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Sample records for local field corrections

  1. Quantum local-field corrections and spontaneous decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheel, Stefan; Knöll, Ludwig; Welsch, Dirk-Gunnar; Barnett, Stephen M.

    1999-08-01

    A recently developed scheme [S. Scheel, L. Knöll, and D.-G. Welsch, Phys. Rev. A 58, 700 (1998)] for quantizing the macroscopic electromagnetic field in linear dispersive and absorbing dielectrics satisfying the Kramers-Kronig relations is used to derive the quantum local-field correction for the standard virtual-sphere-cavity model. The electric and magnetic local-field operators are shown to become approximately consistent with QED only if the polarization noise is fully taken into account. It is shown that the polarization fluctuations in the local field can dramatically change the spontaneous decay rate, compared with the familiar result obtained from the classical local-field correction. In particular, the spontaneous emission rate strongly depends on the radius of the local-field virtual cavity.

  2. Establishing local workplace field correction factors for neutron personal dosemeters.

    PubMed

    Vanhavere, Filip; Cauwels, Vanessa

    2014-10-01

    The present personal neutron dosemeters still need local correction factors to be able to provide accuracy comparable with photon dosemeters. Characterisation of the local neutron field is an indispensable part of neutron dosimetry to obtain such correction factors. It is often overlooked that besides characterisation in the neutron energy also the directional distribution of neutrons plays a crucial part in this characterisation. The authors have done such characterisation in the energy and angle for four workplace fields in Paks NPP. For this a relatively simple approximation method was used using the Nprobe for the energy distribution and measurements on the six sides of the slab phantom with personal dosemeters for the directional distribution. This allowed one to estimate a reference neutron Hp(10) rate and to compare it with the response of several neutron personal dosemeters.

  3. Coulomb's law corrections and fermion field localization in a tachyonic de Sitter thick braneworld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartas-Fuentevilla, Roberto; Escalante, Alberto; Germán, Gabriel; Herrera-Aguilar, Alfredo; Rigel Mora-Luna, Refugio

    2016-05-01

    Following recent studies which show that it is possible to localize gravity as well as scalar and gauge vector fields in a tachyonic de Sitter thick braneworld, we investigate the solution of the gauge hierarchy problem, the localization of fermion fields in this model, the recovering of the Coulomb law on the non-relativistic limit of the Yukawa interaction between bulk fermions and gauge bosons localized in the brane, and confront the predicted 5D corrections to the photon mass with its upper experimental/observational bounds, finding the model physically viable since it passes these tests. In order to achieve the latter aims we first consider the Yukawa interaction term between the fermionic and the tachyonic scalar fields MF(T)ΨΨ̅ in the action and analyze four distinct tachyonic functions F(T) that lead to four different structures of the respective fermionic mass spectra with different physics. In particular, localization of the massless left-chiral fermion zero mode is possible for three of these cases. We further analyze the phenomenology of these Yukawa interactions among fermion fields and gauge bosons localized on the brane and obtain the crucial and necessary information to compute the corrections to Coulomb's law coming from massive KK vector modes in the non-relativistic limit. These corrections are exponentially suppressed due to the presence of the mass gap in the mass spectrum of the bulk gauge vector field. From our results we conclude that corrections to Coulomb's law in the thin brane limit have the same form (up to a numerical factor) as far as the left-chiral massless fermion field is localized on the brane. Finally we compute the corrections to the Coulomb's law for an arbitrarily thick brane scenario which can be interpreted as 5D corrections to the photon mass. By performing consistent estimations with brane phenomenology, we found that the predicted corrections to the photon mass, which are well bounded by the experimentally observed or

  4. Coulomb’s law corrections and fermion field localization in a tachyonic de Sitter thick braneworld

    SciTech Connect

    Cartas-Fuentevilla, Roberto; Escalante, Alberto; Germán, Gabriel; Herrera-Aguilar, Alfredo; Mora-Luna, Refugio Rigel

    2016-05-11

    Following recent studies which show that it is possible to localize gravity as well as scalar and gauge vector fields in a tachyonic de Sitter thick braneworld, we investigate the solution of the gauge hierarchy problem, the localization of fermion fields in this model, the recovering of the Coulomb law on the non-relativistic limit of the Yukawa interaction between bulk fermions and gauge bosons localized in the brane, and confront the predicted 5D corrections to the photon mass with its upper experimental/observational bounds, finding the model physically viable since it passes these tests. In order to achieve the latter aims we first consider the Yukawa interaction term between the fermionic and the tachyonic scalar fields MF(T)ΨΨ-bar in the action and analyze four distinct tachyonic functions F(T) that lead to four different structures of the respective fermionic mass spectra with different physics. In particular, localization of the massless left-chiral fermion zero mode is possible for three of these cases. We further analyze the phenomenology of these Yukawa interactions among fermion fields and gauge bosons localized on the brane and obtain the crucial and necessary information to compute the corrections to Coulomb’s law coming from massive KK vector modes in the non-relativistic limit. These corrections are exponentially suppressed due to the presence of the mass gap in the mass spectrum of the bulk gauge vector field. From our results we conclude that corrections to Coulomb’s law in the thin brane limit have the same form (up to a numerical factor) as far as the left-chiral massless fermion field is localized on the brane. Finally we compute the corrections to the Coulomb’s law for an arbitrarily thick brane scenario which can be interpreted as 5D corrections to the photon mass. By performing consistent estimations with brane phenomenology, we found that the predicted corrections to the photon mass, which are well bounded by the experimentally

  5. Finite-temperature electron correlations in the framework of a dynamic local-field correction

    SciTech Connect

    Schweng, H.K.; Boehm, H.M. )

    1993-07-15

    The quantum-mechanical version of the Singwi-Tosi-Land-Sjoelander (STLS) approximation is applied to finite temperatures. This approximation has two main advantages. First, it includes a dynamic local-field correction and second, it gives positive values for the pair-distribution function in the short-range region at zero temperature. This is even valid for rather low densities. After a description of the numerical difficulties arising with the use of a dynamic approximation, the results for the static-structure factor and the pair-distribution function are discussed thoroughly. Detailed work is performed on the static part of the local-field correction, with special emphasis put on the investigation of its structure. A peak is found at a wave vector [ital q][approx]2.8 (in units of the Fermi wave vector) for small temperatures, which tends towards higher values of [ital q] with increasing temperature. This peak causes an attractive particle-hole interaction in a certain [ital q] region and thus gives rise to the appearance of a charge-density wave. A parametric description is given for the static local-field correction in order to simplify further applications. Furthermore, the exchange-and-correlation free energy is considered. The results are compared with the STLS results and with the modified convolution approach.

  6. Sensitivity of resistive and Hall measurements to local inhomogeneities: Finite-field, intensity, and area corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koon, Daniel W.; Wang, Fei; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth; Hansen, Ole

    2014-10-01

    We derive exact, analytic expressions for the sensitivity of sheet resistance and Hall sheet resistance measurements to local inhomogeneities for the cases of nonzero magnetic fields, strong perturbations, and perturbations over a finite area, extending our earlier results on weak perturbations. We express these sensitivities for conductance tensor components and for other charge transport quantities. Both resistive and Hall sensitivities, for a van der Pauw specimen in a finite magnetic field, are a superposition of the zero-field sensitivities to both sheet resistance and Hall sheet resistance. Strong perturbations produce a nonlinear correction term that depends on the strength of the inhomogeneity. Solution of the specific case of a finite-sized circular inhomogeneity coaxial with a circular specimen suggests a first-order correction for the general case. Our results are confirmed by computer simulations on both a linear four-point probe array on a large circular disc and a van der Pauw square geometry. Furthermore, the results also agree well with Náhlík et al. published experimental results for physical holes in a circular copper foil disc.

  7. Sum rules and static local-field corrections of electron liquids in two and three dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwamoto, N.

    1984-01-01

    The dielectric functions of electron liquids which take into account short-range electron-electron correlations via the static local-field corrections are examined in the light of the frequency-moment sum rules. The formation is given for degenerate as well as classical electron liquids in arbitrary (d) spatial dimensions, which is suitable for comparison between the two- and three-dimensional cases. By using the virial equations of state it is shown that such dielectric functions cannot satisfy the compressibility sum rule and the third-frequency-moment sum rule simultaneously. In the degenerate case, the plasmon, single-pair, and multipair contributions to the sum rules are analyzed, and the reason for this incompatibility is discussed.

  8. Correcting field-dependent aberrations with nanoscale accuracy in three-dimensional single-molecule localization microscopy

    PubMed Central

    von Diezmann, Alex; Lee, Maurice Y.; Lew, Matthew D.; Moerner, W. E.

    2016-01-01

    The localization of single fluorescent molecules enables the imaging of molecular structure and dynamics with subdiffraction precision and can be extended to three dimensions using point spread function (PSF) engineering. However, the nanoscale accuracy of localization throughout a 3D single-molecule microscope’s field of view has not yet been rigorously examined. By using regularly spaced subdiffraction apertures filled with fluorescent dyes, we reveal field-dependent aberrations as large as 50–100 nm and show that they can be corrected to less than 25 nm over an extended 3D focal volume. We demonstrate the applicability of this technique for two engineered PSFs, the double-helix PSF and the astigmatic PSF. We expect these results to be broadly applicable to 3D single-molecule tracking and superresolution methods demanding high accuracy. PMID:26973863

  9. Comparative merits of the memory function and dynamic local-field correction of the classical one-component plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mithen, James P.; Daligault, Jérôme; Gregori, Gianluca

    2012-05-01

    The complementarity of the liquid and plasma descriptions of the classical one-component plasma is explored by studying wave number and frequency dependent dynamical quantities: the dynamical structure factor (DSF) and the dynamic local field correction (LFC). Accurate molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to validate and test models of the DSF and LFC. Our simulations, which span the entire fluid regime (Γ=0.1-175), show that the DSF is very well represented by a simple and well known memory function model of generalized hydrodynamics. On the other hand, the LFC, which we have computed using MD for the first time, is not well described by existing models.

  10. Error Field Correction in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jong-kyu; Boozer, Allen H.; Menard, Jonathan E.; Schaffer, Michael J.

    2008-05-22

    A new method for correcting magnetic field errors in the ITER tokamak is developed using the Ideal Perturbed Equilibrium Code (IPEC). The dominant external magnetic field for driving islands is shown to be localized to the outboard midplane for three ITER equilibria that represent the projected range of operational scenarios. The coupling matrices between the poloidal harmonics of the external magnetic perturbations and the resonant fields on the rational surfaces that drive islands are combined for different equilibria and used to determine an ordered list of the dominant errors in the external magnetic field. It is found that efficient and robust error field correction is possible with a fixed setting of the correction currents relative to the currents in the main coils across the range of ITER operating scenarios that was considered.

  11. New orbit correction method uniting global and local orbit corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, N.; Takaki, H.; Sakai, H.; Satoh, M.; Harada, K.; Kamiya, Y.

    2006-01-01

    A new orbit correction method, called the eigenvector method with constraints (EVC), is proposed and formulated to unite global and local orbit corrections for ring accelerators, especially synchrotron radiation(SR) sources. The EVC can exactly correct the beam positions at arbitrarily selected ring positions such as light source points, simultaneously reducing closed orbit distortion (COD) around the whole ring. Computer simulations clearly demonstrate these features of the EVC for both cases of the Super-SOR light source and the Advanced Light Source (ALS) that have typical structures of high-brilliance SR sources. In addition, the effects of errors in beam position monitor (BPM) reading and steering magnet setting on the orbit correction are analytically expressed and also compared with the computer simulations. Simulation results show that the EVC is very effective and useful for orbit correction and beam position stabilization in SR sources.

  12. Continuous quantum error correction through local operations

    SciTech Connect

    Mascarenhas, Eduardo; Franca Santos, Marcelo; Marques, Breno; Terra Cunha, Marcelo

    2010-09-15

    We propose local strategies to protect global quantum information. The protocols, which are quantum error-correcting codes for dissipative systems, are based on environment measurements, direct feedback control, and simple encoding of the logical qubits into physical qutrits whose decaying transitions are indistinguishable and equally probable. The simple addition of one extra level in the description of the subsystems allows for local actions to fully and deterministically protect global resources such as entanglement. We present codes for both quantum jump and quantum state diffusion measurement strategies and test them against several sources of inefficiency. The use of qutrits in information protocols suggests further characterization of qutrit-qutrit disentanglement dynamics, which we also give together with simple local environment measurement schemes able to prevent distillability sudden death and even enhance entanglement in situations in which our feedback error correction is not possible.

  13. Conservation of ζ with radiative corrections from heavy field

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Takahiro; Urakawa, Yuko

    2016-06-08

    In this paper, we address a possible impact of radiative corrections from a heavy scalar field χ on the curvature perturbation ζ. Integrating out χ, we derive the effective action for ζ, which includes the loop corrections of the heavy field χ. When the mass of χ is much larger than the Hubble scale H, the loop corrections of χ only yield a local contribution to the effective action and hence the effective action simply gives an action for ζ in a single field model, where, as is widely known, ζ is conserved in time after the Hubble crossing time. Meanwhile, when the mass of χ is comparable to H, the loop corrections of χ can give a non-local contribution to the effective action. Because of the non-local contribution from χ, in general, ζ may not be conserved, even if the classical background trajectory is determined only by the evolution of the inflaton. In this paper, we derive the condition that ζ is conserved in time in the presence of the radiative corrections from χ. Namely, we show that when the dilatation invariance, which is a part of the diffeomorphism invariance, is preserved at the quantum level, the loop corrections of the massive field χ do not disturb the constant evolution of ζ at super Hubble scales. In this discussion, we show the Ward-Takahashi identity for the dilatation invariance, which yields a consistency relation for the correlation functions of the massive field χ.

  14. Sample drift correction in 3D fluorescence photoactivation localization microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlodzianoski, Michael J.; Schreiner, John M.; Callahan, Steven P.; Smolková, Katarina; Dlasková, Andrea; Šantorová, Jitka; Ježek, Petr; Bewersdorf, Joerg

    2011-08-01

    The recent development of diffraction-unlimited far-field fluorescence microscopy has overcome the classical resolution limit of ~250 nm of conventional light microscopy by about a factor of ten. The improved resolution, however, reveals not only biological structures at an unprecedented resolution, but is also susceptible to sample drift on a much finer scale than previously relevant. Without correction, sample drift leads to smeared images with decreased resolution, and in the worst case to misinterpretation of the imaged structures. This poses a problem especially for techniques such as Fluorescence Photoactivation Localization Microscopy (FPALM/PALM) or Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy (STORM), which often require minutes recording time. Here we discuss an approach that corrects for three-dimensional (3D) drift in images of fixed samples without the requirement for fiduciary markers or instrument modifications. Drift is determined by calculating the spatial cross-correlation function between subsets of localized particles imaged at different times. Correction down to ~5 nm precision is achieved despite the fact that different molecules are imaged in each frame. We demonstrate the performance of our drift correction algorithm with different simulated structures and analyze its dependence on particle density and localization precision. By imaging mitochondria with Biplane FPALM we show our algorithm's feasibility in a practical application.

  15. INTERACTION REGION LOCAL CORRECTION FOR THE LARGE HADRON COLLIDER.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.; FISCHER,W.; PTITSIN,V.; OSTOJIC,R.; STRAIT,J.

    1999-03-29

    The performance of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at collision energy is limited by the field quality of the interaction region (IB) quadrupoles and dipoles. In this paper we study the impact of the expected field errors of these magnets on the dynamic aperture (DA). Since the betatron phase advance is well defined for magnets that are located in regions of large beta functions, local corrections can be very effective and robust. We compare possible compensation schemes and propose a corrector layout to meet the required DA performance.

  16. FIELD CORRECTION FACTORS FOR PERSONAL NEUTRON DOSEMETERS.

    PubMed

    Luszik-Bhadra, M

    2016-09-01

    A field-dependent correction factor can be obtained by comparing the readings of two albedo neutron dosemeters fixed in opposite directions on a polyethylene sphere to the H*(10) reading as determined with a thermal neutron detector in the centre of the same sphere. The work shows that the field calibration technique as used for albedo neutron dosemeters can be generalised for all kind of dosemeters, since H*(10) is a conservative estimate of the sum of the personal dose equivalents Hp(10) in two opposite directions. This result is drawn from reference values as determined by spectrometers within the EVIDOS project at workplace of nuclear installations in Europe. More accurate field-dependent correction factors can be achieved by the analysis of several personal dosimeters on a phantom, but reliable angular responses of these dosemeters need to be taken into account.

  17. Scatter factor corrections for elongated fields.

    PubMed

    Higgins, P D; Sohn, W H; Sibata, C H; McCarthy, W A

    1989-01-01

    Measurements have been made to determine scatter factor corrections for elongated fields of Cobalt-60 and for nominal linear accelerator energies of 6 MV (Siemens Mevatron 67) and 18 MV (AECL Therac 20). It was found that for every energy the collimator scatter factor varies by 2% or more as the field length-to-width ratio increases beyond 3:1. The phantom scatter factor is independent of which collimator pair is elongated at these energies. For 18 MV photons it was found that the collimator scatter factor is complicated by field-size-dependent backscatter into the beam monitor.

  18. Scatter factor corrections for elongated fields

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, P.D.; Sohn, W.H.; Sibata, C.H.; McCarthy, W.A. )

    1989-09-01

    Measurements have been made to determine scatter factor corrections for elongated fields of Cobalt-60 and for nominal linear accelerator energies of 6 MV (Siemens Mevatron 67) and 18 MV (AECL Therac 20). It was found that for every energy the collimator scatter factor varies by 2% or more as the field length-to-width ratio increases beyond 3:1. The phantom scatter factor is independent of which collimator pair is elongated at these energies. For 18 MV photons it was found that the collimator scatter factor is complicated by field-size-dependent backscatter into the beam monitor.

  19. Mean Field Analysis of Quantum Annealing Correction.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Shunji; Nishimori, Hidetoshi; Albash, Tameem; Lidar, Daniel A

    2016-06-03

    Quantum annealing correction (QAC) is a method that combines encoding with energy penalties and decoding to suppress and correct errors that degrade the performance of quantum annealers in solving optimization problems. While QAC has been experimentally demonstrated to successfully error correct a range of optimization problems, a clear understanding of its operating mechanism has been lacking. Here we bridge this gap using tools from quantum statistical mechanics. We study analytically tractable models using a mean-field analysis, specifically the p-body ferromagnetic infinite-range transverse-field Ising model as well as the quantum Hopfield model. We demonstrate that for p=2, where the phase transition is of second order, QAC pushes the transition to increasingly larger transverse field strengths. For p≥3, where the phase transition is of first order, QAC softens the closing of the gap for small energy penalty values and prevents its closure for sufficiently large energy penalty values. Thus QAC provides protection from excitations that occur near the quantum critical point. We find similar results for the Hopfield model, thus demonstrating that our conclusions hold in the presence of disorder.

  20. Gravitational radiative corrections from effective field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberger, Walter D.; Ross, Andreas

    2010-06-15

    In this paper we construct an effective field theory (EFT) that describes long wavelength gravitational radiation from compact systems. To leading order, this EFT consists of the multipole expansion, which we describe in terms of a diffeomorphism invariant point particle Lagrangian. The EFT also systematically captures 'post-Minkowskian' corrections to the multipole expansion due to nonlinear terms in general relativity. Specifically, we compute long distance corrections from the coupling of the (mass) monopole moment to the quadrupole moment, including up to two mass insertions. Along the way, we encounter both logarithmic short distance (UV) and long wavelength (IR) divergences. We show that the UV divergences can be (1) absorbed into a renormalization of the multipole moments and (2) resummed via the renormalization group. The IR singularities are shown to cancel from properly defined physical observables. As a concrete example of the formalism, we use this EFT to reproduce a number of post-Newtonian corrections to the gravitational wave energy flux from nonrelativistic binaries, including long distance effects up to 3 post-Newtonian (v{sup 6}) order. Our results verify that the factorization of scales proposed in the NRGR framework of Goldberger and Rothstein is consistent up to order 3PN.

  1. Indoor localization using magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathapati Subbu, Kalyan Sasidhar

    Indoor localization consists of locating oneself inside new buildings. GPS does not work indoors due to multipath reflection and signal blockage. WiFi based systems assume ubiquitous availability and infrastructure based systems require expensive installations, hence making indoor localization an open problem. This dissertation consists of solving the problem of indoor localization by thoroughly exploiting the indoor ambient magnetic fields comprising mainly of disturbances termed as anomalies in the Earth's magnetic field caused by pillars, doors and elevators in hallways which are ferromagnetic in nature. By observing uniqueness in magnetic signatures collected from different campus buildings, the work presents the identification of landmarks and guideposts from these signatures and further develops magnetic maps of buildings - all of which can be used to locate and navigate people indoors. To understand the reason behind these anomalies, first a comparison between the measured and model generated Earth's magnetic field is made, verifying the presence of a constant field without any disturbances. Then by modeling the magnetic field behavior of different pillars such as steel reinforced concrete, solid steel, and other structures like doors and elevators, the interaction of the Earth's field with the ferromagnetic fields is described thereby explaining the causes of the uniqueness in the signatures that comprise these disturbances. Next, by employing the dynamic time warping algorithm to account for time differences in signatures obtained from users walking at different speeds, an indoor localization application capable of classifying locations using the magnetic signatures is developed solely on the smart phone. The application required users to walk short distances of 3-6 m anywhere in hallway to be located with accuracies of 80-99%. The classification framework was further validated with over 90% accuracies using model generated magnetic signatures representing

  2. The image-charge correction for curved field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Debabrata; Ramachandran, Rajasree

    2017-07-01

    The image-charge potential plays a key role in field emission by lowering the potential barrier, thereby leading to an increase in current density by orders of magnitude. The classical image-charge potential is however strictly applicable to planar emitters rather than the curved protrusions characteristic of field emission sites. Using recent results [Jensen et al., J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B 35, 02C101 (2017)] for a hyperboloid emitting surface, we show that for a charge close to the emitter surface, the image charge magnitude and location are well approximated by replacing the surface locally by a sphere having the same radius of curvature. Corrections to the image-charge potential under this approximation are calculated and found to be significant for field emission when the radius of curvature is in the nanometer regime. In such cases, there is reduced electron emission and the effect is more pronounced at lower external field strengths.

  3. Tropospheric corrections to GPS measurements using locally measured meteorological parameters compared with general tropospheric corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirchner, D.; Lentz, C.; Ressler, H.

    1994-01-01

    At the Technical University Graz (TUG), Austria, the Global Positioning System (GPS) has been used for time transfer purposes since the early 80's and from that time on local meteorological parameters have been recorded together with each measurement (satellite track). The paper compares the tropospheric corrections (delays) obtained from models usually employed in GPS receivers and those using locally measured meteorological parameters.

  4. Correcting chromatic offset in multicolor super-resolution localization microscopy.

    PubMed

    Erdelyi, Miklos; Rees, Eric; Metcalf, Daniel; Schierle, Gabriele S Kaminski; Dudas, Laszlo; Sinko, Jozsef; Knight, Alex E; Kaminski, Clemens F

    2013-05-06

    Localization based super-resolution microscopy techniques require precise drift correction methods because the achieved spatial resolution is close to both the mechanical and optical performance limits of modern light microscopes. Multi-color imaging methods require corrections in addition to those dealing with drift due to the static, but spatially-dependent, chromatic offset between images. We present computer simulations to quantify this effect, which is primarily caused by the high-NA objectives used in super-resolution microscopy. Although the chromatic offset in well corrected systems is only a fraction of an optical wavelength in magnitude (<50 nm) and thus negligible in traditional diffraction limited imaging, we show that object colocalization by multi-color super-resolution methods is impossible without appropriate image correction. The simulated data are in excellent agreement with experiments using fluorescent beads excited and localized at multiple wavelengths. Finally we present a rigorous and practical calibration protocol to correct for chromatic optical offset, and demonstrate its efficacy for the imaging of transferrin receptor protein colocalization in HeLa cells using two-color direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM).

  5. Better band gaps with asymptotically corrected local exchange potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Prashant; Harbola, Manoj K.; Hemanadhan, M.; Mookerjee, Abhijit; Johnson, D. D.

    2016-02-01

    We formulate a spin-polarized van Leeuwen and Baerends (vLB) correction to the local density approximation (LDA) exchange potential [R. van Leeuwen and E. J. Baerends, Phys. Rev. A 49, 2421 (1994), 10.1103/PhysRevA.49.2421] that enforces the ionization potential (IP) theorem following T. Stein et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 266802 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.105.266802]. For electronic-structure problems, the vLB correction replicates the behavior of exact-exchange potentials, with improved scaling and well-behaved asymptotics, but with the computational cost of semilocal functionals. The vLB + IP correction produces a large improvement in the eigenvalues over those from the LDA due to correct asymptotic behavior and atomic shell structures, as shown in rare-gas, alkaline-earth, zinc-based oxides, alkali halides, sulfides, and nitrides. In half-Heusler alloys, this asymptotically corrected LDA reproduces the spin-polarized properties correctly, including magnetism and half-metallicity. We also consider finite-sized systems [e.g., ringed boron nitride (B12N12 ) and graphene (C24)] to emphasize the wide applicability of the method.

  6. Better band gaps with asymptotically corrected local exchange potentials

    DOE PAGES

    Singh, Prashant; Harbola, Manoj K.; Hemanadhan, M.; ...

    2016-02-22

    In this study, we formulate a spin-polarized van Leeuwen and Baerends (vLB) correction to the local density approximation (LDA) exchange potential [R. van Leeuwen and E. J. Baerends, Phys. Rev. A 49, 2421 (1994)] that enforces the ionization potential (IP) theorem following T. Stein et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 266802 (2010)]. For electronic-structure problems, the vLB correction replicates the behavior of exact-exchange potentials, with improved scaling and well-behaved asymptotics, but with the computational cost of semilocal functionals. The vLB + IP correction produces a large improvement in the eigenvalues over those from the LDA due to correct asymptotic behaviormore » and atomic shell structures, as shown in rare-gas, alkaline-earth, zinc-based oxides, alkali halides, sulfides, and nitrides. In half-Heusler alloys, this asymptotically corrected LDA reproduces the spin-polarized properties correctly, including magnetism and half-metallicity. We also consider finite-sized systems [e.g., ringed boron nitride (B12N12) and graphene (C24)] to emphasize the wide applicability of the method.« less

  7. Better band gaps with asymptotically corrected local exchange potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Prashant; Harbola, Manoj K.; Hemanadhan, M.; Mookerjee, Abhijit; Johnson, D. D.

    2016-02-22

    In this study, we formulate a spin-polarized van Leeuwen and Baerends (vLB) correction to the local density approximation (LDA) exchange potential [R. van Leeuwen and E. J. Baerends, Phys. Rev. A 49, 2421 (1994)] that enforces the ionization potential (IP) theorem following T. Stein et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 266802 (2010)]. For electronic-structure problems, the vLB correction replicates the behavior of exact-exchange potentials, with improved scaling and well-behaved asymptotics, but with the computational cost of semilocal functionals. The vLB + IP correction produces a large improvement in the eigenvalues over those from the LDA due to correct asymptotic behavior and atomic shell structures, as shown in rare-gas, alkaline-earth, zinc-based oxides, alkali halides, sulfides, and nitrides. In half-Heusler alloys, this asymptotically corrected LDA reproduces the spin-polarized properties correctly, including magnetism and half-metallicity. We also consider finite-sized systems [e.g., ringed boron nitride (B12N12) and graphene (C24)] to emphasize the wide applicability of the method.

  8. Data Correction for Gantry-tilted Local CT.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hongzhu; Zhang, Cishen; Yan, Ming; Zhou, Jiayin

    2005-01-01

    Gantry-tilted helical multi-slice computed tomography (CT) refers to the helical scanning CT system equipped with multi-row detector operating at some gantry tilting angle. Its purpose is to avoid the area which is vulnerable to the X-ray radiation. The local tomography is to reduce the total radiation dose by only scanning the region of interest for image reconstruction. In this paper we consider the scanning scheme, and incorporate the local tomography technique with the gantry-tilted helical multi-slice CT. The image degradation problem caused by gantry tilting is studied, and a new error correction method is proposed to deal with this problem in the local CT. Computer simulation shows that the proposed method can enhance the local imaging performance in terms of image sharpness and artifacts reduction.

  9. Optimal Drift Correction for Superresolution Localization Microscopy with Bayesian Inference

    PubMed Central

    Elmokadem, Ahmed; Yu, Ji

    2015-01-01

    Single-molecule-localization-based superresolution microscopy requires accurate sample drift correction to achieve good results. Common approaches for drift compensation include using fiducial markers and direct drift estimation by image correlation. The former increases the experimental complexity and the latter estimates drift at a reduced temporal resolution. Here, we present, to our knowledge, a new approach for drift correction based on the Bayesian statistical framework. The technique has the advantage of being able to calculate the drifts for every image frame of the data set directly from the single-molecule coordinates. We present the theoretical foundation of the algorithm and an implementation that achieves significantly higher accuracy than image-correlation-based estimations. PMID:26536254

  10. Frame Field Singularity Correction for Automatic Hexahedralization.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tengfei; Huang, Jin; Wang, Yuanzhen; Tong, Yiying; Bao, Hujun

    2014-08-01

    We present an automatic hexahedralization tool, based on a systematic treatment that removes some of the singularities that would lead to degenerate volumetric parameterization. Such singularities could be abundant in automatically generated frame fields guiding the interior and boundary layouts of the hexahedra in an all hexahedral mesh. We first give the mathematical definitions of the inadmissible singularities prevalent in frame fields, including newly introduced surface singularity types. We then give a practical framework for adjusting singularity graphs by automatically modifying the rotational transition of frames between charts (cells of a tetrahedral mesh for the volume) to resolve the issues detected in the internal and boundary singularity graph. After applying an additional re-smoothing of the frame field with the modified transition conditions, we cut the volume into a topologically trivial domain, with the original topology encoded by the self-intersections of the boundary of the domain, and solve a mixed integer problem on this domain for a global parameterization. Finally, a properly connected hexahedral mesh is constructed from the integer isosurfaces of (u,v,w) in the parameterization. We demonstrate the applicability of the method on complex shapes, and discuss its limitations.

  11. Local correction of non-periodic motion in computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schretter, Colas; Neukirchen, Christoph; Rose, Georg; Bertram, Matthias

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents a new iterative motion correction technique composed of motion estimation in projection space, motion segmentation in image space, and motion compensation within an analytical filtered-backprojection (FBP) image reconstruction algorithm. The motion is estimated by elastic registration of acquired projections on reference projections. Reference projections are sampled from the image, reconstructed in a previous iteration step. To apply the motion compensation locally, the image regions significantly affected by motion are segmented. First the perceived motion is identified in projection space by computing the absolute difference between acquired line integrals and reference line integrals. Then, differences are reconstructed in image space, and the image is regularized with a pipeline of standard image processing operators. The result of this procedure is a normalized motion map, associating each image element with a measure of the local motion detected there. The estimated displacement vectors in projection space and the reconstructed motion map in image space are then used by an adaptive motion-compensated FBP algorithm to reconstruct a sharper image. Results are shown qualitatively and quantitatively for reconstructions from realistic projections, simulated from clinical patient data. Since the method does not assume any periodicity of the motion model, it can correct reconstruction artifacts due to unstructured patient motion, such as breath-hold failure, abdominal contractions, and nervous movements.

  12. Local Dynamic Reactive Power for Correction of System Voltage Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Kueck, John D; Rizy, D Tom; Li, Fangxing; Xu, Yan; Li, Huijuan; Adhikari, Sarina; Irminger, Philip

    2008-12-01

    Distribution systems are experiencing outages due to a phenomenon known as local voltage collapse. Local voltage collapse is occurring in part because modern air conditioner compressor motors are much more susceptible to stalling during a voltage dip than older motors. These motors can stall in less than 3 cycles (.05s) when a fault, such as on the sub-transmission system, causes voltage to sag to 70 to 60%. The reasons for this susceptibility are discussed in the report. During the local voltage collapse, voltages are depressed for a period of perhaps one or two minutes. There is a concern that these local events are interacting together over larger areas and may present a challenge to system reliability. An effective method of preventing local voltage collapse is the use of voltage regulation from Distributed Energy Resources (DER) that can supply or absorb reactive power. DER, when properly controlled, can provide a rapid correction to voltage dips and prevent motor stall. This report discusses the phenomenon and causes of local voltage collapse as well as the control methodology we have developed to counter voltage sag. The problem is growing because of the use of low inertia, high efficiency air conditioner (A/C) compressor motors and because the use of electric A/C is growing in use and becoming a larger percentage of system load. A method for local dynamic voltage regulation is discussed which uses reactive power injection or absorption from local DER. This method is independent, rapid, and will not interfere with conventional utility system voltage control. The results of simulations of this method are provided. The method has also been tested at the ORNL s Distributed Energy Communications and Control (DECC) Laboratory using our research inverter and synchronous condenser. These systems at the DECC Lab are interconnected to an actual distribution system, the ORNL distribution system, which is fed from TVA s 161kV sub-transmission backbone. The test results

  13. Characterizing and Designing Localized Electromagnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borzdov, Georgy N.

    2004-11-01

    An approach to characterizing and designing localized electromagnetic fields in complex media and free space, based on the use of differentiable manifolds, differentiable mappings, and the rotation group, is discussed. Families of exact time-harmonic solutions to Maxwell's equations -- standing waves defined by spherical harmonics, and localized fields defined by the rotation group -- are presented.

  14. Can small field diode correction factors be applied universally?

    PubMed

    Liu, Paul Z Y; Suchowerska, Natalka; McKenzie, David R

    2014-09-01

    Diode detectors are commonly used in dosimetry, but have been reported to over-respond in small fields. Diode correction factors have been reported in the literature. The purpose of this study is to determine whether correction factors for a given diode type can be universally applied over a range of irradiation conditions including beams of different qualities. A mathematical relation of diode over-response as a function of the field size was developed using previously published experimental data in which diodes were compared to an air core scintillation dosimeter. Correction factors calculated from the mathematical relation were then compared those available in the literature. The mathematical relation established between diode over-response and the field size was found to predict the measured diode correction factors for fields between 5 and 30 mm in width. The average deviation between measured and predicted over-response was 0.32% for IBA SFD and PTW Type E diodes. Diode over-response was found to be not strongly dependent on the type of linac, the method of collimation or the measurement depth. The mathematical relation was found to agree with published diode correction factors derived from Monte Carlo simulations and measurements, indicating that correction factors are robust in their transportability between different radiation beams. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  15. Eddy current correction in volume-localized MR spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C.; Wendt, R. E. 3rd; Evans, H. J.; Rowe, R. M.; Hedrick, T. D.; LeBlanc, A. D.

    1994-01-01

    The quality of volume-localized magnetic resonance spectroscopy is affected by eddy currents caused by gradient switching. Eddy currents can be reduced with improved gradient systems; however, it has been suggested that the distortion due to eddy currents can be compensated for during postprocessing with a single-frequency reference signal. The authors propose modifying current techniques for acquiring the single-frequency reference signal by using relaxation weighting to reduce interference from components that cannot be eliminated by digital filtering alone. Additional sequences with T1 or T2 weighting for reference signal acquisition are shown to have the same eddy current characteristics as the original signal without relaxation weighting. The authors also studied a new eddy current correction method that does not require a single-frequency reference signal. This method uses two free induction decays (FIDs) collected from the same volume with two sequences with opposite gradients. Phase errors caused by eddy currents are opposite in these two FIDs and can be canceled completely by combining the FIDs. These methods were tested in a phantom. Eddy current distortions were corrected, allowing quantitative measurement of structures such as the -CH = CH- component, which is otherwise undetectable.

  16. Decoupling the SSC collider using local correction techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Bourianoff, G.; Pilat, F.

    1991-10-01

    This paper will summarize recent study of the effects and correction of linear coupling in the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) lattice. There are several aspects of the SSC lattice that make direct extrapolation of techniques used on existing machines unreliable. The most obvious aspect of the SSC which departs from previous experience is the small dynamic aperture which lies well within the beampipe. A second aspect is the existence of long arcs with low superperiodicity which allows various sources of skew quadrupole to accumulate to large, and, perhaps, nonlinear values. A third aspect is the relatively large value of systematic skew quadrupole error in the main dipoles. This results from asymmetric placement of the cold mass in the cryostat. Coupling must be considered harmful if it leads to irreversible emittance blow-up, a decrease in the dynamic aperture, or inoperability of the machine. These negative effects are generally related to coupling terms that accumulate to large and, hence, nonlinear values prior to correction. The harmful effects can also be cause by the linearly coupled orbits interacting with high-order multipole fields that exist in the other magnets.

  17. Local Field Potentials: Myths and Misunderstandings

    PubMed Central

    Herreras, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    The intracerebral local field potential (LFP) is a measure of brain activity that reflects the highly dynamic flow of information across neural networks. This is a composite signal that receives contributions from multiple neural sources, yet interpreting its nature and significance may be hindered by several confounding factors and technical limitations. By and large, the main factor defining the amplitude of LFPs is the geometry of the current sources, over and above the degree of synchronization or the properties of the media. As such, similar levels of activity may result in potentials that differ in several orders of magnitude in different populations. The geometry of these sources has been experimentally inaccessible until intracerebral high density recordings enabled the co-activating sources to be revealed. Without this information, it has proven difficult to interpret a century's worth of recordings that used temporal cues alone, such as event or spike related potentials and frequency bands. Meanwhile, a collection of biophysically ill-founded concepts have been considered legitimate, which can now be corrected in the light of recent advances. The relationship of LFPs to their sources is often counterintuitive. For instance, most LFP activity is not local but remote, it may be larger further from rather than close to the source, the polarity does not define its excitatory or inhibitory nature, and the amplitude may increase when source's activity is reduced. As technological developments foster the use of LFPs, the time is now ripe to raise awareness of the need to take into account spatial aspects of these signals and of the errors derived from neglecting to do so. PMID:28018180

  18. Generalized conservation laws in non-local field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kegeles, Alexander; Oriti, Daniele

    2016-04-01

    We propose a geometrical treatment of symmetries in non-local field theories, where the non-locality is due to a lack of identification of field arguments in the action. We show that the existence of a symmetry of the action leads to a generalized conservation law, in which the usual conserved current acquires an additional non-local correction term, obtaining a generalization of the standard Noether theorem. We illustrate the general formalism by discussing the specific physical example of complex scalar field theory of the type describing the hydrodynamic approximation of Bose-Einstein condensates. We expect our analysis and results to be of particular interest for the group field theory formulation of quantum gravity.

  19. Test of Scintillometer Saturation Correction Methods Using Field Experimental Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleissl, J.; Hartogensis, O. K.; Gomez, J. D.

    2010-12-01

    Saturation of large aperture scintillometer (LAS) signals can result in sensible heat flux measurements that are biased low. A field study with LASs of different aperture sizes and path lengths was performed to investigate the onset of, and corrections for, signal saturation. Saturation already occurs at {C_n^2 ≈ 0.074 D^{5/3} λ^{1/3} L^{-8/3}}, where {C_n^2} is the structure parameter of the refractive index, D is the aperture size, λ is the wavelength, L is the transect length, which is smaller than theoretically derived saturation limits. At a transect length of 1 km, a height of 2.5 m, and aperture ≈0.15 m the correction factor exceeds 5% already at {C_n^2=2× 10^{-12}m^{-2/3}}, which will affect many practical applications of scintillometry. The Clifford correction method, which only depends on {C_n^2} and the transect geometry, provides good saturation corrections over the range of conditions observed in our study. The saturation correction proposed by Ochs and Hill results in correction factors that are too small in large saturation regimes. An inner length scale dependence of the saturation correction factor was not observed. Thus for practical applications the Clifford correction method should be applied.

  20. Self-interaction correction and relativistic exchange on the core states and core hyperfine fields in Fe, Co, and Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severin, L.; Richter, M.; Steinbeck, L.

    1997-04-01

    Local density calculations with self-interaction-corrected core states are reported for the transition-metal ferromagnets Fe, Co, and Ni. The hyperfine field matrix elements have been computed. Good agreement with measurements is obtained for Co, whereas for Fe and Ni the discrepancy between local density theory and experiment remains also in the self-interaction-corrected calculation. Possible changes in the core states due to relativistic exchange corrections are also discussed and found to be of minor importance.

  1. Second order higher-derivative corrections in Double Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lescano, Eric; Marqués, Diego

    2017-06-01

    HSZ Double Field Theory is a higher-derivative theory of gravity with exact and manifest T-duality symmetry. The first order corrections in the massless sector were shown to be governed solely by Chern-Simons deformations of the three-form field strength. We compute the full action with up to six derivatives O({α}^' 2}) for the universal sector containing the metric, two-form and dilaton fields. The Green-Schwarz transformation of the two-form field remains uncorrected to second order. In addition to the expected Chern-Simons-squared and Riemann-cubed terms the theory contains a cubic Gauss-Bonnet interaction, plus other six-derivative unambiguous terms involving the three-form field strength whose presence indicates that the theory must contain further higher-derivative corrections.

  2. Correcting field harmonics after design in superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    For a variety of reasons the actual field harmonics, as measured, in the superconducting magnets come out to be somewhat different than what were intended at the time of design. In this paper we shall discuss the schemes which can be used to correct them in the magnets. We shall discuss them for both the allowed and non-allowed harmonics. Since the deviation in field harmonics from their design value is mainly related to the mechanical properties of the coil cross section, in order for a scheme to work as planned, the mechanical configuration of the coil should not be changed significantly while this correction is being implemented.

  3. Correcting field harmonics after design in superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.C.

    1992-10-01

    For a variety of reasons the actual field harmonics, as measured, in the superconducting magnets come out to be somewhat different than what were intended at the time of design. In this paper we shall discuss the schemes which can be used to correct them in the magnets. We shall discuss them for both the allowed and non-allowed harmonics. Since the deviation in field harmonics from their design value is mainly related to the mechanical properties of the coil cross section, in order for a scheme to work as planned, the mechanical configuration of the coil should not be changed significantly while this correction is being implemented.

  4. Simulated field maps for susceptibility artefact correction in interventional MRI.

    PubMed

    Kochan, Martin; Daga, Pankaj; Burgos, Ninon; White, Mark; Cardoso, M Jorge; Mancini, Laura; Winston, Gavin P; McEvoy, Andrew W; Thornton, John; Yousry, Tarek; Duncan, John S; Stoyanov, Danail; Ourselin, Sébastien

    2015-09-01

    Intraoperative MRI (iMRI) is a powerful modality for acquiring images of the brain to facilitate precise image-guided neurosurgery. Diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) provides critical information about location, orientation and structure of nerve fibre tracts, but suffers from the "susceptibility artefact" stemming from magnetic field perturbations due to the step change in magnetic susceptibility at air-tissue boundaries in the head. An existing approach to correcting the artefact is to acquire a field map by means of an additional MRI scan. However, to recover true field maps from the acquired field maps near air-tissue boundaries is challenging, and acquired field maps are unavailable in historical MRI data sets. This paper reports a detailed account of our method to simulate field maps from structural MRI scans that was first presented at IPCAI 2014 and provides a thorough experimental and analysis section to quantitatively validate our technique. We perform automatic air-tissue segmentation of intraoperative MRI scans, feed the segmentation into a field map simulation step and apply the acquired and the simulated field maps to correct DW-MRI data sets. We report results for 12 patient data sets acquired during anterior temporal lobe resection surgery for the surgical management of focal epilepsy. We find a close agreement between acquired and simulated field maps and observe a statistically significant reduction in the susceptibility artefact in DW-MRI data sets corrected using simulated field maps in the vicinity of the resection. The artefact reduction obtained using acquired field maps remains better than that using the simulated field maps in all evaluated regions of the brain. The proposed simulated field maps facilitate susceptibility artefact reduction near the resection. Accurate air-tissue segmentation is key to achieving accurate simulation. The proposed simulation approach is adaptable to different iMRI and neurosurgical applications.

  5. Local density corrected three-body distribution functions for probing local structure reorganization in liquids.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Anirban; Hofer, Thomas S; Rode, Bernd M

    2008-11-28

    Three-body distribution functions are calculated for metal ions in an aqueous medium in order to investigate and characterise solvent structure reorganization. Based on the existing formulation of three body correlation function, a local density correction is introduced to enable a comparison of different sub-regions within a solvate as well as different systems, thus taking into account the varying density arising from the influence of the solute.

  6. Analysis and correction of field fluctuations in fMRI data using field monitoring.

    PubMed

    Bollmann, Saskia; Kasper, Lars; Vannesjo, S Johanna; Diaconescu, Andreea O; Dietrich, Benjamin E; Gross, Simon; Stephan, Klaas E; Pruessmann, Klaas P

    2017-01-09

    This work investigates the role of magnetic field fluctuations as a confound in fMRI. In standard fMRI experiments with single-shot EPI acquisition at 3 Tesla the uniform and gradient components of the magnetic field were recorded with NMR field sensors. By principal component analysis it is found that differences of field evolution between the EPI readouts are explainable by few components relating to slow and within-shot field dynamics of hardware and physiological origin. The impact of fluctuating field components is studied by selective data correction and assessment of its influence on image fluctuation and SFNR. Physiological field fluctuations, attributed to breathing, were found to be small relative to those of hardware origin. The dominant confounds were hardware-related and attributable to magnet drift and thermal changes. In raw image time series, field fluctuation caused significant SFNR loss, reflected by a 67% gain upon correction. Large part of this correction can be accomplished by traditional image realignment, which addresses slow and spatially uniform field changes. With realignment, explicit field correction increased the SFNR on the order of 6%. In conclusion, field fluctuations are a relevant confound in fMRI and can be addressed effectively by retrospective data correction. Based on the physics involved it is anticipated that the advantage of full field correction increases with field strength, with non-Cartesian readouts, and upon phase-sensitive BOLD analysis.

  7. Intensity calibration and flat-field correction for fluorescence microscopes.

    PubMed

    Model, Michael

    2014-04-01

    Standardization in fluorescence microscopy involves calibration of intensity in reproducible units and correction for spatial nonuniformity of illumination (flat-field or shading correction). Both goals can be achieved using concentrated solutions of fluorescent dyes. When a drop of a highly concentrated fluorescent dye is placed between a slide and a coverslip it produces a spatially uniform field, resistant to photobleaching and with reproducible quantum yield; it can be used as a brightness standard for wide-field and confocal microscopes. For wide-field microscopes, calibration can be further extended to absolute molecular units. This can be done by imaging a solution of known concentration and known depth; the latter can be prepared by placing a small spherical lens in a diluted solution of the same fluorophore that is used in the biological specimen.

  8. Alternative Methods for Field Corrections in Helical Solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, M. L.; Krave, S. T.; Tompkins, J. C.; Yonehara, K.; Flanagan, G.; Kahn, S. A.; Melconian, K.

    2015-05-01

    Helical cooling channels have been proposed for highly efficient 6D muon cooling. Helical solenoids produce solenoidal, helical dipole, and helical gradient field components. Previous studies explored the geometric tunability limits on these main field components. In this paper we present two alternative correction schemes, tilting the solenoids and the addition of helical lines, to reduce the required strength of the anti-solenoid and add an additional tuning knob.

  9. Simplified Method for Local Correction of System International Normalized Ratio.

    PubMed

    Chandrashekar, Vani

    2017-08-01

    International normalized ratio (INR) derivation is dependent on the international sensitivity index (ISI) of thromboplastin. It varies with instrument and reagents used. To evaluate the role of a correction factor in the derivation of INR. We studied prothrombin time (PT) and INR from patients using 3 thromboplastins of varying ISI values. The correction factor was applied to the observed INR to obtain a corrected INR. The difference between corrected INR and observed INR values varies from -0.8 through 0.96. Corrected INR is dependent on PT only. It can be applied to all patients irrespective of cause for elevated PT.

  10. Localization Corrections for Mobile Laser Scanner Using Local Support-Based Outlier Filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtola, V. V.; Virtanen, J.-P.; Rönnholm, P.; Nüchter, A.

    2016-06-01

    Following the pioneering work introduced in [Lehtola et al., ISPRS J. Photogramm. Remote Sens. 99, 2015, pp. 25-29], we extend the state-of-the-art intrinsic localization solution for a single two-dimensional (2D) laser scanner from one into (quasi) three dimensions (3D). By intrinsic localization, we mean that no external sensors are used to localize the scanner, such as inertial measurement devices (IMU) or global navigation satellite systems (GNSS). Specifically, the proposed method builds on a novel concept of local support-based filtering of outliers, which enables the use of six degrees-of-freedom (DoF) simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) for the purpose of enacting appropriate trajectory corrections into the previous one-dimensional solution. Moreover, the local support-based filtering concept is platform independent, and is therefore likely to be widely generalizable. The here presented overall method is yet limited into quasi-3D by its inability to recover trajectories with steep curvature, but in the future, it may be further extended into full 3D.

  11. Loop Corrections to Standard Model fields in inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xingang; Wang, Yi; Xianyu, Zhong-Zhi

    2016-08-01

    We calculate 1-loop corrections to the Schwinger-Keldysh propagators of Standard-Model-like fields of spin-0, 1/2, and 1, with all renormalizable interactions during inflation. We pay special attention to the late-time divergences of loop corrections, and show that the divergences can be resummed into finite results in the late-time limit using dynamical renormalization group method. This is our first step toward studying both the Standard Model and new physics in the primordial universe.

  12. Correcting the bias of spike field coherence estimators due to a finite number of spikes.

    PubMed

    Grasse, D W; Moxon, K A

    2010-07-01

    The coherence between oscillatory activity in local field potentials (LFPs) and single neuron action potentials, or spikes, has been suggested as a neural substrate for the representation of information. The power spectrum of a spike-triggered average (STA) is commonly used to estimate spike field coherence (SFC). However, when a finite number of spikes is used to construct the STA, the coherence estimator is biased. We introduce here a correction for the bias imposed by the limited number of spikes available in experimental conditions. In addition, we present an alternative method for estimating SFC from an STA by using a filter bank approach. This method is shown to be more appropriate in some analyses, such as comparing coherence across frequency bands. The proposed bias correction is a linear transformation derived from an idealized model of spike-field interaction but is shown to hold in more realistic settings. Uncorrected and corrected SFC estimates from both estimation methods are compared across multiple simulated spike-field models and experimentally collected data. The bias correction was shown to reduce the bias of the estimators, but add variance. However, the corrected estimates had a reduced or unchanged mean squared error in the majority of conditions evaluated. The bias correction provides an effective way to reduce bias in an SFC estimator without increasing the mean squared error.

  13. Resolving the Physics of Error Field Correction Through Error Field Proxy Experiments in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttery, R. J.; Ferraro, N. M.; La Haye, R. J.; Schaffer, M. J.; Strait, E. J.; Hanson, J. M.; Park, J.-K.; Reimerdes, H.

    2012-10-01

    Recent studies have determined the scale and likely origins of limitations to error field correction by using DIII-D's multiple coil arrays to apply known large amplitude proxy error fields and attempting correction with additional coils of different structure. It was found that even with pure n=1 proxy fields and carefully optimized correction field, the benefits of correction were substantially limited, at the ˜50% level in terms of low density access. This indicates coupling of residual fields either through higher order resonances and/or through non-resonant braking of the plasma The interpretation is confirmed by modeling with the IPEC code, which shows that the correction process reduces resonant components, but increases non-resonant NTV damping, thus decreasing rotation and easing penetration of residual resonant fields. The result is significant, suggesting multiple field components must be compensated to achieve good correction, and that the best approach may be to minimize the total field in the plasma by cancelling error fields close to their source or close to the plasma.

  14. Receptive Field Inference with Localized Priors

    PubMed Central

    Park, Mijung; Pillow, Jonathan W.

    2011-01-01

    The linear receptive field describes a mapping from sensory stimuli to a one-dimensional variable governing a neuron's spike response. However, traditional receptive field estimators such as the spike-triggered average converge slowly and often require large amounts of data. Bayesian methods seek to overcome this problem by biasing estimates towards solutions that are more likely a priori, typically those with small, smooth, or sparse coefficients. Here we introduce a novel Bayesian receptive field estimator designed to incorporate locality, a powerful form of prior information about receptive field structure. The key to our approach is a hierarchical receptive field model that flexibly adapts to localized structure in both spacetime and spatiotemporal frequency, using an inference method known as empirical Bayes. We refer to our method as automatic locality determination (ALD), and show that it can accurately recover various types of smooth, sparse, and localized receptive fields. We apply ALD to neural data from retinal ganglion cells and V1 simple cells, and find it achieves error rates several times lower than standard estimators. Thus, estimates of comparable accuracy can be achieved with substantially less data. Finally, we introduce a computationally efficient Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm for fully Bayesian inference under the ALD prior, yielding accurate Bayesian confidence intervals for small or noisy datasets. PMID:22046110

  15. Correcting the fundamental ion mobility equation for field effects.

    PubMed

    Siems, William F; Viehland, Larry A; Hill, Herbert H

    2016-11-14

    The fundamental ion mobility equation computes the energy-averaged collision cross section as a function of measured drift velocity, electric field strength, ion and neutral masses, and drift gas state parameters. As field strength approaches zero, in particular when the drift velocity drops below about 4% of the average ion-neutral thermal speed, the fundamental equation takes on an especially simple form because the collision frequency and average momentum transfer become indistinguishable from their thermal values. However, in modern high-performance IMS-MS instruments, ion drift velocities may be 10-50% or more of thermal speed, and analysis using the zero-field equation gives rise to erroneously large cross sections. We address this problem by developing correction factors for the zero-field equation from an improved momentum-transfer (MT) theory for ion mobility, corrected and completed herein, and from the well-known two-temperature (2T) theory. The corrected and uncorrected equations are compared by their ability to recover known hard-sphere cross sections from accurately-computed mobility data. Both MT and 2T expressions adjust for the field-driven increase in collision frequency and are noticeably superior to zero-field expression whenever the ion drift velocity is greater than ∼4% of thermal speed. The MT expression also adjusts for the mass and field dependent change in average momentum transfer, and is more accurate than the 2T first approximation whenever the mass of the ionic species is greater than about four times that of drift gas molecules, as is the case in most analytical applications of IMS coupled to MS.

  16. Radiative corrections from heavy fast-roll fields during inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Rajeev Kumar; Sandora, McCullen; Sloth, Martin S. E-mail: sandora@cp3.dias.sdu.dk

    2015-06-01

    We investigate radiative corrections to the inflaton potential from heavy fields undergoing a fast-roll phase transition. We find that a logarithmic one-loop correction to the inflaton potential involving this field can induce a temporary running of the spectral index. The induced running can be a short burst of strong running, which may be related to the observed anomalies on large scales in the cosmic microwave spectrum, or extend over many e-folds, sustaining an effectively constant running to be searched for in the future. We implement this in a general class of models, where effects are mediated through a heavy messenger field sitting in its minimum. Interestingly, within the present framework it is a generic outcome that a large running implies a small field model with a vanishing tensor-to-scalar ratio, circumventing the normal expectation that small field models typically lead to an unobservably small running of the spectral index. An observable level of tensor modes can also be accommodated, but, surprisingly, this requires running to be induced by a curvaton. If upcoming observations are consistent with a small tensor-to-scalar ratio as predicted by small field models of inflation, then the present study serves as an explicit example contrary to the general expectation that the running will be unobservable.

  17. Radiative corrections from heavy fast-roll fields during inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Rajeev Kumar; Sandora, McCullen; Sloth, Martin S.

    2015-06-09

    We investigate radiative corrections to the inflaton potential from heavy fields undergoing a fast-roll phase transition. We find that a logarithmic one-loop correction to the inflaton potential involving this field can induce a temporary running of the spectral index. The induced running can be a short burst of strong running, which may be related to the observed anomalies on large scales in the cosmic microwave spectrum, or extend over many e-folds, sustaining an effectively constant running to be searched for in the future. We implement this in a general class of models, where effects are mediated through a heavy messenger field sitting in its minimum. Interestingly, within the present framework it is a generic outcome that a large running implies a small field model with a vanishing tensor-to-scalar ratio, circumventing the normal expectation that small field models typically lead to an unobservably small running of the spectral index. An observable level of tensor modes can also be accommodated, but, surprisingly, this requires running to be induced by a curvaton. If upcoming observations are consistent with a small tensor-to-scalar ratio as predicted by small field models of inflation, then the present study serves as an explicit example contrary to the general expectation that the running will be unobservable.

  18. Small field correction factors for the IBA Razor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Paul Z Y; Reggiori, Giacomo; Lobefalo, Francesca; Mancosu, Pietro; Tomatis, Stefano; McKenzie, David R; Suchowerska, Natalka

    2016-08-01

    The IBA Razor diode supersedes the IBA SFD and is intended for use in small fields. However, its behaviour in small fields has not yet been quantified. In this work, we examine the response of the Razor diode against the air core scintillation dosimeter (FOD) and Gafchromic film in photon beams from three Varian linac beams. Fields between 4mm and 30mm in width were measured, both with and without a flattening filter and at two energies. The Razor exhibited an over-response of up to 4.5% for MLC collimated fields and 7.1% for stereotactic cone collimated fields. The presence of the flattening filter altered the over-response by up to 1.5%. The small field correction factors are tabulated and agree with the mathematical relation of Liu et al. (2014). Four samples of the Razor were used, two having received a significant prior dose. The correction factors for the four samples differed and may depend on their dose history. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Gauge Field Localization on Deformed Branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tofighi, A.; Moazzen, M.; Farokhtabar, A.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we utilise the Chumbes-Holf da Silva-Hott (CHH) mechanism to investigate the issue of gauge field localization on a deformed brane constructed with one scalar field, which can be coupled to gravity minimally or non-minimally. The study of deformed defects is important because they contain internal structures which may have implications in braneworld models. With the CHH mechanism, we find that the massless zero mode of gauge field, in the case of minimal or non-minimal coupling is localized on the brane. Moreover, in the case of non-minimal coupling, it is shown that, when the non-minimal coupling constant is larger than its critical value, then the zero mode is localized on each sub brane.

  20. Dynamic local field factor of an uniform electron liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, G.

    1988-08-01

    We present an expression for the dynamic local field factor of a uniform interacting electron liquid, as G(q, ω) = G1(q) + G2(q, ω), where G1 is the static local field factor of the STLS-theory, and G2 has a structure similar to that obtainable from the mode-coupling theory of the Memory-function approach. The q → 0 limit of the imaginary part of G, which is of interest in the time-dependent Local-density-functional theory, has the correct ω-3/2 dependence, and yields the long-wavelength plasmon damping coefficient in good agreement with diagramatic calculations as well as the mode-coupling approach; detailed numerical results are also presented.

  1. The Local Group: the ultimate deep field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Weisz, Daniel R.; Bullock, James S.; Cooper, Michael C.

    2016-10-01

    Near-field cosmology - using detailed observations of the Local Group and its environs to study wide-ranging questions in galaxy formation and dark matter physics - has become a mature and rich field over the past decade. There are lingering concerns, however, that the relatively small size of the present-day Local Group (˜2 Mpc diameter) imposes insurmountable sample-variance uncertainties, limiting its broader utility. We consider the region spanned by the Local Group's progenitors at earlier times and show that it reaches 3 arcmin ≈ 7 comoving Mpc in linear size (a volume of ≈350 Mpc3) at z = 7. This size at early cosmic epochs is large enough to be representative in terms of the matter density and counts of dark matter haloes with Mvir(z = 7) ≲ 2 × 109 M⊙. The Local Group's stellar fossil record traces the cosmic evolution of galaxies with 103 ≲ M⋆(z = 0)/M⊙ ≲ 109 (reaching M1500 > -9 at z ˜ 7) over a region that is comparable to or larger than the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field (HUDF) for the entire history of the Universe. In the JWST era, resolved stellar populations will probe regions larger than the HUDF and any deep JWST fields, further enhancing the value of near-field cosmology.

  2. Localizing periodicity in near-field images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraundorf, P.

    1990-02-01

    We show that Bayesian Physical inference, like that used in statistical mechanics, can guide the systematic construction of Fourier dark-field methods for localizing periodicity in near-field (e.g., scanning tunneling and electron phase contrast) images. For crystals in an aperiodic field, the Fourier coefficient Zeicphi combines with a prior estimate for background amplitude B to predict background phase (β) values distributed with a probability p(β-φ||Z,φ,B) inversely proportional to amplitude P of the signal of interest, when the latter is treated as an unknown translation scaled to B.

  3. Re-visit local coupling correction in the interaction regions of RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.; Liu, C.; Marusic, A.; Minty, M.; Ptitsyn, V.; Schoefer, V.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Zimmer, C.

    2011-11-01

    In this article we will re-visit the local coupling correction in the interaction regions (IRs) of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). We will review the measurement data of triplet quadrupole rolls, the local coupling correction strengths in the RHIC control system, and the methods for the local coupling correction with local skew quadrupole correctors. Based on the in-turnnel measurement data of triplet roll errors in 2011, we will analytically calculate and simulate IR-bump method to find out the local skew correction strengths and compare them at store and at injection with the Blue and Yellow ring lattices in the 2011 polarized proton (p-p) and Au-Au runs. The vertical dispersion from the triplet roll errors, local and global coupling correction skew quadrupoles, and the vertical dipole correctors are calculated and discussed.

  4. Quantum Corrections and Effective Action in Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalvit, Diego A. R.

    1998-07-01

    In this Thesis we study quantum corrections to the classical dynamics for mean values in field theory. To that end we make use of the formalism of the closed time path effective action to get real and causal equations of motion. We introduce a coarse grained effective action, which is useful in the study of phase transitions in field theory. We derive an exact renormalization group equation that describes how this action varies with the coarse graining scale. We develop different approximation methods to solve that equation, and we obtain non perturbative improvements to the effective potential for a self interacting scalar field theory. We also discuss the stochastic aspects contained in this action. On the other hand, using the effective action, we find low energy and large distance quantum corrections for the gravitational potential, treating relativity as an effective low energy theory. We include the effect of scalar fields, fermions and gravitons. The inclusion of metric fluctuations causes Einstein semiclassical equations to depend on the gauge fixing parameters, and they are therefore non physical. We solve this problem identifying as a physical observable the trayectory of a test particle. We explicitly show that the geodesic equation for such particle is independent of the arbitrary parameters of the gauge fixing.

  5. Gauge field localization on brane worlds

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, Rommel; Rodriguez, R. Omar; Melfo, Alejandra; Pantoja, Nelson

    2010-04-15

    We consider the effects of spacetime curvature and brane thickness on the localization of gauge fields on a brane via kinetic terms induced by localized fermions. We find that in a warped geometry with an infinitely thin brane, both the infrared and the ultraviolet behavior of the electromagnetic propagator are affected, providing a more stringent bound on the brane's tension than that coming from the requirement of four-dimensional gravity on the brane. On the other hand, for a thick wall in a flat spacetime, where the fermions are localized by means of a Yukawa coupling, we find that four-dimensional electromagnetism is recovered in a region bounded from above by the same critical distance appearing in the thin case, but also from below by a new scale related to the brane's thickness and the electromagnetic couplings. This imposes very stringent bounds on the brane's thickness which seem to invalidate the localization mechanism for this case.

  6. Comparison of inhomogeneity correction algorithms in small photon fields.

    PubMed

    Jones, Andrew O; Das, Indra J

    2005-03-01

    Algorithms such as convolution superposition, Batho, and equivalent pathlength which were originally developed and validated for conventional treatments under conditions of electronic equilibrium using relatively large fields greater than 5 x 5 cm2 are routinely employed for inhomogeneity corrections. Modern day treatments using intensity modulated radiation therapy employ small beamlets characterized by the resolution of the multileaf collimator. These beamlets, in general, do not provide electronic equilibrium even in a homogeneous medium, and these effects are exaggerated in media with inhomogenieties. Monte Carlo simulations are becoming a tool of choice in understanding the dosimetry of small photon fields as they encounter low density media. In this study, depth dose data from the Monte Carlo simulations are compared to the results of the convolution superposition, Batho, and equivalent pathlength algorithms. The central axis dose within the low-density inhomogeneity as calculated by Monte Carlo simulation and convolution superposition decreases for small field sizes whereas it increases using the Batho and equivalent pathlength algorithms. The dose perturbation factor (DPF) is defined as the ratio of dose to a point within the inhomogeneity to the same point in a homogeneous phantom. The dose correction factor is defined as the ratio of dose calculated by an algorithm at a point to the Monte Carlo derived dose at the same point, respectively. DPF is noted to be significant for small fields and low density for all algorithms. Comparisons of the algorithms with Monte Carlo simulations is reflected in the DCF, which is close to 1.0 for the convolution-superposition algorithm. The Batho and equivalent pathlength algorithms differ significantly from Monte Carlo simulation for most field sizes and densities. Convolution superposition shows better agreement with Monte Carlo data versus the Batho or equivalent pathlength corrections. As the field size increases the

  7. A defect corrected finite element approach for the accurate evaluation of magnetic fields on unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Römer, Ulrich; Schöps, Sebastian; De Gersem, Herbert

    2017-04-01

    In electromagnetic simulations of magnets and machines, one is often interested in a highly accurate and local evaluation of the magnetic field uniformity. Based on local post-processing of the solution, a defect correction scheme is proposed as an easy to realize alternative to higher order finite element or hybrid approaches. Radial basis functions (RBFs) are key for the generality of the method, which in particular can handle unstructured grids. Also, contrary to conventional finite element basis functions, higher derivatives of the solution can be evaluated, as required, e.g., for deflection magnets. Defect correction is applied to obtain a solution with improved accuracy and adjoint techniques are used to estimate the remaining error for a specific quantity of interest. Significantly improved (local) convergence orders are obtained. The scheme is also applied to the simulation of a Stern-Gerlach magnet currently in operation.

  8. Local respiratory motion correction for PET/CT imaging: Application to lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lamare, F. Fernandez, P.; Fayad, H.; Visvikis, D.

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Despite multiple methodologies already proposed to correct respiratory motion in the whole PET imaging field of view (FOV), such approaches have not found wide acceptance in clinical routine. An alternative can be the local respiratory motion correction (LRMC) of data corresponding to a given volume of interest (VOI: organ or tumor). Advantages of LRMC include the use of a simple motion model, faster execution times, and organ specific motion correction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of LMRC using various motion models for oncology (lung lesion) applications. Methods: Both simulated (NURBS based 4D cardiac-torso phantom) and clinical studies (six patients) were used in the evaluation of the proposed LRMC approach. PET data were acquired in list-mode and synchronized with respiration. The implemented approach consists first in defining a VOI on the reconstructed motion average image. Gated PET images of the VOI are subsequently reconstructed using only lines of response passing through the selected VOI and are used in combination with a center of gravity or an affine/elastic registration algorithm to derive the transformation maps corresponding to the respiration effects. Those are finally integrated in the reconstruction process to produce a motion free image over the lesion regions. Results: Although the center of gravity or affine algorithm achieved similar performance for individual lesion motion correction, the elastic model, applied either locally or to the whole FOV, led to an overall superior performance. The spatial tumor location was altered by 89% and 81% for the elastic model applied locally or to the whole FOV, respectively (compared to 44% and 39% for the center of gravity and affine models, respectively). This resulted in similar associated overall tumor volume changes of 84% and 80%, respectively (compared to 75% and 71% for the center of gravity and affine models, respectively). The application of the nonrigid

  9. Quantum corrections to the cosmological evolution of conformally coupled fields

    SciTech Connect

    Cembranos, Jose A.R.; Olive, Keith A.; Peloso, Marco; Uzan, Jean-Philippe E-mail: olive@physics.umn.edu E-mail: uzan@iap.fr

    2009-07-01

    Because the source term for the equations of motion of a conformally coupled scalar field, such as the dilaton, is given by the trace of the matter energy momentum tensor, it is commonly assumed to vanish during the radiation dominated epoch in the early universe. As a consequence, such fields are generally frozen in the early universe. Here we compute the finite temperature radiative correction to the source term and discuss its consequences on the evolution of such fields in the early universe. We discuss in particular, the case of scalar tensor theories of gravity which have general relativity as an attractor solution. We show that, in some cases, the universe can experience an early phase of contraction, followed by a non-singular bounce, and standard expansion. This can have interesting consequences for the abundance of thermal relics; for instance, it can provide a solution to the gravitino problem. We conclude by discussing the possible consequences of the quantum corrections to the evolution of the dilaton.

  10. Localization of vector field on dynamical domain wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, Masafumi; Nojiri, Shin'ichi

    2017-03-01

    In the previous works (arxiv:arXiv:1202.5375 and arxiv:arXiv:1402.1346), the dynamical domain wall, where the four dimensional FRW universe is embedded in the five dimensional space-time, has been realized by using two scalar fields. In this paper, we consider the localization of vector field in three formulations. The first formulation was investigated in the previous paper (arxiv:arXiv:1510.01099) for the U (1) gauge field. In the second formulation, we investigate the Dvali-Shifman mechanism (arxiv:arXiv:hep-th/9612128), where the non-abelian gauge field is confined in the bulk but the gauge symmetry is spontaneously broken on the domain wall. In the third formulation, we investigate the Kaluza-Klein modes coming from the five dimensional graviton. In the Randall-Sundrum model, the graviton was localized on the brane. We show that the (5 , μ) components (μ = 0 , 1 , 2 , 3) of the graviton are also localized on the domain wall and can be regarded as the vector field on the domain wall. There are, however, some corrections coming from the bulk extra dimension if the domain wall universe is expanding.

  11. Beginning stages of local magnetic field formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bumba, V.

    Based on a study of the initial stages of local magnetic field formation, the appearance of a new magnetic flux in the photosphere is studied. This magnetic flux is found to occur both under the influence of different modes of convective motion as well as under the action of Paleomagnetic fields. Waldmeier's Heliographic Maps of the Photosphere and Mt. Wilson Observatory daily magnetic maps were used in the analysis. Observed regularities could not be explained by a model of magnetic flux tubes emerging on the photospheric surface. This model can not account for the practically simultaneous development of separate active regions, belonging to different solar hemispheres and different cycles of solar activity in one, relatively narrow, 'unipolar' sector of the background field. It is also difficult to explain the different roles and velocities of negative and positive polarities during the formation of new magnetic fields. The importance of velocity measurements and maps for solving the observed phenomenon is stressed.

  12. Wave packet systems on local fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Firdous A.; Ahmad, Owais

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we introduce the notion of wave packet systems on local fields of positive characteristic and derive some characterizations of these systems by means of two basic equations in the Fourier domain. More precisely, we establish a complete characterization of orthogonal wave packet systems in L2(K) which include the corresponding results of wavelet analysis and Gabor theory as the special cases. We shall also provide a sufficient condition of the completeness of wave packet systems on local fields of positive characteristic subject to some mild conditions. The paper concludes with the necessary and sufficient conditions for the wave packet systems to be wave packet Parseval frames for L2(K) .

  13. Single-shot imaging with higher-dimensional encoding using magnetic field monitoring and concomitant field correction.

    PubMed

    Testud, Frederik; Gallichan, Daniel; Layton, Kelvin J; Barmet, Christoph; Welz, Anna M; Dewdney, Andrew; Cocosco, Chris A; Pruessmann, Klaas P; Hennig, Jürgen; Zaitsev, Maxim

    2015-03-01

    PatLoc (Parallel Imaging Technique using Localized Gradients) accelerates imaging and introduces a resolution variation across the field-of-view. Higher-dimensional encoding employs more spatial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs) than the corresponding image dimensionality requires, e.g. by applying two quadratic and two linear spatial encoding magnetic fields to reconstruct a 2D image. Images acquired with higher-dimensional single-shot trajectories can exhibit strong artifacts and geometric distortions. In this work, the source of these artifacts is analyzed and a reliable correction strategy is derived. A dynamic field camera was built for encoding field calibration. Concomitant fields of linear and nonlinear spatial encoding magnetic fields were analyzed. A combined basis consisting of spherical harmonics and concomitant terms was proposed and used for encoding field calibration and image reconstruction. A good agreement between the analytical solution for the concomitant fields and the magnetic field simulations of the custom-built PatLoc SEM coil was observed. Substantial image quality improvements were obtained using a dynamic field camera for encoding field calibration combined with the proposed combined basis. The importance of trajectory calibration for single-shot higher-dimensional encoding is demonstrated using the combined basis including spherical harmonics and concomitant terms, which treats the concomitant fields as an integral part of the encoding. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Heuristic approximations for sound fields produced by spherical waves incident on locally and non-locally reacting planar surfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai Ming; Tao, Hongdan

    2014-01-01

    The classic Weyl-van der Pol (WVDP) formula is a well-known asymptotic solution for accurately predicting sound fields above a locally reacting ground surface. However, the form of the WVDP formula is inadequate for predicting sound fields in the vicinity of non-locally reacting surfaces; a correction term is often required in the formula to provide accurate numerical solutions. Even with this correction, there is a singularity in the diffraction wave term when the source is located directly above or below the receiver. This paper explores a heuristic method to remove this singularity and suggests an analytical form comparable to the WVDP formula. This improved formula offers a physically interpretable solution and allows for accurate predictions of the total sound field above locally and non-locally reacting surfaces for all geometrical configurations.

  15. Spin polarization induced by an electric field in the presence of weak localization effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerci, Daniele; Borge, Juan; Raimondi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We evaluate the spin polarization (Edelstein or inverse spin galvanic effect) and the spin Hall current induced by an applied electric field by including the weak localization corrections for a two-dimensional electron gas. We show that the weak localization effects yield logarithmic corrections to both the spin polarization conductivity relating the spin polarization and the electric field and to the spin Hall angle relating the spin and charge currents. The renormalization of both the spin polarization conductivity and the spin Hall angle combine to produce a zero correction to the total spin Hall conductivity as required by an exact identity. Suggestions for the experimental observation of the effect are given.

  16. Reprint of : Spin polarization induced by an electric field in the presence of weak localization effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerci, Daniele; Borge, Juan; Raimondi, Roberto

    2016-08-01

    We evaluate the spin polarization (Edelstein or inverse spin galvanic effect) and the spin Hall current induced by an applied electric field by including the weak localization corrections for a two-dimensional electron gas. We show that the weak localization effects yield logarithmic corrections to both the spin polarization conductivity relating the spin polarization and the electric field and to the spin Hall angle relating the spin and charge currents. The renormalization of both the spin polarization conductivity and the spin Hall angle combine to produce a zero correction to the total spin Hall conductivity as required by an exact identity. Suggestions for the experimental observation of the effect are given.

  17. Stability of gradient field corrections for quantitative diffusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Baxter P.; Blaber, Justin; Welch, E. Brian; Ding, Zhaohua; Anderson, Adam W.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2017-03-01

    In magnetic resonance diffusion imaging, gradient nonlinearity causes significant bias in the estimation of quantitative diffusion parameters such as diffusivity, anisotropy, and diffusion direction in areas away from the magnet isocenter. This bias can be substantially reduced if the scanner- and coil-specific gradient field nonlinearities are known. Using a set of field map calibration scans on a large (29 cm diameter) phantom combined with a solid harmonic approximation of the gradient fields, we predicted the obtained b-values and applied gradient directions throughout a typical field of view for brain imaging for a typical 32-direction diffusion imaging sequence. We measured the stability of these predictions over time. At 80 mm from scanner isocenter, predicted b-value was 1-6% different than intended due to gradient nonlinearity, and predicted gradient directions were in error by up to 1 degree. Over the course of one month the change in these quantities due to calibration-related factors such as scanner drift and variation in phantom placement was <0.5% for b-values, and <0.5 degrees for angular deviation. The proposed calibration procedure allows the estimation of gradient nonlinearity to correct b-values and gradient directions ahead of advanced diffusion image processing for high angular resolution data, and requires only a five-minute phantom scan that can be included in a weekly or monthly quality assurance protocol.

  18. Stability of Gradient Field Corrections for Quantitative Diffusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Baxter P.; Blaber, Justin; Welch, E. Brian; Ding, Zhaohua; Anderson, Adam W.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-01-01

    In magnetic resonance diffusion imaging, gradient nonlinearity causes significant bias in the estimation of quantitative diffusion parameters such as diffusivity, anisotropy, and diffusion direction in areas away from the magnet isocenter. This bias can be substantially reduced if the scanner- and coil-specific gradient field nonlinearities are known. Using a set of field map calibration scans on a large (29 cm diameter) phantom combined with a solid harmonic approximation of the gradient fields, we predicted the obtained b-values and applied gradient directions throughout a typical field of view for brain imaging for a typical 32-direction diffusion imaging sequence. We measured the stability of these predictions over time. At 80 mm from scanner isocenter, predicted b-value was 1-6% different than intended due to gradient nonlinearity, and predicted gradient directions were in error by up to 1 degree. Over the course of one month the change in these quantities due to calibration-related factors such as scanner drift and variation in phantom placement was <0.5% for b-values, and <0.5 degrees for angular deviation. The proposed calibration procedure allows the estimation of gradient nonlinearity to correct b-values and gradient directions ahead of advanced diffusion image processing for high angular resolution data, and requires only a five-minute phantom scan that can be included in a weekly or monthly quality assurance protocol. PMID:28736467

  19. Breast density quantification using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with bias field correction: A postmortem study

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Huanjun; Johnson, Travis; Lin, Muqing; Le, Huy Q.; Ducote, Justin L.; Su, Min-Ying; Molloi, Sabee

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Quantification of breast density based on three-dimensional breast MRI may provide useful information for the early detection of breast cancer. However, the field inhomogeneity can severely challenge the computerized image segmentation process. In this work, the effect of the bias field in breast density quantification has been investigated with a postmortem study. Methods: T1-weighted images of 20 pairs of postmortem breasts were acquired on a 1.5 T breast MRI scanner. Two computer-assisted algorithms were used to quantify the volumetric breast density. First, standard fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering was used on raw images with the bias field present. Then, the coherent local intensity clustering (CLIC) method estimated and corrected the bias field during the iterative tissue segmentation process. Finally, FCM clustering was performed on the bias-field-corrected images produced by CLIC method. The left–right correlation for breasts in the same pair was studied for both segmentation algorithms to evaluate the precision of the tissue classification. Finally, the breast densities measured with the three methods were compared to the gold standard tissue compositions obtained from chemical analysis. The linear correlation coefficient, Pearson's r, was used to evaluate the two image segmentation algorithms and the effect of bias field. Results: The CLIC method successfully corrected the intensity inhomogeneity induced by the bias field. In left–right comparisons, the CLIC method significantly improved the slope and the correlation coefficient of the linear fitting for the glandular volume estimation. The left–right breast density correlation was also increased from 0.93 to 0.98. When compared with the percent fibroglandular volume (%FGV) from chemical analysis, results after bias field correction from both the CLIC the FCM algorithms showed improved linear correlation. As a result, the Pearson's r increased from 0.86 to 0.92 with the bias field correction

  20. Breast density quantification using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with bias field correction: A postmortem study

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Huanjun; Johnson, Travis; Lin, Muqing; Le, Huy Q.; Ducote, Justin L.; Su, Min-Ying; Molloi, Sabee

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Quantification of breast density based on three-dimensional breast MRI may provide useful information for the early detection of breast cancer. However, the field inhomogeneity can severely challenge the computerized image segmentation process. In this work, the effect of the bias field in breast density quantification has been investigated with a postmortem study. Methods: T1-weighted images of 20 pairs of postmortem breasts were acquired on a 1.5 T breast MRI scanner. Two computer-assisted algorithms were used to quantify the volumetric breast density. First, standard fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering was used on raw images with the bias field present. Then, the coherent local intensity clustering (CLIC) method estimated and corrected the bias field during the iterative tissue segmentation process. Finally, FCM clustering was performed on the bias-field-corrected images produced by CLIC method. The left–right correlation for breasts in the same pair was studied for both segmentation algorithms to evaluate the precision of the tissue classification. Finally, the breast densities measured with the three methods were compared to the gold standard tissue compositions obtained from chemical analysis. The linear correlation coefficient, Pearson'sr, was used to evaluate the two image segmentation algorithms and the effect of bias field. Results: The CLIC method successfully corrected the intensity inhomogeneity induced by the bias field. In left–right comparisons, the CLIC method significantly improved the slope and the correlation coefficient of the linear fitting for the glandular volume estimation. The left–right breast density correlation was also increased from 0.93 to 0.98. When compared with the percent fibroglandular volume (%FGV) from chemical analysis, results after bias field correction from both the CLIC the FCM algorithms showed improved linear correlation. As a result, the Pearson'sr increased from 0.86 to 0.92 with the bias field correction

  1. FALCON: a concept to extend adaptive optics corrections to cosmological fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Francois; Puech, Mathieu; Assemat, Francois F.; Gendron, Eric; Sayede, Frederic; Laporte, Philippe; Marteaud, Michel; Liotard, Arnaud; Zamkotsian, Frederic

    2004-07-01

    FALCON is an original concept for a next generation spectrograph at ESO VLT or at future ELTs. It is a spectrograph including multiple small integral field units (IFUs) which can be deployed within a large field of view such as that of VLT/GIRAFFE. In FALCON, each IFU features an adaptive optics correction using off-axis natural reference stars in order to combine, in the 0.8 - 1.8 μm wavelength range, spatial and spectral resolutions (0.1 - 0.15 arcsec and R = 1000 +/- 5000). These conditions are ideally suited for distant galaxy studies, which should be done within fields of view larger than the galaxy clustering scales (4 - 9 Mpc), i.e. foV > 100 arcmin. Instead of compensating the whole field, the adaptive correction will be performed locally on each IFU. This implies to use small miniaturized devices both for adaptive optics correction and wavefront sensing. Applications to high latitude fields imply to use atmospheric tomography because the stars required for wavefront sensing will be in most of the cases far outside the isoplanatic patch.

  2. Magnetic fields in Local Group dwarf irregulars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chyży, K. T.; Weżgowiec, M.; Beck, R.; Bomans, D. J.

    2011-05-01

    Aims: We wish to clarify whether strong magnetic fields can be effectively generated in typically low-mass dwarf galaxies and to assess the role of dwarf galaxies in the magnetization of the Universe. Methods: We performed a search for radio emission and magnetic fields in an unbiased sample of 12 Local Group (LG) irregular and dwarf irregular galaxies with the 100-m Effelsberg telescope at 2.64 GHz. Three galaxies were detected. A higher frequency (4.85 GHz) was used to search for polarized emission in five dwarfs that are the most luminous ones in the infrared domain, of which three were detected. Results: Magnetic fields in LG dwarfs are weak, with a mean value of the total field strength of <4.2 ± 1.8 μG, three times lower than in the normal spirals. The strongest field among all LG dwarfs of 10 μG (at 2.64 GHz) is observed in the starburst dwarf IC 10. The production of total magnetic fields in dwarf systems appears to be regulated mainly by the star-formation surface density (with the power-law exponent of 0.30 ± 0.04) or by the gas surface density (with the exponent 0.47 ± 0.09). In addition, we find systematically stronger fields in objects of higher global star-formation rate. The dwarf galaxies follow a similar far-infrared relationship (with a slope of 0.91 ± 0.08) to that determined for high surface brightness spiral galaxies. The magnetic field strength in dwarf galaxies does not correlate with their maximum rotational velocity, indicating that a small-scale rather than a large-scale dynamo process is responsible for producting magnetic fields in dwarfs. If magnetization of the Universe by galactic outflows is coeval with its metal enrichment, we show that more massive objects (such as Lyman break galaxies) can efficiently magnetize the intergalactic medium with a magnetic field strength of about 0.8 nG out to a distance of 160-530 kpc at redshifts 5-3, respectively. Magnetic fields that are several times weaker and shorter magnetization

  3. Symmetries and quantum corrections in heavy quark effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIrvin, Matthew James

    1997-11-01

    Finite-mass corrections to the Lagrangian of heavy quark effective field theory appear in a power series in the reciprocal of the quark mass. The running of these terms' coefficients to order 1/m2 is calculated to one loop, continuously redefining the quark field to eliminate operators vanishing according to the leading- order equation of motion. Results are found to agree with other recent calculations, and with constraints implied by reparameterization invariance. Different forms for the reparameterization transformation have appeared in the literature. A field redefinition is discussed which reveals the equivalence, at the level of the S-matrix, of a large family of reparameterization transformations. To order 1/m2 in the Lagrangian, these give differing predictions only for operators vanishing by the leading- order equation of motion. A new, very straightforward proof of the reparameterization constraints, applicable to order 1/m2 but to all orders in αs, is described. The results are compared with two previously proposed versions of reparameterization invariance.

  4. Correction of localized shape errors on optical surfaces by altering the localized density of surface or near-surface layers

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, John S.; Folta, James A.; Montcalm, Claude

    2005-01-18

    Figure errors are corrected on optical or other precision surfaces by changing the local density of material in a zone at or near the surface. Optical surface height is correlated with the localized density of the material within the same region. A change in the height of the optical surface can then be caused by a change in the localized density of the material at or near the surface.

  5. Magnetic Field Data Correction in Space for Modelling the Lithospheric Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thébault, E.; Lesur, V.; Kauristie, K.; Shore, R.

    2017-03-01

    The Earth's magnetic field as it is measured by low-Earth orbit satellites such as Swarm and CHAMP results from the superposition of internal and external source fields overlapping in time and in space. The Earth's lithospheric field is one of the weakest sources detectable from space and its accurate description requires treatments of rapidly-varying magnetic fields generated by current systems in the ionosphere and magnetosphere. In this paper, we review methods most commonly used in geomagnetism to identify and then to correct for the external perturbation fields at satellite altitudes. We document the pros and cons of Fourier Filtering, polynomial and Spherical Harmonics analyses, Singular Spectral Analysis (SSA) and Line-levelling techniques. The difficulties are illustrated with an application of the methods on a common set of real Swarm magnetic field measurements and with a discussion on the differences between lithospheric field models obtained with each treatment. We finally discuss some perspectives for improvements of external field correction techniques relying on statistical or more explicit assumptions about the geographical distribution as well as the shape and strengths of the external magnetic field structures.

  6. Characteristics of geometric distortion correction with increasing field-of-view in open-configuration MRI.

    PubMed

    Hong, Cheolpyo; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Han, Bong Soo

    2014-07-01

    Open-configuration magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems are becoming increasingly desirable for musculoskeletal imaging and image-guided radiotherapy because of their non-claustrophobic configuration. However, geometric image distortion in large fields-of-view (FOV) due to field inhomogeneity and gradient nonlinearity hinders the practical applications of open-type MRI. We demonstrated the use of geometric distortion correction for increasing FOV in open MRI. Geometric distortion was modeled and corrected as a global polynomial function. The appropriate polynomial order was identified as the minimum difference between the coordinates of control points in the distorted MR image space and those predicted by polynomial modeling. The sixth order polynomial function was found to give the optimal value for geometric distortion correction. The area of maximum distortion was<1 pixel with an FOV of 285mm. The correction performance error was increased at most 1.2% and 2.9% for FOVs of 340mm and~400mm compared with the FOV of 285mm. In particular, unresolved distortion was generated by local deformation near the gradient coil center. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Strong-field ionization via a high-order Coulomb-corrected strong-field approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaiber, Michael; Daněk, Jiří; Yakaboylu, Enderalp; Hatsagortsyan, Karen Z.; Keitel, Christoph H.

    2017-02-01

    Signatures of the Coulomb corrections in the photoelectron momentum distribution during laser-induced ionization of atoms or ions in tunneling and multiphoton regimes are investigated analytically in the case of a one-dimensional problem. A high-order Coulomb-corrected strong-field approximation is applied, where the exact continuum state in the S matrix is approximated by the eikonal Coulomb-Volkov state including the second-order corrections to the eikonal. Although without high-order corrections our theory coincides with the known analytical R -matrix (ARM) theory, we propose a simplified procedure for the matrix element derivation. Rather than matching the eikonal Coulomb-Volkov wave function with the bound state as in the ARM theory to remove the Coulomb singularity, we calculate the matrix element via the saddle-point integration method by time as well as by coordinate, and in this way avoiding the Coulomb singularity. The momentum shift in the photoelectron momentum distribution with respect to the ARM theory due to high-order corrections is analyzed for tunneling and multiphoton regimes. The relation of the quantum corrections to the tunneling delay time is discussed.

  8. VERSE-guided parallel RF excitations using dynamic field correction.

    PubMed

    Çavuşoğlu, Mustafa; Mooiweer, Ronald; Pruessmann, Klaas P; Malik, Shaihan J

    2017-02-17

    In parallel RF pulse design, peak RF magnitudes and specific absorption rate levels are critical concerns in the hardware and safety limits. The variable rate selective excitation (VERSE) method is an efficient technique to limit the peak RF power by applying a local-only RF and gradient waveform reshaping while retaining the on-resonance profile. The accuracy of the excitation performed by the VERSEd RF and gradient waveforms strictly depends on the performance of the employed hardware. Any deviation from the nominal gradient fields as a result of frequency dependent system imperfections violates the VERSE condition similarly to off-resonance effects, leading to significant excitation errors and the RF pulse not converging to the targeted peak RF power. Moreover, for iterative VERSE-guided RF pulse design (i.e. reVERSE), the k-space trajectory actually changes at every iteration, which is assumed to be constant. In this work, we show both theoretically and experimentally the effect of gradient system imperfections on iteratively VERSEd parallel RF excitations. In order to improve the excitation accuracy besides limiting the RF power below certain thresholds, we propose to integrate gradient field monitoring or gradient impulse response function (GIRF) estimations of the actual gradient fields into the RF pulse design problem. A third-order dynamic field camera comprising a set of NMR field sensors and GIRFs was used to measure or estimate the actual gradient waveforms that are involved in the VERSE algorithm respectively. The deviating and variable k-space is counteracted at each iteration of the VERSE-guided iterative RF pulse design. The proposed approaches are demonstrated for accelerated multiple-channel spatially selective RF pulses, and highly improved experimental performance was achieved at both 3 T and 7 T.

  9. Proton-detected Separated Local Field Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chin H.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2011-01-01

    PISEMO, a separated local field experiment that can be performed with either direct 15N (or 13C) detection or indirect 1H detection, is demonstrated on a single crystal of a model peptide. The 1H signals modulated by 1H-15N heteronuclear dipole-dipole couplings are observed stroboscopically in the windows of a multiple-pulse sequence used to attenuate the 1H-1H homonuclear dipole-dipole couplings. 1H-detection yields spectra with about 2.5 times the signal to noise ratio observed with 15N-detection under equivalent conditions. Resolution in both the 15N chemical shift and 1H-15N heteronuclear dipole-dipole coupling dimensions is similar to that observed with PISEMA, however, since only on-resonance pulses are utilized, the bandwidth is better. PMID:17981481

  10. On the covariant formalism of the effective field theory of gravity and leading order corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codello, Alessandro; Jain, Rajeev Kumar

    2016-11-01

    We construct the covariant effective field theory of gravity as an expansion in inverse powers of the Planck mass, identifying the leading and next-to-leading quantum corrections. We determine the form of the effective action for the cases of pure gravity with cosmological constant as well as gravity coupled to matter. By means of heat kernel methods we renormalize and compute the leading quantum corrections to quadratic order in a curvature expansion. The final effective action in our covariant formalism is generally non-local and can be readily used to understand the phenomenology on different spacetimes. In particular, we point out that on curved backgrounds the observable leading quantum gravitational effects are less suppressed than on Minkowski spacetime.

  11. Fast Concomitant Gradient Field and Field Inhomogeneity Correction for Spiral Cardiac Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Joseph Y.; Santos, Juan M.; Pauly, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Non-Cartesian imaging provides many advantages in terms of flexibility, functionality, and speed. However, a major drawback to these imaging methods is off-resonance distortion artifacts. These artifacts manifest as blurring in spiral imaging. Common techniques that remove the off-resonance field inhomogeneity distortion effects are not sufficient, because the high order concomitant gradient fields are nontrivial for common imaging conditions, such as imaging 5 cm off isocenter in an 1.5T scanner. Previous correction algorithms are either slow or do not take into account the known effects of concomitant gradient fields along with the field inhomogeneities. To ease the correction, the distortion effects are modeled as a non-stationary convolution problem. In this work, two fast and accurate post-gridding algorithms are presented and analyzed. These methods account for both the concomitant field effects and the field inhomogeneities. One algorithm operates in the frequency domain and the other in the spatial domain. To take advantage of their speed and accuracy, the algorithms are applied to a real-time cardiac study and a high-resolution cardiac study. Both of the presented algorithms provide for a practical solution to the off-resonance problem in spiral imaging. PMID:21384423

  12. Impacts of wind-field correction on the numerical simulation of storm-surge inundation during typhoon ;Rammasun;

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuxing; Gao, Ting; Han, Zhenyu; Liu, Qinzheng

    2017-09-01

    Accurate wind forcing is an important prerequisite of storm-surge and inundation simulations. However, traditional methods of wind-field improvement, such as an increase in resolution and the assimilation of observations, are difficult to provide because of either computational limitations or the lack of observations, which detracts from the ability to make quick assessments. Therefore, a method for correcting the wind field is developed for low-resolution wind fields, depending on the underlying surface. We investigate the ability of the correction method to simulate storm surge and inundation using the Finite-Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM), with the Typhoon ;Rammasun; as an example. The total elevations, astronomic tides and surges are validated against routine observations, while inundation areas and submerged depths before and after the wind-field correction are compared with the results of field surveys. Corrected wind fields in the harbor and inundated regions significantly increase the simulated water elevations, inundation areas and submerged depths, with the submerged depths being more consistent with observations. Our local wind-field correction method for different underlying surfaces is a simple and effective tool for providing more accurate wind forcing for storm-surge and inundation simulations.

  13. Inferring Cortical Variability from Local Field Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yuwei; Liu, Liu D.; McFarland, James M.; Pack, Christopher C.

    2016-01-01

    The responses of sensory neurons can be quite different to repeated presentations of the same stimulus. Here, we demonstrate a direct link between the trial-to-trial variability of cortical neuron responses and network activity that is reflected in local field potentials (LFPs). Spikes and LFPs were recorded with a multielectrode array from the middle temporal (MT) area of the visual cortex of macaques during the presentation of continuous optic flow stimuli. A maximum likelihood-based modeling framework was used to predict single-neuron spiking responses using the stimulus, the LFPs, and the activity of other recorded neurons. MT neuron responses were strongly linked to gamma oscillations (maximum at 40 Hz) as well as to lower-frequency delta oscillations (1–4 Hz), with consistent phase preferences across neurons. The predicted modulation associated with the LFP was largely complementary to that driven by visual stimulation, as well as the activity of other neurons, and accounted for nearly half of the trial-to-trial variability in the spiking responses. Moreover, the LFP model predictions accurately captured the temporal structure of noise correlations between pairs of simultaneously recorded neurons, and explained the variation in correlation magnitudes observed across the population. These results therefore identify signatures of network activity related to the variability of cortical neuron responses, and suggest their central role in sensory cortical function. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The function of sensory neurons is nearly always cast in terms of representing sensory stimuli. However, recordings from visual cortex in awake animals show that a large fraction of neural activity is not predictable from the stimulus. We show that this variability is predictable given the simultaneously recorded measures of network activity, local field potentials. A model that combines elements of these signals with the stimulus processing of the neuron can predict neural

  14. Inferring Cortical Variability from Local Field Potentials.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yuwei; Liu, Liu D; McFarland, James M; Pack, Christopher C; Butts, Daniel A

    2016-04-06

    The responses of sensory neurons can be quite different to repeated presentations of the same stimulus. Here, we demonstrate a direct link between the trial-to-trial variability of cortical neuron responses and network activity that is reflected in local field potentials (LFPs). Spikes and LFPs were recorded with a multielectrode array from the middle temporal (MT) area of the visual cortex of macaques during the presentation of continuous optic flow stimuli. A maximum likelihood-based modeling framework was used to predict single-neuron spiking responses using the stimulus, the LFPs, and the activity of other recorded neurons. MT neuron responses were strongly linked to gamma oscillations (maximum at 40 Hz) as well as to lower-frequency delta oscillations (1-4 Hz), with consistent phase preferences across neurons. The predicted modulation associated with the LFP was largely complementary to that driven by visual stimulation, as well as the activity of other neurons, and accounted for nearly half of the trial-to-trial variability in the spiking responses. Moreover, the LFP model predictions accurately captured the temporal structure of noise correlations between pairs of simultaneously recorded neurons, and explained the variation in correlation magnitudes observed across the population. These results therefore identify signatures of network activity related to the variability of cortical neuron responses, and suggest their central role in sensory cortical function. The function of sensory neurons is nearly always cast in terms of representing sensory stimuli. However, recordings from visual cortex in awake animals show that a large fraction of neural activity is not predictable from the stimulus. We show that this variability is predictable given the simultaneously recorded measures of network activity, local field potentials. A model that combines elements of these signals with the stimulus processing of the neuron can predict neural responses dramatically better

  15. Field of view extension and truncation correction for MR-based human attenuation correction in simultaneous MR/PET imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Blumhagen, Jan O. Ladebeck, Ralf; Fenchel, Matthias; Braun, Harald; Quick, Harald H.; Faul, David; Scheffler, Klaus

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: In quantitative PET imaging, it is critical to accurately measure and compensate for the attenuation of the photons absorbed in the tissue. While in PET/CT the linear attenuation coefficients can be easily determined from a low-dose CT-based transmission scan, in whole-body MR/PET the computation of the linear attenuation coefficients is based on the MR data. However, a constraint of the MR-based attenuation correction (AC) is the MR-inherent field-of-view (FoV) limitation due to static magnetic field (B{sub 0}) inhomogeneities and gradient nonlinearities. Therefore, the MR-based human AC map may be truncated or geometrically distorted toward the edges of the FoV and, consequently, the PET reconstruction with MR-based AC may be biased. This is especially of impact laterally where the patient arms rest beside the body and are not fully considered. Methods: A method is proposed to extend the MR FoV by determining an optimal readout gradient field which locally compensates B{sub 0} inhomogeneities and gradient nonlinearities. This technique was used to reduce truncation in AC maps of 12 patients, and the impact on the PET quantification was analyzed and compared to truncated data without applying the FoV extension and additionally to an established approach of PET-based FoV extension. Results: The truncation artifacts in the MR-based AC maps were successfully reduced in all patients, and the mean body volume was thereby increased by 5.4%. In some cases large patient-dependent changes in SUV of up to 30% were observed in individual lesions when compared to the standard truncated attenuation map. Conclusions: The proposed technique successfully extends the MR FoV in MR-based attenuation correction and shows an improvement of PET quantification in whole-body MR/PET hybrid imaging. In comparison to the PET-based completion of the truncated body contour, the proposed method is also applicable to specialized PET tracers with little uptake in the arms and might

  16. Field of view extension and truncation correction for MR-based human attenuation correction in simultaneous MR/PET imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Blumhagen, Jan O. Ladebeck, Ralf; Fenchel, Matthias; Braun, Harald; Quick, Harald H.; Faul, David; Scheffler, Klaus

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: In quantitative PET imaging, it is critical to accurately measure and compensate for the attenuation of the photons absorbed in the tissue. While in PET/CT the linear attenuation coefficients can be easily determined from a low-dose CT-based transmission scan, in whole-body MR/PET the computation of the linear attenuation coefficients is based on the MR data. However, a constraint of the MR-based attenuation correction (AC) is the MR-inherent field-of-view (FoV) limitation due to static magnetic field (B{sub 0}) inhomogeneities and gradient nonlinearities. Therefore, the MR-based human AC map may be truncated or geometrically distorted toward the edges of the FoV and, consequently, the PET reconstruction with MR-based AC may be biased. This is especially of impact laterally where the patient arms rest beside the body and are not fully considered. Methods: A method is proposed to extend the MR FoV by determining an optimal readout gradient field which locally compensates B{sub 0} inhomogeneities and gradient nonlinearities. This technique was used to reduce truncation in AC maps of 12 patients, and the impact on the PET quantification was analyzed and compared to truncated data without applying the FoV extension and additionally to an established approach of PET-based FoV extension. Results: The truncation artifacts in the MR-based AC maps were successfully reduced in all patients, and the mean body volume was thereby increased by 5.4%. In some cases large patient-dependent changes in SUV of up to 30% were observed in individual lesions when compared to the standard truncated attenuation map. Conclusions: The proposed technique successfully extends the MR FoV in MR-based attenuation correction and shows an improvement of PET quantification in whole-body MR/PET hybrid imaging. In comparison to the PET-based completion of the truncated body contour, the proposed method is also applicable to specialized PET tracers with little uptake in the arms and might

  17. Bleed-through correction for rendering and correlation analysis in multi-colour localization microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dahan; Curthoys, Nikki M; Parent, Matthew T; Hess, Samuel T

    2013-09-01

    Multi-colour localization microscopy has enabled sub-diffraction studies of colocalization between multiple biological species and quantification of their correlation at length scales previously inaccessible with conventional fluorescence microscopy. However, bleed-through, or misidentification of probe species, creates false colocalization and artificially increases certain types of correlation between two imaged species, affecting the reliability of information provided by colocalization and quantified correlation. Despite the potential risk of these artefacts of bleed-through, neither the effect of bleed-through on correlation nor methods of its correction in correlation analyses has been systematically studied at typical rates of bleed-through reported to affect multi-colour imaging. Here, we present a reliable method of bleed-through correction applicable to image rendering and correlation analysis of multi-colour localization microscopy. Application of our bleed-through correction shows our method accurately corrects the artificial increase in both types of correlations studied (Pearson coefficient and pair correlation), at all rates of bleed-through tested, in all types of correlations examined. In particular, anti-correlation could not be quantified without our bleed-through correction, even at rates of bleed-through as low as 2%. Demonstrated with dichroic-based multi-colour FPALM here, our presented method of bleed-through correction can be applied to all types of localization microscopy (PALM, STORM, dSTORM, GSDIM, etc.), including both simultaneous and sequential multi-colour modalities, provided the rate of bleed-through can be reliably determined.

  18. Antlia Dwarf Galaxy: distance, quantitative morphology and recent formation history via statistical field correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimbblet, Kevin A.; Couch, Warrick J.

    2012-01-01

    We apply a statistical field correction technique originally designed to determine membership of high redshift galaxy clusters to Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging of the Antlia Dwarf Galaxy; a galaxy at the very edge of the Local Group. Using the tip of the red giant branch standard candle method coupled with a simple Sobel edge detection filter we find a new distance to Antlia of 1.31 ± 0.03 Mpc. For the first time for a Local Group member, we compute the concentration, asymmetry and clumpiness quantitative morphology parameters for Antlia from the distribution of resolved stars in the HST/Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) field, corrected with a new method for contaminants and complement these parameters with the Gini coefficient (G) and the second-order moment of the brightest 20 per cent of the flux (M20). We show that it is a classic dwarf elliptical (C = 2.0, A = 0.063, S = 0.077, G = 0.39 and M20=-1.17 in the F814W band), but has an appreciable blue stellar population at its core, confirming on-going star formation. The values of asymmetry and clumpiness, as well as Gini and M20 are consistent with an undisturbed galaxy. Although our analysis suggests that Antlia may not be tidally influenced by NGC 3109, it does not necessarily preclude such interaction.

  19. Gauge threshold corrections for {N}=2 heterotic local models with flux, and mock modular forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlevaro, Luca; Israël, Dan

    2013-03-01

    We determine threshold corrections to the gauge couplings in local models of {N}=2 smooth heterotic compactifications with torsion, given by the direct product of a warped Eguchi-Hanson space and a two-torus, together with a line bundle. Using the worldsheet cft description previously found and by suitably regularising the infinite target space volume divergence, we show that threshold corrections to the various gauge factors are governed by the non-holomorphic completion of the Appell-Lerch sum. While its holomorphic Mock-modular component captures the contribution of states that localise on the blown-up two-cycle, the non-holomorphic correction originates from non-localised bulk states. We infer from this analysis universality properties for {N}=2 heterotic local models with flux, based on target space modular invariance and the presence of such non-localised states. We finally determine the explicit dependence of these one-loop gauge threshold corrections on the moduli of the two-torus, and by S-duality we extract the corresponding string-loop and E1-instanton corrections to the Kähler potential and gauge kinetic functions of the dual type i model. In both cases, the presence of non-localised bulk states brings about novel perturbative and non-perturbative corrections, some features of which can be interpreted in the light of analogous corrections to the effective theory in compact models.

  20. Impact of mask CDU and local CD variation on intra-field CDU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Junji; Mouraille, Orion; Finders, Jo; Higuchi, Masaru; Kojima, Yosuke; Sato, Shunsuke; Morimoto, Hiroaki

    2012-11-01

    The control of critical dimension uniformity (CDU), especially intra-field CDU, is an important aspect for advanced lithography, and this property must be controlled very tightly since it affects all of the exposure fields. It is well known that the influence of the mask CDU on the wafer intra-field CDU is becoming dominant because the mask error enhancement factor (MEEF) is quite high for low-k1 lithography. Additionally, the abovementioned factors impact the CDU through global (field-level) and local (grating-level) variations. In this paper, we analyze in detail CDU budgets by clarifying the impact of local CD variation. The 50-nm staggered hole features using Att-PSM showed a mask global CDU of 1.64 nm (3sigma at the mask level) and a wafer intra-field CDU of 2.30 nm, indicating that the mask global CDU was a major part of the intra-field CDU. By compensating for the contribution of the mask CD, the wafer intra-field CDU can be reduced to 0.986 nm. We analyzed the budgets of wafer intra-field CDU, which is caused by local CD variation (mask and process) and measurement noise. We determined that a primary cause of the wafer intra-field CDU after applying a mask CD correction was these local CD variations, which might disturb the proper use of dose correction for the mask CD. We demonstrated that the impact of mask local CD variation on the correction flow can be greatly reduced by averaging multiple point measurements within a small area, and therefore discuss the optimum conditions allowing for an accurate intra-field CDU determination. We also consider optimization of the CD sampling scheme in order to apply a dose correction on an exposure system to compensate for the mask CDU.

  1. Correcting GOES-R Magnetometer Data for Stray Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Delano; Freesland, Douglas; Tadikonda, Sivakumar; Kronenwetter, Jeffrey; Todirita, Monica; Dahya, Melissa; Chu, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Time-varying spacecraft magnetic fields, i.e. stray fields, are a problem for magnetometer systems. While constant fields can be removed by calibration, stray fields are difficult to distinguish from ambient field variations. Putting two magnetometers on a long boom and solving for both the ambient and stray fields can help, but this gradiometer solution is more sensitive to noise than a single magnetometer. As shown here for the R-series Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES-R), unless the stray fields are larger than the noise, simply averaging the two magnetometer readings gives a more accurate solution. If averaging is used, it may be worthwhile to estimate and remove stray fields explicitly. Models and estimation algorithms to do so are provided for solar array, arcjet and reaction wheel fields.

  2. Correcting GOES-R Magnetometer Data for Stray Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Delano R.; Freesland, Douglas C.; Tadikonda, Sivakumara K.; Kronenwetter, Jeffrey; Todirita, Monica; Dahya, Melissa; Chu, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Time-varying spacecraft magnetic fields or stray fields are a problem for magnetometer systems. While constant fields can be removed with zero offset calibration, stray fields are difficult to distinguish from ambient field variations. Putting two magnetometers on a long boom and solving for both the ambient and stray fields can be a good idea, but this gradiometer solution is even more susceptible to noise than a single magnetometer. Unless the stray fields are larger than the magnetometer noise, simply averaging the two measurements is a more accurate approach. If averaging is used, it may be worthwhile to explicitly estimate and remove stray fields. Models and estimation algorithms are provided for solar array, arcjet and reaction wheel fields.

  3. Correcting GOES-R Magnetometer Data for Stray Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Delano; Freesland, Douglas; Tadikonda, Sivakumara K.; Kronenwetter, Jeffrey; Todirita, Monica; Dahya, Melissa; Chu, Donald

    2016-05-01

    Time-varying spacecraft magnetic fields, i.e. stray fields, are a problem for magnetometer systems. While constant fields can be removed by calibration, stray fields are difficult to distinguish from ambient field variations. Putting two magnetometers on a long boom and solving for both the ambient and stray fields can help, but this gradiometer solution is more sensitive to noise than a single magnetometer. As shown here for the R-series Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES-R), unless the stray fields are larger than the noise, simply averaging the two magnetometer readings gives a more accurate solution. If averaging is used, it may be worthwhile to estimate and remove stray fields explicitly. Models and estimation algorithms to do so are provided for solar array, arcjet and reaction wheel fields.

  4. Experimental Flat-Field for Correction of XRT Contamination Spots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, D. E.; Fox, J. L.; Kankelborg, C.

    2012-08-01

    Beginning in mid-2007, the XRT images are marred by dark spots due to beads of congealed contaminant. While programs are available for improving the cosmetic appearance of the images, no method has yet been demonstrated for a quantitative correction. We have employed a flatfielding method developed for MSU's MOSES sounding rocket payload, in an attempt to restore capabilities for quantitative photometry in the affected pixels. Initial results are encouraging; characterization of the uncertainties in the photometric correction are ongoing. We report on the degree to which this flatfielding attempt has been successful.

  5. EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN, ADMINISTRATIVE GUIDE FOR SPEECH CORRECTION PROGRAMS IN LOCAL SCHOOL DISTRICTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CLOPPER, DONALD

    THIS BULLETIN LISTS GUIDELINES FOR DEVELOPING AND ADMINISTERING A SPEECH CORRECTION PROGRAM, WITH EMPHASIS ON THE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN THE FOLLOWING AGENCIES--STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION, LOCAL SCHOOL DISTRICT, SPEECH CORRECTIONIST, CLASSROOM TEACHER, AND PARENT. THE RESPONSIBILITIES AND FUNCTIONS OF THE STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ARE…

  6. Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-04-01

    Seismic images of the Brooks Range, Arctic Alaska, reveal crustal-scale duplexing: Correction Geology, v. 23, p. 65 68 (January 1995) The correct Figure 4A, for the loose insert, is given here. See Figure 4A below. Corrected inserts will be available to those requesting copies of the article from the senior author, Gary S. Fuis, U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025. Figure 4A. P-wave velocity model of Brooks Range region (thin gray contours) with migrated wide-angle reflections (heavy red lines) and migreated vertical-incidence reflections (short black lines) superimposed. Velocity contour interval is 0.25 km/s; 4,5, and 6 km/s contours are labeled. Estimated error in velocities is one contour interval. Symbols on faults shown at top are as in Figure 2 caption.

  7. Stochastic bias correction of dynamically downscaled precipitation fields for Germany through copula-based integration of gridded observation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, G.; Vogl, S.; Laux, P.; Wagner, S.; Kunstmann, H.

    2014-07-01

    Dynamically downscaled precipitation fields from regional climate model (RCM) often cannot be used directly for local climate change impact studies. Due to their inherent biases, i.e. systematic over- or underestimations compared to observations, several correction approaches have been developed. Most of the bias correction procedures such as the quantile mapping approach employ a transfer function that based on the statistical differences between RCM output and observations. Apart from such transfer function based statistical correction algorithms, a stochastic bias correction technique, based on the concept of Copula theory, is developed here and applied to correct precipitation fields from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. As Dynamically downscaled precipitation fields we used high resolution (7 km, daily) WRF simulations for Germany driven by ERA40 reanalysis data for 1971-2000. The REGNIE data set from Germany Weather Service is used as gridded observation data (1 km, daily) and rescaled to 7 km for this application. The 30 year time series are splitted into a calibration (1971-1985) and validation (1986-2000) period of equal length. Based on the estimated dependence structure between WRF and REGNIE data and the identified respective marginal distributions in calibration period, separately analyzed for the different seasons, conditional distribution functions are derived for each time step in validation period. This finally allows to get additional information about the range of the statistically possible bias corrected values. The results show that the Copula-based approach efficiently corrects most of the errors in WRF derived precipitation for all seasons. It is also found that the Copula-based correction performs better for wet bias correction than for dry bias correction. In autumn and winter, the correction introduced a small dry bias in the Northwest of Germany. The average relative bias of daily mean precipitation from WRF for the

  8. Ionization in an intense field considering Coulomb correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Huo, Yi-Ning; Tang, Zeng-Hua; Ma, Feng-Cai

    2017-01-01

    We derive a simple ionization rate formula for the ground state of a hydrogen atom in the velocity gauge under the conditions: ω \\ll 1 a.u. (a.u. is short for atomic unit) and γ \\ll 1 (ω is the laser frequency and γ is the Keldysh parameter). Comparisons are made among the different versions of the Keldysh–Faisal–Reiss (KFR) theory. The numerical study shows that with considering the quasi-classical (WKB) Coulomb correction in the final state of the ionized electron, the photoionization rate is enhanced compared with without considering the Coulomb correction, and the Reiss theory with the WKB Coulomb correction gives the correct result in the tunneling regime. Our concise formula of the ionization rate may provide an insight into the ionization mechanism for the ground state of a hydrogen atom. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11274149 and 11304185) and the Program of Shenyang Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technology, China (Grant No. F12-254-1-00).

  9. Correction techniques for the truncation of the source field in acoustic analogies.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Lera, Paula; Schram, Christophe

    2008-12-01

    The truncation of the source field may induce large overpredictions in the acoustic field computed through acoustic analogies. A comparative study of different correction approaches proposed in the literature is carried out, considering three different techniques: correction terms based on a convection assumption, use of model extensions, and windowing techniques. It is shown that convection-based correction terms need to take into account noncompactness effects of the source field in order to yield accurate results. A modified correction term that includes these effects is derived, and its equivalence to the method of model extensions in the case of purely convected flows is highlighted. Moreover, the performance of different windowing techniques is investigated.

  10. Local filtration based scatter correction for cone-beam CT using primary modulation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lei

    2016-11-01

    Excessive scatter contamination fundamentally limits the image quality of cone-beam CT (CBCT), hindering its quantitative use in clinical applications. The author has previously proposed an effective scatter correction method for CBCT using primary modulation. A Fourier transform-based algorithm (FTPM) was implemented to estimate scatter from modulated projections, with a few limitations including the assumption of uniform modulation frequency and magnitude that becomes less accurate in the presence of beam-hardening and other nonideal effects. This paper aims to overcome the above drawbacks by developing a new algorithm for the primary modulation method with improved accuracy and reliability. Incident x-ray intensities for each detector pixel with and without the interception of the modulator blocker are estimated from a modulated flat-field image. A new signal relationship is then developed to obtain a first scatter estimate from a modulated projection using a spatially varying modulation distribution. The method empirically adjusts the effective modulation magnitude for each projection ray to account for the beam-hardening effects. Estimated scatter signals with high expected errors are discarded in the generation of the final scatter distribution. The author proposes a technique of local filtration to accelerate major portions of the signal processing, and the new algorithm is referred to as local filtration based primary modulation (LFPM). The study on the Catphan® 600 phantom shows that LFPM effectively removes scatter-induced cupping artifacts on CBCT images and reduces the CT image error from 222 to 15 HU. In addition, the image contrast on eight contrast rods of the phantom is enhanced by a factor of 2 on average. On an anthropomorphic head phantom, LFPM reduces the CT image error from 153 to 18 HU and eliminates the streak artifacts observed on the result of FTPM with substantially improved image uniformity. On the Rando® phantom, LFPM reduces the CT

  11. Corrections to halo model in presence of primordial magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varalakshmi, Cheera; Nigam, Rahul

    2017-01-01

    We study the role played by the primordial magnetic field in the process of structure formation in the early universe. We have compared the halo mass abundance in the presence and absence of the magnetic field. We derive a modified Press-Schechter formula in presence of another source for matter perturbation and use it to study how this extra source affects halo count. This other source is the magnetic field with a given power spectrum. We find the ranges for the magnetic field strength over which the field enhances the halo formation for a mass range for spectral index nb = -2.95. We found that for field strength less than or equal to B = 7.0 nG, which we call the cut-off field strength, the presence of magnetic field enhances halo formation at low mass scale while it disrupts for a stronger field. We further investigate the dependence of halo count on the spectral index of the magnetic field power spectrum. We observe that at the cut-off field strength, halo formation is disrupted for a spectral index larger than -2.9. We carry out similar investigation for the more generic ellipsoidal collapse where the mass function is given by the Sheth-Tormen formula. For this case we find the cut-off field strength is 5.5 nG.

  12. Far-ultraviolet studies. VII - The spectrum and latitude dependence of the local interstellar radiation field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, R. C.; Anderson, R. C.; Fastie, W. G.

    1980-01-01

    A direct measurement has been made of the spectrum (1180-1680 A) and Gould-latitude dependence of the local interstellar radiation field, over about one-third of the sky. The result is corrected to give expected values for the entire sky. The average local 1180-1680 A energy density is 5.8 x 10 to the -17th ergs/cu cm A. The surface brightness falls off toward high latitudes much more steeply than published models predict.

  13. Far-ultraviolet studies. VII - The spectrum and latitude dependence of the local interstellar radiation field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, R. C.; Anderson, R. C.; Fastie, W. G.

    1980-01-01

    A direct measurement has been made of the spectrum (1180-1680 A) and Gould-latitude dependence of the local interstellar radiation field, over about one-third of the sky. The result is corrected to give expected values for the entire sky. The average local 1180-1680 A energy density is 5.8 x 10 to the -17th ergs/cu cm A. The surface brightness falls off toward high latitudes much more steeply than published models predict.

  14. Quantum dynamical simulations of local field enhancement in metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Negre, Christian F A; Perassi, Eduardo M; Coronado, Eduardo A; Sánchez, Cristián G

    2013-03-27

    Field enhancements (Γ) around small Ag nanoparticles (NPs) are calculated using a quantum dynamical simulation formalism and the results are compared with electrodynamic simulations using the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) in order to address the important issue of the intrinsic atomistic structure of NPs. Quite remarkably, in both quantum and classical approaches the highest values of Γ are located in the same regions around single NPs. However, by introducing a complete atomistic description of the metallic NPs in optical simulations, a different pattern of the Γ distribution is obtained. Knowing the correct pattern of the Γ distribution around NPs is crucial for understanding the spectroscopic features of molecules inside hot spots. The enhancement produced by surface plasmon coupling is studied by using both approaches in NP dimers for different inter-particle distances. The results show that the trend of the variation of Γ versus inter-particle distance is different for classical and quantum simulations. This difference is explained in terms of a charge transfer mechanism that cannot be obtained with classical electrodynamics. Finally, time dependent distribution of the enhancement factor is simulated by introducing a time dependent field perturbation into the Hamiltonian, allowing an assessment of the localized surface plasmon resonance quantum dynamics.

  15. Entropy of local smeared field observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satz, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    We re-conceptualize the usual entanglement entropy of quantum fields in a spatial region as a limiting case of a more general and well-defined quantity, the entropy of a subalgebra of smeared field observables. We introduce this notion, discuss various examples, and recover from it the area law for the entanglement entropy of a sphere in Minkowski space.

  16. Bleed-through correction for rendering and correlation analysis in multi-colour localization microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dahan; Curthoys, Nikki M.; Parent, Matthew T.; Hess, Samuel T.

    2015-01-01

    Multi-colour localization microscopy has enabled sub-diffraction studies of colocalization between multiple biological species and quantification of their correlation at length scales previously inaccessible with conventional fluorescence microscopy. However, bleed-through, or misidentification of probe species, creates false colocalization and artificially increases certain types of correlation between two imaged species, affecting the reliability of information provided by colocalization and quantified correlation. Despite the potential risk of these artefacts of bleed-through, neither the effect of bleed-through on correlation nor methods of its correction in correlation analyses has been systematically studied at typical rates of bleed-through reported to affect multi-colour imaging. Here, we present a reliable method of bleed-through correction applicable to image rendering and correlation analysis of multi-colour localization microscopy. Application of our bleed-through correction shows our method accurately corrects the artificial increase in both types of correlations studied (Pearson coefficient and pair correlation), at all rates of bleed-through tested, in all types of correlations examined. In particular, anti-correlation could not be quantified without our bleed-through correction, even at rates of bleed-through as low as 2%. Demonstrated with dichroic-based multi-colour FPALM here, our presented method of bleed-through correction can be applied to all types of localization microscopy (PALM, STORM, dSTORM, GSDIM, etc.), including both simultaneous and sequential multi-colour modalities, provided the rate of bleed-through can be reliably determined. PMID:26185614

  17. The orientation of the local interstellar magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Opher, M; Stone, E C; Gombosi, T I

    2007-05-11

    The orientation of the local interstellar magnetic field introduces asymmetries in the heliosphere that affect the location of heliospheric radio emissions and the streaming direction of ions from the termination shock of the solar wind. We combined observations of radio emissions and energetic particle streaming with extensive three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic computer simulations of magnetic field draping over the heliopause to show that the plane of the local interstellar field is approximately 60 degrees to 90 degrees from the galactic plane. This finding suggests that the field orientation in the Local Interstellar Cloud differs from that of a larger-scale interstellar magnetic field thought to parallel the galactic plane.

  18. Model to localize gauge and tensor fields on thick branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chumbes, A. E. R.; Hoff da Silva, J. M.; Hott, M. B.

    2012-04-01

    It is shown that the introduction of a suitable function in the higher-dimensional gauge field action may be used in order to achieve gauge bosons localization on a thick brane. The model is constructed upon analogies to the effective coupling of neutral scalar field to electromagnetic field and to the Friedberg-Lee model for hadrons. After that we move forward studying the localization of the Kalb-Ramond field via this procedure.

  19. Corrections.

    PubMed

    2015-07-01

    Lai Y-S, Biedermann P, Ekpo UF, et al. Spatial distribution of schistosomiasis and treatment needs in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review and geostatistical analysis. Lancet Infect Dis 2015; published online May 22. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(15)00066-3—Figure 1 of this Article should have contained a box stating ‘100 references added’ with an arrow pointing inwards, rather than a box stating ‘199 records excluded’, and an asterisk should have been added after ‘1473 records extracted into GNTD’. Additionally, the positioning of the ‘§ and ‘†’ footnotes has been corrected in table 1. These corrections have been made to the online version as of June 4, 2015.

  20. Correction.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    In the article by Guessous et al (Guessous I, Pruijm M, Ponte B, Ackermann D, Ehret G, Ansermot N, Vuistiner P, Staessen J, Gu Y, Paccaud F, Mohaupt M, Vogt B, Pechère-Bertschi A, Martin PY, Burnier M, Eap CB, Bochud M. Associations of ambulatory blood pressure with urinary caffeine and caffeine metabolite excretions. Hypertension. 2015;65:691–696. doi: 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.114.04512), which published online ahead of print December 8, 2014, and appeared in the March 2015 issue of the journal, a correction was needed.One of the author surnames was misspelled. Antoinette Pechère-Berstchi has been corrected to read Antoinette Pechère-Bertschi.The authors apologize for this error.

  1. A posteriori correction for source decay in 3D bioluminescent source localization using multiview measured data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Li; Wang, Pu; Tian, Jie; Liu, Dan; Wang, Ruifang

    2009-02-01

    As a novel optical molecular imaging technique, bioluminescence tomography (BLT) can be used to monitor the biological activities non-invasively at the cellular and molecular levels. In most of known BLT studies, however, the time variation of the bioluminescent source is neglected. It gives rise to the inconsistent views during the multiview continuous wave measurement. In other words, the real measured data from different measured views come from 'different' bioluminescent sources. It could bring large errors in bioluminescence reconstruction. In this paper, a posteriori correction strategy for adaptive FEM-based reconstruction is proposed and developed. The method helps to improve the source localization considering the bioluminescent energy variance during the multiview measurement. In the method, the correction for boundary signals by means of a posteriori correction strategy, which adopts the energy ratio of measured data in the overlapping domains between the adjacent measurements as the correcting factor, can eliminate the effect of the inconsistent views. Then the adaptive mesh refinement with a posteriori error estimation helps to improve the precision and efficiency of BLT reconstruction. In addition, a priori permissible source region selection based on the surface measured data further reduces the ill-posedness of BLT and enhances numerical stability. Finally, three-dimension numerical simulations using the heterogeneous phantom are performed. The numerically measured data is generated by Monte Carlo (MC) method which is known as the Gold standard and can avoid the inverse crime. The reconstructed result with correction shows more accuracy compared to that without correction.

  2. High magnetic field corrections to resistance thermometers at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.; Brooks, J. S.; Perenboom, J. A. A. J.; Han, S.-Y.; Qualls, J. S.

    1999-04-01

    We present a reliable method to account for the magnetoresistance of resistance sensors which are used as thermometers in many low temperature (T⩽20 K) experiments carried out in high magnetic fields (to 31 T). To apply the method, a set of isothermal magnetoresistance data, and a zero magnetic field temperature calibration are first necessary. A simple algorithm, which uses this data set, can then be applied to compute the temperature from the measured resistance at any field. The method is particularly useful for temperature dependent measurements at fixed field, or where, in cases where the temperature may change unpredictably during a change in magnetic field. We apply this method to the treatment of data in two separate experiments with the two different thermometers, RuO2 (below 1 K) and Cernox (above 1 K) sensors, respectively.

  3. An improved method for flat-field correction of flat panel x-ray detector.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Alexander L C; Seibert, J Anthony; Boone, John M

    2006-02-01

    In this Technical Note, the effects of different flat-field techniques are examined for a cesium iodide flat panel detector, which exhibited a slightly nonlinear exposure response. The results indicate that the variable flat-field correction method with the appropriate polynomial fit provides excellent correction throughout the entire exposure range. The averaged normalized variation factor, used to assess the nonuniformity of the flat-field correction, decreased from 30.76 for the fixed correction method to 4.13 for the variable flat-field correction method with a fourth-order polynomial fit for the 60 kVp spectrum, and from 16.42 to 3.97 for the 95 kVp spectrum.

  4. Local field distribution near corrugated interfaces: Green's function formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, K. W.; Wan, Jones T. K.

    2001-12-01

    We have developed a Green's function formalism to compute the local field distribution near an interface separating two media of different dielectric constants. The Maxwell's equations are converted into a surface integral equation; thus it greatly simplifies the solutions and yields accurate results for interfaces of arbitrary shape. The integral equation is solved and the local field distribution is obtained for a periodic interface.

  5. Local concurrent error detection and correction in data structures using virtual backpointers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C. C.; Chen, P. P.; Fuchs, W. K.

    1987-01-01

    A new technique, based on virtual backpointers, for local concurrent error detection and correction in linked data structures is presented. Two new data structures, the Virtual Double Linked List, and the B-tree with Virtual Backpointers, are described. For these structures, double errors can be detected in 0(1) time and errors detected during forward moves can be corrected in 0(1) time. The application of a concurrent auditor process to data structure error detection and correction is analyzed, and an implementation is described, to determine the effect on mean time to failure of a multi-user shared database system. The implementation utilizes a Sequent shared memory multiprocessor system operating on a shared databased of Virtual Double Linked Lists.

  6. Local concurrent error detection and correction in data structures using virtual backpointers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Chung-Chi Jim; Chen, Paul Peichuan; Fuchs, W. Kent

    1989-01-01

    A new technique, based on virtual backpointers, for local concurrent error detection and correction in linked data strutures is presented. Two new data structures, the Virtual Double Linked List, and the B-tree with Virtual Backpointers, are described. For these structures, double errors can be detected in 0(1) time and errors detected during forward moves can be corrected in 0(1) time. The application of a concurrent auditor process to data structure error detection and correction is analyzed, and an implementation is described, to determine the effect on mean time to failure of a multi-user shared database system. The implementation utilizes a Sequent shared memory multiprocessor system operating on a shared database of Virtual Double Linked Lists.

  7. Gradient corrections to the local-density approximation for trapped superfluid Fermi gases

    SciTech Connect

    Csordas, Andras; Almasy, Orsolya; Szepfalusy, Peter

    2010-12-15

    Two species superfluid Fermi gas is investigated on the BCS side up to the Feshbach resonance. Using the Greens's function technique gradient corrections are calculated to the generalized Thomas-Fermi theory including Cooper pairing. Their relative magnitude is found to be measured by the small parameter (d/R{sub TF}){sup 4}, where d is the oscillator length of the trap potential and R{sub TF} is the radial extension of the density n in the Thomas-Fermi approximation. In particular, at the Feshbach resonance the universal corrections to the local density approximation are calculated and a universal prefactor {kappa}{sub W}=7/27 is derived for the von Weizsaecker-type correction {kappa}{sub W}(({h_bar}/2{pi}){sup 2}/2m)({nabla}{sup 2}n{sup 1/2}/n{sup 1/2}).

  8. Local concurrent error detection and correction in data structures using virtual backpointers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Chung-Chi Jim; Chen, Paul Peichuan; Fuchs, W. Kent

    1989-01-01

    A new technique, based on virtual backpointers, for local concurrent error detection and correction in linked data strutures is presented. Two new data structures, the Virtual Double Linked List, and the B-tree with Virtual Backpointers, are described. For these structures, double errors can be detected in 0(1) time and errors detected during forward moves can be corrected in 0(1) time. The application of a concurrent auditor process to data structure error detection and correction is analyzed, and an implementation is described, to determine the effect on mean time to failure of a multi-user shared database system. The implementation utilizes a Sequent shared memory multiprocessor system operating on a shared database of Virtual Double Linked Lists.

  9. The Local Stellar Velocity Field via Vector Spherical Harmonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markarov, V. V.; Murphy, D. W.

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the local field of stellar tangential velocities for a sample of 42,339 nonbinary Hipparcos stars with accurate parallaxes, using a vector spherical harmonic formalism. We derive simple relations between the parameters of the classical linear model (Ogorodnikov-Milne) of the local systemic field and low-degree terms of the general vector harmonic decomposition. Taking advantage of these relationships, we determine the solar velocity with respect to the local stars of (V(sub X), V(sub Y), V(sub Z)) (10.5, 18.5, 7.3) +/- 0.1 km s(exp -1) not corrected for the asymmetric drift with respect to the local standard of rest. If only stars more distant than 100 pc are considered, the peculiar solar motion is (V(sub X), V(sub Y), V(sub Z)) (9.9, 15.6, 6.9) +/- 0.2 km s(exp -1). The adverse effects of harmonic leakage, which occurs between the reflex solar motion represented by the three electric vector harmonics in the velocity space and higher degree harmonics in the proper-motion space, are eliminated in our analysis by direct subtraction of the reflex solar velocity in its tangential components for each star. The Oort parameters determined by a straightforward least-squares adjustment in vector spherical harmonics are A=14.0 +/- 1.4, B=13.1 +/- 1.2, K=1.1 +/- 1.8, and C=2.9 +/- 1.4 km s(exp -1) kpc(exp -1). The physical meaning and the implications of these parameters are discussed in the framework of a general linear model of the velocity field. We find a few statistically significant higher degree harmonic terms that do not correspond to any parameters in the classical linear model. One of them, a third-degree electric harmonic, is tentatively explained as the response to a negative linear gradient of rotation velocity with distance from the Galactic plane, which we estimate at approximately -20 km s(exp -1) kpc(exp -1). A similar vertical gradient of rotation velocity has been detected for more distant stars representing the thick disk (z greater than 1 kpc

  10. The Local Stellar Velocity Field via Vector Spherical Harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, V. V.; Murphy, D. W.

    2007-07-01

    We analyze the local field of stellar tangential velocities for a sample of 42,339 nonbinary Hipparcos stars with accurate parallaxes, using a vector spherical harmonic formalism. We derive simple relations between the parameters of the classical linear model (Ogorodnikov-Milne) of the local systemic field and low-degree terms of the general vector harmonic decomposition. Taking advantage of these relationships, we determine the solar velocity with respect to the local stars of (VX,VY,VZ)=(10.5,18.5,7.3)+/-0.1 km s-1 not corrected for the asymmetric drift with respect to the local standard of rest. If only stars more distant than 100 pc are considered, the peculiar solar motion is (VX,VY,VZ)=(9.9,15.6,6.9)+/-0.2 km s-1. The adverse effects of harmonic leakage, which occurs between the reflex solar motion represented by the three electric vector harmonics in the velocity space and higher degree harmonics in the proper-motion space, are eliminated in our analysis by direct subtraction of the reflex solar velocity in its tangential components for each star. The Oort parameters determined by a straightforward least-squares adjustment in vector spherical harmonics are A=14.0+/-1.4, B=-13.1+/-1.2, K=1.1+/-1.8, and C=-2.9+/-1.4 km s-1 kpc-1. The physical meaning and the implications of these parameters are discussed in the framework of a general linear model of the velocity field. We find a few statistically significant higher degree harmonic terms that do not correspond to any parameters in the classical linear model. One of them, a third-degree electric harmonic, is tentatively explained as the response to a negative linear gradient of rotation velocity with distance from the Galactic plane, which we estimate at ~-20 km s-1 kpc-1. A similar vertical gradient of rotation velocity has been detected for more distant stars representing the thick disk (z>1 kpc), but here we surmise its existence in the thin disk at z<200 pc. The most unexpected and unexplained term within

  11. [Is local bone graft sufficient to maintain the surgical correction in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis curves?].

    PubMed

    Mardomingo, A; Sánchez-Mariscal, F; Alvarez, P; Pizones, J; Zúñica, L; Izquierdo, E

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare postoperative clinical and radiological results in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis curves treated by posterior arthrodesis using autogenous bone graft from iliac crest (CI) versus only local autograft bone (HL). A retrospective matched cohort study was conducted on 73 patients (CI n=37 and HL n=36) diagnosed with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and treated surgically by posterior arthrodesis. The mean post-operative follow-up was 126 months in the CI group vs. 66 months in the HL group. The radiographic data collected consisted of preoperative, postoperative, and final follow-up antero-posterior and lateral full-length radiographs. Loss of correction and quality of arthrodesis were evaluated by comparing the scores obtained from the Spanish version of the SRS-22 questionnaire. There were significant differences in the post-operative results as regards the correction of the Cobb angle of the main curve (HL 61 ± 15% vs. CI 51 ± 14%, P<.004), however a greater loss of correction was found in the local bone group (CI 4.5 ± 7.3° vs. HL 8.5 ± 6.3°, P=.02). There were no significant differences as regards the correction of the Cobb angle of the main curve at the end of follow-up. There were no clinical differences between the two groups in the SRS-22 scores. At 5 years of follow-up, there was a statistically significant greater loss of radiographic correction at the end of final follow-up in the local bone graft group. However clinical differences were not observed as regards the SRS-22 scores. Copyright © 2013 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Local Anyonic Quantum Fields on the Circle Leading to Cone-Local Anyons in Two Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaschke, Matthias

    2015-08-01

    Using the method of implementable one-particle Bogoliubov transformations, it is possible to explicitly define a local covariant net of quantum fields on the (universal covering of the) circle S 1 with braid group statistics. These anyon fields transform under a representation of for arbitrary real-valued spin and their commutation relations depend on the relative winding number of localization regions. By taking the tensor product with a local covariant field theory on , one can obtain a (non-boost covariant) cone-localized field net for anyons in two dimensions.

  13. Localization of Vector Field on Pure Geometrical Thick Brane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Tao-Tao; Zhao, Li

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate the localization of a five-dimensional vector field on a pure geometrical thick brane. In previous work, it was shown that a free massless vector field cannot be localized on such thick brane. Hence we introduce the interaction between the vector field and the background scalar field. Two types of couplings are constructed as examples. We get a typical volcano potential for the first type of coupling and a finite square-well-like potential for the second one. Both of the two types of couplings ensure that the vector zero mode can be localized on the pure geometrical thick brane under some conditions.

  14. Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-12-01

    Alleged mosasaur bite marks on Late Cretaceous ammonites are limpet (patellogastropod) home scars Geology, v. 26, p. 947 950 (October 1998) This article had the following printing errors: p. 947, Abstract, line 11, “sepia” should be “septa” p. 947, 1st paragraph under Introduction, line 2, “creep” should be “deep” p. 948, column 1, 2nd paragraph, line 7, “creep” should be “deep” p. 949, column 1, 1st paragraph, line 1, “creep” should be “deep” p. 949, column 1, 1st paragraph, line 5, “19774” should be “1977)” p. 949, column 1, 4th paragraph, line 7, “in particular” should be “In particular” CORRECTION Mammalian community response to the latest Paleocene thermal maximum: An isotaphonomic study in the northern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming Geology, v. 26, p. 1011 1014 (November 1998) An error appeared in the References Cited. The correct reference appears below: Fricke, H. C., Clyde, W. C., O'Neil, J. R., and Gingerich, P. D., 1998, Evidence for rapid climate change in North America during the latest Paleocene thermal maximum: Oxygen isotope compositions of biogenic phosphate from the Bighorn Basin (Wyoming): Earth and Planetary Science Letters, v. 160, p. 193 208.

  15. Localized Chromaticity Correction of Low-Beta Insertions in Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Donald, M.; Helm, R.; Moshammer, I.H.; Forest, E.; Robin, David; Zholents, A.A.; Sullivan, M.; Irwin, J.

    1993-05-01

    The correction of the chromaticity of low-beta insertions in the storage rings is usually made with sextupole lenses in the ring's arcs. When decreasing the beta functions at the insertion point (IP), this technique becomes fairly ineffective, since it fails to properly correct the higher order chromatic aberrations. Here we consider the approach where the chromatic effects of the quadrupole lenses generating low beta functions at the IP are corrected locally with two families of sextupoles, one family for each plane. Each family has two pairs of sextupoles which are located symmetrically on both sides of the IP. The sextupole-like aberrations of individual sextupoles are eliminated by utilizing optics forming a -I transformation between sextupoles in the pair. The optics also includes bending magnets which preserve equal dispersion functions at the two sextupoles in each pair. At sextupoles in one family, the vertical beta function is made large and the horizontal is made small. The situation is reversed in the sextupoles of the other family. The betatron phase advances from the IP to the sextupoles are chosen to eliminate a second order chromatic aberration. The application of the localized chromatic correction is demonstrated using as an example the lattice design for the Low Energy Ring of the SLAC/LBL/LLNL PEP-II B Factory.

  16. A Local Corrections Algorithm for Solving Poisson's Equation inThree Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    McCorquodale, Peter; Colella, Phillip; Balls, Gregory T.; Baden,Scott B.

    2006-10-30

    We present a second-order accurate algorithm for solving thefree-space Poisson's equation on a locally-refined nested grid hierarchyin three dimensions. Our approach is based on linear superposition oflocal convolutions of localized charge distributions, with the nonlocalcoupling represented on coarser grids. There presentation of the nonlocalcoupling on the local solutions is based on Anderson's Method of LocalCorrections and does not require iteration between different resolutions.A distributed-memory parallel implementation of this method is observedto have a computational cost per grid point less than three times that ofa standard FFT-based method on a uniform grid of the same resolution, andscales well up to 1024 processors.

  17. Field Error Analysis and a Correction Scheme for the KSTAR device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, K.-I.; Lee, D. K.; Jhang, Hogun; Lee, G.-S.; Kwon, K. H.

    2000-10-01

    Non-axisymmetric error fields can lead to tokamak plasma performance degradation and ultimately premature plasma disruption, if some error field components are larger than threshold values. The major sources of the field error include the unavoidable winding irregularities of the poloidal field coils during manufacturing, poloidal field and toroidal field coils misalignments during installation, stray fields from bus and lead wires between coils and power supplies, and welded joints of the vacuum vessel. Numerical simulation results are presented for Fourier harmonics of the error field obtained on the (m,n) = (2,1) resonant flux surface with a coil current set for the reference equilibrium configuration. Field error contributions are considered separately for all major error sources. An error correction scheme designed to reduce key components of the total net error field is also discussed in relation to the field error correction coils inside the vacuum vessel.

  18. Use of localized performance-based functions for the specification and correction of hybrid imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisson, Jerold B.; Mounts, Darryl I.; Fehniger, Michael J.

    1992-08-01

    Localized wavefront performance analysis (LWPA) is a system that allows the full utilization of the system optical transfer function (OTF) for the specification and acceptance of hybrid imaging systems. We show that LWPA dictates the correction of wavefront errors with the greatest impact on critical imaging spatial frequencies. This is accomplished by the generation of an imaging performance map-analogous to a map of the optic pupil error-using a local OTF. The resulting performance map a function of transfer function spatial frequency is directly relatable to the primary viewing condition of the end-user. In addition to optimizing quality for the viewer it will be seen that the system has the potential for an improved matching of the optical and electronic bandpass of the imager and for the development of more realistic acceptance specifications. 1. LOCAL WAVEFRONT PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS The LWPA system generates a local optical quality factor (LOQF) in the form of a map analogous to that used for the presentation and evaluation of wavefront errors. In conjunction with the local phase transfer function (LPTF) it can be used for maximally efficient specification and correction of imaging system pupil errors. The LOQF and LPTF are respectively equivalent to the global modulation transfer function (MTF) and phase transfer function (PTF) parts of the OTF. The LPTF is related to difference of the average of the errors in separated regions of the pupil. Figure

  19. Bulk locality and quantum error correction in AdS/CFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almheiri, Ahmed; Dong, Xi; Harlow, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    We point out a connection between the emergence of bulk locality in AdS/CFT and the theory of quantum error correction. Bulk notions such as Bogoliubov transformations, location in the radial direction, and the holographic entropy bound all have natural CFT interpretations in the language of quantum error correction. We also show that the question of whether bulk operator reconstruction works only in the causal wedge or all the way to the extremal surface is related to the question of whether or not the quantum error correcting code realized by AdS/CFT is also a "quantum secret sharing scheme", and suggest a tensor network calculation that may settle the issue. Interestingly, the version of quantum error correction which is best suited to our analysis is the somewhat nonstandard "operator algebra quantum error correction" of Beny, Kempf, and Kribs. Our proposal gives a precise formulation of the idea of "subregion-subregion" duality in AdS/CFT, and clarifies the limits of its validity.

  20. Error Field Correction in DIII-D Ohmic Plasmas With Either Handedness

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jong-Kyu; Schaffer, Micahel J.; La Haye, Robert J.; Scoville, Timothy J.; Menard, Jonathon E.

    2011-05-16

    Error field correction results in DIII-D plasmas are presented in various configurations. In both left-handed and right-handed plasma configurations, where the intrinsic error fields become different due to the opposite helical twist (handedness) of the magnetic field, the optimal error correction currents and the toroidal phases of internal(I)-coils are empirically established. Applications of the Ideal Perturbed Equilibrium Code to these results demonstrate that the field component to be minimized is not the resonant component of the external field, but the total field including ideal plasma responses. Consistency between experiment and theory has been greatly improved along with the understanding of ideal plasma responses, but non-ideal plasma responses still need to be understood to achieve the reliable predictability in tokamak error field correction.

  1. Designing localized electromagnetic fields in a source-free space.

    PubMed

    Borzdov, George N

    2002-06-01

    An approach to characterizing and designing localized electromagnetic fields, based on the use of differentiable manifolds, differentiable mappings, and the group of rotation, is presented. By way of illustration, novel families of exact time-harmonic solutions to Maxwell's equations in the source-free space--localized fields defined by the rotation group--are obtained. The proposed approach provides a broad spectrum of tools to design localized fields, i.e., to build-in symmetry properties of oscillating electric and magnetic fields, to govern the distributions of their energy densities (both size and form of localization domains), and to set the structure of time-average energy fluxes. It is shown that localized fields can be combined as constructive elements to obtain a complex field structure with desirable properties, such as one-, two-, or three-dimensional field gratings. The proposed approach can be used in designing localized electromagnetic fields to govern motion and state of charged and neutral particles. As an example, motion of relativistic electrons in one-dimensional and three-dimensional field gratings is treated.

  2. Corrections to the apparent value of the cosmological constant due to local inhomogeneities

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, Antonio Enea; Chen, Pisin E-mail: pisinchen@phys.ntu.edu.tw

    2011-10-01

    Supernovae observations strongly support the presence of a cosmological constant, but its value, which we will call apparent, is normally determined assuming that the Universe can be accurately described by a homogeneous model. Even in the presence of a cosmological constant we cannot exclude nevertheless the presence of a small local inhomogeneity which could affect the apparent value of the cosmological constant. Neglecting the presence of the inhomogeneity can in fact introduce a systematic misinterpretation of cosmological data, leading to the distinction between an apparent and true value of the cosmological constant. We establish the theoretical framework to calculate the corrections to the apparent value of the cosmological constant by modeling the local inhomogeneity with a ΛLTB solution. Our assumption to be at the center of a spherically symmetric inhomogeneous matter distribution correspond to effectively calculate the monopole contribution of the large scale inhomogeneities surrounding us, which we expect to be the dominant one, because of other observations supporting a high level of isotropy of the Universe around us. By performing a local Taylor expansion we analyze the number of independent degrees of freedom which determine the local shape of the inhomogeneity, and consider the issue of central smoothness, showing how the same correction can correspond to different inhomogeneity profiles. Contrary to previous attempts to fit data using large void models our approach is quite general. The correction to the apparent value of the cosmological constant is in fact present for local inhomogeneities of any size, and should always be taken appropriately into account both theoretically and observationally.

  3. Radiation dosimetry in magnetic fields with Farmer-type ionization chambers: determination of magnetic field correction factors for different magnetic field strengths and field orientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spindeldreier, C. K.; Schrenk, O.; Bakenecker, A.; Kawrakow, I.; Burigo, L.; Karger, C. P.; Greilich, S.; Pfaffenberger, A.

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this work was to determine magnetic field correction factors that are needed for dosimetry in hybrid devices for MR-guided radiotherapy for Farmer-type ionization chambers for different magnetic field strengths and field orientations. The response of six custom-built Farmer-type chambers irradiated at a 6 MV linac was measured in a water tank positioned in a magnet with magnetic field strengths between 0.0 T and 1.1 T. Chamber axis, beam and magnetic field were perpendicular to each other and both magnetic field directions were investigated. EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulations were compared to the measurements and simulations with different field orientations were performed. For all geometries, magnetic field correction factors, kBQ , and perturbation factors were calculated. A maximum increase of 8.8% in chamber response was measured for the magnetic field perpendicular to chamber and beam axis. The measured chamber response could be reproduced by adjusting the dead volume layer near the chamber stem in the Monte Carlo simulations. For the magnetic field parallel to the chamber axis or parallel to the beam, the simulated response increased by 1.1% at maximum for field strengths up to 1.1 T. A complex dependence of the response was found on chamber radius, magnetic field strength and orientation of beam, chamber axis and magnetic field direction. Especially for magnetic fields perpendicular to beam and chamber axis, the exact sensitive volume has to be considered in the simulations. To minimize magnetic field correction factors and the influence of dead volumes on the response of Farmer chambers, a measurement set-up with the magnetic field parallel to the chamber axis or parallel to the beam is recommended for dosimetry.

  4. Free-field correction values for Interacoustics DD 45 supra-aural audiometric earphones.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Torben

    2011-06-01

    This paper reports free-field correction values for the Interacoustics DD 45 audiometric earphone. The free-field correction values for earphones provide the loudness based equivalence to loudspeaker presentation. Correction values are especially used for the calibration of audiometric equipment for speech audiometry performed with headphones. Calibration values may be found in, e.g. the ISO 389 series of standards. The free-field correction values were determined by means of loudness balance measurements of one-third octave noises (centre frequencies 125 Hz to 8000 Hz) presented alternately from a loudspeaker in a free field and from the earphones. The procedure was essentially in accordance with the free-field frequency response procedure described in IEC 60268-7: Headphones and earphones. Four earphones and 14 test subjects. Free field correction values are reported for the acoustic coupler IEC 60318-3 (NBS 9-A) and for the ear simulator IEC 60318-1. The results are in good agreement with the results of another independent investigation. The reported free-field correction values may be used as part of the basis for future standardization of the DD 45 earphone.

  5. The orbital-specific virtual local triples correction: OSV-L(T)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütz, Martin; Yang, Jun; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic; Manby, Frederick R.; Werner, Hans-Joachim

    2013-02-01

    A local method based on orbital specific virtuals (OSVs) for calculating the perturbative triples correction in local coupled cluster calculations is presented. In contrast to the previous approach based on projected atomic orbitals (PAOs), described by Schütz [J. Chem. Phys. 113, 9986 (2000)], 10.1063/1.1323265, the new scheme works without any ad hoc truncations of the virtual space to domains. A single threshold defines the pair and triple specific virtual spaces completely and automatically. It is demonstrated that the computational cost of the method scales linearly with molecular size. Employing the recommended threshold a similar fraction of the correlation energy is recovered as with the original PAO method at a somewhat lower cost. A benchmark for 52 reactions demonstrates that for reaction energies the intrinsic accuracy of the coupled cluster with singles and doubles excitations and a perturbative treatment of triples excitations method can be reached by OSV-local coupled cluster theory with singles and doubles and perturbative triples, provided a MP2 correction is applied that accounts for basis set incompleteness errors as well as for remaining domain errors. As an application example the interaction energies of the guanine-cytosine dimers in the Watson-Crick and stacked arrangements are investigated at the level of local coupled cluster theory with singles and doubles and perturbative triples. Based on these calculations we propose new complete-basis-set-limit estimates for these interaction energies at this level of theory.

  6. Local field effect as a function of pulse duration

    SciTech Connect

    Novitsky, Denis V.

    2010-07-15

    In this brief report we give semiclassical consideration to the role of pulse duration in the observation of local field effects in the regime of optical switching. We show that the main parameter governing local field influence is the ratio of peak Rabi frequency corresponding to medium inversion and Lorentz frequency of the medium. To obtain significant local field effect, this parameter should be near unity that is valid only for long enough pulses. We also discuss the role of relaxation and pulse shape in this process.

  7. Asymptotic behavior of local dipolar fields in thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, G. J.; Stenning, G. B. G.; van der Laan, G.

    2016-10-01

    A simple method, based on layer by layer direct summation, is used to determine the local dipolar fields in uniformly magnetized thin films. The results show that the dipolar constants converge ~1/m where the number of spins in a square film is given by (2m+1)2. Dipolar field results for sc, bcc, fcc, and hexagonal lattices are presented and discussed. The results can be used to calculate local dipolar fields in films with either ferromagnetic, antiferromagnetic, spiral, exponential decay behavior, provided the magnetic order only changes normal to the film. Differences between the atomistic (local fields) and macroscopic fields (Maxwellian) are also examined. For the latter, the macro B-field inside the film is uniform and falls to zero sharply outside, in accord with Maxwell boundary conditions. In contrast, the local field for the atomistic point dipole model is highly non-linear inside and falls to zero at about three lattice spacing outside the film. Finally, it is argued that the continuum field B (used by the micromagnetic community) and the local field Bloc(r) (used by the FMR community) will lead to differing values for the overall demagnetization energy.

  8. Acoustic source localization in mixed field using spherical microphone arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qinghua; Wang, Tong

    2014-12-01

    Spherical microphone arrays have been used for source localization in three-dimensional space recently. In this paper, a two-stage algorithm is developed to localize mixed far-field and near-field acoustic sources in free-field environment. In the first stage, an array signal model is constructed in the spherical harmonics domain. The recurrent relation of spherical harmonics is independent of far-field and near-field mode strengths. Therefore, it is used to develop spherical estimating signal parameter via rotational invariance technique (ESPRIT)-like approach to estimate directions of arrival (DOAs) for both far-field and near-field sources. In the second stage, based on the estimated DOAs, simple one-dimensional MUSIC spectrum is exploited to distinguish far-field and near-field sources and estimate the ranges of near-field sources. The proposed algorithm can avoid multidimensional search and parameter pairing. Simulation results demonstrate the good performance for localizing far-field sources, or near-field ones, or mixed field sources.

  9. Imaging Local Electric Field Distribution by Plasmonic Impedance Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yixian; Shan, Xiaonan; Wang, Shaopeng; Tao, Nongjian; Blanchard, Pierre-Yves; Hu, Keke; Mirkin, Michael V

    2016-02-02

    We report on imaging of local electric field on an electrode surface with plasmonic electrochemical impedance microscopy (P-EIM). The local electric field is created by putting an electrode inside a micropipet positioned over the electrode and applying a voltage between the two electrodes. We show that the distribution of the surface charge as well as the local electric field at the electrode surface can be imaged with P-EIM. The spatial distribution and the dependence of the local charge density and electric field on the distance between the micropipet and the surface are measured, and the results are compared with the finite element calculations. The work also demonstrates the possibility of integrating plasmonic imaging with scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) and other scanning probe microscopies.

  10. Motor field sensitivity for preoperative localization of motor cortex

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Peter T.; Berger, Mitchel S.; Nagarajan, Srikantan S.

    2014-01-01

    Object In this study the role of magnetic source imaging for preoperative motor mapping was evaluated by using a single-dipole localization method to analyze motor field data in 41 patients. Methods Data from affected and unaffected hemispheres were collected in patients performing voluntary finger flexion movements. Somatosensory evoked field (SSEF) data were also obtained using tactile stimulation. Dipole localization using motor field (MF) data was successful in only 49% of patients, whereas localization with movement evoked field (MEF) data was successful in 66% of patients. When the spatial distribution of MF and MEF dipoles in relation to SSEF dipoles was analyzed, the motor dipoles were not spatially distinct from somatosensory dipoles. Conclusions The findings in this study suggest that single-dipole localization for the analysis of motor data is not sufficiently sensitive and is nonspecific, and thus not clinically useful. PMID:17044563

  11. Wavefront correction using machine learning methods for single molecule localization microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tehrani, Kayvan F.; Xu, Jianquan; Kner, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Optical Aberrations are a major challenge in imaging biological samples. In particular, in single molecule localization (SML) microscopy techniques (STORM, PALM, etc.) a high Strehl ratio point spread function (PSF) is necessary to achieve sub-diffraction resolution. Distortions in the PSF shape directly reduce the resolution of SML microscopy. The system aberrations caused by the imperfections in the optics and instruments can be compensated using Adaptive Optics (AO) techniques prior to imaging. However, aberrations caused by the biological sample, both static and dynamic, have to be dealt with in real time. A challenge for wavefront correction in SML microscopy is a robust optimization approach in the presence of noise because of the naturally high fluctuations in photon emission from single molecules. Here we demonstrate particle swarm optimization for real time correction of the wavefront using an intensity independent metric. We show that the particle swarm algorithm converges faster than the genetic algorithm for bright fluorophores.

  12. Quark mean field model with pion and gluon corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Xueyong; Hu, Jinniu; Shen, Hong

    2016-10-01

    The properties of nuclear matter and finite nuclei are studied within the quark mean field (QMF) model by taking the effects of pions and gluons into account at the quark level. The nucleon is described as the combination of three constituent quarks confined by a harmonic oscillator potential. To satisfy the spirit of QCD theory, the contributions of pions and gluons on the nucleon structure are treated in second-order perturbation theory. In a nuclear many-body system, nucleons interact with each other by exchanging mesons between quarks. With different constituent quark mass, mq, we determine three parameter sets for the coupling constants between mesons and quarks, named QMF-NK1, QMF-NK2, and QMF-NK3, by fitting the ground-state properties of several closed-shell nuclei. It is found that all of the three parameter sets can give a satisfactory description of properties of nuclear matter and finite nuclei, moreover they also predict a larger neutron star mass around 2.3 M⊙ without hyperon degrees of freedom.

  13. In-flight corrections in free-flying barn owls (Tyto alba) during sound localization tasks.

    PubMed

    Hausmann, Laura; Plachta, Dennis T T; Singheiser, Martin; Brill, Sandra; Wagner, Hermann

    2008-09-01

    Barn owls localize a stationary auditory target with high accuracy. They might also be able to hit a target that is intermittently moving while the owl is approaching. If so, there should be a critical delay before strike initiation, up to which the owl can adapt its flight path to a new stimulus position. In this study, this critical stimulus delay was determined in a three-dimensional free-flight paradigm. Barn owls localized a pulsed broadband noise while sitting on a perch in total darkness. This initial signal stopped with the owl's take-off and an in-flight stimulus (target sound), lasting 200 ms, was introduced at variable time delays (300-1200 ms) during the approximate flight time of 1300 ms. The owls responded to the in-flight signal with a corrective head and body turn. The percentage of trials in which correction turns occurred (40-80%) depended upon the individual bird, but was independent of the stimulus delay within a range of 800 ms after take-off. Correction turns strongly decreased at delays >or=800 ms. The landing precision of the owls, defined as their distance to the in-flight speaker, did not decrease with increasing stimulus delay, but decreased if the owl failed to perform a correction turn towards that speaker. Landing precision was higher for a short (50 cm) than for a large (100 cm) distance between the initial and the new target. Thus, the ability of barn owls to adapt their flight path to a new sound target depends on the in-flight stimulus delay, as well as on the distance between initial and novel targets.

  14. Dynamical localization: Hydrogen atoms in magnetic and microwave fields

    SciTech Connect

    Benvenuto, F.; Casati, G.; Shepelyansky, D.L.

    1997-03-01

    We show that dynamical localization for excited hydrogen atoms in magnetic and microwave fields takes place at quite low microwave frequency ({omega}n{sup 3}{lt}1). Estimates of the localization length are given for different parameter regimes, showing that the quantum delocalization border drops significantly as compared to the case of zero magnetic field. This opens up broad possibilities for laboratory investigations. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. Object localization using the statistical behavior of volume speckle fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abregana, Timothy Joseph T.; Almoro, Percival F.

    2016-12-01

    Speckle noise presents challenges in object localization using reconstructed wavefronts. Here, a technique for axial localization of rough test objects based on a statistical algorithm that processes volume speckle fields is demonstrated numerically and experimentally. The algorithm utilizes the standard deviation of phase difference maps as a metric to characterize the object wavefront at different axial locations. Compared with an amplitude-based localization method utilizing energy of image gradient, the technique is shown to be robust against speckle noise.

  16. A new approach for beam hardening correction based on the local spectrum distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasoulpour, Naser; Kamali-Asl, Alireza; Hemmati, Hamidreza

    2015-09-01

    Energy dependence of material absorption and polychromatic nature of x-ray beams in the Computed Tomography (CT) causes a phenomenon which called ;beam hardening;. The purpose of this study is to provide a novel approach for Beam Hardening (BH) correction. This approach is based on the linear attenuation coefficients of Local Spectrum Distributions (LSDs) in the various depths of a phantom. The proposed method includes two steps. Firstly, the hardened spectra in various depths of the phantom (or LSDs) are estimated based on the Expectation Maximization (EM) algorithm for arbitrary thickness interval of known materials in the phantom. The performance of LSD estimation technique is evaluated by applying random Gaussian noise to transmission data. Then, the linear attenuation coefficients with regarding to the mean energy of LSDs are obtained. Secondly, a correction function based on the calculated attenuation coefficients is derived in order to correct polychromatic raw data. Since a correction function has been used for the conversion of the polychromatic data to the monochromatic data, the effect of BH in proposed reconstruction must be reduced in comparison with polychromatic reconstruction. The proposed approach has been assessed in the phantoms which involve less than two materials, but the correction function has been extended for using in the constructed phantoms with more than two materials. The relative mean energy difference in the LSDs estimations based on the noise-free transmission data was less than 1.5%. Also, it shows an acceptable value when a random Gaussian noise is applied to the transmission data. The amount of cupping artifact in the proposed reconstruction method has been effectively reduced and proposed reconstruction profile is uniform more than polychromatic reconstruction profile.

  17. Noise-resistant local binary pattern with an embedded error-correction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jianfeng; Jiang, Xudong; Yuan, Junsong

    2013-10-01

    Local binary pattern (LBP) is sensitive to noise. Local ternary pattern (LTP) partially solves this problem. Both LBP and LTP, however, treat the corrupted image patterns as they are. In view of this, we propose a noise-resistant LBP (NRLBP) to preserve the image local structures in presence of noise. The small pixel difference is vulnerable to noise. Thus, we encode it as an uncertain state first, and then determine its value based on the other bits of the LBP code. It is widely accepted that most of the image local structures are represented by uniform codes and noise patterns most likely fall into the non-uniform codes. Therefore, we assign the value of an uncertain bit hence as to form possible uniform codes. Thus, we develop an error-correction mechanism to recover the distorted image patterns. In addition, we find that some image patterns such as lines are not captured in uniform codes. Those line patterns may appear less frequently than uniform codes, but they represent a set of important local primitives for pattern recognition. Thus, we propose an extended noise-resistant LBP (ENRLBP) to capture line patterns. The proposed NRLBP and ENRLBP are more resistant to noise compared with LBP, LTP, and many other variants. On various applications, the proposed NRLBP and ENRLBP demonstrate superior performance to LBP/LTP variants.

  18. Localization Correction to Anomalous Hall Effect in the Perpendicular CoFeB Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jinjun; Yang, Xiaofei; Zhu, Tao

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we reported an obvious weak localization (WL) effect in perpendicular CoFeB sandwiched by Ta and MgO layers. The WL correction to the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) arises when the sheet resistance is larger than 1.5kΩ. Furthermore, it is found that the mechanism of AHE is strongly related to the characteristic of the granularity in the MgO/CoFeB/Ta thin films. Both skew scattering and side jump mechanisms will give comparable contribution in the high disorder regime.

  19. Corrective osteotomy and local bone grafting for extra-articular malunion of the proximal phalanx.

    PubMed

    Capo, John T; Shamian, Ben; Lim, Philip K

    2012-01-01

    Corrective osteotomies are often utilised to treat finger deformities that may occur due to a phalangeal malunion. Rotational or angular malalignment, in addition to shortening of the digit may negatively affect hand function and be aesthetically displeasing. Thorough preoperative examination of the malunion and its associated deformities is crucial in determining the type of osteotomy technique to be used. Osteotomies can create bony defects that need to be filled with bone graft or some type of graft substitute. We describe an opening wedge osteotomy with local cancellous bone graft combined with dual plating to treat a dorsal angular deformity in a proximal phalangeal malunion.

  20. Using the electron localization function to correct for confinement physics in semi-local density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Feng Mattsson, Ann E.; Armiento, Rickard

    2014-05-14

    We have previously proposed that further improved functionals for density functional theory can be constructed based on the Armiento-Mattsson subsystem functional scheme if, in addition to the uniform electron gas and surface models used in the Armiento-Mattsson 2005 functional, a model for the strongly confined electron gas is also added. However, of central importance for this scheme is an index that identifies regions in space where the correction provided by the confined electron gas should be applied. The electron localization function (ELF) is a well-known indicator of strongly localized electrons. We use a model of a confined electron gas based on the harmonic oscillator to show that regions with high ELF directly coincide with regions where common exchange energy functionals have large errors. This suggests that the harmonic oscillator model together with an index based on the ELF provides the crucial ingredients for future improved semi-local functionals. For a practical illustration of how the proposed scheme is intended to work for a physical system we discuss monoclinic cupric oxide, CuO. A thorough discussion of this system leads us to promote the cell geometry of CuO as a useful benchmark for future semi-local functionals. Very high ELF values are found in a shell around the O ions, and take its maximum value along the Cu–O directions. An estimate of the exchange functional error from the effect of electron confinement in these regions suggests a magnitude and sign that could account for the error in cell geometry.

  1. Using the electron localization function to correct for confinement physics in semi-local density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Hao, Feng; Armiento, Rickard; Mattsson, Ann E

    2014-05-14

    We have previously proposed that further improved functionals for density functional theory can be constructed based on the Armiento-Mattsson subsystem functional scheme if, in addition to the uniform electron gas and surface models used in the Armiento-Mattsson 2005 functional, a model for the strongly confined electron gas is also added. However, of central importance for this scheme is an index that identifies regions in space where the correction provided by the confined electron gas should be applied. The electron localization function (ELF) is a well-known indicator of strongly localized electrons. We use a model of a confined electron gas based on the harmonic oscillator to show that regions with high ELF directly coincide with regions where common exchange energy functionals have large errors. This suggests that the harmonic oscillator model together with an index based on the ELF provides the crucial ingredients for future improved semi-local functionals. For a practical illustration of how the proposed scheme is intended to work for a physical system we discuss monoclinic cupric oxide, CuO. A thorough discussion of this system leads us to promote the cell geometry of CuO as a useful benchmark for future semi-local functionals. Very high ELF values are found in a shell around the O ions, and take its maximum value along the Cu-O directions. An estimate of the exchange functional error from the effect of electron confinement in these regions suggests a magnitude and sign that could account for the error in cell geometry.

  2. Performance Monitoring Local Field Potentials in the Medial Frontal Cortex of Primates: Supplementary Eye Field

    PubMed Central

    Emeric, Erik E.; Leslie, Melanie; Pouget, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    We describe intracranial local field potentials (LFPs) recorded in the supplementary eye field (SEF) of macaque monkeys performing a saccade countermanding task. The most prominent feature at 90% of the sites was a negative-going polarization evoked by a contralateral visual target. At roughly 50% of sites a negative-going polarization was observed preceding saccades, but in stop signal trials this polarization was not modulated in a manner sufficient to control saccade initiation. When saccades were canceled in stop signal trials, LFP modulation increased with the inferred magnitude of response conflict derived from the coactivation of gaze-shifting and gaze-holding neurons. At 30% of sites, a pronounced negative-going polarization occurred after errors. This negative polarity did not appear in unrewarded correct trials. Variations of response time with trial history were not related to any features of the LFP. The results provide new evidence that error-related and conflict-related but not feedback-related signals are conveyed by the LFP in the macaque SEF and are important for identifying the generator of the error-related negativity. PMID:20660423

  3. Copula-based assimilation of radar and gauge information to derive bias corrected precipitation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogl, S.; Laux, P.; Qiu, W.; Mao, G.; Kunstmann, H.

    2012-01-01

    This study addresses the problem of combining radar information and gauge measurements. Gauge measurements are the best available source of absolute rainfall intensity albeit their spatial availability is limited. Precipitation information obtained by radar mimics well the spatial patterns but is biased for their absolute values. In this study Copula models are used to describe the dependence structure between gauge observations and rainfall derived from radar reflectivity at the corresponding grid cells. Only the positive pairs (radar > 0, gauge > 0) are considered. As not each grid cell can be assigned to one gauge, the integration of point information, i.e. gauge rainfall intensities, is achieved by considering the structure and the strength of dependence between the radar pixels and all the gauges within the radar image. Two different approaches namely Maximum Theta and Multiple Theta are presented. They finally allow for generating precipitation fields which mimic the spatial patterns of the radar fields and correct them for biases in their absolute rainfall intensities. The performance of the approach, which can be seen as a bias-correction for radar scenes, is demonstrated for the Bavarian Alps. The bias-corrected rainfall fields are compared to a field of interpolated gauge values (Ordinary Kriging) and are validated with the available gauge measurements. The simulated precipitation fields are compared to an operationally corrected radar precipitation field (RADOLAN). This comparison of the Copula-based approach and RADOLAN by different validation measures indicates that the Copula-based method successfully corrects for errors in the radar precipitation.

  4. Copula-based assimilation of radar and gauge information to derive bias corrected precipitation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogl, S.; Laux, P.; Qiu, W.; Mao, G.; Kunstmann, H.

    2012-04-01

    This study addresses the problem of combining radar information and gauge measurements. Gauge measurements are the best available source of absolute rainfall intensity albeit their spatial availability is limited. Precipitation information obtained by radar mimics well the spatial patterns but is biased for their absolute values. In this study Copula models are used to describe the dependence structure between gauge observations and rainfall derived from radar reflectivity at the corresponding grid cells. Only the positive pairs (radar > 0, gauge > 0) are considered. As not each grid cell can be assigned to one gauge, the integration of point information, i.e. gauge rainfall intensities, is achieved by considering the structure and the strength of dependence between the radar pixels and all the gauges within the radar image. Two different approaches namely Maximum Theta and Multiple Theta are presented. They finally allow for generating precipitation fields which mimic the spatial patterns of the radar fields and correct them for biases in their absolute rainfall intensities. The performance of the approach, which can be seen as a bias-correction for radar scenes, is demonstrated for the Bavarian Alps. The bias-corrected rainfall fields are compared to a field of interpolated gauge values (Ordinary Kriging) and are validated with the available gauge measurements. The simulated precipitation fields are compared to an operationally corrected radar precipitation field (RADOLAN). This comparison of the Copula-based approach and RADOLAN by different validation measures indicates that the Copula-based method successfully corrects for errors in the radar precipitation.

  5. Self-interaction-corrected local-spin-density calculations for rare earth materials

    SciTech Connect

    Svane, A.; Temmerman, W.M.; Szotek, Z.; Laegsgaard, J.; Winter, H.

    2000-04-20

    The ab initio self-interaction-corrected (SIC) local-spin-density (LSD) approximation is discussed with emphasis on the ability to describe localized f-electron states in rare earth solids. Two methods for minimizing the SIC-LSD total energy functional are discussed, one using a unified Hamiltonian for all electron states, thus having the advantages of Bloch's theorem, the other one employing an iterative scheme in real space. Results for cerium and cerium compounds as well as other rare earths are presented. For the cerium compounds the onset of f-electron delocalization can be accurately described, including the intricate isostructural phase transitions in elemental cerium and CeP. In Pr and Sm the equilibrium lattice constant and zero temperature equation of state is greatly improved in comparison with the LSD results.

  6. Quantum corrections to the generalized Proca theory via a matter field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amado, André; Haghani, Zahra; Mohammadi, Azadeh; Shahidi, Shahab

    2017-09-01

    We study the quantum corrections to the generalized Proca theory via matter loops. We consider two types of interactions, linear and nonlinear in the vector field. Calculating the one-loop correction to the vector field propagator, three- and four-point functions, we show that the non-linear interactions are harmless, although they renormalize the theory. The linear matter-vector field interactions introduce ghost degrees of freedom to the generalized Proca theory. Treating the theory as an effective theory, we calculate the energy scale up to which the theory remains healthy.

  7. Local versus average field failure criterion in amorphous polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yuesong; Mao, Yunzhe; Sun, Lin; Koslowski, Marisol

    2015-03-01

    There is extensive work developing laws that predict yielding in amorphous polymers, ranging from the pioneer experimental work of Sternstein et al (1968 Appl. Polym. Symp. 7 175-99) to the novel molecular dynamics simulations of Jaramillo et al (2012 Phys. Rev. B 85 024114). While atomistic models render damage criteria in terms of local values of the stress and strain fields, experiments provide yield conditions in terms of the average values of these fields. Unfortunately, it is not possible to compare these results due to the differences in time and length scales. Here, we use a micromechanical phase-field damage model with parameters calculated from atomistic simulations to connect atomistic and macroscopic scale experiments. The phase-field damage model is used to study failure in composite materials. We find that the yield criterion should be described in terms of local stress and strains fields and cannot be extended directly from applied stress field values to determine yield conditions.

  8. Anisotropies in magnetic field evolution and local Lyapunov exponents

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, X.Z.; Boozer, A.H.

    2000-01-13

    The natural occurrence of small scale structures and the extreme anisotropy in the evolution of a magnetic field embedded in a conducting flow is interpreted in terms of the properties of the local Lyapunov exponents along the various local characteristic (un)stable directions for the Lagrangian flow trajectories. The local Lyapunov exponents and the characteristic directions are functions of Lagrangian coordinates and time, which are completely determined once the flow field is specified. The characteristic directions that are associated with the spatial anisotropy of the problem, are prescribed in both Lagrangian and Eulerian frames. Coordinate transformation techniques are employed to relate the spatial distributions of the magnetic field, the induced current density, and the Lorentz force, which are usually followed in Eulerian frame, to those of the local Lyapunov exponents, which are naturally defined in Lagrangian coordinates.

  9. Local Ambipolar Graphene Field Effect Transistors via Metal Side Gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jifa; Jauregui, Luis; Lopez, Gabriel; Cao, Helin; Chen, Yong

    2010-03-01

    We fabricated local graphene field effect transistors (FET) based on metal side gates. The characteristic ambipolar field effect of graphene device was observed by sweeping only the voltage of a local metal side gate. The local charge neutrality point of the side-gate graphene FET can be tuned in a large voltage range from positive to negative by a second side gate. Furthermore, we observed that the field effect due to the side gate can be appreciably weakened by electrically grounding the back gate compared to floating the back gate. The experimental results can be well explained by electrostatic simulation using COMSOL. Our technique offers a simple method for local tuning of charge density of graphene nanodevices while avoiding coating graphene surface with dielectrics, which may cause contamination and degradation of graphene.

  10. Method of correcting eddy current magnetic fields in particle accelerator vacuum chambers

    DOEpatents

    Danby, G.T.; Jackson, J.W.

    1990-03-19

    A method for correcting magnetic field aberrations produced by eddy currents induced in a particle accelerator vacuum chamber housing is provided wherein correction windings are attached to selected positions on the housing and the windings are energized by transformer action from secondary coils, which coils are inductively coupled to the poles of electro-magnets that are powered to confine the charged particle beam within a desired orbit as the charged particles are accelerated through the vacuum chamber by a particle-driving rf field. The power inductively coupled to the secondary coils varies as a function of variations in the power supplied by the particle-accelerating rf field to a beam of particles accelerated through the vacuum chamber, so the current in the energized correction coils is effective to cancel eddy current flux fields that would otherwise be induced in the vacuum chamber by power variations (dB/dt) in the particle beam.

  11. Method of correcting eddy current magnetic fields in particle accelerator vacuum chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Danby, Gordon T.; Jackson, John W.

    1991-01-01

    A method for correcting magnetic field aberrations produced by eddy currents induced in a particle accelerator vacuum chamber housing is provided wherein correction windings are attached to selected positions on the housing and the windings are energized by transformer action from secondary coils, which coils are inductively coupled to the poles of electro-magnets that are powered to confine the charged particle beam within a desired orbit as the charged particles are accelerated through the vacuum chamber by a particle-driving rf field. The power inductively coupled to the secondary coils varies as a function of variations in the power supplied by the particle-accelerating rf field to a beam of particles accelerated through the vacuum chamber, so the current in the energized correction coils is effective to cancel eddy current flux fields that would otherwise be induced in the vacuum chamber by power variations in the particle beam.

  12. Local and nonlocal parallel heat transport in general magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego B; Chacon, Luis

    2011-01-01

    A novel approach for the study of parallel transport in magnetized plasmas is presented. The method avoids numerical pollution issues of grid-based formulations and applies to integrable and chaotic magnetic fields with local or nonlocal parallel closures. In weakly chaotic fields, the method gives the fractal structure of the devil's staircase radial temperature profile. In fully chaotic fields, the temperature exhibits self-similar spatiotemporal evolution with a stretched-exponential scaling function for local closures and an algebraically decaying one for nonlocal closures. It is shown that, for both closures, the effective radial heat transport is incompatible with the quasilinear diffusion model.

  13. Fermion localization on two-field thick branes

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, L. B.

    2011-02-15

    In a recent paper published in this journal, Almeida and collaborators [Phys. Rev. D 79, 125022 (2009)] analyze the issue of fermion localization of fermions on a brane constructed from two scalar fields coupled with gravity (Bloch brane model). In that meritorious research the simplest Yukawa coupling {eta}{Psi}{phi}{chi}{Psi} was considered. That work does not analyze the zero mode in details. In this paper, the localization of fermions on two-field thick branes is reinvestigated. It is found that the simplest Yukawa coupling does not support the localization of fermions on the brane. In addition, the problem of fermion localization for some other Yukawa couplings are analyzed. It is shown that the zero mode for left-handed and right-handed fermions can be localized on the brane depending on the values for the coupling constant {eta} and the Bloch brane's parameter a.

  14. Bulk from bi-locals in Thermo field CFT

    DOE PAGES

    Jevicki, Antal; Yoon, Junggi

    2016-02-15

    For this research, we study the Large N dynamics of the O(N) field theory in the Thermo field dynamics approach. The question of recovering the high temperature phase and the corresponding O(N) gauging is clarified. Through the associated bi-local representation we discuss the emergent bulk space-time and construction of (Higher spin) fields. In addition, we note the presence of ‘evanescent’ modes in this construction and also the mixing of spins at finite temperature.

  15. Bulk from bi-locals in Thermo field CFT

    SciTech Connect

    Jevicki, Antal; Yoon, Junggi

    2016-02-15

    For this research, we study the Large N dynamics of the O(N) field theory in the Thermo field dynamics approach. The question of recovering the high temperature phase and the corresponding O(N) gauging is clarified. Through the associated bi-local representation we discuss the emergent bulk space-time and construction of (Higher spin) fields. In addition, we note the presence of ‘evanescent’ modes in this construction and also the mixing of spins at finite temperature.

  16. Localized electron heating by strong guide-field magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xuehan; Inomoto, Michiaki; Sugawara, Takumichi; Yamasaki, Kotaro; Ushiki, Tomohiko; Ono, Yasushi

    2015-10-01

    Localized electron heating of magnetic reconnection was studied under strong guide-field using two merging spherical tokamak plasmas in the University of Tokyo Spherical Tokamak experiment. Our new slide-type two-dimensional Thomson scattering system is documented for the first time the electron heating localized around the X-point. Shape of the high electron temperature area does not agree with that of energy dissipation term Et.jt . If we include a guide-field effect term Bt/(Bp+αBt) for Et.jt , the energy dissipation area becomes localized around the X-point, suggesting that the electrons are accelerated by the reconnection electric field parallel to the magnetic field and thermalized around the X-point.

  17. Quasi locality of the GGE in interacting-to-free quenches in relativistic field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastianello, Alvise; Sotiriadis, Spyros

    2017-02-01

    We study the quench dynamics in continuous relativistic quantum field theory, more specifically the locality properties of the large time stationary state. After a quantum quench in a one-dimensional integrable model, the expectation values of local observables are expected to relax to a generalized Gibbs ensemble (GGE), constructed out of the conserved charges of the model. Quenching to a free bosonic theory, it has been shown that the system indeed relaxes to a GGE described by the momentum mode occupation numbers. We first address the question whether the latter can be written directly in terms of local charges and we find that, in contrast to the lattice case, this is not possible in continuous field theories. We then investigate the less stringent requirement of the existence of a sequence of truncated local GGEs that converges to the correct steady state, in the sense of the expectation values of the local observables. While we show that such a sequence indeed exists, in order to unequivocally determine the so-defined GGE, we find that information about the expectation value of the recently discovered quasi-local charges is in the end necessary, the latter being the suitable generalization of the local charges while passing from the lattice to the continuum. Lastly, we study the locality properties of the GGE and show that the latter is completely determined by the knowledge of the expectation value of a countable set of suitably defined quasi-local charges.

  18. Deformable registration of CT and cone-beam CT by local CBCT intensity correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seyoun; Plishker, William; Shekhar, Raj; Quon, Harry; Wong, John; Lee, Junghoon

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to accurately register CT to cone-beam CT (CBCT) by iteratively correcting local CBCT intensity. CBCT is a widely used intra-operative imaging modality in image-guided radiotherapy and surgery. A short scan followed by a filtered-backprojection is typically used for CBCT reconstruction. While data on the mid-plane (plane of source-detector rotation) is complete, off-mid-planes undergo different information deficiency and the computed reconstructions are approximate. This causes different reconstruction artifacts at off-mid-planes depending on slice locations, and therefore impedes accurate registration between CT and CBCT. To address this issue, we correct CBCT intensities by matching local intensity histograms slice by slice in conjunction with intensity-based deformable registration. This correction-registration step is repeated until the result image converges. We tested the proposed method on eight head-and-neck cancer cases and compared its performance with state-of-the-art registration methods, Bspline, demons, and optical flow, which are widely used for CT-CBCT registration. Normalized mutual-information (NMI), normalized cross-correlation (NCC), and structural similarity (SSIM) were computed as similarity measures for the performance evaluation. Our method produced overall NMI of 0.59, NCC of 0.96, and SSIM of 0.93, outperforming existing methods by 3.6%, 2.4%, and 2.8% in terms of NMI, NCC, and SSIM scores, respectively. Experimental results show that our method is more consistent and roust than existing algorithms, and also computationally efficient with faster convergence.

  19. Thermal corrections to Rényi entropies for conformal field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, Christopher P.; Nian, Jun

    2015-06-01

    We compute thermal corrections to Rényi entropies of d dimensional conformal field theories on spheres. Consider the nth Rényi entropy for a cap of opening angle 2 θ on S d-1. From a Boltzmann sum decomposition and the operator-state correspondence, the leading correction is related to a certain two-point correlation function of the operator (not equal to the identity) with smallest scaling dimension. More specifically, via a conformal map, the correction can be expressed in terms of the two-point function on a certain conical space with opening angle 2 πn. In the case of free conformal field theories, this two-point function can be computed explicitly using the method of images. We perform the computation for the conformally coupled scalar. From the n → 1 limit of our results, we extract the leading thermal correction to the entanglement entropy, reproducing results of arXiv:1407.1358.

  20. Vortex configuration in the presence of local magnetic field and locally applied stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wissberg, Shai; Kremen, Anna; Shperber, Yishai; Kalisky, Beena

    2017-02-01

    Vortex configuration is determined by the repulsive interaction, which becomes dominant with increasing vortex density, by the pinning potential, and by other considerations such as the local magnetic fields, currents flowing in the sample, or as we showed recently, by local stress applied on the sample. In this work we describe different ways to control vortex configuration using scanning SQUID microscopy.

  1. The Influence of Radiosonde 'Age' on TRMM Field Campaign Soundings Humidity Correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, Biswadev; Halverson, Jeffrey B.; Wang, Jun-Hong

    2002-01-01

    Hundreds of Vaisala sondes with a RS80-H Humicap thin-film capacitor humidity sensor were launched during the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) field campaigns in Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere held in Brazil (LBA) and in Kwajalein experiment (KWAJEX) held in the Republic of Marshall Islands. Using Six humidity error correction algorithms by Wang et al., these sondes were corrected for significant dry bias in the RS80-H data. It is further shown that sonde surface temperature error must be corrected for a better representation of the relative humidity. This error becomes prominent due to sensor arm-heating in the first 50-s data.

  2. Direct Visualization of Local Electromagnetic Field Structures by Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Naoya; Findlay, Scott D; Matsumoto, Takao; Kohno, Yuji; Seki, Takehito; Sánchez-Santolino, Gabriel; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2017-07-18

    The functional properties of materials and devices are critically determined by the electromagnetic field structures formed inside them, especially at nanointerface and surface regions, because such structures are strongly associated with the dynamics of electrons, holes and ions. To understand the fundamental origin of many exotic properties in modern materials and devices, it is essential to directly characterize local electromagnetic field structures at such defect regions, even down to atomic dimensions. In recent years, rapid progress in the development of high-speed area detectors for aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with sub-angstrom spatial resolution has opened new possibilities to directly image such electromagnetic field structures at very high-resolution. In this Account, we give an overview of our recent development of differential phase contrast (DPC) microscopy for aberration-corrected STEM and its application to many materials problems. In recent years, we have developed segmented-type STEM detectors which divide the detector plane into 16 segments and enable simultaneous imaging of 16 STEM images which are sensitive to the positions and angles of transmitted/scattered electrons on the detector plane. These detectors also have atomic-resolution imaging capability. Using these segmented-type STEM detectors, we show DPC STEM imaging to be a very powerful tool for directly imaging local electromagnetic field structures in materials and devices in real space. For example, DPC STEM can clearly visualize the local electric field variation due to the abrupt potential change across a p-n junction in a GaAs semiconductor, which cannot be observed by normal in-focus bright-field or annular type dark-field STEM imaging modes. DPC STEM is also very effective for imaging magnetic field structures in magnetic materials, such as magnetic domains and skyrmions. Moreover, real-time imaging of electromagnetic field structures can

  3. A voxelation-corrected non-stationary 3D cluster-size test based on random field theory.

    PubMed

    Li, Huanjie; Nickerson, Lisa D; Zhao, Xuna; Nichols, Thomas E; Gao, Jia-Hong

    2015-09-01

    Cluster-size tests (CSTs) based on random field theory (RFT) are commonly adopted to identify significant differences in brain images. However, the use of RFT in CSTs rests on the assumption of uniform smoothness (stationarity). When images are non-stationary, CSTs based on RFT will likely lead to increased false positives in smooth regions and reduced power in rough regions. An adjustment to the cluster size according to the local smoothness at each voxel has been proposed for the standard test based on RFT to address non-stationarity, however, this technique requires images with a large degree of spatial smoothing, large degrees of freedom and high intensity thresholding. Recently, we proposed a voxelation-corrected 3D CST based on Gaussian random field theory that does not place constraints on the degree of spatial smoothness. However, this approach is only applicable to stationary images, requiring further modification to enable use for non-stationary images. In this study, we present modifications of this method to develop a voxelation-corrected non-stationary 3D CST based on RFT. Both simulated and real data were used to compare the voxelation-corrected non-stationary CST to the standard cluster-size adjusted non-stationary CST based on RFT and the voxelation-corrected stationary CST. We found that voxelation-corrected stationary CST is liberal for non-stationary images and the voxelation-corrected non-stationary CST performs better than cluster-size adjusted non-stationary CST based on RFT under low smoothness, low intensity threshold and low degrees of freedom. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Electrostatic focal spot correction for x-ray tubes operating in strong magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Lillaney, Prasheel; Shin, Mihye; Hinshaw, Waldo; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2014-11-01

    A close proximity hybrid x-ray/magnetic resonance (XMR) imaging system offers several critical advantages over current XMR system installations that have large separation distances (∼5 m) between the imaging fields of view. The two imaging systems can be placed in close proximity to each other if an x-ray tube can be designed to be immune to the magnetic fringe fields outside of the MR bore. One of the major obstacles to robust x-ray tube design is correcting for the effects of the MR fringe field on the x-ray tube focal spot. Any fringe field component orthogonal to the x-ray tube electric field leads to electron drift altering the path of the electron trajectories. The method proposed in this study to correct for the electron drift utilizes an external electric field in the direction of the drift. The electric field is created using two electrodes that are positioned adjacent to the cathode. These electrodes are biased with positive and negative potential differences relative to the cathode. The design of the focusing cup assembly is constrained primarily by the strength of the MR fringe field and high voltage standoff distances between the anode, cathode, and the bias electrodes. From these constraints, a focusing cup design suitable for the close proximity XMR system geometry is derived, and a finite element model of this focusing cup geometry is simulated to demonstrate efficacy. A Monte Carlo simulation is performed to determine any effects of the modified focusing cup design on the output x-ray energy spectrum. An orthogonal fringe field magnitude of 65 mT can be compensated for using bias voltages of +15 and -20 kV. These bias voltages are not sufficient to completely correct for larger orthogonal field magnitudes. Using active shielding coils in combination with the bias electrodes provides complete correction at an orthogonal field magnitude of 88.1 mT. Introducing small fields (<10 mT) parallel to the x-ray tube electric field in addition to the

  5. Electrostatic focal spot correction for x-ray tubes operating in strong magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Lillaney, Prasheel; Shin, Mihye; Hinshaw, Waldo; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: A close proximity hybrid x-ray/magnetic resonance (XMR) imaging system offers several critical advantages over current XMR system installations that have large separation distances (∼5 m) between the imaging fields of view. The two imaging systems can be placed in close proximity to each other if an x-ray tube can be designed to be immune to the magnetic fringe fields outside of the MR bore. One of the major obstacles to robust x-ray tube design is correcting for the effects of the MR fringe field on the x-ray tube focal spot. Any fringe field component orthogonal to the x-ray tube electric field leads to electron drift altering the path of the electron trajectories. Methods: The method proposed in this study to correct for the electron drift utilizes an external electric field in the direction of the drift. The electric field is created using two electrodes that are positioned adjacent to the cathode. These electrodes are biased with positive and negative potential differences relative to the cathode. The design of the focusing cup assembly is constrained primarily by the strength of the MR fringe field and high voltage standoff distances between the anode, cathode, and the bias electrodes. From these constraints, a focusing cup design suitable for the close proximity XMR system geometry is derived, and a finite element model of this focusing cup geometry is simulated to demonstrate efficacy. A Monte Carlo simulation is performed to determine any effects of the modified focusing cup design on the output x-ray energy spectrum. Results: An orthogonal fringe field magnitude of 65 mT can be compensated for using bias voltages of +15 and −20 kV. These bias voltages are not sufficient to completely correct for larger orthogonal field magnitudes. Using active shielding coils in combination with the bias electrodes provides complete correction at an orthogonal field magnitude of 88.1 mT. Introducing small fields (<10 mT) parallel to the x-ray tube electric

  6. Local ionospheric corrections derived from GNSS - A case study with TerraSAR-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gisinger, Christoph; Balss, Ulrich; Cong, Xiao Ying; Steigenberger, Peter; Eineder, Michael; Pail, Roland; Hugentobler, Urs

    2013-04-01

    Germany's synthetic aperture radar (SAR) satellites TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X belong to the latest generation of radar satellites which have moved radar remote sensing to a new level. Besides being an all weather and all day imaging system, radar remote sensing offers various advanced methods like SAR interferometry or persistent scatterer interferometry that exploit magnitude and phase information of the radar signal. In order to achieve centimeter to millimeter accuracy with these advanced methods, all occurring error contributions (internal signal delay, orbit, troposphere, ionosphere, solid earth tides, loading effects, ...) have to be taken into account by applying appropriate corrections. Within the project DLR@Uni funded by the German Helmholtz Association HGF, an experimental framework at Wettzell station has been set up to perform a detailed analysis of all the corrections required for high resolution radar satellites and to achieve the goal of a 1cm precision level for absolute radar coordinates. This framework involves a 1.5 meter corner reflector (CR), a 1.5 year series of data takes from TerraSAR-X, and it makes use of the multi-sensor environment of Wettzell station. Besides Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) for orbit assessment and the local geodetic network to control the CR reference coordinates, the Wettzell GNSS receivers are used for generating tropospheric and ionospheric corrections. By comparing the reference radar times (range and azimuth) available from geodetic survey with those from the TerraSAR-X data takes, the quality of the corrections can be investigated. Although often being considered negligible for X-band observations, the conducted experiment has clearly shown the necessity for ionospheric corrections, if the capabilities of current SAR satellites are to be fully exploited. For every TerraSAR-X data take, the ionospheric impact was derived from the geometry-free linear combination of the GNSS measurements and modeled in terms of

  7. HDR Pathological Image Enhancement Based on Improved Bias Field Correction and Guided Image Filter

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ganzheng; Li, Siqi; Gong, Shang; Yang, Benqiang; Zhang, Libo

    2016-01-01

    Pathological image enhancement is a significant topic in the field of pathological image processing. This paper proposes a high dynamic range (HDR) pathological image enhancement method based on improved bias field correction and guided image filter (GIF). Firstly, a preprocessing including stain normalization and wavelet denoising is performed for Haematoxylin and Eosin (H and E) stained pathological image. Then, an improved bias field correction model is developed to enhance the influence of light for high-frequency part in image and correct the intensity inhomogeneity and detail discontinuity of image. Next, HDR pathological image is generated based on least square method using low dynamic range (LDR) image, H and E channel images. Finally, the fine enhanced image is acquired after the detail enhancement process. Experiments with 140 pathological images demonstrate the performance advantages of our proposed method as compared with related work. PMID:28116303

  8. HDR Pathological Image Enhancement Based on Improved Bias Field Correction and Guided Image Filter.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qingjiao; Jiang, Huiyan; Zhu, Ganzheng; Li, Siqi; Gong, Shang; Yang, Benqiang; Zhang, Libo

    2016-01-01

    Pathological image enhancement is a significant topic in the field of pathological image processing. This paper proposes a high dynamic range (HDR) pathological image enhancement method based on improved bias field correction and guided image filter (GIF). Firstly, a preprocessing including stain normalization and wavelet denoising is performed for Haematoxylin and Eosin (H and E) stained pathological image. Then, an improved bias field correction model is developed to enhance the influence of light for high-frequency part in image and correct the intensity inhomogeneity and detail discontinuity of image. Next, HDR pathological image is generated based on least square method using low dynamic range (LDR) image, H and E channel images. Finally, the fine enhanced image is acquired after the detail enhancement process. Experiments with 140 pathological images demonstrate the performance advantages of our proposed method as compared with related work.

  9. Nonlinear Correction to Absorption Spectrum under Irradiation of Microwave Field in Conventional BCS Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jujo, Takanobu

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the absorption spectrum of s-wave superconductors under microwave pump field irradiation. The third-order response function is calculated in the dirty limit with the electron-phonon interaction included at finite temperatures. We find that the nonlinear correction to the linear absorption shows peculiar behavior when the pump field frequency is smaller than the superconducting gap. At finite temperatures, a negative nonlinear correction exists, which is caused by thermally excited quasiparticles. The vertex correction by impurity scattering is found to contain a dissipation mechanism by inelastic scattering (interaction between electrons and acoustic phonons) or nonlocality. We need this mechanism to obtain finite absorption in a nonequilibrium stationary state under a monochromatic external field. Although this term originates from the deformation of a one-particle state, there is also a final-state interaction (the amplitude mode). The latter term represents two-photon excitation and is almost independent of temperature.

  10. Localized Dictionaries Based Orientation Field Estimation for Latent Fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Xiao Yang; Jianjiang Feng; Jie Zhou

    2014-05-01

    Dictionary based orientation field estimation approach has shown promising performance for latent fingerprints. In this paper, we seek to exploit stronger prior knowledge of fingerprints in order to further improve the performance. Realizing that ridge orientations at different locations of fingerprints have different characteristics, we propose a localized dictionaries-based orientation field estimation algorithm, in which noisy orientation patch at a location output by a local estimation approach is replaced by real orientation patch in the local dictionary at the same location. The precondition of applying localized dictionaries is that the pose of the latent fingerprint needs to be estimated. We propose a Hough transform-based fingerprint pose estimation algorithm, in which the predictions about fingerprint pose made by all orientation patches in the latent fingerprint are accumulated. Experimental results on challenging latent fingerprint datasets show the proposed method outperforms previous ones markedly.

  11. Towards reference dosimetry for the MR-linac: magnetic field correction of the ionization chamber reading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smit, K.; van Asselen, B.; Kok, J. G. M.; Aalbers, A. H. L.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.

    2013-09-01

    In the UMC Utrecht a prototype MR-linac has been installed. The system consists of a 6 MV Elekta (Crawley, UK) linear accelerator and a 1.5 T Philips (Best, The Netherlands) Achieva MRI system. This paper investigates the feasibility to correct the ionization chamber reading for the magnetic field within the dosimetry calibration method described by Almond et al (1999 Med. Phys. 26 1847-70). Firstly, the feasibility of using an ionization chamber in an MR-linac was assessed by investigating possible influences of the magnetic field on NE2571 Farmer-type ionization chamber characteristics: linearity, repeatability, orientation in the magnetic field; and AAPM TG51 correction factor for voltage polarity and ion recombination. We found that these AAPM correction factors for the NE2571 chamber were not influenced by the magnetic field. Secondly, the influence of the permanent 1.5 T magnetic field on the NE2571 chamber reading was quantified. The reading is influenced by the magnetic field; therefore, a correction factor has been added. For the standardized setup used in this paper, the NE2571 chamber reading increases by 4.9% (± 0.2%) due to the transverse 1.5 T magnetic field. Dosimetry measurements in an MR-linac are feasible, if a setup-specific magnetic field correction factor (P1.5 T) for the charge reading is introduced. For the setup investigated in this paper, the P1.5 T has a value of 0.953.

  12. Towards reference dosimetry for the MR-linac: magnetic field correction of the ionization chamber reading.

    PubMed

    Smit, K; van Asselen, B; Kok, J G M; Aalbers, A H L; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W

    2013-09-07

    In the UMC Utrecht a prototype MR-linac has been installed. The system consists of a 6 MV Elekta (Crawley, UK) linear accelerator and a 1.5 T Philips (Best, The Netherlands) Achieva MRI system. This paper investigates the feasibility to correct the ionization chamber reading for the magnetic field within the dosimetry calibration method described by Almond et al (1999 Med. Phys. 26 1847-70). Firstly, the feasibility of using an ionization chamber in an MR-linac was assessed by investigating possible influences of the magnetic field on NE2571 Farmer-type ionization chamber characteristics: linearity, repeatability, orientation in the magnetic field; and AAPM TG51 correction factor for voltage polarity and ion recombination. We found that these AAPM correction factors for the NE2571 chamber were not influenced by the magnetic field. Secondly, the influence of the permanent 1.5 T magnetic field on the NE2571 chamber reading was quantified. The reading is influenced by the magnetic field; therefore, a correction factor has been added. For the standardized setup used in this paper, the NE2571 chamber reading increases by 4.9% (± 0.2%) due to the transverse 1.5 T magnetic field. Dosimetry measurements in an MR-linac are feasible, if a setup-specific magnetic field correction factor (P1.5 T) for the charge reading is introduced. For the setup investigated in this paper, the P1.5 T has a value of 0.953.

  13. Pedestrian simulations in hexagonal cell local field model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Biao; Wang, Jianyuan; Xiong, Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Pedestrian dynamics have caused wide concern over the recent years. This paper presents a local field (LF) model based on regular hexagonal cells to simulate pedestrian dynamics in scenarios such as corridors and bottlenecks. In this model, the simulation scenarios are discretized into regular hexagonal cells. The local field is a small region around pedestrian. Each pedestrian will choose his/her target cell according to the situation in his/her local field. Different walking strategies are considered in the simulation in corridor scenario and the fundamental graphs are used to verify this model. Different shapes of exit are also discussed in the bottleneck scenario. The statistics of push effect show that the smooth bottleneck exit may be more safe.

  14. Corrections to the energy levels of a spin-zero particle bound in a strong field

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R. N.; Milstein, A. I.; Karshenboim, S. G.

    2006-01-15

    Formulas for the corrections to the energy levels and wave functions of a spin-zero particle bound in a strong field are derived. The general case of the sum of a Lorentz-scalar potential and zero component of a Lorentz-vector potential is considered. The forms of the corrections differ essentially from those for spin-(1/2) particles. As an example of application of our results, we evaluated the electric polarizability of a ground state of a spin-zero particle bound in a strong Coulomb field.

  15. Thermal corrections to the Casimir energy in a general weak gravitational field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazari, Borzoo

    2016-12-01

    We calculate finite temperature corrections to the energy of the Casimir effect of a two conducting parallel plates in a general weak gravitational field. After solving the Klein-Gordon equation inside the apparatus, mode frequencies inside the apparatus are obtained in terms of the parameters of the weak background. Using Matsubara’s approach to quantum statistical mechanics gravity-induced thermal corrections of the energy density are obtained. Well-known weak static and stationary gravitational fields are analyzed and it is found that in the low temperature limit the energy of the system increases compared to that in the zero temperature case.

  16. Locally oriented potential field for controlling multi-robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Roseli A. F.; Prestes, Edson; Idiart, Marco A. P.; Faria, Gedson

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we present an extension of the boundary value problem path planner (BVP PP) to control multiple robots in a robot soccer scenario. This extension is called Locally Oriented Potential Field (LOPF) and computes a potential field from the numerical solution of a BVP using local relaxations in different patches of the solution space. This permits that a single solution of the BVP endows distinct robots with different behaviors in a team. We present the steps to implement LOPF as well as several results obtained in simulation.

  17. THE PLANCHEREL FORMULA FOR SL(2) OVER A LOCAL FIELD*

    PubMed Central

    Sally, P. J.; Shalika, J. A.

    1969-01-01

    More than two decades ago, in his classical paper on the irreducible unitary representations of the Lorentz group, V. Bargmann initiated the concrete study of Fourier analysis on real Lie groups and obtained the analogue of the classical Fourier expansion theorem in the case of the Lorentz group. Since then the general theory for real semisimple Lie groups has been extensively developed, chiefly through the work of Harish-Chandra. More generally, one may consider groups defined by algebraic equations over locally compact fields, in particular local fields, and ask for an explicit Fourier expansion formula. In the present article the authors obtain this formula for the group SL(2). PMID:16591775

  18. Localized Electron Heating by Strong Guide-Field Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xuehan; Sugawara, Takumichi; Inomoto, Michiaki; Yamasaki, Kotaro; Ono, Yasushi; UTST Team

    2015-11-01

    Localized electron heating of magnetic reconnection was studied under strong guide-field (typically Bt 15Bp) using two merging spherical tokamak plasmas in Univ. Tokyo Spherical Tokamak (UTST) experiment. Our new slide-type two-dimensional Thomson scattering system documented for the first time the electron heating localized around the X-point. The region of high electron temperature, which is perpendicular to the magnetic field, was found to have a round shape with radius of 2 [cm]. Also, it was localized around the X-point and does not agree with that of energy dissipation term Et .jt . When we include a guide-field effect term Bt / (Bp + αBt) for Et .jt where α =√{ (vin2 +vout2) /v∥2 } , the energy dissipation area becomes localized around the X-point, suggesting that the electrons are accelerated by the reconnection electric field parallel to the magnetic field and thermalized around the X-point. This work was supported by JSPS A3 Foresight Program ``Innovative Tokamak Plasma Startup and Current Drive in Spherical Torus,'' a Grant-in-Aid from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Fellows 15J03758.

  19. Correction of environmental magnetic fields for the acquisition of Nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion profiles below Earth's field.

    PubMed

    Zampetoulas, Vasileios; Lurie, David J; Broche, Lionel M

    2017-09-01

    T1 relaxation times can be measured at a range of magnetic field strengths by Fast Field-Cycling (FFC) NMR relaxometry to provide T1-dispersion curves. These are valuable tools for the investigation of material properties as they provide information about molecular dynamics non-invasively. However, accessing information at fields below 230 μT (10kHz proton Larmor frequency) requires careful correction of unwanted environmental magnetic fields. In this work a novel method is proposed that compensates for the environmental fields on a FFC-NMR relaxometer and extends the acquisition of Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion profiles to 2.3μT (extremely low field region), with direct application in the study of slow molecular motions. Our method is an improvement of an existing technique, reported by Anoardo and Ferrante in 2003, which exploits the non-adiabatic behaviour of the magnetisation in rapidly-varying magnetic fields and makes use of the oscillation of the signal amplitude to estimate the field strength. This increases the accuracy in measuring the environmental fields and allows predicting the optimal correction values by applying simple equations to fit the data acquired. Validation of the method is performed by comparisons with well-known dispersion curves obtained from polymers and benzene. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Correction of environmental magnetic fields for the acquisition of Nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion profiles below Earth's field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zampetoulas, Vasileios; Lurie, David J.; Broche, Lionel M.

    2017-09-01

    T1 relaxation times can be measured at a range of magnetic field strengths by Fast Field-Cycling (FFC) NMR relaxometry to provide T1-dispersion curves. These are valuable tools for the investigation of material properties as they provide information about molecular dynamics non-invasively. However, accessing information at fields below 230 μT (10 kHz proton Larmor frequency) requires careful correction of unwanted environmental magnetic fields. In this work a novel method is proposed that compensates for the environmental fields on a FFC-NMR relaxometer and extends the acquisition of Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion profiles to 2.3 μT (extremely low field region), with direct application in the study of slow molecular motions. Our method is an improvement of an existing technique, reported by Anoardo and Ferrante in 2003, which exploits the non-adiabatic behaviour of the magnetisation in rapidly-varying magnetic fields and makes use of the oscillation of the signal amplitude to estimate the field strength. This increases the accuracy in measuring the environmental fields and allows predicting the optimal correction values by applying simple equations to fit the data acquired. Validation of the method is performed by comparisons with well-known dispersion curves obtained from polymers and benzene.

  1. Mutual information after a local quench in conformal field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asplund, Curtis T.; Bernamonti, Alice

    2014-03-01

    We compute the entanglement entropy and mutual information for two disjoint intervals in two-dimensional conformal field theories as a function of time after a local quench, using the replica trick and boundary conformal field theory. We obtain explicit formulas for the universal contributions, which are leading in the regimes of, for example, close or well-separated intervals of fixed length. The results are largely consistent with the quasiparticle picture, in which entanglement above that present in the ground state is carried by pairs of entangled freely propagating excitations. We also calculate the mutual information for two disjoint intervals in a proposed holographic local quench, whose holographic energy-momentum tensor matches the conformal field theory one. We find that the holographic mutual information shows qualitative differences from the conformal field theory results and we discuss possible interpretations of this.

  2. Field Theory Approach to Many-Body Localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altland, Alexander; Micklitz, Tobias

    2017-03-01

    We introduce an analytic approach to many-body localization (MBL) in random spin chains. We consider MBL within a first quantized framework where it becomes a localization phenomenon in the high-dimensional lattice defined by the Hilbert space of the clean system. Designed in analogy with the field-theory description of single particle localization, our approach describes wave package propagation on that lattice after a disorder average has been performed and the system is controlled by only a few universal parameters. We discuss the stability of an ergodic weak disorder and a localized strong disorder phase, respectively, and demonstrate that the latter is protected by mechanisms which put MBL outside the universality class of Anderson localization.

  3. Copula-based assimilation of radar and gauge information to derive bias-corrected precipitation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogl, S.; Laux, P.; Qiu, W.; Mao, G.; Kunstmann, H.

    2012-07-01

    This study addresses the problem of combining radar information and gauge measurements. Gauge measurements are the best available source of absolute rainfall intensity albeit their spatial availability is limited. Precipitation information obtained by radar mimics well the spatial patterns but is biased for their absolute values. In this study copula models are used to describe the dependence structure between gauge observations and rainfall derived from radar reflectivity at the corresponding grid cells. After appropriate time series transformation to generate "iid" variates, only the positive pairs (radar >0, gauge >0) of the residuals are considered. As not each grid cell can be assigned to one gauge, the integration of point information, i.e. gauge rainfall intensities, is achieved by considering the structure and the strength of dependence between the radar pixels and all the gauges within the radar image. Two different approaches, namely Maximum Theta and Multiple Theta, are presented. They finally allow for generating precipitation fields that mimic the spatial patterns of the radar fields and correct them for biases in their absolute rainfall intensities. The performance of the approach, which can be seen as a bias-correction for radar fields, is demonstrated for the Bavarian Alps. The bias-corrected rainfall fields are compared to a field of interpolated gauge values (ordinary kriging) and are validated with available gauge measurements. The simulated precipitation fields are compared to an operationally corrected radar precipitation field (RADOLAN). The copula-based approach performs similarly well as indicated by different validation measures and successfully corrects for errors in the radar precipitation.

  4. MULTI-MODE ERROR FIELD CORRECTION ON THE DIII-D TOKAMAK

    SciTech Connect

    SCOVILLE, JT; LAHAYE, RJ

    2002-10-01

    OAK A271 MULTI-MODE ERROR FIELD CORRECTION ON THE DIII-D TOKAMAK. Error field optimization on DIII-D tokamak plasma discharges has routinely been done for the last ten years with the use of the external ''n = 1 coil'' or the ''C-coil''. The optimum level of correction coil current is determined by the ability to avoid the locked mode instability and access previously unstable parameter space at low densities. The locked mode typically has toroidal and poloidal mode numbers n = 1 and m = 2, respectively, and it is this component that initially determined the correction coil current and phase. Realization of the importance of nearby n = 1 mode components m = 1 and m = 3 has led to a revision of the error field correction algorithm. Viscous and toroidal mode coupling effects suggested the need for additional terms in the expression for the radial ''penetration'' field B{sub pen} that can induce a locked mode. To incorporate these effects, the low density locked mode threshold database was expanded. A database of discharges at various toroidal fields, plasma currents, and safety factors was supplement4ed with data from an experiment in which the fields of the n = 1 coil and C-coil were combined, allowing the poloidal mode spectrum of the error field to be varied. A multivariate regression analysis of this new low density locked mode database was done to determine the low density locked mode threshold scaling relationship n{sub e} {proportional_to} B{sub T}{sup -0.01} q{sub 95}{sup -0.79} B{sub pen} and the coefficients of the poloidal mode components in the expression for B{sub pen}. Improved plasma performance is achieved by optimizing B{sub pen} by varying the applied correction coil currents.

  5. Sparse angular CT reconstruction using non-local means based iterative-correction POCS.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jing; Ma, Jianhua; Liu, Nan; Zhang, Hua; Bian, Zhaoying; Feng, Yanqiu; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan

    2011-04-01

    In divergent-beam computed tomography (CT), sparse angular sampling frequently leads to conspicuous streak artifacts. In this paper, we propose a novel non-local means (NL-means) based iterative-correction projection onto convex sets (POCS) algorithm, named as NLMIC-POCS, for effective and robust sparse angular CT reconstruction. The motivation for using NLMIC-POCS is that NL-means filtered image can produce an acceptable priori solution for sequential POCS iterative reconstruction. The NLMIC-POCS algorithm has been tested on simulated and real phantom data. The experimental results show that the presented NLMIC-POCS algorithm can significantly improve the image quality of the sparse angular CT reconstruction in suppressing streak artifacts and preserving the edges of the image.

  6. An approach for drag correction based on the local heterogeneity for gas-solid flows

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tingwen; Wang, Limin; Rogers, William; Zhou, Guofeng; Ge, Wei

    2016-09-22

    The drag models typically used for gas-solids interaction are mainly developed based on homogeneous systems of flow passing fixed particle assembly. It has been shown that the heterogeneous structures, i.e., clusters and bubbles in fluidized beds, need to be resolved to account for their effect in the numerical simulations. Since the heterogeneity is essentially captured through the local concentration gradient in the computational cells, this study proposes a simple approach to account for the non-uniformity of solids spatial distribution inside a computational cell and its effect on the interaction between gas and solid phases. Finally, to validate this approach, the predicted drag coefficient has been compared to the results from direct numerical simulations. In addition, the need to account for this type of heterogeneity is discussed for a periodic riser flow simulation with highly resolved numerical grids and the impact of the proposed correction for drag is demonstrated.

  7. An approach for drag correction based on the local heterogeneity for gas-solid flows

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Tingwen; Wang, Limin; Rogers, William; ...

    2016-09-22

    The drag models typically used for gas-solids interaction are mainly developed based on homogeneous systems of flow passing fixed particle assembly. It has been shown that the heterogeneous structures, i.e., clusters and bubbles in fluidized beds, need to be resolved to account for their effect in the numerical simulations. Since the heterogeneity is essentially captured through the local concentration gradient in the computational cells, this study proposes a simple approach to account for the non-uniformity of solids spatial distribution inside a computational cell and its effect on the interaction between gas and solid phases. Finally, to validate this approach, themore » predicted drag coefficient has been compared to the results from direct numerical simulations. In addition, the need to account for this type of heterogeneity is discussed for a periodic riser flow simulation with highly resolved numerical grids and the impact of the proposed correction for drag is demonstrated.« less

  8. Wedge-local quantum fields on a nonconstant noncommutative spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Much, A.

    2012-08-15

    Within the framework of warped convolutions we deform the massless free scalar field. The deformation is performed by using the generators of the special conformal transformations. The investigation shows that the deformed field turns out to be wedge-local. Furthermore, it is shown that the spacetime induced by the deformation with the special conformal operators is nonconstant noncommutative. The noncommutativity is obtained by calculating the deformed commutator of the coordinates.

  9. Error field measurement, correction and heat flux balancing on Wendelstein 7-X

    DOE PAGES

    Lazerson, Samuel A.; Otte, Matthias; Jakubowski, Marcin; ...

    2017-03-10

    The measurement and correction of error fields in Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) is critical to long pulse high beta operation, as small error fields may cause overloading of divertor plates in some configurations. Accordingly, as part of a broad collaborative effort, the detection and correction of error fields on the W7-X experiment has been performed using the trim coil system in conjunction with the flux surface mapping diagnostic and high resolution infrared camera. In the early commissioning phase of the experiment, the trim coils were used to open an n/m = 1/2 island chain in a specially designed magnetic configuration. Themore » flux surfacing mapping diagnostic was then able to directly image the magnetic topology of the experiment, allowing the inference of a small similar to 4 cm intrinsic island chain. The suspected main sources of the error field, slight misalignment and deformations of the superconducting coils, are then confirmed through experimental modeling using the detailed measurements of the coil positions. Observations of the limiters temperatures in module 5 shows a clear dependence of the limiter heat flux pattern as the perturbing fields are rotated. Plasma experiments without applied correcting fields show a significant asymmetry in neutral pressure (centered in module 4) and light emission (visible, H-alpha, CII, and CIII). Such pressure asymmetry is associated with plasma-wall (limiter) interaction asymmetries between the modules. Application of trim coil fields with n = 1 waveform correct the imbalance. Confirmation of the error fields allows the assessment of magnetic fields which resonate with the n/m = 5/5 island chain.« less

  10. Suppression of edge-localized modes by magnetic field perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Kleva, Robert G.; Guzdar, Parvez N.

    2010-11-15

    Transport bursts in simulations of edge-localized modes (ELMs) in tokamaks are suppressed by the application of magnetic field perturbations. The amplitude of the applied magnetic field perturbations is characterized by a stochasticity parameter S. When S>1, magnetic flux surfaces are destroyed and the magnetic field lines diffuse in minor radius. As S increases in the simulations, the magnitude of the ELM bursts decreases. The size of bursts is reduced to a very small value while S is still less than unity and most of the magnetic flux surfaces are still preserved. Magnetic field line stochasticity is not a requirement for the stabilization of ELMs by the magnetic field perturbations. The magnetic field perturbations act by suppressing the growth of the resistive ballooning instability that underlies the ELM bursts.

  11. Multiple trim magnets, or magic fingers,'' for insertion device field integral correction

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyer, E.; Marks, S.; Pipersky, P.; Schlueter, R. )

    1995-02-01

    Multiple trim magnets (MTMs), also known as magic fingers,'' are an arrangement of magnets for reducing integrated magnetic-field errors in insertion devices. The idea is to use transverse arrays of permanent magnets, hence the name multiple trim magnets,'' above and below the midplane, to correct both normal and skew longitudinal magnetic-field integral errors in a device. MTMs are typically installed at the ends of an ID. Adjustments are made by changing either the size, position, or orientation of each trim magnet. Application of the MTMs to the ALS undulators reduced both the normal and skew longitudinal field integral errors, over the entire 20 mm[times]60 mm good field region,'' of the beam aperture by as much as an order of magnitude. The requirements included corrections of field and gradients outside the multipole convergence radius. Additionally, these trim magnet arrays provided correction of the linear component of the integrated field gradients for particles with trajectories not parallel to the nominal beam axis. The MTM concept, design, construction, tests that demonstrated feasibility, and magnetic-field integral reduction of ALS undulators are presented.

  12. Local approximations for effective scalar field equations of motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berera, Arjun; Moss, Ian G.; Ramos, Rudnei O.

    2007-10-01

    Fluctuation and dissipation dynamics is examined at all temperature ranges for the general case of a background time evolving scalar field coupled to heavy intermediate quantum fields which in turn are coupled to light quantum fields. The evolution of the background field induces particle production from the light fields through the action of the intermediate catalyzing heavy fields. Such field configurations are generically present in most particle physics models, including grand unified and supersymmetry theories, with application of this mechanism possible in inflation, heavy ion collision, and phase transition dynamics. The effective evolution equation for the background field is obtained and a fluctuation-dissipation theorem is derived for this system. The effective evolution, in general, is nonlocal in time. Appropriate conditions are found for when these time nonlocal effects can be approximated by local terms. Here careful distinction is made between a local expansion and the special case of a derivative expansion to all orders, which requires analytic behavior of the evolution equation in Fourier space.

  13. Localization and mass spectra of various matter fields on scalar-tensor brane

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Qun-Ying; Zhao, Zhen-Hua; Zhong, Yi; Yang, Jie; Zhou, Xiang-Nan

    2015-03-10

    Recently, a new scalar-tensor braneworld model was presented in [http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevD.86.127502]. It not only solves the gauge hierarchy problem but also reproduces a correct Friedmann-like equation on the brane. In this new model, there are two different brane solutions, for which the mass spectra of gravity on the brane are the same. In this paper, we investigate localization and mass spectra of various bulk matter fields (i.e., scalar, vector, Kalb-Ramond, and fermion fields) on the brane. It is shown that the zero modes of all the matter fields can be localized on the positive tension brane under some conditions, and the mass spectra of each kind of bulk matter field for the two brane solutions are different except for some special cases, which implies that the two brane solutions are not physically equivalent. When the coupling constants between the dilaton and bulk matter fields take special values, the mass spectra for both solutions are the same, and the scalar and vector zero modes are localized on the negative tension brane, while the KR zero mode is still localized on the positive tension brane.

  14. Above-threshold ionization with highly charged ions in superstrong laser fields. I. Coulomb-corrected strong-field approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaiber, Michael; Yakaboylu, Enderalp; Hatsagortsyan, Karen Z.

    2013-02-01

    Aiming at the investigation of above-threshold ionization in superstrong laser fields with highly charged ions, we develop a Coulomb-corrected strong-field approximation (SFA). The influence of the Coulomb potential of the atomic core on the ionized electron dynamics in the continuum is taken into account via the eikonal approximation, treating the Coulomb potential perturbatively in the phase of the quasiclassical wave function of the continuum electron. In this paper the formalism of the Coulomb-corrected SFA for the nonrelativistic regime is discussed, employing velocity and length gauge. Direct ionization of a hydrogenlike system in a strong linearly polarized laser field is considered. The relation of the results in the different gauges to the Perelomov-Popov-Terent'ev imaginary-time method is discussed.

  15. Formation of the residual stress field under local thermal actions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burenin, A. A.; Dats, E. P.; Murashkin, E. V.

    2014-03-01

    The one-dimensional process of material deformation due to local heating and subsequent cooling is analyzed in the framework of the classical theory of elastoplastic deformations. The problem of formation of residual stresses in a thin plate made of an elastoplastic material under a given thermal action is solved. The graphs of fields of residual stresses and displacements are constructed.

  16. Convective Flow Induced by Localized Traveling Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An axisymmetric traveling magnetic field induces a meridional base flow in a cylindrical zone of an electrically conducting liquid. This remotely induced flow can be conveniently controlled, in magnitude and direction, and can have benefits for crystal growth applications. In particular, it can be used to offset natural convection. For long vertical cylinders, non-uniform and localized in the propagating direction, magnetic fields are required for this purpose. Here we investigate a particular form of this field, namely that induced by a set of a few electric current coils. An order of magnitude reduction of buoyancy convection is theoretically demonstrated for a vertical Bridgman crystal growth configuration.

  17. Locally smeared operator product expansions in scalar field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Monahan, Christopher; Orginos, Kostas

    2015-04-01

    We propose a new locally smeared operator product expansion to decompose non-local operators in terms of a basis of smeared operators. The smeared operator product expansion formally connects nonperturbative matrix elements determined numerically using lattice field theory to matrix elements of non-local operators in the continuum. These nonperturbative matrix elements do not suffer from power-divergent mixing on the lattice, which significantly complicates calculations of quantities such as the moments of parton distribution functions, provided the smearing scale is kept fixed in the continuum limit. The presence of this smearing scale complicates the connection to the Wilson coefficients of the standard operator product expansion and requires the construction of a suitable formalism. We demonstrate the feasibility of our approach with examples in real scalar field theory.

  18. Locally smeared operator product expansions in scalar field theory

    DOE PAGES

    Monahan, Christopher; Orginos, Kostas

    2015-04-01

    We propose a new locally smeared operator product expansion to decompose non-local operators in terms of a basis of smeared operators. The smeared operator product expansion formally connects nonperturbative matrix elements determined numerically using lattice field theory to matrix elements of non-local operators in the continuum. These nonperturbative matrix elements do not suffer from power-divergent mixing on the lattice, which significantly complicates calculations of quantities such as the moments of parton distribution functions, provided the smearing scale is kept fixed in the continuum limit. The presence of this smearing scale complicates the connection to the Wilson coefficients of the standardmore » operator product expansion and requires the construction of a suitable formalism. We demonstrate the feasibility of our approach with examples in real scalar field theory.« less

  19. Real-time distortion correction system of large-field optical display equipment based on FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chun; Zhou, Yongjun; Zheng, Yongrui; Li, Jie

    2011-08-01

    Current distortion correction systems can not meet the requirements of the large-field optical display equipment because of small field, low resolution, poor real-time property and commonality. "The symmetrical transform" and "the improved bilinear interpolation" were proposed. The general system scheme was designed and implemented in the Virtex-5 FPGA devices. The appropriate data structure of the look-up table was adopted and the optimized scheme for the input memory named "the double even-odd cache" was put forward. MIG (Memory Interface Generator) software tool was utilized to control DDR2 SDRAM and DSP48E was used. The real-time distortion correction system of the large-field optical display equipment was accomplished. The experimental result shows that the correction system can correct the large-field and high-resolution (1280x1024) video image (60 frames per second). The system delays only 1.48ms while the deviation in precision is less than 9' and has the well commonality.

  20. Decoupled recovery of energy and momentum with correction of n = 2 error fields

    SciTech Connect

    Paz-Soldan, Carlos A.; Logan, Nikolas C.; Lanctot, Matthew J.; Hanson, Jeremy M.; King, Josh D.; La Haye, Robert J.; Nazikian, Raffi; Park, Jong -K.; Strait, Edward J.

    2015-07-06

    Experiments applying known n = 2 “proxy” error fields (EFs) find that the rotation braking introduced by the proxy EF cannot be completely alleviated through optimal n = 2 correction with poorly matched poloidal spectra. This imperfect performance recovery demonstrates the importance of correcting multiple components of the n = 2 field spectrum and is in contrast to previous results with n = 1 EFs despite similar execution. Measured optimal n = 2 proxy EF correction currents are consistent with those required to null dominant mode coupling to the resonant surfaces and minimize the neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) torque, calculated using ideal MHD plasma response computation. Unlike rotation braking, density pumpout can be fully corrected despite poorly matched spectra, indicating density pumpout is driven only by a single component proportional to the resonant coupling. Through precise n = 2 spectral control density pumpout and rotation braking can thus be decoupled. Rotation braking with n = 2 fields is also found to be proportional to the level of concurrent toroidal rotation, consistent with NTV theory. Lastly, plasmas with modest countercurrent rotation are insensitive to the n = 2 field with neither rotation braking nor density pumpout observed.

  1. Decoupled recovery of energy and momentum with correction of n = 2 error fields

    DOE PAGES

    Paz-Soldan, Carlos; Logan, Nikolas C.; Lanctot, Matthew J.; ...

    2015-07-06

    Experiments applying known n = 2 ‘proxy’ error fields (EFs) find that the rotation braking introduced by the proxy EF cannot be completely alleviated through optimal n = 2 correction with poorly matched poloidal spectra. This imperfect performance recovery demonstrates the importance of correcting multiple components of the n = 2 field spectrum and is in contrast to previous results with n = 1 EFs despite a similar execution. Measured optimal n = 2 proxy EF correction currents are consistent with those required to null dominant mode coupling to the resonant surfaces and minimize the neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) torque,more » calculated using ideal MHD plasma response computation. Unlike rotation braking, density pumpout can be fully corrected despite poorly matched spectra, indicating density pompous is driven only by a single component proportional to the resonant coupling. Through precise n = 2 spectral control density pumpout and rotation braking can thus be decoupled. Rotation braking with n = 2 fields is also found to be proportional to the level of co-current toroidal rotation, consistent with NTV theory. Furthermore, plasmas with modest counter-current rotation are insensitive to the n = 2 field with neither rotation braking nor density pumpout observed.« less

  2. Laboratory spectra of field samples as a check on two atmospheric correction methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Pung; Greeley, Ronald

    1993-01-01

    Atmospheric correction is the first step toward quantitative analysis of imaging spectroscopy data. Two methods, MODTRAN model and the empirical line, were used to convert AVIRIS radiance values to reflectance values. A set of laboratory spectra of field samples corresponding to AVIRIS coverage was used to assess these methods. This will also serve to select bands for future quantative analyses.

  3. Decoupled recovery of energy and momentum with correction of n = 2 error fields

    DOE PAGES

    Paz-Soldan, Carlos A.; Logan, Nikolas C.; Lanctot, Matthew J.; ...

    2015-07-06

    Experiments applying known n = 2 “proxy” error fields (EFs) find that the rotation braking introduced by the proxy EF cannot be completely alleviated through optimal n = 2 correction with poorly matched poloidal spectra. This imperfect performance recovery demonstrates the importance of correcting multiple components of the n = 2 field spectrum and is in contrast to previous results with n = 1 EFs despite similar execution. Measured optimal n = 2 proxy EF correction currents are consistent with those required to null dominant mode coupling to the resonant surfaces and minimize the neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) torque, calculatedmore » using ideal MHD plasma response computation. Unlike rotation braking, density pumpout can be fully corrected despite poorly matched spectra, indicating density pumpout is driven only by a single component proportional to the resonant coupling. Through precise n = 2 spectral control density pumpout and rotation braking can thus be decoupled. Rotation braking with n = 2 fields is also found to be proportional to the level of concurrent toroidal rotation, consistent with NTV theory. Lastly, plasmas with modest countercurrent rotation are insensitive to the n = 2 field with neither rotation braking nor density pumpout observed.« less

  4. Decoupled recovery of energy and momentum with correction of n = 2 error fields

    SciTech Connect

    Paz-Soldan, Carlos; Logan, Nikolas C.; Lanctot, Matthew J.; Hanson, Jeremy M.; King, Josh D.; La Haye, Rob J.; Nazikian, Raffi; Park, Jong -Kyu; Strait, Edward J.

    2015-07-06

    Experiments applying known n = 2 ‘proxy’ error fields (EFs) find that the rotation braking introduced by the proxy EF cannot be completely alleviated through optimal n = 2 correction with poorly matched poloidal spectra. This imperfect performance recovery demonstrates the importance of correcting multiple components of the n = 2 field spectrum and is in contrast to previous results with n = 1 EFs despite a similar execution. Measured optimal n = 2 proxy EF correction currents are consistent with those required to null dominant mode coupling to the resonant surfaces and minimize the neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) torque, calculated using ideal MHD plasma response computation. Unlike rotation braking, density pumpout can be fully corrected despite poorly matched spectra, indicating density pompous is driven only by a single component proportional to the resonant coupling. Through precise n = 2 spectral control density pumpout and rotation braking can thus be decoupled. Rotation braking with n = 2 fields is also found to be proportional to the level of co-current toroidal rotation, consistent with NTV theory. Furthermore, plasmas with modest counter-current rotation are insensitive to the n = 2 field with neither rotation braking nor density pumpout observed.

  5. Nonrigid motion correction in 3D using autofocusing with localized linear translations.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Joseph Y; Alley, Marcus T; Cunningham, Charles H; Vasanawala, Shreyas S; Pauly, John M; Lustig, Michael

    2012-12-01

    MR scans are sensitive to motion effects due to the scan duration. To properly suppress artifacts from nonrigid body motion, complex models with elements such as translation, rotation, shear, and scaling have been incorporated into the reconstruction pipeline. However, these techniques are computationally intensive and difficult to implement for online reconstruction. On a sufficiently small spatial scale, the different types of motion can be well approximated as simple linear translations. This formulation allows for a practical autofocusing algorithm that locally minimizes a given motion metric--more specifically, the proposed localized gradient-entropy metric. To reduce the vast search space for an optimal solution, possible motion paths are limited to the motion measured from multichannel navigator data. The novel navigation strategy is based on the so-called "Butterfly" navigators, which are modifications of the spin-warp sequence that provides intrinsic translational motion information with negligible overhead. With a 32-channel abdominal coil, sufficient number of motion measurements were found to approximate possible linear motion paths for every image voxel. The correction scheme was applied to free-breathing abdominal patient studies. In these scans, a reduction in artifacts from complex, nonrigid motion was observed. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Non-rigid Motion Correction in 3D Using Autofocusing with Localized Linear Translations

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Joseph Y.; Alley, Marcus T.; Cunningham, Charles H.; Vasanawala, Shreyas S.; Pauly, John M.; Lustig, Michael

    2012-01-01

    MR scans are sensitive to motion effects due to the scan duration. To properly suppress artifacts from non-rigid body motion, complex models with elements such as translation, rotation, shear, and scaling have been incorporated into the reconstruction pipeline. However, these techniques are computationally intensive and difficult to implement for online reconstruction. On a sufficiently small spatial scale, the different types of motion can be well-approximated as simple linear translations. This formulation allows for a practical autofocusing algorithm that locally minimizes a given motion metric – more specifically, the proposed localized gradient-entropy metric. To reduce the vast search space for an optimal solution, possible motion paths are limited to the motion measured from multi-channel navigator data. The novel navigation strategy is based on the so-called “Butterfly” navigators which are modifications to the spin-warp sequence that provide intrinsic translational motion information with negligible overhead. With a 32-channel abdominal coil, sufficient number of motion measurements were found to approximate possible linear motion paths for every image voxel. The correction scheme was applied to free-breathing abdominal patient studies. In these scans, a reduction in artifacts from complex, non-rigid motion was observed. PMID:22307933

  7. Quantification and correction of geometric distortions in low-field MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra Robles, Juan M.; Dominguez, William; Gonzalez, Evelio R.; Berdellans, Ilse

    1999-05-01

    Geometric distortions are one of the most important degrading factors in MRI. They usually do not greatly affect the clinical relevance of images, but their correction is indispensable for lesion volume measurements, radiotherapy and surgical planning. In this work, the main sources of geometric distortion in Cuban low-field MRI systems are studied. Geometric distortion models and correction algorithms are tested by means of computer simulation using theoretical distributions of the magnetic fields. The real distributions are determined from images of a grid phantom. Calculated static field distributions showed that the system magnetic center is shifted, relative to magnet geometric center. Quantitative measurements provided inhomogeneity values (93 ppm in a spherical region of diameter 256 mm) larger than calibration data (65 ppm) obtained 15 months ago. The shim settings must be readjusted. The temporal behavior of static field was also studied. The magnet heating produces a slow time variation in static field intensity, but field error distribution proved to be stable. In the images, geometric distortions increase with increasing distance from image center and ranged from -6 to 7 mm. The implemented correction procedure reduced distortions from maximally 7 mm to the order of pixel resolution (0.8 - 1 mm).

  8. Monte Carlo calculated correction factors for diodes and ion chambers in small photon fields.

    PubMed

    Czarnecki, D; Zink, K

    2013-04-21

    The application of small photon fields in modern radiotherapy requires the determination of total scatter factors Scp or field factors Ω(f(clin), f(msr))(Q(clin), Q(msr)) with high precision. Both quantities require the knowledge of the field-size-dependent and detector-dependent correction factor k(f(clin), f(msr))(Q(clin), Q(msr)). The aim of this study is the determination of the correction factor k(f(clin), f(msr))(Q(clin), Q(msr)) for different types of detectors in a clinical 6 MV photon beam of a Siemens KD linear accelerator. The EGSnrc Monte Carlo code was used to calculate the dose to water and the dose to different detectors to determine the field factor as well as the mentioned correction factor for different small square field sizes. Besides this, the mean water to air stopping power ratio as well as the ratio of the mean energy absorption coefficients for the relevant materials was calculated for different small field sizes. As the beam source, a Monte Carlo based model of a Siemens KD linear accelerator was used. The results show that in the case of ionization chambers the detector volume has the largest impact on the correction factor k(f(clin), f(msr))(Q(clin), Q(msr)); this perturbation may contribute up to 50% to the correction factor. Field-dependent changes in stopping-power ratios are negligible. The magnitude of k(f(clin), f(msr))(Q(clin), Q(msr)) is of the order of 1.2 at a field size of 1 × 1 cm(2) for the large volume ion chamber PTW31010 and is still in the range of 1.05-1.07 for the PinPoint chambers PTW31014 and PTW31016. For the diode detectors included in this study (PTW60016, PTW 60017), the correction factor deviates no more than 2% from unity in field sizes between 10 × 10 and 1 × 1 cm(2), but below this field size there is a steep decrease of k(f(clin), f(msr))(Q(clin), Q(msr)) below unity, i.e. a strong overestimation of dose. Besides the field size and detector dependence, the results reveal a clear dependence of the

  9. Monte Carlo calculated correction factors for diodes and ion chambers in small photon fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnecki, D.; Zink, K.

    2013-04-01

    The application of small photon fields in modern radiotherapy requires the determination of total scatter factors Scp or field factors \\Omega ^{f_{clin} ,f_{msr}}_{Q_{clin} ,Q_{msr}} with high precision. Both quantities require the knowledge of the field-size-dependent and detector-dependent correction factor k^{f_{clin} ,f_{msr}}_{Q_{clin} ,Q_{msr}}. The aim of this study is the determination of the correction factor k^{f_{clin} ,f_{msr}}_{Q_{clin} ,Q_{msr}} for different types of detectors in a clinical 6 MV photon beam of a Siemens KD linear accelerator. The EGSnrc Monte Carlo code was used to calculate the dose to water and the dose to different detectors to determine the field factor as well as the mentioned correction factor for different small square field sizes. Besides this, the mean water to air stopping power ratio as well as the ratio of the mean energy absorption coefficients for the relevant materials was calculated for different small field sizes. As the beam source, a Monte Carlo based model of a Siemens KD linear accelerator was used. The results show that in the case of ionization chambers the detector volume has the largest impact on the correction factor k^{f_{clin} ,f_{msr}}_{Q_{clin} ,Q_{msr}}; this perturbation may contribute up to 50% to the correction factor. Field-dependent changes in stopping-power ratios are negligible. The magnitude of k^{f_{clin} ,f_{msr}}_{Q_{clin} ,Q_{msr}} is of the order of 1.2 at a field size of 1 × 1 cm2 for the large volume ion chamber PTW31010 and is still in the range of 1.05-1.07 for the PinPoint chambers PTW31014 and PTW31016. For the diode detectors included in this study (PTW60016, PTW 60017), the correction factor deviates no more than 2% from unity in field sizes between 10 × 10 and 1 × 1 cm2, but below this field size there is a steep decrease of k^{f_{clin} ,f_{msr}}_{Q_{clin} ,Q_{msr}} below unity, i.e. a strong overestimation of dose. Besides the field size and detector dependence, the results

  10. Quantum entanglement of local operators in conformal field theories.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Masahiro; Numasawa, Tokiro; Takayanagi, Tadashi

    2014-03-21

    We introduce a series of quantities which characterize a given local operator in any conformal field theory from the viewpoint of quantum entanglement. It is defined by the increased amount of (Rényi) entanglement entropy at late time for an excited state defined by acting the local operator on the vacuum. We consider a conformal field theory on an infinite space and take the subsystem in the definition of the entanglement entropy to be its half. We calculate these quantities for a free massless scalar field theory in two, four and six dimensions. We find that these results are interpreted in terms of quantum entanglement of a finite number of states, including Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen states. They agree with a heuristic picture of propagations of entangled particles.

  11. Quantum Entanglement of Local Operators in Conformal Field Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozaki, Masahiro; Numasawa, Tokiro; Takayanagi, Tadashi

    2014-03-01

    We introduce a series of quantities which characterize a given local operator in any conformal field theory from the viewpoint of quantum entanglement. It is defined by the increased amount of (Rényi) entanglement entropy at late time for an excited state defined by acting the local operator on the vacuum. We consider a conformal field theory on an infinite space and take the subsystem in the definition of the entanglement entropy to be its half. We calculate these quantities for a free massless scalar field theory in two, four and six dimensions. We find that these results are interpreted in terms of quantum entanglement of a finite number of states, including Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen states. They agree with a heuristic picture of propagations of entangled particles.

  12. Dynamic-local-field approximation for the quantum solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etters, R. D.; Danilowicz, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    A local-molecular-field description for the ground-state properties of the quantum solids is presented. The dynamical behavior of atoms contributing to the local field, which acts on an arbitrary pair of test particles, is incorporated by decoupling the pair correlations between these field atoms. The energy, pressure, compressibility, single-particle-distribution function, and the rms atomic deviations about the equilibrium lattice sites are calculated for H2, He-3, and He-4 over the volume range from 5 to 24.5 cu cm/mole. The results are in close agreement with existing Monte Carlo calculations wherever comparisons are possible. At very high pressure, the results agree with simplified descriptions which depend on negligible overlap of the system wave function between neighboring lattice sites.

  13. Methods to Correct Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence Distributions for Local Nonuniform Laser Attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoffels, Genie G. M.; Stoks, Sander; Dam, Nico; Ter Meulen, J. J.

    2000-10-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence is often used to obtain two-dimensional density distributions of specific molecules in reactive or nonreactive flows. In opaque environments, such as sooty flames or dusty air flows, the laser intensity decrease over the field of view must be taken into account. We describe two methods to determine the local extinction factor, and, from that, the local laser intensity. Both methods are based on elastic light scattering, one of which employs two elastic light scattering images, recorded simultaneously from the same probe volume, but illuminated from opposite directions. Although exact in principle, this method requires considerable experimental expenditure, and for this reason a more approximate method by use of only a single elastic scattering image is described as well. The results of both methods, applied to combustion diagnostics in an optically accessible Diesel engine, are compared.

  14. Rapid and effective correction of RF inhomogeneity for high field magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M S; DuBois, R M; Zeineh, M M

    2000-08-01

    The well-known variability in the distribution of high frequency electromagnetic fields in the human body causes problems in the analysis of structural information in high field magnetic resonance images. We describe a method of compensating for the purely intensity-based effects. In our simple and rapid correction algorithm, we first use statistical means to determine the background image noise level and the edges of the image features. We next populate all "noise" pixels with the mean signal intensity of the image features. These data are then smoothed by convolution with a gaussian filter using Fourier methods. Finally, the original data that are above the noise level are normalized to the smoothed images, thereby eliminating the lowest spatial frequencies in the final, corrected data. Processing of a 124 slice, 256 x 256 volume dataset requires under 70 sec on a laptop personal computer. Overall, the method is less prone to artifacts from edges or from sensitivity to absolute head position than are other correction techniques. Following intensity correction, the images demonstrated obvious qualitative improvement and, when subjected to automated segmentation tools, the accuracy of segmentation improved, in one example, from 35.3% to 84.7% correct, as compared to a manually-constructed gold standard.

  15. Cosmology with many light scalar fields: Stochastic inflation and loop corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Adshead, Peter; Easther, Richard; Lim, Eugene A.

    2009-03-15

    We explore the consequences of the existence of a very large number of light scalar degrees of freedom in the early universe. We distinguish between participator and spectator fields. The former have a small mass, and can contribute to the inflationary dynamics; the latter are either strictly massless or have a negligible VEV. In N-flation and generic assisted inflation scenarios, inflation is a cooperative phenomenon driven by N participator fields, none of which could drive inflation on its own. We review upper bounds on N, as a function of the inflationary Hubble scale H. We then consider stochastic and eternal inflation in models with N participator fields showing that individual fields may evolve stochastically while the whole ensemble behaves deterministically, and that a wide range of eternal inflationary scenarios are possible in this regime. We then compute one-loop quantum corrections to the inflationary power spectrum. These are largest with N spectator fields and a single participator field, and the resulting bound on N is always weaker than those obtained in other ways. We find that loop corrections to the N-flation power spectrum do not scale with N, and thus place no upper bound on the number of participator fields. This result also implies that, at least to leading order, the theory behaves like a composite single scalar field. In order to perform this calculation, we address a number of issues associated with loop calculations in the Schwinger-Keldysh ''in-in'' formalism.

  16. Localization of disordered bosons and magnets in random fields

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xiaoquan; Müller, Markus

    2013-10-15

    We study localization properties of disordered bosons and spins in random fields at zero temperature. We focus on two representatives of different symmetry classes, hard-core bosons (XY magnets) and Ising magnets in random transverse fields, and contrast their physical properties. We describe localization properties using a locator expansion on general lattices. For 1d Ising chains, we find non-analytic behavior of the localization length as a function of energy at ω=0, ξ{sup −1}(ω)=ξ{sup −1}(0)+A|ω|{sup α}, with α vanishing at criticality. This contrasts with the much smoother behavior predicted for XY magnets. We use these results to approach the ordering transition on Bethe lattices of large connectivity K, which mimic the limit of high dimensionality. In both models, in the paramagnetic phase with uniform disorder, the localization length is found to have a local maximum at ω=0. For the Ising model, we find activated scaling at the phase transition, in agreement with infinite randomness studies. In the Ising model long range order is found to arise due to a delocalization and condensation initiated at ω=0, without a closing mobility gap. We find that Ising systems establish order on much sparser (fractal) subgraphs than XY models. Possible implications of these results for finite-dimensional systems are discussed. -- Highlights: •Study of localization properties of disordered bosons and spins in random fields. •Comparison between XY magnets (hard-core bosons) and Ising magnets. •Analysis of the nature of the magnetic transition in strong quenched disorder. •Ising magnets: activated scaling, no closing mobility gap at the transition. •Ising order emerges on sparser (fractal) support than XY order.

  17. Light scattering, field localization and local density of states in co-axial plasmonic nanowires.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Nate; Dal Negro, Luca

    2010-07-19

    Based on analytical scattering theory, we develop a multipolar expansion method to investigate systematically the near-field enhancement, far-field scattering and Local Density of States (LDOS) spectra in concentric metal-insulator-metal (MIM) cylindrical nanostructures, or coaxial plasmonic nanowires (CPNs). We demonstrate that these structures support distinctive plasmonic resonances with strongly reduced scattering in the far-field zone and significant electric field enhancement in deep sub-wavelength dielectric regions. Additionally, we study systematically the effects of geometrical parameters and dielectric index on the near-field and far-field plasmonic response of CPNs in the visible and near infrared spectral range. Finally, we demonstrate that CPNs provide a convenient approach for engineering strong (almost three orders of magnitude) LDOS enhancement in sub-wavelength dielectric gaps at multiple frequencies. These results enable the engineering of multiband optical detectors and CPNs-based light emitters with simultaneously enhanced excitation and emission rates for nanoplasmonics.

  18. The spectral basis of optimal error field correction on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Paz-Soldan, Carlos A.; Buttery, Richard J.; Garofalo, Andrea M.; Hanson, Jeremy M.; La Haye, Robert J.; Lanctot, Matthew J.; Park, Jong -Ku; Solomon, Wayne M.; Strait, Edward J.

    2014-04-28

    Here, experimental optimum error field correction (EFC) currents found in a wide breadth of dedicated experiments on DIII-D are shown to be consistent with the currents required to null the poloidal harmonics of the vacuum field which drive the kink mode near the plasma edge. This allows the identification of empirical metrics which predict optimal EFC currents with accuracy comparable to that of first- principles modeling which includes the ideal plasma response. While further metric refinements are desirable, this work suggests optimal EFC currents can be effectively fed-forward based purely on knowledge of the vacuum error field and basic equilibrium properties which are routinely calculated in real-time.

  19. Spectral investigation of nonlinear local field effects in Ag nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Rodrigo Takeda, Yoshihiko; Ohnuma, Masato; Oyoshi, Keiji

    2015-03-21

    The capability of Ag nanoparticles to modulate their optical resonance condition, by optical nonlinearity, without an external feedback system was experimentally demonstrated. These optical nonlinearities were studied in the vicinity of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), using femtosecond pump-and-probe spectroscopy with a white-light continuum probe. Transient transmission changes ΔT/T exhibited strong photon energy and particle size dependence and showed a complex and non-monotonic change with increasing pump light intensity. Peak position and change of sign redshift with increasing pump light intensity demonstrate the modulation of the LSPR. These features are discussed in terms of the intrinsic feedback via local field enhancement.

  20. Monte Carlo and experimental determination of correction factors for gamma knife perfexion small field dosimetry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoros, E.; Moutsatsos, A.; Pappas, E. P.; Georgiou, E.; Kollias, G.; Karaiskos, P.; Pantelis, E.

    2017-09-01

    Detector-, field size- and machine-specific correction factors are required for precise dosimetry measurements in small and non-standard photon fields. In this work, Monte Carlo (MC) simulation techniques were used to calculate the k{{Qmsr},{{Q}0}}{{fmsr},{{f}ref}} and k{{Qclin},{{Q}msr}}{{fclin},{{f}msr}} correction factors for a series of ionization chambers, a synthetic microDiamond and diode dosimeters, used for reference and/or output factor (OF) measurements in the Gamma Knife Perfexion photon fields. Calculations were performed for the solid water (SW) and ABS plastic phantoms, as well as for a water phantom of the same geometry. MC calculations for the k{{Qclin},{{Q}msr}}{{fclin},{{f}msr}} correction factors in SW were compared against corresponding experimental results for a subset of ionization chambers and diode detectors. Reference experimental OF data were obtained through the weighted average of corresponding measurements using TLDs, EBT-2 films and alanine pellets. k{{Qmsr},{{Q}0}}{{fmsr},{{f}ref}} values close to unity (within 1%) were calculated for most of ionization chambers in water. Greater corrections of up to 6.0% were observed for chambers with relatively large air-cavity dimensions and steel central electrode. A phantom correction of 1.006 and 1.024 (breaking down to 1.014 from the ABS sphere and 1.010 from the accompanying ABS phantom adapter) were calculated for the SW and ABS phantoms, respectively, adding up to k{{Qmsr},{{Q}0}}{{fmsr},{{f}ref}} corrections in water. Both measurements and MC calculations for the diode and microDiamond detectors resulted in lower than unit k{{Qclin},{{Q}msr}}{{fclin},{{f}msr}} correction factors, due to their denser sensitive volume and encapsulation materials. In comparison, higher than unit k{{Qclin},{{Q}msr}}{{fclin},{{f}msr}} results for the ionization chambers suggested field size depended dose underestimations (being significant for the 4 mm field), with magnitude depending on the combination of

  1. Monte Carlo and experimental determination of correction factors for gamma knife perfexion small field dosimetry measurements.

    PubMed

    Zoros, E; Moutsatsos, A; Pappas, E P; Georgiou, E; Kollias, G; Karaiskos, P; Pantelis, E

    2017-09-05

    Detector-, field size- and machine-specific correction factors are required for precise dosimetry measurements in small and non-standard photon fields. In this work, Monte Carlo (MC) simulation techniques were used to calculate the [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] correction factors for a series of ionization chambers, a synthetic microDiamond and diode dosimeters, used for reference and/or output factor (OF) measurements in the Gamma Knife Perfexion photon fields. Calculations were performed for the solid water (SW) and ABS plastic phantoms, as well as for a water phantom of the same geometry. MC calculations for the [Formula: see text] correction factors in SW were compared against corresponding experimental results for a subset of ionization chambers and diode detectors. Reference experimental OF data were obtained through the weighted average of corresponding measurements using TLDs, EBT-2 films and alanine pellets. [Formula: see text] values close to unity (within 1%) were calculated for most of ionization chambers in water. Greater corrections of up to 6.0% were observed for chambers with relatively large air-cavity dimensions and steel central electrode. A phantom correction of 1.006 and 1.024 (breaking down to 1.014 from the ABS sphere and 1.010 from the accompanying ABS phantom adapter) were calculated for the SW and ABS phantoms, respectively, adding up to [Formula: see text] corrections in water. Both measurements and MC calculations for the diode and microDiamond detectors resulted in lower than unit [Formula: see text] correction factors, due to their denser sensitive volume and encapsulation materials. In comparison, higher than unit [Formula: see text] results for the ionization chambers suggested field size depended dose underestimations (being significant for the 4 mm field), with magnitude depending on the combination of contradicting phenomena associated with volume averaging and electron fluence perturbations. Finally, the presence

  2. Importance of far-field topographic and isostatic corrections for regional density modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szwillus, Wolfgang; Ebbing, Jörg; Holzrichter, Nils

    2016-10-01

    The long-wavelength gravity field contains information about processes in the sublithospheric mantle. As satellite-derived gravity models now provide the long to medium-wavelength gravity field at unprecedented accuracy, techniques used to process gravity data need to be updated. We show that when determining these long-wavelengths, the treatment of topographic-isostatic effect (TIE) and isostatic effects (IE) is a likely source of error. We constructed a global isostatic model and calculated global TIE and IE. These calculations were done for ground stations as well as stations at satellite height. We considered both gravity and gravity gradients. Using these results, we determined how much of the gravity signal comes from distant sources. We find that a significant long-wavelength bias is introduced if far-field effects on the topographic effect are neglected. However, due to isostatic compensation far-field effects of the topographic effect are to a large degree compensated by the far-field IE. This means that far-field effects can be reduced effectively by always considering topographic masses together with their compensating isostatic masses. We show that to correctly represent the ultra-long wavelengths, a global background model should be used. This is demonstrated both globally and for a continental-scale case area in North America. In the case of regional modelling, where the ultra-long wavelengths are not of prime importance, gravity gradients can be used to help minimize correction errors caused by far-field effects.

  3. Monitoring and correcting spatio-temporal variations of the MR scanner’s static magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    El-Sharkawy, AbdEl Monem; Schär, Michael; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2007-01-01

    The homogeneity and stability of the static magnetic field are of paramount importance to the accuracy of MR procedures that are sensitive to phase errors and magnetic field inhomogeneity. It is shown that intense gradient utilization in clinical horizontal-bore superconducting MR scanners of three different vendors results in main magnetic fields that vary on a long time scale both spatially and temporally by amounts of order 0.8–2.5 ppm. The observed spatial changes have linear and quadratic variations that are strongest along the z direction. It is shown that the effect of such variations is of sufficient magnitude to completely obfuscate thermal phase shifts measured by proton-resonance frequency-shift MR thermometry and certainly affect accuracy. In addition, field variations cause signal loss and line-broadening in MR spectroscopy, as exemplified by a fourfold line-broadening of metabolites over the course of a 45 min human brain study. The field variations are consistent with resistive heating of the magnet structures. It is concluded that correction strategies are required to compensate for these spatial and temporal field drifts for phase-sensitive MR protocols. It is demonstrated that serial field mapping and phased difference imaging correction protocols can substantially compensate for the drift effects observed in the MR thermometry and spectroscopy experiments. PMID:17043837

  4. Modeling the Corona and Solar Wind Using Polar Field Corrected Synoptic Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arge, Charles; de Toma, G.; Owens, M.; Pizzo, V.

    2006-06-01

    Measurements of the line-of-sight (LOS) photospheric field near the Sun's poles are often highly unreliable because of their close proximity to the limb (i.e., only a small component of the field vector is directed toward the observer) and because the Sun's rotation axis is inclined 7.25° to the ecliptic plane. Regions located within 7.25° of the poles are in fact not even observable from Earth for up to six months at a time. The least reliable LOS photospheric field measurements thus tend to be those located near the poles. Photospheric field observations serve as a key driver to all coronal and solar wind models. These models (both simple and advanced) are especially sensitive to the field values at the Sun's poles, and therefore, it is crucial that they are determined as reliably as possible. In this study, we apply a polar field correction technique that we have developed [Arge and Pizzo, 2000] to a solar cycles worth of LOS photospheric magnetic field Carrington maps from Mount Wilson Solar observatory. We then use both the polar corrected as well as the uncorrected maps in the Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) model, which is a simple physics and empirical based coronal and solar wind model. The WSA solar wind predictions at L1 are then compared with each other as well as with the observations from the WIND and ACE spacecraft.

  5. Correction of the field in the SSC dipoles using superconductor on the wedges

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Talman, R.M.

    1987-09-01

    The SSC colliding beam storage ring requires superconducting magnets capable of producing a magnetic field of 6.6 T which has very high accuracy. For many of the multipoles, that multipole must be reduced (at a radius of 1 centimeter) to the order of 0.2 parts in 10,000. This field accuracy is dictated by the physics of storing very small high-current proton beams at energies ranging from 1 TeV to 20 TeV. Magnetization of the superconductor can cause sextupole field errors of up to 6 parts in 10,000 at an injection field of 0.33 T at a radius of 1 centimeter. Saturation of the magnet iron can induce sextupole field errors of 1 to 2 parts in 10,000 at the full field of 6.6 T. Manufacturing errors can induce other multipole components, both normal and skew. The SSC coil has three wedges separating the superconducting coil blocks on the inner layer of the coil. These wedges must be accurately located. If the wedges have superconductors attached, one can correct all of the magnetic field multipoles (both normal and skew) from N = 1 (dipole) to N = 6 (12 pole). This paper describes this method of correction as it pertains to the SSC dipole magnet. 9 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Heel effect adaptive flat field correction of digital x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yongjian; Wang, Jue

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Anode heel effect renders large-scale background nonuniformities in digital radiographs. Conventional offset/gain calibration is performed at mono source-to-image distance (SID), and disregards the SID-dependent characteristic of heel effect. It results in a residual nonuniform background in the corrected radiographs when the SID settings for calibration and correction differ. In this work, the authors develop a robust and efficient computational method for digital x-ray detector gain correction adapted to SID-variant heel effect, without resorting to physical filters, phantoms, complicated heel effect models, or multiple-SID calibration and interpolation.Methods: The authors present the Duo-SID projection correction method. In our approach, conventional offset/gain calibrations are performed only twice, at the minimum and maximum SIDs of the system in typical clinical use. A fast iterative separation algorithm is devised to extract the detector gain and basis heel patterns from the min/max SID calibrations. The resultant detector gain is independent of SID, while the basis heel patterns are parameterized by the min- and max-SID. The heel pattern at any SID is obtained from the min-SID basis heel pattern via projection imaging principles. The system gain desired at a specific acquisition SID is then constructed using the projected heel pattern and detector gain map.Results: The method was evaluated for flat field and anatomical phantom image corrections. It demonstrated promising improvements over interpolation and conventional gain calibration/correction methods, lowering their correction errors by approximately 70% and 80%, respectively. The separation algorithm was able to extract the detector gain and heel patterns with less than 2% error, and the Duo-SID corrected images showed perceptually appealing uniform background across the detector.Conclusions: The Duo-SID correction method has substantially improved on conventional offset/gain corrections for

  7. Motion correction for improved target localization with on-board cone-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Li, T; Schreibmann, E; Yang, Y; Xing, L

    2006-01-21

    On-board imager (OBI) based cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has become available in radiotherapy clinics to accurately identify the target in the treatment position. However, due to the relatively slow gantry rotation (typically about 60 s for a full 360 degrees scan) in acquiring the CBCT projection data, the patient's respiratory motion causes serious problems such as blurring, doubling, streaking and distortion in the reconstructed images, which heavily degrade the image quality and the target localization. In this work, we present a motion compensation method for slow-rotating CBCT scans by incorporating into image reconstruction a patient-specific motion model, which is derived from previously obtained four-dimensional (4D) treatment planning CT images of the same patient via deformable registration. The registration of the 4D CT phases results in transformations representing a temporal sequence of three-dimensional (3D) deformation fields, or in other words, a 4D model of organ motion. The algorithm was developed heuristically in two-dimensional (2D) parallel-beam geometry and extended to 3D cone-beam geometry. By simulations with digital phantoms capable of translational motion and other complex motion, we demonstrated that the algorithm can reduce the motion artefacts locally, and restore the tumour size and shape, which may thereby improve the accuracy of target localization and patient positioning when CBCT is used as the treatment guidance.

  8. Fermion localization and resonances on two-field thick branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, C. A. S.; Casana, R.; Ferreira, M. M., Jr.; Gomes, A. R.

    2009-06-01

    We consider (4, 1)-dimensional branes constructed with two scalar fields ϕ and χ coupled to a Dirac spinor field by means of a general Yukawa coupling. The equation of motion for the coefficients of the chiral decomposition of the spinor in curved spacetime leads to a Schrödinger-like equation whose solutions allow to obtain the masses of the fermionic modes. The simplest Yukawa coupling Ψ¯ϕχΨ is considered for the Bloch brane model and fermion localization is studied. We found resonances for both chiralities and related their appearance to branes with internal structure.

  9. Fermion localization and resonances on two-field thick branes

    SciTech Connect

    Almeida, C. A. S.; Casana, R.; Ferreira, M. M. Jr.; Gomes, A. R.

    2009-06-15

    We consider (4, 1)-dimensional branes constructed with two scalar fields {phi} and {chi} coupled to a Dirac spinor field by means of a general Yukawa coupling. The equation of motion for the coefficients of the chiral decomposition of the spinor in curved spacetime leads to a Schroedinger-like equation whose solutions allow to obtain the masses of the fermionic modes. The simplest Yukawa coupling {psi}{phi}{chi}{psi} is considered for the Bloch brane model and fermion localization is studied. We found resonances for both chiralities and related their appearance to branes with internal structure.

  10. New Time Dependent Sensitivity Corrections and Updated Flat Fields for the ACS/SBC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, Roberto J.; Kossakowski, Diana

    2017-06-01

    The sensitivity of the Solar Blind Channel on the Advanced Camera for Surveys changes with time. Until now there was no correction available for this effect. Here we present the new corrections, derived for all the imaging filters using observations that date back to installation, more than 15 years worth of data. The sensitivity can now be continuously monitored and the correction updated as necessary. Additionaly, we present a new set of flat fields for all imaging filters. These are necessary because of the previous discovery of a change in the high frequency pattern in the flats currently in use. The new flats were derived using an improved algorithm than what was used for the previous versions, employing MCMC fitting techniques.

  11. Near-field beamforming analysis for acoustic emission source localization.

    PubMed

    He, Tian; Pan, Qiang; Liu, Yaoguang; Liu, Xiandong; Hu, Dayong

    2012-07-01

    This paper attempts to introduce a near-field acoustic emission (AE) beamforming method to estimate the AE source locations by using a small array of sensors closely placed in a local region. The propagation characteristics of AE signals are investigated based on guided wave theory to discuss the feasibility of using beamforming techniques in AE signal processing. To validate the effectiveness of the AE beamforming method, a series of pencil lead break tests at various regions of a thin steel plate are conducted. The potential of this method for engineering applications are explored through rotor-stator rubbing tests. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can effectively determine the region where rubbing occurs. It is expected that the work of this paper may provide a helpful analysis tool for near-field AE source localization.

  12. Fatigue crack localization with near-field acoustic emission signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Changjiang; Zhang, Yunfeng

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents an AE source localization technique using near-field acoustic emission (AE) signals induced by crack growth and propagation. The proposed AE source localization technique is based on the phase difference in the AE signals measured by two identical AE sensing elements spaced apart at a pre-specified distance. This phase difference results in canceling-out of certain frequency contents of signals, which can be related to AE source direction. Experimental data from simulated AE source such as pencil breaks was used along with analytical results from moment tensor analysis. It is observed that the theoretical predictions, numerical simulations and the experimental test results are in good agreement. Real data from field monitoring of an existing fatigue crack on a bridge was also used to test this system. Results show that the proposed method is fairly effective in determining the AE source direction in thick plates commonly encountered in civil engineering structures.

  13. A Modified Brain MR Image Segmentation and Bias Field Estimation Model Based on Local and Global Information

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Wang; Luan, Kuan; Liang, Hong; Ma, Xingcheng

    2016-01-01

    Because of the poor radio frequency coil uniformity and gradient-driven eddy currents, there is much noise and intensity inhomogeneity (bias) in brain magnetic resonance (MR) image, and it severely affects the segmentation accuracy. Better segmentation results are difficult to achieve by traditional methods; therefore, in this paper, a modified brain MR image segmentation and bias field estimation model based on local and global information is proposed. We first construct local constraints including image neighborhood information in Gaussian kernel mapping space, and then the complete regularization is established by introducing nonlocal spatial information of MR image. The weighting between local and global information is automatically adjusted according to image local information. At the same time, bias field information is coupled with the model, and it makes the model reduce noise interference but also can effectively estimate the bias field information. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm has strong robustness to noise and bias field is well corrected. PMID:27660649

  14. Band-structure-corrected local density approximation study of semiconductor quantum dots and wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingbo; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2005-09-01

    This paper presents results of ab initio accuracy thousand atom calculations of colloidal quantum dots and wires using the charge patching method. We have used density functional theory under local density approximation (LDA), and we have corrected the LDA bulk band structures by modifying the nonlocal pseudopotentials, so that their effective masses agree with experimental values. We have systematically studied the electronic states of group III-V (GaAs, InAs, InP, GaN, AlN, and InN) and group II-VI (CdSe, CdS, CdTe, ZnSe, ZnS, ZnTe, and ZnO) systems. We have also calculated the electron-hole Coulomb interactions in these systems. We report the exciton energies as functions of the quantum dot sizes and quantum wire diameters for all the above materials. We found generally good agreements between our calculated results and experimental measurements. For CdSe and InP, the currently calculated results agree well with the previously calculated results using semiempirical pseudopotentials. The ratios of band-gap-increases between quantum wires and dots are material-dependent, but a majority of them are close to 0.586, as predicted by the simple effective-mass model. Finally, the size dependence of 1Se-1Pe transition energies of CdSe quantum dots agrees well with the experiment. Our results can be used as benchmarks for future experiments and calculations.

  15. Validation of Regression-Based Myogenic Correction Techniques for Scalp and Source-Localized EEG

    PubMed Central

    McMenamin, Brenton W.; Shackman, Alexander J.; Maxwell, Jeffrey S.; Greischar, Lawrence L.; Davidson, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    EEG and EEG source-estimation are susceptible to electromyographic artifacts (EMG) generated by the cranial muscles. EMG can mask genuine effects or masquerade as a legitimate effect - even in low frequencies, such as alpha (8–13Hz). Although regression-based correction has been used previously, only cursory attempts at validation exist and the utility for source-localized data is unknown. To address this, EEG was recorded from 17 participants while neurogenic and myogenic activity were factorially varied. We assessed the sensitivity and specificity of four regression-based techniques: between-subjects, between-subjects using difference-scores, within-subjects condition-wise, and within-subject epoch-wise on the scalp and in data modeled using the LORETA algorithm. Although within-subject epoch-wise showed superior performance on the scalp, no technique succeeded in the source-space. Aside from validating the novel epoch-wise methods on the scalp, we highlight methods requiring further development. PMID:19298626

  16. Riemann correlator in de Sitter including loop corrections from conformal fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröb, Markus B.; Roura, Albert; Verdaguer, Enric

    2014-07-01

    The Riemann correlator with appropriately raised indices characterizes in a gauge-invariant way the quantum metric fluctuations around de Sitter spacetime including loop corrections from matter fields. Specializing to conformal fields and employing a method that selects the de Sitter-invariant vacuum in the Poincaré patch, we obtain the exact result for the Riemann correlator through order H4/mp4. The result is expressed in a manifestly de Sitter-invariant form in terms of maximally symmetric bitensors. Its behavior for both short and long distances (sub- and superhorizon scales) is analyzed in detail. Furthermore, by carefully taking the flat-space limit, the explicit result for the Riemann correlator for metric fluctuations around Minkowki spacetime is also obtained. Although the main focus is on free scalar fields (our calculation corresponds then to one-loop order in the matter fields), the result for general conformal field theories is also derived.

  17. Riemann correlator in de Sitter including loop corrections from conformal fields

    SciTech Connect

    Fröb, Markus B.; Verdaguer, Enric

    2014-07-01

    The Riemann correlator with appropriately raised indices characterizes in a gauge-invariant way the quantum metric fluctuations around de Sitter spacetime including loop corrections from matter fields. Specializing to conformal fields and employing a method that selects the de Sitter-invariant vacuum in the Poincaré patch, we obtain the exact result for the Riemann correlator through order H{sup 4}/m{sub p}{sup 4}. The result is expressed in a manifestly de Sitter-invariant form in terms of maximally symmetric bitensors. Its behavior for both short and long distances (sub- and superhorizon scales) is analyzed in detail. Furthermore, by carefully taking the flat-space limit, the explicit result for the Riemann correlator for metric fluctuations around Minkowki spacetime is also obtained. Although the main focus is on free scalar fields (our calculation corresponds then to one-loop order in the matter fields), the result for general conformal field theories is also derived.

  18. Small field detector correction factors: effects of the flattening filter for Elekta and Varian linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Madelaine K; Liu, Paul Z Y; Lee, Christopher; McKenzie, David R; Suchowerska, Natalka

    2016-05-08

    Flattening filter-free (FFF) beams are becoming the preferred beam type for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR), as they enable an increase in dose rate and a decrease in treatment time. This work assesses the effects of the flattening filter on small field output factors for 6 MV beams generated by both Elekta and Varian linear accelerators, and determines differences between detector response in flattened (FF) and FFF beams. Relative output factors were measured with a range of detectors (diodes, ionization cham-bers, radiochromic film, and microDiamond) and referenced to the relative output factors measured with an air core fiber optic dosimeter (FOD), a scintillation dosimeter developed at Chris O'Brien Lifehouse, Sydney. Small field correction factors were generated for both FF and FFF beams. Diode measured detector response was compared with a recently published mathematical relation to predict diode response corrections in small fields. The effect of flattening filter removal on detector response was quantified using a ratio of relative detector responses in FFF and FF fields for the same field size. The removal of the flattening filter was found to have a small but measurable effect on ionization chamber response with maximum deviations of less than ± 0.9% across all field sizes measured. Solid-state detectors showed an increased dependence on the flattening filter of up to ± 1.6%. Measured diode response was within ± 1.1% of the published mathematical relation for all fields up to 30 mm, independent of linac type and presence or absence of a flattening filter. For 6 MV beams, detector correction factors between FFF and FF beams are interchangeable for a linac between FF and FFF modes, providing that an additional uncertainty of up to ± 1.6% is accepted.

  19. The Local Stellar Velocity Field via Vector Spherical Harmonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makarov, V. V.; Murphy, D. W.

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the local field of stellar tangential velocities for a sample of 42,339 nonbinary Hipparcos stars with accurate parallaxes, using a vector spherical harmonic formalism.We derive simple relations between the parameters of the classical linear model (Ogorodnikov-Milne) of the local systemic field and low-degree terms of the general vector harmonic decomposition. Taking advantage of these relationships, we determine the solar velocity with respect to the local stars of (V(sub X), V(sub Y), V(sub Z)) = (10.5, 18.5, 7.3) +/- 0.1 km s(exp -1) not for the asymmetric drift with respect to the local standard of rest. If only stars more distant than 100 pc are considered, the peculiar solar motion is (V(sub X), V(sub Y), V(sub Z)) = (9.9, 15.6, 6.9) +/- 0.2 km s(exp -1). The adverse effects of harmonic leakage, which occurs between the reflex solar motion represented by the three electric vector harmonics in the velocity space and higher degree harmonics in the proper-motion space, are eliminated in our analysis by direct subtraction of the reflex solar velocity in its tangential components for each star...

  20. The Local Stellar Velocity Field via Vector Spherical Harmonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makarov, V. V.; Murphy, D. W.

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the local field of stellar tangential velocities for a sample of 42,339 nonbinary Hipparcos stars with accurate parallaxes, using a vector spherical harmonic formalism.We derive simple relations between the parameters of the classical linear model (Ogorodnikov-Milne) of the local systemic field and low-degree terms of the general vector harmonic decomposition. Taking advantage of these relationships, we determine the solar velocity with respect to the local stars of (V(sub X), V(sub Y), V(sub Z)) = (10.5, 18.5, 7.3) +/- 0.1 km s(exp -1) not for the asymmetric drift with respect to the local standard of rest. If only stars more distant than 100 pc are considered, the peculiar solar motion is (V(sub X), V(sub Y), V(sub Z)) = (9.9, 15.6, 6.9) +/- 0.2 km s(exp -1). The adverse effects of harmonic leakage, which occurs between the reflex solar motion represented by the three electric vector harmonics in the velocity space and higher degree harmonics in the proper-motion space, are eliminated in our analysis by direct subtraction of the reflex solar velocity in its tangential components for each star...

  1. The local dayside reconnection rate for oblique interplanetary magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komar, C. M.; Cassak, P. A.

    2016-06-01

    We present an analysis of local properties of magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause for various interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientations in global magnetospheric simulations. This has heretofore not been practical because it is difficult to locate where reconnection occurs for oblique IMF, but new techniques make this possible. The approach is to identify magnetic separators, the curves separating four regions of differing magnetic topology, which map the reconnection X line. The electric field parallel to the X line is the local reconnection rate. We compare results to a simple model of local two-dimensional asymmetric reconnection. To do so, we find the plasma parameters that locally drive reconnection in the magnetosheath and magnetosphere in planes perpendicular to the X line at a large number of points along the X line. The global magnetohydrodynamic simulations are from the three-dimensional Block-Adaptive, Tree Solarwind Roe-type Upwind Scheme (BATS-R-US) code with a uniform resistivity, although the techniques described here are extensible to any global magnetospheric simulation model. We find that the predicted local reconnection rates scale well with the measured values for all simulations, being nearly exact for due southward IMF. However, the absolute predictions differ by an undetermined constant of proportionality, whose magnitude increases as the IMF clock angle changes from southward to northward. We also show similar scaling agreement in a simulation with oblique southward IMF and a dipole tilt. The present results will be an important component of a full understanding of the local and global properties of dayside reconnection.

  2. A test of SDSS aperture corrections using integral-field spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Andrew W.; Glazebrook, Karl; Gilbank, David G.; McGregor, Peter J.; Damjanov, Ivana; Abraham, Roberto G.; Sharp, Rob

    2017-09-01

    Corrections for fibre aperture losses in modern surveys such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey are at the foundation of statistical studies of galaxy properties, yet these corrections are not well understood. We compare direct measurements of the total (aperture-free) H α-based star formation rate from integral-field spectroscopy with Brinchmann et al. and Gilbank et al. derived estimates of the star formation rate from fibre-aperture spectroscopy for the same z ≃ 0.07 star-forming galaxies drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. This comparison reveals that aperture-corrected star formation rates are underestimated for more highly star-forming galaxies: specifically by 0.3 and 0.6 dex at rates of star formation of 10 and 100 M⊙ yr-1, respectively, while the underestimate vanishes at 1 M⊙ yr-1. Furthermore, previous estimates of the aperture loss for H α emission only marginally correlate with direct measurements of the aperture loss for individual galaxies. The primary limitation of our work is the lack of spatially resolved dust attenuation corrections. We conclude that corrections for aperture losses should be considered with caution.

  3. Hydrogen atom in a strong magnetic field. II. Relativistic corrections for low-lying excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poszwa, A.; Rutkowski, A.

    2004-02-01

    The highly accurate solution of the Schrödinger equation in the form of common Landau exponential factor multiplied by a power series in two variables, the sine of the cone angle and radial variable is completed by the first-order relativistic correction calculated within the framework of the relativistic direct perturbation theory (DPT). It is found that in contrast to behavior of relativistic corrections for the ground state and 2p-1(ms=-1/2) excited state, which change sign from negative to positive near B≈1011 G and B≈1010 G, respectively [Z. Chen and S. P. Goldman, Phys. Rev A 45, 1722 (1992)], the relativistic corrections for 2s0(ms=-1/2) and 2p0(ms=-1/2) excited states are negative for the magnetic field varying in range 0correction significantly mix nonrelativistic states the near-degenerate version of DPT is used. The avoided crossings of relativistic levels with μ=-1/2 and π=-1, evolving from field-free states with principal quantum numbers n=2,3,4 are presented.

  4. A field size specific backscatter correction algorithm for accurate EPID dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Berry, Sean L; Polvorosa, Cynthia S; Wuu, Cheng-Shie

    2010-06-01

    Portal dose images acquired with an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device (EPID) suffer from artifacts related to backscattered radiation. The backscatter signal varies as a function of field size (FS) and location on the EPID. Most current portal dosimetry algorithms fail to account for the FS dependence. The ramifications of this omission are investigated and solutions for correcting the measured dose images for FS specific backscatter are proposed. A series of open field dose images were obtained for field sizes ranging from 2×2 to 30×40cm2. Each image was analyzed to determine the amount of backscatter present. Two methods to account for the relationship between FS and backscatter are offered. These include the use of discrete FS specific correction matrices and the use of a single generalized equation. The efficacy of each approach was tested on the clinical dosimetric images for ten patients, 49 treatment fields. The fields were evaluated to determine whether there was an improvement in the dosimetric result over the commercial vendor's current algorithm. It was found that backscatter manifests itself as an asymmetry in the measured signal primarily in the inplane direction. The maximum error is approximately 3.6% for 10×10 and 12.5×12.5cm2 field sizes. The asymmetry decreased with increasing FS to approximately 0.6% for fields larger than 30×30cm2. The dosimetric comparison between the measured and predicted dose images was significantly improved (p⪡.001) when a FS specific backscatter correction was applied. The average percentage of points passing a 2%, 2 mm gamma criteria increased from 90.6% to between 96.7% and 97.2% after the proposed methods were employed. The error observed in a measured portal dose image depends on how much its FS differs from the 30×40cm2 calibration conditions. The proposed methods for correcting for FS specific backscatter effectively improved the ability of the EPID to perform dosimetric measurements

  5. Error field measurement, correction and heat flux balancing on Wendelstein 7-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazerson, Samuel A.; Otte, Matthias; Jakubowski, Marcin; Israeli, Ben; Wurden, Glen A.; Wenzel, Uwe; Andreeva, Tamara; Bozhenkov, Sergey; Biedermann, Christoph; Kocsis, Gábor; Szepesi, Tamás; Geiger, Joachim; Pedersen, Thomas Sunn; Gates, David; The W7-X Team

    2017-04-01

    The measurement and correction of error fields in Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) is critical to long pulse high beta operation, as small error fields may cause overloading of divertor plates in some configurations. Accordingly, as part of a broad collaborative effort, the detection and correction of error fields on the W7-X experiment has been performed using the trim coil system in conjunction with the flux surface mapping diagnostic and high resolution infrared camera. In the early commissioning phase of the experiment, the trim coils were used to open an n/m  =  1/2 island chain in a specially designed magnetic configuration. The flux surfacing mapping diagnostic was then able to directly image the magnetic topology of the experiment, allowing the inference of a small  ∼4 cm intrinsic island chain. The suspected main sources of the error field, slight misalignment and deformations of the superconducting coils, are then confirmed through experimental modeling using the detailed measurements of the coil positions. Observations of the limiters temperatures in module 5 shows a clear dependence of the limiter heat flux pattern as the perturbing fields are rotated. Plasma experiments without applied correcting fields show a significant asymmetry in neutral pressure (centered in module 4) and light emission (visible, H-alpha, CII, and CIII). Such pressure asymmetry is associated with plasma-wall (limiter) interaction asymmetries between the modules. Application of trim coil fields with n  =  1 waveform correct the imbalance. Confirmation of the error fields allows the assessment of magnetic fields which resonate with the n/m  =  5/5 island chain. Notice: This manuscript has been authored by Princeton University under Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The publisher, by accepting the article for publication acknowledges, that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world

  6. Quantification of local geometric distortion in structural magnetic resonance images: Application to ultra-high fields.

    PubMed

    Lau, Jonathan C; Khan, Ali R; Zeng, Tony Y; MacDougall, Keith W; Parrent, Andrew G; Peters, Terry M

    2017-01-06

    Ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides superior visualization of brain structures compared to lower fields, but images may be prone to severe geometric inhomogeneity. We propose to quantify local geometric distortion at ultra-high fields in in vivo datasets of human subjects scanned at both ultra-high field and lower fields. By using the displacement field derived from nonlinear image registration between images of the same subject, focal areas of spatial uncertainty are quantified. Through group and subject-specific analysis, we were able to identify regions systematically affected by geometric distortion at air-tissue interfaces prone to magnetic susceptibility, where the gradient coil non-linearity occurs in the occipital and suboccipital regions, as well as with distance from image isocenter. The derived displacement maps, quantified in millimeters, can be used to prospectively evaluate subject-specific local spatial uncertainty that should be taken into account in neuroimaging studies, and also for clinical applications like stereotactic neurosurgery where accuracy is critical. Validation with manual fiducial displacement demonstrated excellent correlation and agreement. Our results point to the need for site-specific calibration of geometric inhomogeneity. Our methodology provides a framework to permit prospective evaluation of the effect of MRI sequences, distortion correction techniques, and scanner hardware/software upgrades on geometric distortion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Markov random field and Gaussian mixture for segmented MRI-based partial volume correction in PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousse, Alexandre; Pedemonte, Stefano; Thomas, Benjamin A.; Erlandsson, Kjell; Ourselin, Sébastien; Arridge, Simon; Hutton, Brian F.

    2012-10-01

    In this paper we propose a segmented magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) prior-based maximum penalized likelihood deconvolution technique for positron emission tomography (PET) images. The model assumes the existence of activity classes that behave like a hidden Markov random field (MRF) driven by the segmented MRI. We utilize a mean field approximation to compute the likelihood of the MRF. We tested our method on both simulated and clinical data (brain PET) and compared our results with PET images corrected with the re-blurred Van Cittert (VC) algorithm, the simplified Guven (SG) algorithm and the region-based voxel-wise (RBV) technique. We demonstrated our algorithm outperforms the VC algorithm and outperforms SG and RBV corrections when the segmented MRI is inconsistent (e.g. mis-segmentation, lesions, etc) with the PET image.

  8. Systematic 1{ital /N} corrections for bosonic and fermionic vector models without auxiliary fields

    SciTech Connect

    de Mello Koch, R.; Rodrigues, J.P.

    1996-12-01

    In this paper, colorless bilocal fields are employed to study the large {ital N} limit of both fermionic and bosonic vector models. The Jacobian associated with the change of variables from the original fields to the bilocals is computed exactly, thereby providing an exact effective action. This effective action is shown to reproduce the familiar perturbative expansion for the two and four point functions. In particular, in the case of fermionic vector models, the effective action accounts correctly for the Fermi statistics. The theory also is studied nonperturbatively. The stationary points of the effective action are shown to provide the usual large {ital N} gap equations. The homogeneous equation associated with the quadratic (in the bilocals) action is simply the two particle Bethe-Salpeter equation. Finally, the leading correction in 1/{ital N} is shown to be in agreement with the exact {ital S} matrix of the model. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  9. Relative Localization in Wireless Sensor Networks for Measurement of Electric Fields under HVDC Transmission Lines

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yong; Wang, Qiusheng; Yuan, Haiwen; Song, Xiao; Hu, Xuemin; Zhao, Luxing

    2015-01-01

    In the wireless sensor networks (WSNs) for electric field measurement system under the High-Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) transmission lines, it is necessary to obtain the electric field distribution with multiple sensors. The location information of each sensor is essential to the correct analysis of measurement results. Compared with the existing approach which gathers the location information by manually labelling sensors during deployment, the automatic localization can reduce the workload and improve the measurement efficiency. A novel and practical range-free localization algorithm for the localization of one-dimensional linear topology wireless networks in the electric field measurement system is presented. The algorithm utilizes unknown nodes' neighbor lists based on the Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI) values to determine the relative locations of nodes. The algorithm is able to handle the exceptional situation of the output permutation which can effectively improve the accuracy of localization. The performance of this algorithm under real circumstances has been evaluated through several experiments with different numbers of nodes and different node deployments in the China State Grid HVDC test base. Results show that the proposed algorithm achieves an accuracy of over 96% under different conditions. PMID:25658390

  10. Relative localization in wireless sensor networks for measurement of electric fields under HVDC transmission lines.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yong; Wang, Qiusheng; Yuan, Haiwen; Song, Xiao; Hu, Xuemin; Zhao, Luxing

    2015-02-04

    In the wireless sensor networks (WSNs) for electric field measurement system under the High-Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) transmission lines, it is necessary to obtain the electric field distribution with multiple sensors. The location information of each sensor is essential to the correct analysis of measurement results. Compared with the existing approach which gathers the location information by manually labelling sensors during deployment, the automatic localization can reduce the workload and improve the measurement efficiency. A novel and practical range-free localization algorithm for the localization of one-dimensional linear topology wireless networks in the electric field measurement system is presented. The algorithm utilizes unknown nodes' neighbor lists based on the Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI) values to determine the relative locations of nodes. The algorithm is able to handle the exceptional situation of the output permutation which can effectively improve the accuracy of localization. The performance of this algorithm under real circumstances has been evaluated through several experiments with different numbers of nodes and different node deployments in the China State Grid HVDC test base. Results show that the proposed algorithm achieves an accuracy of over 96% under different conditions.

  11. Subleading Spin-Orbit Correction to the Newtonian Potential in Effective Field Theory Formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrodin, Delphine L.

    We study the gravitational dynamics in the early inspiral phase of coalescing compact binaries using Non-Relativistic General Relativity (NRGR) - an effective field theory formalism based on the post-Newtonian expansion, but which provides a consistent lagrangian framework and a systematic way in which to study binary dynamics and gravitational wave emission. We calculate in this framework the spin-orbit correction to the newtonian potential at 2.5 PN.

  12. Artificial local magnetic field inhomogeneity enhances T2 relaxivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zijian; Tian, Rui; Wang, Zhenyu; Yang, Zhen; Liu, Yijing; Liu, Gang; Wang, Ruifang; Gao, Jinhao; Song, Jibin; Nie, Liming; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2017-05-01

    Clustering of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is perhaps the most effective, yet intriguing strategy to enhance T2 relaxivity in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, the underlying mechanism is still not fully understood and the attempts to generalize the classic outersphere theory from single particles to clusters have been found to be inadequate. Here we show that clustering of MNPs enhances local field inhomogeneity due to reduced field symmetry, which can be further elevated by artificially involving iron oxide NPs with heterogeneous geometries in terms of size and shape. The r2 values of iron oxide clusters and Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert simulations confirmed our hypothesis, indicating that solving magnetic field inhomogeneity may become a powerful way to build correlation between magnetization and T2 relaxivity of MNPs, especially magnetic clusters. This study provides a simple yet distinct mechanism to interpret T2 relaxivity of MNPs, which is crucial to the design of high-performance MRI contrast agents.

  13. Artificial local magnetic field inhomogeneity enhances T2 relaxivity

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zijian; Tian, Rui; Wang, Zhenyu; Yang, Zhen; Liu, Yijing; Liu, Gang; Wang, Ruifang; Song, Jibin; Nie, Liming; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2017-01-01

    Clustering of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is perhaps the most effective, yet intriguing strategy to enhance T2 relaxivity in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, the underlying mechanism is still not fully understood and the attempts to generalize the classic outersphere theory from single particles to clusters have been found to be inadequate. Here we show that clustering of MNPs enhances local field inhomogeneity due to reduced field symmetry, which can be further elevated by artificially involving iron oxide NPs with heterogeneous geometries in terms of size and shape. The r2 values of iron oxide clusters and Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert simulations confirmed our hypothesis, indicating that solving magnetic field inhomogeneity may become a powerful way to build correlation between magnetization and T2 relaxivity of MNPs, especially magnetic clusters. This study provides a simple yet distinct mechanism to interpret T2 relaxivity of MNPs, which is crucial to the design of high-performance MRI contrast agents. PMID:28516947

  14. Automatic NMO Correction and Full Common Depth Point NMO Velocity Field Estimation in Anisotropic Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedek, Mohamed; Gross, Lutz; Tyson, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    We present a new computational method of automatic normal moveout (NMO) correction that not only accurately flattens and corrects the far offset data, but simultaneously provides NMO velocity (v_nmo) for each individual seismic trace. The method is based on a predefined number of NMO velocity sweeps using linear vertical interpolation of different NMO velocities at each seismic trace. At each sweep, we measure the semblance between the zero offset trace (pilot trace) and the next seismic trace using a trace-by-trace rather than sample-by-sample based semblance measure; then after all the sweeps are done, the one with the maximum semblance value is chosen, which is assumed to be the most suitable NMO velocity trace that accurately flattens seismic reflection events. Other traces follow the same process, and a final velocity field is then extracted. Isotropic, anisotropic and lateral heterogenous synthetic geological models were built to test the method. A range of synthetic background noise, ranging from 10 to 30 %, was applied to the models. In addition, the method was tested on Hess's VTI (vertical transverse isotropy) model. Furthermore, we tested our method on a real pre-stack seismic CDP gathered from a gas field in Alaska. The results from the presented examples show an excellent NMO correction and extracted a reasonably accurate NMO velocity field.

  15. Parallel transmission RF pulse design for eddy current correction at ultra high field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Hai; Zhao, Tiejun; Qian, Yongxian; Ibrahim, Tamer; Boada, Fernando

    2012-08-01

    Multidimensional spatially selective RF pulses have been used in MRI applications such as B1 and B0 inhomogeneities mitigation. However, the long pulse duration has limited their practical applications. Recently, theoretical and experimental studies have shown that parallel transmission can effectively shorten pulse duration without sacrificing the quality of the excitation pattern. Nonetheless, parallel transmission with accelerated pulses can be severely impeded by hardware and/or system imperfections. One of such imperfections is the effect of the eddy current field. In this paper, we first show the effects of the eddy current field on the excitation pattern and then report an RF pulse the design method to correct eddy current fields caused by the RF coil and the gradient system. Experimental results on a 7 T human eight-channel parallel transmit system show substantial improvements on excitation patterns with the use of eddy current correction. Moreover, the proposed model-based correction method not only demonstrates comparable excitation patterns as the trajectory measurement method, but also significantly improves time efficiency.

  16. Faster dynamic imaging of speech with field inhomogeneity corrected spiral fast low angle shot (FLASH) at 3 T.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Bradley P; Conway, Charles A; Bae, Youkyung; Seethamraju, Ravi; Kuehn, David P

    2010-11-01

    To evaluate the impact of magnetic field inhomogeneity correction on achievable imaging speeds for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of articulating oropharyngeal structures during speech and to determine if sufficient acquisition speed is available for visualizing speech structures with real-time MRI. We designed a spiral fast low angle shot (FLASH) sequence that combines several acquisition techniques with an advanced image reconstruction approach that includes magnetic field inhomogeneity correction. A simulation study was performed to examine the interaction between imaging speed, image quality, number of spiral shots, and field inhomogeneity correction. Six volunteer subjects were scanned to demonstrate adequate visualization of articulating structures during simple speech samples. The simulation study confirmed that magnetic field inhomogeneity correction improves the available tradeoff between image quality and speed. Our optimized sequence co-acquires magnetic field maps for image correction and achieves a dynamic imaging rate of 21.4 frames per second, significantly faster than previous studies. Improved visualization of anatomical structures, such as the soft palate, was also seen from the field-corrected reconstructions in data acquired on volunteer subjects producing simple speech samples. Adequate temporal resolution of articulating oropharyngeal structures during speech can be obtained by combining outer volume suppression, multishot spiral imaging, and magnetic field corrected image reconstruction. Correcting for the large, dynamic magnetic field variation in the oropharyngeal cavity improves image quality and allows for higher temporal resolution. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Chemical and biochemical analysis using microfluidic-localized field platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepaniak, Michael; Abu-Hatab, Nahla; Wellman, Amber; John, Joshy; Connatser, Maggie

    2007-09-01

    Microfluidics offer the advantages of multiplexed analysis on small, inexpensive platforms. We describe herein two distinct optical detection techniques that have the common point of sequestering and measuring analyte signals in highly localized EM fields. The first technique mates a microfluidic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) platform with colloidal-based surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) in order to perform parallel, high throughput vibrational spectroscopy. Spectra are acquired for analytes localized in surface plasmon fields associated with conventional and uniquely synthesized cubic silver colloids. SERS studies such as pH of the colloidal solution, and the type of colloid are used to demonstrate the efficiency and applicability of the method. In addition, a facile passive pumping method is used to deliver Ag colloids and analytes into the channels where all SERS measurements were completed under nondestructive flowing conditions. With this approach, SERS signal reproducibility was found to be better than 7%. A calibration curve for the drug mitoxantrone (resonance enhanced) was generated. The second technique seeks to integrate a passively-pumped, microfluidic, PDMS platform and planar waveguide technology, utilizing magnetic beads as solid supports for fluoro-assays with direct detection of bound analyte within the sample mixture accomplished by selectively driving functionalized beads to a localized evanescent field. Because analyte binding occurs in free solution, the reaction is not diffusion limited and, once magnetically delivered to the evanescent wave, the analyte can be detected with fewer complications arising from non-optically homogeneous, biological matrices. Additionally, the evanescent sensing surface can be easily regenerated by simply removing the bead-retaining magnetic field. Initial testing, optimization and calibration were performed using a model sandwich immunoassay system for the detection of rabbit IgG, with which we demonstrate a

  18. New localization mechanism and Hodge duality for q -form field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Chun-E.; Liu, Yu-Xiao; Guo, Heng; Zhang, Sheng-Li

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the problem of localization and the Hodge duality for a q -form field on a p -brane with codimension one. By a general Kaluza-Klein (KK) decomposition without gauge fixing, we obtain two Schrödinger-like equations for two types of KK modes of the bulk q -form field, which determine the localization and mass spectra of these KK modes. It is found that there are two types of zero modes (the 0-level modes): a q -form zero mode and a (q -1 )-form one, which cannot be localized on the brane at the same time. For the n -level KK modes, there are two interacting KK modes, a massive q -form KK mode and a massless (q -1 )-form one. By analyzing gauge invariance of the effective action and choosing a gauge condition, the n -level massive q -form KK mode decouples from the n -level massless (q -1 )-form one. It is also found that the Hodge duality in the bulk naturally becomes two dualities on the brane. The first one is the Hodge duality between a q -form zero mode and a (p -q -1 )-form one, or between a (q -1 )-form zero mode and a (p -q )-form one. The second duality is between two group KK modes: one is an n -level massive q -form KK mode with mass mn and an n -level massless (q -1 )-form mode; another is an n -level (p -q )-form one with the same mass mn and an n -level massless (p -q -1 )-form mode. Because of the dualities, the effective field theories on the brane for the KK modes of the two dual bulk form fields are physically equivalent.

  19. Noncommutative correction to Aharonov-Bohm scattering: A field theory approach

    SciTech Connect

    Anacleto, M.A.; Gomes, M.; Silva, A.J. da; Spehler, D.

    2004-10-15

    We study a noncommutative nonrelativistic theory in 2+1 dimensions of a scalar field coupled to the Chern-Simons field. In the commutative situation this model has been used to simulate the Aharonov-Bohm effect in the field theory context. We verified that, contrary to the commutative result, the inclusion of a quartic self-interaction of the scalar field is not necessary to secure the ultraviolet renormalizability of the model. However, to obtain a smooth commutative limit the presence of a quartic gauge invariant self-interaction is required. For small noncommutativity we fix the corrections to the Aharonov-Bohm scattering and prove that up to one loop the model is free from dangerous infrared/ultraviolet divergences.

  20. Effect of gauge-field interaction on fermion transport in two dimensions: Hartree conductivity correction and dephasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, T.; Gornyi, I. V.; Mirlin, A. D.; Wölfle, P.

    2008-06-01

    We consider the quantum corrections to the conductivity of fermions interacting via a Chern Simons gauge field and concentrate on the Hartree-type contributions. The first-order Hartree approximation is only valid in the limit of weak coupling λ≪g-1/2 to the gauge field ( g≫1 is the dimensionless conductance) and results in an antilocalizing conductivity correction ˜λ2gln2T . In the case of strong coupling, an infinite summation of higher-order terms is necessary, which includes both the virtual (renormalization of the frequency) and real (dephasing) processes. At intermediate temperatures, T0≪T≪gT0 , where T0˜1/g2τ and τ is the elastic scattering time, the T dependence of the conductivity is determined by the Hartree correction, δσH(T)-δσH(gT0)∝g1/2-(T/T0)1/2[1+ln(gT0/T)1/2] , so that σ(T) increases with lowering T . At low temperatures, T≪T0 , the temperature-dependent part of the Hartree correction assumes a logarithmic form with a coefficient of order unity, δσH∝ln(1/T) . As a result, the negative exchange contribution δσex∝-lngln(1/T) becomes dominant, which yields localization in the limit of T→0 . We further discuss dephasing at strong coupling and show that the dephasing rates are of the order of T , owing to the interplay of inelastic scattering and renormalization. On the other hand, the dephasing length is anomalously short, Lφ≪LT , where LT is the thermal length. For the case of composite fermions with long-range Coulomb interaction, the gauge-field propagator is less singular. The resulting Hartree correction has the usual sign and temperature dependence, δσH∝lngln(1/T) , and for realistic g is overcompensated by the negative exchange contribution due to the gauge-boson and scalar parts of the interaction. In this case, the dephasing length Lφ is of the order of LT for not too low temperatures and exceeds LT for T≲gT0 .

  1. Evaluation of tumor localization in respiration motion-corrected cone-beam CT: Prospective study in lung

    SciTech Connect

    Dzyubak, Oleksandr; Kincaid, Russell; Hertanto, Agung; Hu, Yu-Chi; Pham, Hai; Yorke, Ellen; Zhang, Qinghui; Mageras, Gig S.; Rimner, Andreas

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: Target localization accuracy of cone-beam CT (CBCT) images used in radiation treatment of respiratory disease sites is affected by motion artifacts (blurring and streaking). The authors have previously reported on a method of respiratory motion correction in thoracic CBCT at end expiration (EE). The previous retrospective study was limited to examination of reducing motion artifacts in a small number of patient cases. They report here on a prospective study in a larger group of lung cancer patients to evaluate respiratory motion-corrected (RMC)-CBCT ability to improve lung tumor localization accuracy and reduce motion artifacts in Linac-mounted CBCT images. A second study goal examines whether the motion correction derived from a respiration-correlated CT (RCCT) at simulation yields similar tumor localization accuracy at treatment. Methods: In an IRB-approved study, 19 lung cancer patients (22 tumors) received a RCCT at simulation, and on one treatment day received a RCCT, a respiratory-gated CBCT at end expiration, and a 1-min CBCT. A respiration monitor of abdominal displacement was used during all scans. In addition to a CBCT reconstruction without motion correction, the motion correction method was applied to the same 1-min scan. Projection images were sorted into ten bins based on abdominal displacement, and each bin was reconstructed to produce ten intermediate CBCT images. Each intermediate CBCT was deformed to the end expiration state using a motion model derived from RCCT. The deformed intermediate CBCT images were then added to produce a final RMC-CBCT. In order to evaluate the second study goal, the CBCT was corrected in two ways, one using a model derived from the RCCT at simulation [RMC-CBCT(sim)], the other from the RCCT at treatment [RMC-CBCT(tx)]. Image evaluation compared uncorrected CBCT, RMC-CBCT(sim), and RMC-CBCT(tx). The gated CBCT at end expiration served as the criterion standard for comparison. Using automatic rigid image

  2. Evaluation of tumor localization in respiration motion-corrected cone-beam CT: Prospective study in lung

    PubMed Central

    Dzyubak, Oleksandr; Kincaid, Russell; Hertanto, Agung; Hu, Yu-Chi; Pham, Hai; Rimner, Andreas; Yorke, Ellen; Zhang, Qinghui; Mageras, Gig S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Target localization accuracy of cone-beam CT (CBCT) images used in radiation treatment of respiratory disease sites is affected by motion artifacts (blurring and streaking). The authors have previously reported on a method of respiratory motion correction in thoracic CBCT at end expiration (EE). The previous retrospective study was limited to examination of reducing motion artifacts in a small number of patient cases. They report here on a prospective study in a larger group of lung cancer patients to evaluate respiratory motion-corrected (RMC)-CBCT ability to improve lung tumor localization accuracy and reduce motion artifacts in Linac-mounted CBCT images. A second study goal examines whether the motion correction derived from a respiration-correlated CT (RCCT) at simulation yields similar tumor localization accuracy at treatment. Methods: In an IRB-approved study, 19 lung cancer patients (22 tumors) received a RCCT at simulation, and on one treatment day received a RCCT, a respiratory-gated CBCT at end expiration, and a 1-min CBCT. A respiration monitor of abdominal displacement was used during all scans. In addition to a CBCT reconstruction without motion correction, the motion correction method was applied to the same 1-min scan. Projection images were sorted into ten bins based on abdominal displacement, and each bin was reconstructed to produce ten intermediate CBCT images. Each intermediate CBCT was deformed to the end expiration state using a motion model derived from RCCT. The deformed intermediate CBCT images were then added to produce a final RMC-CBCT. In order to evaluate the second study goal, the CBCT was corrected in two ways, one using a model derived from the RCCT at simulation [RMC-CBCT(sim)], the other from the RCCT at treatment [RMC-CBCT(tx)]. Image evaluation compared uncorrected CBCT, RMC-CBCT(sim), and RMC-CBCT(tx). The gated CBCT at end expiration served as the criterion standard for comparison. Using automatic rigid image

  3. Evaluation of tumor localization in respiration motion-corrected cone-beam CT: prospective study in lung.

    PubMed

    Dzyubak, Oleksandr; Kincaid, Russell; Hertanto, Agung; Hu, Yu-Chi; Pham, Hai; Rimner, Andreas; Yorke, Ellen; Zhang, Qinghui; Mageras, Gig S

    2014-10-01

    Target localization accuracy of cone-beam CT (CBCT) images used in radiation treatment of respiratory disease sites is affected by motion artifacts (blurring and streaking). The authors have previously reported on a method of respiratory motion correction in thoracic CBCT at end expiration (EE). The previous retrospective study was limited to examination of reducing motion artifacts in a small number of patient cases. They report here on a prospective study in a larger group of lung cancer patients to evaluate respiratory motion-corrected (RMC)-CBCT ability to improve lung tumor localization accuracy and reduce motion artifacts in Linac-mounted CBCT images. A second study goal examines whether the motion correction derived from a respiration-correlated CT (RCCT) at simulation yields similar tumor localization accuracy at treatment. In an IRB-approved study, 19 lung cancer patients (22 tumors) received a RCCT at simulation, and on one treatment day received a RCCT, a respiratory-gated CBCT at end expiration, and a 1-min CBCT. A respiration monitor of abdominal displacement was used during all scans. In addition to a CBCT reconstruction without motion correction, the motion correction method was applied to the same 1-min scan. Projection images were sorted into ten bins based on abdominal displacement, and each bin was reconstructed to produce ten intermediate CBCT images. Each intermediate CBCT was deformed to the end expiration state using a motion model derived from RCCT. The deformed intermediate CBCT images were then added to produce a final RMC-CBCT. In order to evaluate the second study goal, the CBCT was corrected in two ways, one using a model derived from the RCCT at simulation [RMC-CBCT(sim)], the other from the RCCT at treatment [RMC-CBCT(tx)]. Image evaluation compared uncorrected CBCT, RMC-CBCT(sim), and RMC-CBCT(tx). The gated CBCT at end expiration served as the criterion standard for comparison. Using automatic rigid image registration, each CBCT was

  4. Numerical correction of distorted images in full-field optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Gihyeon; Kim, Ju Wan; Choi, Woo June; Lee, Byeong Ha

    2012-03-01

    We propose a numerical method which can numerically correct the distorted en face images obtained with a full field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCT) system. It is shown that the FF-OCT image of the deep region of a biological sample is easily blurred or degraded because the sample has a refractive index (RI) much higher than its surrounding medium in general. It is analyzed that the focal plane of the imaging system is segregated from the imaging plane of the coherence-gated system due to the RI mismatch. This image-blurring phenomenon is experimentally confirmed by imaging the chrome pattern of a resolution test target through its glass substrate in water. Moreover, we demonstrate that the blurred image can be appreciably corrected by using the numerical correction process based on the Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction theory. The proposed correction method is applied to enhance the image of a human hair, which permits the distinct identification of the melanin granules inside the cortex layer of the hair shaft.

  5. Correction method for influence of tissue scattering for sidestream dark-field oximetry using multicolor LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurata, Tomohiro; Oda, Shigeto; Kawahira, Hiroshi; Haneishi, Hideaki

    2016-12-01

    We have previously proposed an estimation method of intravascular oxygen saturation (SO_2) from the images obtained by sidestream dark-field (SDF) imaging (we call it SDF oximetry) and we investigated its fundamental characteristics by Monte Carlo simulation. In this paper, we propose a correction method for scattering by the tissue and performed experiments with turbid phantoms as well as Monte Carlo simulation experiments to investigate the influence of the tissue scattering in the SDF imaging. In the estimation method, we used modified extinction coefficients of hemoglobin called average extinction coefficients (AECs) to correct the influence from the bandwidth of the illumination sources, the imaging camera characteristics, and the tissue scattering. We estimate the scattering coefficient of the tissue from the maximum slope of pixel value profile along a line perpendicular to the blood vessel running direction in an SDF image and correct AECs using the scattering coefficient. To evaluate the proposed method, we developed a trial SDF probe to obtain three-band images by switching multicolor light-emitting diodes and obtained the image of turbid phantoms comprised of agar powder, fat emulsion, and bovine blood-filled glass tubes. As a result, we found that the increase of scattering by the phantom body brought about the decrease of the AECs. The experimental results showed that the use of suitable values for AECs led to more accurate SO_2 estimation. We also confirmed the validity of the proposed correction method to improve the accuracy of the SO_2 estimation.

  6. Reality, measurement and locality in Quantum Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tommasini, Daniele

    2002-07-01

    It is currently believed that the local causality of Quantum Field Theory (QFT) is destroyed by the measurement process. This belief is also based on the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) paradox and on the so-called Bell's theorem, that are thought to prove the existence of a mysterious, instantaneous action between distant measurements. However, I have shown recently that the EPR argument is removed, in an interpretation-independent way, by taking into account the fact that the Standard Model of Particle Physics prevents the production of entangled states with a definite number of particles. This result is used here to argue in favor of a statistical interpretation of QFT and to show that it allows for a full reconciliation with locality and causality. Within such an interpretation, as Ballentine and Jarret pointed out long ago, Bell's theorem does not demonstrate any nonlocality.

  7. The field LMXB populations of local early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, Mark; Zepf, Steve E.; Kundu, Arunav; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Lehmer, Bret; Maraston, Claudia; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Eufrasio, Rafael T.; Coulter, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    We present the results of our ongoing study of the low mass X-ray binary (LMXB) populations of local early-type galaxies. By combining deep Chandra observations with HST optical mosaics, we have determined the field LMXB populations of nine local early-type galaxies. We use these data to determine the specific frequency of LMXBs in these galaxies, n_x (the number of LMXBs per stellar K-band light). We find that the shape of the XLF is similar among these galaxies, but also find a significant variation in the scaling. We test for correlations between n_x and galaxy: velocity dispersion; metallicity and Mg abundance; globular cluster specific frequency; and proposed IMF variation. No significant correlations are observed and we note the need to expand the sample of galaxies further to understand the underlying reason for variations in the formation efficiency of LMXBs in these galaxies.

  8. Acquiring local field potential information from amperometric neurochemical recordings

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Lin, Shih-Chieh; Nicolelis, Miguel A.L.

    2009-01-01

    Simultaneous acquisition of in vivo electrophysiological and neurochemical information is essential for understanding how endogenous neurochemicals modulate the dynamics of brain activity. However, up to now such a task has rarely been accomplished due to the major technical challenge of operating two independent recording systems simultaneously in real-time. Here we propose a simpler solution for achieving this goal by using only a standard electrochemical technique - amperometry. To demonstrate its feasibility, we compared amperometric signals with simultaneously recorded local field potential (LFP) signals. We found that the high frequency component (HFC) of the amperometric signals did not reflect neurochemical fluctuations, but instead it resembled LFPs in several aspects, including: (1) coherent spectral fluctuations; (2) clear characterization of different brain states; (3) identical hippocampal theta depth profile. As such, our findings provide the first demonstration that both LFP and local neurochemical information can be simultaneously acquired from electrochemical sensors alone. PMID:19428527

  9. Evaluation of Field Map and Nonlinear Registration Methods for Correction of Susceptibility Artifacts in Diffusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sijia; Peterson, Daniel J.; Gatenby, J. C.; Li, Wenbin; Grabowski, Thomas J.; Madhyastha, Tara M.

    2017-01-01

    Correction of echo planar imaging (EPI)-induced distortions (called “unwarping”) improves anatomical fidelity for diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and functional imaging investigations. Commonly used unwarping methods require the acquisition of supplementary images during the scanning session. Alternatively, distortions can be corrected by nonlinear registration to a non-EPI acquired structural image. In this study, we compared reliability using two methods of unwarping: (1) nonlinear registration to a structural image using symmetric normalization (SyN) implemented in Advanced Normalization Tools (ANTs); and (2) unwarping using an acquired field map. We performed this comparison in two different test-retest data sets acquired at differing sites (N = 39 and N = 32). In both data sets, nonlinear registration provided higher test-retest reliability of the output fractional anisotropy (FA) maps than field map-based unwarping, even when accounting for the effect of interpolation on the smoothness of the images. In general, field map-based unwarping was preferable if and only if the field maps were acquired optimally. PMID:28270762

  10. Localization and Dualities in Three-dimensional Superconformal Field Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willett, Brian

    In this thesis we apply the technique of localization to three-dimensional N = 2 superconformal field theories. We consider both theories which are exactly superconformal, and those which are believed to flow to nontrivial superconformal fixed points, for which we consider implicitly these fixed points. We find that in such theories, the partition function and certain supersymmetric observables, such as Wilson loops, can be computed exactly by a matrix model. This matrix model consists of an integral over g , the Lie algebra of the gauge group of the theory, of a certain product of 1-loop factors and classical contributions. One can also consider a space of supersymmetric deformations of the partition function corresponding to the set of abelian global symmetries. In the second part of the thesis we apply these results to test dualities. We start with the case of ABJM theory, which is dual to M-theory on an asymptotically AdS4 x S7 background. We extract strong coupling results in the field theory, which can be compared to semiclassical, weak coupling results in the gravity theory, and a nontrivial agreement is found. We also consider several classes of dualities between two three-dimensional field theories, namely, 3D mirror symmetry, Aharony duality, and Giveon-Kutasov duality. Here the dualities are typically between the IR limits of two Yang-Mills theories, which are strongly coupled in three dimensions since Yang-Mills theory is asymptotically free here. Thus the comparison is again very nontrivial, and relies on the exactness of the localization computation. We also compare the deformed partition functions, which tests the mapping of global symmetries of the dual theories. Finally, we discuss some recent progress in the understanding of general three-dimensional theories in the form of the F-theorem, a conjectured analogy to the a-theorem in four dimensions and c-theorem in two dimensions, which is closely related to the localization computation.

  11. Local electric fields in optical glasses during field-assisted ionic exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupascu, Alexandru I.; Kevorkian, Antoine P.; Cristescu, Constantin P.; Popescu, Ion M.

    2000-02-01

    We study the phenomena connected with high concentration of incoming ions emerging during field-assisted migration in otpical glass. We find that ion dynamics are very different at concentrations higher and lower than a certain parameter called the transition concentration. To explain anomalies at high ionic concentrations, we introduce a supplementary local electric field. This field opposes to the field E0 existing in the glass at all concentrations of incoming ions and is connected with a local space charge. We investigate its dependence on concentration and on E0. These effects are studied using a model with concentration-dependent diffusion coefficients and mobilities. We present a method to obtain the concentration dependence of the relevant quantities. Theoretical curves are compared with experimental results measured in usual silicate glasses, during Ag+-Na+ exchanges.

  12. Bias Field Inconsistency Correction of Motion-Scattered Multislice MRI for Improved 3D Image Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kio; Habas, Piotr A.; Rajagopalan, Vidya; Scott, Julia A.; Corbett-Detig, James M.; Rousseau, Francois; Barkovich, A. James; Glenn, Orit A.; Studholme, Colin

    2012-01-01

    A common solution to clinical MR imaging in the presence of large anatomical motion is to use fast multi-slice 2D studies to reduce slice acquisition time and provide clinically usable slice data. Recently, techniques have been developed which retrospectively correct large scale 3D motion between individual slices allowing the formation of a geometrically correct 3D volume from the multiple slice stacks. One challenge, however, in the final reconstruction process is the possibility of varying intensity bias in the slice data, typically due to the motion of the anatomy relative to imaging coils. As a result, slices which cover the same region of anatomy at different times may exhibit different sensitivity. This bias field inconsistency can induce artifacts in the final 3D reconstruction that can impact both clinical interpretation of key tissue boundaries and the automated analysis of the data. Here we describe a framework to estimate and correct the bias field inconsistency in each slice collectively across all motion corrupted image slices. Experiments using synthetic and clinical data show that the proposed method reduces intensity variability in tissues and improves the distinction between key tissue types. PMID:21511561

  13. Bias field inconsistency correction of motion-scattered multislice MRI for improved 3D image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kio; Habas, Piotr A; Rajagopalan, Vidya; Scott, Julia A; Corbett-Detig, James M; Rousseau, Francois; Barkovich, A James; Glenn, Orit A; Studholme, Colin

    2011-09-01

    A common solution to clinical MR imaging in the presence of large anatomical motion is to use fast multislice 2D studies to reduce slice acquisition time and provide clinically usable slice data. Recently, techniques have been developed which retrospectively correct large scale 3D motion between individual slices allowing the formation of a geometrically correct 3D volume from the multiple slice stacks. One challenge, however, in the final reconstruction process is the possibility of varying intensity bias in the slice data, typically due to the motion of the anatomy relative to imaging coils. As a result, slices which cover the same region of anatomy at different times may exhibit different sensitivity. This bias field inconsistency can induce artifacts in the final 3D reconstruction that can impact both clinical interpretation of key tissue boundaries and the automated analysis of the data. Here we describe a framework to estimate and correct the bias field inconsistency in each slice collectively across all motion corrupted image slices. Experiments using synthetic and clinical data show that the proposed method reduces intensity variability in tissues and improves the distinction between key tissue types.

  14. Phenomenological local field enhancement factor distributions around electromagnetic hot spots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Ru, E. C.; Etchegoin, P. G.

    2009-05-01

    We propose a general phenomenological description of the enhancement factor distribution for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and other related phenomena exploiting large local field enhancements at hot spots. This description extends naturally the particular case of a single (fixed) hot spot, and it is expected to be "universal" for many classes of common SERS substrates containing a collection of electromagnetic hot spots with varying geometrical parameters. We further justify it from calculations with generalized Mie theory. The description studied here provides a useful starting point for a qualitative (and semiquantitative) understanding of experimental data and, in particular, the analysis of the statistics of single-molecule SERS events.

  15. Investigation of nanogap localized field enhancement in gold plasmonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debu, Desalegn Tadesse; Bauman, Stephen; Saylor, Cameron; Novak, Eric; French, David; Herzog, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    Nanogaps between plasmonic structures allow confining the localized electric field with moreenhancements. Based on previously implemented two-step lithography process, we introducea nano-masking technique to fabricate nanostructrues and nanogaps for various geometrical patterns. This new method can fabricate gold nanostructures as well as nanogaps that are less than 10nm, below the limiting scale of lithography. Simulation from finite element method (FEM) shows strong gap dependence of optical properties and peak enhancement of these devices. The fabricated plasmonic nanostructure provides wide range of potential future application including highly sensitive optical antenna, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy and biosensing.

  16. Retrospective estimation of the susceptibility driven field map for distortion correction in echo planar imaging.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Hiroyuki; Kim, Boklye

    2013-01-01

    Echo planar imaging (EPI) sequence used for acquiring functional MRI (fMRI) time series data provides the advantage of high temporal resolution, but also is highly sensitive to the magnetic field inhomogeneity resulting in geometric distortions. A static field-inhomogeneity map measured before or after the fMRI scan to correct for such distortions does not account for magnetic field changes due to the head motion during the time series acquisition. In practice, the field map dynamically changes with head motion during the scan and leads to variations in the geometric distortion. We model in this work the field inhomogeneity with the object and the scanner dependent terms. The object-specific term varies with the object's magnetic susceptibility and orientation, i.e., head position with respect to B0. Thus, the simple transformation of the acquired field may not yield an accurate field map. We assume that the scanner-specific field remains unchanged and independent of the head motion. Our approach in this study is to retrospectively estimate the object's magnetic susceptibility (chi) map from an observed high-resolution static field map using an estimator derived from a probability density function of non-uniform noise. This approach is capable of finding the susceptibility map regardless of the wrapping effect. A dynamic field map at each head position can be estimated by applying a rigid body transformation to the estimated chi-map and the 3-D susceptibility voxel convolution (SVC) which is a physics-based discrete convolution model for computing chi-induced field inhomogeneity.

  17. Localizing gauge fields on a topological Abelian string and the Coulomb law

    SciTech Connect

    Torrealba S, Rafael S.

    2010-07-15

    The confinement of electromagnetic field is studied in axial symmetrical, warped, six-dimensional brane world, using a recently proposed topological Abelian string-vortex solution as background. It was found, that the massless gauge field fluctuations follow four-dimensional Maxwell equations in the Lorenz gauge. The massless zero mode is localized when the thickness of the string vortex is less than 5{beta}/4{pi}e{sup 2}v{sup 2} and there are no other localized massless modes. There is also an infinite of nonlocalized massive Fourier modes, that follow four-dimensional Proca equations with a continuous spectrum. To compute the corrections to the Coulomb potential, a radial cutoff was introduced, in order to achieve a discrete mass spectrum. As a main result, a (R{sub o}/{beta}R{sup 2}) correction was found for the four-dimensional effective Coulomb law; the result is in correspondence with the observed behavior of the Coulomb potential at today's measurable distances.

  18. Influence of magnetic field on electric-field-induced local polar states in manganites

    SciTech Connect

    Mamin, R. F.; Strle, J.; Kabanov, V. V.; Kranjec, A.; Borovsak, M.; Mihailovic, D.; Bizyaev, D. A.; Yusupov, R. V.; Bukharaev, A. A.

    2015-11-09

    It is shown that creation of local charged states at the surface of the lanthanum-strontium manganite single crystals by means of bias application via a conducting atomic force microscope tip is strongly affected by magnetic field. Both a charge and a size of created structures increase significantly on application of the magnetic field during the induction. We argue that the observed phenomenon originates from a known tendency of manganites toward charge segregation and its intimate relation to magnetic ordering.

  19. Space Weather Magnetometer Set with Automated AC Spacecraft Field Correction for GEO-KOMPSAT-2A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auster, U.; Magnes, W.; Delva, M.; Valavanoglou, A.; Leitner, S.; Hillenmaier, O.; Strauch, C.; Brown, P.; Whiteside, B.; Bendyk, M.; Hilgers, A.; Kraft, S.; Luntama, J. P.; Seon, J.

    2016-05-01

    Monitoring the solar wind conditions, in particular its magnetic field (interplanetary magnetic field) ahead of the Earth is essential in performing accurate and reliable space weather forecasting. The magnetic condition of the spacecraft itself is a key parameter for the successful performance of the magnetometer onboard. In practice a condition with negligible magnetic field of the spacecraft cannot always be fulfilled and magnetic sources on the spacecraft interfere with the natural magnetic field measured by the space magnetometer. The presented "ready-to-use" Service Oriented Spacecraft Magnetometer (SOSMAG) is developed for use on any satellite implemented without magnetic cleanliness programme. It enables detection of the spacecraft field AC variations on a proper time scale suitable to distinguish the magnetic field variations relevant to space weather phenomena, such as sudden increase in the interplanetary field or southward turning. This is achieved through the use of dual fluxgate magnetometers on a short boom (1m) and two additional AMR sensors on the spacecraft body, which monitor potential AC disturbers. The measurements of the latter sensors enable an automated correction of the AC signal contributions from the spacecraft in the final magnetic vector. After successful development and test of the EQM prototype, a flight model (FM) is being built for the Korean satellite Geo-Kompsat 2A, with launch foreseen in 2018.

  20. Local spectrum analysis of field propagation in an anisotropic medium. Part I. Time-harmonic fields.

    PubMed

    Tinkelman, Igor; Melamed, Timor

    2005-06-01

    The phase-space beam summation is a general analytical framework for local analysis and modeling of radiation from extended source distributions. In this formulation, the field is expressed as a superposition of beam propagators that emanate from all points in the source domain and in all directions. In this Part I of a two-part investigation, the theory is extended to include propagation in anisotropic medium characterized by a generic wave-number profile for time-harmonic fields; in a companion paper [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 22, 1208 (2005)], the theory is extended to time-dependent fields. The propagation characteristics of the beam propagators in a homogeneous anisotropic medium are considered. With use of Gaussian windows for the local processing of either ordinary or extraordinary electromagnetic field distributions, the field is represented by a phase-space spectral distribution in which the propagating elements are Gaussian beams that are formulated by using Gaussian plane-wave spectral distributions over the extended source plane. By applying saddle-point asymptotics, we extract the Gaussian beam phenomenology in the anisotropic environment. The resulting field is parameterized in terms of the spatial evolution of the beam curvature, beam width, etc., which are mapped to local geometrical properties of the generic wave-number profile. The general results are applied to the special case of uniaxial crystal, and it is found that the asymptotics for the Gaussian beam propagators, as well as the physical phenomenology attached, perform remarkably well.

  1. Local spectrum analysis of field propagation in an anisotropic medium. Part I. Time-harmonic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinkelman, Igor; Melamed, Timor

    2005-06-01

    The phase-space beam summation is a general analytical framework for local analysis and modeling of radiation from extended source distributions. In this formulation, the field is expressed as a superposition of beam propagators that emanate from all points in the source domain and in all directions. In this Part I of a two-part investigation, the theory is extended to include propagation in anisotropic medium characterized by a generic wave-number profile for time-harmonic fields; in a companion paper [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A22, 1208 (2005)], the theory is extended to time-dependent fields. The propagation characteristics of the beam propagators in a homogeneous anisotropic medium are considered. With use of Gaussian windows for the local processing of either ordinary or extraordinary electromagnetic field distributions, the field is represented by a phase-space spectral distribution in which the propagating elements are Gaussian beams that are formulated by using Gaussian plane-wave spectral distributions over the extended source plane. By applying saddle-point asymptotics, we extract the Gaussian beam phenomenology in the anisotropic environment. The resulting field is parameterized in terms of the spatial evolution of the beam curvature, beam width, etc., which are mapped to local geometrical properties of the generic wave-number profile. The general results are applied to the special case of uniaxial crystal, and it is found that the asymptotics for the Gaussian beam propagators, as well as the physical phenomenology attached, perform remarkably well.

  2. Exponentially localized Wannier functions in periodic zero flux magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Nittis, G.; Lein, M.

    2011-11-01

    In this work, we investigate conditions which ensure the existence of an exponentially localized Wannier basis for a given periodic hamiltonian. We extend previous results [Panati, G., Ann. Henri Poincare 8, 995-1011 (2007), 10.1007/s00023-007-0326-8] to include periodic zero flux magnetic fields which is the setting also investigated by Kuchment [J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 42, 025203 (2009), 10.1088/1751-8113/42/2/025203]. The new notion of magnetic symmetry plays a crucial rôle; to a large class of symmetries for a non-magnetic system, one can associate "magnetic" symmetries of the related magnetic system. Observing that the existence of an exponentially localized Wannier basis is equivalent to the triviality of the so-called Bloch bundle, a rank m hermitian vector bundle over the Brillouin zone, we prove that magnetic time-reversal symmetry is sufficient to ensure the triviality of the Bloch bundle in spatial dimension d = 1, 2, 3. For d = 4, an exponentially localized Wannier basis exists provided that the trace per unit volume of a suitable function of the Fermi projection vanishes. For d > 4 and d ⩽ 2m (stable rank regime) only the exponential localization of a subset of Wannier functions is shown; this improves part of the analysis of Kuchment [J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 42, 025203 (2009), 10.1088/1751-8113/42/2/025203]. Finally, for d > 4 and d > 2m (unstable rank regime) we show that the mere analysis of Chern classes does not suffice in order to prove triviality and thus exponential localization.

  3. Logarithmic corrections to the entropy of scalar field in BTZ black hole spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Dharm Veer; Sachan, Shobhit

    The entanglement entropy correlates two quantum subsystems which are part of a larger system. A logarithmic divergence term present in the entanglement entropy is universal in nature and directly proportional to the conformal anomaly. We study this logarithmic divergence term of entropy for massive scalar field in (2 + 1) dimensions by applying numerical techniques to entanglement entropy approach. This (2+1)-dimensional massive theory can be obtained from the (3+1)-dimensional massless scalar field via dimensional reduction. We also calculated mass corrections to entanglement entropy for scalar field. Finally, we observe that the area law contribution to the entanglement entropy is not affected by this mass term and the universal quantities depend upon the basic properties of the system.

  4. Bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy using a double aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Behan, Gavin; Kirkland, Angus I; Nellist, Peter D; Cosgriff, Eireann C; D'Alfonso, Adrian J; Morgan, Andrew J; Allen, Leslie J; Hashimoto, Ayako; Takeguchi, Masaki; Mitsuishi, Kazutaka; Shimojo, Masayuki

    2011-06-01

    Scanning confocal electron microscopy (SCEM) offers a mechanism for three-dimensional imaging of materials, which makes use of the reduced depth of field in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The simplest configuration of SCEM is the bright-field mode. In this paper we present experimental data and simulations showing the form of bright-field SCEM images. We show that the depth dependence of the three-dimensional image can be explained in terms of two-dimensional images formed in the detector plane. For a crystalline sample, this so-called probe image is shown to be similar to a conventional diffraction pattern. Experimental results and simulations show how the diffracted probes in this image are elongated in thicker crystals and the use of this elongation to estimate sample thickness is explored.

  5. The spectral basis of optimal error field correction on DIII-D

    DOE PAGES

    Paz-Soldan, Carlos A.; Buttery, Richard J.; Garofalo, Andrea M.; ...

    2014-04-28

    Here, experimental optimum error field correction (EFC) currents found in a wide breadth of dedicated experiments on DIII-D are shown to be consistent with the currents required to null the poloidal harmonics of the vacuum field which drive the kink mode near the plasma edge. This allows the identification of empirical metrics which predict optimal EFC currents with accuracy comparable to that of first- principles modeling which includes the ideal plasma response. While further metric refinements are desirable, this work suggests optimal EFC currents can be effectively fed-forward based purely on knowledge of the vacuum error field and basic equilibriummore » properties which are routinely calculated in real-time.« less

  6. Effects of superposition of detector solenoid and FFS quadrupole fields in SLC and correction methods

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.J.

    1983-07-25

    For the so-called superconducting FFS option with L* = 2.2 m, the MK2 solenoid does not overlap Q1, the FFS quad nearest the IP. For the permanent magnet option with L* = 0.75 m, the MK2 solenoid would overlap both Q1 and Q2. In either case an 8 m long solenoid, contemplated for the SLD detector, would overlap both Q1 and Q2. The solenoid field cannot be shielded so in an overlap region one will have a superposition of solenoid an quadrupole fields. Recently, the question was raised, What are the optical consequences when the solenoid and quad fields are superimposed. The question had not been considered before, but rough estimates suggested immediately that there might indeed be ugly consequences in terms of an enlargement of spot size at the IP. The purpose of this note is to answer the question quantitatively and to consider methods of correction of the ugly consequences.

  7. Prime focus wide-field corrector designs with lossless atmospheric dispersion correction

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, Will; Gillingham, Peter; Smith, Greg; Kent, Steve; Doel, Peter

    2014-07-18

    Wide-Field Corrector designs are presented for the Blanco and Mayall telescopes, the CFHT and the AAT. The designs are Terezibh-style, with 5 or 6 lenses, and modest negative optical power. They have 2.2-3 degree fields of view, with curved and telecentric focal surfaces suitable for fiber spectroscopy. Some variants also allow wide-field imaging, by changing the last WFC element. Apart from the adaptation of the Terebizh design for spectroscopy, the key feature is a new concept for a 'Compensating Lateral Atmospheric Dispersion Corrector', with two of the lenses being movable laterally by small amounts. This provides excellent atmospheric dispersion correction, without any additional surfaces or absorption. A novel and simple mechanism for providing the required lens motions is proposed, which requires just 3 linear actuators for each of the two moving lenses.

  8. Diffusion and Signatures of Localization in Stochastic Conformal Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Denis; Doyon, Benjamin

    2017-09-01

    We define a simple model of conformal field theory in random space-time environments, which we refer to as stochastic conformal field theory. This model accounts for the effects of dilute random impurities in strongly interacting critical many-body systems. On one hand, surprisingly, although impurities are separated by macroscopic distances, we find that the infinite-time steady state is factorized on microscopic lengths, a signature of the emergence of localization. The stationary state also displays vanishing energy current and strong uncorrelated spatial fluctuations of local observables. On the other hand, at finite times, the transient shows a crossover from ballistic to diffusive energy propagation. In this regime and a Markovian limit, concentrating on current-generating initial states with a temperature imbalance, we show that the energy current and density satisfy simple dissipative hydrodynamic equations. We describe the space-time scales at which nonequilibrium currents exist. We show that a light-cone effect subsists in the presence of impurities although a momentum burst propagates transiently on a diffusive scale only.

  9. Modeling local flotation frequency in a turbulent flow field.

    PubMed

    Kostoglou, Margaritis; Karapantsios, Thodoris D; Matis, Kostas A

    2006-09-25

    Despite the significance of turbulent fluid motion for enhancing the flotation rate in several industrial processes, there is no unified approach to the modeling of the flotation rate in a turbulent flow field. Appropriate modeling of the local flotation (bubble-particle attachment) rate is the basic constituent for global modeling and prediction of flotation equipment efficiency. Existing approaches for the local flotation rate are limited to specific set of conditions like high or low turbulence. In addition, the combined effects of buoyant bubble rise and/or particle gravity settling are usually ignored. The situation is even vaguer for the computation of collision and attachment efficiencies which are usually computed using the gravity induced velocities although the dominant mode of flotation is the turbulent one. The scope of this work is clear: the development of a general expression for the flotation rate in a turbulent flow field which will cover in a unified and consistent way all possible sets of the problem parameters. This is achieved by using concepts from statistical approach to homogeneous turbulence and gas kinetic theory.

  10. SU-E-T-299: Small Fields Profiles Correction Through Detectors Spatial Response Functions and Field Size Dependence Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Filipuzzi, M; Garrigo, E; Venencia, C; Germanier, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To calculate the spatial response function of various radiation detectors, to evaluate the dependence on the field size and to analyze the small fields profiles corrections by deconvolution techniques. Methods: Crossline profiles were measured on a Novalis Tx 6MV beam with a HDMLC. The configuration setup was SSD=100cm and depth=5cm. Five fields were studied (200×200mm2,100×100mm2, 20×20mm2, 10×10mm2and 5×5mm2) and measured were made with passive detectors (EBT3 radiochromic films and TLD700 thermoluminescent detectors), ionization chambers (PTW30013, PTW31003, CC04 and PTW31016) and diodes (PTW60012 and IBA SFD). The results of passive detectors were adopted as the actual beam profile. To calculate the detectors kernels, modeled by Gaussian functions, an iterative process based on a least squares criterion was used. The deconvolutions of the measured profiles were calculated with the Richardson-Lucy method. Results: The profiles of the passive detectors corresponded with a difference in the penumbra less than 0.1mm. Both diodes resolve the profiles with an overestimation of the penumbra smaller than 0.2mm. For the other detectors, response functions were calculated and resulted in Gaussian functions with a standard deviation approximate to the radius of the detector in study (with a variation less than 3%). The corrected profiles resolve the penumbra with less than 1% error. Major discrepancies were observed for cases in extreme conditions (PTW31003 and 5×5mm2 field size). Conclusion: This work concludes that the response function of a radiation detector is independent on the field size, even for small radiation beams. The profiles correction, using deconvolution techniques and response functions of standard deviation equal to the radius of the detector, gives penumbra values with less than 1% difference to the real profile. The implementation of this technique allows estimating the real profile, freeing from the effects of the detector used for the

  11. Si dielectric function in a local basis representation: Optical properties, local field effects, excitons, and stopping power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, M.; González, P.; Ortega, J.; Flores, F.

    2014-11-01

    An atomiclike basis representation is used to analyze the dielectric function ɛ (q ⃗+G ⃗,q ⃗+G⃗';ω ) of Si. First, we show that a s p3d5 local basis set yields good results for the electronic band structure of this crystal and, then, we analyze the Si optical properties including local field and excitonic effects. In our formulation, we follow Hanke and Sham [W. Hanke and L. J. Sham, Phys. Rev. B 12, 4501 (1975), 10.1103/PhysRevB.12.4501; Phys. Rev. B 21, 4656 (1980), 10.1103/PhysRevB.21.4656], and introduce excitonic effects using a many-body formulation that incorporates a static screened electron-hole interaction. Dynamical effects in this interaction are also analyzed and shown to introduce non-negligible corrections in the optical spectrum. Our results are found in reasonable agreement with the experimental evidence and with other theoretical results calculated with the computationally more demanding plane-wave representation. Finally, calculations for the stopping power of Si are also presented.

  12. Local and Average Structures in Ferroelectrics under Perturbing Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usher, Tedi-Marie

    Ferroelectric and dielectric ceramics are used in a multitude of applications including sonar, micro-positioning, actuators, transducers, and capacitors. The most widely used compositions are lead (Pb)-based, however there is an ongoing effort to reduce lead-based materials in consumer applications. Many lead-free compositions are under investigation; some are already in production and others have been identified as suitable for certain applications. For any such material system, there is a need to thoroughly characterize the structure in order to develop robust structure-property relationships, particularly during in situ application of different stimuli (e.g. electric field and mechanical stress). This work investigates two lead-free material systems of interest, (1-x)Na1/2Bi1/2TiO3 - (x)BaTiO3 (NBT-xBT) and (1-x)BaTiO3 - (x)Bi(Zn1/2Ti1/2)O3 (BT-xBZT), as well as the constituent compounds Na1/2Bi1/2TiO3 and BaTiO3. Both systems exhibit compositional boundaries between unique phases exhibiting different functional properties. Advanced scattering techniques are used to characterize the atomic structures and how they change during in situ application of different stimuli. The long-range, average structures are probed using high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) and neutron diffraction (ND) and local scale structures are probed using X-ray or neutron total scattering, which are converted to pair distribution functions (PDFs). First, two in situ ND experiments which investigate structural changes to NBT-xBT in response to uniaxial stresses and electric fields are presented. In response to stresses, different crystallographic directions strain differently. The elastic anisotropy, (i.e., the orientation-dependence of elastic stiffness) for the studied compositions is characterized. A general inverse relationship between elastic anisotropy and piezoelectric anisotropy is demonstrated for three common ferroelectric point groups. In response to electric fields

  13. Matched field localization based on CS-MUSIC algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shuangle; Tang, Ruichun; Peng, Linhui; Ji, Xiaopeng

    2016-04-01

    The problem caused by shortness or excessiveness of snapshots and by coherent sources in underwater acoustic positioning is considered. A matched field localization algorithm based on CS-MUSIC (Compressive Sensing Multiple Signal Classification) is proposed based on the sparse mathematical model of the underwater positioning. The signal matrix is calculated through the SVD (Singular Value Decomposition) of the observation matrix. The observation matrix in the sparse mathematical model is replaced by the signal matrix, and a new concise sparse mathematical model is obtained, which means not only the scale of the localization problem but also the noise level is reduced; then the new sparse mathematical model is solved by the CS-MUSIC algorithm which is a combination of CS (Compressive Sensing) method and MUSIC (Multiple Signal Classification) method. The algorithm proposed in this paper can overcome effectively the difficulties caused by correlated sources and shortness of snapshots, and it can also reduce the time complexity and noise level of the localization problem by using the SVD of the observation matrix when the number of snapshots is large, which will be proved in this paper.

  14. Second-order correction to the Bigeleisen–Mayer equation due to the nuclear field shift

    PubMed Central

    Bigeleisen, Jacob

    1998-01-01

    The nuclear field shift affects the electronic, rotational, and vibrational energies of polyatomic molecules. The theory of the shifts in molecular spectra has been studied by Schlembach and Tiemann [Schlembach, J. & Tiemann, E. (1982) Chem. Phys. 68, 21]; measurements of the electronic and rotational shifts of the diatomic halides of Pb and Tl have been made by Tiemann et al. [Tiemann, E., Knöckel, H. & Schlembach, J. (1982) Ber. Bunsenges. Phys. Chem. 86, 821]. These authors have estimated the relative shifts in the harmonic frequencies of these compounds due to the nuclear field shift to be of the order of 10−6. I have used this estimate of the relative shift in vibrational frequency to calculate the correction to the harmonic oscillator approximation to the isotopic reduced partition-function ratio 208Pb32S/207Pb32S. The correction is 0.3% of the harmonic oscillator value at 300 K. In the absence of compelling evidence to the contrary, it suffices to calculate the nuclear field effect on the total isotopic partition-function ratio from its shift of the electronic zero point energy and the unperturbed molecular vibration. PMID:9560183

  15. Initial error field correction studies in the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, C. E.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Menard, J. E.; Ferraro, N. M.; Park, J.-K.; Bell, R. E.; Leblanc, B. P.; Podesta, M.; Sabbagh, S. A.; NSTX-U Team

    2016-10-01

    Non-axisymmetries in the magnetic field coils and/or the passive conducting structures of tokamaks produce small but important `error fields' that can strongly degrade plasma performance. This paper reports on initial error field correction (EFC) studies in the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U). The NSTX-U device is equipped with an array of six independently powered EFC coils that produce non-axisymmetric radial magnetic fields at the midplane. These coils are used to perform compass scans where an n = 1 magnetic perturbation is ramped in amplitude at constant phase until the plasma rotation locks. Successive discharges are taken with different toroidal phases to determine the optimum EFC required to avoid locking. Multiple compass scans confirm that substantial EFC coil current (1200 A-turns) is required to achieve optimum performance in the flattop of beam-heated L-mode discharges. Interestingly, the q = 2 surface is locked throughout these L-modes such that the applied magnetic perturbations lock the sawtoothing core of the plasma. Additional compass scans early in the discharge indicate that the required EFC evolves as a function of time. Efforts to identify the various error field sources, including metrology of the main vertical field coils, are ongoing. Supported by US DoE Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  16. The importance of matched poloidal spectra to error field correction in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Paz-Soldan, Carlos; Lanctot, Matthew J.; Logan, Nikolas C.; Shiraki, Daisuke; Buttery, Richard J.; Hanson, Jeremy M.; La Haye, Robert J.; Park, Jong -Kyu; Solomon, Wayne M.; Strait, Edward J.

    2014-07-09

    Optimal error field correction (EFC) is thought to be achieved when coupling to the least-stable "dominant" mode of the plasma is nulled at each toroidal mode number (n). The limit of this picture is tested in the DIII-D tokamak by applying superpositions of in- and ex-vessel coil set n = 1 fields calculated to be fully orthogonal to the n = 1 dominant mode. In co-rotating H-mode and low-density Ohmic scenarios the plasma is found to be respectively 7x and 20x less sensitive to the orthogonal field as compared to the in-vessel coil set field. For the scenarios investigated, any geometry of EFC coil can thus recover a strong majority of the detrimental effect introduced by the n = 1 error field. Furthermore, despite low sensitivity to the orthogonal field, its optimization in H-mode is shown to be consistent with minimizing the neoclassical toroidal viscosity torque and not the higher-order n = 1 mode coupling.

  17. The importance of matched poloidal spectra to error field correction in DIII-D

    DOE PAGES

    Paz-Soldan, Carlos; Lanctot, Matthew J.; Logan, Nikolas C.; ...

    2014-07-09

    Optimal error field correction (EFC) is thought to be achieved when coupling to the least-stable "dominant" mode of the plasma is nulled at each toroidal mode number (n). The limit of this picture is tested in the DIII-D tokamak by applying superpositions of in- and ex-vessel coil set n = 1 fields calculated to be fully orthogonal to the n = 1 dominant mode. In co-rotating H-mode and low-density Ohmic scenarios the plasma is found to be respectively 7x and 20x less sensitive to the orthogonal field as compared to the in-vessel coil set field. For the scenarios investigated, anymore » geometry of EFC coil can thus recover a strong majority of the detrimental effect introduced by the n = 1 error field. Furthermore, despite low sensitivity to the orthogonal field, its optimization in H-mode is shown to be consistent with minimizing the neoclassical toroidal viscosity torque and not the higher-order n = 1 mode coupling.« less

  18. The effect of finite field size on classification and atmospheric correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Fraser, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    The atmospheric effect on the upward radiance of sunlight scattered from the Earth-atmosphere system is strongly influenced by the contrasts between fields and their sizes. For a given atmospheric turbidity, the atmospheric effect on classification of surface features is much stronger for nonuniform surfaces than for uniform surfaces. Therefore, the classification accuracy of agricultural fields and urban areas is dependent not only on the optical characteristics of the atmosphere, but also on the size of the surface do not account for the nonuniformity of the surface have only a slight effect on the classification accuracy; in other cases the classification accuracy descreases. The radiances above finite fields were computed to simulate radiances measured by a satellite. A simulation case including 11 agricultural fields and four natural fields (water, soil, savanah, and forest) was used to test the effect of the size of the background reflectance and the optical thickness of the atmosphere on classification accuracy. It is concluded that new atmospheric correction methods, which take into account the finite size of the fields, have to be developed to improve significantly the classification accuracy.

  19. From neurons to circuits: linear estimation of local field potentials

    PubMed Central

    Rasch, Malte; Logthetis, Nikos K.; Kreiman, Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    Extracellular physiological recordings are typically separated into two frequency bands: local field potentials (LFPs, a circuit property) and spiking multi-unit activity (MUA). There has been increased interest in LFPs due to their correlation with fMRI measurements and the possibility of studying local processing and neuronal synchrony. To further understand the biophysical origin of LFPs, we asked whether it is possible to estimate their time course based on the spiking activity from the same or nearby electrodes. We used Signal Estimation Theory to show that a linear filter operation on the activity of one/few neurons can explain a significant fraction of the LFP time course in the macaque primary visual cortex. The linear filter used to estimate the LFPs had a stereotypical shape characterized by a sharp downstroke at negative time lags and a slower positive upstroke for positve time lags. The filter was similar across neocortical regions and behavioral conditions including spontaneous activity and visual stimulation. The estimations had a spatial resolution of ~1 mm and a temporal resolution of ~200 ms. By considering a causal filter, we observed a temporal asymmetry such that the positive time lags in the filter contributed more to the LFP estimation than negative time lags. Additionally, we showed that spikes occurring within ~10 ms of spikes from nearby neurons yielded better estimation accuracies than nonsynchronous spikes. In sum, our results suggest that at least some circuit-level local properties of the field potentials can be predicted from the activity of one or a few neurons. PMID:19889990

  20. A wide field corrector with loss-less and purely passive atmospheric dispersion correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillingham, Peter; Saunders, Will

    2014-07-01

    A 2.5 degree field diameter corrector lens design for the Cassegrain focus of the VISTA 4 meter telescope is presented. It comprises four single elements of glasses with high UV transmission, all axi-symmetric for operation at the zenith. One element is displaced laterally to provide atmospheric dispersion correction. A key feature, especially beneficial for the VISTA application, is that the ADC element can be mounted so it is driven simply by gravity; thus its operation needs no motors, encoders, cabling, or software control. A simple mechanical design to achieve this and the optical performance details are described.

  1. Effective field theory for large logarithms in radiative corrections to electron proton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Richard J.

    2017-01-01

    Radiative corrections to elastic electron proton scattering are analyzed in effective field theory. A new factorization formula identifies all sources of large logarithms in the limit of large momentum transfer, Q2≫me2. Explicit matching calculations are performed through two-loop order. A renormalization analysis in soft-collinear effective theory is performed to systematically compute and resum large logarithms. Implications for the extraction of charge radii and other observables from scattering data are discussed. The formalism may be applied to other lepton-nucleon scattering and e+e- annihilation processes.

  2. Local Field Distribution Function and High Order Field Moments for metal-dielectric composites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genov, Dentcho A.; Sarychev, Andrey K.; Shalaev, Vladimir M.

    2001-11-01

    In a span of two decades the physics of nonlinear optics saw vast improvement in our understanding of optical properties for various inhomogeneous mediums. One such medium is the metal-dielectric composite, where the metal inclusions have a surface coverage fraction of p, while the rest (1-p) is assumed to represent the dielectric host. The computations carried out by using different theoretical models and the experimental data show existence of giant local electric and magnetic field fluctuations. In this presentation we will introduce a new developed 2D model that determines exactly the Local Field Distribution Function (LFDF) and all other relevant parameters of the film. The LFDF for small filling factors will be shown to transform from lognormal distribution into a single-dipole distribution function. We also will confirm the predictions of the scaling theory for the high field moments, which have a power law dependence on the loss factor.

  3. Use of a spherical albedo system for correcting the readings of albedo dosimeters in JINR phasotron neutron radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokrov, Yu. V.; Morozova, S. V.

    2014-03-01

    Results of calibrating a spherical albedo system in the radiation fields of a Pu-Be radionuclide neutron source are presented. It is shown that it can be used for correcting the readings of the DVGN-01 albedo dosimeter. The results of measurements with the system in JINR phasotron neutron fields for the purpose of correcting the DVGN-01 readings in these fields are given. The values of the correction factors for DVGN-01 albedo dosimeters when used in personnel neutron dosimetry (PD) on the JINR phasotron are determined.

  4. Local field enhancement and thermoplasmonics in multimodal aluminum structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiecha, Peter R.; Mennemanteuil, Marie-Maxime; Khlopin, Dmitry; Martin, Jérôme; Arbouet, Arnaud; Gérard, Davy; Bouhelier, Alexandre; Plain, Jérôme; Cuche, Aurélien

    2017-07-01

    Aluminum nanostructures have recently been at the focus of numerous studies due to their properties including oxidation stability and surface plasmon resonances covering the ultraviolet and visible spectral windows. In this article, we reveal a facet of this metal relevant for both plasmonic purposes and photothermal conversion. The field distribution of high-order plasmonic resonances existing in two-dimensional Al structures is studied by nonlinear photoluminescence microscopy in a spectral region where electronic interband transitions occur. The polarization sensitivity of the field intensity maps shows that the electric field concentration can be addressed and controlled on demand. We use a numerical tool based on the Green dyadic method to analyze our results and to simulate the absorbed energy that is locally converted into heat. The polarization-dependent temperature increase of the Al structures is experimentally quantitatively measured, and is in an excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. Our work highlights Al as a promising candidate for designing thermal nanosources integrated in coplanar geometries for thermally assisted nanomanipulation or biophysical applications.

  5. Locality of Gravitational Systems from Entanglement of Conformal Field Theories.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jennifer; Marcolli, Matilde; Ooguri, Hirosi; Stoica, Bogdan

    2015-06-05

    The Ryu-Takayanagi formula relates the entanglement entropy in a conformal field theory to the area of a minimal surface in its holographic dual. We show that this relation can be inverted for any state in the conformal field theory to compute the bulk stress-energy tensor near the boundary of the bulk spacetime, reconstructing the local data in the bulk from the entanglement on the boundary. We also show that positivity, monotonicity, and convexity of the relative entropy for small spherical domains between the reduced density matrices of any state and of the ground state of the conformal field theory are guaranteed by positivity conditions on the bulk matter energy density. As positivity and monotonicity of the relative entropy are general properties of quantum systems, this can be interpreted as a derivation of bulk energy conditions in any holographic system for which the Ryu-Takayanagi prescription applies. We discuss an information theoretical interpretation of the convexity in terms of the Fisher metric.

  6. Local field potentials reflect multiple spatial scales in V4

    PubMed Central

    Mineault, Patrick J.; Zanos, Theodoros P.; Pack, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    Local field potentials (LFP) reflect the properties of neuronal circuits or columns recorded in a volume around a microelectrode (Buzsáki et al., 2012). The extent of this integration volume has been a subject of some debate, with estimates ranging from a few hundred microns (Katzner et al., 2009; Xing et al., 2009) to several millimeters (Kreiman et al., 2006). We estimated receptive fields (RFs) of multi-unit activity (MUA) and LFPs at an intermediate level of visual processing, in area V4 of two macaques. The spatial structure of LFP receptive fields varied greatly as a function of time lag following stimulus onset, with the retinotopy of LFPs matching that of MUAs at a restricted set of time lags. A model-based analysis of the LFPs allowed us to recover two distinct stimulus-triggered components: an MUA-like retinotopic component that originated in a small volume around the microelectrodes (~350 μm), and a second component that was shared across the entire V4 region; this second component had tuning properties unrelated to those of the MUAs. Our results suggest that the LFP reflects neural activity across multiple spatial scales, which both complicates its interpretation and offers new opportunities for investigating the large-scale structure of network processing. PMID:23533106

  7. The effect of local anatomy on the electric field induced by TMS: evaluation at 14 different target sites.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Arno M; Oostendorp, Thom F; Stegeman, Dick F

    2014-10-01

    Many human cortical regions are targeted with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). The stimulus intensity used for a certain region is generally based on the motor threshold stimulation intensity determined over the motor cortex (M1). However, it is well known that differences exist in coil-target distance and target site anatomy between cortical regions. These differences may well make the stimulation intensity derived from M1 sub-optimal for other regions. Our goal was to determine in what way the induced electric fields differ between cortical target regions. We used finite element method modeling to calculate the induced electric field for multiple target sites in a realistic head model. The effects on the electric field due to coil-target distance and target site anatomy have been quantified. The results show that a correction based on the distance alone does not correctly adjust the induced electric field for regions other than M1. In addition, a correction based solely on the TMS-induced electric field (primary field) does not suffice. A precise adjustment should include coil-target distance, the secondary field caused by charge accumulation at conductivity discontinuities and the direction of the field relative to the local cerebrospinal fluid-grey matter boundary.

  8. Solving outside-axial-field-of-view scatter correction problem in PET via digital experimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreyev, Andriy; Zhu, Yang-Ming; Ye, Jinghan; Song, Xiyun; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2016-03-01

    Unaccounted scatter impact from unknown outside-axial-field-of-view (outside-AFOV) activity in PET is an important degrading factor for image quality and quantitation. Resource consuming and unpopular way to account for the outside- AFOV activity is to perform an additional PET/CT scan of adjacent regions. In this work we investigate a solution to the outside-AFOV scatter problem without performing a PET/CT scan of the adjacent regions. The main motivation for the proposed method is that the measured random corrected prompt (RCP) sinogram in the background region surrounding the measured object contains only scattered events, originating from both inside- and outside-AFOV activity. In this method, the scatter correction simulation searches through many randomly-chosen outside-AFOV activity estimates along with known inside-AFOV activity, generating a plethora of scatter distribution sinograms. This digital experimentation iterates until a decent match is found between a simulated scatter sinogram (that include supposed outside-AFOV activity) and the measured RCP sinogram in the background region. The combined scatter impact from inside- and outside-AFOV activity can then be used for scatter correction during final image reconstruction phase. Preliminary results using measured phantom data indicate successful phantom length estimate with the method, and, therefore, accurate outside-AFOV scatter estimate.

  9. Active control of Type-I Edge-Localized Modes with n=1 Perturbation Fields in the JET Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Y.; Koslowski, R.; Thomas, P.; Nardon, E.; Alper, B.; Baranov, Y.; Beurskens, M.; Bigi, M.; Crombe, K.; de la Luna, E.; De Vries, P.; Fundamenski, W.; Rachlew, Elisabeth G; Zimmermann, O.

    2007-06-01

    Type-I edge-localized modes (ELMs) have been mitigated at the JET tokamak using a static external n=1 perturbation field generated by four error field correction coils located far from the plasma. During the application of the n=1 field the ELM frequency increased by a factor of 4 and the amplitude of the D signal decreased. The energy loss per ELM normalized to the total stored energy, W/W, dropped to values below 2%. Transport analyses shows no or only a moderate (up to 20%) degradation of energy confinement time during the ELM mitigation phase.

  10. Cascading and local-field effects in non-linear optics revisited: a quantum-field picture based on exchange of photons.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Kochise; Mukamel, Shaul

    2014-01-28

    The semi-classical theory of radiation-matter coupling misses local-field effects that may alter the pulse time-ordering and cascading that leads to the generation of new signals. These are then introduced macroscopically by solving Maxwell's equations. This procedure is convenient and intuitive but ad hoc. We show that both effects emerge naturally by including coupling to quantum modes of the radiation field that are initially in the vacuum state to second order. This approach is systematic and suggests a more general class of corrections that only arise in a QED framework. In the semi-classical theory, which only includes classical field modes, the susceptibility of a collection of N non-interacting molecules is additive and scales as N. Second-order coupling to a vacuum mode generates an effective retarded interaction that leads to cascading and local field effects both of which scale as N(2).

  11. Cascading and local-field effects in non-linear optics revisited: A quantum-field picture based on exchange of photons

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Kochise; Mukamel, Shaul

    2014-01-01

    The semi-classical theory of radiation-matter coupling misses local-field effects that may alter the pulse time-ordering and cascading that leads to the generation of new signals. These are then introduced macroscopically by solving Maxwell's equations. This procedure is convenient and intuitive but ad hoc. We show that both effects emerge naturally by including coupling to quantum modes of the radiation field that are initially in the vacuum state to second order. This approach is systematic and suggests a more general class of corrections that only arise in a QED framework. In the semi-classical theory, which only includes classical field modes, the susceptibility of a collection of N non-interacting molecules is additive and scales as N. Second-order coupling to a vacuum mode generates an effective retarded interaction that leads to cascading and local field effects both of which scale as N2. PMID:25669529

  12. Cascading and local-field effects in non-linear optics revisited: A quantum-field picture based on exchange of photons

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Kochise Mukamel, Shaul

    2014-01-28

    The semi-classical theory of radiation-matter coupling misses local-field effects that may alter the pulse time-ordering and cascading that leads to the generation of new signals. These are then introduced macroscopically by solving Maxwell's equations. This procedure is convenient and intuitive but ad hoc. We show that both effects emerge naturally by including coupling to quantum modes of the radiation field that are initially in the vacuum state to second order. This approach is systematic and suggests a more general class of corrections that only arise in a QED framework. In the semi-classical theory, which only includes classical field modes, the susceptibility of a collection of N non-interacting molecules is additive and scales as N. Second-order coupling to a vacuum mode generates an effective retarded interaction that leads to cascading and local field effects both of which scale as N{sup 2}.

  13. Automatic segmentation for brain MR images via a convex optimized segmentation and bias field correction coupled model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunjie; Zhao, Bo; Zhang, Jianwei; Zheng, Yuhui

    2014-09-01

    Accurate segmentation of magnetic resonance (MR) images remains challenging mainly due to the intensity inhomogeneity, which is also commonly known as bias field. Recently active contour models with geometric information constraint have been applied, however, most of them deal with the bias field by using a necessary pre-processing step before segmentation of MR data. This paper presents a novel automatic variational method, which can segment brain MR images meanwhile correcting the bias field when segmenting images with high intensity inhomogeneities. We first define a function for clustering the image pixels in a smaller neighborhood. The cluster centers in this objective function have a multiplicative factor that estimates the bias within the neighborhood. In order to reduce the effect of the noise, the local intensity variations are described by the Gaussian distributions with different means and variances. Then, the objective functions are integrated over the entire domain. In order to obtain the global optimal and make the results independent of the initialization of the algorithm, we reconstructed the energy function to be convex and calculated it by using the Split Bregman theory. A salient advantage of our method is that its result is independent of initialization, which allows robust and fully automated application. Our method is able to estimate the bias of quite general profiles, even in 7T MR images. Moreover, our model can also distinguish regions with similar intensity distribution with different variances. The proposed method has been rigorously validated with images acquired on variety of imaging modalities with promising results.

  14. Generalized second law of thermodynamics for non-canonical scalar field model with corrected-entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sudipta; Debnath, Ujjal; Mamon, Abdulla Al

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we have considered a non-canonical scalar field dark energy model in the framework of flat FRW background. It has also been assumed that the dark matter sector interacts with the non-canonical dark energy sector through some interaction term. Using the solutions for this interacting non-canonical scalar field dark energy model, we have investigated the validity of generalized second law (GSL) of thermodynamics in various scenarios using first law and area law of thermodynamics. For this purpose, we have assumed two types of horizons viz apparent horizon and event horizon for the universe and using first law of thermodynamics, we have examined the validity of GSL on both apparent and event horizons. Next, we have considered two types of entropy-corrections on apparent and event horizons. Using the modified area law, we have examined the validity of GSL of thermodynamics on apparent and event horizons under some restrictions of model parameters.

  15. Prime focus wide-field corrector designs with lossless atmospheric dispersion correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, Will; Gillingham, Peter; Smith, Greg; Kent, Steve; Doel, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Wide-Field Corrector designs are presented for the Blanco and Mayall telescopes, the CFHT and the AAT. The designs are Terezibh-style, with 5 or 6 lenses, and modest negative optical power. They have 2.2°-3° ields of view, with curved and telecentric focal surfaces suitable for fiber spectroscopy. Some variants also allow wide-field imaging, by changing the last WFC element. Apart from the adaptation of the Terebizh design for spectroscopy, the key feature is a new concept for a `Compensating Lateral Atmospheric Dispersion Corrector', with two of the lenses being movable laterally by small amounts. This provides excellent atmospheric dispersion correction, without any additional surfaces or absorption. A novel and simple mechanism for providing the required lens motions is proposed, which requires just 3 linear actuators for each of the two moving lenses.

  16. Coulomb-corrected strong-field quantum trajectories beyond dipole approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keil, Th; Bauer, D.

    2017-10-01

    Non-dipole effects in strong-field photoelectron momentum spectra have been revealed experimentally (Smeenk et al 2011 Phys. Rev. Lett. 106 193002; Ludwig et al 2014 Phys. Rev. Lett. 113 243001). For certain laser parameters and photoelectron momenta the spectra were found to be shifted against the laser propagation direction whereas one would naively assume that the radiation pressure due to the {\\boldsymbol{v}}× {\\boldsymbol{B}}-force pushes electrons always in the propagation direction. Only the interplay between Lorentz and Coulomb forces may give rise to such counterintuitive dynamics. In this work, we calculate the momentum-dependent shift in and against the propagation direction by extending the quantum trajectory-based Coulomb-corrected strong-field approximation beyond the dipole approximation. A semi-analytical treatment where both magnetic and Coulomb forces are treated perturbatively but simultaneously reproduces the results from the full numerical solution of the equations of motion.

  17. Numerical correction of coherence gate in full-field swept-source interference microscopy.

    PubMed

    Grebenyuk, Anton A; Ryabukho, Vladimir P

    2012-07-01

    A big problem in low-coherence interference microscopy is the degradation of the coherence signal caused by shift of the angular and temporal spectrum gates. It limits the depth of field in confocal optical coherence microscopy and degrades images of sample inner structure in most interference microscopy techniques. To overcome this problem we propose numerical correction of the coherence gate in application to full-field swept-source interference microscopy. The proposed technique allows three-dimensional sample imaging without mechanical movement of the microscope components and is also capable of determining separately the geometrical thickness and the refractive index of the sample layers, when the sample contains a transversal pattern. The applicability of the proposed technique is verified with numerical simulation.

  18. Correction factors for ionization chamber dosimetry in CyberKnife: Machine-specific, plan-class, and clinical fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gago-Arias, Araceli; Antolin, Elena; Fayos-Ferrer, Francisco; Simon, Rocio; Gonzalez-Castano, Diego M.; Palmans, Hugo; Sharpe, Peter; Gomez, Faustino; Pardo-Montero, Juan

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is the application of the formalism for ionization chamber reference dosimetry of small and nonstandard fields [R. Alfonso, P. Andreo, R. Capote, M. S. Huq, W. Kilby, P. Kjaell, T. R. Mackie, H. Palmans, K. Rosser, J. Seuntjens, W. Ullrich, and S. Vatnitsky, 'A new formalism for reference dosimetry of small and nonstandard fields,' Med. Phys. 35, 5179-5186 (2008)] to the CyberKnife robotic radiosurgery system. Correction factors for intermediate calibration fields, a machine-specific reference field (msr) and two plan-class specific reference fields (pcsr), have been studied. Furthermore, the applicability of the new formalism to clinical dosimetry has been analyzed through the investigation of two clinical treatments. Methods: PTW31014 and Scanditronix-Wellhofer CC13 ionization chamber measurements were performed for the fields under investigation. Absorbed dose to water was determined using alanine reference dosimetry, and experimental correction factors were calculated from alanine to ionization chamber readings ratios. In addition, correction factors were calculated for the intermediate calibration fields and one of the clinical treatment fields using the Monte Carlo method and these were compared with the experimental values. Results: Overall correction factors deviating from unity by approximately 2% were obtained from both measurements and simulations, with values below and above unity for the studied intermediate calibration fields and clinical fields for the ionization chambers under consideration. Monte Carlo simulations yielded correction factors comparable with those obtained from measurements for the machine-specific reference field, although differences from 1% to 3.3% were observed between measured and calculated correction factors for the composite intermediate calibration fields. Dose distribution inhomogeneities are thought to be responsible for such discrepancies. Conclusions: The differences found between overall

  19. Determination of small-field correction factors for cylindrical ionization chambers using a semiempirical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kwangwoo; Bak, Jino; Park, Sungho; Choi, Wonhoon; Park, Suk Won

    2016-02-01

    A semiempirical method based on the averaging effect of the sensitive volumes of different air-filled ionization chambers (ICs) was employed to approximate the correction factors for beam quality produced from the difference in the sizes of the reference field and small fields. We measured the output factors using several cylindrical ICs and calculated the correction factors using a mathematical method similar to deconvolution; in the method, we modeled the variable and inhomogeneous energy fluence function within the chamber cavity. The parameters of the modeled function and the correction factors were determined by solving a developed system of equations as well as on the basis of the measurement data and the geometry of the chambers. Further, Monte Carlo (MC) computations were performed using the Monaco® treatment planning system to validate the proposed method. The determined correction factors (k{{Q\\text{msr}},Q}{{f\\text{smf}}, {{f}\\text{ref}}} ) were comparable to the values derived from the MC computations performed using Monaco®. For example, for a 6 MV photon beam and a field size of 1  ×  1 cm2, k{{Q\\text{msr}},Q}{{f\\text{smf}}, {{f}\\text{ref}}} was calculated to be 1.125 for a PTW 31010 chamber and 1.022 for a PTW 31016 chamber. On the other hand, the k{{Q\\text{msr}},Q}{{f\\text{smf}}, {{f}\\text{ref}}} values determined from the MC computations were 1.121 and 1.031, respectively; the difference between the proposed method and the MC computation is less than 2%. In addition, we determined the k{{Q\\text{msr}},Q}{{f\\text{smf}}, {{f}\\text{ref}}} values for PTW 30013, PTW 31010, PTW 31016, IBA FC23-C, and IBA CC13 chambers as well. We devised a method for determining k{{Q\\text{msr}},Q}{{f\\text{smf}}, {{f}\\text{ref}}} from both the measurement of the output factors and model-based mathematical computation. The proposed method can be useful in case the MC simulation would not be applicable for the clinical settings.

  20. Daily Isocenter Correction With Electromagnetic-Based Localization Improves Target Coverage and Rectal Sparing During Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rajendran, Ramji Ramaswamy; Plastaras, John P.; Mick, Rosemarie; McMichael Kohler, Diane; Kassaee, Alireza; Vapiwala, Neha

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate dosimetric consequences of daily isocenter correction during prostate cancer radiation therapy using the Calypso 4D localization system. Methods and Materials: Data were analyzed from 28 patients with electromagnetic transponders implanted in their prostates for daily target localization and tracking. Treatment planning isocenters were recorded based on the values of the vertical, longitudinal, and lateral axes. Isocenter location obtained via alignment with skin tattoos was compared with that obtained via the electromagnetic localization system. Daily isocenter shifts, based on the isocenter location differences between the two alignment methods in each spatial axis, were calculated for each patient over their entire course. The mean isocenter shifts were used to determine dosimetric consequences of treatment based on skin tattoo alignments alone. Results: The mean += SD of the percentages of treatment days with shifts beyond += 0.5 cm for vertical, longitudinal and lateral shifts were 62% += 28%, 35% += 26%, and 38% +=21%, respectively. If daily electromagnetic localization was not used, the excess in prescribed dose delivered to 70% of the rectum was 10 Gy and the deficit in prescribed dose delivered to 95% of the planning target volume was 10 Gy. The mean isocenter shift was not associated with the volumes of the prostate, rectum, or bladder, or with patient body mass index. Conclusions: Daily isocenter localization can reduce the treatment dose to the rectum. Correcting for this variability could lead to improved dose delivery, reduced side effects, and potentially improved treatment outcomes.

  1. Daily isocenter correction with electromagnetic-based localization improves target coverage and rectal sparing during prostate radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Ramji Ramaswamy; Plastaras, John P; Mick, Rosemarie; McMichael Kohler, Diane; Kassaee, Alireza; Vapiwala, Neha

    2010-03-15

    To evaluate dosimetric consequences of daily isocenter correction during prostate cancer radiation therapy using the Calypso 4D localization system. Data were analyzed from 28 patients with electromagnetic transponders implanted in their prostates for daily target localization and tracking. Treatment planning isocenters were recorded based on the values of the vertical, longitudinal, and lateral axes. Isocenter location obtained via alignment with skin tattoos was compared with that obtained via the electromagnetic localization system. Daily isocenter shifts, based on the isocenter location differences between the two alignment methods in each spatial axis, were calculated for each patient over their entire course. The mean isocenter shifts were used to determine dosimetric consequences of treatment based on skin tattoo alignments alone. The mean SD of the percentages of treatment days with shifts beyond 0.5 cm for vertical, longitudinal and lateral shifts were 62% 28%, 35% 26%, and 38% 21%, respectively. If daily electromagnetic localization was not used, the excess in prescribed dose delivered to 70% of the rectum was 10 Gy and the deficit in prescribed dose delivered to 95% of the planning target volume was 10 Gy. The mean isocenter shift was not associated with the volumes of the prostate, rectum, or bladder, or with patient body mass index. Daily isocenter localization can reduce the treatment dose to the rectum. Correcting for this variability could lead to improved dose delivery, reduced side effects, and potentially improved treatment outcomes. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Radiative correction to the Casimir energy for massive scalar field on a spherical surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valuyan, M. A.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, the first-order radiative correction to the Casimir energy for a massive scalar field in the ϕ4 theory on a spherical surface with S2 topology was calculated. In common methods for calculating the radiative correction to the Casimir energy, the counter-terms related to free theory are used. However, in this study, by using a systematic perturbation expansion, the obtained counter-terms in renormalization program were automatically position-dependent. We maintained that this dependency was permitted, reflecting the effects of the boundary conditions imposed or background space in the problem. Additionally, along with the renormalization program, a supplementary regularization technique that we named Box Subtraction Scheme (BSS) was performed. This scheme presents a useful method for the regularization of divergences, providing a situation that the infinities would be removed spontaneously without any ambiguity. Analysis of the necessary limits of the obtained results for the Casimir energy of the massive and massless scalar field confirmed the appropriate and reasonable consistency of the answers.

  3. Trapped energetic ion dynamics affected by localized electric field perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Seiya

    2016-01-01

    Trapped energetic ion orbits in helical systems are numerically simulated using the Lorentz model. Simulation results of precession drift frequencies of trapped energetic ions are benchmarked by those of analytic solutions. The effects of the electric field perturbation localized at the rational surface on trapped energetic ions are examined, where the perturbation has an arbitrary rotation frequency and an amplitude fixed in time. It is found that the trapped energetic ions resonantly interact with the perturbation, when the rotation frequency of the perturbation is comparable to the precession drift frequencies of trapped energetic ions. The simulation results are suggestive to a mechanism of the energetic-ion-induced interchange mode, which might be associated with the fishbone mode observed in helical systems.

  4. Differential cohomology and locally covariant quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Christian; Schenkel, Alexander; Szabo, Richard J.

    We study differential cohomology on categories of globally hyperbolic Lorentzian manifolds. The Lorentzian metric allows us to define a natural transformation whose kernel generalizes Maxwell's equations and fits into a restriction of the fundamental exact sequences of differential cohomology. We consider smooth Pontryagin duals of differential cohomology groups, which are subgroups of the character groups. We prove that these groups fit into smooth duals of the fundamental exact sequences of differential cohomology and equip them with a natural presymplectic structure derived from a generalized Maxwell Lagrangian. The resulting presymplectic Abelian groups are quantized using the CCR-functor, which yields a covariant functor from our categories of globally hyperbolic Lorentzian manifolds to the category of C∗-algebras. We prove that this functor satisfies the causality and time-slice axioms of locally covariant quantum field theory, but that it violates the locality axiom. We show that this violation is precisely due to the fact that our functor has topological subfunctors describing the Pontryagin duals of certain singular cohomology groups. As a byproduct, we develop a Fréchet-Lie group structure on differential cohomology groups.

  5. Wave field localization in a prestressed functionally graded layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyankova, T. I.; Kalinchuk, V. V.

    2017-05-01

    Characteristic features of wave field formation caused by a surface source of harmonic vibration in a prestressed functionally graded layer are investigated. It is assumed that the elastic moduli and the density of the material vary with depth according to arbitrary laws. The initial material of the medium is represented by a model hyperelastic material with third-order elastic moduli. The boundary-value problem for a set of Lamè equations is reduced to a set of Cauchy problems with initial conditions, which is solved by the Runge-Kutta-Merson method modified to fit the specific problem under study. Considering shear vibrations of a functionally graded layer as an example, effects of the type of its inhomogeneity, variations in its properties, and nature of its initial stressed state on the displacement distribution in depth are investigated. Special attention is paid to characteristic features of displacement localization in a layer with an interface-type inclusion near critical frequencies. A direct relation between the inhomogeneous layer structure and the type of displacement localization in depth is demonstrated. It is found that the role of initial stresses and variations in material parameters considerably increases in the vicinities of critical frequencies.

  6. Field trips local and abroad: What every field trip leader needs to know about insurance coverage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanelly, T.

    2016-12-01

    Leading field trips locally or internationally is an essential part of being a geoscience educator. Being a field trip guide and coordinator often means that you will be responsible for minors (under the age of 21), transportation, and touring (e.g. hiking, exploring) in unique and sometimes rugged environments. Professors, and alike, at universities and colleges may not have adequate insurance covered should a student(s) render maladies, or worse death, under your advisement. This poster outlines questions that could be presented to your university or college's lawyer to ensure field trip guides are properly covered for liability in most situations. Additionally, it will provide explanation for common legal terms often used when explaining insurance coverage relating to university or college employment. Lastly, this poster will provide suggestions on how to pursue professional coverage polices that can protect you both in the field and in the classroom/laboratory.

  7. Generalized local-frame-transformation theory for excited species in external fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannakeas, P.; Greene, Chris H.; Robicheaux, F.

    2016-07-01

    A rigorous theoretical framework is developed for a generalized local-frame-transformation theory (GLFT). The GLFT is applicable to the following systems: Rydberg atoms or molecules in an electric field and negative ions in any combination of electric and/or magnetic fields. A first test application to the photoionization spectra of Rydberg atoms in an external electric field demonstrates dramatic improvement over the first version of the local-frame-transformation theory developed initially by U. Fano [Phys. Rev. A 24, 619 (1981), 10.1103/PhysRevA.24.619] and D. A. Harmin [Phys. Rev. A 26, 2656 (1982), 10.1103/PhysRevA.26.2656]. This revised GLFT theory yields nontrivial corrections because it now includes the full on-shell Hilbert space without adopting the truncations in the original theory. Comparisons of the semianalytical GLFT Stark spectra with ab initio numerical simulations yield errors in the range of a few tens of MHz, an improvement over the original Fano-Harmin theory, whose errors are 10-100 times larger. Our analysis provides a systematic pathway to precisely describe the corresponding photoabsorption spectra that should be accurate enough to meet most modern experimental standards.

  8. Dose build up correction for radiation monitors in high-energy bremsstrahlung photon radiation fields.

    PubMed

    Nair, Haridas G; Nayak, M K; Dev, Vipin; Thakkar, K K; Sarkar, P K; Sharma, D N

    2006-01-01

    Conventional radiation monitors have been found to underestimate the personal dose equivalent in the high-energy bremsstrahlung photon radiation fields encountered near electron storage rings. Depth-dose measurements in a water phantom were carried out with a radiation survey meter in the bremsstrahlung photon radiation fields from a 450 MeV electron storage ring to find out the magnitude of the underestimation. Dose equivalent indicated by the survey meter was found to build up with increase in thickness of water placed in front of the meter up to certain depth and then reduce with further increase in thickness. A dose equivalent build up factor was estimated from the measurements. An absorbed dose build up factor in a water phantom was also estimated from calculations performed using the Monte Carlo codes, EGS-4 and EGSnrc. The calculations are found to be in very good agreement with the measurements. The studies indicate inadequacy of commercially available radiation monitors for radiation monitoring within shielded enclosures and in streaming high-energy photon radiation fields from electron storage rings, and the need for proper correction for use in such radiation fields.

  9. Validation of ICA-Based Myogenic Artifact Correction for Scalp and Source-Localized EEG

    PubMed Central

    McMenamin, Brenton W.; Shackman, Alexander J.; Maxwell, Jeffrey S.; Bachhuber, David R. W.; Koppenhaver, Adam M.; Greischar, Lawrence L.; Davidson, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    Muscle electrical activity, or “electromyogenic” (EMG) artifact, poses a serious threat to the validity of electroencephalography (EEG) investigations in the frequency domain. EMG is sensitive to a variety of psychological processes and can mask genuine effects or masquerade as legitimate neurogenic effects across the scalp in frequencies at least as low as the alpha band (8–13Hz). Although several techniques for correcting myogenic activity have been described, most are subjected to only limited validation attempts. Attempts to gauge the impact of EMG correction on intracerebral source models (source “localization” analyses) are rarer still. Accordingly, we assessed the sensitivity and specificity of one prominent correction tool, independent component analysis (ICA), on the scalp and in the source-space using high-resolution EEG. Data were collected from 17 participants while neurogenic and myogenic activity was independently varied. Several protocols for classifying and discarding components classified as myogenic and non-myogenic artifact (e.g., ocular) were systematically assessed, leading to the exclusion of one-third to as much as three-quarters of the variance in the EEG. Some, but not all, of these protocols showed adequate performance on the scalp. Indeed, performance was superior to previously validated regression-based techniques. Nevertheless, ICA-based EMG correction exhibited low validity in the intracerebral source-space, likely owing to incomplete separation of neurogenic from myogenic sources. Taken with prior work, this indicates that EMG artifact can substantially distort estimates of intracerebral spectral activity. Neither regression- nor ICA-based EMG correction techniques provide complete safeguards against such distortions. In light of these results, several practical suggestions and recommendations are made for intelligently using ICA to minimize EMG and other common artifacts. PMID:19833218

  10. Vector Sky Glint Corrections for Above Surface Retrieval of the Subsurface Polarized Light Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilerson, A.; Foster, R.; McGilloway, A.; Ibrahim, A.; El-habashi, A.; Carrizo, C.; Ahmed, S.

    2016-02-01

    Knowledge of the underwater light field is fundamental to determining the health of the world's oceans and coastal regions. For decades, traditional remote sensing retrieval methods that rely solely on the spectral intensity of the water-leaving light have provided indicators of marine ecosystem health. As the demand for retrieval accuracy rises, use of the polarized nature of light as an additional remote sensing tool is becoming necessary. In order to observe the underwater polarized light field from above the surface (for ship, shore, or satellite applications), a method of correcting the above water signal for the effects of polarized surface-reflected skylight is needed. For three weeks in July-August 2014, the NASA Ship Aircraft Bio-Optical Research (SABOR) cruise continuously observed the polarized radiance of the ocean and the sky using a HyperSAS-POL system. The system autonomously tracks the Sun position and the heading of the research vessel in order to maintain a fixed relative solar azimuth angle (i.e. ±90°) and therefore avoid the specular reflection of the sunlight. Additionally, in-situ inherent optical properties (IOPs) were continuously acquired using a set of instrument packages modified for underway measurement, hyperspectral radiometric measurements were taken manually at all stations, and an underwater polarimeter was deployed when conditions permitted. All measurements, above and below the sea surface, were combined and compared in an effort to first develop a glint (sky + Sun) correction scheme for the upwelling polarized signal from a wind-driven ocean surface and compare with one assuming that the ocean surface is flat. Accurate retrieval of the subsurface vector light field is demonstrated through comparisons with polarized radiative transfer codes and direct measurements made by the underwater polarimeter.

  11. Optical properties of surfaces with supercell ab initio calculations: Local-field effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tancogne-Dejean, Nicolas; Giorgetti, Christine; Véniard, Valérie

    2015-12-01

    Surface optical and electronic properties are crucial for material science and have implications in fields as various as nanotechnology, nonlinear optics, and spectroscopies. In particular, the huge variation of electronic density perpendicular to the surface is expected to play a key role in absorption due to local-field effects. Numerous state-of-the-art theoretical and numerical ab initio formalisms developed for studying these properties are based on supercell approaches, in reciprocal space, due to their efficiency. In this paper, we show that the standard scheme fails for the out-of-plane optical response of the surface. This response is interpreted using the "effective-medium theory" with vacuum and also in terms of interaction between replicas, as the supercell approach implies a periodicity which is absent in the real system. We propose an alternative formulation, also based on the supercell, for computing the macroscopic dielectric function. Application to the clean Si(001) 2 ×1 surface allows us to present the effect of the local fields for both peak positions and line shape on the bulk and surface contributions. It shows how local fields built up for the in-plane and out-of-plane dielectric responses of the surface. In addition to their conceptual impact, our results explain why the standard approach gives reliable predictions for the in-plane components, leading to correct reflectance anisotropy spectra. Our scheme can be further generalized to other low-dimensional geometries, such as clusters or nanowires, and open the way to nonlinear optics for surfaces.

  12. Vector meson masses from a hidden local symmetry in a constant magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Mamiya; Matsuzaki, Shinya

    2016-06-01

    We discuss the magnetic responses of vector meson masses based on the hidden local symmetry (HLS) model in a constant magnetic field, described by the lightest two-flavor system including the pion, rho and omega mesons in the spectrum. The effective masses influenced under the magnetic field are evaluated according to the derivative or chiral expansion established in the HLS model. At the leading order O (p2), the g factor of the charged rho meson is fixed to be 2, implying that the rho meson at this order is treated just like a pointlike spin-1 particle. Beyond the leading order, one finds anomalous magnetic interactions of the charged rho meson, involving the anomalous magnetic moment, which give corrections to the effective mass. It is then suggested that up to O (p4) the charged rho meson tends to become massless. Of interest is that nontrivial magnetic dependence of neutral mesons emerges to give rise to the significant mixing among neutral mesons. Consequently, it leads to the dramatic enhancement of the omega meson mass, which is testable in future lattice simulations. Corrections from terms beyond O (p4) are also addressed.

  13. Performance Monitoring Local Field Potentials in the Medial Frontal Cortex of Primates: Anterior Cingulate Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Emeric, Erik E.; Brown, Joshua W.; Leslie, Melanie; Pouget, Pierre; Stuphorn, Veit; Schall, Jeffrey D.

    2009-01-01

    We describe intracranial local field potentials (LFP) recorded in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) of macaque monkeys performing a saccade countermanding task. The most prominent feature at ∼70% of sites was greater negative polarity after errors than after rewarded correct trials. This negative polarity was also evoked in unrewarded correct trials. The LFP evoked by the visual target was much less polarized, and the weak presaccadic modulation was insufficient to control the initiation of saccades. When saccades were cancelled, LFP modulation decreased slightly with the magnitude of response conflict that corresponds to the coactivation of gaze-shifting and -holding neurons estimated from the probability of canceling. However, response time adjustments on subsequent trials were not correlated with LFP polarity on individual trials. The results provide clear evidence that error- and feedback-related, but not conflict-related, signals are carried by the LFP in the macaque ACC. Finding performance monitoring field potentials in the ACC of macaque monkeys establishes a bridge between event-related potential and functional brain-imaging studies in humans and neurophysiology studies in non-human primates. PMID:18077665

  14. Quality Assurance of Ultrasound Imaging Systems for Target Localization and Online Setup Corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Tome, Wolfgang A. Orton, Nigel P.

    2008-05-01

    We describe quality assurance paradigms for ultrasound imaging systems for target localization (UISTL). To determine the absolute localization accuracy of a UISTL, an absolute coordinate system can be established in the treatment room and spherical targets at various depths can be localized. To test the ability of such a system to determine the magnitude of internal organ motion, a phantom that mimics the human male pelvic anatomy can be used to simulate different organ motion ranges. To assess the interuser variability of ultrasound (US) guidance, different experienced users can independently determine the daily organ shifts for the same patients for a number of consecutive fractions. The average accuracy for a UISTL for the localization of spherical targets at various depths has been found to be 0.57 {+-} 0.47 mm in each spatial dimension for various focal depths. For the phantom organ motion test it was found that the true organ motion could be determined to within 1.0 mm along each axis. The variability between different experienced users who localized the same 5 patients for five consecutive fractions was small in comparison to the indicated shifts. In addition to the quality assurance tests that address the ability of a UISTL to accurately localize a target, a thorough quality assurance program should also incorporate the following two aspects to ensure consistent and accurate localization in daily clinical use: (1) adequate training and performance monitoring of users of the US target localization system, and (2) prescreening of patients who may not be good candidates for US localization.

  15. Fermi orbital self-interaction corrected electronic structure of molecules beyond local density approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, T. Liebing, S.; Kortus, J.; Pederson, Mark R.

    2015-12-14

    The correction of the self-interaction error that is inherent to all standard density functional theory calculations is an object of increasing interest. In this article, we apply the very recently developed Fermi-orbital based approach for the self-interaction correction [M. R. Pederson et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 121103 (2014) and M. R. Pederson, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 064112 (2015)] to a set of different molecular systems. Our study covers systems ranging from simple diatomic to large organic molecules. We focus our analysis on the direct estimation of the ionization potential from orbital eigenvalues. Further, we show that the Fermi orbital positions in structurally similar molecules appear to be transferable.

  16. Calculation of correction factors for ionization chamber measurements with small fields in low-density media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisaturo, O.; Pachoud, M.; Bochud, F. O.; Moeckli, R.

    2012-07-01

    The quantity of interest for high-energy photon beam therapy recommended by most dosimetric protocols is the absorbed dose to water. Thus, ionization chambers are calibrated in absorbed dose to water, which is the same quantity as what is calculated by most treatment planning systems (TPS). However, when measurements are performed in a low-density medium, the presence of the ionization chamber generates a perturbation at the level of the secondary particle range. Therefore, the measured quantity is close to the absorbed dose to a volume of water equivalent to the chamber volume. This quantity is not equivalent to the dose calculated by a TPS, which is the absorbed dose to an infinitesimally small volume of water. This phenomenon can lead to an overestimation of the absorbed dose measured with an ionization chamber of up to 40% in extreme cases. In this paper, we propose a method to calculate correction factors based on the Monte Carlo simulations. These correction factors are obtained by the ratio of the absorbed dose to water in a low-density medium □Dw,Q,V1low averaged over a scoring volume V1 for a geometry where V1 is filled with the low-density medium and the absorbed dose to water □Dw,QV2low averaged over a volume V2 for a geometry where V2 is filled with water. In the Monte Carlo simulations, □Dw,QV2low is obtained by replacing the volume of the ionization chamber by an equivalent volume of water, according to the definition of the absorbed dose to water. The method is validated in two different configurations which allowed us to study the behavior of this correction factor as a function of depth in phantom, photon beam energy, phantom density and field size.

  17. A Novel System for Correction of Relative Angular Displacement between Airborne Platform and UAV in Target Localization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chenglong; Liu, Jinghong; Song, Yueming; Liang, Huaidan

    2017-01-01

    This paper provides a system and method for correction of relative angular displacements between an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) and its onboard strap-down photoelectric platform to improve localization accuracy. Because the angular displacements have an influence on the final accuracy, by attaching a measuring system to the platform, the texture image of platform base bulkhead can be collected in a real-time manner. Through the image registration, the displacement vector of the platform relative to its bulkhead can be calculated to further determine angular displacements. After being decomposed and superposed on the three attitude angles of the UAV, the angular displacements can reduce the coordinate transformation errors and thus improve the localization accuracy. Even a simple kind of method can improve the localization accuracy by 14.3%. PMID:28273845

  18. A Novel System for Correction of Relative Angular Displacement between Airborne Platform and UAV in Target Localization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chenglong; Liu, Jinghong; Song, Yueming; Liang, Huaidan

    2017-03-04

    This paper provides a system and method for correction of relative angular displacements between an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) and its onboard strap-down photoelectric platform to improve localization accuracy. Because the angular displacements have an influence on the final accuracy, by attaching a measuring system to the platform, the texture image of platform base bulkhead can be collected in a real-time manner. Through the image registration, the displacement vector of the platform relative to its bulkhead can be calculated to further determine angular displacements. After being decomposed and superposed on the three attitude angles of the UAV, the angular displacements can reduce the coordinate transformation errors and thus improve the localization accuracy. Even a simple kind of method can improve the localization accuracy by 14.3%.

  19. Non-perturbative corrections to mean-field critical behavior: the spherical model on a spider-web graph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balram, Ajit C.; Dhar, Deepak

    2012-03-01

    We consider the spherical model on a spider-web graph. This graph is effectively infinite dimensional, similar to the Bethe lattice, but has loops. We show that these lead to non-trivial corrections to the simple mean-field behavior. We first determine all normal modes of the coupled springs problem on this graph, using its large symmetry group. In the thermodynamic limit, the spectrum is a set of δ-functions, and all the modes are localized. The fractional number of modes with frequency less than ω varies as exp ( - C/ω) for ω tending to zero, where C is a constant. For an unbiased random walk on the vertices of this graph, this implies that the probability of return to the origin at time t varies as exp ( - C‧t1/3), for large t, where C‧ is a constant. For the spherical model, we show that while the critical exponents take the values expected from the mean-field theory, the free energy per site at temperature T, near and above the critical temperature Tc, also has an essential singularity of the type exp [ - K(T - Tc)-1/2].

  20. Clearing the waters: Evaluating the need for site-specific field fluorescence corrections based on turbidity measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saraceno, John F.; Shanley, James B.; Downing, Bryan D.; Pellerin, Brian A.

    2017-01-01

    In situ fluorescent dissolved organic matter (fDOM) measurements have gained increasing popularity as a proxy for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in streams. One challenge to accurate fDOM measurements in many streams is light attenuation due to suspended particles. Downing et al. (2012) evaluated the need for corrections to compensate for particle interference on fDOM measurements using a single sediment standard in a laboratory study. The application of those results to a large river improved unfiltered field fDOM accuracy. We tested the same correction equation in a headwater tropical stream and found that it overcompensated fDOM when turbidity exceeded ∼300 formazin nephelometric units (FNU). Therefore, we developed a site-specific, field-based fDOM correction equation through paired in situ fDOM measurements of filtered and unfiltered streamwater. The site-specific correction increased fDOM accuracy up to a turbidity as high as 700 FNU, the maximum observed in this study. The difference in performance between the laboratory-based correction equation of Downing et al. (2012) and our site-specific, field-based correction equation likely arises from differences in particle size distribution between the sediment standard used in the lab (silt) and that observed in our study (fine to medium sand), particularly during high flows. Therefore, a particle interference correction equation based on a single sediment type may not be ideal when field sediment size is significantly different. Given that field fDOM corrections for particle interference under turbid conditions are a critical component in generating accurate DOC estimates, we describe a way to develop site-specific corrections.

  1. Enhanced Soundings for Local Coupling Studies Field Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, Craig R; Santanello, Joseph A; Gentine, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    This document presents initial analyses of the enhanced radiosonde observations obtained during the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Enhanced Soundings for Local Coupling Studies Field Campaign (ESLCS), which took place at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility (CF) from June 15 to August 31, 2015. During ESLCS, routine 4-times-daily radiosonde measurements at the ARM-SGP CF were augmented on 12 days (June 18 and 29; July 11, 14, 19, and 26; August 15, 16, 21, 25, 26, and 27) with daytime 1-hourly radiosondes and 10-minute ‘trailer’ radiosondes every 3 hours. These 12 intensive operational period (IOP) days were selected on the basis of prior-day qualitative forecasts of potential land-atmosphere coupling strength. The campaign captured 2 dry soil convection advantage days (June 29 and July 14) and 10 atmospherically controlled days. Other noteworthy IOP events include: 2 soil dry-down sequences (July 11-14-19 and August 21-25-26), a 2-day clear-sky case (August 15-16), and the passing of Tropical Storm Bill (June 18). To date, the ESLCS data set constitutes the highest-temporal-resolution sampling of the evolution of the daytime planetary boundary layer (PBL) using radiosondes at the ARM-SGP. The data set is expected to contribute to: 1) improved understanding and modeling of the diurnal evolution of the PBL, particularly with regard to the role of local soil wetness, and (2) new insights into the appropriateness of current ARM-SGP CF thermodynamic sampling strategies.

  2. Self-Consistent Pushing and Cranking Corrections to the Meson Fields of the Chiral Quark-Loop Soliton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleif, M.; Wünsch, R.; Maissner, T.

    We study translational and spin-isospin symmetry restoration for the two-flavor chiral quark-loop soliton. Instead of a static soliton at rest we consider a boosted and rotating hedgehog soliton. Corrected classical meson fields are obtained by minimizing a corrected energy functional which has been derived by semi-classical methods (variation after projection). We evaluate corrected meson fields in the region 300 MeV ≤ M≤ 600 MeV of constituent quark masses M and compare them with the uncorrected fields. We study the effect of the corrections on various expectation values of nuclear observables such as the root-mean square radius, the axial-vector coupling constant, magnetic moments and the delta-nucleon mass splitting.

  3. 2-D Path Corrections for Local and Regional Coda Waves: A Test of Transportability

    SciTech Connect

    Mayeda, K M; Malagnini, L; Phillips, W S; Walter, W R; Dreger, D S; Morasca, P

    2005-07-13

    Reliable estimates of the seismic source spectrum are necessary for accurate magnitude, yield, and energy estimation. In particular, how seismic radiated energy scales with increasing earthquake size has been the focus of recent debate within the community and has direct implications on earthquake source physics studies as well as hazard mitigation. The 1-D coda methodology of Mayeda et al. [2003] has provided the lowest variance estimate of the source spectrum when compared against traditional approaches that use direct S-waves, thus making it ideal for networks that have sparse station distribution. The 1-D coda methodology has been mostly confined to regions of approximately uniform complexity. For larger, more geophysically complicated regions, 2-D path corrections may be required. We will compare performance of 1-D versus 2-D path corrections in a variety of regions. First, the complicated tectonics of the northern California region coupled with high quality broadband seismic data provides for an ideal ''apples-to-apples'' test of 1-D and 2-D path assumptions on direct waves and their coda. Next, we will compare results for the Italian Alps using high frequency data from the University of Genoa. For Northern California, we used the same station and event distribution and compared 1-D and 2-D path corrections and observed the following results: (1) 1-D coda results reduced the amplitude variance relative to direct S-waves by roughly a factor of 8 (800%); (2) Applying a 2-D correction to the coda resulted in up to 40% variance reduction from the 1-D coda results; (3) 2-D direct S-wave results, though better than 1-D direct waves, were significantly worse than the 1-D coda. We found that coda-based moment-rate source spectra derived from the 2-D approach were essentially identical to those from the 1-D approach for frequencies less than {approx}0.7-Hz, however for the high frequencies (0.7 {le} f {le} 8.0-Hz), the 2-D approach resulted in inter-station scatter

  4. Correcting mean-field approximations for birth-death-movement processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Ruth E.; Simpson, Matthew J.

    2010-10-01

    On the microscale, migration, proliferation and death are crucial in the development, homeostasis and repair of an organism; on the macroscale, such effects are important in the sustainability of a population in its environment. Dependent on the relative rates of migration, proliferation and death, spatial heterogeneity may arise within an initially uniform field; this leads to the formation of spatial correlations and can have a negative impact upon population growth. Usually, such effects are neglected in modeling studies and simple phenomenological descriptions, such as the logistic model, are used to model population growth. In this work we outline some methods for analyzing exclusion processes which include agent proliferation, death and motility in two and three spatial dimensions with spatially homogeneous initial conditions. The mean-field description for these types of processes is of logistic form; we show that, under certain parameter conditions, such systems may display large deviations from the mean field, and suggest computationally tractable methods to correct the logistic-type description.

  5. Model-based motion correction of reduced field of view diffusion MRI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hering, Jan; Wolf, Ivo; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Maier-Hein, Klaus H.

    2014-03-01

    In clinical settings, application of the most recent modelling techniques is usually unfeasible due to the limited acquisition time. Localised acquisitions enclosing only the object of interest by reducing the field-of-view (FOV) counteract the time limitation but pose new challenges to the subsequent processing steps like motion correction. We use datasets from the Human Connectome Project (HCP) to simulate head motion distorted reduced FOV acquisitions and present an evaluation of head motion correction approaches: the commonly used affine regis- tration onto an unweighted reference image guided by the mutual information (MI) metric and a model-based approach, which uses reference images computed from approximated tensor data to improve the performance of the MI metric. While the standard approach using the MI metric yields up to 15% outliers (error>5 mm) and a mean spatial error above 1.5 mm, the model-based approach reduces the number of outliers (1%) and the spatial error significantly (p<0.01). The behavior is also reflected by the visual analysis of the MI metric. The evaluation shows that the MI metric is of very limited use for reduced FOV data post-processing. The model-based approach has proven more suitable in this context.

  6. Active subthreshold dendritic conductances shape the local field potential

    PubMed Central

    Ness, Torbjørn V.; Remme, Michiel W. H.

    2016-01-01

    Key points The local field potential (LFP), the low‐frequency part of extracellular potentials recorded in neural tissue, is often used for probing neural circuit activity. Interpreting the LFP signal is difficult, however.While the cortical LFP is thought mainly to reflect synaptic inputs onto pyramidal neurons, little is known about the role of the various subthreshold active conductances in shaping the LFP.By means of biophysical modelling we obtain a comprehensive qualitative understanding of how the LFP generated by a single pyramidal neuron depends on the type and spatial distribution of active subthreshold currents.For pyramidal neurons, the h‐type channels probably play a key role and can cause a distinct resonance in the LFP power spectrum.Our results show that the LFP signal can give information about the active properties of neurons and imply that preferred frequencies in the LFP can result from those cellular properties instead of, for example, network dynamics. Abstract The main contribution to the local field potential (LFP) is thought to stem from synaptic input to neurons and the ensuing subthreshold dendritic processing. The role of active dendritic conductances in shaping the LFP has received little attention, even though such ion channels are known to affect the subthreshold neuron dynamics. Here we used a modelling approach to investigate the effects of subthreshold dendritic conductances on the LFP. Using a biophysically detailed, experimentally constrained model of a cortical pyramidal neuron, we identified conditions under which subthreshold active conductances are a major factor in shaping the LFP. We found that, in particular, the hyperpolarization‐activated inward current, I h, can have a sizable effect and cause a resonance in the LFP power spectral density. To get a general, qualitative understanding of how any subthreshold active dendritic conductance and its cellular distribution can affect the LFP, we next performed a systematic

  7. Real-time motion- and B0-correction for LASER-localized spiral-accelerated 3D-MRSI of the brain at 3T.

    PubMed

    Bogner, Wolfgang; Hess, Aaron T; Gagoski, Borjan; Tisdall, M Dylan; van der Kouwe, Andre J W; Trattnig, Siegfried; Rosen, Bruce; Andronesi, Ovidiu C

    2014-03-01

    The full potential of magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) is often limited by localization artifacts, motion-related artifacts, scanner instabilities, and long measurement times. Localized adiabatic selective refocusing (LASER) provides accurate B1-insensitive spatial excitation even at high magnetic fields. Spiral encoding accelerates MRSI acquisition, and thus, enables 3D-coverage without compromising spatial resolution. Real-time position- and shim/frequency-tracking using MR navigators correct motion- and scanner instability-related artifacts. Each of these three advanced MRI techniques provides superior MRSI data compared to commonly used methods. In this work, we integrated in a single pulse sequence these three promising approaches. Real-time correction of motion, shim, and frequency-drifts using volumetric dual-contrast echo planar imaging-based navigators were implemented in an MRSI sequence that uses low-power gradient modulated short-echo time LASER localization and time efficient spiral readouts, in order to provide fast and robust 3D-MRSI in the human brain at 3T. The proposed sequence was demonstrated to be insensitive to motion- and scanner drift-related degradations of MRSI data in both phantoms and volunteers. Motion and scanner drift artifacts were eliminated and excellent spectral quality was recovered in the presence of strong movement. Our results confirm the expected benefits of combining a spiral 3D-LASER-MRSI sequence with real-time correction. The new sequence provides accurate, fast, and robust 3D metabolic imaging of the human brain at 3T. This will further facilitate the use of 3D-MRSI for neuroscience and clinical applications.

  8. Limits of the measurability of the local quantum electromagnetic-field amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compagno, G.; Persico, F.

    1998-03-01

    The precision with which the amplitude of the free electromagnetic field can be measured locally in QED is evaluated by analyzing a well-known gedanken experiment originally proposed by Bohr and Rosenfeld (BR). The analysis is performed by applying standard theoretical techniques familiar in quantum optics. The main result obtained for the precision is significantly different from the generally accepted Bohr-Rosenfeld result. This leads to questioning the widely accepted notion of the compensating field, fostered by these authors. A misconception at the origin of this notion is pointed out by a careful investigation of the self-force acting on the apparatus designed to measure the field. The correct expression for this self-force is found to be at variance with that proposed by Bohr and Rosenfeld and generally accepted. It is argued that, as a consequence of this new expression and in contrast with the generally accepted view, no compensating force of nonelectromagnetic nature is required in order to perform measurements of the quantum field amplitude with any desired accuracy. It is shown that the only limitations to the precision of the measurement, in the BR gedanken experiment, arise from the time-energy uncertainty principle, as well as from the finite dimensions of the measuring apparatus.

  9. Many-body localization in a long range XXZ model with random-field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo

    2016-12-01

    Many-body localization (MBL) in a long range interaction XXZ model with random field are investigated. Using the exact diagonal method, the MBL phase diagram with different tuning parameters and interaction range is obtained. It is found that the phase diagram of finite size results supplies strong evidence to confirm that the threshold interaction exponent α = 2. The tuning parameter Δ can efficiently change the MBL edge in high energy density stats, thus the system can be controlled to transfer from thermal phase to MBL phase by changing Δ. The energy level statistics data are consistent with result of the MBL phase diagram. However energy level statistics data cannot detect the thermal phase correctly in extreme long range case.

  10. New correction procedures for the fast field program which extend its range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, M.; Sack, R. A.

    1990-01-01

    A fast field program (FFP) algorithm was developed based on the method of Lee et al., for the prediction of sound pressure level from low frequency, high intensity sources. In order to permit accurate predictions at distances greater than 2 km, new correction procedures have had to be included in the algorithm. Certain functions, whose Hankel transforms can be determined analytically, are subtracted from the depth dependent Green's function. The distance response is then obtained as the sum of these transforms and the Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT) of the residual k dependent function. One procedure, which permits the elimination of most complex exponentials, has allowed significant changes in the structure of the FFP algorithm, which has resulted in a substantial reduction in computation time.

  11. Curvature wavefront sensing performance simulations for active correction of the Javalambre wide-field telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chueca, Sergio; Marín-Franch, Antonio; Cenarro, Andrés. Javier; Varela, Jesús; Ederoclite, Alessandro; Cristóbal-Hornillos, David; Hernández-Monteagudo, Carlos; Gruel, Nicolás.; Moles, Mariano; Yanes, Axel; Rueda, Fernando; Rueda, Sergio; Luis-Simoes, Roberto; Hernández-Fuertes, Javier; López-Sainz, Angel; Maícas-Sacristán, Natalio; Lamadrid, José Luis; Díaz-Martín, Miguel Chioare; Taylor, Keith

    2012-09-01

    In order to maintain image quality during Javalambre wide field telescope operations, deformations and rigid body motions must be actively controlled to minimize optical disturbances. For JST/T250 the aberrations of the telescope will be measured with four curvature sensors at the focal plane. To correct the measured distortions, the secondary mirror position (with a hexapod support) and the camera position can be modified in a control closed loop. Multiple software tools have been developed to accomplish this goal, constituting the "Observatorio Astrofísico de Javalambre" (OAJ) Active Optics Pipeline. We present a comprehensive analysis of the wave-front sensing system, including the availability of reference stars, pupil registration, wavefront estimators and the iteration matrix evaluation techniques. Some preliminary simulations have been made using a telescope model with a Optical Ray Tracing Software.

  12. Correction of Proton Resonance Frequency Shift Temperature Maps for Magnetic Field Disturbances Caused by Breathing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmatukha, Andriy V.; Bakker, Chris J. G.

    2006-05-01

    Respiratory Induced Resonance Offset (RIRO) is a periodic disturbance of the magnetic field due to breathing. Such disturbances handicap the accuracy of the Proton Resonance Frequency Shift (PRFS) method of MRI temperature mapping in anatomies situated nearby the lungs and chest wall. In this work, we propose a method capable of minimizing errors caused by RIRO in PRFS temperature maps. In this method, a set of baseline images characterizing RIRO at a variety of respiratory cycle instants is acquired before the thermal treatment starts. During the treatment, the temperature evolution is found from two successive images. Then, the calculated temperature changes are corrected for the additional contribution caused by RIRO using the pre-treatment baseline images acquired at the identical instances of the respiratory cycle. Our method is shown to improve the accuracy and stability of PRFS temperature maps in the presence of RIRO and motion in phantom and volunteer experiments.

  13. Bulk gauge fields in warped space and localized supersymmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Chacko, Z.; Ponton, Eduardo

    2003-11-01

    We consider five dimensional supersymmetric warped scenarios in which the Standard Model quark and lepton fields are localized on the ultraviolet brane, while the Standard Model gauge fields propagate in the bulk. Supersymmetry is assumed to be broken on the infrared brane. The relative sizes of supersymmetry breaking effects are found to depend on the hierarchy between the infrared scale and the weak scale. If the infrared scale is much larger than the weak scale the leading supersymmetry breaking effect on the visible brane is given by gaugino mediation. The gaugino masses at the weak scale are proportional to the square of the corresponding gauge coupling, while the dominant contribution to the scalar masses arises from logarithmically enhanced radiative effects involving the gaugino mass that are cutoff at the infrared scale. While the LSP is the gravitino, the NLSP which is the stau is stable on collider time scales. If however the infrared scale is close to the weak scale then the effects of hard supersymmetry breaking operators on the scalar masses can become comparable to those from gaugino mediation. These operators alter the relative strengths of the couplings of gauge bosons and gauginos to matter, and give loop contributions to the scalar masses that are also cutoff at the infrared scale. The gaugino masses, while exhibiting a more complicated dependence on the corresponding gauge coupling, remain hierarchical and become proportional to the corresponding gauge coupling in the limit of strong supersymmetry breaking. The scalar masses are finite and a loop factor smaller than the gaugino masses. The LSP remains the gravitino.

  14. Stimulus dependence of local field potential spectra: experiment versus theory.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Francesca; Mazzoni, Alberto; Logothetis, Nikos K; Panzeri, Stefano; Brunel, Nicolas

    2014-10-29

    The local field potential (LFP) captures different neural processes, including integrative synaptic dynamics that cannot be observed by measuring only the spiking activity of small populations. Therefore, investigating how LFP power is modulated by external stimuli can offer important insights into sensory neural representations. However, gaining such insight requires developing data-driven computational models that can identify and disambiguate the neural contributions to the LFP. Here, we investigated how networks of excitatory and inhibitory integrate-and-fire neurons responding to time-dependent inputs can be used to interpret sensory modulations of LFP spectra. We computed analytically from such models the LFP spectra and the information that they convey about input and used these analytical expressions to fit the model to LFPs recorded in V1 of anesthetized macaques (Macaca mulatta) during the presentation of color movies. Our expressions explain 60%-98% of the variance of the LFP spectrum shape and its dependency upon movie scenes and we achieved this with realistic values for the best-fit parameters. In particular, synaptic best-fit parameters were compatible with experimental measurements and the predictions of firing rates, based only on the fit of LFP data, correlated with the multiunit spike rate recorded from the same location. Moreover, the parameters characterizing the input to the network across different movie scenes correlated with cross-scene changes of several image features. Our findings suggest that analytical descriptions of spiking neuron networks may become a crucial tool for the interpretation of field recordings. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3414589-17$15.00/0.

  15. Measuring complex behaviors of local oscillatory networks in deep brain local field potentials.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yongzhi; Geng, Xinyi; Li, Luming; Stein, John F; Aziz, Tipu Z; Green, Alexander L; Wang, Shouyan

    2016-05-01

    Multiple oscillations emerging from the same neuronal substrate serve to construct a local oscillatory network. The network usually exhibits complex behaviors of rhythmic, balancing and coupling between the oscillations, and the quantification of these behaviors would provide valuable insight into organization of the local network related to brain states. An integrated approach to quantify rhythmic, balancing and coupling neural behaviors based upon power spectral analysis, power ratio analysis and cross-frequency power coupling analysis was presented. Deep brain local field potentials (LFPs) were recorded from the thalamus of patients with neuropathic pain and dystonic tremor. t-Test was applied to assess the difference between the two patient groups. The rhythmic behavior measured by power spectral analysis showed significant power spectrum difference in the high beta band between the two patient groups. The balancing behavior measured by power ratio analysis showed significant power ratio differences at high beta band to 8-20 Hz, and 30-40 Hz to high beta band between the patient groups. The coupling behavior measured by cross-frequency power coupling analysis showed power coupling differences at (theta band, high beta band) and (45-55 Hz, 70-80 Hz) between the patient groups. The study provides a strategy for studying the brain states in a multi-dimensional behavior space and a framework to screen quantitative characteristics for biomarkers related to diseases or nuclei. The work provides a comprehensive approach for understanding the complex behaviors of deep brain LFPs and identifying quantitative biomarkers for brain states related to diseases or nuclei. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The Local Interstellar Magnetic Field Determined from the IBEX Ribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirnstein, E.; Funsten, H. O.; Heerikhuisen, J.; Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.; Pogorelov, N. V.

    2015-12-01

    As the solar wind plasma flows away from the Sun, it eventually collides with the local interstellar medium, creating the heliosphere. Neutral atoms from interstellar space travel inside the heliosphere and charge-exchange with the solar wind plasma, creating energetic neutral atoms (ENAs). Some of these ENAs travel outside the heliosphere, undergo two charge-exchange events, and travel back inside the heliosphere towards Earth, with the strongest intensity in directions perpendicular to the interstellar magnetic field (IMF). It is widely believed that this process generates the "ribbon" of enhanced ENA intensity observed by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX), and has been shown to explain many key features of the observations. IBEX observations of the ribbon are composed of a complex, line-of-sight integration of ENAs that come from different distances beyond the heliopause, and thus the ENAs detected by IBEX over a wide range of energies are uniquely coupled to the IMF draped around the heliosphere. We present a detailed analysis of the IBEX ribbon measurements using 3D simulations of the heliosphere and computations of the ribbon flux at Earth based on IBEX capabilities, and derive the magnitude and direction of the IMF required to reproduce the position of the IBEX ribbon in the sky. These results have potentially large implications for our understanding of the solar-interstellar environment.

  17. Performance of FFT methods in local gravity field modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forsberg, Rene; Solheim, Dag

    1989-01-01

    Fast Fourier transform (FFT) methods provide a fast and efficient means of processing large amounts of gravity or geoid data in local gravity field modelling. The FFT methods, however, has a number of theoretical and practical limitations, especially the use of flat-earth approximation, and the requirements for gridded data. In spite of this the method often yields excellent results in practice when compared to other more rigorous (and computationally expensive) methods, such as least-squares collocation. The good performance of the FFT methods illustrate that the theoretical approximations are offset by the capability of taking into account more data in larger areas, especially important for geoid predictions. For best results good data gridding algorithms are essential. In practice truncated collocation approaches may be used. For large areas at high latitudes the gridding must be done using suitable map projections such as UTM, to avoid trivial errors caused by the meridian convergence. The FFT methods are compared to ground truth data in New Mexico (xi, eta from delta g), Scandinavia (N from delta g, the geoid fits to 15 cm over 2000 km), and areas of the Atlantic (delta g from satellite altimetry using Wiener filtering). In all cases the FFT methods yields results comparable or superior to other methods.

  18. On the photovoltaic effect in local field potential recordings.

    PubMed

    Mikulovic, Sanja; Pupe, Stefano; Peixoto, Helton Maia; Do Nascimento, George C; Kullander, Klas; Tort, Adriano B L; Leão, Richardson N

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetics allows light activation of genetically defined cell populations and the study of their link to specific brain functions. While it is a powerful method that has revolutionized neuroscience in the last decade, the shortcomings of directly stimulating electrodes and living tissue with light have been poorly characterized. Here, we assessed the photovoltaic effects in local field potential (LFP) recordings of the mouse hippocampus. We found that light leads to several artifacts that resemble genuine LFP features in animals with no opsin expression, such as stereotyped peaks at the power spectrum, phase shifts across different recording channels, coupling between low and high oscillation frequencies, and sharp signal deflections that are detected as spikes. Further, we tested how light stimulation affected hippocampal LFP recordings in mice expressing channelrhodopsin 2 in parvalbumin neurons (PV/ChR2 mice). Genuine oscillatory activity at the frequency of light stimulation could not be separated from light-induced artifacts. In addition, light stimulation in PV/ChR2 mice led to an overall decrease in LFP power. Thus, genuine LFP changes caused by the stimulation of specific cell populations may be intermingled with spurious changes caused by photovoltaic effects. Our data suggest that care should be taken in the interpretation of electrophysiology experiments involving light stimulation.

  19. On the photovoltaic effect in local field potential recordings

    PubMed Central

    Mikulovic, Sanja; Pupe, Stefano; Peixoto, Helton Maia; Do Nascimento, George C.; Kullander, Klas; Tort, Adriano B. L.; Leão, Richardson N.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. Optogenetics allows light activation of genetically defined cell populations and the study of their link to specific brain functions. While it is a powerful method that has revolutionized neuroscience in the last decade, the shortcomings of directly stimulating electrodes and living tissue with light have been poorly characterized. Here, we assessed the photovoltaic effects in local field potential (LFP) recordings of the mouse hippocampus. We found that light leads to several artifacts that resemble genuine LFP features in animals with no opsin expression, such as stereotyped peaks at the power spectrum, phase shifts across different recording channels, coupling between low and high oscillation frequencies, and sharp signal deflections that are detected as spikes. Further, we tested how light stimulation affected hippocampal LFP recordings in mice expressing channelrhodopsin 2 in parvalbumin neurons (PV/ChR2 mice). Genuine oscillatory activity at the frequency of light stimulation could not be separated from light-induced artifacts. In addition, light stimulation in PV/ChR2 mice led to an overall decrease in LFP power. Thus, genuine LFP changes caused by the stimulation of specific cell populations may be intermingled with spurious changes caused by photovoltaic effects. Our data suggest that care should be taken in the interpretation of electrophysiology experiments involving light stimulation. PMID:26835485

  20. Local Field Potentials in the Gustatory Cortex Carry Taste Information

    PubMed Central

    Pavão, Rodrigo; Piette, Caitlin E.; Lopes-dos-Santos, Vítor; Katz, Donald B.

    2014-01-01

    It has been recently shown that local field potentials (LFPs) from the auditory and visual cortices carry information about sensory stimuli, but whether this is a universal property of sensory cortices remains to be determined. Moreover, little is known about the temporal dynamics of sensory information contained in LFPs following stimulus onset. Here we investigated the time course of the amount of stimulus information in LFPs and spikes from the gustatory cortex of awake rats subjected to tastants and water delivery on the tongue. We found that the phase and amplitude of multiple LFP frequencies carry information about stimuli, which have specific time courses after stimulus delivery. The information carried by LFP phase and amplitude was independent within frequency bands, since the joint information exhibited neither synergy nor redundancy. Tastant information in LFPs was also independent and had a different time course from the information carried by spikes. These findings support the hypothesis that the brain uses different frequency channels to dynamically code for multiple features of a stimulus. PMID:24966378

  1. Field-independent source localization of Neptune's radio bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Desch, M. D.; Kaiser, M. L.

    1990-01-01

    During the Voyager 2 encounter with Neptune, a narrowbanded bursty radio component was observed between 500 and 1326 kHz by the Planetary Radio Astronomy instrument. Based on the emission occurrence pattern, the radio source has been localized without the explicit use of the Neptunian offset-tilted dipole magnetic field model, which is accurate only at distances greater than 4 R(N) (Neptune radii) from the planet. Only assumptions based upon the general nature of radio wave propagation in planetary magnetospheres were used. A number of different candidate radial positions were sampled. For example, at 1.5 R(N), the derived source location was positioned only about 10 deg from the south magnetic pole. The radiation from this source was beamed into a cone of 77.5 + or - 6.3 deg half-angle that was tilted about 10 deg from the radial direction to the north-northeast. At other sampled radial positions, similar source locations were obtained. Due to its proximity to the south magnetic pole, the kilometric emission radio source is believed to be associated with an active auroral region, similar in nature to those found at earth and Saturn.

  2. Distribution of high-stability 10 GHz local oscillator over 100 km optical fiber with accurate phase-correction system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Siwei; Sun, Dongning; Dong, Yi; Xie, Weilin; Shi, Hongxiao; Yi, Lilin; Hu, Weisheng

    2014-02-15

    We have developed a radio-frequency local oscillator remote distribution system, which transfers a phase-stabilized 10.03 GHz signal over 100 km optical fiber. The phase noise of the remote signal caused by temperature and mechanical stress variations on the fiber is compensated by a high-precision phase-correction system, which is achieved using a single sideband modulator to transfer the phase correction from intermediate frequency to radio frequency, thus enabling accurate phase control of the 10 GHz signal. The residual phase noise of the remote 10.03 GHz signal is measured to be -70  dBc/Hz at 1 Hz offset, and long-term stability of less than 1×10⁻¹⁶ at 10,000 s averaging time is achieved. Phase error is less than ±0.03π.

  3. Polarization loss correction derived from hydrogen local-resistance measurement in low Pt-loaded polymer-electrolyte fuel cells

    DOE PAGES

    Freiberg, Anna T. S.; Tucker, Michael C.; Weber, Adam Z.

    2017-04-12

    The reduction of platinum-loading on the cathode side of polymer-electrolyte fuel cells leads to a poorly understood increase in mass-transport resistance (MTR) at high current densities. This local resistance was measured using a facile hydrogen-pump technique with dilute active gases for membrane-electrode assemblies with catalyst layers of varying platinum-loading (0.03-0.40 mgPt/cm²). Furthermore, polarization curves in H2/air were measured and corrected for the overpotential caused by the increased MTR for low loadings on the air side due to the reduced concentration of reactant gas at the catalyst surface. The difference in performance after correction for all resistances including the MTR ismore » minor, suggesting its origin to be diffusive in nature, and proving the meaningfulness of the facile hydrogen-pump technique for the characterization of the cathode catalyst layer under defined operation conditions.« less

  4. Fast conjugate phase image reconstruction based on a Chebyshev approximation to correct for B0 field inhomogeneity and concomitant gradients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weitian; Sica, Christopher T.; Meyer, Craig H.

    2008-01-01

    Off-resonance effects can cause image blurring in spiral scanning and various forms of image degradation in other MRI methods. Off-resonance effects can be caused by both B0 inhomogeneity and concomitant gradient fields. Previously developed off-resonance correction methods focus on the correction of a single source of off-resonance. This work introduces a computationally efficient method of correcting for B0 inhomogeneity and concomitant gradients simultaneously. The method is a fast alternative to conjugate phase reconstruction, with the off-resonance phase term approximated by Chebyshev polynomials. The proposed algorithm is well suited for semiautomatic off-resonance correction, which works well even with an inaccurate or low-resolution field map. The proposed algorithm is demonstrated using phantom and in vivo data sets acquired by spiral scanning. Semiautomatic off-resonance correction alone is shown to provide a moderate amount of correction for concomitant gradient field effects, in addition to B0 imhomogeneity effects. However, better correction is provided by the proposed combined method. The best results were produced using the semiautomatic version of the proposed combined method. PMID:18956462

  5. Prediction of CT Substitutes from MR Images Based on Local Diffeomorphic Mapping for Brain PET Attenuation Correction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yao; Yang, Wei; Lu, Lijun; Lu, Zhentai; Zhong, Liming; Huang, Meiyan; Feng, Yanqiu; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan

    2016-10-01

    Attenuation correction is important for PET reconstruction. In PET/MR, MR intensities are not directly related to attenuation coefficients that are needed in PET imaging. The attenuation coefficient map can be derived from CT images. Therefore, prediction of CT substitutes from MR images is desired for attenuation correction in PET/MR. This study presents a patch-based method for CT prediction from MR images, generating attenuation maps for PET reconstruction. Because no global relation exists between MR and CT intensities, we propose local diffeomorphic mapping (LDM) for CT prediction. In LDM, we assume that MR and CT patches are located on 2 nonlinear manifolds, and the mapping from the MR manifold to the CT manifold approximates a diffeomorphism under a local constraint. Locality is important in LDM and is constrained by the following techniques. The first is local dictionary construction, wherein, for each patch in the testing MR image, a local search window is used to extract patches from training MR/CT pairs to construct MR and CT dictionaries. The k-nearest neighbors and an outlier detection strategy are then used to constrain the locality in MR and CT dictionaries. Second is local linear representation, wherein, local anchor embedding is used to solve MR dictionary coefficients when representing the MR testing sample. Under these local constraints, dictionary coefficients are linearly transferred from the MR manifold to the CT manifold and used to combine CT training samples to generate CT predictions. Our dataset contains 13 healthy subjects, each with T1- and T2-weighted MR and CT brain images. This method provides CT predictions with a mean absolute error of 110.1 Hounsfield units, Pearson linear correlation of 0.82, peak signal-to-noise ratio of 24.81 dB, and Dice in bone regions of 0.84 as compared with real CTs. CT substitute-based PET reconstruction has a regression slope of 1.0084 and R(2) of 0.9903 compared with real CT-based PET. In this method

  6. Evaluation of a 3D local multiresolution algorithm for the correction of partial volume effects in positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Le Pogam, Adrien; Hatt, Mathieu; Descourt, Patrice; Boussion, Nicolas; Tsoumpas, Charalampos; Turkheimer, Federico E; Prunier-Aesch, Caroline; Baulieu, Jean-Louis; Guilloteau, Denis; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2011-09-01

    Partial volume effects (PVEs) are consequences of the limited spatial resolution in emission tomography leading to underestimation of uptake in tissues of size similar to the point spread function (PSF) of the scanner as well as activity spillover between adjacent structures. Among PVE correction methodologies, a voxel-wise mutual multiresolution analysis (MMA) was recently introduced. MMA is based on the extraction and transformation of high resolution details from an anatomical image (MR/CT) and their subsequent incorporation into a low-resolution PET image using wavelet decompositions. Although this method allows creating PVE corrected images, it is based on a 2D global correlation model, which may introduce artifacts in regions where no significant correlation exists between anatomical and functional details. A new model was designed to overcome these two issues (2D only and global correlation) using a 3D wavelet decomposition process combined with a local analysis. The algorithm was evaluated on synthetic, simulated and patient images, and its performance was compared to the original approach as well as the geometric transfer matrix (GTM) method. Quantitative performance was similar to the 2D global model and GTM in correlated cases. In cases where mismatches between anatomical and functional information were present, the new model outperformed the 2D global approach, avoiding artifacts and significantly improving quality of the corrected images and their quantitative accuracy. A new 3D local model was proposed for a voxel-wise PVE correction based on the original mutual multiresolution analysis approach. Its evaluation demonstrated an improved and more robust qualitative and quantitative accuracy compared to the original MMA methodology, particularly in the absence of full correlation between anatomical and functional information.

  7. Evaluation of a 3D local multiresolution algorithm for the correction of partial volume effects in positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Le Pogam, Adrien; Hatt, Mathieu; Descourt, Patrice; Boussion, Nicolas; Tsoumpas, Charalampos; Turkheimer, Federico E.; Prunier-Aesch, Caroline; Baulieu, Jean-Louis; Guilloteau, Denis; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Partial volume effects (PVE) are consequences of the limited spatial resolution in emission tomography leading to under-estimation of uptake in tissues of size similar to the point spread function (PSF) of the scanner as well as activity spillover between adjacent structures. Among PVE correction methodologies, a voxel-wise mutual multi-resolution analysis (MMA) was recently introduced. MMA is based on the extraction and transformation of high resolution details from an anatomical image (MR/CT) and their subsequent incorporation into a low resolution PET image using wavelet decompositions. Although this method allows creating PVE corrected images, it is based on a 2D global correlation model which may introduce artefacts in regions where no significant correlation exists between anatomical and functional details. Methods A new model was designed to overcome these two issues (2D only and global correlation) using a 3D wavelet decomposition process combined with a local analysis. The algorithm was evaluated on synthetic, simulated and patient images, and its performance was compared to the original approach as well as the geometric transfer matrix (GTM) method. Results Quantitative performance was similar to the 2D global model and GTM in correlated cases. In cases where mismatches between anatomical and functional information were present the new model outperformed the 2D global approach, avoiding artefacts and significantly improving quality of the corrected images and their quantitative accuracy. Conclusions A new 3D local model was proposed for a voxel-wise PVE correction based on the original mutual multi-resolution analysis approach. Its evaluation demonstrated an improved and more robust qualitative and quantitative accuracy compared to the original MMA methodology, particularly in the absence of full correlation between anatomical and functional information. PMID:21978037

  8. Leading corrections to local approximations. II. The case with turning points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Raphael F.; Burke, Kieron

    2017-03-01

    Quantum corrections to Thomas-Fermi (TF) theory are investigated for noninteracting one-dimensional fermions with known uniform semiclassical approximations to the density and kinetic energy. Their structure is analyzed, and contributions from distinct phase space regions (classically-allowed versus forbidden at the Fermi energy) are derived analytically. Universal formulas are derived for both particle numbers and energy components in each region. For example, in the semiclassical limit, exactly (6π √{3 }) -1 of a particle leaks into the evanescent region beyond a turning point. The correct normalization of semiclassical densities is proven analytically in the semiclassical limit. Energies and densities are tested numerically in a variety of one-dimensional potentials, especially in the limit where TF theory becomes exact. The subtle relation between the pointwise accuracy of the semiclassical approximation and integrated expectation values is explored. The limitations of the semiclassical formulas are also investigated when the potential varies too rapidly. The approximations are shown to work for multiple wells, except right at the mid-phase point of the evanescent regions. The implications for density functional approximations are discussed.

  9. Threshold Region Performance Prediction for Adaptive Matched Field Processing Localization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    significant non-local estimation errors at low signal-to-noise ratios ( SNRs )-errors not modeled by traditional localization measures such as the Cramer...as a function of SNR , for apertures and environments of interest. Particular attention will be given to the "threshold SNR " (below which localization...performance degrades rapidly due to global estimation errors) and to the minimum SNR required to achieve acceptable range/depth localization. Initial

  10. SU-C-304-07: Are Small Field Detector Correction Factors Strongly Dependent On Machine-Specific Characteristics?

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, D; Tanny, S; Parsai, E; Sperling, N

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The current small field dosimetry formalism utilizes quality correction factors to compensate for the difference in detector response relative to dose deposited in water. The correction factors are defined on a machine-specific basis for each beam quality and detector combination. Some research has suggested that the correction factors may only be weakly dependent on machine-to-machine variations, allowing for determinations of class-specific correction factors for various accelerator models. This research examines the differences in small field correction factors for three detectors across two Varian Truebeam accelerators to determine the correction factor dependence on machine-specific characteristics. Methods: Output factors were measured on two Varian Truebeam accelerators for equivalently tuned 6 MV and 6 FFF beams. Measurements were obtained using a commercial plastic scintillation detector (PSD), two ion chambers, and a diode detector. Measurements were made at a depth of 10 cm with an SSD of 100 cm for jaw-defined field sizes ranging from 3×3 cm{sup 2} to 0.6×0.6 cm{sup 2}, normalized to values at 5×5cm{sup 2}. Correction factors for each field on each machine were calculated as the ratio of the detector response to the PSD response. Percent change of correction factors for the chambers are presented relative to the primary machine. Results: The Exradin A26 demonstrates a difference of 9% for 6×6mm{sup 2} fields in both the 6FFF and 6MV beams. The A16 chamber demonstrates a 5%, and 3% difference in 6FFF and 6MV fields at the same field size respectively. The Edge diode exhibits less than 1.5% difference across both evaluated energies. Field sizes larger than 1.4×1.4cm2 demonstrated less than 1% difference for all detectors. Conclusion: Preliminary results suggest that class-specific correction may not be appropriate for micro-ionization chamber. For diode systems, the correction factor was substantially similar and may be useful for class

  11. Weak localization and conductance fluctuations in a quantum dot with parallel magnetic field and spin-orbit scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremers, Jan-Hein; Brouwer, Piet W.; Fal'Ko, Vladimir I.

    2003-09-01

    In the presence of both spin-orbit scattering and a magnetic field the conductance of a chaotic GaAs quantum dot displays quite a rich behavior. Using a Hamiltonian derived by Aleiner and Fal’ko [Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 256801 (2001)] we calculate the weak localization correction and the covariance of the conductance, as a function of parallel and perpendicular magnetic field and spin-orbit coupling strength. We also show how the combination of an in-plane magnetic field and spin-orbit scattering gives rise to a component to the magnetoconductance that is antisymmetric with respect to reversal of the perpendicular component of the magnetic field and how spin-orbit scattering leads to a “magnetic-field echo” in the conductance autocorrelation function. Our results can be used for a measurement of the Dresselhaus and Bychkov-Rashba spin-orbit scattering lengths in a GaAs/GaAlAs heterostructure.

  12. In-flight calibration of the Dawn Framing Camera II: Flat fields and stray light correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, S. E.; Mottola, S.; Matz, K.-D.; Roatsch, T.

    2014-05-01

    The NASA Dawn spacecraft acquired thousands of images of asteroid Vesta during its year-long orbital tour, and is now on its way to asteroid Ceres. A method for calibrating images acquired by the onboard Framing Camera was described by Schröder et al. (Schröder et al. [2013]. Icarus 226, 1304). However, their method is only valid for point sources. In this paper we extend the calibration to images of extended sources like Vesta. For this, we devise a first-order correction for in-field stray light, which is known to plague images taken through the narrow band filters, and revise the flat fields that were acquired in an integrating sphere before launch. We used calibrated images of the Vesta surface to construct simple photometric models for all filters, that allow us to study how the spectrum changes with increasing phase angle (phase reddening). In combination with these models, our calibration method can be used to create near-seamless mosaics that are radiometrically accurate to a few percent. Such mosaics are provided in JVesta, the Vesta version of the JMARS geographic information system.

  13. Modified Amber Force Field Correctly Models the Conformational Preference for Tandem GA pairs in RNA

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Molecular mechanics with all-atom models was used to understand the conformational preference of tandem guanine-adenine (GA) noncanonical pairs in RNA. These tandem GA pairs play important roles in determining stability, flexibility, and structural dynamics of RNA tertiary structures. Previous solution structures showed that these tandem GA pairs adopt either imino (cis Watson–Crick/Watson–Crick A-G) or sheared (trans Hoogsteen/sugar edge A-G) conformations depending on the sequence and orientation of the adjacent closing base pairs. The solution structures (GCGGACGC)2 [Biochemistry, 1996, 35, 9677–9689] and (GCGGAUGC)2 [Biochemistry, 2007, 46, 1511–1522] demonstrate imino and sheared conformations for the two central GA pairs, respectively. These systems were studied using molecular dynamics and free energy change calculations for conformational changes, using umbrella sampling. For the structures to maintain their native conformations during molecular dynamics simulations, a modification to the standard Amber ff10 force field was required, which allowed the amino group of guanine to leave the plane of the base [J. Chem. Theory Comput., 2009, 5, 2088–2100] and form out-of-plane hydrogen bonds with a cross-strand cytosine or uracil. The requirement for this modification suggests the importance of out-of-plane hydrogen bonds in stabilizing the native structures. Free energy change calculations for each sequence demonstrated the correct conformational preference when the force field modification was used, but the extent of the preference is underestimated. PMID:24803859

  14. Efficient Correction of Inhomogeneous Static Magnetic Field-Induced Distortion in Echo Planar Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Dominic; Kuperman, Joshua M.; Dale, Anders M.

    2009-01-01

    Single-shot Echo Planar Imaging (EPI) is one of the most efficient magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisition schemes, producing relatively high-definition images in 100 ms or less. These qualities make it desirable for Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI), functional MRI (fMRI), and Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MRI (DSC-MRI). However, EPI suffers from severe spatial and intensity distortion due to B0 field inhomogeneity induced by magnetic susceptibility variations. Anatomically accurate, undistorted images are essential for relating DTI and fMRI images with anatomical MRI scans, and for spatial registration with other modalities. We present here a fast, robust, and accurate procedure for correcting EPI images from such spatial and intensity distortions. The method involves acquisition of scans with opposite phase encoding polarities, resulting in opposite spatial distortion patterns, and alignment of the resulting images using a fast nonlinear registration procedure. We show that this method, requiring minimal additional scan time, provides superior accuracy relative to the more commonly used, and more time consuming, field mapping approach. This method is also highly computationally efficient, allowing for direct ‘real-time’ implementation on the MRI scanner. We further demonstrate that the proposed method can be used to recover dropouts in gradient echo (BOLD and DSC-MRI) EPI images. PMID:19944768

  15. Development of threedimensional optical correction method for reconstruction of flow field in droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Han Seo; Gim, Yeonghyeon; Kang, Seung-Hwan

    2015-11-01

    A three-dimensional optical correction method was developed to reconstruct droplet-based flow fields. For a numerical simulation, synthetic phantoms were reconstructed by a simultaneous multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique using three projection images which were positioned at an offset angle of 45°. If the synthetic phantom in a conical object with refraction index which differs from atmosphere, the image can be distorted because a light is refracted on the surface of the conical object. Thus, the direction of the projection ray was replaced by the refracted ray which occurred on the surface of the conical object. In order to prove the method considering the distorted effect, reconstruction results of the developed method were compared with the original phantom. As a result, the reconstruction result of the method showed smaller error than that without the method. The method was applied for a Taylor cone which was caused by high voltage between a droplet and a substrate to reconstruct the three-dimensional flow fields for analysis of the characteristics of the droplet. This work was supported by the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Korean government (MEST) (No. 2013R1A2A2A01068653).

  16. Efficient time-sampling method in Coulomb-corrected strong-field approximation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiang-Ru; Wang, Mu-Xue; Xiong, Wei-Hao; Peng, Liang-You

    2016-11-01

    One of the main goals of strong-field physics is to understand the complex structures formed in the momentum plane of the photoelectron. For this purpose, different semiclassical methods have been developed to seek an intuitive picture of the underlying mechanism. The most popular ones are the quantum trajectory Monte Carlo (QTMC) method and the Coulomb-corrected strong-field approximation (CCSFA), both of which take the classical action into consideration and can describe the interference effect. The CCSFA is more widely applicable in a large range of laser parameters due to its nonadiabatic nature in treating the initial tunneling dynamics. However, the CCSFA is much more time consuming than the QTMC method because of the numerical solution to the saddle-point equations. In the present work, we present a time-sampling method to overcome this disadvantage. Our method is as efficient as the fast QTMC method and as accurate as the original treatment in CCSFA. The performance of our method is verified by comparing the results of these methods with that of the exact solution to the time-dependent Schrödinger equation.

  17. Efficient time-sampling method in Coulomb-corrected strong-field approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xiang-Ru; Wang, Mu-Xue; Xiong, Wei-Hao; Peng, Liang-You

    2016-11-01

    One of the main goals of strong-field physics is to understand the complex structures formed in the momentum plane of the photoelectron. For this purpose, different semiclassical methods have been developed to seek an intuitive picture of the underlying mechanism. The most popular ones are the quantum trajectory Monte Carlo (QTMC) method and the Coulomb-corrected strong-field approximation (CCSFA), both of which take the classical action into consideration and can describe the interference effect. The CCSFA is more widely applicable in a large range of laser parameters due to its nonadiabatic nature in treating the initial tunneling dynamics. However, the CCSFA is much more time consuming than the QTMC method because of the numerical solution to the saddle-point equations. In the present work, we present a time-sampling method to overcome this disadvantage. Our method is as efficient as the fast QTMC method and as accurate as the original treatment in CCSFA. The performance of our method is verified by comparing the results of these methods with that of the exact solution to the time-dependent Schrödinger equation.

  18. The Gauge-Field Propagator in Light-Cone Gauge: Which is the Correct One?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantovani, L.; Bacchetta, A.; Pasquini, B.; Xiong, X.

    2017-03-01

    In the literature one can find two different expressions for the gauge-field propagator in light-cone gauge, containing the sum of three rather than two terms. The question of which of the two is the correct one has been a subject of debate. We propose a solution to this question by evaluating one-loop level processes in QED, both in the covariant approach in the light-cone gauge and in the light-front time-ordered perturbation theory (TOPT) approach, proving the equivalence between the two formulations of the theory. The form of the propagator turns out to be crucial in the proof, in particular as concerns its relation with the diagrams containing instantaneously propagating photons and instantaneous interactions. We show that the diagrams in light-front TOPT with instantaneous photons can be recovered in the covariant approach starting from the propagators with only two terms. Our proof of the equivalence clarifies which form should be used for the gauge-field propagator in the covariant approach. This result naturally applies to the QCD case also.

  19. Efficient correction of inhomogeneous static magnetic field-induced distortion in Echo Planar Imaging.

    PubMed

    Holland, Dominic; Kuperman, Joshua M; Dale, Anders M

    2010-03-01

    Single-shot Echo Planar Imaging (EPI) is one of the most efficient magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisition schemes, producing relatively high-definition images in 100 ms or less. These qualities make it desirable for Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI), functional MRI (fMRI), and Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MRI (DSC-MRI). However, EPI suffers from severe spatial and intensity distortion due to B(0) field inhomogeneity induced by magnetic susceptibility variations. Anatomically accurate, undistorted images are essential for relating DTI and fMRI images with anatomical MRI scans, and for spatial registration with other modalities. We present here a fast, robust, and accurate procedure for correcting EPI images from such spatial and intensity distortions. The method involves acquisition of scans with opposite phase encoding polarities, resulting in opposite spatial distortion patterns, and alignment of the resulting images using a fast nonlinear registration procedure. We show that this method, requiring minimal additional scan time, provides superior accuracy relative to the more commonly used, and more time consuming, field mapping approach. This method is also highly computationally efficient, allowing for direct "real-time" implementation on the MRI scanner. We further demonstrate that the proposed method can be used to recover dropouts in gradient echo (BOLD and DSC-MRI) EPI images.

  20. Efficient high-order analysis of bowtie nanoantennas using the locally corrected Nyström method.

    PubMed

    Chorsi, Hamid T; Gedney, Stephen D

    2015-11-30

    It is demonstrated that the Locally Corrected Nyström (LCN) method is a versatile and numerically efficient computational method for the modeling of scattering from plasmonic bowtie nanoantennas. The LCN method is a high-order analysis method that can provide exponential convergence. It is straightforward to implement, accurate and computationally efficient. To the best of the author's knowledge, the high-order LCN is here applied for the first time to 3D nanostructures. Numerical results show the accuracy and efficiency of the LCN applied to the electromagnetic analysis of nanostructures.

  1. Distance correction system for localization based on linear regression and smoothing in ambient intelligence display.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Hee; Choi, Jae-Hun; Lim, Myung-Eun; Park, Soo-Jun

    2008-01-01

    This paper suggests the method of correcting distance between an ambient intelligence display and a user based on linear regression and smoothing method, by which distance information of a user who approaches to the display can he accurately output even in an unanticipated condition using a passive infrared VIR) sensor and an ultrasonic device. The developed system consists of an ambient intelligence display and an ultrasonic transmitter, and a sensor gateway. Each module communicates with each other through RF (Radio frequency) communication. The ambient intelligence display includes an ultrasonic receiver and a PIR sensor for motion detection. In particular, this system selects and processes algorithms such as smoothing or linear regression for current input data processing dynamically through judgment process that is determined using the previous reliable data stored in a queue. In addition, we implemented GUI software with JAVA for real time location tracking and an ambient intelligence display.

  2. Case study for correction of a widespread cadmium soil contamination problem using local funds

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, T.J.; Cassler, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    A Pennsylvania Community had been land spreading liquid sewage sludge since 1964. The Community had also been giving away sludge dried on sand beds to all comers during the same period. The Community economy includes a large light bulb manufacturing facility. Recurring digester problems and yellow coloration of the sewage prompted an investigation and it was determined that the problem was mainly cadmium sulfide being discharged by the light bulb manufacturing facility. In 1976, USDA officials were invited in to assess the problem. The Community was advised to discontinue sludge applications on certain farms and to lime the land used. The light bulb manufacturer was instructed to abate the discharge of cadmium. The Community advised the farmers where heavy sludge application was made to lime their lands and discontinued using those sites. The land application program continued, with the feeling that the problem had been corrected.

  3. Neuroanatomic localization of priming effects for famous faces with latency-corrected event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Rajan; Ouyang, Guang; Sommer, Werner; Zhou, Changsong

    2016-02-01

    The late components of event-related brain potentials (ERPs) pose a difficult problem in source localization. One of the reasons is the smearing of these components in conventional averaging because of trial-to-trial latency-variability. The smearing problem may be addressed by reconstructing the ERPs after latency synchronization with the Residue Iteration Decomposition (RIDE) method. Here we assessed whether the benefits of RIDE at the surface level also improve source localization of RIDE-reconstructed ERPs (RERPs) measured in a face priming paradigm. Separate source models for conventionally averaged ERPs and RERPs were derived and sources were localized for both early and late components. Jackknife averaging on the data was used to reduce the residual variance during source localization compared to conventional source model fitting on individual subject data. Distances between corresponding sources of both ERP and RERP models were measured to check consistency in both source models. Sources for activity around P100, N170, early repetition effect (ERE/N250r) and late repetition effect (LRE/N400) were reported and priming effects in these sources were evaluated for six time windows. Significant improvement in priming effect of the late sources was found from the RERP source model, especially in the Medio-Temporal Lobe, Prefrontal Cortex, and Anterior Temporal Lobe. Consistent with previous studies, we found early priming effects in the right hemisphere and late priming effects in the left hemisphere. Also, the priming effects in right hemisphere outnumbered the left hemisphere, signifying dominance of right hemisphere in face recognition. In conclusion, RIDE reconstructed ERPs promise a comprehensive understanding of the time-resolved dynamics the late sources play during face recognition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Obtaining local bone graft for Evans calcaneal osteotomy in pes planovalgus deformity correction.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Khalid M S; Fenelon, Christopher; Galbraith, John G; D'Souza, Lester G

    2017-09-01

    Lateral column lengthening osteotomy is very useful surgical technique in treating stage II of pes planovalgus deformity of the foot. Either autograft from the iliac crest or allograft can be used for this purpose. In our technique we describe a novel method of obtaining bone graft locally from the calcaneus and therefore avoiding complications and morbidity associated with iliac crest graft. Copyright © 2016 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Vortex identification from local properties of the vorticity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsas, J. H.; Moriconi, L.

    2017-01-01

    A number of systematic procedures for the identification of vortices/coherent structures have been developed as a way to address their possible kinematical and dynamical roles in structural formulations of turbulence. It has been broadly acknowledged, however, that vortex detection algorithms, usually based on linear-algebraic properties of the velocity gradient tensor, can be plagued with severe shortcomings and may become, in practical terms, dependent on the choice of subjective threshold parameters in their implementations. In two-dimensions, a large class of standard vortex identification prescriptions turn out to be equivalent to the "swirling strength criterion" (λc i-criterion), which is critically revisited in this work. We classify the instances where the accuracy of the λc i-criterion is affected by nonlinear superposition effects and propose an alternative vortex detection scheme based on the local curvature properties of the vorticity graph (x ,y ,ω ) —the "vorticity curvature criterion" (λω-criterion)—which improves over the results obtained with the λc i-criterion in controlled Monte Carlo tests. A particularly problematic issue, given its importance in wall-bounded flows, is the eventual inadequacy of the λc i-criterion for many-vortex configurations in the presence of strong background shear. We show that the λω-criterion is able to cope with these cases as well, if a subtraction of the mean velocity field background is performed, in the spirit of the Reynolds decomposition procedure. A realistic comparative study for vortex identification is then carried out for a direct numerical simulation of a turbulent channel flow, including a three-dimensional extension of the λω-criterion. In contrast to the λc i-criterion, the λω-criterion indicates in a consistent way the existence of small scale isotropic turbulent fluctuations in the logarithmic layer, in consonance with long-standing assumptions commonly taken in turbulent boundary

  6. Unified segmentation based correction of R1 brain maps for RF transmit field inhomogeneities (UNICORT)

    PubMed Central

    Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Lutti, Antoine; Helms, Gunther; Novak, Marianne; Ashburner, John; Hutton, Chloe

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative mapping of the longitudinal relaxation rate (R1 = 1/T1) in the human brain enables the investigation of tissue microstructure and macroscopic morphology which are becoming increasingly important for clinical and neuroimaging applications. R1 maps are now commonly estimated from two fast high-resolution 3D FLASH acquisitions with variable excitation flip angles, because this approach is fast and does not rely on special acquisition techniques. However, these R1 maps need to be corrected for bias due to RF transmit field (B1+) inhomogeneities, requiring additional B1+ mapping which is usually time consuming and difficult to implement. We propose a technique that simultaneously estimates the B1+ inhomogeneities and R1 values from the uncorrected R1 maps in the human brain without need for B1+ mapping. It employs a probabilistic framework for unified segmentation based correction of R1 maps for B1+ inhomogeneities (UNICORT). The framework incorporates a physically informed generative model of smooth B1+ inhomogeneities and their multiplicative effect on R1 estimates. Extensive cross-validation with the established standard using measured B1+ maps shows that UNICORT yields accurate B1+ and R1 maps with a mean deviation from the standard of less than 4.3% and 5%, respectively. The results of different groups of subjects with a wide age range and different levels of atypical brain anatomy further suggest that the method is robust and generalizes well to wider populations. UNICORT is easy to apply, as it is computationally efficient and its basic framework is implemented as part of the tissue segmentation in SPM8. PMID:20965260

  7. Unified segmentation based correction of R1 brain maps for RF transmit field inhomogeneities (UNICORT).

    PubMed

    Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Lutti, Antoine; Helms, Gunther; Novak, Marianne; Ashburner, John; Hutton, Chloe

    2011-02-01

    Quantitative mapping of the longitudinal relaxation rate (R1=1/T1) in the human brain enables the investigation of tissue microstructure and macroscopic morphology which are becoming increasingly important for clinical and neuroimaging applications. R1 maps are now commonly estimated from two fast high-resolution 3D FLASH acquisitions with variable excitation flip angles, because this approach is fast and does not rely on special acquisition techniques. However, these R1 maps need to be corrected for bias due to RF transmit field (B1(+)) inhomogeneities, requiring additional B1(+) mapping which is usually time consuming and difficult to implement. We propose a technique that simultaneously estimates the B1(+) inhomogeneities and R1 values from the uncorrected R1 maps in the human brain without need for B1(+) mapping. It employs a probabilistic framework for unified segmentation based correction of R1 maps for B1(+) inhomogeneities (UNICORT). The framework incorporates a physically informed generative model of smooth B1(+) inhomogeneities and their multiplicative effect on R1 estimates. Extensive cross-validation with the established standard using measured B1(+) maps shows that UNICORT yields accurate B1(+) and R1 maps with a mean deviation from the standard of less than 4.3% and 5%, respectively. The results of different groups of subjects with a wide age range and different levels of atypical brain anatomy further suggest that the method is robust and generalizes well to wider populations. UNICORT is easy to apply, as it is computationally efficient and its basic framework is implemented as part of the tissue segmentation in SPM8.

  8. Local spectrum analysis of field propagation in an anisotropic medium. Part II. Time-dependent fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinkelman, Igor; Melamed, Timor

    2005-06-01

    In Part I of this two-part investigation [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A22, 1200 (2005)], we presented a theory for phase-space propagation of time-harmonic electromagnetic fields in an anisotropic medium characterized by a generic wave-number profile. In this Part II, these investigations are extended to transient fields, setting a general analytical framework for local analysis and modeling of radiation from time-dependent extended-source distributions. In this formulation the field is expressed as a superposition of pulsed-beam propagators that emanate from all space-time points in the source domain and in all directions. Using time-dependent quadratic-Lorentzian windows, we represent the field by a phase-space spectral distribution in which the propagating elements are pulsed beams, which are formulated by a transient plane-wave spectrum over the extended-source plane. By applying saddle-point asymptotics, we extract the beam phenomenology in the anisotropic environment resulting from short-pulsed processing. Finally, the general results are applied to the special case of uniaxial crystal and compared with a reference solution.

  9. Local spectrum analysis of field propagation in an anisotropic medium. Part II. Time-dependent fields.

    PubMed

    Tinkelman, Igor; Melamed, Timor

    2005-06-01

    In Part I of this two-part investigation [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 22, 1200 (2005)], we presented a theory for phase-space propagation of time-harmonic electromagnetic fields in an anisotropic medium characterized by a generic wave-number profile. In this Part II, these investigations are extended to transient fields, setting a general analytical framework for local analysis and modeling of radiation from time-dependent extended-source distributions. In this formulation the field is expressed as a superposition of pulsed-beam propagators that emanate from all space-time points in the source domain and in all directions. Using time-dependent quadratic-Lorentzian windows, we represent the field by a phase-space spectral distribution in which the propagating elements are pulsed beams, which are formulated by a transient plane-wave spectrum over the extended-source plane. By applying saddle-point asymptotics, we extract the beam phenomenology in the anisotropic environment resulting from short-pulsed processing. Finally, the general results are applied to the special case of uniaxial crystal and compared with a reference solution.

  10. The effects of magnetic field distortion on the accuracy of passive device localization frames in MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Cepek, Jeremy; Chronik, Blaine A; Fenster, Aaron

    2014-05-01

    The interventional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging environment presents many challenges for the accurate localization of interventional devices. In particular, geometric distortion of the static magnetic field may be both appreciable and unpredictable. This paper aims to quantify the sensitivity of localization error of various passive device localization frames to static magnetic field distortion in MR. Three localization frames were considered based on having distinctly different methods of encoding position and orientation in MR images. For each frame, the effects of static field distortion were modeled, allowing rotational and translational errors to be computed as functions of the level of distortion, which was modeled using a first order approximation. Validation of the model was performed by imaging the localization frames in a 3T clinical MR scanner, and simulating the effects of static field distortion by varying the scanner's center frequency and gradient shim values. Plots of the rotational and translational components of error in localization frame position and orientation estimates are provided for ranges of uniform static field distortions of 1-100 μT and static field distortion gradients of 0.01-1 mT/m in all three directions. The theoretical estimates are in good agreement with the results obtained by imaging. The error in position and orientation estimation of passive localization frames in MR can be sensitive to static magnetic field distortions. The level of sensitivity, the type of error (i.e., rotational or translational), and the direction of error are dependent on the frame's design and the method used to image it. If 2D gradient echo imaging is employed, frames with position and orientation estimate sensitivity to slice-select error (such as the z-frame) should be avoided, since this source of error is not easily correctable. Accurate frame position and orientation estimates that are insensitive to static field distortion can be achieved

  11. Progressivism, Control and Correction: Local Education Authorities and Educational Policy in Twentieth-Century England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosvenor, Ian; Myers, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    Through an analysis of both education policy and knowledge creation, this article explores the historical dimensions of two key features of the "new information age." In the field of education, it documents the development of a progressive education policy in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Birmingham, UK. This policy…

  12. A Novel Method of Localization for Moving Objects with an Alternating Magnetic Field.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Yan, Shenggang; Li, Bin

    2017-04-21

    Magnetic detection technology has wide applications in the fields of geological exploration, biomedical treatment, wreck removal and localization of unexploded ordinance. A large number of methods have been developed to locate targets with static magnetic fields, however, the relation between the problem of localization of moving objectives with alternating magnetic fields and the localization with a static magnetic field is rarely studied. A novel method of target localization based on coherent demodulation was proposed in this paper. The problem of localization of moving objects with an alternating magnetic field was transformed into the localization with a static magnetic field. The Levenberg-Marquardt (L-M) algorithm was applied to calculate the position of the target with magnetic field data measured by a single three-component magnetic sensor. Theoretical simulation and experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  13. A Novel Method of Localization for Moving Objects with an Alternating Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiang; Yan, Shenggang; Li, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic detection technology has wide applications in the fields of geological exploration, biomedical treatment, wreck removal and localization of unexploded ordinance. A large number of methods have been developed to locate targets with static magnetic fields, however, the relation between the problem of localization of moving objectives with alternating magnetic fields and the localization with a static magnetic field is rarely studied. A novel method of target localization based on coherent demodulation was proposed in this paper. The problem of localization of moving objects with an alternating magnetic field was transformed into the localization with a static magnetic field. The Levenberg-Marquardt (L-M) algorithm was applied to calculate the position of the target with magnetic field data measured by a single three-component magnetic sensor. Theoretical simulation and experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:28430153

  14. Restudy of surface tension of QGP with one-loop correction in the mean-field potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. Somorendro; Gupta, K. K.; Jha, A. K.

    2014-07-01

    Surface tension of quark-gluon plasma (QGP) evolution with one-loop correction in the mean-field potential is studied. First, with the correction, the stable QGP droplet size decreases. Then, the value of surface tension is found to be improved and it approaches to the lattice value of surface tension 0.24Tc3. Moreover, the ratio of the surface tension to the cube of the critical temperature is found to increase the value in comparison to earlier studies without correction factor [R. Ramanathan, K. K. Gupta, A. K. Jha and S. S. Singh, Pram. J. Phys. 68, 757 (2007)].

  15. Perturbative correction for the basis set incompleteness error of complete-active-space self-consistent field.

    PubMed

    Kong, Liguo; Valeev, Edward F

    2010-11-07

    To reduce the basis set incompleteness of the complete-active-space self-consistent field (CASSCF) wave function and energy we develop a second-order perturbation correction due to single excitations to complete set of unoccupied states. Other than the one- and two-electron integrals, only one- and two-particle reduced density matrices are required to compute the correction, denoted as [2](S). Benchmark calculations on prototypical ground-state bond-breaking problems show that only the aug-cc-pVXZ basis is needed with the [2](S) correction to match the accuracy of CASSCF energies of the aug-cc-pV(X+1)Z quality.

  16. Water quality monitoring by thematic mapper in coastal environments. A performance analysis of local biooptical algorithms and atmospheric correction procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Tassan, S. . Inst. for Remote Sensing Applications); d'Alcala, M.R. . Biological Oceanography Lab.)

    1993-08-01

    The Thematic Mapper (TM) sensor's ability to monitor localized phenomena associated with anthropogenic pollution in coastal waters has been investigated with reference to experimental data collected on a test site in the Gulf of Naples. In situ measurements yielded the biooptical algorithms for chlorophyll and sediment retrieval as well as an optical model for the computation of the subsurface reflectance as a function of water composition, specific to the site. The algorithms' performance was assessed through a sensitivity analysis, taking into account the correlation among chlorophyll, sediment, and yellow substance contents, as well as the stratification characteristics of the water body. Sensitivity analysis techniques were similarly used to evaluate the performance in the coastal environment of three atmospheric correction models, which assume uniform aerosol load and composition, uniform aerosol composition, and varying aerosol load and composition, respectively. A comparison with sea-truth data collected for the Land-sat overpass of 22 June 1988 showed a satisfactory correspondence between measured concentrations and concentrations retrieved from the TM data using the above atmospheric correction procedures and local biooptical algorithms. Consistent with the indications of the sensitivity analysis, the best agreement was obtained by the atmospheric model assuming varying aerosol load and composition.

  17. Zero and first order phase shift correction for field map estimation with dual-echo GRE using bipolar gradients

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Desmond T. B.; Chenevert, Thomas L.; Fessler, Jeffrey A.; Kim, Boklye

    2007-01-01

    A simple phase error correction technique used for field map estimation with a generally available dual-echo GRE sequence is presented. Magnetic field inhomogeneity maps estimated using two separate GRE volume acquisitions at different echo times are prone to dynamic motion errors between acquisitions. By using the dual-echo sequence the data are collected during two back-to-back readout gradients in opposite polarity after a single RF pulse, and inter-echo motion artifacts and alignment errors in field map estimation can be factored out. Residual phase error from the asymmetric readout pulses is modeled as an affine term in the readout direction. Results from phantom and human data suggest that the first order phase correction term stays constant over time and, hence, can be applied to different data acquired with the same protocol over time. The zero order phase correction term may change with time and is estimated empirically for different scans. PMID:17442524

  18. Delaunay Tessellation Field Estimator analysis of the PSCz local Universe: density field and cosmic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano-Díaz, Emilio; van de Weygaert, Rien

    2007-11-01

    We apply the Delaunay Tessellation Field Estimator (DTFE) to reconstruct and analyse the matter distribution and cosmic velocity flows in the local Universe on the basis of the PSCz galaxy survey. The prime objective of this study is the production of optimal resolution 3D maps of the volume-weighted velocity and density fields throughout the nearby universe, the basis for a detailed study of the structure and dynamics of the cosmic web at each level probed by underlying galaxy sample. Fully volume-covering 3D maps of the density and (volume-weighted) velocity fields in the cosmic vicinity, out to a distance of 150h-1Mpc, are presented. Based on the Voronoi and Delaunay tessellation defined by the spatial galaxy sample, DTFE involves the estimate of density values on the basis of the volume of the related Delaunay tetrahedra and the subsequent use of the Delaunay tessellation as natural multidimensional (linear) interpolation grid for the corresponding density and velocity fields throughout the sample volume. The linearized model of the spatial galaxy distribution and the corresponding peculiar velocities of the PSCz galaxy sample, produced by Branchini et al., forms the input sample for the DTFE study. The DTFE maps reproduce the high-density supercluster regions in optimal detail, both their internal structure as well as their elongated or flattened shape. The corresponding velocity flows trace the bulk and shear flows marking the region extending from the Pisces-Perseus supercluster, via the Local Superclusters, towards the Hydra-Centaurus and the Shapley concentration. The most outstanding and unique feature of the DTFE maps is the sharply defined radial outflow regions in and around underdense voids, marking the dynamical importance of voids in the local Universe. The maximum expansion rate of voids defines a sharp cut-off in the DTFE velocity divergence probability distribution function. We found that on the basis of this cut-off DTFE manages to consistently

  19. Infinite-time average of local fields in an integrable quantum field theory after a quantum quench.

    PubMed

    Mussardo, G

    2013-09-06

    The infinite-time average of the expectation values of local fields of any interacting quantum theory after a global quench process are key quantities for matching theoretical and experimental results. For quantum integrable field theories, we show that they can be obtained by an ensemble average that employs a particular limit of the form factors of local fields and quantities extracted by the generalized Bethe ansatz.

  20. Influence and Correction from the Human Body on the Measurement of a Power-Frequency Electric Field Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Dongping; Liu, Huaitong; Zhou, Qiang; Xie, Yutong; Ma, Qichao

    2016-01-01

    According to the operating specifications of existing electric field measuring instruments, measuring technicians must be located far from the instruments to eliminate the influence of the human body occupancy on a spatial electric field. Nevertheless, in order to develop a portable safety protection instrument with an effective electric field warning function for working staff in a high-voltage environment, it is necessary to study the influence of an approaching human body on the measurement of an electric field and to correct the measurement results. A single-shaft electric field measuring instrument called the Type LP-2000, which was developed by our research team, is used as the research object in this study. First, we explain the principle of electric field measurement and describe the capacitance effect produced by the human body. Through a theoretical analysis, we show that the measured electric field value decreases as a human body approaches. Their relationship is linearly proportional. Then, the ratio is identified as a correction coefficient to correct for the influence of human body proximity. The conclusion drawn from the theoretical analysis is proved via simulation. The correction coefficient kb = 1.8010 is obtained on the basis of the linear fitting of simulated data. Finally, a physical experiment is performed. When no human is present, we compare the results from the Type LP-2000 measured with Narda EFA-300 and the simulated value to verify the accuracy of the Type LP-2000. For the case of an approaching human body, the correction coefficient kb* = 1.9094 is obtained by comparing the data measured with the Type LP-2000 to the simulated value. The correction coefficient obtained from the experiment (i.e., kb*) is highly consistent with that obtained from the simulation (i.e., kb). Two experimental programs are set; under these programs, the excitation voltages and distance measuring points are regulated to produce different electric field

  1. Influence and Correction from the Human Body on the Measurement of a Power-Frequency Electric Field Sensor.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Dongping; Liu, Huaitong; Zhou, Qiang; Xie, Yutong; Ma, Qichao

    2016-06-10

    According to the operating specifications of existing electric field measuring instruments, measuring technicians must be located far from the instruments to eliminate the influence of the human body occupancy on a spatial electric field. Nevertheless, in order to develop a portable safety protection instrument with an effective electric field warning function for working staff in a high-voltage environment, it is necessary to study the influence of an approaching human body on the measurement of an electric field and to correct the measurement results. A single-shaft electric field measuring instrument called the Type LP-2000, which was developed by our research team, is used as the research object in this study. First, we explain the principle of electric field measurement and describe the capacitance effect produced by the human body. Through a theoretical analysis, we show that the measured electric field value decreases as a human body approaches. Their relationship is linearly proportional. Then, the ratio is identified as a correction coefficient to correct for the influence of human body proximity. The conclusion drawn from the theoretical analysis is proved via simulation. The correction coefficient kb = 1.8010 is obtained on the basis of the linear fitting of simulated data. Finally, a physical experiment is performed. When no human is present, we compare the results from the Type LP-2000 measured with Narda EFA-300 and the simulated value to verify the accuracy of the Type LP-2000. For the case of an approaching human body, the correction coefficient kb* = 1.9094 is obtained by comparing the data measured with the Type LP-2000 to the simulated value. The correction coefficient obtained from the experiment (i.e., kb*) is highly consistent with that obtained from the simulation (i.e., kb). Two experimental programs are set; under these programs, the excitation voltages and distance measuring points are regulated to produce different electric field

  2. Electromagnetic field enhancement and light localization in deterministic aperiodic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinath, Ashwin

    The control of light matter interaction in periodic and random media has been investigated in depth during the last few decades, yet structures with controlled degree of disorder such as Deterministic Aperiodic Nano Structures (DANS) have been relatively unexplored. DANS are characterized by non-periodic yet long-range correlated (deterministic) morphologies and can be generated by the mathematical rules of symbolic dynamics and number theory. In this thesis, I have experimentally investigated the unique light transport and localization properties in planar dielectric and metal (plasmonics) DANS. In particular, I have focused on the design, nanofabrication and optical characterization of DANS, formed by arranging metal/dielectric nanoparticles in an aperiodic lattice. This effort is directed towards development of on-chip nanophotonic applications with emphasis on label-free bio-sensing and enhanced light emission. The DANS designed as Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) substrate is composed of multi-scale aperiodic nanoparticle arrays fabricated by e-beam lithography and are capable of reproducibly demonstrating enhancement factors as high as ˜107. Further improvement of SERS efficiency is achieved by combining DANS formed by top-down approach with bottom-up reduction of gold nanoparticles, to fabricate novel nanostructures called plasmonic "nano-galaxies" which increases the SERS enhancement factors by 2--3 orders of magnitude while preserving the reproducibility. In this thesis, along with presenting details of fabrication and SERS characterization of these "rationally designed" SERS substrates, I will also present results on using these substrates for detection of DNA nucleobases, as well as reproducible label-free detection of pathogenic bacteria with species specificity. In addition to biochemical detection, the combination of broadband light scattering behavior and the ability for the generation of reproducible high fields in DANS make these

  3. Spin noise explores local magnetic fields in a semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhov, Ivan I.; Kozlov, Gleb G.; Smirnov, Dmitrii S.; Glazov, Mikhail M.; Efimov, Yurii P.; Eliseev, Sergei A.; Lovtcius, Viacheslav A.; Petrov, Vladimir V.; Kavokin, Kirill V.; Kavokin, Alexey V.; Zapasskii, Valerii S.

    2016-02-01

    Rapid development of spin noise spectroscopy of the last decade has led to a number of remarkable achievements in the fields of both magnetic resonance and optical spectroscopy. In this report, we demonstrate a new - magnetometric - potential of the spin noise spectroscopy and use it to study magnetic fields acting upon electron spin-system of an n-GaAs layer in a high-Q microcavity probed by elliptically polarized light. Along with the external magnetic field, applied to the sample, the spin noise spectrum revealed the Overhauser field created by optically oriented nuclei and an additional, previously unobserved, field arising in the presence of circularly polarized light. This “optical field” is directed along the light propagation axis, with its sign determined by sign of the light helicity. We show that this field results from the optical Stark effect in the field of the elliptically polarized light. This conclusion is supported by theoretical estimates.

  4. Spin noise explores local magnetic fields in a semiconductor

    PubMed Central

    Ryzhov, Ivan I.; Kozlov, Gleb G.; Smirnov, Dmitrii S.; Glazov, Mikhail M.; Efimov, Yurii P.; Eliseev, Sergei A.; Lovtcius, Viacheslav A.; Petrov, Vladimir V.; Kavokin, Kirill V.; Kavokin, Alexey V.; Zapasskii, Valerii S.

    2016-01-01

    Rapid development of spin noise spectroscopy of the last decade has led to a number of remarkable achievements in the fields of both magnetic resonance and optical spectroscopy. In this report, we demonstrate a new – magnetometric – potential of the spin noise spectroscopy and use it to study magnetic fields acting upon electron spin-system of an n-GaAs layer in a high-Q microcavity probed by elliptically polarized light. Along with the external magnetic field, applied to the sample, the spin noise spectrum revealed the Overhauser field created by optically oriented nuclei and an additional, previously unobserved, field arising in the presence of circularly polarized light. This “optical field” is directed along the light propagation axis, with its sign determined by sign of the light helicity. We show that this field results from the optical Stark effect in the field of the elliptically polarized light. This conclusion is supported by theoretical estimates. PMID:26882994

  5. Constraining the Adaptive Optics Point-Spread Function in Crowded Fields: Measuring Photometric Aperture Corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehy, Christopher D.; McCrady, Nate; Graham, James R.

    2006-08-01

    The point-spread function (PSF) of an adaptive optics (AO) system is often poorly known. This ignorance can lead to significant systematic errors. Since the degree of AO correction is sensitive to the observing conditions (seeing, wind speed, brightness of the wave front reference, etc.), it would be desirable to estimate the PSF from the data themselves rather than from observations of a PSF star at another time. We have developed a method to estimate the PSF delivered by an AO system in the case where the scene consists of a crowded star field. We model the modulation transfer function (MTF) of several key components of the imaging system (atmosphere filtered by an AO system, telescope pupil, and pixel array). The power spectrum of the image, even a dense star field, can be used to constrain our model, which in turn can be used to reconstruct the PSF. In the case of circularly symmetric PSFs, we demonstrate that the power spectrum of the source distribution function can be successfully removed from the measured MTF and that our fit successfully recovers input parameters from a model data set constructed from these parameters. We also show that the method yields reasonable fit parameters and a useful approximation to the PSF when applied to data from the laser guide star (LGS) AO system at the Keck Observatory. Comparison of Keck LGS AO data and Hubble Space Telescope observations with NICMOS show that photometric accuracy of a few percent can be achieved for data with Strehl ratios as low as 4%. Based on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory.

  6. Beyond-mean-field corrections within the second random-phase approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, M.; Gambacurta, D.; Engel, J.

    2016-06-01

    A subtraction procedure, introduced to overcome double-counting problems in beyond-mean-field theories, is used in the second random-phase approximation (SRPA). Doublecounting problems arise in the energy-density functional framework in all cases where effective interactions tailored at leading order are used for higher-order calculations, such as those done in the SRPA model. It was recently shown that this subtraction procedure also guarantees that the stability condition related to the Thouless theorem is verified in extended RPA models. We discuss applications of the subtraction procedure, introduced within the SRPA model, to the nucleus 16O. The application of the subtraction procedure leads to: (i) stable results that are weakly cutoff dependent; (ii) a considerable upwards correction of the SRPA spectra (which were systematically shifted downwards by several MeV with respect to RPA spectra, in all previous calculations). With this important implementation of the model, many applications may be foreseen to analyze the genuine impact of 2 particle-2 hole configurations (without any cutoff dependences and anomalous shifts) on the excitation spectra of medium-mass and heavy nuclei.

  7. Correction of proton resonance frequency shift temperature maps for magnetic field disturbances caused by breathing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmatukha, Andriy V.; Bakker, Chris J. G.

    2006-09-01

    Respiratory induced resonance offset (RIRO) is a periodic disturbance of a magnetic field due to breathing. Such disturbance handicaps the accuracy of the proton resonance frequency shift (PRFS) method of MRI temperature mapping in anatomies situated nearby the lungs and chest wall. In this work, we propose a method capable of minimizing errors caused by RIRO in PRFS temperature maps. In this method, a set of baseline images characterizing RIRO at a variety of respiratory cycle instants is acquired before the thermal treatment starts. During the treatment, the temperature evolution is found from two successive images. Then, the calculated temperature changes are corrected for the additional contribution caused by RIRO using the pre-treatment baseline images acquired at the identical instances of the respiratory cycle. Our method is shown to improve the accuracy and stability of PRFS temperature maps in the presence of RIRO and inter-scan motion in phantom and volunteers' breathing experiments. Our method is also shown to be applicable to anatomies moving during breathing if a proper registration procedure is applied.

  8. Approximate light cone effects in a nonrelativistic quantum field theory after a local quench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertini, Bruno

    2017-02-01

    We study the spreading of correlations after a local quench in a nonrelativistic quantum field theory. We focus on noninteracting nonrelativistic fermions and study the time evolution after two identical systems in their ground states are suddenly joined together with a localized impurity at the junction. We find that, even if the quasiparticles of the system have unbounded dispersion, the correlations show light cone effects. We carry out a detailed study of these effects by developing an accurate asymptotic expansion of the two-point function and determining exactly the density of particles at any time after the quench. In particular, we find that the width of the light cone region is ∝t1 /2 . The structure of correlations, however, does not show a pure light cone form: "superluminal corrections" are much larger than in the bounded-dispersion case. These findings can be explained by inspecting the structure of excitations generated by the initial state. We show that a similar picture also emerges in the presence of a harmonic trapping potential and when more than two systems are suddenly joined at a single point.

  9. Generalized local frame transformation theory for Rydberg atoms in external fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannakeas, Panagiotis; Robicheaux, Francis; Greene, Chris H.

    2016-05-01

    In this work a rigorous theoretical framework is developed generalizing the local frame transformation theory (GLFT) and it is applied to the photoionization spectra of Rydberg atoms in an external electric field. The resulting development is compared with previous theoretical treatments, including the first version of local frame transformation theory, developed initially by Fano and Harmin. Our revised version of the theory yields non-trivial corrections because we now take into account the full Hilbert space on the energy shell without adopting truncations utilized by the original Fano-Harmin theory. The semi-analytical calculations from GLFT approach are compared with ab initio numerical simulations yielding errors of few tens of MHz whereas the errors in the original Fano-Harmin theory are one or two orders of magnitude larger. Our analysis provides a systematic pathway to precisely describe the corresponding photoabsorption spectra that should be accurate enough to meet modern experimental standards. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, under Award numbers DE-SC0010545 (for PG and CHG) and DE-SC0012193 (for FR).

  10. Lightfast optical current in dielectric by plasmonically induced local field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seungchul; Kwon, Ojoon; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2014-08-01

    Recently, ultrafast strong field induced optical current in SiO2 dielectric medium has demonstrated. By foaming laser intensity more than 1013 W•cm-2 in the dielectric material, the optical current was generated in a dielectric gap without any DC bias. This phenomenon is affected by the strength electric field of incident laser field and the generated electrons follow the speed of optical frequency enabling lightfast electronics in the future. In this study, we especially adopted nanoplasmonic field to trigger and control current flow in a nanometer spatial resolution. Nanoplasmonic field enables to manipulate light field in nanoscale domain. By using nanoplasmonic field, optically induced current flow can be selectively controlled by characteristic of nanoplasmonic nanostructure. For the first demonstration, saw tooth like 2-D nano Au pattern was numerically and experimentally investigated to boost up the laser intensity of incident 4.5 fs laser pulse with minimum field distortion and broadening. The intensity enhancement factor of plasmonic field at the saw tooth tip was ~40, enabling Wannier-Stark effect with incidence intensity level of only 1011W•cm-2 in the TiO2 substrate. The carrier envelope phase of laser pulse is controlled to measure ultrafast optical current generation in dielectric medium by plasmonically induced strong near-field. This will be the basis for developing practical lightfast optical electronics in the future.

  11. Orbit correction in a linear nonscaling fixed field alternating gradient accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kelliher, D. J.; Machida, S.; Edmonds, C. S.; Kirkman, I. W.; Jones, J. K.; Muratori, B. D.; Garland, J. M.; Berg, J. S.

    2014-11-20

    In a linear non-scaling FFAG the large natural chromaticity of the machine results in a betatron tune that varies by several integers over the momentum range. In addition, orbit correction is complicated by the consequent variation of the phase advance between lattice elements. Here we investigate how the correction of multiple closed orbit harmonics allows correction of both the COD and the accelerated orbit distortion over the momentum range.

  12. Method for correction of measured polarization angles from motional Stark effect spectroscopy for the effects of electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luce, T. C.; Petty, C. C.; Meyer, W. H.; Holcomb, C. T.; Burrell, K. H.; Bergsten, L. J.

    2016-12-01

    An approximate method to correct the motional Stark effect (MSE) spectroscopy for the effects of intrinsic plasma electric fields has been developed. The motivation for using an approximate method is to incorporate electric field effects for between-pulse or real-time analysis of the current density or safety factor profile. The toroidal velocity term in the momentum balance equation is normally the dominant contribution to the electric field orthogonal to the flux surface over most of the plasma. When this approximation is valid, the correction to the MSE data can be included in a form like that used when electric field effects are neglected. This allows measurements of the toroidal velocity to be integrated into the interpretation of the MSE polarization angles without changing how the data is treated in existing codes. In some cases, such as the DIII-D system, the correction is especially simple, due to the details of the neutral beam and MSE viewing geometry. The correction method is compared using DIII-D data in a variety of plasma conditions to analysis that assumes no radial electric field is present and to analysis that uses the standard correction method, which involves significant human intervention for profile fitting. The comparison shows that the new correction method is close to the standard one, and in all cases appears to offer a better result than use of the uncorrected data. The method has been integrated into the standard DIII-D equilibrium reconstruction code in use for analysis between plasma pulses and is sufficiently fast that it will be implemented in real-time equilibrium analysis for control applications.

  13. Method for correction of measured polarization angles from motional Stark effect spectroscopy for the effects of electric fields

    DOE PAGES

    Luce, T. C.; Petty, C. C.; Meyer, W. H.; ...

    2016-11-02

    An approximate method to correct the motional Stark effect (MSE) spectroscopy for the effects of intrinsic plasma electric fields has been developed. The motivation for using an approximate method is to incorporate electric field effects for between-pulse or real-time analysis of the current density or safety factor profile. The toroidal velocity term in the momentum balance equation is normally the dominant contribution to the electric field orthogonal to the flux surface over most of the plasma. When this approximation is valid, the correction to the MSE data can be included in a form like that used when electric field effectsmore » are neglected. This allows measurements of the toroidal velocity to be integrated into the interpretation of the MSE polarization angles without changing how the data is treated in existing codes. In some cases, such as the DIII-D system, the correction is especially simple, due to the details of the neutral beam and MSE viewing geometry. The correction method is compared using DIII-D data in a variety of plasma conditions to analysis that assumes no radial electric field is present and to analysis that uses the standard correction method, which involves significant human intervention for profile fitting. The comparison shows that the new correction method is close to the standard one, and in all cases appears to offer a better result than use of the uncorrected data. Lastly, the method has been integrated into the standard DIII-D equilibrium reconstruction code in use for analysis between plasma pulses and is sufficiently fast that it will be implemented in real-time equilibrium analysis for control applications.« less

  14. Method for correction of measured polarization angles from motional Stark effect spectroscopy for the effects of electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Luce, T. C.; Petty, C. C.; Meyer, W. H.; Holcomb, C. T.; Burrell, K. H.; Bergsten, L. J.

    2016-11-02

    An approximate method to correct the motional Stark effect (MSE) spectroscopy for the effects of intrinsic plasma electric fields has been developed. The motivation for using an approximate method is to incorporate electric field effects for between-pulse or real-time analysis of the current density or safety factor profile. The toroidal velocity term in the momentum balance equation is normally the dominant contribution to the electric field orthogonal to the flux surface over most of the plasma. When this approximation is valid, the correction to the MSE data can be included in a form like that used when electric field effects are neglected. This allows measurements of the toroidal velocity to be integrated into the interpretation of the MSE polarization angles without changing how the data is treated in existing codes. In some cases, such as the DIII-D system, the correction is especially simple, due to the details of the neutral beam and MSE viewing geometry. The correction method is compared using DIII-D data in a variety of plasma conditions to analysis that assumes no radial electric field is present and to analysis that uses the standard correction method, which involves significant human intervention for profile fitting. The comparison shows that the new correction method is close to the standard one, and in all cases appears to offer a better result than use of the uncorrected data. Lastly, the method has been integrated into the standard DIII-D equilibrium reconstruction code in use for analysis between plasma pulses and is sufficiently fast that it will be implemented in real-time equilibrium analysis for control applications.

  15. Consistent Feature Extraction From Vector Fields: Combinatorial Representations and Analysis Under Local Reference Frames

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatia, Harsh

    2015-05-01

    This dissertation presents research on addressing some of the contemporary challenges in the analysis of vector fields—an important type of scientific data useful for representing a multitude of physical phenomena, such as wind flow and ocean currents. In particular, new theories and computational frameworks to enable consistent feature extraction from vector fields are presented. One of the most fundamental challenges in the analysis of vector fields is that their features are defined with respect to reference frames. Unfortunately, there is no single “correct” reference frame for analysis, and an unsuitable frame may cause features of interest to remain undetected, thus creating serious physical consequences. This work develops new reference frames that enable extraction of localized features that other techniques and frames fail to detect. As a result, these reference frames objectify the notion of “correctness” of features for certain goals by revealing the phenomena of importance from the underlying data. An important consequence of using these local frames is that the analysis of unsteady (time-varying) vector fields can be reduced to the analysis of sequences of steady (timeindependent) vector fields, which can be performed using simpler and scalable techniques that allow better data management by accessing the data on a per-time-step basis. Nevertheless, the state-of-the-art analysis of steady vector fields is not robust, as most techniques are numerical in nature. The residing numerical errors can violate consistency with the underlying theory by breaching important fundamental laws, which may lead to serious physical consequences. This dissertation considers consistency as the most fundamental characteristic of computational analysis that must always be preserved, and presents a new discrete theory that uses combinatorial representations and algorithms to provide consistency guarantees during vector field analysis along with the uncertainty

  16. Magnetic Field Modeling with a Set of Individual Localized Coils

    PubMed Central

    Juchem, Christoph; Nixon, Terence W.; McIntyre, Scott; Rothman, Douglas L.; de Graaf, Robin A.

    2010-01-01

    A set of generic, circular individual coils is shown to be capable of generating highly complex magnetic field distributions in a flexible fashion. Arbitrarily oriented linear field gradients can be generated in three-dimensional as well as sliced volumes at amplitudes that allow imaging applications. The multi-coil approach permits the simultaneous generation of linear MRI encoding fields and complex shim fields by the same setup, thereby reducing system complexity. The choice of the sensitive volume over which the magnetic fields are optimized remains temporally and spatially variable at all times. The restriction of the field synthesis to experimentally relevant, smaller volumes such as single slices directly translates into improved efficiency, i.e. higher magnetic field amplitudes and/or reduced coil currents. For applications like arterial spin labeling, signal spoiling and diffusion weighting, perfect linearity of the gradient fields is not required and reduced demands on accuracy can also be readily translated into improved efficiency. The first experimental realization was achieved for mouse head MRI with 24 coils that were mounted on the surface of a cylindrical former. Oblique linear field gradients of 20 kHz/cm (47 mT/m) were generated with a maximum current of 1.4 A which allowed radial imaging of a mouse head. The potential of the new approach for generating arbitrary magnetic field shapes is demonstrated by synthesizing the more complex, higher order spherical harmonic magnetic field distributions X2-Y2, Z2 and Z2X. The new multi-coil approach provides the framework for the integration of conventional imaging and shim coils into a single multi-coil system in which shape, strength, accuracy and spatial coverage of the magnetic field can be specifically optimized for the application at hand. PMID:20347360

  17. Improved UTE-based attenuation correction for cranial PET-MR using dynamic magnetic field monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Aitken, A. P.; Giese, D.; Tsoumpas, C.; Schleyer, P.; Kozerke, S.; Prieto, C.; Schaeffter, T.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Ultrashort echo time (UTE) MRI has been proposed as a way to produce segmented attenuation maps for PET, as it provides contrast between bone, air, and soft tissue. However, UTE sequences require samples to be acquired during rapidly changing gradient fields, which makes the resulting images prone to eddy current artifacts. In this work it is demonstrated that this can lead to misclassification of tissues in segmented attenuation maps (AC maps) and that these effects can be corrected for by measuring the true k-space trajectories using a magnetic field camera. Methods: The k-space trajectories during a dual echo UTE sequence were measured using a dynamic magnetic field camera. UTE images were reconstructed using nominal trajectories and again using the measured trajectories. A numerical phantom was used to demonstrate the effect of reconstructing with incorrect trajectories. Images of an ovine leg phantom were reconstructed and segmented and the resulting attenuation maps were compared to a segmented map derived from a CT scan of the same phantom, using the Dice similarity measure. The feasibility of the proposed method was demonstrated inin vivo cranial imaging in five healthy volunteers. Simulated PET data were generated for one volunteer to show the impact of misclassifications on the PET reconstruction. Results: Images of the numerical phantom exhibited blurring and edge artifacts on the bone–tissue and air–tissue interfaces when nominal k-space trajectories were used, leading to misclassification of soft tissue as bone and misclassification of bone as air. Images of the tissue phantom and thein vivo cranial images exhibited the same artifacts. The artifacts were greatly reduced when the measured trajectories were used. For the tissue phantom, the Dice coefficient for bone in MR relative to CT was 0.616 using the nominal trajectories and 0.814 using the measured trajectories. The Dice coefficients for soft tissue were 0.933 and 0.934 for the

  18. The correct citation and spelling of Ptiliogonys and type locality of Ptiliogonys cinereus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Browning, M. Ralph

    1989-01-01

    William Swainson published descriptions and illustrations of many new forms of New World birds. In some of his earlier papers, Swainson cited his own works (of which only some parts have been published) as well as some manuscripts that were never published (see McMillan 1971). Swainson also referred to works that were published later under different titles. For example, Swainson (1827a) listed several names of birds and cited his "Mexican Zoology," a work that was never published. Later he (Swainson 1831-1832) referred to the "Cat. of Mex. Mus. App. p. 4 (1824)," in which he claimed to have described the taxa he had listed in Swainson (1827a).Modern authorities (e.g. Greenway 1960: 371; American Ornithologists' Union [AOU] 1983: 582) refer to the 1824 source as the original publication for the genus they render as Ptilogonys and (AOU 1983) for the species Ptilogonys cinereus. However, there is no evidence that the 1824 work was ever seen as a manuscript or published. In this paper, I review the use of "Swainson, 1824," as a citation and discuss the actual publication, spelling of the names Ptiliogonys and Ptiliogonys cinereus, and type locality of the species.

  19. The correct citation and spelling of Ptiliogonys and type locality of Ptiliogonys cinereus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Browning, M. Ralph

    1989-01-01

    William Swainson published descriptions and illustrations of many new forms of New World birds. In some of his earlier papers, Swainson cited his own works (of which only some parts have been published) as well as some manuscripts that were never published (see McMillan 1971). Swainson also referred to works that were published later under different titles. For example, Swainson (1827a) listed several names of birds and cited his "Mexican Zoology," a work that was never published. Later he (Swainson 1831-1832) referred to the "Cat. of Mex. Mus. App. p. 4 (1824)," in which he claimed to have described the taxa he had listed in Swainson (1827a). Modern authorities (e.g. Greenway 1960: 371; American Ornithologists' Union [AOU] 1983: 582) refer to the 1824 source as the original publication for the genus they render as Ptilogonys and (AOU 1983) for the species Ptilogonys cinereus. However, there is no evidence that the 1824 work was ever seen as a manuscript or published. In this paper, I review the use of "Swainson, 1824," as a citation and discuss the actual publication, spelling of the names Ptiliogonys and Ptiliogonys cinereus, and type locality of the species.

  20. Unveiling locally linearly polarized vector fields with broken axial symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xilin; Lou Kai; Chen Jing; Gu Bing; Li Yongnan; Wang Huitian

    2011-06-15

    We explore how the focusing of axial-symmetry-broken vector fields is associated with a sector aperture whose apex coincides with the field axis. Its focused field is azimuthally split into a pair of orthogonal right- and left-handed circularly polarized partial rings which are rotated by angles of {+-}{pi}/2 with respect to the input vector field carrying no orbital angular momentum (OAM) and no spin angular momentum (SAM), respectively. Each member of the pair of partial rings carries not only the opposite OAM but also the opposite SAM. We unveil the underlying physics behind such an effect.

  1. Developing an Autonomous Unmanned Aerial System to Estimate Field Terrain Corrections for Gravity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaub, L.; Seruge, C.; Chopra, S. D.; Glen, J. M. G.; Teodorescu, M.

    2016-12-01

    We have developed a method employing an autonomous Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) to provide a more robust measure of the Field Terrain Correction (FTC) for gravity measurements than is offered by traditional methods. The resolution of digital terrain that is typically available for much of the United States (10 or 30m) is too low to adequately estimate the FTC in steep terrain. Most often, the FTC, which corresponds to the innermost zone around the gravity station (e.g., extending to 68m radius for the Hayford-Bowie zones A&B), is estimated in the field with the aid of templates and charts that attempt to approximate sectors of the terrain as uniform slopes. The aforementioned techniques can result in significant error if they are not performed by experienced practitioners, particularly when the terrain is complex. In our approach, we dispatch a UAS to collect images around the gravity station, which we use to construct a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of the area with the Structure from Motion (SfM) method. The resulting DEMs allow us to precisely calculate the FTC. We have developed software to automate most of the procedure including the autonomous flight and image capturing by the UAS. As part of our initial testing, we have experimented with a variety of flight paths, at several sites spanning a range of terrain conditions, to determine the most efficient flight characteristics for this application. Selecting field sites where existing LiDAR data were available, has enabled us to characterize errors in the DEMs derived from SfM and to assess the tradeoffs between flight time, processing time, and accuracy of the resulting FTCs. Our methodology is fast (flight time: 3-4 minutes, depending on weather conditions) and robust primarily because the UAS flight is automated. It can be used to calculate the FTC of a variety of terrain conditions and delivers results that are much more precise than existing methods that do not make use of high-resolution digital terrain

  2. A compact quantum correction model for symmetric double gate metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Edward Namkyu; Shin, Yong Hyeon; Yun, Ilgu

    2014-11-07

    A compact quantum correction model for a symmetric double gate (DG) metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) is investigated. The compact quantum correction model is proposed from the concepts of the threshold voltage shift (ΔV{sub TH}{sup QM}) and the gate capacitance (C{sub g}) degradation. First of all, ΔV{sub TH}{sup QM} induced by quantum mechanical (QM) effects is modeled. The C{sub g} degradation is then modeled by introducing the inversion layer centroid. With ΔV{sub TH}{sup QM} and the C{sub g} degradation, the QM effects are implemented in previously reported classical model and a comparison between the proposed quantum correction model and numerical simulation results is presented. Based on the results, the proposed quantum correction model can be applicable to the compact model of DG MOSFET.

  3. The critical spot eraser—a method to interactively control the correction of local hot and cold spots in IMRT planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Süss, Philipp; Bortz, Michael; Küfer, Karl-Heinz; Thieke, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Common problems in inverse radiotherapy planning are localized dose insufficiencies like hot spots in organs at risk or cold spots inside targets. These are hard to correct since the optimization is based on global evaluations like maximum/minimum doses, equivalent uniform doses or dose-volume constraints for whole structures. In this work, we present a new approach to locally correct the dose of any given treatment plan. Once a treatment plan has been found that is acceptable in general but requires local corrections, these areas are marked by the planner. Then the system generates new plans that fulfil the local dose goals. Consequently, it is possible to interactively explore all plans between the locally corrected plans and the original treatment plan, allowing one to exactly adjust the degree of local correction and how the plan changes overall. Both the amount (in Gy) and the size of the local dose change can be navigated. The method is introduced formally as a new mathematical optimization setting, and is evaluated using a clinical example of a meningioma at the base of the skull. It was possible to eliminate a hot spot outside the target volume while controlling the dose changes to all other parts of the treatment plan. The proposed method has the potential to become the final standard step of inverse treatment planning. For more information on this article, see medicalphysicsweb.org

  4. Sub-10 nm near-field localization by plasmonic metal nanoaperture arrays with ultrashort light pulses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hongki; Kim, Chulhong; Kim, Donghyun

    2015-01-01

    Near-field localization by ultrashort femtosecond light pulses has been investigated using simple geometrical nanoapertures. The apertures employ circular, rhombic, and triangular shapes to localize the distribution of surface plasmon. To understand the geometrical effect on the localization, aperture length and period of the nanoapertures were varied. Aperture length was shown to affect the performance more than aperture period due mainly to intra-aperture coupling of near-fields. Triangular apertures provided the strongest spatial localization below 10 nm in size as well as the highest enhancement of field intensity by more than 7000 times compared to the incident light pulse. Use of ultrashort pulses was found to allow much stronger light localization than with continuous-wave light. The results can be used for super-localization sensing and imaging applications where spatially localized fields can break through the limits in achieving improved sensitivity and resolution. PMID:26628326

  5. Trapping and injecting single domain walls in magnetic wire by local fields.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Manuel; Basheed, G A; Infante, Germán; Del Real, Rafael P

    2012-01-20

    A single domain wall (DW) moves at linearly increasing velocity under an increasing homogeneous drive magnetic field. Present experiments show that the DW is braked and finally trapped at a given position when an additional antiparallel local magnetic field is applied. That position and its velocity are further controlled by suitable tuning of the local field. In turn, the parallel local field of small amplitude does not significantly affect the effective wall speed at long distance, although it generates tail-to-tail and head-to-head pairs of walls moving along opposite directions when that field is strong enough.

  6. Corrective measures technology for shallow land burial at arid sites: field studies of biointrusion barriers and erosion control

    SciTech Connect

    Nyhan, J.W.; Hakonson, T.E.; Lopez, E.A.

    1986-03-01

    The field research program involving corrective measures technologies for arid shallow land burial (SLB) sites is described. Results of field testing of a biointrusion barrier installed at a close-out waste disposal site (Area B) at Los Alamos are presented. Soil erosion and infiltration of water into a simulated trench cap with various surface treatments were measured, and the interaction between erosion control and subsurface water dynamics is discussed relative to waste management.

  7. Decoupled recovery of energy and momentum with correction of n  =  2 error fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz-Soldan, C.; Logan, N. C.; Lanctot, M. J.; Hanson, J. M.; King, J. D.; La Haye, R. J.; Nazikian, R.; Park, J.-K.; Strait, E. J.

    2015-08-01

    Experiments applying known n  =  2 ‘proxy’ error fields (EFs) find that the rotation braking introduced by the proxy EF cannot be completely alleviated through optimal n  =  2 correction with poorly matched poloidal spectra. This imperfect performance recovery demonstrates the importance of correcting multiple components of the n  =  2 field spectrum and is in contrast to previous results with n  =  1 EFs despite a similar execution. Measured optimal n  =  2 proxy EF correction currents are consistent with those required to null dominant mode coupling to the resonant surfaces and minimize the neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) torque, calculated using ideal MHD plasma response computation. Unlike rotation braking, density pumpout can be fully corrected despite poorly matched spectra, indicating density pumpout is driven only by a single component proportional to the resonant coupling. Through precise n  =  2 spectral control density pumpout and rotation braking can thus be decoupled. Rotation braking with n  =  2 fields is also found to be proportional to the level of co-current toroidal rotation, consistent with NTV theory. Plasmas with modest counter-current rotation are insensitive to the n  =  2 field with neither rotation braking nor density pumpout observed.

  8. Localization from near-source quasi-static electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, John Compton

    1993-09-01

    A wide range of research has been published on the problem of estimating the parameters of electromagnetic and acoustical sources from measurements of signals measured at an array of sensors. In the quasi-static electromagnetic cases examined here, the signal variation from a point source is relatively slow with respect to the signal propagation and the spacing of the array of sensors. As such, the location of the point sources can only be determined from the spatial diversity of the received signal across the array. The inverse source localization problem is complicated by unknown model order and strong local minima. The nonlinear optimization problem is posed for solving for the parameters of the quasi-static source model. The transient nature of the sources can be exploited to allow subspace approaches to separate out the signal portion of the spatial correlation matrix. Decomposition techniques are examined for improved processing, and an adaptation of MUtiple SIgnal Characterization (MUSIC) is presented for solving the source localization problem. Recent results on calculating the Cramer-Rao error lower bounds are extended to the multidimensional problem here. This thesis focuses on the problem of source localization in magnetoencephalography (MEG), with a secondary application to thunderstorm source localization. Comparisons are also made between MEG and its electrical equivalent, electroencephalography (EEG). The error lower bounds are examined in detail for several MEG and EEG configurations, as well as localizing thunderstorm cells over Cape Canaveral and Kennedy Space Center. Time-eigenspectrum is introduced as a parsing technique for improving the performance of the optimization problem.

  9. Species-Independent Femtosecond Localized Electric Field Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogariu, Arthur; Goldberg, Benjamin M.; O'Byrne, Sean; Miles, Richard B.

    2017-02-01

    We present an optical measurement method using a femtosecond laser for nonintrusive measurements of electric field strength and orientation in virtually any gas or gas mixture via second-harmonic generation. This simple method takes advantage of the asymmetry in polarizability induced by an applied electric field, which enables the otherwise forbidden second-harmonic generation in any centrosymmetric or homogeneous media. The use of a femtosecond laser source permits high intensities without avalanche breakdown and leads to the measurement of electric field strength down to approximately 100 V / cm in air with submillimeter spatial resolution governed by the confocal parameter and femtosecond temporal resolution governed by the laser-pulse duration.

  10. Stochastic bias correction of dynamically downscaled precipitation fields for Germany through Copula-based integration of gridded observation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, G.; Vogl, S.; Laux, P.; Wagner, S.; Kunstmann, H.

    2015-04-01

    Dynamically downscaled precipitation fields from regional climate models (RCMs) often cannot be used directly for regional climate studies. Due to their inherent biases, i.e., systematic over- or underestimations compared to observations, several correction approaches have been developed. Most of the bias correction procedures such as the quantile mapping approach employ a transfer function that is based on the statistical differences between RCM output and observations. Apart from such transfer function-based statistical correction algorithms, a stochastic bias correction technique, based on the concept of Copula theory, is developed here and applied to correct precipitation fields from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. For dynamically downscaled precipitation fields we used high-resolution (7 km, daily) WRF simulations for Germany driven by ERA40 reanalysis data for 1971-2000. The REGNIE (REGionalisierung der NIEderschlagshöhen) data set from the German Weather Service (DWD) is used as gridded observation data (1 km, daily) and aggregated to 7 km for this application. The 30-year time series are split into a calibration (1971-1985) and validation (1986-2000) period of equal length. Based on the estimated dependence structure (described by the Copula function) between WRF and REGNIE data and the identified respective marginal distributions in the calibration period, separately analyzed for the different seasons, conditional distribution functions are derived for each time step in the validation period. This finally allows to get additional information about the range of the statistically possible bias-corrected values. The results show that the Copula-based approach efficiently corrects most of the errors in WRF derived precipitation for all seasons. It is also found that the Copula-based correction performs better for wet bias correction than for dry bias correction. In autumn and winter, the correction introduced a small dry bias in the

  11. Experimental determination of field factors ([Formula: see text]) for small radiotherapy beams using the daisy chain correction method.

    PubMed

    Lárraga-Gutiérrez, José Manuel

    2015-08-07

    Recently, Alfonso et al proposed a new formalism for the dosimetry of small and non-standard fields. The proposed new formalism is strongly based on the calculation of detector-specific beam correction factors by Monte Carlo simulation methods, which accounts for the difference in the response of the detector between the small and the machine specific reference field. The correct calculation of the detector-specific beam correction factors demands an accurate knowledge of the linear accelerator, detector geometry and composition materials. The present work shows that the field factors in water may be determined experimentally using the daisy chain correction method down to a field size of 1 cm × 1 cm for a specific set of detectors. The detectors studied were: three mini-ionization chambers (PTW-31014, PTW-31006, IBA-CC01), three silicon-based diodes (PTW-60018, IBA-SFD and IBA-PFD) and one synthetic diamond detector (PTW-60019). Monte Carlo simulations and experimental measurements were performed for a 6 MV photon beam at 10 cm depth in water with a source-to-axis distance of 100 cm. The results show that the differences between the experimental and Monte Carlo calculated field factors are less than 0.5%-with the exception of the IBA-PFD-for field sizes between 1.5 cm × 1.5 cm and 5 cm × 5 cm. For the 1 cm × 1 cm field size, the differences are within 2%. By using the daisy chain correction method, it is possible to determine measured field factors in water. The results suggest that the daisy chain correction method is not suitable for measurements performed with the IBA-PFD detector. The latter is due to the presence of tungsten powder in the detector encapsulation material. The use of Monte Carlo calculated [Formula: see text] is encouraged for field sizes less than or equal to 1 cm × 1 cm for the dosimeters used in this work.

  12. Determination of Rectification Corrections for Semi Gantry Crane Rail Axes in the Local 3D Coordinate System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipiak, Daria; Kamiński, Waldemar

    2015-02-01

    Electronic tacheometers are currently the standard instruments used in geodetic work, including also geodetic engineering measurements. The main advantage connected with this equipment is among others high accuracy of the measurement and thus high accuracy of the final determinations represented for example by the points' coordinates. One of many applications of the tacheometers is the measurement of crane rail axes. This measurement is based on polar method and it allows to get the spatial coordinates of points in 3D local system. The standard technology of measurement of crane rail axes and development of its calculations' results is well-known and widely presented in the subject literature. At the same time new methods of observations results evaluation are developing. Some new proposals for the development of measurement results were already presented in (Kamiński, 2013). This paper is a generalisation of the paper quoted above. The authors developed the concept which was presented there by a proposal for determining rectification corrections for semi gantry crane rail axes. To carried out the task, the parametric method with conditions on parameters was used. Moreover the practical tests on simulated measurement results were conducted. The results obtained from alignment confirmed the theoretical assumptions. Despite the fact that analyses were carried out only on the simulated data, it is already possible to say that presented method for determination of rectification corrections for crane rail axes can be used for development of the observations from real measurement.

  13. Wavelet-based denoising of the Fourier metric in real-time wavefront correction for single molecule localization microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tehrani, Kayvan Forouhesh; Mortensen, Luke J.; Kner, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Wavefront sensorless schemes for correction of aberrations induced by biological specimens require a time invariant property of an image as a measure of fitness. Image intensity cannot be used as a metric for Single Molecule Localization (SML) microscopy because the intensity of blinking fluorophores follows exponential statistics. Therefore a robust intensity-independent metric is required. We previously reported a Fourier Metric (FM) that is relatively intensity independent. The Fourier metric has been successfully tested on two machine learning algorithms, a Genetic Algorithm and Particle Swarm Optimization, for wavefront correction about 50 μm deep inside the Central Nervous System (CNS) of Drosophila. However, since the spatial frequencies that need to be optimized fall into regions of the Optical Transfer Function (OTF) that are more susceptible to noise, adding a level of denoising can improve performance. Here we present wavelet-based approaches to lower the noise level and produce a more consistent metric. We compare performance of different wavelets such as Daubechies, Bi-Orthogonal, and reverse Bi-orthogonal of different degrees and orders for pre-processing of images.

  14. Low-dimensional attractor for neural activity from local field potentials in optogenetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Oprisan, Sorinel A.; Lynn, Patrick E.; Tompa, Tamas; Lavin, Antonieta

    2015-01-01

    We used optogenetic mice to investigate possible nonlinear responses of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) local network to light stimuli delivered by a 473 nm laser through a fiber optics. Every 2 s, a brief 10 ms light pulse was applied and the local field potentials (LFPs) were recorded with a 10 kHz sampling rate. The experiment was repeated 100 times and we only retained and analyzed data from six animals that showed stable and repeatable response to optical stimulations. The presence of nonlinearity in our data was checked using the null hypothesis that the data were linearly correlated in the temporal domain, but were random otherwise. For each trail, 100 surrogate data sets were generated and both time reversal asymmetry and false nearest neighbor (FNN) were used as discriminating statistics for the null hypothesis. We found that nonlinearity is present in all LFP data. The first 0.5 s of each 2 s LFP recording were dominated by the transient response of the networks. For each trial, we used the last 1.5 s of steady activity to measure the phase resetting induced by the brief 10 ms light stimulus. After correcting the LFPs for the effect of phase resetting, additional preprocessing was carried out using dendrograms to identify “similar” groups among LFP trials. We found that the steady dynamics of mPFC in response to light stimuli could be reconstructed in a three-dimensional phase space with topologically similar “8”-shaped attractors across different animals. Our results also open the possibility of designing a low-dimensional model for optical stimulation of the mPFC local network. PMID:26483665

  15. Frequency-dependent local field factors in dielectric liquids by a polarizable force field and molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Davari, Nazanin; Haghdani, Shokouh; Åstrand, Per-Olof

    2015-12-31

    A force field model for calculating local field factors, i.e. the linear response of the local electric field for example at a nucleus in a molecule with respect to an applied electric field, is discussed. It is based on a combined charge-transfer and point-dipole interaction model for the polarizability, and thereby it includes two physically distinct terms for describing electronic polarization: changes in atomic charges arising from transfer of charge between the atoms and atomic induced dipole moments. A time dependence is included both for the atomic charges and the atomic dipole moments and if they are assumed to oscillate with the same frequency as the applied electric field, a model for frequency-dependent properties are obtained. Furthermore, if a life-time of excited states are included, a model for the complex frequency-dependent polariability is obtained including also information about excited states and the absorption spectrum. We thus present a model for the frequency-dependent local field factors through the first molecular excitation energy. It is combined with molecular dynamics simulations of liquids where a large set of configurations are sampled and for which local field factors are calculated. We are normally not interested in the average of the local field factor but rather in configurations where it is as high as possible. In electrical insulation, we would like to avoid high local field factors to reduce the risk for electrical breakdown, whereas for example in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, high local field factors are desired to give dramatically increased intensities.

  16. Above-threshold ionization with highly charged ions in superstrong laser fields. II. Relativistic Coulomb-corrected strong-field approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaiber, Michael; Yakaboylu, Enderalp; Hatsagortsyan, Karen Z.

    2013-02-01

    We develop a relativistic Coulomb-corrected strong-field approximation (SFA) for the investigation of spin effects at above-threshold ionization in relativistically strong laser fields with highly charged hydrogenlike ions. The Coulomb-corrected SFA is based on the relativistic eikonal-Volkov wave function describing the ionized electron laser-driven continuum dynamics disturbed by the Coulomb field of the ionic core. The SFA in different partitions of the total Hamiltonian is considered. The formalism is applied for direct ionization of a hydrogenlike system in a strong linearly polarized laser field. The differential and total ionization rates are calculated analytically. The relativistic analog of the Perelomov-Popov-Terent'ev ionization rate is retrieved within the SFA technique. The physical relevance of the SFA in different partitions is discussed.

  17. Polarization-Controlled TIRFM with Focal Drift and Spatial Field Intensity Correction

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Daniel S.; Toledo-Crow, Ricardo; Mattheyses, Alexa L.; Simon, Sanford M.

    2014-01-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) is becoming an increasingly common methodology to narrow the illumination excitation thickness to study cellular process such as exocytosis, endocytosis, and membrane dynamics. It is also frequently used as a method to improve signal/noise in other techniques such as in vitro single-molecule imaging, stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy/photoactivated localization microscopy imaging, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging. The unique illumination geometry of TIRFM also enables a distinct method to create an excitation field for selectively exciting fluorophores that are aligned either parallel or perpendicular to the optical axis. This selectivity has been used to study orientation of cell membranes and cellular proteins. Unfortunately, the coherent nature of laser light, the typical excitation source in TIRFM, often creates spatial interference fringes across the illuminated area. These fringes are particularly problematic when imaging large cellular areas or when accurate quantification is necessary. Methods have been developed to minimize these fringes by modulating the TIRFM field during a frame capture period; however, these approaches eliminate the possibility to simultaneously excite with a specific polarization. A new, to our knowledge, technique is presented, which compensates for spatial fringes while simultaneously permitting rapid image acquisition of both parallel and perpendicular excitation directions in ∼25 ms. In addition, a back reflection detection scheme was developed that enables quick and accurate alignment of the excitation laser. The detector also facilitates focus drift compensation, a common problem in TIRFM due to the narrow excitation depth, particularly when imaging over long time courses or when using a perfusion flow chamber. The capabilities of this instrument were demonstrated by imaging membrane orientation using DiO on live cells and on lipid

  18. Introduction of an expert system for the discrimination of local pulmonary vein and atrial far field signals.

    PubMed

    Klemm, Hanno Ulrich; Heitzer, Thomas; Ruprecht, Ute; Johnsen, Christin; Meinertz, Thomas; Ventura, Rodolfo

    2010-11-01

    Discrimination of local and far field potentials during sinus rhythm and atrial fibrillation (AF) is essential for successful pulmonary vein (PV) isolation. We sought to introduce an expert system for the classification of electrophysiologic PV signals. For the expert system database, we analyzed ablation procedures of 50 patients with paroxysmal and persistent AF. Standard circumferential catheters and bipolar recordings were required. In a prospective trial, the expert system was compared with the performing electrophysiologists' classifications of potentials during 15 procedures. A total of 1,343 recordings of local PV and far field signals were validated by the sudden disappearance of local potentials during ablation, the presence of dissociated PV activity, and pacing maneuvers. A fast Fourier transform was applied to the individual potentials. Analysis continued in the amplitude and phase representation. Four parameters significant (p < 0.001) for classification were identified and entered a logistic regression model. Overall sensitivity and specificity of the model was 87% with minor, nonsignificant variations for individual PVs and different underlying rhythms. Concordance with ad hoc electrophysiologists' classification of local potentials was 70%, which increased during post hoc analysis to 86% since classification of 14% of the potentials had to be revised. For these potentials, the expert system correctly predicted their local origin in 86%. An expert system for the evaluation of electrophysiologic signals based on morphology analysis using the Fourier transform is feasible. The ease of use and online availability facilitate a widespread use for AF ablation procedures.

  19. Geometrical parameters effects on local electric field enhancement of silver-dielectric-silver multilayer nanoshell

    SciTech Connect

    Shirzaditabar, Farzad; Saliminasab, Maryam

    2013-05-15

    The local electric field enhancement at different points of silver-dielectric-silver nanoshell is investigated using quasi-static theory. Because of the symmetric and anti-symmetric coupling between surface plasmon of inner silver core and outer silver shell, the local electric field spectrum of silver-dielectric-silver has two distinct peaks at resonance wavelengths. The silver core size and middle dielectric thickness affect the local electric field enhancement at different points of silver-dielectric-silver nanoshell. Increasing the silver core radius always leads to blue shift of shorter resonance wavelength and red shift of longer resonance wavelength. We observed two distinct local electric field peaks, which are corresponded to the symmetric and anti-symmetric coupling between inner and outer surface plasmons. In a system with thick silver shell, local electric field enhancement is greater than a system with thin silver shell. However, the local electric field variations as a function of silver core radius in both systems are different at different points of nanoshell. The effects of the dielectric thickness variations on local electric field are different from those from silver core size variations. As the dielectric thickness is about 3 nm, the highest local electric field enhancement occurs at the surface of the inner silver core, where the symmetric and anti-symmetric modes are mixed together.

  20. Improving the specificity of R2' to the deoxyhaemoglobin content of brain tissue: Prospective correction of macroscopic magnetic field gradients.

    PubMed

    Blockley, Nicholas P; Stone, Alan J

    2016-07-15

    The reversible transverse relaxation rate, R2', is sensitive to the deoxyhaemoglobin content of brain tissue, enabling information about the oxygen extraction fraction to be obtained. However, R2' is also sensitive to macroscopic magnetic field gradients, particularly at air-tissue interfaces where a large susceptibility difference is present. It is important that this latter effect is minimised in order to produce meaningful estimates of blood oxygenation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to implement a technique to prospectively correct for the effect of susceptibility induced magnetic field gradients on R2' weighted data. This was achieved by combining the Gradient-Echo Slice Excitation Profile Imaging (GESEPI) technique with an Asymmetric Spin Echo (ASE) pulse sequence. The main advantages of this approach are (i) shorter acquisition times, since a separately acquired magnetic field map is not required and (ii) simpler analysis, since retrospective correction for the effects of magnetic field gradients in postprocessing is not required. In these experiments we show that with this newly developed technique it is possible to correct the majority of grey matter voxels for the expected distribution of through-slice magnetic field gradients to produce maps of R2' in a short scan duration.

  1. Mixed model phase evolution for correction of magnetic field inhomogeneity effects in 3D quantitative gradient echo-based MRI.

    PubMed

    Fatnassi, Chemseddine; Boucenna, Rachid; Zaidi, Habib

    2017-07-01

    In 3D gradient echo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), strong field gradients B0macro are visually observed at air/tissue interfaces. At low spatial resolution in particular, the respective field gradients lead to an apparent increase in intravoxel dephasing, and subsequently, to signal loss or inaccurate R2* estimates. If the strong field gradients are measured, their influence can be removed by postprocessing. Conventional corrections usually assume a linear phase evolution with time. For high macroscopic gradient inhomogeneities near the edge of the brain and at the paranasal sinuses, however, this assumption is often broken. Herein, we explored a novel model that considers both linear and stochastic dependences of the phase evolution with echo time in the presence of weak and strong macroscopic field inhomogeneities. We tested the performance of the model at large field gradients using simulation, phantom, and human in vivo studies. The performance of the proposed approach was markedly better than the standard correction method, providing a correction equivalent to that of the conventional approach in regions with high signal to noise ratio (SNR > 10), but appearing more robust in regions with low SNR (SNR < 4). The proposed technique shows promise to improve R2* measurements in regions of large susceptibilities. The clinical and research applications still require further investigation. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  2. Accounting for vegetation height and wind direction to correct eddy covariance measurements of energy fluxes over hilly crop fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitouna-Chebbi, Rim; Prévot, Laurent; Jacob, Frédéric; Voltz, Marc

    2015-05-01

    As agricultural hilly watersheds are widespread throughout the world, there is a strong need for reliable estimates of land surface fluxes, especially evapotranspiration, over crop fields on hilly slopes. In order to obtain reliable estimates from eddy covariance (EC) measurements in such conditions, the current study aimed at proposing adequate planar fit tilt corrections that account for the combined effects of topography, wind direction, and vegetation height on airflow inclinations. EC measurements were collected within an agricultural hilly watershed in northeastern Tunisia, throughout the growth cycles of cereals, legumes, and pasture. The wind had two dominant directions that induced upslope and downslope winds. For upslope winds, the airflows were parallel to the slopes and slightly came closer to the horizontal plane when vegetation grew. For downslope winds, over fields located in the lee of the rim top, the airflows were almost horizontal over bare soil and came closer to the topographical slope when vegetation grew. We therefore adjusted the planar fit tilt correction on EC measurements according to vegetation height and by discriminating between upslope and downslope winds. This adjusted tilt correction improved the energy balance closure in most cases, and the obtained energy balance closures were similar to that reported in the literature for flat conditions. We conclude that EC data collected within crop fields on hilly slopes can be used for monitoring land surface fluxes, provided planar fit tilt corrections are applied in an appropriate manner.

  3. Physiologic noise regression, motion regression, and TOAST dynamic field correction in complex-valued fMRI time series.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Andrew D; Rowe, Daniel B

    2012-02-01

    As more evidence is presented suggesting that the phase, as well as the magnitude, of functional MRI (fMRI) time series may contain important information and that there are theoretical drawbacks to modeling functional response in the magnitude alone, removing noise in the phase is becoming more important. Previous studies have shown that retrospective correction of noise from physiologic sources can remove significant phase variance and that dynamic main magnetic field correction and regression of estimated motion parameters also remove significant phase fluctuations. In this work, we investigate the performance of physiologic noise regression in a framework along with correction for dynamic main field fluctuations and motion regression. Our findings suggest that including physiologic regressors provides some benefit in terms of reduction in phase noise power, but it is small compared to the benefit of dynamic field corrections and use of estimated motion parameters as nuisance regressors. Additionally, we show that the use of all three techniques reduces phase variance substantially, removes undesirable spatial phase correlations and improves detection of the functional response in magnitude and phase.

  4. Field-Line Localized Destabilization of Ballooning Modes in Three-Dimensional Tokamaks.

    PubMed

    Willensdorfer, M; Cote, T B; Hegna, C C; Suttrop, W; Zohm, H; Dunne, M; Strumberger, E; Birkenmeier, G; Denk, S S; Mink, F; Vanovac, B; Luhmann, L C

    2017-08-25

    Field-line localized ballooning modes have been observed at the edge of high confinement mode plasmas in ASDEX Upgrade with rotating 3D perturbations induced by an externally applied n=2 error field and during a moderate level of edge localized mode mitigation. The observed ballooning modes are localized to the field lines which experience one of the two zero crossings of the radial flux surface displacement during one rotation period. The localization of the ballooning modes agrees very well with the localization of the largest growth rates from infinite-n ideal ballooning stability calculations using a realistic 3D ideal magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium. This analysis predicts a lower stability with respect to the axisymmetric case. The primary mechanism for the local lower stability is the 3D distortion of the local magnetic shear.

  5. Field-Line Localized Destabilization of Ballooning Modes in Three-Dimensional Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willensdorfer, M.; Cote, T. B.; Hegna, C. C.; Suttrop, W.; Zohm, H.; Dunne, M.; Strumberger, E.; Birkenmeier, G.; Denk, S. S.; Mink, F.; Vanovac, B.; Luhmann, L. C.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2017-08-01

    Field-line localized ballooning modes have been observed at the edge of high confinement mode plasmas in ASDEX Upgrade with rotating 3D perturbations induced by an externally applied n =2 error field and during a moderate level of edge localized mode mitigation. The observed ballooning modes are localized to the field lines which experience one of the two zero crossings of the radial flux surface displacement during one rotation period. The localization of the ballooning modes agrees very well with the localization of the largest growth rates from infinite-n ideal ballooning stability calculations using a realistic 3D ideal magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium. This analysis predicts a lower stability with respect to the axisymmetric case. The primary mechanism for the local lower stability is the 3D distortion of the local magnetic shear.

  6. Field-aligned neutral wind bias correction scheme for global ionospheric modeling at midlatitudes by assimilating FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC hmF2 data under geomagnetically quiet conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yang-Yi; Matsuo, Tomoko; Maruyama, Naomi; Liu, Jann-Yenq

    2015-04-01

    This study demonstrates the usage of a data assimilation procedure, which ingests the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (F3/C) hmF2 observations to correct the model wind biases to enhance the capability of the new global Ionosphere Plasmasphere Electrodynamics (IPE) model under geomagnetically quiet conditions. The IPE model is built upon the field line interhemispheric plasma model with a realistic geomagnetic field model and empirical model drivers. The hmF2 observed by the F3/C radio occultation technique is utilized to adjust global thermospheric field-aligned neutral winds (i.e., a component of the thermospheric neutral wind parallel to the magnetic field) at midlatitudes according to a linear relationship between time differentials of the field-aligned wind and hmF2. The adjusted winds are further applied to drive the IPE model. The comparison of the modeled electron density with the observations of F3/C and ground-based GPS receivers at the 2012 March equinox suggests that the modeled electron density can be significantly improved in the midlatitude regions of the Southern Hemisphere, if the wind correction scheme is applied. Moreover, the F3/C observation, the IPE model, and the wind bias correction scheme are applied to study the 2012 Southern Hemisphere Midlatitude Summer Nighttime Anomaly (southern MSNA)/Weddell Sea Anomaly (WSA) event at December solstice for examining the role of the neutral winds in controlling the longitudinal variation of the southern MSNA/WSA behavior. With the help of the wind bias correction scheme, the IPE model better tracks the F3/C-observed eastward movement of the southern MSNA/WSA feature. The apparent eastward movement of the southern MSNA/WSA features in the local time coordinate is primarily caused by the longitudinal variation in the declination angle of the geomagnetic field that controls the field-aligned projection of both geographic meridional and zonal components of the neutral wind. Both the IPE simulations and the F3/C

  7. Fine optical alignment correction of astronomical spectrographs via in-situ full-field moment-based wavefront sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hanshin; Hill, Gary J.; Tuttle, Sarah E.; Vattiat, Brian L.

    2012-09-01

    The image moment-based wavefront sensing (IWFS) utilizes moments of focus-modulated focal plane images to determine modal wavefront aberrations. This permits fast, easy, and accurate measurement of wavefront error (WFE) on any available finite-sized isolated targets across the entire focal plane (FP) of an imaging system, thereby allowing not only in-situ full-field image quality assessment, but also deterministic fine alignment correction of the imaging system. We present an experimental demonstration where fine alignment correction of a fast camera system in a fiber-fed astronomical spectrograph, called VIRUS, is accomplished by using IWFS.

  8. Intra-field on-product overlay improvement by application of RegC and TWINSCAN corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharoni, Ofir; Dmitriev, Vladimir; Graitzer, Erez; Perets, Yuval; Gorhad, Kujan; van Haren, Richard; Cekli, Hakki E.; Mulkens, Jan

    2015-03-01

    The on product overlay specification and Advanced Process Control (APC) is getting extremely challenging particularly after the introduction of multi-patterning applications like Spacer Assisted Double Patterning (SADP) and multipatterning techniques like N-repetitive Litho-Etch steps (LEN, N >= 2). When the latter is considered, most of the intrafield overlay contributors drop out of the overlay budget. This is a direct consequence of the fact that the scanner settings (like dose, illumination settings, etc.) as well as the subsequent processing steps can be made very similar for two consecutive Litho-Etch layers. The major overlay contributor that may require additional attention is the Image Placement Error (IPE). When the inter-layer overlay is considered, controlling the intra-field overlay contribution gets more complicated. In addition to the IPE contribution, the TWINSCANTM lens fingerprint in combination with the exposure settings is going to play a role as well. Generally speaking, two subsequent functional layers have different exposure settings. This results in a (non-reticle) additional overlay contribution. In this paper, we have studied the wafer overlay correction capability by RegC® in addition to the TWINSCANTM intrafield corrections to improve the on product overlay performance. RegC® is a reticle intra-volume laser writing technique that causes a predictable deformation element (RegC® deformation element) inside the quartz (Qz) material of a reticle. This technique enables to post-process an existing reticle to correct for instance for IPE. Alternatively, a pre-determined intra-field fingerprint can be added to the reticle such that it results in a straight field after exposure. This second application might be very powerful to correct for instance for (cold) lens fingerprints that cannot be corrected by the scanner itself. Another possible application is the intra-field processing fingerprint. One should realize that a RegC® treatment of a

  9. Seafloor bathymetry in deep and shallow water marine CSEM responses of Nigerian Niger Delta oil field: Effects and corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folorunso, Adetayo Femi; Li, Yuguo

    2015-12-01

    Topography distortions in bathymetrically acquired marine Controlled-Source Electromagnetic (mCSEM) responses are capable of misleading interpretation to the presence or absence of the target if not corrected for. For this reason, the effects and correction of bathymetry distortions on the deep and shallow seafloor mCSEM responses of the Niger Delta Oil province were examined in this paper. Marine CSEM response of the Niger Delta geological structure was modelled by using a 2.5D adaptive finite element forward modelling code. In both the deep water and shallow water cases, the bathymetry distortions in the electric field amplitude and phase were found to get smaller with increasing Tx-Rx offsets and contain short-wavelength components in the amplitude curves which persist at all Tx-Rx offsets. In the deep water, topographic effects on the reservoir signatures are not significant, but as water depth reduces, bathymetric distortions become more significant as a result of the airwave effects, masking the target signatures. The correction technique produces a good agreement between the flat-seafloor reservoir model and its equivalent bathymetric model in deep water at 0.25 Hz, while in shallow water, the corrected response only shows good agreement at shorter offsets but becomes complicated at longer offsets due to airwave effects. Transmission frequency was extended above and below 0.25 Hz in the frequency spectrum and the correction method applied. The bathymetry correction at higher frequency (1.75 Hz) is not effective in removing the topographic effects in either deep or shallow water. At 0.05 Hz for both seafloor scenarios, we obtained the best corrected amplitude profiles, removing completely the distortions from both topographic undulation and airwave effects in the shallow water model. Overall, the work shows that the correction technique is effective in reducing bathymetric effects in deep water at medium frequency and in both deep and shallow waters at a low

  10. Electroweak corrections using effective field theory: Applications to the CERN LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu Juiyu; Kelley, Randall; Manohar, Aneesh V.

    2008-10-01

    Electroweak Sudakov logarithms at high energy, of the form ({alpha}/sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W}){sup n}log{sup m}s/M{sub Z,W}{sup 2}, are summed using effective theory (EFT) methods. The exponentiation of Sudakov logarithms and factorization is discussed in the EFT formalism. Radiative corrections are computed to scattering processes in the standard model involving an arbitrary number of external particles. The computations include nonzero particle masses such as the t-quark mass, electroweak mixing effects which lead to unequal W and Z masses and a massless photon, and Higgs corrections proportional to the top-quark Yukawa coupling. The structure of the radiative corrections, and which terms are summed by the EFT renormalization group is discussed in detail. The omitted terms are smaller than 1%. We give numerical results for the corrections to dijet production, dilepton production, tt production, and squark pair production. The purely electroweak corrections are significant--about 15% at 1 TeV, increasing to 30% at 5 TeV, and they change both the scattering rate and angular distribution. The QCD corrections (which are well-known) are also computed with the EFT. They are much larger--about a factor of 4 at 1 TeV, increasing to a factor of 30 at 5 TeV. Mass effects are also significant; the qq{yields}tt rate is enhanced relative to the light-quark production rate by 40%.

  11. Application of k-space energy spectrum analysis to susceptibility field mapping and distortion correction in gradient-echo EPI.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nan-kuei; Oshio, Koichi; Panych, Lawrence P

    2006-06-01

    Echo-planar imaging (EPI) is widely used in functional MRI studies. It is well known that EPI quality is usually degraded by geometric distortions, when there exist susceptibility field inhomogeneities. EPI distortions may be corrected if the field maps are available. It is possible to estimate the susceptibility field gradients from the phase reconstruction of a single-TE EPI image, after a successful phase-unwrapping procedure. However, in regions affected by pronounced field gradients, the phase-unwrapping of a single-TE image may fail, and therefore the estimated field maps may be incorrect. It has been reported that the field inhomogeneity may be calculated more reliably from T2*-weighted images corresponding to multiple TEs. However, the multi-TE MRI field mapping increases the scan time. Furthermore, the measured field maps may be invalid if the subject's position changes during dynamic scans. To overcome the limitations in conventional field mapping approaches, a novel k-space energy spectrum analysis algorithm is developed, which quantifies the spatially dependent echo-shifting effect and the susceptibility field gradients directly from the k-space data of single-TE gradient-echo EPI. Using the k-space energy spectrum analysis, susceptibility field gradients can be reliably measured without phase-unwrapping, and EPI distortions can be corrected without extra field mapping scans or pulse sequence modification. The reported technique can be used to retrospectively improve the image quality of the previously acquired EPI and functional MRI data, provided that the complex-domain k-space data are still available.

  12. Locality and entanglement in bandlimited quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pye, Jason; Donnelly, William; Kempf, Achim

    2015-11-01

    We consider a model for a Planck-scale ultraviolet cutoff which is based on Shannon sampling. Shannon sampling originated in information theory, where it expresses the equivalence of continuous and discrete representations of information. When applied to quantum field theory, Shannon sampling expresses a hard ultraviolet cutoff in the form of a bandlimitation. This introduces nonlocality at the cutoff scale in a way that is more subtle than a simple discretization of space: quantum fields can then be represented as either living on continuous space or, entirely equivalently, as living on any one lattice whose average spacing is sufficiently small. We explicitly calculate vacuum entanglement entropies in 1 +1 dimensions and we find a transition between logarithmic and linear scaling of the entropy, which is the expected 1 +1 dimensional analog of the transition from an area to a volume law. We also use entanglement entropy and mutual information as measures to probe in detail the localizability of the field degrees of freedom. We find that, even though neither translation nor rotation invariance are broken, each field degree of freedom occupies an incompressible volume of space, indicating a finite information density.

  13. Local Properties of Index-Alpha Stable Fields.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-01

    not exhaust that class, e.g. Cambanis and Soltani (1983). Sufficient conditions for (3.1) and (3.2) to hold are respectively (3.5) lim suP XIN+aP4...The Geometry of Random Fields, John Wiley and Sons, New York. 2. Cambanis, S. and Soltani , A.R. (1983) "Prediction of stable processes: spectral and

  14. Efficient Simulation and Downscaling of Large Non-Stationary Fields with Varying Local Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodov, B.

    2015-12-01

    Simulation of locally anisotropic, non-stationary random fields is a relatively new topic in geostatistics with applications currently restricted to the construction of an admissible covariance matrix. In this paper, we introduce an efficient algorithm for constructing large non-stationary random fields with arbitrary local covariance structure and anisotropy. At the heart of our approach is a newly developed robust directional multiresolution framework combined with a local tensor anisotropy model. The use of our algorithm is illustrated with local anisotropy analysis, simulation and downscaling of complex pseudo-precipitation (PP) fields* related to tropical and extra-tropical cyclones. The efficiency of the algorithm allows obtaining realistic downscaled global GCM precipitation fields down to a few kilometers resolution in seconds.* Reference: Unpublished work by Huiling Yuan and Zoltan Toth. PP fields are constructed by taking the precipitation as the positive component of the field and the water vapor saturation deficit as its negative complement.

  15. Local heating of matter in the early universe owing to the interaction of the Higgs field with a scalar field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belotsky, K. M.; Golikova, Yu. A.; Rubin, S. G.

    2017-07-01

    It is shown that the formation of primordialmassive black holes may be accompanied by a local heating of matter. The proposed heating mechanism is based on the interaction of the Higgs field with a scalar field that is responsible for the formation of black holes.

  16. Dark Field Technology - A Practical Approach To Local Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaulieu, David R.; Hellebrekers, Paul P.

    1987-01-01

    A fully automated direct reticle reference alignment system for use in step and repeat camera systems is described. The technique, first outlined by Janus S. Wilczynski, ("Optical Step and Repeat Camera with Dark Field Alignment", J. Vac. Technol., 16(6), Nov./Dec. 1979), has been implemented on GCA Corporation's DSW Wafer Stepper. Results from various process levels covering the typical CMOS process have shown that better than ±0.2μm alignment accuracy can be obtained with minimal process sensitivity. The technique employs fixed illumination and microscope optics to achieve excellent registration stability and maintenance-free operation. Latent image techniques can be exploited for intra-field, grid and focus characterization.

  17. Local Properties of Measures in Quantum Field Theory and Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velhinho, José M.

    2015-01-01

    We show that measure theoretical results concerning the Ashtekar-Lewandowski measure in the space of generalized connections have direct analogues in the context of the Bohr compactification of the line and associated Haar measure. We present also a characterization of the support of the measure associated with the canonical quantization of the free massive scalar field, following closely well known analogous results concerning the Euclidean path integral measure.

  18. Comparative sensitivity study and reading correction of various albedo dosimeters in neutron fields on the U-400M accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokrov, Yu. V.; Morozov, S. V.; Shchegolev, V. Yu.

    2013-03-01

    The sensitivities of three types of albedo dosimeters are experimentally studied in U-400M accelerator radiation fields in the experimental hall (one point) and behind its shielding (three points). It is shown that the ratios of the sensitivity of the albedo dosimeter (AD) and the combined personal dosimeter (CPD) used earlier at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) to the sensitivity of the DVGN-01 dosimeter are constant within 25%. This allows the AD and CPD sensitivities obtained earlier at the JINR facilities to be used for correcting readings of the DVGN-01 now used at JINR for personal radiation monitoring. Correction coefficients are found for DVGN-01 readings behind the U-400M shielding. This has allowed a more reliable correction coefficient to be established for the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions (FLNR).

  19. MR image segmentation and bias field estimation based on coherent local intensity clustering with total variation regularization.

    PubMed

    Tu, Xiaoguang; Gao, Jingjing; Zhu, Chongjing; Cheng, Jie-Zhi; Ma, Zheng; Dai, Xin; Xie, Mei

    2016-12-01

    Though numerous segmentation algorithms have been proposed to segment brain tissue from magnetic resonance (MR) images, few of them consider combining the tissue segmentation and bias field correction into a unified framework while simultaneously removing the noise. In this paper, we present a new unified MR image segmentation algorithm whereby tissue segmentation, bias correction and noise reduction are integrated within the same energy model. Our method is presented by a total variation term introduced to the coherent local intensity clustering criterion function. To solve the nonconvex problem with respect to membership functions, we add auxiliary variables in the energy function such as Chambolle's fast dual projection method can be used and the optimal segmentation and bias field estimation can be achieved simultaneously throughout the reciprocal iteration. Experimental results show that the proposed method has a salient advantage over the other three baseline methods on either tissue segmentation or bias correction, and the noise is significantly reduced via its applications on highly noise-corrupted images. Moreover, benefiting from the fast convergence of the proposed solution, our method is less time-consuming and robust to parameter setting.

  20. Electrostatic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability produced by a localized electric field perpendicular to an external magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, P. L.

    1987-01-01

    The evolution of a plasma with a localized electric field perpendicular to an external magnetic field is shown to be dominated by the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. For small ion gyroradius, the instability is similar to the fluid mode. When the ion gyroradius is an appreciable fraction of the spatial extent of the electric field, the plasma is not in equilibrium, and the initial drift profile relaxes. Subsequent evolution still leads to vortex flows.

  1. Switching local magnetization by electric-field-induced domain wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakizakai, Haruka; Ando, Fuyuki; Koyama, Tomohiro; Yamada, Kihiro; Kawaguchi, Masashi; Kim, Sanghoon; Kim, Kab-Jin; Moriyama, Takahiro; Chiba, Daichi; Ono, Teruo

    2016-06-01

    Electric field effect on magnetism is an appealing technique for manipulating magnetization at a low energy cost. Here, we show that the local magnetization of an ultrathin Co film can be switched by simply applying a gate electric field without the assistance of any external magnetic field or current flow. The local magnetization switching is explained by nucleation and annihilation of magnetic domains through domain wall motion induced by the electric field. Our results lead to external-field-free and ultralow-energy spintronic applications.

  2. A diagrammatic quantum field approach to localized-electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonev, Stanimir; Ashcroft, Neil W.

    2002-03-01

    We present a diagrammatic language for the variational evaluation of the energy of systems with localized electrons. It is used to develop a convergent series expansion for the energy in powers of overlap integrals of single-particle orbitals. This method gives intuitive and practical rules for writing down the expansion to arbitrary order of overlap, and can be applied to any spin configuration, and to any dimension. Our approach extends previous work by van Dijk and Vertogen,(L. G. J. van Dijk and G. Vertogen, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 3), 7763 (1991). Abarenkov,(I. V. Abarenkov, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 5) 2341 (1993). and Moulopoulos and Ashcroft.(K. Moulopoulos and N. W. Ashcroft, Phys. Rev. B 48) 11646 (1993).

  3. Improved chromatical and field correction of high-NA GRIN-based endomicroscopic imaging systems for new biophotonics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matz, Gregor; Messerschmidt, Bernhard; Gross, Herbert

    2015-03-01

    Endomicroscopic objectives have been used for linear confocal as well as nonlinear quasi-confocal imaging processes for many years, especially in medical and neuroscience applications. State-of-the-art devices achieve sub-cellular resolutions by combining plano-convex lenses with special high-NA silver-doped GRIN lenses and diffractive optical elements for their chromatic correction. NAs of 0.8 are achieved while keeping the outer diameter of the mounted objective as thin as 1.4 mm. Recently developed designs correct two major drawbacks of the state-of-the-art devices and are presented in comparison with their precursors. With these developments, the diffraction-limited field of view is increased by 350% in diameter for monochromatic corrected devices and even more for the polychromatic corrected ones. Besides, solutions for chromatic corrected objectives are presented which avoid diffractive optical elements and rather make use of achromatic lenses. The design concepts of those recently developed objectives are presented here and corresponding prototypes are evaluated by confocal and quasi-confocal experiments as well as by wavefront measurements.

  4. Small field diode correction factors derived using an air core fibre optic scintillation dosimeter and EBT2 film.

    PubMed

    Ralston, Anna; Liu, Paul; Warrener, Kirbie; McKenzie, David; Suchowerska, Natalka

    2012-05-07

    There is no commercially available real-time dosimeter that can accurately measure output factors for field sizes down to 4 mm without the use of correction factors. Silicon diode detectors are commonly used but are not dosimetrically water equivalent, resulting in energy dependence and fluence perturbation. In contrast, plastic scintillators are nearly dosimetrically water equivalent. A fibre optic dosimeter (FOD) with a 0.8 mm(3) plastic scintillator coupled to an air core light guide was used to measure the output factors for Novalis/BrainLab stereotactic cones of diameter 4-30 mm and Novalis MLC fields of width 5-100 mm. The FOD data matched the output factors measured by a 0.125 cm(3) Semiflex ion chamber for the MLC fields above 30 mm and those measured with the EBT2 radiochromic film for the cones and MLC fields below 30 mm. Relative detector readings were obtained with four diode types (IBA SFD, EFD, PFD, PTW 60012) for the same fields. Empirical diode correction factors were determined by taking the ratio of FOD output factors to diode relative detector readings. The diodes were found to over-respond by 3%-16% for the smallest field. There was good agreement between different diodes of the same model number.

  5. Small field diode correction factors derived using an air core fibre optic scintillation dosimeter and EBT2 film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralston, Anna; Liu, Paul; Warrener, Kirbie; McKenzie, David; Suchowerska, Natalka

    2012-05-01

    There is no commercially available real-time dosimeter that can accurately measure output factors for field sizes down to 4 mm without the use of correction factors. Silicon diode detectors are commonly used but are not dosimetrically water equivalent, resulting in energy dependence and fluence perturbation. In contrast, plastic scintillators are nearly dosimetrically water equivalent. A fibre optic dosimeter (FOD) with a 0.8 mm3 plastic scintillator coupled to an air core light guide was used to measure the output factors for Novalis/BrainLab stereotactic cones of diameter 4-30 mm and Novalis MLC fields of width 5-100 mm. The FOD data matched the output factors measured by a 0.125 cm3 Semiflex ion chamber for the MLC fields above 30 mm and those measured with the EBT2 radiochromic film for the cones and MLC fields below 30 mm. Relative detector readings were obtained with four diode types (IBA SFD, EFD, PFD, PTW 60012) for the same fields. Empirical diode correction factors were determined by taking the ratio of FOD output factors to diode relative detector readings. The diodes were found to over-respond by 3%-16% for the smallest field. There was good agreement between different diodes of the same model number.

  6. Bremsstrahlung radiation from slow electrons in a Coulomb field: Classical limit and quantum correction

    SciTech Connect

    Manakov, N. L. Krylovetsky, A. A.; Marmo, S. I.

    2015-11-15

    Compact analytic expressions have been derived by a direct expansion in ħ → 0 for the nonrelativistic amplitude of Coulomb bremsstrahlung radiation (BR), the differential (in frequency and angles of the scattered electron) BR cross section, and the triply differential BR cross section that takes into account the bremsstrahlung photon direction and polarization and the scattered electron direction. They contain the classical limit and a quantum correction of the order of ħ at an arbitrary BR frequency ω. An explicit expression has been found for