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Sample records for local electronic structure

  1. Electronic Structure, Localization and 5f Occupancy in Pu Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, John J.; Beaux, Miles F.; Durakiewicz, Tomasz; Graham, Kevin S.; Bauer, Eric D.; Mitchell, Jeremy N.; Tobash, Paul H.; Richmond, Scott

    2012-05-03

    The electronic structure of delta plutonium ({delta}-Pu) and plutonium compounds is investigated using photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). Results for {delta}-Pu show a small component of the valence electronic structure which might reasonably be associated with a 5f{sup 6} configuration. PES results for PuTe are used as an indication for the 5f{sup 6} configuration due to the presence of atomic multiplet structure. Temperature dependent PES data on {delta}-Pu indicate a narrow peak centered 20 meV below the Fermi energy and 100 meV wide. The first PES data for PuCoIn5 indicate a 5f electronic structure more localized than the 5fs in the closely related PuCoGa{sub 5}. There is support from the PES data for a description of Pu materials with an electronic configuration of 5f{sup 5} with some admixture of 5f{sup 6} as well as a localized/delocalized 5f{sup 5} description.

  2. How localized is ``local?'' Efficiency vs. accuracy of O(N) domain decomposition in local orbital based all-electron electronic structure theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havu, Vile; Blum, Volker; Scheffler, Matthias

    2007-03-01

    Numeric atom-centered local orbitals (NAO) are efficient basis sets for all-electron electronic structure theory. The locality of NAO's can be exploited to render (in principle) all operations of the self-consistency cycle O(N). This is straightforward for 3D integrals using domain decomposition into spatially close subsets of integration points, enabling critical computational savings that are effective from ˜tens of atoms (no significant overhead for smaller systems) and make large systems (100s of atoms) computationally feasible. Using a new all-electron NAO-based code,^1 we investigate the quantitative impact of exploiting this locality on two distinct classes of systems: Large light-element molecules [Alanine-based polypeptide chains (Ala)n], and compact transition metal clusters. Strict NAO locality is achieved by imposing a cutoff potential with an onset radius rc, and exploited by appropriately shaped integration domains (subsets of integration points). Conventional tight rc<= 3å have no measurable accuracy impact in (Ala)n, but introduce inaccuracies of 20-30 meV/atom in Cun. The domain shape impacts the computational effort by only 10-20 % for reasonable rc. ^1 V. Blum, R. Gehrke, P. Havu, V. Havu, M. Scheffler, The FHI Ab Initio Molecular Simulations (aims) Project, Fritz-Haber-Institut, Berlin (2006).

  3. Local electronic structures and 2D topological phase transition of ultrathin Sb films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sunghwan; Jin, Kyung-Hwan; Park, Joonbum; Kim, Jun Sung; Jhi, Seung-Hoon; Yeom, Han Woong

    We investigate local electronic structures of ultrathin Sb islands and their edges grown on Bi2Te2Se by scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The Sb islands of various thickness are grown with atomically well ordered edge structure over the 3 bilayers (BL). On the surfaces and edges of these islands, we clearly resolve edge-localized electronic states by STS measurements, which depend on the thickness. The DFT calculations identify that the strongly localized edge states of 4 and 5 BL films correspond to a quantum spin Hall (QSH) states while the edge states of 3 BL are trivial. Our experimental and theoretical results confirm the 2D topological phase transition of the ultrathin Sb films from trivial to QSH phase. Center for Artificial Low Dimensional Electronic Systems, Institute for Basic Science and Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Korea.

  4. On the robustness of the localized spatiotemporal structures in electron-positron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mahajan, S.M.; Berezhiani, V.I. |; Miklaszewski, R.

    1998-04-01

    It is shown that, in an electron-positron plasma with a small fraction of ions, large-amplitude localized spatiotemporal structures (light bullets) can be readily generated and sustained. These light bullets are found to be exceptionally robust: they can emerge from a large variety of initial field distributions and are remarkably stable.

  5. Distinct local electronic structure and magnetism for Mn in amorphous Si and Ge

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Li; Cao, J. X.; Helgren, E.; Karel, J.; Arenholz, E.; Ouyang, Lu; Smith, David J.; Wu, R. Q.; Hellman, F.

    2010-06-01

    Transition metals such as Mn generally have large local moments in covalent semiconductors due to their partially filled d shells. However, Mn magnetization in group-IV semiconductors is more complicated than often recognized. Here we report a striking crossover from a quenched Mn moment (<0.1 {mu}{sub B}) in amorphous Si (a-Si) to a large distinct local Mn moment ({ge}3{mu}{sub B}) in amorphous Ge (a-Ge) over a wide range of Mn concentrations (0.005-0.20). Corresponding differences are observed in d-shell electronic structure and the sign of the Hall effect. Density-functional-theory calculations show distinct local structures, consistent with different atomic density measured for a-Si and a-Ge, respectively, and the Mn coordination number N{sub c} is found to be the key factor. Despite the amorphous structure, Mn in a-Si is in a relatively well-defined high coordination interstitial type site with broadened d bands, low moment, and electron (n-type) carriers, while Mn in a-Ge is in a low coordination substitutional type site with large local moment and holes (p-type) carriers. Moreover, the correlation between N{sub c} and the magnitude of the local moment is essentially independent of the matrix; the local Mn moments approach zero when N{sub c} > 7 for both a-Si and a-Ge.

  6. Tuning LDA+U for electron localization and structure at oxygen vacancies in ceria.

    PubMed

    Castleton, C W M; Kullgren, J; Hermansson, K

    2007-12-28

    We examine the real space structure and the electronic structure (particularly Ce4f electron localization) of oxygen vacancies in CeO(2) (ceria) as a function of U in density functional theory studies with the rotationally invariant forms of the LDA+U and GGA+U functionals. The four nearest neighbor Ce ions always relax outwards, with those not carrying localized Ce4f charge moving furthest. Several quantification schemes show that the charge starts to become localized at U approximately 3 eV and that the degree of localization reaches a maximum at approximately 6 eV for LDA+U or at approximately 5.5 eV for GGA+U. For higher U it decreases rapidly as charge is transferred onto second neighbor O ions and beyond. The localization is never into atomic corelike states; at maximum localization about 80-90% of the Ce4f charge is located on the two nearest neighboring Ce ions. However, if we look at the total atomic charge we find that the two ions only make a net gain of (0.2-0.4)e each, so localization is actually very incomplete, with localization of Ce4f electrons coming at the expense of moving other electrons off the Ce ions. We have also revisited some properties of defect-free ceria and find that with LDA+U the crystal structure is actually best described with U=3-4 eV, while the experimental band structure is obtained with U=7-8 eV. (For GGA+U the lattice parameters worsen for U>0 eV, but the band structure is similar to LDA+U.) The best overall choice is U approximately 6 eV with LDA+U and approximately 5.5 eV for GGA+U, since the localization is most important, but a consistent choice for both CeO(2) and Ce(2)O(3), with and without vacancies, is hard to find.

  7. Local Structure, Electronic Behavior, and Electrocatalytic Reactivity of CO-Reduced Platinum-Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Duchesne, Paul N.; Chen, Guangxu; Zheng, Nanfeng; Zhang, Peng

    2014-02-18

    A series of platinum–iron oxide nanoparticles was synthesized using a “clean” CO-reduction method that employed different ratios of Pt-Fe precursor salts in oleylamine at elevated temperatures. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) studies revealed that nearly monodisperse (i.e., with relative standard deviations of less than 15%) nanoparticles with mean diameters of 3.5–4.4 nm and varied elemental compositions (Pt54Fe46 Pt70Fe30, and Pt87Fe13) were obtained. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements at the Pt L3- and Fe K-edges revealed that these nanoparticles all consisted of a Pt core with amorphous iron oxide on the surface. Furthermore, it was observed that the local structure (e.g., Pt–Pt bond distance and coordination number) and electronic behavior of the Pt–FeO nanoparticles (e.g., Pt d electron density and Fe valence state) are dependent on the Pt-Fe precursor ratios used in their synthesis. Quantum mechanical ab initio calculations were employed to interpret the results from X-ray spectroscopy and help elucidate the relationships between local structure and electronic properties in the nanoparticle samples. Finally, the surface reactivity of these nanoparticles in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) was explored, demonstrating higher electrocatalytic activity for all three platinum–iron oxide samples in comparison with a commercial Pt catalyst. The surface reactivity was also found to be sensitive to the Pt-Fe ratios of the nanoparticles and could be correlated with their local structure and electronic behavior.

  8. Scale-adaptive tensor algebra for local many-body methods of electronic structure theory

    SciTech Connect

    Liakh, Dmitry I

    2014-01-01

    While the formalism of multiresolution analysis (MRA), based on wavelets and adaptive integral representations of operators, is actively progressing in electronic structure theory (mostly on the independent-particle level and, recently, second-order perturbation theory), the concepts of multiresolution and adaptivity can also be utilized within the traditional formulation of correlated (many-particle) theory which is based on second quantization and the corresponding (generally nonorthogonal) tensor algebra. In this paper, we present a formalism called scale-adaptive tensor algebra (SATA) which exploits an adaptive representation of tensors of many-body operators via the local adjustment of the basis set quality. Given a series of locally supported fragment bases of a progressively lower quality, we formulate the explicit rules for tensor algebra operations dealing with adaptively resolved tensor operands. The formalism suggested is expected to enhance the applicability and reliability of local correlated many-body methods of electronic structure theory, especially those directly based on atomic orbitals (or any other localized basis functions).

  9. TiO2 nanotube arrays for photocatalysis: Effects of crystallinity, local order, and electronic structure

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Jing; Hosseinpour, Pegah M.; Luo, Si; Heiman, Don; Menon, Latika; Arena, Dario A.; Lewis, Laura H.

    2014-11-19

    To furnish insight into correlations of electronic and local structure and photoactivity, arrays of short and long TiO₂ nanotubes were synthesized by electrochemical anodization of Ti foil, followed by thermal treatment in O₂ (oxidizing), Ar (inert), and H₂ (reducing) environments. The physical and electronic structures of these nanotubes were probed with x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and synchrotron-based x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and correlated with their photocatalytic properties. The photocatalytic activity of the nanotubes was evaluated by monitoring the degradation of methyl orange under UV-VIS light irradiation. Results show that upon annealing at 350 °C all as-anodized amorphous TiO₂ nanotube samplesmore » partially transform to the anatase structure, with variations in the degree of crystallinity and in the concentration of local defects near the nanotubes' surface (~5 nm) depending on the annealing conditions. Degradation of methyl orange was not detectable for the as-anodized TiO₂ nanotubes regardless of their length. The annealed long nanotubes demonstrated detectable catalytic activity, which was more significant with the H₂-annealed nanotubes than with the Ar- and O₂-annealed nanotube samples. This enhanced photocatalytic response of the H₂-annealed long nanotubes relative to the other samples is positively correlated with the presence of a larger concentration of lattice defects (such as Ti3+ and anticipated oxygen vacancies) and a slightly lower degree of crystallinity near the nanotube surface. These physical and electronic structural attributes impact the efficacy of visible light absorption; moreover, the increased concentration of surface defects is postulated to promote the generation of hydroxyl radicals and thus accelerate the photodegradation of the methyl orange. The information obtained from this study provides unique insight into the role of the near-surface electronic and defect structure

  10. Electronic transport in graphene structure: from weak to strong localization regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lherbier, Aurelien

    2015-03-01

    Graphene, often named the wonder material for its many fascinating properties, has sparked out intense research activities over the last decade. Electronic transport in graphene became rapidly an important research field because of the early reported extremely high charge carrier mobility which triggered large expectations for nanoelectronic devices. Besides mobilities, graphene samples can exhibit particularly long electronic coherence lengths which allow for phase-related quantum transport phenomena such as the weak and strong localization transport regimes. This makes graphene a remarkable playground for fundamental studies of localization theory in low-dimensional systems. In this presentation, using tight-binding models enriched by first principle calculations, and a real-space Kubo-Greenwood method, multiscale simulations of the electronic transport in various graphene-based systems will be discussed. Such an approach allows for computing transport properties of systems containing millions of atoms reaching therefore the experimental sample size. In order to tailor graphene properties, chemical and/or structural modifications are widely used. However, such modifications act as scattering defects and usually deteriorate transport properties. Open a band gap while maintaining good mobility is a typical illustration of this dual problem. The influence of various chemical and structural defects will be analyzed. In particular, the consequences of unbalanced sublattice nitrogen doping in graphene and the case of highly defective graphene structures exhibiting strong Anderson insulator behaviors will be examined. Defects being even more detrimental for transport in 1D structures, a synthesis method that is free of defects is highly desirable. A solution is provided by a bottom-up chemistry approach where precursor monomers are self-assembled. The electronic transport and the potential for nanoelectronics of such defect-free carbon ribbons will also be discussed.

  11. Structural and electronic properties of trans-polyacetylene under local strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketabi, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    A theoretical study is presented to investigate the structural and electronic properties of trans-polyacetylene (trans-PA) molecule under local strain. The influence of a local bending or compression of the space between neighboring carbon atoms on the band gap of the molecule was studied. Making use of an effective difference equation based on tight-binding procedure the band structure of trans-PA has been calculated. Our results indicate that the energy gap of the strained molecule modified significantly which affects the electronic properties of the molecule. We found that the size of the molecular gap is proportional to the bending angle so that for the bending perpendicular to π-orbitals plane the band gap reduced drastically and for the parallel one the band gap gradually increased. Furthermore, the current-voltage characteristics of the strained trans-PA molecule are studied. We found that under the local strain the threshold voltage for the current flow through the bent molecule decreased (increased) depending on the bending is perpendicular (parallel) to the molecule plane.

  12. Localization of fluorescently labeled structures in frozen-hydrated samples using integrated light electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Faas, F G A; Bárcena, M; Agronskaia, A V; Gerritsen, H C; Moscicka, K B; Diebolder, C A; van Driel, L F; Limpens, R W A L; Bos, E; Ravelli, R B G; Koning, R I; Koster, A J

    2013-03-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy is an increasingly popular technique to study complex biological systems at various levels of resolution. Fluorescence microscopy can be employed to scan large areas to localize regions of interest which are then analyzed by electron microscopy to obtain morphological and structural information from a selected field of view at nm-scale resolution. Previously, an integrated approach to room temperature correlative microscopy was described. Combined use of light and electron microscopy within one instrument greatly simplifies sample handling, avoids cumbersome experimental overheads, simplifies navigation between the two modalities, and improves the success rate of image correlation. Here, an integrated approach for correlative microscopy under cryogenic conditions is presented. Its advantages over the room temperature approach include safeguarding the native hydrated state of the biological specimen, preservation of the fluorescence signal without risk of quenching due to heavy atom stains, and reduced photo bleaching. The potential of cryo integrated light and electron microscopy is demonstrated for the detection of viable bacteria, the study of in vitro polymerized microtubules, the localization of mitochondria in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, and for a search into virus-induced intracellular membrane modifications within mammalian cells. PMID:23261400

  13. Asymptotic near-nucleus structure of the electron-interaction potential in local effective potential theories

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Zhixin; Sahni, Viraht

    2007-03-15

    In local effective potential theories of electronic structure, the electron correlations due to the Pauli exclusion principle, Coulomb repulsion, and correlation-kinetic effects, are all incorporated in the local electron-interaction potential v{sub ee}(r). In previous work, it has been shown that for spherically symmetric or sphericalized systems, the asymptotic near-nucleus expansion of this potential is v{sub ee}(r)=v{sub ee}(0)+{beta}r+O(r{sup 2}), with v{sub ee}(0) being finite. By assuming that the Schroedinger and local effective potential theory wave functions are analytic near the nucleus of atoms, we prove the following via quantal density functional theory (QDFT): (i) Correlations due to the Pauli principle and Coulomb correlations do not contribute to the linear structure; (ii) these Pauli and Coulomb correlations contribute quadratically; (iii) the linear structure is solely due to correlation-kinetic effects, the contributions of these effects being determined analytically. We also derive by application of adiabatic coupling constant perturbation theory via QDFT (iv) the asymptotic near-nucleus expansion of the Hohenberg-Kohn-Sham theory exchange v{sub x}(r) and correlation v{sub c}(r) potentials. These functions also approach the nucleus linearly with the linear term of v{sub x}(r) being solely due to the lowest-order correlation kinetic effects, and the linear term of v{sub c}(r) being due solely to the higher-order correlation kinetic contributions. The above conclusions are equally valid for systems of arbitrary symmetry, provided spherical averages of the properties are employed.

  14. Local conditions for the Pauli potential in order to yield self-consistent electron densities exhibiting proper atomic shell structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finzel, Kati

    2016-01-01

    The local conditions for the Pauli potential that are necessary in order to yield self-consistent electron densities from orbital-free calculations are investigated for approximations that are expressed with the help of a local position variable. It is shown that those local conditions also apply when the Pauli potential is given in terms of the electron density. An explicit formula for the Ne atom is given, preserving the local conditions during the iterative procedure. The resulting orbital-free electron density exhibits proper shell structure behavior and is in close agreement with the Kohn-Sham electron density. This study demonstrates that it is possible to obtain self-consistent orbital-free electron densities with proper atomic shell structure from simple one-point approximations for the Pauli potential at local density level.

  15. Local conditions for the Pauli potential in order to yield self-consistent electron densities exhibiting proper atomic shell structure.

    PubMed

    Finzel, Kati

    2016-01-21

    The local conditions for the Pauli potential that are necessary in order to yield self-consistent electron densities from orbital-free calculations are investigated for approximations that are expressed with the help of a local position variable. It is shown that those local conditions also apply when the Pauli potential is given in terms of the electron density. An explicit formula for the Ne atom is given, preserving the local conditions during the iterative procedure. The resulting orbital-free electron density exhibits proper shell structure behavior and is in close agreement with the Kohn-Sham electron density. This study demonstrates that it is possible to obtain self-consistent orbital-free electron densities with proper atomic shell structure from simple one-point approximations for the Pauli potential at local density level.

  16. Bonding in elemental boron: a view from electronic structure calculations using maximally localized Wannier functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogitsu, Tadashi; Gygi, Francois; Reed, John; Schwegler, Eric; Galli, Giulia

    2007-03-01

    Boron exhibits the most complex structure of all elemental solids, with more than 300 atoms per unit cell arranged in interconnecting icosahedra, and some crystallographic positions occupied with a probability of less than one. The precise determination of the ground state geometry of boron---the so-called β-boron structure--has been elusive and its electronic and bonding properties have been difficult to rationalize. Using lattice model Monte Carlo optimization techniques and ab-initio simulations, we have shown that a defective, quasi-ordered β solid is the most stable structure at zero as well as finite T. In the absence of partially occupied sites (POS), the perfect β-boron crystal is unstable; the presence of POS lower its internal energy below that of an ordered α-phase, not mere an entropic effect. We present a picture of the intricate and unique bonding in boron based on maximally localized Wannier (MLWF) functions, which indicates that the presence of POS provides a subtle, yet essential spatial balance between electron deficient and fully saturated bonds. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Dept. of Energy at the University of California/ LLNL under contract no. W-7405-Eng-48.

  17. Gas phase structures and charge localization in small aluminum oxide anions: Infrared photodissociation spectroscopy and electronic structure calculations.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaowei; Fagiani, Matias R; Gewinner, Sandy; Schöllkopf, Wieland; Asmis, Knut R; Bischoff, Florian A; Berger, Fabian; Sauer, Joachim

    2016-06-28

    We use cryogenic ion trap vibrational spectroscopy in combination with quantum chemical calculations to study the structure of mono- and dialuminum oxide anions. The infrared photodissociation spectra of D2-tagged AlO1-4 (-) and Al2O3-6 (-) are measured in the region from 400 to 1200 cm(-1). Structures are assigned based on a comparison to simulated harmonic and anharmonic IR spectra derived from electronic structure calculations. The monoaluminum anions contain an even number of electrons and exhibit an electronic closed-shell ground state. The Al2O3-6 (-) anions are oxygen-centered radicals. As a result of a delicate balance between localization and delocalization of the unpaired electron, only the BHLYP functional is able to qualitatively describe the observed IR spectra of all species with the exception of AlO3 (-). Terminal Al-O stretching modes are found between 1140 and 960 cm(-1). Superoxo and peroxo stretching modes are found at higher (1120-1010 cm(-1)) and lower energies (850-570 cm(-1)), respectively. Four modes in-between 910 and 530 cm(-1) represent the IR fingerprint of the common structural motif of dialuminum oxide anions, an asymmetric four-member Al-(O)2-Al ring. PMID:27369513

  18. Gas phase structures and charge localization in small aluminum oxide anions: Infrared photodissociation spectroscopy and electronic structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xiaowei; Fagiani, Matias R.; Gewinner, Sandy; Schöllkopf, Wieland; Asmis, Knut R.; Bischoff, Florian A.; Berger, Fabian; Sauer, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    We use cryogenic ion trap vibrational spectroscopy in combination with quantum chemical calculations to study the structure of mono- and dialuminum oxide anions. The infrared photodissociation spectra of D2-tagged AlO1-4- and Al2O3-6- are measured in the region from 400 to 1200 cm-1. Structures are assigned based on a comparison to simulated harmonic and anharmonic IR spectra derived from electronic structure calculations. The monoaluminum anions contain an even number of electrons and exhibit an electronic closed-shell ground state. The Al2O3-6- anions are oxygen-centered radicals. As a result of a delicate balance between localization and delocalization of the unpaired electron, only the BHLYP functional is able to qualitatively describe the observed IR spectra of all species with the exception of AlO3-. Terminal Al-O stretching modes are found between 1140 and 960 cm-1. Superoxo and peroxo stretching modes are found at higher (1120-1010 cm-1) and lower energies (850-570 cm-1), respectively. Four modes in-between 910 and 530 cm-1 represent the IR fingerprint of the common structural motif of dialuminum oxide anions, an asymmetric four-member Al-(O)2-Al ring.

  19. Electronic structure and local magnetism of 3d-5d impurity substituted CeFe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Rakesh; Das, G. P.; Srivastava, S. K.

    2016-04-01

    We present here a systematic first-principles study of electronic structure and local magnetic properties of Ce[Fe0.75M0.25]2 compounds, where M is a 3d, 4d or 5d transition or post-transition element, using the generalized gradient approximation of the density functional theory. The d-f band hybridizations existing in CeFe2 get modified by the impurity M in an orderly manner across a period for each impurity series: the hybridization is strongest for the Mn group impurity in the period and gets diminished on either side of it. The weakening of the d-f hybridization strength is also associated with a relative localization of the Ce 4f states with respect to the delocalized 4f states in CeFe2. The above effects are most prominent for 3d impurity series, while for 4d and 5d impurities, the hybridizations and relocalizations are relatively weak due primarily to the relatively extended nature of 4d and 5d wavefunctions. The Ce local moment is found to decrease from the CeFe2 value in proportion to the strength of relocalization, thus following almost the same orderly trend as obeyed by the d-f hybridization. Further, depending on the way the spin-up and spin-down densities of states of an impurity shift relative to the Fermi energy, the impurity local moments are highest for Mn or Fe group, reduce on either side, become zero for Ni to Ga, and are small but negative for V and Ti. The Ce hyperfine field is found to follow the M local moment in a linear fashion, and vice-versa.

  20. Local electronic structure and magnetic properties of 3d transition metal doped GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, He; Duan, Haiming

    2008-05-01

    The local electronic structure and magnetic properties of GaAs doped with 3d transition metal (Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni) were studied by using discrete variational method (DVM) based on density functional theory. The calculated result indicated that the magnetic moment of transition metal increases first and then decreases, and reaches the maximum value when Mn is doped into GaAs. In the case of Mn concentration of 1.4%, the magnetic moment of Mn is in good agreement with the experimental result. The coupling between impure atoms in the system with two impure atoms was found to have obvious variation. For different transition metal, the coupling between the impure atom and the nearest neighbor As also has different variation.

  1. Propagation of localized structures in relativistic magnetized electron-positron plasmas using particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    López, Rodrigo A.; Muñoz, Víctor; Viñas, Adolfo F.; Valdivia, Juan A.

    2015-09-15

    We use a particle-in-cell simulation to study the propagation of localized structures in a magnetized electron-positron plasma with relativistic finite temperature. We use as initial condition for the simulation an envelope soliton solution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation, derived from the relativistic two fluid equations in the strongly magnetized limit. This envelope soliton turns out not to be a stable solution for the simulation and splits in two localized structures propagating in opposite directions. However, these two localized structures exhibit a soliton-like behavior, as they keep their profile after they collide with each other due to the periodic boundary conditions. We also observe the formation of localized structures in the evolution of a spatially uniform circularly polarized Alfvén wave. In both cases, the localized structures propagate with an amplitude independent velocity.

  2. Local atomic and electronic structure in LaMnO{sub 3} across the orbital ordering transition

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, Raquel A.; Souza-Neto, Narcizo M.; Ramos, Aline Y.; Tolentino, Helio C.N.; Granado, Eduardo

    2004-12-01

    The local atomic disorder and electronic structure in the environment of manganese atoms in LaMnO{sub 3} has been studied by x-ray absorption spectroscopy over a temperature range (300-870 K) covering the orbital ordering transition ({approx}710 K). The Mn-O distance splitting into short and long bonds (1.95 and 2.15 A) is kept across the transition temperature, so that the MnO{sub 6} octahedra remain locally Jahn-Teller distorted. Discontinuities in the Mn local structure are identified in the extended x-ray fine structure spectra at this temperature, associated with a reduction of the disorder in the superexchange angle and to the removal of the anisotropy in the radial disorder within the coordination shell. Subtle changes in the electronic local structure also take place at the Mn site at the transition temperature. The near-edge spectra show a small drop of the Mn 4p hole count and a small enhancement in the pre-edge structures at the transition temperature. These features are associated with an increase of the covalence of the Mn-O bonds. Our results shed light on the local electronic and structural phenomena in a model of order-disorder transition, where the cooperative distortion is overcome by the thermal disorder.

  3. Local electronic structure and photoelectrochemical activity of partial chemically etched Ti-doped hematite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rioult, Maxime; Belkhou, Rachid; Magnan, Hélène; Stanescu, Dana; Stanescu, Stefan; Maccherozzi, Francesco; Rountree, Cindy; Barbier, Antoine

    2015-11-01

    The direct conversion of solar light into chemical energy or fuel through photoelectrochemical water splitting is promising as a clean hydrogen production solution. Ti-doped hematite (Ti:α-Fe2O3) is a potential key photoanode material, which despite its optimal band gap, excellent chemical stability, abundance, non-toxicity and low cost, still has to be improved. Here we give evidence of a drastic improvement of the water splitting performances of Ti-doped hematite photoanodes upon a HCl wet-etching. In addition to the topography investigation by atomic force microscopy, a detailed determination of the local electronic structure has been carried out in order to understand the phenomenon and to provide new insights in the understanding of solar water splitting. Using synchrotron radiation based spectromicroscopy (X-PEEM), we investigated the X-ray absorption spectral features at the L3 Fe edge of the as grown surface and of the wet-etched surface on the very same sample thanks to patterning. We show that HCl wet etching leads to substantial surface modifications of the oxide layer including increased roughness and chemical reduction (presence of Fe2 +) without changing the band gap. We demonstrate that these changes are profitable and correlated to the drastic changes of the photocatalytic activity.

  4. Three-Dimensional Imaging of the Local Structure of Materials at Atomic Resolution by Electron Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chun

    Electron tomography was originally developed in 1968, and has been primarily applied to determine the three-dimensional (3D) structure of biological systems. In the last decade, the application of electron tomography in materials science and nanoscience has revived due to the utilization of scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) in the high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) mode, and a highest resolution of ˜1 nm3 has been achieved. However, improving the resolution from ˜1 nm 3 to the atomic level remains a challenging task, which requires new tomographic reconstruction algorithms, better projection alignment methods, state-of-the-art STEM instruments, and more accurate data-acquisition procedures. In this thesis, important progress has been made in all these four areas. First, a novel tomographic method, termed equally sloped tomography (EST), was developed and allows the 3D image reconstruction of tilt series with a limited number projections and a "missing wedge" (i.e. specimens cannot usually be tilted beyond +/-70°). Second, an alignment method which can be used to align the projections of a tilt series at atomic-level resolution was developed based on center of mass. Finally, by using a Titan 80-300 STEM instrument at the California NanoSystems Institute, UCLA, more accurate data acquisition procedures were developed and a number of tomographic tilt series of atomic resolution projections from different nanoparticles have been obtained. With all these combinations, the 3D structure of a 10 nm gold nanoparticle was determined at 2.4 A resolution, the highest resolution ever achieved in any general tomography method. More recently, this novel electron tomography method has been applied to observe nearly all the atoms in a Pt nanoparticle, and imaged for the first time the 3D core structure of edge and screw dislocations at atomic resolution. Furthermore, through numerical simulations the feasibility of determining the 3D atomic structure of

  5. Ion Streaming Instabilities in Pair Ion Plasma and Localized Structure with Non-Thermal Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir Khattak, M.; Mushtaq, A.; Qamar, A.

    2015-12-01

    Pair ion plasma with a fraction of non-thermal electrons is considered. We investigate the effects of the streaming motion of ions on linear and nonlinear properties of unmagnetized, collisionless plasma by using the fluid model. A dispersion relation is derived, and the growth rate of streaming instabilities with effect of streaming motion of ions and non-thermal electrons is calculated. A qausi-potential approach is adopted to study the characteristics of ion acoustic solitons. An energy integral equation involving Sagdeev potential is derived during this process. The presence of the streaming term in the energy integral equation affects the structure of the solitary waves significantly along with non-thermal electrons. Possible application of the work to the space and laboratory plasmas are highlighted.

  6. TiO2 nanotube arrays for photocatalysis: Effects of crystallinity, local order, and electronic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jing; Hosseinpour, Pegah M.; Luo, Si; Heiman, Don; Menon, Latika; Arena, Dario A.; Lewis, Laura H.

    2014-11-19

    To furnish insight into correlations of electronic and local structure and photoactivity, arrays of short and long TiO₂ nanotubes were synthesized by electrochemical anodization of Ti foil, followed by thermal treatment in O₂ (oxidizing), Ar (inert), and H₂ (reducing) environments. The physical and electronic structures of these nanotubes were probed with x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and synchrotron-based x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and correlated with their photocatalytic properties. The photocatalytic activity of the nanotubes was evaluated by monitoring the degradation of methyl orange under UV-VIS light irradiation. Results show that upon annealing at 350 °C all as-anodized amorphous TiO₂ nanotube samples partially transform to the anatase structure, with variations in the degree of crystallinity and in the concentration of local defects near the nanotubes' surface (~5 nm) depending on the annealing conditions. Degradation of methyl orange was not detectable for the as-anodized TiO₂ nanotubes regardless of their length. The annealed long nanotubes demonstrated detectable catalytic activity, which was more significant with the H₂-annealed nanotubes than with the Ar- and O₂-annealed nanotube samples. This enhanced photocatalytic response of the H₂-annealed long nanotubes relative to the other samples is positively correlated with the presence of a larger concentration of lattice defects (such as Ti3+ and anticipated oxygen vacancies) and a slightly lower degree of crystallinity near the nanotube surface. These physical and electronic structural attributes impact the efficacy of visible light absorption; moreover, the increased concentration of surface defects is postulated to promote the generation of hydroxyl radicals and thus accelerate the photodegradation of the methyl orange. The information obtained from this study provides unique insight into the role of the near-surface electronic and defect structure

  7. Exciton Localization in Extended π-Electron Systems: Comparison of Linear and Cyclic Structures.

    PubMed

    Thiessen, Alexander; Würsch, Dominik; Jester, Stefan-S; Aggarwal, A Vikas; Idelson, Alissa; Bange, Sebastian; Vogelsang, Jan; Höger, Sigurd; Lupton, John M

    2015-07-30

    We employ five π-conjugated model materials of different molecular shape-oligomers and cyclic structures-to investigate the extent of exciton self-trapping and torsional motion of the molecular framework following optical excitation. Our studies combine steady state and transient fluorescence spectroscopy in the ensemble with measurements of polarization anisotropy on single molecules, supported by Monte Carlo simulations. The dimer exhibits a significant spectral red shift within ∼100 ps after photoexcitation which is attributed to torsional relaxation. This relaxation mechanism is inhibited in the structurally rigid macrocyclic analogue. However, both systems show a high degree of exciton localization but with very different consequences: while, in the macrocycle, the exciton localizes randomly on different parts of the ring, scrambling polarization memory, in the dimer, localization leads to a deterministic exciton position with luminescence characteristics of a dipole. Monte Carlo simulations allow us to quantify the structural difference between the emitting and absorbing units of the π-conjugated system in terms of disorder parameters.

  8. Fermi orbital self-interaction corrected electronic structure of molecules beyond local density approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Torsten; Liebing, Simon; Kortus, Jens; Pederson, Mark

    The correction of the self-interaction error that is inherent to all standard density functional theory (DFT) calculations is an object of increasing interest. We present our results on the application of the recently developed Fermi-orbital based approach for the self-interaction correction (FO-SIC) to a set of different molecular systems. Our study covers systems ranging from simple diatomic to large organic molecules. Our focus lies on the direct estimation of the ionization potential from orbital eigenvalues and on the ordering of electronic levels in metal-organic molecules. Further, we show that the Fermi orbital positions in structurally similar molecules appear to be transferable. Support by DFG FOR1154 is greatly acknowledged.

  9. Probing the structural and dynamical properties of liquid water with models including non-local electron correlation.

    PubMed

    Del Ben, Mauro; Hutter, Jürg; VandeVondele, Joost

    2015-08-01

    Water is a ubiquitous liquid that displays a wide range of anomalous properties and has a delicate structure that challenges experiment and simulation alike. The various intermolecular interactions that play an important role, such as repulsion, polarization, hydrogen bonding, and van der Waals interactions, are often difficult to reproduce faithfully in atomistic models. Here, electronic structure theories including all these interactions at equal footing, which requires the inclusion of non-local electron correlation, are used to describe structure and dynamics of bulk liquid water. Isobaric-isothermal (NpT) ensemble simulations based on the Random Phase Approximation (RPA) yield excellent density (0.994 g/ml) and fair radial distribution functions, while various other density functional approximations produce scattered results (0.8-1.2 g/ml). Molecular dynamics simulation in the microcanonical (NVE) ensemble based on Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) yields dynamical properties in the condensed phase, namely, the infrared spectrum and diffusion constant. At the MP2 and RPA levels of theory, ice is correctly predicted to float on water, resolving one of the anomalies as resulting from a delicate balance between van der Waals and hydrogen bonding interactions. For several properties, obtaining quantitative agreement with experiment requires correction for nuclear quantum effects (NQEs), highlighting their importance, for structure, dynamics, and electronic properties. A computed NQE shift of 0.6 eV for the band gap and absorption spectrum illustrates the latter. Giving access to both structure and dynamics of condensed phase systems, non-local electron correlation will increasingly be used to study systems where weak interactions are of paramount importance. PMID:26254660

  10. Probing the structural and dynamical properties of liquid water with models including non-local electron correlation.

    PubMed

    Del Ben, Mauro; Hutter, Jürg; VandeVondele, Joost

    2015-08-01

    Water is a ubiquitous liquid that displays a wide range of anomalous properties and has a delicate structure that challenges experiment and simulation alike. The various intermolecular interactions that play an important role, such as repulsion, polarization, hydrogen bonding, and van der Waals interactions, are often difficult to reproduce faithfully in atomistic models. Here, electronic structure theories including all these interactions at equal footing, which requires the inclusion of non-local electron correlation, are used to describe structure and dynamics of bulk liquid water. Isobaric-isothermal (NpT) ensemble simulations based on the Random Phase Approximation (RPA) yield excellent density (0.994 g/ml) and fair radial distribution functions, while various other density functional approximations produce scattered results (0.8-1.2 g/ml). Molecular dynamics simulation in the microcanonical (NVE) ensemble based on Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) yields dynamical properties in the condensed phase, namely, the infrared spectrum and diffusion constant. At the MP2 and RPA levels of theory, ice is correctly predicted to float on water, resolving one of the anomalies as resulting from a delicate balance between van der Waals and hydrogen bonding interactions. For several properties, obtaining quantitative agreement with experiment requires correction for nuclear quantum effects (NQEs), highlighting their importance, for structure, dynamics, and electronic properties. A computed NQE shift of 0.6 eV for the band gap and absorption spectrum illustrates the latter. Giving access to both structure and dynamics of condensed phase systems, non-local electron correlation will increasingly be used to study systems where weak interactions are of paramount importance.

  11. Probing the structural and dynamical properties of liquid water with models including non-local electron correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Del Ben, Mauro Hutter, Jürg; VandeVondele, Joost

    2015-08-07

    Water is a ubiquitous liquid that displays a wide range of anomalous properties and has a delicate structure that challenges experiment and simulation alike. The various intermolecular interactions that play an important role, such as repulsion, polarization, hydrogen bonding, and van der Waals interactions, are often difficult to reproduce faithfully in atomistic models. Here, electronic structure theories including all these interactions at equal footing, which requires the inclusion of non-local electron correlation, are used to describe structure and dynamics of bulk liquid water. Isobaric-isothermal (NpT) ensemble simulations based on the Random Phase Approximation (RPA) yield excellent density (0.994 g/ml) and fair radial distribution functions, while various other density functional approximations produce scattered results (0.8-1.2 g/ml). Molecular dynamics simulation in the microcanonical (NVE) ensemble based on Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) yields dynamical properties in the condensed phase, namely, the infrared spectrum and diffusion constant. At the MP2 and RPA levels of theory, ice is correctly predicted to float on water, resolving one of the anomalies as resulting from a delicate balance between van der Waals and hydrogen bonding interactions. For several properties, obtaining quantitative agreement with experiment requires correction for nuclear quantum effects (NQEs), highlighting their importance, for structure, dynamics, and electronic properties. A computed NQE shift of 0.6 eV for the band gap and absorption spectrum illustrates the latter. Giving access to both structure and dynamics of condensed phase systems, non-local electron correlation will increasingly be used to study systems where weak interactions are of paramount importance.

  12. TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays for photocatalysis: Effects of crystallinity, local order, and electronic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jing; Hosseinpour, Pegah M.; Lewis, Laura H.; Luo, Si; Heiman, Don; Menon, Latika; Arena, Dario A.

    2015-03-15

    To furnish insight into correlations of electronic and local structure and photoactivity, arrays of short and long TiO{sub 2} nanotubes were synthesized by electrochemical anodization of Ti foil, followed by thermal treatment in O{sub 2} (oxidizing), Ar (inert), and H{sub 2} (reducing) environments. The physical and electronic structures of these nanotubes were probed with x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and synchrotron-based x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and correlated with their photocatalytic properties. The photocatalytic activity of the nanotubes was evaluated by monitoring the degradation of methyl orange under UV-VIS light irradiation. Results show that upon annealing at 350 °C all as-anodized amorphous TiO{sub 2} nanotube samples partially transform to the anatase structure, with variations in the degree of crystallinity and in the concentration of local defects near the nanotubes' surface (∼5 nm) depending on the annealing conditions. Degradation of methyl orange was not detectable for the as-anodized TiO{sub 2} nanotubes regardless of their length. However, the annealed long nanotubes demonstrated detectable catalytic activity, which was more significant with the H{sub 2}-annealed nanotubes than with the Ar- and O{sub 2}-annealed nanotube samples. This enhanced photocatalytic response of the H{sub 2}-annealed long nanotubes relative to the other samples is positively correlated with the presence of a larger concentration of lattice defects (such as Ti{sup 3+} and anticipated oxygen vacancies) and a slightly lower degree of crystallinity near the nanotube surface. These physical and electronic structural attributes impact the efficacy of visible light absorption; moreover, the increased concentration of surface defects is postulated to promote the generation of hydroxyl radicals and thus accelerate the photodegradation of the methyl orange. The information obtained from this study provides unique insight into the role of the near

  13. Distinct Effect of Cr Bulk and Surface Doping on the Local Environment and Electronic Structure of Bi2 Se3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Turgut; Pletikosic, Ivo; Valla, Tonica; Sinkovic, Boris

    We report on studies of Cr doping of Bi2Se3 by comparing surface doped with bulk doped Bi2Se3 films and their electronic and local structures studied by in-situ ARPES and core-level photoemission spectroscopies, respectively. In the case of surface doping we see the evidence for Cr substituting the Bi by observation of the extra feature in the Bi 5d photoemission spectra that increases with doping. On the other hand the Cr 3p spectra show two distinct chemical states indicating that there are two different Cr locations with different local electronic configuration. However, unlike theoretical expectations, the electronic structure measured at 15 K shows that surface states preserve gapless feature with well defined Dirac cone and presence of quantum well states, induced by doping. In contrast, the bulk Cr doped Bi2Se3 films show gapped surface states with gap energy as large as 100 meV even at room temperature, which is far above the reported ferromagnetic transition temperature. Yt and BS acknowledge support from University of Connecticut REP program.

  14. Local structural distortion and electronic modifications in PrNiO3 across the metal-insulator transition

    SciTech Connect

    Piamonteze, C.; Tolentino, H.C.N.; Ramos, A.Y.; Massa, N. E.; Alonso, J.A.; Martinez-Lope, M.J.; Casais, M.T.

    2003-01-24

    Local electronic and structural properties of PrNiO3 perovskite were studied by means of X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy at Ni K and L edges. The EXAFS results at Ni K edge show a structural transition from three different Ni-O bond-lengths at the insulating phase to two Ni-O bond-lengths above TMI. These results were interpreted as being due to a transition from a structure with two different Ni sites at the insulating phase to one distorted Ni site at the metallic phase. The Ni L edge spectra show a remarkable difference between the spectra measured at the insulating and metallic phases that indicates a decreasing degree of hybridization between Ni3d and O2p bands from the metallic to the insulating phase.

  15. Non-local exchange correlation functionals impact on the structural, electronic and optical properties of III-V arsenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najwa Anua, N.; Ahmed, R.; Shaari, A.; Saeed, M. A.; Haq, Bakhtiar Ul; Goumri-Said, Souraya

    2013-10-01

    Exchange correlation (XC) energy functionals play a vital role in the efficiency of density functional theory (DFT) calculations, more soundly in the calculation of fundamental electronic energy bandgap. In the present DFT study of III-arsenides, we investigate the implications of XC-energy functional and corresponding potential on the structural, electronic and optical properties of XAs (X = B, Al, Ga, In). Firstly we report and discuss the optimized structural lattice parameters and the band gap calculations performed within different non-local XC functionals as implemented in the DFT-packages: WIEN2k, CASTEP and SIESTA. These packages are representative of the available code in ab initio studies. We employed the LDA, GGA-PBE, GGA-WC and mBJ-LDA using WIEN2k. In CASTEP, we employed the hybrid functional, sX-LDA. Furthermore LDA, GGA-PBE and meta-GGA were employed using SIESTA code. Our results point to GGA-WC as a more appropriate approximation for the calculations of structural parameters. However our electronic bandstructure calculations at the level of mBJ-LDA potential show considerable improvements over the other XC functionals, even the sX-LDA hybrid functional. We report also the optical properties within mBJ potential, which show a nice agreement with the experimental measurements in addition to other theoretical results.

  16. Electron acceleration at localized wave structures in the solar corona (German Title: Elektronenbeschleunigung an lokalen Wellenstrukturen in der Sonnenkorona)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miteva, Rositsa Stoycheva

    2007-07-01

    Our dynamic Sun manifests its activity by different phenomena: from the 11-year cyclic sunspot pattern to the unpredictable and violent explosions in the case of solar flares. During flares, a huge amount of the stored magnetic energy is suddenly released and a substantial part of this energy is carried by the energetic electrons, considered to be the source of the nonthermal radio and X-ray radiation. One of the most important and still open question in solar physics is how the electrons are accelerated up to high energies within (the observed in the radio emission) short time scales. Because the acceleration site is extremely small in spatial extent as well (compared to the solar radius), the electron acceleration is regarded as a local process. The search for localized wave structures in the solar corona that are able to accelerate electrons together with the theoretical and numerical description of the conditions and requirements for this process, is the aim of the dissertation. Two models of electron acceleration in the solar corona are proposed in the dissertation: I. Electron acceleration due to the solar jet interaction with the background coronal plasma (the jet--plasma interaction) A jet is formed when the newly reconnected and highly curved magnetic field lines are relaxed by shooting plasma away from the reconnection site. Such jets, as observed in soft X-rays with the Yohkoh satellite, are spatially and temporally associated with beams of nonthermal electrons (in terms of the so-called type III metric radio bursts) propagating through the corona. A model that attempts to give an explanation for such observational facts is developed here. Initially, the interaction of such jets with the background plasma leads to an (ion-acoustic) instability associated with growing of electrostatic fluctuations in time for certain range of the jet initial velocity. During this process, any test electron that happen to feel this electrostatic wave field is drawn to co

  17. Dependence of Localized Electronic Structure on Ligand Configuration in the [2Fe] Hydrogenase Catalytic Core^*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Christopher H.; Kim, Kwiseon

    2007-03-01

    The [FeFe] hydrogenase enzyme is found in a variety of organisms, including Archaea, Eubacteria, and green algae^1,2, and crystallographically determined atomic position data is available for two examples. The biologically unusual catalytic H-cluster, responsible for proton reduction to H2 in vivo, is conserved in the known structures and includes two bis-thiolato bridged iron ions with extensive cyano- and carbonyl ligation. To address the configurational specificity of the diatomic ligand ligation, density functional theoretical calculations were done on [2Fe] core models of the active center, with varying CO and CN^- ligation patterns. Bonding in each complex has been characterized within the Natural Bond Orbital formalism. The effect of ligand configuration on bonding and charge distribution as well as Kohn-Sham orbital structure will be presented. [1] M. Forestier, P. King, L. Zhang, M. Posewitz, S. Schwarzer, T. Happe, M.L. Ghirardi, and M. Seibert, Eur. J. Biochem. 270, 2750 (2003). [2] Posewitz, M.C., P.W. King, S.L. Smolinski, R.D. Smith, II, A.R. Ginley, M.L. Ghirardi, and M. Seibert, Biochem. Soc. Trans. 33, 102 (2005). ^*This work was supported by the US DOE-SC-BES Hydrogen Fuels Initiative, and done in collaboration with the NREL Chemical and Biosciences Center.

  18. Electron Structure of Francium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koufos, Alexander

    2012-02-01

    This talk presents the first calculations of the electronic structure of francium for the bcc, fcc and hcp structures, using the Augmented Plane Wave (APW) method in its muffin-tin and linearized general potential forms. Both the Local Density Approximation (LDA) and Generalized Gradient Approximation (GGA), were used to calculate the electronic structure and total energy of francium (Fr). The GGA and LDA both found the total energy of the hcp structure slightly below that of the fcc and bcc structure, respectively. This is in agreement with similar results for the other alkali metals using the same methodology. The equilibrium lattice constant, bulk modulus and superconductivity parameters were calculated. We found that under pressures, in the range of 1-5 GPa, Fr could be a superconductor at a critical temperature of about 4K.

  19. Fermi orbital self-interaction corrected electronic structure of molecules beyond local density approximation.

    PubMed

    Hahn, T; Liebing, S; Kortus, J; Pederson, Mark R

    2015-12-14

    The correction of the self-interaction error that is inherent to all standard density functional theory calculations is an object of increasing interest. In this article, we apply the very recently developed Fermi-orbital based approach for the self-interaction correction [M. R. Pederson et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 121103 (2014) and M. R. Pederson, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 064112 (2015)] to a set of different molecular systems. Our study covers systems ranging from simple diatomic to large organic molecules. We focus our analysis on the direct estimation of the ionization potential from orbital eigenvalues. Further, we show that the Fermi orbital positions in structurally similar molecules appear to be transferable.

  20. Fermi orbital self-interaction corrected electronic structure of molecules beyond local density approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, T. Liebing, S.; Kortus, J.; Pederson, Mark R.

    2015-12-14

    The correction of the self-interaction error that is inherent to all standard density functional theory calculations is an object of increasing interest. In this article, we apply the very recently developed Fermi-orbital based approach for the self-interaction correction [M. R. Pederson et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 121103 (2014) and M. R. Pederson, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 064112 (2015)] to a set of different molecular systems. Our study covers systems ranging from simple diatomic to large organic molecules. We focus our analysis on the direct estimation of the ionization potential from orbital eigenvalues. Further, we show that the Fermi orbital positions in structurally similar molecules appear to be transferable.

  1. [Theoretical Investigation of the Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Parameters and Local Structures for Zinc Phosphate Glass Doped with VO2+].

    PubMed

    Li, Chao-ying; Yuang, Xian-Kai; Tu, Qiu; Wang, Wei-yang; Zheng, Xue-mei

    2015-07-01

    As an important model system, 3d(1) ions (VO2+, V4+ et al) have been extensively investigated by means of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and many experimental results of EPR parameters were also measured. The optical absorption and EPR parameters (g factors g||, g⊥ and hyperfine structure constants A||, A⊥) of a tetragonal V4+ center in zinc phosphate glass are theoretically investigated, using the perturbation formulas for a 3d(1) ion in tetragonally compressed octahedra. Since the spin-orbit coupling parameter r (150 cm(-1)) of ligand O2- is close to that ξp(0) (≈248 cm(-1)) of the central 3d(1) ion in zinc phosphate glass doped VO2+, the effect of the spin-orbit coupling parameter ξp(0) on the EPR spectra and optical absorption spectra should be taken into account. In this work, the relationship between the EPR parameters as well as the optical absorption spectra and the local structure of the impurity center are established based on the superposition model. By fitting the calculated EPR parameters and optical absorption spectra for V4+ center in zinc phosphate glass to the experimental data, the local structure parameters of [VO6](8-) cluster are obtained. According to the investigation, the magnitudes of the metal-ligand distances parallel and perpendicular to the C4-axis of [VO6](8-) cluster are, respectively, R|| ≈ 0.175 nm and R⊥ ≈ 0.197 nm, the local structure around the V4+ ions possesses a compressed tetragonal distortion along C4 axis. Theoretical results of EPR parameters and optical absorption spectra are in good agreement with experimental data, the validity of the calculated results has also been discussed. Thus, perturbation method is effective to the studies the EPR parameters and optical spectra of transition-metal 3d ions in crystals. In addition, based on the studies of the hyperfine structure constants (All and A1), one can found that the large value of kappa indicates a large contribution to the hyperfine constant by the

  2. Probing local and electronic structure in Warm Dense Matter: single pulse synchrotron x-ray absorption spectroscopy on shocked Fe

    PubMed Central

    Torchio, Raffaella; Occelli, Florent; Mathon, Olivier; Sollier, Arnaud; Lescoute, Emilien; Videau, Laurent; Vinci, Tommaso; Benuzzi-Mounaix, Alessandra; Headspith, Jon; Helsby, William; Bland, Simon; Eakins, Daniel; Chapman, David; Pascarelli, Sakura; Loubeyre, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Understanding Warm Dense Matter (WDM), the state of planetary interiors, is a new frontier in scientific research. There exists very little experimental data probing WDM states at the atomic level to test current models and those performed up to now are limited in quality. Here, we report a proof-of-principle experiment that makes microscopic investigations of materials under dynamic compression easily accessible to users and with data quality close to that achievable at ambient. Using a single 100 ps synchrotron x-ray pulse, we have measured, by K-edge absorption spectroscopy, ns-lived equilibrium states of WDM Fe. Structural and electronic changes in Fe are clearly observed for the first time at such extreme conditions. The amplitude of the EXAFS oscillations persists up to 500 GPa and 17000 K, suggesting an enduring local order. Moreover, a discrepancy exists with respect to theoretical calculations in the value of the energy shift of the absorption onset and so this comparison should help to refine the approximations used in models. PMID:27246145

  3. Probing local and electronic structure in Warm Dense Matter: single pulse synchrotron x-ray absorption spectroscopy on shocked Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torchio, Raffaella; Occelli, Florent; Mathon, Olivier; Sollier, Arnaud; Lescoute, Emilien; Videau, Laurent; Vinci, Tommaso; Benuzzi-Mounaix, Alessandra; Headspith, Jon; Helsby, William; Bland, Simon; Eakins, Daniel; Chapman, David; Pascarelli, Sakura; Loubeyre, Paul

    2016-06-01

    Understanding Warm Dense Matter (WDM), the state of planetary interiors, is a new frontier in scientific research. There exists very little experimental data probing WDM states at the atomic level to test current models and those performed up to now are limited in quality. Here, we report a proof-of-principle experiment that makes microscopic investigations of materials under dynamic compression easily accessible to users and with data quality close to that achievable at ambient. Using a single 100 ps synchrotron x-ray pulse, we have measured, by K-edge absorption spectroscopy, ns-lived equilibrium states of WDM Fe. Structural and electronic changes in Fe are clearly observed for the first time at such extreme conditions. The amplitude of the EXAFS oscillations persists up to 500 GPa and 17000 K, suggesting an enduring local order. Moreover, a discrepancy exists with respect to theoretical calculations in the value of the energy shift of the absorption onset and so this comparison should help to refine the approximations used in models.

  4. Probing local and electronic structure in Warm Dense Matter: single pulse synchrotron x-ray absorption spectroscopy on shocked Fe.

    PubMed

    Torchio, Raffaella; Occelli, Florent; Mathon, Olivier; Sollier, Arnaud; Lescoute, Emilien; Videau, Laurent; Vinci, Tommaso; Benuzzi-Mounaix, Alessandra; Headspith, Jon; Helsby, William; Bland, Simon; Eakins, Daniel; Chapman, David; Pascarelli, Sakura; Loubeyre, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Understanding Warm Dense Matter (WDM), the state of planetary interiors, is a new frontier in scientific research. There exists very little experimental data probing WDM states at the atomic level to test current models and those performed up to now are limited in quality. Here, we report a proof-of-principle experiment that makes microscopic investigations of materials under dynamic compression easily accessible to users and with data quality close to that achievable at ambient. Using a single 100 ps synchrotron x-ray pulse, we have measured, by K-edge absorption spectroscopy, ns-lived equilibrium states of WDM Fe. Structural and electronic changes in Fe are clearly observed for the first time at such extreme conditions. The amplitude of the EXAFS oscillations persists up to 500 GPa and 17000 K, suggesting an enduring local order. Moreover, a discrepancy exists with respect to theoretical calculations in the value of the energy shift of the absorption onset and so this comparison should help to refine the approximations used in models. PMID:27246145

  5. Local electrical properties of n-AlInAs/i-GaInAs electron channel structures characterized by the probe-electron-beam-induced current technique.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kentaro; Nokuo, Takeshi; Chen, Jun; Sekiguchi, Takashi

    2014-04-01

    We developed a probe-electron-beam-induced current (probe-EBIC) technique to investigate the electrical properties of n-Al(0.48)In(0.52)As/i-Ga(0.30)In(0.70)As electron channel structures for a high-electron-mobility transistor, grown on a lattice-matched InP substrate and lattice-mismatched GaAs (001) and Si (001) substrates. EBIC imaging of planar surfaces at low magnifications revealed misfit dislocations originating from the AlInAs-graded buffer layer. The cross-sections of GaInAs channel structures on an InP substrate were studied by high-magnification EBIC imaging as well as cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy. EBIC imaging showed that the structure is nearly defect-free and the carrier depletion zone extends from the channel toward the i-AlInAs buffer layer.

  6. Localization of electrons and excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Sven

    2006-07-01

    Electrons, electron holes, or excitations in finite or infinite 'multimer systems' may be localized or delocalized. In the theory of Hush, localization depends on the ratio Δ/ λ ( Δ/2 = coupling; λ = reorganization energy). The latter theory has been extended to the infinite system [S. Larsson, A. Klimkāns, Mol. Cryst. Liq. Cryst. 355 (2000) 217]. The metal/insulator transition often takes place abruptly as a function of Δ/ λ. It is argued that localization in a system with un-filled bands cannot be determined on the basis of Mott-Hubbard U alone, but depends on the number of accessible valence states, reorganization energy λ and coupling Δ (=2t). In fact U = 0 does not necessarily imply delocalization. The analysis here shows that there are many different situations for an insulator to metal transition. Charge transfer in doped NiO is characterized by Ni 2+ - Ni 3+ exchange while charge transfer in pure NiO is characterized by a disproportionation 2Ni 2+ → Ni + + Ni 3+. In spite of the great differences between these two cases, U has been applied without discrimination to both. The relevant localization parameters appear to be Δ and λ in the first case, with only two oxidation states, and U, Δ and λ in the second case with three oxidation states. The analysis is extended to insulator-metal transitions, giant magnetic resistance (GMR) and high Tc superconductivity (SC). λ and Δ can be determined quite accurately in quantum mechanical calculations involving only one and two monomers, respectively.

  7. Temperature dependent evolution of the electronic and local atomic structure in the cubic colossal magnetoresistive manganite La1-xSrxMnO3

    SciTech Connect

    Arenholz, Elke; Mannella, N.; Booth, C.H.; Rosenhahn, A.; Sell, B.C.; Nambu, A.; Marchesini, S.; Mun, B. S.; Yang, S.-H.; Watanabe, M.; Ibrahim, K.; Arenholz, E.; Young, A.; Guo, J.; Tomioka, Y.; Fadley, C.S.

    2007-12-06

    We have studied the temperature-dependent evolution of the electronic and local atomic structure in the cubic colossal magnetoresistive manganite La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (x= 0.3-0.4) with core and valence level photoemission (PE), x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS), extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and magnetometry. As the temperature is varied across the Curie temperature T{sub c}, our PE experiments reveal a dramatic change of the electronic structure involving an increase in the Mn spin moment from {approx} 3 {micro}B to {approx} 4 {micro}B, and a modification of the local chemical environment of the other constituent atoms indicative of electron localization on the Mn atom. These effects are reversible and exhibit a slow-timescale {approx}200 K-wide hysteresis centered at T{sub c}. Based upon the probing depths accessed in our PE measurements, these effects seem to survive for at least 35-50 {angstrom} inward from the surface, while other consistent signatures for this modification of the electronic structure are revealed by more bulk sensitive spectroscopies like XAS and XES/RIXS. We interpret these effects as spectroscopic fingerprints for polaron formation, consistent with the presence of local Jahn-Teller distortions of the MnO{sub 6} octahedra around the Mn atom, as revealed by the EXAFS data. Magnetic susceptibility measurements in addition show typical signatures of ferro-magnetic clusters formation well above the Curie temperature.

  8. Electronic structure, local magnetism, and spin-orbit effects of Ir(IV)-, Ir(V)-, and Ir(VI)-based compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laguna-Marco, M. A.; Kayser, P.; Alonso, J. A.; Martínez-Lope, M. J.; van Veenendaal, M.; Choi, Y.; Haskel, D.

    2015-06-01

    Element- and orbital-selective x-ray absorption and magnetic circular dichroism measurements are carried out to probe the electronic structure and magnetism of Ir 5 d electronic states in double perovskite Sr2MIrO 6 (M = Mg , Ca, Sc, Ti, Ni, Fe, Zn, In) and La2NiIrO6 compounds. All the studied systems present a significant influence of spin-orbit interactions in the electronic ground state. In addition, we find that the Ir 5 d local magnetic moment shows different character depending on the oxidation state despite the net magnetization being similar for all the compounds. Ir carries an orbital contribution comparable to the spin contribution for Ir4 + (5 d5) and Ir5 + (5 d4) oxides, whereas the orbital contribution is quenched for Ir6 + (5 d3) samples. Incorporation of a magnetic 3 d atom allows getting insight into the magnetic coupling between 5 d and 3 d transition metals. Together with previous susceptibility and neutron diffraction measurements, the results indicate that Ir carries a significant local magnetic moment even in samples without a 3 d metal. The size of the (small) net magnetization of these compounds is a result of predominant antiferromagnetic interactions between local moments coupled with structural details of each perovskite structure.

  9. Electron Transfer and Localization in Endohederal Metallofullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shenyuan; Yoon, Mina; Hicke, Christian; Zhang, Zhenyu; Wang, Enge

    2008-03-01

    Endohedral metallofullerenes constitute an appealing class of nanoscale building blocks for fabrication of a wide range of noval materials. One open question of fundamental importance is the precise nature of charge redistribution with the carbon cages (Cn) upon metal encapsulation. Using ab initio density functional theory, we systematically study the electronic structure of metallofullerenes, focusing on the spatial charge redistribution. For all large metallofullerenes (n>32), the valence electrons of the metal atoms are all transferred to the fullerene states. Surprisingly, the transferred charge is found to be highly localized inside the cage near the metal cations, rather than uniformly distributed on the surfaces of the carbon cage as traditionally belied. This counterintuitive charge localization picture is attributed to the strong metal-cage interactions within the systems. These findings may prove to be instrumental in the design of novel fullerene-based functional nanomaterials.

  10. Electronic structure localization and spin-state transition in Cu-substituted FeSe: Fe1-xCuxSe

    SciTech Connect

    Chadov, Stanislav; Scharf, Daniel; Fecher, Gerhard H; Felser, Claudia; Zhang, Lijun; Singh, David J

    2010-01-01

    We report density-functional studies of the Fe{sub 1-x}Cu{sub x}Se alloy done using supercell and coherent-potential approximation methods. Magnetic behavior was investigated using the disordered local moment approach. We find that Cu occurs in a nominal d{sup 10} configuration and is highly disruptive to the electronic structure of the Fe sheets. This would be consistent with a metal-insulator transition due to Anderson localization. We further find a strong crossover from a weak moment itinerant system to a local moment magnet at x{approx}0.12. We associate this with the experimentally observed jump near this concentration. our results are consistent with the characterization of this concentration-dependent jump as a transition to a spin glass.

  11. Annealing temperature dependence of local atomic and electronic structure of polycrystalline La0.5Sr0.5MnO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong-Guang; Li, Yong-Tao; Xie, Liang; Dong, Xue-Guang; Li, Qi

    2015-10-01

    The local atomic and electronic structure of La0.5Sr0.5MnO3 was investigated at different annealing temperatures (TA) by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). The extended X-ray absorption fine structure indicates that the MnO6 octahedral distortion is reduced by increasing TA. The chemical shift for the sample with TA = 1350°C measured by XPS of Mn 2p core level demonstrates the increasing of Mn3+ ions content. From the deconvolution of valence band photoemission spectra, the number of eg electron is also proved to increase with increasing TA. It is also demonstrated that there is a strongest hybridization between O 2p and surrounding atomic orbital states in sample with TA = 1350°C, which is consistent with valence band photoemission.

  12. Studies of local structural distortions in strained ultrathin BaTiO3 films using scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Park, Daesung; Herpers, Anja; Menke, Tobias; Heidelmann, Markus; Houben, Lothar; Dittmann, Regina; Mayer, Joachim

    2014-06-01

    Ultrathin ferroelectric heterostructures (SrTiO3/BaTiO3/BaRuO3/SrRuO3) were studied by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) in terms of structural distortions and atomic displacements. The TiO2-termination at the top interface of the BaTiO3 layer was changed into a BaO-termination by adding an additional BaRuO3 layer. High-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) imaging by aberration-corrected STEM revealed that an artificially introduced BaO-termination can be achieved by this interface engineering. By using fast sequential imaging and frame-by-frame drift correction, the effect of the specimen drift was significantly reduced and the signal-to-noise ratio of the HAADF images was improved. Thus, a quantitative analysis of the HAADF images was feasible, and an in-plane and out-of-plane lattice spacing of the BaTiO3 layer of 3.90 and 4.22 Å were determined. A 25 pm shift of the Ti columns from the center of the unit cell of BaTiO3 along the c-axis was observed. By spatially resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy studies, a reduction of the crystal field splitting (CFS, ΔL3=1.93 eV) and an asymmetric broadening of the eg peak were observed in the BaTiO3 film. These results verify the presence of a ferroelectric polarization in the ultrathin BaTiO3 film.

  13. Natural geometric representation for electron local observables

    SciTech Connect

    Minogin, V.G.

    2014-03-15

    An existence of the quartic identities for the electron local observables that define orthogonality relations for the 3D quantities quadratic in the electron observables is found. It is shown that the joint solution of the quartic and bilinear identities for the electron observables defines a unique natural representation of the observables. In the natural representation the vector type electron local observables have well-defined fixed positions with respect to a local 3D orthogonal reference frame. It is shown that the natural representation of the electron local observables can be defined in six different forms depending on a choice of the orthogonal unit vectors. The natural representation is used to determine the functional dependence of the electron wave functions on the local observables valid for any shape of the electron wave packet. -- Highlights: •Quartic identities that define the orthogonality relations for the electron local observables are found. •Joint solution of quartic and bilinear identities defines a unique natural representation of the electron local observables. •Functional dependence of the electron wave functions on the electron local observables is determined.

  14. Local symmetry breaking of a thin crystal structure of β-Si3N4 as revealed by spherical aberration corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hwang Su; Zhang, Zaoli; Kaiser, Ute

    2012-06-01

    This report is an extension of the study for structural imaging of 5-6 nm thick β-Si(3)N(4) [0001] crystal with a spherical aberration corrected transmission electron microscope by Zhang and Kaiser [2009. Structure imaging of β-Si(3)N(4) by spherical aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Ultramicroscopy 109, 1114-1120]. In this work, a local symmetry breaking with an uneven resolution of dumbbells in the six-membered rings revealed in the reported images in the study of Zhang and Kaiser has been analyzed in detail. It is found that this local asymmetry in the image basically is not relevant to a slight mistilt of the specimen and/or a beam tilt (coma). Rather the certain variation of the tetrahedral bond length of Si-N(4) in the crystal structure is found to be responsible for the uneven resolution with a local structural variation from region to region. This characteristic of the variation is also supposed to give a distorted lattice of apparently 2°-2.5° deviations from the perfect hexagonal unit cell as observed in the reported image in the work of Zhang and Kaiser. It is discussed that this variation may prevail only in a thin specimen with a thickness ranging ~≤ 5-6 nm. At the same time, it is noted that the average of the bond length variation is close to the fixed length known in a bulk crystal of β-Si(3)N(4).

  15. Structure, energetics, and electronic properties of the surface of a promoted MoS{sub 2} catalyst: An ab initio local density functional study

    SciTech Connect

    Raybaud, P.; Hafner, J.; Kresse, G.; Kasztelan, S.; Toulhoat, H.

    2000-02-15

    The determination of the local structure of cobalt- or nickel-promoted MoS{sub 2}-based hydrodesulfurization catalysts is of interest for understanding the mechanism leading to an increased activity brought by cobalt or nickel, the so-called synergetic effect. For that reason, the authors carried out ab initio calculations using density functional theory under the generalized gradient approximation for periodic systems. The edge substitution model emerges as the most stable structure and provides an excellent agreement with local structures experimentally determined on real catalysts by in situ extended X-ray absorption fine structure. The authors studied the absorption of sulfur on the active edge surface of the promoted MoS{sub 2} catalyst and determined the equilibrium coverage under sulfiding conditions. It is demonstrated that the incorporation of promoter atoms has a strong influence on the sulfur-metal bond energy at the surface and in particular leads to a reduction of the equilibrium S coverage of the active metal sites. A comparative study on the effects of Co, Ni, and Cu atoms as promoters was performed. Detailed results on the surface electronic structure of promoted MoS{sub 2} are presented.

  16. Structural and electronic control of the metal to insulator transition and local orderings in the θ-(BEDT-TTF)2X organic conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alemany, Pere; Pouget, Jean-Paul; Canadell, Enric

    2015-11-01

    A first-principles density functional theory (DFT) study of θ -(BEDT-TTF)2X molecular conductors with X  =  I3, CsCo(SCN)4 (ambient pressure, 7.5 kbar and 10 kbar), CsZn(SCN)4, TlCo(SCN)4, RbCo(SCN)4 and RbZn(SCN)4 (220 K and 90 K) is reported. It is shown that these salts exhibit three different types of band structure each of them associated with a different physical behavior. In contrast with previous proposals it is found that the key electronic parameter behind the differences in the band structures is the intrastack transfer integral, t c . A new mechanism for the metal to insulator transition in the θ -(BEDT-TTF)2MM‧(SCN)4 (\\text{M}=\\text{Rb} , Tl; {{\\text{M}}\\prime}=\\text{Zn} , Co) salts is proposed, where an order-disorder structural transition of the ethylenedithio groups doubling the periodicity along the stack direction drives the system into an electronically pseudo-1D system along the interstack direction that is subject to a 4k F charge localization of holes. The structural rearrangement is such that the holes are not distributed equally between the two donors; the larger hole density is associated with the B donors which establish the strongest hydrogen bonds with the anion layers. A detailed microscopic description of how disorder of the ethylenedithio groups, the θ dihedral angle and the electronic structure intermingle and lead to the unusual phase diagram of these salts is presented. In this framework the role of pressure and uniaxial strain in controlling the physical behavior of these salts is discussed.

  17. Self-Interaction Corrected Electronic Structure and Energy Gap of CuAlO2 beyond Local Density Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, Akitaka

    2011-05-01

    We implemented a self-interaction correction (SIC) into first-principles calculation code to go beyond local density approximation and applied it to CuAlO2. Our simulation shows that the valence band width calculated within the SIC is narrower than that calculated without the SIC because the SIC makes the d-band potential deeper. The energy gap calculated within the SIC expands and is close to experimental data.

  18. Parameterised local spin density exchange-correlation energies and potentials for electronic structure calculations I. Zero temperature formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLaren, J. M.; Clougherty, D. P.; McHenry, M. E.; Donovan, M. M.

    1991-09-01

    Commonly used approximate forms for the exchange-correlation energy and potential within the local density approximation are summarised, and FORTRAN code is included for the evaluation of these various forms. Included are the following: Xα, Kohn-Sham-Gaspàr, Hedin-Lundqvist-Wilkins, Janak-Moruzzi-Williams, Von Barth-Hedin, Ceperley-Alder (Perdew-Zunger), and Ceperley-Alder (Vosko-Wilk-Nusair). Both the Vosko-Wilk-Nusair and the Von Barth-Hedin expressions for spin interpolation between paramagnetic and ferromagnetic limits are also provided.

  19. Electron Transfer and Localization in Endohederal Metallofullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shenyuan; Yoon, Mina; Hicke, Christian; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2008-01-01

    Endohedral metallofullerenes constitute an appealing class of nanoscale building blocks for fabrication of a wide range of noval materials. One open question of fundamental importance is the precise nature of charge redistribution with the carbon cages (Cn) upon metal encapsulation. Using ab initio density functional theory, we systematically study the electronic structure of metallofullerenes, focusing on the spatial charge redistribution. For all large metallofullerenes (n >32), the valence electrons of the metal atoms are all transferred to the fullerene states. Surprisingly, the transferred charge is found to be highly localized inside the cage near the metal cations, rather than uniformly distributed on the surfaces of the carbon cage as traditionally belied. This counterintuitive charge localization picture is attributed to the strong metal-cage interactions within the systems. These findings may prove to be instrumental in the design of novel fullerene-based functional nanomaterials. 1Supported by the DMSE program and grant no. DE-FG02-05ER46209 of USDOE, grant no. DMR-0606485 of USNSF, and NSF of China.

  20. Temperature dependent evolution of the local electronic structure of atmospheric plasma treated carbon nanotubes: Near edge x-ray absorption fine structure study

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, S. S.; Papakonstantinou, P.; Okpalugo, T. I. T.; Murphy, H.

    2006-09-01

    Near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy has been employed to obtain the temperature dependent evolution of the electronic structure of acid treated carbon nanotubes, which were further modified by dielectric barrier discharge plasma processing in an ammonia atmosphere. The NEXAFS studies were performed from room temperature up to 900 deg. C. The presence of oxygen and nitrogen containing functional groups was observed in C K edge, N K edge, and O K edge NEXAFS spectra of the multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The N K edge spectra revealed three types of {pi}* features, the source of which was decisively identified by their temperature dependent evolution. It was established that these features are attributed to pyridinelike, NO, and graphitelike structures, respectively. The O K edge indicated that both carbonyl (C=O), {pi}*(CO), and ether C-O-C, {sigma}*(CO), functionalities were present. Upon heating in a vacuum to 900 deg. C the {pi}*(CO) resonances disappeared while the {sigma}*(CO) resonances were still present confirming their higher thermal stability. Heating did not produce a significant change in the {pi}* feature of the C K edge spectrum indicating that the tabular structure of the nanotubes is essentially preserved following the thermal decomposition of the functional groups on the nanotube surface.

  1. How do electron localization functions describe π-electron delocalization?

    PubMed

    Steinmann, Stephan N; Mo, Yirong; Corminboeuf, Clemence

    2011-12-14

    Scalar fields provide an intuitive picture of chemical bonding. In particular, the electron localization function (ELF) has proven to be highly valuable in interpreting a broad range of bonding patterns. The discrimination between enhanced or reduced electron (de)localization within cyclic π-conjugated systems remains, however, challenging for ELF. In order to clearly distinguish between the local properties of ten highly and weakly π-(de)localized prototype systems, we compare the ELFs of both the canonical wave functions and electron-localized states (diabatic) with those of two closely related scalar fields: the electron localizability indicator (ELI-D) and the localized orbital locator (LOL). The simplest LOL function distinguishes enhanced from weak π-(de)localization in an insightful and reliable manner. LOL offers the finest contrast between annulenes with 4n/4n + 2 π electrons and their inorganic analogues as well as between hyperconjugated cyclopentadiene derivatives. LOL(π) also gives an appealing and intuitive picture of the π-bond. In contrast, the most popular ELF fails to capture subtle contrasting local electronic properties and suffers from the arbitrariness of the σ/π dissection. The orbital separation of the most recent ELI-D is clear-cut but the interpretations sometime less straightforward in the present context. PMID:21660323

  2. How do electron localization functions describe π-electron delocalization?

    PubMed

    Steinmann, Stephan N; Mo, Yirong; Corminboeuf, Clemence

    2011-12-14

    Scalar fields provide an intuitive picture of chemical bonding. In particular, the electron localization function (ELF) has proven to be highly valuable in interpreting a broad range of bonding patterns. The discrimination between enhanced or reduced electron (de)localization within cyclic π-conjugated systems remains, however, challenging for ELF. In order to clearly distinguish between the local properties of ten highly and weakly π-(de)localized prototype systems, we compare the ELFs of both the canonical wave functions and electron-localized states (diabatic) with those of two closely related scalar fields: the electron localizability indicator (ELI-D) and the localized orbital locator (LOL). The simplest LOL function distinguishes enhanced from weak π-(de)localization in an insightful and reliable manner. LOL offers the finest contrast between annulenes with 4n/4n + 2 π electrons and their inorganic analogues as well as between hyperconjugated cyclopentadiene derivatives. LOL(π) also gives an appealing and intuitive picture of the π-bond. In contrast, the most popular ELF fails to capture subtle contrasting local electronic properties and suffers from the arbitrariness of the σ/π dissection. The orbital separation of the most recent ELI-D is clear-cut but the interpretations sometime less straightforward in the present context.

  3. Local geometric and electronic structures and origin of magnetism in Co-doped BaTiO{sub 3} multiferroics

    SciTech Connect

    Phan, The-Long; Ho, T. A.; Manh, T. V.; Yu, S. C.; Thang, P. D.; Thanh, Tran Dang; Lam, V. D.; Dang, N. T.

    2015-05-07

    We have prepared polycrystalline samples BaTi{sub 1−x}Co{sub x}O{sub 3} (x = 0–0.1) by solid-state reaction. X-ray diffraction and Raman-scattering studies reveal the phase separation in crystal structure as changing Co-doping content (x). The samples with x = 0–0.01 are single phase in a tetragonal structure. At higher doping contents (x > 0.01), there is the formation and development of a secondary hexagonal phase. Magnetization measurements at room temperature indicate a coexistence of paramagnetic and weak-ferromagnetic behaviors in BaTi{sub 1−x}Co{sub x}O{sub 3} samples with x > 0, while pure BaTiO{sub 3} is diamagnetic. Both these properties increase with increasing x. Analyses of X-ray absorption spectra recorded from BaTi{sub 1−x}Co{sub x}O{sub 3} for the Co and Ti K-edges indicate the presence of Co{sup 2+} and Co{sup 3+} ions. They locate in the Ti{sup 4+} site of the tetragonal and hexagonal BaTiO{sub 3} structures. Particularly, there is a shift of oxidation state from Co{sup 2+} to Co{sup 3+} when Co-doping content increases. We believe that the paramagnetic nature in BaTi{sub 1−x}Co{sub x}O{sub 3} samples is due to isolated Co{sup 2+} and Co{sup 3+} centers. The addition of Co{sup 3+} ions enhances the paramagnetic behavior. Meanwhile, the origin of ferromagnetism is due to lattice defects, which is less influenced by the changes caused by the variation in concentration of Co{sup 2+} and Co{sup 3+} ions.

  4. The 3R modification of LixTiS2 - insights into local electronic structures from high-temperature in situ NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkening, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Titanium disulphide was one of the very first electrode materials investigated to serve as insertion host in rechargeable, that is secondary lithium-ion batteries. At room temperature the trigonal, layer structured modification exists that can easily accommodate Li ions up to the composition ?. With increasing temperature, however, the present results give evidence that ? (?) transforms into a new crystal structure that is expected to be metastable at room temperature. Here, this high-temperature modification is attributed to the 3R polymorph previously described by Colbow et al. Quite recently, the same phase has been characterized by X-ray diffraction and Rietveld refinement. In the present work, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is used to follow up this transformation in situ; it is able to monitor the associated changes of local electronic structures sensed by the lithium ions. Indeed, via in situ NMR, which has been carried out at temperatures as high as 1023 K, it was possible to directly reveal the evolution of a metastable phase which reversibly forms upon heating the trigonal starting material ?.

  5. Electronic structure of Calcium hexaborides

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Byounghak; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2005-06-15

    We present a theoretical study of crystal and electronic structures of CaB6 within a screened-exchange local density approximation (sX-LDA). Our ab initio total energy calculations show that CaB6 is a semiconductor with a gap of >1.2 eV, in agreement with recent experimental observations. We show a very sensitive band gap dependence on the crystal internal parameter, which might partially explain the scatter of previous theoretical results. Our calculation demonstrates that it is essential to study this system simultaneously for both crystal structures and electronic properties, and that the sX-LDA provides an ideal method for this problem.

  6. Local orbitals in electron scattering calculations*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winstead, Carl L.; McKoy, Vincent

    2016-05-01

    We examine the use of local orbitals to improve the scaling of calculations that incorporate target polarization in a description of low-energy electron-molecule scattering. After discussing the improved scaling that results, we consider the results of a test calculation that treats scattering from a two-molecule system using both local and delocalized orbitals. Initial results are promising. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  7. Local electron heating in nanoscopic conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agosta, Roberto; Sai, Na; di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2007-03-01

    The electron current density in nanoscale junctions is typically several orders of magnitude larger than the corresponding one in bulk electrodes. Consequently, the electron-electron scattering rate increases substantially in the junction. This leads to local electron heating of the underlying Fermi sea [1] in analogy to the local ionic heating that is due to the increased electron-phonon scattering rates [2]. By using a novel hydrodynamic formulation of transport [3], we predict the bias dependence of local electron heating in quasi-ballistic nanoscale conductors [1], its effect on ionic heating [1], and the consequent observable changes in the inelastic conductance [4]. [1] R. D'Agosta, N. Sai and M. Di Ventra, accepted in Nano Letters (2006). [2] Y.-C. Chen, M. Zwolak, and M. Di Ventra, Nano Lett. 3, 1961 (2003); Nano Lett. 4, 1709 (2004); Nano Lett. 5, 621 (2005). M. J. Montgomery, T. N. Todorov, and A. P. Sutton, J. Phys. Cond. Matt. 14, 5377 (2002). [3] R. D'Agosta and M. Di Ventra, J. Phys. Cond. Matt. in press. [4] R. D'Agosta and M. Di Ventra, in preparation.

  8. Excess Electron Localization in Solvated DNA Bases

    SciTech Connect

    Smyth, Maeve; Kohanoff, Jorge

    2011-06-10

    We present a first-principles molecular dynamics study of an excess electron in condensed phase models of solvated DNA bases. Calculations on increasingly large microsolvated clusters taken from liquid phase simulations show that adiabatic electron affinities increase systematically upon solvation, as for optimized gas-phase geometries. Dynamical simulations after vertical attachment indicate that the excess electron, which is initially found delocalized, localizes around the nucleobases within a 15 fs time scale. This transition requires small rearrangements in the geometry of the bases.

  9. Electron localization of anions probed by nitrile vibrations

    DOE PAGES

    Mani, Tomoyasu; Grills, David C.; Newton, Marshall D.; Miller, John R.

    2015-08-02

    Localization and delocalization of electrons is a key concept in chemistry, and is one of the important factors determining the efficiency of electron transport through organic conjugated molecules, which have potential to act as “molecular wires”. This, in turn, substantially influences the efficiencies of organic solar cells and other molecular electronic devices. It is also necessary to understand the electronic energy landscape and the dynamics of electrons through molecular chain that govern their transport capabilities in one-dimensional conjugated chains so that we can better define the design principles of conjugated molecules for their applications. We show that nitrile ν(C≡N) vibrationsmore » respond to the degree of electron localization in nitrile-substituted organic anions by utilizing time-resolved infrared (TRIR) detection combined with pulse radiolysis. Measurements of a series of aryl nitrile anions allow us to construct a semi-empirical calibration curve between the changes in the ν(C≡N) IR shifts and the changes in the electronic charges from the neutral to the anion states in the nitriles; more electron localization in the nitrile anion results in larger IR shifts. Furthermore, the IR linewidth in anions can report a structural change accompanying changes in the electronic density distribution. Probing the shift of the nitrile ν(C≡N) IR vibrational bands enables us to determine how the electron is localized in anions of nitrile-functionalized oligofluorenes, considered as organic mixed-valence compounds. We estimate the diabatic electron transfer distance, electronic coupling strengths, and energy barriers in these organic mixed-valence compounds. The analysis reveals a dynamic picture, showing that the electron is moving back and forth within the oligomers with a small activation energy of ≤ kBT, likely controlled by the movement of dihedral angles between monomer units. Thus, implications for the electron transport capability

  10. Electron localization of anions probed by nitrile vibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Mani, Tomoyasu; Grills, David C.; Newton, Marshall D.; Miller, John R.

    2015-08-02

    Localization and delocalization of electrons is a key concept in chemistry, and is one of the important factors determining the efficiency of electron transport through organic conjugated molecules, which have potential to act as “molecular wires”. This, in turn, substantially influences the efficiencies of organic solar cells and other molecular electronic devices. It is also necessary to understand the electronic energy landscape and the dynamics of electrons through molecular chain that govern their transport capabilities in one-dimensional conjugated chains so that we can better define the design principles of conjugated molecules for their applications. We show that nitrile ν(C≡N) vibrations respond to the degree of electron localization in nitrile-substituted organic anions by utilizing time-resolved infrared (TRIR) detection combined with pulse radiolysis. Measurements of a series of aryl nitrile anions allow us to construct a semi-empirical calibration curve between the changes in the ν(C≡N) IR shifts and the changes in the electronic charges from the neutral to the anion states in the nitriles; more electron localization in the nitrile anion results in larger IR shifts. Furthermore, the IR linewidth in anions can report a structural change accompanying changes in the electronic density distribution. Probing the shift of the nitrile ν(C≡N) IR vibrational bands enables us to determine how the electron is localized in anions of nitrile-functionalized oligofluorenes, considered as organic mixed-valence compounds. We estimate the diabatic electron transfer distance, electronic coupling strengths, and energy barriers in these organic mixed-valence compounds. The analysis reveals a dynamic picture, showing that the electron is moving back and forth within the oligomers with a small activation energy of ≤ kBT, likely controlled by the movement of dihedral angles between monomer units. Thus, implications for the electron transport

  11. Electron Localization of Anions Probed by Nitrile Vibrations.

    PubMed

    Mani, Tomoyasu; Grills, David C; Newton, Marshall D; Miller, John R

    2015-09-01

    Localization and delocalization of electrons is a key concept in chemistry, and is one of the important factors determining the efficiency of electron transport through organic conjugated molecules, which have potential to act as "molecular wires". This, in turn, substantially influences the efficiencies of organic solar cells and other molecular electronic devices. It is also necessary to understand the electronic energy landscape and the dynamics that govern electron transport capabilities in one-dimensional conjugated chains so that we can better define the design principles for conjugated molecules for their applications. We show that nitrile ν(C≡N) vibrations respond to the degree of electron localization in nitrile-substituted organic anions by utilizing time-resolved infrared detection combined with pulse radiolysis. Measurements of a series of aryl nitrile anions allow us to construct a semiempirical calibration curve between the changes in the ν(C≡N) infrared (IR) shifts and the changes in the electronic charges from the neutral to the anion states in the nitriles; more electron localization in the nitrile anion results in larger IR shifts. Furthermore, the IR line width in anions can report a structural change accompanying changes in the electronic density distribution. Probing the shift of the nitrile ν(C≡N) IR vibrational bands enables us to determine how the electron is localized in anions of nitrile-functionalized oligofluorenes, considered as organic mixed-valence compounds. We estimate the diabatic electron transfer distance, electronic coupling strengths, and energy barriers in these mixed-valence compounds. The analysis reveals a dynamic picture, showing that the electron is moving back and forth within the oligomers with a small activation energy of ≤kBT, likely controlled by the movement of dihedral angles between monomer units. Implications for the electron transport capability in molecular wires are discussed. PMID:26234163

  12. Electronic structure of disordered conjugated polymers: Polythiophenes

    SciTech Connect

    Vukmirovic, Nenad; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2008-11-26

    Electronic structure of disordered semiconducting conjugated polymers was studied. Atomic structure was found from a classical molecular dynamics simulation and the charge patching method was used to calculate the electronic structure with the accuracy similar to the one of density functional theory in local density approximation. The total density of states, the local density of states at different points in the system and the wavefunctions of several states around the gap were calculated in the case of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and polythiophene (PT) systems to gain insight into the origin of disorder in the system, the degree of carrier localization and the role of chain interactions. The results indicated that disorder in the electronic structure of alkyl substituted polythiophenes comes from disorder in the conformation of individualchains, while in the case of polythiophene there is an additional contribution due to disorder in the electronic coupling between the chains. Each of the first several wavefunctions in the conduction and valence band of P3HT is localized over several rings of a single chain. It was shown that the localization can be caused in principle both by ring torsions and chain bending, however the effect of ring torsions is much stronger. PT wavefunctions are more complicated due to larger interchain electronic coupling and are not necessarily localized on a single chain.

  13. Laser cooling via excitation of localized electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emin, David

    2007-07-01

    Under appropriate conditions, absorption of light by a solid can initiate a process by which it is cooled. In particular, energy is extracted from a material when its absorption of a photon is followed by emission of a photon of higher energy. This up-conversion requires some of the solid’s electrons to garner energy from atomic vibrations. Here, two schemes for laser cooling via localized electronic states are addressed. The first scheme utilizes the ground state and an excited state of a localized center. In this two-level scheme, the cooling process is initiated with photon absorption in the extreme low-energy tail of a localized state’s vibrationally broadened absorption spectrum. The subsequent atomic relaxation transfers energy of especially large vibratory atomic strains into electrical energy that is then extracted via photon emission. The second scheme involves the ground state and two excited states of a localized center. Cooling is facilitated when (i) the photoexcitation of an electron from its ground state to the lower excited level is followed by (ii) electron-phonon-induced promotion to the uppermost level and the subsequent (iii) return of the electron to its ground state with emission of a photon of higher energy than that of the absorbed photon. However, competing relaxation processes contribute to heating. The net cooling power per unit volume is maximized for both schemes, thereby determining characteristics of localized electronic systems that foster optical cooling. The cooling power per unit volume is greatest at high temperatures and falls rapidly as the thermal energy is reduced below each system’s luminescence Stokes shift. Moreover, cooling via the three-level scheme is most effective when (i) the energy separation between excited states is smaller than the thermal energy and (ii) the degeneracy of the highest-lying excited state is much larger than that of the center’s middle level. These restrictive conditions appear to be

  14. Imaging physical phenomena with local probes: From electrons to photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnell, Dawn A.; Basov, D. N.; Bode, Matthias; Diebold, Ulrike; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Madhavan, Vidya; Novotny, Lukas; Salmeron, Miquel; Schwarz, Udo D.; Weiss, Paul S.

    2012-07-01

    The invention of scanning tunneling and atomic force probes revolutionized our understanding of surfaces by providing real-space information about the geometric and electronic structure of surfaces at atomic spatial resolution. However, the junction of a nanometer-sized probe tip and a surface contains much more information than is intrinsic to conventional tunneling and atomic force measurements. This review summarizes recent advances that push the limits of the probing function at nanometer-scale spatial resolution in the context of important scientific problems. Issues such as molecular interface contact, superconductivity, electron spin, plasmon field focusing, surface diffusion, bond vibration, and phase transformations are highlighted as examples in which local probes elucidate complex function. The major classes of local probes are considered, including those of electromagnetic properties, electron correlations, surface structure and chemistry, optical interactions, and electromechanical coupling.

  15. Probing the local electronic structure of the cross-linked (1 × 2) reconstruction of rutile TiO2(110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, Chi Ming; Pang, Chi Lun; Thornton, Geoff

    2016-08-01

    The electronic structure of cross-linked TiO2(110)-(1 × 2) has been investigated using scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) and by monitoring changes in ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) following exposure of the surface to O2. STS reveals two states located in the bandgap, at 0.7 and 1.5 eV below the Fermi level. The population of these two states varies over different parts of the (1 × 2)-reconstructed surface. An additional state at 1.1 eV above the Fermi level is observed at the double link part of the structure. All of the bandgap states are attenuated following exposure to O2, while the workfunction is increased. We attribute this to an electron transfer from the surface to the adsorbed oxygen.

  16. Electronics for Piezoelectric Smart Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warkentin, D. J.; Tani, J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper briefly presents work addressing some of the basic considerations for the electronic components used in smart structures incorporating piezoelectric elements. After general remarks on the application of piezoelectric elements to the problem of structural vibration control, three main topics are described. Work to date on the development of techniques for embedding electronic components within structural parts is presented, followed by a description of the power flow and dissipation requirements of those components. Finally current work on the development of electronic circuits for use in an 'active wall' for acoustic noise is introduced.

  17. Local atomic and electronic structure of LaCoO3 /SrTiO3 thin films by HAADF STEM and EELS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisevich, Albina; Hyuck Jang, Jae; Kim, Young-Min; Qiao, Liang; Biegalski, Michael

    2013-03-01

    For perovskite films with several competing functionalities, magnetic and electronic properties can be affected both by structural order parameters and chemical factors. For example, in LaCoO3 (LCO) thin films, magnetic and transport properties are strongly dependent on strain state and oxygen content. For this study, LCO thin films were deposited by pulsed laser deposition method with different thicknesses (2, 5, 15 unit cell and 20 nm thickness) on SrTiO3 substrate. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of the grown films have demonstrated that Co 3p edges shift up to 2 eV for 15 u.c. and 20 nm films, indicating possible presence of 2D electron gas. The structure of the 5 u.c and 15 u.c LCO films was examined. Atomic position mapping from STEM HAADF and BF images can reveal lattice parameter and octahedral tilt behavior with atomic resolution. BF STEM imaging showed that octahedral tilts were active in the 15 u.c. film but not in the 5 u.c. film. A complex pattern of O K fine structure evolution at the interface was observed; results of the deconvolution of different contributions to this behavior using advanced simulations, as well as data on oxygen vacancy mapping, will be presented. Research supported by the US DOE-BES, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division, and through a user project supported by ORNL's ShaRE User Program.

  18. Guanine quadruplex structures localize to heterochromatin

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Roland F.; Moshkin, Yuri M.; Mouton, Stijn; Grzeschik, Nicola A.; Kalicharan, Ruby D.; Kuipers, Jeroen; Wolters, Anouk H.G.; Nishida, Kazuki; Romashchenko, Aleksander V.; Postberg, Jan; Lipps, Hans; Berezikov, Eugene; Sibon, Ody C.M.; Giepmans, Ben N.G.; Lansdorp, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing amounts of data support a role for guanine quadruplex (G4) DNA and RNA structures in various cellular processes. We stained different organisms with monoclonal antibody 1H6 specific for G4 DNA. Strikingly, immuno-electron microscopy showed exquisite specificity for heterochromatin. Polytene chromosomes from Drosophila salivary glands showed bands that co-localized with heterochromatin proteins HP1 and the SNF2 domain-containing protein SUUR. Staining was retained in SUUR knock-out mutants but lost upon overexpression of SUUR. Somatic cells in Macrostomum lignano were strongly labeled, but pluripotent stem cells labeled weakly. Similarly, germline stem cells in Drosophila ovaries were weakly labeled compared to most other cells. The unexpected presence of G4 structures in heterochromatin and the difference in G4 staining between somatic cells and stem cells with germline DNA in ciliates, flatworms, flies and mammals point to a conserved role for G4 structures in nuclear organization and cellular differentiation. PMID:26384414

  19. Correlated cryogenic photoactivated localization microscopy and cryo-electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi-Wei; Chen, Songye; Tocheva, Elitza I; Treuner-Lange, Anke; Löbach, Stephanie; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte; Jensen, Grant J

    2014-07-01

    Cryo-electron tomography (CET) produces three-dimensional images of cells in a near-native state at macromolecular resolution, but identifying structures of interest can be challenging. Here we describe a correlated cryo-PALM (photoactivated localization microscopy)-CET method for localizing objects within cryo-tomograms to beyond the diffraction limit of the light microscope. Using cryo-PALM-CET, we identified multiple and new conformations of the dynamic type VI secretion system in the crowded interior of Myxococcus xanthus.

  20. Localized structures in gaseous combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobloch, Edgar; Lo Jacono, David; Bergeon, Alain

    2015-11-01

    We consider a flame between a pair of porous walls at x = +/- 1 that allow fuel and oxidizer to diffuse into the burn region from opposite sides. The burn process is described by a binary one-step process of Arrhenius type. The heat released is redistributed via radiation. Convection is ignored. In 1D the low and high temperature states are connected by an S-shaped branch with a fold at low Damköhler number below which extinction takes place. Various instabilities occur on the upper (flame) branch leading to different time-dependent but 1D flames. In 2D the situation is dramatically modified: near the extinction region the burn front breaks up into structures that are localized in the direction along the front, with multiple branches of such states bifurcating from the fold. These correspond to states with n = 1 , 2 , ⋯ identical and equispaced hotspots. Further bifurcations generate states in which the hotspots are nonidentical and separated by unequal distances. All these states are present in the same parameter interval, implying great sensitivity of the system to initial conditions.

  1. DNA Electronic Fingerprints by Local Spectroscopy on Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balatsky, Alexander

    2013-03-01

    Working and scalable alternatives to the conventional chemical methods of DNA sequencing that are based on electronic/ionic signatures would revolutionize the field of sequencing. The approach of a single molecule imaging and spectroscopy with unprecedented resolution, achieved by Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy (STS) and nanopore electronics could enable this revolution. We use the data from our group and others in applying this local scanning tunneling microscopy and illustrate possibilities of electronic sequencing of freeze dried deposits on graphene. We will present two types of calculated fingerprints: first in Local Density of States (LDOS) of DNA nucleotide bases (A,C,G,T) deposited on graphene. Significant base-dependent features in the LDOS in an energy range within few eV of the Fermi level were found in our calculations. These features can serve as electronic fingerprints for the identification of individual bases in STS. In the second approach we present calculated base dependent electronic transverse conductance as DNA translocates through the graphene nanopore. Thus we argue that the fingerprints of DNA-graphene hybrid structures may provide an alternative route to DNA sequencing using STS. Work supported by US DOE, NORDITA.

  2. First-Principles Study on Electronic Structure and Spin State of Rutile (Ti,Co)O2 by Self-Interaction-Corrected Local Density Approximation: Role of Oxygen Vacancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kizaki, Hidetoshi; Toyoda, Masayuki; Sato, Kazunori; Katayama-Yoshida, Hiroshi

    2009-05-01

    Electronic structure of rutile-TiO2 based dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMS) are investigated within self-interaction-corrected local density approximation (SIC-LDA). These results are compared with those calculated within standard LDA. We employ the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker method combined with coherent potential approximation. It is found that high-spin state in (Ti,Co)O2 with O vacancy is predicted in the SIC-LDA. This result is in good agreement with the experimental results. As a result, we find that O vacancy in (Ti,Co)O2 is the origin of Co2+ high-spin state and SIC-LDA is indispensable to describe the correct electronic structure and spin state of TiO2-based DMS.

  3. Local electronic properties of organic semiconductor interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenfeld, Michael L.

    Understanding organic semiconductor interfaces is critical to developing organic photovoltaics (OPV). OPV interfaces are disordered due to weak intermolecular interactions, resulting in diverse charge transfer micro-environments. I present experimental data isolating high-order intermolecular interactions controlling interfacial energy level alignment and describe new instrumental capabilities providing access to the local electronic and kinetic landscape at organic semiconductor interfaces. Interface formation between vanadyl naphthalocyanine (VONc) and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) is investigated. Ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS) shows that the VONc binding energy (BE) decouples from the work function, shifting in an opposite direction and contradicting the standard interface dipole model. This effect is quantitatively described using an electrostatic depolarization model and confirmed by simulations which show an inhomogeneous potential at the interface. New data and literature values suggest orthogonality between polarizability and molecular dipole in polar porphyrazines. Their potential for interface engineering is discussed. The electron-rich Au(111)/VONc interface is investigated. The organic layer induces a large interface dipole in Au(111) which can be fit to a depolarization model. Ionization potential and depolarization data suggest that the second VONc layer on Au(111) adopts a tilted geometry. Electrostatic differences between Au(111)/VONc and HOPG/VONc are discussed, demonstrating that interface dipole contributions are not interchangeable. The surface states of the Au(111)/VONc interface are characterized by angle resolved 2-photon photoemission to determine the magnitude of the perturbation. The measured free-electron-like effective mass and BE destabilization of the Shockley state is attributed to step edges caused by lifting the Au(111) (22x 3 ) reconstruction. The Shockley state is accessible primarily through resonance

  4. Local regularization of tilt projections reduces artifacts in electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Maiorca, Mauro; Millet, Coralie; Hanssen, Eric; Abbey, Brian; Kazmierczak, Edmund; Tilley, Leann

    2014-04-01

    Electron tomography produces very high resolution 3D image volumes useful for investigating the structure and function of cellular components. Unfortunately, unavoidable discontinuities and physical constraints in the acquisition geometry lead to a range of artifacts that can affect the reconstructed image. In particular, highly electron dense regions, such as gold nanoparticles, can hide proximal biological structures and degrade the overall quality of the reconstructed tomograms. In this work we introduce a pre-reconstruction non-conservative non-linear isotropic diffusion (NID) filter that automatically identifies and reduces local irregularities in the tilt projections. We illustrate the improvement in quality obtained using this approach for reconstructed tomograms generated from samples of malaria parasite-infected red blood cells. A quantitative and qualitative evaluation for our approach on both simulated and real data is provided.

  5. Local spin dynamics with the electron electric dipole moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Masahiro; Soga, Kota; Senami, Masato; Tachibana, Akitomo

    2016-01-01

    The local spin dynamics of the electron is studied from the viewpoint of the electric dipole moment (EDM) of the electron in the framework of the quantum field theory. The improvements of the computational accuracy of the effective electric field (Eeff) for the EDM and the understanding of spin precession are important for the experimental determination of the upper bound of the EDM. Calculations of Eeff in YbF (2Σ1 /2 ), BaF (2Σ1 /2 ), ThO (3Δ1 ), and HF+ (2Π1 /2 ) are performed on the basis of the restricted active space configuration interaction approach by using the four-component relativistic electronic structure calculation. The spin precession is also discussed from the viewpoint of local spin torque dynamics. We show that a contribution to the torque density for the spin is brought into by the EDM. Distributions of the local spin angular momentum density and torque densities induced by external fields in the above molecules are calculated and a property related with large Eeff is discussed.

  6. Electronic Structure Principles and Aromaticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chattaraj, P. K.; Sarkar, U.; Roy, D. R.

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between aromaticity and stability in molecules on the basis of quantities such as hardness and electrophilicity is explored. The findings reveal that aromatic molecules are less energetic, harder, less polarizable, and less electrophilic as compared to antiaromatic molecules, as expected from the electronic structure principles.

  7. Electronic and crystallographic structure of apatites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderín, L.; Stott, M. J.; Rubio, A.

    2003-04-01

    An ab initio study of four different stoichiometric apatites (oxyapatite, hydroxyapatite, fluorapatite, and chlorapatite) is presented. The calculations were performed using density-functional theory with the local-density approximation for exchange and correlation, and a full relaxation of the electronic structure, the atomic arrangement, and the unit cell. Hexagonal unit cells were obtained for all four apatites, and the calculated atomic arrangements are in close agreement with observation in those cases for which the structure is firmly established. A zero-temperature structure is predicted for oxyapatite, and two possible configurations were found for the Cl- ions in chlorapatite. The possibility of the monoclinic structure in hydroxyapatite and chlorapatite was also studied but no indication of greater stability with respect to the hexagonal structure was found. A relationship between the structure of the apatites and that of pure calcium is discussed.

  8. Structural and electronic properties for atomic clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yan

    We have studied the structural and electronic properties for different groups of atomic clusters by doing a global search on the potential energy surface using the Taboo Search in Descriptors Space (TSDS) method and calculating the energies with Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory (KS-DFT). Our goal was to find the structural and electronic principles for predicting the structure and stability of clusters. For Ben (n = 3--20), we have found that the evolution of geometric and electronic properties with size reflects a change in the nature of the bonding from van der Waals to metallic and then bulk-like. The cluster sizes with extra stability agree well with the predictions of the jellium model. In the 4d series of transition metal (TM) clusters, as the d-type bonding becomes more important, the preferred geometric structure changes from icosahedral (Y, Zr), to distorted compact structures (Nb, Mo), and FCC or simple cubic crystal fragments (Tc, Ru, Rh) due to the localized nature of the d-type orbital. Analysis of relative isomer energies and their electronic density of states suggest that these clusters tend to follow a maximum hardness principle (MHP). For A4B12 clusters (A is divalent, B is monovalent), we found unusually large (on average 1.95 eV) HOMO-LUMO gap values. This shows the extra stability at an electronic closed shell (20 electrons) predicted by the jellium model. The importance of symmetry, closed electronic and ionic shells in stability is shown by the relative stability of homotops of Mg4Ag12 which also provides support for the hypothesis that clusters that satisfy more than one stability criterion ("double magic") should be particularly stable.

  9. Structural and electronic properties of thallium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliwal, Neetu; Srivastava, Vipul

    2016-05-01

    The tight binding linear muffin-tin-orbital (TB-LMTO) method within the local density approximation (LDA has been used to calculate structural and electronic properties of thallium pnictides TlX (X=Sb, Bi) at high pressure. As a function of volume, the total energy is evaluated. Apart from this, the lattice parameter (a0), bulk modulus (B0), band structure (BS) and density of states (DOS) are calculated. From energy band diagram we observed metallic behaviour in TlSb and TlBi compounds. The values of equilibrium lattice constants and bulk modulus are agreed well with the available data.

  10. Electron-electron interaction, weak localization and spin valve effect in vertical-transport graphene devices

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Mingsheng; Gong, Youpin; Wei, Xiangfei; Zhu, Chao; Xu, Jianbao; Liu, Ping; Guo, Yufen; Li, Weiwei; Liu, Liwei; Liu, Guangtong

    2014-04-14

    We fabricated a vertical structure device, in which graphene is sandwiched between two asymmetric ferromagnetic electrodes. The measurements of electron and spin transport were performed across the combined channels containing the vertical and horizontal components. The presence of electron-electron interaction (EEI) was found not only at low temperatures but also at moderate temperatures up to ∼120 K, and EEI dominates over weak localization (WL) with and without applying magnetic fields perpendicular to the sample plane. Moreover, spin valve effect was observed when magnetic filed is swept at the direction parallel to the sample surface. We attribute the EEI and WL surviving at a relatively high temperature to the effective suppress of phonon scattering in the vertical device structure. The findings open a way for studying quantum correlation at relatively high temperature.

  11. On the local electronic and atomic structure of Ce1-xPrxO2-δ epitaxial films on Si

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Gang Schubert, Markus Andreas; Zoellner, Marvin Hartwig; D'Acapito, Francesco; Boscherini, Federico

    2014-09-28

    The local electronic and atomic structure of (111)-oriented, single crystalline mixed Ce1-xPrxO2-δ (x = 0, 0.1 and 0.6) epitaxial thin films on silicon substrates have been investigated in view of engineering redox properties of complex oxide films. Non-destructive X-ray absorption near edge structure reveals that Pr shows only +3 valence and Ce shows only nominal +4 valence in mixed oxides. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) studies were performed at K edges of Ce and Pr using a specially designed monochromator system for high energy measurements. They demonstrate that the fluorite lattice of ceria (CeO₂) is almost not perturbed for x = 0.1 sample, while higher Pr concentration (x = 0.6) not only generates a higher disorder level (thus more disordered oxygen) but also causes a significant reduction of Ce–O interatomic distances. The valence states of the cations were also examined by techniques operating in highly reducing environments: scanning transmission electron microscopy-electron energy loss spectroscopy and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy; in these reducing environments, evidence for the presence of Ce³⁺ was clearly found for the higher Pr concentration. Thus, the introduction of Pr³⁺ into CeO₂ strongly enhances the oxygen exchange properties of CeO₂. This improved oxygen mobility properties of CeO₂ are attributed to the lattice disorder induced by Pr mixing in the CeO₂ fluorite lattice, as demonstrated by EXAFS measurements. Thus, a comprehensive picture of the modifications of the atomic and electronic structure of Ce1-xPrxO2-δ epitaxial films and their relation is obtained.

  12. Electronic properties of polycrystalline graphene under large local strain

    SciTech Connect

    He, Xin; Tang, Ning E-mail: geweikun@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn Duan, Junxi; Mei, Fuhong; Meng, Hu; Lu, Fangchao; Xu, Fujun; Yang, Xuelin; Gao, Li; Wang, Xinqiang; Shen, Bo E-mail: geweikun@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Ge, Weikun E-mail: geweikun@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

    2014-06-16

    To explore the transport properties of polycrystalline graphene under large tensile strain, a strain device has been fabricated using piezocrystal to load local strain onto graphene, up to 22.5%. Ionic liquid gate whose capability of tuning carrier density being much higher than that of a solid gate is used to survey the transfer characteristics of the deformed graphene. The conductance of the Dirac point and field effect mobility of electrons and holes is found to decrease with increasing strain, which is attributed to the scattering of the graphene grain boundaries, the strain induced change of band structure, and defects. However, the transport gap is still not opened. Our study is helpful to evaluate the application of graphene in stretchable electronics.

  13. Electron Coherence in Mesoscopic Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Kamenev, Alex; Glazman, Leonid

    2011-03-20

    The recent rapid progress in nanofabrication and experimental techniques made it possible to investigate a variety of meso-- and nano--scale systems, which were unavailable only a few years ago. Examples include fabrication of high-quality quantum wires in semiconductor heterostructures, of nanoscale hybrid superconductor--normal metal structures, and of a variety of novel (and much smaller) quantum dot and q-bit designs. These technological advances have led to formulation of a number of condensed matter theory problems which are equally important for applications and for the fundamental science. The present proposal aims at filling the exposed gaps in knowledge and at facilitating further development of experimental and theoretical physics of nanoscale structures. Specifically, the two PIs address the following issues: (i) The theory of interacting electrons in a quantum wire which accounts adequately for the non-linear dispersion relation of the electrons. The existing approaches rely on models with {\\em linearized} electron spectrum, which fall short of addressing a growing list of experimentally relevant phenomena. (ii) Dynamics of hybrid normal--superconducting systems. A reliable treatment of dissipative phenomena in such structures is not developed as of yet, while rapid progress in fabrication makes finding the proper theoretical treatment methods highly desirable. (iii)~The fundamental limits on relaxation times of a superconducting charge q-bit. The latter is one of the most advanced scalable realizations of a quantum computing device. (iv)~The dynamics and relaxation times of a spin of an electron in a small semiconductor quantum dot. Besides the fundamental importance, these structures are also valuable candidates for quantum computing applications.

  14. Theoretical studies of the local structures and electron paramagnetic resonance parameters for Cu2+ center in Zn(C3H3O4)2(H2O)2 single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hua-Ming; Xiao, Wen-Bo; Wan, Xiong

    2014-07-01

    The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) parameters (g factors gxx, gyy, gzz and hyperfine structure constants Axx, Ayy, Azz) are interpreted by taking account of the admixture of d-orbitals in the ground state wave function of the Cu2+ ion in a Zn(C3H3O4)2(H2O)2 (DABMZ) single crystal. Based on the calculation, local structural parameters of the impurity Cu2+ center were obtained (i.e. Ra≈1.92 Å, Rb≈1.96 Å, Rc≈1.99 Å). The theoretical EPR parameters based on the above Cu2+-O2- bond lengths in the DABMZ crystal show good agreement with the observed values and some improvements have been made as compared with those in the previous studies.

  15. Electronic Structure of Few-Electron Quantum Dot Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popsueva, V.; Hansen, J. P.; Caillat, J.

    2007-12-01

    We present a study of strongly correlated few-electron quantum dots, exploring the spectra of various few-electron quantum dot molecules: a double (diatomic) structure a quadruple two-electron quantum dot, and a three-electron double dot. Electron energy spectra are computed for different values of dot separation. All spectra show clear band structures and can be understood from asymptotical properties of the system.

  16. Structural Dynamics of Electronic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhir, E.

    2013-03-01

    The published work on analytical ("mathematical") and computer-aided, primarily finite-element-analysis (FEA) based, predictive modeling of the dynamic response of electronic systems to shocks and vibrations is reviewed. While understanding the physics of and the ability to predict the response of an electronic structure to dynamic loading has been always of significant importance in military, avionic, aeronautic, automotive and maritime electronics, during the last decade this problem has become especially important also in commercial, and, particularly, in portable electronics in connection with accelerated testing of various surface mount technology (SMT) systems on the board level. The emphasis of the review is on the nonlinear shock-excited vibrations of flexible printed circuit boards (PCBs) experiencing shock loading applied to their support contours during drop tests. At the end of the review we provide, as a suitable and useful illustration, the exact solution to a highly nonlinear problem of the dynamic response of a "flexible-and-heavy" PCB to an impact load applied to its support contour during drop testing.

  17. Combinatorics of locally optimal RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Fusy, Eric; Clote, Peter

    2014-01-01

    It is a classical result of Stein and Waterman that the asymptotic number of RNA secondary structures is 1.104366∙n-3/2∙2.618034n. Motivated by the kinetics of RNA secondary structure formation, we are interested in determining the asymptotic number of secondary structures that are locally optimal, with respect to a particular energy model. In the Nussinov energy model, where each base pair contributes -1 towards the energy of the structure, locally optimal structures are exactly the saturated structures, for which we have previously shown that asymptotically, there are 1.07427∙n-3/2∙2.35467n many saturated structures for a sequence of length n. In this paper, we consider the base stacking energy model, a mild variant of the Nussinov model, where each stacked base pair contributes -1 toward the energy of the structure. Locally optimal structures with respect to the base stacking energy model are exactly those secondary structures, whose stems cannot be extended. Such structures were first considered by Evers and Giegerich, who described a dynamic programming algorithm to enumerate all locally optimal structures. In this paper, we apply methods from enumerative combinatorics to compute the asymptotic number of such structures. Additionally, we consider analogous combinatorial problems for secondary structures with annotated single-stranded, stacking nucleotides (dangles).

  18. Combinatorics of locally optimal RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Fusy, Eric; Clote, Peter

    2014-01-01

    It is a classical result of Stein and Waterman that the asymptotic number of RNA secondary structures is 1.104366∙n-3/2∙2.618034n. Motivated by the kinetics of RNA secondary structure formation, we are interested in determining the asymptotic number of secondary structures that are locally optimal, with respect to a particular energy model. In the Nussinov energy model, where each base pair contributes -1 towards the energy of the structure, locally optimal structures are exactly the saturated structures, for which we have previously shown that asymptotically, there are 1.07427∙n-3/2∙2.35467n many saturated structures for a sequence of length n. In this paper, we consider the base stacking energy model, a mild variant of the Nussinov model, where each stacked base pair contributes -1 toward the energy of the structure. Locally optimal structures with respect to the base stacking energy model are exactly those secondary structures, whose stems cannot be extended. Such structures were first considered by Evers and Giegerich, who described a dynamic programming algorithm to enumerate all locally optimal structures. In this paper, we apply methods from enumerative combinatorics to compute the asymptotic number of such structures. Additionally, we consider analogous combinatorial problems for secondary structures with annotated single-stranded, stacking nucleotides (dangles). PMID:23263300

  19. Imaging Local Electronic Corrugations and Doped Regions in Graphene

    SciTech Connect

    B Schultz; C Patridge; V Lee; C Jaye; P Lysaght; C Smith; J Barnett; D Fischer; D Prendergast; S Banerjee

    2011-12-31

    Electronic structure heterogeneities are ubiquitous in two-dimensional graphene and profoundly impact the transport properties of this material. Here we show the mapping of discrete electronic domains within a single graphene sheet using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy in conjunction with ab initio density functional theory calculations. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy imaging provides a wealth of detail regarding the extent to which the unoccupied levels of graphene are modified by corrugation, doping and adventitious impurities, as a result of synthesis and processing. Local electronic corrugations, visualized as distortions of the {pi}*cloud, have been imaged alongside inhomogeneously doped regions characterized by distinctive spectral signatures of altered unoccupied density of states. The combination of density functional theory calculations, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy imaging, and in situ near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy experiments also provide resolution of a longstanding debate in the literature regarding the spectral assignments of pre-edge and interlayer states.

  20. Sparse maps—A systematic infrastructure for reduced-scaling electronic structure methods. I. An efficient and simple linear scaling local MP2 method that uses an intermediate basis of pair natural orbitals

    SciTech Connect

    Pinski, Peter; Riplinger, Christoph; Neese, Frank E-mail: frank.neese@cec.mpg.de; Valeev, Edward F. E-mail: frank.neese@cec.mpg.de

    2015-07-21

    In this work, a systematic infrastructure is described that formalizes concepts implicit in previous work and greatly simplifies computer implementation of reduced-scaling electronic structure methods. The key concept is sparse representation of tensors using chains of sparse maps between two index sets. Sparse map representation can be viewed as a generalization of compressed sparse row, a common representation of a sparse matrix, to tensor data. By combining few elementary operations on sparse maps (inversion, chaining, intersection, etc.), complex algorithms can be developed, illustrated here by a linear-scaling transformation of three-center Coulomb integrals based on our compact code library that implements sparse maps and operations on them. The sparsity of the three-center integrals arises from spatial locality of the basis functions and domain density fitting approximation. A novel feature of our approach is the use of differential overlap integrals computed in linear-scaling fashion for screening products of basis functions. Finally, a robust linear scaling domain based local pair natural orbital second-order Möller-Plesset (DLPNO-MP2) method is described based on the sparse map infrastructure that only depends on a minimal number of cutoff parameters that can be systematically tightened to approach 100% of the canonical MP2 correlation energy. With default truncation thresholds, DLPNO-MP2 recovers more than 99.9% of the canonical resolution of the identity MP2 (RI-MP2) energy while still showing a very early crossover with respect to the computational effort. Based on extensive benchmark calculations, relative energies are reproduced with an error of typically <0.2 kcal/mol. The efficiency of the local MP2 (LMP2) method can be drastically improved by carrying out the LMP2 iterations in a basis of pair natural orbitals. While the present work focuses on local electron correlation, it is of much broader applicability to computation with sparse tensors in

  1. Electronic and structural properties of metallic microclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A.

    1992-04-01

    The first part of this thesis presents a first-order pseudopotential calculation at T=O of the total energy of small sodium clusters of size N<800. The calculation is based on a local-pseudopotential scheme and local-density correlation and exchange. A temperature-size (T-N) phase-diagram is then derived using the T=O results and Lindemann`s criterion for melting. The phase-diagram contains three regions of stability: (1) a liquid (jellium) phase at temperatures above the melting line T{sub M}(N) where cluster-stability occurs at electronic magic numbers: (2) a phase related to complete geometrical shells of body-centered-cubic structure at temperatures below the melting line; and (3) a close-packed structure at very low temperatures and sufficiently large N. The melting line drops to T{sub M}(N)=O for N<65, where electronic magic numbers are stable even at T=O. The phase diagram reduces asymptotically to the known phases of sodium as N{yields}{infinity}, including the known martensitic transformation at T{approximately}5 K. The second and the last part of this thesis consists of a study of small-cluster many-body systems by means of an on-site ``local`` chemical potential which allows the continuous variation of local electron-density. This method yields a criterion to distinguish particular features of a small cluster that are likely to survive in the large-N thermodynamic limit from those discontinuities that arise only from finite-size effects.

  2. Electronic and structural properties of metallic microclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A.

    1992-04-01

    The first part of this thesis presents a first-order pseudopotential calculation at T=O of the total energy of small sodium clusters of size N<800. The calculation is based on a local-pseudopotential scheme and local-density correlation and exchange. A temperature-size (T-N) phase-diagram is then derived using the T=O results and Lindemann's criterion for melting. The phase-diagram contains three regions of stability: (1) a liquid (jellium) phase at temperatures above the melting line T{sub M}(N) where cluster-stability occurs at electronic magic numbers: (2) a phase related to complete geometrical shells of body-centered-cubic structure at temperatures below the melting line; and (3) a close-packed structure at very low temperatures and sufficiently large N. The melting line drops to T{sub M}(N)=O for N<65, where electronic magic numbers are stable even at T=O. The phase diagram reduces asymptotically to the known phases of sodium as N{yields}{infinity}, including the known martensitic transformation at T{approximately}5 K. The second and the last part of this thesis consists of a study of small-cluster many-body systems by means of an on-site local'' chemical potential which allows the continuous variation of local electron-density. This method yields a criterion to distinguish particular features of a small cluster that are likely to survive in the large-N thermodynamic limit from those discontinuities that arise only from finite-size effects.

  3. Local atomic and electronic structure of oxide/GaAs and SiO2/Si interfaces using high-resolution XPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunthaner, F. J.; Grunthaner, P. J.; Vasquez, R. P.; Lewis, B. F.; Maserjian, J.; Madhukar, A.

    1979-01-01

    The chemical structures of thin SiO2 films, thin native oxides of GaAs (20-30 A), and the respective oxide-semiconductor interfaces, have been investigated using high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Depth profiles of these structures have been obtained using argon ion bombardment and wet chemical etching techniques. The chemical destruction induced by the ion profiling method is shown by direct comparison of these methods for identical samples. Fourier transform data-reduction methods based on linear prediction with maximum entropy constraints are used to analyze the discrete structure in oxides and substrates. This discrete structure is interpreted by means of a structure-induced charge-transfer model.

  4. Electronic instrumentation for smart structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanar, George J.

    1995-04-01

    The requirements of electronic instrumentation for smart structures are similar to those of data acquisition systems at our national particle physics laboratories. Modern high energy and heavy ion physics experiments may have tens of thousands of channels of data sources producing data that must be converted to digital form, compacted, stored and interpreted. In parallel, multiple sensors distributed in and around smart structures generate either binary or analog signals that are voltage, charge, or time like in their information content. In all cases, they must be transmitted, converted and preserved into a unified digital format for real-time processing. This paper will review the current status of practical large scale electronic measurement systems with special attention to architectures and physical organization. Brief surveys of the current state of the art will include preamplifiers and amplifiers, comparators and discriminators, voltage or charge analog-to-digital converters, time internal meters or time-to-digital converters, and finally, counting or scalar systems. The paper will conclude by integrating all of these ideas in a concept for an all-digital readout of a smart structure using the latest techniques used in physics research today.

  5. Local Electronic And Dielectric Properties at Nanosized Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnell, Dawn A.

    2015-02-23

    Final Report to the Department of Energy for period 6/1/2000 to 11/30/2014 for Grant # DE-FG02-00ER45813-A000 to the University of Pennsylvania Local Electronic And Dielectric Properties at Nanosized Interfaces PI: Dawn Bonnell The behavior of grain boundaries and interfaces has been a focus of fundamental research for decades because variations of structure and composition at interfaces dictate mechanical, electrical, optical and dielectric properties in solids. Similarly, the consequence of atomic and electronic structures of surfaces to chemical and physical interactions are critical due to their implications to catalysis and device fabrication. Increasing fundamental understanding of surfaces and interfaces has materially advanced technologies that directly bear on energy considerations. Currently, exciting developments in materials processing are enabling creative new electrical, optical and chemical device configurations. Controlled synthesis of nanoparticles, semiconducting nanowires and nanorods, optical quantum dots, etc. along with a range of strategies for assembling and patterning nanostructures portend the viability of new devices that have the potential to significantly impact the energy landscape. As devices become smaller the impact of interfaces and surfaces grows geometrically. As with other nanoscale phenomena, small interfaces do not exhibit the same properties as do large interfaces. The size dependence of interface properties had not been explored and understanding at the most fundamental level is necessary to the advancement of nanostructured devices. An equally important factor in the behavior of interfaces in devices is the ability to examine the interfaces under realistic conditions. For example, interfaces and boundaries dictate the behavior of oxide fuel cells which operate at extremely high temperatures in dynamic high pressure chemical environments. These conditions preclude the characterization of local properties during fuel cell

  6. Deterministic weak localization in periodic structures.

    PubMed

    Tian, C; Larkin, A

    2005-12-01

    In some perfect periodic structures classical motion exhibits deterministic diffusion. For such systems we present the weak localization theory. As a manifestation for the velocity autocorrelation function a universal power law decay is predicted to appear at four Ehrenfest times. This deterministic weak localization is robust against weak quenched disorders, which may be confirmed by coherent backscattering measurements of periodic photonic crystals.

  7. Local density functional calculations of the electronic structures of the intermetallic systems U{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}Sn and UFe{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Matar, S.F.; Chevalier, B.; Etourneau, J.; Eyert, V.

    1997-02-05

    The electronic structures of U{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}Sn and UFe{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} are self-consistently calculated within the local density functional theory using the augmented spherical wave (ASW) method. Calculations are scalar relativistic. The experimentally observed Pauli paramagnetic behavior of the two systems is accounted for and the influence of hybridization between the different l-states on the chemical bonding is discussed from the site-projected densities of states (DOS) as well as from the modulation of the DOS by the sign and magnitude of the overlap integral, i.e., with the so-called COOP. From this, we propose a mechanism for the evolution of bonding within the series to which the two compounds belong. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Interference Effects of Strongly Localized Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Ernesto Antonio

    We explore the possible role of quantum interference phenomena in conduction in the Variable Range Hopping, or deep insulating regime. The critical resistors in the Miller-Abrahams network are regarded as the phase coherent units. We consider a simple model of forward scattering paths (disregard backscattering) on a diagonal lattice. The hopping probability for non-resonant tunneling between two impurity sites, is computed numerically by evolving all directed Feynman paths in a disordered matrix of elastically scattering sites (intermediate impurities). The whole probability distribution for two dimensional samples is very broad, well fitted to a log-normal form. The average of the distribution increases linearly with the hopping length t, determining a global contribution to the localization length, coming from the interference part. The fluctuations grow with the hopping length as a non-trivial power law of t^{1over 3} . The system has a bound state which gives rise to the properties of the model. The exponents found are the same as those for directed polymers (DP) in a random media. Next we consider the effects of a magnetic field applied perpendicularly to the plane of the sample. The probability distribution for hopping is preserved in the field. We also find a positive magnetoconductance (MC) for small fields due to an increased localization length, in agreement with recent experiments. The features observed numerically are explained on the basis of the moment analysis, which suggests a single governing parameter for the interference effects. The effects of spin-orbit (SO) scattering are also studied (strong scattering limit). The interference contribution to the localization length is field independent in presence of SO. A small positive MC is found due to changes in the amplitude. Finally we investigate the problem of the universality of high moments in the strongly localized regime, by studying directed paths on a hierarchical lattice. We find non

  9. A New Electron Localization Function and Its Interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levit, Creon; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    A new electron localization function is justified and compared with the laplacian of the electronic charge density. Some advantages of the new function and its novel predictions are discussed. Several slides and some video of visualizations using the new function in comparison to the laplacian will be shown.

  10. Think Locally: A Prudent Approach to Electronic Resource Management Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson-Sundell, Nat

    2011-01-01

    A few articles have drawn some amount of attention specifically to the local causes of the success or failure of electronic resource management system (ERMS) implementations. In fact, it seems clear that local conditions will largely determine whether any given ERMS implementation will succeed or fail. This statement might seem obvious, but the…

  11. High-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance analysis of the oxidation state and local structure of Ni and Mn ions in Ni,Mn-codoped LiCoO(2).

    PubMed

    Stoyanova, R; Barra, A-L; Yoncheva, M; Zhecheva, E; Shinova, E; Tzvetkova, P; Simova, S

    2010-02-15

    High-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (HF-EPR) spectroscopy was employed to examine the oxidation state and local structure of Ni and Mn ions in Ni,Mn-codoped LiCoO(2). The assignment of EPR signals was based on Mg,Mn-codoped LiCoO(2) and Ni-doped LiCoO(2) used as Mn(4+) and low-spin Ni(3+) EPR references. Complementary information on the oxidation state of transition-metal ions was obtained by solid-state (6,7)Li NMR spectroscopy. For slightly doped oxides (LiCo(1-x)Ni(x)Mn(x)O(2) with x < 0.05), nickel and manganese substitute for cobalt in the CoO(2) layers and are stabilized as Ni(3+) and Mn(4+) ions. The local structure of Mn(4+) ions was determined by modeling of the axial zero-field-splitting parameter in the framework of the Newman superposition model. It has been found that the local trigonal distortion around Mn(4+) is smaller in comparison with that of the host site. To achieve a local compensation of Mn(4+) charge, several defect models are discussed. With an increase in the total dopant content (LiCo(1-x)Ni(x)Mn(x)O(2) and 0.05 local charge compensation, their usual oxidation states of 2+ and 4+. PMID:20078096

  12. The electron localization as the information content of the conditional pair density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbina, Andres S.; Torres, F. Javier; Rincon, Luis

    2016-06-01

    In the present work, the information gained by an electron for "knowing" about the position of another electron with the same spin is calculated using the Kullback-Leibler divergence (DKL) between the same-spin conditional pair probability density and the marginal probability. DKL is proposed as an electron localization measurement, based on the observation that regions of the space with high information gain can be associated with strong correlated localized electrons. Taking into consideration the scaling of DKL with the number of σ-spin electrons of a system (Nσ), the quantity χ = (Nσ - 1) DKLfcut is introduced as a general descriptor that allows the quantification of the electron localization in the space. fcut is defined such that it goes smoothly to zero for negligible densities. χ is computed for a selection of atomic and molecular systems in order to test its capability to determine the region in space where electrons are localized. As a general conclusion, χ is able to explain the electron structure of molecules on the basis of chemical grounds with a high degree of success and to produce a clear differentiation of the localization of electrons that can be traced to the fluctuation in the average number of electrons in these regions.

  13. The electron localization as the information content of the conditional pair density.

    PubMed

    Urbina, Andres S; Torres, F Javier; Rincon, Luis

    2016-06-28

    In the present work, the information gained by an electron for "knowing" about the position of another electron with the same spin is calculated using the Kullback-Leibler divergence (DKL) between the same-spin conditional pair probability density and the marginal probability. DKL is proposed as an electron localization measurement, based on the observation that regions of the space with high information gain can be associated with strong correlated localized electrons. Taking into consideration the scaling of DKL with the number of σ-spin electrons of a system (N(σ)), the quantity χ = (N(σ) - 1) DKLfcut is introduced as a general descriptor that allows the quantification of the electron localization in the space. fcut is defined such that it goes smoothly to zero for negligible densities. χ is computed for a selection of atomic and molecular systems in order to test its capability to determine the region in space where electrons are localized. As a general conclusion, χ is able to explain the electron structure of molecules on the basis of chemical grounds with a high degree of success and to produce a clear differentiation of the localization of electrons that can be traced to the fluctuation in the average number of electrons in these regions. PMID:27369494

  14. Fast probe of local electronic states in nanostructures utilizing a single-lead quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Tomohiro; Amaha, Shinichi; Nakajima, Takashi; Delbecq, Matthieu R.; Yoneda, Jun; Takeda, Kenta; Sugawara, Retsu; Allison, Giles; Ludwig, Arne; Wieck, Andreas D.; Tarucha, Seigo

    2015-09-01

    Transport measurements are powerful tools to probe electronic properties of solid-state materials. To access properties of local electronic states in nanostructures, such as local density of states, electronic distribution and so on, micro-probes utilizing artificial nanostructures have been invented to perform measurements in addition to those with conventional macroscopic electronic reservoirs. Here we demonstrate a new kind of micro-probe: a fast single-lead quantum dot probe, which utilizes a quantum dot coupled only to the target structure through a tunneling barrier and fast charge readout by RF reflectometry. The probe can directly access the local electronic states with wide bandwidth. The probe can also access more electronic states, not just those around the Fermi level, and the operations are robust against bias voltages and temperatures.

  15. Fast probe of local electronic states in nanostructures utilizing a single-lead quantum dot

    PubMed Central

    Otsuka, Tomohiro; Amaha, Shinichi; Nakajima, Takashi; Delbecq, Matthieu R.; Yoneda, Jun; Takeda, Kenta; Sugawara, Retsu; Allison, Giles; Ludwig, Arne; Wieck, Andreas D.; Tarucha, Seigo

    2015-01-01

    Transport measurements are powerful tools to probe electronic properties of solid-state materials. To access properties of local electronic states in nanostructures, such as local density of states, electronic distribution and so on, micro-probes utilizing artificial nanostructures have been invented to perform measurements in addition to those with conventional macroscopic electronic reservoirs. Here we demonstrate a new kind of micro-probe: a fast single-lead quantum dot probe, which utilizes a quantum dot coupled only to the target structure through a tunneling barrier and fast charge readout by RF reflectometry. The probe can directly access the local electronic states with wide bandwidth. The probe can also access more electronic states, not just those around the Fermi level, and the operations are robust against bias voltages and temperatures. PMID:26416582

  16. Electronic Structure of B12 coenzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Lizhi; Ching, W. Y.; Randaccio, Lucio

    2001-06-01

    We have carried out an ab-initio local density functional calculations of the two most important B12 coenzymes, adoensyl-cobalamin (Ado-Cbl) and methyl-cobalamin (Me-Cbl). The crystal structures were determined by accurate X-ray synchrotron radiation measurements. Both crystals have space group P2121 with four molecules, or about 800 atoms, per unit cell. Our electronic structure calculation is based on one full molecule including the side chains. Results are analyzed in terms of atom and orbital resolved partial density of states (PDOS), Mulliken effective charges and bond orders. The PDOS analysis shows that the Co complexes of both B12 coenzymes had a HOMO/LUMO gap of about 1.5 eV. The Co-C bond order in Me-Cbl is smaller than that in Ado-Cbl. This appears to be in contradiction with the measured bond dissociated energies. However, this could also indicate the importance of the effects of solvents, which were not included in the calculation. We are investigating whether the effect of the solvents could dramatically modify the electronic structures of Ado-Cbl and Me-Cbl.

  17. Polarization properties of localized structures in VCSELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averlant, Etienne; Tlidi, Mustapha; Ackemann, Thorsten; Thienpont, Hugo; Panajotov, Krassimir

    2016-04-01

    Broad area Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers (VCSELs) have peculiar polarization properties which are a field of study by itself.1-3 These properties have already been used for localized structure generation, in a simple configuration, where only one polarization component was used.4 Here, we present new experimental and theoretical results on the complex polarization behavior of localized structures generated in an optically-injected broad area VCSEL. A linear stability analysis of the spin-flip VCSEL model is performed for the case of broad area devices, in a restrained and experimentally relevant parameter set. Numerical simulations are performed, in one and two dimensions. They reveal existence of vector localized structures. These structures have a complex polarization state, which is not simply a linear polarization following the one of the optical injection. Experimental results confirm theoretical predictions. Applications of this work can lead to the encoding of small color images in the polarization state of an ensemble of localized structures at the surface of a broad area VCSEL.

  18. Weak localization and electron-electron interactions in few layer black phosphorus devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yanmeng; Gillgren, Nathaniel; Espiritu, Timothy; Tran, Son; Yang, Jiawei; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takahashi; Lau, Chun Ning

    2016-09-01

    Few layer phosphorene (FLP) devices are extensively studied due to their unique electronic properties and potential applications on nano-electronics. Here we present magnetotransport studies which reveal electron-electron interactions as the dominant scattering mechanism in hexagonal boron nitride-encapsulated FLP devices. From weak localization measurements, we estimate the electron dephasing length to be 30 to 100 nm at low temperatures, which exhibits a strong dependence on carrier density n and a power-law dependence on temperature (˜T -0.4). These results establish that the dominant scattering mechanism in FLP is electron-electron interactions.

  19. Towards scalable electronic structure calculations for alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Stocks, G.M.; Nicholson, D.M.C.; Wang, Y.; Shelton, W.A.; Szotek, Z.; Temmermann, W.M.

    1994-06-01

    A new approach to calculating the properties of large systems within the local density approximation (LDA) that offers the promise of scalability on massively parallel supercomputers is outlined. The electronic structure problem is formulated in real space using multiple scattering theory. The standard LDA algorithm is divided into two parts. Firstly, finding the self-consistent field (SCF) electron density, Secondly, calculating the energy corresponding to the SCF density. We show, at least for metals and alloys, that the former problem is easily solved using real space methods. For the second we take advantage of the variational properties of a generalized Harris-Foulkes free energy functional, a new conduction band Fermi function, and a fictitious finite electron temperature that again allow us to use real-space methods. Using a compute-node {R_arrow} atom equivalence the new method is naturally highly parallel and leads to O(N) scaling where N is the number of atoms making up the system. We show scaling data gathered on the Intel XP/S 35 Paragon for systems up to 512-atoms/simulation cell. To demonstrate that we can achieve metallurgical-precision, we apply the new method to the calculation the energies of disordered CuO{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5} alloys using a large random sample.

  20. Electron localization in self-assembled Si quantum dots grown on Ge(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepina, N. P.; Zinovieva, A. F.; Zinovyev, V. A.; Deryabin, A. S.; Kulik, L. V.; Dvurechenskii, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    Electron localization in a Si/Ge heterosystem with Si quantum dots (QDs) was studied by transport and electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements. For Si QD structures grown on Ge(111) substrates, the ESR signal with a g-factor g=2.0022+/- 0.0001 and ESR line width {{Δ }}H≈ 1.2 Oe was observed and attributed to the electrons localized in QDs. The g-factor value was explained taking into account the energy band modification due to both strain and quantum confinement. The transport behavior confirms the efficient electron localization in QDs for a Si/Ge(111) system. A strong Ge-Si intermixing in QD structures grown on Ge(001) is assumed to be the main reason for an unobserved ESR signal from the QDs.

  1. Electronic structure of herbicides: Atrazine and bromoxynil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Igor; Kovač, Branka

    2011-06-01

    The electronic structures of herbicides atrazine and bromoxynil have been investigated by UV photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), quantum chemical calculations and comparison with X-ray diffraction, molecular docking and molecular dynamics studies. Their electronic and molecular structures are discussed in the context of their biological activity. This is the first report which correlates the molecular mechanism of biological activity of these herbicides with their experimentally determined electronic and molecular structures.

  2. Localized electron heating during magnetic reconnection in MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, T.; Tanabe, H.; Watanabe, T. G.; Hayashi, Y.; Imazawa, R.; Inomoto, M.; Ono, Y.; Gryaznevich, M.; Scannell, R.; Michael, C.; The MAST Team

    2016-10-01

    Significant increase in the plasma temperature above 1 keV was measured during the kilogauss magnetic field reconnection of two merging toroidal plasmas under the high-guide field and collision-less conditions. The electron temperature was observed to peak significantly at the X-point inside the current sheet, indicating Joule heating caused by the toroidal electric field along the X-line. This peaked temperature increases significantly with the guide field, in agreement with the electron mean-free path calculation. The slow electron heating in the downstream suggests energy conversion from ions to electrons through ion-electron collisions in the bulk plasma as the second electron heating mechanism in the bulk plasma. The electron density profile clearly reveals the electron density pile-up / fast shock structures in the downstream of reconnection, suggesting energy conversion from ion flow energy to ion thermal energy as well as significant ion heating by reconnection outflow.

  3. Detecting structure of haplotypes and local ancestry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present a two-layer hidden Markov model to detect the structure of haplotypes for unrelated individuals. This allows us to model two scales of linkage disequilibrium (one within a group of haplotypes and one between groups), thereby taking advantage of rich haplotype information to infer local an...

  4. Multilevel domain decomposition for electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Barrault, M. . E-mail: maxime.barrault@edf.fr; Cances, E. . E-mail: cances@cermics.enpc.fr; Hager, W.W. . E-mail: hager@math.ufl.edu; Le Bris, C. . E-mail: lebris@cermics.enpc.fr

    2007-03-01

    We introduce a new multilevel domain decomposition method (MDD) for electronic structure calculations within semi-empirical and density functional theory (DFT) frameworks. This method iterates between local fine solvers and global coarse solvers, in the spirit of domain decomposition methods. Using this approach, calculations have been successfully performed on several linear polymer chains containing up to 40,000 atoms and 200,000 atomic orbitals. Both the computational cost and the memory requirement scale linearly with the number of atoms. Additional speed-up can easily be obtained by parallelization. We show that this domain decomposition method outperforms the density matrix minimization (DMM) method for poor initial guesses. Our method provides an efficient preconditioner for DMM and other linear scaling methods, variational in nature, such as the orbital minimization (OM) procedure.

  5. Local representation of the electronic dielectric response function

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Deyu; Ge, Xiaochuan

    2015-12-11

    We present a local representation of the electronic dielectric response function, based on a spatial partition of the dielectric response into contributions from each occupied Wannier orbital using a generalized density functional perturbation theory. This procedure is fully ab initio, and therefore allows us to rigorously define local metrics, such as “bond polarizability,” on Wannier centers. We show that the locality of the bare response function is determined by the locality of three quantities: Wannier functions of the occupied manifold, the density matrix, and the Hamiltonian matrix. Furthermore, in systems with a gap, the bare dielectric response is exponentially localized, which supports the physical picture of the dielectric response function as a collection of interacting local responses that can be captured by a tight-binding model.

  6. Local representation of the electronic dielectric response function

    DOE PAGES

    Lu, Deyu; Ge, Xiaochuan

    2015-12-11

    We present a local representation of the electronic dielectric response function, based on a spatial partition of the dielectric response into contributions from each occupied Wannier orbital using a generalized density functional perturbation theory. This procedure is fully ab initio, and therefore allows us to rigorously define local metrics, such as “bond polarizability,” on Wannier centers. We show that the locality of the bare response function is determined by the locality of three quantities: Wannier functions of the occupied manifold, the density matrix, and the Hamiltonian matrix. Furthermore, in systems with a gap, the bare dielectric response is exponentially localized,more » which supports the physical picture of the dielectric response function as a collection of interacting local responses that can be captured by a tight-binding model.« less

  7. Structural phase transition and electronic properties of NdBi

    SciTech Connect

    Sahu, Ashvini K.; Patiya, Jagdish; Sanyal, Sankar P.

    2015-06-24

    The structural and electronic properties of NdBi from an electronic structure calculation have been presented. The calculation is performed using self-consistent tight binding linear muffin tin orbital (TB-LMTO) method within the local density approximation (LDA). The calculated equilibrium structural parameters are in good agreement with the available experimental results. It is found that this compound shows metallic behavior under ambient condition and undergoes a structural phase transition from the NaCl structure to the CsCl structure at the pressure 20.1 GPa. The electronic structures of NdBi under pressure are investigated. It is found that NdBi have metallization and the hybridizations of atoms in NdBi under pressure become stronger.

  8. Program For Local-Area-Network Electronic Mail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiner, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    MailRoom is computer program for local-area network (LAN) electronic mail. Enables users of LAN to exchange electronically notes, letters, reminders, or any sort of communication via their computers. Links all users of LAN into communication circle in which messages created, sent, copied, printed, downloaded, uploaded, and deleted through series of menu-driven screens. Includes feature that enables users to determine whether messages sent have been read by receivers. Written in Microsoft QuickBasic.

  9. Studying localized corrosion using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Chee, See Wee; Pratt, Sarah H.; Hattar, Khalid; Duquette, David; Ross, Frances M.; Hull, Robert

    2014-11-07

    Using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (LCTEM), localized corrosion of Cu and Al thin films immersed in aqueous NaCl solutions was studied. We demonstrate that potentiostatic control can be used to initiate pitting and that local compositional changes, due to focused ion beam implantation of Au+ ions, can modify the corrosion susceptibility of Al films. Likewise, a discussion on strategies to control the onset of pitting is also presented.

  10. Studying localized corrosion using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chee, See Wee; Pratt, Sarah H.; Hattar, Khalid; Duquette, David; Ross, Frances M.; Hull, Robert

    2014-11-07

    Using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (LCTEM), localized corrosion of Cu and Al thin films immersed in aqueous NaCl solutions was studied. We demonstrate that potentiostatic control can be used to initiate pitting and that local compositional changes, due to focused ion beam implantation of Au+ ions, can modify the corrosion susceptibility of Al films. Likewise, a discussion on strategies to control the onset of pitting is also presented.

  11. Electronic correlation contributions to structural energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haydock, Roger

    2015-03-01

    The recursion method is used to calculate electronic excitation spectra including electron-electron interactions within the Hubbard model. The effects of correlation on structural energies are then obtained from these spectra and applied to stacking faults. http://arxiv.org/abs/1405.2288 Supported by the Richmond F. Snyder Fund and Gifts.

  12. Excitation of local magnetic moments by tunneling electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauyacq, Jean-Pierre; Lorente, Nicolás; Novaes, Frederico Dutilh

    2012-05-01

    The advent of milli-kelvin scanning tunneling microscopes (STM) with inbuilt magnetic fields has opened access to the study of magnetic phenomena with atomic resolution at surfaces. In the case of single atoms adsorbed on a surface, the existence of different magnetic energy levels localized on the adsorbate is due to the breaking of the rotational invariance of the adsorbate spin by the interaction with its environment, leading to energy terms in the meV range. These structures were revealed by STM experiments in IBM Almaden in the early 2000s for atomic adsorbates on CuN surfaces. The experiments consisted in the study of the changes in conductance caused by inelastic tunneling of electrons (IETS, inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy). Manganese and Iron adatoms were shown to have different magnetic anisotropies induced by the substrate. More experiments by other groups followed up, showing that magnetic excitations could be detected in a variety of systems: e.g. complex organic molecules showed that their magnetic anisotropy was dependent on the molecular environment, piles of magnetic molecules showed that they interact via intermolecular exchange interaction, spin waves were excited on ferromagnetic surfaces and in Mn chains, and magnetic impurities have been analyzed on semiconductors. These experiments brought up some intriguing questions: the efficiency of magnetic excitations was very high, the excitations could or could not involve spin flip of the exciting electron and singular-like behavior was sometimes found at the excitation thresholds. These facts called for extended theoretical analysis; perturbation theories, sudden-approximation approaches and a strong coupling scheme successfully explained most of the magnetic inelastic processes. In addition, many-body approaches were also used to decipher the interplay between inelastic processes and the Kondo effect. Spin torque transfer has been shown to be effective in changing spin orientations of an

  13. Local temperature of out-of-equilibrium quantum electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meair, J.; Bergfield, J. P.; Stafford, C. A.; Jacquod, Ph.

    2014-07-01

    We show how the local temperature of out-of-equilibrium, quantum electron systems can be consistently defined with the help of an external voltage and temperature probe. We determine sufficient conditions under which the temperature measured by the probe (i) is independent of details of the system-probe coupling, (ii) is equal to the temperature obtained from an independent current-noise measurement, (iii) satisfies the transitivity condition expressed by the zeroth law of thermodynamics, and (iv) is consistent with Carnot's theorem. This local temperature therefore characterizes the system in the common sense of equilibrium thermodynamics, but remains well defined even in out-of-equilibrium situations with no local equilibrium.

  14. Parallel adaptive mesh refinement for electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, S.; Weare, J.; Ong, E.; Baden, S.

    1996-12-01

    We have applied structured adaptive mesh refinement techniques to the solution of the LDA equations for electronic structure calculations. Local spatial refinement concentrates memory resources and numerical effort where it is most needed, near the atomic centers and in regions of rapidly varying charge density. The structured grid representation enables us to employ efficient iterative solver techniques such as conjugate gradients with multigrid preconditioning. We have parallelized our solver using an object-oriented adaptive mesh refinement framework.

  15. Localized Electron Heating by Strong Guide-Field Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xuehan; Sugawara, Takumichi; Inomoto, Michiaki; Yamasaki, Kotaro; Ono, Yasushi; UTST Team

    2015-11-01

    Localized electron heating of magnetic reconnection was studied under strong guide-field (typically Bt 15Bp) using two merging spherical tokamak plasmas in Univ. Tokyo Spherical Tokamak (UTST) experiment. Our new slide-type two-dimensional Thomson scattering system documented for the first time the electron heating localized around the X-point. The region of high electron temperature, which is perpendicular to the magnetic field, was found to have a round shape with radius of 2 [cm]. Also, it was localized around the X-point and does not agree with that of energy dissipation term Et .jt . When we include a guide-field effect term Bt / (Bp + αBt) for Et .jt where α =√{ (vin2 +vout2) /v∥2 } , the energy dissipation area becomes localized around the X-point, suggesting that the electrons are accelerated by the reconnection electric field parallel to the magnetic field and thermalized around the X-point. This work was supported by JSPS A3 Foresight Program ``Innovative Tokamak Plasma Startup and Current Drive in Spherical Torus,'' a Grant-in-Aid from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Fellows 15J03758.

  16. Finding local community structure in networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clauset, Aaron

    2005-08-01

    Although the inference of global community structure in networks has recently become a topic of great interest in the physics community, all such algorithms require that the graph be completely known. Here, we define both a measure of local community structure and an algorithm that infers the hierarchy of communities that enclose a given vertex by exploring the graph one vertex at a time. This algorithm runs in time O(k2d) for general graphs when d is the mean degree and k is the number of vertices to be explored. For graphs where exploring a new vertex is time consuming, the running time is linear, O(k) . We show that on computer-generated graphs the average behavior of this technique approximates that of algorithms that require global knowledge. As an application, we use this algorithm to extract meaningful local clustering information in the large recommender network of an online retailer.

  17. Electron tomography of dislocation structures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, G.S.; House, S.D.; Kacher, J.; Tanaka, M.; Higashida, K.; Robertson, I.M.

    2014-01-15

    Recent developments in the application of electron tomography for characterizing microstructures in crystalline solids are described. The underlying principles for electron tomography are presented in the context of typical challenges in adapting the technique to crystalline systems and in using diffraction contrast imaging conditions. Methods for overcoming the limitations associated with the angular range, the number of acquired images, and uniformity of image contrast are introduced. In addition, a method for incorporating the real space coordinate system into the tomogram is presented. As the approach emphasizes development of experimental solutions to the challenges, the solutions developed and implemented are presented in the form of examples.

  18. Electronic structures of endohedral fullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Changming; Hettich, R.L.; Puretzky, A.A.; Ying, Z.C.; Haufler, R.E.; Compton, R.N.

    1994-12-31

    Fullerenes with different elements trapped inside the cage have been the subject of active research both experimentally and theoretically ever since the initial discovery of C{sub 60}. La@C{sub n}, were the first endohedral fullerenes produced both in gas phase and in macroscopic quantities. Early electron spin resonance investigation of La@C{sub 82} by R.D. Johnson, et.al indicated that La transfer nearly all of the three valence electrons to the fullerene cage, forming a La{sup 3+}@C{sub 82}{sup 3-} complex. Theoretical calculations also have shown that La transfers its valence electrons to the fullerene cage in molecules of La@C{sub n}. Investigations with ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy by L. Wang, et.al. indicated that attaching a potassium atom outside the C{sub 60} cage lowers the electron affinity (EA) while trapping Ca atom inside the C{sub 60} sphere increases the EA compared with parent C{sub 60} molecule. These results indicate that metallofullerenes appear to have substantially lower ionization potentials (IP) and higher EA than empty fullerenes.

  19. Electron gun controlled smart structure

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Jeffrey W.; Main, John Alan; Redmond, James M.; Henson, Tammy D.; Watson, Robert D.

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed is a method and system for actively controlling the shape of a sheet of electroactive material; the system comprising: one or more electrodes attached to the frontside of the electroactive sheet; a charged particle generator, disposed so as to direct a beam of charged particles (e.g. electrons) onto the electrode; a conductive substrate attached to the backside of the sheet; and a power supply electrically connected to the conductive substrate; whereby the sheet changes its shape in response to an electric field created across the sheet by an accumulation of electric charge within the electrode(s), relative to a potential applied to the conductive substrate. Use of multiple electrodes distributed across on the frontside ensures a uniform distribution of the charge with a single point of e-beam incidence, thereby greatly simplifying the beam scanning algorithm and raster control electronics, and reducing the problems associated with "blooming". By placing a distribution of electrodes over the front surface of a piezoelectric film (or other electroactive material), this arrangement enables improved control over the distribution of surface electric charges (e.g. electrons) by creating uniform (and possibly different) charge distributions within each individual electrode. Removal or deposition of net electric charge can be affected by controlling the secondary electron yield through manipulation of the backside electric potential with the power supply. The system can be used for actively controlling the shape of space-based deployable optics, such as adaptive mirrors and inflatable antennae.

  20. Ground-state Electronic Structure of Actinide Monocarbides and Mononitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Petit, Leon; Svane, Axel; Szotek, Zdzislawa; Temmerman, Walter M; Stocks, George Malcolm

    2009-01-01

    The self-interaction corrected local spin-density approximation is used to investigate the ground-state valency configuration of the actinide ions in the actinide monocarbides, AC (A=U,Np,Pu,Am,Cm), and the actinide mononitrides, AN. The electronic structure is characterized by a gradually increasing degree of f electron localization from U to Cm, with the tendency toward localization being slightly stronger in the (more ionic) nitrides compared to the (more covalent) carbides. The itinerant band picture is found to be adequate for UC and acceptable for UN, while a more complex manifold of competing localized and delocalized f-electron configurations underlies the ground states of NpC, PuC, AmC, NpN, and PuN. The fully localized 5f-electron configuration is realized in CmC (f{sup 7}), CmN (f{sup 7}), and AmN (f{sup 6}). The observed sudden increase in lattice parameter from PuN to AmN is found to be related to the localization transition. The calculated valence electron densities of states are in good agreement with photoemission data.

  1. General theory of electronic transport in molecular crystals. I. Local linear electron-phonon coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silbey, R.; Munn, R. W.

    1980-02-01

    An improved general theory of electronic transport in molecular crystals with local linear electron-phonon coupling is presented. It is valid for arbitrary electronic and phonon bandwidths and for arbitrary electron-phonon coupling strength, yielding small-polaron theory for narrow electronic bands and strong coupling, and semiconductor theory for wide electronic bands and weak coupling. Detailed results are derived for electronic excitations fully clothed with phonons and having a bandwidth no larger than the phonon frequency; the electronic and phonon densities of states are taken as Gaussian for simplicity. The dependence of the diffusion coefficient on temperature and on the other parameters is analyzed thoroughly. The calculated behavior provides a rational interpretation of observed trends in the magnitude and temperature dependence of charge-carrier drift mobilities in molecular crystals.

  2. An electronic structure perspective of graphene interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Brian J.; Dennis, Robert V.; Lee, Vincent; Banerjee, Sarbajit

    2014-03-01

    The unusual electronic structure of graphene characterized by linear energy dispersion of bands adjacent to the Fermi level underpins its remarkable transport properties. However, for practical device integration, graphene will need to be interfaced with other materials: 2D layered structures, metals (as ad-atoms, nanoparticles, extended surfaces, and patterned metamaterial geometries), dielectrics, organics, or hybrid structures that in turn are constituted from various inorganic or organic components. The structural complexity at these nanoscale interfaces holds much promise for manifestation of novel emergent phenomena and provides a means to modulate the electronic structure of graphene. In this feature article, we review the modifications to the electronic structure of graphene induced upon interfacing with disparate types of materials with an emphasis on iterative learnings from theoretical calculations and electronic spectroscopy (X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD)). We discuss approaches for engineering and modulating a bandgap in graphene through interfacial hybridization, outline experimental methods for examining electronic structure at interfaces, and overview device implications of engineered interfaces. A unified view of how geometric and electronic structure are correlated at interfaces will provide a rational means for designing heterostructures exhibiting emergent physical phenomena with implications for plasmonics, photonics, spintronics, and engineered polymer and metal matrix composites.

  3. An electronic structure perspective of graphene interfaces.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Brian J; Dennis, Robert V; Lee, Vincent; Banerjee, Sarbajit

    2014-04-01

    The unusual electronic structure of graphene characterized by linear energy dispersion of bands adjacent to the Fermi level underpins its remarkable transport properties. However, for practical device integration, graphene will need to be interfaced with other materials: 2D layered structures, metals (as ad-atoms, nanoparticles, extended surfaces, and patterned metamaterial geometries), dielectrics, organics, or hybrid structures that in turn are constituted from various inorganic or organic components. The structural complexity at these nanoscale interfaces holds much promise for manifestation of novel emergent phenomena and provides a means to modulate the electronic structure of graphene. In this feature article, we review the modifications to the electronic structure of graphene induced upon interfacing with disparate types of materials with an emphasis on iterative learnings from theoretical calculations and electronic spectroscopy (X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD)). We discuss approaches for engineering and modulating a bandgap in graphene through interfacial hybridization, outline experimental methods for examining electronic structure at interfaces, and overview device implications of engineered interfaces. A unified view of how geometric and electronic structure are correlated at interfaces will provide a rational means for designing heterostructures exhibiting emergent physical phenomena with implications for plasmonics, photonics, spintronics, and engineered polymer and metal matrix composites.

  4. Radially Localized Measurements of Superthermal Electrons Using Obilique Ece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preische, Sherrie Anne

    1995-01-01

    In the effort to design a tokamak which will make a more compact and economically attractive fusion energy reactor, tokamak regimes are envisioned in which radial profiles of the density, temperature, and current are controlled. Lower Hybrid Current Drive is one of the most flexible and proven means of controlling the plasma current profile. In order to develop a better understanding of how, to what extent, and under what conditions LHCD can be used to tailor the current profile, the radial profile and velocity distribution of the fast current-carrying electrons and their time evolution must be known. Spacially localized information about the fast electron distribution function is difficult to obtain. The electron calcitrant resonance, through its sensitivity to the magnetic field as well as to the frequency and angle of observation, provides a means of probing the fast electron distribution function in detail. A new and unique diagnostic has been developed, installed, and operated on the PBX -M tokamak to measure the Electron Cyclotron Emission from these fast electrons. An oblique horizontal view of upshifted cyclotron emission in the midplane gives radial as well as velocity space information about the fast electrons by utilizing the sensitivity of the electron cyclotron resonance. Emission in extraordinary (X)-mode at frequencies refracted by the right-hand cutoff is radially localized. An experiment has been performed in which quasi-X mode emission in the range 60-90 GHz is observed through a focusing gaussian lens antenna at a 57^ circ angle to the toroidal magnetic field. Using the sensitivity of the resonance condition to small changes in frequency and field, radially localized moments. E_ parallel, T_ |, n_{sth}, of the fast electron distribution function are found by a Bayesian analysis method. The evolution of the current profile obtained from these measurements is examined in detail. After the LHCD is turned off, the dynamics are found to be

  5. Structural change of graphite during electron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, J. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Pedraza, D.F. )

    1992-01-01

    Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite was irradiated at room temperature with 300-keV electrons. High resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy were employed to study the structure of electron-irradiated graphite. Results consistently indicated absence of long-range order periodicity in the basal plane, and loose retention of the c-axis periodicity. Structure was modeled based on a mixture of sixfold and non-sixfold atom rings. Formation of non-sixfold atom rings was related to the observed buckling and discontinuity of the original graphite basal plane.

  6. Structural change of graphite during electron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, J.; Pedraza, D.F.

    1992-12-31

    Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite was irradiated at room temperature with 300-keV electrons. High resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy were employed to study the structure of electron-irradiated graphite. Results consistently indicated absence of long-range order periodicity in the basal plane, and loose retention of the c-axis periodicity. Structure was modeled based on a mixture of sixfold and non-sixfold atom rings. Formation of non-sixfold atom rings was related to the observed buckling and discontinuity of the original graphite basal plane.

  7. Electronic Structure of Small Lanthanide Containing Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafader, Jared O.; Ray, Manisha; Topolski, Josey E.; Chick Jarrold, Caroline

    2016-06-01

    Lanthanide-based materials have unusual electronic properties because of the high number of electronic degrees of freedom arising from partial occupation of 4f orbitals, which make these materials optimal for their utilization in many applications including electronics and catalysis. Electronic spectroscopy of small lanthanide molecules helps us understand the role of these 4f electrons, which are generally considered core-like because of orbital contraction, but are energetically similar to valence electrons. The spectroscopy of small lanthanide-containing molecules is relatively unexplored and to broaden this understanding we have completed the characterization of small cerium, praseodymium, and europium molecules using photoelectron spectroscopy coupled with DFT calculations. The characterization of PrO, EuH, EuO/EuOH, and CexOy molecules have allowed for the determination of their electron affinity, the assignment of numerous anion to neutral state transitions, modeling of anion/neutral structures and electron orbital occupation.

  8. Localizing Target Structures in Ultrasound Video

    PubMed Central

    Kwitt, R.; Vasconcelos, N.; Razzaque, S.; Aylward, S.

    2013-01-01

    The problem of localizing specific anatomic structures using ultrasound (US) video is considered. This involves automatically determining when an US probe is acquiring images of a previously defined object of interest, during the course of an US examination. Localization using US is motivated by the increased availability of portable, low-cost US probes, which inspire applications where inexperienced personnel and even first-time users acquire US data that is then sent to experts for further assessment. This process is of particular interest for routine examinations in underserved populations as well as for patient triage after natural disasters and large-scale accidents, where experts may be in short supply. The proposed localization approach is motivated by research in the area of dynamic texture analysis and leverages several recent advances in the field of activity recognition. For evaluation, we introduce an annotated and publicly available database of US video, acquired on three phantoms. Several experiments reveal the challenges of applying video analysis approaches to US images and demonstrate that good localization performance is possible with the proposed solution. PMID:23746488

  9. Structural physiology based on electron crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2011-01-01

    There are many questions in brain science, which are extremely interesting but very difficult to answer. For example, how do education and other experiences during human development influence the ability and personality of the adult? The molecular mechanisms underlying such phenomena are still totally unclear. However, technological and instrumental advancements of electron microscopy have facilitated comprehension of the structures of biological components, cells, and organelles. Electron crystallography is especially good for studying the structure and function of membrane proteins, which are key molecules of signal transduction in neural and other cells. Electron crystallography is now an established technique to analyze the structures of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers, which are close to their natural biological environment. By utilizing cryo-electron microscopes with helium cooled specimen stages, which were developed through a personal motivation to understand functions of neural systems from a structural point of view, structures of membrane proteins were analyzed at a resolution higher than 3 Å. This review has four objectives. First, it is intended to introduce the new research field of structural physiology. Second, it introduces some of the personal struggles, which were involved in developing the cryo-electron microscope. Third, it discusses some of the technology for the structural analysis of membrane proteins based on cryo-electron microscopy. Finally, it reviews structural and functional analyses of membrane proteins. PMID:21416541

  10. Electronic structure of metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Oelhafen, P.; Lapka, R.; Gubler, U.; Krieg, J.; DasGupta, A.; Guentherodt, H.J.; Mizoguchi, T.; Hague, C.; Kuebler, J.; Nagel, S.R.

    1981-01-01

    This paper is organized in six sections and deals with (1) the glassy transition metal alloys, their d-band structure, the d-band shifts on alloying and their relation to the alloy heat of formation (..delta..H) and the glass forming ability, (2) the glass to crystal phase transition viewed by valence band spectroscopy, (3) band structure calculations, (4) metallic glasses prepared by laser glazing, (5) glassy normal metal alloys, and (6) glassy hydrides.

  11. Wave packet spreading and localization in electron-nuclear scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, Paul E.; Markmann, Andreas; Morozov, Igor V.; Valuev, Ilya A.; Fichtl, Christopher A.; Richards, David F.; Batista, Victor S.; Graziani, Frank R.; Murillo, Michael S.

    2013-06-01

    The wave packet molecular dynamics (WPMD) method provides a variational approximation to the solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. Its application in the field of high-temperature dense plasmas has yielded diverging electron width (spreading), which results in diminishing electron-nuclear interactions. Electron spreading has previously been ascribed to a shortcoming of the WPMD method and has been counteracted by various heuristic additions to the models used. We employ more accurate methods to determine if spreading continues to be predicted by them and how WPMD can be improved. A scattering process involving a single dynamic electron interacting with a periodic array of statically screened protons is used as a model problem for comparison. We compare the numerically exact split operator Fourier transform method, the Wigner trajectory method, and the time-dependent variational principle (TDVP). Within the framework of the TDVP, we use the standard variational form of WPMD, the single Gaussian wave packet (WP), as well as a sum of Gaussian WPs, as in the split WP method. Wave packet spreading is predicted by all methods, so it is not the source of the unphysical diminishing of electron-nuclear interactions in WPMD at high temperatures. Instead, the Gaussian WP's inability to correctly reproduce breakup of the electron's probability density into localized density near the protons is responsible for the deviation from more accurate predictions. Extensions of WPMD must include a mechanism for breakup to occur in order to yield dynamics that lead to accurate electron densities.

  12. Localized electronic states at grain boundaries on the surface of graphene and graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luican-Mayer, Adina; Barrios-Vargas, Jose E.; Toft Falkenberg, Jesper; Autès, Gabriel; Cummings, Aron W.; Soriano, David; Li, Guohong; Brandbyge, Mads; Yazyev, Oleg V.; Roche, Stephan; Andrei, Eva Y.

    2016-09-01

    Recent advances in large-scale synthesis of graphene and other 2D materials have underscored the importance of local defects such as dislocations and grain boundaries (GBs), and especially their tendency to alter the electronic properties of the material. Understanding how the polycrystalline morphology affects the electronic properties is crucial for the development of applications such as flexible electronics, energy harvesting devices or sensors. We here report on atomic scale characterization of several GBs and on the structural-dependence of the localized electronic states in their vicinity. Using low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy, together with tight binding and ab initio numerical simulations we explore GBs on the surface of graphite and elucidate the interconnection between the local density of states and their atomic structure. We show that the electronic fingerprints of these GBs consist of pronounced resonances which, depending on the relative orientation of the adjacent crystallites, appear either on the electron side of the spectrum or as an electron-hole symmetric doublet close to the charge neutrality point. These two types of spectral features will impact very differently the transport properties allowing, in the asymmetric case to introduce transport anisotropy which could be utilized to design novel growth and fabrication strategies to control device performance.

  13. Role of Geometric Distortion and Polarization in Localizing Electronic Excitations in Conjugated Polymers.

    PubMed

    Nayyar, Iffat H; Batista, Enrique R; Tretiak, Sergei; Saxena, Avadh; Smith, Darryl L; Martin, Richard L

    2013-02-12

    Five different Density Functional Theory (DFT) models (ranging from pure GGA to long-range-corrected hybrid functionals) were used to study computationally the nature of the self-trapped electronic states in oligophenylene vinylenes. The electronic excitations in question include the lowest singlet (S1) and triplet (T1(†)) excitons (calculated using Time Dependent DFT (TD-DFT) method), positive (P(+)) and negative (P(-)) polarons, and the lowest triplet (T1) states (computed with the Self-Consistent Field (SCF) scheme). The polaron formation (spatial localization of excitations) is observed only with the use of range-corrected hybrid DFT models including long-range electronic exchange interactions. The extent of localization for all studied excitations is found to be invariant with respect to the size of the oligomer chain in their corresponding optimal geometries. We have analyzed the interdependence between the extent of the geometrical distortion and the localization of the orbital and spin density, and have observed that the localization of the P(+) and P(-) charged species is quite sensitive to solvent polarization effects and the character of the DFT functional used, rather than the structural deformations. In contrast, the localization of neutral states, S1 and T1(†), is found to follow the structural distortions. Notably, T1 excitation obtained with the mean field SCF approach is always strongly localized in range-corrected hybrid DFT models. The molecular orbital energetics of these excitations was further investigated to identify the relationship between state localization and the corresponding orbital structure. A characteristic stabilization (destabilization) of occupied (virtual) orbitals is observed in hybrid DFT models, compared to tight-binding model-like orbital filling in semilocal GGA functionals. The molecular and natural orbital representation allows visualization of the spatial extent of the underlying electronic states. In terms of

  14. Timescales for localized electron injections to become a thin shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liemohn, Michael; Fok, Mei-Ching; Zheng, Qiuhua.; Xu, Shaosui

    Timescales for localized injections of electrons into the Earth's inner magnetosphere to spread into a thin shell are presented. The Radiation Belt Environment (RBE) model is used to numerically examine this topic, initializing the simulations with an MLT-confined Gaussian peak of electrons. Near the slot region, where the numerical experiments are conducted (L=3), the transition from a localized injection into a thin shell is driven by scattering with plasmaspheric hiss, shifting the energy and pitch angle of the particles, and ULF waves, shifting the radial location of the particles, all of which changes the drift speed. This mixing is energy dependent, taking much longer at the lower energies. It is shown that during static driving conditions it takes >3 hours for a narrow-MLT initial distribution of MeV-energy electrons to transform into a uniformly distributed ring, but takes more than 6 hours for < 300 keV electrons to achieve a thin shell state. During a magnetic storm interval, the timescale to reach a thin shell is somewhat shorter as the large-scale fluctuations of the magnetic field diffuse the particles in radial distance, enhancing the mixing. Interestingly, some parts of velocity space take longer with the magnetic fluctuations included, and the influence of the hiss scattering is modified as well. The implication is that localized injections, from the tail or from another source, do not become symmetric in local time for several hours, during which MLT-dependent interactions can play a significant role on the evolution and dynamics of the population.

  15. Computational Chemistry Using Modern Electronic Structure Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Stephen; Dines, Trevor J.; Chowdhry, Babur Z.; Withnall, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Various modern electronic structure methods are now days used to teach computational chemistry to undergraduate students. Such quantum calculations can now be easily used even for large size molecules.

  16. Structure of Wet Specimens in Electron Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, D. F.

    1974-01-01

    Discussed are past work and recent advances in the use of electron microscopes for viewing structures immersed in gas and liquid. Improved environmental chambers make it possible to examine wet specimens easily. (Author/RH)

  17. Instructional Approach to Molecular Electronic Structure Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dykstra, Clifford E.; Schaefer, Henry F.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a graduate quantum mechanics projects in which students write a computer program that performs ab initio calculations on the electronic structure of a simple molecule. Theoretical potential energy curves are produced. (MLH)

  18. Effect of Structural Relaxation on the Electronic Structure of Graphene on Hexagonal Boron Nitride.

    PubMed

    Slotman, G J; van Wijk, M M; Zhao, Pei-Liang; Fasolino, A; Katsnelson, M I; Yuan, Shengjun

    2015-10-30

    We performed calculations of electronic, optical, and transport properties of graphene on hexagonal boron nitride with realistic moiré patterns. The latter are produced by structural relaxation using a fully atomistic model. This relaxation turns out to be crucially important for electronic properties. We describe experimentally observed features such as additional Dirac points and the "Hofstadter butterfly" structure of energy levels in a magnetic field. We find that the electronic structure is sensitive to many-body renormalization of the local energy gap. PMID:26565485

  19. Effect of Structural Relaxation on the Electronic Structure of Graphene on Hexagonal Boron Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slotman, G. J.; van Wijk, M. M.; Zhao, Pei-Liang; Fasolino, A.; Katsnelson, M. I.; Yuan, Shengjun

    2015-10-01

    We performed calculations of electronic, optical, and transport properties of graphene on hexagonal boron nitride with realistic moiré patterns. The latter are produced by structural relaxation using a fully atomistic model. This relaxation turns out to be crucially important for electronic properties. We describe experimentally observed features such as additional Dirac points and the "Hofstadter butterfly" structure of energy levels in a magnetic field. We find that the electronic structure is sensitive to many-body renormalization of the local energy gap.

  20. Impact of cation-based localized electronic states on the conduction and valence band structure of Al{sub 1−x}In{sub x}N alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, S.; Caro, M. A.; O'Reilly, E. P.

    2014-04-28

    We demonstrate that cation-related localized states strongly perturb the band structure of Al{sub 1−x}In{sub x}N leading to a strong band gap bowing at low In content. Our first-principles calculations show that In-related localized states are formed both in the conduction and the valence band in Al{sub 1−x}In{sub x}N for low In composition, x, and that these localized states dominate the evolution of the band structure with increasing x. Therefore, the commonly used assumption of a single composition-independent bowing parameter breaks down when describing the evolution both of the conduction and of the valence band edge in Al{sub 1−x}In{sub x}N.

  1. Localized electron heating and density peaking in downstream helicon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Soumen; Barada, K. K.; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Ghosh, J.; Bora, D.

    2015-06-01

    Localized electron temperature and density peaking at different axial locations in the downstream helicon plasma have been observed in a linear helicon device with both geometrical and magnetic expansion. The discharge is produced with an m=+1 right helical antenna powered by a RF source operating at 13.56 MHz. Axial wave field measurement shows the presence of damped helicon waves with standing wave character folded into it even at low densities (˜ {{10}16} m-3 ). The measured helicon wavelength is just about twice the antenna length and the phase velocity ≤ft({{v}p}\\right) is almost the speed required for electron impact ionization. These experimental observations strongly advocate the Landau damping heating and density production by the helicon waves, particularly in low density plasma such as ours. The electron temperature maximizes at 35-45 cm away from the antenna center in our experiments indicating a local source of heating at those locations. Different mechanisms responsible for this additional heating at a particular spatial location have been discussed for their possible roles. Further downstream from the location of the maximum electron temperature, a density peak located 55-65 cm away from the antenna is observed. This downstream density peaking can be explained through pressure balance in the system.

  2. Dimensionality and Localization of Electron States in Conducting Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhao Hui

    The electron localization and the dimensionality of conducting polymers are studied by a variety of transport and magnetic techniques. Two model conducting polymer systems, the emeraldine salt form of polyaniline (PAN-ES) and one of its derivatives (POT-ES), are employed in the studies. The electron localization is increased with increasing one-dimensionality of a quasi-one-dimensional disordered system (Quasi-1d-DS). This concept is tested by studying electron localization in polyaniline (PAN) and its methyl ring-substituted derivative poly(o-toluidine) (POT). The experimental results showed greater electron localization in the HCl salt of POT than that of PAN, reflected in much smaller sigma_{DC}, sigma_{MW} and epsilon, increased Curie susceptibility and decreased Pauli-like susceptibility. The localization is attributed to the reduced interchain diffusion rate caused by decreased interchain coherence and increased interchain separation, both of which result from the presence of CH_3 on the C_6 rings. The T-dependences of lnsigma ~ -T^{-1/2} and S(T) ~ S_0 + B/T are interpreted as quasi-1d variable range hopping (VRH) between the nearest neighboring chains. Within the model, electric field (F) dependence of sigma(F)~{cal K}F^{1/2} with { cal K}~ T^{-1/2} can be understood. Charging energy limited tunneling model for granular metals and three-dimensional VRH model with a Coulomb gap are not consistent with the experiment. Other possible mechanisms for electron localization and the general implications for control of dimensionality and conductivity are discussed. The interchain coupling may change the dimensionality of electron states of conducting polymers. It is an open question if "metallic" polymers have one dimensional or three dimensional conduction states. We investigate this issue by studying the oriented polyaniline system. The thermopower, microwave dielectric constant and EPR data suggest that the electrons are three-dimensionally delocalized while the

  3. Transport in nanoscale systems: hydrodynamics, turbulence, and local electron heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2007-03-01

    Transport in nanoscale systems is usually described as an open-boundary scattering problem. This picture, however, says nothing about the dynamical onset of steady states, their microscopic nature, or their dependence on initial conditions [1]. In order to address these issues, I will first describe the dynamical many-particle state via an effective quantum hydrodynamic theory [2]. This approach allows us to predict a series of novel phenomena like turbulence of the electron liquid [2], local electron heating in nanostructures [3], and the effect of electron viscosity on resistance [4]. I will provide both analytical results and numerical examples of first-principles electron dynamics in nanostructures using the above approach. I will also discuss possible experimental tests of our predictions. Work supported in part by NSF and DOE. [1] N. Bushong, N. Sai and M. Di Ventra, ``Approach to steady-state transport in nanoscale systems'' Nano Letters, 5 2569 (2005); M. Di Ventra and T.N. Todorov, ``Transport in nanoscale systems: the microcanonical versus grand-canonical picture,'' J. Phys. Cond. Matt. 16, 8025 (2004). [2] R. D'Agosta and M. Di Ventra, ``Hydrodynamic approach to transport and turbulence in nanoscale conductors,'' cond-mat/05123326; J. Phys. Cond. Matt., in press. [3] R. D'Agosta, N. Sai and M. Di Ventra, ``Local electron heating in nanoscale conductors,'' cond-mat/0605312; Nano Letters, in press. [4] N. Sai, M. Zwolak, G. Vignale and M. Di Ventra, ``Dynamical corrections to the DFT-LDA electron conductance in nanoscale systems,'' Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 186810 (2005).

  4. A Mapping of the Electron Localization Function for Earth Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Gerald V.; Cox, David F.; Ross, Nancy; Crawford, T Daniel; Burt, Jason; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2005-06-01

    The electron localization function, ELF, generated for a number of geometry-optimized earth materials, provides a graphical representation of the spatial localization of the probability electron density distribution as embodied in domains ascribed to localized bond and lone pair electrons. The lone pair domains, displayed by the silica polymorphs quartz, coesite and cristobalite, are typically banana-shaped and oriented perpendicular to the plane of the SiOSi angle at ~0.60 Å from the O atom on the reflex side of the angle. With decreasing angle, the domains increase in magnitude, indicating an increase in the nucleophilic character of the O atom, rendering it more susceptible to potential electrophilic attack. The Laplacian isosurface maps of the experimental and theoretical electron density distribution for coesite substantiates the increase in the size of the domain with decreasing angle. Bond pair domains are displayed along each of the SiO bond vectors as discrete concave hemispherically-shaped domains at ~0.70 Å from the O atom. For more closed-shell ionic bonded interactions, the bond and lone pair domains are often coalesced, resulting in concave hemispherical toroidal-shaped domains with local maxima centered along the bond vectors. As the shared covalent character of the bonded interactions increases, the bond and lone pair domains are better developed as discrete domains. ELF isosurface maps generated for the earth materials tremolite, diopside, talc and dickite display banana-shaped lone pair domains associated with the bridging O atoms of SiOSi angles and concave hemispherical toroidal bond pair domains associated with the nonbridging ones. The lone pair domains in dickite and talc provide a basis for understanding the bonded interactions between the adjacent neutral layers. Maps were also generated for beryl, cordierite, quartz, low albite, forsterite, wadeite, åkermanite, pectolite, periclase, hurlbutite, thortveitite and vanthoffite. Strategies

  5. Electronic structure and enthalpy of hydrogen and helium mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, M.; Klepeis, J. E.; Schafer, K. J.; Barbee, T. W., III

    1992-11-01

    The first local density approximation (LDA) calculations of the electronic structure, equation of state, and enthalpy of mixing were carried out for a number of different compositions of hydrogen and helium in bcc and fcc lattices. These are fully quantum mechanical, self-consistent calculations utilizing state-of-the-art methods of electron band theory, which make no assumptions regarding pressure ionization. The major approximation in the LDA method is that the exchange and correlation energy is given by a free electron functional in terms of the local electron density. The majority of previous mixture calculations start with the assumption that both hydrogen and helium are pressure-ionized so that the electronic structure is approximately that of free or weakly screened electrons in the presence of positive ions. Stevenson used a hard-sphere mixture model for the ions with an ion-ion pseudopotential to account for electron screening and predicted that a mixture containing 7% helium by number, the composition believed to be present in Jupiter and Saturn, would phase separate at a temperature of about 7000 K at 8 Mbar. Subsequent calculations carried out for the fully ionized mixture and for a mixture of screened ions (linear response theory) have all arrived at predictions similar to those of Stevenson. MacFarlane and Hubbard performed Thomas-Fermi-Dirac calculations for mixing enthalpies of hydrogen and helium in bcc and fcc lattices and predicted that phase separation would not occur at any temperature.

  6. Localization of the valence electron of endohedrally confined hydrogen, lithium and sodium in fullerene cages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuestas, Eloisa; Serra, Pablo

    2016-03-01

    The localization of the valence electron of H, Li and Na atoms enclosed by three different fullerene molecules is studied. The structure of the fullerene molecules is used to calculate the equilibrium position of the endohedrally atom as the minimum of the classical (N + 1)-body Lennard-Jones potential. Once the position of the guest atom is determined, the fullerene cavity is modeled by a short range attractive shell according to molecule symmetry, and the enclosed atom is modeled by an effective one-electron potential. In order to examine whether the endohedral compound is formed by a neutral atom inside a neutral fullerene molecule X@CN or if the valence electron of the encapsulated atom localizes in the fullerene giving rise to a state with the form X+@CN-, we analyze the electronic density, the projections onto free atomic states and the weights of partial angular waves.

  7. Localization of the valence electron of endohedrally confined hydrogen, lithium and sodium in fullerene cages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuestas, Eloisa; Serra, Pablo

    2016-03-01

    The localization of the valence electron of H, Li and Na atoms enclosed by three different fullerene molecules is studied. The structure of the fullerene molecules is used to calculate the equilibrium position of the endohedrally atom as the minimum of the classical (N + 1)-body Lennard-Jones potential. Once the position of the guest atom is determined, the fullerene cavity is modeled by a short range attractive shell according to molecule symmetry, and the enclosed atom is modeled by an effective one-electron potential. In order to examine whether the endohedral compound is formed by a neutral atom inside a neutral fullerene molecule X@CN or if the valence electron of the encapsulated atom localizes in the fullerene giving rise to a state with the form X+@CN‑, we analyze the electronic density, the projections onto free atomic states and the weights of partial angular waves.

  8. Electronic structure calculations in arbitrary electrostatic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Mark A.; Rappoport, Dmitrij; Lee, Elizabeth M. Y.; Olivares-Amaya, Roberto; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2012-01-01

    Modeling of electronic structure of molecules in electrostatic environments is of considerable relevance for surface-enhanced spectroscopy and molecular electronics. We have developed and implemented a novel approach to the molecular electronic structure in arbitrary electrostatic environments that is compatible with standard quantum chemical methods and can be applied to medium-sized and large molecules. The scheme denoted CheESE (chemistry in electrostatic environments) is based on the description of molecular electronic structure subject to a boundary condition on the system/environment interface. Thus, it is particularly suited to study molecules on metallic surfaces. The proposed model is capable of describing both electrostatic effects near nanostructured metallic surfaces and image-charge effects. We present an implementation of the CheESE model as a library module and show example applications to neutral and negatively charged molecules.

  9. Fabrication of graphitic nanowire structure by electron beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takai, Kazuyuki; Enoki, Toshiaki

    2007-12-01

    The graphitic nanowire structure was fabricated by local graphitization induced by direct electron-beam irradiation or the annealing treatment of wire-shaped nano-sized pattern, where glassy carbon film was used as the precursor materials. The direct irradiation of the 50 keV electron beam hardly causes the local graphitization of the sample, while the annealing of nanowire-patterned glassy carbon with 50 nm width successfully gives graphitic nanowire structure. The electrical conductivity of the fabricated nanowire structure shows metallic temperature dependence. However, the graphitic domain size of the wire was found to be very small (ca. 5 nm) by using Raman spectroscopy and the magnetoresistance. Higher temperature annealing is expected to improve the crystallinity of the graphitic nanowire.

  10. Study of electronic structures of solids with strongly interacting electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yen-Sheng

    This work contains studies of two classes of perovskite transition metal oxides. The first class is the layered perovskite cuprates and the related nickelate. The second class is the three dimensional perovskite manganites. Both model and ab initio calculations are carried out for the two classes of systems. The dissertation is therefore divided into the following four parts. The first part is about the 3-band Hubbard model. The model is commonly used for describing the electronic properties of the important CuO2 layers in the crystals of high-Tc superconducting cuprates, such as doped La2CuO4 and YBa2Cu3O 7. The straightforward perturbation expansion on the model taking tpd/ɛpd (~0.36 for the cuprates) as the small parameter does not converge. In this work, I show that there exist canonical transformations on the model Hamiltonian such that the perturbation expansion based on the transformed Hamiltonians converges. In the second part, crystal Hartree-Fock calculations are carried out for La2NiO4 and La2CuO4. The results predict correctly that these two materials are antiferromagnetic insulators, in contrast to the wrong predictions made by the density functional calculations using the local spin density approximation (LSDA). The spin form factors of the materials are also calculated. The results agree with previous theoretical works using an embedded cluster model. The calculated spin form factor of La2CuO4 is consistent with the few experimental data currently available, while the results for La2NiO4 show a large discrepancy between theory and experiment. We question the accuracy of the experimental results of La2NiO4 and call for more experiments to settle the issue. In the third part, crystal Hartree-Fock calculations are carried out for LaMnO3. Our main focus is on the magnetic and orbital orderings, the effect of the crystal distortion from the cubic perovskite structure, and the analysis of the projected density of states. In addition, we also find

  11. Electronic structure and photoelectron spectra of osmium and ruthenium tetraoxides

    SciTech Connect

    Topol', I.A.; Vovna, V.I.; Kazachek, M.V.

    1988-01-01

    The X/sub ..cap alpha../-SW method has been used in the nonrelativistic and quasirelativistic approximations to calculate the electronic structures of OsO/sub 4/, RuO/sub 4/, and FeO/sub 4/. When the 5d element is replaced by a 4d or 3d one, the electron-density redistribution is due mainly to the d electrons. All the d electrons in FeO/sub 4/ are localized on the iron atom, which markedly reduced the ionic and covalent bonding on the transition from RuO/sub 4/ to FeO/sub 4/, which explains the instability of FeO/sub 4/. The calculated spin-orbit splittings agree well with the structure of the PES bands, which enables one to establish the sequence of MO ionization energies unambiguously.

  12. Structural surface investigations with low-energy backscattered electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Crescenzi, Maurizio

    The development of electron spectroscopies based on inelastic scattering fine structure is driven mainly by the need for structural methods which allow the investigation of the geometrical environment of different atomic species of the surface region of the sample. The EELFS (Extended Energy Loss Fine Structure) technique, using low-kinetic-energy electrons (1000-2000 eV) in reflection geometry, has been proven a useful tool for local structural investigation of clean surfaces, thin films and chemisorbed species. The main appeal of this technique, besides its experimental accessibility, is that the data analysis follows the procedure used for EXAFS (Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure) spectroscopy to obtain the atomic selectivity, the radial distribution function, the coordination number and the thermal and anisotropic effects. The near-edge energy-loss feature has been used to investigate the density of empty states close to EF and it appeeal particularly sensitive for following the structural changes and for discriminating among various phases and compound formations which occur in the surface region. In this work I review some recent developments, applications and theoretical considerations of the EELFS technique to give local structural parameters and to assess the basic mechanisms which dominate the low-energy electron-surface interaction.

  13. Local charge measurement using off-axis electron holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beleggia, M.; Gontard, L. C.; Dunin-Borkowski, R. E.

    2016-07-01

    A model-independent approach based on Gauss’ theorem for measuring the local charge in a specimen from an electron-optical phase image recorded using off-axis electron holography was recently proposed. Here, we show that such a charge measurement is reliable when it is applied to determine the total charge enclosed within an object. However, the situation is more complicated for a partial charge measurement when the integration domain encloses only part of the object. We analyze in detail the effects on charge measurement of the mean inner potential of the object, of the presence of induced charges on nearby supports/electrodes and of noise. We perform calculations for spherical particles and highlight the differences when dealing with other object shapes. Our analysis is tested using numerical simulations and applied to the interpretation of an experimental dataset recorded from a sapphire particle.

  14. Software abstractions and computational issues in parallel structure adaptive mesh methods for electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, S.; Weare, J.; Ong, E.; Baden, S.

    1997-05-01

    We have applied structured adaptive mesh refinement techniques to the solution of the LDA equations for electronic structure calculations. Local spatial refinement concentrates memory resources and numerical effort where it is most needed, near the atomic centers and in regions of rapidly varying charge density. The structured grid representation enables us to employ efficient iterative solver techniques such as conjugate gradient with FAC multigrid preconditioning. We have parallelized our solver using an object- oriented adaptive mesh refinement framework.

  15. Nanoscale imaging of the electronic and structural transitions in vanadium dioxide.

    SciTech Connect

    Qazilbash, M. M.; Tripathi, A.; Schafgans, A. A.; Kim, B.-J.; Kim, H.-T.; Cai, Z.; Holt, M. V.; Maser, J. M.; Keilmann, F.; Shpyrko, O. G.; Basov, D. N.

    2011-04-13

    We investigate the electronic and structural changes at the nanoscale in vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}) in the vicinity of its thermally driven phase transition. Both electronic and structural changes exhibit phase coexistence leading to percolation. In addition, we observe a dichotomy between the local electronic and structural transitions. Nanoscale x-ray diffraction reveals local, nonmonotonic switching of the lattice structure, a phenomenon that is not seen in the electronic insulator-to-metal transition mapped by near-field infrared microscopy.

  16. Defect Induced Electronic Structure of Uranofullerene

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xing; Cheng, Cheng; Zhang, Wei; Xin, Minsi; Huai, Ping; Zhang, Ruiqin; Wang, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    The interaction between the inner atoms/cluster and the outer fullerene cage is the source of various novel properties of endohedral metallofullerenes. Herein, we introduce an adatom-type spin polarization defect on the surface of a typical endohedral stable U2@C60 to predict the associated structure and electronic properties of U2@C61 based on the density functional theory method. We found that defect induces obvious changes in the electronic structure of this metallofullerene. More interestingly, the ground state of U2@C61 is nonet spin in contrast to the septet of U2@C60. Electronic structure analysis shows that the inner U atoms and the C ad-atom on the surface of the cage contribute together to this spin state, which is brought about by a ferromagnetic coupling between the spin of the unpaired electrons of the U atoms and the C ad-atom. This discovery may provide a possible approach to adapt the electronic structure properties of endohedral metallofullerenes. PMID:23439318

  17. Structural electronic and phonon properties of some transition metal aluminides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatima, Bushra; Pandit, Premlata; Sanyal, Sankar P.

    2012-06-01

    The structural and electronic properties of some Transition metal Aluminides (TMAl) namely ruthenium aluminide (RuAl), nickel aluminide (NiAl) and cobalt aluminide (CoAl) have been studied using plane wave pseudopotential method (PWSCF) within the local density approximation (LDA). The three TMAl's crystallizes in the CsCl-type structure (B2 phase). From the analysis of band structure and density of state, we found that these TMAl's are metallic in nature. The vibrational properties in terms of phonon dispersion curves and density of state have also been reported for RuAl using density functional perturbation theory (DFPT).

  18. Electronic transmission in quasiperiodic serial stub structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Samar; Chakrabarti, Arunava

    2004-01-01

    We present exact results on the electronic transmission through quantum stub waveguides arranged in a Fibonacci quasiperiodic pattern. Discretizing the Schrödinger equation, we map the problem into an equivalent tight binding form and study the transmission spectrum using the transfer matrix method. We emphasize the effect of local positional correlations in a Fibonacci quantum stub array that may lead to resonant eigenstates. Using the real space renormalization group ideas we unravel various local clusters of stubs responsible for resonance. Extended eigenstates have been shown to exist and we find that, under some special circumstances, the electronic charge density exhibits a totally periodic character in such a non-periodic sequence. Our method is completely general and can be applied to any arbitrary sequence of stubs: periodic, quasiperiodic or random. This may lead to a possible experimental verification of the role of positional correlations in the transport behaviour of a class of mesoscopic devices.

  19. The Electronic Structure of Heavy Element Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bursten, Bruce E.

    2000-07-25

    The area of study is the bonding in heavy element complexes, and the application of more sophisticated electronic structure theories. Progress is recounted in several areas: (a) technological advances and current methodologies - Relativistic effects are extremely important in gaining an understanding of the electronic structure of compounds of the actinides, transactinides, and other heavy elements. Therefore, a major part of the continual benchmarking was the proper inclusion of the appropriate relativistic effects for the properties under study. (b) specific applications - These include organoactinide sandwich complexes, CO activation by actinide atoms, and theoretical studies of molecules of the transactinide elements. Finally, specific directions in proposed research are described.

  20. Creating and Probing Graphene Electron Optics with Local Scanning Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroscio, Joseph

    Ballistic propagation and the light-like dispersion of graphene charge carriers make graphene an attractive platform for optics-inspired graphene electronics where gate tunable potentials can control electron refraction and transmission. In analogy to optical wave propagation in lenses, mirrors and metamaterials, gate potentials can be used to create a negative index of refraction for Veselago lensing and Fabry-Pérot interferometers. In circular geometries, gate potentials can induce whispering gallery modes (WGM), similar to optical and acoustic whispering galleries albeit on a much smaller length scale. Klein scattering of Dirac carriers plays a central role in determining the coherent propagation of electron waves in these resonators. In this talk, I examine the probing of electron resonators in graphene confined by linear and circular gate potentials with the scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The tip in the STM tunnel junction serves both as a tunable local gate potential, and as a probe of the graphene states through tunneling spectroscopy. A combination of a back gate potential, Vg, and tip potential, Vb, creates and controls a circular pn junction that confines the WGM graphene states. The resonances are observed in two separate channels in the tunneling spectroscopy experiment: first, by directly tunneling into the state at the bias energy eVb, and, second, by tunneling from the resonance at the Fermi level as the state is gated by the tip potential. The second channel produces a fan-like set of WGM peaks, reminiscent of the fringes seen in planar geometries by transport measurements. The WGM resonances split in a small applied magnetic field, with a large energy splitting approaching the WGM spacing at 0.5 T. These results agree well with recent theory on Klein scattering in graphene electron resonators. This work is done in collaboration with Y. Zhao, J. Wyrick, F.D. Natterer, J. F. Rodriquez-Nieva, C. Lewandoswski, K. Watanabe, T. Taniguchi, N. B

  1. Electronic structure of atomically precise graphene nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Ruffieux, Pascal; Cai, Jinming; Plumb, Nicholas C; Patthey, Luc; Prezzi, Deborah; Ferretti, Andrea; Molinari, Elisa; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Pignedoli, Carlo A; Fasel, Roman

    2012-08-28

    Some of the most intriguing properties of graphene are predicted for specifically designed nanostructures such as nanoribbons. Functionalities far beyond those known from extended graphene systems include electronic band gap variations related to quantum confinement and edge effects, as well as localized spin-polarized edge states for specific edge geometries. The inability to produce graphene nanostructures with the needed precision, however, has so far hampered the verification of the predicted electronic properties. Here, we report on the electronic band gap and dispersion of the occupied electronic bands of atomically precise graphene nanoribbons fabricated via on-surface synthesis. Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling spectroscopy data from armchair graphene nanoribbons of width N = 7 supported on Au(111) reveal a band gap of 2.3 eV, an effective mass of 0.21 m(0) at the top of the valence band, and an energy-dependent charge carrier velocity reaching 8.2 × 10(5) m/s in the linear part of the valence band. These results are in quantitative agreement with theoretical predictions that include image charge corrections accounting for screening by the metal substrate and confirm the importance of electron-electron interactions in graphene nanoribbons.

  2. Wave packet spreading and localization in electron-nuclear scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markmann, Andreas; Grabowski*, P. E.; Morozov, I. V.; Valuev, I. A.; Fichtl, C. A.; Batista, V. S.; Graziani, F. R.; Murillo, M. S.; Cimarron Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    The wave packet molecular dynamics (WPMD) method solves the time-dependent Schrödinger equation via a variational approximation. Application to high-temperature dense plasmas has yielded diverging electron width (spreading) with diminished electron-nuclear interaction. This was previously ascribed to a shortcoming of WPMD and has been counteracted by heuristic additions to the model. We employ various methods to determine if spreading continues to be predicted. Single electron scattering on a periodic array of statically screened protons is used as a model problem for comparison via the numerically exact split operator Fourier transform method, the Wigner trajectory method, and the time-dependent variational principle (TDVP). Within the TDVP, we use as ansätze the standard form of WPMD, a single Gaussian wave packet (WP), as well as the split WP method, a linear combination of Gaussian WPs. Spreading is predicted by all methods, so is not the cause of unphysical diminishing interactions in WPMD. Instead, the Gaussian WP's inability to reproduce breakup of the density into fragments localized near ions is responsible for the deviation between methods. Hence, extensions of WPMD must include a mechanism for breakup. Authors contributed equally.

  3. Electronic structure of Si/disilicide interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujitani, Hideaki; Asano, Setsuro

    1990-01-01

    Using supercells, the electronic structures of Si(111)/CoSi2 and Si(111)/NiSi2 interfaces are studied by the linear muffin-tin orbital atomic sphere approximation method (LMTO-ASA). Schottky barrier heights (SBH's) are strongly correlated with the interface atomic structures and are determined mainly by interface bonding states and the screening effect of the semiconductor. Metal-induced gap states (MIGS) are metal wave function tails caused by the Schottky barriers.

  4. Electronic structure of Si/disilicide interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujitani, Hideaki; Asano, Setsuro

    1989-11-01

    Using supercells, the electronic structures of Si(111)/CoSi 2 and Si(111)/NiSi 2 interfaces are studied by the linear muffin-tin orbital atomic sphere approximation method (LMTO-ASA). Schottky barrier heights (SBH's) are strongly correlated with the interface atomic structures and are determined mainly by interface bonding states and the screening effect of the semiconductor. Metal-induced gap states (MIGS) are metal wave function tails caused by the Schottky barriers.

  5. Electronic structure of the superconducting layered perovskite niobate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, Izumi; Nishihara, Yoshikazu

    1998-07-01

    The electronic energy-band structure for RbLaNb2O7, which is closely related to the layered perovskite niobate superconducting KCa2Nb3O10 and metallic KLaNb2O7 with Li intercalation, has been calculated by using the scalar-relativistic full-potential linearized augmented-plane-wave method within the local-density approximation. The result of the calculation shows that this compound is a band insulator with a small gap, and its conduction band is a typical two-dimensional one and the valence band is rather three dimensional. We can conclude that the layered perovskite niobate KCa2Nb3O10 is a band insulator that can be superconducting with electron doping, and have the highly two-dimensional electronic structure.

  6. Electronic Structure and Properties of Organic Bulk-Heterojunction Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Street, Robert A

    2016-05-01

    The electronic structure and physical mechanisms of carrier generation and transport in the organic bulk heterojunction are reviewed. The electronic structure describes the bands and band-tail states, the band alignment at the bulk-heterojunction interface, and the overall density-of-states model. The different electronic character of excitons and mobile charge is discussed, the former being highly molecular and the latter more delocalized. Dissociation of the exciton via the charge-transfer (CT) states is attributed to weak binding of the CT state arising from charge delocalization. Carrier transport and charge collection is strongly influenced by the presence of localized band-tail states. Recombination is attributed primarily to transitions from mobile carriers to band-tail or deep trap states. PMID:26603977

  7. Electron localization in a mixed-valence diniobium benzene complex

    DOE PAGES

    Gianetti, Thomas L.; Nocton, Grégory; Minasian, Stefan G.; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Kozimor, Stosh A.; Shuh, David K.; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Bergman, Robert G.; Arnold, John

    2014-11-11

    Reaction of the neutral diniobium benzene complex {[Nb(BDI)NtBu]2(μ-C6H6)} (BDI = N,N'-diisopropylbenzene-β-diketiminate) with Ag[B(C6F5)4] results in a single electron oxidation to produce a cationic diniobium arene complex, {[Nb(BDI)NtBu]2(μ-C6H6)}{B(C6F5)4}. Investigation of the solid state and solution phase structure using single-crystal X-ray diffraction, cyclic voltammetry, magnetic susceptibility, and multinuclear NMR spectroscopy indicates that the oxidation results in an asymmetric molecule with two chemically inequivalent Nb atoms. Further characterization using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, UV-visible, Nb L3,2-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), and EPR spectroscopies supports assignment of a diniobium complex, in which one Nb atom carries a single unpaired electron that ismore » not largely delocalized on the second Nb atom. During the oxidative transformation, one electron is removed from the δ-bonding HOMO, which causes a destabilization of the molecule and formation of an asymmetric product. Subsequent reactivity studies indicate that the oxidized product allows access to metal-based chemistry with substrates that did not exhibit reactivity with the starting neutral complex.« less

  8. Electron localization in a mixed-valence diniobium benzene complex

    SciTech Connect

    Gianetti, Thomas L.; Nocton, Grégory; Minasian, Stefan G.; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Kozimor, Stosh A.; Shuh, David K.; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Bergman, Robert G.; Arnold, John

    2014-11-11

    Reaction of the neutral diniobium benzene complex {[Nb(BDI)NtBu]2(μ-C6H6)} (BDI = N,N'-diisopropylbenzene-β-diketiminate) with Ag[B(C6F5)4] results in a single electron oxidation to produce a cationic diniobium arene complex, {[Nb(BDI)NtBu]2(μ-C6H6)}{B(C6F5)4}. Investigation of the solid state and solution phase structure using single-crystal X-ray diffraction, cyclic voltammetry, magnetic susceptibility, and multinuclear NMR spectroscopy indicates that the oxidation results in an asymmetric molecule with two chemically inequivalent Nb atoms. Further characterization using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, UV-visible, Nb L3,2-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), and EPR spectroscopies supports assignment of a diniobium complex, in which one Nb atom carries a single unpaired electron that is not largely delocalized on the second Nb atom. During the oxidative transformation, one electron is removed from the δ-bonding HOMO, which causes a destabilization of the molecule and formation of an asymmetric product. Subsequent reactivity studies indicate that the oxidized product allows access to metal-based chemistry with substrates that did not exhibit reactivity with the starting neutral complex.

  9. Crystal structure refinement from electron diffraction data

    SciTech Connect

    Dudka, A. P. Avilov, A. S.; Lepeshov, G. G.

    2008-05-15

    A procedure of crystal structure refinement from electron diffraction data is described. The electron diffraction data on polycrystalline films are processed taking into account possible overlap of reflections and two-beam interaction. The diffraction from individual single crystals in an electron microscope equipped with a precession attachment is described using the Bloch-wave method, which takes into account multibeam scattering, and a special approach taking into consideration the specific features of the diffraction geometry in the precession technique. Investigations were performed on LiF, NaF, CaF{sub 2}, and Si crystals. A method for reducing experimental data, which allows joint electron and X-ray diffraction study, is proposed.

  10. Evidence of local power deposition and electron heating by a standing electromagnetic wave in electron-cyclotron-resonance plasma.

    PubMed

    Durocher-Jean, A; Stafford, L; Dap, S; Makasheva, K; Clergereaux, R

    2014-09-01

    Microwave plasmas excited at electron-cyclotron resonance were studied in the 0.5-15 mTorr pressure range. In contrast with low-limit pressure conditions where the plasma emission highlights a fairly homogeneous spatial structure, a periodic spatial modulation (period ∼6.2 cm) appeared as pressure increased. This feature is ascribed to a local power deposition (related to the electron density) due to the presence of a standing electromagnetic wave created by the feed electromagnetic field (2.45 GHz) in the cavity formed by the reactor walls. Analysis of the electron energy probability function by Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy further revealed the presence of a high-energy tail that showed strong periodic spatial modulation at higher pressure. The spatial evolution of the electron density and of the characteristic temperature of these high-energy electrons coincides with the nodes (maximum) and antinodes (minimum) of the standing wave. These spatially-modulated power deposition and electron heating mechanisms are then discussed.

  11. Evidence of local power deposition and electron heating by a standing electromagnetic wave in electron-cyclotron-resonance plasma.

    PubMed

    Durocher-Jean, A; Stafford, L; Dap, S; Makasheva, K; Clergereaux, R

    2014-09-01

    Microwave plasmas excited at electron-cyclotron resonance were studied in the 0.5-15 mTorr pressure range. In contrast with low-limit pressure conditions where the plasma emission highlights a fairly homogeneous spatial structure, a periodic spatial modulation (period ∼6.2 cm) appeared as pressure increased. This feature is ascribed to a local power deposition (related to the electron density) due to the presence of a standing electromagnetic wave created by the feed electromagnetic field (2.45 GHz) in the cavity formed by the reactor walls. Analysis of the electron energy probability function by Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy further revealed the presence of a high-energy tail that showed strong periodic spatial modulation at higher pressure. The spatial evolution of the electron density and of the characteristic temperature of these high-energy electrons coincides with the nodes (maximum) and antinodes (minimum) of the standing wave. These spatially-modulated power deposition and electron heating mechanisms are then discussed. PMID:25314546

  12. Local electron-electron interaction strength in ferromagnetic nickel determined by spin-polarized positron annihilation.

    PubMed

    Ceeh, Hubert; Weber, Josef Andreas; Weber, Josef Andreass; Böni, Peter; Leitner, Michael; Benea, Diana; Chioncel, Liviu; Ebert, Hubert; Minár, Jan; Vollhardt, Dieter; Hugenschmidt, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    We employ a positron annihilation technique, the spin-polarized two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR), to measure the spin-difference spectra of ferromagnetic nickel. The experimental data are compared with the theoretical results obtained within a combination of the local spin density approximation (LSDA) and the many-body dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT). We find that the self-energy defining the electronic correlations in Ni leads to anisotropic contributions to the momentum distribution. By direct comparison of the theoretical and experimental results we determine the strength of the local electronic interaction U in ferromagnetic Ni as 2.0 ± 0.1 eV. PMID:26879249

  13. Local electron-electron interaction strength in ferromagnetic nickel determined by spin-polarized positron annihilation

    PubMed Central

    Ceeh, Hubert; Weber, Josef Andreass; Böni, Peter; Leitner, Michael; Benea, Diana; Chioncel, Liviu; Ebert, Hubert; Minár, Jan; Vollhardt, Dieter; Hugenschmidt, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    We employ a positron annihilation technique, the spin-polarized two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR), to measure the spin-difference spectra of ferromagnetic nickel. The experimental data are compared with the theoretical results obtained within a combination of the local spin density approximation (LSDA) and the many-body dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT). We find that the self-energy defining the electronic correlations in Ni leads to anisotropic contributions to the momentum distribution. By direct comparison of the theoretical and experimental results we determine the strength of the local electronic interaction U in ferromagnetic Ni as 2.0 ± 0.1 eV. PMID:26879249

  14. Electronic structure engineering of various structural phases of phosphorene.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Sumandeep; Kumar, Ashok; Srivastava, Sunita; Tankeshwar, K

    2016-07-21

    We report the tailoring of the electronic structures of various structural phases of phosphorene (α-P, β-P, γ-P and δ-P) based homo- and hetero-bilayers through in-plane mechanical strains, vertical pressure and transverse electric field by employing density functional theory. In-plane biaxial strains have considerably modified the electronic bandgap of both homo- and hetero-bilayers while vertical pressure induces metallization in the considered structures. The γ-P homo-bilayer structure showed the highest ultimate tensile strength (UTS ∼ 6.21 GPa) upon in-plane stretching. Upon application of a transverse electric field, the variation in the bandgap of hetero-bilayers was found to be strongly dependent on the polarity of the applied field which is attributed to the counterbalance between the external electric field and the internal field induced by different structural phases and heterogeneity in the arrangements of atoms of each surface of the hetero-bilayer system. Our results demonstrate that the electronic structures of the considered hetero- and homo-bilayers of phosphorene could be modified by biaxial strain, pressure and electric field to achieve the desired properties for future nano-electronic devices.

  15. [Localization of the apical foramen using the newest electronic instruments: stereomicroscopy and SEM (scanning electron microscopy)].

    PubMed

    Pagavino, G; Diamante, D; Marri, M; Pace, R

    1995-11-01

    Introduction of double impedence as new parameter in root canal length electronic measurement allowed first and second generation electronic apical localizers main problems overcoming: precision failure in presence of conducting fluids. Our study's purpose was an in vitro evaluation of two third generation instruments (Apit-Osada and Root ZX-Morita Corp.) ability in apical foramen localization using sodium hypoclorite as irrigating solution. 40 human monorooted teeth with immature apex were studied. 20 samples were measured by Apit and 20 by Root ZX; measurements were recorded when apical foramen was reached. Samples were fixed for stereomicroscope observation before and after apical 3 mm worn and prepared for SEM observation. Evaluations about each system's precision were made by calculating difference between foramen position determined by electronic localizer and its real anatomical position determined by a computed image analizing system linked to SEM. All measurements were included between a minimum value of -0.45 mm and a maximum value of 0.26 mm. Mann Whithney U test was performed to compare average values of the two sample groups but his was not meaningful (p = 0.18) showing that there is no valuable difference in accuracy between Apit and Root ZX. According to most researchers, who consider a +/- 0.5 mm error range clinically acceptable, and considering that in vitro measurements never exceded this limit value we conclude confirming both instruments' safety.

  16. Electronic structure of bacterial surface protein layers

    SciTech Connect

    Maslyuk, Volodymyr V.; Mertig, Ingrid; Bredow, Thomas; Mertig, Michael; Vyalikh, Denis V.; Molodtsov, Serguei L.

    2008-01-15

    We report an approach for the calculation of the electronic density of states of the dried two-dimensional crystalline surface protein layer (S layer) of the bacterium Bacillus sphaericus NCTC 9602. The proposed model is based on the consideration of individual amino acids in the corresponding conformation of the peptide chain which additively contribute to the electronic structure of the entire protein complex. The derived results agree well with the experimental data obtained by means of photoemission (PE), resonant PE, and near-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

  17. Electronic energy transfer: Localized operator partitioning of electronic energy in composite quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Yaser; Brumer, Paul

    2012-11-01

    A Hamiltonian based approach using spatially localized projection operators is introduced to give precise meaning to the chemically intuitive idea of the electronic energy on a quantum subsystem. This definition facilitates the study of electronic energy transfer in arbitrarily coupled quantum systems. In particular, the decomposition scheme can be applied to molecular components that are strongly interacting (with significant orbital overlap) as well as to isolated fragments. The result defines a consistent electronic energy at all internuclear distances, including the case of separated fragments, and reduces to the well-known Förster and Dexter results in their respective limits. Numerical calculations of coherent energy and charge transfer dynamics in simple model systems are presented and the effect of collisionally induced decoherence is examined.

  18. Electronic structure of substitutionally disordered alloys: Direct configurational averaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wolverton, C.; de Fontaine, D.; Dreysse, H.; Ceder, G.

    1992-04-01

    The method of direct configurational averaging (DCA) has been proposed to study the electronic structure of disordered alloys. Local density of states and band structure energies are obtained by averaging over a small number of configrations within a tight-binding Hamiltonian. Effective cluster interactions, the driving quantities for ordering in solids, are computed for various alloys using a tight-binding form of the linearized muffin-tin orbital method (TB-LMTO). The DCA calculations are used to determine various energetic and thermodynamic quantities for binary and ternasy alloys. (Pd, Rh, V).

  19. MAILROOM- A LOCAL AREA NETWORK ELECTRONIC MAIL PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiner, M. J.

    1994-01-01

    The Mailroom program is a Local Area Network (LAN) electronic mail program. It allows LAN users to electronically exchange notes, letters, reminders, or any sort of communication via their computer. The Mailroom program links all LAN users into a communication circle where messages can be created, sent, copied, printed, downloaded, uploaded, and deleted through a series of menu-driven screens. Mailroom includes a feature which allows users to determine if a message they have sent has been read by the receiver. Each user must be separately installed and removed from Mailroom as they join or leave the network. Mailroom comes with a program that accomplishes this with minimum of effort on the part of the Network Administrator/Manager. There is also a program that allows the Network Administrator/Manager to install Mailroom on each user's workstation so that on execution of Mailroom the user's station may be identified and the configurations settings activated. It will create its own configuration and data/supporting files during the setup and installation process. The Mailroom program is written in Microsoft QuickBasic. It was developed to run on networked IBM XT/ATs or compatibles and requires that all participating workstations share a common drive. It has been implemented under DOS 3.2 and has a memory requirement of 71K. Mailroom was developed in 1988.

  20. Electron density power spectrum in the local interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.; Rickett, B. J.; Spangler, S. R.

    1995-01-01

    Interstellar scintillation (ISS), fluctuations in the amplitude and phase of radio waves caused by scattering in the interstellar medium, is important as a diagnostic of interstellar plasma turbulence. ISS is also of interest because it is noise for other radio astronomical observations. The unifying concern is the power spectrum of the interstellar electron density. Here we use ISS observations through the nearby (less than or approximately =1 kpc) (ISM) to estimate the spectrum. From measurements of angular broadening of pulsars and extragalactic sources, decorrelation bandwidth of pulsars, refractive steering of features in pulsar dynamic spectra, dispersion measured fluctuations of pulsars, and refractive scintillation index measurements, we construct a composite structure function that is approximately power law over 2 x 10(exp 6) m less than scale less than 10(exp 13) m. The data are consistent with the structure function having a logarithmic slope versus baseline less than 2; thus there is a meaningful connection between scales in the radiowave fluctuation field and the scales in the electron density field causing the scattering. The data give an upper limit to the inner scale, l(sub o) less than or approximately 10(exp 8) m and are consistent with much smaller values. We construct a composite electron density spectrum that is approximately power law over at least the approximately = 5 decade wavenumber range 10(exp -13)/m less than wavenumber less than 10(exp -8)/m and that may extend to higher wavenumbers. The average spectral index of electron density over this wavenumber range is approximately = 3.7, very close to the value expected for a Kolmogorov process. The outer scale size, L(sub o), must be greater than or approximately = 10(exp 13) m (determined from dispersion measure fluctuations). When the ISS data are combined with measurements of differential Faraday rotation angle, and gradients in the average electron density, constraints can be put on the

  1. Probing Structural and Electronic Dynamics with Ultrafast Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Plemmons, DA; Suri, PK; Flannigan, DJ

    2015-05-12

    In this Perspective, we provide an overview,of the field of ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM). We begin by briefly discussing the emergence of methods for probing ultrafast structural dynamics and the information that can be obtained. Distinctions are drawn between the two main types a probes for femtosecond (fs) dynamics fast electrons and X-ray photons and emphasis is placed on hour the nature of charged particles is exploited in ultrafast electron-based' experiments:. Following this, we describe the versatility enabled by the ease with which electron trajectories and velocities can be manipulated with transmission electron microscopy (TEM): hardware configurations, and we emphasize how this is translated to the ability to measure scattering intensities in real, reciprocal, and energy space from presurveyed and selected rianoscale volumes. Owing to decades of ongoing research and development into TEM instrumentation combined with advances in specimen holder technology, comprehensive experiments can be conducted on a wide range of materials in various phases via in situ methods. Next, we describe the basic operating concepts, of UEM, and we emphasize that its development has led to extension of several of the formidable capabilities of TEM into the fs domain, dins increasing the accessible temporal parameter spade by several orders of magnitude. We then divide UEM studies into those conducted in real (imaging), reciprocal (diffraction), and energy (spectroscopy) spate. We begin each of these sections by providing a brief description of the basic operating principles and the types of information that can be gathered followed by descriptions of how these approaches are applied in UM, the type of specimen parameter space that can be probed, and an example of the types of dynamics that can be resolved. We conclude with an Outlook section, wherein we share our perspective on some future directions of the field pertaining to continued instrument development and

  2. Correlative infrared–electron nanoscopy reveals the local structure–conductivity relationship in zinc oxide nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Stiegler, J.M.; Tena-Zaera, R.; Idigoras, O.; Chuvilin, A.; Hillenbrand, R.

    2012-01-01

    High-resolution characterization methods play a key role in the development, analysis and optimization of nanoscale materials and devices. Because of the various material properties, only a combination of different characterization techniques provides a comprehensive understanding of complex functional materials. Here we introduce correlative infrared–electron nanoscopy, a novel method yielding transmission electron microscope and infrared near-field images of one and the same nanostructure. While transmission electron microscopy provides structural information up to the atomic level, infrared near-field imaging yields nanoscale maps of chemical composition and conductivity. We demonstrate the method's potential by studying the relation between conductivity and crystal structure in ZnO nanowire cross-sections. The combination of infrared conductivity maps and the local crystal structure reveals a radial free-carrier gradient, which inversely correlates to the density of extended crystalline defects. Our method opens new avenues for studying the local interplay between structure, conductivity and chemical composition in widely different material systems. PMID:23072801

  3. Electronic structure of self-assembled amorphous polyfluorenes.

    PubMed

    Kilina, Svetlana; Batista, Enrique R; Yang, Ping; Tretiak, Sergei; Saxena, Avadh; Martin, Richard L; Smith, Darryl L

    2008-07-01

    We investigate the role of conformational disorder and intermolecular interactions on the electronic structure of amorphous clusters of polyfluorenes. Classical molecular dynamics simulations are used to determine probable molecular geometries and chain packing, and first-principles density functional theory calculations are employed to determine electronic structure and orbital localization properties. Intramolecular and intermolecular effects are disentangled by contrasting results for densely packed oligomer clusters and for ensembles of isolated oligomers with the same intramolecular geometries. Our simulations show that intermolecular disorder allows for nearly planar configurations of interacting fluorenes compared to the isolated molecules. This rationalizes the experimentally detected formation of the planar crystalline morphologies that frequently accompany twisted glassy configurations in fluorene films. The energy gap (HOMO-LUMO gap) significantly decreases for planar configurations. The electron and hole orbital energies are strongly dependent on both torsional angles and intermolecular interactions. This leads to strong localization of electronic states in amorphous polymer aggregates, which is analyzed by examining the respective orbital participation ratios. Notably, the energies of unoccupied levels show stronger dependence on the conformational disorder, compared to that of occupied levels. This results in the more probable formation of trap states near the edge of the conduction band than near the valence band. PMID:19206305

  4. Electronic structure calculations on helical conducting polymers.

    PubMed

    Ripoll, Juan D; Serna, Andrei; Guerra, Doris; Restrepo, Albeiro

    2010-10-21

    We present a study of the electronic structure and derived properties of polyfurane (PFu), polypyrrol (PPy), and polythiophene (PTh). Two spatial arrangements are considered: trans chain (tc-PFu, tc-PPy, tc-PTh) and cis α-helical (α-PFu, α-PPy, α-PTh). Even at the small sizes considered here, helical conformations appear to be stable. Band gaps of pure, undoped oligomers fall into the semiconductor range. Density of states (DOS) analysis suggest dense valence and conduction bands. Bond length alternation analysis predicts almost complete delocalization of the π clouds in all spatial arrangements. Doping with electron donors or electron-withdrawing impurities reduces all band gaps close to the metallic regime in addition to increasing the DOS for the valence and conduction bands.

  5. Synthesis, electronic structure, and Raman scattering of phosphorous-doped single-wall carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Sumpter, Bobby G; Cruz Silva, Eduardo; Meunier, Vincent; Terrones Maldonado, Humberto; Terrones Maldonado, Mauricio; Campos-Delgado, Jessica; Jorio, Ado; Pimenta, M. A.; Rao, A. M.; Maciel, I. O.

    2009-01-01

    Substitutional phosphorous doping in single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is investigated by density functional theory and resonance Raman spectroscopy. Electronic structure calculations predict charge localization on the phosphorus atom, which is also responsible of generating non-dispersive valence and conduction bands close to the Fermi level. Analysis of electron and phonon renormalization in the double-resonance Raman process confirms the different nature of the phosphorous donor doping (localized) when compared to nitrogen substitutional doping (non-localized) in SWNTs.

  6. Electronic Structure of Iridium Clusters on Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Bradford A.; Bradley, Aaron J.; Ugeda, Miguel M.; Coh, Sinisa; Zettl, Alex; Crommie, Michael F.; Cohen, Marvin L.; Louie, Steven G.

    2015-03-01

    Graphene was predicted to exhibit non-trivial Z2 topology, but its exceedingly weak spin-orbit coupling prevented this from being observed. Previous theoretical work has proposed enhancing the spin-orbit coupling strength by depositing individual adatoms adsorbed onto the surface of graphene. We show experimental evidence that the iridium adatoms cluster, with a cluster size of at least two atoms. We investigate through theoretical calculations the orientation of the iridium dimers on graphene, contrast the electronic structure of iridium dimers with iridium monomers, and compare the theoretical iridium dimer electronic structure calculations with the experimental results determined via scanning tunneling spectroscopy. This work was supported by NSF Grant No. DMR10-1006184 and U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Computational resources have been provided by DOE at LBNL's NERSC facility.

  7. Electronic structure studies of topological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shuyun

    Three-dimensional (3D) Dirac fermions are a new class of topological quantum materials. In 3D Dirac semimetals, the conduction and valence bands touch each other at discrete points in the momentum space and show linear dispersions along all momentum directions, forming 3D Dirac cones which are protected by the crystal symmetry. Here I will present our recent studies of the electronic structures of novel materials which host 3D Dirac fermions by using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy.

  8. Structure and Electronic Properties of Polycrystalline Dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Mckenna, Keith P.; Shluger, AL

    2013-07-07

    We present an overview of the theoretical approaches that can be employed to model polycrystalline oxides along with a discussion of their limitations and associated challenges. We then present results for two metal oxide materials, MgO and HfO2, where theory and experiment have come together to provide insight into the structure and electronic properties of grain boundaries. Finally, we conclude with a discussion and outlook.

  9. Aromaticity of rings-in-molecules (RIMs) from electron localization-delocalization matrices (LDMs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumar, Ismat; Cook, Ronald; Ayers, Paul W.; Matta, Chérif F.

    2016-01-01

    A new and powerful molecular descriptor termed the LDM (localization-delocalization matrix) has recently been proposed as a molecular fingerprinting tool and has been shown to yield robust quantitative-structure-to-activity/property-relationships (QSAR/QSPR). An LDM lists the average number of electrons localized within an atom in a molecule along its diagonal while the off-diagonal elements are the pair-wise average number of electrons shared between every pair of atoms in the molecule, bonded or not. Hence, the LDM is a representation of a fuzzy molecular graph that accounts for the whereabouts of all electron(s) in the molecule and can be expected to encode for several facets of its chemistry at once. We show that the LDM captures the aromatic character of a ring-in-a-molecule by comparing the aromaticity ranking based on the LDMs and their eigenvalues of 6-membered carbon rings within (polycyclic) benzenoid hydrocarbons with the ranking based on four well-established local aromaticity measures (harmonic oscillator model of aromaticity, acromatic fluctuation index, para delocalization index, and nucleus independent chemical shift(0)). This paper is dedicated to the memory of Professor Paul von Ragué Schleyer (1930-2014).

  10. Local conservation laws and the structure of the many-body localized states.

    PubMed

    Serbyn, Maksym; Papić, Z; Abanin, Dmitry A

    2013-09-20

    We construct a complete set of local integrals of motion that characterize the many-body localized (MBL) phase. Our approach relies on the assumption that local perturbations act locally on the eigenstates in the MBL phase, which is supported by numerical simulations of the random-field XXZ spin chain. We describe the structure of the eigenstates in the MBL phase and discuss the implications of local conservation laws for its nonequilibrium quantum dynamics. We argue that the many-body localization can be used to protect coherence in the system by suppressing relaxation between eigenstates with different local integrals of motion.

  11. Controlling the Electronic Structure of Bilayer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Taisuke; Bostwick, Aaron; McChesney, Jessica; Seyller, Thomas; Horn, Karsten; Rotenberg, Eli

    2007-03-01

    Carbon-based materials such as carbon nanotubes, graphite intercalation compounds, fullerenes, and ultrathin graphite films exhibit many exotic phenomena such as superconductivity and an anomalous quantum Hall effect. These findings have caused renewed interest in the electronic structure of ultrathin layers of graphene: a single honeycomb carbon layer that is the building block for these materials. There is a strong motivation to incorporate graphene multilayers into atomic-scale devices, spurred on by rapid progress in their fabrication and manipulation. We have synthesized bilayer graphene thin films deposited on insulating silicon carbide and characterized their electronic band structure using angle-resolved photoemission. By selectively adjusting the carrier concentration in each layer, changes in the Coulomb potential led to control of the gap between valence and conduction bands [1]. This control over the band structure suggests the potential application of bilayer graphene to switching functions in atomic scale electronic devices. [1] T. Ohta, A. Bostwick, T. Seyller, K. Horn, E. Rotenberg, Science, 313, 951 (2006).

  12. Smart electronics and MEMS for aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadan, Vijay K.; Varadan, Vasundara V.

    1995-09-01

    In this paper, smart electronics and MEMS are employed to sense and control the drag in aircraft structures. The sensors are fabricated with interdigital transducers printed on a piezoelectric polymer. They in turn are mounted onto an ultra thin Penn State's novel RF antenna (Patent field). The sensor are designed to measure both pressure and shear of the fluid flow on aerospace structures. The wave form measurements may be monitored at a remote location either at the cockpit or elsewhere via the antennas in the sensors and an outside antenna. The integrated MEMS actuators which comprise of cantilever-, diaphram- and microbridge-based MEMS with suitable smart electronics etched onto the structure are controlled by the built-in antennas through feedback and feedforward control architecture. The integration of such materials and smart electronics into the skin of airfoil is ideal for sensing and controlling drag. The basic idea of this concept involves detection of the point of transition from laminar to turbulent flow and transmitting acoustical energy into the boundary layer so that the low energy fluid particles accelerate in the transverse direction and mix with the high energy flow outside of the boundary layer. 3D microriblets can be fabricated using stereo lithography and UV curable conducting polymers. The control of drag using these active microriblets are outlined.

  13. Electron transfer and localization in endohedral metallofullerenes: Ab initio density functional theory calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shenyuan; Yoon, Mina; Hicke, Christian; Zhang, Zhenyu; Wang, Enge

    2008-09-01

    Endohedral metallofullerenes constitute an appealing class of nanoscale building blocks for fabrication of a wide range of materials. One open question of fundamental importance is the precise nature of charge redistribution within the carbon cages (Cn) upon metal encapsulation. Using ab initio density functional theory, we systematically study the electronic structure of metallofullerenes, focusing on the spatial charge redistribution. For large metallofullerenes (n>32) , the valence electrons of the metal atoms are all transferred to the fullerene states. Surprisingly, the transferred charge is found to be highly localized inside the cage near the metal cations rather than uniformly distributed on the surfaces of the carbon cage as traditionally believed. This counterintuitive charge localization picture is attributed to the strong metal-cage interactions within the systems. These findings may prove to be instrumental in the design of fullerene-based functional nanomaterials.

  14. Localization and preparation of recombination-active extended defects for transmission electron microscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Falkenberg, M A; Schuhmann, H; Seibt, M; Radisch, V

    2010-06-01

    Recombination-active extended defects in semiconductors frequently occur at a low density which makes their structural and chemical analysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques virtually impossible. Here an approach is described that uses in situ electron beam induced current (EBIC) in a focused ion beam machine to localize such defects for TEM lamella preparation. As an example, a defect complex occurring in block-cast multicrystalline silicon with a density of less than 10(4) cm(-3) has been prepared and analyzed by TEM. The chemical sensitivity of the technique is estimated to be about 10(13) atoms cm(-2) which is comparable to synchrotron-based x-ray techniques. The localization accuracy of the TEM lamella is shown to be better than 50 nm when low-energy EBIC is used.

  15. Spatially Resolved Electronic Structures of Atomically Precise Armchair Graphene Nanoribbons

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Han; Wei, Dacheng; Sun, Jiatao; Wong, Swee Liang; Feng, Yuan Ping; Neto, A. H. Castro; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen

    2012-01-01

    Graphene has attracted much interest in both academia and industry. The challenge of making it semiconducting is crucial for applications in electronic devices. A promising approach is to reduce its physical size down to the nanometer scale. Here, we present the surface-assisted bottom-up fabrication of atomically precise armchair graphene nanoribbons (AGNRs) with predefined widths, namely 7-, 14- and 21-AGNRs, on Ag(111) as well as their spatially resolved width-dependent electronic structures. STM/STS measurements reveal their associated electron scattering patterns and the energy gaps over 1 eV. The mechanism to form such AGNRs is addressed based on the observed intermediate products. Our results provide new insights into the local properties of AGNRs, and have implications for the understanding of their electrical properties and potential applications. PMID:23248746

  16. Spatially Resolved Electronic Structures of Atomically Precise Armchair Graphene Nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Han; Wei, Dacheng; Sun, Jiatao; Wong, Swee Liang; Feng, Yuan Ping; Neto, A. H. Castro; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen

    2012-12-01

    Graphene has attracted much interest in both academia and industry. The challenge of making it semiconducting is crucial for applications in electronic devices. A promising approach is to reduce its physical size down to the nanometer scale. Here, we present the surface-assisted bottom-up fabrication of atomically precise armchair graphene nanoribbons (AGNRs) with predefined widths, namely 7-, 14- and 21-AGNRs, on Ag(111) as well as their spatially resolved width-dependent electronic structures. STM/STS measurements reveal their associated electron scattering patterns and the energy gaps over 1 eV. The mechanism to form such AGNRs is addressed based on the observed intermediate products. Our results provide new insights into the local properties of AGNRs, and have implications for the understanding of their electrical properties and potential applications.

  17. Electronic structure of solid uranium tetrafluoride UF4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teterin, A. Yu.; Teterin, Yu. A.; Maslakov, K. I.; Panov, A. D.; Ryzhkov, M. V.; Vukcevic, L.

    2006-07-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) and conversion electron spectra of the outer (0-15eV) and inner (15-40eV) valence electrons for UF4 were measured. Relativistic Xα discrete variation ( RXα DV) calculation data for the UF84-(C4v) cluster reflecting uranium close environment in solid UF4 were used for the quantitative interpretation of the fine spectral structure. Quantitative agreement between the experimental and theoretical data was established. The U5f electrons ( ≈1 U5f electron) were shown to participate directly in the chemical bond formation. This U 5 f electron was shown to be delocalized within the outer valence molecular orbitals (OVMO) range (1-15eV) . The other U5f electrons were shown to be localized and to participate weakly in the chemical bond formation. The XPS line associated with these electrons was observed at 3.8eV . The vacant U5f states are generally delocalized in the range of the low positive energies (0-7 eV). The contribution of the U6p electronic density to the molecular orbitals of UF4 was experimentally and theoretically evaluated. The U6p electrons were experimentally shown to participate significantly ( 0.6U6p electrons) in the formation of the OVMO beside the formation of the inner valence molecular orbitals (IVMO). IVMO composition and sequence order in the binding energy range 15-40eV in UF4 were determined.

  18. Invariant current approach to wave propagation in locally symmetric structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zampetakis, V. E.; Diakonou, M. K.; Morfonios, C. V.; Kalozoumis, P. A.; Diakonos, F. K.; Schmelcher, P.

    2016-05-01

    A theory for wave mechanical systems with local inversion and translation symmetries is developed employing the two-dimensional solution space of the stationary Schrödinger equation. The local symmetries of the potential are encoded into corresponding local basis vectors in terms of symmetry-induced two-point invariant currents which map the basis amplitudes between symmetry-related points. A universal wavefunction structure in locally symmetric potentials is revealed, independently of the physical boundary conditions, by using special local bases which are adapted to the existing local symmetries. The local symmetry bases enable efficient computation of spatially resolved wave amplitudes in systems with arbitrary combinations of local inversion and translation symmetries. The approach opens the perspective of a flexible analysis and control of wave localization in structurally complex systems.

  19. Delocalized and localized states of eg electrons in half-doped manganites.

    PubMed

    Winkler, E L; Tovar, M; Causa, M T

    2013-07-24

    We have studied the magnetic behaviour of half-doped manganite Y0.5Ca0.5MnO3 in an extended range of temperatures by means of magnetic susceptibility, χ(T), and electron spin resonance (ESR) experiments. At high temperature the system crystallizes in an orthorhombic structure. The resistivity value, ρ ≃ 0.05 Ω cm at 500 K, indicates a metallic behaviour, while the Curie-Weiss dependence of χ(T) and the thermal evolution of the ESR parameters are very well described by a model that considers a system conformed by localized Mn(4+) cores, [Formula: see text], and itinerant, eg, electrons. The strong coupling between t2g and eg electrons results in an enhanced Curie constant and an FM Curie-Weiss temperature that overcomes the AFM interactions between the [Formula: see text] cores. A transition to a more distorted phase is observed at T ≈ 500 K and signatures of localization of the eg electrons appear in the χ(T) behaviour below 300 K. A new Curie-Weiss regime is observed, where the Curie-constant value is consistent with dimer formation. Based on mean-field calculations, the dimer formation is predicted as a function of the interaction strength between the t2g and eg electrons.

  20. Electronic structure study of strongly correlated Mott-insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Quan

    Strongly correlated electronic systems have presented the most challenging problems to condensed matter theorists for many years and this continues to be the case. They are complicated materials with active d or f orbitals, whose valence electrons are in the intermediate region between itinerant (band-like) and highly localized (atomic-like) limits, which demand genuine many-body treatment. Although dealing with strongly correlated systems is a notorious problem, they have drawn broad interests of both theoretical and experimental condensed matter physicists, with intensive studies carried out in the past and present. This is due to the most exotic properties associated with strongly correlated materials, such as high-temperature superconductivity, metal-insulator transition, volume collapse, Kondo effect, colossal magnetoresistance, and many others. Although density functional theory (DFT) within local density approximation (LDA) is very successful in describing a wide range of materials, it encounters difficulty in predicting strongly correlated systems. Traditionally, they have been studied by model Hamiltonians with empirical parameters. The development of dynamical mean field theory (DMFT) and its marriage to DFT have brought new hope for first-principle study of strongly correlated systems. In this work, electronic structures of select strongly correlated systems are studied using LDA+DMFT. As theoretical backgrounds, reviews of DFT and DMFT are given in the first few chapters, where we also introduce the philosophy and workflow of LDA+DMFT. In the following chapters, applications to transition metal oxides, undoped high-temperature superconductors and actinide oxides are presented, where electronic structures of these materials and other properties derived from electronic structures are calculated and compared with experiments where available. Generally good agreements have been found between theory and experiments.

  1. Very Local Interstellar Spectra for Galactic Electrons, Protons and Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potgieter, Marius

    2014-10-01

    The local interstellar spectra (LIS) for cosmic rays at energies below ˜30 GeV/nuc are increasingly obscured from view at Earth by solar modulation, the lower the energy becomes. These charged particles encounter significant changes in the heliosphere, over an 11-year cycle, which include processes such as convection, diffusion, adiabatic energy losses and gradient, curvature and current sheet drifts. Particle drifts cause charge-sign-dependent modulation and a 22-year cycle, adding complexity to determining the respective very LIS from observations only at Earth. However, with measurements now made by the Voyager 1 spacecraft in the vicinity of the heliopause, it is possible to determine a very LIS for galactic electrons between ˜5 and ˜120 MeV. At these low energies, also galactic protons observed in the outer heliosphere had been completely obscured by the so-called anomalous component which is accelerated inside the heliosheath. Since August 2012, these anomalous cosmic rays are substantially depleted at Voyager 1 so that for cosmic ray ions, it is now possible to obtain a lower limit to their very LIS. Combining numerical modelling of solar modulation with the accurate measurements by the PAMELA mission and with Voyager observations, the lower limit of the very LIS for electrons, protons and helium and other ions can be determined from ˜5 MeV and above. These spectra are called heliopause spectra which is considered to be the lowest possible very LIS. Also, from an astrophysics point of view, the determination of what can be called a very LIS, not just an averaged galactic spectrum, is encouraging. The mentioned aspects are discussed, focusing on a comparison of recent heliospheric observations and corresponding solar modulation modelling.

  2. Phase Diagram and Electronic Structure of Praseodymium and Plutonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanatà, Nicola; Yao, Yongxin; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Ho, Kai-Ming; Kotliar, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    We develop a new implementation of the Gutzwiller approximation in combination with the local density approximation, which enables us to study complex 4 f and 5 f systems beyond the reach of previous approaches. We calculate from first principles the zero-temperature phase diagram and electronic structure of Pr and Pu, finding good agreement with the experiments. Our study of Pr indicates that its pressure-induced volume-collapse transition would not occur without change of lattice structure—contrarily to Ce. Our study of Pu shows that the most important effect originating the differentiation between the equilibrium densities of its allotropes is the competition between the Peierls effect and the Madelung interaction and not the dependence of the electron correlations on the lattice structure.

  3. Electronic structure of interfaces between hexagonal and rhombohedral graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taut, M.; Koepernik, K.

    2016-07-01

    An analysis of the electronic structure of interfaces between hexagonal (A B ) and rhombohedral (A B C ) graphite based on density functional theory is presented. Both of the two simplest interface structures host (localized) interface bands, which are located around the K point in the Brillouin zone, and which give rise to strong peaks in the density of states at the Fermi level. All interface bands near the Fermi energy are localized at monomers (single atoms with dangling pz orbitals), whereas those around 0.5 eV belong to pz-bonded trimers, which are introduced by the interface and which are not found in the two adjacent bulk substances. There is also an interface band at the (A B ) side of the interface which resembles one of the interface states near a stacking fault in (A B ) graphite.

  4. Electronic structure theory of the superheavy elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliav, Ephraim; Fritzsche, Stephan; Kaldor, Uzi

    2015-12-01

    High-accuracy calculations of atomic properties of the superheavy elements (SHE) up to element 122 are reviewed. The properties discussed include ionization potentials, electron affinities and excitation energies, which are associated with the spectroscopic and chemical behavior of these elements, and are therefore of considerable interest. Accurate predictions of these quantities require high-order inclusion of relativity and electron correlation, as well as large, converged basis sets. The Dirac-Coulomb-Breit Hamiltonian, which includes all terms up to second order in the fine-structure constant α, serves as the framework for the treatment; higher-order Lamb shift terms are considered in some selected cases. Electron correlation is treated by either the multiconfiguration self-consistent-field approach or by Fock-space coupled cluster theory. The latter is enhanced by the intermediate Hamiltonian scheme, allowing the use of larger model (P) spaces. The quality of the calculations is assessed by applying the same methods to lighter homologs of the SHEs and comparing with available experimental information. Very good agreement is obtained, within a few hundredths of an eV, and similar accuracy is expected for the SHEs. Many of the properties predicted for the SHEs differ significantly from what may be expected by straightforward extrapolation of lighter homologs, demonstrating that the structure and chemistry of SHEs are strongly affected by relativity. The major scientific challenge of the calculations is to find the electronic structure and basic atomic properties of the SHE and assign its proper place in the periodic table. Significant recent developments include joint experimental-computational studies of the excitation spectrum of Fm and the ionization energy of Lr, with excellent agreement of experiment and theory, auguring well for the future of research in the field.

  5. Resolving Presynaptic Structure by Electron Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Guy A.; Jackson, Dakota R.; Spirou, George A.

    2016-01-01

    A key goal in neurobiology is to generate a theoretical framework that merges structural, physiological and molecular explanations of brain function. These categories of explanation do not advance in synchrony; advances in one category define new experiments in other categories. For example, the synapse was defined physiologically and biochemically before it was visualized using electron microscopy. Indeed, the original descriptions of synapses in the 1950s were lent credence by the presence of spherical vesicles in presynaptic terminals that were considered to be the substrate for quantal neurotransmission. In the last few decades, our understanding of synaptic function has again been driven by physiological and molecular techniques. The key molecular players for synaptic vesicle structure, mobility and fusion were identified and applications of the patch clamp technique permitted physiological estimation of neurotransmitter release and receptor properties. These advances demand higher resolution structural images of synapses. During the 1990s a second renaissance in cell biology driven by EM was fueled by improved techniques for electron tomography (ET) with the ability to compute virtual images with nm resolution between image planes. Over the last fifteen years, ET has been applied to the presynaptic terminal with special attention to the active zone and organelles of the nerve terminal. In this review, we first summarize the technical improvements that have led to a resurgence in utilization of ET and then we summarize new insights gained by the application of ET to reveal the high-resolution structure of the nerve terminal. PMID:25683026

  6. Electronic structure and crystal phase stability of palladium hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Houari, Abdesalem; Matar, Samir F.; Eyert, Volker

    2014-11-07

    The results of electronic structure calculations for a variety of palladium hydrides are presented. The calculations are based on density functional theory and used different local and semilocal approximations. The thermodynamic stability of all structures as well as the electronic and chemical bonding properties are addressed. For the monohydride, taking into account the zero-point energy is important to identify the octahedral Pd-H arrangement with its larger voids and, hence, softer hydrogen vibrational modes as favorable over the tetrahedral arrangement as found in the zincblende and wurtzite structures. Stabilization of the rocksalt structure is due to strong bonding of the 4d and 1s orbitals, which form a characteristic split-off band separated from the main d-band group. Increased filling of the formerly pure d states of the metal causes strong reduction of the density of states at the Fermi energy, which undermines possible long-range ferromagnetic order otherwise favored by strong magnetovolume effects. For the dihydride, octahedral Pd-H arrangement as realized, e.g., in the pyrite structure turns out to be unstable against tetrahedral arrangement as found in the fluorite structure. Yet, from both heat of formation and chemical bonding considerations, the dihydride turns out to be less favorable than the monohydride. Finally, the vacancy ordered defect phase Pd{sub 3}H{sub 4} follows the general trend of favoring the octahedral arrangement of the rocksalt structure for Pd:H ratios less or equal to one.

  7. The structure of the hydrated electron in bulk and at interfaces: Does the hydrated electron occupy a cavity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, Jennifer Ryan

    Since its discovery over fifty years ago, the hydrated electron has been the subject of much interest. Hydrated electrons, which are free electrons in water, are found in fields ranging from biochemistry to radiation chemistry, so it is important that we understand the structure and dynamics of this species. Because of its high reactivity, the hydrated electron's structure has proven difficult to pin down, especially its molecular details. One-electron mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics simulations have proven useful in helping elucidate the structure of the hydrated electron. The picture most commonly presented from these studies is one of the electron residing in a cavity, disrupting the local water structure much like an anion the size of bromide. Our group has recently proposed a completely different structure for the hydrated electron, which arose from rigorous calculations of a new electron-water potential. The picture that emerged was of an electron that does not occupy a cavity but instead draws water within itself; this non-cavity electron resides in a region of enhanced water density. The one-electron cavity and non-cavity models all predict similar experimental observables that probe the electronic structure of the hydrated electron, such as the optical absorption spectrum, which makes it difficult to determine which model most accurately describes the true structure of the hydrated electron. In this thesis, we work to calculate experimental observables for various simulated cavity and non-cavity models that are particularly sensitive to the local water structure near the electron, in an effort to distinguish the various models from each other. Two particular observables we are interested in are the resonance Raman spectrum and the temperature dependent optical absorption spectrum of the hydrated electron. We find that for both of these experiments, only the non-cavity model has qualitative agreement with experiment; the cavity models miss the

  8. Structures of Local Rearrangements in Soft Colloidal Glasses.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiunan; Liu, Rui; Yang, Mingcheng; Wang, Wei-Hua; Chen, Ke

    2016-06-10

    We image local structural rearrangements in soft colloidal glasses under small periodic perturbations induced by thermal cycling. Local structural entropy S_{2} positively correlates with observed rearrangements in colloidal glasses. The high S_{2} values of the rearranging clusters in glasses indicate that fragile regions in glasses are structurally less correlated, similar to structural defects in crystalline solids. Slow-evolving high S_{2} spots are capable of predicting local rearrangements long before the relaxations occur, while fluctuation-created high S_{2} spots best correlate with local deformations right before the rearrangement events. Local free volumes are also found to correlate with particle rearrangements at extreme values, although the ability to identify relaxation sites is substantially lower than S_{2}. Our experiments provide an efficient structural identifier for the fragile regions in glasses and highlight the important role of structural correlations in the physics of glasses. PMID:27341261

  9. Localized heating of electrons in ionization zones: Going beyond the Penning-Thornton paradigm in magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2014-12-07

    The fundamental question of how energy is supplied to a magnetron discharge is commonly answered by the Penning-Thornton paradigm invoking secondary electrons. Huo et al. (Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 22, 045005, (2013)) used a global discharge model to show that electron heating in the electric field of the magnetic presheath is dominant. In this contribution, this concept is applied locally taking into account the electric potential structure of ionization zones. Images of ionization zones can and should be interpreted as diagrams of the localization of electric potential and related electron energy, where certain collisions promote or dampen their formation.

  10. Thermal transfer structures coupling electronics card(s) to coolant-cooled structure(s)

    DOEpatents

    David, Milnes P; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Parida, Pritish R; Schmidt, Roger R

    2014-12-16

    Cooling apparatuses and coolant-cooled electronic systems are provided which include thermal transfer structures configured to engage with a spring force one or more electronics cards with docking of the electronics card(s) within a respective socket(s) of the electronic system. A thermal transfer structure of the cooling apparatus includes a thermal spreader having a first thermal conduction surface, and a thermally conductive spring assembly coupled to the conduction surface of the thermal spreader and positioned and configured to reside between and physically couple a first surface of an electronics card to the first surface of the thermal spreader with docking of the electronics card within a socket of the electronic system. The thermal transfer structure is, in one embodiment, metallurgically bonded to a coolant-cooled structure and facilitates transfer of heat from the electronics card to coolant flowing through the coolant-cooled structure.

  11. Weak localization and electron-electron interactions in indium-doped ZnO nanowires.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Richard S; Li, Dongdong; Witte, Christopher M; Lu, Jia G

    2009-12-01

    Single crystal ZnO nanowires doped with indium are synthesized via the laser-assisted chemical vapor deposition method. The conductivity of the nanowires is measured at low temperatures in magnetic fields with directions both perpendicular and parallel to the wire axes. A quantitative fit of our data is obtained, consistent with the theory of a quasi-one-dimensional metallic system with quantum corrections due to weak localization and electron-electron interactions. The anisotropy of the magneto-conductivity agrees with theory. The two quantum corrections are of approximately equal magnitude with respective temperature dependences of T(-1/3)and T(-1/2). The alternative model of quasi-two-dimensional surface conductivity is excluded by the absence of oscillations in the magneto-conductivity in parallel magnetic fields. PMID:19831413

  12. Direct observations of local electronic states in an Al-based quasicrystal by STEM-EELS.

    PubMed

    Seki, Takehito; Abe, Eiji

    2014-11-01

    Most quasicrystals (QCs) reveal pseudogaps in their density of states around Fermi level, and hence the stability of QCs have been discussed in terms of energetic gains in electron systems. In fact, many QCs have been discovered by tuning valence electron density based on Hume-Rothery rule. Therefore, understanding electronic structures in QCs may provide an important clue for their stabilization mechanism. Generally, it has been frequently discussed based on an interaction between Fermi surface and Brillouin zone boundary within the framework of nearly free electron model, which is believed to be an underlying physics of a Hume-Rothery's empirical criteria. However the hybridization effect also stabilize electron system, particularly in Al-transition metal system, in which a lot of quasicrystalline phases were discovered. Therefore, the electronic structures of QCs have not yet been fully understood, whereas their atomic structures have been studied well in terms of configuration entropy by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) [1]. In the present work, we investigate local electronic states in Al-based QCs using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) combined with STEM, by which EELS spectra with sub-Å probe and atomic structure can be obtained simultaneously. We report STEM-EELS results on AlCuIr decagonal phases [2].jmicro;63/suppl_1/i17-a/DFU069F1F1DFU069F1Fig. 1.Core-loss edges obtained from cluster-centers and cluster-edges. Al L1 (left) Ir O23, Ir N67 (center) and Cu L23 (right). Principal components analysis clearly shows up the atomic-site dependence of plasmon loss spectra in a two-dimensional map. Qualitatively, there seems to be certain correlations between the plasmon peaks and the core-loss edges, Al L1, Ir O23, Ir N67 and Cu L23, all of which reveal different behaviors at the cluster centers and the edges (Fig. 1). All results indicate the cluster centers have metallic states and the cluster edges have covalent states in comparison

  13. Electronic structure interpolation via atomic orbitals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mohan; Guo, G-C; He, Lixin

    2011-08-17

    We present an efficient scheme for accurate electronic structure interpolation based on systematically improvable optimized atomic orbitals. The atomic orbitals are generated by minimizing the spillage value between the atomic basis calculations and the converged plane wave basis calculations on some coarse k-point grid. They are then used to calculate the band structure of the full Brillouin zone using the linear combination of atomic orbitals algorithms. We find that usually 16-25 orbitals per atom can give an accuracy of about 10 meV compared to the full ab initio calculations, and the accuracy can be systematically improved by using more atomic orbitals. The scheme is easy to implement and robust, and works equally well for metallic systems and systems with complicated band structures. Furthermore, the atomic orbitals have much better transferability than Shirley's basis and Wannier functions, which is very useful for perturbation calculations.

  14. Localized reconstruction of subunits from electron cryomicroscopy images of macromolecular complexes

    PubMed Central

    Ilca, Serban L.; Kotecha, Abhay; Sun, Xiaoyu; Poranen, Minna M.; Stuart, David I.; Huiskonen, Juha T.

    2015-01-01

    Electron cryomicroscopy can yield near-atomic resolution structures of highly ordered macromolecular complexes. Often however some subunits bind in a flexible manner, have different symmetry from the rest of the complex, or are present in sub-stoichiometric amounts, limiting the attainable resolution. Here we report a general method for the localized three-dimensional reconstruction of such subunits. After determining the particle orientations, local areas corresponding to the subunits can be extracted and treated as single particles. We demonstrate the method using three examples including a flexible assembly and complexes harbouring subunits with either partial occupancy or mismatched symmetry. Most notably, the method allows accurate fitting of the monomeric RNA-dependent RNA polymerase bound at the threefold axis of symmetry inside a viral capsid, revealing for the first time its exact orientation and interactions with the capsid proteins. Localized reconstruction is expected to provide novel biological insights in a range of challenging biological systems. PMID:26534841

  15. Electronic structure and bonding in crystalline peroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Königstein, Markus; Sokol, Alexei A.; Catlow, C. Richard A.

    1999-08-01

    Hartree-Fock and density-functional PW91 theories as realized in the CRYSTAL95 code have been applied to investigate the structural and electronic properties of Ba, Sr, and Ca peroxide materials with the calcium carbide crystal structure, results for which are compared with those for the corresponding oxides. Special attention is paid to the stabilization of the peroxide molecular ion O2-2 in the ionic environment provided by the lattice, and to chemical bonding effects. In order to describe the covalent bonding within the O2-2 ion and the polarization of the O- ion in the crystal electrostatic field, it is essential to include an account of the effects of electron correlation. The PW91 density functional has allowed us to reproduce the crystallographic parameters within a 3% error. The chemical bonding within the peroxide molecular ion has a complex nature with a balance between the weak covalent bond of σz type and the strong electrostatic repulsion of the closed-shell electron groups occupying O 2s and O 2px and 2py states. Compression of the peroxide ion in the ionic crystals gives rise to an excessive overlap of the O 2s closed shells of the two O- ions of a peroxide molecular ion O2-2, which in turn determines the antibonding character of the interaction and chemical bonding in the O2-2 molecular ion.

  16. Local structure of solid Rb at megabar pressures

    SciTech Connect

    De Panfilis, S.; Gorelli, F.; Santoro, M.; Ulivi, L.; Gregoryanz, E.; Irifune, T.; Shinmei, T.; Kantor, I.; Mathon, O.; Pascarelli, S.

    2015-06-07

    We have investigated the local and electronic structure of solid rubidium by means of x-ray absorption spectroscopy up to 101.0 GPa, thus doubling the maximum investigated experimental pressure. This study confirms the predicted stability of phase VI and was completed by the combination of two pivotal instrumental solutions. On one side, we made use of nanocrystalline diamond anvils, which, contrary to the more commonly used single crystal diamond anvils, do not generate sharp Bragg peaks (glitches) at specific energies that spoil the weak fine structure oscillations in the x-ray absorption cross section. Second, we exploited the performance of a state-of-the-art x-ray focussing device yielding a beam spot size of 5 × 5 μm{sup 2}, spatially stable over the entire energy scan. An advanced data analysis protocol was implemented to extract the pressure dependence of the structural parameters in phase VI of solid Rb from 51.2 GPa up to the highest pressure. A continuous reduction of the nearest neighbour distances was observed, reaching about 6% over the probed pressure range. We also discuss a phenomenological model based on the Einstein approximation to describe the pressure behaviour of the mean-square relative displacement. Within this simplified scheme, we estimate the Grüneisen parameter for this high pressure Rb phase to be in the 1.3–1.5 interval.

  17. Extraordinary electronic properties in uncommon structure types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mazhar Nawaz

    In this thesis I present the results of explorations into several uncommon structure types. In Chapter 1 I go through the underlying idea of how we search for new compounds with exotic properties in solid state chemistry. The ideas of exploring uncommon structure types, building up from the simple to the complex, using chemical intuition and thinking by analogy are discussed. Also, the history and basic concepts of superconductivity, Dirac semimetals, and magnetoresistance are briefly reviewed. In chapter 2, the 1s-InTaS2 structural family is introduced along with the discovery of a new member of the family, Ag0:79VS2; the synthesis, structure, and physical properties of two different polymorphs of the material are detailed. Also in this chapter, we report the observation of superconductivity in another 1s structure, PbTaSe2. This material is especially interesting due to it being very heavy (resulting in very strong spin orbit coulping (SOC)), layered, and noncentrosymmetric. Electronic structure calculations reveal the presence of a bulk 3D Dirac cone (very similar to graphene) that is gapped by SOC originating from the hexagonal Pb layer. In Chapter 3 we show the re-investigation of the crystal structure of the 3D Dirac semimetal, Cd3As2. It is found to be centrosymmetric, rather than noncentrosymmetric, and as such all bands are spin degenerate and there is a 4-fold degenerate bulk Dirac point at the Fermi level, making Cd3As2 a 3D electronic analog to graphene. Also, for the first time, scanning tunneling microscopy experiments identify a 2x2 surface reconstruction in what we identify as the (112) cleavage plane of single crystals; needle crystals grow with a [110] long axis direction. Lastly, in chapter 4 we report the discovery of "titanic" (sadly dubbed ⪉rge, nonsaturating" by Nature editors and given the acronym XMR) magnetoresistance (MR) in the non-magnetic, noncentrosymmetric, layered transition metal dichalcogenide WTe2; over 13 million% at 0.53 K in

  18. Optical Evidence of Itinerant-Localized Crossover of 4f Electrons in Cerium Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Shin-ichi; Kwon, Yong Seung; Matsumoto, Yuji; Aoki, Haruyoshi; Sakai, Osamu

    2016-08-01

    Cerium (Ce)-based heavy-fermion materials have a characteristic double-peak structure (mid-IR peak) in the optical conductivity [σ(ω)] spectra originating from the strong conduction (c)-f electron hybridization. To clarify the behavior of the mid-IR peak at a low c-f hybridization strength, we compared the σ(ω) spectra of the isostructural antiferromagnetic and heavy-fermion Ce compounds with the calculated unoccupied density of states and the spectra obtained from the impurity Anderson model. With decreasing c-f hybridization intensity, the mid-IR peak shifts to the low-energy side owing to the renormalization of the unoccupied 4f state, but suddenly shifts to the high-energy side owing to the f-f on-site Coulomb interaction at a slight localized side from the quantum critical point (QCP). This finding gives us information on the change in the electronic structure across QCP.

  19. Pu electronic structure and photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, John J; Durakiewicz, Tomasz; Graham, Kevin S; Bauer, Eric D; Moore, David P; Mitchell, Jeremy N; Kennison, John A; Martin, Richard L; Roy, Lindsay E; Scuseria, G. E.

    2010-01-01

    The electronic structure of PuCoGa{sub 5}, Pu metal, and PuO{sub 2} is explored using photoelectron spectroscopy. Ground state electronic properties are inferred from temperature dependent photoemission near the Fermi energy for Pu metal. Angle-resolved photoemission details the energy vs. crystaJ momentum landscape near the Fermi energy for PuCoGa{sub 5} which shows significant dispersion in the quasiparticle peak near the Fermi energy. For the Mott insulators AnO{sub 2}(An = U, Pu) the photoemission results are compared against hybrid functional calculations and the model prediction of a cross over from ionic to covalent bonding is found to be reasonable.

  20. Electronic Structure of II-Vi Semiconductors and Their Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Su-Huai

    The II-VI semiconductors ZnXVI, CdXVI, and HgXVI are known to have a metal d band inside the main valence band. Using all-electron self-consistent electronic structure techniques, we study their effects on valence properties. For II-VI semiconductors, we find that p-d repulsion and hybridization (i) lower the band gaps, (ii) alter the sign of the crystal-field splitting, (iii) reduce the spin-orbit splitting, (iv) change the valence band offset between common-anion semiconductors, and (v) increase the equilibrium lattice parameters, p-d repulsion is also shown to be responsible for the anomalously small band gaps in chalcopyrites, and for the negative exchange splitting in MnTe. We also study the electronic structure of ordered and random II-VI substitutional alloys and identify the mechanism for their band gap narrowing. The random {A_{1-x}^{II}B_{x}^{II}C^{VI}} alloys are represented by the "special quasirandom structures." We show how chemical and structural perturbations lead to (i) distinct A-like and B-like features in the density of states and (ii) different C-like features associated with fluctuations in the local environments around the common sublattice.

  1. Electronic structure and electron energy-loss spectroscopy of ZrO2 zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, L. K.; Vast, Nathalie; Baranek, Philippe; Cheynet, Marie-Claude; Reining, Lucia

    2004-12-01

    The atomic and electronic structures of zirconia are calculated within density functional theory, and their evolution is analyzed as the crystal-field symmetry changes from tetrahedral [cubic (c-ZrO2) and tetragonal (t-ZrO2) phases] to octahedral (hypothetical rutile ZrO2 ), to a mixing of these symmetries (monoclinic phase, m-ZrO2 ). We find that the theoretical bulk modulus in c-ZrO2 is 30% larger than the experimental value, showing that the introduction of yttria in zirconia has a significant effect. Electronic structure fingerprints which characterize each phase from their electronic spectra are identified. We have carried out electron energy-loss spectroscopy experiments at low momentum transfer and compared these results to the theoretical spectra calculated within the random phase approximation. We show a dependence of the valence and 4p ( N2,3 edge) plasmons on the crystal structure, the dependence of the latter being brought into the spectra by local-field effects. Last, we attribute low energy excitations observed in EELS of m-ZrO2 to defect states 2eV above the top of the intrinsic valence band, and the EELS fundamental band gap value is reconciled with the 5.2 or 5.8eV gaps determined by vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy.

  2. Effects of xenon insertion into hydrogen bromide. Comparison of the electronic structure of the HBr···CO2 and HXeBr···CO2 complexes using quantum chemical topology methods: electron localization function, atoms in molecules and symmetry adapted perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Makarewicz, Emilia; Gordon, Agnieszka J; Mierzwicki, Krzysztof; Latajka, Zdzislaw; Berski, Slawomir

    2014-06-01

    Quantum chemistry methods have been applied to study the influence of the Xe atom inserted into the hydrogen-bromine bond (HBr → HXeBr), particularly on the nature of atomic interactions in the HBr···CO2 and HXeBr···CO2 complexes. Detailed analysis of the nature of chemical bonds has been carried out using topological analysis of the electron localization function, while topological analysis of electron density was used to gain insight into the nature of weak nonbonding interactions. Symmetry-adapted perturbation theory within the orbital approach was applied for greater understanding of the physical contributions to the total interaction energy.

  3. Electronic Structure of Buried Interfaces - Oral Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, Zachary

    2015-08-25

    In the electronics behind computer memory storage, the speed and size are dictated by the performance of permanent magnets inside devices called read heads. Complicated magnets made of stacked layers of thin films can be engineered to have properties that yield more energy storage and faster switching times compared to conventional iron or cobalt magnets. The reason is that magnetism is a result of subtle interactions amongst electrons; just how neurons come together on large scales to make cat brains and dog brains, ensembles of electrons interact and become ferromagnets and paramagnets. These interactions make magnets too difficult to study in their entirety, so I focus on the interfaces between layers, which are responsible for the coupling materials physicists hope to exploit to produce next-generation magnets. This project, I study a transition metal oxide material called LSCO, Lanthanum Cobaltite, which can be a paramagnet or a ferromagnet depending on how you tweak the electronic structure. It exhibits an exciting behavior: its sum is greater than the sum of its parts. When another similar material called a LSMO, Lanthanum Manganite, is grown on top of it, their interface has a different type of magnetism from the LSCO or the LSMO! I hope to explain this by demonstrating differently charged ions in the interface. The typical method for quantifying this is x-ray absorption, but all conventional techniques look at every layer simultaneously, averaging the interfaces and the LSCO layers that we want to characterize separately. Instead, I must use a new reflectivity technique, which tracks the intensity of reflected x-rays at different angles, at energies near the absorption peaks of certain elements, to track changes in the electronic structure of the material. The samples were grown by collaborators at the Takamura group at U.C. Davis and probed with this “resonant reflectivity” technique on Beamline 2-1 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

  4. Analysis of the electronic structure of crystals through band structure unfolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordienko, A. B.; Kosobutsky, A. V.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we consider an alternative implementation of the band structure unfolding method within the framework of the density functional theory, which combines the advantages of the basis of localized functions and plane waves. This approach has been used to analyze the electronic structure of the ordered CuCl x Br1- x copper halide alloys and F 0 center in MgO that enables us to reveal qualitatively the features remaining hidden when using the standard supercell method, because of the complex band structure of systems with defects.

  5. Criticality of the electron-nucleus cusp condition to local effective potential-energy theories

    SciTech Connect

    Pan Xiaoyin; Sahni, Viraht

    2003-01-01

    Local(multiplicative) effective potential energy-theories of electronic structure comprise the transformation of the Schroedinger equation for interacting Fermi systems to model noninteracting Fermi or Bose systems whereby the equivalent density and energy are obtained. By employing the integrated form of the Kato electron-nucleus cusp condition, we prove that the effective electron-interaction potential energy of these model fermions or bosons is finite at a nucleus. The proof is general and valid for arbitrary system whether it be atomic, molecular, or solid state, and for arbitrary state and symmetry. This then provides justification for all prior work in the literature based on the assumption of finiteness of this potential energy at a nucleus. We further demonstrate the criticality of the electron-nucleus cusp condition to such theories by an example of the hydrogen molecule. We show thereby that both model system effective electron-interaction potential energies, as determined from densities derived from accurate wave functions, will be singular at the nucleus unless the wave function satisfies the electron-nucleus cusp condition.

  6. Electronic structure and optical properties of resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Zhi-Fan; Zhou, Rong-Feng

    2013-03-01

    We used the density of functional theory (DFT) to study the electronic structure and density of states of resin by ab initio calculation. The results show the band gap of resin is 1.7 eV. The covalent bond is combined C/O atoms with H atoms. The O 2p orbital is the biggest effect near the Fermi level. The results of optical properties show the reflectivity is low, and the refractive index is 1.7 in visible light range. The highest absorption coefficient peak is in 490 nm and the value is 75,000.

  7. 8th international conference on electronic spectroscopy and structure

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Art

    2000-10-16

    Gathering from 33 countries around the world, 408 registrants and a number of local drop-in participants descended on the Clark Kerr Campus of the University of California, Berkeley, from Monday, August 7 through Saturday, August 12, 2000 for the Eighth International Conference on Electronic Structure and Spectroscopy (ICESS8). At the conference, participants benefited from an extensive scientific program comprising more than 100 oral presentations (plenary lectures and invited and contributed talks) and 330 poster presentations, as well as ample time for socializing and a tour of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at the nearby Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  8. Local structure of equality constrained NLP problems

    SciTech Connect

    Mari, J.

    1994-12-31

    We show that locally around a feasible point, the behavior of an equality constrained nonlinear program is described by the gradient and the Hessian of the Lagrangian on the tangent subspace. In particular this holds true for reduced gradient approaches. Applying the same ideas to the control of nonlinear ODE:s, one can device first and second order methods that can be applied also to stiff problems. We finally describe an application of these ideas to the optimization of the production of human growth factor by fed-batch fermentation.

  9. Femtosecond X-ray absorption study of electron localization in photoexcited anatase TiO2

    PubMed Central

    Santomauro, F. G.; Lübcke, A.; Rittmann, J.; Baldini, E.; Ferrer, A.; Silatani, M.; Zimmermann, P.; Grübel, S.; Johnson, J. A.; Mariager, S. O.; Beaud, P.; Grolimund, D.; Borca, C.; Ingold, G.; Johnson, S.L.; Chergui, M.

    2015-01-01

    Transition metal oxides are among the most promising solar materials, whose properties rely on the generation, transport and trapping of charge carriers (electrons and holes). Identifying the latter’s dynamics at room temperature requires tools that combine elemental and structural sensitivity, with the atomic scale resolution of time (femtoseconds, fs). Here, we use fs Ti K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) upon 3.49 eV (355 nm) excitation of aqueous colloidal anatase titanium dioxide nanoparticles to probe the trapping dynamics of photogenerated electrons. We find that their localization at Titanium atoms occurs in <300 fs, forming Ti3+ centres, in or near the unit cell where the electron is created. We conclude that electron localization is due to its trapping at pentacoordinated sites, mostly present in the surface shell region. The present demonstration of fs hard X-ray absorption capabilities opens the way to a detailed description of the charge carrier dynamics in transition metal oxides. PMID:26437873

  10. Femtosecond X-ray absorption study of electron localization in photoexcited anatase TiO2.

    PubMed

    Santomauro, F G; Lübcke, A; Rittmann, J; Baldini, E; Ferrer, A; Silatani, M; Zimmermann, P; Grübel, S; Johnson, J A; Mariager, S O; Beaud, P; Grolimund, D; Borca, C; Ingold, G; Johnson, S L; Chergui, M

    2015-10-06

    Transition metal oxides are among the most promising solar materials, whose properties rely on the generation, transport and trapping of charge carriers (electrons and holes). Identifying the latter's dynamics at room temperature requires tools that combine elemental and structural sensitivity, with the atomic scale resolution of time (femtoseconds, fs). Here, we use fs Ti K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) upon 3.49 eV (355 nm) excitation of aqueous colloidal anatase titanium dioxide nanoparticles to probe the trapping dynamics of photogenerated electrons. We find that their localization at Titanium atoms occurs in <300 fs, forming Ti(3+) centres, in or near the unit cell where the electron is created. We conclude that electron localization is due to its trapping at pentacoordinated sites, mostly present in the surface shell region. The present demonstration of fs hard X-ray absorption capabilities opens the way to a detailed description of the charge carrier dynamics in transition metal oxides.

  11. The CECAM Electronic Structure Library: community-driven development of software libraries for electronic structure simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Micael

    The CECAM Electronic Structure Library (ESL) is a community-driven effort to segregate shared pieces of software as libraries that could be contributed and used by the community. Besides allowing to share the burden of developing and maintaining complex pieces of software, these can also become a target for re-coding by software engineers as hardware evolves, ensuring that electronic structure codes remain at the forefront of HPC trends. In a series of workshops hosted at the CECAM HQ in Lausanne, the tools and infrastructure for the project were prepared, and the first contributions were included and made available online (http://esl.cecam.org). In this talk I will present the different aspects and aims of the ESL and how these can be useful for the electronic structure community.

  12. Analysis of boron carbides' electronic structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Iris A.; Beckel, Charles L.

    1986-01-01

    The electronic properties of boron-rich icosahedral clusters were studied as a means of understanding the electronic structure of the icosahedral borides such as boron carbide. A lower bound was estimated on bipolaron formation energies in B12 and B11C icosahedra, and the associated distortions. While the magnitude of the distortion associated with bipolaron formation is similar in both cases, the calculated formation energies differ greatly, formation being much more favorable on B11C icosahedra. The stable positions of a divalent atom relative to an icosahedral borane was also investigated, with the result that a stable energy minimum was found when the atom is at the center of the borane, internal to the B12 cage. If incorporation of dopant atoms into B12 cages in icosahedral boride solids is feasible, novel materials might result. In addition, the normal modes of a B12H12 cluster, of the C2B10 cage in para-carborane, and of a B12 icosahedron of reduced (D sub 3d) symmetry, such as is found in the icosahedral borides, were calculated. The nature of these vibrational modes will be important in determining, for instance, the character of the electron-lattice coupling in the borides, and in analyzing the lattice contribution to the thermal conductivity.

  13. Experimental Benchmarking of Pu Electronic Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G; Moore, K T; Chung, B W; Wall, M A; Schwartz, A J; Ebbinghaus, B B; Butterfield, M T; Teslich, Jr., N E; Bliss, R A; Morton, S A; Yu, S W; Komesu, T; Waddill, G D; der Laan, G v; Kutepov, A L

    2005-10-13

    The standard method to determine the band structure of a condensed phase material is to (1) obtain a single crystal with a well defined surface and (2) map the bands with angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (occupied or valence bands) and inverse photoelectron spectroscopy (unoccupied or conduction bands). Unfortunately, in the case of Pu, the single crystals of Pu are either nonexistent, very small and/or having poorly defined surfaces. Furthermore, effects such as electron correlation and a large spin-orbit splitting in the 5f states have further complicated the situation. Thus, we have embarked upon the utilization of unorthodox electron spectroscopies, to circumvent the problems caused by the absence of large single crystals of Pu with well-defined surfaces. Our approach includes the techniques of resonant photoelectron spectroscopy [1], x-ray absorption spectroscopy [1,2,3,4], electron energy loss spectroscopy [2,3,4], Fano Effect measurements [5], and Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy [6], including the utilization of micro-focused beams to probe single-crystallite regions of polycrystalline Pu samples. [2,3,6

  14. Experimental Benchmarking of Pu Electronic Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J.G.; Moore, K.T.; Chung, B.W.; Wall, M.A.; Schwartz, A.J.; Ebbinghaus, B.B.; Butterfield, M.T.; Teslich, Jr., N.E.; Bliss, R.A.; Morton, S.A.; Yu, S.W.; Komesu, T.; Waddill, G.D.; van der Laan, G.; Kutepov, A.L.

    2008-10-30

    The standard method to determine the band structure of a condensed phase material is to (1) obtain a single crystal with a well defined surface and (2) map the bands with angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (occupied or valence bands) and inverse photoelectron spectroscopy (unoccupied or conduction bands). Unfortunately, in the case of Pu, the single crystals of Pu are either nonexistent, very small and/or having poorly defined surfaces. Furthermore, effects such as electron correlation and a large spin-orbit splitting in the 5f states have further complicated the situation. Thus, we have embarked upon the utilization of unorthodox electron spectroscopies, to circumvent the problems caused by the absence of large single crystals of Pu with well-defined surfaces. Our approach includes the techniques of resonant photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, Fano Effect measurements, and Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy, including the utilization of micro-focused beams to probe single-crystallite regions of polycrystalline Pu samples.

  15. Electron beam coupling to a metamaterial structure

    SciTech Connect

    French, David M.; Shiffler, Don; Cartwright, Keith

    2013-08-15

    Microwave metamaterials have shown promise in numerous applications, ranging from strip lines and antennas to metamaterial-based electron beam driven devices. In general, metamaterials allow microwave designers to obtain electromagnetic characteristics not typically available in nature. High Power Microwave (HPM) sources have in the past drawn inspiration from work done in the conventional microwave source community. In this article, the use of metamaterials in an HPM application is considered by using an effective medium model to determine the coupling of an electron beam to a metamaterial structure in a geometry similar to that of a dielectric Cerenkov maser. Use of the effective medium model allows for the analysis of a wide range of parameter space, including the “mu-negative,”“epsilon-negative,” and “double negative” regimes of the metamaterial. The physics of such a system are modeled analytically and by utilizing the particle-in-cell code ICEPIC. For this geometry and effective medium representation, optimum coupling of the electron beam to the metamaterial, and thus the optimum microwave or RF production, occurs in the epsilon negative regime of the metamaterial. Given that HPM tubes have been proposed that utilize a metamaterial, this model provides a rapid method of characterizing a source geometry that can be used to quickly understand the basic physics of such an HPM device.

  16. Fast electronic structure methods for strongly correlated molecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head-Gordon, Martin; Beran, Gregory J. O.; Sodt, Alex; Jung, Yousung

    2005-01-01

    A short review is given of newly developed fast electronic structure methods that are designed to treat molecular systems with strong electron correlations, such as diradicaloid molecules, for which standard electronic structure methods such as density functional theory are inadequate. These new local correlation methods are based on coupled cluster theory within a perfect pairing active space, containing either a linear or quadratic number of pair correlation amplitudes, to yield the perfect pairing (PP) and imperfect pairing (IP) models. This reduces the scaling of the coupled cluster iterations to no worse than cubic, relative to the sixth power dependence of the usual (untruncated) coupled cluster doubles model. A second order perturbation correction, PP(2), to treat the neglected (weaker) correlations is formulated for the PP model. To ensure minimal prefactors, in addition to favorable size-scaling, highly efficient implementations of PP, IP and PP(2) have been completed, using auxiliary basis expansions. This yields speedups of almost an order of magnitude over the best alternatives using 4-center 2-electron integrals. A short discussion of the scope of accessible chemical applications is given.

  17. Enhancing community detection by using local structural information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Ju; Hu, Ke; Zhang, Yan; Bao, Mei-Hua; Tang, Liang; Tang, Yan-Ni; Gao, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Jian-Ming; Chen, Benyan; Hu, Jing-Bo

    2016-03-01

    Many real-world networks, such as gene networks, protein-protein interaction networks and metabolic networks, exhibit community structures, meaning the existence of groups of densely connected vertices in the networks. Many local similarity measures in the networks are closely related to the concept of the community structures, and may have a positive effect on community detection in the networks. Here, various local similarity measures are used to extract local structural information, which is then applied to community detection in the networks by using the edge-reweighting strategy. The effect of the local similarity measures on community detection is carefully investigated and compared in various networks. The experimental results show that the local similarity measures are crucial for the improvement of community detection methods, while the positive effect of the local similarity measures is closely related to the networks under study and applied community detection methods.

  18. Structure and navigation for electronic publishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillinghast, John; Beretta, Giordano B.

    1998-01-01

    The sudden explosion of the World Wide Web as a new publication medium has given a dramatic boost to the electronic publishing industry, which previously was a limited market centered around CD-ROMs and on-line databases. While the phenomenon has parallels to the advent of the tabloid press in the middle of last century, the electronic nature of the medium brings with it the typical characteristic of 4th wave media, namely the acceleration in its propagation speed and the volume of information. Consequently, e-publications are even flatter than print media; Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet share the same computer screen with a home-made plagiarized copy of Deep Throat. The most touted tool for locating useful information on the World Wide Web is the search engine. However, due to the medium's flatness, sought information is drowned in a sea of useless information. A better solution is to build tools that allow authors to structure information so that it can easily be navigated. We experimented with the use of ontologies as a tool to formulate structures for information about a specific topic, so that related concepts are placed in adjacent locations and can easily be navigated using simple and ergonomic user models. We describe our effort in building a World Wide Web based photo album that is shared among a small network of people.

  19. Pentacene Derivatives: Electronic Structure and Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netusil, Ross; Ilie, Carolina; Kane, Thorin; Damkaci, Fehmi

    2013-03-01

    The variation in composition and structure of the substituent groups of pentacene compounds promises a broad range of electronic structures and behaviors and provides a vast and alluring field of inquiry with avenues of exploration. These include the development of synthetic schema, the process of design for novel derivatives and, in order to identify those hypothesized compounds which demonstrate the desired behavior, the identification and refinement of computational tools that make accurate predictions about the electronic behavior of theoretical compounds. Two computational techniques and six pentacene derivatives are here examined. One technique was used to predict the vibrational spectra of the compounds, in order to both acquire data about the optical conductivity of the compounds and to establish a pool of theoretical data against which experimental data will be compared. The molecular orbital energy level diagram of the same six compounds was derived using a second approach, with the same goals of discerning between valid and invalid predictive schema by comparison with pending experimental data and between hypothesized compounds which show promise and those which present little potential for use in organic semiconductor technology.

  20. Multigrid Methods in Electronic Structure Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Emil

    1996-03-01

    Multigrid techniques have become the method of choice for a broad range of computational problems. Their use in electronic structure calculations introduces a new set of issues when compared to traditional plane wave approaches. We have developed a set of techniques that address these issues and permit multigrid algorithms to be applied to the electronic structure problem in an efficient manner. In our approach the Kohn-Sham equations are discretized on a real-space mesh using a compact representation of the Hamiltonian. The resulting equations are solved directly on the mesh using multigrid iterations. This produces rapid convergence rates even for ill-conditioned systems with large length and/or energy scales. The method has been applied to both periodic and non-periodic systems containing over 400 atoms and the results are in very good agreement with both theory and experiment. Example applications include a vacancy in diamond, an isolated C60 molecule, and a 64-atom cell of GaN with the Ga d-electrons in valence which required a 250 Ry cutoff. A particular strength of a real-space multigrid approach is its ready adaptability to massively parallel computer architectures. The compact representation of the Hamiltonian is especially well suited to such machines. Tests on the Cray-T3D have shown nearly linear scaling of the execution time up to the maximum number of processors (512). The MPP implementation has been used for studies of a large Amyloid Beta Peptide (C_146O_45N_42H_210) found in the brains of Alzheimers disease patients. Further applications of the multigrid method will also be described. (in collaboration D. J. Sullivan and J. Bernholc)

  1. Phonon localization in ultrathin layered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döring, F.; Eberl, C.; Schlenkrich, S.; Schlenkrich, F.; Hoffmann, S.; Liese, T.; Krebs, H. U.; Pisana, S.; Santos, T.; Schuhmann, H.; Seibt, M.; Mansurova, M.; Ulrichs, H.; Zbarsky, V.; Münzenberg, M.

    2015-04-01

    An efficient way for minimizing phonon thermal conductivity in solids is to nanostructure them by means of reduced phonon mean free path, phonon scattering and phonon reflection at interfaces. A sophisticated approach toward this lies in the fabrication of thin multilayer films of different materials. In this paper, we show by femtosecond-pump-probe reflectivity measurements that in different multilayer systems with varying acoustic mismatch (consisting of metals, semiconductors, oxides and polymers), oscillations due to phonon localization can be observed. For the growth of multilayer films with well-defined layer thicknesses, we used magnetron sputtering, evaporation and pulsed laser deposition. By altering the material combinations and reducing the layer thicknesses down to 3 nm, we observed different mechanisms of phonon blocking, reaching in the frequency regime up to 360 GHz.

  2. Electronic Document Imaging and Optical Storage Systems for Local Governments: An Introduction. Local Government Records Technical Information Series. Number 21.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Stanley F.

    This publication introduces electronic document imaging systems and provides guidance for local governments in New York in deciding whether such systems should be adopted for their own records and information management purposes. It advises local governments on how to develop plans for using such technology by discussing its advantages and…

  3. Electronic Structure and Bonding in Complex Biomolecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Lizhi

    2005-03-01

    For over a century vitamin B12 and its enzyme cofactor derivates have persistently attracted research efforts for their vital biological role, unique Co-C bonding, rich red-ox chemistry, and recently their candidacies as drug delivery vehicles etc. However, our understanding of this complex metalorganic molecule's efficient enzyme activated catalytic power is still controversial. We have for the first time calculated the electronic structure, Mulliken effective charge and bonding of a whole Vitamin B12 molecule without any structural simplification by first- principles approaches based on density functional theory using structures determined by high resolution X-ray diffraction. A partial density of states analysis shows excellent agreement with X-ray absorption data and has been used successfully to interpret measured optical absorption spectra. Mulliken bonding analysis of B12 and its derivatives reveal noticeable correlations between the two axial ligands which could be exploited by the enzyme to control the catalytic process. Our calculated X-ray near edge structure of B12 and its derivates using Slater's transition state theory are also in good agreement with experiments. The same approach has been applied to other B12 derivatives, ferrocene peptides, and recently DNA molecules.

  4. Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication of Titanium Alloy Gradient Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brice, Craig A.; Newman, John A.; Bird, Richard Keith; Shenoy, Ravi N.; Baughman, James M.; Gupta, Vipul K.

    2014-01-01

    Historically, the structural optimization of aerospace components has been done through geometric methods. A monolithic material is chosen based on the best compromise between the competing design limiting criteria. Then the structure is geometrically optimized to give the best overall performance using the single material chosen. Functionally graded materials offer the potential to further improve structural efficiency by allowing the material composition and/or microstructural features to spatially vary within a single structure. Thus, local properties could be tailored to the local design limiting criteria. Additive manufacturing techniques enable the fabrication of such graded materials and structures. This paper presents the results of a graded material study using two titanium alloys processed using electron beam freeform fabrication, an additive manufacturing process. The results show that the two alloys uniformly mix at various ratios and the resultant static tensile properties of the mixed alloys behave according to rule-of-mixtures. Additionally, the crack growth behavior across an abrupt change from one alloy to the other shows no discontinuity and the crack smoothly transitions from one crack growth regime into another.

  5. Local structures of copper-doped ZnO films

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Q.; Buchholz, D.B.; Chang, R.P.H.

    2009-01-05

    We report the local structures of a series of copper-doped zinc oxide films using polarization-dependent x-ray-absorption spectroscopy. The films were grown by pulsed-laser ablation under various conditions. The results show that films where copper exists solely as clusters are not ferromagnetic. The results also show that some of the copper-doped zinc oxide films are not ferromagnetic despite the fact that the copper substitution for zinc in the ZnO lattice is in the Cu{sup 2+} state, which provides the necessary unpaired spins for ferromagnetism. Therefore, Cu{sup 2+}/Zn{sup 2+} substitution is not the only imperative condition for ferromagnetism to occur. We present characteristics unique to the electronic and atomic structure of ferromagnetic films and argue that the increased covalence of the Cu{sub Zn}-O bond found in these films is a prerequisite for the spin alignments in a substitutionally copper-doped zinc oxide film.

  6. Electronic structure effects in liquid water studied by photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Nordlund, Dennis; Odelius, Michael; Bluhm, Hendrik; Ogasawara, Hirohito; Pettersson, Lars G.M.; Nilsson, Anders

    2008-04-29

    We present valence photoelectron emission spectra of liquid water in comparison with gas-phase water, ice close to the melting point, low temperature amorphous and crystalline ice. All aggregation states have major electronic structure changes relative to the free molecule, with rehybridization and development of bonding and anti-bonding states accompanying the hydrogen bond formation. Sensitivity to the local structural order, most prominent in the shape and splitting of the occupied 3a{sub 1} orbital, is understood from the electronic structure averaging over various geometrical structures, and reflects the local nature of the orbital interaction.

  7. Stability, electronic structure and reactivity of the polymerized fullerite forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belavin, V. V.; Bulusheva, L. G.; Okotrub, A. V.; Tomanek, D.

    2000-12-01

    A study of band structure, stability and electron density distribution from selected crystal orbitals of polymerized C60 forms was carried out. Linear chain, tetragonal and hexagonal layers, and three-dimensional (3D) polymer with a simple cubic lattice were calculated using an empirical tight-binding method. The hopping parameters were chosen to fit a theoretical X-ray emission spectrum of C60 to the experimental one. Our results indicate that all calculated polymers are semiconductors with the smallest energy gap for hexagonal structure. Though the molecules C60 are linked by strong covalent bonds, the crystal orbitals characterized by the electron density localization on an individual carbon cage are separated in the electronic structure of polymers. The suggestions about reactivity of the 1D and 2D tetragonal polymers were made from the analyses of crystal orbitals accompanied with the highest occupied (HO) and lowest unoccupied (LU) bands. The polymerized C60 forms were found to be less stable than an icosahedral fullerene molecule.

  8. Local atomic structure modulations activate metal oxide as electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu Hang; Liu, Peng Fei; Pan, Lin Feng; Wang, Hai Feng; Yang, Zhen Zhong; Zheng, Li Rong; Hu, P; Zhao, Hui Jun; Gu, Lin; Yang, Hua Gui

    2015-08-19

    Modifications of local structure at atomic level could precisely and effectively tune the capacity of materials, enabling enhancement in the catalytic activity. Here we modulate the local atomic structure of a classical but inert transition metal oxide, tungsten trioxide, to be an efficient electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water, which has shown promise as an alternative to platinum. Structural analyses and theoretical calculations together indicate that the origin of the enhanced activity could be attributed to the tailored electronic structure by means of the local atomic structure modulations. We anticipate that suitable structure modulations might be applied on other transition metal oxides to meet the optimal thermodynamic and kinetic requirements, which may pave the way to unlock the potential of other promising candidates as cost-effective electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution in industry.

  9. Local atomic structure modulations activate metal oxide as electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu Hang; Liu, Peng Fei; Pan, Lin Feng; Wang, Hai Feng; Yang, Zhen Zhong; Zheng, Li Rong; Hu, P.; Zhao, Hui Jun; Gu, Lin; Yang, Hua Gui

    2015-01-01

    Modifications of local structure at atomic level could precisely and effectively tune the capacity of materials, enabling enhancement in the catalytic activity. Here we modulate the local atomic structure of a classical but inert transition metal oxide, tungsten trioxide, to be an efficient electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water, which has shown promise as an alternative to platinum. Structural analyses and theoretical calculations together indicate that the origin of the enhanced activity could be attributed to the tailored electronic structure by means of the local atomic structure modulations. We anticipate that suitable structure modulations might be applied on other transition metal oxides to meet the optimal thermodynamic and kinetic requirements, which may pave the way to unlock the potential of other promising candidates as cost-effective electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution in industry. PMID:26286479

  10. Electronic structure of Ca, Sr, and Ba under pressure.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Animalu, A. O. E.; Heine, V.; Vasvari, B.

    1967-01-01

    Electronic band structure calculations phase of Ca, Sr and Ba over wide range of atomic volumes under pressure electronic band structure calculations for fcc phase of Ca, Sr and Ba over wide range of atomic volumes under pressure electronic band structure calculations for fcc phase of Ca, Sr and Ba over wide range of atomic volumes under pressure

  11. Electronic structure of benzene adsorbed on Ni and Cu surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Weinelt, M.; Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N.

    1997-04-01

    Benzene has for a long time served as a prototype adsorption system of large molecules. It adsorbs with the molecular plane parallel to the surface. The bonding of benzene to a transition metal is typically viewed to involve the {pi} system. Benzene adsorbs weakly on Cu and strongly on Ni. It is interesting to study how the adsorption strength is reflected in the electronic structure of the adsorbate-substrate complex. The authors have used X-ray Emission (XE) and X-ray Absorption (XA) spectroscopies to selectively study the electronic states localized on the adsorbed benzene molecule. Using XES the occupied states can be studies and with XAS the unoccupied states. The authors have used beamline 8.0 and the Swedish endstation equipped with a grazing incidence x-ray spectrometer and a partial yield absorption detector. The resolution in the XES and XAS were 0.5 eV and 0.05 eV, respectively.

  12. Effects of nonextensivity on the electron-acoustic solitary structures in a magnetized electron-positron-ion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafat, A.; Rahman, M. M.; Alam, M. S.; Mamun, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    Obliquely propagating electron-acoustic solitary waves (EASWs) in a magnetized electron-positron-ion plasma (containing nonextensive hot electrons and positrons, inertial cold electrons, and immobile positive ions) are precisely investigated by deriving the Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation. It is found that the basic features (viz. polarity, amplitude, width, phase speed, etc.) of the EASWs are significantly modified by the effects of the external magnetic field, obliqueness of the system, nonextensivity of hot positrons and electrons, ratio of the hot electron temperature to the hot positron temperature, and ratio of the cold electron number density to the hot positron number density. The findings of our results can be employed in understanding the localized electrostatic structures and the characteristics of EASWs in various astrophysical plasmas.

  13. Local Structural Alignment of RNA with Affine Gap Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Thomas K. F.; Cheung, Brenda W. Y.; Lam, T. W.; Yiu, S. M.

    Predicting new non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) of a family can be done by aligning the potential candidate with a member of the family with known sequence and secondary structure. Existing tools either only consider the sequence similarity or cannot handle local alignment with gaps. In this paper, we consider the problem of finding the optimal local structural alignment between a query RNA sequence (with known secondary structure) and a target sequence (with unknown secondary structure) with the affine gap penalty model. We provide the algorithm to solve the problem. Based on a preliminary experiment, we show that there are ncRNA families in which considering local structural alignment with gap penalty model can identify real hits more effectively than using global alignment or local alignment without gap penalty model.

  14. Reversible Hydrogen Storage Materials – Structure, Chemistry, and Electronic Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Ian M.; Johnson, Duane D.

    2014-06-21

    To understand the processes involved in the uptake and release of hydrogen from candidate light-weight metal hydride storage systems, a combination of materials characterization techniques and first principle calculation methods have been employed. In addition to conventional microstructural characterization in the transmission electron microscope, which provides projected information about the through thickness microstructure, electron tomography methods were employed to determine the three-dimensional spatial distribution of catalyst species for select systems both before and after dehydrogenation. Catalyst species identification as well as compositional analysis of the storage material before and after hydrogen charging and discharging was performed using a combination of energy dispersive spectroscopy, EDS, and electron energy loss spectroscopy, EELS. The characterization effort was coupled with first-principles, electronic-structure and thermodynamic techniques to predict and assess meta-stable and stable phases, reaction pathways, and thermodynamic and kinetic barriers. Systems studied included:NaAlH4, CaH2/CaB6 and Ca(BH4)2, MgH2/MgB2, Ni-Catalyzed Magnesium Hydride, TiH2-Catalyzed Magnesium Hydride, LiBH4, Aluminum-based systems and Aluminum

  15. Local gravity and large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juszkiewicz, Roman; Vittorio, Nicola; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1990-01-01

    The magnitude and direction of the observed dipole anisotropy of the galaxy distribution can in principle constrain the amount of large-scale power present in the spectrum of primordial density fluctuations. This paper confronts the data, provided by a recent redshift survey of galaxies detected by the IRAS satellite, with the predictions of two cosmological models with very different levels of large-scale power: the biased Cold Dark Matter dominated model (CDM) and a baryon-dominated model (BDM) with isocurvature initial conditions. Model predictions are investigated for the Local Group peculiar velocity, v(R), induced by mass inhomogeneities distributed out to a given radius, R, for R less than about 10,000 km/s. Several convergence measures for v(R) are developed, which can become powerful cosmological tests when deep enough samples become available. For the present data sets, the CDM and BDM predictions are indistinguishable at the 2 sigma level and both are consistent with observations. A promising discriminant between cosmological models is the misalignment angle between v(R) and the apex of the dipole anisotropy of the microwave background.

  16. Electronic structure and bonding in transuranics: comparison with lanthanides

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    The physico-chemical properties of the actinide metals, alloys, and compounds show interesting parallels and contrasts with the rare earths, beyond uranium. At first there is a transition region where the unique bonding properties of the early actinides become less prominent, due to progressive f-electron localization. Nevertheless, in contrast to the rare earths, f-electron energies remain close to the Fermi level, resulting in complex behavior as a function of temperature, pressure and structure. Particularly interesting in this region are the metallic hydrides, whose chemistry is clearly rare-earth like, but whose electronic properties are entirely different. At americium a major localization and f-band narrowing occurs, but the explanation of americium behavior is obscured by the occurrence of the unique f/sup 6/ non-magnetic solid-state configuration. Beyond americium, it would appear that real rare-earth-like behavior finally begins; this has been born out by recent studies on the thermodynamics and cohesive energies of curium, berkelium, californium and einsteinium metals. However, a new complication arises almost immediately, in the onset of incipient stabilization of the divalent state, which already appears in californium, whose physico-chemical properties are remarkably similar to samarium. Einsteinium appears to be fully divalent, thus heralding the beginning of a mini-series of truly divalent metals.

  17. Negative local resistance due to viscous electron backflow in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandurin, Denis

    Theoretical and experimental studies of systems in which particles undergo frequent mutual collisions date back to more than two centuries ago. Transport in such systems is described by hydrodynamic theory that was found very successful in explaining the response of classical liquids and gases to external fields. It has been argued for a long time that collective behavior of charge carriers in solids can be also described by hydrodynamic approach. However, there has been almost no direct evidence to hydrodynamic electron transport so far. This is because the conditions at which the hydrodynamic effects become observable are very strict: the electron-electron scattering length should provide the shortest spatial scale in the problem. First of all, this requires ultra clean systems where the scattering at impurities is diminished. Second, the electron-phonon scattering rate should be smaller than that of electron-electron scattering. Due to weak electron-phonon coupling high mobility graphene devices offer an ideal system to study electron hydrodynamics. To amplify the hydrodynamic effects we employed a special measurement geometry. The idea is that in case of hydrodynamic electron flow, vortices emerge in the spatial electric current distribution near the current injection contact. That results in a development of a negative voltage drop at the nearby contacts. We were able to detect such negative signal over the range of temperatures when the electronic system is in a hydrodynamic regime. Finally, we performed a rheological study of electron liquid in graphene. The electron viscosity was found to be an order of magnitude larger than that of honey which is in good agreement with many-body calculation.

  18. Structural evolution and valence electron-state change during ultra thin silicon-oxide growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, A.; Abe, S.; Nakayama, H.; Nishino, T.; Iida, S.

    2000-06-01

    We have studied valence electron-state changes of Si during initial oxidation of Si(111) clean surface, HF-treated Si(001) and Si(111) surfaces by Auger valence electron spectroscopy (AVES). The results showed that the valence electron-state changes during initial oxidation were sensitively reflected in Si[2s,2p,V] (V=3s,3p) AVES spectra and that they depended on both initial surface treatment and surface orientation. The local valence electron-states, local density of states in other words, showed the characteristic-structure evolution depending on the initial surface treatment and surface orientation.

  19. Core-hole effect on XANES and electronic structure of minor actinide dioxides with fluorite structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Chikashi; Nishi, Tsuyoshi; Nakada, Masami; Akabori, Mitsuo; Hirata, Masaru; Kaji, Yoshiyuki

    2012-02-01

    The authors investigated theoretically core-hole effects on X-ray absorption near-edge structures (XANES) of Np and Am LIII in neptunium dioxide (NpO2) and americium dioxide (AmO2) with CaF2-type crystal lattices using the all-electron full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave (FP-LAPW) method. The peak creation mechanism of XANES was shown by examining the electronic structures of these oxides, which indicated that core-hole screening was more marked for AmO2 than for NpO2 because of the difference in the charge transfer between these oxides. Furthermore, the results of charge density analysis suggested that the white line was assigned to the quasi-bound state composed of the localized Np d or Am d components and O components, and that the tail structure was created as a result of delocalized standing waves between the Np or Am atoms.

  20. Efficient O(N) integration for all-electron electronic structure calculation using numeric basis functions

    SciTech Connect

    Havu, V. Blum, V.; Havu, P.; Scheffler, M.

    2009-12-01

    We consider the problem of developing O(N) scaling grid-based operations needed in many central operations when performing electronic structure calculations with numeric atom-centered orbitals as basis functions. We outline the overall formulation of localized algorithms, and specifically the creation of localized grid batches. The choice of the grid partitioning scheme plays an important role in the performance and memory consumption of the grid-based operations. Three different top-down partitioning methods are investigated, and compared with formally more rigorous yet much more expensive bottom-up algorithms. We show that a conceptually simple top-down grid partitioning scheme achieves essentially the same efficiency as the more rigorous bottom-up approaches.

  1. Energetics and electronic structure of UAl4 with point defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniznik, L.; Alonso, P. R.; Gargano, P. H.; Rubiolo, G. H.

    2015-11-01

    UAl4 ideal and defect structures were studied within the framework of the Density Functional Theory. The structural and magnetic ordering of UAl4 in paramagnetic, ferromagnetic, and antiferromagnetic states have been investigated, within the collinear and non-collinear spin approximation, using the GGA model, as embedded in the program package VASP. An antiferromagnetic (0 1 bar 1) layer structure with spins aligned to the [010] direction was found to be energetically preferred. The analysis of density of states and bonding charge density point out that the bonding mechanism consists primarily of band mixing between the U 5f and Al 3p states. Supercells were built from UAl4 unit cells with the established magnetic structure. For those supercells we calculated the energy of formation of vacancies and antisite defects taking into account the existence of three distinct aluminum sites. Point defect formation energies, local lattice relaxations, as well as the defect induced magnetic ordering and electronic density redistribution, are discussed. It is shown that antiferromagnetism is locally broken. Al antisites and U antisites in Al 4e Wyckoff positions are the constitutional point defects in Al-rich and U-rich oI20 UAl4, respectively. In this way we have presented here the first set of data which makes it possible to discuss and quantify the point defects concentrations in the experimental composition range for existence of this uranium aluminide.

  2. Electronic Structure Calculations of Highly Charged Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromley, Steve; Ziolkowski, Marcin; Marler, Joan

    2016-05-01

    Exotic systems like Highly Charged Ions (HCIs) are attracting more attention based on their properties and possible interactions. Abundance of HCIs in the solar wind and their interaction with the upper atmosphere puts them in the attention of astro- and atmospheric physicists. Also, their unique properties originating in the high charge make them an excellent candidate for precision measurements and the next generation of atomic clocks. For a better understanding of the dynamics of processes involving HCIs a combined theoretical and experimental effort is needed to study their basic properties and interactions. Both theory and experiment need to be combined due to the extreme nature of these systems. We present preliminary insight into electronic structure of light HCIs, their interactions with neutral atoms and dynamics of charge transfer processes.

  3. Electronic structures of reconstructed zigzag silicene nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Yi E-mail: wangyanli-04@tsinghua.org.cn; Wang, Yanli E-mail: wangyanli-04@tsinghua.org.cn

    2014-02-24

    Edge states and magnetism are crucial for spintronic applications of nanoribbons. Here, using first-principles calculations, we explore structural stabilities and electronic properties of zigzag silicene nanoribbons (ZSiNRs) with Klein and pentagon-heptagon reconstructions. Comparing to unreconstructed zigzag edges, deformed bare pentagon-heptagon ones are favored under H-poor conditions, while H-rich surroundings stabilize di-hydrogenated Klein edges. These Klein edges have analogous magnetism to zigzag ones, which also possess the electric-field-induced half-metallicity of nanoribbons. Moreover, diverse magnetic states can be achieved by asymmetric Klein and zigzag edges into ZSiNRs, which could be transformed from antiferromagnetic-semiconductors to bipolar spin-gapless-semiconductors and ferromagnetic-metals depending on edge hydrogenations.

  4. Electronic structures of reconstructed zigzag silicene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yi; Wang, Yanli

    2014-02-01

    Edge states and magnetism are crucial for spintronic applications of nanoribbons. Here, using first-principles calculations, we explore structural stabilities and electronic properties of zigzag silicene nanoribbons (ZSiNRs) with Klein and pentagon-heptagon reconstructions. Comparing to unreconstructed zigzag edges, deformed bare pentagon-heptagon ones are favored under H-poor conditions, while H-rich surroundings stabilize di-hydrogenated Klein edges. These Klein edges have analogous magnetism to zigzag ones, which also possess the electric-field-induced half-metallicity of nanoribbons. Moreover, diverse magnetic states can be achieved by asymmetric Klein and zigzag edges into ZSiNRs, which could be transformed from antiferromagnetic-semiconductors to bipolar spin-gapless-semiconductors and ferromagnetic-metals depending on edge hydrogenations.

  5. Electronic Structure of Ethynyl Substituted Cyclobutadienes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmert, Frank Lee Emmert, III; Thompson, Stephanie J.; Slipchenko, Lyudmila V.

    2011-06-01

    We investigated the effects of ethynyl substitution on the electronic structure of cyclobutadiene. These species are involved in Bergman Cyclization reactionsand are possible intermediates in the formation of fullerenes and graphite sheets. Prediction of the electronic energy of cyclobutadiene is challenging for single-reference ab initio methods such as HF, MP2 or DFT because of Jahn-Teller distortions and the diradical character of the singlet state. We determined the vertical and adiabatic singlet-triplet energy splittings, the natural charges and spin densities in substituted cyclobutadienes, using the equations of motion spin flip coupled cluster with single and double excitations (EOM-SF-CCSD) method that accurately describes diradical states. The adiabatic singlet-triplet gaps decrease upon substituent addition, but the singlet state is always lower in energy. However, we found that the results are affected by spin-contamination of the reference state and deteriorate when an unrestricted HF reference is employed. O. L. Chapman, C. L. McIntosh, J. Pacansky, "Cyclobutadiene" J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1973, 95, (2), 614-617. N. S. Goroff, "Mechanism of Fullerene Formation." Acc. Chem. Res. 1996, 29, (2), 77-83. L.V. Slipchenko and A.I. Krylov, "Singlet-triplet gaps in diradicals by the Spin-Flip approach: A benchmark study", J. Chem. Phys. 2002, 117, 4694-4708.

  6. Electron Liquids in Semiconductor Quantum Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Aron Pinczuk

    2009-05-25

    The groups led by Stormer and Pinczuk have focused this project on goals that seek the elucidation of novel many-particle effects that emerge in two-dimensional electron systems (2DES) as the result from fundamental quantum interactions. This experimental research is conducted under extreme conditions of temperature and magnetic field. From the materials point of view, the ultra-high mobility systems in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum structures continue to be at the forefront of this research. The newcomer materials are based on graphene, a single atomic layer of graphite. The graphene research is attracting enormous attention from many communities involved in condensed matter research. The investigated many-particle phenomena include the integer and fractional quantum Hall effect, composite fermions, and Dirac fermions, and a diverse group of electron solid and liquid crystal phases. The Stormer group performed magneto-transport experiments and far-infrared spectroscopy, while the Pinczuk group explores manifestations of such phases in optical spectra.

  7. Silicene oxides: formation, structures and electronic properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Pi, Xiaodong; Ni, Zhenyi; Liu, Yong; Lin, Shisheng; Xu, Mingsheng; Yang, Deren

    2013-12-16

    Understanding the oxidation of silicon has been critical to the success of all types of silicon materials, which are the cornerstones of modern silicon technologies. For the recent experimentally obtained two-dimensional silicene, oxidation should also be addressed to enable the development of silicene-based devices. Here we focus on silicene oxides (SOs) that result from the partial or full oxidation of silicene in the framework of density functional theory. It is found that the formation of SOs greatly depends on oxidation conditions, which concern the oxidizing agents of oxygen and hydroxyl. The honeycomb lattice of silicene may be preserved, distorted or destroyed after oxidation. The charge state of Si in partially oxidized silicene ranges from +1 to +3, while that in fully oxidized silicene is +4. Metals, semimetals, semiconductors and insulators can all be found among the SOs, which show a wide spectrum of electronic structures. Our work indicates that the oxidation of silicene should be exquisitely controlled to obtain specific SOs with desired electronic properties.

  8. Local Influence Analysis of Nonlinear Structural Equation Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sik-Yum; Tang, Nian-Sheng

    2004-01-01

    By regarding the latent random vectors as hypothetical missing data and based on the conditional expectation of the complete-data log-likelihood function in the EM algorithm, we investigate assessment of local influence of various perturbation schemes in a nonlinear structural equation model. The basic building blocks of local influence analysis…

  9. Local imaging of high mobility two-dimensional electron systems with virtual scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pelliccione, M.; Bartel, J.; Goldhaber-Gordon, D.; Sciambi, A.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.

    2014-11-03

    Correlated electron states in high mobility two-dimensional electron systems (2DESs), including charge density waves and microemulsion phases intermediate between a Fermi liquid and Wigner crystal, are predicted to exhibit complex local charge order. Existing experimental studies, however, have mainly probed these systems at micron to millimeter scales rather than directly mapping spatial organization. Scanning probes should be well-suited to study the spatial structure of these states, but high mobility 2DESs are found at buried semiconductor interfaces, beyond the reach of conventional scanning tunneling microscopy. Scanning techniques based on electrostatic coupling to the 2DES deliver important insights, but generally with resolution limited by the depth of the 2DES. In this letter, we present our progress in developing a technique called “virtual scanning tunneling microscopy” that allows local tunneling into a high mobility 2DES. Using a specially designed bilayer GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure where the tunnel coupling between two separate 2DESs is tunable via electrostatic gating, combined with a scanning gate, we show that the local tunneling can be controlled with sub-250 nm resolution.

  10. Local imaging of high mobility two-dimensional electron systems with virtual scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelliccione, M.; Bartel, J.; Sciambi, A.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.; Goldhaber-Gordon, D.

    2014-11-01

    Correlated electron states in high mobility two-dimensional electron systems (2DESs), including charge density waves and microemulsion phases intermediate between a Fermi liquid and Wigner crystal, are predicted to exhibit complex local charge order. Existing experimental studies, however, have mainly probed these systems at micron to millimeter scales rather than directly mapping spatial organization. Scanning probes should be well-suited to study the spatial structure of these states, but high mobility 2DESs are found at buried semiconductor interfaces, beyond the reach of conventional scanning tunneling microscopy. Scanning techniques based on electrostatic coupling to the 2DES deliver important insights, but generally with resolution limited by the depth of the 2DES. In this letter, we present our progress in developing a technique called "virtual scanning tunneling microscopy" that allows local tunneling into a high mobility 2DES. Using a specially designed bilayer GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure where the tunnel coupling between two separate 2DESs is tunable via electrostatic gating, combined with a scanning gate, we show that the local tunneling can be controlled with sub-250 nm resolution.

  11. Automated Localization of Multiple Pelvic Bone Structures on MRI.

    PubMed

    Onal, Sinan; Lai-Yuen, Susana; Bao, Paul; Weitzenfeld, Alfredo; Hart, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a fully automated localization method for multiple pelvic bone structures on magnetic resonance images (MRI). Pelvic bone structures are at present identified manually on MRI to locate reference points for measurement and evaluation of pelvic organ prolapse (POP). Given that this is a time-consuming and subjective procedure, there is a need to localize pelvic bone structures automatically. However, bone structures are not easily differentiable from soft tissue on MRI as their pixel intensities tend to be very similar. In this paper, we present a model that combines support vector machines and nonlinear regression capturing global and local information to automatically identify the bounding boxes of bone structures on MRI. The model identifies the location of the pelvic bone structures by establishing the association between their relative locations and using local information such as texture features. Results show that the proposed method is able to locate the bone structures of interest accurately (dice similarity index >0.75) in 87-91% of the images. This research aims to enable accurate, consistent, and fully automated localization of bone structures on MRI to facilitate and improve the diagnosis of health conditions such as female POP.

  12. 5f-electron localization in the actinide metals: thorides, actinides and the Mott transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, A. C.

    2016-03-01

    For the light actinides Ac-Cm, the numbers of localized and itinerant 5f-electrons are determined by comparing various estimates of the f-electron counts. At least one itinerant f-electron is found for each element, Pa-Cm. These results resolve certain disagreements among electron counts determined by different methods and are consistent with the Mott transition model and with the picture of the 5f-electrons' dual nature.

  13. Exchange coupling in transition metal monoxides: Electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Guntram; Daene, Markus W; Ernst, Arthur; Bruno, Patrick; Lueders, Martin; Szotek, Zdzislawa; Temmerman, Walter M; Wolfam, Hergert

    2009-01-01

    An ab initio study of magnetic-exchange interactions in antiferromagnetic and strongly correlated 3d transition metal monoxides is presented. Their electronic structure is calculated using the local self-interaction correction approach, implemented within the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker band-structure method, which is based on multiple scattering theory. The Heisenberg exchange constants are evaluated with the magnetic force theorem. Based on these the corresponding Neel temperatures TN and spin-wave dispersions are calculated. The Neel temperatures are obtained using mean-field approximation, random-phase approximation and Monte Carlo simulations. The pressure dependence of TN is investigated using exchange constants calculated for different lattice constants. All the calculated results are compared to experimental data.

  14. Atomic and electronic structure of twin growth defects in magnetite

    PubMed Central

    Gilks, Daniel; Nedelkoski, Zlatko; Lari, Leonardo; Kuerbanjiang, Balati; Matsuzaki, Kosuke; Susaki, Tomofumi; Kepaptsoglou, Demie; Ramasse, Quentin; Evans, Richard; McKenna, Keith; Lazarov, Vlado K.

    2016-01-01

    We report the existence of a stable twin defect in Fe3O4 thin films. By using aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopy the atomic structure of the twin boundary has been determined. The boundary is confined to the (111) growth plane and it is non-stoichiometric due to a missing Fe octahedral plane. By first principles calculations we show that the local atomic structural configuration of the twin boundary does not change the nature of the superexchange interactions between the two Fe sublattices across the twin grain boundary. Besides decreasing the half-metallic band gap at the boundary the altered atomic stacking at the boundary does not change the overall ferromagnetic (FM) coupling between the grains. PMID:26876049

  15. Atomic and electronic structure of twin growth defects in magnetite.

    PubMed

    Gilks, Daniel; Nedelkoski, Zlatko; Lari, Leonardo; Kuerbanjiang, Balati; Matsuzaki, Kosuke; Susaki, Tomofumi; Kepaptsoglou, Demie; Ramasse, Quentin; Evans, Richard; McKenna, Keith; Lazarov, Vlado K

    2016-02-15

    We report the existence of a stable twin defect in Fe3O4 thin films. By using aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopy the atomic structure of the twin boundary has been determined. The boundary is confined to the (111) growth plane and it is non-stoichiometric due to a missing Fe octahedral plane. By first principles calculations we show that the local atomic structural configuration of the twin boundary does not change the nature of the superexchange interactions between the two Fe sublattices across the twin grain boundary. Besides decreasing the half-metallic band gap at the boundary the altered atomic stacking at the boundary does not change the overall ferromagnetic (FM) coupling between the grains.

  16. Local electron spectrum above 100 MeV derived from gamma-ray emissivity spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, A. W.

    1985-01-01

    Two new determinations of the local gamma-ray emmissivity spectrum are in good accord and were used to derive constraints on the local electron spectrum. The requirement for an electron intensity above 1 GeV larger than previously believed is confirmed and no low energy upturn is then needed.

  17. Electronic and structural transitions in dense liquid sodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raty, Jean-Yves; Schwegler, Eric; Bonev, Stanimir A.

    2007-09-01

    At ambient conditions, the light alkali metals are free-electron-like crystals with a highly symmetric structure. However, they were found recently to exhibit unexpected complexity under pressure. It was predicted from theory-and later confirmed by experiment-that lithium and sodium undergo a sequence of symmetry-breaking transitions, driven by a Peierls mechanism, at high pressures. Measurements of the sodium melting curve have subsequently revealed an unprecedented (and still unexplained) pressure-induced drop in melting temperature from 1,000K at 30GPa down to room temperature at 120GPa. Here we report results from ab initio calculations that explain the unusual melting behaviour in dense sodium. We show that molten sodium undergoes a series of pressure-induced structural and electronic transitions, analogous to those observed in solid sodium but commencing at much lower pressure in the presence of liquid disorder. As pressure is increased, liquid sodium initially evolves by assuming a more compact local structure. However, a transition to a lower-coordinated liquid takes place at a pressure of around 65GPa, accompanied by a threefold drop in electrical conductivity. This transition is driven by the opening of a pseudogap, at the Fermi level, in the electronic density of states-an effect that has not hitherto been observed in a liquid metal. The lower-coordinated liquid emerges at high temperatures and above the stability region of a close-packed free-electron-like metal. We predict that similar exotic behaviour is possible in other materials as well.

  18. Characterizing Localized Surface Plasmons Using Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherqui, Charles; Thakkar, Niket; Li, Guoliang; Camden, Jon P.; Masiello, David J.

    2016-05-01

    Electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) offers a window to view nanoscale properties and processes. When performed in a scanning transmission electron microscope, EELS can simultaneously render images of nanoscale objects with subnanometer spatial resolution and correlate them with spectroscopic information at a spectral resolution of ˜10-100 meV. Consequently, EELS is a near-perfect tool for understanding the optical and electronic properties of individual plasmonic metal nanoparticles and few-nanoparticle assemblies, which are significant in a wide range of fields. This review presents an overview of basic plasmonics and EELS theory and highlights several recent noteworthy experiments involving the interrogation of plasmonic metal nanoparticle systems using electron beams.

  19. Structural phase transition and electronic properties in samarium chalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panwar, Y. S.; Aynyas, Mahendra; Pataiya, J.; Sanyal, Sankar P.

    2016-05-01

    The electronic structure and high pressure properties of samarium monochalcogenides SmS, SmSe and SmTe have been reported by using tight binding linear muffin-tin-orbital (TB-LMTO) method within the local density approximation (LDA). The total energy as a function of volume is evaluated. It is found that these monochalcogenides are stable in NaCl-type structure under ambient pressure. We predict a structural phase transition from NaCl-type (B1-phase) structure to CsCl-type (B2-type) structure for these compounds. Phase transition pressures were found to be 1.7, 4.4 and 6.6 GPa, for SmS, SmSe and SmTe respectively. Apart from this, the lattice parameter (a0), bulk modulus (B0), band structure (BS) and density of states (DOS) are calculated. From energy band diagram we observed that these compounds exhibit metallic character. The calculated values of equilibrium lattice parameter and phase transition pressure are in general good agreement with available data.

  20. Localization-delocalization transition of electrons at the percolation threshold of semiconductor GaAs1–xNx alloys: The appearance of a mobility edge

    DOE PAGES

    Alberi, K.; Fluegel, B.; Beaton, D. A.; Ptak, A. J.; Mascarenhas, A.

    2012-07-09

    Electrons in semiconductor alloys have generally been described in terms of Bloch states that evolve from constructive interference of electron waves scattering from perfectly periodic potentials, despite the loss of structural periodicity that occurs on alloying. Using the semiconductor alloy GaAs₁₋xNx as a prototype, we demonstrate a localized to delocalized transition of the electronic states at a percolation threshold, the emergence of a mobility edge, and the onset of an abrupt perturbation to the host GaAs electronic structure, shedding light on the evolution of electronic structure in these abnormal alloys.

  1. Kinetics of vertical transport and localization of electrons in strained semiconductor supperlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Gerchikov, L. G. Mamaev, Yu. A.; Yashin, Yu. P.

    2015-08-15

    The kinetics of vertical electron transport in a semiconductor superlattice is considered taking into account partial localization of electrons. The time dependences of photoemission currents from samples based on a strained semiconductor superlattice calculated by numerically solving the kinetic equation are in good agreement with experimental data. Comparison of the theory with experiment makes it possible to determine the characteristic electron localization and thermoactivation times, the diffusion length, and losses of photoelectrons in the superlattice.

  2. RESCU: A real space electronic structure method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaud-Rioux, Vincent; Zhang, Lei; Guo, Hong

    2016-02-01

    In this work we present RESCU, a powerful MATLAB-based Kohn-Sham density functional theory (KS-DFT) solver. We demonstrate that RESCU can compute the electronic structure properties of systems comprising many thousands of atoms using modest computer resources, e.g. 16 to 256 cores. Its computational efficiency is achieved from exploiting four routes. First, we use numerical atomic orbital (NAO) techniques to efficiently generate a good quality initial subspace which is crucially required by Chebyshev filtering methods. Second, we exploit the fact that only a subspace spanning the occupied Kohn-Sham states is required, and solving accurately the KS equation using eigensolvers can generally be avoided. Third, by judiciously analyzing and optimizing various parts of the procedure in RESCU, we delay the O (N3) scaling to large N, and our tests show that RESCU scales consistently as O (N2.3) from a few hundred atoms to more than 5000 atoms when using a real space grid discretization. The scaling is better or comparable in a NAO basis up to the 14,000 atoms level. Fourth, we exploit various numerical algorithms and, in particular, we introduce a partial Rayleigh-Ritz algorithm to achieve efficiency gains for systems comprising more than 10,000 electrons. We demonstrate the power of RESCU in solving KS-DFT problems using many examples running on 16, 64 and/or 256 cores: a 5832 Si atoms supercell; a 8788 Al atoms supercell; a 5324 Cu atoms supercell and a small DNA molecule submerged in 1713 water molecules for a total 5399 atoms. The KS-DFT is entirely converged in a few hours in all cases. Our results suggest that the RESCU method has reached a milestone of solving thousands of atoms by KS-DFT on a modest computer cluster.

  3. Nonlinearity in structural and electronic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, A.R.; Beardmore, K.M.; Ben-Naim, E.

    1997-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project strengthens a nonlinear technology base relevant to a variety of problems arising in condensed matter and materials science, and applies this technology to those problems. In this way the controlled synthesis of, and experiments on, novel electronic and structural materials provide an important focus for nonlinear science, while nonlinear techniques help advance the understanding of the scientific principles underlying the control of microstructure and dynamics in complex materials. This research is primarily focused on four topics: (1) materials microstructure: growth and evolution, and porous media; (2) textures in elastic/martensitic materials; (3) electro- and photo-active polymers; and (4) ultrafast photophysics in complex electronic materials. Accomplishments included the following: organization of a ``Nonlinear Materials`` seminar series and international conferences including ``Fracture, Friction and Deformation,`` ``Nonequilibrium Phase Transitions,`` and ``Landscape Paradigms in Physics and Biology``; invited talks at international conference on ``Synthetic Metals,`` ``Quantum Phase Transitions,`` ``1996 CECAM Euroconference,`` and the 1995 Fall Meeting of the Materials Research Society; large-scale simulations and microscopic modeling of nonlinear coherent energy storage at crack tips and sliding interfaces; large-scale simulation and microscopic elasticity theory for precursor microstructure and dynamics at solid-solid diffusionless phase transformations; large-scale simulation of self-assembling organic thin films on inorganic substrates; analysis and simulation of smoothing of rough atomic surfaces; and modeling and analysis of flux pattern formation in equilibrium and nonequilibrium Josephson junction arrays and layered superconductors.

  4. First principle investigation of structural and electronic properties of bulk ZnSe

    SciTech Connect

    Khatta, Swati; Tripathi, S. K. Prakash, Satya

    2015-08-28

    Electronic and structural properties of ZnSe are investigated using plane-wave self-consistent field method within the framework of density functional theory. The pseudopotential method within the local density approximation is used for the exchange-correlation potential. The equilibrium lattice parameter, static bulk modulus and its pressure derivative are calculated. The electronic band structure, partial density of states and density of states are also obtained. The results are compared with available theoretical calculations and experimental results.

  5. The electronic structure of hard materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winarski, Robert Paul

    This research dissertation involves an experimental as well as a theoretical examination of the electronic structure of hard materials. The materials that are presented in this dissertation cover a wide class of materials, consisting of transition metal borides, irradiated polymer films, theoretically predicted superhard semiconductors, doped intermetallic alloys, and transition metal carbides. The borides are traditionally used in high temperature, hard coating applications, such as rocket nozzle linings, extreme wear surfaces, and corrosion coatings. Measurements of the borides appear to show that the bonding in these hard materials is primarily between the boron atoms in these systems. Also of note are the remarkably short interatomic distances between the boron atoms and between the boron and metal atoms in these materials. Irradiated polymer films are being developed for electronic applications, in the hopes that circuits can be developed that can benefit from the high thermal stability, dielectric properties, and mechanical properties provided by these materials. C3N4 is a theoretically predicted superhard material, and some of the first soft x-ray emission measurements of well-characterized samples of this compound are discussed in this work. Intermetallic alloys, in particular Ni3Al, are rather hard, but brittle metallic alloys. It has been found that the addition of boron atoms, in rather low concentrations, can increase the ductility of these alloys, allowing them to be utilized in a wider variety of applications. Measurements of this system have examined a question regarding the positioning of the boron atoms in the structures of this alloy. Finally, the transition metal carbides are used extensively as coatings in industrial applications such as cutting and grinding tools, and polishing compounds. Measurements of these materials suggest that the high degree of covalency between the metal and carbon atoms is primarily responsible for the hardness of

  6. Deriving quantum theory from its local structure and reversibility.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, Gonzalo; Masanes, Lluís; Short, Anthony J; Müller, Markus P

    2012-08-31

    We investigate the class of physical theories with the same local structure as quantum theory but potentially different global structure. It has previously been shown that any bipartite correlations generated by such a theory can be simulated in quantum theory but that this does not hold for tripartite correlations. Here we explore whether imposing an additional constraint on this space of theories-that of dynamical reversibility-will allow us to recover the global quantum structure. In the particular case in which the local systems are identical qubits, we show that any theory admitting at least one continuous reversible interaction must be identical to quantum theory.

  7. Structure of local interactions in complex financial dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, X. F.; Chen, T. T.; Zheng, B.

    2014-01-01

    With the network methods and random matrix theory, we investigate the interaction structure of communities in financial markets. In particular, based on the random matrix decomposition, we clarify that the local interactions between the business sectors (subsectors) are mainly contained in the sector mode. In the sector mode, the average correlation inside the sectors is positive, while that between the sectors is negative. Further, we explore the time evolution of the interaction structure of the business sectors, and observe that the local interaction structure changes dramatically during a financial bubble or crisis. PMID:24936906

  8. Research Update: Spatially resolved mapping of electronic structure on atomic level by multivariate statistical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Belianinov, Alex; Panchapakesan, G.; Lin, Wenzhi; Sales, Brian C.; Sefat, Athena Safa; Jesse, Stephen; Pan, Minghu; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2014-12-02

    Atomic level spatial variability of electronic structure in Fe-based superconductor FeTe0.55Se0.45 (Tc = 15 K) is explored using current-imaging tunneling-spectroscopy. Multivariate statistical analysis of the data differentiates regions of dissimilar electronic behavior that can be identified with the segregation of chalcogen atoms, as well as boundaries between terminations and near neighbor interactions. Subsequent clustering analysis allows identification of the spatial localization of these dissimilar regions. Similar statistical analysis of modeled calculated density of states of chemically inhomogeneous FeTe1 x Sex structures further confirms that the two types of chalcogens, i.e., Te and Se, can be identified by their electronic signature and differentiated by their local chemical environment. This approach allows detailed chemical discrimination of the scanning tunneling microscopy data including separation of atomic identities, proximity, and local configuration effects and can be universally applicable to chemically and electronically inhomogeneous surfaces.

  9. Research Update: Spatially resolved mapping of electronic structure on atomic level by multivariate statistical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belianinov, Alex; Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Lin, Wenzhi; Sales, Brian C.; Sefat, Athena S.; Jesse, Stephen; Pan, Minghu; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2014-12-01

    Atomic level spatial variability of electronic structure in Fe-based superconductor FeTe0.55Se0.45 (Tc = 15 K) is explored using current-imaging tunneling-spectroscopy. Multivariate statistical analysis of the data differentiates regions of dissimilar electronic behavior that can be identified with the segregation of chalcogen atoms, as well as boundaries between terminations and near neighbor interactions. Subsequent clustering analysis allows identification of the spatial localization of these dissimilar regions. Similar statistical analysis of modeled calculated density of states of chemically inhomogeneous FeTe1-xSex structures further confirms that the two types of chalcogens, i.e., Te and Se, can be identified by their electronic signature and differentiated by their local chemical environment. This approach allows detailed chemical discrimination of the scanning tunneling microscopy data including separation of atomic identities, proximity, and local configuration effects and can be universally applicable to chemically and electronically inhomogeneous surfaces.

  10. An online substructure identification method for local structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Jilin; Jankowski, Łukasz; Ou, Jinping

    2013-09-01

    This paper proposes a substructure isolation method, which uses time series of measured local response for online monitoring of substructures. The proposed monitoring process consists of two key steps: construction of the isolated substructure, and its identification. The isolated substructure is an independent virtual structure, which is numerically isolated from the global structure by placing virtual supports on the interface. First, the isolated substructure is constructed by a specific linear combination of time series of its measured local responses. Then, the isolated substructure is identified using its local natural frequencies extracted from the combined responses. The substructure is assumed to be linear; the outside part of the global structure can have any characteristics. The method has no requirements on the initial state of the structure, and so the process can be carried out repetitively for online monitoring. Online isolation and monitoring is illustrated in a numerical example with a frame model, and then verified in a cantilever beam experiment.

  11. Reconstruction of biofilm images: combining local and global structural parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Resat, Haluk; Renslow, Ryan S.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-11-07

    Digitized images can be used for quantitative comparison of biofilms grown under different conditions. Using biofilm image reconstruction, it was previously found that biofilms with a completely different look can have nearly identical structural parameters and that the most commonly utilized global structural parameters were not sufficient to uniquely define these biofilms. Here, additional local and global parameters are introduced to show that these parameters considerably increase the reliability of the image reconstruction process. Assessment using human evaluators indicated that the correct identification rate of the reconstructed images increased from 50% to 72% with the introduction of the new parameters into the reconstruction procedure. An expanded set of parameters especially improved the identification of biofilm structures with internal orientational features and of structures in which colony sizes and spatial locations varied. Hence, the newly introduced structural parameter sets helped to better classify the biofilms by incorporating finer local structural details into the reconstruction process.

  12. Local structure of multiferroic RMn 2O 5: Important role of the R site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyson, T. A.; Chen, Z.; DeLeon, M. A.; Yoong, S.; Cheong, S.-W.

    2009-06-01

    The temperature and magnetic field dependent local structure of RMn 2O 5 systems was examined. While no significant displacements of the Mn ions are observed, it is found that the R-O distribution exhibits changes at low temperature which are possibly related to the changes in the electric polarization. Density functional computations are used to explore the system dynamics and to link the local structural measurements with anomalous changes in the infrared absorption spectra. The anomalous R-O distribution and observed coupling to magnetic fields point to the need to properly treat the 4f electrons on the R sites in these systems.

  13. Electronic Structure and Dynamics of Nitrosyl Porphyrins

    PubMed Central

    Scheidt, W. Robert; Barabanschikov, Alexander; Pavlik, Jeffrey W.; Silvernail, Nathan J.; Sage, J. Timothy

    2010-01-01

    fully successful at capturing the interaction between the axial NO and imidazole ligands. This supports previous conclusions that hemeNO complexes exhibit an unusual degree of variability with respect to computational method, and we speculate that this variability hints at a genuine electronic instability that a protein can exploit to tune reactivity. We anticipate that ongoing characterization of heme-NO complexes will deepen our understanding of their structure, dynamics, and reactivity. PMID:20666384

  14. Electronic Structures of Uranium Compounds Studied by Soft X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimori, Shin-ichi; Takeda, Yukiharu; Okane, Tetsuo; Saitoh, Yuji; Fujimori, Atsushi; Yamagami, Hiroshi; Haga, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Etsuji; Ōnuki, Yoshichika

    2016-06-01

    The electronic structures of uranium-based compounds have been studied by photoelectron spectroscopy with soft X-ray synchrotron radiation. Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy with soft X-rays has made it possible to directly observe their bulk band structures and Fermi surfaces. It has been shown that the band structures and Fermi surfaces of itinerant compounds such as UB2, UN, and UFeGa5 are quantitatively described by a band-structure calculation treating all U 5f electrons as itinerant. Furthermore, the overall electronic structures of heavy-fermion compounds such as UPd2Al3, UNi2Al3, and URu2Si2 are also explained by a band-structure calculation, although some disagreements exist, which might originate from the electron correlation effect. This suggests that the itinerant description of U 5f states is an appropriate starting point for the description of their electronic structures. The situation is similar for ferromagnetic superconductors such as UGe2, URhGe, UCoGe, and UIr, although the complications from their low-symmetry crystal structures make it more difficult to describe their detailed electronic structures. The local electronic structures of the uranium site have been probed by core-level photoelectron spectroscopy with soft X-rays. The comparisons of core-level spectra of heavy-fermion compounds with typical itinerant and localized compounds suggest that the local electronic structures of most itinerant and heavy-fermion compounds are close to the U 5f3 configuration except for UPd2Al3 and UPt3. The core-level spectrum of UPd2Al3 has similarities to those of both itinerant and localized compounds, suggesting that it is located at the boundary between the itinerant and localized states. Moreover, the spectrum of UPt3 is very close to that of the localized compound UPd3, suggesting that it is nearly localized, although there are narrow quasi-particle bands in the vicinity of EF.

  15. Fine structure of subauroral electric field and electron content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarevich, Roman A.; Bristow, W. A.

    2014-05-01

    Small-scale structure of the plasma convection and electron content within the subauroral polarization stream (SAPS) is investigated. We present ionospheric observations during the main phase of the geomagnetic storm on 17 March 2013, during which a sequence of intense, highly localized, and fast-moving electric field (EF) structures within SAPS was observed by the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network Christmas Valley West (CVW) radar. The CVW EF measurements at 60 s resolution are analyzed in context of coincident GPS measurements of the total electron content (TEC) at 30 s resolution. The strong and narrow feature of the subauroral ion drift (SAID) was observed poleward of the TEC trough, with a TEC enhancement (peak) seen in the SAPS (SAID) region. The SAPS wave activity commenced ~2 h (15 min) after first appearance of SAPS (SAID). The SAPS structures appeared near the poleward edge of the trough, propagated westward, and merged with SAID near TEC peak. The propagation velocity was comparable with convection velocity within each EF structure. The SAPS TEC exhibited a general decrease toward the end of the period. On a smaller time scale, TEC exhibited a small but appreciable decrease within EF structures. The wavelet spectra of EF and TEC showed similar variations, with wave period of ~5 min period near onset and increasing to 8-10 min toward the end of the period with significant wave activity. A scenario is discussed, in which the SAPS wave activity may modify the ionospheric conductance and TEC at small scales, with large-scale magnetosphere-ionosphere feedback acting to continuously deplete TEC where/when such activity does not occur.

  16. Electron and hole dynamics in the electronic and structural phase transitions of VO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haglund, Richard

    2015-03-01

    The ultrafast, optically induced insulator-to-metal transition (IMT) and the associated structural phase transition (SPT) in vanadium dioxide (VO2) have been studied for over a decade. However, only recently have effects due to the combined presence of electron-hole pairs and injected electrons been observed. Here we compare and contrast IMT dynamics when both hot electrons and optically excited electron-hole pairs are involved, in (1) thin films of VO2 overlaid by a thin gold foil, in which hot electrons are generated by 1.5 eV photons absorbed in the foil and accelerated through the VO2 by an applied electric field; (2) VO2 nanoparticles covered with a sparse mesh of gold nanoparticles averaging 20-30 nm in diameter in which hot electrons are generated by resonant excitation and decay of the localized surface plasmon; and (3) bare VO2 thin films excited by intense near-single-cycle THz pulses. In the first case, the IMT is driven by excitation of the bulk gold plasmon, and the SPT appears on a few-picosecond time scale. In the second case, density-functional calculations indicate that above a critical carrier density, the addition of a single electron to a 27-unit supercell drives the catastrophic collapse of the coherent phonon associated with, and leading to, the SPT. In the third case, sub-bandgap-energy photons (approximately 0.1 eV) initiate the IMT, but exhibit the same sub-100 femtosecond switching time and coherent phonon dynamics as observed when the IMT is initiated by 1.5 eV photons. This suggests that the underlying mechanism must be quite different, possibly THz-field induced interband tunneling of spatially separated electron-hole pairs. The implications of these findings for ultrafast switching in opto-electronic devices - such as hybrid VO2 silicon ring resonators - are briefly considered. Support from the National Science Foundation (DMR-1207407), the Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy (DE-FG02-01ER45916) and the Defense Threat

  17. Electronic structure of Mg: From monolayers to bulk

    SciTech Connect

    Schiller, F.; Laubschat, C.; Heber, M.; Servedio, V.D.P.

    2004-09-15

    The structure of thin Mg films epitaxially grown onto a W(110) crystal was analyzed by low energy electron and Auger electron diffraction verifying a growth of bulk Mg. Normal-emission angle-resolved photoemission spectra of the growing films reveal quantum well states on both sides of a surface state. These states result from electron confinement in the Mg layer and are used to derive the electronic structure perpendicular to the surface. Off-normal, the electronic structure is dominated by the parabolic dispersion of surface states forming circles around the {gamma}-points and ellipses around the M-points in the Fermi surface cuts.

  18. Using the electron localization function to correct for confinement physics in semi-local density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Feng Mattsson, Ann E.; Armiento, Rickard

    2014-05-14

    We have previously proposed that further improved functionals for density functional theory can be constructed based on the Armiento-Mattsson subsystem functional scheme if, in addition to the uniform electron gas and surface models used in the Armiento-Mattsson 2005 functional, a model for the strongly confined electron gas is also added. However, of central importance for this scheme is an index that identifies regions in space where the correction provided by the confined electron gas should be applied. The electron localization function (ELF) is a well-known indicator of strongly localized electrons. We use a model of a confined electron gas based on the harmonic oscillator to show that regions with high ELF directly coincide with regions where common exchange energy functionals have large errors. This suggests that the harmonic oscillator model together with an index based on the ELF provides the crucial ingredients for future improved semi-local functionals. For a practical illustration of how the proposed scheme is intended to work for a physical system we discuss monoclinic cupric oxide, CuO. A thorough discussion of this system leads us to promote the cell geometry of CuO as a useful benchmark for future semi-local functionals. Very high ELF values are found in a shell around the O ions, and take its maximum value along the Cu–O directions. An estimate of the exchange functional error from the effect of electron confinement in these regions suggests a magnitude and sign that could account for the error in cell geometry.

  19. Probing Actinide Electronic Structure through Pu Cluster Calculations

    DOE PAGES

    Ryzhkov, Mickhail V.; Mirmelstein, Alexei; Yu, Sung-Woo; Chung, Brandon W.; Tobin, James G.

    2013-02-26

    The calculations for the electronic structure of clusters of plutonium have been performed, within the framework of the relativistic discrete-variational method. Moreover, these theoretical results and those calculated earlier for related systems have been compared to spectroscopic data produced in the experimental investigations of bulk systems, including photoelectron spectroscopy. Observation of the changes in the Pu electronic structure as a function of size provides powerful insight for aspects of bulk Pu electronic structure.

  20. Graph-based linear scaling electronic structure theory.

    PubMed

    Niklasson, Anders M N; Mniszewski, Susan M; Negre, Christian F A; Cawkwell, Marc J; Swart, Pieter J; Mohd-Yusof, Jamal; Germann, Timothy C; Wall, Michael E; Bock, Nicolas; Rubensson, Emanuel H; Djidjev, Hristo

    2016-06-21

    We show how graph theory can be combined with quantum theory to calculate the electronic structure of large complex systems. The graph formalism is general and applicable to a broad range of electronic structure methods and materials, including challenging systems such as biomolecules. The methodology combines well-controlled accuracy, low computational cost, and natural low-communication parallelism. This combination addresses substantial shortcomings of linear scaling electronic structure theory, in particular with respect to quantum-based molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:27334148

  1. The imprint of Gould's belt on the local cosmic ray electron spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, M.; Perrot, C.; Grenier, I.

    2001-08-01

    In a recent paper Pohl and Esposito (1998) demonstrated that if the sources of cosmic-rays are discrete, as are Supernova Remnants (SNR), then the spectra of cosmic-ray electrons largely vary with location and time and the locally measured electron spectrum may not be representative of the electron spectra elsewhere in the Galaxy, which could be substantially harder than the local one. They have shown that the observed excess of γ-ray emission above 1 GeV can in fact be partially explained as a correspondingly hard inverse Compton component, provided the bulk of cosmic-ray electrons is produced in SNR. As part of a program to model the Galactic γ-ray foreground we have continued the earlier studies by investigating the impact of the star forming region Gould's Belt on the local electron spectrum. If the electron sources in Gould's Belt were continous, the local electron spectrum would be slightly hardened. If the electron sources are discrete, which is the more probable case, the variation in the local electron spectrum found by Pohl & Esposito persists. 1 The local cosmic-ray electron spectrum The recent detections of non-thermal X-ray synchrotron radiation from the supernova remnants SN1006 (Koyama et al., 1995), RX J1713.7-3946 (Koyama et al., 1997), IC443 (Keohane et al., 1997; Slane et al., 1999), Cas A (Allen et al., 1997), and RCW86 (Borkowski et al., 2001) and the subsequent detections of SN1006 (Tanimori et al., 1998), RX J1713.7-3946 (Muraishi et al., 2000), and Cas A (Aharonian et al., 2001) at TeV energies support the hypothesis that at least Galactic cosmic-ray electrons are accelerated predominantly in SNR. The Galactic distribution and spectrum of cosmic-ray electrons are intimately linked to the distribution and nature of their sources. Supernovae and hence their remnants are tran-

  2. Electronic structure of aluminum nitride: Theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Loughin, S.; French, R.H. ); Ching, W.Y.; Xu, Y.N. ); Slack, G.A. )

    1993-08-30

    We report the results of a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) study of single crystal and polycrystalline AlN over the range 4--40 eV and compare these with theoretical optical properties calculated from first principles using an orthogonalized linear combination of atomic orbitals in the local density approximation. The electronic structure of AlN has a two-dimensional (2D) character indicated by logarithmic divergences at 8.7 and 14 eV. These mark the centers of two sets of 2D critical points which are associated with N 2[ital p][r arrow]Al 3[ital s] transitions and Al=N[r arrow]Al 3[ital p] transitions, respectively. A third feature is centered at 33 eV and associated with N 2[ital s][r arrow]Al 3[ital d] transitions.

  3. Electron microscopy: essentials for viral structure, morphogenesis and rapid diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Hung, Tao; Song, Jingdong; He, Jinsheng

    2013-05-01

    Electron microscopy (EM) should be used in the front line for detection of agents in emergencies and bioterrorism, on accounts of its speed and accuracy. However, the number of EM diagnostic laboratories has decreased considerably and an increasing number of people encounter difficulties with EM results. Therefore, the research on viral structure and morphologyant in EM diagnostic practice. EM has several technological advantages, and should be a fundamental tool in clinical diagnosis of viruses, particularly when agents are unknown or unsuspected. In this article, we review the historical contribution of EM to virology, and its use in virus differentiation, localization of specific virus antigens, virus-cell interaction, and viral morphogenesis. It is essential that EM investigations are based on clinical and comprehensive pathogenesis data from light or confocal microscopy. Furthermore, avoidance of artifacts or false results is necessary to exploit fully the advantages while minimizing its limitations.

  4. Local flow structures defined by kinematic events in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adrian, R. J.; Ditter, J. L.

    1988-01-01

    The spatial structure of turbulent motion in incompressible isotropic turbulence is investigated using a conditional average in which the conditional event specifies the local deformation tensor in addition to the local velocity vector. This average gives the best estimate of the flow field around a fixed point x given the kinematic state at x. Estimates are calculated for various kinematic states in isotropic turbulence, including pure translation, pure shear, plane strain, axisymmetric strain, and pure rotation. It is demonstrated that the large-scale motion is dominated by a vortex ring structure associated with the translational component, except at critical points of the velocity vector field.

  5. Structural, electronic, and magnetic characteristics of Np2Co17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halevy, I.; Hen, A.; Orion, I.; Colineau, E.; Eloirdi, R.; Griveau, J.-C.; Gaczyński, P.; Wilhelm, F.; Rogalev, A.; Sanchez, J.-P.; Winterrose, M. L.; Magnani, N.; Shick, A. B.; Caciuffo, R.

    2012-01-01

    A previously unknown neptunium-transition-metal binary compound Np2Co17 has been synthesized and characterized by means of powder x-ray diffraction, 237Np Mössbauer spectroscopy, superconducting-quantum-interference-device magnetometry, and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). The compound crystallizes in a Th2Ni17-type hexagonal structure with room-temperature lattice parameters a=8.3107(1) Å and c=8.1058(1) Å. Magnetization curves indicate the occurrence of ferromagnetic order below TC>350 K. Mössbauer spectra suggest a Np3+ oxidation state and give an ordered moment of μNp=1.57(4) μB and μNp=1.63(4) μB for the Np atoms located, respectively, at the 2b and 2d crystallographic positions of the P63/mmc space group. Combining these values with a sum-rule analysis of the XMCD spectra measured at the neptunium M4,5 absorption edges, one obtains the spin and orbital contributions to the site-averaged Np moment [μS=-1.88(9) μB, μL=3.48(9) μB]. The ratio between the expectation value of the magnetic-dipole moment and the spin magnetic moment (mmd/μS=+1.36) is positive as predicted for localized 5f electrons and lies between the values calculated in intermediate-coupling (IC) and jj approximations. The expectation value of the angular part of the spin-orbit-interaction operator is in excellent agreement with the IC estimate. The ordered moment averaged over the four inequivalent Co sites, as obtained from the saturation value of the magnetization, is μCo≃1.6 μB. The experimental results are discussed against the predictions of first-principles electronic-structure calculations based on the spin-polarized local-spin-density approximation plus the Hubbard interaction.

  6. Dramatic changes in electronic structure revealed by fractionally charged nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Aron J.; Mori-Sánchez, Paula

    2014-01-28

    Discontinuous changes in the electronic structure upon infinitesimal changes to the Hamiltonian are demonstrated. These are revealed in one and two electron molecular systems by full configuration interaction (FCI) calculations when the realm of the nuclear charge is extended to be fractional. FCI electron densities in these systems show dramatic changes in real space and illustrate the transfer, hopping, and removal of electrons. This is due to the particle nature of electrons seen in stretched systems and is a manifestation of an energy derivative discontinuity at constant number of electrons. Dramatic errors of density functional theory densities are seen in real space as this physics is missing from currently used approximations. The movements of electrons in these simple systems encapsulate those in real physical processes, from chemical reactions to electron transport and pose a great challenge for the development of new electronic structure methods.

  7. Electron spin resonance (ESR) probe for interventional MRI instrument localization.

    PubMed

    Ehnholm, G J; Vahala, E T; Kinnunen, J; Nieminen, J E; Standertskjöld-Nordenstam, C; Uusitalo, M A

    1999-08-01

    This article presents a miniaturized electron spin resonance (ESR) probe for deducing the position of a surgical instrument on an MR image. The ESR probe constructed was small enough to fit inside a 14-G biopsy needle sheath, and position information of the sheath could be acquired using a simple gradient sequence. The position accuracy was estimated from needle trajectories as inferred from the needle artifact, the actual physical trajectory, and measured coordinates. The probe was able to track the tip of a biopsy needle quickly (10 samples/sec) and precisely with accuracy better than +/-2 mm. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 1999;10:216-219.

  8. Local lattice strain measurements in semiconductor devices by using convergent-beam electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toda, Akio; Ikarashi, Nobuyuki; Ono, Haruhiko

    2000-03-01

    We examined the lattice strain distribution around local oxidation of silicon (LOCOS) in a semiconductor device by using highly accurate (1.8×10 -4 standard deviation) convergent-beam electron diffraction (CBED) at a nanometer-scale spatial resolution (10 nm in diameter). The nanometer-scale measurement was done by reducing the elastic relaxation using a thick (about 600 nm) sample and by removing the inelastically scattered electrons by means of an electron energy filter. A highly accurate measurement was achieved through the analysis of higher-order Laue zone (HOLZ) patterns using the least-squares fitting of HOLZ line intersection distances between the observations and calculations. Our examination showed that the LOCOS structure gave singularities in strain distributions at the field edge. That is, compressive strain exists in both the vertical and horizontal directions of the substrate, and the shear strain increased there. Most notably, two-dimensional measurements revealed that the singularity of the normal strain in the horizontal direction of the substrate generated at the field edge propagated into the substrate.

  9. Our Milky Way structure in the context of local galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Juntai

    2015-08-01

    The Milky Way is the closest galaxy to us, and has been studied extensively due to its proximity. Understanding its structure and dynamics will help us understand spiral galaxies in general. I will review the latest research progress in the structure, kinematics, and dynamics of the Milky Way in the context of local galaxies. I will cover most structural components (the bulge/bar, disk, and spiral structures) and discuss the implications of some new results on the formation history of our home galaxy.

  10. European X-Ray Free Electron Laser (EXFEL): local implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2013-10-01

    European X-Ray FEL - free electron laser is under construction in DESY Hamburg. It is scheduled to be operational at 2015/16 at a cost more than 1 billion Euro. The laser uses SASE method to generate x-ray light. It is propelled by an electron linac of 17,5GeV energy and more than 2km in length. The linac uses superconducting SRF TESLA technology working at 1,3 GHz in frequency. The prototype of EXFEL is FLASH Laser (200 m in length), where the "proof of principle" was checked, and from the technologies were transferred to the bigger machine. The project was stared in the nineties by building a TTF Laboratory -Tesla Test Facility. The EXFEL laser is a child of a much bigger teraelectronovolt collider project TESLA (now abandoned in Germany but undertaken by international community in a form the ILC). A number of experts and young researchers from Poland participate in the design, construction and research of the FLASH and EXFEL lasers.

  11. Electronic structure imperfections and chemical bonding at graphene interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Brian Joseph

    nanomaterial with lateral dimensions in the hundreds of microns if not larger, with a corresponding atomic vertical thickness poses significant difficulties. Graphene's unique structure is dominated by surface area or potentially hybridized interfaces; consequently, the true realization of this remarkable nanomaterial in device constructs relies on engineering graphene interfaces at the surface in order to controllably mold the electronic structure. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy and the transmission mode analogue scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) are particularly useful tools to study the unoccupied states of graphene and graphene interfaces. In addition, polarized NEXAFS and STXM studies provide information on surface orientation, bond sterics, and the extent of substrate alignment before and after interfacial hybridization. The work presented in this dissertation is fundamentally informed by NEXAFS and STXM measurements on graphene/metal, graphene/dielectric, and graphene/organic interfaces. We start with a general review of the electronic structure of freestanding graphene and graphene interfaces in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2, we investigate freestanding single-layer graphene via STXM and NEXAFS demonstrating that electronic structure heterogeneities from synthesis and processing are ubiquitous in 2-dimensional graphene. We show the mapping of discrete charge transfer regions as a result of doped impurities that decorate the surfaces of graphene and that transfer processing imparts local electronic corrugations or ripples. In corroboration with density functional theory, definitive assignments to the spectral features, global steric orientations of the localized domains, and quantitative charge transfer schemes are evidenced. In the following chapters, we deliberately (Chapter 3) incorporate substitutional nitrogen into reduced graphene oxide to induce C--N charge redistribution and improve global conductivity, (Chapter 4

  12. A new EXAFS method for the local structure analysis of low-Z elements.

    PubMed

    Isomura, Noritake; Kamada, Masao; Nonaka, Takamasa; Nakamura, Eiken; Takano, Takumi; Sugiyama, Harue; Kimoto, Yasuji

    2016-01-01

    A unique analytical method is proposed for local structure analysis via extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. The measurement of electron energy distribution curves at various excitation photon energies using an electron energy analyzer is applied to determine a specific elemental Auger spectrum. To demonstrate the method, the N K-edge EXAFS spectra for a silicon nitride film were obtained via simultaneous measurement of the N KLL Auger and background spectra using dual-energy windows. The background spectrum was then used to remove the photoelectrons and secondary electron mixing in the energy distribution curves. The spectrum obtained following this subtraction procedure represents the `true' N K-edge EXAFS spectrum without the other absorptions that are observed in total electron yield N K-edge EXAFS spectra. The first nearest-neighbor distance (N-Si) derived from the extracted N K-edge EXAFS oscillation was in good agreement with the value derived from Si K-edge analysis. This result confirmed that the present method, referred to as differential electron yield (DEY)-EXAFS, is valid for deriving local surface structure information for low-Z elements. PMID:26698075

  13. A novel method to compare protein structures using local descriptors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Protein structure comparison is one of the most widely performed tasks in bioinformatics. However, currently used methods have problems with the so-called "difficult similarities", including considerable shifts and distortions of structure, sequential swaps and circular permutations. There is a demand for efficient and automated systems capable of overcoming these difficulties, which may lead to the discovery of previously unknown structural relationships. Results We present a novel method for protein structure comparison based on the formalism of local descriptors of protein structure - DEscriptor Defined Alignment (DEDAL). Local similarities identified by pairs of similar descriptors are extended into global structural alignments. We demonstrate the method's capability by aligning structures in difficult benchmark sets: curated alignments in the SISYPHUS database, as well as SISY and RIPC sets, including non-sequential and non-rigid-body alignments. On the most difficult RIPC set of sequence alignment pairs the method achieves an accuracy of 77% (the second best method tested achieves 60% accuracy). Conclusions DEDAL is fast enough to be used in whole proteome applications, and by lowering the threshold of detectable structure similarity it may shed additional light on molecular evolution processes. It is well suited to improving automatic classification of structure domains, helping analyze protein fold space, or to improving protein classification schemes. DEDAL is available online at http://bioexploratorium.pl/EP/DEDAL. PMID:21849047

  14. Cosmic Flows and the Structure of the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinmetz, Matthias

    2016-03-01

    The Local Volume is the area of the cosmos we can analyze in most detail with respect to the properties of its galaxy population, their abundance, their inner structure, their distribution, and their formation. Indeed, many challenges of the cosmological concordance model such as the substructure crisis or the surprising occurrence of vast planes of satellite galaxies are intimately linked to observations of the local galaxy population. However, owing to the peculiar environment of our Milky Way system and its cosmic neighborhood, the Local Volume may also be severely biased. Cosmography, i.e. the reconstruction of the local cosmic web from cosmic flows, and constrained simulations of structure formation as a tool to produce simulated local group analogues provide a powerful method to analyze and quantify these biases. Possible applications include the analysis of the local distribution of dwarf galaxies around luminous galaxies and the characterization of the mass accretion history of these objects. Thanks to the extension of galaxy velocity data out to distances in excess of 200Mpc, we are now capable to reconstruct the 3D matter distribution out to these distances, thus constraining the formation history of object such as the Virgo Cluster.

  15. Isotope-induced partial localization of core electrons in the homonuclear molecule N2.

    PubMed

    Rolles, Daniel; Braune, Markus; Cvejanović, Slobodan; Gessner, Oliver; Hentges, Rainer; Korica, Sanja; Langer, Burkhard; Lischke, Toralf; Prümper, Georg; Reinköster, Axel; Viefhaus, Jens; Zimmermann, Björn; McKoy, Vincent; Becker, Uwe

    2005-09-29

    Because of inversion symmetry and particle exchange, all constituents of homonuclear diatomic molecules are in a quantum mechanically non-local coherent state; this includes the nuclei and deep-lying core electrons. Hence, the molecular photoemission can be regarded as a natural double-slit experiment: coherent electron emission originates from two identical sites, and should give rise to characteristic interference patterns. However, the quantum coherence is obscured if the two possible symmetry states of the electronic wavefunction ('gerade' and 'ungerade') are degenerate; the sum of the two exactly resembles the distinguishable, incoherent emission from two localized core sites. Here we observe the coherence of core electrons in N(2) through a direct measurement of the interference exhibited in their emission. We also explore the gradual transition to a symmetry-broken system of localized electrons by comparing different isotope-substituted species--a phenomenon analogous to the acquisition of partial 'which-way' information in macroscopic double-slit experiments.

  16. Electronic band structure and photoemission: A review and projection

    SciTech Connect

    Falicov, L.M.

    1987-09-01

    A brief review of electronic-structure calculations in solids, as a means of interpreting photoemission spectra, is presented. The calculations are, in general, of three types: ordinary one-electron-like band structures, which apply to bulk solids and are the basis of all other calculations; surface modified calculations, which take into account, self-consistently if at all possible, the presence of a vacuum-solid interface and of the electronic modifications caused thereby; and many-body calculations, which go beyond average-field approximations and consider dynamic rearrangement effects caused by electron-electron correlations during the photoemission process. 44 refs.

  17. Spatial and electron structure of substituted gold clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarzhemsky, V. G.; Kazaryan, M. A.; Bulychev, N. A.; Dyakov, Y. A.; Kosheleva, O. K.; Chen, C. H.

    2015-12-01

    The structure of intermetallic clusters Au12M (M=Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os) and features of their interaction with electron donors and acceptor atoms, i.e. H and F, were investigated making use computer calculation based of density functional theory. In was found that metal clusters with effective electron number equal to 18 have more symmetrical shape then that with a number of electrons differing from 18. The interaction of gold nanoparticles with silica was modeled by attachment of SiO4H groups and the connection of the electronic structure with electronic transitions in spaser is discussed.

  18. One Single Static Measurement Predicts Wave Localization in Complex Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, Gautier; Gondel, Alexane; Dubois, Marc; Atlan, Michael; Feppon, Florian; Labbé, Aimé; Gillot, Camille; Garelli, Alix; Ernoult, Maxence; Mayboroda, Svitlana; Filoche, Marcel; Sebbah, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    A recent theoretical breakthrough has brought a new tool, called the localization landscape, for predicting the localization regions of vibration modes in complex or disordered systems. Here, we report on the first experiment which measures the localization landscape and demonstrates its predictive power. Holographic measurement of the static deformation under uniform load of a thin plate with complex geometry provides direct access to the landscape function. When put in vibration, this system shows modes precisely confined within the subregions delineated by the landscape function. Also the maxima of this function match the measured eigenfrequencies, while the minima of the valley network gives the frequencies at which modes become extended. This approach fully characterizes the low frequency spectrum of a complex structure from a single static measurement. It paves the way for controlling and engineering eigenmodes in any vibratory system, especially where a structural or microscopic description is not accessible.

  19. One Single Static Measurement Predicts Wave Localization in Complex Structures.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Gautier; Gondel, Alexane; Dubois, Marc; Atlan, Michael; Feppon, Florian; Labbé, Aimé; Gillot, Camille; Garelli, Alix; Ernoult, Maxence; Mayboroda, Svitlana; Filoche, Marcel; Sebbah, Patrick

    2016-08-12

    A recent theoretical breakthrough has brought a new tool, called the localization landscape, for predicting the localization regions of vibration modes in complex or disordered systems. Here, we report on the first experiment which measures the localization landscape and demonstrates its predictive power. Holographic measurement of the static deformation under uniform load of a thin plate with complex geometry provides direct access to the landscape function. When put in vibration, this system shows modes precisely confined within the subregions delineated by the landscape function. Also the maxima of this function match the measured eigenfrequencies, while the minima of the valley network gives the frequencies at which modes become extended. This approach fully characterizes the low frequency spectrum of a complex structure from a single static measurement. It paves the way for controlling and engineering eigenmodes in any vibratory system, especially where a structural or microscopic description is not accessible. PMID:27563967

  20. The Changing Market Structure of Local Television News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Angela

    The growth in competition for revenues, along with the advent of cable, independent television and video cassette recorders (VCR), may signify a change in the market structure of local television news. To explain if and how this change may be occurring, an explanation of economic theory as well as evidence from "Broadcast and Cable Yearbook" and…

  1. Structures of Participation in the "University of Local Knowledge"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Penny; Irish, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    "Structures of Participation" concerns a recent media arts project, the University of Local Knowledge (ULK). ULK is simultaneously a critique of established academic institutions and disciplines and a system for self-organized learning among the residents of Knowle West, an area of south Bristol (UK). Beginning in 2009, the Knowle West…

  2. Local structure of numerically generated worm hole spacetime.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siino, M.

    The author investigates the evolution of the apparent horizons in a numerically gererated worm hole spacetime. The behavior of the apparent horizons is affected by the dynamics of the matter field. By using the local mass of the system, he interprets the evolution of the worm hole structure.

  3. Local Structure of CuIn3Se5

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C. H.; Wei, S. H.; Leyarovska, N.; Johnson, J. W.; Zhang, S. B.; Stanbery, B. J.; Anderson, T. J.

    2000-01-01

    The results of a detailed EXAFS study of the Cu-K, In-K, and Se-K edges CuIn3Se5 are reported. The Cu and In first nearest neighbor local structures were found to be almost identical to those in CuInSe2.

  4. Quantum transport through disordered 1D wires: Conductance via localized and delocalized electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Gopar, Víctor A.

    2014-01-14

    Coherent electronic transport through disordered systems, like quantum wires, is a topic of fundamental and practical interest. In particular, the exponential localization of electron wave functions-Anderson localization-due to the presence of disorder has been widely studied. In fact, Anderson localization, is not an phenomenon exclusive to electrons but it has been observed in microwave and acoustic experiments, photonic materials, cold atoms, etc. Nowadays, many properties of electronic transport of quantum wires have been successfully described within a scaling approach to Anderson localization. On the other hand, anomalous localization or delocalization is, in relation to the Anderson problem, a less studied phenomenon. Although one can find signatures of anomalous localization in very different systems in nature. In the problem of electronic transport, a source of delocalization may come from symmetries present in the system and particular disorder configurations, like the so-called Lévy-type disorder. We have developed a theoretical model to describe the statistical properties of transport when electron wave functions are delocalized. In particular, we show that only two physical parameters determine the complete conductance distribution.

  5. One- and many-electron self-interaction error in local and global hybrid functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Tobias; Kümmel, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    Electronic self-interaction poses a fundamental challenge in density-functional theory. It greatly limits, e.g., the physical interpretation of eigenvalues as electron removal energies. We here investigate whether local hybrid functionals that are designed to be free from one-electron self-interaction lead to occupied Kohn-Sham eigenvalues and orbitals that approximate photoemission observables well. We compare the local hybrid results to the ones from global hybrid functionals that only partially counteract the self-interaction, and to the results that are obtained with a Perdew-Zunger-type self-interaction correction. Furthermore, we check whether being nominally free from one-electron self-interaction translates into a reduced many-electron self-interaction error. Our findings show that this is not the case for the local hybrid functionals that we studied: In practice they are similar to global hybrids in many respects, despite being formally superior. This finding indicates that there is a conceptual difference between the Perdew-Zunger way and the local hybrid way of translating the one-electron condition to a many-electron system. We also point out and solve some difficulties that occur when using local hybrid functionals in combination with pseudopotentials.

  6. Effect of potassium doping on electronic structure and thermoelectric properties of topological crystalline insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychowdhury, Subhajit; Sandhya Shenoy, U.; Waghmare, Umesh V.; Biswas, Kanishka

    2016-05-01

    Topological crystalline insulator (TCI), Pb0.6Sn0.4Te, exhibits metallic surface states protected by crystal mirror symmetry with negligibly small band gap. Enhancement of its thermoelectric performances needs tuning of its electronic structure particularly through engineering of its band gap. While physical perturbations tune the electronic structure of TCI by breaking of the crystal mirror symmetry, chemical means such as doping have been more attractive recently as they result in better thermoelectric performance in TCIs. Here, we demonstrate that K doping in TCI, Pb0.6Sn0.4Te, breaks the crystal mirror symmetry locally and widens electronic band gap, which is confirmed by direct electronic absorption spectroscopy and electronic structure calculations. K doping in Pb0.6Sn0.4Te increases p-type carrier concentration and suppresses the bipolar conduction via widening a band gap, which collectively boosts the thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) to 1 at 708 K.

  7. QWalk: A quantum Monte Carlo program for electronic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Lucas K. Bajdich, Michal Mitas, Lubos

    2009-05-20

    We describe QWalk, a new computational package capable of performing quantum Monte Carlo electronic structure calculations for molecules and solids with many electrons. We describe the structure of the program and its implementation of quantum Monte Carlo methods. It is open-source, licensed under the GPL, and available at the web site (http://www.qwalk.org)

  8. Weak localization and electron–electron interactions in few layer black phosphorus devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yanmeng; Gillgren, Nathaniel; Espiritu, Timothy; Tran, Son; Yang, Jiawei; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takahashi; Lau, Chun Ning

    2016-09-01

    Few layer phosphorene (FLP) devices are extensively studied due to their unique electronic properties and potential applications on nano-electronics. Here we present magnetotransport studies which reveal electron–electron interactions as the dominant scattering mechanism in hexagonal boron nitride-encapsulated FLP devices. From weak localization measurements, we estimate the electron dephasing length to be 30 to 100 nm at low temperatures, which exhibits a strong dependence on carrier density n and a power-law dependence on temperature (∼T ‑0.4). These results establish that the dominant scattering mechanism in FLP is electron–electron interactions.

  9. Local Fine Structural Insight into Mechanism of Electrochemical Passivation of Titanium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Yu, Hongying; Wang, Ke; Xu, Haisong; Wang, Shaoyang; Sun, Dongbai

    2016-07-20

    Electrochemically formed passive film on titanium in 1.0 M H2SO4 solution and its thickness, composition, chemical state, and local fine structure are examined by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and X-ray absorption fine structure. AES analysis reveals that the thickness and composition of oxide film are proportional to the reciprocal of current density in potentiodynamic polarization. XPS depth profiles of the chemical states of titanium exhibit the coexistence of various valences cations in the surface. Quantitative X-ray absorption near edge structure analysis of the local electronic structure of the topmost surface (∼5.0 nm) shows that the ratio of [TiO2]/[Ti2O3] is consistent with that of passivation/dissolution of electrochemical activity. Theoretical calculation and analysis of extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectra at Ti K-edge indicate that both the structures of passivation and dissolution are distorted caused by the appearance of two different sites of Ti-O and Ti-Ti. And the bound water in the topmost surface plays a vital role in structural disorder confirmed by XPS. Overall, the increase of average Ti-O coordination causes the electrochemical passivation, and the dissolution is due to the decrease of average Ti-Ti coordination. The structural variations of passivation in coordination number and interatomic distance are in good agreement with the prediction of point defect model. PMID:27355902

  10. Electronic Resources in a Next-Generation Catalog: The Case of WorldCat Local

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shadle, Steve

    2009-01-01

    In April 2007, the University of Washington Libraries debuted WorldCat Local (WCL), a localized version of the WorldCat database that interoperates with a library's integrated library system and fulfillment services to provide a single-search interface for a library's physical and electronic content. This brief will describe how WCL incorporates a…

  11. Local structure of ZnO micro flowers and nanoparticles obtained by micro segmented flow synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shuning; Roy, Amitava; Lichtenberg, Henning; Merchan, Gregory; Kumar, Challa S.S.R.; Köhler, J. Michael

    2012-03-07

    The micro-segmented flow technique was applied for continuous synthesis of ZnO micro- and nanoparticles with short residence times of 9.4 s and 21.4 s, respectively. The obtained particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and photoluminescence spectroscopy were used to determine the size and optical properties of ZnO nanoparticles. In addition, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy was employed to investigate local structural properties. The EXAFS measurements reveal a larger degree of structural disorder in the nanoparticles than the microparticles. These structural changes should be taken into consideration while evaluating the size-dependent visible emission of ZnO nanoparticles.

  12. Localization of acoustic modes in periodic porous silicon structures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The propagation of longitudinal acoustic waves in multilayer structures based on porous silicon and the experimental measurement of acoustic transmission for the structures in the gigahertz range are reported and studied theoretically. The considered structures exhibit band gaps in the transmission spectrum and these are localized modes inside the band gap, coming from defect layers introduced in periodic systems. The frequency at which the acoustic resonances appear can be tuned by changing the porosity and/or thickness of the defect layer. PMID:25206317

  13. Viscoplastic response of structures for intense local heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Earl A.; Kolenski, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    A thermoviscoplastic finite element method employing the Bodner-Partom constitutve model is used to investigate the response of simplified thermal-structural models to intense local heating. The computational method formulates the problem in rate and advances the solution in time by numerical integration. The thermoviscoplastic response of simplified structures with prescribed temperatures is investigated. With rapid rises of temperature, the nickel alloy structures display initially higher yield stresses due to strain rate effects. As temperatures approach elevated values, yield stress and stiffness degrade rapidly and pronounced plastic deformation occurs.

  14. Local Crystalline Structure in an Amorphous Protein Dense Phase

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Daniel G.; Modla, Shannon; Wagner, Norman J.; Sandler, Stanley I.; Lenhoff, Abraham M.

    2015-01-01

    Proteins exhibit a variety of dense phases ranging from gels, aggregates, and precipitates to crystalline phases and dense liquids. Although the structure of the crystalline phase is known in atomistic detail, little attention has been paid to noncrystalline protein dense phases, and in many cases the structures of these phases are assumed to be fully amorphous. In this work, we used small-angle neutron scattering, electron microscopy, and electron tomography to measure the structure of ovalbumin precipitate particles salted out with ammonium sulfate. We found that the ovalbumin phase-separates into core-shell particles with a core radius of ∼2 μm and shell thickness of ∼0.5 μm. Within this shell region, nanostructures comprised of crystallites of ovalbumin self-assemble into a well-defined bicontinuous network with branches ∼12 nm thick. These results demonstrate that the protein gel is comprised in part of nanocrystalline protein. PMID:26488663

  15. Neural networks for local structure detection in polymorphic systems.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Philipp; Dellago, Christoph

    2013-10-28

    The accurate identification and classification of local ordered and disordered structures is an important task in atomistic computer simulations. Here, we demonstrate that properly trained artificial neural networks can be used for this purpose. Based on a neural network approach recently developed for the calculation of energies and forces, the proposed method recognizes local atomic arrangements from a set of symmetry functions that characterize the environment around a given atom. The algorithm is simple and flexible and it does not rely on the definition of a reference frame. Using the Lennard-Jones system as well as liquid water and ice as illustrative examples, we show that the neural networks developed here detect amorphous and crystalline structures with high accuracy even in the case of complex atomic arrangements, for which conventional structure detection approaches are unreliable.

  16. Local magnetic structure determination using polarized neutron holography

    SciTech Connect

    Szakál, Alex Markó, Márton Cser, László

    2015-05-07

    A unique and important property of the neutron is that it possesses magnetic moment. This property is widely used for determination of magnetic structure of crystalline samples observing the magnetic components of the diffraction peaks. Investigations of diffraction patterns give information only about the averaged structure of a crystal but for discovering of local spin arrangement around a specific (e.g., impurity) nucleus remains still a challenging problem. Neutron holography is a useful tool to investigate the local structure around a specific nucleus embedded in a crystal lattice. The method has been successfully applied experimentally in several cases using non-magnetic short range interaction of the neutron and the nucleus. A mathematical model of the hologram using interaction between magnetic moment of the atom and the neutron spin for polarized neutron holography is provided. Validity of a polarized neutron holographic experiment is demonstrated by applying the proposed method on model systems.

  17. Measurement of Two Low-Temperature Energy Gaps in the Electronic Structure of Antiferromagnetic USb2 Using Ultrafast Optical Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, J.; Durakiewicz, T.; Trugman, S. A.; Zhu, J.-X.; Riseborough, P. S.; Baumbach, R.; Bauer, E. D.; Gofryk, K.; Meng, J.-Q.; Joyce, J. J.; Taylor, A. J.; Prasankumar, R. P.

    2013-08-01

    Ultrafast optical spectroscopy is used to study the antiferromagnetic f-electron system USb2. We observe the opening of two charge gaps at low temperatures (≲45K), arising from renormalization of the electronic structure. Analysis of our data indicates that one gap is due to hybridization between localized f-electron and conduction electron bands, while band renormalization involving magnons leads to the emergence of the second gap. These experiments thus enable us to shed light on the complex electronic structure emerging at the Fermi surface in f-electron systems.

  18. Measurement of two low-temperature energy gaps in the electronic structure of antiferromagnetic USb2 using ultrafast optical spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Qi, J; Durakiewicz, T; Trugman, S A; Zhu, J-X; Riseborough, P S; Baumbach, R; Bauer, E D; Gofryk, K; Meng, J-Q; Joyce, J J; Taylor, A J; Prasankumar, R P

    2013-08-01

    Ultrafast optical spectroscopy is used to study the antiferromagnetic f-electron system USb(2). We observe the opening of two charge gaps at low temperatures (electronic structure. Analysis of our data indicates that one gap is due to hybridization between localized f-electron and conduction electron bands, while band renormalization involving magnons leads to the emergence of the second gap. These experiments thus enable us to shed light on the complex electronic structure emerging at the Fermi surface in f-electron systems.

  19. An Investigation of Magnetic, Electronic and Structural Properties of Metallofullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, S. Vincent; Qian, Meichun; Khanna, Shiv

    2008-03-01

    Gadolinium based endohedral metallofullerenes Gd3N@C80 functionalized with OH radicals have been found to enhance the relaxivity by orders of magnitude over conventional agents and are being sought as new contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Using state of the art density functional theory (DFT) in the regime of the local density approximation with the on-site Coulomb interaction (LSDA+U), we have carried out theoretical studies to determine the electronic and magnetic properties of gadolinium-based and lutetium-based nitride fullerenes, namely Lu3-xGdxN@C80 (x = 1-2). While Gd3N@C80 has previously shown promising features as a contrast agent, the idea of replacing gadolinium atoms by lutetium has been proposed to result in a mixed-metal species for multi-modal imaging. Our results indicate that Lu2GdN@C80 is the most stable of all possible configurations with a binding energy 16.57 eV, can be considered for use as both an MRI contrast agent, due to gadolinium's high magnetic moment, and as a potential radioactive therapeutic or diagnostic agent, by neutron activation of a lutetium radioisotope. These results along with details of electronic structure will be presented.

  20. Electronic structure of BaO/W cathode surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, Wolfgang

    1989-01-01

    The local electronic structure of the emissive layer of barium dispenser thermionic cathodes is investigated theoretically using the relativistic scattered-wave approach. The interaction of Ba and O with W, Os, and W-Os alloy surfaces is studied with atomic clusters modeling different absorption environments representative of B- and M-type cathodes. Ba is found to be strongly oxidized, while O and the metal substrate are in a reduced chemical state. The presence of O enhances the surface dipole and Ba binding energy relative to Ba on W. Model results for W-Os alloy substrates show only relatively small changes in Ba and O for identical geometries, but very large charge redistributions inside the substrate, which are attributed to the electronegativity difference between Os and W. If Os is present in the surface layer, the charge transfer from Ba to the substrate and the Ba binding energy increase relative to W. Explanations are offered for the improved electron emission from alloy surfaces and the different emission enhancement for different alloy substrates.

  1. Electron-beam-induced deposition and post-treatment processes to locally generate clean titanium oxide nanostructures on Si(100).

    PubMed

    Schirmer, M; Walz, M-M; Vollnhals, F; Lukasczyk, T; Sandmann, A; Chen, C; Steinrück, H-P; Marbach, H

    2011-02-25

    We have investigated the lithographic generation of TiO(x) nanostructures on Si(100) via electron-beam-induced deposition (EBID) of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and local Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). In addition, the fabricated nanostructures were also characterized ex situ via atomic force microscopy (AFM) under ambient conditions. In EBID, a highly focused electron beam is used to locally decompose precursor molecules and thereby to generate a deposit. A drawback of this nanofabrication technique is the unintended deposition of material in the vicinity of the impact position of the primary electron beam due to so-called proximity effects. Herein, we present a post-treatment procedure to deplete the unintended deposits by moderate sputtering after the deposition process. Moreover, we were able to observe the formation of pure titanium oxide nanocrystals (<100 nm) in situ upon heating the sample in a well-defined oxygen atmosphere. While the nanocrystal growth for the as-deposited structures also occurs in the surroundings of the irradiated area due to proximity effects, it is limited to the pre-defined regions, if the sample was sputtered before heating the sample under oxygen atmosphere. The described two-step post-treatment procedure after EBID presents a new pathway for the fabrication of clean localized nanostructures. PMID:21242619

  2. Electron-beam-induced deposition and post-treatment processes to locally generate clean titanium oxide nanostructures on Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirmer, M.; Walz, M.-M.; Vollnhals, F.; Lukasczyk, T.; Sandmann, A.; Chen, C.; Steinrück, H.-P.; Marbach, H.

    2011-02-01

    We have investigated the lithographic generation of TiOx nanostructures on Si(100) via electron-beam-induced deposition (EBID) of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and local Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). In addition, the fabricated nanostructures were also characterized ex situ via atomic force microscopy (AFM) under ambient conditions. In EBID, a highly focused electron beam is used to locally decompose precursor molecules and thereby to generate a deposit. A drawback of this nanofabrication technique is the unintended deposition of material in the vicinity of the impact position of the primary electron beam due to so-called proximity effects. Herein, we present a post-treatment procedure to deplete the unintended deposits by moderate sputtering after the deposition process. Moreover, we were able to observe the formation of pure titanium oxide nanocrystals (<100 nm) in situ upon heating the sample in a well-defined oxygen atmosphere. While the nanocrystal growth for the as-deposited structures also occurs in the surroundings of the irradiated area due to proximity effects, it is limited to the pre-defined regions, if the sample was sputtered before heating the sample under oxygen atmosphere. The described two-step post-treatment procedure after EBID presents a new pathway for the fabrication of clean localized nanostructures.

  3. Scanning transmission electron microscopy of biological structures.

    PubMed

    Colliex, C; Mory, C

    1994-01-01

    The design of the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) has been conceived to optimize its detection efficiency of the different elastic and inelastic signals resulting from the interaction of the high energy primary electrons with the specimen. Its potential use to visualize and measure biological objects was recognized from the first studies by Crewe and coworkers in the seventies. Later the real applications have not followed the initial hopes. The purpose of the present paper is to describe how the instrument has practically evolved and recently begun to demonstrate all its potentialities for quantitative electron microscopy of a wide range of biological specimens, from freeze-dried isolated macromolecules to unstained cryosections. Emphasis will be put on the mass-mapping, multi-signal and elemental mapping modes which are unique features of the STEM instruments.

  4. Topological framework for local structure analysis in condensed matter

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Emanuel A.; Han, Jian; Srolovitz, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Physical systems are frequently modeled as sets of points in space, each representing the position of an atom, molecule, or mesoscale particle. As many properties of such systems depend on the underlying ordering of their constituent particles, understanding that structure is a primary objective of condensed matter research. Although perfect crystals are fully described by a set of translation and basis vectors, real-world materials are never perfect, as thermal vibrations and defects introduce significant deviation from ideal order. Meanwhile, liquids and glasses present yet more complexity. A complete understanding of structure thus remains a central, open problem. Here we propose a unified mathematical framework, based on the topology of the Voronoi cell of a particle, for classifying local structure in ordered and disordered systems that is powerful and practical. We explain the underlying reason why this topological description of local structure is better suited for structural analysis than continuous descriptions. We demonstrate the connection of this approach to the behavior of physical systems and explore how crystalline structure is compromised at elevated temperatures. We also illustrate potential applications to identifying defects in plastically deformed polycrystals at high temperatures, automating analysis of complex structures, and characterizing general disordered systems. PMID:26460045

  5. Precession electron diffraction and its utility for structural fingerprinting in the transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeck, Peter; Rouvimov, Sergei; Nicolopoulos, Stavros

    2009-09-01

    Precession electron diffraction (PED) in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) is discussed in order to illustrate its utility for structural fingerprinting of nanocrystals. While individual nanocrystals may be fingerprinted structurally from PED spot patterns, ensembles of nanocrystals may be fingerprinted from powder PED ring patterns.

  6. Local duality in spin structure functions g1(p) and g1(d)

    SciTech Connect

    Yelena Prok

    2006-02-01

    Inclusive double spin asymmetries obtained by scattering polarized electrons off polarized protons and deuterons have been analyzed to address the issue of quark hadron duality in the polarized spin structure functions gp 1 and gd 1. A polarized electron beam, solid polarized NH3 and ND3 targets and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) in Hall B were used to collect the data. The resulting gp 1 and gd 1 were averaged over the nucleon resonance energy region (M local duality.

  7. Local spin torque induced by electron electric dipole moment in the YbF molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, Masahiro; Senami, Masato; Ogiso, Yoji; Tachibana, Akitomo

    2014-10-06

    In this study, we show the modification of the equation of motion of the electronic spin, which is derived by the quantum electron spin vorticity principle, by the effect of the electron electric dipole moment (EDM). To investigate the new contribution to spin torque by EDM, using first principle calculations, we visualize distributions of the local spin angular momentum density and local spin torque density of the YbF molecule on which the static electric field and magnetic field are applied at t = 0.

  8. Current driven due to localized electron power deposition in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, R.W.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Luce, T.C.; Prater, R.; Sauter, O.; Smirnov, A.P.

    1999-05-01

    Due to spatial localization of electron cyclotron wave injection in DIII-D, electrons heated in an off-axis region must toroidally transit the tokamak 25--50 times before re-entering the heating region. This distance is of the order of the mean free path. The effect of such RF localization is simulated with a time-dependent Fokker-Planck code which is 2D-in-velocity, 1D-in-space-along-B, and periodic in space. An effective parallel electric field arises to maintain continuity of the driven current. Somewhat surprisingly, the localized current drive efficiency remains equal to that for a uniform medium.

  9. Electronic structure of CoPt based systems: from bulk to nanoalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zosiak, L.; Goyhenex, C.; Kozubski, R.; Tréglia, G.

    2015-11-01

    An accurate description of the local electronic structure is necessary for guiding the design of materials with targeted properties in a controlled way. For complex materials like nanoalloys, self-consistent tight-binding calculations should be a good alternative to ab initio methods, for handling the most complex and large systems (hundreds to thousands of atoms), provided that these parameterized method is well founded from ab initio ones that they intend to replace. Ab initio calculations (density functional theory) enabled us to derive rules for charge distribution as a function of structural change and alloying effects in Co and Pt based systems, from bulk to nanoalloys. A general local neutrality rule per site, orbital and species was found. Based on it, self-consistent tight-binding calculations could be implemented and applied to CoPt nanoalloys. A very good agreement is obtained between tight-binding and DFT calculations in terms of local electronic structure.

  10. Tracking Coherent Structures and Source Localization in Geophysical Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgoston, Eric; Hsieh, Ani; Schwartz, Ira; Yecko, Philip

    There has been a steady increase in the deployment of autonomous underwater and surface vehicles for applications such as ocean monitoring, tracking of marine processes, and forecasting contaminant transport. The underwater environment poses unique challenges since robots must operate in a communication and localization-limited environment where their dynamics are tightly coupled with the environmental dynamics. This work presents current efforts in understanding the impact of geophysical fluid dynamics on underwater vehicle control and autonomy. The focus of the talk is on the use of collaborative vehicles to track Lagrangian coherent structures and to localize contaminant spills. Research supported by the National Science Foundation and the Office of Naval Research.

  11. Electron crystallography for structural and functional studies of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2011-01-01

    Membrane proteins are important research targets for basic biological sciences and drug design, but studies of their structure and function are considered difficult to perform. Studies of membrane structures have been greatly facilitated by technological and instrumental advancements in electron microscopy together with methodological advancements in biology. Electron crystallography is especially useful in studying the structure and function of membrane proteins. Electron crystallography is now an established method of analyzing the structures of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers, which resembles their natural biological environment. To better understand the neural system function from a structural point of view, we developed the cryo-electron microscope with a helium-cooled specimen stage, which allows for analysis of the structures of membrane proteins at a resolution higher than 3 Å. This review introduces recent instrumental advances in cryo-electron microscopy and presents some examples of structure analyses of membrane proteins, such as bacteriorhodopsin, water channels and gap junction channels. This review has two objectives: first, to provide a personal historical background to describe how we came to develop the cryo-electron microscope and second, to discuss some of the technology required for the structural analysis of membrane proteins based on cryo-electron microscopy.

  12. The change of the electronic structure of alkali halide films on W(110) under electron bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieckhoff, S.; Maus-Friedrichs, W.; Kempter, V.

    1992-03-01

    NaCl and Csl films of up to four layers were deposited onto W(110) surfaces and investigated by metastable impact electron spectroscopy (MIES), UPS and AES. The electronic structure of the films under electron bombardment was then studied by MIES/UPS. The results are compared with the corresponding ones obtained by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). An interpretation of the results is attempted on the basis of existing theories for desorption induced by electronic transitions (DIET) of alkali halides.

  13. Creation of Electron Trap States in Silicon Dioxide By Local Electron Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winslow, Dustin; Williams, Clayton

    2012-02-01

    Over a decade ago, the Scanning Tunneling Microscope was shown capable of desorbing single hydrogen atoms from the surface of hydrogen terminated silicon.ootnotetextT.C. Shen et. al. Science 268, 1590 (1995). The resultant dangling bonds can act as atomic scale quantum dots.ootnotetextM. B Haider et. al. PRL 102, 046805 (2009). Electrons trapped in such dangling bond states at the surface of crystalline silicon have short retention times at room temperature, due to the proximity of the occupied state energy level to the conduction band. Here we report on a method for creating electron trap states at the surface of a silicon dioxide film by electron injection from a metalized Atomic Force Microscope probe tip. Single Electron Tunneling Force measurementsootnotetextE. Bussmann, et. al. Appl. Phys. Lett., 85, 13 (2004). are employed to examine the existence of trap states in the silicon dioxide surface before and after the electron injection. Evidence for electron trap state creation, without topographic modification of the silicon dioxide surface, will be presented. The trap states created by this process have electron retention times which are greater than one second at room temperature. The methodology for trap state creation and detection will be presented.

  14. Cellulose Acetate Membranes: Electron Microscopy of Structure.

    PubMed

    Riley, R; Gardner, J O; Merten, U

    1964-02-21

    Electron photomicrographs of cellulose acetate membranes used in the reverse osmosis processof water desalination reveal a dense surface layer with a porous substructure. The high rate oftransmission for water can be correlated with the thickness of the dense layer on the air-driedsurface of the membrane.

  15. Electronic-structure calculations of praseodymium metal by means of modified density-functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Svane, A.; Trygg, J.; Johansson, B.; Eriksson, O. |

    1997-09-01

    Electronic-structure calculations of elemental praseodymium are presented. Several approximations are used to describe the Pr f electrons. It is found that the low-pressure, trivalent phase is well described using either the self-interaction corrected (SIC) local-spin-density (LSD) approximation or the generalized-gradient approximation (GGA) with spin and orbital polarization (OP). In the SIC-LSD approach the Pr f electrons are treated explicitly as localized with a localization energy given by the self-interaction of the f orbital. In the GGA+OP scheme the f-electron localization is described by the onset of spin and orbital polarization, the energetics of which is described by spin-moment formation energy and a term proportional to the total orbital moment, L{sub z}{sup 2}. The high-pressure phase is well described with the f electrons treated as band electrons, in either the LSD or the GGA approximations, of which the latter describes more accurately the experimental equation of state. The calculated pressure of the transition from localized to delocalized behavior is 280 kbar in the SIC-LSD approximation and 156 kbar in the GGA+OP approach, both comparing favorably with the experimentally observed transition pressure of 210 kbar. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. Ab-initio study of structural, mechanical and electronic properties of functionalized carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Milowska, Karolina Z.; Birowska, Magdalena; Majewski, Jacek A.

    2013-12-04

    We present exemplary results of extensive studies of structural, mechanical and electronic properties of covalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). We report new results for metallic (9,0), and semiconducting (10,0) single-wall carbon nanotubes (CNT) functionalized with -COOH, -OH, and both groups with concentration up to 12.5%. Our studies are performed in the framework of the density functional theory (DFT). We discuss here the stability, local and global changes in structure, elastic moduli (Young's, Shear, and Bulk), electronic structure and resulting band gaps, as a function of the density of the adsorbed molecules.

  17. Local structure in BaTi O3-BiSc O3 dipole glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, I.; Krayzman, V.; Woicik, J. C.; Bridges, F.; Sterbinsky, G. E.; Usher, T.-M.; Jones, J. L.; Torrejon, D.

    2016-03-01

    Local structures in cubic perovskite-type (B a0.6B i0.4) (T i0.6S c0.4) O3 solid solutions that exhibit reentrant dipole glass behavior have been studied with variable-temperature x-ray/neutron total scattering, extended x-ray absorption fine structure, and electron diffraction methods. Simultaneous fitting of these data using a reverse Monte Carlo algorithm provided instantaneous atomic configurations, which have been used to extract local displacements of the constituent species. The smaller Bi and Ti atoms exhibit probability density distributions that consist of 14 and 8 split sites, respectively. In contrast, Ba and Sc feature single-site distributions. The multisite distributions arise from large and strongly anisotropic off-center displacements of Bi and Ti. The cation displacements are correlated over a short range, with a correlation length limited by chemical disorder. The magnitudes of these displacements and their anisotropy, which are largely determined by local chemistry, change relatively insignificantly on cooling from room temperature. The structure features a nonrandom distribution of local polarization with low-dimensional polar clusters that are several unit cells in size. In situ measurements of atomic pair-distribution function under applied electric field were used to study field-induced changes in the local structure; however, no significant effects besides lattice expansion in the direction of the field could be observed up to electric-field values of 4 kV m m-1 .

  18. Imaging doped silicon test structures using low energy electron microscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Nakakura, Craig Yoshimi; Anderson, Meredith Lynn; Kellogg, Gary Lee

    2010-01-01

    This document is the final SAND Report for the LDRD Project 105877 - 'Novel Diagnostic for Advanced Measurements of Semiconductor Devices Exposed to Adverse Environments' - funded through the Nanoscience to Microsystems investment area. Along with the continuous decrease in the feature size of semiconductor device structures comes a growing need for inspection tools with high spatial resolution and high sample throughput. Ideally, such tools should be able to characterize both the surface morphology and local conductivity associated with the structures. The imaging capabilities and wide availability of scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) make them an obvious choice for imaging device structures. Dopant contrast from pn junctions using secondary electrons in the SEM was first reported in 1967 and more recently starting in the mid-1990s. However, the serial acquisition process associated with scanning techniques places limits on the sample throughput. Significantly improved throughput is possible with the use of a parallel imaging scheme such as that found in photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM) and low energy electron microscopy (LEEM). The application of PEEM and LEEM to device structures relies on contrast mechanisms that distinguish differences in dopant type and concentration. Interestingly, one of the first applications of PEEM was a study of the doping of semiconductors, which showed that the PEEM contrast was very sensitive to the doping level and that dopant concentrations as low as 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3} could be detected. More recent PEEM investigations of Schottky contacts were reported in the late 1990s by Giesen et al., followed by a series of papers in the early 2000s addressing doping contrast in PEEM by Ballarotto and co-workers and Frank and co-workers. In contrast to PEEM, comparatively little has been done to identify contrast mechanisms and assess the capabilities of LEEM for imaging semiconductor device strictures. The one exception is the

  19. NMR study of localized electrons in conductive Langmuir-Blodgett films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukada, Hiroshi

    1999-01-01

    An investigation of nuclear spin lattice relaxation was performed on a conductive Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) film based on a charge-transfer (CT) complex of bisethylenedioxytetrathiafulvalene (BO) and decyltetracyanoquinodimethane (C10TCNQ). The characteristic peak of the relaxation rate T-11 of 1H was observed at a low temperature (10 K). As in its pristine solid (BO-C10TCNQ complex), the behavior of the relaxation rate was explained by the theory of localization. From the quantitative analysis of the behavior, the detailed dynamics of the localized electrons in the LB film were successfully obtained. In addition, the outer-planar anisotropy of T-11 of 1H was observed in the LB film. This indicates that the observed echo mainly originated from 1H at the end ethylene groups of BO. The fact that the field dependence of this anisotropic T-11 is well fitted by the cosine curve provides detailed information of the hyperfine structures in the LB film. Considering these results in combination with those of the temperature dependence of T-11, it is concluded that the variance of each level of BO is small and that the nature of disorder in the LB film is that of a continuum.

  20. A local average distance descriptor for flexible protein structure comparison

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Protein structures are flexible and often show conformational changes upon binding to other molecules to exert biological functions. As protein structures correlate with characteristic functions, structure comparison allows classification and prediction of proteins of undefined functions. However, most comparison methods treat proteins as rigid bodies and cannot retrieve similarities of proteins with large conformational changes effectively. Results In this paper, we propose a novel descriptor, local average distance (LAD), based on either the geodesic distances (GDs) or Euclidean distances (EDs) for pairwise flexible protein structure comparison. The proposed method was compared with 7 structural alignment methods and 7 shape descriptors on two datasets comprising hinge bending motions from the MolMovDB, and the results have shown that our method outperformed all other methods regarding retrieving similar structures in terms of precision-recall curve, retrieval success rate, R-precision, mean average precision and F1-measure. Conclusions Both ED- and GD-based LAD descriptors are effective to search deformed structures and overcome the problems of self-connection caused by a large bending motion. We have also demonstrated that the ED-based LAD is more robust than the GD-based descriptor. The proposed algorithm provides an alternative approach for blasting structure database, discovering previously unknown conformational relationships, and reorganizing protein structure classification. PMID:24694083

  1. Localized conductive patterning via focused electron beam reduction of graphene oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Songkil; Henry, Mathias; Kulkarni, Dhaval D.; Zackowski, Paul; Jang, Seung Soon; Tsukruk, Vladimir V.; Fedorov, Andrei G.

    2015-03-30

    We report on a method for “direct-write” conductive patterning via reduction of graphene oxide (GO) sheets using focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) of carbon. FEBID treatment of the intrinsically dielectric graphene oxide between two metal terminals opens up the conduction channel, thus enabling a unique capability for nanoscale conductive domain patterning in GO. An increase in FEBID electron dose results in a significant increase of the domain electrical conductivity with improving linearity of drain-source current vs. voltage dependence, indicative of a change of graphene oxide electronic properties from insulating to semiconducting. Density functional theory calculations suggest a possible mechanism underlying this experimentally observed phenomenon, as localized reduction of graphene oxide layers via interactions with highly reactive intermediates of electron-beam-assisted dissociation of surface-adsorbed hydrocarbon molecules. These findings establish an unusual route for using FEBID as nanoscale lithography and patterning technique for engineering carbon-based nanomaterials and devices with locally tailored electronic properties.

  2. Localized conductive patterning via focused electron beam reduction of graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Songkil; Kulkarni, Dhaval D.; Henry, Mathias; Zackowski, Paul; Jang, Seung Soon; Tsukruk, Vladimir V.; Fedorov, Andrei G.

    2015-03-01

    We report on a method for "direct-write" conductive patterning via reduction of graphene oxide (GO) sheets using focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) of carbon. FEBID treatment of the intrinsically dielectric graphene oxide between two metal terminals opens up the conduction channel, thus enabling a unique capability for nanoscale conductive domain patterning in GO. An increase in FEBID electron dose results in a significant increase of the domain electrical conductivity with improving linearity of drain-source current vs. voltage dependence, indicative of a change of graphene oxide electronic properties from insulating to semiconducting. Density functional theory calculations suggest a possible mechanism underlying this experimentally observed phenomenon, as localized reduction of graphene oxide layers via interactions with highly reactive intermediates of electron-beam-assisted dissociation of surface-adsorbed hydrocarbon molecules. These findings establish an unusual route for using FEBID as nanoscale lithography and patterning technique for engineering carbon-based nanomaterials and devices with locally tailored electronic properties.

  3. Communication: Near-locality of exchange and correlation density functionals for 1- and 2-electron systems.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianwei; Perdew, John P; Yang, Zenghui; Peng, Haowei

    2016-05-21

    The uniform electron gas and the hydrogen atom play fundamental roles in condensed matter physics and quantum chemistry. The former has an infinite number of electrons uniformly distributed over the neutralizing positively charged background, and the latter only one electron bound to the proton. The uniform electron gas was used to derive the local spin density approximation to the exchange-correlation functional that undergirds the development of the Kohn-Sham density functional theory. We show here that the ground-state exchange-correlation energies of the hydrogen atom and many other 1- and 2-electron systems are modeled surprisingly well by a different local spin density approximation (LSDA0). LSDA0 is constructed to satisfy exact constraints but agrees surprisingly well with the exact results for a uniform two-electron density in a finite, curved three-dimensional space. We also apply LSDA0 to excited or noded 1-electron densities, where it works less well. Furthermore, we show that the localization of the exact exchange hole for a 1- or 2-electron ground state can be measured by the ratio of the exact exchange energy to its optimal lower bound. PMID:27208927

  4. Communication: Near-locality of exchange and correlation density functionals for 1- and 2-electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jianwei; Perdew, John P.; Yang, Zenghui; Peng, Haowei

    2016-05-01

    The uniform electron gas and the hydrogen atom play fundamental roles in condensed matter physics and quantum chemistry. The former has an infinite number of electrons uniformly distributed over the neutralizing positively charged background, and the latter only one electron bound to the proton. The uniform electron gas was used to derive the local spin density approximation to the exchange-correlation functional that undergirds the development of the Kohn-Sham density functional theory. We show here that the ground-state exchange-correlation energies of the hydrogen atom and many other 1- and 2-electron systems are modeled surprisingly well by a different local spin density approximation (LSDA0). LSDA0 is constructed to satisfy exact constraints but agrees surprisingly well with the exact results for a uniform two-electron density in a finite, curved three-dimensional space. We also apply LSDA0 to excited or noded 1-electron densities, where it works less well. Furthermore, we show that the localization of the exact exchange hole for a 1- or 2-electron ground state can be measured by the ratio of the exact exchange energy to its optimal lower bound.

  5. Electron Precipitation Associated with Small-Scale Auroral Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michell, R.; Samara, M.; Grubbs, G. A., II; Hampton, D. L.; Bonnell, J. W.; Ogasawara, K.

    2014-12-01

    We present results from the Ground-to-Rocket Electrons Electrodynamics Correlative Experiment (GREECE) sounding rocket mission, where we combined high-resolution ground-based auroral imaging with high time-resolution precipitating electron measurements. The GREECE payload successfully launched from Poker Flat, Alaska on 03 March 2014 and reached an apogee of approximately 335 km. The narrow field-of-view auroral imaging was taken from Venetie, AK, which is directly under apogee. This enabled the small-scale auroral features at the magnetic footpoint of the rocket payload to be imaged in detail. The electron precipitation was measured with the Acute Precipitating Electron Spectrometer (APES) onboard the payload. Features in the electron data are matched up with their corresponding auroral structures and boundaries, enabling measurement of the exact electron distributions responsible for the specific small-scale auroral features. These electron distributions will then be used to infer what the potential electron acceleration processes were.

  6. Earth Structure, Ice Mass Changes, and the Local Dynamic Geoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harig, C.; Simons, F. J.

    2014-12-01

    Spherical Slepian localization functions are a useful method for studying regional mass changes observed by satellite gravimetry. By projecting data onto a sparse basis set, the local field can be estimated more easily than with the full spherical harmonic basis. We have used this method previously to estimate the ice mass change in Greenland from GRACE data, and it can also be applied to other planetary problems such as global magnetic fields. Earth's static geoid, in contrast to the time-variable field, is in large part related to the internal density and rheological structure of the Earth. Past studies have used dynamic geoid kernels to relate this density structure and the internal deformation it induces to the surface geopotential at large scales. These now classical studies of the eighties and nineties were able to estimate the mantle's radial rheological profile, placing constraints on the ratio between upper and lower mantle viscosity. By combining these two methods, spherical Slepian localization and dynamic geoid kernels, we have created local dynamic geoid kernels which are sensitive only to density variations within an area of interest. With these kernels we can estimate the approximate local radial rheological structure that best explains the locally observed geoid on a regional basis. First-order differences of the regional mantle viscosity structure are accessible to this technique. In this contribution we present our latest, as yet unpublished results on the geographical and temporal pattern of ice mass changes in Antarctica over the past decade, and we introduce a new approach to extract regional information about the internal structure of the Earth from the static global gravity field. Both sets of results are linked in terms of the relevant physics, but also in being developed from the marriage of Slepian functions and geoid kernels. We make predictions on the utility of our approach to derive fully three-dimensional rheological Earth models, to

  7. Energy-filtered Electron Transport Structures for Low-power Low-noise 2-D Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xuan; Qiu, Wanzhi; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2016-01-01

    In addition to cryogenic techniques, energy filtering has the potential to achieve high-performance low-noise 2-D electronic systems. Assemblies based on graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have been demonstrated to exhibit interesting transport properties, including resonant tunnelling. In this paper, we investigate GQDs based structures with the goal of producing energy filters for next generation lower-power lower-noise 2-D electronic systems. We evaluate the electron transport properties of the proposed GQD device structures to demonstrate electron energy filtering and the ability to control the position and magnitude of the energy passband by appropriate device dimensioning. We also show that the signal-to-thermal noise ratio performance of the proposed nanoscale device can be modified according to device geometry. The tunability of two-dimensional GQD structures indicates a promising route for the design of electron energy filters to produce low-power and low-noise electronics. PMID:27796343

  8. Local structure co-occurrence pattern for image retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ke; Zhang, Fan; Lu, Jia; Lu, Yinghua; Kong, Jun; Zhang, Ming

    2016-03-01

    Image description and annotation is an active research topic in content-based image retrieval. How to utilize human visual perception is a key approach to intelligent image feature extraction and representation. This paper has proposed an image feature descriptor called the local structure co-occurrence pattern (LSCP). LSCP extracts the whole visual perception for an image by building a local binary structure, and it is represented by a color-shape co-occurrence matrix which explores the relationship of multivisual feature spaces according to visual attention mechanism. As a result, LSCP not only describes low-level visual features integrated with texture feature, color feature, and shape feature but also bridges high-level semantic comprehension. Extensive experimental results on an image retrieval task on the benchmark datasets, corel-10,000, MIT VisTex, and INRIA Holidays, have demonstrated the usefulness, effectiveness, and robustness of the proposed LSCP.

  9. Local density maxima - Progenitors of structure. [of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Y.; Shaham, J.

    1985-01-01

    Beginning with a short review of the observational data and of some previous theoretical ideas and numerical simulations, the question is addressed of how the large-scale structure that emerges around local density maxima depends on the nature of the primordial density perturbations field. The density contrast profile around local maxima is given, to a good approximation, by the primordial two-point correlation function. The mean number density of objects of a given core mass is calculated as a function of the primordial power spectrum, p(k). In an open universe, rich clusters should have halos steeper than galactic haloes. The observed structure is found to be consistent with omega-sub-zero less than 1.0 and n = -1.

  10. Dynamics of Localized Structures in Systems with Broken Parity Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javaloyes, J.; Camelin, P.; Marconi, M.; Giudici, M.

    2016-04-01

    A great variety of nonlinear dissipative systems are known to host structures having a correlation range much shorter than the size of the system. The dynamics of these localized structures (LSs) has been investigated so far in situations featuring parity symmetry. In this Letter we extend this analysis to systems lacking this property. We show that the LS drifting speed in a parameter varying landscape is not simply proportional to the parameter gradient, as found in parity preserving situations. The symmetry breaking implies a new contribution to the velocity field which is a function of the parameter value, thus leading to a new paradigm for LSs manipulation. We illustrate this general concept by studying the trajectories of the LSs found in a passively mode-locked laser operated in the localization regime. Moreover, the lack of parity affects significantly LSs interactions which are governed by asymmetrical repulsive forces.

  11. The local spiral structure of the Milky Way

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ye; Reid, Mark; Dame, Thomas; Menten, Karl; Sakai, Nobuyuki; Li, Jingjing; Brunthaler, Andreas; Moscadelli, Luca; Zhang, Bo; Zheng, Xingwu

    2016-01-01

    The nature of the spiral structure of the Milky Way has long been debated. Only in the last decade have astronomers been able to accurately measure distances to a substantial number of high-mass star-forming regions, the classic tracers of spiral structure in galaxies. We report distance measurements at radio wavelengths using the Very Long Baseline Array for eight regions of massive star formation near the Local spiral arm of the Milky Way. Combined with previous measurements, these observations reveal that the Local Arm is larger than previously thought, and both its pitch angle and star formation rate are comparable to those of the Galaxy’s major spiral arms, such as Sagittarius and Perseus. Toward the constellation Cygnus, sources in the Local Arm extend for a great distance along our line of sight and roughly along the solar orbit. Because of this orientation, these sources cluster both on the sky and in velocity to form the complex and long enigmatic Cygnus X region. We also identify a spur that branches between the Local and Sagittarius spiral arms. PMID:27704048

  12. Curly arrows meet electron density transfers in chemical reaction mechanisms: from electron localization function (ELF) analysis to valence-shell electron-pair repulsion (VSEPR) inspired interpretation.

    PubMed

    Andrés, Juan; Berski, Sławomir; Silvi, Bernard

    2016-07-01

    Probing the electron density transfers during a chemical reaction can provide important insights, making possible to understand and control chemical reactions. This aim has required extensions of the relationships between the traditional chemical concepts and the quantum mechanical ones. The present work examines the detailed chemical insights that have been generated through 100 years of work worldwide on G. N. Lewis's ground breaking paper on The Atom and the Molecule (Lewis, G. N. The Atom and the Molecule, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1916, 38, 762-785), with a focus on how the determination of reaction mechanisms can be reached applying the bonding evolution theory (BET), emphasizing how curly arrows meet electron density transfers in chemical reaction mechanisms and how the Lewis structure can be recovered. BET that combines the topological analysis of the electron localization function (ELF) and Thom's catastrophe theory (CT) provides a powerful tool providing insight into molecular mechanisms of chemical rearrangements. In agreement with physical laws and quantum theoretical insights, BET can be considered as an appropriate tool to tackle chemical reactivity with a wide range of possible applications. Likewise, the present approach retrieves the classical curly arrows used to describe the rearrangements of chemical bonds for a given reaction mechanism, providing detailed physical grounds for this type of representation. The ideas underlying the valence-shell-electron pair-repulsion (VSEPR) model applied to non-equilibrium geometries provide simple chemical explanations of density transfers. For a given geometry around a central atom, the arrangement of the electronic domain may comply or not with the VSEPR rules according with the valence shell population of the considered atom. A deformation yields arrangements which are either VSEPR defective (at least a domain is missing to match the VSEPR arrangement corresponding to the geometry of the ligands), VSEPR compliant

  13. Curly arrows meet electron density transfers in chemical reaction mechanisms: from electron localization function (ELF) analysis to valence-shell electron-pair repulsion (VSEPR) inspired interpretation.

    PubMed

    Andrés, Juan; Berski, Sławomir; Silvi, Bernard

    2016-07-01

    Probing the electron density transfers during a chemical reaction can provide important insights, making possible to understand and control chemical reactions. This aim has required extensions of the relationships between the traditional chemical concepts and the quantum mechanical ones. The present work examines the detailed chemical insights that have been generated through 100 years of work worldwide on G. N. Lewis's ground breaking paper on The Atom and the Molecule (Lewis, G. N. The Atom and the Molecule, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1916, 38, 762-785), with a focus on how the determination of reaction mechanisms can be reached applying the bonding evolution theory (BET), emphasizing how curly arrows meet electron density transfers in chemical reaction mechanisms and how the Lewis structure can be recovered. BET that combines the topological analysis of the electron localization function (ELF) and Thom's catastrophe theory (CT) provides a powerful tool providing insight into molecular mechanisms of chemical rearrangements. In agreement with physical laws and quantum theoretical insights, BET can be considered as an appropriate tool to tackle chemical reactivity with a wide range of possible applications. Likewise, the present approach retrieves the classical curly arrows used to describe the rearrangements of chemical bonds for a given reaction mechanism, providing detailed physical grounds for this type of representation. The ideas underlying the valence-shell-electron pair-repulsion (VSEPR) model applied to non-equilibrium geometries provide simple chemical explanations of density transfers. For a given geometry around a central atom, the arrangement of the electronic domain may comply or not with the VSEPR rules according with the valence shell population of the considered atom. A deformation yields arrangements which are either VSEPR defective (at least a domain is missing to match the VSEPR arrangement corresponding to the geometry of the ligands), VSEPR compliant

  14. Local atomic structure inheritance in Ag{sub 50}Sn{sub 50} melt

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Yanwen; Bian, Xiufang Qin, Jingyu; Hu, Lina; Yang, Jianfei; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Xiaolin; Yang, Chuncheng; Zhang, Shuo; Huang, Yuying

    2014-01-28

    Local structure inheritance signatures were observed during the alloying process of the Ag{sub 50}Sn{sub 50} melt, using high-temperature X-ray diffraction and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The coordination number N{sub m} around Ag atom is similar in the alloy and in pure Ag melts (N{sub m} ∼ 10), while, during the alloying process, the local structure around Sn atoms rearranges. Sn-Sn covalent bonds were substituted by Ag-Sn chemical bonds, and the total coordination number around Sn increases by about 70% as compared with those in the pure Sn melt. Changes in the electronic structure of the alloy have been studied by Ag and Sn K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy, as well as by calculations of the partial density of states. We propose that a leading mechanism for local structure inheritance in Ag{sub 50}Sn{sub 50} is due to s-p dehybridization of Sn and to the interplay between Sn-s and Ag-d electrons.

  15. Electronic structure and stability of some silicon compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Igor; Abu-Izneid, Tareq; Kovač, Branka

    2010-05-01

    The electronic structures of N,1,3-tris(1,1-dimethylethyl)-cyclodisilazan-2-amine ( I) and 2,3,5,5-tetrakis(trimethylsilyl)cyclopentadiene ( II) have been investigated by HeI and HeII UV photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) and quantum chemical calculations. We discuss the influence of substituent effects on their electronic structure and thermodynamic stability. Our study shows that trimethylsilyl substituents have strong influence on the electronic structure of cyclopentadiene via inductive effect. Their influence on thermodynamic stability is also pronounced. In substituted cyclodisilazanes hyperconjugative influence of alkylsilyl groups was shown to cause relative thermodynamic stabilization of the cyclodisilazane system.

  16. Correlating Electronic Transport to Atomic Structures in Self-Assembled Quantum Wires

    SciTech Connect

    Li, An-Ping; Qin, Shengyong; Kim, Tae Hwan; Ouyang, Wenjie; Zhang, Yanning; Weitering, Harm H; Shih, Chih-Kang; Baddorf, Arthur P; Wu, Ruiqian

    2012-01-01

    Quantum wires, as a smallest electronic conductor, are expected to be a fundamental component in all quantum architectures. The electronic conductance in quantum wires, however, is often dictated by structural instabilities and electron localization at the atomic scale. Here we report on the evolutions of electronic transport as a function of temperature and interwire coupling as the quantum wires of GdSi{sub 2} are self-assembled on Si(100) wire-by-wire. The correlation between structure, electronic properties, and electronic transport are examined by combining nanotransport measurements, scanning tunneling microscopy, and density functional theory calculations. A metal-insulator transition is revealed in isolated nanowires, while a robust metallic state is obtained in wire bundles at low temperature. The atomic defects lead to electron localizations in isolated nanowire, and interwire coupling stabilizes the structure and promotes the metallic states in wire bundles. This illustrates how the conductance nature of a one-dimensional system can be dramatically modified by the environmental change on the atomic scale.

  17. Dynamic modulation of electronic properties of graphene by localized carbon doping using focused electron beam induced deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Russell, M.; Henry, M.; Kim, S. S.; Naik, R. R.; Voevodin, A. A.; Jang, S. S.; Tsukruk, V. V.; Fedorov, A. G.

    2015-09-01

    We report on the first demonstration of controllable carbon doping of graphene to engineer local electronic properties of a graphene conduction channel using focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID). Electrical measurements indicate that an ``n-p-n'' junction on graphene conduction channel is formed by partial carbon deposition near the source and drain metal contacts by low energy (<50 eV) secondary electrons due to inelastic collisions of long range backscattered primary electrons generated from a low dose of high energy (25 keV) electron beam (1 × 1018 e- per cm2). Detailed AFM imaging provides direct evidence of the new mechanism responsible for dynamic evolution of the locally varying graphene doping. The FEBID carbon atoms, which are physisorbed and weakly bound to graphene, diffuse towards the middle of graphene conduction channel due to their surface chemical potential gradient, resulting in negative shift of Dirac voltage. Increasing a primary electron dose to 1 × 1019 e- per cm2 results in a significant increase of carbon deposition, such that it covers the entire graphene conduction channel at high surface density, leading to n-doping of graphene channel. Collectively, these findings establish a unique capability of FEBID technique to dynamically modulate the doping state of graphene, thus enabling a new route to resist-free, ``direct-write'' functional patterning of graphene-based electronic devices with potential for on-demand re-configurability.We report on the first demonstration of controllable carbon doping of graphene to engineer local electronic properties of a graphene conduction channel using focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID). Electrical measurements indicate that an ``n-p-n'' junction on graphene conduction channel is formed by partial carbon deposition near the source and drain metal contacts by low energy (<50 eV) secondary electrons due to inelastic collisions of long range backscattered primary electrons generated

  18. Presolvated Electron Reaction with Methylacetoacetate: Electron Localization, Proton-Deuteron Exchange, and H-atom Abstraction

    PubMed Central

    Petrovici, Alex; Adhikary, Amitava; Kumar, Anil; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-produced electrons initiate various reaction processes that are important to radiation damage to biomolecules. In this work, the site of attachment of the prehydrated electrons with methylacetoacetate (MAA, CH3-CO-CH2-CO-OCH3) at 77 K and subsequent reactions of the anion radical (CH3-CO•−-CH2-CO-OCH3) in the temperature range (77 to ca. 170 K) have been investigated in homogeneous H2O and D2O aqueous glasses by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. At 77 K, the prehydrated electron attaches to MAA forming the anion radical in which the electron is delocalized over the two carbonyl groups. This species readily protonates to produce the protonated electron adduct radical CH3-C(•)OH-CH2-CO-OCH3. The ESR spectrum of CH3-C(•)OH-CH2-CO-OCH3 in H2O shows line components due to proton hyperfine couplings of the methyl and methylene groups. Whereas, the ESR spectrum of CH3-C(•)OH-CH2-CO-OCH3 in D2O glass shows only the line components due to proton hyperfine couplings of CH3 group. This is expected since the methylen protons in MAA are readily exchangeable in D2O. On stepwise annealing to higher temperatures (ca. 150 to 170 K), CH3-C(•)OH-CH2-CO-OCH3 undergoes bimolecular H-atom abstraction from MAA to form the more stable radical, CH3-CO-CH•-CO-OCH3. Theoretical calculations using density functional theory (DFT) support the radical assignments. PMID:25255751

  19. Structural, electronic and thermal properties of Mo{sub 3}Ir superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Subhashree, G. Sankar, S.; Krithiga, R.; Devi, L. Vimala

    2015-06-24

    Self consistent first principle calculations on superconducting material Mo{sub 3}Ir of A15 phase have been performed to understand their fundamental characteristics of the structural, electronic and thermal properties. The bulk modulus (B{sub 0}), Debye temperature (θ{sub D}), density of states (N (E{sub F})) and electronic specific heat coefficient (γ) have been computed in terms of the electronic structure results obtained by using the tight-binding linear muffin tin orbital (TB-LMTO) method based on the density functional theory (DFT) within the local density approximation (LDA). Structural, electronic and thermal properties calculated here are found to corroborate well with the experimental and theoretical results of literature.

  20. Advancing Efficient All-Electron Electronic Structure Methods Based on Numeric Atom-Centered Orbitals for Energy Related Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, Volker

    This talk describes recent advances of a general, efficient, accurate all-electron electronic theory approach based on numeric atom-centered orbitals; emphasis is placed on developments related to materials for energy conversion and their discovery. For total energies and electron band structures, we show that the overall accuracy is on par with the best benchmark quality codes for materials, but scalable to large system sizes (1,000s of atoms) and amenable to both periodic and non-periodic simulations. A recent localized resolution-of-identity approach for the Coulomb operator enables O (N) hybrid functional based descriptions of the electronic structure of non-periodic and periodic systems, shown for supercell sizes up to 1,000 atoms; the same approach yields accurate results for many-body perturbation theory as well. For molecular systems, we also show how many-body perturbation theory for charged and neutral quasiparticle excitation energies can be efficiently yet accurately applied using basis sets of computationally manageable size. Finally, the talk highlights applications to the electronic structure of hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite materials, as well as to graphene-based substrates for possible future transition metal compound based electrocatalyst materials. All methods described here are part of the FHI-aims code. VB gratefully acknowledges contributions by numerous collaborators at Duke University, Fritz Haber Institute Berlin, TU Munich, USTC Hefei, Aalto University, and many others around the globe.

  1. Structural and electronic properties of endohedral metallofullerenes.

    PubMed

    Akasaka, Takeshi; Lu, Xing

    2012-04-01

    This account presents an overview of our achievements in structural and chemical understanding of endohedral metallofullerenes (EMFs), a new class of metal-carbon hybrid materials formed by encapsulation of metals inside fullerene cavities. Structural determination of EMFs is of fundamental importance for understanding their intrinsic properties and the formation mechanism, and for broadening their applications. We have developed an effective method for determining the structures of paramagnetic EMFs, and also succeeded in observing the motion of cluster in a di-metal EMF for the first time. Recently, we unambiguously established the structures of some carbide EMFs which had been wrongly assumed as conventional EMFs previously. More importantly, we have obtained some insoluble EMF species which had never been explored or even expected before. Meanwhile, the chemical properties of various EMFs with different cage structures or different metallic cores have been systematically investigated by means of both covalent and supramolecular considerations, yielding many fascinating results relating to the dictating effect of internal metals. It is noteworthy that all these achievements are based on unambiguous X-ray results of pristine or functionalized EMFs.

  2. Writing silica structures in liquid with scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    van de Put, Marcel W P; Carcouët, Camille C M C; Bomans, Paul H H; Friedrich, Heiner; de Jonge, Niels; Sommerdijk, Nico A J M

    2015-02-01

    Silica nanoparticles are imaged in solution with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) using a liquid cell with silicon nitride (SiN) membrane windows. The STEM images reveal that silica structures are deposited in well-defined patches on the upper SiN membranes upon electron beam irradiation. The thickness of the deposits is linear with the applied electron dose. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) demonstrate that the deposited patches are a result of the merging of the original 20 nm-diameter nanoparticles, and that the related surface roughness depends on the electron dose rate used. Using this approach, sub-micrometer scale structures are written on the SiN in liquid by controlling the electron exposure as function of the lateral position.

  3. Examination of the local structure in composite and lowdimensional semiconductor by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lawniczak-Jablonska, K.; Demchenko, I.N.; Piskorska, E.; Wolska,A.; Talik, E.; Zakharov, D.N.; Liliental-Weber, Z.

    2006-09-25

    X-ray absorption methods have been successfully used to obtain quantitative information about local atomic composition of two different materials. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure analysis and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy allowed us to determine seven chemical compounds and their concentrations in c-BN composite. Use of Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure in combination with Transmission Electron Microscopy enabled us to determine the composition and size of buried Ge quantum dots. It was found that the quantum dots consisted out of pure Ge core covered by 1-2 monolayers of a layer rich in Si.

  4. Electronic structure of xDNA.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel; Zhao, Xiongce; Kent, P R C; Sumpter, Bobby G

    2007-08-01

    xDNA is an artificial duplex made of natural and benzo-homologated bases. The latter can be seen as a fusion between benzene and a natural base. We have used two different ab initio techniques, one based on B3LYP and a Gaussian expansion of the wave functions, and the other on GGA and plane-waves, to investigate the electronic properties of an xDNA duplex and a natural one with an analogous sequence. The calculations were performed in dry conditions, i.e., H atoms were used to neutralize the charge. It is found that the HOMO-LUMO gap of xDNA is about 0.5 eV smaller than that of B-DNA, independent of the technique used. The pi-pi* gap of xDNA is 1.3 or 1.0 eV smaller than that of B-DNA, depending on whether one uses B3LYP/6-31G or GGA/plane-waves, respectively. An analysis of how saturation changes the electronic properties of the nucleotide pairs that make up these duplexes suggests that different saturation schemes significantly affect the HOMO-LUMO gap value of xDNA and B-DNA. The same is not true for the pi-pi* gap. That xDNA has a smaller pi-pi* gap than B-DNA suggests that xDNA could be a plausible candidate for molecular-wire applications.

  5. A method for visualizing cytoskeletal structures by the scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, I; Amakawa, Y

    1989-01-01

    The cytoskeleton of intestinal epithelial cells was observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Tissues were treated with Triton X-100, stained to enhance conductivity, and freeze-fractured in liquid nitrogen. With these procedures, not only the localization of core filaments (actin-containing microfilaments) and intermediate filaments but also the relations between fibrous structures and cell organellae were clearly revealed. This conventional method is of great value in interpreting the three-dimensional organization of intracellular fine structures. PMID:2809464

  6. Nanoscale interfacial structure for Novel Opto-electronic and Ion-trapping Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulin-Avila, Erick

    In this dissertation, we present contributions to the nanoscale engineering of electronic and geometrical structure of dielectric-metal interfaces. Such structure is designed to support the interaction of light and matter for useful scientific and technological applications. Among our interests are electromagnetic subwavelength localization, propagation and storage; photonic manipulation, modulation, synchronization and its use in the confinement of atomic systems. The latter is directed towards a new generation of scalable devices for quantum information processing (QIP) and surface science studies.

  7. Characterization of small thermal structures in RFX-mod electron temperature profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassina, A.; Gobbin, M.; Spagnolo, S.; Franz, P.; Terranova, D.

    2016-05-01

    In the RFX-mod reverse field pinch (RFP) experiment, electron temperature profiles often feature structures and fluctuations at fine scale. The present work aims at characterizing their occurrence and their localization, in particular by linking them to underlying tearing modes magnetic islands. The confinement characteristics are discussed, identifying analogies with respect to high scale T e structures. Finally, high frequency magnetic activity (i.e. microtearing instabilities) is confirmed to be closely correlated to the presence and proximity of temperature gradients.

  8. Structure and electronic properties of mixed (a + c) dislocation cores in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, M. K.; Rhode, S. L.; Moram, M. A.

    2014-08-14

    Classical atomistic models and atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy studies of GaN films reveal that mixed (a + c)-type dislocations have multiple different core structures, including a dissociated structure consisting of a planar fault on one of the (12{sup ¯}10) planes terminated by two different partial dislocations. Density functional theory calculations show that all cores introduce localized states into the band gap, which affects device performance.

  9. Electron Diffraction Determination of Nanoscale Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, Joel H

    2013-03-01

    Dominant research results on adsorption on gold clusters are reviewed, including adsorption of H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} on gold cluster cations and anions, kinetics of CO adsorption to middle sized gold cluster cations, adsorption of CO on Au{sub n}{sup +} with induced changes in structure, and H{sub 2}O enhancement of CO adsorption.

  10. Linear Scaling Electronic Structure Methods with Periodic Boundary Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Gustavo E. Scuseria

    2008-02-08

    The methodological development and computational implementation of linear scaling quantum chemistry methods for the accurate calculation of electronic structure and properties of periodic systems (solids, surfaces, and polymers) and their application to chemical problems of DOE relevance.

  11. Stacking dependent electronic structures of transition metal dichalcogenides heterobilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yea-Lee; Park, Cheol-Hwan; Ihm, Jisoon

    The systematic study of the electronic structures and optical properties of the transition metal dichalcogenides (TMD) heterobilayers can significantly improve the designing of new electronic and optoelectronic devices. Here, we theoretically study the electronic structures and optical properties of TMD heterobilayers using the first-principles methods. The band structures of TMD heterobilayer are shown to be determined by the band alignments of the each layer, the weak interlayer interactions, and angle dependent stacking patterns. The photoluminescence spectra are investigated using the calculated band structures, and the optical absorption spectra are examined by the GW approximations including the electron-hole interaction through the solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation. It is expected that the weak interlayer interaction gives rise to the substantial interlayer optical transition which will be corresponding to the interlayer exciton.

  12. Assessing the local identifiability of probabilistic knowledge structures.

    PubMed

    Stefanutti, Luca; Heller, Jürgen; Anselmi, Pasquale; Robusto, Egidio

    2012-12-01

    Given a collection Q of problems, in knowledge space theory Doignon & Falmagne, (International Journal of Man-Machine Studies 23:175-196, 1985) the knowledge state of a student is the collection K ⊆ Q of all problems that this student is capable of solving. A knowledge structure is a pair (Q, ), where is a collection of knowledge states that contains at least the empty set and Q. A probabilistic knowledge structure (PKS) is a knowledge structure (Q, , π), where π is a probability distribution on the knowledge states. The PKS that has received the most attention is the basic local independence model BLIM; Falmagne & Doignon, (British Journal of Mathematical and Statistical Psychology 41:1-23, 1988a, Journal of Mathematical Psychology 32:232-258, 1988b). To the best of our knowledge, systematic investigations in the literature concerning the identifiability of the BLIM are totally missing. Based on the theoretical work of Bamber and van Santen (Journal of Mathematical Psychology 29:443-473, 1985), the present article is aimed to present a method and a corresponding computerized procedure for assessing the local identifiability of the BLIM, which is applicable to any finite knowledge structure of moderate size. PMID:22588988

  13. Local Structure of Cerium in Aluminophosphate and Silicophosphate Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Rygel, Jennifer L.; Chen, Yongsheng; Pantano, Carlo G.; Shibata, Tomohiro; Du, Jincheng; Kokou, Leopold; Woodman, Robert; Belcher, James

    2011-09-20

    The local structure of cerium in two systematic compositional series of glasses, nominally CeP{sub 3}O{sub 9}-AlP{sub 3}O{sub 9} and CeP{sub 3}O{sub 9}-SiP{sub 2}O{sub 7}, was interrogated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. XPS revealed that, for glasses melted in air, {>=}95% of cerium ions are Ce{sup 3+}. This was independently confirmed using X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES). Ce K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) has been used to determine the local structure of Ce{sup 3+}. Near the metaphosphate composition, cerium was found to have an average cerium coordination number of {approx}7.0 and an average cerium-oxygen bond length of 2.41 {angstrom}. The average cerium coordination number and average cerium-oxygen bond distance were found to increase with decreasing cerium concentration in both compositional series. Rare-earth clustering is suggested based on numerical calculations for glasses containing {>=}14 and {>=}15 mol% Ce{sub 2}O{sub 3} for the aluminophosphate and silicophosphate series, respectively.

  14. Probing local structure in glass by the application of shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weingartner, Nicholas B.; Nussinov, Zohar

    2016-09-01

    The glass transition remains one of the great unsolved mysteries of contemporary condensed matter physics. When crystallization is bypassed by rapid cooling, a supercooled liquid, retaining amorphous particle arrangement, results. The physical phenomenology of supercooled liquids is as vast as it is interesting. Most significant, the viscosity of the supercooled liquid displays an incredible increase over a narrow temperature range. Eventually, the supercooled liquid ceases to flow, becomes a glass, and gains rigidity and solid-like behaviors. Understanding what underpins the monumental growth of viscosity, and how rigidity results without long range order is a long-sought goal. Furthermore, discerning what role local structure plays in the kinetics of supercooled liquids remains an open question. Many theories of the glassy slowdown require the growth of static lengthscale related to structure with lowering of the temperature and provide a link between slowdown and propagation of ‘amorphous order’. In light of this, we examine the recently proposed shear penetration depth in the context of other length scales and its relation to local structure. We provide numerical data, based on the simulations of NiZr2, illustrating that this length scale exhibits dramatic growth upon approach to the glass transition and further discuss this in relation to percolating structural connectivity in similar glassforming systems.

  15. Comparative population genetic structures and local adaptation of two mutualists.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Bruce; Olivieri, Isabelle; Lourmas, Mathieu; Stewart, Barbara A

    2004-08-01

    Similar patterns of dispersal and gene flow between closely associated organisms may promote local adaptation and coevolutionary processes. We compare the genetic structures of the two species of a plant genus (Roridula gorgonias and R. dentata) and their respective obligately associated hemipteran mutualists (Pameridea roridulae and P. marlothi) using allozymes. In addition, we determine whether genetic structure is related to differences in host choice by Pameridea. Allozyme variation was found to be very structured among plant populations but less so among hemipteran populations. Strong genetic structuring among hemipteran populations was only evident when large distances isolated the plant populations on which they live. Although genetic distances among plant populations were correlated with genetic distances among hemipteran populations, genetic distances of both plants and hemipterans were better correlated with geographic distance. Because Roridula and Pameridea have different scales of gene flow, adaptation at the local population level is unlikely. However, the restricted gene flow of both plants and hemipterans could enable adaptation to occur at a regional level. In choice experiments, the hemipteran (Pameridea) has a strong preference for its carnivorous host plant (Roridula) above unrelated host plants. Pameridea also prefers its host species to its closely related sister species. Specialization at the specific level is likely to reinforce cospeciation processes in this mutualism. However, Pameridea does not exhibit intraspecific preferences toward plants from their natal populations above plants from isolated, non-natal populations. PMID:15446426

  16. A phenomenological theory of spatially structured local synaptic connectivity.

    PubMed

    Amirikian, Bagrat

    2005-06-01

    The structure of local synaptic circuits is the key to understanding cortical function and how neuronal functional modules such as cortical columns are formed. The central problem in deciphering cortical microcircuits is the quantification of synaptic connectivity between neuron pairs. I present a theoretical model that accounts for the axon and dendrite morphologies of pre- and postsynaptic cells and provides the average number of synaptic contacts formed between them as a function of their relative locations in three-dimensional space. An important aspect of the current approach is the representation of a complex structure of an axonal/dendritic arbor as a superposition of basic structures-synaptic clouds. Each cloud has three structural parameters that can be directly estimated from two-dimensional drawings of the underlying arbor. Using empirical data available in literature, I applied this theory to three morphologically different types of cell pairs. I found that, within a wide range of cell separations, the theory is in very good agreement with empirical data on (i) axonal-dendritic contacts of pyramidal cells and (ii) somatic synapses formed by the axons of inhibitory interneurons. Since for many types of neurons plane arborization drawings are available from literature, this theory can provide a practical means for quantitatively deriving local synaptic circuits based on the actual observed densities of specific types of neurons and their morphologies. It can also have significant implications for computational models of cortical networks by making it possible to wire up simulated neural networks in a realistic fashion.

  17. Comparative population genetic structures and local adaptation of two mutualists.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Bruce; Olivieri, Isabelle; Lourmas, Mathieu; Stewart, Barbara A

    2004-08-01

    Similar patterns of dispersal and gene flow between closely associated organisms may promote local adaptation and coevolutionary processes. We compare the genetic structures of the two species of a plant genus (Roridula gorgonias and R. dentata) and their respective obligately associated hemipteran mutualists (Pameridea roridulae and P. marlothi) using allozymes. In addition, we determine whether genetic structure is related to differences in host choice by Pameridea. Allozyme variation was found to be very structured among plant populations but less so among hemipteran populations. Strong genetic structuring among hemipteran populations was only evident when large distances isolated the plant populations on which they live. Although genetic distances among plant populations were correlated with genetic distances among hemipteran populations, genetic distances of both plants and hemipterans were better correlated with geographic distance. Because Roridula and Pameridea have different scales of gene flow, adaptation at the local population level is unlikely. However, the restricted gene flow of both plants and hemipterans could enable adaptation to occur at a regional level. In choice experiments, the hemipteran (Pameridea) has a strong preference for its carnivorous host plant (Roridula) above unrelated host plants. Pameridea also prefers its host species to its closely related sister species. Specialization at the specific level is likely to reinforce cospeciation processes in this mutualism. However, Pameridea does not exhibit intraspecific preferences toward plants from their natal populations above plants from isolated, non-natal populations.

  18. Local structure and spin transition in Fe2O3 hematite at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanson, Andrea; Kantor, Innokenty; Cerantola, Valerio; Irifune, Tetsuo; Carnera, Alberto; Pascarelli, Sakura

    2016-07-01

    The pressure evolution of the local structure of Fe2O3 hematite has been determined by extended x-ray absorption fine structure up to ˜79 GPa. Below the phase-transition pressure at ˜50 GPa, no increasing of FeO6 octahedra distortion is observed as pressure is applied. Above the phase transition, an abrupt decrease of the nearest-neighbor Fe-O distance is observed concomitantly with a strong reduction in the FeO6 distortion. This information on the local structure, used as a test-bench for the different high-pressure forms proposed in the literature, suggests that the orthorhombic structure with space group A b a 2 , recently proposed by Bykova et al. [Nat. Commun. 7, 10661 (2016), 10.1038/ncomms10661], is the most probable, but puts into question the presence of the P 21 /n form in the pressure range 54-67 GPa. Finally, the crossover from Fe high-spin to low-spin states with pressure increase has been monitored from the pre-edge region of the Fe K -edge absorption spectra. Its "simultaneous" comparison with the local structural changes allows us to conclude that it is the electronic transition that drives the structural transition and not vice versa.

  19. Zigzag Phase Transition in Quantum Wires and Localization in the Inhomogeneous One-Dimensional Electron Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Abhijit C.

    In this work, we study two important themes in the physics of the interacting one-dimensional (1D) electron gas: the transition from one-dimensional to higher dimensional behavior, and the role of inhomogeneity. The interplay between interactions, reduced dimensionality, and inhomogeneity drives a rich variety of phenomena in mesoscopic physics. In 1D, interactions fundamentally alter the nature of the electron gas, and the homogeneous 1D electron gas is described by Luttinger Liquid theory. We use Quantum Monte Carlo methods to study two situations that are beyond Luttinger Liquid theory---the quantum phase transition from a linear 1D electron system to a quasi-1D zigzag arrangement, and electron localization in quantum point contacts. Since the interacting electron gas has fundamentally different behavior in one dimension than in higher dimensions, the transition from 1D to higher dimensional behavior is of both practical and theoretical interest. We study the first stage in such a transition; the quantum phase transition from a 1D linear arrangement of electrons in a quantum wire to a quasi-1D zigzag configuration, and then to a liquid-like phase at higher densities. As the density increases from its lowest values, first, the electrons form a linear Wigner crystal; then, the symmetry about the axis of the wire is broken as the electrons order in a quasi-1D zigzag phase; and, finally, the electrons form a disordered liquid-like phase. We show that the linear to zigzag phase transition occurs even in narrow wires with strong quantum fluctuations, and that it has characteristics which are qualitatively different from the classical transition. Experiments in quantum point contacts (QPC's) show an unexplained feature in the conductance known as the "0.7 Effect''. The presence of the 0.7 effect is an indication of the rich physics present in inhomogeneous systems, and we study electron localization in quantum point contacts to evaluate several different proposed

  20. Electronic structure and magnetism of samarium and neodymium adatoms on free-standing graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozub, Agnieszka L.; Shick, Alexander B.; Máca, František; Kolorenč, Jindřich; Lichtenstein, Alexander I.

    2016-09-01

    The electronic structure of selected rare-earth atoms adsorbed on a free-standing graphene was investigated using methods beyond the conventional density functional theory (DFT+U , DFT+HIA, and DFT+ED). The influence of the electron correlations and the spin-orbit coupling on the magnetic properties has been examined. The DFT+U method predicts both atoms to carry local magnetic moments (spin and orbital) contrary to a nonmagnetic f6 (J =0 ) ground-state configuration of Sm in the gas phase. Application of DFT +Hubbard-I (HIA) and DFT +exact diagonalization (ED) methods cures this problem, and yields a nonmagnetic ground state with six f electrons and J =0 for the Sm adatom. Our calculations show that Nd adatom remains magnetic, with four localized f electrons and J =4.0 . These conclusions could be verified by STM and XAS experiments.

  1. Local intelligent electronic device (IED) rendering templates over limited bandwidth communication link to manage remote IED

    DOEpatents

    Bradetich, Ryan; Dearien, Jason A; Grussling, Barry Jakob; Remaley, Gavin

    2013-11-05

    The present disclosure provides systems and methods for remote device management. According to various embodiments, a local intelligent electronic device (IED) may be in communication with a remote IED via a limited bandwidth communication link, such as a serial link. The limited bandwidth communication link may not support traditional remote management interfaces. According to one embodiment, a local IED may present an operator with a management interface for a remote IED by rendering locally stored templates. The local IED may render the locally stored templates using sparse data obtained from the remote IED. According to various embodiments, the management interface may be a web client interface and/or an HTML interface. The bandwidth required to present a remote management interface may be significantly reduced by rendering locally stored templates rather than requesting an entire management interface from the remote IED. According to various embodiments, an IED may comprise an encryption transceiver.

  2. Topological band order, structural, electronic and optical properties of XPdBi (X = Lu, Sc) compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narimani, M.; Nourbakhsh, Z.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the structural, electronic and optical properties of LuPdBi and ScPdBi compounds are investigated using the density functional theory by WIEN2K package within the generalized gradient approximation, local density approximation, Engel-Vosco generalized gradient approximations and modified Becke-Johnson potential approaches. The topological phases and band orders of these compounds are studied. The effect of pressure on band inversion strength, electron density of states and the linear coefficient of the electronic specific heat of these compounds is investigated. Furthermore, the effect of pressure on real and imaginary parts of dielectric function, absorption and reflectivity coefficients of these compounds is studied.

  3. Local atomic arrangements and lattice distortions in layered Ge-Sb-Te crystal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotnyk, Andriy; Ross, Ulrich; Bernütz, Sabine; Thelander, Erik; Rauschenbach, Bernd

    2016-05-01

    Insights into the local atomic arrangements of layered Ge-Sb-Te compounds are of particular importance from a fundamental point of view and for data storage applications. In this view, a detailed knowledge of the atomic structure in such alloys is central to understanding the functional properties both in the more commonly utilized amorphous–crystalline transition and in recently proposed interfacial phase change memory based on the transition between two crystalline structures. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy allows direct imaging of local arrangement in the crystalline lattice with atomic resolution. However, due to the non-trivial influence of thermal diffuse scattering on the high-angle scattering signal, a detailed examination of the image contrast requires comparison with theoretical image simulations. This work reveals the local atomic structure of trigonal Ge-Sb-Te thin films by using a combination of direct imaging of the atomic columns and theoretical image simulation approaches. The results show that the thin films are prone to the formation of stacking disorder with individual building blocks of the Ge2Sb2Te5, Ge1Sb2Te4 and Ge3Sb2Te6 crystal structures intercalated within randomly oriented grains. The comparison with image simulations based on various theoretical models reveals intermixed cation layers with pronounced local lattice distortions, exceeding those reported in literature.

  4. Local atomic arrangements and lattice distortions in layered Ge-Sb-Te crystal structures

    PubMed Central

    Lotnyk, Andriy; Ross, Ulrich; Bernütz, Sabine; Thelander, Erik; Rauschenbach, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Insights into the local atomic arrangements of layered Ge-Sb-Te compounds are of particular importance from a fundamental point of view and for data storage applications. In this view, a detailed knowledge of the atomic structure in such alloys is central to understanding the functional properties both in the more commonly utilized amorphous–crystalline transition and in recently proposed interfacial phase change memory based on the transition between two crystalline structures. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy allows direct imaging of local arrangement in the crystalline lattice with atomic resolution. However, due to the non-trivial influence of thermal diffuse scattering on the high-angle scattering signal, a detailed examination of the image contrast requires comparison with theoretical image simulations. This work reveals the local atomic structure of trigonal Ge-Sb-Te thin films by using a combination of direct imaging of the atomic columns and theoretical image simulation approaches. The results show that the thin films are prone to the formation of stacking disorder with individual building blocks of the Ge2Sb2Te5, Ge1Sb2Te4 and Ge3Sb2Te6 crystal structures intercalated within randomly oriented grains. The comparison with image simulations based on various theoretical models reveals intermixed cation layers with pronounced local lattice distortions, exceeding those reported in literature. PMID:27220411

  5. Local atomic arrangements and lattice distortions in layered Ge-Sb-Te crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Lotnyk, Andriy; Ross, Ulrich; Bernütz, Sabine; Thelander, Erik; Rauschenbach, Bernd

    2016-05-25

    Insights into the local atomic arrangements of layered Ge-Sb-Te compounds are of particular importance from a fundamental point of view and for data storage applications. In this view, a detailed knowledge of the atomic structure in such alloys is central to understanding the functional properties both in the more commonly utilized amorphous-crystalline transition and in recently proposed interfacial phase change memory based on the transition between two crystalline structures. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy allows direct imaging of local arrangement in the crystalline lattice with atomic resolution. However, due to the non-trivial influence of thermal diffuse scattering on the high-angle scattering signal, a detailed examination of the image contrast requires comparison with theoretical image simulations. This work reveals the local atomic structure of trigonal Ge-Sb-Te thin films by using a combination of direct imaging of the atomic columns and theoretical image simulation approaches. The results show that the thin films are prone to the formation of stacking disorder with individual building blocks of the Ge2Sb2Te5, Ge1Sb2Te4 and Ge3Sb2Te6 crystal structures intercalated within randomly oriented grains. The comparison with image simulations based on various theoretical models reveals intermixed cation layers with pronounced local lattice distortions, exceeding those reported in literature.

  6. Interfacial valence electron localization and the corrosion resistance of Al-SiC nanocomposite

    PubMed Central

    Mosleh-Shirazi, Sareh; Hua, Guomin; Akhlaghi, Farshad; Yan, Xianguo; Li, Dongyang

    2015-01-01

    Microstructural inhomogeneity generally deteriorates the corrosion resistance of materials due to the galvanic effect and interfacial issues. However, the situation may change for nanostructured materials. This article reports our studies on the corrosion behavior of SiC nanoparticle-reinforced Al6061 matrix composite. It was observed that the corrosion resistance of Al6061 increased when SiC nanoparticles were added. Overall electron work function (EWF) of the Al-SiC nanocomposite increased, along with an increase in the corrosion potential. The electron localization function of the Al-SiC nanocomposite was calculated and the results revealed that valence electrons were localized in the region of SiC-Al interface, resulting in an increase in the overall work function and thus building a higher barrier to hinder electrons in the nano-composite to participate in corrosion reactions. PMID:26667968

  7. Role of nonlinear localized structures and turbulence in magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Neha; Yadav, Nitin; Uma, R.; Sharma, R. P.

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, we have analyzed the field localization of kinetic Alfvén wave (KAW) due to the presence of background density perturbation, which are assumed to be originated by the three dimensionally propagating low frequency KAW. These localized structures play an important role for energy transportation at smaller scales in the dispersion range of magnetic power spectrum. For the present model, governing dynamic equations of high frequency pump KAW and low frequency KAW has been derived by considering ponderomotive nonlinearity. Further, these coupled equations have been numerically solved to analyze the resulting localized structures of pump KAW and magnetic power spectrum in the magnetopause regime. Numerically calculated spectrum exhibits inertial range having spectral index of -3/2 followed by steeper scaling; this steepening in the turbulent spectrum is a signature of energy transportation from larger to smaller scales. In this way, the proposed mechanism, which is based on nonlinear wave-wave interaction, may be useful for understanding the particle acceleration and turbulence in magnetopause.

  8. The Role of Localized Inductive Electric Fields in Electron Injections Around Dipolarizing Flux Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrielse, C.; Harris, C.; Angelopoulos, V.; Runov, A.

    2015-12-01

    We study energetic electron injections using an analytical model that describes self-consistent electric and magnetic field perturbations of a transient, localized dipolarizing flux bundle (DFB). This simple model can reproduce most injection signatures at multiple locations simultaneously, reaffirming earlier findings that an earthward-traveling DFB can both transport and accelerate electrons to suprathermal energies, and can thus be considered as the primary driver of short-lived (~<10 min) injections. We find that energetic electron drift paths are greatly influenced by the sharp magnetic field gradients around the localized DFB. If the gradients are weak the energetic electrons initiating at reconnection will drift out of the flow channel such that the observed injection is comprised mostly of plasma sheet electrons. However, if the duskward magnetic field gradients on the DFB's dawn flank are strong they can cause electrons to drift further earthward from the reconnection site than due to E x B alone. Similarly, strong dawnward magnetic field gradients on the DFB's dusk flank can extract energetic electrons from the inner magnetosphere out to the plasma sheet, where they can either be recirculated earthward or remain at higher L-shells. Therefore, the source of electrons observed during injection depends sensitively on the spacecraft location relative to the DFB and on the DFB's properties.

  9. Energy spectra of Penning electrons in non-local plasma at middle and high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanova, M.; Pramatarov, P.; Kudryavtsev, A.; Peyeva, R.

    2014-05-01

    A recently-developed collisional electron spectroscopy (CES) method enabled us to measure the energy spectra of groups of fast non-local electrons in a collisional mode at high pressures, where no collisional energy relaxation of electrons in the different groups takes place in the volume, and the different groups of electrons behave independently of each other. We recorded the energy spectra of groups of fast electrons created via Penning ionization of Ar and N2 impurities by metastable He atoms at He pressures of 30 and 200 Torr. The experiments were conducted in the non-local negative glow plasma of a short dc microdischarge. The Penning electrons' energy spectra were recorded by means of an additional electrode - a sensor located at the boundary of the discharge volume, in contrast with the classical Langmuir probe. The spectra are characterized by the appearance of maxima at characteristic energies corresponding to the energy of the electrons released via Penning reactions. Using the Penning electrons' energy spectra, one can detect and identify the presence of different atomic and molecular admixtures in He at high pressures.

  10. Local Interfacial Structure in Downward Two-Phase Bubbly Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Hiroshi Goda; Seungjin Kim; Paranjape, Sidharth S.; Finch, Joshua P.; Mamoru Ishii; Uhle, Jennifer

    2002-07-01

    The local interfacial structure for vertical air-water co-current downward two-phase flow was investigated under adiabatic conditions. A multi-sensor conductivity probe was utilized in order to acquire the local two-phase flow parameters. The present experimental loop consisted of 25.4 mm and 50.8 mm ID round tubes as test sections. The measurement was performed at three axial locations: L/D = 13, 68 and 133 for the 25.4 mm ID loop and L/D 7, 34, 67 for the 50.8 mm ID loop, in order to study the axial development of the flow. A total of 7 and 10 local measurement points along the tube radius were chosen for the 25.4 mm ID loop and the 50.8 mm ID loop, respectively. The experimental flow conditions were determined within bubbly flow regime. The acquired local parameters included the void fraction, interfacial area concentration, bubble interface frequency, bubble Sauter mean diameter, and interfacial velocity. (authors)

  11. Structure, dynamics, and electronic structure of liquid Ag-Se alloys investigated by ab initio simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchhoff, F.; Holender, J. M.; Gillan, M. J.

    1996-07-01

    Ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations have been used to investigate the structure, dynamics, and electronic properties of the liquid alloy Ag1-xSex at 1350 K and at the three compositions x=0.33, 0.42, and 0.65. To provide a point of reference, calculations are also presented for the equilibrium structure and the electronic structure of the α-Ag2Se crystal. The calculations are based on density-functional theory in the local-density approximation and on the pseudopotential plane-wave method. For the solid, we find excellent agreement with experiment for the equilibrium lattice parameters and the atomic coordinates of the 12-atom orthorhombic unit cell, and we present an analysis of the electronic density of states and density distribution. The reliability of the liquid simulations is confirmed by detailed comparisons with very recent neutron-diffraction results for the partial structure factors and radial distribution functions (RDF) of the stoichiometric liquid Ag2Se. Comparison with the predictions of an empirical interaction model due to Rino et al. is also given for l-Ag2Se. The ab initio simulations show a dramatic change of the Se-Se RDF with increasing Se content. This change is due to the formation of Se clusters bound by covalent bonds, the Se-Se bond length being almost the same as in pure c-Se and l-Se. The clusters are predominantly chainlike, but for higher x there is a significant fraction of threefold coordinated Se atoms. It is shown that the equilibrium fractions of Se present as isolated atoms and in clusters can be understood on a simple charge-balance model based on an ionic interpretation. The Ag diffusion coefficient in the simulated stoichiometric liquid is consistent with experimental values measured in the high-temperature superionic solid. The Ag and Se diffusion coefficients both increase with Se content, in spite of the Se clustering. An analysis of the Se-Se bond dynamics reveals surprisingly short bond lifetimes of less than 1 ps

  12. Detection of localized hot electrons in low-pressure large-area microwave discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terebessy, Tibor; Kando, Masashi; Kudela, Jozef

    2000-10-01

    A localized hot-electron region was observed in low-pressure (<3 mTorr) large-area microwave discharges. The region appears in the vicinity of the waveguiding plasma-dielectric interface in the place of critical plasma density. The existence of localized hot electrons is explained on the basis of transit time heating in the resonantly enhanced electric field. The phenomenon provides experimental evidence that the plasma resonance region plays an active role in heating mechanism in low-pressure microwave discharges.

  13. Density functionals not based on the electron gas: local-density approximation for a Luttinger liquid.

    PubMed

    Lima, N A; Silva, M F; Oliveira, L N; Capelle, K

    2003-04-11

    By shifting the reference system for the local-density approximation (LDA) from the electron gas to other model systems, one obtains a new class of density functionals, which by design account for the correlations present in the chosen reference system. This strategy is illustrated by constructing an explicit LDA for the one-dimensional Hubbard model. While the traditional ab initio LDA is based on a Fermi liquid (the three-dimensional interacting electron gas), this one is based on a Luttinger liquid. First applications to inhomogeneous Hubbard models, including one containing a localized impurity, are reported.

  14. Long electron spin coherence in ion-implanted GaN: The role of localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buß, J. H.; Rudolph, J.; Shvarkov, S.; Hardtdegen, H.; Wieck, A. D.; Hägele, D.

    2013-05-01

    The impact of Ga and Au ion implantation on the electron spin dynamics in bulk wurtzite GaN is studied by time-resolved Kerr-rotation spectroscopy. The spin relaxation time increases strongly by up to a factor of 20 for increasing implantation doses. This drastic increase is caused by a transition from delocalized to localized electrons. We find a characteristic change in the magnetic field dependence of spin relaxation that can be used as a sensitive probe for the degree of localization.

  15. Density functionals not based on the electron gas: local-density approximation for a Luttinger liquid.

    PubMed

    Lima, N A; Silva, M F; Oliveira, L N; Capelle, K

    2003-04-11

    By shifting the reference system for the local-density approximation (LDA) from the electron gas to other model systems, one obtains a new class of density functionals, which by design account for the correlations present in the chosen reference system. This strategy is illustrated by constructing an explicit LDA for the one-dimensional Hubbard model. While the traditional ab initio LDA is based on a Fermi liquid (the three-dimensional interacting electron gas), this one is based on a Luttinger liquid. First applications to inhomogeneous Hubbard models, including one containing a localized impurity, are reported. PMID:12731934

  16. Protein structure prediction with local adjust tabu search algorithm

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Protein folding structure prediction is one of the most challenging problems in the bioinformatics domain. Because of the complexity of the realistic protein structure, the simplified structure model and the computational method should be adopted in the research. The AB off-lattice model is one of the simplification models, which only considers two classes of amino acids, hydrophobic (A) residues and hydrophilic (B) residues. Results The main work of this paper is to discuss how to optimize the lowest energy configurations in 2D off-lattice model and 3D off-lattice model by using Fibonacci sequences and real protein sequences. In order to avoid falling into local minimum and faster convergence to the global minimum, we introduce a novel method (SATS) to the protein structure problem, which combines simulated annealing algorithm and tabu search algorithm. Various strategies, such as the new encoding strategy, the adaptive neighborhood generation strategy and the local adjustment strategy, are adopted successfully for high-speed searching the optimal conformation corresponds to the lowest energy of the protein sequences. Experimental results show that some of the results obtained by the improved SATS are better than those reported in previous literatures, and we can sure that the lowest energy folding state for short Fibonacci sequences have been found. Conclusions Although the off-lattice models is not very realistic, they can reflect some important characteristics of the realistic protein. It can be found that 3D off-lattice model is more like native folding structure of the realistic protein than 2D off-lattice model. In addition, compared with some previous researches, the proposed hybrid algorithm can more effectively and more quickly search the spatial folding structure of a protein chain. PMID:25474708

  17. Electronic structure in the Al-Mn alloy crystalline analog of quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Takeo

    1989-07-01

    Electronic structure in crystalline α-(Al114Mn24) is calculated by the linear muffin-tin orbital-atomic-sphere approximation method with the local-density-functional theory. The density of states consists of a set of spiky peaks. The electronic structure is discussed for quasicrystalline Al-Mn alloy from the viewpoint of the stability and the role of the vacant center of the Mackay icosahedron. The stability is actually owing to the pseudogap of the Mn 3d band and the deep s,p-bonding bands of the Al glue atoms.

  18. Structural and electronic properties of GaAs and GaP semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Rani, Anita; Kumar, Ranjan

    2015-05-15

    The Structural and Electronic properties of Zinc Blende phase of GaAs and GaP compounds are studied using self consistent SIESTA-code, pseudopotentials and Density Functional Theory (DFT) in Local Density Approximation (LDA). The Lattice Constant, Equillibrium Volume, Cohesive Energy per pair, Compressibility and Band Gap are calculated. The band gaps calcultated with DFT using LDA is smaller than the experimental values. The P-V data fitted to third order Birch Murnaghan equation of state provide the Bulk Modulus and its pressure derivatives. Our Structural and Electronic properties estimations are in agreement with available experimental and theoretical data.

  19. Electronic structure calculations of ESR parameters of melanin units.

    PubMed

    Batagin-Neto, Augusto; Bronze-Uhle, Erika Soares; Graeff, Carlos Frederico de Oliveira

    2015-03-21

    Melanins represent an important class of natural pigments present in plants and animals that are currently considered to be promising materials for applications in optic and electronic devices. Despite their interesting properties, some of the basic features of melanins are not satisfactorily understood, including the origin of their intrinsic paramagnetism. A number of experiments have been performed to investigate the electron spin resonance (ESR) response of melanin derivatives, but until now, there has been no consensus regarding the real structure of the paramagnetic centers involved. In this work, we have employed electronic structure calculations to evaluate the ESR parameters of distinct melanin monomers and dimers in order to identify the possible structures associated with unpaired spins in this biopolymer. The g-factors and hyperfine constants of the cationic, anionic and radicalar structures were investigated. The results confirm the existence of at least two distinct paramagnetic centers in melanin structure, identifying the chemical species associated with them and their roles in electrical conductivity.

  20. Importance of Time Scale and Local Environment in Electron-Driven Proton Transfer. The Anion of Acetoacetic Acid.

    PubMed

    Keolopile, Zibo G; Gutowski, Maciej; Buonaugurio, Angela; Collins, Evan; Zhang, Xinxing; Erb, Jeremy; Lectka, Thomas; Bowen, Kit H; Allan, Michael

    2015-11-18

    Anion photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) probe different regions of the anionic potential energy surface. These complementary techniques provided information about anionic states of acetoacetic acid (AA). Electronic structure calculations facilitated the identification of the most stable tautomers and conformers for both neutral and anionic AA and determined their relative stabilities and excess electron binding energies. The most stable conformers of the neutral keto and enol tautomers differ by less than 1 kcal/mol in terms of electronic energies corrected for zero-point vibrations. Thermal effects favor these conformers of the keto tautomer, which do not support an intramolecular hydrogen bond between the keto and the carboxylic groups. The valence anion displays a distinct minimum which results from proton transfer from the carboxylic to the keto group; thus, we name it an ol structure. The minimum is characterized by a short intramolecular hydrogen bond, a significant electron vertical detachment energy of 2.38 eV, but a modest adiabatic electron affinity of 0.33 eV. The valence anion was identified in the anion PES experiments, and the measured electron vertical detachment energy of 2.30 eV is in good agreement with our computational prediction. We conclude that binding an excess electron in a π* valence orbital changes the localization of a proton in the fully relaxed structure of the AA(-) anion. The results of EELS experiments do not provide evidence for an ultrarapid proton transfer in the lowest π* resonance of AA(-), which would be capable of competing with electron autodetachment. This observation is consistent with our computational results, indicating that major gas-phase conformers and tautomers of neutral AA do not support the intramolecular hydrogen bond that would facilitate ultrarapid proton transfer and formation of the ol valence anion. This is confirmed by our vibrational EELS spectrum. Anions

  1. Pre-embedding Method of Electron Microscopy for Glycan Localization in Mammalian Tissues and Cells Using Lectin Probes.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Takata, Kuniaki; Kawakami, Hayato

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the study of glycans is progressing remarkably by the development of glycan analysis systems using mass spectrometry, glycan profiling systems using lectin microarrays, and glycoprotein analysis by the isotope-coded glycosylation site-specific tagging method. With these methodologies, glycan structures and biological functions are being elucidated. In the study of glycan function as well as disease diagnosis, it is important to examine the localization of glycans in tissues and cells. Histochemical methods using lectin probes can localize glycans in the tissues and cells. This chapter describes a pre-embedding electron microscopic method for glycan localization in which tissue sections and cells are incubated with lectin prior to embedding in resin. PMID:27515086

  2. Non-rigid registration and non-local principle component analysis to improve electron microscopy spectrum images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankovich, Andrew B.; Zhang, Chenyu; Oh, Albert; Slater, Thomas J. A.; Azough, Feridoon; Freer, Robert; Haigh, Sarah J.; Willett, Rebecca; Voyles, Paul M.

    2016-09-01

    Image registration and non-local Poisson principal component analysis (PCA) denoising improve the quality of characteristic x-ray (EDS) spectrum imaging of Ca-stabilized Nd2/3TiO3 acquired at atomic resolution in a scanning transmission electron microscope. Image registration based on the simultaneously acquired high angle annular dark field image significantly outperforms acquisition with a long pixel dwell time or drift correction using a reference image. Non-local Poisson PCA denoising reduces noise more strongly than conventional weighted PCA while preserving atomic structure more faithfully. The reliability of and optimal internal parameters for non-local Poisson PCA denoising of EDS spectrum images is assessed using tests on phantom data.

  3. Electronic structure control of single-walled carbon nanotube functionalization.

    PubMed

    Strano, Michael S; Dyke, Christopher A; Usrey, Monica L; Barone, Paul W; Allen, Mathew J; Shan, Hongwei; Kittrell, Carter; Hauge, Robert H; Tour, James M; Smalley, Richard E

    2003-09-12

    Diazonium reagents functionalize single-walled carbon nanotubes suspended in aqueous solution with high selectivity and enable manipulation according to electronic structure. For example, metallic species are shown to react to the near exclusion of semiconducting nanotubes under controlled conditions. Selectivity is dictated by the availability of electrons near the Fermi level to stabilize a charge-transfer transition state preceding bond formation. The chemistry can be reversed by using a thermal treatment that restores the pristine electronic structure of the nanotube. PMID:12970561

  4. Electronic structure of EuFe2As2.

    PubMed

    Adhikary, Ganesh; Sahadev, Nishaina; Biswas, Deepnarayan; Bindu, R; Kumar, Neeraj; Thamizhavel, A; Dhar, S K; Maiti, Kalobaran

    2013-06-01

    Employing high resolution photoemission spectroscopy, we studied the temperature evolution of the electronic structure of EuFe2As2, a unique pnictide, where antiferromagnetism of the Eu layer survives within the superconducting phase due to 'FeAs' layers, achieved via substitution and/or pressure. High energy and angle resolution helped to reveal the signature of peak-dip features, having significant p orbital character and spin density wave transition induced band folding in the electronic structure. A significant spectral weight redistribution is observed below 20 K manifesting the influence of antiferromagnetic order on the conduction electrons.

  5. Electron beam enhanced surface modification for making highly resolved structures

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, J.R.

    1984-10-10

    A method for forming high resolution submicron structures on a substrate is provided by direct writing with a submicron electron beam in a partial pressure of a selected gas phase characterized by the ability to dissociate under the beam into a stable gaseous leaving group and a reactant fragment that combines with the substrate material under beam energy to form at least a surface compound. Variations of the method provide semiconductor device regions on doped silicon substrates, interconnect lines between active sites, three dimensional electronic chip structures, electron beam and optical read mass storage devices that may include color differentiated data areas, and resist areas for use with selective etching techniques.

  6. Electronic structure and magnetism of ThFeAsN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guangtao; Shi, Xianbiao

    2016-03-01

    The electronic structure and magnetic properties of ThFeAsN, a newly discovered superconductor, are investigated by means of first-principles calculations. ThFeAsN shares electronic structure and magnetic properties similar to those of LaOFeAs. Its calculated ground state is the stripe antiferromagnetic state. The hole-like Fermi surfaces (FSs) along the Γ\\text-Z line largely overlap with the electron-like FS along the M\\text-A line with the vector q= (π, π, 0) . Such significant FS nesting induces a peak of the bare susceptibility χ0(q ) at the M-point.

  7. Electron beam enhanced surface modification for making highly resolved structures

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, John R.

    1986-01-01

    A method for forming high resolution submicron structures on a substrate is provided by direct writing with a submicron electron beam in a partial pressure of a selected gas phase characterized by the ability to dissociate under the beam into a stable gaseous leaving group and a reactant fragment that combines with the substrate material under beam energy to form at least a surface compound. Variations of the method provide semiconductor device regions on doped silicon substrates, interconnect lines between active sites, three dimensional electronic chip structures, electron beam and optical read mass storage devices that may include color differentiated data areas, and resist areas for use with selective etching techniques.

  8. Measuring capital market efficiency: Global and local correlations structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristoufek, Ladislav; Vosvrda, Miloslav

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new measure for capital market efficiency. The measure takes into consideration the correlation structure of the returns (long-term and short-term memory) and local herding behavior (fractal dimension). The efficiency measure is taken as a distance from an ideal efficient market situation. The proposed methodology is applied to a portfolio of 41 stock indices. We find that the Japanese NIKKEI is the most efficient market. From a geographical point of view, the more efficient markets are dominated by the European stock indices and the less efficient markets cover mainly Latin America, Asia and Oceania. The inefficiency is mainly driven by a local herding, i.e. a low fractal dimension.

  9. Point-to-set lengths, local structure, and glassiness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaida, Sho; Berthier, Ludovic; Charbonneau, Patrick; Tarjus, Gilles

    2016-09-01

    The growing sluggishness of glass-forming liquids is thought to be accompanied by growing structural order. The nature of such order, however, remains hotly debated. A decade ago, point-to-set (PTS) correlation lengths were proposed as measures of amorphous order in glass formers, but recent results raise doubts as to their generality. Here, we extend the definition of PTS correlations to agnostically capture any type of growing order in liquids, be it local or amorphous. This advance enables the formulation of a clear distinction between slowing down due to conventional critical ordering and that due to glassiness, and provides a unified framework to assess the relative importance of specific local order and generic amorphous order in glass formation.

  10. Method for local temperature measurement in a nanoreactor for in situ high-resolution electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Vendelbo, S B; Kooyman, P J; Creemer, J F; Morana, B; Mele, L; Dona, P; Nelissen, B J; Helveg, S

    2013-10-01

    In situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of solids under reactive gas conditions can be facilitated by microelectromechanical system devices called nanoreactors. These nanoreactors are windowed cells containing nanoliter volumes of gas at ambient pressures and elevated temperatures. However, due to the high spatial confinement of the reaction environment, traditional methods for measuring process parameters, such as the local temperature, are difficult to apply. To address this issue, we devise an electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) method that probes the local temperature of the reaction volume under inspection by the electron beam. The local gas density, as measured using quantitative EELS, is combined with the inherent relation between gas density and temperature, as described by the ideal gas law, to obtain the local temperature. Using this method we determined the temperature gradient in a nanoreactor in situ, while the average, global temperature was monitored by a traditional measurement of the electrical resistivity of the heater. The local gas temperatures had a maximum of 56 °C deviation from the global heater values under the applied conditions. The local temperatures, obtained with the proposed method, are in good agreement with predictions from an analytical model. PMID:23831940

  11. Structural properties of amorphous silicon produced by electron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yamasaki, J.; Takeda, S.

    1999-07-01

    The structural properties of the amorphous Si (a-Si), which was created from crystalline silicon by 2 MeV electron irradiation at low temperatures about 25 K, are examined in detail by means of transmission electron microscopy and transmission electron diffraction. The peak positions in the radial distribution function (RDF) of the a-Si correspond well to those of a-Si fabricated by other techniques. The electron-irradiation-induced a-Si returns to crystalline Si after annealing at 550 C.

  12. Growth, structural, electronic and optical characterization of nitride semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin, Costel

    This project investigates the growth, optical, electronic, surface, magnetic and bulk properties of scandium gallium nitride on Sapphire(0001), manganese scandium nitride on MgO(001), heterostructures of cubic gallium nitride and scandium nitride on Mg(001), and chromium nitride on MgO(001) grown by radio frequency molecular beam epitaxy. The growth of ScxGa1- xN films has been performed at a substrate temperature of 650°C. The diffraction and optical experiments confirm the existence of two main regimes of growth; for high Sc concentration (x ≥ 0.54), a rocksalt crystal structure is obtained. For low x ( x ≤ 0.17), a wurtzite-like crystal structure is observed with local lattice distortions at the sites where the Sc atoms incorporate substitutionally into the Ga sites. The growth of MnxSc1- xN films, with x = 0.03-0.05, has been performed at a substrate temperature of ˜500°C. A rocksalt structure is observed for the MnxSc1-xN films. Magnetic measurements preformed on the Mn0.03Sc0.97 N film show ferromagnetic with a TC ˜ 50 K. As the manganese concentration is increased to x = 0.05, the ferromagnetism is reduced. The growth of heterostructures c-GaN(001)/ScN(001)/MgO(001) and ScN(001)/c-GaN(001)/MgO(001) adopt a cubical symmetry of the MgO(001) substrate. The zincblend c-GaN grown atop of ScN(001) shows a smoother surface (predominantly 2D growth) as compared to the rocksalt ScN(001) grown on atop of c-GaN(001). The growth of stoichiometric CrN(001) films is performed at a substrate temperature of 450°C. A novel growth method of highly crystalline stoichiometric CrN(001) films has been proposed. The room temperature scanning tunneling microscopy together with resistivity versus temperature experiments reveal the electronic behavior of CrN(001) films to be metallic below T N ≃ 270 K, and semiconductor above TN.

  13. "Lagrange functions" for order(N) electronic structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Kalman; Zhang, Zhenyu; Pantelides, S. T.

    2004-03-01

    "Plane waves" have several highly desirable properties for electronic structure calculations, but effectively scale as N3, where N is the number of atoms, because they impose a uniform grid on which one must perform fast Fourier transforms (FFTs). To achieve near-order-N methods, it is imperative to adopt "real-space methods and non-uniform grids. The objective is usually pursued either by discretization or by adopting local basis sets, either numerical or analytical, with optimized short range. Here we report on a novel basis set, which we label "Lagrange functions" that are defined to satisfy the Lagrange interpolation condition and on a grid that corresponds to a Gaussian quadrature for integrations with optimized numerical accuracy. Lagrange functions combine the best attributes of plane waves and real-space methods. Just like plane waves, convergence is controlled by a single parameter in a systematic way, are orthonormal and defined analytically everywhere, but have the added flexibility of a weight function that controls the distribution of grid points and can be used to optimize the calculation for each system. They do not require FFTs and integrals are trivial and accurate since each Lagrange function is nonzero on a single grid point. The power of the method will be illustrated with several examples.

  14. The effects of local blowing perturbations on thermal turbulent structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Can; Araya, Guillermo; Leonardi, Stefano; Castillo, Luciano

    2013-11-01

    Blowing is an active flow control technique with several industrial applications, particularly in film cooling of turbine blades. In the past, the effects of localized blowing have been mostly analyzed on the velocity field and its influence of the flow parameters and turbulence structures (Krogstad and Kourakine, 2000). However, little literature can be found on the effects of blowing on the coherent thermal structures. In the present study, an incompressible turbulent channel flow with given steady blowing at the wall is simulated via DNS by means of five spanwise holes. The Reynolds number based on the friction velocity and half channel height is approximately Re = 394 and the molecular Prandtl number is Pr = 0.71. Temperature is considered a passive scalar with isothermal conditions at the wall. Different blowing amplitudes and perturbing angles (with respect to the streamwise direction) are applied to find out their effects on the turbulent thermal structures by means of a two-point correlation analysis. In addition, local reduction and increase of drag are connected to vorticity. The corresponding influence of perturbing amplitudes and angles on the energy budget of thermal fluctuations and turbulent Prandtl numbers are also shown and discussed.

  15. Thermal-structural analysis of electron gun with control grid.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lieming; Zhang, Kai; Yu, Hailong; Huang, Tao; Li, Bin

    2012-02-01

    Steady state thermal-structural analysis of electron guns is essential due to the requirement of high reliability in beam performance. Temperatures and displacements for all the components of an electron gun with a control grid are computed. Steady-state thermal analysis has been carried out for various cathode temperatures and various intercepted powers on the control grid to determine the temperature of the control grid. These results are verified experimentally based on measured results from an assembled electron gun. Structural analysis of the electron gun is used to evaluate the deformation of the inner electrodes under the hot condition. The results show that the thermal stress slightly changes the characteristics of the gun. The obtained thermal deformation data can be helpful to modify the design dimensions and assembly of an electron gun.

  16. Structural complexities in the active layers of organic electronics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Stephanie S; Loo, Yueh-Lin

    2010-01-01

    The field of organic electronics has progressed rapidly in recent years. However, understanding the direct structure-function relationships between the morphology in electrically active layers and the performance of devices composed of these materials has proven difficult. The morphology of active layers in organic electronics is inherently complex, with heterogeneities existing across multiple length scales, from subnanometer to micron and millimeter range. A major challenge still facing the organic electronics community is understanding how the morphology across all of the length scales in active layers collectively determines the device performance of organic electronics. In this review we highlight experiments that have contributed to the elucidation of structure-function relationships in organic electronics and also point to areas in which knowledge of such relationships is still lacking. Such knowledge will lead to the ability to select active materials on the basis of their inherent properties for the fabrication of devices with prespecified characteristics.

  17. Structure and electronic properties of azadirachtin.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Elton A S; de Oliveira, Daniel A B; Farias, Sergio A S; Gargano, Ricardo; Martins, João B L

    2014-02-01

    We performed a combined DFT and Monte Carlo (13)C NMR chemical-shift study of azadirachtin A, a triterpenoid that acts as a natural insect antifeedant. A conformational search using a Monte Carlo technique based on the RM1 semiempirical method was carried out in order to establish its preferred structure. The B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p), wB97XD/6-311++G(d,p), M06/6-311++G(d,p), M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p), and CAM-B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) levels of theory were used to predict NMR chemical shifts. A Monte Carlo population-weighted average spectrum was produced based on the predicted Boltzmann contributions. In general, good agreement between experimental and theoretical data was obtained using both methods, and the (13)C NMR chemical shifts were predicted highly accurately. The geometry was optimized at the semiempirical level and used to calculate the NMR chemical shifts at the DFT level, and these shifts showed only minor deviations from those obtained following structural optimization at the DFT level, and incurred a much lower computational cost. The theoretical ultraviolet spectrum showed a maximum absorption peak that was mainly contributed by the tiglate group. PMID:24509732

  18. MATERIALS WITH COMPLEX ELECTRONIC/ATOMIC STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. PARKIN; L. CHEN; ET AL

    2000-09-01

    We explored both experimentally and theoretically the behavior of materials at stresses close to their theoretical strength. This involves the preparation of ultra fine scale structures by a variety of fabrication methods. In the past year work has concentrated on wire drawing of in situ composites such as Cu-Ag and Cu-Nb. Materials were also fabricated by melting alloys in glass and drawing them into filaments at high temperatures by a method known as Taylor wire technique. Cu-Ag microwires have been drawn by this technique to produce wires 10 {micro}m in diameter that consist of nanoscale grains of supersaturated solid solution. Organogels formed from novel organic gelators containing cholesterol tethered to squaraine dyes or trans-stilbene derivatives have been studied from several different perspectives. The two types of molecules are active toward several organic liquids, gelling in some cases at w/w percentages as low as 0.1. While relatively robust, acroscopically dry gels are formed in several cases, studies with a variety of probes indicate that much of the solvent may exist in domains that are essentially liquid-like in terms of their microenvironment. The gels have been imaged by atomic force microscopy and conventional and fluorescence microscopy, monitoring both the gelator fluorescence in the case of the stilbene-cholesterol gels and, the fluorescence of solutes dissolved in the solvent. Remarkably, our findings show that several of the gels are composed of similarly appearing fibrous structures visible at the nano-, micro-, and macroscale.

  19. Validation of local hybrid functionals for TDDFT calculations of electronic excitation energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Toni M.; Bahmann, Hilke; Arbuznikov, Alexei V.; Kaupp, Martin

    2016-02-01

    The first systematic evaluation of local hybrid functionals for the calculation of electronic excitation energies within linear-response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is reported. Using our recent efficient semi-numerical TDDFT implementation [T. M. Maier et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 11, 4226 (2015)], four simple, thermochemically optimized one-parameter local hybrid functionals based on local spin-density exchange are evaluated against a database of singlet and triplet valence excitations of organic molecules, and against a mixed database including also Rydberg, intramolecular charge-transfer (CT) and core excitations. The four local hybrids exhibit comparable performance to standard global or range-separated hybrid functionals for common singlet valence excitations, but several local hybrids outperform all other functionals tested for the triplet excitations of the first test set, as well as for relative energies of excited states. Evaluation for the combined second test set shows that local hybrids can also provide excellent Rydberg and core excitations, in the latter case rivaling specialized functionals optimized specifically for such excitations. This good performance of local hybrids for different excitation types could be traced to relatively large exact-exchange (EXX) admixtures in a spatial region intermediate between valence and asymptotics, as well as close to the nucleus, and lower EXX admixtures in the valence region. In contrast, the tested local hybrids cannot compete with the best range-separated hybrids for intra- and intermolecular CT excitation energies. Possible directions for improvement in the latter category are discussed. As the used efficient TDDFT implementation requires essentially the same computational effort for global and local hybrids, applications of local hybrid functionals to excited-state problems appear promising in a wide range of fields. Influences of current-density dependence of local kinetic

  20. Localized structural health monitoring via transmission zero invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, Gregory William

    2000-11-01

    This thesis presents a method of localized health monitoring based on an invariance property of transmission zeros of substructural frequency response functions. The proposed method has several desirable characteristics which make it attractive for use in damage detection applications. These are the independence from initial parameter estimates, the determination of a unique damage location, and the fact that the method is particularly suited for structural continuum applications where other methods perform poorly. The proposed method is based on a substructuring technique for structural mechanics. The structural equations of motion are cast in a variational framework and are mathematically decomposed into substructures using Lagrange multipliers as boundary constraints. The global dynamics of the system are then written in terms of the independent dynamics of each substructure plus the inter-element dynamics. The frequency response functions of the localized form represent the energy transfer between unique input forces which are derived from the total global force input and output variables which exist independently on a substructure. Because transmission zeros are highly dependent on the input and output of the system under consideration, they exhibit different characteristics in the local form versus the global form. If damage is limited to a change in flexibility, then it can be shown that the transmission zeros of a partition of the full transfer function matrix corresponding to a damaged substructure are invariant to the damage. Transmission zeros of partitions of the transfer function matrix corresponding to healthy substructures likewise can be shown to vary with the damage. Identification of the substructure whose zeros exhibit the least amount of variation between tests results in identification of the damage location. Analytical and experimental examples are used to demonstrate the theory and abilities of the proposed method. In each example, the system

  1. Localized Epidermal Drug Delivery Induced by Supramolecular Solvent Structuring.

    PubMed

    Benaouda, F; Jones, S A; Martin, G P; Brown, M B

    2016-01-01

    The preferential localization of drug molecules in the epidermis of human skin is considered advantageous for a number of agents, but achieving such a delivery profile can be problematic. The aim of the present study was to assess if the manipulation of solvent supramolecular structuring in the skin could be used to promote drug residence in the epidermal tissue. Skin deposition studies showed that a 175-fold increase in the epidermal loading of a model drug diclofenac (138.65 ± 11.67 μg·cm(-2)), compared to a control (0.81 ± 0.13 μg·cm(-2)), could be achieved by colocalizing the drug with a high concentration of propylene glycol (PG) in the tissue. For such a system at 1 h postdose application, the PG flux into the skin was 9.3 mg·cm(2)·h(-1) and the PG-water ratio in the epidermis was 76:24 (v/v). At this solvent ratio infrared spectroscopy indicated that PG rich supramolecular structures, which displayed a relatively strong physical affinity for the drug, were formed. Encouraging the production of the PG-rich supermolecular structures in the epidermis by applying diclofenac to the skin using a high PG loading dose (240 μg·cm(-2)) produced an epidermal-transdermal drug distribution of 6.8:1. However, generating water-rich solvent supermolecular structures in the epidermis by applying diclofenac using a low PG loading dose (2.2 μg·cm(-2)) led to a loss of preferential epidermal localization of diclofenac in the tissue (0.7:1 epidermal-transdermal drug distribution). This change in diclofenac skin deposition profile in response to PG variations and the accompanying FTIR data supported the notion that supramolecular solvent structures could control drug accumulation in the human epidermis. PMID:26593153

  2. Electronic structure of a graphene superlattice with massive Dirac fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, Jonas R. F.

    2015-02-28

    We study the electronic and transport properties of a graphene-based superlattice theoretically by using an effective Dirac equation. The superlattice consists of a periodic potential applied on a single-layer graphene deposited on a substrate that opens an energy gap of 2Δ in its electronic structure. We find that extra Dirac points appear in the electronic band structure under certain conditions, so it is possible to close the gap between the conduction and valence minibands. We show that the energy gap E{sub g} can be tuned in the range 0 ≤ E{sub g} ≤ 2Δ by changing the periodic potential. We analyze the low energy electronic structure around the contact points and find that the effective Fermi velocity in very anisotropic and depends on the energy gap. We show that the extra Dirac points obtained here behave differently compared to previously studied systems.

  3. Electronic band structure of surface-doped black phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jimin; Ryu, Sae Hee; Sohn, Yeongsup; Kim, Keun Su

    2015-03-01

    There are rapidly growing interests in the study of few-layer black phosphorus owing to its promising device characteristics that may impact our future electronics technology. The low-energy band structure of black phosphorus has been widely predicted to be controllable by external perturbations, such as strain and doping. In this work, we attempt to control the electronic band structure of black phosphorous by in-situ surface deposition of alkali-metal atoms. We found that surface doping induces steep band bending towards the bulk, leading to the emergence of new 2D electronic states that are confined within only few phosphorene layers of black phosphorus. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we directly measured the electronic band structure and its evolution as a function of dopant density. Supported by IBS.

  4. Local probing of structure and property in dimensionally confined amorphous and crystalline structures by S/TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Aiming

    The characterization of materials' microstructure has been brought up to a new level since the invention and broad application of transmission electron microscope (TEM) thanks to the high-energy electron beam source which guarantees an unsurpassable spatial resolution and theoretical study of interaction between electron and matter. The advent of nano-world has imposed an urgent request to characterize nano-assemblies in nano- or even sub-nano-scale and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) which typically utilizes an electron probe with a size of 1nm or even smaller has found its unique advantage to unravel the local structure, chemical and physical properties of these emerging nanostructures. Dimensionally constrained nanostructures such as thin films and nanopatterned systems have attracted people's attention for decades due to their novel chemical and physical properties and popularity in energy storage, biological integration and etc. This dissertation focuses on the unique characterization capability of S/TEM to study the local order in amorphous transparent conducting oxide thin films, disordering in 2-D layered materials, localized surface plasmons in nanoporous gold patterns on 2-D layered structures and crystallization process in dimensionally and spatially constrained oxide nanopatterns observed by in-situ TEM. Electron diffraction and x-ray diffraction are commonly used techniques to study the crystallinity in a certain material - crystalline or amorphous. In amorphous materials which lack long-range order, normal electron diffraction and x-ray diffraction techniques won't be able to extract any useful information regarding the ordering or disordering in the materials. We have developed a unique set of electron diffraction methods in both TEM and STEM, combined with density functional theory molecular dynamics of liquid quench to study the short-range (< 1 nm) and medium-range order (between 1 nm and 3 nm) in amorphous transparent oxide films

  5. A measure of localization properties of one-dimensional single electron lattice systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Longyan; Li, Wenjia; Zhao, Shengmei; Cheng, Weiwen

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel quantity to measure the degree of localization properties of various types of one-dimension single electron states. The quantity includes information about the spatial variation of probability density of quantum states. Numerical results show that it can distinguish localized states from delocalized ones, so it can be used as a fruitful index to monitor the localization-delocalization transition. Comparing with existing measures, such as geometric average density of states, inverse participation ratio, and quantum information entropies, our proposed quantity has some advantages over them.

  6. Electronic band structure effects in monolayer, bilayer, and hybrid graphene structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puls, Conor

    Since its discovery in 2005, graphene has been the focus of intense theoretical and experimental study owing to its unique two-dimensional band structure and related electronic properties. In this thesis, we explore the electronic properties of graphene structures from several perspectives including the magnetoelectrical transport properties of monolayer graphene, gap engineering and measurements in bilayer graphene, and anomalous quantum oscillation in the monolayer-bilayer graphene hybrids. We also explored the device implications of our findings, and the application of some experimental techniques developed for the graphene work to the study of a complex oxide, Ca3Ru2O7, exhibiting properties of strongly correlated electrons. Graphene's high mobility and ballistic transport over device length scales, make it suitable for numerous applications. However, two big challenges remain in the way: maintaining high mobility in fabricated devices, and engineering a band gap to make graphene compatible with logical electronics and various optical devices. We address the first challenge by experimentally evaluating mobilities in scalable monolayer graphene-based field effect transistors (FETs) and dielectric-covered Hall bars. We find that the mobility is limited in these devices, and is roughly inversely proportional to doping. By considering interaction of graphene's Dirac fermions with local charged impurities at the interface between graphene and the top-gate dielectric, we find that Coulomb scattering is responsible for degraded mobility. Even in the cleanest devices, a band gap is still desirable for electronic applications of graphene. We address this challenge by probing the band structure of bilayer graphene, in which a field-tunable energy band gap has been theoretically proposed. We use planar tunneling spectroscopy of exfoliated bilayer graphene flakes demonstrate both measurement and control of the energy band gap. We find that both the Fermi level and

  7. Local structure study of Fe dopants in Ni-deficit Ni3Al alloys

    DOE PAGES

    V. N. Ivanovski; Umicevic, A.; Belosevic-Cavor, J.; Lei, Hechang; Li, Lijun; Cekic, B.; Koteski, V.; Petrovic, C.

    2015-08-24

    We found that the local electronic and magnetic structure, hyperfine interactions, and phase composition of polycrystalline Ni–deficient Ni 3-x FexAl (x = 0.18 and 0.36) were investigated by means of 57 Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. The samples were characterized by X–ray diffraction and magnetization measurements. The ab initio calculations performed with the projector augmented wave method and the calculations of the energies of iron point defects were done to elucidate the electronic structure and site preference of Fe doped Ni 3 Al. Moreover, the value of calculated electric field gradient tensor Vzz=1.6 1021Vm-2 matches well with the results of Mössbauer spectroscopymore » and indicates that the Fe atoms occupy Ni sites.« less

  8. Localized structures in dissipative media: from optics to plant ecology

    PubMed Central

    Tlidi, M.; Staliunas, K.; Panajotov, K.; Vladimirov, A. G.; Clerc, M. G.

    2014-01-01

    Localized structures (LSs) in dissipative media appear in various fields of natural science such as biology, chemistry, plant ecology, optics and laser physics. The proposal for this Theme Issue was to gather specialists from various fields of nonlinear science towards a cross-fertilization among active areas of research. This is a cross-disciplinary area of research dominated by nonlinear optics due to potential applications for all-optical control of light, optical storage and information processing. This Theme Issue contains contributions from 18 active groups involved in the LS field and have all made significant contributions in recent years. PMID:25246688

  9. Localization-Based Super-Resolution Imaging of Cellular Structures

    PubMed Central

    Kanchanawong, Pakorn; Waterman, Clare M.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy allows direct visualization of fluorescently tagged proteins within cells. However, the spatial resolution of conventional fluorescence microscopes is limited by diffraction to ~250 nm, prompting the development of super-resolution microscopy which offers resolution approaching the scale of single proteins, i.e., ~20 nm. Here, we describe protocols for single molecule localization-based super-resolution imaging, using focal adhesion proteins as an example and employing either photoswitchable fluorophores or photoactivatable fluorescent proteins. These protocols should also be easily adaptable to imaging a broad array of macromolecular assemblies in cells whose components can be fluorescently tagged and assemble into high density structures. PMID:23868582

  10. Excess electron reactivity in amino acid aqueous solution revealed by ab initio molecular dynamics simulation: anion-centered localization and anion-relayed electron transfer dissociation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiuxiu; Gao, Liang; Liu, Jinxiang; Yang, Hongfang; Wang, Shoushan; Bu, Yuxiang

    2015-10-28

    Studies on the structure, states, and reactivity of excess electrons (EEs) in biological media are of great significance. Although there is information about EE interaction with desolvated biological molecules, solution effects are hardly explored. In this work, we present an ab initio molecular dynamics simulation study on the interaction and reactivity of an EE with glycine in solution. Our simulations reveal two striking results. Firstly, a pre-solvated EE partially localizes on the negatively charged -COO(-) group of the zwitterionic glycine and the remaining part delocalizes over solvent water molecules, forming an anion-centered quasi-localized structure, due to relative alignment of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy levels of potential sites for EE residence in the aqueous solution. Secondly, after a period of anion-centered localization of an EE, the zwitterionic glycine is induced to spontaneously fragment through the cleavage of the N-Cα bond, losing ammonia (deamination), and leaving a ˙CH2-COO(-) anion radical, in good agreement with experimental observations. Introduction of the same groups (-COO(-) or -NH3(+)) in the side chain (taking lysine and aspartic acid as examples) can affect EE localization, with the fragmentation of the backbone part of these amino acids dependent on the properties of the side chain groups. These findings provide insights into EE interaction mechanisms with the backbone parts of amino acids and low energy EE induced fragmentation of amino acids and even peptides and proteins.

  11. Locally Biased Galaxy Formation and Large-Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Vijay K.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Weinberg, David H.

    2000-01-01

    We examine the influence of the morphology-density relation and a wide range of simple models for biased galaxy formation on statistical measures of large-scale structure. We contrast the behavior of local biasing models, in which the efficiency of galaxy formation is determined by the density, geometry, or velocity dispersion of the local mass distribution, with that of nonlocal biasing models, in which galaxy formation is modulated coherently over scales larger than the galaxy correlation length. If morphological segregation of galaxies is governed by a local morphology-density relation, then the correlation function of E/S0 galaxies should be steeper and stronger than that of spiral galaxies on small scales, as observed, while on large scales the E/S0 and spiral galaxies should have correlation functions with the same shape but different amplitudes. Similarly, all of our local bias models produce scale-independent amplification of the correlation function and power spectrum in the linear and mildly nonlinear regimes; only a nonlocal biasing mechanism can alter the shape of the power spectrum on large scales. Moments of the biased galaxy distribution retain the hierarchical pattern of the mass moments, but biasing alters the values and scale dependence of the hierarchical amplitudes S3 and S4. Pair-weighted moments of the galaxy velocity distribution are sensitive to the details of the bias prescription even if galaxies have the same local velocity distribution as the underlying dark matter. The nonlinearity of the relation between galaxy density and mass density depends on the biasing prescription and the smoothing scale, and the scatter in this relation is a useful diagnostic of the physical parameters that determine the bias. While the assumption that galaxy formation is governed by local physics leads to some important simplifications on large scales, even local biasing is a multifaceted phenomenon whose impact cannot be described by a single parameter or

  12. Evidence of locally enhanced target heating due to instabilities of counter-streaming fast electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Koester, Petra; Cecchetti, Carlo A.; Booth, Nicola; Woolsey, Nigel; Chen, Hui; Evans, Roger G.; Gregori, Gianluca; Li, Bin; Mithen, James; Murphy, Christopher D.; Labate, Luca; Gizzi, Leonida A.; Levato, Tadzio; Makita, Mikako; Riley, David; Notley, Margaret; Pattathil, Rajeev

    2015-02-15

    The high-current fast electron beams generated in high-intensity laser-solid interactions require the onset of a balancing return current in order to propagate in the target material. Such a system of counter-streaming electron currents is unstable to a variety of instabilities such as the current-filamentation instability and the two-stream instability. An experimental study aimed at investigating the role of instabilities in a system of symmetrical counter-propagating fast electron beams is presented here for the first time. The fast electron beams are generated by double-sided laser-irradiation of a layered target foil at laser intensities above 10{sup 19 }W/cm{sup 2}. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of the emission from the central Ti layer shows that locally enhanced energy deposition is indeed achieved in the case of counter-propagating fast electron beams.

  13. Electronic correlation in magnetic contributions to structural energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haydock, Roger

    For interacting electrons the density of transitions [see http://arxiv.org/abs/1405.2288] replaces the density of states in calculations of structural energies. Extending previous work on paramagnetic metals, this approach is applied to correlation effects on the structural stability of magnetic transition metals. Supported by the H. V. Snyder Gift to the University of Oregon.

  14. Electron transport in radiotherapy using local-to-global Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Svatos, M.M.; Chandler, W.P.; Siantar, C.L.H.; Rathkopf, J.A.; Ballinger, C.T.; Neuenschwander, H.; Mackie, T.R.; Reckwerdt, P.J.

    1994-09-01

    Local-to-Global (L-G) Monte Carlo methods are a way to make three-dimensional electron transport both fast and accurate relative to other Monte Carlo methods. This is achieved by breaking the simulation into two stages: a local calculation done over small geometries having the size and shape of the ``steps`` to be taken through the mesh; and a global calculation which relies on a stepping code that samples the stored results of the local calculation. The increase in speed results from taking fewer steps in the global calculation than required by ordinary Monte Carlo codes and by speeding up the calculation per step. The potential for accuracy comes from the ability to use long runs of detailed codes to compile probability distribution functions (PDFs) in the local calculation. Specific examples of successful Local-to-Global algorithms are given.

  15. Electron vortex magnetic holes: A nonlinear coherent plasma structure

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, Christopher T. Burgess, David; Sundberg, Torbjorn; Camporeale, Enrico

    2015-01-15

    We report the properties of a novel type of sub-proton scale magnetic hole found in two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of decaying turbulence with a guide field. The simulations were performed with a realistic value for ion to electron mass ratio. These structures, electron vortex magnetic holes (EVMHs), have circular cross-section. The magnetic field depression is associated with a diamagnetic azimuthal current provided by a population of trapped electrons in petal-like orbits. The trapped electron population provides a mean azimuthal velocity and since trapping preferentially selects high pitch angles, a perpendicular temperature anisotropy. The structures arise out of initial perturbations in the course of the turbulent evolution of the plasma, and are stable over at least 100 electron gyroperiods. We have verified the model for the EVMH by carrying out test particle and PIC simulations of isolated structures in a uniform plasma. It is found that (quasi-)stable structures can be formed provided that there is some initial perpendicular temperature anisotropy at the structure location. The properties of these structures (scale size, trapped population, etc.) are able to explain the observed properties of magnetic holes in the terrestrial plasma sheet. EVMHs may also contribute to turbulence properties, such as intermittency, at short scale lengths in other astrophysical plasmas.

  16. Electron vortex magnetic holes: A nonlinear coherent plasma structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, Christopher T.; Burgess, David; Camporeale, Enrico; Sundberg, Torbjorn

    2015-01-01

    We report the properties of a novel type of sub-proton scale magnetic hole found in two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of decaying turbulence with a guide field. The simulations were performed with a realistic value for ion to electron mass ratio. These structures, electron vortex magnetic holes (EVMHs), have circular cross-section. The magnetic field depression is associated with a diamagnetic azimuthal current provided by a population of trapped electrons in petal-like orbits. The trapped electron population provides a mean azimuthal velocity and since trapping preferentially selects high pitch angles, a perpendicular temperature anisotropy. The structures arise out of initial perturbations in the course of the turbulent evolution of the plasma, and are stable over at least 100 electron gyroperiods. We have verified the model for the EVMH by carrying out test particle and PIC simulations of isolated structures in a uniform plasma. It is found that (quasi-)stable structures can be formed provided that there is some initial perpendicular temperature anisotropy at the structure location. The properties of these structures (scale size, trapped population, etc.) are able to explain the observed properties of magnetic holes in the terrestrial plasma sheet. EVMHs may also contribute to turbulence properties, such as intermittency, at short scale lengths in other astrophysical plasmas.

  17. Engineering the Electronic Band Structure for Multiband Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, N.; Reichertz, L.A.; Yu, K.M.; Campman, K.; Walukiewicz, W.

    2010-07-12

    Using the unique features of the electronic band structure of GaNxAs1-x alloys, we have designed, fabricated and tested a multiband photovoltaic device. The device demonstrates an optical activity of three energy bands that absorb, and convert into electrical current, the crucial part of the solar spectrum. The performance of the device and measurements of electroluminescence, quantum efficiency and photomodulated reflectivity are analyzed in terms of the Band Anticrossing model of the electronic structure of highly mismatched alloys. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using highly mismatched alloys to engineer the semiconductor energy band structure for specific device applications.

  18. A comparison of classical and quantum analyses of electron localization sites in liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motakabbir, Kazi A.; Schnitker, Jurgen; Rossky, Peter J.

    1992-08-01

    The results of an earlier study [Schnitker, Rossky, and Kenney-Wallace, J. Chem. Phys. 85, 2986 (1986)] in which likely sites for electron localization in pure liquid water were identified and characterized via a physically motivated purely classical analysis are statistically compared to a corresponding fully quantum mechanical treatment of the excess electronic ground state. It is shown that the most energetically favorable localization sites identified by the classical treatment correspond reasonably to the quantum mechanical result both energetically and spatially. It is found that the existence and location of a physically localized ground state can be determined from the classical results if both the minimum of the estimated absolute total electronic energy and the difference between this minimum and the alternative local minima identified within a solvent configuration are considered. Further, the results confirm that the concentration of such effective sites is relatively high in the liquid (˜0.01 M). Hence, the classical approach has merit as a qualitative tool for the analysis of the electronic states supported by the preexisting configurational order in a liquid.

  19. Sustainable Development and African Local Government: Can Electronic Training Help Build Capacities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Hazel; Thomas, Alan

    2007-01-01

    A recent study carried out by European and African organizations into the potential for electronic distance training (EDT) on sustainability in African local governments concluded that EDT was both "useful and feasible". This article reflects on some of the theoretical and practical implications of that study. It focuses on the connection between…

  20. A theory of local and global processes which affect solar wind electrons. 2: Experimental support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scudder, J. D.; Olbert, S.

    1979-01-01

    The microscopic characteristics of the Coulomb cross section show that there are three natural subpopulations for plasma electrons: the subthermals with local kinetic energy E kT sub c; the transthermals with kT sub c E 7 kT sub c and the extrathermals E 7 kT sub c. Data from three experimental groups on three different spacecraft in the interplanetary medium over a radial range are presented to support the five interrelations projected between solar wind electron properties and changes in the interplanetary medium: (1) subthermals respond primarily to local changes (compression and rarefactions) in stream dynamics; (2) the extrathermal fraction of the ambient electron density should be anti-correlated with the asymptotic bulk speed; (3) the extrathermal "temperature" should be anti-correlated with the local wind speed at 1 AU; (4) the heat flux carried by electrons should be anti-correlated with the local bulk speed; and (5) the extrathermal differential 'temperature' should be nearly independent of radius within 1 AU.

  1. Goeppert-Mayer Award Recipient: Electron Scattering and Nucleon Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beise, Elizabeth

    1998-04-01

    Electron scattering from hydrogen and light nuclear targets has long been recognized as one of the best tools for understanding the electromagnetic structure of protons, neutrons and few-nucleon systems. In the last decade, considerable progress has been made in the field through advances in polarized beams and polarized targets. Improvements in polarized electron sources has made it feasible to also study the structure of the nucleon through parity-violating electron scattering, where the nucleon's neutral weak structure is probed. In this talk, a summary of the present experimental status of the nucleon's electroweak structure will be presented, with an emphasis on recent results from the MIT-Bates and Jefferson Laboratories.

  2. Advanced Accelerating Structures and Their Interaction with Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gai Wei

    2009-01-22

    In this paper, we give a brief description of several advanced accelerating structures, such as dielectric loaded waveguides, photonic band gap, metamaterials and improved iris-loaded cavities. We describe wakefields generated by passing high current electron beams through these structures, and applications of wakefields to advanced accelerator schemes. One of the keys to success for high gradient wakefield acceleration is to develop high current drive beam sources. As an example, the high current RF photo injector at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator, passed a {approx}80 nC electron beam through a high gradient dielectric loaded structure to achieve a 100 MV/m gradient. We will summarize recent related experiments on beam-structure interactions and also discuss high current electron beam generation and propagation and their applications to wakefield acceleration.

  3. Advanced accelerating structures and their interaction with electron beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, W.; High Energy Physics

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we give a brief description of several advanced accelerating structures, such as dielectric loaded waveguides, photonic band gap, metamaterials and improved iris-loaded cavities. We describe wakefields generated by passing high current electron beams through these structures, and applications of wakefields to advanced accelerator schemes. One of the keys to success for high gradient wakefield acceleration is to develop high current drive beam sources. As an example, the high current RF photo injector at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator, passed a {approx}80 nC electron beam through a high gradient dielectric loaded structure to achieve a 100 MV/m gradient. We will summarize recent related experiments on beam-structure interactions and also discuss high current electron beam generation and propagation and their applications to wakefield acceleration.

  4. Vertical Electron Transport through PbS-EuS Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrotek, S.; Dybko, K.; Morawski, A.; Makosa, A.; Wosinski, T.; Figielski, T.; Tkaczyk, Z.; Lusakowska, E.; Story, T.; Sipatov, A. Yu

    2003-01-01

    Temperature dependence of current-voltage I-V characteristics and resistivity is studied in ferromagnetic PbS-EuS semiconductor tunnel structures grown on n-PbS (100) substrates. For the structures with a single (2-4 nm thick) ferromagnetic EuS electron barrier we observe strongly non-linear I-V characteristics with an effective tunneling barrier height of 0.3-0.7 eV. The experimentally observed non-monotonic temperature dependence of the (normal to the plane of the structure) electrical resistance of these structures is discussed in terms of the electron tunneling mechanism taking into account the temperature dependent shift of the band offsets at the EuS-PbS heterointerface as well as the exchange splitting of the electronic states at the bottom of the conduction band of EuS.

  5. Copper plasmonics and catalysis: role of electron-phonon interactions in dephasing localized surface plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qi-C.; Ding, Yuchen; Goodman, Samuel M.; H. Funke, Hans; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-10-01

    Copper metal can provide an important alternative for the development of efficient, low-cost and low-loss plasmonic nanoparticles, and selective nanocatalysts. However, poor chemical stability and lack of insight into photophysics and plasmon decay mechanisms has impeded study. Here, we use smooth conformal ALD coating on copper nanoparticles to prevent surface oxidation, and study dephasing time for localized surface plasmons on different sized copper nanoparticles. Using dephasing time as a figure of merit, we elucidate the role of electron-electron, electron-phonon, impurity, surface and grain boundary scattering on the decay of localized surface plasmon waves. Using our quantitative analysis and different temperature dependent measurements, we show that electron-phonon interactions dominate over other scattering mechanisms in dephasing plasmon waves. While interband transitions in copper metal contributes substantially to plasmon losses, tuning surface plasmon modes to infrared frequencies leads to a five-fold enhancement in the quality factor. These findings demonstrate that conformal ALD coatings can improve the chemical stability for copper nanoparticles, even at high temperatures (>300 °C) in ambient atmosphere, and nanoscaled copper is a good alternative material for many potential applications in nanophotonics, plasmonics, catalysis and nanoscale electronics.Copper metal can provide an important alternative for the development of efficient, low-cost and low-loss plasmonic nanoparticles, and selective nanocatalysts. However, poor chemical stability and lack of insight into photophysics and plasmon decay mechanisms has impeded study. Here, we use smooth conformal ALD coating on copper nanoparticles to prevent surface oxidation, and study dephasing time for localized surface plasmons on different sized copper nanoparticles. Using dephasing time as a figure of merit, we elucidate the role of electron-electron, electron-phonon, impurity, surface and grain

  6. Global functions in global-local finite-element analysis of localized stresses in prismatic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dong, Stanley B.

    1989-01-01

    An important consideration in the global local finite-element method (GLFEM) is the availability of global functions for the given problem. The role and mathematical requirements of these global functions in a GLFEM analysis of localized stress states in prismatic structures are discussed. A method is described for determining these global functions. Underlying this method are theorems due to Toupin and Knowles on strain energy decay rates, which are related to a quantitative expression of Saint-Venant's principle. It is mentioned that a mathematically complete set of global functions can be generated, so that any arbitrary interface condition between the finite element and global subregions can be represented. Convergence to the true behavior can be achieved with increasing global functions and finite-element degrees of freedom. Specific attention is devoted to mathematically two-dimensional and three-dimensional prismatic structures. Comments are offered on the GLFEM analysis of NASA flat panel with a discontinuous stiffener. Methods for determining global functions for other effects are also indicated, such as steady-state dynamics and bodies under initial stress.

  7. Spectroscopic investigations of the electronic structure of neptunyl ions.

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkerson, M. P.; Berg, J. M.; Dewey, H. J.

    2003-01-01

    Molecular electronic structures are innately sensitive to the geometric and chemical environments around the metal center of coordination compounds . However, the interrelationships between the electronic structures and molecular geometries of actinide species, which often contain more than one electron in the Sf valence shell, are quite complex due to the large numbers of possible electronic states and high densities of vibronically enabled transitions .1'2 Investigations of the optical signatures of simple, well-defined molecular systems should provide the most straightforward approach for unharnessing these fundamental relationships, and in particular, systems with a single electron in the valence Sf shell, such as the neptunyl ion (Np0 22+), should provide the most viable means for characte rizing actinide electronic structure. Furthermore, Sf orbital-occupied actinide systems exhibit not only visible and ultraviolet ligand-to-metal charge-transfer spectral bands, but also near-infrared Sf-Sf transitions resulting from promotion of a Sf electron to an orbital of primarily Sf character .

  8. Investigation of S3-2 satellite data for local time variation of energetic electron precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbe, S.; Sheldon, W. R.; Benbrook, J. R.; Bering, E. A.; Vampola, A. L.

    1994-01-01

    Data on precipitating electrons from the S3-2 satellite were investigated for local time variation at four L = 4 stations in the southern hemisphere. The equatorial pitch angles of electrons mirroring at 100 km, assumed to be the edge of the bounce loss cone, are calculated for L = 4 using the International Geomagnetic Reference Field for the epoch of the S3-2 data, along with the variation in mirror altitude per degree of equatorial pitch angle. The largest obstacle to the investigation was uneven sampling in terms of local time for all of the stations. However, this situation was improved upon by the use of S3-2 measurements at the conjugate locations of the four stations which provided additional data on electrons in the southern hemisphere bounce loss cone. Evidence for an effect of the dawn-to-dusk geoelectric field was found at two of the stations, Halley Bay and Siple, in the form of a minimum in electron precipitation at dusk. However, the present study does not completely resolve the question of local time modulation of electron precipitation at L = 4 in the southern hemisphere. Furthermore, while the average precipitation was lowest at the Kerguelen site, as would be expected on the basis of drift loss cone (DLC) theories, the intensity at that site exceeds the level that is expected on the basis of these DLC theories.

  9. Membrane protein structures without crystals, by single particle electron cryomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vinothkumar, Kutti R

    2015-01-01

    It is an exciting period in membrane protein structural biology with a number of medically important protein structures determined at a rapid pace. However, two major hurdles still remain in the structural biology of membrane proteins. One is the inability to obtain large amounts of protein for crystallization and the other is the failure to get well-diffracting crystals. With single particle electron cryomicroscopy, both these problems can be overcome and high-resolution structures of membrane proteins and other labile protein complexes can be obtained with very little protein and without the need for crystals. In this review, I highlight recent advances in electron microscopy, detectors and software, which have allowed determination of medium to high-resolution structures of membrane proteins and complexes that have been difficult to study by other structural biological techniques. PMID:26435463

  10. The electronic structure of homogeneous ferromagnetic (Ga, Mn)N epitaxial films

    SciTech Connect

    Piskorska-Hommel, E.; Winiarski, M. J.; Kunert, G.; Falta, J.; Demchenko, I. N.; Roshchupkina, O. D.; Grenzer, J.; Hommel, D.; Holý, V.

    2015-02-14

    X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) techniques, namely, X-ray Near Edge Structure (XANES), Extended XAFS (EXAFS), and Anomalous X-ray Diffraction (AXRD) were used to investigate the local atomic and electronic structure of (Ga, Mn)N magnetic layers with Mn concentrations of up to 10% grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy. The XANES and AXRD analysis prove the Mn incorporation on substitutional GaN lattice sites. EXAFS results indicate the good quality of the structure under examination, although 0.5 nitride atom vacancies were found. The Wien2k code was applied to interpret the XANES spectra quantitatively, i.e., to determine the electronic structure of the Mn atoms. It was shown that accounting for the core-hole effect is necessary to reconstruct effectively the XANES spectra. Conducted charge density analysis based on DFT calculations identified the valency of Mn atom to be of 2.4+.

  11. Tunable interaction-induced localization of surface electrons in antidot nanostructured Bi2Te3 thin films.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-Chao; Lu, Hai-Zhou; He, Hong-Tao; Li, Baikui; Liu, Shi-Guang; He, Qing Lin; Wang, Gan; Sou, Iam Keong; Shen, Shun-Qing; Wang, Jiannong

    2014-09-23

    Recently, a logarithmic decrease of conductivity has been observed in topological insulators at low temperatures, implying a tendency of localization of surface electrons. Here, we report quantum transport experiments on the topological insulator Bi2Te3 thin films with arrayed antidot nanostructures. With increasing density of the antidots, a systematic decrease is observed in the slope of the logarithmic temperature-dependent conductivity curves, indicating the electron-electron interaction can be tuned by the antidots. Meanwhile, the weak antilocalization effect revealed in magnetoconductivity exhibits an enhanced dominance of electron-electron interaction among decoherence mechanisms. The observation can be understood from an antidot-induced reduction of the effective dielectric constant, which controls the interactions between the surface electrons. Our results clarify the indispensable role of the electron-electron interaction in the localization of surface electrons and indicate the localization of surface electrons in an interacting topological insulator.

  12. Structure of a Bacterial Cell Surface Decaheme Electron Conduit

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Thomas A.; Edwards, Marcus; Gates, Andrew J.; Hall, Andrea; White, Gaye; Bradley, Justin; Reardon, Catherine L.; Shi, Liang; Beliaev, Alex S.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Wang, Zheming; Watmough, Nicholas; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David J.

    2011-05-23

    Some bacterial species are able to utilize extracellular mineral forms of iron and manganese as respiratory electron acceptors. In Shewanella oneidensis this involves deca-heme cytochromes that are located on the bacterial cell surface at the termini of trans-outermembrane (OM) electron transfer conduits. The cell surface cytochromes can potentially play multiple roles in mediating electron transfer directly to insoluble electron sinks, catalyzing electron exchange with flavin electron shuttles or participating in extracellular inter-cytochrome electron exchange along ‘nanowire’ appendages. We present a 3.2 Å crystal structure of one of these deca-heme cytochromes, MtrF, that allows the spatial organization of the ten hemes to be visualized for the first time. The hemes are organized across four domains in a unique crossed conformation, in which a staggered 65 Å octa-heme chain transects the length of the protein and is bisected by a planar 45 Å tetra-heme chain that connects two extended Greek key split β-barrel domains. The structure provides molecular insight into how reduction of insoluble substrate (e.g. minerals), soluble substrates (e.g. flavins) and cytochrome redox partners might be possible in tandem at different termini of a trifurcated electron transport chain on the cell surface.

  13. Cytochrome b 6 f function and localization, phosphorylation state of thylakoid membrane proteins and consequences on cyclic electron flow.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Louis; Chazaux, Marie; Peltier, Gilles; Johnson, Xenie; Alric, Jean

    2016-09-01

    Both the structure and the protein composition of thylakoid membranes have an impact on light harvesting and electron transfer in the photosynthetic chain. Thylakoid membranes form stacks and lamellae where photosystem II and photosystem I localize, respectively. Light-harvesting complexes II can be associated to either PSII or PSI depending on the redox state of the plastoquinone pool, and their distribution is governed by state transitions. Upon state transitions, the thylakoid ultrastructure and lateral distribution of proteins along the membrane are subject to significant rearrangements. In addition, quinone diffusion is limited to membrane microdomains and the cytochrome b 6 f complex localizes either to PSII-containing grana stacks or PSI-containing stroma lamellae. Here, we discuss possible similarities or differences between green algae and C3 plants on the functional consequences of such heterogeneities in the photosynthetic electron transport chain and propose a model in which quinones, accepting electrons either from PSII (linear flow) or NDH/PGR pathways (cyclic flow), represent a crucial control point. Our aim is to give an integrated description of these processes and discuss their potential roles in the balance between linear and cyclic electron flows. PMID:27534565

  14. Direct arylations for study of the air-stable P-heterocyclic biradical: from wide electronic tuning to characterization of the localized radicalic electrons.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shigekazu; Ueta, Yasuhiro; Ngo, Trang Thi Thu; Kobayashi, Makoto; Hashizume, Daisuke; Nishida, Jun-ichi; Yamashita, Yoshiro; Mikami, Koichi

    2013-11-20

    We have developed methods for installing aryl substituents directly on the phosphino groups of the 1,3-diphosphacyclobutane-2,4-diyl system. The aryl substituents tuned the electronic and structural characteristics of the biradical unit both in solution and in the solid state. 1-tert-butyl-2,4-bis(2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenyl)-1,3-diphosphacyclobuten-4-yl anion, prepared from phosphaalkyne (Mes*C≡P; Mes* = 2,4,6-tBu3C6H2) and t-butyllithium, was allowed to react with an electron-deficient N-heterocyclic reagent. The corresponding N-heteroaryl-substituted P-heterocyclic biradicals were produced via SNAr reactions. Biradicals bearing perfluorinated pyridyl substituents exhibited photoabsorption properties comparable to those of previously reported derivatives because the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbit levels were reduced by a similar amount. In contrast, the triazine substituent reduced the band gap of the biradical unit, and the large red shift in the visible absorption and high oxidation potential were further tuned via subsequent SNAr and Negishi coupling reactions. The amino-substituted triazine structure provided a strongly electron-donating biradical chromophore, which produced unique p-type semiconducting behavior even though there was no obvious π-overlap in the crystalline state. The single-electron transfer reaction involving Mes*C≡P, phenyllithium, and iodine afforded 1,3-diphenyl-2,4-bis(2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenyl)-1,3-diphosphacyclobutane-2,4-diyl via the intermediate P-heterocyclic monoradical. The tetraaryl-substituted symmetric biradical product was used to determine the electron density distribution from the X-ray diffraction data. The data show highly localized radicalic electrons around the skeletal carbon atoms, moderately polarized skeletal P-C bonds in the four-membered ring, and no covalent transannular interaction.

  15. Optical spectrum and local lattice structure for ruby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Kuang, X.-Y.; Mao, A.-J.; Huang, X.-F.

    2007-01-01

    By diagonalizing the 120×120 complete energy matrices for d3 ion in trigonal crystal field, which contains the electrostatic interaction, the trigonal field as well as the spin-orbit interaction, the unified calculation of the whole optical and EPR spectra for ruby are made. And matrix elements of the Zeeman energy with the magnetic field parallel or perpendicular to the trigonal axis are introduced into the complete energy matrices for obtaining the g factors of the energy levels. It is concluded that zero-field splitting and optical spectra as well as g factors are in good agreement with the experimental data and the distorted local lattice structure is determined firstly results from a stretching of the O2- ions along the C3 axis. The pressure-induced shifts of energy levels, g factors and local lattice structure are also discussed. In particular, all the calculations are carried out successfully within the framework of the crystal-field model which is consistent with the opinion of Macfarlane and Sturge that if all terms within the d3 configuration are included, one need not go outside conventional crystal-field theory.

  16. Mechanochemically synthesized fluorides: local structures and ion transport.

    PubMed

    Preishuber-Pflügl, Florian; Wilkening, Martin

    2016-06-01

    The performance of new sensors or advanced electrochemical energy storage devices strongly depends on the active materials chosen to realize such systems. In particular, their morphology may greatly influence their overall macroscopic properties. Frequently, limitations in classical ways of chemical preparation routes hamper the development of materials with tailored properties. Fortunately, such hurdles can be overcome by mechanochemical synthesis. The versatility of mechanosynthesis allows the provision of compounds that are not available through common synthesis routes. The mechanical treatment of two or three starting materials in high-energy ball mills enables the synthesis not only of new compounds but also of nanocrystalline materials with unusual properties such as enhanced ion dynamics. Fast ion transport is of crucial importance in electrochemical energy storage. It is worth noting that mechanosynthesis also provides access to metastable phases that cannot be synthesized by conventional solid state synthesis. Ceramic synthesis routes often yield the thermally, i.e., thermodynamically, stable products rather than metastable compounds. In this perspective we report the mechanochemical synthesis of nanocrystalline fluorine ion conductors that serve as model substances to understand the relationship between local structures and ion dynamics. While ion transport properties were complementarily probed via conductivity spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic relaxation, local structures of the phases prepared were investigated by high-resolution (19)F NMR spectroscopy carried out by fast magic angle spinning. The combination of nuclear and non-nuclear techniques also helped us to shed light on the mechanisms controlling mechanochemical reactions in general. PMID:27172256

  17. Mechanochemically synthesized fluorides: local structures and ion transport.

    PubMed

    Preishuber-Pflügl, Florian; Wilkening, Martin

    2016-06-01

    The performance of new sensors or advanced electrochemical energy storage devices strongly depends on the active materials chosen to realize such systems. In particular, their morphology may greatly influence their overall macroscopic properties. Frequently, limitations in classical ways of chemical preparation routes hamper the development of materials with tailored properties. Fortunately, such hurdles can be overcome by mechanochemical synthesis. The versatility of mechanosynthesis allows the provision of compounds that are not available through common synthesis routes. The mechanical treatment of two or three starting materials in high-energy ball mills enables the synthesis not only of new compounds but also of nanocrystalline materials with unusual properties such as enhanced ion dynamics. Fast ion transport is of crucial importance in electrochemical energy storage. It is worth noting that mechanosynthesis also provides access to metastable phases that cannot be synthesized by conventional solid state synthesis. Ceramic synthesis routes often yield the thermally, i.e., thermodynamically, stable products rather than metastable compounds. In this perspective we report the mechanochemical synthesis of nanocrystalline fluorine ion conductors that serve as model substances to understand the relationship between local structures and ion dynamics. While ion transport properties were complementarily probed via conductivity spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic relaxation, local structures of the phases prepared were investigated by high-resolution (19)F NMR spectroscopy carried out by fast magic angle spinning. The combination of nuclear and non-nuclear techniques also helped us to shed light on the mechanisms controlling mechanochemical reactions in general.

  18. Embrittlement and Flow Localization in Reactor Structural Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Xianglin Wu; Xiao Pan; James Stubbins

    2006-10-06

    Many reactor components and structural members are made from metal alloys due, in large part, to their strength and ability to resist brittle fracture by plastic deformation. However, brittle fracture can occur when structural material cannot undergo extensive, or even limited, plastic deformation due to irradiation exposure. Certain irradiation conditions lead to the development of a damage microstructure where plastic flow is limited to very small volumes or regions of material, as opposed to the general plastic flow in unexposed materials. This process is referred to as flow localization or plastic instability. The true stress at the onset of necking is a constant regardless of the irradiation level. It is called 'critical stress' and this critical stress has strong temperature dependence. Interrupted tensile testes of 316L SS have been performed to investigate the microstructure evolution and competing mechanism between mechanic twinning and planar slip which are believed to be the controlling mechanism for flow localization. Deformation twinning is the major contribution of strain hardening and good ductility for low temperatures, and the activation of twinning system is determined by the critical twinning stress. Phases transform and texture analyses are also discussed in this study. Finite element analysis is carried out to complement the microstructural analysis and for the prediction of materaials performance with and without stress concentration and irradiation.

  19. Electronic structure of thiolate-covered gold nanoparticles: Au102(MBA)44.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Galli, Giulia; Gygi, François

    2008-09-23

    We present first principles, density functional theory (DFT) calculations of the structural and electronic properties of thiolate-protected gold nanoparticles [Au(102)(MBA)(44) ] that have been recently crystallized and measured by X-ray diffraction. Our calculations yield structural properties in very good agreement with experiment and reveal the impact of thiolate adsorption on both the surface geometry and the electronic structure of the gold core; in particular, within DFT we observe the emergence of an energy gap of about 0.5 eV, upon MBA adsorption. Using a localized orbital analysis, we characterize the electron distribution in the nanoparticle and provide insight into the bonding of thiolates on curved gold surfaces.

  20. The Electronic Structure of Single-Layer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, David Alan

    Single-layer graphene has been widely researched in recent years due to its perceived technological applicability and its scientific importance as a unique model system with relativistic Dirac Fermions. Because of its unique geometric and electronic structure, the properties of graphene can be tuned or manipulated in several ways. This tunability is important for technological applications in its own right, and it also allows us to study the fundamental properties of Dirac Fermions, including unique many-body interactions and the nature of the quasiparticles at half-filling. This thesis is a detailed examination of the electronic and structural properties of graphene, studied with angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and other surface science techniques like low-energy electron microscopy and diffraction. This thesis is organized as follows. Chapter 1 gives an introduction to the electronic and structural properties of single-layer graphene. It provides a brief historical overview of major theoretical and experimental milestones and sets the stage for the important theoretical and experimental questions that this thesis addresses. Chapters 2 and 3 describe the experimental setup. Chapter 2 discusses the experimental techniques used in this thesis with particular focus on the mechanics of ARPES. Chapter 3 discusses the different graphene growth techniques that were used to create our sample with particular focus on our characterization of epitaxial graphene on SiC(0001). Chapters 4 and 5 form the meat of this thesis: they provide a thorough discussion of the electronic properties of graphene as studied by ARPES. Chapter 4 describes how various perturbations can result in the manipulation of the bare electronic band structure, including the deposition of atomic or molecular species on top of an epitaxial graphene sheet as well as the interactions between graphene and its substrate. Chapter 5 describes the many-body physics in single-layer graphene. It