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Sample records for local electronic structure

  1. Electronic-structure calculation for metals by local optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, C.; Min, B. I.; Benedek, R.; Garner, J.

    1989-03-01

    Recent work by Car and Parrinello has generated considerable interest in the calculation of electronic structure by nonlinear optimization. The technique introduced by these authors, dynamical simulated annealing, is designed for problems that involve energy barriers. When local optimization suffices to determine the energy minimum, more direct methods are available. In this paper we apply the algorithm suggested by Williams and Soler to calculate the electronic structure of metals, using a plane-wave expansion for the electronic orbitals and an electron-ion pseudopotential of the Kleinman-Bylander form. Radial pseudopotentials were taken from the compilation of Bachelet, Hamann, and Schlüter. Calculations are performed to optimize the electronic structure (i) with fixed atomic configuration, or (ii) with the atomic volume being optimized simultaneously. It is found that the dual optimization (ii) converges in essentially the same number of steps as the static lattice optimization (i). Numerical results are presented for Li, K, Al, and simple-cubic P.

  2. Electronic structure and localized states in a model amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, G.; Delerue, C.; Lannoo, M.

    1998-03-01

    The electronic structure of a model amorphous silicon (a-Si) represented by a supercell of 4096 silicon atoms [B.R. Djordjevic, M.F. Thorpe, and F. Wooten, Phys. Rev. B 52, 5685 (1995)] and of a model hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) that we have built from the a-Si model are calculated in the tight-binding approximation. The band edges near the gap are characterized by exponential tails of localized states induced mainly by the variations in bond angles. The spatial localization of the states is compared between a-Si and a-Si:H. Comparison with experiments suggests that the structural models give good descriptions of the amorphous materials.

  3. The local electronic structure of alpha-Li3N.

    PubMed

    Fister, T T; Seidler, G T; Shirley, E L; Vila, F D; Rehr, J J; Nagle, K P; Linehan, J C; Cross, J O

    2008-07-28

    New theoretical and experimental investigations of the occupied and unoccupied local electronic densities of states (DOS) are reported for alpha-Li(3)N. Band-structure and density-functional theory calculations confirm the absence of covalent bonding character. However, real-space full-multiple-scattering (RSFMS) calculations of the occupied local DOS find less extreme nominal valences than have previously been proposed. Nonresonant inelastic x-ray scattering, RSFMS calculations, and calculations based on the Bethe-Salpeter equation are used to characterize the unoccupied electronic final states local to both the Li and N sites. There is a good agreement between experiment and theory. Throughout the Li 1s near-edge region, both experiment and theory find strong similarities in the s-and p-type components of the unoccupied local final DOS projected onto an orbital angular momentum basis (l-DOS). An unexpected, significant correspondence exists between the near-edge spectra for the Li 1s and N 1s initial states. We argue that both spectra are sampling essentially the same final DOS due to the combination of long core-hole lifetimes, long photoelectron lifetimes, and the fact that orbital angular momentum is the same for all relevant initial states. Such considerations may be generally applicable for low atomic number compounds.

  4. The local electronic structure of α-Li3N

    SciTech Connect

    Fister, Timothy T.; Siedler, Gerald T.; Shirley, E. L.; Vila, Fernando D.; Nagle, Kenneth P.; Rehr, John J.; Linehan, John C.; Cross, Julie O.

    2008-07-28

    We investigate the local electronic structure of α-Li3N by the combination of nonresonant inelastic x-ray scattering measurements and three independent ab initio theoretical treatments. Experimental determination of the local final density of states projected onto an orbital angular momentum basis (l-DOS) for Li 1s initial states finds strong similarities in the s- and p-DOS throughout the near-edge region, which we attribute to the 3-fold rotational symmetry about Li sites in the Li2N sheets of α-Li3N. We also find a significant correspondence between the near-edge spectra for the Li 1s and N 1s contributions to the NRIXS signal. This is unexpected, as such behavior is typically associated with covalent materials whereas α-Li3N is strongly ionic. We explain that such similarity in the DOS at different sites in either ionic or covalent systems may occur when the core-hole lifetimes are very long, so that the lifetime of the photoelectron is the dominant factor in cutting off high-order multiple scattering in the near-edge regime. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for DOE.

  5. Local atomic order, electronic structure and electron transport properties of Cu-Zr metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonowicz, J.; Pietnoczka, A.; Pekała, K.; Latuch, J.; Evangelakis, G. A.

    2014-05-01

    We studied atomic and electronic structures of binary Cu-Zr metallic glasses (MGs) using combined experimental and computational methods including X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, electrical resistivity, thermoelectric power (TEP) measurements, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, and ab-initio calculations. The results of MD simulations and extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis indicate that atomic order of Cu-Zr MGs and can be described in terms of interpenetrating icosahedral-like clusters involving five-fold symmetry. MD configurations were used as an input for calculations of theoretical electronic density of states (DOS) functions which exhibits good agreement with the experimental X-ray absorption near-edge spectra. We found no indication of minimum of DOS at Fermi energy predicted by Mott's nearly free electron (NFE) model for glass-forming alloys. The theoretical DOS was subsequently used to test Mott's model describing the temperature variation of electrical resistivity and thermoelectric power of transition metal-based MGs. We demonstrate that the measured temperature variations of electrical resistivity and TEP remain in a contradiction with this model. On the other hand, the experimental temperature dependence of electrical resistivity can be explained by incipient localization of conduction electrons. It is shown that weak localization model works up to relatively high temperatures when localization is destroyed by phonons. Our results indicate that electron transport properties of Cu-Zr MGs are dominated by localization effects rather than by electronic structure. We suggest that NFE model fails to explain a relatively high glass-forming ability of binary Cu-Zr alloys.

  6. Local atomic order, electronic structure and electron transport properties of Cu-Zr metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Antonowicz, J. Pietnoczka, A.; Pękała, K.; Latuch, J.; Evangelakis, G. A.

    2014-05-28

    We studied atomic and electronic structures of binary Cu-Zr metallic glasses (MGs) using combined experimental and computational methods including X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, electrical resistivity, thermoelectric power (TEP) measurements, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, and ab-initio calculations. The results of MD simulations and extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis indicate that atomic order of Cu-Zr MGs and can be described in terms of interpenetrating icosahedral-like clusters involving five-fold symmetry. MD configurations were used as an input for calculations of theoretical electronic density of states (DOS) functions which exhibits good agreement with the experimental X-ray absorption near-edge spectra. We found no indication of minimum of DOS at Fermi energy predicted by Mott's nearly free electron (NFE) model for glass-forming alloys. The theoretical DOS was subsequently used to test Mott's model describing the temperature variation of electrical resistivity and thermoelectric power of transition metal-based MGs. We demonstrate that the measured temperature variations of electrical resistivity and TEP remain in a contradiction with this model. On the other hand, the experimental temperature dependence of electrical resistivity can be explained by incipient localization of conduction electrons. It is shown that weak localization model works up to relatively high temperatures when localization is destroyed by phonons. Our results indicate that electron transport properties of Cu-Zr MGs are dominated by localization effects rather than by electronic structure. We suggest that NFE model fails to explain a relatively high glass-forming ability of binary Cu-Zr alloys.

  7. Local electronic structures in electron-doped cuprates with coexisting orders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Hu, Xiao

    2010-12-01

    Motivated by the observation of a so-called non-monotonic gap in recent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurement, we study the local electronic structure near impurities in electron-doped cuprates by considering the influence of antiferromagnetic (AF) spin-density-wave (SDW) order. We find that the evolution of density of states (DOS) with AF SDW order clearly indicates the non-monotonic d-wave gap behavior. More interestingly, the local DOS for spin-up is much different from that for spin-down with increasing AF SDW order. As a result, the impurity induced resonance state near the Fermi energy exhibits a spin-polarized feature. These features can be detected by spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy experiments.

  8. Probing the band structure and local electronic properties of low-dimensional semiconductor structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walrath, Jenna Cherie

    Low-dimensional semiconductor structures are important for a wide variety of applications, and recent advances in nanoscale fabrication are paving the way for increasingly precise nano-engineering of a wide range of materials. It is therefore essential that the physics of materials at the nanoscale are thoroughly understood to unleash the full potential of nanotechnology, requiring the development of increasingly sophisticated instrumentation and modeling. Of particular interest is the relationship between the local density of states (LDOS) of low-dimensional structures and the band structure and local electronic properties. This dissertation presents the investigation of the band structure, LDOS, and local electronic properties of nanostructures ranging from zero-dimensional (0D) quantum dots (QDs) to two-dimensional (2D) thin films, synthesizing computational and experimental approaches including Poisson-Schrodinger band structure calculations, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS), and scanning thermoelectric microscopy (SThEM). A method is presented for quantifying the local Seebeck coefficient (S) with SThEM, using a quasi-3D conversion matrix approach to directly convert temperature gradient-induced voltages S. For a GaAs p-n junction, the resulting S-profile is consistent with that computed using the free carrier concentration profile. This combined computational-experimental approach is expected to enable nanoscale measurements of S across a wide variety of heterostructure interfaces. The local carrier concentration, n, is profiled across epitaxial InAs/GaAs QDs, where SThEM is used to profile the temperature gradient-induced voltage, which is converted to a profile of the local S and finally to an n profile. The S profile is converted to a conduction band-edge profile and compared with Poisson-Schrodinger band-edge simulations. The combined computational-experimental approach suggests a reduced n in the QD center in

  9. How localized is ``local?'' Efficiency vs. accuracy of O(N) domain decomposition in local orbital based all-electron electronic structure theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havu, Vile; Blum, Volker; Scheffler, Matthias

    2007-03-01

    Numeric atom-centered local orbitals (NAO) are efficient basis sets for all-electron electronic structure theory. The locality of NAO's can be exploited to render (in principle) all operations of the self-consistency cycle O(N). This is straightforward for 3D integrals using domain decomposition into spatially close subsets of integration points, enabling critical computational savings that are effective from ˜tens of atoms (no significant overhead for smaller systems) and make large systems (100s of atoms) computationally feasible. Using a new all-electron NAO-based code,^1 we investigate the quantitative impact of exploiting this locality on two distinct classes of systems: Large light-element molecules [Alanine-based polypeptide chains (Ala)n], and compact transition metal clusters. Strict NAO locality is achieved by imposing a cutoff potential with an onset radius rc, and exploited by appropriately shaped integration domains (subsets of integration points). Conventional tight rc<= 3å have no measurable accuracy impact in (Ala)n, but introduce inaccuracies of 20-30 meV/atom in Cun. The domain shape impacts the computational effort by only 10-20 % for reasonable rc. ^1 V. Blum, R. Gehrke, P. Havu, V. Havu, M. Scheffler, The FHI Ab Initio Molecular Simulations (aims) Project, Fritz-Haber-Institut, Berlin (2006).

  10. Distinct local electronic structure and magnetism for Mn in amorphous Si and Ge

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Li; Cao, J. X.; Helgren, E.; Karel, J.; Arenholz, E.; Ouyang, Lu; Smith, David J.; Wu, R. Q.; Hellman, F.

    2010-06-01

    Transition metals such as Mn generally have large local moments in covalent semiconductors due to their partially filled d shells. However, Mn magnetization in group-IV semiconductors is more complicated than often recognized. Here we report a striking crossover from a quenched Mn moment (<0.1 {mu}{sub B}) in amorphous Si (a-Si) to a large distinct local Mn moment ({ge}3{mu}{sub B}) in amorphous Ge (a-Ge) over a wide range of Mn concentrations (0.005-0.20). Corresponding differences are observed in d-shell electronic structure and the sign of the Hall effect. Density-functional-theory calculations show distinct local structures, consistent with different atomic density measured for a-Si and a-Ge, respectively, and the Mn coordination number N{sub c} is found to be the key factor. Despite the amorphous structure, Mn in a-Si is in a relatively well-defined high coordination interstitial type site with broadened d bands, low moment, and electron (n-type) carriers, while Mn in a-Ge is in a low coordination substitutional type site with large local moment and holes (p-type) carriers. Moreover, the correlation between N{sub c} and the magnitude of the local moment is essentially independent of the matrix; the local Mn moments approach zero when N{sub c} > 7 for both a-Si and a-Ge.

  11. Effect of oxygen deficiency on electronic properties and local structure of amorphous tantalum oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Denny, Yus Rama; Firmansyah, Teguh; Oh, Suhk Kun; Kang, Hee Jae; Yang, Dong-Seok; Heo, Sung; Chung, JaeGwan; Lee, Jae Cheol

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • The effect of oxygen flow rate on electronic properties and local structure of tantalum oxide thin films was studied. • The oxygen deficiency induced the nonstoichiometric state a-TaOx. • A small peak at 1.97 eV above the valence band side appeared on nonstoichiometric Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} thin films. • The oxygen flow rate can change the local electronic structure of tantalum oxide thin films. - Abstract: The dependence of electronic properties and local structure of tantalum oxide thin film on oxygen deficiency have been investigated by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Reflection Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (REELS), and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The XPS results showed that the oxygen flow rate change results in the appearance of features in the Ta 4f at the binding energies of 23.2 eV, 24.4 eV, 25.8, and 27.3 eV whose peaks are attributed to Ta{sup 1+}, Ta{sup 2+}, Ta{sup 3+}/Ta{sup 4+}, and Ta{sup 5+}, respectively. The presence of nonstoichiometric state from tantalum oxide (TaOx) thin films could be generated by the oxygen vacancies. In addition, XAS spectra manifested both the increase of coordination number of the first Ta-O shell and a considerable reduction of the Ta-O bond distance with the decrease of oxygen deficiency.

  12. Effect of structural distortion and polarization in localization of electronic excitations in organic semiconductor materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayyar, Iffat; Batista, Enrique; Tretiak, Sergei; Saxena, Avadh; Smith, Darryl; Martin, Richard

    2012-02-01

    Organic polymers find varied applications in optoelectronic devices such as solar cells, light emitting diodes and lasers. Detailed understanding of charge carrier transport by polarons and excitonic energy transfer producing singlet and triplet excitations is critical to improve their efficiency. We benchmarked the ability of current functional models to describe the spatial extent of self-trapped neutral and charged excitations for MEH-PPV owing to its superior luminescence and experimental evidence. Now we are interested in distinguishing between two distinct origins leading to localization; spatial localization of the wavefunction by itself on the undistorted geometry and localization of the wavefunction assured by distortion of the structure during its relaxation. We suggest localization is produced by electronic rearrangements and character of the functional. We also observe that different functionals place the highest occupied and lowest virtual orbitals at different positions in the energy band diagram based on their ability to predict the extent of localization of these states.

  13. Simulation of NMR data reveals that proteins' local structures are stabilized by electronic polarization.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yan; Ji, Chang G; Mei, Ye; Zhang, John Z H

    2009-06-24

    Molecular dynamics simulations of NMR backbone relaxation order parameters have been carried out to investigate the polarization effect on the protein's local structure and dynamics for five benchmark proteins (bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor, immunoglobulin-binding domain (B1) of streptococcal protein G, bovine apo-calbindin D9K, human interleukin-4 R88Q mutant, and hen egg white lysozyme). In order to isolate the polarization effect from other interaction effects, our study employed both the standard AMBER force field (AMBER03) and polarized protein-specific charges (PPCs) in the MD simulations. The simulated order parameters, employing both the standard nonpolarizable and polarized force fields, are directly compared with experimental data. Our results show that residue-specific order parameters at some specific loop and turn regions are significantly underestimated by the MD simulations using the standard AMBER force field, indicating hyperflexibility of these local structures. Detailed analysis of the structures and dynamic motions of individual residues reveals that the hyperflexibility of these local structures is largely related to the breaking or weakening of relevant hydrogen bonds. In contrast, the agreement with the experimental results is significantly improved and more stable local structures are observed in the MD simulations using the polarized force field. The comparison between theory and experiment provides convincing evidence that intraprotein hydrogen bonds in these regions are stabilized by electronic polarization, which is critical to the dynamical stability of these local structures in proteins.

  14. Correlative infrared-electron nanoscopy reveals the local structure-conductivity relationship in zinc oxide nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiegler, J. M.; Tena-Zaera, R.; Idigoras, O.; Chuvilin, A.; Hillenbrand, R.

    2012-10-01

    High-resolution characterization methods play a key role in the development, analysis and optimization of nanoscale materials and devices. Because of the various material properties, only a combination of different characterization techniques provides a comprehensive understanding of complex functional materials. Here we introduce correlative infrared-electron nanoscopy, a novel method yielding transmission electron microscope and infrared near-field images of one and the same nanostructure. While transmission electron microscopy provides structural information up to the atomic level, infrared near-field imaging yields nanoscale maps of chemical composition and conductivity. We demonstrate the method's potential by studying the relation between conductivity and crystal structure in ZnO nanowire cross-sections. The combination of infrared conductivity maps and the local crystal structure reveals a radial free-carrier gradient, which inversely correlates to the density of extended crystalline defects. Our method opens new avenues for studying the local interplay between structure, conductivity and chemical composition in widely different material systems.

  15. Local atomic and electronic structure of boron chemical doping in monolayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liuyan; Levendorf, Mark; Goncher, Scott; Schiros, Theanne; Pálová, Lucia; Zabet-Khosousi, Amir; Rim, Kwang Taeg; Gutiérrez, Christopher; Nordlund, Dennis; Jaye, Cherno; Hybertsen, Mark; Reichman, David; Flynn, George W; Park, Jiwoong; Pasupathy, Abhay N

    2013-10-09

    We use scanning tunneling microscopy and X-ray spectroscopy to characterize the atomic and electronic structure of boron-doped and nitrogen-doped graphene created by chemical vapor deposition on copper substrates. Microscopic measurements show that boron, like nitrogen, incorporates into the carbon lattice primarily in the graphitic form and contributes ~0.5 carriers into the graphene sheet per dopant. Density functional theory calculations indicate that boron dopants interact strongly with the underlying copper substrate while nitrogen dopants do not. The local bonding differences between graphitic boron and nitrogen dopants lead to large scale differences in dopant distribution. The distribution of dopants is observed to be completely random in the case of boron, while nitrogen displays strong sublattice clustering. Structurally, nitrogen-doped graphene is relatively defect-free while boron-doped graphene films show a large number of Stone-Wales defects. These defects create local electronic resonances and cause electronic scattering, but do not electronically dope the graphene film.

  16. TiO2 nanotube arrays for photocatalysis: Effects of crystallinity, local order, and electronic structure

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Jing; Hosseinpour, Pegah M.; Luo, Si; ...

    2014-11-19

    To furnish insight into correlations of electronic and local structure and photoactivity, arrays of short and long TiO₂ nanotubes were synthesized by electrochemical anodization of Ti foil, followed by thermal treatment in O₂ (oxidizing), Ar (inert), and H₂ (reducing) environments. The physical and electronic structures of these nanotubes were probed with x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and synchrotron-based x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and correlated with their photocatalytic properties. The photocatalytic activity of the nanotubes was evaluated by monitoring the degradation of methyl orange under UV-VIS light irradiation. Results show that upon annealing at 350 °C all as-anodized amorphous TiO₂ nanotube samplesmore » partially transform to the anatase structure, with variations in the degree of crystallinity and in the concentration of local defects near the nanotubes' surface (~5 nm) depending on the annealing conditions. Degradation of methyl orange was not detectable for the as-anodized TiO₂ nanotubes regardless of their length. The annealed long nanotubes demonstrated detectable catalytic activity, which was more significant with the H₂-annealed nanotubes than with the Ar- and O₂-annealed nanotube samples. This enhanced photocatalytic response of the H₂-annealed long nanotubes relative to the other samples is positively correlated with the presence of a larger concentration of lattice defects (such as Ti3+ and anticipated oxygen vacancies) and a slightly lower degree of crystallinity near the nanotube surface. These physical and electronic structural attributes impact the efficacy of visible light absorption; moreover, the increased concentration of surface defects is postulated to promote the generation of hydroxyl radicals and thus accelerate the photodegradation of the methyl orange. The information obtained from this study provides unique insight into the role of the near-surface electronic and defect structure

  17. The effects of local correlations on the electronic structure of FeSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Matthew; Kim, Timur; Haghighirad, Amir; Coldea, Amalia

    FeSe is structurally the simplest of Fe-based superconductors, but its complex and unique properties pose important theoretical questions. One important aspect of the physics of FeSe is the understanding of the strength and effects of electronic correlations. In order to explore this, we have performed angle-resolved photo-emission spectroscopy (ARPES) measurements on high quality bulk single crystals of FeSe over a wide range of binding energies, in different scattering geometries and with varying incident photon energies, analysing the quasiparticle renormalisations, scattering rates and degree of coherence. We find that FeSe exhibits moderately strong, orbital-dependent correlation effects which are understood to arise primarily due to local electron-electron interactions on the Fe sites. We conclude that electronic correlations constitute a key ingredient in understanding the electronic structure of FeSe. Part of this work was supported by EPSRC, UK (EP/I004475/1, EP/I017836/1). We thank Diamond Light Source for access to Beamline I05.

  18. Localization of fluorescently labeled structures in frozen-hydrated samples using integrated light electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Faas, F G A; Bárcena, M; Agronskaia, A V; Gerritsen, H C; Moscicka, K B; Diebolder, C A; van Driel, L F; Limpens, R W A L; Bos, E; Ravelli, R B G; Koning, R I; Koster, A J

    2013-03-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy is an increasingly popular technique to study complex biological systems at various levels of resolution. Fluorescence microscopy can be employed to scan large areas to localize regions of interest which are then analyzed by electron microscopy to obtain morphological and structural information from a selected field of view at nm-scale resolution. Previously, an integrated approach to room temperature correlative microscopy was described. Combined use of light and electron microscopy within one instrument greatly simplifies sample handling, avoids cumbersome experimental overheads, simplifies navigation between the two modalities, and improves the success rate of image correlation. Here, an integrated approach for correlative microscopy under cryogenic conditions is presented. Its advantages over the room temperature approach include safeguarding the native hydrated state of the biological specimen, preservation of the fluorescence signal without risk of quenching due to heavy atom stains, and reduced photo bleaching. The potential of cryo integrated light and electron microscopy is demonstrated for the detection of viable bacteria, the study of in vitro polymerized microtubules, the localization of mitochondria in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, and for a search into virus-induced intracellular membrane modifications within mammalian cells.

  19. Local electronic structure and nanolevel hierarchical organization of bone tissue: theory and NEXAFS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlychev, A. A.; Avrunin, A. S.; Vinogradov, A. S.; Filatova, E. O.; Doctorov, A. A.; Krivosenko, Yu S.; Samoilenko, D. O.; Svirskiy, G. I.; Konashuk, A. S.; Rostov, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations of native bone are carried out to understand relationships between its hierarchical organization and local electronic and atomic structure of the mineralized phase. The 3D superlattice model of a coplanar assembly of the hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanocrystallites separated by the hydrated nanolayers is introduced to account the interplay of short-, long- and super-range order parameters in bone tissue. The model is applied to (i) predict and rationalize the HAP-to-bone spectral changes in the electronic structure and (ii) describe the mechanisms ensuring the link of the hierarchical organization with the electronic structure of the mineralized phase in bone. To check the predictions the near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) at the Ca 2p, P 2p and O 1s thresholds is measured for native bone and compared with NEXAFS for reference compounds. The NEXAFS analysis has demonstrated the essential hierarchy induced HAP-to-bone red shifts of the Ca and P 2p-to-valence transitions. The lowest O 1s excitation line at 532.2 eV in bone is assigned with superposition of core transitions in the hydroxide OH-(H2O) m anions, Ca2+(H2O) n cations, the carboxyl groups inside the collagen and [PO4]2- and [PO4]- anions with unsaturated P-O bonds.

  20. Local conditions for the Pauli potential in order to yield self-consistent electron densities exhibiting proper atomic shell structure

    SciTech Connect

    Finzel, Kati

    2016-01-21

    The local conditions for the Pauli potential that are necessary in order to yield self-consistent electron densities from orbital-free calculations are investigated for approximations that are expressed with the help of a local position variable. It is shown that those local conditions also apply when the Pauli potential is given in terms of the electron density. An explicit formula for the Ne atom is given, preserving the local conditions during the iterative procedure. The resulting orbital-free electron density exhibits proper shell structure behavior and is in close agreement with the Kohn-Sham electron density. This study demonstrates that it is possible to obtain self-consistent orbital-free electron densities with proper atomic shell structure from simple one-point approximations for the Pauli potential at local density level.

  1. Local crystal structure analysis with 10-pm accuracy using scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Saito, Mitsuhiro; Kimoto, Koji; Nagai, Takuro; Fukushima, Shun; Akahoshi, Daisuke; Kuwahara, Hideki; Matsui, Yoshio; Ishizuka, Kazuo

    2009-06-01

    We demonstrate local crystal structure analysis based on annular dark-field (ADF) imaging in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Using a stabilized STEM instrument and customized software, we first realize high accuracy of elemental discrimination and atom-position determination with a 10-pm-order accuracy, which can reveal major cation displacements associated with a variety of material properties, e.g. ferroelectricity and colossal magnetoresistivity. A-site ordered/disordered perovskite manganites Tb(0.5)Ba(0.5)MnO(3) are analysed; A-site ordering and a Mn-site displacement of 12 pm are detected in each specific atomic column. This method can be applied to practical and advanced materials, e.g. strongly correlated electron materials.

  2. Electronic structure and local magnetism of 3d-5d impurity substituted CeFe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Rakesh; Das, G. P.; Srivastava, S. K.

    2016-04-01

    We present here a systematic first-principles study of electronic structure and local magnetic properties of Ce[Fe0.75M0.25]2 compounds, where M is a 3d, 4d or 5d transition or post-transition element, using the generalized gradient approximation of the density functional theory. The d-f band hybridizations existing in CeFe2 get modified by the impurity M in an orderly manner across a period for each impurity series: the hybridization is strongest for the Mn group impurity in the period and gets diminished on either side of it. The weakening of the d-f hybridization strength is also associated with a relative localization of the Ce 4f states with respect to the delocalized 4f states in CeFe2. The above effects are most prominent for 3d impurity series, while for 4d and 5d impurities, the hybridizations and relocalizations are relatively weak due primarily to the relatively extended nature of 4d and 5d wavefunctions. The Ce local moment is found to decrease from the CeFe2 value in proportion to the strength of relocalization, thus following almost the same orderly trend as obeyed by the d-f hybridization. Further, depending on the way the spin-up and spin-down densities of states of an impurity shift relative to the Fermi energy, the impurity local moments are highest for Mn or Fe group, reduce on either side, become zero for Ni to Ga, and are small but negative for V and Ti. The Ce hyperfine field is found to follow the M local moment in a linear fashion, and vice-versa.

  3. Local spectroscopy of moiré-induced electronic structure in gate-tunable twisted bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Dillon; Wang, Yang; Jung, Jeil; Pezzini, Sergio; DaSilva, Ashley M.; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Jung, Han Sae; Khajeh, Ramin; Kim, Youngkyou; Lee, Juwon; Kahn, Salman; Tollabimazraehno, Sajjad; Rasool, Haider; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Zettl, Alex; Adam, Shaffique; MacDonald, Allan H.; Crommie, Michael F.

    2015-10-01

    Twisted bilayer graphene (tBLG) forms a quasicrystal whose structural and electronic properties depend on the angle of rotation between its layers. Here, we present a scanning tunneling microscopy study of gate-tunable tBLG devices supported by atomically smooth and chemically inert hexagonal boron nitride (BN). The high quality of these tBLG devices allows identification of coexisting moiré patterns and moiré super-superlattices produced by graphene-graphene and graphene-BN interlayer interactions. Furthermore, we examine additional tBLG spectroscopic features in the local density of states beyond the first van Hove singularity. Our experimental data are explained by a theory of moiré bands that incorporates ab initio calculations and confirms the strongly nonperturbative character of tBLG interlayer coupling in the small twist-angle regime.

  4. Propagation of localized structures in relativistic magnetized electron-positron plasmas using particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    López, Rodrigo A.; Muñoz, Víctor; Viñas, Adolfo F.; Valdivia, Juan A.

    2015-09-15

    We use a particle-in-cell simulation to study the propagation of localized structures in a magnetized electron-positron plasma with relativistic finite temperature. We use as initial condition for the simulation an envelope soliton solution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation, derived from the relativistic two fluid equations in the strongly magnetized limit. This envelope soliton turns out not to be a stable solution for the simulation and splits in two localized structures propagating in opposite directions. However, these two localized structures exhibit a soliton-like behavior, as they keep their profile after they collide with each other due to the periodic boundary conditions. We also observe the formation of localized structures in the evolution of a spatially uniform circularly polarized Alfvén wave. In both cases, the localized structures propagate with an amplitude independent velocity.

  5. Local atomic and electronic structure in LaMnO{sub 3} across the orbital ordering transition

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, Raquel A.; Souza-Neto, Narcizo M.; Ramos, Aline Y.; Tolentino, Helio C.N.; Granado, Eduardo

    2004-12-01

    The local atomic disorder and electronic structure in the environment of manganese atoms in LaMnO{sub 3} has been studied by x-ray absorption spectroscopy over a temperature range (300-870 K) covering the orbital ordering transition ({approx}710 K). The Mn-O distance splitting into short and long bonds (1.95 and 2.15 A) is kept across the transition temperature, so that the MnO{sub 6} octahedra remain locally Jahn-Teller distorted. Discontinuities in the Mn local structure are identified in the extended x-ray fine structure spectra at this temperature, associated with a reduction of the disorder in the superexchange angle and to the removal of the anisotropy in the radial disorder within the coordination shell. Subtle changes in the electronic local structure also take place at the Mn site at the transition temperature. The near-edge spectra show a small drop of the Mn 4p hole count and a small enhancement in the pre-edge structures at the transition temperature. These features are associated with an increase of the covalence of the Mn-O bonds. Our results shed light on the local electronic and structural phenomena in a model of order-disorder transition, where the cooperative distortion is overcome by the thermal disorder.

  6. Local electronic structure and ferromagnetic interaction in La(Co,Ni)O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Meng-Jie; Nagel, Peter; Fuchs, Dirk; von Loehneysen, Hilbert; Merz, Michael; Schuppler, Stefan

    Perovskite-related transition-metal oxides exhibit a wide range of properties from insulating to superconducting as well as many peculiar magnetic phases, and cobaltites, in particular, have been known for their proximity to spin-state transitions. How this changes with partial substitution by Ni is the topic of the present study. The local electronic structure and the ferromagnetic interaction in La(Co1-xNix) O3 has been studied by x-ray absorption (XAS) and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). XAS clearly indicates a mixed-valence state for both Co and Ni, with both valences changing systematically with Ni content, x. While the gradual spin-state transition of Co3+ from low-spin (LS) to high-spin (HS) is preserved for low x it is suppressed in the high Ni-content samples. Regarding the spin configuration of Ni we find it stabilized in a ``mixed'' spin state, unlike the purely LS state of Ni in LaNiO3. XMCD identifies the element-specific contributions to the magnetic moment and interactions. In particular, we find that it must be the coexistence of the HS state in both Co3+ and Ni3 + that induces t2 g-based ferromagnetic interaction via the double-exchange mechanism.

  7. Edge states and local electronic structure around an adsorbed impurity in a topological superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Yuan-Yen; Choi, Hongchul; Ahmed, Towfiq; Ting, C. S.; Zhu, Jian-Xin

    2015-11-01

    Recently, topological superconducting states have attracted much interest. In this paper, we consider a topological superconductor with Z2 topological mirror order [Y.-Y. Tai et al., Phys. Rev. B 91, 041111(R) (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.91.041111] and s±-wave superconducting pairing symmetry, within a two-orbital model originally designed for iron-based superconductivity [Y.-Y. Tai et al., Europhys. Lett. 103, 67001 (2013), 10.1209/0295-5075/103/67001]. We predict the existence of gapless edge states. We also study the local electronic structure around an adsorbed interstitial magnetic impurity in the system, and find the existence of low-energy in-gap bound states even with a weak spin polarization on the impurity. We also discuss the relevance of our results to a recent scanning tunneling microscopy experiment on a Fe(Te,Se) compound with an adsorbed Fe impurity [J.-X. Yin et al., Nat. Phys. 11, 543 (2015), 10.1038/nphys3371], for which our density functional calculations show the Fe impurity is spin polarized.

  8. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES Electronic Transport Calculations Using Maximally-Localized Wannier Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Neng-Ping

    2011-01-01

    I present a method to calculate the ballistic transport properties of atomic-scale structures under bias. The electronic structure of the system is calculated using the Kohn-Sham scheme of density functional theory (DFT). The DFT eigenvectors are then transformed into a set of maximally localized Wannier functions (MLWFs) [N. Marzari and D. Vanderbilt, Phys. Rev. B 56 (1997) 12847]. The MLWFs are used as a minimal basis set to obtain the Hamitonian matrices of the scattering region and the adjacent leads, which are needed for transport calculation using the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism. The coupling of the scattering region to the semi-infinite leads is described by the self-energies of the leads. Using the nonequilibrium Green's function method, one calculates self-consistently the charge distribution of the system under bias and evaluates the transmission and current through the system. To solve the Poisson equation within the scheme of MLWFs I introduce a computationally efficient method. The method is applied to a molecular hydrogen contact in two transition metal monatomic wires (Cu and Pt). It is found that for Pt the I-V characteristics is approximately linear dependence, however, for Cu the I-V characteristics manifests a linear dependence at low bias voltages and exhibits apparent nonlinearity at higher bias voltages. I have also calculated the transmission in the zero bias voltage limit for a single CO molecule adsorbed on Cu and Pt monatomic wires. While a chemical scissor effect occurs for the Cu monatomic wire with an adsorbed CO molecule, it is absent for the Pt monatomic wire due to the contribution of d-orbitals at the Fermi energy.

  9. TiO2 nanotube arrays for photocatalysis: Effects of crystallinity, local order, and electronic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jing; Hosseinpour, Pegah M.; Luo, Si; Heiman, Don; Menon, Latika; Arena, Dario A.; Lewis, Laura H.

    2014-11-19

    To furnish insight into correlations of electronic and local structure and photoactivity, arrays of short and long TiO₂ nanotubes were synthesized by electrochemical anodization of Ti foil, followed by thermal treatment in O₂ (oxidizing), Ar (inert), and H₂ (reducing) environments. The physical and electronic structures of these nanotubes were probed with x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and synchrotron-based x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and correlated with their photocatalytic properties. The photocatalytic activity of the nanotubes was evaluated by monitoring the degradation of methyl orange under UV-VIS light irradiation. Results show that upon annealing at 350 °C all as-anodized amorphous TiO₂ nanotube samples partially transform to the anatase structure, with variations in the degree of crystallinity and in the concentration of local defects near the nanotubes' surface (~5 nm) depending on the annealing conditions. Degradation of methyl orange was not detectable for the as-anodized TiO₂ nanotubes regardless of their length. The annealed long nanotubes demonstrated detectable catalytic activity, which was more significant with the H₂-annealed nanotubes than with the Ar- and O₂-annealed nanotube samples. This enhanced photocatalytic response of the H₂-annealed long nanotubes relative to the other samples is positively correlated with the presence of a larger concentration of lattice defects (such as Ti3+ and anticipated oxygen vacancies) and a slightly lower degree of crystallinity near the nanotube surface. These physical and electronic structural attributes impact the efficacy of visible light absorption; moreover, the increased concentration of surface defects is postulated to promote the generation of hydroxyl radicals and thus accelerate the photodegradation of the methyl orange. The information obtained from this study provides unique insight into the role of the near-surface electronic and defect structure

  10. Tailoring the local structure and electronic property of AuPd nanoparticles by selecting capping molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng; Zhang, Peng

    2010-01-01

    Nine AuPd nanoparticle samples selectively capped with tetraoctylphosphonium bromide, primary amine and tertiary amine molecules were studied with the Au L3-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The AuPd mixing patterns were analyzed by comparing the XAS results with the theoretical coordination numbers of 24 AuPd model clusters of varied size, Au concentration, and bimetal mixing pattern. It was found that the use of amines, particularly tertiary amine, produced a more homogeneous AuPd mixing pattern and the Au d-electron density was fine-tunable by tailoring the density of Au-Pd bonds. Mechanisms for the tailored structural and electronic properties of these nanoparticles were proposed.

  11. Local Electronic and Chemical Structure of Oligo-acetylene Derivatives Formed Through Radical Cyclizations at a Surface

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Semiconducting π-conjugated polymers have attracted significant interest for applications in light-emitting diodes, field-effect transistors, photovoltaics, and nonlinear optoelectronic devices. Central to the success of these functional organic materials is the facile tunability of their electrical, optical, and magnetic properties along with easy processability and the outstanding mechanical properties associated with polymeric structures. In this work we characterize the chemical and electronic structure of individual chains of oligo-(E)-1,1′-bi(indenylidene), a polyacetylene derivative that we have obtained through cooperative C1–C5 thermal enediyne cyclizations on Au(111) surfaces followed by a step-growth polymerization of the (E)-1,1′-bi(indenylidene) diradical intermediates. We have determined the combined structural and electronic properties of this class of oligomers by characterizing the atomically precise chemical structure of individual monomer building blocks and oligomer chains (via noncontact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM)), as well as by imaging their localized and extended molecular orbitals (via scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/STS)). Our combined structural and electronic measurements reveal that the energy associated with extended π-conjugated states in these oligomers is significantly lower than the energy of the corresponding localized monomer orbitals, consistent with theoretical predictions. PMID:24387223

  12. Local structural evidence for strong electronic correlations in spinel LiRh2O4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knox, K. R.; Abeykoon, A. M. M.; Zheng, H.; Yin, W.-G.; Tsvelik, A. M.; Mitchell, J. F.; Billinge, S. J. L.; Bozin, E. S.

    2013-11-01

    The local structure of the spinel LiRh2O4 has been studied using atomic-pair distribution function analysis of powder x-ray diffraction data. This measurement is sensitive to the presence of short Rh-Rh bonds that form due to dimerization of Rh4+ ions on the pyrochlore sublattice, independent of the existence of long-range order. We show that structural dimers exist in the low-temperature phase, as previously supposed, with a bond shortening of Δr˜0.15 Å. The dimers persist up to 350 K, well above the insulator-metal transition, with Δr decreasing in magnitude on warming. Such behavior is inconsistent with the Fermi-surface nesting-driven Peierls transition model. Instead, we argue that LiRh2O4 should properly be described as a strongly correlated system.

  13. Asymptotic Near Nucleus Structure of the Electron-Interaction Potential in Local Effective Potential Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahni, Viraht; Qian, Zhixin

    2007-03-01

    In previous work, it has been shown that for spherically symmetric or sphericalized systems, the asymptotic near nucleus structure of the electron-interaction potential is vee(r) = vee(0) + βr + γr^2. In this paper we prove via time-independent Quantal Density Functional Theory[1](Q-DFT): (i) correlations due to the Pauli exclusion principle and Coulomb repulsion do not contribute to the linear structure;(ii) these Pauli and Coulomb correlations contribute quadratically; (iii) the linear structure is solely due to Correlation-Kinetic effects, the coefficient β being determined analytically. By application of adiabatic coupling constant perturbation theory via QDFT we further prove: (iv) the Kohn-Sham (KS-DFT) `exchange' potential vx(r) approaches the nucleus linearly, this structure being due solely to lowest- order Correlation-Kinetic effects: (v) the KS-DFT `correlation' potential vc(r) also approaches the nucleus linearly, being solely due to higher-order Correlation-Kinetic contributions. The above conclusions are equally valid for system of arbitrary symmetry, provided spherical averages of the properties are employed. 1 Quantal Density Functional Theory, V. Sahni (Springer-Verlag 2004)

  14. Forging Fast Ion Conducting Nanochannels with Swift Heavy Ions: The Correlated Role of Local Electronic and Atomic Structure

    DOE PAGES

    Sachan, Ritesh; Cooper, Valentino R.; Liu, Bin; ...

    2016-12-19

    Atomically disordered oxides have attracted significant attention in recent years due to the possibility of enhanced ionic conductivity. However, the correlation between atomic disorder, corresponding electronic structure, and the resulting oxygen diffusivity is not well understood. The disordered variants of the ordered pyrochlore structure in gadolinium titanate (Gd2Ti2O7) are seen as a particularly interesting prospect due to intrinsic presence of a vacant oxygen site in the unit atomic structure, which could provide a channel for fast oxygen conduction. In this paper, we provide insights into the subangstrom scale on the disordering-induced variations in the local atomic environment and its effectmore » on the electronic structure in high-energy ion irradiation-induced disordered nanochannels, which can be utilized as pathways for fast oxygen ion transport. With the help of an atomic plane-by-plane-resolved analyses, the work shows how the presence of various types of TiOx polyhedral that exist in the amorphous and disordered crystalline phase modify the electronic structures relative to the ordered pyrochlore phase in Gd2Ti2O7. Finally, the correlated molecular dynamics simulations on the disordered structures show a remarkable enhancement in oxygen diffusivity as compared with ordered pyrochlore lattice and make that a suitable candidate for applications requiring fast oxygen conduction.« less

  15. Forging Fast Ion Conducting Nanochannels with Swift Heavy Ions: The Correlated Role of Local Electronic and Atomic Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Sachan, Ritesh; Cooper, Valentino R.; Liu, Bin; Aidhy, Dilpuneet S.; Voas, Brian K.; Lang, Maik; Ou, Xin; Trautmann, Christina; Zhang, Yanwen; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Weber, William J.

    2016-12-19

    Atomically disordered oxides have attracted significant attention in recent years due to the possibility of enhanced ionic conductivity. However, the correlation between atomic disorder, corresponding electronic structure, and the resulting oxygen diffusivity is not well understood. The disordered variants of the ordered pyrochlore structure in gadolinium titanate (Gd2Ti2O7) are seen as a particularly interesting prospect due to intrinsic presence of a vacant oxygen site in the unit atomic structure, which could provide a channel for fast oxygen conduction. In this paper, we provide insights into the subangstrom scale on the disordering-induced variations in the local atomic environment and its effect on the electronic structure in high-energy ion irradiation-induced disordered nanochannels, which can be utilized as pathways for fast oxygen ion transport. With the help of an atomic plane-by-plane-resolved analyses, the work shows how the presence of various types of TiOx polyhedral that exist in the amorphous and disordered crystalline phase modify the electronic structures relative to the ordered pyrochlore phase in Gd2Ti2O7. Finally, the correlated molecular dynamics simulations on the disordered structures show a remarkable enhancement in oxygen diffusivity as compared with ordered pyrochlore lattice and make that a suitable candidate for applications requiring fast oxygen conduction.

  16. Probing the structural and dynamical properties of liquid water with models including non-local electron correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Del Ben, Mauro Hutter, Jürg; VandeVondele, Joost

    2015-08-07

    Water is a ubiquitous liquid that displays a wide range of anomalous properties and has a delicate structure that challenges experiment and simulation alike. The various intermolecular interactions that play an important role, such as repulsion, polarization, hydrogen bonding, and van der Waals interactions, are often difficult to reproduce faithfully in atomistic models. Here, electronic structure theories including all these interactions at equal footing, which requires the inclusion of non-local electron correlation, are used to describe structure and dynamics of bulk liquid water. Isobaric-isothermal (NpT) ensemble simulations based on the Random Phase Approximation (RPA) yield excellent density (0.994 g/ml) and fair radial distribution functions, while various other density functional approximations produce scattered results (0.8-1.2 g/ml). Molecular dynamics simulation in the microcanonical (NVE) ensemble based on Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) yields dynamical properties in the condensed phase, namely, the infrared spectrum and diffusion constant. At the MP2 and RPA levels of theory, ice is correctly predicted to float on water, resolving one of the anomalies as resulting from a delicate balance between van der Waals and hydrogen bonding interactions. For several properties, obtaining quantitative agreement with experiment requires correction for nuclear quantum effects (NQEs), highlighting their importance, for structure, dynamics, and electronic properties. A computed NQE shift of 0.6 eV for the band gap and absorption spectrum illustrates the latter. Giving access to both structure and dynamics of condensed phase systems, non-local electron correlation will increasingly be used to study systems where weak interactions are of paramount importance.

  17. TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays for photocatalysis: Effects of crystallinity, local order, and electronic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jing; Hosseinpour, Pegah M.; Lewis, Laura H.; Luo, Si; Heiman, Don; Menon, Latika; Arena, Dario A.

    2015-03-15

    To furnish insight into correlations of electronic and local structure and photoactivity, arrays of short and long TiO{sub 2} nanotubes were synthesized by electrochemical anodization of Ti foil, followed by thermal treatment in O{sub 2} (oxidizing), Ar (inert), and H{sub 2} (reducing) environments. The physical and electronic structures of these nanotubes were probed with x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and synchrotron-based x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and correlated with their photocatalytic properties. The photocatalytic activity of the nanotubes was evaluated by monitoring the degradation of methyl orange under UV-VIS light irradiation. Results show that upon annealing at 350 °C all as-anodized amorphous TiO{sub 2} nanotube samples partially transform to the anatase structure, with variations in the degree of crystallinity and in the concentration of local defects near the nanotubes' surface (∼5 nm) depending on the annealing conditions. Degradation of methyl orange was not detectable for the as-anodized TiO{sub 2} nanotubes regardless of their length. However, the annealed long nanotubes demonstrated detectable catalytic activity, which was more significant with the H{sub 2}-annealed nanotubes than with the Ar- and O{sub 2}-annealed nanotube samples. This enhanced photocatalytic response of the H{sub 2}-annealed long nanotubes relative to the other samples is positively correlated with the presence of a larger concentration of lattice defects (such as Ti{sup 3+} and anticipated oxygen vacancies) and a slightly lower degree of crystallinity near the nanotube surface. These physical and electronic structural attributes impact the efficacy of visible light absorption; moreover, the increased concentration of surface defects is postulated to promote the generation of hydroxyl radicals and thus accelerate the photodegradation of the methyl orange. The information obtained from this study provides unique insight into the role of the near

  18. Local electronic structure of aqueous zinc acetate: oxygen K-edge X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy on micro-jets.

    PubMed

    Golnak, Ronny; Atak, Kaan; Suljoti, Edlira; Hodeck, Kai F; Lange, Kathrin M; Soldatov, Mikhail A; Engel, Nicholas; Aziz, Emad F

    2013-06-07

    Oxygen K-edge X-ray absorption, emission, and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectra were measured to site selectively gain insights into the electronic structure of aqueous zinc acetate solution. The character of the acetate ion and the influence of zinc and water on its local electronic structure are discussed.

  19. Extended electron energy loss fine structure simulation of the local boron environment in sodium aluminoborosilicate glasses containing gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Morris; Li, Hong; Li, Liyu ); Strachan, Denis M. )

    2003-10-15

    Gadolinium can be dissolved in sodium-alumino-borosilicate glasses up to 47 wt% in a baseline borosilicate glass (mol%) 20 B2O3, 5 Al2O3, 60 SiO2,and 20 Na2O. Understanding of Gd dissolution in borosilicate melts is important in glass formulation optimization. Electron energy loss fine structure (ELFS) spectroscopy is chosen, which provides well resolved local atomic structure information for both amorphous and crystalline materials with high sensitivity to low Z elements such as Al, B, Na, O, and Si where the x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) technique faces experimental difficulty. In this study, we report our results of boron K-edge ELFS study. Two borosilicate glass samples with 30 and 47 mass% Gd2O3, B20Gd30 and B20Gd47were chosen for B K-edge ELFS study. EEL spectra were acquired on a Philips 430 TEM equipped with Gatan PEELS system 666 and EL/P 2.1 software with Custom function AcqLong. The ELFS data analysis was performed using UWELFS, UWXAFS and FEFF software. From our Gd solubility study, the local structure of Gd in the borate environment possibly resembles double chain structure found in crystalline Gd(BO2)3 as proposed by Chakraborty et al. The B/Gd ratio's in both glasses are smaller then 3, which means the excess Gd atoms in the Si-sites would be 17 and 60 mol% of the total Gd atoms, respectively according to the model, yet the local environment of borate sites saturated with Gd should be remained. To verity above hypothesis, the double chain structure model was applied to fit boron K-edge. The model was shown to well fit experimental boron K-edge EELS spectra for both glasses with some degree of distance distortion which is understandable in amorphous structure. Therefore, it is very likely that Gd stabilized in borate sites has a local structure resembling the double chain Gd(BO2)3 structure as proposed by our solubility study and literature.

  20. Electron acceleration at localized wave structures in the solar corona (German Title: Elektronenbeschleunigung an lokalen Wellenstrukturen in der Sonnenkorona)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miteva, Rositsa Stoycheva

    2007-07-01

    Our dynamic Sun manifests its activity by different phenomena: from the 11-year cyclic sunspot pattern to the unpredictable and violent explosions in the case of solar flares. During flares, a huge amount of the stored magnetic energy is suddenly released and a substantial part of this energy is carried by the energetic electrons, considered to be the source of the nonthermal radio and X-ray radiation. One of the most important and still open question in solar physics is how the electrons are accelerated up to high energies within (the observed in the radio emission) short time scales. Because the acceleration site is extremely small in spatial extent as well (compared to the solar radius), the electron acceleration is regarded as a local process. The search for localized wave structures in the solar corona that are able to accelerate electrons together with the theoretical and numerical description of the conditions and requirements for this process, is the aim of the dissertation. Two models of electron acceleration in the solar corona are proposed in the dissertation: I. Electron acceleration due to the solar jet interaction with the background coronal plasma (the jet--plasma interaction) A jet is formed when the newly reconnected and highly curved magnetic field lines are relaxed by shooting plasma away from the reconnection site. Such jets, as observed in soft X-rays with the Yohkoh satellite, are spatially and temporally associated with beams of nonthermal electrons (in terms of the so-called type III metric radio bursts) propagating through the corona. A model that attempts to give an explanation for such observational facts is developed here. Initially, the interaction of such jets with the background plasma leads to an (ion-acoustic) instability associated with growing of electrostatic fluctuations in time for certain range of the jet initial velocity. During this process, any test electron that happen to feel this electrostatic wave field is drawn to co

  1. Local environment effects in the magnetic properties and electronic structure of disordered FePt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Saleem Ayaz; Minár, Ján; Ebert, Hubert; Blaha, Peter; Šipr, Ondřej

    2017-01-01

    Local aspects of magnetism of disordered FePt are investigated by ab initio fully relativistic full-potential calculations, employing the supercell approach and the coherent potential approximation (CPA). The focus is on trends of the spin and orbital magnetic moments with chemical composition and with bond lengths around the Fe and Pt atoms. A small but distinct difference between average magnetic moments obtained when using the supercells and when relying on the CPA is identified and linked to the neglect of the Madelung potential in the CPA.

  2. Electron Structure of Francium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koufos, Alexander

    2012-02-01

    This talk presents the first calculations of the electronic structure of francium for the bcc, fcc and hcp structures, using the Augmented Plane Wave (APW) method in its muffin-tin and linearized general potential forms. Both the Local Density Approximation (LDA) and Generalized Gradient Approximation (GGA), were used to calculate the electronic structure and total energy of francium (Fr). The GGA and LDA both found the total energy of the hcp structure slightly below that of the fcc and bcc structure, respectively. This is in agreement with similar results for the other alkali metals using the same methodology. The equilibrium lattice constant, bulk modulus and superconductivity parameters were calculated. We found that under pressures, in the range of 1-5 GPa, Fr could be a superconductor at a critical temperature of about 4K.

  3. Dependence of Localized Electronic Structure on Ligand Configuration in the [2Fe] Hydrogenase Catalytic Core^*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Christopher H.; Kim, Kwiseon

    2007-03-01

    The [FeFe] hydrogenase enzyme is found in a variety of organisms, including Archaea, Eubacteria, and green algae^1,2, and crystallographically determined atomic position data is available for two examples. The biologically unusual catalytic H-cluster, responsible for proton reduction to H2 in vivo, is conserved in the known structures and includes two bis-thiolato bridged iron ions with extensive cyano- and carbonyl ligation. To address the configurational specificity of the diatomic ligand ligation, density functional theoretical calculations were done on [2Fe] core models of the active center, with varying CO and CN^- ligation patterns. Bonding in each complex has been characterized within the Natural Bond Orbital formalism. The effect of ligand configuration on bonding and charge distribution as well as Kohn-Sham orbital structure will be presented. [1] M. Forestier, P. King, L. Zhang, M. Posewitz, S. Schwarzer, T. Happe, M.L. Ghirardi, and M. Seibert, Eur. J. Biochem. 270, 2750 (2003). [2] Posewitz, M.C., P.W. King, S.L. Smolinski, R.D. Smith, II, A.R. Ginley, M.L. Ghirardi, and M. Seibert, Biochem. Soc. Trans. 33, 102 (2005). ^*This work was supported by the US DOE-SC-BES Hydrogen Fuels Initiative, and done in collaboration with the NREL Chemical and Biosciences Center.

  4. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES: Localized electronic states in gaps on hole-net structures of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei-Qi; Lü, Quan; Zhang, Rong-Tao; Wang, Xiao-Yun; Yu, Shi-Qiang

    2009-11-01

    Hole-net structure silicon is fabricated by laser irradiation and annealing, on which a photoluminescence (PL) band in a the region of 650-750 nm is pinned and its intensity increases obviously after oxidation. It is found that the PL intensity changes with both laser irradiation time and annealing time. Calculations show that some localized states appear in the band gap of the smaller nanocrystal when Si = O bonds or Si-O-Si bonds are passivated on the surface. It is discovered that the density and the number of Si = O bonds or Si-O-Si bonds related to both the irradiation time and the annealing time obviously affect the generation of the localized gap states of hole-net silicon, by which the production of stimulated emission through controlling oxidation time can be explained.

  5. Extended electron energy loss fine structure simulation of the local boron environment in sodium aluminoborosilicate glasses containing gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Morris; Li, Hong; Li, Liyu ); Strachan, Denis M. )

    2003-12-01

    Phase separation in sodium-aluminoborosilicate glasses was systematically studied as a function of Gd2O3 concentration with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) methods. Gadolinium-induced phase separation in the three systems can be consistently explained by proposing that Gd cations partition to the borate-rich environments and subsequent agglomeration of the Gd-borate moieties, or short-range ordered structural groups, in the glass. Agglomeration of the Gd-borate rich environments is further discussed within the context of excess metal oxides,[Na2O]ex or[Al2O3]ex=|Na2O - Al2O3|, and excess B2O3,[B2O3]ex, available for incorporating Gd cations. Results showed that agglomeration of the Gd-borate rich environments occurred at a much lower Gd2O3 concentration in the glass without[Na2O]ex or[Al2O3]ex and at a significantly higher Gd2O3 concentration in the glass with either[Na2O]ex or[Al2O3]ex. Assuming 1BO4 : 1Gd : 2BO3 (based on literature-reported Gd-metaborate structure) as a local Gd-borate environment in glass, we introduced the saturation index of boron, SI[B]= Gd2O3/(1/3[B2O3]ex), to examine the glass susceptibility to Gd-induced phase separation for all three alkali-aluminoborosilicate systems. While our results have provided some insight to the glass structure, they also provide insight to the mechanism by which the metal oxide is dissolved into the melt. This appears to occur predominantly through boron complexation of the metal oxide.

  6. A theoretical study of the local electronic structure of two adjacent CuOplanes in YBa 2Cu 3O 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suter, H. U.; Stoll, E. P.; Hüsser, P.; Schafroth, S.; Meier, P. F.

    1997-08-01

    To reveal the local electronic structure of the two adjacent CuOplanes in YBa 2Cu 3O 7, ab initio studies on a small cluster (Cu 2Y 4O 8) were performed. Electron correlation was investigated with both density functional theory and Møller-Plesset theory. The ionisation energies, electron affinities adn the singlet-triplet differences are discussed with respect to model Hamiltonians of high-T c compounds.

  7. Probing local and electronic structure in Warm Dense Matter: single pulse synchrotron x-ray absorption spectroscopy on shocked Fe

    PubMed Central

    Torchio, Raffaella; Occelli, Florent; Mathon, Olivier; Sollier, Arnaud; Lescoute, Emilien; Videau, Laurent; Vinci, Tommaso; Benuzzi-Mounaix, Alessandra; Headspith, Jon; Helsby, William; Bland, Simon; Eakins, Daniel; Chapman, David; Pascarelli, Sakura; Loubeyre, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Understanding Warm Dense Matter (WDM), the state of planetary interiors, is a new frontier in scientific research. There exists very little experimental data probing WDM states at the atomic level to test current models and those performed up to now are limited in quality. Here, we report a proof-of-principle experiment that makes microscopic investigations of materials under dynamic compression easily accessible to users and with data quality close to that achievable at ambient. Using a single 100 ps synchrotron x-ray pulse, we have measured, by K-edge absorption spectroscopy, ns-lived equilibrium states of WDM Fe. Structural and electronic changes in Fe are clearly observed for the first time at such extreme conditions. The amplitude of the EXAFS oscillations persists up to 500 GPa and 17000 K, suggesting an enduring local order. Moreover, a discrepancy exists with respect to theoretical calculations in the value of the energy shift of the absorption onset and so this comparison should help to refine the approximations used in models. PMID:27246145

  8. Probing local and electronic structure in Warm Dense Matter: single pulse synchrotron x-ray absorption spectroscopy on shocked Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torchio, Raffaella; Occelli, Florent; Mathon, Olivier; Sollier, Arnaud; Lescoute, Emilien; Videau, Laurent; Vinci, Tommaso; Benuzzi-Mounaix, Alessandra; Headspith, Jon; Helsby, William; Bland, Simon; Eakins, Daniel; Chapman, David; Pascarelli, Sakura; Loubeyre, Paul

    2016-06-01

    Understanding Warm Dense Matter (WDM), the state of planetary interiors, is a new frontier in scientific research. There exists very little experimental data probing WDM states at the atomic level to test current models and those performed up to now are limited in quality. Here, we report a proof-of-principle experiment that makes microscopic investigations of materials under dynamic compression easily accessible to users and with data quality close to that achievable at ambient. Using a single 100 ps synchrotron x-ray pulse, we have measured, by K-edge absorption spectroscopy, ns-lived equilibrium states of WDM Fe. Structural and electronic changes in Fe are clearly observed for the first time at such extreme conditions. The amplitude of the EXAFS oscillations persists up to 500 GPa and 17000 K, suggesting an enduring local order. Moreover, a discrepancy exists with respect to theoretical calculations in the value of the energy shift of the absorption onset and so this comparison should help to refine the approximations used in models.

  9. The effect of the electronic structure, phase transition, and localized dynamics of atoms in the formation of tiny particles of gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mubarak; Lin, I.-Nan

    2017-01-01

    In addition to self-governing properties, tiny-sized particles of metallic colloids are the building blocks of large-sized particles; thus, their study has been the subject of a large number of publications. In the present work, it has been discussed that geometry structure of tiny particle made through atom-to-atom amalgamation depends on attained dynamics of gold atoms along with protruded orientations. The localized process conditions direct two-dimensional structure of a tiny particle at atomically flat air-solution interface while heating locally dynamically approached atoms, thus, negate the role of van der Waals interactions. At electronphoton-solution interface, impinging electrons stretch or deform atoms of tiny particles depending on the mechanism of impingement. In addition, to strike regular grid of electrons ejected on split of atoms not executing excitations and de-excitations of their electrons, atoms of tiny particles also deform or stretch while occupying various sites depending on the process of synergy. Under suitable impinging electron streams, those tiny particles in monolayer two-dimensional structure electron states of their atoms are diffused in the direction of transferred energy, thus, coincide to the next adjacent atoms in each one-dimensional array dealing the same sort of behavior. Instantaneously, photons of adequate energy propagate on the surfaces of such electronic structures and modify those into smooth elements, thus, disregard the phenomenon of localized surface plasmons. This study highlights the fundamental process of formation of tiny particles where the role of localized dynamics of atoms and their electronic structure along with interaction to light are discussed. Such a tool of processing materials, in nonequilibrium pulse-based process, opens a number of possibilities to develop engineered materials with specific chemical, optical, and electronic properties.

  10. Laser induced local structural and property modifications in semiconductors for electronic and photonic superstructures - Silicon carbide to graphene conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Naili

    Graphene is a single atomic layer two-dimensional (2D) hexagonal crystal of carbon atoms with sp2-bonding. Because of its various special or unique properties, graphene has attracted huge attention and considerable interest in recent years. This PhD research work focuses on the development of a novel approach to fabricating graphene micro- and nano-structures using a 532 nm Nd:YAG laser, a technique based on local conversion of 3C-SiC thin film into graphene. Different from other reported laser-induced graphene on single crystalline 4H- or 6H- SiC, this study focus on 3C-SiC polycrystal film grown using MBE. Because the SiC thin film is grown on silicon wafer, this approach may potentially lead to various new technologies that are compatible with those of Si microelectronics for fabricating graphene-based electronic, optoelectronic, and photonic devices. The growth conditions for depositing 3C-SiC using MBE on Si wafers with three orientations, (100), (110), and (111), were evaluated and explored. The surface morphology and crystalline structure of 3C-SiC epilayer were investigated with SEM, AFM, XRD, μ-Raman, and TEM. The laser modification process to convert 3C-SiC into graphene layers has been developed and optimized by studying the quality dependence of the graphene layers on incident power, irradiation time, and surface morphology of the SiC film. The laser and power density used in this study which focused on thin film SiC was compared with those used in other related research works which focused on bulk SiC. The laser-induced graphene was characterized with μ-Raman, SEM/EDS, TEM, AFM, and, I-V curve tracer. Selective deposition of 3C-SiC thin film on patterned Si substrate with SiO2 as deposition mask has been demonstrated, which may allow the realization of graphene nanostructures (e.g., dots and ribbons) smaller than the diffraction limit spot size of the laser beam, down to the order of 100 nm. The electrical conductance of directly written graphene

  11. Localization of electrons and excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Sven

    2006-07-01

    Electrons, electron holes, or excitations in finite or infinite 'multimer systems' may be localized or delocalized. In the theory of Hush, localization depends on the ratio Δ/ λ ( Δ/2 = coupling; λ = reorganization energy). The latter theory has been extended to the infinite system [S. Larsson, A. Klimkāns, Mol. Cryst. Liq. Cryst. 355 (2000) 217]. The metal/insulator transition often takes place abruptly as a function of Δ/ λ. It is argued that localization in a system with un-filled bands cannot be determined on the basis of Mott-Hubbard U alone, but depends on the number of accessible valence states, reorganization energy λ and coupling Δ (=2t). In fact U = 0 does not necessarily imply delocalization. The analysis here shows that there are many different situations for an insulator to metal transition. Charge transfer in doped NiO is characterized by Ni 2+ - Ni 3+ exchange while charge transfer in pure NiO is characterized by a disproportionation 2Ni 2+ → Ni + + Ni 3+. In spite of the great differences between these two cases, U has been applied without discrimination to both. The relevant localization parameters appear to be Δ and λ in the first case, with only two oxidation states, and U, Δ and λ in the second case with three oxidation states. The analysis is extended to insulator-metal transitions, giant magnetic resistance (GMR) and high Tc superconductivity (SC). λ and Δ can be determined quite accurately in quantum mechanical calculations involving only one and two monomers, respectively.

  12. Impurities and electronic localization in graphene bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojeda Collado, H. P.; Usaj, Gonzalo; Balseiro, C. A.

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the electronic properties of bilayer graphene with Bernal stacking and a low concentration of adatoms. Assuming that the host bilayer lies on top of a substrate, we consider the case where impurities are adsorbed only on the upper layer. We describe nonmagnetic impurities as a single orbital hybridized with carbon's pz states. The effect of impurity doping on the local density of states with and without a gated electric field perpendicular to the layers is analyzed. We look for Anderson localization in the different regimes and estimate the localization length. In the biased system, the field-induced gap is partially filled by strongly localized impurity states. Interestingly, the structure, distribution, and localization length of these states depend on the field polarization.

  13. Correlation of Calculated Halonium Ion Structures with Experimental Product Distributions from Terminal Alkenes: The Effect of Electron-Withdrawing Fluorine Substituents on the Structure and Charge Localization of Halonium Ions (PREPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-03

    2) Substituting a vinyl hydrogen with a fluorine presents an interesting situation for electrophilic reactions. The π-bond is less...reactive toward electrophiles due to the electron-withdrawing effect of the vinyl fluorine . Therefore, carbocations or radical cations are destabilized...NUMBER Distributions from Terminal Alkenes: The Effect of Electron-Withdrawing Fluorine Substituents on the Structure and Charge Localization of

  14. Role of defects in BiFeO₃ multiferroic films and their local electronic structure by x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ravalia, Ashish; Vagadia, Megha; Solanki, P. S.; Shah, N. A.; Kuberkar, D. G.; Gautam, S.; Chae, K. H.; Asokan, K.

    2014-10-21

    Present study reports the role of defects in the electrical transport in BiFeO₃ (BFO) multiferroic films and its local electronic structure investigated by near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure. Defects created by high energy 200 MeV Ag⁺¹⁵ ion irradiation with a fluence of ∼5 × 10¹¹ ions/cm² results in the increase in structural strain and reduction in the mobility of charge carriers and enhancement in resistive (I-V) and polarization (P-E) switching behaviour. At higher fluence of ∼5 × 10¹² ions/cm², there is a release in the structural strain due to local annealing effect, resulting in an increase in the mobility of charge carriers, which are released from oxygen vacancies and hence suppression in resistive and polarization switching. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure studies at Fe L₃,₂- and O K-edges show a significant change in the spectral features suggesting the modifications in the local electronic structure responsible for changes in the intrinsic magnetic moment and electrical transport properties of BFO.

  15. Temperature dependent evolution of the electronic and local atomic structure in the cubic colossal magnetoresistive manganite La1-xSrxMnO3

    SciTech Connect

    Arenholz, Elke; Mannella, N.; Booth, C.H.; Rosenhahn, A.; Sell, B.C.; Nambu, A.; Marchesini, S.; Mun, B. S.; Yang, S.-H.; Watanabe, M.; Ibrahim, K.; Arenholz, E.; Young, A.; Guo, J.; Tomioka, Y.; Fadley, C.S.

    2007-12-06

    We have studied the temperature-dependent evolution of the electronic and local atomic structure in the cubic colossal magnetoresistive manganite La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (x= 0.3-0.4) with core and valence level photoemission (PE), x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS), extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and magnetometry. As the temperature is varied across the Curie temperature T{sub c}, our PE experiments reveal a dramatic change of the electronic structure involving an increase in the Mn spin moment from {approx} 3 {micro}B to {approx} 4 {micro}B, and a modification of the local chemical environment of the other constituent atoms indicative of electron localization on the Mn atom. These effects are reversible and exhibit a slow-timescale {approx}200 K-wide hysteresis centered at T{sub c}. Based upon the probing depths accessed in our PE measurements, these effects seem to survive for at least 35-50 {angstrom} inward from the surface, while other consistent signatures for this modification of the electronic structure are revealed by more bulk sensitive spectroscopies like XAS and XES/RIXS. We interpret these effects as spectroscopic fingerprints for polaron formation, consistent with the presence of local Jahn-Teller distortions of the MnO{sub 6} octahedra around the Mn atom, as revealed by the EXAFS data. Magnetic susceptibility measurements in addition show typical signatures of ferro-magnetic clusters formation well above the Curie temperature.

  16. Local structures of electrons with energies of hundreds of keV in the inner belt and the slot region observed from the Vernov satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovtyukh, A. S.; Myagkova, I. N.; Bogomolov, A. V.; Bogomolov, V. V.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Svertilov, S. I.

    2016-11-01

    The structure and dynamics of electron fluxes of subrelativistic energies in the range 235-300 keV at L < 4 during December 3-8, 2014, are analyzed according to the RELEC instrument onboard the Vernov satellite. Sharp changes in the parameters of the solar wind and the IMF were detected on December 6, but they did not lead to a magnetic storm. However, after the event of December 6, subrelativistic electron fluxes in the inner belt and the slot region were enhanced and structured. The dynamics of electron fluxes in the local transient bursts at L 1.5-1.7 is considered in detail. It is shown that these bursts are associated with the development of the cyclotron instability in the tops of magnetic flux tubes near the inner belt maximum. The electron anisotropic index is estimated in these bursts. It is shown that in the beginning these bursts are anisotropic and that they become isotropic as the decay proceeds. The most likely chain of physical mechanisms that could lead to variations in electron fluxes of the inner belt described in this paper is presented. For the first time, the topological effects in stationary distributions of the electrons of the inner belt observed at low altitudes in the South Atlantic Anomaly region are explained.

  17. Impact of local strain on Ti-L₂,₃ electron energy-loss near-edge structures of BaTiO₃: a first-principles multiplet study.

    PubMed

    Ootsuki, Shirou; Ikeno, Hidekazu; Umeda, Yuji; Yonezawa, Yu; Moriwake, Hiroki; Kuwabara, Akihide; Kido, Osamu; Ueda, Satoko; Tanaka, Isao; Fujikawa, Yoshinori; Mizoguchi, Teruyasu

    2014-06-01

    Identification of local strains is crucial because the local strains largely influence the ferroelectric property of BaTiO₃. The effects of local strains induced by external pressures on the Ti-L₂,₃ electron energy-loss near-edge structure (ELNES) of BaTiO₃ were theoretically investigated using first-principles multiplet calculations. We revealed that the effects appear in the position of the spectral threshold, namely the spectrum shifts to lower and higher energy sides by the tensile and compressive pressures, respectively. We concluded that conventional ELNES observations can identify only large strains induced by -10 GPa, and 0.1 eV energy resolution is required to identify ±2% of strains.

  18. Extended x-ray-absorption and electron-energy-loss fine-structure studies of the local atomic structure of amorphous unhydrogenated and hydrogenated silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaloyeros, Alain E.; Rizk, Richard B.; Woodhouse, John B.

    1988-12-01

    Extended x-ray-absorption (EXAFS) and electron-energy-loss fine-structure (EXELFS) measurements have been performed on amorphous unhydrogenated silicon carbide, a-SiC, and amorphous hydrogenated silicon carbide, a-SiC:H. Two hydrogenated samples with hydrogen concentrations corresponding, respectively, to H flows of 4 sccm (20% of argon flow) and 8 sccm (40% of argon flow) during the reactive sputtering process, were analyzed (sccm denotes standard cubic centimeters per minute at STP). It is found that short-range order (SRO), consisting of the same tetrahedrally coordinated units present in cubic crystalline c-SiC (zinc-blende structure), where a Si atom is surrounded by nearly four C atoms and vice versa, does exist in all the amorphous samples. This SRO, however, is detected only at a level of the first C and Si coordination shells in a-SiC and a-SiC:H. The structural disorder of the first Si and C coordination shells in all forms of amorphous SiC is somewhat greater than c-SiC, and it decreases appreciably as hydrogen is added. The a-SiC sample exhibits large Si and C coordination numbers, almost identical to c-SiC, a low atomic density, and virtually the same Si-C bond length as c-SiC. These results indicate that a relatively small concentration of large voids exist in a highly disordered a-SiC matrix. The a-SiC:H samples, on the other hand, exhibit a decrease in the C coordination number relative to a-SiC, which is independent of H concentration, low Si and C atomic densities, comparable to a-SiC, and virtually the same Si coordination number as a-SiC. These EXAFS-EXELFS results are consistent with a model where part of the H is substituting for Si in the local tetrahedra surrounding C atoms, while the rest is located inside internal voids in the a-SiC:H samples. The surface of the voids is composed of C atoms which have at least one bond to H, and of Si atoms. Finally, a straightforward computational procedure is applied to estimate the size of these voids

  19. Studies of local structural distortions in strained ultrathin BaTiO3 films using scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Park, Daesung; Herpers, Anja; Menke, Tobias; Heidelmann, Markus; Houben, Lothar; Dittmann, Regina; Mayer, Joachim

    2014-06-01

    Ultrathin ferroelectric heterostructures (SrTiO3/BaTiO3/BaRuO3/SrRuO3) were studied by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) in terms of structural distortions and atomic displacements. The TiO2-termination at the top interface of the BaTiO3 layer was changed into a BaO-termination by adding an additional BaRuO3 layer. High-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) imaging by aberration-corrected STEM revealed that an artificially introduced BaO-termination can be achieved by this interface engineering. By using fast sequential imaging and frame-by-frame drift correction, the effect of the specimen drift was significantly reduced and the signal-to-noise ratio of the HAADF images was improved. Thus, a quantitative analysis of the HAADF images was feasible, and an in-plane and out-of-plane lattice spacing of the BaTiO3 layer of 3.90 and 4.22 Å were determined. A 25 pm shift of the Ti columns from the center of the unit cell of BaTiO3 along the c-axis was observed. By spatially resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy studies, a reduction of the crystal field splitting (CFS, ΔL3=1.93 eV) and an asymmetric broadening of the eg peak were observed in the BaTiO3 film. These results verify the presence of a ferroelectric polarization in the ultrathin BaTiO3 film.

  20. An insight into crystal, electronic, and local structures of lithium iron silicate (Li2FeSiO4) materials upon lithium extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamon-in, O.; Klysubun, W.; Limphirat, W.; Srilomsak, S.; Meethong, N.

    2013-05-01

    Recently, orthosilicate, Li2MSiO4 (where M=transition metal) materials have been attracting considerable attention for potential use as a new generation cathode for Li-ion batteries due to their safety, low toxicity, and low cost characteristics. In addition, the presence of two Li+ ions in the molecule offers a multiple electron-charge transfer (M2+/M3+ and M3+/M4+ redox couples), thus allowing a high achievable capacity of more than 320 mA h/g per M unit. Good electrochemical properties of Li2FeSiO4 have been reported through several approaches such as downsizing of the particles, carbon-coating, etc. However, in addition to electrochemical performance, fundamental understanding regarding crystal, electronic and local structure changes during charge/discharge processes is also important and needs more rigorous investigation. In this work, lithium iron silicates (Li2FeSiO4/C) in space group of Pnma: a=10.6671(3) Å, b=6.2689(2) Å, and c=5.0042(2) Å have been prepared by solid-state reaction. The synthesized as well as chemical delithiated samples have been characterized by XRD, HRTEM, AAS and XAS techniques. We will show the results focusing on Fe K-edge XANES, EXAFS, HRTEM and XRD of the Li2-xFeSiO4 samples and discuss how the crystal, electronic, and local structure changes upon Li+ de-intercalation.

  1. Local control approach to ultrafast electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vindel-Zandbergen, Patricia; Meier, Christoph; Sola, Ignacio R.

    2016-10-01

    We study ultrafast electron transfer between separated nuclei using local control theory. By imposing electron ionization and electron transport through the continuum, different local control formulations are used to increase the yield of retrapping the electron at the desired nuclei. The control mechanism is based on impulsive de-excitation. Both symmetric and asymmetric nuclear arrangements are analyzed, as well as the role of the nuclear motion.

  2. Correlative photoactivated localization and scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kopek, Benjamin G; Shtengel, Gleb; Grimm, Jonathan B; Clayton, David A; Hess, Harald F

    2013-01-01

    The ability to localize proteins precisely within subcellular space is crucial to understanding the functioning of biological systems. Recently, we described a protocol that correlates a precise map of fluorescent fusion proteins localized using three-dimensional super-resolution optical microscopy with the fine ultrastructural context of three-dimensional electron micrographs. While it achieved the difficult simultaneous objectives of high photoactivated fluorophore preservation and ultrastructure preservation, it required a super-resolution optical and specialized electron microscope that is not available to many researchers. We present here a faster and more practical protocol with the advantage of a simpler two-dimensional optical (Photoactivated Localization Microscopy (PALM)) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) system that retains the often mutually exclusive attributes of fluorophore preservation and ultrastructure preservation. As before, cryosections were prepared using the Tokuyasu protocol, but the staining protocol was modified to be amenable for use in a standard SEM without the need for focused ion beam ablation. We show the versatility of this technique by labeling different cellular compartments and structures including mitochondrial nucleoids, peroxisomes, and the nuclear lamina. We also demonstrate simultaneous two-color PALM imaging with correlated electron micrographs. Lastly, this technique can be used with small-molecule dyes as demonstrated with actin labeling using phalloidin conjugated to a caged dye. By retaining the dense protein labeling expected for super-resolution microscopy combined with ultrastructural preservation, simplifying the tools required for correlative microscopy, and expanding the number of useful labels we expect this method to be accessible and valuable to a wide variety of researchers.

  3. Finite-size effects on electronic structure and local properties in passivated AA-stacked bilayer armchair-edge graphene nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiongwen; Shi, Zhengang; Xiang, Shaohua; Song, Kehui; Zhou, Guanghui

    2017-03-01

    Based on the tight-binding model and dual-probe scanning tunneling microscopy technology, we theoretically investigate the electronic structure and local property in the passivated AA-stacked bilayer armchair-edge graphene nanoribbons (AABLAGNRs). We show that they are highly sensitive to the size of the ribbons, which is evidently different from the single-layer armchair-edge graphene nanoribbons. The '3p' rule only applies to the narrow AABLGNRs. Namely, in the passivated 3p- and (3p  +  1)-AABLGNRs, the narrow ribbons are semiconducting while the medium and wide ribbons are metallic. Although the passivated (3p  +  2)-AABLGNRs are metallic, the '3j' rule only applies to the narrow and medium ribbons. Namely, electrons are in the semiconducting states at sites of line 3j while they are in the metallic states at other sites. This induces a series of parallel and discrete metallic channels, consisting of lines 3j  -  1 and 3j  -  2, for the low-energy electronic transports. In the passivated wide (3p  +  2)-AABLGNRs, all electrons are in the metallic states. Additionally, the '3p' and '3j' rules are controllable to disappear and reappear by applying an external perpendicular electric field. Resultantly, an electric filed-driven current switch can be realized in the passivated narrow and medium (3p  +  2)-AABLGNRs.

  4. Finite-size effects on electronic structure and local properties in passivated AA-stacked bilayer armchair-edge graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiongwen; Shi, Zhengang; Xiang, Shaohua; Song, Kehui; Zhou, Guanghui

    2017-03-01

    Based on the tight-binding model and dual-probe scanning tunneling microscopy technology, we theoretically investigate the electronic structure and local property in the passivated AA-stacked bilayer armchair-edge graphene nanoribbons (AABLAGNRs). We show that they are highly sensitive to the size of the ribbons, which is evidently different from the single-layer armchair-edge graphene nanoribbons. The ‘3p’ rule only applies to the narrow AABLGNRs. Namely, in the passivated 3p- and (3p  +  1)-AABLGNRs, the narrow ribbons are semiconducting while the medium and wide ribbons are metallic. Although the passivated (3p  +  2)-AABLGNRs are metallic, the ‘3j’ rule only applies to the narrow and medium ribbons. Namely, electrons are in the semiconducting states at sites of line 3j while they are in the metallic states at other sites. This induces a series of parallel and discrete metallic channels, consisting of lines 3j  -  1 and 3j  -  2, for the low-energy electronic transports. In the passivated wide (3p  +  2)-AABLGNRs, all electrons are in the metallic states. Additionally, the ‘3p’ and ‘3j’ rules are controllable to disappear and reappear by applying an external perpendicular electric field. Resultantly, an electric filed-driven current switch can be realized in the passivated narrow and medium (3p  +  2)-AABLGNRs.

  5. Manipulation of electronic structure via alteration of local orbital environment in [(SrIrO3)m,(SrTi O3)] (m =1 ,2 ,and ∞ ) superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, So Yeun; Kim, Choong H.; Sandilands, L. J.; Sohn, C. H.; Matsuno, J.; Takagi, H.; Kim, K. W.; Lee, Y. S.; Moon, S. J.; Noh, T. W.

    2016-12-01

    We investigated the electronic structure of [(SrIrO3)m,(SrTi O3)] (m =1 ,2 ,and ∞ ) superlattice (SL) thin films with optical spectroscopy and first principles calculations. Our optical results confirmed the existence of the Jeff= 1 /2 states in SL samples, similar to the bulk Ruddlesden-Popper series S rn+1I rnO3 n +1 iridates. Apart from this similarity, in the SL samples, we observed red shifts of the characteristic optical excitations in the Jeff= 1 /2 state and an enhancement of the low-energy spectral weight, which implies a reduction in the effective electron correlation for bands near the Fermi energy. The density functional theory plus Coulomb interactions (DFT +U ) calculations suggested that the SrTi O3 layer intervened between SrIr O3 layers in the SLs activated additional hopping channels between the Ir ions, thus increasing the bandwidth and reducing the effective strength of the correlations. This paper demonstrates that fabrication of iridium-based heterostructures can be used to finely tune electronic structures via alteration of their local orbital environments.

  6. Local atomic and electronic structures in ferromagnetic topological insulator Cr-doped (BixSb1-x) 2Te3 studied by XAFS and ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhen; Wei, Xinyuan; Wang, Jiajia; Pan, Hong; Ji, Fuhao; Ye, Mao; Yang, Zhongqin; Qiao, Shan

    2015-09-01

    The local atomic and electronic structures around the dopants in Cr-doped (BixSb1 -x )2Te3 are studied by x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements and first-principles calculations. Both Cr and Bi are confirmed substituting Sb sites (CrSb and BiSb). The six nearest Te atoms around Cr move towards Cr and shorten the Cr-Te bond lengths to 2.76 Å and 2.77 Å for x =0.1 and x =0.2 , respectively. Importantly, we reveal the hybridization between the Sb/Te p states and Cr d states by the presence of a pre-edge peak at Cr K -absorption edge, which is also supported by our ab initio calculations. These findings provide important clues to understand the mechanism of ferromagnetic order in this system with quantum anomalous Hall effect.

  7. How do electron localization functions describe π-electron delocalization?

    PubMed

    Steinmann, Stephan N; Mo, Yirong; Corminboeuf, Clemence

    2011-12-14

    Scalar fields provide an intuitive picture of chemical bonding. In particular, the electron localization function (ELF) has proven to be highly valuable in interpreting a broad range of bonding patterns. The discrimination between enhanced or reduced electron (de)localization within cyclic π-conjugated systems remains, however, challenging for ELF. In order to clearly distinguish between the local properties of ten highly and weakly π-(de)localized prototype systems, we compare the ELFs of both the canonical wave functions and electron-localized states (diabatic) with those of two closely related scalar fields: the electron localizability indicator (ELI-D) and the localized orbital locator (LOL). The simplest LOL function distinguishes enhanced from weak π-(de)localization in an insightful and reliable manner. LOL offers the finest contrast between annulenes with 4n/4n + 2 π electrons and their inorganic analogues as well as between hyperconjugated cyclopentadiene derivatives. LOL(π) also gives an appealing and intuitive picture of the π-bond. In contrast, the most popular ELF fails to capture subtle contrasting local electronic properties and suffers from the arbitrariness of the σ/π dissection. The orbital separation of the most recent ELI-D is clear-cut but the interpretations sometime less straightforward in the present context.

  8. A Local Variant of the Conductor-Like Screening Model for Fragment-Based Electronic-Structure Methods.

    PubMed

    Goez, Albrecht; Neugebauer, Johannes

    2015-11-10

    Due to steadily rising computational power and sophisticated modeling approaches, increasingly larger molecular systems can be modeled with ab initio methods. An especially promising approach is subsystem methods, where the total system is broken down into smaller subunits that can be treated individually. If an implicit solvent environment such as the conductor-like screening model (COSMO) is included in the description, then additional environmental effects can be incorporated at relatively low cost. For very large systems described with subsystem methods, however, the solution of the COSMO equations can actually become the bottleneck of the calculation. A prominent example in this area is biomolecular systems such as proteins, which can, for instance, be described with frozen density embedding (FDE), especially the related 3-FDE approach. In this article, we present an alternative COSMO variant, which exploits the subsystem nature of the underlying electronic description and has been implemented in a development version of the Amsterdam Density Functional program suite (Adf). We show that the computational cost for the solvent model can be reduced dramatically while retaining the accuracy of the regular description. We compare several schemes for density and surface charge updates and assess the effect of the single tuning parameter.

  9. Local geometric and electronic structures and origin of magnetism in Co-doped BaTiO{sub 3} multiferroics

    SciTech Connect

    Phan, The-Long; Ho, T. A.; Manh, T. V.; Yu, S. C.; Thang, P. D.; Thanh, Tran Dang; Lam, V. D.; Dang, N. T.

    2015-05-07

    We have prepared polycrystalline samples BaTi{sub 1−x}Co{sub x}O{sub 3} (x = 0–0.1) by solid-state reaction. X-ray diffraction and Raman-scattering studies reveal the phase separation in crystal structure as changing Co-doping content (x). The samples with x = 0–0.01 are single phase in a tetragonal structure. At higher doping contents (x > 0.01), there is the formation and development of a secondary hexagonal phase. Magnetization measurements at room temperature indicate a coexistence of paramagnetic and weak-ferromagnetic behaviors in BaTi{sub 1−x}Co{sub x}O{sub 3} samples with x > 0, while pure BaTiO{sub 3} is diamagnetic. Both these properties increase with increasing x. Analyses of X-ray absorption spectra recorded from BaTi{sub 1−x}Co{sub x}O{sub 3} for the Co and Ti K-edges indicate the presence of Co{sup 2+} and Co{sup 3+} ions. They locate in the Ti{sup 4+} site of the tetragonal and hexagonal BaTiO{sub 3} structures. Particularly, there is a shift of oxidation state from Co{sup 2+} to Co{sup 3+} when Co-doping content increases. We believe that the paramagnetic nature in BaTi{sub 1−x}Co{sub x}O{sub 3} samples is due to isolated Co{sup 2+} and Co{sup 3+} centers. The addition of Co{sup 3+} ions enhances the paramagnetic behavior. Meanwhile, the origin of ferromagnetism is due to lattice defects, which is less influenced by the changes caused by the variation in concentration of Co{sup 2+} and Co{sup 3+} ions.

  10. Investigation of electronic and local structural changes during lithium uptake and release of nano-crystalline NiFe2O4 by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Dong; Permien, Stefan; Rana, Jatinkumar; Krengel, Markus; Sun, Fu; Schumacher, Gerhard; Bensch, Wolfgang; Banhart, John

    2017-02-01

    Nano-crystalline NiFe2O4 particles were synthesized and used as active electrode material for a lithium ion battery that showed a high discharge capacity of 1534 mAh g-1 and charge capacity of 1170 mAh g-1 during the 1st cycle. X-ray absorption spectroscopy including XANES and EXAFS were used to investigate electronic and local structural changes of NiFe2O4 during the 1st lithiation and de-lithiation process. As lithium is inserted into the structure, tetrahedral site Fe3+ ions are reduced to Fe2+ and moved from tetrahedral sites to empty octahedral sites, while Ni2+ ions are unaffected. As a consequence, the matrix spinel structure collapses and transforms to an intermediate rock-salt monoxide phase. Meanwhile, the inserted Li is partially consumed by the formation of SEI and other side reactions during the conversion reaction. With further lithiation, the monoxide phase is reduced to highly disordered metallic Fe/Ni nanoparticles with a number of nearest neighbors of 6.0(8) and 8.1(4) for Fe and Ni, respectively. During subsequent de-lithiation, the metal particles are individually re-oxidized to Fe2O3 and NiO phases instead to the original NiFe2O4 spinel phase.

  11. Study of local atomic and electronic structure in glassy metallic alloys. Progress report, December 1, 1979-November 1, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Messmer, R.P.; Wong, J.

    1980-01-01

    During the first reporting period, March 1, 1979-December 1, 1979, small clusters such as Fe/sub 4/, Ni/sub 4/, Ni/sub 2/Fe/sub 2/ alone and containing the metalloid atoms P and B were investigated. The effect of P and B on the magnetic moment of the clusters was investigated and found to parallel the known experimental trend. Significant metal-metalloid bonding was found in all the clusters studied. During the present reporting period a detailed analysis of the bonding in these small clusters was carried out. As a result of this detailed analysis a very significant conclusion has been reached: there are preferential metal-metalloid interactions which are predicted on the basis of the calculations. Room temperature extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra above the K absorption edge of metal constituents in the following metal-metalloid and metal-metal glasses have been measured in the February and June 1980 runs at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory: Fe/sub 1-x/B/sub x/, (FeNi)/sub 1-x/B/sub x/, Ni/sub 1-x/B/sub x/; Zr/sub 1-x/M/sub x/ (M- Fe, Co, Ni and Cu) and Nb/sub 1-x/Ni/sub x/.

  12. Electronic structure and local atomic arrangement of transition metal ions in nanoporous iron-substituted nickel phosphates, VSB-1 and VSB-5.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Woo; Oh, Eun-Jin; Jhung, Sung Hwa; Chang, Jong-San; Hwang, Seong-Ju

    2010-01-01

    The electronic structure and local atomic arrangement of transition metal ions in nanoporous iron-substituted nickel phosphates VSB-1 and VSB-5 have been investigated using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy at Fe K- and Ni K-edges. The Fe K-edge XANES study clearly demonstrated that substituted iron ions were stabilized in octahedral nickel sites of nanoporous nickel phosphate lattice. A comparison with several Fe-references revealed that the substituted irons have mixed Fe2+/Fe3+ oxidation state with the average valence of +2.8-3.0. According to the Ni K-edge XANES analysis, the aliovalent substitution of Ni2+ with Fe2+/Fe3+ induced a slight reduction of divalent nickel ions in VSB-5 to meet a charge balance. On the contrary, Fe substitution for the VSB-1 phase did not cause notable decrease in the oxidation state of nickel ions, which would be related either to the accompanying decrease of pentavalent phosphorus cations or to the increase of oxygen anions. In conclusion, the present findings clearly demonstrated that the nanoporous lattice of nickel phosphate can accommodate effectively iron ions in its octahedral nickel sites.

  13. Investigation of the local structure of Cu2+ ions doped in alkali lead tetraborate glasses by their electron paramagnetic resonance and optical spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ying; Chen, Zhi

    2014-06-01

    The local structure of the Cu2+ centers in alkali lead tetraborate glasses was theoretically studied based on the optical spectra data and high-order perturbation formulas of the spin Hamiltonian parameters (electron paramagnetic resonance g factors g∥, g⊥ and hyperfine structure constants A∥, A⊥) for a 3d9 ion in a tetragonally elongated octahedron. In these formulas, the relative axial elongation of the ligand O2- octahedron around the Cu2+ due to the Jahn-Teller effect is taken into account by considering the contributions to the g factors from the tetragonal distortion which is characterized by the tetragonal crystal-field parameters Ds and Dt. From the calculations, the ligand O2- octahedral around Cu2+ is determined to suffer about 19.2% relative elongation along the C4 axis of the alkali lead tetraborate glass system, and a negative sign for A∥ and a positive sign for A⊥ for these Cu2+ centers are suggested in the discussion.

  14. The electronic structure of Lu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibbetts, T. A.; Harmon, B. N.

    1982-12-01

    The electronic structure of hcp Lu has been calculated using a linearized augmented plane wave (LAPW) method and the Hedin-Lundqvist local density approximation for exchange and correlation. Although complete self-consistency was hindered by the proximity of the 4f levels to the Fermi energy, the valence bands were converged and the calculation yielded a Fermi surface remarkably similar to that calculated by Keeton and Loucks. Comparison is made with recent de Haas-van Alphen and neutron magnetic form factor experiments.

  15. Local orbitals in electron scattering calculations*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winstead, Carl L.; McKoy, Vincent

    2016-05-01

    We examine the use of local orbitals to improve the scaling of calculations that incorporate target polarization in a description of low-energy electron-molecule scattering. After discussing the improved scaling that results, we consider the results of a test calculation that treats scattering from a two-molecule system using both local and delocalized orbitals. Initial results are promising. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  16. Excess Electron Localization in Solvated DNA Bases

    SciTech Connect

    Smyth, Maeve; Kohanoff, Jorge

    2011-06-10

    We present a first-principles molecular dynamics study of an excess electron in condensed phase models of solvated DNA bases. Calculations on increasingly large microsolvated clusters taken from liquid phase simulations show that adiabatic electron affinities increase systematically upon solvation, as for optimized gas-phase geometries. Dynamical simulations after vertical attachment indicate that the excess electron, which is initially found delocalized, localizes around the nucleobases within a 15 fs time scale. This transition requires small rearrangements in the geometry of the bases.

  17. Electron localization following attosecond molecular photoionization.

    PubMed

    Sansone, G; Kelkensberg, F; Pérez-Torres, J F; Morales, F; Kling, M F; Siu, W; Ghafur, O; Johnsson, P; Swoboda, M; Benedetti, E; Ferrari, F; Lépine, F; Sanz-Vicario, J L; Zherebtsov, S; Znakovskaya, I; L'huillier, A; Ivanov, M Yu; Nisoli, M; Martín, F; Vrakking, M J J

    2010-06-10

    For the past several decades, we have been able to directly probe the motion of atoms that is associated with chemical transformations and which occurs on the femtosecond (10(-15)-s) timescale. However, studying the inner workings of atoms and molecules on the electronic timescale has become possible only with the recent development of isolated attosecond (10(-18)-s) laser pulses. Such pulses have been used to investigate atomic photoexcitation and photoionization and electron dynamics in solids, and in molecules could help explore the prompt charge redistribution and localization that accompany photoexcitation processes. In recent work, the dissociative ionization of H(2) and D(2) was monitored on femtosecond timescales and controlled using few-cycle near-infrared laser pulses. Here we report a molecular attosecond pump-probe experiment based on that work: H(2) and D(2) are dissociatively ionized by a sequence comprising an isolated attosecond ultraviolet pulse and an intense few-cycle infrared pulse, and a localization of the electronic charge distribution within the molecule is measured that depends-with attosecond time resolution-on the delay between the pump and probe pulses. The localization occurs by means of two mechanisms, where the infrared laser influences the photoionization or the dissociation of the molecular ion. In the first case, charge localization arises from quantum mechanical interference involving autoionizing states and the laser-altered wavefunction of the departing electron. In the second case, charge localization arises owing to laser-driven population transfer between different electronic states of the molecular ion. These results establish attosecond pump-probe strategies as a powerful tool for investigating the complex molecular dynamics that result from the coupling between electronic and nuclear motions beyond the usual Born-Oppenheimer approximation.

  18. Electron localization of anions probed by nitrile vibrations

    DOE PAGES

    Mani, Tomoyasu; Grills, David C.; Newton, Marshall D.; ...

    2015-08-02

    Localization and delocalization of electrons is a key concept in chemistry, and is one of the important factors determining the efficiency of electron transport through organic conjugated molecules, which have potential to act as “molecular wires”. This, in turn, substantially influences the efficiencies of organic solar cells and other molecular electronic devices. It is also necessary to understand the electronic energy landscape and the dynamics of electrons through molecular chain that govern their transport capabilities in one-dimensional conjugated chains so that we can better define the design principles of conjugated molecules for their applications. We show that nitrile ν(C≡N) vibrationsmore » respond to the degree of electron localization in nitrile-substituted organic anions by utilizing time-resolved infrared (TRIR) detection combined with pulse radiolysis. Measurements of a series of aryl nitrile anions allow us to construct a semi-empirical calibration curve between the changes in the ν(C≡N) IR shifts and the changes in the electronic charges from the neutral to the anion states in the nitriles; more electron localization in the nitrile anion results in larger IR shifts. Furthermore, the IR linewidth in anions can report a structural change accompanying changes in the electronic density distribution. Probing the shift of the nitrile ν(C≡N) IR vibrational bands enables us to determine how the electron is localized in anions of nitrile-functionalized oligofluorenes, considered as organic mixed-valence compounds. We estimate the diabatic electron transfer distance, electronic coupling strengths, and energy barriers in these organic mixed-valence compounds. The analysis reveals a dynamic picture, showing that the electron is moving back and forth within the oligomers with a small activation energy of ≤ kBT, likely controlled by the movement of dihedral angles between monomer units. Thus, implications for the electron transport capability

  19. Electron localization of anions probed by nitrile vibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Mani, Tomoyasu; Grills, David C.; Newton, Marshall D.; Miller, John R.

    2015-08-02

    Localization and delocalization of electrons is a key concept in chemistry, and is one of the important factors determining the efficiency of electron transport through organic conjugated molecules, which have potential to act as “molecular wires”. This, in turn, substantially influences the efficiencies of organic solar cells and other molecular electronic devices. It is also necessary to understand the electronic energy landscape and the dynamics of electrons through molecular chain that govern their transport capabilities in one-dimensional conjugated chains so that we can better define the design principles of conjugated molecules for their applications. We show that nitrile ν(C≡N) vibrations respond to the degree of electron localization in nitrile-substituted organic anions by utilizing time-resolved infrared (TRIR) detection combined with pulse radiolysis. Measurements of a series of aryl nitrile anions allow us to construct a semi-empirical calibration curve between the changes in the ν(C≡N) IR shifts and the changes in the electronic charges from the neutral to the anion states in the nitriles; more electron localization in the nitrile anion results in larger IR shifts. Furthermore, the IR linewidth in anions can report a structural change accompanying changes in the electronic density distribution. Probing the shift of the nitrile ν(C≡N) IR vibrational bands enables us to determine how the electron is localized in anions of nitrile-functionalized oligofluorenes, considered as organic mixed-valence compounds. We estimate the diabatic electron transfer distance, electronic coupling strengths, and energy barriers in these organic mixed-valence compounds. The analysis reveals a dynamic picture, showing that the electron is moving back and forth within the oligomers with a small activation energy of ≤ kBT, likely controlled by the movement of dihedral angles between monomer units. Thus, implications for the electron transport

  20. Localized structures in convective experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burguete, J.; Mancini, H.

    2014-01-01

    In this work we review localized structures appearing in thermo-convective experiments performed in extended (large "aspect ratio") fluid layers. After a brief general review (not exhaustive), we focus on some results obtained in pure fluids in a Bénard-Marangoni system with non-homogeneous heating where some structures of this kind appear. The experimental results are compared in reference to the most classical observed in binary mixtures experiments or simulations. In the Bénard-Marangoni experiment we present the stability diagram where localized structures appear and the typical situations where these local mechanisms have been studied experimentally. Some new experimental results are also included. The authors want to honor Prof. H. Brand in his 60th. birthday and to thank him for helpful discussions.

  1. Dynamical properties and instability of local fluorite BaF(2) structure around doped Mn(2+) ions-EPR and electron spin echo studies.

    PubMed

    Lijewski, S; Hoffmann, S K; Goslar, J; Wencka, M; Ulanov, V A

    2008-09-24

    The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron spin echo (ESE) were measured at the X-band for Mn(2+) in a BaF(2) crystal in the temperature range 4.2-300 K. In addition to the cubic symmetry centre, two other lower concentration tetragonal centres were identified. Temperature variations and computer simulation of the EPR spectrum confirm that the cubic symmetry of the MnF(8) centre is deformed to two T(d) tetrahedra of different dimensions at around 45 K. Electron spin relaxation was measured in the temperature range 4.2-35 K, where the ESE signal was detectable. For higher temperature the Mn(2+) dynamics produces homogeneously broadened EPR lines. At the lowest temperatures the spin-lattice relaxation is governed by ordinary phonon processes with 1/T(1)∼T(5). The efficiency of these processes rapidly decreases and at about 11 K a local mode of energy 17 cm(-1) becomes the relaxation mechanism. Phase relaxation observed as ESE signal dephasing indicates that after the local deformation jumps (tunnelling with frequency 4 × 10(8) s(-1)) between the two tetrahedral configurations appear, with the energy barrier being the local mode energy. This motion is directly visible as a resonance-type enhancement of the ESE dephasing rate 1/T(M) around 11 K. Only the cubic centre displays the above dynamics.

  2. Localized Electron States Near a Metal-SemiconductorNanocontact

    SciTech Connect

    Demchenko, Denis O.; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2007-04-25

    The electronic structure of nanowires in contact withmetallic electrodes of experimentally relevant sizes is calculated byincorporating the electrostatic polarization potential into the atomisticsingle particle Schrodinger equation. We show that the presence of anelectrode produces localized electron/hole states near the electrode, aphenomenon only exhibited in nanostructures and overlooked in the past.This phenomenon will have profound implications on electron transport insuch nanosystems. We calculate several electrode/nanowire geometries,with varying contact depths and nanowire radii. We demonstrate the changein the band gap of up to 0.5 eV in 3 nm diameter CdSe nanowires andcalculate the magnitude of the applied electric field necessary toovercome the localization.

  3. Correlated cryogenic photoactivated localization microscopy and electron cryotomography

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yi-Wei; Chen, Songye; Tocheva, Elitza I.; Treuner-Lange, Anke; Löbach, Stephanie; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte; Jensen, Grant J.

    2014-01-01

    Electron cryotomography (ECT) produces three-dimensional images of cells in a near-native state at macromolecular resolution, but identifying structures of interest can be challenging. Here we describe a correlated "cryo-PALM"-ECT method for localizing objects within cryotomograms to beyond the diffraction limit of the light microscope, and use it to identify multiple and new conformations of the dynamic type VI secretion system in the crowded interior of Myxococcus xanthus. PMID:24813625

  4. Correlated cryogenic photoactivated localization microscopy and cryo-electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi-Wei; Chen, Songye; Tocheva, Elitza I; Treuner-Lange, Anke; Löbach, Stephanie; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte; Jensen, Grant J

    2014-07-01

    Cryo-electron tomography (CET) produces three-dimensional images of cells in a near-native state at macromolecular resolution, but identifying structures of interest can be challenging. Here we describe a correlated cryo-PALM (photoactivated localization microscopy)-CET method for localizing objects within cryo-tomograms to beyond the diffraction limit of the light microscope. Using cryo-PALM-CET, we identified multiple and new conformations of the dynamic type VI secretion system in the crowded interior of Myxococcus xanthus.

  5. Electronic transport in nanoscale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagerqvist, Johan

    In this dissertation electronic transport in nanoscale structures is discussed. An expression for the shot noise, a fluctuation in current due to the discreteness of charge, is derived directly from the wave functions of a nanoscale system. Investigation of shot noise is of particular interest due to the rich fundamental physics involved. For example, the study of shot noise can provide fundamental insight on the nature of electron transport in a nanoscale junction. We report calculations of the shot noise properties of parallel wires in the regime in which the interwire distance is much smaller than the inelastic mean free path. The validity of quantized transverse momenta in a nanoscale structure and its effect on shot noise is also discussed. We theoretically propose and show the feasibility of a novel protocol for DNA sequencing based on the electronic signature of single-stranded DNA while it translocates through a nanopore. We find that the currents for the bases are sufficiently different to allow for efficient sequencing. Our estimates reveal that sequencing of an entire human genome could be done with very high accuracy in a matter of hours, e.g., orders of magnitude faster than present techniques. We also find that although the overall magnitude of the current may change dramatically with different detection conditions, the intrinsic distinguishability of the bases is not significantly affected by pore size and transverse field strength. Finally, we study the ability of water to screen charges in nanopores by using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations coupled to electrostatic calculations. Due to the short length scales of the nanopore geometry and the large local field gradient of a single ion, the energetics of transporting an ion through the pore is strongly dependent on the microscopic details of the electric field. We show that as long as the pore allows the first hydration shell to stay intact, e.g., ˜6 nearby water molecules, the electric field

  6. Electronic structure of Mn and Fe oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Walter

    2008-03-01

    We present a clear, simple tight-binding representation of the electronic structure and cohesive energy (energy of atomization) of MnO, Mn2O3, and MnO2, in which the formal charge states Mn^2+, Mn^3+, and Mn^4+, respectively, occur. It is based upon localized cluster orbitals for each Mn and its six oxygen neighbors. This approach is fundamentally different from local-density theory (or LDA+U), and perhaps diametrically opposite to Dynamical Mean Field Theory. Electronic states were calculated self-consistently using existing parameters [1], but it is found that the charge density is quite insensitive to charge state, so that the starting parameters are adequate. The cohesive energy per Mn is dominated by the transfer of two s electrons to oxygen p states, the same for all three compounds. The differing transfer of majority d electrons to oxygen p states, and the coupling between them, accounts for the observed variation in cohesion in the series. The same description applies to the perovskites, such as LaxSr1-xMnO3, and can be used for FeO, Fe2O3 (and FeO2), Because the formulation is local, it is equally applicable to impurities, defects and surfaces. [1] Walter A. Harrison, Elementary Electronic Structure, World Scientific (Singapore, 1999), revised edition (2004).

  7. DNA Electronic Fingerprints by Local Spectroscopy on Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balatsky, Alexander

    2013-03-01

    Working and scalable alternatives to the conventional chemical methods of DNA sequencing that are based on electronic/ionic signatures would revolutionize the field of sequencing. The approach of a single molecule imaging and spectroscopy with unprecedented resolution, achieved by Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy (STS) and nanopore electronics could enable this revolution. We use the data from our group and others in applying this local scanning tunneling microscopy and illustrate possibilities of electronic sequencing of freeze dried deposits on graphene. We will present two types of calculated fingerprints: first in Local Density of States (LDOS) of DNA nucleotide bases (A,C,G,T) deposited on graphene. Significant base-dependent features in the LDOS in an energy range within few eV of the Fermi level were found in our calculations. These features can serve as electronic fingerprints for the identification of individual bases in STS. In the second approach we present calculated base dependent electronic transverse conductance as DNA translocates through the graphene nanopore. Thus we argue that the fingerprints of DNA-graphene hybrid structures may provide an alternative route to DNA sequencing using STS. Work supported by US DOE, NORDITA.

  8. Solvation effects on the electronic structure of 4-N, N-dimethylaminobenzonitrile: Mixing of the local ππ* and charge-transfer states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Quan-yuan; Bernstein, Elliot R.

    1992-07-01

    The effect of polar solvents acetonitrile and water on the electronic excited states of 4-N, N-dimethylaminobenzonitrile (DMABN) is studied through the optical spectroscopy of small clusters of DMABN/solvent. The clusters are created in a supersonic jet expansion. The results of mass resolved excitation spectroscopy (MRES), fluorescence excitation (FE), dispersed emission (DE), and photodepletion studies demonstrate that the solvent molecule can bind to DMABN at two distinct sites for the one-to-one cluster. Both DMABN (H2O)1 clusters generate small blue shifts for the S1←S0 cluster transition and evidence low-energy vibronic structure nearly identical to that found for the bare molecule. The DMABN (CH3CN)1 clusters behave quite differently. One cluster geometry induces a small blue shift of the S1←S0 electronic transition with little change in its vibronic structure and intensity pattern. We suggest this binding site involves the cyano end of the DMABN molecule. The second cluster geometry induces a large red shift (˜1000 cm-1) and significant broadening (>103 cm-1) of the lowest-energy transition. This red shifted transition is associated with a charge-transfer transition within the DMABN molecule lowered in energy due to the acetonitrile coordination with the DMABN aromatic ring. The lowering of the charge-transfer state in DMABN (CH3CN)n, n=1,...,5 clusters is supported by the following data: long wavelength emission from clusters with broad red shifted absorption; distinct lifetimes for emission at 350 nm (4.6 ns) and 400 nm (6.0 ns); broad red shifted absorption for one geometry of the DMABN (CH3CN)1 cluster. These results support the idea that the charge-transfer transition in DMABN is stabilized by short-range dipole-dipole interactions between DMABN and polar nonhydrogen bonding solvents.

  9. Local electronic properties of organic semiconductor interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenfeld, Michael L.

    Understanding organic semiconductor interfaces is critical to developing organic photovoltaics (OPV). OPV interfaces are disordered due to weak intermolecular interactions, resulting in diverse charge transfer micro-environments. I present experimental data isolating high-order intermolecular interactions controlling interfacial energy level alignment and describe new instrumental capabilities providing access to the local electronic and kinetic landscape at organic semiconductor interfaces. Interface formation between vanadyl naphthalocyanine (VONc) and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) is investigated. Ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS) shows that the VONc binding energy (BE) decouples from the work function, shifting in an opposite direction and contradicting the standard interface dipole model. This effect is quantitatively described using an electrostatic depolarization model and confirmed by simulations which show an inhomogeneous potential at the interface. New data and literature values suggest orthogonality between polarizability and molecular dipole in polar porphyrazines. Their potential for interface engineering is discussed. The electron-rich Au(111)/VONc interface is investigated. The organic layer induces a large interface dipole in Au(111) which can be fit to a depolarization model. Ionization potential and depolarization data suggest that the second VONc layer on Au(111) adopts a tilted geometry. Electrostatic differences between Au(111)/VONc and HOPG/VONc are discussed, demonstrating that interface dipole contributions are not interchangeable. The surface states of the Au(111)/VONc interface are characterized by angle resolved 2-photon photoemission to determine the magnitude of the perturbation. The measured free-electron-like effective mass and BE destabilization of the Shockley state is attributed to step edges caused by lifting the Au(111) (22x 3 ) reconstruction. The Shockley state is accessible primarily through resonance

  10. The Local Electronic Library: Science Fiction or the Real Future?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuadra, Carlos A.

    1983-01-01

    Addresses the question of whether interest in downloading into local electronic libraries is a reflection of user needs or is being generated by those who have something to sell. Growth of online services, growth of local computer capacity, purposes of a local electronic library, and sources of data are highlighted. (EJS)

  11. An optimized locally adaptive non-local means denoising filter for cryo-electron microscopy data.

    PubMed

    Wei, Dai-Yu; Yin, Chang-Cheng

    2010-12-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) now plays an important role in structural analysis of macromolecular complexes, organelles and cells. However, the cryo-EM images obtained close to focus and under low dose conditions have a very high level of noise and a very low contrast, which hinders high-resolution structural analysis. Here, an optimized locally adaptive non-local (LANL) means filter, which can preserve signal details and simultaneously significantly suppress noise for cryo-EM data, is presented. This filter takes advantage of a wide range of pixels to estimate the denoised pixel values instead of the traditional filter that only uses pixels in the local neighborhood. The filter performed well on simulated data and showed promising results on raw cryo-EM images and tomograms. The predominant advantage of this optimized LANL-means filter is the structural signal and the background are clearly distinguishable. This locally adaptive non-local means filter may become a useful tool in the analysis of cryo-EM data, such as automatic particle picking, extracting structural features and segmentation of tomograms.

  12. Theoretical electronic structure of structurally modified graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorak, Marc David

    Graphene has emerged as a promising replacement for silicon in next-generation electronics and optoelectronic devices. If graphene is to be used in semiconductor devices, however, it must acquire an electronic band gap. Numerous approaches have been proposed to control the band gap of graphene, including the periodic patterning of defects. However, the mechanism for band gap opening and the associated physics in graphene patterned with defects remain unclear. Using both analytic theory and first-principles calculations, we show that periodic patterning of defects on graphene can open a large and tunable band gap, induce strong absorption peaks at optical wavelengths, and host a giant band gap quantum spin Hall phase. First, a geometric rule is analytically derived for the arrangements of defects that open a band gap in graphene, with one ninth of all possible patterns opening a band gap. Next, we perform ab-initio density functional calculations to compare the effects of structural vacancies, hexagonal BN dopants, and passivants on the electronic structure of graphene. Qualitatively, these three types of structural defects behave the same, with only slight differences in their resulting band structures. By adjusting the shape of structural defects, we show how to move the Dirac cones in reciprocal space in accordance with the tight-binding model for the anisotropic honeycomb lattice, while the fundamental mechanism for band gap opening remains the same. To quantitatively predict the band gap and optical properties of these materials, we employ many-body perturbation theory with Green's functions (GW/Bethe-Salpeter equation) to directly include electron-electron and electron-hole interactions. Structurally modified graphene shows a strong renormalization of the fundamental band gap over single particle descriptions, and a strong electron-hole interaction as indicated by strong exciton binding energies (> 0.5 eV). Finally, we show that structurally modified graphene

  13. Nano-fEM: protein localization using photo-activated localization microscopy and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shigeki; Richards, Jackson; Hollopeter, Gunther; Hobson, Robert J; Davis, Wayne M; Jorgensen, Erik M

    2012-12-03

    Mapping the distribution of proteins is essential for understanding the function of proteins in a cell. Fluorescence microscopy is extensively used for protein localization, but subcellular context is often absent in fluorescence images. Immuno-electron microscopy, on the other hand, can localize proteins, but the technique is limited by a lack of compatible antibodies, poor preservation of morphology and because most antigens are not exposed to the specimen surface. Correlative approaches can acquire the fluorescence image from a whole cell first, either from immuno-fluorescence or genetically tagged proteins. The sample is then fixed and embedded for electron microscopy, and the images are correlated (1-3). However, the low-resolution fluorescence image and the lack of fiducial markers preclude the precise localization of proteins. Alternatively, fluorescence imaging can be done after preserving the specimen in plastic. In this approach, the block is sectioned, and fluorescence images and electron micrographs of the same section are correlated (4-7). However, the diffraction limit of light in the correlated image obscures the locations of individual molecules, and the fluorescence often extends beyond the boundary of the cell. Nano-resolution fluorescence electron microscopy (nano-fEM) is designed to localize proteins at nano-scale by imaging the same sections using photo-activated localization microscopy (PALM) and electron microscopy. PALM overcomes the diffraction limit by imaging individual fluorescent proteins and subsequently mapping the centroid of each fluorescent spot (8-10). We outline the nano-fEM technique in five steps. First, the sample is fixed and embedded using conditions that preserve the fluorescence of tagged proteins. Second, the resin blocks are sectioned into ultrathin segments (70-80 nm) that are mounted on a cover glass. Third, fluorescence is imaged in these sections using the Zeiss PALM microscope. Fourth, electron dense structures are

  14. Electronic Structure Principles and Aromaticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chattaraj, P. K.; Sarkar, U.; Roy, D. R.

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between aromaticity and stability in molecules on the basis of quantities such as hardness and electrophilicity is explored. The findings reveal that aromatic molecules are less energetic, harder, less polarizable, and less electrophilic as compared to antiaromatic molecules, as expected from the electronic structure principles.

  15. Electron Scattering and Nuclear Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trower, W. P.; Ficenec, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    Presents information about the nucleus gained by studies of electron scattering. Discusses what can be implied about the shape of the charge distribution, the nucleus positions, the vibrational modes of the nucleus, the momentum of the nucleus, and the granularity and core structures of the nucleus. (DS)

  16. Localized structure of Euglena bioconvection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iima, Makoto; Shoji, Erika; Awazu, Akinori; Nishimori, Hiraku; Izumi, Shunsuke; Hiroshima University Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    Bioconvection of a suspension of Euglena gracilis, a photosensitive flagellate whose body length is approximately 50 micrometers, was experimentally studied. Under strong light intensity, Euglena has a negative phototaxis; they tend to go away from the light source. When the bright illumination is given from the bottom, a large scale spatio-temporal pattern is generated as a result of interaction between Euglena and surrounding flow. Recently, localized convection pattern had been reported, however, the generation process and interaction of the localized convection cells has not been analyzed. We performed experimental study to understand the localization mechanism, in particular, the onset of bioconvection and lateral localization behavior due to phototaxis. Experiments started from different initial condition suggests a bistability near the onset of the convection as binary fluid convection that also shows localized convection cells. Dynamics of localized convections cells, which is similar to the binary fluid convection case although the basic equations are not the same, is also reported.

  17. Structural and electronic properties for atomic clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yan

    We have studied the structural and electronic properties for different groups of atomic clusters by doing a global search on the potential energy surface using the Taboo Search in Descriptors Space (TSDS) method and calculating the energies with Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory (KS-DFT). Our goal was to find the structural and electronic principles for predicting the structure and stability of clusters. For Ben (n = 3--20), we have found that the evolution of geometric and electronic properties with size reflects a change in the nature of the bonding from van der Waals to metallic and then bulk-like. The cluster sizes with extra stability agree well with the predictions of the jellium model. In the 4d series of transition metal (TM) clusters, as the d-type bonding becomes more important, the preferred geometric structure changes from icosahedral (Y, Zr), to distorted compact structures (Nb, Mo), and FCC or simple cubic crystal fragments (Tc, Ru, Rh) due to the localized nature of the d-type orbital. Analysis of relative isomer energies and their electronic density of states suggest that these clusters tend to follow a maximum hardness principle (MHP). For A4B12 clusters (A is divalent, B is monovalent), we found unusually large (on average 1.95 eV) HOMO-LUMO gap values. This shows the extra stability at an electronic closed shell (20 electrons) predicted by the jellium model. The importance of symmetry, closed electronic and ionic shells in stability is shown by the relative stability of homotops of Mg4Ag12 which also provides support for the hypothesis that clusters that satisfy more than one stability criterion ("double magic") should be particularly stable.

  18. Electron-electron interaction, weak localization and spin valve effect in vertical-transport graphene devices

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Mingsheng; Gong, Youpin; Wei, Xiangfei; Zhu, Chao; Xu, Jianbao; Liu, Ping; Guo, Yufen; Li, Weiwei; Liu, Liwei; Liu, Guangtong

    2014-04-14

    We fabricated a vertical structure device, in which graphene is sandwiched between two asymmetric ferromagnetic electrodes. The measurements of electron and spin transport were performed across the combined channels containing the vertical and horizontal components. The presence of electron-electron interaction (EEI) was found not only at low temperatures but also at moderate temperatures up to ∼120 K, and EEI dominates over weak localization (WL) with and without applying magnetic fields perpendicular to the sample plane. Moreover, spin valve effect was observed when magnetic filed is swept at the direction parallel to the sample surface. We attribute the EEI and WL surviving at a relatively high temperature to the effective suppress of phonon scattering in the vertical device structure. The findings open a way for studying quantum correlation at relatively high temperature.

  19. Site Sensitivity and local electronic symmetries in carboranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fister, T. T.; Seidler, G. T.; Vila, F. D.; Cross, J. O.; Linehan, J. C.

    2007-03-01

    Icosohedral carboranes containing ten boron and two carbon atoms are seeing renewed interest because of their potential use in new cancer and AIDS therapies. These molecules have flexible geometries which allow bonding to three types of carbon sites (e.g. ortho-, para-, and meta- configurations). Using a new multielement spectrometer, we present the first x-ray Raman scattering (XRS) study on each isomer with excited state spectra taken from the both the carbon and boron 1s states. The change in the electronic structure between the isomers is most pronounced in the carbon spectrum, where the position in the edge confirms prior density functional theory calculations. With the boron spectra, we used the unique momentum transfer dependence of XRS to extract the symmetry components of the density of unoccupied states, i.e. the l-DOS. These results give an improved picture of the local electronic properties of the carboranes.

  20. Electronic structure of lithium tetraborate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooten, David J.

    Due to many of its attributes, Li2B4O7 provides a possible material for incorporation as either a primary or companion material in future solid state neutron detectors. There is however a lack of fundamental characterization information regarding this useful material, particularly its electronic configuration. To address this, an investigation of Li2B4O7(110) and Li2B 4O7(100) was undertaken, utilizing photoemission and inverse photoemission spectroscopic techniques. The measured band gap depended on crystallographic direction with the band gaps ranging from 8.9+/-0.5 eV to 10.1+/-0.5 eV. The measurement yielded a density of states that qualitatively agreed with the theoretical results from model bulk band structure calculations for Li2B4O7; albeit with a larger band gap than predicted, but consistent with the known deficiencies of Local Density Approximation and Density Functional Theory calculations. The occupied states of both surfaces were extremely flat; to the degree that resolving periodic dispersion of the occupied states was inconclusive, within the resolution of the system. However, both surfaces demonstrated clear periodic dispersion within the empty states very close to theoretical Brillouin zone values. These attributes also translated to a lighter charge carrier effective mass in the unoccupied states. Of the two surfaces, Li2B4O 7(110) yielded the more consistent values in orthogonal directions for energy states. The presence of a bulk band gap surface state and image potential state in Li2B4O7(110) was indicative of a defect-free surface. The absence of both in the more polar, more dielectric Li2B4O7(100) was attributed to the presence of defects determined to be O vacancies. The results from Li2B 4O7(110) were indicative of a more stable surface than Li 2B4O7(100). In addition, Li 1s bulk and surface core level components were determined at the binding energies of -56.5+0.4 and -53.7+0.5 eV. Resonance features were observed along the [001

  1. On the local electronic and atomic structure of Ce1-xPrxO2-δ epitaxial films on Si

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Gang Schubert, Markus Andreas; Zoellner, Marvin Hartwig; D'Acapito, Francesco; Boscherini, Federico

    2014-09-28

    The local electronic and atomic structure of (111)-oriented, single crystalline mixed Ce1-xPrxO2-δ (x = 0, 0.1 and 0.6) epitaxial thin films on silicon substrates have been investigated in view of engineering redox properties of complex oxide films. Non-destructive X-ray absorption near edge structure reveals that Pr shows only +3 valence and Ce shows only nominal +4 valence in mixed oxides. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) studies were performed at K edges of Ce and Pr using a specially designed monochromator system for high energy measurements. They demonstrate that the fluorite lattice of ceria (CeO₂) is almost not perturbed for x = 0.1 sample, while higher Pr concentration (x = 0.6) not only generates a higher disorder level (thus more disordered oxygen) but also causes a significant reduction of Ce–O interatomic distances. The valence states of the cations were also examined by techniques operating in highly reducing environments: scanning transmission electron microscopy-electron energy loss spectroscopy and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy; in these reducing environments, evidence for the presence of Ce³⁺ was clearly found for the higher Pr concentration. Thus, the introduction of Pr³⁺ into CeO₂ strongly enhances the oxygen exchange properties of CeO₂. This improved oxygen mobility properties of CeO₂ are attributed to the lattice disorder induced by Pr mixing in the CeO₂ fluorite lattice, as demonstrated by EXAFS measurements. Thus, a comprehensive picture of the modifications of the atomic and electronic structure of Ce1-xPrxO2-δ epitaxial films and their relation is obtained.

  2. Structural Dynamics of Electronic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhir, E.

    2013-03-01

    The published work on analytical ("mathematical") and computer-aided, primarily finite-element-analysis (FEA) based, predictive modeling of the dynamic response of electronic systems to shocks and vibrations is reviewed. While understanding the physics of and the ability to predict the response of an electronic structure to dynamic loading has been always of significant importance in military, avionic, aeronautic, automotive and maritime electronics, during the last decade this problem has become especially important also in commercial, and, particularly, in portable electronics in connection with accelerated testing of various surface mount technology (SMT) systems on the board level. The emphasis of the review is on the nonlinear shock-excited vibrations of flexible printed circuit boards (PCBs) experiencing shock loading applied to their support contours during drop tests. At the end of the review we provide, as a suitable and useful illustration, the exact solution to a highly nonlinear problem of the dynamic response of a "flexible-and-heavy" PCB to an impact load applied to its support contour during drop testing.

  3. Densest Local Structures of Uniaxial Ellipsoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaller, Fabian M.; Weigel, Robert F. B.; Kapfer, Sebastian C.

    2016-10-01

    Connecting the collective behavior of disordered systems with local structure on the particle scale is an important challenge, for example, in granular and glassy systems. Compounding complexity, in many scientific and industrial applications, particles are polydisperse, aspherical, or even of varying shape. Here, we investigate a generalization of the classical kissing problem in order to understand the local building blocks of packings of aspherical grains. We numerically determine the densest local structures of uniaxial ellipsoids by minimizing the Set Voronoi cell volume around a given particle. Depending on the particle aspect ratio, different local structures are observed and classified by symmetry and Voronoi coordination number. In extended disordered packings of frictionless particles, knowledge of the densest structures allows us to rescale the Voronoi volume distributions onto the single-parameter family of k -Gamma distributions. Moreover, we find that approximate icosahedral clusters are found in random packings, while the optimal local structures for more aspherical particles are not formed.

  4. Electronic structure investigations of quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotenberg, E.; Theis, W.; Horn, K.

    2004-08-01

    We present a review of the determination of density of states (DOS) of quasicrystals using valence band photoemission spectroscopy. The absence of fine or spiky structure in the angle-integrated DOS of quasicrystals suggests the possibility of delocalized electronic states. These were confirmed with angle-resolved photoemission studies, which clearly establish the presence of dispersing features attributed to momentum-dependent bandstructure. Such dispersing states are observed not only for deeper-lying sp states, but also for d-derived bands near the Fermi level. Data from three different high symmetry surfaces of decagonal Al-Ni-Co, an ideal model system, are presented. We find that only a few dominant reciprocal lattice vectors are sufficient to describe the quasiperiodic potential, and the implications for electronic properties are discussed.

  5. Sparse maps—A systematic infrastructure for reduced-scaling electronic structure methods. I. An efficient and simple linear scaling local MP2 method that uses an intermediate basis of pair natural orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinski, Peter; Riplinger, Christoph; Valeev, Edward F.; Neese, Frank

    2015-07-01

    In this work, a systematic infrastructure is described that formalizes concepts implicit in previous work and greatly simplifies computer implementation of reduced-scaling electronic structure methods. The key concept is sparse representation of tensors using chains of sparse maps between two index sets. Sparse map representation can be viewed as a generalization of compressed sparse row, a common representation of a sparse matrix, to tensor data. By combining few elementary operations on sparse maps (inversion, chaining, intersection, etc.), complex algorithms can be developed, illustrated here by a linear-scaling transformation of three-center Coulomb integrals based on our compact code library that implements sparse maps and operations on them. The sparsity of the three-center integrals arises from spatial locality of the basis functions and domain density fitting approximation. A novel feature of our approach is the use of differential overlap integrals computed in linear-scaling fashion for screening products of basis functions. Finally, a robust linear scaling domain based local pair natural orbital second-order Möller-Plesset (DLPNO-MP2) method is described based on the sparse map infrastructure that only depends on a minimal number of cutoff parameters that can be systematically tightened to approach 100% of the canonical MP2 correlation energy. With default truncation thresholds, DLPNO-MP2 recovers more than 99.9% of the canonical resolution of the identity MP2 (RI-MP2) energy while still showing a very early crossover with respect to the computational effort. Based on extensive benchmark calculations, relative energies are reproduced with an error of typically <0.2 kcal/mol. The efficiency of the local MP2 (LMP2) method can be drastically improved by carrying out the LMP2 iterations in a basis of pair natural orbitals. While the present work focuses on local electron correlation, it is of much broader applicability to computation with sparse tensors in

  6. Sparse maps—A systematic infrastructure for reduced-scaling electronic structure methods. I. An efficient and simple linear scaling local MP2 method that uses an intermediate basis of pair natural orbitals

    SciTech Connect

    Pinski, Peter; Riplinger, Christoph; Neese, Frank E-mail: frank.neese@cec.mpg.de; Valeev, Edward F. E-mail: frank.neese@cec.mpg.de

    2015-07-21

    In this work, a systematic infrastructure is described that formalizes concepts implicit in previous work and greatly simplifies computer implementation of reduced-scaling electronic structure methods. The key concept is sparse representation of tensors using chains of sparse maps between two index sets. Sparse map representation can be viewed as a generalization of compressed sparse row, a common representation of a sparse matrix, to tensor data. By combining few elementary operations on sparse maps (inversion, chaining, intersection, etc.), complex algorithms can be developed, illustrated here by a linear-scaling transformation of three-center Coulomb integrals based on our compact code library that implements sparse maps and operations on them. The sparsity of the three-center integrals arises from spatial locality of the basis functions and domain density fitting approximation. A novel feature of our approach is the use of differential overlap integrals computed in linear-scaling fashion for screening products of basis functions. Finally, a robust linear scaling domain based local pair natural orbital second-order Möller-Plesset (DLPNO-MP2) method is described based on the sparse map infrastructure that only depends on a minimal number of cutoff parameters that can be systematically tightened to approach 100% of the canonical MP2 correlation energy. With default truncation thresholds, DLPNO-MP2 recovers more than 99.9% of the canonical resolution of the identity MP2 (RI-MP2) energy while still showing a very early crossover with respect to the computational effort. Based on extensive benchmark calculations, relative energies are reproduced with an error of typically <0.2 kcal/mol. The efficiency of the local MP2 (LMP2) method can be drastically improved by carrying out the LMP2 iterations in a basis of pair natural orbitals. While the present work focuses on local electron correlation, it is of much broader applicability to computation with sparse tensors in

  7. Sparse maps—A systematic infrastructure for reduced-scaling electronic structure methods. I. An efficient and simple linear scaling local MP2 method that uses an intermediate basis of pair natural orbitals.

    PubMed

    Pinski, Peter; Riplinger, Christoph; Valeev, Edward F; Neese, Frank

    2015-07-21

    In this work, a systematic infrastructure is described that formalizes concepts implicit in previous work and greatly simplifies computer implementation of reduced-scaling electronic structure methods. The key concept is sparse representation of tensors using chains of sparse maps between two index sets. Sparse map representation can be viewed as a generalization of compressed sparse row, a common representation of a sparse matrix, to tensor data. By combining few elementary operations on sparse maps (inversion, chaining, intersection, etc.), complex algorithms can be developed, illustrated here by a linear-scaling transformation of three-center Coulomb integrals based on our compact code library that implements sparse maps and operations on them. The sparsity of the three-center integrals arises from spatial locality of the basis functions and domain density fitting approximation. A novel feature of our approach is the use of differential overlap integrals computed in linear-scaling fashion for screening products of basis functions. Finally, a robust linear scaling domain based local pair natural orbital second-order Möller-Plesset (DLPNO-MP2) method is described based on the sparse map infrastructure that only depends on a minimal number of cutoff parameters that can be systematically tightened to approach 100% of the canonical MP2 correlation energy. With default truncation thresholds, DLPNO-MP2 recovers more than 99.9% of the canonical resolution of the identity MP2 (RI-MP2) energy while still showing a very early crossover with respect to the computational effort. Based on extensive benchmark calculations, relative energies are reproduced with an error of typically <0.2 kcal/mol. The efficiency of the local MP2 (LMP2) method can be drastically improved by carrying out the LMP2 iterations in a basis of pair natural orbitals. While the present work focuses on local electron correlation, it is of much broader applicability to computation with sparse tensors in

  8. Local Electronic And Dielectric Properties at Nanosized Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnell, Dawn A.

    2015-02-23

    Final Report to the Department of Energy for period 6/1/2000 to 11/30/2014 for Grant # DE-FG02-00ER45813-A000 to the University of Pennsylvania Local Electronic And Dielectric Properties at Nanosized Interfaces PI: Dawn Bonnell The behavior of grain boundaries and interfaces has been a focus of fundamental research for decades because variations of structure and composition at interfaces dictate mechanical, electrical, optical and dielectric properties in solids. Similarly, the consequence of atomic and electronic structures of surfaces to chemical and physical interactions are critical due to their implications to catalysis and device fabrication. Increasing fundamental understanding of surfaces and interfaces has materially advanced technologies that directly bear on energy considerations. Currently, exciting developments in materials processing are enabling creative new electrical, optical and chemical device configurations. Controlled synthesis of nanoparticles, semiconducting nanowires and nanorods, optical quantum dots, etc. along with a range of strategies for assembling and patterning nanostructures portend the viability of new devices that have the potential to significantly impact the energy landscape. As devices become smaller the impact of interfaces and surfaces grows geometrically. As with other nanoscale phenomena, small interfaces do not exhibit the same properties as do large interfaces. The size dependence of interface properties had not been explored and understanding at the most fundamental level is necessary to the advancement of nanostructured devices. An equally important factor in the behavior of interfaces in devices is the ability to examine the interfaces under realistic conditions. For example, interfaces and boundaries dictate the behavior of oxide fuel cells which operate at extremely high temperatures in dynamic high pressure chemical environments. These conditions preclude the characterization of local properties during fuel cell

  9. Electronic instrumentation for smart structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanar, George J.

    1995-04-01

    The requirements of electronic instrumentation for smart structures are similar to those of data acquisition systems at our national particle physics laboratories. Modern high energy and heavy ion physics experiments may have tens of thousands of channels of data sources producing data that must be converted to digital form, compacted, stored and interpreted. In parallel, multiple sensors distributed in and around smart structures generate either binary or analog signals that are voltage, charge, or time like in their information content. In all cases, they must be transmitted, converted and preserved into a unified digital format for real-time processing. This paper will review the current status of practical large scale electronic measurement systems with special attention to architectures and physical organization. Brief surveys of the current state of the art will include preamplifiers and amplifiers, comparators and discriminators, voltage or charge analog-to-digital converters, time internal meters or time-to-digital converters, and finally, counting or scalar systems. The paper will conclude by integrating all of these ideas in a concept for an all-digital readout of a smart structure using the latest techniques used in physics research today.

  10. Local atomic and electronic structure of oxide/GaAs and SiO2/Si interfaces using high-resolution XPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunthaner, F. J.; Grunthaner, P. J.; Vasquez, R. P.; Lewis, B. F.; Maserjian, J.; Madhukar, A.

    1979-01-01

    The chemical structures of thin SiO2 films, thin native oxides of GaAs (20-30 A), and the respective oxide-semiconductor interfaces, have been investigated using high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Depth profiles of these structures have been obtained using argon ion bombardment and wet chemical etching techniques. The chemical destruction induced by the ion profiling method is shown by direct comparison of these methods for identical samples. Fourier transform data-reduction methods based on linear prediction with maximum entropy constraints are used to analyze the discrete structure in oxides and substrates. This discrete structure is interpreted by means of a structure-induced charge-transfer model.

  11. Combinatorics of locally optimal RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Fusy, Eric; Clote, Peter

    2014-01-01

    It is a classical result of Stein and Waterman that the asymptotic number of RNA secondary structures is 1.104366∙n-3/2∙2.618034n. Motivated by the kinetics of RNA secondary structure formation, we are interested in determining the asymptotic number of secondary structures that are locally optimal, with respect to a particular energy model. In the Nussinov energy model, where each base pair contributes -1 towards the energy of the structure, locally optimal structures are exactly the saturated structures, for which we have previously shown that asymptotically, there are 1.07427∙n-3/2∙2.35467n many saturated structures for a sequence of length n. In this paper, we consider the base stacking energy model, a mild variant of the Nussinov model, where each stacked base pair contributes -1 toward the energy of the structure. Locally optimal structures with respect to the base stacking energy model are exactly those secondary structures, whose stems cannot be extended. Such structures were first considered by Evers and Giegerich, who described a dynamic programming algorithm to enumerate all locally optimal structures. In this paper, we apply methods from enumerative combinatorics to compute the asymptotic number of such structures. Additionally, we consider analogous combinatorial problems for secondary structures with annotated single-stranded, stacking nucleotides (dangles).

  12. Imaging of localized electronic states at a nonconducting surface by single-electron tunneling force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bussmann, Ezra B; Zheng, Ning; Williams, Clayton C

    2006-11-01

    Localized electronic states near a nonconducting SiO(2) surface are imaged on a approximately 1 nm scale by single-electron tunneling between the states and a scanning probe tip. Each tunneling electron is detected by electrostatic force. The images represent the number of tunneling electrons at each spatial location. The spatial resolution of the single electron tunneling force microscope is determined by quantum mechanical tunneling, providing new atomic-scale access to electronic states in dielectric surfaces and nonconducting nanostructures.

  13. Local statistical interpretation for water structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qiang

    2013-05-01

    In this Letter, Raman spectroscopy is employed to study supercooled water down to a temperature of 248 K at ambient pressure. Based on our interpretation of the Raman OH stretching band, decreasing temperature mainly leads to a structural transition from the single donor-single acceptor (DA) to the double donor-double acceptor (DDAA) hydrogen bonding motif. Additionally, a local statistical interpretation of the water structure is proposed, which reveals that a water molecule interacts with molecules in the first shell through various local hydrogen-bonded networks. From this, a local structure order parameter is proposed to explain the short-range order and long-range disorder.

  14. Local structural origins of the distinct electronic properties of Nb-substituted SrTiO3 and BaTiO3

    SciTech Connect

    Proffen, Thomas E; Page, Katharine L; Kolodiazhnyi, Taras; Cheetham, Anthony K; Seshadri, R

    2008-01-01

    Relating the minute details of crystal and defect structures to the properties of transition metal oxides is a central preoccupation in condensed matter science. Aiding in these efforts have been the many significant advances in high resolution and high momentum transfer neutron diffraction, which today provide unprecedented precision in describing the location of atoms in functional materials.

  15. Electronic structure quantum Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajdich, Michal; Mitas, Lubos

    2009-04-01

    Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) is an advanced simulation methodology for studies of manybody quantum systems. The QMC approaches combine analytical insights with stochastic computational techniques for efficient solution of several classes of important many-body problems such as the stationary Schrödinger equation. QMC methods of various flavors have been applied to a great variety of systems spanning continuous and lattice quantum models, molecular and condensed systems, BEC-BCS ultracold condensates, nuclei, etc. In this review, we focus on the electronic structure QMC, i.e., methods relevant for systems described by the electron-ion Hamiltonians. Some of the key QMC achievements include direct treatment of electron correlation, accuracy in predicting energy differences and favorable scaling in the system size. Calculations of atoms, molecules, clusters and solids have demonstrated QMC applicability to real systems with hundreds of electrons while providing 90-95% of the correlation energy and energy differences typically within a few percent of experiments. Advances in accuracy beyond these limits are hampered by the so-called fixed-node approximation which is used to circumvent the notorious fermion sign problem. Many-body nodes of fermion states and their properties have therefore become one of the important topics for further progress in predictive power and efficiency of QMC calculations. Some of our recent results on the wave function nodes and related nodal domain topologies will be briefly reviewed. This includes analysis of few-electron systems and descriptions of exact and approximate nodes using transformations and projections of the highly-dimensional nodal hypersurfaces into the 3D space. Studies of fermion nodes offer new insights into topological properties of eigenstates such as explicit demonstrations that generic fermionic ground states exhibit the minimal number of two nodal domains. Recently proposed trial wave functions based on Pfaffians with

  16. Deterministic weak localization in periodic structures.

    PubMed

    Tian, C; Larkin, A

    2005-12-09

    In some perfect periodic structures classical motion exhibits deterministic diffusion. For such systems we present the weak localization theory. As a manifestation for the velocity autocorrelation function a universal power law decay is predicted to appear at four Ehrenfest times. This deterministic weak localization is robust against weak quenched disorders, which may be confirmed by coherent backscattering measurements of periodic photonic crystals.

  17. Metastable and spin-polarized states in electron systems with localized electron-electron interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sablikov, Vladimir A.; Shchamkhalova, Bagun S.

    2014-05-01

    We study the formation of spontaneous spin polarization in inhomogeneous electron systems with pair interaction localized in a small region that is not separated by a barrier from surrounding gas of non-interacting electrons. Such a system is interesting as a minimal model of a quantum point contact in which the electron-electron interaction is strong in a small constriction coupled to electron reservoirs without barriers. Based on the analysis of the grand potential within the self-consistent field approximation, we find that the formation of the polarized state strongly differs from the Bloch or Stoner transition in homogeneous interacting systems. The main difference is that a metastable state appears in the critical point in addition to the globally stable state, so that when the interaction parameter exceeds a critical value, two states coexist. One state has spin polarization and the other is unpolarized. Another feature is that the spin polarization increases continuously with the interaction parameter and has a square-root singularity in the critical point. We study the critical conditions and the grand potentials of the polarized and unpolarized states for one-dimensional and two-dimensional models in the case of extremely small size of the interaction region.

  18. Study of local atomic order in amorphous materials in a computerized transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Balossier, G; Garg, R K; Bonhomme, P; Thomas, X

    1989-03-01

    Experimental results obtained by electron diffraction (ED) and extended electron energy loss fine structure (EXELFS) techniques to study the local atomic order in amorphous materials such as carbon, silicon, and its oxides are described. Potential applications of ED and EXELFS techniques and their limitations are also discussed.

  19. Actinide electronic structure and atomic forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, R. C.; Rudin, Sven P.; Trinkle, Dallas R.; Jones, M. D.

    2000-07-01

    We have developed a new method[1] of fitting tight-binding parameterizations based on functional forms developed at the Naval Research Laboratory.[2] We have applied these methods to actinide metals and report our success using them (see below). The fitting procedure uses first-principles local-density-approximation (LDA) linear augmented plane-wave (LAPW) band structure techniques[3] to first calculate an electronic-structure band structure and total energy for fcc, bcc, and simple cubic crystal structures for the actinide of interest. The tight-binding parameterization is then chosen to fit the detailed energy eigenvalues of the bands along symmetry directions, and the symmetry of the parameterization is constrained to agree with the correct symmetry of the LDA band structure at each eigenvalue and k-vector that is fit to. By fitting to a range of different volumes and the three different crystal structures, we find that the resulting parameterization is robust and appears to accurately calculate other crystal structures and properties of interest.

  20. Electron localization function in full-potential representation for crystalline materials.

    PubMed

    Ormeci, A; Rosner, H; Wagner, F R; Kohout, M; Grin, Yu

    2006-01-26

    The electron localization function (ELF) is implemented in the first-principles, all-electron, full-potential local orbital method. This full-potential implementation increases the accuracy with which the ELF can be computed for crystalline materials. Some representative results obtained are presented and compared with the results of other methods. Although for crystal structures with directed bonding only minor differences are found, in simple elemental metals, there are differences in the valence region, which give rise to different ELF topologies.

  1. The electron localization as the information content of the conditional pair density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbina, Andres S.; Torres, F. Javier; Rincon, Luis

    2016-06-01

    In the present work, the information gained by an electron for "knowing" about the position of another electron with the same spin is calculated using the Kullback-Leibler divergence (DKL) between the same-spin conditional pair probability density and the marginal probability. DKL is proposed as an electron localization measurement, based on the observation that regions of the space with high information gain can be associated with strong correlated localized electrons. Taking into consideration the scaling of DKL with the number of σ-spin electrons of a system (Nσ), the quantity χ = (Nσ - 1) DKLfcut is introduced as a general descriptor that allows the quantification of the electron localization in the space. fcut is defined such that it goes smoothly to zero for negligible densities. χ is computed for a selection of atomic and molecular systems in order to test its capability to determine the region in space where electrons are localized. As a general conclusion, χ is able to explain the electron structure of molecules on the basis of chemical grounds with a high degree of success and to produce a clear differentiation of the localization of electrons that can be traced to the fluctuation in the average number of electrons in these regions.

  2. Fast probe of local electronic states in nanostructures utilizing a single-lead quantum dot

    PubMed Central

    Otsuka, Tomohiro; Amaha, Shinichi; Nakajima, Takashi; Delbecq, Matthieu R.; Yoneda, Jun; Takeda, Kenta; Sugawara, Retsu; Allison, Giles; Ludwig, Arne; Wieck, Andreas D.; Tarucha, Seigo

    2015-01-01

    Transport measurements are powerful tools to probe electronic properties of solid-state materials. To access properties of local electronic states in nanostructures, such as local density of states, electronic distribution and so on, micro-probes utilizing artificial nanostructures have been invented to perform measurements in addition to those with conventional macroscopic electronic reservoirs. Here we demonstrate a new kind of micro-probe: a fast single-lead quantum dot probe, which utilizes a quantum dot coupled only to the target structure through a tunneling barrier and fast charge readout by RF reflectometry. The probe can directly access the local electronic states with wide bandwidth. The probe can also access more electronic states, not just those around the Fermi level, and the operations are robust against bias voltages and temperatures. PMID:26416582

  3. Basis functions for electronic structure calculations on spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, Peter M. W. Loos, Pierre-François Agboola, Davids

    2014-12-28

    We introduce a new basis function (the spherical Gaussian) for electronic structure calculations on spheres of any dimension D. We find general expressions for the one- and two-electron integrals and propose an efficient computational algorithm incorporating the Cauchy-Schwarz bound. Using numerical calculations for the D = 2 case, we show that spherical Gaussians are more efficient than spherical harmonics when the electrons are strongly localized.

  4. Localized electron heating by strong guide-field magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xuehan; Inomoto, Michiaki; Sugawara, Takumichi; Yamasaki, Kotaro; Ushiki, Tomohiko; Ono, Yasushi

    2015-10-01

    Localized electron heating of magnetic reconnection was studied under strong guide-field using two merging spherical tokamak plasmas in the University of Tokyo Spherical Tokamak experiment. Our new slide-type two-dimensional Thomson scattering system is documented for the first time the electron heating localized around the X-point. Shape of the high electron temperature area does not agree with that of energy dissipation term Et.jt . If we include a guide-field effect term Bt/(Bp+αBt) for Et.jt , the energy dissipation area becomes localized around the X-point, suggesting that the electrons are accelerated by the reconnection electric field parallel to the magnetic field and thermalized around the X-point.

  5. Introduction: Dissipative localized structures in extended systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tlidi, Mustapha; Taki, Majid; Kolokolnikov, Theodore

    2007-09-01

    Localized structures belong to the class of dissipative structures found far from equilibrium. Contributions from the most representative groups working on a various fields of natural science such as biology, chemistry, plant ecology, mathematics, optics, and laser physics are presented. The aim of this issue is to gather specialists from these fields towards a cross-fertilization among these active areas of research and thereby to present an overview of the state of art in the formation and the characterization of dissipative localized structures. Nonlinear optics and laser physics have an important part in this issue because of potential applications in information technology. In particular, localized structures could be used as "bits" for parallel information storage and processing.

  6. Weak localization and electron-electron interactions in few layer black phosphorus devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yanmeng; Gillgren, Nathaniel; Espiritu, Timothy; Tran, Son; Yang, Jiawei; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takahashi; Lau, Chun Ning

    2016-09-01

    Few layer phosphorene (FLP) devices are extensively studied due to their unique electronic properties and potential applications on nano-electronics. Here we present magnetotransport studies which reveal electron-electron interactions as the dominant scattering mechanism in hexagonal boron nitride-encapsulated FLP devices. From weak localization measurements, we estimate the electron dephasing length to be 30 to 100 nm at low temperatures, which exhibits a strong dependence on carrier density n and a power-law dependence on temperature (˜T -0.4). These results establish that the dominant scattering mechanism in FLP is electron-electron interactions.

  7. Localized electron heating during magnetic reconnection in MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, T.; Tanabe, H.; Watanabe, T. G.; Hayashi, Y.; Imazawa, R.; Inomoto, M.; Ono, Y.; Gryaznevich, M.; Scannell, R.; Michael, C.; The MAST Team

    2016-10-01

    Significant increase in the plasma temperature above 1 keV was measured during the kilogauss magnetic field reconnection of two merging toroidal plasmas under the high-guide field and collision-less conditions. The electron temperature was observed to peak significantly at the X-point inside the current sheet, indicating Joule heating caused by the toroidal electric field along the X-line. This peaked temperature increases significantly with the guide field, in agreement with the electron mean-free path calculation. The slow electron heating in the downstream suggests energy conversion from ions to electrons through ion-electron collisions in the bulk plasma as the second electron heating mechanism in the bulk plasma. The electron density profile clearly reveals the electron density pile-up / fast shock structures in the downstream of reconnection, suggesting energy conversion from ion flow energy to ion thermal energy as well as significant ion heating by reconnection outflow.

  8. Non-locality, adiabaticity, thermodynamics and electron energy probability functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boswell, Roderick; Zhang, Yunchao; Charles, Christine; Takahashi, Kazunori

    2016-09-01

    Thermodynamic properties are revisited for electrons that are governed by nonlocal electron energy probability functions in a plasma of low collisionality. Measurements in a laboratory helicon double layer experiment have shown that the effective electron temperature and density show a polytropic correlation with an index of γe = 1 . 17 +/- 0 . 02 along the divergent magnetic field, implying a nearly isothermal plasma (γe = 1) with heat being brought into the system. However, the evolution of electrons along the divergent magnetic field is essentially an adiabatic process, which should have a γe = 5 / 3 . The reason for this apparent contradiction is that the nearly collisionless plasma is very far from local thermodynamic equilibrium and the electrons behave nonlocally. The corresponding effective electron enthalpy has a conservation relation with the potential energy, which verifies that there is no heat transferred into the system during the electron evolution. The electrons are shown in nonlocal momentum equilibrium under the electric field and the gradient of the effective electron pressure. The convective momentum of ions, which can be assumed as a cold species, is determined by the effective electron pressure and the effective electron enthalpy is shown to be the source for ion acceleration. For these nearly collisionless plasmas, the use of traditional thermodynamic concepts can lead to very erroneous conclusions regarding the thermal conductivity.

  9. Electronic Structure and Effectively Unpaired Electron Density Topology in closo-Boranes: Nonclassical Three-Center Two-Electron Bonding.

    PubMed

    Lobayan, Rosana M; Bochicchio, Roberto C; Torre, Alicia; Lain, Luis

    2011-04-12

    This article provides a detailed study of the structure and bonding in closo-borane cluster compounds X2B3H3 (X = BH(-), P, SiH, CH, N), with particular emphasis on the description of the electron distribution using the topology of the quantum many-body effectively unpaired density. The close relationship observed between the critical points of this quantity and the localization of the electron cloud allows us to characterize the nonclassical bonding patterns of these systems. The obtained results confirm the suitability of the local rule to detect three-center two-electron bonds, which was conjectured in our previous study on boron hydrides.

  10. Electronic processes in multilayer memory structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotnikov, A. F.

    The papers presented in this volume contain results of recent theoretical and experimental research related to electron processes in optoelectronic memory media based on structures consisting of a metal, an amorphous insulating layer, and a semiconductor. Topics discussed include photostimulated electron processes in metal-insulator-semiconductor structures, electron transfer phenomena in amorphous dielectric layers, degradation phenomena in MNOS memory elements under prolonged charge injection into the dielectric layer, and characteristics of charge relaxation in MNOS structures following multiple reprogramming.

  11. Local representation of the electronic dielectric response function

    DOE PAGES

    Lu, Deyu; Ge, Xiaochuan

    2015-12-11

    We present a local representation of the electronic dielectric response function, based on a spatial partition of the dielectric response into contributions from each occupied Wannier orbital using a generalized density functional perturbation theory. This procedure is fully ab initio, and therefore allows us to rigorously define local metrics, such as “bond polarizability,” on Wannier centers. We show that the locality of the bare response function is determined by the locality of three quantities: Wannier functions of the occupied manifold, the density matrix, and the Hamiltonian matrix. Furthermore, in systems with a gap, the bare dielectric response is exponentially localized,more » which supports the physical picture of the dielectric response function as a collection of interacting local responses that can be captured by a tight-binding model.« less

  12. Local representation of the electronic dielectric response function

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Deyu; Ge, Xiaochuan

    2015-12-11

    We present a local representation of the electronic dielectric response function, based on a spatial partition of the dielectric response into contributions from each occupied Wannier orbital using a generalized density functional perturbation theory. This procedure is fully ab initio, and therefore allows us to rigorously define local metrics, such as “bond polarizability,” on Wannier centers. We show that the locality of the bare response function is determined by the locality of three quantities: Wannier functions of the occupied manifold, the density matrix, and the Hamiltonian matrix. Furthermore, in systems with a gap, the bare dielectric response is exponentially localized, which supports the physical picture of the dielectric response function as a collection of interacting local responses that can be captured by a tight-binding model.

  13. Polarization properties of localized structures in VCSELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averlant, Etienne; Tlidi, Mustapha; Ackemann, Thorsten; Thienpont, Hugo; Panajotov, Krassimir

    2016-04-01

    Broad area Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers (VCSELs) have peculiar polarization properties which are a field of study by itself.1-3 These properties have already been used for localized structure generation, in a simple configuration, where only one polarization component was used.4 Here, we present new experimental and theoretical results on the complex polarization behavior of localized structures generated in an optically-injected broad area VCSEL. A linear stability analysis of the spin-flip VCSEL model is performed for the case of broad area devices, in a restrained and experimentally relevant parameter set. Numerical simulations are performed, in one and two dimensions. They reveal existence of vector localized structures. These structures have a complex polarization state, which is not simply a linear polarization following the one of the optical injection. Experimental results confirm theoretical predictions. Applications of this work can lead to the encoding of small color images in the polarization state of an ensemble of localized structures at the surface of a broad area VCSEL.

  14. Program For Local-Area-Network Electronic Mail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiner, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    MailRoom is computer program for local-area network (LAN) electronic mail. Enables users of LAN to exchange electronically notes, letters, reminders, or any sort of communication via their computers. Links all users of LAN into communication circle in which messages created, sent, copied, printed, downloaded, uploaded, and deleted through series of menu-driven screens. Includes feature that enables users to determine whether messages sent have been read by receivers. Written in Microsoft QuickBasic.

  15. Multilevel domain decomposition for electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Barrault, M. . E-mail: maxime.barrault@edf.fr; Cances, E. . E-mail: cances@cermics.enpc.fr; Hager, W.W. . E-mail: hager@math.ufl.edu; Le Bris, C. . E-mail: lebris@cermics.enpc.fr

    2007-03-01

    We introduce a new multilevel domain decomposition method (MDD) for electronic structure calculations within semi-empirical and density functional theory (DFT) frameworks. This method iterates between local fine solvers and global coarse solvers, in the spirit of domain decomposition methods. Using this approach, calculations have been successfully performed on several linear polymer chains containing up to 40,000 atoms and 200,000 atomic orbitals. Both the computational cost and the memory requirement scale linearly with the number of atoms. Additional speed-up can easily be obtained by parallelization. We show that this domain decomposition method outperforms the density matrix minimization (DMM) method for poor initial guesses. Our method provides an efficient preconditioner for DMM and other linear scaling methods, variational in nature, such as the orbital minimization (OM) procedure.

  16. Studying localized corrosion using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chee, See Wee; Pratt, Sarah H.; Hattar, Khalid; Duquette, David; Ross, Frances M.; Hull, Robert

    2014-11-07

    Using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (LCTEM), localized corrosion of Cu and Al thin films immersed in aqueous NaCl solutions was studied. We demonstrate that potentiostatic control can be used to initiate pitting and that local compositional changes, due to focused ion beam implantation of Au+ ions, can modify the corrosion susceptibility of Al films. Likewise, a discussion on strategies to control the onset of pitting is also presented.

  17. Studying localized corrosion using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Chee, See Wee; Pratt, Sarah H.; Hattar, Khalid; ...

    2014-11-07

    Using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (LCTEM), localized corrosion of Cu and Al thin films immersed in aqueous NaCl solutions was studied. We demonstrate that potentiostatic control can be used to initiate pitting and that local compositional changes, due to focused ion beam implantation of Au+ ions, can modify the corrosion susceptibility of Al films. Likewise, a discussion on strategies to control the onset of pitting is also presented.

  18. Electronic Structure of Lanthanum Hydrides with Switchable Optical Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.; Zhang, F.; Ng, K.; Zhang, F.; Anisimov, V.; Rice, T.; Anisimov, V.

    1997-02-01

    Recent dramatic changes in the optical properties of LaH{sub 2+x} and YH{sub 2+x} films discovered by Huiberts {ital et al.}[Nature (London) {bold 380}, 231 (1996)] suggest their electronic structure is described best by a local model. Electron correlation is important in H{sup -} centers and in explaining the transparent insulating behavior of LaH{sub 3}. The metal-insulator transition at x{approximately}0.8 takes place in a band of highly localized states centered on the H vacancies in the LaH{sub 3} structure. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. Structural phase transition and electronic properties of NdBi

    SciTech Connect

    Sahu, Ashvini K.; Patiya, Jagdish; Sanyal, Sankar P.

    2015-06-24

    The structural and electronic properties of NdBi from an electronic structure calculation have been presented. The calculation is performed using self-consistent tight binding linear muffin tin orbital (TB-LMTO) method within the local density approximation (LDA). The calculated equilibrium structural parameters are in good agreement with the available experimental results. It is found that this compound shows metallic behavior under ambient condition and undergoes a structural phase transition from the NaCl structure to the CsCl structure at the pressure 20.1 GPa. The electronic structures of NdBi under pressure are investigated. It is found that NdBi have metallization and the hybridizations of atoms in NdBi under pressure become stronger.

  20. Detecting structure of haplotypes and local ancestry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present a two-layer hidden Markov model to detect the structure of haplotypes for unrelated individuals. This allows us to model two scales of linkage disequilibrium (one within a group of haplotypes and one between groups), thereby taking advantage of rich haplotype information to infer local an...

  1. Electronic correlation contributions to structural energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haydock, Roger

    2015-03-01

    The recursion method is used to calculate electronic excitation spectra including electron-electron interactions within the Hubbard model. The effects of correlation on structural energies are then obtained from these spectra and applied to stacking faults. http://arxiv.org/abs/1405.2288 Supported by the Richmond F. Snyder Fund and Gifts.

  2. Localized Electron Heating by Strong Guide-Field Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xuehan; Sugawara, Takumichi; Inomoto, Michiaki; Yamasaki, Kotaro; Ono, Yasushi; UTST Team

    2015-11-01

    Localized electron heating of magnetic reconnection was studied under strong guide-field (typically Bt 15Bp) using two merging spherical tokamak plasmas in Univ. Tokyo Spherical Tokamak (UTST) experiment. Our new slide-type two-dimensional Thomson scattering system documented for the first time the electron heating localized around the X-point. The region of high electron temperature, which is perpendicular to the magnetic field, was found to have a round shape with radius of 2 [cm]. Also, it was localized around the X-point and does not agree with that of energy dissipation term Et .jt . When we include a guide-field effect term Bt / (Bp + αBt) for Et .jt where α =√{ (vin2 +vout2) /v∥2 } , the energy dissipation area becomes localized around the X-point, suggesting that the electrons are accelerated by the reconnection electric field parallel to the magnetic field and thermalized around the X-point. This work was supported by JSPS A3 Foresight Program ``Innovative Tokamak Plasma Startup and Current Drive in Spherical Torus,'' a Grant-in-Aid from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Fellows 15J03758.

  3. Parallel adaptive mesh refinement for electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, S.; Weare, J.; Ong, E.; Baden, S.

    1996-12-01

    We have applied structured adaptive mesh refinement techniques to the solution of the LDA equations for electronic structure calculations. Local spatial refinement concentrates memory resources and numerical effort where it is most needed, near the atomic centers and in regions of rapidly varying charge density. The structured grid representation enables us to employ efficient iterative solver techniques such as conjugate gradients with multigrid preconditioning. We have parallelized our solver using an object-oriented adaptive mesh refinement framework.

  4. Localized electrons on a lattice with incommensurate magnetic flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishman, Shmuel; Shapir, Yonathan; Wang, Xiang-Rong

    1992-11-01

    The magnetic-field effects on lattice wave functions of Hofstadter electrons strongly localized at boundaries are studied analytically and numerically. The exponential decay of the wave function is modulated by a field-dependent amplitude J(t)=tprodt-1r=02 cos(παr), where α is the magnetic flux per plaquette (in units of a flux quantum) and t is the distance from the boundary (in units of the lattice spacing). The behavior of ||J(t)|| is found to depend sensitively on the value of α. While for rational values α=p/q the envelope of J(t) increases as 2t/q, the behavior for α irrational (q-->∞) is erratic with an aperiodic structure which drastically changes with α. For algebraic α it is found that J(t) increases as a power law tβ(α) while it grows faster (presumably as tβ(α)lnt) for transcendental α. This is very different from the growth rate J(t)~e√t that is typical for cosines with random phases. The theoretical analysis is extended to products of the type Jν(t)=tprodt-1r=02 cos(παrν) with ν>0. Different behavior of Jν(t) is found in various regimes of ν. It changes from periodic for small ν to randomlike for large ν.

  5. Electronic band structure of defect chalcopyrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiaoshu; Lambrecht, Walter R. L.

    2001-03-01

    The defect chalcopyrites of chemical composition II-III-VI4 in which II, III and VI mean group-II elements such as Cd or Hg, group-III elements such as Al and Ga and group-VI elements such as S, Se, Te, form an interesting family of semiconductor compounds with potential nonlinear optical applications. They can be thought of as derived from the regular I-III-VI2 chalcopyrites by doubling the formula unit and replacing the group I element, for example, Ag by the group-II element and a vacancy in an ordered manner. The chalcopyrites themselves are derived from II-VI compounds by replacing the group-II by a group I and a group-III element. In this contribution we present electronic band structure calculations of some of these compounds, calculated using the linear muffin-tin orbital method combined with the local density functional approximation. We discuss the relation of the band structures of the corresponding zincblende, chalcopyrite and defect chalcopyrite compounds. In particular, the role of the group I or group II d-band energy will be shown to be important. The trends with chemical substutions and the effects of structural distortions c/a and internal parameters accompanying the chemical distortion will be discussed.

  6. Electronic structures of ytterbocene-imine complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Da Re, R. E.; Kuehl, C. J.; John, K. D.; Morris, D. E.

    2004-01-01

    The electronic structures of complexes of the form [(C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2}Yb(L)]{sup +/0} (L = bipyridine, phenanthroline, terpyridine) have been probed using cyclic voltammetry and electronic spectroscopy. Remarkably, the voltammetric data reveal that the imine-based LUMO is stabilized and the redox-active metal f orbital is destabilized by ca. 1 V each upon formation of the ytterbocene-imine adduct, which is presumably responsible for the [(f){sup 13}({pi}*(L)){sup 1}] charge-transfer ground state characteristic of these complexes. The ca. 0.8 V separation between ligand-based oxidation and metal-based reduction waves for each ytterbocene adduct correlates with the energy of its optically promoted {pi}*(L)-f(Yb) charge transfer (LMCT) transition (ca. 5000 cm{sup -1}). The coupling between this LMCT excited state and the {sup 2}F{sub 7/2} ground and {sup 2}F{sub 5/2} excited states of Yb(III) leads to unusually large intensities ({var_epsilon} {approx} 1000) for the metal-localized f-f bands, which will be discussed in the context of an intensity borrowing mechanism that invokes exchange between the ligand-based {sup 2}S and metal-based {sup 2}F spin states.

  7. Electronic Structure of Lithium Tetraborate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    binding energies of -56.5+0.4 and -53.7+0.5 eV. Resonance features were observed along the [001] direction and were attributed to a Coster- Kronig ...could be theoretically explained as an Auger electron [12] or Coster- Kronig process [13] of a Li 1s electron photoexcitation to an unoccupied 2p...Coster Kronig , which requires only one Li atom. Such a Coster Kronig mechanism is pictorially displayed below in Figure 7.9. 128 Figure 7.9

  8. Electron tomography of dislocation structures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, G.S.; House, S.D.; Kacher, J.; Tanaka, M.; Higashida, K.; Robertson, I.M.

    2014-01-15

    Recent developments in the application of electron tomography for characterizing microstructures in crystalline solids are described. The underlying principles for electron tomography are presented in the context of typical challenges in adapting the technique to crystalline systems and in using diffraction contrast imaging conditions. Methods for overcoming the limitations associated with the angular range, the number of acquired images, and uniformity of image contrast are introduced. In addition, a method for incorporating the real space coordinate system into the tomogram is presented. As the approach emphasizes development of experimental solutions to the challenges, the solutions developed and implemented are presented in the form of examples.

  9. Quantum-classical simulation of electron localization in negatively charged methanol clusters.

    PubMed

    Mones, Letif; Rossky, Peter J; Turi, László

    2011-08-28

    A series of quantum molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate the energetic, structural, dynamic, and spectroscopic properties of methanol cluster anions, [(CH(3)OH)(n)](-), (n = 50-500). Consistent with the inference from photo-electron imaging experiments, we find two main localization modes of the excess electron in equilibrated methanol clusters at ∼200 K. The two different localization patterns have strikingly different physical properties, consistent with experimental observations, and are manifest in comparable cluster sizes to those observed. Smaller clusters (n ≤ 128) tend to localize the electron in very weakly bound, diffuse electronic states on the surface of the cluster, while in larger ones the electron is stabilized in solvent cavities, in compact interior-bound states. The interior states exhibit properties that largely resemble and smoothly extrapolate to those simulated for a solvated electron in bulk methanol. The surface electronic states of methanol cluster anions are significantly more weakly bound than the surface states of the anionic water clusters. The key source of the difference is the lack of stabilizing free hydroxyl groups on a relaxed methanol cluster surface. We also provide a mechanistic picture that illustrates the essential role of the interactions of the excess electron with the hydroxyl groups in the dynamic process of the transition of the electron from surface-bound states to interior-bound states.

  10. Electron gun controlled smart structure

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Jeffrey W.; Main, John Alan; Redmond, James M.; Henson, Tammy D.; Watson, Robert D.

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed is a method and system for actively controlling the shape of a sheet of electroactive material; the system comprising: one or more electrodes attached to the frontside of the electroactive sheet; a charged particle generator, disposed so as to direct a beam of charged particles (e.g. electrons) onto the electrode; a conductive substrate attached to the backside of the sheet; and a power supply electrically connected to the conductive substrate; whereby the sheet changes its shape in response to an electric field created across the sheet by an accumulation of electric charge within the electrode(s), relative to a potential applied to the conductive substrate. Use of multiple electrodes distributed across on the frontside ensures a uniform distribution of the charge with a single point of e-beam incidence, thereby greatly simplifying the beam scanning algorithm and raster control electronics, and reducing the problems associated with "blooming". By placing a distribution of electrodes over the front surface of a piezoelectric film (or other electroactive material), this arrangement enables improved control over the distribution of surface electric charges (e.g. electrons) by creating uniform (and possibly different) charge distributions within each individual electrode. Removal or deposition of net electric charge can be affected by controlling the secondary electron yield through manipulation of the backside electric potential with the power supply. The system can be used for actively controlling the shape of space-based deployable optics, such as adaptive mirrors and inflatable antennae.

  11. Drifting localized structures in doubly diffusive convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobloch, Edgar; Lo Jacono, David; Bergeon, Alain

    2016-11-01

    We use numerical continuation to compute a multiplicity of spatially localized states in doubly diffusive convection in a vertical slot driven by imposed horizontal temperature and concentration differences. The calculations focus on the so-called opposing case, in which the resulting gradients are in balance. No-slip boundary conditions are used at the sides and periodic boundary conditions with large spatial period are used in the vertical direction. This system exhibits homoclinic snaking of stationary spatially localized structures with point symmetry. In this talk we demonstrate the existence, near threshold, of drifting pulses of spatially localized convection that appear when mixed concentration boundary conditions are used, and use homotopic continuation to identify similar states in the case of fixed concentration boundary conditions. We show that these states persist to large values of the Grasshof number and provide a detailed study of their properties.

  12. Electronic spectrum and localization of electronic states in aperiodic quantum dot chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotaev, P. Yu.; Vekilov, Yu. Kh.; Kaputkina, N. E.

    2014-02-01

    The electronic energy spectra of aperiodic Thue-Morse, Rudin-Shapiro, and double-periodic quantum dot chains are investigated in the tight-binding approximation. The dependence of the spectrum on all parameters of a "mixed" aperiodic chain model is studied: the electronic energy at quantum dots and the hopping integrals. The electronic degree of localization in the chains under consideration is determined by analyzing the inverse participation ratio. Its spectral distribution and the dependence of the band-averaged degree of localization on these model parameters have been calculated. It is shown that a transition of the system's sites to a resonant state in which the degree of electron localization decreases, while an overlap between the subbands occurs in the spectrum is possible when the parameters are varied.

  13. Automatic Tool for Local Assembly Structures

    SciTech Connect

    2016-10-11

    Whole community shotgun sequencing of total DNA (i.e. metagenomics) and total RNA (i.e. metatranscriptomics) has provided a wealth of information in the microbial community structure, predicted functions, metabolic networks, and is even able to reconstruct complete genomes directly. Here we present ATLAS (Automatic Tool for Local Assembly Structures) a comprehensive pipeline for assembly, annotation, genomic binning of metagenomic and metatranscriptomic data with an integrated framework for Multi-Omics. This will provide an open source tool for the Multi-Omic community at large.

  14. Complex structures of dense lithium: Electronic origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degtyareva, V. F.

    2016-11-01

    Lithium—the lightest alkali metal exhibits unexpected structures and electronic behavior at high pressures. Like the heavier alkali metals, Li is bcc at ambient pressure and transforms first to fcc (at 7.5 GPa). The post-fcc high-pressure form Li-cI 16 (at 40-60 GPa) is similar to Na-cI 16 and related to more complex structures of heavy alkalis Rb-oC52 and Cs- oC84. The other high pressure phases for Li (oC88, oC40, oC24) observed at pressures up to 130 GPa are found only in Li. The different route of Li high-pressure structures correlates with its special electronic configuration containing the only 3 electrons (at 1s and 2s levels). Crystal structures for Li are analyzed within the model of Fermi sphere-Brillouin zone interactions. Stability of post-fcc structures for Li are supported by the Hume-Rothery arguments when new diffraction plains appear close to the Fermi level producing pseudogaps near the Fermi level and decreasing the crystal energy. The filling of Brillouin-Jones zones by electron states for a given structure defines the physical properties as optical reflectivity, electrical resistivity and superconductivity. To understand the complexity of structural and physical properties of Li above 60 GPa it is necessary to assume the valence electron band overlap with the core electrons and increase the valence electron count under compression.

  15. Electronic Structure of Small Lanthanide Containing Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafader, Jared O.; Ray, Manisha; Topolski, Josey E.; Chick Jarrold, Caroline

    2016-06-01

    Lanthanide-based materials have unusual electronic properties because of the high number of electronic degrees of freedom arising from partial occupation of 4f orbitals, which make these materials optimal for their utilization in many applications including electronics and catalysis. Electronic spectroscopy of small lanthanide molecules helps us understand the role of these 4f electrons, which are generally considered core-like because of orbital contraction, but are energetically similar to valence electrons. The spectroscopy of small lanthanide-containing molecules is relatively unexplored and to broaden this understanding we have completed the characterization of small cerium, praseodymium, and europium molecules using photoelectron spectroscopy coupled with DFT calculations. The characterization of PrO, EuH, EuO/EuOH, and CexOy molecules have allowed for the determination of their electron affinity, the assignment of numerous anion to neutral state transitions, modeling of anion/neutral structures and electron orbital occupation.

  16. Localized electronic states at grain boundaries on the surface of graphene and graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luican-Mayer, Adina; Barrios-Vargas, Jose E.; Toft Falkenberg, Jesper; Autès, Gabriel; Cummings, Aron W.; Soriano, David; Li, Guohong; Brandbyge, Mads; Yazyev, Oleg V.; Roche, Stephan; Andrei, Eva Y.

    2016-09-01

    Recent advances in large-scale synthesis of graphene and other 2D materials have underscored the importance of local defects such as dislocations and grain boundaries (GBs), and especially their tendency to alter the electronic properties of the material. Understanding how the polycrystalline morphology affects the electronic properties is crucial for the development of applications such as flexible electronics, energy harvesting devices or sensors. We here report on atomic scale characterization of several GBs and on the structural-dependence of the localized electronic states in their vicinity. Using low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy, together with tight binding and ab initio numerical simulations we explore GBs on the surface of graphite and elucidate the interconnection between the local density of states and their atomic structure. We show that the electronic fingerprints of these GBs consist of pronounced resonances which, depending on the relative orientation of the adjacent crystallites, appear either on the electron side of the spectrum or as an electron-hole symmetric doublet close to the charge neutrality point. These two types of spectral features will impact very differently the transport properties allowing, in the asymmetric case to introduce transport anisotropy which could be utilized to design novel growth and fabrication strategies to control device performance.

  17. Structural physiology based on electron crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2011-01-01

    There are many questions in brain science, which are extremely interesting but very difficult to answer. For example, how do education and other experiences during human development influence the ability and personality of the adult? The molecular mechanisms underlying such phenomena are still totally unclear. However, technological and instrumental advancements of electron microscopy have facilitated comprehension of the structures of biological components, cells, and organelles. Electron crystallography is especially good for studying the structure and function of membrane proteins, which are key molecules of signal transduction in neural and other cells. Electron crystallography is now an established technique to analyze the structures of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers, which are close to their natural biological environment. By utilizing cryo-electron microscopes with helium cooled specimen stages, which were developed through a personal motivation to understand functions of neural systems from a structural point of view, structures of membrane proteins were analyzed at a resolution higher than 3 Å. This review has four objectives. First, it is intended to introduce the new research field of structural physiology. Second, it introduces some of the personal struggles, which were involved in developing the cryo-electron microscope. Third, it discusses some of the technology for the structural analysis of membrane proteins based on cryo-electron microscopy. Finally, it reviews structural and functional analyses of membrane proteins. PMID:21416541

  18. Structure and electronic properties of lead-selenide nanocrystal solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitham, Kevin

    Recent advances in the controlled formation of nanocrystal superlattices have potential for creating materials with properties by design. The ability to tune nanocrystal size, shape and composition as well as symmetry of the superlattice opens routes to new materials. Calculations of such materials predict interesting electronic phenomena including topological states and Dirac cones, however experimental support is lacking. We have investigated electron localization in nanocrystal superlattices using a combination of advanced structural characterization techniques and charge transport measurements. Recent experimental efforts to improve the electronic properties of nanocrystal solids have focused on increasing inter-dot coupling. However, this approach only leads to electronic bands if the coupling energy can overcome energetic and translational disorder. We have investigated oriented-attachment as a method to create nanocrystal superlattices with increased coupling and translational order. We show that epitaxially connected superlattices form by a coherent phase transformation that is sensitive to structural defects and ligand length. In order to measure intrinsic electronic properties we demonstrate control over electronic defects by tailoring surface chemistry and device architecture. To probe charge transport in these structures we performed variable temperature field-effect measurements. By integrating structure analysis, surface chemistry, and transport measurements we find that carriers are localized to a few superlattice constants due to disorder. Importantly, our analysis shows that greater delocalization is possible by optimizing dot-to-dot bonding, thus providing a path forward to create quantum dot solids in which theoretically predicted properties can be realized.

  19. Frequency based localization of structural discrepancies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, G. D.; Milani, J.

    1988-01-01

    The intent of modal analysis is to develop a reliable model of a structure by working with the analytical and experimental modal properties of frequency, damping and mode shape. In addition to identifying these modal properties, it would be desirable to determine spatially which parts of the structure are modelled poorly or well. It is shown how the pattern of discrepancies in the analytical and experimental test values for the pole and the driving point zero frequencies of a structure can be linked to discrepancies in the mass or stiffness of the structural elements. The success of the procedure depends on the numerical conditioning of a modal reference matrix. Strategies to insure adequate numerical conditioning require a formulation which avoids geometric and energy storage symmetries of the structure, and ignores structural elements which contribute negligibly small potential or kinetic energy to the excited modes. Physical insight into the numerical conditioning problem is provided by a numerical example and by localization of a mass discrepancy in a real structure based on lab tests.

  20. The Structure of the Local Hot Bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Chiao, M.; Collier, M. R.; Cravens, T.; Galeazzi, M.; Koutroumpa, D.; Kuntz, K. D.; Lallement, R.; Lepri, S. T.; McCammon, D.; Morgan, K.; Porter, F. S.; Snowden, S. L.; Thomas, N. E.; Uprety, Y.; Ursino, E.; Walsh, B. M.

    2017-01-01

    Diffuse X-rays from the Local Galaxy (DXL) is a sounding rocket mission designed to quantify and characterize the contribution of Solar Wind Charge eXchange (SWCX) to the Diffuse X-ray Background and study the properties of the Local Hot Bubble (LHB). Based on the results from the DXL mission, we quantified and removed the contribution of SWCX to the diffuse X-ray background measured by the ROSAT All Sky Survey. The “cleaned” maps were used to investigate the physical properties of the LHB. Assuming thermal ionization equilibrium, we measured a highly uniform temperature distributed around kT = 0.097 keV ± 0.013 keV (FWHM) ± 0.006 keV (systematic). We also generated a thermal emission measure map and used it to characterize the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the LHB, which we found to be in good agreement with the structure of the local cavity measured from dust and gas.

  1. Instructional Approach to Molecular Electronic Structure Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dykstra, Clifford E.; Schaefer, Henry F.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a graduate quantum mechanics projects in which students write a computer program that performs ab initio calculations on the electronic structure of a simple molecule. Theoretical potential energy curves are produced. (MLH)

  2. Computational Chemistry Using Modern Electronic Structure Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Stephen; Dines, Trevor J.; Chowdhry, Babur Z.; Withnall, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Various modern electronic structure methods are now days used to teach computational chemistry to undergraduate students. Such quantum calculations can now be easily used even for large size molecules.

  3. Electronic structure and isomer shifts of neptunium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svane, A.; Petit, L.; Temmerman, W. M.; Szotek, Z.

    2002-08-01

    The electronic structures of αNp metal and 28 Np compounds are calculated with the generalized gradient approximation to density-functional theory, implemented with the full-potential linear-muffin-tin-orbital method. The calculations are compared to experimental isomer shifts providing a calibration of the 237Np isomeric transition with a value of Δ=(-40.1+/-1.3)×10- 3 fm2 for the difference in nuclear radius between the excited isomeric level and the ground state. The isomer shift is primarily determined by the chemical environment. Decreasing the volume, either by external or chemical pressure, causes an f-->s+d charge transfer on Np, which leads to a higher electron contact density. The possible f-electron localization in Np compounds is discussed using self-interaction corrections, and it is concluded that f-electron localization has only a minor influence on the isomer shift.

  4. Crossed Andreev Reflection and Spin-Resolved Non-local Electron Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalenkov, Mikhail S.; Zaikin, Andrei D.

    The phenomenon of crossed Andreev reflection (CAR) is known to play a key role in non-local electron transport across three-terminal normal-superconducting-normal (NSN) devices. Here, we review our general theory of non-local charge transport in three-terminal disordered ferromagnet-superconductor-ferromagnet (FSF) structures. We demonstrate that CAR is highly sensitive to electron spins and yields a rich variety of properties of non-local conductance, which we describe non-perturbatively at arbitrary voltages, temperature, degree of disorder, spin-dependent interface transmissions and their polarizations. We demonstrate that magnetic effects have different implications: While strong exchange field suppresses disorder-induced electron interference in ferromagnetic electrodes, spin-sensitive electron scattering at SF interfaces can drive the total non-local conductance negative at sufficiently low energies. At higher energies, magnetic effects become less important and the non-local resistance behaves similarly to the non-magnetic case. Our results can be applied to multi-terminal hybrid structures with normal, ferromagnetic and half-metallic electrodes and can be directly tested in future experiments.

  5. Controlling the Electronic Structure of Bilayer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Taisuke; Bostwick, Aaron; Seyller, Thomas; Horn, Karsten; Rotenberg, Eli

    2006-08-01

    We describe the synthesis of bilayer graphene thin films deposited on insulating silicon carbide and report the characterization of their electronic band structure using angle-resolved photoemission. By selectively adjusting the carrier concentration in each layer, changes in the Coulomb potential led to control of the gap between valence and conduction bands. This control over the band structure suggests the potential application of bilayer graphene to switching functions in atomic-scale electronic devices.

  6. A mapping of the electron localization function for earth materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, G. V.; Cox, D. F.; Ross, N. L.; Crawford, T. D.; Burt, J. B.; Rosso, K. M.

    2005-06-01

    The electron localization function, ELF, generated for a number of geometry-optimized earth materials, provides a graphical representation of the spatial localization of the probability electron density distribution as embodied in domains ascribed to localized bond and lone pair electrons. The lone pair domains, displayed by the silica polymorphs quartz, coesite and cristobalite, are typically banana-shaped and oriented perpendicular to the plane of the SiOSi angle at ~0.60 Å from the O atom on the reflex side of the angle. With decreasing angle, the domains increase in magnitude, indicating an increase in the nucleophilic character of the O atom, rendering it more susceptible to potential electrophilic attack. The Laplacian isosurface maps of the experimental and theoretical electron density distribution for coesite substantiates the increase in the size of the domain with decreasing angle. Bond pair domains are displayed along each of the SiO bond vectors as discrete concave hemispherically-shaped domains at ~0.70 Å from the O atom. For more closed-shell ionic bonded interactions, the bond and lone pair domains are often coalesced, resulting in concave hemispherical toroidal-shaped domains with local maxima centered along the bond vectors. As the shared covalent character of the bonded interactions increases, the bond and lone pair domains are better developed as discrete domains. ELF isosurface maps generated for the earth materials tremolite, diopside, talc and dickite display banana-shaped lone pair domains associated with the bridging O atoms of SiOSi angles and concave hemispherical toroidal bond pair domains associated with the nonbridging ones. The lone pair domains in dickite and talc provide a basis for understanding the bonded interactions between the adjacent neutral layers. Maps were also generated for beryl, cordierite, quartz, low albite, forsterite, wadeite, åkermanite, pectolite, periclase, hurlbutite, thortveitite and vanthoffite. Strategies

  7. A Mapping of the Electron Localization Function for Earth Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Gerald V.; Cox, David F.; Ross, Nancy; Crawford, T Daniel; Burt, Jason; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2005-06-01

    The electron localization function, ELF, generated for a number of geometry-optimized earth materials, provides a graphical representation of the spatial localization of the probability electron density distribution as embodied in domains ascribed to localized bond and lone pair electrons. The lone pair domains, displayed by the silica polymorphs quartz, coesite and cristobalite, are typically banana-shaped and oriented perpendicular to the plane of the SiOSi angle at ~0.60 Å from the O atom on the reflex side of the angle. With decreasing angle, the domains increase in magnitude, indicating an increase in the nucleophilic character of the O atom, rendering it more susceptible to potential electrophilic attack. The Laplacian isosurface maps of the experimental and theoretical electron density distribution for coesite substantiates the increase in the size of the domain with decreasing angle. Bond pair domains are displayed along each of the SiO bond vectors as discrete concave hemispherically-shaped domains at ~0.70 Å from the O atom. For more closed-shell ionic bonded interactions, the bond and lone pair domains are often coalesced, resulting in concave hemispherical toroidal-shaped domains with local maxima centered along the bond vectors. As the shared covalent character of the bonded interactions increases, the bond and lone pair domains are better developed as discrete domains. ELF isosurface maps generated for the earth materials tremolite, diopside, talc and dickite display banana-shaped lone pair domains associated with the bridging O atoms of SiOSi angles and concave hemispherical toroidal bond pair domains associated with the nonbridging ones. The lone pair domains in dickite and talc provide a basis for understanding the bonded interactions between the adjacent neutral layers. Maps were also generated for beryl, cordierite, quartz, low albite, forsterite, wadeite, åkermanite, pectolite, periclase, hurlbutite, thortveitite and vanthoffite. Strategies

  8. Electronic structure and enthalpy of hydrogen and helium mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, M.; Klepeis, J. E.; Schafer, K. J.; Barbee, T. W., III

    1992-11-01

    The first local density approximation (LDA) calculations of the electronic structure, equation of state, and enthalpy of mixing were carried out for a number of different compositions of hydrogen and helium in bcc and fcc lattices. These are fully quantum mechanical, self-consistent calculations utilizing state-of-the-art methods of electron band theory, which make no assumptions regarding pressure ionization. The major approximation in the LDA method is that the exchange and correlation energy is given by a free electron functional in terms of the local electron density. The majority of previous mixture calculations start with the assumption that both hydrogen and helium are pressure-ionized so that the electronic structure is approximately that of free or weakly screened electrons in the presence of positive ions. Stevenson used a hard-sphere mixture model for the ions with an ion-ion pseudopotential to account for electron screening and predicted that a mixture containing 7% helium by number, the composition believed to be present in Jupiter and Saturn, would phase separate at a temperature of about 7000 K at 8 Mbar. Subsequent calculations carried out for the fully ionized mixture and for a mixture of screened ions (linear response theory) have all arrived at predictions similar to those of Stevenson. MacFarlane and Hubbard performed Thomas-Fermi-Dirac calculations for mixing enthalpies of hydrogen and helium in bcc and fcc lattices and predicted that phase separation would not occur at any temperature.

  9. Electron-interface phonon interaction in multiple quantum well structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J. P.; Teng, H. B.; Haddad, G. I.; Stroscio, M. A.

    1998-08-01

    Intersubband relaxation rates due to electron interactions with the interface phonons are evaluated for multiple quantum well structures designed for step quantum well lasers operating at mid-infrared to submillimetre wavelengths. The interface phonon modes and electron-phonon interaction Hamiltonians for the structures are derived using the transfer matrix method, based on the macroscopic dielectric continuum model, whereas the electron wavefunctions are obtained by solving the Schrödinger equation. Fermi's golden rule is employed to calculate the electron relaxation rates between the subbands in these structures. The relaxation rates for two different structures are examined and compared with those calculated using the bulk phonon modes and the Fröhlich interaction Hamiltonian. The sum rule for the relationship between the form factors of the various localized phonon modes and the bulk phonon modes is verified. The results obtained in this work illustrate that the transfer matrix method provides a convenient way for deriving the properties of the interface phonon modes in different structures of current interest and that, for preferential electron relaxation in intersubband laser structures, the effects of the interface phonon modes are significant and should be considered for optimal design of these laser structures.

  10. Foil support structure for large electron guns

    SciTech Connect

    Brucker, J.P.; Rose, E.A.

    1993-08-01

    This paper describes a novel support structure for a vacuum diode used to pump a gaseous laser with an electron beam. Conventional support structures are designed to hold a foil flat and rigid. This new structure takes advantage of the significantly greater strength of metals in pure tension, utilizing curved shapes for both foil and support structure. The shape of the foil is comparable to the skin of a balloon, and the shape of the support structures is comparable to the cables of a suspension bridge. This design allows a significant reduction in foil thickness and support structure mass, resulting in a lower electron-beam loss between diode and laser gas. In addition, the foil is pre-formed in the support structure at pressures higher than operating pressure. Therefore, the foil is operated far from the yield point. Increased reliability is anticipated.

  11. Variability of Protein Structure Models from Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Monroe, Lyman; Terashi, Genki; Kihara, Daisuke

    2017-03-02

    An increasing number of biomolecular structures are solved by electron microscopy (EM). However, the quality of structure models determined from EM maps vary substantially. To understand to what extent structure models are supported by information embedded in EM maps, we used two computational structure refinement methods to examine how much structures can be refined using a dataset of 49 maps with accompanying structure models. The extent of structure modification as well as the disagreement between refinement models produced by the two computational methods scaled inversely with the global and the local map resolutions. A general quantitative estimation of deviations of structures for particular map resolutions are provided. Our results indicate that the observed discrepancy between the deposited map and the refined models is due to the lack of structural information present in EM maps and thus these annotations must be used with caution for further applications.

  12. Plasmonic hot electron transport drives nano-localized chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Cortés, Emiliano; Xie, Wei; Cambiasso, Javier; Jermyn, Adam S.; Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Narang, Prineha; Schlücker, Sebastian; Maier, Stefan A.

    2017-01-01

    Nanoscale localization of electromagnetic fields near metallic nanostructures underpins the fundamentals and applications of plasmonics. The unavoidable energy loss from plasmon decay, initially seen as a detriment, has now expanded the scope of plasmonic applications to exploit the generated hot carriers. However, quantitative understanding of the spatial localization of these hot carriers, akin to electromagnetic near-field maps, has been elusive. Here we spatially map hot-electron-driven reduction chemistry with 15 nm resolution as a function of time and electromagnetic field polarization for different plasmonic nanostructures. We combine experiments employing a six-electron photo-recycling process that modify the terminal group of a self-assembled monolayer on plasmonic silver nanoantennas, with theoretical predictions from first-principles calculations of non-equilibrium hot-carrier transport in these systems. The resulting localization of reactive regions, determined by hot-carrier transport from high-field regions, paves the way for improving efficiency in hot-carrier extraction science and nanoscale regio-selective surface chemistry. PMID:28348402

  13. Plasmonic hot electron transport drives nano-localized chemistry.

    PubMed

    Cortés, Emiliano; Xie, Wei; Cambiasso, Javier; Jermyn, Adam S; Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Narang, Prineha; Schlücker, Sebastian; Maier, Stefan A

    2017-03-28

    Nanoscale localization of electromagnetic fields near metallic nanostructures underpins the fundamentals and applications of plasmonics. The unavoidable energy loss from plasmon decay, initially seen as a detriment, has now expanded the scope of plasmonic applications to exploit the generated hot carriers. However, quantitative understanding of the spatial localization of these hot carriers, akin to electromagnetic near-field maps, has been elusive. Here we spatially map hot-electron-driven reduction chemistry with 15 nm resolution as a function of time and electromagnetic field polarization for different plasmonic nanostructures. We combine experiments employing a six-electron photo-recycling process that modify the terminal group of a self-assembled monolayer on plasmonic silver nanoantennas, with theoretical predictions from first-principles calculations of non-equilibrium hot-carrier transport in these systems. The resulting localization of reactive regions, determined by hot-carrier transport from high-field regions, paves the way for improving efficiency in hot-carrier extraction science and nanoscale regio-selective surface chemistry.

  14. Electronic and optical properties of novel carbon structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Manyalibo Joseph

    Novel carbon structures in the form of fullerenes and disordered carbon clusters offer a wide variety of physical systems, possessing both long or short range order, which can generally be tuned through non- combustive heat-treatment at various elevated temperatures, THT. Due to the sheer complexity and diversity of the possible nanoscale arrangements, the optical and electronic properties of carbon structures with finite dimensions and crystallinity are still not fully understood. In this study, we focus mainly on the structures produced from carbonization of the hydrocarbon polymer polyparaphenylene (PPP), but we also present experimental results from carbons based on other precursors (e.g. mesophase pitch) which yield quite different structures with both comparable and contrasting physical properties. In terms of electronic properties, we show that in the low-THT PPP-based structures, which exemplify extreme disorder, the electronic states are strongly localized, giving rise to a Mott T1/4 hopping conductivity and self-trapped spin defects AS evidenced by low-temperature transport and electron spin resonance experiments. Electronic transitions which give rise to ~2-3 eV photoluminescent emissions in PPP-based structures are found to be influenced most strongly by residual semi-localized polymeric states which weakly couple to low-frequency PPP phonon modes. However, at intermediate heat-treatment temperatures (THT~ 1500[-]2500oC), all sp2-bonded carbon compounds in this study exhibit a characteristic phonon spectrum (as evidenced by Raman spectroscopy) in which disorder may be characterized by non-zone-center phonon scattering arising from finite crystallite sizes. Because of its intimate connection to carrier confinement and structural disorder, the anomalous 'disorder-induced' graphite D-band is thoroughly investigated by use of Raman spectroscopy, showing that strong dispersion effects are due to a photon-phonon coupling mediated by electronic transitions

  15. Symmetry breaking and hole localization in multiple core electron ionization.

    PubMed

    Carravetta, V; Ågren, H

    2013-08-08

    Motivated by recent opportunitites to study hollow molecules with multiple core holes offered by X-ray free electron lasers, we revisit the core-hole localization and symmetry breaking problem, now studying ionization of more than one core electron. It is shown, using a N2 molecule with one, two, three, and four core holes, for example, that in a multiconfigurational determination of the core ionization potentials employing a molecular point group with broken inversion symmetry, one particular configuration is sufficient to account for the symmetry breaking relaxation energy in an independent particle approximation in the case of one or three holes, whereas the choice of point group symmetry is unessential for two and four holes. The relaxation energy follows a quadratic dependence on the number of holes in both representations.

  16. The local electron affinity for non-minimal basis sets.

    PubMed

    Clark, Timothy

    2010-07-01

    A technique known as intensity filtering is introduced to select valence-like virtual orbitals for calculating the local electron affinity, EA(L). Intensity filtering allows EA(L) to be calculated using semiempirical molecular orbital techniques that include polarisation functions. Without intensity filtering, such techniques yield spurious EA(L) values that are dominated by the polarisation functions. As intensity filtering should also be applicable for ab initio or density functional theory calculations with large basis sets, it also makes EA(L) available for these techniques.

  17. Localization and structure of carbonaceous deposits on reforming catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Espinat, D.; Freund, E.; Martino, G. ); Dexpert, H. , Orsay )

    1990-12-01

    The aging of alumina-supported Pt-containing reforming catalysts by coke deposition has previously been extensively investigated. In the present work, a large number of techniques including optical and electron microscopy have been used to determine both the localization and the structure of the so-called coke (carbonaceous deposits) formed during the normal operation of these catalysts. The coke is not uniformly deposited on the surface of the catalysts. Its structure is not uniform for a given catalyst, and depends on the operating condition (especially the H{sub 2}/hydrocarbon ratio) as well as the composition of the metallic phase (pure platinum or multimetallic alloy). The structure is always rather well organized (pregraphitic) even at the onset of coke deposition.

  18. Electronic Structure and Phase Stability of PdPt Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ishimoto, Takayoshi; Koyama, Michihisa

    2016-03-03

    To understand the origin of the physicochemical nature of bimetallic PdPt nanoparticles, we theoretically investigated the phase stability and electronic structure employing the PdPt nanoparticles models consisting of 711 atoms (ca. 3 nm). For the Pd-Pt core-shell nanoparticle, the PdPt solid-solution phase was found to be a thermodynamically stable phase in the nanoparticle as the result of difference in surface energy of Pd and Pt nanoparticles and configurational entropy effect, while it is well known that the Pd and Pt are the immiscible combination in the bulk phase. The electronic structure of nanoparticles is conducted to find that the electron transfer occurs locally within surface and subsurface layers. In addition, the electron transfer from Pd to Pt at the interfacial layers in core-shell nanoparticles is observed, which leads to unique geometrical and electronic structure changes. Our results show a clue for the tunability of the electronic structure of nanoparticles by controlling the arrangement in the nanoparticles.

  19. Electronic structure and polarizability of metallic nanoshells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prodan, E.; Nordlander, P.

    2002-01-01

    An efficient method for the calculation of the electronic structure of metallic nanoshells is developed. The method is applied to a large nanoshell (of 10 nm in diameter) containing more than 2.5×10 4 conduction electrons. The calculations show that the density of states of the nanoshell is relatively bulk-like. The frequency dependent polarizability is calculated and shown to display strong confinement effects and features similar to what is predicted by semi-classical electrodynamic theory.

  20. Software abstractions and computational issues in parallel structure adaptive mesh methods for electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, S.; Weare, J.; Ong, E.; Baden, S.

    1997-05-01

    We have applied structured adaptive mesh refinement techniques to the solution of the LDA equations for electronic structure calculations. Local spatial refinement concentrates memory resources and numerical effort where it is most needed, near the atomic centers and in regions of rapidly varying charge density. The structured grid representation enables us to employ efficient iterative solver techniques such as conjugate gradient with FAC multigrid preconditioning. We have parallelized our solver using an object- oriented adaptive mesh refinement framework.

  1. Computation of Local and Global Properties of the Electron Localization Function Topology in Crystals.

    PubMed

    Contreras-García, J; Pendás, A Martín; Recio, J M; Silvi, B

    2009-01-13

    We present a novel computational procedure, general, automated, and robust, for the analysis of local and global properties of the electron localization function (ELF) in crystalline solids. Our algorithm successfully faces the two main shortcomings of the ELF analysis in crystals: (i) the automated identification and characterization of the ELF induced topology in periodic systems, which is impeded by the great number and concentration of critical points in crystalline cells, and (ii) the localization of the zero flux surfaces and subsequent integration of basins, whose difficulty is due to the diverse (in many occasions very flat or very steep) ELF profiles connecting the set of critical points. Application of the new code to representative crystals exhibiting different bonding patterns is carried out in order to show the performance of the algorithm and the conceptual possibilities offered by the complete characterization of the ELF topology in solids.

  2. Creating and Probing Graphene Electron Optics with Local Scanning Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroscio, Joseph

    Ballistic propagation and the light-like dispersion of graphene charge carriers make graphene an attractive platform for optics-inspired graphene electronics where gate tunable potentials can control electron refraction and transmission. In analogy to optical wave propagation in lenses, mirrors and metamaterials, gate potentials can be used to create a negative index of refraction for Veselago lensing and Fabry-Pérot interferometers. In circular geometries, gate potentials can induce whispering gallery modes (WGM), similar to optical and acoustic whispering galleries albeit on a much smaller length scale. Klein scattering of Dirac carriers plays a central role in determining the coherent propagation of electron waves in these resonators. In this talk, I examine the probing of electron resonators in graphene confined by linear and circular gate potentials with the scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The tip in the STM tunnel junction serves both as a tunable local gate potential, and as a probe of the graphene states through tunneling spectroscopy. A combination of a back gate potential, Vg, and tip potential, Vb, creates and controls a circular pn junction that confines the WGM graphene states. The resonances are observed in two separate channels in the tunneling spectroscopy experiment: first, by directly tunneling into the state at the bias energy eVb, and, second, by tunneling from the resonance at the Fermi level as the state is gated by the tip potential. The second channel produces a fan-like set of WGM peaks, reminiscent of the fringes seen in planar geometries by transport measurements. The WGM resonances split in a small applied magnetic field, with a large energy splitting approaching the WGM spacing at 0.5 T. These results agree well with recent theory on Klein scattering in graphene electron resonators. This work is done in collaboration with Y. Zhao, J. Wyrick, F.D. Natterer, J. F. Rodriquez-Nieva, C. Lewandoswski, K. Watanabe, T. Taniguchi, N. B

  3. Defect Induced Electronic Structure of Uranofullerene

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xing; Cheng, Cheng; Zhang, Wei; Xin, Minsi; Huai, Ping; Zhang, Ruiqin; Wang, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    The interaction between the inner atoms/cluster and the outer fullerene cage is the source of various novel properties of endohedral metallofullerenes. Herein, we introduce an adatom-type spin polarization defect on the surface of a typical endohedral stable U2@C60 to predict the associated structure and electronic properties of U2@C61 based on the density functional theory method. We found that defect induces obvious changes in the electronic structure of this metallofullerene. More interestingly, the ground state of U2@C61 is nonet spin in contrast to the septet of U2@C60. Electronic structure analysis shows that the inner U atoms and the C ad-atom on the surface of the cage contribute together to this spin state, which is brought about by a ferromagnetic coupling between the spin of the unpaired electrons of the U atoms and the C ad-atom. This discovery may provide a possible approach to adapt the electronic structure properties of endohedral metallofullerenes. PMID:23439318

  4. Electronic structure of Gd-doped MgO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukoyanov, A. V.; Anisimov, V. I.

    2016-02-01

    The electronic structure of Gd-doped MgO is investigated using the LSDA+U (local spin density approximation with U-correction) method and compared with the MgO structure. The total density of states obtained accounting for the correlation effects in the 4 f shell of gadolinium is found to be formed by the oxygen 2 p states at the valence band and the 4 f gadolinium occupied states, while the conduction band is represented by a mixture of empty electronic states. Magnetic properties of the calculated Gd-doped MgO are found to be formed solely by the Gd-4 f-magnetic moment of about 7μB, in good agreement with recent experimental results suggesting a ferromagnetic coupling of the local magnetic moments induced by Gd.

  5. Boron Fullerenes: An Electronic Structure Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadrzadeh, Arta; Pupysheva, Olga; Boustani, Ihsan; Yakobson, Boris

    2008-03-01

    Using ab initio calculations, we study electronic structure and frequency modes of B80, a member of boron fullerene family made from boron isomorphs of carbon fullerenes with additional atoms in the centers of hexagons. We also investigate geometrical and electronic structural properties of double-rings with various diameters, which are important as building blocks of boron nanotubes, and as the most stable clusters among the studied isomers with no more than 36 atoms. Double-rings also appear as building blocks of B80. Furthermore, we investigate the possibility of further stabilizing some of fullerenes by depleting them.

  6. The Electronic Structure of Heavy Element Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bursten, Bruce E.

    2000-07-25

    The area of study is the bonding in heavy element complexes, and the application of more sophisticated electronic structure theories. Progress is recounted in several areas: (a) technological advances and current methodologies - Relativistic effects are extremely important in gaining an understanding of the electronic structure of compounds of the actinides, transactinides, and other heavy elements. Therefore, a major part of the continual benchmarking was the proper inclusion of the appropriate relativistic effects for the properties under study. (b) specific applications - These include organoactinide sandwich complexes, CO activation by actinide atoms, and theoretical studies of molecules of the transactinide elements. Finally, specific directions in proposed research are described.

  7. First-Principles-Based Method for Electron Localization: Application to Monolayer Hexagonal Boron Nitride.

    PubMed

    Ekuma, C E; Dobrosavljević, V; Gunlycke, D

    2017-03-10

    We present a first-principles-based many-body typical medium dynamical cluster approximation and density function theory method for characterizing electron localization in disordered structures. This method applied to monolayer hexagonal boron nitride shows that the presence of boron vacancies could turn this wide-gap insulator into a correlated metal. Depending on the strength of the electron interactions, these calculations suggest that conduction could be obtained at a boron vacancy concentration as low as 1.0%. We also explore the distribution of the local density of states, a fingerprint of spatial variations, which allows localized and delocalized states to be distinguished. The presented method enables the study of disorder-driven insulator-metal transitions not only in h-BN but also in other physical materials.

  8. First-Principles-Based Method for Electron Localization: Application to Monolayer Hexagonal Boron Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekuma, C. E.; Dobrosavljević, V.; Gunlycke, D.

    2017-03-01

    We present a first-principles-based many-body typical medium dynamical cluster approximation and density function theory method for characterizing electron localization in disordered structures. This method applied to monolayer hexagonal boron nitride shows that the presence of boron vacancies could turn this wide-gap insulator into a correlated metal. Depending on the strength of the electron interactions, these calculations suggest that conduction could be obtained at a boron vacancy concentration as low as 1.0%. We also explore the distribution of the local density of states, a fingerprint of spatial variations, which allows localized and delocalized states to be distinguished. The presented method enables the study of disorder-driven insulator-metal transitions not only in h -BN but also in other physical materials.

  9. Characterizing the Locality of Diabatic States for Electronic Excitation Transfer by Decomposing the Diabatic Coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Vura-Weis, Josh; Newton, M. D.; Wasielewski, Michael R; Subotnik, J.E.

    2010-12-09

    A common strategy to calculate electronic coupling matrix elements for charge or energy transfer is to take the adiabatic states generated by electronic structure computations and rotate them to form localized diabatic states. In this paper, we show that, for intermolecular transfer of singlet electronic excitation, usually we cannot fully localize the electronic excitations in this way. Instead, we calculate putative initial and final states with small excitation tails caused by weak interactions with high energy excited states in the electronic manifold. These tails do not lead to substantial changes in the total diabatic coupling between states, but they do lead to a different partitioning of the total coupling between Coulomb (Förster), exchange (Dexter), and one-electron components. The tails may be reduced by using a multistate diabatic model or eliminated entirely by truncation (denoted as “chopping”). Without more information, we are unable to conclude with certainty whether the observed diabatic tails are a physical reality or a computational artifact. This research suggests that decomposition of the diabatic coupling between chromophores into Coulomb, exchange, and one-electron components may depend strongly on the number of states considered, and such results should be treated with caution.

  10. Structural and electronic properties of small silicon clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baturin, V. S.; Lepeshkin, S. V.; Magnitskaya, M. V.; Matsko, N. L.; Uspenskii, Yu A.

    2014-05-01

    The atomic structure and electronic spectrum of silicon nanoclusters (Si-ncs) Si7, Si10,Si10H16 and Si10H20 are calculated using the evolutionary algorithm with total energy computed within density functional theory and generalized gradient approximation (DFT-GGA). When analysing the low-energy structures, we pay significant attention to their symmetry and interatomic bond geometry. The candidate structures arising in the process of evolutionary algorithm convergence are also considered and classified by their topology and grouping near local energy minima. Possible ways to improve the convergence of evolutionary computation are discussed. Addressing qualitative criteria for the ground-state atomic structure of Si-ncs, we consider correlations between the density of electronic states and the total energetics of clusters in the ground state and low-energy-isomer configurations.

  11. Electron localization in a mixed-valence diniobium benzene complex

    DOE PAGES

    Gianetti, Thomas L.; Nocton, Grégory; Minasian, Stefan G.; ...

    2014-11-11

    Reaction of the neutral diniobium benzene complex {[Nb(BDI)NtBu]2(μ-C6H6)} (BDI = N,N'-diisopropylbenzene-β-diketiminate) with Ag[B(C6F5)4] results in a single electron oxidation to produce a cationic diniobium arene complex, {[Nb(BDI)NtBu]2(μ-C6H6)}{B(C6F5)4}. Investigation of the solid state and solution phase structure using single-crystal X-ray diffraction, cyclic voltammetry, magnetic susceptibility, and multinuclear NMR spectroscopy indicates that the oxidation results in an asymmetric molecule with two chemically inequivalent Nb atoms. Further characterization using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, UV-visible, Nb L3,2-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), and EPR spectroscopies supports assignment of a diniobium complex, in which one Nb atom carries a single unpaired electron that ismore » not largely delocalized on the second Nb atom. During the oxidative transformation, one electron is removed from the δ-bonding HOMO, which causes a destabilization of the molecule and formation of an asymmetric product. Subsequent reactivity studies indicate that the oxidized product allows access to metal-based chemistry with substrates that did not exhibit reactivity with the starting neutral complex.« less

  12. Electron localization in a mixed-valence diniobium benzene complex

    SciTech Connect

    Gianetti, Thomas L.; Nocton, Grégory; Minasian, Stefan G.; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Kozimor, Stosh A.; Shuh, David K.; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Bergman, Robert G.; Arnold, John

    2014-11-11

    Reaction of the neutral diniobium benzene complex {[Nb(BDI)NtBu]2(μ-C6H6)} (BDI = N,N'-diisopropylbenzene-β-diketiminate) with Ag[B(C6F5)4] results in a single electron oxidation to produce a cationic diniobium arene complex, {[Nb(BDI)NtBu]2(μ-C6H6)}{B(C6F5)4}. Investigation of the solid state and solution phase structure using single-crystal X-ray diffraction, cyclic voltammetry, magnetic susceptibility, and multinuclear NMR spectroscopy indicates that the oxidation results in an asymmetric molecule with two chemically inequivalent Nb atoms. Further characterization using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, UV-visible, Nb L3,2-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), and EPR spectroscopies supports assignment of a diniobium complex, in which one Nb atom carries a single unpaired electron that is not largely delocalized on the second Nb atom. During the oxidative transformation, one electron is removed from the δ-bonding HOMO, which causes a destabilization of the molecule and formation of an asymmetric product. Subsequent reactivity studies indicate that the oxidized product allows access to metal-based chemistry with substrates that did not exhibit reactivity with the starting neutral complex.

  13. Structural and electronic properties of a tetrahedral amorphous carbon surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jianjun; Drabold, D. A.

    1997-03-01

    We present ab initio studies of a model of tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) surface. Our methodology is LDA (with Harris functional and local basis) molecular dynamics simulations. The surface is modeled by a 216 atom slab supercell. Several candidate slabs are constructed by starting with the DTW model (B.R. Djordjevic, M.F. Thorpe and F. Wooten, Phys. Rev. B 52) 5685 (1995) and applying various simulated heating/quenching cycles. We analyze the structural and electronic properties of the surface , with special attention forcused on the electronic signatures of surface structural defects. Preliminary results indicate that the surface layer significantly graphitizes, and many surface gap states are present in the electronic density of states.

  14. Evidence of local power deposition and electron heating by a standing electromagnetic wave in electron-cyclotron-resonance plasma.

    PubMed

    Durocher-Jean, A; Stafford, L; Dap, S; Makasheva, K; Clergereaux, R

    2014-09-01

    Microwave plasmas excited at electron-cyclotron resonance were studied in the 0.5-15 mTorr pressure range. In contrast with low-limit pressure conditions where the plasma emission highlights a fairly homogeneous spatial structure, a periodic spatial modulation (period ∼6.2 cm) appeared as pressure increased. This feature is ascribed to a local power deposition (related to the electron density) due to the presence of a standing electromagnetic wave created by the feed electromagnetic field (2.45 GHz) in the cavity formed by the reactor walls. Analysis of the electron energy probability function by Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy further revealed the presence of a high-energy tail that showed strong periodic spatial modulation at higher pressure. The spatial evolution of the electron density and of the characteristic temperature of these high-energy electrons coincides with the nodes (maximum) and antinodes (minimum) of the standing wave. These spatially-modulated power deposition and electron heating mechanisms are then discussed.

  15. Electronic and structural properties of functional nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Teng

    In this Thesis, I present a study of electronic and structural properties of functional nanostructures such as MoSxIy nanowires, self-assembled monolayer on top of metallic surfaces and structural changes induced in graphite by photo excitations. MoSxI y nanowires, which can be easily synthesized in one step, show many advantages over conventional carbon nanotubes in molecular electronics and many other applications. But how to self-assemble them into desired pattern for practical electronic network? Self-assembled monolayers of polymers on metallic surfaces may help to guide pattern formation of some nanomaterials such as MoSxIy nanowires. I have investigated the physical properties of these nanoscale wires and microscopic self-assembly mechanisms of patterns by total energy calculations combined with molecular dynamics simulations and structure optimization. First, I studied the stability of novel Molybdenum chaicohalide nanowires, a candidate for molecular electronics applications. Next, I investigated the self-assembly of nanoparticles into ordered arrays with the aid of a template. Such templates, I showed, can be formed by polymer adsorption on surfaces such as highly ordered pyrolytic graphite and Ag(111). Finally, I studied the physical origin of of structural changes induced in graphite by light in form of a femtosecond laser pulse.

  16. Structure refinement from precession electron diffraction data.

    PubMed

    Palatinus, Lukáš; Jacob, Damien; Cuvillier, Priscille; Klementová, Mariana; Sinkler, Wharton; Marks, Laurence D

    2013-03-01

    Electron diffraction is a unique tool for analysing the crystal structures of very small crystals. In particular, precession electron diffraction has been shown to be a useful method for ab initio structure solution. In this work it is demonstrated that precession electron diffraction data can also be successfully used for structure refinement, if the dynamical theory of diffraction is used for the calculation of diffracted intensities. The method is demonstrated on data from three materials - silicon, orthopyroxene (Mg,Fe)(2)Si(2)O(6) and gallium-indium tin oxide (Ga,In)(4)Sn(2)O(10). In particular, it is shown that atomic occupancies of mixed crystallographic sites can be refined to an accuracy approaching X-ray or neutron diffraction methods. In comparison with conventional electron diffraction data, the refinement against precession diffraction data yields significantly lower figures of merit, higher accuracy of refined parameters, much broader radii of convergence, especially for the thickness and orientation of the sample, and significantly reduced correlations between the structure parameters. The full dynamical refinement is compared with refinement using kinematical and two-beam approximations, and is shown to be superior to the latter two.

  17. Local electron-electron interaction strength in ferromagnetic nickel determined by spin-polarized positron annihilation.

    PubMed

    Ceeh, Hubert; Weber, Josef Andreas; Weber, Josef Andreass; Böni, Peter; Leitner, Michael; Benea, Diana; Chioncel, Liviu; Ebert, Hubert; Minár, Jan; Vollhardt, Dieter; Hugenschmidt, Christoph

    2016-02-16

    We employ a positron annihilation technique, the spin-polarized two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR), to measure the spin-difference spectra of ferromagnetic nickel. The experimental data are compared with the theoretical results obtained within a combination of the local spin density approximation (LSDA) and the many-body dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT). We find that the self-energy defining the electronic correlations in Ni leads to anisotropic contributions to the momentum distribution. By direct comparison of the theoretical and experimental results we determine the strength of the local electronic interaction U in ferromagnetic Ni as 2.0 ± 0.1 eV.

  18. Local electron-electron interaction strength in ferromagnetic nickel determined by spin-polarized positron annihilation

    PubMed Central

    Ceeh, Hubert; Weber, Josef Andreass; Böni, Peter; Leitner, Michael; Benea, Diana; Chioncel, Liviu; Ebert, Hubert; Minár, Jan; Vollhardt, Dieter; Hugenschmidt, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    We employ a positron annihilation technique, the spin-polarized two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR), to measure the spin-difference spectra of ferromagnetic nickel. The experimental data are compared with the theoretical results obtained within a combination of the local spin density approximation (LSDA) and the many-body dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT). We find that the self-energy defining the electronic correlations in Ni leads to anisotropic contributions to the momentum distribution. By direct comparison of the theoretical and experimental results we determine the strength of the local electronic interaction U in ferromagnetic Ni as 2.0 ± 0.1 eV. PMID:26879249

  19. Compositional dependence of the local structure of Se{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} alloys: Electron energy-loss spectra, real-space multiple-scattering calculations, and first-principles molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Katcho, N. A.; Lomba, E.; Urones-Garrote, E.; Otero-Diaz, L. C.; Landa-Canovas, A. R.

    2006-06-01

    In this work we present an investigation on the composition dependence of the local structure in Se{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} crystalline alloys analyzing their experimental energy-loss spectra with the aid of a real-space multiple-scattering modeling approach and first-principles molecular dynamics. The concourse of this latter technique is essential for a proper modeling of the alloy spectra. From our results, it can be inferred that Se{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} alloys exhibit a high degree of substitutional disorder ruling out the existence of fully ordered alternating copolymer chains of Se and Te atoms.

  20. Electronic energy transfer: Localized operator partitioning of electronic energy in composite quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Yaser; Brumer, Paul

    2012-11-01

    A Hamiltonian based approach using spatially localized projection operators is introduced to give precise meaning to the chemically intuitive idea of the electronic energy on a quantum subsystem. This definition facilitates the study of electronic energy transfer in arbitrarily coupled quantum systems. In particular, the decomposition scheme can be applied to molecular components that are strongly interacting (with significant orbital overlap) as well as to isolated fragments. The result defines a consistent electronic energy at all internuclear distances, including the case of separated fragments, and reduces to the well-known Förster and Dexter results in their respective limits. Numerical calculations of coherent energy and charge transfer dynamics in simple model systems are presented and the effect of collisionally induced decoherence is examined.

  1. Localize.pytom: a modern webserver for cryo-electron tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hrabe, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Localize.pytom, available through http://localize.pytom.org is a webserver for the localize module in the PyTom package. It is a free website and open to all users and there is no login requirement. The server accepts tomograms as they are imaged and reconstructed by Cryo-Electron Tomography (CET) and returns densities and coordinates of candidate-macromolecules in the tomogram. Localization of macromolecules in cryo-electron tomograms is one of the key procedures to unravel structural features of imaged macromolecules. Positions of localized molecules are further used for structural analysis by single particle procedures such as fine alignment, averaging and classification. Accurate localization can be furthermore used to generate molecular atlases of whole cells. Localization uses a cross-correlation-based score and requires a reference volume as input. A reference can either be a previously detected macromolecular structure or extrapolated on the server from a specific PDB chain. Users have the option to use either coarse or fine angular sampling strategies based on uniformly distributed rotations and to accurately compensate for the CET common ‘Missing Wedge’ artefact during sampling. After completion, all candidate macromolecules cut out from the tomogram are available for download. Their coordinates are stored and available in XML format, which can be easily integrated into successive analysis steps in other software. A pre-computed average of the first one hundred macromolecules is also available for immediate download, and the user has the option to further analyse the average, based on the detected score distribution in a novel web-density viewer. PMID:25934806

  2. MAILROOM- A LOCAL AREA NETWORK ELECTRONIC MAIL PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiner, M. J.

    1994-01-01

    The Mailroom program is a Local Area Network (LAN) electronic mail program. It allows LAN users to electronically exchange notes, letters, reminders, or any sort of communication via their computer. The Mailroom program links all LAN users into a communication circle where messages can be created, sent, copied, printed, downloaded, uploaded, and deleted through a series of menu-driven screens. Mailroom includes a feature which allows users to determine if a message they have sent has been read by the receiver. Each user must be separately installed and removed from Mailroom as they join or leave the network. Mailroom comes with a program that accomplishes this with minimum of effort on the part of the Network Administrator/Manager. There is also a program that allows the Network Administrator/Manager to install Mailroom on each user's workstation so that on execution of Mailroom the user's station may be identified and the configurations settings activated. It will create its own configuration and data/supporting files during the setup and installation process. The Mailroom program is written in Microsoft QuickBasic. It was developed to run on networked IBM XT/ATs or compatibles and requires that all participating workstations share a common drive. It has been implemented under DOS 3.2 and has a memory requirement of 71K. Mailroom was developed in 1988.

  3. Electron microscopic localization of cytoplasmic myosin with ferritin- labeled antibodies

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    We localized myosin in vertebrate nonmuscle cells by electron microscopy using purified antibodies coupled with ferritin. Native and formaldehyde-fixed filaments of purified platelet myosin filaments each consisting of approximately 30 myosin molecules bound an equivalent number of ferritin-antimyosin conjugates. In preparations of crude platelet actomyosin, the ferritin-antimyosin bound exclusively to similar short, 10-15 nm wide filaments. In both cases, binding of the ferritin-antimyosin to the myosin filaments was blocked by preincubation with unlabeled antimyosin. With indirect fluorescent antibody staining at the light microscope level, we found that the ferritin-antimyosin and unlabeled antimyosin stained HeLa cells identically, with the antibodies concentrated in 0.5-microns spots along stress fibers. By electron microscopy, we found that the concentration of ferritin-antimyosin in the dense regions of stress fibers was five to six times that in the intervening less dense regions, 20 times that in the cytoplasmic matrix, and 100 times that in the nucleus. These concentration differences may account for the light microscope antibody staining pattern of spread interphase cells. Some, but certainly not all, of the ferritin-antimyosin was associated with 10-15-nm filaments. In mouse intestinal epithelial cells, ferritin- antimyosin was located almost exclusively in the terminal web. In isolated brush borders exposed to 5 mM MgCl2, ferritin-antimyosin was also concentrated in the terminal web associated with 10-15-nm filaments. PMID:7193682

  4. Electronic structure engineering of various structural phases of phosphorene.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Sumandeep; Kumar, Ashok; Srivastava, Sunita; Tankeshwar, K

    2016-07-21

    We report the tailoring of the electronic structures of various structural phases of phosphorene (α-P, β-P, γ-P and δ-P) based homo- and hetero-bilayers through in-plane mechanical strains, vertical pressure and transverse electric field by employing density functional theory. In-plane biaxial strains have considerably modified the electronic bandgap of both homo- and hetero-bilayers while vertical pressure induces metallization in the considered structures. The γ-P homo-bilayer structure showed the highest ultimate tensile strength (UTS ∼ 6.21 GPa) upon in-plane stretching. Upon application of a transverse electric field, the variation in the bandgap of hetero-bilayers was found to be strongly dependent on the polarity of the applied field which is attributed to the counterbalance between the external electric field and the internal field induced by different structural phases and heterogeneity in the arrangements of atoms of each surface of the hetero-bilayer system. Our results demonstrate that the electronic structures of the considered hetero- and homo-bilayers of phosphorene could be modified by biaxial strain, pressure and electric field to achieve the desired properties for future nano-electronic devices.

  5. Electron density power spectrum in the local interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.; Rickett, B. J.; Spangler, S. R.

    1995-01-01

    Interstellar scintillation (ISS), fluctuations in the amplitude and phase of radio waves caused by scattering in the interstellar medium, is important as a diagnostic of interstellar plasma turbulence. ISS is also of interest because it is noise for other radio astronomical observations. The unifying concern is the power spectrum of the interstellar electron density. Here we use ISS observations through the nearby (less than or approximately =1 kpc) (ISM) to estimate the spectrum. From measurements of angular broadening of pulsars and extragalactic sources, decorrelation bandwidth of pulsars, refractive steering of features in pulsar dynamic spectra, dispersion measured fluctuations of pulsars, and refractive scintillation index measurements, we construct a composite structure function that is approximately power law over 2 x 10(exp 6) m less than scale less than 10(exp 13) m. The data are consistent with the structure function having a logarithmic slope versus baseline less than 2; thus there is a meaningful connection between scales in the radiowave fluctuation field and the scales in the electron density field causing the scattering. The data give an upper limit to the inner scale, l(sub o) less than or approximately 10(exp 8) m and are consistent with much smaller values. We construct a composite electron density spectrum that is approximately power law over at least the approximately = 5 decade wavenumber range 10(exp -13)/m less than wavenumber less than 10(exp -8)/m and that may extend to higher wavenumbers. The average spectral index of electron density over this wavenumber range is approximately = 3.7, very close to the value expected for a Kolmogorov process. The outer scale size, L(sub o), must be greater than or approximately = 10(exp 13) m (determined from dispersion measure fluctuations). When the ISS data are combined with measurements of differential Faraday rotation angle, and gradients in the average electron density, constraints can be put on the

  6. [Structured electronic consultation letter for shoulder disorders].

    PubMed

    Paloneva, Juha; Oikari, Marjo; Ylinen, Jari; Ingalsuo, Minna; Ilkka, Kunnamo; Ilkka, Kiviranta

    2012-01-01

    Referral to a specialist has a significant influence on management of the patient and costs associated with the treatments. However, development and research of the process by which patients are referred has been almost neglected. Expectations considering the purpose, contents, and timing of the referral of the consulting physician and the consultant do not always meet. A structured, electronic consultation letter was developed to respond this need. Functionality and interactivity are the key elements of the referral, including (1) an electronic referral letter to a specialist, (2) interactive education in clinical examination and management of shoulder disorders, and (3) an instrument of clinical examination and documentation of shoulder disorders.

  7. Local electronic, sensing and optical properties of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staii, Cristian

    The work presented in this thesis is focused on the electronic and optical properties of single wall carbon nanotubes (swCNs). In a first set of experiments we investigate the local electronic properties of swCNs using novel scanning probe microscopies. We use Scanning Gate Microscopy (SGM) to measure the energy of the resonant scattering centers in metallic swCNs, and to show the local nature of the memory effect observed in swCN field effect transistors (swCN-FETs). We also combine Impedance Spectroscopy and SGM to measure the high frequency properties of swCN-FETs. These experiments provide the first observations concerning the role of individual defects at high frequencies. The results are consistent with a simple parallel R-C circuit model for the swCN-FET. Furthermore, we present a quantitative model for the phase shifts observed in Scanning Conductance Microscopy (SCM) and demonstrate that this can be used to investigate the electronic properties of nanoscale samples without requiring electrical contacts. We provide a general method based on SCM that can be used to measure the dielectric constant of nanoscale objects. In a second set of experiments we demonstrate that swCN-FETs functionalized with single stranded DNA (ss-DNA) act as highly sensitive chemical sensors. The ss-DNA decorated swCN-FETs are sensitive to chemical species (odors) that do not cause a detectable response in non-functionalized swCN-FETs. Moreover, odor responses of these devices are different in sign and magnitude for different odors, and the odor response characteristics are dependent on the base sequence of the ss-DNA used to decorate the swCN. These results suggest that swCN-FET functionalized with ss-DNA and related molecules (RNA, aptamers, etc) are extremely promising candidates for sensing applications. Finally, we present photoluminescence measurements on individual swCNs, freely suspended across open apertures. These experiments show asymmetric peak line shapes, with line

  8. The electronic structure of nonpolyhex carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    László, István

    2004-01-01

    Generalizing the folding method to any periodic two-dimensional planar carbon structures we have calculated the corresponding electronic structures in the framework of the one orbital one site tight-binding (Bloch-Hückel) method by solving the eigenvalue problems in a numerical way. We discussed the metallic or the nonmetallic behavior of the nanotubes by applying the folding vectors of parameters (m, n). We extended the topological coordinate method to two-dimensional periodic planar structures as well. Nearly regular hexagonal, pentagonal, and heptagonal polygons were obtained. The curvatures of the final relaxed structures can be read from the sizes of the polygons. Thus relying only on the topological information we could describe the shape of the tubular structures and their conductivity behaviors.

  9. Mechanical Deformation and Electronic Structure of Carbon Nanotorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Wu, Shi-Yu; Jayanthi, Chakram

    2000-03-01

    The mechanical deformation and the electronic structure of carbon nanotorus of various radii are studied using an order(N) non-orthogonal tight-binding molecular dynamics[1] at finite temperature. The onset of the development of kinks in the torus is investigated as a function of radius. The defect structures associated with the kinks are analyzed in terms of local bonding configurations and the bond charge between pairs of atoms. [1] C.S. Jayanthi, S.Y. Wu, J. Cocks, N.S. Luo, Z.L. Xie, M.Menon, and G. Yang, Phys. Rev. B57, 3799 (1998).

  10. Probing Structural and Electronic Dynamics with Ultrafast Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Plemmons, DA; Suri, PK; Flannigan, DJ

    2015-05-12

    In this Perspective, we provide an overview,of the field of ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM). We begin by briefly discussing the emergence of methods for probing ultrafast structural dynamics and the information that can be obtained. Distinctions are drawn between the two main types a probes for femtosecond (fs) dynamics fast electrons and X-ray photons and emphasis is placed on hour the nature of charged particles is exploited in ultrafast electron-based' experiments:. Following this, we describe the versatility enabled by the ease with which electron trajectories and velocities can be manipulated with transmission electron microscopy (TEM): hardware configurations, and we emphasize how this is translated to the ability to measure scattering intensities in real, reciprocal, and energy space from presurveyed and selected rianoscale volumes. Owing to decades of ongoing research and development into TEM instrumentation combined with advances in specimen holder technology, comprehensive experiments can be conducted on a wide range of materials in various phases via in situ methods. Next, we describe the basic operating concepts, of UEM, and we emphasize that its development has led to extension of several of the formidable capabilities of TEM into the fs domain, dins increasing the accessible temporal parameter spade by several orders of magnitude. We then divide UEM studies into those conducted in real (imaging), reciprocal (diffraction), and energy (spectroscopy) spate. We begin each of these sections by providing a brief description of the basic operating principles and the types of information that can be gathered followed by descriptions of how these approaches are applied in UM, the type of specimen parameter space that can be probed, and an example of the types of dynamics that can be resolved. We conclude with an Outlook section, wherein we share our perspective on some future directions of the field pertaining to continued instrument development and

  11. Electronic Structure of PbSe Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdeev, I. D.; Nestoklon, M. O.

    2016-11-01

    We present the tight binding calculations of the lead selenide nanowires: energy spectra of quantum confined states as a function of nanowire radius, dispersion in the full Brillouin zone, and the radial part of local electronic state density, which helps us to recognise valley splitting in the spectra. Also, we compare our results to KP perturbation theory predictions. We show that the value of the valley splitting is comparable with the distance between two levels of size quantization and that it strongly depends on the arrangement of the atoms in the wire.

  12. Aromaticity of rings-in-molecules (RIMs) from electron localization-delocalization matrices (LDMs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumar, Ismat; Cook, Ronald; Ayers, Paul W.; Matta, Chérif F.

    2016-01-01

    A new and powerful molecular descriptor termed the LDM (localization-delocalization matrix) has recently been proposed as a molecular fingerprinting tool and has been shown to yield robust quantitative-structure-to-activity/property-relationships (QSAR/QSPR). An LDM lists the average number of electrons localized within an atom in a molecule along its diagonal while the off-diagonal elements are the pair-wise average number of electrons shared between every pair of atoms in the molecule, bonded or not. Hence, the LDM is a representation of a fuzzy molecular graph that accounts for the whereabouts of all electron(s) in the molecule and can be expected to encode for several facets of its chemistry at once. We show that the LDM captures the aromatic character of a ring-in-a-molecule by comparing the aromaticity ranking based on the LDMs and their eigenvalues of 6-membered carbon rings within (polycyclic) benzenoid hydrocarbons with the ranking based on four well-established local aromaticity measures (harmonic oscillator model of aromaticity, acromatic fluctuation index, para delocalization index, and nucleus independent chemical shift(0)). This paper is dedicated to the memory of Professor Paul von Ragué Schleyer (1930-2014).

  13. Electronic structure of worm-eaten graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negishi, Hayato; Takeda, Kyozaburo

    2017-02-01

    We theoretically study the electronic structure of graphenes having several kinds of imperfections such as atomic vacancies and heteroatom replacements. We consider 12 different configurations of vacancies and 39 different geometries of heteroatom replacements in order to approximately take into account the random conformations of imperfections. To systematically provide a perspective understanding of the defect π and σ states caused by atomistic voids and/or vacancies and heteroatom replacements, we have carried out a tight-binding (TB) calculation. We study the orbital hybridization to clarify the origin and formation of π and σ defect states arising from such imperfections. We also discuss the electronic structure around the Fermi level through the TB band calculation.

  14. Electronic structure investigation of biphenylene films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totani, R.; Grazioli, C.; Zhang, T.; Bidermane, I.; Lüder, J.; de Simone, M.; Coreno, M.; Brena, B.; Lozzi, L.; Puglia, C.

    2017-02-01

    Photoelectron Spectroscopy (PS) and Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy have been used to investigate the occupied and empty density of states of biphenylene films of different thicknesses, deposited onto a Cu(111) crystal. The obtained results have been compared to previous gas phase spectra and single molecule Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations to get insights into the possible modification of the molecular electronic structure in the film induced by the adsorption on a surface. Furthermore, NEXAFS measurements allowed characterizing the variation of the molecular arrangement with the film thickness and helped to clarify the substrate-molecule interaction.

  15. Atomic and Electronic Structure of Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2003-01-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; Part I. Crystalline Solids: 1. Atomic structure of crystals; 2. The single-particle approximation; 3. Electrons in crystal potential; 4. Band structure of crystals; 5. Applications of band theory; 6. Lattice vibrations; 7. Magnetic behaviour of solids; 8. Superconductivity; Part II. Defects, Non-Crystalline Solids and Finite Structures: 9. Defects I: point defects; 10. Defects II: line defects; 11. Defects III: surfaces and interfaces; 12. Non-crystalline solids; 13. Finite structures; Part III. Appendices: A. Elements of classical electrodynamics; B. Elements of quantum mechanics; C. Elements of thermodynamics; D. Elements of statistical mechanics; E. Elements of elasticity theory; F. The Madelung energy; G. Mathematical tools; H. Nobel Prize citations; I. Units and symbols; References; Index.

  16. Spectral properties and localization of an electron in a two-dimensional system with point scatterers in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gredeskul, S. A.; Zusman, M.; Avishai, Y.; Azbel', M. Ya.

    1997-09-01

    Electron spectral properties and localization in a two-dimensional system with point potentials subject to a perpendicular magnetic field are studied. A brief review of the known results concerning electron dynamics in such systems is presented. For a set of periodic point potentials, exact dispersion laws and energy-flux diagram (Hofstadter-type butterfly) are obtained. It is shown that, in the case of one-dimensional disorder, the electron localization in a strong magnetic field is described by the random Harper equation. Energy-flux diagram for the localization length is presented and the fractal structure of the localization length is demonstrated. Near the Landau levels an exact formula for the localization length as a function of energy and disorder is obtained. The corresponding critical exponent is equal to unity which is reminiscent of one-dimensional characteristics.

  17. Controlling the Electronic Structure of Bilayer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Taisuke; Bostwick, Aaron; McChesney, Jessica; Seyller, Thomas; Horn, Karsten; Rotenberg, Eli

    2007-03-01

    Carbon-based materials such as carbon nanotubes, graphite intercalation compounds, fullerenes, and ultrathin graphite films exhibit many exotic phenomena such as superconductivity and an anomalous quantum Hall effect. These findings have caused renewed interest in the electronic structure of ultrathin layers of graphene: a single honeycomb carbon layer that is the building block for these materials. There is a strong motivation to incorporate graphene multilayers into atomic-scale devices, spurred on by rapid progress in their fabrication and manipulation. We have synthesized bilayer graphene thin films deposited on insulating silicon carbide and characterized their electronic band structure using angle-resolved photoemission. By selectively adjusting the carrier concentration in each layer, changes in the Coulomb potential led to control of the gap between valence and conduction bands [1]. This control over the band structure suggests the potential application of bilayer graphene to switching functions in atomic scale electronic devices. [1] T. Ohta, A. Bostwick, T. Seyller, K. Horn, E. Rotenberg, Science, 313, 951 (2006).

  18. Delocalized and localized states of eg electrons in half-doped manganites.

    PubMed

    Winkler, E L; Tovar, M; Causa, M T

    2013-07-24

    We have studied the magnetic behaviour of half-doped manganite Y0.5Ca0.5MnO3 in an extended range of temperatures by means of magnetic susceptibility, χ(T), and electron spin resonance (ESR) experiments. At high temperature the system crystallizes in an orthorhombic structure. The resistivity value, ρ ≃ 0.05 Ω cm at 500 K, indicates a metallic behaviour, while the Curie-Weiss dependence of χ(T) and the thermal evolution of the ESR parameters are very well described by a model that considers a system conformed by localized Mn(4+) cores, [Formula: see text], and itinerant, eg, electrons. The strong coupling between t2g and eg electrons results in an enhanced Curie constant and an FM Curie-Weiss temperature that overcomes the AFM interactions between the [Formula: see text] cores. A transition to a more distorted phase is observed at T ≈ 500 K and signatures of localization of the eg electrons appear in the χ(T) behaviour below 300 K. A new Curie-Weiss regime is observed, where the Curie-constant value is consistent with dimer formation. Based on mean-field calculations, the dimer formation is predicted as a function of the interaction strength between the t2g and eg electrons.

  19. Approximate ab initio calculations of electronic structure of amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durandurdu, M.; Drabold, D. A.; Mousseau, N.

    2000-12-01

    We report on ab initio calculations of electronic states of two large and realistic models of amorphous silicon generated using a modified version of the Wooten-Winer-Weaire algorithm and relaxed, in both cases, with a Keating and a modified Stillinger-Weber potentials. The models have no coordination defects and a very narrow bond-angle distribution. We compute the electronic density-of-states and pay particular attention to the nature of the band-tail states around the electronic gap. All models show a large and perfectly clean optical gap and realistic Urbach tails. Based on these results and the extended quasi-one-dimensional stringlike structures observed for certain eigenvalues in the band tails, we postulate that the generation of model a-Si without localized states might be achievable under certain circumstances.

  20. Spatially Resolved Electronic Structures of Atomically Precise Armchair Graphene Nanoribbons

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Han; Wei, Dacheng; Sun, Jiatao; Wong, Swee Liang; Feng, Yuan Ping; Neto, A. H. Castro; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen

    2012-01-01

    Graphene has attracted much interest in both academia and industry. The challenge of making it semiconducting is crucial for applications in electronic devices. A promising approach is to reduce its physical size down to the nanometer scale. Here, we present the surface-assisted bottom-up fabrication of atomically precise armchair graphene nanoribbons (AGNRs) with predefined widths, namely 7-, 14- and 21-AGNRs, on Ag(111) as well as their spatially resolved width-dependent electronic structures. STM/STS measurements reveal their associated electron scattering patterns and the energy gaps over 1 eV. The mechanism to form such AGNRs is addressed based on the observed intermediate products. Our results provide new insights into the local properties of AGNRs, and have implications for the understanding of their electrical properties and potential applications. PMID:23248746

  1. Localized heating of electrons in ionization zones: Going beyond the Penning-Thornton paradigm in magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2014-12-07

    The fundamental question of how energy is supplied to a magnetron discharge is commonly answered by the Penning-Thornton paradigm invoking secondary electrons. Huo et al. (Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 22, 045005, (2013)) used a global discharge model to show that electron heating in the electric field of the magnetic presheath is dominant. In this contribution, this concept is applied locally taking into account the electric potential structure of ionization zones. Images of ionization zones can and should be interpreted as diagrams of the localization of electric potential and related electron energy, where certain collisions promote or dampen their formation.

  2. The structure of the hydrated electron in bulk and at interfaces: Does the hydrated electron occupy a cavity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, Jennifer Ryan

    Since its discovery over fifty years ago, the hydrated electron has been the subject of much interest. Hydrated electrons, which are free electrons in water, are found in fields ranging from biochemistry to radiation chemistry, so it is important that we understand the structure and dynamics of this species. Because of its high reactivity, the hydrated electron's structure has proven difficult to pin down, especially its molecular details. One-electron mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics simulations have proven useful in helping elucidate the structure of the hydrated electron. The picture most commonly presented from these studies is one of the electron residing in a cavity, disrupting the local water structure much like an anion the size of bromide. Our group has recently proposed a completely different structure for the hydrated electron, which arose from rigorous calculations of a new electron-water potential. The picture that emerged was of an electron that does not occupy a cavity but instead draws water within itself; this non-cavity electron resides in a region of enhanced water density. The one-electron cavity and non-cavity models all predict similar experimental observables that probe the electronic structure of the hydrated electron, such as the optical absorption spectrum, which makes it difficult to determine which model most accurately describes the true structure of the hydrated electron. In this thesis, we work to calculate experimental observables for various simulated cavity and non-cavity models that are particularly sensitive to the local water structure near the electron, in an effort to distinguish the various models from each other. Two particular observables we are interested in are the resonance Raman spectrum and the temperature dependent optical absorption spectrum of the hydrated electron. We find that for both of these experiments, only the non-cavity model has qualitative agreement with experiment; the cavity models miss the

  3. A soft X-ray spectroscopic perspective of electron localization and transport in tungsten doped bismuth vanadate single crystals.

    PubMed

    Jovic, Vedran; Rettie, Alexander J E; Singh, Vijay R; Zhou, Jianshi; Lamoureux, Bethany; Buddie Mullins, C; Bluhm, Hendrik; Laverock, Jude; Smith, Kevin E

    2016-11-23

    Doped BiVO4 is a promising photoelectrochemical water splitting anode, whose activity is hampered by poor charge transport. Here we use a set of X-ray spectroscopic methods to probe the origin and nature of localized electron states in W:BiVO4. Furthermore, using the polarized nature of the X-rays, we probe variations in the electronic structure along the crystal axes. In this manner, we reveal aspects of the electronic structure related to electron localization and observations consistent with conductivity anisotropy between the ab-plane and c-axis. We verify that tungsten substitutes as W(6+) for V(5+) in BiVO4. This is shown to result in the presence of inter-band gap states related to electrons at V(4+) sites of e symmetry. The energetic position of the states in the band gap suggest that they are highly localized and may act as recombination centres. Polarization dependent X-ray absorption spectra reveal anisotropy in the electronic structure between the ab-plane and c-axis. Results show the superior hybridization between V 3d and O 2p states, higher V wavefunction overlap and broader conduction bands in the ab-plane than in the c-axis. These insights into the electronic structure are discussed in the context of existing experimental and theoretical reports regarding charge transport in BiVO4.

  4. Atomic and electronic structure of Ni-Nb metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, C. C.; Yang, Y.-F. Xi, X. K.

    2013-12-07

    Solid state {sup 93}Nb nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been employed to investigate the atomic and electronic structures in Ni-Nb based metallic glass (MG) model system. {sup 93}Nb nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) isotropic metallic shift of Ni{sub 60}Nb{sub 35}Sn{sub 5} has been found to be ∼100 ppm lower than that of Ni{sub 60}Nb{sub 35}Zr{sub 5} MG, which is correlated with their intrinsic fracture toughness. The evolution of {sup 93}Nb NMR isotropic metallic shifts upon alloying is clearly an electronic origin, as revealed by both local hyperfine fields analysis and first-principle computations. This preliminary result indicates that, in addition to geometrical considerations, atomic form factors should be taken into a description of atomic structures for better understanding the mechanical behaviors of MGs.

  5. Electronic structure of spontaneously strained graphene on hexagonal boron nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    San-Jose, Pablo; Gutiérrez-Rubio, A.; Sturla, Mauricio; Guinea, Francisco

    2014-09-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride substrates have been shown to dramatically improve the electric properties of graphene. Recently, it has been observed that when the two honeycomb crystals are close to perfect alignment, strong lattice distortions develop in graphene due to the moiré adhesion landscape. Simultaneously, a gap opens at the Dirac point. Here, we derive a simple low-energy electronic model for graphene aligned with the substrate, taking into account spontaneous strains at equilibrium and pseudogauge fields. We carry out a detailed characterization of the modified band structure, gap, local and global density of states, and band topology in terms of physical parameters. We show that the overall electronic structure is strongly modified by the spontaneous strains.

  6. Local conservation laws and the structure of the many-body localized states.

    PubMed

    Serbyn, Maksym; Papić, Z; Abanin, Dmitry A

    2013-09-20

    We construct a complete set of local integrals of motion that characterize the many-body localized (MBL) phase. Our approach relies on the assumption that local perturbations act locally on the eigenstates in the MBL phase, which is supported by numerical simulations of the random-field XXZ spin chain. We describe the structure of the eigenstates in the MBL phase and discuss the implications of local conservation laws for its nonequilibrium quantum dynamics. We argue that the many-body localization can be used to protect coherence in the system by suppressing relaxation between eigenstates with different local integrals of motion.

  7. Electronic structure theory of the superheavy elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliav, Ephraim; Fritzsche, Stephan; Kaldor, Uzi

    2015-12-01

    High-accuracy calculations of atomic properties of the superheavy elements (SHE) up to element 122 are reviewed. The properties discussed include ionization potentials, electron affinities and excitation energies, which are associated with the spectroscopic and chemical behavior of these elements, and are therefore of considerable interest. Accurate predictions of these quantities require high-order inclusion of relativity and electron correlation, as well as large, converged basis sets. The Dirac-Coulomb-Breit Hamiltonian, which includes all terms up to second order in the fine-structure constant α, serves as the framework for the treatment; higher-order Lamb shift terms are considered in some selected cases. Electron correlation is treated by either the multiconfiguration self-consistent-field approach or by Fock-space coupled cluster theory. The latter is enhanced by the intermediate Hamiltonian scheme, allowing the use of larger model (P) spaces. The quality of the calculations is assessed by applying the same methods to lighter homologs of the SHEs and comparing with available experimental information. Very good agreement is obtained, within a few hundredths of an eV, and similar accuracy is expected for the SHEs. Many of the properties predicted for the SHEs differ significantly from what may be expected by straightforward extrapolation of lighter homologs, demonstrating that the structure and chemistry of SHEs are strongly affected by relativity. The major scientific challenge of the calculations is to find the electronic structure and basic atomic properties of the SHE and assign its proper place in the periodic table. Significant recent developments include joint experimental-computational studies of the excitation spectrum of Fm and the ionization energy of Lr, with excellent agreement of experiment and theory, auguring well for the future of research in the field.

  8. Electronic structure of interfaces between hexagonal and rhombohedral graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taut, M.; Koepernik, K.

    2016-07-01

    An analysis of the electronic structure of interfaces between hexagonal (A B ) and rhombohedral (A B C ) graphite based on density functional theory is presented. Both of the two simplest interface structures host (localized) interface bands, which are located around the K point in the Brillouin zone, and which give rise to strong peaks in the density of states at the Fermi level. All interface bands near the Fermi energy are localized at monomers (single atoms with dangling pz orbitals), whereas those around 0.5 eV belong to pz-bonded trimers, which are introduced by the interface and which are not found in the two adjacent bulk substances. There is also an interface band at the (A B ) side of the interface which resembles one of the interface states near a stacking fault in (A B ) graphite.

  9. Localized SXR Emission During Electron Bernstein Wave Injection in MST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Jay; Forest, Cary; Seltzman, Andrew

    2008-11-01

    The electron Bernstein wave has been suggested as a solution to the RFP confinement problem: sustained, off-axis current drive stabilizes the resistive tearing modes which govern thermal transport. A staged experiment to test the feasibility of EBW heating and current drive is underway on MST. Experiments (˜10^5 W) aimed at a demonstration of EBW heating have produced a localized increase in SXR emission. This measured emission is consistent with modeling in its location, energy spectrum and dependence on radial diffusion within the plasma. Preliminary analysis indicates that the emission is strongest in the region where ray tracing predicts maximum deposition of the injected power. The multi-chord SXR camera used is sensitive to 4-7 keV photons which is consistent with Fokker-Plank modeling of EBW injection. The enhanced SXR emission vanishes quickly when radial diffusion in the plasma is high (as indicated by m=0 magnetic activity); this is also consistent with Fokker-Plank modeling. An increase of boron emission (and presumably boron within the plasma) is also observed during EBW injection. This presents an alternative explanation to the enhanced SXR emission; recent efforts have been made to isolate the two effects.

  10. Electronically Tuned Local Oscillators for the NOEMA Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattiocco, Francois; Garnier, Olivier; Maier, Doris; Navarrini, Alessandro; Serres, Patrice

    2016-03-01

    We present an overview of the electronically tuned local oscillator (LO) system developed at the Institut de RadioAstronomie millimetrique (IRAM) for the superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) receivers of the NOrthern Extended Millimeter Array interferometer (NOEMA). We modified the frequency bands and extended the bandwidths of the LO designs developed by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) for the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) project to cover the four NOEMA LO frequency ranges 82-108.3 GHz (Band 1), 138.6-171.3 GHz (Band 2), 207.7-264.4 GHz (Band 3), and 283-365 GHz (Band 4). The NOEMA LO system employs commercially available MMICs and GaAs millimeter MMICs from NRAO which are micro-assembled into active multiplied chain (AMC) and power amplifier (PA) modules. We discuss the problem of the LO spurious harmonics and of the LO signal directly multiplied by the SIS mixers that add extra noise and lead to detections of unwanted spectral lines from higher order sidebands. A waveguide filter in the LO path is used to reduce the higher order harmonics level of the LO at the output of the final frequency multiplier, thus mitigating the undesired effects and improving the system noise temperature.

  11. Localized reconstruction of subunits from electron cryomicroscopy images of macromolecular complexes

    PubMed Central

    Ilca, Serban L.; Kotecha, Abhay; Sun, Xiaoyu; Poranen, Minna M.; Stuart, David I.; Huiskonen, Juha T.

    2015-01-01

    Electron cryomicroscopy can yield near-atomic resolution structures of highly ordered macromolecular complexes. Often however some subunits bind in a flexible manner, have different symmetry from the rest of the complex, or are present in sub-stoichiometric amounts, limiting the attainable resolution. Here we report a general method for the localized three-dimensional reconstruction of such subunits. After determining the particle orientations, local areas corresponding to the subunits can be extracted and treated as single particles. We demonstrate the method using three examples including a flexible assembly and complexes harbouring subunits with either partial occupancy or mismatched symmetry. Most notably, the method allows accurate fitting of the monomeric RNA-dependent RNA polymerase bound at the threefold axis of symmetry inside a viral capsid, revealing for the first time its exact orientation and interactions with the capsid proteins. Localized reconstruction is expected to provide novel biological insights in a range of challenging biological systems. PMID:26534841

  12. Electronic structure and crystal phase stability of palladium hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Houari, Abdesalem; Matar, Samir F.; Eyert, Volker

    2014-11-07

    The results of electronic structure calculations for a variety of palladium hydrides are presented. The calculations are based on density functional theory and used different local and semilocal approximations. The thermodynamic stability of all structures as well as the electronic and chemical bonding properties are addressed. For the monohydride, taking into account the zero-point energy is important to identify the octahedral Pd-H arrangement with its larger voids and, hence, softer hydrogen vibrational modes as favorable over the tetrahedral arrangement as found in the zincblende and wurtzite structures. Stabilization of the rocksalt structure is due to strong bonding of the 4d and 1s orbitals, which form a characteristic split-off band separated from the main d-band group. Increased filling of the formerly pure d states of the metal causes strong reduction of the density of states at the Fermi energy, which undermines possible long-range ferromagnetic order otherwise favored by strong magnetovolume effects. For the dihydride, octahedral Pd-H arrangement as realized, e.g., in the pyrite structure turns out to be unstable against tetrahedral arrangement as found in the fluorite structure. Yet, from both heat of formation and chemical bonding considerations, the dihydride turns out to be less favorable than the monohydride. Finally, the vacancy ordered defect phase Pd{sub 3}H{sub 4} follows the general trend of favoring the octahedral arrangement of the rocksalt structure for Pd:H ratios less or equal to one.

  13. Electronic structure and crystal phase stability of palladium hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houari, Abdesalem; Matar, Samir F.; Eyert, Volker

    2014-11-01

    The results of electronic structure calculations for a variety of palladium hydrides are presented. The calculations are based on density functional theory and used different local and semilocal approximations. The thermodynamic stability of all structures as well as the electronic and chemical bonding properties are addressed. For the monohydride, taking into account the zero-point energy is important to identify the octahedral Pd-H arrangement with its larger voids and, hence, softer hydrogen vibrational modes as favorable over the tetrahedral arrangement as found in the zincblende and wurtzite structures. Stabilization of the rocksalt structure is due to strong bonding of the 4d and 1s orbitals, which form a characteristic split-off band separated from the main d-band group. Increased filling of the formerly pure d states of the metal causes strong reduction of the density of states at the Fermi energy, which undermines possible long-range ferromagnetic order otherwise favored by strong magnetovolume effects. For the dihydride, octahedral Pd-H arrangement as realized, e.g., in the pyrite structure turns out to be unstable against tetrahedral arrangement as found in the fluorite structure. Yet, from both heat of formation and chemical bonding considerations, the dihydride turns out to be less favorable than the monohydride. Finally, the vacancy ordered defect phase Pd3H4 follows the general trend of favoring the octahedral arrangement of the rocksalt structure for Pd:H ratios less or equal to one.

  14. Electronic bandstructure of semiconductor dilute bismide structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erucar, T.; Nutku, F.; Donmez, O.; Erol, A.

    2017-02-01

    In this work electronic band structure of dilute bismide GaAs/GaAs1-xBix quantum well structures with 1.8% and 3.75% bismuth compositions have been investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Photoluminescence (PL) measurements reveal that effective bandgap of the samples decreases approximately 65 meV per bismuth concentration. Temperature dependence of the effective bandgap is obtained to be higher for the sample with higher bismuth concentration. Moreover, both asymmetric characteristic at the low energy tail of the PL and full width at half maximum (FWHM) of PL peak increase with increasing bismuth composition as a result of increased Bi related defects located above valence band (VB). In order to explain composition dependence of the effective bandgap quantitatively, valence band anti-crossing (VBAC) model is used. Bismuth composition and temperature dependence of effective bandgap in a quantum well structure is modeled by solving Schrödinger equation and compared with experimental PL data.

  15. Electronic structure interpolation via atomic orbitals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mohan; Guo, G-C; He, Lixin

    2011-08-17

    We present an efficient scheme for accurate electronic structure interpolation based on systematically improvable optimized atomic orbitals. The atomic orbitals are generated by minimizing the spillage value between the atomic basis calculations and the converged plane wave basis calculations on some coarse k-point grid. They are then used to calculate the band structure of the full Brillouin zone using the linear combination of atomic orbitals algorithms. We find that usually 16-25 orbitals per atom can give an accuracy of about 10 meV compared to the full ab initio calculations, and the accuracy can be systematically improved by using more atomic orbitals. The scheme is easy to implement and robust, and works equally well for metallic systems and systems with complicated band structures. Furthermore, the atomic orbitals have much better transferability than Shirley's basis and Wannier functions, which is very useful for perturbation calculations.

  16. Thermal transfer structures coupling electronics card(s) to coolant-cooled structure(s)

    DOEpatents

    David, Milnes P; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Parida, Pritish R; Schmidt, Roger R

    2014-12-16

    Cooling apparatuses and coolant-cooled electronic systems are provided which include thermal transfer structures configured to engage with a spring force one or more electronics cards with docking of the electronics card(s) within a respective socket(s) of the electronic system. A thermal transfer structure of the cooling apparatus includes a thermal spreader having a first thermal conduction surface, and a thermally conductive spring assembly coupled to the conduction surface of the thermal spreader and positioned and configured to reside between and physically couple a first surface of an electronics card to the first surface of the thermal spreader with docking of the electronics card within a socket of the electronic system. The thermal transfer structure is, in one embodiment, metallurgically bonded to a coolant-cooled structure and facilitates transfer of heat from the electronics card to coolant flowing through the coolant-cooled structure.

  17. Electron transfer mechanism and the locality of the system-bath interaction: a comparison of local, semilocal, and pure dephasing models.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Emily A; Katz, Gil; Goldsmith, Randall H; Wasielewski, Michael R; Ratner, Mark A; Kosloff, Ronnie; Nitzan, Abraham

    2006-02-21

    We simulate the effects of two types of dephasing processes, a nonlocal dephasing of system eigenstates and a dephasing of semilocal eigenstates, on the rate and mechanism of electron transfer (eT) through a series of donor-bridge-acceptor systems, D-B(N)-A, where N is the number of identical bridge units. Our analytical and numerical results show that pure dephasing, defined as the perturbation of system eigenstates through the system-bath interaction, does not disrupt coherent eT because it induces no localization; electron transfer may proceed through superexchange in a system undergoing only pure dephasing. A more physically reasonable description may be obtained via a system-bath interaction that reflects the perturbation of more local electronic structure by local nuclear distortions and dipole interactions. The degree of locality of this interaction is guided by the structure of the system Hamiltonian and by the nature of the measurement performed on the system (i.e., the nature of the environment). We compare our result from this "semilocal" model with an even more local phenomenological dephasing model. We calculate electron transfer rate by obtaining nonequilibrium steady-state solutions for the elements of a reduced density matrix; a semigroup formalism is used to write down the dissipative part of the equation of motion.

  18. Calculation of smooth potential energy surfaces using local electron correlation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mata, Ricardo A.; Werner, Hans-Joachim

    2006-11-01

    The geometry dependence of excitation domains in local correlation methods can lead to noncontinuous potential energy surfaces. We propose a simple domain merging procedure which eliminates this problem in many situations. The method is applied to heterolytic bond dissociations of ketene and propadienone, to SN2 reactions of Cl- with alkylchlorides, and in a quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical study of the chorismate mutase enzyme. It is demonstrated that smooth potentials are obtained in all cases. Furthermore, basis set superposition error effects are reduced in local calculations, and it is found that this leads to better basis set convergence when computing barrier heights or weak interactions. When the electronic structure strongly changes between reactants or products and the transition state, the domain merging procedure leads to a balanced description of all structures and accurate barrier heights.

  19. Calculation of smooth potential energy surfaces using local electron correlation methods

    SciTech Connect

    Mata, Ricardo A.; Werner, Hans-Joachim

    2006-11-14

    The geometry dependence of excitation domains in local correlation methods can lead to noncontinuous potential energy surfaces. We propose a simple domain merging procedure which eliminates this problem in many situations. The method is applied to heterolytic bond dissociations of ketene and propadienone, to SN2 reactions of Cl{sup -} with alkylchlorides, and in a quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical study of the chorismate mutase enzyme. It is demonstrated that smooth potentials are obtained in all cases. Furthermore, basis set superposition error effects are reduced in local calculations, and it is found that this leads to better basis set convergence when computing barrier heights or weak interactions. When the electronic structure strongly changes between reactants or products and the transition state, the domain merging procedure leads to a balanced description of all structures and accurate barrier heights.

  20. Extraordinary electronic properties in uncommon structure types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mazhar Nawaz

    In this thesis I present the results of explorations into several uncommon structure types. In Chapter 1 I go through the underlying idea of how we search for new compounds with exotic properties in solid state chemistry. The ideas of exploring uncommon structure types, building up from the simple to the complex, using chemical intuition and thinking by analogy are discussed. Also, the history and basic concepts of superconductivity, Dirac semimetals, and magnetoresistance are briefly reviewed. In chapter 2, the 1s-InTaS2 structural family is introduced along with the discovery of a new member of the family, Ag0:79VS2; the synthesis, structure, and physical properties of two different polymorphs of the material are detailed. Also in this chapter, we report the observation of superconductivity in another 1s structure, PbTaSe2. This material is especially interesting due to it being very heavy (resulting in very strong spin orbit coulping (SOC)), layered, and noncentrosymmetric. Electronic structure calculations reveal the presence of a bulk 3D Dirac cone (very similar to graphene) that is gapped by SOC originating from the hexagonal Pb layer. In Chapter 3 we show the re-investigation of the crystal structure of the 3D Dirac semimetal, Cd3As2. It is found to be centrosymmetric, rather than noncentrosymmetric, and as such all bands are spin degenerate and there is a 4-fold degenerate bulk Dirac point at the Fermi level, making Cd3As2 a 3D electronic analog to graphene. Also, for the first time, scanning tunneling microscopy experiments identify a 2x2 surface reconstruction in what we identify as the (112) cleavage plane of single crystals; needle crystals grow with a [110] long axis direction. Lastly, in chapter 4 we report the discovery of "titanic" (sadly dubbed ⪉rge, nonsaturating" by Nature editors and given the acronym XMR) magnetoresistance (MR) in the non-magnetic, noncentrosymmetric, layered transition metal dichalcogenide WTe2; over 13 million% at 0.53 K in

  1. Pu electronic structure and photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, John J; Durakiewicz, Tomasz; Graham, Kevin S; Bauer, Eric D; Moore, David P; Mitchell, Jeremy N; Kennison, John A; Martin, Richard L; Roy, Lindsay E; Scuseria, G. E.

    2010-01-01

    The electronic structure of PuCoGa{sub 5}, Pu metal, and PuO{sub 2} is explored using photoelectron spectroscopy. Ground state electronic properties are inferred from temperature dependent photoemission near the Fermi energy for Pu metal. Angle-resolved photoemission details the energy vs. crystaJ momentum landscape near the Fermi energy for PuCoGa{sub 5} which shows significant dispersion in the quasiparticle peak near the Fermi energy. For the Mott insulators AnO{sub 2}(An = U, Pu) the photoemission results are compared against hybrid functional calculations and the model prediction of a cross over from ionic to covalent bonding is found to be reasonable.

  2. Structural and electronic properties of fluorographene.

    PubMed

    Samarakoon, Duminda K; Chen, Zhifan; Nicolas, Chantel; Wang, Xiao-Qian

    2011-04-04

    The structural and electronic characteristics of fluorinated graphene are investigated based on first-principles density-functional calculations. A detailed analysis of the energy order for stoichiometric fluorographene membranes indicates that there exists prominent chair and stirrup conformations, which correlate with the experimentally observed in-plane lattice expansion contrary to a contraction in graphane. The optical response of fluorographene is investigated using the GW-Bethe-Salpeter equation approach. The results are in good conformity with the experimentally observed optical gap and reveal predominant charge-transfer excitations arising from strong electron-hole interactions. The appearance of bounded excitons in the ultraviolet region can result in an excitonic Bose-Einstein condensate in fluorographene.

  3. Effects of xenon insertion into hydrogen bromide. Comparison of the electronic structure of the HBr···CO2 and HXeBr···CO2 complexes using quantum chemical topology methods: electron localization function, atoms in molecules and symmetry adapted perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Makarewicz, Emilia; Gordon, Agnieszka J; Mierzwicki, Krzysztof; Latajka, Zdzislaw; Berski, Slawomir

    2014-06-05

    Quantum chemistry methods have been applied to study the influence of the Xe atom inserted into the hydrogen-bromine bond (HBr → HXeBr), particularly on the nature of atomic interactions in the HBr···CO2 and HXeBr···CO2 complexes. Detailed analysis of the nature of chemical bonds has been carried out using topological analysis of the electron localization function, while topological analysis of electron density was used to gain insight into the nature of weak nonbonding interactions. Symmetry-adapted perturbation theory within the orbital approach was applied for greater understanding of the physical contributions to the total interaction energy.

  4. Real-time feedback from iterative electronic structure calculations.

    PubMed

    Vaucher, Alain C; Haag, Moritz P; Reiher, Markus

    2016-04-05

    Real-time feedback from iterative electronic structure calculations requires to mediate between the inherently unpredictable execution times of the iterative algorithm used and the necessity to provide data in fixed and short time intervals for real-time rendering. We introduce the concept of a mediator as a component able to deal with infrequent and unpredictable reference data to generate reliable feedback. In the context of real-time quantum chemistry, the mediator takes the form of a surrogate potential that has the same local shape as the first-principles potential and can be evaluated efficiently to deliver atomic forces as real-time feedback. The surrogate potential is updated continuously by electronic structure calculations and guarantees to provide a reliable response to the operator for any molecular structure. To demonstrate the application of iterative electronic structure methods in real-time reactivity exploration, we implement self-consistent semiempirical methods as the data source and apply the surrogate-potential mediator to deliver reliable real-time feedback.

  5. Structures of Local Rearrangements in Soft Colloidal Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiunan; Liu, Rui; Yang, Mingcheng; Wang, Wei-Hua; Chen, Ke

    2016-06-01

    We image local structural rearrangements in soft colloidal glasses under small periodic perturbations induced by thermal cycling. Local structural entropy S2 positively correlates with observed rearrangements in colloidal glasses. The high S2 values of the rearranging clusters in glasses indicate that fragile regions in glasses are structurally less correlated, similar to structural defects in crystalline solids. Slow-evolving high S2 spots are capable of predicting local rearrangements long before the relaxations occur, while fluctuation-created high S2 spots best correlate with local deformations right before the rearrangement events. Local free volumes are also found to correlate with particle rearrangements at extreme values, although the ability to identify relaxation sites is substantially lower than S2. Our experiments provide an efficient structural identifier for the fragile regions in glasses and highlight the important role of structural correlations in the physics of glasses.

  6. Electronic Structure of Buried Interfaces - Oral Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, Zachary

    2015-08-25

    In the electronics behind computer memory storage, the speed and size are dictated by the performance of permanent magnets inside devices called read heads. Complicated magnets made of stacked layers of thin films can be engineered to have properties that yield more energy storage and faster switching times compared to conventional iron or cobalt magnets. The reason is that magnetism is a result of subtle interactions amongst electrons; just how neurons come together on large scales to make cat brains and dog brains, ensembles of electrons interact and become ferromagnets and paramagnets. These interactions make magnets too difficult to study in their entirety, so I focus on the interfaces between layers, which are responsible for the coupling materials physicists hope to exploit to produce next-generation magnets. This project, I study a transition metal oxide material called LSCO, Lanthanum Cobaltite, which can be a paramagnet or a ferromagnet depending on how you tweak the electronic structure. It exhibits an exciting behavior: its sum is greater than the sum of its parts. When another similar material called a LSMO, Lanthanum Manganite, is grown on top of it, their interface has a different type of magnetism from the LSCO or the LSMO! I hope to explain this by demonstrating differently charged ions in the interface. The typical method for quantifying this is x-ray absorption, but all conventional techniques look at every layer simultaneously, averaging the interfaces and the LSCO layers that we want to characterize separately. Instead, I must use a new reflectivity technique, which tracks the intensity of reflected x-rays at different angles, at energies near the absorption peaks of certain elements, to track changes in the electronic structure of the material. The samples were grown by collaborators at the Takamura group at U.C. Davis and probed with this “resonant reflectivity” technique on Beamline 2-1 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

  7. Damping of Electron Density Structures and Implications for Interstellar Scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, K. W.; Terry, P. W.

    2011-04-01

    The forms of electron density structures in kinetic Alfvén wave (KAW) turbulence are studied in connection with scintillation. The focus is on small scales L ~ 108-1010 cm where the KAW regime is active in the interstellar medium, principally within turbulent H II regions. Scales at 10 times the ion gyroradius and smaller are inferred to dominate scintillation in the theory of Boldyrev et al. From numerical solutions of a decaying KAW turbulence model, structure morphology reveals two types of localized structures, filaments and sheets, and shows that they arise in different regimes of resistive and diffusive damping. Minimal resistive damping yields localized current filaments that form out of Gaussian-distributed initial conditions. When resistive damping is large relative to diffusive damping, sheet-like structures form. In the filamentary regime, each filament is associated with a non-localized magnetic and density structure, circularly symmetric in cross section. Density and magnetic fields have Gaussian statistics (as inferred from Gaussian-valued kurtosis) while density gradients are strongly non-Gaussian, more so than current. This enhancement of non-Gaussian statistics in a derivative field is expected since gradient operations enhance small-scale fluctuations. The enhancement of density gradient kurtosis over current kurtosis is not obvious, yet it suggests that modest density fluctuations may yield large scintillation events during pulsar signal propagation. In the sheet regime the same statistical observations hold, despite the absence of localized filamentary structures. Probability density functions are constructed from statistical ensembles in both regimes, showing clear formation of long, highly non-Gaussian tails.

  8. Rodlike localized structure in isotropic pattern-forming systems.

    PubMed

    Bordeu, Ignacio; Clerc, Marcel G

    2015-10-01

    Stationary two-dimensional localized structures have been observed in a wide variety of dissipative systems. The existence, stability properties, dynamical evolution, and bifurcation diagram of an azimuthal symmetry breaking, rodlike localized structure in the isotropic prototype model of pattern formation, the Swift-Hohenberg model, is studied. These rodlike structures persist under the presence of nongradient perturbations. Interaction properties of the rodlike structures are studied. This allows us to envisage the possibility of different crystal-like configurations.

  9. Femtosecond X-ray absorption study of electron localization in photoexcited anatase TiO2

    PubMed Central

    Santomauro, F. G.; Lübcke, A.; Rittmann, J.; Baldini, E.; Ferrer, A.; Silatani, M.; Zimmermann, P.; Grübel, S.; Johnson, J. A.; Mariager, S. O.; Beaud, P.; Grolimund, D.; Borca, C.; Ingold, G.; Johnson, S.L.; Chergui, M.

    2015-01-01

    Transition metal oxides are among the most promising solar materials, whose properties rely on the generation, transport and trapping of charge carriers (electrons and holes). Identifying the latter’s dynamics at room temperature requires tools that combine elemental and structural sensitivity, with the atomic scale resolution of time (femtoseconds, fs). Here, we use fs Ti K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) upon 3.49 eV (355 nm) excitation of aqueous colloidal anatase titanium dioxide nanoparticles to probe the trapping dynamics of photogenerated electrons. We find that their localization at Titanium atoms occurs in <300 fs, forming Ti3+ centres, in or near the unit cell where the electron is created. We conclude that electron localization is due to its trapping at pentacoordinated sites, mostly present in the surface shell region. The present demonstration of fs hard X-ray absorption capabilities opens the way to a detailed description of the charge carrier dynamics in transition metal oxides. PMID:26437873

  10. Femtosecond X-ray absorption study of electron localization in photoexcited anatase TiO2.

    PubMed

    Santomauro, F G; Lübcke, A; Rittmann, J; Baldini, E; Ferrer, A; Silatani, M; Zimmermann, P; Grübel, S; Johnson, J A; Mariager, S O; Beaud, P; Grolimund, D; Borca, C; Ingold, G; Johnson, S L; Chergui, M

    2015-10-06

    Transition metal oxides are among the most promising solar materials, whose properties rely on the generation, transport and trapping of charge carriers (electrons and holes). Identifying the latter's dynamics at room temperature requires tools that combine elemental and structural sensitivity, with the atomic scale resolution of time (femtoseconds, fs). Here, we use fs Ti K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) upon 3.49 eV (355 nm) excitation of aqueous colloidal anatase titanium dioxide nanoparticles to probe the trapping dynamics of photogenerated electrons. We find that their localization at Titanium atoms occurs in <300 fs, forming Ti(3+) centres, in or near the unit cell where the electron is created. We conclude that electron localization is due to its trapping at pentacoordinated sites, mostly present in the surface shell region. The present demonstration of fs hard X-ray absorption capabilities opens the way to a detailed description of the charge carrier dynamics in transition metal oxides.

  11. Surface structure and electronic properties of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siekhaus, W. J.; Somorjai, G. A.

    1975-01-01

    A surface potential model is developed to explain dopant effects on chemical vapor deposition. Auger analysis of the interaction between allotropic forms of carbon and silicon films has shown Si-C formation for all forms by glassy carbon. LEED intensity measurements have been used to determine the mean square displacement of surface atoms of silicon single crystals, and electron loss spectroscopy has shown the effect of structure and impurities on surface states located within the band gap. A thin film of Al has been used to enhance film crystallinity at low temperature.

  12. Structural, electronic and optical properties of carbonnitride

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Marvin L.

    1996-01-31

    Carbon nitride was proposed as a superhard material and a structural prototype, Beta-C3N4, was examined using several theoretical models. Some reports claiming experimental verifications have been made recently. The current status of the theory and experiment is reviewed, and a detailed discussion is presented of calculations of the electronic and optical properties of this material. These calculations predict that Beta-C3N4 will have a minimum gap which is indirect at 6.4 plus or minus 0.5 eV. A discussion of the possibility of carbon nitride nanotubes is also presented.

  13. Local structure of solid Rb at megabar pressures

    SciTech Connect

    De Panfilis, S.; Gorelli, F.; Santoro, M.; Ulivi, L.; Gregoryanz, E.; Irifune, T.; Shinmei, T.; Kantor, I.; Mathon, O.; Pascarelli, S.

    2015-06-07

    We have investigated the local and electronic structure of solid rubidium by means of x-ray absorption spectroscopy up to 101.0 GPa, thus doubling the maximum investigated experimental pressure. This study confirms the predicted stability of phase VI and was completed by the combination of two pivotal instrumental solutions. On one side, we made use of nanocrystalline diamond anvils, which, contrary to the more commonly used single crystal diamond anvils, do not generate sharp Bragg peaks (glitches) at specific energies that spoil the weak fine structure oscillations in the x-ray absorption cross section. Second, we exploited the performance of a state-of-the-art x-ray focussing device yielding a beam spot size of 5 × 5 μm{sup 2}, spatially stable over the entire energy scan. An advanced data analysis protocol was implemented to extract the pressure dependence of the structural parameters in phase VI of solid Rb from 51.2 GPa up to the highest pressure. A continuous reduction of the nearest neighbour distances was observed, reaching about 6% over the probed pressure range. We also discuss a phenomenological model based on the Einstein approximation to describe the pressure behaviour of the mean-square relative displacement. Within this simplified scheme, we estimate the Grüneisen parameter for this high pressure Rb phase to be in the 1.3–1.5 interval.

  14. Electronic structure calculation by nonlinear optimization: Application to metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedek, R.; Min, B. I.; Woodward, C.; Garner, J.

    1988-04-01

    There is considerable interest in the development of novel algorithms for the calculation of electronic structure (e.g., at the level of the local-density approximation of density-functional theory). In this paper we consider a first-order equation-of-motion method. Two methods of solution are described, one proposed by Williams and Soler, and the other base on a Born-Dyson series expansion. The extension of the approach to metallic systems is outlined and preliminary numerical calculations for Zintl-phase NaTl are presented.

  15. Comparison of optimization methods for electronic-structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, J.; Das, S. G.; Min, B. I.; Woodward, C.; Benedek, R.

    1989-06-01

    The performance of several local-optimization methods for calculating electronic structure is compared. The fictitious first-order equation of motion proposed by Williams and Soler is integrated numerically by three procedures: simple finite-difference integration, approximate analytical integration (the Williams-Soler algorithm), and the Born perturbation series. These techniques are applied to a model problem for which exact solutions are known, the Mathieu equation. The Williams-Soler algorithm and the second Born approximation converge equally rapidly, but the former involves considerably less computational effort and gives a more accurate converged solution. Application of the method of conjugate gradients to the Mathieu equation is discussed.

  16. 8th international conference on electronic spectroscopy and structure

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Art

    2000-10-16

    Gathering from 33 countries around the world, 408 registrants and a number of local drop-in participants descended on the Clark Kerr Campus of the University of California, Berkeley, from Monday, August 7 through Saturday, August 12, 2000 for the Eighth International Conference on Electronic Structure and Spectroscopy (ICESS8). At the conference, participants benefited from an extensive scientific program comprising more than 100 oral presentations (plenary lectures and invited and contributed talks) and 330 poster presentations, as well as ample time for socializing and a tour of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at the nearby Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  17. Electronic Structure of the NaxCoO2 Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillay, D.; Johannes, M. D.; Mazin, I. I.

    2008-12-01

    The idea that surface effects may play an important role in suppressing eg' Fermi surface pockets on NaxCoO2 (0.333≤x≤0.75) has been frequently proposed to explain the discrepancy between local-density approximation calculations which find eg' hole pockets present and Angle resolved photoemission spectra (ARPES) experiments, which do not observe the hole pockets. Since ARPES is a surface sensitive technique, it is important to investigate the effects that surface formation will have on the electronic structure. We show that a combination of surface formation and contamination effects could resolve the ongoing controversy between ARPES experiments and theory.

  18. Electronic structure of disordered α-FeMn alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paduani, C.; da Silva, E. G.

    1996-08-01

    Cluster calculations were performed with the first-principles discrete variational method, in the LSD approximation and spin-polarized case, to investigate the electronic structure of the ferromagnetic disordered α-FeMn alloys. We investigated the effect on the local magnetic properties at iron sites of the introduction of Mn atoms in their first and second neighborhoods. The calculated magnetic moment and hyperfine magnetic field ( Hc) for an isolated Mn atom in a bcc iron host were obtained as -3.15 μB and -230 kG, respectively, in good agreement with experimental results.

  19. Localization of antigens PwA33 and La on lampbrush chromosomes and on nucleoplasmic structures in the oocyte of the urodele Pleurodeles waltl: light and electron microscopic immunocytochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Pyne, C K; Simon, F; Loones, M T; Géraud, G; Bachmann, M; Lacroix, J C

    1994-12-01

    Monoclonal antibodies A33/22 and La11G7 have been used to study the distribution of the corresponding antigens, PwA33 and La, on the lampbrush chromosome loops and nucleoplasmic structures of P. waltl oocytes, using immunofluorescence, confocal laser scanning microscopy and immunogold labeling. The results obtained with these antibodies have been compared with those obtained with the Sm-antigen-specific monoclonal antibody Y12. All these monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) labeled the matrices of the majority of normal loops along their whole length. Nucleoplasmic RNP granules showed a strong staining with the mAbs La11G7 and Y12 throughout their mass, but with the mAb A33/22, they showed only a weak peripheral labeling in the form of patches on their surface. This patchy labeling was confirmed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Electron microscopy revealed that this patchy labeling might be due to a hitherto undescribed type of submicroscopic granular structure, around 100 nm in either dimension, formed by 10-nm particles. Such granules were observed either attached to the RNP granules or free in the nucleoplasm, but rarely in relation with the normal loop matrices. These 100-nm granules may have a role in the movement of proteins and snRNPs inside the oocyte nuclei for storage, recycling, and/or degradation. Our results also suggest that all the microscopically visible free RNP granules of the nucleoplasm of P. waltl oocytes correspond to B snurposomes. The granules forming the B (globular) loops showed a labeling pattern similar to that of B snurposomes; their possible relationship is discussed.

  20. Electronic dental anesthesia in a patient with suspected allergy to local anesthetics: report of case.

    PubMed

    Malamed, S F; Quinn, C L

    1988-01-01

    A 56-year-old patient with alleged allergy to local anesthetics required restorative dental treatment. Electronic dental anesthesia was used successfully, in lieu of injectable local anesthetics, to manage intraoperative pain associated with the restoration of vital mandibular teeth.

  1. Quantum mirages formed by coherent projection of electronic structure

    PubMed

    Manoharan; Lutz; Eigler

    2000-02-03

    Image projection relies on classical wave mechanics and the use of natural or engineered structures such as lenses or resonant cavities. Well-known examples include the bending of light to create mirages in the atmosphere, and the focusing of sound by whispering galleries. However, the observation of analogous phenomena in condensed matter systems is a more recent development, facilitated by advances in nanofabrication. Here we report the projection of the electronic structure surrounding a magnetic Co atom to a remote location on the surface of a Cu crystal; electron partial waves scattered from the real Co atom are coherently refocused to form a spectral image or 'quantum mirage'. The focusing device is an elliptical quantum corral, assembled on the Cu surface. The corral acts as a quantum mechanical resonator, while the two-dimensional Cu surface-state electrons form the projection medium. When placed on the surface, Co atoms display a distinctive spectroscopic signature, known as the many-particle Kondo resonance, which arises from their magnetic moment. By positioning a Co atom at one focus of the ellipse, we detect a strong Kondo signature not only at the atom, but also at the empty focus. This behaviour contrasts with the usual spatially-decreasing response of an electron gas to a localized perturbation.

  2. Structure and luminescence of intrinsic localized states in sodium silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinou, Konstantinos; Duffy, Dorothy M.; Shluger, Alexander L.

    2016-11-01

    Sodium silicate glasses exhibit a characteristic luminescence with a maximum at about 3.4 eV, which is thought to be determined by optical excitation of local glass structures, called L centers. To investigate the atomic and electronic structures of these centers, we calculated the electronic properties of the ground and excited states of a sodium silicate glass using classical and ab initio methods. Classical molecular dynamics was used to generate glass models of Na2O -3 SiO2 molar composition, and the density functional theory (DFT), with hybrid functionals, was used to identify and characterize the geometric and electronic structures of L centers. The ground and excited L* center states are studied, and their calculated excitation and luminescence transition energies are in good agreement with experimental data. The results confirm that the lowest triplet excited states in sodium silicate glass are associated with small clusters of Na ions and nonbridging oxygen atoms. These clusters serve as structural precursors for the localization of the excited states, and the broad distribution of the luminescence energies is correlated with the short-range order of the Na cations. The atomic and electronic structures of the electron E1- and hole H1+ centers are also studied. These results provide a more detailed insight into the atomistic structure of localized states in these important glasses.

  3. The CECAM Electronic Structure Library: community-driven development of software libraries for electronic structure simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Micael

    The CECAM Electronic Structure Library (ESL) is a community-driven effort to segregate shared pieces of software as libraries that could be contributed and used by the community. Besides allowing to share the burden of developing and maintaining complex pieces of software, these can also become a target for re-coding by software engineers as hardware evolves, ensuring that electronic structure codes remain at the forefront of HPC trends. In a series of workshops hosted at the CECAM HQ in Lausanne, the tools and infrastructure for the project were prepared, and the first contributions were included and made available online (http://esl.cecam.org). In this talk I will present the different aspects and aims of the ESL and how these can be useful for the electronic structure community.

  4. Electronic-structural dynamics in graphene.

    PubMed

    Gierz, Isabella; Cavalleri, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    We review our recent time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy experiments, which measure the transient electronic structure of optically driven graphene. For pump photon energies in the near infrared ([Formula: see text]), we have discovered the formation of a population-inverted state near the Dirac point, which may be of interest for the design of THz lasing devices and optical amplifiers. At lower pump photon energies ([Formula: see text]), for which interband absorption is not possible in doped samples, we find evidence for free carrier absorption. In addition, when mid-infrared pulses are made resonant with an infrared-active in-plane phonon of bilayer graphene ([Formula: see text]), a transient enhancement of the electron-phonon coupling constant is observed, providing interesting perspective for experiments that report light-enhanced superconductivity in doped fullerites in which a similar lattice mode was excited. All the studies reviewed here have important implications for applications of graphene in optoelectronic devices and for the dynamical engineering of electronic properties with light.

  5. Electronic-structural dynamics in graphene

    PubMed Central

    Gierz, Isabella; Cavalleri, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    We review our recent time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy experiments, which measure the transient electronic structure of optically driven graphene. For pump photon energies in the near infrared (ℏωpump=950 meV), we have discovered the formation of a population-inverted state near the Dirac point, which may be of interest for the design of THz lasing devices and optical amplifiers. At lower pump photon energies (ℏωpump<400 meV), for which interband absorption is not possible in doped samples, we find evidence for free carrier absorption. In addition, when mid-infrared pulses are made resonant with an infrared-active in-plane phonon of bilayer graphene (ℏωpump=200 meV), a transient enhancement of the electron-phonon coupling constant is observed, providing interesting perspective for experiments that report light-enhanced superconductivity in doped fullerites in which a similar lattice mode was excited. All the studies reviewed here have important implications for applications of graphene in optoelectronic devices and for the dynamical engineering of electronic properties with light. PMID:27822486

  6. Electron beam coupling to a metamaterial structure

    SciTech Connect

    French, David M.; Shiffler, Don; Cartwright, Keith

    2013-08-15

    Microwave metamaterials have shown promise in numerous applications, ranging from strip lines and antennas to metamaterial-based electron beam driven devices. In general, metamaterials allow microwave designers to obtain electromagnetic characteristics not typically available in nature. High Power Microwave (HPM) sources have in the past drawn inspiration from work done in the conventional microwave source community. In this article, the use of metamaterials in an HPM application is considered by using an effective medium model to determine the coupling of an electron beam to a metamaterial structure in a geometry similar to that of a dielectric Cerenkov maser. Use of the effective medium model allows for the analysis of a wide range of parameter space, including the “mu-negative,”“epsilon-negative,” and “double negative” regimes of the metamaterial. The physics of such a system are modeled analytically and by utilizing the particle-in-cell code ICEPIC. For this geometry and effective medium representation, optimum coupling of the electron beam to the metamaterial, and thus the optimum microwave or RF production, occurs in the epsilon negative regime of the metamaterial. Given that HPM tubes have been proposed that utilize a metamaterial, this model provides a rapid method of characterizing a source geometry that can be used to quickly understand the basic physics of such an HPM device.

  7. Analysis of boron carbides' electronic structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Iris A.; Beckel, Charles L.

    1986-01-01

    The electronic properties of boron-rich icosahedral clusters were studied as a means of understanding the electronic structure of the icosahedral borides such as boron carbide. A lower bound was estimated on bipolaron formation energies in B12 and B11C icosahedra, and the associated distortions. While the magnitude of the distortion associated with bipolaron formation is similar in both cases, the calculated formation energies differ greatly, formation being much more favorable on B11C icosahedra. The stable positions of a divalent atom relative to an icosahedral borane was also investigated, with the result that a stable energy minimum was found when the atom is at the center of the borane, internal to the B12 cage. If incorporation of dopant atoms into B12 cages in icosahedral boride solids is feasible, novel materials might result. In addition, the normal modes of a B12H12 cluster, of the C2B10 cage in para-carborane, and of a B12 icosahedron of reduced (D sub 3d) symmetry, such as is found in the icosahedral borides, were calculated. The nature of these vibrational modes will be important in determining, for instance, the character of the electron-lattice coupling in the borides, and in analyzing the lattice contribution to the thermal conductivity.

  8. Experimental Benchmarking of Pu Electronic Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J.G.; Moore, K.T.; Chung, B.W.; Wall, M.A.; Schwartz, A.J.; Ebbinghaus, B.B.; Butterfield, M.T.; Teslich, Jr., N.E.; Bliss, R.A.; Morton, S.A.; Yu, S.W.; Komesu, T.; Waddill, G.D.; van der Laan, G.; Kutepov, A.L.

    2008-10-30

    The standard method to determine the band structure of a condensed phase material is to (1) obtain a single crystal with a well defined surface and (2) map the bands with angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (occupied or valence bands) and inverse photoelectron spectroscopy (unoccupied or conduction bands). Unfortunately, in the case of Pu, the single crystals of Pu are either nonexistent, very small and/or having poorly defined surfaces. Furthermore, effects such as electron correlation and a large spin-orbit splitting in the 5f states have further complicated the situation. Thus, we have embarked upon the utilization of unorthodox electron spectroscopies, to circumvent the problems caused by the absence of large single crystals of Pu with well-defined surfaces. Our approach includes the techniques of resonant photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, Fano Effect measurements, and Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy, including the utilization of micro-focused beams to probe single-crystallite regions of polycrystalline Pu samples.

  9. Experimental Benchmarking of Pu Electronic Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G; Moore, K T; Chung, B W; Wall, M A; Schwartz, A J; Ebbinghaus, B B; Butterfield, M T; Teslich, Jr., N E; Bliss, R A; Morton, S A; Yu, S W; Komesu, T; Waddill, G D; der Laan, G v; Kutepov, A L

    2005-10-13

    The standard method to determine the band structure of a condensed phase material is to (1) obtain a single crystal with a well defined surface and (2) map the bands with angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (occupied or valence bands) and inverse photoelectron spectroscopy (unoccupied or conduction bands). Unfortunately, in the case of Pu, the single crystals of Pu are either nonexistent, very small and/or having poorly defined surfaces. Furthermore, effects such as electron correlation and a large spin-orbit splitting in the 5f states have further complicated the situation. Thus, we have embarked upon the utilization of unorthodox electron spectroscopies, to circumvent the problems caused by the absence of large single crystals of Pu with well-defined surfaces. Our approach includes the techniques of resonant photoelectron spectroscopy [1], x-ray absorption spectroscopy [1,2,3,4], electron energy loss spectroscopy [2,3,4], Fano Effect measurements [5], and Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy [6], including the utilization of micro-focused beams to probe single-crystallite regions of polycrystalline Pu samples. [2,3,6

  10. Geometry motivated alternative view on local protein backbone structures.

    PubMed

    Zacharias, Jan; Knapp, Ernst Walter

    2013-11-01

    We present an alternative to the classical Ramachandran plot (R-plot) to display local protein backbone structure. Instead of the (φ, ψ)-backbone angles relating to the chemical architecture of polypeptides generic helical parameters are used. These are the rotation or twist angle ϑ and the helical rise parameter d. Plots with these parameters provide a different view on the nature of local protein backbone structures. It allows to display the local structures in polar (d, ϑ)-coordinates, which is not possible for an R-plot, where structural regimes connected by periodicity appear disconnected. But there are other advantages, like a clear discrimination of the handedness of a local structure, a larger spread of the different local structure domains--the latter can yield a better separation of different local secondary structure motives--and many more. Compared to the R-plot we are not aware of any major disadvantage to classify local polypeptide structures with the (d, ϑ)-plot, except that it requires some elementary computations. To facilitate usage of the new (d, ϑ)-plot for protein structures we provide a web application (http://agknapp.chemie.fu-berlin.de/secsass), which shows the (d, ϑ)-plot side-by-side with the R-plot.

  11. Structure and navigation for electronic publishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillinghast, John; Beretta, Giordano B.

    1998-01-01

    The sudden explosion of the World Wide Web as a new publication medium has given a dramatic boost to the electronic publishing industry, which previously was a limited market centered around CD-ROMs and on-line databases. While the phenomenon has parallels to the advent of the tabloid press in the middle of last century, the electronic nature of the medium brings with it the typical characteristic of 4th wave media, namely the acceleration in its propagation speed and the volume of information. Consequently, e-publications are even flatter than print media; Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet share the same computer screen with a home-made plagiarized copy of Deep Throat. The most touted tool for locating useful information on the World Wide Web is the search engine. However, due to the medium's flatness, sought information is drowned in a sea of useless information. A better solution is to build tools that allow authors to structure information so that it can easily be navigated. We experimented with the use of ontologies as a tool to formulate structures for information about a specific topic, so that related concepts are placed in adjacent locations and can easily be navigated using simple and ergonomic user models. We describe our effort in building a World Wide Web based photo album that is shared among a small network of people.

  12. Multigrid Methods in Electronic Structure Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Emil

    1996-03-01

    Multigrid techniques have become the method of choice for a broad range of computational problems. Their use in electronic structure calculations introduces a new set of issues when compared to traditional plane wave approaches. We have developed a set of techniques that address these issues and permit multigrid algorithms to be applied to the electronic structure problem in an efficient manner. In our approach the Kohn-Sham equations are discretized on a real-space mesh using a compact representation of the Hamiltonian. The resulting equations are solved directly on the mesh using multigrid iterations. This produces rapid convergence rates even for ill-conditioned systems with large length and/or energy scales. The method has been applied to both periodic and non-periodic systems containing over 400 atoms and the results are in very good agreement with both theory and experiment. Example applications include a vacancy in diamond, an isolated C60 molecule, and a 64-atom cell of GaN with the Ga d-electrons in valence which required a 250 Ry cutoff. A particular strength of a real-space multigrid approach is its ready adaptability to massively parallel computer architectures. The compact representation of the Hamiltonian is especially well suited to such machines. Tests on the Cray-T3D have shown nearly linear scaling of the execution time up to the maximum number of processors (512). The MPP implementation has been used for studies of a large Amyloid Beta Peptide (C_146O_45N_42H_210) found in the brains of Alzheimers disease patients. Further applications of the multigrid method will also be described. (in collaboration D. J. Sullivan and J. Bernholc)

  13. Structure and local charging of electromigrated Au nanocontacts.

    PubMed

    Arnold, D; Marz, M; Schneider, S; Hoffmann-Vogel, R

    2017-02-03

    We study the structure and the electronic properties of Au nanocontacts created by controlled electromigration of thin film devices, a method frequently used to contact molecules. In contrast to electromigration testing, a current is applied in a cyclic fashion and during each cycle the resistance increase of the metal upon heating is used to avoid thermal runaway. In this way, nanometer sized-gaps are obtained. The thin film devices with an optimized structure at the origin of the electromigration process are made by shadow evaporation without contamination by organic materials. Defining rounded edges and a thinner area in the center of the device allow to pre-determine the location where the electromigration takes place. Scanning force microscopy images of the pristine Au film and electromigrated contact show its grainy structure. Through electromigration, a 1.5 μm-wide slit is formed, with extensions only on the anode side that had previously not been observed in narrower structures. It is discussed whether this could be explained by asymmetric heating of both electrodes. New grains are formed in the slit and on the extensions on both, the anode and the cathode side. The smaller structures inside the slit lead to an electrode distance below 150 nm. Kelvin probe force microscopy images show a local work function difference with fluctuations of 70 mV on the metal before electromigration. Between the electrodes, disconnected through electromigration, a work function difference of 3.2 V is observed due to charging. Some of the grains newly formed by electromigration are electrically disconnected from the electrodes.

  14. Structure and local charging of electromigrated Au nanocontacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, D.; Marz, M.; Schneider, S.; Hoffmann-Vogel, R.

    2017-02-01

    We study the structure and the electronic properties of Au nanocontacts created by controlled electromigration of thin film devices, a method frequently used to contact molecules. In contrast to electromigration testing, a current is applied in a cyclic fashion and during each cycle the resistance increase of the metal upon heating is used to avoid thermal runaway. In this way, nanometer sized-gaps are obtained. The thin film devices with an optimized structure at the origin of the electromigration process are made by shadow evaporation without contamination by organic materials. Defining rounded edges and a thinner area in the center of the device allow to pre-determine the location where the electromigration takes place. Scanning force microscopy images of the pristine Au film and electromigrated contact show its grainy structure. Through electromigration, a 1.5 μm-wide slit is formed, with extensions only on the anode side that had previously not been observed in narrower structures. It is discussed whether this could be explained by asymmetric heating of both electrodes. New grains are formed in the slit and on the extensions on both, the anode and the cathode side. The smaller structures inside the slit lead to an electrode distance below 150 nm. Kelvin probe force microscopy images show a local work function difference with fluctuations of 70 mV on the metal before electromigration. Between the electrodes, disconnected through electromigration, a work function difference of 3.2 V is observed due to charging. Some of the grains newly formed by electromigration are electrically disconnected from the electrodes.

  15. Electronic structure effects in liquid water studied by photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Nordlund, Dennis; Odelius, Michael; Bluhm, Hendrik; Ogasawara, Hirohito; Pettersson, Lars G.M.; Nilsson, Anders

    2008-04-29

    We present valence photoelectron emission spectra of liquid water in comparison with gas-phase water, ice close to the melting point, low temperature amorphous and crystalline ice. All aggregation states have major electronic structure changes relative to the free molecule, with rehybridization and development of bonding and anti-bonding states accompanying the hydrogen bond formation. Sensitivity to the local structural order, most prominent in the shape and splitting of the occupied 3a{sub 1} orbital, is understood from the electronic structure averaging over various geometrical structures, and reflects the local nature of the orbital interaction.

  16. Electronic Structure and Bonding in Complex Biomolecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Lizhi

    2005-03-01

    For over a century vitamin B12 and its enzyme cofactor derivates have persistently attracted research efforts for their vital biological role, unique Co-C bonding, rich red-ox chemistry, and recently their candidacies as drug delivery vehicles etc. However, our understanding of this complex metalorganic molecule's efficient enzyme activated catalytic power is still controversial. We have for the first time calculated the electronic structure, Mulliken effective charge and bonding of a whole Vitamin B12 molecule without any structural simplification by first- principles approaches based on density functional theory using structures determined by high resolution X-ray diffraction. A partial density of states analysis shows excellent agreement with X-ray absorption data and has been used successfully to interpret measured optical absorption spectra. Mulliken bonding analysis of B12 and its derivatives reveal noticeable correlations between the two axial ligands which could be exploited by the enzyme to control the catalytic process. Our calculated X-ray near edge structure of B12 and its derivates using Slater's transition state theory are also in good agreement with experiments. The same approach has been applied to other B12 derivatives, ferrocene peptides, and recently DNA molecules.

  17. Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication of Titanium Alloy Gradient Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brice, Craig A.; Newman, John A.; Bird, Richard Keith; Shenoy, Ravi N.; Baughman, James M.; Gupta, Vipul K.

    2014-01-01

    Historically, the structural optimization of aerospace components has been done through geometric methods. A monolithic material is chosen based on the best compromise between the competing design limiting criteria. Then the structure is geometrically optimized to give the best overall performance using the single material chosen. Functionally graded materials offer the potential to further improve structural efficiency by allowing the material composition and/or microstructural features to spatially vary within a single structure. Thus, local properties could be tailored to the local design limiting criteria. Additive manufacturing techniques enable the fabrication of such graded materials and structures. This paper presents the results of a graded material study using two titanium alloys processed using electron beam freeform fabrication, an additive manufacturing process. The results show that the two alloys uniformly mix at various ratios and the resultant static tensile properties of the mixed alloys behave according to rule-of-mixtures. Additionally, the crack growth behavior across an abrupt change from one alloy to the other shows no discontinuity and the crack smoothly transitions from one crack growth regime into another.

  18. Negative local resistance due to viscous electron backflow in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandurin, Denis

    Theoretical and experimental studies of systems in which particles undergo frequent mutual collisions date back to more than two centuries ago. Transport in such systems is described by hydrodynamic theory that was found very successful in explaining the response of classical liquids and gases to external fields. It has been argued for a long time that collective behavior of charge carriers in solids can be also described by hydrodynamic approach. However, there has been almost no direct evidence to hydrodynamic electron transport so far. This is because the conditions at which the hydrodynamic effects become observable are very strict: the electron-electron scattering length should provide the shortest spatial scale in the problem. First of all, this requires ultra clean systems where the scattering at impurities is diminished. Second, the electron-phonon scattering rate should be smaller than that of electron-electron scattering. Due to weak electron-phonon coupling high mobility graphene devices offer an ideal system to study electron hydrodynamics. To amplify the hydrodynamic effects we employed a special measurement geometry. The idea is that in case of hydrodynamic electron flow, vortices emerge in the spatial electric current distribution near the current injection contact. That results in a development of a negative voltage drop at the nearby contacts. We were able to detect such negative signal over the range of temperatures when the electronic system is in a hydrodynamic regime. Finally, we performed a rheological study of electron liquid in graphene. The electron viscosity was found to be an order of magnitude larger than that of honey which is in good agreement with many-body calculation.

  19. Electronic structure of Ca, Sr, and Ba under pressure.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Animalu, A. O. E.; Heine, V.; Vasvari, B.

    1967-01-01

    Electronic band structure calculations phase of Ca, Sr and Ba over wide range of atomic volumes under pressure electronic band structure calculations for fcc phase of Ca, Sr and Ba over wide range of atomic volumes under pressure electronic band structure calculations for fcc phase of Ca, Sr and Ba over wide range of atomic volumes under pressure

  20. Electronic structure of benzene adsorbed on Ni and Cu surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Weinelt, M.; Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N.

    1997-04-01

    Benzene has for a long time served as a prototype adsorption system of large molecules. It adsorbs with the molecular plane parallel to the surface. The bonding of benzene to a transition metal is typically viewed to involve the {pi} system. Benzene adsorbs weakly on Cu and strongly on Ni. It is interesting to study how the adsorption strength is reflected in the electronic structure of the adsorbate-substrate complex. The authors have used X-ray Emission (XE) and X-ray Absorption (XA) spectroscopies to selectively study the electronic states localized on the adsorbed benzene molecule. Using XES the occupied states can be studies and with XAS the unoccupied states. The authors have used beamline 8.0 and the Swedish endstation equipped with a grazing incidence x-ray spectrometer and a partial yield absorption detector. The resolution in the XES and XAS were 0.5 eV and 0.05 eV, respectively.

  1. Population structure with localized haplotype clusters.

    PubMed

    Browning, Sharon R; Weir, Bruce S

    2010-08-01

    We propose a multilocus version of F(ST) and a measure of haplotype diversity using localized haplotype clusters. Specifically, we use haplotype clusters identified with BEAGLE, which is a program implementing a hidden Markov model for localized haplotype clustering and performing several functions including inference of haplotype phase. We apply this methodology to HapMap phase 3 data. With this haplotype-cluster approach, African populations have highest diversity and lowest divergence from the ancestral population, East Asian populations have lowest diversity and highest divergence, and other populations (European, Indian, and Mexican) have intermediate levels of diversity and divergence. These relationships accord with expectation based on other studies and accepted models of human history. In contrast, the population-specific F(ST) estimates obtained directly from single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) do not reflect such expected relationships. We show that ascertainment bias of SNPs has less impact on the proposed haplotype-cluster-based F(ST) than on the SNP-based version, which provides a potential explanation for these results. Thus, these new measures of F(ST) and haplotype-cluster diversity provide an important new tool for population genetic analysis of high-density SNP data.

  2. Enhancing community detection by using local structural information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Ju; Hu, Ke; Zhang, Yan; Bao, Mei-Hua; Tang, Liang; Tang, Yan-Ni; Gao, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Jian-Ming; Chen, Benyan; Hu, Jing-Bo

    2016-03-01

    Many real-world networks, such as gene networks, protein-protein interaction networks and metabolic networks, exhibit community structures, meaning the existence of groups of densely connected vertices in the networks. Many local similarity measures in the networks are closely related to the concept of the community structures, and may have a positive effect on community detection in the networks. Here, various local similarity measures are used to extract local structural information, which is then applied to community detection in the networks by using the edge-reweighting strategy. The effect of the local similarity measures on community detection is carefully investigated and compared in various networks. The experimental results show that the local similarity measures are crucial for the improvement of community detection methods, while the positive effect of the local similarity measures is closely related to the networks under study and applied community detection methods.

  3. Order-N Electronic Structure Calculation of n-TYPE GaAs Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, S.; Iitaka, T.

    2008-10-01

    A linear scale method for calculating electronic properties of large and complex systems is introduced within a local density approximation. The method is based on the Chebyshev polynomial expansion and the time-dependent method, which is tested in calculating the electronic structure of a model n-type GaAs quantum dot.

  4. Electronic structure and magneto-optical properties of CeSb and Gd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antropov, V. P.; Liechtenstein, A. I.; Harmon, B. N.

    1995-02-01

    The electronic structure of gadolinium metal and CeSb have been calculated using a density functional method which explicitly includes the Coulomb parameter U for the 4f-electrons. The calculated density of states, total energies, Fermi surface, and magneto-optical properties are in better agreement with experiment than those obtained with the standard local density technique.

  5. Electronic structure and bonding in transuranics: comparison with lanthanides

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    The physico-chemical properties of the actinide metals, alloys, and compounds show interesting parallels and contrasts with the rare earths, beyond uranium. At first there is a transition region where the unique bonding properties of the early actinides become less prominent, due to progressive f-electron localization. Nevertheless, in contrast to the rare earths, f-electron energies remain close to the Fermi level, resulting in complex behavior as a function of temperature, pressure and structure. Particularly interesting in this region are the metallic hydrides, whose chemistry is clearly rare-earth like, but whose electronic properties are entirely different. At americium a major localization and f-band narrowing occurs, but the explanation of americium behavior is obscured by the occurrence of the unique f/sup 6/ non-magnetic solid-state configuration. Beyond americium, it would appear that real rare-earth-like behavior finally begins; this has been born out by recent studies on the thermodynamics and cohesive energies of curium, berkelium, californium and einsteinium metals. However, a new complication arises almost immediately, in the onset of incipient stabilization of the divalent state, which already appears in californium, whose physico-chemical properties are remarkably similar to samarium. Einsteinium appears to be fully divalent, thus heralding the beginning of a mini-series of truly divalent metals.

  6. Reversible Hydrogen Storage Materials – Structure, Chemistry, and Electronic Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Ian M.; Johnson, Duane D.

    2014-06-21

    To understand the processes involved in the uptake and release of hydrogen from candidate light-weight metal hydride storage systems, a combination of materials characterization techniques and first principle calculation methods have been employed. In addition to conventional microstructural characterization in the transmission electron microscope, which provides projected information about the through thickness microstructure, electron tomography methods were employed to determine the three-dimensional spatial distribution of catalyst species for select systems both before and after dehydrogenation. Catalyst species identification as well as compositional analysis of the storage material before and after hydrogen charging and discharging was performed using a combination of energy dispersive spectroscopy, EDS, and electron energy loss spectroscopy, EELS. The characterization effort was coupled with first-principles, electronic-structure and thermodynamic techniques to predict and assess meta-stable and stable phases, reaction pathways, and thermodynamic and kinetic barriers. Systems studied included:NaAlH4, CaH2/CaB6 and Ca(BH4)2, MgH2/MgB2, Ni-Catalyzed Magnesium Hydride, TiH2-Catalyzed Magnesium Hydride, LiBH4, Aluminum-based systems and Aluminum

  7. Structural evolution and valence electron-state change during ultra thin silicon-oxide growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, A.; Abe, S.; Nakayama, H.; Nishino, T.; Iida, S.

    2000-06-01

    We have studied valence electron-state changes of Si during initial oxidation of Si(111) clean surface, HF-treated Si(001) and Si(111) surfaces by Auger valence electron spectroscopy (AVES). The results showed that the valence electron-state changes during initial oxidation were sensitively reflected in Si[2s,2p,V] (V=3s,3p) AVES spectra and that they depended on both initial surface treatment and surface orientation. The local valence electron-states, local density of states in other words, showed the characteristic-structure evolution depending on the initial surface treatment and surface orientation.

  8. Local atomic structure modulations activate metal oxide as electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu Hang; Liu, Peng Fei; Pan, Lin Feng; Wang, Hai Feng; Yang, Zhen Zhong; Zheng, Li Rong; Hu, P.; Zhao, Hui Jun; Gu, Lin; Yang, Hua Gui

    2015-01-01

    Modifications of local structure at atomic level could precisely and effectively tune the capacity of materials, enabling enhancement in the catalytic activity. Here we modulate the local atomic structure of a classical but inert transition metal oxide, tungsten trioxide, to be an efficient electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water, which has shown promise as an alternative to platinum. Structural analyses and theoretical calculations together indicate that the origin of the enhanced activity could be attributed to the tailored electronic structure by means of the local atomic structure modulations. We anticipate that suitable structure modulations might be applied on other transition metal oxides to meet the optimal thermodynamic and kinetic requirements, which may pave the way to unlock the potential of other promising candidates as cost-effective electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution in industry. PMID:26286479

  9. Local atomic structure modulations activate metal oxide as electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu Hang; Liu, Peng Fei; Pan, Lin Feng; Wang, Hai Feng; Yang, Zhen Zhong; Zheng, Li Rong; Hu, P.; Zhao, Hui Jun; Gu, Lin; Yang, Hua Gui

    2015-08-01

    Modifications of local structure at atomic level could precisely and effectively tune the capacity of materials, enabling enhancement in the catalytic activity. Here we modulate the local atomic structure of a classical but inert transition metal oxide, tungsten trioxide, to be an efficient electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water, which has shown promise as an alternative to platinum. Structural analyses and theoretical calculations together indicate that the origin of the enhanced activity could be attributed to the tailored electronic structure by means of the local atomic structure modulations. We anticipate that suitable structure modulations might be applied on other transition metal oxides to meet the optimal thermodynamic and kinetic requirements, which may pave the way to unlock the potential of other promising candidates as cost-effective electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution in industry.

  10. Local atomic structure modulations activate metal oxide as electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu Hang; Liu, Peng Fei; Pan, Lin Feng; Wang, Hai Feng; Yang, Zhen Zhong; Zheng, Li Rong; Hu, P; Zhao, Hui Jun; Gu, Lin; Yang, Hua Gui

    2015-08-19

    Modifications of local structure at atomic level could precisely and effectively tune the capacity of materials, enabling enhancement in the catalytic activity. Here we modulate the local atomic structure of a classical but inert transition metal oxide, tungsten trioxide, to be an efficient electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in acidic water, which has shown promise as an alternative to platinum. Structural analyses and theoretical calculations together indicate that the origin of the enhanced activity could be attributed to the tailored electronic structure by means of the local atomic structure modulations. We anticipate that suitable structure modulations might be applied on other transition metal oxides to meet the optimal thermodynamic and kinetic requirements, which may pave the way to unlock the potential of other promising candidates as cost-effective electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution in industry.

  11. Efficient O(N) integration for all-electron electronic structure calculation using numeric basis functions

    SciTech Connect

    Havu, V. Blum, V.; Havu, P.; Scheffler, M.

    2009-12-01

    We consider the problem of developing O(N) scaling grid-based operations needed in many central operations when performing electronic structure calculations with numeric atom-centered orbitals as basis functions. We outline the overall formulation of localized algorithms, and specifically the creation of localized grid batches. The choice of the grid partitioning scheme plays an important role in the performance and memory consumption of the grid-based operations. Three different top-down partitioning methods are investigated, and compared with formally more rigorous yet much more expensive bottom-up algorithms. We show that a conceptually simple top-down grid partitioning scheme achieves essentially the same efficiency as the more rigorous bottom-up approaches.

  12. Immuno- and correlative light microscopy-electron tomography methods for 3D protein localization in yeast.

    PubMed

    Mari, Muriel; Geerts, Willie J C; Reggiori, Fulvio

    2014-10-01

    Compartmentalization of eukaryotic cells is created and maintained through membrane rearrangements that include membrane transport and organelle biogenesis. Three-dimensional reconstructions with nanoscale resolution in combination with protein localization are essential for an accurate molecular dissection of these processes. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a key model system for identifying genes and characterizing pathways essential for the organization of cellular ultrastructures. Electron microscopy studies of yeast, however, have been hampered by the presence of a cell wall that obstructs penetration of resins and cryoprotectants, and by the protein dense cytoplasm, which obscures the membrane details. Here we present an immuno-electron tomography (IET) method, which allows the determination of protein distribution patterns on reconstructed organelles from yeast. In addition, we extend this IET approach into a correlative light microscopy-electron tomography procedure where structures positive for a specific protein localized through a fluorescent signal are resolved in 3D. These new investigative tools for yeast will help to advance our understanding of the endomembrane system organization in eukaryotic cells.

  13. Electron localization in ultrathin films of three-dimensional topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Jian; Shi, Gang; Liu, Nan; Li, Yongqing

    2016-11-01

    The recent discovery of three-dimensional (3D) topological insulators (TIs) has provided a fertile ground for obtaining further insights into electron localization in condensed matter systems. In the past few years, a tremendous amount of research effort has been devoted to investigate electron transport properties of 3D TIs and their low dimensional structures in a wide range of disorder strength, covering transport regimes from weak antilocalization to strong localization. The knowledge gained from these studies not only offers sensitive means to probe the surface states of 3D TIs but also forms a basis for exploring novel topological phases. In this article, we briefly review the main experimental progress in the study of the localization in 3D TIs, with a focus on the latest results on ultrathin TI films. Some new transport data will also be presented in order to complement those reported previously in the literature. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2012CB921703 and 2015CB921102), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61425015, 11374337, and 91121003), and the Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDB070202).

  14. Local imaging of high mobility two-dimensional electron systems with virtual scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pelliccione, M.; Bartel, J.; Goldhaber-Gordon, D.; Sciambi, A.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.

    2014-11-03

    Correlated electron states in high mobility two-dimensional electron systems (2DESs), including charge density waves and microemulsion phases intermediate between a Fermi liquid and Wigner crystal, are predicted to exhibit complex local charge order. Existing experimental studies, however, have mainly probed these systems at micron to millimeter scales rather than directly mapping spatial organization. Scanning probes should be well-suited to study the spatial structure of these states, but high mobility 2DESs are found at buried semiconductor interfaces, beyond the reach of conventional scanning tunneling microscopy. Scanning techniques based on electrostatic coupling to the 2DES deliver important insights, but generally with resolution limited by the depth of the 2DES. In this letter, we present our progress in developing a technique called “virtual scanning tunneling microscopy” that allows local tunneling into a high mobility 2DES. Using a specially designed bilayer GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure where the tunnel coupling between two separate 2DESs is tunable via electrostatic gating, combined with a scanning gate, we show that the local tunneling can be controlled with sub-250 nm resolution.

  15. Local structural study of doped-ceria by EXAFS spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirbhate, S. C.; Yadav, A. K.; Acharya, S. A.; Sagdeo, A. P.; Jha, S. N.

    2016-05-01

    In the present work, Structural and Local structural study of Sm, Gd doped and Sm-Gd co-doped ceria system has been studied by Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy (EXAFS). These ceria based systems are synthesized by hydrothermal synthesis route. Fluorite structure is confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and data is well fitted using Rietveld refinement by Full-Prof suite. Local structural changes in terms of coordination with surrounding, inter atomic distances and Debye Waller factor of nearest neighbor and next nearest neighbor has been discussed.

  16. Electron Liquids in Semiconductor Quantum Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Aron Pinczuk

    2009-05-25

    The groups led by Stormer and Pinczuk have focused this project on goals that seek the elucidation of novel many-particle effects that emerge in two-dimensional electron systems (2DES) as the result from fundamental quantum interactions. This experimental research is conducted under extreme conditions of temperature and magnetic field. From the materials point of view, the ultra-high mobility systems in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum structures continue to be at the forefront of this research. The newcomer materials are based on graphene, a single atomic layer of graphite. The graphene research is attracting enormous attention from many communities involved in condensed matter research. The investigated many-particle phenomena include the integer and fractional quantum Hall effect, composite fermions, and Dirac fermions, and a diverse group of electron solid and liquid crystal phases. The Stormer group performed magneto-transport experiments and far-infrared spectroscopy, while the Pinczuk group explores manifestations of such phases in optical spectra.

  17. Electronic structures of reconstructed zigzag silicene nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Yi E-mail: wangyanli-04@tsinghua.org.cn; Wang, Yanli E-mail: wangyanli-04@tsinghua.org.cn

    2014-02-24

    Edge states and magnetism are crucial for spintronic applications of nanoribbons. Here, using first-principles calculations, we explore structural stabilities and electronic properties of zigzag silicene nanoribbons (ZSiNRs) with Klein and pentagon-heptagon reconstructions. Comparing to unreconstructed zigzag edges, deformed bare pentagon-heptagon ones are favored under H-poor conditions, while H-rich surroundings stabilize di-hydrogenated Klein edges. These Klein edges have analogous magnetism to zigzag ones, which also possess the electric-field-induced half-metallicity of nanoribbons. Moreover, diverse magnetic states can be achieved by asymmetric Klein and zigzag edges into ZSiNRs, which could be transformed from antiferromagnetic-semiconductors to bipolar spin-gapless-semiconductors and ferromagnetic-metals depending on edge hydrogenations.

  18. Structure, Stability and Electronic Properties of Nanodiamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, Giulia

    Diamond nanoparticles, or nanodiamonds, have the most disparate origins. They are found in crude oil at concentrations up to thousands of parts per million, in meteorites, interstellar dust, and protoplanetary nebulae, as well as in certain sediment layers on Earth. They can also be produced in the laboratory by chemical vapor deposition or by detonating high explosive materials. Here we summarize what is known about nanodiamond sources; we then describe the atomic and electronic structure, and stability of diamond nanoparticles, highlighting the role of theory and computations in understanding and predicting their properties. Possible technological applications of thin films composed of nanodiamonds, ranging from micro-resonators to substrates for drug delivery, are briefly discussed.

  19. Core-hole effect on XANES and electronic structure of minor actinide dioxides with fluorite structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Chikashi; Nishi, Tsuyoshi; Nakada, Masami; Akabori, Mitsuo; Hirata, Masaru; Kaji, Yoshiyuki

    2012-02-01

    The authors investigated theoretically core-hole effects on X-ray absorption near-edge structures (XANES) of Np and Am LIII in neptunium dioxide (NpO2) and americium dioxide (AmO2) with CaF2-type crystal lattices using the all-electron full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave (FP-LAPW) method. The peak creation mechanism of XANES was shown by examining the electronic structures of these oxides, which indicated that core-hole screening was more marked for AmO2 than for NpO2 because of the difference in the charge transfer between these oxides. Furthermore, the results of charge density analysis suggested that the white line was assigned to the quasi-bound state composed of the localized Np d or Am d components and O components, and that the tail structure was created as a result of delocalized standing waves between the Np or Am atoms.

  20. Band structures and localization properties of aperiodic layered phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhi-Zhong; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2012-03-01

    The band structures and localization properties of in-plane elastic waves with coupling of longitudinal and transverse modes oblique propagating in aperiodic phononic crystals based on Thue-Morse and Rudin-Shapiro sequences are studied. Using transfer matrix method, the concept of the localization factor is introduced and the correctness is testified through the Rytov dispersion relation. For comparison, the perfect periodic structure and the quasi-periodic Fibonacci system are also considered. In addition, the influences of the random disorder, local resonance, translational and/or mirror symmetries on the band structures of the aperiodic phononic crystals are analyzed in this paper.

  1. Local gravity and large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juszkiewicz, Roman; Vittorio, Nicola; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1990-01-01

    The magnitude and direction of the observed dipole anisotropy of the galaxy distribution can in principle constrain the amount of large-scale power present in the spectrum of primordial density fluctuations. This paper confronts the data, provided by a recent redshift survey of galaxies detected by the IRAS satellite, with the predictions of two cosmological models with very different levels of large-scale power: the biased Cold Dark Matter dominated model (CDM) and a baryon-dominated model (BDM) with isocurvature initial conditions. Model predictions are investigated for the Local Group peculiar velocity, v(R), induced by mass inhomogeneities distributed out to a given radius, R, for R less than about 10,000 km/s. Several convergence measures for v(R) are developed, which can become powerful cosmological tests when deep enough samples become available. For the present data sets, the CDM and BDM predictions are indistinguishable at the 2 sigma level and both are consistent with observations. A promising discriminant between cosmological models is the misalignment angle between v(R) and the apex of the dipole anisotropy of the microwave background.

  2. Photo-electron momentum distribution and electron localization studies from laser-induced atomic and molecular dissociations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Dipanwita

    The broad objective of ultrafast strong-field studies is to be able to measure and control atomic and molecular dynamics on a femtosecond timescale. This thesis work has two major themes: (1) Study of high-energy photoelectron distributions from atomic targets. (2) Electron localization control in atomic and molecular reactions using shaped laser pulses. The first section focuses on the study of photoelectron diffraction patterns of simple atomic targets to understand the target structure. We measure the full vector momentum spectra of high energy photoelectrons from atomic targets (Xe, Ar and Kr) generated by intense laser pulses. The target dependence of the angular distribution of the highest energy photoelectrons as predicted by Quantitative Rescattering Theory (QRS) is explored. More recent developments show target structure information can be retrieved from photoelectrons over a range of energies, from 4Up up to 10Up, independent of the peak intensity at which the photoelectron spectra have been measured. Controlling the fragmentation pathways by manipulating the pulse shape is another major theme of ultrafast science today. In the second section we study the asymmetry of electron (and ion) emission from atoms (and molecules) by interaction with asymmetric pulses formed by the superposition of two colors (800 & 400 nm). Xe electron momentum spectra obtained as a function of the two-color phase exhibit a pronounced asymmetry. Using QRS theory we can analyze this asymmetric yield of the high energy photoelectrons to determine accurately the laser peak intensity and the absolute phase of the two-color electric field. This can be used as a standard pulse calibration method for all two-color studies. Experiments showing strong left-right asymmetry in D+ ion yield from D2 molecules using two-color pulses is also investigated. The asymmetry effect is found to be very ion-energy dependent.

  3. A Discontinuous Galerkin Framework for Electronic Structure Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baczewski, Andrew; Shanker, Balasubramaniam; Mahanti, Subhendra; Levine, Benjamin

    2012-02-01

    It is generally accepted that a good basis set for any calculation should possess a number of salient features, including systematic improvability, adaptive resolution of multiscale features, and fidelity in capturing the pertinent physics. Considering the progenitors of most modern electronic structure basis sets to be Gaussian-type orbitals or planewaves, descendants of these methods have inherited features that address either systematic improvability (planewaves) or adaptive resolution (Gaussians) separately, and use a variety of tricks to differentiate the core and valence physics. Discontinuous Galerkin methods provide a framework for defining adaptive local basis sets, that may be based on these canonical basis sets, that can be mixed and matched to simultaneously achieve all of these goals. Our group is presently developing a new electronic structure code to enable Density Functional and Hartree-Fock calculations within this framework, particularly in the context of all-electron formulations wherein the accurate resolution of both core and valence states is necessary. Numerous implementation details will be addressed, including the incorporation of hardware- and software-based acceleration, such as GPU-based parallelism, and fast electrostatics solvers.

  4. Electronic and structural ground state of heavy alkali metals at high pressure

    DOE PAGES

    Fabbris, G.; Lim, J.; Veiga, L. S. I.; ...

    2015-02-17

    Here, alkali metals display unexpected properties at high pressure, including emergence of low symmetry crystal structures, that appear to occur due to enhanced electronic correlations among the otherwise nearly-free conduction electrons. We investigate the high pressure electronic and structural ground state of K, Rb, and Cs using x-ray absorption spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction measurements together with ab initio theoretical calculations. The sequence of phase transitions under pressure observed at low temperature is similar in all three heavy alkalis except for the absence of the oC84 phase in Cs. Both the experimental and theoretical results point to pressure-enhanced localization of themore » valence electrons characterized by pseudo-gap formation near the Fermi level and strong spd hybridization. Although the crystal structures predicted to host magnetic order in K are not observed, the localization process appears to drive these alkalis closer to a strongly correlated electron state.« less

  5. Electronic and structural ground state of heavy alkali metals at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Fabbris, G.; Lim, J.; Veiga, L. S. I.; Haskel, D.; Schilling, J. S.

    2015-02-17

    Here, alkali metals display unexpected properties at high pressure, including emergence of low symmetry crystal structures, that appear to occur due to enhanced electronic correlations among the otherwise nearly-free conduction electrons. We investigate the high pressure electronic and structural ground state of K, Rb, and Cs using x-ray absorption spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction measurements together with ab initio theoretical calculations. The sequence of phase transitions under pressure observed at low temperature is similar in all three heavy alkalis except for the absence of the oC84 phase in Cs. Both the experimental and theoretical results point to pressure-enhanced localization of the valence electrons characterized by pseudo-gap formation near the Fermi level and strong spd hybridization. Although the crystal structures predicted to host magnetic order in K are not observed, the localization process appears to drive these alkalis closer to a strongly correlated electron state.

  6. Atomic and electronic structure of twin growth defects in magnetite

    PubMed Central

    Gilks, Daniel; Nedelkoski, Zlatko; Lari, Leonardo; Kuerbanjiang, Balati; Matsuzaki, Kosuke; Susaki, Tomofumi; Kepaptsoglou, Demie; Ramasse, Quentin; Evans, Richard; McKenna, Keith; Lazarov, Vlado K.

    2016-01-01

    We report the existence of a stable twin defect in Fe3O4 thin films. By using aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopy the atomic structure of the twin boundary has been determined. The boundary is confined to the (111) growth plane and it is non-stoichiometric due to a missing Fe octahedral plane. By first principles calculations we show that the local atomic structural configuration of the twin boundary does not change the nature of the superexchange interactions between the two Fe sublattices across the twin grain boundary. Besides decreasing the half-metallic band gap at the boundary the altered atomic stacking at the boundary does not change the overall ferromagnetic (FM) coupling between the grains. PMID:26876049

  7. Atomic and electronic structure of twin growth defects in magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilks, Daniel; Nedelkoski, Zlatko; Lari, Leonardo; Kuerbanjiang, Balati; Matsuzaki, Kosuke; Susaki, Tomofumi; Kepaptsoglou, Demie; Ramasse, Quentin; Evans, Richard; McKenna, Keith; Lazarov, Vlado K.

    2016-02-01

    We report the existence of a stable twin defect in Fe3O4 thin films. By using aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopy the atomic structure of the twin boundary has been determined. The boundary is confined to the (111) growth plane and it is non-stoichiometric due to a missing Fe octahedral plane. By first principles calculations we show that the local atomic structural configuration of the twin boundary does not change the nature of the superexchange interactions between the two Fe sublattices across the twin grain boundary. Besides decreasing the half-metallic band gap at the boundary the altered atomic stacking at the boundary does not change the overall ferromagnetic (FM) coupling between the grains.

  8. Structure and Electronic Properties of Cerium Orthophosphate: Theory and Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Adelstein, Nicole; Mun, B. Simon; Ray, Hannah; Ross Jr, Phillip; Neaton, Jeffrey; De Jonghe, Lutgard

    2010-07-27

    Structural and electronic properties of cerium orthophosphate (CePO{sub 4}) are calculated using density functional theory (DFT) with the local spin-density approximation (LSDA+U), with and without gradient corrections (GGA-(PBE)+U), and compared to X-ray diffraction and photoemission spectroscopy measurements. The density of states is found to change significantly as the Hubbard parameter U, which is applied to the Ce 4f states, is varied from 0 to 5 eV. The calculated structural properties are in good agreement with experiment and do not change significantly with U. Choosing U = 3 eV for LDSA provides the best agreement between the calculated density of states and the experimental photoemission spectra.

  9. Atomic and electronic structure of twin growth defects in magnetite.

    PubMed

    Gilks, Daniel; Nedelkoski, Zlatko; Lari, Leonardo; Kuerbanjiang, Balati; Matsuzaki, Kosuke; Susaki, Tomofumi; Kepaptsoglou, Demie; Ramasse, Quentin; Evans, Richard; McKenna, Keith; Lazarov, Vlado K

    2016-02-15

    We report the existence of a stable twin defect in Fe3O4 thin films. By using aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopy the atomic structure of the twin boundary has been determined. The boundary is confined to the (111) growth plane and it is non-stoichiometric due to a missing Fe octahedral plane. By first principles calculations we show that the local atomic structural configuration of the twin boundary does not change the nature of the superexchange interactions between the two Fe sublattices across the twin grain boundary. Besides decreasing the half-metallic band gap at the boundary the altered atomic stacking at the boundary does not change the overall ferromagnetic (FM) coupling between the grains.

  10. Localization-delocalization transition of electrons at the percolation threshold of semiconductor GaAs1–xNx alloys: The appearance of a mobility edge

    DOE PAGES

    Alberi, K.; Fluegel, B.; Beaton, D. A.; ...

    2012-07-09

    Electrons in semiconductor alloys have generally been described in terms of Bloch states that evolve from constructive interference of electron waves scattering from perfectly periodic potentials, despite the loss of structural periodicity that occurs on alloying. Using the semiconductor alloy GaAs₁₋xNx as a prototype, we demonstrate a localized to delocalized transition of the electronic states at a percolation threshold, the emergence of a mobility edge, and the onset of an abrupt perturbation to the host GaAs electronic structure, shedding light on the evolution of electronic structure in these abnormal alloys.

  11. Kinetics of vertical transport and localization of electrons in strained semiconductor supperlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Gerchikov, L. G. Mamaev, Yu. A.; Yashin, Yu. P.

    2015-08-15

    The kinetics of vertical electron transport in a semiconductor superlattice is considered taking into account partial localization of electrons. The time dependences of photoemission currents from samples based on a strained semiconductor superlattice calculated by numerically solving the kinetic equation are in good agreement with experimental data. Comparison of the theory with experiment makes it possible to determine the characteristic electron localization and thermoactivation times, the diffusion length, and losses of photoelectrons in the superlattice.

  12. Theory of electronic polarization and localization in insulators with applications to solid hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Ivo Nuno Saldanha Do Rosario E.

    A theory is formulated, and practical expressions are derived, for the full quantum-mechanical distribution of the intrinsic macroscopic polarization of an insulator in terms of the ground state wave function. The formalism applies to an insulating system of N electrons obeying twisted boundary conditions over a finite volume. The central quantity is a cumulant generating function which yields, upon successive differentiation, all the cumulants and moments of the probability distribution of an appropriately defined center of mass X/N of the electrons ( X=SN i=1xi ). The first moment is the average polarization, where we recover the well-known Berry phase expression. The second cumulant gives the mean-square fluctuation of the polarization, which defines an electronic localization length squared x2m along each direction m:x2m= X2m -Xm 2/N . It can be expressed in terms of a metric, which measures the infinitesimal distance between quantum states in a Hilbert space parametrized by the twisted boundary conditions. The fluctuation-dissipation relation is used to show that in the thermodynamic limit x2m diverges when the system becomes metallic and is a finite, measurable quantity in the insulating state, related to the optical gap by x2m≤ℎ2 /2meEg . In noninteracting systems x2m is related to the spread of the Wannier functions, and this picture is generalized to correlated insulators by defining the many-body analog of Wannier functions. In the limit of large N the maximally-localized many-body Wannier functions become localized in disconnected regions of the high-dimensional configuration space of the N electrons, establishing a direct connection with Kohn's theory of the insulating state. By recasting the generating function in terms of these functions, it is shown that macroscopic polarization results from the localized character of an insulating wave function in configuration space. The Berry phase theory is used to compute the Born effective charges in

  13. Local structural modeling for implementation of optimal active damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaurock, Carl A.; Miller, David W.

    1993-09-01

    Local controllers are good candidates for active control of flexible structures. Local control generally consists of low order, frequency benign compensators using collocated hardware. Positive real compensators and plant transfer functions ensure that stability margins and performance robustness are high. The typical design consists of an experimentally chosen gain on a fixed form controller such as rate feedback. The resulting compensator performs some combination of damping (dissipating energy) and structural modification (changing the energy flow paths). Recent research into structural impedance matching has shown how to optimize dissipation based on the local behavior of the structure. This paper investigates the possibility of improving performance by influencing global energy flow, using local controllers designed using a global performance metric.

  14. Electronic structure of stacking faults in rhombohedral graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taut, M.; Koepernik, K.; Richter, M.

    2014-08-01

    The electronic structure of stacking faults and surfaces without and with an additional displaced layer is calculated for the case of rhombohedral (ABC) graphite. The full-potential local-orbital code and the generalized gradient approximation to density functional theory are used. All considered surfaces and interfaces induce surface/interface bands. All discovered surface and interface bands are restricted to the vicinity of the symmetry line K-M in the two-dimensional Brillouin zone. There are groups of localized band pairs around ±0, ±0.2, and ±0.6 eV for one of the two considered types of stacking faults; ±0 and ±0.5 eV for the other type and for a displaced surface layer. At the K point in the Brillouin zone, there is a one-to-one correspondence between these localized bands and the eigenvalues of those linear atomic clusters, which are produced by the perturbation of periodicity due to the displaced surface layer or due to the stacking faults. Some of the localized bands produce strong van Hove singularities in the local density of states near the surface or interface at energies up to several 0.1 eV. It is suggested to check these findings experimentally by appropriate spectroscopic methods. Undisturbed bulk (ABC) graphite is virtually a zero-gap semiconductor with a minute density of states at the Fermi energy. Both the surface and any of the considered stacking faults produce sharp peaks in the local density of states near the perturbation at energies of about 10 meV around the Fermi energy. This should provide a considerable contribution to the conductivity and its temperature dependence for samples with stacking faults or large surface-to-volume fraction.

  15. Automated Localization of Multiple Pelvic Bone Structures on MRI.

    PubMed

    Onal, Sinan; Lai-Yuen, Susana; Bao, Paul; Weitzenfeld, Alfredo; Hart, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a fully automated localization method for multiple pelvic bone structures on magnetic resonance images (MRI). Pelvic bone structures are at present identified manually on MRI to locate reference points for measurement and evaluation of pelvic organ prolapse (POP). Given that this is a time-consuming and subjective procedure, there is a need to localize pelvic bone structures automatically. However, bone structures are not easily differentiable from soft tissue on MRI as their pixel intensities tend to be very similar. In this paper, we present a model that combines support vector machines and nonlinear regression capturing global and local information to automatically identify the bounding boxes of bone structures on MRI. The model identifies the location of the pelvic bone structures by establishing the association between their relative locations and using local information such as texture features. Results show that the proposed method is able to locate the bone structures of interest accurately (dice similarity index >0.75) in 87-91% of the images. This research aims to enable accurate, consistent, and fully automated localization of bone structures on MRI to facilitate and improve the diagnosis of health conditions such as female POP.

  16. Experimental and theoretical electronic structure of quinacridone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüftner, Daniel; Refaely-Abramson, Sivan; Pachler, Michael; Resel, Roland; Ramsey, Michael G.; Kronik, Leeor; Puschnig, Peter

    2014-08-01

    The energy positions of frontier orbitals in organic electronic materials are often studied experimentally by (inverse) photoemission spectroscopy and theoretically within density functional theory. However, standard exchange-correlation functionals often result in too small fundamental gaps, may lead to wrong orbital energy ordering, and do not capture polarization-induced gap renormalization. Here we examine these issues and a strategy for overcoming them by studying the gas phase and bulk electronic structure of the organic molecule quinacridone (5Q), a promising material with many interesting properties for organic devices. Experimentally we perform angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARUPS) on thin films of the crystalline β phase of 5Q. Theoretically we employ an optimally tuned range-separated hybrid functional (OT-RSH) within density functional theory. For the gas phase molecule, our OT-RSH result for the ionization potential (IP) represents a substantial improvement over the semilocal PBE and the PBE0 hybrid functional results, producing an IP in quantitative agreement with experiment. For the bulk crystal we take into account the correct screening in the bulk, using the recently developed optimally tuned screened range-separated hybrid (OT-SRSH) approach, while retaining the optimally tuned parameters for the range separation and the short-range Fock exchange. This leads to a band gap narrowing due to polarization effects and results in a valence band spectrum in excellent agreement with experimental ARUPS data, with respect to both peak positions and heights. Finally, full-frequency G0W0 results based on a hybrid functional starting point are shown to agree with the OT-SRSH approach, improving substantially on the PBE-starting point.

  17. Nonlinearity in structural and electronic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, A.R.; Beardmore, K.M.; Ben-Naim, E.

    1997-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project strengthens a nonlinear technology base relevant to a variety of problems arising in condensed matter and materials science, and applies this technology to those problems. In this way the controlled synthesis of, and experiments on, novel electronic and structural materials provide an important focus for nonlinear science, while nonlinear techniques help advance the understanding of the scientific principles underlying the control of microstructure and dynamics in complex materials. This research is primarily focused on four topics: (1) materials microstructure: growth and evolution, and porous media; (2) textures in elastic/martensitic materials; (3) electro- and photo-active polymers; and (4) ultrafast photophysics in complex electronic materials. Accomplishments included the following: organization of a ``Nonlinear Materials`` seminar series and international conferences including ``Fracture, Friction and Deformation,`` ``Nonequilibrium Phase Transitions,`` and ``Landscape Paradigms in Physics and Biology``; invited talks at international conference on ``Synthetic Metals,`` ``Quantum Phase Transitions,`` ``1996 CECAM Euroconference,`` and the 1995 Fall Meeting of the Materials Research Society; large-scale simulations and microscopic modeling of nonlinear coherent energy storage at crack tips and sliding interfaces; large-scale simulation and microscopic elasticity theory for precursor microstructure and dynamics at solid-solid diffusionless phase transformations; large-scale simulation of self-assembling organic thin films on inorganic substrates; analysis and simulation of smoothing of rough atomic surfaces; and modeling and analysis of flux pattern formation in equilibrium and nonequilibrium Josephson junction arrays and layered superconductors.

  18. RESCU: A real space electronic structure method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaud-Rioux, Vincent; Zhang, Lei; Guo, Hong

    2016-02-01

    In this work we present RESCU, a powerful MATLAB-based Kohn-Sham density functional theory (KS-DFT) solver. We demonstrate that RESCU can compute the electronic structure properties of systems comprising many thousands of atoms using modest computer resources, e.g. 16 to 256 cores. Its computational efficiency is achieved from exploiting four routes. First, we use numerical atomic orbital (NAO) techniques to efficiently generate a good quality initial subspace which is crucially required by Chebyshev filtering methods. Second, we exploit the fact that only a subspace spanning the occupied Kohn-Sham states is required, and solving accurately the KS equation using eigensolvers can generally be avoided. Third, by judiciously analyzing and optimizing various parts of the procedure in RESCU, we delay the O (N3) scaling to large N, and our tests show that RESCU scales consistently as O (N2.3) from a few hundred atoms to more than 5000 atoms when using a real space grid discretization. The scaling is better or comparable in a NAO basis up to the 14,000 atoms level. Fourth, we exploit various numerical algorithms and, in particular, we introduce a partial Rayleigh-Ritz algorithm to achieve efficiency gains for systems comprising more than 10,000 electrons. We demonstrate the power of RESCU in solving KS-DFT problems using many examples running on 16, 64 and/or 256 cores: a 5832 Si atoms supercell; a 8788 Al atoms supercell; a 5324 Cu atoms supercell and a small DNA molecule submerged in 1713 water molecules for a total 5399 atoms. The KS-DFT is entirely converged in a few hours in all cases. Our results suggest that the RESCU method has reached a milestone of solving thousands of atoms by KS-DFT on a modest computer cluster.

  19. First principle investigation of structural and electronic properties of bulk ZnSe

    SciTech Connect

    Khatta, Swati; Tripathi, S. K. Prakash, Satya

    2015-08-28

    Electronic and structural properties of ZnSe are investigated using plane-wave self-consistent field method within the framework of density functional theory. The pseudopotential method within the local density approximation is used for the exchange-correlation potential. The equilibrium lattice parameter, static bulk modulus and its pressure derivative are calculated. The electronic band structure, partial density of states and density of states are also obtained. The results are compared with available theoretical calculations and experimental results.

  20. Research Update: Spatially resolved mapping of electronic structure on atomic level by multivariate statistical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Belianinov, Alex; Panchapakesan, G.; Lin, Wenzhi; Sales, Brian C.; Sefat, Athena Safa; Jesse, Stephen; Pan, Minghu; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2014-12-02

    Atomic level spatial variability of electronic structure in Fe-based superconductor FeTe0.55Se0.45 (Tc = 15 K) is explored using current-imaging tunneling-spectroscopy. Multivariate statistical analysis of the data differentiates regions of dissimilar electronic behavior that can be identified with the segregation of chalcogen atoms, as well as boundaries between terminations and near neighbor interactions. Subsequent clustering analysis allows identification of the spatial localization of these dissimilar regions. Similar statistical analysis of modeled calculated density of states of chemically inhomogeneous FeTe1 x Sex structures further confirms that the two types of chalcogens, i.e., Te and Se, can be identified by their electronic signature and differentiated by their local chemical environment. This approach allows detailed chemical discrimination of the scanning tunneling microscopy data including separation of atomic identities, proximity, and local configuration effects and can be universally applicable to chemically and electronically inhomogeneous surfaces.

  1. Local Sparse Structure Denoising for Low-Light-Level Image.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing; Yue, Jiang; Zhang, Yi; Bai, Lianfa

    2015-12-01

    Sparse and redundant representations perform well in image denoising. However, sparsity-based methods fail to denoise low-light-level (LLL) images because of heavy and complex noise. They consider sparsity on image patches independently and tend to lose the texture structures. To suppress noises and maintain textures simultaneously, it is necessary to embed noise invariant features into the sparse decomposition process. We, therefore, used a local structure preserving sparse coding (LSPSc) formulation to explore the local sparse structures (both the sparsity and local structure) in image. It was found that, with the introduction of spatial local structure constraint into the general sparse coding algorithm, LSPSc could improve the robustness of sparse representation for patches in serious noise. We further used a kernel LSPSc (K-LSPSc) formulation, which extends LSPSc into the kernel space to weaken the influence of linear structure constraint in nonlinear data. Based on the robust LSPSc and K-LSPSc algorithms, we constructed a local sparse structure denoising (LSSD) model for LLL images, which was demonstrated to give high performance in the natural LLL images denoising, indicating that both the LSPSc- and K-LSPSc-based LSSD models have the stable property of noise inhibition and texture details preservation.

  2. Local structure preserving sparse coding for infrared target recognition

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jing; Yue, Jiang; Zhang, Yi; Bai, Lianfa

    2017-01-01

    Sparse coding performs well in image classification. However, robust target recognition requires a lot of comprehensive template images and the sparse learning process is complex. We incorporate sparsity into a template matching concept to construct a local sparse structure matching (LSSM) model for general infrared target recognition. A local structure preserving sparse coding (LSPSc) formulation is proposed to simultaneously preserve the local sparse and structural information of objects. By adding a spatial local structure constraint into the classical sparse coding algorithm, LSPSc can improve the stability of sparse representation for targets and inhibit background interference in infrared images. Furthermore, a kernel LSPSc (K-LSPSc) formulation is proposed, which extends LSPSc to the kernel space to weaken the influence of the linear structure constraint in nonlinear natural data. Because of the anti-interference and fault-tolerant capabilities, both LSPSc- and K-LSPSc-based LSSM can implement target identification based on a simple template set, which just needs several images containing enough local sparse structures to learn a sufficient sparse structure dictionary of a target class. Specifically, this LSSM approach has stable performance in the target detection with scene, shape and occlusions variations. High performance is demonstrated on several datasets, indicating robust infrared target recognition in diverse environments and imaging conditions. PMID:28323824

  3. Aluminum alloy material structure impact localization by using FBG sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiubin

    2014-12-01

    The aluminum alloy structure impact localization system by using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors and impact localization algorithm was investigated. A four-FBG sensing network was established. And the power intensity demodulation method was initialized employing the narrow-band tunable laser. The wavelet transform was used to weaken the impact signal noise. And the impact signal time difference was extracted to build the time difference localization algorithm. At last, a fiber Bragg grating impact localization system was established and experimentally verified. The experimental results showed that in the aluminum alloy plate with the 500 mm*500 mm*2 mm test area, the maximum and average impact abscissa localization errors were 11 mm and 6.25 mm, and the maximum and average impact ordinate localization errors were 9 mm and 4.25 mm, respectively. The fiber Bragg grating sensors and demodulation system are feasible to realize the aviation aluminum alloy material structure impact localization. The research results provide a reliable method for the aluminum alloy material structure impact localization.

  4. Two-dimensional localized structures in harmonically forced oscillatory systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Y.-P.; Knobloch, E.

    2016-12-01

    Two-dimensional spatially localized structures in the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation with 1:1 resonance are studied near the simultaneous presence of a steady front between two spatially homogeneous equilibria and a supercritical Turing bifurcation on one of them. The bifurcation structures of steady circular fronts and localized target patterns are computed in the Turing-stable and Turing-unstable regimes. In particular, localized target patterns grow along the solution branch via ring insertion at the core in a process reminiscent of defect-mediated snaking in one spatial dimension. Stability of axisymmetric solutions on these branches with respect to axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric perturbations is determined, and parameter regimes with stable axisymmetric oscillons are identified. Direct numerical simulations reveal novel depinning dynamics of localized target patterns in the radial direction, and of circular and planar localized hexagonal patterns in the fully two-dimensional system.

  5. Local structures around the substituted elements in mixed layered oxides

    PubMed Central

    Akama, Shota; Kobayashi, Wataru; Amaha, Kaoru; Niwa, Hideharu; Nitani, Hiroaki; Moritomo, Yutaka

    2017-01-01

    The chemical substitution of a transition metal (M) is an effective method to improve the functionality of a material, such as its electrochemical, magnetic, and dielectric properties. The substitution, however, causes local lattice distortion because the difference in the ionic radius (r) modifies the local interatomic distances. Here, we systematically investigated the local structures in the pure (x = 0.0) and mixed (x = 0.05 or 0.1) layered oxides, Na(M1−xM′x)O2 (M and M′ are the majority and minority transition metals, respectively), by means of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis. We found that the local interatomic distance (dM-O) around the minority element approaches that around the majority element to reduces the local lattice distortion. We further found that the valence of the minority Mn changes so that its ionic radius approaches that of the majority M. PMID:28252008

  6. Local structures around the substituted elements in mixed layered oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akama, Shota; Kobayashi, Wataru; Amaha, Kaoru; Niwa, Hideharu; Nitani, Hiroaki; Moritomo, Yutaka

    2017-03-01

    The chemical substitution of a transition metal (M) is an effective method to improve the functionality of a material, such as its electrochemical, magnetic, and dielectric properties. The substitution, however, causes local lattice distortion because the difference in the ionic radius (r) modifies the local interatomic distances. Here, we systematically investigated the local structures in the pure (x = 0.0) and mixed (x = 0.05 or 0.1) layered oxides, Na(M1‑xM‧x)O2 (M and M‧ are the majority and minority transition metals, respectively), by means of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis. We found that the local interatomic distance (dM-O) around the minority element approaches that around the majority element to reduces the local lattice distortion. We further found that the valence of the minority Mn changes so that its ionic radius approaches that of the majority M.

  7. Local Factors Determine Plant Community Structure on Closely Neighbored Islands

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jianbo; Jiang, Lin; Yu, Lin; Sun, Que

    2011-01-01

    Despite the recent popularity of the metacommunity concept, ecologists have not evaluated the applicability of different metacommunity frameworks to insular organisms. We surveyed 50 closely spaced islands in the Thousand-Island Lake of China to examine the role of local (environmental) and regional (dispersal) factors in structuring woody plant assemblages (tree and shrub species) on these islands. By partitioning the variation in plant community structure into local and regional causes, we showed that local environmental conditions, specifically island morphometric characteristics, accounted for the majority of the variation in plant community structure among the studied islands. Spatial variables, representing the potential importance of species dispersal, explained little variation. We conclude that one metacommunity framework–species sorting–best characterizes these plant communities. This result reinforces the idea that the traditional approach of emphasizing the local perspective when studying ecological communities continues to hold its value. PMID:21572960

  8. Electronic structure of cyclohexane on Ni(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, W.; Zebisch, P.; Bornemann, T.; Steinrück, H.-P.

    1990-12-01

    Mono- and multilayers of cyclohexane adsorbed on a Ni(111) surface have been studied by angle resolved UV photoelectron spectroscopy (ARUPS) using linearly polarized synchrotron radiation, temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED). Cyclohexane is molecularly adsorbed on Ni(111) at temperatures below 200 K and desorbs without dehydrogenation. Desorption from the first layer exhibits zeroth-order desorption behavior indicative of desorption from two-dimensional islands. The first layer exhibits a well ordered ( 7 × 7)R19.1° LEED structure starting at coverages of 0.04 ML up to the saturation coverage of 0.143 ML, also indicative of island formation. For cyclohexane in the first layer the binding energies of the various molecular levels are, apart from an overall shift to smaller values by 0.7 eV, within ± 0.1 eV identical to those of condensed cyclohexane. This absence of chemical shifts indicates that there is only very weak (if any) chemical interaction between cyclohexane and the Ni(111) surface. From the normal emission ARUPS spectra and symmetry selection rules we conclude that the symmetry of cyclohexane adsorbed on Ni(111) is lower than C 3v. This is attributed to a slightly inclined adsorption geometry with intramolecular C 3v symmetry of the adsorbed molecules.

  9. Using the electron localization function to correct for confinement physics in semi-local density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Feng Mattsson, Ann E.; Armiento, Rickard

    2014-05-14

    We have previously proposed that further improved functionals for density functional theory can be constructed based on the Armiento-Mattsson subsystem functional scheme if, in addition to the uniform electron gas and surface models used in the Armiento-Mattsson 2005 functional, a model for the strongly confined electron gas is also added. However, of central importance for this scheme is an index that identifies regions in space where the correction provided by the confined electron gas should be applied. The electron localization function (ELF) is a well-known indicator of strongly localized electrons. We use a model of a confined electron gas based on the harmonic oscillator to show that regions with high ELF directly coincide with regions where common exchange energy functionals have large errors. This suggests that the harmonic oscillator model together with an index based on the ELF provides the crucial ingredients for future improved semi-local functionals. For a practical illustration of how the proposed scheme is intended to work for a physical system we discuss monoclinic cupric oxide, CuO. A thorough discussion of this system leads us to promote the cell geometry of CuO as a useful benchmark for future semi-local functionals. Very high ELF values are found in a shell around the O ions, and take its maximum value along the Cu–O directions. An estimate of the exchange functional error from the effect of electron confinement in these regions suggests a magnitude and sign that could account for the error in cell geometry.

  10. Using the electron localization function to correct for confinement physics in semi-local density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Hao, Feng; Armiento, Rickard; Mattsson, Ann E

    2014-05-14

    We have previously proposed that further improved functionals for density functional theory can be constructed based on the Armiento-Mattsson subsystem functional scheme if, in addition to the uniform electron gas and surface models used in the Armiento-Mattsson 2005 functional, a model for the strongly confined electron gas is also added. However, of central importance for this scheme is an index that identifies regions in space where the correction provided by the confined electron gas should be applied. The electron localization function (ELF) is a well-known indicator of strongly localized electrons. We use a model of a confined electron gas based on the harmonic oscillator to show that regions with high ELF directly coincide with regions where common exchange energy functionals have large errors. This suggests that the harmonic oscillator model together with an index based on the ELF provides the crucial ingredients for future improved semi-local functionals. For a practical illustration of how the proposed scheme is intended to work for a physical system we discuss monoclinic cupric oxide, CuO. A thorough discussion of this system leads us to promote the cell geometry of CuO as a useful benchmark for future semi-local functionals. Very high ELF values are found in a shell around the O ions, and take its maximum value along the Cu-O directions. An estimate of the exchange functional error from the effect of electron confinement in these regions suggests a magnitude and sign that could account for the error in cell geometry.

  11. Fully automated localization of multiple pelvic bone structures on MRI.

    PubMed

    Onal, Sinan; Lai-Yuen, Susana; Bao, Paul; Weitzenfeld, Alfredo; Hart, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a fully automated localization method for multiple pelvic bone structures on magnetic resonance images (MRI). Pelvic bone structures are currently identified manually on MRI to identify reference points for measurement and evaluation of pelvic organ prolapse (POP). Given that this is a time-consuming and subjective procedure, there is a need to localize pelvic bone structures without any user interaction. However, bone structures are not easily differentiable from soft tissue on MRI as their pixel intensities tend to be very similar. In this research, we present a model that automatically identifies the bounding boxes of the bone structures on MRI using support vector machines (SVM) based classification and non-linear regression model that captures global and local information. Based on the relative locations of pelvic bones and organs, and local information such as texture features, the model identifies the location of the pelvic bone structures by establishing the association between their locations. Results show that the proposed method is able to locate the bone structures of interest accurately. The pubic bone, sacral promontory, and coccyx were correctly detected (DSI > 0.75) in 92%, 90%, and 88% of the testing images. This research aims to enable accurate, consistent and fully automated identification of pelvic bone structures on MRI to facilitate and improve the diagnosis of female pelvic organ prolapse.

  12. Electronic Structures of Uranium Compounds Studied by Soft X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimori, Shin-ichi; Takeda, Yukiharu; Okane, Tetsuo; Saitoh, Yuji; Fujimori, Atsushi; Yamagami, Hiroshi; Haga, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Etsuji; Ōnuki, Yoshichika

    2016-06-01

    The electronic structures of uranium-based compounds have been studied by photoelectron spectroscopy with soft X-ray synchrotron radiation. Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy with soft X-rays has made it possible to directly observe their bulk band structures and Fermi surfaces. It has been shown that the band structures and Fermi surfaces of itinerant compounds such as UB2, UN, and UFeGa5 are quantitatively described by a band-structure calculation treating all U 5f electrons as itinerant. Furthermore, the overall electronic structures of heavy-fermion compounds such as UPd2Al3, UNi2Al3, and URu2Si2 are also explained by a band-structure calculation, although some disagreements exist, which might originate from the electron correlation effect. This suggests that the itinerant description of U 5f states is an appropriate starting point for the description of their electronic structures. The situation is similar for ferromagnetic superconductors such as UGe2, URhGe, UCoGe, and UIr, although the complications from their low-symmetry crystal structures make it more difficult to describe their detailed electronic structures. The local electronic structures of the uranium site have been probed by core-level photoelectron spectroscopy with soft X-rays. The comparisons of core-level spectra of heavy-fermion compounds with typical itinerant and localized compounds suggest that the local electronic structures of most itinerant and heavy-fermion compounds are close to the U 5f3 configuration except for UPd2Al3 and UPt3. The core-level spectrum of UPd2Al3 has similarities to those of both itinerant and localized compounds, suggesting that it is located at the boundary between the itinerant and localized states. Moreover, the spectrum of UPt3 is very close to that of the localized compound UPd3, suggesting that it is nearly localized, although there are narrow quasi-particle bands in the vicinity of EF.

  13. Electronic Structure and Dynamics of Nitrosyl Porphyrins

    PubMed Central

    Scheidt, W. Robert; Barabanschikov, Alexander; Pavlik, Jeffrey W.; Silvernail, Nathan J.; Sage, J. Timothy

    2010-01-01

    fully successful at capturing the interaction between the axial NO and imidazole ligands. This supports previous conclusions that hemeNO complexes exhibit an unusual degree of variability with respect to computational method, and we speculate that this variability hints at a genuine electronic instability that a protein can exploit to tune reactivity. We anticipate that ongoing characterization of heme-NO complexes will deepen our understanding of their structure, dynamics, and reactivity. PMID:20666384

  14. The imprint of Gould's belt on the local cosmic ray electron spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, M.; Perrot, C.; Grenier, I.

    2001-08-01

    In a recent paper Pohl and Esposito (1998) demonstrated that if the sources of cosmic-rays are discrete, as are Supernova Remnants (SNR), then the spectra of cosmic-ray electrons largely vary with location and time and the locally measured electron spectrum may not be representative of the electron spectra elsewhere in the Galaxy, which could be substantially harder than the local one. They have shown that the observed excess of γ-ray emission above 1 GeV can in fact be partially explained as a correspondingly hard inverse Compton component, provided the bulk of cosmic-ray electrons is produced in SNR. As part of a program to model the Galactic γ-ray foreground we have continued the earlier studies by investigating the impact of the star forming region Gould's Belt on the local electron spectrum. If the electron sources in Gould's Belt were continous, the local electron spectrum would be slightly hardened. If the electron sources are discrete, which is the more probable case, the variation in the local electron spectrum found by Pohl & Esposito persists. 1 The local cosmic-ray electron spectrum The recent detections of non-thermal X-ray synchrotron radiation from the supernova remnants SN1006 (Koyama et al., 1995), RX J1713.7-3946 (Koyama et al., 1997), IC443 (Keohane et al., 1997; Slane et al., 1999), Cas A (Allen et al., 1997), and RCW86 (Borkowski et al., 2001) and the subsequent detections of SN1006 (Tanimori et al., 1998), RX J1713.7-3946 (Muraishi et al., 2000), and Cas A (Aharonian et al., 2001) at TeV energies support the hypothesis that at least Galactic cosmic-ray electrons are accelerated predominantly in SNR. The Galactic distribution and spectrum of cosmic-ray electrons are intimately linked to the distribution and nature of their sources. Supernovae and hence their remnants are tran-

  15. Deriving quantum theory from its local structure and reversibility.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, Gonzalo; Masanes, Lluís; Short, Anthony J; Müller, Markus P

    2012-08-31

    We investigate the class of physical theories with the same local structure as quantum theory but potentially different global structure. It has previously been shown that any bipartite correlations generated by such a theory can be simulated in quantum theory but that this does not hold for tripartite correlations. Here we explore whether imposing an additional constraint on this space of theories-that of dynamical reversibility-will allow us to recover the global quantum structure. In the particular case in which the local systems are identical qubits, we show that any theory admitting at least one continuous reversible interaction must be identical to quantum theory.

  16. Vortex emission accompanies the advection of optical localized structures.

    PubMed

    Haudin, F; Rojas, R G; Bortolozzo, U; Clerc, M G; Residori, S

    2011-02-11

    We show that the advection of optical localized structures is accompanied by the emission of vortices, with phase singularities appearing in the wake of the drifting structure. Localized structures are obtained in a light-valve experiment and made to drift by a mirror tilt in the feedback loop. Pairs of oppositely charged vortices are detected for small drifts, whereas for large drifts a vortex array develops. Observations are supported by numerical simulations and linear stability analysis of the system equations and are expected to be generic for a large class of translated optical patterns.

  17. Probing Actinide Electronic Structure through Pu Cluster Calculations

    DOE PAGES

    Ryzhkov, Mickhail V.; Mirmelstein, Alexei; Yu, Sung-Woo; ...

    2013-02-26

    The calculations for the electronic structure of clusters of plutonium have been performed, within the framework of the relativistic discrete-variational method. Moreover, these theoretical results and those calculated earlier for related systems have been compared to spectroscopic data produced in the experimental investigations of bulk systems, including photoelectron spectroscopy. Observation of the changes in the Pu electronic structure as a function of size provides powerful insight for aspects of bulk Pu electronic structure.

  18. Graph-based linear scaling electronic structure theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niklasson, Anders M. N.; Mniszewski, Susan M.; Negre, Christian F. A.; Cawkwell, Marc J.; Swart, Pieter J.; Mohd-Yusof, Jamal; Germann, Timothy C.; Wall, Michael E.; Bock, Nicolas; Rubensson, Emanuel H.; Djidjev, Hristo

    2016-06-01

    We show how graph theory can be combined with quantum theory to calculate the electronic structure of large complex systems. The graph formalism is general and applicable to a broad range of electronic structure methods and materials, including challenging systems such as biomolecules. The methodology combines well-controlled accuracy, low computational cost, and natural low-communication parallelism. This combination addresses substantial shortcomings of linear scaling electronic structure theory, in particular with respect to quantum-based molecular dynamics simulations.

  19. Graph-based linear scaling electronic structure theory.

    PubMed

    Niklasson, Anders M N; Mniszewski, Susan M; Negre, Christian F A; Cawkwell, Marc J; Swart, Pieter J; Mohd-Yusof, Jamal; Germann, Timothy C; Wall, Michael E; Bock, Nicolas; Rubensson, Emanuel H; Djidjev, Hristo

    2016-06-21

    We show how graph theory can be combined with quantum theory to calculate the electronic structure of large complex systems. The graph formalism is general and applicable to a broad range of electronic structure methods and materials, including challenging systems such as biomolecules. The methodology combines well-controlled accuracy, low computational cost, and natural low-communication parallelism. This combination addresses substantial shortcomings of linear scaling electronic structure theory, in particular with respect to quantum-based molecular dynamics simulations.

  20. Electronic fluxes during Diels-Alder reactions involving 1,2-benzoquinones: mechanistic insights from the analysis of electron localization function and catastrophe theory.

    PubMed

    González-Navarrete, Patricio; Domingo, Luis R; Andrés, Juan; Berski, Slawomir; Silvi, Bernard

    2012-11-15

    By means of the joint use of electron localization function (ELF) and Thom's catastrophe theory, a theoretical analysis of the energy profile for the hetero-Diels-Alder reaction of 4-methoxy-1,2-benzoquinone 1 and methoxyethylene 2 has been carried out. The 12 different structural stability domains obtained by the bonding evolution theory have been identified as well as the bifurcation catastrophes (fold and cusp) responsible for the changes in the topology of the system. This analysis permits finding a relationship between the ELF topology and the evolution of the bond breaking/forming processes and electron pair rearrangements through the reaction progress in terms of the different ways of pairing up the electrons. The reaction mechanism corresponds to an asynchronous electronic flux; first, the O1-C5 bond is formed by the nucleophilic attack of the C5 carbon of the electron rich ethylene 2 on the most electrophilically activated carbonyl O1 oxygen of 1, and once the σ bond has been completed, the formation process of the second O4C6 bond takes place. In addition, the values of the local electrophilicity and local nucleophilcity indices in the framework of conceptual density functional theory accounts for the asychronicity of the process as well as for the observed regioselectivity.

  1. Reconstruction of biofilm images: combining local and global structural parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Resat, Haluk; Renslow, Ryan S.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-10-20

    Digitized images can be used for quantitative comparison of biofilms grown under different conditions. Using biofilm image reconstruction, it was previously found that biofilms with a completely different look can have nearly identical structural parameters and that the most commonly utilized global structural parameters were not sufficient to uniquely define these biofilms. Here, additional local and global parameters are introduced to show that these parameters considerably increase the reliability of the image reconstruction process. Assessment using human evaluators indicated that the correct identification rate of the reconstructed images increased from 50% to 72% with the introduction of the new parameters into the reconstruction procedure. An expanded set of parameters especially improved the identification of biofilm structures with internal orientational features and of structures in which colony sizes and spatial locations varied. Hence, the newly introduced structural parameter sets helped to better classify the biofilms by incorporating finer local structural details into the reconstruction process.

  2. Electronic structures and optical properties of silicon nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Freeman, Arthur

    2006-03-01

    Recent optical spectroscopic and theoretical/computational studies challenge the previous consensus on the nature of the optical properties of Si nanowires (SiNW). Here, we present results of precise theoretical FLAPW determinations of the electronic structures and optical properties of (001) and (111) one nm SiNW. The electronic states at the gaps demonstrate a strong orientation dependent parabolic character in the Brillouin zone and a clear entanglement in real space between 1D and 2D dimensions of the wire. The local symmetry imposed by quantum confinement quenches the transitions around the gap, yielding an optically inactive direct gap. The observed (001) photoluminescence is attributed to a transition rooted in an Si8 ring. The optical structure in the experimental range is well reproduced by our first-principles calculations that include the screened exchange-LDA correction to the well-known failure of the LDA. Our predictions about the anisotropy and orientation dependent optical absorption are easily verified experimentally. Work supported by DARPA B529527//W-7405-Eng-48. Holmes, Johnston, Doty, and Korgel, Science 287, 1471 (2000) Zhao, Wei, Yang, and Chou, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 236805 (2004) Wimmer, Krakauer, Weinert, and Freeman, PRB 24, 864 (1981)

  3. Local lattice strain measurements in semiconductor devices by using convergent-beam electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toda, Akio; Ikarashi, Nobuyuki; Ono, Haruhiko

    2000-03-01

    We examined the lattice strain distribution around local oxidation of silicon (LOCOS) in a semiconductor device by using highly accurate (1.8×10 -4 standard deviation) convergent-beam electron diffraction (CBED) at a nanometer-scale spatial resolution (10 nm in diameter). The nanometer-scale measurement was done by reducing the elastic relaxation using a thick (about 600 nm) sample and by removing the inelastically scattered electrons by means of an electron energy filter. A highly accurate measurement was achieved through the analysis of higher-order Laue zone (HOLZ) patterns using the least-squares fitting of HOLZ line intersection distances between the observations and calculations. Our examination showed that the LOCOS structure gave singularities in strain distributions at the field edge. That is, compressive strain exists in both the vertical and horizontal directions of the substrate, and the shear strain increased there. Most notably, two-dimensional measurements revealed that the singularity of the normal strain in the horizontal direction of the substrate generated at the field edge propagated into the substrate.

  4. Density and localized states' impact on amorphous carbon electron transport mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caicedo-Dávila, S.; Lopez-Acevedo, O.; Velasco-Medina, J.; Avila, A.

    2016-12-01

    This work discusses the electron transport mechanisms that we obtained as a function of the density of amorphous carbon (a-C) ultra-thin films. We calculated the density of states (total and projected), degree of electronic states' localization, and transmission function using the density functional theory and nonequilibrium Green's functions method. We generated 25 sample a-C structures using ab-initio molecular dynamics within the isothermal-isobaric ensemble. We identified three transport regimes as a function of the density, varying from semimetallic in low-density samples ( ≤2.4 g/cm3) to thermally activated in high-density ( ≥2.9 g/cm3) tetrahedral a-C. The middle-range densities (2.4 g/cm3 ≤ρ≤ 2.9 g/cm3) are characterized by resonant tunneling and hopping transport. Our findings offer a different perspective from the tight-binding model proposed by Katkov and Bhattacharyya [J. Appl. Phys. 113, 183712 (2013)], and agree with experimental observations in low-dimensional carbon systems [see S. Bhattacharyya, Appl. Phys. Lett. 91, 21 (2007)]. Identifying transport regimes is crucial to the process of understanding and applying a-C thin film in electronic devices and electrode coating in biosensors.

  5. A Theoretical Study of NO2 Complexes with Aluminium and Gallium Based on Topological Analysis of Electron Density and Electron Localization Function

    SciTech Connect

    Panek, Jaroslaw; Latajaka, Zdzislaw

    2000-12-26

    Results of DFT and MP4 calculations on AlNO2 and GaNO2 molecules are presented. One Cs and two C2v structures (two minima and one TS) are found and their energies and vibrational frequencies are reported and discussed. The minima are close in energy and lie ca. 70 kcal mol-1 below reactants (M+NO2). More insight is obtained via topological analysis of electron density and electron localization function (ELF). It is shown that the molecules are bound mainly via electrostatic interactions, and there is a significant charge transfer from metal atom to the NO2 moiety. Detailed analysis of the ELF shows that the loss of stability of gallium complexes with respect to aluminium structures is best explained by (antibonding) influence of gallium semi-cored electrons.

  6. Dramatic changes in electronic structure revealed by fractionally charged nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Aron J.; Mori-Sánchez, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Discontinuous changes in the electronic structure upon infinitesimal changes to the Hamiltonian are demonstrated. These are revealed in one and two electron molecular systems by full configuration interaction (FCI) calculations when the realm of the nuclear charge is extended to be fractional. FCI electron densities in these systems show dramatic changes in real space and illustrate the transfer, hopping, and removal of electrons. This is due to the particle nature of electrons seen in stretched systems and is a manifestation of an energy derivative discontinuity at constant number of electrons. Dramatic errors of density functional theory densities are seen in real space as this physics is missing from currently used approximations. The movements of electrons in these simple systems encapsulate those in real physical processes, from chemical reactions to electron transport and pose a great challenge for the development of new electronic structure methods.

  7. Structural, electronic, and magnetic characteristics of Np2Co17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halevy, I.; Hen, A.; Orion, I.; Colineau, E.; Eloirdi, R.; Griveau, J.-C.; Gaczyński, P.; Wilhelm, F.; Rogalev, A.; Sanchez, J.-P.; Winterrose, M. L.; Magnani, N.; Shick, A. B.; Caciuffo, R.

    2012-01-01

    A previously unknown neptunium-transition-metal binary compound Np2Co17 has been synthesized and characterized by means of powder x-ray diffraction, 237Np Mössbauer spectroscopy, superconducting-quantum-interference-device magnetometry, and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). The compound crystallizes in a Th2Ni17-type hexagonal structure with room-temperature lattice parameters a=8.3107(1) Å and c=8.1058(1) Å. Magnetization curves indicate the occurrence of ferromagnetic order below TC>350 K. Mössbauer spectra suggest a Np3+ oxidation state and give an ordered moment of μNp=1.57(4) μB and μNp=1.63(4) μB for the Np atoms located, respectively, at the 2b and 2d crystallographic positions of the P63/mmc space group. Combining these values with a sum-rule analysis of the XMCD spectra measured at the neptunium M4,5 absorption edges, one obtains the spin and orbital contributions to the site-averaged Np moment [μS=-1.88(9) μB, μL=3.48(9) μB]. The ratio between the expectation value of the magnetic-dipole moment and the spin magnetic moment (mmd/μS=+1.36) is positive as predicted for localized 5f electrons and lies between the values calculated in intermediate-coupling (IC) and jj approximations. The expectation value of the angular part of the spin-orbit-interaction operator is in excellent agreement with the IC estimate. The ordered moment averaged over the four inequivalent Co sites, as obtained from the saturation value of the magnetization, is μCo≃1.6 μB. The experimental results are discussed against the predictions of first-principles electronic-structure calculations based on the spin-polarized local-spin-density approximation plus the Hubbard interaction.

  8. Localization of Somatic Antigen on Gram-Negative Bacteria by Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Shands, J. W.

    1965-01-01

    Shands, J. W. (University of Florida, Gainesville). Localization of somatic antigen on gram-negative bacteria by electron microscopy. J. Bacteriol. 90:266–270. 1965.—Antisera specific for the somatic antigens of Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli O113 were prepared, and globulins isolated from these antisera were labeled with ferritin. Micrographs of labeled, sectioned bacteria show that somatic antigen is located in considerable quantities on the surface of the bacteria, and, furthermore, that it can extend up to 150 mμ beyond the confines of the cell wall. The arrangement of the ferritin on the bacteria suggests that the antigenic sites are located on fibrillar structures. Images PMID:16562028

  9. Studies of local electron heat transport on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, E.D.; Chang, Z.Y.; Janos, A.; McGuire, K.M.; Scott, S.; Taylor, G.

    1993-08-16

    The anomalously fast relaxation of the perturbations to the electron temperature profile caused by a sawtooth crash has been studied extensively on TFTR. We will show that on a short timescale the heat pulse is not simply diffusive as has been generally assumed, but that modeling of the heat pulse requires a transient enhancement in {chi}{sub e} following the sawtooth crash. It will be shown that the time-dependent enhancement in {chi}{sub e} predicted by non-linear thermal transport models, i.e., incremental {chi} models or the Rebut-Lallia-Watkins transport model, is much smaller than that required to explain the anomalies in the heat pulse propagation.

  10. A Transport Model for Non-Local Heating of Electrons in ICP Reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. H.; Bose, Deepak; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A new model has been developed for non-local heating of electrons in ICP reactors, based on a hydrodynamic approach. The model has been derived using the electron momentum conservation in azimuthal direction with electromagnetic and frictional forces respectively as driving force and damper of harmonic oscillatory motion of electrons. The resulting transport equations include the convection of azimuthal electron momentum in radial and axial directions, thereby accounting for the non-local effects. The azimuthal velocity of electrons and the resulting electrical current are coupled to the Maxwell's relations, thus forming a self-consistent model for non-local heating. This model is being implemented along with a set of Navier-Stokes equations for plasma dynamics and gas flow to simulate low-pressure (few mTorr's) ICP discharges. Characteristics of nitrogen plasma in a TCP 300mm etch reactor is being studied. The results will be compared against the available Langmuir probe measurements.

  11. Electronic structure imperfections and chemical bonding at graphene interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Brian Joseph

    nanomaterial with lateral dimensions in the hundreds of microns if not larger, with a corresponding atomic vertical thickness poses significant difficulties. Graphene's unique structure is dominated by surface area or potentially hybridized interfaces; consequently, the true realization of this remarkable nanomaterial in device constructs relies on engineering graphene interfaces at the surface in order to controllably mold the electronic structure. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy and the transmission mode analogue scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) are particularly useful tools to study the unoccupied states of graphene and graphene interfaces. In addition, polarized NEXAFS and STXM studies provide information on surface orientation, bond sterics, and the extent of substrate alignment before and after interfacial hybridization. The work presented in this dissertation is fundamentally informed by NEXAFS and STXM measurements on graphene/metal, graphene/dielectric, and graphene/organic interfaces. We start with a general review of the electronic structure of freestanding graphene and graphene interfaces in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2, we investigate freestanding single-layer graphene via STXM and NEXAFS demonstrating that electronic structure heterogeneities from synthesis and processing are ubiquitous in 2-dimensional graphene. We show the mapping of discrete charge transfer regions as a result of doped impurities that decorate the surfaces of graphene and that transfer processing imparts local electronic corrugations or ripples. In corroboration with density functional theory, definitive assignments to the spectral features, global steric orientations of the localized domains, and quantitative charge transfer schemes are evidenced. In the following chapters, we deliberately (Chapter 3) incorporate substitutional nitrogen into reduced graphene oxide to induce C--N charge redistribution and improve global conductivity, (Chapter 4

  12. Influences of consolidation processes on local paper structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Yongjoo

    The accurate measurement of the structural parameters such as thickness, grammage, apparent density and surface topography, and the proper evaluation of the variation of each parameter, are very important not only for predicting the end use properties of the paper, but also for diagnosing the pa permaking processes. The difficulty of the measurement of thickness at fine scale ˜1 mm has been an impediment to the understanding of local paper structure. To address this problem, a twin laser profilometer instrument (TLP) for non-contacting measurement of local thickness and surface topography was developed, characterized and calibrated in this work. The fundamental relationships between structural parameters were reexamined with various handsheet samples. The effects of wet pressing on the local paper structure were evaluated using laboratory static press and commercial press felts. The different press pressure had no significant influence on the local density variation of the handsheet samples. The influences of felts on the surface topography were also successfully observed. The different densification effects of soft nip and hard nip calendering processes were evaluated by direct comparison of structural parameters before and after processing. The much higher selective reduction in local thickness (larger reduction for the thicker area) by the hard nip calendering process resulted in different relationships between structural parameters. The various periodic variations in the paper structure were also detected, analyzed and identified. The effects of different forming elements such as the conventional foil system and the velocity induced drainage (VID) system on the paper structure and end use properties were evaluated with pilot machine trials and commercial product produced using different forming elements. Generally, the VID samples showed better formation, less two sidedness in the fine distribution through thickness direction, and less densification during

  13. Strain localization and percolation of stable structure in amorphous solids.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yunfeng; Falk, Michael L

    2005-08-26

    Spontaneous strain localization occurs during mechanical tests of a model amorphous solid simulated using molecular dynamics. The degree of localization depends upon the extent of structural relaxation prior to mechanical testing. In the most rapidly quenched samples higher strain rates lead to increased localization, while the more gradually quenched samples exhibit the opposite strain rate dependence. This transition coincides with the k-core percolation of atoms with quasi-crystal-like short range order. The authors infer the existence of a related microstructural length scale.

  14. Characterizing the Locality of Diabatic States forElectronic Excitation Transfer By Decomposing theDiabatic Coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, M.D.; Vura-Weis, J.; Wasielewski, M.R.; Subotnik, J.E.

    2010-10-19

    A common strategy to calculate electronic coupling matrix elements for charge or energy transfer is to take the adiabatic states generated by electronic structure computations and rotate them to form localized diabatic states. In this paper, we show that, for intermolecular transfer of singlet electronic excitation, usually we cannot fully localize the electronic excitations in this way. Instead, we calculate putative initial and final states with small excitation tails caused by weak interactions with high energy excited states in the electronic manifold. These tails do not lead to substantial changes in the total diabatic coupling between states, but they do lead to a different partitioning of the total coupling between Coulomb (Forster), exchange (Dexter), and one-electron components. The tails may be reduced by using a multistate diabatic model or eliminated entirely by truncation (denoted as 'chopping'). Without more information, we are unable to conclude with certainty whether the observed diabatic tails are a physical reality or a computational artifact. This research suggests that decomposition of the diabatic coupling between chromophores into Coulomb, exchange, and one-electron components may depend strongly on the number of states considered, and such results should be treated with caution.

  15. Affordable, Lightweight, Highly Conductive Polymer Composite Electronic Packaging Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-06-01

    matrix composite materials and how various material designs can be utilized in various structural/thermal configurations to produce electronic housings and...conductive polymer composite electronic packaging (i.e., electronic housings and heat sinks). The research will center on predominately polymer

  16. Quantum transport through disordered 1D wires: Conductance via localized and delocalized electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Gopar, Víctor A.

    2014-01-14

    Coherent electronic transport through disordered systems, like quantum wires, is a topic of fundamental and practical interest. In particular, the exponential localization of electron wave functions-Anderson localization-due to the presence of disorder has been widely studied. In fact, Anderson localization, is not an phenomenon exclusive to electrons but it has been observed in microwave and acoustic experiments, photonic materials, cold atoms, etc. Nowadays, many properties of electronic transport of quantum wires have been successfully described within a scaling approach to Anderson localization. On the other hand, anomalous localization or delocalization is, in relation to the Anderson problem, a less studied phenomenon. Although one can find signatures of anomalous localization in very different systems in nature. In the problem of electronic transport, a source of delocalization may come from symmetries present in the system and particular disorder configurations, like the so-called Lévy-type disorder. We have developed a theoretical model to describe the statistical properties of transport when electron wave functions are delocalized. In particular, we show that only two physical parameters determine the complete conductance distribution.

  17. Electronic Structure and Mechanical Properties of Grain Boundaries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-17

    presence of localized states which may compete for the carriers donated by impurities. The local application of the HSAB principle gives a unified...calculations and with the explicit analysis of the interactions among the electronic states in these systems. Because the application of the local HSAB ...and the dopant-boundary energies being so large, the basic reasoning behing applying the HSAB principle remains intact. We should still expect the

  18. Dynamic modulation of electronic properties of graphene by localized carbon doping using focused electron beam induced deposition.

    PubMed

    Kim, S; Russell, M; Henry, M; Kim, S S; Naik, R R; Voevodin, A A; Jang, S S; Tsukruk, V V; Fedorov, A G

    2015-09-28

    We report on the first demonstration of controllable carbon doping of graphene to engineer local electronic properties of a graphene conduction channel using focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID). Electrical measurements indicate that an "n-p-n" junction on graphene conduction channel is formed by partial carbon deposition near the source and drain metal contacts by low energy (<50 eV) secondary electrons due to inelastic collisions of long range backscattered primary electrons generated from a low dose of high energy (25 keV) electron beam (1 × 10(18) e(-) per cm(2)). Detailed AFM imaging provides direct evidence of the new mechanism responsible for dynamic evolution of the locally varying graphene doping. The FEBID carbon atoms, which are physisorbed and weakly bound to graphene, diffuse towards the middle of graphene conduction channel due to their surface chemical potential gradient, resulting in negative shift of Dirac voltage. Increasing a primary electron dose to 1 × 10(19) e(-) per cm(2) results in a significant increase of carbon deposition, such that it covers the entire graphene conduction channel at high surface density, leading to n-doping of graphene channel. Collectively, these findings establish a unique capability of FEBID technique to dynamically modulate the doping state of graphene, thus enabling a new route to resist-free, "direct-write" functional patterning of graphene-based electronic devices with potential for on-demand re-configurability.

  19. Electronic Resources in a Next-Generation Catalog: The Case of WorldCat Local

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shadle, Steve

    2009-01-01

    In April 2007, the University of Washington Libraries debuted WorldCat Local (WCL), a localized version of the WorldCat database that interoperates with a library's integrated library system and fulfillment services to provide a single-search interface for a library's physical and electronic content. This brief will describe how WCL incorporates a…

  20. Interlibrary Service Requests for Locally and Electronically Available Items: Patterns of Use, Users, and Canceled Requests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Jessica R.; Kuehn, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    As the use of the Ohio State University Libraries interlibrary services has increased, there have been more requests to borrow items that are already available to patrons locally, often in electronic format. Patterns relating to why patrons could not find locally available materials were identified in the record of canceled interlibrary requests…

  1. Strong impact of lattice vibrations on electronic and magnetic properties of paramagnetic Fe revealed by disordered local moments molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alling, B.; Körmann, F.; Grabowski, B.; Glensk, A.; Abrikosov, I. A.; Neugebauer, J.

    2016-06-01

    We study the impact of lattice vibrations on magnetic and electronic properties of paramagnetic bcc and fcc iron at finite temperature, employing the disordered local moments molecular dynamics (DLM-MD) method. Vibrations strongly affect the distribution of local magnetic moments at finite temperature, which in turn correlates with the local atomic volumes. Without the explicit consideration of atomic vibrations, the mean local magnetic moment and mean field derived magnetic entropy of paramagnetic bcc Fe are larger compared to paramagnetic fcc Fe, which would indicate that the magnetic contribution stabilizes the bcc phase at high temperatures. In the present study we show that this assumption is not valid when the coupling between vibrations and magnetism is taken into account. At the γ -δ transition temperature (1662 K), the lattice distortions cause very similar magnetic moments of both bcc and fcc structures and hence magnetic entropy contributions. This finding can be traced back to the electronic densities of states, which also become increasingly similar between bcc and fcc Fe with increasing temperature. Given the sensitive interplay of the different physical excitation mechanisms, our results illustrate the need for an explicit consideration of vibrational disorder and its impact on electronic and magnetic properties to understand paramagnetic Fe. Furthermore, they suggest that at the γ -δ transition temperature electronic and magnetic contributions to the Gibbs free energy are extremely similar in bcc and fcc Fe.

  2. Electron-beam-induced deposition and post-treatment processes to locally generate clean titanium oxide nanostructures on Si(100).

    PubMed

    Schirmer, M; Walz, M-M; Vollnhals, F; Lukasczyk, T; Sandmann, A; Chen, C; Steinrück, H-P; Marbach, H

    2011-02-25

    We have investigated the lithographic generation of TiO(x) nanostructures on Si(100) via electron-beam-induced deposition (EBID) of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and local Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). In addition, the fabricated nanostructures were also characterized ex situ via atomic force microscopy (AFM) under ambient conditions. In EBID, a highly focused electron beam is used to locally decompose precursor molecules and thereby to generate a deposit. A drawback of this nanofabrication technique is the unintended deposition of material in the vicinity of the impact position of the primary electron beam due to so-called proximity effects. Herein, we present a post-treatment procedure to deplete the unintended deposits by moderate sputtering after the deposition process. Moreover, we were able to observe the formation of pure titanium oxide nanocrystals (<100 nm) in situ upon heating the sample in a well-defined oxygen atmosphere. While the nanocrystal growth for the as-deposited structures also occurs in the surroundings of the irradiated area due to proximity effects, it is limited to the pre-defined regions, if the sample was sputtered before heating the sample under oxygen atmosphere. The described two-step post-treatment procedure after EBID presents a new pathway for the fabrication of clean localized nanostructures.

  3. Electron-beam-induced deposition and post-treatment processes to locally generate clean titanium oxide nanostructures on Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirmer, M.; Walz, M.-M.; Vollnhals, F.; Lukasczyk, T.; Sandmann, A.; Chen, C.; Steinrück, H.-P.; Marbach, H.

    2011-02-01

    We have investigated the lithographic generation of TiOx nanostructures on Si(100) via electron-beam-induced deposition (EBID) of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and local Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). In addition, the fabricated nanostructures were also characterized ex situ via atomic force microscopy (AFM) under ambient conditions. In EBID, a highly focused electron beam is used to locally decompose precursor molecules and thereby to generate a deposit. A drawback of this nanofabrication technique is the unintended deposition of material in the vicinity of the impact position of the primary electron beam due to so-called proximity effects. Herein, we present a post-treatment procedure to deplete the unintended deposits by moderate sputtering after the deposition process. Moreover, we were able to observe the formation of pure titanium oxide nanocrystals (<100 nm) in situ upon heating the sample in a well-defined oxygen atmosphere. While the nanocrystal growth for the as-deposited structures also occurs in the surroundings of the irradiated area due to proximity effects, it is limited to the pre-defined regions, if the sample was sputtered before heating the sample under oxygen atmosphere. The described two-step post-treatment procedure after EBID presents a new pathway for the fabrication of clean localized nanostructures.

  4. Local Function Conservation in Sequence and Structure Space

    PubMed Central

    Weinhold, Nils; Sander, Oliver; Domingues, Francisco S.; Lengauer, Thomas; Sommer, Ingolf

    2008-01-01

    We assess the variability of protein function in protein sequence and structure space. Various regions in this space exhibit considerable difference in the local conservation of molecular function. We analyze and capture local function conservation by means of logistic curves. Based on this analysis, we propose a method for predicting molecular function of a query protein with known structure but unknown function. The prediction method is rigorously assessed and compared with a previously published function predictor. Furthermore, we apply the method to 500 functionally unannotated PDB structures and discuss selected examples. The proposed approach provides a simple yet consistent statistical model for the complex relations between protein sequence, structure, and function. The GOdot method is available online (http://godot.bioinf.mpi-inf.mpg.de). PMID:18604264

  5. Local function conservation in sequence and structure space.

    PubMed

    Weinhold, Nils; Sander, Oliver; Domingues, Francisco S; Lengauer, Thomas; Sommer, Ingolf

    2008-07-04

    We assess the variability of protein function in protein sequence and structure space. Various regions in this space exhibit considerable difference in the local conservation of molecular function. We analyze and capture local function conservation by means of logistic curves. Based on this analysis, we propose a method for predicting molecular function of a query protein with known structure but unknown function. The prediction method is rigorously assessed and compared with a previously published function predictor. Furthermore, we apply the method to 500 functionally unannotated PDB structures and discuss selected examples. The proposed approach provides a simple yet consistent statistical model for the complex relations between protein sequence, structure, and function. The GOdot method is available online (http://godot.bioinf.mpi-inf.mpg.de).

  6. Measurement of two low-temperature energy gaps in the electronic structure of antiferromagnetic USb2 using ultrafast optical spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Qi, J; Durakiewicz, T; Trugman, S A; Zhu, J-X; Riseborough, P S; Baumbach, R; Bauer, E D; Gofryk, K; Meng, J-Q; Joyce, J J; Taylor, A J; Prasankumar, R P

    2013-08-02

    Ultrafast optical spectroscopy is used to study the antiferromagnetic f-electron system USb(2). We observe the opening of two charge gaps at low temperatures (electronic structure. Analysis of our data indicates that one gap is due to hybridization between localized f-electron and conduction electron bands, while band renormalization involving magnons leads to the emergence of the second gap. These experiments thus enable us to shed light on the complex electronic structure emerging at the Fermi surface in f-electron systems.

  7. Local Structure Around Te in Heavily Doped GaAs:Te using X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Pietnoczka, A.; Bacewicz, R.; Slupinski, T.; Antonowicz, J.; Wei, Su-Huai

    2012-04-01

    The annealing of heavily doped GaAs:Te can significantly change the free electron concentration in a reversible manner. These changes of electrical properties are accompanied by the structural changes of GaAs:Te solid solution. We used X-ray Absorption Fine Structure at K-edge of tellurium to determine local changes around Te atoms for different states of the GaAs:Te crystals caused by the annealing corresponding to different electron concentrations. The best EXAFS fit for the samples with high electron concentration was obtained for the substitutional Te{sub As} model with elongated Te-Ga bonds (as compared to the As-Ga distance). For the samples in the low concentration state the best fit was for the pairs of Te atoms forming a rhombohedral symmetry double-DX centre, with the proportional admixture of the substitutional tellurium.

  8. Stabilizing hierarchical compensation for locally controlled large flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, B.; Balas, M.

    1989-01-01

    A two-level hierarchical control strategy is proposed for large flexible space structures. The lower level consists of a set of local controllers. The higher level is a stabilizing compensator to account for any instabilities caused by controller-structure interaction with unmodeled dynamics. The advantage of this hierarchical strategy is that the lower level can be designed to meet the performance requirements, and the higher level can be designed independently to produce overall stability.

  9. Local spin torque induced by electron electric dipole moment in the YbF molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, Masahiro; Senami, Masato; Ogiso, Yoji; Tachibana, Akitomo

    2014-10-06

    In this study, we show the modification of the equation of motion of the electronic spin, which is derived by the quantum electron spin vorticity principle, by the effect of the electron electric dipole moment (EDM). To investigate the new contribution to spin torque by EDM, using first principle calculations, we visualize distributions of the local spin angular momentum density and local spin torque density of the YbF molecule on which the static electric field and magnetic field are applied at t = 0.

  10. Electronic structure of BaO/W cathode surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, Wolfgang

    1989-01-01

    The local electronic structure of the emissive layer of barium dispenser thermionic cathodes is investigated theoretically using the relativistic scattered-wave approach. The interaction of Ba and O with W, Os, and W-Os alloy surfaces is studied with atomic clusters modeling different absorption environments representative of B- and M-type cathodes. Ba is found to be strongly oxidized, while O and the metal substrate are in a reduced chemical state. The presence of O enhances the surface dipole and Ba binding energy relative to Ba on W. Model results for W-Os alloy substrates show only relatively small changes in Ba and O for identical geometries, but very large charge redistributions inside the substrate, which are attributed to the electronegativity difference between Os and W. If Os is present in the surface layer, the charge transfer from Ba to the substrate and the Ba binding energy increase relative to W. Explanations are offered for the improved electron emission from alloy surfaces and the different emission enhancement for different alloy substrates.

  11. Local structure analysis of materials for increased energy efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medling, Scott

    adjacent to a S vacancy. In Chapter 5, I present a study into thermoelectric clathrates to determine how differences in size of one of the cage atoms affects the local structure and, therefore, the thermoelectric properties. I then discuss the effect of additional cage disorder on the scattering of phonons and the scattering of electrons, and thus the thermoelectric figure of merit. In Chapter 6, I present an XMCD study of La1 --xSrxCoO 3, finding results that are consistent with Sr-induced formation of ferromagnetic clusters within the non-magnetic, insulating matrix. We also show that not only are the O states spin-polarized, but a significant fraction of holes from Sr-doping go onto the O sites. Further, experimental results are compared to density functional calculations and discussed.

  12. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy of inhomogeneous electronic structure in monolayer and bilayer graphene on SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brar, Victor W.; Zhang, Yuanbo; Yayon, Yossi; Ohta, Taisuke; McChesney, Jessica L.; Bostwick, Aaron; Rotenberg, Eli; Horn, Karsten; Crommie, Michael F.

    2007-09-01

    The authors present a scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) study of the local electronic structure of single and bilayer graphene grown epitaxially on a SiC(0001) surface. Low voltage topographic images reveal fine, atomic-scale carbon networks, whereas higher bias images are dominated by emergent spatially inhomogeneous large-scale structure similar to a carbon-rich reconstruction of SiC(0001). STS spectroscopy shows an ˜100meV gaplike feature around zero bias for both monolayer and bilayer graphene/SiC, as well as significant spatial inhomogeneity in electronic structure above the gap edge. Nanoscale structure at the SiC/graphene interface is seen to correlate with observed electronic spatial inhomogeneity. These results are relevant for potential devices involving electronic transport or tunneling in graphene/SiC.

  13. Velocity-space structure of runaway electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, V.; Cairns, R.A.; Lashmore-Davies, C.N.; Shoucri, M.M.

    1986-09-01

    The region of velocity space is determined in which electron runaway occurs because of a dc electric field. Phase-space analysis of the relaxation equations describing test electrons, corroborated by two-dimensional (2-D) numerical integration of the Fokker--Planck equation, reveals that the Dreicer condition for runaway v-italic/sup 2//sub parallel/> or =(2+Z-italic/sub i-italic/)E-italic/sub c-italic//E-italic is only sufficient. A weaker condition v-italic/sup 2//sub parallel/> or =(2+Z-italic/sub i-italic/)/sup 1//sup ///sup 2/E-italic/sub c-italic//E-italic is established, and it is shown, in general, that runaway in velocity space only occurs for those electrons that are outside one of the separatrices of the relaxation equations. The scaling with v-italic/sub parallel/ of the parallel distribution function and of the perpendicular temperature is also derived.

  14. One Single Static Measurement Predicts Wave Localization in Complex Structures.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Gautier; Gondel, Alexane; Dubois, Marc; Atlan, Michael; Feppon, Florian; Labbé, Aimé; Gillot, Camille; Garelli, Alix; Ernoult, Maxence; Mayboroda, Svitlana; Filoche, Marcel; Sebbah, Patrick

    2016-08-12

    A recent theoretical breakthrough has brought a new tool, called the localization landscape, for predicting the localization regions of vibration modes in complex or disordered systems. Here, we report on the first experiment which measures the localization landscape and demonstrates its predictive power. Holographic measurement of the static deformation under uniform load of a thin plate with complex geometry provides direct access to the landscape function. When put in vibration, this system shows modes precisely confined within the subregions delineated by the landscape function. Also the maxima of this function match the measured eigenfrequencies, while the minima of the valley network gives the frequencies at which modes become extended. This approach fully characterizes the low frequency spectrum of a complex structure from a single static measurement. It paves the way for controlling and engineering eigenmodes in any vibratory system, especially where a structural or microscopic description is not accessible.

  15. The Changing Market Structure of Local Television News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Angela

    The growth in competition for revenues, along with the advent of cable, independent television and video cassette recorders (VCR), may signify a change in the market structure of local television news. To explain if and how this change may be occurring, an explanation of economic theory as well as evidence from "Broadcast and Cable…

  16. Local Structure of CuIn3Se5

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C. H.; Wei, S. H.; Leyarovska, N.; Johnson, J. W.; Zhang, S. B.; Stanbery, B. J.; Anderson, T. J.

    2000-01-01

    The results of a detailed EXAFS study of the Cu-K, In-K, and Se-K edges CuIn3Se5 are reported. The Cu and In first nearest neighbor local structures were found to be almost identical to those in CuInSe2.

  17. Filamentation of laser beam and suppression of stimulated Raman scattering due to localization of electron plasma wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purohit, Gunjan; Sharma, Prerana; Sharma, R. P.

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents the effect of laser beam filamentation on the localization of electron plasma wave (EPW) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in unmagnetized plasma when relativistic and ponderomotive nonlinearities are operative. The splitted profile of the laser beam is obtained due to uneven focusing of the off-axial rays. The semi-analytical solution of the nonlinearly coupled EPW equation in the presence of laser beam filaments has been found. It is observed that due to this nonlinear coupling between these two waves, localization of EPW takes place. Stimulated Raman scattering of this EPW is studied and back reflectivity has been calculated. Further, the localization of EPW affects the eigenfrequency and damping of plasma wave. The new enhanced damping of the plasma wave has been calculated and it is found that the SRS process gets suppressed due to the localization of plasma wave in laser beam filamentary structures.

  18. Atomistic modeling of electronic structure and transport in disordered nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharche, Neerav

    As the Si-CMOS technology approaches the end of the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS), the semiconductor industry faces a formidable challenge to continue the transistor scaling according to Moore's law. To continue the scaling of classical devices, alternative channel materials such as SiGe, carbon nanotubes, nanowires, and III-V based materials are being investigated along with novel 3D device geometries. Researchers are also investigating radically new quantum computing devices, which are expected to perform calculations faster than the existing classical Si-CMOS based structures. Atomic scale disorders such as interface roughness, alloy randomness, non-uniform strain, and dopant fluctuations are routinely present in the experimental realization of such devices. These disorders now play an increasingly important role in determining the electronic structure and transport properties as device sizes enter the nanometer regime. This work employs the atomistic tight-binding technique, which is ideally suited for modeling systems with local disorders on an atomic scale. High-precision multi-million atom electronic structure calculations of (111) Si surface quantum wells and (100) SiGe/Si/SiGe heterostructure quantum wells are performed to investigate the modulation of valley splitting induced by atomic scale disorders. The calculations presented here resolve the existing discrepancies between theoretically predicted and experimentally measured valley splitting, which is an important design parameter in quantum computing devices. Supercell calculations and the zone-unfolding method are used to compute the bandstructures of inhomogeneous nanowires made of AlGaAs and SiGe and their connection with the transmission coefficients computed using non-equilibrium Green's function method is established. A unified picture of alloy nanowires emerges, in which the nanodevice (transmission) and nanomaterials (bandstructure) viewpoints complement each other

  19. Local structure of ZnO micro flowers and nanoparticles obtained by micro segmented flow synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shuning; Roy, Amitava; Lichtenberg, Henning; Merchan, Gregory; Kumar, Challa S.S.R.; Köhler, J. Michael

    2012-03-07

    The micro-segmented flow technique was applied for continuous synthesis of ZnO micro- and nanoparticles with short residence times of 9.4 s and 21.4 s, respectively. The obtained particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and photoluminescence spectroscopy were used to determine the size and optical properties of ZnO nanoparticles. In addition, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy was employed to investigate local structural properties. The EXAFS measurements reveal a larger degree of structural disorder in the nanoparticles than the microparticles. These structural changes should be taken into consideration while evaluating the size-dependent visible emission of ZnO nanoparticles.

  20. Electronic-structure calculations of praseodymium metal by means of modified density-functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Svane, A.; Trygg, J.; Johansson, B.; Eriksson, O. |

    1997-09-01

    Electronic-structure calculations of elemental praseodymium are presented. Several approximations are used to describe the Pr f electrons. It is found that the low-pressure, trivalent phase is well described using either the self-interaction corrected (SIC) local-spin-density (LSD) approximation or the generalized-gradient approximation (GGA) with spin and orbital polarization (OP). In the SIC-LSD approach the Pr f electrons are treated explicitly as localized with a localization energy given by the self-interaction of the f orbital. In the GGA+OP scheme the f-electron localization is described by the onset of spin and orbital polarization, the energetics of which is described by spin-moment formation energy and a term proportional to the total orbital moment, L{sub z}{sup 2}. The high-pressure phase is well described with the f electrons treated as band electrons, in either the LSD or the GGA approximations, of which the latter describes more accurately the experimental equation of state. The calculated pressure of the transition from localized to delocalized behavior is 280 kbar in the SIC-LSD approximation and 156 kbar in the GGA+OP approach, both comparing favorably with the experimentally observed transition pressure of 210 kbar. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  1. Pressure-Induced Local Structural Changes in Heavy Fermion β-YbAlB4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Yui; Ikeda, Shugo; Kuga, Kentaro; Suzuki, Shintaro; Nakatsuji, Satoru; Hirao, Naohisa; Ohishi, Yasuo; Kobayashi, Hisao

    2016-02-01

    The structural properties of β-YbAlB4 with an orthorhombic Cmmm symmetry have been investigated by powder X-ray diffraction analysis using synchrotron radiation under high pressure (up to ˜20 GPa) at 7 K. Although the refined lattice parameters exhibit no discontinuity and the pressure dependence of the volume was well reproduced by the Murnaghan's equation of state up to ˜20 GPa, detailed analyses of the observed X-ray diffraction patterns reveal local structure changes in B layers at 3.5(2) and 5.8(1) GPa. The changes in the local structure strongly affect the bonding structures in the B layers among the conduction electrons of β-YbAlB4 under pressure at 7 K.

  2. Ab-initio study of structural, mechanical and electronic properties of functionalized carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Milowska, Karolina Z.; Birowska, Magdalena; Majewski, Jacek A.

    2013-12-04

    We present exemplary results of extensive studies of structural, mechanical and electronic properties of covalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). We report new results for metallic (9,0), and semiconducting (10,0) single-wall carbon nanotubes (CNT) functionalized with -COOH, -OH, and both groups with concentration up to 12.5%. Our studies are performed in the framework of the density functional theory (DFT). We discuss here the stability, local and global changes in structure, elastic moduli (Young's, Shear, and Bulk), electronic structure and resulting band gaps, as a function of the density of the adsorbed molecules.

  3. Local Crystalline Structure in an Amorphous Protein Dense Phase.

    PubMed

    Greene, Daniel G; Modla, Shannon; Wagner, Norman J; Sandler, Stanley I; Lenhoff, Abraham M

    2015-10-20

    Proteins exhibit a variety of dense phases ranging from gels, aggregates, and precipitates to crystalline phases and dense liquids. Although the structure of the crystalline phase is known in atomistic detail, little attention has been paid to noncrystalline protein dense phases, and in many cases the structures of these phases are assumed to be fully amorphous. In this work, we used small-angle neutron scattering, electron microscopy, and electron tomography to measure the structure of ovalbumin precipitate particles salted out with ammonium sulfate. We found that the ovalbumin phase-separates into core-shell particles with a core radius of ∼2 μm and shell thickness of ∼0.5 μm. Within this shell region, nanostructures comprised of crystallites of ovalbumin self-assemble into a well-defined bicontinuous network with branches ∼12 nm thick. These results demonstrate that the protein gel is comprised in part of nanocrystalline protein.

  4. Local Crystalline Structure in an Amorphous Protein Dense Phase

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Daniel G.; Modla, Shannon; Wagner, Norman J.; Sandler, Stanley I.; Lenhoff, Abraham M.

    2015-01-01

    Proteins exhibit a variety of dense phases ranging from gels, aggregates, and precipitates to crystalline phases and dense liquids. Although the structure of the crystalline phase is known in atomistic detail, little attention has been paid to noncrystalline protein dense phases, and in many cases the structures of these phases are assumed to be fully amorphous. In this work, we used small-angle neutron scattering, electron microscopy, and electron tomography to measure the structure of ovalbumin precipitate particles salted out with ammonium sulfate. We found that the ovalbumin phase-separates into core-shell particles with a core radius of ∼2 μm and shell thickness of ∼0.5 μm. Within this shell region, nanostructures comprised of crystallites of ovalbumin self-assemble into a well-defined bicontinuous network with branches ∼12 nm thick. These results demonstrate that the protein gel is comprised in part of nanocrystalline protein. PMID:26488663

  5. Localized conductive patterning via focused electron beam reduction of graphene oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Songkil; Henry, Mathias; Kulkarni, Dhaval D.; Zackowski, Paul; Jang, Seung Soon; Tsukruk, Vladimir V.; Fedorov, Andrei G.

    2015-03-30

    We report on a method for “direct-write” conductive patterning via reduction of graphene oxide (GO) sheets using focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) of carbon. FEBID treatment of the intrinsically dielectric graphene oxide between two metal terminals opens up the conduction channel, thus enabling a unique capability for nanoscale conductive domain patterning in GO. An increase in FEBID electron dose results in a significant increase of the domain electrical conductivity with improving linearity of drain-source current vs. voltage dependence, indicative of a change of graphene oxide electronic properties from insulating to semiconducting. Density functional theory calculations suggest a possible mechanism underlying this experimentally observed phenomenon, as localized reduction of graphene oxide layers via interactions with highly reactive intermediates of electron-beam-assisted dissociation of surface-adsorbed hydrocarbon molecules. These findings establish an unusual route for using FEBID as nanoscale lithography and patterning technique for engineering carbon-based nanomaterials and devices with locally tailored electronic properties.

  6. OPEN PROBLEM: Spatially localized structures in dissipative systems: open problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobloch, E.

    2008-04-01

    Stationary spatially localized structures, sometimes called dissipative solitons, arise in many interesting and important applications, including buckling of slender structures under compression, nonlinear optics, fluid flow, surface catalysis, neurobiology and many more. The recent resurgence in interest in these structures has led to significant advances in our understanding of the origin and properties of these states, and these in turn suggest new questions, both general and system-specific. This paper surveys these results focusing on open problems, both mathematical and computational, as well as on new applications.

  7. Localization of acoustic modes in periodic porous silicon structures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The propagation of longitudinal acoustic waves in multilayer structures based on porous silicon and the experimental measurement of acoustic transmission for the structures in the gigahertz range are reported and studied theoretically. The considered structures exhibit band gaps in the transmission spectrum and these are localized modes inside the band gap, coming from defect layers introduced in periodic systems. The frequency at which the acoustic resonances appear can be tuned by changing the porosity and/or thickness of the defect layer. PMID:25206317

  8. Local treatment of electron excitations in the EOM-CCSD method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korona, Tatiana; Werner, Hans-Joachim

    2003-02-01

    The Equation-of-Motion coupled cluster method restricted to single and double excitations (EOM-CCSD) and singlet excited states is formulated in a basis of nonorthogonal local orbitals. In the calculation of excited states only electron promotions from localized molecular orbitals into subspaces (excitation domains) of the local basis are allowed, which strongly reduces the number of EOM-CCSD amplitudes to be optimized. Furthermore, double excitations are neglected unless the excitation domains of the corresponding localized occupied orbitals are close to each other. Unlike in the local methods for the ground state, the excitation domains cannot be simply restricted to the atomic orbitals that are spatially close to the localized occupied orbitals. In the present paper the choice of the excitation domains is based on the analysis of wave functions computed by more approximate (and cheaper) methods like, e.g., configuration-interaction singles. The effect of various local approximations is investigated in detail, and it is found that a balanced description of the local configuration spaces describing the ground and excited states is essential to obtain accurate results. Using a single set of parameters for a given basis set, test calculations with the local EOM-CCSD method were performed for 14 molecules and 49 electronically excited states. The excitation energies computed by the local EOM-CCSD method reproduce the conventional EOM-CCSD excitation energies with an average error of 0.06 eV.

  9. Local duality in spin structure functions g1(p) and g1(d)

    SciTech Connect

    Yelena Prok

    2006-02-01

    Inclusive double spin asymmetries obtained by scattering polarized electrons off polarized protons and deuterons have been analyzed to address the issue of quark hadron duality in the polarized spin structure functions gp 1 and gd 1. A polarized electron beam, solid polarized NH3 and ND3 targets and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) in Hall B were used to collect the data. The resulting gp 1 and gd 1 were averaged over the nucleon resonance energy region (M local duality.

  10. Local magnetic structure determination using polarized neutron holography

    SciTech Connect

    Szakál, Alex Markó, Márton Cser, László

    2015-05-07

    A unique and important property of the neutron is that it possesses magnetic moment. This property is widely used for determination of magnetic structure of crystalline samples observing the magnetic components of the diffraction peaks. Investigations of diffraction patterns give information only about the averaged structure of a crystal but for discovering of local spin arrangement around a specific (e.g., impurity) nucleus remains still a challenging problem. Neutron holography is a useful tool to investigate the local structure around a specific nucleus embedded in a crystal lattice. The method has been successfully applied experimentally in several cases using non-magnetic short range interaction of the neutron and the nucleus. A mathematical model of the hologram using interaction between magnetic moment of the atom and the neutron spin for polarized neutron holography is provided. Validity of a polarized neutron holographic experiment is demonstrated by applying the proposed method on model systems.

  11. Local magnetic structure determination using polarized neutron holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szakál, Alex; Markó, Márton; Cser, László

    2015-05-01

    A unique and important property of the neutron is that it possesses magnetic moment. This property is widely used for determination of magnetic structure of crystalline samples observing the magnetic components of the diffraction peaks. Investigations of diffraction patterns give information only about the averaged structure of a crystal but for discovering of local spin arrangement around a specific (e.g., impurity) nucleus remains still a challenging problem. Neutron holography is a useful tool to investigate the local structure around a specific nucleus embedded in a crystal lattice. The method has been successfully applied experimentally in several cases using non-magnetic short range interaction of the neutron and the nucleus. A mathematical model of the hologram using interaction between magnetic moment of the atom and the neutron spin for polarized neutron holography is provided. Validity of a polarized neutron holographic experiment is demonstrated by applying the proposed method on model systems.

  12. Local structural investigation of buried InAs(x)P(1-x)/InP interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberti, C.; Bordiga, S.; Boscherini, F.; Pascarelli, S.; Schiavini, G. M.; Ferari, C.; Lazzarini, L.; Salviati, G.

    1994-10-01

    A local structural investigation has been carried out on the 10 A InAs(x)P(1-x) layer in ad hoc grown InAs(x)P(1-x)/InP epitaxal multistructures deposited by low pressure metallorganic chemical vapor deposition by means of extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, and high resolution x-ray diffraction analyses. The goal was to characterize the local structure of the unwanted, strained, interface layers of InAs(x)P(1-x) produced by the exposure of the InP surface to AsH3 as occurs during the growth of InP/In(0.53)Ga(0.47)As heterostructures optimized for photonics. High resolution x-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy confirm the high crystalline perfection of the investigated interfaces. As K-edge extended x-ray absorption fine structure analysis shows, the first shell environment of As at these interfaces is similar to that found in bulk InAs(x)P(1-X) alloys of similar composition, as determined experimentally and by comparison with recent theories of bond lengths in semiconductor alloys. In particular we measure an As-In bond length which varies at most 0.02 A with As concentration at the interface; this implies that epitaxy with InP is accompanied by local structural distortions, such as bond angle variations, which accommodate the nearly constant As-In bond length.

  13. Curly arrows meet electron density transfers in chemical reaction mechanisms: from electron localization function (ELF) analysis to valence-shell electron-pair repulsion (VSEPR) inspired interpretation.

    PubMed

    Andrés, Juan; Berski, Sławomir; Silvi, Bernard

    2016-07-07

    Probing the electron density transfers during a chemical reaction can provide important insights, making possible to understand and control chemical reactions. This aim has required extensions of the relationships between the traditional chemical concepts and the quantum mechanical ones. The present work examines the detailed chemical insights that have been generated through 100 years of work worldwide on G. N. Lewis's ground breaking paper on The Atom and the Molecule (Lewis, G. N. The Atom and the Molecule, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1916, 38, 762-785), with a focus on how the determination of reaction mechanisms can be reached applying the bonding evolution theory (BET), emphasizing how curly arrows meet electron density transfers in chemical reaction mechanisms and how the Lewis structure can be recovered. BET that combines the topological analysis of the electron localization function (ELF) and Thom's catastrophe theory (CT) provides a powerful tool providing insight into molecular mechanisms of chemical rearrangements. In agreement with physical laws and quantum theoretical insights, BET can be considered as an appropriate tool to tackle chemical reactivity with a wide range of possible applications. Likewise, the present approach retrieves the classical curly arrows used to describe the rearrangements of chemical bonds for a given reaction mechanism, providing detailed physical grounds for this type of representation. The ideas underlying the valence-shell-electron pair-repulsion (VSEPR) model applied to non-equilibrium geometries provide simple chemical explanations of density transfers. For a given geometry around a central atom, the arrangement of the electronic domain may comply or not with the VSEPR rules according with the valence shell population of the considered atom. A deformation yields arrangements which are either VSEPR defective (at least a domain is missing to match the VSEPR arrangement corresponding to the geometry of the ligands), VSEPR compliant

  14. Syntheses and electronic structures of decamethylmetallocenes

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, J.L.

    1981-04-01

    The synthesis of decamethylmanganocene ((eta-C/sub 5/(CH/sub 3/)/sub 5/)/sub 2/Mn or (Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/Mn)) is described. Magnetic susceptibility and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies show that (Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/Mn is a low-spin, 17-electron compound with an orbitally degenerate, /sup 2/E/sub 2g/ (e/sub 2g//sup 3/ a/sub 1g//sup 2/) ground state. An x-ray crystallographic study of (Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/Mn shows that it is a monomeric, D/sub 5d/ decamethylmetallocene with metal to ring carbon distances that are about 0.3 A shorter than those determined for high-spin manganocenes. The syntheses of new (Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/M (M = Mg,V,Cr,Co, and Ni) and ((Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/M)PF/sub 6/ (M = Cr,Co, and Ni) compounds are described. In addition, a preparative route to a novel, dicationic decamethylmetallocene, ((Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/Ni)(PF/sub 6/)/sub 2/ is reported. Infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance, magnetic susceptibility, and/or x-ray crystallographic studies indicate that all the above compounds are D/sub 5d/ or D/sub 5h/ decamethylmetallocenes with low-spin electronic configurations. Cyclic voltammetry studies verify the reversibility and the one-electron nature of the (Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/M ..-->.. ((Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/M)/sup +/ (M = Cr,Mn,Fe,Co,Ni), ((Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/Mn)/sup -/ ..-->.. (Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/Mn and ((Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/Ni)/sup +/ ..-->.. (Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/Ni)/sup 2 +/ redox reactions. These studies reveal that the neutral decamethylmetallocenes are much more easily oxidized than their metallocene counterparts. This result attests to the electron-donating properties of the ten substituent methyl groups. Proton and carbon-13 NMR data are reported for the diamagnetic Mg(II), Mn(I), Fe(II), Co(III), and Ni(IV) decamethylmetallocenes and for ((Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/V(CO)/sub 2/)/sup +/. The uv-visible absorption spectra of the 15-, 18- and 20- electron decamethylmetallocenes are also reported.

  15. Electronic structure and optical properties of solid C 60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattesini, M.; Ahuja, R.; Sa, L.; Hugosson, H. W.; Johansson, B.; Eriksson, O.

    2009-06-01

    The electronic structure and the optical properties of face-centered-cubic C 60 have been investigated by using an all-electron full-potential method. Our ab initio results show that the imaginary dielectric function for high-energy values looks very similar to that of graphite, revealing close electronic structure similarities between the two systems. We have also identified the origin of different peaks in the dielectric function of fullerene by means of the calculated electronic density of states. The computed optical spectrum compares fairly well with the available experimental data for the Vis-UV absorption spectrum of solid C 60.

  16. Spin noise of localized electrons: Interplay of hopping and hyperfine interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazov, M. M.

    2015-05-01

    The theory of spin fluctuations is developed for an ensemble of localized electrons, taking into account both the hyperfine interaction of electron and nuclear spins and electron hopping between the sites. The analytical expression for the spin noise spectrum is derived for an arbitrary relation between the electron spin precession frequency in a field of nuclear fluctuations and the hopping rate. An increase in the hopping rate results in a drastic change in the spin noise spectrum. The effect of an external magnetic field is briefly addressed.

  17. Topological framework for local structure analysis in condensed matter

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Emanuel A.; Han, Jian; Srolovitz, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Physical systems are frequently modeled as sets of points in space, each representing the position of an atom, molecule, or mesoscale particle. As many properties of such systems depend on the underlying ordering of their constituent particles, understanding that structure is a primary objective of condensed matter research. Although perfect crystals are fully described by a set of translation and basis vectors, real-world materials are never perfect, as thermal vibrations and defects introduce significant deviation from ideal order. Meanwhile, liquids and glasses present yet more complexity. A complete understanding of structure thus remains a central, open problem. Here we propose a unified mathematical framework, based on the topology of the Voronoi cell of a particle, for classifying local structure in ordered and disordered systems that is powerful and practical. We explain the underlying reason why this topological description of local structure is better suited for structural analysis than continuous descriptions. We demonstrate the connection of this approach to the behavior of physical systems and explore how crystalline structure is compromised at elevated temperatures. We also illustrate potential applications to identifying defects in plastically deformed polycrystals at high temperatures, automating analysis of complex structures, and characterizing general disordered systems. PMID:26460045

  18. Energy-filtered Electron Transport Structures for Low-power Low-noise 2-D Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xuan; Qiu, Wanzhi; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2016-01-01

    In addition to cryogenic techniques, energy filtering has the potential to achieve high-performance low-noise 2-D electronic systems. Assemblies based on graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have been demonstrated to exhibit interesting transport properties, including resonant tunnelling. In this paper, we investigate GQDs based structures with the goal of producing energy filters for next generation lower-power lower-noise 2-D electronic systems. We evaluate the electron transport properties of the proposed GQD device structures to demonstrate electron energy filtering and the ability to control the position and magnitude of the energy passband by appropriate device dimensioning. We also show that the signal-to-thermal noise ratio performance of the proposed nanoscale device can be modified according to device geometry. The tunability of two-dimensional GQD structures indicates a promising route for the design of electron energy filters to produce low-power and low-noise electronics. PMID:27796343

  19. Energy-filtered Electron Transport Structures for Low-power Low-noise 2-D Electronics.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xuan; Qiu, Wanzhi; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2016-10-31

    In addition to cryogenic techniques, energy filtering has the potential to achieve high-performance low-noise 2-D electronic systems. Assemblies based on graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have been demonstrated to exhibit interesting transport properties, including resonant tunnelling. In this paper, we investigate GQDs based structures with the goal of producing energy filters for next generation lower-power lower-noise 2-D electronic systems. We evaluate the electron transport properties of the proposed GQD device structures to demonstrate electron energy filtering and the ability to control the position and magnitude of the energy passband by appropriate device dimensioning. We also show that the signal-to-thermal noise ratio performance of the proposed nanoscale device can be modified according to device geometry. The tunability of two-dimensional GQD structures indicates a promising route for the design of electron energy filters to produce low-power and low-noise electronics.

  20. Energy-filtered Electron Transport Structures for Low-power Low-noise 2-D Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xuan; Qiu, Wanzhi; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2016-10-01

    In addition to cryogenic techniques, energy filtering has the potential to achieve high-performance low-noise 2-D electronic systems. Assemblies based on graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have been demonstrated to exhibit interesting transport properties, including resonant tunnelling. In this paper, we investigate GQDs based structures with the goal of producing energy filters for next generation lower-power lower-noise 2-D electronic systems. We evaluate the electron transport properties of the proposed GQD device structures to demonstrate electron energy filtering and the ability to control the position and magnitude of the energy passband by appropriate device dimensioning. We also show that the signal-to-thermal noise ratio performance of the proposed nanoscale device can be modified according to device geometry. The tunability of two-dimensional GQD structures indicates a promising route for the design of electron energy filters to produce low-power and low-noise electronics.

  1. Vibrational structure of defect luminescence bands in GaN from electronic structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkauskas, Audrius; van de Walle, Chris G.

    2012-02-01

    Optical methods are among the most powerful to characterize defects in materials. The study of optical signatures based on state-of-the-art electronic structure methods is therefore very important. In this work we investigate the vibrational structure of luminescence bands pertaining to deep defect levels in GaN. Since luminescence lineshapes depend sensitively on defect geometries and vibrational frequencies, these should be described accurately. The latter is achieved through the use of hybrid density functionals. Both quasi-localized and bulk phonons are included in our description. In the case of transitions accompanied by very large lattice relaxations, anharmonic effects become sizeable, and these are also accounted for. For the defects studied a very good agreement with available experimental data is achieved. For instance, in the case of wide luminescence bands the resulting line widths are within 0.05 eV of the experimental values. This work was supported by the Swiss NSF and by NSF.

  2. Electron Precipitation Associated with Small-Scale Auroral Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michell, R.; Samara, M.; Grubbs, G. A., II; Hampton, D. L.; Bonnell, J. W.; Ogasawara, K.

    2014-12-01

    We present results from the Ground-to-Rocket Electrons Electrodynamics Correlative Experiment (GREECE) sounding rocket mission, where we combined high-resolution ground-based auroral imaging with high time-resolution precipitating electron measurements. The GREECE payload successfully launched from Poker Flat, Alaska on 03 March 2014 and reached an apogee of approximately 335 km. The narrow field-of-view auroral imaging was taken from Venetie, AK, which is directly under apogee. This enabled the small-scale auroral features at the magnetic footpoint of the rocket payload to be imaged in detail. The electron precipitation was measured with the Acute Precipitating Electron Spectrometer (APES) onboard the payload. Features in the electron data are matched up with their corresponding auroral structures and boundaries, enabling measurement of the exact electron distributions responsible for the specific small-scale auroral features. These electron distributions will then be used to infer what the potential electron acceleration processes were.

  3. Assessment of delocalized and localized molecular orbitals through electron momentum spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan; Cheung, Ling-Fung; Ning, Chuan-Gang

    2014-06-01

    Recently, there was a hot controversy about the concept of localized orbitals, which was triggered by Grushow's work titled “Is it time to retire the hybrid atomic orbital?” [J. Chem. Educ. 88, 860 (2011)]. To clarify the issue, we assess the delocalized and localized molecular orbitals from an experimental view using electron momentum spectroscopy. The delocalized and localized molecular orbitals based on various theoretical models for CH4, NH3, and H2O are compared with the experimental momentum distributions. Our results show that the delocalized molecular orbitals rather than the localized ones can give a direct interpretation of the experimental (e, 2e) results.

  4. Tracking Coherent Structures and Source Localization in Geophysical Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgoston, Eric; Hsieh, Ani; Schwartz, Ira; Yecko, Philip

    There has been a steady increase in the deployment of autonomous underwater and surface vehicles for applications such as ocean monitoring, tracking of marine processes, and forecasting contaminant transport. The underwater environment poses unique challenges since robots must operate in a communication and localization-limited environment where their dynamics are tightly coupled with the environmental dynamics. This work presents current efforts in understanding the impact of geophysical fluid dynamics on underwater vehicle control and autonomy. The focus of the talk is on the use of collaborative vehicles to track Lagrangian coherent structures and to localize contaminant spills. Research supported by the National Science Foundation and the Office of Naval Research.

  5. 18-Electron Resonance Structures in the BCC Transition Metals and Their CsCl-type Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Vinokur, Anastasiya I; Fredrickson, Daniel C

    2017-03-06

    Bonding in elemental metals and simple alloys has long been thought of as involving intense delocalization, with little connection to the localized bonds of covalent systems. In this Article, we show that the bonding in body-centered cubic (bcc) structures of the group 6 transition metals can in fact be represented, via the concepts of the 18-n rule and isolobal bonding, in terms of two balanced resonance structures. We begin with a reversed approximation Molecular Orbital (raMO) analysis of elemental Mo in its bcc structure. The raMO analysis indicates that, despite the low electron count (six valence electrons per Mo atom), nine electron pairs can be associated with any given Mo atom, corresponding to a filled 18-electron configuration. Six of these electron pairs take part in isolobal bonds along the second-nearest neighbor contacts, with the remaining three (based on the t2g d orbitals) interacting almost exclusively with first-nearest neighbors. In this way, each primitive cubic network defined by the second-nearest neighbor contacts comprises an 18-n electron system with n = 6, which essentially describes the full electronic structure of the phase. Of course, either of the two interpenetrating primitive cubic frameworks of the bcc structure can act as a basis for this discussion, leading us to write two resonance structures with equal weights for bcc-Mo. The electronic structures of CsCl-type variants with the same electron count can then be interpreted in terms of changing the relative weights of these two resonance structures, as is qualitatively confirmed with raMO analysis. This combination of raMO analysis with the resonance concept offers an avenue to extend the 18-n rule into other transition metal-rich structures.

  6. Functional implications of local DNA structures in regulatory motifs.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Qian

    2013-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of DNA has been proposed to be a major determinant for functional transcription factors (TFs) and DNA interaction. Here, we use hydroxyl radical cleavage pattern as a measure of local DNA structure. We compared the conservation between DNA sequence and structure in terms of information content and attempted to assess the functional implications of DNA structures in regulatory motifs. We used statistical methods to evaluate the structural divergence of substituting a single position within a binding site and applied them to a collection of putative regulatory motifs. The following are our major observations: (i) we observed more information in structural alignment than in the corresponding sequence alignment for most of the transcriptional factors; (ii) for each TF, majority of positions have more information in the structural alignment as compared to the sequence alignment; (iii) we further defined a DNA structural divergence score (SD score) for each wild-type and mutant pair that is distinguished by single-base mutation. The SD score for benign mutations is significantly lower than that of switch mutations. This indicates structural conservation is also important for TFBS to be functional and DNA structures will provide previously unappreciated information for TF to realize the binding specificity.

  7. Electronic, chemical and structural characterization of CNTs grown by SiC surface decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Policicchio, A.; Caruso, T.; Agostino, R. G.; Maccallini, E.; Chiarello, G.; Colavita, E.; Formoso, V.; Castriota, M.; Cazzanelli, E.

    2008-03-01

    The electronic, chemical and structural properties of Carbon NanoTubes (CNTs) synthesized by Silicon Carbide surface decomposition were analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy/Spectroscopy (STM/STS), Electron Energy Loss (EEL) and Raman spectroscopy. A clear relationship between the bonding features and the growth condition (temperature and growth time) is obtained. The morphology of the sample investigated by SEM reveals a well-packed and aligned structure of the CNTs. Different lengths of the CNTs are observed depending on the local temperature of the sample surface. The longest observed CNTs were 500/600 nm. The STS measurements show I-V diode-like characteristic curve which can be used, for instance, as an electron collector in solar cells applications. As a perspective metallic electrode, gold, will be deposited on top of the CNTs in the future, to collect the electron current and investigated by the same techniques.

  8. Fluctuations and local ice structure in model supercooled water.

    PubMed

    Overduin, S D; Patey, G N

    2015-09-07

    Large-scale simulations (up to 32,000 molecules) are used to analyze local structures and fluctuations for the TIP4P/2005 and TIP5P water models, under deeply supercooled conditions, near previously proposed liquid-liquid critical points. Bulk freezing does not occur in our simulations, but correlations between molecules with local ice-like structure (ice-like molecules) are strong and long ranged (∼4 nm), exceeding the shortest dimension of smaller simulation cells at the lowest temperatures considered. Correlations between ice-like molecules decay slowly at low temperature, on the order of a hundred nanoseconds. Local ice-like structure is strongly correlated with highly tetrahedral liquid structure at all times, both structures contribute to density fluctuations, and to the associated anomalous scattering. For the TIP4P/2005 and TIP5P models, we show that the apparent spontaneous liquid-liquid phase separations, recently reported [T. Yagasaki, M. Matsumoto, and H. Tanaka, Phys. Rev. E 89, 020301 (2014)] for small rectangular simulation cells below the proposed critical points, exhibit strong system size dependence and do not occur at all in the largest systems we consider. Furthermore, in the smaller rectangular systems where layers of different densities do occur, we find that the appearance of a region of low density is always accompanied simultaneously by an excess of local ice density, with no separation in time. Our results suggest that the density differences observed in direct simulations for the two models considered here are likely due to long-range correlations between ice-like molecules and do not provide strong evidence of liquid-liquid phase separation.

  9. Advancing Efficient All-Electron Electronic Structure Methods Based on Numeric Atom-Centered Orbitals for Energy Related Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, Volker

    This talk describes recent advances of a general, efficient, accurate all-electron electronic theory approach based on numeric atom-centered orbitals; emphasis is placed on developments related to materials for energy conversion and their discovery. For total energies and electron band structures, we show that the overall accuracy is on par with the best benchmark quality codes for materials, but scalable to large system sizes (1,000s of atoms) and amenable to both periodic and non-periodic simulations. A recent localized resolution-of-identity approach for the Coulomb operator enables O (N) hybrid functional based descriptions of the electronic structure of non-periodic and periodic systems, shown for supercell sizes up to 1,000 atoms; the same approach yields accurate results for many-body perturbation theory as well. For molecular systems, we also show how many-body perturbation theory for charged and neutral quasiparticle excitation energies can be efficiently yet accurately applied using basis sets of computationally manageable size. Finally, the talk highlights applications to the electronic structure of hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite materials, as well as to graphene-based substrates for possible future transition metal compound based electrocatalyst materials. All methods described here are part of the FHI-aims code. VB gratefully acknowledges contributions by numerous collaborators at Duke University, Fritz Haber Institute Berlin, TU Munich, USTC Hefei, Aalto University, and many others around the globe.

  10. Recognition of Local DNA Structures by p53 Protein.

    PubMed

    Brázda, Václav; Coufal, Jan

    2017-02-10

    p53 plays critical roles in regulating cell cycle, apoptosis, senescence and metabolism and is commonly mutated in human cancer. These roles are achieved by interaction with other proteins, but particularly by interaction with DNA. As a transcription factor, p53 is well known to bind consensus target sequences in linear B-DNA. Recent findings indicate that p53 binds with higher affinity to target sequences that form cruciform DNA structure. Moreover, p53 binds very tightly to non-B DNA structures and local DNA structures are increasingly recognized to influence the activity of wild-type and mutant p53. Apart from cruciform structures, p53 binds to quadruplex DNA, triplex DNA, DNA loops, bulged DNA and hemicatenane DNA. In this review, we describe local DNA structures and summarize information about interactions of p53 with these structural DNA motifs. These recent data provide important insights into the complexity of the p53 pathway and the functional consequences of wild-type and mutant p53 activation in normal and tumor cells.

  11. Recognition of Local DNA Structures by p53 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Brázda, Václav; Coufal, Jan

    2017-01-01

    p53 plays critical roles in regulating cell cycle, apoptosis, senescence and metabolism and is commonly mutated in human cancer. These roles are achieved by interaction with other proteins, but particularly by interaction with DNA. As a transcription factor, p53 is well known to bind consensus target sequences in linear B-DNA. Recent findings indicate that p53 binds with higher affinity to target sequences that form cruciform DNA structure. Moreover, p53 binds very tightly to non-B DNA structures and local DNA structures are increasingly recognized to influence the activity of wild-type and mutant p53. Apart from cruciform structures, p53 binds to quadruplex DNA, triplex DNA, DNA loops, bulged DNA and hemicatenane DNA. In this review, we describe local DNA structures and summarize information about interactions of p53 with these structural DNA motifs. These recent data provide important insights into the complexity of the p53 pathway and the functional consequences of wild-type and mutant p53 activation in normal and tumor cells. PMID:28208646

  12. Structural, electronic and thermal properties of Mo{sub 3}Ir superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Subhashree, G. Sankar, S.; Krithiga, R.; Devi, L. Vimala

    2015-06-24

    Self consistent first principle calculations on superconducting material Mo{sub 3}Ir of A15 phase have been performed to understand their fundamental characteristics of the structural, electronic and thermal properties. The bulk modulus (B{sub 0}), Debye temperature (θ{sub D}), density of states (N (E{sub F})) and electronic specific heat coefficient (γ) have been computed in terms of the electronic structure results obtained by using the tight-binding linear muffin tin orbital (TB-LMTO) method based on the density functional theory (DFT) within the local density approximation (LDA). Structural, electronic and thermal properties calculated here are found to corroborate well with the experimental and theoretical results of literature.

  13. Writing silica structures in liquid with scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    van de Put, Marcel W P; Carcouët, Camille C M C; Bomans, Paul H H; Friedrich, Heiner; de Jonge, Niels; Sommerdijk, Nico A J M

    2015-02-04

    Silica nanoparticles are imaged in solution with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) using a liquid cell with silicon nitride (SiN) membrane windows. The STEM images reveal that silica structures are deposited in well-defined patches on the upper SiN membranes upon electron beam irradiation. The thickness of the deposits is linear with the applied electron dose. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) demonstrate that the deposited patches are a result of the merging of the original 20 nm-diameter nanoparticles, and that the related surface roughness depends on the electron dose rate used. Using this approach, sub-micrometer scale structures are written on the SiN in liquid by controlling the electron exposure as function of the lateral position.

  14. Monaural sound localization based on structure-induced acoustic resonance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Keonwook; Kim, Youngwoong

    2015-02-06

    A physical structure such as a cylindrical pipe controls the propagated sound spectrum in a predictable way that can be used to localize the sound source. This paper designs a monaural sound localization system based on multiple pyramidal horns around a single microphone. The acoustic resonance within the horn provides a periodicity in the spectral domain known as the fundamental frequency which is inversely proportional to the radial horn length. Once the system accurately estimates the fundamental frequency, the horn length and corresponding angle can be derived by the relationship. The modified Cepstrum algorithm is employed to evaluate the fundamental frequency. In an anechoic chamber, localization experiments over azimuthal configuration show that up to 61% of the proper signal is recognized correctly with 30% misfire. With a speculated detection threshold, the system estimates direction 52% in positive-to-positive and 34% in negative-to-positive decision rate, on average.

  15. A local average distance descriptor for flexible protein structure comparison

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Protein structures are flexible and often show conformational changes upon binding to other molecules to exert biological functions. As protein structures correlate with characteristic functions, structure comparison allows classification and prediction of proteins of undefined functions. However, most comparison methods treat proteins as rigid bodies and cannot retrieve similarities of proteins with large conformational changes effectively. Results In this paper, we propose a novel descriptor, local average distance (LAD), based on either the geodesic distances (GDs) or Euclidean distances (EDs) for pairwise flexible protein structure comparison. The proposed method was compared with 7 structural alignment methods and 7 shape descriptors on two datasets comprising hinge bending motions from the MolMovDB, and the results have shown that our method outperformed all other methods regarding retrieving similar structures in terms of precision-recall curve, retrieval success rate, R-precision, mean average precision and F1-measure. Conclusions Both ED- and GD-based LAD descriptors are effective to search deformed structures and overcome the problems of self-connection caused by a large bending motion. We have also demonstrated that the ED-based LAD is more robust than the GD-based descriptor. The proposed algorithm provides an alternative approach for blasting structure database, discovering previously unknown conformational relationships, and reorganizing protein structure classification. PMID:24694083

  16. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES: Spin-Dependent Electron Properties of a Triple-Terminal Quantum Dot Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yu; Gong, Wei-Jiang; Wei, Guo-Zhu

    2009-12-01

    Electron transport properties of a triple-terminal Aharonov-Bohm interferometer are theoretically studied. By applying a Rashba spin-orbit coupling to a quantum dot locally, we find that remarkable spin polarization comes about in the electron transport process with tuning the structure parameters, i.e., the magnetic flux or quantum dot levels. When the quantum dot levels are aligned with the Fermi level, there only appear spin polarization in this structure by the presence of an appropriate magnetic flux. However, in absence of magnetic flux spin polarization and spin separation can be simultaneously realized with the adjustment of quantum dot levels, namely, an incident electron from one terminal can select a specific terminal to depart from the quantum dots according to its spin state.

  17. In situ KPFM imaging of local photovoltaic characteristics of structured organic photovoltaic devices.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Fukuchi, Yasumasa; Fukasawa, Masako; Sassa, Takafumi; Kimoto, Atsushi; Tajima, Yusuke; Uchiyama, Masanobu; Yamashita, Takashi; Matsumoto, Mutsuyoshi; Aoyama, Tetsuya

    2014-02-12

    Here, we discuss the local photovoltaic characteristics of a structured bulk heterojunction, organic photovoltaic devices fabricated with a liquid carbazole, and a fullerene derivative based on analysis by scanning kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). Periodic photopolymerization induced by an interference pattern from two laser beams formed surface relief gratings (SRG) in the structured films. The surface potential distribution in the SRGs indicates the formation of donor and acceptor spatial distribution. Under illumination, the surface potential reversibly changed because of the generation of fullerene anions and hole transport from the films to substrates, which indicates that we successfully imaged the local photovoltaic characteristics of the structured photovoltaic devices. Using atomic force microscopy, we confirmed the formation of the SRG because of the material migration to the photopolymerized region of the films, which was induced by light exposure through photomasks. The structuring technique allows for the direct fabrication and the control of donor and acceptor spatial distribution in organic photonic and electronic devices with minimized material consumption. This in situ KPFM technique is indispensable to the fabrication of nanoscale electron donor and electron acceptor spatial distribution in the devices.

  18. Electronic structure of sulfur-modified nanocrystalline carbon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S.; Weiner, B. R.; Morell, G.

    2005-05-01

    Thin films of nanocrystalline diamond were grown by filament-assisted chemical-vapor deposition using methane as carbon precursor with high hydrogen dilution and hydrogen sulfide concentration ranging from 0to500ppm in the gas phase. The surface topography and electronic structure of these films (n-C:S) were investigated using ultrahigh-vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS), respectively. Topographic image analyses depict that the root-mean-square roughness of the film surface and average grain size decreases with increasing sulfur incorporation either in gas phase or solid films. High-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy images reveal the localized regions of high conductivity (white) surrounded by less conductive regions (black) pointing at the existence of inhomogeneous mixture of sp2- and sp3-bonded carbon in aggregate or clustered and dispersed state. The surface density of states was determined using scanning tunneling spectroscopy where normalized differential conductivity, i.e., (dI /dV)/(I/V) mimics local density of states (DOS). These methods were employed to understand the role of sulfur in the modification of both the surface microstructure and electronic structure near the Fermi level. The band edges were derived by taking tangents to the differential conductivity (dI/dV) within a certain potential window of ±2eV of the Fermi level. The resulting band gap is found to be similar to that measured optically (Tauc gap). The Fermi level for undoped nanocrystalline carbon (n-C) was found just below the midgap indicating that n-C is a weakly p-type semiconductor. The STS DOS shows oscillatory behavior or peaks which we ascribe to states of the surface layer having relatively more graphitic or sp2-bonded carbon bonds. With higher sulfur addition, the Fermi level is found to move above the midgap. These results seem to agree quite well with our early work on electrical conductivity exhibiting n-type doping taking

  19. Crossover from itinerant-electron to localized-electron behavior in Sr(1-x)Ca(x)CrO3 perovskite solid solution.

    PubMed

    Long, Youwen; Yang, Liuxiang; Lv, Yuxi; Liu, Qingqing; Jin, Changqing; Zhou, Jianshi; Goodenough, John B

    2011-09-07

    Polycrystalline samples of the perovskite family Sr(1-x)Ca(x)CrO(3) have been prepared at high pressure and temperature in steps of 1/6 over the range 0 ≤ x ≤ 1. Rietveld analysis shows a series of structural phase transitions from cubic to tetragonal to orthorhombic with increasing x. The cubic samples have no long-range magnetic order; the other samples become antiferromagnetically ordered below a T(N) that increases with x. At ambient pressure, the electric transport properties of the cubic and tetragonal phases are semiconducting with a small (meV range) activation energy that increases with x; the orthorhombic phase exhibits variable-range hopping rather than the small-polaron behavior typically found for mixed-valent, localized-electron configurations. Above a pressure P=P(C), a smooth insulator-metal transition is found at a T(IM) that decreases with increasing P for a fixed x; P(C) increases with x. These phenomena are rationalized qualitatively with a π(∗)-band model having a width W(π) that approaches crossover from itinerant-electron to localized-electron behavior as W(π) decreases with increasing x. The smaller size of the Ca(2+) ion induces the structural changes and the greater acidity of the Ca(2+) ion is primarily responsible for narrowing W(π) as x increases.

  20. Earth Structure, Ice Mass Changes, and the Local Dynamic Geoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harig, C.; Simons, F. J.

    2014-12-01

    Spherical Slepian localization functions are a useful method for studying regional mass changes observed by satellite gravimetry. By projecting data onto a sparse basis set, the local field can be estimated more easily than with the full spherical harmonic basis. We have used this method previously to estimate the ice mass change in Greenland from GRACE data, and it can also be applied to other planetary problems such as global magnetic fields. Earth's static geoid, in contrast to the time-variable field, is in large part related to the internal density and rheological structure of the Earth. Past studies have used dynamic geoid kernels to relate this density structure and the internal deformation it induces to the surface geopotential at large scales. These now classical studies of the eighties and nineties were able to estimate the mantle's radial rheological profile, placing constraints on the ratio between upper and lower mantle viscosity. By combining these two methods, spherical Slepian localization and dynamic geoid kernels, we have created local dynamic geoid kernels which are sensitive only to density variations within an area of interest. With these kernels we can estimate the approximate local radial rheological structure that best explains the locally observed geoid on a regional basis. First-order differences of the regional mantle viscosity structure are accessible to this technique. In this contribution we present our latest, as yet unpublished results on the geographical and temporal pattern of ice mass changes in Antarctica over the past decade, and we introduce a new approach to extract regional information about the internal structure of the Earth from the static global gravity field. Both sets of results are linked in terms of the relevant physics, but also in being developed from the marriage of Slepian functions and geoid kernels. We make predictions on the utility of our approach to derive fully three-dimensional rheological Earth models, to

  1. Local intelligent electronic device (IED) rendering templates over limited bandwidth communication link to manage remote IED

    DOEpatents

    Bradetich, Ryan; Dearien, Jason A; Grussling, Barry Jakob; Remaley, Gavin

    2013-11-05

    The present disclosure provides systems and methods for remote device management. According to various embodiments, a local intelligent electronic device (IED) may be in communication with a remote IED via a limited bandwidth communication link, such as a serial link. The limited bandwidth communication link may not support traditional remote management interfaces. According to one embodiment, a local IED may present an operator with a management interface for a remote IED by rendering locally stored templates. The local IED may render the locally stored templates using sparse data obtained from the remote IED. According to various embodiments, the management interface may be a web client interface and/or an HTML interface. The bandwidth required to present a remote management interface may be significantly reduced by rendering locally stored templates rather than requesting an entire management interface from the remote IED. According to various embodiments, an IED may comprise an encryption transceiver.

  2. Local structure co-occurrence pattern for image retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ke; Zhang, Fan; Lu, Jia; Lu, Yinghua; Kong, Jun; Zhang, Ming

    2016-03-01

    Image description and annotation is an active research topic in content-based image retrieval. How to utilize human visual perception is a key approach to intelligent image feature extraction and representation. This paper has proposed an image feature descriptor called the local structure co-occurrence pattern (LSCP). LSCP extracts the whole visual perception for an image by building a local binary structure, and it is represented by a color-shape co-occurrence matrix which explores the relationship of multivisual feature spaces according to visual attention mechanism. As a result, LSCP not only describes low-level visual features integrated with texture feature, color feature, and shape feature but also bridges high-level semantic comprehension. Extensive experimental results on an image retrieval task on the benchmark datasets, corel-10,000, MIT VisTex, and INRIA Holidays, have demonstrated the usefulness, effectiveness, and robustness of the proposed LSCP.

  3. Alfvénic localized structures in partially ionized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borhanian, Jafar; Rezaei, Arash

    2017-02-01

    The existence and dynamics of Alfvénic localized structures are investigated in partially ionized plasmas. We have employed the Hall magnetohydrodynamics model for partially ionized plasmas and shown that the evolution of a weakly nonlinear and weakly dispersive Alfvén wave is governed by a derivative nonlinear Schrödinger (DNLS) type equation. In the Hall effect domination limit, this equation reduces to a standard DNLS equation that possesses localized solutions in the form of solitons and rogue waves. The dependence of the profile of these structures on the Hall parameter is addressed. When the ohmic and ambipolar effects are small but finite in comparison to the Hall effect, the evolution equation takes the form of a perturbed DNLS equation. In this limit, the dynamics of envelope soliton solution is examined by means of the soliton perturbation method, the moment method, to be precise.

  4. The local spiral structure of the Milky Way.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ye; Reid, Mark; Dame, Thomas; Menten, Karl; Sakai, Nobuyuki; Li, Jingjing; Brunthaler, Andreas; Moscadelli, Luca; Zhang, Bo; Zheng, Xingwu

    2016-09-01

    The nature of the spiral structure of the Milky Way has long been debated. Only in the last decade have astronomers been able to accurately measure distances to a substantial number of high-mass star-forming regions, the classic tracers of spiral structure in galaxies. We report distance measurements at radio wavelengths using the Very Long Baseline Array for eight regions of massive star formation near the Local spiral arm of the Milky Way. Combined with previous measurements, these observations reveal that the Local Arm is larger than previously thought, and both its pitch angle and star formation rate are comparable to those of the Galaxy's major spiral arms, such as Sagittarius and Perseus. Toward the constellation Cygnus, sources in the Local Arm extend for a great distance along our line of sight and roughly along the solar orbit. Because of this orientation, these sources cluster both on the sky and in velocity to form the complex and long enigmatic Cygnus X region. We also identify a spur that branches between the Local and Sagittarius spiral arms.

  5. The local spiral structure of the Milky Way

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ye; Reid, Mark; Dame, Thomas; Menten, Karl; Sakai, Nobuyuki; Li, Jingjing; Brunthaler, Andreas; Moscadelli, Luca; Zhang, Bo; Zheng, Xingwu

    2016-01-01

    The nature of the spiral structure of the Milky Way has long been debated. Only in the last decade have astronomers been able to accurately measure distances to a substantial number of high-mass star-forming regions, the classic tracers of spiral structure in galaxies. We report distance measurements at radio wavelengths using the Very Long Baseline Array for eight regions of massive star formation near the Local spiral arm of the Milky Way. Combined with previous measurements, these observations reveal that the Local Arm is larger than previously thought, and both its pitch angle and star formation rate are comparable to those of the Galaxy’s major spiral arms, such as Sagittarius and Perseus. Toward the constellation Cygnus, sources in the Local Arm extend for a great distance along our line of sight and roughly along the solar orbit. Because of this orientation, these sources cluster both on the sky and in velocity to form the complex and long enigmatic Cygnus X region. We also identify a spur that branches between the Local and Sagittarius spiral arms. PMID:27704048

  6. Structure and electronic properties of mixed (a + c) dislocation cores in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, M. K.; Rhode, S. L.; Moram, M. A.

    2014-08-14

    Classical atomistic models and atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy studies of GaN films reveal that mixed (a + c)-type dislocations have multiple different core structures, including a dissociated structure consisting of a planar fault on one of the (12{sup ¯}10) planes terminated by two different partial dislocations. Density functional theory calculations show that all cores introduce localized states into the band gap, which affects device performance.

  7. Extracting covalent and ionic structures from usual delocalized wave functions: the electron-expansion methodology.

    PubMed

    Papanikolaou, P; Karafiloglou, P

    2008-09-18

    We present easily programmable expansions, allowing the calculation of the weights of local covalent and ionic structures of a chemical bond from usual delocalized wave functions; they are obtained in the framework of the electron-expansion methodology, in which the hole conditions (involved by definition in a covalent or ionic structure) are expanded in terms involving only electrons. From the derived relations, true for both HF and correlated levels, one can also express the covalency/ionicity and the localization of a usual two-electron two-center (2e/2c) bond in terms of electronic populations. The three-electron populations are crucial for bond localization. On the contrary, in 2e/2c bonding, and particularly in Charge-Shift bonds (which show enhanced covalent-ionic interactions) although the three-electron populations can be non-negligible, they are not important for the covalency/ionicity of these bonds. Numerical applications and discussion are given for correlated MO wave functions of butadiene, hexatriene, and pyrrole molecules on the basis of both natural atomic orbitals (NAOs) (orthogonal orbitals) and pre-NAOs (nonorthogonal orbitals).

  8. Interfacial valence electron localization and the corrosion resistance of Al-SiC nanocomposite

    PubMed Central

    Mosleh-Shirazi, Sareh; Hua, Guomin; Akhlaghi, Farshad; Yan, Xianguo; Li, Dongyang

    2015-01-01

    Microstructural inhomogeneity generally deteriorates the corrosion resistance of materials due to the galvanic effect and interfacial issues. However, the situation may change for nanostructured materials. This article reports our studies on the corrosion behavior of SiC nanoparticle-reinforced Al6061 matrix composite. It was observed that the corrosion resistance of Al6061 increased when SiC nanoparticles were added. Overall electron work function (EWF) of the Al-SiC nanocomposite increased, along with an increase in the corrosion potential. The electron localization function of the Al-SiC nanocomposite was calculated and the results revealed that valence electrons were localized in the region of SiC-Al interface, resulting in an increase in the overall work function and thus building a higher barrier to hinder electrons in the nano-composite to participate in corrosion reactions. PMID:26667968

  9. Secondary electron emission from surfaces with small structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhanoev, A. R.; Spahn, F.; Yaroshenko, V.; Lühr, H.; Schmidt, J.

    2015-09-01

    It is found that for objects possessing small surface structures with differing radii of curvature the secondary electron emission (SEE) yield may be significantly higher than for objects with smooth surfaces of the same material. The effect is highly pronounced for surface structures of nanometer scale, often providing a more than 100 % increase of the SEE yield. The results also show that the SEE yield from surfaces with structure does not show a universal dependence on the energy of the primary, incident electrons as it is found for flat surfaces in experiments. We derive conditions for the applicability of the conventional formulation of SEE using the simplifying assumption of universal dependence. Our analysis provides a basis for studying low-energy electron emission from nanometer structured surfaces under a penetrating electron beam important in many technological applications.

  10. Linear Scaling Electronic Structure Methods with Periodic Boundary Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Gustavo E. Scuseria

    2008-02-08

    The methodological development and computational implementation of linear scaling quantum chemistry methods for the accurate calculation of electronic structure and properties of periodic systems (solids, surfaces, and polymers) and their application to chemical problems of DOE relevance.

  11. Stacking dependent electronic structures of transition metal dichalcogenides heterobilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yea-Lee; Park, Cheol-Hwan; Ihm, Jisoon

    The systematic study of the electronic structures and optical properties of the transition metal dichalcogenides (TMD) heterobilayers can significantly improve the designing of new electronic and optoelectronic devices. Here, we theoretically study the electronic structures and optical properties of TMD heterobilayers using the first-principles methods. The band structures of TMD heterobilayer are shown to be determined by the band alignments of the each layer, the weak interlayer interactions, and angle dependent stacking patterns. The photoluminescence spectra are investigated using the calculated band structures, and the optical absorption spectra are examined by the GW approximations including the electron-hole interaction through the solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation. It is expected that the weak interlayer interaction gives rise to the substantial interlayer optical transition which will be corresponding to the interlayer exciton.

  12. Localized structural frustration for evaluating the impact of sequence variants

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sushant; Clarke, Declan; Gerstein, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Population-scale sequencing is increasingly uncovering large numbers of rare single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) in coding regions of the genome. The rarity of these variants makes it challenging to evaluate their deleteriousness with conventional phenotype–genotype associations. Protein structures provide a way of addressing this challenge. Previous efforts have focused on globally quantifying the impact of SNVs on protein stability. However, local perturbations may severely impact protein functionality without strongly disrupting global stability (e.g. in relation to catalysis or allostery). Here, we describe a workflow in which localized frustration, quantifying unfavorable local interactions, is employed as a metric to investigate such effects. Using this workflow on the Protein Databank, we find that frustration produces many immediately intuitive results: for instance, disease-related SNVs create stronger changes in localized frustration than non-disease related variants, and rare SNVs tend to disrupt local interactions to a larger extent than common variants. Less obviously, we observe that somatic SNVs associated with oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) induce very different changes in frustration. In particular, those associated with TSGs change the frustration more in the core than the surface (by introducing loss-of-function events), whereas those associated with oncogenes manifest the opposite pattern, creating gain-of-function events. PMID:27915290

  13. Electronic structure and magnetism of samarium and neodymium adatoms on free-standing graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozub, Agnieszka L.; Shick, Alexander B.; Máca, František; Kolorenč, Jindřich; Lichtenstein, Alexander I.

    2016-09-01

    The electronic structure of selected rare-earth atoms adsorbed on a free-standing graphene was investigated using methods beyond the conventional density functional theory (DFT+U , DFT+HIA, and DFT+ED). The influence of the electron correlations and the spin-orbit coupling on the magnetic properties has been examined. The DFT+U method predicts both atoms to carry local magnetic moments (spin and orbital) contrary to a nonmagnetic f6 (J =0 ) ground-state configuration of Sm in the gas phase. Application of DFT +Hubbard-I (HIA) and DFT +exact diagonalization (ED) methods cures this problem, and yields a nonmagnetic ground state with six f electrons and J =0 for the Sm adatom. Our calculations show that Nd adatom remains magnetic, with four localized f electrons and J =4.0 . These conclusions could be verified by STM and XAS experiments.

  14. Topological band order, structural, electronic and optical properties of XPdBi (X = Lu, Sc) compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narimani, M.; Nourbakhsh, Z.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the structural, electronic and optical properties of LuPdBi and ScPdBi compounds are investigated using the density functional theory by WIEN2K package within the generalized gradient approximation, local density approximation, Engel-Vosco generalized gradient approximations and modified Becke-Johnson potential approaches. The topological phases and band orders of these compounds are studied. The effect of pressure on band inversion strength, electron density of states and the linear coefficient of the electronic specific heat of these compounds is investigated. Furthermore, the effect of pressure on real and imaginary parts of dielectric function, absorption and reflectivity coefficients of these compounds is studied.

  15. Electron Diffraction Determination of Nanoscale Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, Joel H

    2013-03-01

    Dominant research results on adsorption on gold clusters are reviewed, including adsorption of H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} on gold cluster cations and anions, kinetics of CO adsorption to middle sized gold cluster cations, adsorption of CO on Au{sub n}{sup +} with induced changes in structure, and H{sub 2}O enhancement of CO adsorption.

  16. Wavelength dependence of electron localization in the laser-driven dissociation of H2(+).

    PubMed

    Liu, Kunlong; Hong, Weiyi; Zhang, Qingbin; Lu, Peixiang

    2011-12-19

    We theoretically investigate the laser wavelength dependence of asymmetric dissociation of H2(+). It is found that the electron localization in molecular dissociation is significantly manipulated by varying the wavelength of the driving field. Through creating a strong nuclear vibration in the laser-molecular interaction, our simulations demonstrate that the few-cycle mid-infrared pulse can effectively localize the electron at one of the dissociating nuclei with weak ionization. Moreover, we show that the observed phase-shift of the dissociation asymmetry is attributed to the different population transfers by the remaining fields after the internuclear distances reach the one-photon coupling point.

  17. Distal chromatin structure influences local nucleosome positions and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Jansen, An; van der Zande, Elisa; Meert, Wim; Fink, Gerald R; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2012-05-01

    The positions of nucleosomes across the genome influence several cellular processes, including gene transcription. However, our understanding of the factors dictating where nucleosomes are located and how this affects gene regulation is still limited. Here, we perform an extensive in vivo study to investigate the influence of the neighboring chromatin structure on local nucleosome positioning and gene expression. Using truncated versions of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae URA3 gene, we show that nucleosome positions in the URA3 promoter are at least partly determined by the local DNA sequence, with so-called 'anti-nucleosomal elements' like poly(dA:dT) tracts being key determinants of nucleosome positions. In addition, we show that changes in the nucleosome positions in the URA3 promoter strongly affect the promoter activity. Most interestingly, in addition to demonstrating the effect of the local DNA sequence, our study provides novel in vivo evidence that nucleosome positions are also affected by the position of neighboring nucleosomes. Nucleosome structure may therefore be an important selective force for conservation of gene order on a chromosome, because relocating a gene to another genomic position (where the positions of neighboring nucleosomes are different from the original locus) can have dramatic consequences for the gene's nucleosome structure and thus its expression.

  18. Cosmic structure and dynamics of the local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Erdoǧdu, Pirin; Nuza, Sebastián. E.; Khalatyan, Arman; Angulo, Raul E.; Hoffman, Yehuda; Gottlöber, Stefan

    2012-11-01

    We present a cosmography analysis of the local Universe based on the recently released Two-Micron All-Sky Redshift Survey catalogue. Our method is based on a Bayesian Networks Machine Learning algorithm (the KIGEN-code) which self-consistently samples the initial density fluctuations compatible with the observed galaxy distribution and a structure formation model given by second-order Lagrangian perturbation theory (2LPT). From the initial conditions we obtain an ensemble of reconstructed density and peculiar velocity fields which characterize the local cosmic structure with high accuracy unveiling non-linear structures like filaments and voids in detail. Coherent redshift-space distortions are consistently corrected within 2LPT. From the ensemble of cross-correlations between the reconstructions and the galaxy field and the variance of the recovered density fields, we find that our method is extremely accurate up to k˜ 1 h Mpc-1 and still yields reliable results down to scales of about 3-4 h-1 Mpc. The motion of the Local Group we obtain within ˜80 h-1 Mpc (vLG = 522 ± 86 km s-1, lLG = 291° ± 16°, bLG = 34° ± 8°) is in good agreement with measurements derived from the cosmic microwave background and from direct observations of peculiar motions and is consistent with the predictions of ΛCDM.

  19. Signatures of unconventional pairing in near-vortex electronic structure of LiFeAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyungmin; Fischer, Mark H.; Kim, Eun-Ah

    2013-05-01

    A major question in Fe-based superconductors remains the structure of the pairing, in particular whether it is of unconventional nature. The electronic structure near a vortex can serve as a platform for phase-sensitive measurements to answer this question. By solving the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations for LiFeAs, we calculate the energy-dependent local electronic structure near a vortex for different nodeless gap-structure possibilities. At low energies, the local density of states (LDOS) around a vortex is determined by the normal-state electronic structure. At energies closer to the gap value, however, the LDOS can distinguish an anisotropic s-wave gap from a conventional isotropic s-wave gap. We show within our self-consistent calculation that in addition, the local gap profile differs between a conventional and an unconventional pairing. We explain this through admixing of a secondary order parameter within Ginzburg-Landau theory. In-field scanning tunneling spectroscopy near a vortex can therefore be used as a real-space probe of the gap structure.

  20. Electronic Structure Differences in ZrO2 vs. HfO2

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Weijun; Bowen Jr., K.H.; Li, Jun; Dabkowska, Iwona; Gutowski, Maciej S.

    2005-12-22

    While ZrO2 and HfO2 are, for the most part, quite similar chemically, subtle differences in their electronic structures appear to be responsible for differing MO2/Si (M = Zr, Hf) interface stabilities. In order to shed light on the electronic structure differences between ZrO2 and HfO2, we have conducted joint experimental/theoretical studies. Since electron affinities are a sensitive probe of electronic structure, we have measured them by conducting photoelectron spectroscopic experiments on ZrO2- and HfO2-. The electron affinity of HfO2 was determined to be 2.14? 0.03 eV, while that of ZrO2 was determined to be 1.64 ? 0.03 eV. Concurrently, electronic structure calculations were conducted to determine electron affinities, vibrational frequencies, and geometries of these systems. The calculated electron affinities of HfO2 and ZrO2 were found to be 2.05 and 1.62 eV, respectively. The molecular results confirm earlier predictions from solid phases that HfO2 is more ionic than ZrO2. The excess electron in MO2- occupies an sd-type hybrid orbital localized on the M atom (M=Zr, Hf). The structural parameters of ZrO2 and HfO2 were found to be very similar. The difference in geometries between the neutral and the anion is along the symmetrical stretching and bending modes. Together, these studies unveil significant differences in the electronic structures of ZrO2 and HfO2.

  1. Non-rigid registration and non-local principle component analysis to improve electron microscopy spectrum images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankovich, Andrew B.; Zhang, Chenyu; Oh, Albert; Slater, Thomas J. A.; Azough, Feridoon; Freer, Robert; Haigh, Sarah J.; Willett, Rebecca; Voyles, Paul M.

    2016-09-01

    Image registration and non-local Poisson principal component analysis (PCA) denoising improve the quality of characteristic x-ray (EDS) spectrum imaging of Ca-stabilized Nd2/3TiO3 acquired at atomic resolution in a scanning transmission electron microscope. Image registration based on the simultaneously acquired high angle annular dark field image significantly outperforms acquisition with a long pixel dwell time or drift correction using a reference image. Non-local Poisson PCA denoising reduces noise more strongly than conventional weighted PCA while preserving atomic structure more faithfully. The reliability of and optimal internal parameters for non-local Poisson PCA denoising of EDS spectrum images is assessed using tests on phantom data.

  2. Direct investigation of subsurface interface electronic structure by ballistic-electron-emission microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, W. J.; Bell, L. D.

    1988-01-01

    A new technique for spectroscopic investigation of subsurface interface electronic structure has been developed. The method, ballistic-electron-emission microscopy (BEEM), is based on scanning tunneling microscopy. BEEM makes possible, for the first time, direct imaging of subsurface interface properties with nanometer spatial resolution. The first application of BEEM to subsurface Schottky-barrier interfaces is reported.

  3. The role of localized inductive electric fields in electron injections around dipolarizing flux bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrielse, Christine; Harris, Camilla; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Artemyev, Anton; Runov, Andrei

    2016-10-01

    We study energetic electron injections by using an analytical model that self-consistently describes electric and magnetic field perturbations of a transient, localized dipolarizing flux bundle (DFB). This simple model reproduces most injection signatures at multiple locations simultaneously, reaffirming earlier findings that an earthward-traveling DFB can both transport and accelerate electrons to suprathermal energies, and can thus be considered an important driver of short-lived ( < 10 min) injections. We find that energetic electron drift paths are greatly influenced by the sharp magnetic field gradients around a localized DFB. Because a DFB is so localized (only a few RE wide across the tail), there are strong duskward magnetic field gradients on the DFB's dawn flank and strong dawnward magnetic field gradients on its dusk flank. Electrons on the DFB's dawnside therefore ∇B drift farther earthward from the reconnection site, whereas electrons on its duskside can potentially evacuate the inner magnetosphere by ∇B drifting tailward. This results in flux decrease at the front's duskside. As a result, the source of electrons observed during injection depends sensitively on the spacecraft location relative to the DFB and on the DFB's properties. We similarly find that the process of electron energization depends on how the electrons interact with the DFB. The initial injection signature is from electrons that interact with the front and gain the majority of their energy from the increasing magnetic field (∂B/∂t), whereas populations that arrive later gain most of their energy from ∇B drifting across the flow channel and against the DFB's electric fields.

  4. Electronic resonance and local field effects on the nonlinear optical activity of H-aggregate-forming stilbazolium amphiphiles

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Z.; Lu, W.; Bohn, P.W.

    1995-05-04

    Stilbazolium dyes, which form H-aggregates upon condensation at the air-water interface, typically display nonlinear optical (NLO) activity far below what would be predicted on the basis of their large intrinsic molecular hyperpolarizability, {beta}. Three separate hypothesis have been put forward to explain this observation: structural inversion to produce a centrosymmetric head-to-tail structure, local field effects, which act to reduce the effective magnitude of the nonlinear driving field, and changes in electronic structure, which shift the electronic resonance frequencies for the aggregates. Investigation of the linear and nonlinear spectroscopy of the dye 4-(4-dihexadecylaminostyryl)-N-methylpyridinium iodide were performed on a series of samples in which the aggregation state of the structure was changed systematically, but without changing the composition of the film. These experiments show that, for this particular dye, changes in electronic structure upon aggregation comprise the most important factor in determining the reduction in second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency of the aggregate. 23 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Structural and electronic properties of GaAs and GaP semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Rani, Anita; Kumar, Ranjan

    2015-05-15

    The Structural and Electronic properties of Zinc Blende phase of GaAs and GaP compounds are studied using self consistent SIESTA-code, pseudopotentials and Density Functional Theory (DFT) in Local Density Approximation (LDA). The Lattice Constant, Equillibrium Volume, Cohesive Energy per pair, Compressibility and Band Gap are calculated. The band gaps calcultated with DFT using LDA is smaller than the experimental values. The P-V data fitted to third order Birch Murnaghan equation of state provide the Bulk Modulus and its pressure derivatives. Our Structural and Electronic properties estimations are in agreement with available experimental and theoretical data.

  6. Magnetic structure and local lattice distortion in giant negative thermal expansion material Mn3Cu1-xGexN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iikubo, S.; Kodama, K.; Takenaka, K.; Takagi, H.; Shamoto, S.

    2010-11-01

    Magnetic and local structures in an antiperovskite system, Mn3Cu1-xGexN, with a giant negative thermal expansion have been studied by neutron powder diffraction measurement. We discuss (1) an importance of an averaged cubic crystal structure and a ΓG5g antiferromagnetic spin structure for the large magneto-volume effect (MVE) in this itinerant electron system, (2) an unique role of a local lattice distortion well described by the low temperature tetragonal structure of Mn3GeN for the broadening of MVE.

  7. Local structure and spin transition in Fe2O3 hematite at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanson, Andrea; Kantor, Innokenty; Cerantola, Valerio; Irifune, Tetsuo; Carnera, Alberto; Pascarelli, Sakura

    2016-07-01

    The pressure evolution of the local structure of Fe2O3 hematite has been determined by extended x-ray absorption fine structure up to ˜79 GPa. Below the phase-transition pressure at ˜50 GPa, no increasing of FeO6 octahedra distortion is observed as pressure is applied. Above the phase transition, an abrupt decrease of the nearest-neighbor Fe-O distance is observed concomitantly with a strong reduction in the FeO6 distortion. This information on the local structure, used as a test-bench for the different high-pressure forms proposed in the literature, suggests that the orthorhombic structure with space group A b a 2 , recently proposed by Bykova et al. [Nat. Commun. 7, 10661 (2016), 10.1038/ncomms10661], is the most probable, but puts into question the presence of the P 21 /n form in the pressure range 54-67 GPa. Finally, the crossover from Fe high-spin to low-spin states with pressure increase has been monitored from the pre-edge region of the Fe K -edge absorption spectra. Its "simultaneous" comparison with the local structural changes allows us to conclude that it is the electronic transition that drives the structural transition and not vice versa.

  8. Validation of local hybrid functionals for TDDFT calculations of electronic excitation energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Toni M.; Bahmann, Hilke; Arbuznikov, Alexei V.; Kaupp, Martin

    2016-02-01

    The first systematic evaluation of local hybrid functionals for the calculation of electronic excitation energies within linear-response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is reported. Using our recent efficient semi-numerical TDDFT implementation [T. M. Maier et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 11, 4226 (2015)], four simple, thermochemically optimized one-parameter local hybrid functionals based on local spin-density exchange are evaluated against a database of singlet and triplet valence excitations of organic molecules, and against a mixed database including also Rydberg, intramolecular charge-transfer (CT) and core excitations. The four local hybrids exhibit comparable performance to standard global or range-separated hybrid functionals for common singlet valence excitations, but several local hybrids outperform all other functionals tested for the triplet excitations of the first test set, as well as for relative energies of excited states. Evaluation for the combined second test set shows that local hybrids can also provide excellent Rydberg and core excitations, in the latter case rivaling specialized functionals optimized specifically for such excitations. This good performance of local hybrids for different excitation types could be traced to relatively large exact-exchange (EXX) admixtures in a spatial region intermediate between valence and asymptotics, as well as close to the nucleus, and lower EXX admixtures in the valence region. In contrast, the tested local hybrids cannot compete with the best range-separated hybrids for intra- and intermolecular CT excitation energies. Possible directions for improvement in the latter category are discussed. As the used efficient TDDFT implementation requires essentially the same computational effort for global and local hybrids, applications of local hybrid functionals to excited-state problems appear promising in a wide range of fields. Influences of current-density dependence of local kinetic

  9. Electronic structure calculations of ESR parameters of melanin units.

    PubMed

    Batagin-Neto, Augusto; Bronze-Uhle, Erika Soares; Graeff, Carlos Frederico de Oliveira

    2015-03-21

    Melanins represent an important class of natural pigments present in plants and animals that are currently considered to be promising materials for applications in optic and electronic devices. Despite their interesting properties, some of the basic features of melanins are not satisfactorily understood, including the origin of their intrinsic paramagnetism. A number of experiments have been performed to investigate the electron spin resonance (ESR) response of melanin derivatives, but until now, there has been no consensus regarding the real structure of the paramagnetic centers involved. In this work, we have employed electronic structure calculations to evaluate the ESR parameters of distinct melanin monomers and dimers in order to identify the possible structures associated with unpaired spins in this biopolymer. The g-factors and hyperfine constants of the cationic, anionic and radicalar structures were investigated. The results confirm the existence of at least two distinct paramagnetic centers in melanin structure, identifying the chemical species associated with them and their roles in electrical conductivity.

  10. Structural properties of amorphous silicon produced by electron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yamasaki, J.; Takeda, S.

    1999-07-01

    The structural properties of the amorphous Si (a-Si), which was created from crystalline silicon by 2 MeV electron irradiation at low temperatures about 25 K, are examined in detail by means of transmission electron microscopy and transmission electron diffraction. The peak positions in the radial distribution function (RDF) of the a-Si correspond well to those of a-Si fabricated by other techniques. The electron-irradiation-induced a-Si returns to crystalline Si after annealing at 550 C.

  11. Distinct electronic structure for the extreme magnetoresistance in YSb

    SciTech Connect

    He, Junfeng; Zhang, Chaofan; Ghimire, Nirmal J.; Liang, Tian; Jia, Chunjing; Jiang, Juan; Tang, Shujie; Chen, Sudi; He, Yu; Mo, S. -K.; Hwang, C. C.; Hashimoto, M.; Lu, D. H.; Moritz, B.; Devereaux, T. P.; Chen, Y. L.; Mitchell, J. F.; Shen, Z. -X.

    2016-12-23

    An extreme magnetoresistance (XMR) has recently been observed in several nonmagnetic semimetals. Increasing experimental and theoretical evidence indicates that the XMR can be driven by either topological protection or electron-hole compensation. Moreover, by investigating the electronic structure of a XMR material, YSb, we present spectroscopic evidence for a special case which lacks topological protection and perfect electron-hole compensation. Further investigations reveal that a cooperative action of a substantial difference between electron and hole mobility and a moderate carrier compensation might contribute to the XMR in YSb.

  12. Electronic structure modulation of graphene edges by chemical functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taira, Remi; Yamanaka, Ayaka; Okada, Susumu

    2016-11-01

    Using the density functional theory with the effective screening medium method, we study the electronic properties of graphene nanoribbons with zigzag edges that are terminated by hydrogen and ketone, hydroxyl, carbonyl, and carboxyl functional groups. Our calculations showed that the work function and electronic structures of the edges of the nanoribbons are sensitive to the functional groups attached to the edges. The nearly free electron state emerges in the vacuum region outside the hydroxylated edges and crosses the Fermi level, indicating the possibility of negative electron affinity at the edges.

  13. Electron beam enhanced surface modification for making highly resolved structures

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, John R.

    1986-01-01

    A method for forming high resolution submicron structures on a substrate is provided by direct writing with a submicron electron beam in a partial pressure of a selected gas phase characterized by the ability to dissociate under the beam into a stable gaseous leaving group and a reactant fragment that combines with the substrate material under beam energy to form at least a surface compound. Variations of the method provide semiconductor device regions on doped silicon substrates, interconnect lines between active sites, three dimensional electronic chip structures, electron beam and optical read mass storage devices that may include color differentiated data areas, and resist areas for use with selective etching techniques.

  14. Electron beam enhanced surface modification for making highly resolved structures

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, J.R.

    1984-10-10

    A method for forming high resolution submicron structures on a substrate is provided by direct writing with a submicron electron beam in a partial pressure of a selected gas phase characterized by the ability to dissociate under the beam into a stable gaseous leaving group and a reactant fragment that combines with the substrate material under beam energy to form at least a surface compound. Variations of the method provide semiconductor device regions on doped silicon substrates, interconnect lines between active sites, three dimensional electronic chip structures, electron beam and optical read mass storage devices that may include color differentiated data areas, and resist areas for use with selective etching techniques.

  15. Solitary structures with ion and electron thermal anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khusroo, Murchana; Bora, Madhurjya P.

    2015-11-01

    The formation of electrostatic solitary structures is analysed for a magnetised plasma with ion and electron thermal anisotropies. The ion thermal anisotropy is modelled with the help of the Chew-Goldberger-Low (CGL) double adiabatic equations of state while the electrons are treated as inertia-less species with an anisotropic bi-Maxwellian velocity distribution function. A negative electron thermal anisotropy ≤ft({{T}e\\bot}/{{T}e\\parallel}>1\\right) is found to help form large amplitude solitary structures which are in agreement with observational data.

  16. Structural damage localization using wavelet-based silhouette statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Uk; Koh, Bong-Hwan

    2009-04-01

    This paper introduces a new methodology for classifying and localizing structural damage in a truss structure. The application of wavelet analysis along with signal classification techniques in engineering problems allows us to discover novel characteristics that can be used for the diagnosis and classification of structural defects. This study exploits the data discriminating capability of silhouette statistics, which is eventually combined with the wavelet-based vertical energy threshold technique for the purpose of extracting damage-sensitive features and clustering signals of the same class. This threshold technique allows us to first obtain a suitable subset of the extracted or modified features of our data, i.e. good predictor sets should contain features that are strongly correlated to the characteristics of the data without considering the classification method used, although each of these features should be as uncorrelated with each other as possible. The silhouette statistics have been used to assess the quality of clustering by measuring how well an object is assigned to its corresponding cluster. We use this concept for the discriminant power function used in this paper. The simulation results of damage detection in a truss structure show that the approach proposed in this study can be successfully applied for locating both open- and breathing-type damage even in the presence of a considerable amount of process and measurement noise. Finally, a typical data mining tool such as classification and regression tree (CART) quantitatively evaluates the performance of the damage localization results in terms of the misclassification error.

  17. Local Structure of Cerium in Aluminophosphate and Silicophosphate Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    J Rygel; Y Chen; C Pantano; T Shibata; J Du; L Kokou; R Woodman; J Belcher

    2011-12-31

    The local structure of cerium in two systematic compositional series of glasses, nominally CeP{sub 3}O{sub 9}-AlP{sub 3}O{sub 9} and CeP{sub 3}O{sub 9}-SiP{sub 2}O{sub 7}, was interrogated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. XPS revealed that, for glasses melted in air, {>=}95% of cerium ions are Ce{sup 3+}. This was independently confirmed using X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES). Ce K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) has been used to determine the local structure of Ce{sup 3+}. Near the metaphosphate composition, cerium was found to have an average cerium coordination number of {approx}7.0 and an average cerium-oxygen bond length of 2.41 {angstrom}. The average cerium coordination number and average cerium-oxygen bond distance were found to increase with decreasing cerium concentration in both compositional series. Rare-earth clustering is suggested based on numerical calculations for glasses containing {>=}14 and {>=}15 mol% Ce{sub 2}O{sub 3} for the aluminophosphate and silicophosphate series, respectively.

  18. Local Structure of Cerium in Aluminophosphate and Silicophosphate Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Rygel, Jennifer L.; Chen, Yongsheng; Pantano, Carlo G.; Shibata, Tomohiro; Du, Jincheng; Kokou, Leopold; Woodman, Robert; Belcher, James

    2011-09-20

    The local structure of cerium in two systematic compositional series of glasses, nominally CeP{sub 3}O{sub 9}-AlP{sub 3}O{sub 9} and CeP{sub 3}O{sub 9}-SiP{sub 2}O{sub 7}, was interrogated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. XPS revealed that, for glasses melted in air, {>=}95% of cerium ions are Ce{sup 3+}. This was independently confirmed using X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES). Ce K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) has been used to determine the local structure of Ce{sup 3+}. Near the metaphosphate composition, cerium was found to have an average cerium coordination number of {approx}7.0 and an average cerium-oxygen bond length of 2.41 {angstrom}. The average cerium coordination number and average cerium-oxygen bond distance were found to increase with decreasing cerium concentration in both compositional series. Rare-earth clustering is suggested based on numerical calculations for glasses containing {>=}14 and {>=}15 mol% Ce{sub 2}O{sub 3} for the aluminophosphate and silicophosphate series, respectively.

  19. Probing local structure in glass by the application of shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weingartner, Nicholas B.; Nussinov, Zohar

    2016-09-01

    The glass transition remains one of the great unsolved mysteries of contemporary condensed matter physics. When crystallization is bypassed by rapid cooling, a supercooled liquid, retaining amorphous particle arrangement, results. The physical phenomenology of supercooled liquids is as vast as it is interesting. Most significant, the viscosity of the supercooled liquid displays an incredible increase over a narrow temperature range. Eventually, the supercooled liquid ceases to flow, becomes a glass, and gains rigidity and solid-like behaviors. Understanding what underpins the monumental growth of viscosity, and how rigidity results without long range order is a long-sought goal. Furthermore, discerning what role local structure plays in the kinetics of supercooled liquids remains an open question. Many theories of the glassy slowdown require the growth of static lengthscale related to structure with lowering of the temperature and provide a link between slowdown and propagation of ‘amorphous order’. In light of this, we examine the recently proposed shear penetration depth in the context of other length scales and its relation to local structure. We provide numerical data, based on the simulations of NiZr2, illustrating that this length scale exhibits dramatic growth upon approach to the glass transition and further discuss this in relation to percolating structural connectivity in similar glassforming systems.

  20. Quantification of nanoscale density fluctuations using electron microscopy: Light-localization properties of biological cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pradhan, Prabhakar; Damania, Dhwanil; Turzhitsky, Vladimir; Subramanian, Hariharan; Backman, Vadim; Joshi, Hrushikesh M.; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Roy, Hemant K.; Taflove, Allen

    2010-12-13

    We report a study of the nanoscale mass-density fluctuations of heterogeneous optical dielectric media, including nanomaterials and biological cells, by quantifying their nanoscale light-localization properties. Transmission electron microscope images of the media are used to construct corresponding effective disordered optical lattices. Light-localization properties are studied by the statistical analysis of the inverse participation ratio (IPR) of the localized eigenfunctions of these optical lattices at the nanoscale. We validated IPR analysis using nanomaterials as models of disordered systems fabricated from dielectric nanoparticles. As an example, we then applied such analysis to distinguish between cells with different degrees of aggressive malignancy.

  1. Electron localization due to side-attached molecules on graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunez, C. D.; Orellana, P. A.; Rosales, L.

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we have studied the electron localization due to a random distribution of side-attached linear organic molecules on graphene nanoribbons. By using the Green's function formalism within a tight binding Hamiltonian approximation and considering an Anderson-like disorder, we have calculated the conductance of the systems and the corresponding localization lengths. Our results show that the localization length strongly depends on the molecular concentration and on the length of the molecules, effects that are robust for different ribbon widths. These results suggest possible applications in molecular detectors or sensors based on graphene nanoribbons.

  2. Local atomic arrangements and lattice distortions in layered Ge-Sb-Te crystal structures

    PubMed Central

    Lotnyk, Andriy; Ross, Ulrich; Bernütz, Sabine; Thelander, Erik; Rauschenbach, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Insights into the local atomic arrangements of layered Ge-Sb-Te compounds are of particular importance from a fundamental point of view and for data storage applications. In this view, a detailed knowledge of the atomic structure in such alloys is central to understanding the functional properties both in the more commonly utilized amorphous–crystalline transition and in recently proposed interfacial phase change memory based on the transition between two crystalline structures. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy allows direct imaging of local arrangement in the crystalline lattice with atomic resolution. However, due to the non-trivial influence of thermal diffuse scattering on the high-angle scattering signal, a detailed examination of the image contrast requires comparison with theoretical image simulations. This work reveals the local atomic structure of trigonal Ge-Sb-Te thin films by using a combination of direct imaging of the atomic columns and theoretical image simulation approaches. The results show that the thin films are prone to the formation of stacking disorder with individual building blocks of the Ge2Sb2Te5, Ge1Sb2Te4 and Ge3Sb2Te6 crystal structures intercalated within randomly oriented grains. The comparison with image simulations based on various theoretical models reveals intermixed cation layers with pronounced local lattice distortions, exceeding those reported in literature. PMID:27220411

  3. Local atomic arrangements and lattice distortions in layered Ge-Sb-Te crystal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotnyk, Andriy; Ross, Ulrich; Bernütz, Sabine; Thelander, Erik; Rauschenbach, Bernd

    2016-05-01

    Insights into the local atomic arrangements of layered Ge-Sb-Te compounds are of particular importance from a fundamental point of view and for data storage applications. In this view, a detailed knowledge of the atomic structure in such alloys is central to understanding the functional properties both in the more commonly utilized amorphous–crystalline transition and in recently proposed interfacial phase change memory based on the transition between two crystalline structures. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy allows direct imaging of local arrangement in the crystalline lattice with atomic resolution. However, due to the non-trivial influence of thermal diffuse scattering on the high-angle scattering signal, a detailed examination of the image contrast requires comparison with theoretical image simulations. This work reveals the local atomic structure of trigonal Ge-Sb-Te thin films by using a combination of direct imaging of the atomic columns and theoretical image simulation approaches. The results show that the thin films are prone to the formation of stacking disorder with individual building blocks of the Ge2Sb2Te5, Ge1Sb2Te4 and Ge3Sb2Te6 crystal structures intercalated within randomly oriented grains. The comparison with image simulations based on various theoretical models reveals intermixed cation layers with pronounced local lattice distortions, exceeding those reported in literature.

  4. Nano-structured electron transporting materials for perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hefei; Huang, Ziru; Wei, Shiyuan; Zheng, Lingling; Xiao, Lixin; Gong, Qihuang

    2016-03-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite solar cells have been developing rapidly in the past several years, and their power conversion efficiency has reached over 20%, nearing that of polycrystalline silicon solar cells. Because the diffusion length of the hole in perovskites is longer than that of the electron, the performance of the device can be improved by using an electron transporting layer, e.g., TiO2, ZnO and TiO2/Al2O3. Nano-structured electron transporting materials facilitate not only electron collection but also morphology control of the perovskites. The properties, morphology and preparation methods of perovskites are reviewed in the present article. A comprehensive understanding of the relationship between the structure and property will benefit the precise control of the electron transporting process and thus further improve the performance of perovskite solar cells.

  5. Nano-structured electron transporting materials for perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hefei; Huang, Ziru; Wei, Shiyuan; Zheng, Lingling; Xiao, Lixin; Gong, Qihuang

    2016-03-28

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite solar cells have been developing rapidly in the past several years, and their power conversion efficiency has reached over 20%, nearing that of polycrystalline silicon solar cells. Because the diffusion length of the hole in perovskites is longer than that of the electron, the performance of the device can be improved by using an electron transporting layer, e.g., TiO2, ZnO and TiO2/Al2O3. Nano-structured electron transporting materials facilitate not only electron collection but also morphology control of the perovskites. The properties, morphology and preparation methods of perovskites are reviewed in the present article. A comprehensive understanding of the relationship between the structure and property will benefit the precise control of the electron transporting process and thus further improve the performance of perovskite solar cells.

  6. Structural complexities in the active layers of organic electronics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Stephanie S; Loo, Yueh-Lin

    2010-01-01

    The field of organic electronics has progressed rapidly in recent years. However, understanding the direct structure-function relationships between the morphology in electrically active layers and the performance of devices composed of these materials has proven difficult. The morphology of active layers in organic electronics is inherently complex, with heterogeneities existing across multiple length scales, from subnanometer to micron and millimeter range. A major challenge still facing the organic electronics community is understanding how the morphology across all of the length scales in active layers collectively determines the device performance of organic electronics. In this review we highlight experiments that have contributed to the elucidation of structure-function relationships in organic electronics and also point to areas in which knowledge of such relationships is still lacking. Such knowledge will lead to the ability to select active materials on the basis of their inherent properties for the fabrication of devices with prespecified characteristics.

  7. Computational method for general multicenter electronic structure calculations.

    PubMed

    Batcho, P F

    2000-06-01

    Here a three-dimensional fully numerical (i.e., chemical basis-set free) method [P. F. Batcho, Phys. Rev. A 57, 6 (1998)], is formulated and applied to the calculation of the electronic structure of general multicenter Hamiltonian systems. The numerical method is presented and applied to the solution of Schrödinger-type operators, where a given number of nuclei point singularities is present in the potential field. The numerical method combines the rapid "exponential" convergence rates of modern spectral methods with the multiresolution flexibility of finite element methods, and can be viewed as an extension of the spectral element method. The approximation of cusps in the wave function and the formulation of multicenter nuclei singularities are efficiently dealt with by the combination of a coordinate transformation and a piecewise variational spectral approximation. The complete system can be efficiently inverted by established iterative methods for elliptical partial differential equations; an application of the method is presented for atomic, diatomic, and triatomic systems, and comparisons are made to the literature when possible. In particular, local density approximations are studied within the context of Kohn-Sham density functional theory, and are presented for selected subsets of atomic and diatomic molecules as well as the ozone molecule.

  8. Generation of off-axially localized tail electrons in helical antenna produce cylindrical plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Sonu; Ghosh, Soumen; Bose, Sayak; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Ghosh, J.; Bora, D.

    2016-09-01

    Off-axially localized tail electrons are observed in helical antenna produce cylindrical radio frequency (RF) plasma. Although, tail electrons are commonly observed in capacitive and inductive plasmas, localization of their population only at the off-axis of a cylindrical RF system is very unique. Moreover, we are reporting the generation of tail electrons even in absence of double layer in expanding helical antenna produce plasma. It is also shown that the confinements of these tail electrons are restricted only at the off-axis at Argon fill pressure bellow 1x10-3mbar. Experimental results will be presented to show that the tail electrons which generate off-axially in the source chamber are also found at the expansion chamber. External axial diverging magnetic field lines are bringing them from narrow source to large expansion chamber. To understand the underline mechanism of these tail electrons generation, role of (a) RF electric fields via changing RF source power and (b) their off-axial confinement with rising magnetic fields are discussed. Quantitative discussion on self-consistent model for collisionless RF power coupling with edge electrons will also be presented.

  9. Evidence of locally enhanced target heating due to instabilities of counter-streaming fast electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koester, Petra; Booth, Nicola; Cecchetti, Carlo A.; Chen, Hui; Evans, Roger G.; Gregori, Gianluca; Labate, Luca; Levato, Tadzio; Li, Bin; Makita, Mikako; Mithen, James; Murphy, Christopher D.; Notley, Margaret; Pattathil, Rajeev; Riley, David; Woolsey, Nigel; Gizzi, Leonida A.

    2015-02-01

    The high-current fast electron beams generated in high-intensity laser-solid interactions require the onset of a balancing return current in order to propagate in the target material. Such a system of counter-streaming electron currents is unstable to a variety of instabilities such as the current-filamentation instability and the two-stream instability. An experimental study aimed at investigating the role of instabilities in a system of symmetrical counter-propagating fast electron beams is presented here for the first time. The fast electron beams are generated by double-sided laser-irradiation of a layered target foil at laser intensities above 1019 W/cm2. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of the emission from the central Ti layer shows that locally enhanced energy deposition is indeed achieved in the case of counter-propagating fast electron beams.

  10. Evidence of locally enhanced target heating due to instabilities of counter-streaming fast electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Koester, Petra; Cecchetti, Carlo A.; Booth, Nicola; Woolsey, Nigel; Chen, Hui; Evans, Roger G.; Gregori, Gianluca; Li, Bin; Mithen, James; Murphy, Christopher D.; Labate, Luca; Gizzi, Leonida A.; Levato, Tadzio; Makita, Mikako; Riley, David; Notley, Margaret; Pattathil, Rajeev

    2015-02-15

    The high-current fast electron beams generated in high-intensity laser-solid interactions require the onset of a balancing return current in order to propagate in the target material. Such a system of counter-streaming electron currents is unstable to a variety of instabilities such as the current-filamentation instability and the two-stream instability. An experimental study aimed at investigating the role of instabilities in a system of symmetrical counter-propagating fast electron beams is presented here for the first time. The fast electron beams are generated by double-sided laser-irradiation of a layered target foil at laser intensities above 10{sup 19 }W/cm{sup 2}. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of the emission from the central Ti layer shows that locally enhanced energy deposition is indeed achieved in the case of counter-propagating fast electron beams.

  11. The direction of the electron motion of H2 + in the dissociation localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Z. M.; Zeng, Z. N.; Li, R. X.; Xu, Z. Z.

    2016-11-01

    A terahertz laser pulse is used to steer the electron motion after {{{{H}}}2}+ is irradiated by an ultrashort ultraviolet laser pulse. The numerical simulation demonstrates that the ionized electron is pulled out along the polarization direction of the electric field, in contrast, the electrons in the dissociative state move in the opposite direction to that of the electric force. Referring to the coupled dynamic equations for the 1s{σ }g and 2p{σ }u states and the analytical solution of the electron localization of the two lowest states of a double-well Coulomb potential model in an external static electric field, one can easily disclose the underlying mechanism for such an electron motion steering.

  12. Electronic band structure of surface-doped black phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jimin; Ryu, Sae Hee; Sohn, Yeongsup; Kim, Keun Su

    2015-03-01

    There are rapidly growing interests in the study of few-layer black phosphorus owing to its promising device characteristics that may impact our future electronics technology. The low-energy band structure of black phosphorus has been widely predicted to be controllable by external perturbations, such as strain and doping. In this work, we attempt to control the electronic band structure of black phosphorous by in-situ surface deposition of alkali-metal atoms. We found that surface doping induces steep band bending towards the bulk, leading to the emergence of new 2D electronic states that are confined within only few phosphorene layers of black phosphorus. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we directly measured the electronic band structure and its evolution as a function of dopant density. Supported by IBS.

  13. Electronic structure of a graphene superlattice with massive Dirac fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, Jonas R. F.

    2015-02-28

    We study the electronic and transport properties of a graphene-based superlattice theoretically by using an effective Dirac equation. The superlattice consists of a periodic potential applied on a single-layer graphene deposited on a substrate that opens an energy gap of 2Δ in its electronic structure. We find that extra Dirac points appear in the electronic band structure under certain conditions, so it is possible to close the gap between the conduction and valence minibands. We show that the energy gap E{sub g} can be tuned in the range 0 ≤ E{sub g} ≤ 2Δ by changing the periodic potential. We analyze the low energy electronic structure around the contact points and find that the effective Fermi velocity in very anisotropic and depends on the energy gap. We show that the extra Dirac points obtained here behave differently compared to previously studied systems.

  14. Role of nonlinear localized structures and turbulence in magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Neha; Yadav, Nitin; Uma, R.; Sharma, R. P.

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, we have analyzed the field localization of kinetic Alfvén wave (KAW) due to the presence of background density perturbation, which are assumed to be originated by the three dimensionally propagating low frequency KAW. These localized structures play an important role for energy transportation at smaller scales in the dispersion range of magnetic power spectrum. For the present model, governing dynamic equations of high frequency pump KAW and low frequency KAW has been derived by considering ponderomotive nonlinearity. Further, these coupled equations have been numerically solved to analyze the resulting localized structures of pump KAW and magnetic power spectrum in the magnetopause regime. Numerically calculated spectrum exhibits inertial range having spectral index of -3/2 followed by steeper scaling; this steepening in the turbulent spectrum is a signature of energy transportation from larger to smaller scales. In this way, the proposed mechanism, which is based on nonlinear wave-wave interaction, may be useful for understanding the particle acceleration and turbulence in magnetopause.

  15. Local structural investigation of SmFeAsO₁₋xF(x) high temperature superconductors.

    PubMed

    Malavasi, Lorenzo; Artioli, Gianluca A; Kim, Hyunjeong; Maroni, Beatrice; Joseph, Boby; Ren, Yang; Proffen, Thomas; Billinge, Simon J L

    2011-07-13

    A strong revitalization of the field of high temperature superconductivity (HTSC) has been induced recently by the discovery of T(C) around 26 K in F-doped LaFeAsO iron pnictides. Starting from this discovery, a huge amount of experimental data have been accumulated. This important corpus of results will allow the development of suitable theoretical models aimed at describing the basic electronic structure properties and nature of superconducting states in these fascinating new systems. A close correlation between structural features and physical properties of the normal and superconducting states has already been demonstrated in the current literature. Advanced theoretical models are also based on the close correlation with structural properties and in particular with the Fe-As tetrahedral array. As for other complex materials, a deeper understanding of their structure-properties correlation requires a full knowledge of the atomic arrangement within the structure. Here we report an investigation of the local structure in the SmFeAsO₁₋ xF(x) system carried out by means of x-ray total scattering measurements and pair distribution function analysis. The results presented indicate that the local structure of these HTSC significantly differs from the average structure determined by means of traditional diffraction techniques, in particular the distribution of Fe-As bond lengths. In addition, a model for describing the observed discrepancies is presented.

  16. Local structural investigation of SmFeAsO1 - xFx high temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malavasi, Lorenzo; Artioli, Gianluca A.; Kim, Hyunjeong; Maroni, Beatrice; Joseph, Boby; Ren, Yang; Proffen, Thomas; Billinge, Simon J. L.

    2011-07-01

    A strong revitalization of the field of high temperature superconductivity (HTSC) has been induced recently by the discovery of TC around 26 K in F-doped LaFeAsO iron pnictides. Starting from this discovery, a huge amount of experimental data have been accumulated. This important corpus of results will allow the development of suitable theoretical models aimed at describing the basic electronic structure properties and nature of superconducting states in these fascinating new systems. A close correlation between structural features and physical properties of the normal and superconducting states has already been demonstrated in the current literature. Advanced theoretical models are also based on the close correlation with structural properties and in particular with the Fe-As tetrahedral array. As for other complex materials, a deeper understanding of their structure-properties correlation requires a full knowledge of the atomic arrangement within the structure. Here we report an investigation of the local structure in the SmFeAsO1 - xFx system carried out by means of x-ray total scattering measurements and pair distribution function analysis. The results presented indicate that the local structure of these HTSC significantly differs from the average structure determined by means of traditional diffraction techniques, in particular the distribution of Fe-As bond lengths. In addition, a model for describing the observed discrepancies is presented.

  17. Perpendicular Localization of Electron Holes by Spatially Inhomogeneous Flows During Magnetic Reconnection*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, D. L.; Goldman, M. V.

    2008-12-01

    Bipolar fields signaling the presence of electron phase space holes have been observed in situ by satellites near regions of magnetic reconnection in Earth's magnetopause and magnetotail. In order to identify possible origins for such holes, a recent numerical study [1] employed 1D and 2D electrostatic Vlasov simulations initialized with electron and ion distributions taken from 2D electromagnetic Particle in Cell (PIC) simulations of magnetic reconnection. Both electron-electron instabilities along the X-line and electron-ion (i.e., Buneman) instabilities along the separatrix were found to be viable sources of electron holes. However, long-lived coherent Buneman-driven holes only formed when the destabilizing current was restricted to a narrow channel perpendicular to the local magnetic field vector B. In this presentation we extend the 2D Vlasov study of electron holes driven by unstable distributions to include both e-e and e-i instabilities localized in the direction perpendicular to B. Emphasis will be placed on how the ion/electron mass and temperature ratios (mi/me and Ti/Te) and the magnetization ratios (Ωe/ωe and Ωi/ωi) influence the properties of the resulting electron holes, including their spatial size and aspect ratio. Distributions from recent implicit PIC reconnection simulations [2] will be used to guide the initialization of the Vlasov simulations. *Research supported by NASA, NSF, and DOE. [1] M. V. Goldman, D. L. Newman, and P. L. Pritchett, "Vlasov Simulations of Electron Holes Driven by Particle Distributions from PIC Reconnection Simulations with a Guide Field," submitted to Geophys.~Res.~Lett. (2008). [2] A. Divin, G. Lapenta, D. L. Newman and M. V. Goldman, "Implicit PIC Simulations of Guide Field Magnetic Reconnection," this meeting.

  18. Protein structure prediction with local adjust tabu search algorithm

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Protein folding structure prediction is one of the most challenging problems in the bioinformatics domain. Because of the complexity of the realistic protein structure, the simplified structure model and the computational method should be adopted in the research. The AB off-lattice model is one of the simplification models, which only considers two classes of amino acids, hydrophobic (A) residues and hydrophilic (B) residues. Results The main work of this paper is to discuss how to optimize the lowest energy configurations in 2D off-lattice model and 3D off-lattice model by using Fibonacci sequences and real protein sequences. In order to avoid falling into local minimum and faster convergence to the global minimum, we introduce a novel method (SATS) to the protein structure problem, which combines simulated annealing algorithm and tabu search algorithm. Various strategies, such as the new encoding strategy, the adaptive neighborhood generation strategy and the local adjustment strategy, are adopted successfully for high-speed searching the optimal conformation corresponds to the lowest energy of the protein sequences. Experimental results show that some of the results obtained by the improved SATS are better than those reported in previous literatures, and we can sure that the lowest energy folding state for short Fibonacci sequences have been found. Conclusions Although the off-lattice models is not very realistic, they can reflect some important characteristics of the realistic protein. It can be found that 3D off-lattice model is more like native folding structure of the realistic protein than 2D off-lattice model. In addition, compared with some previous researches, the proposed hybrid algorithm can more effectively and more quickly search the spatial folding structure of a protein chain. PMID:25474708

  19. A semi-classical model of attosecond electron localization in dissociative ionization of hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Kelkensberg, Freek; Sansone, Giuseppe; Ivanov, Misha Y; Vrakking, Marc

    2011-05-21

    In the development of attosecond molecular science, a series of experiments have recently been performed where ionic fragment asymmetries in the dissociative ionization of H(2) into H(+) + H and that of D(2) into D(+) + D were used to uncover electron localization processes that occur on the attosecond and few-femtosecond timescale. Electron localization was observed both in strong-field dissociative ionization using carrier envelope phase-stable few-cycle laser pulses [Kling et al., Science, 2006, 312, 246] and in a two-color extreme ultra-violet + infrared attosecond pump-probe experiment [Sansone et al., Nature, 2010, 465, 763]. Here we show that the observed electron localization can be well understood using a semi-classical model that describes the dynamics in terms of quasi-static states that take the interaction of the molecule with the laser field instantaneously into account. The electron localization is shown to be determined by the passage of the dissociating molecule through a regime where the laser-molecule interaction is neither diabatic nor adiabatic.

  20. Sustainable Development and African Local Government: Can Electronic Training Help Build Capacities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Hazel; Thomas, Alan

    2007-01-01

    A recent study carried out by European and African organizations into the potential for electronic distance training (EDT) on sustainability in African local governments concluded that EDT was both "useful and feasible". This article reflects on some of the theoretical and practical implications of that study. It focuses on the…

  1. Topological Insulators: Electronic Band Structure and Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaz, S.; Koc, H.; Mamedov, A. M.; Ozbay, E.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we present the results of our ab initio calculation of the elastic constants, density of states, charge density, and Born effective charge tensors for ferroelectric (rhombohedral) and paraelectric phases (cubic) of the narrow band ferroelectrics (GeTe, SnTe) pseudopotentials. The related quantities such as bulk modulus and shear modulus using obtained elastic constants have also been estimated in the present work. The total and partial densities of states corresponding to the band structure of Sn(Ge)Te(S,Se) were calculated. We also calculated the Born effective charge tensor of an atom (for instance, Ge, Sn, Te, etc.), which is defined as the induced polarization of the solid along the main direction by a unit displacement in the perpendicular direction of the sublattice of an atom at the vanishing electric field.

  2. Electronic Structure and Transport in Magnetic Multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    2008-02-18

    ORNL assisted Seagate Recording Heads Operations in the development of CIPS pin Valves for application as read sensors in hard disk drives. Personnel at ORNL were W. H. Butler and Xiaoguang Zhang. Dr. Olle Heinonen from Seagate RHO also participated. ORNL provided codes and materials parameters that were used by Seagate to model CIP GMR in their heads. The objectives were to: (1) develop a linearized Boltzmann transport code for describing CIP GMR based on realistic models of the band structure and interfaces in materials in CIP spin valves in disk drive heads; (2) calculate the materials parameters needed as inputs to the Boltzmann code; and (3) transfer the technology to Seagate Recording Heads.

  3. Electronic band structure effects in monolayer, bilayer, and hybrid graphene structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puls, Conor

    Since its discovery in 2005, graphene has been the focus of intense theoretical and experimental study owing to its unique two-dimensional band structure and related electronic properties. In this thesis, we explore the electronic properties of graphene structures from several perspectives including the magnetoelectrical transport properties of monolayer graphene, gap engineering and measurements in bilayer graphene, and anomalous quantum oscillation in the monolayer-bilayer graphene hybrids. We also explored the device implications of our findings, and the application of some experimental techniques developed for the graphene work to the study of a complex oxide, Ca3Ru2O7, exhibiting properties of strongly correlated electrons. Graphene's high mobility and ballistic transport over device length scales, make it suitable for numerous applications. However, two big challenges remain in the way: maintaining high mobility in fabricated devices, and engineering a band gap to make graphene compatible with logical electronics and various optical devices. We address the first challenge by experimentally evaluating mobilities in scalable monolayer graphene-based field effect transistors (FETs) and dielectric-covered Hall bars. We find that the mobility is limited in these devices, and is roughly inversely proportional to doping. By considering interaction of graphene's Dirac fermions with local charged impurities at the interface between graphene and the top-gate dielectric, we find that Coulomb scattering is responsible for degraded mobility. Even in the cleanest devices, a band gap is still desirable for electronic applications of graphene. We address this challenge by probing the band structure of bilayer graphene, in which a field-tunable energy band gap has been theoretically proposed. We use planar tunneling spectroscopy of exfoliated bilayer graphene flakes demonstrate both measurement and control of the energy band gap. We find that both the Fermi level and

  4. Role of atomic multiplets in the electronic structure of rare-earth semiconductors and semimetals.

    PubMed

    Pourovskii, Leonid V; Delaney, Kris T; Van de Walle, Chris G; Spaldin, Nicola A; Georges, Antoine

    2009-03-06

    We present a study of the effects of strong correlations in rare-earth pnictides, in which localized 4f states simultaneously retain atomiclike character and strongly influence the free-electron-like valence electron states. Using erbium arsenide as our example, we use a modern implementation of dynamical mean-field theory to obtain the atomic multiplet structure of the Er3+ 4f shell, as well as its unusually strong coupling to the electronic Fermi surfaces; these types of behavior are not correctly described within conventional electronic-structure methods. We are then able to explain the long-standing theoretical question of the quasisaturation of magnetization in an applied magnetic field, and to obtain the first quantitative agreement with experimental Shubnikov-de Haas frequencies of the Fermi-surface sheets.

  5. Ultrafast electronic response of graphene to a strong and localized electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, Elisabeth; Wilhelm, Richard A.; Pétuya, Rémi; Smejkal, Valerie; Kozubek, Roland; Hierzenberger, Anke; Bayer, Bernhard C.; Aldazabal, Iñigo; Kazansky, Andrey K.; Libisch, Florian; Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.; Schleberger, Marika; Facsko, Stefan; Borisov, Andrei G.; Arnau, Andrés; Aumayr, Friedrich

    2016-12-01

    The way conduction electrons respond to ultrafast external perturbations in low dimensional materials is at the core of the design of future devices for (opto)electronics, photodetection and spintronics. Highly charged ions provide a tool for probing the electronic response of solids to extremely strong electric fields localized down to nanometre-sized areas. With ion transmission times in the order of femtoseconds, we can directly probe the local electronic dynamics of an ultrathin foil on this timescale. Here we report on the ability of freestanding single layer graphene to provide tens of electrons for charge neutralization of a slow highly charged ion within a few femtoseconds. With values higher than 1012 A cm-2, the resulting local current density in graphene exceeds previously measured breakdown currents by three orders of magnitude. Surprisingly, the passing ion does not tear nanometre-sized holes into the single layer graphene. We use time-dependent density functional theory to gain insight into the multielectron dynamics.

  6. Ultrafast electronic response of graphene to a strong and localized electric field

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Elisabeth; Wilhelm, Richard A.; Pétuya, Rémi; Smejkal, Valerie; Kozubek, Roland; Hierzenberger, Anke; Bayer, Bernhard C.; Aldazabal, Iñigo; Kazansky, Andrey K.; Libisch, Florian; Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.; Schleberger, Marika; Facsko, Stefan; Borisov, Andrei G.; Arnau, Andrés; Aumayr, Friedrich

    2016-01-01

    The way conduction electrons respond to ultrafast external perturbations in low dimensional materials is at the core of the design of future devices for (opto)electronics, photodetection and spintronics. Highly charged ions provide a tool for probing the electronic response of solids to extremely strong electric fields localized down to nanometre-sized areas. With ion transmission times in the order of femtoseconds, we can directly probe the local electronic dynamics of an ultrathin foil on this timescale. Here we report on the ability of freestanding single layer graphene to provide tens of electrons for charge neutralization of a slow highly charged ion within a few femtoseconds. With values higher than 1012 A cm−2, the resulting local current density in graphene exceeds previously measured breakdown currents by three orders of magnitude. Surprisingly, the passing ion does not tear nanometre-sized holes into the single layer graphene. We use time-dependent density functional theory to gain insight into the multielectron dynamics. PMID:28000666

  7. Investigation of S3-2 satellite data for local time variation of energetic electron precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbe, S.; Sheldon, W. R.; Benbrook, J. R.; Bering, E. A.; Vampola, A. L.

    1994-01-01

    Data on precipitating electrons from the S3-2 satellite were investigated for local time variation at four L = 4 stations in the southern hemisphere. The equatorial pitch angles of electrons mirroring at 100 km, assumed to be the edge of the bounce loss cone, are calculated for L = 4 using the International Geomagnetic Reference Field for the epoch of the S3-2 data, along with the variation in mirror altitude per degree of equatorial pitch angle. The largest obstacle to the investigation was uneven sampling in terms of local time for all of the stations. However, this situation was improved upon by the use of S3-2 measurements at the conjugate locations of the four stations which provided additional data on electrons in the southern hemisphere bounce loss cone. Evidence for an effect of the dawn-to-dusk geoelectric field was found at two of the stations, Halley Bay and Siple, in the form of a minimum in electron precipitation at dusk. However, the present study does not completely resolve the question of local time modulation of electron precipitation at L = 4 in the southern hemisphere. Furthermore, while the average precipitation was lowest at the Kerguelen site, as would be expected on the basis of drift loss cone (DLC) theories, the intensity at that site exceeds the level that is expected on the basis of these DLC theories.

  8. Electronic correlation in magnetic contributions to structural energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haydock, Roger

    For interacting electrons the density of transitions [see http://arxiv.org/abs/1405.2288] replaces the density of states in calculations of structural energies. Extending previous work on paramagnetic metals, this approach is applied to correlation effects on the structural stability of magnetic transition metals. Supported by the H. V. Snyder Gift to the University of Oregon.

  9. Electron vortex magnetic holes: A nonlinear coherent plasma structure

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, Christopher T. Burgess, David; Sundberg, Torbjorn; Camporeale, Enrico

    2015-01-15

    We report the properties of a novel type of sub-proton scale magnetic hole found in two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of decaying turbulence with a guide field. The simulations were performed with a realistic value for ion to electron mass ratio. These structures, electron vortex magnetic holes (EVMHs), have circular cross-section. The magnetic field depression is associated with a diamagnetic azimuthal current provided by a population of trapped electrons in petal-like orbits. The trapped electron population provides a mean azimuthal velocity and since trapping preferentially selects high pitch angles, a perpendicular temperature anisotropy. The structures arise out of initial perturbations in the course of the turbulent evolution of the plasma, and are stable over at least 100 electron gyroperiods. We have verified the model for the EVMH by carrying out test particle and PIC simulations of isolated structures in a uniform plasma. It is found that (quasi-)stable structures can be formed provided that there is some initial perpendicular temperature anisotropy at the structure location. The properties of these structures (scale size, trapped population, etc.) are able to explain the observed properties of magnetic holes in the terrestrial plasma sheet. EVMHs may also contribute to turbulence properties, such as intermittency, at short scale lengths in other astrophysical plasmas.

  10. Electron vortex magnetic holes: A nonlinear coherent plasma structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, Christopher T.; Burgess, David; Camporeale, Enrico; Sundberg, Torbjorn

    2015-01-01

    We report the properties of a novel type of sub-proton scale magnetic hole found in two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of decaying turbulence with a guide field. The simulations were performed with a realistic value for ion to electron mass ratio. These structures, electron vortex magnetic holes (EVMHs), have circular cross-section. The magnetic field depression is associated with a diamagnetic azimuthal current provided by a population of trapped electrons in petal-like orbits. The trapped electron population provides a mean azimuthal velocity and since trapping preferentially selects high pitch angles, a perpendicular temperature anisotropy. The structures arise out of initial perturbations in the course of the turbulent evolution of the plasma, and are stable over at least 100 electron gyroperiods. We have verified the model for the EVMH by carrying out test particle and PIC simulations of isolated structures in a uniform plasma. It is found that (quasi-)stable structures can be formed provided that there is some initial perpendicular temperature anisotropy at the structure location. The properties of these structures (scale size, trapped population, etc.) are able to explain the observed properties of magnetic holes in the terrestrial plasma sheet. EVMHs may also contribute to turbulence properties, such as intermittency, at short scale lengths in other astrophysical plasmas.

  11. Measuring capital market efficiency: Global and local correlations structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristoufek, Ladislav; Vosvrda, Miloslav

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new measure for capital market efficiency. The measure takes into consideration the correlation structure of the returns (long-term and short-term memory) and local herding behavior (fractal dimension). The efficiency measure is taken as a distance from an ideal efficient market situation. The proposed methodology is applied to a portfolio of 41 stock indices. We find that the Japanese NIKKEI is the most efficient market. From a geographical point of view, the more efficient markets are dominated by the European stock indices and the less efficient markets cover mainly Latin America, Asia and Oceania. The inefficiency is mainly driven by a local herding, i.e. a low fractal dimension.

  12. Correlation Between Local Structure and Boson Peak in Metallic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Azkar Saeed; Zhao, Xiangnan; Xu, Mingxiang; Zhang, Dongxian; Hu, Junwen; Fecht, Hans J.; Wang, Xiaodong; Cao, Qingping; Jiang, J. Z.

    2017-01-01

    We made a systematic study of the boson peak for six different Zr-based metallic glasses and found a universal correlation between average local atomic structure and boson peak. It is found that the boson peak can be decomposed into six characteristic vibratory modes, i.e., Debye's vibratory mode and five Einstein's vibratory modes. By using the Ioffe-Regel condition over all studied Zr-based metallic glasses, we reveal that atomic pair correlation function exactly maps on the low-temperature dynamics and the origin of the boson peak, which is the sum of vibrations of local density fluctuation domains in the glasses. In addition, it is found that the Debye's type oscillators are the major contributors to the low-temperature specific heat capacities. This study opens a new way of understanding the relationship of the physical properties with the atomic arrangements in glasses.

  13. Decoupling of structural and electronic phase transitions in VO2.

    PubMed

    Tao, Zhensheng; Han, Tzong-Ru T; Mahanti, Subhendra D; Duxbury, Phillip M; Yuan, Fei; Ruan, Chong-Yu; Wang, Kevin; Wu, Junqiao

    2012-10-19

    Using optical, TEM, and ultrafast electron diffraction experiments we find that single crystal VO(2) microbeams gently placed on insulating substrates or metal grids exhibit different behaviors, with structural and metal-insulator transitions occurring at the same temperature for insulating substrates, while for metal substrates a new monoclinic metal phase lies between the insulating monoclinic phase and the metallic rutile phase. The structural and electronic phase transitions in these experiments are strongly first order and we discuss their origins in the context of current understanding of multiorbital splitting, strong correlation effects, and structural distortions that act cooperatively in this system.

  14. Electronic states in hybrid boron nitride and graphene structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, M.; Huang, Y. H.; Ma, F.; Hu, T. W.; Xu, K. W.; Chu, Paul K.

    2013-08-01

    The energy bands and electronic states of hybrid boron nitride (BN) and graphene structures are studied by first principle calculations. The electronic states change from semi-metallic to insulating depending on the number of B and N atoms as well as domain symmetry. When there are unequal numbers of B and N atoms, mid-gap states usually appear around the Fermi level and the corresponding hybrid structure possesses magnetic and semi-metallic properties. However, when the numbers of B and N atoms are equal, a band gap exists indicative of a semiconducting or insulating nature which depends on the structural symmetry.

  15. Engineering the Electronic Band Structure for Multiband Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, N.; Reichertz, L.A.; Yu, K.M.; Campman, K.; Walukiewicz, W.

    2010-07-12

    Using the unique features of the electronic band structure of GaNxAs1-x alloys, we have designed, fabricated and tested a multiband photovoltaic device. The device demonstrates an optical activity of three energy bands that absorb, and convert into electrical current, the crucial part of the solar spectrum. The performance of the device and measurements of electroluminescence, quantum efficiency and photomodulated reflectivity are analyzed in terms of the Band Anticrossing model of the electronic structure of highly mismatched alloys. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using highly mismatched alloys to engineer the semiconductor energy band structure for specific device applications.

  16. Engineering the electronic band structure for multiband solar cells.

    PubMed

    López, N; Reichertz, L A; Yu, K M; Campman, K; Walukiewicz, W

    2011-01-14

    Using the unique features of the electronic band structure of GaN(x)As(1-x) alloys, we have designed, fabricated and tested a multiband photovoltaic device. The device demonstrates an optical activity of three energy bands that absorb, and convert into electrical current, the crucial part of the solar spectrum. The performance of the device and measurements of electroluminescence, quantum efficiency and photomodulated reflectivity are analyzed in terms of the band anticrossing model of the electronic structure of highly mismatched alloys. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using highly mismatched alloys to engineer the semiconductor energy band structure for specific device applications.

  17. Electronic structure and bonding in skutterudite-type phosphides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llunell, Miquel; Alemany, Pere; Alvarez, Santiago; Zhukov, Vladlen P.; Vernes, Andreas

    1996-04-01

    The electronic structures of the skutterudite-type phosphides CoP3 and NiP3 have been investigated by means of first-principles linear muffin-tin orbital-atomic sphere approximation band-structure calculations. The presence of P4 rings in the skutterudite structure is of great importance in determining the nature of the electronic bands around the Fermi level, composed mainly of π-type molecular orbitals of these units. The metallic character found for NiP3 should be ascribed to the phosphorus framework rather than to the metal atoms.

  18. Localized operator partitioning method for electronic excitation energies in the time-dependent density functional formalism.

    PubMed

    Nagesh, Jayashree; Frisch, Michael J; Brumer, Paul; Izmaylov, Artur F

    2016-12-28

    We extend the localized operator partitioning method (LOPM) [J. Nagesh, A. F. Izmaylov, and P. Brumer, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 084114 (2015)] to the time-dependent density functional theory framework to partition molecular electronic energies of excited states in a rigorous manner. A molecular fragment is defined as a collection of atoms using Becke's atomic partitioning. A numerically efficient scheme for evaluating the fragment excitation energy is derived employing a resolution of the identity to preserve standard one- and two-electron integrals in the final expressions. The utility of this partitioning approach is demonstrated by examining several excited states of two bichromophoric compounds: 9-((1- naphthyl)- methyl)- anthracene and 4-((2- naphthyl)- methyl)- benzaldehyde. The LOPM is found to provide nontrivial insights into the nature of electronic energy localization that is not accessible using a simple density difference analysis.

  19. New approach to Tolman's electronic parameter based on local vibrational modes.

    PubMed

    Kalescky, Robert; Kraka, Elfi; Cremer, Dieter

    2014-01-06

    Tolman's electronic parameter (TEP) derived from the A1-symmetrical CO stretching frequency of nickel-phosphine-tricarbonyl complexes, R3PNi(CO)3, is brought to a new, improved level by replacing normal with local vibrational frequencies. CO normal vibrational frequencies are always flawed by mode-mode coupling especially with metal-carbon stretching modes, which leads to coupling frequencies as large as 100 cm(-1) and can become even larger when the transition metal and the number of ligands is changed. Local TEP (LTEP) values, being based on local CO stretching force constants rather than normal mode frequencies, no longer suffer from mode coupling and mass effects. For 42 nickel complexes of the type LNi(CO)3, it is shown that LTEP values provide a different ordering of ligand electronic effects as previously suggested by TEP and CEP values. The general applicability of the LTEP concept is demonstrated.

  20. Local probing of structure and property in dimensionally confined amorphous and crystalline structures by S/TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Aiming

    The characterization of materials' microstructure has been brought up to a new level since the invention and broad application of transmission electron microscope (TEM) thanks to the high-energy electron beam source which guarantees an unsurpassable spatial resolution and theoretical study of interaction between electron and matter. The advent of nano-world has imposed an urgent request to characterize nano-assemblies in nano- or even sub-nano-scale and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) which typically utilizes an electron probe with a size of 1nm or even smaller has found its unique advantage to unravel the local structure, chemical and physical properties of these emerging nanostructures. Dimensionally constrained nanostructures such as thin films and nanopatterned systems have attracted people's attention for decades due to their novel chemical and physical properties and popularity in energy storage, biological integration and etc. This dissertation focuses on the unique characterization capability of S/TEM to study the local order in amorphous transparent conducting oxide thin films, disordering in 2-D layered materials, localized surface plasmons in nanoporous gold patterns on 2-D layered structures and crystallization process in dimensionally and spatially constrained oxide nanopatterns observed by in-situ TEM. Electron diffraction and x-ray diffraction are commonly used techniques to study the crystallinity in a certain material - crystalline or amorphous. In amorphous materials which lack long-range order, normal electron diffraction and x-ray diffraction techniques won't be able to extract any useful information regarding the ordering or disordering in the materials. We have developed a unique set of electron diffraction methods in both TEM and STEM, combined with density functional theory molecular dynamics of liquid quench to study the short-range (< 1 nm) and medium-range order (between 1 nm and 3 nm) in amorphous transparent oxide films