, but these differences were not meaningful. The topical anesthetic and the placebo had similar effects on pain perception for injection of local anesthesia for the PSA and GPN.

  8. Percutaneous penetration kinetics of lidocaine and prilocaine in two local anesthetic formulations assessed by in vivo microdialysis in pigs.

    PubMed

    Wei, Huilin; Chen, Yun; Xu, Lanfang; Zheng, Jiarun

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize and compare the percutaneous penetration kinetics of lidocaine (L) and prilocaine (P) in two local anesthetic formulations by in vivo microdialysis coupled with HPLC. The microdialysis system for studying lidocaine and prilocaine was calibrated by a no-net-flux method in vitro and retrodialysis method in vivo, respectively. A dosage of 0.2 g/cm2 of an in-house P-L formulation (2.5% lidocaine and 2.5% prilocaine, methylcellulose-based) and commercially available Eutectic Mixture of Local Anesthesia (EMLA, 2.5% lidocaine and 2.5% prilocaine, carbopol-based) was separately but symmetrically applied in the dorsal region of pigs. Saline (0.9%, w/v) was perfused into the linear microdialysis probe at a flow rate of 1.5 microl/min. Dialysate was collected upon topical application up to 6 h at 20-min intervals and assessed by HPLC. The results demonstrated the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC(0-6 h)) of lidocaine and prilocaine in EMLA was 71.95+/-23.36 microg h/ml and 38.01+/-14.8 microg h/ml, respectively, in comparison to 167.11+/-56.12 microg h/ml and 87.02+/-30.38 microg h/ml in the P-L formulation. The maximal concentrations (Cmax) of lidocaine and prilocaine in the dermis were 29.2+/-9.08 microg/ml and 16.54+/-5.31 microg/ml in EMLA and 80.93+/-17.98 microg/ml and 43.69+/-12.87 microg/ml in the P-L formulation, respectively. This study indicates a well-calibrated microdialysis system can provide vital real-time information on percutaneous drug delivery and specifically a methylcellulose-based P-L formulation can increase percutaneous absorption of both lidocaine and prilocaine in pigs compared to carbopol-based EMLA.

  9. Effects of magnesium sulfate and propofol on the minimum alveolar concentration preventing motor movement in sevoflurane-anesthetized dogs.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Alanna N; Seddighi, Reza; Rohrbach, Barton W; Cox, Sherry K; Egger, Christine M; Martin-Flores, Manuel; Doherty, Thomas J

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effect of MgSO4, alone and in combination with propofol, on the minimum alveolar concentration preventing motor movement (MACNM) in sevoflurane-anesthetized dogs. ANIMALS 6 healthy purpose-bred adult male Beagles (least squares mean ± SEM body weight, 12.0 ± 1.1 kg). PROCEDURES Dogs were anesthetized 3 times at weekly intervals. The MACNM was measured 45 minutes after induction of anesthesia (baseline; MACNM-B) and was determined each time by use of a noxious electrical stimulus. Treatments were administered as a loading dose and constant rate infusion (CRI) as follows: treatment 1, MgSO4 loading dose of 45 mg/kg and CRI of 15 mg/kg/h; treatment 2, propofol loading dose of 4 mg/kg and CRI of 9 mg/kg/h; and treatment 3, MgSO4 and propofol combination (same doses used previously for each drug). A mixed-model ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer tests were used to determine effects of each treatment on the percentage decrease from MACNM-B. Data were reported as least squares mean ± SEM values. RESULTS Decrease from MACNM-B was 3.4 ± 3.1%, 48.3 ± 3.1%, and 50.3 ± 3.1%, for treatments 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The decrease for treatments 2 and 3 was significantly different from that for treatment 1; however, no significant difference existed between results for treatments 2 and 3. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE MgSO4 did not affect MACNM, nor did it potentiate the effects of propofol on MACNM. Administration of MgSO4 in this study appeared to provide no clinical advantage as an anesthetic adjuvant.

  10. Comparison of the efficacy of saline, local anesthetics, and steroids in epidural and facet joint injections for the management of spinal pain: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Nampiaparampil, Devi E.; Manchikanti, Kavita N.; Falco, Frank J.E.; Singh, Vijay; Benyamin, Ramsin M.; Kaye, Alan D.; Sehgal, Nalini; Soin, Amol; Simopoulos, Thomas T.; Bakshi, Sanjay; Gharibo, Christopher G.; Gilligan, Christopher J.; Hirsch, Joshua A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The efficacy of epidural and facet joint injections has been assessed utilizing multiple solutions including saline, local anesthetic, steroids, and others. The responses to these various solutions have been variable and have not been systematically assessed with long-term follow-ups. Methods: Randomized trials utilizing a true active control design were included. The primary outcome measure was pain relief and the secondary outcome measure was functional improvement. The quality of each individual article was assessed by Cochrane review criteria, as well as the criteria developed by the American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians (ASIPP) for assessing interventional techniques. An evidence analysis was conducted based on the qualitative level of evidence (Level I to IV). Results: A total of 31 trials met the inclusion criteria. There was Level I evidence that local anesthetic with steroids was effective in managing chronic spinal pain based on multiple high-quality randomized controlled trials. The evidence also showed that local anesthetic with steroids and local anesthetic alone were equally effective except in disc herniation, where the superiority of local anesthetic with steroids was demonstrated over local anesthetic alone. Conclusion: This systematic review showed equal efficacy for local anesthetic with steroids and local anesthetic alone in multiple spinal conditions except for disc herniation where the superiority of local anesthetic with steroids was seen over local anesthetic alone. PMID:26005584

  11. Molecular Insights into the Local Anesthetic Receptor within Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels Using Hydroxylated Analogs of Mexiletine.

    PubMed

    Desaphy, Jean-François; Dipalma, Antonella; Costanza, Teresa; Carbonara, Roberta; Dinardo, Maria Maddalena; Catalano, Alessia; Carocci, Alessia; Lentini, Giovanni; Franchini, Carlo; Camerino, Diana Conte

    2012-01-01

    results confirm our former hypothesis by showing that the presence of hydroxyl groups to the aryloxy moiety of mexiletine greatly reduced sodium channel block, and provide molecular insights into the intimate interaction of local anesthetics with their receptor. PMID:22403541

  12. Influence of local anesthetics upon human polymorphonuclear leukocyte function in vitro. Reduction of lysosomal enzyme release and superoxide anion production.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, I M; Lind, S; Hoffstein, S; Weissmann, G

    1977-08-01

    Cationic local anesthetics have been reported to influence cellular responses to surface stimuli by interfering with the function of microtubules and microfilaments. Since unimpaired microtubule and microfilament functions are required by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes in order to respond normally to surface stimulation, we have studied effects of the local anesthetic, tetracaine on the function and morphology of these cells in vitro. Tetracaine (0.25--1.0 mM) significantly reduced extracellular release of the lysosomal enzymes, beta-glucuronidase and lysozyme from polymorphonuclear leukocytes exposed to serum-treated zymosan (a particulate stimulus), zymosan-treated serum (a soluble stimulus), and to the surface-active lectin, concanavalin A. Tetracaine also significantly reduced superoixde anion production (superoxide dismutase-inhibitable cytochrome c reduction) by these cells. Tetrancaine was not cytotoxic and its effects could be reversed completely by washing cells once with buffer. Electron microscope examination of tetracaine-treated cells revealed marked alterations of surface membranes. Microtubules and microfilaments appeared normal in "resting" polymorphonuclear leukocytes, but the increase in microtubules normally observed in stimulated cells was not seen after tetracaine treatment. These results suggest that tetracaine interferes with those interactions between immune reactants and the polymorphonuclear leukocyte cell surface which provoke exocytosis and increased oxidative metabolism.

  13. The effect of buffering on pain and duration of local anesthetic in the face: A double-blind, randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Afolabi, Oluwatola; Murphy, Amanda; Chung, Bryan; Lalonde, Donald H

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The acidity of lidocaine preparations is believed to contribute to the pain of local anesthetic injection. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of buffering lidocaine on the pain of injection and duration of anesthetic effect. METHODS: A double-blind, randomized trial involving 44 healthy volunteers was conducted. The upper lip was injected with a solution of: lidocaine 1% (Xylocaine, AstraZeneca, Canada, Inc) with epinephrine; and lidocaine 1% with epinephrine and 8.4% sodium bicarbonate. Volunteers reported pain of injection and duration of anesthetic effect. RESULTS: Twenty-six participants found the unbuffered solution to be more painful. Fifteen participants found the buffered solution to be more painful; the difference was not statistically significant. Twenty-one volunteers reported duration of anesthetic effect. The buffered solution provided longer anesthetic effect than the unbuffered solution (P=0.004). CONCLUSION: Although buffering increased the duration of lidocaine’s anesthetic effect in this particular model, a decrease in the pain of the injection was not demonstrated, likely due to limitations of the study. PMID:24497759

  14. Anesthesia with Isoflurane and Sevoflurane in the Crested Serpent Eagle (Spilornis cheela hoya): Minimum Anesthetic Concentration, Physiological Effects, Hematocrit, Plasma Chemistry and Behavioral Effects

    PubMed Central

    CHAN, Fang-Tse; CHANG, Geng-Ruei; WANG, Hsien-Chi; HSU, Tien-Huan

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The initial goal of this study was to determine the minimum anesthetic concentration (MAC) for isoflurane (ISO) and sevoflurane (SEVO) for the crested serpent eagle. Next, we compared the anesthetic effects of each on the physiological effects, hematocrit, plasma chemistry values and behavior in spontaneously breathing captive adult crested serpent eagles. Sixteen eagles were randomly allocated to two groups for anesthesia with ISO (n=8) or SEVO (n=8). First, we measured the MAC values of ISO and SEVO, and four weeks later, we investigated the effect of each on the physiological effects, hematocrit (HCT) and plasma chemistry values. The MAC values of ISO and SEVO for crested serpent eagles were 1.46 ± 0.30 and 2.03 ± 0.32%, respectively. The results revealed no significant differences between the two anesthetics in induction time, while time of extubation to recovery was significantly shorter with SEVO. A time-related increase in end-tidal CO2 and decreases in body temperature and respiratory rates were observed during anesthesia with each anesthetic. There were no significant differences between the effect of the two anesthetics on heart rate, hematocrit, plasma chemistry values or respiration, although each caused minor respiration depression. We concluded that SEVO is a more effective inhalant agent than ISO for use in eagles, showing the most rapidest induction and recovery from anesthesia. PMID:23955396

  15. The Effect of 2 Injection Speeds on Local Anesthetic Discomfort During Inferior Alveolar Nerve Blocks

    PubMed Central

    de Souza Melo, Marcelo Rodrigo; Sabey, Mark Jon Santana; Lima, Carla Juliane; de Almeida Souza, Liane Maciel; Groppo, Francisco Carlos

    2015-01-01

    This randomized double-blind crossover trial investigated the discomfort associated with 2 injection speeds, low (60 seconds) and slow (100 seconds), during inferior alveolar nerve block by using 1.8 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1 : 100,000 epinephrine. Three phases were considered: (a) mucosa perforation, (b) needle insertion, and (c) solution injection. Thirty-two healthy adult volunteers needing bilateral inferior alveolar nerve blocks at least 1 week apart were enrolled in the present study. The anesthetic procedure discomfort was recorded by volunteers on a 10-cm visual analog scale in each phase for both injection speeds. Comparison between the 2 anesthesia speeds in each phase was performed by paired t test. Results showed no statistically significant difference between injection speeds regarding perforation (P = .1016), needle placement (P = .0584), or speed injection (P = .1806). The discomfort in all phases was considered low. We concluded that the 2 injection speeds tested did not affect the volunteers' pain perception during inferior alveolar nerve blocks. PMID:26398126

  16. Absorption of lidocaine and prilocaine after application of a eutectic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA) on normal and diseased skin.

    PubMed

    Juhlin, L; Hägglund, G; Evers, H

    1989-01-01

    A eutectic mixture of 5% lidocaine and prilocaine was applied under occlusion for 1 or 2 hours on 25-100 cm2 areas of normal and diseased skin, and the absorption was followed by measuring the concentrations of the drugs in the draining vein and the general circulation at different time intervals after the application. The analgesic and vascular effects in the skin were also recorded. When the mixture was applied on normal skin the absorption was more rapid from the face than from the forearm. The absorption from diseased skin was faster than that from normal skin, with higher plasma concentrations, and a more rapid but shorter anesthetic effect was noted. With the doses used the plasma levels in the general circulation were 100 times lower than those associated with toxicity. The drug concentrations in the draining vein were highest after treatment of diseased skin and were 2-90 times higher than in the general circulation. The plasma concentrations of lidocaine and prilocaine ran parallel to each other, but the prilocaine level was 10-50% lower than that of lidocaine in the draining vein and 200-300% lower in the general circulation.

  17. Severe central nervous system and cardiovascular toxicity in a pediatric patient after ingestion of an over-the-counter local anesthetic.

    PubMed

    Nelsen, Jamie; Holland, Michael; Dougherty, Michelle; Bernad, Jason; Stork, Christine; Marraffa, Jeanna

    2009-10-01

    Dibucaine is considered one of the most potent and consequently toxic amide anesthetics available, and despite withdrawal from the US market as a spinal anesthetic, it remains accessible as an over-the-counter preparation in the United States. Dibucaine exposures in children are infrequently encountered, but to date, all reported consequential ingestions have resulted in death. We report the first case of a potentially fatal dibucaine-induced wide-complex arrhythmia in a child who survived her clinical course without sequelae. It is our hope that this report will highlight the toxicity of dibucaine and prompt a review of its over-the-counter status. The rationale and success of a new antidote, 20% lipid emulsion, for the management of local anesthetic toxicity is discussed.

  18. Inferior alveolar nerve block by injection into the pterygomandibular space anterior to the mandibular foramen: radiographic study of local anesthetic spread in the pterygomandibular space.

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Y.; Takasugi, Y.; Moriya, K.; Furuya, H.

    2000-01-01

    We studied the spread of local anesthetic solution in the inferior alveolar nerve block by the injection of local anesthetic solution into the pterygomandibular space anterior to the mandibular foramen (anterior technique). Seventeen volunteers were injected with 1.8 mL of a mixture containing lidocaine and contrast medium utilizing the anterior technique. The course of spread was traced by fluoroscopy in the sagittal plane, and the distribution area was evaluated by lateral cephalograms and horizontal computed tomography. The results indicate that the contrast medium mixture spreads rapidly in the pterygomandibular space to the inferior alveolar nerve in the subjects who exhibited inferior alveolar nerve block effect. We concluded that the anesthetic effect due to the anterior technique was produced by the rapid distribution of anesthetic solution in the pterygomandibular space toward the mandibular foramen, and individual differences in the time of onset of analgesia may be due to differences in the histologic perineural tissues. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:11432178

  19. Inhibition of hyperhidrosis by topical application of a local anesthetic composition.

    PubMed

    Juhlin, L; Evers, H; Broberg, F

    1979-01-01

    An eutectic mixture of 5% lidocaine and 5% prilocaine applied locally to the skin inhibited epinephrine-induced sweating in healthy subjects. It also inhibited palmar and axillary hyperhidrosis from 1 to 6 hours after application to 15 of 17 patients tested. A placebo lotion was without effect. When used daily for 3--4 weeks, only 25% of the patients were very pleased with the treatment. The reason for the decrease of efficacy is uncertain.

  20. Inadvertent injection of formalin mistaken for local anesthetic agent: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Arakeri, Gururaj; Brennan, Peter A

    2012-05-01

    Chemical facial cellulitis, while commonly seen in domestic accidents or attempted suicide, is uncommon in the dental office and hence rarely addressed in the dental literature. We present an unusual case of chemical facial cellulitis caused by inadvertent injection of formalin into the soft tissues of the oral cavity, which was mistaken for local anesthesia solution. This report comprises the immediate symptoms, possible root cause, and management of the difficult situation. We also provide some guidelines to avoid such unfortunate events.

  1. The local anesthetic proparacaine modifies sodium transport in toad skin and perturbs the structures of model and cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, Mario; Schneider, Carlos; Norris, Beryl; Villena, Fernando; Cárdenas, Hernán; Cuevas, Francisco; Sotomayor, Carlos P

    2002-01-01

    Experimental results indicate a significant decrease in the potential difference (PD) and in the short-circuit current (Isc) after the application of proparacaine to isolated toad skin, which may reflect an inhibition of the active transport of ions. This finding was explained on the basis of the results obtained from membrane models incubated with proparacaine. These consisted of human erythrocytes, isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes (IUM), phospholipid multilayers built-up of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), representatives of phospholipid classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the human erythrocyte membrane, respectively, and in large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) of DMPC X-ray diffraction showed that proparacaine interaction with DMPC and DMPE bilayers perturbed both structures, especially DMPC. This result, confirmed by fluorescence spectroscopy of DMPC LUV at 18 degrees C, demonstrated that the local anesthetic (LA) could interact with the lipid moiety of cell membranes. However, effects observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of human erythrocytes and by fluorescence spectroscopy of IUM might also imply proparacaine-protein interactions. Thus, the LA may alter epitheial sodium channels through interaction with the lipid matrix and with channel protein residues. PMID:12440736

  2. Effects of Different Anesthetic Techniques on Serum Leptin, C-reactive Protein, and Cortisol Concentrations in Anorectal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Buyukkocak, Unase; Daphan, Cagatay; Caglayan, Osman; Aydinuraz, Kuzey; Kaya, Tahsin; Saygun, Oral; Agalar, Fatih

    2006-01-01

    Aim To compare the effects of intratracheal general anesthesia (ITGA) and regional (saddle block) anesthesia on leptin, C-reactive protein (CRP), and cortisol blood concentrations during anorectal surgery. Methods Fifty-eight patients suffering from hemorrhoidal disease, pilonidal sinus, anal fissure, or anal fistula were included the study. Patients were randomly assigned into one of the two groups (n = 29). Patients in one group received ITGA. After thiopental and fentanyl induction, vecuronium was used as a muscle relaxant. Anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane. In the other group we applied saddle block, injecting hyperbaric bupivacaine into the subarachnoid space, through the L3-L4 intervertebral space, in the sitting position. Blood samples were collected for leptin, CRP, and cortisol analysis before the induction of anesthesia at 3 and 24 hours postoperatively. Results Preoperative leptin, CRP, and cortisol concentrations were comparable between the groups. There was no significant difference in postoperative levels of leptin and CRP in both groups. Although not significant, leptin and CRP concentrations were lower in the saddle block group at three hours postoperatively (mean ± SD, 6.95 ± 8.59 and 6.02 ± 12.25, respectively) than in the ITGA group (mean ± SD, 9.04 ± 9.89 and 8.40 ± 15.75, respectively). During early postoperative period, cortisol increased slightly in the ITGA group and remained at similar level in the saddle block group, but later decreased in both groups. Cortisol levels in the saddle block group were significantly lower than in the ITGA group at 3 hours postoperatively (343.7 ± 329.6 vs 611.4 ± 569.8; P = 0.034). Conclusion Saddle block, a regional anesthetic technique, may attenuate stress response in patients undergoing anorectal surgery, by blocking afferent neural input during early postoperative period. PMID:17167859

  3. Hemoglobin adducts of the human bladder carcinogen o-toluidine after treatment with the local anesthetic prilocaine.

    PubMed

    Gaber, Kerstin; Harréus, Ulrich A; Matthias, Christoph; Kleinsasser, Norbert H; Richter, Elmar

    2007-01-01

    Prilocaine, a widely used local anesthetic, is metabolized to o-toluidine which is classified as human carcinogen. We aimed to assess the impact of prilocaine-treatment on hemoglobin adducts from o-toluidine. Blood samples were obtained before and 24h after receiving prilocaine local anesthesia (Xylonest, 100mg) from 20 head and neck surgery patients and 6 healthy volunteers. Hemoglobin adducts of o-toluidine and 4-aminobiphenyl were determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Hemoglobin adducts of o-toluidine were significantly increased 24h after 100mg prilocaine-treatment by 21.6+/-12.8ng/g hemoglobin (mean+/-S.D., N=26; P<0.0001). This corresponds to a 6-360-fold increase of o-toluidine adduct levels in 25 patients from 0.54+/-0.95ng/g before treatment to 22.0+/-13.2ng/g 24h after surgery (mean+/-S.D.). Because of an extremely high background level the increase was only 1.6-fold in one patient (40.9ng/g before and 64.4ng/g 24h after prilocaine injection). Current smoking had no influence on background values and on the increase of o-toluidine adducts. No treatment-related differences were seen in mean hemoglobin adduct levels of 4-aminobiphenyl which were significantly higher in smokers, 0.149+/-0.096ng/g (mean+/-S.D., N=8) as compared to nonsmokers 0.036+/-0.035ng/g (mean+/-S.D., N=16; P<0.01). In conclusion, prilocaine anesthesia leads to a massive increase of hemoglobin adducts of the carcinogenic arylamine o-toluidine. This implies a carcinogenic risk which should be taken into account in preventive hazard minimization.

  4. β-Cyclodextrin-Propyl Sulfonic Acid Catalysed One-Pot Synthesis of 1,2,4,5-Tetrasubstituted Imidazoles as Local Anesthetic Agents.

    PubMed

    Ran, Yan; Li, Ming; Zhang, Zong-Ze

    2015-11-12

    Some functionalized 1,2,4,5-tetrasubstituted imidazole derivatives were synthesized using a one-pot, four component reaction involving 1,2-diketones, aryl aldehydes, ammonium acetate and substituted aromatic amines. The synthesis has been efficiently carried out in a solvent free medium using β-cyclodextrin-propyl sulfonic acid as a catalyst to afford the target compounds in excellent yields. The local anesthetic effect of these derivatives was assessed in comparison to lidocaine as a standard using a rabbit corneal and mouse tail anesthesia model. The three most potent promising compounds were subjected to a rat sciatic nerve block assay where they showed considerable local anesthetic activity, along with minimal toxicity. Among the tested analogues, 4-(1-benzyl-4,5-diphenyl-1H-imidazol-2-yl)-N,N-dimethylaniline (5g) was identified as most potent analogue with minimal toxicity. It was further characterized by a more favourable therapeutic index than the standard.

  5. β-Cyclodextrin-Propyl Sulfonic Acid Catalysed One-Pot Synthesis of 1,2,4,5-Tetrasubstituted Imidazoles as Local Anesthetic Agents.

    PubMed

    Ran, Yan; Li, Ming; Zhang, Zong-Ze

    2015-01-01

    Some functionalized 1,2,4,5-tetrasubstituted imidazole derivatives were synthesized using a one-pot, four component reaction involving 1,2-diketones, aryl aldehydes, ammonium acetate and substituted aromatic amines. The synthesis has been efficiently carried out in a solvent free medium using β-cyclodextrin-propyl sulfonic acid as a catalyst to afford the target compounds in excellent yields. The local anesthetic effect of these derivatives was assessed in comparison to lidocaine as a standard using a rabbit corneal and mouse tail anesthesia model. The three most potent promising compounds were subjected to a rat sciatic nerve block assay where they showed considerable local anesthetic activity, along with minimal toxicity. Among the tested analogues, 4-(1-benzyl-4,5-diphenyl-1H-imidazol-2-yl)-N,N-dimethylaniline (5g) was identified as most potent analogue with minimal toxicity. It was further characterized by a more favourable therapeutic index than the standard. PMID:26569210

  6. Chip-based nanoelectrospray ionization with Fourier transform mass spectrometric detection to screen for local anesthetics intended to mask limb sore in walking horses.

    PubMed

    Szarka, Szabolcs; Prokai, Laszlo

    2015-03-01

    We report a high-throughput chip-based nanoelectrospray ionization method coupled with Fourier transform mass spectrometry to screen for local anesthetics in samples collected by swabbing. These drugs have been used to mask pain on the limbs of walking horses after forbidden practices of soring or physical abuse. Optimized for lidocaine, the method afforded sub-ppm mass accuracy for nine local anesthetics included in the study. From doped cotton swabs, two third and all of the analytes were detected after adding 10 ng and 100 ng of each drug, respectively. Benzocaine and/or lidocaine were found on positive swab samples collected during walking horse competitions. PMID:25800188

  7. Comparative evaluation of endodontic pressure syringe, insulin syringe, jiffy tube, and local anesthetic syringe in obturation of primary teeth: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Hiremath, Mallayya C.; Srivastava, Pooja

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare four methods of root canal obturation in primary teeth using conventional radiography. Materials and Methods: A total of 96 root canals of primary molars were prepared and obturated with zinc oxide eugenol. Obturation methods compared were endodontic pressure syringe, insulin syringe, jiffy tube, and local anesthetic syringe. The root canal obturations were evaluated by conventional radiography for the length of obturation and presence of voids. The obtained data were analyzed using Chi-square test. Results: The results showed significant differences between the four groups for the length of obturation (P < 0.05). The endodontic pressure syringe showed the best results (98.5% optimal fillings) and jiffy tube showed the poor results (37.5% optimal fillings) for the length of obturation. The insulin syringe (79.2% optimal fillings) and local anesthetic syringe (66.7% optimal fillings) showed acceptable results for the length of root canal obturation. However, minor voids were present in all the four techniques used. Conclusions: Endodontic pressure syringe produced the best results in terms of length of obturation and controlling paste extrusion from the apical foramen. However, insulin syringe and local anesthetic syringe can be used as effective alternative methods. PMID:27433062

  8. Ion-transfer voltammetry of local anesthetics at an organic solvent/water interface and pharmacological activity vs. ion partition coefficient relationship.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Y; Katano, H; Senda, M

    2001-01-01

    The ion-transfer reaction of local anesthetics at an organic solvent/water interface has been studied using cyclic voltammetry (CV) with a stationary nitrobenzene (NB)/water (W) interface. Procaine and seven other local anesthetics gave reversible or quasi-reversible voltammograms at the NB/W interface in the pH range between 0.9 and 9.6. These drugs are present in aqueous solution in either neutral or ionic form, or both forms. The half-wave potential, as determined by the midpoint potential in CV, vs. pH curves, were determined and analyzed to determine the partition coefficients of both neutral and ionic forms of the drugs between NB and W. The partition coefficients of the ionic forms were derived from their formal potential of transfer at an NB/W interface. The dissociation constants of ionic forms of the drugs in NB were also deduced. A high correlation between the pharmacological activity and the partition coefficient of the ionic form of amide-linked local anesthetics has been shown.

  9. [The comparison of the effects and side effects of local anesthetic and opioid combinations in epidural patient controlled analgesia].

    PubMed

    Eti, Zeynep; Umuroğlu, Tümay; Takil, Arzu; Göğüş, Yilmaz

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the efficacy and side effects of local anesthetic and opioid combinations in 457 patients who have received epidural patient-controlled analgesia (EPCA). Hemodynamic parameters, numeric rating scale, sedation scores, the degree of motor and sensory blockage, the presence of side effects, the parameters of PCA device were recorded from the postoperative pain records. 253 patients received 0.1 % bupivacaine + 3 microg/ml fentanyl (Group B1F3), 80 patients received 0.125 % bupivacaine + 3 microg/ml fentanyl (Group B12F3), 43 patients received 0.125 % bupivacaine + 4 microg/ml fentanyl (Group B12F4), 46 patients received 0.1 % bupivacaine + 0.1 mg/ml morphine (Group B1M1) and 35 patients received 0.125 % bupivacaine + 0.1 mg/ml morphine (Group B12M1). Nausea was significantly higher in group B1M1 compared to B12F3, in group B12M1 compared to B1F3 and B12F3 (p<0.05), vomiting was significantly higher in group B1M1 and B12M1 (p<0.05) compared to B12F3, pruritus was significantly higher in group B12F4 compared to B12F3 and B1F3, in group B1M1 compared to B1F3 and B12F3 and in group B12M1 compared to B1F3 and B12F3 (p<0.05). As a result, in EPCA, the combination of bupivacaine and fentanyl provides as effective analgesia as the combination of bupivacaine and morphine and 3 mg/ml fentanyl admixture may be preferred with less side effects such as nausea, vomiting and pruritus.

  10. Na channel activation gate modulates slow recovery from use-dependent block by local anesthetics in squid giant axons.

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, J Z; Tanguy, J

    1985-01-01

    The time course of recovery from use-dependent block of sodium channels caused by local anesthetics was studied in squid axons. In the presence of lidocaine or its quaternary derivatives, QX-222 and QX-314, or 9-aminoacridine (9-AA), recovery from use-dependent block occurred in two phases: a fast phase and a slow phase. Only the fast phase was observed in the presence of benzocaine. The fast phase had a time constant of several milliseconds and resembled recovery from the fast Na inactivation in the absence of drug. Depending on the drug present, the magnitude of the time constant of the slow phase varied (for example at -80 mV): lidocaine, 270 ms; QX-222, 4.4 s; QX-314, 17 s; and 9-AA, 14 s. The two phases differed in the voltage dependence of recovery time constants. When the membrane was hyperpolarized, the recovery time constant for the fast phase was decreased, whereas that for the slow phase was increased for QX-compounds and 9-AA or unchanged for lidocaine. The fast phase is interpreted as representing the unblocked channels recovering from the fast Na inactivation, and the slow phase as representing the bound and blocked channels recovering from the use-dependent block accumulated by repetitive depolarizing pulse. The voltage dependence of time constants for the slow recovery is consistent with the m-gate trapping hypothesis. According to this hypothesis, the drug molecule is trapped by the activation gate (the m-gate) of the channel. The cationic form of drug molecule leaves the channel through the hydrophilic pathway, when the channel is open. However, lidocaine, after losing its proton, may leave the closed channel rapidly through the hydrophobic pathway. PMID:2410043

  11. Interaction of local anesthetics with a peptide encompassing the IV/S4-S5 linker of the Na+ channel.

    PubMed

    Fraceto, Leonardo F; Oyama, Sérgio; Nakaie, Clóvis R; Spisni, Alberto; de Paula, Eneida; Pertinhez, Thelma A

    2006-08-20

    The peptide pIV/S4-S5 encompasses the cytoplasmic linker between helices S4-S5 in domain IV of the voltage-gated Na+ channel, residues 1644-1664. The interaction of two local anesthetics (LA), lidocaine and benzocaine, with pIV/S4-S5 has been studied by DOSY, heteronuclear NMR 1H-15N-HSQC spectroscopy and computational methods. DOSY indicates that benzocaine, a neutral ester, exhibits stronger interaction with pIV/S4-S5 than lidocaine, a charged amine-amide. Weighted average chemical shifts, Deltadelta(1H-15N), show that benzocaine affects residues L1653, M1655 and S1656 while lidocaine slightly perturbs residues I1646, L1649 and A1659, L1660, near the N- and C-terminus, respectively. Computational methods confirmed the stability of the benzocaine binding and the existence of two binding sites for lidocaine. Even considering that the approach of studying the peptide in the presence of a co-solvent (TFE/H2O, 30%/70% v/v) has an inherently limited implication, our data strongly support the existence of multiple LA binding sites in the IV/S4-S5 linker, as suggested in the literature. In addition, we consider that LA can bind to the S4-S5 linker with diverse binding modes and strength since this linker is part of the receptor for the "inactivation gate particle". Conditions for devising new functional studies, aiming to better understand Na+ channel functionality as well as the various facets of LA pharmacological activity are proposed in this work.

  12. (/sup 3/H)Batrachotoxinin A 20 alpha-benzoate binding to voltage-sensitive sodium channels: a rapid and quantitative assay for local anesthetic activity in a variety of drugs

    SciTech Connect

    McNeal, E.T.; Lewandowski, G.A.; Daly, J.W.; Creveling, C.R.

    1985-03-01

    (/sup 3/H)Batrachotoxinin A benzoate ((/sup 3/H)BTX-B) binds with high affinity to sites on voltage-dependent sodium channels in a vesicular preparation from guinea pig cerebral cortex. In this preparation, local anesthetics competitively antagonize the binding of (/sup 3/H)BTX-B. The potencies of some 40 classical local anesthetics and a variety of catecholamine, histamine, serotonin, adenosine, GABA, glycine, acetylcholine, and calcium antagonists, tranquilizers, antidepressants, barbiturates, anticonvulsants, steroids, vasodilators, antiinflammatories, anticoagulants, analgesics, and other agents have been determined. An excellent correlation with the known local anesthetic activity of many of these agents indicate that antagonism of binding of (/sup 3/H)BTX-B binding provides a rapid, quantitative, and facile method for the screening and investigation of local anesthetic activity.

  13. Analgesic efficacy of ultrasound guided transversus abdominis plane block versus local anesthetic infiltration in adult patients undergoing single incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Bava, Ejas P.; Ramachandran, Rashmi; Rewari, Vimi; Chandralekha; Bansal, Virinder Kumar; Trikha, Anjan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block has been used to provide intra- and post-operative analgesia with single incision laparoscopic (SIL) bariatric and gynecological surgery with mixed results. Its efficacy in providing analgesia for SIL cholecystectomy (SILC) via the same approach remains unexplored. Aims: The primary objective of our study was to compare the efficacy of bilateral TAP block with local anesthetic infiltration for perioperative analgesia in patients undergoing SILC. Settings and Design: This was a prospective, randomized, controlled, double-blinded trial performed in a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: Forty-two patients undergoing SILC were randomized to receive either ultrasound-guided (USG) bilateral mid-axillary TAP blocks with 0.375% ropivacaine or local anesthetic infiltration of the port site. The primary outcome measure was the requirement of morphine in the first 24 h postoperatively. Statistical Analysis: The data were analyzed using t-test, Mann–Whitney test or Chi-square test. Results: The 24 h morphine requirement (mean ± standard deviation) was 34.57 ± 14.64 mg in TAP group and 32.76 ± 14.34 mg in local infiltration group (P = 0.688). The number of patients requiring intraoperative supplemental fentanyl in TAP group was 8 and in local infiltration group was 16 (P = 0.028). The visual analog scale scores at rest and on coughing were significantly higher in the local infiltration group in the immediate postoperative period (P = 0.034 and P = 0.007, respectively). Conclusion: USG bilateral TAP blocks were not effective in decreasing 24 h morphine requirement as compared to local anesthetic infiltration in patients undergoing SILC although it provided some analgesic benefit intraoperatively and in the initial 4 h postoperatively. Hence, the benefits of TAP blocks are not worth the effort and time spent for administering them for this surgery. PMID:27746552

  14. Anti-metastatic Potential of Amide-linked Local Anesthetics: Inhibition of Lung Adenocarcinoma Cell Migration and Inflammatory Src Signaling Independent of Sodium Channel Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Piegeler, Tobias; Votta-Velis, E. Gina; Liu, Guoquan; Place, Aaron T.; Schwartz, David E.; Beck-Schimmer, Beatrice; Minshall, Richard D.; Borgeat, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Background Retrospective analysis of patients undergoing cancer surgery suggests the use of regional anesthesia may reduce cancer recurrence and improve survival. Amide-linked local anesthetics have anti-inflammatory properties, although the mechanism of action in this regard is unclear. As inflammatory processes involving Src tyrosine protein kinase and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 are important in tumor growth and metastasis, we hypothesized that amide-linked local anesthetics may inhibit inflammatory Src-signaling involved in migration of adenocarcinoma cells. Methods NCI-H838 lung cancer cells were incubated with Tumor Necrosis Factor-α in absence/presence of ropivacaine, lidocaine, or chloroprocaine (1nM-100μM). Cell migration and total cell lysate Src-activation and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 phosphorylation were assessed. The role of voltage-gated sodium-channels in the mechanism of local anesthetic effects was also evaluated. Results Ropivacaine treatment (100μM) of H838 cells for 20 minutes decreased basal Src activity by 62% (p=0.003), and both ropivacaine and lidocaine co-administered with Tumor Necrosis Factor-α statistically significantly decreased Src-activation and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 phosphorylation, whereas chloroprocaine had no such effect. Migration of these cells at 4 hours was inhibited by 26% (p=0.005) in presence of 1μM ropivacaine and 21% by 1μM lidocaine (p=0.004). These effects of ropivacaine and lidocaine were independent of voltage-gated sodium-channel inhibition. Conclusions This study indicates that amide-, but not ester-linked local anesthetics may provide beneficial anti-metastatic effects. The observed inhibition of NCI-H838 cell migration by lidocaine and ropivacaine was associated with the inhibition of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-induced Src-activation and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 phosphorylation, providing the first evidence of a molecular mechanism which appears to be independent of their

  15. Absolute determination of local tropospheric OH concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armerding, Wolfgang; Comes, Franz-Josef

    1994-01-01

    Long path absorption (LPA) according to Lambert Beer's law is a method to determine absolute concentrations of trace gases such as tropospheric OH. We have developed a LPA instrument which is based on a rapid tuning of the light source which is a frequency doubled dye laser. The laser is tuned across two or three OH absorption features around 308 nm with a scanning speed of 0.07 cm(exp -1)/microsecond and a repetition rate of 1.3 kHz. This high scanning speed greatly reduces the fluctuation of the light intensity caused by the atmosphere. To obtain the required high sensitivity the laser output power is additionally made constant and stabilized by an electro-optical modulator. The present sensitivity is of the order of a few times 10(exp 5) OH per cm(exp 3) for an acquisition time of a minute and an absorption path length of only 1200 meters so that a folding of the optical path in a multireflection cell was possible leading to a lateral dimension of the cell of a few meters. This allows local measurements to be made. Tropospheric measurements have been carried out in 1991 resulting in the determination of OH diurnal variation at specific days in late summer. Comparison with model calculations have been made. Interferences are mainly due to SO2 absorption. The problem of OH self generation in the multireflection cell is of minor extent. This could be shown by using different experimental methods. The minimum-maximum signal to noise ratio is about 8 x 10(exp -4) for a single scan. Due to the small size of the absorption cell the realization of an open air laboratory is possible in which by use of an additional UV light source or by additional fluxes of trace gases the chemistry can be changed under controlled conditions allowing kinetic studies of tropospheric photochemistry to be made in open air.

  16. Effects of Methadone on the Minimum Anesthetic Concentration of Isoflurane, and Its Effects on Heart Rate, Blood Pressure and Ventilation during Isoflurane Anesthesia in Hens (Gallus gallus domesticus)

    PubMed Central

    Pypendop, Bruno Henri; Zangirolami Filho, Darcio; Sousa, Samuel Santos; Valadão, Carlos Augusto Araújo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the temporal effects of intramuscular methadone administration on the minimum anesthetic concentration (MAC) of isoflurane in hens, and to evaluate the effects of the isoflurane-methadone combination on heart rate and rhythm, blood pressure and ventilation. Thirteen healthy adult hens weighing 1.7 ± 0.2 kg were used. The MAC of isoflurane was determined in each individual using the bracketing method. Subsequently, the reduction in isoflurane MAC produced by methadone (3 or 6 mg kg-1, IM) was determined by the up-and-down method. Stimulation was applied at 15 and 30 minutes, and at 45 minutes if the bird had not moved at 30 minutes. Isoflurane MAC reduction was calculated at each time point using logistic regression. After a washout period, birds were anesthetized with isoflurane and methadone, 6 mg kg-1 IM was administered. Heart rate and rhythm, respiratory rate, blood gas values and invasive blood pressure were measured at 1.0 and 0.7 isoflurane MAC, and during 45 minutes after administration of methadone once birds were anesthetized with 0.7 isoflurane MAC. Fifteen minutes after administration of 3 mg kg-1 of methadone, isoflurane MAC was reduced by 2 (-9 to 13)% [logistic regression estimate (95% Wald confidence interval)]. Administration of 6 mg kg-1 of methadone decreased isoflurane MAC by 29 (11 to 46)%, 27 (-3 to 56)% and 10 (-8 to 28)% after 15, 30 and 45 minutes, respectively. Methadone (6 mg kg-1) induced atrioventricular block in three animals and ventricular premature contractions in two. Methadone caused an increase in arterial blood pressure and arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide, while heart rate and pH decreased. Methadone, 6 mg kg-1 IM significantly reduced isoflurane MAC by 30% in hens 15 minutes after administration. At this dose, methadone caused mild respiratory acidosis and increase in systemic blood pressure. PMID:27018890

  17. Comparative Analysis of Local Anesthesia with 2 Different Concentrations of Adrenaline: A Randomized and Single Blind Study

    PubMed Central

    Managutti, Anil; Prakasam, Michael; Puthanakar, Nagraj; Menat, Shailesh; Shah, Disha; Patel, Harsh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Local anesthetic agents are more commonly used in dentistry to have painless procedure during surgical intervention in bone and soft tissue. There are many local anesthetic agents available with the wide selection of vaso-constrictive agents that improve the clinical efficacy and the duration of local anesthesia. Most commonly lignocaine with adrenaline is used in various concentrations. Systemically adrenaline like drugs can cause a number of cardiovascular disturbances while most are short lived, permanent injury or even death may follow in drug induced ventricular fibrillation, myocardial infarction or cerebro-vascular accidents. This study compared the efficacy and cardiovascular effects with the use of 2% lignocaine with two different concentrations. Materials and Methods: Forty patients underwent extractions of mandibular bilateral teeth using 2% lignocaine with two different concentrations - one with 1:80000 and the other with 1:200000. Results: There was no significant difference in the efficacy and duration with the 2% lignocaine with 2 different concentrations. 2% lignocaine with 1:80000 adrenaline concentration has significantly increased the heart rate and blood pressure especially systolic compared with the lignocaine with 1:200000. Conclusion: Though 2% lignocaine with 1:80000 is widely used in India, 1:200000 adrenaline concentrations do not much affect the cardiovascular parameters. So it is recommended to use 2% lignocaine with 1:200000 for cardiac patients. PMID:25878474

  18. Low flow oxygen therapy from a portable oxygen concentrator or an oxygen cylinder effectively treats hypoxemia in anesthetized white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus).

    PubMed

    Fahlman, Asa; Caulkett, Nigel; Woodbury, Murray; Duke-Novakovski, Tanya; Wourms, Vincent

    2014-06-01

    For treatment of hypoxemia, delivery of the minimum effective oxygen flow rate is advantageous during field anesthesia because it prolongs the life of the oxygen cylinder. Portable oxygen concentrators as the oxygen source require less logistical considerations than cylinders and are a safer alternative during helicopter field work because they are nonexplosive devices. The objective of this study was to evaluate low oxygen flow rates by continuous or pulsed intranasal delivery for treatment of hypoxemia in anesthetized white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). Nine captive adult female deer (body mass 56-72 kg) were physically restrained in a drop-floor chute and hand injected intramuscularly with medetomidine (0.1-0.14 mg/kg) and ketamine (2.5-4.3 mg/kg). Intranasal oxygen was delivered from an oxygen cylinder at continuous flow rates of 1 and 2 L/min or from a battery driven oxygen concentrator (EverGo Portable Oxygen Concentrator, Respironics) with pulse-dose delivery (maximum capacity of 1.05 L/min). The pulse-dose setting (pulse volume 12-70 ml) was adjusted according to the respiratory rate. Arterial blood gases were analyzed before, during, and after O2 supplementation. A 10-min washout period was allowed between treatment groups. All three treatments adequately treated hypoxemia. The partial pressure of arterial oxygenation increased significantly from baseline values of 55 +/- 10 to 115 +/- 31 mm Hg during supplementation from the oxygen concentrator, to 138 +/- 21 mm Hg during supplementation from the oxygen cylinder at 1 L/min, and to 201 +/- 42 mm Hg at 2 L/min. In conclusion, low flow rates of intranasal oxygen supplemented continuously from an oxygen cylinder or by pulsed delivery from a portable oxygen concentrator effectively treated hypoxemia in anesthetized white-tailed deer.

  19. Waste anesthetic gas exposures to veterinarians and animal technicians

    SciTech Connect

    Wingfield, W.E.; Ruby, D.L.; Buchan, R.M.; Gunther, B.J.

    1981-02-15

    A survey of veterinarians was conducted in an 11-county region of eastern Colorado to determine the extent of usage of inhalation anesthetics and to measure exposures of veterinarians and their assistants to waste anesthetic gases. The survey indicated that inhalation anesthetics were used in 80.8% of the 210 practices. Exposures to waste anesthetics in veterinary practices were far less than reported in human hospitals. Waste anesthetic concentrations were affected by size of the patient, type of breathing system, and use of scavenging systems. Dilution ventilation had no effect on breathing zone concentrations. The endotracheal tube and occasionally the anesthetic machine were the major sources of leakage of anesthetic gases.

  20. Endothelial Barrier Protection by Local Anesthetics: Ropivacaine and Lidocaine Block Tumor Necrosis Factor-α–induced Endothelial Cell Src Activation

    PubMed Central

    Piegeler, Tobias; Votta-Velis, E. Gina; Bakhshi, Farnaz R.; Mao, Mao; Carnegie, Graeme; Bonini, Marcelo G.; Schwartz, David E.; Borgeat, Alain; Beck-Schimmer, Beatrice; Minshall, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pulmonary endothelial barrier dysfunction mediated in part by Src-kinase activation plays a crucial role in acute inflammatory disease. Proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), activate Src via phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase/Akt-dependent nitric oxide generation, a process initiated by recruitment of phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase regulatory subunit p85 to TNF-receptor-1. Because amide-linked local anesthetics have well-established anti-inflammatory effects, the authors hypothesized that ropivacaine and lidocaine attenuate inflammatory Src signaling by disrupting the phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase–Akt–nitric oxide pathway, thus blocking Src-dependent neutrophil adhesion and endothelial hyperpermeability. Methods Human lung microvascular endothelial cells, incubated with TNFα in the absence or presence of clinically relevant concentrations of ropivacaine and lidocaine, were analyzed by Western blot, probing for phosphorylated/activated Src, endothelial nitric oxide synthase, Akt, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and caveolin-1. The effect of ropivacaine on TNFα-induced nitric oxide generation, co-immunoprecipitation of TNF-receptor-1 with p85, neutrophil adhesion, and endothelial barrier disruption were assessed. Results Ropivacaine and lidocaine attenuated TNFα-induced Src activation (half-maximal inhibitory concentration [IC50] = 8.611 × 10−10 M for ropivacaine; IC50 = 5.864 × 10−10 M for lidocaine) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation (IC50 = 7.572 × 10−10 M for ropivacaine; IC50 = 6.377 × 10−10 M for lidocaine). Akt activation (n = 7; P = 0.006) and stimulus-dependent binding of TNF-receptor-1 and p85 (n = 6; P = 0.043) were blocked by 1 nM of ropivacaine. TNFα-induced neutrophil adhesion and disruption of endothelial monolayers via Src-dependent intercellular adhesion molecule-1- and caveolin-1-phosphorylation, respectively, were also attenuated. Conclusions Ropivacaine and lidocaine

  1. Enhancement of the 1-Octanol/Water Partition Coefficient of the Anti-Inflammatory Indomethacin in the Presence of Lidocaine and Other Local Anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Tateuchi, Ryo; Sagawa, Naoki; Shimada, Yohsuke; Goto, Satoru

    2015-07-30

    Side effects and excessive potentiation of drug efficacy caused by polypharmacy are becoming important social issues. The apparent partition coefficient of indomethacin (log P'IND) increases in the presence of lidocaine, and this is used as a physicochemical model for investigating polypharmacy. We examined the changes in log P'IND caused by clinically used local anesthetics-lidocaine, tetracaine, mepivacaine, bupivacaine, and dibucaine-and by structurally similar basic drugs-procainamide, imipramine, and diltiazem. The quantitative structure-activity relationship study of log P'IND showed that the partition coefficient values (log PLA) and the structural entropic terms (ΔSobs, log f) of the additives affect log P'IND. These results indicate that the local anesthetics and structurally similar drugs function as phase-transfer catalysts, increasing the membrane permeability of indomethacin via heterogeneous intermolecular association. Therefore, we expect that the potency of indomethacin, an acidic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, will be increased by concurrent administration of the other drugs.

  2. Ca(2+)-antagonistic action of bevantolol on hypothalamic neurons in vitro: its comparison with those of other beta-adrenoceptor antagonists, a local anesthetic and a Ca(2+)-antagonist.

    PubMed

    Omura, T; Kobayashi, T; Nishioka, K; Miyake, N; Akaike, N

    1996-01-15

    The Ca(2+)-antagonistic action of bevantolol, a beta 1-adrenoceptor antagonist, on high- and low-voltage activated Ca2+ currents (HVA- and LVA-ICa) was examined on neurons dissociated from rat brain. Bevantolol (10(-6) to 10(-4) M) inhibited concentration-dependently both ICa. The IC50 value of bevantolol for LVA-ICa was 4 x 10(-5) M, while bevantolol at 10(-4) M inhibited HVA-ICa by 28.5 +/- 7.7%. The potency of bevantolol in inhibiting both ICa was greater than those of propranolol, labetalol and lidocaine, while the inhibitory action of bevantolol on voltage-activated Na+ current was weakest among them. Bevantolol may possess Ca(2+)-antagonistic action that is independent from local anesthetic action.

  3. Toward Localized In Vivo Biomarker Concentration Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaojuan; Reeves, Daniel; Shi, Yipeng; Gimi, Barjor; Nemani, Krishnamurthy V.; Perreard, Irina M.; Toraya-Brown, Seiko; Fiering, Steven; Weaver, John B.

    2015-01-01

    We know a great deal about the biochemistry of cells because they can be isolated and studied. The biochemistry of the much more complex in vivo environment is more difficult to study because the only ways to quantitate concentrations is to sacrifice the animal or biopsy the tissue. Either method disrupts the environment profoundly and neither method allows longitudinal studies on the same individual. Methods of measuring chemical concentrations in vivo are very valuable alternatives to sacrificing groups of animals. We are developing microscopic magnetic nanoparticle (mNP) probes to measure the concentration of a selected molecule in vivo. The mNPs are targeted to bind the selected molecule and the resulting reduction in rotational freedom can be quantified remotely using magnetic spectroscopy. The mNPs must be contained in micrometer sized porous shells to keep them from migrating and to protect them from clearance by the immune system. There are two key issues in the development of the probes. First, we demonstrate the ability to measure concentrations in the porous walled alginate probes both in phosphate buffered saline and in blood, which is an excellent surrogate for the complex and challenging in vivo environment. Second, sensitivity is critical because it allows microscopic probes to measure very small concentrations very far away. We report sensitivity measurements on recently introduced technology that has allowed us to improve the sensitivity by two orders of magnitude, a factor of 200 so far. PMID:26203196

  4. [Local anesthesia in the children undergoing the fibroendoscopic study of the nasal cavity, nasopharynx, and larynx: are topical anesthetics needed?].

    PubMed

    Soldatsky, Yu L; Denisova, O A; Mazur, E M

    2015-01-01

    This prospective randomized study with double blind control was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of various anesthetic techniques employed prior to fibroendoscopy of the nose, nasopharynx, and larynx of the children. The study included 160 children at the age varying from 3 to 14 (mean 7.4±2.96) years randomly allocated to four statistically comparable groups matched for age and sex. The following preparations were used to treat the children prior to fibroendoscopy: physiological solution (group 1), a 0.05% xylometazoline solution (group 2), a 10% lidocaine solution (group 3), and a mixture of 0.05% xylometazoline and 10% lidocaine solutions (group 4). The evaluation of the tolerance to the pretreatment of the nasal cavity with lidocaine and lidocaine plus xylometazoline (groups 3 and 4) showed that it was significantly (p<0.05) worse than in groups 1 and 2. The subjective tolerance to fibroendoscopy as reported by the patients was on the average similar in the children of all four groups (p>0.05). The doctors found the tolerance of fibroendoscopy to be the worst following pretreatment with the physiological solution (group 1) and the best after pretreatment with a mixture of lidocaine and xylometazoline (group 4) (p=0.03). The children comprising groups 2 and 3 were not significantly different in terms of the tolerance to fibroendoscopy (p>0.05). It is concluded that the pretreatment of the nasal cavity of the children with a 10% lidocaine solution before fibroendoscopy has no advantage over the pretreatment with a 0.05% xylometazoline solution; at the same time, insuflation of lidocaine as an anesthetic induces more pronounced negative emotions compared with the application of 0.05% xylometazoline. PMID:26525473

  5. Anesthetic action of volatile anesthetics by using Paramecium as a model.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Miaomiao; Xia, Huimin; Xu, Younian; Xin, Naixing; Liu, Jiao; Zhang, Shihai

    2012-06-01

    Although empirically well understood in their clinical administration, volatile anesthetics are not yet well comprehended in their mechanism studies. A major conundrum emerging from these studies is that there is no validated model to assess the presumed candidate sites of the anesthetics. We undertook this study to test the hypothesis that the single-celled Paramecium could be anesthetized and served as a model organism in the study of anesthetics. We assessed the motion of Paramecium cells with Expert Vision system and the chemoresponse of Paramecium cells with T-maze assays in the presence of four different volatile anesthetics, including isoflurane, sevoflurane, enflurane and ether. Each of those volatiles was dissolved in buffers to give drug concentrations equal to 0.8, 1.0, and 1.2 EC50, respectively, in clinical practice. We could see that after application of volatile anesthetics, the swimming of the Paramecium cells was accelerated and then suppressed, or even stopped eventually, and the index of the chemoresponse of the Paramecium cells (denoted as I ( che )) was decreased. All of the above impacts were found in a concentration-dependent fashion. The biphasic effects of the clinical concentrations of volatile anesthetics on Paramecium simulated the situation of high species in anesthesia, and the inhibition of the chemoresponse also indicated anesthetized. In conclusion, the findings in our studies suggested that the single-celled Paramecium could be anesthetized with clinical concentrations of volatile anesthetics and therefore be utilized as a model organism to study the mechanisms of volatile anesthetics.

  6. Benzocaine as an anesthetic for striped bass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilderhus, Philip A.; Lemm, Carol A.; Woods, L. Curry, III

    1991-01-01

    Benzocaine was tested as an anesthetic on juvenile and mature adult striped bass (Morone saxatilis ). Concentrations of 55 mg/L at 22 degree C to 80 mg/L at 11 degree C effectively anesthetized fish in about 3 min. Recovery was more rapid as temperature increased. Fish survived concentrations of twice the effective concentration and exposure times up to 60 min at the effective concentration. Striped bass required higher concentrations for anesthetization than had been previously demonstrated for salmonid fishes, but safety margins for both concentration and exposure time were wider than for the salmonids.

  7. A study of the perturbation effects of the local anesthetic procaine on human erythrocyte and model membranes and of modifications of the sodium transport in toad skin.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, Mario; Schneider, Carlos; Villena, Fernando; Norris, Beryl; Cárdenas, Hernán; Cuevas, Francisco; Sotomayor, Carlos P

    2005-08-01

    The interaction of the local anesthetic procaine with human erythrocytes, isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes (IUM), isolated toad skins, and molecular models is described. The latter consisted of phospholipid multilayers built-up of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and of dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), representatives of phospholipid classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the human erythrocyte membrane, respectively. Optical and scanning electron microscopy of human erythrocytes revealed that procaine induced the formation of stomatocytes. Experiments performed on IUM at 37 degrees C by fluorescence spectroscopy showed that procaine interacted with the phospholipid bilayer polar groups but not with the hydrophobic acyl chains. X-ray diffraction indicated that procaine perturbed DMPC structure to a higher extent when compared with DMPE, its polar head region being more affected. Electrophysiological measurements disclosed a significant decrease in the potential difference (PD) and in the short-circuit current (Isc) after the application of procaine to isolated toad skin, reflecting inhibition of active ion transport. PMID:15894419

  8. Comparison of injection pain, heart rate increase, and postinjection pain of articaine and lidocaine in a primary intraligamentary injection administered with a computer-controlled local anesthetic delivery system.

    PubMed Central

    Nusstein, John; Berlin, Jeffrey; Reader, Al; Beck, Mike; Weaver, Joel M.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective, randomized, double-blind study was to compare the pain of injection, heart rate increase, and postinjection pain of the intraligamentary injection of 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine and 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine administered with a computer-controlled local anesthetic delivery system. Using a crossover design, intraligamentary injections of 1.4 mL of 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine and 1.4 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine were randomly administered on the mesial and distal aspects of the mandibular first molar with a computer-controlled local anesthetic delivery system in a double-blind manner at 2 separate appointments to 51 subjects. The results demonstrated the incidence of moderate pain was 14%-27% with needle insertion, with 0%-4% reporting severe pain. For solution deposition, moderate pain was reported 8%-18% of the time, with no reports of severe pain. There were no significant differences between the articaine and lidocaine solutions. Regarding heart rate changes, neither anesthetic solution resulted in a significant increase in heart rate over baseline readings. On day 1 postinjection, there was a 31% incidence of moderate/severe pain with the articaine solution and 20% incidence of moderate/severe pain with the lidocaine solution. The moderate/severe pain ratings decreased over the next 2 days. There were no significant differences between the articaine and lidocaine solutions. We concluded that the intraligamentary injection of 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine was similar to 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine for injection pain and postinjection pain in the mandibular first molar when administered with a computer-controlled local anesthetic delivery system. For both anesthetic solutions, heart rate did not significantly increase with the intraligamentary injection using the computer-controlled local anesthetic system. PMID:15675261

  9. Improving entanglement concentration of Gaussian states by local displacements

    SciTech Connect

    Fiurasek, Jaromir

    2011-07-15

    We investigate entanglement concentration of continuous-variable Gaussian states by local single-photon subtractions combined with local Gaussian operations. We first analyze the local squeezing-enhanced entanglement-concentration protocol proposed very recently by Zhang and van Loock [arXiv:1103.4500] and discuss the mechanism by which local squeezing before photon subtraction helps to increase the entanglement of the output state of the protocol. We next show that a similar entanglement improvement can be achieved by using local coherent displacements instead of single-mode squeezing.

  10. Allergic response to metabisulfite in lidocaine anesthetic solution.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, J. R.; Maestrello, C. L.; Campbell, R. L.

    2001-01-01

    True allergies to local anesthetics are rare. It is common for practitioners to misdiagnose a serious adverse event to local anesthetics as an allergic reaction. The most likely causes for an allergic response are the preservative, antioxidant, or metabolites and not the anesthetic itself. This case report illustrates the need for practitioners to understand the many potential allergens in local anesthetics and to correctly diagnose patients that are truly allergic to the local anesthetic. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figures 4 and 5 PMID:11495401

  11. Comparison of cardiorespiratory variables in dorsally recumbent horses anesthetized with guaifenesin-ketamine-xylazine spontaneously breathing 50% or maximal oxygen concentrations.

    PubMed

    Karrasch, Nicole M; Hubbell, John A E; Aarnes, Turi K; Bednarski, Richard M; Lerche, Phillip

    2015-04-01

    This study compared cardiorespiratory variables in dorsally recumbent horses anesthetized with guaifenesin-ketamine-xylazine and spontaneously breathing 50% or maximal (> 90%) oxygen (O2) concentrations. Twelve healthy mares were randomly assigned to breathe 50% or maximal O2 concentrations. Horses were sedated with xylazine, induced to recumbency with ketamine-diazepam, and anesthesia was maintained with guaifenesin-ketamine-xylazine to effect. Heart rate, arterial blood pressures, respiratory rate, lithium dilution cardiac output (CO), inspired and expired O2 and carbon dioxide partial pressures, and tidal volume were measured. Arterial and mixed-venous blood samples were collected prior to sedation (baseline), during 30 minutes of anesthesia, 10 minutes after disconnection from O2, and 30 minutes after standing. Shunt fraction, O2 delivery, and alveolar-arterial O2 partial pressures difference [P(A-a)O2] were calculated. Recovery times were recorded. There were no significant differences between groups in cardiorespiratory parameters or in P(A-a)O2 at baseline or 30 minutes after standing. Oxygen partial pressure difference in the 50% group was significantly less than in the maximal O2 group during anesthesia. PMID:25829559

  12. Comparison of cardiorespiratory variables in dorsally recumbent horses anesthetized with guaifenesin-ketamine-xylazine spontaneously breathing 50% or maximal oxygen concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Karrasch, Nicole M.; Hubbell, John A.E.; Aarnes, Turi K.; Bednarski, Richard M.; Lerche, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    This study compared cardiorespiratory variables in dorsally recumbent horses anesthetized with guaifenesin-ketamine-xylazine and spontaneously breathing 50% or maximal (> 90%) oxygen (O2) concentrations. Twelve healthy mares were randomly assigned to breathe 50% or maximal O2 concentrations. Horses were sedated with xylazine, induced to recumbency with ketamine-diazepam, and anesthesia was maintained with guaifenesin-ketamine-xylazine to effect. Heart rate, arterial blood pressures, respiratory rate, lithium dilution cardiac output (CO), inspired and expired O2 and carbon dioxide partial pressures, and tidal volume were measured. Arterial and mixed-venous blood samples were collected prior to sedation (baseline), during 30 minutes of anesthesia, 10 minutes after disconnection from O2, and 30 minutes after standing. Shunt fraction, O2 delivery, and alveolar-arterial O2 partial pressures difference [P(A-a)O2] were calculated. Recovery times were recorded. There were no significant differences between groups in cardiorespiratory parameters or in P(A-a)O2 at baseline or 30 minutes after standing. Oxygen partial pressure difference in the 50% group was significantly less than in the maximal O2 group during anesthesia. PMID:25829559

  13. New patents on topical anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Cantisani, Carmen; Macaluso, Laura; Frascani, Federica; Paolino, Giovanni; D'Andrea, Vito; Richetta, Antonio G; Calvieri, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Anesthesia is defined as a total or partial loss of sensation and it may be general, local or topical, depending on the method of drug administration and area of the body affected. General anesthesia is a reversible state of unconsciousness produced by anesthetic agents, characterized by amnesia, muscle relaxation and loss of sensitivity to pain of the whole body. General anesthetic drugs can be classified into two main groups according to their predominant molecular pharmacological effects: volatile and intravenous agents. Local anesthesia produce a reversible loss of sensation in a portion of the body and it reversibly block impulse conduction along nerve axons and other excitable membrane. All local anesthetics (LA) are membrane stabilizing drugs; they reversibly decrease the rate of depolarization and repolarization of excitable membranes. They act mainly by inhibiting sodium influx through sodium-specific ion channels in the neuronal cell membrane, in particular the voltage-gated sodium channels. When the influx of sodium is interrupted, an action potential cannot arise and signal conduction is inhibited. The main local anesthetic (LA) agents for skin anesthesia are benzocaine (aminoester), prilocaine and lidocaine (aminoamides) which are commercially available as gels, ointments and creams (benzocaine and eutectic mixture of lidocaine and prilocaine) or as a bioadhesive (lidocaine) with different compositions (vehicles and excipients) for adults or pediatric use. Topical anesthetics decrease anxiety, pain and discomfort during cutaneous procedures and provide effective analgesia with rapid onset, prolonged duration and minimal side effects. This article outlines the different classes of topical anesthetics available and gives an overview of the mechanism of action, metabolism of each different class, of the possible complications that can occur because of their use and their possible treatment options and new patents.

  14. Children's behavioral pain reactions during local anesthetic injection using cotton-roll vibration method compared with routine topical anesthesia: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Bagherian, Ali; Sheikhfathollahi, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Background: Topical anesthesia has been widely advocated as an important component of atraumatic administration of intraoral local anesthesia. The aim of this study was to use direct observation of children's behavioral pain reactions during local anesthetic injection using cotton-roll vibration method compared with routine topical anesthesia. Materials and Methods: Forty-eight children participated in this randomized controlled clinical trial. They received two separate inferior alveolar nerve block or primary maxillary molar infiltration injections on contralateral sides of the jaws by both cotton-roll vibration (a combination of topical anesthesia gel, cotton roll, and vibration for physical distraction) and control (routine topical anesthesia) methods. Behavioral pain reactions of children were measured according to the author-developed face, head, foot, hand, trunk, and cry (FHFHTC) scale, resulting in total scores between 0 and 18. Results: The total scores on the FHFHTC scale ranged between 0-5 and 0-10 in the cotton-roll vibration and control methods, respectively. The mean ± standard deviation values of total scores on FHFHTC scale were lower in the cotton-roll vibration method (1.21 ± 1.38) than in control method (2.44 ± 2.18), and this was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Conclusion: It may be concluded that the cotton-roll vibration method can be more helpful than the routine topical anesthesia in reducing behavioral pain reactions in children during local anesthesia administration. PMID:27274349

  15. Minimum effective local anesthetic volume for surgical anesthesia by subparaneural, ultrasound-guided popliteal sciatic nerve block: A prospective dose-finding study.

    PubMed

    Bang, Seung Uk; Kim, Dong Ju; Bae, Jin Ho; Chung, Kyudon; Kim, Yeesuk

    2016-08-01

    Because of its rapid onset time, recent years have seen an increase in the use of ultrasound (US)-guided popliteal sciatic nerve block (PSNB) via subparaneural injection for induction of surgical anesthesia. Moreover, in below-knee surgery, combined blocks, as opposed to sciatic nerve block alone, have become more common. These combined blocks often require a large volume of local anesthetic (LA), thus increasing the risk of local-anesthetic systemic toxicity (LAST). Thus, to decrease the risk of LAST, it is important to know the minimum effective volume (MEV) required for an adequate block. We, therefore, aimed to determine the MEV of ropivacaine 0.75% for induction of surgical anesthesia by the method of US-guided popliteal sciatic nerve block via subparaneural injection.Thirty patients underwent a US-guided PSNB with ropivacaine 0.75% at a 20-mL starting volume. Using a step-up/step-down method, we determined injection volumes for consecutive patients from the preceding patient's outcome. When an effective block was achieved within 40 minutes after injection, the next patient's volume was decreased by 2 mL. If the block failed, the next patient's volume was increased by 2 mL. The sensory and motor blockade was graded according to a 4-point scale. The block was considered a success if a combination of anesthesia and paresis (a score of 3 for both the sensory and motor nerves) was achieved within 40 minutes. The primary outcome measure was the MEV resulting in a successful subparaneural block of the sciatic nerve in 50% of patients (MEV50). Additionally, the data were processed with a probit regression analysis to determine the volume required to produce a complete sciatic nerve block in 90% of subjects (ED90).The MEV50 of 0.75% ropivacaine is 6.14 mL (95% confidence interval, 4.33-7.94 mL). The ED90 by probit analysis for a subparaneural injection was 8.9 mL (95% CI, 7.09-21.75 mL).The 6.14-mL MEV50 of ropivacaine 0.75% represents a 71% reduction

  16. Effect of bispectral index versus end-tidal anesthetic gas concentration-guided protocol on time to tracheal extubation for halothane-based general anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Neena; Mathur, Pooja Rawat; Khan, Shoyeb; Khare, Arvind; Mathur, Veena; Sethi, Surendra

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Early extubation is a desirable goal after general anesthesia. Very few studies have compared the effect of bispectral index (BIS) monitoring versus standard end-tidal anesthetic gas (ETAG) concentration monitoring on tracheal extubation time for halothane-based anesthesia. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of BIS versus ETAG-guided anesthesia on time to tracheal extubation for halothane-based anesthesia in general surgical setting. Methods: This was a randomized, controlled double-blind study. Sixty patients with the American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status Class 1 or 2, receiving halothane-based general anesthesia were randomized to BIS-guided (n = 30) and ETAG-guided anesthesia (n = 30). Time to tracheal extubation was measured. In BIS group, BIS value was kept between 40 and 60 while in ETAG group; ETAG value was kept between 0.7 and 1.3 minimum alveolar concentration. The two groups were compared using Student's t-test, and P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Data were processed and analyzed using SPSS version 17 software. Results: Mean time to tracheal extubation was significantly longer in BIS group (9.63 ± 3.02 min) as compared to ETAG group (5.29 ± 1.51 min), mean difference 4.34 min with 95% confidence interval (3.106, 5.982) (P < 0.05). Conclusion: In our study, the extubation time was significantly longer in BIS-guided anesthesia as compared to ETAG-guided anesthesia. ETAG monitoring promotes earlier extubation of patients as compared to BIS monitoring during halothane anesthesia. PMID:27746557

  17. Intraoperative anesthetic complications.

    PubMed

    Milam, S B

    1987-01-01

    Intraoperative anesthetic complications can be prevented or minimized if the anesthetist is able to anticipate such problems in the preanesthetic period. Therefore, an adequate preanesthetic medical history that includes previous anesthetic experiences and past and current drug therapy is extremely important. Furthermore, the anesthetist must be properly trained to anticipate undesirable reactions to anesthetic agents. The signs of an impending disaster are subtle and nonspecific in the anesthetized patient. Therefore, continuous vigilance of the patient's physiologic status coupled with a high index of suspicion are essential to safe anesthetic management of dental patients. PMID:3468015

  18. The conformational stability, solvation and the assignments of the experimental infrared, Raman, 1H and 13C NMR spectra of the local anesthetic drug lidocaine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badawi, Hassan M.; Förner, Wolfgang; Ali, Shaikh A.

    2015-05-01

    The structure, vibrational and 1H and 13C NMR spectra of the local anesthetic drug lidocaine were investigated by the B3LYP/6-311G∗∗ calculations. The molecule was predicted to have the non-planar cis (NCCN ∼ 0°) structures being about 2-6 kcal/mol lower in energy than the corresponding trans (NCCN ∼ 180°) forms. The calculated NCCN (9.6°) and CNCC (-132.2°) torsional angles were in a good qualitative agreement with the reported X-ray angles (3.1 and 13.0°, -102.67 and -77.9°, respectively, for H-bonded dimers). The Gibbs energy of solution of lidocaine in formamide, water, dimethylsulfoxide, acetonitrile, methanol, ethanol and chloroform solutions was estimated at the B3LYP level. The predicted affinity of lidocaine toward the alcohols, acetonitrile and chloroform solutions was in excellent agreement with the reported experimental solubility of the drug in organic solvents. The analysis of the observed vibrational spectra is consistent with the presence of lidocaine in only one conformation at room temperature. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra of lidocaine were interpreted by experimental and DFT calculated chemical shifts of the drug. The RMSD between experimental and theoretical 1H and 13C chemical shifts for lidocaine is 0.47 and 8.26 ppm, respectively.

  19. Novel serine-based gemini surfactants as chemical permeation enhancers of local anesthetics: A comprehensive study on structure-activity relationships, molecular dynamics and dermal delivery.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Raquel S; Cova, Tânia F G G; Silva, Sérgio M C; Oliveira, Rita; do Vale, M Luísa C; Marques, Eduardo F; Pais, Alberto A C C; Veiga, Francisco J B

    2015-06-01

    This work aims at studying the efficacy of a series of novel biocompatible, serine-based surfactants as chemical permeation enhancers for two different local anesthetics, tetracaine and ropivacaine, combining an experimental and computational approach. The surfactants consist of gemini molecules structurally related, but with variations in headgroup charge (nonionic vs. cationic) and in the hydrocarbon chain lengths (main and spacer chains). In vitro permeation and molecular dynamics studies combined with cytotoxicity profiles were performed to investigate the permeation of both drugs, probe skin integrity, and rationalize the interactions at molecular level. Results show that these enhancers do not have significant deleterious effects on the skin structure and do not cause relevant changes on cell viability. Permeation across the skin is clearly improved using some of the selected serine-based gemini surfactants, namely the cationic ones with long alkyl chains and shorter spacer. This is noteworthy in the case of ropivacaine hydrochloride, which is not easily administered through the stratum corneum. Molecular dynamics results provide a mechanistic view of the surfactant action on lipid membranes that essentially corroborate the experimental observations. Overall, this study suggests the viability of these serine-based surfactants as suitable and promising delivery agents in pharmaceutical formulations.

  20. Percolation velocity dependence on local concentration in bidisperse granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Ryan P.; Xiao, Hongyi; Deng, Zhekai; Umbanhowar, Paul B.; Lueptow, Richard M.

    The percolation velocity, up, of granular material in size or density bidisperse mixtures depends on the local concentration, particle size ratio, particle density ratio, and shear rate, γ ˙. Discrete element method computational results were obtained for bounded heap flows with size ratios between 1 and 3 and for density ratios between 1 and 4. The results indicate that small particles percolate downward faster when surrounded by large particles than large particles percolate upward when surrounded by small particles, as was recently observed in shear-box experiments. Likewise, heavy particles percolate downward faster when surrounded by light particles than light particles percolate upward when surrounded by heavy particles. The dependence of up / γ ˙ on local concentration results in larger percolation flux magnitudes at high concentrations of large (or light) particles compared to high concentrations of small (or heavy) particles, while local volumetric flux is conserved. The dependence of up / γ ˙ on local concentration can be incorporated into a continuum model, but the impact on global segregation patterns is usually minimal. Partially funded by Dow Chemical Company and NSF Grant No. CBET-1511450.

  1. Kinetics of the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase from desert cobra (Walterinnesia aegyptia) venom by local anesthetics: procaine and tetracaine.

    PubMed

    al-Jafari, A A; Kamal, M A; Duhaiman, A S; Alhomida, A S

    1996-10-01

    The kinetic parameters of W. aegyptia venom acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition by procaine and tetracaine hydrochloride were investigated in the present study. Procaine and tetracaine reversibly inhibited the AChE activity in a concentration-dependent manner, the IC50 being about 0.28 and 0.04 mM, respectively. The Michaelis-Menten constant (K(m)) for the hydrolysis of acetylthiocholine iodide was found to be 0.051 mM with Vmax 10.2 mumole/min/mg protein. Both K(m) and Vmax were affected by procaine while only Vmax decreased with tetracaine. A Lineweaver-Burk plot and its secondary replot indicated that the nature of the inhibition is of the linear mixed type for procaine which is considered to be a mixture of competitive and noncompetitive types while the inhibition was noncompetitive for tetracaine. The values of Ki(slope) and K(intercept were estimated as 0.133 mM and 0.451 mM for procaine and 7.2 x 10(-3) mM for tetracaine, respectively, by the secondary replots of the Lineweaver-Burk plot.

  2. Comment on "Local impermeant anions establish the neuronal chloride concentration".

    PubMed

    Voipio, Juha; Boron, Walter F; Jones, Stephen W; Hopfer, Ulrich; Payne, John A; Kaila, Kai

    2014-09-01

    Glykys et al. (Reports, 7 February 2014, p. 670) conclude that, rather than ion transporters, "local impermeant anions establish the neuronal chloride concentration" and thereby determine "the magnitude and direction of GABAAR currents at individual synapses." If this were possible, perpetual ion-motion machines could be constructed. The authors' conclusions conflict with basic thermodynamic principles.

  3. Efficacy of subpleural continuous infusion of local anesthetics after thoracoscopic pulmonary resection for primary lung cancer compared to intravenous patient-controlled analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Joonho; Haam, Seokjin

    2016-01-01

    Background This study compared the efficacy and side effects of intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) with those of a subpleural continuous infusion of local anesthetic (ON-Q system) in patients undergoing thoracoscopic pulmonary resection for primary lung cancer. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 66 patients who underwent thoracoscopic pulmonary resection for primary lung cancer from January 2014 to August 2015 (36 in the IV-PCA group and 30 in the ON-Q group). The numeric pain intensity scale (NPIS), additional IV injections for pain control, side effects, and early discontinuation of the pain control device were compared. Results There were no differences in the general characteristics of the two groups. The NPIS scores gradually decreased with time (P<0.001), but the two groups had differences in pattern of NPIS scores (P=0.111). There were no differences in the highest NPIS score during admission (4.75±2.35 vs. 5.27±1.87, P=0.334) or the number of additional IV injections for pain control in the same period (0.72±0.94 for IV-PCA vs. 0.83±0.65 for ON-Q; P=0.575). Side effects such as nausea, dizziness, and drowsiness were significantly more frequent with IV-PCA (36.1% vs. 10.0%, P=0.014), and early discontinuation of the pain control device was more frequent in the IV-PCA group (33.3% vs. 6.7%, P=0.008). Conclusions The ON-Q system was equivalent to the IV-PCA for postoperative pain control after thoracoscopic pulmonary resection for primary lung cancer, and it also had fewer effects and early discontinuations. PMID:27499973

  4. Point mutations at the local anesthetic receptor site modulate the state-dependent block of rat Na v1.4 sodium channels by pyrazoline-type insecticides.

    PubMed

    Silver, Kristopher S; Soderlund, David M

    2007-05-01

    Pyrazoline-type insecticides (PTIs) selectively block sodium channels at membrane potentials that promote slow sodium channel inactivation and are proposed to interact with a site that overlaps the local anesthetic (LA) receptor site. Mutagenesis studies identified two amino acid residues in the S6 segment of homology domain IV (Phe-1579 and Tyr-1586 in the rat Na(v)1.4 sodium channel) as principal elements of the LA receptor. To test the hypothesis that PTIs bind to the LA receptor, we constructed mutated Na(v)1.4/F1579A and Na(v)1.4/Y1586A cDNAs, expressed native and mutated channels in Xenopus oocytes, and examined the effects of these mutations on channel block by three PTIs (indoxacarb, its bioactivation product DCJW, and RH3421) by two-electrode voltage clamp. DCJW and RH3421 had no effect on Na(v)1.4 channels held at -120mV but caused a slowly developing block upon depolarization to -30mV. Estimated IC(50) values following 15min of exposure were 1 and 4muM for DCJW and RH3421, respectively. Indoxacarb failed to block Na(v)1.4 channels under all experimental conditions. Sensitivity to block by DCJW and RH3421 at -30mV was significantly reduced in Na(v)1.4/F1579A channels, a finding that is consistent with the impact of this mutation on drug binding. In contrast to its effect on drug binding, the Y1586A mutation increased the sensitivity of Na(v)1.4 channels held at -30mV to all three compounds, conferring modest sensitivity to indoxacarb and increasing sensitivity to DCJW and RH3421 by 58- and 16-fold, respectively. These results provide direct evidence for the action of PTIs at the LA receptor.

  5. Adherence to Guidelines for the Management of Local Anesthetic Systemic Toxicity Is Improved by an Electronic Decision Support Tool and Designated ‘Reader’

    PubMed Central

    McEvoy, Matthew D.; Hand, William R.; Stoll, W. David; Furse, Cory M.; Nietert, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives A hardcopy or paper cognitive aid has been shown to improve performance during the management of simulated local anesthetic systemic toxicity (LAST) when given to the team leader. However, there remains room for improvement in order to ensure a system that can achieve perfect adherence to the published guidelines for LAST management. Recent research has shown that implementing a checklist via a designated reader may be of benefit. Accordingly, we sought to investigate the effect of an electronic decision support tool (DST) and designated ‘Reader’ role on team performance during an in-situ simulation of LAST. Methods Participants were randomized to Reader+DST (N = 16, rDST) and Control (N = 15, memory alone). The rDST group received the assistance of a dedicated Reader on the response team who was equipped with an electronic DST. The primary outcome measure was adherence to guidelines. Results For overall and critical percent correct scores, the rDST group scored higher than Control (99.3% vs 72.2%, P < 0.0001; 99.5% vs 70%, P < 0.0001, respectively). In the LAST scenario, 0 of 15 (0%) in the control group performed 100% of critical management steps, while 15 of 16 (93.8%) in the rDST group did so (P < 0.0001). Conclusions In a prospective, randomized single-blinded study, a designated Reader with an electronic DST improved adherence to guidelines in the management of an in-situ simulation of LAST. Such tools are promising in the future of medicine, but further research is needed to ensure the best methods for implementing them in the clinical arena. PMID:24956454

  6. Influence of topical application of capsaicin, menthol and local anesthetics on intraoral somatosensory sensitivity in healthy subjects: temporal and spatial aspects.

    PubMed

    Naganawa, Takuya; Baad-Hansen, Lene; Ando, Tomohiro; Svensson, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate temporal and spatial aspects of somatosensory changes after topical application of capsaicin, menthol and local anesthetics (LA) on the gingiva with the use of intraoral palpometers and thermal devices. Sixteen healthy volunteers (eight male, eight female) participated. Four topical preparations (capsaicin, menthol, LA and Vaseline as a control) were randomly applied to the gingiva around the first premolar in the upper jaw via individual oral templates, which allowed spatial mapping of somatosensory changes at and adjacent to the site of application. The topical drugs were applied for 15 min in a randomized and balanced sequence. The perceived preparation-evoked pain intensity was recorded with the use of 0-10 visual analog scales (VAS). Standardized mechanical and thermal stimuli were applied before, during and up to 30 min after the topical applications, and numerical rating scales (NRS) were used to score the perceived intensity of the stimuli. Peak VAS, area under the curve and mean VAS preparation-evoked pain scores for capsaicin, menthol, LA and control were compared with paired t tests. NRS scores for mechanical and thermal test stimuli were analyzed with four-way repeated measurements analyses of variance. Capsaicin evoked significantly higher VAS pain parameters as well as higher NRS scores to heat stimuli than control (P < 0.029). There were no significant differences in stimulus-evoked NRS scores between the menthol and control conditions (P = 0.518), but LA caused significantly lower stimulus-evoked NRS scores compared with control (P < 0.001). Post hoc tests showed that capsaicin caused sensitization to heat stimuli at and adjacent to the application area. In conclusion, this study for the first time demonstrates the time course of capsaicin-evoked heat hyperalgesia in and outside the site of application at the oral mucosa (primary and secondary hyperalgesia).

  7. [Facial locoregional anesthetics: principles and precautions].

    PubMed

    Lefort, H; Lacroix, G; Cordier, A; Bey, E; Duhamel, P

    2009-12-01

    Facial locoregional anesthetics (ALR) with nervous blocks are simple and reliable to perform, need little technical resources with a very low iatrogenic risk. These blocks allow anesthesia without deforming wound banks using the same materials as usual local anesthetic procedures. Three principal nervous blocks, in a straight line along the vertical pupil axis, allow managing - even extensive - facial wounds. Few side effects may occur which can be easily prevented. It is a good alternative to local anesthetic for the treatment of extensive and deep areas which is performed with a lower number of injections and a high rate of success. These techniques are easy to learn and practise. These anesthetic techniques allow a nice treatment of different kinds of facial wounds from simple suture to flaps.

  8. Noninvasive investigation of skin local hypothermia influence upon local oxygenation and hemoglobin concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douplik, Alexandre Y.; Kessler, Manfred D.; Kakihana, Yasuyuki; Krug, Alfons

    1997-08-01

    Functional evaluation of local hemoglobin concentration and hemoglobin oxygenation based on back scattering spectra from human skin in vivo have been obtained in visible range (502 - 628 nm) by a rapid microlightguide spectrometer (EMPHO II) with step 250 micrometer. Analysis of received results has shown that during local cooling there is two nearly simultaneous reactions: reduction of hemoglobin concentration and increase of hemoglobin oxygenation level. In a case when one has used previous heating of planning place for cooling, reduction of hemoglobin concentration is expressed higher by 22 - 33%.

  9. Profiling the local carrier concentration across a semiconductor quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Walrath, J. C.; Lin, Yen-Hsiang; Huang, S.; Goldman, R. S.

    2015-05-11

    We profile the local carrier concentration, n, across epitaxial InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) consisting of 3D islands on top of a 2D alloy layer. We use scanning thermoelectric microscopy to measure a profile of the temperature gradient-induced voltage, which is converted to a profile of the local Seebeck coefficient, S. The S profile is then converted to a conduction band-edge profile and compared with Poisson-Schrodinger band-edge simulations. Our combined computational-experimental approach suggests a reduced carrier concentration in the QD center in comparison to that of the 2D alloy layer. The relative roles of free carrier trapping and/or dopant expulsion are discussed.

  10. Comment on "Local impermeant anions establish the neuronal chloride concentration".

    PubMed

    Luhmann, Heiko J; Kirischuk, Sergei; Kilb, Werner

    2014-09-01

    Glykys et al. (Reports, 7 February 2014, p. 670) proposed that cytoplasmic impermeant anions and polyanionic extracellular matrix glycoproteins establish the local neuronal intracellular chloride concentration, [Cl(-)]i, and thereby the polarity of γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor signaling. The experimental procedures and results in this study are insufficient to support these conclusions. Contradictory results previously published by these authors and other laboratories are not referred to.

  11. Anesthetic diffusion through lipid membranes depends on the protonation rate.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Isidoro, Rosendo; Sierra-Valdez, F J; Ruiz-Suárez, J C

    2014-12-18

    Hundreds of substances possess anesthetic action. However, despite decades of research and tests, a golden rule is required to reconcile the diverse hypothesis behind anesthesia. What makes an anesthetic to be local or general in the first place? The specific targets on proteins, the solubility in lipids, the diffusivity, potency, action time? Here we show that there could be a new player equally or even more important to disentangle the riddle: the protonation rate. Indeed, such rate modulates the diffusion speed of anesthetics into lipid membranes; low protonation rates enhance the diffusion for local anesthetics while high ones reduce it. We show also that there is a pH and membrane phase dependence on the local anesthetic diffusion across multiple lipid bilayers. Based on our findings we incorporate a new clue that may advance our understanding of the anesthetic phenomenon.

  12. Mutations M287L and Q266I in the Glycine Receptor α1 Subunit Change Sensitivity to Volatile Anesthetics in Oocytes and Neurons, but Not the Minimal Alveolar Concentration in Knockin Mice

    PubMed Central

    Borghese, Cecilia M.; Xiong, Wei; Oh, S. Irene; Ho, Angel; Mihic, S. John; Zhang, Li; Lovinger, David M.; Homanics, Gregg E.; Eger, Edmond I; Harris, R. Adron

    2012-01-01

    Background Volatile anesthetics (VAs) alter the function of key central nervous system proteins but it is not clear which, if any, of these targets mediates the immobility produced by VAs in the face of noxious stimulation. A leading candidate is the glycine receptor, a ligand-gated ion channel important for spinal physiology. VAs variously enhance such function, and blockade of spinal GlyRs with strychnine affects the minimal alveolar concentration (an anesthetic EC50) in proportion to the degree of enhancement. Methods We produced single amino acid mutations into the glycine receptorα1 subunit that increased (M287L, third transmembrane region) or decreased (Q266I, second transmembrane region) sensitivity to isoflurane in recombinant receptors, and introduced such receptors into mice. The resulting knockin mice presented impaired glycinergic transmission, but heterozygous animals survived to adulthood, and we determined the effect of isoflurane on glycine-evoked responses of brain stem neurons from the knockin mice, and the minimal alveolar concentration for isoflurane and other VAs in the immature and mature knockin mice. Results Studies of glycine-evoked currents in brain stem neurons from knock-in mice confirmed the changes seen with recombinant receptors. No increases in the minimal alveolar concentration were found in knockin mice, but the minimal alveolar concentration for isoflurane and enflurane (but not halothane) decreased in 2-week-old Q266I mice. This change is opposite to the one expected for a mutation that decreases the sensitivity to volatile anesthetics. Conclusion Taken together, these results indicate that glycine receptors containing the α1 subunit are not likely to be crucial for the action of isoflurane and other VAs. PMID:22885675

  13. Localized phosphorus spectroscopy in vivo: Quantitation of metabolite concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wylezinska-Arridge, Marzena Malgorzata

    This project was dedicated to the investigation of the factors that may affect absolute quantitation in localized 31P MRS and if possible to the improvement of the accuracy of both localization and quantification. Three aspects have been looked at: 1) the acquisition /localization technique used; 2) the strategy used for conversion of signal amplitude/peak areas into concentrations; and 3) methods for MRS signal processing and analysis. With respect to the first aspect, image selected in vivo spectroscopy (ISIS) and point resolved spectroscopy (PRESS), were considered. Aspects of ISIS localization, including relaxation effects during inversion and excitation adiabatic pulses, and uniformity of spin excitation across the "in vivo" 31P spectral range, were investigated using simulation. In order to reduce the chemical shift displacement error in ISIS, a new adiabatic pulse for spin inversion, has been designed and experimentally verified. For PRESS, the performance of the selective 90[degrees] and 180[degrees] pulses was investigated experimentally and using simulations. The consequences of nonideal flip angles on T1 measurements based on two PRESS experiments were analyzed. Effects of amplitude and phase modulation of the ATP signal during the PRESS sequence were analyzed using product-operator formalism for an AMX system. A tissue substitute material, with known metabolite concentrations and simulating the 31P spectrum obtained from neonatal brain, has been developed for testing quantitation accuracy. The manufacture, physical properties and chemical stability of a material has been presented. The following calibration protocols have been experimentally verified: use of water as an internal concentration reference (ICR), and use of a standard phantom as an external concentration reference (ECR). A modified ECR protocol using the tissue substitute material as a reference, has been suggested to deal with problems related to off-resonance effects. This protocol has

  14. Minimum anesthetic volume in regional anesthesia by using ultrasound-guidance.

    PubMed

    Di Filippo, Alessandro; Falsini, Silvia; Adembri, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    The ultrasound guidance in regional anesthesia ensures the visualization of needle placement and the spread of Local Anesthetics. Over the past few years there was a substantial interest in determining the Minimum Effective Anesthetic Volume necessary to accomplish surgical anesthesia. The precise and real-time visualization of Local Anesthetics spread under ultrasound guidance block may represent the best requisite for reducing Local Anesthetics dose and Local Anesthetics-related effects. We will report a series of studies that have demonstrated the efficacy of ultrasound guidance blocks to reduce Local Anesthetics and obtain surgical anesthesia as compared to block performed under blind or electrical nerve stimulation technique. Unfortunately, the results of studies are widely divergent and not seem to indicate a dose considered effective, for each block, in a definitive way; but it is true that, through the use of ultrasound guidance, it is possible to reduce the dose of anesthetic in the performance of anesthetic blocks. PMID:27591464

  15. Comparative analysis of tissue reactions to anesthetic solutions: histological analysis in subcutaneous tissue of rats.

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Paulo Domingos; Sanches, Marcio Giampietro; Okamoto, Tetuo

    2003-01-01

    Postanesthetic pain is a relatively common complication after local anesthesia. This complication may be caused by the anesthetic technique or by the anesthetic solution used. Tissue reactions induced by the anesthetic solutions may be one of the factors resulting in pain after anesthesia. The objective of this study was to comparatively analyze tissue reactions induced by different anesthetic solutions in the subcutaneous tissue of rats. The following solutions were utilized: 2% lidocaine without vasoconstrictor; a 0.5% bupivacaine solution with 1:200,000 adrenaline; a 4% articaine solution and 2% mepivacaine, both with 1:100,000 adrenaline; and a 0.9% sodium chloride solution as a control. Sterilized absorbent paper cones packed inside polyethylene tubes were soaked in the solutions and implanted in the subcutaneous region. The sacrifice periods were 1, 2, 5, and 10 days after surgery. The specimens were prepared and stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histological analysis. The results showed that there is a difference in tissue irritability produced by the local anesthetic solutions. The results also showed that there is no relation between the concentration of the drug and the inflammatory intensity, that the mepivacaine and articaine solutions promoted less inflammatory reaction than the bupivacaine, and that the lidocaine solution produced the least intense inflammation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:14959905

  16. The active titration method for measuring local hydroxyl radical concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprengnether, Michele; Prinn, Ronald G.

    1994-01-01

    We are developing a method for measuring ambient OH by monitoring its rate of reaction with a chemical species. Our technique involves the local, instantaneous release of a mixture of saturated cyclic hydrocarbons (titrants) and perfluorocarbons (dispersants). These species must not normally be present in ambient air above the part per trillion concentration. We then track the mixture downwind using a real-time portable ECD tracer instrument. We collect air samples in canisters every few minutes for roughly one hour. We then return to the laboratory and analyze our air samples to determine the ratios of the titrant to dispersant concentrations. The trends in these ratios give us the ambient OH concentration from the relation: dlnR/dt = -k(OH). A successful measurement of OH requires that the trends in these ratios be measureable. We must not perturb ambient OH concentrations. The titrant to dispersant ratio must be spatially invariant. Finally, heterogeneous reactions of our titrant and dispersant species must be negligible relative to the titrant reaction with OH. We have conducted laboratory studies of our ability to measure the titrant to dispersant ratios as a function of concentration down to the few part per trillion concentration. We have subsequently used these results in a gaussian puff model to estimate our expected uncertainty in a field measurement of OH. Our results indicate that under a range of atmospheric conditions we expect to be able to measure OH with a sensitivity of 3x10(exp 5) cm(exp -3). In our most optimistic scenarios, we obtain a sensitivity of 1x10(exp 5) cm(exp -3). These sensitivity values reflect our anticipated ability to measure the ratio trends. However, because we are also using a rate constant to obtain our (OH) from this ratio trend, our accuracy cannot be better than that of the rate constant, which we expect to be about 20 percent.

  17. Estimation of local extreme suspended sediment concentrations in California Rivers.

    PubMed

    Tramblay, Yves; Saint-Hilaire, André; Ouarda, Taha B M J; Moatar, Florentina; Hecht, Barry

    2010-09-01

    The total amount of suspended sediment load carried by a stream during a year is usually transported during one or several extreme events related to high river flow and intense rainfall, leading to very high suspended sediment concentrations (SSCs). In this study quantiles of SSC derived from annual maximums and the 99th percentile of SSC series are considered to be estimated locally in a site-specific approach using regional information. Analyses of relationships between physiographic characteristics and the selected indicators were undertaken using the localities of 5-km radius draining of each sampling site. Multiple regression models were built to test the regional estimation for these indicators of suspended sediment transport. To assess the accuracy of the estimates, a Jack-Knife re-sampling procedure was used to compute the relative bias and root mean square error of the models. Results show that for the 19 stations considered in California, the extreme SSCs can be estimated with 40-60% uncertainty, depending on the presence of flow regulation in the basin. This modelling approach is likely to prove functional in other Mediterranean climate watersheds since they appear useful in California, where geologic, climatic, physiographic, and land-use conditions are highly variable. PMID:20570317

  18. Neurometric assessment of intraoperative anesthetic

    DOEpatents

    Kangas, Lars J.; Keller, Paul E.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for collecting EEG data, reducing the EEG data into coefficients, and correlating those coefficients with a depth of unconsciousness or anesthetic depth, and which obtains a bounded first derivative of anesthetic depth to indicate trends. The present invention provides a developed artificial neural network based method capable of continuously analyzing EEG data to discriminate between awake and anesthetized states in an individual and continuously monitoring anesthetic depth trends in real-time. The present invention enables an anesthesiologist to respond immediately to changes in anesthetic depth of the patient during surgery and to administer the correct amount of anesthetic.

  19. Neurometric assessment of intraoperative anesthetic

    DOEpatents

    Kangas, L.J.; Keller, P.E.

    1998-07-07

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for collecting EEG data, reducing the EEG data into coefficients, and correlating those coefficients with a depth of unconsciousness or anesthetic depth, and which obtains a bounded first derivative of anesthetic depth to indicate trends. The present invention provides a developed artificial neural network based method capable of continuously analyzing EEG data to discriminate between awake and anesthetized states in an individual and continuously monitoring anesthetic depth trends in real-time. The present invention enables an anesthesiologist to respond immediately to changes in anesthetic depth of the patient during surgery and to administer the correct amount of anesthetic. 7 figs.

  20. Intravenous glucose administration in fasting rats has differential effects on acylated and unacylated ghrelin in the portal and systemic circulation: a comparison between portal and peripheral concentrations in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Gauna, Carlotta; Uitterlinden, Piet; Kramer, Piet; Kiewiet, Rosalie M; Janssen, Joop A M J L; Delhanty, Patric J D; van Aken, Maarten O; Ghigo, Ezio; Hofland, Leo J; Themmen, Axel P N; van der Lely, Aart Jan

    2007-11-01

    Ghrelin is produced by the gastrointestinal tract, and its systemic concentrations are mainly regulated by nutritional factors. Our aim was to investigate: 1) endogenous portal and systemic acylated and unacylated ghrelin levels (AG and UAG, respectively); 2) whether an iv glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) modifies AG and UAG; and 3) whether the liver passage plays a role in regulating systemic AG and UAG. To elucidate this, we evaluated the effects of IVGTT or saline injection on endogenous portal and systemic concentrations of glucose, insulin, AG, and UAG in anesthetized fasting rats. Hepatic extraction of insulin, AG, and UAG and the ratio of AG to UAG were also measured. IVGTT suppressed both portal (P < 0.03) and peripheral (P < 0.05) UAG, whereas it only blunted prehepatic, but not peripheral, AG. During fasting, hepatic clearance of UAG was 11%, and it was decreased to 8% by IVGTT. AG was cleared by the liver by 38% but unaffected by glucose. The AG to UAG ratio was higher in the portal than the systemic circulation, both in the saline (P < 0.004) and IVGTT (P < 0.0005) rats. In conclusion, this study shows that: 1) the ratio of AG to UAG is very low in the portal vein and decreases further in the systemic circulation; 2) IVGTT in anesthetized fasting rats inhibits UAG, whereas it only blunts prehepatic, but not systemic, AG; and 3) hepatic clearance of AG is much higher than that of UAG. Thus, our results suggest that peripheral AG metabolic regulation and action are mainly confined within the gastrointestinal tract.

  1. Use of anesthetics associated to vasoconstrictors for dentistry in patients with cardiopathies. Review of the literature published in the last decade

    PubMed Central

    Serrera Figallo, María A.; Velázquez Cayón, Rocío T.; Corcuera Flores, Jose R.; Machuca Portillo, Guillermo

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The use of local anesthetics associated to vasoconstrictor agents in dentistry is thoroughly justified and is widely extended, but we cannot ignore the fact that anesthetic infiltration poses risk of complications throughout the dental treatment period. The objective of the present review is to document the reported effects the use of the local anesthetics most widely employed in dentistry, with or without association to vasoconstrictor agents may have in patients with any sort of cardiopathy. Study Design: We have searched for randomized clinical trials on the assessment of the cardiovascular effects of local anesthetics used in dentistry, without limits as regards age or sex, conducted in patients with any type of cardiopathy which were published during the last decade and were index-linked in Cochrane, Embase and Medline. Results: We have found six randomized clinical trials index-linked in Medline and Cochrane in the past ten years. These trials compare different types of anesthetics: lidocaine 2%, mepivacaine 2%, prilocaine 2% , associated or not to different vasoconstrictor concentrations such as adrenaline or felypressin. The cardiopathies affecting the patients included in the different trials range from hypertension, ischemic heart disease, arrythmias, chronic coronary disease to heart transplantation. Conclusions: The use of anesthetics associated to vasoconstrictor agents is justified in the case of patients with cardiopathies (once we get over the period in which any type of dental manipulation is contraindicated) and in controlled hypertensive patients. In any case, we must be very careful with the choice and execution of the anesthetic technique, being it possible to use a dose between 1.8 and 3.6 ml, on a general basis. Further studies are necessary to establish the effects of these drugs on severe hypertensive patients or in patients with other more advanced cardiopathies. Key words:Vasoconstrictor agents, epinephrine/adverse effects

  2. Liquid General Anesthetics Lower Critical Temperatures in Plasma Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Ellyn; Karslake, Joshua; Machta, Benjamin B.; Veatch, Sarah L.

    2013-01-01

    A large and diverse array of small hydrophobic molecules induce general anesthesia. Their efficacy as anesthetics has been shown to correlate both with their affinity for a hydrophobic environment and with their potency in inhibiting certain ligand-gated ion channels. In this study we explore the effects that n-alcohols and other liquid anesthetics have on the two-dimensional miscibility critical point observed in cell-derived giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs). We show that anesthetics depress the critical temperature (Tc) of these GPMVs without strongly altering the ratio of the two liquid phases found below Tc. The magnitude of this affect is consistent across n-alcohols when their concentration is rescaled by the median anesthetic concentration (AC50) for tadpole anesthesia, but not when plotted against the overall concentration in solution. At AC50 we see a 4°C downward shift in Tc, much larger than is typically seen in the main chain transition at these anesthetic concentrations. GPMV miscibility critical temperatures are also lowered to a similar extent by propofol, phenylethanol, and isopropanol when added at anesthetic concentrations, but not by tetradecanol or 2,6 diterbutylphenol, two structural analogs of general anesthetics that are hydrophobic but have no anesthetic potency. We propose that liquid general anesthetics provide an experimental tool for lowering critical temperatures in plasma membranes of intact cells, which we predict will reduce lipid-mediated heterogeneity in a way that is complimentary to increasing or decreasing cholesterol. Also, several possible implications of our results are discussed in the context of current models of anesthetic action on ligand-gated ion channels. PMID:24359747

  3. Interaction of general anesthetics with phospholipid vesicles and biological membranes.

    PubMed

    Vanderkooi, J M; Landesberg, R; Selick, H; McDonald, G G

    1977-01-01

    Low concentrations of general anesthetics, including halothane, ethrane, trilene, diethyl ether and chloroform are observed to shift the phase transitions of phospholipid vesicles to lower temperatures, and from these data partition coefficients for the anesthetic between lipid and water can be calculated. In contrast to the anesthetics, high concentrations of ethanol are required to shift the phase transition of lipids and glycerol causes no effect. Above the phase transition general anesthetics alter nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of phospholipid dispersions and increase the rotational and lateral diffusion rates of fluorescent probes located in the hydrocarbon core of the bilayer, indicating that they induce disorder in the structure. In red blood cell membranes and sarcoplasmic reticulum fragments, the rotational diffusion rate of 1-phenyl-6-phenylhexatriene is increased in the presence of general anesthetics. The 220 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of sarcoplasmic reticulum reveal some resolved lines from the lecithin fatty acid protons; addition of general anesthetic increases the contribution of these peaks. The data from the NMR and fluorescence techniques lead to the conclusion that general anesthetics increase the pool size of melted lipids in the bimolecular phospholipid layers of biological membranes; this would account for the ability of general anesthetics to increase passive diffusion rates of various substances in membranes.

  4. Local shear stress and its correlation with local volume fraction in concentrated non-Brownian suspensions: lattice Boltzmann simulation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Ki; Ahn, Kyung Hyun; Lee, Seung Jong

    2014-12-01

    The local shear stress of non-Brownian suspensions was investigated using the lattice Boltzmann method coupled with the smoothed profile method. Previous studies have only focused on the bulk rheology of complex fluids because the local rheology of complex fluids was not accessible due to technical limitations. In this study, the local shear stress of two-dimensional solid particle suspensions in Couette flow was investigated with the method of planes to correlate non-Newtonian fluid behavior with the structural evolution of concentrated particle suspensions. Shear thickening was successfully captured for highly concentrated suspensions at high particle Reynolds number, and both the local rheology and local structure of the suspensions were analyzed. It was also found that the linear correlation between the local particle stress and local particle volume fraction was dramatically reduced during shear thickening. These results clearly show how the change in local structure of suspensions influences the local and bulk rheology of the suspensions. PMID:25615103

  5. Hyperlipidemia sink for anesthetic agents.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Thomas J; Porhomayon, Jahan; Nader, Nader D; Eldesouki, Enas; Smith, Kelly; Hobika, Geoffrey G

    2016-11-01

    We present a case that involves anesthetic resistance during anesthesia for electroconvulsive therapy. Despite adequate dosing of both intravenous and inhalation anesthetics, our patient was resistant to induction of the state of general anesthesia. Subsequently, we noticed extreme hyperlipidemia. We hypothesized that the patient's extreme hyperlipidemia served as an anesthetic "sink" and prevented the full dose of intravenous agents from quickly reaching their intended site of action.

  6. Selected Antimicrobial Activity of Topical Ophthalmic Anesthetics

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Margaret M.; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E.; Patel, Robin; Pulido, Jose S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Endophthalmitis is a rare complication of intravitreal injection (IVI). It is recommended that povidone-iodine be the last agent applied before IVI. Patients have reported povidone-iodine application to be the most bothersome part of IVIs. Topical anesthetics have been demonstrated to have antibacterial effects. This study compared the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of topical anesthetic eye drops (proparacaine 0.5%, tetracaine 0.5%, lidocaine 2.0%) and the antiseptic, 5.0% povidone-iodine, against two organisms causing endophthalmitis after IVI. Methods Minimum inhibitory concentration values of topical anesthetics, povidone-iodine, preservative benzalkonium chloride (0.01%), and saline control were determined using five isolates of each Staphylococcus epidermidis and viridans group Streptococcus species (VGS). A broth microdilution technique was used with serial dilutions. Results Lidocaine (8.53 × 10−5mol/mL) had MICs of 4.27 to 8.53 × 10−5 mol/mL, and tetracaine (1.89 × 10−5 mol/mL) had MICs of 9.45 × 10−6 mol/mL for all isolates. Proparacaine (1.7 × 10−5 mol/mL) had MICs of 1.32 to 5.3 × 10−7 and 4.25 × 10−6 mol/mL for S. epidermidis and VGS, respectively). Benzalkonium chloride (3.52 × 10−7 mol/mL) had MICs of 1.86 × 10−9 to 1.1 × 10−8 and 4.40 × 10−8 mol/mL for S. epidermidis and VGS, respectively. Povidone-iodine (1.37 × 10−4 mol/mL) had MICs of 2.14 to 4.28 × 10−6 and 8.56 × 10−6 mol/mL for S. epidermidis and VGS, respectively. Conclusion Proparacaine was the anesthetic with the lowest MICs, lower than that of povidone-iodine. Benzalkonium chloride had lower MICs than proparacaine. All tested anesthetics and povidone-iodine inhibited growth of S. epidermidis and VGS at commercially available concentrations. Translational Relevance For certain patients, it could be possible to use topical anesthetic after povidone-iodine for comfort without inhibiting and perhaps contributing additional antimicrobial

  7. 40 CFR 52.1164 - Localized high concentrations-carbon monoxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Localized high concentrations-carbon... Localized high concentrations—carbon monoxide. (a) Not later than October 1, 1975, the Commonwealth shall... quality standards for carbon monoxide. Once such localized areas have been identified, the...

  8. 40 CFR 52.1164 - Localized high concentrations-carbon monoxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Localized high concentrations-carbon... Localized high concentrations—carbon monoxide. (a) Not later than October 1, 1975, the Commonwealth shall... quality standards for carbon monoxide. Once such localized areas have been identified, the...

  9. 40 CFR 52.1164 - Localized high concentrations-carbon monoxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Localized high concentrations-carbon... Localized high concentrations—carbon monoxide. (a) Not later than October 1, 1975, the Commonwealth shall... quality standards for carbon monoxide. Once such localized areas have been identified, the...

  10. 40 CFR 52.1164 - Localized high concentrations-carbon monoxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Localized high concentrations-carbon... Localized high concentrations—carbon monoxide. (a) Not later than October 1, 1975, the Commonwealth shall... quality standards for carbon monoxide. Once such localized areas have been identified, the...

  11. 40 CFR 52.1164 - Localized high concentrations-carbon monoxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Localized high concentrations-carbon... Localized high concentrations—carbon monoxide. (a) Not later than October 1, 1975, the Commonwealth shall... quality standards for carbon monoxide. Once such localized areas have been identified, the...

  12. Structural basis for the inhibition of firefly luciferase by a general anesthetic.

    PubMed

    Franks, N P; Jenkins, A; Conti, E; Lieb, W R; Brick, P

    1998-11-01

    The firefly luciferase enzyme from Photinus pyralis is probably the best-characterized model system for studying anesthetic-protein interactions. It binds a diverse range of general anesthetics over a large potency range, displays a sensitivity to anesthetics that is very similar to that found in animals, and has an anesthetic sensitivity that can be modulated by one of its substrates (ATP). In this paper we describe the properties of bromoform acting as a general anesthetic (in Rana temporaria tadpoles) and as an inhibitor of the firefly luciferase enzyme at high and low ATP concentrations. In addition, we describe the crystal structure of the low-ATP form of the luciferase enzyme in the presence of bromoform at 2.2-A resolution. These results provide a structural basis for understanding the anesthetic inhibition of the enzyme, as well as an explanation for the ATP modulation of its anesthetic sensitivity.

  13. Computational modeling of temperature elevation and thermoregulatory response in the brains of anesthetized rats locally exposed at 1.5 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Akimasa; Masuda, Hiroshi; Kanai, Yuya; Asai, Ryuichi; Fujiwara, Osamu; Arima, Takuji; Kawai, Hiroki; Watanabe, Soichi; Lagroye, Isabelle; Veyret, Bernard

    2011-12-01

    The dominant effect of human exposures to microwaves is caused by temperature elevation ('thermal effect'). In the safety guidelines/standards, the specific absorption rate averaged over a specific volume is used as a metric for human protection from localized exposure. Further investigation on the use of this metric is required, especially in terms of thermophysiology. The World Health Organization (2006 RF research agenda) has given high priority to research into the extent and consequences of microwave-induced temperature elevation in children. In this study, an electromagnetic-thermal computational code was developed to model electromagnetic power absorption and resulting temperature elevation leading to changes in active blood flow in response to localized 1.457 GHz exposure in rat heads. Both juvenile (4 week old) and young adult (8 week old) rats were considered. The computational code was validated against measurements for 4 and 8 week old rats. Our computational results suggest that the blood flow rate depends on both brain and core temperature elevations. No significant difference was observed between thermophysiological responses in 4 and 8 week old rats under these exposure conditions. The computational model developed herein is thus applicable to set exposure conditions for rats in laboratory investigations, as well as in planning treatment protocols in the thermal therapy.

  14. Anesthetic Concerns of Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norfleet, William T.

    1999-01-01

    Anesthesiologists are acutely aware of the fact that, although a given surgical procedure may be relatively simple, the required anesthetic care is, in certain cases, extremely complex. This principle is particularly evident when one ponders the difficulties involved in providing even basic anesthetic care in microgravity. In this issue some of these difficulties through the evaluation of airway management techniques during water immersion are confronted, a simulation of the gravito-inertial conditions of space flight. As prelude for this paper, I would like to outline some of the challenges to be overcome before surgical, anesthetic, and critical care can be delivered beyond our home planet.

  15. Dynamic characteristics of the cutaneous vasodilator response to a local external pressure application detected by the laser Doppler flowmetry technique on anesthetized rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humeau, Anne; Koitka, Audrey; Saumet, Jean-Louis; L'Huillier, Jean-Pierre

    2003-10-01

    The laser Doppler flowmetry technique has recently been used to report a significant transient increase of the cutaneous blood flow signal when a local non-noxious pressure is applied progressively on the skin (11.1 Pa/s). The present work analyses the dynamic characteristics of this vasodilatory reflex response on anaesthetised rats. A de-noising algorithm using wavelets is proposed to obtain accurate values of these dynamic characteristics. The blood flow peak and the time to reach this peak are computed on the de-noised recordings. The results show that the mean time to reach the peak of perfusion is 85.3 s (time t = 0 at the beginning of the pressure application). The mean peak value is 188.3 arbitrary units (a.u.), whereas the mean value of the perfusion before the pressure application is 113.4 a.u. The mean minimum value obtained at the end of the experiment is 60.7 a.u. This latter value is, on the average, reached 841.3 s after the beginning of the pressure application. The comparison of the dynamic characteristics, computed with the de-noising algorithm on signals obtained in other situations, will give a better understanding on some cutaneous lesions such as those present on diabetic people.

  16. 21 CFR 872.6100 - Anesthetic warmer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthetic warmer. 872.6100 Section 872.6100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6100 Anesthetic warmer. (a) Identification. An anesthetic warmer is an AC-powered device into which tubes containing anesthetic solution are intended to...

  17. 21 CFR 868.5880 - Anesthetic vaporizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Anesthetic vaporizer. 868.5880 Section 868.5880...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5880 Anesthetic vaporizer. (a) Identification. An anesthetic vaporizer is a device used to vaporize liquid anesthetic and deliver a...

  18. 21 CFR 868.5880 - Anesthetic vaporizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthetic vaporizer. 868.5880 Section 868.5880...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5880 Anesthetic vaporizer. (a) Identification. An anesthetic vaporizer is a device used to vaporize liquid anesthetic and deliver a...

  19. 21 CFR 872.6100 - Anesthetic warmer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Anesthetic warmer. 872.6100 Section 872.6100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6100 Anesthetic warmer. (a) Identification. An anesthetic warmer is an AC-powered device into which tubes containing anesthetic solution are intended to...

  20. 21 CFR 868.5880 - Anesthetic vaporizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Anesthetic vaporizer. 868.5880 Section 868.5880...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5880 Anesthetic vaporizer. (a) Identification. An anesthetic vaporizer is a device used to vaporize liquid anesthetic and deliver a...

  1. 21 CFR 868.5880 - Anesthetic vaporizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Anesthetic vaporizer. 868.5880 Section 868.5880...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5880 Anesthetic vaporizer. (a) Identification. An anesthetic vaporizer is a device used to vaporize liquid anesthetic and deliver a...

  2. 21 CFR 872.6100 - Anesthetic warmer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Anesthetic warmer. 872.6100 Section 872.6100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6100 Anesthetic warmer. (a) Identification. An anesthetic warmer is an AC-powered device into which tubes containing anesthetic solution are intended to...

  3. 21 CFR 872.6100 - Anesthetic warmer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Anesthetic warmer. 872.6100 Section 872.6100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6100 Anesthetic warmer. (a) Identification. An anesthetic warmer is an AC-powered device into which tubes containing anesthetic solution are intended to...

  4. 21 CFR 872.6100 - Anesthetic warmer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Anesthetic warmer. 872.6100 Section 872.6100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6100 Anesthetic warmer. (a) Identification. An anesthetic warmer is an AC-powered device into which tubes containing anesthetic solution are intended to...

  5. 21 CFR 868.5880 - Anesthetic vaporizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Anesthetic vaporizer. 868.5880 Section 868.5880...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5880 Anesthetic vaporizer. (a) Identification. An anesthetic vaporizer is a device used to vaporize liquid anesthetic and deliver a...

  6. Anesthetic considerations in myofibrillar myopathy.

    PubMed

    Latham, Gregory J; Lopez, Grace

    2015-03-01

    Myofibrillar myopathy (MFM) is a relatively newly recognized genetic disease that leads to progressive muscle deterioration. MFM has a varied phenotypic presentation and impacts cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscles. Affected individuals are at increased risk of respiratory failure, significant cardiac conduction abnormalities, cardiomyopathy, and sudden cardiac death. In addition, significant skeletal muscle involvement is common, which may lead to contractures, respiratory insufficiency, and airway compromise as the disease progresses. This study is the first report of anesthetic management of a patient with MFM. We report multiple anesthetic encounters of a child with genetically confirmed BAG3-myopathy, a subtype of MFM with severe childhood disease onset. A review of the anesthetic implications of the disease is provided, with specific exploration of possible susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia, rhabdomyolysis, and sensitivity to other anesthetic agents.

  7. Altered states: psychedelics and anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Icaza, Eduardo E; Mashour, George A

    2013-12-01

    The psychedelic experience has been reported since antiquity, but there is relatively little known about the underlying neural mechanisms. A recent neuroimaging study on psilocybin revealed a pattern of decreased cerebral blood flow and functional disconnections that is surprisingly similar to that caused by various anesthetics. In this article, the authors review historical examples of psychedelic experiences induced by general anesthetics and then contrast the mechanisms by which these two drug classes generate altered states of consciousness. PMID:24061599

  8. Altered states: psychedelics and anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Icaza, Eduardo E; Mashour, George A

    2013-12-01

    The psychedelic experience has been reported since antiquity, but there is relatively little known about the underlying neural mechanisms. A recent neuroimaging study on psilocybin revealed a pattern of decreased cerebral blood flow and functional disconnections that is surprisingly similar to that caused by various anesthetics. In this article, the authors review historical examples of psychedelic experiences induced by general anesthetics and then contrast the mechanisms by which these two drug classes generate altered states of consciousness.

  9. The tetrodotoxin-resistant Na+ channel Na (v)1.8 reduces the potency of local anesthetics in blocking C-fiber nociceptors.

    PubMed

    Kistner, Katrin; Zimmermann, Katharina; Ehnert, Corina; Reeh, Peter W; Leffler, Andreas

    2010-04-01

    The generation of action potentials in nociceptive neurons is accomplished by the tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTXr) Na+ channel Na(v)1.8. Following nerve injury, a redistribution of Na(v)1.8 from dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons into peripheral axons contributes to hyperexcitability and possibly to neuropathic pain. Na(v)1.8 has been reported to display a lower sensitivity to block by Na+ channel blockers as compared to TTX-sensitive (TTXs) Na(v) subunits. Furthermore, the antinociceptive efficacy of lidocaine is increased in Na(v)1.8-knockout mice. Here, we asked if Na(v)1.8 expression can reduce the susceptibility of sensory neurons to block by lidocaine. Employing wild-type and Na(v)1.8-knockout mice, we examined C-fibers in the skin-nerve preparation and Na+ currents in DRG neurons by patch-clamp recordings. Deletion of Na(v)1.8 resulted in an enhanced tonic block of Na+ currents in DRG neurons held at -80 mV but not at -140 mV. Accordingly, lower concentrations of lidocaine were required for a conduction block of C-fibers from Na(v)1.8-knockout as compared to wild-type mice. The efficacy of lidocaine on neurons lacking Na(v)1.8 was further increased by cold temperatures, due to a synergistic hyperpolarizing shift of the slow inactivation of TTXs Na+ channels by lidocaine and cooling. Finally, the approximately 90% reduction of TTXr Na+ currents in injured neurons from mice with a peripheral nerve injury was accompanied with an enhanced tonic block by lidocaine. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that the expression of Na(v)1.8 in sensory neurons can confine the antinociceptive efficacy of lidocaine and other Na+ channel blockers employed for pain treatment. PMID:20174994

  10. Effects of anesthetic compounds on responses of earthworms to electrostimulation.

    PubMed

    Podolak-Machowska, Agnieszka; Kostecka, Joanna; Librowski, Tadeusz; Santocki, Michal; Bigaj, Janusz; Plytycz, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Earthworms play an important role in biomedical research, and some surgical procedures require anesthesia. Anesthetic treatments used so far usually induce convulsive body movements connected with extrusion of coelomocyte-containing coelomic fluid that may affect experimental results. Extensive movements connected with the expulsion of coelomic fluid are exploited by immunologists as a method of harvesting immunocompetent coelomocytes from worms subjected to mild electrostimulation (4.5V). The aim of the investigations was to find anesthetic drugs without unintentional coelomocyte depletion. Experiments were performed on adult specimens of Dendrobaena veneta, the coelomocytes of which consist of amoebocytes and riboflavin-storing eleocytes. Earthworm mobility was filmed and extrusion of coelomocytes was quantified by detection of eleocyte-derived riboflavin in immersion fluid. Treatments included earthworms (1) immersed either in physiological saline (controls) or in a solution of one of the tested anesthetic drugs; (2) electrostimulated immediately after anesthesia, and (3) electrostimulated a second time after a 1-hour recovery period. The well-established fish and amphibian anesthetic agent MS-222 induced coelomocyte expulsion. In contrast, solutions of the mammalian local anesthetic drug, prilocaine hydrochloride (0.25-0.5%, 5-10 min) caused temporal earthworm immobilization followed by recovery, thus showing utility as an efficient earthworm anesthetic.

  11. 63,65Cu NMR Method in a Local Field for Investigation of Copper Ore Concentrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilenko, A. N.; Starykh, R. V.; Khabibullin, I. Kh.; Matukhin, V. L.

    2015-01-01

    To choose the most efficient method and ore beneficiation flow diagram, it is important to know physical and chemical properties of ore concentrates. The feasibility of application of the 63,65Cu nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method in a local field aimed at studying the properties of copper ore concentrates in the copper-iron-sulfur system is demonstrated. 63,65Cu NMR spectrum is measured in a local field for a copper concentrate sample and relaxation parameters (times T1 and T2) are obtained. The spectrum obtained was used to identify a mineral (chalcopyrite) contained in the concentrate. Based on the experimental data, comparative characteristics of natural chalcopyrite and beneficiated copper concentrate are given. The feasibility of application of the NMR method in a local field to explore mineral deposits is analyzed.

  12. EMLA-induced methemoglobinemia and systemic topical anesthetic toxicity.

    PubMed

    Hahn, In-Hei; Hoffman, Robert S; Nelson, Lewis S

    2004-01-01

    This case report illustrates an adult presenting with the simultaneous occurrence of both methemoglobinemia (MetHb) and systemic toxicity from the topical application of local anesthetics while undergoing laser epilation therapy of the legs. The concurrent development of both is considered uncommon in this setting and may have been related to several factors, including her recent previous treatment, increased absorption secondary to abraded skin with the addition of occlusive dressing, and possible alteration of protein binding and drug metabolism due to the use of medications. The clinical manifestations and mechanisms of MetHb and systemic local anesthetic toxicity are discussed.

  13. General Anesthetic Conditions Induce Network Synchrony and Disrupt Sensory Processing in the Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Lissek, Thomas; Obenhaus, Horst A.; Ditzel, Désirée A. W.; Nagai, Takeharu; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Sprengel, Rolf; Hasan, Mazahir T.

    2016-01-01

    General anesthetics are commonly used in animal models to study how sensory signals are represented in the brain. Here, we used two-photon (2P) calcium activity imaging with cellular resolution to investigate how neuronal activity in layer 2/3 of the mouse barrel cortex is modified under the influence of different concentrations of chemically distinct general anesthetics. Our results show that a high isoflurane dose induces synchrony in local neuronal networks and these cortical activity patterns closely resemble those observed in EEG recordings under deep anesthesia. Moreover, ketamine and urethane also induced similar activity patterns. While investigating the effects of deep isoflurane anesthesia on whisker and auditory evoked responses in the barrel cortex, we found that dedicated spatial regions for sensory signal processing become disrupted. We propose that our isoflurane-2P imaging paradigm can serve as an attractive model system to dissect cellular and molecular mechanisms that induce the anesthetic state, and it might also provide important insight into sleep-like brain states and consciousness. PMID:27147963

  14. [Anesthetic management in bronchial asthma].

    PubMed

    Kozian, Alf; Schilling, Thomas; Hachenberg, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    In daily practice, acute and chronic pulmonary diseases are common issues presenting to the anesthetist. Respiratory physiology in general is affected by both general and regional anesthesia, which results in an increased number of perioperative complications in pulmonary risk patients. Therefore, anesthetic management of patients with bronchial asthma needs to address different clinical topics: the physical appearance of pulmonary disease, type and extent of surgical intervention as well as effects of therapeutic drugs, anesthetics and mechanical ventilation on respiratory function. The present work describes important precautions in preoperative scheduling of the asthmatic patient. In the operative course, airway manipulation and a number of anesthetics are able to trigger intraoperative bronchial spasm with possibly fatal outcome. It is essential to avoid these substances to prevent asthma attack. If asthmatic status occurs, appropriate procedures according to therapeutic standards have to be applied to the patient. Postoperatively, sufficient pain therapy avoids pulmonary complications and improves outcome. PMID:27359239

  15. Clinical comparison of preinjection anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Plotkin, S

    1998-02-01

    To minimize injection anxiety and discomfort, the podiatric surgeon can choose from a variety of topical anesthetics. Available modalities include skin refrigerants (also referred to as vapocoolants), needleless injection systems, iontophoresis, and eutectic mixtures of topical anesthetic cream such as EMLA Cream. Many of the vapocoolants contain chlorofluorocarbons, which are known to damage the ozone layer, a stratospheric layer that filters out harmful ultraviolet B radiation. In accordance with the 1992 Montreal Protocol, which banned the manufacture of certain chlorofluorocarbon compounds, many commonly used vapocoolants will no longer be available. Some newly marketed vapocoolants produce extremely cold temperatures, limiting their use. This article discusses the properties of various vapocoolants and other topical anesthetics and compares their effectiveness in patient trials.

  16. Anesthetic consideration for neurointerventional procedures.

    PubMed

    Joung, Kyung Woon; Yang, Ku Hyun; Shin, Won Jung; Song, Myung Hee; Ham, Kyungdon; Jung, Seung Chul; Lee, Deok Hee; Suh, Dae Chul

    2014-09-01

    Interventional neuroradiology (INR) has been a rapidly expanding and advancing clinical area during the past few decades. As the complexity and diversity of INR procedures increases, the demand for anesthesia also increases. Anesthesia for interventional neuroradiology is a challenge for the anesthesiologist due to the unfamiliar working environment which the anesthesiologist must consider, as well as the unique neuro-interventional components. This review provides an overview of the anesthetic options and specific consideration of the anesthesia requirements for each procedure. We also introduce the anesthetic management for interventional neuroradiology performed in our medical institution.

  17. Environmental implications of anesthetic gases.

    PubMed

    Yasny, Jeffrey S; White, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    For several decades, anesthetic gases have greatly enhanced the comfort and outcome for patients during surgery. The benefits of these agents have heavily outweighed the risks. In recent years, the attention towards their overall contribution to global climate change and the environment has increased. Anesthesia providers have a responsibility to minimize unnecessary atmospheric pollution by utilizing techniques that can lessen any adverse effects of these gases on the environment. Moreover, health care facilities that use anesthetic gases are accountable for ensuring that all anesthesia equipment, including the scavenging system, is effective and routinely maintained. Implementing preventive practices and simple strategies can promote the safest and most healthy environment.

  18. The incidence of complications associated with local anesthesia in dentistry.

    PubMed Central

    Daubländer, M.; Müller, R.; Lipp, M. D.

    1997-01-01

    Local anesthetics are frequently administered in dentistry and thus can be expected to be a major source of drug-related complications in the dental office. Additionally, the dentist will more often be confronted with the treatment of risk patients; thus, the incidence of side effects can be expected to rise. In this study, 2731 patients receiving dental anesthesia were evaluated by questionnaire for risk factors, type and dosage of local anesthetic applied, type and duration of treatment, and complications associated with the administration of the local anesthetic. Of all patients, 45.9% had at least one risk factor in their medical histories, with cardiovascular diseases and allergies being the most frequent. The overall incidence of complications was 4.5%. It was significantly higher in risk patients (5.7%) than in nonrisk patients (3.5%). The most frequently observed complications (dizziness, tachycardia, agitation, nausea, tremor) were transient in nature and did not require treatment. Severe complications (seizure, bronchospasm) occurred in only two cases (0.07%). Articaine was found to be administered in over 90% of all dental anesthesias in Germany despite the great variety of local anesthetics available. Articaine 1:100,000 caused more sympathomimetic side effects than did articaine 1:200,000. Additionally, doses of local anesthetics proved not to be strictly determined according to body weight, especially for patients weighing less than 50 kg. In summary, it can be stated that dental local anesthesia can be considered safe. Nevertheless, the incidence of complications due to dental anesthesia can be expected to be further reduced if (a) patients are routinely evaluated for risk factors with an adequate medical history prior to dental treatment, (b) doses of local anesthetics are strictly determined according to body weight, (c) anesthetics with low concentrations of epinephrine are used, and (d) the concept of a differentiated dental anesthesia is applied

  19. Effects of Anesthetic Management on Early Postoperative Recovery, Hemodynamics and Pain After Supratentorial Craniotomy

    PubMed Central

    Ayrian, Eugenia; Kaye, Alan David; Varner, Chelsia L.; Guerra, Carolina; Vadivelu, Nalini; Urman, Richard D.; Zelman, Vladimir; Lumb, Philip D.; Rosa, Giovanni; Bilotta, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Various clinical trials have assessed how intraoperative anesthetics can affect early recovery, hemodynamics and nociception after supratentorial craniotomy. Whether or not the difference in recovery pattern differs in a meaningful way with anesthetic choice is controversial. This review examines and compares different anesthetics with respect to wake-up time, hemodynamics, respiration, cognitive recovery, pain, nausea and vomiting, and shivering. When comparing inhalational anesthetics to intravenous anesthetics, either regimen produces similar recovery results. Newer shorter acting agents accelerate the process of emergence and extubation. A balanced inhalational/intravenous anesthetic could be desirable for patients with normal intracranial pressure, while total intravenous anesthesia could be beneficial for patients with elevated intracranial pressure. Comparison of inhalational anesthetics shows all appropriate for rapid emergence, decreasing time to extubation, and cognitive recovery. Comparison of opioids demonstrates similar awakening and extubation time if the infusion of longer acting opioids was ended at the appropriate time. Administration of local anesthetics into the skin, and addition of corticosteroids, NSAIDs, COX-2 inhibitors, and PCA therapy postoperatively provided superior analgesia. It is also important to emphasize the possibility of long-term effects of anesthetics on cognitive function. More research is warranted to develop best practices strategies for the future that are evidence-based. PMID:26345202

  20. Effects of Anesthetic Management on Early Postoperative Recovery, Hemodynamics and Pain After Supratentorial Craniotomy.

    PubMed

    Ayrian, Eugenia; Kaye, Alan David; Varner, Chelsia L; Guerra, Carolina; Vadivelu, Nalini; Urman, Richard D; Zelman, Vladimir; Lumb, Philip D; Rosa, Giovanni; Bilotta, Federico

    2015-10-01

    Various clinical trials have assessed how intraoperative anesthetics can affect early recovery, hemodynamics and nociception after supratentorial craniotomy. Whether or not the difference in recovery pattern differs in a meaningful way with anesthetic choice is controversial. This review examines and compares different anesthetics with respect to wake-up time, hemodynamics, respiration, cognitive recovery, pain, nausea and vomiting, and shivering. When comparing inhalational anesthetics to intravenous anesthetics, either regimen produces similar recovery results. Newer shorter acting agents accelerate the process of emergence and extubation. A balanced inhalational/intravenous anesthetic could be desirable for patients with normal intracranial pressure, while total intravenous anesthesia could be beneficial for patients with elevated intracranial pressure. Comparison of inhalational anesthetics shows all appropriate for rapid emergence, decreasing time to extubation, and cognitive recovery. Comparison of opioids demonstrates similar awakening and extubation time if the infusion of longer acting opioids was ended at the appropriate time. Administration of local anesthetics into the skin, and addition of corticosteroids, NSAIDs, COX-2 inhibitors, and PCA therapy postoperatively provided superior analgesia. It is also important to emphasize the possibility of long-term effects of anesthetics on cognitive function. More research is warranted to develop best practices strategies for the future that are evidence-based. PMID:26345202

  1. General Anesthetic Actions on GABAA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Paul S; Kolesky, Scott E; Jenkins, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    General anesthetic drugs interact with many receptors in the nervous system, but only a handful of these interactions are critical for producing anesthesia. Over the last 20 years, neuropharmacologists have revealed that one of the most important target sites for general anesthetics is the GABAA receptor. In this review we will discuss what is known about anesthetic – GABAA receptor interactions. PMID:20808541

  2. Simultaneous In-Situ Measurement of Local Particle Size, Particle Concentration, and Velocity of Aerosols.

    PubMed

    Weber; Schweiger

    1999-02-01

    Photon correlation spectroscopy has been applied to the characterization of (quasi-)monodisperse aerosols. The experiments were carried out with an experimental standard pin hole setup on laminar flowing aerosols of the submicrometer particle size range. It is shown that beside local mean particle size and local aerosol velocity simultaneously the local particle number concentration may be obtained from a single measured autocorrelation function. The proposed procedure does not require calibration. It is pointed out that measurement conditions can be adapted to the properties of the aerosol to be characterized, thus allowing characterization of aerosols over a wide parameter range, e.g., it is not restricted to the case of low particle concentration. The experimental results are compared to data from literature, data from reference measurements and data from a theoretical model, respectively. The method can also be usefull for characterization of other fluid-particle systems as hydrosols. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  3. The thermodynamics of general and local anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Graesbøll, Kaare; Sasse-Middelhoff, Henrike; Heimburg, Thomas

    2014-05-20

    General anesthetics are known to cause depression of the freezing point of transitions in biomembranes. This is a consequence of ideal mixing of the anesthetic drugs in the membrane fluid phase and exclusion from the solid phase. Such a generic law provides physical justification of the famous Meyer-Overton rule. We show here that general anesthetics, barbiturates, and local anesthetics all display the same effect on melting transitions. Their effect is reversed by hydrostatic pressure. Thus, the thermodynamic behavior of local anesthetics is very similar to that of general anesthetics. We present a detailed thermodynamic analysis of heat capacity profiles of membranes in the presence of anesthetics. Using this analysis, we are able to describe experimentally observed calorimetric profiles and predict the anesthetic features of arbitrary molecules. In addition, we discuss the thermodynamic origin of the cutoff effect of long-chain alcohols and the additivity of the effect of general and local anesthetics. PMID:24853743

  4. The Thermodynamics of General and Local Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Græsbøll, Kaare; Sasse-Middelhoff, Henrike; Heimburg, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    General anesthetics are known to cause depression of the freezing point of transitions in biomembranes. This is a consequence of ideal mixing of the anesthetic drugs in the membrane fluid phase and exclusion from the solid phase. Such a generic law provides physical justification of the famous Meyer-Overton rule. We show here that general anesthetics, barbiturates, and local anesthetics all display the same effect on melting transitions. Their effect is reversed by hydrostatic pressure. Thus, the thermodynamic behavior of local anesthetics is very similar to that of general anesthetics. We present a detailed thermodynamic analysis of heat capacity profiles of membranes in the presence of anesthetics. Using this analysis, we are able to describe experimentally observed calorimetric profiles and predict the anesthetic features of arbitrary molecules. In addition, we discuss the thermodynamic origin of the cutoff effect of long-chain alcohols and the additivity of the effect of general and local anesthetics. PMID:24853743

  5. The Thermodynamics of General and Local Anesthesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Græsbøll, Kaare; Sasse-Middelhoff, Henrike; Heimburg, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    General anesthetics are known to cause depression of the freezing point of transitions in biomembranes. This is a consequence of ideal mixing of the anesthetic drugs in the membrane fluid phase and exclusion from the solid phase. Such a generic law provides physical justification of the famous Meyer-Overton rule. We show here that general anesthetics, barbiturates and local anesthetics all display the same effect on melting transitions. Their effect is reversed by hydrostatic pressure. Thus, the thermodynamic behavior of local anesthetics is very similar to that of general anesthetics. We present a detailed thermodynamic analysis of heat capacity profiles of membranes in the presence of anesthetics. This analysis is able to describe experimentally observed calorimetric profiles and permits prediction of the anesthetic features of arbitrary molecules. In addition, we discuss the thermodynamic origin of the cutoff-effect of long-chain alcohols and the additivity of the effect of general and local anesthetics.

  6. The thermodynamics of general and local anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Graesbøll, Kaare; Sasse-Middelhoff, Henrike; Heimburg, Thomas

    2014-05-20

    General anesthetics are known to cause depression of the freezing point of transitions in biomembranes. This is a consequence of ideal mixing of the anesthetic drugs in the membrane fluid phase and exclusion from the solid phase. Such a generic law provides physical justification of the famous Meyer-Overton rule. We show here that general anesthetics, barbiturates, and local anesthetics all display the same effect on melting transitions. Their effect is reversed by hydrostatic pressure. Thus, the thermodynamic behavior of local anesthetics is very similar to that of general anesthetics. We present a detailed thermodynamic analysis of heat capacity profiles of membranes in the presence of anesthetics. Using this analysis, we are able to describe experimentally observed calorimetric profiles and predict the anesthetic features of arbitrary molecules. In addition, we discuss the thermodynamic origin of the cutoff effect of long-chain alcohols and the additivity of the effect of general and local anesthetics.

  7. Nondestructive Quantification of Local Plasticizer Concentration in PVC by (1)H NMR Relaxometry.

    PubMed

    Adams, Alina; Kwamen, Rance; Woldt, Benjamin; Graß, Michael

    2015-12-01

    The properties of plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) , one of the most important polymers today, are strongly dictated by the concentration of plasticizer. Yet, it has been impossible to quantify this concentration at different positions inside a PVC product without its destruction because of a lack of suitable analytical methods. Thus, this paper introduces a simple, fast, and efficient way to determine truly nondestructively the concentration of plasticizer in PVC by single-sided nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). With the help of correlation curves between the concentration of plasticizer inside nonaged PVC samples and the corresponding volume-averaged NMR parameters, single-sided NMR allows the quantification of the local concentration of plasticizer in aged PVC plates at different depths by spatially resolved relaxation measurements. The presented approach represents a fundamental step toward in situ characterization of plasticized PVC.

  8. Impact of closing Canada's largest point-source of mercury emissions on local atmospheric mercury concentrations.

    PubMed

    Eckley, Chris S; Parsons, Matthew T; Mintz, Rachel; Lapalme, Monique; Mazur, Maxwell; Tordon, Robert; Elleman, Robert; Graydon, Jennifer A; Blanchard, Pierrette; St Louis, Vincent

    2013-09-17

    The Flin Flon, Manitoba copper smelter was Canada's largest point source of mercury emissions until its closure in 2010 after ~80 years of operation. The objective of this study was to understand the variables controlling the local ground-level air mercury concentrations before and after this major point source reduction. Total gaseous mercury (TGM) in air, mercury in precipitation, and other ancillary meteorological and air quality parameters were measured pre- and postsmelter closure, and mercury speciation measurements in air were collected postclosure. The results showed that TGM was significantly elevated during the time period when the smelter operated (4.1 ± 3.7 ng m(-3)), decreased only 20% during the year following its closure, and remained ~2-fold above background levels. Similar trends were observed for mercury concentrations in precipitation. Several lines of evidence indicated that while smelter stack emissions would occasionally mix down to the surface resulting in large spikes in TGM concentrations (up to 61 ng m(-3)), the largest contributor to elevated TGM concentrations before and after smelter closure was from surface-air fluxes from mercury-enriched soils and/or tailings. These findings highlight the ability of legacy mercury, deposited to local landscapes over decades from industrial activities, to significantly affect local air concentrations via emissions/re-emissions. PMID:23978035

  9. Local gastric and serum amoxicillin concentrations after different oral application forms.

    PubMed Central

    Cooreman, M P; Krausgrill, P; Hengels, K J

    1993-01-01

    The high recolonization rate after monotherapy of Helicobacter pylori-positive gastritis may be due to insufficient local drug concentrations. To investigate the role of local diffusion, we measured levels of amoxicillin, a drug with good in vitro activity against H. pylori, in the mucosa and serum. One gram of amoxicillin was given to healthy volunteers as a tablet (n = 6) or as water-dissolved, fizzing "Tab" (n = 6). Gastroscopy with biopsies from the antrum, corpus, and fundus was performed at 30, 60, and 90 min. Concentrations in the mucosa were measured after homogenization with the agar diffusion method using Bacillus subtilis as the biological indicator. Serum samples, taken basally and every 15 min, were analyzed by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Drug levels in the fundus and corpus remained far below those in the antrum for both application forms. The highest concentrations were reached after 30 min, with bactericidal levels in the antrum in two of six subjects who took the tablet form and five of six subjects who used Tabs. At 60 and 90 min, almost all values were below the MBC for 90% of the strains tested. The concentrations in serum, however, rose continuously, to reach a maximum after 75 or 90 min. These results show that incomplete elimination may be due to subbactericidal concentrations of antibiotics with high in vitro efficiency at the desired site of action in vivo and that local diffusion in the mucosa is essential for therapeutic effectiveness against H. pylori. PMID:8363383

  10. Anesthetic implications of laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, A. J.

    1998-01-01

    Minimally invasive therapy aims to minimize the trauma of any interventional process but still achieve a satisfactory therapeutic result. The development of "critical pathways," rapid mobilization and early feeding have contributed towards the goal of shorter hospital stay. This concept has been extended to include laparoscopic cholecystectomy and hernia repair. Reports have been published confirming the safety of same day discharge for the majority of patients. However, we would caution against overenthusiastic ambulatory laparoscopic cholecystectomy on the rational but unproven assumption that early discharge will lead to occasional delays in diagnosis and management of postoperative complications. Intraoperative complications of laparoscopic surgery are mostly due to traumatic injuries sustained during blind trocar insertion and physiologic changes associated with patient positioning and pneumoperitoneum creation. General anesthesia and controlled ventilation comprise the accepted anesthetic technique to reduce the increase in PaCO2. Investigators have recently documented the cardiorespiratory compromise associated with upper abdominal laparoscopic surgery, and particular emphasis is placed on careful perioperative monitoring of ASA III-IV patients during insufflation. Setting limits on the inflationary pressure is advised in these patients. Anesthesiologists must maintain a high index of suspicion for complications such as gas embolism, extraperitoneal insufflation and surgical emphysema, pneumothorax and pneumomediastinum. Postoperative nausea and vomiting are among the most common and distressing symptoms after laparoscopic surgery. A highly potent and selective 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, ondansetron, has proven to be an effective oral and IV prophylaxis against postoperative emesis in preliminary studies. Opioids remain an important component of the anesthesia technique, although the introduction of newer potent NSAIDs may diminish their use. A preoperative

  11. [Endogenous anesthetic depressions (psychopathology and typology)].

    PubMed

    Baranov, P A

    2011-01-01

    The psychopathological structure of anesthetic depressions was studied in 80 patients with progredient schizophrenia. Three variants of anesthetic depression were distinguished, viz, anxiety anesthesia with agitation, sensorial psychic anesthesia, and multiple depersonalization symptoms; melancholic anesthesia with the depressive triad, self-reproach ideas and sensorial ideatory psychic anesthesia; anesthesia proper with ideatory psychic anesthesia as the main or sole manifestation of depression. The study revealed transitions of these variants in the structure of schizophrenic episodes from anxiety anesthetic to melancholic anesthetic and further on to purely anesthetic ones. The latter type of depression proved refractory to antidepressive therapy and tended to persist for a long time. PMID:21674918

  12. Genotoxicity of Anesthetics Evaluated In Vivo (Animals)

    PubMed Central

    Braz, Mariana G.; Karahalil, Bensu

    2015-01-01

    The anesthesia has been improved all over the years. However, it can have impact on health, in both patients and animals anesthetized, as well as professionals exposed to inhaled anesthetics. There is continuing effort to understand the possible effects of anesthetics at molecular levels. Knowing the effects of anesthetic agents on genetic material could be a valuable basic support to better understand the possible mechanisms of these agents. Thus, the purpose of this review is to provide an overview on the genotoxic potential, evaluated in animal models, of many anesthetics that have already been used and those currently used in anesthesia. PMID:26199936

  13. Glutamate and aspartate do not exhibit the same changes in their extracellular concentrations in the rat striatum after N-methyl-D-aspartate local administration.

    PubMed

    Parrot, Sandrine; Bert, Lionel; Renaud, Bernard; Denoroy, Luc

    2003-02-01

    To determine whether glutamate (Glu) and aspartate (Asp) undergo a similar regulation of their extracellular levels, Glu and Asp were simultaneously monitored in the striatum of anesthetized rats after local N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor stimulation, using 1-min in vivo microdialysis coupled to capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection. Application of NMDA (10 min, 10(-3) M) through the dialysis probe induced 1) an increase (+50%) in Asp during the NMDA administration and 2) a surprising biphasic effect on Glu, with a rapid increase (+30%) and a return to baseline before the end of NMDA application, followed by a second increase (+40%) occurring after and linked to the end of NMDA administration. When studied in the presence of 10 microM tetrodotoxin (TTX) or 0.1 mM Ca(2+), the increase in Asp was partially TTX-dependent, and the early increase in Glu appeared to be partially TTX and Ca(2+) dependent, whereas the second increase in Glu was not. The second increase in Glu level was still present when NMDA antagonists (AP5 or MK-801) were administered at the end of NMDA application. Finally, only extracellular Asp was increased through application of lower NMDA concentrations (10(-4) M, 10(-5) M), whereas extracellular Glu was not affected. In conclusion, these results suggest a differential control of Glu and Asp extracellular levels in rat striatum by distinct mechanisms linked to NMDA receptors and involving neuronal or nonneuronal release.

  14. Renal effects of methoxyverapamil in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Brown, B; Churchill, P

    1983-05-01

    The purpose of these experiments was to determine the renal effects of methoxyverapamil (D-600). Three groups of rats were anesthetized with sodium pentobarbital and given 0, 0.85 or 1.69 nmol/min of methoxyverapamil i.v. Increases in urine flow and Na, K and Ca excretory rates occurred, in an apparently dose-dependent manner. Plasma Na and arterial renin concentration decreased at both doses and, at the higher dose, mean arterial blood pressure and effective renal plasma flow decreased while plasma K increased. Plasma Ca, glomerular filtration rate, filtration fraction and total renal plasma flow were not affected. The findings that methoxyverapamil increased urine flow and electrolyte excretion without changing glomerular filtration rate are consistent with the hypothesis that methoxyverapamil acts directly on tubular reabsorptive mechanisms. These effects, and the effect on plasma renin concentration, could contribute to the beneficial effects of this and other Ca entry antagonists in the treatment of hypertension.

  15. Local modulation of chemoattractant concentrations by single cells: dissection using a bulk-surface computational model

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, M.

    2016-01-01

    Chemoattractant gradients are usually considered in terms of sources and sinks that are independent of the chemotactic cell. However, recent interest has focused on ‘self-generated’ gradients, in which cell populations create their own local gradients as they move. Here, we consider the interplay between chemoattractants and single cells. To achieve this, we extend a recently developed computational model to incorporate breakdown of extracellular attractants by membrane-bound enzymes. Model equations are parametrized, using the published estimates from Dictyostelium cells chemotaxing towards cyclic AMP. We find that individual cells can substantially modulate their local attractant field under physiologically appropriate conditions of attractant and enzymes. This means the attractant concentration perceived by receptors can be a small fraction of the ambient concentration. This allows efficient chemotaxis in chemoattractant concentrations that would be saturating without local breakdown. Similar interactions in which cells locally mould a stimulus could function in many types of directed cell motility, including haptotaxis, durotaxis and even electrotaxis. PMID:27708760

  16. Local absorption of zinc from wounds treated with different concentrations of zinc sulphate.

    PubMed

    Hallmans, G

    1978-01-01

    In the present study it was shown in rats that zinc is absorbed from excisional wounds treated with zinc sulphate. Systemic toxic effects were observed in the group treated with 20% zinc sulphate. Local toxic effects were seen in wounds treated with 0.2%, 2% and 20% zinc sulphate. An inhibitory effect of zinc on the migration of granulocytes was suggested on the basis of microscopic observation. In the operated groups which were not treated with zinc and the group treated with 0.02% zinc sulphate a decline was observed in the concentration of zinc in serum. The zinc concentration in serum increased in proportion to the zinc sulphate concentration (0.2%, 2% and 20%) applied to the wounds, while the copper concentration decreased in the groups treated with 2% and 20% zinc sulphate. In all operated groups an increase in zinc and copper concentrations was observed in liver. This was most pronounced in groups treated with higher concentrations of zinc sulphate (0.2%, 2% and 20%). The groups treated with higher concentrations of zinc sulphate also had higher pancreas zinc concentrations than the remaining groups.

  17. Trends in atmospheric ammonium concentrations in relation to atmospheric sulfate and local agriculture.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Victoria R; Lovett, Gary M; Weathers, Kathleen C; Likens, Gene E

    2005-06-01

    Ammonium (NH(4)(+)) concentrations in air and precipitation at the Institute of Ecosystem Studies (IES) in southeastern New York, USA declined over an 11-year period from 1988 to 1999, but increased from 1999 to 2001. These trends in particulate NH(4)(+) correlated well with trends in particulate SO(4)(2-) over the 1988-2001 period. The NH(4)(+) trends were not as well correlated with local cattle and milk production, which declined continuously throughout the period. This suggests that regional transport of SO(4)(2-) may have a greater impact on concentrations of NH(4)(+) and subsequent deposition than local agricultural emissions of NH(3). Ammonium concentrations in precipitation correlated significantly with precipitation SO(4)(2-) concentrations for the 1984-2001 period although NH(4)(+) in precipitation increased after 1999 and SO(4)(2-) in precipitation continued to decline after 1999. The correlation between NH(4)(+) and SO(4)(2-) was stronger for particulates than for precipitation. Particulate NH(4)(+) concentrations were also correlated with particulate SO(4)(2-) concentrations at 31 of 35 eastern U.S. CASTNet sites that had at least 10 years of data. Air concentrations of NH(4)(+) and SO(4)(2-) were more strongly correlated at the sites that were located within an agricultural landscape than in forested sites. At most of the sites there was either no trend or a decrease in NH(4)(+) dry deposition during the 1988-2001 period. The sites that showed an increasing trend in NH(4)(+) dry deposition were generally located in the southeastern U.S. The results of this study suggest that, in the northeastern U.S., air concentrations of NH(4)(+) and subsequent deposition may be more closely linked to SO(4)(2-) and thus SO(2) emissions than with NH(3) emissions. These results also suggest that reductions in S emissions have reduced NH(4)(+) transport to and NH(4)(+)-N deposition in the Northeast.

  18. Potent Inhalational Anesthetics for Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Satuito, Mary; Tom, James

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide and the volatile inhalational anesthetics have defined anxiety and pain control in both dentistry and medicine for over a century. From curious experimentation to spectacular public demonstrations, the initial work of 2 dentists, Horace Wells and William T. G. Morton, persists to this day in modern surgery and anesthesia. This article reviews the history, similarities, differences, and clinical applications of the most popular inhalational agents used in contemporary dental surgical settings. PMID:26866411

  19. Potent Inhalational Anesthetics for Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Satuito, Mary; Tom, James

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide and the volatile inhalational anesthetics have defined anxiety and pain control in both dentistry and medicine for over a century. From curious experimentation to spectacular public demonstrations, the initial work of 2 dentists, Horace Wells and William T. G. Morton, persists to this day in modern surgery and anesthesia. This article reviews the history, similarities, differences, and clinical applications of the most popular inhalational agents used in contemporary dental surgical settings.

  20. Potent Inhalational Anesthetics for Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Satuito, Mary; Tom, James

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide and the volatile inhalational anesthetics have defined anxiety and pain control in both dentistry and medicine for over a century. From curious experimentation to spectacular public demonstrations, the initial work of 2 dentists, Horace Wells and William T. G. Morton, persists to this day in modern surgery and anesthesia. This article reviews the history, similarities, differences, and clinical applications of the most popular inhalational agents used in contemporary dental surgical settings. PMID:26866411

  1. Breastfeeding Problems Following Anesthetic Administration

    PubMed Central

    Howie, William O.; McMullen, Patricia C.

    2006-01-01

    Research literature supports the notion that maternal comfort should be considered a priority and that mothers should receive adequate information regarding any drug prior to receiving that drug. Some studies indicate that difficulties with breastfeeding may be related to the amount of the anesthetic or analgesic that is administered to the mother. Thus, it seems wise to administer the lowest possible dose to the mother in order to minimize the amount of drug (or metabolite) exposure to the nursing infant. Infant exposure can be further reduced if breastfeeding is avoided during the times when the mother receives high doses of anesthetics and analgesics. However, because relatively small amounts of the drug are excreted into the breast milk, some mothers may opt to continue nursing after weighing the benefits of breastfeeding against the potential risk to the infant. Others may choose to “pump and dump” breast milk while they receive anesthetic or analgesic agents. Any concerns in this regard should be discussed with the anesthesia provider, preferably prior to labor or to any surgeries while breastfeeding. PMID:17541461

  2. A nonparametric approach to calculate critical micelle concentrations: the local polynomial regression method.

    PubMed

    López Fontán, J L; Costa, J; Ruso, J M; Prieto, G; Sarmiento, F

    2004-02-01

    The application of a statistical method, the local polynomial regression method, (LPRM), based on a nonparametric estimation of the regression function to determine the critical micelle concentration (cmc) is presented. The method is extremely flexible because it does not impose any parametric model on the subjacent structure of the data but rather allows the data to speak for themselves. Good concordance of cmc values with those obtained by other methods was found for systems in which the variation of a measured physical property with concentration showed an abrupt change. When this variation was slow, discrepancies between the values obtained by LPRM and others methods were found.

  3. Local fish consumption and serum PCB concentrations among Mohawk men at Akwesasne

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, E.F.; Deres, D.A.; Hwang, S.A.; Bush, B.; Yang, B.; Tarbell, A.; Jacobs, A.

    1999-02-01

    A study was conducted to assess local fish consumption patterns and their relationship to concentrations of total polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the serum of Mohawk men residing near three hazardous waste sites. From 1992 to 1995, 139 men were interviewed and donated a 20-ml venous blood sample. The results indicated that the men ate a mean of 21.2 local fish meals during the past year, compared with annual means of 27.7 meals 1--2 years before and 88.6 meals more than 2 years before. This change is probably a consequence of advisories issued against the consumption of local fish, since 97% of the mean were aware of the advisories and two-third had changed their behavior as a result. Multiple regression analysis revealed that serum PCB levels increased with age and local fish consumption. The data suggest that local fish consumption has contributed to body burdens in this population and that the advisories have been effective in modifying local fish consumption habits.

  4. Efficacy of benzocaine as an anesthetic for salmonid fishes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilderhus, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    Benzocaine was tested in the laboratory to determine the effective concentrations for anesthetizing juvenile chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha an rainbow trout O. mykiss (formerly Salmo gairdneri ). Tests were conducted at three water temperatures, in waters ranging from very soft to very hard, and with groups of rainbow trout from 5 to 47 cm long and chinook salmon 20 cm long. Effective concentrations were defined as those that rendered the fish fully handleable in 3 min or less, allowed recovery of most fish within 10 min, and caused no mortality after 15-min exposures. Concentrations of 25-45 mg/L anesthetized both species over the entire range of conditions tested. Although efficacy was essentially unrelated to species or water quality, it was related to water temperature and size of fish; the concentrations of benzocaine required were highest at the lowest water temperature and for the largest fish.

  5. Comparison of the concentration-effect relationship of a local antiinflammatory agent and oral acetylsalicylic acid: the value of local application.

    PubMed

    Poisson, M; Ralambosoa, C; Blehaut, H; Astoin, J

    1985-01-01

    Using a pharmacological model, the comparison between acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), administered orally, and a solution combining two salicylate derivatives (ethyl 5-methoxy-salicylate and 3-phenyl-propyl-salicylate), applied locally, demonstrated the value of the local application. Indeed, the pharmacological activity was highly significant and directly related to the tissue concentration of salicyl ions, which was higher after local application of the solution than after oral administration of ASA. The local solution also resulted in a lower plasma concentration of salicylate ions, allowing high plasma salicylate concentrations to be avoided. PMID:4074414

  6. Objective Circulation type classifications for the estimation of local PM10 concentrations in Bavarian cities (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weitnauer, Claudia; Beck, Christoph; Jacobeit, Jucundus

    2013-04-01

    Concentrations of particulate matter with a particle distribution of a median aerodynamic diameter < 10 μm (PM10), are known to be relevant for public health, notably concerning cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. High pollution events of PM10 are defined by a threshold of a daily mean concentration of 50μg/m³ by directive 1999/30/EC and following directive 2008/50/EC of the European Union, which are relevant for regional air-quality mitigation strategies. Local concentrations of these fine particles are influenced by meteorological parameters on different scales, e.g. local meteorological conditions and large scale circulation dynamics. In order to detect critical periods of high PM10 concentrations, one focus in recent studies is the improvement of accurate short-term deterministic and statistical prediction models as well as reliable approaches for long-term air-quality prediction. The general relationship between local PM10 and large-scale circulation dynamics - as for example reflected by weather- or circulation types - has been proven in several studies, but so far only a few systematic attempts have been made to optimize weather- and circulation type classifications concerning their relationship to local PM10 concentrations. Against this background the aim of this study is to evaluate various approaches for the optimization of circulation type classifications with respect to their relevance for local PM10 concentrations in Bavarian cities (Germany) in order to detect those approaches that are best suited for the use in planned subsequent studies (e.g. estimation of potential PM10 variations due to future climate change). The used data set of daily mean PM10 has been provided by the Bavarian Environment Agency. For the analysed period 1980-2011 measurements of 16 urban traffic related stations, spread over the whole of Bavaria, are available. We provide initial characteristics of this data set concerning data availability, basic quality aspects, long

  7. State of the art: sedation concepts with volatile anesthetics in critically Ill patients.

    PubMed

    Soukup, Jens; Schärff, Katharina; Kubosch, Kristina; Pohl, Carsten; Bomplitz, Michael; Kompardt, Jesco

    2009-12-01

    The use of volatile anesthetics in the intensive care unit (ICU) has only been possible at great cost with the use of commercially available anesthesia systems. A new anesthetic-conserving device (AnaConDa) now facilitates, from a technical viewpoint, the routine use of volatile anesthetics in intensive care patients as part of prolonged sedation, using ICU ventilators. The volatile anesthetic is hereby applied continually via a syringe pump into a miniature vaporizer, which is integrated into the ventilator circuit in place of the usual respiratory filter. During expiration, the anesthetic exhaled by the patient enters the recirculation system, is predominantly stored in the active carbon layer of the anesthetic-conserving device, and redirected into the inspiratory air. At clinically relevant concentrations, more than 90% of the gas is recirculated in such a way. Aside from the possibility of using a central anesthetic gas scavenging system, the use of special passive residual gas filters, which can be connected to the expiratory outlet of the respirator machine, appears above all to be practical. The use of volatile anesthetics on the ICU could adopt a permanent position in various intensive care analgosedation concepts in future. It may be possible thereby to optimize the treatment process both in medical and economical terms. PMID:19327951

  8. Identification of a GABAA receptor anesthetic binding site at subunit interfaces by photolabeling with an etomidate analog.

    PubMed

    Li, Guo-Dong; Chiara, David C; Sawyer, Gregory W; Husain, S Shaukat; Olsen, Richard W; Cohen, Jonathan B

    2006-11-01

    General anesthetics, including etomidate, act by binding to and enhancing the function of GABA type A receptors (GABA(A)Rs), which mediate inhibitory neurotransmission in the brain. Here, we used a radiolabeled, photoreactive etomidate analog ([(3)H]azietomidate), which retains anesthetic potency in vivo and enhances GABA(A)R function in vitro, to identify directly, for the first time, amino acids that contribute to a GABA(A)R anesthetic binding site. For GABA(A)Rs purified by affinity chromatography from detergent extracts of bovine cortex, [(3)H]azietomidate photoincorporation was increased by GABA and inhibited by etomidate in a concentration-dependent manner (IC(50) = 30 microm). Protein microsequencing of fragments isolated from proteolytic digests established photolabeling of two residues: one within the alphaM1 transmembrane helix at alpha1Met-236 (and/or the homologous methionines in alpha2,3,5), not previously implicated in etomidate function, and one within the betaM3 transmembrane helix at beta3Met-286 (and/or the homologous methionines in beta1,2), an etomidate sensitivity determinant. The pharmacological specificity of labeling indicates that these methionines contribute to a single binding pocket for etomidate located in the transmembrane domain at the interface between beta and alpha subunits, in what is predicted by structural models based on homology with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor to be a water-filled pocket approximately 50 A below the GABA binding site. The localization of the etomidate binding site to an intersubunit, not an intrasubunit, binding pocket is a novel conclusion that suggests more generally that the localization of drug binding sites to subunit interfaces may be a feature not only for GABA and benzodiazepines but also for etomidate and other intravenous and volatile anesthetics. PMID:17093081

  9. Direct measurement of local dissolved oxygen concentration spatial profiles in a cell culture environment.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Yuki; Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Tsuneda, Satoshi

    2015-06-01

    Controlling local dissolved oxygen concentration (DO) in media is critical for cell or tissue cultures. Various biomaterials and culture methods have been developed to modulate DO. Direct measurement of local DO in cultures has not been validated as a method to test DO modulation. In the present study we developed a DO measurement system equipped with a Clark-type oxygen microelectrode manipulated with 1 μm precision in three-dimensional space to explore potential applications for tissue engineering. By determining the microelectrode tip position precisely against the bottom plane of culture dishes with rat or human cardiac cells in static monolayer culture, we successfully obtained spatial distributions of DO in the medium. Theoretical quantitative predictions fit the obtained data well. Based on analyses of the variance between samples, we found the data reflected "local" oxygen consumption in the vicinity of the microelectrode and the detection of temporal changes in oxygen consumption rates of cultured cells was limited by the diffusion rate of oxygen in the medium. This oxygen measuring system monitors local oxygen consumption and production with high spatial resolution, and can potentially be used with recently developed oxygen modulating biomaterials to design microenvironments and non-invasively monitor local DO dynamics during culture.

  10. Drosophila Social Clustering is Disrupted by Anesthetics and in narrow abdomen Ion Channel Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Burg, Elyssa D.; Langan, Sara T.; Nash, Howard A.

    2013-01-01

    Members of many species tend to congregate, a behavioral strategy known as local enhancement. Selective advantages of local enhancement range from efficient use of resources to defense from predators. While previous studies have examined many types of social behavior in fruit flies, few have specifically investigated local enhancement. Resource-independent local enhancement has recently been described in the fruit fly using a measure called social space index, although the neural mechanisms remain unknown. Here we analyze resource-independent local enhancement of Drosophila under conditions that allow us to elucidate its neural mechanisms. We have investigated the effects of general volatile anesthetics, compounds that compromise higher order functioning of the type typically required for responding to social cues. We exposed Canton-S flies to non-immobilizing concentrations of halothane and found that flies had a significantly decreased social space index compared to flies tested in air. Narrow abdomen (na) mutants, which display altered responses to anesthetics in numerous behavioral assays, also have a significantly reduced social space index, an effect that was fully reversed by restoring expression of na by driving a UAS-NA rescue construct with NA-GAL4. We found that na expression in cholinergic neurons fully rescued the behavioral defect, whereas expression of na in glutamatergic neurons did so only partially. Our results also suggest a role for na expression in the mushroom bodies, since suppressing na expression in the mushroom bodies of NA-GAL4 rescue flies diminishes social space index. Our data indicate that resource-independent local enhancement, a simple behavioral strategy, requires complex neural processing. PMID:23398613

  11. Contributions of local and regional sources of NO x to ozone concentrations in Southeast Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongliang; Ying, Qi

    2011-06-01

    The Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) model with a modified SAPRC-99 photochemical mechanism was used to investigate the contributions of local and upwind NO x sources to O 3 concentrations in Southeast Texas during the 2000 Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS 2000) from August 25 to September 5, 2000. Contributions from eight different local NO x source types and eight different source regions to the 8-h average daytime O 3 concentrations from 1100 to 1800 CST (referred to as AD O 3 hereafter) are determined. Both diesel engines and highway gasoline vehicles account for 25 ppb of AD O 3 in the urban Houston area. NO x from natural gas combustion produces 35 ppb of AD O 3 in the industrial area of Houston. Contributions from industrial sources and coal combustion to AD O 3 have comparatively less broad spatial distribution with maximum values of 14 ppb and 20 ppb, respectively. Although the local sources are the most important sources, upwind sources have non-negligible influences (20-50%) on AD O 3 in the entire domain, with a maximum of 50 ppb in rural and coastal areas and 20 ppb in urban and industrial areas. To probe the origins of upwind sources contributions, NO x emissions in the entire eastern United States are divided into eight different regions and their contributions to O 3 concentrations in the Houston-Galveston-Brazoria (HGB) and Beaumont-Port Arthur (BPA) areas are determined. Among the various NO x source regions resolved in this study, other Texas counties near the HGB and BPA areas and southeastern states are the most important non-local sources of O 3. Under favorable transport conditions, emissions from neighbor states and northeastern states could also contribute to non-negligible O 3 concentrations (7-15%) in the HGB and BPA areas. This indicates that in addition to reduce local emissions, regional NO x emission controls, especially from the neighbor counties and states, are also necessary to improve O 3 air quality in Southeast Texas.

  12. Anesthetic consideration for nonintubated VATS

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jen-Ting; Hung, Ming-Hui; Chen, Jin-Shing

    2014-01-01

    In the recent decade, nonintubated-intubated video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) has been extensively performed and evaluated. The indicated surgical procedures and suitable patient groups are steadily increasing. Perioperative anesthetic management presents itself as a fresh issue for the iatrogenic open pneumothorax, which is intended for unilateral lung collapse to create a steady surgical field, and the ensuing physiologic derangement involving ventilatory and hemodynamic perspectives. With appropriate monitoring, meticulous employment of regional anesthesia, sedation, vagal block, and ventilatory support, nonintubated VATS is proved to be a safe alternative to the conventional intubated general anesthesia. PMID:24455170

  13. Dual effects of neuroprotection and neurotoxicity by general anesthetics: Role of intracellular calcium homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Huafeng; Inan, Saadet

    2013-01-01

    Although general anesthetics have long been considered neuroprotective, there are growing concerns about neurotoxicity. Preclinical studies clearly demonstrated that commonly used general anesthetics are both neuroprotective and neurotoxic, with unclear mechanisms. Recent studies suggest that differential activation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors, a calcium release channel located on the membrane of endoplasmic reticulum (ER), play important role on determining the fate of neuroprotection or neurotoxicity by general anesthetics. General anesthetics at low concentrations for short duration are sublethal stress factors which induce endogenous neuroprotective mechanisms and provide neuroprotection via adequate activation of InsP3R and moderate calcium release from ER. On the other hand, general anesthetics at high concentrations for prolonged duration are lethal stress factors which induce neuronal damage by over activation of InsP3R and excessive and abnormal Ca2+ release from ER. This review emphasizes the duel effects of both neuroprotection and neurotoxicity via differential regulation of intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis by commonly used general anesthetics and recommends strategy to maximize neuroprotective but minimize neurotoxic effects of general anesthetics. PMID:23721657

  14. Do PCB concentration trends in Lake Michigan fishes reflect global or local patterns?

    SciTech Connect

    Stow, C.A.; Carpenter, S.R.

    1994-12-31

    The authors have examined the fit of three alternative, models to PCB concentration data for seven species of Lake Michigan fishes. The best fit model for all seven species indicates that, following rapid decreases through the mid-1980s, PCBs are no longer declining. The authors believe this pattern indicates PCBs are currently originating from global or local pools that are being recycled in the environment. If the current PCB source in Lake Michigan is primarily sediment or fluvial, then this may be an isolated pattern. However, a sizeable atmospheric input would suggest that this problem may be occurring in many systems.

  15. Lidocaine Concentration in Oral Tissue by the Addition of Epinephrine

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Eri; Yoshida, Kenji; Kawaai, Hiroyoshi; Yamazaki, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    The vasoconstrictive effect due to the addition of epinephrine to local anesthetic has been clearly shown by measuring blood-flow volume or blood anesthetic concentration in oral mucosal tissue. However, there are no reports on the measurement of anesthetic concentration using samples directly taken from the jawbone and oral mucosal tissue. Consequently, in this study, the effect of lidocaine concentration in the jawbone and oral mucosal tissue by the addition of epinephrine to the local anesthetic lidocaine was considered by quantitatively measuring lidocaine concentration within the tissue. Japanese white male rabbits (n = 96) were used as test animals. General anesthesia was induced by sevoflurane and oxygen, and then cannulation to the femoral artery was performed while arterial pressure was constantly recorded. Infiltration anesthesia was achieved by 0.5 mL of 2% lidocaine containing 1 : 80,000 epinephrine in the upper jawbone (E+) and 0.5 mL of 2% of epinephrine additive–free lidocaine (E0) under the periosteum. At specified time increments (10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 minutes), samples from the jawbone, oral mucosa, and blood were collected, and lidocaine concentration was directly measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. No significant differences in the change in blood pressure were observed either in E+ or E0. In both E+ and E0 groups, the serum lidocaine concentration peaked 10 minutes after local anesthesia and decreased thereafter. At all time increments, serum lidocaine concentration in E+ was significantly lower than that in E0. There were no significant differences in measured lidocaine concentration between jawbone and mucosa within either the E+ or the E0 groups at all time points, although the E0 group had significantly lower jawbone and mucosa concentrations than the E+ group at all time points when comparing the 2 groups to each other. Addition of epinephrine to the local anesthetic inhibited systemic absorption of local

  16. Hyaluronic acid and fibrin hydrogels with concentrated DNA/PEI polyplexes for local gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yuguo; Rahim, Maha; Ng, Quinn; Segura, Tatiana

    2011-08-10

    Local delivery of DNA through a hydrogel scaffold would increase the applicability of gene therapy in tissue regeneration and cancer therapy. However, the delivery of DNA/cationic polymer nanoparticles (polyplexes) using hydrogels is challenging due to the aggregation and inactivation of polyplexes during their incorporation into hydrogel scaffolds. We developed a novel process (termed caged nanoparticle encapsulation or CnE) to load concentrated and unaggregated non-viral gene delivery nanoparticles into various hydrogels. Previously, we showed that PEG hydrogels loaded with DNA/PEI polyplexes through this process were able to deliver genes both in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we found that hyaluronic acid and fibrin hydrogels with concentrated and unaggregated polyplexes loaded through CnE were able to deliver genes in vivo as well, demonstrating the universality of the process.

  17. Influence of local and regional Mediterranean meteorology on SO₂ ground-level concentrations in SE Spain.

    PubMed

    Santacatalina, Milagros; Carratalá, Adoración; Mantilla, Enrique

    2011-06-01

    This work presents the results of a 4-year study on sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) ground-level concentrations in an area of southeastern Spain, the L'Alacantí region, where the cement industry is important and coke use extends to other industries as well. The main source of SO(2) emissions in the area was found to be a the Lepold cement plant (one of the two cement plants in the area). The high levels of SO(2) probably extend back to 1920 when this plant began operations. Both local and Mediterranean-scale meteorological processes influence the SO(2) ground-level concentration and together explain the dispersion dynamics of this pollutant. The location and topography of the study zone result in NW Atlantic advections and E-SE sea breezes being the dominant atmospheric circulation patterns in the area. Under stable meteorological conditions, minor local circulations are also relevant to the SO(2) concentration levels. The high frequency of local circulations determines a concentration pattern that changes during the day, with impacts occurring preferentially in a W-NW direction from the source at midday (sea breeze and strong thermal mixture), and in a SE direction at night. This causes the SO(2) concentrations to present well-defined diurnal cycles with well-differentiated shapes depending on the location of the sampling station relative to the source. The dependence of SO(2) 10 min levels on the wind origin and speed throughout the day has been evaluated by studying statistical parameters including P95, P50 and arithmetic mean. Exceedances occur under specific dispersion conditions at distances less than 1 km from the source. However, the source is traceable at larger distances and the levels are higher than typical urban ones. P95 was used as an estimator of the occurrence of larger levels or impacts. Leeward of NW winds and the source, at night and in early morning, P95 levels are comprised between 30 and 55 µg m(-3). In contrast, with SE winds and at midday, P95

  18. Inducibility of human atrial fibrillation in an in silico model reflecting local acetylcholine distribution and concentration.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Minki; Lee, Hyun-Seung; Pak, Hui-Nam; Shim, Eun Bo

    2016-01-01

    Vagal nerve activity has been known to play a crucial role in the induction and maintenance of atrial fibrillation (AF). However, it is unclear how the distribution and concentration of local acetylcholine (ACh) promotes AF. In this study, we investigated the effect of the spatial distribution and concentration of ACh on fibrillation patterns in an in silico human atrial model. A human atrial action potential model with an ACh-dependent K(+) current (IKAch) was used to examine the effect of vagal activation. A simulation of cardiac wave dynamics was performed in a realistic 3D model of the atrium. A model of the ganglionated plexus (GP) and nerve was developed based on the "octopus hypothesis". The pattern of cardiac wave dynamics was examined by applying vagal activation to the GP areas or randomly. AF inducibility in the octopus hypothesis-based GP and nerve model was tested. The effect of the ACh concentration level was also examined. In the single cell simulation, an increase in the ACh concentration shortened APD90 and increased the maximal slope of the restitution curve. In the 3D simulation, a random distribution of vagal activation promoted wavebreaks while ACh secretion limited to the GP areas did not induce a noticeable change in wave dynamics. The octopus hypothesis-based model of the GP and nerve exhibited AF inducibility at higher ACh concentrations. In conclusion, a 3D in silico model of the GP and parasympathetic nerve based on the octopus model exhibited higher AF inducibility with higher ACh concentrations. PMID:26807030

  19. High concentrations of anthocyanins in genuine cherry-juice of old local Austrian Prunus avium varieties.

    PubMed

    Schüller, Elisabeth; Halbwirth, Heidi; Mikulic-Petkovsek, Maja; Slatnar, Ana; Veberic, Robert; Forneck, Astrid; Stich, Karl; Spornberger, Andreas

    2015-04-15

    Antioxidant activity and polyphenols were quantified in vapour-extracted juice of nine Austrian, partially endemic varieties of sweet cherry (Prunus avium): cv. 'Spätbraune von Purbach', cv. 'Early Rivers', cv. 'Joiser Einsiedekirsche', cv. 'Große Schwarze Knorpelkirsche' and four unidentified local varieties. Additionally the effect of storage was evaluated for six of the varieties. A variety showing the highest antioxidant capacity (9.64 μmol Trolox equivalents per mL), total polyphenols (2747 mg/L) and total cyanidins (1085 mg/L) was suitable for mechanical harvest and its juice did not show any losses of antioxidant capacity and total anthocyanin concentration during storage. The juice of cv. 'Große Schwarze Knorpelkirsche' had also high concentrations of total anthocyanins (873 mg/L), but showed substantial losses through storage. The local Austrian sweet cherry varieties from the Pannonian climate zone are particularly suitable for the production of processed products like cherry juice with high content of anthocyanins and polyphenols. PMID:25466109

  20. Motoneuronal TASK channels contribute to immobilizing effects of inhalational general anesthetics

    PubMed Central

    Lazarenko, Roman M.; Willcox, Sarah C.; Shu, Shaofang; Berg, Allison P.; Jevtovic-Todorovic, Vesna; Talley, Edmund M.; Chen, Xiangdong; Bayliss, Douglas A.

    2010-01-01

    General anesthetics cause sedation, hypnosis and immobilization via central nervous system mechanisms that remain incompletely understood; contributions of particular anesthetic targets in specific neural pathways remain largely unexplored. Among potential molecular targets for mediating anesthetic actions, the TASK subgroup (TASK-1, K2P3.1& TASK-3, K2P9.1) of background K+ channels are appealing candidates since they are expressed in CNS sites relevant to anesthetic actions and activated by clinically relevant concentrations of inhaled anesthetics. Here, we used global and conditional TASK channel single and double subunit knockout mice to demonstrate definitively that TASK channels account for motoneuronal anesthetic-activated K+ currents and to test their contributions to sedative, hypnotic and immobilizing anesthetic actions. In motoneurons from all knockout mice lines, TASK-like currents were reduced and cells were less sensitive to hyperpolarizing effects of halothane and isoflurane. In an immobilization assay, higher concentrations of both halothane and isoflurane were required to render TASK knockout animals unresponsive to a tail pinch; in assays of sedation (loss of movement) and hypnosis (loss-of-righting reflex), TASK knockout mice showed a modest decrease in sensitivity, and only for halothane. In conditional knockout mice, with TASK channel deletion restricted to cholinergic neurons, immobilizing actions of the inhaled anesthetics and sedative effects of halothane were reduced to the same extent as in global knockout lines. These data indicate that TASK channels in cholinergic neurons are a molecular substrate for select actions of inhaled anesthetics; for immobilization, which is spinally mediated, these data implicate motoneurons as the likely neuronal substrate. PMID:20519544

  1. Localized auxin peaks in concentration-based transport models of the shoot apical meristem

    PubMed Central

    Draelants, Delphine; Avitabile, Daniele; Vanroose, Wim

    2015-01-01

    We study the formation of auxin peaks in a generic class of concentration-based auxin transport models, posed on static plant tissues. Using standard asymptotic analysis, we prove that, on bounded domains, auxin peaks are not formed via a Turing instability in the active transport parameter, but via simple corrections to the homogeneous steady state. When the active transport is small, the geometry of the tissue encodes the peaks’ amplitude and location: peaks arise where cells have fewer neighbours, that is, at the boundary of the domain. We test our theory and perform numerical bifurcation analysis on two models that are known to generate auxin patterns for biologically plausible parameter values. In the same parameter regimes, we find that realistic tissues are capable of generating a multitude of stationary patterns, with a variable number of auxin peaks, that can be selected by different initial conditions or by quasi-static changes in the active transport parameter. The competition between active transport and production rate determines whether peaks remain localized or cover the entire domain. In particular, changes in the auxin production that are fast with respect to the cellular life cycle affect the auxin peak distribution, switching from localized spots to fully patterned states. We relate the occurrence of localized patterns to a snaking bifurcation structure, which is known to arise in a wide variety of nonlinear media, but has not yet been reported in plant models. PMID:25878130

  2. Localized auxin peaks in concentration-based transport models of the shoot apical meristem.

    PubMed

    Draelants, Delphine; Avitabile, Daniele; Vanroose, Wim

    2015-05-01

    We study the formation of auxin peaks in a generic class of concentration-based auxin transport models, posed on static plant tissues. Using standard asymptotic analysis, we prove that, on bounded domains, auxin peaks are not formed via a Turing instability in the active transport parameter, but via simple corrections to the homogeneous steady state. When the active transport is small, the geometry of the tissue encodes the peaks' amplitude and location: peaks arise where cells have fewer neighbours, that is, at the boundary of the domain. We test our theory and perform numerical bifurcation analysis on two models that are known to generate auxin patterns for biologically plausible parameter values. In the same parameter regimes, we find that realistic tissues are capable of generating a multitude of stationary patterns, with a variable number of auxin peaks, that can be selected by different initial conditions or by quasi-static changes in the active transport parameter. The competition between active transport and production rate determines whether peaks remain localized or cover the entire domain. In particular, changes in the auxin production that are fast with respect to the cellular life cycle affect the auxin peak distribution, switching from localized spots to fully patterned states. We relate the occurrence of localized patterns to a snaking bifurcation structure, which is known to arise in a wide variety of nonlinear media, but has not yet been reported in plant models.

  3. n-Dodecyl β-D-maltoside specifically competes with general anesthetics for anesthetic binding sites.

    PubMed

    Xu, Longhe; Matsunaga, Felipe; Xi, Jin; Li, Min; Ma, Jingyuan; Liu, Renyu

    2014-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that the anionic detergent sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) specifically interacts with the anesthetic binding site in horse spleen apoferritin, a soluble protein which models anesthetic binding sites in receptors. This raises the possibility of other detergents similarly interacting with and occluding such sites from anesthetics, thereby preventing the proper identification of novel anesthetic binding sites. n-Dodecyl β-D-maltoside (DDM) is a non-ionic detergent commonly used during protein-anesthetic studies because of its mild and non-denaturing properties. In this study, we demonstrate that SDS and DDM occupy anesthetic binding sites in the model proteins human serum albumin (HSA) and horse spleen apoferritin and thereby inhibit the binding of the general anesthetics propofol and isoflurane. DDM specifically interacts with HSA (Kd = 40 μM) with a lower affinity than SDS (Kd = 2 μM). DDM exerts all these effects while not perturbing the native structures of either model protein. Computational calculations corroborated the experimental results by demonstrating that the binding sites for DDM and both anesthetics on the model proteins overlapped. Collectively, our results indicate that DDM and SDS specifically interact with anesthetic binding sites and may thus prevent the identification of novel anesthetic sites. Special precaution should be taken when undertaking and interpreting results from protein-anesthetic investigations utilizing detergents like SDS and DDM.

  4. Clinical efficacy of tetracaine anesthetic paste.

    PubMed

    Hopp, Christa; Goebel, William; Hildebolt, Charles; Rotter, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Benzocaine, the most commonly used topical anesthetic in dentistry, often fails to eliminate the pain associated with injections. One type of anesthetic used frequently in medicine with success is tetracaine, but minimal research has been done regarding the application of tetracaine in dentistry. This study sought to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of tetracaine anesthetic paste (TAP), a newly formulated topical anesthetic. For this study, TAP was applied to the maxillary mucobuccal fold of one side of the arch and benzocaine paste was applied to the opposite side prior to injection of anesthetic. Patients then reported the level of pain experienced on each side and were evaluated for any adverse reactions. The results showed no difference in effectiveness between TAP and benzocaine paste, and no adverse reactions were reported. Because of the safety and effectiveness of tetracaine extraorally, further research is warranted on its intraoral use.

  5. Cs diffusion in local Taiwan laterite with different solution concentration, pH and packing density.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tsing-Hai; Li, Ming-Hsu; Teng, Shi-Ping

    2008-09-01

    In this work we used an "in-diffusion" method to study the effects of pH, solution concentration and packing density on Cs diffusion by packing local Taiwan laterite (LTL) into modified capillary columns with 5mm diameter. These packed columns were first pre-equilibrated with synthetic groundwater (GW) for 3 weeks. The diffusion experiments were then carried out at ambient condition for 2 weeks. Our experimental results showed that the Cs diffusion profile fits Fick's second law very well in given experimental conditions, indicating the validity of modified capillary column method. Generally speaking, Cs diffusion in LTL decreases as the pH increases and as Cs concentration decreases. The apparent diffusion coefficient (D(a)) increases from 5.52 x 10(-12) (10(-7)M) to 2.18 x 10(-11) (10(-3)M)m(2)/s, while the effective diffusion coefficient (D(e)) shows slight variation as the Cs concentration changes. Both the derived D(a) and D(e) values decrease as the pH increases, implying that the diffusion mechanisms of Cs nuclide in alkaline and acid environment are different. In addition, our results show that Cs diffusion is unaffected by the given packing density, indicating the interlaminary space is not the major determinant of Cs adsorption and diffusion in LTL. PMID:18321721

  6. Cs diffusion in local Taiwan laterite with different solution concentration, pH and packing density.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tsing-Hai; Li, Ming-Hsu; Teng, Shi-Ping

    2008-09-01

    In this work we used an "in-diffusion" method to study the effects of pH, solution concentration and packing density on Cs diffusion by packing local Taiwan laterite (LTL) into modified capillary columns with 5mm diameter. These packed columns were first pre-equilibrated with synthetic groundwater (GW) for 3 weeks. The diffusion experiments were then carried out at ambient condition for 2 weeks. Our experimental results showed that the Cs diffusion profile fits Fick's second law very well in given experimental conditions, indicating the validity of modified capillary column method. Generally speaking, Cs diffusion in LTL decreases as the pH increases and as Cs concentration decreases. The apparent diffusion coefficient (D(a)) increases from 5.52 x 10(-12) (10(-7)M) to 2.18 x 10(-11) (10(-3)M)m(2)/s, while the effective diffusion coefficient (D(e)) shows slight variation as the Cs concentration changes. Both the derived D(a) and D(e) values decrease as the pH increases, implying that the diffusion mechanisms of Cs nuclide in alkaline and acid environment are different. In addition, our results show that Cs diffusion is unaffected by the given packing density, indicating the interlaminary space is not the major determinant of Cs adsorption and diffusion in LTL.

  7. Scientometrics of anesthetic drugs and their techniques of administration, 1984-2013.

    PubMed

    Vlassakov, Kamen V; Kissin, Igor

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess progress in the field of anesthetic drugs over the past 30 years using scientometric indices: popularity indices (general and specific), representing the proportion of articles on a drug relative to all articles in the field of anesthetics (general index) or the subfield of a specific class of anesthetics (specific index); index of change, representing the degree of growth in publications on a topic from one period to the next; index of expectations, representing the ratio of the number of articles on a topic in the top 20 journals relative to the number of articles in all (>5,000) biomedical journals covered by PubMed; and index of ultimate success, representing a publication outcome when a new drug takes the place of a common drug previously used for the same purpose. Publications on 58 topics were assessed during six 5-year periods from 1984 to 2013. Our analysis showed that during 2009-2013, out of seven anesthetics with a high general popularity index (≥2.0), only two were introduced after 1980, ie, the inhaled anesthetic sevoflurane and the local anesthetic ropivacaine; however, only sevoflurane had a high index of expectations (12.1). Among anesthetic adjuncts, in 2009-2013, only one agent, sugammadex, had both an extremely high index of change (>100) and a high index of expectations (25.0), reflecting the novelty of its mechanism of action. The index of ultimate success was positive with three anesthetics, ie, lidocaine, isoflurane, and propofol, all of which were introduced much longer than 30 years ago. For the past 30 years, there were no new anesthetics that have produced changes in scientometric indices indicating real progress.

  8. Local film thinning due to concentration gradient of an insoluble surfactant at an interface.

    PubMed

    Jeelani, S A K; Windhab, E J

    2006-06-15

    The local thinning of a viscous liquid film on a substrate driven by a surface (or interfacial) tension gradient due to a concentration gradient of a monolayer of an insoluble surfactant initially non-uniformly distributed at a liquid interface relevant to chemical engineering, biomedical and other applications is investigated. A simple model is presented for the temporal evolution of the profiles of radial variation in the thickness of a thin liquid film, the effects of gravity and capillarity due to deformation of the interface in slowing down the film thinning process being allowed. As time increases, the surfactant spreads and the radius of its front increases inversely with decrease in the two-third power of the film thickness at the center. The model describes well not only the published experimental results but also those obtained by other authors using numerical simulations of a set of coupled partial differential equations.

  9. Local measurement of temperatures and concentrations: A review for hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dankert, C.; Cattolica, R.; Sellers, W.

    1993-01-01

    The quality of reentry simulation for Shuttle, HERMES, Sanger, and NASP systematically suffers from the strong non-equilibrium of rotational and vibrational temperature due to the rapid acceleration of the test gas in the nozzle. Therefore the determination of temperatures is necessary and, if possible, preferable by a non-intrusive technique. The specific interests of this review are optical techniques such as electron beam fluorescence, laser-induced fluorescence, and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering. The capabilities available for local measurements with temporal resolution and quantitative accuracy are discussed for velocity, temperature, density, species concentrations, and fluctuations due to turbulence. The applicability of these methods of measurement is presented and discussed for the coming topic in aerothermodynamics: experimental techniques of hot gases in high enthalpy flows.

  10. Local ecological factors, ultrafine particulate concentrations, and asthma prevalence rates in Buffalo, New York, neighborhoods.

    PubMed

    Lwebuga-Mukasa, Jamson S; Oyana, Tonny J; Johnson, Caryn

    2005-06-01

    Previous to this study various healthcare utilization studies and house-to-house surveys had shown that Buffalo's west side had a high utilization rate for asthma and high asthma prevalence in comparison with neighboring communities. The relative contributions of traffic-related pollution and personal and local ecological factors to the high asthma rates were still unknown. To investigate the potential roles of personal home environmental factors and local ecological factors in variations of asthma prevalence in Buffalo neighborhoods, we conducted a cross-sectional survey of a systematic random sample of 2000 households in the city of Buffalo, New York, with a response rate of 80.4%. We found that the odds of having at least one person with asthma per household on Buffalo's west side was 2.57 times [95% confidence interval (CI)=1.85-3.57] that of Buffalo's east side. There were no statistically significant differences in the odds of finding at least one person with asthma in households of other Buffalo neighborhoods. We further found no difference in the odds of having asthma on Buffalo's west side even after correcting for race/ethnicity, household triggers of asthma, and socioeconomic factors. Monitoring ultrafine particulates showed increased levels in communities downwind of the Peace Bridge Complex and major roadways supplying it. A multiple-regression model showed that asthma prevalence may be influenced by humidity and ultrafine particulate concentrations. These results suggest that increased asthma risk may be influenced by chronic exposure to personal and local ecological factors. PMID:16036408

  11. Interactions of anesthetics with the membrane-water interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, A.; Cieplak, P.; Wilson, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    Although the potency of conventional anesthetics correlates with lipophilicity, an affinity to water also is essential. It was recently found that compounds with very low affinities to water do not produce anesthesia regardless of their lipophilicity. This finding implies that clinical anesthesia might arise because of interactions at molecular sites near the interface of neuronal membranes with the aqueous environment and, therefore, might require increased concentrations of anesthetic molecules at membrane interfaces. As an initial test of this hypothesis, we calculated in molecular dynamics simulations the free energy profiles for the transfer of anesthetic 1,1,2-trifluoroethane and nonanesthetic perfluoroethane across water-membrane and water-hexane interfaces. Consistent with the hypothesis, it was found that trifluoroethane, but not perfluoroethane, exhibits a free energy minimum and, therefore, increased concentrations at both interfaces. The transfer of trifluoroethane from water to the nonpolar hexane or interior of the membrane is accompanied by a considerable, solvent-induced shift in the conformational equilibrium around the C-C bond.

  12. Localized corrosion resistance of corrosion-resistant Ni based alloys in hot concentrated seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Sugahara, Katsuo; Takizawa, Yoshio

    1998-12-31

    Localized corrosion resistance of stainless steel (Type 316L), a titanium-based alloy (Ti-0.15Pd) and corrosion-resistant nickel-based alloys (a new alloy MAT-21 (Alloy T) and Alloy C-276) was evaluated in four simulated seawater solutions containing 1.8 to 22.0 wt% of chloride ions concentrated by evaporation. Stress corrosion cracking was observed on the 316L stainless steel but not on Alloy T and Alloy C-276 in the solutions. Pitting attack occurred on the surface of the 316L stainless steel base metal in all the solutions. Alloy C-276 suffered pitting attack on the surface including the welded section only in the solutions containing 18.9 and 22.0 wt% of chloride ions, respectively. No pitting attack occurred over any part of the surface including the welded section of Alloy T in any of the solutions. No crevice corrosion was observed in an immersion test of Alloy T and the Ti-0.15 5Pd alloy using test pieces with crevices although crevice corrosion was seen the creviced test pieces of Alloy C-276 and the 316L stainless steel. It was found that both Alloy T and the Ti-0.15Pd alloy, which exhibit high repassivation potentials for crevice corrosion (E{sub r,CREV})corresponding to crevice corrosion potentials, have excellent crevice corrosion resistance, while these alloys which exhibit corrosion potentials greater than E{sub r,CREV}in a solution with a high chloride ion concentration and a high dissolved oxygen concentration in open air may be corroding in the crevices.

  13. Anesthetics and red blood cell rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydogan, Burcu; Aydogan, Sami

    2014-05-01

    There are many conditions where it is useful for anesthetists to have a knowledge of blood rheology. Blood rheology plays an important role in numerous clinical situations. Hemorheologic changes may significantly affect the induction and recovery times with anesthetic agents. But also, hemorheologic factors are directly or indirectly affected by many anesthetic agents or their metabolites. In this review, the blood rheology with special emphasis on its application in anesthesiology, the importance hemorheological parameters in anesthesiology and also the effect of some anesthetic substances on red blood cell rheology were presented.

  14. Child with aplastic anemia: Anesthetic management

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Manpreet; Gupta, Babita; Sharma, Aanchal; Sharma, Sanjeev

    2012-01-01

    Aplastic anemia is a rare heterogeneous disorder of hematopoietic stem cells causing pancytopenia and marrow hypoplasia with the depletion of all types of blood cells. This results in anemia, neutropenia and thrombocytopenia, which pose a challenge to both surgical and anesthetic management of such cases. We report a child with aplastic anemia who sustained traumatic ulcer on the arm and underwent split-thickness skin grafting under general anesthesia. There are only two case reports on anesthetic considerations in aplastic anemia patients in the literature. The anesthetic management is challenging because of the rarity of the disease, associated pancytopenia and immunosuppression. PMID:23162410

  15. [Ultrafiltration as a fast and simple method for determination of free and protein bound prilocaine concentration. Clinical study following high-dose plexus anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Bachmann-Mennenga, B; Biscoping, J; Schürg, R; Sinning, E; Hempelmann, G

    1991-05-01

    Ultrafiltration as a Fast and Simple Method to Separate Free and Protein Bound Concentrations of Local Anesthetics/Pharmacokinetic studies following high-dose anesthesia of the axillary plexus. As many other drugs amide-type local anesthetics are protein bound in plasma. The extent of binding varies between local anesthetics. The free, non protein-bound fraction of these drugs is mainly responsible for cardiovascular and central-nervous side effects. If high doses are necessary for regional anesthetic procedures it seems reasonable to determine the pharmacological active, non protein-bound fraction in addition to the total concentration of the local anesthetic drug. Analyses of protein binding was performed using an ultrafiltration method which is discussed in this paper. Total (HPLC) and unbound plasma levels (combination of ultrafiltration and HPLC) of the local anesthetic drug in central venous blood were studied in 20 healthy orthopedic patients, undergoing plastic surgery of the upper limb (elbow, forearm, hand), over a time period of 90 min, when performing axillary plexus block with 30 ml prilocaine (CAS 721-50-6) 2% (= 600 mg). Separation of the local anesthetic fractions was achieved using the ultrafiltration system MPS-1, equipped with a YMT-membrane. These membranes have a narrow pore size retaining molecules larger than 30000 Dalton. Ultrafiltration was accomplished by subjecting 1.2 ml of plasma to centrifugation at 2000 x g for 60 min at 30 degrees C using a clinical centrifuge equipped with a 35 degree angle head rotor. The plasma samples were adjusted to physiological pH (7.40) with a sodium-potassium-phosphate buffer. The tightness of the used membrane was controlled by a micromethod for protein estimation (sensitivity 10 micrograms/ml).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Anesthetics lower Tc of a 2D miscibility critical point in the plasma membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machta, Benjamin; Gray, Elly; Veatch, Sarah

    2014-03-01

    Many small hydrophobic molecules induce general anesthesia. Their efficacy as anesthetics has been shown to correlate both with their hydrophobicity and with their potency in inhibiting certain ligand gated ion channels. I will first report on our experiments on the effects that these molecules have on the two-dimensional miscibility critical point observed in cell derived vesicles (GPMVs). We show that anesthetics depress the critical temperature (Tc) of these GPMVs but do not strongly affect the ratio of phases found below Tc. The magnitude of this affect is consistent across the n-alcohols only when their concentration is rescaled by the median anesthetic concentration (AC50) for tadpole anesthesia and at AC50 we see a 4K downward shift in Tc. I will next present a model in which anesthetics interfere with native allosteric regulation of ligand gated channels by the critical membrane, showing that our observed change in critical properties could lead to the previously observed changes in channel conductance without a direct interaction between anesthetic molecules and their target proteins. Finally, I will discuss ongoing experiments that will clarify the role of this membrane effect in mediating the organism level anesthetic response.

  17. Anesthetic Efficacy in Irreversible Pulpitis: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Allegretti, Carlos E; Sampaio, Roberta M; Horliana, Anna C R T; Armonia, Paschoal L; Rocha, Rodney G; Tortamano, Isabel Peixoto

    2016-01-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve block has a high failure rate in the treatment of mandibular posterior teeth with irreversible pulpitis. The aim of this study was to compare the anesthetic efficacy of 4% articaine, 2% lidocaine and 2% mepivacaine, all in combination with 1:100,000 epinephrine, in patients with irreversible pulpitis of permanent mandibular molars during a pulpectomy procedure. Sixty-six volunteers from the Emergency Center of the School of Dentistry, University of São Paulo, randomly received 3.6 mL of local anesthetic as a conventional inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB). The subjective signal of lip numbness, pulpal anesthesia and absence of pain during the pulpectomy procedure were evaluated respectively, by questioning the patient, stimulation using an electric pulp tester and a verbal analogue scale. All patients reported the subjective signal of lip numbness. Regarding pulpal anesthesia success as measured with the pulp tester, the success rate was respectively 68.2% for mepivacaine, 63.6% for articaine and 63.6% for lidocaine. Regarding patients who reported no pain or mild pain during the pulpectomy, the success rate was, respectively 72.7% for mepivacaine, 63.6% for articaine and 54.5% for lidocaine. These differences were not statistically significant. Neither of the solutions resulted in 100% anesthetic success in patients with irreversible pulpitis of mandibular molars.

  18. Cytochrome c Oxidase Inhibition by Anesthetics: Thermodynamic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderkooi, Garret; Chazotte, Brad

    1982-06-01

    The thermodynamic parameters that characterize the inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase activity, in rat liver submitochondrial particles, by n-butanol, tetracaine, and dibucaine were obtained. Three equilibria were assumed in order to account for the data: for the interaction of inhibitor with the native state of the enzyme, for the interaction of inhibitor with the thermally (reversibly) denatured state, and for the change between the native and thermally denatured states. Inhibition results from interaction with both the native and denatured states but, because the interaction is stronger with the denatured than with the native state, the native/denatured equilibrium is shifted to the right by the anesthetics. The enthalpies of interaction are -2.3, -4.7, and 3.7 kcal/mol (1 cal = 4.18 J) for the native state and -10, -6, and -14 kcal/mol for the denatured state, for n-butanol, tetracaine, and dibucaine, respectively. These values are much smaller than the previous estimates obtained by using the assumption that anesthetics interact only with the thermally denatured state of enzymes (e.g., -81 kcal/mol for tetracaine inhibition of luciferase). Our results suggest that local anesthetics inhibit enzyme activity by causing a reversible perturbation of protein conformation. The magnitude of the perturbation is much smaller (in energetic terms) than that which accompanies thermal denaturation.

  19. General anesthetics and β-amyloid protein

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhongcong; Xu, Zhipeng

    2012-01-01

    With roughly 234 million people undergoing surgery with anesthesia each year worldwide, it is important to determine whether commonly used anesthetics can induce any neurotoxicity. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of age-related dementia, and a rapidly growing health problem. Several studies suggest that anesthesia could be associated with the development of AD. Moreover, studies in cultured cells and animals show that commonly used inhalation anesthetics may induce changes consistent with AD neuropathogenesis, e.g., β-amyloid protein accumulation. Therefore, in this mini review, we focus on the recent research investigating the effects of commonly used anesthetics including isoflurane, sevoflurane, desflurane, nitrous oxide, and propofol, on Aβ accumulation in vitro and in vivo. We further discuss the future direction of the research determining the effects of anesthetics on β-amyloid protein accumulation. PMID:22918033

  20. General anesthetics and β-amyloid protein.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhongcong; Xu, Zhipeng

    2013-12-01

    With roughly 234 million people undergoing surgery with anesthesia each year worldwide, it is important to determine whether commonly used anesthetics can induce any neurotoxicity. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of age-related dementia, and a rapidly growing health problem. Several studies suggest that anesthesia could be associated with the development of AD. Moreover, studies in cultured cells and animals show that commonly used inhalation anesthetics may induce changes consistent with AD neuropathogenesis, e.g., β-amyloid protein accumulation. Therefore, in this mini review, we focus on the recent research investigating the effects of commonly used anesthetics including isoflurane, sevoflurane, desflurane, nitrous oxide, and propofol, on Aβ accumulation in vitro and in vivo. We further discuss the future direction of the research determining the effects of anesthetics on β-amyloid protein accumulation. PMID:22918033

  1. Management of exposure to waste anesthetic gases.

    PubMed

    Smith, Francis Duval

    2010-04-01

    Anesthetic agents were developed in the 1700s, and nitrous oxide was first used in 1884. Research on the effects of waste anesthetic gas exposure started appearing in the literature in 1967. Short-term exposure causes lethargy and fatigue, and long-term exposure may be linked to spontaneous abortion, congenital abnormalities, infertility, premature births, cancer, and renal and hepatic disease. Today, perioperative staff members are exposed to trace amounts of waste anesthetic gas, and although this exposure cannot be eliminated, it can be controlled. Health care facilities are required to develop, implement, measure, and control practices to reduce anesthetic gas exposure to the lowest practical level. Exposure levels must be measured every six months and maintained at less than 25 parts per million for nitrous oxide and 2 parts per million for halogenated agents to be compliant with Occupational Safety and Health Administration standards.

  2. General Anesthetics and Molecular Mechanisms of Unconsciousness

    PubMed Central

    Forman, Stuart A.; Chin, Victor A.

    2013-01-01

    General anesthetic agents are unique in clinical medicine, because they are the only drugs used to produce unconsciousness as a therapeutic goal. In contrast to older hypotheses that assumed all general anesthetics produce their central nervous system effects through a common mechanism, we outline evidence that general anesthesia represents a number of distinct pharmacological effects that are likely mediated by different neural circuits, and perhaps via different molecular targets. Within the context of this neurobiological framework, we review recent molecular pharmacological and transgenic animal studies. These studies reveal that different groups of general anesthetics, which can be discerned based on their clinical features, produce unconsciousness via distinct molecular targets and therefore via distinct mechanisms. We further postulate that different types of general anesthetics selectively disrupt different critical steps (perhaps in different neuronal circuits) in the processing of sensory information and memory that results in consciousness. PMID:18617817

  3. A pharmacokinetic study of a topical anesthetic (EMLA® ) in mouse soft tissue laceration.

    PubMed

    Al-Musawi, Alaa; Matar, Kamal; Kombian, Samuel B; Andersson, Lars

    2012-12-01

    The use of topical anesthesia instead of injection of local anesthetics for managing soft tissue lacerations in the emergency situations may be a relief for both patients and surgeons. Topical anesthesia in the form of a cream eutectic mixture of local anesthetics (EMLA®) containing 2.5% lidocaine and 2.5% prilocaine has been reported as an efficient anesthetic on skin before venipuncture anesthesia and as an alternative to injection anesthesia in some minor surgery situations. The aim of this study was to compare the pharmacokinetics of EMLA® when applied in a laceration with topical skin application in the mouse. A total of 120 Albino Laboratory-bred strain mouse (BALB-c) male mice were divided into three groups with regard to application mode of EMLA®. Group A: with laceration, 48 mice; Group B: on intact shaved skin, 48 mice; Group C: control group (24 mice) with same procedures but without application of EMLA®. Blood levels were collected at 0, 10, 20, 30, 45, 60, 75, and 90 min post-EMLA® application. Plasma sample analysis was carried out by employing liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) method, and the pharmacokinetic analysis of the mouse plasma samples was estimated by standard non-compartmental methods. The pharmacokinetic parameters of lidocaine and prilocaine were significantly altered following EMLA® application to lacerated mouse skin in contrast to intact skin. The absorption of lidocaine and prilocaine was rapid following application of EMLA® to lacerated and intact mouse skin. Maximum drug plasma concentration (C(max) ) and area under the drug plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) values of lidocaine were significantly increased by 448.6% and 161.5%, respectively, following application of EMLA to lacerated mouse skin in comparison with intact mouse skin. Similarly, prilocaine's C(max) and AUC values were also increased by 384% and 265.7%, respectively, following EMLA application to lacerated mouse skin, in

  4. Anesthetic management of maternal Mirror syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tayler, E; DeSimone, C

    2014-11-01

    Mirror syndrome (Ballantyne syndrome, triple edema, maternal hydrops, pseudotoxemia) is a rarely diagnosed condition associated with pregnancy that can be life-threatening for both the mother and fetus. There is limited literature on its pathogenesis and anesthetic management, making prevention and treatment complex. The duration of pregnancy and severity of maternal or fetal presentation often determines outcome. We describe the anesthetic considerations of a morbidly obese parturient with Mirror syndrome. PMID:25066819

  5. Colorimetric determination of Timolol concentration based on localized surface plasmon resonance of silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirjani, Amirmostafa; Bagheri, Mozhgan; Heydari, Mojgan; Hesaraki, Saeed

    2016-09-01

    In this work, a rapid and simple colorimetric method based on the surface plasmon resonance of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was developed for the detection of the drug Timolol. The method used is based on the interaction of Timolol with the surface of the as-synthesized AgNPs, which promotes aggregation of the nanoparticles. This aggregation exploits the surface plasmon resonance through the electric dipole-dipole interaction and coupling among the agglomerated particles, hence bringing forth distinctive changes in the spectra as well as the color of colloidal silver. UV-vis spectrophotometery was used to monitor the changes of the localized surface plasmon resonance of AgNPs at wavelengths of 400 and 550 nm. The developed colorimetric sensor has a wide dynamic range of 1.0 × 10-7 M-1.0 × 10-3 M for detection of Timolol with a low detection limit of 1.2 × 10-6 M. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of Timolol concentration in ophthalmic eye-drop solution with a response time lower than 40 s.

  6. Colorimetric determination of Timolol concentration based on localized surface plasmon resonance of silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirjani, Amirmostafa; Bagheri, Mozhgan; Heydari, Mojgan; Hesaraki, Saeed

    2016-09-01

    In this work, a rapid and simple colorimetric method based on the surface plasmon resonance of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was developed for the detection of the drug Timolol. The method used is based on the interaction of Timolol with the surface of the as‑synthesized AgNPs, which promotes aggregation of the nanoparticles. This aggregation exploits the surface plasmon resonance through the electric dipole–dipole interaction and coupling among the agglomerated particles, hence bringing forth distinctive changes in the spectra as well as the color of colloidal silver. UV‑vis spectrophotometery was used to monitor the changes of the localized surface plasmon resonance of AgNPs at wavelengths of 400 and 550 nm. The developed colorimetric sensor has a wide dynamic range of 1.0 × 10‑7 M–1.0 × 10‑3 M for detection of Timolol with a low detection limit of 1.2 × 10‑6 M. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of Timolol concentration in ophthalmic eye‑drop solution with a response time lower than 40 s.

  7. Colorimetric determination of Timolol concentration based on localized surface plasmon resonance of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Amirjani, Amirmostafa; Bagheri, Mozhgan; Heydari, Mojgan; Hesaraki, Saeed

    2016-09-16

    In this work, a rapid and simple colorimetric method based on the surface plasmon resonance of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was developed for the detection of the drug Timolol. The method used is based on the interaction of Timolol with the surface of the as-synthesized AgNPs, which promotes aggregation of the nanoparticles. This aggregation exploits the surface plasmon resonance through the electric dipole-dipole interaction and coupling among the agglomerated particles, hence bringing forth distinctive changes in the spectra as well as the color of colloidal silver. UV-vis spectrophotometery was used to monitor the changes of the localized surface plasmon resonance of AgNPs at wavelengths of 400 and 550 nm. The developed colorimetric sensor has a wide dynamic range of 1.0 × 10(-7) M-1.0 × 10(-3) M for detection of Timolol with a low detection limit of 1.2 × 10(-6) M. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of Timolol concentration in ophthalmic eye-drop solution with a response time lower than 40 s.

  8. Periodic, quasiperiodic, and chaotic potentials generated by electrochemical concentration cells: Local and global dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeyer, K.-P.; Münster, A. F.; Hauser, M. J. B.; Schneider, F. W.

    1994-09-01

    We extend previous work describing the passive electrical coupling of two periodic chemical states to include quasiperiodic and chaotic states. Our setup resembles an electrochemical concentration cell (a battery) whose half cells [continuous-flow stirred tank reactors (CSTRs)] each contain the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction. For a closed electrical circuit the two half cells are weakly coupled by an external variable resistance and by a constant low mass flow. This battery may produce either periodic, quasiperiodic, or chaotic alternating current depending on the dynamic BZ states chosen in the half cells. A lower fractal dimensionality is calculated from the electrical potential of a single chaotic CSTR than from the difference potential (relative potential) of the two chaotic half cell potentials. A similar situation is observed in model calculations of a chaotic spatiotemporal system (the driven Brusselator in one space dimension) where the dimensionality derived from a local time series is lower than the dimensionality of the global trajectory calculated from the Karhunen-Loeve coefficients.

  9. Colorimetric determination of Timolol concentration based on localized surface plasmon resonance of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Amirjani, Amirmostafa; Bagheri, Mozhgan; Heydari, Mojgan; Hesaraki, Saeed

    2016-09-16

    In this work, a rapid and simple colorimetric method based on the surface plasmon resonance of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was developed for the detection of the drug Timolol. The method used is based on the interaction of Timolol with the surface of the as-synthesized AgNPs, which promotes aggregation of the nanoparticles. This aggregation exploits the surface plasmon resonance through the electric dipole-dipole interaction and coupling among the agglomerated particles, hence bringing forth distinctive changes in the spectra as well as the color of colloidal silver. UV-vis spectrophotometery was used to monitor the changes of the localized surface plasmon resonance of AgNPs at wavelengths of 400 and 550 nm. The developed colorimetric sensor has a wide dynamic range of 1.0 × 10(-7) M-1.0 × 10(-3) M for detection of Timolol with a low detection limit of 1.2 × 10(-6) M. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of Timolol concentration in ophthalmic eye-drop solution with a response time lower than 40 s. PMID:27504595

  10. Inhibition of Nav1.7 channels by methyl eugenol as a mechanism underlying its antinociceptive and anesthetic actions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ze-Jun; Tabakoff, Boris; Levinson, Simon R; Heinbockel, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Methyl eugenol is a major active component extracted from the Chinese herb Asari Radix et Rhizoma, which has been used to treat toothache and other pain. Previous in vivo studies have shown that methyl eugenol has anesthetic and antinociceptive effects. The aim of this study was to determine the possible mechanism underlying its effect on nervous system disorders. Methods: The direct interaction of methyl eugenol with Na+ channels was explored and characterized using electrophysiological recordings from Nav1.7-transfected CHO cells. Results: In whole-cell patch clamp mode, methyl eugenol tonically inhibited peripheral nerve Nav1.7 currents in a concentration- and voltage-dependent manner, with an IC50 of 295 μmol/L at a −100 mV holding potential. Functionally, methyl eugenol preferentially bound to Nav1.7 channels in the inactivated and/or open state, with weaker binding to channels in the resting state. Thus, in the presence of methyl eugenol, Nav1.7 channels exhibited reduced availability for activation in a steady-state inactivation protocol, strong use-dependent inhibition, enhanced binding kinetics, and slow recovery from inactivation compared to untreated channels. An estimation of the affinity of methyl eugenol for the resting and inactivated states of the channel also demonstrated that methyl eugenol preferentially binds to inactivated channels, with a 6.4 times greater affinity compared to channels in the resting state. The failure of inactivated channels to completely recover to control levels at higher concentrations of methyl eugenol implies that the drug may drive more drug-bound, fast-inactivated channels into drug-bound, slow-inactivated channels. Conclusion: Methyl eugenol is a potential candidate as an effective local anesthetic and analgesic. The antinociceptive and anesthetic effects of methyl eugenol result from the inhibitory action of methyl eugenol on peripheral Na+ channels. PMID:26051112

  11. Evaluation of Waste Anesthetic Gas in the Postanesthesia Care Unit within the Patient Breathing Zone

    PubMed Central

    Hiller, Kenneth N.; Altamirano, Alfonso V.; Cai, Chunyan; Tran, Stephanie F.; Williams, George W.

    2015-01-01

    Potential health hazards from waste anesthetic gases (WAGs) have been a concern since the introduction of inhalational anesthetics into clinical practice. The potential to exceed recommended exposure levels (RELs) in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) exists. The aim of this pilot study was to assess sevoflurane WAG levels while accounting for factors that affect inhalational anesthetic elimination. In this pilot study, 20 adult day surgery patients were enrolled with anesthesia maintained with sevoflurane. Following extubation, exhaled WAG from the patient breathing zone was measured 8 inches from the patient's mouth in the PACU. Maximum sevoflurane WAG levels in the patient breathing zone exceeded National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) RELs for every 5-minute time interval measured during PACU Phase I. Observed WAGs in our study were explained by inhalational anesthetic pharmacokinetics. Further analysis suggests that the rate of washout of sevoflurane was dependent on the duration of anesthetic exposure. This study demonstrated that clinically relevant inhalational anesthetic concentrations result in sevoflurane WAG levels that exceed current RELs. Evaluating peak and cumulative sevoflurane WAG levels in the breathing zone of PACU Phase I and Phase II providers is warranted to quantify the extent and duration of exposure. PMID:26693222

  12. Effect of combining anesthetics in neonates on long-term cognitive function

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bradley H.; Hazarika, Obhi D.; Quitoriano, Gabe R.; Lin, Nan; Leong, Jason; Brosnan, Heather; Chan, John T.; May, Laura D. V.; Yu, Damon; Alkhamisi, Ashkan; Stratmann, Greg; Sall, Jeffrey W.

    2014-01-01

    Background With growing evidence that anesthesia exposure in infancy affects cognitive development, it is important to understand how distinct anesthetic agents and combinations can alter long-term memory. Investigations of neuronal death suggest that combining anesthetic agents increases the extent of neuronal injury. However, it is unclear how the use of simultaneously combined anesthetics affects cognitive outcome relative to the use of a single agent. Methods Postnatal day (P)7 male rats were administered either sevoflurane as a single agent or the combined delivery of sevoflurane with nitrous oxide at 1 Minimum Alveolar Concentration for 4 h. Behavior was assessed in adulthood using the forced alternating T-maze, social recognition, and context-specific object recognition tasks. Results Animals exposed to either anesthetic were unimpaired in the forced alternating T-maze test and had intact social recognition. Subjects treated with the combined anesthetic displayed a deficit, however, in the object recognition task, while those treated with sevoflurane alone were unaffected. Conclusion A combined sevoflurane and nitrous oxide anesthetic led to a distinct behavioral outcome compared with sevoflurane alone, suggesting that the simultaneous use of multiple agents may uniquely influence early neural and cognitive development and potentially impacts associative memory. PMID:25003987

  13. Variation of Local Liquid-Water Concentration About and Ellipsoid of Fineness Ratio 5 Moving in a Droplet Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsch, Robert G.; Brun, Rinaldo J.

    1954-01-01

    Trajectories of water droplets about an ellipsoid of revolution with a fineness ratio of 5 (which often approximates the shape of an aircraft fuselage or missile) were computed with the aid of a differential analyzer. Analyses of these trajectories indicate that the local concentration of liquid water at various points about an ellipsoid in flight through a droplet field varies considerably and under some conditions may be several times the free-stream concentration. Curves of the local concentration factor as a function of spatial position were obtained and are presented in terms of dimensionless parameters Re(sub 0) (free-stream Reynolds number) and K (inertia), which contain flight and atmospheric conditions. These curves show that the local concentration factor at any point is very sensitive to change in the dimensionless parameters Re(sub 0) and K. These data indicate that the expected local concentration factors should be considered when choosing the location of, or when determining antiicing heat requirements for, water- or ice-sensitive devices that protrude into the stream from an aircraft fuselage or missile. Similarly, the concentration factor should be considered when choosing the location on an aircraft of instruments that measure liquid-water content or droplet-size distribution in the atmosphere.

  14. Common Internal Allosteric Network Links Anesthetic Binding Sites in a Pentameric Ligand-Gated Ion Channel

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Thomas T.

    2016-01-01

    General anesthetics bind reversibly to ion channels, modifying their global conformational distributions, but the underlying atomic mechanisms are not completely known. We examine this issue by way of the model protein Gloeobacter violaceous ligand-gated ion channel (GLIC) using computational molecular dynamics, with a coarse-grained model to enhance sampling. We find that in flooding simulations, both propofol and a generic particle localize to the crystallographic transmembrane anesthetic binding region, and that propofol also localizes to an extracellular region shared with the crystallographic ketamine binding site. Subsequent simulations to probe these binding modes in greater detail demonstrate that ligand binding induces structural asymmetry in GLIC. Consequently, we employ residue interaction correlation analysis to describe the internal allosteric network underlying the coupling of ligand and distant effector sites necessary for conformational change. Overall, the results suggest that the same allosteric network may underlie the actions of various anesthetics, regardless of binding site. PMID:27403526

  15. Common Internal Allosteric Network Links Anesthetic Binding Sites in a Pentameric Ligand-Gated Ion Channel.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Thomas T; Mincer, Joshua S

    2016-01-01

    General anesthetics bind reversibly to ion channels, modifying their global conformational distributions, but the underlying atomic mechanisms are not completely known. We examine this issue by way of the model protein Gloeobacter violaceous ligand-gated ion channel (GLIC) using computational molecular dynamics, with a coarse-grained model to enhance sampling. We find that in flooding simulations, both propofol and a generic particle localize to the crystallographic transmembrane anesthetic binding region, and that propofol also localizes to an extracellular region shared with the crystallographic ketamine binding site. Subsequent simulations to probe these binding modes in greater detail demonstrate that ligand binding induces structural asymmetry in GLIC. Consequently, we employ residue interaction correlation analysis to describe the internal allosteric network underlying the coupling of ligand and distant effector sites necessary for conformational change. Overall, the results suggest that the same allosteric network may underlie the actions of various anesthetics, regardless of binding site. PMID:27403526

  16. Anesthetizing animals: Similar to humans yet, peculiar?

    PubMed Central

    Kurdi, Madhuri S.; Ramaswamy, Ashwini H.

    2015-01-01

    From time immemorial, animals have served as models for humans. Like humans, animals too have to undergo several types of elective and emergency surgeries. Several anesthetic techniques and drugs used in humans are also used in animals. However, unlike humans, the animal kingdom includes a wide variety of species, breeds, and sizes. Different species have variable pharmacological responses, anatomy, temperament, behavior, and lifestyles. The anesthetic techniques and drugs have to suit different species and breeds. Nevertheless, there are several drugs and many peculiar anesthetic techniques used in animals but not in human beings. Keeping this in mind, literature was hand searched and electronically searched using the words “veterinary anesthesia,” “anesthetic drugs and techniques in animals” using Google search engine. The interesting information so collected is presented in this article which highlights some challenging and amazing aspects of anesthetizing animals including the preanesthetic assessment, preparation, premedication, monitoring, induction of general anesthesia, intubation, equipment, regional blocks, neuraxial block, and perioperative complications. PMID:26712963

  17. Class I antiarrhythmic drugs produced a spinal anesthetic effect in rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuo-Lun; Chu, Chin-Chen; Cheng, Kuang-I; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Yeh, Mou-Yung

    2011-11-14

    Class I antiarrhythmic drugs are commonly used to treat cardiac rhythm disorders. Some of those drugs were recently reported to have both a cutaneous analgesic and a neural blocking effect. We evaluated whether these drugs have a spinal anesthetic effect. Three Class I antiarrhythmic drugs (class IA: quinidine, IB: mexiletine, and IC: flecainide) were tested. After they had been intrathecally injected in rats, the potencies and durations of these drugs on spinal anesthesia were recorded. Bupivacaine, a commonly used local anesthetic, and 5% dextrose solution were used as controls. Bupivacaine, flecainide, quinidine, and mexiletine produced a dose-related spinal blockade of motor function, proprioception, and nociception, but dextrose solution produced no spinal anesthetic effect. The descending order of potency was bupivacaine>flecainide>quinidine>mexiletine (p<0.05 for all differences). On an equipotent basis, flecainide, quinidine, and bupivacaine produced similar durations of action, all of which were significantly longer than that of mexiletine (p<0.05). In conclusion, intrathecal injections of Class I antiarrhythmic drugs produced a dose-related spinal anesthetic effect. These drugs may be potential candidates for developing new local anesthetics. PMID:22027179

  18. Prediction of local concentration statistics in variably saturated soils: Influence of observation scale and comparison with field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Wendy; Destouni, Georgia; Demmy, George; Foussereau, Xavier

    1998-07-01

    The methodology developed in Destouni and Graham [Destouni, G., Graham, W.D., 1997. The influence of observation method on local concentration statistics in the subsurface. Water Resour. Res. 33 (4) 663-676.] for predicting locally measured concentration statistics for solute transport in heterogeneous porous media under saturated flow conditions is applied to the prediction of conservative nonreactive solute transport in the vadose zone where observations are obtained by soil coring. Exact analytical solutions are developed for both the mean and variance of solute concentrations measured in discrete soil cores using a simplified physical model for vadose-zone flow and solute transport. Theoretical results show that while the ensemble mean concentration is relatively insensitive to the length-scale of the measurement, predictions of the concentration variance are significantly impacted by the sampling interval. Results also show that accounting for vertical heterogeneity in the soil profile results in significantly less spreading in the mean and variance of the measured solute breakthrough curves, indicating that it is important to account for vertical heterogeneity even for relatively small travel distances. Model predictions for both the mean and variance of locally measured solute concentration, based on independently estimated model parameters, agree well with data from a field tracer test conducted in Manatee County, Florida.

  19. Methemoglobinemia from topically applied anesthetic spray.

    PubMed

    Dinneen, S F; Mohr, D N; Fairbanks, V F

    1994-09-01

    Topically applied anesthetic spray is commonly used as part of premedication for general anesthesia and for endoscopic procedures; it is rarely associated with side effects. In this report, we describe two cases of toxic methemoglobinemia that resulted from topically applied anesthetic spray used before endoscopy. In both cases, standard doses were used; however, methemoglobin levels of 45% and 38% developed within 1 hour of the procedure. Both patients had normal levels of erythrocyte methemoglobin reductase, an indication that this rare but potentially fatal side effect can occur in persons who have no predisposing factors. Because toxic methemoglobinemia is easily treated, our report emphasizes the need to recognize this problem when topically applied anesthetic sprays are used.

  20. Anesthetic Techniques and Cancer Recurrence after Surgery

    PubMed Central

    D'Arrigo, Maria G.; Triolo, Stefania; Mondello, Stefania; La Torre, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    Many of the most common anesthetics are used in surgical oncology, yet effects on cancer cells are still not known. Anesthesia technique could differentially affect cancer recurrence in oncologic patients undergoing surgery, due to immunosuppression, stimulation of angiogenesis, and dissemination of residual cancer cells. Data support the use of intravenous anesthetics, such as propofol anesthesia, thanks to antitumoral protective effects inhibiting cyclooxygenase 2 and prostaglandins E2 in cancer cells, and stimulation of immunity response; a restriction in the use of volatile anesthetics; restriction in the use of opioids as they suppress humoral and cellular immunity, and their chronic use favors angiogenesis and development of metastases; use of locoregional anesthesia compared with general anesthesia, as locoregional appears to reduce cancer recurrence after surgery. However, these findings must be interpreted cautiously as there is no evidence that simple changes in the practice of anesthesia can have a positive impact on postsurgical survival of cancer patients. PMID:24683330

  1. Anesthetic effects of a combination of medetomidine, midazolam and butorphanol on the production of offspring in Japanese field vole, Microtus montebelli

    PubMed Central

    KAGEYAMA, Atsuko; TOHEI, Atsushi; USHIJIMA, Hitoshi; OKADA, Konosuke

    2016-01-01

    Pentobarbital sodium (Somnopentyl) can induce surgical anesthesia with a strong hypnotic effect that causes loss of consciousness. Animals have been known to die during experimental surgery under anesthesia with Somnopentyl, causing it to be declared inadequate as a general anesthetic for single treatment. An anesthetic combination of 0.3 mg/kg medetomidine, 4.0 mg/kg midazolam and 5.0 mg/kg butorphanol (M/M/B:0.3/4/5) was reported to induce anesthesia for a duration of around 40 min in ICR mice; similar anesthetic effects were reported in both male and female BALB/c and C57BL/6J strains of mice. However, the anesthetic effects of this combination in Japanese field vole, Microtus montebelli, remain to be evaluated. In the present study, we assessed the effects of Somnopentyl and different concentrations of anesthetic combination (M/M/B:0.3/4/5, 0.23/3/3.75 or 0.15/2/2.5) in Japanese field voles, by means of anesthetic scores. We also examined effect of these anesthetics on production of offspring. Death of the animals was observed only with Somnopentyl. The anesthetic score of Somnopentyl was lower than those of the other anesthetics, although there were no significant differences in duration, body weight and frequency of respiratory among the evaluated anesthetics. Abortion rate with Somnopentyl was significantly higher than that with the M/M/B:0.23/3/3.75 combination, although there was no significant difference in the number of offspring between two. In conclusion, results of this study provide basic information for achieving appropriate anesthetic concentrations in addition to indicating a new, safe and effective surgical anesthetic for Japanese field voles. PMID:27238159

  2. Anesthetic effects of a combination of medetomidine, midazolam and butorphanol on the production of offspring in Japanese field vole, Microtus montebelli.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Atsuko; Tohei, Atsushi; Ushijima, Hitoshi; Okada, Konosuke

    2016-09-01

    Pentobarbital sodium (Somnopentyl) can induce surgical anesthesia with a strong hypnotic effect that causes loss of consciousness. Animals have been known to die during experimental surgery under anesthesia with Somnopentyl, causing it to be declared inadequate as a general anesthetic for single treatment. An anesthetic combination of 0.3 mg/kg medetomidine, 4.0 mg/kg midazolam and 5.0 mg/kg butorphanol (M/M/B:0.3/4/5) was reported to induce anesthesia for a duration of around 40 min in ICR mice; similar anesthetic effects were reported in both male and female BALB/c and C57BL/6J strains of mice. However, the anesthetic effects of this combination in Japanese field vole, Microtus montebelli, remain to be evaluated. In the present study, we assessed the effects of Somnopentyl and different concentrations of anesthetic combination (M/M/B:0.3/4/5, 0.23/3/3.75 or 0.15/2/2.5) in Japanese field voles, by means of anesthetic scores. We also examined effect of these anesthetics on production of offspring. Death of the animals was observed only with Somnopentyl. The anesthetic score of Somnopentyl was lower than those of the other anesthetics, although there were no significant differences in duration, body weight and frequency of respiratory among the evaluated anesthetics. Abortion rate with Somnopentyl was significantly higher than that with the M/M/B:0.23/3/3.75 combination, although there was no significant difference in the number of offspring between two. In conclusion, results of this study provide basic information for achieving appropriate anesthetic concentrations in addition to indicating a new, safe and effective surgical anesthetic for Japanese field voles. PMID:27238159

  3. Discrete change in volatile anesthetic sensitivity in mice with inactivated tandem pore potassium channel TRESK

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Yun Jeong; Zhang, Jianan; Au, Paul; Sabbadini, Marta; Xie, Guo-Xi; Yost, C. Spencer

    2010-01-01

    Backgrcound We investigated the role of tandem pore domain potassium channel (K2P) TRESK in neurobehavioral function and volatile anesthetic sensitivity in genetically modified mice. Methods Exon III of the mouse TRESK gene locus was deleted by homologous recombination using a targeting vector. The genotype of bred mice (wildtype, knockout or heterozygote) was determined using the polymerase chain reaction. Morphologic and behavioral evaluations of TRESK knockout mice were compared to wildtype littermates. Sensitivity of bred mice to isoflurane, halothane, sevoflurane and desflurane were studied by determining the minimum alveolar concentration preventing movement to tail clamping in 50% of each genotype. Results TRESK knockout mice had normal development and behavior except for decreased number of inactive periods and increased thermal pain sensitivity (20% decrease in latency with hot plate test). TRESK knockout mice showed a statistically significant 8% increase in isoflurane minimum alveolar concentration compared to wildtype littermates; sensitivity to other volatile anesthetics was not significantly different. Spontaneous mortality of TRESK knockout mice following initial anesthesia testing was nearly threefold higher than that of wildtype littermates. Conclusions TRESK alone is not critical for baseline central nervous system function but may contribute to the action of volatile anesthetics. The inhomogenous change in anesthetic sensitivity corroborates findings in other K2P knockout mice and supports the idea that the mechanism of volatile anesthetic action involves multiple targets. Although it was not shown in this study, a compensatory effect by other K2P channels may also contribute to these observations. PMID:21042202

  4. [Anesthetic maintenance during circular face lifting].

    PubMed

    Parshin, V I; Pastukhova, N K

    2010-01-01

    The paper deals with the specific features of anesthetic maintenance (ketamine, diprivan, dormicum, perfalgan, promedol) during circular face lifting without artificial ventilation. All intravenous anesthesia procedures have yielded good results. Narcotic analgesics may be removed from the anesthetic maintenance scheme, ruling out the necessity of their licensing, storing, and recording. The use of perfalgan causes no hallucinogenic reactions and offers the optimum level of anesthesia. During face lifting, 2.3 +/- 0.6-hour anesthesia with spontaneous breathing is possible, safe, and warranted. PMID:20524331

  5. Pheochromocytoma resection: Current concepts in anesthetic management

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishna, Harish

    2015-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma represents very significant challenges to the anesthetist, especially when undiagnosed. These chromaffin tissue tumors are not uncommon in anesthetic practice and have varied manifestations. The perioperative management of these tumors has improved remarkably over the years, in conjunction with the evolution of surgical techniques (open laparotomy to laparoscopic techniques and now to robotic approaches in the present day). This review attempts to comprehensively address the intraoperative and postoperative issues in the management of these challenging tumors with an emphasis on hemodynamic monitoring and anesthetic technique. PMID:26330708

  6. Anesthetic considerations on adrenal gland surgery.

    PubMed

    Domi, Rudin; Sula, Hektor; Kaci, Myzafer; Paparisto, Sokol; Bodeci, Artan; Xhemali, Astrit

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal gland surgery needs a multidisciplinary team including endocrinologist, radiologist, anesthesiologist, and surgeon. The indications for adrenal gland surgery include hormonal secreting and non-hormonal secreting tumors. Adrenal hormonal secreting tumors present to the anesthesiologist unique challenges requiring good preoperative evaluation, perioperative hemodynamic control, corrections of all electrolytes and metabolic abnormalities, a detailed and careful anesthetic strategy, overall knowledge about the specific diseases, control and maintaining of postoperative adrenal function, and finally a good collaboration with other involved colleagues. This review will focus on the endocrine issues, as well as on the above-mentioned aspects of anesthetic management during hormone secreting adrenal gland tumor resection. PMID:25368694

  7. Anesthetic Considerations on Adrenal Gland Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Domi, Rudin; Sula, Hektor; Kaci, Myzafer; Paparisto, Sokol; Bodeci, Artan; Xhemali, Astrit

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal gland surgery needs a multidisciplinary team including endocrinologist, radiologist, anesthesiologist, and surgeon. The indications for adrenal gland surgery include hormonal secreting and non-hormonal secreting tumors. Adrenal hormonal secreting tumors present to the anesthesiologist unique challenges requiring good preoperative evaluation, perioperative hemodynamic control, corrections of all electrolytes and metabolic abnormalities, a detailed and careful anesthetic strategy, overall knowledge about the specific diseases, control and maintaining of postoperative adrenal function, and finally a good collaboration with other involved colleagues. This review will focus on the endocrine issues, as well as on the above-mentioned aspects of anesthetic management during hormone secreting adrenal gland tumor resection. PMID:25368694

  8. Glutamatergic Neurotransmission Links Sensitivity to Volatile Anesthetics with Mitochondrial Function.

    PubMed

    Zimin, Pavel I; Woods, Christian B; Quintana, Albert; Ramirez, Jan-Marino; Morgan, Philip G; Sedensky, Margaret M

    2016-08-22

    An enigma of modern medicine has persisted for over 150 years. The mechanisms by which volatile anesthetics (VAs) produce their effects (loss of consciousness, analgesia, amnesia, and immobility) remain an unsolved mystery. Many attractive putative molecular targets have failed to produce a significant effect when genetically tested in whole-animal models [1-3]. However, mitochondrial defects increase VA sensitivity in diverse organisms from nematodes to humans [4-6]. Ndufs4 knockout (KO) mice lack a subunit of mitochondrial complex I and are strikingly hypersensitive to VAs yet resistant to the intravenous anesthetic ketamine [7]. The change in VA sensitivity is the largest reported for a mammal. Limiting NDUFS4 loss to a subset of glutamatergic neurons recapitulates the VA hypersensitivity of Ndufs4(KO) mice, while loss in GABAergic or cholinergic neurons does not. Baseline electrophysiologic function of CA1 pyramidal neurons does not differ between Ndufs4(KO) and control mice. Isoflurane concentrations that anesthetize only Ndufs4(KO) mice (0.6%) decreased the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) only in Ndufs4(KO) CA1 neurons, while concentrations effective in control mice (1.2%) decreased sEPSC frequencies in both control and Ndufs4(KO) CA1 pyramidal cells. Spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) were not differentially affected between genotypes. The effects of isoflurane were similar on evoked field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) and paired pulse facilitation (PPF) in KO and control hippocampal slices. We propose that CA1 presynaptic excitatory neurotransmission is hypersensitive to isoflurane in Ndufs4(KO) mice due to the inhibition of pre-existing reduced complex I function, reaching a critical reduction that can no longer meet metabolic demands. PMID:27498564

  9. The environmental impact of the Glostavent® anesthetic machine.

    PubMed

    Eltringham, Roger J; Neighbour, Robert C

    2015-06-01

    Because anesthetic machines have become more complex and more expensive, they have become less suitable for use in the many isolated hospitals in the poorest countries in the world. In these situations, they are frequently unable to function at all because of interruptions in the supply of oxygen or electricity and the absence of skilled technicians for maintenance and servicing. Despite these disadvantages, these machines are still delivered in large numbers, thereby expending precious resources without any benefit to patients. The Glostavent was introduced primarily to enable an anesthetic service to be delivered in these difficult circumstances. It is smaller and less complex than standard anesthetic machines and much less expensive to produce. It combines a drawover anesthetic system with an oxygen concentrator and a gas-driven ventilator. It greatly reduces the need for the purchase and transport of cylinders of compressed gases, reduces the impact on the environment, and enables considerable savings. Cylinder oxygen is expensive to produce and difficult to transport over long distances on poor roads. Consequently, the supply may run out. However, when using the Glostavent, oxygen is normally produced at a fraction of the cost of cylinders by the oxygen concentrator, which is an integral part of the Glostavent. This enables great savings in the purchase and transport cost of oxygen cylinders. If the electricity fails and the oxygen concentrator ceases to function, oxygen from a reserve cylinder automatically provides the pressure to drive the ventilator and oxygen for the breathing circuit. Consequently, economy is achieved because the ventilator has been designed to minimize the amount of driving gas required to one-seventh of the patient's tidal volume. Additional economies are achieved by completely eliminating spillage of oxygen from the breathing system and by recycling the driving gas into the breathing system to increase the Fraction of Inspired Oxygen

  10. Awake vs. anesthetized: layer-specific sensory processing in visual cortex and functional connectivity between cortical areas.

    PubMed

    Sellers, Kristin K; Bennett, Davis V; Hutt, Axel; Williams, James H; Fröhlich, Flavio

    2015-06-01

    During general anesthesia, global brain activity and behavioral state are profoundly altered. Yet it remains mostly unknown how anesthetics alter sensory processing across cortical layers and modulate functional cortico-cortical connectivity. To address this gap in knowledge of the micro- and mesoscale effects of anesthetics on sensory processing in the cortical microcircuit, we recorded multiunit activity and local field potential in awake and anesthetized ferrets (Mustela putoris furo) during sensory stimulation. To understand how anesthetics alter sensory processing in a primary sensory area and the representation of sensory input in higher-order association areas, we studied the local sensory responses and long-range functional connectivity of primary visual cortex (V1) and prefrontal cortex (PFC). Isoflurane combined with xylazine provided general anesthesia for all anesthetized recordings. We found that anesthetics altered the duration of sensory-evoked responses, disrupted the response dynamics across cortical layers, suppressed both multimodal interactions in V1 and sensory responses in PFC, and reduced functional cortico-cortical connectivity between V1 and PFC. Together, the present findings demonstrate altered sensory responses and impaired functional network connectivity during anesthesia at the level of multiunit activity and local field potential across cortical layers.

  11. Awake vs. anesthetized: layer-specific sensory processing in visual cortex and functional connectivity between cortical areas

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, Kristin K.; Bennett, Davis V.; Hutt, Axel; Williams, James H.

    2015-01-01

    During general anesthesia, global brain activity and behavioral state are profoundly altered. Yet it remains mostly unknown how anesthetics alter sensory processing across cortical layers and modulate functional cortico-cortical connectivity. To address this gap in knowledge of the micro- and mesoscale effects of anesthetics on sensory processing in the cortical microcircuit, we recorded multiunit activity and local field potential in awake and anesthetized ferrets (Mustela putoris furo) during sensory stimulation. To understand how anesthetics alter sensory processing in a primary sensory area and the representation of sensory input in higher-order association areas, we studied the local sensory responses and long-range functional connectivity of primary visual cortex (V1) and prefrontal cortex (PFC). Isoflurane combined with xylazine provided general anesthesia for all anesthetized recordings. We found that anesthetics altered the duration of sensory-evoked responses, disrupted the response dynamics across cortical layers, suppressed both multimodal interactions in V1 and sensory responses in PFC, and reduced functional cortico-cortical connectivity between V1 and PFC. Together, the present findings demonstrate altered sensory responses and impaired functional network connectivity during anesthesia at the level of multiunit activity and local field potential across cortical layers. PMID:25833839

  12. Evaluation of prilocaine for the reduction of pain associated with transmucosal anesthetic administration.

    PubMed Central

    Kramp, L. F.; Eleazer, P. D.; Scheetz, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    This investigation evaluated the use and efficacy of prilocaine HCl (4% plain Citanest) for minimizing pain associated with the intraoral administration of local anesthesia. Clinical anecdotes support the hypothesis that prilocaine without a vasoconstrictor reduces pain during injection. To determine relative injection discomfort, use of 4% plain prilocaine was compared with use of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine and 2% mepivacaine with 1:20,000 levonordefrin. Prior to routine endodontic procedures, 150 adult patients received 0.3 to 1.8 mL of local anesthetic via the same gauge needle without the use of a topical local anesthetic. Injection methods included buccal infiltration, labial infiltration, palatal infiltration, and inferior alveolar nerve block. Following each injection, patients were asked to describe the level of discomfort by scoring on a visual analog scale of 1 to 10, where 1 = painless and 10 = severe pain. Analyses via 2-way analysis of variance revealed no interaction between anesthetic and site of injection. However, there were statistically significant differences among the injection sites. Post hoc analysis revealed that prilocaine was associated with significantly less pain perception when compared to mepivacaine and lidocaine. These results suggest that differences in initial pain perception during transmucosal injection may be a function of the local anesthetic use, and prilocaine can produce less discomfort than the others tested. Images Figure 1 PMID:10853565

  13. A methodology suitable for TEM local measurements of carbon concentration in retained austenite

    SciTech Connect

    Kammouni, A.; Saikaly, W. Dumont, M.; Marteau, C.; Bano, X.; Charai, A.

    2008-09-15

    Carbon concentration in retained austenite grains is of great importance determining the mechanical properties of hot-rolled TRansformation Induced Plasticity steels. Among the different techniques available to measure such concentrations, Kikuchi lines obtained in Transmission Electron Microscopy provide a relatively easy and accurate method. The major problem however is to be able to locate an austenitic grain in the observed Transmission Electron Microscopy thin foil. Focused Ion Beam in combination with Scanning Electron Microscopy was used to successfully prepare a thin foil for Transmission Electron Microscopy and carbon concentration measurements from a 700 nm retained austenite grain.

  14. General and Localized corrosion of Austenitic and Borated Stainless Steels in Simulated Concentrated Ground Waters

    SciTech Connect

    D. Fix; J. Estill; L. Wong; R. Rebak

    2004-05-28

    Boron containing stainless steels are used in the nuclear industry for applications such as spent fuel storage, control rods and shielding. It was of interest to compare the corrosion resistance of three borated stainless steels with standard austenitic alloy materials such as type 304 and 316 stainless steels. Tests were conducted in three simulated concentrated ground waters at 90 C. Results show that the borated stainless were less resistant to corrosion than the witness austenitic materials. An acidic concentrated ground water was more aggressive than an alkaline concentrated ground water.

  15. General and Localized Corrosion of Austenitic And Borated Stainless Steels in Simulated Concentrated Ground Waters

    SciTech Connect

    Estill, J C; Rebak, R B; Fix, D V; Wong, L L

    2004-03-11

    Boron containing stainless steels are used in the nuclear industry for applications such as spent fuel storage, control rods and shielding. It was of interest to compare the corrosion resistance of three borated stainless steels with standard austenitic alloy materials such as type 304 and 316 stainless steels. Tests were conducted in three simulated concentrated ground waters at 90 C. Results show that the borated stainless were less resistant to corrosion than the witness austenitic materials. An acidic concentrated ground water was more aggressive than an alkaline concentrated ground water.

  16. Emulsified halothane produces long-term epidural anesthetic effect: a study in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Li, Fengshan; Liao, Daqing; Liu, Jin; Xiao, Lin; Guo, Jiao; Yi, Mingliang; Zhou, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that volatile anesthetics could produce local anesthesia. Emulsified isoflurane at 8% has been reported to produce epidural anesthetic effect in rabbits. This study was designed to investigate the long-term epidural anesthetic effect of emulsified halothane in rabbits. In this study, 40 healthy adult rabbits (weighting 2.0-2.5 kg) with an epidural catheter were randomly divided into 4 groups (n=10/group), receiving epidural administration of 1% lidocaine (lido group), 8% emulsified isoflurane 1ml (8% E-iso group), 8% emulsified halothane (8% E-Halo group) and 12% emulsified halothane (12% E-Halo group). After administration, sensory and motor functions as well as consciousness state were assessed until 60 minutes after sensory and motor function returned to its baseline or at least for 180 min. After epidural anesthesia, all the rabbits were continuously observed for 7 days and sacrificed for pathological evaluations. As a result, all the four study solutions produced typical epidural anesthesia. Onset times of sensory and motor function blockade were similar among the four groups (P>0.05). Duration of sensory blockade in 12% E-Halo group (83±13 min) was significantly longer than other groups: 51±12 min in 8% E-Halo group (P<0.01), 57±8 min in 8% E-iso group (P<0.01) and 47±9 min in lido group (P<0.01). Duration of sensory blockade in 8% E-iso group is longer than lido group (P<0.05). Duration of motor blockade in 12% E-Halo group (81±12 min) was also significantly longer than other groups: 40±8 min in 8% E-Halo group (P<0.01), 37±3 min in 8% E-iso group (P<0.01), 37±6 min in lido group (P<0.01). Normal consciousness was found in the rabbits from 8% E-Halo, 8% E-iso and lido groups while there were four rabbits in 12% E-Halo group (4/10) showed a light sedation. For all the rabbits, no pathological injury was found. The present study demonstrates that emulsified halothane produces reversible concentration

  17. Different effects of anesthetics on spontaneous leukocyte rolling in rat skin.

    PubMed

    Janssen, G H; Tangelder, G J; oude Egbrink, M G; Reneman, R S

    1997-01-01

    In immunological reactions, leukocytes need to travel from the intravascular space through the vessel wall into the surrounding tissue. The first step in this process is leukocyte rolling, which has often been studied in anesthetized animals. In this study, we investigated the effect of pentobarbital, Hypnorm and both components of the latter, fentanyl and fluanisone, on this primary leukocyte-endothelial cell interaction. Using intravital brightfield video microscopy, observations were made in postcapillary venules in the intact skin of the nailfold of trained conscious Lewis rats. Subsequently, the animals were anesthetized and observations were made in vivo. Leukocyte rolling was significantly elevated after injection of Hypnorm or fentanyl, while pentobarbital and fluanisone had no effect. None of the anesthetics affected leukocyte rolling velocity. Blood flow was significantly increased only after injection of Hypnorm and fluanisone. No correlation existed between the relative changes in leukocyte rolling and concomitant changes in blood flow. The results show that the level of leukocyte rolling can be affected by anesthetics. These changes are probably not mediated by changes in local hemodynamics. Pentobarbital anesthesia does not influence leukocyte rolling. Therefore, pentobarbital is a suitable anesthetic for observation of leukocyte rolling in skin. Hypnorm significantly increases the level of rolling in skin venules. This effect seems to be caused mainly by fentanyl.

  18. α2-Adrenergic Stimulation of the Ventrolateral Preoptic Nucleus Destabilizes the Anesthetic State

    PubMed Central

    McCarren, Hilary S.; Chalifoux, Michael R.; Han, Bo; Moore, Jason T.; Meng, Qing Cheng; Baron-Hionis, Nina; Sedigh-Sarvestani, Madineh; Contreras, Diego; Beck, Sheryl G.

    2014-01-01

    The sleep-promoting ventrolateral preoptic nucleus (VLPO) shares reciprocal inhibitory inputs with wake–active neuronal nuclei, including the locus ceruleus. Electrophysiologically, sleep-promoting neurons in the VLPO are directly depolarized by the general anesthetic isoflurane and hyperpolarized by norepinephrine, a wake-promoting neurotransmitter. However, the integration of these competing influences on the VLPO, a sleep- and anesthetic-active structure, has yet to be evaluated in either brain slices in vitro or the intact organism. Single-cell multiplex RT-PCR conducted on both isoflurane-activated, putative sleep-promoting VLPO neurons and neighboring, state-indifferent VLPO neurons in mouse brain slices revealed widespread expression of α2A-, α2B- and α2C-adrenergic receptors in both populations. Indeed, both norepinephrine and the highly selective α2 agonist dexmedetomidine each reversed the VLPO depolarization induced by isoflurane in slices in vitro. When microinjected directly into the VLPO of a mouse lightly anesthetized with isoflurane, dexmedetomidine increased behavioral arousal and reduced the depressant effects of isoflurane on barrel cortex somatosensory-evoked potentials but failed to elicit spectral changes in spontaneous EEG. Based on these observations, we conclude that local modulation of α-adrenergic activity in the VLPO destabilizes, but does not fully antagonize, the anesthetic state, thus priming the brain for anesthetic emergence. PMID:25471576

  19. Comparative cardiovascular effects of four fishery anesthetics in spinally transected rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fredricks, K.T.; Gingerich, W.H.; Fater, D.C.

    1993-01-01

    1. We compared the effects of four anesthetics on heart rate, dorsal and ventral aortic blood pressure, and electrocardiograms of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). 1. Exposure to the local anesthetics tricaine methanesulfonate (MS-222) and benzocaine hydrochloride (BZH) produced minimal cardiovascular alterations. Mean dorsal aortic pressure (DAP) decreased during exposure to MS-222, and mean DAP and mean ventral aortic pressure (VAP) increased 15% during recovery from BZH. 3. Exposure to the general anesthetic 2-phenoxyethanol (2-PE) or the hypnotic agent etomidate (ET) dramatically decreased heart rate and blood pressures and altered EKG patterns. 4. During recovery, VAP and DAP increased above baseline for an extended period. Heart rate and EKG patterns rapidly returned to normal.

  20. Anesthetic technique for inferior alveolar nerve block: a new approach

    PubMed Central

    PALTI, Dafna Geller; de ALMEIDA, Cristiane Machado; RODRIGUES, Antonio de Castro; ANDREO, Jesus Carlos; LIMA, José Eduardo Oliveira

    2011-01-01

    Background Effective pain control in Dentistry may be achieved by local anesthetic techniques. The success of the anesthetic technique in mandibular structures depends on the proximity of the needle tip to the mandibular foramen at the moment of anesthetic injection into the pterygomandibular region. Two techniques are available to reach the inferior alveolar nerve where it enters the mandibular canal, namely indirect and direct; these techniques differ in the number of movements required. Data demonstrate that the indirect technique is considered ineffective in 15% of cases and the direct technique in 1329% of cases. Objective Objective: The aim of this study was to describe an alternative technique for inferior alveolar nerve block using several anatomical points for reference, simplifying the procedure and enabling greater success and a more rapid learning curve. Materials and Methods A total of 193 mandibles (146 with permanent dentition and 47 with primary dentition) from dry skulls were used to establish a relationship between the teeth and the mandibular foramen. By using two wires, the first passing through the mesiobuccal groove and middle point of the mesial slope of the distolingual cusp of the primary second molar or permanent first molar (right side), and the second following the oclusal plane (left side), a line can be achieved whose projection coincides with the left mandibular foramen. Results The obtained data showed correlation in 82.88% of cases using the permanent first molar, and in 93.62% of cases using the primary second molar. Conclusion This method is potentially effective for inferior alveolar nerve block, especially in Pediatric Dentistry. PMID:21437463

  1. Test monkeys anesthetized by routine procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Test monkeys are safely anesthetized for five minutes by confining them for less than six minutes in enclosures containing a controlled volume of ether. Thus the monkeys can be properly and safely positioned on test couches and fitted with electrodes or other devices prior to physiological tests.

  2. Anesthetic considerations in intracranial aneurysm surgery.

    PubMed

    Steen, Stephen N; Johnson, Calvin; Lumb, Phillip D; Zelman, Vladimer; Mok, Martin S

    2002-03-01

    Rupture of an intracranial aneurysm generally has a poor outcome, though perioperative treatments have improved. At the present time, the important factors in the management of intracranial aneurysm surgery appear to be the maintenance of adequate cerebral perfusion pressure and the avoidance of hyperglycemia. Relevant features of the anesthetic management of this surgery are discussed.

  3. Characteristics of total gaseous mercury (TGM) concentrations in an industrial complex in South Korea: impacts from local sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Yong-Seok; Jeong, Seung-Pyo; Holsen, Thomas M.; Han, Young-Ji; Choi, Eunhwa; Park, Eun Ha; Kim, Tae Young; Eum, Hee-Sang; Park, Dae Gun; Kim, Eunhye; Kim, Soontae; Kim, Jeong-Hun; Choi, Jaewon; Yi, Seung-Muk

    2016-08-01

    Total gaseous mercury (TGM) concentrations were measured every 5 min in Pohang, Gyeongsangbuk-do, Korea, during summer (17-23 August 2012), fall (9-17 October 2012), winter (22-29 January 2013), and spring (26 March-3 April 2013) to (1) characterize the hourly and seasonal variations of atmospheric TGM concentrations; (2) identify the relationships between TGM and co-pollutants; and (3) identify likely source directions and locations of TGM using the conditional probability function (CPF), conditional bivariate probability function (CBPF) and total potential source contribution function (TPSCF). The TGM concentration was statistically significantly highest in fall (6.7 ± 6.4 ng m-3), followed by spring (4.8 ± 4.0 ng m-3), winter (4.5 ± 3.2 ng m-3) and summer (3.8 ± 3.9 ng m-3). There was a weak but statistically significant negative correlation between the TGM concentration and ambient air temperature (r = -0.08, p<0.05). Although the daytime temperature (14.7 ± 10.0 °C) was statistically significantly higher than that in the nighttime (13.0 ± 9.8 °C) (p<0.05), the daytime TGM concentration (5.3 ± 4.7 ng m-3) was statistically significantly higher than that in the nighttime (4.7 ± 4.7 ng m-3) (p<0.01), possibly due to local emissions related to industrial activities and activation of local surface emission sources. The observed ΔTGM / ΔCO was significantly lower than that of Asian long-range transport, but similar to that of local sources in Korea and in US industrial events, suggesting that local sources are more important than those of long-range transport. CPF, CBPF and TPSCF indicated that the main sources of TGM were iron and manufacturing facilities, the hazardous waste incinerators and the coastal areas.

  4. Optimized circulation and weather type classifications relating large-scale atmospheric conditions to local PM10 concentrations in Bavaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weitnauer, C.; Beck, C.; Jacobeit, J.

    2013-12-01

    In the last decades the critical increase of the emission of air pollutants like nitrogen dioxide, sulfur oxides and particulate matter especially in urban areas has become a problem for the environment as well as human health. Several studies confirm a risk of high concentration episodes of particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter < 10 μm (PM10) for the respiratory tract or cardiovascular diseases. Furthermore it is known that local meteorological and large scale atmospheric conditions are important influencing factors on local PM10 concentrations. With climate changing rapidly, these connections need to be better understood in order to provide estimates of climate change related consequences for air quality management purposes. For quantifying the link between large-scale atmospheric conditions and local PM10 concentrations circulation- and weather type classifications are used in a number of studies by using different statistical approaches. Thus far only few systematic attempts have been made to modify consisting or to develop new weather- and circulation type classifications in order to improve their ability to resolve local PM10 concentrations. In this contribution existing weather- and circulation type classifications, performed on daily 2.5 x 2.5 gridded parameters of the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data set, are optimized with regard to their discriminative power for local PM10 concentrations at 49 Bavarian measurement sites for the period 1980 to 2011. Most of the PM10 stations are situated in urban areas covering urban background, traffic and industry related pollution regimes. The range of regimes is extended by a few rural background stations. To characterize the correspondence between the PM10 measurements of the different stations by spatial patterns, a regionalization by an s-mode principal component analysis is realized on the high-pass filtered data. The optimization of the circulation- and weather types is implemented using two representative

  5. Local Media Concentration: Ad Hoc Challenges to Media Cross-Owners After "FCC v. NCCB."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Firestone, Charles M.

    This paper explores some of the implications of cross-ownership of newspapers and other media in a single market and the role of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), the Department of Justice, and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) in enforcing national policy favoring a deconcentration of local mass media. It describes the history of FCC…

  6. 21 CFR 868.5550 - Anesthetic gas mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Anesthetic gas mask. 868.5550 Section 868.5550...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5550 Anesthetic gas mask. (a) Identification. An anesthetic gas mask is a device, usually made of conductive rubber, that is positioned over...

  7. 21 CFR 868.5550 - Anesthetic gas mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthetic gas mask. 868.5550 Section 868.5550...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5550 Anesthetic gas mask. (a) Identification. An anesthetic gas mask is a device, usually made of conductive rubber, that is positioned over...

  8. 21 CFR 868.5550 - Anesthetic gas mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Anesthetic gas mask. 868.5550 Section 868.5550...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5550 Anesthetic gas mask. (a) Identification. An anesthetic gas mask is a device, usually made of conductive rubber, that is positioned over...

  9. 21 CFR 868.6100 - Anesthetic cabinet, table, or tray.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Anesthetic cabinet, table, or tray. 868.6100... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6100 Anesthetic cabinet, table, or tray. (a) Identification. An anesthetic cabinet, table, or tray is a device intended to...

  10. 46 CFR 147.105 - Anesthetics, drugs, and medicines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Anesthetics, drugs, and medicines. 147.105 Section 147... SHIPS' STORES Stowage and Other Special Requirements for Particular Materials § 147.105 Anesthetics, drugs, and medicines. Anesthetics, drugs, and medicines must be stowed and dispensed in accordance...

  11. 21 CFR 868.6100 - Anesthetic cabinet, table, or tray.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthetic cabinet, table, or tray. 868.6100... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6100 Anesthetic cabinet, table, or tray. (a) Identification. An anesthetic cabinet, table, or tray is a device intended to...

  12. 46 CFR 111.105-37 - Flammable anesthetics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Hazardous Locations § 111.105-37 Flammable anesthetics. Each electric installation where a flammable anesthetic is used or stored must meet NFPA 99 (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flammable anesthetics. 111.105-37 Section...

  13. 46 CFR 147.105 - Anesthetics, drugs, and medicines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Anesthetics, drugs, and medicines. 147.105 Section 147... SHIPS' STORES Stowage and Other Special Requirements for Particular Materials § 147.105 Anesthetics, drugs, and medicines. Anesthetics, drugs, and medicines must be stowed and dispensed in accordance...

  14. 46 CFR 111.105-37 - Flammable anesthetics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Hazardous Locations § 111.105-37 Flammable anesthetics. Each electric installation where a flammable anesthetic is used or stored must meet NFPA 99 (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Flammable anesthetics. 111.105-37 Section...

  15. 46 CFR 111.105-37 - Flammable anesthetics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Hazardous Locations § 111.105-37 Flammable anesthetics. Each electric installation where a flammable anesthetic is used or stored must meet NFPA 99 (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Flammable anesthetics. 111.105-37 Section...

  16. 21 CFR 868.6100 - Anesthetic cabinet, table, or tray.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Anesthetic cabinet, table, or tray. 868.6100... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6100 Anesthetic cabinet, table, or tray. (a) Identification. An anesthetic cabinet, table, or tray is a device intended to...

  17. 46 CFR 111.105-37 - Flammable anesthetics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Hazardous Locations § 111.105-37 Flammable anesthetics. Each electric installation where a flammable anesthetic is used or stored must meet NFPA 99 (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Flammable anesthetics. 111.105-37 Section...

  18. 21 CFR 868.6100 - Anesthetic cabinet, table, or tray.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Anesthetic cabinet, table, or tray. 868.6100... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6100 Anesthetic cabinet, table, or tray. (a) Identification. An anesthetic cabinet, table, or tray is a device intended to...

  19. 21 CFR 868.6100 - Anesthetic cabinet, table, or tray.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Anesthetic cabinet, table, or tray. 868.6100... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6100 Anesthetic cabinet, table, or tray. (a) Identification. An anesthetic cabinet, table, or tray is a device intended to...

  20. 46 CFR 111.105-37 - Flammable anesthetics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Hazardous Locations § 111.105-37 Flammable anesthetics. Each electric installation where a flammable anesthetic is used or stored must meet NFPA 99 (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Flammable anesthetics. 111.105-37 Section...

  1. Local contamination, and not feeding preferences, explains elevated PCB concentrations in Labrador ringed seals (Pusa hispida).

    PubMed

    Brown, Tanya M; Iverson, Sara J; Fisk, Aaron T; Macdonald, Robie W; Helbing, Caren C; Reimer, Ken J

    2015-05-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in high trophic level species typically reflect the contributions of myriad sources, such that source apportionment is rarely possible. The release of PCBs by a military radar station into Saglek Bay, Labrador contaminated the local marine food web. For instance, while heavier (higher chlorinated) PCB profiles in some ringed seals (Pusa hispida) were previously attributed to this local source, differences in feeding preferences among seals could not be ruled out as a contributing factor. Herein, similar fatty acid profiles between those seals with 'local' PCB profiles and those with 'long-range' or background profiles indicate little support for the possibility that differential feeding ecologies underlay the divergent PCB profiles. Ringed seals appeared to feed predominantly on zooplankton (Mysis oculata and Themisto libellula), followed by the dusky snailfish (Liparis gibbus), arctic cod (Boreogadus saida), and shorthorn sculpin (Myoxocephalus scorpius). Principal components analysis (PCA) and PCB homolog profiles illustrated the extent of contamination of the Saglek food web, which had very different (and much heavier) PCB profiles than those food web members contaminated by 'long-range' sources. Locally contaminated prey had PCB levels that were higher (2- to 544-fold) than prey contaminated by 'long-range' sources and exceeded wildlife consumption guidelines for PCBs. The application of multivariate analyses to two distinct datasets, including PCB congeners (n=50) and fatty acids (n=65), afforded the opportunity to clearly distinguish the contribution of locally-released PCBs to a ringed seal food web from those delivered via long-ranged transport. Results from the present study strongly suggest that habitat use rather than differences in prey selection is the primary mechanism explaining the divergent PCB patterns in Labrador ringed seals. PMID:25725460

  2. Local contamination, and not feeding preferences, explains elevated PCB concentrations in Labrador ringed seals (Pusa hispida).

    PubMed

    Brown, Tanya M; Iverson, Sara J; Fisk, Aaron T; Macdonald, Robie W; Helbing, Caren C; Reimer, Ken J

    2015-05-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in high trophic level species typically reflect the contributions of myriad sources, such that source apportionment is rarely possible. The release of PCBs by a military radar station into Saglek Bay, Labrador contaminated the local marine food web. For instance, while heavier (higher chlorinated) PCB profiles in some ringed seals (Pusa hispida) were previously attributed to this local source, differences in feeding preferences among seals could not be ruled out as a contributing factor. Herein, similar fatty acid profiles between those seals with 'local' PCB profiles and those with 'long-range' or background profiles indicate little support for the possibility that differential feeding ecologies underlay the divergent PCB profiles. Ringed seals appeared to feed predominantly on zooplankton (Mysis oculata and Themisto libellula), followed by the dusky snailfish (Liparis gibbus), arctic cod (Boreogadus saida), and shorthorn sculpin (Myoxocephalus scorpius). Principal components analysis (PCA) and PCB homolog profiles illustrated the extent of contamination of the Saglek food web, which had very different (and much heavier) PCB profiles than those food web members contaminated by 'long-range' sources. Locally contaminated prey had PCB levels that were higher (2- to 544-fold) than prey contaminated by 'long-range' sources and exceeded wildlife consumption guidelines for PCBs. The application of multivariate analyses to two distinct datasets, including PCB congeners (n=50) and fatty acids (n=65), afforded the opportunity to clearly distinguish the contribution of locally-released PCBs to a ringed seal food web from those delivered via long-ranged transport. Results from the present study strongly suggest that habitat use rather than differences in prey selection is the primary mechanism explaining the divergent PCB patterns in Labrador ringed seals.

  3. Cellular mechanisms against ischemia reperfusion injury induced by the use of anesthetic pharmacological agents.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, P; Tapia, L; Mardones, L A; Pedemonte, J C; Farías, J G; Castillo, R L

    2014-07-25

    Ischemia-reperfusion (IR) cycle in the myocardium is associated with activation of an injurious cascade, thus leading to new myocardial challenges, which account for up to 50% of infarct size. Some evidence implicates reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a probable cause of myocardial injury in prooxidant clinical settings. Damage occurs during both ischemia and post-ischemic reperfusion in animal and human models. The mechanisms that contribute to this damage include the increase in cellular calcium (Ca(2+)) concentration and induction of ROS sources during reperfusion. Pharmacological preconditioning, which includes pharmacological strategies that counteract the ROS burst and Ca(2+) overload followed to IR cycle in the myocardium, could be effective in limiting injury. Currently widespread evidence supports the use of anesthetics agents as an important cardioprotective strategy that act at various levels such as metabotropic receptors, ion channels or mitochondrial level. Their administration before a prolonged ischemic episode is known as anesthetic preconditioning, whereas when given at the very onset of reperfusion, is termed anesthetic postconditioning. Both types of anesthetic conditioning reduce, albeit not to the same degree, the extent of myocardial injury. This review focuses on cellular and pathophysiological concepts on the myocardial damage induced by IR and how anesthetic pharmacological agents commonly used could attenuate the functional and structural effects induced by oxidative stress in cardiac tissue. PMID:24835546

  4. The Timing of Acupuncture Stimulation Does Not Influence Anesthetic Requirement

    PubMed Central

    Chernyak, Grigory; Sengupta, Papiya; Lenhardt, Rainer; Liem, Edwin; Doufas, Anthony G.; Sessler, Daniel I.; Akça, Ozan

    2005-01-01

    Studies suggest that acupuncture is more effective when induced before induction of general anesthesia than afterwards. We tested the hypothesis that electro-acupuncture initiated 30 minutes before induction reduces anesthetic requirement more than acupuncture initiated after induction. Seven volunteers were each anesthetized with desflurane on 3 study days. Needles were inserted percutaneously at 4 acupuncture points thought to produce analgesia in the upper abdominal area and provide generalized sedative and analgesic effects: Zusanli (St36), Sanyinjiao (Sp6), Liangqiu (St34), and Hegu (LI4). Needles were stimulated at 2-Hz and 10-Hz, with frequencies alternating at two-second intervals. On Preinduction day, electro-acupuncture was started 30 minutes before induction of anesthesia and maintained throughout the study. On At-induction day, needles were positioned before induction of anesthesia, but electro-acupuncture stimulation was not initiated until after induction. On Control day, electrodes were positioned near the acupoints, but needles were not inserted. Noxious electrical stimulation was administered via 25-G needles on the upper abdomen (70 mA, 100 Hz, 10 seconds). Desflurane concentration was increased 0.5% when movement occurred and decreased 0.5% when it did not. These up-and-down sequences continued until volunteers crossed from movement to no-movement 4 times. The P50 of logistic regression identified desflurane requirement. Desflurane requirement was similar on the Control (5.2±0.6%, mean±SD), Preinduction (5.0±0.8%), and At-induction (4.7±0.3%, P=0.125) days. This type of acupuncture is thus unlikely to facilitate general anesthesia or decrease the need for anesthetic drugs. PMID:15673863

  5. Neural mass model-based tracking of anesthetic brain states.

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, Levin; Freestone, Dean R; Manton, Jonathan H; Heyse, Bjorn; Vereecke, Hugo E M; Lipping, Tarmo; Struys, Michel M R F; Liley, David T J

    2016-06-01

    Neural mass model-based tracking of brain states from electroencephalographic signals holds the promise of simultaneously tracking brain states while inferring underlying physiological changes in various neuroscientific and clinical applications. Here, neural mass model-based tracking of brain states using the unscented Kalman filter applied to estimate parameters of the Jansen-Rit cortical population model is evaluated through the application of propofol-based anesthetic state monitoring. In particular, 15 subjects underwent propofol anesthesia induction from awake to anesthetised while behavioral responsiveness was monitored and frontal electroencephalographic signals were recorded. The unscented Kalman filter Jansen-Rit model approach applied to frontal electroencephalography achieved reasonable testing performance for classification of the anesthetic brain state (sensitivity: 0.51; chance sensitivity: 0.17; nearest neighbor sensitivity 0.75) when compared to approaches based on linear (autoregressive moving average) modeling (sensitivity 0.58; nearest neighbor sensitivity: 0.91) and a high performing standard depth of anesthesia monitoring measure, Higuchi Fractal Dimension (sensitivity: 0.50; nearest neighbor sensitivity: 0.88). Moreover, it was found that the unscented Kalman filter based parameter estimates of the inhibitory postsynaptic potential amplitude varied in the physiologically expected direction with increases in propofol concentration, while the estimates of the inhibitory postsynaptic potential rate constant did not. These results combined with analysis of monotonicity of parameter estimates, error analysis of parameter estimates, and observability analysis of the Jansen-Rit model, along with considerations of extensions of the Jansen-Rit model, suggests that the Jansen-Rit model combined with unscented Kalman filtering provides a valuable reference point for future real-time brain state tracking studies. This is especially true for studies of

  6. Highly Localized Acoustic Streaming and Size-Selective Submicrometer Particle Concentration Using High Frequency Microscale Focused Acoustic Fields.

    PubMed

    Collins, David J; Ma, Zhichao; Ai, Ye

    2016-05-17

    Concentration and separation of particles and biological specimens are fundamental functions of micro/nanofluidic systems. Acoustic streaming is an effective and biocompatible way to create rapid microscale fluid motion and induce particle capture, though the >100 MHz frequencies required to directly generate acoustic body forces on the microscale have traditionally been difficult to generate and localize in a way that is amenable to efficient generation of streaming. Moreover, acoustic, hydrodynamic, and electrical forces as typically applied have difficulty manipulating specimens in the submicrometer regime. In this work, we introduce highly focused traveling surface acoustic waves (SAW) at high frequencies between 193 and 636 MHz for efficient and highly localized production of acoustic streaming vortices on microfluidic length scales. Concentration occurs via a novel mechanism, whereby the combined acoustic radiation and streaming field results in size-selective aggregation in fluid streamlines in the vicinity of a high-amplitude acoustic beam, as opposed to previous acoustic radiation induced particle concentration where objects typically migrate toward minimum pressure locations. Though the acoustic streaming is induced by a traveling wave, we are able to manipulate particles an order of magnitude smaller than possible using the traveling wave force alone. We experimentally and theoretically examine the range of particle sizes that can be captured in fluid streamlines using this technique, with rapid particle concentration demonstrated down to 300 nm diameters. We also demonstrate that locations of trapping and concentration are size-dependent, which is attributed to the combined effects of the acoustic streaming and acoustic forces.

  7. Regional patterns and local variability of dry and occult deposition strongly influence sulfate concentrations in Maine lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, S.A.; Kahl, J.S.; Brakke, D.F.; Brewer, G.F.; Haines, T.A.

    1988-01-01

    There is great uncertainty and large cost in making dry deposition measurements. The authors present evidence based on wet deposition, evapotranspiration, S storage in lake sediments, and sulfate concentrations in lakes and streams in Maine that the dry deposition flux of sulfur to drainage basins of lakes in Maine ranges from nearly 0% to more than 100% of wet deposition, even in small areas. The regional pattern of sulfate concentrations in Maine lakes is due to gradients in both wet and dry deposition and variation in evapotranspiration. Patterns are modified locally by lakes hydrologic type, elevation, vegetation, and terrestrial drainage basin aspect. (Copyright (c) 1988 Elsevier Science Publishers B.V.)

  8. Sensitivity of the CSR self-interaction to the local longitudinal charge concentration of an electron bunch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, R.

    2001-12-01

    Recent measurements of the coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) effects indicated that the observed emittance growth and energy modulation due to the orbit-curvature-induced bunch self-interaction are sometimes bigger than predictions based on Gaussian longitudinal charge distributions. In this paper, by performing a model study, we show both analytically and numerically that when the longitudinal bunch charge distribution involves concentration of charges in a small fraction of the bunch length, enhancement of the CSR self-interaction beyond the Gaussian prediction may occur. The level of this enhancement is sensitive to the level of the local charge concentration.

  9. The effect of anesthetization and urinary bladder catheterization on renal function of rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunn, J.B.; Willford, W.A.

    1970-01-01

    1. Rainbow trout were anesthetized with MS-222 (Sandoz) or methylpentynol and catheterized. Urine was collected at selected intervals up to 48 hr. 2. Effects of MS-222 anesthesia on urine flow and composition were isolated from the stress of catheterization by re-anesthetizing the fish 18 to 20 hr post catheterization. 3. Urine output patterns were similar following MS-222 or methylpentynol anesthesia and catheterization. Highest urine flows were measured 4 to 8 hr post treatment. The highest urine output after re-anesthetization with MS-222 was observed 2 to 4 hr post-anesthesia. 4. Highest concentrations of Na2+, K+, Ca2+, Cl- and inorganic PO4 in the urine were measured in the first 2 hr after anesthesia and catheterization. 5. Flow rates and chemical composition of urine indicate that "normal" renal function is re-established 12 to 24 hr post-treatment.

  10. Concentric Magnetic Structures for Magnetophoretic Bead Collection, Cell Trapping and Analysis of Cell Morphological Changes Caused by Local Magnetic Forces

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chen-Yu; Wei, Zung-Hang

    2015-01-01

    Concentric magnetic structures (ring and square) with domain wall (DW) pinning geometry are designed for biological manipulation. Magnetic beads collection was firstly demonstrated to analyse the local magnetic field generated by DWs and the effective regions to capture magnetic targets of size 1 μm. Primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) are magnetically labeled by internalizing poly (styrene sulfonic acid) stabilized magnetic nanoparticles (PSS-MNPs) and then are selectively trapped by head-to-tail DWs (HH DWs) or tail-to-tail DWs (TT DWs) to be arranged into linear shape or cross shape. The morphologies and the nuclear geometry of the cells growing on two kinds of concentric magnetic structures are shown to be distinctive. The intracellular magnetic forces generated by the local magnetic field of DWs are found to influence the behaviour of cells. PMID:26270332

  11. Variations of ice nuclei concentration induced by rain and snowfall within a local forested site in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Kazutaka; Maki, Teruya; Kobayashi, Fumihisa; Kakikawa, Makiko; Wada, Masashi; Matsuki, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    Biological ice nuclei (IN) such as certain species of bacteria and fungi are believed to have impacts on ice nucleation in mixed-phase clouds at temperatures warmer than -15 °C. Recent studies have indicated that rain is closely related to increases of biological IN in the near-surface atmosphere. However, variations of IN concentrations during rain and snowfall have not been compared. In the present study, field measurements of atmospheric IN were carried out under fine, cloudy, rain and snow at a local forested site in Japan. IN concentrations at -7 °C in spring were dramatically increased by rain, and concentrations associated with rain (0.86-2.2 m-3) were greater than 2.6 times higher than the mean concentration during fine weather (0.33 m-3). In winter, concentrations associated with rain (1.6 to >5.7 m-3) were also higher than those under cloudy sky (1.1 m-3), but increases were not observed during snowfall (0.21-0.4 m-3). Detectable IN concentrations associated with rain considerably decreased after heat treatment at 90 °C, indicating that IN increased during rain were likely biological substances such as heat-sensitive ice nucleation active proteins. Consequently, different types of precipitation may have varying effects on IN concentration associated with biological substances.

  12. Global and Local Contributions to Mercury Concentrations in Lake Michigan and Impact on Fish Consumption Advisories

    EPA Science Inventory

    LM2-Mercury, a mercury species mass balance model developed for Lake Michigan, was used to assess mercury cycling in Lake Michigan. A calibrated model (including a hindcast) was used to predict mercury concentrations in the lake based on various sensitivity and management scenari...

  13. Anesthetic Sevoflurane Causes Rho-Dependent Filopodial Shortening in Mouse Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zimering, Jeffrey H.; Dong, Yuanlin; Fang, Fang; Huang, Lining; Zhang, Yiying; Xie, Zhongcong

    2016-01-01

    Early postnatal anesthesia causes long-lasting learning and memory impairment in rodents, however, evidence for a specific neurotoxic effect on early synaptogenesis has not been demonstrated. Drebrin A is an actin binding protein whose localization in dendritic protrusions serves an important role in dendritic spine morphogenesis, and is a marker for early synaptogenesis. We therefore set out to investigate whether clinically-relevant concentrations of anesthetic sevoflurane, widely- used in infants and children, alters dendritic morphology in cultured fetal day 16 mouse hippocampal neurons. After 7 days in vitro, mouse hippocampal neurons were exposed to four hours of 3% sevoflurane in 95% air/5% CO2 or control condition (95% air/5% CO2). Neurons were fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde and stained with Alexa Fluor555-Phalloidin, and/or rabbit anti-mouse drebrin A/E antibodies which permitted subcellular localization of filamentous (F)-actin and/or drebrin immunoreactivity, respectively. Sevoflurane caused acute significant length-shortening in filopodia and thin dendritic spines in days-in-vitro 7 neurons, an effect which was completely rescued by co-incubating neurons with ten micromolar concentrations of the selective Rho kinase inhibitor Y27632. Filopodia and thin spine recovered in length two days after sevoflurane exposure. Yet cluster-type filopodia (a precursor to synaptic filopodia) were persistently significantly decreased in number on day-in-vitro 9, in part owing to preferential localization of drebrin immunoreactivity to dendritic shafts versus filopodial stalks. These data suggest that sevoflurane induces F-actin depolymerization leading to acute, reversible length-shortening in dendritic protrusions through a mechanism involving (in part) activation of RhoA/Rho kinase signaling and impairs localization of drebrin A to filopodia required for early excitatory synapse formation. PMID:27441369

  14. Mercury concentrations in coastal California precipitation: Evidence of local and trans-Pacific fluxes of mercury to North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steding, Douglas J.; Flegal, A. Russell

    2002-12-01

    Because of mercury's (Hg) relatively high vapor pressure and long (0.5-2 years) atmospheric residence, there is the potential for long-range transport of contaminant Hg. Many studies have focused on that transport and deposition in central and eastern North America, Europe, and the Arctic, but there has been little research on the cycling of Hg in the western coast of North America. That deficiency is addressed in this preliminary study, which indicates there is long-range transport of Hg across the North Pacific. This transport is evidenced by the elevated (relative to equatorial and theoretical baseline) Hg concentrations in rainwater collected on the coast of California, as well as by the positive correlation between North Pacific storm tracks and Hg concentrations, with maximum concentrations associated with storms from 20°-40° latitude. Those tracks trace air masses containing industrial emissions with peak O3 concentrations moving eastward off the Asian continent. The Asian fluxes appear to enhance Hg concentrations both directly, through the emission of particle-bound Hg and reactive Hg2+, and indirectly, by increasing the rate of oxidation of Hg0 in the atmosphere. Superimposed on the trans-Pacific background of industrial Hg is a local signal, with elevated concentrations at the urban site relative to the more pristine coastal site in California. This secondary enrichment is tentatively attributed to elevated local emissions of redox species, including O3 and its precursors, which increase oxidation rates of Hg0 in the atmosphere and Hg concentrations in precipitation.

  15. Radon concentration in soil gas around local disjunctive tectonic zones in the Krakow area.

    PubMed

    Swakoń, J; Kozak, K; Paszkowski, M; Gradziński, R; Łoskiewicz, J; Mazur, J; Janik, M; Bogacz, J; Horwacik, T; Olko, P

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate radon in the vicinity of geologic fault zones within the Krakow region of Poland, and to determine the influence of such formations on enhanced radon concentrations in soil. Radon ((222)Rn and (220)Rn) concentration measurements in soil gas (using ionization chamber AlphaGUARD PQ2000 PRO and diffusion chambers with CR-39 detectors), as well as radioactive natural isotopes of radium, thorium and potassium in soil samples (using gamma ray spectrometry with NaI(Tl) and HPGe detectors), were performed. Site selection was based on a geological map of Krakow. Geophysical methods (ground penetrating radar and shallow acoustic seismic) were applied to recognize the geological structure of the area and to locate the predicted courses of faults. Elevated levels of radon and thoron in soil gas were found in the study area when compared with those observed in an earlier survey covering Krakow agglomeration. For (222)Rn, the arithmetic mean of registered concentration values was 39 kBq/m(3) (median: 35.5 kBq/m(3)). For (220)Rn, the arithmetic mean was 10.8 kBq/m(3) and median 11.8 kBq/m(3).

  16. Single-molecule imaging at high fluorophore concentrations by local activation of dye

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Geertsema, Hylkje J.; Mangel, Walter F.; Schulte, Aartje C.; Spenkelink, Lisanne M.; McGrath, William J.; Morrone, Seamus R.; Sohn, Jungsan; Robinson, Andrew; van Oijen, Antoine M.

    2015-02-17

    Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy is a powerful approach to observe biomolecular interactions with high spatial and temporal resolution. Detecting fluorescent signals from individual, labeled proteins above high levels of background fluorescence remains challenging, however. For this reason, the concentrations of labeled proteins in in vitro assays are often kept low compared to their in vivo concentrations. Here, we present a new fluorescence imaging technique by which single fluorescent molecules can be observed in real time at high, physiologically relevant concentrations. The technique requires a protein and its macromolecular substrate to be labeled each with a different fluorophore. Then, making use ofmore » short-distance energy-transfer mechanisms, the fluorescence from only those proteins bound to their substrate are selectively activated. This approach is demonstrated by labeling a DNA substrate with an intercalating stain, exciting the stain, and using energy transfer from the stain to activate the fluorescence of only those labeled DNA-binding proteins bound to the DNA. Such an experimental design allowed us to observe the sequence-independent interaction of Cy5-labeled interferon-inducible protein 16 (IFI16) with DNA and the sliding via one-dimensional diffusion of Cy5-labeled adenovirus protease (pVIc-AVP) on DNA in the presence of a background of hundreds of nM Cy5 fluorophore.« less

  17. Electrochemical scaffold generates localized, low concentration of hydrogen peroxide that inhibits bacterial pathogens and biofilms.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Sujala T; Atci, Erhan; Babauta, Jerome T; Falghoush, Azeza Mohamed; Snekvik, Kevin R; Call, Douglas R; Beyenal, Haluk

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that low concentrations of H2O2 could be generated through the electrochemical conversion of oxygen by applying an electric potential to a conductive scaffold and produce a low, but constant, concentration of H2O2 that would be sufficient to destroy biofilms. To test our hypothesis we used a multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strain, because this species is often implicated in difficult-to-treat biofilm infections. We used conductive carbon fabric as the scaffold material ("e-scaffold"). In vitro experiments demonstrated the production of a maximum constant concentration of ~25 μM H2O2 near the e-scaffold surface. An e-scaffold was overlaid onto an existing A. baumannii biofilm, and within 24 h there was a ~4-log reduction in viable bacteria with an ~80% decrease in biofilm surface coverage. A similar procedure was used to overlay an e-scaffold onto an existing A. baumannii biofilm that was grown on a porcine explant. After 24 h, there was a ~3-log reduction in viable bacteria from the infected porcine explants with no observable damage to the underlying mammalian tissue based on a viability assay and histology. This research establishes a novel foundation for an alternative antibiotic-free wound dressing to eliminate biofilms.

  18. Single-molecule imaging at high fluorophore concentrations by local activation of dye

    SciTech Connect

    Geertsema, Hylkje J.; Mangel, Walter F.; Schulte, Aartje C.; Spenkelink, Lisanne M.; McGrath, William J.; Morrone, Seamus R.; Sohn, Jungsan; Robinson, Andrew; van Oijen, Antoine M.

    2015-02-17

    Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy is a powerful approach to observe biomolecular interactions with high spatial and temporal resolution. Detecting fluorescent signals from individual, labeled proteins above high levels of background fluorescence remains challenging, however. For this reason, the concentrations of labeled proteins in in vitro assays are often kept low compared to their in vivo concentrations. Here, we present a new fluorescence imaging technique by which single fluorescent molecules can be observed in real time at high, physiologically relevant concentrations. The technique requires a protein and its macromolecular substrate to be labeled each with a different fluorophore. Then, making use of short-distance energy-transfer mechanisms, the fluorescence from only those proteins bound to their substrate are selectively activated. This approach is demonstrated by labeling a DNA substrate with an intercalating stain, exciting the stain, and using energy transfer from the stain to activate the fluorescence of only those labeled DNA-binding proteins bound to the DNA. Such an experimental design allowed us to observe the sequence-independent interaction of Cy5-labeled interferon-inducible protein 16 (IFI16) with DNA and the sliding via one-dimensional diffusion of Cy5-labeled adenovirus protease (pVIc-AVP) on DNA in the presence of a background of hundreds of nM Cy5 fluorophore.

  19. Electrochemical scaffold generates localized, low concentration of hydrogen peroxide that inhibits bacterial pathogens and biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Sultana, Sujala T.; Atci, Erhan; Babauta, Jerome T.; Mohamed Falghoush, Azeza; Snekvik, Kevin R.; Call, Douglas R.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that low concentrations of H2O2 could be generated through the electrochemical conversion of oxygen by applying an electric potential to a conductive scaffold and produce a low, but constant, concentration of H2O2 that would be sufficient to destroy biofilms. To test our hypothesis we used a multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strain, because this species is often implicated in difficult-to-treat biofilm infections. We used conductive carbon fabric as the scaffold material (“e-scaffold”). In vitro experiments demonstrated the production of a maximum constant concentration of ~25 μM H2O2 near the e-scaffold surface. An e-scaffold was overlaid onto an existing A. baumannii biofilm, and within 24 h there was a ~4-log reduction in viable bacteria with an ~80% decrease in biofilm surface coverage. A similar procedure was used to overlay an e-scaffold onto an existing A. baumannii biofilm that was grown on a porcine explant. After 24 h, there was a ~3-log reduction in viable bacteria from the infected porcine explants with no observable damage to the underlying mammalian tissue based on a viability assay and histology. This research establishes a novel foundation for an alternative antibiotic-free wound dressing to eliminate biofilms. PMID:26464174

  20. Radon concentration in soil gas around local disjunctive tectonic zones in the Krakow area.

    PubMed

    Swakoń, J; Kozak, K; Paszkowski, M; Gradziński, R; Łoskiewicz, J; Mazur, J; Janik, M; Bogacz, J; Horwacik, T; Olko, P

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate radon in the vicinity of geologic fault zones within the Krakow region of Poland, and to determine the influence of such formations on enhanced radon concentrations in soil. Radon ((222)Rn and (220)Rn) concentration measurements in soil gas (using ionization chamber AlphaGUARD PQ2000 PRO and diffusion chambers with CR-39 detectors), as well as radioactive natural isotopes of radium, thorium and potassium in soil samples (using gamma ray spectrometry with NaI(Tl) and HPGe detectors), were performed. Site selection was based on a geological map of Krakow. Geophysical methods (ground penetrating radar and shallow acoustic seismic) were applied to recognize the geological structure of the area and to locate the predicted courses of faults. Elevated levels of radon and thoron in soil gas were found in the study area when compared with those observed in an earlier survey covering Krakow agglomeration. For (222)Rn, the arithmetic mean of registered concentration values was 39 kBq/m(3) (median: 35.5 kBq/m(3)). For (220)Rn, the arithmetic mean was 10.8 kBq/m(3) and median 11.8 kBq/m(3). PMID:15511556

  1. The Hyades cluster-supercluster connection - Evidence for a local concentration of dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casertano, Stefano; Iben, Icko, Jr.; Shiels, Aaron

    1993-01-01

    Stars that evaporate from the Hyades cluster will remain within a few hundred parsecs of the cluster only if they are dynamically bound to a much more massive entity containing the cluster. A local mass enhancement of at least (5-10) x 10 exp 5 solar masses, with a radius of about 100 pc, can trap stars with an origin related to that of the Hyades cluster and explains the excess of stars with velocities near the Hyades velocity that constitutes the Hyades supercluster. Part of this mass enhancement can be in visible stars, but a substantial fraction is likely to be in the form of dark matter.

  2. [Evoked potentials and inhalation anesthetics].

    PubMed

    Thiel, A; Russ, W; Hempelmann, G

    1988-01-01

    Intraoperative monitoring of evoked potentials can be affected by various factors including volatile anaesthetics. These effects have to be considered in order to give correct interpretations of the obtained data. Visual evoked potentials (VEP) and auditory evoked potentials (AEP) will show strong alterations under general anaesthesia whereas brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP) are slightly affected. The effects of nitrous oxide, halothane, enflurane, and isoflurane on somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) after median nerve stimulation were studied in 35 healthy adult patients. pCO2 and tympanic membrane temperature were held constant. Simultaneous cervical and cortical SEP recording was performed using surface electrodes. After induction of anaesthesia SEP were recorded during normoventilation with 100% oxygen and after inhalation of 66.6% nitrous oxide. 10 patients received halothane at inspired concentrations of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0%. After nitrous oxide had been replaced by oxygen, halothane was reduced in steps of 0.5%. SEP were recorded at the end of each period (15 min). Equipotent doses of enflurane or isoflurane were administered to 15 and 10 patients, respectively. Nitrous oxide depressed early cortical SEP amplitude. Halothane, enflurane, and isoflurane caused dose dependent increases of latencies. Reduction of amplitude was most pronounced with isoflurane. Using high doses of enflurane in oxygen cortical SEP showed unusual high amplitudes associated with marked increases of latencies. Even under high concentrations of volatile anaesthetics cervical SEP were minimally affected. The effects of anaesthetic gases have to be considered when SEP are recorded intraoperatively.

  3. Estimation of ultrafine particle concentrations at near-highway residences using data from local and central monitors.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Christina H; Brugge, Doug; Williams, Paige; Mittleman, Murray; Durant, John L; Spengler, John D

    2012-09-01

    Ultrafine particles (UFP; aerodynamic diameter < 0.1 micrometers) are a ubiquitous exposure in the urban environment and are elevated near highways. Most epidemiological studies of UFP health effects use central site monitoring data, which may misclassify exposure. Our aims were to: (1) examine the relationship between distant and proximate monitoring sites and their ability to predict hourly UFP concentration measured at residences in an urban community with a major interstate highway and; (2) determine if meteorology and proximity to traffic improve explanatory power. Short-term (1 - 3 weeks) residential monitoring of UFP concentration was conducted at 18 homes. Long-term monitoring was conducted at two near-highway monitoring sites and a central site. We created models of outdoor residential UFP concentration based on concentrations at the near-highway site, at the central site, at both sites together and without fixed sites. UFP concentration at residential sites was more highly correlated with those at a near-highway site than a central site. In regression models of each site alone, a 10% increase in UFP concentration at a near-highway site was associated with a 6% (95% CI: 6%, 7%) increase at residences while a 10% increase in UFP concentration at the central site was associated with a 3% (95% CI: 2%, 3%) increase at residences. A model including both sites showed minimal change in the magnitude of the association between the near-highway site and the residences, but the estimated association with UFP concentration at the central site was substantially attenuated. These associations remained after adjustment for other significant predictors of residential UFP concentration, including distance from highway, wind speed, wind direction, highway traffic volume and precipitation. The use of a central site as an estimate of personal exposure for populations near local emissions of traffic-related air pollutants may result in exposure misclassification.

  4. Saturation fluorimetry of complex organic compounds with a high local concentration of fluorophores (by the example of phytoplankton)

    SciTech Connect

    Maslov, D V; Ostroumov, E E; Fadeev, V V

    2006-02-28

    Saturation of fluorescence of complex organic compounds with a high local concentration of fluorescing molecules (fluorophores), when singlet-singlet annihilation makes a noticeable contribution to saturation, is considered. The fluorescence saturation curve is obtained analytically for the case of a rectangular temporal and spatial distribution of photons in a laser pulse. It is shown that the fluorescence saturation curve depends on the parameter {Phi}{sub 0}, which is proportional to the concentration of fluorescing molecules, and on the parameters A, B, and {alpha} describing the influence of singlet-singlet annihilation, bleaching of an optically thin layer, and nonstationarity of excitation, respectively. The fluorescence saturation curves are studied experimentally for compounds with a high local concentration of fluorescing molecules such as molecules of a monoculture of diatomic alga Thalassiosira weissflogii. The experimental fluorescence saturation curves are well described by the obtained analytic expression. The values of the parameter {Phi}{sub 0}, proportional to the concentration of chlorophyll a, and the parameter A (for the first time) are obtained from the alga fluorescence saturation curves. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  5. Special article: general anesthetic gases and the global environment.

    PubMed

    Ishizawa, Yumiko

    2011-01-01

    General anesthetics are administered to approximately 50 million patients each year in the United States. Anesthetic vapors and gases are also widely used in dentists' offices, veterinary clinics, and laboratories for animal research. All the volatile anesthetics that are currently used are halogenated compounds destructive to the ozone layer. These halogenated anesthetics could have potential significant impact on global warming. The widely used anesthetic gas nitrous oxide is a known greenhouse gas as well as an important ozone-depleting gas. These anesthetic gases and vapors are primarily eliminated through exhalation without being metabolized in the body, and most anesthesia systems transfer these gases as waste directly and unchanged into the atmosphere. Little consideration has been given to the ecotoxicological properties of gaseous general anesthetics. Our estimation using the most recent consumption data indicates that the anesthetic use of nitrous oxide contributes 3.0% of the total emissions in the United States. Studies suggest that the influence of halogenated anesthetics on global warming will be of increasing relative importance given the decreasing level of chlorofluorocarbons globally. Despite these nonnegligible pollutant effects of the anesthetics, no data on the production or emission of these gases and vapors are publicly available. The primary goal of this article is to critically review the current data on the potential effects of general anesthetics on the global environment and to describe possible alternatives and new technologies that may prevent these gases from being discharged into the atmosphere.

  6. Direct measurement of local oxygen concentration in the bone marrow of live animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Joel A.; Ferraro, Francesca; Roussakis, Emmanuel; Klein, Alyssa; Wu, Juwell; Runnels, Judith M.; Zaher, Walid; Mortensen, Luke J.; Alt, Clemens; Turcotte, Raphaël; Yusuf, Rushdia; Côté, Daniel; Vinogradov, Sergei A.; Scadden, David T.; Lin, Charles P.

    2014-04-01

    Characterization of how the microenvironment, or niche, regulates stem cell activity is central to understanding stem cell biology and to developing strategies for the therapeutic manipulation of stem cells. Low oxygen tension (hypoxia) is commonly thought to be a shared niche characteristic in maintaining quiescence in multiple stem cell types. However, support for the existence of a hypoxic niche has largely come from indirect evidence such as proteomic analysis, expression of hypoxia inducible factor-1α (Hif-1α) and related genes, and staining with surrogate hypoxic markers (for example, pimonidazole). Here we perform direct in vivo measurements of local oxygen tension (pO2) in the bone marrow of live mice. Using two-photon phosphorescence lifetime microscopy, we determined the absolute pO2 of the bone marrow to be quite low (<32 mm Hg) despite very high vascular density. We further uncovered heterogeneities in local pO2, with the lowest pO2 (~9.9 mm Hg, or 1.3%) found in deeper peri-sinusoidal regions. The endosteal region, by contrast, is less hypoxic as it is perfused with small arteries that are often positive for the marker nestin. These pO2 values change markedly after radiation and chemotherapy, pointing to the role of stress in altering the stem cell metabolic microenvironment.

  7. Direct measurement of local oxygen concentration in the bone marrow of live animals

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Joel A.; Ferraro, Francesca; Roussakis, Emmanuel; Klein, Alyssa; Wu, Juwell; Runnels, Judith M.; Zaher, Walid; Mortensen, Luke J.; Alt, Clemens; Turcotte, Raphaël; Yusuf, Rushdia; Côté, Daniel; Vinogradov, Sergei A.; Scadden, David T.; Lin, Charles P.

    2014-01-01

    Characterizing how the microenvironment, or niche, regulates stem cell activity is central to understanding stem cell biology and to developing strategies for therapeutic manipulation of stem cells1. Low oxygen tension (hypoxia) is commonly thought to be a shared niche characteristic in maintaining quiescence in multiple stem cell types2–4. However, support for the existence of a hypoxic niche has largely come from indirect evidence such as proteomic analysis5, expression of HIF-1 and related genes6, and staining with surrogate hypoxic markers (e.g. pimonidazole)6–8. Here we perform direct in vivo measurements of local oxygen tension (pO2) in the bone marrow (BM) of live mice. Using two-photon phosphorescence lifetime microscopy (2PLM), we determined the absolute pO2 of the BM to be quite low (<32 mmHg) despite very high vascular density. We further uncovered heterogeneities in local pO2, with the lowest pO2 (~9.9 mmHg, or 1.3%) found in deeper peri-sinusoidal regions. The endosteal region, by contrast, is less hypoxic as it is perfused with small arteries that are often positive for the marker nestin. These pO2 values change dramatically after radiation and chemotherapy, pointing to the role of stress in altering the stem cell metabolic microenvironment. PMID:24590072

  8. Large-scale atmospheric circulation and local particulate matter concentrations in Bavaria - from current observations to future projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Christoph; Weitnauer, Claudia; Brosy, Caroline; Hald, Cornelius; Lochbihler, Kai; Siegmund, Stefan; Jacobeit, Jucundus

    2016-04-01

    Particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 10 μm or less (PM10) may have distinct adverse effects on human health. Spatial and temporal variations in PM10 concentrations reflect local emission rates, but are as well influenced by the local and synoptic-scale atmospheric conditions. Against this background, it can be furthermore argued that potential future climate change and associated variations in large-scale atmospheric circulation and local meteorological parameters will probably provoke corresponding changes in future PM10 concentration levels. The DFG-funded research project „Particulate matter and climate change in Bavaria" aimed at establishing quantitative relationships between daily and monthly PM10 indices at different Bavarian urban stations and the corresponding large-scale atmospheric circulation as well as local meteorological conditions. To this end, several statistical downscaling approaches have been developed for the period 1980 to 2011. PM10 data from 19 stations from the air quality monitoring network (LÜB) of the Bavarian Environmental Agency (LfU) have been utilized as predictands. Large-scale atmospheric gridded data from the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data base and local meteorological observational data provided by the German Meteorological Service (DWD) served as predictors. The downscaling approaches encompass the synoptic downscaling of daily PM10 concentrations and several multivariate statistical models for the estimation of daily and monthly PM10, i.e.monthly mean and number of days exceeding a certain PM10 concentration threshold. Both techniques utilize objective circulation type classifications, which have been optimized with respect to their synoptic skill for the target variable PM10. All downscaling approaches have been evaluated via cross validation using varying subintervals of the 1980-2011 period as calibration and validation periods respectively. The most suitable - in terms of model skill determined from cross

  9. Method development for the enantiomeric purity determination of low concentrations of adrenaline in local anaesthetic solutions by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Sänger-van de Griend, Cari E; Ek, Anders G; Widahl-Näsman, Monica E; Andersson, E K Margareta

    2006-04-11

    L-adrenaline is often included in local anaesthetic (LA) solutions for injection to improve the quality of the anaesthetic block. The concentration of the LA is between 2.5 and 20 mg/ml and the concentration of adrenaline is typically < or = 0.1% of the LA concentration. In order to follow the racemization into d-adrenaline, not only is chiral separation needed but also sufficient resolution from the LA and other components of the injection solution. Furthermore, very high sensitivity is needed in order to be able to determine the d-enantiomer at very low concentrations, i.e. down to about 0.1 microg/ml. The development of a chiral capillary electrophoresis method that is able to determine the racemization of adrenaline is described, together with a limited validation. Samples are injected without pretreatment and analysed with a capillary electrophoresis buffer containing 40 mM heptakis(2,6-di-O-methyl)-beta-cyclodextrin, 0.10 M phosphoric acid and 0.05 M triethanolamine. The amounts of d-adrenaline found in the LA products tested were typically < 3% of the l-adrenaline concentration and < 0.003% of the LA concentration.

  10. Effects of volatile anesthetic on channel structure of gramicidin A.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Pei; Mandal, Pravat K; Zegarra, Martha

    2002-01-01

    Volatile anesthetic agent, 1-chloro-1,2,2-trifluorocyclobutane (F3), was found to alter gramicidin A channel function by enhancing Na(+) transport (. Biophys. J. 77:739-746). Whether this functional change is associated with structural alternation is evaluated by circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance results indicate that at low millimolar concentrations, 1-chloro-1,2,2-trifluorocyclobutane causes minimal changes in gramicidin A channel structure in sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles. All hydrogen bonds between channel backbones are well maintained in the presence of 1-chloro-1,2,2-trifluorocyclobutane, and the channel structure is stable. The finding supports the notion that low affinity drugs such as volatile anesthetics and alcohols can cause significant changes in protein function without necessarily producing associated changes in protein structure. To understand the molecular mechanism of general anesthesia, it is important to recognize that in addition to structural changes, other protein properties, including dynamic characteristics of channel motions, may also be of functional significance. PMID:12202367

  11. alpha-Synuclein fission yeast model: concentration-dependent aggregation without plasma membrane localization or toxicity.

    PubMed

    Brandis, Katrina A; Holmes, Isaac F; England, Samantha J; Sharma, Nijee; Kukreja, Lokesh; DebBurman, Shubhik K

    2006-01-01

    Despite fission yeast's history of modeling salient cellular processes, it has not yet been used to model human neurodegeneration-linked protein misfolding. Because alpha-synuclein misfolding and aggregation are linked to Parkinson's disease (PD), here, we report a fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) model that evaluates alpha-synuclein misfolding, aggregation, and toxicity and compare these properties with those recently characterized in budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Wild-type alpha-synuclein and three mutants (A30P, A53T, and A30P/A53T) were expressed with thiamine-repressible promoters (using vectors of increasing promoter strength: pNMT81, pNMT41, and pNMT1) to test directly in living cells the nucleation polymerization hypothesis for alpha-synuclein misfolding and aggregation. In support of the hypothesis, wild-type and A53T alpha-synuclein formed prominent intracellular cytoplasmic inclusions within fission yeast cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, whereas A30P and A30P/A53T remained diffuse throughout the cytoplasm. A53T alpha-synuclein formed aggregates faster than wild-type alpha-synuclein and at a lower alpha-synuclein concentration. Unexpectedly, unlike in budding yeast, wild-type and A53T alpha-synuclein did not target to the plasma membrane in fission yeast, not even at low alpha-synuclein concentrations or as a precursor step to forming aggregates. Despite alpha-synuclein's extensive aggregation, it was surprisingly nontoxic to fission yeast. Future genetic dissection might yield molecular insight into this protection against toxicity. We speculate that alpha-synuclein toxicity might be linked to its membrane binding capacity. To conclude, S. pombe and S. cerevisiae model similar yet distinct aspects of alpha-synuclein biology, and both organisms shed insight into alpha-synuclein's role in PD pathogenesis.

  12. The public health impacts of concentrated animal feeding operations on local communities.

    PubMed

    Greger, Michael; Koneswaran, Gowri

    2010-01-01

    Large-scale farm animal production facilities, also known as concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs), release a significant amount of contaminants into the air and water. Adverse health effects related to exposure to these contaminants among CAFO workers have been well-documented; however, less is known about their impact on the health of residents in nearby communities. Epidemiological research in this area suggests that neighboring residents are at increased risk of developing neurobehavioral symptoms and respiratory illnesses, including asthma. Additional research is needed to better understand community-scale exposures and health outcomes related to the management practices and emissions of CAFOs. PMID:20010001

  13. Opioid induced hyperalgesia in anesthetic settings.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeon Jeong; Yeomans, David C

    2014-11-01

    Pain is difficult to investigate and difficult to treat, in part, because of problems in quantification and assessment. The use of opioids, combined with classic anesthetics to maintain hemodynamic stability by controlling responses to intraoperative painful events has gained significant popularity in the anesthetic field. However, several side effects profiles concerning perioperative use of opioid have been published. Over the past two decades, many concerns have arisen with respect to opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), which is the paradoxical effect wherein opioid usage may decrease pain thresholds and increase atypical pain unrelated to the original, preexisting pain. This brief review focuses on the evidence, mechanisms, and modulatory and pharmacologic management of OIH in order to elaborate on the clinical implication of OIH.

  14. Heart rate effects of intraosseous injections using slow and fast rates of anesthetic solution deposition.

    PubMed

    Susi, Louis; Reader, Al; Nusstein, John; Beck, Mike; Weaver, Joel; Drum, Melissa

    2008-01-01

    The authors, using a crossover design, randomly administered, in a single-blind manner, 3 primary intraosseous injections to 61 subjects using: the Wand local anesthetic system at a deposition rate of 45 seconds (fast injection); the Wand local anesthetic system at a deposition rate of 4 minutes and 45 seconds (slow injection); a conventional syringe injection at a deposition rate of 4 minutes and 45 seconds (slow injection), in 3 separate appointments spaced at least 3 weeks apart. A pulse oximeter measured heart rate (pulse). The results demonstrated the mean maximum heart rate was statistically higher with the fast intraosseous injection (average 21 to 28 beats/min increase) than either of the 2 slow intraosseous injections (average 10 to 12 beats/min increase). There was no statistically significant difference between the 2 slow injections. We concluded that an intraosseous injection of 1.4 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1 : 100,000 epinephrine with the Wand at a 45-second rate of anesthetic deposition resulted in a significantly higher heart rate when compared with a 4-minute and 45-second anesthetic solution deposition using either the Wand or traditional syringe.

  15. Unexpected Complete Heart Block and Anesthetic Implications.

    PubMed

    Torres, Arturo G

    2015-08-01

    A healthy, active duty military 25-year-old female with a history of congenital complete heart block presented for a routine septorhinoplasty. During the preoperative interview, she did not disclose her heart condition. A preordered electrocardiogram was not available. During induction of anesthesia, she became extremely bradycardic, approaching asystole, requiring resuscitation. This case highlights the potential anesthetic risks in individuals with a history of congenital heart rhythm disease.

  16. Parental presence during pediatric anesthetic inductions.

    PubMed

    Himes, Mary Kay; Munyer, Kristina; Henly, Susan J

    2003-08-01

    Children's responses to parental presence during anesthetic induction have been researched thoroughly; however, not much is known about the response of parents to being present at their child's induction. The purpose of this research was to examine parent's preparation for, attitudes and emotions about, and experiences with being present for their child's anesthetic induction. Participants included parents who accompanied their children ranging from 1 to 10 years of age during induction by general anesthesia. Multiple-choice surveys were distributed preoperatively to a convenience sample of 55 parents who were present for their child's anesthetic induction. Of 55 surveys, 38 (69%) were returned postoperatively. Data were analyzed using frequency distributions, cross-tabulations with chi 2 tests, and correlation coefficients. In general, parents felt accurately prepared and satisfied with their preparation. They thought their presence was beneficial to their child, themselves, and anesthesia personnel. Overall satisfaction with preparation was related to the completeness of the information they received (r = 0.35; P < .04). Complete and accurate information about the induction event before surgery and emotional support during induction are important psychosocial aspects of anesthesia care for parents who plan to be present during their child's induction.

  17. Spatial and Temporal Variability of the Concentration Field from Localized Releases in a Regular Building Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulart, E. V.; Coceal, O.; Branford, S.; Thomas, T. G.; Belcher, S. E.

    2016-05-01

    Spatial and temporal fluctuations in the concentration field from an ensemble of continuous point-source releases in a regular building array are analyzed from data generated by direct numerical simulations. The release is of a passive scalar under conditions of neutral stability. Results are related to the underlying flow structure by contrasting data for an imposed wind direction of 0° and 45° relative to the buildings. Furthermore, the effects of distance from the source and vicinity to the plume centreline on the spatial and temporal variability are documented. The general picture that emerges is that this particular geometry splits the flow domain into segments (e.g., "streets" and "intersections") in each of which the air is, to a first approximation, well mixed. Notable exceptions to this general rule include regions close to the source, near the plume edge, and in unobstructed channels to which the flow is aligned. In the oblique (45°) case the strongly three-dimensional nature of the flow enhances mixing of a scalar within the canopy leading to reduced temporal and spatial concentration fluctuations within the plume core. These fluctuations are in general larger for the parallel flow (0°) case, especially so in the long unobstructed channels. Due to the more complex flow structure in the canyon-type streets behind buildings, fluctuations are lower than in the open channels, though still substantially larger than for oblique flow. These results are relevant to the formulation of simple models for dispersion in urban areas and to the quantification of the uncertainties in their predictions.

  18. Extraction of local coordination structure in a low-concentration uranyl system by XANES.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linjuan; Zhou, Jing; Zhang, Jianyong; Su, Jing; Zhang, Shuo; Chen, Ning; Jia, Yunpeng; Li, Jiong; Wang, Yu; Wang, Jian Qiang

    2016-05-01

    Obtaining structural information of uranyl species at an atomic/molecular scale is a critical step to control and predict their physical and chemical properties. To obtain such information, experimental and theoretical L3-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra of uranium were studied systematically for uranyl complexes. It was demonstrated that the bond lengths (R) in the uranyl species and relative energy positions (ΔE) of the XANES were determined as follows: ΔE1 = 168.3/R(U-Oax)(2) - 38.5 (for the axial plane) and ΔE2 = 428.4/R(U-Oeq)(2) - 37.1 (for the equatorial plane). These formulae could be used to directly extract the distances between the uranium absorber and oxygen ligand atoms in the axial and equatorial planes of uranyl ions based on the U L3-edge XANES experimental data. In addition, the relative weights were estimated for each configuration derived from the water molecule and nitrate ligand based on the obtained average equatorial coordination bond lengths in a series of uranyl nitrate complexes with progressively varied nitrate concentrations. Results obtained from XANES analysis were identical to that from extended X-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) analysis. XANES analysis is applicable to ubiquitous uranyl-ligand complexes, such as the uranyl-carbonate complex. Most importantly, the XANES research method could be extended to low-concentration uranyl systems, as indicated by the results of the uranyl-amidoximate complex (∼40 p.p.m. uranium). Quantitative XANES analysis, a reliable and straightforward method, provides a simplified approach applied to the structural chemistry of actinides. PMID:27140156

  19. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationship of anesthetic drugs: from modeling to clinical use

    PubMed Central

    Billard, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    Anesthesia is a combination of unconsciousness, amnesia, and analgesia, expressed in sleeping patients by limited reaction to noxious stimulations. It is achieved by several classes of drugs, acting mainly on central nervous system. Compared to other therapeutic families, the anesthetic drugs, administered by intravenous or pulmonary route, are quickly distributed in the blood and induce in a few minutes effects that are fully reversible within minutes or hours. These effects change in parallel with the concentration of the drug, and the concentration time course of the drug follows with a reasonable precision mathematical models based on the Fick principle. Therefore, understanding concentration time course allows adjusting the dosing delivery scheme in order to control the effects.   The purpose of this short review is to describe the basis of pharmacokinetics and modeling, the concentration-effects relationship, and drug interactions modeling to offer to anesthesiologists and non-anesthesiologists an overview of the rules to follow to optimize anesthetic drug delivery. PMID:26918133

  20. Influence of electrolyte concentration on holdup, flow regime transition and local flow properties in a large scale bubble column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besagni, Giorgio; Inzoli, Fabio

    2015-11-01

    We experimentally investigate the influence of the electrolyte concentration on holdup, flow regime transition and local flow properties in a large scale bubble column, with air and water as working fluids. The column is 0.24 m inner diameter, 5.3 m height and the air is introduced by a spider sparger up to a superficial gas velocity of 0.2 m/s. The influence of five NaCl concentrations are investigated by using gas holdup and optical probe measurements. The gas holdup measurements are used for analysing the flow regime transition between the homogeneous and the transition regime and the optical probe is used for studying the local flow characteristics at different radial positions. The presence of NaCl - up to a critical concentration - increases the gas holdup. The increase in the gas holdup is due to the inhibition of the coalescence between the bubbles and, thus, the extension of the homogeneous regime. The results are in agreement with the previous literature on smaller bubble columns.

  1. Anesthetic considerations for endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Kothandan, Harikrishnan; Haw Chieh, Geoffrey Liew; Khan, Shariq Ali; Karthekeyan, Ranjith Baskar; Sharad, Shah Shitalkumar

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysm is defined as a localized and permanent dilatation with an increase in normal diameter by more than 50%. It is more common in males and can affect up to 8% of elderly men. Smoking is the greatest risk factor for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and other risk factors include hypertension, hyperlipidemia, family history of aneurysms, inflammatory vasculitis, and trauma. Endovascular Aneurysm Repair [EVAR] is a common procedure performed for AAA, because of its minimal invasiveness as compared with open surgical repair. Patients undergoing EVAR have a greater incidence of major co-morbidities and should undergo comprehensive preoperative assessment and optimization within the multidisciplinary settings. In majority of cases, EVAR is extremely well-tolerated. The aim of this article is to outline the Anesthetic considerations related to EVAR. PMID:26750684

  2. Sensitivity of passive microwave sea ice concentration algorithms to the selection of locally and seasonally adjusted tie points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, Konrad; Schweiger, Axel

    1989-01-01

    The sensitivity of passive microwave sea-ice concentration (SIC) algorithms to the selection of tie points was analyzed. SICs were derived with the NASA Team ice algorithm for global tie points and for locally and seasonally adjusted tie points. The SSM/I SIC was then compared to Landsat-MSS-derived SICs. Preliminary results show a mean difference of SSM/I- and Landsat-derived SICs for 50 x 50 km grid cells of 2.7 percent along the ice edge of the Beaufort Sea during fall with local tie points. The accuracy decreased to 9.7 percent when global tie points were used. During freeze-up in the Beaufort Sea, with grey ice and nilas as dominant ice cover, the mean difference was 4.3 percent for local tie points and 13.9 percent for global tie points. For the spring ice cover in the Bering Sea a mean difference of 4.4 percent for local tie points and 15.7 percent for global tie points was found. This large difference reveals some limitations of the NASA-Team algorithm under freeze-up and spring conditions (thin ice areas).

  3. Localization of neuropeptide-Y immunoreactivity in estradiol-concentrating cells in the hypothalamus

    SciTech Connect

    Sar, M.; Sahu, A.; Crowley, W.R.; Kalra, S.P. )

    1990-12-01

    Considerable evidence shows that gonadal steroids exert a facilitatory influence on levels and release of neuropeptide-Y (NPY) from the hypothalamus. However, it is not known whether gonadal steroids act directly on NPY-producing cells in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) of the hypothalamus to produce these facilitatory effects on NPY or whether they act on other cells that have a modulatory influence via synapses on ARC NPY cells. We applied the combined method of steroid autoradiography and immunocytochemistry to assess the localization of (3H)estradiol in relation to NPY-producing cells in the hypothalamus. Rats (n = 6) were bilaterally ovariectomized and injected intracerebroventricularly with colchicine. Twenty-four hours later each rat received an iv injection of 17 beta-(2,4,6,7,16,17(-3)H)estradiol (SA, 166 Ci/mmol) at a dose of 5.0 micrograms/kg BW. One hour after the injection of (3H)estradiol, the rats were perfused with 4% paraformaldehyde; brains were removed, frozen in isopentane precooled in liquid nitrogen (-190 C), sectioned, and processed for autoradiography. The autoradiograms were then incubated with specific antibodies for NPY immunostaining by the avidin-biotin-peroxidase method. The results revealed NPY-immunopositive cells in the ARC, striatum, hippocampus, amygdala, and cerebral cortex and a few cells in the median eminence. NPY-immunoreactive fibers were also detected in the internal layer of the median eminence. The largest number of neurons showing NPY immunoreactivity in the cytoplasm was detected in the ARC, and only in this nucleus did we observed colocalization of (3H)estradiol and NPY immunoreactivity in neurons. A population of NPY-immunopositive cells in the ARC (10-20%) exhibited nuclear (3H)estradiol; the majority of these cells were located in the lateral and ventral portions of the ARC.

  4. Comparison of atmospheric pesticide concentrations measured at three sampling sites: local, regional and long-range transport.

    PubMed

    Sanusi, A; Millet, M; Mirabe, P; Wortham, H

    2000-12-18

    We present the comparison of atmospheric concentrations of eleven currently used pesticides (HCB, alpha-HCH, gamma-HCH, trifluraline, mecoprop, phosalone, atrazine, carbofuran, carbaryl, diuron and isoproturon) measured in remote (Aubure), rural (Colmar) and urban (Strasbourg) areas of Alsace and Vosges regions (cast France). Pesticides samples were collected simultaneously on two of the three sites during the summer season of 1993 and 1994, using a Hi-Vol sampler with Whatman filter paper and XAD-2 resin. The particle and gas phases were collected separately during 24 h. The relative importance of local emissions and local, regional and long distance transport on the contamination of the atmosphere in the three environments (remote, rural and urban) were investigated. To facilitate the interpretation of the results, the alpha/gamma-HCH ratio was used as a tracer of pesticide emissions.

  5. Effect of Localized Spin Concentration on Giant Magnetoresistance in Molecular Conductor TPP[FexCo1-x(Pc)(CN)2]2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Mitsuo; Kanda, Akinori; Murakawa, Hiroshi; Matsuda, Masaki; Inabe, Tamotsu; Tajima, Hiroyuki; Hanasaki, Noriaki

    2016-02-01

    We studied the effect of the localized spin concentration on the giant magnetoresistance (GMR) and the charge order (CO) in the phthalocyanine (Pc) molecular conductors TPP[FexCo1-x(Pc)(CN)2]2 (TPP = tetraphenylphosphonium), in which the localized spin concentration can be controlled by adjusting the Fe concentration x. Resistivity studies indicated that the CO state was stabilized by localized spins. The negative magnetoresistance was observed even in the region of a localized spin concentration of as low as about 5%. In the high-concentration region, the negative magnetoresistance changed into a positive one at low temperatures. This result shows that a magnetic field stabilizes the CO state, unless the magnetic field is sufficiently strong to break the antiferromagnetic order of the localized spins.

  6. Acute Helicobacter pylori infection: clinical features, local and systemic immune response, gastric mucosal histology, and gastric juice ascorbic acid concentrations.

    PubMed Central

    Sobala, G M; Crabtree, J E; Dixon, M F; Schorah, C J; Taylor, J D; Rathbone, B J; Heatley, R V; Axon, A T

    1991-01-01

    The symptomatology of a case of acute infection with Helicobacter pylori is described, together with the accompanying changes in gastric mucosal histology, local and systemic humoral immune response, and gastric ascorbic acid concentration. The patient was an endoscopist, previously negative for the carbon-14 urea breath test, who had a week of epigastric pain and then became asymptomatic. H pylori was detected by culture of antral biopsy specimens and was still present after 74 days. Five days after infection the histological findings showed acute neutrophilic gastritis; by day 74 changes of chronic gastritis were evident. The patient seroconverted by IgG enzyme linked immunosorbent assay by day 74, but a mucosal IgM and IgA response was evident as early as day 14. Infection was accompanied by a transient hypochlorhydria but a sustained fall in gastric juice ascorbic acid concentration. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1752479

  7. Inhibition of cation channel function at the nicotinic acethylcholine receptor from Torpedo: Agonist self-inhibition and anesthetic drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Forman, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    Modulation of the nicotinic acethylcholine receptor from Torpedo by cholinergic agonists, local anesthetics, and n-alkanols was studied using {sup 86}Rb{sup +} flux studies in sealed native Torpedo electroplaque membrane vesicles. Reliable concentration-response and kinetic data were obtained using manual ten sec filtration assays in vesicles partially blocked with alpha-bungarotoxin to remove spare receptors and quenched-flow assays to assess initial {sup 86}Rb{sup +} flux rates or the rate of drug-induced receptor inactivation. Concentration response relationships for the agonists acetylcholine, carbamylcholine, suberyldicholine, phenyltrimethylammonium, and (-)-nicotine are all bell-shape due to stimulation of cation channel opening at low concentrations and inhibition of channels at higher concentrations. The rate of agonist-induced fast desensitization (k{sub d}) increases with (acetylcholine) in parallel with channel activation, suggesting that desensitization proceeds from the open state and/or states in rapid equilibrium with it. At self-inhibitory acetylcholine concentrations, a new rapid inactivation (rate = k{sub f}) is observed before fast desensitization. The rate and extent of rapid inactivation is compatible with bimolecular association between acethylcholine and inhibitory site with K{sub B} = 40 mM.

  8. Concentration dependent requirement for local protein synthesis in motor neuron subtype specific response to axon guidance cues

    PubMed Central

    Nedelec, Stephane; Peljto, Mirza; Shi, Peng; Amoroso, Mackenzie W.; Kam, Lance C.; Wichterle, Hynek

    2012-01-01

    Formation of functional motor circuits relies on the ability of distinct spinal motor neuron subtypes to project their axons with high precision to appropriate muscle targets. While guidance cues contributing to motor axon pathfinding have been identified, the intracellular pathways underlying subtype specific responses to these cues remain poorly understood. In particular, it remains controversial whether responses to axon guidance cues depend on axonal protein synthesis. Using a growth cone collapse assay, we demonstrate that mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC) derived spinal motor neurons (ES-MNs) respond to ephrin-A5, Sema3f and Sema3a in a concentration dependent manner. At low doses, ES-MNs exhibit segmental or subtype specific responses, while this selectivity is lost at higher concentrations. Response to high doses of semaphorins and to all doses of ephrin-A5 is protein synthesis independent. In contrast, using microfluidic devices and stripe assays, we show that growth cone collapse and guidance at low concentrations of semaphorins relies on local protein synthesis in the axonal compartment. Similar bimodal response to low and high concentrations of guidance cues is observed in human ES-MNs, pointing to a general mechanism by which neurons increase their repertoire of responses to the limited set of guidance cues involved in neural circuit formation. PMID:22279234

  9. [Cardiac failure in a child during anesthetic induction with sevoflurane].

    PubMed

    Oto, Hirotaka; Nakamura, Tadaho; Nakamura, Kyouichi; Tani, Makiko; Kobayashi, Osamu; Takahashi, Yukio

    2006-09-01

    A five-year-old boy with recurring tonsillitis and sleep apnea was admitted for tonsillectomy and tympanic membrane tubing. He presented with a history of bronchial asthma and hereditary spherocytosis without obvious cardiac failure symptoms. Anesthetic agents for induction included nitrous oxide, oxygen, and sevoflurane. Because oxygen saturation decreased immediately to 90%, tracheal intubation was performed. The patient began to wheeze. Sevoflurane concentration was increased but cardiac murmur (gallop), cold limbs and jugular vein distension were noted. Acute cardiac failure was diagnosed following a chest X-ray and cardiac echo showing an enlarged heart, CTR of 80%, left ventricular dilation, and contractile failure. Tympanic membrane tubing only was performed. Sevoflurane was discontinued and the patient was treated for the cardiac failure under an ICU oxygen tent. The patient was discharged when his general condition improved. He showed elevated levels of viral antibodies, suggesting myocarditis. Later he was treated for dilating cardiomyopathy before undergoing a heart transplant. PMID:16984022

  10. Anticholeretic effect of substance P in anesthetized dogs.

    PubMed

    Holm, I; Thulin, L; Hellgren, M

    1978-03-01

    Nine anesthetized dogs were provided with acute common duct fistulas after exclusion of the gallbladder. Synthetic Substance P was administered as caval infusions in a dosage of 0.5-20 ng x kg-1 x min-1, duration 10 min. The output of hepatic bile, sodium and amylase decreased during infusion by 40-52 per cent at the highest doses. After termination of infusion all 3 parameters increased by 19-60 per cent above the basal level. The biliary concentration of sodium was constant, while that of amylase increased during infusion. The responses were dose-related. The anticholeresis induced by substance P might be due to inhibition of the canalicular bile fraction, which presumably is mediated by active sodium transport and independent of bile salt excretion.

  11. Localization, concentration, and transmission efficiency of Banana bunchy top virus in four asexual lineages of Pentalonia aphids.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shizu; Greenwell, April M; Bressan, Alberto

    2013-02-22

    Banana bunchy top virus (BBTV) is the most destructive pathogenic virus of banana plants worldwide. The virus is transmitted in a circulative non-propagative manner by the banana aphid, Pentalonia nigronervosa Coquerel. In this work, we examined the localization, accumulation, and transmission efficiency of BBTV in four laboratory-established lineages of Pentalonia aphids derived from four different host plants: taro (Colocasia esculenta), heliconia (Heliconia spp.), red ginger (Alpinia purpurata), and banana (Musa sp.). Mitochondrial sequencing identified three and one lineages as Pentalonia caladii van der Goot, a recently proposed species, and P. nigronervosa, respectively. Microsatellite analysis separated the aphid lineages into four distinct genotypes. The transmission of BBTV was tested using leaf disk and whole-plant assays, both of which showed that all four lineages are competent vectors of BBTV, although the P. caladii from heliconia transmitted BBTV to the leaf disks at a significantly lower rate than did P. nigronervosa. The concentration of BBTV in dissected guts, haemolymph, and salivary glands was quantified by real-time PCR. The BBTV titer reached similar concentrations in the guts, haemolymph, and salivary glands of aphids from all four lineages tested. Furthermore, immunofluorescence assays showed that BBTV antigens localized to the anterior midguts and the principal salivary glands, demonstrating a similar pattern of translocations across the four lineages. The results reported in this study showed for the first time that P. caladii is a competent vector of BBTV.

  12. The crystal structure and morphology of NiO-YSZ composite that prepared from local zircon concentrate of Bangka Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmawati, F.; Apriyani, K.; Heraldy, E.; Soepriyanto, S.

    2016-03-01

    In order to increase the economic value of local zircon concentrate from Bangka Island, NiO-YSZ was synthesized from Zirconia, ZrO2 that was prepared from local zircon concentrate. The NiO-YSZ composite was synthesized by solid state reaction method. XRD analysis equipped with Le Bail refinement was carried out to analyze the crystal structure and cell parameters of the prepared materials. The result showed that zirconia was crystallized in tetragonal structure with a space group of P42/NMC. Yttria-Stabilized-Zirconia (YSZ) was prepared by doping 8% mol yttrium oxide into zirconia and then sintered at 1250°C for 3 hours. Doping of 8% mol Yttria allowed phase transformation of zirconia from tetragonal into the cubic structure. Meanwhile, the composite of NiO-YSZ consists of two crystalline phases, i.e. the NiO with cubic structure and the YSZ with cubic structure. SEM analysis of the prepared materials shows that the addition of NiO into YSZ allows the morphology to become more roughness with larger grain size.

  13. Localization, Concentration, and Transmission Efficiency of Banana bunchy top virus in Four Asexual Lineages of Pentalonia aphids

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shizu; Greenwell, April M.; Bressan, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Banana bunchy top virus (BBTV) is the most destructive pathogenic virus of banana plants worldwide. The virus is transmitted in a circulative non-propagative manner by the banana aphid, Pentalonia nigronervosa Coquerel. In this work, we examined the localization, accumulation, and transmission efficiency of BBTV in four laboratory-established lineages of Pentalonia aphids derived from four different host plants: taro (Colocasia esculenta), heliconia (Heliconia spp.), red ginger (Alpinia purpurata), and banana (Musa sp.). Mitochondrial sequencing identified three and one lineages as Pentalonia caladii van der Goot, a recently proposed species, and P. nigronervosa, respectively. Microsatellite analysis separated the aphid lineages into four distinct genotypes. The transmission of BBTV was tested using leaf disk and whole-plant assays, both of which showed that all four lineages are competent vectors of BBTV, although the P. caladii from heliconia transmitted BBTV to the leaf disks at a significantly lower rate than did P. nigronervosa. The concentration of BBTV in dissected guts, haemolymph, and salivary glands was quantified by real-time PCR. The BBTV titer reached similar concentrations in the guts, haemolymph, and salivary glands of aphids from all four lineages tested. Furthermore, immunofluorescence assays showed that BBTV antigens localized to the anterior midguts and the principal salivary glands, demonstrating a similar pattern of translocations across the four lineages. The results reported in this study showed for the first time that P. caladii is a competent vector of BBTV. PMID:23435241

  14. Localization, concentration, and transmission efficiency of Banana bunchy top virus in four asexual lineages of Pentalonia aphids.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shizu; Greenwell, April M; Bressan, Alberto

    2013-02-01

    Banana bunchy top virus (BBTV) is the most destructive pathogenic virus of banana plants worldwide. The virus is transmitted in a circulative non-propagative manner by the banana aphid, Pentalonia nigronervosa Coquerel. In this work, we examined the localization, accumulation, and transmission efficiency of BBTV in four laboratory-established lineages of Pentalonia aphids derived from four different host plants: taro (Colocasia esculenta), heliconia (Heliconia spp.), red ginger (Alpinia purpurata), and banana (Musa sp.). Mitochondrial sequencing identified three and one lineages as Pentalonia caladii van der Goot, a recently proposed species, and P. nigronervosa, respectively. Microsatellite analysis separated the aphid lineages into four distinct genotypes. The transmission of BBTV was tested using leaf disk and whole-plant assays, both of which showed that all four lineages are competent vectors of BBTV, although the P. caladii from heliconia transmitted BBTV to the leaf disks at a significantly lower rate than did P. nigronervosa. The concentration of BBTV in dissected guts, haemolymph, and salivary glands was quantified by real-time PCR. The BBTV titer reached similar concentrations in the guts, haemolymph, and salivary glands of aphids from all four lineages tested. Furthermore, immunofluorescence assays showed that BBTV antigens localized to the anterior midguts and the principal salivary glands, demonstrating a similar pattern of translocations across the four lineages. The results reported in this study showed for the first time that P. caladii is a competent vector of BBTV. PMID:23435241

  15. Postoperative sciatic and femoral or saphenous nerve blockade for lower extremity surgery in anesthetized adults

    PubMed Central

    Lollo, Loreto; Bhananker, Sanjay; Stogicza, Agnes

    2015-01-01

    Background: Guidelines warn of increased risks of injury when placing regional nerve blocks in the anesthetized adult but complications occurred in patients that received neither sedation nor local anesthetic. This restriction of nerve block administration places vulnerable categories of patients at risk of severe opioid induced side effects. Patient and operative technical factors can preclude use of preoperative regional anesthesia. The purpose of this study was to assess complications following sciatic popliteal and femoral or saphenous nerve blockade administered to anesthetized adult patients following foot and ankle surgery. Materials and Methods: Postoperative patients administered general anesthesia received popliteal sciatic nerve blockade and either femoral or saphenous nerve blockade if operative procedures included medial incisions. Nerve blocks were placed with nerve stimulator or ultrasound guidance. A continuous nerve catheter was inserted if hospital admission was over 24 hours. Opioid analgesic supplementation was administered for inadequate pain relief. Postoperative pain scores and total analgesic requirements for 24 hours were recorded. Nerve block related complications were monitored for during the hospital admission and at follow up surgical clinic evaluation. Results: 190 anesthetized adult patients were administered 357 nerve blocks. No major nerve injury or deficit was reported. One patient had numbness in the toes not ascribed to a specific nerve of the lower extremity. Perioperative opioid dose differences were noted between male and female and between opioid naïve and tolerant patients. PMID:26807391

  16. What is the optimal anesthetic protocol for measurements of cerebral autoregulation in spontaneously breathing mice?

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenghui; Schuler, Beat; Vogel, Olga; Arras, Margarete; Vogel, Johannes

    2010-12-01

    Autoregulation, an important feature of the cerebral circulation, is affected in many diseases. Since genetically modified mice are a fundamental tool in biomedical research, including neuro(bio)logy also in this specie measurements of cerebral autoregulation (CA) are mandatory. However, this requires anesthesia that unfortunately significantly impacts cerebral perfusion and consequently might distort CA measurements directly or by altering arterial pCO(2). The latter can be avoided by artificial ventilation but requires several control measurements of blood gases, each consuming at least 100 μl of blood or 5% of a mouse's blood volume. To avoid such diagnostic hemorrhage, we systematically analyzed the effect of different common anesthetic protocols used for rodents in spontaneously breathing mice on CA measured with Laser speckle perfusion imaging. Halothane, Isoflurane and Pentobarbital abrogated CA and Ketamin/Xylazine as well as Chloralose had a moderate reproducibility. In contrast, the rather rarely used anesthetic Ethomidate applied in low doses combined with local anesthetics had the best reproducibility. Although with this anesthesia the lower CA limit was lower than with Ketamin/Xylazine and Chloralose as reported in the handful of papers so far dealing with CA in mice, we suggest Ethomidate as the anesthetic of choice for CA measurements in spontaneously breathing mice.

  17. Are one or two dangerous? Lidocaine and topical anesthetic exposures in children.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Liesl A; Dolan, Teresa Sullivan; Seibert, H Edward

    2009-07-01

    Topical anesthetics are found in a variety of prescription and non-prescription preparations, from teething gels to hemorrhoid creams. In 2003, there were 8576 exposures to local/topical anesthetics reported to the American Association of Poison Control Centers, with 67% of cases in the age group younger than 6 years old. This report reviews the available literature involving topical anesthetic exposures in children younger than 6 years old, including the National Library of Medicine's Pub Med database (limited to English language) and data from POISINDEX. Additionally, we reviewed the American Association of Poison Control Centers' annual reports from 1983 to 2003. There were 7 deaths in this age range from topical anesthetics. Although the number of deaths is low, the fact that there have been deaths reveals the serious nature of the toxicity that can result from these readily available non-prescription analgesics. Toxicity may result from topical absorption, ingestion, or aspiration. Additionally, toxicity can result from unintentional as well as therapeutic mishaps. Although the number of cases is limited, these medications can be toxic at low doses-which, in children younger than 6 years of age, may amount to as little as a teaspoon.

  18. Local anesthesia: a review.

    PubMed

    Malamed, S F; Sykes, P; Kubota, Y; Matsuura, H; Lipp, M

    1992-01-01

    Local anesthetics are the most widely administered drugs in dentistry. Significant advances have been made in past decades that have greatly increased both the safety and the efficacy of these important drugs. This paper reviews the history of local anesthesia, pharmacokinetics and clinical implications, techniques, complications, and future directions in the quest for more effective pain control in dentistry.

  19. A Unitary Anesthetic Binding Site at High Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    L Vedula; G Brannigan; N Economou; J Xi; M Hall; R Liu; M Rossi; W Dailey; K Grasty; et. al.

    2011-12-31

    Propofol is the most widely used injectable general anesthetic. Its targets include ligand-gated ion channels such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, but such receptor-channel complexes remain challenging to study at atomic resolution. Until structural biology methods advance to the point of being able to deal with systems such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, it will be necessary to use more tractable surrogates to probe the molecular details of anesthetic recognition. We have previously shown that recognition of inhalational general anesthetics by the model protein apoferritin closely mirrors recognition by more complex and clinically relevant protein targets; here we show that apoferritin also binds propofol and related GABAergic anesthetics, and that the same binding site mediates recognition of both inhalational and injectable anesthetics. Apoferritin binding affinities for a series of propofol analogs were found to be strongly correlated with the ability to potentiate GABA responses at GABA{sub A} receptors, validating this model system for injectable anesthetics. High resolution x-ray crystal structures reveal that, despite the presence of hydrogen bond donors and acceptors, anesthetic recognition is mediated largely by van der Waals forces and the hydrophobic effect. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the ligands undergo considerable fluctuations about their equilibrium positions. Finally, apoferritin displays both structural and dynamic responses to anesthetic binding, which may mimic changes elicited by anesthetics in physiologic targets like ion channels.

  20. A Unitary Anesthetic Binding Site at High Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Vedula, L. Sangeetha; Brannigan, Grace; Economou, Nicoleta J.; Xi, Jin; Hall, Michael A.; Liu, Renyu; Rossi, Matthew J.; Dailey, William P.; Grasty, Kimberly C.; Klein, Michael L.; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.; Loll, Patrick J.

    2009-10-21

    Propofol is the most widely used injectable general anesthetic. Its targets include ligand-gated ion channels such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, but such receptor-channel complexes remain challenging to study at atomic resolution. Until structural biology methods advance to the point of being able to deal with systems such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, it will be necessary to use more tractable surrogates to probe the molecular details of anesthetic recognition. We have previously shown that recognition of inhalational general anesthetics by the model protein apoferritin closely mirrors recognition by more complex and clinically relevant protein targets; here we show that apoferritin also binds propofol and related GABAergic anesthetics, and that the same binding site mediates recognition of both inhalational and injectable anesthetics. Apoferritin binding affinities for a series of propofol analogs were found to be strongly correlated with the ability to potentiate GABA responses at GABA{sub A} receptors, validating this model system for injectable anesthetics. High resolution x-ray crystal structures reveal that, despite the presence of hydrogen bond donors and acceptors, anesthetic recognition is mediated largely by van der Waals forces and the hydrophobic effect. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the ligands undergo considerable fluctuations about their equilibrium positions. Finally, apoferritin displays both structural and dynamic responses to anesthetic binding, which may mimic changes elicited by anesthetics in physiologic targets like ion channels.

  1. A Unitary Anesthetic-Binding Site at High Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Vedula, L.; Brannigan, G; Economou, N; Xi, J; Hall, M; Liu, R; Rossi, M; Dailey, W; Grasty, K; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Propofol is the most widely used injectable general anesthetic. Its targets include ligand-gated ion channels such as the GABAA receptor, but such receptor-channel complexes remain challenging to study at atomic resolution. Until structural biology methods advance to the point of being able to deal with systems such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, it will be necessary to use more tractable surrogates to probe the molecular details of anesthetic recognition. We have previously shown that recognition of inhalational general anesthetics by the model protein apoferritin closely mirrors recognition by more complex and clinically relevant protein targets; here we show that apoferritin also binds propofol and related GABAergic anesthetics, and that the same binding site mediates recognition of both inhalational and injectable anesthetics. Apoferritin binding affinities for a series of propofol analogs were found to be strongly correlated with the ability to potentiate GABA responses at GABA{sub A} receptors, validating this model system for injectable anesthetics. High resolution x-ray crystal structures reveal that, despite the presence of hydrogen bond donors and acceptors, anesthetic recognition is mediated largely by van der Waals forces and the hydrophobic effect. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the ligands undergo considerable fluctuations about their equilibrium positions. Finally, apoferritin displays both structural and dynamic responses to anesthetic binding, which may mimic changes elicited by anesthetics in physiologic targets like ion channels.

  2. A Unitary Anesthetic Binding Site at High Resolution*

    PubMed Central

    Vedula, L. Sangeetha; Brannigan, Grace; Economou, Nicoleta J.; Xi, Jin; Hall, Michael A.; Liu, Renyu; Rossi, Matthew J.; Dailey, William P.; Grasty, Kimberly C.; Klein, Michael L.; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.; Loll, Patrick J.

    2009-01-01

    Propofol is the most widely used injectable general anesthetic. Its targets include ligand-gated ion channels such as the GABAA receptor, but such receptor-channel complexes remain challenging to study at atomic resolution. Until structural biology methods advance to the point of being able to deal with systems such as the GABAA receptor, it will be necessary to use more tractable surrogates to probe the molecular details of anesthetic recognition. We have previously shown that recognition of inhalational general anesthetics by the model protein apoferritin closely mirrors recognition by more complex and clinically relevant protein targets; here we show that apoferritin also binds propofol and related GABAergic anesthetics, and that the same binding site mediates recognition of both inhalational and injectable anesthetics. Apoferritin binding affinities for a series of propofol analogs were found to be strongly correlated with the ability to potentiate GABA responses at GABAA receptors, validating this model system for injectable anesthetics. High resolution x-ray crystal structures reveal that, despite the presence of hydrogen bond donors and acceptors, anesthetic recognition is mediated largely by van der Waals forces and the hydrophobic effect. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the ligands undergo considerable fluctuations about their equilibrium positions. Finally, apoferritin displays both structural and dynamic responses to anesthetic binding, which may mimic changes elicited by anesthetics in physiologic targets like ion channels. PMID:19605349

  3. Mimosa pudica, Dionaea muscipula and anesthetics.

    PubMed

    De Luccia, Thiago Paes de Barros

    2012-09-01

    Some studies showed that anesthetics reduce the response of physical stimuli in Mimosa pudica and in Venus Flytrap (Dionaea muscipula), peculiar plants that have the ability to respond to touch stimuli. In this research we tested the effects of ketamine, lidocaine, diethyl ether, and amlodipine on the movements of Mimosa pudica and Venus Flytrap. With a literature review, we tried to bring elements to theorize about the interaction of these substances with these plants. The angular displacement in Mimosa´s petiole and in Dionaea leaves is what was measured to compare the drugs group with control groups.

  4. Mimosa pudica, Dionaea muscipula and anesthetics

    PubMed Central

    De Luccia, Thiago Paes de Barros

    2012-01-01

    Some studies showed that anesthetics reduce the response of physical stimuli in Mimosa pudica and in Venus Flytrap (Dionaea muscipula), peculiar plants that have the ability to respond to touch stimuli. In this research we tested the effects of ketamine, lidocaine, diethyl ether, and amlodipine on the movements of Mimosa pudica and Venus Flytrap. With a literature review, we tried to bring elements to theorize about the interaction of these substances with these plants. The angular displacement in Mimosa´s petiole and in Dionaea leaves is what was measured to compare the drugs group with control groups. PMID:22899087

  5. External cardiovascular resuscitation of the anesthetized pony.

    PubMed

    Frauenfelder, H C; Fessler, J F; Latshaw, H S; Moore, A B; Bottoms, G D

    1981-10-01

    External cardiac massage and concomitant respiratory support were used successfully 6 of 8 anesthetized ponies sustaining unexpected cardiac arrest while being used in a study of shock. Approximately 20 thoracic compressions/min maintained systolic and diastolic aortic blood pressures in excess of 50% of the corresponding base-line values in 5 ponies. The high success rate was attributed to early recognition of the problem, the small size of the patient, and the relatively short duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (average, 2.9 minutes). It was concluded that external cardiac message can be effective for cardiopulmonary resuscitation in selected equine patients that have sustained cardiac arrest.

  6. In vivo molecular labeling of halogenated volatile anesthetics via intrinsic molecular vibrations using nonlinear Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagashima, Yu; Suzuki, Takayuki; Terada, Sumio; Tsuji, Shoji; Misawa, Kazuhiko

    2011-01-01

    Halogenated volatile anesthetics are frequently used for inhaled anesthesia in clinical practice. No appropriate biological method has been available for visualizing their localization in action. Therefore, despite their frequent use, the mechanism of action of these drugs has not been fully investigated. We measured coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectra of sevoflurane and isoflurane, two of the most representative volatile anesthetics, and determined the low-frequency vibrational modes without nonresonant background disturbance. Molecular dynamics calculations predict that these modes are associated with multiple halogen atoms. Because halogen atoms rarely appear in biological compounds, the entire spectral landscape of these modes is expected to be a good marker for investigating the spatial localization of these drugs within the intracellular environment. Using live squid giant axons, we could detect the unique CARS spectra of sevoflurane for the first time in a biological setting.

  7. The degradation, absorption, and solubility of volatile anesthetics in soda lime depend on water content.

    PubMed

    Strum, D P; Eger, E I

    1994-02-01

    Absorption of anesthetic into soda lime may delay induction of anesthesia and degradation by soda lime may produce toxic products. We determined whether the moisture content of soda lime influences the mechanisms underlying absorption (saturable uptake), degradation, and solubility (nonsaturable uptake). We placed liquid anesthetic (sevoflurane, isoflurane, halothane, enflurane, or desflurane) in 581-mL equilibration flasks containing soda lime of various water contents (0%-15.1% H2O) and sampled the vapor concentrations repeatedly for 24-35 h. Loss of vapor from the gas phase was partitioned into absorption, degradation, and solubility factors by regression analyses. We also found that soda lime in absorbers may dry from H2O contents of 15% to 4%-8.5% in routine clinical use. Our observations suggest that during induction of anesthesia a portion of the delivered anesthetic may be lost to the soda lime, rather than delivered to the patient. In addition, the potential for production of toxic products may be increased when volatile anesthetics are used with dry soda lime.

  8. Allyl m-Trifluoromethyldiazirine Mephobarbital: An Unusually Potent Enantioselective and Photoreactive Barbiturate General Anesthetic

    SciTech Connect

    Savechenkov, Pavel Y.; Zhang, Xi; Chiara, David C.; Stewart, Deirdre S.; Ge, Rile; Zhou, Xiaojuan; Raines, Douglas E.; Cohen, Jonathan B.; Forman, Stuart A.; Miller, Keith W.; Bruzik, Karol S.

    2012-12-10

    We synthesized 5-allyl-1-methyl-5-(m-trifluoromethyl-diazirynylphenyl)barbituric acid (14), a trifluoromethyldiazirine-containing derivative of general anesthetic mephobarbital, separated the racemic mixture into enantiomers by chiral chromatography, and determined the configuration of the (+)-enantiomer as S by X-ray crystallography. Additionally, we obtained the {sup 3}H-labeled ligand with high specific radioactivity. R-(-)-14 is an order of magnitude more potent than the most potent clinically used barbiturate, thiopental, and its general anesthetic EC{sub 50} approaches those for propofol and etomidate, whereas S-(+)-14 is 10-fold less potent. Furthermore, at concentrations close to its anesthetic potency, R-(-)-14 both potentiated GABA-induced currents and increased the affinity for the agonist muscimol in human {alpha}1{beta}2/3{gamma}2L GABA{sub A} receptors. Finally, R-(-)-14 was found to be an exceptionally efficient photolabeling reagent, incorporating into both {alpha}1 and {beta}3 subunits of human {alpha}1{beta}3 GABAA receptors. These results indicate R-(-)-14 is a functional general anesthetic that is well-suited for identifying barbiturate binding sites on Cys-loop receptors.

  9. Allyl m-trifluoromethyldiazirine mephobarbital: an unusually potent enantioselective and photoreactive barbiturate general anesthetic.

    PubMed

    Savechenkov, Pavel Y; Zhang, Xi; Chiara, David C; Stewart, Deirdre S; Ge, Rile; Zhou, Xiaojuan; Raines, Douglas E; Cohen, Jonathan B; Forman, Stuart A; Miller, Keith W; Bruzik, Karol S

    2012-07-26

    We synthesized 5-allyl-1-methyl-5-(m-trifluoromethyl-diazirynylphenyl)barbituric acid (14), a trifluoromethyldiazirine-containing derivative of general anesthetic mephobarbital, separated the racemic mixture into enantiomers by chiral chromatography, and determined the configuration of the (+)-enantiomer as S by X-ray crystallography. Additionally, we obtained the (3)H-labeled ligand with high specific radioactivity. R-(-)-14 is an order of magnitude more potent than the most potent clinically used barbiturate, thiopental, and its general anesthetic EC(50) approaches those for propofol and etomidate, whereas S-(+)-14 is 10-fold less potent. Furthermore, at concentrations close to its anesthetic potency, R-(-)-14 both potentiated GABA-induced currents and increased the affinity for the agonist muscimol in human α1β2/3γ2L GABA(A) receptors. Finally, R-(-)-14 was found to be an exceptionally efficient photolabeling reagent, incorporating into both α1 and β3 subunits of human α1β3 GABA(A) receptors. These results indicate R-(-)-14 is a functional general anesthetic that is well-suited for identifying barbiturate binding sites on Cys-loop receptors.

  10. Dexmedetomidine as an anesthetic adjuvant in laparoscopic surgery: An observational study using entropy monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Ghodki, Poonam S; Thombre, Shalini K; Sardesai, Shalini P; Harnagle, Kalpana D

    2012-01-01

    Background: Dexmedetomidine is a highly selective α2 agonist with properties of sedation, analgesia and anxiolysis, making it an ideal anesthetic adjuvant. Using an anesthetic adjuvant that decreases requirement of anesthetics and analgesics may predispose the patient to awareness. We monitored the depth of anesthesia (DOA) using entropy to avoid unwanted awareness under anesthesia. Materials and Methods: 30 patients, American Society of Anesthesiologists grade I and II, aged between 18 to 50 years of either gender undergoing laparoscopic surgeries under general anesthesia were studied. Loading dose infusion of dexmedetomidine was started 1 mcg/kg for 15 minutes and patients were premedicated. Routine induction with propofol and fentanyl was carried out, and maintenance infusion of dexmedetomidine 0.2 mcg/kg/hr was given. Patients were monitored with standard monitoring, and in addition, the DOA was monitored with entropy. Results: A 62.5% reduction (0.75 mg/kg) in the induction dose of propofol was observed, with a 30% less end-tidal concentration of isoflurane requirement for maintenance of anesthesia, while maintaining the adequate DOA. Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine is an effective anesthetic adjuvant that can be safely used in laparoscopy without the fear of awareness under anesthesia. PMID:22869940

  11. Participation of the GABAergic system in the anesthetic effect of Lippia alba (Mill.) N.E. Brown essential oil

    PubMed Central

    Heldwein, C.G.; Silva, L.L.; Reckziegel, P.; Barros, F.M.C.; Bürger, M.E.; Baldisserotto, B.; Mallmann, C.A.; Schmidt, D.; Caron, B.O.; Heinzmann, B.M.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the possible involvement of the GABAergic system in the anesthetic effect of Lippia alba essential oil (EO). We propose a new animal model using silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen) exposed to an anesthetic bath to study the mechanism of action of EO. To observe the induction and potentiation of the anesthetic effect of EO, juvenile silver catfish (9.30 ± 1.85 g; 10.15 ± 0.95 cm; N = 6) were exposed to various concentrations of L. alba EO in the presence or absence of diazepam [an agonist of high-affinity binding sites for benzodiazepinic (BDZ) sites coupled to the GABAA receptor complex]. In another experiment, fish (N = 6) were initially anesthetized with the EO and then transferred to an anesthetic-free aquarium containing flumazenil (a selective antagonist of binding sites for BDZ coupled to the GABAA receptor complex) or water to assess recovery time from the anesthesia. In this case, flumazenil was used to observe the involvement of the GABA-BDZ receptor in the EO mechanism of action. The results showed that diazepam potentiates the anesthetic effect of EO at all concentrations tested. Fish exposed to diazepam and EO showed faster recovery from anesthesia when flumazenil was added to the recovery bath (12.0 ± 0.3 and 7.2 ± 0.7, respectively) than those exposed to water (9.2 ± 0.2 and 3.5 ± 0.3, respectively). In conclusion, the results demonstrated the involvement of the GABAergic system in the anesthetic effect of L. alba EO on silver catfish. PMID:22473320

  12. Methods to produce calibration mixtures for anesthetic gas monitors and how to perform volumetric calculations on anesthetic gases.

    PubMed

    Christensen, P L; Nielsen, J; Kann, T

    1992-10-01

    A simple procedure for making calibration mixtures of oxygen and the anesthetic gases isoflurane, enflurane, and halothane is described. One to ten grams of the anesthetic substance is evaporated in a closed, 11,361-cc glass bottle filled with oxygen gas at atmospheric pressure. The carefully mixed gas is used to calibrate anesthetic gas monitors. By comparison of calculated and measured volumetric results it is shown that at atmospheric conditions the volumetric behavior of anesthetic gas mixtures can be described with reasonable accuracy using the ideal gas law. A procedure is described for calculating the deviation from ideal gas behavior in cases in which this is needed. PMID:1453187

  13. Transport of topical anesthetics in vitamin E loaded silicone hydrogel contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Peng, Cheng-Chun; Burke, Michael T; Chauhan, Anuj

    2012-01-17

    Transport of surface active anesthetic drugs through silicone hydrogel contact lenses containing nanosized vitamin E aggregates is explored for achieving extended anesthetics delivery. Commercial silicone hydrogel contact lenses release most ophthalmic drugs including local anesthetics for only a few hours, which is not adequate. Here we focus on creating dispersion of highly hydrophobic vitamin E aggregates in the lenses as barriers for drug diffusion for increasing the release durations. This approach has been shown previously to be successful in extending the release durations for some common hydrophilic ophthalmic drugs. The topical anesthetic drugs considered here (lidocaine, bupivacaine, and tetracaine) are hydrophilic at physiologic pH due to the charge, and so these cannot partition into the vitamin E barriers. However, these surface active drug molecules adsorb on the surface of the vitamin E barriers and diffuse along the surface, leading to only a small decrease in the effective diffusivity compared to non-surface-active hydrophilic drugs. The drug adsorption can be described by the Langmuir isotherm, and measurements of surface coverage of the drugs on the vitamin E provide an estimate of the available surface area of vitamin E, which can then be utilized to estimate the size of the aggregates. A diffusion controlled transport model that includes surface diffusion along the vitamin E aggregates and diffusion in the gel fit the transport data well. In conclusion, the vitamin E loaded silicone contact lens can provide continuous anesthetics release for about 1-7 days, depending on the method of drug loading in the lenses, and thus could be very useful for postoperative pain control after corneal surgery such as the photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) procedure for vision correction.

  14. Benzocaine as a fish anesthetic: efficacy and safety for spawning-phase salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilderhus, P.A.

    1990-01-01

    The anesthetic benzocaine was tested for efficacy and safety for spawning-phase chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) at federal fish hatcheries. Tests were conducted in the existing hatchery water supplies (soft water; temperatures, 10–13 °C. Crystalline benzocaine was dissolved in ethanol (1 g/30 mL), and aliquots of that stock solution were added to the water in test tanks. Benzocaine concentrations of 25–30 mg/L anesthetized most fish in less than 3.5 min, and most fish recovered in less than 10 min after 15 min of exposure. Safety margins were narrow; both species tolerated 30 mg/L for about 20 min, but 25 min of exposure caused deaths. For 15 min exposures, concentrations of 35 mg/L for chinook salmon and 40 mg/L for Atlantic salmon were lethal.

  15. 21 CFR 868.5550 - Anesthetic gas mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Anesthetic gas mask. 868.5550 Section 868.5550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5550 Anesthetic gas mask....

  16. 21 CFR 868.5550 - Anesthetic gas mask.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Anesthetic gas mask. 868.5550 Section 868.5550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5550 Anesthetic gas mask....

  17. 46 CFR 147.105 - Anesthetics, drugs, and medicines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Anesthetics, drugs, and medicines. 147.105 Section 147.105 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES HAZARDOUS..., drugs, and medicines. Anesthetics, drugs, and medicines must be stowed and dispensed in accordance...

  18. 46 CFR 147.105 - Anesthetics, drugs, and medicines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Anesthetics, drugs, and medicines. 147.105 Section 147.105 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES HAZARDOUS..., drugs, and medicines. Anesthetics, drugs, and medicines must be stowed and dispensed in accordance...

  19. 46 CFR 147.105 - Anesthetics, drugs, and medicines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Anesthetics, drugs, and medicines. 147.105 Section 147.105 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DANGEROUS CARGOES HAZARDOUS..., drugs, and medicines. Anesthetics, drugs, and medicines must be stowed and dispensed in accordance...

  20. Crop harvest in Denmark and Central Europe contributes to the local load of airborne Alternaria spore concentrations in Copenhagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skjøth, C. A.; Sommer, J.; Frederiksen, L.; Gosewinkel Karlson, U.

    2012-11-01

    This study examines the hypothesis that Danish agricultural areas are the main source of airborne Alternaria spores in Copenhagen, Denmark. We suggest that the contribution to the overall load is mainly local or regional, but with intermittent long distance transport (LDT) from more remote agricultural areas. This hypothesis is supported by investigating a 10 yr bi-hourly record of Alternaria spores in the air from Copenhagen. This record shows 232 clinically relevant episodes (daily average spore concentration above 100 m-3) with a distinct daily profile. The data analysis also revealed potential LDT episodes almost every year. A source map and analysis of atmospheric transport suggest that LDT always originates from the main agricultural areas in Central Europe. A dedicated emission study in cereal crops under harvest during 2010 also supports our hypothesis. The emission study showed that although the fields had been treated against fungal infections, harvesting still produced large amounts of airborne fungal spores. It is likely that such harvesting periods can cause clinically relevant levels of fungal spores in the atmosphere. Our findings suggest that crop harvest in Central Europe causes episodes of high airborne Alternaria spore concentrations in Copenhagen as well as other urban areas in this region. It is likely that such episodes could be simulated using atmospheric transport models.

  1. Calculation of the g Factors and Local Angular Distortions for ZnO:Cu2+ Nanocrystals With Various Copper Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.-L.; Wu, S.-Y.; Hu, X.-F.; Teng, B.-H.; Wu, M.-H.

    2016-07-01

    Based on the perturbation treatments for a tetragonally distorted tetrahedral 3d 9 cluster, the g factors and local angular distortions are calculated for ZnO:Cu2+ nanocrystals with various Cu2+ concentrations in different systems I and II under dissimilar experimental conditions. Because of the dynamic Jahn-Teller effect, the bond angles θ between the four equivalent Cu2+-O2- bonds and the C4 axis are about 1.5o larger than that (θ0 ≈ 54.736o) of an ideal tetrahedron. Consequently, the original slightly trigonally distorted oxygen tetrahedron of the host Zn2+ site is transformed into a tetragonally compressed one. The isotropy of g factors may be attributed to the appropriate angular distortions Δθ = θ - θ0 due to the dynamic Jahn-Teller effect. The slightly increasing (or decreasing) g factors with concentration x can be illustrated as the delicate increases (or decreases) of the angular distortions (Δθ) and the covalency factors (N) for system I (or II), respectively, under almost equivalent crystal-fi eld strengths (Dq).

  2. Superior antibacterial activity of zinc oxide/graphene oxide composites originating from high zinc concentration localized around bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Wen; Cao, Aoneng; Jiang, Yu; Zhang, Xin; Liu, Jia-Hui; Liu, Yuanfang; Wang, Haifang

    2014-02-26

    New materials with good antibacterial activity and less toxicity to other species attract numerous research interest. Taking advantage of zinc oxide (ZnO) and graphene oxide (GO), the ZnO/GO composites were prepared by a facile one-pot reaction to achieve superior antibacterial properties without damaging other species. In the composites, ZnO nanoparticles (NPs), with a size of about 4 nm, homogeneously anchored onto GO sheets. The typical bacterium Escherichia coli and HeLa cell were used to evaluate the antibacterial activity and cytotoxicity of the ZnO/GO composites, respectively. The synergistic effects of GO and ZnO NPs led to the superior antibacterial activity of the composites. GO helped the dispersion of ZnO NPs, slowed the dissolution of ZnO, acted as the storage site for the dissolved zinc ions, and enabled the intimate contact of E. coli with ZnO NPs and zinc ions as well. The close contact enhanced the local zinc concentration pitting on the bacterial membrane and the permeability of the bacterial membrane and thus induced bacterial death. In addition, the ZnO/GO composites were found to be much less toxic to HeLa cells, compared to the equivalent concentration of ZnO NPs in the composites. The results indicate that the ZnO/GO composites are promising disinfection materials to be used in surface coatings on various substrates to effectively inhibit bacterial growth, propagation, and survival in medical devices.

  3. Atomistic models of general anesthetics for use in in silico biological studies.

    PubMed

    Arcario, Mark J; Mayne, Christopher G; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2014-10-23

    While small molecules have been used to induce anesthesia in a clinical setting for well over a century, a detailed understanding of the molecular mechanism remains elusive. In this study, we utilize ab initio calculations to develop a novel set of CHARMM-compatible parameters for the ubiquitous modern anesthetics desflurane, isoflurane, sevoflurane, and propofol for use in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The parameters generated were rigorously tested against known experimental physicochemical properties including dipole moment, density, enthalpy of vaporization, and free energy of solvation. In all cases, the anesthetic parameters were able to reproduce experimental measurements, signifying the robustness and accuracy of the atomistic models developed. The models were then used to study the interaction of anesthetics with the membrane. Calculation of the potential of mean force for inserting the molecules into a POPC bilayer revealed a distinct energetic minimum of 4-5 kcal/mol relative to aqueous solution at the level of the glycerol backbone in the membrane. The location of this minimum within the membrane suggests that anesthetics partition to the membrane prior to binding their ion channel targets, giving context to the Meyer-Overton correlation. Moreover, MD simulations of these drugs in the membrane give rise to computed membrane structural parameters, including atomic distribution, deuterium order parameters, dipole potential, and lateral stress profile, that indicate partitioning of anesthetics into the membrane at the concentration range studied here, which does not appear to perturb the structural integrity of the lipid bilayer. These results signify that an indirect, membrane-mediated mechanism of channel modulation is unlikely.

  4. Global versus local causes and health implications of high mercury concentrations in sharks from the east coast of South Africa.

    PubMed

    McKinney, Melissa A; Dean, Kylie; Hussey, Nigel E; Cliff, Geremy; Wintner, Sabine P; Dudley, Sheldon F J; Zungu, M Philip; Fisk, Aaron T

    2016-01-15

    Conservation concern regarding the overharvest of global shark populations for meat and fin consumption largely surrounds documented deleterious ecosystem effects, but may be further supported by improved knowledge of possibly high levels in their edible tissues (particularly meat) of the neurotoxin, methylmercury (CH3Hg). For many regions, however, little data exist on shark tissue Hg concentrations, and reasons for Hg variation within and among species or across regions are poorly understood. We quantified total Hg (THg) in 17 shark species (total n=283) from the east coast of South Africa, a top Hg emitter globally. Concentrations varied from means of around 0.1 mg kg(-1) dry weight (dw) THg in hardnose smoothhound (Mustelus mosis) and whale (Rhincodon typus) sharks to means of over 10 mg kg(-1) dw in shortfin mako (Isurus oxyrinchus), scalloped hammerhead (Sphyrna lewini), white (Carcharodon carcharias) and ragged-tooth (Carcharias taurus) sharks. These sharks had higher THg levels than conspecifics sampled from coastal waters of the North Atlantic and North, mid-, and South Pacific, and although sampling year and shark size may play a confounding role, this result suggests the potential importance of elevated local emissions. Values of THg showed strong, species-specific correlations with length, and nearly half the remaining variation was explained by trophic position (using nitrogen stable isotopes, δ(15)N), whereas measures of foraging habitat (using carbon stable isotopes, δ(13)C) were not significant. Mercury concentrations were above the regulatory guidelines for fish health effects and safe human consumption for 88% and 70% of species, respectively, suggesting on-going cause for concern for shark health, and human consumers of shark meat.

  5. Global versus local causes and health implications of high mercury concentrations in sharks from the east coast of South Africa.

    PubMed

    McKinney, Melissa A; Dean, Kylie; Hussey, Nigel E; Cliff, Geremy; Wintner, Sabine P; Dudley, Sheldon F J; Zungu, M Philip; Fisk, Aaron T

    2016-01-15

    Conservation concern regarding the overharvest of global shark populations for meat and fin consumption largely surrounds documented deleterious ecosystem effects, but may be further supported by improved knowledge of possibly high levels in their edible tissues (particularly meat) of the neurotoxin, methylmercury (CH3Hg). For many regions, however, little data exist on shark tissue Hg concentrations, and reasons for Hg variation within and among species or across regions are poorly understood. We quantified total Hg (THg) in 17 shark species (total n=283) from the east coast of South Africa, a top Hg emitter globally. Concentrations varied from means of around 0.1 mg kg(-1) dry weight (dw) THg in hardnose smoothhound (Mustelus mosis) and whale (Rhincodon typus) sharks to means of over 10 mg kg(-1) dw in shortfin mako (Isurus oxyrinchus), scalloped hammerhead (Sphyrna lewini), white (Carcharodon carcharias) and ragged-tooth (Carcharias taurus) sharks. These sharks had higher THg levels than conspecifics sampled from coastal waters of the North Atlantic and North, mid-, and South Pacific, and although sampling year and shark size may play a confounding role, this result suggests the potential importance of elevated local emissions. Values of THg showed strong, species-specific correlations with length, and nearly half the remaining variation was explained by trophic position (using nitrogen stable isotopes, δ(15)N), whereas measures of foraging habitat (using carbon stable isotopes, δ(13)C) were not significant. Mercury concentrations were above the regulatory guidelines for fish health effects and safe human consumption for 88% and 70% of species, respectively, suggesting on-going cause for concern for shark health, and human consumers of shark meat. PMID:26409147

  6. PROSPECTIVE RANDOMIZED STUDY COMPARING TWO ANESTHETIC METHODS FOR SHOULDER SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    Ikemoto, Roberto Yukio; Murachovsky, Joel; Prata Nascimento, Luis Gustavo; Bueno, Rogerio Serpone; Oliveira Almeida, Luiz Henrique; Strose, Eric; de Mello, Sérgio Cabral; Saletti, Deise

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of suprascapular nerve block in combination with infusion of anesthetic into the subacromial space, compared with interscalene block. Methods: Forty-five patients with small or medium-sized isolated supraspinatus tendon lesions who underwent arthroscopic repair were prospectively and comparatively evaluated through random assignation to three groups of 15, each with a different combination of anesthetic methods. The efficacy of postoperative analgesia was measured using the visual analogue scale for pain and the analgesic, anti-inflammatory and opioid drug consumption. Inhalation anesthetic consumption during surgery was also compared between the groups. Results: The statistical analysis did not find any statistically significant differences among the groups regarding anesthetic consumption during surgery or postoperative analgesic efficacy during the first 48 hours. Conclusion: Suprascapular nerve block with infusion of anesthetic into the subacromial space is an excellent alternative to interscalene block, particularly in hospitals in which an electrical nerve stimulating device is unavailable. PMID:27022569

  7. Efficiency of eugenol as anesthetic for the early life stages of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Paula A P; Miranda-Filho, Kleber C; Melo, Daniela C de; Luz, Ronald K

    2015-03-01

    In aquaculture, activities with anesthetic compounds are usually used in order to ensure the welfare of farmed fish, allowing handling out of water with decreased trauma by stress. Presently, there is no information about anesthetic action of eugenol in early life stages of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). The objective of this study was to evaluate different concentrations of eugenol for larvae and juveniles of Nile tilapia. Sixty animals were used for each group of weight, group I = 0.02 g; group II = 0.08 g; group III = 0.22 g; group IV = 2.62 g; and group V = 11.64 g. The eugenol concentrations tested were 50, 75, 100, 125, 150 and 175 mg L-1. No mortality was reported during the tests with eugenol. Tilapia larvae with 0.02 g and juveniles around 11.64 g can be anesthetized with eugenol concentrations between 150 and 175 mg L-1, since they determine the shortest sedation time (23 and 72 seconds, for the group of lowest and highest weights, respectively).

  8. Ethyl-p-aminobenzoate (Benzocaine): efficacy as an anesthetic for five species of freshwater fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, V.K.; Gilderhus, P.A.

    1979-01-01

    Ethyl-p-aminobenzoate (benzocaine) was tested for its efficacy as an anesthetic for rainbow trout (Salmo gairdnerii, brown trout (Salmo truttas, northern pike (Esox lucius). carp (Cyprinus carpio), and largemouth bass (Mieropterus salmoidesi. Since benzocaine is not water soluble, it was applied with acetone as a carrier. Concentrations of 100 to 200 mg!l were required for large adult northern pike, compared with 50 to 100 mg/l for small fish. Rates of sedation and recovery were slower in cold water than in warm water. Water hardness had little influence on the activity of benzocaine. Fish were anesthetized faster and recovered more slowly in acid than in alkaline water. Benzocaine produced deep anesthesia, but concentrations that rendered the fish handleable within 5 min were generally not safe for exposures longer than 15 min. Concentrations of benzocaine efficacious for fish were not acutely toxic to eggs of coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshauiytschas, rainbow trout, brown trout, or lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush). Benzocaine is not registered for fishery use and is neither more effective nor safer than the registered anesthetic, tricaine methanesulfonate (MS-222l.

  9. Anesthetic management of an infant for aortopexy.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shruti; Gupta, Richa; Wadhawan, Sonia

    2013-04-01

    Tracheomalacia is a rare condition characterized by weakness of tracheobronchial cartilaginous bridges. Severe weakness results in tracheal collapse during inspiration, obstructing normal airflow. Tracheomalacia may also be associated with esophageal atresia, tracheoesophageal fistula, and gastroesophageal reflux. Aortopexy is an established surgical procedure for treatment of severe tracheomalacia. A 2-month-old boy was scheduled for aortopexy. He had already undergone repair of tracheoesophageal fistula and had failed multiple attempts at extubation. Intraoperative flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy was performed to guide the amount and direction of aortopexy for assuring the most effective tracheal decompression. Since tracheomalacia is best assessed in a spontaneously breathing patient, it was an anesthetic challenge to maintain an adequate depth of anesthesia while allowing the patient to breathe spontaneously. Throughout the intraoperative period, SpO2 remained ≥96%. Following the procedure, the trachea was extubated and patient was able to breathe normally. PMID:23878453

  10. Cardiovascular effects of esmolol in anesthetized humans.

    PubMed

    Menkhaus, P G; Reves, J G; Kissin, I; Alvis, J M; Govier, A V; Samuelson, P N; Lell, W A; Henling, C E; Bradley, E

    1985-03-01

    We studied the cardiovascular effects of esmolol, a newly synthesized beta-adrenocepter antagonist, in anesthetized humans. Forty patients (four groups of 10 each) with ischemic heart disease and normal ventricular function were anesthetized with diazepam, pancuronium, and N2O in O2. Esmolol was given by continuous infusion in cumulative doses of 1100 micrograms/kg (group 1), 2000 micrograms/kg (group 2), and 2700 micrograms/kg (group 3); a control group received no esmolol. Infusion of esmolol was begun 3 min prior to and ended 4 min after tracheal intubation. All three doses of esmolol significantly (P less than 0.001) attenuated the heart rate responses to intubation. Rate-pressure products were significantly (P less than 0.001) lower in esmolol-treated patients than in controls after intubation, but ST-segment changes compatible with ischemia occurred in one patient in each group. Increases in heart rate were associated with significant increases in plasma norepinephrine levels (r = 0.45, P = 0.02) in the control group, but not in esmolol-treated patients, a demonstration that esmolol antagonizes the beta-adrenergic effects of norepinephrine. The effect of esmolol on heart rate was absent 5 min after cessation of infusion, and plasma levels of esmolol were undetectable in 26 of 30 treated patients 15 min after the termination of esmolol infusion. Esmolol has a rapid onset and short duration of effect. It can be used safely during anesthesia in patients with normal ventricular function to attenuate cardiac response to sympathetic stimulation. PMID:2858169

  11. Brainstem node for loss of consciousness due to GABA(A) receptor-active anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Minert, Anne; Devor, Marshall

    2016-01-01

    The molecular agents that induce loss of consciousness during anesthesia are classically believed to act by binding to cognate transmembrane receptors widely distributed in the CNS and critically suppressing local processing and network connectivity. However, previous work has shown that microinjection of anesthetics into a localized region of the brainstem mesopontine tegmentum (MPTA) rapidly and reversibly induces anesthesia in the absence of global spread. This implies that functional extinction is determined by neural pathways rather than vascular distribution of the anesthetic agent. But does clinical (systemic-induced) anesthesia employ MPTA-linked circuitry? Here we show that cell-selective lesioning of the MPTA in rats does not, in itself, induce anesthesia or coma. However, it increases the systemic dose of pentobarbital required to induce anesthesia, in a manner proportional to the extent of the lesion. Such lesions also affect emergence, extending the duration of anesthesia. Off-target and sham lesions were ineffective. Combined with the prior microinjection data, we conclude that drug delivery to the MPTA is sufficient to induce loss-of-consciousness and that neurons in this locus are necessary for anesthetic induction at clinically relevant doses. Together, the results support an architecture for anesthesia with the MPTA serving as a key node in an endogenous network of dedicated pathways that switch between wake and unconsciousness. As such, the MPTA might also play a role in syncope, concussion and sleep.

  12. Evaluation of Common Anesthetic and Analgesic Techniques for Tail Biopsy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Carissa P; Carver, Scott; Kendall, Lon V

    2012-01-01

    Tail biopsy in mice is a common procedure in genetically modified mouse colonies. We evaluated the anesthetic and analgesic effects of various agents commonly used to mitigate pain after tail biopsy. We used a hot-water immersion assay to evaluate the analgesic effects of isoflurane, ice-cold ethanol, ethyl chloride, buprenorphine, and 2-point local nerve blocks before studying their effects on mice receiving tail biopsies. Mice treated with ethyl chloride spray, isoflurane and buprenorphine, and 2-point local nerve blocks demonstrated increased tail-flick latency compared with that of untreated mice. When we evaluated the behavior of adult and preweanling mice after tail biopsy, untreated mice demonstrated behavioral changes immediately after tail biopsy that lasted 30 to 60 min before returning to normal. The use of isoflurane, isoflurane and buprenorphine, buprenorphine, 2-point nerve block, or ethyl chloride spray in adult mice did not significantly improve their behavioral response to tail biopsy. Similarly, the use of buprenorphine and ethyl chloride spray in preweanling mice did not improve their behavioral response to tail biopsy compared with that of the untreated group. However, immersion in bupivacaine for 30 s after tail biopsy decreased tail grooming behavior during the first 30 min after tail biopsy. The anesthetic and analgesic regimens tested provide little benefit in adult and preweanling mice. Given that tail biopsy results in pain that lasts 30 to 60 min, investigators should carefully consider the appropriate anesthetic or analgesic regimen to incorporate into tail-biopsy procedures for mice. PMID:23294888

  13. Evaluation of common anesthetic and analgesic techniques for tail biopsy in mice.

    PubMed

    Jones, Carissa P; Carver, Scott; Kendall, Lon V

    2012-11-01

    Tail biopsy in mice is a common procedure in genetically modified mouse colonies. We evaluated the anesthetic and analgesic effects of various agents commonly used to mitigate pain after tail biopsy. We used a hot-water immersion assay to evaluate the analgesic effects of isoflurane, ice-cold ethanol, ethyl chloride, buprenorphine, and 2-point local nerve blocks before studying their effects on mice receiving tail biopsies. Mice treated with ethyl chloride spray, isoflurane and buprenorphine, and 2-point local nerve blocks demonstrated increased tail-flick latency compared with that of untreated mice. When we evaluated the behavior of adult and preweanling mice after tail biopsy, untreated mice demonstrated behavioral changes immediately after tail biopsy that lasted 30 to 60 min before returning to normal. The use of isoflurane, isoflurane and buprenorphine, buprenorphine, 2-point nerve block, or ethyl chloride spray in adult mice did not significantly improve their behavioral response to tail biopsy. Similarly, the use of buprenorphine and ethyl chloride spray in preweanling mice did not improve their behavioral response to tail biopsy compared with that of the untreated group. However, immersion in bupivacaine for 30 s after tail biopsy decreased tail grooming behavior during the first 30 min after tail biopsy. The anesthetic and analgesic regimens tested provide little benefit in adult and preweanling mice. Given that tail biopsy results in pain that lasts 30 to 60 min, investigators should carefully consider the appropriate anesthetic or analgesic regimen to incorporate into tail-biopsy procedures for mice.

  14. An integrated system for the determination of the local, regional and long-transport contributions to Particulate Matter concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amodio, M.; Andriani, E.; Daresta, B. E.; de Gennaro, G.; di Gilio, A.; Ielpo, P.,; Placentino, C. M.; Trizio, L.; Tutino, M.

    2010-05-01

    Several epidemiological studies have shown the negative effects of air pollution on human health, which range from respiratory and cardiovascular disease to neurotoxic effects, and cancer. Most recent investigations have been focused on health toxicological features of Particulate Matter (PM) and its interactions with other pollutants: it was found that fine particles (PM2.5) could be an effective media to transport these pollutants deeply into the lung and to cause many kind of reactions which include oxidative stress, local pulmonary and systemic inflammatory responses (Künzli and Perez, 2009). Based on these implications on public health, many countries have developed plans to suggest effective control strategies which involve the identification of Particulate Matter sources, the quantitative estimation of the emission rates of the pollutants, the understanding of PM transport, mixing and transformation processes and the identification of main factors influencing PM concentrations. In this field, receptor models can be useful tools to estimate sources contributions to PM collected in an area under investigations. Different approaches to receptor model analysis can be distinguished on basis of whether chemical characteristics of emission sources are required to be known before the source apportionment. The multivariate approach could be preferred when a lack of information concerning sources profiles occurred (Hopke, 2003). In this work, the results obtained by applying an integrated approach in the monitoring of PM using several typologies of instrumentations will be shown. A prototype for the determination of the contributions of a single source (‘fugitive emission') on the fine PM concentrations has been developed: it consists of a Swam dual-channel sampler, an OPC Monitor, a sonic anemometer and a PBL Mixing monitor. The investigated site chosen for the application of prototype will be the iron and steel pole of Taranto (Apulia Region, South of Italy

  15. Local release from affinity-based polymers increases urethral concentration of the stem cell chemokine CCL7 in rats.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Delgado, Edgardo; Sadeghi, Zhina; Wang, Nick X; Kenyon, Jonathan; Satyanarayan, Sapna; Kavran, Michael; Flask, Chris; Hijaz, Adonis Z; von Recum, Horst A

    2016-04-01

    The protein chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 7 (CCL7) is significantly over-expressed in urethral and vaginal tissues immediately following vaginal distention in a rat model of stress urinary incontinence. Further evidence, in this scenario and other clinical scenarios, indicates CCL7 stimulates stem cell homing for regenerative repair. This CCL7 gradient is likely absent or compromised in the natural repair process of women who continue to suffer from SUI into advanced age. We evaluated the feasibility of locally providing this missing CCL7 gradient by means of an affinity-based implantable polymer. To engineer these polymers we screened the affinity of different proteoglycans, to use them as CCL7-binding hosts. We found heparin to be the strongest binding host for CCL7 with a 0.323 nM dissociation constant. Our experimental approach indicates conjugation of heparin to a polymer backbone (using either bovine serum albumin or poly (ethylene glycol) as the base polymer) can be used as a delivery system capable of providing sustained concentrations of CCL7 in a therapeutically useful range up to a month in vitro. With this approach we are able to detect, after polymer implantation, significant increase in CCL7 in the urethral tissue directly surrounding the polymer implants with only trace amounts of human CCL7 present in the blood of the animals. Whole animal serial sectioning shows evidence of retention of locally injected human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) only in animals with sustained CCL7 delivery, 2 weeks after affinity-polymers were implanted. PMID:27097800

  16. Efficacy of tramadol as a preincisional infiltration anesthetic in children undergoing inguinal hernia repair: a prospective randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Numanoğlu, Kemal Varım; Ayoğlu, Hilal; Er, Duygu TatlıEbubekir

    2014-01-01

    Background Preincisional local anesthetic infiltration at the surgical site is a therapeutic option for postoperative pain relief for pediatric inguinal hernia. Additionally, tramadol has been used as an analgesic for postoperative pain in children. Recently, the local anesthetic effects of tramadol have been reported. The aim of this study was to determine both the systemic analgesic and the local anesthetic effects of tramadol and to determine how it differs from bupivacaine when administered preincisionally. Methods Fifty-two healthy children, aged 2–7 years, who were scheduled for elective herniorrhaphy were randomly allocated to receive either preincisional infiltration at the surgical site with 2 mg/kg tramadol (Group T, n=26) or 0.25 mL/kg 0.5% bupivacaine (Group B, n=26). At the time of anesthetic administration, perioperative hemodynamic parameters were recorded. The pain assessments were performed 10 minutes after the end of anesthesia and during the first 6-hour period, using pain scores. The time of first dose of analgesia and need for additional analgesia were recorded. Results Between T and B groups, the anesthesia time, perioperative hemodynamic changes, and pain scores were not statistically different. However, in group B, the postoperative analgesic requirement was higher than in group T. Conclusion Tramadol shows equal analgesic effect to bupivacaine and decreases additional analgesic requirement, when used for preincisional infiltration anesthesia in children undergoing inguinal herniorrhaphy. PMID:25285011

  17. The antagonistic effect of an inhalation anesthetic and high pressure on the phase diagram of mixed dipalmitoyl-dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Trudell, J R; Payan, D G; Chin, J H; Cohen, E N

    1975-01-01

    Several workers have shown that phase transition-related changes in membrane lipids have a profound effect on membrane-solvated protein function. This phase transition temperature dependence has been explained as resulting from the formation of lateral phase separations within the membrane bilayer. The present study demonstrates that a clinical concentration of an inhalation anesthetic produces changes in both the phase transition temperature of pure lipid bilayers and the lateral phase separation temperature of mixed dipalmitoyl- and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers of a magnitude sufficient to influence protein function. It is further shown that pressure is able to antagonize the effect of the anesthetic on these transition temperatures. It is proposed that anesthetic action within nerve membranes may be the result of changes in the lateral phase separation-controlled environment of the membrane-solvated proteins essential to nerve function. PMID:164016

  18. Can anesthetic treatment worsen outcome in status epilepticus?

    PubMed

    Sutter, Raoul; Kaplan, Peter W

    2015-08-01

    Status epilepticus refractory to first-line and second-line antiepileptic treatments challenges neurologists and intensivists as mortality increases with treatment refractoriness and seizure duration. International guidelines advocate anesthetic drugs, such as continuously administered high-dose midazolam, propofol, and barbiturates, for the induction of therapeutic coma in patients with treatment-refractory status epilepticus. The seizure-suppressing effect of anesthetic drugs is believed to be so strong that some experts recommend using them after benzodiazepines have failed. Although the rationale for the use of anesthetic drugs in patients with treatment-refractory status epilepticus seems clear, the recommendation of their use in treating status epilepticus is based on expert opinions rather than on strong evidence. Randomized trials in this context are lacking, and recent studies provide disturbing results, as the administration of anesthetics was associated with poor outcome independent of possible confounders. This calls for caution in the straightforward use of anesthetics in treating status epilepticus. However, there are still more questions than answers, and current evidence for the adverse effects of anesthetic drugs in patients with status epilepticus remains too limited to advocate a change of treatment algorithms. In this overview, the rationale and the conflicting clinical implications of anesthetic drugs in patients with treatment-refractory status epilepticus are discussed, and remaining questions are elaborated. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Status Epilepticus".

  19. Forecasting hourly PM(10) concentration in Cyprus through artificial neural networks and multiple regression models: implications to local environmental management.

    PubMed

    Paschalidou, Anastasia K; Karakitsios, Spyridon; Kleanthous, Savvas; Kassomenos, Pavlos A

    2011-02-01

    In the present work, two types of artificial neural network (NN) models using the multilayer perceptron (MLP) and the radial basis function (RBF) techniques, as well as a model based on principal component regression analysis (PCRA), are employed to forecast hourly PM(10) concentrations in four urban areas (Larnaca, Limassol, Nicosia and Paphos) in Cyprus. The model development is based on a variety of meteorological and pollutant parameters corresponding to the 2-year period between July 2006 and June 2008, and the model evaluation is achieved through the use of a series of well-established evaluation instruments and methodologies. The evaluation reveals that the MLP NN models display the best forecasting performance with R (2) values ranging between 0.65 and 0.76, whereas the RBF NNs and the PCRA models reveal a rather weak performance with R (2) values between 0.37-0.43 and 0.33-0.38, respectively. The derived MLP models are also used to forecast Saharan dust episodes with remarkable success (probability of detection ranging between 0.68 and 0.71). On the whole, the analysis shows that the models introduced here could provide local authorities with reliable and precise predictions and alarms about air quality if used on an operational basis. PMID:20652425

  20. Forecasting hourly PM(10) concentration in Cyprus through artificial neural networks and multiple regression models: implications to local environmental management.

    PubMed

    Paschalidou, Anastasia K; Karakitsios, Spyridon; Kleanthous, Savvas; Kassomenos, Pavlos A

    2011-02-01

    In the present work, two types of artificial neural network (NN) models using the multilayer perceptron (MLP) and the radial basis function (RBF) techniques, as well as a model based on principal component regression analysis (PCRA), are employed to forecast hourly PM(10) concentrations in four urban areas (Larnaca, Limassol, Nicosia and Paphos) in Cyprus. The model development is based on a variety of meteorological and pollutant parameters corresponding to the 2-year period between July 2006 and June 2008, and the model evaluation is achieved through the use of a series of well-established evaluation instruments and methodologies. The evaluation reveals that the MLP NN models display the best forecasting performance with R (2) values ranging between 0.65 and 0.76, whereas the RBF NNs and the PCRA models reveal a rather weak performance with R (2) values between 0.37-0.43 and 0.33-0.38, respectively. The derived MLP models are also used to forecast Saharan dust episodes with remarkable success (probability of detection ranging between 0.68 and 0.71). On the whole, the analysis shows that the models introduced here could provide local authorities with reliable and precise predictions and alarms about air quality if used on an operational basis.

  1. [Anesthetic management for pheochromocytoma resection: a comparison of epinephrine predominant and norepinephrine predominant pheochromocytoma].

    PubMed

    Doi, M; Ikeda, K

    1994-04-01

    Eleven patients with pheochromocytoma were divided into two groups; epinephrine predominant group (n = 4) and norepinephrine predominant group (n = 7). In each case, anesthesia was given using only inhalational anesthetics and adenosine triphosphate (ATP); and the same strategy was used to control cardiovascular variables. If arterial blood pressure, pulmonary artery pressure, central venous pressure or heart rate failed to be controlled with the strategy before the tumor resection, phentolamine, trinitroglycerine or propranolol was used. After the tumor resection, if decreasing the anesthetic concentration, cessation of ATP infusion and rapid intravenous infusion could not maintain the systolic arterial blood pressure above 80 mmHg, norepinephrine was infused. Maximum heart rate and arterial blood pressure during the tumor exploration were similar in both groups. No ventricular arrhythmias were recognized in any case. The frequency of usage of the cardiovascular depressants was not different between the two groups. In the norepinephrine predominant group, five cases required norepinephrine infusion after the tumor resection, but in the epinephrine predominant group, none required the norepinephrine infusion. Desensitization of alpha 1 adrenergic receptor induced by continuous high plasma norepinephrine concentration, was considered to decrease vascular resistance. In conclusion, except for the hypotension after the tumor resection in the norepinephrine predominant pheochromocytoma, both epinephrine predominant and norepinephrine predominant pheochromocytoma could be managed with similar anesthetic risks. PMID:8189622

  2. The anesthetic action of ethanol analyzed by genetics in Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Mingi; Choi, Myung Kyu; Lee, Junho

    2008-02-29

    Acute exposure to ethanol causes paralysis at high concentrations in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We set out to elucidate the mechanism of the anesthetic action of ethanol by genetic approaches. We identified nine mutations that conferred reduced sensitivity to ethanol after chemical, irradiation, or transposon insertion mutagenesis. Of these nine, we further characterized five mutations that defined four genes, jud-1-jud-4. Analysis of the phenotypes of the animals heterozygous for two unlinked genes revealed that jud-1 and jud-3 act synergistically in a gene dose-dependent manner. We cloned jud-4 and found that it encodes a protein with limited homology to human Homer proteins. jud-4 was expressed in the hypodermis and vulva muscles, suggesting that this gene acts in tissues directly exposed to the external environment. Characterization of the other mutations identified in this study will facilitate the elucidation of the molecular mechanism for the anesthetic action of ethanol.

  3. Challenges Encountered Using Ophthalmic Anesthetics in Space Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayuse, T.; Law, J.; Alexander, D.; Moynihan, S.; LeBlanc, C.; Langford, K.; Magalhaes, L.

    2015-01-01

    On orbit, ophthalmic anesthetics are used for tonometry and off-nominal corneal examinations. Proparacaine has been flown traditionally. However, the manufacturers recently changed its storage requirements from room temperature storage to refrigerated storage to preserve stability and prolong the shelf-life. Since refrigeration on orbit is not readily available and there were stability concerns about flying proparacaine unrefrigerated, tetracaine was selected as an alternative ophthalmic anesthetic in 2013. We will discuss the challenges encountered flying and using these anesthetics on the International Space Station.

  4. Anesthetic potency and cardiopulmonary effects of sevoflurane in goats: comparison with isoflurane and halothane.

    PubMed Central

    Hikasa, Y; Okuyama, K; Kakuta, T; Takase, K; Ogasawara, S

    1998-01-01

    The anesthetic potency and cardiopulmonary effects of sevoflurane were compared with those of isoflurane and halothane in goats. The (mean +/- SD) minimal alveolar concentration (MAC) was 0.96 +/- 0.12% for halothane, 1.29 +/- 0.11% for isoflurane, and 2.33 +/- 0.15% for sevoflurane. Cardiopulmonary effects of sevoflurane, halothane and isoflurane were examined at end-tidal concentrations equivalent to 1, 1.5 and 2 MAC during either spontaneous or controlled ventilation (SV or CV). During SV, there were no significant differences in respiration rate, tidal volume and minute ventilation between anesthetics. Dose-dependent decreases in both tidal volume and minute ventilation induced by halothane were greater than those by either sevoflurane or isoflurane. Hypercapnia and acidosis induced by sevoflurane were not significantly different from those by either isoflurane or halothane at 1 and 1.5 MAC, but were less than those by halothane at 2 MAC. There was no significant difference in heart rate between anesthetics during SV and CV. During SV, all anesthetics induced dose-dependent decreases in arterial pressure, rate pressure product, systemic vascular resistance, left ventricular minute work index and left ventricular stroke work index. Systemic vascular resistance with isoflurane at 2 MAC was lower than that with sevoflurane. During CV, sevoflurane induced dose-dependent circulatory depression (decreases in arterial pressure, cardiac index, rate pressure product, systemic vascular resistance, left ventricular minute work index and right ventricular minute work index), similar to isoflurane. Halothane did not significantly alter systemic vascular resistance from 1 to 2 MAC. PMID:9798097

  5. Effects of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) on somatosensory evoked potentials in humans anesthetized with isoflurane and nitrous oxide.

    PubMed

    Andoh, T; Ohtsuka, T; Okazaki, K; Okutsu, Y; Okumura, F

    1993-08-01

    In order to examine the usefulness of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as an adjuvant to anesthesia for surgery requiring intraoperative somatosensory evoked potential (SSEP) monitoring, we have studied the effects of ATP on SSEPs in patients anesthetized with isoflurane and nitrous oxide (N2O). A control recording of SSEP was performed while anesthesia was maintained with 0.5% end-tidal concentration of isoflurane in 60% N2O. The recordings were repeated after an ATP infusion had been added to this basal anesthesia at the rates of 100 micrograms.kg bw-1.min-1 and 200 micrograms.kg bw-1.min-1. SSEP was also studied when end-tidal isoflurane concentration was increased to 1.5% after cessation of ATP infusion. An infusion of ATP combined with 0.5% isoflurane and 60% N2O effectively inhibited an increase in blood pressure during surgery. The amplitude of the cortical component of SSEP was lowered by 1.5% isoflurane, which also increased both cortical and spinal latencies as well as central conduction time (CCT). In contrast ATP infusions at both rates induced no significant changes in latencies, amplitude and CCT. The results indicate that ATP infusion combined with 0.5% isoflurane in 60% N2O can be a useful anesthetic technique for intraoperative SSEP monitoring because adequate anesthetic depth can be maintained by a low concentration of anesthetics without further suppression of SSEPs. PMID:8213025

  6. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation: anesthetic considerations.

    PubMed

    Billings, Frederic T; Kodali, Susheel K; Shanewise, Jack S

    2009-05-01

    Aortic valvular stenosis remains the most common debilitating valvular heart lesion. Despite the benefit of aortic valve (AV) replacement, many high-risk patients cannot tolerate surgery. AV implantation treats aortic stenosis without subjecting patients to sternotomy, cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), and aorta cross-clamping. This transcatheter procedure is performed via puncture of the left ventricular (LV) apex or percutaneously, via the femoral artery or vein. Patients undergo general anesthesia, intense hemodynamic manipulation, and transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). To elucidate the role of the anesthesiologist in the management of transcatheter AV implantation, we review the literature and provide our experience, focusing on anesthetic care, intraoperative events, TEE, and perioperative complications. Two approaches to the aortic annulus are performed today: transfemoral retrograde and transapical antegrade. Iliac artery size and tortuosity, aortic arch atheroma, and pathology in the area of the (LV) apex help determine the preferred approach in each patient. A general anesthetic is tailored to achieve extubation after procedure completion, whereas IV access and pharmacological support allow for emergent sternotomy and initiation of CPB. Rapid ventricular pacing and cessation of mechanical ventilation interrupts cardiac ejection and minimizes heart translocation during valvuloplasty and prosthesis implantation. Although these maneuvers facilitate exact prosthesis positioning within the native annulus, they promote hypotension and arrhythmia. Vasopressor administration before pacing and cardioversion may restore adequate hemodynamics. TEE determines annulus size, aortic pathology, ventricular function, and mitral regurgitation. TEE and fluoroscopy are used for positioning the introducer catheter within the aortic annulus. The prosthesis, crimped on a valvuloplasty balloon catheter, is implanted by inflation. TEE immediately measures aortic regurgitation and

  7. 3D interactive model of lumbar spinal structures of anesthetic interest.

    PubMed

    Prats-Galino, Alberto; Reina, Miguel A; Mavar Haramija, Marija; Puigdellivol-Sánchez, Anna; Juanes Méndez, Juan A; De Andrés, José A

    2015-03-01

    A 3D model of lumbar structures of anesthetic interest was reconstructed from human magnetic resonance (MR) images and embedded in a Portable Document Format (PDF) file, which can be opened by freely available software and used offline. The MR images were analyzed using a specific 3D software platform for biomedical data. Models generated from manually delimited volumes of interest and selected MR images were exported to Virtual Reality Modeling Language format and were presented in a PDF document containing JavaScript-based functions. The 3D file and the corresponding instructions and license files can be downloaded freely at http://diposit.ub.edu/dspace/handle/2445/44844?locale=en. The 3D PDF interactive file includes reconstructions of the L3-L5 vertebrae, intervertebral disks, ligaments, epidural and foraminal fat, dural sac and nerve root cuffs, sensory and motor nerve roots of the cauda equina, and anesthetic approaches (epidural medial, spinal paramedial, and selective nerve root paths); it also includes a predefined sequential educational presentation. Zoom, 360° rotation, selective visualization, and transparency graduation of each structure and clipping functions are available. Familiarization requires no specialized informatics knowledge. The ease with which the document can be used could make it valuable for anatomical and anesthetic teaching and demonstration of patient information. PMID:25352014

  8. Anesthetic efficacy of a combination of hyaluronidase and lidocaine with epinephrine in inferior alveolar nerve blocks.

    PubMed Central

    Ridenour, S.; Reader, A.; Beck, M.; Weaver, J.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective, randomized, double-blind study was to determine the anesthetic efficacy of a buffered lidocaine with epinephrine solution compared to a combination buffered lidocaine with epinephrine plus hyaluronidase solution in inferior alveolar nerve blocks. Thirty subjects randomly received an inferior alveolar nerve block using 1 of the 2 solutions at 2 separate appointments using a repeated-measures design. Mandibular anterior and posterior teeth were blindly pulp tested at 4-minute cycles for 60 minutes postinjection. No response from the subject to the maximum output (80 reading) of the pulp tester was used as the criterion for pulpal anesthesia. Anesthesia was considered successful when 2 consecutive readings of 80 were obtained. A postoperative survey was used to measure pain and trismus. The results demonstrated 100% of the subjects had profound lip numbness with both solutions for inferior alveolar nerve blocks. The anesthetic success rates for individual teeth ranged from 20 to 80%. There were no significant differences (P > .05) between the 2 solutions. However, the combination lidocaine/hyaluronidase solution resulted in a significant increase in postoperative pain and trismus. It was concluded that adding hyaluronidase to a buffered lidocaine solution with epinephrine did not statistically increase the incidence of pulpal anesthesia in inferior alveolar nerve blocks and, because of its potential tissue damaging effect, it should not be added to local anesthetic solutions for inferior alveolar nerve blocks. PMID:11495405

  9. Robustness of cortical topography across fields, laminae, anesthetic states, and neurophysiological signal types

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wei; Chambers, Anna R.; Darrow, Keith N.; Hancock, Kenneth E.; Shinn-Cunningham, Barbara G.; Polley, Daniel B.

    2012-01-01

    Topographically organized maps of the sensory receptor epithelia are regarded as cornerstones of cortical organization as well as valuable readouts of diverse biological processes ranging from evolution to neural plasticity. However, maps are most often derived from multiunit activity recorded in the thalamic input layers of anesthetized animals using near-threshold stimuli. Less distinct topography has been described by studies that deviated from the formula above, which brings into question the generality of the principle. Here, we explicitly compared the strength of tonotopic organization at various depths within core and belt regions of the auditory cortex using electrophysiological measurements ranging from single units to delta-band local field potentials (LFP) in the awake and anesthetized mouse. Unit recordings in the middle cortical layers revealed a precise tonotopic organization in core, but not belt, regions of auditory cortex that was similarly robust in awake and anesthetized conditions. In core fields, tonotopy was degraded outside the middle layers or when LFP signals were substituted for unit activity, due to an increasing proportion of recording sites with irregular tuning for pure tones. However, restricting our analysis to clearly defined receptive fields revealed an equivalent tonotopic organization in all layers of the cortical column and for LFP activity ranging from gamma to theta bands. Thus, core fields represent a transition between topographically organized simple receptive field arrangements that extend throughout all layers of the cortical column and the emergence of non-tonotopic representations outside the input layers that are further elaborated in the belt fields. PMID:22764225

  10. [Introduces a novel scavenger for waste anesthetic gas].

    PubMed

    Hu, Yan-dong; Liang, Jin-bing; Song, Jin-hua

    2009-01-01

    This article introduces a novel scavenger for waste anesthetic gas which makes use of negative pressure in operating room. This setting can scavenge the exhaust gas absolutely without affection the normal work of anaesthesia.

  11. Top-down mechanisms of anesthetic-induced unconsciousness

    PubMed Central

    Mashour, George A.

    2014-01-01

    The question of how structurally and pharmacologically diverse general anesthetics disrupt consciousness has persisted since the nineteenth century. There has traditionally been a significant focus on “bottom-up” mechanisms of anesthetic action, in terms of sensory processing, arousal systems, and structural scales. However, recent evidence suggests that the neural mechanisms of anesthetic-induced unconsciousness may involve a “top-down” process, which parallels current perspectives on the neurobiology of conscious experience itself. This article considers various arguments for top-down mechanisms of anesthetic-induced unconsciousness, with a focus on sensory processing and sleep-wake networks. Furthermore, recent theoretical work is discussed to highlight the possibility that top-down explanations may be causally sufficient, even assuming critical bottom-up events. PMID:25002838

  12. Frequency dependence of capnography in anesthetized rabbits.

    PubMed

    Ioan, I; Demoulin, B; Duvivier, C; Leblanc, A L; Bonabel, C; Marchal, F; Schweitzer, C; Varechova, S

    2014-01-01

    Aspirative capnography may be of help to diagnose early childhood asthma, but clinical usefulness in young children is limited by the relatively high respiratory rate. This study aimed to characterize the [Formula: see text] time course during airway constriction in 8 anesthetized rabbits, artificially ventilated at 30, 60 and 80breaths/min. Methacholine was inhaled to double the respiratory resistance measured at 8Hz by the forced oscillation technique. The capnogram shape changed in response to both methacholine and ventilatory frequency. Slope of phase II, the peak of first-order time derivative and trough of the second-order time derivative of the [Formula: see text] signal, were significantly attenuated after methacholine compared with baseline at all breathing rates (p<0.02). Moreover, significant correlations between respiratory reactance and resistance were observed with the phase III slope and the angle described by phase II and phase III (p<0.01). It is concluded that capnography may be useful to identify acute airway changes related to bronchoconstriction, even at high breathing frequencies. PMID:24035836

  13. [Anesthetic management for patients with mitochondrial disease].

    PubMed

    Imai, Yousuke; Yamada, Yoshitsugu

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are caused by a decrease in ATP production due to mutations of mitochondrial or mitochondria-related nuclear DNA. Their effects are likely to appear in tissues with a high energy demand, including skeletal muscle, nervous, and cardiovascular systems. Cardiac manifestations of mitochondrial diseases can be divided into cardiomyopathies, which are primarily hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies, and electropathies, which are primarily conduction system disease and ventricular pre-excitation. The first principle of anesthesia for patients with mitochondrial diseases is to avoid any additional burden on the already declined metabolic functions. Appropriate oxygenation, minimization of the oxygen demand, stable cardiovascular management, maintenance of a normal blood glucose level and body temperature, and effective perioperative pain control are of importance. Most anesthetics have been reported to reduce mitochondrial functions, and although enhancement of the sensitivity and prolongation of the duration of action have been reported, they are clinically used with no major problems. Detailed preoperative evaluation of the disease condition and careful intraoperative monitoring are important for the prevention of perioperative complications.

  14. A Comparative Study of Lidocaine and Lidocaine­ Mannitol in Anesthetizing Human Teeth with Inflamed Pulps

    PubMed Central

    Talati, Ali; Bidar, Maryam; Sadeghi, Ghazal; Nezami, Hossein

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Failure to achieve adequate and profound anesthesia in teeth with acute pulp inflammation is a common condition during emergency visits in root canal therapy. Many different anesthetic solutions such as morphine and capsaicin have accordingly been examined. Mannitol­ an alcoholic sugar with high osmotic pressure level- is applicated for reducing intracranial and post retinal pressure in medicine. It has also been used for its diuretic effect. In combination with local anesthetic solution, it increases permeability of the nerve fiber sheath and leads to influx of the local anesthetic through cytoplasmic membrane .The purpose of the present study was to compare the efficacy of routine local anesthesia with or without using mannitol in teeth with inflamed pulps. MATERIALS AND METHODS: one hundred patients with acute dental pain in posterior teeth were selected. Vials with 3 ml anesthetic solution containing 2.5% lidocaine with 1/80000 epinephrine or 2.5% lidocaine with 1/80000 epinephrine and 0.5 mol mannitol were used for anesthesia. For each patient, the routine injection technique was applied, during the removal of decay and dentine. Depth of anesthesia was evaluated and the supplementary injection was done in case of pain feeling and then pulpotomy was done. The analysis of data was done using chi-square statistical test. RESULTS: The results showed that complete anesthesia after the first injection was obtained with lidocaine mannitol in 46% and with lidocaine alone in 38% of cases. However, the difference was not significant. CONCLUSION: These finding suggest that the addition of mannitol to the standard anesthetic solution could insignificantly increase the level of anesthesia in teeth with inflamed pulps. PMID:24494021

  15. Respiratory anesthetic emergencies in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    PubMed

    Gesek, Daniel J

    2013-08-01

    Respiratory anesthetic emergencies are the most common complications encountered during the administration of anesthesia in both the adult and pediatric populations. Regardless of the depth of anesthesia, a thorough review of the patients' health history, including the past medical history, edication list, prior anesthesia history, and complex physical examination, is critical in the promotion of safety in the oral and maxillofacial surgery office. The effective management of respiratory anesthetic emergencies includes both strong didactic and clinical skills. PMID:23706929

  16. Respiratory anesthetic emergencies in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    PubMed

    Gesek, Daniel J

    2013-08-01

    Respiratory anesthetic emergencies are the most common complications encountered during the administration of anesthesia in both the adult and pediatric populations. Regardless of the depth of anesthesia, a thorough review of the patients' health history, including the past medical history, edication list, prior anesthesia history, and complex physical examination, is critical in the promotion of safety in the oral and maxillofacial surgery office. The effective management of respiratory anesthetic emergencies includes both strong didactic and clinical skills.

  17. Liposomal formulations of prilocaine: effect of complexation with hydroxypropyl-ß-cyclodextrin on drug anesthetic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Bragagni, Marco; Maestrelli, Francesca; Mennini, Natascia; Ghelardini, Carla; Mura, Paola

    2010-12-01

    A combined strategy, based on cyclodextrin complexation and loading in liposomes, has been investigated to develop a new delivery system with improved therapeutic activity of the local anesthetic, prilocaine (PRL). In order to evaluate the actual effectiveness and advantages of this approach compared to the traditional drug-in-liposome one, four different liposomal formulations were prepared: (1) liposomes loaded with PRL base as complex with hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP CD) in the aqueous phase; (2) liposomes loaded with PRL hydrochloride in the aqueous phase; (3) liposomes loaded with PRL base in the lipophilic phase; and (4) "double-loaded" liposomes, containing free PRL base in the membrane bilayer and its HP CD complex in the aqueous compartment. All batches were characterized for particle size, charge, deformability, and entrapment efficiency from using, respectively, light scattering, extrusion, and dialysis techniques, while the anesthetic effect was evaluated in vivo on Guinea pigs, according to the test of dorsal muscle contraction. All drug liposomal dispersions showed enhanced analgesic duration with respect to the corresponding aqueous solutions, but significant differences were observed between the different formulations. In particular, cyclodextrin complexation not only allowed an efficient encapsulation of PRL base in the aqueous vesicle core, but also increased the anesthetic effect duration and reduced the initial lag time, in comparison with the corresponding formulations containing, respectively, free PRL in the lipophilic phase or PRL hydrochloride in the aqueous vesicle core. The technique of double loading was the most effective, giving rise to the shortest onset time and longest duration of anesthetic effect.

  18. Determination of relative positions and localizations of paramagnetic probe molecules in liquid crystal by analysis of concentration broadening of EPR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomogailo, Daria A.; Paramonov, Nikita A.; Chumakova, Natalia A.; Vorobiev, Andrey Kh.

    2016-07-01

    The angular dependences of concentration broadening of EPR spectra for nitroxide spin probes in liquid crystals were experimentally measured. The obvious angular dependence of the broadening found for oriented smectic liquid crystal HOPDOB proves the paired localization of the probe molecules. The numerical calculation of the angular dependence taking into account the magnetic dipolar and spin exchange interactions have been used for quantitative determination of position of probes in the pairs. The probable localization of the probes in the smectic layer is discussed.

  19. Optimal concentration of local well brine groundwater irrigation for Bamboo willow introduced to the arid areas in northern Xinjiang province, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wei; Cao, Ling; Zhang, Ya; Cui, Kaiqiang; Wu, Shengli

    2015-04-01

    The adaptation and survive of introduced plants to local well brine groundwater irrigation is an important issue, while people introduce some plants to improve the local environment in the construction of urban greening oases in arid areas, north China. We measured some of the photosynthetic characteristics of introduced Bamboo willow irrigated by different local well brine groundwater in the wild controlled experiments, in May 2014 in Kelamayi city in north China, which to seek the most appropriate irrigation concentration of underground saline water, and to clarify the physiological ecological adaptation to the local habitat. The parameters, measured by Li-6400XT, a portable photosynthesis system, include the following ones, net photosynthetic rate (Pn), stomatal conductance (Gs), transpiration rate (Tr), the internal CO2 concentration (Ci) and efficiency of water application (WUE) of one-year old introduced Bamboo willow irrigated by set salinity groundwater gradient, as 0 g/L, 5 g/L and 10 g/L. the results showed that (1) In each salt water concentration, the diurnal variation curve of net photosynthetic rate showed as "bimodal curve" style, and obvious "midday depression". (2) The parameter Pn of Bamboo willow irrigated by salt water of 5g/L was highest compared with the other two, and the value Pn irrigated by salt water concentration of 10g/L down. The net photosynthetic rate would increase in the salt concentration of 10g/L. In conclusion, the salt groundwater concentration of 10g/L was the optimal concentration of local well brine groundwater irrigation for Bamboo willow introduced to the arid areas in northern Xinjiang province, China.

  20. Investigation of the Local Ge Concentration in Si/SiGe Multi-QW Structures by CBED Analysis and FEM Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruh, E.; Mussler, G.; Müller, E.; Grützmacher, D.

    The local Ge concentration in Si/SiGe multiquantum well structures was investigated by CBED analysis. Series of bright field CBED patterns were taken across the quantum wells using the [340]-zone axis in STEM mode. The HOLZ lines in these patterns were fitted with the JEMS program [1] in order to deduce the local lattice parameters. With finite-element calculations taking the plastic relaxation of the thin TEM foil into account the Ge concentrations corresponding to these sets of lattice parameters were determined.

  1. Anesthetic Considerations in Hepatectomies under Hepatic Vascular Control

    PubMed Central

    Tympa, Aliki; Theodoraki, Kassiani; Tsaroucha, Athanassia; Arkadopoulos, Nikolaos; Vassiliou, Ioannis; Smyrniotis, Vassilios

    2012-01-01

    Background. Hazards of liver surgery have been attenuated by the evolution in methods of hepatic vascular control and the anesthetic management. In this paper, the anesthetic considerations during hepatic vascular occlusion techniques were reviewed. Methods. A Medline literature search using the terms “anesthetic,” “anesthesia,” “liver,” “hepatectomy,” “inflow,” “outflow occlusion,” “Pringle,” “hemodynamic,” “air embolism,” “blood loss,” “transfusion,” “ischemia-reperfusion,” “preconditioning,” was performed. Results. Task-orientated anesthetic management, according to the performed method of hepatic vascular occlusion, ameliorates the surgical outcome and improves the morbidity and mortality rates, following liver surgery. Conclusions. Hepatic vascular occlusion techniques share common anesthetic considerations in terms of preoperative assessment, monitoring, induction, and maintenance of anesthesia. On the other hand, the hemodynamic management, the prevention of vascular air embolism, blood transfusion, and liver injury are plausible when the anesthetic plan is scheduled according to the method of hepatic vascular occlusion performed. PMID:22690040

  2. Comparative efficacy of 16 anesthetic chemicals on rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilderhus, P.A.; Marking, L.L.

    1987-01-01

    Presently there are no legally registered fish anesthetics that allow for the release of fish or use of the fish for food soon after they have been anesthetized. MS-222 (tricaine), the only anesthetic registered for use on fish in the United States, cannot be used within 21 d of harvesting the fish for food. As the start in a search for an anesthetic that can be used with little or no withdrawal period, we tested the efficacy of 16 chemicals as anesthetics on rainbow trout Salmo gairdneri. Efficacy was defined by the fish (1) becoming handleable (quiet enough to be manipulated and handled readily) in 3 min or less, (2) recovering in 10 min or less, and (3) showing no mortality after 15 min in the anesthetic solution. Four chemicals--MS-222, quinaldine sulfate, benzocaine, and 2-phenoxyethanol--met these criteria for efficacy. Chemicals that yielded excessive induction or recovery times or caused excessive mortality were methylpentynol, chlorobutanol, etomidate, metomidate, Piscaine, propanidid, carbon dioxide, nicotine, salt, Halothane, Metofane, and Biotal. Because carbon dioxide leaves no residues and requires no withdrawal period, it may be an acceptable alternative for fishery workers who can tolerate somewhat shallower anesthesia and longer induction and recovery times.

  3. Topical Ocular Anesthetic Abuse Among Iranian Welders: Time for Action

    PubMed Central

    Sharifi, Ali; Sharifi, Hamid; Karamouzian, Mohammad; Mokhtari, Mahmoud; Esmaeili, Hamidreza Hosein; Nejad, Afshin Sarafi; Rahmatian, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to estimate the prevalence of topical ocular anesthetic abuse among welders in Iran and suggest public health solutions for this issue. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 390 welders were randomly recruited and queried on the use of anesthetic drops. A questionnaire was administered through structured one-on-one interviews conducted by the first author. Results: A total of 314 welders (80.5%) declared that they had used topical anesthetics at least once during their working lives. Almost 90% of them stated a preference for self-treatment over seeking help from a physician due to cultural and financial reasons. The most commonly used topical anesthetic was tetracaine. Most of the subjects (97.4%) had obtained the drugs from pharmacies without a prescription. Conclusions: The prevalence of topical ocular anesthetic abuse among welders in Iran is alarmingly high and may partially be due to cultural issues. Although most physicians are aware that topical anesthetics should only be used as a diagnostic tool, there is a crucial need to re-emphasize the ocular risks associated with chronic use of these medications. Educational programs for both physicians and the public are necessary to address the problem. PMID:24339685

  4. Brainstem Regions Involved in the Expiration Reflex. A c-fos Study in Anesthetized Cats

    PubMed Central

    Poliacek, Ivan; Halasova, Erika; Jakus, Jan; Murin, Peter; Barani, Helena; Stransky, Albert; Bolser, Donald C

    2009-01-01

    Expression of the immediate-early gene c-fos, a marker of neuronal activation, was employed to localize brainstem neuronal populations functionally related to the expiration reflex (ER). Twelve spontaneously breathing, non-decerebrate, pentobarbital anesthetized cats were used. The level of Fos-like immunoreactivity (FLI) in 6 animals with repetitive ERs mechanically induced from the glottis (296±9 ERs) was compared to FLI in 6 control non-stimulated cats. Respiratory rate, arterial blood pressure, and end tidal CO2 concentration remained stable during the experiment. In the medulla, increased FLI was found in the region of nucleus tractus solitarii (p<0.001), in the ventrolateral medulla along with the lateral tegmental field (p<0.01), and in the vestibular nuclei (p<0.01). In the pons, increased FLI was detected in the caudal extensions of the lateral parabrachial and Kölliker-Fuse nuclei (p<0.05). Within the rostral mesencephalon FLI was enhanced in the midline area (p<0.05). A lower level of ER-related FLI compared to control animals was detected in the pontine raphe region (p<0.05) and the lateral division of mesencephalic periaqueductal gray (p<0.05). The results suggest that the ER is coordinated by a complex long loop of medullary-pontine-mesencephalic neuronal circuits, some of which may differ from those of other respiratory reflexes. The FLI related to the expulsive behavior ER differs from that induced by laryngeal stimulation and laryngeal adductor responses, particularly in ventrolateral medulla and mesencephalon. PMID:17964550

  5. Involvement of superoxide in ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in anesthetized cats

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, T.; Miura, M.; Katsumata, U.; Ichinose, M.; Kimura, K.; Inoue, H.; Takishima, T.; Shirato, K. )

    1993-07-01

    To determine whether oxygen radical scavengers inhibit ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness, we examined the protective effect of polyethylene glycol-superoxide dismutase (PEG-SOD) and PEG-catalase (PEG-CAT) on ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in cat airways. Twenty-five cats divided into five groups were anesthetized and mechanically ventilated. There was no difference between the groups in baseline airway responsiveness to inhaled acetylcholine (ACh). In the control group, AChPC, the concentration required to produce a doubling increase in baseline pulmonary resistance, was significantly reduced by ozone exposure (2.0 ppm for 2 h); the ratios of AChPC before ozone exposure to after ozone exposure (AChPC ratio) were 14.8 +/- 5.7 (p < 0.001) and 4.80 +/- 1.6 (p < 0.01) 30 and 120 min after exposure, respectively. Local administration of PEG-SOD (2,000 U/kg) into airways partially but significantly prevented ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness. The AChPC ratios were 6.2 +/- 1.4 and 1.5 +/- 0.2 30 and 120 min after exposure, respectively, which were significantly different from those of the control group (p < 0.05), whereas PEG-CAT pretreatment (6,000 U/kg) was without effect. Combined pretreatment with PEG-SOD and PEG-CAT had no additional protective effect compared with PEG-SOD alone. PEG-SOD had no direct effect on airway responsiveness to ACh. These results suggest that superoxide may be involved in ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness.

  6. Pharmacokinetics and anesthetic activity of eugenol in male Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Guenette, S A; Beaudry, F; Marier, J F; Vachon, P

    2006-08-01

    Eugenol, the principle chemical constituent of clove oil, has recently been evaluated for its anesthetic and analgesic properties in fish and amphibians. The objective of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetic (PK) and anesthetic activity of eugenol in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received single i.v. doses of eugenol (0, 5, 10, 20, 40 and 60 mg/kg) and anesthetic level was evaluated with the withdrawal reflex. For the 20 mg/kg dose level, blood and urinary samples were collected over 1 h for the PK assessment. Plasma and blood concentrations of eugenol, as well as metabolite identification in urine, were determined using a novel dansyl chloride derivatization method with liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). PK parameters were calculated using noncompartmental methods. Eugenol-induced loss of consciousness in a dose-dependent manner, with mean (+/-SEM) recovery in reflex time of 167 +/- 42 sec observed at the highest dose level. Mean systemic clearance (Cl) in plasma and blood were 157 and 204 mL/min/kg, respectively. Glucuronide and sulfate conjugates were identified in urine. Overall, eugenol produced a reversible, dose-dependent anesthesia in male Sprague-Dawley rats. PMID:16846463

  7. Differential Effects of Cocaine on Dopamine Neuron Firing in Awake and Anesthetized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Koulchitsky, Stanislav; De Backer, Benjamin; Quertemont, Etienne; Charlier, Corinne; Seutin, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Cocaine (benzoylmethylecgonine), a natural alkaloid, is a powerful psychostimulant and a highly addictive drug. Unfortunately, the relationships between its behavioral and electrophysiological effects are not clear. We investigated the effects of cocaine on the firing of midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons, both in anesthetized and awake rats, using pre-implanted multielectrode arrays and a recently developed telemetric recording system. In anesthetized animals, cocaine (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) produced a general decrease of the firing rate and bursting of DA neurons, sometimes preceded by a transient increase in both parameters, as previously reported by others. In awake rats, however, injection of cocaine led to a very different pattern of changes in firing. A decrease in firing rate and bursting was observed in only 14% of DA neurons. Most of the other DA neurons underwent increases in firing rate and bursting: these changes were correlated with locomotor activity in 52% of the neurons, but were uncorrelated in 29% of them. Drug concentration measurements indicated that the observed differences between the two conditions did not have a pharmacokinetic origin. Taken together, our results demonstrate that cocaine injection differentially affects the electrical activity of DA neurons in awake and anesthetized states. The observed increases in neuronal activity may in part reflect the cocaine-induced synaptic potentiation found ex vivo in these neurons. Our observations also show that electrophysiological recordings in awake animals can uncover drug effects, which are masked by general anesthesia. PMID:22298123

  8. Role for the propofol hydroxyl in anesthetic protein target molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Woll, Kellie A; Weiser, Brian P; Liang, Qiansheng; Meng, Tao; McKinstry-Wu, Andrew; Pinch, Benika; Dailey, William P; Gao, Wei Dong; Covarrubias, Manuel; Eckenhoff, Roderic G

    2015-06-17

    Propofol is a widely used intravenous general anesthetic. We synthesized 2-fluoro-1,3-diisopropylbenzene, a compound that we call "fropofol", to directly assess the significance of the propofol 1-hydroxyl for pharmacologically relevant molecular recognition in vitro and for anesthetic efficacy in vivo. Compared to propofol, fropofol had a similar molecular volume and only a small increase in hydrophobicity. Isothermal titration calorimetry and competition assays revealed that fropofol had higher affinity for a protein site governed largely by van der Waals interactions. Within another protein model containing hydrogen bond interactions, propofol demonstrated higher affinity. In vivo, fropofol demonstrated no anesthetic efficacy, but at high concentrations produced excitatory activity in tadpoles and mice; fropofol also antagonized propofol-induced hypnosis. In a propofol protein target that contributes to hypnosis, α1β2γ2L GABAA receptors, fropofol demonstrated no significant effect alone or on propofol positive allosteric modulation of the ion channel, suggesting an additional requirement for the 1-hydroxyl within synaptic GABAA receptor site(s). However, fropofol caused similar adverse cardiovascular effects as propofol by a dose-dependent depression of myocardial contractility. Our results directly implicate the propofol 1-hydroxyl as contributing to molecular recognition within protein targets leading to hypnosis, but not necessarily within protein targets leading to side effects of the drug.

  9. Anesthetic effects changeable in habitual drinkers: Mechanistic drug interactions with neuro-active indoleamine-aldehyde condensation products associated with alcoholic beverage consumption.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Hironori

    2016-07-01

    Clinicians often experience the reduced efficacy of general and local anesthetics and anesthesia-related drugs in habitual drinkers and chronic alcoholics. However, the mechanistic background underlying such anesthetic tolerance remains unclear. Biogenic indoleamines condense with alcohol-derived aldehydes during fermentation processes and under physiological conditions to produce neuro-active tetrahydro-β-carbolines and β-carbolines, many of which are contained not only in various alcoholic beverages but also in human tissues and body fluids. These indoleamine-aldehyde condensation products are increased in the human body because of their exogenous and endogenous supply enhanced by alcoholic beverage consumption. Since tetrahydro-β-carbolines and β-carbolines target receptors, ion channels and neuronal membranes which are common to anesthetic agents, we propose a hypothesis that they may pharmacodynamically interact at GABAA receptors, NMDA receptors, voltage-gated Na(+) channels and membrane lipid bilayers to attenuate anesthetics-induced positive allosteric GABAA receptor modulation, NMDA receptor antagonism, ion channel blockade and neuronal membrane modification, thereby affecting anesthetic efficacy. The condensation products may also cooperatively interact with ethanol that induces adaptive changes and cross-tolerance to anesthetics and with dopamine-aldehyde adducts that act on GABAA receptors and membrane lipids. Because tetrahydro-β-carbolines and β-carbolines are metabolized to lose or decrease their neuro-activities, induction of the relevant enzymes by habitual drinking could produce an inter-individual difference of drinkers in susceptibility to anesthetic agents. The present hypothesis would also provide a unified framework for different modes of anesthetic action, which are inhibited by neuro-active indoleamine-aldehyde condensation products associated with alcoholic beverage consumption. PMID:27241259

  10. Interaction of Anesthetics with the Rho GTPase Regulator Rho GDP Dissociation Inhibitor†

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Cojen; Shanmugasundararaj, Sivananthaperumal; Miller, Keith W.; Malinowski, Steve A.; Cook, Anthony C.; Slater, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    The physiological effects of anesthetics have been ascribed to their interaction with hydrophobic sites within functionally relevant CNS proteins. Studies have shown that volatile anesthetics compete for luciferin binding to the hydrophobic substrate binding site within firefly luciferase and inhibit its activity (Franks, N. P., and Lieb, W. R. (1984) Nature 310, 599–601). To assess whether anesthetics also compete for ligand binding to a mammalian signal transduction protein, we investigated the interaction of the volatile anesthetic, halothane, with the Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor (RhoGDIα), which binds the geranylgeranyl moiety of GDP-bound Rho GTPases. Consistent with the existence of a discrete halothane binding site, the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of RhoGDIα was quenched by halothane (2-bromo-2-chloro-1,1,1-trifluoroethane) in a saturable, concentration-dependent manner. Bromine quenching of tryptophan fluorescence is short range and W192 and W194 of the RhoGDIα are located within the geranylgeranyl binding pocket, suggesting that halothane binds within this region. Supporting this, N-acetyl-geranylgeranyl cysteine reversed tryptophan quenching by halothane. Short chain n-alcohols (n<6) also reversed tryptophan quenching, suggesting that RhoGDIα may also bind n-alkanols. Consistent with this, E193 was photo-labeled by 3-azibutanol. This residue is located in the vicinity of, but outside, the geranylgeranyl chain binding pocket, suggesting that the alcohol binding site is distinct from that occupied by halothane. Supporting this, N-acetyl-geranylgeranyl cysteine enhanced E193 photo-labeling by 3-azibutanol. Overall, the results suggest that halothane binds to a site within the geranylgeranyl chain binding pocket of RhoGDIα, whereas alcohols bind to a distal site that interacts allosterically with this pocket. PMID:18702520

  11. The effect of sub-anesthetic and anesthetic ketamine on water maze memory acquisition, consolidation and retrieval.

    PubMed

    Moosavi, Maryam; Yadollahi Khales, Golnaz; Rastegar, Karim; Zarifkar, Asadollah

    2012-02-29

    Ketamine, a non-selective inhibitor of NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) channels is used in anesthetic or sub-anesthetic doses to induce analgesia, amnesia, to suppress fear, anxiety and depression. Although the ketamine's effect on memory acquisition is known, its effects on other aspects of memory are controversial. Morris water maze is a task which assesses spatial learning and memory. This study was aimed to assess the ketamine's differential effect on water maze memory acquisition, consolidation and retrieval. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (250-350 g) were trained in water maze single training session. 24h later a probe trial which was consisted of a single trial without platform was done. To assess the effect of ketamine on water maze memory acquisition it was administered before training; to assess its effect on memory consolidation it was administered immediately after training and to assess its effect on memory retrieval it was injected before probe trial. Ketamine both in sub-anesthetic and anesthetic doses impaired water maze memory acquisition, its anesthetic dose but not sub-anesthetic dose impaired memory consolidation and on retrieval stage, both doses deteriorated memory retrieval. It seems that NMDA receptor activity is not just necessary during water maze memory acquisition but also their post-learning reactivation is required to maintain memory consolidation and retrieval.

  12. The effect of chloride ion concentration gradients on the initiation of localized corrosion of steel in reinforced concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, M.J.; Brown, R.

    1994-12-31

    It has been established that for steel reinforced concrete roads treated with deicing salts or exposed to a marine environment, chloride ions are introduced at the surface of the concrete structure. Two models were discussed in which chloride ion concentration gradients would form in a steel reinforced concrete structure. Electrochemical testing to investigate the models was conducted on plain carbon steel specimens in a simulated concrete environment of saturated calcium hydroxide solution with varying concentrations of sodium chloride. The varying chloride ion concentrations promoted open circuit potential shifts. These potential shifts may lead to galvanic corrosion effects depending on the chloride ion concentration gradients in the structure.

  13. Application of nonparametric regression methods to study the relationship between NO2 concentrations and local wind direction and speed at background sites.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Aoife; Misstear, Bruce; Broderick, Brian

    2011-02-15

    Background concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) are not constant but vary temporally and spatially. The current paper presents a powerful tool for the quantification of the effects of wind direction and wind speed on background NO(2) concentrations, particularly in cases where monitoring data are limited. In contrast to previous studies which applied similar methods to sites directly affected by local pollution sources, the current study focuses on background sites with the aim of improving methods for predicting background concentrations adopted in air quality modelling studies. The relationship between measured NO(2) concentration in air at three such sites in Ireland and locally measured wind direction has been quantified using nonparametric regression methods. The major aim was to analyse a method for quantifying the effects of local wind direction on background levels of NO(2) in Ireland. The method was expanded to include wind speed as an added predictor variable. A Gaussian kernel function is used in the analysis and circular statistics employed for the wind direction variable. Wind direction and wind speed were both found to have a statistically significant effect on background levels of NO(2) at all three sites. Frequently environmental impact assessments are based on short term baseline monitoring producing a limited dataset. The presented non-parametric regression methods, in contrast to the frequently used methods such as binning of the data, allow concentrations for missing data pairs to be estimated and distinction between spurious and true peaks in concentrations to be made. The methods were found to provide a realistic estimation of long term concentration variation with wind direction and speed, even for cases where the data set is limited. Accurate identification of the actual variation at each location and causative factors could be made, thus supporting the improved definition of background concentrations for use in air quality modelling

  14. The association between local fish consumption and DDE, mirex, and HCB concentrations in the breast milk of Mohawk women at Akwesasne.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, E F; Hwang, S A; Deres, D A; Bush, B; Cook, K; Worswick, P

    2001-01-01

    A study was conducted to assess the extent to which the consumption of local fish contaminated with p,p'-dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE), mirex, and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) has impacted the concentrations of these compounds in the milk of nursing Mohawk women residing along the St. Lawrence River. From 1986 to 1992, 97 Mohawk women were interviewed, and each donated a one-time sample of at least 50 ml of breast milk. The comparison population consisted of 154 Caucasians from other rural areas in New York State. After adjustment for potential confounders, Mohawk mothers who gave birth from 1986 to 1990 had significantly higher geometric mean p,p'-DDE milk concentrations than did the control group, but no significant differences were observed from 1991 to 1992. In contrast, mirex was significantly elevated among the Mohawks throughout the study period, while HCB showed no difference at any point. Mohawk women with the greatest estimated cumulative lifetime exposure to p,p'-DDE from local fish consumption had a significantly higher geometric mean milk level of that compound relative to control women, but no differences in mirex or HCB concentrations in breast milk by local fish consumption were found. The reduction in breast milk p,p'-DDE concentrations among the Mohawk women from 1986 to 1990 parallels a corresponding decrease in local fish consumption, and may be the result of the advisories that have been issued over the past decade recommending against the consumption of local fish by pregnant and nursing Mohawk women. Elevations in the concentrations of mirex in the breast milk of the Mohawks are consistent with the fact that it is a common contaminant in the region and throughout the Lake Ontario-St. Lawrence River Basin.

  15. Anesthetic activity and bio-guided fractionation of the essential oil of Aloysia gratissima (Gillies & Hook.) Tronc. in silver catfish Rhamdia quelen.

    PubMed

    Benovit, Simone C; Silva, Lenise L; Salbego, Joseânia; Loro, Vania L; Mallmann, Carlos A; Baldisserotto, Bernardo; Flores, Erico M M; Heinzmann, Berta M

    2015-09-01

    This work aimed to determine the efficacy of the essential oil of A. gratissima as anesthetic for silver catfish, and to perform the bio-guided fractionation of essential oil aiming to isolate compounds responsible for the noted effects. Fish were submitted to anesthesia bath with essential oil, its fractions and isolated compounds to determine time of anesthetic induction and recovery. Eugenol (50 mg L(-1)) was used as positive control. Essential oil of A. gratissima was effective as an anesthetic at concentrations of 300 to 900 mg L(-1). Fish presented involuntary muscle contractions during induction and recovery. The bio-guided fractionation of essential oil furnished E-(-)-pinocamphone, (-)-caryophyllene oxide, (-)-guaiol and (+)-spathulenol. E-(-)-pinocamphone caused the same side effects observed for essential oil. (-)-Caryophyllene oxide, (-)-guaiol and (+)-spathulenol showed only sedative effects at proportional concentrations to those of the constituents in essential oil. (+)-Spathulenol (51.2 mg L(-1)) promoted deep anesthesia without side effects. A higher concentration of (+)-spathulenol, and lower or absent amounts ofE-(-)-pinocamphone could contribute to increase the activity and safety of the essential oil of A. gratissima. (+)-Spathulenol showed potent sedative and anesthetic activities in silver catfish, and could be considered as a viable compound for the development of a new anesthetic.

  16. Anesthetic activity and bio-guided fractionation of the essential oil of Aloysia gratissima (Gillies & Hook.) Tronc. in silver catfish Rhamdia quelen.

    PubMed

    Benovit, Simone C; Silva, Lenise L; Salbego, Joseânia; Loro, Vania L; Mallmann, Carlos A; Baldisserotto, Bernardo; Flores, Erico M M; Heinzmann, Berta M

    2015-09-01

    This work aimed to determine the efficacy of the essential oil of A. gratissima as anesthetic for silver catfish, and to perform the bio-guided fractionation of essential oil aiming to isolate compounds responsible for the noted effects. Fish were submitted to anesthesia bath with essential oil, its fractions and isolated compounds to determine time of anesthetic induction and recovery. Eugenol (50 mg L(-1)) was used as positive control. Essential oil of A. gratissima was effective as an anesthetic at concentrations of 300 to 900 mg L(-1). Fish presented involuntary muscle contractions during induction and recovery. The bio-guided fractionation of essential oil furnished E-(-)-pinocamphone, (-)-caryophyllene oxide, (-)-guaiol and (+)-spathulenol. E-(-)-pinocamphone caused the same side effects observed for essential oil. (-)-Caryophyllene oxide, (-)-guaiol and (+)-spathulenol showed only sedative effects at proportional concentrations to those of the constituents in essential oil. (+)-Spathulenol (51.2 mg L(-1)) promoted deep anesthesia without side effects. A higher concentration of (+)-spathulenol, and lower or absent amounts ofE-(-)-pinocamphone could contribute to increase the activity and safety of the essential oil of A. gratissima. (+)-Spathulenol showed potent sedative and anesthetic activities in silver catfish, and could be considered as a viable compound for the development of a new anesthetic. PMID:26221984

  17. Lethal toxicity from equimolar infusions of cocaine and cocaine metabolites in conscious and anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Mets, B; Virag, L

    1995-11-01

    We compared the lethal toxicity of cocaine with that of three of its metabolites to determine the contribution of these metabolites to the lethal potential from cocaine infusion. Equimolar quantities of cocaine, norcocaine, benzoylecgonine, and ecgonine methyl ester were infused in conscious rats to determine onset of convulsions and respiratory arrest. In addition, the convulsive and respiratory toxicity for cocaine and norcocaine were evaluated in anesthetized rats and their circulatory toxicity in anesthetized and ventilated rats. Norcocaine infusion resulted in earlier onset of convulsions and respiratory arrest in conscious rats than cocaine and earlier onset of circulatory arrest. Plasma concentrations of norcocaine and cocaine were not different at these times. Benzoylecgonine and ecgonine methyl ester were less potent convulsants and respiratory depressants than norcocaine and cocaine, with ecgonine methyl ester more respiratory depressant than benzoylecgonine. Pentobarbital anesthesia enhanced the respiratory depression and suppressed or delayed the onset of convulsions from norcocaine and cocaine infusion. Prolonged infusion of cocaine to circulatory arrest resulted in benzoylecgonine concentrations approximately 60%, and norcocaine concentrations approximately 5%, of the cocaine concentration, but no detectable ecgonine methyl ester formation. We conclude that although norcocaine, ecgonine methyl ester, and benzoylecgonine administered separately have lethal potential in massive dosages, death from cocaine overdose primarily results from the parent compound and not from metabolite formation.

  18. Stream segregation in the anesthetized auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Scholes, Chris; Palmer, Alan R.; Sumner, Christian J.

    2015-01-01

    Auditory stream segregation describes the way that sounds are perceptually segregated into groups or streams on the basis of perceptual attributes such as pitch or spectral content. For sequences of pure tones, segregation depends on the tones' proximity in frequency and time. In the auditory cortex (and elsewhere) responses to sequences of tones are dependent on stimulus conditions in a similar way to the perception of these stimuli. However, although highly dependent on stimulus conditions, perception is also clearly influenced by factors unrelated to the stimulus, such as attention. Exactly how ‘bottom-up’ sensory processes and non-sensory ‘top-down’ influences interact is still not clear. Here, we recorded responses to alternating tones (ABAB …) of varying frequency difference (FD) and rate of presentation (PR) in the auditory cortex of anesthetized guinea-pigs. These data complement previous studies, in that top-down processing resulting from conscious perception should be absent or at least considerably attenuated. Under anesthesia, the responses of cortical neurons to the tone sequences adapted rapidly, in a manner sensitive to both the FD and PR of the sequences. While the responses to tones at frequencies more distant from neuron best frequencies (BFs) decreased as the FD increased, the responses to tones near to BF increased, consistent with a release from adaptation, or forward suppression. Increases in PR resulted in reductions in responses to all tones, but the reduction was greater for tones further from BF. Although asymptotically adapted responses to tones showed behavior that was qualitatively consistent with perceptual stream segregation, responses reached asymptote within 2 s, and responses to all tones were very weak at high PRs (>12 tones per second). A signal-detection model, driven by the cortical population response, made decisions that were dependent on both FD and PR in ways consistent with perceptual stream segregation. This

  19. Effects of different general anesthetics on serum hemolysis and hepatic and muscular glycogenolysis in rats.

    PubMed

    Machado, E F A; Normand, A C R; Nunes, L A S; Brenzikofer, R; Macedo, D V

    2009-11-01

    Anesthetics can affect the structure and biological function of tissues and systems differentially. The aim of the present study was to compare three injectable anesthetics generally used in experiments with animals in terms of the degree of hemolysis and glycogenolysis occurring after profound anesthesia. Twenty-four male Wistar rats (330-440 g) were divided into three groups (N = 8): chloral hydrate (CH), ketamine + xylazine (KX), Zoletil 50(R) (zolazepam and tiletamine) + xylazine (ZTX). After deep anesthesia, total blood was collected. The liver and white (WG) and red gastrocnemius (RG) muscles were also immediately removed. The degree of serum hemolysis was quantified on the basis of hemoglobin concentration (g/L). Hepatic and muscular glycogen concentrations (mmol/kg wet tissue) were quantified by the phenol-sulfuric method. The CH and KX groups exhibited serum hemolysis (4.0 +/- 2.2 and 1.9 +/- 0.9 g/L, respectively; P < 0.05) compared to the ZTX group, which presented none. Only KX induced elevated glycogenolysis (mmol/kg wet tissue) in the liver (86.9 +/- 63.2) and in WG (18.7 +/- 9.0) and RG (15.2 +/- 7.2; P < 0.05). The CH and ZTX groups exhibited no glycogenolysis in the liver (164.4 +/- 41.1 and 176.8 +/- 54.4, respectively), WG (28.8 +/- 4.4, 32.0 +/- 6.5, respectively) or RG (29.0 +/- 4.9; 25.3 +/- 8.6, respectively). Our data indicate that ZTX seems to be an appropriate general anesthetic for studies that seek to simultaneously quantify the concentration of glycogen and serum biochemical markers without interferences. ZTX is reasonably priced, found easily at veterinary markets, quickly induces deep anesthesia, and presents a low mortality rate.

  20. Effects of Anesthetic Agent Propofol on Postoperative Sex Hormone Levels

    PubMed Central

    Kim, H.; Ku, S.-Y.; Kim, H. C.; Suh, C. S.; Kim, S. H.; Choi, Y. M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Several studies have found anesthetic agents including propofol in ovarian follicular fluid. However, little is known about the effect of anesthetic agents on ovarian function. We aimed to investigate whether there were differences in the postoperative levels of sex hormones when propofol was used as the anesthetic agent. Methods: A retrospective review was done of 80 patients who underwent ovarian surgery, with 72 infertile women serving as controls. Patients were included in the study if their serum estradiol (E2) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) levels were measured during their first postoperative menstrual cycle. Results: Patients were grouped according to the use or non-use of propofol as follows: propofol group (n = 39) and non-propofol group (n = 41). The control group did not undergo surgery. Postoperative E2 levels did not differ between the three groups, but FSH levels were significantly higher in the patients who had undergone surgery compared to controls (p < 0.05). Post-hoc analysis of E2 and FSH levels in the propofol and non-propofol groups did not show any significant differences. Conclusions: The use of propofol did not result in any differences compared to other anesthetic agents in terms of postoperative sex hormone levels after gynecologic surgery. The type of anesthetic agent does not seem to affect the postoperative levels of female sex hormones. PMID:27134297