Science.gov

Sample records for local field corrections

  1. Local-field correction in the strong-coupling regime

    SciTech Connect

    Hien, Tran Minh; Dung, Ho Trung; Welsch, Dirk-Gunnar

    2011-04-15

    The influence of the local-field correction on the strong atom-field coupling regime are investigated using the real-cavity model. The atom is positioned at the center of a multilayer sphere. Three types of mirrors are considered: perfectly reflecting, Lorentz band gap, and Bragg-distributed ones, with special emphasis on experimental practicability. In particular, the influence of the local field on the spectral resonance lines, the Rabi oscillation frequency and decay rate, and the condition indicating the occurrence of the strong-coupling regime are studied in detail. It is shown that the local-field correction gives rise to a structureless plateau in the density of states of the electromagnetic field. The level of the plateau rises with increasing material density and/or absorption, which may eventually destroy the strong-coupling regime. The effect of the local field is especially pronounced at high-material densities due to direct energy transfer from the guest atom to the medium. At lower material density and/or absorption, variation of the material density does not seem to affect much the strong-coupling regime, except for a small shift in the resonance frequency.

  2. Finite-temperature electron correlations in the framework of a dynamic local-field correction

    SciTech Connect

    Schweng, H.K.; Boehm, H.M. )

    1993-07-15

    The quantum-mechanical version of the Singwi-Tosi-Land-Sjoelander (STLS) approximation is applied to finite temperatures. This approximation has two main advantages. First, it includes a dynamic local-field correction and second, it gives positive values for the pair-distribution function in the short-range region at zero temperature. This is even valid for rather low densities. After a description of the numerical difficulties arising with the use of a dynamic approximation, the results for the static-structure factor and the pair-distribution function are discussed thoroughly. Detailed work is performed on the static part of the local-field correction, with special emphasis put on the investigation of its structure. A peak is found at a wave vector [ital q][approx]2.8 (in units of the Fermi wave vector) for small temperatures, which tends towards higher values of [ital q] with increasing temperature. This peak causes an attractive particle-hole interaction in a certain [ital q] region and thus gives rise to the appearance of a charge-density wave. A parametric description is given for the static local-field correction in order to simplify further applications. Furthermore, the exchange-and-correlation free energy is considered. The results are compared with the STLS results and with the modified convolution approach.

  3. Correction: Localized plasmon assisted structured illumination microscopy for wide-field high-speed dispersion-independent super resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Ponsetto, Joseph Louis; Wei, Feifei; Liu, Zhaowei

    2016-02-14

    Correction for 'Localized plasmon assisted structured illumination microscopy for wide-field high-speed dispersion-independent super resolution imaging' by Joseph Louis Ponsetto et al., Nanoscale, 2014, 6, 5807-5812.

  4. Sum rules and static local-field corrections of electron liquids in two and three dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwamoto, N.

    1984-01-01

    The dielectric functions of electron liquids which take into account short-range electron-electron correlations via the static local-field corrections are examined in the light of the frequency-moment sum rules. The formation is given for degenerate as well as classical electron liquids in arbitrary (d) spatial dimensions, which is suitable for comparison between the two- and three-dimensional cases. By using the virial equations of state it is shown that such dielectric functions cannot satisfy the compressibility sum rule and the third-frequency-moment sum rule simultaneously. In the degenerate case, the plasmon, single-pair, and multipair contributions to the sum rules are analyzed, and the reason for this incompatibility is discussed.

  5. The effect of local perturbation fields on human DTI: Characterisation, measurement and correction

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Siawoosh; Nagy, Zoltan; Möller, Harald E.; Symms, Mark R.; Carmichael, David W.; Josephs, Oliver; Weiskopf, Nikolaus

    2012-01-01

    Indices derived from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data, including the mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA), are often used to better understand the microstructure of the brain. DTI, however, is susceptible to imaging artefacts, which can bias these indices. The most important sources of artefacts in DTI include eddy currents, nonuniformity and mis-calibration of gradients. We modelled these and other artefacts using a local perturbation field (LPF) approach. LPFs during the diffusion-weighting period describe the local mismatches between the effective and the expected diffusion gradients resulting in a spatially varying error in the diffusion weighting B matrix and diffusion tensor estimation. We introduced a model that makes use of phantom measurements to provide a robust estimation of the LPF in DTI without requiring any scanner-hardware-specific information or special MRI sequences. We derived an approximation of the perturbed diffusion tensor in the isotropic-diffusion limit that can be used to identify regions in any DTI index map that are affected by LPFs. Using these models, we simulated and measured LPFs and characterised their effect on human DTI for three different clinical scanners. The small FA values found in grey matter were biased towards greater anisotropy leading to lower grey-to-white matter contrast (up to 10%). Differences in head position due to e.g. repositioning produced errors of up to 10% in the MD, reducing comparability in multi-centre or longitudinal studies. We demonstrate the importance of the proposed correction by showing improved consistency across scanners, different head positions and an increased FA contrast between grey and white matter. PMID:22197741

  6. Negative index of refraction in a four-level system with magnetoelectric cross coupling and local field corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Bello, F.

    2011-07-15

    This research focuses on a coherently driven four-level atomic medium with the aim of inducing a negative index of refraction while taking into consideration local field corrections as well as magnetoelectric cross coupling (i.e.,chirality) within the material's response functions. Two control fields are used to render the medium transparent for a probe field which simultaneously couples to an electric and a magnetic dipole transition, thus allowing one to test the permittivity and permeability of the material at the same time. Numerical simulations show that a negative index of refraction with low absorption can be obtained for a range of probe detunings while depending on number density and the ratio between the intensities of the control fields.

  7. Influence of local-field corrections on Thomson scattering in collision-dominated two-component plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fortmann, Carsten; Wierling, August; Roepke, Gerd

    2010-02-15

    The dynamic structure factor, which determines the Thomson scattering spectrum, is calculated via an extended Mermin approach. It incorporates the dynamical collision frequency as well as the local-field correction factor. This allows to study systematically the impact of electron-ion collisions as well as electron-electron correlations due to degeneracy and short-range interaction on the characteristics of the Thomson scattering signal. As such, the plasmon dispersion and damping width is calculated for a two-component plasma, where the electron subsystem is completely degenerate. Strong deviations of the plasmon resonance position due to the electron-electron correlations are observed at increasing Brueckner parameters r{sub s}. These results are of paramount importance for the interpretation of collective Thomson scattering spectra, as the determination of the free electron density from the plasmon resonance position requires a precise theory of the plasmon dispersion. Implications due to different approximations for the electron-electron correlation, i.e., different forms of the one-component local-field correction, are discussed.

  8. Error Field Correction in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jong-kyu; Boozer, Allen H.; Menard, Jonathan E.; Schaffer, Michael J.

    2008-05-22

    A new method for correcting magnetic field errors in the ITER tokamak is developed using the Ideal Perturbed Equilibrium Code (IPEC). The dominant external magnetic field for driving islands is shown to be localized to the outboard midplane for three ITER equilibria that represent the projected range of operational scenarios. The coupling matrices between the poloidal harmonics of the external magnetic perturbations and the resonant fields on the rational surfaces that drive islands are combined for different equilibria and used to determine an ordered list of the dominant errors in the external magnetic field. It is found that efficient and robust error field correction is possible with a fixed setting of the correction currents relative to the currents in the main coils across the range of ITER operating scenarios that was considered.

  9. PRINCIPLE OF INTERACTION REGION LOCAL CORRECTION

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.

    1999-09-07

    For hadron storage rings like the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the machine performance at collision is usually limited by the field quality of the interaction region (IR) magnets. A robust local correction for the IR region is valuable in improving the dynamic aperture with practically achievable magnet field quality. The authors present in this paper the action-angle kick minimization principle on which the local IR correction for both RHIC and the LHC are based.

  10. New orbit correction method uniting global and local orbit corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, N.; Takaki, H.; Sakai, H.; Satoh, M.; Harada, K.; Kamiya, Y.

    2006-01-01

    A new orbit correction method, called the eigenvector method with constraints (EVC), is proposed and formulated to unite global and local orbit corrections for ring accelerators, especially synchrotron radiation(SR) sources. The EVC can exactly correct the beam positions at arbitrarily selected ring positions such as light source points, simultaneously reducing closed orbit distortion (COD) around the whole ring. Computer simulations clearly demonstrate these features of the EVC for both cases of the Super-SOR light source and the Advanced Light Source (ALS) that have typical structures of high-brilliance SR sources. In addition, the effects of errors in beam position monitor (BPM) reading and steering magnet setting on the orbit correction are analytically expressed and also compared with the computer simulations. Simulation results show that the EVC is very effective and useful for orbit correction and beam position stabilization in SR sources.

  11. Ground-state properties of quasi-one-dimensional electron systems within dynamic local-field correction: Quantum Singwi-Tosi-Land-Sjölander theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanatar, B.; Bulutay, C.

    1999-06-01

    Dynamic local-field correction (LFC) brings a richer picture about the description of a many-body system than the standard mean-field theories. Here we investigate the ground-state properties of a quasi-one-dimensional electronic system using the quantum version of the Singwi-Tosi-Land-Sjölander (STLS) theory and present a critical account of its performance. The results are markedly different than those theories based on static LFC and the random-phase approximation; an example is the static structure factor, which develops a significant peak at low densities, signaling a developing ordered phase. An indication of growing instability at low densities is seen on G(q,0), the static behavior of the dynamic LFC, which has an oscillatory character with a magnitude exceeding unity, peaking exactly at 4kF. The pair-correlation function comes out as positive for the densities considered in this work. The correlation energy and the compressibility curves are seen to be quite close to the static STLS results. A flaw of the theory is the significantly negative values of the dynamic structure factor around the plasmon frequencies, also the lifetime of the plasmons turns out to be negative away from the single-pair continuum. In summary, the major shortcomings of the dynamic STLS scheme are the violation of the compressibility sum rule (as in the static STLS case) and the misrepresentation of the plasmons in the dynamic structure factor.

  12. Local Field Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarrio, C.; Schnatterly, S. E.

    We review the local field problem, beginning with the pioneering work of the 19th century. We then approach the problem from a microscopic perspective and include a momentum dependence. We also offer experimental examples.

  13. How strong is localization in the integer quantum Hall effect: Relevant quantum corrections to conductivity in non-zero magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greshnov, A. A.; Kolesnikova, E. N.; Utesov, O. I.; Zegrya, G. G.

    2010-02-01

    The divergent at ω=0 quantum correction to conductivity δσ2(ω) of the leading order in (kFl)-1 has been calculated neglecting Cooperon-type contributions suppressed by moderate or strong magnetic field. In the so-called diffusion approximation this quantity is equal to zero up to the second order in (kFl)-1. More subtle treatment of the problem shows that δσ2(ω) is non-zero due to ballistic contributions neglected previously. Knowledge of δσ2(ω) allows to estimate value of the so-called unitary localization length as ξu≈lexp(1.6g2) where Drude conductivity is given by σ0=ge2/h. This estimation underpins the statement of the linear growth of σxx peaks with Landau level number n in the integer quantum Hall effect regime [1] (Greshnov and Zegrya, 2008; Greshnov et al., 2008) at least for n≤2 and calls Pruisken-Khmelnitskii hypothesis of universality [2] (Levine et al., 1983; Khmelnitskii, 1983) in question.

  14. Continuous quantum error correction through local operations

    SciTech Connect

    Mascarenhas, Eduardo; Franca Santos, Marcelo; Marques, Breno; Terra Cunha, Marcelo

    2010-09-15

    We propose local strategies to protect global quantum information. The protocols, which are quantum error-correcting codes for dissipative systems, are based on environment measurements, direct feedback control, and simple encoding of the logical qubits into physical qutrits whose decaying transitions are indistinguishable and equally probable. The simple addition of one extra level in the description of the subsystems allows for local actions to fully and deterministically protect global resources such as entanglement. We present codes for both quantum jump and quantum state diffusion measurement strategies and test them against several sources of inefficiency. The use of qutrits in information protocols suggests further characterization of qutrit-qutrit disentanglement dynamics, which we also give together with simple local environment measurement schemes able to prevent distillability sudden death and even enhance entanglement in situations in which our feedback error correction is not possible.

  15. Gauge threshold corrections for local orientifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conlon, Joseph P.; Palti, Eran

    2009-09-01

    We study gauge threshold corrections for systems of fractional branes at local orientifold singularities and compare with the general Kaplunovsky-Louis expression for locally supersymmetric Script N = 1 gauge theories. We focus on branes at orientifolds of the Bbb C3/Bbb Z4, Bbb C3/Bbb Z6 and Bbb C3/Bbb Z6' singularities. We provide a CFT construction of these theories and compute the threshold corrections. Gauge coupling running undergoes two phases: one phase running from the bulk winding scale to the string scale, and a second phase running from the string scale to the infrared. The first phase is associated to the contribution of Script N = 2 sectors to the IR β functions and the second phase to the contribution of both Script N = 1 and Script N = 2 sectors. In contrast, naive application of the Kaplunovsky-Louis formula gives single running from the bulk winding mode scale. The discrepancy is resolved through 1-loop non-universality of the holomorphic gauge couplings at the singularity, induced by a 1-loop redefinition of the twisted blow-up moduli which couple differently to different gauge nodes. We also study the physics of anomalous and non-anomalous U(1)s and give a CFT description of how masses for non-anomalous U(1)s depend on the global properties of cycles.

  16. Universal corrections to entanglement entropy of local quantum quenches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Justin R.; Khetrapal, Surbhi; Kumar, S. Prem

    2016-08-01

    We study the time evolution of single interval Rényi and entanglement entropies following local quantum quenches in two dimensional conformal field theories at finite temperature for which the locally excited states have a finite temporal width ɛ. We show that, for local quenches produced by the action of a conformal primary field, the time dependence of Rényi and entanglement entropies at order ɛ2 is universal. It is determined by the expectation value of the stress tensor in the replica geometry and proportional to the conformal dimension of the primary field generating the local excitation. We also show that in CFTs with a gravity dual, the ɛ2 correction to the holographic entanglement entropy following a local quench precisely agrees with the CFT prediction. We then consider CFTs admitting a higher spin symmetry and turn on a higher spin chemical potential μ. We calculate the time dependence of the order ɛ2 correction to the entanglement entropy for small μ, and show that the contribution at order μ 2 is universal. We verify our arguments against exact results for minimal models and the free fermion theory.

  17. Conservation of ζ with radiative corrections from heavy field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Takahiro; Urakawa, Yuko

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we address a possible impact of radiative corrections from a heavy scalar field χ on the curvature perturbation ζ. Integrating out χ, we derive the effective action for ζ, which includes the loop corrections of the heavy field χ. When the mass of χ is much larger than the Hubble scale H, the loop corrections of χ only yield a local contribution to the effective action and hence the effective action simply gives an action for ζ in a single field model, where, as is widely known, ζ is conserved in time after the Hubble crossing time. Meanwhile, when the mass of χ is comparable to H, the loop corrections of χ can give a non-local contribution to the effective action. Because of the non-local contribution from χ, in general, ζ may not be conserved, even if the classical background trajectory is determined only by the evolution of the inflaton. In this paper, we derive the condition that ζ is conserved in time in the presence of the radiative corrections from χ. Namely, we show that when the dilatation invariance, which is a part of the diffeomorphism invariance, is preserved at the quantum level, the loop corrections of the massive field χ do not disturb the constant evolution of ζ at super Hubble scales. In this discussion, we show the Ward-Takahashi identity for the dilatation invariance, which yields a consistency relation for the correlation functions of the massive field χ.

  18. Sample drift correction in 3D fluorescence photoactivation localization microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlodzianoski, Michael J.; Schreiner, John M.; Callahan, Steven P.; Smolková, Katarina; Dlasková, Andrea; Šantorová, Jitka; Ježek, Petr; Bewersdorf, Joerg

    2011-08-01

    The recent development of diffraction-unlimited far-field fluorescence microscopy has overcome the classical resolution limit of ~250 nm of conventional light microscopy by about a factor of ten. The improved resolution, however, reveals not only biological structures at an unprecedented resolution, but is also susceptible to sample drift on a much finer scale than previously relevant. Without correction, sample drift leads to smeared images with decreased resolution, and in the worst case to misinterpretation of the imaged structures. This poses a problem especially for techniques such as Fluorescence Photoactivation Localization Microscopy (FPALM/PALM) or Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy (STORM), which often require minutes recording time. Here we discuss an approach that corrects for three-dimensional (3D) drift in images of fixed samples without the requirement for fiduciary markers or instrument modifications. Drift is determined by calculating the spatial cross-correlation function between subsets of localized particles imaged at different times. Correction down to ~5 nm precision is achieved despite the fact that different molecules are imaged in each frame. We demonstrate the performance of our drift correction algorithm with different simulated structures and analyze its dependence on particle density and localization precision. By imaging mitochondria with Biplane FPALM we show our algorithm's feasibility in a practical application.

  19. INTERACTION REGION LOCAL CORRECTION FOR THE LARGE HADRON COLLIDER.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.; FISCHER,W.; PTITSIN,V.; OSTOJIC,R.; STRAIT,J.

    1999-03-29

    The performance of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at collision energy is limited by the field quality of the interaction region (IB) quadrupoles and dipoles. In this paper we study the impact of the expected field errors of these magnets on the dynamic aperture (DA). Since the betatron phase advance is well defined for magnets that are located in regions of large beta functions, local corrections can be very effective and robust. We compare possible compensation schemes and propose a corrector layout to meet the required DA performance.

  20. FIELD CORRECTION FACTORS FOR PERSONAL NEUTRON DOSEMETERS.

    PubMed

    Luszik-Bhadra, M

    2016-09-01

    A field-dependent correction factor can be obtained by comparing the readings of two albedo neutron dosemeters fixed in opposite directions on a polyethylene sphere to the H*(10) reading as determined with a thermal neutron detector in the centre of the same sphere. The work shows that the field calibration technique as used for albedo neutron dosemeters can be generalised for all kind of dosemeters, since H*(10) is a conservative estimate of the sum of the personal dose equivalents Hp(10) in two opposite directions. This result is drawn from reference values as determined by spectrometers within the EVIDOS project at workplace of nuclear installations in Europe. More accurate field-dependent correction factors can be achieved by the analysis of several personal dosimeters on a phantom, but reliable angular responses of these dosemeters need to be taken into account. PMID:26493946

  1. Mean Field Analysis of Quantum Annealing Correction.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Shunji; Nishimori, Hidetoshi; Albash, Tameem; Lidar, Daniel A

    2016-06-01

    Quantum annealing correction (QAC) is a method that combines encoding with energy penalties and decoding to suppress and correct errors that degrade the performance of quantum annealers in solving optimization problems. While QAC has been experimentally demonstrated to successfully error correct a range of optimization problems, a clear understanding of its operating mechanism has been lacking. Here we bridge this gap using tools from quantum statistical mechanics. We study analytically tractable models using a mean-field analysis, specifically the p-body ferromagnetic infinite-range transverse-field Ising model as well as the quantum Hopfield model. We demonstrate that for p=2, where the phase transition is of second order, QAC pushes the transition to increasingly larger transverse field strengths. For p≥3, where the phase transition is of first order, QAC softens the closing of the gap for small energy penalty values and prevents its closure for sufficiently large energy penalty values. Thus QAC provides protection from excitations that occur near the quantum critical point. We find similar results for the Hopfield model, thus demonstrating that our conclusions hold in the presence of disorder.

  2. Mean Field Analysis of Quantum Annealing Correction.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Shunji; Nishimori, Hidetoshi; Albash, Tameem; Lidar, Daniel A

    2016-06-01

    Quantum annealing correction (QAC) is a method that combines encoding with energy penalties and decoding to suppress and correct errors that degrade the performance of quantum annealers in solving optimization problems. While QAC has been experimentally demonstrated to successfully error correct a range of optimization problems, a clear understanding of its operating mechanism has been lacking. Here we bridge this gap using tools from quantum statistical mechanics. We study analytically tractable models using a mean-field analysis, specifically the p-body ferromagnetic infinite-range transverse-field Ising model as well as the quantum Hopfield model. We demonstrate that for p=2, where the phase transition is of second order, QAC pushes the transition to increasingly larger transverse field strengths. For p≥3, where the phase transition is of first order, QAC softens the closing of the gap for small energy penalty values and prevents its closure for sufficiently large energy penalty values. Thus QAC provides protection from excitations that occur near the quantum critical point. We find similar results for the Hopfield model, thus demonstrating that our conclusions hold in the presence of disorder. PMID:27314705

  3. Mean Field Analysis of Quantum Annealing Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Shunji; Nishimori, Hidetoshi; Albash, Tameem; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2016-06-01

    Quantum annealing correction (QAC) is a method that combines encoding with energy penalties and decoding to suppress and correct errors that degrade the performance of quantum annealers in solving optimization problems. While QAC has been experimentally demonstrated to successfully error correct a range of optimization problems, a clear understanding of its operating mechanism has been lacking. Here we bridge this gap using tools from quantum statistical mechanics. We study analytically tractable models using a mean-field analysis, specifically the p -body ferromagnetic infinite-range transverse-field Ising model as well as the quantum Hopfield model. We demonstrate that for p =2 , where the phase transition is of second order, QAC pushes the transition to increasingly larger transverse field strengths. For p ≥3 , where the phase transition is of first order, QAC softens the closing of the gap for small energy penalty values and prevents its closure for sufficiently large energy penalty values. Thus QAC provides protection from excitations that occur near the quantum critical point. We find similar results for the Hopfield model, thus demonstrating that our conclusions hold in the presence of disorder.

  4. Indoor localization using magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathapati Subbu, Kalyan Sasidhar

    Indoor localization consists of locating oneself inside new buildings. GPS does not work indoors due to multipath reflection and signal blockage. WiFi based systems assume ubiquitous availability and infrastructure based systems require expensive installations, hence making indoor localization an open problem. This dissertation consists of solving the problem of indoor localization by thoroughly exploiting the indoor ambient magnetic fields comprising mainly of disturbances termed as anomalies in the Earth's magnetic field caused by pillars, doors and elevators in hallways which are ferromagnetic in nature. By observing uniqueness in magnetic signatures collected from different campus buildings, the work presents the identification of landmarks and guideposts from these signatures and further develops magnetic maps of buildings - all of which can be used to locate and navigate people indoors. To understand the reason behind these anomalies, first a comparison between the measured and model generated Earth's magnetic field is made, verifying the presence of a constant field without any disturbances. Then by modeling the magnetic field behavior of different pillars such as steel reinforced concrete, solid steel, and other structures like doors and elevators, the interaction of the Earth's field with the ferromagnetic fields is described thereby explaining the causes of the uniqueness in the signatures that comprise these disturbances. Next, by employing the dynamic time warping algorithm to account for time differences in signatures obtained from users walking at different speeds, an indoor localization application capable of classifying locations using the magnetic signatures is developed solely on the smart phone. The application required users to walk short distances of 3-6 m anywhere in hallway to be located with accuracies of 80-99%. The classification framework was further validated with over 90% accuracies using model generated magnetic signatures representing

  5. Better band gaps with asymptotically corrected local exchange potentials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Singh, Prashant; Harbola, Manoj K.; Hemanadhan, M.; Mookerjee, Abhijit; Johnson, D. D.

    2016-02-22

    In this study, we formulate a spin-polarized van Leeuwen and Baerends (vLB) correction to the local density approximation (LDA) exchange potential [R. van Leeuwen and E. J. Baerends, Phys. Rev. A 49, 2421 (1994)] that enforces the ionization potential (IP) theorem following T. Stein et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 266802 (2010)]. For electronic-structure problems, the vLB correction replicates the behavior of exact-exchange potentials, with improved scaling and well-behaved asymptotics, but with the computational cost of semilocal functionals. The vLB + IP correction produces a large improvement in the eigenvalues over those from the LDA due to correct asymptotic behaviormore » and atomic shell structures, as shown in rare-gas, alkaline-earth, zinc-based oxides, alkali halides, sulfides, and nitrides. In half-Heusler alloys, this asymptotically corrected LDA reproduces the spin-polarized properties correctly, including magnetism and half-metallicity. We also consider finite-sized systems [e.g., ringed boron nitride (B12N12) and graphene (C24)] to emphasize the wide applicability of the method.« less

  6. Electroweak Sudakov Corrections using Effective Field Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu Juiyu; Golf, Frank; Kelley, Randall; Manohar, Aneesh V.

    2008-01-18

    Electroweak Sudakov corrections of the form {alpha}{sup n}log{sup m}s/M{sub W,Z}{sup 2} are summed using renormalization group evolution in soft-collinear effective theory. Results are given for the scalar, vector, and tensor form factors for fermion and scalar particles. The formalism for including massive gauge bosons in soft-collinear effective theory is developed.

  7. Optimal Drift Correction for Superresolution Localization Microscopy with Bayesian Inference.

    PubMed

    Elmokadem, Ahmed; Yu, Ji

    2015-11-01

    Single-molecule-localization-based superresolution microscopy requires accurate sample drift correction to achieve good results. Common approaches for drift compensation include using fiducial markers and direct drift estimation by image correlation. The former increases the experimental complexity and the latter estimates drift at a reduced temporal resolution. Here, we present, to our knowledge, a new approach for drift correction based on the Bayesian statistical framework. The technique has the advantage of being able to calculate the drifts for every image frame of the data set directly from the single-molecule coordinates. We present the theoretical foundation of the algorithm and an implementation that achieves significantly higher accuracy than image-correlation-based estimations.

  8. Quadratic α‧-corrections to heterotic double field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kanghoon

    2015-10-01

    We investigate α‧-corrections of heterotic double field theory up to quadratic order in the language of supersymmetric O (D, D + dim ⁡ G) gauged double field theory. After introducing double-vielbein formalism with a parametrization which reproduces heterotic supergravity, we show that supersymmetry for heterotic double field theory up to leading order α‧-correction is obtained from supersymmetric gauged double field theory. We discuss the necessary modifications of the symmetries defined in supersymmetric gauged double field theory. Further, we construct supersymmetric completion at quadratic order in α‧.

  9. A Guide to Researching the Criminal Justice/Corrections Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Annie M.

    This combination guide and bibliography is designed to assist students enrolled in classes in the criminal justice/corrections field. Step-by-step guidelines for writing a term paper are presented along with a bibliography listing resources dealing with corrections and criminal justice that are available in the Chicago State University library.…

  10. Local Dynamic Reactive Power for Correction of System Voltage Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Kueck, John D; Rizy, D Tom; Li, Fangxing; Xu, Yan; Li, Huijuan; Adhikari, Sarina; Irminger, Philip

    2008-12-01

    Distribution systems are experiencing outages due to a phenomenon known as local voltage collapse. Local voltage collapse is occurring in part because modern air conditioner compressor motors are much more susceptible to stalling during a voltage dip than older motors. These motors can stall in less than 3 cycles (.05s) when a fault, such as on the sub-transmission system, causes voltage to sag to 70 to 60%. The reasons for this susceptibility are discussed in the report. During the local voltage collapse, voltages are depressed for a period of perhaps one or two minutes. There is a concern that these local events are interacting together over larger areas and may present a challenge to system reliability. An effective method of preventing local voltage collapse is the use of voltage regulation from Distributed Energy Resources (DER) that can supply or absorb reactive power. DER, when properly controlled, can provide a rapid correction to voltage dips and prevent motor stall. This report discusses the phenomenon and causes of local voltage collapse as well as the control methodology we have developed to counter voltage sag. The problem is growing because of the use of low inertia, high efficiency air conditioner (A/C) compressor motors and because the use of electric A/C is growing in use and becoming a larger percentage of system load. A method for local dynamic voltage regulation is discussed which uses reactive power injection or absorption from local DER. This method is independent, rapid, and will not interfere with conventional utility system voltage control. The results of simulations of this method are provided. The method has also been tested at the ORNL s Distributed Energy Communications and Control (DECC) Laboratory using our research inverter and synchronous condenser. These systems at the DECC Lab are interconnected to an actual distribution system, the ORNL distribution system, which is fed from TVA s 161kV sub-transmission backbone. The test results

  11. Local fields in high- Tc materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarrio, C.; Benitez, E. L.; Schnatterly, S. E.

    1992-04-01

    Most high-temperature superconductors exhibit two-dimensional conductance; therefore the conduction electrons are localized in the third dimension, and experience the local electric field rather than the macroscopic applied field in that direction. We report model calculations which indicate that the local field leads to enhanced electron-phonon coupling in these materials which may play a role in determining the high transition temperatures.

  12. Eddy current correction in volume-localized MR spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C.; Wendt, R. E. 3rd; Evans, H. J.; Rowe, R. M.; Hedrick, T. D.; LeBlanc, A. D.

    1994-01-01

    The quality of volume-localized magnetic resonance spectroscopy is affected by eddy currents caused by gradient switching. Eddy currents can be reduced with improved gradient systems; however, it has been suggested that the distortion due to eddy currents can be compensated for during postprocessing with a single-frequency reference signal. The authors propose modifying current techniques for acquiring the single-frequency reference signal by using relaxation weighting to reduce interference from components that cannot be eliminated by digital filtering alone. Additional sequences with T1 or T2 weighting for reference signal acquisition are shown to have the same eddy current characteristics as the original signal without relaxation weighting. The authors also studied a new eddy current correction method that does not require a single-frequency reference signal. This method uses two free induction decays (FIDs) collected from the same volume with two sequences with opposite gradients. Phase errors caused by eddy currents are opposite in these two FIDs and can be canceled completely by combining the FIDs. These methods were tested in a phantom. Eddy current distortions were corrected, allowing quantitative measurement of structures such as the -CH = CH- component, which is otherwise undetectable.

  13. Momentum dependence of local fields in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarrio, C.; Schnatterly, S. E.

    1992-02-01

    We report measurements of microscopic local fields in four polycrystalline solids obtained in two different manners. In N2, the local field shows a striking increase with momentum out to our maximum measured value of 1.1 Å-1, while in O2 the local field increases at low momentum and reaches a maximum at 0.75 Å-1. In Ar, the dielectric constant, which is directly related to the local-field strength, shows a sharp increase but reaches a maximum and begins to decrease at high momentum. In Kr, the dielectric constant shows only a small increase before reaching a maximum. For the cubic cases, we find reasonable agreement with point-dipole calculations. These results suggest that in many cubic materials, the local-field strength near the Brillouin-zone boundary may be up to a factor of 4 stronger than the Clausius-Mossotti value at the zone center.

  14. Intensity calibration and flat-field correction for fluorescence microscopes.

    PubMed

    Model, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Standardization in fluorescence microscopy involves calibration of intensity in reproducible units and correction for spatial nonuniformity of illumination (flat-field or shading correction). Both goals can be achieved using concentrated solutions of fluorescent dyes. When a drop of a highly concentrated fluorescent dye is placed between a slide and a coverslip it produces a spatially uniform field, resistant to photobleaching and with reproducible quantum yield; it can be used as a brightness standard for wide-field and confocal microscopes. For wide-field microscopes, calibration can be further extended to absolute molecular units. This can be done by imaging a solution of known concentration and known depth; the latter can be prepared by placing a small spherical lens in a diluted solution of the same fluorophore that is used in the biological specimen.

  15. Alternative Methods for Field Corrections in Helical Solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, M. L.; Krave, S. T.; Tompkins, J. C.; Yonehara, K.; Flanagan, G.; Kahn, S. A.; Melconian, K.

    2015-05-01

    Helical cooling channels have been proposed for highly efficient 6D muon cooling. Helical solenoids produce solenoidal, helical dipole, and helical gradient field components. Previous studies explored the geometric tunability limits on these main field components. In this paper we present two alternative correction schemes, tilting the solenoids and the addition of helical lines, to reduce the required strength of the anti-solenoid and add an additional tuning knob.

  16. Localization Corrections for Mobile Laser Scanner Using Local Support-Based Outlier Filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtola, V. V.; Virtanen, J.-P.; Rönnholm, P.; Nüchter, A.

    2016-06-01

    Following the pioneering work introduced in [Lehtola et al., ISPRS J. Photogramm. Remote Sens. 99, 2015, pp. 25-29], we extend the state-of-the-art intrinsic localization solution for a single two-dimensional (2D) laser scanner from one into (quasi) three dimensions (3D). By intrinsic localization, we mean that no external sensors are used to localize the scanner, such as inertial measurement devices (IMU) or global navigation satellite systems (GNSS). Specifically, the proposed method builds on a novel concept of local support-based filtering of outliers, which enables the use of six degrees-of-freedom (DoF) simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) for the purpose of enacting appropriate trajectory corrections into the previous one-dimensional solution. Moreover, the local support-based filtering concept is platform independent, and is therefore likely to be widely generalizable. The here presented overall method is yet limited into quasi-3D by its inability to recover trajectories with steep curvature, but in the future, it may be further extended into full 3D.

  17. Loop Corrections to Standard Model fields in inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xingang; Wang, Yi; Xianyu, Zhong-Zhi

    2016-08-01

    We calculate 1-loop corrections to the Schwinger-Keldysh propagators of Standard-Model-like fields of spin-0, 1/2, and 1, with all renormalizable interactions during inflation. We pay special attention to the late-time divergences of loop corrections, and show that the divergences can be resummed into finite results in the late-time limit using dynamical renormalization group method. This is our first step toward studying both the Standard Model and new physics in the primordial universe.

  18. Heterotic α'-corrections in Double Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedoya, Oscar A.; Marqués, Diego; Núñez, Carmen

    2014-12-01

    We extend the generalized flux formulation of Double Field Theory to include all the first order bosonic contributions to the α' expansion of the heterotic string low energy effective theory. The generalized tangent space and duality group are enhanced by α' corrections, and the gauge symmetries are generated by the usual (gauged) generalized Lie derivative in the extended space. The generalized frame receives derivative corrections through the spin connection with torsion, which is incorporated as a new degree of freedom in the extended bein. We compute the generalized fluxes and find the Riemann curvature tensor with torsion as one of their components. All the four-derivative terms of the action, Bianchi identities and equations of motion are reproduced. Using this formalism, we obtain the first order α' corrections to the heterotic Buscher rules. The relation of our results to alternative formulations in the literature is discussed and future research directions are outlined.

  19. Radiative corrections from heavy fast-roll fields during inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Rajeev Kumar; Sandora, McCullen; Sloth, Martin S.

    2015-06-09

    We investigate radiative corrections to the inflaton potential from heavy fields undergoing a fast-roll phase transition. We find that a logarithmic one-loop correction to the inflaton potential involving this field can induce a temporary running of the spectral index. The induced running can be a short burst of strong running, which may be related to the observed anomalies on large scales in the cosmic microwave spectrum, or extend over many e-folds, sustaining an effectively constant running to be searched for in the future. We implement this in a general class of models, where effects are mediated through a heavy messenger field sitting in its minimum. Interestingly, within the present framework it is a generic outcome that a large running implies a small field model with a vanishing tensor-to-scalar ratio, circumventing the normal expectation that small field models typically lead to an unobservably small running of the spectral index. An observable level of tensor modes can also be accommodated, but, surprisingly, this requires running to be induced by a curvaton. If upcoming observations are consistent with a small tensor-to-scalar ratio as predicted by small field models of inflation, then the present study serves as an explicit example contrary to the general expectation that the running will be unobservable.

  20. Re-visit local coupling correction in the interaction regions of RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.; Liu, C.; Marusic, A.; Minty, M.; Ptitsyn, V.; Schoefer, V.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Zimmer, C.

    2011-11-01

    In this article we will re-visit the local coupling correction in the interaction regions (IRs) of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). We will review the measurement data of triplet quadrupole rolls, the local coupling correction strengths in the RHIC control system, and the methods for the local coupling correction with local skew quadrupole correctors. Based on the in-turnnel measurement data of triplet roll errors in 2011, we will analytically calculate and simulate IR-bump method to find out the local skew correction strengths and compare them at store and at injection with the Blue and Yellow ring lattices in the 2011 polarized proton (p-p) and Au-Au runs. The vertical dispersion from the triplet roll errors, local and global coupling correction skew quadrupoles, and the vertical dipole correctors are calculated and discussed.

  1. Intra-field overlay correction for illumination based distortion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pike, Michael; Brunner, Timothy; Morgenfeld, Bradley; Jing, Nan; Wiltshire, Timothy

    2015-03-01

    The use of extreme freeform illumination conditions and multi patterning processes used to generate sub 40nm images can result in significant intra-field overlay errors. When levels with differing illumination conditions are aligned to each other, these intra-field distortions can result in overlay errors which are uncorrectable using normal linear feedback corrections. We use a double exposure method, previously described by Minghetti [1] et al. to isolate and measure intra-field overlay distortions caused by tool lens signatures and different illumination conditions. A full field test reticle is used to create a dual level expose pattern. The same pattern is exposed twice, but with two different illumination conditions. The first exposure is done with a standard reference illumination. The second exposure is the target illumination condition. The test reticle has overlay target pairs that are measurable when the 2nd exposure is offset in the Y direction by the designed amount. This allows for a high density, 13x13, intra-field overlay measurement to be collected and modeled to determine 2nd and 3rd order intra-field terms. Since the resulting illumination and scanner lens specific intra field corrections are independent of field size, the sub-recipes can be applied to any product exposure independent of field size, which use the same illumination conditions as the test exposures. When the method is applied to all exposure levels in a product build cycle, the overlay errors contributed by the reference illumination condition cancel out. The remaining errors are due exclusively to the impact of the illumination condition on that scanner lens. Actual results correlated well with the model with more than 80% of the predicted overlay improvement being achieved.

  2. The Local Group: the ultimate deep field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Weisz, Daniel R.; Bullock, James S.; Cooper, Michael C.

    2016-10-01

    Near-field cosmology - using detailed observations of the Local Group and its environs to study wide-ranging questions in galaxy formation and dark matter physics - has become a mature and rich field over the past decade. There are lingering concerns, however, that the relatively small size of the present-day Local Group (˜2 Mpc diameter) imposes insurmountable sample-variance uncertainties, limiting its broader utility. We consider the region spanned by the Local Group's progenitors at earlier times and show that it reaches 3 arcmin ≈ 7 comoving Mpc in linear size (a volume of ≈350 Mpc3) at z = 7. This size at early cosmic epochs is large enough to be representative in terms of the matter density and counts of dark matter haloes with Mvir(z = 7) ≲ 2 × 109 M⊙. The Local Group's stellar fossil record traces the cosmic evolution of galaxies with 103 ≲ M⋆(z = 0)/M⊙ ≲ 109 (reaching M1500 > -9 at z ˜ 7) over a region that is comparable to or larger than the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field (HUDF) for the entire history of the Universe. In the JWST era, resolved stellar populations will probe regions larger than the HUDF and any deep JWST fields, further enhancing the value of near-field cosmology.

  3. Tls Field Data Based Intensity Correction for Forest Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinzel, J.; Huber, M. O.

    2016-06-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) is increasingly used for forestry applications. Besides the three dimensional point coordinates, the 'intensity' of the reflected signal plays an important role in forestry and vegetation studies. The benefit of the signal intensity is caused by the wavelength of the laser that is within the near infrared (NIR) for most scanners. The NIR is highly indicative for various vegetation characteristics. However, the intensity as recorded by most terrestrial scanners is distorted by both external and scanner specific factors. Since details about system internal alteration of the signal are often unknown to the user, model driven approaches are impractical. On the other hand, existing data driven calibration procedures require laborious acquisition of separate reference datasets or areas of homogenous reflection characteristics from the field data. In order to fill this gap, the present study introduces an approach to correct unwanted intensity variations directly from the point cloud of the field data. The focus is on the variation over range and sensor specific distortions. Instead of an absolute calibration of the values, a relative correction within the dataset is sufficient for most forestry applications. Finally, a method similar to time series detrending is presented with the only pre-condition of a relative equal distribution of forest objects and materials over range. Our test data covers 50 terrestrial scans captured with a FARO Focus 3D S120 scanner using a laser wavelength of 905 nm. Practical tests demonstrate that our correction method removes range and scanner based alterations of the intensity.

  4. Local respiratory motion correction for PET/CT imaging: Application to lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lamare, F. Fernandez, P.; Fayad, H.; Visvikis, D.

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Despite multiple methodologies already proposed to correct respiratory motion in the whole PET imaging field of view (FOV), such approaches have not found wide acceptance in clinical routine. An alternative can be the local respiratory motion correction (LRMC) of data corresponding to a given volume of interest (VOI: organ or tumor). Advantages of LRMC include the use of a simple motion model, faster execution times, and organ specific motion correction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of LMRC using various motion models for oncology (lung lesion) applications. Methods: Both simulated (NURBS based 4D cardiac-torso phantom) and clinical studies (six patients) were used in the evaluation of the proposed LRMC approach. PET data were acquired in list-mode and synchronized with respiration. The implemented approach consists first in defining a VOI on the reconstructed motion average image. Gated PET images of the VOI are subsequently reconstructed using only lines of response passing through the selected VOI and are used in combination with a center of gravity or an affine/elastic registration algorithm to derive the transformation maps corresponding to the respiration effects. Those are finally integrated in the reconstruction process to produce a motion free image over the lesion regions. Results: Although the center of gravity or affine algorithm achieved similar performance for individual lesion motion correction, the elastic model, applied either locally or to the whole FOV, led to an overall superior performance. The spatial tumor location was altered by 89% and 81% for the elastic model applied locally or to the whole FOV, respectively (compared to 44% and 39% for the center of gravity and affine models, respectively). This resulted in similar associated overall tumor volume changes of 84% and 80%, respectively (compared to 75% and 71% for the center of gravity and affine models, respectively). The application of the nonrigid

  5. Local field effects in periodic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porvatkina, O. V.; Tishchenko, A. A.; Strikhanov, M. N.

    2016-08-01

    In this article we investigate dielectric and magnetic properties of periodic metamaterials taking into account the so-called local field effect, caused by interaction between single particles the material consists of. We also consider the spatial dispersion effects. As a result, generalized Clausius-Mossotti techniques have been extended to the case of periodic metamaterials; permittivity tensor and permeability tensor were obtained.

  6. Gauge field localization on brane worlds

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, Rommel; Rodriguez, R. Omar; Melfo, Alejandra; Pantoja, Nelson

    2010-04-15

    We consider the effects of spacetime curvature and brane thickness on the localization of gauge fields on a brane via kinetic terms induced by localized fermions. We find that in a warped geometry with an infinitely thin brane, both the infrared and the ultraviolet behavior of the electromagnetic propagator are affected, providing a more stringent bound on the brane's tension than that coming from the requirement of four-dimensional gravity on the brane. On the other hand, for a thick wall in a flat spacetime, where the fermions are localized by means of a Yukawa coupling, we find that four-dimensional electromagnetism is recovered in a region bounded from above by the same critical distance appearing in the thin case, but also from below by a new scale related to the brane's thickness and the electromagnetic couplings. This imposes very stringent bounds on the brane's thickness which seem to invalidate the localization mechanism for this case.

  7. Quantum corrections to the cosmological evolution of conformally coupled fields

    SciTech Connect

    Cembranos, Jose A.R.; Olive, Keith A.; Peloso, Marco; Uzan, Jean-Philippe E-mail: olive@physics.umn.edu E-mail: uzan@iap.fr

    2009-07-01

    Because the source term for the equations of motion of a conformally coupled scalar field, such as the dilaton, is given by the trace of the matter energy momentum tensor, it is commonly assumed to vanish during the radiation dominated epoch in the early universe. As a consequence, such fields are generally frozen in the early universe. Here we compute the finite temperature radiative correction to the source term and discuss its consequences on the evolution of such fields in the early universe. We discuss in particular, the case of scalar tensor theories of gravity which have general relativity as an attractor solution. We show that, in some cases, the universe can experience an early phase of contraction, followed by a non-singular bounce, and standard expansion. This can have interesting consequences for the abundance of thermal relics; for instance, it can provide a solution to the gravitino problem. We conclude by discussing the possible consequences of the quantum corrections to the evolution of the dilaton.

  8. Dispersion-Corrected Mean-Field Electronic Structure Methods.

    PubMed

    Grimme, Stefan; Hansen, Andreas; Brandenburg, Jan Gerit; Bannwarth, Christoph

    2016-05-11

    Mean-field electronic structure methods like Hartree-Fock, semilocal density functional approximations, or semiempirical molecular orbital (MO) theories do not account for long-range electron correlation (London dispersion interaction). Inclusion of these effects is mandatory for realistic calculations on large or condensed chemical systems and for various intramolecular phenomena (thermochemistry). This Review describes the recent developments (including some historical aspects) of dispersion corrections with an emphasis on methods that can be employed routinely with reasonable accuracy in large-scale applications. The most prominent correction schemes are classified into three groups: (i) nonlocal, density-based functionals, (ii) semiclassical C6-based, and (iii) one-electron effective potentials. The properties as well as pros and cons of these methods are critically discussed, and typical examples and benchmarks on molecular complexes and crystals are provided. Although there are some areas for further improvement (robustness, many-body and short-range effects), the situation regarding the overall accuracy is clear. Various approaches yield long-range dispersion energies with a typical relative error of 5%. For many chemical problems, this accuracy is higher compared to that of the underlying mean-field method (i.e., a typical semilocal (hybrid) functional like B3LYP). PMID:27077966

  9. Heuristic approximations for sound fields produced by spherical waves incident on locally and non-locally reacting planar surfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai Ming; Tao, Hongdan

    2014-01-01

    The classic Weyl-van der Pol (WVDP) formula is a well-known asymptotic solution for accurately predicting sound fields above a locally reacting ground surface. However, the form of the WVDP formula is inadequate for predicting sound fields in the vicinity of non-locally reacting surfaces; a correction term is often required in the formula to provide accurate numerical solutions. Even with this correction, there is a singularity in the diffraction wave term when the source is located directly above or below the receiver. This paper explores a heuristic method to remove this singularity and suggests an analytical form comparable to the WVDP formula. This improved formula offers a physically interpretable solution and allows for accurate predictions of the total sound field above locally and non-locally reacting surfaces for all geometrical configurations.

  10. Reprint of : Spin polarization induced by an electric field in the presence of weak localization effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerci, Daniele; Borge, Juan; Raimondi, Roberto

    2016-08-01

    We evaluate the spin polarization (Edelstein or inverse spin galvanic effect) and the spin Hall current induced by an applied electric field by including the weak localization corrections for a two-dimensional electron gas. We show that the weak localization effects yield logarithmic corrections to both the spin polarization conductivity relating the spin polarization and the electric field and to the spin Hall angle relating the spin and charge currents. The renormalization of both the spin polarization conductivity and the spin Hall angle combine to produce a zero correction to the total spin Hall conductivity as required by an exact identity. Suggestions for the experimental observation of the effect are given.

  11. Correction of localized shape errors on optical surfaces by altering the localized density of surface or near-surface layers

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, John S.; Folta, James A.; Montcalm, Claude

    2005-01-18

    Figure errors are corrected on optical or other precision surfaces by changing the local density of material in a zone at or near the surface. Optical surface height is correlated with the localized density of the material within the same region. A change in the height of the optical surface can then be caused by a change in the localized density of the material at or near the surface.

  12. Breast density quantification using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with bias field correction: A postmortem study

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Huanjun; Johnson, Travis; Lin, Muqing; Le, Huy Q.; Ducote, Justin L.; Su, Min-Ying; Molloi, Sabee

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Quantification of breast density based on three-dimensional breast MRI may provide useful information for the early detection of breast cancer. However, the field inhomogeneity can severely challenge the computerized image segmentation process. In this work, the effect of the bias field in breast density quantification has been investigated with a postmortem study. Methods: T1-weighted images of 20 pairs of postmortem breasts were acquired on a 1.5 T breast MRI scanner. Two computer-assisted algorithms were used to quantify the volumetric breast density. First, standard fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering was used on raw images with the bias field present. Then, the coherent local intensity clustering (CLIC) method estimated and corrected the bias field during the iterative tissue segmentation process. Finally, FCM clustering was performed on the bias-field-corrected images produced by CLIC method. The left–right correlation for breasts in the same pair was studied for both segmentation algorithms to evaluate the precision of the tissue classification. Finally, the breast densities measured with the three methods were compared to the gold standard tissue compositions obtained from chemical analysis. The linear correlation coefficient, Pearson'sr, was used to evaluate the two image segmentation algorithms and the effect of bias field. Results: The CLIC method successfully corrected the intensity inhomogeneity induced by the bias field. In left–right comparisons, the CLIC method significantly improved the slope and the correlation coefficient of the linear fitting for the glandular volume estimation. The left–right breast density correlation was also increased from 0.93 to 0.98. When compared with the percent fibroglandular volume (%FGV) from chemical analysis, results after bias field correction from both the CLIC the FCM algorithms showed improved linear correlation. As a result, the Pearson'sr increased from 0.86 to 0.92 with the bias field correction

  13. A robust vector field correction method via a mixture statistical model of PIV signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yong; Yang, Hua; Yin, Zhouping

    2016-03-01

    Outlier (spurious vector) is a common problem in practical velocity field measurement using particle image velocimetry technology (PIV), and it should be validated and replaced by a reliable value. One of the most challenging problems is to correctly label the outliers under the circumstance that measurement noise exists or the flow becomes turbulent. Moreover, the outlier's cluster occurrence makes it difficult to pick out all the outliers. Most of current methods validate and correct the outliers using local statistical models in a single pass. In this work, a vector field correction (VFC) method is proposed directly from a mixture statistical model of PIV signal. Actually, this problem is formulated as a maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation of a Bayesian model with hidden/latent variables, labeling the outliers in the original field. The solution of this MAP estimation, i.e., the outlier set and the restored flow field, is optimized iteratively using an expectation-maximization algorithm. We illustrated this VFC method on two kinds of synthetic velocity fields and two kinds of experimental data and demonstrated that it is robust to a very large number of outliers (even up to 60 %). Besides, the proposed VFC method has high accuracy and excellent compatibility for clustered outliers, compared with the state-of-the-art methods. Our VFC algorithm is computationally efficient, and corresponding Matlab code is provided for others to use it. In addition, our approach is general and can be seamlessly extended to three-dimensional-three-component (3D3C) PIV data.

  14. Deformation field correction for spatial normalization of PET images

    PubMed Central

    Bilgel, Murat; Carass, Aaron; Resnick, Susan M.; Wong, Dean F.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2015-01-01

    Spatial normalization of positron emission tomography (PET) images is essential for population studies, yet the current state of the art in PET-to-PET registration is limited to the application of conventional deformable registration methods that were developed for structural images. A method is presented for the spatial normalization of PET images that improves their anatomical alignment over the state of the art. The approach works by correcting the deformable registration result using a model that is learned from training data having both PET and structural images. In particular, viewing the structural registration of training data as ground truth, correction factors are learned by using a generalized ridge regression at each voxel given the PET intensities and voxel locations in a population-based PET template. The trained model can then be used to obtain more accurate registration of PET images to the PET template without the use of a structural image. A cross validation evaluation on 79 subjects shows that the proposed method yields more accurate alignment of the PET images compared to deformable PET-to-PET registration as revealed by 1) a visual examination of the deformed images, 2) a smaller error in the deformation fields, and 3) a greater overlap of the deformed anatomical labels with ground truth segmentations. PMID:26142272

  15. Full-field interferometry using infinity corrected optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charrett, T. O. H.; Tatam, R. P.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper the construction of full-field (imaging) interferometers using infinity corrected optics commonly used in microscopy is discussed, with an emphasis on self-mixing interferometry configurations where the imaged light field is mixed with itself rather than a reference wave. Such configurations are used in speckle shearing interferometry, flow visualisation and quantitative flow measurement. The critical considerations for constructing path-length imbalanced full-field interferometers for these and similar applications are discussed, expressions are derived for key calculations and interferograms from example interferometers are presented. These include the concept of balancing the infinity-spaces of the two arms via the use of a glass block to minimise the optical path difference variation across the interferogram and ensure adequate sampling of the fringes on the detector. Further, the use of tilted glass blocks in single-pass and double-pass arrangements is detailed for the generation and control of spatial carrier fringes without extensive realignment of the interferometer, and for phase shifting.

  16. Supergeometry in Locally Covariant Quantum Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hack, Thomas-Paul; Hanisch, Florian; Schenkel, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we analyze supergeometric locally covariant quantum field theories. We develop suitable categories SLoc of super-Cartan supermanifolds, which generalize Lorentz manifolds in ordinary quantum field theory, and show that, starting from a few representation theoretic and geometric data, one can construct a functor A : SLoc to S* Alg to the category of super-*-algebras, which can be interpreted as a non-interacting super-quantum field theory. This construction turns out to disregard supersymmetry transformations as the morphism sets in the above categories are too small. We then solve this problem by using techniques from enriched category theory, which allows us to replace the morphism sets by suitable morphism supersets that contain supersymmetry transformations as their higher superpoints. We construct super-quantum field theories in terms of enriched functors eA : eSLoc to eS* Alg between the enriched categories and show that supersymmetry transformations are appropriately described within the enriched framework. As examples we analyze the superparticle in 1|1-dimensions and the free Wess-Zumino model in 3|2-dimensions.

  17. Polarizabilities in the condensed phase and the local fields problem: A direct reaction field formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Duijnen, Piet Th.; de Vries, Alex H.; Swart, Marcel; Grozema, Ferdinand

    2002-11-01

    A consistent derivation is given for local field factors to be used for correcting measured or calculated static (hyper)polarizabilities in the condensed phases. We show how local fields should be used in the coupled perturbative Hartree-Fock or finite field methods for calculating these properties, specifically for the direct reaction field (DRF) approach, in which a quantum chemically treated "solute" is embedded in a classical "solvent" mainly containing discrete molecules. The derivation of the local fields is based on a strictly linear response of the classical parts and they are independent of any quantum mechanical method to be used. In applications to two water dimers in two basis sets it is shown that DRF matches fully quantum mechanical results quite well. For acetone in eleven different solvents we find that if the solvent is modeled by only a dielectric continuum (hyper)polarizabilities increase with respect to their vacuum values, while with the discrete model they decrease. We show that the use of the Lorentz field factor for extracting (hyper)polarizabilities from experimental susceptibilities may lead to serious errors.

  18. Past-time Radar Rainfall Estimates using Radar AWS Rainrate system with Local Gauge Correction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, D.; Lee, M. H.; Suk, M. K.; Nam, K. Y.; Hwang, J.; Ko, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    The Weather Radar Center at Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA) has radar network for warnings for heavy rainfall and severe storms. We have been operating an operational real-time adjusted the Radar-Automatic Weather Station (AWS) Rainrate (RAR) system developed by KMA in 2006 for providing radar-based quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) to meteorologists. This system has several uncertainty in estimating precipitation by radar reflectivity (Z) and rainfall intensity (R) relationship. To overcome uncertainty of the RAR system and improve the accuracy of QPE, we are applied the Local Gauge Correction (LGC) method which uses geo-statistical effective radius of errors of the QPE to RAR system in 2012. According to the results of previous study in 2014 (Lee et al., 2014), the accuracy of the RAR system with LGC method improved about 7.69% than before in the summer season of 2012 (from June to August). It has also improved the accuracy of hydrograph when we examined the accuracy of flood simulation using hydrologic model and data derived by the RAR system with LGC method. We confirmed to have its effectiveness through these results after the application of LGC method. It is required for high quality data of long term to utilize in hydrology field. To provide QPE data more precisely and collect past-time data, we produce that calculated by the RAR system with LGC method in the summer season from 2006 to 2009 and investigate whether the accuracy of past-time radar rainfall estimation enhance or not. Keywords : Radar-AWS Rainrate system, Local gauge correction, past-time Radar rainfall estimation Acknowledgements : This research is supported by "Development and application of Cross governmental dual-pol radar harmonization (WRC-2013-A-1)" project of the Weather Radar Center, Korea Meteorological Administration in 2015.

  19. On the covariant formalism of the effective field theory of gravity and leading order corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codello, Alessandro; Jain, Rajeev Kumar

    2016-11-01

    We construct the covariant effective field theory of gravity as an expansion in inverse powers of the Planck mass, identifying the leading and next-to-leading quantum corrections. We determine the form of the effective action for the cases of pure gravity with cosmological constant as well as gravity coupled to matter. By means of heat kernel methods we renormalize and compute the leading quantum corrections to quadratic order in a curvature expansion. The final effective action in our covariant formalism is generally non-local and can be readily used to understand the phenomenology on different spacetimes. In particular, we point out that on curved backgrounds the observable leading quantum gravitational effects are less suppressed than on Minkowski spacetime.

  20. Correction.

    PubMed

    2015-11-01

    In the article by Heuslein et al, which published online ahead of print on September 3, 2015 (DOI: 10.1161/ATVBAHA.115.305775), a correction was needed. Brett R. Blackman was added as the penultimate author of the article. The article has been corrected for publication in the November 2015 issue. PMID:26490278

  1. A general formalism for quasi-local correction of multipole distortions in periodic transport systems

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, D.; Forest, E.

    1988-06-01

    We generalize a new concept of local correction of nonlinearities due to multipole content by giving it a mathematical description. We present a general method which allows for a general reduction of all the distortions produced by a given set of multipole errors. The method can be applied to correct an arbitrary distribution of the errors in any transport system, such as transport lines, linacs, synchrotrons and storage rings. 11 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Field of view extension and truncation correction for MR-based human attenuation correction in simultaneous MR/PET imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Blumhagen, Jan O. Ladebeck, Ralf; Fenchel, Matthias; Braun, Harald; Quick, Harald H.; Faul, David; Scheffler, Klaus

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: In quantitative PET imaging, it is critical to accurately measure and compensate for the attenuation of the photons absorbed in the tissue. While in PET/CT the linear attenuation coefficients can be easily determined from a low-dose CT-based transmission scan, in whole-body MR/PET the computation of the linear attenuation coefficients is based on the MR data. However, a constraint of the MR-based attenuation correction (AC) is the MR-inherent field-of-view (FoV) limitation due to static magnetic field (B{sub 0}) inhomogeneities and gradient nonlinearities. Therefore, the MR-based human AC map may be truncated or geometrically distorted toward the edges of the FoV and, consequently, the PET reconstruction with MR-based AC may be biased. This is especially of impact laterally where the patient arms rest beside the body and are not fully considered. Methods: A method is proposed to extend the MR FoV by determining an optimal readout gradient field which locally compensates B{sub 0} inhomogeneities and gradient nonlinearities. This technique was used to reduce truncation in AC maps of 12 patients, and the impact on the PET quantification was analyzed and compared to truncated data without applying the FoV extension and additionally to an established approach of PET-based FoV extension. Results: The truncation artifacts in the MR-based AC maps were successfully reduced in all patients, and the mean body volume was thereby increased by 5.4%. In some cases large patient-dependent changes in SUV of up to 30% were observed in individual lesions when compared to the standard truncated attenuation map. Conclusions: The proposed technique successfully extends the MR FoV in MR-based attenuation correction and shows an improvement of PET quantification in whole-body MR/PET hybrid imaging. In comparison to the PET-based completion of the truncated body contour, the proposed method is also applicable to specialized PET tracers with little uptake in the arms and might

  3. A new real time filter for local exposure correction in panoramic radiographs

    SciTech Connect

    Frosio, I.; Borghese, N. A.

    2006-09-15

    A new real time filter for local exposure correction in panoramic radiographs is presented here. The filter, called PaRSEC, allows eliminating the exposure artifacts, mainly introduced by Automatic Exposure Control (AEC) systems. These artifacts reduce the image readability and its diagnostic utility. The PaRSEC filter operates a local exposure equalization, based on a reliable estimate of the column mean gray level. Qualitative and quantitative results are reported for typical panoramic radiographs. They show a complete removal of the artifacts. The method compares favorably with other classical methods targeted to exposure correction.

  4. Antlia Dwarf Galaxy: distance, quantitative morphology and recent formation history via statistical field correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimbblet, Kevin A.; Couch, Warrick J.

    2012-01-01

    We apply a statistical field correction technique originally designed to determine membership of high redshift galaxy clusters to Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging of the Antlia Dwarf Galaxy; a galaxy at the very edge of the Local Group. Using the tip of the red giant branch standard candle method coupled with a simple Sobel edge detection filter we find a new distance to Antlia of 1.31 ± 0.03 Mpc. For the first time for a Local Group member, we compute the concentration, asymmetry and clumpiness quantitative morphology parameters for Antlia from the distribution of resolved stars in the HST/Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) field, corrected with a new method for contaminants and complement these parameters with the Gini coefficient (G) and the second-order moment of the brightest 20 per cent of the flux (M20). We show that it is a classic dwarf elliptical (C = 2.0, A = 0.063, S = 0.077, G = 0.39 and M20=-1.17 in the F814W band), but has an appreciable blue stellar population at its core, confirming on-going star formation. The values of asymmetry and clumpiness, as well as Gini and M20 are consistent with an undisturbed galaxy. Although our analysis suggests that Antlia may not be tidally influenced by NGC 3109, it does not necessarily preclude such interaction.

  5. Continuous head-localization and data correction in a whole-cortex MEG sensor.

    PubMed

    Wilson, H S

    2004-11-30

    Continuous monitoring of the position of a subject's head is an essential part of improving localization accuracy and resolution in MEG. We describe a procedure that has been developed for whole-cortex MEG sensors. The system uses three (or more) small head coils driven continuously by low-amplitude sinusoidal currents with frequencies chosen so they do not interfere with MEG measurements and with each other and are easily separated from power-line signals and harmonics. Analysis of the response of the MEG sensors to the head coils allows continuous monitoring of the position (update times as short as T=2/fpower) using a 3-parameter minimization. The best-fit positions of the head coils are then combined to determine the head translation and rotation. Analysis of phantom data recorded with a 275-channel CTF MEG system in a shielded room shows that coil positions can be determined with an accuracy of approximately 2 mm with an update period T=1/15 s even when the head coils are moving approximately 25 mm at speeds up to 40 mm/s. Data are corrected by expressing the scalar potential for the magnetic field as a spherical-harmonic series, and then determining the effect of rotations and translations on the terms of the series. Since the MEG helmet covers only approximately 60% of the full sphere, care must be taken in determining the coefficients of the spherical-harmonic series to ensure that the modeled magnetic field does not become unrealistically large in the region where there are no MEG sensors (i.e. in the lower 40% of the sphere). Our approach has been to use a minimum-field-energy criterion that minimizes the squared gradient averaged over 4pi sr and radii from 96 to 145 mm while matching the MEG measurements.

  6. Visual-based simultaneous localization and mapping and global positioning system correction for geo-localization of a mobile robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrabah, Sid Ahmed; Sahli, Hichem; Baudoin, Yvan

    2011-12-01

    This paper introduces an approach combining visual-based simultaneous localization and mapping (V-SLAM) and global positioning system (GPS) correction for accurate multi-sensor localization of an outdoor mobile robot in geo-referenced maps. The proposed framework combines two extended Kalman filters (EKF); the first one, referred to as the integration filter, is dedicated to the improvement of the GPS localization based on data from an inertial navigation system and wheels' encoders. The second EKF implements the V-SLAM process. The linear and angular velocities in the dynamic model of the V-SLAM EKF filter are given by the GPS/INS/Encoders integration filter. On the other hand, the output of the V-SLAM EKF filter is used to update the dynamics estimation in the integration filter and therefore the geo-referenced localization. This solution increases the accuracy and the robustness of the positioning during GPS outage and allows SLAM in less featured environments.

  7. Correcting GOES-R Magnetometer Data for Stray Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Delano R.; Freesland, Douglas C.; Tadikonda, Sivakumara K.; Kronenwetter, Jeffrey; Todirita, Monica; Dahya, Melissa; Chu, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Time-varying spacecraft magnetic fields or stray fields are a problem for magnetometer systems. While constant fields can be removed with zero offset calibration, stray fields are difficult to distinguish from ambient field variations. Putting two magnetometers on a long boom and solving for both the ambient and stray fields can be a good idea, but this gradiometer solution is even more susceptible to noise than a single magnetometer. Unless the stray fields are larger than the magnetometer noise, simply averaging the two measurements is a more accurate approach. If averaging is used, it may be worthwhile to explicitly estimate and remove stray fields. Models and estimation algorithms are provided for solar array, arcjet and reaction wheel fields.

  8. [Locally Dynamically Moving Average Algorithm for the Fully Automated Baseline Correction of Raman Spectrum].

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng-fei; Yang, Rui; Ji, Jiang; Guo, Han-ming; Hu, Qi; Zhuang, Song-lin

    2015-05-01

    The baseline correction is an, extremely important spectral preprocessing step and can significantly improve the accuracy of the subsequent spectral analysis algorithm. At present most of the baseline correction algorithms are manual and semi-automated. The manual baseline correction depends on the user experience and its accuracy is greatly affected by the subjective factor. The semi-automated baseline correction needs to set different optimizing parameters for different Raman spectra, which will be inconvenient to users. In this paper, a locally.dynamically moving average algorithm (LDMA) for the fully automated baseline correction is presented and its basic ideas.and steps are demonstrated in detail. In the LDMA algorithm the modified moving averaging algorithm (MMA) is used to strip the Raman peaks. By automatically finding the baseline subintervals of the raw Raman spectrum to divide the total spectrum range into multi Raman peak subintervals, the LDMA algorithm succeed in dynamically changing the window half width of the MA algorithm and controlling the numbers of the smoothing iterations in each Raman peak subinterval. Hence, the phenomena of overcorrection and under-correction are avoided to the most degree. The LDMA algorithm has achieved great effect not only to the synthetic Raman spectra with the convex, exponential, or sigmoidal baseline but also to the real Raman spectra.

  9. Far-ultraviolet studies. VII - The spectrum and latitude dependence of the local interstellar radiation field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, R. C.; Anderson, R. C.; Fastie, W. G.

    1980-01-01

    A direct measurement has been made of the spectrum (1180-1680 A) and Gould-latitude dependence of the local interstellar radiation field, over about one-third of the sky. The result is corrected to give expected values for the entire sky. The average local 1180-1680 A energy density is 5.8 x 10 to the -17th ergs/cu cm A. The surface brightness falls off toward high latitudes much more steeply than published models predict.

  10. Electroweak corrections to high energy processes using effective field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu Juiyu; Golf, Frank; Kelley, Randall; Manohar, Aneesh V.

    2008-03-01

    Electroweak Sudakov logarithms at high energy, of the form ({alpha}/sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W}){sup n}log{sup m}s/M{sub Z,W}{sup 2}, are summed using effective theory methods. The corrections are computed to processes involving two external particles in the standard model. The results include nonzero particle masses, such as the t-quark mass, electroweak mixing effects which lead to unequal W and Z masses, and radiative Higgs corrections proportional to the Yukawa couplings. We show that the matching at the scale M{sub W,Z} has a term at most linear in logs/{mu}{sup 2} to all orders. The effective theory formalism is compared with, and extends, previous work based on infrared evolution equations.

  11. Quantum dynamical simulations of local field enhancement in metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Negre, Christian F A; Perassi, Eduardo M; Coronado, Eduardo A; Sánchez, Cristián G

    2013-03-27

    Field enhancements (Γ) around small Ag nanoparticles (NPs) are calculated using a quantum dynamical simulation formalism and the results are compared with electrodynamic simulations using the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) in order to address the important issue of the intrinsic atomistic structure of NPs. Quite remarkably, in both quantum and classical approaches the highest values of Γ are located in the same regions around single NPs. However, by introducing a complete atomistic description of the metallic NPs in optical simulations, a different pattern of the Γ distribution is obtained. Knowing the correct pattern of the Γ distribution around NPs is crucial for understanding the spectroscopic features of molecules inside hot spots. The enhancement produced by surface plasmon coupling is studied by using both approaches in NP dimers for different inter-particle distances. The results show that the trend of the variation of Γ versus inter-particle distance is different for classical and quantum simulations. This difference is explained in terms of a charge transfer mechanism that cannot be obtained with classical electrodynamics. Finally, time dependent distribution of the enhancement factor is simulated by introducing a time dependent field perturbation into the Hamiltonian, allowing an assessment of the localized surface plasmon resonance quantum dynamics.

  12. Local concurrent error detection and correction in data structures using virtual backpointers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C. C.; Chen, P. P.; Fuchs, W. K.

    1987-01-01

    A new technique, based on virtual backpointers, for local concurrent error detection and correction in linked data structures is presented. Two new data structures, the Virtual Double Linked List, and the B-tree with Virtual Backpointers, are described. For these structures, double errors can be detected in 0(1) time and errors detected during forward moves can be corrected in 0(1) time. The application of a concurrent auditor process to data structure error detection and correction is analyzed, and an implementation is described, to determine the effect on mean time to failure of a multi-user shared database system. The implementation utilizes a Sequent shared memory multiprocessor system operating on a shared databased of Virtual Double Linked Lists.

  13. Gradient corrections to the local-density approximation for trapped superfluid Fermi gases

    SciTech Connect

    Csordas, Andras; Almasy, Orsolya; Szepfalusy, Peter

    2010-12-15

    Two species superfluid Fermi gas is investigated on the BCS side up to the Feshbach resonance. Using the Greens's function technique gradient corrections are calculated to the generalized Thomas-Fermi theory including Cooper pairing. Their relative magnitude is found to be measured by the small parameter (d/R{sub TF}){sup 4}, where d is the oscillator length of the trap potential and R{sub TF} is the radial extension of the density n in the Thomas-Fermi approximation. In particular, at the Feshbach resonance the universal corrections to the local density approximation are calculated and a universal prefactor {kappa}{sub W}=7/27 is derived for the von Weizsaecker-type correction {kappa}{sub W}(({h_bar}/2{pi}){sup 2}/2m)({nabla}{sup 2}n{sup 1/2}/n{sup 1/2}).

  14. Corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-09-01

    The feature article "Material advantage?" on the effects of technology and rule changes on sporting performance (July pp28-30) stated that sprinters are less affected by lower oxygen levels at high altitudes because they run "aerobically". They run anaerobically. The feature about the search for the Higgs boson (August pp22-26) incorrectly gave the boson's mass as roughly 125 MeV it is 125 GeV, as correctly stated elsewhere in the issue. The article also gave a wrong value for the intended collision energy of the Superconducting Super Collider, which was designed to collide protons with a total energy of 40 TeV.

  15. Correction.

    PubMed

    2015-05-22

    The Circulation Research article by Keith and Bolli (“String Theory” of c-kitpos Cardiac Cells: A New Paradigm Regarding the Nature of These Cells That May Reconcile Apparently Discrepant Results. Circ Res. 2015:116:1216-1230. doi: 10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.116.305557) states that van Berlo et al (2014) observed that large numbers of fibroblasts and adventitial cells, some smooth muscle and endothelial cells, and rare cardiomyocytes originated from c-kit positive progenitors. However, van Berlo et al reported that only occasional fibroblasts and adventitial cells derived from c-kit positive progenitors in their studies. Accordingly, the review has been corrected to indicate that van Berlo et al (2014) observed that large numbers of endothelial cells, with some smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts, and more rarely cardiomyocytes, originated from c-kit positive progenitors in their murine model. The authors apologize for this error, and the error has been noted and corrected in the online version of the article, which is available at http://circres.ahajournals.org/content/116/7/1216.full ( PMID:25999426

  16. Locally adaptive regression filter-based infrared focal plane array non-uniformity correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia; Qin, Hanlin; Yan, Xiang; Huang, He; Zhao, Yingjuan; Zhou, Huixin

    2015-10-01

    Due to the limitations of the manufacturing technology, the response rates to the same infrared radiation intensity in each infrared detector unit are not identical. As a result, the non-uniformity of infrared focal plane array, also known as fixed pattern noise (FPN), is generated. To solve this problem, correcting the non-uniformity in infrared image is a promising approach, and many non-uniformity correction (NUC) methods have been proposed. However, they have some defects such as slow convergence, ghosting and scene degradation. To overcome these defects, a novel non-uniformity correction method based on locally adaptive regression filter is proposed. First, locally adaptive regression method is used to separate the infrared image into base layer containing main scene information and the detail layer containing detailed scene with FPN. Then, the detail layer sequence is filtered by non-linear temporal filter to obtain the non-uniformity. Finally, the high quality infrared image is obtained by subtracting non-uniformity component from original image. The experimental results show that the proposed method can significantly eliminate the ghosting and the scene degradation. The results of correction are superior to the THPF-NUC and NN-NUC in the aspects of subjective visual and objective evaluation index.

  17. A Local Corrections Algorithm for Solving Poisson's Equation inThree Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    McCorquodale, Peter; Colella, Phillip; Balls, Gregory T.; Baden,Scott B.

    2006-10-30

    We present a second-order accurate algorithm for solving thefree-space Poisson's equation on a locally-refined nested grid hierarchyin three dimensions. Our approach is based on linear superposition oflocal convolutions of localized charge distributions, with the nonlocalcoupling represented on coarser grids. There presentation of the nonlocalcoupling on the local solutions is based on Anderson's Method of LocalCorrections and does not require iteration between different resolutions.A distributed-memory parallel implementation of this method is observedto have a computational cost per grid point less than three times that ofa standard FFT-based method on a uniform grid of the same resolution, andscales well up to 1024 processors.

  18. Bulk locality and quantum error correction in AdS/CFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almheiri, Ahmed; Dong, Xi; Harlow, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    We point out a connection between the emergence of bulk locality in AdS/CFT and the theory of quantum error correction. Bulk notions such as Bogoliubov transformations, location in the radial direction, and the holographic entropy bound all have natural CFT interpretations in the language of quantum error correction. We also show that the question of whether bulk operator reconstruction works only in the causal wedge or all the way to the extremal surface is related to the question of whether or not the quantum error correcting code realized by AdS/CFT is also a "quantum secret sharing scheme", and suggest a tensor network calculation that may settle the issue. Interestingly, the version of quantum error correction which is best suited to our analysis is the somewhat nonstandard "operator algebra quantum error correction" of Beny, Kempf, and Kribs. Our proposal gives a precise formulation of the idea of "subregion-subregion" duality in AdS/CFT, and clarifies the limits of its validity.

  19. Corrections to the apparent value of the cosmological constant due to local inhomogeneities

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, Antonio Enea; Chen, Pisin E-mail: pisinchen@phys.ntu.edu.tw

    2011-10-01

    Supernovae observations strongly support the presence of a cosmological constant, but its value, which we will call apparent, is normally determined assuming that the Universe can be accurately described by a homogeneous model. Even in the presence of a cosmological constant we cannot exclude nevertheless the presence of a small local inhomogeneity which could affect the apparent value of the cosmological constant. Neglecting the presence of the inhomogeneity can in fact introduce a systematic misinterpretation of cosmological data, leading to the distinction between an apparent and true value of the cosmological constant. We establish the theoretical framework to calculate the corrections to the apparent value of the cosmological constant by modeling the local inhomogeneity with a ΛLTB solution. Our assumption to be at the center of a spherically symmetric inhomogeneous matter distribution correspond to effectively calculate the monopole contribution of the large scale inhomogeneities surrounding us, which we expect to be the dominant one, because of other observations supporting a high level of isotropy of the Universe around us. By performing a local Taylor expansion we analyze the number of independent degrees of freedom which determine the local shape of the inhomogeneity, and consider the issue of central smoothness, showing how the same correction can correspond to different inhomogeneity profiles. Contrary to previous attempts to fit data using large void models our approach is quite general. The correction to the apparent value of the cosmological constant is in fact present for local inhomogeneities of any size, and should always be taken appropriately into account both theoretically and observationally.

  20. The Local Stellar Velocity Field via Vector Spherical Harmonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markarov, V. V.; Murphy, D. W.

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the local field of stellar tangential velocities for a sample of 42,339 nonbinary Hipparcos stars with accurate parallaxes, using a vector spherical harmonic formalism. We derive simple relations between the parameters of the classical linear model (Ogorodnikov-Milne) of the local systemic field and low-degree terms of the general vector harmonic decomposition. Taking advantage of these relationships, we determine the solar velocity with respect to the local stars of (V(sub X), V(sub Y), V(sub Z)) (10.5, 18.5, 7.3) +/- 0.1 km s(exp -1) not corrected for the asymmetric drift with respect to the local standard of rest. If only stars more distant than 100 pc are considered, the peculiar solar motion is (V(sub X), V(sub Y), V(sub Z)) (9.9, 15.6, 6.9) +/- 0.2 km s(exp -1). The adverse effects of harmonic leakage, which occurs between the reflex solar motion represented by the three electric vector harmonics in the velocity space and higher degree harmonics in the proper-motion space, are eliminated in our analysis by direct subtraction of the reflex solar velocity in its tangential components for each star. The Oort parameters determined by a straightforward least-squares adjustment in vector spherical harmonics are A=14.0 +/- 1.4, B=13.1 +/- 1.2, K=1.1 +/- 1.8, and C=2.9 +/- 1.4 km s(exp -1) kpc(exp -1). The physical meaning and the implications of these parameters are discussed in the framework of a general linear model of the velocity field. We find a few statistically significant higher degree harmonic terms that do not correspond to any parameters in the classical linear model. One of them, a third-degree electric harmonic, is tentatively explained as the response to a negative linear gradient of rotation velocity with distance from the Galactic plane, which we estimate at approximately -20 km s(exp -1) kpc(exp -1). A similar vertical gradient of rotation velocity has been detected for more distant stars representing the thick disk (z greater than 1 kpc

  1. The orbital-specific virtual local triples correction: OSV-L(T).

    PubMed

    Schütz, Martin; Yang, Jun; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic; Manby, Frederick R; Werner, Hans-Joachim

    2013-02-01

    A local method based on orbital specific virtuals (OSVs) for calculating the perturbative triples correction in local coupled cluster calculations is presented. In contrast to the previous approach based on projected atomic orbitals (PAOs), described by Schütz [J. Chem. Phys. 113, 9986 (2000)], the new scheme works without any ad hoc truncations of the virtual space to domains. A single threshold defines the pair and triple specific virtual spaces completely and automatically. It is demonstrated that the computational cost of the method scales linearly with molecular size. Employing the recommended threshold a similar fraction of the correlation energy is recovered as with the original PAO method at a somewhat lower cost. A benchmark for 52 reactions demonstrates that for reaction energies the intrinsic accuracy of the coupled cluster with singles and doubles excitations and a perturbative treatment of triples excitations method can be reached by OSV-local coupled cluster theory with singles and doubles and perturbative triples, provided a MP2 correction is applied that accounts for basis set incompleteness errors as well as for remaining domain errors. As an application example the interaction energies of the guanine-cytosine dimers in the Watson-Crick and stacked arrangements are investigated at the level of local coupled cluster theory with singles and doubles and perturbative triples. Based on these calculations we propose new complete-basis-set-limit estimates for these interaction energies at this level of theory.

  2. Mean-field theory and ɛ expansion for Anderson localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, A. B.; Lubensky, T. C.

    1981-03-01

    A general field-theoretic formulation of the Anderson model for the localization of wave functions in a random potential is given in terms of n-component replicated fields in the limit n-->0, and is analyzed primarily for spatial dimension d>=4. Lengths ξ1 and ξ2 associated with the spatial decay of correlations in the single-particle and two-particle Green's functions, respectively, are introduced. Two different regimes, the weak coupling and strong coupling, are distinguished depending on whether ξ-11 or ξ-12, respectively, vanishes as the mobility energy, Ec, is approached. The weak-coupling regime vanishes as d-->4+. Mean-field theory is developed from the uniform minimum of the Lagrangian for both the strong- and weak-coupling cases. For the strong-coupling case it gives the exponents va=14, γa=βa=12, η=0, and μ=1, where βa is the exponent associated with the density of extended states and μ is that associated with the conductivity. Simple heuristic arguments are used to verify the correctness of these unusual mean-field values. Infrared divergences in perturbation theory for the strong-coupling case occur for d<8, and an ɛ expansion (ɛ=8-d) is developed which is found to be identical to that previously analyzed for the statistics of lattice animals and which gives βa=12-ɛ12, η=-ɛ9, va=14+ɛ36, and μ=1-5ɛ36. The results are consistent with the Ward identity, which in combination with scaling arguments requires that βa+γa=1. The treatment takes account of the fact that the average of the on-site Green's function [G(x-->,x-->E)]av is nonzero and is predicated on this quantity being real, i.e., on the density of states vanishing at the mobility edge. We also show that localized states emerge naturally from local minima of finite action in the Lagrangian. These instanton solutions are analyzed on a lattice where the cutoff produced by the lattice constant leads to lattice instantons which exist for all d, in contrast to the case for the

  3. The ISOCAM field-of-view distortion correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ali, B.; Ott, S.; Vo, T. D.; Gastaud, R.; Okumura, K.

    2000-01-01

    We describe results from new re-analysis of the ISOCAM field-of-view distortion. In this contribution we describe the procedure for determining the distortion, the implentation and resulting effects on the ISOCAM astrometric measurements, mosaicking and flux calibration.

  4. Error Field Correction in DIII-D Ohmic Plasmas With Either Handedness

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jong-Kyu; Schaffer, Micahel J.; La Haye, Robert J.; Scoville, Timothy J.; Menard, Jonathon E.

    2011-05-16

    Error field correction results in DIII-D plasmas are presented in various configurations. In both left-handed and right-handed plasma configurations, where the intrinsic error fields become different due to the opposite helical twist (handedness) of the magnetic field, the optimal error correction currents and the toroidal phases of internal(I)-coils are empirically established. Applications of the Ideal Perturbed Equilibrium Code to these results demonstrate that the field component to be minimized is not the resonant component of the external field, but the total field including ideal plasma responses. Consistency between experiment and theory has been greatly improved along with the understanding of ideal plasma responses, but non-ideal plasma responses still need to be understood to achieve the reliable predictability in tokamak error field correction.

  5. A new approach for beam hardening correction based on the local spectrum distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasoulpour, Naser; Kamali-Asl, Alireza; Hemmati, Hamidreza

    2015-09-01

    Energy dependence of material absorption and polychromatic nature of x-ray beams in the Computed Tomography (CT) causes a phenomenon which called "beam hardening". The purpose of this study is to provide a novel approach for Beam Hardening (BH) correction. This approach is based on the linear attenuation coefficients of Local Spectrum Distributions (LSDs) in the various depths of a phantom. The proposed method includes two steps. Firstly, the hardened spectra in various depths of the phantom (or LSDs) are estimated based on the Expectation Maximization (EM) algorithm for arbitrary thickness interval of known materials in the phantom. The performance of LSD estimation technique is evaluated by applying random Gaussian noise to transmission data. Then, the linear attenuation coefficients with regarding to the mean energy of LSDs are obtained. Secondly, a correction function based on the calculated attenuation coefficients is derived in order to correct polychromatic raw data. Since a correction function has been used for the conversion of the polychromatic data to the monochromatic data, the effect of BH in proposed reconstruction must be reduced in comparison with polychromatic reconstruction. The proposed approach has been assessed in the phantoms which involve less than two materials, but the correction function has been extended for using in the constructed phantoms with more than two materials. The relative mean energy difference in the LSDs estimations based on the noise-free transmission data was less than 1.5%. Also, it shows an acceptable value when a random Gaussian noise is applied to the transmission data. The amount of cupping artifact in the proposed reconstruction method has been effectively reduced and proposed reconstruction profile is uniform more than polychromatic reconstruction profile.

  6. Local field effect as a function of pulse duration

    SciTech Connect

    Novitsky, Denis V.

    2010-07-15

    In this brief report we give semiclassical consideration to the role of pulse duration in the observation of local field effects in the regime of optical switching. We show that the main parameter governing local field influence is the ratio of peak Rabi frequency corresponding to medium inversion and Lorentz frequency of the medium. To obtain significant local field effect, this parameter should be near unity that is valid only for long enough pulses. We also discuss the role of relaxation and pulse shape in this process.

  7. Asymptotic behavior of local dipolar fields in thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, G. J.; Stenning, G. B. G.; van der Laan, G.

    2016-10-01

    A simple method, based on layer by layer direct summation, is used to determine the local dipolar fields in uniformly magnetized thin films. The results show that the dipolar constants converge ~1/m where the number of spins in a square film is given by (2m+1)2. Dipolar field results for sc, bcc, fcc, and hexagonal lattices are presented and discussed. The results can be used to calculate local dipolar fields in films with either ferromagnetic, antiferromagnetic, spiral, exponential decay behavior, provided the magnetic order only changes normal to the film. Differences between the atomistic (local fields) and macroscopic fields (Maxwellian) are also examined. For the latter, the macro B-field inside the film is uniform and falls to zero sharply outside, in accord with Maxwell boundary conditions. In contrast, the local field for the atomistic point dipole model is highly non-linear inside and falls to zero at about three lattice spacing outside the film. Finally, it is argued that the continuum field B (used by the micromagnetic community) and the local field Bloc(r) (used by the FMR community) will lead to differing values for the overall demagnetization energy.

  8. Acoustic source localization in mixed field using spherical microphone arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qinghua; Wang, Tong

    2014-12-01

    Spherical microphone arrays have been used for source localization in three-dimensional space recently. In this paper, a two-stage algorithm is developed to localize mixed far-field and near-field acoustic sources in free-field environment. In the first stage, an array signal model is constructed in the spherical harmonics domain. The recurrent relation of spherical harmonics is independent of far-field and near-field mode strengths. Therefore, it is used to develop spherical estimating signal parameter via rotational invariance technique (ESPRIT)-like approach to estimate directions of arrival (DOAs) for both far-field and near-field sources. In the second stage, based on the estimated DOAs, simple one-dimensional MUSIC spectrum is exploited to distinguish far-field and near-field sources and estimate the ranges of near-field sources. The proposed algorithm can avoid multidimensional search and parameter pairing. Simulation results demonstrate the good performance for localizing far-field sources, or near-field ones, or mixed field sources.

  9. Using the electron localization function to correct for confinement physics in semi-local density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Feng Mattsson, Ann E.; Armiento, Rickard

    2014-05-14

    We have previously proposed that further improved functionals for density functional theory can be constructed based on the Armiento-Mattsson subsystem functional scheme if, in addition to the uniform electron gas and surface models used in the Armiento-Mattsson 2005 functional, a model for the strongly confined electron gas is also added. However, of central importance for this scheme is an index that identifies regions in space where the correction provided by the confined electron gas should be applied. The electron localization function (ELF) is a well-known indicator of strongly localized electrons. We use a model of a confined electron gas based on the harmonic oscillator to show that regions with high ELF directly coincide with regions where common exchange energy functionals have large errors. This suggests that the harmonic oscillator model together with an index based on the ELF provides the crucial ingredients for future improved semi-local functionals. For a practical illustration of how the proposed scheme is intended to work for a physical system we discuss monoclinic cupric oxide, CuO. A thorough discussion of this system leads us to promote the cell geometry of CuO as a useful benchmark for future semi-local functionals. Very high ELF values are found in a shell around the O ions, and take its maximum value along the Cu–O directions. An estimate of the exchange functional error from the effect of electron confinement in these regions suggests a magnitude and sign that could account for the error in cell geometry.

  10. Quark mean field model with pion and gluon corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Xueyong; Hu, Jinniu; Shen, Hong

    2016-10-01

    The properties of nuclear matter and finite nuclei are studied within the quark mean field (QMF) model by taking the effects of pions and gluons into account at the quark level. The nucleon is described as the combination of three constituent quarks confined by a harmonic oscillator potential. To satisfy the spirit of QCD theory, the contributions of pions and gluons on the nucleon structure are treated in second-order perturbation theory. In a nuclear many-body system, nucleons interact with each other by exchanging mesons between quarks. With different constituent quark mass, mq, we determine three parameter sets for the coupling constants between mesons and quarks, named QMF-NK1, QMF-NK2, and QMF-NK3, by fitting the ground-state properties of several closed-shell nuclei. It is found that all of the three parameter sets can give a satisfactory description of properties of nuclear matter and finite nuclei, moreover they also predict a larger neutron star mass around 2.3 M⊙ without hyperon degrees of freedom.

  11. Empirical Corrections to the Amber RNA Force Field with Target Metadynamics.

    PubMed

    Gil-Ley, Alejandro; Bottaro, Sandro; Bussi, Giovanni

    2016-06-14

    The computational study of conformational transitions in nucleic acids still faces many challenges. For example, in the case of single stranded RNA tetranucleotides, agreement between simulations and experiments is not satisfactory due to inaccuracies in the force fields commonly used in molecular dynamics simulations. We here use experimental data collected from high-resolution X-ray structures to attempt an improvement of the latest version of the AMBER force field. A modified metadynamics algorithm is used to calculate correcting potentials designed to enforce experimental distributions of backbone torsion angles. Replica-exchange simulations of tetranucleotides including these correcting potentials show significantly better agreement with independent solution experiments for the oligonucleotides containing pyrimidine bases. Although the proposed corrections do not seem to be portable to generic RNA systems, the simulations revealed the importance of the α and ζ backbone angles for the modulation of the RNA conformational ensemble. The correction protocol presented here suggests a systematic procedure for force-field refinement.

  12. Self-interaction-corrected local-spin-density calculations for rare earth materials

    SciTech Connect

    Svane, A.; Temmerman, W.M.; Szotek, Z.; Laegsgaard, J.; Winter, H.

    2000-04-20

    The ab initio self-interaction-corrected (SIC) local-spin-density (LSD) approximation is discussed with emphasis on the ability to describe localized f-electron states in rare earth solids. Two methods for minimizing the SIC-LSD total energy functional are discussed, one using a unified Hamiltonian for all electron states, thus having the advantages of Bloch's theorem, the other one employing an iterative scheme in real space. Results for cerium and cerium compounds as well as other rare earths are presented. For the cerium compounds the onset of f-electron delocalization can be accurately described, including the intricate isostructural phase transitions in elemental cerium and CeP. In Pr and Sm the equilibrium lattice constant and zero temperature equation of state is greatly improved in comparison with the LSD results.

  13. Motor field sensitivity for preoperative localization of motor cortex

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Peter T.; Berger, Mitchel S.; Nagarajan, Srikantan S.

    2014-01-01

    Object In this study the role of magnetic source imaging for preoperative motor mapping was evaluated by using a single-dipole localization method to analyze motor field data in 41 patients. Methods Data from affected and unaffected hemispheres were collected in patients performing voluntary finger flexion movements. Somatosensory evoked field (SSEF) data were also obtained using tactile stimulation. Dipole localization using motor field (MF) data was successful in only 49% of patients, whereas localization with movement evoked field (MEF) data was successful in 66% of patients. When the spatial distribution of MF and MEF dipoles in relation to SSEF dipoles was analyzed, the motor dipoles were not spatially distinct from somatosensory dipoles. Conclusions The findings in this study suggest that single-dipole localization for the analysis of motor data is not sufficiently sensitive and is nonspecific, and thus not clinically useful. PMID:17044563

  14. Robust and automated solution for correcting hotspots locally using cost-function based OPC solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babcock, Carl; Yang, Dongok; McGowan, Sarah; Ye, Jun; Yan, Bo; Qiu, Jianhong; Baron, Stanislas; Pandey, Taksh; Kapasi, Sanjay; Aquino, Chris

    2014-03-01

    In previous work1, we introduced a new technology called Flexible Mask Optimization (FMO) that was successfully used for localized OPC correction. OPC/RET techniques such as model-based assist feature and process-window-based OPC solvers have become essential for addressing critical patterning issues at 2× and lower technology nodes. With an FMO flow, critical patterns were identified, classified and corrected in localized areas only, using advanced techniques. One challenge with this flow is that once the hotspots are identified, a user still has to come up with OPC solutions to address the hotspots. This process can be cumbersome and time consuming as different types of hotspots with new designs may require different recipes, causing delays to tapeout. What is required is a robust, powerful and automated OPC technique that can handle various types of hotspots, so an automatic hotspot correction flow can be established. In this work, we introduce a new cost-function-based OPC technique called Co-optimization OPC that can be used to correct various types of hotspots with minimum tuning effort. In this approach, the OPC solver simultaneously solves for all the segments in a patch including main and sub-resolution assist features (SRAF), applying additional user-defined cost function constraints such as MEEF, PV band, MRC and SRAF printability. Unlike conventional OPC solvers, Cooptimization solvers can also move and grow SRAFs, which further improves the process window. The key benefit of the Co-optimization OPC solution is that it can be used in a standard recipe to resolve many different hotspots encountered across various designs for a given layer. In this study, we demonstrate that Co-optimization OPC can be successfully used to address various types of hotspots across designs for selected 2× nm node line/space layers, as an example. These layers have been particularly challenging as they use single-exposure lithography with k1 around 0.3. Aggressive RET

  15. Deformable registration of CT and cone-beam CT by local CBCT intensity correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seyoun; Plishker, William; Shekhar, Raj; Quon, Harry; Wong, John; Lee, Junghoon

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to accurately register CT to cone-beam CT (CBCT) by iteratively correcting local CBCT intensity. CBCT is a widely used intra-operative imaging modality in image-guided radiotherapy and surgery. A short scan followed by a filtered-backprojection is typically used for CBCT reconstruction. While data on the mid-plane (plane of source-detector rotation) is complete, off-mid-planes undergo different information deficiency and the computed reconstructions are approximate. This causes different reconstruction artifacts at off-mid-planes depending on slice locations, and therefore impedes accurate registration between CT and CBCT. To address this issue, we correct CBCT intensities by matching local intensity histograms slice by slice in conjunction with intensity-based deformable registration. This correction-registration step is repeated until the result image converges. We tested the proposed method on eight head-and-neck cancer cases and compared its performance with state-of-the-art registration methods, Bspline, demons, and optical flow, which are widely used for CT-CBCT registration. Normalized mutual-information (NMI), normalized cross-correlation (NCC), and structural similarity (SSIM) were computed as similarity measures for the performance evaluation. Our method produced overall NMI of 0.59, NCC of 0.96, and SSIM of 0.93, outperforming existing methods by 3.6%, 2.4%, and 2.8% in terms of NMI, NCC, and SSIM scores, respectively. Experimental results show that our method is more consistent and roust than existing algorithms, and also computationally efficient with faster convergence.

  16. Non-local means-based nonuniformity correction for infrared focal-plane array detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hui; Zhang, Zhi-jie; Chen, Fu-sheng; Wang, Chen-sheng

    2014-11-01

    The infrared imaging systems are normally based on the infrared focal-plane array (IRFPA) which can be considered as an array of independent detectors aligned at the focal plane of the imaging system. Unfortunately, every detector on the IRFPA may have a different response to the same input infrared signal which is known as the nonuniformity problem. Then we can observe the fixed pattern noise (FPN) from the resulting images. Standard nonuniformity correction (NUC) methods need to be recalibrated after a short period of time due the temporal drift of the FPN. Scene-based nonuniformity correction (NUC) techniques eliminate the need for calibration by correction coefficients based on the scene being viewed. However, in the scene-based NUC method the problem of ghosting artifacts widely seriously decreases the image quality, which can degrade the performance of many applications such as target detection and track. This paper proposed an improved scene-based method based on the retina-like neural network approach. The method incorporates the use of non-local means (NLM) method into the estimation of the gain and the offset of each detector. This method can not only estimates the accurate correction coefficient but also restrict the ghosting artifacts efficiently. The proposed method relies on the use of NLM method which is a very successful image denoising method. And then the NLM used here can preserve the image edges efficiently and obtain a reliable spatial estimation. We tested the proposed NUC method by applying it to an IR sequence of frames. The performance of the proposed method was compared the other well-established adaptive NUC techniques.

  17. Correction: Enhanced photoresponse in dye-sensitized solar cells via localized surface plasmon resonance through highly stable nickel nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Md. Mahbubur; Im, Sang Hyuk; Lee, Jae-Joon

    2016-03-01

    Correction for `Enhanced photoresponse in dye-sensitized solar cells via localized surface plasmon resonance through highly stable nickel nanoparticles' by Md. Mahbubur Rahman et al., Nanoscale, 2016, DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08155f.

  18. Local Field Factors and Dielectric Properties of Liquid Benzene.

    PubMed

    Davari, Nazanin; Daub, Christopher D; Åstrand, Per-Olof; Unge, Mikael

    2015-09-01

    Local electric field factors are calculated for liquid benzene by combining molecular dynamic simulations with a subsequent force-field model based on a combined charge-transfer and point-dipole interaction model for the local field factor. The local field factor is obtained as a linear response of the local field to an external electric field, and the response is calculated at frequencies through the first absorption maximum. It is found that the largest static local field factor is around 2.4, while it is around 6.4 at the absorption frequency. The linear susceptibility, the dielectric constant, and the first absorption maximum of liquid benzene are also studied. The electronic contribution to the dielectric constant is around 2.3 at zero frequency, in good agreement with the experimental value around 2.2, while it increases to 6.3 at the absorption frequency. The π → π* excitation energy is around 6.0 eV, as compared to the gas-phase value of around 6.3 eV, while the experimental values are 6.5 and 6.9 eV for the liquid and gas phase, respectively, demonstrating that the gas-to-liquid shift is well-described.

  19. Performance Monitoring Local Field Potentials in the Medial Frontal Cortex of Primates: Supplementary Eye Field

    PubMed Central

    Emeric, Erik E.; Leslie, Melanie; Pouget, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    We describe intracranial local field potentials (LFPs) recorded in the supplementary eye field (SEF) of macaque monkeys performing a saccade countermanding task. The most prominent feature at 90% of the sites was a negative-going polarization evoked by a contralateral visual target. At roughly 50% of sites a negative-going polarization was observed preceding saccades, but in stop signal trials this polarization was not modulated in a manner sufficient to control saccade initiation. When saccades were canceled in stop signal trials, LFP modulation increased with the inferred magnitude of response conflict derived from the coactivation of gaze-shifting and gaze-holding neurons. At 30% of sites, a pronounced negative-going polarization occurred after errors. This negative polarity did not appear in unrewarded correct trials. Variations of response time with trial history were not related to any features of the LFP. The results provide new evidence that error-related and conflict-related but not feedback-related signals are conveyed by the LFP in the macaque SEF and are important for identifying the generator of the error-related negativity. PMID:20660423

  20. Method of correcting eddy current magnetic fields in particle accelerator vacuum chambers

    DOEpatents

    Danby, G.T.; Jackson, J.W.

    1990-03-19

    A method for correcting magnetic field aberrations produced by eddy currents induced in a particle accelerator vacuum chamber housing is provided wherein correction windings are attached to selected positions on the housing and the windings are energized by transformer action from secondary coils, which coils are inductively coupled to the poles of electro-magnets that are powered to confine the charged particle beam within a desired orbit as the charged particles are accelerated through the vacuum chamber by a particle-driving rf field. The power inductively coupled to the secondary coils varies as a function of variations in the power supplied by the particle-accelerating rf field to a beam of particles accelerated through the vacuum chamber, so the current in the energized correction coils is effective to cancel eddy current flux fields that would otherwise be induced in the vacuum chamber by power variations (dB/dt) in the particle beam.

  1. Method of correcting eddy current magnetic fields in particle accelerator vacuum chambers

    DOEpatents

    Danby, Gordon T.; Jackson, John W.

    1991-01-01

    A method for correcting magnetic field aberrations produced by eddy currents induced in a particle accelerator vacuum chamber housing is provided wherein correction windings are attached to selected positions on the housing and the windings are energized by transformer action from secondary coils, which coils are inductively coupled to the poles of electro-magnets that are powered to confine the charged particle beam within a desired orbit as the charged particles are accelerated through the vacuum chamber by a particle-driving rf field. The power inductively coupled to the secondary coils varies as a function of variations in the power supplied by the particle-accelerating rf field to a beam of particles accelerated through the vacuum chamber, so the current in the energized correction coils is effective to cancel eddy current flux fields that would otherwise be induced in the vacuum chamber by power variations in the particle beam.

  2. Creating Local Field Trips: Seeing Geographical Principles through Empirical Eyes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, James O.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses how instructors can design a local field trip for undergraduate students enrolled in an economic geography class. The purpose of the field trip is to help students observe and interpret familiar scenes in terms of geographical concepts such as central place theory, changing land use, and spatial competition. (RM)

  3. Local ionospheric corrections derived from GNSS - A case study with TerraSAR-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gisinger, Christoph; Balss, Ulrich; Cong, Xiao Ying; Steigenberger, Peter; Eineder, Michael; Pail, Roland; Hugentobler, Urs

    2013-04-01

    Germany's synthetic aperture radar (SAR) satellites TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X belong to the latest generation of radar satellites which have moved radar remote sensing to a new level. Besides being an all weather and all day imaging system, radar remote sensing offers various advanced methods like SAR interferometry or persistent scatterer interferometry that exploit magnitude and phase information of the radar signal. In order to achieve centimeter to millimeter accuracy with these advanced methods, all occurring error contributions (internal signal delay, orbit, troposphere, ionosphere, solid earth tides, loading effects, ...) have to be taken into account by applying appropriate corrections. Within the project DLR@Uni funded by the German Helmholtz Association HGF, an experimental framework at Wettzell station has been set up to perform a detailed analysis of all the corrections required for high resolution radar satellites and to achieve the goal of a 1cm precision level for absolute radar coordinates. This framework involves a 1.5 meter corner reflector (CR), a 1.5 year series of data takes from TerraSAR-X, and it makes use of the multi-sensor environment of Wettzell station. Besides Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) for orbit assessment and the local geodetic network to control the CR reference coordinates, the Wettzell GNSS receivers are used for generating tropospheric and ionospheric corrections. By comparing the reference radar times (range and azimuth) available from geodetic survey with those from the TerraSAR-X data takes, the quality of the corrections can be investigated. Although often being considered negligible for X-band observations, the conducted experiment has clearly shown the necessity for ionospheric corrections, if the capabilities of current SAR satellites are to be fully exploited. For every TerraSAR-X data take, the ionospheric impact was derived from the geometry-free linear combination of the GNSS measurements and modeled in terms of

  4. Anisotropies in magnetic field evolution and local Lyapunov exponents

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, X.Z.; Boozer, A.H.

    2000-01-13

    The natural occurrence of small scale structures and the extreme anisotropy in the evolution of a magnetic field embedded in a conducting flow is interpreted in terms of the properties of the local Lyapunov exponents along the various local characteristic (un)stable directions for the Lagrangian flow trajectories. The local Lyapunov exponents and the characteristic directions are functions of Lagrangian coordinates and time, which are completely determined once the flow field is specified. The characteristic directions that are associated with the spatial anisotropy of the problem, are prescribed in both Lagrangian and Eulerian frames. Coordinate transformation techniques are employed to relate the spatial distributions of the magnetic field, the induced current density, and the Lorentz force, which are usually followed in Eulerian frame, to those of the local Lyapunov exponents, which are naturally defined in Lagrangian coordinates.

  5. Fermion localization on two-field thick branes

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, L. B.

    2011-02-15

    In a recent paper published in this journal, Almeida and collaborators [Phys. Rev. D 79, 125022 (2009)] analyze the issue of fermion localization of fermions on a brane constructed from two scalar fields coupled with gravity (Bloch brane model). In that meritorious research the simplest Yukawa coupling {eta}{Psi}{phi}{chi}{Psi} was considered. That work does not analyze the zero mode in details. In this paper, the localization of fermions on two-field thick branes is reinvestigated. It is found that the simplest Yukawa coupling does not support the localization of fermions on the brane. In addition, the problem of fermion localization for some other Yukawa couplings are analyzed. It is shown that the zero mode for left-handed and right-handed fermions can be localized on the brane depending on the values for the coupling constant {eta} and the Bloch brane's parameter a.

  6. Local Flow Field and Slip Length of Superhydrophobic Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Schäffel, David; Koynov, Kaloian; Vollmer, Doris; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Schönecker, Clarissa

    2016-04-01

    While the global slippage of water past superhydrophobic surfaces has attracted wide interest, the local distribution of slip still remains unclear. Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we performed detailed measurements of the local flow field and slip length for water in the Cassie state on a microstructured superhydrophobic surface. We revealed that the local slip length is finite, nonconstant, anisotropic, and sensitive to the presence of surfactants. In combination with numerical calculations of the flow, we can explain all these properties by the local hydrodynamics. PMID:27081981

  7. Local and nonlocal parallel heat transport in general magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego B; Chacon, Luis

    2011-01-01

    A novel approach for the study of parallel transport in magnetized plasmas is presented. The method avoids numerical pollution issues of grid-based formulations and applies to integrable and chaotic magnetic fields with local or nonlocal parallel closures. In weakly chaotic fields, the method gives the fractal structure of the devil's staircase radial temperature profile. In fully chaotic fields, the temperature exhibits self-similar spatiotemporal evolution with a stretched-exponential scaling function for local closures and an algebraically decaying one for nonlocal closures. It is shown that, for both closures, the effective radial heat transport is incompatible with the quasilinear diffusion model.

  8. Corrected mean-field models for spatially dependent advection-diffusion-reaction phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Matthew J.; Baker, Ruth E.

    2011-05-01

    In the exclusion-process literature, mean-field models are often derived by assuming that the occupancy status of lattice sites is independent. Although this assumption is questionable, it is the foundation of many mean-field models. In this work we develop methods to relax the independence assumption for a range of discrete exclusion-process-based mechanisms motivated by applications from cell biology. Previous investigations that focused on relaxing the independence assumption have been limited to studying initially uniform populations and ignored any spatial variations. By ignoring spatial variations these previous studies were greatly simplified due to translational invariance of the lattice. These previous corrected mean-field models could not be applied to many important problems in cell biology such as invasion waves of cells that are characterized by moving fronts. Here we propose generalized methods that relax the independence assumption for spatially inhomogeneous problems, leading to corrected mean-field descriptions of a range of exclusion-process-based models that incorporate (i) unbiased motility, (ii) biased motility, and (iii) unbiased motility with agent birth and death processes. The corrected mean-field models derived here are applicable to spatially variable processes including invasion wave-type problems. We show that there can be large deviations between simulation data and traditional mean-field models based on invoking the independence assumption. Furthermore, we show that the corrected mean-field models give an improved match to the simulation data in all cases considered.

  9. Bulk from bi-locals in Thermo field CFT

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jevicki, Antal; Yoon, Junggi

    2016-02-15

    For this research, we study the Large N dynamics of the O(N) field theory in the Thermo field dynamics approach. The question of recovering the high temperature phase and the corresponding O(N) gauging is clarified. Through the associated bi-local representation we discuss the emergent bulk space-time and construction of (Higher spin) fields. In addition, we note the presence of ‘evanescent’ modes in this construction and also the mixing of spins at finite temperature.

  10. The Influence of Radiosonde 'Age' on TRMM Field Campaign Soundings Humidity Correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, Biswadev; Halverson, Jeffrey B.; Wang, Jun-Hong

    2002-01-01

    Hundreds of Vaisala sondes with a RS80-H Humicap thin-film capacitor humidity sensor were launched during the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) field campaigns in Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere held in Brazil (LBA) and in Kwajalein experiment (KWAJEX) held in the Republic of Marshall Islands. Using Six humidity error correction algorithms by Wang et al., these sondes were corrected for significant dry bias in the RS80-H data. It is further shown that sonde surface temperature error must be corrected for a better representation of the relative humidity. This error becomes prominent due to sensor arm-heating in the first 50-s data.

  11. Robust 2D phase correction for echo planar imaging under a tight field-of-view.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dan; King, Kevin F; Zur, Yuval; Hinks, R Scott

    2010-12-01

    Nyquist ghost artifacts are a serious issue in echo planar imaging. These artifacts primarily originate from phase difference between even and odd echo images and can be removed or reduced using phase correction methods. The commonly used 1D phase correction can only correct phase difference along readout axis. 2D correction is, therefore, necessary when phase difference presents along both readout and phase encoding axes. However, existing 2D methods have several unaddressed issues that affect their practicality. These issues include uncharacterized noise behavior, image artifact due to unoptimized phase estimation, Gibbs ringing artifact when directly applying to partial k(y) data, and most seriously a new image artifact under tight field-of-view (i.e., field-of-view slightly smaller than object size). All these issues are addressed in this article. Specifically, theoretical analysis of noise amplification and effect of phase estimation error is provided, and tradeoff between noise and ghost is studied. A new 2D phase correction method with improved polynomial fitting, joint homodyne processing and phase correction, compatibility with tight field-of-view is then proposed. Various results show that the proposed method can robustly generate images free of Nyquist ghosts and other image artifacts even in oblique scans or when cross-term eddy current terms are significant. PMID:20806354

  12. Electrostatic focal spot correction for x-ray tubes operating in strong magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Lillaney, Prasheel; Shin, Mihye; Hinshaw, Waldo; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: A close proximity hybrid x-ray/magnetic resonance (XMR) imaging system offers several critical advantages over current XMR system installations that have large separation distances (∼5 m) between the imaging fields of view. The two imaging systems can be placed in close proximity to each other if an x-ray tube can be designed to be immune to the magnetic fringe fields outside of the MR bore. One of the major obstacles to robust x-ray tube design is correcting for the effects of the MR fringe field on the x-ray tube focal spot. Any fringe field component orthogonal to the x-ray tube electric field leads to electron drift altering the path of the electron trajectories. Methods: The method proposed in this study to correct for the electron drift utilizes an external electric field in the direction of the drift. The electric field is created using two electrodes that are positioned adjacent to the cathode. These electrodes are biased with positive and negative potential differences relative to the cathode. The design of the focusing cup assembly is constrained primarily by the strength of the MR fringe field and high voltage standoff distances between the anode, cathode, and the bias electrodes. From these constraints, a focusing cup design suitable for the close proximity XMR system geometry is derived, and a finite element model of this focusing cup geometry is simulated to demonstrate efficacy. A Monte Carlo simulation is performed to determine any effects of the modified focusing cup design on the output x-ray energy spectrum. Results: An orthogonal fringe field magnitude of 65 mT can be compensated for using bias voltages of +15 and −20 kV. These bias voltages are not sufficient to completely correct for larger orthogonal field magnitudes. Using active shielding coils in combination with the bias electrodes provides complete correction at an orthogonal field magnitude of 88.1 mT. Introducing small fields (<10 mT) parallel to the x-ray tube electric

  13. Electrostatic focal spot correction for x-ray tubes operating in strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lillaney, Prasheel; Shin, Mihye; Hinshaw, Waldo; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: A close proximity hybrid x-ray/magnetic resonance (XMR) imaging system offers several critical advantages over current XMR system installations that have large separation distances (∼5 m) between the imaging fields of view. The two imaging systems can be placed in close proximity to each other if an x-ray tube can be designed to be immune to the magnetic fringe fields outside of the MR bore. One of the major obstacles to robust x-ray tube design is correcting for the effects of the MR fringe field on the x-ray tube focal spot. Any fringe field component orthogonal to the x-ray tube electric field leads to electron drift altering the path of the electron trajectories. Methods: The method proposed in this study to correct for the electron drift utilizes an external electric field in the direction of the drift. The electric field is created using two electrodes that are positioned adjacent to the cathode. These electrodes are biased with positive and negative potential differences relative to the cathode. The design of the focusing cup assembly is constrained primarily by the strength of the MR fringe field and high voltage standoff distances between the anode, cathode, and the bias electrodes. From these constraints, a focusing cup design suitable for the close proximity XMR system geometry is derived, and a finite element model of this focusing cup geometry is simulated to demonstrate efficacy. A Monte Carlo simulation is performed to determine any effects of the modified focusing cup design on the output x-ray energy spectrum. Results: An orthogonal fringe field magnitude of 65 mT can be compensated for using bias voltages of +15 and −20 kV. These bias voltages are not sufficient to completely correct for larger orthogonal field magnitudes. Using active shielding coils in combination with the bias electrodes provides complete correction at an orthogonal field magnitude of 88.1 mT. Introducing small fields (<10 mT) parallel to the x-ray tube electric

  14. Sparse angular CT reconstruction using non-local means based iterative-correction POCS.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jing; Ma, Jianhua; Liu, Nan; Zhang, Hua; Bian, Zhaoying; Feng, Yanqiu; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan

    2011-04-01

    In divergent-beam computed tomography (CT), sparse angular sampling frequently leads to conspicuous streak artifacts. In this paper, we propose a novel non-local means (NL-means) based iterative-correction projection onto convex sets (POCS) algorithm, named as NLMIC-POCS, for effective and robust sparse angular CT reconstruction. The motivation for using NLMIC-POCS is that NL-means filtered image can produce an acceptable priori solution for sequential POCS iterative reconstruction. The NLMIC-POCS algorithm has been tested on simulated and real phantom data. The experimental results show that the presented NLMIC-POCS algorithm can significantly improve the image quality of the sparse angular CT reconstruction in suppressing streak artifacts and preserving the edges of the image.

  15. Towards reference dosimetry for the MR-linac: magnetic field correction of the ionization chamber reading.

    PubMed

    Smit, K; van Asselen, B; Kok, J G M; Aalbers, A H L; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W

    2013-09-01

    In the UMC Utrecht a prototype MR-linac has been installed. The system consists of a 6 MV Elekta (Crawley, UK) linear accelerator and a 1.5 T Philips (Best, The Netherlands) Achieva MRI system. This paper investigates the feasibility to correct the ionization chamber reading for the magnetic field within the dosimetry calibration method described by Almond et al (1999 Med. Phys. 26 1847-70). Firstly, the feasibility of using an ionization chamber in an MR-linac was assessed by investigating possible influences of the magnetic field on NE2571 Farmer-type ionization chamber characteristics: linearity, repeatability, orientation in the magnetic field; and AAPM TG51 correction factor for voltage polarity and ion recombination. We found that these AAPM correction factors for the NE2571 chamber were not influenced by the magnetic field. Secondly, the influence of the permanent 1.5 T magnetic field on the NE2571 chamber reading was quantified. The reading is influenced by the magnetic field; therefore, a correction factor has been added. For the standardized setup used in this paper, the NE2571 chamber reading increases by 4.9% (± 0.2%) due to the transverse 1.5 T magnetic field. Dosimetry measurements in an MR-linac are feasible, if a setup-specific magnetic field correction factor (P1.5 T) for the charge reading is introduced. For the setup investigated in this paper, the P1.5 T has a value of 0.953.

  16. Towards reference dosimetry for the MR-linac: magnetic field correction of the ionization chamber reading.

    PubMed

    Smit, K; van Asselen, B; Kok, J G M; Aalbers, A H L; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W

    2013-09-01

    In the UMC Utrecht a prototype MR-linac has been installed. The system consists of a 6 MV Elekta (Crawley, UK) linear accelerator and a 1.5 T Philips (Best, The Netherlands) Achieva MRI system. This paper investigates the feasibility to correct the ionization chamber reading for the magnetic field within the dosimetry calibration method described by Almond et al (1999 Med. Phys. 26 1847-70). Firstly, the feasibility of using an ionization chamber in an MR-linac was assessed by investigating possible influences of the magnetic field on NE2571 Farmer-type ionization chamber characteristics: linearity, repeatability, orientation in the magnetic field; and AAPM TG51 correction factor for voltage polarity and ion recombination. We found that these AAPM correction factors for the NE2571 chamber were not influenced by the magnetic field. Secondly, the influence of the permanent 1.5 T magnetic field on the NE2571 chamber reading was quantified. The reading is influenced by the magnetic field; therefore, a correction factor has been added. For the standardized setup used in this paper, the NE2571 chamber reading increases by 4.9% (± 0.2%) due to the transverse 1.5 T magnetic field. Dosimetry measurements in an MR-linac are feasible, if a setup-specific magnetic field correction factor (P1.5 T) for the charge reading is introduced. For the setup investigated in this paper, the P1.5 T has a value of 0.953. PMID:23938362

  17. Towards reference dosimetry for the MR-linac: magnetic field correction of the ionization chamber reading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smit, K.; van Asselen, B.; Kok, J. G. M.; Aalbers, A. H. L.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.

    2013-09-01

    In the UMC Utrecht a prototype MR-linac has been installed. The system consists of a 6 MV Elekta (Crawley, UK) linear accelerator and a 1.5 T Philips (Best, The Netherlands) Achieva MRI system. This paper investigates the feasibility to correct the ionization chamber reading for the magnetic field within the dosimetry calibration method described by Almond et al (1999 Med. Phys. 26 1847-70). Firstly, the feasibility of using an ionization chamber in an MR-linac was assessed by investigating possible influences of the magnetic field on NE2571 Farmer-type ionization chamber characteristics: linearity, repeatability, orientation in the magnetic field; and AAPM TG51 correction factor for voltage polarity and ion recombination. We found that these AAPM correction factors for the NE2571 chamber were not influenced by the magnetic field. Secondly, the influence of the permanent 1.5 T magnetic field on the NE2571 chamber reading was quantified. The reading is influenced by the magnetic field; therefore, a correction factor has been added. For the standardized setup used in this paper, the NE2571 chamber reading increases by 4.9% (± 0.2%) due to the transverse 1.5 T magnetic field. Dosimetry measurements in an MR-linac are feasible, if a setup-specific magnetic field correction factor (P1.5 T) for the charge reading is introduced. For the setup investigated in this paper, the P1.5 T has a value of 0.953.

  18. Impurity States in Ionic Crystals: a Self-Interaction - Corrected Local Spin Density Theory Study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Koblar Alan

    1988-12-01

    While the local spin density theory (LSD) has been successfully used to calculate the electronic properties of a variety of condensed matter systems, its use does not provide an adequate description of point impurities in insulating crystals. Unphysical self-interaction effects in LSD lead to calculated one-electron properties which do not agree well with corresponding experimental properties in the limit of localized states. As an additional result of the spurious self-interactions, LSD calculations underestimate the host crystal band gaps in these systems by typically 40%. Recently the self-interaction-correction (SIC) was developed to remove the non-physical effects of electronic self-interaction from LSD. The resulting SIC-LSD theory is self-interaction free, and its use greatly improves the description of both localized states and insulator band gaps compared to uncorrected LSD. In the first part of this work, a novel method for calculating multiplet -dependent atomic wave functions in SIC-LSD is described, and calculated SIC-LSD wave functions for the quintet and triplet excited states of atomic oxygen are shown to be in excellent agreement with the corresponding Hartree-Fock wave functions, further establishing the success of SIC -LSD in calculating the properties of localized states. SIC -LSD is then applied to the NaCl:Cu^+ and LiCl:Ag^+ impurity systems. Transitions associated with the impurity ions in these systems are studied, and the calculated transition energies are found to be in good agreement with experiment. By examining the impurity state wave functions, characteristic differences between the absorption spectra for the Cu^+ and Ag^+ systems are explained.

  19. Universal thermal corrections to single interval entanglement entropy for two dimensional conformal field theories.

    PubMed

    Cardy, John; Herzog, Christopher P

    2014-05-01

    We consider single interval Rényi and entanglement entropies for a two dimensional conformal field theory on a circle at nonzero temperature. Assuming that the finite size of the system introduces a unique ground state with a nonzero mass gap, we calculate the leading corrections to the Rényi and entanglement entropy in a low temperature expansion. These corrections have a universal form for any two dimensional conformal field theory that depends only on the size of the mass gap and its degeneracy. We analyze the limits where the size of the interval becomes small and where it becomes close to the size of the spatial circle. PMID:24836236

  20. Corrections to the energy levels of a spin-zero particle bound in a strong field

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R. N.; Milstein, A. I.; Karshenboim, S. G.

    2006-01-15

    Formulas for the corrections to the energy levels and wave functions of a spin-zero particle bound in a strong field are derived. The general case of the sum of a Lorentz-scalar potential and zero component of a Lorentz-vector potential is considered. The forms of the corrections differ essentially from those for spin-(1/2) particles. As an example of application of our results, we evaluated the electric polarizability of a ground state of a spin-zero particle bound in a strong Coulomb field.

  1. Localized Dictionaries Based Orientation Field Estimation for Latent Fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Xiao Yang; Jianjiang Feng; Jie Zhou

    2014-05-01

    Dictionary based orientation field estimation approach has shown promising performance for latent fingerprints. In this paper, we seek to exploit stronger prior knowledge of fingerprints in order to further improve the performance. Realizing that ridge orientations at different locations of fingerprints have different characteristics, we propose a localized dictionaries-based orientation field estimation algorithm, in which noisy orientation patch at a location output by a local estimation approach is replaced by real orientation patch in the local dictionary at the same location. The precondition of applying localized dictionaries is that the pose of the latent fingerprint needs to be estimated. We propose a Hough transform-based fingerprint pose estimation algorithm, in which the predictions about fingerprint pose made by all orientation patches in the latent fingerprint are accumulated. Experimental results on challenging latent fingerprint datasets show the proposed method outperforms previous ones markedly.

  2. Localized Eddy Current Compensation Using Quantitative Field Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terpstra, M.; Andersen, P. M.; Gruetter, R.

    1998-03-01

    Eddy current effects induced by switched gradients in proximal conducting structures are traditionally reduced by applying preemphasis currents whose amplitudes and decay characteristics must be set to offset the eddy current fields. We present an expeditious, localized, and quantitative method for mapping and adjusting the parameters for eddy current compensation. Mapping is based on analysis of projections as used in the fast automatic shimming technique by mapping along projections (FASTMAP). Adjustment methods are demonstrated in high-field horizontal bore systems. The proposed localized eddy current mapping technique may also be used for localized measurements in situations where asymmetric conducting structures may cause nonlinear eddy current fields, such as in interventional MRI and open magnet designs.

  3. MULTI-MODE ERROR FIELD CORRECTION ON THE DIII-D TOKAMAK

    SciTech Connect

    SCOVILLE, JT; LAHAYE, RJ

    2002-10-01

    OAK A271 MULTI-MODE ERROR FIELD CORRECTION ON THE DIII-D TOKAMAK. Error field optimization on DIII-D tokamak plasma discharges has routinely been done for the last ten years with the use of the external ''n = 1 coil'' or the ''C-coil''. The optimum level of correction coil current is determined by the ability to avoid the locked mode instability and access previously unstable parameter space at low densities. The locked mode typically has toroidal and poloidal mode numbers n = 1 and m = 2, respectively, and it is this component that initially determined the correction coil current and phase. Realization of the importance of nearby n = 1 mode components m = 1 and m = 3 has led to a revision of the error field correction algorithm. Viscous and toroidal mode coupling effects suggested the need for additional terms in the expression for the radial ''penetration'' field B{sub pen} that can induce a locked mode. To incorporate these effects, the low density locked mode threshold database was expanded. A database of discharges at various toroidal fields, plasma currents, and safety factors was supplement4ed with data from an experiment in which the fields of the n = 1 coil and C-coil were combined, allowing the poloidal mode spectrum of the error field to be varied. A multivariate regression analysis of this new low density locked mode database was done to determine the low density locked mode threshold scaling relationship n{sub e} {proportional_to} B{sub T}{sup -0.01} q{sub 95}{sup -0.79} B{sub pen} and the coefficients of the poloidal mode components in the expression for B{sub pen}. Improved plasma performance is achieved by optimizing B{sub pen} by varying the applied correction coil currents.

  4. Locally oriented potential field for controlling multi-robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Roseli A. F.; Prestes, Edson; Idiart, Marco A. P.; Faria, Gedson

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we present an extension of the boundary value problem path planner (BVP PP) to control multiple robots in a robot soccer scenario. This extension is called Locally Oriented Potential Field (LOPF) and computes a potential field from the numerical solution of a BVP using local relaxations in different patches of the solution space. This permits that a single solution of the BVP endows distinct robots with different behaviors in a team. We present the steps to implement LOPF as well as several results obtained in simulation.

  5. Transformation of the dihedral corrective map for D-amino residues using the CHARMM force field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turpin, Eleanor R.; Hirst, Jonathan D.

    2012-08-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent were performed on two peptides and two proteins containing D-amino residues, using three implementations of the CHARMM22 all-atom force field: (a) with the standard CMAP corrective term, (b) neglecting the correction entirely and (c) using a transformation of the CMAP grid (φ, ψ) → (-φ, -ψ) for the D-amino residues. The transformed map led to sampling of conformations which are closest to the X-ray crystallographic structures for D-amino residues and the standard CMAP correction destabilises D-amino secondary structure. Thus, the transformation of the CMAP term is needed to simulate proteins and peptides containing D-amino residues correctly.

  6. Localized Electron Heating by Strong Guide-Field Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xuehan; Sugawara, Takumichi; Inomoto, Michiaki; Yamasaki, Kotaro; Ono, Yasushi; UTST Team

    2015-11-01

    Localized electron heating of magnetic reconnection was studied under strong guide-field (typically Bt 15Bp) using two merging spherical tokamak plasmas in Univ. Tokyo Spherical Tokamak (UTST) experiment. Our new slide-type two-dimensional Thomson scattering system documented for the first time the electron heating localized around the X-point. The region of high electron temperature, which is perpendicular to the magnetic field, was found to have a round shape with radius of 2 [cm]. Also, it was localized around the X-point and does not agree with that of energy dissipation term Et .jt . When we include a guide-field effect term Bt / (Bp + αBt) for Et .jt where α =√{ (vin2 +vout2) /v∥2 } , the energy dissipation area becomes localized around the X-point, suggesting that the electrons are accelerated by the reconnection electric field parallel to the magnetic field and thermalized around the X-point. This work was supported by JSPS A3 Foresight Program ``Innovative Tokamak Plasma Startup and Current Drive in Spherical Torus,'' a Grant-in-Aid from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Fellows 15J03758.

  7. Virtual local target method for avoiding local minimum in potential field based robot navigation.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xi-Yong; Zhu, Jing

    2003-01-01

    A novel robot navigation algorithm with global path generation capability is presented. Local minimum is a most intractable but is an encountered frequently problem in potential field based robot navigation. Through appointing appropriately some virtual local targets on the journey, it can be solved effectively. The key concept employed in this algorithm are the rules that govern when and how to appoint these virtual local targets. When the robot finds itself in danger of local minimum, a virtual local target is appointed to replace the global goal temporarily according to the rules. After the virtual target is reached, the robot continues on its journey by heading towards the global goal. The algorithm prevents the robot from running into local minima anymore. Simulation results showed that it is very effective in complex obstacle environments. PMID:12765277

  8. Virtual local target method for avoiding local minimum in potential field based robot navigation.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xi-Yong; Zhu, Jing

    2003-01-01

    A novel robot navigation algorithm with global path generation capability is presented. Local minimum is a most intractable but is an encountered frequently problem in potential field based robot navigation. Through appointing appropriately some virtual local targets on the journey, it can be solved effectively. The key concept employed in this algorithm are the rules that govern when and how to appoint these virtual local targets. When the robot finds itself in danger of local minimum, a virtual local target is appointed to replace the global goal temporarily according to the rules. After the virtual target is reached, the robot continues on its journey by heading towards the global goal. The algorithm prevents the robot from running into local minima anymore. Simulation results showed that it is very effective in complex obstacle environments.

  9. Localization and mass spectra of various matter fields on scalar-tensor brane

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Qun-Ying; Zhao, Zhen-Hua; Zhong, Yi; Yang, Jie; Zhou, Xiang-Nan

    2015-03-10

    Recently, a new scalar-tensor braneworld model was presented in [http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevD.86.127502]. It not only solves the gauge hierarchy problem but also reproduces a correct Friedmann-like equation on the brane. In this new model, there are two different brane solutions, for which the mass spectra of gravity on the brane are the same. In this paper, we investigate localization and mass spectra of various bulk matter fields (i.e., scalar, vector, Kalb-Ramond, and fermion fields) on the brane. It is shown that the zero modes of all the matter fields can be localized on the positive tension brane under some conditions, and the mass spectra of each kind of bulk matter field for the two brane solutions are different except for some special cases, which implies that the two brane solutions are not physically equivalent. When the coupling constants between the dilaton and bulk matter fields take special values, the mass spectra for both solutions are the same, and the scalar and vector zero modes are localized on the negative tension brane, while the KR zero mode is still localized on the positive tension brane.

  10. Local approximations for effective scalar field equations of motion

    SciTech Connect

    Berera, Arjun; Moss, Ian G.; Ramos, Rudnei O.

    2007-10-15

    Fluctuation and dissipation dynamics is examined at all temperature ranges for the general case of a background time evolving scalar field coupled to heavy intermediate quantum fields which in turn are coupled to light quantum fields. The evolution of the background field induces particle production from the light fields through the action of the intermediate catalyzing heavy fields. Such field configurations are generically present in most particle physics models, including grand unified and supersymmetry theories, with application of this mechanism possible in inflation, heavy ion collision, and phase transition dynamics. The effective evolution equation for the background field is obtained and a fluctuation-dissipation theorem is derived for this system. The effective evolution, in general, is nonlocal in time. Appropriate conditions are found for when these time nonlocal effects can be approximated by local terms. Here careful distinction is made between a local expansion and the special case of a derivative expansion to all orders, which requires analytic behavior of the evolution equation in Fourier space.

  11. Quantification and correction of geometric distortions in low-field MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra Robles, Juan M.; Dominguez, William; Gonzalez, Evelio R.; Berdellans, Ilse

    1999-05-01

    Geometric distortions are one of the most important degrading factors in MRI. They usually do not greatly affect the clinical relevance of images, but their correction is indispensable for lesion volume measurements, radiotherapy and surgical planning. In this work, the main sources of geometric distortion in Cuban low-field MRI systems are studied. Geometric distortion models and correction algorithms are tested by means of computer simulation using theoretical distributions of the magnetic fields. The real distributions are determined from images of a grid phantom. Calculated static field distributions showed that the system magnetic center is shifted, relative to magnet geometric center. Quantitative measurements provided inhomogeneity values (93 ppm in a spherical region of diameter 256 mm) larger than calibration data (65 ppm) obtained 15 months ago. The shim settings must be readjusted. The temporal behavior of static field was also studied. The magnet heating produces a slow time variation in static field intensity, but field error distribution proved to be stable. In the images, geometric distortions increase with increasing distance from image center and ranged from -6 to 7 mm. The implemented correction procedure reduced distortions from maximally 7 mm to the order of pixel resolution (0.8 - 1 mm).

  12. Gene flow in maize fields with different local pollen densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goggi, A. Susana; Lopez-Sanchez, Higinio; Caragea, Petrutza; Westgate, Mark; Arritt, Raymond; Clark, Craig A.

    2007-08-01

    The development of maize ( Zea mays L.) varieties as factories of pharmaceutical and industrial compounds has renewed interest in controlling pollen dispersal. The objective of this study was to compare gene flow into maize fields of different local pollen densities under the same environmental conditions. Two fields of approximately 36 ha were planted with a nontransgenic, white hybrid, in Ankeny, Iowa, USA. In the center of both fields, a 1-ha plot of a yellow-seeded stacked RR/Bt transgenic hybrid was planted as a pollen source. Before flowering, the white receiver maize of one field was detasseled in a 4:1 ratio to reduce the local pollen density (RPD). The percentage of outcross in the field with RPD was 42.2%, 6.3%, and 1.3% at 1, 10, and 35 m from the central plot, respectively. The percentage of outcross in the white maize with normal pollen density (NPD) was 30.1%, 2.7%, and 0.4%, respectively, at these distances. At distances greater than 100 m, the outcross frequency decreased below 0.1 and 0.03% in the field with RPD and NPD, respectively. A statistical model was used to compare pollen dispersal based on observed outcross percentages. The likelihood ratio test confirmed that the models of outcrossing in the two fields were significantly different ( P is practically 0). Results indicated that when local pollen is low, the incoming pollen has a competitive advantage and the level of outcross is significantly greater than when the local pollen is abundant.

  13. Local fields in solids: microscopic aspects for dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnatterly, S. E.; Tarrio, C.

    1992-04-01

    The authors offer a historical and pedagogical introduction to the local-field problem in dielectrics. They then discuss a microscopic approach to the problem and introduce momentum dependence. Finally they apply these results to electron-phonon coupling in quasi-two-dimensional systems, in particular the high-Tc superconductors.

  14. Statistical Interpretation of the Local Field Inside Dielectrics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berrera, Ruben G.; Mello, P. A.

    1982-01-01

    Compares several derivations of the Clausius-Mossotti relation to analyze consistently the nature of approximations used and their range of applicability. Also presents a statistical-mechanical calculation of the local field for classical system of harmonic oscillators interacting via the Coulomb potential. (Author/SK)

  15. Monte Carlo calculated correction factors for diodes and ion chambers in small photon fields.

    PubMed

    Czarnecki, D; Zink, K

    2013-04-21

    The application of small photon fields in modern radiotherapy requires the determination of total scatter factors Scp or field factors Ω(f(clin), f(msr))(Q(clin), Q(msr)) with high precision. Both quantities require the knowledge of the field-size-dependent and detector-dependent correction factor k(f(clin), f(msr))(Q(clin), Q(msr)). The aim of this study is the determination of the correction factor k(f(clin), f(msr))(Q(clin), Q(msr)) for different types of detectors in a clinical 6 MV photon beam of a Siemens KD linear accelerator. The EGSnrc Monte Carlo code was used to calculate the dose to water and the dose to different detectors to determine the field factor as well as the mentioned correction factor for different small square field sizes. Besides this, the mean water to air stopping power ratio as well as the ratio of the mean energy absorption coefficients for the relevant materials was calculated for different small field sizes. As the beam source, a Monte Carlo based model of a Siemens KD linear accelerator was used. The results show that in the case of ionization chambers the detector volume has the largest impact on the correction factor k(f(clin), f(msr))(Q(clin), Q(msr)); this perturbation may contribute up to 50% to the correction factor. Field-dependent changes in stopping-power ratios are negligible. The magnitude of k(f(clin), f(msr))(Q(clin), Q(msr)) is of the order of 1.2 at a field size of 1 × 1 cm(2) for the large volume ion chamber PTW31010 and is still in the range of 1.05-1.07 for the PinPoint chambers PTW31014 and PTW31016. For the diode detectors included in this study (PTW60016, PTW 60017), the correction factor deviates no more than 2% from unity in field sizes between 10 × 10 and 1 × 1 cm(2), but below this field size there is a steep decrease of k(f(clin), f(msr))(Q(clin), Q(msr)) below unity, i.e. a strong overestimation of dose. Besides the field size and detector dependence, the results reveal a clear dependence of the

  16. Locally smeared operator product expansions in scalar field theory

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Monahan, Christopher; Orginos, Kostas

    2015-04-01

    We propose a new locally smeared operator product expansion to decompose non-local operators in terms of a basis of smeared operators. The smeared operator product expansion formally connects nonperturbative matrix elements determined numerically using lattice field theory to matrix elements of non-local operators in the continuum. These nonperturbative matrix elements do not suffer from power-divergent mixing on the lattice, which significantly complicates calculations of quantities such as the moments of parton distribution functions, provided the smearing scale is kept fixed in the continuum limit. The presence of this smearing scale complicates the connection to the Wilson coefficients of the standardmore » operator product expansion and requires the construction of a suitable formalism. We demonstrate the feasibility of our approach with examples in real scalar field theory.« less

  17. Locally smeared operator product expansions in scalar field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Monahan, Christopher; Orginos, Kostas

    2015-04-01

    We propose a new locally smeared operator product expansion to decompose non-local operators in terms of a basis of smeared operators. The smeared operator product expansion formally connects nonperturbative matrix elements determined numerically using lattice field theory to matrix elements of non-local operators in the continuum. These nonperturbative matrix elements do not suffer from power-divergent mixing on the lattice, which significantly complicates calculations of quantities such as the moments of parton distribution functions, provided the smearing scale is kept fixed in the continuum limit. The presence of this smearing scale complicates the connection to the Wilson coefficients of the standard operator product expansion and requires the construction of a suitable formalism. We demonstrate the feasibility of our approach with examples in real scalar field theory.

  18. Localized input fields in rigorous coupled-wave analysis.

    PubMed

    Auer, Maximilian; Brenner, Karl-Heinz

    2014-11-01

    We introduce a new treatment for localized input fields in coupled-wave theory. It consists of a combination of angular spectrum decomposition and a cyclic formulation of rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA), which does not require the computation of several standard RCWA calculations. The cyclic approach especially concerns the definition of the convolution matrix of the permittivity and enables the processing of multiple input plane waves in a single RCWA calculation. At the same time it ensures physically meaningful simulation results for finite truncation limits and thus inherently conserves energy. By adapting the three-dimensional (3D)-RCWA algorithm to efficiently simulate the effects of localized and arbitrarily polarized input fields to 3D volume gratings, various advanced diffraction problems such as fiber coupling, the influence of distorted plane waves, or the effects of focused beams on diffraction gratings can be investigated. Therefore, the impact of this work should concern many fields of application.

  19. Quantum entanglement of local operators in conformal field theories.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Masahiro; Numasawa, Tokiro; Takayanagi, Tadashi

    2014-03-21

    We introduce a series of quantities which characterize a given local operator in any conformal field theory from the viewpoint of quantum entanglement. It is defined by the increased amount of (Rényi) entanglement entropy at late time for an excited state defined by acting the local operator on the vacuum. We consider a conformal field theory on an infinite space and take the subsystem in the definition of the entanglement entropy to be its half. We calculate these quantities for a free massless scalar field theory in two, four and six dimensions. We find that these results are interpreted in terms of quantum entanglement of a finite number of states, including Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen states. They agree with a heuristic picture of propagations of entangled particles.

  20. Empirical Corrections to the Amber RNA Force Field with Target Metadynamics.

    PubMed

    Gil-Ley, Alejandro; Bottaro, Sandro; Bussi, Giovanni

    2016-06-14

    The computational study of conformational transitions in nucleic acids still faces many challenges. For example, in the case of single stranded RNA tetranucleotides, agreement between simulations and experiments is not satisfactory due to inaccuracies in the force fields commonly used in molecular dynamics simulations. We here use experimental data collected from high-resolution X-ray structures to attempt an improvement of the latest version of the AMBER force field. A modified metadynamics algorithm is used to calculate correcting potentials designed to enforce experimental distributions of backbone torsion angles. Replica-exchange simulations of tetranucleotides including these correcting potentials show significantly better agreement with independent solution experiments for the oligonucleotides containing pyrimidine bases. Although the proposed corrections do not seem to be portable to generic RNA systems, the simulations revealed the importance of the α and ζ backbone angles for the modulation of the RNA conformational ensemble. The correction protocol presented here suggests a systematic procedure for force-field refinement. PMID:27153317

  1. Empirical Corrections to the Amber RNA Force Field with Target Metadynamics

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The computational study of conformational transitions in nucleic acids still faces many challenges. For example, in the case of single stranded RNA tetranucleotides, agreement between simulations and experiments is not satisfactory due to inaccuracies in the force fields commonly used in molecular dynamics simulations. We here use experimental data collected from high-resolution X-ray structures to attempt an improvement of the latest version of the AMBER force field. A modified metadynamics algorithm is used to calculate correcting potentials designed to enforce experimental distributions of backbone torsion angles. Replica-exchange simulations of tetranucleotides including these correcting potentials show significantly better agreement with independent solution experiments for the oligonucleotides containing pyrimidine bases. Although the proposed corrections do not seem to be portable to generic RNA systems, the simulations revealed the importance of the α and ζ backbone angles for the modulation of the RNA conformational ensemble. The correction protocol presented here suggests a systematic procedure for force-field refinement. PMID:27153317

  2. Validation of Regression-Based Myogenic Correction Techniques for Scalp and Source-Localized EEG

    PubMed Central

    McMenamin, Brenton W.; Shackman, Alexander J.; Maxwell, Jeffrey S.; Greischar, Lawrence L.; Davidson, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    EEG and EEG source-estimation are susceptible to electromyographic artifacts (EMG) generated by the cranial muscles. EMG can mask genuine effects or masquerade as a legitimate effect - even in low frequencies, such as alpha (8–13Hz). Although regression-based correction has been used previously, only cursory attempts at validation exist and the utility for source-localized data is unknown. To address this, EEG was recorded from 17 participants while neurogenic and myogenic activity were factorially varied. We assessed the sensitivity and specificity of four regression-based techniques: between-subjects, between-subjects using difference-scores, within-subjects condition-wise, and within-subject epoch-wise on the scalp and in data modeled using the LORETA algorithm. Although within-subject epoch-wise showed superior performance on the scalp, no technique succeeded in the source-space. Aside from validating the novel epoch-wise methods on the scalp, we highlight methods requiring further development. PMID:19298626

  3. Heel effect adaptive flat field correction of digital x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yongjian; Wang, Jue

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Anode heel effect renders large-scale background nonuniformities in digital radiographs. Conventional offset/gain calibration is performed at mono source-to-image distance (SID), and disregards the SID-dependent characteristic of heel effect. It results in a residual nonuniform background in the corrected radiographs when the SID settings for calibration and correction differ. In this work, the authors develop a robust and efficient computational method for digital x-ray detector gain correction adapted to SID-variant heel effect, without resorting to physical filters, phantoms, complicated heel effect models, or multiple-SID calibration and interpolation.Methods: The authors present the Duo-SID projection correction method. In our approach, conventional offset/gain calibrations are performed only twice, at the minimum and maximum SIDs of the system in typical clinical use. A fast iterative separation algorithm is devised to extract the detector gain and basis heel patterns from the min/max SID calibrations. The resultant detector gain is independent of SID, while the basis heel patterns are parameterized by the min- and max-SID. The heel pattern at any SID is obtained from the min-SID basis heel pattern via projection imaging principles. The system gain desired at a specific acquisition SID is then constructed using the projected heel pattern and detector gain map.Results: The method was evaluated for flat field and anatomical phantom image corrections. It demonstrated promising improvements over interpolation and conventional gain calibration/correction methods, lowering their correction errors by approximately 70% and 80%, respectively. The separation algorithm was able to extract the detector gain and heel patterns with less than 2% error, and the Duo-SID corrected images showed perceptually appealing uniform background across the detector.Conclusions: The Duo-SID correction method has substantially improved on conventional offset/gain corrections for

  4. Localization of disordered bosons and magnets in random fields

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xiaoquan; Müller, Markus

    2013-10-15

    We study localization properties of disordered bosons and spins in random fields at zero temperature. We focus on two representatives of different symmetry classes, hard-core bosons (XY magnets) and Ising magnets in random transverse fields, and contrast their physical properties. We describe localization properties using a locator expansion on general lattices. For 1d Ising chains, we find non-analytic behavior of the localization length as a function of energy at ω=0, ξ{sup −1}(ω)=ξ{sup −1}(0)+A|ω|{sup α}, with α vanishing at criticality. This contrasts with the much smoother behavior predicted for XY magnets. We use these results to approach the ordering transition on Bethe lattices of large connectivity K, which mimic the limit of high dimensionality. In both models, in the paramagnetic phase with uniform disorder, the localization length is found to have a local maximum at ω=0. For the Ising model, we find activated scaling at the phase transition, in agreement with infinite randomness studies. In the Ising model long range order is found to arise due to a delocalization and condensation initiated at ω=0, without a closing mobility gap. We find that Ising systems establish order on much sparser (fractal) subgraphs than XY models. Possible implications of these results for finite-dimensional systems are discussed. -- Highlights: •Study of localization properties of disordered bosons and spins in random fields. •Comparison between XY magnets (hard-core bosons) and Ising magnets. •Analysis of the nature of the magnetic transition in strong quenched disorder. •Ising magnets: activated scaling, no closing mobility gap at the transition. •Ising order emerges on sparser (fractal) support than XY order.

  5. Spectral investigation of nonlinear local field effects in Ag nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Rodrigo Takeda, Yoshihiko; Ohnuma, Masato; Oyoshi, Keiji

    2015-03-21

    The capability of Ag nanoparticles to modulate their optical resonance condition, by optical nonlinearity, without an external feedback system was experimentally demonstrated. These optical nonlinearities were studied in the vicinity of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), using femtosecond pump-and-probe spectroscopy with a white-light continuum probe. Transient transmission changes ΔT/T exhibited strong photon energy and particle size dependence and showed a complex and non-monotonic change with increasing pump light intensity. Peak position and change of sign redshift with increasing pump light intensity demonstrate the modulation of the LSPR. These features are discussed in terms of the intrinsic feedback via local field enhancement.

  6. Importance of far-field Topographic and Isostatic corrections for regional density modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szwillus, Ebbing, Holzrichter

    2016-07-01

    The long-wavelength gravity field contains information about processes in the sub-lithospheric mantle. As satellite-derived gravity models now provide the long to medium-wavelength gravity field at unprecedented accuracy, techniques used to process gravity data need to be updated. We show that when determining these long-wavelengths, the treatment of topographic and isostatic effects is a likely source of error. We constructed a global isostatic model and calculated global topographic and isostatic effect. These calculations were done for ground stations as well as stations at satellite height. We considered both gravity and gravity gradients. Using these results, we determined how much of the gravity signal comes from distant sources. We find that a significant long-wavelength bias is introduced if far-field effects on the topographic effect are neglected. However, due to isostatic compensation far-field effects of the topographic effect are to a large degree compensated by the far-field isostatic effect. This means that far-field effects can be reduced effectively by always considering topographic masses together with their compensating isostatic masses. We show that to correctly represent the ultra-long wavelengths, a global background model should be used. This is demonstrated both globally and for a continental-scale case area in North America. In the case of regional modeling, where the ultra-long wavelengths are not of prime importance, gravity gradients can be used to help minimize correction errors caused by far-field effects.

  7. Importance of far-field topographic and isostatic corrections for regional density modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szwillus, Wolfgang; Ebbing, Jörg; Holzrichter, Nils

    2016-10-01

    The long-wavelength gravity field contains information about processes in the sublithospheric mantle. As satellite-derived gravity models now provide the long to medium-wavelength gravity field at unprecedented accuracy, techniques used to process gravity data need to be updated. We show that when determining these long-wavelengths, the treatment of topographic-isostatic effect (TIE) and isostatic effects (IE) is a likely source of error. We constructed a global isostatic model and calculated global TIE and IE. These calculations were done for ground stations as well as stations at satellite height. We considered both gravity and gravity gradients. Using these results, we determined how much of the gravity signal comes from distant sources. We find that a significant long-wavelength bias is introduced if far-field effects on the topographic effect are neglected. However, due to isostatic compensation far-field effects of the topographic effect are to a large degree compensated by the far-field IE. This means that far-field effects can be reduced effectively by always considering topographic masses together with their compensating isostatic masses. We show that to correctly represent the ultra-long wavelengths, a global background model should be used. This is demonstrated both globally and for a continental-scale case area in North America. In the case of regional modelling, where the ultra-long wavelengths are not of prime importance, gravity gradients can be used to help minimize correction errors caused by far-field effects.

  8. Effect Of Various Parameters On Field Uniformity Corrections In Scintillation Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olch, Arthur J.; Graham, L. S.; Uszler, J. M.; Holly, F. E.

    1980-12-01

    Many Anger scintillation cameras are equipped with microprocessors for live correction of field nonuniformities. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the corrected flood field uniformity after varying count rate, analyzer window size, analyzer window position, and scatter. A 2.54 cm thick Tc-99m disk source was used with large and small field Anger cameras under conditions simulating clinical usage. Uniformity was evaluated quantitatively by computing the location and percentage of cells in a 64X64 matrix that were within +/-5% of the mean cell count; it was judged qualitatively by examination of the computer thresholded image. The corrected 2.54 cm thick Tc-99m disk flood image showed virtually no change in uniformity as scatter medium was increased from 0 cm to 8.9 cm. When count rate was varied from 5K to 44K cps as much as a 13% decrease in field uniformity was observed. Changing the analyzer window size produced a 5-21% decrease in uniformity while changing the window position resulted in even more significant image degradation. Knowledge of these camera characteristics is important in improving clinical images.

  9. Measuring Earth's Local Magnetic Field Using a Helmholtz Coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jonathan E.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, I present a low-cost interactive experiment for measuring the strength of Earth's local magnetic field. This activity can be done in most high schools or two-year physics laboratories with limited resources, yet will have a tremendous learning impact. This experiment solidifies the three-dimensional nature of Earth's magnetic field vector and helps reinforce the aspect of the vertical component of Earth's magnetic field. Students should realize that Earth's magnetic field is not fully horizontal (except at the magnetic equator) and that a compass simply indicates the direction of the horizontal component of Earth's magnetic field. A magnetic dip needle compass can be used to determine the angle (known as the "dip angle" or "inclination angle") measured from the direction in which Earth's magnetic field vector points to the horizontal. In this activity, students will be able to determine the horizontal component of the field using a Helmholtz coil and, knowing the dip angle, the Earth's magnetic field strength can be determined.

  10. Fate of Extended States and Localization Transition at Weak Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kun

    1997-03-01

    The reconciliation between the nonexistence of extended states in two dimensions in zero magnetic field, and the existence of critical energies in the high field limit, first addressed qualitatively (D. E. Khmelnitskii, Phys. Lett. A 106), 182 (1984); R. B. Laughlin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 52, 2304 (1984). a decade ago, has reemerged as a subject of considerable interest and debate, following experimental investigations in the two dimensional electron gas at low fields. We have addressed the problem on two fronts. For strong magnetic fields, where Landau level mixing effects are weak, we have developed a systematic analytic expansion in powers of 1\\over B. (F. D. M. Haldane and Kun Yang, Phys. Rev. Lett. 78), to appear. We find the dominant level repulsion effect (of order 1\\over B^2), lowers the energies of typical states in a Landau band. The critical energies, however, are not affected at this order. In contrast, we find that, the extended state energies levitates to order 1\\over B^3, thus reconciling levitation of extended states with level repulsion due to Landau level mixing. In the regime of weak magnetic field and strong Landau level mixing, where the perturbative approach is not applicable, we have performed a numerical study on lattice models, (Kun Yang and R. N. Bhatt, Phys. Rev. Lett. 76), 1316 (1996). which provides evidence for this levitation at weak magnetic field. Furthermore, we obtain a localization transition to an insulating phase at weak field, and a finite size scaling analysis shows that the localization length diverges at this transition with an exponent that is the same as that of the plateau transitions in the strong field regime, ν≈ 2.3. Relations between our theoretical results and experimental findings will be discussed.

  11. Riemann correlator in de Sitter including loop corrections from conformal fields

    SciTech Connect

    Fröb, Markus B.; Verdaguer, Enric

    2014-07-01

    The Riemann correlator with appropriately raised indices characterizes in a gauge-invariant way the quantum metric fluctuations around de Sitter spacetime including loop corrections from matter fields. Specializing to conformal fields and employing a method that selects the de Sitter-invariant vacuum in the Poincaré patch, we obtain the exact result for the Riemann correlator through order H{sup 4}/m{sub p}{sup 4}. The result is expressed in a manifestly de Sitter-invariant form in terms of maximally symmetric bitensors. Its behavior for both short and long distances (sub- and superhorizon scales) is analyzed in detail. Furthermore, by carefully taking the flat-space limit, the explicit result for the Riemann correlator for metric fluctuations around Minkowki spacetime is also obtained. Although the main focus is on free scalar fields (our calculation corresponds then to one-loop order in the matter fields), the result for general conformal field theories is also derived.

  12. A Modified Brain MR Image Segmentation and Bias Field Estimation Model Based on Local and Global Information

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Wang; Luan, Kuan; Liang, Hong; Ma, Xingcheng

    2016-01-01

    Because of the poor radio frequency coil uniformity and gradient-driven eddy currents, there is much noise and intensity inhomogeneity (bias) in brain magnetic resonance (MR) image, and it severely affects the segmentation accuracy. Better segmentation results are difficult to achieve by traditional methods; therefore, in this paper, a modified brain MR image segmentation and bias field estimation model based on local and global information is proposed. We first construct local constraints including image neighborhood information in Gaussian kernel mapping space, and then the complete regularization is established by introducing nonlocal spatial information of MR image. The weighting between local and global information is automatically adjusted according to image local information. At the same time, bias field information is coupled with the model, and it makes the model reduce noise interference but also can effectively estimate the bias field information. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm has strong robustness to noise and bias field is well corrected. PMID:27660649

  13. A Modified Brain MR Image Segmentation and Bias Field Estimation Model Based on Local and Global Information

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Wang; Luan, Kuan; Liang, Hong; Ma, Xingcheng

    2016-01-01

    Because of the poor radio frequency coil uniformity and gradient-driven eddy currents, there is much noise and intensity inhomogeneity (bias) in brain magnetic resonance (MR) image, and it severely affects the segmentation accuracy. Better segmentation results are difficult to achieve by traditional methods; therefore, in this paper, a modified brain MR image segmentation and bias field estimation model based on local and global information is proposed. We first construct local constraints including image neighborhood information in Gaussian kernel mapping space, and then the complete regularization is established by introducing nonlocal spatial information of MR image. The weighting between local and global information is automatically adjusted according to image local information. At the same time, bias field information is coupled with the model, and it makes the model reduce noise interference but also can effectively estimate the bias field information. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm has strong robustness to noise and bias field is well corrected.

  14. Scalar field cosmology via non-local integrals of motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimakis, N.

    2016-08-01

    In re-parametrization invariant systems, such as mini-superspace Lagrangians, the existence of constraints can lead to the emergence of additional non-local integrals of motion defined in phase space. In the case of a FLRW flat/non-flat space-time minimally coupled to an arbitrary scalar field, we manage to use such conserved quantities to completely integrate the system of equations of motion. This is achieved without constraining the potential in any way. Thus, obtaining the most general solution that encompasses all possible cosmological scenarios which can be based on the existence of a scalar field.

  15. Orientation correlation and local field in liquid nitrobenzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, David P.

    2016-06-01

    Hyper-Rayleigh scattering (HRS) is sensitive to long-range molecular orientation correlation in isotropic liquids composed of dipolar molecules. Measurements of the polarization, angle, and spectral dependence for HRS from liquid nitrobenzene (NB) are analyzed to determine the NB molecular orientation correlations at long range. The longitudinal and transverse orientation correlation functions for r > 3 nm are BL(r) = (a/r)3 and BT(r) = - BL(r)/2, where a = 0.20 ± 0.01 nm. Measurements of HRS induced by dissolved ions are also analyzed and combined with molecular dynamics simulation and dielectric response results, to determine the molecular dipole moment μ = 3.90 ± 0.04 D, Kirkwood orientation correlation factor gK = 0.68 ± 0.02, and local field factor f(0) = 0.85 ± 0.04 × Onsager local field factor in liquid nitrobenzene.

  16. Markov random field and Gaussian mixture for segmented MRI-based partial volume correction in PET.

    PubMed

    Bousse, Alexandre; Pedemonte, Stefano; Thomas, Benjamin A; Erlandsson, Kjell; Ourselin, Sébastien; Arridge, Simon; Hutton, Brian F

    2012-10-21

    In this paper we propose a segmented magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) prior-based maximum penalized likelihood deconvolution technique for positron emission tomography (PET) images. The model assumes the existence of activity classes that behave like a hidden Markov random field (MRF) driven by the segmented MRI. We utilize a mean field approximation to compute the likelihood of the MRF. We tested our method on both simulated and clinical data (brain PET) and compared our results with PET images corrected with the re-blurred Van Cittert (VC) algorithm, the simplified Guven (SG) algorithm and the region-based voxel-wise (RBV) technique. We demonstrated our algorithm outperforms the VC algorithm and outperforms SG and RBV corrections when the segmented MRI is inconsistent (e.g. mis-segmentation, lesions, etc) with the PET image.

  17. Systematic 1{ital /N} corrections for bosonic and fermionic vector models without auxiliary fields

    SciTech Connect

    de Mello Koch, R.; Rodrigues, J.P.

    1996-12-01

    In this paper, colorless bilocal fields are employed to study the large {ital N} limit of both fermionic and bosonic vector models. The Jacobian associated with the change of variables from the original fields to the bilocals is computed exactly, thereby providing an exact effective action. This effective action is shown to reproduce the familiar perturbative expansion for the two and four point functions. In particular, in the case of fermionic vector models, the effective action accounts correctly for the Fermi statistics. The theory also is studied nonperturbatively. The stationary points of the effective action are shown to provide the usual large {ital N} gap equations. The homogeneous equation associated with the quadratic (in the bilocals) action is simply the two particle Bethe-Salpeter equation. Finally, the leading correction in 1/{ital N} is shown to be in agreement with the exact {ital S} matrix of the model. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  18. The local dayside reconnection rate for oblique interplanetary magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komar, C. M.; Cassak, P. A.

    2016-06-01

    We present an analysis of local properties of magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause for various interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientations in global magnetospheric simulations. This has heretofore not been practical because it is difficult to locate where reconnection occurs for oblique IMF, but new techniques make this possible. The approach is to identify magnetic separators, the curves separating four regions of differing magnetic topology, which map the reconnection X line. The electric field parallel to the X line is the local reconnection rate. We compare results to a simple model of local two-dimensional asymmetric reconnection. To do so, we find the plasma parameters that locally drive reconnection in the magnetosheath and magnetosphere in planes perpendicular to the X line at a large number of points along the X line. The global magnetohydrodynamic simulations are from the three-dimensional Block-Adaptive, Tree Solarwind Roe-type Upwind Scheme (BATS-R-US) code with a uniform resistivity, although the techniques described here are extensible to any global magnetospheric simulation model. We find that the predicted local reconnection rates scale well with the measured values for all simulations, being nearly exact for due southward IMF. However, the absolute predictions differ by an undetermined constant of proportionality, whose magnitude increases as the IMF clock angle changes from southward to northward. We also show similar scaling agreement in a simulation with oblique southward IMF and a dipole tilt. The present results will be an important component of a full understanding of the local and global properties of dayside reconnection.

  19. The Local Stellar Velocity Field via Vector Spherical Harmonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makarov, V. V.; Murphy, D. W.

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the local field of stellar tangential velocities for a sample of 42,339 nonbinary Hipparcos stars with accurate parallaxes, using a vector spherical harmonic formalism.We derive simple relations between the parameters of the classical linear model (Ogorodnikov-Milne) of the local systemic field and low-degree terms of the general vector harmonic decomposition. Taking advantage of these relationships, we determine the solar velocity with respect to the local stars of (V(sub X), V(sub Y), V(sub Z)) = (10.5, 18.5, 7.3) +/- 0.1 km s(exp -1) not for the asymmetric drift with respect to the local standard of rest. If only stars more distant than 100 pc are considered, the peculiar solar motion is (V(sub X), V(sub Y), V(sub Z)) = (9.9, 15.6, 6.9) +/- 0.2 km s(exp -1). The adverse effects of harmonic leakage, which occurs between the reflex solar motion represented by the three electric vector harmonics in the velocity space and higher degree harmonics in the proper-motion space, are eliminated in our analysis by direct subtraction of the reflex solar velocity in its tangential components for each star...

  20. Evaluation of tumor localization in respiration motion-corrected cone-beam CT: Prospective study in lung

    SciTech Connect

    Dzyubak, Oleksandr; Kincaid, Russell; Hertanto, Agung; Hu, Yu-Chi; Pham, Hai; Yorke, Ellen; Zhang, Qinghui; Mageras, Gig S.; Rimner, Andreas

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: Target localization accuracy of cone-beam CT (CBCT) images used in radiation treatment of respiratory disease sites is affected by motion artifacts (blurring and streaking). The authors have previously reported on a method of respiratory motion correction in thoracic CBCT at end expiration (EE). The previous retrospective study was limited to examination of reducing motion artifacts in a small number of patient cases. They report here on a prospective study in a larger group of lung cancer patients to evaluate respiratory motion-corrected (RMC)-CBCT ability to improve lung tumor localization accuracy and reduce motion artifacts in Linac-mounted CBCT images. A second study goal examines whether the motion correction derived from a respiration-correlated CT (RCCT) at simulation yields similar tumor localization accuracy at treatment. Methods: In an IRB-approved study, 19 lung cancer patients (22 tumors) received a RCCT at simulation, and on one treatment day received a RCCT, a respiratory-gated CBCT at end expiration, and a 1-min CBCT. A respiration monitor of abdominal displacement was used during all scans. In addition to a CBCT reconstruction without motion correction, the motion correction method was applied to the same 1-min scan. Projection images were sorted into ten bins based on abdominal displacement, and each bin was reconstructed to produce ten intermediate CBCT images. Each intermediate CBCT was deformed to the end expiration state using a motion model derived from RCCT. The deformed intermediate CBCT images were then added to produce a final RMC-CBCT. In order to evaluate the second study goal, the CBCT was corrected in two ways, one using a model derived from the RCCT at simulation [RMC-CBCT(sim)], the other from the RCCT at treatment [RMC-CBCT(tx)]. Image evaluation compared uncorrected CBCT, RMC-CBCT(sim), and RMC-CBCT(tx). The gated CBCT at end expiration served as the criterion standard for comparison. Using automatic rigid image

  1. Relative localization in wireless sensor networks for measurement of electric fields under HVDC transmission lines.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yong; Wang, Qiusheng; Yuan, Haiwen; Song, Xiao; Hu, Xuemin; Zhao, Luxing

    2015-01-01

    In the wireless sensor networks (WSNs) for electric field measurement system under the High-Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) transmission lines, it is necessary to obtain the electric field distribution with multiple sensors. The location information of each sensor is essential to the correct analysis of measurement results. Compared with the existing approach which gathers the location information by manually labelling sensors during deployment, the automatic localization can reduce the workload and improve the measurement efficiency. A novel and practical range-free localization algorithm for the localization of one-dimensional linear topology wireless networks in the electric field measurement system is presented. The algorithm utilizes unknown nodes' neighbor lists based on the Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI) values to determine the relative locations of nodes. The algorithm is able to handle the exceptional situation of the output permutation which can effectively improve the accuracy of localization. The performance of this algorithm under real circumstances has been evaluated through several experiments with different numbers of nodes and different node deployments in the China State Grid HVDC test base. Results show that the proposed algorithm achieves an accuracy of over 96% under different conditions.

  2. Relative localization in wireless sensor networks for measurement of electric fields under HVDC transmission lines.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yong; Wang, Qiusheng; Yuan, Haiwen; Song, Xiao; Hu, Xuemin; Zhao, Luxing

    2015-01-01

    In the wireless sensor networks (WSNs) for electric field measurement system under the High-Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) transmission lines, it is necessary to obtain the electric field distribution with multiple sensors. The location information of each sensor is essential to the correct analysis of measurement results. Compared with the existing approach which gathers the location information by manually labelling sensors during deployment, the automatic localization can reduce the workload and improve the measurement efficiency. A novel and practical range-free localization algorithm for the localization of one-dimensional linear topology wireless networks in the electric field measurement system is presented. The algorithm utilizes unknown nodes' neighbor lists based on the Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI) values to determine the relative locations of nodes. The algorithm is able to handle the exceptional situation of the output permutation which can effectively improve the accuracy of localization. The performance of this algorithm under real circumstances has been evaluated through several experiments with different numbers of nodes and different node deployments in the China State Grid HVDC test base. Results show that the proposed algorithm achieves an accuracy of over 96% under different conditions. PMID:25658390

  3. Automatic NMO Correction and Full Common Depth Point NMO Velocity Field Estimation in Anisotropic Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedek, Mohamed; Gross, Lutz; Tyson, Stephen

    2016-07-01

    We present a new computational method of automatic normal moveout (NMO) correction that not only accurately flattens and corrects the far offset data, but simultaneously provides NMO velocity (v_nmo ) for each individual seismic trace. The method is based on a predefined number of NMO velocity sweeps using linear vertical interpolation of different NMO velocities at each seismic trace. At each sweep, we measure the semblance between the zero offset trace (pilot trace) and the next seismic trace using a trace-by-trace rather than sample-by-sample based semblance measure; then after all the sweeps are done, the one with the maximum semblance value is chosen, which is assumed to be the most suitable NMO velocity trace that accurately flattens seismic reflection events. Other traces follow the same process, and a final velocity field is then extracted. Isotropic, anisotropic and lateral heterogenous synthetic geological models were built to test the method. A range of synthetic background noise, ranging from 10 to 30 %, was applied to the models. In addition, the method was tested on Hess's VTI (vertical transverse isotropy) model. Furthermore, we tested our method on a real pre-stack seismic CDP gathered from a gas field in Alaska. The results from the presented examples show an excellent NMO correction and extracted a reasonably accurate NMO velocity field.

  4. Numerical simulations of localized high field 1H MR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Lana G.; Young, Karl; Matson, Gerald B.

    2008-11-01

    The limited bandwidths of volume selective RF pulses in localized in vivo MRS experiments introduce spatial artifacts that complicate spectral quantification of J-coupled metabolites. These effects are commonly referred to as a spatial interference or "four compartment" artifacts and are more pronounced at higher field strengths. The main focus of this study is to develop a generalized approach to numerical simulations that combines full density matrix calculations with 3D localization to investigate the spatial artifacts and to provide accurate prior knowledge for spectral fitting. Full density matrix calculations with 3D localization using experimental pulses were carried out for PRESS (TE = 20, 70 ms), STEAM (TE = 20, 70 ms) and LASER (TE = 70 ms) pulse sequences and compared to non-localized simulations and to phantom solution data at 4 T. Additional simulations at 1.5 and 7 T were carried out for STEAM and PRESS (TE = 20 ms). Four brain metabolites that represented a range from weak to strong J-coupling networks were included in the simulations (lactate, N-acetylaspartate, glutamate and myo-inositol). For longer TE, full 3D localization was necessary to achieve agreement between the simulations and phantom solution spectra for the majority of cases in all pulse sequence simulations. For short echo time (TE = 20 ms), ideal pulses without localizing gradients gave results that were in agreement with phantom results at 4 T for STEAM, but not for PRESS (TE = 20). Numerical simulations that incorporate volume localization using experimental RF pulses are shown to be a powerful tool for generation of accurate metabolic basis sets for spectral fitting and for optimization of experimental parameters.

  5. Field inhomogeneity correction using partial differential phases in magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Young-Joong; Park, Jinho; Yoon, Jong-Hyun; Ahn, Chang-Beom

    2015-05-01

    Correction of an inhomogeneous magnetic field is proposed using partial differential phases in magnetic resonance imaging. Estimation of the inhomogeneous magnetic field from a measured phase is not an easy task due to phase wrapping and chemical-dependent phase shifts. Using the proposed partial differential phase technique, such problems are resolved. The proposed technique uses most of the 3D pixel data regardless of chemical compounds for the estimation of the inhomogeneous magnetic field. A large number of partial difference data compared to the number of expansion terms for the model of inhomogeneous magnetic field provides a very stable estimation, robust to noise. The technique is applicable to in vivo shimming, water-fat imaging, eddy current compensation, and most phase-related measurements and imaging. The efficacy of the proposed technique is demonstrated with in vivo water-fat imaging.

  6. Noncommutative correction to Aharonov-Bohm scattering: A field theory approach

    SciTech Connect

    Anacleto, M.A.; Gomes, M.; Silva, A.J. da; Spehler, D.

    2004-10-15

    We study a noncommutative nonrelativistic theory in 2+1 dimensions of a scalar field coupled to the Chern-Simons field. In the commutative situation this model has been used to simulate the Aharonov-Bohm effect in the field theory context. We verified that, contrary to the commutative result, the inclusion of a quartic self-interaction of the scalar field is not necessary to secure the ultraviolet renormalizability of the model. However, to obtain a smooth commutative limit the presence of a quartic gauge invariant self-interaction is required. For small noncommutativity we fix the corrections to the Aharonov-Bohm scattering and prove that up to one loop the model is free from dangerous infrared/ultraviolet divergences.

  7. Local non-Calderbank-Shor-Steane quantum error-correcting code on a three-dimensional lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Isaac H.

    2011-05-01

    We present a family of non-Calderbank-Shor-Steane quantum error-correcting code consisting of geometrically local stabilizer generators on a 3D lattice. We study the Hamiltonian constructed from ferromagnetic interaction of overcomplete set of local stabilizer generators. The degenerate ground state of the system is characterized by a quantum error-correcting code whose number of encoded qubits are equal to the second Betti number of the manifold. These models (i) have solely local interactions; (ii) admit a strong-weak duality relation with an Ising model on a dual lattice; (iii) have topological order in the ground state, some of which survive at finite temperature; and (iv) behave as classical memory at finite temperature.

  8. New localization mechanism and Hodge duality for q -form field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Chun-E.; Liu, Yu-Xiao; Guo, Heng; Zhang, Sheng-Li

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the problem of localization and the Hodge duality for a q -form field on a p -brane with codimension one. By a general Kaluza-Klein (KK) decomposition without gauge fixing, we obtain two Schrödinger-like equations for two types of KK modes of the bulk q -form field, which determine the localization and mass spectra of these KK modes. It is found that there are two types of zero modes (the 0-level modes): a q -form zero mode and a (q -1 )-form one, which cannot be localized on the brane at the same time. For the n -level KK modes, there are two interacting KK modes, a massive q -form KK mode and a massless (q -1 )-form one. By analyzing gauge invariance of the effective action and choosing a gauge condition, the n -level massive q -form KK mode decouples from the n -level massless (q -1 )-form one. It is also found that the Hodge duality in the bulk naturally becomes two dualities on the brane. The first one is the Hodge duality between a q -form zero mode and a (p -q -1 )-form one, or between a (q -1 )-form zero mode and a (p -q )-form one. The second duality is between two group KK modes: one is an n -level massive q -form KK mode with mass mn and an n -level massless (q -1 )-form mode; another is an n -level (p -q )-form one with the same mass mn and an n -level massless (p -q -1 )-form mode. Because of the dualities, the effective field theories on the brane for the KK modes of the two dual bulk form fields are physically equivalent.

  9. Localized magnetic fields enhance the field sensitivity of the gyrotropic resonance frequency of a magnetic vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Jasper P.; Metaxas, Peter J.

    2016-02-01

    We have carried out micromagnetic simulations of the gyrotropic resonance mode of a magnetic vortex in the presence of spatially localized and spatially uniform out-of-plane magnetic fields. We show that the field-induced change in the gyrotropic mode frequency is significantly larger when the field is centrally localized over lengths which are comparable to or a few times larger than the vortex core radius. When aligned with the core magnetization, such fields generate an additional confinement of the core. This confinement increases the vortex stiffness in the small-displacement limit, leading to a resonance shift which is greater than that expected for a uniform out-of-plane field of the same amplitude. Fields generated by uniformly magnetized spherical particles having a fixed separation from the disk are found to generate analogous effects except that there is a maximum in the shift at intermediate particle sizes where field localization and stray field magnitude combine optimally to generate a maximum confinement.

  10. Numerical correction of distorted images in full-field optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Gihyeon; Kim, Ju Wan; Choi, Woo June; Lee, Byeong Ha

    2012-03-01

    We propose a numerical method which can numerically correct the distorted en face images obtained with a full field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCT) system. It is shown that the FF-OCT image of the deep region of a biological sample is easily blurred or degraded because the sample has a refractive index (RI) much higher than its surrounding medium in general. It is analyzed that the focal plane of the imaging system is segregated from the imaging plane of the coherence-gated system due to the RI mismatch. This image-blurring phenomenon is experimentally confirmed by imaging the chrome pattern of a resolution test target through its glass substrate in water. Moreover, we demonstrate that the blurred image can be appreciably corrected by using the numerical correction process based on the Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction theory. The proposed correction method is applied to enhance the image of a human hair, which permits the distinct identification of the melanin granules inside the cortex layer of the hair shaft.

  11. Correction method for influence of tissue scattering for sidestream dark-field oximetry using multicolor LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurata, Tomohiro; Oda, Shigeto; Kawahira, Hiroshi; Haneishi, Hideaki

    2016-10-01

    We have previously proposed an estimation method of intravascular oxygen saturation (SO_2) from the images obtained by sidestream dark-field (SDF) imaging (we call it SDF oximetry) and we investigated its fundamental characteristics by Monte Carlo simulation. In this paper, we propose a correction method for scattering by the tissue and performed experiments with turbid phantoms as well as Monte Carlo simulation experiments to investigate the influence of the tissue scattering in the SDF imaging. In the estimation method, we used modified extinction coefficients of hemoglobin called average extinction coefficients (AECs) to correct the influence from the bandwidth of the illumination sources, the imaging camera characteristics, and the tissue scattering. We estimate the scattering coefficient of the tissue from the maximum slope of pixel value profile along a line perpendicular to the blood vessel running direction in an SDF image and correct AECs using the scattering coefficient. To evaluate the proposed method, we developed a trial SDF probe to obtain three-band images by switching multicolor light-emitting diodes and obtained the image of turbid phantoms comprised of agar powder, fat emulsion, and bovine blood-filled glass tubes. As a result, we found that the increase of scattering by the phantom body brought about the decrease of the AECs. The experimental results showed that the use of suitable values for AECs led to more accurate SO_2 estimation. We also confirmed the validity of the proposed correction method to improve the accuracy of the SO_2 estimation.

  12. Methyl bromide emissions from a covered field: III. Correcting chamber flux for temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, S.R.; Gan, J.; Ernst, F.F.; Wang, D.

    1996-07-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the environmental fate and transport of methyl bromide (MeBr) in agricultural systems. Part of this experiment involved the use of three flow-through chambers to estimate the MeBr flux through a sheet of clear polyethylene plastic covering the field. Using the chamber data, the total mass lost to the atmosphere was estimated to be 96% of the applied mass, and the results were highly variable between chambers (i.e., standard deviation of 298 kg or 35%). The air temperature inside the chamber was found to be much higher than the air temperature outside and was highly correlated with the diurnal variation in incoming solar radiation. Since the diffusion through polyethylene film was found to be strongly dependent on the temperature, a method was developed to correct the chamber flux density data for enhanced diffusion caused by increases in the temperature inside the chamber. After correcting for temperature, the estimated total MeBr emission was reduced to approximately 59% (21% standard deviation) of the applied amount, which is about 5% less than was measured using other methods. When chambers are used to measure volatilization of MeBr or other fumigants from fields covered with a sheet of polyethylene plastic, the chambers should be designed to minimize internal heating or some method should be used to correct the volatilization rate for the effects of temperature. 16 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Optimization of wavefront-coded infinity-corrected microscope systems with extended depth of field.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tingyu; Mauger, Thomas; Li, Guoqiang

    2013-01-01

    The depth of field of an infinity-corrected microscope system is greatly extended by simply applying a specially designed phase mask between the objective and the tube lens. In comparison with the method of modifying the structure of objective, it is more cost effective and provides improved flexibility for assembling the system. Instead of using an ideal optical system for simulation which was the focus of the previous research, a practical wavefront-coded infinity-corrected microscope system is designed in this paper by considering the various aberrations. Two new optimization methods, based on the commercial optical design software, are proposed to design a wavefront-coded microscope using a non-symmetric phase mask and a symmetric phase mask, respectively. We use polynomial phase mask and rational phase mask as examples of the non-symmetric and symmetric phase masks respectively. Simulation results show that both optimization methods work well for a 32 × infinity-corrected microscope system with 0.6 numerical aperture. The depth of field is extended to about 13 times of the traditional one.

  14. Bias Corrections for Regional Estimates of the Time-averaged Geomagnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constable, C.; Johnson, C. L.

    2009-05-01

    We assess two sources of bias in the time-averaged geomagnetic field (TAF) and paleosecular variation (PSV): inadequate temporal sampling, and the use of unit vectors in deriving temporal averages of the regional geomagnetic field. For the first temporal sampling question we use statistical resampling of existing data sets to minimize and correct for bias arising from uneven temporal sampling in studies of the time- averaged geomagnetic field (TAF) and its paleosecular variation (PSV). The techniques are illustrated using data derived from Hawaiian lava flows for 0-5~Ma: directional observations are an updated version of a previously published compilation of paleomagnetic directional data centered on ± 20° latitude by Lawrence et al./(2006); intensity data are drawn from Tauxe & Yamazaki, (2007). We conclude that poor temporal sampling can produce biased estimates of TAF and PSV, and resampling to appropriate statistical distribution of ages reduces this bias. We suggest that similar resampling should be attempted as a bias correction for all regional paleomagnetic data to be used in TAF and PSV modeling. The second potential source of bias is the use of directional data in place of full vector data to estimate the average field. This is investigated for the full vector subset of the updated Hawaiian data set. Lawrence, K.P., C.G. Constable, and C.L. Johnson, 2006, Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., 7, Q07007, DOI 10.1029/2005GC001181. Tauxe, L., & Yamazkai, 2007, Treatise on Geophysics,5, Geomagnetism, Elsevier, Amsterdam, Chapter 13,p509

  15. Localizing gauge fields on a topological Abelian string and the Coulomb law

    SciTech Connect

    Torrealba S, Rafael S.

    2010-07-15

    The confinement of electromagnetic field is studied in axial symmetrical, warped, six-dimensional brane world, using a recently proposed topological Abelian string-vortex solution as background. It was found, that the massless gauge field fluctuations follow four-dimensional Maxwell equations in the Lorenz gauge. The massless zero mode is localized when the thickness of the string vortex is less than 5{beta}/4{pi}e{sup 2}v{sup 2} and there are no other localized massless modes. There is also an infinite of nonlocalized massive Fourier modes, that follow four-dimensional Proca equations with a continuous spectrum. To compute the corrections to the Coulomb potential, a radial cutoff was introduced, in order to achieve a discrete mass spectrum. As a main result, a (R{sub o}/{beta}R{sup 2}) correction was found for the four-dimensional effective Coulomb law; the result is in correspondence with the observed behavior of the Coulomb potential at today's measurable distances.

  16. Radiative corrections to the Casimir Pressure under the influence of temperature and external fields

    SciTech Connect

    Robaschik, D.; Scharonhorst, K.; Wieczorek, E.

    1987-03-01

    Generalizing the quantum field theory (QFT) with boundary conditions in covariant gauge to the case of finite temperature, we develop the quantum electrodynamics (QED) with boundary conditions in the Matsubara approach as well as in the thermofield formulation. We rederive the known results of the free-field theory for the pressure and the free energy of the Casimir problem. For infinitely thin plates we calculate the radiative corrections in second-order perturbation theory at finite temperature. Thereby it turns out that the calculation in of the vacuum energy at the vanishing temperature via the Z functional is much simplier than the calculation via the energy momentum tensor. This observation allows determination of the influence of static electromagnetic fields on the Casimir problem. copyright 1987 Academic Press, Inc.

  17. Prime focus wide-field corrector designs with lossless atmospheric dispersion correction

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, Will; Gillingham, Peter; Smith, Greg; Kent, Steve; Doel, Peter

    2014-07-18

    Wide-Field Corrector designs are presented for the Blanco and Mayall telescopes, the CFHT and the AAT. The designs are Terezibh-style, with 5 or 6 lenses, and modest negative optical power. They have 2.2-3 degree fields of view, with curved and telecentric focal surfaces suitable for fiber spectroscopy. Some variants also allow wide-field imaging, by changing the last WFC element. Apart from the adaptation of the Terebizh design for spectroscopy, the key feature is a new concept for a 'Compensating Lateral Atmospheric Dispersion Corrector', with two of the lenses being movable laterally by small amounts. This provides excellent atmospheric dispersion correction, without any additional surfaces or absorption. A novel and simple mechanism for providing the required lens motions is proposed, which requires just 3 linear actuators for each of the two moving lenses.

  18. Automated motion correction using parallel-strip registration for wide-field en face OCT angiogram

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Pengxiao; Liu, Gangjun; Zhang, Miao; Dongye, Changlei; Wang, Jie; Pechauer, Alex D.; Hwang, Thomas S.; Wilson, David J.; Huang, David; Li, Dengwang

    2016-01-01

    We propose an innovative registration method to correct motion artifacts for wide-field optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) acquired by ultrahigh-speed swept-source OCT (>200 kHz A-scan rate). Considering that the number of A-scans along the fast axis is much higher than the number of positions along slow axis in the wide-field OCTA scan, a non-orthogonal scheme is introduced. Two en face angiograms in the vertical priority (2 y-fast) are divided into microsaccade-free parallel strips. A gross registration based on large vessels and a fine registration based on small vessels are sequentially applied to register parallel strips into a composite image. This technique is extended to automatically montage individual registered, motion-free angiograms into an ultrawide-field view. PMID:27446709

  19. Near-Field Source Localization Using a Special Cumulant Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Han; Wei, Gang

    A new near-field source localization algorithm based on a uniform linear array was proposed. The proposed algorithm estimates each parameter separately but does not need pairing parameters. It can be divided into two important steps. The first step is bearing-related electric angle estimation based on the ESPRIT algorithm by constructing a special cumulant matrix. The second step is the other electric angle estimation based on the 1-D MUSIC spectrum. It offers much lower computational complexity than the traditional near-field 2-D MUSIC algorithm and has better performance than the high-order ESPRIT algorithm. Simulation results demonstrate that the performance of the proposed algorithm is close to the Cramer-Rao Bound (CRB).

  20. Exponentially localized Wannier functions in periodic zero flux magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Nittis, G.; Lein, M.

    2011-11-01

    In this work, we investigate conditions which ensure the existence of an exponentially localized Wannier basis for a given periodic hamiltonian. We extend previous results [Panati, G., Ann. Henri Poincare 8, 995-1011 (2007), 10.1007/s00023-007-0326-8] to include periodic zero flux magnetic fields which is the setting also investigated by Kuchment [J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 42, 025203 (2009), 10.1088/1751-8113/42/2/025203]. The new notion of magnetic symmetry plays a crucial rôle; to a large class of symmetries for a non-magnetic system, one can associate "magnetic" symmetries of the related magnetic system. Observing that the existence of an exponentially localized Wannier basis is equivalent to the triviality of the so-called Bloch bundle, a rank m hermitian vector bundle over the Brillouin zone, we prove that magnetic time-reversal symmetry is sufficient to ensure the triviality of the Bloch bundle in spatial dimension d = 1, 2, 3. For d = 4, an exponentially localized Wannier basis exists provided that the trace per unit volume of a suitable function of the Fermi projection vanishes. For d > 4 and d ⩽ 2m (stable rank regime) only the exponential localization of a subset of Wannier functions is shown; this improves part of the analysis of Kuchment [J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 42, 025203 (2009), 10.1088/1751-8113/42/2/025203]. Finally, for d > 4 and d > 2m (unstable rank regime) we show that the mere analysis of Chern classes does not suffice in order to prove triviality and thus exponential localization.

  1. Influence of magnetic field on electric-field-induced local polar states in manganites

    SciTech Connect

    Mamin, R. F.; Strle, J.; Kabanov, V. V.; Kranjec, A.; Borovsak, M.; Mihailovic, D.; Bizyaev, D. A.; Yusupov, R. V.; Bukharaev, A. A.

    2015-11-09

    It is shown that creation of local charged states at the surface of the lanthanum-strontium manganite single crystals by means of bias application via a conducting atomic force microscope tip is strongly affected by magnetic field. Both a charge and a size of created structures increase significantly on application of the magnetic field during the induction. We argue that the observed phenomenon originates from a known tendency of manganites toward charge segregation and its intimate relation to magnetic ordering.

  2. Si dielectric function in a local basis representation: Optical properties, local field effects, excitons, and stopping power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, M.; González, P.; Ortega, J.; Flores, F.

    2014-11-01

    An atomiclike basis representation is used to analyze the dielectric function ɛ (q ⃗+G ⃗,q ⃗+G⃗';ω ) of Si. First, we show that a s p3d5 local basis set yields good results for the electronic band structure of this crystal and, then, we analyze the Si optical properties including local field and excitonic effects. In our formulation, we follow Hanke and Sham [W. Hanke and L. J. Sham, Phys. Rev. B 12, 4501 (1975), 10.1103/PhysRevB.12.4501; Phys. Rev. B 21, 4656 (1980), 10.1103/PhysRevB.21.4656], and introduce excitonic effects using a many-body formulation that incorporates a static screened electron-hole interaction. Dynamical effects in this interaction are also analyzed and shown to introduce non-negligible corrections in the optical spectrum. Our results are found in reasonable agreement with the experimental evidence and with other theoretical results calculated with the computationally more demanding plane-wave representation. Finally, calculations for the stopping power of Si are also presented.

  3. Local spectrum analysis of field propagation in an anisotropic medium. Part I. Time-harmonic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinkelman, Igor; Melamed, Timor

    2005-06-01

    The phase-space beam summation is a general analytical framework for local analysis and modeling of radiation from extended source distributions. In this formulation, the field is expressed as a superposition of beam propagators that emanate from all points in the source domain and in all directions. In this Part I of a two-part investigation, the theory is extended to include propagation in anisotropic medium characterized by a generic wave-number profile for time-harmonic fields; in a companion paper [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A22, 1208 (2005)], the theory is extended to time-dependent fields. The propagation characteristics of the beam propagators in a homogeneous anisotropic medium are considered. With use of Gaussian windows for the local processing of either ordinary or extraordinary electromagnetic field distributions, the field is represented by a phase-space spectral distribution in which the propagating elements are Gaussian beams that are formulated by using Gaussian plane-wave spectral distributions over the extended source plane. By applying saddle-point asymptotics, we extract the Gaussian beam phenomenology in the anisotropic environment. The resulting field is parameterized in terms of the spatial evolution of the beam curvature, beam width, etc., which are mapped to local geometrical properties of the generic wave-number profile. The general results are applied to the special case of uniaxial crystal, and it is found that the asymptotics for the Gaussian beam propagators, as well as the physical phenomenology attached, perform remarkably well.

  4. SU-E-T-299: Small Fields Profiles Correction Through Detectors Spatial Response Functions and Field Size Dependence Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Filipuzzi, M; Garrigo, E; Venencia, C; Germanier, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To calculate the spatial response function of various radiation detectors, to evaluate the dependence on the field size and to analyze the small fields profiles corrections by deconvolution techniques. Methods: Crossline profiles were measured on a Novalis Tx 6MV beam with a HDMLC. The configuration setup was SSD=100cm and depth=5cm. Five fields were studied (200×200mm2,100×100mm2, 20×20mm2, 10×10mm2and 5×5mm2) and measured were made with passive detectors (EBT3 radiochromic films and TLD700 thermoluminescent detectors), ionization chambers (PTW30013, PTW31003, CC04 and PTW31016) and diodes (PTW60012 and IBA SFD). The results of passive detectors were adopted as the actual beam profile. To calculate the detectors kernels, modeled by Gaussian functions, an iterative process based on a least squares criterion was used. The deconvolutions of the measured profiles were calculated with the Richardson-Lucy method. Results: The profiles of the passive detectors corresponded with a difference in the penumbra less than 0.1mm. Both diodes resolve the profiles with an overestimation of the penumbra smaller than 0.2mm. For the other detectors, response functions were calculated and resulted in Gaussian functions with a standard deviation approximate to the radius of the detector in study (with a variation less than 3%). The corrected profiles resolve the penumbra with less than 1% error. Major discrepancies were observed for cases in extreme conditions (PTW31003 and 5×5mm2 field size). Conclusion: This work concludes that the response function of a radiation detector is independent on the field size, even for small radiation beams. The profiles correction, using deconvolution techniques and response functions of standard deviation equal to the radius of the detector, gives penumbra values with less than 1% difference to the real profile. The implementation of this technique allows estimating the real profile, freeing from the effects of the detector used for the

  5. The importance of matched poloidal spectra to error field correction in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Paz-Soldan, C. Lanctot, M. J.; Buttery, R. J.; La Haye, R. J.; Strait, E. J.; Logan, N. C.; Park, J.-K.; Solomon, W. M.; Shiraki, D.; Hanson, J. M.

    2014-07-15

    Optimal error field correction (EFC) is thought to be achieved when coupling to the least-stable “dominant” mode of the plasma is nulled at each toroidal mode number (n). The limit of this picture is tested in the DIII-D tokamak by applying superpositions of in- and ex-vessel coil set n = 1 fields calculated to be fully orthogonal to the n = 1 dominant mode. In co-rotating H-mode and low-density Ohmic scenarios, the plasma is found to be, respectively, 7× and 20× less sensitive to the orthogonal field as compared to the in-vessel coil set field. For the scenarios investigated, any geometry of EFC coil can thus recover a strong majority of the detrimental effect introduced by the n = 1 error field. Despite low sensitivity to the orthogonal field, its optimization in H-mode is shown to be consistent with minimizing the neoclassical toroidal viscosity torque and not the higher-order n = 1 mode coupling.

  6. The effect of finite field size on classification and atmospheric correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Fraser, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    The atmospheric effect on the upward radiance of sunlight scattered from the Earth-atmosphere system is strongly influenced by the contrasts between fields and their sizes. For a given atmospheric turbidity, the atmospheric effect on classification of surface features is much stronger for nonuniform surfaces than for uniform surfaces. Therefore, the classification accuracy of agricultural fields and urban areas is dependent not only on the optical characteristics of the atmosphere, but also on the size of the surface do not account for the nonuniformity of the surface have only a slight effect on the classification accuracy; in other cases the classification accuracy descreases. The radiances above finite fields were computed to simulate radiances measured by a satellite. A simulation case including 11 agricultural fields and four natural fields (water, soil, savanah, and forest) was used to test the effect of the size of the background reflectance and the optical thickness of the atmosphere on classification accuracy. It is concluded that new atmospheric correction methods, which take into account the finite size of the fields, have to be developed to improve significantly the classification accuracy.

  7. Localized electric field of plasmonic nanoplatform enhanced photodynamic tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiye; Wen, Tao; Zhao, Ruifang; Liu, Xixi; Ji, Tianjiao; Wang, Hai; Shi, Xiaowei; Shi, Jian; Wei, Jingyan; Zhao, Yuliang; Wu, Xiaochun; Nie, Guangjun

    2014-11-25

    Near-infrared plasmonic nanoparticles demonstrate great potential in disease theranostic applications. Herein a nanoplatform, composed of mesoporous silica-coated gold nanorods (AuNRs), is tailor-designed to optimize the photodynamic therapy (PDT) for tumor based on the plasmonic effect. The surface plasmon resonance of AuNRs was fine-tuned to overlap with the exciton absorption of indocyanine green (ICG), a near-infrared photodynamic dye with poor photostability and low quantum yield. Such overlap greatly increases the singlet oxygen yield of incorporated ICG by maximizing the local field enhancement, and protecting the ICG molecules against photodegradation by virtue of the high absorption cross section of the AuNRs. The silica shell strongly increased ICG payload with the additional benefit of enhancing ICG photostability by facilitating the formation of ICG aggregates. As-fabricated AuNR@SiO2-ICG nanoplatform enables trimodal imaging, near-infrared fluorescence from ICG, and two-photon luminescence/photoacoustic tomography from the AuNRs. The integrated strategy significantly improved photodynamic destruction of breast tumor cells and inhibited the growth of orthotopic breast tumors in mice, with mild laser irradiation, through a synergistic effect of PDT and photothermal therapy. Our study highlights the effect of local field enhancement in PDT and demonstrates the importance of systematic design of nanoplatform to greatly enhancing the antitumor efficacy. PMID:25375193

  8. Time transients in the quantum corrected Newtonian potential induced by a massless nonminimally coupled scalar field

    SciTech Connect

    Marunovic, Anja; Prokopec, Tomislav

    2011-05-15

    We calculate the one-loop graviton vacuum polarization induced by a massless, nonminimally coupled scalar field on Minkowski background. We make use of the Schwinger-Keldysh formalism, which allows us to study time dependent phenomena. As an application we compute the leading quantum correction to the Newtonian potential of a point particle. The novel aspect of the calculation is the use of the Schwinger-Keldysh formalism, within which we calculate the time transients induced by switching on the graviton-scalar coupling.

  9. Matched field localization based on CS-MUSIC algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shuangle; Tang, Ruichun; Peng, Linhui; Ji, Xiaopeng

    2016-04-01

    The problem caused by shortness or excessiveness of snapshots and by coherent sources in underwater acoustic positioning is considered. A matched field localization algorithm based on CS-MUSIC (Compressive Sensing Multiple Signal Classification) is proposed based on the sparse mathematical model of the underwater positioning. The signal matrix is calculated through the SVD (Singular Value Decomposition) of the observation matrix. The observation matrix in the sparse mathematical model is replaced by the signal matrix, and a new concise sparse mathematical model is obtained, which means not only the scale of the localization problem but also the noise level is reduced; then the new sparse mathematical model is solved by the CS-MUSIC algorithm which is a combination of CS (Compressive Sensing) method and MUSIC (Multiple Signal Classification) method. The algorithm proposed in this paper can overcome effectively the difficulties caused by correlated sources and shortness of snapshots, and it can also reduce the time complexity and noise level of the localization problem by using the SVD of the observation matrix when the number of snapshots is large, which will be proved in this paper.

  10. Local field emission spectroscopy of InSb micrograins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukov, N. D.; Glukhovskoy, E. G.; Mosiyash, D. S.

    2015-11-01

    Local electron density-of-state spectra and level parameters in indium antimonide (InSb) micrograins have been studied using a tunneling microscope in the field-electron emission regime. The activation energies (ψ) of electron levels and electron lifetimes (τ) on these levels have been determined based on the correspondence of current-voltage characteristics to the probabilities of emission. Several local electron levels in a near-surface region of intrinsic ( i-InSb) micrograins are identified with ψ ˜ 0.73, 1.33, 1.85, 2.15, and 5.1 eV and τ ˜ 5 × 10-8-3 × 10-7 s, respectively. A physical model is proposed, according to which "light" electrons are localized due to the Coulomb interaction and their dimensional quantization takes place in the near-surface zone as determined by the effective mass, energy, and concentration of electrons and the radius of curvature of the micrograin surface.

  11. Self-Interaction Corrected Electronic Structure and Energy Gap of CuAlO2 beyond Local Density Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, Akitaka

    2011-05-01

    We implemented a self-interaction correction (SIC) into first-principles calculation code to go beyond local density approximation and applied it to CuAlO2. Our simulation shows that the valence band width calculated within the SIC is narrower than that calculated without the SIC because the SIC makes the d-band potential deeper. The energy gap calculated within the SIC expands and is close to experimental data.

  12. Use of a spherical albedo system for correcting the readings of albedo dosimeters in JINR phasotron neutron radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokrov, Yu. V.; Morozova, S. V.

    2014-03-01

    Results of calibrating a spherical albedo system in the radiation fields of a Pu-Be radionuclide neutron source are presented. It is shown that it can be used for correcting the readings of the DVGN-01 albedo dosimeter. The results of measurements with the system in JINR phasotron neutron fields for the purpose of correcting the DVGN-01 readings in these fields are given. The values of the correction factors for DVGN-01 albedo dosimeters when used in personnel neutron dosimetry (PD) on the JINR phasotron are determined.

  13. Daily Isocenter Correction With Electromagnetic-Based Localization Improves Target Coverage and Rectal Sparing During Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rajendran, Ramji Ramaswamy; Plastaras, John P.; Mick, Rosemarie; McMichael Kohler, Diane; Kassaee, Alireza; Vapiwala, Neha

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate dosimetric consequences of daily isocenter correction during prostate cancer radiation therapy using the Calypso 4D localization system. Methods and Materials: Data were analyzed from 28 patients with electromagnetic transponders implanted in their prostates for daily target localization and tracking. Treatment planning isocenters were recorded based on the values of the vertical, longitudinal, and lateral axes. Isocenter location obtained via alignment with skin tattoos was compared with that obtained via the electromagnetic localization system. Daily isocenter shifts, based on the isocenter location differences between the two alignment methods in each spatial axis, were calculated for each patient over their entire course. The mean isocenter shifts were used to determine dosimetric consequences of treatment based on skin tattoo alignments alone. Results: The mean += SD of the percentages of treatment days with shifts beyond += 0.5 cm for vertical, longitudinal and lateral shifts were 62% += 28%, 35% += 26%, and 38% +=21%, respectively. If daily electromagnetic localization was not used, the excess in prescribed dose delivered to 70% of the rectum was 10 Gy and the deficit in prescribed dose delivered to 95% of the planning target volume was 10 Gy. The mean isocenter shift was not associated with the volumes of the prostate, rectum, or bladder, or with patient body mass index. Conclusions: Daily isocenter localization can reduce the treatment dose to the rectum. Correcting for this variability could lead to improved dose delivery, reduced side effects, and potentially improved treatment outcomes.

  14. Time-localized projectors in string field theory with an E-field

    SciTech Connect

    Maccaferri, C.; Scherer Santos, R.J.; Tolla, D.D.

    2005-03-15

    We extend the analysis of Bonora et al. [hep-th/0409063] to the case of a constant electric field turned on the world volume and on a transverse direction of a D-brane. We show that time localization is still obtained by inverting the discrete eigenvalues of the lump solution. The lifetime of the unstable soliton is shown to depend on two free parameters: the b parameter and the value of the electric field. As a by-product, we construct the normalized diagonal basis of the star algebra in the B{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}}-field background.

  15. Solving outside-axial-field-of-view scatter correction problem in PET via digital experimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreyev, Andriy; Zhu, Yang-Ming; Ye, Jinghan; Song, Xiyun; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2016-03-01

    Unaccounted scatter impact from unknown outside-axial-field-of-view (outside-AFOV) activity in PET is an important degrading factor for image quality and quantitation. Resource consuming and unpopular way to account for the outside- AFOV activity is to perform an additional PET/CT scan of adjacent regions. In this work we investigate a solution to the outside-AFOV scatter problem without performing a PET/CT scan of the adjacent regions. The main motivation for the proposed method is that the measured random corrected prompt (RCP) sinogram in the background region surrounding the measured object contains only scattered events, originating from both inside- and outside-AFOV activity. In this method, the scatter correction simulation searches through many randomly-chosen outside-AFOV activity estimates along with known inside-AFOV activity, generating a plethora of scatter distribution sinograms. This digital experimentation iterates until a decent match is found between a simulated scatter sinogram (that include supposed outside-AFOV activity) and the measured RCP sinogram in the background region. The combined scatter impact from inside- and outside-AFOV activity can then be used for scatter correction during final image reconstruction phase. Preliminary results using measured phantom data indicate successful phantom length estimate with the method, and, therefore, accurate outside-AFOV scatter estimate.

  16. The effect of local anatomy on the electric field induced by TMS: evaluation at 14 different target sites.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Arno M; Oostendorp, Thom F; Stegeman, Dick F

    2014-10-01

    Many human cortical regions are targeted with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). The stimulus intensity used for a certain region is generally based on the motor threshold stimulation intensity determined over the motor cortex (M1). However, it is well known that differences exist in coil-target distance and target site anatomy between cortical regions. These differences may well make the stimulation intensity derived from M1 sub-optimal for other regions. Our goal was to determine in what way the induced electric fields differ between cortical target regions. We used finite element method modeling to calculate the induced electric field for multiple target sites in a realistic head model. The effects on the electric field due to coil-target distance and target site anatomy have been quantified. The results show that a correction based on the distance alone does not correctly adjust the induced electric field for regions other than M1. In addition, a correction based solely on the TMS-induced electric field (primary field) does not suffice. A precise adjustment should include coil-target distance, the secondary field caused by charge accumulation at conductivity discontinuities and the direction of the field relative to the local cerebrospinal fluid-grey matter boundary.

  17. 76 FR 13285 - Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Disability in State and Local Government Services; Corrections

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-11

    ... corrections to the final rule published in the Federal Register of Wednesday, September 15, 2010, at 75 FR... 35.151(e) (``Social service center establishments''), there are two errors in the following language: ``* * * the Department proposed adding a provision that would require certain social service...

  18. Efficient correction for CT image artifacts caused by objects extending outside the scan field of view.

    PubMed

    Ohnesorge, B; Flohr, T; Schwarz, K; Heiken, J P; Bae, K T

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a method of eliminating CT image artifacts generated by objects extending outside the scan field of view, such as obese or inadequately positioned patients. CT projection data are measured only within the scan field of view and thus are abruptly discontinuous at the projection boundaries if the scanned object extends outside the scan field of view. This data discontinuity causes an artifact that consists of a bright peripheral band that obscures objects near the boundary of the scan field of view. An adaptive mathematical extrapolation scheme with low computational expense was applied to reduce the data discontinuity prior to convolution in a filtered backprojection reconstruction. Despite extended projection length, the convolution length was not increased and thus the reconstruction time was not affected. Raw projection data from ten patients whose bodies extended beyond the scan field of view were reconstructed using a conventional method and our extended reconstruction method. Limitations of the algorithm are investigated and extensions for further improvement are discussed. The images reconstructed by conventional filtered backprojection demonstrated peripheral bright-band artifacts near the boundary of the scan field of view. Images reconstructed with our technique were free of such artifacts and clearly showed the anatomy at the periphery of the scan field of view with correct attenuation values. We conclude that bright-band artifacts generated by obese patients whose bodies extend beyond the scan field of view were eliminated with our reconstruction method, which reduces boundary data discontinuity. The algorithm can be generalized to objects with inhomogeneous peripheral density and to true "Region of Interest Reconstruction" from truncated projections.

  19. Locality of Gravitational Systems from Entanglement of Conformal Field Theories.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jennifer; Marcolli, Matilde; Ooguri, Hirosi; Stoica, Bogdan

    2015-06-01

    The Ryu-Takayanagi formula relates the entanglement entropy in a conformal field theory to the area of a minimal surface in its holographic dual. We show that this relation can be inverted for any state in the conformal field theory to compute the bulk stress-energy tensor near the boundary of the bulk spacetime, reconstructing the local data in the bulk from the entanglement on the boundary. We also show that positivity, monotonicity, and convexity of the relative entropy for small spherical domains between the reduced density matrices of any state and of the ground state of the conformal field theory are guaranteed by positivity conditions on the bulk matter energy density. As positivity and monotonicity of the relative entropy are general properties of quantum systems, this can be interpreted as a derivation of bulk energy conditions in any holographic system for which the Ryu-Takayanagi prescription applies. We discuss an information theoretical interpretation of the convexity in terms of the Fisher metric.

  20. Improving the accuracy of pulsed field gradient NMR diffusion experiments: Correction for gradient non-uniformity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connell, Mark A.; Bowyer, Paul J.; Adam Bone, P.; Davis, Adrian L.; Swanson, Alistair G.; Nilsson, Mathias; Morris, Gareth A.

    2009-05-01

    Pulsed field gradient NMR is a well-established technique for the determination of self-diffusion coefficients. However, a significant source of systematic error exists in the spatial variation of the applied pulsed field gradient. Non-uniform pulsed field gradients cause the decay of peak amplitudes to deviate from the expected exponential dependence on gradient squared. This has two undesirable effects: the apparent diffusion coefficient will deviate from the true value to an extent determined by the choice of experimental parameters, and the error estimated by the nonlinear least squares fitting will contain a significant systematic contribution. In particular, the apparent diffusion coefficient determined by exponential fitting of the diffusional attenuation of NMR signals will depend both on the exact pulse widths used and on the range of gradient amplitudes chosen. These problems can be partially compensated for if experimental attenuation data are fitted to a function corrected for the measured spatial dependence of the gradient and signal strength. This study describes a general alternative to existing methods for the calibration of NMR diffusion measurements. The dominant longitudinal variation of the pulsed field gradient amplitude and the signal strength are mapped by measuring pulsed field gradient echoes in the presence of a weak read gradient. These data are then used to construct a predicted signal decay function for the whole sample, which is parameterised as the exponential of a power series. Results are presented which compare diffusion coefficients obtained using the new calibration method with previous literature values.

  1. Variational level set combined with Markov random field modeling for simultaneous intensity non-uniformity correction and segmentation of MR images.

    PubMed

    Shahvaran, Zahra; Kazemi, Kamran; Helfroush, Mohammad Sadegh; Jafarian, Nassim; Noorizadeh, Negar

    2012-08-15

    Noise and intensity non-uniformity are causing major difficulties in magnetic resonance (MR) image segmentation. This paper introduces a variational level set approach for simultaneous MR image segmentation and intensity non-uniformity correction. The proposed energy functional is based on local Gaussian intensity fitting with local means and variances. Furthermore, the proposed model utilizes Markov random fields to model the spatial correlation between neighboring pixels/voxels. The improvements achieved with our method are demonstrated by brain segmentation experiments with simulated and real magnetic resonance images with different noise and bias level. In particular, it is superior in term of accuracy as compared to LGDF and FSL-FAST methods.

  2. Determination of small-field correction factors for cylindrical ionization chambers using a semiempirical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kwangwoo; Bak, Jino; Park, Sungho; Choi, Wonhoon; Park, Suk Won

    2016-02-01

    A semiempirical method based on the averaging effect of the sensitive volumes of different air-filled ionization chambers (ICs) was employed to approximate the correction factors for beam quality produced from the difference in the sizes of the reference field and small fields. We measured the output factors using several cylindrical ICs and calculated the correction factors using a mathematical method similar to deconvolution; in the method, we modeled the variable and inhomogeneous energy fluence function within the chamber cavity. The parameters of the modeled function and the correction factors were determined by solving a developed system of equations as well as on the basis of the measurement data and the geometry of the chambers. Further, Monte Carlo (MC) computations were performed using the Monaco® treatment planning system to validate the proposed method. The determined correction factors (k{{Q\\text{msr}},Q}{{f\\text{smf}}, {{f}\\text{ref}}} ) were comparable to the values derived from the MC computations performed using Monaco®. For example, for a 6 MV photon beam and a field size of 1  ×  1 cm2, k{{Q\\text{msr}},Q}{{f\\text{smf}}, {{f}\\text{ref}}} was calculated to be 1.125 for a PTW 31010 chamber and 1.022 for a PTW 31016 chamber. On the other hand, the k{{Q\\text{msr}},Q}{{f\\text{smf}}, {{f}\\text{ref}}} values determined from the MC computations were 1.121 and 1.031, respectively; the difference between the proposed method and the MC computation is less than 2%. In addition, we determined the k{{Q\\text{msr}},Q}{{f\\text{smf}}, {{f}\\text{ref}}} values for PTW 30013, PTW 31010, PTW 31016, IBA FC23-C, and IBA CC13 chambers as well. We devised a method for determining k{{Q\\text{msr}},Q}{{f\\text{smf}}, {{f}\\text{ref}}} from both the measurement of the output factors and model-based mathematical computation. The proposed method can be useful in case the MC simulation would not be applicable for the clinical settings.

  3. Active control of Type-I Edge-Localized Modes with n=1 Perturbation Fields in the JET Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Y.; Koslowski, R.; Thomas, P.; Nardon, E.; Alper, B.; Baranov, Y.; Beurskens, M.; Bigi, M.; Crombe, K.; de la Luna, E.; De Vries, P.; Fundamenski, W.; Rachlew, Elisabeth G; Zimmermann, O.

    2007-06-01

    Type-I edge-localized modes (ELMs) have been mitigated at the JET tokamak using a static external n=1 perturbation field generated by four error field correction coils located far from the plasma. During the application of the n=1 field the ELM frequency increased by a factor of 4 and the amplitude of the D signal decreased. The energy loss per ELM normalized to the total stored energy, W/W, dropped to values below 2%. Transport analyses shows no or only a moderate (up to 20%) degradation of energy confinement time during the ELM mitigation phase.

  4. Size-extensive vibrational self-consistent field methods with anharmonic geometry corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermes, Matthew R.; Keçeli, Murat; Hirata, So

    2012-06-01

    In the size-extensive vibrational self-consistent field (XVSCF) method introduced earlier [M. Keçeli and S. Hirata, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 134108 (2011)], 10.1063/1.3644895, only a small subset of even-order force constants that can form connected diagrams were used to compute extensive total energies and intensive transition frequencies. The mean-field potentials of XVSCF formed with these force constants have been shown to be effectively harmonic, making basis functions, quadrature, or matrix diagonalization in the conventional VSCF method unnecessary. We introduce two size-consistent VSCF methods, XVSCF(n) and XVSCF[n], for vibrationally averaged geometries in addition to energies and frequencies including anharmonic effects caused by up to the nth-order force constants. The methods are based on our observations that a small number of odd-order force constants of certain types can form open, connected diagrams isomorphic to the diagram of the mean-field potential gradients and that these nonzero gradients shift the potential minima by intensive amounts, which are interpreted as anharmonic geometry corrections. XVSCF(n) evaluates these mean-field gradients and force constants at the equilibrium geometry and estimates this shift accurately, but approximately, neglecting the coupling between these two quantities. XVSCF[n] solves the coupled equations for geometry corrections and frequencies with an iterative algorithm, giving results that should be identical to those of VSCF when applied to an infinite system. We present the diagrammatic and algebraic definitions, algorithms, and initial implementations as well as numerical results of these two methods. The results show that XVSCF(n) and XVSCF[n] reproduce the vibrationally averaged geometries of VSCF for naphthalene and anthracene in their ground and excited vibrational states accurately at fractions of the computational cost.

  5. Gain Correction for an X-ray Imaging System With a Movable Flat Panel Detector and Intrinsic Localization Crosshair.

    PubMed

    Park, Yang-Kyun; Sharp, Gregory C

    2016-04-01

    Gain calibration for X-ray imaging systems with a movable flat panel detector and an intrinsic crosshair is a challenge due to the geometry-dependent heel effect and crosshair artifact. This study aims to develop a gain correction method for such systems by implementing the Multi-Acquisition Gain Image Correction technique. Flood field images containing crosshair and heel effect were acquired in 4 different flat panel detector positions at fixed exposure parameters. The crosshair region was automatically detected using common image processing algorithms and removed by a simple interpolation procedure, resulting in a crosshair-removed image. A large kernel-based correction was then used to remove the heel effect. Mask filters corresponding to each crosshair region were applied to the resultant heel effect-removed images to invalidate the pixels of the original crosshair region. Finally, a seamless gain map was composed with corresponding valid pixels from the processed images either by the sequential replacement or by the selective averaging techniques developed in this study. Quantitative evaluation was performed based on normalized noise power spectrum and detective quantum efficiency improvement factor for the flood field images corrected by the Multi-Acquisition Gain Image Correction-based gain maps. For comparison purposes, a single crosshair-removed gain map was also tested. As a result, it was demonstrated that the Multi-Acquisition Gain Image Correction technique achieved better image quality than the crosshair-removed technique, showing lower normalized noise power spectrum values over most of spatial frequencies. The improvement was more obvious at the priori-crosshair region of the gain map. The mean detective quantum efficiency improvement factor was 1.09 ± 0.06, 2.46 ± 0.32, and 3.34 ± 0.36 in the priori-crosshair region and 2.35 ± 0.31, 2.33 ± 0.31, and 3.09 ± 0.34 in the normal region, for crosshair-removed, Multi-Acquisition Gain Image

  6. Correction factors for ionization chamber dosimetry in CyberKnife: Machine-specific, plan-class, and clinical fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gago-Arias, Araceli; Antolin, Elena; Fayos-Ferrer, Francisco; Simon, Rocio; Gonzalez-Castano, Diego M.; Palmans, Hugo; Sharpe, Peter; Gomez, Faustino; Pardo-Montero, Juan

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is the application of the formalism for ionization chamber reference dosimetry of small and nonstandard fields [R. Alfonso, P. Andreo, R. Capote, M. S. Huq, W. Kilby, P. Kjaell, T. R. Mackie, H. Palmans, K. Rosser, J. Seuntjens, W. Ullrich, and S. Vatnitsky, 'A new formalism for reference dosimetry of small and nonstandard fields,' Med. Phys. 35, 5179-5186 (2008)] to the CyberKnife robotic radiosurgery system. Correction factors for intermediate calibration fields, a machine-specific reference field (msr) and two plan-class specific reference fields (pcsr), have been studied. Furthermore, the applicability of the new formalism to clinical dosimetry has been analyzed through the investigation of two clinical treatments. Methods: PTW31014 and Scanditronix-Wellhofer CC13 ionization chamber measurements were performed for the fields under investigation. Absorbed dose to water was determined using alanine reference dosimetry, and experimental correction factors were calculated from alanine to ionization chamber readings ratios. In addition, correction factors were calculated for the intermediate calibration fields and one of the clinical treatment fields using the Monte Carlo method and these were compared with the experimental values. Results: Overall correction factors deviating from unity by approximately 2% were obtained from both measurements and simulations, with values below and above unity for the studied intermediate calibration fields and clinical fields for the ionization chambers under consideration. Monte Carlo simulations yielded correction factors comparable with those obtained from measurements for the machine-specific reference field, although differences from 1% to 3.3% were observed between measured and calculated correction factors for the composite intermediate calibration fields. Dose distribution inhomogeneities are thought to be responsible for such discrepancies. Conclusions: The differences found between overall

  7. Cascading and local-field effects in non-linear optics revisited: A quantum-field picture based on exchange of photons

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Kochise Mukamel, Shaul

    2014-01-28

    The semi-classical theory of radiation-matter coupling misses local-field effects that may alter the pulse time-ordering and cascading that leads to the generation of new signals. These are then introduced macroscopically by solving Maxwell's equations. This procedure is convenient and intuitive but ad hoc. We show that both effects emerge naturally by including coupling to quantum modes of the radiation field that are initially in the vacuum state to second order. This approach is systematic and suggests a more general class of corrections that only arise in a QED framework. In the semi-classical theory, which only includes classical field modes, the susceptibility of a collection of N non-interacting molecules is additive and scales as N. Second-order coupling to a vacuum mode generates an effective retarded interaction that leads to cascading and local field effects both of which scale as N{sup 2}.

  8. Cascading and local-field effects in non-linear optics revisited: a quantum-field picture based on exchange of photons.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Kochise; Mukamel, Shaul

    2014-01-28

    The semi-classical theory of radiation-matter coupling misses local-field effects that may alter the pulse time-ordering and cascading that leads to the generation of new signals. These are then introduced macroscopically by solving Maxwell's equations. This procedure is convenient and intuitive but ad hoc. We show that both effects emerge naturally by including coupling to quantum modes of the radiation field that are initially in the vacuum state to second order. This approach is systematic and suggests a more general class of corrections that only arise in a QED framework. In the semi-classical theory, which only includes classical field modes, the susceptibility of a collection of N non-interacting molecules is additive and scales as N. Second-order coupling to a vacuum mode generates an effective retarded interaction that leads to cascading and local field effects both of which scale as N(2).

  9. Magnetostatic focal spot correction for x-ray tubes operating in strong magnetic fields using iterative optimization

    PubMed Central

    Lillaney, Prasheel; Shin, Mihye; Conolly, Steven M.; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Combining x-ray fluoroscopy and MR imaging systems for guidance of interventional procedures has become more commonplace. By designing an x-ray tube that is immune to the magnetic fields outside of the MR bore, the two systems can be placed in close proximity to each other. A major obstacle to robust x-ray tube design is correcting for the effects of the magnetic fields on the x-ray tube focal spot. A potential solution is to design active shielding that locally cancels the magnetic fields near the focal spot. Methods: An iterative optimization algorithm is implemented to design resistive active shielding coils that will be placed outside the x-ray tube insert. The optimization procedure attempts to minimize the power consumption of the shielding coils while satisfying magnetic field homogeneity constraints. The algorithm is composed of a linear programming step and a nonlinear programming step that are interleaved with each other. The coil results are verified using a finite element space charge simulation of the electron beam inside the x-ray tube. To alleviate heating concerns an optimized coil solution is derived that includes a neodymium permanent magnet. Any demagnetization of the permanent magnet is calculated prior to solving for the optimized coils. The temperature dynamics of the coil solutions are calculated using a lumped parameter model, which is used to estimate operation times of the coils before temperature failure. Results: For a magnetic field strength of 88 mT, the algorithm solves for coils that consume 588 A/cm2. This specific coil geometry can operate for 15 min continuously before reaching temperature failure. By including a neodymium magnet in the design the current density drops to 337 A/cm2, which increases the operation time to 59 min. Space charge simulations verify that the coil designs are effective, but for oblique x-ray tube geometries there is still distortion of the focal spot shape along with deflections of approximately

  10. Magnetostatic focal spot correction for x-ray tubes operating in strong magnetic fields using iterative optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Lillaney, Prasheel; Shin, Mihye; Conolly, Steven M.; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: Combining x-ray fluoroscopy and MR imaging systems for guidance of interventional procedures has become more commonplace. By designing an x-ray tube that is immune to the magnetic fields outside of the MR bore, the two systems can be placed in close proximity to each other. A major obstacle to robust x-ray tube design is correcting for the effects of the magnetic fields on the x-ray tube focal spot. A potential solution is to design active shielding that locally cancels the magnetic fields near the focal spot. Methods: An iterative optimization algorithm is implemented to design resistive active shielding coils that will be placed outside the x-ray tube insert. The optimization procedure attempts to minimize the power consumption of the shielding coils while satisfying magnetic field homogeneity constraints. The algorithm is composed of a linear programming step and a nonlinear programming step that are interleaved with each other. The coil results are verified using a finite element space charge simulation of the electron beam inside the x-ray tube. To alleviate heating concerns an optimized coil solution is derived that includes a neodymium permanent magnet. Any demagnetization of the permanent magnet is calculated prior to solving for the optimized coils. The temperature dynamics of the coil solutions are calculated using a lumped parameter model, which is used to estimate operation times of the coils before temperature failure. Results: For a magnetic field strength of 88 mT, the algorithm solves for coils that consume 588 A/cm{sup 2}. This specific coil geometry can operate for 15 min continuously before reaching temperature failure. By including a neodymium magnet in the design the current density drops to 337 A/cm{sup 2}, which increases the operation time to 59 min. Space charge simulations verify that the coil designs are effective, but for oblique x-ray tube geometries there is still distortion of the focal spot shape along with deflections of

  11. Spin resonance strength of a localized rf magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. Y.

    2006-07-01

    Spin-resonance strength produced by a localized rf field has been a focus of recent publications [V. S. Morozov , Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 7, 024002 (2004).PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.7.024002; M. A. Leonova (to be published).; T. Roser, in Handbook of Accelerator Physics and Engineering, edited by A. W. Chao and M. Tigner (World Scientific, Singapore, 1999), p. 151.; M. Bai, W. W. MacKay, and T. Roser, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 8, 099001 (2005).PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.8.099001; V. S. Morozov , Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 8, 099002 (2005).PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.8.099002]. This paper discusses the debated factor of 2, and provides a formula to calculate the component enhanced by the induced betatron motion.

  12. Quality Assurance of Ultrasound Imaging Systems for Target Localization and Online Setup Corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Tome, Wolfgang A. Orton, Nigel P.

    2008-05-01

    We describe quality assurance paradigms for ultrasound imaging systems for target localization (UISTL). To determine the absolute localization accuracy of a UISTL, an absolute coordinate system can be established in the treatment room and spherical targets at various depths can be localized. To test the ability of such a system to determine the magnitude of internal organ motion, a phantom that mimics the human male pelvic anatomy can be used to simulate different organ motion ranges. To assess the interuser variability of ultrasound (US) guidance, different experienced users can independently determine the daily organ shifts for the same patients for a number of consecutive fractions. The average accuracy for a UISTL for the localization of spherical targets at various depths has been found to be 0.57 {+-} 0.47 mm in each spatial dimension for various focal depths. For the phantom organ motion test it was found that the true organ motion could be determined to within 1.0 mm along each axis. The variability between different experienced users who localized the same 5 patients for five consecutive fractions was small in comparison to the indicated shifts. In addition to the quality assurance tests that address the ability of a UISTL to accurately localize a target, a thorough quality assurance program should also incorporate the following two aspects to ensure consistent and accurate localization in daily clinical use: (1) adequate training and performance monitoring of users of the US target localization system, and (2) prescreening of patients who may not be good candidates for US localization.

  13. Fermi orbital self-interaction corrected electronic structure of molecules beyond local density approximation.

    PubMed

    Hahn, T; Liebing, S; Kortus, J; Pederson, Mark R

    2015-12-14

    The correction of the self-interaction error that is inherent to all standard density functional theory calculations is an object of increasing interest. In this article, we apply the very recently developed Fermi-orbital based approach for the self-interaction correction [M. R. Pederson et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 121103 (2014) and M. R. Pederson, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 064112 (2015)] to a set of different molecular systems. Our study covers systems ranging from simple diatomic to large organic molecules. We focus our analysis on the direct estimation of the ionization potential from orbital eigenvalues. Further, we show that the Fermi orbital positions in structurally similar molecules appear to be transferable.

  14. Fermi orbital self-interaction corrected electronic structure of molecules beyond local density approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Torsten; Liebing, Simon; Kortus, Jens; Pederson, Mark

    The correction of the self-interaction error that is inherent to all standard density functional theory (DFT) calculations is an object of increasing interest. We present our results on the application of the recently developed Fermi-orbital based approach for the self-interaction correction (FO-SIC) to a set of different molecular systems. Our study covers systems ranging from simple diatomic to large organic molecules. Our focus lies on the direct estimation of the ionization potential from orbital eigenvalues and on the ordering of electronic levels in metal-organic molecules. Further, we show that the Fermi orbital positions in structurally similar molecules appear to be transferable. Support by DFG FOR1154 is greatly acknowledged.

  15. Fermi orbital self-interaction corrected electronic structure of molecules beyond local density approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, T. Liebing, S.; Kortus, J.; Pederson, Mark R.

    2015-12-14

    The correction of the self-interaction error that is inherent to all standard density functional theory calculations is an object of increasing interest. In this article, we apply the very recently developed Fermi-orbital based approach for the self-interaction correction [M. R. Pederson et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 121103 (2014) and M. R. Pederson, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 064112 (2015)] to a set of different molecular systems. Our study covers systems ranging from simple diatomic to large organic molecules. We focus our analysis on the direct estimation of the ionization potential from orbital eigenvalues. Further, we show that the Fermi orbital positions in structurally similar molecules appear to be transferable.

  16. Generalized local-frame-transformation theory for excited species in external fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannakeas, P.; Greene, Chris H.; Robicheaux, F.

    2016-07-01

    A rigorous theoretical framework is developed for a generalized local-frame-transformation theory (GLFT). The GLFT is applicable to the following systems: Rydberg atoms or molecules in an electric field and negative ions in any combination of electric and/or magnetic fields. A first test application to the photoionization spectra of Rydberg atoms in an external electric field demonstrates dramatic improvement over the first version of the local-frame-transformation theory developed initially by U. Fano [Phys. Rev. A 24, 619 (1981), 10.1103/PhysRevA.24.619] and D. A. Harmin [Phys. Rev. A 26, 2656 (1982), 10.1103/PhysRevA.26.2656]. This revised GLFT theory yields nontrivial corrections because it now includes the full on-shell Hilbert space without adopting the truncations in the original theory. Comparisons of the semianalytical GLFT Stark spectra with ab initio numerical simulations yield errors in the range of a few tens of MHz, an improvement over the original Fano-Harmin theory, whose errors are 10-100 times larger. Our analysis provides a systematic pathway to precisely describe the corresponding photoabsorption spectra that should be accurate enough to meet most modern experimental standards.

  17. An optimized controller for ARGOS: using multiple wavefront sensor signals for homogeneous correction over the field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, D.

    2010-07-01

    ARGOS is the ground layer adaptive optics system planned for the LBT. The goal of such a ground layer adaptive optics system is to provide a maximum homogeneity of the point spread function over the full field of view. Controllers for optimized correction with an adaptive optics system with guide star and science target at different field angles are well known in the case of a single guide star. As ARGOS uses three laser guide stars and one auxiliary natural guide star a weighting scheme is required to optimize the homogeneity using all available information. Especially the tip and tilt modes measured by the one single off axis guide star and estimated thereof over the field will need to be improved by incorporation of the laser measurements. I will present the full scheme for an optimized controller for the ARGOS system. This controller uses the wavefront signals of the three lasers to additionally reconstruct the lower atmosphere. Information on the higher atmosphere will be provided by a DIMM-MASS instrument. The control scheme is tested analytically and the variation of the point spread function is then measured over the full field.

  18. 2-D Path Corrections for Local and Regional Coda Waves: A Test of Transportability

    SciTech Connect

    Mayeda, K M; Malagnini, L; Phillips, W S; Walter, W R; Dreger, D S; Morasca, P

    2005-07-13

    Reliable estimates of the seismic source spectrum are necessary for accurate magnitude, yield, and energy estimation. In particular, how seismic radiated energy scales with increasing earthquake size has been the focus of recent debate within the community and has direct implications on earthquake source physics studies as well as hazard mitigation. The 1-D coda methodology of Mayeda et al. [2003] has provided the lowest variance estimate of the source spectrum when compared against traditional approaches that use direct S-waves, thus making it ideal for networks that have sparse station distribution. The 1-D coda methodology has been mostly confined to regions of approximately uniform complexity. For larger, more geophysically complicated regions, 2-D path corrections may be required. We will compare performance of 1-D versus 2-D path corrections in a variety of regions. First, the complicated tectonics of the northern California region coupled with high quality broadband seismic data provides for an ideal ''apples-to-apples'' test of 1-D and 2-D path assumptions on direct waves and their coda. Next, we will compare results for the Italian Alps using high frequency data from the University of Genoa. For Northern California, we used the same station and event distribution and compared 1-D and 2-D path corrections and observed the following results: (1) 1-D coda results reduced the amplitude variance relative to direct S-waves by roughly a factor of 8 (800%); (2) Applying a 2-D correction to the coda resulted in up to 40% variance reduction from the 1-D coda results; (3) 2-D direct S-wave results, though better than 1-D direct waves, were significantly worse than the 1-D coda. We found that coda-based moment-rate source spectra derived from the 2-D approach were essentially identical to those from the 1-D approach for frequencies less than {approx}0.7-Hz, however for the high frequencies (0.7 {le} f {le} 8.0-Hz), the 2-D approach resulted in inter-station scatter

  19. Local strain redistribution corrections for a simplified inelastic analysis procedure based on an elastic finite-element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.; Hwang, S. Y.

    1985-01-01

    Strain redistribution corrections were developed for a simplified inelastic analysis procedure to economically calculate material cyclic response at the critical location of a structure for life prediction proposes. The method was based on the assumption that the plastic region in the structure is local and the total strain history required for input can be defined from elastic finite-element analyses. Cyclic stress-strain behavior was represented by a bilinear kinematic hardening model. The simplified procedure predicts stress-strain response with reasonable accuracy for thermally cycled problems but needs improvement for mechanically load-cycled problems. Neuber-type corrections were derived and incorporated in the simplified procedure to account for local total strain redistribution under cyclic mechanical loading. The corrected simplified method was used on a mechanically load-cycled benchmark notched-plate problem. The predicted material response agrees well with the nonlinear finite-element solutions for the problem. The simplified analysis computer program was 0.3% of the central processor unit time required for a nonlinear finite-element analysis.

  20. Performance Monitoring Local Field Potentials in the Medial Frontal Cortex of Primates: Anterior Cingulate Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Emeric, Erik E.; Brown, Joshua W.; Leslie, Melanie; Pouget, Pierre; Stuphorn, Veit; Schall, Jeffrey D.

    2009-01-01

    We describe intracranial local field potentials (LFP) recorded in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) of macaque monkeys performing a saccade countermanding task. The most prominent feature at ∼70% of sites was greater negative polarity after errors than after rewarded correct trials. This negative polarity was also evoked in unrewarded correct trials. The LFP evoked by the visual target was much less polarized, and the weak presaccadic modulation was insufficient to control the initiation of saccades. When saccades were cancelled, LFP modulation decreased slightly with the magnitude of response conflict that corresponds to the coactivation of gaze-shifting and -holding neurons estimated from the probability of canceling. However, response time adjustments on subsequent trials were not correlated with LFP polarity on individual trials. The results provide clear evidence that error- and feedback-related, but not conflict-related, signals are carried by the LFP in the macaque ACC. Finding performance monitoring field potentials in the ACC of macaque monkeys establishes a bridge between event-related potential and functional brain-imaging studies in humans and neurophysiology studies in non-human primates. PMID:18077665

  1. Calculation of correction factors for ionization chamber measurements with small fields in low-density media.

    PubMed

    Pisaturo, O; Pachoud, M; Bochud, F O; Moeckli, R

    2012-07-21

    The quantity of interest for high-energy photon beam therapy recommended by most dosimetric protocols is the absorbed dose to water. Thus, ionization chambers are calibrated in absorbed dose to water, which is the same quantity as what is calculated by most treatment planning systems (TPS). However, when measurements are performed in a low-density medium, the presence of the ionization chamber generates a perturbation at the level of the secondary particle range. Therefore, the measured quantity is close to the absorbed dose to a volume of water equivalent to the chamber volume. This quantity is not equivalent to the dose calculated by a TPS, which is the absorbed dose to an infinitesimally small volume of water. This phenomenon can lead to an overestimation of the absorbed dose measured with an ionization chamber of up to 40% in extreme cases. In this paper, we propose a method to calculate correction factors based on the Monte Carlo simulations. These correction factors are obtained by the ratio of the absorbed dose to water in a low-density medium □D(w,Q,V1)(low) averaged over a scoring volume V₁ for a geometry where V₁ is filled with the low-density medium and the absorbed dose to water □D(w,QV2)(low) averaged over a volume V₂ for a geometry where V₂ is filled with water. In the Monte Carlo simulations, □D(w,QV2)(low) is obtained by replacing the volume of the ionization chamber by an equivalent volume of water, according to the definition of the absorbed dose to water. The method is validated in two different configurations which allowed us to study the behavior of this correction factor as a function of depth in phantom, photon beam energy, phantom density and field size.

  2. Self-Consistent Pushing and Cranking Corrections to the Meson Fields of the Chiral Quark-Loop Soliton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleif, M.; Wünsch, R.; Maissner, T.

    We study translational and spin-isospin symmetry restoration for the two-flavor chiral quark-loop soliton. Instead of a static soliton at rest we consider a boosted and rotating hedgehog soliton. Corrected classical meson fields are obtained by minimizing a corrected energy functional which has been derived by semi-classical methods (variation after projection). We evaluate corrected meson fields in the region 300 MeV ≤ M≤ 600 MeV of constituent quark masses M and compare them with the uncorrected fields. We study the effect of the corrections on various expectation values of nuclear observables such as the root-mean square radius, the axial-vector coupling constant, magnetic moments and the delta-nucleon mass splitting.

  3. Correcting mean-field approximations for birth-death-movement processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Ruth E.; Simpson, Matthew J.

    2010-10-01

    On the microscale, migration, proliferation and death are crucial in the development, homeostasis and repair of an organism; on the macroscale, such effects are important in the sustainability of a population in its environment. Dependent on the relative rates of migration, proliferation and death, spatial heterogeneity may arise within an initially uniform field; this leads to the formation of spatial correlations and can have a negative impact upon population growth. Usually, such effects are neglected in modeling studies and simple phenomenological descriptions, such as the logistic model, are used to model population growth. In this work we outline some methods for analyzing exclusion processes which include agent proliferation, death and motility in two and three spatial dimensions with spatially homogeneous initial conditions. The mean-field description for these types of processes is of logistic form; we show that, under certain parameter conditions, such systems may display large deviations from the mean field, and suggest computationally tractable methods to correct the logistic-type description.

  4. An automatic stain removal algorithm of series aerial photograph based on flat-field correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang; Yan, Dongmei; Yang, Yang

    2010-10-01

    The dust on the camera's lens will leave dark stains on the image. Calibrating and compensating the intensity of the stained pixels play an important role in the airborne image processing. This article introduces an automatic compensation algorithm for the dark stains. It's based on the theory of flat-field correction. We produced a whiteboard reference image by aggregating hundreds of images recorded in one flight and use their average pixel values to simulate the uniform white light irradiation. Then we constructed a look-up table function based on this whiteboard image to calibrate the stained image. The experiment result shows that the proposed procedure can remove lens stains effectively and automatically.

  5. Correction of Proton Resonance Frequency Shift Temperature Maps for Magnetic Field Disturbances Caused by Breathing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmatukha, Andriy V.; Bakker, Chris J. G.

    2006-05-01

    Respiratory Induced Resonance Offset (RIRO) is a periodic disturbance of the magnetic field due to breathing. Such disturbances handicap the accuracy of the Proton Resonance Frequency Shift (PRFS) method of MRI temperature mapping in anatomies situated nearby the lungs and chest wall. In this work, we propose a method capable of minimizing errors caused by RIRO in PRFS temperature maps. In this method, a set of baseline images characterizing RIRO at a variety of respiratory cycle instants is acquired before the thermal treatment starts. During the treatment, the temperature evolution is found from two successive images. Then, the calculated temperature changes are corrected for the additional contribution caused by RIRO using the pre-treatment baseline images acquired at the identical instances of the respiratory cycle. Our method is shown to improve the accuracy and stability of PRFS temperature maps in the presence of RIRO and motion in phantom and volunteer experiments.

  6. Bright-field imaging of compound semiconductors using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Toshihiro; Lu, Jing; McCartney, Martha R.; Smith, David J.

    2016-09-01

    This study reports the observation of six different zincblende compound semiconductors in [110] projection using large-collection-angle bright-field (LABF) imaging with an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope. Phase contrast is completely suppressed when the collection semi-angle is set equal to the convergence semi-angle and there are no reversals in image contrast with changes in defocus or thickness. The optimum focus for imaging closely separated pairs of atomic columns (‘dumbbells’) is unique and easily recognized, and the positions of atomic columns occupied by heavier atoms always have darker intensity than those occupied by lighter atoms. Thus, the crystal polarity of compound semiconductors can be determined unambiguously. Moreover, it is concluded that the LABF imaging mode will be highly beneficial for studying other more complicated heterostructures at the atomic scale.

  7. New correction procedures for the fast field program which extend its range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, M.; Sack, R. A.

    1990-01-01

    A fast field program (FFP) algorithm was developed based on the method of Lee et al., for the prediction of sound pressure level from low frequency, high intensity sources. In order to permit accurate predictions at distances greater than 2 km, new correction procedures have had to be included in the algorithm. Certain functions, whose Hankel transforms can be determined analytically, are subtracted from the depth dependent Green's function. The distance response is then obtained as the sum of these transforms and the Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT) of the residual k dependent function. One procedure, which permits the elimination of most complex exponentials, has allowed significant changes in the structure of the FFP algorithm, which has resulted in a substantial reduction in computation time.

  8. Active subthreshold dendritic conductances shape the local field potential

    PubMed Central

    Ness, Torbjørn V.; Remme, Michiel W. H.

    2016-01-01

    Key points The local field potential (LFP), the low‐frequency part of extracellular potentials recorded in neural tissue, is often used for probing neural circuit activity. Interpreting the LFP signal is difficult, however.While the cortical LFP is thought mainly to reflect synaptic inputs onto pyramidal neurons, little is known about the role of the various subthreshold active conductances in shaping the LFP.By means of biophysical modelling we obtain a comprehensive qualitative understanding of how the LFP generated by a single pyramidal neuron depends on the type and spatial distribution of active subthreshold currents.For pyramidal neurons, the h‐type channels probably play a key role and can cause a distinct resonance in the LFP power spectrum.Our results show that the LFP signal can give information about the active properties of neurons and imply that preferred frequencies in the LFP can result from those cellular properties instead of, for example, network dynamics. Abstract The main contribution to the local field potential (LFP) is thought to stem from synaptic input to neurons and the ensuing subthreshold dendritic processing. The role of active dendritic conductances in shaping the LFP has received little attention, even though such ion channels are known to affect the subthreshold neuron dynamics. Here we used a modelling approach to investigate the effects of subthreshold dendritic conductances on the LFP. Using a biophysically detailed, experimentally constrained model of a cortical pyramidal neuron, we identified conditions under which subthreshold active conductances are a major factor in shaping the LFP. We found that, in particular, the hyperpolarization‐activated inward current, I h, can have a sizable effect and cause a resonance in the LFP power spectral density. To get a general, qualitative understanding of how any subthreshold active dendritic conductance and its cellular distribution can affect the LFP, we next performed a systematic

  9. Limits of the measurability of the local quantum electromagnetic-field amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compagno, G.; Persico, F.

    1998-03-01

    The precision with which the amplitude of the free electromagnetic field can be measured locally in QED is evaluated by analyzing a well-known gedanken experiment originally proposed by Bohr and Rosenfeld (BR). The analysis is performed by applying standard theoretical techniques familiar in quantum optics. The main result obtained for the precision is significantly different from the generally accepted Bohr-Rosenfeld result. This leads to questioning the widely accepted notion of the compensating field, fostered by these authors. A misconception at the origin of this notion is pointed out by a careful investigation of the self-force acting on the apparatus designed to measure the field. The correct expression for this self-force is found to be at variance with that proposed by Bohr and Rosenfeld and generally accepted. It is argued that, as a consequence of this new expression and in contrast with the generally accepted view, no compensating force of nonelectromagnetic nature is required in order to perform measurements of the quantum field amplitude with any desired accuracy. It is shown that the only limitations to the precision of the measurement, in the BR gedanken experiment, arise from the time-energy uncertainty principle, as well as from the finite dimensions of the measuring apparatus.

  10. Charge localization in a diamine cation provides a test of energy functionals and self-interaction correction

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xinxin; Zhang, Yao; Jónsson, Elvar; Jónsson, Hannes; Weber, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) is widely applied in calculations of molecules and materials. Yet, it suffers from a well-known over-emphasis on charge delocalization arising from self-interaction error that destabilizes localized states. Here, using the symmetric diamine N,N′-dimethylpiperazine as a model, we have experimentally determined the relative energy of a state with positive charge localized on one of the two nitrogen atoms, and a state with positive charge delocalized over both nitrogen atoms. The charge-localized state was found to be 0.33 (0.04) eV higher in energy than the charge-delocalized state. This provides an important test of theoretical approaches to electronic structure calculations. Calculations with all DFT functionals commonly used today, including hybrid functionals with exact exchange, fail to predict a stable charge-localized state. However, the application of an explicit self-interaction correction to a semi-local functional identifies both states and gives relative energy in excellent agreement with both experiment and CCSD(T) calculations. PMID:26980327

  11. Bulk gauge fields in warped space and localized supersymmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Chacko, Z.; Ponton, Eduardo

    2003-11-01

    We consider five dimensional supersymmetric warped scenarios in which the Standard Model quark and lepton fields are localized on the ultraviolet brane, while the Standard Model gauge fields propagate in the bulk. Supersymmetry is assumed to be broken on the infrared brane. The relative sizes of supersymmetry breaking effects are found to depend on the hierarchy between the infrared scale and the weak scale. If the infrared scale is much larger than the weak scale the leading supersymmetry breaking effect on the visible brane is given by gaugino mediation. The gaugino masses at the weak scale are proportional to the square of the corresponding gauge coupling, while the dominant contribution to the scalar masses arises from logarithmically enhanced radiative effects involving the gaugino mass that are cutoff at the infrared scale. While the LSP is the gravitino, the NLSP which is the stau is stable on collider time scales. If however the infrared scale is close to the weak scale then the effects of hard supersymmetry breaking operators on the scalar masses can become comparable to those from gaugino mediation. These operators alter the relative strengths of the couplings of gauge bosons and gauginos to matter, and give loop contributions to the scalar masses that are also cutoff at the infrared scale. The gaugino masses, while exhibiting a more complicated dependence on the corresponding gauge coupling, remain hierarchical and become proportional to the corresponding gauge coupling in the limit of strong supersymmetry breaking. The scalar masses are finite and a loop factor smaller than the gaugino masses. The LSP remains the gravitino.

  12. Distance correction system for localization based on linear regression and smoothing in ambient intelligence display.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Hee; Choi, Jae-Hun; Lim, Myung-Eun; Park, Soo-Jun

    2008-01-01

    This paper suggests the method of correcting distance between an ambient intelligence display and a user based on linear regression and smoothing method, by which distance information of a user who approaches to the display can he accurately output even in an unanticipated condition using a passive infrared VIR) sensor and an ultrasonic device. The developed system consists of an ambient intelligence display and an ultrasonic transmitter, and a sensor gateway. Each module communicates with each other through RF (Radio frequency) communication. The ambient intelligence display includes an ultrasonic receiver and a PIR sensor for motion detection. In particular, this system selects and processes algorithms such as smoothing or linear regression for current input data processing dynamically through judgment process that is determined using the previous reliable data stored in a queue. In addition, we implemented GUI software with JAVA for real time location tracking and an ambient intelligence display.

  13. The Local Interstellar Magnetic Field Determined from the IBEX Ribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirnstein, E.; Funsten, H. O.; Heerikhuisen, J.; Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.; Pogorelov, N. V.

    2015-12-01

    As the solar wind plasma flows away from the Sun, it eventually collides with the local interstellar medium, creating the heliosphere. Neutral atoms from interstellar space travel inside the heliosphere and charge-exchange with the solar wind plasma, creating energetic neutral atoms (ENAs). Some of these ENAs travel outside the heliosphere, undergo two charge-exchange events, and travel back inside the heliosphere towards Earth, with the strongest intensity in directions perpendicular to the interstellar magnetic field (IMF). It is widely believed that this process generates the "ribbon" of enhanced ENA intensity observed by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX), and has been shown to explain many key features of the observations. IBEX observations of the ribbon are composed of a complex, line-of-sight integration of ENAs that come from different distances beyond the heliopause, and thus the ENAs detected by IBEX over a wide range of energies are uniquely coupled to the IMF draped around the heliosphere. We present a detailed analysis of the IBEX ribbon measurements using 3D simulations of the heliosphere and computations of the ribbon flux at Earth based on IBEX capabilities, and derive the magnitude and direction of the IMF required to reproduce the position of the IBEX ribbon in the sky. These results have potentially large implications for our understanding of the solar-interstellar environment.

  14. Performance of FFT methods in local gravity field modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forsberg, Rene; Solheim, Dag

    1989-01-01

    Fast Fourier transform (FFT) methods provide a fast and efficient means of processing large amounts of gravity or geoid data in local gravity field modelling. The FFT methods, however, has a number of theoretical and practical limitations, especially the use of flat-earth approximation, and the requirements for gridded data. In spite of this the method often yields excellent results in practice when compared to other more rigorous (and computationally expensive) methods, such as least-squares collocation. The good performance of the FFT methods illustrate that the theoretical approximations are offset by the capability of taking into account more data in larger areas, especially important for geoid predictions. For best results good data gridding algorithms are essential. In practice truncated collocation approaches may be used. For large areas at high latitudes the gridding must be done using suitable map projections such as UTM, to avoid trivial errors caused by the meridian convergence. The FFT methods are compared to ground truth data in New Mexico (xi, eta from delta g), Scandinavia (N from delta g, the geoid fits to 15 cm over 2000 km), and areas of the Atlantic (delta g from satellite altimetry using Wiener filtering). In all cases the FFT methods yields results comparable or superior to other methods.

  15. Motor task event detection using Subthalamic Nucleus Local Field Potentials.

    PubMed

    Niketeghad, Soroush; Hebb, Adam O; Nedrud, Joshua; Hanrahan, Sara J; Mahoor, Mohammad H

    2015-08-01

    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) provides significant therapeutic benefit for movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Current DBS devices lack real-time feedback (thus are open loop) and stimulation parameters are adjusted during scheduled visits with a clinician. A closed-loop DBS system may reduce power consumption and DBS side effects. In such systems, DBS parameters are adjusted based on patient's behavior, which means that behavior detection is a major step in designing such systems. Various physiological signals can be used to recognize the behaviors. Subthalamic Nucleus (STN) Local Field Potential (LFP) is a great candidate signal for the neural feedback, because it can be recorded from the stimulation lead and does not require additional sensors. A practical behavior detection method should be able to detect behaviors asynchronously meaning that it should not use any prior knowledge of behavior onsets. In this paper, we introduce a behavior detection method that is able to asynchronously detect the finger movements of Parkinson patients. As a result of this study, we learned that there is a motor-modulated inter-hemispheric connectivity between LFP signals recorded bilaterally from STN. We used non-linear regression method to measure this connectivity and use it to detect the finger movements. Performance of this method is evaluated using Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC). PMID:26737550

  16. SU-C-304-07: Are Small Field Detector Correction Factors Strongly Dependent On Machine-Specific Characteristics?

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, D; Tanny, S; Parsai, E; Sperling, N

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The current small field dosimetry formalism utilizes quality correction factors to compensate for the difference in detector response relative to dose deposited in water. The correction factors are defined on a machine-specific basis for each beam quality and detector combination. Some research has suggested that the correction factors may only be weakly dependent on machine-to-machine variations, allowing for determinations of class-specific correction factors for various accelerator models. This research examines the differences in small field correction factors for three detectors across two Varian Truebeam accelerators to determine the correction factor dependence on machine-specific characteristics. Methods: Output factors were measured on two Varian Truebeam accelerators for equivalently tuned 6 MV and 6 FFF beams. Measurements were obtained using a commercial plastic scintillation detector (PSD), two ion chambers, and a diode detector. Measurements were made at a depth of 10 cm with an SSD of 100 cm for jaw-defined field sizes ranging from 3×3 cm{sup 2} to 0.6×0.6 cm{sup 2}, normalized to values at 5×5cm{sup 2}. Correction factors for each field on each machine were calculated as the ratio of the detector response to the PSD response. Percent change of correction factors for the chambers are presented relative to the primary machine. Results: The Exradin A26 demonstrates a difference of 9% for 6×6mm{sup 2} fields in both the 6FFF and 6MV beams. The A16 chamber demonstrates a 5%, and 3% difference in 6FFF and 6MV fields at the same field size respectively. The Edge diode exhibits less than 1.5% difference across both evaluated energies. Field sizes larger than 1.4×1.4cm2 demonstrated less than 1% difference for all detectors. Conclusion: Preliminary results suggest that class-specific correction may not be appropriate for micro-ionization chamber. For diode systems, the correction factor was substantially similar and may be useful for class

  17. Sound Field Directivity Correction in Synthetic Aperture Algorithm for Medical Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasinkevych, Yuriy; Klimonda, Ziemowit; Lewandowski, Marcin; Nowicki, Andrzej

    The paper presents modified multi-element synthetic transmit aperture (MSTA) method for ultrasound imaging with RF echoes correction taking into account the influence of the element directivity, which property becomes significant as the element width becomes commensurable with the wavelength corresponding to the nominal frequency of the transmit signal. The angular dependence of the radiation efficiency of the transmit-receive aperture is approximated by a far-field radiation pattern resulting from the exact solution of the corresponding mixed boundary-value problem for periodic baffle system. The directivity is calculated at the nominal frequency of the excitation signal and is incorporated into the conventional MSTA algorithm. Numerical experiments performed in MATLAB® environment using data simulated by FIELD II program as well as measurement data acquired using the Ultrasonix SonixTOUCH Research system are shown. The comparison of the results obtain by the modified and conventional MSTA methods is given which reveals significant improvement of the image quality, especially in the area neighboring to the transducer's aperture, and increase of the visualization depth at the same time.

  18. Progressivism, Control and Correction: Local Education Authorities and Educational Policy in Twentieth-Century England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosvenor, Ian; Myers, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    Through an analysis of both education policy and knowledge creation, this article explores the historical dimensions of two key features of the "new information age." In the field of education, it documents the development of a progressive education policy in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Birmingham, UK. This policy extended access…

  19. The Properties of Local Barred Disks in the Field and Dense Environments: Implications for Galaxy Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinova, I.; Jogee, S.; Barazza, F. D.; Heiderman, A.; Gray, M. E.; Barden, M.; Wolf, C.; Peng, C. Y.; Bacon, D.; Balogh, M.; Bell, E. F.; Böhm, A.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Häußler, B.; Heymans, C.; Jahnke, K.; van Kampen, E.; Lane, K.; McIntosh, D. H.; Meisenheimer, K.; Sánchez, S. F.; Sommerville, R. S.; Taylor, A.; Wisotzki, L.; Zheng, X.

    2009-12-01

    Stellar bars are the most efficient internal drivers of disk evolution because they redistribute material and angular momentum within the galaxy and dark matter halo. Mounting evidence suggests that processes other than major mergers, such as minor mergers, secular processes driven by bars, and clump coalescence, as well as smooth accretion, play an important role in galaxy evolution since z = 2. As a key step toward characterizing this evolution and constraining theoretical models, we determine the frequency and properties of bars in the local Universe in both field and cluster environment, based on three of our studies: Marinova & Jogee (2007), Barazza, Jogee, & Marinova (2008) and Marinova et al. (2009). Among field spirals of intermediate Hubble types in the OSU survey, we find using ellipse fitting that the bar fraction is 44% in the optical and 60% in the NIR, giving an extinction correction factor of approximately 1.4 at z ˜ 0. Using data from the Abell 901/902 cluster system at z ˜ 0.165 from the HST ACS survey STAGES, we find that the optical bar fraction is a strong trend of both absolute magnitude and host bulge-to-total ratio, increasing for galaxies that are brighter and/or more disk-dominated. The latter trend is also found in the field from SDSS. For bright early types and faint late types the optical bar fraction in the cluster is similar to that in the field. We find that between the core region and the virial radii of the clusters the optical bar fraction is not a strong function of local environment density. We discuss the implications of our results in the context of theoretical models of the impact of bars on galaxy evolution.

  20. Removal of spurious correlations between spikes and local field potentials.

    PubMed

    Zanos, Theodoros P; Mineault, Patrick J; Pack, Christopher C

    2011-01-01

    Single neurons carry out important sensory and motor functions related to the larger networks in which they are embedded. Understanding the relationships between single-neuron spiking and network activity is therefore of great importance and the latter can be readily estimated from low-frequency brain signals known as local field potentials (LFPs). In this work we examine a number of issues related to the estimation of spike and LFP signals. We show that spike trains and individual spikes contain power at the frequencies that are typically thought to be exclusively related to LFPs, such that simple frequency-domain filtering cannot be effectively used to separate the two signals. Ground-truth simulations indicate that the commonly used method of estimating the LFP signal by low-pass filtering the raw voltage signal leads to artifactual correlations between spikes and LFPs and that these correlations exert a powerful influence on popular metrics of spike-LFP synchronization. Similar artifactual results were seen in data obtained from electrophysiological recordings in macaque visual cortex, when low-pass filtering was used to estimate LFP signals. In contrast LFP tuning curves in response to sensory stimuli do not appear to be affected by spike contamination, either in simulations or in real data. To address the issue of spike contamination, we devised a novel Bayesian spike removal algorithm and confirmed its effectiveness in simulations and by applying it to the electrophysiological data. The algorithm, based on a rigorous mathematical framework, outperforms other methods of spike removal on most metrics of spike-LFP correlations. Following application of this spike removal algorithm, many of our electrophysiological recordings continued to exhibit spike-LFP correlations, confirming previous reports that such relationships are a genuine aspect of neuronal activity. Overall, these results show that careful preprocessing is necessary to remove spikes from LFP

  1. Influence of spiking activity on cortical local field potentials

    PubMed Central

    Waldert, Stephan; Lemon, Roger N; Kraskov, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The intra-cortical local field potential (LFP) reflects a variety of electrophysiological processes including synaptic inputs to neurons and their spiking activity. It is still a common assumption that removing high frequencies, often above 300 Hz, is sufficient to exclude spiking activity from LFP activity prior to analysis. Conclusions based on such supposedly spike-free LFPs can result in false interpretations of neurophysiological processes and erroneous correlations between LFPs and behaviour or spiking activity. Such findings might simply arise from spike contamination rather than from genuine changes in synaptic input activity. Although the subject of recent studies, the extent of LFP contamination by spikes is unclear, and the fundamental problem remains. Using spikes recorded in the motor cortex of the awake monkey, we investigated how different factors, including spike amplitude, duration and firing rate, together with the noise statistic, can determine the extent to which spikes contaminate intra-cortical LFPs. We demonstrate that such contamination is realistic for LFPs with a frequency down to ∼10 Hz. For LFP activity below ∼10 Hz, such as movement-related potential, contamination is theoretically possible but unlikely in real situations. Importantly, LFP frequencies up to the (high-) gamma band can remain unaffected. This study shows that spike–LFP crosstalk in intra-cortical recordings should be assessed for each individual dataset to ensure that conclusions based on LFP analysis are valid. To this end, we introduce a method to detect and to visualise spike contamination, and provide a systematic guide to assess spike contamination of intra-cortical LFPs. PMID:23981719

  2. Local spectrum analysis of field propagation in an anisotropic medium. Part II. Time-dependent fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinkelman, Igor; Melamed, Timor

    2005-06-01

    In Part I of this two-part investigation [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A22, 1200 (2005)], we presented a theory for phase-space propagation of time-harmonic electromagnetic fields in an anisotropic medium characterized by a generic wave-number profile. In this Part II, these investigations are extended to transient fields, setting a general analytical framework for local analysis and modeling of radiation from time-dependent extended-source distributions. In this formulation the field is expressed as a superposition of pulsed-beam propagators that emanate from all space-time points in the source domain and in all directions. Using time-dependent quadratic-Lorentzian windows, we represent the field by a phase-space spectral distribution in which the propagating elements are pulsed beams, which are formulated by a transient plane-wave spectrum over the extended-source plane. By applying saddle-point asymptotics, we extract the beam phenomenology in the anisotropic environment resulting from short-pulsed processing. Finally, the general results are applied to the special case of uniaxial crystal and compared with a reference solution.

  3. Local spectrum analysis of field propagation in an anisotropic medium. Part II. Time-dependent fields.

    PubMed

    Tinkelman, Igor; Melamed, Timor

    2005-06-01

    In Part I of this two-part investigation [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 22, 1200 (2005)], we presented a theory for phase-space propagation of time-harmonic electromagnetic fields in an anisotropic medium characterized by a generic wave-number profile. In this Part II, these investigations are extended to transient fields, setting a general analytical framework for local analysis and modeling of radiation from time-dependent extended-source distributions. In this formulation the field is expressed as a superposition of pulsed-beam propagators that emanate from all space-time points in the source domain and in all directions. Using time-dependent quadratic-Lorentzian windows, we represent the field by a phase-space spectral distribution in which the propagating elements are pulsed beams, which are formulated by a transient plane-wave spectrum over the extended-source plane. By applying saddle-point asymptotics, we extract the beam phenomenology in the anisotropic environment resulting from short-pulsed processing. Finally, the general results are applied to the special case of uniaxial crystal and compared with a reference solution.

  4. Cosmological perturbations in SFT inspired non-local scalar field models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshelev, Alexey S.; Vernov, Sergey Yu.

    2012-10-01

    We study cosmological perturbations in models with a single non-local scalar field originating from the string field theory description of the rolling tachyon dynamics. We construct the equation for the energy density perturbations of the non-local scalar field and explicitly prove that for the free field it is identical to a system of local cosmological perturbation equations in a particular model with multiple (maybe infinitely many) local free scalar fields. We also show that vector and tensor perturbations are absent in this set-up.

  5. The correct citation and spelling of Ptiliogonys and type locality of Ptiliogonys cinereus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Browning, M. Ralph

    1989-01-01

    William Swainson published descriptions and illustrations of many new forms of New World birds. In some of his earlier papers, Swainson cited his own works (of which only some parts have been published) as well as some manuscripts that were never published (see McMillan 1971). Swainson also referred to works that were published later under different titles. For example, Swainson (1827a) listed several names of birds and cited his "Mexican Zoology," a work that was never published. Later he (Swainson 1831-1832) referred to the "Cat. of Mex. Mus. App. p. 4 (1824)," in which he claimed to have described the taxa he had listed in Swainson (1827a). Modern authorities (e.g. Greenway 1960: 371; American Ornithologists' Union [AOU] 1983: 582) refer to the 1824 source as the original publication for the genus they render as Ptilogonys and (AOU 1983) for the species Ptilogonys cinereus. However, there is no evidence that the 1824 work was ever seen as a manuscript or published. In this paper, I review the use of "Swainson, 1824," as a citation and discuss the actual publication, spelling of the names Ptiliogonys and Ptiliogonys cinereus, and type locality of the species.

  6. Influence and Correction from the Human Body on the Measurement of a Power-Frequency Electric Field Sensor.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Dongping; Liu, Huaitong; Zhou, Qiang; Xie, Yutong; Ma, Qichao

    2016-06-10

    According to the operating specifications of existing electric field measuring instruments, measuring technicians must be located far from the instruments to eliminate the influence of the human body occupancy on a spatial electric field. Nevertheless, in order to develop a portable safety protection instrument with an effective electric field warning function for working staff in a high-voltage environment, it is necessary to study the influence of an approaching human body on the measurement of an electric field and to correct the measurement results. A single-shaft electric field measuring instrument called the Type LP-2000, which was developed by our research team, is used as the research object in this study. First, we explain the principle of electric field measurement and describe the capacitance effect produced by the human body. Through a theoretical analysis, we show that the measured electric field value decreases as a human body approaches. Their relationship is linearly proportional. Then, the ratio is identified as a correction coefficient to correct for the influence of human body proximity. The conclusion drawn from the theoretical analysis is proved via simulation. The correction coefficient kb = 1.8010 is obtained on the basis of the linear fitting of simulated data. Finally, a physical experiment is performed. When no human is present, we compare the results from the Type LP-2000 measured with Narda EFA-300 and the simulated value to verify the accuracy of the Type LP-2000. For the case of an approaching human body, the correction coefficient kb* = 1.9094 is obtained by comparing the data measured with the Type LP-2000 to the simulated value. The correction coefficient obtained from the experiment (i.e., kb*) is highly consistent with that obtained from the simulation (i.e., kb). Two experimental programs are set; under these programs, the excitation voltages and distance measuring points are regulated to produce different electric field

  7. Influence and Correction from the Human Body on the Measurement of a Power-Frequency Electric Field Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Dongping; Liu, Huaitong; Zhou, Qiang; Xie, Yutong; Ma, Qichao

    2016-01-01

    According to the operating specifications of existing electric field measuring instruments, measuring technicians must be located far from the instruments to eliminate the influence of the human body occupancy on a spatial electric field. Nevertheless, in order to develop a portable safety protection instrument with an effective electric field warning function for working staff in a high-voltage environment, it is necessary to study the influence of an approaching human body on the measurement of an electric field and to correct the measurement results. A single-shaft electric field measuring instrument called the Type LP-2000, which was developed by our research team, is used as the research object in this study. First, we explain the principle of electric field measurement and describe the capacitance effect produced by the human body. Through a theoretical analysis, we show that the measured electric field value decreases as a human body approaches. Their relationship is linearly proportional. Then, the ratio is identified as a correction coefficient to correct for the influence of human body proximity. The conclusion drawn from the theoretical analysis is proved via simulation. The correction coefficient kb = 1.8010 is obtained on the basis of the linear fitting of simulated data. Finally, a physical experiment is performed. When no human is present, we compare the results from the Type LP-2000 measured with Narda EFA-300 and the simulated value to verify the accuracy of the Type LP-2000. For the case of an approaching human body, the correction coefficient kb* = 1.9094 is obtained by comparing the data measured with the Type LP-2000 to the simulated value. The correction coefficient obtained from the experiment (i.e., kb*) is highly consistent with that obtained from the simulation (i.e., kb). Two experimental programs are set; under these programs, the excitation voltages and distance measuring points are regulated to produce different electric field

  8. Beyond-mean-field corrections within the second random-phase approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, M.; Gambacurta, D.; Engel, J.

    2016-06-01

    A subtraction procedure, introduced to overcome double-counting problems in beyond-mean-field theories, is used in the second random-phase approximation (SRPA). Doublecounting problems arise in the energy-density functional framework in all cases where effective interactions tailored at leading order are used for higher-order calculations, such as those done in the SRPA model. It was recently shown that this subtraction procedure also guarantees that the stability condition related to the Thouless theorem is verified in extended RPA models. We discuss applications of the subtraction procedure, introduced within the SRPA model, to the nucleus 16O. The application of the subtraction procedure leads to: (i) stable results that are weakly cutoff dependent; (ii) a considerable upwards correction of the SRPA spectra (which were systematically shifted downwards by several MeV with respect to RPA spectra, in all previous calculations). With this important implementation of the model, many applications may be foreseen to analyze the genuine impact of 2 particle-2 hole configurations (without any cutoff dependences and anomalous shifts) on the excitation spectra of medium-mass and heavy nuclei.

  9. Orbit correction in a linear nonscaling fixed field alternating gradient accelerator

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kelliher, D. J.; Machida, S.; Edmonds, C. S.; Kirkman, I. W.; Jones, J. K.; Muratori, B. D.; Garland, J. M.; Berg, J. S.

    2014-11-20

    In a linear non-scaling FFAG the large natural chromaticity of the machine results in a betatron tune that varies by several integers over the momentum range. In addition, orbit correction is complicated by the consequent variation of the phase advance between lattice elements. Here we investigate how the correction of multiple closed orbit harmonics allows correction of both the COD and the accelerated orbit distortion over the momentum range.

  10. Electromagnetic field enhancement and light localization in deterministic aperiodic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinath, Ashwin

    The control of light matter interaction in periodic and random media has been investigated in depth during the last few decades, yet structures with controlled degree of disorder such as Deterministic Aperiodic Nano Structures (DANS) have been relatively unexplored. DANS are characterized by non-periodic yet long-range correlated (deterministic) morphologies and can be generated by the mathematical rules of symbolic dynamics and number theory. In this thesis, I have experimentally investigated the unique light transport and localization properties in planar dielectric and metal (plasmonics) DANS. In particular, I have focused on the design, nanofabrication and optical characterization of DANS, formed by arranging metal/dielectric nanoparticles in an aperiodic lattice. This effort is directed towards development of on-chip nanophotonic applications with emphasis on label-free bio-sensing and enhanced light emission. The DANS designed as Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) substrate is composed of multi-scale aperiodic nanoparticle arrays fabricated by e-beam lithography and are capable of reproducibly demonstrating enhancement factors as high as ˜107. Further improvement of SERS efficiency is achieved by combining DANS formed by top-down approach with bottom-up reduction of gold nanoparticles, to fabricate novel nanostructures called plasmonic "nano-galaxies" which increases the SERS enhancement factors by 2--3 orders of magnitude while preserving the reproducibility. In this thesis, along with presenting details of fabrication and SERS characterization of these "rationally designed" SERS substrates, I will also present results on using these substrates for detection of DNA nucleobases, as well as reproducible label-free detection of pathogenic bacteria with species specificity. In addition to biochemical detection, the combination of broadband light scattering behavior and the ability for the generation of reproducible high fields in DANS make these

  11. Maximum-likelihood and other processors for incoherent and coherent matched-field localization.

    PubMed

    Dosso, Stan E; Wilmut, Michael J

    2012-10-01

    This paper develops a series of maximum-likelihood processors for matched-field source localization given various states of information regarding the frequency and time variation of source amplitude and phase, and compares these with existing approaches to coherent processing with incomplete source knowledge. The comparison involves elucidating each processor's approach to source spectral information within a unifying formulation, which provides a conceptual framework for classifying and comparing processors and explaining their relative performance, as quantified in a numerical study. The maximum-likelihood processors represent optimal estimators given the assumption of Gaussian noise, and are based on analytically maximizing the corresponding likelihood function over explicit unknown source spectral parameters. Cases considered include knowledge of the relative variation in source amplitude over time and/or frequency (e.g., a flat spectrum), and tracking the relative phase variation over time, as well as incoherent and coherent processing. Other approaches considered include the conventional (Bartlett) processor, cross-frequency incoherent processor, pair-wise processor, and coherent normalized processor. Processor performance is quantified as the probability of correct localization from Monte Carlo appraisal over a large number of random realizations of noise, source location, and environmental parameters. Processors are compared as a function of signal-to-noise ratio, number of frequencies, and number of sensors. PMID:23039424

  12. Spin noise explores local magnetic fields in a semiconductor

    PubMed Central

    Ryzhov, Ivan I.; Kozlov, Gleb G.; Smirnov, Dmitrii S.; Glazov, Mikhail M.; Efimov, Yurii P.; Eliseev, Sergei A.; Lovtcius, Viacheslav A.; Petrov, Vladimir V.; Kavokin, Kirill V.; Kavokin, Alexey V.; Zapasskii, Valerii S.

    2016-01-01

    Rapid development of spin noise spectroscopy of the last decade has led to a number of remarkable achievements in the fields of both magnetic resonance and optical spectroscopy. In this report, we demonstrate a new – magnetometric – potential of the spin noise spectroscopy and use it to study magnetic fields acting upon electron spin-system of an n-GaAs layer in a high-Q microcavity probed by elliptically polarized light. Along with the external magnetic field, applied to the sample, the spin noise spectrum revealed the Overhauser field created by optically oriented nuclei and an additional, previously unobserved, field arising in the presence of circularly polarized light. This “optical field” is directed along the light propagation axis, with its sign determined by sign of the light helicity. We show that this field results from the optical Stark effect in the field of the elliptically polarized light. This conclusion is supported by theoretical estimates. PMID:26882994

  13. Infinite-time average of local fields in an integrable quantum field theory after a quantum quench.

    PubMed

    Mussardo, G

    2013-09-01

    The infinite-time average of the expectation values of local fields of any interacting quantum theory after a global quench process are key quantities for matching theoretical and experimental results. For quantum integrable field theories, we show that they can be obtained by an ensemble average that employs a particular limit of the form factors of local fields and quantities extracted by the generalized Bethe ansatz.

  14. Improved UTE-based attenuation correction for cranial PET-MR using dynamic magnetic field monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Aitken, A. P.; Giese, D.; Tsoumpas, C.; Schleyer, P.; Kozerke, S.; Prieto, C.; Schaeffter, T.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Ultrashort echo time (UTE) MRI has been proposed as a way to produce segmented attenuation maps for PET, as it provides contrast between bone, air, and soft tissue. However, UTE sequences require samples to be acquired during rapidly changing gradient fields, which makes the resulting images prone to eddy current artifacts. In this work it is demonstrated that this can lead to misclassification of tissues in segmented attenuation maps (AC maps) and that these effects can be corrected for by measuring the true k-space trajectories using a magnetic field camera. Methods: The k-space trajectories during a dual echo UTE sequence were measured using a dynamic magnetic field camera. UTE images were reconstructed using nominal trajectories and again using the measured trajectories. A numerical phantom was used to demonstrate the effect of reconstructing with incorrect trajectories. Images of an ovine leg phantom were reconstructed and segmented and the resulting attenuation maps were compared to a segmented map derived from a CT scan of the same phantom, using the Dice similarity measure. The feasibility of the proposed method was demonstrated inin vivo cranial imaging in five healthy volunteers. Simulated PET data were generated for one volunteer to show the impact of misclassifications on the PET reconstruction. Results: Images of the numerical phantom exhibited blurring and edge artifacts on the bone–tissue and air–tissue interfaces when nominal k-space trajectories were used, leading to misclassification of soft tissue as bone and misclassification of bone as air. Images of the tissue phantom and thein vivo cranial images exhibited the same artifacts. The artifacts were greatly reduced when the measured trajectories were used. For the tissue phantom, the Dice coefficient for bone in MR relative to CT was 0.616 using the nominal trajectories and 0.814 using the measured trajectories. The Dice coefficients for soft tissue were 0.933 and 0.934 for the

  15. A compact quantum correction model for symmetric double gate metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Edward Namkyu; Shin, Yong Hyeon; Yun, Ilgu

    2014-11-07

    A compact quantum correction model for a symmetric double gate (DG) metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) is investigated. The compact quantum correction model is proposed from the concepts of the threshold voltage shift (ΔV{sub TH}{sup QM}) and the gate capacitance (C{sub g}) degradation. First of all, ΔV{sub TH}{sup QM} induced by quantum mechanical (QM) effects is modeled. The C{sub g} degradation is then modeled by introducing the inversion layer centroid. With ΔV{sub TH}{sup QM} and the C{sub g} degradation, the QM effects are implemented in previously reported classical model and a comparison between the proposed quantum correction model and numerical simulation results is presented. Based on the results, the proposed quantum correction model can be applicable to the compact model of DG MOSFET.

  16. Characterization and correction of eddy-current artifacts in unipolar and bipolar diffusion sequences using magnetic field monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Rachel W.; von Deuster, Constantin; Giese, Daniel; Stoeck, Christian T.; Harmer, Jack; Aitken, Andrew P.; Atkinson, David; Kozerke, Sebastian

    2014-07-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of moving organs is gaining increasing attention but robust performance requires sequence modifications and dedicated correction methods to account for system imperfections. In this study, eddy currents in the "unipolar" Stejskal-Tanner and the velocity-compensated "bipolar" spin-echo diffusion sequences were investigated and corrected for using a magnetic field monitoring approach in combination with higher-order image reconstruction. From the field-camera measurements, increased levels of second-order eddy currents were quantified in the unipolar sequence relative to the bipolar diffusion sequence while zeroth and linear orders were found to be similar between both sequences. Second-order image reconstruction based on field-monitoring data resulted in reduced spatial misalignment artifacts and residual displacements of less than 0.43 mm and 0.29 mm (in the unipolar and bipolar sequences, respectively) after second-order eddy-current correction. Results demonstrate the need for second-order correction in unipolar encoding schemes but also show that bipolar sequences benefit from second-order reconstruction to correct for incomplete intrinsic cancellation of eddy-currents.

  17. Characterization and correction of eddy-current artifacts in unipolar and bipolar diffusion sequences using magnetic field monitoring.

    PubMed

    Chan, Rachel W; von Deuster, Constantin; Giese, Daniel; Stoeck, Christian T; Harmer, Jack; Aitken, Andrew P; Atkinson, David; Kozerke, Sebastian

    2014-07-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of moving organs is gaining increasing attention but robust performance requires sequence modifications and dedicated correction methods to account for system imperfections. In this study, eddy currents in the "unipolar" Stejskal-Tanner and the velocity-compensated "bipolar" spin-echo diffusion sequences were investigated and corrected for using a magnetic field monitoring approach in combination with higher-order image reconstruction. From the field-camera measurements, increased levels of second-order eddy currents were quantified in the unipolar sequence relative to the bipolar diffusion sequence while zeroth and linear orders were found to be similar between both sequences. Second-order image reconstruction based on field-monitoring data resulted in reduced spatial misalignment artifacts and residual displacements of less than 0.43 mm and 0.29 mm (in the unipolar and bipolar sequences, respectively) after second-order eddy-current correction. Results demonstrate the need for second-order correction in unipolar encoding schemes but also show that bipolar sequences benefit from second-order reconstruction to correct for incomplete intrinsic cancellation of eddy-currents. PMID:24880880

  18. Wavelet-based denoising of the Fourier metric in real-time wavefront correction for single molecule localization microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tehrani, Kayvan Forouhesh; Mortensen, Luke J.; Kner, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Wavefront sensorless schemes for correction of aberrations induced by biological specimens require a time invariant property of an image as a measure of fitness. Image intensity cannot be used as a metric for Single Molecule Localization (SML) microscopy because the intensity of blinking fluorophores follows exponential statistics. Therefore a robust intensity-independent metric is required. We previously reported a Fourier Metric (FM) that is relatively intensity independent. The Fourier metric has been successfully tested on two machine learning algorithms, a Genetic Algorithm and Particle Swarm Optimization, for wavefront correction about 50 μm deep inside the Central Nervous System (CNS) of Drosophila. However, since the spatial frequencies that need to be optimized fall into regions of the Optical Transfer Function (OTF) that are more susceptible to noise, adding a level of denoising can improve performance. Here we present wavelet-based approaches to lower the noise level and produce a more consistent metric. We compare performance of different wavelets such as Daubechies, Bi-Orthogonal, and reverse Bi-orthogonal of different degrees and orders for pre-processing of images.

  19. Determination of Rectification Corrections for Semi Gantry Crane Rail Axes in the Local 3D Coordinate System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipiak, Daria; Kamiński, Waldemar

    2015-02-01

    Electronic tacheometers are currently the standard instruments used in geodetic work, including also geodetic engineering measurements. The main advantage connected with this equipment is among others high accuracy of the measurement and thus high accuracy of the final determinations represented for example by the points' coordinates. One of many applications of the tacheometers is the measurement of crane rail axes. This measurement is based on polar method and it allows to get the spatial coordinates of points in 3D local system. The standard technology of measurement of crane rail axes and development of its calculations' results is well-known and widely presented in the subject literature. At the same time new methods of observations results evaluation are developing. Some new proposals for the development of measurement results were already presented in (Kamiński, 2013). This paper is a generalisation of the paper quoted above. The authors developed the concept which was presented there by a proposal for determining rectification corrections for semi gantry crane rail axes. To carried out the task, the parametric method with conditions on parameters was used. Moreover the practical tests on simulated measurement results were conducted. The results obtained from alignment confirmed the theoretical assumptions. Despite the fact that analyses were carried out only on the simulated data, it is already possible to say that presented method for determination of rectification corrections for crane rail axes can be used for development of the observations from real measurement.

  20. Many-body local fields and Fermi-liquid parameters in a quasi-two-dimensional electron liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarlagadda, Sudhakar; Giuliani, Gabriele F.

    1994-05-01

    We present a quantitative theory of the quasiparticle properties in a Fermi liquid. Our approach uses as an input our previous result for the quasiparticle energy which incorporates the vertex corrections associated with charge and spin-density fluctuations through suitably defined many-body local fields. The method is explicitly applied to the case of the quasi-two-dimensional electron liquid occurring in silicon inversion layers. In particular, we discuss results for the effective mass m* and the modified Landé factor g* (Wilson ratio) that are in reasonable agreement with reported findings. Our calculations are performed by making use of a self-consistent static model for the many-body local fields and are consequently free of arbitrary parameters.

  1. Magnetic Field Modeling with a Set of Individual Localized Coils

    PubMed Central

    Juchem, Christoph; Nixon, Terence W.; McIntyre, Scott; Rothman, Douglas L.; de Graaf, Robin A.

    2010-01-01

    A set of generic, circular individual coils is shown to be capable of generating highly complex magnetic field distributions in a flexible fashion. Arbitrarily oriented linear field gradients can be generated in three-dimensional as well as sliced volumes at amplitudes that allow imaging applications. The multi-coil approach permits the simultaneous generation of linear MRI encoding fields and complex shim fields by the same setup, thereby reducing system complexity. The choice of the sensitive volume over which the magnetic fields are optimized remains temporally and spatially variable at all times. The restriction of the field synthesis to experimentally relevant, smaller volumes such as single slices directly translates into improved efficiency, i.e. higher magnetic field amplitudes and/or reduced coil currents. For applications like arterial spin labeling, signal spoiling and diffusion weighting, perfect linearity of the gradient fields is not required and reduced demands on accuracy can also be readily translated into improved efficiency. The first experimental realization was achieved for mouse head MRI with 24 coils that were mounted on the surface of a cylindrical former. Oblique linear field gradients of 20 kHz/cm (47 mT/m) were generated with a maximum current of 1.4 A which allowed radial imaging of a mouse head. The potential of the new approach for generating arbitrary magnetic field shapes is demonstrated by synthesizing the more complex, higher order spherical harmonic magnetic field distributions X2-Y2, Z2 and Z2X. The new multi-coil approach provides the framework for the integration of conventional imaging and shim coils into a single multi-coil system in which shape, strength, accuracy and spatial coverage of the magnetic field can be specifically optimized for the application at hand. PMID:20347360

  2. Magnetic field modeling with a set of individual localized coils.

    PubMed

    Juchem, Christoph; Nixon, Terence W; McIntyre, Scott; Rothman, Douglas L; de Graaf, Robin A

    2010-06-01

    A set of generic, circular individual coils is shown to be capable of generating highly complex magnetic field distributions in a flexible fashion. Arbitrarily oriented linear field gradients can be generated in three-dimensional as well as sliced volumes at amplitudes that allow imaging applications. The multi-coil approach permits the simultaneous generation of linear MRI encoding fields and complex shim fields by the same setup, thereby reducing system complexity. The choice of the sensitive volume over which the magnetic fields are optimized remains temporally and spatially variable at all times. The restriction of the field synthesis to experimentally relevant, smaller volumes such as single slices directly translates into improved efficiency, i.e. higher magnetic field amplitudes and/or reduced coil currents. For applications like arterial spin labeling, signal spoiling and diffusion weighting, perfect linearity of the gradient fields is not required and reduced demands on accuracy can also be readily translated into improved efficiency. The first experimental realization was achieved for mouse head MRI with 24 coils that were mounted on the surface of a cylindrical former. Oblique linear field gradients of 20 kHz/cm (47 mT/m) were generated with a maximum current of 1.4A which allowed radial imaging of a mouse head. The potential of the new approach for generating arbitrary magnetic field shapes is demonstrated by synthesizing the more complex, higher order spherical harmonic magnetic field distributions X2-Y2, Z2 and Z2X. The new multi-coil approach provides the framework for the integration of conventional imaging and shim coils into a single multi-coil system in which shape, strength, accuracy and spatial coverage of the magnetic field can be specifically optimized for the application at hand.

  3. A Novel Microaneurysms Detection Method Based on Local Applying of Markov Random Field.

    PubMed

    Ganjee, Razieh; Azmi, Reza; Moghadam, Mohsen Ebrahimi

    2016-03-01

    Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) is one of the most common complications of long-term diabetes. It is a progressive disease and by damaging retina, it finally results in blindness of patients. Since Microaneurysms (MAs) appear as a first sign of DR in retina, early detection of this lesion is an essential step in automatic detection of DR. In this paper, a new MAs detection method is presented. The proposed approach consists of two main steps. In the first step, the MA candidates are detected based on local applying of Markov random field model (MRF). In the second step, these candidate regions are categorized to identify the correct MAs using 23 features based on shape, intensity and Gaussian distribution of MAs intensity. The proposed method is evaluated on DIARETDB1 which is a standard and publicly available database in this field. Evaluation of the proposed method on this database resulted in the average sensitivity of 0.82 for a confidence level of 75 as a ground truth. The results show that our method is able to detect the low contrast MAs with the background while its performance is still comparable to other state of the art approaches.

  4. Corrective measures technology for shallow land burial at arid sites: field studies of biointrusion barriers and erosion control

    SciTech Connect

    Nyhan, J.W.; Hakonson, T.E.; Lopez, E.A.

    1986-03-01

    The field research program involving corrective measures technologies for arid shallow land burial (SLB) sites is described. Results of field testing of a biointrusion barrier installed at a close-out waste disposal site (Area B) at Los Alamos are presented. Soil erosion and infiltration of water into a simulated trench cap with various surface treatments were measured, and the interaction between erosion control and subsurface water dynamics is discussed relative to waste management.

  5. Experimental determination of field factors ([Formula: see text]) for small radiotherapy beams using the daisy chain correction method.

    PubMed

    Lárraga-Gutiérrez, José Manuel

    2015-08-01

    Recently, Alfonso et al proposed a new formalism for the dosimetry of small and non-standard fields. The proposed new formalism is strongly based on the calculation of detector-specific beam correction factors by Monte Carlo simulation methods, which accounts for the difference in the response of the detector between the small and the machine specific reference field. The correct calculation of the detector-specific beam correction factors demands an accurate knowledge of the linear accelerator, detector geometry and composition materials. The present work shows that the field factors in water may be determined experimentally using the daisy chain correction method down to a field size of 1 cm × 1 cm for a specific set of detectors. The detectors studied were: three mini-ionization chambers (PTW-31014, PTW-31006, IBA-CC01), three silicon-based diodes (PTW-60018, IBA-SFD and IBA-PFD) and one synthetic diamond detector (PTW-60019). Monte Carlo simulations and experimental measurements were performed for a 6 MV photon beam at 10 cm depth in water with a source-to-axis distance of 100 cm. The results show that the differences between the experimental and Monte Carlo calculated field factors are less than 0.5%-with the exception of the IBA-PFD-for field sizes between 1.5 cm × 1.5 cm and 5 cm × 5 cm. For the 1 cm × 1 cm field size, the differences are within 2%. By using the daisy chain correction method, it is possible to determine measured field factors in water. The results suggest that the daisy chain correction method is not suitable for measurements performed with the IBA-PFD detector. The latter is due to the presence of tungsten powder in the detector encapsulation material. The use of Monte Carlo calculated [Formula: see text] is encouraged for field sizes less than or equal to 1 cm × 1 cm for the dosimeters used in this work. PMID:26161448

  6. Sub-10 nm near-field localization by plasmonic metal nanoaperture arrays with ultrashort light pulses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hongki; Kim, Chulhong; Kim, Donghyun

    2015-01-01

    Near-field localization by ultrashort femtosecond light pulses has been investigated using simple geometrical nanoapertures. The apertures employ circular, rhombic, and triangular shapes to localize the distribution of surface plasmon. To understand the geometrical effect on the localization, aperture length and period of the nanoapertures were varied. Aperture length was shown to affect the performance more than aperture period due mainly to intra-aperture coupling of near-fields. Triangular apertures provided the strongest spatial localization below 10 nm in size as well as the highest enhancement of field intensity by more than 7000 times compared to the incident light pulse. Use of ultrashort pulses was found to allow much stronger light localization than with continuous-wave light. The results can be used for super-localization sensing and imaging applications where spatially localized fields can break through the limits in achieving improved sensitivity and resolution. PMID:26628326

  7. Localization from near-source quasi-static electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.C.

    1993-09-01

    A wide range of research has been published on the problem of estimating the parameters of electromagnetic and acoustical sources from measurements of signals measured at an array of sensors. In the quasi-static electromagnetic cases examined here, the signal variation from a point source is relatively slow with respect to the signal propagation and the spacing of the array of sensors. As such, the location of the point sources can only be determined from the spatial diversity of the received signal across the array. The inverse source localization problem is complicated by unknown model order and strong local minima. The nonlinear optimization problem is posed for solving for the parameters of the quasi-static source model. The transient nature of the sources can be exploited to allow subspace approaches to separate out the signal portion of the spatial correlation matrix. Decomposition techniques are examined for improved processing, and an adaptation of MUtiple SIgnal Characterization (MUSIC) is presented for solving the source localization problem. Recent results on calculating the Cramer-Rao error lower bounds are extended to the multidimensional problem here. This thesis focuses on the problem of source localization in magnetoencephalography (MEG), with a secondary application to thunderstorm source localization. Comparisons are also made between MEG and its electrical equivalent, electroencephalography (EEG). The error lower bounds are examined in detail for several MEG and EEG configurations, as well as localizing thunderstorm cells over Cape Canaveral and Kennedy Space Center. Time-eigenspectrum is introduced as a parsing technique for improving the performance of the optimization problem.

  8. Spatial regulation of Aurora A activity during mitotic spindle assembly requires RHAMM to correctly localize TPX2

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Helen; Mohan, Pooja; Jiang, Jihong; Nemirovsky, Oksana; He, Daniel; Fleisch, Markus C; Niederacher, Dieter; Pilarski, Linda M; Lim, C James; Maxwell, Christopher A

    2014-01-01

    Construction of a mitotic spindle requires biochemical pathways to assemble spindle microtubules and structural proteins to organize these microtubules into a bipolar array. Through a complex with dynein, the receptor for hyaluronan-mediated motility (RHAMM) cross-links mitotic microtubules to provide structural support, maintain spindle integrity, and correctly orient the mitotic spindle. Here, we locate RHAMM to sites of microtubule assembly at centrosomes and non-centrosome sites near kinetochores and demonstrate that RHAMM is required for the activation of Aurora kinase A. Silencing of RHAMM delays the kinetics of spindle assembly, mislocalizes targeting protein for XKlp2 (TPX2), and attenuates the localized activation of Aurora kinase A with a consequent reduction in mitotic spindle length. The RHAMM–TPX2 complex requires a C-terminal basic leucine zipper in RHAMM and a domain that includes the nuclear localization signal in TPX2. Together, our findings identify RHAMM as a critical regulator for Aurora kinase A signaling and suggest that RHAMM ensures bipolar spindle assembly and mitotic progression through the integration of biochemical and structural pathways. PMID:24875404

  9. All possible local charges in a local quantum field theory: Massive case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amigó, J. M.

    1988-04-01

    A proof for local charges of the classical result first put forward by Coleman and Mandula [Phys. Rev. 159, 1251 (1967)] is given. Local charges are operators defined as integrals of the time component of conserved Hermitian density currents; in interacting theories they happen to be generators of symmetries of the S matrix.

  10. Low-dimensional attractor for neural activity from local field potentials in optogenetic mice.

    PubMed

    Oprisan, Sorinel A; Lynn, Patrick E; Tompa, Tamas; Lavin, Antonieta

    2015-01-01

    We used optogenetic mice to investigate possible nonlinear responses of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) local network to light stimuli delivered by a 473 nm laser through a fiber optics. Every 2 s, a brief 10 ms light pulse was applied and the local field potentials (LFPs) were recorded with a 10 kHz sampling rate. The experiment was repeated 100 times and we only retained and analyzed data from six animals that showed stable and repeatable response to optical stimulations. The presence of nonlinearity in our data was checked using the null hypothesis that the data were linearly correlated in the temporal domain, but were random otherwise. For each trail, 100 surrogate data sets were generated and both time reversal asymmetry and false nearest neighbor (FNN) were used as discriminating statistics for the null hypothesis. We found that nonlinearity is present in all LFP data. The first 0.5 s of each 2 s LFP recording were dominated by the transient response of the networks. For each trial, we used the last 1.5 s of steady activity to measure the phase resetting induced by the brief 10 ms light stimulus. After correcting the LFPs for the effect of phase resetting, additional preprocessing was carried out using dendrograms to identify "similar" groups among LFP trials. We found that the steady dynamics of mPFC in response to light stimuli could be reconstructed in a three-dimensional phase space with topologically similar "8"-shaped attractors across different animals. Our results also open the possibility of designing a low-dimensional model for optical stimulation of the mPFC local network.

  11. Random vectorial fields representing the local structure of turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevillard, Laurent; Robert, Raoul; Vargas, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    We propose a method to build up a random homogeneous, isotropic and incompressible turbulent velocity field that mimics turbulence in the inertial range. The underlying Gaussian field is given by a modified Biot-Savart law. The long range correlated nature of turbulence is then incorporated heuristically using a non linear transformation inspired by the recent fluid deformation imposed by the Euler equations. The resulting velocity field shows a non vanishing mean energy transfer towards the small scales and realistic alignment properties of vorticity with the eigenframe of the deformation rate.

  12. Polarization-controlled TIRFM with focal drift and spatial field intensity correction.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Daniel S; Toledo-Crow, Ricardo; Mattheyses, Alexa L; Simon, Sanford M

    2014-03-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) is becoming an increasingly common methodology to narrow the illumination excitation thickness to study cellular process such as exocytosis, endocytosis, and membrane dynamics. It is also frequently used as a method to improve signal/noise in other techniques such as in vitro single-molecule imaging, stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy/photoactivated localization microscopy imaging, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging. The unique illumination geometry of TIRFM also enables a distinct method to create an excitation field for selectively exciting fluorophores that are aligned either parallel or perpendicular to the optical axis. This selectivity has been used to study orientation of cell membranes and cellular proteins. Unfortunately, the coherent nature of laser light, the typical excitation source in TIRFM, often creates spatial interference fringes across the illuminated area. These fringes are particularly problematic when imaging large cellular areas or when accurate quantification is necessary. Methods have been developed to minimize these fringes by modulating the TIRFM field during a frame capture period; however, these approaches eliminate the possibility to simultaneously excite with a specific polarization. A new, to our knowledge, technique is presented, which compensates for spatial fringes while simultaneously permitting rapid image acquisition of both parallel and perpendicular excitation directions in ~25 ms. In addition, a back reflection detection scheme was developed that enables quick and accurate alignment of the excitation laser. The detector also facilitates focus drift compensation, a common problem in TIRFM due to the narrow excitation depth, particularly when imaging over long time courses or when using a perfusion flow chamber. The capabilities of this instrument were demonstrated by imaging membrane orientation using DiO on live cells and on lipid bilayers

  13. Polarization-Controlled TIRFM with Focal Drift and Spatial Field Intensity Correction

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Daniel S.; Toledo-Crow, Ricardo; Mattheyses, Alexa L.; Simon, Sanford M.

    2014-01-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) is becoming an increasingly common methodology to narrow the illumination excitation thickness to study cellular process such as exocytosis, endocytosis, and membrane dynamics. It is also frequently used as a method to improve signal/noise in other techniques such as in vitro single-molecule imaging, stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy/photoactivated localization microscopy imaging, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging. The unique illumination geometry of TIRFM also enables a distinct method to create an excitation field for selectively exciting fluorophores that are aligned either parallel or perpendicular to the optical axis. This selectivity has been used to study orientation of cell membranes and cellular proteins. Unfortunately, the coherent nature of laser light, the typical excitation source in TIRFM, often creates spatial interference fringes across the illuminated area. These fringes are particularly problematic when imaging large cellular areas or when accurate quantification is necessary. Methods have been developed to minimize these fringes by modulating the TIRFM field during a frame capture period; however, these approaches eliminate the possibility to simultaneously excite with a specific polarization. A new, to our knowledge, technique is presented, which compensates for spatial fringes while simultaneously permitting rapid image acquisition of both parallel and perpendicular excitation directions in ∼25 ms. In addition, a back reflection detection scheme was developed that enables quick and accurate alignment of the excitation laser. The detector also facilitates focus drift compensation, a common problem in TIRFM due to the narrow excitation depth, particularly when imaging over long time courses or when using a perfusion flow chamber. The capabilities of this instrument were demonstrated by imaging membrane orientation using DiO on live cells and on lipid

  14. Embeddings of maximal tori in classical groups over local and global fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer-Fluckiger, E.; Lee, T.-Y.; Parimala, R.

    2016-08-01

    Embeddings of maximal tori in classical groups over fields of characteristic not 2 are the subject matter of several recent papers. The aim of the present paper is to give necessary and sufficient conditions for such an embedding to exist, when the base field is a local field, or the field of real numbers. This completes the results of [3], where a complete criterion is given for the Hasse principle to hold when the base field is a global field.

  15. Seafloor bathymetry in deep and shallow water marine CSEM responses of Nigerian Niger Delta oil field: Effects and corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folorunso, Adetayo Femi; Li, Yuguo

    2015-12-01

    Topography distortions in bathymetrically acquired marine Controlled-Source Electromagnetic (mCSEM) responses are capable of misleading interpretation to the presence or absence of the target if not corrected for. For this reason, the effects and correction of bathymetry distortions on the deep and shallow seafloor mCSEM responses of the Niger Delta Oil province were examined in this paper. Marine CSEM response of the Niger Delta geological structure was modelled by using a 2.5D adaptive finite element forward modelling code. In both the deep water and shallow water cases, the bathymetry distortions in the electric field amplitude and phase were found to get smaller with increasing Tx-Rx offsets and contain short-wavelength components in the amplitude curves which persist at all Tx-Rx offsets. In the deep water, topographic effects on the reservoir signatures are not significant, but as water depth reduces, bathymetric distortions become more significant as a result of the airwave effects, masking the target signatures. The correction technique produces a good agreement between the flat-seafloor reservoir model and its equivalent bathymetric model in deep water at 0.25 Hz, while in shallow water, the corrected response only shows good agreement at shorter offsets but becomes complicated at longer offsets due to airwave effects. Transmission frequency was extended above and below 0.25 Hz in the frequency spectrum and the correction method applied. The bathymetry correction at higher frequency (1.75 Hz) is not effective in removing the topographic effects in either deep or shallow water. At 0.05 Hz for both seafloor scenarios, we obtained the best corrected amplitude profiles, removing completely the distortions from both topographic undulation and airwave effects in the shallow water model. Overall, the work shows that the correction technique is effective in reducing bathymetric effects in deep water at medium frequency and in both deep and shallow waters at a low

  16. Correction of the axial asymmetry of the poloidal magnetic field in the Globus-M spherical tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, Yu. V.; Patrov, M. I.; Varfolomeev, V. I.; Gusev, V. K.; Lamzin, E. A.; Sakharov, N. V.; Sychevskii, S. E.

    2010-06-15

    The toroidal inhomogeneity of the poloidal magnetic field-the so-called error fields that arise due to imperfections in manufacturing and assembling of the electromagnetic system-was measured in the Globus-M spherical tokamak. A substantial inhomogeneity corresponding to the n = 1 mode, which gave rise to a locked mode and led to discharge disruption, was revealed. After compensation of this inhomogeneity with the help of special correction coils, the discharge duration increased and the global plasma parameters improved substantially. A technique for determining and compensating the n = 1 mode inhomogeneity is described, the measured dependences of the penetration threshold of the m = 2/n = 1 mode on the plasma parameters are given, and results of experiments in which record parameters for the Globus-M tokamak were achieved after correction of the poloidal magnetic field are presented.

  17. Frequency-dependent local field factors in dielectric liquids by a polarizable force field and molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Davari, Nazanin; Haghdani, Shokouh; Åstrand, Per-Olof

    2015-12-31

    A force field model for calculating local field factors, i.e. the linear response of the local electric field for example at a nucleus in a molecule with respect to an applied electric field, is discussed. It is based on a combined charge-transfer and point-dipole interaction model for the polarizability, and thereby it includes two physically distinct terms for describing electronic polarization: changes in atomic charges arising from transfer of charge between the atoms and atomic induced dipole moments. A time dependence is included both for the atomic charges and the atomic dipole moments and if they are assumed to oscillate with the same frequency as the applied electric field, a model for frequency-dependent properties are obtained. Furthermore, if a life-time of excited states are included, a model for the complex frequency-dependent polariability is obtained including also information about excited states and the absorption spectrum. We thus present a model for the frequency-dependent local field factors through the first molecular excitation energy. It is combined with molecular dynamics simulations of liquids where a large set of configurations are sampled and for which local field factors are calculated. We are normally not interested in the average of the local field factor but rather in configurations where it is as high as possible. In electrical insulation, we would like to avoid high local field factors to reduce the risk for electrical breakdown, whereas for example in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, high local field factors are desired to give dramatically increased intensities.

  18. Fine optical alignment correction of astronomical spectrographs via in-situ full-field moment-based wavefront sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hanshin; Hill, Gary J.; Tuttle, Sarah E.; Vattiat, Brian L.

    2012-09-01

    The image moment-based wavefront sensing (IWFS) utilizes moments of focus-modulated focal plane images to determine modal wavefront aberrations. This permits fast, easy, and accurate measurement of wavefront error (WFE) on any available finite-sized isolated targets across the entire focal plane (FP) of an imaging system, thereby allowing not only in-situ full-field image quality assessment, but also deterministic fine alignment correction of the imaging system. We present an experimental demonstration where fine alignment correction of a fast camera system in a fiber-fed astronomical spectrograph, called VIRUS, is accomplished by using IWFS.

  19. Intra-field on-product overlay improvement by application of RegC and TWINSCAN corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharoni, Ofir; Dmitriev, Vladimir; Graitzer, Erez; Perets, Yuval; Gorhad, Kujan; van Haren, Richard; Cekli, Hakki E.; Mulkens, Jan

    2015-03-01

    The on product overlay specification and Advanced Process Control (APC) is getting extremely challenging particularly after the introduction of multi-patterning applications like Spacer Assisted Double Patterning (SADP) and multipatterning techniques like N-repetitive Litho-Etch steps (LEN, N >= 2). When the latter is considered, most of the intrafield overlay contributors drop out of the overlay budget. This is a direct consequence of the fact that the scanner settings (like dose, illumination settings, etc.) as well as the subsequent processing steps can be made very similar for two consecutive Litho-Etch layers. The major overlay contributor that may require additional attention is the Image Placement Error (IPE). When the inter-layer overlay is considered, controlling the intra-field overlay contribution gets more complicated. In addition to the IPE contribution, the TWINSCANTM lens fingerprint in combination with the exposure settings is going to play a role as well. Generally speaking, two subsequent functional layers have different exposure settings. This results in a (non-reticle) additional overlay contribution. In this paper, we have studied the wafer overlay correction capability by RegC® in addition to the TWINSCANTM intrafield corrections to improve the on product overlay performance. RegC® is a reticle intra-volume laser writing technique that causes a predictable deformation element (RegC® deformation element) inside the quartz (Qz) material of a reticle. This technique enables to post-process an existing reticle to correct for instance for IPE. Alternatively, a pre-determined intra-field fingerprint can be added to the reticle such that it results in a straight field after exposure. This second application might be very powerful to correct for instance for (cold) lens fingerprints that cannot be corrected by the scanner itself. Another possible application is the intra-field processing fingerprint. One should realize that a RegC® treatment of a

  20. Field-aligned neutral wind bias correction scheme for global ionospheric modeling at midlatitudes by assimilating FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC hmF2 data under geomagnetically quiet conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yang-Yi; Matsuo, Tomoko; Maruyama, Naomi; Liu, Jann-Yenq

    2015-04-01

    This study demonstrates the usage of a data assimilation procedure, which ingests the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (F3/C) hmF2 observations to correct the model wind biases to enhance the capability of the new global Ionosphere Plasmasphere Electrodynamics (IPE) model under geomagnetically quiet conditions. The IPE model is built upon the field line interhemispheric plasma model with a realistic geomagnetic field model and empirical model drivers. The hmF2 observed by the F3/C radio occultation technique is utilized to adjust global thermospheric field-aligned neutral winds (i.e., a component of the thermospheric neutral wind parallel to the magnetic field) at midlatitudes according to a linear relationship between time differentials of the field-aligned wind and hmF2. The adjusted winds are further applied to drive the IPE model. The comparison of the modeled electron density with the observations of F3/C and ground-based GPS receivers at the 2012 March equinox suggests that the modeled electron density can be significantly improved in the midlatitude regions of the Southern Hemisphere, if the wind correction scheme is applied. Moreover, the F3/C observation, the IPE model, and the wind bias correction scheme are applied to study the 2012 Southern Hemisphere Midlatitude Summer Nighttime Anomaly (southern MSNA)/Weddell Sea Anomaly (WSA) event at December solstice for examining the role of the neutral winds in controlling the longitudinal variation of the southern MSNA/WSA behavior. With the help of the wind bias correction scheme, the IPE model better tracks the F3/C-observed eastward movement of the southern MSNA/WSA feature. The apparent eastward movement of the southern MSNA/WSA features in the local time coordinate is primarily caused by the longitudinal variation in the declination angle of the geomagnetic field that controls the field-aligned projection of both geographic meridional and zonal components of the neutral wind. Both the IPE simulations and the F3/C

  1. T-duality of α‧-correction to DBI action at all orders of gauge field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garousi, Mohammad R.

    2016-08-01

    By explicit calculations of four-field couplings, we observe that the higher derivative corrections to the DBI action in flat space-time, can be either in a covariant form or in a T-duality invariant form. The two forms are related by a non-covariant field redefinition. Using this observation, we then propose a non-covariant but T-duality invariant action which includes all orders of massless fields and has two extra derivatives with respect to the DBI action.

  2. Topology-corrected segmentation and local intensity estimates for improved partial volume classification of brain cortex in MRI.

    PubMed

    Rueda, Andrea; Acosta, Oscar; Couprie, Michel; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Fripp, Jurgen; Dowson, Nicholas; Romero, Eduardo; Salvado, Olivier

    2010-05-15

    In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), accuracy and precision with which brain structures may be quantified are frequently affected by the partial volume (PV) effect. PV is due to the limited spatial resolution of MRI compared to the size of anatomical structures. Accurate classification of mixed voxels and correct estimation of the proportion of each pure tissue (fractional content) may help to increase the precision of cortical thickness estimation in regions where this measure is particularly difficult, such as deep sulci. The contribution of this work is twofold: on the one hand, we propose a new method to label voxels and compute tissue fractional content, integrating a mechanism for detecting sulci with topology preserving operators. On the other hand, we improve the computation of the fractional content of mixed voxels using local estimation of pure tissue intensity means. Accuracy and precision were assessed using simulated and real MR data and comparison with other existing approaches demonstrated the benefits of our method. Significant improvements in gray matter (GM) classification and cortical thickness estimation were brought by the topology correction. The fractional content root mean squared error diminished by 6.3% (p<0.01) on simulated data. The reproducibility error decreased by 8.8% (p<0.001) and the Jaccard similarity measure increased by 3.5% on real data. Furthermore, compared with manually guided expert segmentations, the similarity measure was improved by 12.0% (p<0.001). Thickness estimation with the proposed method showed a higher reproducibility compared with the measure performed after partial volume classification using other methods.

  3. Geometrical parameters effects on local electric field enhancement of silver-dielectric-silver multilayer nanoshell

    SciTech Connect

    Shirzaditabar, Farzad; Saliminasab, Maryam

    2013-05-15

    The local electric field enhancement at different points of silver-dielectric-silver nanoshell is investigated using quasi-static theory. Because of the symmetric and anti-symmetric coupling between surface plasmon of inner silver core and outer silver shell, the local electric field spectrum of silver-dielectric-silver has two distinct peaks at resonance wavelengths. The silver core size and middle dielectric thickness affect the local electric field enhancement at different points of silver-dielectric-silver nanoshell. Increasing the silver core radius always leads to blue shift of shorter resonance wavelength and red shift of longer resonance wavelength. We observed two distinct local electric field peaks, which are corresponded to the symmetric and anti-symmetric coupling between inner and outer surface plasmons. In a system with thick silver shell, local electric field enhancement is greater than a system with thin silver shell. However, the local electric field variations as a function of silver core radius in both systems are different at different points of nanoshell. The effects of the dielectric thickness variations on local electric field are different from those from silver core size variations. As the dielectric thickness is about 3 nm, the highest local electric field enhancement occurs at the surface of the inner silver core, where the symmetric and anti-symmetric modes are mixed together.

  4. Geometrical parameters effects on local electric field enhancement of silver-dielectric-silver multilayer nanoshell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirzaditabar, Farzad; Saliminasab, Maryam

    2013-05-01

    The local electric field enhancement at different points of silver-dielectric-silver nanoshell is investigated using quasi-static theory. Because of the symmetric and anti-symmetric coupling between surface plasmon of inner silver core and outer silver shell, the local electric field spectrum of silver-dielectric-silver has two distinct peaks at resonance wavelengths. The silver core size and middle dielectric thickness affect the local electric field enhancement at different points of silver-dielectric-silver nanoshell. Increasing the silver core radius always leads to blue shift of shorter resonance wavelength and red shift of longer resonance wavelength. We observed two distinct local electric field peaks, which are corresponded to the symmetric and anti-symmetric coupling between inner and outer surface plasmons. In a system with thick silver shell, local electric field enhancement is greater than a system with thin silver shell. However, the local electric field variations as a function of silver core radius in both systems are different at different points of nanoshell. The effects of the dielectric thickness variations on local electric field are different from those from silver core size variations. As the dielectric thickness is about 3 nm, the highest local electric field enhancement occurs at the surface of the inner silver core, where the symmetric and anti-symmetric modes are mixed together.

  5. Atom localization in a Doppler broadened medium via two standing-wave fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd-Elnabi, Somia; Osman, Kariman I.

    2016-01-01

    The atom localization has been achieved in a four-level V-type atomic system interacting with two classical unidirectional standing-wave fields and weak probe field in a Doppler broadened medium under several conditions at very low temperature. The precision of the atom localization is compared with the system in the presence and absence of the Doppler broadened medium. The influence of some parameters such as the amplitude, wave vectors and the phase shift of the standing-wave fields on the atom localization is studied and has been found to obtain various atom localization patterns with symmetric shape.

  6. Regional and local geologic structure of the Momotombo field, Nicaragua

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, L.H.

    1980-09-01

    The regional geologic-tectonic setting of northwestern Nicaragua is the result of subduction. Differential plate margin movement and segmentation formed a deep rift paralleling the Middle American Trench. Deep-seated shear faults provided access to sublithospheric magmas to create the Nicaraguan volcanic chain. Volcan Momotombo is the southernmost volcano of the Marabios Range of northern Nicaragua. It hosts a proven geothermal resource known as the Momotombo field, located within a small graben structure and measuring less than one square kilometer. This geothermally productive area appears not to be a geothermal reservoir, but rather part of a thermal convection system. Wells in the central and eastern part of the field have diminished in output and temperature. The presence of a temperature inversion zone, clearly distinguishable in the eastern end of the field, indicates that no conductive heating of the productive zone is taking place.

  7. A Hi Fidelity Asymptotic Theory For Local Field Recovery Inside Pre-stressed Composite Media

    SciTech Connect

    Breitzman, Timothy; Lipton, Robert; Iarve, Endel

    2008-02-15

    We introduce a new mathematically rigorous high fidelity asymptotic theory for recovering the local field behavior inside complex composite architectures. The theory applies to zones containing strong spatial variance of local material properties. The method is used to recover the local field across ply interfaces for a pre-stressed multi-ply fiber reinforced composite. The results are shown to be in good agreement with direct numerical simulations for realistic fiber sizes and fiber-matrix elastic properties.

  8. Comparative sensitivity study and reading correction of various albedo dosimeters in neutron fields on the U-400M accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokrov, Yu. V.; Morozov, S. V.; Shchegolev, V. Yu.

    2013-03-01

    The sensitivities of three types of albedo dosimeters are experimentally studied in U-400M accelerator radiation fields in the experimental hall (one point) and behind its shielding (three points). It is shown that the ratios of the sensitivity of the albedo dosimeter (AD) and the combined personal dosimeter (CPD) used earlier at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) to the sensitivity of the DVGN-01 dosimeter are constant within 25%. This allows the AD and CPD sensitivities obtained earlier at the JINR facilities to be used for correcting readings of the DVGN-01 now used at JINR for personal radiation monitoring. Correction coefficients are found for DVGN-01 readings behind the U-400M shielding. This has allowed a more reliable correction coefficient to be established for the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions (FLNR).

  9. A localized orbital analysis of the thermochemical errors in hybrid density functional theory: achieving chemical accuracy via a simple empirical correction scheme.

    PubMed

    Friesner, Richard A; Knoll, Eric H; Cao, Yixiang

    2006-09-28

    This paper describes an empirical localized orbital correction model which improves the accuracy of density functional theory (DFT) methods for the prediction of thermochemical properties for molecules of first and second row elements. The B3LYP localized orbital correction version of the model improves B3LYP DFT atomization energy calculations on the G3 data set of 222 molecules from a mean absolute deviation (MAD) from experiment of 4.8 to 0.8 kcal/mol. The almost complete elimination of large outliers and the substantial reduction in MAD yield overall results comparable to the G3 wave-function-based method; furthermore, the new model has zero additional computational cost beyond standard DFT calculations. The following four classes of correction parameters are applied to a molecule based on standard valence bond assignments: corrections to atoms, corrections to individual bonds, corrections for neighboring bonds of a given bond, and radical environmental corrections. Although the model is heuristic and is based on a 22 parameter multiple linear regression to experimental errors, each of the parameters is justified on physical grounds, and each provides insight into the fundamental limitations of DFT, most importantly the failure of current DFT methods to accurately account for nondynamical electron correlation.

  10. Localization of virtual objects in the near visual field.

    PubMed

    Ellis, S R; Menges, B M

    1998-09-01

    We examined errors in the localization of nearby virtual objects presented via see-through helmet-mounted displays as a function of viewing conditions and scene content in four experiments using a total of 38 participants. Monocular, biocular, and stereoscopic presentation of the virtual objects, accommodation (required focus), participants' age, and the position of physical surfaces were examined. Nearby physical surfaces were found to introduce localization errors that differ depending on the other experimental factors. These errors apparently arise from the occlusion of the physical background by the optically superimposed virtual objects, but they are modified by participants' accommodative competence and specific viewing conditions. The apparent physical size and transparency of the virtual objects and physical surfaces, respectively, are influenced by their relative position when superimposed. The design implications of the findings are discussed in a concluding section. Head-mounted displays of virtual objects are currently being evaluated as aids for mechanical assembly and equipment maintenance. Other applications include telesurgery, surgical planning, telerobotics, and visualization aids for robotic programming.

  11. On local bifurcations in neural field models with transmission delays.

    PubMed

    van Gils, S A; Janssens, S G; Kuznetsov, Yu A; Visser, S

    2013-03-01

    Neural field models with transmission delays may be cast as abstract delay differential equations (DDE). The theory of dual semigroups (also called sun-star calculus) provides a natural framework for the analysis of a broad class of delay equations, among which DDE. In particular, it may be used advantageously for the investigation of stability and bifurcation of steady states. After introducing the neural field model in its basic functional analytic setting and discussing its spectral properties, we elaborate extensively an example and derive a characteristic equation. Under certain conditions the associated equilibrium may destabilise in a Hopf bifurcation. Furthermore, two Hopf curves may intersect in a double Hopf point in a two-dimensional parameter space. We provide general formulas for the corresponding critical normal form coefficients, evaluate these numerically and interpret the results. PMID:23192328

  12. Local field and radiative relaxation rate in a dielectric medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, D. V.; Roerich, Vl. K.; Gladush, M. G.

    2011-10-01

    The effect of macroscopic parameters of a substance on the optical characteristics of impurity particles is investigated. A generalized control equation is derived for two-level emitters forming an ensemble of optical centers in a transparent dielectric medium. In this equation, the effective values of the acting pump field and the radiative relaxation rate of an optical center are taken into account. The formalism developed here is a completely microscopic approach based on the chain of the Bogoliubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon equations for reduced density matrices and correlation operators for material particles and modes of a quantized radiation field. The method used here makes it possible to take into account the effects of individual and collective behavior of emitters, which are associated with the presence of an intermediate medium, consistently without using phenomenological procedures. It is shown that the resultant analytic expression for the effective lifetime of the excited state of an optical center conforms with experimental data.

  13. Effect of ferroelastic twin walls on local polarizations switching - phase field modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Quanzi; Choudhury, S; Zhang, J X; Li, Y L; Chen, Q; Kalinin, S V

    2008-01-01

    Local polarization switching in epitaxial ferroelectric thin films in the presence of ferroelastic domain walls was studied using phase-field approach. The nucleation bias profile across a twin wall was analyzed, and the localization of preferential nucleation sites was established. This analysis was further extended to a realistic domain structure with multiple twin boundaries. It was observed that the local nucleation voltage required for a 180{sup o} domain switching is closely related to the number of such local defects.

  14. Bremsstrahlung radiation from slow electrons in a Coulomb field: Classical limit and quantum correction

    SciTech Connect

    Manakov, N. L. Krylovetsky, A. A.; Marmo, S. I.

    2015-11-15

    Compact analytic expressions have been derived by a direct expansion in ħ → 0 for the nonrelativistic amplitude of Coulomb bremsstrahlung radiation (BR), the differential (in frequency and angles of the scattered electron) BR cross section, and the triply differential BR cross section that takes into account the bremsstrahlung photon direction and polarization and the scattered electron direction. They contain the classical limit and a quantum correction of the order of ħ at an arbitrary BR frequency ω. An explicit expression has been found for the quantum correction of the order of ħ to the classical BR spectrum.

  15. Small field diode correction factors derived using an air core fibre optic scintillation dosimeter and EBT2 film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralston, Anna; Liu, Paul; Warrener, Kirbie; McKenzie, David; Suchowerska, Natalka

    2012-05-01

    There is no commercially available real-time dosimeter that can accurately measure output factors for field sizes down to 4 mm without the use of correction factors. Silicon diode detectors are commonly used but are not dosimetrically water equivalent, resulting in energy dependence and fluence perturbation. In contrast, plastic scintillators are nearly dosimetrically water equivalent. A fibre optic dosimeter (FOD) with a 0.8 mm3 plastic scintillator coupled to an air core light guide was used to measure the output factors for Novalis/BrainLab stereotactic cones of diameter 4-30 mm and Novalis MLC fields of width 5-100 mm. The FOD data matched the output factors measured by a 0.125 cm3 Semiflex ion chamber for the MLC fields above 30 mm and those measured with the EBT2 radiochromic film for the cones and MLC fields below 30 mm. Relative detector readings were obtained with four diode types (IBA SFD, EFD, PFD, PTW 60012) for the same fields. Empirical diode correction factors were determined by taking the ratio of FOD output factors to diode relative detector readings. The diodes were found to over-respond by 3%-16% for the smallest field. There was good agreement between different diodes of the same model number.

  16. Aberration corrected 1.2-MV cold field-emission transmission electron microscope with a sub-50-pm resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Akashi, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Yoshio; Tanigaki, Toshiaki Shimakura, Tomokazu; Kawasaki, Takeshi; Furutsu, Tadao; Shinada, Hiroyuki; Osakabe, Nobuyuki; Müller, Heiko; Haider, Maximilian; Tonomura, Akira

    2015-02-16

    Atomic-resolution electromagnetic field observation is critical to the development of advanced materials and to the unveiling of their fundamental physics. For this purpose, a spherical-aberration corrected 1.2-MV cold field-emission transmission electron microscope has been developed. The microscope has the following superior properties: stabilized accelerating voltage, minimized electrical and mechanical fluctuation, and coherent electron emission. These properties have enabled to obtain 43-pm information transfer. On the bases of these performances, a 43-pm resolution has been obtained by correcting lens aberrations up to the third order. Observations of GaN [411] thin crystal showed a projected atomic locations with a separation of 44 pm.

  17. Brownian regime of finite-N corrections to particle motion in the XY Hamiltonian mean field model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Bruno V.; Amato, Marco A.; Elskens, Yves

    2016-08-01

    We study the dynamics of the N-particle system evolving in the XY Hamiltonian mean field (HMF) model for a repulsive potential, when no phase transition occurs. Starting from a homogeneous distribution, particles evolve in a mean field created by the interaction with all others. This interaction does not change the homogeneous state of the system, and particle motion is approximately ballistic with small corrections. For initial particle data approaching a waterbag, it is explicitly proved that corrections to the ballistic velocities are in the form of independent Brownian noises over a time scale diverging not slower than {N}2/5 as N\\to ∞ , which proves the propagation of molecular chaos. Molecular dynamics simulations of the XY-HMF model confirm our analytical findings.

  18. OBSERVATIONS OF SIMILARITY THEORY STABILITY CORRECTION TERMS FOR MOMENTUM AND TEMPERATURE, OVER AGRICULTURAL FIELDS AND FORESTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many observations of temperature and wind speed profiles have been taken over "ideal" terrain and analyzed to develop the stability correction terms which are commonly used in the application of similarity theory. Fewer observations have been taken and analyzed in this manner ov...

  19. Switching local magnetization by electric-field-induced domain wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakizakai, Haruka; Ando, Fuyuki; Koyama, Tomohiro; Yamada, Kihiro; Kawaguchi, Masashi; Kim, Sanghoon; Kim, Kab-Jin; Moriyama, Takahiro; Chiba, Daichi; Ono, Teruo

    2016-06-01

    Electric field effect on magnetism is an appealing technique for manipulating magnetization at a low energy cost. Here, we show that the local magnetization of an ultrathin Co film can be switched by simply applying a gate electric field without the assistance of any external magnetic field or current flow. The local magnetization switching is explained by nucleation and annihilation of magnetic domains through domain wall motion induced by the electric field. Our results lead to external-field-free and ultralow-energy spintronic applications.

  20. Simulations of the magnet misalignments, field errors and orbit correction for the SLC north arc

    SciTech Connect

    Kheifets, S.; Chao, A.; Jaeger, J.; Shoaee, H.

    1983-11-01

    Given the intensity of linac bunches and their repetition rate the desired luminosity of SLC 1.0 x 10/sup 30/ cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/ requires focusing the interaction bunches to a spot size in the micrometer (..mu..m) range. The lattice that achieves this goal is obtained by careful design of both the arcs and the final focus systems. For the micrometer range of the beam spot size both the second order geometric and chromatic aberrations may be completely destructive. The concept of second order achromat proved to be extremely important in this respect and the arcs are built essentially as a sequence of such achromats. Between the end of the linac and the interaction point (IP) there are three special sections in addition to the regular structure: matching section (MS) designed for matching the phase space from the linac to the arcs, reverse bend section (RB) which provides the matching when the sign of the curvature is reversed in the arc and the final focus system (FFS). The second order calculations are done by the program TURTLE. Using the TURTLE histogram in the x-y plane and assuming identical histogram for the south arc, corresponding 'luminosity' L is found. The simulation of the misalignments and error effects have to be done simultaneously with the design and simulation of the orbit correction scheme. Even after the orbit is corrected and the beam can be transmitted through the vacuum chamber, the focusing of the beam to the desired size at the IP remains a serious potential problem. It is found, as will be elaborated later, that even for the best achieved orbit correction, additional corrections of the dispersion function and possibly transfer matrix are needed. This report describes a few of the presently conceived correction schemes and summarizes some results of computer simulations done for the SLC north arc. 8 references, 12 figures, 6 tables.

  1. Insights into lateral marsh retreat mechanism through localized field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendoni, M.; Mel, R.; Solari, L.; Lanzoni, S.; Francalanci, S.; Oumeraci, H.

    2016-02-01

    Deterioration of salt marshes may be due to several factors related to increased anthropic pressure, sea level rise, and erosive processes. While salt marshes can reach equilibrium in the vertical direction, adapting to sea level rise, they are inherently unstable in the horizontal direction. Marsh boundaries are characterized by scarps with bare sediment below the vegetated surface layer that can be easily removed by wave-induced erosion. In this work, we explore the different mechanisms involved in the erosion of marsh borders through the interpretation of field data. The analysis is based on a systematic field monitoring of a salt marsh in the Venice Lagoon subject to lateral erosion. Measurements included horizontal retreat of the scarp at various locations and wave height in front of the marsh during three storm surges. Continuous erosion and mass failures alternated during the observed period, leading to an average retreat up to 80 cm/yr. The data, collected roughly every month for 1.5 year, indicate that the linear relation that links the observed erosion rate to the impinging wave power exhibits a larger slope than that already estimated in literature on the basis of long-term surveys. Moreover, an increase in the gradient of erodibility is detected along the marsh scarp, due to the combined action of soil strengthening by vegetation on the marsh surface and the impact of wave breaking at the bank toe, which promote cantilever failures and increase the lateral erosion rate.

  2. Monte-Carlo scatter correction for cone-beam computed tomography with limited scan field-of-view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertram, Matthias; Sattel, Timo; Hohmann, Steffen; Wiegert, Jens

    2008-03-01

    In flat detector cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), scattered radiation is a major source of image degradation, making accurate a posteriori scatter correction inevitable. A potential solution to this problem is provided by computerized scatter correction based on Monte-Carlo simulations. Using this technique, the detected distributions of X-ray scatter are estimated for various viewing directions using Monte-Carlo simulations of an intermediate reconstruction. However, as a major drawback, for standard CBCT geometries and with standard size flat detectors such as mounted on interventional C-arms, the scan field of view is too small to accommodate the human body without lateral truncations, and thus this technique cannot be readily applied. In this work, we present a novel method for constructing a model of the object in a laterally and possibly also axially extended field of view, which enables meaningful application of Monte-Carlo based scatter correction even in case of heavy truncations. Evaluation is based on simulations of a clinical CT data set of a human abdomen, which strongly exceeds the field of view of the simulated C-arm based CBCT imaging geometry. By using the proposed methodology, almost complete removal of scatter-caused inhomogeneities is demonstrated in reconstructed images.

  3. First-order correction terms in the weak-field asymptotic theory of tunneling ionization in many-electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, Vinh H.; Tolstikhin, Oleg I.; Morishita, Toru

    2016-10-01

    The many-electron weak-field asymptotic theory of tunneling ionization including the first-order correction terms in the asymptotic expansion of the ionization rate in field strength was highlighted in our recent fast track communication (Trinh et al 2015 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 48 061003) by demonstrating its performance for two-electron atoms. Here we present a thorough derivation of the first-order terms omitted in the previous publication and provide additional numerical illustrations of the theory.

  4. 77 FR 39508 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-03

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL... Museum of Natural History in Chicago, IL (Field Museum). The human remains and associated funerary... Helen Robbins, Repatriation Director, Field Museum of Natural History, 1400 South Lake Shore......

  5. Simultaneous fluorescence and high-resolution bright-field imaging with aberration correction over a wide field-of-view with Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Jaebum; Kim, Jinho; Ou, Xiaoze; Horstmeyer, Roarke; Yang, Changhuei

    2016-03-01

    We present a method to acquire both fluorescence and high-resolution bright-field images with correction for the spatially varying aberrations over a microscope's wide field-of-view (FOV). First, the procedure applies Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) to retrieve the amplitude and phase of a sample, at a resolution that significantly exceeds the cutoff frequency of the microscope objective lens. At the same time, FPM algorithm is able to leverage on the redundancy within the set of acquired FPM bright-field images to estimate the microscope aberrations, which usually deteriorate in regions further away from the FOV's center. Second, the procedure acquires a raw wide-FOV fluorescence image within the same setup. Lack of moving parts allows us to use the FPM-estimated aberration map to computationally correct for the aberrations in the fluorescence image through deconvolution. Overlaying the aberration-corrected fluorescence image on top of the high-resolution bright-field image can be done with accurate spatial correspondence. This can provide means to identifying fluorescent regions of interest within the context of the sample's bright-field information. An experimental demonstration successfully improves the bright-field resolution of fixed, stained and fluorescently tagged HeLa cells by a factor of 4.9, and reduces the error caused by aberrations in a fluorescence image by 31%, over a field of view of 6.2 mm by 9.3 mm. For optimal deconvolution, we show the fluorescence image needs to have a signal-to-noise ratio of ~18.

  6. Direct observation of momentum-dependent local-field effects in solid nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarrio, C.; Schnatterly, S. E.

    1991-02-01

    We have measured the momentum dependence of the 1Πg<--X 1Σ+g transition in cubic solid nitrogen. We have evaluated the oscillator strength of the transition and compared it to the markedly different strength found in analogous measurements on the gas, and conclude that local-field effects present in the solid are responsible for the differences found. This is the first momentum-dependent measurement of local fields in a solid. The local-field enhancement factor increases by about a factor of 3 over the momentum range covered, and is consistent with a simple model calculation for small momenta.

  7. Direct subwavelength imaging and control of near-field localization in individual silver nanocubes

    SciTech Connect

    Mårsell, Erik; Svärd, Robin; Miranda, Miguel; Guo, Chen; Harth, Anne; Lorek, Eleonora; Mauritsson, Johan; Arnold, Cord L.; L'Huillier, Anne; Mikkelsen, Anders; Losquin, Arthur; Xu, Hongxing

    2015-11-16

    We demonstrate the control of near-field localization within individual silver nanocubes through photoemission electron microscopy combined with broadband, few-cycle laser pulses. We find that the near-field is concentrated at the corners of the cubes, and that it can be efficiently localized to different individual corners depending on the polarization of the incoming light. The experimental results are confirmed by finite-difference time-domain simulations, which also provide an intuitive picture of polarization dependent near-field localization in nanocubes.

  8. PARTICLES AND FIELDS Two loop electroweak corrections from heavy fermions to b → s + γ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiu-Yi; Feng, Tai-Fu

    2010-12-01

    Applying an effective Lagrangian method and an on-shell scheme, we analyze the electroweak corrections to the rare decay b → s + γ from some special two loop diagrams in which a closed heavy fermion loop is attached to the virtual charged gauge bosons or Higgs. At the decoupling limit where the virtual fermions in the inner loop are much heavier than the electroweak scale, we verify the final results satisfying the decoupling theorem explicitly when the interactions among Higgs and heavy fermions do not contain the nondecoupling couplings. Adopting the universal assumptions on the relevant couplings and mass spectrum of new physics, we find that the relative corrections from those two loop diagrams to the SM theoretical prediction on the branching ratio of B → Xsγ can reach 5% as the energy scale of new physics ΛNP = 200 GeV.

  9. Organic crystal polymorphism: a benchmark for dispersion-corrected mean-field electronic structure methods.

    PubMed

    Brandenburg, Jan Gerit; Grimme, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    We analyze the energy landscape of the sixth crystal structure prediction blind test targets with various first principles and semi-empirical quantum chemical methodologies. A new benchmark set of 59 crystal structures (termed POLY59) for testing quantum chemical methods based on the blind test target crystals is presented. We focus on different means to include London dispersion interactions within the density functional theory (DFT) framework. We show the impact of pairwise dispersion corrections like the semi-empirical D2 scheme, the Tkatchenko-Scheffler (TS) method, and the density-dependent dispersion correction dDsC. Recent methodological progress includes higher-order contributions in both the many-body and multipole expansions. We use the D3 correction with Axilrod-Teller-Muto type three-body contribution, the TS based many-body dispersion (MBD), and the nonlocal van der Waals density functional (vdW-DF2). The density functionals with D3 and MBD correction provide an energy ranking of the blind test polymorphs in excellent agreement with the experimentally found structures. As a computationally less demanding method, we test our recently presented minimal basis Hartree-Fock method (HF-3c) and a density functional tight-binding Hamiltonian (DFTB). Considering the speed-up of three to four orders of magnitudes, the energy ranking provided by the low-cost methods is very reasonable. We compare the computed geometries with the corresponding X-ray data where TPSS-D3 performs best. The importance of zero-point vibrational energy and thermal effects on crystal densities is highlighted. PMID:27484372

  10. The lure of local SETI: Fifty years of field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ailleris, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    With the commemoration in October 2007 of the Sputnik launch, space exploration celebrated its 50th anniversary. Despite impressive technological and scientific achievements the fascination for space has weakened during the last decades. One contributing factor has been the gradual disappearance of mankind's hope of discovering extraterrestrial life within its close neighbourhood. In striking contrast and since the middle of the 20th century, a non-negligible proportion of the population have already concluded that intelligent beings from other worlds do exist and visit Earth through space vehicles popularly called Unidentified Flying Objects (UFOs). In light of the continuous public interest for the UFO enigma symbolized by the recent widely diffused media announcements on the release of French and English governmental files; and considering the approach of broadening the strategies of the "Active SETI" approach and the existence of a rich multi-disciplinary UFO documentation of potential interest for SETI; this paper describes some past scientific attempts to demonstrate the physical reality of the phenomena and potentially the presence on Earth of probes of extraterrestrial origin. Details of the different instrumented field studies deployed by scientists and organizations during the period 1950-1990 in the USA, Canada and Europe are provided. In conclusion it will be argued that while continuing the current radio/optical SETI searches, there is the necessity to maintain sustaining attention to the topic of anomalous aerospace phenomena and to develop new rigorous research approaches.

  11. Correction-less dosimetry of nonstandard photon fields: a new criterion to determine the usability of radiation detectors.

    PubMed

    Kamio, Y; Bouchard, H

    2014-09-01

    In the IAEA-AAPM dosimetry formalism, detector measurements in general nonstandard conditions are corrected using the factor k(f(clin),f(msr))(Q(clin),Q(msr)). This factor needs to be evaluated on a case-by-case basis which is difficult to accomplish in practice. The present paper aims to provide a method that allows neglecting correction factors for small and composite IMRT fields by first determining a radiation detector's usability in these fields. Detailed models of nine radiation detectors are built: four ionization chambers (NE2571, A12, A1SL, A14), three small field detectors (PTW31018 microLion, PTW60003 natural diamond, PTW60012 unshielded diode) and two near water-equivalent detectors (alanine, W1 scintillating fiber). Using the egs_chamber Monte Carlo code, dose response functions at 6 MV and 25 MV are sampled for each detector and their corresponding volume of water. These functions are then used with a newly derived criterion to evaluate an upper bound ξ(f(ns),f(msr))(Q(ns),Q(msr)) on the variable ε(f(ns),f(msr))(Q(ns),Q(msr)) if no field collimation/modulation occurs over a given perturbation zone. The variable ε(f(ns),f(msr))(Q(ns),Q(msr)) is defined as the absolute value of the relative deviation from unity of a nonstandard field quality correction factor k(f(ns),f(msr))(Q(ns),Q(msr)). Using the same criterion, perturbation zones are evaluated by finding the smallest field size allowed for correction-less dosimetry with a given tolerance ξ(f(ns),f(msr))(Q(ns),Q(msr)). For composite fields, the sensitivity of detectors to the non-uniformity of virtual symmetric collapsed beams over regions of interest specified by the criterion is studied to estimate an upper bound ξ ̃(f(ns),f(ref))(Q(ns),Q) on ε(f(ns),f(ref))(Q(ns),Q) for a given beam flatness. Finally, a newly defined perturbation function is used to minimize the perturbations of the microLion chamber through density compensation. The theoretical criterion shows good agreement with full

  12. Correction: Towards the rationalization of catalytic activity values by means of local hyper-softness on the catalytic site: a criticism about the use of net electric charges.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Araya, Jorge Ignacio; Grand, André; Glossman-Mitnik, Daniel

    2016-01-28

    Correction for 'Towards the rationalization of catalytic activity values by means of local hyper-softness on the catalytic site: a criticism about the use of net electric charges' by Jorge Ignacio Martínez-Araya et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2015, DOI: 10.1039/c5cp03822g.

  13. Correction: Towards the rationalization of catalytic activity values by means of local hyper-softness on the catalytic site: a criticism about the use of net electric charges.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Araya, Jorge Ignacio; Grand, André; Glossman-Mitnik, Daniel

    2016-01-28

    Correction for 'Towards the rationalization of catalytic activity values by means of local hyper-softness on the catalytic site: a criticism about the use of net electric charges' by Jorge Ignacio Martínez-Araya et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2015, DOI: 10.1039/c5cp03822g. PMID:26524565

  14. Inelastic neutron scattering, Raman, vibrational analysis with anharmonic corrections, and scaled quantum mechanical force field for polycrystalline L-alanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Robert W.; Schlücker, Sebastian; Hudson, Bruce S.

    2008-01-01

    A scaled quantum mechanical harmonic force field (SQMFF) corrected for anharmonicity is obtained for the 23 K L-alanine crystal structure using van der Waals corrected periodic boundary condition density functional theory (DFT) calculations with the PBE functional. Scale factors are obtained with comparisons to inelastic neutron scattering (INS), Raman, and FT-IR spectra of polycrystalline L-alanine at 15-23 K. Calculated frequencies for all 153 normal modes differ from observed frequencies with a standard deviation of 6 wavenumbers. Non-bonded external k = 0 lattice modes are included, but assignments to these modes are presently ambiguous. The extension of SQMFF methodology to lattice modes is new, as are the procedures used here for providing corrections for anharmonicity and van der Waals interactions in DFT calculations on crystals. First principles Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) calculations are performed on the L-alanine crystal structure at a series of classical temperatures ranging from 23 K to 600 K. Corrections for zero-point energy (ZPE) are estimated by finding the classical temperature that reproduces the mean square displacements (MSDs) measured from the diffraction data at 23 K. External k = 0 lattice motions are weakly coupled to bonded internal modes.

  15. Evaluation of a combination of local hybrid functionals with DFT-D3 corrections for the calculation of thermochemical and kinetic data.

    PubMed

    Theilacker, Kolja; Arbuznikov, Alexei V; Bahmann, Hilke; Kaupp, Martin

    2011-08-18

    Due to their position-dependent exact exchange admixture, local hybrid functionals offer a higher flexibility and thus the potential for more universal and accurate exchange correlation functionals compared to global hybrids with a constant admixture, as has been demonstrated in previous work. Yet, the local hybrid constructions used so far do not account for the inclusion of dispersion-type interactions. As a first exploratory step toward a more general approach that includes van der Waals-type interactions with local hybrids, the present work has added DFT-D3-type corrections to a number of simple local hybrid functionals. Optimization of only the s(8) and s(r,6) parameters for the S22 set provides good results for weak interaction energies but deteriorates the excellent performance of the local hybrids for G3 atomization energies and for classical reaction barriers. A combined optimization of the two DFT-D3 parameters with one of the two parameters of the spin-polarized local mixing function (LMF) of a local hybrid for a more general optimization set provides simultaneously accurate dispersion energies, improved atomization energies, and accurate reaction barriers, as well as excellent alkane protobranching ratios. For other LMFs, the improvements of such a combined optimization for the S22 energies have been less satisfactory. The most notable advantage of the dispersion-corrected local hybrids over, for example, a B3LYP-D3 approach, is in the much more accurate reaction barriers.

  16. Push-Broom-Type Very High-Resolution Satellite Sensor Data Correction Using Combined Wavelet-Fourier and Multiscale Non-Local Means Filtering

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Wonseok; Yu, Soohwan; Seo, Doochun; Jeong, Jaeheon; Paik, Joonki

    2015-01-01

    In very high-resolution (VHR) push-broom-type satellite sensor data, both destriping and denoising methods have become chronic problems and attracted major research advances in the remote sensing fields. Since the estimation of the original image from a noisy input is an ill-posed problem, a simple noise removal algorithm cannot preserve the radiometric integrity of satellite data. To solve these problems, we present a novel method to correct VHR data acquired by a push-broom-type sensor by combining wavelet-Fourier and multiscale non-local means (NLM) filters. After the wavelet-Fourier filter separates the stripe noise from the mixed noise in the wavelet low- and selected high-frequency sub-bands, random noise is removed using the multiscale NLM filter in both low- and high-frequency sub-bands without loss of image detail. The performance of the proposed method is compared to various existing methods on a set of push-broom-type sensor data acquired by Korean Multi-Purpose Satellite 3 (KOMPSAT-3) with severe stripe and random noise, and the results of the proposed method show significantly improved enhancement results over existing state-of-the-art methods in terms of both qualitative and quantitative assessments. PMID:26378532

  17. Localization of incipient tip vortex cavitation using ray based matched field inversion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongho; Seong, Woojae; Choo, Youngmin; Lee, Jeunghoon

    2015-10-01

    Cavitation of marine propeller is one of the main contributing factors of broadband radiated ship noise. In this research, an algorithm for the source localization of incipient vortex cavitation is suggested. Incipient cavitation is modeled as monopole type source and matched-field inversion method is applied to find the source position by comparing the spatial correlation between measured and replicated pressure fields at the receiver array. The accuracy of source localization is improved by broadband matched-field inversion technique that enhances correlation by incoherently averaging correlations of individual frequencies. Suggested localization algorithm is verified through known virtual source and model test conducted in Samsung ship model basin cavitation tunnel. It is found that suggested localization algorithm enables efficient localization of incipient tip vortex cavitation using a few pressure data measured on the outer hull above the propeller and practically applicable to the typically performed model scale experiment in a cavitation tunnel at the early design stage.

  18. Classical field theories from Hamiltonian constraint: Canonical equations of motion and local Hamilton-Jacobi theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatloukal, Václav

    2016-04-01

    Classical field theory is considered as a theory of unparametrized surfaces embedded in a configuration space, which accommodates, in a symmetric way, spacetime positions and field values. Dynamics is defined by a (Hamiltonian) constraint between multivector-valued generalized momenta, and points in the configuration space. Starting from a variational principle, we derive local equations of motion, that is, differential equations that determine classical surfaces and momenta. A local Hamilton-Jacobi equation applicable in the field theory then follows readily. The general method is illustrated with three examples: non-relativistic Hamiltonian mechanics, De Donder-Weyl scalar field theory, and string theory.

  19. Observation of the local field distribution in photonic crystal microcavity by SNOM technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maidykovski, Anton I.; Lebedev, Oleg V.; Dolgova, Tatyana V.; Kazantsev, D. V.; Fedyanin, Andrew A.

    2002-11-01

    The spatial distribution of the local optical field at the cleavage of photonic crystal smicrocavity has been obtained by the scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM). The localization of optical radiation at microcavity resonant wavelength in the vicinity of the λ/2 spacer layer is demonstrated. Samples of photonic crystal microcavity are prepared from silicon wafer by electrochemical etching technique. The wavelength of the microcavity mode is optimized for resonance with wavelengths of lasers. The image of the spatial distribution of optical field at the cleaved edge of the facing vertically microcavity is observed. Sample is pumped through external single-mode fiber perpendicularly to the microcavity. SNOM operates in the collection mode with the apertureless tip. We observe the localization of the resonant optical field in microcavity but we do not reveal such localization of the radiation at the non-resonant wavelength.

  20. A two-stage method to correct aberrations induced by slide slant in bright-field microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yilun; Bradley, Andrew P

    2016-08-01

    To achieve optimal image quality in bright field microscopy, the slide surface should be perpendicular to the optical axis of the microscope. However, in the recently proposed "slanted scan" slide acquisition technique, scan speed is increased by purposely slanting the slide by a small angle (of 3-5°) so that multiple focal depths can be imaged simultaneously. In this case, the slanted slide introduces a bend in the point spread function (PSF), resulting in a coma and other aberrations that degrade image quality. In this paper, we propose a two-stage deconvolution method specifically designed to correct the aberrations induced by a slanted scan, but with general applicability to high-resolution bright-field microscopy. Specifically, we initially apply phase deconvolution to correct the dominating coma aberration, before applying a conventional semi-blind deconvolution method to further improve image resolution and contrast. We also propose a novel method to estimate the degree of coma aberration and the PSF of the optics utilising actual cytology specimens. The efficacy of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated quantitatively on simulated data, against a ground-truth (object) image, and qualitatively on cervical cytology specimens. Results demonstrate both improved convergence speed of the two-stage approach, especially when correcting the bend in the PSF, and a resultant image quality that is comparable to a conventionally (flat) scanned specimen. PMID:27182660

  1. A novel passive shimming method for the correction of magnetic fields above the patient bed in MRI.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xia; Zhu, Minhua; Xia, Ling; Crozier, Stuart; Wang, Qiuliang; Ni, Zhipeng; Liu, Feng

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a novel passive shimming method for the effective correction of static magnetic field (B0) inhomogeneities in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) systems. Passive shimming is used to find an optimum configuration for the placement of iron pieces applied to improve the B0 uniformity in the predefined imaging region referred to as the diameter of spherical volume (DSV). However, most passive shimming methods neglect to recognize that the space under the patient bed is not in use for imaging. In this work, we present a new algorithm that attempts to avoid the unnecessary shimming of the space under the patient bed. During implementation, the B0 field is still measured over the DSV surface and then mapped onto the effective imaging volume surface; a dedicated sensitivity matrix is generated only for the imaging area above the patient bed. A linear programming optimization procedure is performed for the determination of thicknesses and locations the shim pieces. Our experimental results showed that by revising the shimming target area, the new method provides superior optimization solutions. Compared to a conventional approach, the new method requires smaller amount of iron to correct the B0 inhomogeneities in the imaging area which has the effect of improving thermal stability to the B0 field. It also reduces the complexity of the optimization problem. Our new shimming strategy helps to improve the magnetic field homogeneity within the realistic imaging space, and ultimately improve image quality. PMID:26073600

  2. Heat Diffusion in a Non-Local Tokomak Stochastic Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hong; Yao, Li; Zhong, Haiyang; Liu, Wei; Yang, Kun; Shao, Ying; Xia, Wenwen; li, Qian

    2011-04-01

    Heat transport across a non-local stochastic magnetic field was studied for the first time. Eleven incompact low m perturbed magnetic islands were used in our calculation. Parallel heat diffusion coefficient to the perpendicular coefficient was found still to be a key factor in influencing the effective radial heat conductivity and the results in this paper were compared with earlier studies in a local stochastic magnetic field.

  3. Field locked to a Fock state by quantum feedback with single photon corrections.

    PubMed

    Zhou, X; Dotsenko, I; Peaudecerf, B; Rybarczyk, T; Sayrin, C; Gleyzes, S; Raimond, J M; Brune, M; Haroche, S

    2012-06-15

    Fock states with photon numbers n up to 7 are prepared on demand in a microwave superconducting cavity by a quantum feedback procedure that reverses decoherence-induced quantum jumps. Circular Rydberg atoms are used as quantum nondemolition sensors or as single-photon emitter or absorber actuators. The quantum nature of these actuators matches the correction of single-photon quantum jumps due to relaxation. The flexibility of this method is suited to the generation of arbitrary sequences of Fock states. PMID:23004271

  4. Externally controlled local magnetic field in a conducting mesoscopic ring coupled to a quantum wire

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, Santanu K.

    2015-01-14

    In the present work, the possibility of regulating local magnetic field in a quantum ring is investigated theoretically. The ring is coupled to a quantum wire and subjected to an in-plane electric field. Under a finite bias voltage across the wire a net circulating current is established in the ring which produces a strong magnetic field at its centre. This magnetic field can be tuned externally in a wide range by regulating the in-plane electric field, and thus, our present system can be utilized to control magnetic field at a specific region. The feasibility of this quantum system in designing spin-based quantum devices is also analyzed.

  5. [Local negative pressure and magnetic field in therapy of patients with erectile dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Karpukhin, I V; Kazantsev, S N

    2007-01-01

    Combined treatment with local negative pressure and pulsating magnetic field conducted in 116 patients with erectile dysfunction aged 20-60 years produced optimal treatment results. Recovery and improvement of the erectile function were achieved in 85.7% patients given local vacuum-magnetotherapy. PMID:17882824

  6. Anderson localization with second quantized fields in a coupled array of waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Clinton; Vemuri, Gautam; Agarwal, G. S.

    2010-11-15

    We report a theoretical study of Anderson localization of nonclassical light in an array of waveguides in which neighboring waveguides are evanescently coupled and in which the disorder can be added in a controlled manner. We use squeezed light at the input to investigate the effects of nonclassicality and compare the results with those obtained by using conventional classical fields, such as a coherent field and a Gaussian field. Our results show that there is an enhancement in fluctuations of localized light due to the medium's disorder. We find superbunching of the localized light, which may be useful for enhancing the interaction between radiation and matter. Another important consequence of sub-Poissonian statistics of the incoming light is to quench the total fluctuations at the output. Finally, we show that as a result of the multiplicative noise in the problem, the output field is far from Gaussian even if the input is a coherent field.

  7. A simple and rapid method for electromagnetic field distortion correction when using two Fastrak sensors for biomechanical studies.

    PubMed

    Hagemeister, Nicola; Parent, Gerald; Husse, Sabine; de Guise, Jacques A

    2008-01-01

    The article presents a simple and rapid method for the correction of electromagnetic distortions when using electromagnetic Fastrak (Polhemus, USA) sensors. It is based on the minimization of objective functions composed of derivative polynomial functions, hence estimating the distortion of the electromagnetic field. The polynomial functions composing the objective function each contain 35 deformation coefficients. These coefficients are then used to correct the electromagnetic measures in position and orientation. Preliminary results on the efficacy of the method are presented for two subjects who walked on a treadmill, and for whom relative movement of the lower leg with respect to the thigh was recorded using two Fastrak sensors. The corrected Fastrak measurements were compared with optoelectronic measurements (Vicon, USA), which are not affected by distortions as electromagnetic sensors are. Results showed that after 3 min of calibrating a volume of approximately 1m(3), the method proved to be efficient in correcting errors in orientation (56% (2.72-1.12 degrees ), 78% (4.4-0.89 degrees ), and 56% (2.25-0.90 degrees ) of error reduction in the respective flexion/extension, ab/adduction and tibial internal/external rotation) and position (53% (18.9-8.9 mm), 21% (6.6-4.6mm), and 48% (15.9-8.1mm) of error reduction in the respective medial/lateral, anterior/posterior and proximal/distal translations) (values are overall means for two subjects and four calibration procedures). That amount of correction compared favorably with values presented in the literature.

  8. Photoelectron circular dichroism of chiral molecules studied with a continuum-state-corrected strong-field approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreissigacker, Ingo; Lein, Manfred

    2014-05-01

    Motivated by recent experiments on circular dichroism in the photoelectron momentum distributions from strong-field ionization of chiral molecules [C. Lux et al., Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 51, 5001 (2012), 10.1002/anie.201109035; C. S. Lehmann et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 234307 (2013), 10.1063/1.4844295], we investigate the origin of this effect theoretically. We show that it is not possible to describe photoelectron circular dichroism with the commonly used strong-field approximation due to its plane-wave nature. We therefore apply the Born approximation to the scattering state and use this as a continuum-state correction in the strong-field approximation. We obtain electron distributions for the molecules camphor and fenchone. In order to gain physical insight into the process, we study the contributions of individual molecular orientations.

  9. Determinations of the correction factors for small fields in cylindrical ionization chambers based on measurement and numerical calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kwangwoo; Choi, Wonhoon; Park, Sungho; Choi, Jin Hwa; Park, Suk Won; Bak, Jino

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the volume averaging effect for air-filled cylindrical ionization chambers to determine the correction factors in a small photon field for a given chamber. We measured output factors with several cylindrical ionization chambers, and by using a mathematical method similar to deconvolution, we modeled the non-constant and inhomogeneous exposure function in the cavity of the chamber. The parameters in the exposure function and the correction factors were determined by solving a system of equations that we had developed by using the measured data and the geometry of the given chamber. The correction factors (CFs) were very similar to those obtained from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. For example, the CFs in this study were found to be 1.116 for PTW31010 and 1.0225 for PTW31016 while the CFs obtained from MC simulations were reported as being approximately between 1.17 and 1.20 for PTW31010 and between 1.02 and 1.06 for PTW31016 in a 6-MV photon beam of 1 × 1 cm2. Furthermore, the method of deconvolution combined with the MC result for the chamber's response function showed a similar CF for PTW 30013, which was reported as 2.29 and 1.54 for a 1 × 1 cm2 and a 1.5 × 1.5 cm2 field size, respectively. The CFs from our method were similar, 2.42 and 1.54. In addition, we report CFs for PTW30013, PTW31010, PTW31016, IBA FC23-C, and IBA CC13. As a consequence, we suggest the use of our method to measure the correct output factor by using the fact that an inhomogeneous exposure causes a volume averaging effect in the cavity of air-filled cylindrical ionization chamber. The result obtained by using our method is very similar to that obtained from MC simulations. The method we developed can easily be applied in clinics.

  10. Monte Carlo-based diode design for correction-less small field dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Charles, P H; Crowe, S B; Kairn, T; Knight, R T; Hill, B; Kenny, J; Langton, C M; Trapp, J V

    2013-07-01

    Due to their small collecting volume, diodes are commonly used in small field dosimetry. However, the relative sensitivity of a diode increases with decreasing small field size. Conversely, small air gaps have been shown to cause a significant decrease in the sensitivity of a detector as the field size is decreased. Therefore, this study uses Monte Carlo simulations to look at introducing air upstream to diodes such that they measure with a constant sensitivity across all field sizes in small field dosimetry. Varying thicknesses of air were introduced onto the upstream end of two commercial diodes (PTW 60016 photon diode and PTW 60017 electron diode), as well as a theoretical unenclosed silicon chip using field sizes as small as 5 mm × 5 mm. The metric D(w,Q)/D(Det,Q) used in this study represents the ratio of the dose to a point of water to the dose to the diode active volume, for a particular field size and location. The optimal thickness of air required to provide a constant sensitivity across all small field sizes was found by plotting D(w,Q)/D(Det,Q) as a function of introduced air gap size for various field sizes, and finding the intersection point of these plots. That is, the point at which D(w,Q)/D(Det,Q) was constant for all field sizes was found. The optimal thickness of air was calculated to be 3.3, 1.15 and 0.10 mm for the photon diode, electron diode and unenclosed silicon chip, respectively. The variation in these results was due to the different design of each detector. When calculated with the new diode design incorporating the upstream air gap, k(f(clin),f(msr))(Q(clin),Q(msr)) was equal to unity to within statistical uncertainty (0.5%) for all three diodes. Cross-axis profile measurements were also improved with the new detector design. The upstream air gap could be implanted on the commercial diodes via a cap consisting of the air cavity surrounded by water equivalent material. The results for the unclosed silicon chip show that an ideal small

  11. Monte Carlo-based diode design for correction-less small field dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, P. H.; Crowe, S. B.; Kairn, T.; Knight, R. T.; Hill, B.; Kenny, J.; Langton, C. M.; Trapp, J. V.

    2013-07-01

    Due to their small collecting volume, diodes are commonly used in small field dosimetry. However, the relative sensitivity of a diode increases with decreasing small field size. Conversely, small air gaps have been shown to cause a significant decrease in the sensitivity of a detector as the field size is decreased. Therefore, this study uses Monte Carlo simulations to look at introducing air upstream to diodes such that they measure with a constant sensitivity across all field sizes in small field dosimetry. Varying thicknesses of air were introduced onto the upstream end of two commercial diodes (PTW 60016 photon diode and PTW 60017 electron diode), as well as a theoretical unenclosed silicon chip using field sizes as small as 5 mm × 5 mm. The metric \\frac{{D_{w,Q} }}{{D_{Det,Q} }} used in this study represents the ratio of the dose to a point of water to the dose to the diode active volume, for a particular field size and location. The optimal thickness of air required to provide a constant sensitivity across all small field sizes was found by plotting \\frac{{D_{w,Q} }}{{D_{Det,Q} }} as a function of introduced air gap size for various field sizes, and finding the intersection point of these plots. That is, the point at which \\frac{{D_{w,Q} }}{{D_{Det,Q} }} was constant for all field sizes was found. The optimal thickness of air was calculated to be 3.3, 1.15 and 0.10 mm for the photon diode, electron diode and unenclosed silicon chip, respectively. The variation in these results was due to the different design of each detector. When calculated with the new diode design incorporating the upstream air gap, k_{Q_{clin} ,Q_{msr} }^{f_{clin} ,f_{msr} } was equal to unity to within statistical uncertainty (0.5%) for all three diodes. Cross-axis profile measurements were also improved with the new detector design. The upstream air gap could be implanted on the commercial diodes via a cap consisting of the air cavity surrounded by water equivalent material. The

  12. A new inclination shallowing correction of the Mauch Chunk Formation of Pennsylvania, based on high-field AIR results: Implications for the Carboniferous North American APW path and Pangea reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilardello, Dario; Kodama, Kenneth P.

    2010-10-01

    A new magnetic anisotropy study was performed on samples of the Lower Carboniferous Mauch Chunk Formation of Pennsylvania. These red beds had been sampled for an inclination shallowing study by Tan and Kodama (2002), however, application of a high-field anisotropy of isothermal remanence magnetization (hf-AIR) technique specifically designed to measure the anisotropy of hematite provides considerably different results from those previously reported. The newly measured fabric has smaller anisotropy (~ 9-17% as opposed to ~ 25-40%) and shows a pronounced ENE-WSW magnetic lineation that is sub-parallel to the trend of the Appalachians and interpretable as a hematite intersection lineation that occurred during local NNW-directed shortening. The measured magnetic fabric yields a new inclination correction with a corrected paleopole that is in better agreement with recently corrected Carboniferous paleopoles than the previously corrected Mauch Chunk paleopole, defining a more consistent APW path. The corrected paleopoles allow calculation of new mean Early (~ 325 Ma) and Late (~ 312 Ma) Carboniferous inclination-corrected paleopoles for North America, which can be compared to coeval, but uncorrected, paleopoles from Gondwana. Results suggest a Pangea B assemblage unless inclination shallowing is considered for Gondwana. Estimating an inclination correction for Gondwana sedimentary rock-derived paleopoles permits a Pangea A-type assemblage at higher southern latitudes than previous reconstructions, which we term Pangea A3.

  13. Divergent selection on locally adapted major histocompatibility complex immune genes experimentally proven in the field

    PubMed Central

    Eizaguirre, Christophe; Lenz, Tobias L; Kalbe, Martin; Milinski, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    Although crucial for the understanding of adaptive evolution, genetically resolved examples of local adaptation are rare. To maximize survival and reproduction in their local environment, hosts should resist their local parasites and pathogens. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) with its key function in parasite resistance represents an ideal candidate to investigate parasite-mediated local adaptation. Using replicated field mesocosms, stocked with second-generation lab-bred three-spined stickleback hybrids of a lake and a river population, we show local adaptation of MHC genotypes to population-specific parasites, independently of the genetic background. Increased allele divergence of lake MHC genotypes allows lake fish to fight the broad range of lake parasites, whereas more specific river genotypes confer selective advantages against the less diverse river parasites. Hybrids with local MHC genotype gained more body weight and thus higher fitness than those with foreign MHC in either habitat, suggesting the evolutionary significance of locally adapted MHC genotypes. PMID:22583762

  14. Development of a three-dimensional correction method for optical distortion of flow field inside a liquid droplet.

    PubMed

    Gim, Yeonghyeon; Ko, Han Seo

    2016-04-15

    In this Letter, a three-dimensional (3D) optical correction method, which was verified by simulation, was developed to reconstruct droplet-based flow fields. In the simulation, a synthetic phantom was reconstructed using a simultaneous multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique with three detectors positioned at the synthetic object (represented by the phantom), with offset angles of 30° relative to each other. Additionally, a projection matrix was developed using the ray tracing method. If the phantom is in liquid, the image of the phantom can be distorted since the light passes through a convex liquid-vapor interface. Because of the optical distortion effect, the projection matrix used to reconstruct a 3D field should be supplemented by the revision ray, instead of the original projection ray. The revision ray can be obtained from the refraction ray occurring on the surface of the liquid. As a result, the error on the reconstruction field of the phantom could be reduced using the developed optical correction method. In addition, the developed optical method was applied to a Taylor cone which was caused by the high voltage between the droplet and the substrate. PMID:27082349

  15. Thinking Globally, Planning Nationally and Acting Locally: Nested Organizational Fields and the Adoption of Environmental Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasi, Ion Bogdan

    2007-01-01

    The study of the adoption of activities to protect the natural environment has tended to focus on the role of organizational fields. This article advances existing research by simultaneously examining conflicting processes that operate in nested organizational fields at local, national and supra-national levels. It examines the recent spread of an…

  16. Application of the minimum correlation technique to the correction of the magnetic field measured by magnetometers on spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mariani, F.

    1979-01-01

    Some aspects of the problem of obtaining precise, absolute determination of the vector of low magnetic fields existing in the interplanetary medium are addressed. In the case of a real S/C, there is always the possibility of a spurious field which includes the spacecraft residual field and/or possible field from the sensors, due to both electronic drifts or changes of the magnetic properties of the sensor core. These latter effects may occur during storage of the sensors prior to launching and/or in-flight. The reliability is demonstrated for a method which postulates that there should be no correlation between changes in measured field magnitude and changes in the measured inclination of the field with respect to any one of three fixed Cartesian component directions. Application of this minimum correlation technique to data from IMP-8 and Helios 1-2 shows it is appropriate for determination of the zero offset corrections of triaxial magnetometers. In general, a number of the order of 1000 consecutive data points is sufficient for a good determination.

  17. Simultaneous suppression of disturbing fields and localization of magnetic markers by means of multipole expansion.

    PubMed

    Hilgenfeld, Bernd; Haueisen, Jens

    2004-09-01

    BACKGROUND: Magnetically marked capsules serve for the analysis of peristalsis and throughput times within the intestinal tract. Moreover, they can be used for the targeted disposal of drugs. The capsules get localized in time by field measurements with a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer array. Here it is important to ensure an online localization with high speed and high suppression of disturbing fields. In this article we use multipole expansions for the simultaneous localization and suppression of disturbing fields. METHODS: We expand the measurement data in terms of inner and outer multipoles. Thereby we obtain directly a separation of marker field and outer disturbing fields. From the inner dipoles and quadrupoles we compute the magnetization and position of the capsule. The outer multipoles get eliminated. RESULTS: The localization goodness has been analyzed depending on the order of the multipoles used and depending on the systems noise level. We found upper limits of the noise level for the usage of certain multipole moments. Given a signal to noise ratio of 40 and utilizing inner dipoles and quadrupoles and outer dipoles, the method enables an accuracy of 5 mm with a speed of 10 localizations per second. CONCLUSION: The multipole localization is an effective method and is capable of online-tracking magnetic markers.

  18. Direct imaging of light elements by annular dark-field aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lotnyk, Andriy Poppitz, David; Gerlach, Jürgen W.; Rauschenbach, Bernd

    2014-02-17

    In this report, we show that an annular dark-field detector in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope allows the direct observation of light element columns in crystalline lattices. At specific imaging conditions, an enhancement of the intensities of light element columns in the presence of heavy element columns is observed. Experimental results are presented for imaging the nitrogen and carbon atomic columns at the GaN-SiC interface and within the GaN and SiC compounds. The crystal polarity of GaN at the interface is identified. The obtained findings are discussed and are well supported by image simulations.

  19. Direct imaging of light elements by annular dark-field aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotnyk, Andriy; Poppitz, David; Gerlach, Jürgen W.; Rauschenbach, Bernd

    2014-02-01

    In this report, we show that an annular dark-field detector in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope allows the direct observation of light element columns in crystalline lattices. At specific imaging conditions, an enhancement of the intensities of light element columns in the presence of heavy element columns is observed. Experimental results are presented for imaging the nitrogen and carbon atomic columns at the GaN-SiC interface and within the GaN and SiC compounds. The crystal polarity of GaN at the interface is identified. The obtained findings are discussed and are well supported by image simulations.

  20. Deformation-induced spatiotemporal fluctuation, evolution and localization of strain fields in a bulk metallic glass

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wu, Yuan; Bei, Hongbin; Wang, Yanli; Lu, Zhaoping; George, Easo P.; Gao, Yanfei

    2015-05-16

    Deformation behavior and local strain evolutions upon loading and unloading of a bulk metallic glass (BMG) were systematically investigated by in situ digital image correlation (DIC). Distinct fluctuations and irreversible local strains were observed before the onset of macroscopic yielding. Statistical analysis shows that these fluctuations might be related to intrinsic structural heterogeneities, and that the evolution history and characteristics of local strain fields play an important role in the subsequent initiation of shear bands. Effects of sample size, pre-strain, and loading conditions were systematically analyzed in terms of the probability distributions of the resulting local strain fields. It ismore » found that a higher degree of local shear strain heterogeneity corresponds to a more ductile stressestrain curve. Implications of these findings are discussed for the design of new materials.« less

  1. Deformation-induced spatiotemporal fluctuation, evolution and localization of strain fields in a bulk metallic glass

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yuan; Bei, Hongbin; Wang, Yanli; Lu, Zhaoping; George, Easo P.; Gao, Yanfei

    2015-05-16

    Deformation behavior and local strain evolutions upon loading and unloading of a bulk metallic glass (BMG) were systematically investigated by in situ digital image correlation (DIC). Distinct fluctuations and irreversible local strains were observed before the onset of macroscopic yielding. Statistical analysis shows that these fluctuations might be related to intrinsic structural heterogeneities, and that the evolution history and characteristics of local strain fields play an important role in the subsequent initiation of shear bands. Effects of sample size, pre-strain, and loading conditions were systematically analyzed in terms of the probability distributions of the resulting local strain fields. It is found that a higher degree of local shear strain heterogeneity corresponds to a more ductile stressestrain curve. Implications of these findings are discussed for the design of new materials.

  2. Local conductance: A means to extract polarization and depolarizing fields near domain walls in ferroelectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, A. M.; Kumar, A.; Gregg, J. M.; Whatmore, R. W.

    2015-10-26

    Conducting atomic force microscopy images of bulk semiconducting BaTiO{sub 3} surfaces show clear stripe domain contrast. High local conductance correlates with strong out-of-plane polarization (mapped independently using piezoresponse force microscopy), and current-voltage characteristics are consistent with dipole-induced alterations in Schottky barriers at the metallic tip-ferroelectric interface. Indeed, analyzing current-voltage data in terms of established Schottky barrier models allows relative variations in the surface polarization, and hence the local domain structure, to be determined. Fitting also reveals the signature of surface-related depolarizing fields concentrated near domain walls. Domain information obtained from mapping local conductance appears to be more surface-sensitive than that from piezoresponse force microscopy. In the right materials systems, local current mapping could therefore represent a useful complementary technique for evaluating polarization and local electric fields with nanoscale resolution.

  3. Wegner estimates, Lifshitz tails, and Anderson localization for Gaussian random magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueki, Naomasa

    2016-07-01

    The Wegner estimate for the Hamiltonian of the Anderson model for the special Gaussian random magnetic field is extended to more general magnetic fields. The Lifshitz tail upper bounds of the integrated density of states as analyzed by Nakamura are reviewed and extended so that Gaussian random magnetic fields can be treated. By these and multiscale analysis, the Anderson localization at low energies is proven.

  4. Magnon localization and Bloch oscillations in finite Heisenberg spin chains in an inhomogeneous magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Kosevich, Yuriy A; Gann, Vladimir V

    2013-06-19

    We study the localization of magnon states in finite defect-free Heisenberg spin-1/2 ferromagnetic chains placed in an inhomogeneous magnetic field with a constant spatial gradient. Continuous transformation from the extended magnon states to the localized Wannier-Zeeman states in a finite spin chain placed in an inhomogeneous field is described both analytically and numerically. We describe for the first time the non-monotonic dependence of the energy levels of magnons, both long and short wavelength, on the magnetic field gradient, which is a consequence of magnon localization in a finite spin chain. We show that, in contrast to the destruction of the magnon band and the establishment of the Wannier-Stark ladder in a vanishingly small field gradient in an infinite chain, the localization of magnon states at the chain ends preserves the memory of the magnon band. Essentially, the localization at the lower- or higher-field chain end resembles the localization of the positive- or negative-effective-mass band quasiparticles. We also show how the beat dynamics of coherent superposition of extended spin waves in a finite chain in a homogeneous or weakly inhomogeneous field transforms into magnon Bloch oscillations of the superposition of localized Wannier-Zeeman states in a strongly inhomogeneous field. We provide a semiclassical description of the magnon Bloch oscillations and show that the correspondence between the quantum and semiclassical descriptions is most accurate for Bloch oscillations of the magnon coherent states, which are built from a coherent superposition of a large number of the nearest-neighbour Wannier-Zeeman states.

  5. Bucking Coil Efficiency Correction for 5'' PMT Exposed to an External Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llodra, Anthony; Reinhold, Joerg

    2014-03-01

    This research was conducted in support of the Hall C upgrade activities at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). We propose to employ bucking coils in order to maximize the collection efficiency of the 5'' PMTs installed on the Cherenkov detector, which could potentially be exposed to external magnetic field produced by the Super Conducting Super High Momentum Spectrometer (SHMS) magnet. In this research project a 5'' PMT was placed in a light tight cylinder with a fiber optic cable. The cylinder was centered within a set of Helmholtz coils to produce a constant external magnetic field. Furthermore, the cylinder was wrapped with 20 coils of standard 12 gauge cable to act as the bucking coil. With the intensity of the LED source, and the magnitude of the external magnetic field fixed at a carefully determined value, data was taken to determine if the collection efficiency of the PMT was indeed affected. With a decrease in collection efficiency confirmed, further data were taken. A range of current (0-6 A) was applied to the bucking coils, while ADC spectra were analyzed in intervals of 0.25 A. The data indicated that in an external magnetic field of approximately 3 Gauss, the 5'' PMT collection efficiency is maximized with the bucking coil current set to approximately 3.5 A. Thus, the data conclusively indicates that the bucking coil system will indeed maximize the collection efficiency of the 5'' PMT. Florida International University.

  6. Arbitrary magnetic field gradient waveform correction using an impulse response based pre-equalization technique.

    PubMed

    Goora, Frédéric G; Colpitts, Bruce G; Balcom, Bruce J

    2014-01-01

    The time-varying magnetic fields used in magnetic resonance applications result in the induction of eddy currents on conductive structures in the vicinity of both the sample under investigation and the gradient coils. These eddy currents typically result in undesired degradations of image quality for MRI applications. Their ubiquitous nature has resulted in the development of various approaches to characterize and minimize their impact on image quality. This paper outlines a method that utilizes the magnetic field gradient waveform monitor method to directly measure the temporal evolution of the magnetic field gradient from a step-like input function and extracts the system impulse response. With the basic assumption that the gradient system is sufficiently linear and time invariant to permit system theory analysis, the impulse response is used to determine a pre-equalized (optimized) input waveform that provides a desired gradient response at the output of the system. An algorithm has been developed that calculates a pre-equalized waveform that may be accurately reproduced by the amplifier (is physically realizable) and accounts for system limitations including system bandwidth, amplifier slew rate capabilities, and noise inherent in the initial measurement. Significant improvements in magnetic field gradient waveform fidelity after pre-equalization have been realized and are summarized. PMID:24316188

  7. POGO satellite orbit corrections: an opportunity to improve the quality of the geomagnetic field measurements?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockmann, Reto; Christiansen, Freddy; Olsen, Nils; Jackson, Andrew

    2015-06-01

    We present an attempt to improve the quality of the geomagnetic field measurements from the Polar Orbiting Geophysical Observatory (POGO) satellite missions in the late 1960s. Inaccurate satellite positions are believed to be a major source of errors for using the magnetic observations for field modelling. To improve the data, we use an iterative approach consisting of two main parts: one is a main field modelling process to obtain the radial field gradient to perturb the orbits and the other is the state-of-the-art GPS orbit modelling software BERNESE to calculate new physical orbits. We report results based on a single-day approach showing a clear increase of the data quality. That single-day approach leads, however, to undesirable orbital jumps at midnight. Furthermore, we report results obtained for a much larger data set comprising almost all of the data from the three missions. With this approach, we eliminate the orbit discontinuities at midnight but only tiny quality improvements could be achieved for geomagnetically quiet data. We believe that improvements to the data are probably still possible, but it would require the original tracking observations to be found.

  8. Arbitrary magnetic field gradient waveform correction using an impulse response based pre-equalization technique.

    PubMed

    Goora, Frédéric G; Colpitts, Bruce G; Balcom, Bruce J

    2014-01-01

    The time-varying magnetic fields used in magnetic resonance applications result in the induction of eddy currents on conductive structures in the vicinity of both the sample under investigation and the gradient coils. These eddy currents typically result in undesired degradations of image quality for MRI applications. Their ubiquitous nature has resulted in the development of various approaches to characterize and minimize their impact on image quality. This paper outlines a method that utilizes the magnetic field gradient waveform monitor method to directly measure the temporal evolution of the magnetic field gradient from a step-like input function and extracts the system impulse response. With the basic assumption that the gradient system is sufficiently linear and time invariant to permit system theory analysis, the impulse response is used to determine a pre-equalized (optimized) input waveform that provides a desired gradient response at the output of the system. An algorithm has been developed that calculates a pre-equalized waveform that may be accurately reproduced by the amplifier (is physically realizable) and accounts for system limitations including system bandwidth, amplifier slew rate capabilities, and noise inherent in the initial measurement. Significant improvements in magnetic field gradient waveform fidelity after pre-equalization have been realized and are summarized.

  9. An Ambiguous Statement Called the "tetrad Postulate" and the Correct Field Equations Satisfied by the Tetrad Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Waldyr A.; Souza, Quintino A. G.

    The names tetrad, tetrads, cotetrads have been used with many different meanings in the physics literature, not all of them equivalent from the mathematical point of view. In this paper, we introduce unambiguous definitions for each of those terms, and show how the old miscellanea made many authors introduce in their formalism an ambiguous statement called the "tetrad postulate," which has been the source of much misunderstanding, as we show explicitly by examining examples found in the literature. Since formulating Einstein's field equations intrinsically in terms of cotetrad fields θa, a = 0, 1, 2, 3 is a worthy enterprise, we derive the equation of motion of each θa using modern mathematical tools (the Clifford bundle formalism and the theory of the square of the Dirac operator). Indeed, we identify (giving all details and theorems) from the square of the Dirac operator some noticeable mathematical objects, namely, the Ricci, Einstein, covariant D'Alembertian and the Hodge Laplacian operators, which permit us to show that each θa satisfies a well-defined wave equation. Also, we present for completeness a detailed derivation of the cotetrad wave equations from a variational principle. We compare the cotetrad wave equation satisfied by each θa with some others appearing in the literature, and which are unfortunately in error.

  10. Weak Lensing PSF Correction of Wide-field CCD Mosaic Images (SULI Paper)

    SciTech Connect

    Cevallos, Marissa; /Caltech /SLAC

    2006-01-04

    Gravitational lensing provides some of the most compelling evidence for the existence of dark matter. Dark matter on galaxy cluster scales can be mapped due to its weak gravitational lensing effect: a cluster mass distribution can be inferred from the net distortion of many thousands of faint background galaxies that it induces. Because atmospheric aberration and defects in the detector distort the apparent shape of celestial objects, it is of great importance to characterize accurately the point spread function (PSF) across an image. In this research, the PSF is studied in images from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), whose camera is divided into 12 CCD chips. Traditional weak lensing methodology involves averaging the PSF across the entire image: in this work we investigate the effects of measuring the PSF in each chip independently. This chip-by-chip analysis was found to reduce the strength of the correlation between star and galaxy shapes, and predicted more strongly the presence of known galaxy clusters in mass maps. These results suggest correcting the CFHT PSF on an individual chip basis significantly improves the accuracy of detecting weak lensing.

  11. A means to make open-face charcoal detectors respond correctly to varying concentration radon fields

    SciTech Connect

    Distenfeld, C.H.

    1995-12-31

    Ronca-Battista and D. Gray 87, outlined the poor response of open-face charcoal detectors to varying concentration radon fields. At worst, for two day exposures with open-face charcoal canisters, their Table 4 indicated a 75% under-response for radon concentrations that were 10 times higher during the first day of two, 10:1. TCS has made similar measurements with open-faced and diffusion barrier detectors in 20:1, 1:20, and 1:1 fields. For the worst case 20:1, measurements indicate TCS two day open-face canisters under respond by 50%, while the Cohen and TCS diffusion barrier devices under responded by about 37%. The reasons for the under response are radon diffusion out of the charcoal due to the forces of lower concentration during the second half of the exposure, and uncompensated radioactive decay of radon gas.

  12. Analysis of the failures and corrective actions for the LHC cryogenics radiation tolerant electronics and its field instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balle, Christoph; Casas, Juan; Vauthier, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    The LHC cryogenic system radiation tolerant electronics and their associated field instruments have been in nominal conditions since before the commissioning of the first LHC beams in September 2008. This system is made of about 15'000 field instruments (thermometers, pressure sensors, liquid helium level gauges, electrical heaters and position switches), 7'500 electronic cards and 853 electronic crates. Since mid-2008 a software tool has been deployed, this allows an operator to report a problem and then lists the corrective actions. The tool is a great help in detecting recurrent problems that may be tackled by a hardware or software consolidation. The corrective actions range from simple resets, exchange of defective equipment, repair of electrical connectors, etc. However a recurrent problem that heals by itself is present on some channels. This type of fault is extremely difficult to diagnose and it appears as a temporary opening of an electrical circuit; its duration can range from a few minutes to several months. This paper presents the main type of problems encountered during the last four years, their evolution over time, the various hardware or software consolidations that have resulted and whether they have had an impact in the availability of the LHC beam.

  13. Analysis of the failures and corrective actions for the LHC cryogenics radiation tolerant electronics and its field instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Balle, Christoph; Casas, Juan; Vauthier, Nicolas

    2014-01-29

    The LHC cryogenic system radiation tolerant electronics and their associated field instruments have been in nominal conditions since before the commissioning of the first LHC beams in September 2008. This system is made of about 15’000 field instruments (thermometers, pressure sensors, liquid helium level gauges, electrical heaters and position switches), 7’500 electronic cards and 853 electronic crates. Since mid-2008 a software tool has been deployed, this allows an operator to report a problem and then lists the corrective actions. The tool is a great help in detecting recurrent problems that may be tackled by a hardware or software consolidation. The corrective actions range from simple resets, exchange of defective equipment, repair of electrical connectors, etc. However a recurrent problem that heals by itself is present on some channels. This type of fault is extremely difficult to diagnose and it appears as a temporary opening of an electrical circuit; its duration can range from a few minutes to several months. This paper presents the main type of problems encountered during the last four years, their evolution over time, the various hardware or software consolidations that have resulted and whether they have had an impact in the availability of the LHC beam.

  14. Gemini planet imager observational calibrations IV: wavelength calibration and flexure correction for the integral field spectograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Schuyler G.; Perrin, Marshall D.; Maire, Jérôme; Ingraham, Patrick J.; Rantakyrö, Fredrik T.; Hibon, Pascale

    2014-08-01

    We present the wavelength calibration for the lenslet-based Integral Field Spectrograph (IFS) that serves as the science instrument for the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI). The GPI IFS features a 2.7" x 2.7" field of view and a 190 x 190 lenslet array (14.3 mas/lenslet) operating in Y, J, H, and K bands with spectral resolving power ranging from R ~ 35 to 78. Due to variations across the field of view, a unique wavelength solution is determined for each lenslet characterized by a two-dimensional position, the spectral dispersion, and the rotation of the spectrum with respect to the detector axes. The four free parameters are fit using a constrained Levenberg-Marquardt least-squares minimization algorithm, which compares an individual lenslet's arc lamp spectrum to a simulated arc lamp spectrum. This method enables measurement of spectral positions to better than 1/10th of a pixel on the GPI IFS detector using Gemini's facility calibration lamp unit GCAL, improving spectral extraction accuracy compared to earlier approaches. Using such wavelength calibrations we have measured how internal flexure of the spectrograph with changing zenith angle shifts spectra on the detector. We describe the methods used to compensate for these shifts when assembling datacubes from on-sky observations using GPI.

  15. Simplest relationship between local field potential and intracellular signals in layered neural tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chizhov, Anton V.; Sanchez-Aguilera, Alberto; Rodrigues, Serafim; de la Prida, Liset Menendez

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between the extracellularly measured electric field potential resulting from synaptic activity in an ensemble of neurons and intracellular signals in these neurons is an important but still open question. Based on a model neuron with a cylindrical dendrite and lumped soma, we derive a formula that substantiates a proportionality between the local field potential and the total somatic transmembrane current that emerges from the difference between the somatic and dendritic membrane potentials. The formula is tested by intra- and extracellular recordings of evoked synaptic responses in hippocampal slices. Additionally, the contribution of different membrane currents to the field potential is demonstrated in a two-population mean-field model. Our formalism, which allows for a simple estimation of unknown dendritic currents directly from somatic measurements, provides an interpretation of the local field potential in terms of intracellularly measurable synaptic signals. It is also applicable to the study of cortical activity using two-compartment neuronal population models.

  16. Simplest relationship between local field potential and intracellular signals in layered neural tissue.

    PubMed

    Chizhov, Anton V; Sanchez-Aguilera, Alberto; Rodrigues, Serafim; de la Prida, Liset Menendez

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between the extracellularly measured electric field potential resulting from synaptic activity in an ensemble of neurons and intracellular signals in these neurons is an important but still open question. Based on a model neuron with a cylindrical dendrite and lumped soma, we derive a formula that substantiates a proportionality between the local field potential and the total somatic transmembrane current that emerges from the difference between the somatic and dendritic membrane potentials. The formula is tested by intra- and extracellular recordings of evoked synaptic responses in hippocampal slices. Additionally, the contribution of different membrane currents to the field potential is demonstrated in a two-population mean-field model. Our formalism, which allows for a simple estimation of unknown dendritic currents directly from somatic measurements, provides an interpretation of the local field potential in terms of intracellularly measurable synaptic signals. It is also applicable to the study of cortical activity using two-compartment neuronal population models. PMID:26764724

  17. Localization and quasilocalization of a spin-1 /2 fermion field on a two-field thick braneworld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Heng; Xie, Qun-Ying; Fu, Chun-E.

    2015-11-01

    Localization of a spin-1 /2 fermion on the braneworld is an important and interesting problem. It is well known that a five-dimensional free massless fermion Ψ minimally coupled to gravity cannot be localized on the Randall-Sundrum braneworld. In order to trap such a fermion, the coupling between the fermion and bulk scalar fields should be introduced. In this paper, localization and quasilocalization of a bulk fermion on the thick braneworld generated by two scalar fields (a kink scalar ϕ and a dilaton scalar π ) are investigated. Two types of couplings between the fermion and two scalars are considered. One coupling is the usual Yukawa coupling -η Ψ ¯ϕ Ψ between the fermion and kink scalar, another one is λ Ψ ¯ΓM∂Mπ γ5Ψ between the fermion and dilaton scalar. The left-chiral fermion zero mode can be localized on the brane, and both the left- and right-chiral fermion massive Kaluza-Klein modes may be localized or quasilocalized. Hence the four-dimensional massless left-chiral fermion and massive Dirac fermions, whose lifetime is infinite or finite, can be obtained on the brane.

  18. Effects of the local structure dependence of evaporation fields on field evaporation behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Lan; Marquis, Emmanuelle A.; Withrow, Travis; Restrepo, Oscar D.; Windl, Wolfgang

    2015-12-14

    Accurate three dimensional reconstructions of atomic positions and full quantification of the information contained in atom probe microscopy data rely on understanding the physical processes taking place during field evaporation of atoms from needle-shaped specimens. However, the modeling framework for atom probe microscopy has only limited quantitative justification. Building on the continuum field models previously developed, we introduce a more physical approach with the selection of evaporation events based on density functional theory calculations. This model reproduces key features observed experimentally in terms of sequence of evaporation, evaporation maps, and depth resolution, and provides insights into the physical limit for spatial resolution.

  19. Lorentz factor determination for local electric fields in semiconductor devices utilizing hyper-thin dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, J. W.

    2015-11-28

    The local electric field (the field that distorts, polarizes, and weakens polar molecular bonds in dielectrics) has been investigated for hyper-thin dielectrics. Hyper-thin dielectrics are currently required for advanced semiconductor devices. In the work presented, it is shown that the common practice of using a Lorentz factor of L = 1/3, to describe the local electric field in a dielectric layer, remains valid for hyper-thin dielectrics. However, at the very edge of device structures, a rise in the macroscopic/Maxwell electric field E{sub diel} occurs and this causes a sharp rise in the effective Lorentz factor L{sub eff}. At capacitor and transistor edges, L{sub eff} is found to increase to a value 2/3 < L{sub eff} < 1. The increase in L{sub eff} results in a local electric field, at device edge, that is 50%–100% greater than in the bulk of the dielectric. This increase in local electric field serves to weaken polar bonds thus making them more susceptible to breakage by standard Boltzmann and/or current-driven processes. This has important time-dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB) implications for all electronic devices utilizing polar materials, including GaN devices that suffer from device-edge TDDB.

  20. Local high-resolution crustal magnetic field analysis from satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plattner, Alain; Simons, Frederik J.

    2016-04-01

    Planetary crustal magnetic fields are key to understanding a planet or moon's structure and history. Due to satellite orbit parameters such as aerobraking (Mars) or only partial coverage (Mercury), or simply because of the strongly heterogeneous crustal field strength, satellite data of planetary magnetic fields vary regionally in their signal-to noise ratio and data coverage. To take full advantage of data quality within one region of a planet or moon without diluting the data with lower quality measurements outside of that region we resort to local methods. Slepian functions are linear combinations of spherical harmonics that provide local sensitivity to structure. Here we present a selection of crustal magnetic field models obtained from vector-valued variable-altitude satellite observations using an altitude-cognizant gradient-vector Slepian approach. This method is based on locally maximizing energy concentration within the region of data availability while simultaneously bandlimiting the model in terms of its spherical-harmonic degree and minimizing noise amplification due to downward continuation. For simple regions such as spherical caps, our method is computationally efficient and allows us to calculate local crustal magnetic field solutions beyond spherical harmonic degree 800, if the data permit. We furthermore discuss extensions of the method that are optimized for the analysis and separation of internal and external magnetic fields.

  1. Local- and field-scale stochastic-advective vertical solute transport in horizontally heterogeneous unsaturated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojha, Richa; Prakash, A.; Govindaraju, Rao S.

    2014-08-01

    Description of field-scale solute transport in unsaturated soils is essential for assessing the degree of contamination, estimating fluxes past a control plane and for designing remedial measures. The flow field is usually described by numerical solution of the Richards equation followed by numerical solution of the advection-dispersion equation to describe contaminant movement. These numerical solutions are highly complex, and do not provide the insights that are possible from simpler analytical representations. In this study, analytical solutions at the local scale are developed to describe purely advective vertical transport of a conservative solute along the principle characteristic of the flow field. Local-scale model development is simplified by using a sharp-front approximation for water movement. These local solutions are then upscaled to field-scale solute transport by adopting a lognormally distributed horizontal hydraulic conductivity field to represent the natural heterogeneity observed in field soils. Analytical expressions are developed for the mean behavior of solute transport at the field scale. Comparisons with experimental observations find that trends of field-scale solute behavior are reasonably reproduced by the model. The accuracy of the proposed solution improves with increasing spatial variability in the hydraulic conductivity as revealed by further comparisons with numerical results of the Richards equation-based field-scale solute movement. In some cases, the sharp-front approximation may lead to anomalous field-scale behavior depending on the role of pre and postponded conditions in the field, and this limitation is discussed. The proposed method shows promise for describing field-scale solute movement in loamy sand and sandy loam soils.

  2. Field confinement with aberration correction for solid immersion lens based fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Ramachandra; Mitic, Jelena; Serov, Alexandre; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Lasser, Theo

    2007-03-01

    The solid immersion lens (SIL) as a tool for increasing the field confinement as well as providing optimal performance by aberration compensation in a confocal fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) system is illustrated here. Using Zernike polynomials we show that aberration compensation and the resultant pre-shaping of the incident wavefront enables near diffraction-limited performance. This is explained based on vectorial computations for high apertures in the Debye approximation. The obtained axial resolution parameters are compared with the obtained diffusion times in a SIL-FCS experiment for measurements in solutions done at the single molecule level.

  3. Separation of true fat and water images by correcting magnetic field inhomogeneity in-situ

    SciTech Connect

    Yeung, H.N.; Kormos, D.W.

    1986-06-01

    Dixon's method of chemical shift imaging of a two-component system is modified and extended without requiring additional imaging time. The modified method allows one to obtain truly segregated fat and water images of animal tissues. This is accomplished by acquiring additional image data from which information about in situ magnetic field inhomogeneity and bulk magnetic susceptibility can be derived. Applications to various anatomic sections of the normal human body are illustrated. The method is compared with the standard Dixon technique of chemical shift image separation.

  4. Unmasking local activity within local field potentials (LFPs) by removing distal electrical signals using independent component analysis

    PubMed Central

    Whitmore, Nathan W.; Lin, Shih-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    Local field potentials (LFPs) are commonly thought to reflect the aggregate dynamics in local neural circuits around recording electrodes. However, we show that when LFPs are recorded in awake behaving animals against a distal reference on the skull as commonly practiced, LFPs are significantly contaminated by non-local and non-neural sources arising from the reference electrode and from movement-related noise. In a data set with simultaneously recorded LFPs and electroencephalograms (EEGs) across multiple brain regions while rats perform an auditory oddball task, we used independent component analysis (ICA) to identify signals arising from electrical reference and from volume-conducted noise based on their distributed spatial pattern across multiple electrodes and distinct power spectral features. These sources of distal electrical signals collectively accounted for 23–77% of total variance in unprocessed LFPs, as well as most of the gamma oscillation responses to the target stimulus in EEGs. Gamma oscillation power was concentrated in volume-conducted noise and was tightly coupled with the onset of licking behavior, suggesting a likely origin of muscle activity associated with body movement or orofacial movement. The removal of distal signal contamination also selectively reduced correlations of LFP/EEG signals between distant brain regions but not within the same region. Finally, the removal of contamination from distal electrical signals preserved an event-related potential (ERP) response to auditory stimuli in the frontal cortex and also increased the coupling between the frontal ERP amplitude and neuronal activity in the basal forebrain, supporting the conclusion that removing distal electrical signals unmasked local activity within LFPs. Together, these results highlight the significant contamination of LFPs by distal electrical signals and caution against the straightforward interpretation of unprocessed LFPs. Our results provide a principled approach to

  5. Localization-based full-field microscopy: how to attain super-resolved images

    PubMed Central

    Son, Taehwang; Lee, Wonju; Kim, Donghyun

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we have investigated localization-based microscopy to achieve full-field super-resolution. For localized sampling, we have considered combs consisting of unit pulses and near-fields localized by surface nanoapertures. Achievable images after reconstruction were assessed in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR). It was found that spatial switching of individual pulses may be needed to break the diffraction limit. Among the parameters, the resolution was largely determined by sampling period while the effect of width of a sampling pulse on PSNR was relatively limited. For the range of sampling parameters that we considered, the highest resolution achievable is estimated to be 70 nm, which can further be enhanced by optimizing the localization parameters. PMID:26201451

  6. Impact of high power and angle of incidence on prism corrections for visual field loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jae-Hyun; Peli, Eli

    2014-06-01

    Prism distortions and spurious reflections are not usually considered when prescribing prisms to compensate for visual field loss due to homonymous hemianopia. Distortions and reflections in the high-power Fresnel prisms used in peripheral prism placement can be considerable, and the simplifying assumption that prism deflection power is independent of angle of incidence into the prisms results in substantial errors. We analyze the effects of high prism power and incidence angle on the field expansion, size of the apical scotomas, and image compression/expansion. We analyze and illustrate the effects of reflections within the Fresnel prisms, primarily due to reflections at the bases, and secondarily due to surface reflections. The strength and location of these effects differs materially depending on whether the serrated prismatic surface is placed toward or away from the eye, and this affects the contribution of the reflections to visual confusion, diplopia, false alarms, and loss of contrast. We conclude with suggestions for controlling and mitigating these effects in clinical practice.

  7. 63,65Cu NMR Method in a Local Field for Investigation of Copper Ore Concentrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilenko, A. N.; Starykh, R. V.; Khabibullin, I. Kh.; Matukhin, V. L.

    2015-01-01

    To choose the most efficient method and ore beneficiation flow diagram, it is important to know physical and chemical properties of ore concentrates. The feasibility of application of the 63,65Cu nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method in a local field aimed at studying the properties of copper ore concentrates in the copper-iron-sulfur system is demonstrated. 63,65Cu NMR spectrum is measured in a local field for a copper concentrate sample and relaxation parameters (times T1 and T2) are obtained. The spectrum obtained was used to identify a mineral (chalcopyrite) contained in the concentrate. Based on the experimental data, comparative characteristics of natural chalcopyrite and beneficiated copper concentrate are given. The feasibility of application of the NMR method in a local field to explore mineral deposits is analyzed.

  8. Passive advection of a vector field: Anisotropy, finite correlation time, exact solution, and logarithmic corrections to ordinary scaling.

    PubMed

    Antonov, N V; Gulitskiy, N M

    2015-10-01

    In this work we study the generalization of the problem considered in [Phys. Rev. E 91, 013002 (2015)] to the case of finite correlation time of the environment (velocity) field. The model describes a vector (e.g., magnetic) field, passively advected by a strongly anisotropic turbulent flow. Inertial-range asymptotic behavior is studied by means of the field theoretic renormalization group and the operator product expansion. The advecting velocity field is Gaussian, with finite correlation time and preassigned pair correlation function. Due to the presence of distinguished direction n, all the multiloop diagrams in this model vanish, so that the results obtained are exact. The inertial-range behavior of the model is described by two regimes (the limits of vanishing or infinite correlation time) that correspond to the two nontrivial fixed points of the RG equations. Their stability depends on the relation between the exponents in the energy spectrum E∝k(⊥)(1-ξ) and the dispersion law ω∝k(⊥)(2-η). In contrast to the well-known isotropic Kraichnan's model, where various correlation functions exhibit anomalous scaling behavior with infinite sets of anomalous exponents, here the corrections to ordinary scaling are polynomials of logarithms of the integral turbulence scale L. PMID:26565343

  9. Grid-based backbone correction to the ff12SB protein force field for implicit-solvent simulations.

    PubMed

    Perez, Alberto; MacCallum, Justin L; Brini, Emiliano; Simmerling, Carlos; Dill, Ken A

    2015-10-13

    Force fields, such as Amber's ff12SB, can be fairly accurate models of the physical forces in proteins and other biomolecules. When coupled with accurate solvation models, force fields are able to bring insight into the conformational preferences, transitions, pathways, and free energies for these biomolecules. When computational speed/cost matters, implicit solvent is often used but at the cost of accuracy. We present an empirical grid-like correction term, in the spirit of cMAPs, to the combination of the ff12SB protein force field and the GBneck2 implicit-solvent model. Ff12SB-cMAP is parametrized on experimental helicity data. We provide validation on a set of peptides and proteins. Ff12SB-cMAP successfully improves the secondary structure biases observed in ff12SB + Gbneck2. Ff12SB-cMAP can be downloaded ( https://github.com/laufercenter/Amap.git ) and used within the Amber package. It can improve the agreement of force fields + implicit solvent with experiments. PMID:26574266

  10. Weaker axially dipolar time-averaged paleomagnetic field based on multidomain-corrected paleointensities from Galapagos lavas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huapei; Kent, Dennis V; Rochette, Pierre

    2015-12-01

    The geomagnetic field is predominantly dipolar today, and high-fidelity paleomagnetic mean directions from all over the globe strongly support the geocentric axial dipole (GAD) hypothesis for the past few million years. However, the bulk of paleointensity data fails to coincide with the axial dipole prediction of a factor-of-2 equator-to-pole increase in mean field strength, leaving the core dynamo process an enigma. Here, we obtain a multidomain-corrected Pliocene-Pleistocene average paleointensity of 21.6 ± 11.0 µT recorded by 27 lava flows from the Galapagos Archipelago near the Equator. Our new result in conjunction with a published comprehensive study of single-domain-behaved paleointensities from Antarctica (33.4 ± 13.9 µT) that also correspond to GAD directions suggests that the overall average paleomagnetic field over the past few million years has indeed been dominantly dipolar in intensity yet only ∼ 60% of the present-day field strength, with a long-term average virtual axial dipole magnetic moment of the Earth of only 4.9 ± 2.4 × 10(22) A ⋅ m(2). PMID:26598664

  11. Weaker axially dipolar time-averaged paleomagnetic field based on multidomain-corrected paleointensities from Galapagos lavas

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huapei; Kent, Dennis V.; Rochette, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The geomagnetic field is predominantly dipolar today, and high-fidelity paleomagnetic mean directions from all over the globe strongly support the geocentric axial dipole (GAD) hypothesis for the past few million years. However, the bulk of paleointensity data fails to coincide with the axial dipole prediction of a factor-of-2 equator-to-pole increase in mean field strength, leaving the core dynamo process an enigma. Here, we obtain a multidomain-corrected Pliocene–Pleistocene average paleointensity of 21.6 ± 11.0 µT recorded by 27 lava flows from the Galapagos Archipelago near the Equator. Our new result in conjunction with a published comprehensive study of single-domain–behaved paleointensities from Antarctica (33.4 ± 13.9 µT) that also correspond to GAD directions suggests that the overall average paleomagnetic field over the past few million years has indeed been dominantly dipolar in intensity yet only ∼60% of the present-day field strength, with a long-term average virtual axial dipole magnetic moment of the Earth of only 4.9 ± 2.4 × 1022 A⋅m2. PMID:26598664

  12. Passive advection of a vector field: Anisotropy, finite correlation time, exact solution, and logarithmic corrections to ordinary scaling.

    PubMed

    Antonov, N V; Gulitskiy, N M

    2015-10-01

    In this work we study the generalization of the problem considered in [Phys. Rev. E 91, 013002 (2015)] to the case of finite correlation time of the environment (velocity) field. The model describes a vector (e.g., magnetic) field, passively advected by a strongly anisotropic turbulent flow. Inertial-range asymptotic behavior is studied by means of the field theoretic renormalization group and the operator product expansion. The advecting velocity field is Gaussian, with finite correlation time and preassigned pair correlation function. Due to the presence of distinguished direction n, all the multiloop diagrams in this model vanish, so that the results obtained are exact. The inertial-range behavior of the model is described by two regimes (the limits of vanishing or infinite correlation time) that correspond to the two nontrivial fixed points of the RG equations. Their stability depends on the relation between the exponents in the energy spectrum E∝k(⊥)(1-ξ) and the dispersion law ω∝k(⊥)(2-η). In contrast to the well-known isotropic Kraichnan's model, where various correlation functions exhibit anomalous scaling behavior with infinite sets of anomalous exponents, here the corrections to ordinary scaling are polynomials of logarithms of the integral turbulence scale L.

  13. Hierarchical radial basis function networks and local polynomial un-warping for X-ray image intensifier distortion correction: a comparison with global techniques.

    PubMed

    Cerveri, P; Forlani, C; Pedotti, A; Ferrigno, G

    2003-03-01

    Global polynomial (GP) methods have been widely used to correct geometric image distortion of small-size (up to 30 cm) X-ray image intensifiers (XRIIs). This work confirms that this kind of approach is suitable for 40 cm XRIIs (now increasingly used). Nonetheless, two local methods, namely 3rd-order local un-warping polynomials (LUPs) and hierarchical radial basis function (HRBF) networks are proposed as alternative solutions. Extensive experimental tests were carried out to compare these methods with classical low-order local polynomial and GP techniques, in terms of residual error (RMSE) measured at points not used for parameter estimation. Simulations showed that the LUP and HRBF methods had accuracies comparable with that attained using GP methods. In detail, the LUP method (0.353 microm) performed worse than HRBF (0.348 microm) only for small grid spacing (15 x 15 control points); the accuracy of both HRBF (0.157 microm) and LUP (0.160 microm) methods was little affected by local distortions (30 x 30 control points); weak local distortions made the GP method poorer (0.320 microm). Tests on real data showed that LUP and HRBF had accuracies comparable with that of GP for both 30 cm (GP: 0.238 microm; LUP: 0.240 microm; HRBF: 0.238 microm) and 40 cm (GP: 0.164 microm; LUP: 0.164 microm; HRBF: 0.164 microm) XRIIs. The LUP-based distortion correction was implemented in real time for image correction in digital tomography applications.

  14. Local electric fields and molecular properties in heterogeneous environments through polarizable embedding.

    PubMed

    List, Nanna Holmgaard; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard; Kongsted, Jacob

    2016-04-21

    In spectroscopies, the local field experienced by a molecule embedded in an environment will be different from the externally applied electromagnetic field, and this difference may significantly alter the response and transition properties of the molecule. The polarizable embedding (PE) model has previously been developed to model the local field contribution stemming from the direct molecule-environment coupling of the electromagnetic response properties of molecules in solution as well as in heterogeneous environments, such as proteins. Here we present an extension of this approach to address the additional effective external field effect, i.e., the manifestations of the environment polarization induced by the external field, which allows for the calculation of properties defined in terms of the external field. Within a response framework, we report calculations of the one- and two-photon absorption (1PA and 2PA, respectively) properties of PRODAN-methanol clusters as well as the fluorescent protein DsRed. Our results demonstrate the necessity of accounting for both the dynamical reaction field and effective external field contributions to the local field in order to reproduce full quantum chemical reference calculations. For the lowest π→π* transition in DsRed, inclusion of effective external field effects gives rise to a 1.9- and 3.5-fold reduction in the 1PA and 2PA cross-sections, respectively. The effective external field is, however, strongly influenced by the heterogeneity of the protein matrix, and the resulting effect can lead to either screening or enhancement depending on the nature of the transition under consideration. PMID:27007060

  15. Wide field adaptive optics correction for the GMT using natural guide stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dam, Marcos A.; Bouchez, Antonin H.; McLeod, Brian A.

    2014-07-01

    The conceptual design of the Giant Magellan Telescope has four wavefront sensors used to maintain the shape and alignment of the segmented primary and secondary mirrors. In this paper, we show that by reading the sensors at 200 Hz, we can also compensate for low altitude turbulence. As a result, there is a large improvement in image quality, even at visible wavelengths, over the entire science field of view of the telescope. A minimum-variance reconstructor is presented that takes slope measurements from four stars of arbitrary location and magnitude and produces the optimal adaptive secondary mirror commands. The performance of the adaptive optics system in this mode is simulated using YAO, an end-to-end simulation tool. We present the results of trade studies performed to optimize the science return of the telescope.

  16. Temporal resolution criterion for correctly simulating relativistic electron motion in a high-intensity laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Arefiev, Alexey V.; Cochran, Ginevra E.; Schumacher, Douglass W.; Robinson, Alexander P. L.; Chen, Guangye

    2015-01-15

    Particle-in-cell codes are now standard tools for studying ultra-intense laser-plasma interactions. Motivated by direct laser acceleration of electrons in sub-critical plasmas, we examine temporal resolution requirements that must be satisfied to accurately calculate electron dynamics in strong laser fields. Using the motion of a single electron in a perfect plane electromagnetic wave as a test problem, we show surprising deterioration of the numerical accuracy with increasing wave amplitude a{sub 0} for a given time-step. We go on to show analytically that the time-step must be significantly less than λ/ca{sub 0} to achieve good accuracy. We thus propose adaptive electron sub-cycling as an efficient remedy.

  17. Corrections to traditional methods of verifying tangential-breast 3D monitor-unit calculations: use of an equivalent triangle to estimate effective fields.

    PubMed

    Prado, Karl L; Kirsner, Steven M; Erice, Rolly C

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes an innovative method for correctly estimating the effective field size of tangential-breast fields. The method uses an "equivalent triangle" to verify intact breast tangential field monitor-unit settings calculated by a 3D planning system to within 2%. The effects on verification calculations of loss of full scatter due to beam oblique incidence, proximity to field boundaries, and reduced scattering volumes are handled properly. The methodology is validated by comparing calculations performed by the 3D planning system with the respective verification estimates. The accuracy of this technique is established for dose calculations both with and without heterogeneity corrections.

  18. Deep-subwavelength imaging of both electric and magnetic localized optical fields by plasmonic campanile nanoantenna

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Caselli, Niccolò; La China, Federico; Bao, Wei; Riboli, Francesco; Gerardino, Annamaria; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund H.; Pagliano, Francesco; Fiore, Andrea; Schuck, P. James; et al

    2015-06-05

    Tailoring the electromagnetic field at the nanoscale has led to artificial materials exhibiting fascinating optical properties unavailable in naturally occurring substances. Besides having fundamental implications for classical and quantum optics, nanoscale metamaterials provide a platform for developing disruptive novel technologies, in which a combination of both the electric and magnetic radiation field components at optical frequencies is relevant to engineer the light-matter interaction. Thus, an experimental investigation of the spatial distribution of the photonic states at the nanoscale for both field components is of crucial importance. Here we experimentally demonstrate a concomitant deep-subwavelength near-field imaging of the electric and magneticmore » intensities of the optical modes localized in a photonic crystal nanocavity. We take advantage of the “campanile tip”, a plasmonic near-field probe that efficiently combines broadband field enhancement with strong far-field to near-field coupling. In conclusion, by exploiting the electric and magnetic polarizability components of the campanile tip along with the perturbation imaging method, we are able to map in a single measurement both the electric and magnetic localized near-field distributions.« less

  19. Deep-subwavelength imaging of both electric and magnetic localized optical fields by plasmonic campanile nanoantenna

    SciTech Connect

    Caselli, Niccolò; La China, Federico; Bao, Wei; Riboli, Francesco; Gerardino, Annamaria; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund H.; Pagliano, Francesco; Fiore, Andrea; Schuck, P. James; Cabrini, Stefano; Weber-Bargioni, Alexander; Gurioli, Massimo; Intonti, Francesca

    2015-06-05

    Tailoring the electromagnetic field at the nanoscale has led to artificial materials exhibiting fascinating optical properties unavailable in naturally occurring substances. Besides having fundamental implications for classical and quantum optics, nanoscale metamaterials provide a platform for developing disruptive novel technologies, in which a combination of both the electric and magnetic radiation field components at optical frequencies is relevant to engineer the light-matter interaction. Thus, an experimental investigation of the spatial distribution of the photonic states at the nanoscale for both field components is of crucial importance. Here we experimentally demonstrate a concomitant deep-subwavelength near-field imaging of the electric and magnetic intensities of the optical modes localized in a photonic crystal nanocavity. We take advantage of the “campanile tip”, a plasmonic near-field probe that efficiently combines broadband field enhancement with strong far-field to near-field coupling. In conclusion, by exploiting the electric and magnetic polarizability components of the campanile tip along with the perturbation imaging method, we are able to map in a single measurement both the electric and magnetic localized near-field distributions.

  20. Deep-subwavelength imaging of both electric and magnetic localized optical fields by plasmonic campanile nanoantenna

    PubMed Central

    Caselli, Niccolò; La China, Federico; Bao, Wei; Riboli, Francesco; Gerardino, Annamaria; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund H.; Pagliano, Francesco; Fiore, Andrea; Schuck, P. James; Cabrini, Stefano; Weber-Bargioni, Alexander; Gurioli, Massimo; Intonti, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Tailoring the electromagnetic field at the nanoscale has led to artificial materials exhibiting fascinating optical properties unavailable in naturally occurring substances. Besides having fundamental implications for classical and quantum optics, nanoscale metamaterials provide a platform for developing disruptive novel technologies, in which a combination of both the electric and magnetic radiation field components at optical frequencies is relevant to engineer the light-matter interaction. Thus, an experimental investigation of the spatial distribution of the photonic states at the nanoscale for both field components is of crucial importance. Here we experimentally demonstrate a concomitant deep-subwavelength near-field imaging of the electric and magnetic intensities of the optical modes localized in a photonic crystal nanocavity. We take advantage of the “campanile tip”, a plasmonic near-field probe that efficiently combines broadband field enhancement with strong far-field to near-field coupling. By exploiting the electric and magnetic polarizability components of the campanile tip along with the perturbation imaging method, we are able to map in a single measurement both the electric and magnetic localized near-field distributions. PMID:26045401

  1. Passive Localization of Mixed Far-Field and Near-Field Sources without Estimating the Number of Sources

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jian; Tao, Haihong; Rao, Xuan; Su, Jia

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel algorithm for the localization of mixed far-field sources (FFSs) and near-field sources (NFSs) without estimating the source number. Firstly, the algorithm decouples the direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation from the range estimation by exploiting fourth-order spatial-temporal cumulants of the observed data. Based on the joint diagonalization structure of multiple spatial-temporal cumulant matrices, a new one-dimensional (1-D) spatial spectrum function is derived to generate the DOA estimates of both FFSs and NFSs. Then, the FFSs and NFSs are identified and the range parameters of NFSs are determined via beamforming technique. Compared with traditional mixed sources localization algorithms, the proposed algorithm avoids the performance deterioration induced by erroneous source number estimation. Furthermore, it has a higher resolution capability and improves the estimation accuracy. Computer simulations are implemented to verify the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. PMID:25668212

  2. Evaluation of Residual Static Corrections by Hybrid Genetic Algorithm Steepest Ascent Autostatics Inversion.Application southern Algerian fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eladj, Said; bansir, fateh; ouadfeul, sid Ali

    2016-04-01

    The application of genetic algorithm starts with an initial population of chromosomes representing a "model space". Chromosome chains are preferentially Reproduced based on Their fitness Compared to the total population. However, a good chromosome has a Greater opportunity to Produce offspring Compared To other chromosomes in the population. The advantage of the combination HGA / SAA is the use of a global search approach on a large population of local maxima to Improve Significantly the performance of the method. To define the parameters of the Hybrid Genetic Algorithm Steepest Ascent Auto Statics (HGA / SAA) job, we Evaluated by testing in the first stage of "Steepest Ascent," the optimal parameters related to the data used. 1- The number of iterations "Number of hill climbing iteration" is equal to 40 iterations. This parameter defines the participation of the algorithm "SA", in this hybrid approach. 2- The minimum eigenvalue for SA '= 0.8. This is linked to the quality of data and S / N ratio. To find an implementation performance of hybrid genetic algorithms in the inversion for estimating of the residual static corrections, tests Were Performed to determine the number of generation of HGA / SAA. Using the values of residual static corrections already calculated by the Approaches "SAA and CSAA" learning has Proved very effective in the building of the cross-correlation table. To determine the optimal number of generation, we Conducted a series of tests ranging from [10 to 200] generations. The application on real seismic data in southern Algeria allowed us to judge the performance and capacity of the inversion with this hybrid method "HGA / SAA". This experience Clarified the influence of the corrections quality estimated from "SAA / CSAA" and the optimum number of generation hybrid genetic algorithm "HGA" required to have a satisfactory performance. Twenty (20) generations Were enough to Improve continuity and resolution of seismic horizons. This Will allow

  3. Imaging local electric fields produced upon synchrotron X-ray exposure.

    PubMed

    Dettmar, Christopher M; Newman, Justin A; Toth, Scott J; Becker, Michael; Fischetti, Robert F; Simpson, Garth J

    2015-01-20

    Electron-hole separation following hard X-ray absorption during diffraction analysis of soft materials under cryogenic conditions produces substantial local electric fields visualizable by second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy. Monte Carlo simulations of X-ray photoelectron trajectories suggest the formation of substantial local electric fields in the regions adjacent to those exposed to X-rays, indicating a possible electric-field-induced SHG (EFISH) mechanism for generating the observed signal. In studies of amorphous vitreous solvents, analysis of the SHG spatial profiles following X-ray microbeam exposure was consistent with an EFISH mechanism. Within protein crystals, exposure to 12-keV (1.033-Å) X-rays resulted in increased SHG in the region extending ∼ 3 μm beyond the borders of the X-ray beam. Moderate X-ray exposures typical of those used for crystal centering by raster scanning through an X-ray beam were sufficient to produce static electric fields easily detectable by SHG. The X-ray-induced SHG activity was observed with no measurable loss for longer than 2 wk while maintained under cryogenic conditions, but disappeared if annealed to room temperature for a few seconds. These results provide direct experimental observables capable of validating simulations of X-ray-induced damage within soft materials. In addition, X-ray-induced local fields may potentially impact diffraction resolution through localized piezoelectric distortions of the lattice. PMID:25552555

  4. Imaging local electric fields produced upon synchrotron X-ray exposure.

    PubMed

    Dettmar, Christopher M; Newman, Justin A; Toth, Scott J; Becker, Michael; Fischetti, Robert F; Simpson, Garth J

    2015-01-20

    Electron-hole separation following hard X-ray absorption during diffraction analysis of soft materials under cryogenic conditions produces substantial local electric fields visualizable by second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy. Monte Carlo simulations of X-ray photoelectron trajectories suggest the formation of substantial local electric fields in the regions adjacent to those exposed to X-rays, indicating a possible electric-field-induced SHG (EFISH) mechanism for generating the observed signal. In studies of amorphous vitreous solvents, analysis of the SHG spatial profiles following X-ray microbeam exposure was consistent with an EFISH mechanism. Within protein crystals, exposure to 12-keV (1.033-Å) X-rays resulted in increased SHG in the region extending ∼ 3 μm beyond the borders of the X-ray beam. Moderate X-ray exposures typical of those used for crystal centering by raster scanning through an X-ray beam were sufficient to produce static electric fields easily detectable by SHG. The X-ray-induced SHG activity was observed with no measurable loss for longer than 2 wk while maintained under cryogenic conditions, but disappeared if annealed to room temperature for a few seconds. These results provide direct experimental observables capable of validating simulations of X-ray-induced damage within soft materials. In addition, X-ray-induced local fields may potentially impact diffraction resolution through localized piezoelectric distortions of the lattice.

  5. High-Resolution Local Crustal Magnetic Field Modeling of the Martian South Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plattner, A.; Simons, F. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) satellite mission has brought us a wealth of information about the Martian magnetic field. Besides determining that Mars currently does not possess an active core field, MGS revealed that Mars contains an unexpectedly wide crustal magnetic field intensity range. In its orbit insertion, MGS performed a series of low altitude passes down to around 100 km above surface. During this mission phase the magnetic field measurements were active. In particular the nighttime low-altitude data are of high interest because they contain minimal noise from solar wind. Since these data only cover a small portion of the planet's surface, to date all Martian crustal magnetic field models blend the highest-quality data with lower quality measurements collected either at higher satellite altitudes or during daytime. In this contribution we present a locally inverted crustal magnetic field model for the Martian South Polar region calculated from only the highest-quality MGS data using locally constructed altitude vector Slepian functions. The South Polar region of Mars contains the southern part of the strongly magnetized Terra Sirenum and the area south of the Tharsis volcanic highland. Besides parts of planetary scale features our area of data coverage also contains local features such as the presumably volcanic Australe Montes and the Prometheus impact crater. These ingredients compose a highly heterogeneous crustal magnetic field. We show that even for our dense low-altitude low-noise data set the inversion for the crustal magnetic field of a weakly magnetized region adjacent to a region containing a strong magnetic field leads to artifacts in the weak region. With our local method we can avoid these artifacts by selecting subregions of roughly homogeneous field intensity and individually invert for crustal magnetic fields from data within only these subregions. This regional and subregional modeling allows us to reveal previously obscured crustal

  6. Large-Scale Dynamics of Mean-Field Games Driven by Local Nash Equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degond, Pierre; Liu, Jian-Guo; Ringhofer, Christian

    2014-02-01

    We introduce a new mean field kinetic model for systems of rational agents interacting in a game-theoretical framework. This model is inspired from non-cooperative anonymous games with a continuum of players and Mean-Field Games. The large time behavior of the system is given by a macroscopic closure with a Nash equilibrium serving as the local thermodynamic equilibrium. An application of the presented theory to a social model (herding behavior) is discussed.

  7. Local time asymmetries and toroidal field line resonances: Global magnetospheric modeling in SWMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellington, S. M.; Moldwin, M. B.; Liemohn, M. W.

    2016-03-01

    We present evidence of resonant wave-wave coupling via toroidal field line resonance (FLR) signatures in the Space Weather Modeling Framework's (SWMF) global, terrestrial magnetospheric model in one simulation driven by a synthetic upstream solar wind with embedded broadband dynamic pressure fluctuations. Using in situ, stationary point measurements of the radial electric field along the 1500 LT meridian, we show that SWMF reproduces a multiharmonic, continuous distribution of FLRs exemplified by 180° phase reversals and amplitude peaks across the resonant L shells. By linearly increasing the amplitude of the dynamic pressure fluctuations in time, we observe a commensurate increase in the amplitude of the radial electric and azimuthal magnetic field fluctuations, which is consistent with the solar wind driver being the dominant source of the fast mode energy. While we find no discernible local time changes in the FLR frequencies despite large-scale, monotonic variations in the dayside equatorial mass density, in selectively sampling resonant points and examining spectral resonance widths, we observe significant radial, harmonic, and time-dependent local time asymmetries in the radial electric field amplitudes. A weak but persistent local time asymmetry exists in measures of the estimated coupling efficiency between the fast mode and toroidal wave fields, which exhibits a radial dependence consistent with the coupling strength examined by Mann et al. (1999) and Zhu and Kivelson (1988). We discuss internal structural mechanisms and additional external energy sources that may account for these asymmetries as we find that local time variations in the strength of the compressional driver are not the predominant source of the FLR amplitude asymmetries. These include resonant mode coupling of observed Kelvin-Helmholtz surface wave generated Pc5 band ultralow frequency pulsations, local time differences in local ionospheric dampening rates, and variations in azimuthal

  8. Forecasting the Solar photospheric magnetic field using solar flux transport model and local ensemble Kalman filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate forecasting the solar photospheric magnetic field distribution play an important role in the estimates of the inner boundary conditions of the coronal and solar wind model. Forecasting solar photospheric magnetic field using the solar flux transport (SFT) model can achieve an acceptable match to the actual field. The observations from ground-based or spacecraft instruments can be assimilated to update the modeled flux. The local ensemble Kalman filtering (LEnKF) method is utilized to improve forecasts and characterize their uncertainty by propagating the SFT model with different model parameters forward in time to control the evolution of the solar photospheric magnetic field. Optimal assimilation of measured data into the ensemble produces an improvement in the fit of the forecast to the actual field. Our approach offers a method to improve operational forecasting of the solar photospheric magnetic field. The LEnKF method also allows sensitivity analysis of the SFT model to noise and uncertainty within the physical representation.

  9. Forecasting the solar photospheric magnetic field using solar flux transport model and local ensemble Kalman filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Du, Aimin; Feng, Xueshang

    2015-04-01

    Accurate forecasting the solar photospheric magnetic field distribution play an important role in the estimates of the inner boundary conditions of the coronal and solar wind model. Forecasting solar photospheric magnetic field using the solar flux transport (SFT) model can achieve an acceptable match to the actual field. The observations from ground-based or spacecraft instruments can be assimilated to update the modeled flux. The local ensemble Kalman filtering (LEnKF) method is utilized to improve forecasts and characterize their uncertainty by propagating the SFT model with different model parameters forward in time to control the evolution of the solar photospheric magnetic field. Optimal assimilation of measured data into the ensemble produces an improvement in the fit of the forecast to the actual field. Our approach offers a method to improve operational forecasting of the solar photospheric magnetic field. The LEnKF method also allows sensitivity analysis of the SFT model to noise and uncertainty within the physical representation.

  10. Application of Learning Methods to Local Electric Field Distributions in Defected Dielectric Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferris, Kim; Jones, Dumont

    2014-03-01

    Local electric fields reflect the structural and dielectric fluctuations in a semiconductor, and affect the material performance both for electron transport and carrier lifetime properties. In this paper, we use the LOCALF methodology with periodic boundary conditions to examine the local electric field distributions and its perturbations for II-VI (CdTe, Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te) semiconductors, containing Te inclusions and small fluctuations in the local dielectric susceptibility. With inclusion of the induced-field term, the electric field distribution shows enhancements and diminishments compared to the macroscopic applied field, reflecting the microstructure characteristics of the dielectric. Learning methods are applied to these distributions to assess the spatial extent of the perturbation, and determine an electric field defined defect size as compared to its physical dimension. Critical concentrations of defects are assessed in terms of defect formation energies. This work was supported by the US Department of Homeland Security, Domestic Nuclear Detection Office, under competitively awarded contract/IAA HSHQDC-08-X-00872-e. This support does not constitute an express or implied endorsement on the part of the Gov't.

  11. Local geometry of electromagnetic fields and its role in molecular multipole transitions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Nan; Cohen, Adam E

    2011-05-12

    Electromagnetic fields with complex spatial variation routinely arise in Nature. We study the response of a small molecule to monochromatic fields of arbitrary three-dimensional geometry. First, we consider the allowed configurations of the fields and field gradients at a single point in space. Many configurations cannot be generated from a single plane wave, regardless of polarization, but any allowed configuration can be generated by superposition of multiple plane waves. There is no local configuration of the fields and gradients that requires near-field effects. Second, we derive a set of local electromagnetic quantities, each of which couples to a particular multipole transition. These quantities are small or zero in plane waves, but can be large in regions of certain superpositions of plane waves. Our findings provide a systematic framework for designing far-field and near-field experiments to drive multipole transitions. The proposed experiments provide information on molecular structure that is inaccessible to other spectroscopic techniques and open the possibility for new types of optical control of molecules.

  12. Minimum-length deformed quantization of a free field on the de Sitter background and corrections to the inflaton perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maziashvili, Michael

    2012-06-01

    The effect of string- and quantum-gravity-inspired minimum-length deformed quantization on a free, massless scalar field is studied on the de Sitter background at the level of second quantization. An analytic solution of a field operator is obtained to the first order in deformation parameter. Using this solution, we then estimate the two-point and four-point correlation functions (with respect to the Bunch-Davies vacuum). The field operator shows up a nonlinear dependence on creation and annihilation operators, therefore the perturbation spectrum proves to be non-Gaussian. The correction to the power spectrum is of the same order as obtained previously in a similar study that incorporates the minimum-length deformed momentum operator into the first quantization picture and then proceeds in the standard way for second quantization. The non-Gaussianity comes at the level of four-point correlation function; its magnitude appears to be suppressed by the factor ˜exp⁡(-6N), where N is the number of e-foldings.

  13. Accurate Evaluation of Ion Conductivity of the Gramicidin A Channel Using a Polarizable Force Field without Any Corrections.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiangda; Zhang, Yuebin; Chu, Huiying; Li, Yan; Zhang, Dinglin; Cao, Liaoran; Li, Guohui

    2016-06-14

    Classical molecular dynamic (MD) simulation of membrane proteins faces significant challenges in accurately reproducing and predicting experimental observables such as ion conductance and permeability due to its incapability of precisely describing the electronic interactions in heterogeneous systems. In this work, the free energy profiles of K(+) and Na(+) permeating through the gramicidin A channel are characterized by using the AMOEBA polarizable force field with a total sampling time of 1 μs. Our results indicated that by explicitly introducing the multipole terms and polarization into the electrostatic potentials, the permeation free energy barrier of K(+) through the gA channel is considerably reduced compared to the overestimated results obtained from the fixed-charge model. Moreover, the estimated maximum conductance, without any corrections, for both K(+) and Na(+) passing through the gA channel are much closer to the experimental results than any classical MD simulations, demonstrating the power of AMOEBA in investigating the membrane proteins. PMID:27171823

  14. SU-E-T-469: A Practical Approach for the Determination of Small Field Output Factors Using Published Monte Carlo Derived Correction Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Calderon, E; Siergiej, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Output factor determination for small fields (less than 20 mm) presents significant challenges due to ion chamber volume averaging and diode over-response. Measured output factor values between detectors are known to have large deviations as field sizes are decreased. No set standard to resolve this difference in measurement exists. We observed differences between measured output factors of up to 14% using two different detectors. Published Monte Carlo derived correction factors were used to address this challenge and decrease the output factor deviation between detectors. Methods: Output factors for Elekta's linac-based stereotactic cone system were measured using the EDGE detector (Sun Nuclear) and the A16 ion chamber (Standard Imaging). Measurements conditions were 100 cm SSD (source to surface distance) and 1.5 cm depth. Output factors were first normalized to a 10.4 cm × 10.4 cm field size using a daisy-chaining technique to minimize the dependence of field size on detector response. An equation expressing the relation between published Monte Carlo correction factors as a function of field size for each detector was derived. The measured output factors were then multiplied by the calculated correction factors. EBT3 gafchromic film dosimetry was used to independently validate the corrected output factors. Results: Without correction, the deviation in output factors between the EDGE and A16 detectors ranged from 1.3 to 14.8%, depending on cone size. After applying the calculated correction factors, this deviation fell to 0 to 3.4%. Output factors determined with film agree within 3.5% of the corrected output factors. Conclusion: We present a practical approach to applying published Monte Carlo derived correction factors to measured small field output factors for the EDGE and A16 detectors. Using this method, we were able to decrease the percent deviation between both detectors from 14.8% to 3.4% agreement.

  15. [Correction of local and central disorders in patients with chronic abacterial prostatitis in usage of amus-01-intramag unit].

    PubMed

    Glybochko, P V; Gol'braĭkh, G E; Raĭgorodskiĭ, Iu M; Valiev, A Z; Surikov, V N

    2007-01-01

    Combined use of dynamic magnetotherapy of local and central action in combination with antibacterial endourethral therapy and rectal administration of vitaprost arrests symptoms of chronic prostatitis. Combination of local and total dynamic magnetotherapy with application of AMUS-01-INTRAMAG unit improves erection quality in 81.8% males with psychogenic form of erectile dysfunction. There was also improvement of spermogram parameters and relieve of asthenovegetative syndrome. PMID:17915452

  16. Comparison of Phase-Based 3D Near-Field Source Localization Techniques for UHF RFID.

    PubMed

    Parr, Andreas; Miesen, Robert; Vossiek, Martin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present multiple techniques for phase-based narrowband backscatter tag localization in three-dimensional space with planar antenna arrays or synthetic apertures. Beamformer and MUSIC localization algorithms, known from near-field source localization and direction-of-arrival estimation, are applied to the 3D backscatter scenario and their performance in terms of localization accuracy is evaluated. We discuss the impact of different transceiver modes known from the literature, which evaluate different send and receive antenna path combinations for a single localization, as in multiple input multiple output (MIMO) systems. Furthermore, we propose a new Singledimensional-MIMO (S-MIMO) transceiver mode, which is especially suited for use with mobile robot systems. Monte-Carlo simulations based on a realistic multipath error model ensure spatial correlation of the simulated signals, and serve to critically appraise the accuracies of the different localization approaches. A synthetic uniform rectangular array created by a robotic arm is used to evaluate selected localization techniques. We use an Ultra High Frequency (UHF) Radiofrequency Identification (RFID) setup to compare measurements with the theory and simulation. The results show how a mean localization accuracy of less than 30 cm can be reached in an indoor environment. Further simulations demonstrate how the distance between aperture and tag affects the localization accuracy and how the size and grid spacing of the rectangular array need to be adapted to improve the localization accuracy down to orders of magnitude in the centimeter range, and to maximize array efficiency in terms of localization accuracy per number of elements. PMID:27347976

  17. Comparison of Phase-Based 3D Near-Field Source Localization Techniques for UHF RFID.

    PubMed

    Parr, Andreas; Miesen, Robert; Vossiek, Martin

    2016-06-25

    In this paper, we present multiple techniques for phase-based narrowband backscatter tag localization in three-dimensional space with planar antenna arrays or synthetic apertures. Beamformer and MUSIC localization algorithms, known from near-field source localization and direction-of-arrival estimation, are applied to the 3D backscatter scenario and their performance in terms of localization accuracy is evaluated. We discuss the impact of different transceiver modes known from the literature, which evaluate different send and receive antenna path combinations for a single localization, as in multiple input multiple output (MIMO) systems. Furthermore, we propose a new Singledimensional-MIMO (S-MIMO) transceiver mode, which is especially suited for use with mobile robot systems. Monte-Carlo simulations based on a realistic multipath error model ensure spatial correlation of the simulated signals, and serve to critically appraise the accuracies of the different localization approaches. A synthetic uniform rectangular array created by a robotic arm is used to evaluate selected localization techniques. We use an Ultra High Frequency (UHF) Radiofrequency Identification (RFID) setup to compare measurements with the theory and simulation. The results show how a mean localization accuracy of less than 30 cm can be reached in an indoor environment. Further simulations demonstrate how the distance between aperture and tag affects the localization accuracy and how the size and grid spacing of the rectangular array need to be adapted to improve the localization accuracy down to orders of magnitude in the centimeter range, and to maximize array efficiency in terms of localization accuracy per number of elements.

  18. Comparison of Phase-Based 3D Near-Field Source Localization Techniques for UHF RFID

    PubMed Central

    Parr, Andreas; Miesen, Robert; Vossiek, Martin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present multiple techniques for phase-based narrowband backscatter tag localization in three-dimensional space with planar antenna arrays or synthetic apertures. Beamformer and MUSIC localization algorithms, known from near-field source localization and direction-of-arrival estimation, are applied to the 3D backscatter scenario and their performance in terms of localization accuracy is evaluated. We discuss the impact of different transceiver modes known from the literature, which evaluate different send and receive antenna path combinations for a single localization, as in multiple input multiple output (MIMO) systems. Furthermore, we propose a new Singledimensional-MIMO (S-MIMO) transceiver mode, which is especially suited for use with mobile robot systems. Monte-Carlo simulations based on a realistic multipath error model ensure spatial correlation of the simulated signals, and serve to critically appraise the accuracies of the different localization approaches. A synthetic uniform rectangular array created by a robotic arm is used to evaluate selected localization techniques. We use an Ultra High Frequency (UHF) Radiofrequency Identification (RFID) setup to compare measurements with the theory and simulation. The results show how a mean localization accuracy of less than 30 cm can be reached in an indoor environment. Further simulations demonstrate how the distance between aperture and tag affects the localization accuracy and how the size and grid spacing of the rectangular array need to be adapted to improve the localization accuracy down to orders of magnitude in the centimeter range, and to maximize array efficiency in terms of localization accuracy per number of elements. PMID:27347976

  19. Electric-field-induced local and mesoscale structural changes in polycrystalline dielectrics and ferroelectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Usher, Tedi -Marie; Levin, Igor; Daniels, John E.; Jones, Jacob L.

    2015-10-01

    In this study, the atomic-scale response of dielectrics/ferroelectrics to electric fields is central to their functionality. Here we introduce an in situ characterization method that reveals changes in the local atomic structure in polycrystalline materials under fields. The method employs atomic pair distribution functions (PDFs), determined from X-ray total scattering that depends on orientation relative to the applied field, to probe structural changes over length scales from sub-Ångstrom to several nanometres. The PDF is sensitive to local ionic displacements and their short-range order, a key uniqueness relative to other techniques. The method is applied to representative ferroelectrics, BaTiO3 and Na½Bi½TiO3, and dielectric SrTiO3. For Na½Bi½TiO3, the results reveal an abrupt field-induced monoclinic to rhombohedral phase transition, accompanied by ordering of the local Bi displacements and reorientation of the nanoscale ferroelectric domains. For BaTiO3 and SrTiO3, the local/nanoscale structural changes observed in the PDFs are dominated by piezoelectric lattice strain and ionic polarizability, respectively.

  20. Electric-field-induced local and mesoscale structural changes in polycrystalline dielectrics and ferroelectrics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Usher, Tedi -Marie; Levin, Igor; Daniels, John E.; Jones, Jacob L.

    2015-10-01

    In this study, the atomic-scale response of dielectrics/ferroelectrics to electric fields is central to their functionality. Here we introduce an in situ characterization method that reveals changes in the local atomic structure in polycrystalline materials under fields. The method employs atomic pair distribution functions (PDFs), determined from X-ray total scattering that depends on orientation relative to the applied field, to probe structural changes over length scales from sub-Ångstrom to several nanometres. The PDF is sensitive to local ionic displacements and their short-range order, a key uniqueness relative to other techniques. The method is applied to representative ferroelectrics, BaTiO3 and Na½Bi½TiO3,more » and dielectric SrTiO3. For Na½Bi½TiO3, the results reveal an abrupt field-induced monoclinic to rhombohedral phase transition, accompanied by ordering of the local Bi displacements and reorientation of the nanoscale ferroelectric domains. For BaTiO3 and SrTiO3, the local/nanoscale structural changes observed in the PDFs are dominated by piezoelectric lattice strain and ionic polarizability, respectively.« less

  1. Imaging local electric fields produced upon synchrotron X-ray exposure

    PubMed Central

    Dettmar, Christopher M.; Newman, Justin A.; Toth, Scott J.; Becker, Michael; Fischetti, Robert F.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2015-01-01

    Electron–hole separation following hard X-ray absorption during diffraction analysis of soft materials under cryogenic conditions produces substantial local electric fields visualizable by second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy. Monte Carlo simulations of X-ray photoelectron trajectories suggest the formation of substantial local electric fields in the regions adjacent to those exposed to X-rays, indicating a possible electric-field–induced SHG (EFISH) mechanism for generating the observed signal. In studies of amorphous vitreous solvents, analysis of the SHG spatial profiles following X-ray microbeam exposure was consistent with an EFISH mechanism. Within protein crystals, exposure to 12-keV (1.033-Å) X-rays resulted in increased SHG in the region extending ∼3 μm beyond the borders of the X-ray beam. Moderate X-ray exposures typical of those used for crystal centering by raster scanning through an X-ray beam were sufficient to produce static electric fields easily detectable by SHG. The X-ray–induced SHG activity was observed with no measurable loss for longer than 2 wk while maintained under cryogenic conditions, but disappeared if annealed to room temperature for a few seconds. These results provide direct experimental observables capable of validating simulations of X-ray–induced damage within soft materials. In addition, X-ray–induced local fields may potentially impact diffraction resolution through localized piezoelectric distortions of the lattice. PMID:25552555

  2. Use of Microscale Landforms to Teach Introductory Physical Geography: Planning a Local Field Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luft, Edward R.

    1990-01-01

    States that firsthand observations of the dynamic process that shapes landforms are important to understanding physical geography. Posits that locally planned, short-duration field exercises to study miniature or fourth-order landforms will enhance instruction about these fundamental geographic concepts. (DB)

  3. Quantum Gravity from the Point of View of Locally Covariant Quantum Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunetti, Romeo; Fredenhagen, Klaus; Rejzner, Katarzyna

    2016-08-01

    We construct perturbative quantum gravity in a generally covariant way. In particular our construction is background independent. It is based on the locally covariant approach to quantum field theory and the renormalized Batalin-Vilkovisky formalism. We do not touch the problem of nonrenormalizability and interpret the theory as an effective theory at large length scales.

  4. Measuring Earth's Local Magnetic Field Using a Helmholtz Coil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Jonathan E.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I present a low-cost interactive experiment for measuring the strength of Earth's local magnetic field. This activity can be done in most high schools or two-year physics laboratories with limited resources, yet will have a tremendous learning impact. This experiment solidifies the three-dimensional nature of Earth's…

  5. Electric-field-induced local and mesoscale structural changes in polycrystalline dielectrics and ferroelectrics.

    PubMed

    Usher, Tedi-Marie; Levin, Igor; Daniels, John E; Jones, Jacob L

    2015-01-01

    The atomic-scale response of dielectrics/ferroelectrics to electric fields is central to their functionality. Here we introduce an in situ characterization method that reveals changes in the local atomic structure in polycrystalline materials under fields. The method employs atomic pair distribution functions (PDFs), determined from X-ray total scattering that depends on orientation relative to the applied field, to probe structural changes over length scales from sub-Ångstrom to several nanometres. The PDF is sensitive to local ionic displacements and their short-range order, a key uniqueness relative to other techniques. The method is applied to representative ferroelectrics, BaTiO3 and Na½Bi½TiO3, and dielectric SrTiO3. For Na½Bi½TiO3, the results reveal an abrupt field-induced monoclinic to rhombohedral phase transition, accompanied by ordering of the local Bi displacements and reorientation of the nanoscale ferroelectric domains. For BaTiO3 and SrTiO3, the local/nanoscale structural changes observed in the PDFs are dominated by piezoelectric lattice strain and ionic polarizability, respectively. PMID:26424360

  6. Underground localization using dual magnetic field sequence measurement and pose graph SLAM for directional drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Byeolteo; Myung, Hyun

    2014-12-01

    With the development of unconventional gas, the technology of directional drilling has become more advanced. Underground localization is the key technique of directional drilling for real-time path following and system control. However, there are problems such as vibration, disconnection with external infrastructure, and magnetic field distortion. Conventional methods cannot solve these problems in real time or in various environments. In this paper, a novel underground localization algorithm using a re-measurement of the sequence of the magnetic field and pose graph SLAM (simultaneous localization and mapping) is introduced. The proposed algorithm exploits the property of the drilling system that the body passes through the previous pass. By comparing the recorded measurement from one magnetic sensor and the current re-measurement from another magnetic sensor, the proposed algorithm predicts the pose of the drilling system. The performance of the algorithm is validated through simulations and experiments.

  7. Tuning Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance in Scanning Near-Field Optical Microscopy Probes.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Thiago L; Archanjo, Bráulio S; Fragneaud, Benjamin; Oliveira, Bruno S; Riikonen, Juha; Li, Changfeng; Ribeiro, Douglas S; Rabelo, Cassiano; Rodrigues, Wagner N; Jorio, Ado; Achete, Carlos A; Cançado, Luiz Gustavo

    2015-06-23

    A reproducible route for tuning localized surface plasmon resonance in scattering type near-field optical microscopy probes is presented. The method is based on the production of a focused-ion-beam milled single groove near the apex of electrochemically etched gold tips. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy are employed to obtain highly spatially and spectroscopically resolved maps of the milled probes, revealing localized surface plasmon resonance at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. By changing the distance L between the groove and the probe apex, the localized surface plasmon resonance energy can be fine-tuned at a desired absorption channel. Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy is applied as a test platform, and the results prove the reliability of the method to produce efficient scattering type near-field optical microscopy probes. PMID:26027751

  8. Terahertz generator on basis on basis of magnetic system with high localized magnetic field values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azbite, S. E.; Denisultanov, A. Kh; Khodsitsky, M. K.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper terahertz generator design was proposed. In this THz generator magnetic system on permanent magnets was used to create which create localized magnetic field. Analytical calculation was made for this magnetic system and simulated was done for it. One can obtain point magnetic field with flux magnetic field value over 2.5 T due to the magnetic system. Beyond that analysis of influence of semiconductor crystals properties was done. The semiconductor crystals are used in the magnetic system for terahertz radiation generation.

  9. Particle localization in a double-well potential by pseudo-supersymmetric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bagrov, V. G. Samsonov, B. F.; Shamshutdinova, V. V.

    2011-06-15

    We study properties of a particle moving in a double-well potential in the two-level approximation placed in an additional external time-dependent field. Using previously established property (J. Phys. A 41, 244023 (2008)) that any two-level system possesses a pseudo-supersymmetry we introduce the notion of pseudo-supersymmetric field. It is shown that these fields, even if their time dependence is not periodical, may produce the effect of localization of the particle in one of the wells of the double-well potential.

  10. Behavior of Caenorhabditis elegans in alternating electric field and its application to their localization and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezai, Pouya; Siddiqui, Asad; Selvaganapathy, Ponnambalam Ravi; Gupta, Bhagwati P.

    2010-04-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is an attractive model organism because of its genetic similarity to humans and the ease of its manipulation in the laboratory. Recently, it was shown that a direct current electric field inside microfluidic channel induces directed movement that is highly sensitive, reliable, and benign. In this letter, we describe the worm's movement response to alternating electric fields in a similar channel setup. We demonstrate that the 1 Hz and higher frequency of alternating current field can effectively localize worms in the channel. This discovery could potentially help design microfluidic devices for high throughput automated analysis of worms.

  11. Controlling surface plasmons and local field by two-dimensional arrays of metallic nano-bottles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iu, Hei; Ong, Daniel H. C.; Wan, Jones T. K.; Li, Jia

    2008-03-01

    In recent years, studies of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) have been intensive. It is of great interest to control SPPs with great precision and flexibility. In this talk, we present our recent work on SPPs manipulation by using two-dimensional arrays of bottle-shaped, metallic cavities. We propose that by tuning the geometry of such ``nano-bottle'' contained in a two-dimensional nano-scale array it is possible to control the resonance frequencies and near field patterns of different SPP modes. The dispersion relations are not sensitive to the sizes and depths of the nano-bottles, but depends strongly on the polarization In particular, by using different polarizations, it is observed that different types of SPPs, either propagating or localized, can be excited independently. Moreover, we attempt to control the local field by closing up the aperture of the nano-bottle. We have found that the local field slowly moves up from the bottom to the neck of bottle by increasing its depth. In addition, the field intensity can be fine-tuned by controlling the topology of the bottleneck, for example, a smaller and thinner neck leads to stronger field intensity. As a result, we believe these nano-bottle arrays are good candidates for making high sensitivity chemical and biological sensors.

  12. Non-linear non-local molecular electrodynamics with nano-optical fields.

    PubMed

    Chernyak, Vladimir Y; Saurabh, Prasoon; Mukamel, Shaul

    2015-10-28

    The interaction of optical fields sculpted on the nano-scale with matter may not be described by the dipole approximation since the fields may vary appreciably across the molecular length scale. Rather than incrementally adding higher multipoles, it is advantageous and more physically transparent to describe the optical process using non-local response functions that intrinsically include all multipoles. We present a semi-classical approach for calculating non-local response functions based on the minimal coupling Hamiltonian. The first, second, and third order response functions are expressed in terms of correlation functions of the charge and the current densities. This approach is based on the gauge invariant current rather than the polarization, and on the vector potential rather than the electric and magnetic fields.

  13. Non-linear non-local molecular electrodynamics with nano-optical fields.

    PubMed

    Chernyak, Vladimir Y; Saurabh, Prasoon; Mukamel, Shaul

    2015-10-28

    The interaction of optical fields sculpted on the nano-scale with matter may not be described by the dipole approximation since the fields may vary appreciably across the molecular length scale. Rather than incrementally adding higher multipoles, it is advantageous and more physically transparent to describe the optical process using non-local response functions that intrinsically include all multipoles. We present a semi-classical approach for calculating non-local response functions based on the minimal coupling Hamiltonian. The first, second, and third order response functions are expressed in terms of correlation functions of the charge and the current densities. This approach is based on the gauge invariant current rather than the polarization, and on the vector potential rather than the electric and magnetic fields. PMID:26520498

  14. Field Effect and Strongly Localized Carriers in the Metal-Insulator Transition Material VO(2).

    PubMed

    Martens, K; Jeong, J W; Aetukuri, N; Rettner, C; Shukla, N; Freeman, E; Esfahani, D N; Peeters, F M; Topuria, T; Rice, P M; Volodin, A; Douhard, B; Vandervorst, W; Samant, M G; Datta, S; Parkin, S S P

    2015-11-01

    The intrinsic field effect, the change in surface conductance with an applied transverse electric field, of prototypal strongly correlated VO(2) has remained elusive. Here we report its measurement enabled by epitaxial VO(2) and atomic layer deposited high-κ dielectrics. Oxygen migration, joule heating, and the linked field-induced phase transition are precluded. The field effect can be understood in terms of field-induced carriers with densities up to ∼5×10(13)  cm(-2) which are trongly localized, as shown by their low, thermally activated mobility (∼1×10(-3)  cm(2)/V s at 300 K). These carriers show behavior consistent with that of Holstein polarons and strongly impact the (opto)electronics of VO(2). PMID:26588400

  15. Localized electromagnetic and weak gravitational fields in the source-free space.

    PubMed

    Borzdov, G N

    2001-03-01

    Localized electromagnetic and weak gravitational time-harmonic fields in the source-free space are treated using expansions in plane waves. The presented solutions describe fields having a very small (about several wavelengths) and clearly defined core region with maximum intensity of field oscillations. In a given Lorentz frame L, a set of the obtained exact time-harmonic solutions of the free-space homogeneous Maxwell equations consists of three subsets (storms, whirls, and tornados), for which time average energy flux is identically zero at all points, azimuthal and spiral, respectively. In any other Lorentz frame L', they will be observed as a kind of electromagnetic missile moving without dispersing at speed Vfields with similar properties are also presented. The properties of these fields are illustrated in graphic form. PMID:11308787

  16. The protein domains of the Dictyostelium microprocessor that are required for correct subcellular localization and for microRNA maturation

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, Janis; Meier, Doreen; Zenk, Fides; Rehders, Maren; Nellen, Wolfgang; Hammann, Christian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The maturation pathways of microRNAs (miRNAs) have been delineated for plants and several animals, belonging to the evolutionary supergroups of Archaeplastida and Opisthokonta, respectively. Recently, we reported the discovery of the microprocessor complex in Dictyostelium discoideum of the Amoebozoa supergroup. The complex is composed of the Dicer DrnB and the dsRBD (double-stranded RNA binding domain) containing protein RbdB. Both proteins localize at nucleoli, where they physically interact, and both are required for miRNA maturation. Here we show that the miRNA phenotype of a ΔdrnB gene deletion strain can be rescued by ectopic expression of a series of DrnB GFP fusion proteins, which consistently showed punctate perinucleolar localization in fluorescence microscopy. These punctate foci appear surprisingly stable, as they persist both disintegration of nucleoli and degradation of cellular nucleic acids. We observed that DrnB expression levels influence the number of microprocessor foci and alter RbdB accumulation. An investigation of DrnB variants revealed that its newly identified nuclear localization signal is necessary, but not sufficient for the perinucleolar localization. Biogenesis of miRNAs, which are RNA Pol II transcripts, is correlated with that localization. Besides its bidentate RNase III domains, DrnB contains only a dsRBD, which surprisingly is dispensable for miRNA maturation. This dsRBD can, however, functionally replace the homologous domain in RbdB. Based on the unique setup of the Dictyostelium microprocessor with a subcellular localization similar to plants, but a protein domain composition similar to animals, we propose a model for the evolutionary origin of RNase III proteins acting in miRNA maturation. PMID:27416267

  17. Local energy and power in many-particle quantum systems driven by an external electrical field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albareda, Guillermo; Traversa, Fabio Lorenzo; Oriols, Xavier

    2016-05-01

    We derive expressions for the expectation values of the local energy and the local power for a many-particle system of (scalar) charged particles interacting with an external electrical field. In analogy with the definition of the (local) current probability density, we construct a local energy operator such that the time-rate of change of its expectation value provides information on the spatial distribution of power. Results are presented as functions of an arbitrarily small volume Ω , and physical insights are discussed by means of the quantum hydrodynamical representation of the wavefunction, which is proven to allow for a clear-cut separation into contributions with and without classical correspondence. Quantum features of the local power are mainly manifested through the presence of non-local sources/sinks of power and through the action of forces with no classical counterpart. Many-particle classical-like effects arise in the form of current-force correlations and through the inflow/outflow of energy across the boundaries of the volume Ω . Interestingly, all these intriguing features are only reflected in the expression of the local power when the volume Ω is finite. Otherwise, for closed systems with Ω \\to ∞ , we recover a classical-like single-particle expression.

  18. Probing microscopic material properties inside simulated membranes through spatially resolved three-dimensional local pressure fields and surface tensions

    PubMed Central

    Kasson, Peter M.; Hess, Berk; Lindahl, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Cellular lipid membranes are spatially inhomogeneous soft materials. Materials properties such as pressure and surface tension thus show important microscopic-scale variation that is critical to many biological functions. We present a means to calculate pressure and surface tension in a 3D-resolved manner within molecular-dynamics simulations and show how such measurements can yield important insight. We also present the first corrections to local virial and pressure fields to account for the constraints typically used in lipid simulations that otherwise cause problems in highly oriented systems such as bilayers. Based on simulations of an asymmetric bacterial ion channel in a POPC bilayer, we demonstrate how 3D-resolved pressure can probe for both short-range and long-range effects from the protein on the membrane environment. We also show how surface tension is a sensitive metric for inter-leaflet equilibrium and can be used to detect even subtle imbalances between bilayer leaflets in a membrane-protein simulation. Since surface tension is known to modulate the function of many proteins, this effect is an important consideration for predictions of ion channel function. We outline a strategy by which our local pressure measurements, which we make available within a version of the GROMACS simulation package, may be used to design optimally equilibrated membrane-protein simulations. PMID:23318532

  19. Near-field optical patterning and structuring based on local-field enhancement at the extremity of a metal tip.

    PubMed

    Royer, Pascal; Barchiesi, Dominique; Lerondel, Gilles; Bachelot, Renaud

    2004-04-15

    We present a particular approach and the associated results allowing the nanostructuration of a thin photosensitive polymer film. This approach based on a scanning near-field optical microscopy configuration uses the field-enhancement (FE) effect, a so-called lightning-rod effect appearing at the extremity of a metallic tip when illuminated with an incident light polarized along the tip axis. The local enhancement of the electromagnetic field straight below the tip's apex is observed directly through a photoisomerization reaction, inducing the growth of a topographical nanodot characterized in situ by atomic-force microscopy using the same probe. From a survey of the literature, we first review the different experimental approaches offered to nanostructure materials by near-field optical techniques. We describe more particularly the FE effect approach. An overview of the theoretical approach of this effect is then given before presenting some experimental results so as theoretical results using the finite-element method. These results show the influence on the nanostructuration of the polymer of a few experimental parameters such as the polarization state, the illumination mode and the tip's geometry. Finally, the potentiality of this technique for some applications in the field of lithography and high-density data storage is shown via the fabrication of nano-patterns.

  20. Self-localized and self-constricted electromagnetic field in plasma and atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alanakyan, Yu. R.

    2016-05-01

    A possibility of creation of a super-high-frequency electromagnetic-field clot in the plasma is shown. Two cases of the field self-localization in the plasma are considered. In the first case, a super-high-frequency electric field creates an annular channel by displacing the plasma and induces a curl-like magnetic field inside. In the second case, the electric field creates a toroidal channel where different field structures are possible. For example, the magnetic lines of the force are aligned along the big circle of the torus, while the curl-like electric lines are aligned along the small circle. Otherwise, the magnetic field is curl-like and the electric-field lines are aligned along the big circle. We evaluate the electric field energy that is required for a curl-like structure of about 3 cm in size to exist during 10 s in the atmospheric air. This energy sustains plasma in the vicinity of the curl-like area.

  1. Correction of depth-dependent aberrations in 3D single-molecule localization and super-resolution microscopy.

    PubMed

    McGorty, Ryan; Schnitzbauer, Joerg; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Bo

    2014-01-15

    Single-molecule switching based super-resolution microscopy techniques have been extended into three dimensions through various 3D single-molecule localization methods. However, the localization accuracy in z can be severely degraded by the presence of aberrations, particularly the spherical aberration introduced by the refractive index mismatch when imaging into an aqueous sample with an oil immersion objective. This aberration confines the imaging depth in most experiments to regions close to the coverslip. Here we show a method to obtain accurate, depth-dependent z calibrations by measuring the point spread function (PSF) at the coverslip surface, calculating the microscope pupil function through phase retrieval, and then computing the depth-dependent PSF with the addition of spherical aberrations. We demonstrate experimentally that this method can maintain z localization accuracy over a large range of imaging depths. Our super-resolution images of a mammalian cell nucleus acquired between 0 and 2.5 μm past the coverslip show that this method produces accurate z localizations even in the deepest focal plane.

  2. AdS/CFT and local renormalization group with gauge fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Ken; Sakai, Tadakatsu

    2016-03-01

    We revisit a study of local renormalization group (RG) with background gauge fields incorporated using the AdS/CFT correspondence. Starting with a (d+1)-dimensional bulk gravity coupled to scalars and gauge fields, we derive a local RG equation from a flow equation by working in the Hamilton-Jacobi formulation of the bulk theory. The Gauss's law constraint associated with gauge symmetry plays an important role. RG flows of the background gauge fields are governed by vector β -functions, and some of their interesting properties are known to follow. We give a systematic rederivation of them on the basis of the flow equation. Fixing an ambiguity of local counterterms in such a manner that is natural from the viewpoint of the flow equation, we determine all the coefficients uniquely appearing in the trace of the stress tensor for d=4. A relation between a choice of schemes and a virial current is discussed. As a consistency check, these are found to satisfy the integrability conditions of local RG transformations. From these results, we are led to a proof of a holographic c-theorem by determining a full family of schemes where a trace anomaly coefficient is related with a holographic c-function.

  3. Effect of the local morphology in the field emission properties of conducting polymer surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Assis, T. A.; Benito, R. M.; Losada, J. C.; Andrade, R. F. S.; Miranda, J. G. V.; de Souza, Nara C.; de Castilho, C. M. C.; Mota, F. de B.; Borondo, F.

    2013-07-01

    In this work, we present systematic theoretical evidence of a relationship between the point local roughness exponent (PLRE) (which quantifies the heterogeneity of an irregular surface) and the cold field emission properties (indicated by the local current density and the macroscopic current density) of real polyaniline (PANI) surfaces, considered nowadays as very good candidates in the design of field emission devices. The latter are obtained from atomic force microscopy data. The electric field and potential are calculated in a region bounded by the rough PANI surface and a distant plane, both boundaries held at distinct potential values. We numerically solve Laplace’s equation subject to appropriate Dirichlet’s condition. Our results show that local roughness reveals the presence of specific sharp emitting spots with a smooth geometry, which are the main ones responsible (but not the only) for the emission efficiency of such surfaces for larger deposition times. Moreover, we have found, with a proper choice of a scale interval encompassing the experimentally measurable average grain length, a highly structured dependence of local current density on PLRE, considering different ticks of PANI surfaces.

  4. Local field enhancement on demand based on hybrid plasmonic-dielectric directional coupler.

    PubMed

    Adhem, Kholod; Avrutsky, Ivan

    2016-03-21

    The concept of local field enhancement using conductor-gap-dielectric-substrate (CGDS) waveguide structure is proposed. The dispersion equation is derived analytically and solved numerically. The solution of the dispersion equation reveals the anti-crossing behavior of coupled modes. the optimal gap layer thickness and the coupling length of the guided modes are obtained. The mechanism of the CGDS works as follows: Light waves are guided by conventional low-loss dielectric waveguides and, upon demand, they are transformed into highly confined plasmonic modes with strong local field enhancement, and get transformed back into low-loss dielectric modes. As an example, in a representative CGDS structure, the optimal plasmonic gap size is 17 nm, the local light intensity is found to be more than one order of magnitude stronger than the intensity of the dielectric mode at the film surface. The coupling length is only 2.1 μm at a wavelength of 632.8 nm. Such a local field confinement on demand is expected to facilitate efficient light-matter interaction in integrated photonic devices while minimizing losses typical for plasmonic structures. PMID:27136767

  5. Local field enhancement on demand based on hybrid plasmonic-dielectric directional coupler.

    PubMed

    Adhem, Kholod; Avrutsky, Ivan

    2016-03-21

    The concept of local field enhancement using conductor-gap-dielectric-substrate (CGDS) waveguide structure is proposed. The dispersion equation is derived analytically and solved numerically. The solution of the dispersion equation reveals the anti-crossing behavior of coupled modes. the optimal gap layer thickness and the coupling length of the guided modes are obtained. The mechanism of the CGDS works as follows: Light waves are guided by conventional low-loss dielectric waveguides and, upon demand, they are transformed into highly confined plasmonic modes with strong local field enhancement, and get transformed back into low-loss dielectric modes. As an example, in a representative CGDS structure, the optimal plasmonic gap size is 17 nm, the local light intensity is found to be more than one order of magnitude stronger than the intensity of the dielectric mode at the film surface. The coupling length is only 2.1 μm at a wavelength of 632.8 nm. Such a local field confinement on demand is expected to facilitate efficient light-matter interaction in integrated photonic devices while minimizing losses typical for plasmonic structures.

  6. High Accuracy Passive Magnetic Field-Based Localization for Feedback Control Using Principal Component Analysis.

    PubMed

    Foong, Shaohui; Sun, Zhenglong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel magnetic field-based sensing system employing statistically optimized concurrent multiple sensor outputs for precise field-position association and localization is presented. This method capitalizes on the independence between simultaneous spatial field measurements at multiple locations to induce unique correspondences between field and position. This single-source-multi-sensor configuration is able to achieve accurate and precise localization and tracking of translational motion without contact over large travel distances for feedback control. Principal component analysis (PCA) is used as a pseudo-linear filter to optimally reduce the dimensions of the multi-sensor output space for computationally efficient field-position mapping with artificial neural networks (ANNs). Numerical simulations are employed to investigate the effects of geometric parameters and Gaussian noise corruption on PCA assisted ANN mapping performance. Using a 9-sensor network, the sensing accuracy and closed-loop tracking performance of the proposed optimal field-based sensing system is experimentally evaluated on a linear actuator with a significantly more expensive optical encoder as a comparison. PMID:27529253

  7. High Accuracy Passive Magnetic Field-Based Localization for Feedback Control Using Principal Component Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Foong, Shaohui; Sun, Zhenglong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel magnetic field-based sensing system employing statistically optimized concurrent multiple sensor outputs for precise field-position association and localization is presented. This method capitalizes on the independence between simultaneous spatial field measurements at multiple locations to induce unique correspondences between field and position. This single-source-multi-sensor configuration is able to achieve accurate and precise localization and tracking of translational motion without contact over large travel distances for feedback control. Principal component analysis (PCA) is used as a pseudo-linear filter to optimally reduce the dimensions of the multi-sensor output space for computationally efficient field-position mapping with artificial neural networks (ANNs). Numerical simulations are employed to investigate the effects of geometric parameters and Gaussian noise corruption on PCA assisted ANN mapping performance. Using a 9-sensor network, the sensing accuracy and closed-loop tracking performance of the proposed optimal field-based sensing system is experimentally evaluated on a linear actuator with a significantly more expensive optical encoder as a comparison. PMID:27529253

  8. High Accuracy Passive Magnetic Field-Based Localization for Feedback Control Using Principal Component Analysis.

    PubMed

    Foong, Shaohui; Sun, Zhenglong

    2016-08-12

    In this paper, a novel magnetic field-based sensing system employing statistically optimized concurrent multiple sensor outputs for precise field-position association and localization is presented. This method capitalizes on the independence between simultaneous spatial field measurements at multiple locations to induce unique correspondences between field and position. This single-source-multi-sensor configuration is able to achieve accurate and precise localization and tracking of translational motion without contact over large travel distances for feedback control. Principal component analysis (PCA) is used as a pseudo-linear filter to optimally reduce the dimensions of the multi-sensor output space for computationally efficient field-position mapping with artificial neural networks (ANNs). Numerical simulations are employed to investigate the effects of geometric parameters and Gaussian noise corruption on PCA assisted ANN mapping performance. Using a 9-sensor network, the sensing accuracy and closed-loop tracking performance of the proposed optimal field-based sensing system is experimentally evaluated on a linear actuator with a significantly more expensive optical encoder as a comparison.

  9. Intrinsic Localized Modes in Quantum Ferromagnetic XXZ Chains in an Oblique Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, De-Jun

    2016-02-01

    A semiclassical study of intrinsic localized spin-wave modes in a one-dimensional quantum ferromagnetic XXZ chain in an oblique magnetic field is presented in this paper. We quantize the model Hamiltonian by introducing the Dyson-Maleev transformation, and adopt the coherent state representation as the basic representation of the system. By means of the method of multiple scales combined with a quasidiscreteness approximation, the equation of motion for the coherent-state amplitude can be reduced to the standard nonlinear Schrödinger equation. It is found that, at the center of the Brillouin zone, when θ < θ c a bright intrinsic localized spin-wave mode appears below the bottom of the magnon frequency band and when θ > θ c a dark intrinsic localized spin-wave resonance mode can occur above the bottom of the magnon frequency band. In other words, the switch between the bright and dark intrinsic localized spin-wave modes can be controlled via varying the angle of the magnetic field. This result has potential applications in quantum information storage. In addition, we find that, at the boundary of the Brillouin zone, the system can only produce a dark intrinsic localized spin-wave mode, whose eigenfrequency is above the upper of the magnon frequency band.

  10. Effects of reconstructed magnetic field from sparse noisy boundary measurements on localization of active neural source.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hui-min; Lee, Kok-Meng; Hu, Liang; Foong, Shaohui; Fu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Localization of active neural source (ANS) from measurements on head surface is vital in magnetoencephalography. As neuron-generated magnetic fields are extremely weak, significant uncertainties caused by stochastic measurement interference complicate its localization. This paper presents a novel computational method based on reconstructed magnetic field from sparse noisy measurements for enhanced ANS localization by suppressing effects of unrelated noise. In this approach, the magnetic flux density (MFD) in the nearby current-free space outside the head is reconstructed from measurements through formulating the infinite series solution of the Laplace's equation, where boundary condition (BC) integrals over the entire measurements provide "smooth" reconstructed MFD with the decrease in unrelated noise. Using a gradient-based method, reconstructed MFDs with good fidelity are selected for enhanced ANS localization. The reconstruction model, spatial interpolation of BC, parametric equivalent current dipole-based inverse estimation algorithm using reconstruction, and gradient-based selection are detailed and validated. The influences of various source depths and measurement signal-to-noise ratio levels on the estimated ANS location are analyzed numerically and compared with a traditional method (where measurements are directly used), and it was demonstrated that gradient-selected high-fidelity reconstructed data can effectively improve the accuracy of ANS localization. PMID:26358243

  11. Local and Global Magnetic Fields of Late-Type Dwarfs OT Ser and YZ CMi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychkov, V. D.; Bychkova, L. V.; Madej, J.; Panferov, A. A.

    2015-04-01

    Differential rotation is the primary energy source for generation of local magnetic fields in the atmospheres of late-type stars (Moss et al. 1995). Moreover, the colder a star, the greater the effect, which was confirmed by observations. For instance, Saar (1988) measured the surface magnetic fields of late-type stars using the integral method Robinson (1980) and drew attention to the fact that the average magnetic field in the spots reaches the values of 1500 G for the G-type dwarfs, 2500 G for the K dwarfs, and 3500 G for the M-dwarf stars. The fraction of the surface of a star covered by spots also increases towards the latest spectral types. These well-known observational facts were explained by theoretical models, such as the α2 mechanism, for instance (Moss et al. 1995). Late-type dwarfs exhibit periodic eruptions resulting from the field line reconnection of newly generated local magnetic fields. This feature is observed in G, K, and M dwarfs, constituting 95%of all the stars in our Galaxy. The most prominent are the field reconnections in the so-called flare stars, which are the M dwarfs. This is understandable, since the peak flux of M dwarfs is placed in the red and infrared regions of the spectrum, whereas a flash has the maximum emission in the violet spectral region. Analysis of long-term photometric observations revealed that, on the average, energy of flares was found constant over a long time period for each flare star. That is to say, this conclusion implies that the power of the local magnetic field generator remains constant at this stage of evolution of stars.

  12. Place as a social space: fields of encounter relating to the local sustainability process.

    PubMed

    Dumreicher, Heidi; Kolb, Bettina

    2008-04-01

    The paper shows how sustainability questions relate to the local space. The local place is not a static entity, but a dynamic one, undergoing constant changes, and it is the rapid social and material processes within the given local situation that is a challenge for the Chinese villages and their integrity. The following article considers the cohesion between the dwellers' emotional co-ownership of their local space and the sustainability process as a driving force in social, economic and ecological development. We bring together the classification of the seven fields of encounter, which were developed out of the empirical data of the Chinese case study villages, and sustainability oriented management considerations for all levels of this concept. We do not pretend to know the solutions, but describe a set of interrelated fields that can be anchor points for placing the solutions and show in which fields action and intervention is possible. In our concept of sustainability, every spatial field has its special meaning, needs special measures and policies and has different connotations to concepts like responsibility, family values or communication systems. We see the social sustainability process as a support for the empowerment of the local dwellers, and the SUCCESS research has encouraged the villages to find suitable sustainability oriented solutions for their natural and societal situation. Before entering the discussion about the chances and potential of a sustainability approach for the Chinese villages, it is first necessary to accept the fact that rural villages play a primordial role in Chinese society and that their potential can strengthen future pathways for China.

  13. Place as a social space: fields of encounter relating to the local sustainability process.

    PubMed

    Dumreicher, Heidi; Kolb, Bettina

    2008-04-01

    The paper shows how sustainability questions relate to the local space. The local place is not a static entity, but a dynamic one, undergoing constant changes, and it is the rapid social and material processes within the given local situation that is a challenge for the Chinese villages and their integrity. The following article considers the cohesion between the dwellers' emotional co-ownership of their local space and the sustainability process as a driving force in social, economic and ecological development. We bring together the classification of the seven fields of encounter, which were developed out of the empirical data of the Chinese case study villages, and sustainability oriented management considerations for all levels of this concept. We do not pretend to know the solutions, but describe a set of interrelated fields that can be anchor points for placing the solutions and show in which fields action and intervention is possible. In our concept of sustainability, every spatial field has its special meaning, needs special measures and policies and has different connotations to concepts like responsibility, family values or communication systems. We see the social sustainability process as a support for the empowerment of the local dwellers, and the SUCCESS research has encouraged the villages to find suitable sustainability oriented solutions for their natural and societal situation. Before entering the discussion about the chances and potential of a sustainability approach for the Chinese villages, it is first necessary to accept the fact that rural villages play a primordial role in Chinese society and that their potential can strengthen future pathways for China. PMID:17766035

  14. Testing Mendelian inheritance from field-collected parasites: Revealing duplicated loci enables correct inference of reproductive mode and mating system.

    PubMed

    Detwiler, Jillian T; Criscione, Charles D

    2011-09-01

    Cryptic aspects of parasite population biology, e.g., mating systems, are increasingly being inferred from polymorphic and co-dominant genetic markers such as microsatellite loci. Underlying the use of such co-dominant markers is the assumption of Mendelian inheritance. The failure to meet this assumption can lead to artifactual statistics and erroneous population inferences. Here, we illustrate the importance of testing the Mendelian segregation and assortment of genetic markers and demonstrate how field-collected samples can be utilised for this purpose. To examine the reproductive mode and mating system of hermaphroditic parasites, we developed microsatellites for the cestode, Oochoristica javaensis. Among loci, we found a bimodal distribution of F(IS) (a fixation index that quantifies the deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium within subpopulations) values where loci were either highly negative (close to -1) or highly positive (∼0.8). By conducting tests of Mendelian segregation from natural crosses, we determined that loci with negative F(IS) values were in fact duplicated loci that were amplified by a single primer pair. Genetic crosses also provided linkage data and indicated that the duplicated loci most likely arose via tandem duplications rather than whole genome/chromosome duplications. By correcting for the duplicated loci, we were able to correctly infer that O. javaensis has sexual reproduction, but the mating system is highly inbred. To assist others in testing Mendelian segregation and independent assortment from natural samples, we discuss the benefits and limitations, and provide guidelines for particular parasite systems amenable to the methods employed here.

  15. Further demonstration of a local evanescent field array coupled (LEAC) biosensor concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Guangwei; Pownall, R.; Stephens, M.; Dandy, D.; Chen, T.; Nikkel, P.; Lear, K.

    2007-03-01

    Low-cost, label-free immunoassay biosensors are needed for point-of-care clinical diagnostics, food safety, environmental monitoring, and biosecurity applications. A novel local, evanescent-field, array coupled (LEAC) photonic biosensor that can simultaneously sense multiple viruses, proteins, or DNA oligomers is being investigated. The sensing mechanism relies on the formation of a biological adlayer via specific binding of an analyte target to one of several localized patches of immobilized biological molecule probes (antibodies, ssDNA, aptamers). The attached analytes modify the waveguide cross-section and thus the optical field. A buried array of evanescently coupled photodetector elements along the length of the waveguide, each opposite a region of specific antibody type, locally sense the modification in the evanescent field due to adlayers of bound analytes. Proof-of-concept experiments have demonstrated strong optical modulation responses to artificial adlayers varying from 17 to ˜100 nm in thickness as observed by near-field scanning optical microscopy. LEAC sensors with electronic readout circuits are have been fabricated in a commercial 0.35 μm CMOS technology. Currently, research efforts are characterizing the effect of different polymer and organic molecules adlayers on the detected optical signal using these sensors.

  16. Rapid tsunami models and earthquake source parameters: Far-field and local applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, E.L.

    2005-01-01

    Rapid tsunami models have recently been developed to forecast far-field tsunami amplitudes from initial earthquake information (magnitude and hypocenter). Earthquake source parameters that directly affect tsunami generation as used in rapid tsunami models are examined, with particular attention to local versus far-field application of those models. First, validity of the assumption that the focal mechanism and type of faulting for tsunamigenic earthquakes is similar in a given region can be evaluated by measuring the seismic consistency of past events. Second, the assumption that slip occurs uniformly over an area of rupture will most often underestimate the amplitude and leading-wave steepness of the local tsunami. Third, sometimes large magnitude earthquakes will exhibit a high degree of spatial heterogeneity such that tsunami sources will be composed of distinct sub-events that can cause constructive and destructive interference in the wavefield away from the source. Using a stochastic source model, it is demonstrated that local tsunami amplitudes vary by as much as a factor of two or more, depending on the local bathymetry. If other earthquake source parameters such as focal depth or shear modulus are varied in addition to the slip distribution patterns, even greater uncertainty in local tsunami amplitude is expected for earthquakes of similar magnitude. Because of the short amount of time available to issue local warnings and because of the high degree of uncertainty associated with local, model-based forecasts as suggested by this study, direct wave height observations and a strong public education and preparedness program are critical for those regions near suspected tsunami sources.

  17. Full-Field Strain Measurement On Titanium Welds And Local Elasto-Plastic Identification With The Virtual Fields Method

    SciTech Connect

    Tattoli, F.; Casavola, C.; Pierron, F.; Rotinat, R.; Pappalettere, C.

    2011-01-17

    One of the main problems in welding is the microstructural transformation within the area affected by the thermal history. The resulting heterogeneous microstructure within the weld nugget and the heat affected zones is often associated with changes in local material properties. The present work deals with the identification of material parameters governing the elasto--plastic behaviour of the fused and heat affected zones as well as the base material for titanium hybrid welded joints (Ti6Al4V alloy). The material parameters are identified from heterogeneous strain fields with the Virtual Fields Method. This method is based on a relevant use of the principle of virtual work and it has been shown to be useful and much less time consuming than classical finite element model updating approaches applied to similar problems. The paper will present results and discuss the problem of selection of the weld zones for the identification.

  18. Hybrid Matter-Wave-Microwave Solitons Produced by the Local-Field Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jieli; Dong, Guangjiong; Malomed, Boris A.

    2015-07-01

    It was recently found that the electric local-field effect (LFE) can lead to a strong coupling of atomic Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) to off-resonant optical fields. We demonstrate that the magnetic LFE gives rise to a previously unexplored mechanism for coupling a (pseudo-) spinor BEC or fermion gas to microwaves (MWs). We present a theory for the magnetic LFE and find that it gives rise to a short-range attractive interaction between two components of the (pseudo) spinor, and a long-range interaction between them. The latter interaction, resulting from deformation of the magnetic field, is locally repulsive but globally attractive, in sharp contrast with its counterpart for the optical LFE, produced by phase modulation of the electric field. Our analytical results, confirmed by the numerical computations, show that the long-range interaction gives rise to modulational instability of the spatially uniform state, and it creates stable ground states in the form of hybrid matter-wave-microwave solitons (which seem like one-dimensional magnetic monopoles), with a size much smaller than the MW wavelength, even in the presence of arbitrarily strong contact intercomponent repulsion. The setting is somewhat similar to exciton-polaritonic condensates in semiconductor microcavities. The release of matter waves from the soliton may be used for the realization of an atom laser. The analysis also applies to molecular BECs with rotational states coupled by the electric MW field.

  19. Scaling of high-field transport and localized heating in graphene transistors.

    PubMed

    Bae, Myung-Ho; Islam, Sharnali; Dorgan, Vincent E; Pop, Eric

    2011-10-25

    We use infrared thermal imaging and electrothermal simulations to find that localized Joule heating in graphene field-effect transistors on SiO(2) is primarily governed by device electrostatics. Hot spots become more localized (i.e., sharper) as the underlying oxide thickness is reduced, such that the average and peak device temperatures scale differently, with significant long-term reliability implications. The average temperature is proportional to oxide thickness, but the peak temperature is minimized at an oxide thickness of ∼90 nm due to competing electrostatic and thermal effects. We also find that careful comparison of high-field transport models with thermal imaging can be used to shed light on velocity saturation effects. The results shed light on optimizing heat dissipation and reliability of graphene devices and interconnects. PMID:21913673

  20. Magnetic Field Homogenization of the Human Prefrontal Cortex with a Set of Localized Electrical Coils

    PubMed Central

    Juchem, Christoph; Nixon, Terence W.; McIntyre, Scott; Rothman, Douglas L.; de Graaf, Robin A.

    2011-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex is a common target brain structure in psychiatry and neuroscience due to its role in working memory and cognitive control. Large differences in magnetic susceptibility between the air-filled sinuses and the tissue/bone in the frontal part of the human head cause a strong and highly localized magnetic field focus in the prefrontal cortex. As a result, image distortion and signal dropout are observed in MR imaging. A set of external, electrical coils is presented that provides localized and high amplitude shim fields in the prefrontal cortex with minimum impact on the rest of the brain when combined with regular zero-to-second order spherical harmonics shimming. The experimental realization of the new shim method strongly minimized or even eliminated signal dropout in gradient-echo images acquired at settings typically used in functional magnetic resonance at 4 Tesla. PMID:19918909

  1. Local-field anisotropy of a light wave in quasi-two-dimensional soft-matter objects

    SciTech Connect

    Aver'yanov, E. M.

    2010-04-15

    Experimental values of the Lorentz tensor components L{sub j} for uniaxial quasi-two dimensional 'soft matter' objects on substrates (bilayer lipid membranes, multilayer Langmuir films, smectics A, hexatic smectics B, submicron films of discotics Col{sub hd}, micron anisotropic films of liquid-crystal comblike polymers and macromolecular polymers, submicron films of conjugated conductive polymers), freely suspended submicron films of smectics A, and uniaxially stretched micron films of conjugated conductive polymers have been determined using dispersion of refractive indices in the visible range. The dependences of the components L{sub j} on the type of orientation (axial, planar) of uniaxial molecules (structural units of the film) with respect to the optical axis of the film, the film thickness, the substrate type, the chemical structure of molecules, and their long-range orientational order are established. It is revealed that the smectic A-hexatic B phase transition and two-dimensional crystallization of the smectic layer lead to changes in the components L{sub j} due to the change in the orientational ordering of molecules as a result of the relation between the orientational and hexatic order parameters. All the above objects are characterized by isotropization of the Lorentz tensor L and the local-field tensor f with a simultaneous decrease in the birefringence of the sample and in the anisotropy of the molecular polarizability due to the change in the electronic structure of molecules. The correction for the anisotropy of the local-field tensor f to the orientational order parameter or the anisotropy of the molecular polarizability increases. The existing model approaches to calculating the components L{sub j} for the objects under consideration are compared with the experimental data.

  2. Long-range orientational order, local-field anisotropy, and mean molecular polarizability in liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Aver'yanov, E. M.

    2009-01-15

    The problems on the relation of the mean effective molecular polarizability {gamma}-bar to the long-range orientational order of molecules (the optical anisotropy of the medium) in uniaxial and biaxial liquid crystals, the local anisotropy on mesoscopic scales, and the anisotropy of the Lorentz tensor L and the local-field tensor f are formulated and solved. It is demonstrated that the presence of the long-range orientational order of molecules in liquid crystals imposes limitations from below on the molecular polarizability {gamma}-bar, which differs for uniaxial and biaxial liquid crystals. The relation between the local anisotropy and the molecular polarizability {gamma}-bar is investigated for calamitic and discotic uniaxial liquid crystals consisting of lath- and disk-shaped molecules. These liquid crystals with identical macroscopic symmetry differ in the local anisotropy and the relationships between the components L{sub parallel} < L{sub perpendicular} , f{sub parallel} < f{sub perpendicular} (calamitic) and L{sub parallel} > L{sub perpendicular} , f{sub parallel} > f{sub perpendicular} (discotic) for an electric field oriented parallel and perpendicular to the director. The limitations from below and above on the molecular polarizability {gamma}-bar due to the anisotropy of the tensors L and f are established for liquid crystals of both types. These limitations indicate that the molecular polarizability {gamma}-bar depends on the phase state and the temperature. The factors responsible for the nonphysical consequences of the local-field models based on the approximation {gamma}-bar = const are revealed. The theoretical inferences are confirmed by the experimental data for a number of calamitic nematic liquid crystals with different values of birefringence and the discotic liquid crystal Col{sub ho}.

  3. Local and global impacts on the fair-weather electric field in Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaniv, Roy; Yair, Yoav; Price, Colin; Katz, Shai

    2016-05-01

    Ground-based measurements of the vertical electric field (Ez or potential gradient) during fair weather days in the Negev desert, southern Israel are presented for the period June 2013-July 2015. We show results of the diurnal variation of Ez on seasonal and annual time scales, and make comparisons with the well-known Carnegie curve. We show a positive correlation between the diurnal Ez values and the number of global thunderstorm clusters on the same days. However, the diurnal Ez curves observed in the Negev desert show a local morning peak (8-10 UT) that is missing from the Carnegie Curve, but observed in other land-based Ez data from around the world. The morning peak is assumed to be a local effect and shown to correlate with a peak in the local aerosol loading in the lower atmosphere due to the increase in turbulence and mixing caused by solar heating in the morning hours.

  4. Neural field dynamics under variation of local and global connectivity and finite transmission speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qubbaj, Murad R.; Jirsa, Viktor K.

    2009-12-01

    Spatially continuous networks with heterogeneous connections are ubiquitous in biological systems, in particular neural systems. To understand the mutual effects of locally homogeneous and globally heterogeneous connectivity, we investigate the stability of the steady state activity of a neural field as a function of its connectivity. The variation of the connectivity is implemented through manipulation of a heterogeneous two-point connection embedded into the otherwise homogeneous connectivity matrix and by variation of the connectivity strength and transmission speed. Detailed examples including the Ginzburg-Landau equation and various other local architectures are discussed. Our analysis shows that developmental changes such as the myelination of the cortical large-scale fiber system generally result in the stabilization of steady state activity independent of the local connectivity. Non-oscillatory instabilities are shown to be independent of any influences of time delay.

  5. Sci—Fri AM: Mountain — 01: Validation of a new formulism and the related correction factors on output factor determination for small photon fields

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yizhen; Younge, Kelly; Nielsen, Michelle; Mutanga, Theodore; Cui, Congwu; Das, Indra J.

    2014-08-15

    Small field dosimetry measurements including output factors are difficult due to lack of charged-particle equilibrium, occlusion of the radiation source, the finite size of detectors, and non-water equivalence of detector components. With available detectors significant variations could be measured that will lead to incorrect delivered dose to patients. IAEA/AAPM have provided a framework and formulation to correct the detector response in small photon fields. Monte Carlo derived correction factors for some commonly used small field detectors are now available, however validation has not been performed prior to this study. An Exradin A16 chamber, EDGE detector and SFD detector were used to perform the output factor measurement for a series of conical fields (5–30mm) on a Varian iX linear accelerator. Discrepancies up to 20%, 10% and 6% were observed for 5, 7.5 and 10 mm cones between the initial output factors measured by the EDGE detector and the A16 ion chamber, while the discrepancies for the conical fields larger than 10 mm were less than 4%. After the application of the correction, the output factors agree well with each other to within 1%. Caution is needed when determining the output factors for small photon fields, especially for fields 10 mm in diameter or smaller. More than one type of detector should be used, each with proper corrections applied to the measurement results. It is concluded that with the application of correction factors to appropriately chosen detectors, output can be measured accurately for small fields.

  6. Electromagnetic vacuum of complex media: Dipole emission versus light propagation, vacuum energy, and local field factors

    SciTech Connect

    Donaire, M.

    2011-02-15

    We offer a unified approach to several phenomena related to the electromagnetic vacuum of a complex medium made of point electric dipoles. To this aim, we apply the linear response theory to the computation of the polarization field propagator and study the spectrum of vacuum fluctuations. The physical distinction among the local density of states which enter the spectra of light propagation, total dipole emission, coherent emission, total vacuum energy, and Schwinger-bulk energy is made clear. Analytical expressions for the spectrum of dipole emission and for the vacuum energy are derived. Their respective relations with the spectrum of external light and with the Schwinger-bulk energy are found. The light spectrum and the Schwinger-bulk energy are determined by the Dyson propagator. The emission spectrum and the total vacuum energy are determined by the polarization propagator. An exact relationship of proportionality between both propagators is found in terms of local field factors. A study of the nature of stimulated emission from a single dipole is carried out. Regarding coherent emission, it contains two components. A direct one which is transferred radiatively and directly from the emitter into the medium and whose spectrum is that of external light. And an indirect one which is radiated by induced dipoles. The induction is mediated by one (and only one) local field factor. Regarding the vacuum energy, we find that in addition to the Schwinger-bulk energy the vacuum energy of an effective medium contains local field contributions proportional to the resonant frequency and to the spectral line width.

  7. Oscillating localized objects formed by a scalar field coupled to gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodor, Gyula; Forgács, Péter; Grandclement, Philippe

    2012-07-01

    Because of the attraction of gravity a real Klein-Gordon field can form long living spherically symmetric localized objects, called oscillatons. These configurations are so long living that until recently by all numerical methods they appeared to be exactly time-periodic. In this report we compare the small-amplitude analytic results for the mass loss rate of oscillatons with the numerical results obtained by the solution of the Fourier mode equations.

  8. A temperature regulating circuit for experimental localized current field hyperthermia systems.

    PubMed

    Astrahan, M A; George, F W

    1980-01-01

    Interest in localized current field (LCF) hyperthermia tumor therapy is rapidly increasing. As yet, however, there is no integral LCF system commercially available. An experimental LCF system may be readily assembled from discrete, general purpose components, except for the tumor temperature regulating circuitry. In this article we present an LCF system designed around general purpose components and a simple circuit for temperature regulation. Comments on system safety, calibration, and performance are also included.

  9. Electro-optical probe for studying local fields in organic heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blinov, L. M.; Lazarev, V. V.; Semeikin, A. S.; Usol'tseva, N. V.; Yudin, S. G.

    2013-03-01

    Dielectric, optical, and electro-optical properties of thin Langmuir films (40-130 nm thick) of meso-substituted palladium tetraphenylporphyrin have been investigated. The key parameter of the characteristic electro-absorption band of this material—the difference in the polarizability for the excited and ground states of its molecules—has been determined. The example of determining the local field in the polymer ferroelectric in the composition of two-layer heterostructure is shown.

  10. A novel full-field experimental method to measure the local compressibility of gas diffusion media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Yeh-Hung; Li, Yongqiang; Rock, Jeffrey A.

    The gas diffusion medium (GDM) in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell needs to simultaneously satisfy the requirements of transporting reactant gases, removing product water, conducting electrons and heat, and providing mechanical support to the membrane electrode assembly (MEA). Concerning the localized over-compression which may force carbon fibers and other conductive debris into the membrane to cause fuel cell failure by electronically shorting through the membrane, we have developed a novel full-field experimental method to measure the local thickness and compressibility of GDM. Applying a uniform air pressure upon a thin polyimide film bonded on the top surface of the GDM with support from the bottom by a flat metal substrate and measuring the thickness change using the 3-D digital image correlation technique with an out-of-plane displacement resolution less than 0.5 μm, we have determined the local thickness and compressive stress/strain behavior in the GDM. Using the local thickness and compressibility data over an area of 11.2 mm × 11.2 mm, we numerically construct the nominal compressive response of a commercial Toray™ TGP-H-060 based GDM subjected to compression by flat platens. Good agreement in the nominal stress/strain curves from the numerical construction and direct experimental flat-platen measurement confirms the validity of the methodology proposed in this article. The result shows that a nominal pressure of 1.4 MPa compressed between two flat platens can introduce localized compressive stress concentration of more than 3 MPa in up to 1% of the total area at various locations from several hundred micrometers to 1 mm in diameter. We believe that this full-field experimental method can be useful in GDM material and process development to reduce the local hard spots and help to mitigate the membrane shorting failure in PEM fuel cells.

  11. Localization and Classification of Paddy Field Pests using a Saliency Map and Deep Convolutional Neural Network

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ziyi; Gao, Junfeng; Yang, Guoguo; Zhang, Huan; He, Yong

    2016-01-01

    We present a pipeline for the visual localization and classification of agricultural pest insects by computing a saliency map and applying deep convolutional neural network (DCNN) learning. First, we used a global contrast region-based approach to compute a saliency map for localizing pest insect objects. Bounding squares containing targets were then extracted, resized to a fixed size, and used to construct a large standard database called Pest ID. This database was then utilized for self-learning of local image features which were, in turn, used for classification by DCNN. DCNN learning optimized the critical parameters, including size, number and convolutional stride of local receptive fields, dropout ratio and the final loss function. To demonstrate the practical utility of using DCNN, we explored different architectures by shrinking depth and width, and found effective sizes that can act as alternatives for practical applications. On the test set of paddy field images, our architectures achieved a mean Accuracy Precision (mAP) of 0.951, a significant improvement over previous methods. PMID:26864172

  12. Localization and Classification of Paddy Field Pests using a Saliency Map and Deep Convolutional Neural Network.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ziyi; Gao, Junfeng; Yang, Guoguo; Zhang, Huan; He, Yong

    2016-01-01

    We present a pipeline for the visual localization and classification of agricultural pest insects by computing a saliency map and applying deep convolutional neural network (DCNN) learning. First, we used a global contrast region-based approach to compute a saliency map for localizing pest insect objects. Bounding squares containing targets were then extracted, resized to a fixed size, and used to construct a large standard database called Pest ID. This database was then utilized for self-learning of local image features which were, in turn, used for classification by DCNN. DCNN learning optimized the critical parameters, including size, number and convolutional stride of local receptive fields, dropout ratio and the final loss function. To demonstrate the practical utility of using DCNN, we explored different architectures by shrinking depth and width, and found effective sizes that can act as alternatives for practical applications. On the test set of paddy field images, our architectures achieved a mean Accuracy Precision (mAP) of 0.951, a significant improvement over previous methods.

  13. The Velocity Field of the Local Universe From Measurements of Type Ia Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Haugbolle, T.; Hannestad, S.; Thomsen, B.; Fynbo, J.; Sollerman, J.; Jha, S.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-12-08

    We present a measurement of the velocity flow of the local universe relative to the CMB rest frame, based on the Jha, Riess & Kirshner (2007) sample of 133 low redshift type Ia supernovae. At a depth of 4500 km s{sup -1} we find a dipole amplitude of 279 {+-} 68 km s{sup -1} in the direction l = 285{sup o} {+-} 18{sup o}, b = -10{sup o} {+-} 15{sup o}, consistent with earlier measurements and with the assumption that the local velocity field is dominated by the Great Attractor region. At a larger depth of 5900 km s{sup -1} we find a shift in the dipole direction towards the Shapley concentration. We also present the first measurement of the quadrupole term in the local velocity flow at these depths. Finally, we have performed detailed studies based on N-body simulations of the expected precision with which the lowest multipoles in the velocity field can be measured out to redshifts of order 0.1. Our mock catalogues are in good agreement with current observations, and demonstrate that our results are robust with respect to assumptions about the influence of local environment on the type Ia supernova rate.

  14. Evidence of toroidally localized turbulence with applied 3D fields in the DIII-D tokamak

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wilcox, R. S.; Shafer, M. W.; Ferraro, N. M.; McKee, G. R.; Zeng, L.; Rhodes, T. L.; Canik, J. M.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Nazikian, R.; Unterberg, E. A.

    2016-09-21

    New evidence indicates that there is significant 3D variation in density fluctuations near the boundary of weakly 3D tokamak plasmas when resonant magnetic perturbations are applied to suppress transient edge instabilities. The increase in fluctuations is concomitant with an increase in the measured density gradient, suggesting that this toroidally localized gradient increase could be a mechanism for turbulence destabilization in localized flux tubes. Two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic simulations find that, although changes to the magnetic field topology are small, there is a significant 3D variation of the density gradient within the flux surfaces that is extended along field lines. This modeling agreesmore » qualitatively with the measurements. The observed gradient and fluctuation asymmetries are proposed as a mechanism by which global profile gradients in the pedestal could be relaxed due to a local change in the 3D equilibrium. In conclusion, these processes may play an important role in pedestal and scrape-off layer transport in ITER and other future tokamak devices with small applied 3D fields.« less

  15. Evidence of Toroidally Localized Turbulence with Applied 3D Fields in the DIII-D Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, R. S.; Shafer, M. W.; Ferraro, N. M.; McKee, G. R.; Zeng, L.; Rhodes, T. L.; Canik, J. M.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Nazikian, R.; Unterberg, E. A.

    2016-09-01

    New evidence indicates that there is significant 3D variation in density fluctuations near the boundary of weakly 3D tokamak plasmas when resonant magnetic perturbations are applied to suppress transient edge instabilities. The increase in fluctuations is concomitant with an increase in the measured density gradient, suggesting that this toroidally localized gradient increase could be a mechanism for turbulence destabilization in localized flux tubes. Two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic simulations find that, although changes to the magnetic field topology are small, there is a significant 3D variation of the density gradient within the flux surfaces that is extended along field lines. This modeling agrees qualitatively with the measurements. The observed gradient and fluctuation asymmetries are proposed as a mechanism by which global profile gradients in the pedestal could be relaxed due to a local change in the 3D equilibrium. These processes may play an important role in pedestal and scrape-off layer transport in ITER and other future tokamak devices with small applied 3D fields.

  16. Local electric field and configuration of CO molecules adsorbed on a nanostructured surface with nanocones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Rong-Yi; Huang, Xiao-Jing

    2009-09-01

    Based on the nanostructured surface model that the (platinum, Pt) nanocones grow out symmetrically from a plane substrate, the local electric field near the conical nanoparticle surface is computed and discussed. On the basis of these results, the adsorbed CO molecules are modelled as dipoles, and three kinds of interactions, i.e. interactions between dipoles and local electric field, between dipoles and dipoles, as well as between dipoles and nanostructured substrate, are taken into account. The spatial configuration of CO molecules adsorbed on the nanocone surface is then given by Monte-Carlo simulation. Our results show that the CO molecules adsorbed on the nanocone surface cause local agglomeration under the action of an external electric field, and this agglomeration becomes more compact with decreasing conical angle, which results in a stronger interaction among molecules. These results serve as a basis for explaining abnormal phenomena such as the abnormal infrared effect (AIRE), which was found when CO molecules were adsorbed on the nanostructured transit ion-metal surface.

  17. First-order quantum correction to the Larmor radiation from a moving charge in a spatially homogeneous time-dependent electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Gen

    2011-02-15

    First-order quantum correction to the Larmor radiation is investigated on the basis of the scalar QED on a homogeneous background of a time-dependent electric field, which is a generalization of a recent work by Higuchi and Walker so as to be extended for an accelerated charged particle in a relativistic motion. We obtain a simple approximate formula for the quantum correction in the limit of the relativistic motion when the direction of the particle motion is parallel to that of the electric field.

  18. RECONSTRUCTING THE INITIAL DENSITY FIELD OF THE LOCAL UNIVERSE: METHODS AND TESTS WITH MOCK CATALOGS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Huiyuan; Mo, H. J.; Yang Xiaohu; Van den Bosch, Frank C.

    2013-07-20

    Our research objective in this paper is to reconstruct an initial linear density field, which follows the multivariate Gaussian distribution with variances given by the linear power spectrum of the current cold dark matter model and evolves through gravitational instabilities to the present-day density field in the local universe. For this purpose, we develop a Hamiltonian Markov Chain Monte Carlo method to obtain the linear density field from a posterior probability function that consists of two components: a prior of a Gaussian density field with a given linear spectrum and a likelihood term that is given by the current density field. The present-day density field can be reconstructed from galaxy groups using the method developed in Wang et al. Using a realistic mock Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7, obtained by populating dark matter halos in the Millennium simulation (MS) with galaxies, we show that our method can effectively and accurately recover both the amplitudes and phases of the initial, linear density field. To examine the accuracy of our method, we use N-body simulations to evolve these reconstructed initial conditions to the present day. The resimulated density field thus obtained accurately matches the original density field of the MS in the density range 0.3{approx}<{rho}/ {rho}-bar {approx}<20 without any significant bias. In particular, the Fourier phases of the resimulated density fields are tightly correlated with those of the original simulation down to a scale corresponding to a wavenumber of {approx}1 h Mpc{sup -1}, much smaller than the translinear scale, which corresponds to a wavenumber of {approx}0.15 h Mpc{sup -1}.

  19. Evolution of localized blobs of swirling or buoyant fluid with and without an ambient magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, P. A.; Sreenivasan, Binod; Aspden, A. J.

    2007-02-15

    We investigate the evolution of localized blobs of swirling or buoyant fluid in an infinite, inviscid, electrically conducting fluid. We consider the three cases of a strong imposed magnetic field, a weak imposed magnetic field, and no magnetic field. For a swirling blob in the absence of a magnetic field, we find, in line with others, that the blob bursts radially outward under the action of the centrifugal force, forming a thin annular vortex sheet. A simple model of this process predicts that the vortex sheet thins exponentially fast and that it moves radially outward with constant velocity. These predictions are verified by high-resolution numerical simulations. When an intense magnetic field is applied, this phenomenon is suppressed, with the energy and angular momentum of the blob now diffusing axially along the magnetic field lines, converting the blob into a columnar structure. For modest or weak magnetic fields, there are elements of both types of behavior, with the radial bursting dominating over axial diffusion for weak fields. However, even when the magnetic field is very weak, the flow structure is quite distinct to that of the nonmagnetic case. In particular, a small but finite magnetic field places a lower bound on the thickness of the annular vortex sheet and produces an annulus of counter-rotating fluid that surrounds the vortex core. The behavior of the buoyant blob is similar. In the absence of a magnetic field, it rapidly develops the mushroomlike shape of a thermal, with a thin vortex sheet at the top and sides of the mushroom. Again, a simple model of this process predicts that the vortex sheet at the top of the thermal thins exponentially fast and rises with constant velocity. These predictions are consistent with earlier numerical simulations. Curiously, however, it is shown that the net vertical momentum associated with the blob increases linearly in time, despite the fact that the vertical velocity at the front of the thermal is constant

  20. Influence of head models on neuromagnetic fields and inverse source localizations

    PubMed Central

    Ramon, Ceon; Haueisen, Jens; Schimpf, Paul H

    2006-01-01

    Background The magnetoencephalograms (MEGs) are mainly due to the source currents. However, there is a significant contribution to MEGs from the volume currents. The structure of the anatomical surfaces, e.g., gray and white matter, could severely influence the flow of volume currents in a head model. This, in turn, will also influence the MEGs and the inverse source localizations. This was examined in detail with three different human head models. Methods Three finite element head models constructed from segmented MR images of an adult male subject were used for this study. These models were: (1) Model 1: full model with eleven tissues that included detailed structure of the scalp, hard and soft skull bone, CSF, gray and white matter and other prominent tissues, (2) the Model 2 was derived from the Model 1 in which the conductivity of gray matter was set equal to the white matter, i.e., a ten tissuetype model, (3) the Model 3 consisted of scalp, hard skull bone, CSF, gray and white matter, i.e., a five tissue-type model. The lead fields and MEGs due to dipolar sources in the motor cortex were computed for all three models. The dipolar sources were oriented normal to the cortical surface and had a dipole moment of 100 μA meter. The inverse source localizations were performed with an exhaustive search pattern in the motor cortex area. A set of 100 trial inverse runs was made covering the 3 cm cube motor cortex area in a random fashion. The Model 1 was used as a reference model. Results The reference model (Model 1), as expected, performed best in localizing the sources in the motor cortex area. The Model 3 performed the worst. The mean source localization errors (MLEs) of the Model 3 were larger than the Model 1 or 2. The contour plots of the magnetic fields on top of the head were also different for all three models. The magnetic fields due to source currents were larger in magnitude as compared to the magnetic fields of volume currents. Discussion These results

  1. Mesoscopic turbulence and local order in Janus particles self-propelling under an ac electric field.

    PubMed

    Nishiguchi, Daiki; Sano, Masaki

    2015-11-01

    To elucidate mechanisms of mesoscopic turbulence exhibited by active particles, we experimentally study turbulent states of nonliving self-propelled particles. We realize an experimental system with dense suspensions of asymmetrical colloidal particles (Janus particles) self-propelling on a two-dimensional surface under an ac electric field. Velocity fields of the Janus particles in the crowded situation can be regarded as a sort of turbulence because it contains many vortices and their velocities change abruptly. Correlation functions of their velocity field reveal the coexistence of polar alignment and antiparallel alignment interactions, which is considered to trigger mesoscopic turbulence. Probability distributions of local order parameters for polar and nematic orders indicate the formation of local clusters with particles moving in the same direction. A broad peak in the energy spectrum of the velocity field appears at the spatial scales where the polar alignment and the cluster formation are observed. Energy is injected at the particle scale and conserved quantities such as energy could be cascading toward the larger clusters. PMID:26651697

  2. The Role of Localized Inductive Electric Fields in Electron Injections Around Dipolarizing Flux Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrielse, C.; Harris, C.; Angelopoulos, V.; Runov, A.

    2015-12-01

    We study energetic electron injections using an analytical model that describes self-consistent electric and magnetic field perturbations of a transient, localized dipolarizing flux bundle (DFB). This simple model can reproduce most injection signatures at multiple locations simultaneously, reaffirming earlier findings that an earthward-traveling DFB can both transport and accelerate electrons to suprathermal energies, and can thus be considered as the primary driver of short-lived (~<10 min) injections. We find that energetic electron drift paths are greatly influenced by the sharp magnetic field gradients around the localized DFB. If the gradients are weak the energetic electrons initiating at reconnection will drift out of the flow channel such that the observed injection is comprised mostly of plasma sheet electrons. However, if the duskward magnetic field gradients on the DFB's dawn flank are strong they can cause electrons to drift further earthward from the reconnection site than due to E x B alone. Similarly, strong dawnward magnetic field gradients on the DFB's dusk flank can extract energetic electrons from the inner magnetosphere out to the plasma sheet, where they can either be recirculated earthward or remain at higher L-shells. Therefore, the source of electrons observed during injection depends sensitively on the spacecraft location relative to the DFB and on the DFB's properties.

  3. Mesoscopic turbulence and local order in Janus particles self-propelling under an ac electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiguchi, Daiki; Sano, Masaki

    2015-11-01

    To elucidate mechanisms of mesoscopic turbulence exhibited by active particles, we experimentally study turbulent states of nonliving self-propelled particles. We realize an experimental system with dense suspensions of asymmetrical colloidal particles (Janus particles) self-propelling on a two-dimensional surface under an ac electric field. Velocity fields of the Janus particles in the crowded situation can be regarded as a sort of turbulence because it contains many vortices and their velocities change abruptly. Correlation functions of their velocity field reveal the coexistence of polar alignment and antiparallel alignment interactions, which is considered to trigger mesoscopic turbulence. Probability distributions of local order parameters for polar and nematic orders indicate the formation of local clusters with particles moving in the same direction. A broad peak in the energy spectrum of the velocity field appears at the spatial scales where the polar alignment and the cluster formation are observed. Energy is injected at the particle scale and conserved quantities such as energy could be cascading toward the larger clusters.

  4. Hidden local symmetry of Eu{sup 3+} in xenotime-like crystals revealed by high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Yibo; Ma, Zongwei; Zhang, Junpei; Wang, Junfeng; Du, Guihuan; Xia, Zhengcai; Han, Junbo Li, Liang; Yu, Xuefeng

    2015-02-07

    The excellent optical properties of europium-doped crystals in visible and near infrared wavelength regions enable them to have broad applications in optoelectronics, laser crystals and sensing devices. The local site crystal fields can affect the intensities and peak positions of the photo-emission lines strongly, but they are usually difficult to be clarified due to magnetically degenerate 4f electronic levels coupling with the crystal fields. Here, we provide an effective way to explore the hidden local symmetry of the Eu{sup 3+} sites in different hosts by taking photoluminescence measurements under pulsed high magnetic fields up to 46 T. The zero-field photoluminescence peaks split further at high magnetic fields when the Zeeman splitting energy is comparable to or larger than that of the crystal field induced zero-field splitting. In particular, a magnetic field induced crossover of the local crystal fields has been observed in the GdVO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} crystal, which resulted from the alignment of Gd{sup 3+} magnetic moment in high magnetic fields; and a hexagonally symmetric local crystal fields was observed in the YPO{sub 4} nanocrystals at the Eu{sup 3+} sites characterized by the special axial and rhombic crystal field terms. These distinct Zeeman splitting behaviors uncover the crystal fields-related local symmetry of luminescent Eu{sup 3+} centers in different hosts or magnetic environments, which are significant for their applications in optics and optoelectronics.

  5. Fractionated Wide-Field Radiation Therapy Followed by Fractionated Local-Field Irradiation for Treating Widespread Painful Bone Metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Ki, Yongkan; Kim, Wontaek; Nam, Jiho; Kim, Donghyun; Jeon, Hosang; Park, Dahl; Kim, Dongwon

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Wide-field radiation therapy (WFRT) is an effective treatment for widespread bone metastasis. We evaluated local-field irradiation (LFI) after fractionated WFRT (f-WFRT) for treating the patients with multiple painful bone lesions. Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2007, 32 patients with multiple bone metastases were treated with fractionated LFI (f-LFI) after f-WFRT. All patients initially received 15 Gy in 5 fractions to a wide field, followed by LFI (9-15 Gy in 3 Gy fractions). Response was assessed by evaluating the degree of pain relief using a visual analog scale before radiotherapy, after f-WFRT, and after f-LFI. Results: Fractionated LFI following f-WFRT yielded an overall relief rate of 93.8% and a complete relief rate of 43.8%. The rate of the appearance of new disease was 6.3% for the patients with complete relief, 20.5% for the patients with a partial relief, and 50% for the patients with no relief. Conclusion: Fractionated LFI after f-WFRT is a well-tolerated and effective treatment for multiple metastatic bone disease.

  6. Local symmetry breaking of a thin crystal structure of β-Si3N4 as revealed by spherical aberration corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hwang Su; Zhang, Zaoli; Kaiser, Ute

    2012-06-01

    This report is an extension of the study for structural imaging of 5-6 nm thick β-Si(3)N(4) [0001] crystal with a spherical aberration corrected transmission electron microscope by Zhang and Kaiser [2009. Structure imaging of β-Si(3)N(4) by spherical aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Ultramicroscopy 109, 1114-1120]. In this work, a local symmetry breaking with an uneven resolution of dumbbells in the six-membered rings revealed in the reported images in the study of Zhang and Kaiser has been analyzed in detail. It is found that this local asymmetry in the image basically is not relevant to a slight mistilt of the specimen and/or a beam tilt (coma). Rather the certain variation of the tetrahedral bond length of Si-N(4) in the crystal structure is found to be responsible for the uneven resolution with a local structural variation from region to region. This characteristic of the variation is also supposed to give a distorted lattice of apparently 2°-2.5° deviations from the perfect hexagonal unit cell as observed in the reported image in the work of Zhang and Kaiser. It is discussed that this variation may prevail only in a thin specimen with a thickness ranging ~≤ 5-6 nm. At the same time, it is noted that the average of the bond length variation is close to the fixed length known in a bulk crystal of β-Si(3)N(4).

  7. NOTE: Control of photon beam dose profiles by localized transverse magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiffel, L.; Li, A.; Chu, J.; Wheatley, R. W.; Naqvi, S.; Pillsbury, R.; Saxena, A.

    2000-12-01

    Unlike electron beams, scant attention has been paid in the literature to possible magnetic field effects on therapeutic photon beams. Generally, dose profiles are considered to be fully determined by beam shape, photon spectrum and the substances in the beam path. Here we show that small superconducting magnets can exercise potentially useful control over photon dose profiles. The magnet produces a locally strong transverse field with large gradients and is applied to the tissue surface below which the photon beam is passing. For one practical magnet design, our simulations, which use the EGS-4 Monte Carlo code modified to include magnetic field effects, show significant intensification and shielding effects. In water phantoms, the effects extend to 3-4 cm or more beyond the warm face of the cryostat and greater distances are achieved in phantoms simulating lung (density ~0.3). Advances in applying the concept and in superconducting materials and magnet design hold promise for extending these ranges.

  8. Local and Global Bifurcations of Flow Fields During Physical Vapor Transport: Application to a Microgravity Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, W. M. B.; Singh, N. B.; Glicksman, M. E.

    1996-01-01

    The local bifurcation of the flow field, during physical vapor transport for a parametric range of experimental interest, shows that its dynamical state ranges from steady to aperiodic. Comparison of computationally predicted velocity profiles with laser doppler velocimetry measurements shows reasonable agreement in both magnitude and planform. Correlation of experimentally measured crystal quality with the predicted dynamical state of the flow field shows a degradation of quality with an increase in Rayleigh number. The global bifurcation of the flow field corresponding to low crystal quality indicates the presence of a traveling wave for Ra = 1.09 x 10(exp 5). For this Rayleigh number threshold a chaotic transport state occurs. However, a microgravity environment for this case effectively stabilizes the flow to diffusive-advective and provides the setting to grow crystals with optimal quality.

  9. Tunable Anderson Localization in Hydrogenated Graphene Based on the Electric Field Effect: First-Principles Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Joongoo; Wei, Su-Huai

    2014-03-01

    We present a mechanism for reversible switching of the Anderson localization (AL) of electrons in hydrogenated graphene through modulation of the H coverage on graphene by external electric fields. The main idea is to exploit the unique acid-base chemistry (i.e., proton transfer reaction) between NH3 gas and hydrogenated graphene, which can be controlled by applying perpendicular electric fields. The proposed field-induced control of disorder in hydrogenated graphene not only has scientific merits in a systematic study of AL of electrons in grapheme but can also lead to new insight into the development of a new type of transistor based on reversible on/off switching of AL. Furthermore, the reversible and effective tuning of the H coverage on graphene should be useful for tailoring material properties of weakly hydrogenated graphene. This work was funded by the NREL LDRD program (DE-AC36-08GO28308).

  10. Narrow band perfect absorber for maximum localized magnetic and electric field enhancement and sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Yong, Zhengdong; Zhang, Senlin; Gong, Chensheng; He, Sailing

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonics offer an exciting way to mediate the interaction between light and matter, allowing strong field enhancement and confinement, large absorption and scattering at resonance. However, simultaneous realization of ultra-narrow band perfect absorption and electromagnetic field enhancement is challenging due to the intrinsic high optical losses and radiative damping in metals. Here, we propose an all-metal plasmonic absorber with an absorption bandwidth less than 8 nm and polarization insensitive absorptivity exceeding 99%. Unlike traditional Metal-Dielectric-Metal configurations, we demonstrate that the narrowband perfect absorption and field enhancement are ascribed to the vertical gap plasmonic mode in the deep subwavelength scale, which has a high quality factor of 120 and mode volume of about 10(-4) × (λres/n)(3). Based on the coupled mode theory, we verify that the diluted field enhancement is proportional to the absorption, and thus perfect absorption is critical to maximum field enhancement. In addition, the proposed perfect absorber can be operated as a refractive index sensor with a sensitivity of 885 nm/RIU and figure of merit as high as 110. It provides a new design strategy for narrow band perfect absorption and local field enhancement, and has potential applications in biosensors, filters and nonlinear optics. PMID:27046540

  11. Narrow band perfect absorber for maximum localized magnetic and electric field enhancement and sensing applications

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Zhengdong; Zhang, Senlin; Gong, Chensheng; He, Sailing

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonics offer an exciting way to mediate the interaction between light and matter, allowing strong field enhancement and confinement, large absorption and scattering at resonance. However, simultaneous realization of ultra-narrow band perfect absorption and electromagnetic field enhancement is challenging due to the intrinsic high optical losses and radiative damping in metals. Here, we propose an all-metal plasmonic absorber with an absorption bandwidth less than 8 nm and polarization insensitive absorptivity exceeding 99%. Unlike traditional Metal-Dielectric-Metal configurations, we demonstrate that the narrowband perfect absorption and field enhancement are ascribed to the vertical gap plasmonic mode in the deep subwavelength scale, which has a high quality factor of 120 and mode volume of about 10−4 × (λres/n)3. Based on the coupled mode theory, we verify that the diluted field enhancement is proportional to the absorption, and thus perfect absorption is critical to maximum field enhancement. In addition, the proposed perfect absorber can be operated as a refractive index sensor with a sensitivity of 885 nm/RIU and figure of merit as high as 110. It provides a new design strategy for narrow band perfect absorption and local field enhancement, and has potential applications in biosensors, filters and nonlinear optics. PMID:27046540

  12. Water vapour correction of the daily 1 km AVHRR global land dataset: Part I validation and use of the Water Vapour input field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeFelice, Thomas P.; Lloyd, D.; Meyer, D.J.; Baltzer, T. T.; Piraina, P.

    2003-01-01

    An atmospheric correction algorithm developed for the 1 km Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) global land dataset was modified to include a near real-time total column water vapour data input field to account for the natural variability of atmospheric water vapour. The real-time data input field used for this study is the Television and Infrared Observational Satellite (TIROS) Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) Pathfinder A global total column water vapour dataset. It was validated prior to its use in the AVHRR atmospheric correction process using two North American AVHRR scenes, namely 13 June and 28 November 1996. The validation results are consistent with those reported by others and entail a comparison between TOVS, radiosonde, experimental sounding, microwave radiometer, and data from a hand-held sunphotometer. The use of this data layer as input to the AVHRR atmospheric correction process is discussed.

  13. Correction of locality records for the endangered arroyo toad (Anaxyrus californicus) from the desert region of southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ervin, Edward L.; Beaman, Kent R.; Fisher, Robert N.

    2013-01-01

    The recovery strategy for an endangered species requires accurate knowledge of its distribution and geographic range. Although the best available information is used when developing a recovery plan, uncertainty often remains in regard to a species actual geographic extent. The arroyo toad (Anaxyrus californicus) occurs almost exclusively in coastal drainages, from Monterey County, California, south into northwestern Baja California, Mexico. Through field reconnaissance and the study of preserved museum specimens we determined that the four reported populations of the arroyo toad from the Sonoran Desert region of Riverside, San Diego, and Imperial counties, California are in error. Two additional sites in the Sonoran Desert are discussed regarding the possibility that the arroyo toad occurs there. We recommend the continued scrutiny of arroyo toad records to maintain a high level of accuracy of its distribution and geographic extent.

  14. Nonlinear effects of locally heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity fields on regional stream-aquifer exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J.; Winter, C. L.; Wang, Z.

    2015-11-01

    Computational experiments are performed to evaluate the effects of locally heterogeneous conductivity fields on regional exchanges of water between stream and aquifer systems in the Middle Heihe River basin (MHRB) of northwestern China. The effects are found to be nonlinear in the sense that simulated discharges from aquifers to streams are systematically lower than discharges produced by a base model parameterized with relatively coarse effective conductivity. A similar, but weaker, effect is observed for stream leakage. The study is organized around three hypotheses: (H1) small-scale spatial variations of conductivity significantly affect regional exchanges of water between streams and aquifers in river basins, (H2) aggregating small-scale heterogeneities into regional effective parameters systematically biases estimates of stream-aquifer exchanges, and (H3) the biases result from slow paths in groundwater flow that emerge due to small-scale heterogeneities. The hypotheses are evaluated by comparing stream-aquifer fluxes produced by the base model to fluxes simulated using realizations of the MHRB characterized by local (grid-scale) heterogeneity. Levels of local heterogeneity are manipulated as control variables by adjusting coefficients of variation. All models are implemented using the MODFLOW (Modular Three-dimensional Finite-difference Groundwater Flow Model) simulation environment, and the PEST (parameter estimation) tool is used to calibrate effective conductivities defined over 16 zones within the MHRB. The effective parameters are also used as expected values to develop lognormally distributed conductivity (K) fields on local grid scales. Stream-aquifer exchanges are simulated with K fields at both scales and then compared. Results show that the effects of small-scale heterogeneities significantly influence exchanges with simulations based on local-scale heterogeneities always producing discharges that are less than those produced by the base model

  15. Field-Scale Modeling of Local Capillary Trapping During CO2 Injection into a Saline Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, B.; Lake, L. W.; Bryant, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    Local capillary trapping is the small-scale (10-2 to 10+1 m) CO2 trapping that is caused by the capillary pressure heterogeneity. The benefit of LCT, applied specially to CO2 sequestration, is that saturation of stored CO2 is larger than the residual gas, yet these CO2 are not susceptible to leakage through failed seals. Thus quantifying the extent of local capillary trapping is valuable in design and risk assessment of geologic storage projects. Modeling local capillary trapping is computationally expensive and may even be intractable using a conventional reservoir simulator. In this paper, we propose a novel method to model local capillary trapping by combining geologic criteria and connectivity analysis. The connectivity analysis originally developed for characterizing well-to-reservoir connectivity is adapted to this problem by means of a newly defined edge weight property between neighboring grid blocks, which accounts for the multiphase flow properties, injection rate, and gravity effect. Then the connectivity is estimated from shortest path algorithm to predict the CO2 migration behavior and plume shape during injection. A geologic criteria algorithm is developed to estimate the potential local capillary traps based only on the entry capillary pressure field. The latter is correlated to a geostatistical realization of permeability field. The extended connectivity analysis shows a good match of CO2 plume computed by the full-physics simulation. We then incorporate it into the geologic algorithm to quantify the amount of LCT structures identified within the entry capillary pressure field that can be filled during CO2 injection. Several simulations are conducted in the reservoirs with different level of heterogeneity (measured by the Dykstra-Parsons coefficient) under various injection scenarios. We find that there exists a threshold Dykstra-Parsons coefficient, below which low injection rate gives rise to more LCT; whereas higher injection rate increases LCT

  16. Nanoscale Imaging of Local Few-Femtosecond Near-Field Dynamics within a Single Plasmonic Nanoantenna

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The local enhancement of few-cycle laser pulses by plasmonic nanostructures opens up for spatiotemporal control of optical interactions on a nanometer and few-femtosecond scale. However, spatially resolved characterization of few-cycle plasmon dynamics poses a major challenge due to the extreme length and time scales involved. In this Letter, we experimentally demonstrate local variations in the dynamics during the few strongest cycles of plasmon-enhanced fields within individual rice-shaped silver nanoparticles. This was done using 5.5 fs laser pulses in an interferometric time-resolved photoemission electron microscopy setup. The experiments are supported by finite-difference time-domain simulations of similar silver structures. The observed differences in the field dynamics across a single particle do not reflect differences in plasmon resonance frequency or dephasing time. They instead arise from a combination of retardation effects and the coherent superposition between multiple plasmon modes of the particle, inherent to a few-cycle pulse excitation. The ability to detect and predict local variations in the few-femtosecond time evolution of multimode coherent plasmon excitations in rationally synthesized nanoparticles can be used in the tailoring of nanostructures for ultrafast and nonlinear plasmonics. PMID:26375959

  17. Encoding of natural sounds by variance of the cortical local field potential.

    PubMed

    Ding, Nai; Simon, Jonathan Z; Shamma, Shihab A; David, Stephen V

    2016-06-01

    Neural encoding of sensory stimuli is typically studied by averaging neural signals across repetitions of the same stimulus. However, recent work has suggested that the variance of neural activity across repeated trials can also depend on sensory inputs. Here we characterize how intertrial variance of the local field potential (LFP) in primary auditory cortex of awake ferrets is affected by continuous natural sound stimuli. We find that natural sounds often suppress the intertrial variance of low-frequency LFP (<16 Hz). However, the amount of the variance reduction is not significantly correlated with the amplitude of the mean response at the same recording site. Moreover, the variance changes occur with longer latency than the mean response. Although the dynamics of the mean response and intertrial variance differ, spectro-temporal receptive field analysis reveals that changes in LFP variance have frequency tuning similar to multiunit activity at the same recording site, suggesting a local origin for changes in LFP variance. In summary, the spectral tuning of LFP intertrial variance and the absence of a correlation with the amplitude of the mean evoked LFP suggest substantial heterogeneity in the interaction between spontaneous and stimulus-driven activity across local neural populations in auditory cortex. PMID:26912594

  18. The gravity of dark vortices: effective field theory for branes and strings carrying localized flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, C. P.; Diener, R.; Williams, M.

    2015-11-01

    A Nielsen-Olesen vortex usually sits in an environment that expels the flux that is confined to the vortex, so flux is not present both inside and outside. We construct vortices for which this is not true, where the flux carried by the vortex also permeates the `bulk' far from the vortex. The idea is to mix the vortex's internal gauge flux with an external flux using off-diagonal kinetic mixing. Such `dark' vortices could play a phenomenological role in models with both cosmic strings and a dark gauge sector. When coupled to gravity they also provide explicit ultra-violet completions for codimension-two brane-localized flux, which arises in extra-dimensional models when the same flux that stabilizes extra-dimensional size is also localized on space-filling branes situated around the extra dimensions. We derive simple formulae for observables such as defect angle, tension, localized flux and on-vortex curvature when coupled to gravity, and show how all of these are insensitive to much of the microscopic details of the solutions, and are instead largely dictated by low-energy quantities. We derive the required effective description in terms of a world-sheet brane action, and derive the matching conditions for its couplings. We consider the case where the dimensions transverse to the bulk compactify, and determine how the on- and off-vortex curvatures and other bulk features depend on the vortex properties. We find that the brane-localized flux does not gravitate, but just renormalizes the tension in a magnetic-field independent way. The existence of an explicit UV completion puts the effective description of these models on a more precise footing, verifying that brane-localized flux can be consistent with sensible UV physics and resolving some apparent paradoxes that can arise with a naive (but commonly used) delta-function treatment of the brane's localization within the bulk.

  19. The Contribution of Local Stresses in the Western Europe Stress Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusters, D.; Camelbeeck, T.; de Viron, O.; Van Camp, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    The analysis of the World Stress Map (WSM) has evidenced first and second stress patterns (Heidbach et al. 2013) in Western Europe. The long wavelength pattern is controlled by plate boundary forces and transmitted into the plate interior. The second order is due to local topography, density and strength contrasts and can modify significantly the long wavelength component of the stress field. We propose to use the second spatial derivatives of a geoid height grid to evaluate the stress generated at the local scale by the spatial variations of the Gravitational Potential Energy (GPE), which is related to inhomogeneous topography and mass distribution in the lithosphere (Camelbeeck et al., 2013). This allows estimating whether this local component could be dominant in the tectonic stress, mainly by comparing our results with the WSM dataset and earthquake fault-plane solutions. For the northern Alps, we obtain results similar to the ones obtained for the Pyrenees by Camelbeeck et al. (Lithosphere, 2013), i.e. 70% of focal mechanisms are in agreement with the local stresses inferred from the geoid. This agrees with Heidbach et al. (2007), who showed that the short wavelength stress pattern is predominant in the Alps In Great Britain, the first order pattern is expected to be the main factor in the global stress field such that in principle, our method may not be appropriate. However, our tectonic style predicted from the geoid agrees with most of the earthquake focal mechanisms, of which 70% correspond to our main horizontal stress direction (σH). Hence, the local stresses should not be neglected when assessing the overall stress state in the UK. On the South Norway shelf, Pascal and Cloetingh (2009) computed the gravitational potential stresses (GPSt). This model generally reflects the WSM and has an intermediate wavelength pattern. However, it does not allow estimating the local stresses due to small geological structures. At such short wavelength, our method

  20. Empirical evaluation of bias field correction algorithms for computer-aided detection of prostate cancer on T2w MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanath, Satish; Palumbo, Daniel; Chappelow, Jonathan; Patel, Pratik; Bloch, B. Nicholas; Rofsky, Neil; Lenkinski, Robert; Genega, Elizabeth; Madabhushi, Anant

    2011-03-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), intensity inhomogeneity refers to an acquisition artifact which introduces a non-linear variation in the signal intensities within the image. Intensity inhomogeneity is known to significantly affect computerized analysis of MRI data (such as automated segmentation or classification procedures), hence requiring the application of bias field correction (BFC) algorithms to account for this artifact. Quantitative evaluation of BFC schemes is typically performed using generalized intensity-based measures (percent coefficient of variation, %CV ) or information-theoretic measures (entropy). While some investigators have previously empirically compared BFC schemes in the context of different domains (using changes in %CV and entropy to quantify improvements), no consensus has emerged as to the best BFC scheme for any given application. The motivation for this work is that the choice of a BFC scheme for a given application should be dictated by application-specific measures rather than ad hoc measures such as entropy and %CV. In this paper, we have attempted to address the problem of determining an optimal BFC algorithm in the context of a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme for prostate cancer (CaP) detection from T2-weighted (T2w) MRI. One goal of this work is to identify a BFC algorithm that will maximize the CaP classification accuracy (measured in terms of the area under the ROC curve or AUC). A secondary aim of our work is to determine whether measures such as %CV and entropy are correlated with a classifier-based objective measure (AUC). Determining the presence or absence of these correlations is important to understand whether domain independent BFC performance measures such as %CV , entropy should be used to identify the optimal BFC scheme for any given application. In order to answer these questions, we quantitatively compared 3 different popular BFC algorithms on a cohort of 10 clinical 3 Tesla prostate T2w MRI datasets

  1. Magnetic field and contact resistance dependence of non-local charge imbalance.

    PubMed

    Kleine, A; Baumgartner, A; Trbovic, J; Golubev, D S; Zaikin, A D; Schönenberger, C

    2010-07-01

    Crossed Andreev reflection (CAR) in metallic nanostructures, a possible basis for solid-state electron entangler devices, is usually investigated by detecting non-local voltages in multi-terminal superconductor/normal metal devices. This task is difficult because other subgap processes may mask the effects of CAR. One of these processes is the generation of charge imbalance (CI) and the diffusion of non-equilibrium quasi-particles in the superconductor. Here we demonstrate a characteristic dependence of non-local CI on a magnetic field applied parallel to the superconducting wire, which can be understood by a generalization of the standard description of CI to non-local experiments. These results can be used to distinguish CAR and CI and to extract CI relaxation times in superconducting nanostructures. In addition, we investigate the dependence of non-local CI on the resistance of the injector and detector contacts and demonstrate a quantitative agreement with a recent theory using only material and junction characteristics extracted from separate direct measurements.

  2. Nucleation of 360 deg DWs in a wire using a local circular field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, Fikriye Idil; Sarella, Anandakumar; Aidala, Katherine E.

    2015-03-01

    Understanding domain wall (DW) motion in ferromagnetic nanostructures is important to realize proposed magnetic data storage and logic devices. Interest in 360o DWs has increased recently with the recognition that their minimal stray field creates only short range interactions, leading to a potentially higher packing density compared to 180o DWs. Our simulations demonstrate the feasibility of nucleating a 360o DW at a specific location along a wire by applying a local circular field that is centered in close proximity to the wire. We simulate the field strength as if from a current carrying wire, which can be experimentally realized by passing current through the tip of an AFM [ 1 , 2 ]. The successful nucleation of a 360o DW depends on the dimensions of the Py wire, on the strength of the circular field, and on the distance of the center of the field from the wire. Once a 360o DW is nucleated, its position shifts with time. We use a notch to stabilize the location of the 360o DW. We investigate the optimal size and spacing of the notches to allow the greatest packing density with control over the nucleation and annihilation of individual domain walls. Supported by NSF DMR-1207924.

  3. Cosmic-Ray Small-scale Anisotropies and Local Turbulent Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Barquero, V.; Farber, R.; Xu, S.; Desiati, P.; Lazarian, A.

    2016-10-01

    Cosmic-ray anisotropy has been observed in a wide energy range and at different angular scales by a variety of experiments over the past decade. However, no comprehensive or satisfactory explanation has been put forth to date. The arrival distribution of cosmic rays at Earth is the convolution of the distribution of their sources and of the effects of geometry and properties of the magnetic field through which particles propagate. It is generally believed that the anisotropy topology at the largest angular scale is adiabatically shaped by diffusion in the structured interstellar magnetic field. On the contrary, the medium- and small-scale angular structure could be an effect of nondiffusive propagation of cosmic rays in perturbed magnetic fields. In particular, a possible explanation for the observed small-scale anisotropy observed at the TeV energy scale may be the effect of particle propagation in turbulent magnetized plasmas. We perform numerical integration of test particle trajectories in low-β compressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence to study how the cosmic rays’ arrival direction distribution is perturbed when they stream along the local turbulent magnetic field. We utilize Liouville’s theorem for obtaining the anisotropy at Earth and provide the theoretical framework for the application of the theorem in the specific case of cosmic-ray arrival distribution. In this work, we discuss the effects on the anisotropy arising from propagation in this inhomogeneous and turbulent interstellar magnetic field.

  4. Localization and mass spectrum of q-form fields on branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Chun-E.; Zhong, Yuan; Xie, Qun-Ying; Liu, Yu-Xiao

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate localization of a bulk massless q-form field on codimension-one branes by using a new Kaluza-Klein (KK) decomposition, for which there are two types of KK modes for the bulk q-form field, the q-form and (q - 1)-form modes. The first modes may be massive or massless while the second ones are all massless. These two types of KK modes satisfy two Schrödinger-like equations. For a five-dimensional brane model with a finite extra dimension, the spectrum of a bulk 3-form field on the brane consists of some massive bound 3-form KK modes as well as some massless bound 2-form ones with different configuration along the extra dimension. These 2-form modes are different from those obtained from a bulk 2-form field. For a five-dimensional degenerated Bloch brane model with an infinite extra dimension, some massive 3-form resonant KK modes and corresponding massless 2-form resonant ones are obtained for a bulk 3-form field.

  5. Distinctive response of many-body localized systems to a strong electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozarzewski, Maciej; Prelovšek, Peter; Mierzejewski, Marcin

    2016-06-01

    We study systems that are close to or within the many-body localized (MBL) regime and are driven by a strong electric field. In the ergodic regime, the disorder extends the applicability of the equilibrium linear-response theory to stronger drivings, whereas the response of the MBL systems is very distinctive, revealing currents with damped oscillations. The oscillation frequency is independent of driving and the damping is not due to heating but rather due to dephasing. The details of damping depend on the system's history reflecting the nonergodicity of the MBL phase, while the frequency of the oscillations remains a robust hallmark of localization. Our results suggest that another distinctive characteristic of the driven MBL phase is also a logarithmic increase of the energy and the polarization with time.

  6. Wavelength dispersion of the local field intensity in silver-gold nanocages.

    PubMed

    Pilot, R; Zoppi, A; Trigari, S; Deepak, F L; Giorgetti, E; Bozio, R

    2015-03-21

    This study provides a combined theoretical and experimental analysis of the far-field (extinction) and of the near-field (SERS enhancement) spectral distribution in hollow nanoparticles, that is, silver-gold nanocages (NCs). Chitosan protected NCs have been synthesized by a galvanic replacement-based procedure: their morphological properties and chemical composition have been characterized by TEM, STEM and ICP. NCs were then functionalized with a thiolated organic dye prior to carrying out SERS measurements. Finite Element Method simulations of a single NC have shown that the field enhancement at the excitation wavelength follows the same spectral dependence as the extinction spectrum and, consequently, the SERS enhancement profile, as a function of the excitation wavelength, peaks at higher energy with respect to extinction. The simulated extinction is remarkably narrower than the experimental spectrum of NCs in solution, indicating that the colloidal sample is substantially polydispersed. However, a simple qualitative model that we have developed would suggest that the SERS enhancement profile is blue-shifted with respect to the extinction in the presence of polydispersivity as well. In addition, NC dimers have been simulated: both their extinction and near field-spectra shift to the red when the size of the gap is reduced analogous to what happens with dimers of filled spherical nanoparticles (NPs). In addition, simulations also revealed that a NC dimer is only slightly more efficient in amplifying the field with respect to the isolated NC, and this behavior is peculiar to NCs. In fact, filled spherical NP dimers exhibit a remarkably stronger field enhancement with respect to the isolated NP. By means of Wavelength Scanned SERS, we measured the spectral distribution of the local field in a dispersion of NCs. We observed experimentally that the local field is distributed in the same spectral region as the extinction and that the absolute value of the SERS

  7. Measuring electromagnetic properties of superconductors in high and localized rf magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Tamin

    Niobium-based Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) particle accelerator cavity performance is sensitive to localized defects that give rise to quenches at high accelerating gradients. In order to identify these material defects on bulk Nb surfaces at their operating frequency and temperature, it is important to develop a new kind of wide bandwidth microwave microscopy with localized and strong RF magnetic fields. A novel near-field magnetic field microwave microscope that enables mapping of the local electrodynamic response in the multi-GHz frequency regime at liquid helium cryogenic temperatures was successful built via the combination of a magnetic writer and a near field-microwave microscope [1] [2]. This magnetic writer can create a localized and strong RF magnetic field and should achieve a condition with Bsurface ~150 mT and sub-micron resolution (Chapter 3). Our objective is to study the extreme and local electrodynamic properties of Niobium (Nb), and to relate these properties to specific defects that limit the ultimate RF performance of superconducting radio frequency cavities made from Nb. Therefore, in this dissertation, many superconducting materials, especially the candidate materials for superconducting RF cavities, were tested at a fixed location to analyze the local electrodynamic response through linear and nonlinear microwave measurements. For the linear measurement (Chapter 4), many fundamental properties of RF superconductivity such as the critical temperature Tc and penetration depth lambda can be identified. For the nonlinear response measurement (Chapter 5), both the intrinsic and extrinsic nonlinearities from the superconductors are excited by our magnetic write head probe. Many models are introduced to identify the measured nonlinearity, including the intrinsic nonlinearity from the modulation of the superconducting order parameter near Tc, and the extrinsic nonlinearity from the moving vortex model, weak-link Josephson effect, and the

  8. Strong Local-Field Effect on the Dynamics of a Dilute Atomic Gas Irradiated by Two Counterpropagating Optical Fields: Beyond Standard Optical Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Jiang; Dong Guangjiong; Zhang Weiping; Shneider, Mikhail N.

    2011-05-27

    We study a recent experiment [K. Li et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 250401 (2008)] on diffracting a Bose-Einstein condensate by two counterpropagating optical fields. Including the local-field effect, we explain the asymmetric momentum distribution and self-imaging of the Bose-Einstein condensate self-consistently. Moreover, we find that the two counterpropagating optical fields could not produce a perfect optical lattice, which is actually deformed by the local-field effect. Our work implies that the local-field effect could be essential for getting a better quantitative analysis of other optical lattice experiments. In particular, the intensity imbalance of the two optical fields could act as a new means to tailor both cold atom dynamics and light propagation.

  9. Exploring the limit of accuracy for density functionals based on the generalized gradient approximation: local, global hybrid, and range-separated hybrid functionals with and without dispersion corrections.

    PubMed

    Mardirossian, Narbe; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2014-05-14

    The limit of accuracy for semi-empirical generalized gradient approximation (GGA) density functionals is explored by parameterizing a variety of local, global hybrid, and range-separated hybrid functionals. The training methodology employed differs from conventional approaches in 2 main ways: (1) Instead of uniformly truncating the exchange, same-spin correlation, and opposite-spin correlation functional inhomogeneity correction factors, all possible fits up to fourth order are considered, and (2) Instead of selecting the optimal functionals based solely on their training set performance, the fits are validated on an independent test set and ranked based on their overall performance on the training and test sets. The 3 different methods of accounting for exchange are trained both with and without dispersion corrections (DFT-D2 and VV10), resulting in a total of 491 508 candidate functionals. For each of the 9 functional classes considered, the results illustrate the trade-off between improved training set performance and diminished transferability. Since all 491 508 functionals are uniformly trained and tested, this methodology allows the relative strengths of each type of functional to be consistently compared and contrasted. The range-separated hybrid GGA functional paired with the VV10 nonlocal correlation functional emerges as the most accurate form for the present training and test sets, which span thermochemical energy differences, reaction barriers, and intermolecular interactions involving lighter main group elements.

  10. WE-E-18A-07: MAGIC: Multi-Acquisition Gain Image Correction for Mobile X-Ray Systems with Intrinsic Localization Crosshairs

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y; Sharp, G

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Gain calibration for X-ray imaging systems with movable flat panel detectors (FPD) and intrinsic crosshairs is a challenge due to the geometry dependence of the heel effect and crosshair artifact. This study aims to develop a gain correction method for such systems by implementing the multi-acquisition gain image correction (MAGIC) technique. Methods: Raw flat-field images containing crosshair shadows and heel effect were acquired in 4 different FPD positions with fixed exposure parameters. The crosshair region was automatically detected and substituted with interpolated values from nearby exposed regions, generating a conventional single-image gain-map for each FPD position. Large kernel-based correction was applied to these images to correct the heel effect. A mask filter was used to invalidate the original cross-hair regions previously filled with the interpolated values. A final, seamless gain-map was created from the processed images by either the sequential filling (SF) or selective averaging (SA) techniques developed in this study. Quantitative evaluation was performed based on detective quantum efficiency improvement factor (DQEIF) for gain-corrected images using the conventional and proposed techniques. Results: Qualitatively, the MAGIC technique was found to be more effective in eliminating crosshair artifacts compared to the conventional single-image method. The mean DQEIF over the range of frequencies from 0.5 to 3.5 mm-1 were 1.09±0.06, 2.46±0.32, and 3.34±0.36 in the crosshair-artifact region and 2.35±0.31, 2.33±0.31, and 3.09±0.34 in the normal region, for the conventional, MAGIC-SF, and MAGIC-SA techniques, respectively. Conclusion: The introduced MAGIC technique is appropriate for gain calibration of an imaging system associated with a moving FPD and an intrinsic crosshair. The technique showed advantages over a conventional single image-based technique by successfully reducing residual crosshair artifacts, and higher image quality

  11. Importance of the Decompensative Correction of the Gravity Field for Study of the Upper Crust: Application to the Arabian Plate and Surroundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaban, Mikhail K.; El Khrepy, Sami; Al-Arifi, Nassir

    2016-08-01

    The isostatic correction represents one of the most useful "geological" reduction methods of the gravity field. With this correction it is possible to remove a significant part of the effect of deep density heterogeneity, which dominates in the Bouguer gravity anomalies. However, even this reduction does not show the full gravity effect of unknown anomalies in the upper crust since their impact is substantially reduced by the isostatic compensation. We analyze a so-called decompensative correction of the isostatic anomalies, which provides a possibility to separate these effects. It was demonstrated that this correction is very significant at the mid-range wavelengths and may exceed 100 m/s2 (mGal), therefore ignoring this effect would lead to wrong conclusions about the upper crust structure. At the same time, the decompensative correction is very sensitive to the compensation depth and effective elastic thickness of the lithosphere. Therefore, these parameters should be properly determined based on other studies. Based on this technique, we estimate the decompensative correction for the Arabian plate and surrounding regions. The amplitude of the decompensative anomalies reaches ±250 m/s2 10-5 (mGal), evidencing for both, large density anomalies of the upper crust (including sediments) and strong isostatic disturbances of the lithosphere. These results improve the knowledge about the crustal structure in the Middle East.

  12. Isotropic proton-detected local-field nuclear magnetic resonancein solids

    SciTech Connect

    Havlin, Robert H.; Walls, Jamie D.; Pines, Alexander

    2004-08-04

    A new nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method is presented which produces linear, isotropic proton-detected local-field spectra for InS spin systems in powdered samples. The method, HETeronuclear Isotropic Evolution (HETIE), refocuses the anisotropic portion of the heteronuclear dipolar coupling frequencies by evolving the system under a series of specially designed Hamiltonians and evolution pathways. The theory behind HETIE is represented along with experimental studies conducted on a powdered sample of ferrocene, demonstrating the methodology outlined in this paper. Applications of HETIE for structural determination in solid-state NMR are discussed.

  13. Local-field effects and forbidden transitions in C60 solid thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongmei; Velasquez, Steven; Schnatterly, S. E.

    1994-01-01

    We have measured the momentum-dependent inelastic-electron-scattering spectra of C60 solid thin films. These data allow the oscillator strength of dipole-forbidden transitions and the dispersion coefficient of the volume plasmon to be evaluated. In addition, we evaluate the complex molecular polarizability from the dielectric function using a point-dipole model for the local-field effects. The results are consistent with the presence and calculated energies of both dipolar and quadrupolar collective molecular excitations in molecular C60.

  14. Electric field induced localization phenomena in a ladder network with superlattice configuration: Effect of backbone environment

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Paramita; Karmakar, S. N.; Maiti, Santanu K.

    2014-09-15

    Electric field induced localization properties of a tight-binding ladder network in presence of backbone sites are investigated. Based on Green's function formalism we numerically calculate two-terminal transport together with density of states for different arrangements of atomic sites in the ladder and its backbone. Our results lead to a possibility of getting multiple mobility edges which essentially plays a switching action between a completely opaque to fully or partly conducting region upon the variation of system Fermi energy, and thus, support in fabricating mesoscopic or DNA-based switching devices.

  15. Co-optimization of RegC and TWINSCAN corrections to improve the intra-field on-product overlay performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorhad, Kujan; Sharoni, Ofir; Dmitriev, Vladimir; Cohen, Avi; van Haren, Richard; Roelofs, Christian; Cekli, Hakki Ergun; Gallagher, Emily; Leray, Philippe; Beyer, Dirk; Trautzsch, Thomas; Steinert, Steffen

    2016-03-01

    Improving wafer On Product Overlay (OPO) is becoming a major challenge in lithography, especially for multipatterning techniques like N-repetitive Litho-Etch steps (LEN, N >= 2). When using different scanner settings and litho processes between inter-layer overlays, intra-field overlay control becomes more complicated. In addition to the Image Placement Error (IPE) contribution, the TWINSCANTM lens fingerprint in combination with the exposure settings is playing a significant role as well. Furthermore the scanner needs to deal with dynamic fingerprints caused by for instance lens and/or reticle heating. This paper will demonstrate the complementary RegC® and TWINSCANTM solution for improving the OPO by cooptimizing the correction capabilities of the individual tools, respectively. As a consequence, the systematic intra-field fingerprints can be decreased along with the overlay (OVL) error at wafer level. Furthermore, the application could be utilized for extending some of the scanner actuators ranges by inducing a pre-determined signatures. These solutions perfectly fit into the ASML Litho InSight (LIS) product in which feedforward and feedback corrections based on YieldStar overlay and other measurements are used to improve the OPO. While the TWINSCANTM scanner corrects for global distortions (up to third order) - scanner Correctable Errors ( CE), the RegC® application can correct for the None Correctable Errors (NCE) by making the high frequency NCE into a CE with low frequency nature. The RegC® induces predictable deformation elements inside the quartz (Qz) material of the reticle, and by doing so it can induce a desired pre-defined signature into the reticle. The deformation introduced by the RegC® is optimized for the actual wafer print taking into account the scale and ortho compensation by the scanner, to correct for the systematic fingerprints and the wafer overlay. These two applications might be very powerful and could contribute to achieve a better

  16. Scaling of the ground-state energy of relativistic ions in high locally bounded magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jakubassa-Amundsen, D. H.

    2010-08-15

    We consider the pseudorelativistic Chandrasekhar/Herbst operator h{sup H} for the description of relativistic one-electron ions in a locally bounded magnetic field. We show that for Coulomb potentials of strength {gamma}<2/{pi}, the spectrum of h{sup H} is discrete below m (the electron mass). For magnetic fields in the class B{sub A}(x)=B{center_dot}(1+{tau}/2)(|x{sub 1}|{sup {tau}+}|x{sub 2}|{sup {tau}})e{sub z}, the ground-state energy of h{sup H} decreases according to B{sup 1}/(2+{tau}) as B{yields}{infinity} for 0{<=}{tau}<{tau}{sub c}, where {tau}{sub c} is some critical value, depending on {gamma}.

  17. FIBER BRAGG GRATING SENSORS FOR LOCALIZED STRAIN MEASUREMENTS AT LOW TEMPERATURE AND IN HIGH MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Ramalingam, Rajinikumar

    2010-04-09

    Study of magnetostrictive effects in the bulk superconductors is very essential and can give more knowledge about the effects like namely, flux pinning induced strain, pincushion distortions in the magnets and so on. Currently used electro mechanical sensors are magnetic field dependent and can only give the global stress/strain information but not the local stress/strains. But the information like radius position dependent strain and characterisation of shape distortion in non cylindrical magnets are interesting. Wavelength encoded multiplexed fiber Bragg Grating sensors inscribed in one fiber gives the possibility to measure magentostrictive effects spatially resolved in low temperature and high magnetic field. This paper specifies the design and technology requirements to adapt FBG sensors for such an application. Also reports the experiments demonstrate the properties of glass FBG at low temperature (4.2 K) and the results of strain measurement at 4.2 K/8 T. The sensor exhibits a linear wavelength change for the strain change.

  18. Method for formation of high quality back contact with screen-printed local back surface field

    DOEpatents

    Rohatgi, Ajeet; Meemongkolkiat, Vichai

    2010-11-30

    A thin silicon solar cell having a back dielectric passivation and rear contact with local back surface field is described. Specifically, the solar cell may be fabricated from a crystalline silicon wafer having a thickness from 50 to 500 micrometers. A barrier layer and a dielectric layer are applied at least to the back surface of the silicon wafer to protect the silicon wafer from deformation when the rear contact is formed. At least one opening is made to the dielectric layer. An aluminum contact that provides a back surface field is formed in the opening and on the dielectric layer. The aluminum contact may be applied by screen printing an aluminum paste having from one to 12 atomic percent silicon and then applying a heat treatment at 750 degrees Celsius.

  19. Nonlinear response of a neoclassical four-field magnetic reconnection model to localized current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Lazzaro, E.; Comisso, L.; Valdettaro, L.

    2010-05-15

    In tokamaks magnetic islands arise from an unstable process of tearing and reconnecting of helical field lines across rational surfaces. After a linear stage the magnetic instability develops through three characteristic nonlinear stages where increasingly complex topological alterations occur in the form of the magnetic islands. The problem of response of reconnection process to the injection of an external current suitably localized is addressed using a four-field model in a plane slab plasma, with a novel extension to account consistently of the relevant neoclassical effects, such as bootstrap current and pressure anisotropy. The results found have implications on the interpretation of the possible mechanism of present day experimental results on neoclassical tearing modes as well as on the concepts for their control or avoidance.

  20. Ultra-fast magnetic vortex core reversal by a local field pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Rückriem, R.; Albrecht, M.; Schrefl, T.

    2014-02-03

    Magnetic vortex core reversal of a 20-nm-thick permalloy disk with a diameter of 100 nm was studied by micromagnetic simulations. By applying a global out-of-plane magnetic field pulse, it turned out that the final core polarity is very sensitive to pulse width and amplitude, which makes it hard to control. The reason for this phenomenon is the excitation of radial spin waves, which dominate the reversal process. The excitation of spin waves can be strongly suppressed by applying a local field pulse within a small area at the core center. With this approach, ultra-short reversal times of about 15 ps were achieved, which are ten times faster compared to a global pulse.