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Sample records for local group galaxy

  1. Local Group Galaxy Emission-line Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaha, Cindy; Baildon, Taylor; Mehta, Shail; Garcia, Edgar; Massey, Philip; Hodge, Paul W.

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of the Local Group Galaxy Emission-line Survey of Hα emission regions in M31, M33 and seven dwarf galaxies in (NGC6822, IC10, WLM, Sextans A and B, Phoenix and Pegasus). Using data from the Local Group Galaxy Survey (LGGS - see Massey et al, 2006), we used continuum-subtracted Ha emission line images to define emission regions with a faint flux limit of 10 -17 ergs-sec-1-cm-2above the background. We have obtained photometric measurements for roughly 7450 Hα emission regions in M31, M33 and five of the seven dwarf galaxies (no regions for Phoenix or Pegasus). Using these regions, with boundaries defined by Hα-emission flux limits, we also measured fluxes for the continuum-subtracted [OIII] and [SII] images and constructed a catalog of Hα fluxes, region sizes and [OIII]/ Hα and [SII]/ Hα line ratios. The HII region luminosity functions and size distributions for the spiral galaxies M31 and M33 are compared with those of the dwarf galaxies NGC 6822 and IC10. For M31 and M33, the average [SII]/ Hα and [OIII]/ Hα line ratios, plotted as a function of galactocentric radius, display a linear trend with shallow slopes consistent with other studies of metallicity gradients in these galaxies. The galaxy-wide averages of [SII]/ Hα line ratios correlate with the masses of the dwarf galaxies following the previously established dwarf galaxy mass-metallicity relationship. The slope of the luminosity functions for the dwarf galaxies varies with galaxy mass. The Carleton Catalog of this Local Group Emission-line Survey will be made available on-line.

  2. Neutral Hydrogen in Local Group Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grcevich, Jana

    The gas content of the faintest and lowest mass dwarf galaxies provide means to study the evolution of these unique objects. The evolutionary histories of low mass dwarf galaxies are interesting in their own right, but may also provide insight into fundamental cosmological problems. These include the nature of dark matter, the disagreement between the number of observed Local Group dwarf galaxies and that predicted by lambda cold dark matter models, and the discrepancy between the observed census of baryonic matter in the Milky Way's environment and theoretical predictions. This thesis explores these questions by studying the neutral hydrogen (HI) component of dwarf galaxies. First, limits on the HI mass of the ultra-faint dwarfs are presented, and the HI content of all Local Group dwarf galaxies is examined from an environmental standpoint. We find that those Local Group dwarfs within 270 kpc of a massive host galaxy are deficient in HI as compared to those at larger galactocentric distances. Ram-pressure arguments are invoked, which suggest halo densities greater than 2-3 x 10-4 cm-3 out to distances of at least 70 kpc, values which are consistent with theoretical models and suggest the halo may harbor a large fraction of the host galaxy's baryons. We also find that accounting for the incompleteness of the dwarf galaxy count, known dwarf galaxies whose gas has been removed could have provided at most 2.1 x 108 M⊙ of HI gas to the Milky Way. Second, we examine the possibility of discovering unknown gas-rich ultra-faint galaxies in the Local Group using HI. The GALFA-HI Survey catalog is searched for compact, isolated HI clouds which are most similar to the expected HI characteristics of low mass dwarf galaxies. Fifty-one Local Group dwarf galaxy candidates are identified through column density, brightness temperature, and kinematic selection criteria, and their properties are explored. Third, we present hydrodynamic simulations of dwarf galaxies experiencing a

  3. Stellar halos around Local Group galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnachie, Alan W.

    2016-08-01

    The Local Group is now home to 102 known galaxies and candidates, with many new faint galaxies continuing to be discovered. The total stellar mass range spanned by this population covers a factor of close to a billion, from the faintest systems with stellar masses of order a few thousand to the Milky Way and Andromeda, with stellar masses of order 1011 M ⊙. Here, I discuss the evidence for stellar halos surrounding Local Group galaxies spanning from dwarf scales (with the case of the Andromeda II dwarf spheroidal), though to intermediate mass systems (M33) and finishing with M31. Evidence of extended stellar populations and merging is seen across the luminosity function, indicating that the processes that lead to halo formation are common at all mass scales.

  4. HI in Local Group Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grcevich, Jana; Putman, M. E.; Peek, J. E. G.

    2007-12-01

    The HI content of the newly discovered satellites of the Milky Way has not been previously studied. We use HIPASS (HI Parkes All Sky Survey), LAB (Leiden/Argentine/Bonn), and GALFA (Galactic Arecibo L-band Feed Array) survey data to explore HI in the environment of the newly discovered dwarf galaxies and add this information to what was previously known about HI in the dwarf spheroidal and lower mass dwarf irregular galaxies of the Local Group. All of the new satellites discovered in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data have limits on their HI masses which range from < 13 M⊙ to 3 x 104 M⊙ except for Leo T, which has an HI mass of approximately 105 M⊙. We find that galaxies within 300 kpc of the Milky Way or Andromeda are all undetected in HI to low limits, or have ambiguous detections, while those further than 300 kpc are predominantly detected with masses > 105 M⊙. The most favored explanation for the lack of HI in dwarf galaxies at small galactocentric distances is ram pressure stripping of the gas in the dwarf galaxy by the larger galaxy's hot halo gas. The HI content will also be discussed in terms of the fuel it provides to the Milky Way and the star formation history of the dwarfs. Finally, we discuss the discovery in the GALFA data of discrete HI clouds with dynamical characteristics similar to known dwarf galaxies.

  5. HI in Local Group Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grcevich, Jana; Putman, Mary; Peek, Joshua E. G.

    2008-08-01

    The HI content of the newly discovered satellites of the Milky Way has not been previously studied. We use HIPASS (HI Parkes All Sky Survey), LAB (Leiden/Argentine/Bonn), and GALFA (Galactic Arecibo L-band Feed Array) survey data to explore HI in the environment of the newly discovered dwarf galaxies and add this information to what was previously known about HI in the dwarf spheroidal and lower mass dwarf irregular galaxies of the Local Group. All of the new satellites discovered in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data have limits on their HI masses which range from <13 Msolar to 3×104 Msolar except for Leo T, which has and HI mass of approximately 105 Msolar. We find that galaxies within 300 kpc of the Milky Way or Andromeda are all undetected in HI to low limits, or have ambiguous detections, while those further than 300 kpc are predominantly detected with masses >105 Msolar. The most favored explanation for the lack of HI in dwarf galaxies at small galactocentric distances is ram pressure stripping of the gas in the dwarf galaxy by the larger galaxy's hot halo gas. Finally, we discuss the discovery in the GALFA data of discrete HI clouds with characteristics similar to known dwarf galaxies.

  6. Local Group dwarf galaxies: nature and nurture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawala, Till; Scannapieco, Cecilia; White, Simon

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the formation and evolution of dwarf galaxies in a high-resolution, hydrodynamical cosmological simulation of a Milky Way sized halo and its environment. Our simulation includes gas cooling, star formation, supernova feedback, metal enrichment and ultraviolet heating. In total, 90 satellites and more than 400 isolated dwarf galaxies are formed in the simulation, allowing a systematic study of the internal and environmental processes that determine their evolution. We find that 95 per cent of satellite galaxies are gas free at z= 0, and identify three mechanisms for gas loss: supernova feedback, tidal stripping and photoevaporation due to re-ionization. Gas-rich satellite galaxies are only found with total masses above ˜5 × 109 M⊙. In contrast, for isolated dwarf galaxies, a total mass of ˜109 M⊙ constitutes a sharp transition; less massive galaxies are predominantly gas free at z= 0, more massive, isolated dwarf galaxies are often able to retain their gas. In general, we find that the total mass of a dwarf galaxy is the main factor which determines its star formation, metal enrichment and its gas content, but that stripping may explain the observed difference in gas content between field dwarf galaxies and satellites with total masses close to 109 M⊙. We also find that a morphological transformation via tidal stripping of infalling, luminous dwarf galaxies whose dark matter is less concentrated than their stars cannot explain the high total mass-to-light ratios of the faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies.

  7. Massive stars in the galaxies of the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Philip

    2013-07-01

    The star-forming galaxies of the Local Group act as our laboratories for testing massive star evolutionary models. In this review, I briefly summarize what we believe we know about massive star evolution, and the connection between OB stars, Luminous Blue Variables, yellow supergiants, red supergiants, and Wolf-Rayet stars. The difficulties and recent successes in identifying these various types of massive stars in the neighboring galaxies of the Local Group will be discussed.

  8. Chemical abundances of massive stars in Local Group galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venn, Kim A.; Kaufer, Andreas; Tolstoy, Eline; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Przybilla, Norbert; Smartt, Stephen J.; Lennon, Daniel J.

    The relative abundances of elements in galaxies can provide valuable information on the stellar and chemical evolution of a galaxy. While nebulae can provide abundances for a variety of light elements, stars are the only way to directly determine the abundances of iron-group and s-process and r-process elements in a galaxy. The new 8m and 10m class telescopes and high-efficiency spectrographs now make high-quality spectral observations of bright supergiants possible in dwarf galaxies in the Local Group. We have been concentrating on elemental abundances in the metal-poor dwarf irregular galaxies, NGC 6822, WLM, Sextants A, and GR 8. Comparing abundance ratios to those predicted from their star formation histories, determined from color-magnitude diagrams, and comparing those ratios between these galaxies can give us new insights into the evolution of these dwarf irregular galaxies. Iron-group abundances also allow us to examine the metallicities of the stars in these galaxies directly, which affects their inferred mass loss rates and predicted stellar evolution properties.

  9. The formation of Local Group planes of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaya, Ed J.; Tully, R. Brent

    2013-12-01

    The confinement of most satellite galaxies in the Local Group to thin planes presents a challenge to the theory of hierarchical galaxy clustering. The Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey (PAndAS) collaboration has identified a particularly thin configuration with kinematic coherence among companions of M31 and there have been long-standing claims that the dwarf companions to the Milky Way lie in a plane roughly orthogonal to the disc of our galaxy. This discussion investigates the possible origins of four Local Group planes: the plane similar, but not identical to that identified by the PAndAS collaboration, an adjacent slightly tilted plane and two planes in the vicinity of the Milky Way: one with very nearby galaxies and the other with more distant ones. Plausible orbits are found by using a combination of Numerical Action methods and a backward in time integration procedure. This investigation assumes that the companion galaxies formed at an early time in accordance with the standard cosmological model. For M31, M33, IC10 and Leo I, solutions are found that are consistent with measurements of their proper motions. For galaxies in planes, there must be commonalities in their proper motions, and this constraint greatly limits the number of physically plausible solutions. Key to the formation of the planar structures has been the evacuation of the Local Void and consequent build-up of the Local Sheet, a wall of this void. Most of the M31 companion galaxies were born in early-forming filamentary or sheet-like substrata that chased M31 out of the void. M31 is a moving target because of its attraction towards the Milky Way, and the result has been alignments stretched towards our galaxy. In the case of the configuration around the Milky Way, it appears that our galaxy was in a three-way competition for companions with M31 and Centaurus A. Only those within a modest band fell our way. The Milky Way's attraction towards the Virgo Cluster resulted in alignment along the

  10. Galex Catalog And Atlas Of Our Local Group Of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madore, Barry

    The NASA Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) mission contains the most comprehensive collection of ultraviolet imaging of Local Group galaxies likely to exist for decades. Unfortunately, this impressive resource will be under-utilized because the standard GALEX pipeline and source catalogs are not designed to properly measure point sources in crowded fields. We propose to solve this problem and unlock this great wealth of data obtained by NASA by constructing the GALEX Catalog and Atlas of Our Local Group Galaxies which shall include 49 GALEX observed Local Group members within 1.5 Mpc including the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds in their entirety. The PSF- fitting photometry method has already been tested and increases the number of detected point sources by 300% over the standard GALEX pipeline. Our catalogs will provide approximately 5-6 million point source measurements. We have also developed a novel method for producing wide field background-balanced mosaics of GALEX data. This has already been implemented for the Magellanic Clouds and the method will be applied to the other largest Local Group Members (M31 and M33). The Atlas images we produce will combine imaging data from all GALEX surveys to achieve maximum depth. Quality assurance of the images and catalogs will be done by the proposers in the course of undertaking a number of science-driven projects that require cross-matching the ultraviolet point sources of the Magellanic Clouds to similar resolution optical (MCPS) and infrared (SAGE) source catalogs. The Catalogs and Atlas (including the Magellanic Clouds cross-matched catalogs) will be made available to the astronomical community by providing them to the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST, the official GALEX archive) as a High Level Science Product as well as assimilated on an object-by- object basis into the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database (NED) and thereby made immediately accessible in VO-compatible format. This program will enhance

  11. ACTIVITY IN GALACTIC NUCLEI OF COMPACT GROUP GALAXIES IN THE LOCAL UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect

    Sohn, Jubee; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Lee, Gwang-Ho; Hwang, Ho Seong; Lee, Jong Chul E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.kr E-mail: hhwang@cfa.harvard.edu

    2013-07-10

    We study the nuclear activity of galaxies in local compact groups. We use a spectroscopic sample of 238 galaxies in 58 compact groups from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release 7 to estimate the fraction of active galactic nucleus (AGN) host galaxies in compact groups, and to compare it with those in cluster and field regions. We use emission-line ratio diagrams to identify AGN host galaxies and find that the AGN fraction of compact group galaxies is 17%-42% depending on the AGN classification method. The AGN fraction in compact groups is not the highest among the galaxy environments. This trend remains even if we use several subsamples segregated by galaxy morphology and optical luminosity. The AGN fraction for early-type galaxies decreases with increasing galaxy number density, but the fraction for late-type galaxies changes little. We find no mid-infrared detected AGN host galaxies in our sample of compact groups using Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer data. These results suggest that the nuclear activity of compact group galaxies (mostly early types) is not strong because of lack of gas supply even though they may experience frequent galaxy-galaxy interactions and mergers that could trigger nuclear activity.

  12. THE ORIENTATIONS OF GALAXY GROUPS AND FORMATION OF THE LOCAL SUPERCLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Godlowski, Wlodzimierz; Flin, Piotr E-mail: sfflin@cyf-kr.edu.p

    2010-01-10

    We analyzed the orientation of galaxy groups in the Local Supercluster (LSC). It is strongly correlated with the distribution of neighboring groups in the scale up to about 20 Mpc. The group major axis is in alignment with both the line joining the two brightest galaxies and the direction toward the center of the LSC, i.e., Virgo cluster. These correlations suggest that two brightest galaxies were formed in filaments of matter directed toward the protosupercluster center. Afterward, the hierarchical clustering leads to aggregation of galaxies around these two galaxies. The groups are formed on the same or similarly oriented filaments. This picture is in agreement with the predictions of numerical simulations.

  13. Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateo, M.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Not long after EDWIN HUBBLE established that galaxies are `island universes' similar to our home galaxy, the MILKY WAY, he realized that a few of these external galaxies are considerably closer to us than any others. In 1936 he first coined the term `Local Group' in his famous book The Realm of the Nebulae to identify our nearest galactic neighbors. More than 60 yr later, the galaxies of the Loca...

  14. Towards a phylogenetic analysis of galaxy evolution: a case study with the dwarf galaxies of the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraix-Burnet, D.; Choler, P.; Douzery, E. J. P.

    2006-09-01

    Context: .The Hubble tuning-fork diagram has always been the preferred scheme for classifying galaxies. It is based only on morphology. In contrast, biologists have long taken the genealogical relatedness of living entities into account for classification purposes. Aims: .Assuming branching evolution of galaxies as a "descent with modification", we show here that the concepts and tools of phylogenetic systematics that are widely used in biology can be heuristically transposed to the case of galaxies. Methods: .This approach, which we call "astrocladistics", is applied to dwarf galaxies of the Local Group and provides the first evolutionary tree for real galaxies. Results: .The trees that we present here are solid enough to support the existence of a hierarchical organisation in the diversity of dwarf galaxies of the Local Group. They also show that these galaxies all stem from a common ancestral kind of object. We find that some kinds of dIrrs are progenitors of both dSphs and other kinds of dIrrs. We also identify three evolutionary groups, each one with its own characteristics and own evolution. Conclusions: .The present work opens a new way to analysing galaxy evolution and a path towards a new systematics of galaxies. Work on other galaxies in the Universe is in progress.

  15. KPNO 0.9m H(alpha) Imaging Survey of ``Transforming Galaxies" in Local Galaxy Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, Christopher; O'Sullivan, Ewan; Raychaudhury, Somak; Gargiulo, Adriana; Campusano, Luis

    2012-02-01

    We propose to use the KPNO 0.9-m telescope to obtain panoramic H(alpha) imaging of ~200 galaxies in two nearby (32, 35 Mpc) galaxy groups NGC 4261 and NGC 5353 from the CLoGS local group survey. In rich clusters ram-pressure stripping has been shown to be very effective at removing the gas contents and quenching star formation in infalling spiral galaxies. It is much less clear how galaxies are affected by the much lower ram pressures found in galaxy groups, or if other environmental processes begin to dominate. Given that >50% of galaxies in the local volume reside in groups, it is vital we gain new insights into which mechanisms drive the SFR-density relation in groups. The proposed H(alpha) imaging will allow us to resolve where star-formation is occuring in each galaxy. This can effectively discriminate between ram-pressure stripping characterized by truncated H(alpha) disks, the much gentler starvation mechanism which produces anemic spirals, and nuclear star-bursts triggered by low-velocity encounters which should be most frequent in groups.

  16. KPNO 0.9m H(alpha) Imaging Survey of ``Transforming Galaxies'' in Local Galaxy Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, Christopher; O'Sullivan, Ewan; Raychaudhury, Somak; Egami, Eiichi; Campusano, Luis

    2012-08-01

    We propose to use the KPNO 0.9-m telescope to obtain panoramic H(alpha) imaging of ~135 galaxies in ten nearby galaxy groups (60- 80 Mpc) from the Complete Local-Volume Groups Sample (CLoGS). In rich clusters ram-pressure stripping has been shown to be very effective at removing the gas contents and quenching star formation in infalling spiral galaxies. It is much less clear how galaxies are affected by the much lower ram pressures found in galaxy groups, or if other environmental processes begin to dominate. Given that >50% of galaxies in the local volume reside in groups, it is vital that we gain new insights into which mechanisms drive the SFR-density relation in groups. The proposed H(alpha) imaging will allow us to resolve where star-formation is occurring in each galaxy. This can effectively discriminate between ram-pressure stripping characterized by truncated H(alpha) disks, the much gentler starvation mechanism which produces anemic spirals, and nuclear starbursts triggered by low-velocity encounters and mergers which should be most frequent in groups.

  17. Resolving the stellar halos of six massive disk galaxies beyond the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monachesi, Antonela; Bell, Eric F.; Radburn-Smith, David J.; de Jong, Roelof S.; Bailin, Jeremy; Holwerda, Benne; Streich, David

    2016-08-01

    Models of galaxy formation in a hierarchical universe predict substantial scatter in the halo-to-halo stellar properties, owing to stochasticity in galaxies' merger histories. Currently, only few detailed observations of stellar halos are available, mainly for the Milky Way and M31. We present the stellar halo color/metallicity and density profiles of red giant branch stars out to ~60 kpc along the minor axis of six massive nearby Milky Way-like galaxies beyond the Local Group from the Galaxy Halos, Outer disks, Substructure, Thick disks and Star clusters (GHOSTS) HST survey. This enlargement of the sample of galaxies with observations of stellar halo properties is needed to understand the range of possible halo properties, i.e. not only the mean properties but also the halo-to-halo scatter, what a `typical' halo looks like, and how similar the Milky Way halo is to other halos beyond the Local Group.

  18. METALLICITY DISTRIBUTION FUNCTIONS OF FOUR LOCAL GROUP DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Teresa L.; Holtzman, Jon; Saha, Abhijit; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara J. E-mail: holtz@nmsu.edu

    2015-06-15

    We present stellar metallicities in Leo I, Leo II, IC 1613, and Phoenix dwarf galaxies derived from medium (F390M) and broad (F555W, F814W) band photometry using the Wide Field Camera 3 instrument on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We measured metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) in two ways, (1) matching stars to isochrones in color–color diagrams and (2) solving for the best linear combination of synthetic populations to match the observed color–color diagram. The synthetic technique reduces the effect of photometric scatter and produces MDFs 30%–50% narrower than the MDFs produced from individually matched stars. We fit the synthetic and individual MDFs to analytical chemical evolution models (CEMs) to quantify the enrichment and the effect of gas flows within the galaxies. Additionally, we measure stellar metallicity gradients in Leo I and II. For IC 1613 and Phoenix our data do not have the radial extent to confirm a metallicity gradient for either galaxy. We find the MDF of Leo I (dwarf spheroidal) to be very peaked with a steep metal-rich cutoff and an extended metal-poor tail, while Leo II (dwarf spheroidal), Phoenix (dwarf transition), and IC 1613 (dwarf irregular) have wider, less peaked MDFs than Leo I. A simple CEM is not the best fit for any of our galaxies; therefore we also fit the “Best Accretion Model” of Lynden-Bell. For Leo II, IC 1613, and Phoenix we find similar accretion parameters for the CEM even though they all have different effective yields, masses, star formation histories, and morphologies. We suggest that the dynamical history of a galaxy is reflected in the MDF, where broad MDFs are seen in galaxies that have chemically evolved in relative isolation and narrowly peaked MDFs are seen in galaxies that have experienced more complicated dynamical interactions concurrent with their chemical evolution.

  19. Galaxy groups

    SciTech Connect

    Brent Tully, R.

    2015-02-01

    Galaxy groups can be characterized by the radius of decoupling from cosmic expansion, the radius of the caustic of second turnaround, and the velocity dispersion of galaxies within this latter radius. These parameters can be a challenge to measure, especially for small groups with few members. In this study, results are gathered pertaining to particularly well-studied groups over four decades in group mass. Scaling relations anticipated from theory are demonstrated and coefficients of the relationships are specified. There is an update of the relationship between light and mass for groups, confirming that groups with mass of a few times 10{sup 12}M{sub ⊙} are the most lit up while groups with more and less mass are darker. It is demonstrated that there is an interesting one-to-one correlation between the number of dwarf satellites in a group and the group mass. There is the suggestion that small variations in the slope of the luminosity function in groups are caused by the degree of depletion of intermediate luminosity systems rather than variations in the number per unit mass of dwarfs. Finally, returning to the characteristic radii of groups, the ratio of first to second turnaround depends on the dark matter and dark energy content of the universe and a crude estimate can be made from the current observations of Ω{sub matter}∼0.15 in a flat topology, with a 68% probability of being less than 0.44.

  20. MCG 06-45-001 - Not a local group galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shore, Steven N.; Sage, Leslie J.

    1990-01-01

    Observations of (C-12)O and (C-13)O J = 1 to 0 for MCG 06-45-001 are examined. It is argued that two features of CO emission with velocities of 1 and 10 km/s indicate that the object is similar to the Galactic molecular clouds in the immediate vicinity, and not to a spiral galaxy as suggested previously. It is considered that CO emission cannot arise from a spiral galaxy at a distance of 2-5 Mpc and that the object is unlikely to be a nearby dwarf. The feature at 10 km/s is considered to arise from a molecular cloud associated with an H II region, which produces the observed IRAS flux.

  1. Friends-of-friends galaxy group finder with membership refinement. Application to the local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tempel, E.; Kipper, R.; Tamm, A.; Gramann, M.; Einasto, M.; Sepp, T.; Tuvikene, T.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Groups form the most abundant class of galaxy systems. They act as the principal drivers of galaxy evolution and can be used as tracers of the large-scale structure and the underlying cosmology. However, the detection of galaxy groups from galaxy redshift survey data is hampered by several observational limitations. Aims: We improve the widely used friends-of-friends (FoF) group finding algorithm with membership refinement procedures and apply the method to a combined dataset of galaxies in the local Universe. A major aim of the refinement is to detect subgroups within the FoF groups, enabling a more reliable suppression of the fingers-of-God effect. Methods: The FoF algorithm is often suspected of leaving subsystems of groups and clusters undetected. We used a galaxy sample built of the 2MRS, CF2, and 2M++ survey data comprising nearly 80 000 galaxies within the local volume of 430 Mpc radius to detect FoF groups. We conducted a multimodality check on the detected groups in search for subgroups. We furthermore refined group membership using the group virial radius and escape velocity to expose unbound galaxies. We used the virial theorem to estimate group masses. Results: The analysis results in a catalogue of 6282 galaxy groups in the 2MRS sample with two or more members, together with their mass estimates. About half of the initial FoF groups with ten or more members were split into smaller systems with the multimodality check. An interesting comparison to our detected groups is provided by another group catalogue that is based on similar data but a completely different methodology. Two thirds of the groups are identical or very similar. Differences mostly concern the smallest and largest of these other groups, the former sometimes missing and the latter being divided into subsystems in our catalogue. The catalogues are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  2. Galaxy evolution in nearby galaxy groups - III. A GALEX view of NGC 5846, the largest group in the local universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Antonietta; Mazzei, Paola; Rampazzo, Roberto; Bianchi, Luciana

    2016-06-01

    We explore the co-evolution of galaxies in nearby groups (Vhel ≤ 3000 km s-1) with a multiwavelength approach. We analyse GALEX far-UV (FUV) and near-UV (NUV) imaging, and Sloan Digital Sky Survey u, g, r, i, z data of groups spanning a large range of dynamical phases. We characterize the photometric properties of spectroscopically confirmed galaxy members and investigate the global properties of the groups through a dynamical analysis. Here, we focus on NGC 5846, the third most massive association of early-type galaxies (ETGs) after the Virgo and Fornax clusters. The group, composed of 90 members, is dominated by ETGs (about 80 per cent), and among ETGs about 40 per cent are dwarfs. Results are compared with those obtained for three groups in the LeoII cloud, which are radically different both in member-galaxy population and dynamical properties. The FUV-NUV cumulative colour distribution and the normalized UV luminosity function (LF) significantly differ due to the different fraction of late-type galaxy population. The UV LF of NGC 5846 resembles that of the Virgo cluster, however our analysis suggests that star formation episodes are still occurring in most of the group galaxies, including ETGs. The NUV-i colour distribution, the optical-UV colour-colour diagram, and NUV-r versus Mr colour-magnitude relation suggest that the gas contribution cannot be neglected in the evolution of ETG-type group members. Our analysis highlights that NGC 5846 is still in an active phase of its evolution, notwithstanding the dominance of dwarf and bright ETGs and its virialized configuration.

  3. The HST Snapshot Survey of Nearby Dwarf Galaxy Candidates. III. Resolved Dwarf Galaxies In and Beyond the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebel, E. K.; Seitzer, P.; Dolphin, A. E.; Geisler, D.; Guhathakurta, P.; Hodge, P. W.; Karachentsev, I. D.; Karachentseva, V. E.; Sarajedini, A.; Sharina, M. E.

    1999-12-01

    We present results for several nearby, resolved dwarf galaxies imaged with WFPC2 in the framework of our HST snapshot survey of nearby dwarf galaxy candidates (Seitzer et al., paper I in this series). All data presented here were analyzed with the automated photometry package HSTPHOT (Dolphin et al., paper IV in this series). Our closest target is the recently discovered Cassiopeia dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy (Karachentsev & Karachentseva 1999, A&A, 341, 355), a new Local Group member and companion of M31 (Grebel & Guhathakurta 1999, ApJ, 511, 101). Our WFPC2 snapshot data reveal a pronounced red horizontal branch in Cas dSph. IC 5152 is a dwarf irregular (dIrr) just beyond the Local Group. Our data show a significant intermediate-age population with a strongly tilted asymptotic giant branch (AGB), a substantial young population, and a wide giant branch. Other nearby galaxies to be discussed include NGC 1560, ESO 471-G006, ESO 470-G018, and KK 035. Most of these galaxies are being resolved into stars for the first time. We describe their properties in detail and derive distances for all dwarfs with a well-defined tip of the red giant branch. Membership of these galaxies in nearby groups is discussed. Support for this work was provided by NASA through grant GO-08192.97A from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. EKG acknowledges support by NASA through grant HF-01108.01-98A from the Space Telescope Science Institute. EKG and IDK are supported by the Henri Chrétien International Research Grant administered by the American Astronomical Society. PG is an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow.

  4. Local dark energy: HST evidence from the vicinity of the M81/M82 galaxy group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, A. D.; Karachentsev, I. D.; Kashibadze, O. G.; Makarov, D. I.; Teerikorpi, P.; Valtonen, M. J.; Dolgachev, V. P.; Domozhilova, L. M.

    2007-10-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope observations of the nearby galaxy group M81/M82 and its vicinity indicate that the dynamics of the expansion outflow around the group is dominated by the antigravity of the dark energy background. The local density of dark energy in the area is estimated to be near the global dark energy density or perhaps exactly equal to it. This conclusion agrees well with our previous results for the Local Group vicinity and the vicinity of the Cen A/M83 group.

  5. Compact Groups of Galaxies with Complete Spectroscopic Redshifts in the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Jubee; Hwang, Ho Seong; Geller, Margaret J.; Diaferio, Antonaldo; Rines, Kenneth J.; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Lee, Gwang-Ho

    2015-12-01

    Dynamical analysis of compact groups provides important tests of models of compact group formation and evolution. By compiling 2066 redshifts from FLWO/FAST, from the literature, and from SDSS DR12 in the fields of compact groups in tet{McC09}, we construct the largest sample of compact groups with complete spectroscopic redshifts in the redshift range 0.01 < z < 0.22. This large redshift sample shows that the interloper fraction in the tet{McC09} compact group candidates is ˜ 42%. A secure sample of 332 compact groups includes 192 groups with four or more member galaxies and 140 groups with three members. The fraction of early-type galaxies in these compact groups is 62%, higher than for the original Hickson compact groups. The velocity dispersions of early- and late-type galaxies in compact groups change little with groupcentric radius; the radii sampled are less than 100 h^{-1} kpc, smaller than the radii typically sampled by members of massive clusters of galaxies. The physical properties of our sample compact groups include size, number density, velocity dispersion, and local environment; these properties slightly differ from those derived for the original Hickson compact groups and for the DPOSS II compact groups. Differences result from subtle differences in the way the group candidates were originally selected. The abundance of the compact groups changes little with redshift over the range covered by this sample. The approximate constancy of the abundance for this sample is a potential constraint on the evolution of compact groups on a few Gigayear timescale.

  6. The Local Group as a time machine: studying the high-redshift Universe with nearby galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Weisz, Daniel R.; Johnson, Benjamin D.; Bullock, James S.; Conroy, Charlie; Fitts, Alex

    2015-10-01

    We infer the UV luminosities of Local Group galaxies at early cosmic times (z ˜ 2 and z ˜ 7) by combining stellar population synthesis modelling with star formation histories derived from deep colour-magnitude diagrams constructed from Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations. Our analysis provides a basis for understanding high-z galaxies - including those that may be unobservable even with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) - in the context of familiar, well-studied objects in the very low-z Universe. We find that, at the epoch of reionization, all Local Group dwarfs were less luminous than the faintest galaxies detectable in deep HST observations of blank fields. We predict that JWST will observe z ˜ 7 progenitors of galaxies similar to the Large Magellanic Cloud today; however, the HST Frontier Fields initiative may already be observing such galaxies, highlighting the power of gravitational lensing. Consensus reionization models require an extrapolation of the observed blank-field luminosity function (LF) at z ≈ 7 by at least 2 orders of magnitude in order to maintain reionization. This scenario requires the progenitors of the Fornax and Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxies to be contributors to the ionizing background at z ˜ 7. Combined with numerical simulations, our results argue for a break in the UV LF from a faint-end slope of α ˜ -2 at MUV ≲ -13 to α ˜ -1.2 at lower luminosities. Applied to photometric samples at lower redshifts, our analysis suggests that HST observations in lensing fields at z ˜ 2 are capable of probing galaxies with luminosities comparable to the expected progenitor of Fornax.

  7. HST Imaging of the Local Volume Dwarf Galaxies Pisces A and B: Prototypes for Local Group Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tollerud, Erik J.; Geha, Marla C.; Grcevich, Jana; Putman, Mary E.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Dolphin, Andrew E.

    2016-08-01

    We present observations of the Pisces A and B galaxies with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope. Photometry from these images clearly resolves a red giant branch (RGB) for both objects, demonstrating that they are nearby dwarf galaxies. We describe a Bayesian inferential approach to determining the distance to these galaxies using the magnitude of the tip of the RGB, and then apply this approach to these galaxies. This reveals the distance to these galaxies as {5.64}-0.15+0.13 {{Mpc}} and {8.89}-0.85+0.75 {{Mpc}} for Pisces A and B, respectively, placing both within the Local Volume but not the Local Group (LG). We estimate the star formation histories of these galaxies, which suggests that they have recently undergone an increase in their star formation rates. Together these yield luminosities for Pisces A and B of {M}V=-{11.57}-0.05+0.06 and -12.9 ± 0.2, respectively, and estimated stellar masses of {log}({M}* /{M}⊙ )={7.0}-1.7+0.4 and {7.5}-1.8+0.3. We further show that these galaxies are likely at the boundary between nearby voids and higher-density filamentary structure. This suggests that they are entering a higher-density region from voids, where they would have experienced delayed evolution, consistent with their recent increased star formation rates. If this is indeed the case, they are useful for study as proxies of the galaxies that later evolved into typical LG satellite galaxies.

  8. What have we learned from the XMM-Newton surveys of Local Group Galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberl, F.

    2016-06-01

    The study of X-ray source populations and diffuse X-ray emission in nearby galaxies is of major importance in understanding the X-ray output of more distant galaxies as well as learning about processes that occur on interstellar scales within our own Galaxy. Depending on the star formation history of the galaxies different types of X-ray sources dominate the total X-ray emission. With modern observatories like XMM-Newton the various classes of X-ray sources (high and low mass X-ray binaries, supernova remnants, super-soft sources) can be studied to the faintest end of their luminosity distribution in Local Group galaxies. XMM-Newton successfully surveyed the large spiral galaxies M31 and M33 and the star forming, irregular Magellanic Clouds. I'll summarise the most important results we have obtained from older populations like low mass X-ray binaries and classical novae in M31 to the younger populations of high mass X-ray binaries and supernova remnants in the Magellanic Clouds. I'll discuss still open questions in this field of research which can be addressed using the high sensitivity of the XMM-Newton instruments.

  9. The Reddening law outside the local group galaxies: The case of NGC 7552 and NGC 5236

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, Anne L.; Calzetti, Daniela; Bica, Eduardo; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa

    1994-01-01

    The dust reddening law from the UV to the near-IR for the extended regions of galaxies is here derived from the spectral distributions of the starburst spiral galaxies NGC 7552 and NGC 5236. The centers of these galaxies have similar absorption and emission line spectra, differing only if the strength of their interstellar lines and in the continuum distribution, with NGC 7552 appearing more reddened than NGC 5236. The disk of NGC 7552 is more inclined, and there is evidence that its center is observed through additional foreground dust and gas clouds, as compared to the center of NGC 5236. While the galaxies can be expected to have similar dust content, they are known to have different dust path lengths to our line of sight. Therefore, differences in the shape of the spectra can be attributed mainly to the effects of dust, allowing us to probe for the first time the properties of the reddening law outside the local group of galaxies. We derive the reddening law based on the optical depth of the emission line of H Alpha and H Beta and also based on the continuum distribtuion. We find that the optical depth from the emission line regions are about twice the optical depth of the continuum regions. Thus, dereddening a starburst galaxy by scaling the Milky Way reddening laws to optical depths obtained from the H Alpha/H Beta line ratio overcompensates for the effect of dust.

  10. H I IN LOCAL GROUP DWARF GALAXIES AND STRIPPING BY THE GALACTIC HALO

    SciTech Connect

    Grcevich, Jana; Putman, Mary E E-mail: mputman@astro.columbia.edu

    2009-05-01

    We examine the H I content and environment of all of the Local Group dwarf galaxies (M {sub tot} < 10{sup 10} M {sub sun}), including the numerous newly discovered satellites of the Milky Way and M31. All of the new dwarfs, with the exception of Leo T, have no detected H I. The majority of dwarf galaxies within {approx}270 kpc of the Milky Way or Andromeda are undetected in H I (<10{sup 4} M {sub sun} for Milky Way dwarfs), while those further than {approx}270 kpc are predominantly detected with masses {approx}10{sup 5} to 10{sup 8} M {sub sun}. Analytical ram-pressure arguments combined with velocities obtained via proper motion studies allow for an estimate of the halo density of the Milky Way at several distances. This halo density is constrained to be greater than 2x 10{sup -4}-3 x 10{sup -4} cm{sup -3} out to distances of at least 70 kpc. This is broadly consistent with theoretical models of the diffuse gas in a Milky Way-like halo and is consistent with this component hosting a large fraction of a galaxy's baryons. Accounting for completeness in the dwarf galaxy count, gasless dwarf galaxies could have provided at most 2.1 x 10{sup 8} M {sub sun} of H I gas to the Milky Way, which suggests that most of our Galaxy's star formation fuel does not come from accreted small satellites in the current era.

  11. Ultra-compact high velocity clouds in the ALFALFA HI survey: Candidate Local Group galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Elizabeth Ann Kovenz

    The increased sensitivity and spatial resolution of the ALFALFA HI survey has resulted in the detection of ultra-compact high velocity clouds (UCHVCs). These objects are good candidates to represent low mass gas-rich galaxies in the Local Group and Local Volume with stellar populations that are too faint to be detected in extant optical surveys. This idea is referred to as the "minihalo hypothesis". We identify the UCHVCs within the ALFALFA dataset via the use of a 3D matched filtering signal identification algorithm. UCHVCs are selected based on a compact size (< 30'), separation from Galactic HI (|upsilon LSR| > 120 km s-1) and isolation. Within the 40% complete ALFALFA survey (alpha.40), 59 UCHVCs are identified; 19 are in a most-isolated subset and are the best galaxy candidates. Due to the presence of large HVC complexes in the fall sky, most notably the Magellanic Stream, the association of UCHVCs with existing structure cannot be ruled out. In the spring sky, the spatial and kinematic distribution of the UCHVCs is consistent with simulations of dark matter halos within the Local Group. In addition, the HI properties of the UCHVCs (if placed at 1 Mpc) are consistent with both theoretical and observational predictions for low mass gas-rich galaxies. Importantly, the HI properties of the UCHVCs are consistent with those of two recently discovered low mass gas-rich galaxies in the Local Group and Local Volume, Leo T and Leo P. Detailed follow-up observations are key for addressing the minihalo hypothesis. High resolution HI observations can constrain the environment of a UCHVC and offer evidence for a hosting dark matter halo through evidence of rotation support and comparison to theoretical models. Observations of one UCHVC at high resolution (15'') reveal the presence of a clumpy HI distribution, similar to both low mass galaxies and circumgalactic compact HVCs. An extended envelope containing ˜50% of the HI flux is resolved out by the array configuration

  12. The Star Formation Histories of Local Group Dwarf Galaxies. III. Characterizing Quenching in Low-mass Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Skillman, Evan D.; Holtzman, Jon; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.

    2015-05-01

    We explore the quenching of low-mass galaxies (104 ≲ {{M}\\star } ≲ 108 {{M}⊙ }) as a function of lookback time using the star formation histories (SFHs) of 38 Local Group dwarf galaxies. The SFHs were derived by analyzing color-magnitude diagrams of resolved stellar populations in archival Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 imaging. We find: (1) lower-mass galaxies quench earlier than higher-mass galaxies; (2) inside of Rvirial there is no correlation between a satellite’s current proximity to a massive host and its quenching epoch; and (3) there are hints of systematic differences in the quenching times of M31 and Milky Way (MW) satellites, although the sample size and uncertainties in the SFHs of M31 dwarfs prohibit definitive conclusions. Combined with results from the literature, we qualitatively consider the redshift evolution (z = 0-1) of the quenched galaxy fraction over ˜7 dex in stellar mass (104 ≲ {{M}\\star } ≲ 1011.5 {{M}⊙ }). The quenched fraction of all galaxies generally increases toward the present, with both the lowest and highest-mass systems exhibiting the largest quenched fractions at all redshifts. In contrast, galaxies between {{M}\\star } ˜ 108-1010 {{M}⊙ } have the lowest quenched fractions. We suggest that such intermediate-mass galaxies are the least efficient at quenching. Finally, we compare our quenching times with predictions for infall times for low-mass galaxies associated with the MW. We find that some of the lowest-mass satellites (e.g., CVn II, Leo IV) may have been quenched before infall, while higher-mass satellites (e.g., Leo I, Fornax) typically quench ˜1-4 Gyr after infall. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the Data Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA constract NAS 5-26555.

  13. An Observational Limit on the Dwarf Galaxy Population of the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiting, Alan B.; Hau, George K. T.; Irwin, Mike; Verdugo, Miguel

    2007-02-01

    We present the results of an all-sky, deep optical survey for faint Local Group dwarf galaxies. Candidate objects were selected from the second Palomar Observatory Sky Survey and ESO/Science Research Council survey plates, and follow-up observations were performed to determine whether they were indeed overlooked members of the Local Group. Only two galaxies (Antlia and Cetus) were discovered this way out of 206 candidates. Based on internal and external comparisons, we estimate that our visual survey is more than 77% complete for objects larger than 1' in size and with a surface brightness greater than an extremely faint limit over the 72% of the sky not obstructed by the Milky Way. Our limit of sensitivity cannot be calculated exactly, but it is certainly fainter than 25 mag arcsec-2 in R, probably 25.5 and possibly approaching 26. We conclude that there are at most one or two Local Group dwarf galaxies fitting our observational criteria still undiscovered in the clear part of the sky, and roughly a dozen hidden behind the Milky Way. Our work places the ``missing satellite problem'' on a firm quantitative observational basis. We present detailed data on all our candidates, including surface brightness measurements.

  14. On the recovery of the local group motion from galaxy redshift surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Nusser, Adi; Davis, Marc; Branchini, Enzo E-mail: mdavis@berkeley.edu

    2014-06-20

    There is an ∼150 km s{sup –1} discrepancy between the measured motion of the Local Group (LG) of galaxies with respect to the cosmic microwave background and the linear theory prediction based on the gravitational force field of the large-scale structure in full-sky redshift surveys. We perform a variety of tests which show that the LG motion cannot be recovered to better than 150-200 km s{sup –1} in amplitude and within ≈10° in direction. The tests rely on catalogs of mock galaxies identified in the Millennium simulation using semi-analytic galaxy formation models. We compare these results to the K{sub s} = 11.75 Two-Mass Galaxy Redshift Survey, which provides the deepest and most complete all-sky spatial distribution of galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts available thus far. In our analysis, we use a new concise relation for deriving the LG motion and bulk flow from the true distribution of galaxies in redshift space. Our results show that the main source of uncertainty is the small effective depth of surveys like the Two-Mass Redshift Survey (2MRS), which prevents a proper sampling of the large-scale structure beyond ∼100 h {sup –1} Mpc. Deeper redshift surveys are needed to reach the 'convergence scale' of ≈250 h {sup –1} Mpc in a ΛCDM universe. Deeper surveys would also mitigate the impact of the 'Kaiser rocket' which, in a survey like 2MRS, remains a significant source of uncertainty. Thanks to the quiet and moderate density environment of the LG, purely dynamical uncertainties of the linear predictions are subdominant at the level of ∼90 km s{sup –1}. Finally, we show that deviations from linear galaxy biasing and shot noise errors provide a minor contribution to the total error budget.

  15. Star Formation as a Function of Neutral Hydrogen Gas Density in Local Group Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Erika K.; Madore, Barry F.; Freedman, Wendy L.

    2016-06-01

    We present a study of the efficiency and timescales of star formation as a function of local neutral hydrogen gas density in four Local Group galaxies: M33, NGC 6822, the LMC, and the SMC. In this work, we conceptualize the process of star formation as a cycle of two major phases - (1) a gas dynamics phase in which neutral hydrogen gas coalesces into clouds, and (2) a stellar phase in which stars have formed and interrupt further gas coalescence during their active lifetimes. By examining the spatial distribution and number densities of stars on maps of neutral hydrogen, we estimate the timescale of the gas coalescence phase relative to the timescale of the stellar phase and infer an efficiency of star formation as a function of neutral hydrogen gas density. From these timescales and efficiencies, we will calculate star formation rates as a function of neutral hydrogen gas density in these galaxies.

  16. Identifying Local Group field galaxies that have interacted with the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teyssier, Maureen; Johnston, Kathryn V.; Kuhlen, Michael

    2012-11-01

    We distinguish between Local Group field galaxies that may have passed through the virial volume of the Milky Way, and those that have not, via a statistical comparison against populations of dark matter haloes in the Via Lactea II (VLII) simulation with known orbital histories. Analysis of VLII provides expectations for this escaped population: they contribute 13 per cent of the galactic population between 300 and 1500 kpc from the Milky Way, and hence we anticipate that about 7 of the 54 known Local Group galaxies in that distance range are likely to be Milky Way escapees. These objects can be of any mass below that of the Milky Way, and they are expected to have positive radial velocities with respect to the Milky Way. Comparison of the radius-velocity distributions of VLII populations and measurements of Local Group galaxies presents a strong likelihood that Tucana, Cetus, NGC 3109, Sextans A, Sextans B, Antlia, NGC 6822, Phoenix, Leo T and NGC 185 have passed through the Milky Way. Most of these dwarfs have a lower H I mass fraction than the majority of dwarfs lying at similar distances to either the Milky Way or M31. Indeed, several of these galaxies - especially those with lower masses - contain signatures in their morphology, star formation history and/or gas content indicative of evolution seen in simulations of satellite/parent galactic interactions. Our results offer strong support for scenarios in which dwarfs of different types form a sequence in morphology and gas content, with evolution along the sequence being driven by interaction history.

  17. Neutral Hydrogen Clouds Near Early-Type Dwarf Galaxies of the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Antoine; Carignan, Claude; Staveley-Smith, Lister

    2006-06-01

    Parkes neutral hydrogen 21 cm line (H I) observations of the surroundings of nine early-type Local Group dwarfs are presented. We detected numerous H I clouds in the general direction of those dwarfs, and these clouds are often offset from the optical center of the galaxies. Although all the observed dwarfs, except Antlia, occupy phase-space regions where the high-velocity cloud (HVC) density is well above average, the measured offsets are smaller than one would expect from a fully random cloud distribution. Possible association is detected for 11 of the 16 investigated clouds, while for two galaxies, Sextans and Leo I, no H I was detected. The galaxies in which H I clouds were found not to coincide with the optical yet have a significant probability of being associated are the Sculptor dwarf, Tucana, LGS 3, Cetus, and Fornax. If the clouds are indeed associated, these galaxies have H I masses of MHI=2×105, 2×106, 7×105, 7×105, and 1×105 Msolar, respectively. However, neither ram pressure nor tidal stripping can easily explain the offsets. In some cases, large offsets are found where ram pressure should be the least effective.

  18. The far-ultraviolet signature of the 'missing' baryons in the Local Group of galaxies.

    PubMed

    Nicastro, Fabrizio; Zezas, Andreas; Elvis, Martin; Mathur, Smita; Fiore, Fabrizio; Cecchi-Pestellini, Cesare; Burke, Douglas; Drake, Jeremy; Casella, Piergiorgio

    2003-02-13

    The number of baryons detected in the low-redshift (z < 1) Universe is far smaller than the number detected in corresponding volumes at higher redshifts. Simulations of the formation of structure in the Universe show that up to two-thirds of the 'missing' baryons may have escaped detection because of their high temperature and low density. One of the few ways to detect this matter directly is to look for its signature in the form of ultraviolet absorption lines in the spectra of background sources such as quasars. Here we show that the amplitude of the average velocity vector of 'high velocity' O vi (O5+) absorption clouds detected in a survey of ultraviolet emission from active galactic nuclei decreases significantly when the vector is transformed to the frames of the Galactic Standard of Rest and the Local Group of galaxies. At least 82 per cent of these absorbers are not associated with any 'high velocity' atomic hydrogen complex in our Galaxy, and are therefore likely to result from a primordial warm-hot intergalactic medium pervading an extended corona around the Milky Way or the Local Group. The total mass of baryons in this medium is estimated to be up to approximately 10(12) solar masses, which is of the order of the mass required to dynamically stabilize the Local Group.

  19. ANCIENT STARS BEYOND THE LOCAL GROUP: RR LYRAE VARIABLES AND BLUE HORIZONTAL BRANCH STARS IN SCULPTOR GROUP DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Da Costa, G. S.; Jerjen, H.; Rejkuba, M.; Grebel, E. K.

    2010-01-10

    We have used Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys images to generate color-magnitude diagrams that reach below the magnitude of the horizontal branch in the Sculptor Group dwarf galaxies ESO294-010 and ESO410-005. In both diagrams, blue horizontal branch stars are unambiguously present, a signature of the existence of an ancient stellar population whose age is comparable to that of the Galactic halo globular clusters. The result is reinforced by the discovery of numerous RR Lyrae variables in both galaxies. The occurrence of these stars is the first direct confirmation of the existence of ancient stellar populations beyond the Local Group and indicates that star formation can occur at the earliest epochs even in low-density environments.

  20. Stellar content of nearby galaxies. III - The local group spiral galaxy M33

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Christine D.; Madore, Barry F.; Freedman, Wendy L.

    1990-01-01

    BVRI CCD photometry is presented for stars brighter than V = 21 mag in four fields in the nearby spiral galaxy M33. V vs (B - V) and I vs (V - I) color-magnitude diagrams clearly show both a young stellar population (as indicated by the blue main sequence and red supergiant plumes) as well as an intermediate-age population of asymptotic giant branch stars. Deep photometry in the outer field (where crowding is less severe) reveals a population consistent in color and magnitude with the tip of the first red giant branch. The M33 distance modulus, 24.6 + or - 0.3 mag, derived from this Population II component is consistent with a recent redetermination of the distance modulus found from Population I Cepheid variables. Finally, some evidence is presented for a radial gradient in the average internal reddening for the fields in M33 reported here.

  1. The star formation histories of local group dwarf galaxies. II. Searching for signatures of reionization

    SciTech Connect

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Skillman, Evan D.; Holtzman, Jon; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.

    2014-07-10

    We search for signatures of reionization in the star formation histories (SFHs) of 38 Local Group dwarf galaxies (10{sup 4} < M{sub *} < 10{sup 9} M{sub ☉}). The SFHs are derived from color-magnitude diagrams using archival Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 imaging. Only five quenched galaxies (And V, And VI, And XIII, Leo IV, and Hercules) are consistent with forming the bulk of their stars before reionization, when full uncertainties are considered. Observations of 13 of the predicted 'true fossils' identified by Bovill and Ricotti show that only two (Hercules and Leo IV) indicate star formation quenched by reionization. However, both are within the virial radius of the Milky Way and evidence of tidal disturbance complicates this interpretation. We argue that the late-time gas capture scenario posited by Ricotti for the low mass, gas-rich, and star-forming fossil candidate Leo T is observationally indistinguishable from simple gas retention. Given the ambiguity between environmental effects and reionization, the best reionization fossil candidates are quenched low mass field galaxies (e.g., KKR 25).

  2. HIERARCHICAL STELLAR STRUCTURES IN THE LOCAL GROUP DWARF GALAXY NGC 6822

    SciTech Connect

    Gouliermis, Dimitrios A.; Walter, Fabian; Schmeja, Stefan; Klessen, Ralf S.; De Blok, W. J. G. E-mail: walter@mpia-hd.mpg.d E-mail: rklessen@ita.uni-heidelberg.d

    2010-12-20

    We present a comprehensive study of the star cluster population and the hierarchical structure in the clustering of blue stars with ages {approx}<500 Myr in the Local Group dwarf irregular galaxy NGC 6822. Our observational material comprises the most complete optical stellar catalog of the galaxy from imaging with the Suprime-Cam at the 8.2 m Subaru Telescope. We identify 47 distinct star clusters with the application of the nearest-neighbor density method to this catalog for a detection threshold of 3{sigma} above the average stellar density. The size distribution of the detected clusters can be very well approximated by a Gaussian with a peak at {approx}68 pc. The total stellar masses of the clusters are estimated by extrapolating the cumulative observed stellar mass function of all clusters to be in the range 10{sup 3}-10{sup 4} M{sub sun}. Their number distribution is fitted very well by a power law with index {alpha} {approx} 1.5 {+-} 0.7, which is consistent with the cluster mass functions of other Local Group galaxies and the cluster initial mass function. In addition to the detected star clusters of the galaxy, the application of the nearest-neighbor density method for various density thresholds, other than 3{sigma}, enabled the identification of stellar concentrations in various lengthscales. The stellar density maps constructed with this technique provide a direct proof of hierarchically structured stellar concentrations in NGC 6822, in the sense that smaller dense stellar concentrations are located inside larger and looser ones. We illustrate this hierarchy by the so-called dendrogram, or structure tree of the detected stellar structures, which demonstrates that most of the detected structures split up into several substructures over at least three levels. We quantify the hierarchy of these structures with the use of the minimum spanning tree method. We find that structures detected at 1, 2, and 3{sigma} density thresholds are hierarchically constructed

  3. Stellar Content and Recent Star Formation History of the Local Group Dwarf Irregular Galaxy IC 1613

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Edouard J.; Aparicio, Antonio; Gallart, Carme; Padilla-Torres, Carmen P.; Panniello, Maurizio

    2007-09-01

    We present resolved-star VI photometry of the Local Group dwarf irregular galaxy IC 1613 reaching I ~ 23.5, obtained with the wide-field camera at the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope. A fit to the stellar density distribution shows an exponential profile of scale length 2.9' ± 0.1' and gives a central surface brightness μV,0 = 22.7 ± 0.6. The significant number of red giant branch (RGB) stars present in the outer part of our images (r > 16.5') indicates that the galaxy is actually more extended than previously estimated. A comparison of the color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) as a function of galactocentric distance shows a clear gradient in the age of its population, the scale length increasing with age, while we find no evidence of a metallicity gradient from the width of the RGB. We present quantitative results of the recent star formation history from a synthetic CMD analysis using IAC-STAR. We find a mean star formation rate of (1.6 ± 0.8) × 10-3 Modot yr-1 kpc-2 in the central r lesssim 2.5' for the last 300 Myr. Based on observations made with the Isaac Newton Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias.

  4. The Star Formation History of the Local Group Dwarf Elliptical Galaxy NGC 185. I. Stellar Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Delgado, D.; Aparicio, A.

    1998-04-01

    We present VI CCD photometry of ~16,000 stars in a 7.2‧ x 7.2‧ field of the Local Group dwarf elliptical galaxy NGC 185. The resulting VI color-magnitude diagram reveals a dominant red giant branch population, an important number of luminous red stars located above the tip of the red giant branch, and a number of blue and yellow stars. Besides the nucleus, our field also covers a large, less crowded area of the galaxy. We show color-magnitude diagrams at six different distances from the nucleus. The red giant branch becomes substantially narrower at larger distances from the nucleus, while the photometry gets deeper. In this paper, we concentrate on investigating the contribution of the observational effects (mainly crowding) to this observed gradient. Although we cannot rule out here the possibility that this trend partially originates in a gradient of the characteristics of the stellar populations of the galaxy with radius, we show that a strong radial gradient exists in the observational effects that can mimic a gradient in the real properties (e.g., age, metallicity) of the stellar population. A distance modulus of m - M = 23.95 +/- 0.10 has been obtained from the tip of the red giant branch, in good agreement with previous estimates. The average stellar metallicity is estimated to be [Fe/H] = -1.43 +/- 0.15, and decreases for increasing galactocentric distance. Based on observations made with the William Herschel Telescope operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias.

  5. Probing the dusty inhabitants of the Local Group Galaxies: JWST/MIRI colors of infrared stellar populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Olivia; Meixner, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    The assembly of galaxies involves the life cycle of mass, metal enrichment and dust that JWST will probe. Detailed studies of nearby galaxies provides guidance for interpreting the more distant forming galaxies. JWST/MIRI will enable stellar population studies akin to work done with HST on the Local Group galaxies but over a new wavelength range. MIRI's imaging capability over nine photometric bands from 5 to 28 microns is particularly suited to survey stars with an infrared excess and to detangle the extinction or thermal emission from various species of dust. These dusty stellar populations include young stellar objects, evolved stars and supernovae that are bright in the infrared. Using the rich Spitzer-IRS spectroscopic dataset and spectral classifications from the Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution (SAGE)-Spectroscopic survey of over a thousand objects in the Magellanic Clouds, we calculate the expected flux -densities and colors in the MIRI broadband filters for these prominent infrared sources. We uses these fluxes to illustrate what JWST will see in stellar population studies for other Local Group galaxies. JWST/MIRI observations of infrared sources in Local Group Galaxies will constrain the life cycle of galaxies through their dust emission. For example, how much of the interstellar dust is supplied by dying stars? Do the number of young stellar objects agree with star formation diagnostic for the galaxy? We discuss the locations of the post- and pre-main-sequence populations in MIRI color-color and color-magnitude space and examine which filters are best for identifying populations of sources. We connect these results to existing galaxies with HST data for instance Andromeda and M33.

  6. First-Ever Census of Variable Mira-Type Stars in Galaxy Outside the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-05-01

    First-Ever Census of Variable Mira-Type Stars in Galaxy Outsidethe Local Group Summary An international team led by ESO astronomer Marina Rejkuba [1] has discovered more than 1000 luminous red variable stars in the nearby elliptical galaxy Centaurus A (NGC 5128) . Brightness changes and periods of these stars were measured accurately and reveal that they are mostly cool long-period variable stars of the so-called "Mira-type" . The observed variability is caused by stellar pulsation. This is the first time a detailed census of variable stars has been accomplished for a galaxy outside the Local Group of Galaxies (of which the Milky Way galaxy in which we live is a member). It also opens an entirely new window towards the detailed study of stellar content and evolution of giant elliptical galaxies . These massive objects are presumed to play a major role in the gravitational assembly of galaxy clusters in the Universe (especially during the early phases). This unprecedented research project is based on near-infrared observations obtained over more than three years with the ISAAC multi-mode instrument at the 8.2-m VLT ANTU telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory . PR Photo 14a/03 : Colour image of the peculiar galaxy Centaurus A . PR Photo 14b/03 : Location of the fields in Centaurus A, now studied. PR Photo 14c/03 : "Field 1" in Centaurus A (visual light; FORS1). PR Photo 14d/03 : "Field 2" in Centaurus A (visual light; FORS1). PR Photo 14e/03 : "Field 1" in Centaurus A (near-infrared; ISAAC). PR Photo 14f/03 : "Field 2" in Centaurus A (near-infrared; ISAAC). PR Photo 14g/03 : Light variation of six variable stars in Centaurus A PR Photo 14h/03 : Light variation of stars in Centaurus A (Animated GIF) PR Photo 14i/03 : Light curves of four variable stars in Centaurus A. Mira-type variable stars Among the stars that are visible in the sky to the unaided eye, roughly one out of three hundred (0.3%) displays brightness variations and is referred to by astronomers as a

  7. First-Ever Census of Variable Mira-Type Stars in Galaxy Outside the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-05-01

    First-Ever Census of Variable Mira-Type Stars in Galaxy Outsidethe Local Group Summary An international team led by ESO astronomer Marina Rejkuba [1] has discovered more than 1000 luminous red variable stars in the nearby elliptical galaxy Centaurus A (NGC 5128) . Brightness changes and periods of these stars were measured accurately and reveal that they are mostly cool long-period variable stars of the so-called "Mira-type" . The observed variability is caused by stellar pulsation. This is the first time a detailed census of variable stars has been accomplished for a galaxy outside the Local Group of Galaxies (of which the Milky Way galaxy in which we live is a member). It also opens an entirely new window towards the detailed study of stellar content and evolution of giant elliptical galaxies . These massive objects are presumed to play a major role in the gravitational assembly of galaxy clusters in the Universe (especially during the early phases). This unprecedented research project is based on near-infrared observations obtained over more than three years with the ISAAC multi-mode instrument at the 8.2-m VLT ANTU telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory . PR Photo 14a/03 : Colour image of the peculiar galaxy Centaurus A . PR Photo 14b/03 : Location of the fields in Centaurus A, now studied. PR Photo 14c/03 : "Field 1" in Centaurus A (visual light; FORS1). PR Photo 14d/03 : "Field 2" in Centaurus A (visual light; FORS1). PR Photo 14e/03 : "Field 1" in Centaurus A (near-infrared; ISAAC). PR Photo 14f/03 : "Field 2" in Centaurus A (near-infrared; ISAAC). PR Photo 14g/03 : Light variation of six variable stars in Centaurus A PR Photo 14h/03 : Light variation of stars in Centaurus A (Animated GIF) PR Photo 14i/03 : Light curves of four variable stars in Centaurus A. Mira-type variable stars Among the stars that are visible in the sky to the unaided eye, roughly one out of three hundred (0.3%) displays brightness variations and is referred to by astronomers as a

  8. Chemo-dynamical evolution of the Local Group dwarf galaxies: The origin of r-process elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Y.; Ishimaru, Y.; Saitoh, T. R.; Fujii, M. S.; Hidaka, J.; Kajino, T.

    2016-06-01

    The r-process elements such as Au, Eu, and U are observed in the extremely metal-poor stars in the Milky Way halo and the Local Group dwarf galaxies. However, the origin of r-process elements has not yet been identified. The abundance of r-process elements of stars in the Local Group galaxies provides clues to clarify early evolutionary history of galaxies. It is important to understand the chemical evolution of the Local Group dwarf galaxies which would be building blocks of the Milky Way. In this study, we perform a series of N-body/smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations of dwarf galaxies. We show that neutron star mergers can reproduce the observation of r-process elements. We find that the effects of gas mixing processes including metals in the star-forming region of a typical scale of giant molecular clouds ¥sim 10-100 pc play significant roles in the early chemical enrichment of dwarf galaxies. We also find that the star formation rate of ˜ 10^{-3} M_{⊙}yr^{-1} in early epoch (<1 Gyr) of galactic halo evolution is necessary for these results. Our results suggest that neutron star mergers are a major site of r-process.

  9. THE EFFECT OF ENVIRONMENT ON MILKY-WAY-MASS GALAXIES IN A CONSTRAINED SIMULATION OF THE LOCAL GROUP

    SciTech Connect

    Creasey, Peter; Scannapieco, Cecilia; Nuza, Sebastián E.; Gottlöber, Stefan; Steinmetz, Matthias; Yepes, Gustavo

    2015-02-10

    In this Letter, we present, for the first time, a study of star formation rate (SFR), gas fraction, and galaxy morphology of a constrained simulation of the Milky Way (MW) and Andromeda (M31) galaxies compared to other MW-mass galaxies. By combining with unconstrained simulations, we cover a sufficient volume to compare these galaxies’ environmental densities ranging from the field to that of the Local Group (LG). This is particularly relevant as it has been shown that, quite generally, galaxy properties depend intimately upon their environment, most prominently when galaxies in clusters are compared to those in the field. For galaxies in loose groups such as the LG, however, environmental effects have been less clear. We consider the galaxy’s environmental density in spheres of 1200 kpc (comoving) and find that while environment does not appear to directly affect morphology, there is a positive trend with SFRs. This enhancement in star formation occurs systematically for galaxies in higher density environments, regardless whether they are part of the LG or in filaments. Our simulations suggest that the richer environment at megaparsec scales may help replenish the star-forming gas, allowing higher specific SFRs in galaxies such as the MW.

  10. Evolved stars in the Local Group galaxies - I. AGB evolution and dust production in IC 1613

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Agli, F.; Di Criscienzo, M.; Boyer, M. L.; García-Hernández, D. A.

    2016-08-01

    We used models of thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, which also describe the dust-formation process in the wind, to interpret the combination of near- and mid-infrared photometric data of the dwarf galaxy IC 1613. This is the first time that this approach is extended to an environment different from the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds (MCs). Our analysis, based on synthetic population techniques, shows nice agreement between the observations and the expected distribution of stars in the colour-magnitude diagrams obtained with JHK and Spitzer bands. This allows a characterization of the individual stars in the AGB sample in terms of mass, chemical composition and formation epoch of the progenitors. We identify the stars exhibiting the largest degree of obscuration as carbon stars evolving through the final AGB phases, descending from 1-1.25 M⊙ objects of metallicity Z = 10-3 and from 1.5-2.5 M⊙ stars with Z = 2 × 10-3. Oxygen-rich stars constitute the majority of the sample (˜65 per cent), mainly low-mass stars (<2 M⊙) that produce a negligible amount of dust (≤10-7 M⊙ yr-1). We predict the overall dust-production rate from IC 1613, mostly determined by carbon stars, to be ˜6 × 10-7 M⊙ yr-1 with an uncertainty of 30 per cent. The capability of the current generation of models to interpret the AGB population in an environment different from the MCs opens the possibility to extend this kind of analysis to other Local Group galaxies.

  11. The Local Group Galaxy IC 1613 and its asymptotic giant branch variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzies, John W.; Whitelock, Patricia A.; Feast, Michael W.

    2015-09-01

    JHKS photometry is presented from a 3-yr survey of the central regions of the Local Group dwarf irregular galaxy IC 1613. The morphologies of the colour-magnitude and colour-colour diagrams are discussed with particular reference to the supergiants and M- and C-type asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Mean JHKS magnitudes, amplitudes and periods are given for five O-rich and nine C-rich Mira variables for which bolometric magnitudes are also estimated. A distance of 750 kpc ((m - M)0 = 24.37 ± 0.08 mag) is derived for IC 1613 by fitting a period-luminosity (PL) relation to the C-rich Miras. This is in agreement with values from the literature. The AGB stars exhibit a range of ages. A comparison with theoretical isochrones suggests that four luminous O-rich Miras are as young as 2 × 108 yr. One of these has a lithium absorption line in its spectrum, demonstrating that it is undergoing hot bottom burning (HBB). This supports the idea that HBB is the cause of the high luminosity of these AGB stars, which puts them above the fundamental PL relation. Further studies of similar stars, selected from their positions in the PL diagram, could provide insight into HBB. A much fainter, presumed O-rich, Mira is similar to those found in Galactic globular clusters. The C Miras are of intermediate age. The O-rich variables are not all recognized as O-rich, or even as AGB stars, on the basis of their J - KS colour. It is important to appreciate this when using near-infrared surveys to classify AGB stars in more distant galaxies.

  12. Non-parametric star formation histories for four dwarf spheroidal galaxies of the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, X.; Gilmore, Gerard; Valls-Gabaud, David

    2000-10-01

    We use recent Hubble Space Telescope colour-magnitude diagrams of the resolved stellar populations of a sample of local dSph galaxies (Carina, Leo I, Leo II and Ursa Minor) to infer the star formation histories of these systems, SFR(t). Applying a new variational calculus maximum likelihood method, which includes a full Bayesian analysis and allows a non-parametric estimate of the function one is solving for, we infer the star formation histories of the systems studied. This method has the advantage of yielding an objective answer, as one need not assume a priori the form of the function one is trying to recover. The results are checked independently using Saha's W statistic. The total luminosities of the systems are used to normalize the results into physical units and derive SN type II rates. We derive the luminosity-weighted mean star formation history of this sample of galaxies.

  13. Chemical history of isolated dwarf galaxies of the Local Group - I. dSphs: Cetus and Tucana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila-Vergara, N.; Carigi, L.; Hidalgo, S. L.; Durazo, R.

    2016-04-01

    For the first time, we obtain chemical evolution models (CEMs) for Tucana and Cetus, two isolated dwarf spheroidal galaxies of the Local Group. The CEMs have been built from the star formation histories (SFHs) and the metallicity histories, both obtained independently by the Local Cosmology from Isolated Dwarfs (LCID) project from deep colour-magnitude diagrams. Based on our models, we find that the chemical histories were complex and can be divided into different epochs and scenarios. In particular, during 75 per cent of the SFH, the galaxies behaved as closed boxes and, during the remaining 25 per cent, either received a lot of primordial gas by accretion or they lost metals through metal-rich winds. In order to discriminate between these two scenarios, abundances ratios in old stars are needed. At t ˜ 4.5 Gyr, the galaxies lost most of their gas due to a short-strong, well-mixed wind. We obtain very similar CEMs for both galaxies, although Cetus is twice as massive as Tucana. We conclude that the star formation in both galaxies began with only 1.5 per cent of the baryonic mass fraction predicted by Λ cold dark matter.

  14. Tidal Interactions at the Edge of the Local Group: New Evidence for Tidal Features in the Antlia Dwarf Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penny, Samantha J.; Pimbblet, Kevin A.; Conselice, Christopher J.; Brown, Michael J. I.; Grützbauch, Ruth; Floyd, David J. E.

    2012-10-01

    Using deep B-band imaging down to ~μ B = 26 mag arcsec-2, we present evidence for tidal tails in the Antlia Dwarf galaxy, one of the most distant members of the Local Group. This elongation is in the direction of Antlia's nearest neighbor, the Magellanic-type NGC 3109. The tail is offset by <10° from a vector linking the centers of the two galaxies, indicative of interactions between the pair. Combined with the warped disk previously identified in NGC 3109, Antlia and NGC 3109 must be at a small separation for tidal features to be present in Antlia. We calculate that Antlia cannot be completely disrupted by NGC 3109 in a single interaction unless its orbit pericenter is <6 kpc; however, multiple interactions could significantly alter its morphology. Therefore despite being located right at the edge of the Local Group, environmental effects are playing an important role in Antlia's evolution.

  15. TIDAL INTERACTIONS AT THE EDGE OF THE LOCAL GROUP: NEW EVIDENCE FOR TIDAL FEATURES IN THE ANTLIA DWARF GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Penny, Samantha J.; Pimbblet, Kevin A.; Brown, Michael J. I.; Floyd, David J. E.; Conselice, Christopher J.; Gruetzbauch, Ruth

    2012-10-20

    Using deep B-band imaging down to {approx}{mu}{sub B} = 26 mag arcsec{sup -2}, we present evidence for tidal tails in the Antlia Dwarf galaxy, one of the most distant members of the Local Group. This elongation is in the direction of Antlia's nearest neighbor, the Magellanic-type NGC 3109. The tail is offset by <10 Degree-Sign from a vector linking the centers of the two galaxies, indicative of interactions between the pair. Combined with the warped disk previously identified in NGC 3109, Antlia and NGC 3109 must be at a small separation for tidal features to be present in Antlia. We calculate that Antlia cannot be completely disrupted by NGC 3109 in a single interaction unless its orbit pericenter is <6 kpc; however, multiple interactions could significantly alter its morphology. Therefore despite being located right at the edge of the Local Group, environmental effects are playing an important role in Antlia's evolution.

  16. Local Universe Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carignan, Claude

    2015-08-01

    One of the outstanding problems in cosmology is addressing the "small-scale crisis" and understanding structure formation at the smallest scales. Standard Lambda Cold Dark Matter cosmological simulations of Milky Way-size DM halos predict many more DM sub-halos than the number of dwarf galaxies observed. This is the so-called Missing Satellites Problem. The most popular interpretation of the Missing Satellites Problem is that the smallest dark matter halos in the universe are extremely inefficient at forming stars. The virialized extent of the Milky Way's halo should contain ~500 satellites, while only ˜100 satellites and dwarfs are observed in the whole Local Group. Despite the large amount of theoretical work and new optical observations, the discrepancy, even if reduced, still persists between observations and hierarchical models, regardless of the model parameters. It may be possible to find those isolated ultra-faint missing dwarf galaxies via their neutral gas component, which is one of the goals we are pursuing with the SKA precursor KAT-7 in South Africa, and soon with the SKA pathfinder MeerKAT.

  17. The Local Group: Our Galactic Neighborhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodge, Paul

    1987-01-01

    Presents information on the properties and largest spirals of the Local Group galaxies. Explains the three categories of galaxies, identifies the brightest members of the Local Group, and discusses recent discoveries within the group. (ML)

  18. The Local Group Census: planetary nebulae in the spheroidal galaxies NGC 147, NGC 185 and NGC 205

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corradi, R. L. M.; Magrini, L.; Greimel, R.; Irwin, M.; Leisy, P.; Lennon, D. J.; Mampaso, A.; Perinotto, M.; Pollacco, D. L.; Walsh, J. R.; Walton, N. A.; Zijlstra, A. A.

    2005-02-01

    In the framework of our narrow-band survey of Local Group galaxies, we present the results of the search for planetary nebulae (PNe) in three spheroidal companions to the Andromeda galaxy. We find 9 candidate PNe in NGC 147, 5 in NGC 185, and 75 in the ˜0.4 square degree area searched around NGC 205, increasing the number of PNe known in these galaxies. It is shown that in the crowded regions of these galaxies continuum-subtracted images are more effective in detecting PNe than colour-colour diagrams obtained via automatic photometry. For NGC 205, the degree of contamination of PNe belonging to the halo of M 31 is estimated; taking it into account, 35 PNe within 1.5 tidal radii from the centre of NGC 205 have been used to build its PN luminosity function. Candidate PNe in NGC 185 are systematically brighter than those in NGC 147. Considering that star formation is thought to have been much stronger in NGC 185 than in NGC 147 in the last 3 Gyr, this might suggest that the bright end of the PN luminosity function is populated by relatively massive stars, as predicted by some recent theoretical models. This result, however, has to be taken with some caution, given the small PN population size of these galaxies and a rather incomplete knowledge of their star formation history. Based on observations obtained at the 2.5m INT telescope operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de Los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias.

  19. The mass distribution and the law of gravity in the Local Group dwarf irregular galaxy IC 1613

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lake, George; Skillman, Evan D.

    1989-10-01

    Results are presented on the H I spectral-line distribution and velocity field of the Local Group dwarf galaxy IC 1613, which were obtained using VLA of the NRAO. The rotation curve of IC 1613 was determined, and Newtonian and non-Newtonian mass models were built. It was found that the H I is lumpy in the inner parts, but H I contours in the outer parts of the galaxy are smooth. The velocity field is regular, and the line of nodes is coincident with the major axis of the gas distribution. The rotation curve of IC 1613 shows evidence of dark matter in the outer parts. However, the maximum density of a dark halo that can be tolerated is an order of magnitude lower than that needed to explain the velocity dispersions of the extreme dwarf spheroidals.

  20. Local normal galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, Carl E.

    1990-01-01

    In the near future, high energy (E greater than 20 MeV) gamma ray astronomy offers the promise of a new means of examining the closest galaxies. Two and possibly three local galaxies, the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds and M31, should be visible to the high energy gamma ray telescope on the Gamma Ray Observatory, and the first should be seen by GAMMA-1. With the assumptions of adequate cosmic ray production and reasonable magnetic field strengths, both of which should likely be satisfied, specific predictions of the gamma ray emission can be made separating the concepts of the galactic and universal nature of cosmic rays. A study of the synchrotron radiation from the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) suggests that the cosmic ray density is similar to that in the local region of our galaxy, but not uniform. It is hoped the measurements will be able to verify this independent of assumptions about the magnetic fields in the LMC.

  1. The star formation histories of local group dwarf galaxies. I. Hubble space telescope/wide field planetary camera 2 observations

    SciTech Connect

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Skillman, Evan D.; Holtzman, Jon; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.

    2014-07-10

    We present uniformly measured star formation histories (SFHs) of 40 Local Group (LG) dwarf galaxies based on color-magnitude diagram (CMD) analysis from archival Hubble Space Telescope imaging. We demonstrate that accurate SFHs can be recovered from CMDs that do not reach the oldest main sequence turn-off (MSTO), but emphasize that the oldest MSTO is critical for precisely constraining the earliest epochs of star formation. We find that: (1) the average lifetime SFHs of dwarf spheroidals (dSphs) can be approximated by an exponentially declining SFH with τ ∼ 5 Gyr; (2) lower luminosity dSphs are less likely to have extended SFHs than more luminous dSphs; (3) the average SFHs of dwarf irregulars (dIrrs), transition dwarfs, and dwarf ellipticals can be approximated by the combination of an exponentially declining SFH (τ ∼ 3-4 Gyr) for lookback ages >10-12 Gyr ago and a constant SFH thereafter; (4) the observed fraction of stellar mass formed prior to z = 2 ranges considerably (80% for galaxies with M < 10{sup 5} M{sub ☉} to 30% for galaxies with M > 10{sup 7} M{sub ☉}) and is largely explained by environment; (5) the distinction between 'ultra-faint' and 'classical' dSphs is arbitrary; (6) LG dIrrs formed a significantly higher fraction of stellar mass prior to z = 2 than the Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies from Leitner and the SFHs from the abundance matching models of Behroozi et al. This may indicate higher than expected star formation efficiencies at early times in low mass galaxies. Finally, we provide all the SFHs in tabulated electronic format for use by the community.

  2. The Star Formation Histories of Local Group Dwarf Galaxies. I. Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Skillman, Evan D.; Holtzman, Jon; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.

    2014-07-01

    We present uniformly measured star formation histories (SFHs) of 40 Local Group (LG) dwarf galaxies based on color-magnitude diagram (CMD) analysis from archival Hubble Space Telescope imaging. We demonstrate that accurate SFHs can be recovered from CMDs that do not reach the oldest main sequence turn-off (MSTO), but emphasize that the oldest MSTO is critical for precisely constraining the earliest epochs of star formation. We find that: (1) the average lifetime SFHs of dwarf spheroidals (dSphs) can be approximated by an exponentially declining SFH with τ ~ 5 Gyr (2) lower luminosity dSphs are less likely to have extended SFHs than more luminous dSphs; (3) the average SFHs of dwarf irregulars (dIrrs), transition dwarfs, and dwarf ellipticals can be approximated by the combination of an exponentially declining SFH (τ ~ 3-4 Gyr) for lookback ages >10-12 Gyr ago and a constant SFH thereafter; (4) the observed fraction of stellar mass formed prior to z = 2 ranges considerably (80% for galaxies with M < 105 M ⊙ to 30% for galaxies with M > 107 M ⊙) and is largely explained by environment; (5) the distinction between "ultra-faint" and "classical" dSphs is arbitrary; (6) LG dIrrs formed a significantly higher fraction of stellar mass prior to z = 2 than the Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies from Leitner and the SFHs from the abundance matching models of Behroozi et al. This may indicate higher than expected star formation efficiencies at early times in low mass galaxies. Finally, we provide all the SFHs in tabulated electronic format for use by the community. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the Data Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  3. Chemo-dynamical evolution model: Enrichment of r-process elements in the Local Group dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Yutaka; Ishimaru, Yuhri; Saitoh, Takayuki R.; Fujii, Michiko S.; Hidaka, Jun; Kajino, Toshitaka

    2016-08-01

    Neutron star mergers are one of the candidate astrophysical site(s) of r-process. Several chemical evolution studies however pointed out that the observed abundance of r-process is difficult to reproduce by neutron star mergers. In this study, we aim to clarify the enrichment of r-process elements in the Local Group dwarf galaxies. We carry out numerical simulations of galactic chemo-dynamical evolution using an N-body/smoothed particle hydrodynamics code, ASURA. We construct a chemo-dynamical evolution model for dwarf galaxies assuming that neutron star mergers are the major source of r-process elements. Our models reproduce the observed dispersion in [Eu/Fe] as a function of [Fe/H] with neutron star mergers with a merger time of 100 Myr. We find that star formation efficiency and metal mixing processes during the first <~ 300 Myr of galaxy evolution are important to reproduce the observations. This study supports that neutron star mergers are a major site of r-process.

  4. LOCAL GROUP DWARF ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES. II. STELLAR KINEMATICS TO LARGE RADII IN NGC 147 AND NGC 185

    SciTech Connect

    Geha, M.; Van der Marel, R. P.; Kalirai, J.; Guhathakurta, P.; Kirby, E. N.

    2010-03-01

    We present kinematic and metallicity profiles for the M 31 dwarf elliptical (dE) satellite galaxies NGC 147 and NGC 185. The profiles represent the most extensive spectroscopic radial coverage for any dE galaxy, extending to a projected distance of 8 half-light radii (8r{sub eff} {approx} 14'). We achieve this coverage via Keck/DEIMOS multislit spectroscopic observations of 520 and 442 member red giant branch stars in NGC 147 and NGC 185, respectively. In contrast to previous studies, we find that both dEs have significant internal rotation. We measure a maximum rotational velocity of 17 +- 2 km s{sup -1} for NGC 147 and 15 +- 5 km s{sup -1} for NGC 185. While both rotation profiles suggest a flattening in the outer regions, there is no indication that we have reached the radius of maximum rotation velocity. The velocity dispersions decrease gently with radius with average dispersions of 16 +- 1 km s{sup -1} and 24 +- 1 km s{sup -1} for NGC 147 and NGC 185, respectively. The average metallicities for NGC 147 and NGC 185 are [Fe/H] = -1.1 +- 0.1 and [Fe/H] = -1.3 +- 0.1, respectively; both dEs have internal metallicity dispersions of 0.5 dex, but show no evidence for a radial metallicity gradient. We construct two-{integral} axisymmetric dynamical models and find that the observed kinematical profiles cannot be explained without modest amounts of non-baryonic dark matter. We measure central mass-to-light ratios of M/L{sub V} = 4.2 +- 0.6 and M/L{sub V} = 4.6 +- 0.6 for NGC 147 and NGC 185, respectively. Both dE galaxies are consistent with being primarily flattened by their rotational motions, although some anisotropic velocity dispersion is needed to fully explain their observed shapes. The velocity profiles of all three Local Group dEs (NGC 147, NGC 185, and NGC 205) suggest that rotation is more prevalent in the dE galaxy class than previously assumed, but often manifests only at several times the effective radius. Since all dEs outside the Local Group have been

  5. On the spin bias of satellite galaxies in the local group-like environment

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jounghun; Lemson, Gerard E-mail: lemson@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2013-05-01

    We utilize the Millennium-II simulation databases to study the spin bias of dark subhalos in the Local Group-like systems which have two prominent satellites with comparable masses. Selecting the group-size halos with total mass similar to that of the Local Group (LG) from the friends-of-friends halo catalog and locating their subhalos from the substructure catalog, we determine the most massive (main) and second to the most massive (submain) ones among the subhalos hosted by each selected halo. When the dimensionless spin parameter (λ) of each subhalo is derived from its specific angular momentum and circular velocity at virial radius, a signal of correlation is detected between the spin parameters of the subhalos and the main-to-submain mass ratios of their host halos at z = 0: the higher main-to-submain mass ratio a host halo has, the higher mean spin parameter its subhalos have. It is also found that the correlations exist even for the subhalo progenitors at z = 0.5 and 1. Our interpretation of this result is that the subhalo spin bias is not a transient effect but an intrinsic property of a LG-like system with higher main-to- submain mass ratio, caused by stronger anisotropic stress in the region. A cosmological implication of our result is also discussed.

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Galaxy groups and clouds in the local universe (Makarov+, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, D.; Karachentsev, I.

    2014-10-01

    We use the HyperLEDA (Paturel et al., 2003, http://atlas.obs-hp.fr/hyperleda/) and the NED (http://ned.ipac.caltech.edu) data bases as the main sources of data on radial velocities, apparent magnitudes, morphological types and other parameters of galaxies. (1 data file).

  7. The masses of local group dwarf spheroidal galaxies: The death of the universal mass profile

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Michelle L. M.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Chapman, Scott C.; Irwin, Michael J.; Rich, R. M.; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Bate, Nicholas F.; Lewis, Geraint F.; Peñarrubia, Jorge; Casey, Caitlin M.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Koch, Andreas; McConnachie, Alan W.; Tanvir, Nial

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the claim that all dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) reside within halos that share a common, universal mass profile as has been derived for dSphs of the galaxy. By folding in kinematic information for 25 Andromeda dSphs, more than doubling the previous sample size, we find that a singular mass profile cannot be found to fit all of the observations well. Further, the best-fit dark matter density profile measured solely for the Milky Way dSphs is marginally discrepant with that of the Andromeda dSphs (at just beyond the 1σ level), where a profile with lower maximum circular velocity, and hence mass, is preferred. The agreement is significantly better when three extreme Andromeda outliers, And XIX, XXI, and XXV, all of which have large half-light radii (≳ 600 pc) and low-velocity dispersions (σ {sub v} < 5 km s{sup –1}), are omitted from the sample. We argue that the unusual properties of these outliers are likely caused by tidal interactions with the host galaxy.

  8. CARBON-RICH DUST PRODUCTION IN METAL-POOR GALAXIES IN THE LOCAL GROUP

    SciTech Connect

    Sloan, G. C.; Matsuura, M.; Lagadec, E.; Van Loon, J. Th.; Kraemer, K. E.; McDonald, I.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Wood, P. R.; Bernard-Salas, J.

    2012-06-20

    We have observed a sample of 19 carbon stars in the Sculptor, Carina, Fornax, and Leo I dwarf spheroidal galaxies with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. The spectra show significant quantities of dust around the carbon stars in Sculptor, Fornax, and Leo I, but little in Carina. Previous comparisons of carbon stars with similar pulsation properties in the Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds revealed no evidence that metallicity affected the production of dust by carbon stars. However, the more metal-poor stars in the current sample appear to be generating less dust. These data extend two known trends to lower metallicities. In more metal-poor samples, the SiC dust emission weakens, while the acetylene absorption strengthens. The bolometric magnitudes and infrared spectral properties of the carbon stars in Fornax are consistent with metallicities more similar to carbon stars in the Magellanic Clouds than in the other dwarf spheroidals in our sample. A study of the carbon budget in these stars reinforces previous considerations that the dredge-up of sufficient quantities of carbon from the stellar cores may trigger the final superwind phase, ending a star's lifetime on the asymptotic giant branch.

  9. A CATALOG OF ULTRA-COMPACT HIGH VELOCITY CLOUDS FROM THE ALFALFA SURVEY: LOCAL GROUP GALAXY CANDIDATES?

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Elizabeth A. K.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P. E-mail: riccardo@astro.cornell.edu

    2013-05-01

    We present a catalog of 59 ultra-compact high velocity clouds (UCHVCs) extracted from the 40% complete ALFALFA HI-line survey. The ALFALFA UCHVCs have median flux densities of 1.34 Jy km s{sup -1}, median angular diameters of 10', and median velocity widths of 23 km s{sup -1}. We show that the full UCHVC population cannot easily be associated with known populations of high velocity clouds. Of the 59 clouds presented here, only 11 are also present in the compact cloud catalog extracted from the commensal GALFA-HI survey, demonstrating the utility of this separate dataset and analysis. Based on their sky distribution and observed properties, we infer that the ALFALFA UCHVCs are consistent with the hypothesis that they may be very low mass galaxies within the Local Volume. In that case, most of their baryons would be in the form of gas, and because of their low stellar content, they remain unidentified by extant optical surveys. At distances of {approx}1 Mpc, the UCHVCs have neutral hydrogen (H I) masses of {approx}10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} M{sub Sun }, H I diameters of {approx}2-3 kpc, and indicative dynamical masses within the H I extent of {approx}10{sup 7}-10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }, similar to the Local Group ultra-faint dwarf Leo T. The recent ALFALFA discovery of the star-forming, metal-poor, low mass galaxy Leo P demonstrates that this hypothesis is true in at least one case. In the case of the individual UCHVCs presented here, confirmation of their extragalactic nature will require further work, such as the identification of an optical counterpart to constrain their distance.

  10. A Catalog of Ultra-compact High Velocity Clouds from the ALFALFA Survey: Local Group Galaxy Candidates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Elizabeth A. K.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.

    2013-05-01

    We present a catalog of 59 ultra-compact high velocity clouds (UCHVCs) extracted from the 40% complete ALFALFA HI-line survey. The ALFALFA UCHVCs have median flux densities of 1.34 Jy km s-1, median angular diameters of 10', and median velocity widths of 23 km s-1. We show that the full UCHVC population cannot easily be associated with known populations of high velocity clouds. Of the 59 clouds presented here, only 11 are also present in the compact cloud catalog extracted from the commensal GALFA-HI survey, demonstrating the utility of this separate dataset and analysis. Based on their sky distribution and observed properties, we infer that the ALFALFA UCHVCs are consistent with the hypothesis that they may be very low mass galaxies within the Local Volume. In that case, most of their baryons would be in the form of gas, and because of their low stellar content, they remain unidentified by extant optical surveys. At distances of ~1 Mpc, the UCHVCs have neutral hydrogen (H I) masses of ~105-106 M ⊙, H I diameters of ~2-3 kpc, and indicative dynamical masses within the H I extent of ~107-108 M ⊙, similar to the Local Group ultra-faint dwarf Leo T. The recent ALFALFA discovery of the star-forming, metal-poor, low mass galaxy Leo P demonstrates that this hypothesis is true in at least one case. In the case of the individual UCHVCs presented here, confirmation of their extragalactic nature will require further work, such as the identification of an optical counterpart to constrain their distance.

  11. Variable stars in Local Group Galaxies - II. Sculptor dSph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Vázquez, C. E.; Stetson, P. B.; Monelli, M.; Bernard, E. J.; Fiorentino, G.; Gallart, C.; Bono, G.; Cassisi, S.; Dall'Ora, M.; Ferraro, I.; Iannicola, G.; Walker, A. R.

    2016-08-01

    We present the identification of 634 variable stars in the Milky Way dSph satellite Sculptor based on archival ground-based optical observations spanning ˜24 years and covering ˜ 2.5 deg2. We employed the same methodologies as the "Homogeneous Photometry" series published by Stetson. In particular, we have identified and characterized the largest (536) RR Lyrae sample so far in a Milky Way dSph satellite. We have also detected four Anomalous Cepheids, 23 SX Phoenicis stars, five eclipsing binaries, three field variable stars, three peculiar variable stars located above the horizontal branch - near to the locus of BL Herculis - that we are unable to classify properly. Additionally we identify 37 Long Period Variables plus 23 probable variable stars, for which the current data do not allow us to determine the period. We report positions and finding charts for all the variable stars, and basic properties (period, amplitude, mean magnitude) and light curves for 574 of them. We discuss the properties of the RR Lyrae stars in the Bailey diagram, which supports the coexistence of subpopulations with different chemical compositions. We estimate the mean mass of Anomalous Cepheids (˜1.5M⊙) and SX Phoenicis stars (˜1M⊙). We discuss in detail the nature of the former. The connections between the properties of the different families of variable stars are discussed in the context of the star formation history of the Sculptor dSph galaxy.

  12. RR LYRAE VARIABLES IN THE LOCAL GROUP DWARF GALAXY NGC 147

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S-C.; Sarajedini, Ata E-mail: ata@astro.ufl.ed

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the RR Lyrae (RRL) population in NGC 147, a dwarf satellite galaxy of M31 (Andromeda). We used both Thuan-Gunn g-band ground-based photometry from the literature and Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 archival data in the F555W and F814W passbands to investigate the pulsation properties of RRL variable candidates in NGC 147. These data sets represent the two extreme cases often found in RRL studies with respect to the phase coverage of the observations and the quality of the photometric measurements. Extensive artificial variable star tests for both cases were performed. We conclude that neither data set is sufficient to confidently determine the pulsation properties of the NGC 147 RRLs. Thus, while we can assert that NGC 147 contains RRL variables, and therefore a population older than approx10 Gyr, it is not possible at this time to use the pulsation properties of these RRLs to study other aspects of this old population. Our results provide a good reference for gauging the completeness of RRL variable detection in future studies.

  13. Stellar populations in local group dwarf elliptical galaxies. I - NGC 147

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mould, J. R.; Kristian, J.; Da Costa, G. S.

    1983-01-01

    A color-magnitude diagram of NGC 147 to an I magnitude of 23 is presented. The stellar population in the outer parts of this elliptical galaxy resembles that of the globular clusters of the Milky Way. Quantitative comparison of the giant branch with those of globular clusters yields a mean metallicity of -1.2 + or - 0.2, making NGC 147 a part of the general correlation between mass and metallicity seen in ellipticals. The giant branch appears to be broad, which suggests a metallicity dispersion. The absence of asymptotic giant branch stars at luminosities above that of the red giant branch tip sets an upper limit of 10 percent for the fraction of stars in this NGC 147 field that have ages less than 12 Gyr. This result contrasts with the situation in some of the related, but less massive, dwarf spheroidal systems. If the choice is made to assume, rather than determine the stellar content of NGC 147, a distance of 630 + or - 50 kpc is derived, similar to that of M31.

  14. Variable stars in Local Group Galaxies - II. Sculptor dSph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Vázquez, C. E.; Stetson, P. B.; Monelli, M.; Bernard, E. J.; Fiorentino, G.; Gallart, C.; Bono, G.; Cassisi, S.; Dall'Ora, M.; Ferraro, I.; Iannicola, G.; Walker, A. R.

    2016-11-01

    We present the identification of 634 variable stars in the Milky Way dwarf spheroidal (dSph) satellite Sculptor based on archival ground-based optical observations spanning ˜24 yr and covering ˜2.5 deg2. We employed the same methodologies as the `Homogeneous Photometry' series published by Stetson. In particular, we have identified and characterized one of the largest (536) RR Lyrae samples so far in a Milky Way dSph satellite. We have also detected four Anomalous Cepheids, 23 SX Phoenicis stars, five eclipsing binaries, three field variable stars, three peculiar variable stars located above the horizontal branch - near to the locus of BL Herculis - that we are unable to classify properly. Additionally, we identify 37 long period variables plus 23 probable variable stars, for which the current data do not allow us to determine the period. We report positions and finding charts for all the variable stars, and basic properties (period, amplitude, mean magnitude) and light curves for 574 of them. We discuss the properties of the RR Lyrae stars in the Bailey diagram, which supports the coexistence of subpopulations with different chemical compositions. We estimate the mean mass of Anomalous Cepheids (˜1.5 M⊙) and SX Phoenicis stars (˜1 M⊙). We discuss in detail the nature of the former. The connections between the properties of the different families of variable stars are discussed in the context of the star formation history of the Sculptor dSph galaxy.

  15. A peculiar Of star in the Local Group galaxy IC 1613

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero, A.; Garcia, M.; Puls, J.; Uytterhoeven, K.; Najarro, F.; Lennon, D. J.; Rivero-González, J. G.

    2012-07-01

    Context. Results from the theory of radiatively driven winds are nowadays incorporated in stellar evolutionary and population synthesis models, and are used in our interpretation of the observations of the deep Universe. Yet, the theory has been confirmed only until Small Magellanic Cloud metallicities. Observations and analyses of O-stars at lower metallicities are difficult, but much needed to prove the theory. Aims: We have observed GHV-62024, an O6.5 IIIf star in the low-metallicity galaxy IC 1613 (Z ≈ 0.15 Z⊙) to study its evolution and wind. According to a previous preliminary analysis that was subject to significant restrictions this star could challenge the radiatively driven wind theory at low metallicities. Here we present a complete analysis of this star. Methods: Our observations were obtained with VIMOS at VLT, at R ≈ 2000 and covered approximately between 4000 and 7000 Å. The observations were analysed using the latest version of the model atmosphere code FASTWIND, which includes the possibility of calculating the N iii spectrum. Results: We obtain the stellar parameters and conclude that the star follows the average wind momentum-luminosity relationship (WLR) expected for its metallicity, but with a high value for the exponent of the wind velocity law, β. Comparing this with values of other stars in the literature, we suggest that this high value may be reached because GHV-62024 could be a fast rotator seen at a low inclination angle. We also suggest that this could favour the appearance of the spectral "f"-characterictics. While the derived β value does not change by adopting a lower wind terminal velocity, we show that a wrong V∞ has a clear impact on the position of the star in the WLR diagram. The N and He abundances are very high, consistent with strong CNO mixing that could have been caused by the fast rotation, although we cannot discard a different origin with present data. Stellar evolutionary model predictions are consistent with

  16. Galaxies in extreme environments: Isolated galaxies versus compact groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durbala, Adriana

    2009-06-01

    This Dissertation comprises two distinct studies of galaxies in dramatically different environments: extreme isolation versus compact groups. We emphasize empirically how "nature" (i.e. internal, secular processes) plays the dominant role in defining the evolution of isolated galaxies and how "nurture" dictates the fate of galaxies in very crowded environments. Two chapters report on a detailed photometric study of a well-defined sample of N ~100 isolated Sb-Sc spiral galaxies. Data source is Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Using i-band images we perform three kinds of measures: (a) bulge/disk/bar decomposition, (b) CAS parametrization (Concentration, Asymmetry, Clumpiness), and (c) Fourier decomposition/analysis of spiral arms and bar properties including dynamical measures of the torque. Having quantified a large set of properties we look for: (i) the interplay between different components of the same galaxy, (ii) trends along the morphological sequence Sb-Sbc-Sc, and (iii) statistical differences between our "isolated" sample and samples of galaxies of similar morphology constructed without regard for isolation. We find that the majority of isolated late-type disk galaxies host pseudobulges rather than classical bulges. The pseudobulges probably form through internal secular processes and bars may play an important role. A clear separation is noted between Sb and Sbc/Sc in various measures, i.e. the former are redder, brighter, have larger disks and bars, more luminous bulges, are more concentrated, more symmetric and dumpier than the latter. Isolated galaxies host larger bars than galaxies in samples defined without isolation constraints. Longer bars are not necessarily stronger, but show a higher contrast in Fourier analysis. Another chapter is a multiwavelength study of Seyfert's Sextet, the highest density galaxy aggregate in the local Universe. Four of its five galaxies are interpreted as remnant bulges of accreted spirals and are now embedded in a luminous halo

  17. Angular momentum in the Local Group

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, A.; Laflamme, R.

    1994-04-01

    We briefly review models for the Local Group and the acquisition of its angular momentum. We describe early attempts to understand the origin of the spin of the galaxies discussing the hypothesis that the Local Group has little angular momentum. Finally we show that using Peebles` least action principle there should be a rather large amount of orbital angular momentum compared to the magnitude of the spin of its galaxies. Therefore the Local Group cannot be thought as tidally isolated. Using Peebles` trajectories we give a possible set of trajectories for Local Group galaxies which would predict their spin.

  18. Identification of dusty massive stars in star-forming dwarf irregular galaxies in the Local Group with mid-IR photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britavskiy, N. E.; Bonanos, A. Z.; Mehner, A.; Boyer, M. L.; McQuinn, K. B. W.

    2015-12-01

    Context. Increasing the statistics of spectroscopically confirmed evolved massive stars in the Local Group enables the investigation of the mass loss phenomena that occur in these stars in the late stages of their evolution. Aims: We aim to complete the census of luminous mid-IR sources in star-forming dwarf irregular (dIrr) galaxies of the Local Group. To achieve this we employed mid-IR photometric selection criteria to identify evolved massive stars, such as red supergiants (RSGs) and luminous blue variables (LBVs), by using the fact that these types of stars have infrared excess due to dust. Methods: The method is based on 3.6 μm and 4.5 μm photometry from archival Spitzer Space Telescope images of nearby galaxies. We applied our criteria to four dIrr galaxies: Pegasus, Phoenix, Sextans A, and WLM, selecting 79 point sources that we observed with the VLT/FORS2 spectrograph in multi-object spectroscopy mode. Results: We identified 13 RSGs, of which 6 are new discoveries, as well as two new emission line stars, and one candidate yellow supergiant. Among the other observed objects we identified carbon stars, foreground giants, and background objects, such as a quasar and an early-type galaxy that contaminate our survey. We use the results of our spectroscopic survey to revise the mid-IR and optical selection criteria for identifying RSGs from photometric measurements. The optical selection criteria are more efficient in separating extragalactic RSGs from foreground giants than mid-IR selection criteria, but the mid-IR selection criteria are useful for identifying dusty stars in the Local Group. This work serves as a basis for further investigation of the newly discovered dusty massive stars and their host galaxies. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under programme IDs 090.D-0009 and 091.D-0010.Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  19. The ACS LCID Project. XI. On the Early Time Resolution of SFHs of Local Group Dwarf Galaxies: Comparing the Effects of Reionization in Models with Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparicio, Antonio; Hidalgo, Sebastian L.; Skillman, Evan; Cassisi, Santi; Mayer, Lucio; Navarro, Julio; Cole, Andrew; Gallart, Carme; Monelli, Matteo; Weisz, Daniel; Bernard, Edouard; Dolphin, Andrew; Stetson, Peter

    2016-05-01

    The analysis of the early star formation history (SFH) of nearby galaxies, obtained from their resolved stellar populations, is relevant as a test for cosmological models. However, the early time resolution of observationally derived SFHs is limited by several factors. Thus, direct comparison of observationally derived SFHs with those derived from theoretical models of galaxy formation is potentially biased. Here we investigate and quantify this effect. For this purpose, we analyze the duration of the early star formation activity in a sample of four Local Group dwarf galaxies and test whether they are consistent with being true fossils of the pre-reionization era; i.e., if the quenching of their star formation occurred before cosmic reionization by UV photons was completed. Two classical dSph (Cetus and Tucana) and two dTrans (LGS-3 and Phoenix) isolated galaxies with total stellar masses between 1.3× {10}6 and 7.2× {10}6 {M}⊙ have been studied. Accounting for time resolution effects, the SFHs peak as much as 1.25 Gyr earlier than the optimal solutions. Thus, this effect is important for a proper comparison of model and observed SFHs. It is also shown that none of the analyzed galaxies can be considered a true fossil of the pre-reionization era, although it is possible that the outer regions of Cetus and Tucana are consistent with quenching by reionization. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program #10505.

  20. The ACS LCID Project. XI. On the Early Time Resolution of SFHs of Local Group Dwarf Galaxies: Comparing the Effects of Reionization in Models with Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparicio, Antonio; Hidalgo, Sebastian L.; Skillman, Evan; Cassisi, Santi; Mayer, Lucio; Navarro, Julio; Cole, Andrew; Gallart, Carme; Monelli, Matteo; Weisz, Daniel; Bernard, Edouard; Dolphin, Andrew; Stetson, Peter

    2016-05-01

    The analysis of the early star formation history (SFH) of nearby galaxies, obtained from their resolved stellar populations, is relevant as a test for cosmological models. However, the early time resolution of observationally derived SFHs is limited by several factors. Thus, direct comparison of observationally derived SFHs with those derived from theoretical models of galaxy formation is potentially biased. Here we investigate and quantify this effect. For this purpose, we analyze the duration of the early star formation activity in a sample of four Local Group dwarf galaxies and test whether they are consistent with being true fossils of the pre-reionization era; i.e., if the quenching of their star formation occurred before cosmic reionization by UV photons was completed. Two classical dSph (Cetus and Tucana) and two dTrans (LGS-3 and Phoenix) isolated galaxies with total stellar masses between 1.3× {10}6 and 7.2× {10}6 {M}ȯ have been studied. Accounting for time resolution effects, the SFHs peak as much as 1.25 Gyr earlier than the optimal solutions. Thus, this effect is important for a proper comparison of model and observed SFHs. It is also shown that none of the analyzed galaxies can be considered a true fossil of the pre-reionization era, although it is possible that the outer regions of Cetus and Tucana are consistent with quenching by reionization. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program #10505.

  1. Radio properties of fossil galaxy groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miraghaei, H.; Khosroshahi, H. G.

    2016-09-01

    We study 1.4 GHz radio properties of a sample of fossil galaxy groups using GMRT radio observations and the FIRST survey catalog. Fossil galaxy groups, having no recent major mergers in their dominant galaxies and also group scale mergers, give us the opportunity to investigate the effect of galaxy merger on AGN activity. In this work, we compare the radio properties of a rich sample of fossil groups with a sample of normal galaxy groups and clusters and show that the brightest group galaxies in fossil groups are under luminous at 1.4 GHz, relative to the general population of the brightest group galaxies, indicating that the dynamically relaxed nature of fossil groups has influenced the AGN activity in their dominant galaxy.

  2. Observing Dwarf Galaxies in the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Joshua

    2016-03-01

    Dwarf galaxies in the Local Group are key probes of both dark matter and galaxy formation. They are the smallest, oldest, most dark matter-dominated, and least chemically enriched stellar systems currently known. However, despite two decades of major computational, theoretical, and observational advances in this field, we are still working toward a complete understanding of star and galaxy formation at the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function. In the last year, large sky surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey and Pan-STARRS have made an unprecedented series of discoveries, nearly doubling the population of Milky Way satellite galaxies that was known at the start of 2015. This increase in the number of nearby dwarfs may significantly improve the sensitivity of searches for dark matter annihilation radiation. Many of these new dwarfs are likely to have originated as satellites of the Magellanic Clouds, providing a unique opportunity to study the effect of galactic environment on the formation of the faintest dwarfs. I will provide an overview of recent discoveries and how they fit in to the previously known population of nearby dwarf galaxies, highlighting a few of the most interesting objects from the perspective of dark matter and stellar nucleosynthesis.

  3. The circular velocity function of group galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Abramson, Louis E.; Williams, Rik J.; Benson, Andrew J.; Kollmeier, Juna A.; Mulchaey, John S.

    2014-09-20

    A robust prediction of ΛCDM cosmology is the halo circular velocity function (CVF), a dynamical cousin of the halo mass function. The correspondence between theoretical and observed CVFs is uncertain, however: cluster galaxies are reported to exhibit a power-law CVF consistent with N-body simulations, but that of the field is distinctly Schechter-like, flattened compared to ΛCDM expectations at circular velocities v {sub c} ≲ 200 km s{sup –1}. Groups offer a powerful probe of the role environment plays in this discrepancy as they bridge the field and clusters. Here, we construct the CVF for a large, mass- and multiplicity-complete sample of group galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Using independent photometric v {sub c} estimators, we find no transition from field to ΛCDM-shaped CVF above v {sub c} = 50 km s{sup –1} as a function of group halo mass. All groups with 12.4 ≲ log M {sub halo}/M {sub ☉} ≲ 15.1 (Local Group analogs to rich clusters) display similar Schechter-like CVFs marginally suppressed at low v {sub c} compared to that of the field. Conversely, some agreement with N-body results emerges for samples saturated with late-type galaxies, with isolated late-types displaying a CVF similar in shape to ΛCDM predictions. We conclude that the flattening of the low-v {sub c} slope in groups is due to their depressed late-type fractions—environment affecting the CVF only to the extent that it correlates with this quantity—and that previous cluster analyses may suffer from interloper contamination. These results serve as useful benchmarks for cosmological simulations of galaxy formation.

  4. Mapping Hydrogen in the Galaxy, Galactic Halo, and Local Group with ALFA: The GALFA-H I Survey Starting with TOGS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, S. J.; Douglas, K. A.; Heiles, C.; Korpela, E. J.; Peek, J. E. G.; Putman, M. E.; Stanimirović, S.

    2008-08-01

    Radio observations of gas in the Milky Way and Local Group are vital for understanding how galaxies function as systems. The unique sensitivity of Arecibo's 305 m dish, coupled with the 7-beam Arecibo L-Band Feed Array (ALFA), provides an unparalleled tool for investigating the full range of interstellar phenomena traced by the H I 21 cm line. The GALFA (Galactic ALFA) H I Survey is mapping the entire Arecibo sky over a velocity range of -700 to +700 km s-1 with 0.2 km s-1 velocity channels and an angular resolution of 3.4'. We present highlights from the TOGS (Turn On GALFA Survey) portion of GALFA-H I, which is covering thousands of square degrees in commensal drift scan observations with the ALFALFA and AGES extragalactic ALFA surveys. This work is supported in part by the National Astronomy and Ionosphere Center, operated by Cornell University under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  5. THE VELOCITY FIELD AROUND GROUPS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hartwick, F. D. A.

    2011-06-15

    A statistical method is presented for determining the velocity field in the immediate vicinity of groups of galaxies using only positional and redshift information with the goal of studying the perturbation of the Hubble flow around groups more distant than the Local Group. The velocities are assumed to obey a Hubble-like expansion law, i.e., V = H{sub exp} R, where the expansion rate H{sub exp} is to be determined. The method is applied to a large, representative group catalog and evidence is found for a sub-Hubble expansion rate within two well-defined radii beyond the virial radii of the groups. This result is consistent with that of Teerikorpi et al. who found a similar expansion law around three nearby groups and extends it to a more representative volume of space.

  6. THE FORNAX DWARF GALAXY AS A REMNANT OF RECENT DWARF-DWARF MERGING IN THE LOCAL GROUP

    SciTech Connect

    Yozin, C.; Bekki, K.

    2012-09-01

    We present results from the first numerical analysis to support the hypothesis, first proposed in Coleman et al., that the Fornax dwarf galaxy was formed from the minor merging of two dwarfs about 2 Gyr ago. Using orbits for the Fornax dwarf that are consistent with the latest proper motion measurements, our dynamical evolution models show that the observed asymmetric shell-like substructures can be formed from the remnant of a smaller dwarf during minor merging. These models also predict the formation of diffuse stellar streams. We discuss how these stellar substructures depend on model parameters of dwarf-dwarf merging, and how the intermediate-age subpopulations found in the vicinity of these substructures may be formed from gas accretion in past merger events. We also suggest that one of Fornax's globular clusters originates from a merged dwarf companion, and demonstrate where as yet undetected tidal streams or H I gas formed from the dwarf merging may be found in the outer halo of the Galaxy.

  7. Nilpotent -local finite groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantarero, José; Scherer, Jérôme; Viruel, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    We provide characterizations of -nilpotency for fusion systems and -local finite groups that are inspired by known result for finite groups. In particular, we generalize criteria by Atiyah, Brunetti, Frobenius, Quillen, Stammbach and Tate.

  8. Galaxy Group Properties in Observations and Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurmi, Pasi

    2016-10-01

    In this project, we compare different properties of galaxy groups in cosmological N-body simulations and SDSS galaxy group catalogs. In the first part of the project (Nurmi et al. 2013) we compared the basic properties of the groups like the luminosity functions, group richness and velocity dispersion distributions and studied how good is the agreement between the mock group catalog and the SDSS group catalog. Here we continue the earlier study and use updated galaxy group catalog (SDSS DR10) and new simulation data (Guo et al. 2013). We reanalyse earlier group properties and include new properties in the analysis like group environment, star formation rates and group masses. Our analysis show that there are clear differences between the simulated and observed properties of galaxy groups, especially for small groups with a few members. Also, the high luminosities are clearly overestimated in the simulations compared with the SDSS group data.

  9. Chemo-dynamical evolution model: Enrichment of r-process elements in the Local Group dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Yutaka; Ishimaru, Yuhri; Saitoh, Takayuki R.; Fujii, Michiko S.; Hidaka, Jun; Kajino, Toshitaka

    2015-08-01

    Enrichment of the r-process elements is expected to provide a critical clue to understand the formation history of galactic halos. Recent astronomical high dispersion observations of metal-poor stars have shown large dispersions in relative abundance ratios of r-process elements such as [Eu/Fe] in stars with [Fe/H] < -2.5. Astrophysical site(s) of r-process has, however, not been identified yet. Promising site(s) of r-process are core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) and neutron-star mergers (NSMs). Recent nucleosynthesis studies have shown that r-process elements heavier than 110 of mass number are difficult to synthesize by CCSNe. On the other hand, several studies reported that NSMs can synthesize these elements due to their environment of low electron fraction. Previous chemical evolution model (e.g., Argast et al. 2004) of the Milky Way (MW) halo without dynamical evolution pointed out that the NSMs are difficult to reproduce observed dispersion in [Eu/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] due to their low rate 10-6 - 10-3 yr-1 for a MW size galaxy and the long delay time, t ≥ 100 Myr. In the present study, we carry out numerical simulations of galactic chemo-dynamical evolution using an N-body/smoothed particle hydrodynamics code, ASURA. We construct detailed chemo-dynamical evolution model for dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) assuming that the NSMs are the major source of the r-process elements. Our models successfully reproduce the observed dispersion in [Eu/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] if we set t < 500 Myr with the Galactic NSM rate ~10-4 yr-1. Moreover, our results are consistent with observed metallicity distribution and mass-metallicity relation of dSphs. We then find that the effects of gas mixing processes including metals in the star-forming region of a typical scale of giant molecular clouds ~ 10 - 100 pc play the significant roles in reproducing the measured dispersion in [Eu/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] of the metal-poor stars in dSphs. We also find that the star formation rate of ~ 10-3 M⊙yr-1

  10. Numerical simulation of galaxies in the M81 galaxy group.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, P. S.; Thronson, H. A., Jr.

    The M81 galaxy group is a typical nearby galaxy group which consists of 15 members, including M82 and NGC 3077. Recent observations of the M81 group using the VLA (Yun, Ho, Lo, 1994) show a large scale H I map of the whole system, with M81, M82 and NGC 3077 inter-connected by a large amount of H I gas. In addition, two gas concentrations are observed at the eastern side of M81. The authors simulate the system numerically to reproduce the morphology, the spatial distribution of these 3 galaxies, and the H I gas surrounding the system.

  11. Properties of satellite galaxies in nearby groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vennik, Jaan

    2016-10-01

    We studied the variation of stellar mass and various star-formation characteristics of satellite galaxies in a volume limited sample of nearby groups as a function of their group-centric distance and of their relative line-of-sight velocity in the group rest frame. We found clear radial dependencies, e.g. massive, red and passive satellites being distributed predominantly near the center of composite group. We also found some evidence of velocity modulation of star-forming properties of satellite galaxies near the group virial radius. We conclude that using kinematical data, it should be feasible to separate dynamical classes of bound, in-falling and 'backsplash' satellite galaxies.

  12. Dynamical theory of dense groups of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mamon, Gary A.

    1990-01-01

    It is well known that galaxies associate in groups and clusters. Perhaps 40% of all galaxies are found in groups of 4 to 20 galaxies (e.g., Tully 1987). Although most groups appear to be so loose that the galaxy interactions within them ought to be insignificant, the apparently densest groups, known as compact groups appear so dense when seen in projection onto the plane of the sky that their members often overlap. These groups thus appear as dense as the cores of rich clusters. The most popular catalog of compact groups, compiled by Hickson (1982), includes isolation among its selection critera. Therefore, in comparison with the cores of rich clusters, Hickson's compact groups (HCGs) appear to be the densest isolated regions in the Universe (in galaxies per unit volume), and thus provide in principle a clean laboratory for studying the competition of very strong gravitational interactions. The $64,000 question here is then: Are compact groups really bound systems as dense as they appear? If dense groups indeed exist, then one expects that each of the dynamical processes leading to the interaction of their member galaxies should be greatly enhanced. This leads us to the questions: How stable are dense groups? How do they form? And the related question, fascinating to any theorist: What dynamical processes predominate in dense groups of galaxies? If HCGs are not bound dense systems, but instead 1D change alignments (Mamon 1986, 1987; Walke & Mamon 1989) or 3D transient cores (Rose 1979) within larger looser systems of galaxies, then the relevant question is: How frequent are chance configurations within loose groups? Here, the author answers these last four questions after comparing in some detail the methods used and the results obtained in the different studies of dense groups.

  13. The chemical evolution of galaxies in the local volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croxall, Kevin V.

    2010-12-01

    The composition of the universe has greatly changed since the first matter condensed from the primordial soup of the Big Bang. As galaxies have grown and evolved over the past Hubble time, massive luminous galaxies have built up more heavy elements than their low mass counterparts. While sundry physical mechanisms have been proposed to account for this observed trend, the physical connection between galaxy mass and metallicity has evaded the understanding of astronomers for several decades. In order to gain a greater understanding of this metallicity-luminosity relation and the physical drivers behind the chemical evolution of galaxies, we have performed a detailed study of galaxies in both isolated and non-isolated environments: namely, galaxies in the local volume (D ≤ 5 Mpc) and galaxy members belonging to the M81 group. Our results from studying the M81 group imply that recent interactions among the central galaxies in this group, rather than mechanisms intrinsic to the galaxies, are likely responsible for the anomalously high abundances in three cluster members. While tidal interactions can alter the chemical make up the galaxies involved, the well established metallicity-luminosity relation indicates a more universal chemical evolution. To further explore this idea, we analyze galaxy abundances, stellar & gas distributions, and kinematics from both new and archival observations of forty-five low mass galaxies within 5 Mpc of the Milky Way. Our results indicate that these galaxies occupy a different mass-to-light ratio parameter space than their larger counter parts. Our study of the local volume explores the effects of various galaxy attributes such as mass, star formation rate, gas mass fraction, and the mass distribution that offer more concrete connections with the evolution of the system. We show that none of the attributes measured in this study exhibit more correlation with metallicity (measured via nebular oxygen abundances) than does the luminosity

  14. Properties of Galaxies and Groups: Nature versus Nurture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemi, Sami-Matias

    2011-09-01

    Due to the inherently nonlinear nature of gravity cosmological N-body simulations have become an invaluable tool when the growth of structure is being studied and modelled closer to the present epoch. Large simulations with high dynamical range have made it possible to model the formation and growth of cosmic structure with unprecedented accuracy. Moreover, galaxies, the basic building blocks of the Universe, can also be modelled in cosmological context. However, despite all the simulations and successes in recent decades, there are still many unanswered questions in the field of galaxy formation and evolution. One of the longest standing issue being the significance of the formation place and thus initial conditions to a galaxy's evolution in respect to environment, often formulated simply as "nature versus nurture" like in human development and psychology. Unfortunately, our understanding of galaxy evolution in different environments is still limited, albeit, for example, the morphology-density relation has shown that the density of the galaxy's local environment can affect its properties. Consequently, the environment should play a role in galaxy evolution, however despite the efforts, the exact role of the galaxy's local environment to its evolution remains open. This thesis introduction discusses briefly the background cosmology, cosmological N-body simulations and semi-analytical models. The second part is reserved for groups of galaxies, whether they are gravitationally bound, and what this may imply for galaxy evolution. The third part of the thesis concentrates on describing results of a case study of isolated field elliptical galaxies. The final chapter discusses another case study of luminous infra-red galaxies.

  15. Galaxy and Group Baryonic Mass Functions for the RESOLVE Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, Kathleen D.; Kannappan, Sheila; Moffett, Amanda J.; Baker, Ashley; Stark, David; Berlind, Andreas A.; Storey-Fisher, Kate; Erickcek, Adrienne L.; Norris, Mark A.; Resolve Team

    2015-01-01

    We present a comparison of the galaxy and group baryonic mass functions for a subvolume of the RESOLVE (Resolved Spectroscopy Of a Local VolumE) survey. RESOLVE occupies A and B semester volumes totaling ~52,000 cubic Mpc, complete in baryonic mass to ~10^9.3 Msun and 10^9.0 Msun respectively, with galaxies and groups ranging in halo mass from 10^11-10^14 Msun. The A semester volume is surrounded by the larger ECO catalog, which lacks complete HI data but occupies ~561,000 cubic Mpc. We define the observed baryonic mass of a galaxy or group to be the sum of its stellar and cold atomic hydrogen components, with the latter inferred indirectly for much of ECO. For groups, we infer the total baryonic mass by summing the observed components of each constituent galaxy and add the likely hot halo gas based on prescriptions from observations and semi-analytic models. We perform subhalo/halo abundance matching between observed galaxies/groups and dark matter simulations, and we compare derived halo properties based on matching on luminosity vs. on observed baryonic mass (or on inferred total baryonic mass for groups). We also present a status update on the galaxy and group velocity functions for these surveys, which will allow for more direct comparison with dark matter simulations. This project was supported by NSF funding for the RESOLVE survey (AST-0955368).

  16. Nearby Clumpy, Gas Rich, Star-forming Galaxies: Local Analogs of High-redshift Clumpy Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garland, C. A.; Pisano, D. J.; Mac Low, M.-M.; Kreckel, K.; Rabidoux, K.; Guzmán, R.

    2015-07-01

    Luminous compact blue galaxies (LCBGs) have enhanced star formation rates (SFRs) and compact morphologies. We combine Sloan Digital Sky Survey data with H i data of 29 LCBGs at redshift z ∼ 0 to understand their nature. We find that local LCBGs have high atomic gas fractions (∼50%) and SFRs per stellar mass consistent with some high-redshift star-forming galaxies (SFGs). Many local LCBGs also have clumpy morphologies, with clumps distributed across their disks. Although rare, these galaxies appear to be similar to the clumpy SFGs commonly observed at z ∼ 1–3. Local LCBGs separate into three groups: (1) interacting galaxies (∼20%) (2) clumpy spirals (∼40%) and (3) non-clumpy, non-spirals with regular shapes and smaller effective radii and stellar masses (∼40%). It seems that the method of building up a high gas fraction, which then triggers star formation, is not the same for all local LCBGs. This may lead to a dichotomy in galaxy characteristics. We consider possible gas delivery scenarios and suggest that clumpy spirals, preferentially located in clusters and with companions, are smoothly accreting gas from tidally disrupted companions and/or intracluster gas enriched by stripped satellites. Conversely, as non-clumpy galaxies are preferentially located in the field and tend to be isolated, we suggest clumpy, cold streams, which destroy galaxy disks and prevent clump formation, as a likely gas delivery mechanism for these systems. Other possibilities include smooth cold streams, a series of minor mergers, or major interactions.

  17. NEARBY CLUMPY, GAS RICH, STAR-FORMING GALAXIES: LOCAL ANALOGS OF HIGH-REDSHIFT CLUMPY GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Garland, C. A.; Pisano, D. J.; Rabidoux, K.; Low, M.-M. Mac; Kreckel, K.; Guzmán, R. E-mail: djpisano@mail.wvu.edu E-mail: mordecai@amnh.org E-mail: guzman@astro.ufl.edu

    2015-07-10

    Luminous compact blue galaxies (LCBGs) have enhanced star formation rates (SFRs) and compact morphologies. We combine Sloan Digital Sky Survey data with H i data of 29 LCBGs at redshift z ∼ 0 to understand their nature. We find that local LCBGs have high atomic gas fractions (∼50%) and SFRs per stellar mass consistent with some high-redshift star-forming galaxies (SFGs). Many local LCBGs also have clumpy morphologies, with clumps distributed across their disks. Although rare, these galaxies appear to be similar to the clumpy SFGs commonly observed at z ∼ 1–3. Local LCBGs separate into three groups: (1) interacting galaxies (∼20%); (2) clumpy spirals (∼40%); and (3) non-clumpy, non-spirals with regular shapes and smaller effective radii and stellar masses (∼40%). It seems that the method of building up a high gas fraction, which then triggers star formation, is not the same for all local LCBGs. This may lead to a dichotomy in galaxy characteristics. We consider possible gas delivery scenarios and suggest that clumpy spirals, preferentially located in clusters and with companions, are smoothly accreting gas from tidally disrupted companions and/or intracluster gas enriched by stripped satellites. Conversely, as non-clumpy galaxies are preferentially located in the field and tend to be isolated, we suggest clumpy, cold streams, which destroy galaxy disks and prevent clump formation, as a likely gas delivery mechanism for these systems. Other possibilities include smooth cold streams, a series of minor mergers, or major interactions.

  18. The properties of fossil groups of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eigenthaler, P.; Zeilinger, W. W.

    2009-12-01

    Numerical simulations as well as optical and X-ray observations over the last few years have shown that poor groups of galaxies can evolve to what is called a fossil group. Dynamical friction as the driving process leads to the coalescence of individual galaxies in ordinary poor groups leaving behind nothing more than a central, massive elliptical galaxy supposed to contain the merger history of the whole group. Due to merging timescales for less-massive galaxies and gas cooling timescales of the X-ray intragroup medium exceeding a Hubble time, a surrounding faint-galaxy population having survived this galactic cannibalism as well as an extended X-ray halo similar to that found in ordinary groups, is expected. Recent studies suggest that fossil groups are very abundant and could be the progenitors of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in the centers of rich galaxy clusters. However, only a few objects are known to the literature. This article aims to summarize the results of observational fossil group research over the last few years and presents ongoing work by the authors. Complementary to previous research, the SDSS and RASS surveys have been cross-correlated to identify new fossil structures yielding 34 newly detected fossil group candidates. Observations with ISIS at the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope on La Palma have been carried out to study the stellar populations of the central ellipticals of 6 fossil groups. In addition multi-object spectroscopy with VLTs VIMOS has been performed to study the shape of the OLF of one fossil system.

  19. SUPERDENSE MASSIVE GALAXIES IN WINGS LOCAL CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Valentinuzzi, T.; D'Onofrio, M.; Fritz, J.; Poggianti, B. M.; Bettoni, D.; Fasano, G.; Moretti, A.; Omizzolo, A.; Varela, J.; Cava, A.; Couch, W. J.; Dressler, A.; Moles, M.; Kjaergaard, P.; Vanzella, E.

    2010-03-20

    Massive quiescent galaxies at z > 1 have been found to have small physical sizes, and hence to be superdense. Several mechanisms, including minor mergers, have been proposed for increasing galaxy sizes from high- to low-z. We search for superdense massive galaxies in the WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS) of X-ray selected galaxy clusters at 0.04 < z < 0.07. We discover a significant population of superdense massive galaxies with masses and sizes comparable to those observed at high redshift. They approximately represent 22% of all cluster galaxies more massive than 3 x 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}, are mostly S0 galaxies, have a median effective radius (R{sub e} ) = 1.61 +- 0.29 kpc, a median Sersic index (n) = 3.0 +- 0.6, and very old stellar populations with a median mass-weighted age of 12.1 +- 1.3 Gyr. We calculate a number density of 2.9 x 10{sup -2} Mpc{sup -3} for superdense galaxies in local clusters, and a hard lower limit of 1.3 x 10{sup -5} Mpc{sup -3} in the whole comoving volume between z = 0.04 and z = 0.07. We find a relation between mass, effective radius, and luminosity-weighted age in our cluster galaxies, which can mimic the claimed evolution of the radius with redshift, if not properly taken into account. We compare our data with spectroscopic high-z surveys and find that-when stellar masses are considered-there is consistency with the local WINGS galaxy sizes out to z {approx} 2, while a discrepancy of a factor of 3 exists with the only spectroscopic z > 2 study. In contrast, there is strong evidence for a large evolution in radius for the most massive galaxies with M{sub *} > 4 x 10{sup 11} M{sub sun} compared to similarly massive galaxies in WINGS, i.e., the brightest cluster galaxies.

  20. The Local Group as an Astrophysical Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario; Brown, Thomas M.

    2006-05-01

    1. History of the Local Group S. van den Bergh; 2. Primordial nucleosynthesis G. Steigman; 3. Galactic structure R. F. G. Wyse; 4. The Large Magellanic Cloud: structure and kinematics R. P. van der Marel; 5. The Local Group as an astrophysical laboratory for massive star feedback M. S. Oey; 6. Hot gas in the Local Group and low-redshift intergalactic medium K. R. Sembach; 7. Stages of satellite accretion M. E. Putman; 8. The star formation history in the Andromeda halo T. M. Brown; 9. Bulge populations in the Local Group R. M. Rich; 10. The Local Group as a laboratory for the chemical evolution of galaxies D. R. Garnett; 11. Massive stars in the Local Group: Star formation and stellar evolution P. Massey; 12. Massive young clusters in the Local Group J. Maíz-Apellániz; 13. Magellanic Cloud planetary nebulae as probes of stellar evolution and populations L. Stanghellini; 14. The old globular clusters: or, life among the ruins W. E. Harris; 15. Chemical evolution models of Local Group galaxies M. Tosi.

  1. The Local Group as an Astrophysical Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario; Brown, Thomas M.

    2011-04-01

    1. History of the Local Group S. van den Bergh; 2. Primordial nucleosynthesis G. Steigman; 3. Galactic structure R. F. G. Wyse; 4. The Large Magellanic Cloud: structure and kinematics R. P. van der Marel; 5. The Local Group as an astrophysical laboratory for massive star feedback M. S. Oey; 6. Hot gas in the Local Group and low-redshift intergalactic medium K. R. Sembach; 7. Stages of satellite accretion M. E. Putman; 8. The star formation history in the Andromeda halo T. M. Brown; 9. Bulge populations in the Local Group R. M. Rich; 10. The Local Group as a laboratory for the chemical evolution of galaxies D. R. Garnett; 11. Massive stars in the Local Group: Star formation and stellar evolution P. Massey; 12. Massive young clusters in the Local Group J. Maíz-Apellániz; 13. Magellanic Cloud planetary nebulae as probes of stellar evolution and populations L. Stanghellini; 14. The old globular clusters: or, life among the ruins W. E. Harris; 15. Chemical evolution models of Local Group galaxies M. Tosi.

  2. AGN feedback in galaxy clusters and groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardcastle, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Mechanical feedback via Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) jets in the centres of galaxy groups and clusters is a crucial ingredient in current models of galaxy formation and cluster evolution. Jet feedback is believed to regulate gas cooling and thus star formation in the most massive galaxies, but a robust physical understanding of this feedback mode is currently lacking. Athena will provide (1) the first kinematic measurements on relevant spatial scales of the hot gas in galaxy, group and cluster haloes as it absorbs the impact of AGN jets, and (2) vastly improved ability to map thermodynamic conditions on scales well-matched to the jets, lobes and gas disturbances produced by them. I will present new predictions of Athena's ability to measure the energetic impact of powerful jets based on our most recent set of numerical models.

  3. Two-Body Escape Speeds in Merged Four-Galaxy Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valtonen, M. J.; Wiren, S.

    1994-01-01

    In the neighbourhood of the Local Group of galaxies, some high speeds of relative motion are observed. In particular, the speeds of Maffei 1 and IC 342 relative to the Andromeda galaxy are in the range 250-300 km s^-1^, which are rather high velocities for the local neighbourhood. Here we study groups of four galaxies, initially composed of two binaries, and follow their evolution through two mergers until only two galaxies remain. We find that the speed of separation of the two galaxies can reach the above-mentioned range of values if (a) the rotation curves of the galaxies rise to this same range of values, and (b) the mass of the group is not excessive. We use these conditions to estimate the mass-to- light ratio of the galaxies in the local area.

  4. Red Supergiants in the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levesque, E. M.

    2013-05-01

    Galaxies in the Local Group span a factor of 15 in metallicity, ranging from the super-solar M 31 to the Wolf-Lundmark-Melotte (WLM) galaxy, which is the lowest-metallicity (0.1 Z⊙) Local Group galaxy currently forming stars. Studies of massive star populations across this broad range of environments have revealed important metal-licity-dependent evolutionary trends, allowing us to test the accuracy of stellar evolutionary tracks at these metallicities for the first time. The RSG population is particularly valuable as a key mass-losing phase of moderately massive stars and a source of core-collapse supernova progenitors. By reviewing recent work on the RSG populations in the Local Group, we are able to quantify limits on these stars' effective temperatures and masses and probe the relationship between RSG mass loss behaviors and host environments. Extragalactic surveys of RSGs have also revealed several unusual RSGs that display signs of unusual spectral variability and dust production, traits that may potentially also correlate with the stars' host environments. I will present some of the latest work that has advanced our understanding of RSGs in the Local Group, and consider the many new questions posed by our ever-evolving picture of these stars.

  5. Choirs H I galaxy groups: The metallicity of dwarf galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, Sarah M.; Drinkwater, Michael J.; Meurer, Gerhardt; Bekki, Kenji; Dopita, Michael A.; Nicholls, David C.; Kilborn, Virginia

    2014-02-10

    We present a recalibration of the luminosity-metallicity relation for gas-rich, star-forming dwarfs to magnitudes as faint as M{sub R} ∼ –13. We use the Dopita et al. metallicity calibrations to calibrate the relation for all the data in this analysis. In metallicity-luminosity space, we find two subpopulations within a sample of high-confidence Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR8 star-forming galaxies: 52% are metal-rich giants and 48% are metal-medium galaxies. Metal-rich dwarfs classified as tidal dwarf galaxy (TDG) candidates in the literature are typically of metallicity 12 + log(O/H) = 8.70 ± 0.05, while SDSS dwarfs fainter than M{sub R} = –16 have a mean metallicity of 12 + log(O/H) = 8.28 ± 0.10, regardless of their luminosity, indicating that there is an approximate floor to the metallicity of low-luminosity galaxies. Our hydrodynamical simulations predict that TDGs should have metallicities elevated above the normal luminosity-metallicity relation. Metallicity can therefore be a useful diagnostic for identifying TDG candidate populations in the absence of tidal tails. At magnitudes brighter than M{sub R} ∼ –16, our sample of 53 star-forming galaxies in 9 H I gas-rich groups is consistent with the normal relation defined by the SDSS sample. At fainter magnitudes, there is an increase in dispersion of the metallicity of our sample, suggestive of a wide range of H I content and environment. In our sample, we identify three (16% of dwarfs) strong TDG candidates (12 + log(O/H) > 8.6) and four (21%) very metal-poor dwarfs (12 + log(O/H) < 8.0), which are likely gas-rich dwarfs with recently ignited star formation.

  6. The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey. VII. The Intrinsic Shapes of Low-luminosity Galaxies in the Core of the Virgo Cluster, and a Comparison with the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Janssen, Rubén; Ferrarese, Laura; MacArthur, Lauren A.; Côté, Patrick; Blakeslee, John P.; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Durrell, Patrick; Gwyn, Stephen; McConnacchie, Alan W.; Boselli, Alessandro; Courteau, Stéphane; Emsellem, Eric; Mei, Simona; Peng, Eric; Puzia, Thomas H.; Roediger, Joel; Simard, Luc; Boyer, Fred; Santos, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the intrinsic shapes of low-luminosity galaxies in the central 300 kpc of the Virgo Cluster using deep imaging obtained as part of the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS). We build a sample of nearly 300 red-sequence cluster members in the yet-unexplored -14 < Mg < -8 mag range, and we measure their apparent axis ratios, q, through Sérsic fits to their two-dimensional light distribution, which is well described by a constant ellipticity parameter. The resulting distribution of apparent axis ratios is then fit by families of triaxial models with normally distributed intrinsic ellipticities, E = 1 - C/A, and triaxialities, T = (A2 - B2)/(A2 - C2). We develop a Bayesian framework to explore the posterior distribution of the model parameters, which allows us to work directly on discrete data, and to account for individual, surface-brightness-dependent axis ratio uncertainties. For this population we infer a mean intrinsic ellipticity \\bar{E} = {0.43}-0.02+0.02 and a mean triaxiality \\bar{T} = {0.16}-0.06+0.07. This implies that faint Virgo galaxies are best described as a family of thick, nearly oblate spheroids with mean intrinsic axis ratios 1:0.94:0.57. The core of Virgo lacks highly elongated low-luminosity galaxies, with 95% of the population having q > 0.45. We additionally attempt a study of the intrinsic shapes of Local Group (LG) satellites of similar luminosities. For the LG population we infer a slightly larger mean intrinsic ellipticity \\bar{E} = {0.51}-0.06+0.07, and the paucity of objects with round apparent shapes translates into more triaxial mean shapes, 1:0.76:0.49. Numerical studies that follow the tidal evolution of satellites within LG-sized halos are in good agreement with the inferred shape distributions, but the mismatch for faint galaxies in Virgo highlights the need for more adequate simulations of this population in the cluster environment. We finally compare the intrinsic shapes of NGVS low-mass galaxies with

  7. Segregation effects in DEEP2 galaxy groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimento, R. S.; Ribeiro, A. L. B.; Lopes, P. A. A.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate segregation phenomena in galaxy groups in the range of 0.2 < z < 1. We study a sample of groups selected from the 4th Data Release of the DEEP2 galaxy redshift survey. We used only groups with at least 8 members within a radius of 4 Mpc. Outliers were removed with the shifting gapper techinque and, then, the virial properties were estimated for each group. The sample was divided into two stacked systems: low(z ≤ 0.6) and high (z > 0.6) redshift groups. Assuming that the color index (U - B)0 can be used as a proxy for the galaxy type, we found that the fraction of blue (star-forming) objects is higher in the high-z sample, with blue objects being dominant at MB > -19.5 for both samples, and red objects being dominant at MB < -19.5 only for the low-z sample. Also, the radial variation of the red fraction indicates that there are more red objects with R < R200 in the low-z sample than in the high-z sample. Our analysis indicates statistical evidence of kinematic segregation, at the 99% c.l., for the low-z sample: redder and brighter galaxies present lower velocity dispersions than bluer and fainter ones. We also find a weaker evidence for spatial segregation between red and blue objects, at the 70% c.l. The analysis of the high-z sample reveals a different result: red and blue galaxies have velocity dispersion distributions not statistically distinct, although redder objects are more concentrated than the bluer ones at the 95% c.l. From the comparison of blue/red and bright/faint fractions, and considering the approximate lookback timescale between the two samples (˜3 Gyr), our results are consistent with a scenario where bright red galaxies had time to reach energy equipartition, while faint blue/red galaxies in the outskirts infall to the inner parts of the groups, thus reducing spatial segregation from z ˜ 0.8 to z ˜ 0.4.

  8. LOCAL TADPOLE GALAXIES: DYNAMICS AND METALLICITY

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez Almeida, J.; Munoz-Tunon, C.; Mendez-Abreu, J.; Elmegreen, D. M.; Elmegreen, B. G. E-mail: cmt@iac.es E-mail: elmegreen@vassar.edu

    2013-04-10

    Tadpole galaxies, with a bright peripheral clump on a faint tail, are morphological types unusual in the nearby universe but very common early on. Low mass local tadpoles were identified and studied photometrically in a previous work, which we complete here analyzing their chemical and dynamical properties. We measure H{alpha} velocity curves of seven local tadpoles, representing 50% of the initial sample. Five of them show evidence for rotation ({approx}70%), and a sixth target hints at it. Often the center of rotation is spatially offset with respect to the tadpole head (three out of five cases). The size and velocity dispersion of the heads are typical of giant H II regions, and three of them yield dynamical masses in fair agreement with their stellar masses as inferred from photometry. In four cases the velocity dispersion at the head is reduced with respect to its immediate surroundings. The oxygen metallicity estimated from [N II] {lambda}6583/H{alpha} often shows significant spatial variations across the galaxies ({approx}0.5 dex), being smallest at the head and larger elsewhere. The resulting chemical abundance gradients are opposite to the ones observed in local spirals, but agrees with disk galaxies at high redshift. We interpret the metallicity variation as a sign of external gas accretion (cold-flows) onto the head of the tadpole. The galaxies are low-metallicity outliers of the mass-metallicity relationship. In particular, two of the tadpole heads are extremely metal poor, with a metallicity smaller than a tenth of the solar value. These two targets are also very young (ages smaller than 5 Myr). All these results combined are consistent with the local tadpole galaxies being disks in early stages of assembling, with their star formation sustained by accretion of external metal-poor gas.

  9. THE SUPPRESSION OF STAR FORMATION AND THE EFFECT OF THE GALAXY ENVIRONMENT IN LOW-REDSHIFT GALAXY GROUPS

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, Jesper; Mulchaey, John S.; Bai, Lei; Ponman, Trevor J.; Raychaudhury, Somak; Dariush, Ali

    2012-10-01

    Understanding the interaction between galaxies and their surroundings is central to building a coherent picture of galaxy evolution. Here we use Galaxy Evolution Explorer imaging of a statistically representative sample of 23 galaxy groups at z Almost-Equal-To 0.06 to explore how local and global group environments affect the UV properties and dust-corrected star formation rates (SFRs) of their member galaxies. The data provide SFRs out to beyond 2R{sub 200} in all groups, down to a completeness limit and limiting galaxy stellar mass of 0.06 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} and 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }, respectively. At fixed galaxy stellar mass, we find that the fraction of star-forming group members is suppressed relative to the field out to an average radius of R Almost-Equal-To 1.5 Mpc Almost-Equal-To 2R{sub 200}, mirroring results for massive clusters. For the first time, we also report a similar suppression of the specific SFR within such galaxies, on average by 40% relative to the field, thus directly revealing the impact of the group environment in quenching star formation within infalling galaxies. At fixed galaxy density and stellar mass, this suppression is stronger in more massive groups, implying that both local and global group environments play a role in quenching. The results favor an average quenching timescale of {approx}> 2 Gyr and strongly suggest that a combination of tidal interactions and starvation is responsible. Despite their past and ongoing quenching, galaxy groups with more than four members still account for at least {approx}25% of the total UV output in the nearby universe.

  10. Intracluster Light in Galaxy Groups and Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMaio, Tahlia; Gonzalez, Anthony; Zabludoff, Ann I.; Zaritsky, Dennis F.

    2016-01-01

    We present recent results from our study on the origin and assembly history of the intracluster starlight (ICL) for a sample of 29 galaxy groups and clusters with 3x1013groups and clusters show clear negative color gradients. Such negative colour (and equivalently, metallicity) gradients can arise from tidal stripping of L* galaxies and/or the disruption of dwarf galaxies, but not major mergers with the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG). We also find ICL luminosities of 3-9 L* in the range 10 < r < 110 kpc for these clusters. Dwarf disruption alone cannot explain the total luminosity of the ICL and remain consistent with the observed evolution in the faint-end slope of the luminosity function. The results of our study are suggestive of a formation history in which the ICL is built-up by a combination of stripping of L* galaxies and/or dwarf disruption and disfavor significant contribution by major mergers with the BCG.This sample of groups and clusters is the largest with HST/WFC3 data for ICL analysis that spans two orders of magnitude in halo mass at redshifts >0.3. Because of this we can investigate how the ICL color profile changes as a function of cluster mass for the first time, as well as expand previous studies of the changing fraction of cluster luminosity that is contained in the BCG+ICL as a function of halo mass. We present our preliminary results and describe our next steps using this sample to investigate the intracluster light in massive halos.

  11. Evolution of Group Galaxies from the First Red-Sequence Cluster Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, I. H.; Yee, H. K. C.; Hsieh, B. C.; Gladders, M.

    2012-04-01

    We study the evolution of the red-galaxy fraction (f red) in 905 galaxy groups with 0.15 <= z < 0.52. The galaxy groups are identified by the "probability friends-of-friends" algorithm from the first Red-Sequence Cluster Survey (RCS1) photometric-redshift sample. There is a high degree of uniformity in the properties of the red sequence of the group galaxies, indicating that the luminous red-sequence galaxies in the groups are already in place by z ~ 0.5 and that they have a formation epoch of z >~ 2. In general, groups at lower redshifts exhibit larger f red than those at higher redshifts, showing a group Butcher-Oemler effect. We investigate the evolution of f red by examining its dependence on four parameters, one of which can be classified as intrinsic and three of which can be classified as environmental: galaxy stellar mass (M *), total group stellar mass (M *, grp, a proxy for group halo mass), normalized group-centric radius (r grp), and local galaxy density (Σ5). We find that M * is the dominant parameter such that there is a strong correlation between f red and galaxy stellar mass. Furthermore, the dependence of f red on the environmental parameters is also a strong function of M *. Massive galaxies (M * >~ 1011 M ⊙) show little dependence of f red on r grp, M *, grp, and Σ5 over the redshift range. The dependence of f red on these parameters is primarily seen for galaxies with lower masses, especially for M * <~ 1010.6 M ⊙. We observe an apparent "group down-sizing" effect, in that galaxies in lower-mass halos, after controlling for galaxy stellar mass, have lower f red. We find a dependence of f red on both r grp and Σ5 after the other parameters are controlled. At a fixed r grp, there is a significant dependence of f red on Σ5, while r grp gradients of f red are seen for galaxies in similar Σ5 regions. This indicates that galaxy group environment has a residual effect over that of local galaxy density (or vice versa), and both parameters need

  12. Diverse Group of Galaxy Types, NGC 3190 Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Ultraviolet image of a diverse group of galaxy types. NGC 3190 is a dusty edge on spiral galaxy. NGC 3187 is highly distorted. The two are separated by only 35 kilo-parsecs (about half the diameter of our own Milky Way galaxy). A ring, elliptical, and other irregular galaxies are also present.

  13. The evolution of galaxy groups and clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzotta, Pasquale

    2016-07-01

    The Athena mission will implement the Hot and Energetic Universe science theme which poses the question of How does ordinary matter assemble into the large-scale structures we see today?. Groups and Galaxy clusters are key laboratories to understand the role of the various physical processes governing the baryonic matter from the kilo-parsec scale of super-massive black holes to the mega-parsec one of the clusters outskirts on assembling and evolving large scale structures. We will focus on the study of the galaxy groups and clusters evolution with the Athen a mission. We will review the status of current constraints in light of the newest results obtained from state of the art cosmological simulations and will discuss the perspectives out to the mission launch time in 2028.

  14. Fossil groups of galaxies: Are they groups? Are they fossils?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupke, Renato de Alencar; Miller, Eric; de Oliveira, Claudia Mendes; Sodre, Laerte; Rykoff, Eli; de Oliveira, Raimundo Lopes; Proctor, Rob

    2010-11-01

    Fossil groups present a puzzle to current theories of structure formation. Despite the low number of bright galaxies, their high velocity dispersions and high TX indicate cluster-like potential wells. Measured concentration parameters seem very high indicating early formation epochs in contradiction with the observed lack of large and well defined cooling cores. There are very few fossil groups with good quality X-ray data and their idiosyncrasies may enhance these apparent contradictions. The standard explanation for their formation suggests that bright galaxies within half the virial radii of these systems were wiped out by cannibalism forming the central galaxy. Since dry mergers, typically invoked to explain the formation of the central galaxies, are not expected to change the IGM energetics significantly, thus not preventing the formation of cooling cores, we investigate the scenario where recent gaseous (wet) mergers formed the central galaxy injecting energy and changing the chemistry of the IGM in fossil groups. We show a test for this scenario using fossil groups with enough X-ray flux in the Chandra X-ray Observatory archive by looking at individual metal abundance ratio distributions near the core. Secondary SN II powered winds would tend to erase the dominance of SN IA ejecta in the core of these systems and would help to erase previously existing cold cores. Strong SN II-powered galactic winds resulting from galaxy merging would be trapped by their deep potential wells reducing the central enhancement of SN Ia/SN II iron mass fraction ratio. The results indicate that there is a decrement in the ratio of SN Ia to SN II iron mass fraction in the central regions of the systems analyzed, varying from 99±1% in the outer regions to 85±2% within the cooling radius (Figure 1) and would inject enough energy into the IGM preventing central gas cooling. The results are consistent with a scenario of later formation epoch for fossil groups, as they are defined

  15. GALAXIES IN X-RAY GROUPS. III. SATELLITE COLOR AND MORPHOLOGY TRANSFORMATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    George, Matthew R.; Ma, Chung-Pei; Bundy, Kevin; Leauthaud, Alexie; Vulcani, Benedetta; Tinker, Jeremy; Wechsler, Risa H.; Finoguenov, Alexis

    2013-06-20

    While the star formation rates and morphologies of galaxies have long been known to correlate with their local environment, the process by which these correlations are generated is not well understood. Galaxy groups are thought to play an important role in shaping the physical properties of galaxies before entering massive clusters at low redshift, and transformations of satellite galaxies likely dominate the buildup of local environmental correlations. To illuminate the physical processes that shape galaxy evolution in dense environments, we study a sample of 116 X-ray selected galaxy groups at z = 0.2-1 with halo masses of 10{sup 13}-10{sup 14} M{sub Sun} and centroids determined with weak lensing. We analyze morphologies based on Hubble Space Telescope imaging and colors determined from 31 photometric bands for a stellar mass-limited population of 923 satellite galaxies and a comparison sample of 16,644 field galaxies. Controlling for variations in stellar mass across environments, we find significant trends in the colors and morphologies of satellite galaxies with group-centric distance and across cosmic time. Specifically at low stellar mass (log (M{sub *}/M{sub Sun }) = 9.8-10.3), the fraction of disk-dominated star-forming galaxies declines from >50% among field galaxies to <20% among satellites near the centers of groups. This decline is accompanied by a rise in quenched galaxies with intermediate bulge+disk morphologies, and only a weak increase in red bulge-dominated systems. These results show that both color and morphology are influenced by a galaxy's location within a group halo. We suggest that strangulation and disk fading alone are insufficient to explain the observed morphological dependence on environment, and that galaxy mergers or close tidal encounters must play a role in building up the population of quenched galaxies with bulges seen in dense environments at low redshift.

  16. The Local Group: the ultimate deep field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Weisz, Daniel R.; Bullock, James S.; Cooper, Michael C.

    2016-10-01

    Near-field cosmology - using detailed observations of the Local Group and its environs to study wide-ranging questions in galaxy formation and dark matter physics - has become a mature and rich field over the past decade. There are lingering concerns, however, that the relatively small size of the present-day Local Group (˜2 Mpc diameter) imposes insurmountable sample-variance uncertainties, limiting its broader utility. We consider the region spanned by the Local Group's progenitors at earlier times and show that it reaches 3 arcmin ≈ 7 comoving Mpc in linear size (a volume of ≈350 Mpc3) at z = 7. This size at early cosmic epochs is large enough to be representative in terms of the matter density and counts of dark matter haloes with Mvir(z = 7) ≲ 2 × 109 M⊙. The Local Group's stellar fossil record traces the cosmic evolution of galaxies with 103 ≲ M⋆(z = 0)/M⊙ ≲ 109 (reaching M1500 > -9 at z ˜ 7) over a region that is comparable to or larger than the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field (HUDF) for the entire history of the Universe. In the JWST era, resolved stellar populations will probe regions larger than the HUDF and any deep JWST fields, further enhancing the value of near-field cosmology.

  17. The global warming of group satellite galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yozin, C.; Bekki, K.

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies adopting λRe, a proxy for specific angular momentum, have highlighted how early-type galaxies (ETGs) are composed of two kinematical classes for which distinct formation mechanisms can be inferred. With upcoming surveys expected to obtain λRe from a broad range of environments (e.g. SAMI, MaNGA), we investigate in this numerical study how the λRe-ɛe distribution of fast-rotating dwarf satellite galaxies reflects their evolutionary state. By combining N-body/SPH simulations of progenitor disc galaxies (stellar mass ≃109 M⊙), their cosmologically-motivated sub-halo infall history and a characteristic group orbit/potential, we demonstrate the evolution of a satellite ETG population driven by tidal interactions (e.g. harassment). As a general result, these satellites remain intrinsically fast-rotating oblate stellar systems since their infall as early as z = 2; mis-identifications as slow rotators often arise due to a bar/spiral lifecycle which plays an integral role in their evolution. Despite the idealistic nature of its construction, our mock λRe-ɛe distribution at z < 0.1 reproduces its observational counterpart from the ATLAS3D/SAURON projects. We predict therefore how the observed λRe-ɛe distribution of a group evolves according to these ensemble tidal interactions.

  18. New dwarf galaxy candidates in the Centaurus group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Oliver; Jerjen, Helmut; Binggeli, Bruno

    2015-11-01

    Context. Recent studies of the distribution and kinematics of the Milky Way and Andromeda satellite galaxy systems have confirmed the existence of coplanar, corotating structures of galaxies. In addition to the "missing satellite problem", these structures pose a major challenge to the standard ΛCDM scenario of structure formation. Aims: We complement the efforts made by the dwarf galaxy community to extend these studies to other nearby galaxy groups by systematically searching for faint unresolved dwarf members with a low surface brightness in the Southern Centaurus group of galaxies. The aim is to determine whether these coplanar, corotating structures are a universal phenomenon. Methods: We imaged an area of 60 sq. deg (0.3 Mpc2) around the M 83 subgroup with the wide-field Dark Energy Camera (DECam) at the CTIO 4 m Blanco telescope in g and r down to a limiting surface brightness of μr ≈ 30 mag arcsec-2. Various image-filtering techniques were applied to the DECam data to enhance the visibility of extremely low-surface brightness objects. Results: We report the discovery of 16 new dwarf galaxy candidates in the direction of the M 83 subgroup, roughly doubling the number of known dwarfs in that region. The photometric properties of the candidates, when compared to those of the Local Group, suggest membership in the M 83 subgroup. The faintest objects have a central star density of ≈1.3 L⊙ pc-2 and a total magnitude of g = 20.25, corresponding to Mg = -9.55 at the nominal distance of 4.9 Mpc. The sky distribution of the new objects is significantly prolonged toward Cen A, suggesting that many of them belong to the Cen A subgroup or a common halo. We also provide updated surface photometry for the brighter, known dwarf members in the surveyed area. Conclusions: Modern survey CCD cameras and sophisticated detection algorithms can be used to systematically probe the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function around the M 83 subgroup of galaxies. We aim at

  19. ISM Properties of Local Luminous Infrared Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Santos, Tanio; Armus, Lee; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Elbaz, David; Malhotra, Sangeeta

    2015-08-01

    Luminous and Ultra-luminous Infrared Galaxies ((U)LIRGs) represent the most important galaxy population at redshifts z > 1 as they account for more than 50% of all star formation produced in the Universe at those epochs; and encompass what it is called the main-sequence (MS) of star-forming galaxies. Investigating their local counterparts -low luminosity LIRGs- is therefore key to understand the physical properties and phases of their inter-stellar medium (ISM) - a task that is rather challenging in the distant Universe. On the other hand, high-z star-bursting (out of the MS) systems, although small in number, account for a modest yet still significant fraction of the total energy production. Here I present far-IR line emission observations ([CII]158μm, [OI]63μm, [OIII]88μm and [NII]122μm) obtained with Herschel for two large samples of nearby LIRGs: The Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS), a sample of more than 240 relatively cold LIRGs, and a survey of 30 LIRGs selected to have very warm mid- to far-IR colors, suggestive of an ongoing intense nuclear starburst and/or an AGN. Using photo-dissociation region (PDR) models we derive the basic characteristics of the ISM (ionization intensity and density) for both samples and study differences among systems as a function of AGN activity, merger stage, dust temperature, and compactness of the starburst - parameters that are thought to control the life cycle of galaxies moving in and out of the MS, locally and at high-z.

  20. Mass dependent galaxy transformation mechanisms in the complex environment of SuperGroup Abell 1882

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Aparajita

    We present our data and results from panchromatic photometry and optical spectrometry of the nearest (extremely rich) filamentary large scale structure, SuperGroup Abell 1882. It is a precursor of a cluster and is an inevitable part of the narrative in the study of galaxy transformations. There has been strong empirical evidence over the past three decades that galaxy environment affects galaxy properties. Blue disky galaxies transform into red bulge-like galaxies as they traverse into the deeper recesses of a cluster. However, we have little insight into the story of galaxy evolution in the early stages of cluster formation. Besides, in relaxed clusters that have been studied extensively, several evolutionary mechanisms take effect on similar spatial and temporal scales, making it almost impossible to disentangle different local and global mechanisms. A SuperGroup on the other hand, has a shallower dark-matter potential. Here, the accreting galaxies are subjected to evolutionary mechanisms over larger time and spatial scales. This separates processes that are otherwise superimposed in rich cluster-filament interfaces. As has been found from cluster studies, galaxy color and morphology tie very strongly with local galaxy density even in a complex and nascent structure like Abell 1882. Our major results indicate that there is a strong dependence of galaxy transformations on the galaxy masses themselves. Mass- dependent evolutionary mechanisms affect galaxies at different spatial scales. The galaxy color also varies with radial projected distance from the assumed center of the structure for a constant local galaxy density, indicating the underlying large scale structure as a second order evolutionary driver. We have looked for clues to the types of mechanisms that might cause the transformations at various mass regimes. We have found the thoroughly quenched low mass galaxies confined to the groups, whereas there are evidences of intermediate-mass quenched galaxies

  1. A COMPARISON OF THE CLUSTERING PROPERTIES BETWEEN GALAXIES AND GROUPS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Xinfa

    2013-03-01

    In this study, I apply cluster analysis and perform comparative studies of clustering properties between galaxies and groups of galaxies. It is found that the number of objects N{sub max} of the richest system and the maximal length D{sub max} of the largest system for groups in all samples are apparently larger than ones for galaxies, and that galaxies preferentially form isolated, paired, and small systems, while groups preferentially form grouped and clustered systems. These results show that groups are more strongly clustered than galaxies, which is consistent with statistical results of the correlation function.

  2. THE EPOCH OF ASSEMBLY OF TWO GALAXY GROUPS: A COMPARATIVE STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, Matthew; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2013-10-01

    Nearby galaxy groups of comparable mass to the Local Group show global variations that reflect differences in their evolutionary history. Satellite galaxies in groups have higher levels of gas deficiency as the distance to their host decreases. The well established gas-deficiency profile of the Local Group reflects an epoch of assembly starting at z ∼< 10. We investigate whether this gas-deficiency profile can be used to determine the epoch of assembly for other nearby groups. We choose the M81 group as this has the most complete inventory, both in terms of membership and multi-wavelength observations. We expand our earlier evolutionary model of satellite dwarf galaxies to not only confirm this result for the Local Group but also show that the more gas-rich M81 group is likely to have assembled at a later time (z ∼< 1-3) than the Local Group.

  3. Evolution of Galaxy Groups in the Illustris Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raouf, Mojtaba; Khosroshahi, Habib G.; Dariush, A.

    2016-06-01

    We present the first study of the evolution of galaxy groups in the Illustris simulation. We focus on dynamically relaxed and unrelaxed galaxy groups representing dynamically evolved and evolving galaxy systems, respectively. The evolutionary state of a group is probed from its luminosity gap and separation between the brightest group galaxy and the center of mass of the group members. We find that the Illustris simulation overproduces galaxy systems with a large luminosity gap, known as fossil systems, in comparison to observations and the probed semi-analytical predictions. However, this simulation is just as successful as the probed semi-analytic model in recovering the correlation between luminosity gap and offset of the luminosity centroid. We find evolutionary tracks based on luminosity gap that indicate that a group with a large luminosity gap is rooted in one with a small luminosity gap, regardless of the position of the brightest group galaxy within the halo. This simulation helps to explore, for the first time, the black hole mass and its accretion rate in galaxy groups. For a given stellar mass of the brightest group galaxies, the black hole mass is larger in dynamically relaxed groups with a lower rate of mass accretion. We find this to be consistent with the latest observational studies of radio activity in the brightest group galaxies in fossil groups. We also find that the intragalactic medium in dynamically evolved groups is hotter for a given halo mass than that in evolving groups, again consistent with earlier observational studies.

  4. Understanding the unique assembly history of central group galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Vulcani, Benedetta; Bundy, Kevin; Lackner, Claire; Leauthaud, Alexie; Treu, Tommaso; Mei, Simona; Coccato, Lodovico; Kneib, Jean Paul; Auger, Matthew; Nipoti, Carlo

    2014-12-10

    Central galaxies (CGs) in massive halos live in unique environments with formation histories closely linked to that of the host halo. In local clusters, they have larger sizes (R{sub e} ) and lower velocity dispersions (σ) at fixed stellar mass M {sub *}, and much larger R{sub e} at a fixed σ than field and satellite galaxies (non-CGs). Using spectroscopic observations of group galaxies selected from the COSMOS survey, we compare the dynamical scaling relations of early-type CGs and non-CGs at z ∼ 0.6 to distinguish possible mechanisms that produce the required evolution. CGs are systematically offset toward larger R{sub e} at fixed σ compared to non-CGs with similar M {sub *}. The CG R{sub e} -M {sub *} relation also shows differences, primarily driven by a subpopulation (∼15%) of galaxies with large R{sub e} , while the M {sub *}-σ relations are indistinguishable. These results are accentuated when double Sérsic profiles, which better fit light in the outer regions of galaxies, are adopted. They suggest that even group-scale CGs can develop extended components by these redshifts that can increase total R{sub e} and M {sub *} estimates by factors of ∼2. To probe the evolutionary link between our sample and cluster CGs, we also analyze two cluster samples at z ∼ 0.6 and z ∼ 0. We find similar results for the more massive halos at comparable z, but much more distinct CG scaling relations at low-z. Thus, the rapid, late-time accretion of outer components, perhaps via the stripping and accretion of satellites, would appear to be a key feature that distinguishes the evolutionary history of CGs.

  5. Impact of High Velocity Interactions on Galaxy Evolution in Galaxy Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machacek, Marie E.; Jones, C.; Forman, W. R.; Kraft, R. P.; Ashby, M. L.; Hardcastle, M. J.

    2007-05-01

    Galaxy interactions in cool groups dominate galaxy evolution at high redshift. Observations of galaxies interacting in nearby galaxy groups, where the same dynamical processes that transform galaxies at high redshift can be studied in detail, are critical to our understanding of galaxy and group evolution. X-ray observations of hot gas features, e.g. surface brightness edges and wakes, reveal that high velocity interactions play a significant role in the transformation of galaxies in groups, yet, because these encounters are difficult to identify in other wavebands, few have been studied. We present two case studies of high velocity galaxy-galaxy and galaxy-gas interactions in galaxy groups: NGC4782(3C278) and NGC4783 in LGG316, and NGC6872 and NGC6876 in the Pavo group. From Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray data, we measure the hot gas temperature, density and metal abundance in the galaxies and the intragroup medium (IGM) to characterize the thermodynamic state of the group, constrain 3D motions of the galaxies through the IGM, and determine the dominant processes transferring matter and energy between the galaxy and group gas. We compare these results with VLA observations of NGC4782/3 and Spitzer IRAC observations of NGC6872 and NGC6876 to study the impact of these interactions on nuclear activity, radio jet evolution, and star formation in these galaxies, and on the heating and enrichment of the IGM. This work was supported in part by the Smithsonian Institution, the Chandra Science Center, NASA contracts AR5-6011X, GO6-7068X, NNX06AG34G, JPL1279244 and the Royal Society.

  6. Optical and X-ray Properties of Groups of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dell'Antonio, I. P.; Geller, M. J.; Fabricant, D.

    1992-12-01

    We study the optical and x-ray properties of 30 groups of galaxies observed with EINSTEIN. We have obtained redshifts for the galaxies in the group fields down to a limiting magnitude M_B<= 15.7. Typically this corresponds to ~ 18 redshifts per group. Our sample contains 14 MKW-AWM clusters, three of which are actually superpositions of two groups. We compare the velocity dispersions and virial masses we derive from the optical data with the x-ray luminosity and structure. We find remarkable correlations between the x-ray structure and optical galaxy positions. The x-ray emission associated with the galaxies is extended even in more distant groups. This emission is probably due to hot gas in the individual galaxy potentials, which implies that the poor clusters of galaxies are dynamically young. This is consistent with results from N-body simulations of group formation.

  7. NUV signatures of environment driven galaxy quenching in SDSS groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crossett, Jacob P.; Pimbblet, Kevin A.; Jones, D. Heath; Brown, Michael J. I.; Stott, John P.

    2016-09-01

    We have investigated the effect of group environment on residual star formation in galaxies, using GALEX NUV galaxy photometry with the SDSS group catalogue of Yang et al. (2007). We compared the (NUV - r) colours of grouped and non-grouped galaxies, and find a significant increase in the fraction of red sequence galaxies with blue (NUV - r) colours outside of groups. When comparing galaxies in mass matched samples of satellite (non-central), and non-grouped galaxies, we found a >4σ difference in the distribution of (NUV - r) colours, and an (NUV - r) blue fraction >3σ higher outside groups. A comparison of satellite and non-grouped samples has found the NUV fraction is a factor of ˜2 lower for satellite galaxies between 1010.5M⊙ and 1010.7M⊙, showing that higher mass galaxies are more able to form stars when not influenced by a group potential. There was a higher (NUV - r) blue fraction of galaxies with lower Sérsic indices (n < 3) outside of groups, not seen in the satellite sample. We have used stellar population models of Bruzual & Charlot (2003) with multiple burst, or exponentially declining star formation histories to find that many of the (NUV - r) blue non-grouped galaxies can be explained by a slow (˜2 Gyr) decay of star formation, compared to the satellite galaxies. We suggest that taken together, the difference in (NUV - r) colours between samples can be explained by a population of secularly evolving, non-grouped galaxies, where star formation declines slowly. This slow channel is less prevalent in group environments where more rapid quenching can occur.

  8. THE EVOLUTION OF CENTRAL GROUP GALAXIES IN HYDRODYNAMICAL SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Feldmann, R.; Carollo, C. M.; Mayer, L.; Lake, G.; Renzini, A.; Quinn, T.; Stinson, G. S.; Yepes, G.

    2010-01-20

    We trace the evolution of central galaxies in three approx10{sup 13} M{sub sun} galaxy groups simulated at high resolution in cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. In all three cases, the evolution in the group potential leads, at z = 0, to central galaxies that are massive, gas-poor early-type systems supported by stellar velocity dispersion and which resemble either elliptical or S0 galaxies. Their z approx 2-2.5 main progenitors are massive (M{sub *} approx (3-10) x 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}), star-forming (20-60 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) galaxies which host substantial reservoirs of cold gas (approx5 x 10{sup 9} M{sub sun}) in extended gas disks. Our simulations thus show that star-forming galaxies observed at z approx 2 are likely the main progenitors of central galaxies in galaxy groups at z = 0. At z approx 2 the stellar component of all galaxies is compact, with a half-mass radius <1 kpc. The central stellar density stays approximatively constant from such early epochs down to z = 0. Instead, the galaxies grow inside out, by acquiring a stellar envelope outside the innermost approx2 kpc. Consequently the density within the effective radius decreases by up to 2 orders of magnitude. Both major and minor mergers contribute to most (70{sup +20}{sub -15}%) of the mass accreted outside the effective radius and thus drive an episodical evolution of the half-mass radii, particularly below z = 1. In situ star formation and secular evolution processes contribute to 14{sup +18}{sub -9}% and 16{sup +6}{sub -11}%, respectively. Overall, the simulated galaxies grow by a factor approx4-5 in mass and size since redshift z approx 2. The short cooling time in the center of groups can foster a 'hot accretion' mode. In one of the three simulated groups this leads to a dramatic rejuvenation of the central group galaxy at z < 1, affecting its morphology, kinematics, and colors. This episode is eventually terminated by a group-group merger. Mergers also appear to be responsible for

  9. The Evolution of Central Group Galaxies in Hydrodynamical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmann, R.; Carollo, C. M.; Mayer, L.; Renzini, A.; Lake, G.; Quinn, T.; Stinson, G. S.; Yepes, G.

    2010-01-01

    We trace the evolution of central galaxies in three ~1013 M sun galaxy groups simulated at high resolution in cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. In all three cases, the evolution in the group potential leads, at z = 0, to central galaxies that are massive, gas-poor early-type systems supported by stellar velocity dispersion and which resemble either elliptical or S0 galaxies. Their z ~ 2-2.5 main progenitors are massive (M * ~ (3-10) × 1010 M sun), star-forming (20-60 M sun yr-1) galaxies which host substantial reservoirs of cold gas (~5 × 109 M sun) in extended gas disks. Our simulations thus show that star-forming galaxies observed at z ~ 2 are likely the main progenitors of central galaxies in galaxy groups at z = 0. At z ~ 2 the stellar component of all galaxies is compact, with a half-mass radius <1 kpc. The central stellar density stays approximatively constant from such early epochs down to z = 0. Instead, the galaxies grow inside out, by acquiring a stellar envelope outside the innermost ~2 kpc. Consequently the density within the effective radius decreases by up to 2 orders of magnitude. Both major and minor mergers contribute to most (70+20 -15%) of the mass accreted outside the effective radius and thus drive an episodical evolution of the half-mass radii, particularly below z = 1. In situ star formation and secular evolution processes contribute to 14+18 -9% and 16+6 -11%, respectively. Overall, the simulated galaxies grow by a factor ~4-5 in mass and size since redshift z ~ 2. The short cooling time in the center of groups can foster a "hot accretion" mode. In one of the three simulated groups this leads to a dramatic rejuvenation of the central group galaxy at z < 1, affecting its morphology, kinematics, and colors. This episode is eventually terminated by a group-group merger. Mergers also appear to be responsible for the suppression of cooling flows in the other two groups. Passive stellar evolution and minor galaxy mergers gradually restore

  10. Faint Dwarf Galaxies in Hickson Compact Group 90

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordenes-Briceño, Yasna; Taylor, Matthew A.; Puzia, Thomas H.; Muñoz, Roberto P.; Eigenthaler, Paul; Georgiev, Iskren Y.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Hilker, Michael; Lançon, Ariane; Mamon, Gary; Mieske, Steffen; Miller, Bryan W.; Peng, Eric W.; Sánchez-Janssen, Rubén

    2016-08-01

    We report the discovery of a very diverse set of five low-surface brightness (LSB) dwarf galaxy candidates in Hickson Compact Group 90 (HCG 90) detected in deep U- and I-band images obtained with VLT/VIMOS. These are the first LSB dwarf galaxy candidates found in a compact group of galaxies. We measure spheroid half-light radii in the range 0.7 ≲ reff/kpc ≲ 1.5 with luminosities of -11.65 ≲ MU ≲ -9.42 and -12.79 ≲ MI ≲ -10.58 mag, corresponding to a color range of (U - I)0 ≃ 1.1 - 2.2 mag and surface brightness levels of μU ≃ 28.1 mag/arcsec2 and μI ≃ 27.4 mag/arcsec2. Their colours and luminosities are consistent with a diverse set of stellar population properties. Assuming solar and 0.02 Z⊙ metallicities we obtain stellar masses in the range M_*|_{Z_odot } ˜eq 10^{5.7-6.3} M_{odot } and M_*|_{0.02 Z_odot } ˜eq 10^{6.3-8} M_{odot }. Three dwarfs are older than 1 Gyr, while the other two significantly bluer dwarfs are younger than ˜2 Gyr at any mass/metallicity combination. Altogether, the new LSB dwarf galaxy candidates share properties with dwarf galaxies found throughout the Local Volume and in nearby galaxy clusters such as Fornax. We find a pair of candidates with ˜2 kpc projected separation, which may represent one of the closest dwarf galaxy pairs found. We also find a nucleated dwarf candidate, with a nucleus size of reff ≃ 46 - 63 pc and magnitude MU, 0 = -7.42 mag and (U - I)0 = 1.51 mag, which is consistent with a nuclear stellar disc with a stellar mass in the range 104.9 - 6.5 M⊙.

  11. 3D structure of nearby groups of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarova, L.; Makarov, D.; Klypin, A.; Gottlöber, S.

    2016-10-01

    Using high accuracy distance estimates, we study the three-dimensional distribution of galaxies in five galaxy groups at a distance less than 5 Mpc from the Milky Way. Due to proximity of these groups our sample of galaxies is nearly complete down to extremely small dwarf galaxies with absolute magnitudes M B = -12. We find that the average number-density profile of the groups shows a steep power-law decline dn/dV ˜ R-3 at distances R=(100-500) kpc consistent with predictions of the standard cosmological model. We also find that there is no indication of a truncation or a cutoff in the density at the expected virial radius: the density profile extends at least to 1.5 Mpc. Vast majority of galaxies within 1.5 Mpc radius around group centres are gas-rich star-forming galaxies. Early-type galaxies are found only in the central ˜ 300 kpc region. Lack of dwarf spheroidal and dwarf elliptical galaxies in the field and in the outskirts of large groups is a clear indication that these galaxies experienced morphological transformation when they came close to the central region of forming galaxy group.

  12. On the formation of polar ring galaxies and tidal dwarf galaxies in gas-rich galaxy groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilborn, Virginia; Sweet, Sarah; Meurer, Gerhardt; Drinkwater, Michael

    2015-08-01

    We are conducting a study of the properties of galaxies and dwarfs in 16 gas-rich galaxy groups identified in the Survey for Ionization in Neutral Gas Galaxies (SINGG; Meurer et al. 2006). We have found a young gas-rich coalescing galaxy group, J1051-17. Key features of this system are gas-rich tidal tails, studded with dwarf galaxies extending 200 kpc which merge in to a low surface brightness polar disk orbiting a very red edge-on host hosting a central AGN. Accretion from the polar disk may be feeding the AGN and powering a galactic wind. The example of this system suggests that tidal interactions with gas rich satellites may be a key process that aligns satellites in to polar planes while fuelling accretion down to the very centres of the host. We discuss the formation scenario of this polar ring galaxy, and investigate the formation of tidal dwarf galaxies in the wider group sample.

  13. The Milky Way, the Local Group & the IR Tully-Fisher Diagram

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malhotra, S.; Spergel, D.; Rhoads, J.; Li, J.

    1996-01-01

    Using the near infrared fluxes of local group galaxies derived from Cosmic Background Explorer/Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment band maps and published Cepheid distances, we construct Tully-Fisher diagrams for the Local Group.

  14. A Survey of Local Group Galaxies Currently Forming Stars: UBVRI Photometry of Stars in Seven Dwarfs and a Comparison with the Entire Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Philip; Olsen, K. A.; Hodge, P. W.; Jacoby, G. H.; McNeill, R. T.; Smith, R. C.; Strong, S. B.

    2006-12-01

    Studies of the resolved stellar content of nearby galaxies provide the only direct way of determining the effect that metallicity (and other environmental factors) play in the formation and evolution of massive stars. Using the 4-m telescopes at Kitt Peak and Cerro Tololo, we have completed a UBVRI survey of stars in M31 and M33 (Massey et al 2006 AJ, 131, 2478) and the seven dwarfs, IC10, NGC 6822, WLM, Sextans B, Sextans A, Pegasus, and Phoenix (newly presented here). In all, we have obtained photometry of 606,547 stars (in B, V, and R, with many having U and/or I as well.) We expect that these data and images will serve as the "finding charts" for 8-m spectroscopic studies for decades to come. Here we provide comparisons of the CMDs of these galaxies with those of the Magellanic Clouds, and derive improved values of reddenings using the blue supergiants. Plus, of course, we include some incredibly pretty pictures.

  15. The extended structure of the dwarf irregular galaxies Sextans A and Sextans B. Signatures of tidal distortion in the outskirts of the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellazzini, M.; Beccari, G.; Fraternali, F.; Oosterloo, T. A.; Sollima, A.; Testa, V.; Galleti, S.; Perina, S.; Faccini, M.; Cusano, F.

    2014-06-01

    We present a detailed study of the stellar and H i structure of the dwarf irregular galaxies Sextans A and Sextans B, members of the NGC 3109 association. We use newly obtained deep (r ≃ 26.5) and wide-field g and r photometry to extend the surface brightness (SB) profiles of the two galaxies down to μV ≃ 31.0 mag/arcsec2. We find that both galaxies are significantly more extended than previously traced with surface photometry, out to ~4 kpc from their centres along their major axes. Older stars are found to have more extended distribution than younger populations. We obtain the first estimate of the mean metallicity for the old stars in Sex B, from the colour distribution of the red giant branch, ⟨[Fe/H]⟩ = -1.6. The SB profiles show significant changes of slope and cannot be fitted with a single Sérsic model. Both galaxies have HI discs as massive as their respective stellar components. In both cases the H i discs display solid-body rotation with maximum amplitude of ~50 km s-1 (albeit with significant uncertainty due to the poorly constrained inclination), implying a dynamical mass ~109 M⊙, a mass-to-light ratio M / LV ~ 25, and a dark-to-baryonic mass ratio of ~10. The distribution of the stellar components is more extended than the gaseous disc in both galaxies. We find that the main, approximately round, stellar body of Sex A is surrounded by an elongated low-SB stellar halo that can be interpreted as a tidal tail, similar to that found in another member of the same association (Antlia). We discuss these, as well as other evidence of tidal disturbance, in the framework of a past passage of the NGC 3109 association close to the Milky Way, which has been hypothesised by several authors and is also supported by the recently discovered filamentary configuration of the association itself. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgTable of stellar photometry is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http

  16. TWO LOCAL VOLUME DWARF GALAXIES DISCOVERED IN 21 cm EMISSION: PISCES A AND B

    SciTech Connect

    Tollerud, Erik J.; Geha, Marla C.; Grcevich, Jana; Putman, Mary E.; Stern, Daniel E-mail: marla.geha@yale.edu E-mail: mputman@astro.columbia.edu

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of two dwarf galaxies, Pisces A and B, from a blind 21 cm H I search. These were the only two galaxies found via optical imaging and spectroscopy of 22 H I clouds identified in the GALFA-H I survey as dwarf galaxy candidates. They have properties consistent with being in the Local Volume (<10 Mpc), and one has resolved stellar populations such that it may be on the outer edge of the Local Group (∼1 Mpc from M31). While the distance uncertainty makes interpretation ambiguous, these may be among the faintest star-forming galaxies known. Additionally, rough estimates comparing these galaxies to ΛCDM dark matter simulations suggest consistency in number density, implying that the dark matter halos likely to host these galaxies are primarily H I-rich. The galaxies may thus be indicative of a large population of dwarfs at the limit of detectability that are comparable to the faint satellites of the Local Group. Because they are outside the influence of a large dark matter halo to alter their evolution, these galaxies can provide critical anchors to dwarf galaxy formation models.

  17. The Effect of Halo Mass on the H I Content of Galaxies in Groups and Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Ilsang; Rosenberg, Jessica L.

    2015-10-01

    We combine data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA Survey (ALFALFA) to study the cold atomic gas content of galaxies in groups and clusters in the local universe. A careful cross-matching of galaxies in the SDSS, ALFALFA, and SDSS group catalogs provides a sample of group galaxies with stellar masses {10}8.4{M}ȯ ≤slant {M}*≤slant {10}10.6{M}ȯ and group halo masses {10}12.5{h}-1{M}ȯ ≤slant {M}h≤slant {10}15.0{h}-1{M}ȯ . Controlling our sample in stellar mass and redshift, we find no significant radial variation in the galaxy H i gas-to-stellar mass ratio for the halo mass range in our sample. However, the fraction of galaxies detected in ALFALFA declines steadily toward the centers of groups, with the effect being most prominent in the most massive halos. In the outskirts of massive halos a hint of a depressed detection fraction for low-mass galaxies suggests pre-processing that decreases the H i in these galaxies before they fall into massive clusters. We interpret the decline in the ALFALFA detection of galaxies in the context of a threshold halo mass for ram pressure stripping for a given galaxy stellar mass. The lack of an observable decrease in the galaxy H i gas-to-stellar mass ratio with the position of galaxies within groups and clusters highlights the difficulty of detecting the impact of environment on the galaxy H i content in a shallow H i survey.

  18. The Effect of Halo Mass on the H I Content of Galaxies in Groups and Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Ilsang; Rosenberg, Jessica L.

    2015-10-01

    We combine data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA Survey (ALFALFA) to study the cold atomic gas content of galaxies in groups and clusters in the local universe. A careful cross-matching of galaxies in the SDSS, ALFALFA, and SDSS group catalogs provides a sample of group galaxies with stellar masses {10}8.4{M}⊙ ≤slant {M}*≤slant {10}10.6{M}⊙ and group halo masses {10}12.5{h}-1{M}⊙ ≤slant {M}h≤slant {10}15.0{h}-1{M}⊙ . Controlling our sample in stellar mass and redshift, we find no significant radial variation in the galaxy H i gas-to-stellar mass ratio for the halo mass range in our sample. However, the fraction of galaxies detected in ALFALFA declines steadily toward the centers of groups, with the effect being most prominent in the most massive halos. In the outskirts of massive halos a hint of a depressed detection fraction for low-mass galaxies suggests pre-processing that decreases the H i in these galaxies before they fall into massive clusters. We interpret the decline in the ALFALFA detection of galaxies in the context of a threshold halo mass for ram pressure stripping for a given galaxy stellar mass. The lack of an observable decrease in the galaxy H i gas-to-stellar mass ratio with the position of galaxies within groups and clusters highlights the difficulty of detecting the impact of environment on the galaxy H i content in a shallow H i survey.

  19. Multifrequency studies of galaxies and groups. I. Environmental effect on galaxy stellar mass and morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poudel, A.; Heinämäki, P.; Nurmi, P.; Teerikorpi, P.; Tempel, E.; Lietzen, H.; Einasto, M.

    2016-05-01

    Context. To understand the role of the environment in galaxy formation, evolution, and present-day properties, it is essential to study the multifrequency behavior of different galaxy populations under various environmental conditions. Aims: We study the stellar mass functions of different galaxy populations in groups as a function of their large-scale environments using multifrequency observations. Methods: We cross-matched the SDSS DR10 group catalog with GAMA Data Release 2 and Wide-field Survey Explorer (WISE) data to construct a catalog of 1651 groups and 11 436 galaxies containing photometric information in 15 different wavebands ranging from ultraviolet (0.152 μm) to mid-infrared (22 μm). We performed the spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting of galaxies using the MAGPHYS code and estimate the rest-frame luminosities and stellar masses. We used the 1 /Vmax method to estimate the galaxy stellar mass and luminosity functions, and the luminosity density field of galaxies to define the large-scale environment of galaxies. Results: The stellar mass functions of both central and satellite galaxies in groups are different in low- and high-density, large-scale environments. Satellite galaxies in high-density environments have a steeper low-mass end slope compared to low-density environments, independent of the galaxy morphology. Central galaxies in low-density environments have a steeper low-mass end slope, but the difference disappears for fixed galaxy morphology. The characteristic stellar mass of satellite galaxies is higher in high-density environments and the difference exists only for galaxies with elliptical morphologies. Conclusions: Galaxy formation in groups is more efficient in high-density, large-scale environments. Groups in high-density environments have higher abundances of satellite galaxies, irrespective of the satellite galaxy morphology. The elliptical satellite galaxies are generally more massive in high-density environments. The stellar

  20. A Survey of Local Group Galaxies Currently Forming Stars. III. A Search for Luminous Blue Variables and Other Hα Emission-Line Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Philip; McNeill, Reagin T.; Olsen, K. A. G.; Hodge, Paul W.; Blaha, Cynthia; Jacoby, George H.; Smith, R. C.; Strong, Shay B.

    2007-12-01

    We describe a search for Hα emission-line stars in M31, M33, and seven dwarfs in or near the Local Group (IC 10, NGC 6822, WLM, Sextans B, Sextans A, Pegasus, and the Phoenix dwarf) using interference filter imaging with the KPNO and CTIO 4 m telescopes and Mosaic cameras. The survey is aimed primarily at identifying new luminous blue variables (LBVs) from their spectroscopic similarity to known LBVs, avoiding the bias toward photometric variability, which may require centuries to manifest itself if LBVs go through long quiescent periods. Follow-up spectroscopy with WIYN confirms that our survey detected a wealth of stars whose spectra are similar to the known LBVs. We "classify" the spectra of known LBVs and compare these to the spectra of the new LBV candidates. We demonstrate spectacular spectral variability for several of the new LBV candidates, such as AM2, previously classified as a Wolf-Rayet star (WR), which now shows Fe I, Fe II, and Balmer emission lines but neither the N III λλ4634, 4642 nor the He II λ4686 emission it did in 1982. Profound spectral changes are also noted for other suspected and known LBVs. Several of the LBV candidates also show >0.5 mag changes in V over the past 10-20 years. The number of known or suspected LBVs is now 24 in M31, 37 in M33, 1 in NGC 6822, and 3 in IC 10. We estimate that the total number of LBVs in M31 and M33 may be several hundred, in contrast to the eight known historically through large-scale photometric variability. This has significant implications for the timescale of the LBV phase. We also identify a few new WRs and peculiar emission-line objects. Observations reported here were obtained at the MMT Observatory, a joint facility of the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Arizona.

  1. Locally Biased Galaxy Formation and Large-Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Vijay K.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Weinberg, David H.

    2000-01-01

    We examine the influence of the morphology-density relation and a wide range of simple models for biased galaxy formation on statistical measures of large-scale structure. We contrast the behavior of local biasing models, in which the efficiency of galaxy formation is determined by the density, geometry, or velocity dispersion of the local mass distribution, with that of nonlocal biasing models, in which galaxy formation is modulated coherently over scales larger than the galaxy correlation length. If morphological segregation of galaxies is governed by a local morphology-density relation, then the correlation function of E/S0 galaxies should be steeper and stronger than that of spiral galaxies on small scales, as observed, while on large scales the E/S0 and spiral galaxies should have correlation functions with the same shape but different amplitudes. Similarly, all of our local bias models produce scale-independent amplification of the correlation function and power spectrum in the linear and mildly nonlinear regimes; only a nonlocal biasing mechanism can alter the shape of the power spectrum on large scales. Moments of the biased galaxy distribution retain the hierarchical pattern of the mass moments, but biasing alters the values and scale dependence of the hierarchical amplitudes S3 and S4. Pair-weighted moments of the galaxy velocity distribution are sensitive to the details of the bias prescription even if galaxies have the same local velocity distribution as the underlying dark matter. The nonlinearity of the relation between galaxy density and mass density depends on the biasing prescription and the smoothing scale, and the scatter in this relation is a useful diagnostic of the physical parameters that determine the bias. While the assumption that galaxy formation is governed by local physics leads to some important simplifications on large scales, even local biasing is a multifaceted phenomenon whose impact cannot be described by a single parameter or

  2. Automatic Detection of Galaxy Groups by Probabilistic Hough Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahem, R. T.; Tino, P.; Pearson, R. J.; Ponman, T. J.; Babul, A.

    2015-12-01

    Galaxy groups play a significant role in explaining the evolution of the universe. Given the amounts of available survey data, automated discovery of galaxy groups is of utmost interest. We introduce a novel methodology, based on probabilistic Hough transform, for finding galaxy groups embedded in a rich background. The model takes advantage of a typical signature pattern of galaxy groups known as "fingers-of-God". It also allows us to include prior astrophysical knowledge as an inherent part of the method. The proposed method is first tested in large scale controlled experiments with 2-D patterns and then verified on 3-D realistic mock data (comparing with the well-known friends-of-friends method used in astrophysics). The experiments suggest that our methodology is a promising new candidate for galaxy group finders developed within a machine learning framework.

  3. Our Milky Way structure in the context of local galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Juntai

    2015-08-01

    The Milky Way is the closest galaxy to us, and has been studied extensively due to its proximity. Understanding its structure and dynamics will help us understand spiral galaxies in general. I will review the latest research progress in the structure, kinematics, and dynamics of the Milky Way in the context of local galaxies. I will cover most structural components (the bulge/bar, disk, and spiral structures) and discuss the implications of some new results on the formation history of our home galaxy.

  4. EVOLUTION OF GROUP GALAXIES FROM THE FIRST RED-SEQUENCE CLUSTER SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Li, I. H.; Yee, H. K. C.; Hsieh, B. C.; Gladders, M. E-mail: hyee@astro.utoronto.ca E-mail: gladders@oddjob.uchicago.edu

    2012-04-20

    We study the evolution of the red-galaxy fraction (f{sub red}) in 905 galaxy groups with 0.15 {<=} z < 0.52. The galaxy groups are identified by the 'probability friends-of-friends' algorithm from the first Red-Sequence Cluster Survey (RCS1) photometric-redshift sample. There is a high degree of uniformity in the properties of the red sequence of the group galaxies, indicating that the luminous red-sequence galaxies in the groups are already in place by z {approx} 0.5 and that they have a formation epoch of z {approx}> 2. In general, groups at lower redshifts exhibit larger f{sub red} than those at higher redshifts, showing a group Butcher-Oemler effect. We investigate the evolution of f{sub red} by examining its dependence on four parameters, one of which can be classified as intrinsic and three of which can be classified as environmental: galaxy stellar mass (M{sub *}), total group stellar mass (M{sub *,grp}, a proxy for group halo mass), normalized group-centric radius (r{sub grp}), and local galaxy density ({Sigma}{sub 5}). We find that M{sub *} is the dominant parameter such that there is a strong correlation between f{sub red} and galaxy stellar mass. Furthermore, the dependence of f{sub red} on the environmental parameters is also a strong function of M{sub *}. Massive galaxies (M{sub *} {approx}> 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }) show little dependence of f{sub red} on r{sub grp}, M{sub *,grp}, and {Sigma}{sub 5} over the redshift range. The dependence of f{sub red} on these parameters is primarily seen for galaxies with lower masses, especially for M{sub *} {approx}< 10{sup 10.6} M{sub Sun }. We observe an apparent 'group down-sizing' effect, in that galaxies in lower-mass halos, after controlling for galaxy stellar mass, have lower f{sub red}. We find a dependence of f{sub red} on both r{sub grp} and {Sigma}{sub 5} after the other parameters are controlled. At a fixed r{sub grp}, there is a significant dependence of f{sub red} on {Sigma}{sub 5}, while r{sub grp

  5. Isolated elliptical galaxies in the local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacerna, I.; Hernández-Toledo, H. M.; Avila-Reese, V.; Abonza-Sane, J.; del Olmo, A.

    2016-04-01

    Context. We have studied a sample of 89 very isolated, elliptical galaxies at z < 0.08 and compared their properties with elliptical galaxies located in a high-density environment such as the Coma supercluster. Aims: Our aim is to probe the role of environment on the morphological transformation and quenching of elliptical galaxies as a function of mass. In addition, we elucidate the nature of a particular set of blue and star-forming isolated ellipticals identified here. Methods: We studied physical properties of ellipticals, such as color, specific star formation rate, galaxy size, and stellar age, as a function of stellar mass and environment based on SDSS data. We analyzed the blue and star-forming isolated ellipticals in more detail, through photometric characterization using GALFIT, and infer their star formation history using STARLIGHT. Results: Among the isolated ellipticals ≈20% are blue, ≲8% are star forming, and ≈10% are recently quenched, while among the Coma ellipticals ≈8% are blue and just ≲1% are star forming or recently quenched. There are four isolated galaxies (≈4.5%) that are blue and star forming at the same time. These galaxies, with masses between 7 × 109 and 2 × 1010 h-2 M⊙, are also the youngest galaxies with light-weighted stellar ages ≲1 Gyr and exhibit bluer colors toward the galaxy center. Around 30-60% of their present-day luminosity, but only <5% of their present-day mass, is due to star formation in the last 1 Gyr. Conclusions: The processes of morphological transformation and quenching seem to be in general independent of environment since most of elliptical galaxies are "red and dead", although the transition to the red sequence should be faster for isolated ellipticals. In some cases, the isolated environment seems to propitiate the rejuvenation of ellipticals by recent (<1 Gyr) cold gas accretion.

  6. Massive young clusters in the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maíz Apellániz, Jesús

    We analyze the properties of the Massive Young Clusters in the Local Group, concentrating on the youngest segment of this population and, more specifically, on the two best studied cases: 30 Doradus and NGC 604. 30 Doradus is a Super Star Cluster and will likely evolve to become a Globular Cluster in the future. NGC 604, on the other hand, is a Scaled OB Association that will be torn apart by the tidal effects of its host galaxy, M33. Given their extreme youth, each cluster is surrounded by a Giant H II Region produced by the high ionizing fluxes from O and WR stars. The two Giant H II Regions are found to be rather thin structures located on the surfaces of Giant Molecular Clouds, and their geometry turns out to be not too different from that of classical H II regions such as the Orion or Eagle Nebulae.

  7. The local radio-galaxy population at 20 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, Elaine M.; Ekers, Ronald D.; Mahony, Elizabeth K.; Mauch, Tom; Murphy, Tara

    2014-02-01

    We have made the first detailed study of the high-frequency radio-source population in the local Universe, using a sample of 202 radio sources from the Australia Telescope 20 GHz (AT20G) survey identified with galaxies from the 6dF Galaxy Survey (6dFGS). The AT20G-6dFGS galaxies have a median redshift of z = 0.058 and span a wide range in radio luminosity, allowing us to make the first measurement of the local radio luminosity function at 20 GHz. Our sample includes some classical Fanaroff-Riley type I (FR I) and FR II radio galaxies, but most of the AT20G-6dFGS galaxies host compact (FR 0) radio active galactic nuclei which appear to lack extended radio emission even at lower frequencies. Most of these FR 0 sources show no evidence for relativistic beaming, and the FR 0 class appears to be a mixed population which includes young compact steep-spectrum and gigahertz peaked-spectrum radio galaxies. We see a strong dichotomy in the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mid-infrared colours of the host galaxies of FR I and FR II radio sources, with the FR I systems found almost exclusively in WISE `early-type' galaxies and the FR II radio sources in WISE `late-type' galaxies. The host galaxies of the flat- and steep-spectrum radio sources have a similar distribution in both K-band luminosity and WISE colours, though galaxies with flat-spectrum sources are more likely to show weak emission lines in their optical spectra. We conclude that these flat-spectrum and steep-spectrum radio sources mainly represent different stages in radio-galaxy evolution, rather than beamed and unbeamed radio-source populations.

  8. The statistical nature of the brightest group galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Shiyin; Yang, Xiaohu; Mo, Houjun; Van den Bosch, Frank; More, Surhud

    2014-02-10

    We examine the statistical properties of the brightest group galaxies (BGGs) by using a complete spectroscopic sample of groups/clusters of galaxies selected from the Data Release 7 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We test whether BGGs and other bright members of groups are consistent with an ordered population among the total population of group galaxies. We find that the luminosity distributions of BGGs do not follow the predictions from the order statistics (OS). The average luminosities of BGGs are systematically brighter than OS predictions. On the other hand, by properly taking into account the brightening effect of the BGGs, the luminosity distributions of the second brightest galaxies are in excellent agreement with the expectations of OS. The brightening of BGGs relative to the OS expectation is consistent with a scenario that the BGGs on average have overgrown about 20% masses relative to the other member galaxies. The growth (ΔM) is not stochastic but correlated with the magnitude gap (G {sub 1,} {sub 2}) between the brightest and the second brightest galaxy. The growth (ΔM) is larger for the groups having more prominent BGGs (larger G {sub 1,} {sub 2}) and averagely contributes about 30% of the final G {sub 1,} {sub 2} of the groups of galaxies.

  9. Galaxy Groups: Proceedings from a Swinburne University Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilborn, Virginia A.; Bekki, Kenji; Brough, Sarah; Doyle, Marianne T.; Evstigneeva, Ekaterina A.; Forbes, Duncan A.; Koribalski, Bärbel S.; Owers, Matthew S.; Power, Chris; Drinkwater, Michael J.; Rohde, David J.; Blake, Christopher A.; Couch, Warrick J.; Pracy, Michael B.; Gibson, Brad K.

    We present the proceedings from a two-day workshop held at Swinburne University on 2005 May 24-25. The workshop participants highlighted current Australian research on both theoretical and observational aspects of galaxy groups. These proceedings include short one-page summaries of a number of the talks presented at the workshop. The talks presented ranged from reconciling N-body simulations with observations, to the HI content of galaxies in groups and the existence of `dark galaxies'. The formation and existence of ultra-compact dwarfs in groups, and a new supergroup in Eridanus were also discussed.

  10. The DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: The Voronoi-Delaunay Method Catalog of Galaxy Groups

    SciTech Connect

    Gerke, Brian F.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Davis, Marc; Marinoni, Christian; Yan, Renbin; Coil, Alison L.; Conroy, Charlie; Cooper, Michael C.; Faber, S.M.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Kaiser, Nick; Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; /Maryland U.

    2012-02-14

    We use the first 25% of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey spectroscopic data to identify groups and clusters of galaxies in redshift space. The data set contains 8370 galaxies with confirmed redshifts in the range 0.7 {<=} z {<=} 1.4, over one square degree on the sky. Groups are identified using an algorithm (the Voronoi-Delaunay Method) that has been shown to accurately reproduce the statistics of groups in simulated DEEP2-like samples. We optimize this algorithm for the DEEP2 survey by applying it to realistic mock galaxy catalogs and assessing the results using a stringent set of criteria for measuring group-finding success, which we develop and describe in detail here. We find in particular that the group-finder can successfully identify {approx}78% of real groups and that {approx}79% of the galaxies that are true members of groups can be identified as such. Conversely, we estimate that {approx}55% of the groups we find can be definitively identified with real groups and that {approx}46% of the galaxies we place into groups are interloper field galaxies. Most importantly, we find that it is possible to measure the distribution of groups in redshift and velocity dispersion, n({sigma}, z), to an accuracy limited by cosmic variance, for dispersions greater than 350 km s{sup -1}. We anticipate that such measurements will allow strong constraints to be placed on the equation of state of the dark energy in the future. Finally, we present the first DEEP2 group catalog, which assigns 32% of the galaxies to 899 distinct groups with two or more members, 153 of which have velocity dispersions above 350 km s{sup -1}. We provide locations, redshifts and properties for this high-dispersion subsample. This catalog represents the largest sample to date of spectroscopically detected groups at z {approx} 1.

  11. Stellar populations in local star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Gonzalez, P. G.

    2003-11-01

    The main goal of this thesis work is studying the main properties of the stellar populations embedded in a statistically complete sample of local active star-forming galaxies: the Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM) Survey of emission-line galaxies. This sample contains 191 local star-forming galaxies at an average redshift of 0.026. The survey was carried out using an objective-prism technique centered at the wavelength of the Halpha nebular emission-line (a common tracer of recent star formation). (continues)

  12. Grouping through local, parallel interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proesmans, Marc; Van Gool, Luc J.; Oosterlinck, Andre J.

    1995-08-01

    This paper describes a new approach for computer based visual grouping. A number of computational principles are defined related to results on neurophysiological and psychophysical experiments. The grouping principles have been subdivided into two groups. The 'first-order processes' perform local operations on 'basic' features such as luminance, color, and orientation. 'Second-order processes' consider bilocal interactions (stereo, optical flow, texture, symmetry). The computational scheme developed in this paper relies on the solution of a set of nonlinear differential equations. They are referred to as 'coupled diffusion maps'. Such systems obey the prescribed computational principles. Several maps, corresponding to different features, evolve in parallel, while all computations within and between the maps are localized in a small neighborhood. Moreover, interactions between maps are bidirectional and retinotopically organized, features also underlying processing by the human visual system. Within this framework, new techniques are proposed and developed for e.g. the segmentation of oriented textures, stereo analysis, optical flow detection, etc. Experiments show that the underlying algorithms prove to be successful for first-order as well as second-order grouping processes and show the promising possiblities such a framework can offer for a large number of low-level vision tasks.

  13. Compact configurations within small evolving groups of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamon, G. A.

    Small virialized groups of galaxies are evolved with a gravitational N-body code, where the galaxies and a diffuse background are treated as single particles, but with mass and luminosity profiles attached, which enbles the estimation of parameters such as internal energies, half-mass radii, and the softened potential energies of interaction. The numerical treatment includes mergers, collisional stripping, tidal limitation by the mean-field of the background (evaluated using a combination of instantaneous and impulsive formulations), galaxy heating from collisons, and background heating from dynamical friction. The groups start out either as dense as appear the groups in Hickson's (1982) catalog, or as loose as appear those in Turner and Gott's (1976a) catalog, and they are simulated many times (usually 20) with different initial positions and velocities. Dense groups of galaxies with massive dark haloes coalesce into a single galaxy and lose their compact group appearance in approximately 3 group half-mass crossing times, while dense groups of galaxies without massive haloes survive the merger instability for 15 half-mass crossing times (in a more massive background to keep the same total group mass).

  14. The Connection between Galaxies and Dark Matter Structures in the Local Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Reddick, Rachel M.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Behroozi, Peter S.

    2012-07-11

    We provide new constraints on the connection between galaxies in the local Universe, identified by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and dark matter halos and their constituent substructures in the {Lambda}CDM model using WMAP7 cosmological parameters. Predictions for the abundance and clustering properties of dark matter halos, and the relationship between dark matter hosts and substructures, are based on a high-resolution cosmological simulation, the Bolshoi simulation. We associate galaxies with dark matter halos and subhalos using subhalo abundance matching, and perform a comprehensive analysis which investigates the underlying assumptions of this technique including (a) which halo property is most closely associated with galaxy stellar masses and luminosities, (b) how much scatter is in this relationship, and (c) how much subhalos can be stripped before their galaxies are destroyed. The models are jointly constrained by new measurements of the projected two-point galaxy clustering and the observed conditional stellar mass function of galaxies in groups. We find that an abundance matching model that associates galaxies with the peak circular velocity of their halos is in good agreement with the data, when scatter of 0.20 {+-} 0.03 dex in stellar mass at a given peak velocity is included. This confirms the theoretical expectation that the stellar mass of galaxies is tightly correlated with the potential wells of their dark matter halos before they are impacted by larger structures. The data put tight constraints on the satellite fraction of galaxies as a function of galaxy stellar mass and on the scatter between halo and galaxy properties, and rule out several alternative abundance matching models that have been considered. This will yield important constraints for galaxy formation models, and also provides encouraging indications that the galaxy - halo connection can be modeled with sufficient fidelity for future precision studies of the dark Universe.

  15. The APOSTLE simulations: solutions to the Local Group's cosmic puzzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawala, Till; Frenk, Carlos S.; Fattahi, Azadeh; Navarro, Julio F.; Bower, Richard G.; Crain, Robert A.; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio; Furlong, Michelle; Helly, John. C.; Jenkins, Adrian; Oman, Kyle A.; Schaller, Matthieu; Schaye, Joop; Theuns, Tom; Trayford, James; White, Simon D. M.

    2016-04-01

    The Local Group galaxies offer some of the most discriminating tests of models of cosmic structure formation. For example, observations of the Milky Way (MW) and Andromeda satellite populations appear to be in disagreement with N-body simulations of the `lambda cold dark matter' (ΛCDM) model: there are far fewer satellite galaxies than substructures in CDM haloes (the `missing satellites' problem); dwarf galaxies seem to avoid the most massive substructures (the `too-big-to-fail' problem); and the brightest satellites appear to orbit their host galaxies on a thin plane (the `planes of satellites' problem). Here we present results from APOSTLE (A Project Of Simulating The Local Environment), a suite of cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of 12 volumes selected to match the kinematics of the Local Group (LG) members. Applying the EAGLE code to the LG environment, we find that our simulations match the observed abundance of LG galaxies, including the satellite galaxies of the MW and Andromeda. Due to changes to the structure of haloes and the evolution in the LG environment, the simulations reproduce the observed relation between stellar mass and velocity dispersion of individual dwarf spheroidal galaxies without necessitating the formation of cores in their dark matter profiles. Satellite systems form with a range of spatial anisotropies, including one similar to the MWs, confirming that such a configuration is not unexpected in ΛCDM. Finally, based on the observed velocity dispersion, size, and stellar mass, we provide estimates of the maximum circular velocity for the haloes of nine MW dwarf spheroidals.

  16. HSTPROMO and the Dynamics of the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besla, Gurtina

    2016-05-01

    Our understanding of the dynamics of our Local Group of galaxies has changed dramatically over the past few years owing to significant advancements in astrometry and our theoretical understanding of galaxy structure. I will provide an overview of key contributions by the Hubble Space Telescope to this evolving picture. In particular, I will highlight the HSTPROMO team’s proper motion measurements of key players in the Local Group, such as the fastest (Leo I) and most massive (LMC and SMC) satellites of the Milky Way and the first ever direct proper motion measurement of M31. These results have met with controversy, challenging preconceived notions of the orbital dynamics of key components of the Local Group. I will further highlight the importance of HST’s continued role in this field in the era of Gaia.

  17. Fossil Groups in the Local Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OSullivan, Ewan

    2005-01-01

    The two galaxies observed as part of this project were originally selected as fossil group candidates because of their isolation from other galaxies and their apparent high X-ray luminosity and extended X-ray emission. However, the X-ray data available was minimal, being drawn from the ROSAT All-Sky Survey. We have performed an initial analysis of the XMM data from both galaxies and found that their gaseous halos are smaller, cooler, and less luminous than expected. In the case of NGC 57, the RASS estimate of extent and luminosity was biased because of a previously unidentified background group which is visible in the XMM data to one side of the galaxy. In the case of IC 153 1, the contribution from background point sources near the galaxy appears to be to blame. This suggests that both galaxies should be reclassified as isolated ellipticals. Such systems are very rare, and currently poorly understood; for comparison, there are now 6-10 known fossil groups, but only one isolated elliptical with useful X-ray data. We are currently re-analyzing the data for the two galaxies to take advantage of the calibration improvements of SAS 6.1, and to include calculations of the mass profiles of the two systems. A paper is currently in preparation dealing with the X-ray properties and environment of the galaxies, and we expect to submit this to the Astrophysical Journal within the next two months. Multi-band optical imaging of the field surrounding NGC 57 has been acquired to confirm its isolated status and provide more information on the background group. IC 1531 was accepted as a target in Chandra cycle 6 as part of a related proposal, and we intend to add this new observation to our XMM data when it becomes available. A second paper is planned to include the results of this combined analysis.

  18. Population studies in groups and clusters of galaxies. III. A catalog of galaxies in five nearby groups

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, H.C.; Sandage, A. Mount Wilson and Las Campanas Observatories, Pasadena, CA Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD )

    1990-07-01

    Five nearby groups of galaxies have been surveyed using large-scale plates from the 2.5 m duPont Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. Catalogs of galaxies brighter than B(T) = 20 are presented for the Leo, Dorado, NGC 1400, NGC 5044, and Antlia groups. A total of 1044 galaxies are included, from visual inspection of 14 plates, covering 31 deg square. Galaxies have been classified in the extended Hubble system, and group memberships have been assigned based on velocity (where available) and morphology. About half the galaxies listed are likely members of one of the nearby groups. The catalogs are complete to B(T) = 18, although the completeness limits vary slightly from group to group. Based on King model fits to the surface density profiles, the core radii of the groups range from 0.3 to 1 Mpc, and central densities range from 120 to 1900 galaxies Mpc exp-3 brighter than M(BT) = -12.5. Dynamical analysis indicates that all of the groups are likely to be gravitationally bound. 64 refs.

  19. Examining the Center: Positions, Dominance, and Star Formation Rates of Most Massive Group Galaxies at Intermediate Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connelly, Jennifer L.; Parker, Laura C.; McGee, Sean; Mulchaey, John S.; Finoguenov, Alexis; Balogh, Michael; Wilman, David; Group Environment Evolution Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The group environment is believed to be the stage for many galaxy transformations, helping evolve blue star-forming galaxies to red passive ones. In local studies of galaxy clusters, the central member is usually a single dominant giant galaxy at the center of the potential with little star formation thought to be the result of galaxy mergers. In nearby groups, a range of morphologies and star formation rates are observed and the formation history is less clear. Further, the position and dominance of the central galaxy cannot be assumed in groups, which are less massive and evolved than clusters. To understand the connections between global group properties and properties of the central group galaxy at intermediate redshift, we examine galaxy groups from the Group Environment and Evolution Collaboration (GEEC) catalog, including both optically- and X-ray-selected groups at redshift z~0.4. The sample is diverse, containing a range in overall mass and evolutionary state. The number of groups is significant, membership is notably complete, and measurements span the IR to the UV allowing the properties of the members to be connected to those of the host groups. Having investigated trends in the global group properties previously, including mass and velocity substructure, we turn our attention now to the galaxy populations, focusing on the central regions of these systems. The most massive and second most massive group galaxies are identified by their stellar mass. The positions of the most massive galaxies (MMGs) are determined with respect to both the luminosity-weighted and X-ray center. Star formation rates are used to explore the fraction of passive/quiescent versus star-forming MMGs and the dominance of the MMGs in our group sample is also tested. Determinations of these characteristics and trends constitute the important first steps toward a detailed understanding of the relationships between the properties of host groups and their most massive galaxies and the

  20. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): galaxy radial alignments in GAMA groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Michael D.; Cole, Shaun; Frenk, Carlos S.; Kelvin, Lee; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Norberg, Peder; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, Sarah; Driver, Simon; Hopkins, Andrew; Liske, Jochen; Loveday, Jon; Robotham, Aaron

    2013-08-01

    We constrain the distributions of projected radial alignment angles of satellite galaxy shapes within the Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey group catalogue. We identify the galaxy groups using spectroscopic redshifts and measure galaxy projected ellipticities from Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging. With a sample of 3850 groups with 13 655 satellite galaxies with high quality shape measurements, we find a less than 2σ signal of radial alignments in the mean projected ellipticity components and the projected position angle when using galaxy shape estimates optimized for weak lensing measurements. Our radial alignment measurement increases to greater than 3σ significance relative to the expectation for no alignments if we use 2D Sérsic model fits to define galaxy orientations. Our weak measurement of radial alignments is in conflict with predictions from dark-matter N-body simulations, which we interpret as evidence for large misalignments of baryons and dark matter in group and cluster satellites. Within our uncertainties, that are dominated by our small sample size, we find only weak and marginally significant trends of the radial alignment angle distributions on projected distance from the group centre, host halo mass, and redshift that could be consistent with a tidal torquing mechanism for radial alignments. Using our lensing optimized shape estimators, we estimate that intrinsic alignments of galaxy group members may contribute a systematic error to the mean differential projected surface mass density of groups inferred from weak lensing observations by -1 ± 20 per cent at scales around 300 h-1 kpc from the group centre assuming a photometric redshift rms error of 10 per cent, and given our group sample with median redshift of 0.17 and median virial masses ˜1013 h-1 M⊙.

  1. Dynamics of galaxy structures in the Local Volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karachentsev, I. D.

    2016-10-01

    I consider a sample of `Updated Nearby Galaxy Catalog' that contains eight hundred objects within 11 Mpc. Environment of each galaxy is characterized by a tidal index Θ1 depending on separation and mass of the galaxy Main Disturber (=MD). The UNGC galaxies with a common MD are ascribed to its `suite' and ranked according to their Θ1. Fifteen the most populated suites contain more than half of the UNGC sample. The fraction of MDs among the brightest galaxies is almost 100% and drops to 50% at M_B = -18 mag. The observational properties of galaxies accumulated in UNGC are used to derive orbital masses of giant galaxies via motions of their satellites. The average orbital-to-stellar mass ratio for them is M orb M* ~= 30, corresponding to the mean local density of matter Ωm ~= 0.09, i.e 1/3 of the global cosmic one. The dark-to-stellar mass ratio for the Milky Way and M31 is typical for other neighboring giant galaxies.

  2. Star formation and environmental quenching of GEEC2 group galaxies at z ˜ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mok, Angus; Balogh, Michael L.; McGee, Sean L.; Wilman, David J.; Finoguenov, Alexis; Tanaka, Masayuki; Bower, Richard G.; Hou, Annie; Mulchaey, John S.; Parker, Laura C.

    2014-03-01

    We present new analysis from the Group Environment Evolution Collaboration 2 (GEEC2) spectroscopic survey of galaxy groups at 0.8 < z < 1. Our previous work revealed an intermediate population between the star-forming and quiescent sequences and a strong environmental dependence in the fraction of quiescent galaxies. Only ˜5 per cent of star-forming galaxies in both the group and field sample show a significant enhancement in star formation, which suggests that quenching is the primary process in the transition from the star-forming to the quiescent state. To model the environmental quenching scenario, we have tested the use of different exponential quenching time-scales and delays between satellite accretion and the onset of quenching. We find that with no delay, the quenching time-scale needs to be long in order to match the observed quiescent fraction, but then this model produces too many intermediate galaxies. Fixing a delay time of 3 Gyr, as suggested from the local Universe, produces too few quiescent galaxies. The observed fractions are best matched with a model that includes a delay that is proportional to the dynamical time and a rapid quenching time-scale (˜0.25 Gyr), but this model also predicts intermediate galaxies Hδ strength higher than that observed. Using stellar synthesis models, we have tested other scenarios, such as the rejuvenation of star formation in early-type galaxies and a portion of quenched galaxies possessing residual star formation. If environment quenching plays a role in the GEEC2 sample, then our work suggests that only a fraction of intermediate galaxies may be undergoing this transition and that quenching occurs quite rapidly in satellite galaxies (≲0.25 Gyr).

  3. Comparisons of the galaxy age, stellar velocity dispersion and K-band luminosity distributions between grouped galaxies and isolated ones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ping; Deng, Xin-Fa

    2016-02-01

    In two volume-limited Main galaxy samples of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 10 (SDSS DR10), we compare the age, stellar velocity dispersion and K-band luminosity distributions of grouped galaxies with those of isolated galaxies, to explore the environmental dependence of these properties of galaxies. It is found that grouped galaxies have preferentially larger stellar velocity dispersions and are preferentially older than isolated galaxies. We also note apparent difference of K-band luminosity distribution at both extremes of density in the luminous volume-limited Main galaxy sample: grouped galaxies are preferentially more luminous than isolated galaxies, while this difference in the faint volume-limited Main galaxy sample is very small.

  4. Test of Current Ideas about Compact Groups of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabaca, Carlos Roberto

    1997-12-01

    In this dissertation we test a number of current ideas about compact groups by focusing on some fundamental paradoxes that they pose about galaxy evolution. Conflicts between observations and models have led some to propose that compact groups are not real physical systems. We tested the physical reality of the groups by studying the strength of the interaction-induced enhancement in the optical and infrared luminosity functions. We also searched for optical interaction tracers in two famous groups: VV 172 and Seyfert's Sextet. The presence of a luminosity enhancement was verified, relative to a sample of isolated field galaxies, supporting the reality of, at least, some of the groups. The luminosity function enhancement was found to be smaller than the one observed in samples of paired galaxies and, especially, merger candidates. We also addressed the question of which groups were most likely physical with a statistical analysis of their environment relative to field galaxies, loose groups, and clusters of galaxies. Groups of only three accordant members were found to be more likely chance alignments and to be located closer to denser aggregates of galaxies than field galaxies. Models for compact groups predict that they are dynamically unstable to rapid coalescence. We searched for the (theoretically) expected population of merger remnants by comparing the optical luminosity function of the groups as units with that of field ellipticals. We found very few field ellipticals with luminosities as high as those expected from compact group mergers even allowing for some dimming. The detection of optical diffuse light in the potential of VV 172 is a further indication that these systems are physically dense and more dynamically evolved than predicted by the theoretical models. A detailed analysis of Seyfert's Sextet using Hubble Space Telescope images revealed that a quiescent coalescence event may be occurring among the galaxies in that compact group. Compact groups

  5. New distances to galaxies in the Centaurus A group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karachentsev, I. D.; Sharina, M. E.; Dolphin, A. E.; Grebel, E. K.; Geisler, D.; Guhathakurta, P.; Hodge, P. W.; Karachentseva, V. E.; Sarajedini, A.; Seitzer, P.

    2002-04-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope/WFPC2 images of seventeen dwarf galaxies in the Centaurus A group. Their distances derived from the magnitudes of the tip of the red giant branch are 5.2 Mpc (KK112), 3.2 Mpc (ESO 321-014), 3.5 Mpc (KK179), 3.4 Mpc (NGC 5102), 4.6 Mpc (KK200), 3.7 Mpc (ESO 324-024), 4.7 Mpc (KK208), 4.6 Mpc (ESO 444-084), 4.4 Mpc (IC 4316), 4.5 Mpc (NGC 5264), 3.6 Mpc (KK211), 3.6 Mpc (KK213), 3.4 Mpc (ESO 325-011), 3.8 Mpc (KK217), 4.0 Mpc (KK221), 4.8 Mpc (NGC 5408), and 3.6 Mpc (PGC 51659). The galaxies are concentrated in two spatially separated groups around NGC 5128 = Cen A and NGC 5236 = M 83. The Cen A group itself has a mean distance of 3.63+/- 0.07 Mpc, a velocity dispersion of 89 km s-1, a mean projected radius of 263 kpc, an estimated orbital mass of 2.1x 1012 Msun, and an orbital mass-to-blue luminosity ratio of 64 Msun/Lsun. For the M 83 group we derived a mean distance of 4.57+/- 0.05 Mpc, a velocity dispersion of 62 km s-1, a mean projected radius of 142 kpc, an estimated orbital mass of 0.8x 1012 Msun, and Morb/LB = 37 Msun/Lsun. The M 83 group moves away from the Cen A group, which yields a radius of the zero-velocity surface of the Cen A group of R0 < 1.26 Mpc. The total mass within R0, M0 < 2.7x 1012 Msun, agrees with the orbital mass estimate. The centroids of both the groups have very small peculiar velocities, (+18+/- 24) km s-1 (Cen A) and (-17+/-27) km s-1 (M 83) with respect to the local Hubble flow with H0 = 70 km s-1 Mpc-1. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. The Space Telescope Science Institute is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. Figure 3 is only available in electronic form at http://www.edpsciences.org

  6. SPIDER - IX. Classifying galaxy groups according to their velocity distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, A. L. B.; de Carvalho, R. R.; Trevisan, M.; Capelato, H. V.; La Barbera, F.; Lopes, P. A. A.; Schilling, A. C.

    2013-09-01

    We introduce a new method to study the velocity distribution of galaxy systems, the Hellinger Distance (HD), designed for detecting departures from a Gaussian velocity distribution. Testing different approaches to measure normality of a distribution, we conclude that HD is the least vulnerable method to type I and II statistical errors. We define a relaxed galactic system as the one with unimodal velocity distribution and a normality deviation below a critical value (HD < 0.05). In this work, we study the Gaussian nature of the velocity distribution of the Berlind group sample, and of the FoF groups from the Millennium simulation. For the Berlind group sample (z < 0.1), 67 per cent of the systems are classified as relaxed, while for the Millennium sample we find 63 per cent (z = 0). We verify that in multi-modal groups the average mass of modes in high-multiplicity (N ≥ 20) systems are significantly larger than in low-multiplicity ones (N < 20), suggesting that groups experience a mass growth at an increasing virialization rate towards z = 0, with larger systems accreting more massive subunits. We also investigate the connection between galaxy properties ([Fe/H], Age, eClass, g - r, Rpetro and <μpetro>) and the Gaussianity of the velocity distribution of the groups. Bright galaxies (Mr ≤ -20.7) residing in the inner and outer regions of groups do not show significant differences in the listed quantities regardless if the group has a Gaussian (G) or a Non-Gaussian (NG) velocity distribution. However, the situation is significantly different when we examine the faint galaxies (-20.7 < Mr ≤ -17.9). In G groups, there is a remarkable difference between the galaxy properties of the inner and outer galaxy populations, testifying how the environment is affecting the galaxies. Instead, in NG groups there is no segregation between the properties of galaxies in the inner and outer regions, showing that the properties of these galaxies still reflect the physical

  7. Local expansion flows of galaxies: quantifying acceleration effect of dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, A. D.; Teerikorpi, P.

    2013-08-01

    The nearest expansion flow of galaxies observed around the Local group is studied as an archetypical example of the newly discovered local expansion flows around groups and clusters of galaxies in the nearby Universe. The flow is accelerating due to the antigravity produced by the universal dark energy background. We introduce a new acceleration measure of the flow which is the dimensionless ``acceleration parameter" Q (x) = x - x-2 depending on the normalized distance x only. The parameter is zero at the zero-gravity distance x = 1, and Q(x) ∝ x, when x ≫ 1. At the distance x = 3, the parameter Q = 2.9. Since the expansion flows have a self-similar structure in normalized variables, we expect that the result is valid as well for all the other expansion flows around groups and clusters of galaxies on the spatial scales from ˜ 1 to ˜ 10 Mpc everywhere in the Universe.

  8. Dynamical history of the Local Group in ΛCDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banik, Indranil; Zhao, Hongsheng

    2016-06-01

    The positions and velocities of galaxies in the Local Group (LG) measure the gravitational field within it. This is mostly due to the Milky Way (MW) and Andromeda (M31). We constrain their masses using distance and radial velocity (RV) measurements of 32 LG galaxies. To do this, we follow the trajectories of many simulated particles starting on a pure Hubble flow at redshift 9. For each observed galaxy, we obtain a trajectory which today is at the same position. Its final velocity is the model prediction for the velocity of that galaxy. Unlike previous simulations based on spherical symmetry, ours are axisymmetric and include gravity from Centaurus A. We find the total LG mass is {4.33^{+0.37}_{-0.32}× {10}^{12} M_{⊙}}, with 0.14 ± 0.07 of this being in the MW. We approximately account for IC 342, M81, the Great Attractor and the Large Magellanic Cloud. No plausible set of initial conditions yields a good match to the RVs of our sample of LG galaxies. Observed RVs systematically exceed those predicted by the best-fitting Lambda Cold Dark Matter (ΛCDM) model, with a typical disagreement of {45.1^{+7.0}_{-5.7}} km s-1 and a maximum of 110 ± 13 km s-1 for DDO 99. Interactions between LG dwarf galaxies cannot easily explain this. One possibility is a past close flyby of the MW and M31. This arises in some modified gravity theories but not in ΛCDM. Gravitational slingshot encounters of material in the LG with either of these massive fast-moving galaxies could plausibly explain why some non-satellite LG galaxies are moving away from us even faster than a pure Hubble flow.

  9. THE DEEP2 GALAXY REDSHIFT SURVEY: THE VORONOI-DELAUNAY METHOD CATALOG OF GALAXY GROUPS

    SciTech Connect

    Gerke, Brian F.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Davis, Marc; Coil, Alison L.; Cooper, Michael C.; Dutton, Aaron A.; Faber, S. M.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Noeske, Kai; Rosario, David J.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Willmer, Christopher N. A.; Yan, Renbin

    2012-05-20

    We present a public catalog of galaxy groups constructed from the spectroscopic sample of galaxies in the fourth data release from the Deep Extragalactic Evolutionary Probe 2 (DEEP2) Galaxy Redshift Survey, including the Extended Groth Strip (EGS). The catalog contains 1165 groups with two or more members in the EGS over the redshift range 0 < z < 1.5 and 1295 groups at z > 0.6 in the rest of DEEP2. Twenty-five percent of EGS galaxies and fourteen percent of high-z DEEP2 galaxies are assigned to galaxy groups. The groups were detected using the Voronoi-Delaunay method (VDM) after it has been optimized on mock DEEP2 catalogs following similar methods to those employed in Gerke et al. In the optimization effort, we have taken particular care to ensure that the mock catalogs resemble the data as closely as possible, and we have fine-tuned our methods separately on mocks constructed for the EGS and the rest of DEEP2. We have also probed the effect of the assumed cosmology on our inferred group-finding efficiency by performing our optimization on three different mock catalogs with different background cosmologies, finding large differences in the group-finding success we can achieve for these different mocks. Using the mock catalog whose background cosmology is most consistent with current data, we estimate that the DEEP2 group catalog is 72% complete and 61% pure (74% and 67% for the EGS) and that the group finder correctly classifies 70% of galaxies that truly belong to groups, with an additional 46% of interloper galaxies contaminating the catalog (66% and 43% for the EGS). We also confirm that the VDM catalog reconstructs the abundance of galaxy groups with velocity dispersions above {approx}300 km s{sup -1} to an accuracy better than the sample variance, and this successful reconstruction is not strongly dependent on cosmology. This makes the DEEP2 group catalog a promising probe of the growth of cosmic structure that can potentially be used for cosmological tests.

  10. Measurable Relationship between Bright Galaxies and Their Faint Companions in WHL J085910.0+294957, a Galaxy Cluster at z = 0.30: Vestiges of Infallen Groups?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joon Hyeop; Lee, Hye-Ran; Kim, Minjin; Seon, Kwang-Il; Kim, Sang Chul; Yang, Soung-Chul; Ree, Chang Hee; Lee, Jong Chul; Jeong, Hyunjin; Ko, Jongwan; Choi, Changsu

    2014-08-01

    The properties of satellite galaxies are closely related to their host galaxies in galaxy groups. In cluster environments, on the other hand, the interaction between close neighbors is known to be limited. Our goal is to examine the relationships between host and satellite galaxies in the harsh environment of a galaxy cluster. To achieve this goal, we study a galaxy cluster WHL J085910.0+294957 at z = 0.30 using deep images obtained with CQUEAN CCD camera mounted on the 2.1 m Otto Struve Telescope. After member selection based on the scaling relations of photometric and structural parameters, we investigate the relationship between bright (Mi <= -18) galaxies and their faint (-18 < Mi <= -15) companions. The weighted mean color of faint companion galaxies shows no significant dependence (<1σ to bootstrap uncertainties) on cluster-centric distance and local luminosity density as well as the luminosity and concentration of an adjacent bright galaxy. However, the weighted mean color shows marginal dependence (~2.2σ) on the color of an adjacent bright galaxy when the sample is limited to bright galaxies with at least two faint companions. By using a permutation test, we confirm that the correlation in color between bright galaxies and their faint companions in this cluster is statistically significant with a confidence level of 98.7%. The statistical significance increases if we additionally remove non-members using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric redshift information (~2.6σ and 99.3%). Our results suggest three possible scenarios: (1) vestiges of infallen groups, (2) dwarf capturing, and (3) tidal tearing of bright galaxies.

  11. Measurable relationship between bright galaxies and their faint companions in WHL J085910.0+294957, a galaxy cluster at z = 0.30: vestiges of infallen groups?

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Joon Hyeop; Lee, Hye-Ran; Kim, Minjin; Seon, Kwang-Il; Kim, Sang Chul; Yang, Soung-Chul; Ree, Chang Hee; Lee, Jong Chul; Jeong, Hyunjin; Ko, Jongwan; Choi, Changsu

    2014-08-20

    The properties of satellite galaxies are closely related to their host galaxies in galaxy groups. In cluster environments, on the other hand, the interaction between close neighbors is known to be limited. Our goal is to examine the relationships between host and satellite galaxies in the harsh environment of a galaxy cluster. To achieve this goal, we study a galaxy cluster WHL J085910.0+294957 at z = 0.30 using deep images obtained with CQUEAN CCD camera mounted on the 2.1 m Otto Struve Telescope. After member selection based on the scaling relations of photometric and structural parameters, we investigate the relationship between bright (M{sub i} ≤ –18) galaxies and their faint (–18 < M{sub i} ≤ –15) companions. The weighted mean color of faint companion galaxies shows no significant dependence (<1σ to bootstrap uncertainties) on cluster-centric distance and local luminosity density as well as the luminosity and concentration of an adjacent bright galaxy. However, the weighted mean color shows marginal dependence (∼2.2σ) on the color of an adjacent bright galaxy when the sample is limited to bright galaxies with at least two faint companions. By using a permutation test, we confirm that the correlation in color between bright galaxies and their faint companions in this cluster is statistically significant with a confidence level of 98.7%. The statistical significance increases if we additionally remove non-members using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric redshift information (∼2.6σ and 99.3%). Our results suggest three possible scenarios: (1) vestiges of infallen groups, (2) dwarf capturing, and (3) tidal tearing of bright galaxies.

  12. Nebular metallicities in two isolated local void dwarf galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholls, David C.; Jerjen, Helmut; Dopita, Michael A.; Basurah, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Isolated dwarf galaxies, especially those situated in voids, may provide insight into primordial conditions in the universe and the physical processes that govern star formation in undisturbed stellar systems. The metallicity of H II regions in such galaxies is key to investigating this possibility. From the SIGRID sample of isolated dwarf galaxies, we have identified two exceptionally isolated objects, the Local Void galaxy [KK98]246 (ESO 461-G036) and another somewhat larger dwarf irregular on the edge of the Local Void, MCG-01-41-006 (HIPASS J1609-04). We report our measurements of the nebular metallicities in these objects. The first object has a single low luminosity H II region, while the second is in a more vigorous star forming phase with several bright H II regions. We find that the metallicities in both galaxies are typical for galaxies of this size, and do not indicate the presence of any primordial gas, despite (for [KK98]246) the known surrounding large reservoir of neutral hydrogen.

  13. STRUCTURES OF LOCAL GALAXIES COMPARED TO HIGH-REDSHIFT STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Petty, Sara M.; De Mello, DuIlia F.; Gallagher, John S.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Lotz, Jennifer M.; Matt Mountain, C.; Smith, Linda J.

    2009-08-15

    The rest-frame far-ultraviolet morphologies of eight nearby interacting and starburst galaxies (Arp 269, M 82, Mrk 8, NGC 520, NGC 1068, NGC 3079, NGC 3310, and NGC 7673) are compared with 54 galaxies at z {approx} 1.5 and 46 galaxies at z {approx} 4 observed in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys onboard the Hubble Space Telescope. The nearby sample is artificially redshifted to z {approx} 1.5 and 4 by applying luminosity and size scaling. We compare the simulated galaxy morphologies to real z {approx} 1.5 and 4 UV-bright galaxy morphologies. We calculate the Gini coefficient (G), the second-order moment of the brightest 20% of the galaxy's flux (M {sub 20}), and the Sersic index (n). We explore the use of nonparametric methods with two-dimensional profile fitting and find the combination of M {sub 20} with n an efficient method to classify galaxies as having merger, exponential disk, or bulge-like morphologies. When classified according to G and M {sub 20} 20/30% of real/simulated galaxies at z {approx} 1.5 and 37/12% at z {approx} 4 have bulge-like morphologies. The rest have merger-like or intermediate distributions. Alternatively, when classified according to the Sersic index, 70% of the z {approx} 1.5 and z {approx} 4 real galaxies are exponential disks or bulge-like with n>0.8, and {approx} 30% of the real galaxies are classified as mergers. The artificially redshifted galaxies have n values with {approx} 35% bulge or exponential at z {approx} 1.5 and 4. Therefore, {approx} 20%-30% of Lyman-break galaxies have structures similar to local starburst mergers, and may be driven by similar processes. We assume merger-like or clumpy star-forming galaxies in the GOODS field have morphological structure with values n < 0.8 and M {sub 20}> - 1.7. We conclude that Mrk 8, NGC 3079, and NGC 7673 have structures similar to those of merger-like and clumpy star-forming galaxies observed at z {approx} 1.5 and 4.

  14. Multi-wavelengths studies of fossil galaxy groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosroshahi, H. G.

    2016-09-01

    Fossil systems are understood to be the end product of galaxy mergers within groups and clusters. Their halo morphology points to their relaxed/virialised nature, thus allowing them to employed as observational probes for the evolution of cosmic structures, their thermodynamics and dark matter distribution. Cosmological simulations, and their underlying models, are broadly consistent with the early formation epoch for fossils. In a series of studies we have looked into the dark matter, IGM and galaxy properties, across a wide range of wavelengths, from X-ray through optical and IR to the Radio, to achieve a better understating of fossil systems, the attributed halo age, IGM heating and their AGNs and use them as laboratories to probe galaxy formation models. We combine luminosity gap with luminosity segregation to identify the most dynamically relaxed systems which allows us to reveal brand new connections between galaxies and their environments.

  15. On the Formation of Elliptical Galaxies via Mergers in Galaxy Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taranu, Dan; Dubinski, John; Yee, Howard K. C.

    2015-08-01

    Giant elliptical galaxies have long been thought to form through gas-rich "major" mergers of two roughly equal-mass spiral galaxies. However, ellipticals are often found at the centers of groups and are likely to have undergone several significant mergers since z=2. We test the hypothesis that ellipticals form through multiple, mainly minor and dry mergers in groups, using hundreds of N-body simulations of mergers in groups of three to twenty-five spirals (Taranu et al. 2013).Realistic mock observations of the central merger remnants show that they have similar surface brightness profiles to local ellipticals. The size-luminosity and velocity dispersion-luminosity relations have modest (~0.1 dex) scatter, with similar slopes; however, most remnants are too large and have too low dispersions for their luminosities. Some remnants show substantial (v/σ > 0.1) rotational support, but most are slow rotators with v/σ << 0.5.Ellipticals also follow a tight "fundamental plane" scaling relation between size R, mean surface brightness μ and velocity dispersion σ: R ∝ σ^a μ^b. This relation has small (<0.06 dex) scatter and significantly different coefficients from the expected scaling (a "tilt"). The remnants lie on a similar fundamental plane, with even smaller scatter (0.02 dex) and a tilt in the correct sense - albeit weaker than observed. This tilt is caused by variable dark matter fractions within the effective radius, such that massive merger remnants have larger central dark matter fractions than their lower-mass counterparts (Taranu et al. 2015).These results suggest that massive ellipticals can originate from multiple, mainly minor and dry mergers of spirals at z<2, producing tight scaling relations in the process. However, significant gas dissipation and/or more compact progenitor spirals may be needed to produce lower-mass, rapidly-rotating ellipticals. I will also show preliminary results from simulations with more realistic progenitor galaxies (including

  16. INTERGALACTIC GAS IN GROUPS OF GALAXIES: IMPLICATIONS FOR DWARF SPHEROIDAL FORMATION AND THE MISSING BARYONS PROBLEM

    SciTech Connect

    Freeland, E.; Wilcots, E. E-mail: ewilcots@astro.wisc.edu

    2011-09-10

    Radio galaxies with bent jets are predominantly located in groups and clusters of galaxies. We use bent-double radio sources, under the assumption that their jets are bent by ram pressure, to probe intragroup medium (IGM) gas densities in galaxy groups. This method provides a direct measurement of the intergalactic gas density and allows us to probe intergalactic gas at large radii and in systems whose IGM is too cool to be detected by the current generation of X-ray telescopes. We find gas with densities of 10{sup -3} to 10{sup -4} cm{sup -3} at group radii from 15 to 700 kpc. A rough estimate of the total baryonic mass in intergalactic gas is consistent with the missing baryons being located in the IGM of galaxy groups. The neutral gas will be easily stripped from dwarf galaxies with total masses of 10{sup 6}-10{sup 7} M{sub sun} in the groups studied here. Indications are that intragroup gas densities in less-massive systems like the Local Group should be high enough to strip gas from dwarfs like Leo T and, in combination with tides, produce dwarf spheroidals.

  17. A 17-billion-solar-mass black hole in a group galaxy with a diffuse core.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jens; Ma, Chung-Pei; McConnell, Nicholas J; Greene, Jenny E; Blakeslee, John P; Janish, Ryan

    2016-04-21

    Quasars are associated with and powered by the accretion of material onto massive black holes; the detection of highly luminous quasars with redshifts greater than z = 6 suggests that black holes of up to ten billion solar masses already existed 13 billion years ago. Two possible present-day 'dormant' descendants of this population of 'active' black holes have been found in the galaxies NGC 3842 and NGC 4889 at the centres of the Leo and Coma galaxy clusters, which together form the central region of the Great Wall--the largest local structure of galaxies. The most luminous quasars, however, are not confined to such high-density regions of the early Universe; yet dormant black holes of this high mass have not yet been found outside of modern-day rich clusters. Here we report observations of the stellar velocity distribution in the galaxy NGC 1600--a relatively isolated elliptical galaxy near the centre of a galaxy group at a distance of 64 megaparsecs from Earth. We use orbit superposition models to determine that the black hole at the centre of NGC 1600 has a mass of 17 billion solar masses. The spatial distribution of stars near the centre of NGC 1600 is rather diffuse. We find that the region of depleted stellar density in the cores of massive elliptical galaxies extends over the same radius as the gravitational sphere of influence of the central black holes, and interpret this as the dynamical imprint of the black holes. PMID:27049949

  18. A 17-billion-solar-mass black hole in a group galaxy with a diffuse core.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jens; Ma, Chung-Pei; McConnell, Nicholas J; Greene, Jenny E; Blakeslee, John P; Janish, Ryan

    2016-04-21

    Quasars are associated with and powered by the accretion of material onto massive black holes; the detection of highly luminous quasars with redshifts greater than z = 6 suggests that black holes of up to ten billion solar masses already existed 13 billion years ago. Two possible present-day 'dormant' descendants of this population of 'active' black holes have been found in the galaxies NGC 3842 and NGC 4889 at the centres of the Leo and Coma galaxy clusters, which together form the central region of the Great Wall--the largest local structure of galaxies. The most luminous quasars, however, are not confined to such high-density regions of the early Universe; yet dormant black holes of this high mass have not yet been found outside of modern-day rich clusters. Here we report observations of the stellar velocity distribution in the galaxy NGC 1600--a relatively isolated elliptical galaxy near the centre of a galaxy group at a distance of 64 megaparsecs from Earth. We use orbit superposition models to determine that the black hole at the centre of NGC 1600 has a mass of 17 billion solar masses. The spatial distribution of stars near the centre of NGC 1600 is rather diffuse. We find that the region of depleted stellar density in the cores of massive elliptical galaxies extends over the same radius as the gravitational sphere of influence of the central black holes, and interpret this as the dynamical imprint of the black holes.

  19. The HI Content of Galaxies in Groups and Clusters as Measured by ALFALFA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odekon, Mary Crone; Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Haynes, Martha P.; Finn, Rose A.; McGowan, Christopher; Micula, Adina; Reed, Lyle; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Hallenbeck, Gregory

    2016-06-01

    We present the HI content of galaxies in nearby groups and clusters as measured by the 70% complete Arecibo Legacy Fast-ALFA (ALFALFA) survey, including constraints from ALFALFA detection limits. Our sample includes 22 systems at distances between 70 and 160 Mpc over the mass range 12.5<' {log} M/{M}⊙ < 15.0, for a total of 1986 late-type galaxies. We find that late-type galaxies in the centers of groups lack HI at fixed stellar mass relative to the regions surrounding them. Larger groups show evidence of a stronger dependence of HI properties on environment, despite a similar dependence of color on environment at fixed stellar mass. We compare several environment variables to determine which is the best predictor of galaxy properties; group-centric distance r and r/{R}200 are similarly effective predictors, while local density is slightly more effective and group size and halo mass are slightly less effective. While both central and satellite galaxies in the blue cloud exhibit a significant dependence of HI content on local density, only centrals show a strong dependence on stellar mass, and only satellites show a strong dependence on halo mass. Finally, we see evidence that HI is deficient for blue cloud galaxies in denser environments even when both stellar mass and color are fixed. This is consistent with a picture where HI is removed or destroyed, followed by reddening within the blue cloud. Our results support the existence of pre-processing in isolated groups, along with an additional rapid mechanism for gas removal within larger groups and clusters, perhaps ram-pressure stripping.

  20. FREQUENT SPIN REORIENTATION OF GALAXIES DUE TO LOCAL INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Cen, Renyue

    2014-04-10

    We study the evolution of angular momenta of M {sub *} = 10{sup 10}-10{sup 12} M {sub ☉} galaxies utilizing large-scale ultra-high resolution cosmological hydrodynamic simulations and find that the spin of the stellar component changes direction frequently because of interactions with nearby systems, such as major mergers, minor mergers, significant gas inflows, and torques. The rate and nature of change of spin direction cannot be accounted for by large-scale tidal torques, because the rates of the latter fall short by orders of magnitude and because the apparent random swings of the spin direction are inconsistent with the alignment by linear density field. The implications for galaxy formation as well as the intrinsic alignment of galaxies are profound. Assuming the large-scale tidal field is the sole alignment agent, a new picture emerging is that intrinsic alignment of galaxies would be a balance between slow large-scale coherent torquing and fast spin reorientation by local interactions. What is still open is whether other processes, such as feeding galaxies with gas and stars along filaments or sheets, introduce coherence for spin directions of galaxies along the respective structures.

  1. THE RELATION BETWEEN MORPHOLOGY AND DYNAMICS OF POOR GROUPS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Tovmassian, Hrant M.; Plionis, M. E-mail: mplionis@astro.noa.gr

    2009-05-10

    shape, should be attributed mostly to the dynamical state of groups, and (2) groups of galaxies in the local universe do not constitute a family of objects in dynamical equilibrium, but rather a family of cosmic structures that are presently at various stages of their virialization process.

  2. Loose groups of galaxies in the Perseus-Pisces survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trasarti-Battistoni, R.

    1998-06-01

    We present a large catalog of loose groups of galaxies in the Southern Galactic Hemisphere, selected from the Perseus-Pisces redshift Survey (PPS). Particular care is taken in order to obtain group samples as homogeneous as possible to previously published catalogs. All our catalogs contain about 200 groups, significantly more than in most previous studies where group samples were obtained from galaxy data sets of comparable quality to (but smaller extent than) PPS. Groups are identified with the adaptive Friends-Of-Friends (FOF) algorithm of \\cite[Huchra & Geller (1982),]{HG82} with suitable normalizations D_0=0.231 \\ h(-1) Mpc and V_0=350 \\ km \\ s(-1) at cz_0=1000 \\ km \\ s(-1) . The luminosity function (LF) normalization phi_ *=0.02 \\ h(3) \\ Mpc(-3) appropriate for PPS yields a number density threshold delta n/n ~ 180 for the adopted D_0, instead of delta n/n ~ 80 used in previous studies of other samples. However, the customary choice of D_0 obtained (through the LF) from a fixed mass overdensity delta rho / rho =80, well motivated in theory, suffers from important observational uncertainties and sample-to-sample variations of the LF normalization, and from major uncertainties in the relation between galaxy density n and mass density rho . We discuss how to self-consistently match FOF parameters among different galaxy samples. We then separately vary several FOF and sample parameters, and discuss their effect on group properties. Loose groups in PPS nicely trace the large scale structure (LSS) in the parent galaxy sample. The group properties vary little with different redshift corrections, redshift cut-off, and galaxy LF, but are rather sensitive to the adopted links D_0 and V_0. More precisely, the typical group size (velocity dispersion) is linearly related to the adopted distance (velocity) link, while it is rather insensitive to the adopted velocity (distance) link. Physical properties of groups in PPS and in directly comparable samples show good

  3. Elliptical galaxies kinematics within general relativity with renormalization group effects

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, Davi C.

    2012-09-01

    The renormalization group framework can be applied to Quantum Field Theory on curved space-time, but there is no proof whether the beta-function of the gravitational coupling indeed goes to zero in the far infrared or not. In a recent paper [1] we have shown that the amount of dark matter inside spiral galaxies may be negligible if a small running of the General Relativity coupling G is present (δG/G{sub 0}∼<10{sup −7} across a galaxy). Here we extend the proposed model to elliptical galaxies and present a detailed analysis on the modeling of NGC 4494 (an ordinary elliptical) and NGC 4374 (a giant elliptical). In order to compare our results to a well known alternative model to the standard dark matter picture, we also evaluate NGC 4374 with MOND. In this galaxy MOND leads to a significative discrepancy with the observed velocity dispersion curve and has a significative tendency towards tangential anisotropy. On the other hand, the approach based on the renormalization group and general relativity (RGGR) could be applied with good results to these elliptical galaxies and is compatible with lower mass-to-light ratios (of about the Kroupa IMF type)

  4. ON THE BARYON FRACTIONS IN CLUSTERS AND GROUPS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Dai Xinyu; Bregman, Joel N.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Rasia, Elena

    2010-08-10

    We present the baryon fractions of 2MASS groups and clusters as a function of cluster richness using total and gas masses measured from stacked ROSAT X-ray data and stellar masses estimated from the infrared galaxy catalogs. We detect X-ray emission even in the outskirts of clusters, beyond r {sub 200} for richness classes with X-ray temperatures above 1 keV. This enables us to more accurately determine the total gas mass in these groups and clusters. We find that the optically selected groups and clusters have flatter temperature profiles and higher stellar-to-gas mass ratios than the individually studied, X-ray bright clusters. We also find that the stellar mass in poor groups with temperatures below 1 keV is comparable to the gas mass in these systems. Combining these results with individual measurements for clusters, groups, and galaxies from the literature, we find a break in the baryon fraction at {approx}1 keV. Above this temperature, the baryon fraction scales with temperature as f{sub b} {proportional_to} T {sup 0.20{+-}0.03}. We see significantly smaller baryon fractions below this temperature and the baryon fraction of poor groups joins smoothly onto that of systems with still shallower potential wells such as normal and dwarf galaxies where the baryon fraction scales with the inferred velocity dispersion as f{sub b} {proportional_to} {sigma}{sup 1.6}. The small scatter in the baryon fraction at any given potential well depth favors a universal baryon loss mechanism and a preheating model for the baryon loss. The scatter is, however, larger for less massive systems. Finally, we note that although the broken power-law relation can be inferred from data points in the literature alone, the consistency between the baryon fractions for poor groups and massive galaxies inspires us to fit the two categories of objects (galaxies and clusters) with one relation.

  5. The local hole revealed by galaxy counts and redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitbourn, J. R.; Shanks, T.

    2014-01-01

    The redshifts of ≈250 000 galaxies are used to study the local hole and its associated peculiar velocities. The sample, compiled from the 6dF Galaxy Redshift Survey and Sloan Digital Sky Survey, provides wide sky coverage to a depth of ≈300 h-1 Mpc. We have therefore examined K- and r-limited galaxy redshift distributions and number counts to map the local density field. Comparing observed galaxy n(z) distributions to homogeneous models in three large regions of the high-latitude sky, we find evidence for underdensities ranging from ≈4-40 per cent in these regions to depths of ≈150 h-1 Mpc with the deepest underdensity being over the southern Galactic cap. Using the Galaxy and Mass Assembly survey, we then establish the normalization of galaxy counts at fainter magnitudes and thus confirm that the underdensity over all three fields at K < 12.5 is ≈15 ± 3 per cent. Finally, we further use redshift catalogues to map sky-averaged peculiar velocities over the same areas using the average redshift-magnitude, overline{z}(m), technique of Soneira. After accounting for the direct effect of the large-scale structure on overline{z}(m), we can then search for peculiar velocities. Taking all three regions into consideration, the data reject at the ≈4σ level the idea that we have recovered the cosmic microwave background rest frame in the volume probed. We therefore conclude that there is some consistent evidence from both counts and Hubble diagrams for a `local hole' with an ≈150 h-1 Mpc underdensity that deeper counts and redshifts in the northern Galactic cap suggest may extend to ≈300 h-1 Mpc.

  6. Galaxies in X-Ray Groups. I. Robust Membership Assignment and the Impact of Group Environments on Quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Matthew R.; Leauthaud, Alexie; Bundy, Kevin; Finoguenov, Alexis; Tinker, Jeremy; Lin, Yen-Ting; Mei, Simona; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Aussel, Hervé; Behroozi, Peter S.; Busha, Michael T.; Capak, Peter; Coccato, Lodovico; Covone, Giovanni; Faure, Cecile; Fiorenza, Stephanie L.; Ilbert, Olivier; Le Floc'h, Emeric; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Tanaka, Masayuki; Wechsler, Risa H.; Wolk, Melody

    2011-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that lead dense environments to host galaxies with redder colors, more spheroidal morphologies, and lower star formation rates than field populations remains an important problem. As most candidate processes ultimately depend on host halo mass, accurate characterizations of the local environment, ideally tied to halo mass estimates and spanning a range in halo mass and redshift, are needed. In this work, we present and test a rigorous, probabilistic method for assigning galaxies to groups based on precise photometric redshifts and X-ray-selected groups drawn from the COSMOS field. The groups have masses in the range 1013 <~ M 200c/M ⊙ <~ 1014 and span redshifts 0 < z < 1. We characterize our selection algorithm via tests on spectroscopic subsamples, including new data obtained at the Very Large Telescope, and by applying our method to detailed mock catalogs. We find that our group member galaxy sample has a purity of 84% and completeness of 92% within 0.5{R_{200c}}. We measure the impact of uncertainties in redshifts and group centering on the quality of the member selection with simulations based on current data as well as future imaging and spectroscopic surveys. As a first application of our new group member catalog which will be made publicly available, we show that member galaxies exhibit a higher quenched fraction compared to the field at fixed stellar mass out to z ~ 1, indicating a significant relationship between star formation and environment at group scales. We also address the suggestion that dusty star-forming galaxies in such groups may impact the high-l power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background and find that such a population cannot explain the low power seen in recent Sunyaev-Zel'dovich measurements.

  7. The radial distribution of galaxies in groups and clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budzynski, J. M.; Koposov, S. E.; McCarthy, I. G.; McGee, S. L.; Belokurov, V.

    2012-06-01

    We present a new catalogue of 55 121 groups and clusters centred on luminous red galaxies from Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 in the redshift range 0.15 ≤z≤ 0.4. We provide halo mass (M500) estimates for each of these groups derived from a calibration between the optical richness of bright galaxies (Mr≤-20.5) within 1 Mpc and X-ray-derived mass for a small subset of 129 groups and clusters with X-ray measurements. For 20 157 high-mass groups and clusters with M500 > 1013.7 M⊙, we find that the catalogue has a purity of >97 per cent and a completeness of ˜90 per cent. We derive the mean (stacked) surface number density profiles of galaxies as a function of total halo mass in different mass bins. We find that derived profiles can be well described by a projected Navarro-Frenk-White profile with a concentration parameter (≈ 2.6) that is approximately a factor of 2 lower than that of the dark matter (as predicted by N-body cosmological simulations) and nearly independent of halo mass. Interestingly, in spite of the difference in shape between the galaxy and dark matter radial distributions, both exhibit a high degree of self-similarity. We also stack the satellite profiles based on other observables, namely redshift, brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) luminosity and satellite luminosity and colour. We see no evidence for strong variation in profile shape with redshift over the range we probe or with BCG luminosity (or BCG luminosity fraction), but we do find a strong dependence on satellite luminosity and colours, in agreement with previous studies. A self-consistent comparison to several recent semi-analytic models of galaxy formation indicates that (1) beyond ≈0.3r500 current models are able to reproduce both the shape and normalization of the satellite profiles, and (2) within ≈0.3r500 the predicted profiles are sensitive to the details of the satellite-BCG merger time-scale calculation. The former is a direct result of the models

  8. Most Distant Group of Galaxies Known in the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-04-01

    New VLT Discovery Pushes Back the Beginnings Summary Using the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) , a team of astronomers from The Netherlands, Germany, France and the USA [1] have discovered the most distant group of galaxies ever seen , about 13.5 billion light-years away. It has taken the light now recorded by the VLT about nine-tenths of the age of the Universe to cover the huge distance. We therefore observe those galaxies as they were at a time when the Universe was only about 10% of its present age . The astronomers conclude that this group of early galaxies will develop into a rich cluster of galaxies, such as those seen in the nearby Universe. The newly discovered structure provides the best opportunity so far for studying when and how galaxies began to form clusters after the initial Big Bang , one of the greatest puzzles in modern cosmology. PR Photo 11a/02 : Sky field with the distant cluster of galaxies. PR Photo 11b/02 : Spectra of some of the galaxies in the cluster. Radio Galaxies as cosmic signposts A most intriguing question in modern astronomy is how the first groupings or "clusters" of galaxies emerged from the gas produced in the Big Bang. Some theoretical models predict that densely populated galaxy clusters ("rich clusters" in current astronomical terminology) are built up through a step-wise process. Clumps develop in the primeval gas, and stars condense out of these clumps to form small galaxies. Then these small galaxies merge together to form larger units. The peculiar class of "radio galaxies" is particularly important for investigating such scenarios. They are called so because their radio emission - a result of violent processes believed to be related to massive black holes located at the centres of these galaxies - is stronger by 5 - 10 orders of magnitude than that of our own Milky Way galaxy. In fact, this radio emission is often so intense that the galaxies can be spotted at extremely large distances, and thus at the remote epoch when

  9. ROSAT observations of the galaxy group AWM 7.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, D. M.; Boehringer, H.

    1995-09-01

    We present results of ROSAT/PSPC and HRI observations of the AWM 7 group of galaxies, which is a poor galaxy cluster and forms part of the Perseus-Pisces filament. The X-ray emission originates from intracluster gas at temperatures of 1.7 to 4.5keV. The cluster obviously is elliptical with a position angle perpendicular to the position angle of the dominant elliptical galaxy NGC 1129, which is offset from the cluster X-ray centre by 30kpc. The analysis of the PSPC imaging and spectral data yield a gravitational mass of 2-5x10^14^Msun_within a radius of 1.2Mpc and a cooling flow with a mass deposition rate of up to 60-66Msun_/yr.

  10. Searching for merging groups of galaxies with Suzaku

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Maejima, Masato; Babazaki, Yasunori; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Hironori; Tawara, Yuzuru; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Sasaki, Shin; Sousbie, Thierry

    2015-08-01

    Observational studies for merging group systems are important in terms of understanding dynamical evolution into cluster systems from group-scale halos in structure formation of the Universe. However, observational samples are very limited due to mainly its low surface brightness. Thus, to search for new merging group-scale halos, 11 fields were selected in total and Suzaku X-ray observatory which possesses both high sensitivity especially in the soft energy band below 1 keV and stable background was used. Seven fields are regions located around junctions of galaxy filaments where intense structure formation is expected. The other regions include an optically-identified group in the field of view where an interaction between central and satellite galaxies is observed in optical. A galaxy-galaxy merger including a central massive galaxy can be an indicator of a major merger for group systems because a single massive galaxy can be a perturber for such low mass systems. We conducted both imaging and spectral analysis for all the fields and discovered significant excess X-ray signals compared to background components from all the fields in their images and spectra. At least 5 systems show complex morphologies with multiple peaks in their intensity maps and no corresponding early-type galaxies exist for some of the peaks, which suggests that the systems are experiencing on-going mergers. Resultant temperatures, abundances, luminosities are 1-2 keV, <0.5 solar and 1042-43 erg s-1, respectively and thus the spectral analysis revealed that the excess X-ray emissions originate from group-scale halos associated with a merging event even though no significant deviation was found compared with a known Lx-kT relation (Kawahara et al. 2011, Mitsuishi et al. 2014, Mitsuishi et al. in prep.). In this conference, we will report on the details of our analysis and results using multiwavelength data such as radio, infrared, optical and X-ray to comprehend the merger phenomena and

  11. Local Analogs for High-redshift Galaxies: Resembling the Physical Conditions of the Interstellar Medium in High-redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Fuyan; Kewley, Lisa J.; Dopita, Michael A.; Juneau, Stephanie

    2016-05-01

    We present a sample of local analogs for high-redshift galaxies selected in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The physical conditions of the interstellar medium (ISM) in these local analogs resemble those in high-redshift galaxies. These galaxies are selected based on their positions in the [O iii]/Hβ versus [N ii]/Hα nebular emission-line diagnostic diagram. We show that these local analogs share similar physical properties with high-redshift galaxies, including high specific star formation rates (sSFRs), flat UV continuums, and compact galaxy sizes. In particular, the ionization parameters and electron densities in these analogs are comparable to those in z ≃ 2–3 galaxies, but higher than those in normal SDSS galaxies by ≃0.6 dex and ≃0.9 dex, respectively. The mass–metallicity relation (MZR) in these local analogs shows ‑0.2 dex offset from that in SDSS star-forming galaxies at the low-mass end, which is consistent with the MZR of the z˜ 2{--}3 galaxies. We compare the local analogs in this study with those in other studies, including Lyman break analogs (LBA) and green pea (GP) galaxies. The analogs in this study share a similar star formation surface density with LBAs, but the ionization parameters and electron density in our analogs are higher than those in LBAs by factors of 1.5 and 3, respectively. The analogs in this study have comparable ionization parameters and electron densities to the GP galaxies, but our method can select galaxies in a wider redshift range. We find the high sSFR and SFR surface density can increase the electron density and ionization parameters, but still cannot fully explain the difference in ISM condition between nearby galaxies and the local analogs/high-redshift galaxies.

  12. Local Analogs for High-redshift Galaxies: Resembling the Physical Conditions of the Interstellar Medium in High-redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Fuyan; Kewley, Lisa J.; Dopita, Michael A.; Juneau, Stephanie

    2016-05-01

    We present a sample of local analogs for high-redshift galaxies selected in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The physical conditions of the interstellar medium (ISM) in these local analogs resemble those in high-redshift galaxies. These galaxies are selected based on their positions in the [O iii]/Hβ versus [N ii]/Hα nebular emission-line diagnostic diagram. We show that these local analogs share similar physical properties with high-redshift galaxies, including high specific star formation rates (sSFRs), flat UV continuums, and compact galaxy sizes. In particular, the ionization parameters and electron densities in these analogs are comparable to those in z ≃ 2-3 galaxies, but higher than those in normal SDSS galaxies by ≃0.6 dex and ≃0.9 dex, respectively. The mass-metallicity relation (MZR) in these local analogs shows -0.2 dex offset from that in SDSS star-forming galaxies at the low-mass end, which is consistent with the MZR of the z˜ 2{--}3 galaxies. We compare the local analogs in this study with those in other studies, including Lyman break analogs (LBA) and green pea (GP) galaxies. The analogs in this study share a similar star formation surface density with LBAs, but the ionization parameters and electron density in our analogs are higher than those in LBAs by factors of 1.5 and 3, respectively. The analogs in this study have comparable ionization parameters and electron densities to the GP galaxies, but our method can select galaxies in a wider redshift range. We find the high sSFR and SFR surface density can increase the electron density and ionization parameters, but still cannot fully explain the difference in ISM condition between nearby galaxies and the local analogs/high-redshift galaxies.

  13. The lack of star formation gradients in galaxy groups up to z ˜ 1.6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziparo, F.; Popesso, P.; Biviano, A.; Finoguenov, A.; Wuyts, S.; Wilman, D.; Salvato, M.; Tanaka, M.; Ilbert, O.; Nandra, K.; Lutz, D.; Elbaz, D.; Dickinson, M.; Altieri, B.; Aussel, H.; Berta, S.; Cimatti, A.; Fadda, D.; Genzel, R.; Le Flo'ch, E.; Magnelli, B.; Nordon, R.; Poglitsch, A.; Pozzi, F.; Portal, M. Sanchez; Tacconi, L.; Bauer, F. E.; Brandt, W. N.; Cappelluti, N.; Cooper, M. C.; Mulchaey, J. S.

    2013-10-01

    In the local Universe, galaxy properties show a strong dependence on environment. In cluster cores, early-type galaxies dominate, whereas star-forming galaxies are more and more common in the outskirts. At higher redshifts and in somewhat less dense environments (e.g. galaxy groups), the situation is less clear. One open issue is that of whether and how the star formation rate (SFR) of galaxies in groups depends on the distance from the centre of mass. To shed light on this topic, we have built a sample of X-ray selected galaxy groups at 0 < z < 1.6 in various blank fields [Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS), Cosmological Evolution Survey (COSMOS), Great Observatories Origin Deep Survey (GOODS)]. We use a sample of spectroscopically confirmed group members with stellar mass M⋆ > 1010.3 M⊙ in order to have a high spectroscopic completeness. As we use only spectroscopic redshifts, our results are not affected by uncertainties due to projection effects. We use several SFR indicators to link the star formation (SF) activity to the galaxy environment. Taking advantage of the extremely deep mid-infrared Spitzer MIPS and far-infrared Herschel1 PACS observations, we have an accurate, broad-band measure of the SFR for the bulk of the star-forming galaxies. We use multi-wavelength Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) fitting techniques to estimate the stellar masses of all objects and the SFR of the MIPS and PACS undetected galaxies. We analyse the dependence of the SF activity, stellar mass and specific SFR on the group-centric distance, up to z ˜ 1.6, for the first time. We do not find any correlation between the mean SFR and group-centric distance at any redshift. We do not observe any strong mass segregation either, in agreement with predictions from simulations. Our results suggest that either groups have a much smaller spread in accretion times with respect to the clusters and that the relaxation time is longer than the group crossing time.

  14. Loose Groups of Galaxies in the Las Campanas Redshift Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Douglas L.; Oemler, Augustus, Jr.; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Shectman, Stephen A.; Kirshner, Robert P.; Lin, Huan; Landy, Stephen D.; Schechter, Paul L.; Allam, Sahar S.

    2000-10-01

    A ``friends-of-friends'' percolation algorithm has been used to extract a catalog of δn/n=80 density enhancements (groups) from the six slices of the Las Campanas Redshift Survey (LCRS). The full catalog contains 1495 groups and includes 35% of the LCRS galaxy sample. A clean sample of 394 groups has been derived by culling groups from the full sample that either are too close to a slice edge, have a crossing time greater than a Hubble time, have a corrected velocity dispersion of zero, or contain a 55" ``orphan'' (a galaxy with a mock redshift that was excluded from the original LCRS redshift catalog due to its proximity to another galaxy-i.e., within 55"). Median properties derived from the clean sample include a line-of-sight velocity dispersion σlos=164 km s-1, crossing time tcr=0.10 H-10, harmonic radius Rh=0.58 h-1 Mpc, pairwise separation Rp=0.64 h-1 Mpc, virial mass Mvir=1.90×1013 h-1 Msolar, total group R-band luminosity Ltot=1.30×1011 h-2 Lsolar, and R-band mass-to-light ratio M/L=171 h Msolar/Lsolar the median number of observed members in a group is three.

  15. Dark matter searches with Cherenkov telescopes: nearby dwarf galaxies or local galaxy clusters?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Conde, Miguel A.; Cannoni, Mirco; Zandanel, Fabio; Gómez, Mario E.; Prada, Francisco

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we compare dwarf galaxies and galaxy clusters in order to elucidate which object class is the best target for gamma-ray DM searches with imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). We have built a mixed dwarfs+clusters sample containing some of the most promising nearby dwarf galaxies (Draco, Ursa Minor, Wilman 1 and Segue 1) and local galaxy clusters (Perseus, Coma, Ophiuchus, Virgo, Fornax, NGC 5813 and NGC 5846), and then compute their DM annihilation flux profiles by making use of the latest modeling of their DM density profiles. We also include in our calculations the effect of DM substructure. Willman 1 appears as the best candidate in the sample. However, its mass modeling is still rather uncertain, so probably other candidates with less uncertainties and quite similar fluxes, namely Ursa Minor and Segue 1, might be better options. As for galaxy clusters, Virgo represents the one with the highest flux. However, its large spatial extension can be a serious handicap for IACT observations and posterior data analysis. Yet, other local galaxy cluster candidates with more moderate emission regions, such as Perseus, may represent good alternatives. After comparing dwarfs and clusters, we found that the former exhibit annihilation flux profiles that, at the center, are roughly one order of magnitude higher than those of clusters, although galaxy clusters can yield similar, or even higher, integrated fluxes for the whole object once substructure is taken into account. Even when any of these objects are strictly point-like according to the properties of their annihilation signals, we conclude that dwarf galaxies are best suited for observational strategies based on the search of point-like sources, while galaxy clusters represent best targets for analyses that can deal with rather extended emissions. Finally, we study the detection prospects for present and future IACTs in the framework of the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model. We

  16. Dark Matter Searches with Cherenkov Telescopes: Nearby Dwarf Galaxies or Local Galaxy Clusters?

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Conde, Miguel A.; Cannoni, Mirco; Zandanel, Fabio; Gomez, Mario E.; Prada, Francisco; /IAA, Granada

    2012-06-06

    In this paper, we compare dwarf galaxies and galaxy clusters in order to elucidate which object class is the best target for gamma-ray DM searches with imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). We have built a mixed dwarfs+clusters sample containing some of the most promising nearby dwarf galaxies (Draco, Ursa Minor, Wilman 1 and Segue 1) and local galaxy clusters (Perseus, Coma, Ophiuchus, Virgo, Fornax, NGC 5813 and NGC 5846), and then compute their DM annihilation flux profiles by making use of the latest modeling of their DM density profiles. We also include in our calculations the effect of DM substructure. Willman 1 appears as the best candidate in the sample. However, its mass modeling is still rather uncertain, so probably other candidates with less uncertainties and quite similar fluxes, namely Ursa Minor and Segue 1, might be better options. As for galaxy clusters, Virgo represents the one with the highest flux. However, its large spatial extension can be a serious handicap for IACT observations and posterior data analysis. Yet, other local galaxy cluster candidates with more moderate emission regions, such as Perseus, may represent good alternatives. After comparing dwarfs and clusters, we found that the former exhibit annihilation flux profiles that, at the center, are roughly one order of magnitude higher than those of clusters, although galaxy clusters can yield similar, or even higher, integrated fluxes for the whole object once substructure is taken into account. Even when any of these objects are strictly point-like according to the properties of their annihilation signals, we conclude that dwarf galaxies are best suited for observational strategies based on the search of point-like sources, while galaxy clusters represent best targets for analyses that can deal with rather extended emissions. Finally, we study the detection prospects for present and future IACTs in the framework of the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model. We

  17. Dust-obscured Galaxies in the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Ho Seong; Geller, Margaret J.

    2013-06-01

    We use Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), AKARI, and Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) data to select local analogs of high-redshift (z ~ 2) dust obscured galaxies (DOGs). We identify 47 local DOGs with S 12 μm/S 0.22 μm >= 892 and S 12 μm > 20 mJy at 0.05 < z < 0.08 in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release 7. The infrared (IR) luminosities of these DOGs are in the range 3.4 × 1010 (L ⊙) <~ L IR <~ 7.0 × 1011 (L ⊙) with a median L IR of 2.1 × 1011 (L ⊙). We compare the physical properties of local DOGs with a control sample of galaxies that have lower S 12 μm/S 0.22 μm but have similar redshift, IR luminosity, and stellar mass distributions. Both WISE 12 μm and GALEX near-ultraviolet (NUV) flux densities of DOGs differ from the control sample of galaxies, but the difference is much larger in the NUV. Among the 47 DOGs, 36% ± 7% have small axis ratios in the optical (i.e., b/a < 0.6), larger than the fraction among the control sample (17% ± 3%). There is no obvious sign of interaction for many local DOGs. No local DOGs have companions with comparable optical magnitudes closer than ~50 kpc. The large- and small-scale environments of DOGs are similar to the control sample. Many physical properties of local DOGs are similar to those of high-z DOGs, even though the IR luminosities of local objects are an order of magnitude lower than for the high-z objects: the presence of two classes (active galactic nuclei- and star formation-dominated) of DOGs, abnormal faintness in the UV rather than extreme brightness in the mid-IR, and diverse optical morphology. These results suggest a common underlying physical origin of local and high-z DOGs. Both seem to represent the high-end tail of the dust obscuration distribution resulting from various physical mechanisms rather than a unique phase of galaxy evolution.

  18. Dust-obscured galaxies in the local universe

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Ho Seong; Geller, Margaret J. E-mail: mgeller@cfa.harvard.edu

    2013-06-01

    We use Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), AKARI, and Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) data to select local analogs of high-redshift (z ∼ 2) dust obscured galaxies (DOGs). We identify 47 local DOGs with S {sub 12μm}/S {sub 0.22μm} ≥ 892 and S {sub 12μm} > 20 mJy at 0.05 < z < 0.08 in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release 7. The infrared (IR) luminosities of these DOGs are in the range 3.4 × 10{sup 10} (L {sub ☉}) ≲ L {sub IR} ≲ 7.0 × 10{sup 11} (L {sub ☉}) with a median L {sub IR} of 2.1 × 10{sup 11} (L {sub ☉}). We compare the physical properties of local DOGs with a control sample of galaxies that have lower S {sub 12μm}/S {sub 0.22μm} but have similar redshift, IR luminosity, and stellar mass distributions. Both WISE 12 μm and GALEX near-ultraviolet (NUV) flux densities of DOGs differ from the control sample of galaxies, but the difference is much larger in the NUV. Among the 47 DOGs, 36% ± 7% have small axis ratios in the optical (i.e., b/a < 0.6), larger than the fraction among the control sample (17% ± 3%). There is no obvious sign of interaction for many local DOGs. No local DOGs have companions with comparable optical magnitudes closer than ∼50 kpc. The large- and small-scale environments of DOGs are similar to the control sample. Many physical properties of local DOGs are similar to those of high-z DOGs, even though the IR luminosities of local objects are an order of magnitude lower than for the high-z objects: the presence of two classes (active galactic nuclei- and star formation-dominated) of DOGs, abnormal faintness in the UV rather than extreme brightness in the mid-IR, and diverse optical morphology. These results suggest a common underlying physical origin of local and high-z DOGs. Both seem to represent the high-end tail of the dust obscuration distribution resulting from various physical mechanisms rather than a unique phase of galaxy evolution.

  19. THE GALAXY CONTENT OF SDSS CLUSTERS AND GROUPS

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Sarah M.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Koester, Benjamin P.

    2009-07-10

    Imaging data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey are used to characterize the population of galaxies in groups and clusters detected with the MaxBCG algorithm. We investigate the dependence of brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) luminosity, and the distributions of satellite galaxy luminosity and satellite color, on cluster properties over the redshift range 0.1 {<=} z {<=} 0.3. The size of the data set allows us to make measurements in many bins of cluster richness, radius and redshift. We find that, within r {sub 200} of clusters with mass above 3 x 10{sup 13} h {sup -1} M {sub sun}, the luminosity function (LF) of both red and blue satellites is only weakly dependent on richness. We further find that the shape of the satellite LF does not depend on cluster-centric distance for magnitudes brighter than {sup 0.25} M{sub i} - 5log{sub 10} h =-19. However, the mix of faint red and blue galaxies changes dramatically. The satellite red fraction is dependent on cluster-centric distance, galaxy luminosity, and cluster mass, and also increases by {approx}5% between redshifts 0.28 and 0.2, independent of richness. We find that BCG luminosity is tightly correlated with cluster richness, scaling as L {sub BCG} {approx} M {sup 0.3} {sub 200}, and has a Gaussian distribution at fixed richness, with {sigma}{sub logL} {approx} 0.17 for massive clusters. The ratios of BCG luminosity to total cluster luminosity and characteristic satellite luminosity scale strongly with cluster richness: in richer systems, BCGs contribute a smaller fraction of the total light, but are brighter compared to typical satellites. This study demonstrates the power of cross-correlation techniques for measuring galaxy populations in purely photometric data.

  20. The Galaxy Content of SDSS Clusters And Groups

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Sarah M.; Sheldon, Erin S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Koester, Benjamin P.; /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.

    2007-11-09

    Imaging data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey are used to characterize the population of galaxies in groups and clusters detected with the MaxBCG algorithm. We investigate the dependence of Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG) luminosity, and the distributions of satellite galaxy luminosity and satellite color, on cluster properties over the redshift range 0.1 {le} z {le} 0.3. The size of the dataset allows us to make measurements in many bins of cluster richness, radius and redshift. We find that, within r200 of clusters with mass above 3x10{sup 13}h{sup -1}M{sub {circle_dot}}, the luminosity function of both red and blue satellites is only weakly dependent on richness. We further find that the shape of the satellite luminosity function does not depend on cluster-centric distance for magnitudes brighter than {sup 0.25}M{sub i} - 5log{sub 10}h = -19. However, the mix of faint red and blue galaxies changes dramatically. The satellite red fraction is dependent on cluster-centric distance, galaxy luminosity and cluster mass, and also increases by {approx}5% between redshifts 0.28 and 0.2, independent of richness. We find that BCG luminosity is tightly correlated with cluster richness, scaling as L{sub BCG} {approx} M{sup 0.3}{sub 200}, and has a Gaussian distribution at fixed richness, with {sigma}{sub log}L {approx} 0.17 for massive clusters. The ratios of BCG luminosity to total cluster luminosity and characteristic satellite luminosity scale strongly with cluster richness: in richer systems, BCGs contribute a smaller fraction of the total light, but are brighter compared to typical satellites. This study demonstrates the power of cross-correlation techniques for measuring galaxy populations in purely photometric data.

  1. CO in Hickson compact group galaxies with enhanced warm H2 emission: Evidence for galaxy evolution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisenfeld, U.; Appleton, P. N.; Cluver, M. E.; Guillard, P.; Alatalo, K.; Ogle, P.

    2014-10-01

    Context. Galaxies in Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs) are believed to experience morphological transformations from blue, star-forming galaxies to red, early-type galaxies. Galaxies with a high ratio between the luminosities of the warm H2 to the 7.7 μm PAH emission (so-called Molecular Hydrogen Emission Galaxies, MOHEGs) are predominantly in an intermediate phase, the green valley. Their enhanced H2 emission suggests that the molecular gas is affected in the transition. Aims: We study the properties of the molecular gas traced by CO in galaxies in HCGs with measured warm H2 emission in order to look for evidence of the perturbations affecting the warm H2 in the kinematics, morphology and mass of the molecular gas. Methods: We observed the CO(1-0) emission of 20 galaxies in HCGs and complemented our sample with 11 CO(1-0) spectra from the literature. Most of the galaxies have measured warm H2 emission, and 14 of them are classified as MOHEGs. We mapped some of these galaxies in order to search for extra-galactic CO emission. We analyzed the molecular gas mass derived from CO(1-0), MH2, and its kinematics, and then compared it to the mass of the warm molecular gas, the stellar mass and star formation rate (SFR). Results: Our results are the following. (i) The mass ratio between the CO-derived and the warm H2 molecular gas is in the same range as found for field galaxies. (ii) Some of the galaxies, mostly MOHEGs, have very broad CO linewidths of up to 1000 km s-1 in the central pointing. The line shapes are irregular and show various components. (iii) In the mapped objects we found asymmetric distributions of the cold molecular gas. (iv) The star formation efficiency (=SFR/MH2) of galaxies in HCGs is very similar to isolated galaxies. No significant difference between MOHEGs and non-MOHEGs or between early-type and spiral galaxies has been found. In a few objects the SFE is significantly lower, indicating the presence of molecular gas that is not actively forming stars

  2. The Space Density of Primordial Gas Clouds near Galaxies and Groups and their Relation to Galactic High-Velocity Clouds.

    PubMed

    Zwaan; Briggs

    2000-02-20

    The Arecibo H i Strip Survey probed the halos of approximately 300 cataloged galaxies and the environments of approximately 14 groups with sensitivity to neutral hydrogen masses >/=107 M middle dot in circle. The survey detected no objects with properties resembling the high-velocity clouds (HVCs) associated with the Milky Way or Local Group. If the HVCs were typically MHi=107.5 M middle dot in circle objects distributed throughout groups and galaxy halos at distances of approximately 1 Mpc, the survey should have made approximately 70 HVC detections in groups and approximately 250 detections around galaxies. The null detection implies that HVCs are deployed at typical distances of galaxies or group barycenters. If the clouds are in virial equilibrium, their average dark matter fraction must be 98% or higher.

  3. Ultracompact Blue Dwarfs: Galaxy Formation in the Local Universe?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbin, Michael

    2004-07-01

    Recent observations suggest that very low-mass galaxies in the local universe are still in the process of formation. To investigate this issue we propose to obtain deep ACS HRC images in the U, V and I bands of a sample of 11 "ultracompact" blue dwarf galaxies {UCBDs} identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. These objects are nearby {z < 0.009}, actively star-forming, and have extremely small angular and physical sizes {d < 6" and D < 1 kpc}. They also tend to reside in voids. Our WFPC2 images of the prototype object of this class, POX 186, reveal this tiny object to have a highly disturbed morphlogy indicative of a recent {within 10^8 yr} collision between two small { 100 pc} clumps of stars that could represent the long-sought building blocks predicted by the Press-Schechter model of hierarchical galaxy formation. This collision has also triggered the formation of a "super" star cluster {SSC} at the object's core that may be the progenitor of a globular cluster. POX 186 thus appears to be a very small dwarf galaxy in the process of formation. This exciting discovery strongly motivates HST imaging of a full sample of UCBDs in order to determine if they have morphologies similar to POX 186. HST images are essential for resolving the structure of these objects, including establishing the presence of SSCs. HST also offers the only way to determine their morphologies in the near UV. The spectra of the objects available from the SDSS will also allow us to measure their star formation rates, dust content and metallicities. In addition to potentially providing the first direct evidence of Press-Schechter building blocks, these data could yield insight into the relationship between galaxy and globular cluster formation, and will serve as a test of the recent "downsizing" model of galaxy formation in which the least massive objects are the last to form.

  4. Status of The Dynamical Census of Galaxies and Groups in the RESOLVE Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, Kathleen D.; Kannappan, Sheila; Hall, Kirsten; Moffett, Amanda J.; Norris, Mark A.; Stark, David; Hoversten, Erik A.; Snyder, Elaine M.; Bittner, Ashley; Norman, Dara J.; Naluminsa, Elizabeth; Crawford, Steve; Vaisanen, Petri; Baker, Ashley; Berlind, Andreas A.; Rosenberg, Daniel; Beauchemin, Ryan William; Bonfield, Charles; RESOLVE Team

    2016-01-01

    The REsolved Spectroscopy of a Local VolumE (RESOLVE) survey is measuring either velocity dispersions or rotation velocities for ~1500 galaxies and ~200 multi-galaxy groups within >50,000 cubic Mpc of the z~0 universe, above a galaxy baryonic mass limit of ~10^9 Msun. Our kinematic census combines multi-slit, IFU, Fabry-Perot, long-slit, and radio linewidth data from the SOAR, SALT, Gemini, AAT, GBT, and Arecibo telescopes, with telescope/instrument combinations optimized for individual galaxy properties. We present a status update of the data taken, particularly focusing on the RESOLVE Early Science region overlapping Stripe 82. We also discuss challenges for dynamical measurements including measuring galaxy inclinations, determining the mix of support from rotational and random motions, and measuring dynamical masses for groups with few members. Finally, we conclude with a preliminary velocity function for the RESOLVE Early Science region. This work has been supported by the NSF through grants AST-0955368 and OCI-1156614, the NC Space Grant Graduate Research Fellowship Program, and a UNC Royster Society of Fellows Dissertation Completion Fellowship.

  5. Extended [C II] Emission in Local Luminous Infrared Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Santos, T.; Armus, L.; Charmandaris, V.; Stacey, G.; Murphy, E. J.; Haan, S.; Stierwalt, S.; Malhotra, S.; Appleton, P.; Inami, H.; Magdis, G. E.; Elbaz, D.; Evans, A. S.; Mazzarella, J. M.; Surace, J. A.; van der Werf, P. P.; Xu, C. K.; Lu, N.; Meijerink, R.; Howell, J. H.; Petric, A. O.; Veilleux, S.; Sanders, D. B.

    2014-06-01

    We present Herschel/PACS observations of extended [C II] 157.7 μm line emission detected on ~1-10 kpc scales in 60 local luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) from the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey. We find that most of the extra-nuclear emission show [C II]/FIR ratios >=4 × 10-3, larger than the mean ratio seen in the nuclei, and similar to those found in the extended disks of normal star-forming galaxies and the diffuse interstellar medium of our Galaxy. The [C II] "deficits" found in the most luminous local LIRGs are therefore restricted to their nuclei. There is a trend for LIRGs with warmer nuclei to show larger differences between their nuclear and extra-nuclear [C II]/FIR ratios. We find an anti-correlation between [C II]/FIR and the luminosity surface density, ΣIR, for the extended emission in the spatially resolved galaxies. However, there is an offset between this trend and that found for the LIRG nuclei. We use this offset to derive a beam filling-factor for the star-forming regions within the LIRG disks of ~6% relative to their nuclei. We confront the observed trend to photo-dissociation region models and find that the slope of the correlation is much shallower than the model predictions. Finally, we compare the correlation found between [C II]/FIR and ΣIR with measurements of high-redshift starbursting IR-luminous galaxies.

  6. The early chemical enrichment histories of two Sculptor group dwarf galaxies as revealed by RR lyrae variables

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Soung-Chul; Kim, Sang Chul; Kyeong, Jaemann; Wagner-Kaiser, Rachel; Sarajedini, Ata

    2014-03-20

    We present the results of our analysis of the RR Lyrae (RRL) variable stars detected in two transition-type dwarf galaxies (dTrans), ESO294-G010 and ESO410-G005 in the Sculptor group, which is known to be one of the closest neighboring galaxy groups to our Local Group. Using deep archival images from the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope, we have identified a sample of RRL candidates in both dTrans galaxies (219 RRab (RR0) and 13 RRc (RR1) variables in ESO294-G010; 225 RRab and 44 RRc stars in ESO410-G005). The metallicities of the individual RRab stars are calculated via the period-amplitude-[Fe/H] relation derived by Alcock et al. This yields mean metallicities of ([Fe/H]){sub ESO294} = –1.77 ± 0.03 and ([Fe/H]){sub ESO410} = –1.64 ± 0.03. The RRL metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) are investigated further via simple chemical evolution models; these reveal the relics of the early chemical enrichment processes for these two dTrans galaxies. In the case of both galaxies, the shapes of the RRL MDFs are well described by pre-enrichment models. This suggests two possible channels for the early chemical evolution for these Sculptor group dTrans galaxies: (1) the ancient stellar populations of our target dwarf galaxies might have formed from the star forming gas which was already enriched through 'prompt initial enrichment' or an 'initial nucleosynthetic spike' from the very first massive stars, or (2) this pre-enrichment state might have been achieved by the end products from more evolved systems of their nearest neighbor, NGC 55. We also study the environmental effects of the formation and evolution of our target dTrans galaxies by comparing their properties with those of 79 volume limited (D {sub ☉} < 2 Mpc) dwarf galaxy samples in terms of the luminosity-metallicity relation and the H I gas content. The presence of these RRL stars strongly supports the idea that although the Sculptor Group galaxies have a considerably

  7. X-Ray-selected Galaxy Groups in Boötes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajgel, Bruna; Jones, Christine; Lopes, Paulo A. A.; Forman, William R.; Murray, Stephen S.; Goulding, Andrew; Andrade-Santos, Felipe

    2014-10-01

    We present the X-ray and optical properties of the galaxy groups selected in the Chandra X-Boötes survey. We used follow-up Chandra observations to better define the group sample and their X-ray properties. Group redshifts were measured from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey spectroscopic data. We used photometric data from the NOAO Deep Wide Field Survey to estimate the group richness (N gals) and the optical luminosity (L opt). Our final sample comprises 32 systems at z < 1.75 with 14 below z = 0.35. For these 14 systems, we estimate velocity dispersions (σ gr ) and perform a virial analysis to obtain the radii (R 200 and R 500) and total masses (M 200 and M 500) for groups with at least 5 galaxy members. We use the Chandra X-ray observations to derive the X-ray luminosity (LX ). We examine the performance of the group properties σgr, L opt, and LX , as proxies for the group mass. Understanding how well these observables measure the total mass is important to estimate how precisely the cluster/group mass function is determined. Exploring the scaling relations built with the X-Boötes sample and comparing these with samples from the literature, we find a break in the LX -M 500 relation at approximately M 500 = 5 × 1013 M ⊙ (for M 500 > 5 × 1013 M ⊙, M500 \\propto L_X0.61+/- 0.02, while for M 500 <= 5 × 1013 M ⊙, M500 \\propto L_X0.44+/- 0.05). Thus, the mass-luminosity relation for galaxy groups cannot be described by the same power law as galaxy clusters. A possible explanation for this break is the dynamical friction, tidal interactions, and projection effects that reduce the velocity dispersion values of the galaxy groups. By extending the cluster luminosity function to the group regime, we predict the number of groups that new X-ray surveys, particularly eROSITA, will detect. Based on our cluster/group luminosity function estimates, eROSITA will identify ~1800 groups (LX = 1041-1043 erg s-1) within a distance of 200 Mpc. Since groups lie in large

  8. A model for the formation of the Local Group

    SciTech Connect

    Peebles, P.J.E.; Melott, A.L.; Holmes, M.R.; Jiang, L.R. Kansas Univ., Lawrence )

    1989-10-01

    Observational tests of a model for the formation of the Local Group are presented and analyzed in which the mass concentration grows by gravitational accretion of local-pressure matter onto two seed masses in an otherwise homogeneous initial mass distribution. The evolution of the mass distribution is studied in an analytic approximation and a numerical computation. The initial seed mass and separation are adjusted to produce the observed present separation and relative velocity of the Andromeda Nebula and the Galaxy. If H(0) is adjusted to about 80 km/s/Mpc with density parameter Omega = 1, then the model gives a good fit to the motions of the outer members of the Local Group. The same model gives particle orbits at radius of about 100 kpc that reasonably approximate the observed distribution of redshifts of the Galactic satellites. 47 refs.

  9. PN populations in the local group and distant stellar populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Warren

    2016-08-01

    Our understanding of galactic structure and evolution is far from complete. Within the past twelve months we have learnt that the Milky Way is about 50% wider than was previously thought. As a consequence, new models are being developed that force us to reassess the kinematic structure of our Galaxy. Similarly, we need to take a fresh look at the halo structure of external galaxies in our Local Group. Studies of stellar populations, star-forming regions, clusters, the interstellar medium, elemental abundances and late stellar evolution are all required in order to understand how galactic assembly has occurred as we see it. PNe play an important role in this investigation by providing a measure of stellar age, mass, abundances, morphology, kinematics and synthesized matter that is returned to the interstellar medium (ISM). Through a method of chemical tagging, halo PNe can reveal evidence of stellar migration and galactic mergers. This is an outline of the advances that have been made towards uncovering the full number of PNe in our Local Group galaxies and beyond. Current numbers are presented and compared to total population estimates based on galactic mass and luminosity. A near complete census of PNe is crucial to understanding the initial-to-final mass relation for stars with mass >1 to <8 times the mass of the sun. It also allows us to extract more evolutionary information from luminosity functions and compare dust-to-gas ratios from PNe in different galactic locations. With new data provided by the Gaia satellite, space-based telescopes and the rise of giant and extra-large telescopes, we are on the verge of observing and understanding objects such as PNe in distant galaxies with the same detail we expected from Galactic observations only a decade ago.

  10. The Astrophysics of galaxy groups and clusters with Athena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettori, Stefano

    The complete story of how groups and clusters of galaxies grow, and how they dissipate the gravitational and non-thermal components of their energy budget over cosmic time, is still beyond our grasp. X-ray observations of the evolving cluster population provide a unique opportunity to address such fundamental open questions as: • How do hot diffuse baryons accrete and dynamically evolve in dark matter potentials? • How and when was the energy that we observe in the ICM generated and distributed? • Where and when are heavy elements produced and how are they circulated? Athena, the next-generation X-ray observatory with large collecting area and an unprecedented combination of high spectral and angular resolution, offers the only way to make major advances in answering these questions. We present the impact of Athena on the study of galaxy group and cluster astrophysics. We focus on observations of nearby (z < 0.5) systems, where Athen+ will revolutionize our understanding of the basic process of energy transfer into the ICM, transform our view of the outer regions of galaxy clusters where material continues to accrete, and allow us to track the generation and diffusion of metals in the intracluster gas.

  11. Deep near-infrared surface photometry and properties of Local Volume dwarf irregular galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, T.; Jerjen, H.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Koribalski, B. S.

    2014-11-01

    We present deep H-band surface photometry and analysis of 40 Local Volume galaxies, a sample primarily composed of dwarf irregulars in the Cen A group, obtained using the Infrared Imager and Spectrograph 2 detector at the 3.9-m Anglo-Australian Telescope. We probe to a surface brightness of ˜25 mag arcsec-2, reaching a 40 times lower stellar density than the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS). Employing extremely careful and rigorous cleaning techniques to remove contaminating sources, we perform surface photometry on 33 detected galaxies deriving the observed total magnitude, effective surface brightness and best-fitting Sérsic parameters. We make image quality and surface photometry comparisons to 2MASS and VISTA Hemisphere Survey demonstrating that deep targeted surveys are still the most reliable means of obtaining accurate surface photometry. We investigate the B - H colours with respect to mass for Local Volume galaxies, finding that the colours of dwarf irregulars are significantly varied, eliminating the possibility of using optical-near-infrared colour transformations to facilitate comparison to the more widely available optical data sets. The structure-luminosity relationships are investigated for our `clean' sample of dwarf irregulars. We demonstrate that a significant fraction of the Local Volume dwarf irregular population have underlying structural properties similar to both Local Volume and Virgo cluster dwarf ellipticals. Linear regressions to structure-luminosity relationships for the Local Volume galaxies and Virgo cluster dwarf ellipticals show significant differences in both slope and scatter around the established trend lines, suggesting that environment might regulate the structural scaling relationships of dwarf galaxies in comparison to their more isolated counterparts.

  12. A WISE VIEW OF STAR FORMATION IN LOCAL GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Sun Mi; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Stern, Daniel; Stanford, Spencer A.; Brodwin, Mark; Jarrett, Thomas

    2011-12-10

    We present results from a systematic study of star formation in local galaxy clusters using 22 {mu}m data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). The 69 systems in our sample are drawn from the Cluster Infall Regions Survey, and all have robust mass determinations. The all-sky WISE data enable us to quantify the amount of star formation, as traced by 22 {mu}m, as a function of radius well beyond R{sub 200}, and investigate the dependence of total star formation rate upon cluster mass. We find that the fraction of star-forming galaxies increases with cluster radius but remains below the field value even at 3R{sub 200}. We also find that there is no strong correlation between the mass-normalized total specific star formation rate and cluster mass, indicating that the mass of the host cluster does not strongly influence the total star formation rate of cluster members.

  13. Dwarfs and Giants in the local flows of galaxies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, A. D.; Emelyanov, N. V.; Karachentsev, I. D.

    We use recent Hubble Space Telescope data on nearby dwarf and giant galaxies to study the dynamical structure and evolutionary trends of the local expansion flows of galaxies. It is found that antigravity of dark energy dominates the force field of the flows and makes them expand with acceleration. It also cools the flows and introduces to them the nearly linear velocity-distance relation with the time-rate close to the global Hubble's factor. There are grounds to expect that this is the universal physical regularity that is common not only for the nearby flows we studied here, but also for all the expansion flows of various spatial scales from the 1 Mpc scale and up to the scale of the global cosmological expansion.

  14. A 17-billion-solar-mass black hole in a group galaxy with a diffuse core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Jens; Ma, Chung-Pei; McConnell, Nicholas J.; Greene, Jenny E.; Blakeslee, John P.; Janish, Ryan

    2016-04-01

    Quasars are associated with and powered by the accretion of material onto massive black holes; the detection of highly luminous quasars with redshifts greater than z = 6 suggests that black holes of up to ten billion solar masses already existed 13 billion years ago. Two possible present-day ‘dormant’ descendants of this population of ‘active’ black holes have been found in the galaxies NGC 3842 and NGC 4889 at the centres of the Leo and Coma galaxy clusters, which together form the central region of the Great Wall—the largest local structure of galaxies. The most luminous quasars, however, are not confined to such high-density regions of the early Universe; yet dormant black holes of this high mass have not yet been found outside of modern-day rich clusters. Here we report observations of the stellar velocity distribution in the galaxy NGC 1600—a relatively isolated elliptical galaxy near the centre of a galaxy group at a distance of 64 megaparsecs from Earth. We use orbit superposition models to determine that the black hole at the centre of NGC 1600 has a mass of 17 billion solar masses. The spatial distribution of stars near the centre of NGC 1600 is rather diffuse. We find that the region of depleted stellar density in the cores of massive elliptical galaxies extends over the same radius as the gravitational sphere of influence of the central black holes, and interpret this as the dynamical imprint of the black holes.

  15. A Guided Tour of Globular Clusters in the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarajedini, Ata

    2010-05-01

    I will lead a guided tour of the globular cluster systems of Local Group galaxies. Beginning with the Milky Way, I will attempt to compare and contrast the properties of the globular clusters in the Sagittarius and Fornax dwarf spheroidals, the LMC, M31, and M33. Along the way, I will concentrate on why these clusters are important and how our understanding of their properties has changed over time. Because of the limited time available, this tour will necessarily be incomplete, but I hope to give the audience a flavor for how active and vibrant this field continues to be.

  16. Fossil group origins. II. Unveiling the formation of the brightest group galaxies through their scaling relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez-Abreu, J.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Barrena, R.; Sánchez-Janssen, R.; Boschin, W.; Castro-Rodriguez, N.; Corsini, E. M.; Del Burgo, C.; D'Onghia, E.; Girardi, M.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Napolitano, N.; Vilchez, J. M.; Zarattini, S.

    2012-01-01

    Context. Fossil systems are galaxy associations dominated by a relatively isolated, bright elliptical galaxy, surrounded by a group of smaller galaxies lacking L∗ objects. Because of this extreme environment, fossil groups (FGs) are ideal laboratories for studying the mass assembly of brightest group galaxies (BGGs). Aims: We analyzed the near-infrared photometric and structural properties of a sample of 20 BGGs present in FGs to better understand their formation mechanisms. They represent the largest sample studied to date. Methods.Ks-band deep images were used to study the structural properties of our sample galaxies. Their surface-brightness distribution was fitted to a Sérsic profile using the GASP2D algorithm. Then, the standard scaling relations were derived for the first time for these galaxies and compared with those of normal ellipticals and brightest cluster galaxies in non-fossil systems. Results: The BGGs presented in this study represent a subset of the most massive galaxies in the Universe. We find that their ellipticity profiles are continuously increasing with the galactocentric radius. Our fossil BCGs follow closely the fundamental plane described by normal ellipticals. However, they depart from both the log σ0 vs. log LKs and log re vs. log LKs relations described by intermediate-mass ellipticals. This occurs in the sense that our BGGs have larger effective radii and smaller velocity dispersions than those predicted by these relations. We also find that more elliptical galaxies systematically deviate from the previous relations, while rounder objects do not. No similar correlation was found with the Sérsic index. Conclusions: The derived scaling relations can be interpreted in terms of the formation scenario of the BGGs. Because our BGGs follow the fundamental plane tilt but have larger effective radii than expected for intermediate-mass ellipticals, we suggest that they only went through dissipational mergers in an early stage of their

  17. The black hole mass function derived from local spiral galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Benjamin L.; Berrier, Joel C.; Shields, Douglas W.; Kennefick, Daniel; Kennefick, Julia; Seigar, Marc S.; Lacy, Claud H. S.; Hartley, Matthew T.

    2014-07-10

    We present our determination of the nuclear supermassive black hole (SMBH) mass function for spiral galaxies in the local universe, established from a volume-limited sample consisting of a statistically complete collection of the brightest spiral galaxies in the southern (δ < 0°) hemisphere. Our SMBH mass function agrees well at the high-mass end with previous values given in the literature. At the low-mass end, inconsistencies exist in previous works that still need to be resolved, but our work is more in line with expectations based on modeling of black hole evolution. This low-mass end of the spectrum is critical to our understanding of the mass function and evolution of black holes since the epoch of maximum quasar activity. The sample is defined by a limiting luminosity (redshift-independent) distance, D{sub L} = 25.4 Mpc (z = 0.00572) and a limiting absolute B-band magnitude, M{sub B}=−19.12. These limits define a sample of 140 spiral galaxies, with 128 measurable pitch angles to establish the pitch angle distribution for this sample. This pitch-angle distribution function may be useful in the study of the morphology of late-type galaxies. We then use an established relationship between the logarithmic spiral arm pitch angle and the mass of the central SMBH in a host galaxy in order to estimate the mass of the 128 respective SMBHs in this volume-limited sample. This result effectively gives us the distribution of mass for SMBHs residing in spiral galaxies over a lookback time, t{sub L} ≤ 82.1 h{sub 67.77}{sup −1} Myr and contained within a comoving volume, V{sub C} = 3.37 × 10{sup 4} h{sub 67.77}{sup −3} Mpc{sup 3}. We estimate that the density of SMBHs residing in spiral galaxies in the local universe is ρ=5.54{sub −2.73}{sup +6.55} × 10{sup 4} h{sub 67.77}{sup 3} M{sub ☉} Mpc{sup –3}. Thus, our derived cosmological SMBH mass density for spiral galaxies is Ω{sub BH}=4.35{sub −2.15}{sup +5.14} × 10{sup –7} h{sub 67.77}. Assuming that

  18. Rest-frame ultraviolet morphologies: connecting local galaxies with the epoch of disk formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes Demello, Duilia; Soto, Emmaris

    2015-08-01

    At all redshifts rest-frame ultraviolet morphologies tend to be patchy and clumpy or extremely compact in nature. These morphological signatures could result from either merger interactions between two or multiple systems that trigger star formation, cloud collapse via gravitational instabilities in a gaseous disk that is fed by cold gas spiraling inwards along filamentary structures, or another mechanism still to be determined. Theoretical simulations of clumpy galaxy evolution suggest they could have evolved secularly through cold gas accretion onto rotating disks. Clumps in disks could have migrated to the center of the potential well of a galaxy and combined to form a bulge, or, if gravitationally unstable, could have dissipated forming the disk component. We are exploring potential correlations amongst different morphological properties at intermediate-z which is pivotal in bridging observations at high-z to the local extragalactic universe. We will show how flocculent galaxies, starburst galaxies and compact groups of galaxies may resemble clumpy disks at intermediate redshifts in the rest-frame UV.

  19. Searching for Wolf-Rayet Stars in the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shara, M. M.; Zurek, D.; Kanarek, G.; Faherty, J.

    2012-12-01

    Tony Moffat has been inspiring the hunt for new Wolf-Rayet stars for over 40 years. These extraordinary objects offer critical tests of stellar evolution theory, and are predicted to be progenitors of type Ib and Ic supernovae. We're only going to know if that prediction is correct (in our lifetimes) by locating and spectrographically confirming of order 10 000 WR stars - a daunting but increasingly doable task. Our 2009 prediction that roughly 6 500 Wolf-Rayet stars live in our Galaxy has been followed by demonstrations in the past few years that, via narrowband infrared imaging and spectroscopy, we can find and confirm almost all Galactic WR stars. The rest of the Local Group is unlikely to contain more than 1 000 WR stars, so the Milky Way is THE place to search exhaustively for them. I briefly describe how we hunt and gather WR stars and give a current (mid-2011) Local Group census of them.

  20. The galaxy luminosity function and the Local Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitbourn, J. R.; Shanks, T.

    2016-06-01

    In a previous study Whitbourn & Shanks have reported evidence for a local void underdense by ≈15 per cent extending to 150-300 h-1 Mpc around our position in the Southern Galactic Cap (SGC). Assuming a local luminosity function they modelled K- and r-limited number counts and redshift distributions in the 6dFGS/2MASS and SDSS redshift surveys and derived normalized n(z) ratios relative to the standard homogeneous cosmological model. Here we test further these results using maximum likelihood techniques that solve for the galaxy density distributions and the galaxy luminosity function simultaneously. We confirm the results from the previous analysis in terms of the number density distributions, indicating that our detection of the `Local Hole' in the SGC is robust to the assumption of either our previous, or newly estimated, luminosity functions. However, there are discrepancies with previously published K- and r-band luminosity functions. In particular the r-band luminosity function has a steeper faint end slope than the r0.1 results of Blanton et al. but is consistent with the r0.1 results of Montero-Dorta & Prada and Loveday et al.

  1. Towards a realistic population of simulated galaxy groups and clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Brun, Amandine M. C.; McCarthy, Ian G.; Schaye, Joop; Ponman, Trevor J.

    2014-06-01

    We present a new suite of large-volume cosmological hydrodynamical simulations called cosmo-OWLS. They form an extension to the OverWhelmingly Large Simulations (OWLS) project, and have been designed to help improve our understanding of cluster astrophysics and non-linear structure formation, which are now the limiting systematic errors when using clusters as cosmological probes. Starting from identical initial conditions in either the Planck or WMAP7 cosmologies, we systematically vary the most important `sub-grid' physics, including feedback from supernovae and active galactic nuclei (AGN). We compare the properties of the simulated galaxy groups and clusters to a wide range of observational data, such as X-ray luminosity and temperature, gas mass fractions, entropy and density profiles, Sunyaev-Zel'dovich flux, I-band mass-to-light ratio, dominance of the brightest cluster galaxy and central massive black hole (BH) masses, by producing synthetic observations and mimicking observational analysis techniques. These comparisons demonstrate that some AGN feedback models can produce a realistic population of galaxy groups and clusters, broadly reproducing both the median trend and, for the first time, the scatter in physical properties over approximately two decades in mass (1013 M⊙ ≲ M500 ≲ 1015 M⊙) and 1.5 decades in radius (0.05 ≲ r/r500 ≲ 1.5). However, in other models, the AGN feedback is too violent (even though they reproduce the observed BH scaling relations), implying that calibration of the models is required. The production of realistic populations of simulated groups and clusters, as well as models that bracket the observations, opens the door to the creation of synthetic surveys for assisting the astrophysical and cosmological interpretation of cluster surveys, as well as quantifying the impact of selection effects.

  2. A UNIVERSAL, LOCAL STAR FORMATION LAW IN GALACTIC CLOUDS, NEARBY GALAXIES, HIGH-REDSHIFT DISKS, AND STARBURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Krumholz, Mark R.; Dekel, Avishai; McKee, Christopher F. E-mail: dekel@phys.huji.ac.il

    2012-01-20

    Star formation laws are rules that relate the rate of star formation in a particular region, either an entire galaxy or some portion of it, to the properties of the gas, or other galactic properties, in that region. While observations of Local Group galaxies show a very simple, local star formation law in which the star formation rate per unit area in each patch of a galaxy scales linearly with the molecular gas surface density in that patch, recent observations of both Milky Way molecular clouds and high-redshift galaxies apparently show a more complicated relationship in which regions of equal molecular gas surface density can form stars at quite different rates. These data have been interpreted as implying either that different star formation laws may apply in different circumstances, that the star formation law is sensitive to large-scale galaxy properties rather than local properties, or that there are high-density thresholds for star formation. Here we collate observations of the relationship between gas and star formation rate from resolved observations of Milky Way molecular clouds, from kpc-scale observations of Local Group galaxies, and from unresolved observations of both disk and starburst galaxies in the local universe and at high redshift. We show that all of these data are in fact consistent with a simple, local, volumetric star formation law. The apparent variations stem from the fact that the observed objects have a wide variety of three-dimensional size scales and degrees of internal clumping, so even at fixed gas column density the regions being observed can have wildly varying volume densities. We provide a simple theoretical framework to remove this projection effect, and we use it to show that all the data, from small solar neighborhood clouds with masses {approx}10{sup 3} M{sub Sun} to submillimeter galaxies with masses {approx}10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }, fall on a single star formation law in which the star formation rate is simply {approx}1% of

  3. Searching for diffuse light in the M96 galaxy group

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, Aaron E.; Mihos, J. Christopher; Harding, Paul; Feldmeier, John J.

    2014-08-10

    We present deep, wide-field imaging of the M96 galaxy group (also known as the Leo I Group). Down to surface brightness limits of μ{sub B} = 30.1 and μ{sub V} = 29.5, we find no diffuse, large-scale optical counterpart to the 'Leo Ring', an extended H I ring surrounding the central elliptical M105 (NGC 3379). However, we do find a number of extremely low surface brightness (μ{sub B} ≳ 29) small-scale streamlike features, possibly tidal in origin, two of which may be associated with the Ring. In addition, we present detailed surface photometry of each of the group's most massive members—M105, NGC 3384, M96 (NGC 3368), and M95 (NGC 3351)—out to large radius and low surface brightness, where we search for signatures of interaction and accretion events. We find that the outer isophotes of both M105 and M95 appear almost completely undisturbed, in contrast to NGC 3384 which shows a system of diffuse shells indicative of a recent minor merger. We also find photometric evidence that M96 is accreting gas from the H I ring, in agreement with H I data. In general, however, interaction signatures in the M96 Group are extremely subtle for a group environment, and provide some tension with interaction scenarios for the formation of the Leo H I Ring. The lack of a significant component of diffuse intragroup starlight in the M96 Group is consistent with its status as a loose galaxy group in which encounters are relatively mild and infrequent.

  4. PN populations in the Local Group and distant stellar populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Warren Alfred

    2015-08-01

    Our understanding of galactic structure and evolution is far from complete. Within the past twelve months we have learnt that the Milky Way is about 50% wider than was previously thought. As a consequence, new models are being developed that force us to reassess the kinematic structure of our Galaxy. Similarly, we need to take a fresh look at the halo structure of external galaxies in our Local Group. Studies of stellar populations, star-forming regions, clusters, the interstellar medium, elemental abundances and late stellar evolution are all required in order to understand how galactic assembly has occurred as we see it.PNe play an important role in this investigation by providing a measure of stellar age, mass, abundances, morphology, kinematics and synthesized matter that is returned to the interstellar medium (ISM). PN populations in the halos can be compared to those deeper within each galaxy to reveal any differences in chemical composition that may, through a method of chemical tagging show signs of stellar migration and galactic entwining.In this talk I will outline the advances that have been made in uncovering the full number of PNe in our Local Group galaxies. Current numbers will be presented and compared to total population estimates based on galactic mass and luminosity. A near complete census of PNe is crucial to understanding the initial-to-final mass relation for stars with mass >1 to <8 times the mass of the sun. It also allows us to extract more evolutionary information from luminosity functions and compare dust-to-gas ratios from PNe in different galactic locations. Nucleosynthesised material returned to the ISM during the PN phase can be compared to non-synthesised matter to expose the role PNe play in enriching the galactic environment.With new data provided by the Gaia satellite, space-based telescopes and the rise of giant and extra-large telescopes supplementing future space telescope missions, we are on the verge of observing and

  5. Detailed photometric analysis of young star groups in the galaxy NGC 300

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, M. J.; Baume, G.; Feinstein, C.

    2016-10-01

    obtained from the size distribution are both 25 pc, in agreement with the value for the Local Group and nearby galaxies. Additionally, we found an average PDMF slope that is compatible with the Salpeter value. Full Table 2 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/594/A34

  6. Local Groups Online: Political Learning and Participation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavanaugh, Andrea; Zin, Thanthan; Schmitz, Joseph; Rosson, Mary Beth; Kim, B. Joon; Carroll, John M.

    Voluntary associations serve crucial roles in local communities and within our larger democratic society. They aggregate shared interests, collective will, and cultivate civic competencies that nurture democratic participation. People active in multiple local groups frequently act as opinion leaders and create “weak” social ties across groups. In Blacksburg and surrounding Montgomery County, Virginia, the Blacksburg Electronic Village (BEV) community computer network has helped to foster nearly universal Internet penetration. Set in this dense Internet context, the present study investigated whether and how personal affiliation with local groups enhanced political participation in this high information and communication technology environment. This paper presents findings from longitudinal survey data which indicate that as individuals’ uses of information technology within local formal groups increase over time, so do their levels and types of involvement in the group. Furthermore, these increases most often appear among people who serve as opinion leaders and maintain weak social ties in their communities. Individuals’ changes in community participation, interests and activities, and Internet use suggest ways in which group members act upon political motivations and interests across various group types.

  7. Analysis of the structure of disk galaxies in the NGC 2300 group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'ina, M. A.; Sil'chenko, O. K.

    2016-10-01

    Data from the 6-m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory obtained using the SCORPIO instrument in imaging mode are used to study member galaxies of the NGC 2300 group. Surface photometry has been carried out for the five largest galaxies in the group, whose isophotal parameters and the parameters of their large-scale structural components (disks and bulges) have been determined. The morphological type of the central galaxy in the group has been refined, and shown to be elliptical. Studies of structural features in non-central disk galaxies have revealed an enhanced percent of bars: bars were found in all disk galaxies of this group, with all of these being compact structures. The similarity of the structural features of the disks of the group galaxies suggests that these disksmay be being restructured in the process of the current merger of the two X-ray subgroups comprising NGC 2300: the group NGC 2300 itself and the group NGC 2276.

  8. Star Formation at Low Metallicity in Local Dwarf Irregular Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmegreen, Bruce; Hunter, Deidre Ann; Rubio, Monica; Brinks, Elias; Cortés, Juan R.; Cigan, Phil

    2016-01-01

    The radial profiles of star formation rates and surface mass densities for gas and stars have been compiled for 20 local dwarf irregular galaxies and converted into disk scale heights and Toomre Q values. The scale heights are relatively large compared to the galaxy sizes (~0.6 times the local radii) and generally increase with radius in a flare. The gaseous Q values are high, ~4, at most radii and even higher for the stars. Star formation proceeds even with these high Q values in a normal exponential disk as viewed in the far ultraviolet. Such normal star formation suggests that Q is not relevant to star formation in dIrrs. The star formation rate per unit area always equals approximately the gas surface density divided by the midplane free fall time with an efficiency factor of about 1% that decreases systematically with radius in approximate proportion to the gas surface density. We view this efficiency variation as a result of a changing molecular fraction in a disk where atomic gas dominates both stars and molecules. In a related study, CO observations with ALMA of star-forming regions at the low metallicities of these dwarfs, which averages 13% solar, shows, in the case of the WLM galaxy, tiny CO clouds inside much larger molecular and atomic hydrogen envelopes. The CO cloud mass fraction within the molecular region is only one percent or so. Nevertheless, the CO clouds have properties that are similar to solar neighborhood clouds: they satisfy the size-linewidth relation observed in the LMC, SMC, and other local dwarfs where CO has been observed, and the same virial mass versus luminosity relation. This uniforming of CO cloud properties seems to be the result of a confining pressure from the weight of the overlying molecular and atomic shielding layers. Star formation at low metallicity therefore appears to be a three dimensional process independent of 2D instabilities involving Q, in highly atomic gas with relatively small CO cores, activated at a rate

  9. The Hubble Sequence in Groups: The Birth of the Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmann, R.; Carollo, C. M.; Mayer, L.

    2011-08-01

    The physical mechanisms and timescales that determine the morphological signatures and the quenching of star formation of typical (~L*) elliptical galaxies are not well understood. To address this issue, we have simulated the formation of a group of galaxies with sufficient resolution to track the evolution of gas and stars inside about a dozen galaxy group members over cosmic history. Galaxy groups, which harbor many elliptical galaxies in the universe, are a particularly promising environment to investigate morphological transformation and star formation quenching, due to their high galaxy density, their relatively low velocity dispersion, and the presence of a hot intragroup medium. Our simulation reproduces galaxies with different Hubble morphologies and, consequently, enables us to study when and where the morphological transformation of galaxies takes place. The simulation does not include feedback from active galactic nuclei showing that it is not an essential ingredient for producing quiescent, red elliptical galaxies in galaxy groups. Ellipticals form, as suspected, through galaxy mergers. In contrast with what has often been speculated, however, these mergers occur at z > 1, before the merging progenitors enter the virial radius of the group and before the group is fully assembled. The simulation also shows that quenching of star formation in the still star-forming elliptical galaxies lags behind their morphological transformation, but, once started, takes less than a billion years to complete. As long envisaged the star formation quenching happens as the galaxies approach and enter the finally assembled group, due to quenching of gas accretion and (to a lesser degree) stripping. A similar sort is followed by unmerged, disk galaxies, which, as they join the group, are turned into the red-and-dead disks that abound in these environments.

  10. Effects of local information on group behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Roychowdhury, S.; Arora, N.; Sen, S.

    1996-12-31

    Researchers in the field of Distributed Artificial Intelligence have studied the effects of local decision-making on overall system performance in both cooperative and self-interested agent groups. The performance of individual agents depends critically on the quality of information available to it about local and global goals and resources. Whereas in general it is assumed that the more accurate and up-to-date the available information, the better is the expected performance of the individual and the group, this conclusion can be challenged in a number of scenarios.

  11. THE ZURICH ENVIRONMENTAL STUDY OF GALAXIES IN GROUPS ALONG THE COSMIC WEB. I. WHICH ENVIRONMENT AFFECTS GALAXY EVOLUTION?

    SciTech Connect

    Carollo, C. Marcella; Cibinel, Anna; Lilly, Simon J.; Miniati, Francesco; Cameron, Ewan; Peng, Yingjie; Pipino, Antonio; Rudick, Craig S.; Norberg, Peder; Silverman, John D.; Van Gorkom, Jacqueline; Finoguenov, Alexis

    2013-10-20

    The Zurich Environmental Study (ZENS) is based on a sample of ∼1500 galaxy members of 141 groups in the mass range ∼10{sup 12.5-14.5} M{sub ☉} within the narrow redshift range 0.05 < z < 0.0585. ZENS adopts novel approaches, described here, to quantify four different galactic environments, namely: (1) the mass of the host group halo; (2) the projected halo-centric distance; (3) the rank of galaxies as central or satellites within their group halos; and (4) the filamentary large-scale structure density. No self-consistent identification of a central galaxy is found in ∼40% of <10{sup 13.5} M{sub ☉} groups, from which we estimate that ∼15% of groups at these masses are dynamically unrelaxed systems. Central galaxies in relaxed and unrelaxed groups generally have similar properties, suggesting that centrals are regulated by their mass and not by their environment. Centrals in relaxed groups have, however, ∼30% larger sizes than in unrelaxed groups, possibly due to accretion of small satellites in virialized group halos. At M > 10{sup 10} M{sub ☉}, satellite galaxies in relaxed and unrelaxed groups have similar size, color, and (specific) star formation rate distributions; at lower galaxy masses, satellites are marginally redder in relaxed relative to unrelaxed groups, suggesting quenching of star formation in low-mass satellites by physical processes active in relaxed halos. Overall, relaxed and unrelaxed groups show similar stellar mass populations, likely indicating similar stellar mass conversion efficiencies. In the enclosed ZENS catalog, we publish all environmental diagnostics as well as the galaxy structural and photometric measurements described in companion ZENS papers II and III.

  12. Localization of Unitary Braid Group Representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowell, Eric C.; Wang, Zhenghan

    2012-05-01

    Governed by locality, we explore a connection between unitary braid group representations associated to a unitary R-matrix and to a simple object in a unitary braided fusion category. Unitary R-matrices, namely unitary solutions to the Yang-Baxter equation, afford explicitly local unitary representations of braid groups. Inspired by topological quantum computation, we study whether or not it is possible to reassemble the irreducible summands appearing in the unitary braid group representations from a unitary braided fusion category with possibly different positive multiplicities to get representations that are uniformly equivalent to the ones from a unitary R-matrix. Such an equivalence will be called a localization of the unitary braid group representations. We show that the q = e π i/6 specialization of the unitary Jones representation of the braid groups can be localized by a unitary 9 × 9 R-matrix. Actually this Jones representation is the first one in a family of theories ( SO( N), 2) for an odd prime N > 1, which are conjectured to be localizable. We formulate several general conjectures and discuss possible connections to physics and computer science.

  13. BRIGHTEST SATELLITE GALAXY ALIGNMENT OF SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY GALAXY GROUPS

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhigang; Wang Yougang; Chen Xuelei; Yang Xiaohu; Xie Lizhi; Wang Xin E-mail: wangygcluster@gmail.com E-mail: lzxie@bao.ac.cn E-mail: wangxin@pha.jhu.edu

    2013-05-01

    We study the alignment signal between the distribution of the brightest satellite galaxies (BSGs) and the major axes of their host groups using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey group catalog constructed by Yang et al. After correcting for the effect of group ellipticity, a statistically significant ({approx}5{sigma}) major-axis alignment is detected and the alignment angle is found to be 43. Degree-Sign 0 {+-} 0. Degree-Sign 4. More massive and richer groups show a stronger BSG alignment. The BSG alignment around blue brightest central galaxies (BCGs) is slightly stronger than that around red BCGs. Red BSGs have a much stronger major-axis alignment than blue BSGs. Unlike BSGs, other satellites do not show very significant alignment with their group's major axis. We further explore BSG alignment using the semi-analytic model (SAM) constructed by Guo et al. In general, we found good agreement of the model with observations: BSGs in the SAM show a strong major-axis alignment that depends on group mass and richness in the same way as in observations and none of the other satellites exhibit prominent alignment. However, a discrepancy also exists in that the SAM shows a BSG color dependence opposite of that in observations, which is most probably induced by a missing large-scale environment ingredient in the SAM. The combination of two popular scenarios can explain the BSG alignment we detected. First, satellites merged into the group along the surrounding filaments, which are strongly aligned with the major axis of the group. Second, BSGs entered their host group more recently than other satellites, so they have preserved more information about their assembling history and major-axis alignment. In the SAM, we found positive evidence for the second scenario in the fact that BSGs merged into groups statistically more recently than other satellites. We also found that most of the BSGs (80%) were BCGs before they merged into groups and earlier merging BSGs tend to be closer to

  14. The kinematical center and mass profile of the local group

    SciTech Connect

    Whiting, Alan B.

    2014-09-20

    Abandoning the assumption that light traces mass, I seek the location of the center of the Local Group of galaxies based solely on kinematic data and the plausible assumption of infall. The available set of positions and radial velocities is shown to be a misleading indicator of Local Group motions, giving a direction to the center offset from the true one; statistical techniques of moderate sophistication do not catch the offset. Corrected calculations show the center to lie in the direction of M31 within the uncertainty of the method, within a few degrees. The distance to the center is not well determined, lying about 0.5 Mpc from the Milky Way. The pattern of observed (galactocentric) radial velocities excludes both dynamically important 'orphan halos' and any extended dark matter halo for the Group as a whole, and shows the Group to have formed from a much more extended volume than it presently occupies. Kinematics alone indicates that the mass of the Group is concentrated effectively in M31 and the Milky Way.

  15. The Kinematical Center and Mass Profile of the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiting, Alan B.

    2014-09-01

    Abandoning the assumption that light traces mass, I seek the location of the center of the Local Group of galaxies based solely on kinematic data and the plausible assumption of infall. The available set of positions and radial velocities is shown to be a misleading indicator of Local Group motions, giving a direction to the center offset from the true one; statistical techniques of moderate sophistication do not catch the offset. Corrected calculations show the center to lie in the direction of M31 within the uncertainty of the method, within a few degrees. The distance to the center is not well determined, lying about 0.5 Mpc from the Milky Way. The pattern of observed (galactocentric) radial velocities excludes both dynamically important "orphan halos" and any extended dark matter halo for the Group as a whole, and shows the Group to have formed from a much more extended volume than it presently occupies. Kinematics alone indicates that the mass of the Group is concentrated effectively in M31 and the Milky Way.

  16. THE ROLE OF MERGER STAGE ON GALAXY RADIO SPECTRA IN LOCAL INFRARED-BRIGHT STARBURST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Eric J.

    2013-11-01

    An investigation of the steep, high-frequency (i.e., ν ∼ 12 GHz) radio spectra among a sample of 31 local infrared-bright starburst galaxies is carried out in light of their Hubble-Space-Telescope-based merger classifications. Radio data covering as many as 10 individual bands allow for spectral indices to be measured over three frequency bins between 0.15 and 32.5 GHz. Sources having the flattest spectral indices measured at ∼2 and 4 GHz, arising from large free-free optical depths among the densest starbursts, appear to be in ongoing through post-stage mergers. The spectral indices measured at higher frequencies (i.e., ∼12 GHz) are steepest for sources associated with ongoing mergers in which their nuclei are distinct, but share a common stellar envelope and/or exhibit tidal tails. These results hold after excluding potential active galactic nuclei based on their low 6.2 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon equivalent widths. Consequently, the low-, mid-, and high-frequency spectral indices each appear to be sensitive to the exact merger stage. It is additionally shown that ongoing mergers, whose progenitors are still separated and share a common envelope and/or exhibit tidal tails, also exhibit excess radio emission relative to what is expected given the far-infrared/radio correlation, suggesting that there may be a significant amount of radio emission that is not associated with ongoing star formation. The combination of these observations, along with high-resolution radio morphologies, leads to a picture in which the steep high-frequency radio spectral indices and excess radio emission arise from radio continuum bridges and tidal tails that are not associated with star formation, similar to what is observed for so-called 'taffy' galaxies. This scenario may also explain the seemingly low far-infrared/radio ratios measured for many high-z submillimeter galaxies, a number of which are merger-driven starbursts.

  17. Hot Gas and AGN Feedback in Galaxies and Nearby Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Christine; Forman, William; Bogdan, Akos; Randall, Scott; Kraft, Ralph; Churazov, Eugene

    2013-07-01

    Massive galaxies harbor a supermassive black hole at their centers. At high redshifts, these galaxies experienced a very active quasar phase, when, as their black holes grew by accretion, they produced enormous amounts of energy. At the present epoch, these black holes still undergo occasional outbursts, although the mode of their energy release is primarily mechanical rather than radiative. The energy from these outbursts can reheat the cooling gas in the galaxy cores and maintain the red and dead nature of the early-type galaxies. These outbursts also can have dramatic effects on the galaxy-scale hot coronae found in the more massive galaxies. We describe research in three areas related to the hot gas around galaxies and their supermassive black holes. First we present examples of galaxies with AGN outbursts that have been studied in detail. Second, we show that X-ray emitting low-luminosity AGN are present in 80% of the galaxies studied. Third, we discuss the first examples of extensive hot gas and dark matter halos in optically faint galaxies.

  18. Galaxy evolution in nearby loose groups - II. Photometric and kinematic characterization of USGC U268 and USGC U376 group members in the Leo cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, A.; Plana, H.; Rampazzo, R.; Bianchi, L.; Rosado, M.; Bettoni, D.; Galletta, G.; Mazzei, P.; Buson, L.; Ambrocio-Cruz, P.; Gabbasov, R. F.

    2013-01-01

    This paper is the second of a series of papers in which we are exploring the coevolution of galaxies and groups in the local Universe, by adopting a multiwavelength approach. Here, we present the photometric and kinematic characterization of two groups, USGC U268 and USGC U376 (U268 and U376 hereafter), which are located in different regions of the Leo cloud. We revisit the group membership, using results from recent redshift surveys, and we investigate their substructures. U268, which is composed of 10 catalogued members and 11 new added members, has a small fraction (≈24 per cent) of early-type galaxies (ETGs). U376 has 16 catalogued members plus eight new added members, with ≈38 per cent of ETGs. We find that there are significant substructures in both groups, which suggests that they are likely to be accreting galaxies. U268 is located in a more loose environment than U376. For each member galaxy, broad-band integrated and surface photometry have been obtained in far-ultraviolet (FUV) and near-ultraviolet (NUV) with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX), and in the u, g, r, i and z (Sloan Digital Sky Survey) bands. Hα imaging and two-dimensional high-resolution kinematical data have been obtained using the scanning Fabry-Pérot interferometer (PUMA) at the 2.12-m telescope at San Pedro Mártir (Baja California, Mexico). We have improved the galaxy classification and we have detected morphological and kinematical distortions that might be connected either to ongoing and/or past interaction/accretion events or to environmental-induced secular evolution. U268 appears to be more active than U376, with a large fraction of galaxies showing interaction signatures (60 per cent versus 13 per cent). The presence of bars among late-type galaxies is ≈10 per cent in U268 and ≈29 per cent in U376. The cumulative distribution of the FUV-NUV colours of galaxies in U268 is significantly different from that in U376, with galaxies in U268 being bluer than those in U376

  19. X-ray-selected galaxy groups in Boötes

    SciTech Connect

    Vajgel, Bruna; Lopes, Paulo A. A.; Jones, Christine; Forman, William R.; Murray, Stephen S.; Goulding, Andrew; Andrade-Santos, Felipe

    2014-10-10

    We present the X-ray and optical properties of the galaxy groups selected in the Chandra X-Boötes survey. We used follow-up Chandra observations to better define the group sample and their X-ray properties. Group redshifts were measured from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey spectroscopic data. We used photometric data from the NOAO Deep Wide Field Survey to estimate the group richness (N {sub gals}) and the optical luminosity (L {sub opt}). Our final sample comprises 32 systems at z < 1.75 with 14 below z = 0.35. For these 14 systems, we estimate velocity dispersions (σ {sub gr}) and perform a virial analysis to obtain the radii (R {sub 200} and R {sub 500}) and total masses (M {sub 200} and M {sub 500}) for groups with at least 5 galaxy members. We use the Chandra X-ray observations to derive the X-ray luminosity (L{sub X} ). We examine the performance of the group properties σ{sub gr}, L {sub opt}, and L{sub X} , as proxies for the group mass. Understanding how well these observables measure the total mass is important to estimate how precisely the cluster/group mass function is determined. Exploring the scaling relations built with the X-Boötes sample and comparing these with samples from the literature, we find a break in the L{sub X} -M {sub 500} relation at approximately M {sub 500} = 5 × 10{sup 13} M {sub ☉} (for M {sub 500} > 5 × 10{sup 13} M {sub ☉}, M{sub 500}∝L{sub X}{sup 0.61±0.02}, while for M {sub 500} ≤ 5 × 10{sup 13} M {sub ☉}, M{sub 500}∝L{sub X}{sup 0.44±0.05}). Thus, the mass-luminosity relation for galaxy groups cannot be described by the same power law as galaxy clusters. A possible explanation for this break is the dynamical friction, tidal interactions, and projection effects that reduce the velocity dispersion values of the galaxy groups. By extending the cluster luminosity function to the group regime, we predict the number of groups that new X-ray surveys, particularly eROSITA, will detect. Based on our cluster/group

  20. Where are compact groups in the local Universe?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Giménez, Eugenia; Zandivarez, Ariel

    2015-06-01

    Aims: The purpose of this work is to perform a statistical analysis of the location of compact groups in the Universe from observational and semi-analytical points of view. Methods: We used the velocity-filtered compact group sample extracted from the Two Micron All Sky Survey for our analysis. We also used a new sample of galaxy groups identified in the 2M++ galaxy redshift catalogue as tracers of the large-scale structure. We defined a procedure to search in redshift space for compact groups that can be considered embedded in other overdense systems and applied this criterion to several possible combinations of different compact and galaxy group subsamples. We also performed similar analyses for simulated compact and galaxy groups identified in a 2M++ mock galaxy catalogue constructed from the Millennium Run Simulation I plus a semi-analytical model of galaxy formation. Results: We observed that only ~27% of the compact groups can be considered to be embedded in larger overdense systems, that is, most of the compact groups are more likely to be isolated systems. The embedded compact groups show statistically smaller sizes and brighter surface brightnesses than non-embedded systems. No evidence was found that embedded compact groups are more likely to inhabit galaxy groups with a given virial mass or with a particular dynamical state. We found very similar results when the analysis was performed using mock compact and galaxy groups. Based on the semi-analytical studies, we predict that 70% of the embedded compact groups probably are 3D physically dense systems. Finally, real space information allowed us to reveal the bimodal behaviour of the distribution of 3D minimum distances between compact and galaxy groups. Conclusions: The location of compact groups should be carefully taken into account when comparing properties of galaxies in environments that are a priori different. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgFull Tables B.1 and B.2

  1. Galaxy Group Stephan's Quintet Video File HubbleMinute: Battle Royale in Stephan's Quintet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope's closeup view of Stephan's Quintet, a group of five galaxies, reveals a string of brighter star clusters that separate like a diamond necklace. Astronomers studying the compact galaxy group Stephan's Quintet have seen creative destruction in the many collisions taking place among its galaxies. This HubbleMinute discusses what astronomers are learning and hope to learn from exploring the quintet.

  2. Group-galaxy correlations in redshift space as a probe of the growth of structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, F. G.; de la Torre, S.; Bianchi, D.; Guzzo, L.; Peacock, J. A.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the use of the cross-correlation between galaxies and galaxy groups to measure redshift-space distortions (RSD) and thus probe the growth rate of cosmological structure. This is compared to the classical approach based on using galaxy auto-correlation. We make use of realistic simulated galaxy catalogues that have been constructed by populating simulated dark matter haloes with galaxies through halo occupation prescriptions. We adapt the classical RSD dispersion model to the case of the group-galaxy cross-correlation function and estimate the RSD parameter β by fitting both the full anisotropic correlation function ξs(rp, π) and its multipole moments. In addition, we define a modified version of the latter statistics by truncating the multipole moments to exclude strongly non-linear distortions at small transverse scales. We fit these three observable quantities in our set of simulated galaxy catalogues and estimate statistical and systematic errors on β for the case of galaxy-galaxy, group-group, and group-galaxy correlation functions. When ignoring off-diagonal elements of the covariance matrix in the fitting, the truncated multipole moments of the group-galaxy cross-correlation function provide the most accurate estimate, with systematic errors below 3 per cent when fitting transverse scales larger than 10 h-1 Mpc. Including the full data covariance enlarges statistical errors but keep unchanged the level of systematic error. Although statistical errors are generally larger for groups, the use of group-galaxy cross-correlation can potentially allow the reduction of systematics while using simple linear or dispersion models.

  3. TIDAL INTERACTION AS THE ORIGIN OF EARLY-TYPE DWARF GALAXIES IN GROUP ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Paudel, Sanjaya; Ree, Chang H.

    2014-11-20

    We present a sample of dwarf galaxies that suffer ongoing disruption by the tidal forces of nearby massive galaxies. By analyzing structural and stellar population properties using the archival imaging and spectroscopic data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), we find that they are likely a ''smoking gun'' example of the formation through tidal stirring of early-type dwarf galaxies (dEs) in the galaxy group environment. The inner cores of these galaxies are fairly intact and the observed light profiles are well fit by the Sérsic functions while the tidally stretched stellar halos are prominent in the outer parts. They are all located within a sky-projected distance of 50 kpc from the centers of the host galaxies and no dwarf galaxies have relative line-of-sight velocities larger than 205 km s{sup –1} to their hosts. We derive the Composite Stellar Population properties of these galaxies by fitting the SDSS optical spectra to a multiple-burst composite stellar population model. We find that these galaxies accumulate a significant fraction of stellar mass within the last 1 Gyr and contain a majority stellar population with an intermediate age of 2 to 4 Gyr. Based on this evidence, we argue that tidal stirring, particularly through the galaxy-galaxy interaction, might have an important role in the formation and evolution of dEs in the group environment where the influence of other gas stripping mechanism might be limited.

  4. Particle Dark Matter Searches Outside the Local Group.

    PubMed

    Regis, Marco; Xia, Jun-Qing; Cuoco, Alessandro; Branchini, Enzo; Fornengo, Nicolao; Viel, Matteo

    2015-06-19

    If dark matter (DM) is composed by particles which are nongravitationally coupled to ordinary matter, their annihilations or decays in cosmic structures can result in detectable radiation. We show that the most powerful technique to detect a particle DM signal outside the Local Group is to study the angular cross-correlation of nongravitational signals with low-redshift gravitational probes. This method allows us to enhance the signal to noise from the regions of the Universe where the DM-induced emission is preferentially generated. We demonstrate the power of this approach by focusing on GeV-TeV DM and on the recent cross-correlation analysis between the 2MASS galaxy catalogue and the Fermi-LAT γ-ray maps. We show that this technique is more sensitive than other extragalactic γ-ray probes, such as the energy spectrum and angular autocorrelation of the extragalactic background, and emission from clusters of galaxies. Intriguingly, we find that the measured cross-correlation can be well fitted by a DM component, with a thermal annihilation cross section and mass between 10 and 100 GeV, depending on the small-scale DM properties and γ-ray production mechanism. This solicits further data collection and dedicated analyses.

  5. Particle Dark Matter Searches Outside the Local Group.

    PubMed

    Regis, Marco; Xia, Jun-Qing; Cuoco, Alessandro; Branchini, Enzo; Fornengo, Nicolao; Viel, Matteo

    2015-06-19

    If dark matter (DM) is composed by particles which are nongravitationally coupled to ordinary matter, their annihilations or decays in cosmic structures can result in detectable radiation. We show that the most powerful technique to detect a particle DM signal outside the Local Group is to study the angular cross-correlation of nongravitational signals with low-redshift gravitational probes. This method allows us to enhance the signal to noise from the regions of the Universe where the DM-induced emission is preferentially generated. We demonstrate the power of this approach by focusing on GeV-TeV DM and on the recent cross-correlation analysis between the 2MASS galaxy catalogue and the Fermi-LAT γ-ray maps. We show that this technique is more sensitive than other extragalactic γ-ray probes, such as the energy spectrum and angular autocorrelation of the extragalactic background, and emission from clusters of galaxies. Intriguingly, we find that the measured cross-correlation can be well fitted by a DM component, with a thermal annihilation cross section and mass between 10 and 100 GeV, depending on the small-scale DM properties and γ-ray production mechanism. This solicits further data collection and dedicated analyses. PMID:26196970

  6. Yellow and Red Supergiants in the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Philip; Neugent, Kathryn; Drout, Maria; Meynet, Georges

    2013-06-01

    Yellow and red supergiants are the "poor cousins" of massive star studies, often overlooked in favor of strong emission-lined Wolf-Rayets or the spectacular, enigmatic Luminous Blue Variables. Recent studies, however, are proving the truth of Kippenhahn & Weigert (1990)'s claim that these evolved stages act as a "sort of magnifying glass, revealing relentlessly the faults of calculations of earlier phases." Identifying complete samples of YSGs and RSGs among the galaxies of the Local Group is difficult, as foreground dwarfs are nearly indistinguishable from bona-fide extragalactic members. We have succeeded in this task only by using a combination of wide-area photometry surveys combined with spectroscopic followup. Since massive star evolution is greatly affected by mass-loss, and mass-loss rates depend upon metallicity, we have conducted such studies over a range of 10 in metallicity, including the SMC, LMC, M33, and M31. These studies not only allow us to test the stellar evolutionary models, but the identification of these stars provides interesting kinematic information on the youngest stellar populations in these galaxies. We will review here what we have learned over the past few years, and what new questions these studies are raising.

  7. Evidence for Tidal Interactions and Mergers as the Origin of Galaxy Morphology Evolution in Compact Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coziol, R.; Plauchu-Frayn, I.

    2007-06-01

    We present the results of a morphological study based on NIR images of 25 galaxies, with different levels of nuclear activity (star formation or AGN), in eight compact groups (CGs) of galaxies. We independently perform two different analyses: a study of the deviations of the isophotal levels from pure ellipses and a study of morphological asymmetries. The results yielded by the two analyses are highly consistent. For the first time, it is possible to show that deviations from pure ellipses are produced by inhomogeneous stellar mass distributions related to galaxy interactions and mergers. We find evidence of mass asymmetries in 74% of the galaxies in our sample. In 59% of these cases, the asymmetries come in pairs and are consistent with tidal effects produced by the proximity of companion galaxies. The symmetric galaxies are generally small in size or mass and inactive, and have an early-type morphology. They may have already lost their gas and least-attached envelope of stars to their more massive companions. In 20% of the galaxies we find evidence for cannibalism: a big galaxy swallowing a smaller companion. In 36% of the early-type galaxies the color gradient is positive (blue nucleus) or flat. Summing up these results, as much as 52% of the galaxies in our sample could show evidence of an ongoing or past merger. Our observations also suggest that galaxies in CGs merge more frequently under ``dry'' conditions (that is, once they have lost most of their gas). The high frequency of interacting and merging galaxies observed in our study is consistent with the bias of our sample toward CGs of type B, which represent the most active phase in the evolution of the groups. In these groups we also find a strong correlation between asymmetries and nuclear activity in early-type galaxies. This correlation allows us to identify tidal interactions and mergers as the cause of galaxy morphology transformation in CGs.

  8. Holographic trace anomaly and local renormalization group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal, Srivatsan; Stergiou, Andreas; Zhu, Yechao

    2015-11-01

    The Hamilton-Jacobi method in holography has produced important results both at a renormalization group (RG) fixed point and away from it. In this paper we use the Hamilton-Jacobi method to compute the holographic trace anomaly for four- and six-dimensional boundary conformal field theories (CFTs), assuming higher-derivative gravity and interactions of scalar fields in the bulk. The scalar field contributions to the anomaly appear in CFTs with exactly marginal operators. Moving away from the fixed point, we show that the Hamilton-Jacobi formalism provides a deep connection between the holographic and the local RG. We derive the local RG equation holographically, and verify explicitly that it satisfies Weyl consistency conditions stemming from the commutativity of Weyl scalings. We also consider massive scalar fields in the bulk corresponding to boundary relevant operators, and comment on their effects to the local RG equation.

  9. MORPHOLOGY AND SIZE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN LOCAL AND HIGH-REDSHIFT LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Rujopakarn, Wiphu; Rieke, George H.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Juneau, Stephanie

    2011-01-10

    We show that the star-forming regions in high-redshift luminous and ultraluminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs and ULIRGs) and submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) have similar physical scales to those in local normal star-forming galaxies. To first order, their higher infrared (IR) luminosities result from higher luminosity surface density. We also find a good correlation between the IR luminosity and IR luminosity surface density in starburst galaxies across over five orders of magnitude of IR luminosity from local normal galaxies to z {approx} 2 SMGs. The intensely star-forming regions of local ULIRGs are significantly smaller than those in their high-redshift counterparts and hence diverge significantly from this correlation, indicating that the ULIRGs found locally are a different population from the high-redshift ULIRGs and SMGs. Based on this relationship, we suggest that luminosity surface density should serve as a more accurate indicator for the IR emitting environment, and hence the observable properties, of star-forming galaxies than their IR luminosity. We demonstrate this approach by showing that ULIRGs at z {approx} 1 and a lensed galaxy at z {approx} 2.5 exhibit aromatic features agreeing with local LIRGs that are an order of magnitude less luminous, but have similar IR luminosity surface density. A consequence of this relationship is that the aromatic emission strength in star-forming galaxies will appear to increase at z>1 for a given IR luminosity compared to their local counterparts.

  10. On the mass of the local group

    SciTech Connect

    González, Roberto E.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2014-10-01

    We use recent proper motion measurements of the tangential velocity of M31, along with its radial velocity and distance, to derive the likelihood of the sum of halo masses of the Milky Way and M31. This is done using a sample of halo pairs in the Bolshoi cosmological simulation of ΛCDM cosmology selected to match the properties and the environment of the Local Group. The resulting likelihood gives an estimate of the sum of the masses of M {sub MW,} {sub 200c} + M {sub M31,} {sub 200c} = 2.40{sub −1.05}{sup +1.95}×10{sup 12} M{sub ⊙} (90% confidence interval). This estimate is consistent with individual mass estimates for the Milky Way and M31 and is consistent, albeit somewhat on the low side, with the mass estimated using the timing argument. We show that although the timing argument is unbiased on average for all pairs, for pairs constrained to have radial and tangential velocities similar to that of the Local Group the argument overestimates the sum of masses by a factor of 1.6. Using similar technique, we estimate the total dark matter mass enclosed within 1 Mpc from the Local Group barycenter to be M{sub LG}(r<1 Mpc)=4.2{sub −2.0}{sup +3.4}×10{sup 12} M{sub ⊙} (90% confidence interval).

  11. Photometric and Kinematical Study of Nearby Groups of Galaxies Around IC 65 and NGC 6962

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vennik, J.; Tago, E.

    The IC 65 group (z = 0.0089) of four late type galaxies - IC 65, UGC 608, UGC 622, and PGC 138291 - has been studied earlier in the 21 cm HI line by van Moorsel (1983, A&AS, 54, 1), who found disturbed HI envelopes of bright group members, and detected a new HI-rich LSB galaxy.

  12. Groups of Galaxies in the CDFS: Tracing the Evolution of Galaxies from z=1.6 to the Present Day

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulchaey, John

    2012-10-01

    Although groups are the most common environment experienced by galaxies, we still know surprisingly little about the mechanisms that drive galaxy evolution in these systems. While galaxy-galaxy encounters and mergers are thought to be common in groups, recent observations and simulations suggest encounters with the hot intragroup medium may also be important. To help distinguish between these possibilities, groups with and without a hot intragroup medium must be studied over a range of redshifts. Such studies have been limited because groups tend to be very faint in X-rays and difficult to detect at even moderate redshifts. Fortunately, the recently completed 4 Msec Chandra observation of the CDFS now allows the hot intragroup gas to be detected in ordinary groups out to z=1 and beyond. Here, we propose to use archival HST images from GEMS, GOODS and CANDELS to study the galaxy populations in a unique sample of 40 X-ray groups and approximately 100 non-X-ray groups in the CDFS in the redshift range z=0.5 to z=1.6. The ACS and WFC3 images will be used to search for signs of interactions and disturbances in these galaxies which will allow a detailed analysis of the effects of interactions as a function of group mass and redshift. Since the depth of the Chandra exposure in the CDFS is unlikely to be matched for any other fields, our group sample will be the only one with sufficient X-ray data to allow such a study for the forseeable future.

  13. Galaxy NGC 55

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This image of the nearby edge-on spiral galaxy NGC 55 was taken by Galaxy Evolution Explorer on September 14, 2003, during 2 orbits. This galaxy lies 5.4 million light years from our Milky Way galaxy and is a member of the 'local group' of galaxies that also includes the Andromeda galaxy (M31), the Magellanic clouds, and 40 other galaxies. The spiral disk of NGC 55 is inclined to our line of sight by approximately 80 degrees and so this galaxy looks cigar-shaped. This picture is a combination of Galaxy Evolution Explorer images taken with the far ultraviolet (colored blue) and near ultraviolet detectors, (colored red). The bright blue regions in this image are areas of active star formation detected in the ultraviolet by Galaxy Evolution Explorer. The red stars in this image are foreground stars in our own Milky Way galaxy.

  14. Kinematics of dwarf galaxies in gas-rich groups, and the survival and detectability of tidal dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweet, Sarah M.; Drinkwater, Michael J.; Meurer, Gerhardt; Kilborn, Virginia; Audcent-Ross, Fiona; Baumgardt, Holger; Bekki, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    We present DEIMOS multi-object spectroscopy (MOS) of 22 star-forming dwarf galaxies located in four gas-rich groups, including six newly discovered dwarfs. Two of the galaxies are strong tidal dwarf galaxy (TDG) candidates based on our luminosity-metallicity relation definition. We model the rotation curves of these galaxies. Our sample shows low mass-to-light ratios (M/L = 0.73 ± 0.39 M⊙/L⊙) as expected for young, star-forming dwarfs. One of the galaxies in our sample has an apparently strongly falling rotation curve, reaching zero rotational velocity outside the turnover radius of rturn = 1.2re. This may be (1) a polar ring galaxy, with a tilted bar within a face-on disc; (2) a kinematic warp. These scenarios are indistinguishable with our current data due to limitations of slit alignment inherent to MOS-mode observations. We consider whether TDGs can be detected based on their tidal radius, beyond which tidal stripping removes kinematic tracers such as Hα emission. When the tidal radius is less than about twice the turnover radius, the expected falling rotation curve cannot be reliably measured. This is problematic for as much as half of our sample, and indeed more generally, galaxies in groups like these. Further to this, the Hα light that remains must be sufficiently bright to be detected; this is only the case for three (14 per cent) galaxies in our sample. We conclude that the falling rotation curves expected of TDGs are intrinsically difficult to detect.

  15. A Submillimeter Survey of Dust Continuum Emission in Local Dust-Obscured Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong Chul; Hwang, Ho Seong; Lee, Gwang-Ho

    2015-08-01

    Dusty star-forming galaxies are responsible for the bulk of cosmic star formation at 1galaxies is far from clear because of their extreme distances. The study of their local analogs helps us to improve understanding of the drivers of the intense star formation activity at high redshift. The submillimeter data on the 'Rayleigh-Jeans' side of the infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of these galaxies are crucial for deriving the physical parameters of the dust content. We therefore conduct a submillimeter survey of local dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs) with the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory and the Submillimeter Array to study their dust properties. We determine the dust masses and temperatures for 16 local DOGs from the SED fit, and compare them with other dusty galaxies to understand a possible evolutionary link among them.

  16. Constraining particle dark matter using local galaxy distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Shin'ichiro; Ishiwata, Koji

    2016-06-01

    It has been long discussed that cosmic rays may contain signals of dark matter. In the last couple of years an anomaly of cosmic-ray positrons has drawn a lot of attentions, and recently an excess in cosmic-ray anti-proton has been reported by AMS-02 collaboration. Both excesses may indicate towards decaying or annihilating dark matter with a mass of around 1–10 TeV . In this article we study the gamma rays from dark matter and constraints from cross correlations with distribution of galaxies, particularly in a local volume. We find that gamma rays due to inverse-Compton process have large intensity, and hence they give stringent constraints on dark matter scenarios in the TeV scale mass regime. Taking the recent developments in modeling astrophysical gamma-ray sources as well as comprehensive possibilities of the final state products of dark matter decay or annihilation into account, we show that the parameter regions of decaying dark matter that are suggested to explain the excesses are excluded. We also discuss the constrains on annihilating scenarios.

  17. Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Normal galaxies, radio galaxies, and Seyfert galaxies are considered. The large magellanic cloud and the great galaxy in Andromedia are highlighted. Quasars and BL lacertae objects are also discussed and a review of the spectral observations of all of these galaxies and celestial objects is presented.

  18. Cluster of galaxies & Cosmology - X-ray analysis of fossil group RXJ1720.1+2360

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozada, Monica

    2012-09-01

    We present the results on the X-ray analysis of fossil group of galaxies RXJ1720.1+2360. Fossil Groups are systems associated to extended emission in X-rays with one single central elliptical galaxy surrounded by very faint companions. This unusual lack of bright galaxies in the group is presumably due to galactic cannibalism. In this study we present for the first time the imaging and spectral analysis of the XMM-Newton data of RXJ1720.1+2360. This work is part of a systematic study to determine the X-ray properties of fossil groups.

  19. The environmental history of group and cluster galaxies in a Λ cold dark matter universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lucia, Gabriella; Weinmann, Simone; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2012-06-01

    We use publicly available galaxy merger trees, obtained applying semi-analytic techniques to a large high-resolution cosmological simulation, to study the environmental history of group and cluster galaxies. Our results highlight the existence of an intrinsic history bias which makes the nature versus nurture (as well as the mass versus environment) debate inherently ill posed. In particular, we show that (i) surviving massive satellites were accreted later than their less massive counterparts, from more massive haloes and (ii) the mixing of galaxy populations is incomplete during halo assembly, which creates a correlation between the time a galaxy becomes satellite and its present distance from the parent halo centre. The weakest trends are found for the most massive satellites, as a result of efficient dynamical friction and late formation times of massive haloes. A large fraction of the most massive group/cluster members are accreted on to the main progenitor of the final halo as central galaxies, while about half of the galaxies with low and intermediate stellar masses are accreted as satellites. Large fractions of group and cluster galaxies (in particular those of low stellar mass) have therefore been ‘pre-processed’ as satellites of groups with mass ˜1013 M⊙. To quantify the relevance of hierarchical structure growth on the observed environmental trends, we have considered observational estimates of the passive galaxy fractions and their variation as a function of halo mass and clustercentric distance. Comparisons with our theoretical predictions require relatively long times (˜5-7 Gyr) for the suppression of star formation in group and cluster satellites. It is unclear how such a gentle mode of strangulation can be achieved by simply relaxing the assumption of instantaneous stripping of the hot gas reservoir associated with accreting galaxies, or if the difficulties encountered by recent galaxy formation models in reproducing the observed trends

  20. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HUBBLE TYPE AND SPECTROSCOPIC CLASS IN LOCAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez Almeida, J.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Munoz-Tunon, C.; Huertas-Company, M. E-mail: jalfonso@iac.es E-mail: marc.huertas@obspm.fr

    2011-07-10

    We compare the Hubble type and the spectroscopic class of the galaxies with spectra in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. As has long been known, elliptical galaxies tend to be red whereas spiral galaxies tend to be blue; however, this relationship presents a large scatter, which we measure and quantify in detail for the first time. We compare the Automatic Spectroscopic K-means-based classification (ASK) with most of the commonly used morphological classifications. Despite the degree of subjectivity involved in morphological classifications, all of them provide consistent results. Given a spectral class, the morphological type wavers with a standard deviation between 2 and 3 T types, and the same large dispersion characterizes the variability of spectral classes given a morphological type. The distributions of Hubble types for each ASK class are very skewed-they present long tails that extend to late morphological types in the red galaxies and to early morphological types in the blue spectroscopic classes. The scatter is not produced by problems with the classification and it remains when particular subsets are considered-low and high galaxy masses, low and high density environments, barred and non-barred galaxies, edge-on galaxies, small and large galaxies, or when a volume-limited sample is considered. A considerable fraction of red galaxies are spirals (40%-60%), but they never present very late Hubble types (Sd or later). Even though red spectra are not associated with ellipticals, most ellipticals do have red spectra: 97% of the ellipticals in the morphological catalog by Nair and Abraham used here for reference belong to ASK 0, 2, or 3; only 3% of the ellipticals are blue. The galaxies in the green valley class (ASK 5) are mostly spirals, and the active galactic nuclei class (ASK 6) presents a large scatter of Hubble types from E to Sd. We investigate variations with redshift using a volume-limited subsample mainly formed by luminous red galaxies

  1. Clustering of Local Group Distances: Publication Bias or Correlated Measurements? II. M31 and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Grijs, Richard; Bono, Giuseppe

    2014-07-01

    The accuracy of extragalactic distance measurements ultimately depends on robust, high-precision determinations of the distances to the galaxies in the local volume. Following our detailed study addressing possible publication bias in the published distance determinations to the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), here we extend our distance range of interest to include published distance moduli to M31 and M33, as well as to a number of their well-known dwarf galaxy companions. We aim at reaching consensus on the best, most homogeneous, and internally most consistent set of Local Group distance moduli to adopt for future, more general use based on the largest set of distance determinations to individual Local Group galaxies available to date. Based on a careful, statistically weighted combination of the main stellar population tracers (Cepheids, RR Lyrae variables, and the magnitude of the tip of the red-giant branch), we derive a recommended distance modulus to M31 of (m-M)_0^M31 = 24.46 +/- 0.10 mag—adopting as our calibration an LMC distance modulus of (m-M)_0^LMC = 18.50 mag—and a fully internally consistent set of benchmark distances to key galaxies in the local volume, enabling us to establish a robust and unbiased, near-field extragalactic distance ladder.

  2. Clustering of local group distances: Publication bias or correlated measurements? II. M31 and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    De Grijs, Richard; Bono, Giuseppe

    2014-07-01

    The accuracy of extragalactic distance measurements ultimately depends on robust, high-precision determinations of the distances to the galaxies in the local volume. Following our detailed study addressing possible publication bias in the published distance determinations to the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), here we extend our distance range of interest to include published distance moduli to M31 and M33, as well as to a number of their well-known dwarf galaxy companions. We aim at reaching consensus on the best, most homogeneous, and internally most consistent set of Local Group distance moduli to adopt for future, more general use based on the largest set of distance determinations to individual Local Group galaxies available to date. Based on a careful, statistically weighted combination of the main stellar population tracers (Cepheids, RR Lyrae variables, and the magnitude of the tip of the red-giant branch), we derive a recommended distance modulus to M31 of (m−M){sub 0}{sup M31}=24.46±0.10 mag—adopting as our calibration an LMC distance modulus of (m−M){sub 0}{sup LMC}=18.50 mag—and a fully internally consistent set of benchmark distances to key galaxies in the local volume, enabling us to establish a robust and unbiased, near-field extragalactic distance ladder.

  3. RESOLVING THE GALAXIES WITHIN A GIANT Ly{alpha} NEBULA: WITNESSING THE FORMATION OF A GALAXY GROUP?

    SciTech Connect

    Prescott, Moire K. M.; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Brodwin, Mark; Chaffee, Frederic H.; Desai, Vandana; Soifer, B. T.; Eisenhardt, Peter; Le Floc'h, Emeric; Matsuda, Yuichi

    2012-06-20

    Detailed analysis of the substructure of Ly{alpha} nebulae can put important constraints on the physical mechanisms at work and the properties of galaxies forming within them. Using high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging of a Ly{alpha} nebula at z Almost-Equal-To 2.656, we have taken a census of the compact galaxies in the vicinity, used optical/near-infrared colors to select system members, and put constraints on the morphology of the spatially extended emission. The system is characterized by (1) a population of compact, low-luminosity ({approx}0.1 L*) sources-17 primarily young, small (R{sub e} Almost-Equal-To 1-2 kpc), disky galaxies including an obscured active galactic nucleus-that are all substantially offset ({approx}>20 kpc) from the line-emitting nebula; (2) the lack of a central galaxy at or near the peak of the Ly{alpha} emission; and (3) several nearly coincident, spatially extended emission components-Ly{alpha}, He II, and UV continuum-that are extremely smooth. These morphological findings are difficult to reconcile with theoretical models that invoke outflows, cold flows, or resonant scattering, suggesting that while all of these physical phenomena may be occurring, they are not sufficient to explain the powering and large extent of Ly{alpha} nebulae. In addition, although the compact galaxies within the system are irrelevant as power sources, the region is significantly overdense relative to the field galaxy population (by at least a factor of four). These observations provide the first estimate of the luminosity function of galaxies within an individual Ly{alpha} nebula system and suggest that large Ly{alpha} nebulae may be the seeds of galaxy groups or low-mass clusters.

  4. Spectroscopic Confirmation of the Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy d0994+71 as a Member of the M81 Group of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloba, Elisa; Sand, David; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Chiboucas, Kristin; Crnojević, Denija; Simon, Joshua D.

    2016-10-01

    We use Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopy to measure the first velocity and metallicity of a dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy beyond the Local Group using resolved stars. Our target, d0944+71, is a faint dSph found in the halo of the massive spiral galaxy M81 by Chiboucas et al. We coadd the spectra of 27 individual stars and measure a heliocentric radial velocity of ‑38 ± 10 km s‑1. This velocity is consistent with d0944+71 being gravitationally bound to M81. We coadd the spectra of the 23 stars that are consistent with being red giant branch stars and measure an overall metallicity of [Fe/H] = ‑1.3 ± 0.3 based on the calcium triplet lines. This metallicity is consistent with d0944+71 following the metallicity‑luminosity relation for Local Group dSphs. We investigate several potential sources of observational bias but find that our sample of targeted stars is representative of the metallicity distribution function of d0944+71 and any stellar contamination due to seeing effects is negligible. The low ellipticity of the galaxy and its position in the metallicity‑luminosity relation suggest that d0944+71 has not been affected by strong tidal stripping.

  5. Hα survey of the local volume: Isolated southern galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaisin, S. S.; Kasparova, A. V.; Knyazev, A. Yu.; Karachentsev, I. D.

    2007-05-01

    We present our Hα observations of 11 isolated southern galaxies: SDIG, PGC 51659, E 222-010, E 272-025, E 137-018, IC 4662, Sag DIG, IC 5052, IC 5152, UGCA 438, and E 149-003, with distances from 1 to 7 Mpc. We have determined the total Hα fluxes from these galaxies. The star formation rates in these galaxies range from 10-1 (IC 4662) to 10-4 M ⊙ yr-1 (SDIG) and the gas depletion time at the observed star formation rates lies within the range from 1/6 to 24 Hubble times H 0 -1 .

  6. Understanding the Physical Conditions in Local Analogs of High-Redshift Starburst Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiewak, Renée; Erb, Dawn; Tremonti, Christina A.; Berg, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    Observations of strong nebular emission lines in high-redshift galaxies (z~2) can be illuminated through the use of analogous local galaxies (z<0.4), for which many more emission lines can be measured. The observed offset in the "BPT" ([N II]λ6584/Hα vs. [O III]λ5007/Hβ) nebular diagnostic diagram between the locus of high redshift galaxies and that of typical local galaxies indicates a change in the physical conditions of the galaxies with redshift; the cause of this offset is unknown, but it may be associated with the ionization parameter, the hardness of the ionizing spectrum, or the N/O abundance ratio. To study the offset, we have selected a sample of local galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 12 (SDSS-III/BOSS DR12), which occupies the same space in the [N II]λ6584/Hα vs. [O III]λ5007/Hβ diagnostic diagram as the z~2 sample. Using a suite of >50 different emission lines, most of which are unavailable in analyses of higher redshift galaxies, and a novel method of improving the spectrophotometric calibration of BOSS data, we investigate the metallicity, ionization state, and abundance ratios of this offset sample in order to shed light on the physical conditions in galaxies in the early universe.

  7. Optical-to-virial velocity ratios of local disc galaxies from combined kinematics and galaxy-galaxy lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, R.; Mandelbaum, R.; Gunn, J. E.; Nakajima, R.; Seljak, U.; Hirata, C. M.

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we measure the optical-to-virial velocity ratios Vopt/V200c of disc galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) at a mean redshift of = 0.07 and with stellar masses 109 < M* < 1011 M⊙. Vopt/V200c, the ratio of the circular velocity measured at the optical radius of the disc (˜10 kpc) to that at the virial radius of the dark matter halo (˜150 kpc), is a powerful observational constraint on disc galaxy formation. It links galaxies to their dark matter haloes dynamically and constrains the total mass profile of disc galaxies over an order of magnitude in length scale. For this measurement, we combine Vopt derived from the Tully-Fisher relation (TFR) from Reyes et al. with V200c derived from halo masses measured with galaxy-galaxy lensing. In anticipation of this combination, we use similarly selected galaxy samples for both the TFR and lensing analysis. For three M* bins with lensing-weighted mean stellar masses of 0.6, 2.7 and 6.5 × 1010 M⊙, we find halo-to-stellar mass ratios M200c/M* = 41, 23 and 26, with 1σ statistical uncertainties of around 0.1 dex, and Vopt/V200c = 1.27 ± 0.08, 1.39 ± 0.06 and 1.27 ± 0.08 (1σ), respectively. Our results suggest that the dark matter and baryonic contributions to the mass within the optical radius are comparable, if the dark matter halo profile has not been significantly modified by baryons. The results obtained in this work will serve as inputs to and constraints on disc galaxy formation models, which will be explored in future work. Finally, we note that this paper presents a new and improved galaxy shape catalogue for weak lensing that covers the full SDSS Data Release 7 footprint.

  8. A Comprehensive Archival Search for Counterparts to Ultra-compact High-Velocity Clouds: Five Local Volume Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sand, D. J.; Crnojević, D.; Bennet, P.; Willman, B.; Hargis, J.; Strader, J.; Olszewski, E.; Tollerud, E. J.; Simon, J. D.; Caldwell, N.; Guhathakurta, P.; James, B. L.; Koposov, S.; McLeod, B.; Morrell, N.; Peacock, M.; Salinas, R.; Seth, A. C.; Stark, D. P.; Toloba, E.

    2015-06-01

    We report five Local Volume dwarf galaxies (two of which are presented here for the first time) uncovered during a comprehensive archival search for optical counterparts to ultra-compact high-velocity clouds (UCHVCs). The UCHVC population of HI clouds are thought to be candidate gas-rich, low-mass halos at the edge of the Local Group and beyond, but no comprehensive search for stellar counterparts to these systems has been presented. Careful visual inspection of all publicly available optical and ultraviolet imaging at the position of the UCHVCs revealed six blue, diffuse counterparts with a morphology consistent with a faint dwarf galaxy beyond the Local Group. Optical spectroscopy of all six candidate dwarf counterparts show that five have an Hα-derived velocity consistent with the coincident HI cloud, confirming their association; the sixth diffuse counterpart is likely a background object. The size and luminosity of the UCHVC dwarfs is consistent with other known Local Volume dwarf irregular galaxies. The gas fraction ({{M}HI}/{{M}star}) of the five dwarfs are generally consistent with that of dwarf irregular galaxies in the Local Volume, although ALFALFA-Dw1 (associated with ALFALFA UCHVC HVC274.68+74.70-123) has a very high {{M}HI}/{{M}star} ˜ 40. Despite the heterogenous nature of our search, we demonstrate that the current dwarf companions to UCHVCs are at the edge of detectability due to their low surface brightness, and that deeper searches are likely to find more stellar systems. If more sensitive searches do not reveal further stellar counterparts to UCHVCs, then the dearth of such systems around the Local Group may be in conflict with ΛCDM simulations.

  9. A Comprehensive Archival Search for Counterparts to Ultra-Compact High Velocity Clouds: Five Local Volume Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crnojevic, Denija; Sand, David J.

    2015-08-01

    We report the discovery of five Local Volume dwarf galaxies uncovered during a comprehensive archival search for optical counterparts to ultra-compact high velocity clouds (UCHVCs). The UCHVC population of HI clouds are thought to be candidate gas-rich, low mass halos at the edge of the Local Group and beyond, but no comprehensive search for stellar counterparts to these systems has been presented. Careful visual inspection of all publicly available optical and ultraviolet imaging at the position of the UCHVCs revealed six blue, diffuse counterparts with a morphology consistent with a faint dwarf galaxy beyond the Local Group. Optical spectroscopy of all six candidate dwarf counterparts show that five have an Halpha-derived velocity consistent with the coincident HI cloud, confirming their association; the sixth diffuse counterpart is likely a background object. The size and luminosity of the UCHVC dwarfs is consistent with other known Local Volume dwarf irregular galaxies. The gas fraction (M_HI/M_star) of the five dwarfs are generally consistent with that of dwarf irregular galaxies in the Local Volume, although ALFALFA-Dw1 (associated with ALFALFA UCHVC HVC274.68+74.70-123) has a very high M_HI/M_star~40. Despite the heterogenous nature of our search, we demonstrate that the current dwarf companions to UCHVCs are at the edge of detectability due to their low surface brightness, and that deeper searches are likely to find more stellar systems. If more sensitive searches do not reveal further stellar counterparts to UCHVCs, then the dearth of such systems around the Local Group may be in conflict with LambdaCDM simulations.

  10. Constrained Local UniversE Simulations: a Local Group factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlesi, Edoardo; Sorce, Jenny G.; Hoffman, Yehuda; Gottlöber, Stefan; Yepes, Gustavo; Libeskind, Noam I.; Pilipenko, Sergey V.; Knebe, Alexander; Courtois, Hélène; Tully, R. Brent; Steinmetz, Matthias

    2016-05-01

    Near-field cosmology is practised by studying the Local Group (LG) and its neighbourhood. This paper describes a framework for simulating the `near field' on the computer. Assuming the Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model as a prior and applying the Bayesian tools of the Wiener filter and constrained realizations of Gaussian fields to the Cosmicflows-2 (CF2) survey of peculiar velocities, constrained simulations of our cosmic environment are performed. The aim of these simulations is to reproduce the LG and its local environment. Our main result is that the LG is likely a robust outcome of the ΛCDMscenario when subjected to the constraint derived from CF2 data, emerging in an environment akin to the observed one. Three levels of criteria are used to define the simulated LGs. At the base level, pairs of haloes must obey specific isolation, mass and separation criteria. At the second level, the orbital angular momentum and energy are constrained, and on the third one the phase of the orbit is constrained. Out of the 300 constrained simulations, 146 LGs obey the first set of criteria, 51 the second and 6 the third. The robustness of our LG `factory' enables the construction of a large ensemble of simulated LGs. Suitable candidates for high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations of the LG can be drawn from this ensemble, which can be used to perform comprehensive studies of the formation of the LG.

  11. The morphological types of galaxies in the Local Supercluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajan, K.; Flin, P.; Godłowski, W.

    2016-10-01

    On the basis of the Hyper - Leda Catalogue HyperLeda 8293 galaxies with heliocentric radial velocities below 2500 km s-1 were selected; 4570 had known morphological types (4366 had calculated b/a ratio). We checked the frequency of the distribution of various types in the LSC, finding spirals and irregulars most numerous, in accordance with expectations. The axial ratio of galaxy diameters of various types was studied, and the dependence of this parameter on the morphological type was noted.

  12. Galaxy evolution through resolved stellar populations in the nearby Centaurus A group .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crnojević, D.; Grebel, E. K.; Ferguson, A. M. N.; Koch, A.; Rejkuba, M.; Da Costa, G.; Jerjen, H.; Irwin, M. J.; Bernard, E. J.; Arimoto, N.; Jablonka, P.; Kobayashi, C.

    The CenA group is a nearby dense complex (˜4 Mpc) dominated by an active elliptical galaxy, hosting more than 60 dwarf companions with a variety of morphological types and stellar contents. We study the resolved stellar populations of a sample of dwarfs using optical and near-infrared data from ACS/HST and ISAAC/VLT. We characterize their recent star formation histories and metallicity content, and compare them to what is known for Local Group dwarfs, underlining similarities and differences. Our results probe the fu ndamental interplay between nature and nurture in the evolution of dwarfs in such a dense environment. We further present the results of the first deep survey of resolved stellar populations in the remote outer halo of our nearest giant elliptical, CenA (VIMOS/VLT optical data). Tracing its halo structure (radial profile, extent and metallicity) out to a remarkable ˜85 kpc and comparing the halo stellar populations to those of CenA's dwarf companions enables us to constrain the mechanisms that contributed to the build-up of CenA in the context of cosmological galaxy formation models.

  13. Constructing massive blue elliptical galaxies in the local universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, Tim

    Over cosmic time, galaxy mass assembly has transitioned from low-mass, star-forming disk galaxies to massive, quiescent elliptical galaxies. The merger hypothesis for the formation of new elliptical galaxies provides one physical explanation to the observed buildup of this population, a key prediction of which is a brief phase of morphological transformation from highly-disturbed remnant to blue elliptical. We study 12 plausible new ellipticals with varying degrees of morphological peculiarities visually selected from a larger parent sample of nearby (0.01 ≤ z ≤ 0.04), massive (M* ≥ 10 10 M⊙ ), concentrated (Petrosian R90/R50 ≥ 2.6), and optically blue galaxies from the SDSS DR4 catalog. Using integral field spectroscopy, we construct two-dimensional spectra of the stellar populations and azimuthally bin them into concentric annuli to determine the relative ages of the stellar populations as a function of radius. Using this data and conclusions from simulations, we seek to distinguish post-mergers from galaxies undergoing other modes of mass assembly. We find that 1/3 of our sample is consistent with having undergone a recent, gas-rich major merger. Another 1/3 of our sample is consistent with having undergone a 'frosting' of recent star formation. The final 1/3 of our sample is either inconsistent with or inconclusive of having undergone a recent, gas-rich major merger.

  14. Galaxy triplets in Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 - II. A connection with compact groups?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duplancic, Fernanda; O'Mill, Ana Laura; Lambas, Diego G.; Sodré, Laerte; Alonso, Sol

    2013-08-01

    We analyse a sample of 71 triplets of luminous galaxies derived from the work of O'Mill et al. We compare the properties of triplets and their members with those of control samples of compact groups, the 10 brightest members of rich clusters and galaxies in pairs. The triplets are restricted to have members with spectroscopic redshifts in the range 0.01 ≤ z ≤ 0.14 and absolute r-band luminosities brighter than Mr = -20.5. For these member galaxies, we analyse the stellar mass content, the star formation rates, the Dn(4000) parameter and (Mg - Mr) colour index. Since galaxies in triplets may finally merge in a single system, we analyse different global properties of these systems. We calculate the probability that the properties of galaxies in triplets are strongly correlated. We also study total star formation activity and global colours, and define the triplet compactness as a measure of the percentage of the system total area that is filled by the light of member galaxies. We concentrate in the comparison of our results with those of compact groups to assess how the triplets are a natural extension of these compact systems. Our analysis suggests that triplet galaxy members behave similarly to compact group members and galaxies in rich clusters. We also find that systems comprising three blue, star-forming, young stellar population galaxies (blue triplets) are most probably real systems and not a chance configuration of interloping galaxies. The same holds for triplets composed of three red, non-star-forming galaxies, showing the correlation of galaxy properties in these systems. From the analysis of the triplet as a whole, we conclude that, at a given total stellar mass content, triplets show a total star formation activity and global colours similar to compact groups. However, blue triplets show a high total star formation activity with a lower stellar mass content. From an analysis of the compactness parameter of the systems we find that light is even more

  15. The GEEC2 spectroscopic survey of Galaxy groups at 0.8 < z < 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balogh, Michael L.; McGee, Sean L.; Mok, Angus; Wilman, David J.; Finoguenov, Alexis; Bower, Richard G.; Mulchaey, John S.; Parker, Laura C.; Tanaka, Masayuki

    2014-09-01

    We present the data release of the Gemini-South GMOS spectroscopy in the fields of 11 galaxy groups at 0.8 < z < 1, within the COSMOS field. This forms the basis of the Galaxy Environment Evolution Collaboration 2 (GEEC2) project to study galaxy evolution in haloes with M ˜ 1013 M⊙ across cosmic time. The final sample includes 162 spectroscopically confirmed members with R < 24.75, and is >50 per cent complete for galaxies within the virial radius, and with stellar mass Mstar > 1010.3 M⊙. Including galaxies with photometric redshifts, we have an effective sample size of ˜400 galaxies within the virial radii of these groups. We present group velocity dispersions, dynamical and stellar masses. Combining with the GCLASS sample of more massive clusters at the same redshift, we find the total stellar mass is strongly correlated with the dynamical mass, with log M200 = 1.20(log Mstar - 12) + 14.07. This stellar fraction of ˜1 per cent is lower than predicted by some halo occupation distribution models, though the weak dependence on halo mass is in good agreement. Most groups have an easily identifiable most massive galaxy (MMG) near the centre of the galaxy distribution, and we present the spectroscopic properties and surface brightness fits to these galaxies. The total stellar mass distribution in the groups, excluding the MMG, compares well with an NFW (Navarro Frenk & White) profile with concentration 4, for galaxies beyond ˜0.2R200. This is more concentrated than the number density distribution, demonstrating that there is some mass segregation.

  16. STRUCTURE IN THE 3D GALAXY DISTRIBUTION. II. VOIDS AND WATERSHEDS OF LOCAL MAXIMA AND MINIMA

    SciTech Connect

    Way, M. J.; Gazis, P. R.; Scargle, Jeffrey D. E-mail: PGazis@sbcglobal.net

    2015-01-20

    The major uncertainties in studies of the multi-scale structure of the universe arise not from observational errors but from the variety of legitimate definitions and detection methods for individual structures. To facilitate the study of these methodological dependencies, we have carried out 12 different analyses defining structures in various ways. This has been done in a purely geometrical way by utilizing the HOP algorithm as a unique parameter-free method of assigning groups of galaxies to local density maxima or minima. From three density estimation techniques (smoothing kernels, Bayesian blocks, and self-organizing maps) applied to three data sets (the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, the Millennium simulation, and randomly distributed points) we tabulate information that can be used to construct catalogs of structures connected to local density maxima and minima. We also introduce a void finder that utilizes a method to assemble Delaunay tetrahedra into connected structures and characterizes regions empty of galaxies in the source catalog.

  17. Structure in the 3D Galaxy Distribution. II. Voids and Watersheds of Local Maxima and Minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Way, M. J.; Gazis, P. R.; Scargle, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    The major uncertainties in studies of the multi-scale structure of the universe arise not from observational errors but from the variety of legitimate definitions and detection methods for individual structures. To facilitate the study of these methodological dependencies, we have carried out 12 different analyses defining structures in various ways. This has been done in a purely geometrical way by utilizing the HOP algorithm as a unique parameter-free method of assigning groups of galaxies to local density maxima or minima. From three density estimation techniques (smoothing kernels, Bayesian blocks, and self-organizing maps) applied to three data sets (the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, the Millennium simulation, and randomly distributed points) we tabulate information that can be used to construct catalogs of structures connected to local density maxima and minima. We also introduce a void finder that utilizes a method to assemble Delaunay tetrahedra into connected structures and characterizes regions empty of galaxies in the source catalog.

  18. The ultraviolet and infrared star formation rates of compact group galaxies: an expanded sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenkić, Laura; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Desjardins, Tyler D.; Walker, Lisa May; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Fedotov, Konstantin; Charlton, Jane; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Durrell, Pat R.; Gronwall, Caryl

    2016-07-01

    Compact groups of galaxies provide insight into the role of low-mass, dense environments in galaxy evolution because the low velocity dispersions and close proximity of galaxy members result in frequent interactions that take place over extended time-scales. We expand the census of star formation in compact group galaxies by Tzanavaris et al. (2010) and collaborators with Swift UVOT, Spitzer IRAC and MIPS 24 μm photometry of a sample of 183 galaxies in 46 compact groups. After correcting luminosities for the contribution from old stellar populations, we estimate the dust-unobscured star formation rate (SFRUV) using the UVOT uvw2 photometry. Similarly, we use the MIPS 24 μm photometry to estimate the component of the SFR that is obscured by dust (SFRIR). We find that galaxies which are MIR-active (MIR-`red'), also have bluer UV colours, higher specific SFRs, and tend to lie in H I-rich groups, while galaxies that are MIR-inactive (MIR-`blue') have redder UV colours, lower specific SFRs, and tend to lie in H I-poor groups. We find the SFRs to be continuously distributed with a peak at about 1 M⊙ yr-1, indicating this might be the most common value in compact groups. In contrast, the specific SFR distribution is bimodal, and there is a clear distinction between star-forming and quiescent galaxies. Overall, our results suggest that the specific SFR is the best tracer of gas depletion and galaxy evolution in compact groups.

  19. Luminous AGB Stars beyond the Local Group: Tracers of Intermediate-age Populations in the Cen A Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crnojević, D.; Rejkuba, M.; Grebel, E. K.; da Costa, G.; Jerjen, H.

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the resolved stellar content of three predominantly old and metal-poor early-type dwarf galaxies in the Centaurus A group (at a distance of ˜4 Mpc). Our goal is to estimate the fraction of the intermediate-age populations (IAPs) and the period of most recent star formation from their luminous AGB stars. We combine optical HST/ACS and near-infrared VLT/ISAAC images to identify AGB star candidates. The first dataset provides high-resolution photometry while the second one permits us to disentangle the galaxies’ stellar content from the foreground contamination and to characterize the IAPs. The IAP fraction is found to be very low in the target galaxies (up to ˜15%). We compare the results to our own Local Group.

  20. THE LOCAL GROUP IN THE COSMIC WEB

    SciTech Connect

    Forero-Romero, J. E.; González, R. E-mail: regonzar@astro.puc.cl

    2015-01-20

    We explore the characteristics of the cosmic web around Local-Group (LG)-like pairs using a cosmological simulation in the ΛCDM cosmology. We use the Hessian of the gravitational potential to classify regions on scales of ∼2 Mpc as a peak, sheet, filament, or void. The sample of LG counterparts is represented by two samples of halo pairs. The first is a general sample composed of pairs with similar masses and isolation criteria as observed for the LG. The second is a subset with additional observed kinematic constraints such as relative pair velocity and separation. We find that the pairs in the LG sample with all constraints are: (1) preferentially located in filaments and sheets, (2) located in a narrow range of local overdensity 0 < δ < 2, web ellipticity 0.1 < e < 1.0, and prolateness –0.4 < p < 0.4, (3) strongly aligned with the cosmic web. The alignments are such that the pair orbital angular momentum tends to be perpendicular to the smallest tidal eigenvector, e-hat {sub 3}, which lies along the filament direction or the sheet plane. A stronger alignment is present for the vector linking the two halos with the vector e-hat {sub 3}. Additionally, we fail to find a strong correlation between the spin of each halo in the pair with the cosmic web. All of these trends are expected to a great extent from the selection of LG total mass in the general sample. Applied to the observed LG, there is a potential conflict between the alignments of the different satellite planes and the numerical evidence for satellite accretion along filaments; the direction defined by e-hat {sub 3}. This highlights the relevance of achieving a precise characterization for the location of the LG in the cosmic web in the cosmological context provided by ΛCDM.

  1. The Local Group in the Cosmic Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forero-Romero, J. E.; González, R.

    2015-01-01

    We explore the characteristics of the cosmic web around Local-Group (LG)-like pairs using a cosmological simulation in the ΛCDM cosmology. We use the Hessian of the gravitational potential to classify regions on scales of ~2 Mpc as a peak, sheet, filament, or void. The sample of LG counterparts is represented by two samples of halo pairs. The first is a general sample composed of pairs with similar masses and isolation criteria as observed for the LG. The second is a subset with additional observed kinematic constraints such as relative pair velocity and separation. We find that the pairs in the LG sample with all constraints are: (1) preferentially located in filaments and sheets, (2) located in a narrow range of local overdensity 0 < δ < 2, web ellipticity 0.1 < e < 1.0, and prolateness -0.4 < p < 0.4, (3) strongly aligned with the cosmic web. The alignments are such that the pair orbital angular momentum tends to be perpendicular to the smallest tidal eigenvector, \\hat{e}_3, which lies along the filament direction or the sheet plane. A stronger alignment is present for the vector linking the two halos with the vector \\hat{e}_3. Additionally, we fail to find a strong correlation between the spin of each halo in the pair with the cosmic web. All of these trends are expected to a great extent from the selection of LG total mass in the general sample. Applied to the observed LG, there is a potential conflict between the alignments of the different satellite planes and the numerical evidence for satellite accretion along filaments; the direction defined by \\hat{e}_3. This highlights the relevance of achieving a precise characterization for the location of the LG in the cosmic web in the cosmological context provided by ΛCDM.

  2. Early-type Galaxies at z = 1.3. I. The Lynx Supercluster: Cluster and Groups at z = 1.3. Morphology and Color-Magnitude Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Simona; Stanford, S. Adam; Holden, Brad P.; Raichoor, Anand; Postman, Marc; Nakata, Fumiaki; Finoguenov, Alexis; Ford, Holland C.; Illingworth, Garth D.; Kodama, Tadayuki; Rosati, Piero; Tanaka, Masayuki; Huertas-Company, Marc; Rettura, Alessandro; Shankar, Francesco; Carrasco, Eleazar R.; Demarco, Ricardo; Eisenhardt, Peter; Jee, Myungkook J.; Koyama, Yusei; White, Richard L.

    2012-08-01

    We confirm the detection of three groups in the Lynx supercluster, at z ≈ 1.3, through spectroscopic follow-up and X-ray imaging, and we give estimates for their redshifts and masses. We study the properties of the group galaxies compared to the two central clusters, RX J0849+4452 and RX J0848+4453. Using spectroscopic follow-up and multi-wavelength photometric redshifts, we select 89 galaxies in the clusters, of which 41 are spectroscopically confirmed, and 74 galaxies in the groups, of which 25 are spectroscopically confirmed. We morphologically classify galaxies by visual inspection, noting that our early-type galaxy (ETG) sample would have been contaminated at the 30%-40% level by simple automated classification methods (e.g., based on Sérsic index). In luminosity-selected samples, both clusters and groups show high fractions of bulge-dominated galaxies with a diffuse component that we visually identified as a disk and which we classified as bulge-dominated spirals, e.g., Sas. The ETG fractions never rise above ≈50% in the clusters, which is low compared to the fractions observed in other massive clusters at z ≈ 1. In the groups, ETG fractions never exceed ≈25%. However, overall bulge-dominated galaxy fractions (ETG plus Sas) are similar to those observed for ETGs in clusters at z ~ 1. Bulge-dominated galaxies visually classified as spirals might also be ETGs with tidal features or merger remnants. They are mainly red and passive, and span a large range in luminosity. Their star formation seems to have been quenched before experiencing a morphological transformation. Because their fraction is smaller at lower redshifts, they might be the spiral population that evolves into ETGs. For mass-selected samples of galaxies with masses M > 1010.6 M ⊙ within Σ > 500 Mpc-2, the ETG and overall bulge-dominated galaxy fractions show no significant evolution with respect to local clusters, suggesting that morphological transformations might occur at lower masses

  3. The Merger History, AGN and Dwarf Galaxies of Hickson Compact Group 59

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Gallagher, S. C.; Fedotov, K.; Durrell, P. R.; Tzanavaris, P.; Hill, A. R.; Zabludoff, A. I.; Maier, M. L.; Elmegreen, D. M.; Charlton, J. C.; Johnson, K. E.; Brandt, W. N.; Walker, L. M.; Eracleous, M.; Maybhate, A.; Gronwall, C.; English, J.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Mulchaey, J. S.

    2011-01-01

    Compact group galaxies often appear unaffected by their unusually dense environment. Closer examination can, however, reveal the subtle, cumulative effects of multiple galaxy interactions. Hickson Compact Group (HCG) 59 is an excellent example of this situation. We present a photometric study of this group in the optical (HST), infrared (Spitzer) and X-ray (Chandra) regimes aimed at characterizing the star formation and nuclear activity in its constituent galaxies and intra-group medium. We associate five dwarf galaxies with the group and update the velocity dispersion, leading to an increase in the dynamical mass of the group of up to a factor of 10 (to 2.8 x 10(exp 13) Stellar Mass), and a subsequent revision of its evolutionary stage. Star formation is proceeding at a level consistent with the morphological types of the four main galaxies, of which two are star-forming and the other two quiescent. Unlike in some other compact groups, star-forming complexes across HCG 59 closely follow mass-radius scaling relations typical of nearby galaxies. In contrast, the ancient globular cluster populations in galaxies HCG 59A and B show intriguing irregularities, and two extragalactic HII regions are found just west of B. We age-date a faint stellar stream in the intra-group medium at approx. 1 Gyr to examine recent interactions. We detect a likely low-luminosity AGN in HCG 59A by its approx. 10(exp 40) erg/s X-ray emission; the active nucleus rather than star formation can account for the UV+IR SED. We discuss the implications of our findings in the context of galaxy evolution in dense environments.

  4. INTRAGROUP AND GALAXY-LINKED DIFFUSE X-RAY EMISSION IN HICKSON COMPACT GROUPS

    SciTech Connect

    Desjardins, Tyler D.; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Brandt, William N.; Charlton, Jane C.; Garmire, Gordon P.; Gronwall, Caryl; Konstantopoulos, Iraklis S.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Zabludoff, Ann I.

    2013-02-15

    Isolated compact groups (CGs) of galaxies present a range of dynamical states, group velocity dispersions, and galaxy morphologies with which to study galaxy evolution, particularly the properties of gas both within the galaxies and in the intragroup medium. As part of a large, multiwavelength examination of CGs, we present an archival study of diffuse X-ray emission in a subset of nine Hickson compact groups (HCGs) observed with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. We find that seven of the groups in our sample exhibit detectable diffuse emission. However, unlike large-scale emission in galaxy clusters, the diffuse features in the majority of the detected groups are linked to the individual galaxies, in the form of both plumes and halos likely as a result of vigourous star formation or activity in the galaxy nucleus, as well as in emission from tidal features. Unlike previous studies from earlier X-ray missions, HCGs 31, 42, 59, and 92 are found to be consistent with the L{sub X} -T relationship from clusters within the errors, while HCGs 16 and 31 are consistent with the cluster L{sub X} -{sigma} relation, though this is likely coincidental given that the hot gas in these two systems is largely due to star formation. We find that L{sub X} increases with decreasing group H I to dynamical-mass ratio with tentative evidence for a dependence in X-ray luminosity on H I morphology whereby systems with intragroup H I indicative of strong interactions are considerably more X-ray luminous than passively evolving groups. We also find a gap in the L{sub X} of groups as a function of the total group specific star formation rate. Our findings suggest that the hot gas in these groups is not in hydrostatic equilibrium and these systems are not low-mass analogs of rich groups or clusters, with the possible exception of HCG 62.

  5. Intragroup and Galaxy-linked Diffuse X-ray Emission In Hickson Compact Groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desjardins, Tyler D.; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis; Mulchaey, John S.; Brandt, William N.; Charlton, Jane C.; Garmire, Gordon P.; Gronwall, Caryl; Cardiff, Ann; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Konstantopoulos, Iraklis, S.; Zabludoff, Ann I.

    2013-01-01

    Isolated compact groups (CGs) of galaxies present a range of dynamical states, group velocity dispersions, and galaxy morphologies with which to study galaxy evolution, particularly the properties of gas both within the galaxies and in the intragroup medium. As part of a large, multiwavelength examination of CGs, we present an archival study of diffuse X-ray emission in a subset of nine Hickson compact groups (HCGs) observed with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. We find that seven of the groups in our sample exhibit detectable diffuse emission. However, unlike large-scale emission in galaxy clusters, the diffuse features in the majority of the detected groups are linked to the individual galaxies, in the form of both plumes and halos likely as a result of vigourous star formation or activity in the galaxy nucleus, as well as in emission from tidal features. Unlike previous studies from earlier X-ray missions, HCGs 31, 42, 59, and 92 are found to be consistent with the L(sub X-Tau) relationship from clusters within the errors, while HCGs 16 and 31 are consistent with the cluster L(sub X-sigma) relation, though this is likely coincidental given that the hot gas in these two systems is largely due to star formation. We find that L(sub X) increases with decreasing group Hi to dynamical-mass ratio with tentative evidence for a dependence in X-ray luminosity on Hi morphology whereby systems with intragroup Hi indicative of strong interactions are considerably more X-ray luminous than passively evolving groups. We also find a gap in the L(sub X) of groups as a function of the total group specific star formation rate. Our findings suggest that the hot gas in these groups is not in hydrostatic equilibrium and these systems are not low-mass analogs of rich groups or clusters, with the possible exception of HCG 62.

  6. Properties of 34 massive galaxy groups within 0.012 < z < 0.027

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopylova, F. G.; Kopylov, A. I.

    2015-04-01

    In order to extend the relationship between the infrared luminosity of groups and clusters of galaxies and their dynamic mass to the 1-5 × 1013 M ⊙ mass region, we selected from the study of Ramella et al. (2004) certain galaxy groups in the region of 0.012 < z < 0.027. Based on the archive data from the SDSS, NED, and 2MASX, for these 34 galaxy groups we determined the dynamic and photometric characteristics. Overall, the sample has the following median characteristics: z = 0.0226, M 200 = 0.58 × 1014 M ⊙, L K = 1.26 × 1012 L ⊙, and N( M K < -21m) = 22. Having this sample added to the earlier prepared sample of 148 groups and clusters of galaxies, we found the following relationships between the dynamic mass M 200, infrared (IR) luminosity, and the number of galaxies within the R 200 radius: L K ( M K < -21m) ∝ M 0.77, N( M K < -21m) ∝ M 0.82, and M/L K ∝ L K/0.22. Practically all the members of the studied sample show a good agreement between the dynamic mass of groups M 200 and IR luminosity of galaxies, and eventually their stellar mass (only the group MKW12 deviates more than 2 σ in all the dependencies).

  7. The Milky Way and the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampazzo, Roberto; D'Onofrio, Mauro; Zaggia, Simone; Lattis, James M.; van der Kruit, Pieter C.; Vallenari, Antonella; Calzetti, Daniela; Madore, Barry F.; Karachentseva, Valentina; Ibata, Rodrigo; Gallart, Carme; Lake, George; Tully, Brent R.; Gilmore, Gerald F.

    The beauty and the charm of the Milky May (MW) The Galaxy - Milky Way have been celebrated by countless poets and writers of many Countries along the centuries (see e.g. the beautiful anthology of Piero Boitani 2012 ). The stellar nature of the MW was firstly observed by Galileo. Galilei Galileo In 1610 in the Sidereus Nuncius ( Galilei 1993 ) Galileo wrote that the MW is "nient'altro che una congerie di innumerevoli Stelle, disseminate a mucchi; chè in qualunque regione di essa si diriga il cannocchiale, subito una ingente folla di Stelle si presenta alla vista, delle quali parecchi si vedono abbastanza grandi e molto distinte; ma la moltitudine delle piccole è del tutto inesplorabile". In the same paragraph, Galileo remarked that observations with his telescope, for the first time, wipe out centuries of philosophical discussions about the nature of the MW. Three more centuries have been necessary to complete a second radical Copernican Revolution that displaces the solar system from being roughly at the center of the MW and project this latter in the vast Universe populated by billions of similar spiral galaxies (see Chap. 1).

  8. Behavior of Neutral Hydrogen in the NGC 877/6 Galaxy Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning Hall, Porter; Minchin, Robert F.; Taylor, Rhys

    2015-01-01

    We observed a 5 square degree area centered on -02:17:31, 14:32:00 at 21-cm as part of the Arecibo Galaxy Environment Survey (AGES) with the NGC 877/6 galaxy group at a velocity of 4000 km/s as the primary target. Our observations covered the redshift range -5,000 < cz < 20,000 km/s allowing for a large volume in front and behind the complex to be analyzed. The NGC 877/6 group contains 8 galaxies inside a common HI envelope with a total neutral hydrogen mass of LogMHI = 10.73. HI is detected outside of the optically-identified galaxies and there are a number of tidal features within the complex. These include AGC 749170, a possible tidal remnant identified by ALFALFA and whose detection we confirm here. Another, smaller group associated with UGC 1742 (LogMHI = 9.95; cz = 6900 km/s) was identified as showing signs of galaxy interaction as well as the possibility of a tidal formation not catalogued in NED as a galaxy. Of the 44 HI sources identified in the data cube, 12 (27%) were not previously recorded in the NED database as galaxies. We will continue our analysis with data from the Mock spectrometers which will extend the redshift range to 45000 km/s.

  9. Evidence for Multiple Mergers among Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies: Remnants of Compact Groups?

    PubMed

    Borne; Bushouse; Lucas; Colina

    2000-02-01

    In a large sample of ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope, we have identified a significant subsample that shows evidence for multiple mergers. The evidence is seen among two classes of ULIRGs: (1) those with multiple remnant nuclei in their core, sometimes accompanied by a complex system of tidal tails, and (2) those that are in fact dense groupings of interacting (soon-to-merge) galaxies. We conservatively estimate that, in the redshift range 0.05groups of galaxies (see Hickson). An evolutionary progression is consistent with the results: from compact groups to pairs to ULIRGs to elliptical galaxies. The last step follows the blowout of gas and dust from the ULIRG. PMID:10622759

  10. AGN feedback in groups of galaxies: a joint X-ray/low-frequency radio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacintucci, S.; O'Sullivan, E.; Vrtilek, J. M.; Raychaudhury, S.; David, L. P.; Venturi, T.; Athreya, R.; Gitti, M.

    2010-07-01

    We present an ongoing, low-frequency radio/X-ray study of 18 nearby galaxy groups, chosen for the evidence, either in the X-ray or radio images, of AGN/intragroup gas interaction. We have obtained radio observations at 235 MHz and 610 MHz with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) for all the groups, and 327 MHz and 150 MHz for a few. We present results of the recent Chandra/GMRT study of the interesting case of AWM 4, a relaxed poor cluster of galaxies with no evidence of a large cool core and no X-ray cavities associated with the central radio galaxy. Our analysis shows how joining low-frequency radio data (to track the history of AGN outbursts) with X-ray data (to determine the state of the hot gas, its disturbances, heating and cooling) can provide a unique insight into the nature of the feedback mechanism in galaxy groups.

  11. CONNECTIONS BETWEEN GALAXY MERGERS AND STARBURST: EVIDENCE FROM THE LOCAL UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Wentao; Yang, Xiaohu; Zhang, Youcai E-mail: xyang@sjtu.edu.cn

    2014-07-01

    Major mergers and interactions between gas-rich galaxies with comparable masses are thought to be the main triggers of starburst. In this work, we study, for a large stellar mass range, the interaction rate of the starburst galaxies in the local universe. We focus independently on central and satellite star forming galaxies extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Here the starburst galaxies are selected in the star formation rate (SFR) stellar mass plane with SFRs five times larger than the median value found for ''star forming'' galaxies of the same stellar mass. Through visual inspection of their images together with close companions determined using spectroscopic redshifts, we find that ∼50% of the ''starburst'' populations show evident merger features, i.e., tidal tails, bridges between galaxies, double cores, and close companions. In contrast, in the control sample we selected from the normal star forming galaxies, only ∼19% of galaxies are associated with evident mergers. The interaction rates may increase by ∼5% for the starburst sample and 2% for the control sample if close companions determined using photometric redshifts are considered. The contrast of the merger rate between the two samples strengthens the hypothesis that mergers and interactions are indeed the main causes of starburst.

  12. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES OF SEVEN IRREGULAR AND THREE TIDAL DWARF GALAXIES IN THE M81 GROUP

    SciTech Connect

    Croxall, Kevin V.; Van Zee, Liese; Lee, Henry; Miller, Bryan W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Lee, Janice C.; Cote, Stephanie; Kennicutt, Robert C. E-mail: vanzee@astro.indiana.ed E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.ed E-mail: stephanie.cote@nrc-cnrc.gc.c E-mail: bmiller@gemini.ed

    2009-11-01

    We have derived nebular abundances for 10 dwarf galaxies belonging to the M81 Group, including several galaxies which do not have abundances previously reported in the literature. For each galaxy, multiple H II regions were observed with GMOS-N at the Gemini Observatory in order to determine abundances of several elements (oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, neon, and argon). For seven galaxies, at least one H II region had a detection of the temperature sensitive [O III] lambda4363 line, allowing a 'direct' determination of the oxygen abundance. No abundance gradients were detected in the targeted galaxies, and the observed oxygen abundances are typically in agreement with the well-known metallicity-luminosity relation. However, three candidate 'tidal dwarf' galaxies lie well off this relation: UGC 5336, Garland, and KDG 61. The nature of these systems suggests that UGC 5336 and Garland are indeed recently formed systems, whereas KDG 61 is most likely a dwarf spheroidal galaxy which lies along the same line of sight as the M81 tidal debris field. We propose that these H II regions formed from previously enriched gas which was stripped from nearby massive galaxies (e.g., NGC 3077 and M81) during a recent tidal interaction.

  13. The frequency and properties of young tidal dwarf galaxies in nearby gas-rich groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee-Waddell, K.; Spekkens, K.; Chandra, P.; Patra, N.; Cuillandre, J.-C.; Wang, J.; Haynes, M. P.; Cannon, J.; Stierwalt, S.; Sick, J.; Giovanelli, R.

    2016-08-01

    We present high-resolution Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) H I observations and deep Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) optical imaging of two galaxy groups: NGC 4725/47 and NGC 3166/9. These data are part of a multi-wavelength unbiased survey of the gas-rich dwarf galaxy populations in three nearby interacting galaxy groups. The NGC 4725/47 group hosts two tidal knots and one dwarf irregular galaxy (dIrr). Both tidal knots are located within a prominent H I tidal tail, appear to have sufficient mass (Mgas ≈ 108 M⊙) to evolve into long-lived tidal dwarf galaxies (TDGs) and are fairly young in age. The NGC 3166/9 group contains a TDG candidate, AGC 208457, at least three dIrrs and four H I knots. Deep CFHT imaging confirms that the optical component of AGC 208457 is bluer - with a 0.28 mag g - r colour - and a few Gyr younger than its purported parent galaxies. Combining the results for these groups with those from the NGC 871/6/7 group reported earlier, we find that the H I properties, estimated stellar ages and baryonic content of the gas-rich dwarfs clearly distinguish tidal features from their classical counterparts. We optimistically identify four potentially long-lived tidal objects associated with three separate pairs of interacting galaxies, implying that TDGs are not readily produced during interaction events as suggested by some recent simulations. The tidal objects examined in this survey also appear to have a wider variety of properties than TDGs of similar mass formed in current simulations of interacting galaxies, which could be the result of pre- or post-formation environmental influences.

  14. Herschel/SPIRE Submillimeter Spectra of Local Active Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira-Santaella, Miguel; Spinoglio, Luigi; Busquet, Gemma; Wilson, Christine D.; Glenn, Jason; Isaak, Kate G.; Kamenetzky, Julia; Rangwala, Naseem; Schirm, Maximilien R. P.; Baes, Maarten; Barlow, Michael J.; Boselli, Alessandro; Cooray, Asantha; Cormier, Diane

    2013-05-01

    We present the submillimeter spectra from 450 to 1550 GHz of 11 nearby active galaxies observed with the SPIRE Fourier Transform Spectrometer (SPIRE/FTS) on board Herschel. We detect CO transitions from J up = 4 to 12, as well as the two [C I] fine structure lines at 492 and 809 GHz and the [N II]1461 GHz line. We used radiative transfer models to analyze the observed CO spectral line energy distributions. The FTS CO data were complemented with ground-based observations of the low-J CO lines. We found that the warm molecular gas traced by the mid-J CO transitions has similar physical conditions (n_H_2 \\sim 103.2-103.9 cm-3 and T kin ~ 300-800 K) in most of our galaxies. Furthermore, we found that this warm gas is likely producing the mid-IR rotational H2 emission. We could not determine the specific heating mechanism of the warm gas, however, it is possibly related to the star formation activity in these galaxies. Our modeling of the [C I] emission suggests that it is produced in cold (T kin < 30 K) and dense (n_H_2 \\gt 10^3 cm-3) molecular gas. Transitions of other molecules are often detected in our SPIRE/FTS spectra. The HF J = 1-0 transition at 1232 GHz is detected in absorption in UGC 05101 and in emission in NGC 7130. In the latter, near-infrared pumping, chemical pumping, or collisional excitation with electrons are plausible excitation mechanisms likely related to the active galactic nucleus of this galaxy. In some galaxies, few H2O emission lines are present. Additionally, three OH+ lines at 909, 971, and 1033 GHz are identified in NGC 7130.

  15. The coevolution of galaxies and supermassive black holes: a local perspective.

    PubMed

    Heckman, Timothy M; Kauffmann, Guinevere

    2011-07-01

    One of the most fascinating discoveries in the past decade was that galaxies typically contain a centrally located black hole with a mass that is millions or even billions of times that of the Sun. There is now compelling evidence that we cannot understand how galaxies formed and evolved without understanding the life cycles of these supermassive black holes (and vice versa). We summarize the current understanding of this coevolution of galaxies and supermassive black holes (based largely on observations of the local, present-day universe) and describe prospects for the future.

  16. A COMPACT GROUP OF GALAXIES AT Z = 2.48 HOSTING AN AGN-DRIVEN OUTFLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, Hsin-Yi; Stockton, Alan E-mail: stockton@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2015-12-10

    We present observations of a remarkable compact group of galaxies at z = 2.48. Four galaxies, all within 40 kpc of each other, surround a powerful high-redshift radio source. This group comprises two compact red passive galaxies and a pair of merging galaxies. One of the red galaxies, with an apparent stellar mass of 3.6 × 10{sup 11}M{sub ⊙} and an effective radius of 470 pc, is one of the most extreme examples of a massive quiescent compact galaxy found so far. One of the pair of merging galaxies hosts the active galactic nucleus (AGN) producing the large powerful radio structure. The merger is massive and enriched, consistent with the mass–metallicity relation expected at this redshift. Close to the merging nuclei, the emission lines exhibit broad and asymmetric profiles that suggest outflows powered either by a very young expanding radio jet or by AGN radiation. At ≳50 kpc from the system, we found a fainter extended-emission region that may be a part of a radio-jet-driven outflow.

  17. The XXL Survey. X. K-band luminosity - weak-lensing mass relation for groups and clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziparo, F.; Smith, G. P.; Mulroy, S. L.; Lieu, M.; Willis, J. P.; Hudelot, P.; McGee, S. L.; Fotopoulou, S.; Lidman, C.; Lavoie, S.; Pierre, M.; Adami, C.; Chiappetti, L.; Clerc, N.; Giles, P.; Maughan, B.; Pacaud, F.; Sadibekova, T.

    2016-06-01

    Galaxy clusters and groups are important cosmological probes and giant cosmic laboratories for studying galaxy evolution. Much effort has been devoted to understanding how and when baryonic matter cools at the centre of potential wells. However, a clear picture of the efficiency with which baryons are converted into stars is still missing. We present the K-band luminosity-halo mass relation, LK,500-M500,WL, for a subsample of 20 of the 100 brightest clusters in the XXL Survey observed with WIRCam at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT). For the first time, we have measured this relation via weak-lensing analysis down to M500,WL = 3.5 × 1013 M⊙. This allows us to investigate whether the slope of the LK-M relation is different for groups and clusters, as seen in other works. The clusters in our sample span a wide range in mass, M500,WL = 0.35-12.10 × 1014 M⊙, at 0 < z < 0.6. The K-band luminosity scales as log 10(LK,500/ 1012 L⊙) ∝ βlog 10(M500,WL/ 1014 M⊙) with β = 0.85+0.35-0.27 and an intrinsic scatter of σlnLK|M = 0.37+0.19-0.17. Combining our sample with some clusters in the Local Cluster Substructure Survey (LoCuSS) present in the literature, we obtain a slope of 1.05+0.16-0.14 and an intrinsic scatter of 0.14+0.09-0.07. The flattening in the LK-M seen in previous works is not seen here and might be a result of a bias in the mass measurement due to assumptions on the dynamical state of the systems. We also study the richness-mass relation and find that group-sized halos have more galaxies per unit halo mass than massive clusters. However, the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in low-mass systems contributes a greater fraction to the total cluster light than BCGs do in massive clusters; the luminosity gap between the two brightest galaxies is more prominent for group-sized halos. This result is a natural outcome of the hierarchical growth of structures, where massive galaxies form and gain mass within low-mass groups and are ultimately accreted

  18. A 3D analysis of the metal distribution in the compact group of galaxies HCG 31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Flores, Sergio; Mendes de Oliveira, Claudia; Alfaro-Cuello, Mayte; Rodrigo Carrasco, Eleazar; de Mello, Duilia; Amram, Philippe

    2015-02-01

    We present new Gemini/GMOS integral field unit observations of the central region of the merging compact group of galaxies HCG 31. Using this data set, we derive the oxygen abundances for the merging galaxies HCG 31A and HCG 31C. We found a smooth metallicity gradient between the nuclei of these galaxies, suggesting a mixing of metals between these objects. These results are confirmed by high-resolution Fabry-Perot data, from which we infer that gas is flowing between HCG 31A and HCG 31C.

  19. Studying structure formation and evolution with strong-lensing galaxy groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foëx, Gaël; Motta, Veronica; Limousin, Marceau; Verdugo, Tomas; Gastaldello, Fabio

    2016-10-01

    We present the analysis of a sample of strong-lensing galaxy group candidates. Our main findings are: confirmation of group-scale systems, complex light distributions, presence of large-scale structures in their surroundings, and evidence of a strong-lensing bias in the mass-concentration relation. We also report the detection of the first 'Bullet group'.

  20. Local starburst galaxies and their descendants. Statistics from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergvall, Nils; Marquart, Thomas; Way, Michael J.; Blomqvist, Anna; Holst, Emma; Östlin, Göran; Zackrisson, Erik

    2016-03-01

    Aims: Despite strong interest in the starburst phenomenon in extragalactic astronomy, the concept remains ill-defined. Here we use a strict definition of starburst to examine the statistical properties of starburst galaxies in the local universe. We also seek to establish links between starburst galaxies, post-starburst (hereafter postburst) galaxies, and active galaxies. Methods: Data were selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7. We applied a novel method of treating dust attenuation and derive star formation rates, ages, and stellar masses assuming a two-component stellar population model. Dynamical masses are calculated from the width of the Hα line. These masses agree excellently with the photometric masses. The mass (gas+stars) range is ~109-1011.5ℳ⊙. As a selection criterion for starburst galaxies, we use, the birthrate parameter, b = SFR/ ⟨ SFR ⟩, requiring that b ≥ 3. For postburst galaxies, we use, the equivalent width of Hδ in absorption with the criterion EWHδ,abs ≥ 6 Å. Results: We find that only 1% of star-forming galaxies are starburst galaxies. They contribute 3-6% to the stellar production and are therefore unimportant for the local star formation activity. The median starburst age is 70 Myr roughly independent of mass, indicating that star formation is mainly regulated by local feedback processes. The b-parameter strongly depends on burst age. Values close to b = 60 are found at ages ~10 Myr, while almost no starbursts are found at ages >1 Gyr. The median baryonic burst mass fraction of sub-L∗ galaxies is 5% and decreases slowly towards high masses. The median mass fraction of the recent burst in the postburst sample is 5-10%. A smaller fraction of the postburst galaxies, however, originates in non-bursting galaxies. The age-mass distribution of the postburst progenitors (with mass fractions >3%) is bimodal with a break at logℳ(ℳ⊙) ~ 10.6, above which the ages are doubled. The starburst and postburst luminosity

  1. Robust automatic photometry of local galaxies from SDSS. Dissecting the color magnitude relation with color profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consolandi, Guido; Gavazzi, Giuseppe; Fumagalli, Michele; Dotti, Massimo; Fossati, Matteo

    2016-06-01

    We present an automatic procedure to perform reliable photometry of galaxies on SDSS images. We selected a sample of 5853 galaxies in the Coma and Virgo superclusters. For each galaxy, we derive Petrosian g and i magnitudes, surface brightness and color profiles. Unlike the SDSS pipeline, our procedure is not affected by the well known shredding problem and efficiently extracts Petrosian magnitudes for all galaxies. Hence we derived magnitudes even from the population of galaxies missed by the SDSS which represents ~25% of all local supercluster galaxies and ~95% of galaxies with g < 11 mag. After correcting the g and i magnitudes for Galactic and internal extinction, the blue and red sequences in the color magnitude diagram are well separated, with similar slopes. In addition, we study (i) the color-magnitude diagrams in different galaxy regions, the inner (r ≤ 1 kpc), intermediate (0.2RPet ≤ r ≤ 0.3RPet) and outer, disk-dominated (r ≥ 0.35RPet)) zone; and (ii), we compute template color profiles, discussing the dependences of the templates on the galaxy masses and on their morphological type. The two analyses consistently lead to a picture where elliptical galaxies show no color gradients, irrespective of their masses. Spirals, instead, display a steeper gradient in their color profiles with increasing mass, which is consistent with the growing relevance of a bulge and/or a bar component above 1010 M⊙. Full Table A.1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/591/A38

  2. Metallicity gradients in local Universe galaxies: Time evolution and effects of radial migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrini, Laura; Coccato, Lodovico; Stanghellini, Letizia; Casasola, Viviana; Galli, Daniele

    2016-04-01

    Context. Our knowledge of the shape of radial metallicity gradients in disc galaxies has recently improved. Conversely, the understanding of their time evolution is more complex, since it requires analysis of stellar populations with different ages or systematic studies of galaxies at different redshifts. In the local Universe, H ii regions and planetary nebulae (PNe) are important tools to investigate radial metallicity gradients in disc galaxies. Aims: We present an in-depth study of all nearby spiral galaxies (M33, M31, NGC 300, and M81) with direct-method nebular abundances of both populations, aiming at studying the evolution of their radial metallicity gradients. For the first time, we also evaluate the radial migration of PN populations. Methods: For the selected galaxies, we analysed H ii region and PN properties to: determine whether oxygen in PNe is a reliable tracer for past interstellar medium (ISM) composition; homogenise published datasets; estimate the migration of the oldest stellar populations; and determine the overall chemical enrichment and slope evolution. Results: We confirm that oxygen in PNe is a reliable tracer for past ISM metallicity. We find that PN gradients are flatter than or equal to those of H ii regions. When radial motions are negligible, this result provides a direct measurement of the time evolution of the gradient. For galaxies with dominant radial motions, we provide upper limits on the gradient evolution. Finally, the total metal content increases with time in all target galaxies, and early morphological types have a larger increment Δ(O/H) than late-type galaxies. Conclusions: Our findings provide important constraints to discriminate among different galactic evolutionary scenarios, favouring cosmological models with enhanced feedback from supernovae. The advent of extremely large telescopes allows us to include galaxies in a wider range of morphologies and environments, thus putting firmer constraints on galaxy formation

  3. SLOSHING COLD FRONTS IN GALAXY GROUPS AND THEIR PERTURBING DISK GALAXIES: AN X-RAY, OPTICAL, AND RADIO CASE STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Gastaldello, Fabio; Di Gesu, Laura; Ghizzardi, Simona; Rossetti, Mariachiara; Giacintucci, Simona; Girardi, Marisa; Roediger, Elke; Brighenti, Fabrizio; Buote, David A.; Humphrey, Philip J.; Eckert, Dominique; Ettori, Stefano; Mathews, William G.

    2013-06-10

    We present a combined X-ray, optical, and radio analysis of the galaxy group IC 1860 using the currently available Chandra and XMM data, multi-object spectroscopy data from the literature, and Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) data. The Chandra and XMM imaging and spectroscopy reveal two surface brightness discontinuities at 45 and 76 kpc shown to be consistent with a pair of cold fronts. These features are interpreted as due to sloshing of the central gas induced by an off-axis minor merger with a perturber. This scenario is further supported by the presence of a peculiar velocity of the central galaxy IC 1860 and the identification of a possible perturber in the optically disturbed spiral galaxy IC 1859. The identification of the perturber is consistent with the comparison with numerical simulations of sloshing. The GMRT observation at 325 MHz shows faint, extended radio emission contained within the inner cold front, as seen in some galaxy clusters hosting diffuse radio mini-halos. However, unlike mini-halos, no particle reacceleration is needed to explain the extended radio emission, which is consistent with aged radio plasma redistributed by the sloshing. There is a strong analogy between the X-ray and optical phenomenology of the IC 1860 group and that of two other groups, NGC 5044 and NGC 5846, showing cold fronts. The evidence presented in this paper is among the strongest supporting the currently favored model of cold-front formation in relaxed objects and establishes the group scale as a chief environment for studying this phenomenon.

  4. Constraints on baryonic dark matter in the Galactic halo and Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richstone, Douglas; Gould, Andrew; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Flynn, Chris

    1992-04-01

    A four-color method and deep CCD data are used to search for very faint metal-poor stars in the direction of the south Galactic pole. The results make it possible to limit the contribution of ordinary old, metal-poor stars to the dynamical halo of the Galaxy or to the Local Group. The ratio of the mass of the halo to its ordinary starlight must be more than about 2000, unless the halo is very small. For the Local Group, this ratio is greater than about 400. If this local dark matter is baryonic, the process of compact-object formation must produce very few 'impurities' in the form of stars similar to those found in globular clusters. The expected number of unbound stars with MV not greater than 6 within 100 pc of the sun is less than 1 based on the present 90-percent upper limit to the Local Group starlight.

  5. Constraints on baryonic dark matter in the Galactic halo and Local Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richstone, Douglas; Gould, Andrew; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Flynn, Chris

    1992-01-01

    A four-color method and deep CCD data are used to search for very faint metal-poor stars in the direction of the south Galactic pole. The results make it possible to limit the contribution of ordinary old, metal-poor stars to the dynamical halo of the Galaxy or to the Local Group. The ratio of the mass of the halo to its ordinary starlight must be more than about 2000, unless the halo is very small. For the Local Group, this ratio is greater than about 400. If this local dark matter is baryonic, the process of compact-object formation must produce very few 'impurities' in the form of stars similar to those found in globular clusters. The expected number of unbound stars with MV not greater than 6 within 100 pc of the sun is less than 1 based on the present 90-percent upper limit to the Local Group starlight.

  6. Catalogues of isolated galaxies, isolated pairs, and isolated triplets in the local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argudo-Fernández, M.; Verley, S.; Bergond, G.; Duarte Puertas, S.; Ramos Carmona, E.; Sabater, J.; Fernández Lorenzo, M.; Espada, D.; Sulentic, J.; Ruiz, J. E.; Leon, S.

    2015-06-01

    Context. The construction of catalogues of galaxies and the a posteriori study of galaxy properties in relation to their environment have been hampered by scarce redshift information. The new 3-dimensional (3D) surveys permit small, faint, physically bound satellites to be distinguished from a background-projected galaxy population, giving a more comprehensive 3D picture of the surroundings. Aims: We aim to provide representative samples of isolated galaxies, isolated pairs, and isolated triplets for testing galaxy evolution and secular processes in low density regions of the local Universe, as well as to characterise their local and large-scale environments. Methods: We used spectroscopic data from the tenth data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-DR10) to automatically and homogeneously compile catalogues of 3702 isolated galaxies, 1240 isolated pairs, and 315 isolated triplets in the local Universe (z ≤ 0.080). To quantify the effects of their local and large-scale environments, we computed the projected density and the tidal strength for the brightest galaxy in each sample. Results: We find evidence of isolated pairs and isolated triplets that are physically bound at projected separations up to d ≤ 450 kpc with radial velocity difference Δν ≤ 160 km s-1, where the effect of the companion typically accounts for more than 98% of the total tidal strength affecting the central galaxy. For galaxies in the catalogues, we provide their positions, redshifts, and degrees of relation with their physical and large-scale environments. The catalogues are publicly available to the scientific community. Conclusions: For isolated galaxies, isolated pairs, and isolated triplets, there is no difference in their degree of interaction with the large-scale structure (up to 5 Mpc), which may suggest that they have a common origin in their formation and evolution. We find that most of them belong to the outer parts of filaments, walls, and clusters, and generally

  7. Tracing the evolution within nearby galaxy groups: a multi-wavelength approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettoni, Daniela; Marino, Antonina; Rampazzo, Roberto; Plana, Henri; Rosado, Margarita; Galletta, Giuseppe; Mazzei, Paola; Bianchi, Luciana; Buson, Lucio M.; Ambrocio-Cruz, Patricia; Gabbasov, Ruslan

    2015-03-01

    Evolutionary scenarios suggest that several mechanisms (from inner secular evolution to accretion/merging) may transform galaxy members, driving groups from an active star forming phase to a more passive, typical of dense environments. We are investigating this transition in a nearby group sample, designed to cover a wide range of properties (see also Marino et al. (2010), Bettoni et al. (2011) and Marino et al. (2012)). We study two groups, USGC U268 and USGC U376 located in different regions of the Leo cloud, through a photometric and kinematic characterization of their member galaxies. We revisit the group membership, using results from recent red-shift surveys, and we investigate their substructures. U268, composed of 10 catalogued members and 11 new added members, has a small fraction (~24%) of early-type galaxies (ETGs). U376 has 16 plus 8 new added members, with ~38% of ETGs. We find the significant substructuring in both groups suggesting that they are likely accreting galaxies. U268 is located in a more loose environment than U376. For each member galaxy, broad band integrated and surface photometry have been obtained in far-UV (FUV) and near-UV (NUV) with GALEX, and in u, g, r, i, z (SDSS) bands. Hα imaging and 2D high resolution kinematical data have been obtained using PUMA Scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer at the 2.12 m telescope in San Pedro Mártir (Baja California, México). We improved the galaxy classification and we detected morphological and kinematical distortions that may be connected to either on-going and/or past interaction/accretion events or environmental induced secular evolution. U268 appears more active than U376, with a large fraction of galaxies showing interaction signatures (60% vs. 13%). The presence of bars among late-type galaxies is ~10% in U268 and 29% in U376. The cumulative distribution of (FUV - NUV) colors of galaxies in U268 is significantly different (bluer) than that of U376's galaxies. Most (80%) of the early

  8. Anomalous Motions in the Local Group: Evidence of a Past Milky Way-Andromeda Flyby?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banik, Indranil; Zhao, Hongsheng

    2016-05-01

    The expansion of the Universe is not homogeneous. In the Local Group (LG), Andromeda (M31) is approaching the Milky Way (MW) at ~110 km/s. To turn around the cosmic expansion locally to this extent, their combined mass must lie in a narrow range of values. This constrains the gravitational field in the LG. I will describe recent calculations (arXiv:1506.07569) solving test particle trajectories in this gravitational field. The major perturber to the LG, Centaurus A, is directly included in our model. Final radial velocities (RVs) are compared with observed RVs of LG dwarf galaxies.We find a major discrepancy for all plausible initial MW and M31 masses. Although few objects have RVs much below the predictions of the best-fitting model, some have RVs much above them, by as much as 110 km/s. We find that these galaxies tend to lie within a plane. This plane aligns closely with the planes of satellite galaxies recently discovered around M31 and the MW.We suggest that the observations can be explained by a past flyby encounter between these galaxies. This doesn't arise in LCDM but does in MOND. In this context, a simple calculation suggests that their planes of satellites can be formed tidally with their observed orientations only if the MW and M31 orbit within a particular plane. Our analysis of much more distant non-satellite galaxies with anomalously high RVs implies they prefer a very similar plane. The flyby time implied by the positions and velocities of these galaxies (~9 Gyr ago) roughly agrees with the time expected from a MOND calculation of the MW-M31 orbit. Interestingly, the velocity dispersion of the MW's disk increased suddenly at around this time, forming its thick disk.

  9. Direct observational evidence for a large transient galaxy population in groups at 0.85 < z < 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balogh, Michael L.; McGee, Sean L.; Wilman, David J.; Finoguenov, Alexis; Parker, Laura C.; Connelly, Jennifer L.; Mulchaey, John S.; Bower, Richard G.; Tanaka, Masayuki; Giodini, Stefania

    2011-04-01

    We introduce our survey of galaxy groups at 0.85 < z < 1, as an extension of the Group Environment and Evolution Collaboration. Here we present the first results, based on Gemini GMOS-S nod-and-shuffle spectroscopy of seven galaxy groups selected from spectroscopically confirmed, extended XMM detections in COSMOS. We use photometric redshifts to select potential group members for spectroscopy, and target galaxies with r < 24.75. In total, we have over 100 confirmed group members, and four of the groups have >15 members. The dynamical mass estimates are in good agreement with the masses estimated from the X-ray luminosity, with most of the groups having 13 < log Mdyn/M⊙ < 14. We compute stellar masses by template-fitting the spectral energy distributions; our spectroscopic sample is statistically complete for all galaxies with Mstar≳ 1010.1 M⊙, and for blue galaxies we sample masses as low as Mstar˜ 108.8 M⊙. The fraction of total mass in galaxy starlight spans a range of 0.25-3 per cent, for the six groups with reliable mass determinations. Like lower redshift groups, these systems are dominated by red galaxies, at all stellar masses Mstar > 1010.1 M⊙. A few group galaxies inhabit the 'blue cloud' that dominates the surrounding field; instead, we find a large and possibly distinct population of galaxies with intermediate colours. The 'green valley' that exists at low redshift is instead well populated in these groups, containing ˜30 per cent of the galaxies. These do not appear to be exceptionally dusty galaxies, and about half show prominent Balmer absorption lines. Furthermore, their Hubble Space Telescope morphologies appear to be intermediate between those of red-sequence and blue-cloud galaxies of the same stellar mass. Unlike red-sequence galaxies, most of the green galaxies have a disc component, but one that is smaller and less structured than discs found in the blue cloud. We postulate that these are a transient population, migrating from the

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Hickson's Compact groups of Galaxies (Hickson+ 1982-1994)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickson, P.

    1999-06-01

    The catalog of groups (file "groups.dat") is a list of 100 compact groups of galaxies identified by a systematic search of the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey red prints. Each group contains four or more galaxies, has an estimated mean surface brightness brighter than 26.0 magnitude per arcsec2 and satisfies an isolation criterion. Dynamical parameters were derived for 92 of the 100 groups, which are listed in file "dynamics.dat"; the Hubble constant was assumed to be Ho=100km/s/Mpc. Data about individual galaxies in these groups are merged into the "galaxies.dat" file; these data include photometric parameters, morphology, redshifts and absolute magnitudes originally published in four different papers. They result from CCD observations at CFHT (Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope) in 1983-1985. Redshifts were observed at the 1.5m telescope of the F.L. Whipple Observatory on Mt. Hopkins, Arizona, over the period 1984-1986, in wavelength range 470-710nm; the remaining fainter galaxies were observed with the CFHT. (4 data files).

  11. The Metallicity Evolution of Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies from the Intermediate Redshift to the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Jianhui; Hu, Ning; Fang, Guanwen; Ye, Chengyun; Kong, Xu

    2016-03-01

    We present oxygen abundance measurements for 74 blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies in the redshift range of [0.2, 0.5] using the strong-line method. The spectra of these objects are taken using Hectospec on the Multiple Mirror Telescope. More than half of these BCDs had dust attenuation corrected using the Balmer decrement method. For comparison, we also selected a sample of 2023 local BCDs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) database. Based on the local and intermediate-z BCD samples, we investigated the cosmic evolution of the metallicity, star formation rate (SFR), and Dn(4000) index. Compared with local BCDs, the intermediate-z BCDs had a systematically higher R23 ratio but a similar O32 ratio. Interestingly, no significant deviation in the mass-metallicity (MZ) relation was found between the intermediate-z and local BCDs. Besides the metallicity, the intermediate-z BCDs also exhibited an SFR distribution that was consistent with local BCDs, suggesting a weak dependence on redshift. The intermediate-z BCDs seemed to be younger than the local BCDs with lower Dn(4000) index values. The insignificant deviation in the mass-metallicity and mass-SFR relations between intermediate-z and local BCDs indicates that the relations between the global parameters of low-mass compact galaxies may be universal. These results from low-mass compact galaxies could be used to place important observational constraints on galaxy formation and evolution models.

  12. X-RAY GROUPS OF GALAXIES IN THE AEGIS DEEP AND WIDE FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Erfanianfar, G.; Lerchster, M.; Nandra, K.; Connelly, J. L.; Mirkazemi, M.; Finoguenov, A.; Tanaka, M.; Laird, E.; Bielby, R.; Faber, S. M.; Kocevski, D.; Jeltema, T.; Newman, J. A.; Coil, A. L.; Brimioulle, F.; Davis, M.; McCracken, H. J.; Willmer, C.; Gerke, B.; and others

    2013-03-10

    We present the results of a search for extended X-ray sources and their corresponding galaxy groups from 800 ks Chandra coverage of the All-wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey (AEGIS). This yields one of the largest X-ray-selected galaxy group catalogs from a blind survey to date. The red-sequence technique and spectroscopic redshifts allow us to identify 100% of reliable sources, leading to a catalog of 52 galaxy groups. These groups span the redshift range z {approx} 0.066-1.544 and virial mass range M{sub 200} {approx} 1.34 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13}-1.33 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun }. For the 49 extended sources that lie within DEEP2 and DEEP3 Galaxy Redshift Survey coverage, we identify spectroscopic counterparts and determine velocity dispersions. We select member galaxies by applying different cuts along the line of sight or in projected spatial coordinates. A constant cut along the line of sight can cause a large scatter in scaling relations in low-mass or high-mass systems depending on the size of the cut. A velocity-dispersion-based virial radius can cause a larger overestimation of velocity dispersion in comparison to an X-ray-based virial radius for low-mass systems. There is no significant difference between these two radial cuts for more massive systems. Independent of radial cut, an overestimation of velocity dispersion can be created in the case of the existence of significant substructure and compactness in X-ray emission, which mostly occur in low-mass systems. We also present a comparison between X-ray galaxy groups and optical galaxy groups detected using the Voronoi-Delaunay method for DEEP2 data in this field.

  13. Feedback in the local Universe: Relation between star formation and AGN activity in early type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaddi, Sravani; O'Dea, Christopher; Baum, Stefi; Jones, Christine; Forman, William; Whitmore, Samantha; Ahmed, Rabeea; Pierce, Katherine; Leary, Sara

    2015-08-01

    Aim: We address the relation between star formation and AGN activity in a large sample of nearby early type (E and S0) galaxies. The redshift range of the galaxies is 0.0002galaxy evolution and formation. Evidence of AGN feedback is found in massive galaxies in galaxy clusters. However, how common AGN feedback is in the local universe and in small scale systems is still not evident.Methods: To answer this question, we carried out a multiple wavelength study of a sample of 231 early type galaxies which were selected to have an apparent K-band magnitude brighter than 13.5 and whose positions correlate with Chandra ACIS-I and ACIS-S sources. The galaxies in the sample are unbiased regarding their star formation and radio source properties. Using the archival observations at radio, IR and UV from VLA, WISE and GALEX respectively, we obtained the radio power, estimate FUV star formation rate (SFR) and other galaxy properties to study AGN activity and ongoing star formation.Results: The relationship between radio power and stellar mass shows that there is an upper envelope of radio power that is a steep function of stellar luminosity. This suggests that less massive galaxies have low radio power while massive galaxies are capable of hosting powerful radio sources. The Radio-MIR relation shows that galaxies with P>=1022 WHz-1 are potential candidates for being AGN. About ~ 7% of the sample show evidence of ongoing star formation with SFR ranging from 10-3 to 1 M⊙yr-1. These are also less massive and radio faint suggesting the absence of active accretion. There is nearly equal fraction of star forming galaxies in radio faint (P<1022 WHz-1) and radio bright galaxies (P>=1022 WHz-1) . Only ~ 5% of the galaxies in our sample have P>=1022 WHz-1 and most of them do not show evidence of bright accretion disks. We see a weak correlation and a dispersion of

  14. Percolation galaxy groups and clusters in the sdss redshift survey: identification, catalogs, and the multiplicity function

    SciTech Connect

    Berlind, Andreas A.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Weinberg, David H.; Blanton, Michael R.; Warren, Michael S.; Abazajian, Kevork; Scranton, Ryan; Hogg, David W.; Scoccimarro, Roman; Bahcall, Neta A.; Brinkmann, J.; Gott, J.Richard, III; Kleinman, S.J.; Krzesinski, J.; Lee, Brian C.; Miller, Christopher J.; Nitta, Atsuko; Schneider, Donald P.; Tucker, Douglas L.; Zehavi, Idit; /CCPP, New York /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /Ohio State U., Dept. Astron. /Los Alamos /Pittsburgh U. /Princeton U. /Subaru Telescope /Apache Point Observ. /Mt. Suhora Observ., Cracow /LBL, Berkeley /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs. /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /Fermilab /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ. /Case Western Reserve U.

    2006-01-01

    We identify galaxy groups and clusters in volume-limited samples of the SDSS redshift survey, using a redshift-space friends-of-friends algorithm. We optimize the friends-of-friends linking lengths to recover galaxy systems that occupy the same dark matter halos, using a set of mock catalogs created by populating halos of N-body simulations with galaxies. Extensive tests with these mock catalogs show that no combination of perpendicular and line-of-sight linking lengths is able to yield groups and clusters that simultaneously recover the true halo multiplicity function, projected size distribution, and velocity dispersion. We adopt a linking length combination that yields, for galaxy groups with ten or more members: a group multiplicity function that is unbiased with respect to the true halo multiplicity function; an unbiased median relation between the multiplicities of groups and their associated halos; a spurious group fraction of less than {approx}1%; a halo completeness of more than {approx}97%; the correct projected size distribution as a function of multiplicity; and a velocity dispersion distribution that is {approx}20% too low at all multiplicities. These results hold over a range of mock catalogs that use different input recipes of populating halos with galaxies. We apply our group-finding algorithm to the SDSS data and obtain three group and cluster catalogs for three volume-limited samples that cover 3495.1 square degrees on the sky. We correct for incompleteness caused by fiber collisions and survey edges, and obtain measurements of the group multiplicity function, with errors calculated from realistic mock catalogs. These multiplicity function measurements provide a key constraint on the relation between galaxy populations and dark matter halos.

  15. Physical properties of local star-forming analogues to z ˜ 5 Lyman-break galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greis, Stephanie M. L.; Stanway, Elizabeth R.; Davies, Luke J. M.; Levan, Andrew J.

    2016-07-01

    Intense, compact, star-forming galaxies are rare in the local Universe but ubiquitous at high redshift. We interpret the 0.1-22 μm spectral energy distributions of a sample of 180 galaxies at 0.05 < z < 0.25 selected for extremely high surface densities of inferred star formation in the ultraviolet. By comparison with well-established stellar population synthesis models, we find that our sample comprises young (˜60-400 Myr), moderate mass (˜6 × 109 M⊙) star-forming galaxies with little dust extinction (mean stellar continuum extinction Econt(B - V) ˜ 0.1) and find star formation rates of a few tens of solar masses per year. We use our inferred masses to determine a mean specific star formation rate for this sample of ˜10-9 yr-1, and compare this to the specific star formation rates in distant Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs), and in other low-redshift populations. We conclude that our sample's characteristics overlap significantly with those of the z ˜ 5 LBG population, making ours the first local analogue population well tuned to match those high-redshift galaxies. We consider implications for the origin and evolution of early galaxies.

  16. Chandra and XMM View Galaxy Groups: New Details from Sharper Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrtilek, J. M.; Ponman, T. J.; O'Sullivan, E. J.; David, L. P.; Harris, D. E.; Forman, W.; Jones, C.; Lane, W. M.; Kassim, N. E.

    2004-08-01

    Groups and poor clusters are the locus of most galaxies in the present-day Universe and the building blocks from which clusters form. They accordingly occupy a significant place in the continuum of structure between isolated galaxies and rich clusters. Owing to the lower temperature of their intracluster gas, X-ray emission from groups produces strong lines from a broader range of elements than do hotter clusters. Here we show results from an examination of several X-ray bright groups, mostly from the Hickson, AWM, and MKW lists, relevant to issues of current interest in the study of both groups and clusters: the distribution of heavy elements, the presence and nature of X-ray cavities and their relation to radio observations, the presence of cooling cores, and X-ray signatures of recent galaxy interactions. This work was supported in part by NASA grants GO2-3186X and GO4-5154X.

  17. Dark energy in the environments of the Local Group, the M 81 group, and the CenA group: the normalized Hubble diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teerikorpi, P.; Chernin, A. D.; Karachentsev, I. D.; Valtonen, M. J.

    2008-05-01

    Context: Type Ia supernova observations on scales of thousands of Mpc show that the global expansion of the universe is accelerated by antigravity produced by the enigmatic dark energy contributing 3/4 of the total energy of the universe. Aims: Does antigravity act on small scales as well as large? As a continuation of our efforts to answer this crucial question we combine high accuracy observations of the galaxy flows around the Local Group and the nearby M 81 and CenA groups to observe the effect of the dark energy density on local scales of a few Mpc. Methods: We use an analytical model to describe non-uniform static space-time regions around galaxy groups. In this context it is useful to present the Hubble flow in a normalized Hubble diagram V/Hv Rv vs. r/R_v, where the vacuum Hubble constant Hv depends only on the cosmological vacuum density and the zero-gravity distance Rv depends on the vacuum density and on the mass of the galaxy group. We have prepared the normalized Hubble diagrams for the LG, M 81 and CenA group environments for different values of the assumed vacuum energy density, using a total of about 150 galaxies, for almost all of which the distances have been measured by the HST. Results: The normalized Hubble diagram, where we identify dynamically different regions, is in agreement with the standard vacuum density (Ωv = 0.77~h_70-2), the out-flow of galaxies clearly being controlled by the minimum energy condition imposed by the central mass plus the vacuum density. A high vacuum density 1.6~h_70-2 violates the minimum energy limit, while a low density 0.1~h_70-2 leaves the start of the Hubble flow around 1-2 Mpc with the slope close to the global value obscure. We also consider the subtle relation of the zero-gravity radius Rv to the zero-velocity distance R0 appearing in the usual retarded expansion around a mass M: in a vacuum-dominated flat universe R0 ≈ 0.76 R_v. Conclusions: The normalized Hubble diagram appears to be a good way to

  18. THE NATURE OF THE SECOND PARAMETER IN THE IRX-{beta} RELATION FOR LOCAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Grasha, Kathryn; Calzetti, Daniela; Andrews, Jennifer E.; Lee, Janice C.; Dale, Daniel A.

    2013-08-20

    We present an analysis of 98 galaxies of low-dust content, selected from the Spitzer Local Volume Legacy survey, aimed at examining the relation between the ultraviolet (UV) color and dust attenuation in normal star-forming galaxies. The IRX-{beta} diagram relates the total dust attenuation in a galaxy, traced by the far-IR (FIR) to UV ratio, to the observed UV color, indicated by {beta}. Previous research has indicated that while starburst galaxies exhibit a relatively tight IRX-{beta} relation, normal star-forming galaxies do not, and have a much larger spread in the total-IR to far-UV (FUV) luminosity for a fixed UV color. We examine the role that the age of the stellar population plays as the ''second parameter'' responsible for the observed deviation and spread of star-forming galaxies from the starburst relation. We model the FUV to FIR spectral energy distribution of each galaxy according to two broad bins of star formation history (SFH): constant and instantaneous burst. We find clear trends between stellar population mean age estimators (extinction-corrected FUV/NIR, U - B, and EW(H{alpha})) and the UV color {beta}; the trends are mostly driven by the galaxies best-described by instantaneous burst populations. We also find a significant correlation between {beta} and the mean age directly determined from the best-fit instantaneous models. As already indicated by other authors, the UV attenuation in star-forming galaxies may not be recovered with the UV color alone and is highly influenced by the stellar population's mean age and SFH. Overall, the scatter in the IRX-{beta} diagram is better correlated with {beta} than with the perpendicular distance, d{sub p}.

  19. Deep Optical Imaging of a Compact Group of Galaxies: Seyfert's Sextet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiura, Shingo; Murayama, Takashi; Shimada, Masashi; Sato, Yasunori; Nagao, Tohru; Molikawa, Kohji; Taniguchi, Yoshiaki; Sanders, D. B.

    2000-11-01

    To investigate the dynamical status of Seyfert's Sextet (SS), we have obtained a deep optical (VR+I) image of this group. Our image shows that a faint envelope, down to a surface brightness μoptical(AB)~=27 mag arcsec-2, surrounds the member galaxies. This envelope is irregular in shape. It is likely that this shape is attributed either to recent-past or to ongoing galaxy interactions in SS. If the member galaxies have experienced a number of mutual interactions over a long timescale, the shape of the envelope should be rounder. Therefore, the irregularly shaped morphology suggests that SS is in an early phase of dynamical interaction among the member galaxies. It is interesting to note that the soft X-ray image obtained with ROSAT (Pildis, Bregman, & Evrard) is significantly similar in morphology. We discuss the possible future evolution of SS briefly.

  20. Carnegie-Spitzer-IMACS Survey: The Rise of Galaxy Groups Since z=1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Rik J.; Kelson, D.; Dressler, A.; McCarthy, P.; Mulchaey, J.; Oemler, A., Jr.; Shectman, S.

    2012-01-01

    We present the first measurements of the evolution of the group stellar mass function (GSMF) since z=1 from the Carnegie-Spitzer-IMACS (CSI) Survey. CSI combines robust mass selection through Spitzer 3.6-micron photometry with low-resolution spectroscopy over a 15 deg2 area, allowing the detailed study of large group (and group/field galaxy) samples over the expected epoch of group formation. From the initial 36,000 CSI galaxy redshifts over 5 deg2, we select groups using a standard friends-of-friends algorithm in angular and redshift space, constructing the GSMF in 3 redshift bins. These mass functions agree well with GSMFs from SDSS at z=0, and with X-ray-selected cluster mass functions at higher masses and redshifts. At all masses the GSMF evolves strongly from z=0.5-1, but only weak evolution is seen in low-mass (log M* ˜ 12.0) groups since z=0.5, indicating that most of these were in place at that epoch. As the majority of low-redshift galaxies reside in groups, the group environment may therefore play an important role in the decline in star formation and evolution of galaxy structures since z=1.

  1. THE ZURICH ENVIRONMENTAL STUDY (ZENS) OF GALAXIES IN GROUPS ALONG THE COSMIC WEB. II. GALAXY STRUCTURAL MEASUREMENTS AND THE CONCENTRATION OF MORPHOLOGICALLY CLASSIFIED SATELLITES IN DIVERSE ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Cibinel, A.; Carollo, C. M.; Lilly, S. J.; Miniati, F.; Cameron, E.; Peng, Y.; Pipino, A.; Rudick, C. S.; Silverman, J. D.; Van Gorkom, J. H.; Finoguenov, A.; Norberg, P. E-mail: marcella@phys.ethz.ch

    2013-10-20

    We present structural measurements for the galaxies in the 0.05 < z < 0.0585 groups of the Zurich Environmental Study, aimed at establishing how galaxy properties depend on four environmental parameters: group halo mass (M{sub GROUP}), group-centric distance (R/R{sub 200}), ranking into central or satellite, and large-scale structure density (δ{sub LSS}). Global galaxy structure is quantified both parametrically and non-parametrically. We correct all these measurements for observational biases due to point-spread function blurring and surface brightness effects as a function of galaxy size, magnitude, steepness of light profile, and ellipticity. Structural parameters are derived also for bulges, disks, and bars. We use the galaxy bulge-to-total ratios (B/T) together with the calibrated non-parametric structural estimators to implement a quantitative morphological classification that maximizes purity in the resulting morphological samples. We investigate how the concentration C of satellite galaxies depends on galaxy mass for each Hubble type and on M{sub GROUP}, R/R{sub 200}, and δ{sub LSS}. At galaxy masses M ≥ 10{sup 10} M{sub ☉}, the concentration of disk satellites increases with increasing stellar mass separately within each morphological bin of B/T. The known increase in concentration with stellar mass for disk satellites is thus due, at least in part, to an increase in galaxy central stellar density at constant B/T. The correlation between concentration and galaxy stellar mass becomes progressively steeper for later morphological types. The concentration of disk satellites shows a barely significant dependence on δ{sub LSS} or R/R{sub 200}. The strongest environmental effect is found with group mass for >10{sup 10} M{sub ☉} disk-dominated satellites, which are ∼10% more concentrated in high mass groups than in lower mass groups.

  2. Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effects from Quasars in Galaxies and Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapi, A.; Cavaliere, A.; De Zotti, G.

    2003-11-01

    The energy fed by active galactic nuclei to the surrounding diffuse baryons changes their amount, temperature, and distribution; so in groups and in member galaxies it affects the X-ray luminosity and also the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect. Here we compute how the latter is enhanced by the transient blast wave driven by an active quasar and is depressed when the equilibrium is recovered with a depleted density. We constrain such depressions and enhancements with the masses of relic black holes in galaxies and the X-ray luminosities in groups. We discuss how all these linked observables can tell the quasar contribution to the thermal history of the baryons pervading galaxies and groups.

  3. K-Band Properties of Well-Sampled Groups of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramella, Massimo; Boschin, Walter; Geller, Margaret J.; Mahdavi, Andisheh; Rines, Kenneth

    2004-11-01

    We use a sample of 55 groups and six clusters of galaxies ranging in mass from 7×1011 to 1.5×1015 Msolar to examine the correlation of the Ks-band luminosity with mass discovered by Lin and coauthors in 2003. We use the Two-Micron All-Sky Survey catalog and published redshifts to construct complete magnitude-limited redshift surveys of the groups. From these surveys we explore the IR photometric properties of groups members, including their IR color distribution and luminosity function. Although we find no significant difference between the group Ks luminosity function and the general field, there is a difference between the color distribution of luminous group members and their counterparts (generally background) in the field. There is a significant population of luminous galaxies with H-Ks>~0.35, which are rarely, if ever, members of the groups in our sample. The most luminous galaxies that populate the groups have a very narrow range of IR color. Over the entire mass range covered by our sample, the Ks luminosity increases with mass as LKs~M0.64+/-0.06, implying that the mass-to-light ratio in the Ks band increases with mass. The agreement between this result and earlier investigations of essentially nonoverlapping sets of systems shows that this window in galaxy formation and evolution is insensitive to the selection of the systems and to the details of the mass and luminosity computations.

  4. Searching for intermediate groups of galaxies with Suzaku in Bootes field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Maejima, Masato; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Babazaki, Yasunori; Matsumoto, Hironori; Tawara, Yuzuru; Miller, Eric D.

    2015-08-01

    To investigate redshift evolution of groups of galaxies is significant also in terms of galaxy evolution. Recent observational studies show that an AGN fraction and a magnitude gap between the first and the second brightest group galaxies increase in group environments at lower redshifts (Oh et al. 2014 & Gozaliasl et al. 2014). Thus, comprehension for the evolution of the systems will bring us to hints on both morphological evolution of galaxies and galaxy-galaxy interactions. However, observational samples of groups of galaxies at higher redshifts are limited due to its low flux and surface brightness. Thus, we aimed at searching for new samples using both X-ray and optical data. To identify the group systems at higher redshifts, deep optical imaging and spectroscopic data are needed. Bootes field is one of the best regions for this purpose because there are up to 17 bands of data available per source from infrared, optical, UV, and X-ray (e.g., Kenter et al. 2005, Chung et al. 2014). XBootes survey was conducted in 2003 using Chandra (Murray et al. 2005) and X-ray extended sources were detected around intermediate optically-identified groups of galaxies even though Chandra could not reveal their origins due to poor photon statistics. Thus, we conducted X-ray follow-up observations using Suzaku which has low and stable background and thus is optimum for such low surface brightness sources for brightest 6 group candidates with redshifts of 0.15-0.42. Consequently, Suzaku detected excess emissions from all the targets in their images and spectral analysis reveals that 4 sources are originated from group- or poor-cluster-scale halos with temperatures, abundances and luminosities of 1.6-3.0 keV, <0.3 solar and ~1044 erg s-1, respectively while no significant emissions from diffuse sources were found from the other two targets. In this conference, we will report on the details of our analysis and results using multiwavelength data such as radio, optical and X-ray to

  5. Searching for intermediate groups of galaxies with Suzaku in Bootes field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawara, Yuzuru; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki

    2016-07-01

    To investigate redshift evolution of groups of galaxies is significant also in terms of galaxy evolution. Recent observational studies show that an AGN fraction and a magnitude gap between the first and the second brightest group galaxies increase in group environments at lower redshifts (Oh et al. 2014 & Gozaliasl et al. 2014). Thus, comprehension for the evolution of the systems will bring us to hints on both morphological evolution of galaxies and galaxy-galaxy interactions. However, observational samples of groups of galaxies at higher redshifts are limited due to its low flux and surface brightness. Thus, we aimed at searching for new samples using both X-ray and optical data. To identify the group systems at higher redshifts, deep optical imaging and spectroscopic data are needed. Bootes field is one of the best regions for this purpose because there are up to 17 bands of data available per source from infrared, optical, UV, and X-ray (e.g., Kenter et al. 2005, Chung et al. 2014). XBootes survey was conducted in 2003 using Chandra (Murray et al. 2005) and X-ray extended sources were detected around intermediate optically-identified groups of galaxies even though Chandra could not reveal their origins due to poor photon statistics. Thus, we conducted X-ray follow-up observations using Suzaku which has low and stable background and thus is optimum for such low surface brightness sources for brightest 6 group candidates with redshifts of 0.15-0.42. Consequently, Suzaku detected excess emissions from all the targets in their images and spectral analysis reveals that 6 sources are originated from group- or poor-cluster-scale halos with temperatures, abundances and luminosities of 1.6-3.0 keV, <0.3 solar and ~1044 erg s-1, respectively. In this conference, we will report on the details of our analysis and results using multiwavelength data such as radio, optical and X-ray to examine the AGN fractions and magnitude gaps in our samples and discuss the redshift

  6. Power spectrum tomography of dark matter annihilation with local galaxy distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, Shin'ichiro

    2014-10-01

    Cross-correlating the gamma-ray background with local galaxy catalogs potentially gives stringent constraints on dark matter annihilation. We provide updated theoretical estimates of sensitivities to the annihilation cross section from gamma-ray data with Fermi telescope and 2MASS galaxy catalogs, by elaborating the galaxy power spectrum and astrophysical backgrounds, and adopting the Markov-Chain Monte Carlo simulations. In particular, we show that taking tomographic approach by dividing the galaxy catalogs into more than one redshift slice will improve the sensitivity by a factor of a few to several. If dark matter halos contain lots of bright substructures, yielding a large annihilation boost (e.g., a factor of ∼100 for galaxy-size halos), then one may be able to probe the canonical annihilation cross section for thermal production mechanism up to masses of ∼700 GeV. Even with modest substructure boost (e.g., a factor of ∼10 for galaxy-size halos), on the other hand, the sensitivities could still reach a factor of three larger than the canonical cross section for dark matter masses of tens to a few hundreds of GeV.

  7. Endpoints of stellar evolution - X-ray surveys of the Local Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    The galaxies of the Local Group offer a variety of settings in which to study galactic source populations unhampered by local interstellar-absorption and distance ambiguities. A review of the subject of Local Group X-ray astronomy from the first discovery of a source in the Large Magellanic Cloud 15 years ago to the most recent analysis of the Einstein Observatory data (in which over 200 X-ray sources were detected in Local Group members) is presented. Following a detailed presentation of the latest results, two examples of the constraints these data impose on stellar and galactic evolution are discussed: study of the distribution of properties for the 30 detected supernova remnants in the Large Magellanic Cloud, and a comparison of the populations of classical X-ray binaries in M31, M33, the Magellanic Clouds, and the Galaxy. A prospectus for future research, including a discussion of the contributions which could be made by the next generation of X-ray observatories, is provided.

  8. On the nature of local instabilities in rotating galactic coronae and cool cores of galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Nipoti, Carlo; Posti, Lorenzo

    2014-09-01

    A long-standing question is whether radiative cooling can lead to local condensation of cold gas in the hot atmospheres of galaxies and galaxy clusters. We address this problem by studying the nature of local instabilities in rotating, stratified, weakly magnetized, optically thin plasmas in the presence of radiative cooling and anisotropic thermal conduction. For both axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric linear perturbations, we provide general equations which can be applied locally to specific systems to establish whether they are unstable and, in case of instability, to determine the kind of evolution (monotonically growing or overstable) and the growth rates of the unstable modes. We present results for models of rotating plasmas representative of Milky-Way-like galaxy coronae and cool-cores of galaxy clusters. We show that the unstable modes arise from a combination of thermal, magnetothermal, magnetorotational, and heat-flux-driven buoyancy instabilities. Local condensation of cold clouds tends to be hampered in cluster cool cores, while it is possible under certain conditions in rotating galactic coronae. If the magnetic field is sufficiently weak, then the magnetorotational instability is dominant even in these pressure-supported systems.

  9. LOCALIZED STARBURSTS IN DWARF GALAXIES PRODUCED BY THE IMPACT OF LOW-METALLICITY COSMIC GAS CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Sánchez Almeida, J.; Muñoz-Tuñón, C.; Filho, M. E.; Elmegreen, B. G.; Elmegreen, D. M.; Pérez-Montero, E.; Vílchez, J. M.; Amorín, R.; Ascasibar, Y.; Papaderos, P.

    2015-09-10

    Models of galaxy formation predict that gas accretion from the cosmic web is a primary driver of star formation over cosmic history. Except in very dense environments where galaxy mergers are also important, model galaxies feed from cold streams of gas from the web that penetrate their dark matter halos. Although these predictions are unambiguous, the observational support has been indirect so far. Here, we report spectroscopic evidence for this process in extremely metal-poor galaxies (XMPs) of the local universe, taking the form of localized starbursts associated with gas having low metallicity. Detailed abundance analyses based on Gran Telescopio Canarias optical spectra of 10 XMPs show that the galaxy hosts have metallicities around 60% solar, on average, while the large star-forming regions that dominate their integrated light have low metallicities of some 6% solar. Because gas mixes azimuthally in a rotation timescale (a few hundred Myr), the observed metallicity inhomogeneities are only possible if the metal-poor gas fell onto the disk recently. We analyze several possibilities for the origin of the metal-poor gas, favoring the metal-poor gas infall predicted by numerical models. If this interpretation is correct, XMPs trace the cosmic web gas in their surroundings, making them probes to examine its properties.

  10. Localized Starbursts in Dwarf Galaxies Produced by the Impact of Low-metallicity Cosmic Gas Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez Almeida, J.; Elmegreen, B. G.; Muñoz-Tuñón, C.; Elmegreen, D. M.; Pérez-Montero, E.; Amorín, R.; Filho, M. E.; Ascasibar, Y.; Papaderos, P.; Vílchez, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    Models of galaxy formation predict that gas accretion from the cosmic web is a primary driver of star formation over cosmic history. Except in very dense environments where galaxy mergers are also important, model galaxies feed from cold streams of gas from the web that penetrate their dark matter halos. Although these predictions are unambiguous, the observational support has been indirect so far. Here, we report spectroscopic evidence for this process in extremely metal-poor galaxies (XMPs) of the local universe, taking the form of localized starbursts associated with gas having low metallicity. Detailed abundance analyses based on Gran Telescopio Canarias optical spectra of 10 XMPs show that the galaxy hosts have metallicities around 60% solar, on average, while the large star-forming regions that dominate their integrated light have low metallicities of some 6% solar. Because gas mixes azimuthally in a rotation timescale (a few hundred Myr), the observed metallicity inhomogeneities are only possible if the metal-poor gas fell onto the disk recently. We analyze several possibilities for the origin of the metal-poor gas, favoring the metal-poor gas infall predicted by numerical models. If this interpretation is correct, XMPs trace the cosmic web gas in their surroundings, making them probes to examine its properties.

  11. Cosmic Dawn (CoDa): the First Radiation-Hydrodynamics Simulation of Reionization and Galaxy Formation in the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocvirk, Pierre; Gillet, Nicolas; Shapiro, Paul R.; Aubert, Dominique; Iliev, Ilian T.; Teyssier, Romain; Yepes, Gustavo; Choi, Jun-Hwan; Sullivan, David; Knebe, Alexander; Gottlöber, Stefan; D'Aloisio, Anson; Park, Hyunbae; Hoffman, Yehuda; Stranex, Timothy

    2016-08-01

    Cosmic reionization by starlight from early galaxies affected their evolution, thereby impacting reionization, itself. Star formation suppression, for example, may explain the observed underabundance of Local Group dwarfs relative to N-body predictions for Cold Dark Matter. Reionization modelling requires simulating volumes large enough [ ˜ (100 Mpc)3] to sample reionization "patchiness", while resolving millions of galaxy sources above ˜108 M⊙ , combining gravitational and gas dynamics with radiative transfer. Modelling the Local Group requires initial cosmological density fluctuations pre-selected to form the well-known structures of the local universe today. Cosmic Dawn ("CoDa") is the first such fully-coupled, radiation-hydrodynamics simulation of reionization of the local universe. Our new hybrid CPU-GPU code, RAMSES-CUDATON, performs hundreds of radiative transfer and ionization rate-solver timesteps on the GPUs for each hydro-gravity timestep on the CPUs. CoDa simulated (91Mpc)3 with 40963 particles and cells, to redshift 4.23, on ORNL supercomputer Titan, utilizing 8192 cores and 8192 GPUs. Global reionization ended slightly later than observed. However, a simple temporal rescaling which brings the evolution of ionized fraction into agreement with observations also reconciles ionizing flux density, cosmic star formation history, CMB electron scattering optical depth and galaxy UV luminosity function with their observed values. Photoionization heating suppressed the star formation of haloes below ˜2 × 109 M⊙ , For most of reionization, star formation was dominated by haloes between 1010 - 1011 M⊙ , so low-mass halo suppression was not reflected by a distinct feature in the global star formation history. Intergalactic filaments display sheathed structures, with hot envelopes surrounding cooler cores, but do not self-shield, unlike regions denser than 100 <ρ>.

  12. X-ray analysis of the galaxy group UGC 03957 beyond R200 with Suzaku

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thölken, Sophia; Lovisari, Lorenzo; Reiprich, Thomas H.; Hasenbusch, Jan

    2016-07-01

    Context. In the last few years, the outskirts of galaxy clusters have been studied in detail and the analyses have brought up interesting results such as indications of possible gas clumping and the breakdown of hydrostatic, thermal, and ionization equilibrium. These phenomena affect the entropy profiles of clusters, which often show deviations from the self-similar prediction around R200. However, significant uncertainties remain for groups of galaxies. In particular the question, of whether entropy profiles are similar to those of galaxy clusters. Aims: We investigated the gas properties of the galaxy group UGC 03957 up to 1.4 R200 ≈ 1.4 Mpc in four azimuthal directions with the Suzaku satellite. We checked for azimuthal symmetry and obtained temperature, entropy, density, and gas mass profiles. Previous studies point to deviations from equilibrium states at the outskirts of groups and clusters and so we studied the hydrodynamical status of the gas at these large radii. Methods: We performed a spectral analysis of five Suzaku observations of UGC 03957 with ~138 ks good exposure time in total and five Chandra snapshot observations for point source detection. We investigated systematic effects such as point spread function and uncertainties in the different background components, and performed a deprojection of the density and temperature profile. Results: We found a temperature drop of a factor of ~3 from the center to the outskirts that is consistent with previous results for galaxy clusters. The metal abundance profile shows a flat behavior towards large radii, which is a hint for galactic winds as the primary ICM enrichment process. The entropy profile is consistent with numerical simulations after applying a gas mass fraction correction. Feedback processes and AGN activity might be one explanation for entropy modification, imprinting out to larger radii in galaxy groups than in galaxy clusters. Previous analyses for clusters and groups often showed an

  13. THE L-{sigma} RELATION OF LOCAL H II GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bordalo, V.; Telles, E. E-mail: etelles@on.br

    2011-07-01

    For the first time we present a new data set of emission line widths for 118 star-forming regions in H II galaxies (HIIGs). This homogeneous set is used to investigate the L-{sigma} relation in conjunction with optical spectrophotometric observations. We were able to classify their nebular emission line profiles due to our high-resolution spectra. Peculiarities in the line profiles such as sharp lines, wings, asymmetries, and in some cases more than one component in emission were verified. From a new independent homogeneous set of spectrophotometric data, we derived physical condition parameters and performed statistical principal component analysis. We have investigated the potential role of metallicity (O/H), H{beta} equivalent width (W{sub H{beta}}), and ionization ratio [O III]/[O II] to account for the observational scatter of the L-{sigma} relation. Our results indicate that the L-{sigma} relation for HIIGs is more sensitive to the evolution of the current starburst event (short-term evolution) and dated by W{sub H}{beta} or even the [O III]/[O II] ratio. The long-term evolution measured by O/H also plays a potential role in determining the luminosity of the current burst for a given velocity dispersion and age as previously suggested. Additionally, galaxies showing Gaussian line profiles present tighter correlations indicating that they are the best targets for the application of the parametric relations as an extragalactic cosmological distance indicator. Best fits for a restricted homogeneous sample of 45 HIIGs provide us with a set of new extragalactic distance indicators with an rms scatter compatible with observational errors of {delta}log L{sub H}{alpha} = 0.2 dex or 0.5 mag. Improvements may still come from future optimized observational programs to reduce the observational uncertainties on the predicted luminosities of HIIGs in order to achieve the precision required for the application of these relations as tests of cosmological models.

  14. A catalog of compact groups of galaxies in the RSDSS commissioning data

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Brian C.; Allam, Sahar S.; Tucker, Douglas L.; Annis, James; Blanton, Michael R.; Johnston, David E.; Scranton, Ryan; Acebo, Yamina; Bahcall, Neta A.; Bartelmann, Matthias; Bohringer, Hans; Ellman, Nancy; Grebel, Eva K.; Infante, Leopoldo; Loveday, Jon; McKay, Timothy A.; Prada, Francisco; Schneider, Donald P.; Stoughton, Chris; Szalay, Alexander S.; Vogeley, Michael S.; Voges, Wolfgang; Yanny, Brian

    2003-11-18

    Compact groups (CGs) of galaxies--relatively poor groups of galaxies in which the typical separations between members is of the order of a galaxy diameter--offer an exceptional laboratory for the study of dense galaxian environments with short (<1Gyr) dynamical time-scales. In this paper, we present an objectively defined catalog of CGs in 153 sq deg of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Early Data Release (SDSS EDR). To identify CGs, we applied a modified version of Hickson's (1982) criteria aimed at finding the highest density CGs and thus reducing the number of chance alignments. Our catalog contains 175 CGs down to a limiting galaxy magnitude of r* = 21. The resulting catalog has a median depth of approximately z = 0.13, substantially deeper than previous CG catalogs. Since the SDSS will eventually image up to one quarter of the celestial sphere, we expect our final catalog, based upon the completed SDSS, will contain on the order of 5,000-10,000 CGs. This catalog will be useful for conducting studies of the general characteristics of CGs, their environments, and their component galaxies.

  15. Local Luminous Infrared Galaxies. III. Co-evolution of Black Hole Growth and Star Formation Activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Pereira-Santaella, Miguel; Rieke, George H.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Wang, Yiping; Hernán-Caballero, Antonio; Rigopoulou, Dimitra

    2013-03-01

    Local luminous infrared (IR) galaxies (LIRGs) have both high star formation rates (SFR) and a high AGN (Seyfert and AGN/starburst composite) incidence. Therefore, they are ideal candidates to explore the co-evolution of black hole (BH) growth and star formation (SF) activity, not necessarily associated with major mergers. Here, we use Spitzer/IRS spectroscopy of a complete volume-limited sample of local LIRGs (distances of <78 Mpc). We estimate typical BH masses of 3 × 107 M ⊙ using [Ne III] 15.56 μm and optical [O III] λ5007 gas velocity dispersions and literature stellar velocity dispersions. We find that in a large fraction of local LIRGs, the current SFR is taking place not only in the inner nuclear ~1.5 kpc region, as estimated from the nuclear 11.3 μm PAH luminosities, but also in the host galaxy. We next use the ratios between the SFRs and BH accretion rates (BHAR) to study whether the SF activity and BH growth are contemporaneous in local LIRGs. On average, local LIRGs have SFR to BHAR ratios higher than those of optically selected Seyferts of similar active galactic nucleus (AGN) luminosities. However, the majority of the IR-bright galaxies in the revised-Shapley-Ames Seyfert sample behave like local LIRGs. Moreover, the AGN incidence tends to be higher in local LIRGs with the lowest SFRs. All of this suggests that in local LIRGs there is a distinct IR-bright star-forming phase taking place prior to the bulk of the current BH growth (i.e., AGN phase). The latter is reflected first as a composite and then as a Seyfert, and later as a non-LIRG optically identified Seyfert nucleus with moderate SF in its host galaxy. This work is based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under NASA contract 1407.

  16. LOCAL LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES. III. CO-EVOLUTION OF BLACK HOLE GROWTH AND STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY?

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Hernan-Caballero, Antonio; Pereira-Santaella, Miguel; Rieke, George H.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Wang Yiping; Rigopoulou, Dimitra

    2013-03-10

    Local luminous infrared (IR) galaxies (LIRGs) have both high star formation rates (SFR) and a high AGN (Seyfert and AGN/starburst composite) incidence. Therefore, they are ideal candidates to explore the co-evolution of black hole (BH) growth and star formation (SF) activity, not necessarily associated with major mergers. Here, we use Spitzer/IRS spectroscopy of a complete volume-limited sample of local LIRGs (distances of <78 Mpc). We estimate typical BH masses of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun} using [Ne III] 15.56 {mu}m and optical [O III] {lambda}5007 gas velocity dispersions and literature stellar velocity dispersions. We find that in a large fraction of local LIRGs, the current SFR is taking place not only in the inner nuclear {approx}1.5 kpc region, as estimated from the nuclear 11.3 {mu}m PAH luminosities, but also in the host galaxy. We next use the ratios between the SFRs and BH accretion rates (BHAR) to study whether the SF activity and BH growth are contemporaneous in local LIRGs. On average, local LIRGs have SFR to BHAR ratios higher than those of optically selected Seyferts of similar active galactic nucleus (AGN) luminosities. However, the majority of the IR-bright galaxies in the revised-Shapley-Ames Seyfert sample behave like local LIRGs. Moreover, the AGN incidence tends to be higher in local LIRGs with the lowest SFRs. All of this suggests that in local LIRGs there is a distinct IR-bright star-forming phase taking place prior to the bulk of the current BH growth (i.e., AGN phase). The latter is reflected first as a composite and then as a Seyfert, and later as a non-LIRG optically identified Seyfert nucleus with moderate SF in its host galaxy.

  17. Clustering of Local Group Distances: Publication Bias or Correlated Measurements? III. The Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Grijs, Richard; Bono, Giuseppe

    2015-06-01

    Aiming at providing a firm mean distance estimate to the SMC, and thus to place it within the internally consistent Local Group distance framework we recently established, we compiled the current largest database of published distance estimates to the galaxy. Based on careful statistical analysis, we derive mean distance estimates to the SMC using eclipsing binary systems, variable stars, stellar population tracers, and star cluster properties. Their weighted mean leads to a final recommendation for the mean SMC distance of (m-M)0SMC=18.96+/- 0.02 mag, where the uncertainty represents the formal error. Systematic effects related to lingering uncertainties in extinction corrections, our physical understanding of the stellar tracers used, and the SMC's complex geometry—including its significant line of sight depth, its irregular appearance which renders definition of the galaxy's center uncertain, as well as its high inclination and possibly warped disk—may contribute additional uncertainties possibly exceeding 0.15-0.20 mag.

  18. Catalogs of Compact Groups of Galaxies from the Enhanced SDSS DR12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Jubee; Geller, Margaret J.; Hwang, Ho Seong; Zahid, H. Jabran; Lee, Myung Gyoon

    2016-08-01

    We apply a friends-of-friends algorithm to an enhanced SDSS DR12 spectroscopic catalog, including redshift from the literature to construct a catalog of 1588 N≥slant 3 compact groups of galaxies containing 5178 member galaxies and covering the redshift range 0.01 < z < 0.19. This catalog contains 18 times as many systems and reaches 3 times the depth of the similar catalog of Barton et al. We construct catalogs from both magnitude-limited and volume-limited galaxy samples. Like Barton et al. we omit the frequently applied isolation criterion in the compact group selection algorithm. Thus the groups selected by fixed projected spatial and rest-frame line-of-sight velocity separation produce a catalog of groups with a redshift-independent median size. In contrast to previous catalogs, the enhanced SDSS DR12 catalog (including galaxies with r < 14.5) includes many systems with z ≲ 0.05. The volume-limited samples are unique to this study. The compact group candidates in these samples have a median stellar mass independent of redshift. Groups with velocity dispersion ≲100 {km} {{{s}}}-1 show abundant evidence for ongoing dynamical interactions among the members. The number density of the volume-limited catalogs agrees with previous catalogs at the lowest redshifts but decreases as the redshift increases. The SDSS fiber placement constraints limit the catalog’s completeness. In spite of this issue, the volume-limited catalogs provide a promising basis for detailed spatially resolved probes of the impact of galaxy–galaxy interactions within similar dense systems over a broad redshift range.

  19. Star Formation Suppression in Compact Group Galaxies: A New Path to Quenching?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alatalo, K.; Appleton, P. N.; Lisenfeld, U.; Bitsakis, T.; Lanz, L.; Lacy, M.; Charmandaris, V.; Cluver, M.; Dopita, M. A.; Guillard, P.; Jarrett, T.; Kewley, L. J.; Nyland, K.; Ogle, P. M.; Rasmussen, J.; Rich, J. A.; Verdes-Montenegro, L.; Xu, C. K.; Yun, M.

    2015-10-01

    We present CO(1-0) maps of 12 warm H2-selected Hickson Compact Groups (HCGs), covering 14 individually imaged warm H2 bright galaxies, with the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy. We found a variety of molecular gas distributions within the HCGs, including regularly rotating disks, bars, rings, tidal tails, and possibly nuclear outflows, though the molecular gas morphologies are more consistent with spirals and early-type galaxies than mergers and interacting systems. Our CO-imaged HCG galaxies, when plotted on the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation, shows star formation (SF) suppression of < {S} > =10+/- 5, distributed bimodally, with five objects exhibiting suppressions of {S} ≳ 10 and depletion timescales ≳10 Gyr. This SF inefficiency is also seen in the efficiency per freefall time of Krumholz et al. We investigate the gas-to-dust ratios of these galaxies to determine if an incorrect LCO-M(H2) conversion caused the apparent suppression and find that HCGs have normal gas-to-dust ratios. It is likely that the cause of the apparent suppression in these objects is associated with shocks injecting turbulence into the molecular gas, supported by the fact that the required turbulent injection luminosity is consistent with the bright H2 luminosity reported by Cluver et al. Galaxies with high SF suppression ({S} ≳ 10) also appear to be those in the most advanced stages of transition across both optical and infrared color space. This supports the idea that at least some galaxies in HCGs are transitioning objects, where a disruption of the existing molecular gas in the system suppresses SF by inhibiting the molecular gas from collapsing and forming stars efficiently. These observations, combined with recent work on poststarburst galaxies with molecular reservoirs, indicates that galaxies do not need to expel their molecular reservoirs prior to quenching SF and transitioning from blue spirals to red early-type galaxies. This may imply that SF quenching can

  20. Deep Fabry-Perot Hα observations of two Sculptor group galaxies, NGC 247 and 300

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; Marcelin, M.; Epinat, B.; Carignan, C.; de Denus-Baillargeon, M.-M.; Daigle, O.; Hernandez, O.

    2011-09-01

    It has been suggested that diffuse ionized gas can extend all the way to the end of the H I disc, and even beyond, such as in the case of the warped galaxyNGC 253 (Bland-Hawthorn et al.). Detecting ionized gas at these radii could carry significant implications as to the distribution of dark matter in galaxies. With the aim of detecting this gas, we carried out a deep Hα kinematical analysis of two Sculptor group galaxies, NGC 247 and 300. The Fabry-Perot data were taken at the 36-cm Marseille Telescope in La Silla, Chile, offering a large field of view. With almost 20 hours of observations for each galaxy, very faint diffuse emission is detected. Typical emission measures of 0.1 cm-6 pc are reached. For NGC 247, emission extending up to a radius comparable with that of the H I disc (r˜ 13 arcmin) is found, but no emission is seen beyond the H I disc. For NGC 300, we detect ionized gas on the entirety of our field of view (rmax˜ 14 arcmin), and find that the bright H II regions are embedded in a diffuse background. Using the deep data, extended optical rotation curves are obtained, as well as mass models. These are the most extended optical rotation curves thus far for these galaxies. We find no evidence suggesting that NGC 247 has a warped disc, and to account for our non-detection of Hα emission beyond its H I disc, as opposed to the warped galaxy NGC 253, our results favour the model in which, only through a warp, ionization by hot young stars in the central region of a galaxy can let photons escape and ionize the interstellar medium in the outer parts.

  1. Mass-metallicity relation for local star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yu-Zhong; Zhang, Shuang-Nan; Zhao, Yong-Heng; Zhang, Wei

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the evolution of the mass-metallicity (M-Z) relation with a large sample of 53 444 star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at 0.04 < z < 0.12, selected from the catalogue of Max-Planck-Institute for Astrophysics-John Hopkins University (MPA-JHU) emission-line measurements for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. Regarding the sample of SFGs, we correct the observational bias and raise the aperture covering fractions to check the reliability of the metallicity evolution. (i) We show that the redshift evolution of the log (Hα) and log([O III]) luminosities is displayed in our sample. (ii) We find the metallicity evolution of ˜0.15 dex at log (M*/M⊙) ˜ 9.3 in SFGs at 0.04 < z < 0.12. (iii) After applying the luminosity thresholds of log (LHα) > 41.0 and log (L_[O III])>39.7, we find that the metallicity evolution is shown well, and that the evolution of the star formation rate (SFR) is still shown well under the latter luminosity threshold, but the evolution is not observed under the former. (iv) The evolution of the M-Z relation seems to disappear at about log (M*/M⊙) > 10.0 after applying the luminosity threshold of log (LHα) > 41.0 or log (L_[O III])>39.7. (v) We find α = 0.09 and α = 0.07 in the equation, μ = log M* - αlog (SFR), for log (LHα) > 41.0 and log (L_[O III])>39.7 samples, respectively, and these imply that the evolution of the M-Z relation might have a weaker dependence on the SFR in our sample.

  2. Indirect Evidence for Escaping Lyman Continuum Photons in Local Lyman Break Galaxy Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandroff, Rachael; Heckman, Timothy M.; Borthakur, Sanchayeeta; Overzier, Roderik

    2015-01-01

    A population of early star-forming galaxies is the leading candidate for the re-ionization of the universe. It is still unclear, however, what conditions and physical processes would enable a significant fraction of the ionizing photons to escape from these gas-rich galaxies. In addition, studies of high redshift galaxies have yet to uncover a large sample of galaxies with the required high escape fraction of ionizing photons.We have uncovered a sample of local analogs to high-redshift, star-forming Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) called Lyman Break Analogs (LBAs) by matching the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) catalogs. These galaxies are remarkably similar to LBGs in their properties-- morphology, size, UV luminosity, SFR, mass, velocity dispersion, metallicity and dust content. We obtained HST COS far-UV spectroscopy plus ancillary multi-waveband data of a sample of 22 LBAs to look for indirect evidence of escaping ionizing radiation (leakiness).We measure three parameters: (1) the residual intensity in the cores of saturated interstellar low-ionization absorption-lines, which indicates incomplete covering by that gas in the galaxy. (2) The relative amount of blue-shifted Lyman alpha line emission, which can indicate the existence of holes in the neutral hydrogen on the front-side of the galaxy outflow, and (3) the relative weakness of the [SII] optical emission lines that trace matter-bounded HII regions. We find all three diagnostics agree well with one another. Finally, we find the strongest correlation between these leakiness indicators and both the compactness of the galactic star-forming region (size and star formation rate/area) and the speed of the galactic outflow. This suggests that extreme feedback- a high intensity of ionizing radiation and strong pressure from both radiation and a hot galactic wind- combines to create significant holes in the neutral gas. These results not only shed new light on the physical

  3. Local Effect of Space-Time Expansion ---- How Galaxies Form and Evolve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jian Liang; Hua, He Yu

    2016-09-01

    generalize gravitational theory of central field to the expanding space-time, and realize the unification of structure of big scope space-time and physical phenomena of small scope, and reasonably and systematically explain gravitational anomalies of solar system such as extra receding rate of lunar orbit, the increase of astronomical unit, the secular change of day length, the earth's expansion as well as the extra acceleration of artificial aerocrafts and so on, which cannot be treated by current knowledge. Besides, it is disclosed that galaxies form from continued growth but not the assemblage of existent matter after big bang, new matter continuously creates in the interior of celestial bodies, celestial bodies, galaxies and space simultaneously enlarge at the same proportion, and it is the local effect of space-time expansion that determines formation and evolution of galaxies.

  4. A z = 1.82 ANALOG OF LOCAL ULTRA-MASSIVE ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Onodera, M.; Daddi, E.; Gobat, R.; Arimoto, N.; Yamada, Y.; Renzini, A.; Mancini, C.; McCracken, H. J.; Capak, P.; Carollo, M.; Lilly, S.; Cimatti, A.; Giavalisco, M.; Ilbert, O.; Kong, X.; Motohara, K.; Ohta, K.; Sanders, D. B.; Scoville, N.

    2010-05-20

    We present observations of a very massive galaxy at z = 1.82 that show that its morphology, size, velocity dispersion, and stellar population properties are fully consistent with those expected for passively evolving progenitors of today's giant ellipticals. These findings are based on a deep optical rest-frame spectrum obtained with the Multi-Object InfraRed Camera and Spectrograph on the Subaru Telescope of a high-z passive galaxy candidate (pBzK) from the COSMOS field, for which we accurately measure its redshift of z = 1.8230 and obtain an upper limit on its velocity dispersion {sigma}{sub *} < 326 km s{sup -1}. By detailed stellar population modeling of both the galaxy broadband spectral energy distribution and the rest-frame optical spectrum, we derive a star formation-weighted age and formation redshift of t {sub sf} {approx_equal} 1-2 Gyr and z {sub form} {approx_equal} 2.5-4, and a stellar mass of M {sub *} {approx_equal} (3-4) x 10{sup 11} M {sub sun}. This is in agreement with a virial mass limit of M {sub vir} < 7 x 10{sup 11} M {sub sun}, derived from the measured {sigma}{sub *} value and stellar half-light radius, as well as with the dynamical mass limit based on the Jeans equations. In contrast to previously reported super-dense passive galaxies at z {approx} 2, the present galaxy at z = 1.82 appears to have both size and velocity dispersion similar to early-type galaxies in the local universe with similar stellar mass. This suggests that z {approx} 2 massive and passive galaxies may exhibit a wide range of properties, then possibly following quite different evolutionary histories from z {approx} 2 to z = 0.

  5. WINGS-SPE. III. Equivalent width measurements, spectral properties, and evolution of local cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, J.; Poggianti, B. M.; Cava, A.; Moretti, A.; Varela, J.; Bettoni, D.; Couch, W. J.; D'Onofrio D'Onofrio, M.; Dressler, A.; Fasano, G.; Kjærgaard, P.; Marziani, P.; Moles, M.; Omizzolo, A.

    2014-06-01

    Context. Cluster galaxies are the ideal sites to look at when studying the influence of the environment on the various aspects of the evolution of galaxies, such as the changes in their stellar content and morphological transformations. In the framework of wings, the WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey, we have obtained optical spectra for ~6000 galaxies selected in fields centred on 48 local (0.04 < z < 0.07) X-ray selected clusters to tackle these issues. Aims: By classifying the spectra based on given spectral lines, we investigate the frequency of the various spectral types as a function of both the clusters' properties and the galaxies' characteristics. In this way, using the same classification criteria adopted for studies at higher redshift, we can consistently compare the properties of the local cluster population to those of their more distant counterparts. Methods: We describe a method that we have developed to automatically measure the equivalent width of spectral lines in a robust way, even in spectra with a non optimal signal-to-noise ratio. This way, we can derive a spectral classification reflecting the stellar content, based on the presence and strength of the [Oii] and Hδ lines. Results: After a quality check, we are able to measure 4381 of the ~6000 originally observed spectra in the fields of 48 clusters, of which 2744 are spectroscopically confirmed cluster members. The spectral classification is then analysed as a function of galaxies' luminosity, stellar mass, morphology, local density, and host cluster's global properties and compared to higher redshift samples (MORPHS and EDisCS). The vast majority of galaxies in the local clusters population are passive objects, being also the most luminous and massive. At a magnitude limit of MV < -18, galaxies in a post-starburst phase represent only ~11% of the cluster population, and this fraction is reduced to ~5% at MV < -19.5, which compares to the 18% at the same magnitude limit for high

  6. LENTICULAR GALAXIES AT THE OUTSKIRTS OF THE LEO II GROUP: NGC 3599 AND NGC 3626

    SciTech Connect

    Sil'chenko, O. K.; Shulga, A. P.; Moiseev, A. V. E-mail: alina.shulga@gmail.co

    2010-11-15

    We have studied unbarred S0 galaxies, NGC 3599 and NGC 3626, the members of the X-ray bright group Leo II, by means of three-dimensional spectroscopy, long-slit spectroscopy, and imaging, with the aim of identifying the epoch and mechanisms of their transformation from spirals. Both galaxies have appeared to bear complex features obviously resulting from minor merging: decoupled gas kinematics, nuclear star-forming rings, and multi-tiered oval large-scale stellar disks. The weak emission line nucleus of NGC 3599 bears all signs of Seyfert activity, according to the line-ratio diagnostics of the gas excitation mechanism. We conclude that the transformation of these lenticular galaxies took place about 1-2 Gyr ago, through gravitational mechanisms unrelated to the hot intragroup medium of Leo II.

  7. Dust Properties of Local Dust-obscured Galaxies with the Submillimeter Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Ho Seong; Andrews, Sean M.; Geller, Margaret J.

    2013-11-01

    We report Submillimeter Array observations of the 880 μm dust continuum emission for four dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs) in the local universe. Two DOGs are clearly detected with S ν(880 μm) =10-13 mJy and S/N > 5, but the other two are not detected with 3σ upper limits of S ν(880 μm) =5-9 mJy. Including an additional two local DOGs with submillimeter data from the literature, we determine the dust masses and temperatures for six local DOGs. The infrared luminosities and dust masses for these DOGs are in the ranges of 1.2-4.9 × 1011(L ⊙) and 4-14 × 107(M ⊙), respectively. The dust temperatures derived from a two-component modified blackbody function are 23-26 K and 60-124 K for the cold and warm dust components, respectively. Comparison of local DOGs with other infrared luminous galaxies with submillimeter detections shows that the dust temperatures and masses do not differ significantly among these objects. Thus, as argued previously, local DOGs are not a distinctive population among dusty galaxies, but simply represent the high-end tail of the dust obscuration distribution.

  8. DUST PROPERTIES OF LOCAL DUST-OBSCURED GALAXIES WITH THE SUBMILLIMETER ARRAY

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Ho Seong; Andrews, Sean M.; Geller, Margaret J. E-mail: sandrews@cfa.harvard.edu

    2013-11-01

    We report Submillimeter Array observations of the 880 μm dust continuum emission for four dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs) in the local universe. Two DOGs are clearly detected with S{sub ν}(880 μm) =10-13 mJy and S/N > 5, but the other two are not detected with 3σ upper limits of S{sub ν}(880 μm) =5-9 mJy. Including an additional two local DOGs with submillimeter data from the literature, we determine the dust masses and temperatures for six local DOGs. The infrared luminosities and dust masses for these DOGs are in the ranges of 1.2-4.9 × 10{sup 11}(L{sub ☉}) and 4-14 × 10{sup 7}(M{sub ☉}), respectively. The dust temperatures derived from a two-component modified blackbody function are 23-26 K and 60-124 K for the cold and warm dust components, respectively. Comparison of local DOGs with other infrared luminous galaxies with submillimeter detections shows that the dust temperatures and masses do not differ significantly among these objects. Thus, as argued previously, local DOGs are not a distinctive population among dusty galaxies, but simply represent the high-end tail of the dust obscuration distribution.

  9. No evidence for a dependence of the mass-size relation of early-type galaxies on environment in the local universe

    SciTech Connect

    Huertas-Company, M.; Shankar, F.; Mei, S.; Bernardi, M.; Meert, A.; Vikram, V.; Aguerri, J. A. L.

    2013-12-10

    The early-type galaxy (ETG) mass-size relation has largely been studied to understand how these galaxies assembled their mass. One key observational result of the last years is that massive galaxies increased their size by a factor of a few at fixed stellar mass from z ∼ 2. Hierarchical models favor minor mergers as a plausible driver of this size growth. Some of these models predict a significant environmental dependence in the sense that galaxies residing in more massive halos tend to be larger than galaxies in lower mass halos, at fixed stellar mass and redshift. At present, observational results of this environmental dependence are contradictory. In this paper we revisit this issue in the local universe, by investigating how the sizes of massive ETGs depend on a large-scale environment using an updated and accurate sample of ETGs in different environments—field, group, and clusters—from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7. Our analysis does not show any significant environmental dependence of the sizes of central and satellite ETGs at fixed stellar mass at z ∼ 0. The size-mass relation of early-type galaxies at z ∼ 0 seems to be universal, i.e., independent of the mass of the host halo and of the position of the galaxy in that halo (central or satellite). The result is robust to different galaxy selections based on star formation, morphology, or central density. Considering our observational errors and the size of the sample, any size ratio larger than 30%-40% between massive galaxies (log(M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) > 11) living in clusters and in the field can be ruled out at 3σ level.

  10. Studying high redshift galaxy groups with the Athena Wide-Field-Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacaud, Florian; Reiprich, Thomas; Ramos Ceja, Miriam Elizabeth; Lovisari, Lorenzo

    2016-07-01

    In this contribution, we will discuss the potential of Athena to study high redshift galaxy groups (1groups in Athena WFI observations and our ability to identify them as extended sources among the numerous active galactic nuclei (AGN) at similar fluxes. Our analysis also includes the determination of the physical properties of these galaxy groups (average gas temperature, luminosity). Based on these tools, we discuss the science achievable with such systems thanks to Athena and its dependance on the final instrumental set-up. In particular, we investigate the impact of different levels of contamination by AGNs and assumptions on the luminosity of the groups as a function of their mass.

  11. The Role of Star Formation in Radio-Loud Galaxy Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbst, Hanna; Wilcots, E.; Hess, K.

    2010-01-01

    X-ray observations have shown that additional non-gravitational processes are required to explain the heating of the intergalactic medium in galaxy groups. The two most likely processes are galactic outflows from starbursts and feedback from AGN. Here, we look at star formation as a possible additional heating mechanism in X-ray luminous groups such as NGC 741, NGC 1052, NGC 524, and NGC 1587. We report on the results of optical imaging of these groups carried out using the WIYN 3.5m telescope with a specific emphasis on measuring the star formation rates of the resident galaxies in each group and estimating the impact of that star formation on the thermodynamics of the intragroup medium.

  12. X-ray Emission from Early-Type Galaxies in Groups and Poor Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paolillo, M.

    2002-04-01

    We present the study of three bright Early-Type galaxies hosted in groups or poor clusters: NGC 1399, NGC 1404 and NGC 507. We used ROSAT HRI, PSPC and, when available, higher resolution Chandra data to study the structure of the X-ray halo. The halo center of NGC 1399 and NGC 507 is dominated by a bright emission peak coincident with the position of the optical galaxy. This central peak is not explained by cooling flow models and is likely to be produced by kinetically heated stellar material. Within the effective radius, the hot gas distribution is tracing the galactic potential due to luminous matter. At larger distances the halo dynamics is dominated by dark matter extending on group and cluster scales. The NGC 1399 complex morphology further requires that the dark matter distribution has a hierarchical structure or that environmental effects are producing departures from hydrostatic equilibrium. We found significant density fluctuations in the hot gas distribution of both NGC 1399 and NGC 507, some of which are explained by the interaction of the radio-emitting plasma with the surrounding ISM. The remaining structures may be the result of galaxy-galaxy encounters, wakes produced by the motion of the galaxy through the ICM or may reflect the inhomogeneity of the cooling process invoked by many authors to explain the failure of the standard cooling-flow models. NGC 1404 represents a puzzling case since, despite its similarity with dominant cluster members, significant differences are found in the hot gas properties. These conflicting evidences can be explained by environmental effects, such as stifling of galactic winds by the ICM. Finally, we studied the population of discrete sources found in proximity of the two dominant galaxies.

  13. Local starburst galaxies and their descendants. Statistics from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergvall, Nils; Marquart, Thomas; Way, Michael J.; Blomqvist, Anna; Holst, Emma; Ostlin, Goran; Zackrisson, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Despite strong interest in the starburst phenomenon in extragalactic astronomy, the concept remains ill-defined. Here we use a strict definition of starburst to examine the statistical properties of starburst galaxies in the local universe. We also seek to establish links between starburst galaxies, post-starburst (hereafter postburst) galaxies, and active galaxies. Data were selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7. We applied a novel method of treating dust attenuation and derive star formation rates, ages, and stellar masses assuming a two-component stellar population model. Dynamical masses are calculated from the width of the H-alpha line. These masses agree excellently with the photometric masses. The mass (gas+stars) range is approximately 10( exp 9) - 10(exp 11.5) solar mass. As a selection criterion for starburst galaxies, we use, the birthrate parameter, b = SFR/SFR, requiring that b is greater than 3. For postburst galaxies, we use, the equivalent width of Hdelta in absorption with the criterion EW (sub Hdelta_abs) is greater than 6 A. Results. We find that only 1% of star-forming galaxies are starburst galaxies. They contribute 3-6% to the stellar production and are therefore unimportant for the local star formation activity. The median starburst age is 70 Myr roughly independent of mass, indicating that star formation is mainly regulated by local feedback processes. The b-parameter strongly depends on burst age. Values close to b = 60 are found at ages approximately 10 Myr, while almost no starbursts are found at ages greater than 1 Gyr. The median baryonic burst mass fraction of sub-L galaxies is 5% and decreases slowly towards high masses. The median mass fraction of the recent burst in the postburst sample is 5-10%. A smaller fraction of the postburst galaxies, however, originates in non-bursting galaxies. The age-mass distribution of the postburst progenitors (with mass fractions is greater than 3%) is bimodal with a break at logM(solar mass

  14. Local density maxima - Progenitors of structure. [of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Y.; Shaham, J.

    1985-01-01

    Beginning with a short review of the observational data and of some previous theoretical ideas and numerical simulations, the question is addressed of how the large-scale structure that emerges around local density maxima depends on the nature of the primordial density perturbations field. The density contrast profile around local maxima is given, to a good approximation, by the primordial two-point correlation function. The mean number density of objects of a given core mass is calculated as a function of the primordial power spectrum, p(k). In an open universe, rich clusters should have halos steeper than galactic haloes. The observed structure is found to be consistent with omega-sub-zero less than 1.0 and n = -1.

  15. Steepened inner density profiles of group galaxies via interactions: an N-body analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobke, Benjamin M.; King, Lindsay J.; Fellhauer, Michael

    2007-06-01

    We continue to see a range of values for the Hubble constant obtained from gravitationally lensed multiple image time-delays when assuming an isothermal lens despite a robust value from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) key project (72 +/- 8 kms-1 Mpc-1). One explanation is that there is a variation in Hubble constant values due to a fundamental heterogeneity in lens galaxies present in groups, that is, central galaxies with a high dark matter surface density, and satellite galaxies with a possibly stripped halo, low dark matter surface density, and a more centrally concentrated matter distribution. Our goal is to see if a variety of group interactions between the most-massive group members can result in significant changes in the galaxy density profiles over the scale probed by strong lensing (<~15 kpc). While stripping of the outer parts of the halo can be expected, the impact on inner regions where the luminous component is important is less clear in the context of lensing, though still crucial, as a steepened density profile within this inner region allows these lens systems to be consistent with current HST/Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) estimates on H0. We employ the particle-mesh code SUPERBOX to carry out the group interaction simulations. An important advantage of using such a code is that it implements a fast, low-storage fast Fourier transform (FFT) algorithm allowing simulations with millions of particles on desk-top machines. We simulate interactions between group members, comparing the density profile for the satellite before and after interaction for the mass range of 1011 to 1013Msolar. Our investigations show a significant steepening of the density profile in the region of ~5-20 kpc, i.e. that which dominates strong lensing in lens galaxies. This effect is independent of the initial mass-to-light ratio. Additionally, the steepening in the inner region is transient in nature, with consecutive interactions returning the profile to an

  16. Improved system for object detection and star/galaxy classification via local subspace analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Yong; Chiu, Kai-Chun; Xu, Lei

    2003-01-01

    The two traditional tasks of object detection and star/galaxy classification in astronomy can be automated by neural networks because the nature of the problems is that of pattern recognition. A typical existing system can be further improved by using one of the local Principal Component Analysis (PCA) models. Our analysis in the context of object detection and star/galaxy classification reveals that local PCA is not only superior to global PCA in feature extraction, but is also superior to gaussian mixture in clustering analysis. Unlike global PCA which performs PCA for the whole data set, local PCA applies PCA individually to each cluster of data. As a result, local PCA often outperforms global PCA for data of multi-modes. Moreover, since local PCA can effectively avoid the trouble of having to specify a large number of free elements of each covariance matrix of gaussian mixture, it can give a better description of local subspace structures of each cluster when applied on high dimensional data with small sample size. In this paper, the local PCA model proposed by Xu [IEEE Trans. Neural Networks 12 (2001) 822] under the general framework of Bayesian Ying Yang (BYY) normalization learning will be adopted. Endowed with the automatic model selection ability of BYY learning, the BYY normalization learning-based local PCA model can cope with those object detection and star/galaxy classification tasks with unknown model complexity. A detailed algorithm for implementation of the local PCA model will be proposed, and experimental results using both synthetic and real astronomical data will be demonstrated.

  17. Constraining ultracompact dwarf galaxy formation with galaxy clusters in the local universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeffer, J.; Hilker, M.; Baumgardt, H.; Griffen, B. F.

    2016-05-01

    We compare the predictions of a semi-analytic model for ultracompact dwarf galaxy (UCD) formation by tidal stripping to the observed properties of globular clusters (GCs) and UCDs in the Fornax and Virgo clusters. For Fornax we find the predicted number of stripped nuclei agrees very well with the excess number of GCs+UCDs above the GC luminosity function. GCs+UCDs with masses >107.3 M⊙ are consistent with being entirely formed by tidal stripping. Stripped nuclei can also account for Virgo UCDs with masses >107.3 M⊙ where numbers are complete by mass. For both Fornax and Virgo, the predicted velocity dispersions and radial distributions of stripped nuclei are consistent with that of UCDs within ˜50-100 kpc but disagree at larger distances where dispersions are too high and radial distributions too extended. Stripped nuclei are predicted to have radially biased anisotropies at all radii, agreeing with Virgo UCDs at clustercentric distances larger than 50 kpc. However, ongoing disruption is not included in our model which would cause orbits to become tangentially biased at small radii. We find the predicted metallicities and central black hole masses of stripped nuclei agree well with the metallicities and implied black hole masses of UCDs for masses >106.5 M⊙. The predicted black hole masses also agree well with that of M60-UCD1, the first UCD with a confirmed central black hole. These results suggest that observed GC+UCD populations are a combination of genuine GCs and stripped nuclei, with the contribution of stripped nuclei increasing towards the high-mass end.

  18. Molecular Gas and Star Formation in Local Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bureau, M.; Davis, T. A.; Alatalo, K.; Crocker, A. F.; Blitz, L.; Young, L. M.; Combes, F.; Bois, M.; Bournaud, F.; Cappellari, M.; Davies, R. L.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Duc, P.-A.; Emsellem, E.; Khochfar, S.; Krajnović, D.; Kuntschner, H.; Lablanche, P.-Y.; McDermid, R. M.; Morganti, R.; Naab, T.; Oosterloo, T.; Sarzi, M.; Scott, N.; Serra, P.; Weijmans, A.

    2011-12-01

    The molecular gas content of local early-type galaxies is constrained and discussed in relation to their evolution. First, as part of the ATLAS3D survey, we present the first complete, large (260 objects), volume-limited single-dish survey of CO in normal local early-type galaxies. We find a surprisingly high detection rate of 22%, independent of luminosity and at best weakly dependent on environment. Second, the extent of the molecular gas is constrained with CO synthesis imaging, and a variety of morphologies is revealed. The kinematics of the molecular gas and stars are often misaligned, implying an external gas origin in over a third of the systems, although this behaviour is drastically diffferent between field and cluster environments. Third, many objects appear to be in the process of forming regular kpc-size decoupled disks, and a star formation sequence can be sketched by piecing together multi-wavelength information on the molecular gas, current star formation, and young stars. Last, early-type galaxies do not seem to systematically obey all our usual prejudices regarding star formation, following the standard Schmidt-Kennicutt law but not the far infrared-radio correlation. This may suggest a greater diversity in star formation processes than observed in disk galaxies. Using multiple molecular tracers, we are thus starting to probe the physical conditions of the cold gas in early-types.

  19. GALAXY INTERACTIONS IN COMPACT GROUPS. I. THE GALACTIC WINDS OF HCG16

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, Frederic P. A.; Dopita, Michael A.; Kewley, Lisa J.

    2013-05-10

    Using the WiFeS integral field spectrograph, we have undertaken a series of observations of star-forming galaxies in compact groups. In this first paper dedicated to the project, we present the analysis of the spiral galaxy NGC 838, a member of the Hickson Compact Group 16, and of its galactic wind. Our observations reveal that the wind forms an asymmetric, bipolar, rotating structure, powered by a nuclear starburst. Emission line ratio diagnostics indicate that photoionization is the dominant excitation mechanism at the base of the wind. Mixing from slow shocks (up to 20%) increases further out along the outflow axis. The asymmetry of the wind is most likely caused by one of the two lobes of the wind bubble bursting out of its H I envelope, as indicated by line ratios and radial velocity maps. The characteristics of this galactic wind suggest that it is caught early (a few Myr) in the wind evolution sequence. The wind is also quite different from the galactic wind in the partner galaxy NGC 839 which contains a symmetric, shock-excited wind. Assuming that both galaxies have similar interaction histories, the two different winds must be a consequence of the intrinsic properties of NGC 838 and NGC 839 and their starbursts.

  20. Some Like it Hot: Linking Diffuse X-Ray Luminosity, Baryonic Mass, and Star Formation Rate in Compact Groups of Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desjardins, Tyler D.; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Mulchaey, John S.; Walker, Lisa May; Brandt, Willian N.; Charlton, Jane C.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis

    2014-01-01

    We present an analysis of the diffuse X-ray emission in 19 compact groups (CGs) of galaxies observed with Chandra. The hottest, most X-ray luminous CGs agree well with the galaxy cluster X-ray scaling relations in L(x-T) and (L(x-sigma), even in CGs where the hot gas is associated with only the brightest galaxy. Using Spitzer photometry, we compute stellar masses and classify Hickson CGs 19, 22, 40, and 42, and RSCGs 32, 44, and 86 as fossil groups using a new definition for fossil systems that includes a broader range of masses. We find that CGs with total stellar and Hi masses are great than or equal to 10(sup (11.3) solar mass are often X-ray luminous, while lower-mass CGs only sometimes exhibit faint, localized X-ray emission. Additionally, we compare the diffuse X-ray luminosity against both the total UV and 24 micron star formation rates of each CG and optical colors of the most massive galaxy in each of the CGs. The most X-ray luminous CGs have the lowest star formation rates, likely because there is no cold gas available for star formation, either because the majority of the baryons in these CGs are in stars or the X-ray halo, or due togas stripping from the galaxies in CGs with hot halos. Finally, the optical colors that trace recent star formation histories of the most massive group galaxies do not correlate with the X-ray luminosities of the CGs, indicating that perhaps the current state of the X-ray halos is independent of the recent history of stellar mass assembly in the most massive galaxies.

  1. Some like it hot: Linking diffuse X-ray luminosity, baryonic mass, and star formation rate in compact groups of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Desjardins, Tyler D.; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis; Walker, Lisa May; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Brandt, William N.; Charlton, Jane C.

    2014-08-01

    We present an analysis of the diffuse X-ray emission in 19 compact groups (CGs) of galaxies observed with Chandra. The hottest, most X-ray luminous CGs agree well with the galaxy cluster X-ray scaling relations in L{sub X} -T and L{sub X} -σ, even in CGs where the hot gas is associated with only the brightest galaxy. Using Spitzer photometry, we compute stellar masses and classify Hickson CGs 19, 22, 40, and 42, and RSCGs 32, 44, and 86 as fossil groups using a new definition for fossil systems that includes a broader range of masses. We find that CGs with total stellar and H I masses ≳ 10{sup 11.3} M{sub ☉} are often X-ray luminous, while lower-mass CGs only sometimes exhibit faint, localized X-ray emission. Additionally, we compare the diffuse X-ray luminosity against both the total UV and 24 μm star formation rates of each CG and optical colors of the most massive galaxy in each of the CGs. The most X-ray luminous CGs have the lowest star formation rates, likely because there is no cold gas available for star formation, either because the majority of the baryons in these CGs are in stars or the X-ray halo, or due to gas stripping from the galaxies in CGs with hot halos. Finally, the optical colors that trace recent star formation histories of the most massive group galaxies do not correlate with the X-ray luminosities of the CGs, indicating that perhaps the current state of the X-ray halos is independent of the recent history of stellar mass assembly in the most massive galaxies.

  2. AGN Feedback in Galaxy Groups: A Joint GMRT/X-ray Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacintucci, S.; Vrtilek, J. M.; O'Sullivan, E.; Raychaudhury, S.; David, L. P.; Venturi, T.; Athreya, R.; Gitti, M.

    2009-12-01

    We present an ongoing study of 18 nearby galaxy groups, chosen for the availability of Chandra and/or XMM-Newton data and evidence for AGN/hot intragroup gas interaction. We have obtained 235 and 610 MHz observations at the GMRT for all the groups, and 327 and 150 MHz for a few. We discuss two interesting cases-NGC 5044 and AWM 4-which exhibit different kinds of AGN/hot gas interaction. With the help of these examples we show how joining low-frequency radio data (to track the history of AGN outbursts through emission from aged electron populations) with X-ray data (to determine the state of hot gas, its disturbances, heating and cooling) can provide a unique insight into the nature of the feedback mechanism in galaxy groups.

  3. The influence of local environment on the emergence of AGN activity in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, M. A.; Del Olmo, A.; Perea, J.; Coziol, R.; Focardi, P.

    2011-11-01

    We have carried out a spectroscopic study to determine the frequency and nature of the nuclear activity found in compact groups. With this aim we chose two samples, one selected from the Hickson Compact Groups Catalogue and another one from the Updated Zwicky Catalogue of Compact Groups. With the analysis of 1056 galaxies we found that more than 71% present some kind of emission, most of them, being low luminosity AGN (L_{Hα}=10^{39} erg s^{-1}). From these we only detect broad components in 16 which means a remarkable deficiency of broad line AGNs as compared to narrow lineAGNs, despite the high frequency of active galaxies encountered ingeneral in these groups.

  4. Intragroup diffuse light in compact groups of galaxies: HCG 79, 88 and 95

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Rocha, C.; Mendes de Oliveira, C.

    2005-12-01

    Deep B and R images of three Hickson Compact Groups, HCG 79, 88 and 95, have been analysed using a new wavelet technique to measure possible intragroup diffuse light present in these systems. The method used, OV_WAV, is a wavelet technique particularly suitable for detecting low surface brightness extended structures, down to a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) = 0.1 per pixel, which corresponds to a 5σ detection level in wavelet space. The three groups studied are in different evolutionary stages, as can be judged by their very different fractions of the total light contained in their intragroup haloes: 46 +/- 11 per cent for HCG 79 and 11 +/- 26 per cent for HCG 95, in the B band, and HCG 88 had no component detected down to a limiting surface brightness of 29.1B mag arcsec-2. For HCG 95, the intragroup light (IGL) is red, similar to the mean colours of the group galaxies themselves, suggesting that it is formed by an old population with no significant ongoing star formation. For HCG 79, however, the intragroup material has a significantly bluer colour than the mean colour of the group galaxies, suggesting that the diffuse light may, at least in part, come from stripping of dwarf galaxies which dissolved into the group potential well.

  5. SARCS strong-lensing galaxy groups. II. Mass-concentration relation and strong-lensing bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foëx, G.; Motta, V.; Jullo, E.; Limousin, M.; Verdugo, T.

    2014-12-01

    Aims: Various studies have shown a lensing bias in the mass-concentration relation of cluster-scale structures that is the result of an alignment of the major axis and the line of sight. In this paper, we aim to study this lensing bias through the mass-concentration relation of galaxy groups, thus extending observational constraints to dark matter haloes of mass ~1013-1014 M⊙. Methods: Our work is based on the stacked weak-lensing analysis of a sample of 80 strong-lensing galaxy groups. By combining several lenses, we significantly increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the lensing signal, thus providing constraints on the mass profile that cannot be obtained for individual objects. The resulting shear profiles were fitted with various mass models, among them the Navarro-Frank-White (NFW) profile, which provides an estimate of the total mass and of the concentration of the composite galaxy groups. Results: The main results of our analysis are the following: (i) the lensing signal does not allow us to firmly distinguish between a simple singular isothermal sphere mass distribution and the expected NFW mass profile; (ii) we obtain an average concentration c200 = 8.6-1.3+2.1 that is much higher than the value expected from numerical simulations for the corresponding average mass M200 = 0.73-0.10+0.11 × 1014 M⊙; (iii) the combination of our results with those at larger mass scales gives a mass-concentration relation c(M) of more than two decades in mass, whose slope disagrees with predictions from numerical simulations using unbiased populations of dark matter haloes; (iv) our combined c(M) relation matches results from simulations that only used haloes with a large strong-lensing cross-section, that is, elongated with a major axis close to the line of sight; (v) for the simplest case of prolate haloes, we estimate a lower limit on the minor-to-major axis ratio a/c = 0.5 for the average SARCS galaxy group with a toy model. Conclusions: Our analysis based on galaxy

  6. Local Luminous Infrared Galaxies. II. Active Galactic Nucleus Activity from Spitzer/Infrared Spectrograph Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Pereira-Santaella, Miguel; Rieke, George H.; Rigopoulou, Dimitra

    2012-01-01

    We quantify the active galactic nucleus (AGN) contribution to the mid-infrared (mid-IR) and the total infrared (IR, 8-1000 μm) emission in a complete volume-limited sample of 53 local luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs, L IR = 1011-1012 L ⊙). We decompose the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph low-resolution 5-38 μm spectra of the LIRGs into AGN and starburst components using clumpy torus models and star-forming galaxy templates, respectively. We find that 50% (25/50) of local LIRGs have an AGN component detected with this method. There is good agreement between these AGN detections through mid-IR spectral decomposition and other AGN indicators, such as the optical spectral class, mid-IR spectral features, and X-ray properties. Taking all the AGN indicators together, the AGN detection rate in the individual nuclei of LIRGs is ~62%. The derived AGN bolometric luminosities are in the range L bol(AGN) = (0.4-50) × 1043 erg s-1. The AGN bolometric contribution to the IR luminosities of the galaxies is generally small, with 70% of LIRGs having L bol[AGN]/L IR <= 0.05. Only ~= 8% of local LIRGs have a significant AGN bolometric contribution L bol[AGN]/L IR > 0.25. From the comparison of our results with literature results of ultraluminous infrared galaxies (L IR = 1012-1013 L ⊙), we confirm that in the local universe the AGN bolometric contribution to the IR luminosity increases with the IR luminosity of the galaxy/system. If we add up the AGN bolometric luminosities we find that AGNs only account for 5%^{+8%}_{-3%} of the total IR luminosity produced by local LIRGs (with and without AGN detections). This proves that the bulk of the IR luminosity of local LIRGs is due to star formation activity. Taking the newly determined IR luminosity density of LIRGs in the local universe, we then estimate an AGN IR luminosity density of ΩAGN IR = 3 × 105 L ⊙ Mpc-3 in LIRGs. This work is based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet

  7. Weak lensing calibrated M-T scaling relation of galaxy groups in the cosmos field

    SciTech Connect

    Kettula, K.; Finoguenov, A.; Massey, R.; Rhodes, J.; Hoekstra, H.; Taylor, J. E.; Spinelli, P. F.; Tanaka, M.; Ilbert, O.; Capak, P.; McCracken, H. J.; Koekemoer, A.

    2013-11-20

    The scaling between X-ray observables and mass for galaxy clusters and groups is instrumental for cluster-based cosmology and an important probe for the thermodynamics of the intracluster gas. We calibrate a scaling relation between the weak lensing mass and X-ray spectroscopic temperature for 10 galaxy groups in the COSMOS field, combined with 55 higher-mass clusters from the literature. The COSMOS data includes Hubble Space Telescope imaging and redshift measurements of 46 source galaxies per arcminute{sup 2}, enabling us to perform unique weak lensing measurements of low-mass systems. Our sample extends the mass range of the lensing calibrated M-T relation an order of magnitude lower than any previous study, resulting in a power-law slope of 1.48{sub −0.09}{sup +0.13}. The slope is consistent with the self-similar model, predictions from simulations, and observations of clusters. However, X-ray observations relying on mass measurements derived under the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium have indicated that masses at group scales are lower than expected. Both simulations and observations suggest that hydrostatic mass measurements can be biased low. Our external weak lensing masses provide the first observational support for hydrostatic mass bias at group level, showing an increasing bias with decreasing temperature and reaching a level of 30%-50% at 1 keV.

  8. The redshift-space neighborhoods of 36 loose groups of galaxies. 1: The data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramella, Massimo; Geller, Margaret J.; Hurchra, John P.; Thorstensen, John R.

    1995-01-01

    We have selected 36 loose groups of galaxies (RGH89) with at least five members, and with mean redshift average value of CZ is greater than 3200 km/s. These groups all lie within the first two slices of the CfA redshift survey 8(sup h) less than or equal to alpha less than or equal to 17(sup h) and 26.5 deg less than or equal to delta less than or equal to 38.5 deg). For each of these groups, we define the redshift-space neighborhood as a region centered on the group coordinates and delimited by a circle of projected radius R(sub cir) = 1.5/h Mpc on the sky, and by a velocity interval delta (sub cz) = 3000 km/s. Here we give the redshifts of 334 galaxies in these redshift-space neighborhoods. For completeness, we also give the redshifts of the 232 original members. These data include 199 new redshifts. We demonstrate that these samples of fainter galaxies significantly increase the number of members.

  9. THE STELLAR-TO-HALO MASS RELATION OF LOCAL GALAXIES SEGREGATES BY COLOR

    SciTech Connect

    Rodríguez-Puebla, Aldo; Yang, Xiaohu; Foucaud, Sebastien; Jing, Y. P.; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Drory, Niv

    2015-02-01

    By means of a statistical approach that combines different semi-empirical methods of galaxy-halo connection, we derive the stellar-to-halo mass relations (SHMR) of local blue and red central galaxies. We also constrain the fraction of halos hosting blue/red central galaxies and the occupation statistics of blue and red satellites as a function of halo mass, M {sub h}. For the observational input we use the blue and red central/satellite galaxy stellar mass functions and two-point correlation functions in the stellar mass range of 9 < log(M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) <12. We find that: (1) the SHMR of central galaxies is segregated by color, with blue centrals having a SHMR above that of red centrals; at log(M {sub h}/M {sub ☉}) ∼12, the M {sub *}-to-M {sub h} ratio of the blue centrals is ≈0.05, which is ∼1.7 times larger than the value of red centrals. (2) The constrained scatters around the SHMRs of red and blue centrals are ≈0.14 and ≈0.11 dex, respectively. The scatter of the average SHMR of all central galaxies changes from ∼0.20 dex to ∼0.14 dex in the 11.3 < log(M {sub h}/M {sub ☉}) <15 range. (3) The fraction of halos hosting blue centrals at M{sub h}=10{sup 11} M {sub ☉} is 87%, but at 2 × 10{sup 12} M {sub ☉} decays to ∼20%, approaching a few percent at higher masses. The characteristic mass at which this fraction is the same for blue and red galaxies is M{sub h}≈7×10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}. Our results suggest that the SHMR of central galaxies at large masses is shaped by mass quenching. At low masses processes that delay star formation without invoking too strong supernova-driven outflows could explain the high M {sub *}-to-M {sub h} ratios of blue centrals as compared to those of the scarce red centrals.

  10. EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES AT z = 1.3. I. THE LYNX SUPERCLUSTER: CLUSTER AND GROUPS AT z = 1.3. MORPHOLOGY AND COLOR-MAGNITUDE RELATION

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Simona; Raichoor, Anand; Huertas-Company, Marc; Adam Stanford, S.; Rettura, Alessandro; Jee, Myungkook J.; Holden, Brad P.; Illingworth, Garth D.; Nakata, Fumiaki; Kodama, Tadayuki; Finoguenov, Alexis; Ford, Holland C.; Rosati, Piero; Tanaka, Masayuki; Koyama, Yusei; Shankar, Francesco; Carrasco, Eleazar R.; Demarco, Ricardo; Eisenhardt, Peter; and others

    2012-08-01

    We confirm the detection of three groups in the Lynx supercluster, at z Almost-Equal-To 1.3, through spectroscopic follow-up and X-ray imaging, and we give estimates for their redshifts and masses. We study the properties of the group galaxies compared to the two central clusters, RX J0849+4452 and RX J0848+4453. Using spectroscopic follow-up and multi-wavelength photometric redshifts, we select 89 galaxies in the clusters, of which 41 are spectroscopically confirmed, and 74 galaxies in the groups, of which 25 are spectroscopically confirmed. We morphologically classify galaxies by visual inspection, noting that our early-type galaxy (ETG) sample would have been contaminated at the 30%-40% level by simple automated classification methods (e.g., based on Sersic index). In luminosity-selected samples, both clusters and groups show high fractions of bulge-dominated galaxies with a diffuse component that we visually identified as a disk and which we classified as bulge-dominated spirals, e.g., Sas. The ETG fractions never rise above Almost-Equal-To 50% in the clusters, which is low compared to the fractions observed in other massive clusters at z Almost-Equal-To 1. In the groups, ETG fractions never exceed Almost-Equal-To 25%. However, overall bulge-dominated galaxy fractions (ETG plus Sas) are similar to those observed for ETGs in clusters at z {approx} 1. Bulge-dominated galaxies visually classified as spirals might also be ETGs with tidal features or merger remnants. They are mainly red and passive, and span a large range in luminosity. Their star formation seems to have been quenched before experiencing a morphological transformation. Because their fraction is smaller at lower redshifts, they might be the spiral population that evolves into ETGs. For mass-selected samples of galaxies with masses M > 10{sup 10.6} M{sub Sun} within {Sigma} > 500 Mpc{sup -2}, the ETG and overall bulge-dominated galaxy fractions show no significant evolution with respect to local

  11. Elementary equivalence of Chevalley groups over local rings

    SciTech Connect

    Bunina, Elena I

    2010-05-11

    It is proved that (elementary) Chevalley groups over local rings with invertible 2 are elementarily equivalent if and only if their types and weight lattices coincide and the initial rings are elementarily equivalent. Bibliography: 25 titles.

  12. A Compact Group of Galaxies at z = 2.48 Hosting an AGN-driven Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Hsin-Yi; Stockton, Alan

    2015-12-01

    We present observations of a remarkable compact group of galaxies at z = 2.48. Four galaxies, all within 40 kpc of each other, surround a powerful high-redshift radio source. This group comprises two compact red passive galaxies and a pair of merging galaxies. One of the red galaxies, with an apparent stellar mass of 3.6 × 1011M⊙ and an effective radius of 470 pc, is one of the most extreme examples of a massive quiescent compact galaxy found so far. One of the pair of merging galaxies hosts the active galactic nucleus (AGN) producing the large powerful radio structure. The merger is massive and enriched, consistent with the mass-metallicity relation expected at this redshift. Close to the merging nuclei, the emission lines exhibit broad and asymmetric profiles that suggest outflows powered either by a very young expanding radio jet or by AGN radiation. At ≳50 kpc from the system, we found a fainter extended-emission region that may be a part of a radio-jet-driven outflow. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation. The work is also based, in part, on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, and on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil), and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).

  13. Broad Hβ Emission-line Variability in a Sample of 102 Local Active Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runco, Jordan N.; Cosens, Maren; Bennert, Vardha N.; Scott, Bryan; Komossa, S.; Malkan, Matthew A.; Lazarova, Mariana S.; Auger, Matthew W.; Treu, Tommaso; Park, Daeseong

    2016-04-01

    A sample of 102 local (0.02 ≤ z ≤ 0.1) Seyfert galaxies with black hole masses MBH > 107M⊙ was selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and observed using the Keck 10 m telescope to study the scaling relations between MBH and host galaxy properties. We study profile changes of the broad Hβ emission line within the three to nine year time frame between the two sets of spectra. The variability of the broad Hβ emission line is of particular interest, not only because it is used to estimate MBH, but also because its strength and width are used to classify Seyfert galaxies into different types. At least some form of broad-line variability (in either width or flux) is observed in the majority (∼66%) of the objects, resulting in a Seyfert-type change for ∼38% of the objects, likely driven by variable accretion and/or obscuration. The broad Hβ line virtually disappears in 3/102 (∼3%) extreme cases. We discuss potential causes for these changing look active galactic nuclei. While similar dramatic transitions have previously been reported in the literature, either on a case-by-case basis or in larger samples focusing on quasars at higher redshifts, our study provides statistical information on the frequency of Hβ line variability in a sample of low-redshift Seyfert galaxies.

  14. Properties of galaxy groups in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey - II. Active galactic nucleus feedback and star formation truncation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinmann, Simone M.; van den Bosch, Frank C.; Yang, Xiaohu; Mo, H. J.; Croton, Darren J.; Moore, Ben

    2006-11-01

    Successfully reproducing the galaxy luminosity function (LF) and the bimodality in the galaxy distribution requires a mechanism that can truncate star formation in massive haloes. Current models of galaxy formation consider two such truncation mechanisms: strangulation, which acts on satellite galaxies, and active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback, which predominantly affects central galaxies. The efficiencies of these processes set the blue fraction of galaxies, fblue(L, M), as a function of galaxy luminosity, L, and halo mass, M. In this paper, we use a galaxy group catalogue extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to determine fblue(L, M). To demonstrate the potential power of these data as a benchmark for galaxy formation models, we compare the results to the semi-analytical model for galaxy formation of Croton et al. Although this model accurately fits the global statistics of the galaxy population, as well as the shape of the conditional LF, there are significant discrepancies when the blue fraction of galaxies as a function of mass and luminosity is compared between the observations and the model. In particular, the model predicts (i) too many faint satellites in massive haloes, (ii) a blue fraction of satellites that is much too low, and (iii) a blue fraction of centrals that is too high and with an inverted luminosity dependence. In the same order, we argue that these discrepancies owe to (i) the neglect of tidal stripping in the semi-analytical model, (ii) the oversimplified treatment of strangulation, and (iii) improper modelling of dust extinction and/or AGN feedback. The data presented here will prove useful to test and calibrate future models of galaxy formation and, in particular, to discriminate between various models for AGN feedback and other star formation truncation mechanisms.

  15. Redshift-Space Distortions and f(z) from Group-Galaxy Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, F. G.; de la Torre, S.; Guzzo, L.; Bianchi, D.; Peacock, J. A.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the accuracy achievable on measurements of the the growth rate of structure f(z) using redshift-space distortions (RSD), when (a) these are measured on the group-galaxy cross correlation function; (b) the latter is expanded over a modified version of the conventional spherical armonics, ``truncated multipole moments''. Simulation results give first indications that this combination can push systematic errors on f(z) below 3%, using scales r >= 10h -1 Mpc.

  16. The structure of locally bounded finite-dimensional representations of connected locally compact groups

    SciTech Connect

    Shtern, A. I.

    2014-04-30

    An analogue of a Lie theorem is obtained for (not necessarily continuous) finite-dimensional representations of soluble finite-dimensional locally compact groups with connected quotient group by the centre. As a corollary, the following automatic continuity proposition is obtained for locally bounded finite-dimensional representations of connected locally compact groups: if G is a connected locally compact group, N is a compact normal subgroup of G such that the quotient group G/N is a Lie group, N{sub 0} is the connected identity component in N, H is the family of elements of G commuting with every element of N{sub 0}, and π is a (not necessarily continuous) locally bounded finite-dimensional representation of G, then π is continuous on the commutator subgroup of H (in the intrinsic topology of the smallest analytic subgroup of G containing this commutator subgroup). Bibliography: 23 titles. (paper)

  17. Exploring the Dependence of Galaxy Properties on Group Halo Environment in RESOLVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Ashley; Berlind, A. A.; Kannappan, S.; Moffett, A. J.; RESOLVE Team

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the development of a new halo mass metric based on group dynamics for the RESOLVE survey as well as its application to understanding the dependence of galaxy properties on environment. Methods and parameters for group finding and calculating dynamical mass are optimized on a mock catalog with similar redshift range to RESOLVE. We also develop additional metrics of the evolutionary state of the group. These methods are applied to a sample of galaxies in the B-semester footprint of the RESOLVE survey, which overlaps with SDSS Stripe 82, as well as the ECO catalog, a larger volume-limited survey that encloses the A-semester footprint of RESOLVE. Using both dynamical halo mass and halo evolutionary state to quantify environment, we study its influence on galaxy properties such as color, gas content, and star formation history. We acknowledge REU funding support to Vanderbilt under NSF grant PHY-1263045 and to the RESOLVE survey at UNC Chapel Hill under AST-0955368.

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Galaxy groups in the VIMOS-VLT Deep Survey (Cucciati+, 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucciati, O.; Marinoni, C.; Iovino, A.; Bardelli, S.; Adami, C.; Mazure, A.; Scodeggio, M.; Maccagni, D.; Temporin, S.; Zucca, E.; de, Lucia G.; Blaizot, J.; Garilli, B.; Meneux, B.; Zamorani, G.; Le Fevre, O.; Cappi, A.; Guzzo, L.; Bottini, D.; Le Brun, V.; Tresse, L.; Vettolani, G.; Zanichelli, A.; Arnouts, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Charlot, S.; Ciliegi, P.; Contini, T.; Foucaud, S.; Franzetti, P.; Gavignaud, I.; Ilbert, O.; Lamareille, F.; McCracken, H. J.; Marano, B.; Merighi, R.; Paltani, S.; Pella, R.; Pollo, A.; Pozzetti, L.; Vergani, D.; Perez-Montero, E.

    2010-08-01

    We have compiled a homogeneous catalogue of optical galaxy groups identified in the VVDS-02h field (0.7x0.7deg2^) by means of the VDM algorithm, in the range 0.2<=z<=1.0. We give the coordinates (RA, DE and z) and a few properties (velocity dispersion, number of galaxy members) of the so-found groups. We also list the galaxies that belong to these groups (ID, RA, DE, z, quality of redshift measurement). (2 data files).

  19. Remnant group of local Lorentz transformations in f (T ) theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, Rafael; Fiorini, Franco

    2015-03-01

    It is shown that the extended teleparallel gravitational theories, known as f (T ) theories, inherit some on shell local Lorentz invariance associated with the tetrad field defining the spacetime structure. We discuss some enlightening examples, such as Minkowski spacetime and cosmological (Friedmann-Robertson-Walker and Bianchi type I) manifolds. In the first case, we show that the absence of gravity reveals itself as an incapability in the selection of a preferred parallelization at a local level, due to the fact that the infinitesimal local Lorentz subgroup acts as a symmetry group of the frame characterizing Minkowski spacetime. Finite transformations are also discussed in these examples and, contrary to the common lore on the subject, we conclude that the set of tetrads responsible for the parallelization of these manifolds is quite vast and that the remnant group of local Lorentz transformations includes one- and two-dimensional Abelian subgroups of the Lorentz group.

  20. Revisiting the Lyman Continuum Escape Crisis: Predictions for z > 6 from Local Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faisst, Andreas L.

    2016-10-01

    The intrinsic escape fraction of ionizing Lyman continuum photons ({f}{{esc}}) is crucial to understanding whether galaxies are capable of reionizing the neutral hydrogen in the early universe at z > 6. Unfortunately, it is not possible to access {f}{{esc}} at z > 4 with direct observations, and the handful of measurements from low-redshift galaxies consistently find {f}{{esc}} < 10%, while at least {f}{{esc}} ˜ 10% is necessary for galaxies to dominate reionization. Here, we present the first empirical prediction of {f}{{esc}} at z > 6 by combining the (sparsely populated) relation between [{{O}} {{III}}]/[{{O}} {{II}}] and {f}{{esc}} with the redshift evolution of [{{O}} {{III}}]/[{{O}} {{II}}] as predicted from local high-z analogs selected by their Hα equivalent width. We find {f}{{esc}}={5.7}-3.3+8.3 % at z = 6 and {f}{{esc}}={10.4}-6.3+15.5 % at z = 9 for galaxies with {log}(M/{M}⊙ )˜ 9.0 (errors given as 1σ). However, there is a negative correlation with stellar mass and we find up to 50% larger {f}{{esc}} per 0.5 dex decrease in stellar mass. The population-averaged escape fraction increases according to {f}{{esc}}={f}{{esc,0}}{((1+z)/3)}α , with f esc,0 = (2.3 ± 0.05)% and α = 1.17 ± 0.02 at z > 2 for {log}(M/{M}⊙ )˜ 9.0. With our empirical prediction of {f}{{esc}} (thus fixing an important, previously unknown variable) and further reasonable assumptions on clumping factor and the production efficiency of Lyman continuum photons, we conclude that the average population of galaxies is just capable of reionizing the universe by z ˜ 6.

  1. Investigating the presence of 500 μm submillimeter excess emission in local star forming galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, Allison; Calzetti, Daniela; Galametz, Maud; Kennicutt, Rob Jr.; Dale, Daniel; Aniano, Gonzalo; Sandstrom, Karin; Walter, Fabian; Armus, Lee; Crocker, Alison; Hinz, Joannah; Hunt, Leslie; Koda, Jin

    2013-11-20

    Submillimeter excess emission has been reported at 500 μm in a handful of local galaxies, and previous studies suggest that it could be correlated with metal abundance. We investigate the presence of an excess submillimeter emission at 500 μm for a sample of 20 galaxies from the Key Insights on Nearby Galaxies: a Far Infrared Survey with Herschel (KINGFISH) that span a range of morphologies and metallicities (12 + log (O/H) = 7.8-8.7). We probe the far-infrared (IR) emission using images from the Spitzer Space Telescope and Herschel Space Observatory in the wavelength range 24-500 μm. We model the far-IR peak of the dust emission with a two-temperature modified blackbody and measure excess of the 500 μm photometry relative to that predicted by our model. We compare the submillimeter excess, where present, with global galaxy metallicity and, where available, resolved metallicity measurements. We do not find any correlation between the 500 μm excess and metallicity. A few individual sources do show excess (10%-20%) at 500 μm; conversely, for other sources, the model overpredicts the measured 500 μm flux density by as much as 20%, creating a 500 μm 'deficit'. None of our sources has an excess larger than the calculated 1σ uncertainty, leading us to conclude that there is no substantial excess at submillimeter wavelengths at or shorter than 500 μm in our sample. Our results differ from previous studies detecting 500 μm excess in KINGFISH galaxies largely due to new, improved photometry used in this study.

  2. J-PLUS and the galaxy star formation rate in the local universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilella, G.; Viironen, K.; López-Sanjuan, C.; Varela, J.; Cenarro, A. J.; J-PAS Team

    2015-05-01

    The Javalambre Physics of the Local Universe Survey (J-PLUS) is a large photometric survey that will cover ˜8000 deg^2 with a set of 5 broad filters (SDSS filter set) and 7 narrow ones. It will be carried out from the Observatorio Astrofísico de Javalambre (OAJ) at the Pico del Buitre, Teruel, Spain. In addition to its main goal, which is the photometric calibration of the J-PAS survey, it has been designed to acquire the Hα flux of the galaxies in the nearby Universe (z≤0.015) up to r˜23 (AB). In this poster we present a first approach to the methodology that will be used to obtain Hα fluxes from photometric data. We first explain different methodologies to recover this flux. To test these methodologies, we simulate observations of real star forming galaxies from SDSS spectra. We show that using the information of one or two broad filters and a narrow one would bias our results. To cope with that, we fit the whole observed spectral energy distribution to a simple stellar population template and isolate the excess of flux inside the Hα filter. This allows us to recover the desired flux with accuracy and without biases. With this information, the J-PLUS survey will allow us to reproduce the Hα luminosity function and derive the star formation rate of thousands of galaxies in the local universe.

  3. THE SPACE DENSITY OF EXTENDED ULTRAVIOLET (XUV) DISKS IN THE LOCAL UNIVERSE AND IMPLICATIONS FOR GAS ACCRETION ONTO GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Lemonias, Jenna J.; Schiminovich, David; Thilker, David; Bianchi, Luciana; Wyder, Ted K.; Martin, D. Christopher; Seibert, Mark; Madore, Barry F.; Treyer, Marie A.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Rich, R. Michael

    2011-06-01

    We present results of the first unbiased search for extended ultraviolet (XUV)-disk galaxies undertaken to determine the space density of such galaxies. Our sample contains 561 local (0.001 < z < 0.05) galaxies that lie in the intersection of available Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) deep imaging (exposure time >1.5 x 10{sup 4} s) and Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 footprints. We explore modifications to the standard classification scheme for our sample that includes both disk- and bulge-dominated galaxies. Visual classification of each galaxy in the sample reveals an XUV-disk frequency of up to 20% for the most nearby portion of our sample. On average over the entire sample (out to z = 0.05) the frequency ranges from a hard limit of 4%-14%. The GALEX imaging allows us to detect XUV disks beyond 100 Mpc. The XUV regions around XUV-disk galaxies are consistently bluer than the main bodies. We find a surprisingly high frequency of XUV emission around luminous red (NUV-r > 5) and green valley (3 < NUV-r < 5) galaxies. The XUV-disk space density in the local universe is >(1.5-4.2) x 10{sup -3} Mpc{sup -3}. Using the XUV emission as an indicator of recent gas accretion, we estimate that the cold gas accretion rate onto these galaxies is >(1.7-4.6) x 10{sup -3} M{sub sun} Mpc{sup -3} yr{sup -1}. The number of XUV disks in the green valley and the estimated accretion rate onto such galaxies points to the intriguing possibility that 7%-18% of galaxies in this population are transitioning away from the red sequence.

  4. Halpha Emission Line Stars in M31, M33 and Seven Local Group Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeill, Reagin T.; Massey, P.; Olsen, K. A.; Hodge, P. W.; Jacoby, G. H.; Blaha, C.; Smith, R. C.; Holmes, S. B.

    2006-12-01

    While there are many ideas as to how differing galactic environments affect the formation and evolution of massive stars, the numbers of stars with known physical properties outside the Milky Way are too scarce to provide much insight. For instance, we have a very poor idea as to the actual number of Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs) in nearby galaxies, since these have mostly been found on the basis of strong photometric variability over a span of a few decades. But, we know that the Galactic LBVs P Cygni and Eta Car had their last major photometric upsets centuries ago. Were these stars located in a nearby galaxy, we might well be unaware of them. In order to help rectify this situation, we have used the recent UBVRI catalogs of M31 and M33 (Massey et al. 2006) and seven dwarf galaxies in the Local Group (Massey et al. 2007) in conjunction with data from narrowband filters centered on Halpha, [SII] and [OIII] to select Halpha emission sources with similar characteristics to the known LBVs. This search uncovered over 300 potential Halpha emission sources in M31 and M33, and 41 potential Halpha emission sources in the dwarf galaxies. Many of the most promising objects in M31 and M33 were observed spectroscopically at WIYN in September, revealing a wealth of new LBVs and Wolf-Rayet stars. In our poster we will outline our selection method and show some of the newly found emission-lined stars. Funding provided by the NSF through grant number AST-0453611.

  5. Evolution in the H I Gas Content of Galaxy Groups: Pre-processing and Mass Assembly in the Current Epoch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Kelley M.; Wilcots, Eric M.

    2013-11-01

    We present an analysis of the neutral hydrogen (H I) content and distribution of galaxies in groups as a function of their parent dark matter halo mass. The Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey α.40 data release allows us, for the first time, to study the H I properties of over 740 galaxy groups in the volume of sky common to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and ALFALFA surveys. We assigned ALFALFA H I detections a group membership based on an existing magnitude/volume-limited SDSS Data Release 7 group/cluster catalog. Additionally, we assigned group "proximity" membership to H I detected objects whose optical counterpart falls below the limiting optical magnitude—thereby not contributing substantially to the estimate of the group stellar mass, but significantly to the total group H I mass. We find that only 25% of the H I detected galaxies reside in groups or clusters, in contrast to approximately half of all optically detected galaxies. Further, we plot the relative positions of optical and H I detections in groups as a function of parent dark matter halo mass to reveal strong evidence that H I is being processed in galaxies as a result of the group environment: as optical membership increases, groups become increasingly deficient of H I rich galaxies at their center and the H I distribution of galaxies in the most massive groups starts to resemble the distribution observed in comparatively more extreme cluster environments. We find that the lowest H I mass objects lose their gas first as they are processed in the group environment, and it is evident that the infall of gas rich objects is important to the continuing growth of large scale structure at the present epoch, replenishing the neutral gas supply of groups. Finally, we compare our results to those of cosmological simulations and find that current models cannot simultaneously predict the H I selected halo occupation distribution for both low and high mass halos.

  6. Diffuse X-ray emission from the NGC 2300 group of galaxies - Implications for dark matter and galaxy evolution in small groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulchaey, John S.; Davis, David S.; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Burstein, David

    1993-01-01

    The discovery of diffuse X-ray emission from the NGC 2300 group of galaxies using the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter is reported. The gas distributions is roughly symmetric and extends to a radius of at least 0.2/h(50) Mpc. A Raymond-Smith hot plasma model provides an excellent fit the X-ray spectrum with a best-fit value temperature of 0.9 + -/15 or - 0.14 keV and abundance 0.06 + 0/.12 or - 0.05 solar. The assumption of gravitational confinement leads to a total mass of the group of 3.0 + 0.4 or - 0.5 x 10 exp 13 solar. Baryons can reasonably account for 4 percent of this mass, and errors could push this number not higher than 10-15 percent. This is one of the strongest pieces of evidence that dark matter dominates small groups such as this one. The intragroup medium in this system has the lowest metal abundance yet found in diffuse gas in a group or cluster.

  7. The Properties of Local Barred Disks in the Field and Dense Environments: Implications for Galaxy Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinova, I.; Jogee, S.; Barazza, F. D.; Heiderman, A.; Gray, M. E.; Barden, M.; Wolf, C.; Peng, C. Y.; Bacon, D.; Balogh, M.; Bell, E. F.; Böhm, A.; Caldwell, J. A. R.; Häußler, B.; Heymans, C.; Jahnke, K.; van Kampen, E.; Lane, K.; McIntosh, D. H.; Meisenheimer, K.; Sánchez, S. F.; Sommerville, R. S.; Taylor, A.; Wisotzki, L.; Zheng, X.

    2009-12-01

    Stellar bars are the most efficient internal drivers of disk evolution because they redistribute material and angular momentum within the galaxy and dark matter halo. Mounting evidence suggests that processes other than major mergers, such as minor mergers, secular processes driven by bars, and clump coalescence, as well as smooth accretion, play an important role in galaxy evolution since z = 2. As a key step toward characterizing this evolution and constraining theoretical models, we determine the frequency and properties of bars in the local Universe in both field and cluster environment, based on three of our studies: Marinova & Jogee (2007), Barazza, Jogee, & Marinova (2008) and Marinova et al. (2009). Among field spirals of intermediate Hubble types in the OSU survey, we find using ellipse fitting that the bar fraction is 44% in the optical and 60% in the NIR, giving an extinction correction factor of approximately 1.4 at z ˜ 0. Using data from the Abell 901/902 cluster system at z ˜ 0.165 from the HST ACS survey STAGES, we find that the optical bar fraction is a strong trend of both absolute magnitude and host bulge-to-total ratio, increasing for galaxies that are brighter and/or more disk-dominated. The latter trend is also found in the field from SDSS. For bright early types and faint late types the optical bar fraction in the cluster is similar to that in the field. We find that between the core region and the virial radii of the clusters the optical bar fraction is not a strong function of local environment density. We discuss the implications of our results in the context of theoretical models of the impact of bars on galaxy evolution.

  8. Alignments of the galaxies in and around the Virgo cluster with the local velocity shear

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jounghun; Rey, Soo Chang; Kim, Suk

    2014-08-10

    Observational evidence is presented for the alignment between the cosmic sheet and the principal axis of the velocity shear field at the position of the Virgo cluster. The galaxies in and around the Virgo cluster from the Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog that was recently constructed by Kim et al. are used to determine the direction of the local sheet. The peculiar velocity field reconstructed from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 is analyzed to estimate the local velocity shear tensor at the Virgo center. Showing first that the minor principal axis of the local velocity shear tensor is almost parallel to the direction of the line of sight, we detect a clear signal of alignment between the positions of the Virgo satellites and the intermediate principal axis of the local velocity shear projected onto the plane of the sky. Furthermore, the dwarf satellites are found to appear more strongly aligned than their normal counterparts, which is interpreted as an indication of the following. (1) The normal satellites and the dwarf satellites fall in the Virgo cluster preferentially along the local filament and the local sheet, respectively. (2) The local filament is aligned with the minor principal axis of the local velocity shear while the local sheet is parallel to the plane spanned by the minor and intermediate principal axes. Our result is consistent with the recent numerical claim that the velocity shear is a good tracer of the cosmic web.

  9. Sensitive 21cm Observations of Neutral Hydrogen in the Local Group near M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Spencer A.; Lockman, Felix J.; Pisano, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    Very sensitive 21 cm H i measurements have been made at several locations around the Local Group galaxy M31 using the Green Bank Telescope at an angular resolution of 9.‧1, with a 5σ detection level of NH i = 3.9 × 1017 cm-2 for a 30 km s-1 line. Most of the H i in a 12 square-degree area almost equidistant between M31 and M33 is contained in nine discrete clouds that have a typical size of a few kpc and a H i mass of 105M⊙. Their velocities in the Local Group Standard of Rest lie between -100 and +40 km s-1, comparable to the systemic velocities of M31 and M33. The clouds appear to be isolated kinematically and spatially from each other. The total H i mass of all nine clouds is 1.4 × 106M⊙ for an adopted distance of 800 kpc, with perhaps another 0.2 × 106M⊙ in smaller clouds or more diffuse emission. The H i mass of each cloud is typically three orders of magnitude less than the dynamical (virial) mass needed to bind the cloud gravitationally. Although they have the size and H i mass of dwarf galaxies, the clouds are unlikely to be part of the satellite system of the Local Group, as they lack stars. To the north of M31, sensitive H i measurements on a coarse grid find emission that may be associated with an extension of the M31 high-velocity cloud (HVC) population to projected distances of ˜100 kpc. An extension of the M31 HVC population at a similar distance to the southeast, toward M33, is not observed.

  10. Intragroup diffuse light in compact groups of galaxies - II. HCG 15, 35 and 51

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Rocha, C.; Ziegler, B. L.; Mendes de Oliveira, C.

    2008-08-01

    This continuing study of intragroup light in compact groups of galaxies aims to establish new constraints to models of formation and evolution of galaxy groups, specially of compact groups, which are a key part in the evolution of larger structures, such as clusters. In this paper we present three additional groups (HCG 15, 35 and 51) using deep wide-field B- and R-band images observed with the LAICA camera at the 3.5-m telescope at the Calar Alto observatory (CAHA). This instrument provides us with very stable flat-fielding, a mandatory condition for reliably measuring intragroup diffuse light. The images were analysed with the OV_WAV package, a wavelet technique that allows us to uncover the intragroup component in an unprecedented way. We have detected that 19, 15 and 26 per cent of the total light of HCG 15, 35 and 51, respectively, are in the diffuse component, with colours that are compatible with old stellar populations and with mean surface brightness that can be as low as 28.4 B mag arcsec-2. Dynamical masses, crossing times and mass-to-light ratios were recalculated using the new group parameters. Also tidal features were analysed using the wavelet technique.

  11. A comparative study of local galaxy clusters - I. Derived X-ray observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Bartlett, J. G.; Evrard, A.

    2014-02-01

    We examine systematic differences in the derived X-ray properties of galaxy clusters as reported by three different groups: Vikhlinin et al., Mantz et al. and Plank Collaboration. The sample overlap between any two pairs of works ranges between 16 to 28 galaxy clusters. We find systematic differences in most reported X-ray properties, including the total cluster mass, M500. The most extreme case is an average 45 ± 5 per cent difference in cluster mass between the Plank Collaboration and Mantz et al., for clusters at z > 0.13 (averaged over 16 clusters). These differences also induce differences in cluster observables defined within an R500 aperture. After accounting for aperture differences, we find very good agreement in gas mass estimates between the different groups. However, the soft-band X-ray luminosity, LX, core-excised spectroscopic temperature, TX, and gas thermal energy, YX = MgasTX display mean differences at the 5-15 per cent level. We also find that the low (z ≤ 0.13) and high (z ≥ 0.13) redshift galaxy cluster samples in Plank Collaboration appear to be systematically different: the YSZ/YX ratio for each of these two sub-samples is ln (YSZ/YX) = -0.06 ± 0.04 and ln (YSZ/YX) = 0.08 ± 0.04, respectively.

  12. Evidence for a ~300 Megaparsec Scale Under-density in the Local Galaxy Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, R. C.; Barger, A. J.; Cowie, L. L.

    2013-09-01

    Galaxy counts and recent measurements of the luminosity density in the near-infrared have indicated the possibility that the local universe may be under-dense on scales of several hundred megaparsecs. The presence of a large-scale under-density in the local universe could introduce significant biases into the interpretation of cosmological observables, and, in particular, into the inferred effects of dark energy on the expansion rate. Here we measure the K-band luminosity density as a function of redshift to test for such a local under-density. For our primary sample in this study, we select galaxies from the UKIDSS Large Area Survey and use spectroscopy from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), the Two-degree Field Galaxy Redshift Survey, the Galaxy And Mass Assembly Survey (GAMA), and other redshift surveys to generate a K-selected catalog of ~35, 000 galaxies that is ~95% spectroscopically complete at K AB < 16.3 (K AB < 17 in the GAMA fields). To complement this sample at low redshifts, we also analyze a K-selected sample from the 2M++ catalog, which combines Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) photometry with redshifts from the 2MASS redshift survey, the Six-degree Field Galaxy Redshift Survey, and the SDSS. The combination of these samples allows for a detailed measurement of the K-band luminosity density as a function of distance over the redshift range 0.01 < z < 0.2 (radial distances D ~ 50-800 h_{70}^{-1} Mpc). We find that the overall shape of the z = 0 rest-frame K-band luminosity function (M*-5log (h 70) = -22.15 ± 0.04 and α = -1.02 ± 0.03) appears to be relatively constant as a function of environment and distance from us. We find a local (z < 0.07, D < 300 h_{70}^{-1} Mpc) luminosity density that is in good agreement with previous studies. Beyond z ~ 0.07, we detect a rising luminosity density that reaches a value of roughly ~1.5 times higher than that measured locally at z > 0.1. This suggests that the stellar mass density as a function of

  13. EVIDENCE FOR A ∼300 MEGAPARSEC SCALE UNDER-DENSITY IN THE LOCAL GALAXY DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Keenan, R. C.; Barger, A. J.; Cowie, L. L.

    2013-09-20

    Galaxy counts and recent measurements of the luminosity density in the near-infrared have indicated the possibility that the local universe may be under-dense on scales of several hundred megaparsecs. The presence of a large-scale under-density in the local universe could introduce significant biases into the interpretation of cosmological observables, and, in particular, into the inferred effects of dark energy on the expansion rate. Here we measure the K-band luminosity density as a function of redshift to test for such a local under-density. For our primary sample in this study, we select galaxies from the UKIDSS Large Area Survey and use spectroscopy from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), the Two-degree Field Galaxy Redshift Survey, the Galaxy And Mass Assembly Survey (GAMA), and other redshift surveys to generate a K-selected catalog of ∼35, 000 galaxies that is ∼95% spectroscopically complete at K{sub AB} < 16.3 (K{sub AB} < 17 in the GAMA fields). To complement this sample at low redshifts, we also analyze a K-selected sample from the 2M++ catalog, which combines Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) photometry with redshifts from the 2MASS redshift survey, the Six-degree Field Galaxy Redshift Survey, and the SDSS. The combination of these samples allows for a detailed measurement of the K-band luminosity density as a function of distance over the redshift range 0.01 < z < 0.2 (radial distances D ∼ 50-800 h{sub 70}{sup -1} Mpc). We find that the overall shape of the z = 0 rest-frame K-band luminosity function (M*-5log (h{sub 70}) = –22.15 ± 0.04 and α = –1.02 ± 0.03) appears to be relatively constant as a function of environment and distance from us. We find a local (z < 0.07, D < 300 h{sub 70}{sup -1} Mpc) luminosity density that is in good agreement with previous studies. Beyond z ∼ 0.07, we detect a rising luminosity density that reaches a value of roughly ∼1.5 times higher than that measured locally at z > 0.1. This suggests that the

  14. Comparison of the properties of two fossil groups of galaxies with the normal group NGC 6034 based on multiband imaging and optical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adami, C.; Jouvel, S.; Guennou, L.; Le Brun, V.; Durret, F.; Clement, B.; Clerc, N.; Comerón, S.; Ilbert, O.; Lin, Y.; Russeil, D.; Seemann, U.

    2012-04-01

    Context. Fossil groups are dominated by a bright galaxy, and their luminosity functions show an absence within half the virial radius of galaxies brighter than the central galaxy magnitude +2. They are nevertheless massive with an extended X-ray halo. The formation and evolution of these structures is still widely debated. Aims: To better understand the origin of these structures, it is crucial to study their faint galaxy population, as well as their large-scale environment, to determine in particular whether they are isolated or not. Methods: We collected multiband imaging and spectroscopy for two fossil groups (RX J1119.7+2126 and 1RXS J235814.4+150524) and one normal group (associated with NGC 6034). We computed photometric redshifts in the central zones of each group, combining previous data with the SDSS five-band data. For each group we investigated the red sequence (RS) of the color-magnitude relation and computed the luminosity functions, stellar population ages and distributions of the group members. Spectroscopy allowed us to investigate the large-scale surroundings of these groups and the substructure levels in 1RXS J235814.4+150524 and NGC 6034. Results: The large-scale environment of 1RXS J235814.4+150524 is poor, though its galaxy density map shows a clear signature of the surrounding cosmic web. RX J1119.7+2126 appears to be very isolated, while the cosmic environment of NGC 6034 is very rich. At the group scale, 1RXS J235814.4+150524 shows no substructure. Galaxies with recent stellar populations seem preferentially located in the group outskirts. A red sequence is discernable for all three groups in a color-magnitude diagram. The luminosity functions based on photometric redshift selection and on statistical background subtraction have comparable shapes, and agree with the few points obtained from spectroscopic redshifts. These luminosity functions show the expected dip between first and second brightest galaxies for the fossil groups only. Their

  15. Metallicity inhomogeneities in local star-forming galaxies as a sign of recent metal-poor gas accretion

    SciTech Connect

    Sánchez Almeida, J.; Morales-Luis, A. B.; Muñoz-Tuñón, C.; Méndez-Abreu, J.; Elmegreen, D. M.; Elmegreen, B. G. E-mail: abml@iac.es E-mail: elmegreen@vassar.edu E-mail: jma20@st-andrews.ac.uk

    2014-03-01

    We measure the oxygen metallicity of the ionized gas along the major axis of seven dwarf star-forming galaxies. Two of them, SDSSJ1647+21 and SDSSJ2238+14, show ≅0.5 dex metallicity decrements in inner regions with enhanced star formation activity. This behavior is similar to the metallicity drop observed in a number of local tadpole galaxies by Sánchez Almeida et al., and was interpreted as showing early stages of assembling in disk galaxies, with the star formation sustained by external metal-poor gas accretion. The agreement with tadpoles has several implications. (1) It proves that galaxies other than the local tadpoles present the same unusual metallicity pattern. (2) Our metallicity inhomogeneities were inferred using the direct method, thus discarding systematic errors usually attributed to other methods. (3) Taken together with the tadpole data, our findings suggest a threshold around one-tenth the solar value for the metallicity drops to show up. Although galaxies with clear metallicity drops are rare, the physical mechanism responsible for them may sustain a significant part of the star formation activity in the local universe. We argue that the star formation dependence of the mass-metallicity relationship, as well as other general properties followed by most local disk galaxies, is naturally interpreted as side effects of pristine gas infall. Alternatives to the metal-poor gas accretion are examined as well.

  16. A new estimation of manganese distribution for local dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Men-Quan; Wang, Zhong-Xiang

    2016-09-01

    The distribution of abundance for iron-peak elements in dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) is important for galaxy evolution and supernova (SN) nucleosynthesis. Nowadays, manganese (Mn) is one of the most observed iron-peak elements in local dSphs. Studies of its distributions allow us to derive and understand the evolution history of these dSphs. We improve a phenomenological model by a two-curve model including a new initial condition, that includes detailed calculations of SN explosion rates and yields. We compare the results with the observed Mn distribution data for three dSphs: Fornax, Sculpture and Sextans. We find that the model can describe the observed Fe and Mn distributions well simultaneously for the three dSphs. The results also indicate that the initial conditions should be determined by the low metallicity samples in the beginning time of the galaxies and the previous assumption of metellicity-dependant Mn yield of SNIa is not needed when a wide mass range of core-collapse SNe is included. Our method is applicable to the chemical evolution of other iron-peak elements in dSphs and can be modified to provide more detailed processes for the evolution of dSphs.

  17. Ionized gas in the circumgalactic vicinity of the M81 galaxy group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Najm, M. N.; Polikarpova, O. L.; Shchekinov, Yu. A.

    2016-04-01

    The dynamics of the dust and gas in the tidal region of the M81 galaxy group have been analyzed, and the drift of the dust relative to the gas has been estimated, including the drift due to the action of radiation pressure from stars in M81. It is concluded that a large fraction of the gas in the tidal region is in the form of ionized hydrogen HII that shields the observedHI gas from the extragalactic Lyman continuum: the observed atomic gas could be only 10% of the total mass of gas. Only then it is possible to satisfactorily explain the excess dust abundance, which exceeds the Galactic value by a factor of six. By analogy, extended HI disks in galaxies with sizes appreciably larger than the stellar disks could be surrounded by HII envelopes with a comparable or greater mass. Such disks could play an important role in supporting prolonged star formation in galaxies with extended HI disks. Associated observational manifestations are discussed. Such HII envelopes outside HI disks could be detectable in absorption in Ly α and lines of ions of heavy elements.

  18. USING M DWARF SPECTRA TO MAP EXTINCTION IN THE LOCAL GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, David O.; West, Andrew A.; Foster, Jonathan B.

    2011-08-15

    We use spectra of more than 56,000 M dwarfs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to create a high-latitude extinction map of the local Galaxy. Our technique compares spectra from the stars in the SDSS Data Release 7 M dwarf sample in low-extinction lines of sight, as determined by Schlegel et al., to other SDSS M dwarf spectra in order to derive improved distance estimates and accurate line-of-sight extinctions. Unlike most previous studies, which have used a two-color method to determine extinction, we fit extinction curves to fluxes across the spectral range from 5700 to 9200 A for every star in our sample. Our result is an A{sub V} map that extends from a few tens of pc to approximately 2 kpc away from the Sun. We also use a similar technique to create a map of R{sub V} values within approximately 1 kpc of the Sun and find that they are consistent with the widely accepted diffuse interstellar medium value of 3.1. Using our extinction data, we derive a dust scale height for the local Galaxy of 119 {+-} 15 pc and find evidence for a local dust cavity.

  19. On the local and global stability of spiral galaxies in modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshan, M.

    2016-09-01

    We study the local and global stability of self-gravitating disks in the context of modified gravity (MOG). MOG is a covariant generalization of general relativity and developed as an alternative for dark matter particles. On the other hand the stability of spiral galaxies is directly linked to the dark matter problem. Thus it seems necessary to study the astrophysical consequences of MOG from gravitational stability point of view. More specifically, we review the generalized version of the Toomre's stability criterion and present the result of some idealized N-body simulation for the global stability of self-gravitating disks.

  20. GRB 080517: a local, low-luminosity gamma-ray burst in a dusty galaxy at z = 0.09

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanway, Elizabeth R.; Levan, Andrew J.; Tanvir, Nial; Wiersema, Klaas; van der Horst, Alexander; Mundell, Carole G.; Guidorzi, Cristiano

    2015-02-01

    We present an analysis of the photometry and spectroscopy of the host galaxy of Swift-detected GRB 080517. From our optical spectroscopy, we identify a redshift of z = 0.089 ± 0.003, based on strong emission lines, making this a rare example of a very local, low-luminosity, long gamma-ray burst. The galaxy is detected in the radio with a flux density of S4.5 GHz = 0.22 ± 0.04 mJy - one of relatively few known gamma-ray bursts hosts with a securely measured radio flux. Both optical emission lines and a strong detection at 22 μm suggest that the host galaxy is forming stars rapidly, with an inferred star formation rate ˜16 M⊙ yr-1 and a high dust obscuration (E(B - V) > 1, based on sightlines to the nebular emission regions). The presence of a companion galaxy within a projected distance of 25 kpc, and almost identical in redshift, suggests that star formation may have been triggered by galaxy-galaxy interaction. However, fitting of the remarkably flat spectral energy distribution from the ultraviolet through to the infrared suggests that an older, 500 Myr post-starburst stellar population is present along with the ongoing star formation. We conclude that the host galaxy of GRB 080517 is a valuable addition to the still very small sample of well-studied local gamma-ray burst hosts.

  1. The masses of satellites in GAMA galaxy groups from 100 square degrees of KiDS weak lensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sifón, Cristóbal; Cacciato, Marcello; Hoekstra, Henk; Brouwer, Margot; van Uitert, Edo; Viola, Massimo; Baldry, Ivan; Brough, Sarah; Brown, Michael J. I.; Choi, Ami; Driver, Simon P.; Erben, Thomas; Grado, Aniello; Heymans, Catherine; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Joachimi, Benjamin; de Jong, Jelte T. A.; Kuijken, Konrad; McFarland, John; Miller, Lance; Nakajima, Reiko; Napolitano, Nicola; Norberg, Peder; Robotham, Aaron S. G.; Schneider, Peter; Kleijn, Gijs Verdoes

    2015-12-01

    We use the first 100 deg2 of overlap between the Kilo-Degree Survey and the Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey to determine the average galaxy halo mass of ˜10 000 spectroscopically confirmed satellite galaxies in massive (M > 1013 h-1 M⊙) galaxy groups. Separating the sample as a function of projected distance to the group centre, we jointly model the satellites and their host groups with Navarro-Frenk-White density profiles, fully accounting for the data covariance. The probed satellite galaxies in these groups have total masses log ≈ 11.7-12.2 consistent across group-centric distance within the errorbars. Given their typical stellar masses, log ˜ 10.5, such total masses imply stellar mass fractions of / ≈ 0.04 h-1. The average subhalo hosting these satellite galaxies has a mass Msub ˜ 0.015Mhost independent of host halo mass, in broad agreement with the expectations of structure formation in a Λ cold dark matter universe.

  2. 7 CFR 610.25 - Subcommittees and Local Working Groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Subcommittees and Local Working Groups. 610.25 Section 610.25 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONSERVATION OPERATIONS TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE State...

  3. Architecture Models and Data Flows in Local and Group Datawarehouses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogza, R. M.; Zaharie, Dorin; Avasilcai, Silvia; Bacali, Laura

    Architecture models and possible data flows for local and group datawarehouses are presented, together with some data processing models. The architecture models consists of several layers and the data flow between them. The choosen architecture of a datawarehouse depends on the data type and volumes from the source data, and inflences the analysis, data mining and reports done upon the data from DWH.

  4. H I Studies of the Sculptor Group Galaxies. V - NGC 253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puche, D.; Carignan, C.; van Gorkom, J. H.

    1995-07-01

    A VLA HI map was made of NGC 253. In this study, there is a continuum map (ngc0253.con), an HI data cube (ngc0253.cub), and moment maps (ngc0253.m0 = total HI, ngc0253.m1 = velocity field, and ngc0253.m2 = second moment). These maps have been used in an extensive dynamical and kinematical study of the Sculptor Group galaxies. The images and related TeX file come from the NRAO CDROM "Images From the Radio Universe" (c. 1992 National Radio Astronomy Observatory, used with permission).

  5. H I Studies of the Sculptor Group Galaxies. II - NGC 7793

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carignan, C.; Puche, D.

    1995-08-01

    A VLA HI map was made of NGC 7793. In this study, there is a continuum map (ngc7793.con), an HI data cube (ngc7793.cub), and moment maps (ngc7793.m0 = total HI, ngc7793.m1 = velocity field, and ngc7793.m2 = second moment). These maps have been used in an extensive dynamical and kinematical study of the Sculptor Group galaxies. The images and related TeX file come from the NRAO CDROM "Images From the Radio Universe" (c. 1992 National Radio Astronomy Observatory, used with permission).

  6. H I Studies of the Sculptor Group Galaxies. IV - NGC 247

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carignan, C.; Puche, D.

    1995-07-01

    A VLA HI map was made of NGC 247. In this study, there is a continuum map (ngc0247.con), an HI data cube (ngc0247.cub), and moment maps (ngc0247.m0 = total HI, ngc0247.m1 = velocity field, and ngc0247.m2 = second moment). These maps have been used in an extensive dynamical and kinematical study of the Sculptor Group galaxies. The images and related TeX file come from the NRAO CDROM "Images From the Radio Universe" (c. 1992 National Radio Astronomy Observatory, used with permission).

  7. H I Studies of the Sculptor Group Galaxies. VI - NGC 300

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puche, D.; Carignan, C.; Bosma, A.

    1995-07-01

    A VLA HI map was made of NGC 300. In this study, there is a continuum map (ngc0300.con), an HI data cube (ngc0300.cub), and moment maps (ngc0300.m0 = total HI, ngc0300.m1 = velocity field, and ngc0300.m2 = second moment). These maps have been used in an extensive dynamical and kinematical study of the Sculptor Group galaxies. The images and related TeX file come from the NRAO CDROM "Images From the Radio Universe" (c. 1992 National Radio Astronomy Observatory, used with permission).

  8. H I Studies of the Sculptor Group Galaxies. III - NGC 55

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puche, Daniel; Carignan, Claude; Wainscoat, Richard J.

    1995-07-01

    A VLA HI map was made of NGC 55. In this study, there is a continuum map (ngc0055.con), an HI data cube (ngc0055.cub), and moment maps (ngc0055.m0 = total HI, ngc0055.m1 = velocity field, and ngc0055.m2 = second moment). These maps have been used in an extensive dynamical and kinematical study of the Sculptor Group galaxies. The images and related TeX file come from the NRAO CDROM "Images From the Radio Universe" (c. 1992 National Radio Astronomy Observatory, used with permission).

  9. It takes a supercluster to raise a galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lietzen, Heidi; Einasto, Maret

    2016-10-01

    The properties of galaxies depend on their environment: red, passive elliptical galaxies are usually located in denser environments than blue, star-forming spiral galaxies. This difference in galaxy populations can be detected at all scales from groups of galaxies to superclusters. In this paper, we will discuss the effect of the large-scale environment on galaxies. Our results suggest that galaxies in superclusters are more likely to be passive than galaxies in voids even when they belong to groups with the same richness. In addition, the galaxies in superclusters are also affected by the morphology of the supercluster: filament-type superclusters contain relatively more red, passive galaxies than spider-type superclusters. These results suggest that the evolution of a galaxy is not determined by its local environment alone, but the large-scale environment also affects.

  10. Mass-to-Light-Ratios of the galaxy clusters and groups observed with Suzaku

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, T.; Matsushita, K.; Sato, K.; Abe, Y.; Akamatsu, H.; Fujita, Y.; Kanno, Y.; Simionescu, A.; Tamura, T.; Werner, N.

    2016-06-01

    We analyzed 15 nearby (z < 0.06 ) clusters and groups observed with Suzaku out to ˜ 2 r_{500}. We derived Fe abundance profiles in the ICM, electron density, cumulative gas mass and Fe mass. We also collected K-band luminosities of galaxies and calculated the ratio of the cumulative gas mass and Fe mass in the ICM to the K-band luminosity (gas-mass-to-light ratio and iron-mass-to-light ratio, respectively). The Coma, Perseus, and medium systems have relatively flat radial profiles of the metal abundances at 0.3 solar within 0.5-1 r_{500}, and ˜ 0.2 solar beyond r_{500}. The gas-mass-to-light-ratios and iron-mass-to-light-ratios ratios increase with radius out to r_{500} and become flatter beyond the radius. The weighted average of the iron-mass-to-light ratios of the clusters at 1.6 r_{500} agrees with the expectation with the Salpeter initial-mass-function of stars, and we do not need a top-heavy slope. In contrast, groups and poor clusters have lower gas-mass-to-light ratios and lower iron-mass-to-light ratios than that of rich systems, with the higher entropy excess. Above these results, we discuss an early metal enrichment in galaxy clusters and groups.

  11. Local Luminous Infrared Galaxies. I. Spatially Resolved Observations with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira-Santaella, Miguel; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Rieke, George H.; Colina, Luis; Díaz-Santos, Tanio; Smith, J.-D. T.; Pérez-González, Pablo G.; Engelbracht, Charles W.

    2010-06-01

    We present results from the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph spectral mapping observations of 15 local luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs). In this paper, we investigate the spatial variations of the mid-IR emission which includes fine structure lines, molecular hydrogen lines, polycyclic aromatic features (PAHs), continuum emission, and the 9.7 μm silicate feature. We also compare the nuclear and integrated spectra. We find that the star formation takes place in extended regions (several kpc) as probed by the PAH emission, as well as the [Ne II]12.81 μm and [Ne III]15.56 μm emissions. The behavior of the integrated PAH emission and 9.7 μm silicate feature is similar to that of local starburst galaxies. We also find that the minima of the [Ne III]15.56 μm/[Ne II]12.81 μm ratio tends to be located at the nuclei and its value is lower than that of H II regions in our LIRGs and nearby galaxies. It is likely that increased densities in the nuclei of LIRGs are responsible for the smaller nuclear [Ne III]15.56 μm/[Ne II]12.81 μm ratios. This includes the possibility that some of the most massive stars in the nuclei are still embedded in ultracompact H II regions. In a large fraction of our sample, the 11.3 μm PAH emission appears more extended than the dust 5.5 μm continuum emission. We find a dependency of the 11.3 μm PAH/7.7 μm PAH and [Ne II]12.81 μm/11.3 μm PAH ratios with the age of the stellar populations. Smaller and larger ratios, respectively, indicate recent star formation. The estimated warm (300 K local starbursts, and Seyfert galaxies. Finally we find that the [Ne II]12.81 μm velocity fields for most of the LIRGs in our sample are compatible with a rotating disk at ~kpc scales, and they are in a good agreement with Hα velocity fields. This work is based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet

  12. OT1_nlu_1: Herschel Spectroscopic Survey of Warm Molecular Gas in Local Luminous Infrared Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, N.

    2010-07-01

    We propose to survey CO spectral line energy distribution (SLED), from J=4-3 up to J=13-12, on 93 local luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs; L_{IR} > 1.0E11 L_{sun}) with Herschel SPIRE FTS spectrometer. These galaxies, plus 32 additional LIRGs that will have similar data from existing Herschel programs (mainly the HerCULES project), form a flux-limited subset of the Great Observatories All-Sky LIRGs Survey (GOALS) sample. Our proposal is built on the legacy of GOALS and extends beyond the existing Herschel HerCULES program, which emphasizes more on ULIRGs, to a much needed sample coverage of the more numerous and diverse population of less luminous LIRGs. The data from the proposed observations will not only provide much needed local LIRG templates for future ALMA studies of high-redshift counterparts, but also lend us a powerful diagnostic tool to probe the warm and dense molecular gas that are more closely related to the starburst or AGN activity in the nuclei of LIRGs. The data from this proposal will provide important statistical clues to the interplay between the cold and warm molecular gas, IR luminosity, star formation rate and efficiency, and the diverse properties of LIRGs. Specifically, using the homogeneous CO SLED data from this proposal, together with ground-base, low-order CO line data (mainly J=1-0) and other data that have been compiled for the GOALS sample, we will address the following questions: (1) What is the dominant nuclear power source in individual sample galaxy: starburst or AGN? (2) What are the typical physical properties of warm molecular gas in the nuclei of LIRGs? (3) How do the nuclear warm gas components correlate to the cold gas component, star formation rate and efficiency, dust temperature, etc? and (4) How does molecular gas excitation change along a merger sequence?

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: GEEC2 spectroscopic survey of Galaxy groups (Balogh+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balogh, M. L.; McGee, S. L.; Mok, A.; Wilman, D. J.; Finoguenov, A.; Bower, R. G.; Mulchaey, J. S.; Parker, L. C.; Tanaka, M.

    2015-04-01

    GEEC2 is a spectroscopic survey of galaxies in 11 groups, one of which was serendipitously discovered in the background of the target, within the COSMOS field. The spectroscopy was obtained with GMOS-South over two semesters (2010A and 2011A). The original goal of the survey was to observe ~20 groups, with 3-4 spectroscopic masks each, to allow an investigation of the intrinsic scatter within group populations. However, repeated attempts to complete the programme have been thwarted by bad weather, scheduling conflicts at Gemini, and variance in ranking from semester to semester. Following the lack of any time awarded in 2012B, attempts to extend the sample have been abandoned for the moment. Details of the target selection and spectroscopic observations have been presented in Papers I-III. (4 data files).

  14. Radio continuum observations of local star-forming galaxies using the Caltech Continuum Backend on the green bank telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Rabidoux, Katie; Pisano, D. J.; Kepley, Amanda A.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Balser, Dana S.

    2014-01-01

    We observed radio continuum emission in 27 local (D < 70 Mpc) star-forming galaxies with the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope between 26 GHz and 40 GHz using the Caltech Continuum Backend. We obtained detections for 22 of these galaxies at all four sub-bands and four more marginal detections by taking the average flux across the entire bandwidth. This is the first detection (full or marginal) at these frequencies for 22 of these galaxies. We fit spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for all of the four sub-band detections. For 14 of the galaxies, SEDs were best fit by a combination of thermal free-free and nonthermal synchrotron components. Eight galaxies with four sub-band detections had steep spectra that were only fit by a single nonthermal component. Using these fits, we calculated supernova rates, total number of equivalent O stars, and star formation rates within each ∼23'' beam. For unresolved galaxies, these physical properties characterize the galaxies' recent star formation on a global scale. We confirm that the radio-far-infrared correlation holds for the unresolved galaxies' total 33 GHz flux regardless of their thermal fractions, though the scatter on this correlation is larger than that at 1.4 GHz. In addition, we found that for the unresolved galaxies, there is an inverse relationship between the ratio of 33 GHz flux to total far-infrared flux and the steepness of the galaxy's spectral index between 1.4 GHz and 33 GHz. This relationship could be an indicator of the timescale of the observed episode of star formation.

  15. Local SDSS galaxies in the Herschel Stripe 82 survey: a critical assessment of optically derived star formation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosario, D. J.; Mendel, J. T.; Ellison, S. L.; Lutz, D.; Trump, J. R.

    2016-04-01

    We study a set of 3319 galaxies in the redshift interval 0.04 < z < 0.15 with far-infrared (FIR) coverage from the Herschel Stripe 82 survey (HerS), and emission-line measurements, redshifts, stellar masses and star formation rates (SFRs) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) (DR7) MPA/JHU data base. About 40 per cent of the sample are detected in the Herschel/SPIRE 250 μm band. Total infrared (TIR) luminosities derived from HerS and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) photometry allow us to compare infrared and optical estimates of SFR with unprecedented statistics for diverse classes of galaxies. We find excellent agreement between TIR-derived and emission line-based SFRs for H II galaxies. Other classes, such as active galaxies and evolved galaxies, exhibit systematic discrepancies between optical and TIR SFRs. We demonstrate that these offsets are attributable primarily to survey biases and the large intrinsic uncertainties of the Dn4000- and colour-based optical calibrations used to estimate the SDSS SFRs of these galaxies. Using a classification scheme which expands upon popular emission-line methods, we demonstrate that emission-line galaxies with uncertain classifications include a population of massive, dusty, metal-rich star-forming systems that are frequently neglected in existing studies. We also study the capabilities of infrared selection of star-forming galaxies. FIR selection reveals a substantial population of galaxies dominated by cold dust which are missed by the long-wavelength WISE bands. Our results demonstrate that Herschel large-area surveys offer the means to construct large, relatively complete samples of local star-forming galaxies with accurate estimates of SFR that can be used to study the interplay between nuclear activity and star formation.

  16. Neutral Hydrogen in the Local Group and around the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Spencer A.

    Galaxies in our universe must acquire fresh gas to continue forming new stars. A likely source of this material may be the gas that resides between galaxies. We do not, however, have a clear understanding of the specifics, such as its distribution. The first claimed detection of this "cosmic web" of material directly in emission was published a decade ago using the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope in the Netherlands while surveying neutral hydrogen in the Local Group of galaxies. Later evidence, in the form of stellar surveys and test particle simulations, showed that a tidal origin of the gas was another possibility. More recent survey work of the Local Group, specifically between the galaxies M31 and M33, motivated us to map a section of the Westerbork emission using the Robert C . Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT). Our survey covers a 12 square degree area between M31 and M33, in which we reach 21 cm column density sensitivities of 1017.2 cm-2 after 400 hours of observations. These observations provide more than a factor of five better spatial resolution, and better than a factor of three in velocity resolution. Not only do we confirm the emission seen in the Westerbork data, we find that the hydrogen gas is composed of clouds a few kiloparsecs across, with properties suggesting they are a unique population to the Local Group. We conclude that the clouds are likely transient condensations from an intergalactic filament of gas, although a tidal feature cannot currently be ruled out. We also conducted GBT pointings to the northwest of M31 to search for the extended emission seen in the Westerbork data as well. What detections we find appear to be more related to the high velocity cloud population of M31. We are continuing to map other regions around M31 to search for more diffuse emission. We also present southern sky maps of the high velocity and intermediate velocity clouds around our own Milky Way, using 21 cm survey data from the Parkes telescope in

  17. Second launch of the Diffuse X-ray emission from the Local Galaxy (DXL) mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan Sapkota, Dhaka

    2016-04-01

    The Diffuse X-ray emission from the Local Galaxy (DXL) is a sounding rocket mission to study the Solar Wind Charge Exchange (SWCX) and Local Hot Bubble (LHB) X-ray emission. After a successful launch of December 2012, DXL’s capabilities were expanded by using two additional proportional counters and three unique filters for the launch of December 2015. Employing Be-, B- and C-based plastic filters, DXL mission re-scanned the Helium Focusing Cone for better spectral and positional information (to address the IBEX controversy). In this paper, we will review the upgraded mission hardware and performance, while sharing some preliminary results from the latest observation.Submitted for the DXL Collaboration

  18. A Dynamically Driven, Universal Thermal Profile of Galaxy Groups and Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, Ido; Keshet, Uri

    2015-09-01

    Large scale structures such as groups and clusters of galaxies show a universal, nearly linear entropy radial profile K(r). Using deprojected 16 clusters and 12 groups from the literature, we find that K\\propto {r}0.96+/- 0.01, consistent with the mean power-law index (0.9–1.1) of previous studies. A similarly good fit is given by a τ \\propto {r}0.72+/- 0.01 ratio between cooling and free-fall times. Both profiles slightly flatten at small radii, as τ becomes of order unity. The entropy profile is usually attributed to self-similar shock accretion (shown to be inconsistent with the data), to non-standard heat conduction, or to turbulent heating. We argue that a dynamical mechanism is needed to sustain such a universal profile, oblivious to the temperature peak at the edge of the core and to the virial shock at the outskirts, and robust to the presence of ongoing cooling, merger, and active galactic nucleus activity. In particular, we show that such a profile can be naturally obtained in a spiral flow, which is likely to underlie most galaxy aggregates according to the ubiquitous spiral patterns and cold fronts observed. Generalizing a two-phase spiral flow model out to the virial radius surprisingly reproduces the thermal profile. A generalized Schwarzschild criterion indicates that observed spiral patterns must involve a convective layer, which may regulate the thermal profile.

  19. AGN Feedback in Galaxy Groups: The Two Interesting Cases of AWM 4 and NGC 5044

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastaldello, Fabio; Buote, David A.; Brighenti, Fabrizio; Mathews, William G.; Temi, Pasquale; Ettori, Stefano

    2009-12-01

    We present AGN feedback in the interesting cases of two groups: AWM 4 and NGC 5044. AWM 4 is characterized by a combination of properties which seems to defy the paradigm for AGN heating in cluster cores: a flat inner temperature profile indicative of a past, major heating episode which completely erased the cool core, as testified by the high central cooling time (>3 Gyrs) and by the high central entropy level (~50 keV cm2), and yet an active central radio galaxy with extended radio lobes out to 100 kpc, revealing recent feeding of the central massive black hole. A recent Chandra observation has revealed the presence of a compact cool corona associated with the BCG, solving the puzzle of the apparent lack of low entropy gas surrounding a bright radio source, but opening the question of its origin. NGC 5044 shows in the inner 10 kpc a pair of cavities together with a set of bright filaments. The cavities are consistent with a recent AGN outburst as also indicated by the extent of dust and Hα emission even though the absence of extended 1.4 GHz emission remains to be explained. The soft X-ray filaments coincident with Hα and dust emission are cooler than those which do not correlate with optical and infrared emission, suggesting that dust-aided cooling can contribute to the overall cooling. For the first time sloshing cold fronts at the scale of a galaxy group have been observed in this object.

  20. Evidence for Black Hole Growth in Local Analogs to Lyman Break Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jia, Jianjun; Ptak, Andrew; Heckman, Timothy M.; Overzier, Roderik A.; Hornschemeier, Ann; LaMassa, Stephanie M.

    2011-01-01

    We have used XMM-Newton to observe six Lyman break analogs (LBAs): members of the rare population of local galaxies that have properties that are very similar to distant Lyman break galaxies. Our six targets were specifically selected because they have optical emission-line properties that are intermediate between starbursts and Type 2 (obscured) active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Our new X-ray data provide an important diagnostic of the presence of an AGN. We find X-ray luminosities of order 10(sup 42) erg per second and ratios of X-ray to far-IR lummositles that are higher than values in pure starburst galaxies by factors ranging from approximately 3 to 30. This strongly suggests the presence of an AGN in at least some of the galaxies. The ratios of the luminosities of the hard (2-10 keV) X-ray to [O III] emission line are low by about an order of magnitude compared with Type 1 AGN, but are consistent with the broad range seen in Type 2 AGN. Either the AGN hard X-rays are significantly obscured or the [O III] emission is dominated by the starburst. We searched for an iron emission line at approximately 6.4 ke V, which is a key feature of obscured AGNs, but only detected emission at the approximately 2sigma level. Finally, we find that the ratios of the mid-infrared (24 micrometer) continuum to [O III]lambda 5007 luminosities in these LBAs are higher than the values for Type 2 AGN by an average of 0.8 dex. Combining all these clues, we conclude that an AGN is likely to be present, but that the bolometric luminosity is produced primarily by an intense starburst. If these black holes are radiating at the Eddington limit, their masses would lie in the range of 10(sup 5) - 10(sup 6) solar mass. These objects may offer ideal local laboratories to investigate the processes by which black holes grew in the early universe.

  1. The APOSTLE project: Local Group kinematic mass constraints and simulation candidate selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattahi, Azadeh; Navarro, Julio F.; Sawala, Till; Frenk, Carlos S.; Oman, Kyle A.; Crain, Robert A.; Furlong, Michelle; Schaller, Matthieu; Schaye, Joop; Theuns, Tom; Jenkins, Adrian

    2016-03-01

    We use a large sample of isolated dark matter halo pairs drawn from cosmological N-body simulations to identify candidate systems whose kinematics match that of the Local Group (LG) of galaxies. We find, in agreement with the `timing argument' and earlier work, that the separation and approach velocity of the Milky Way (MW) and Andromeda (M31) galaxies favour a total mass for the pair of ˜5 × 1012 M⊙. A mass this large, however, is difficult to reconcile with the small relative tangential velocity of the pair, as well as with the small deceleration from the Hubble flow observed for the most distant LG members. Halo pairs that match these three criteria have average masses a factor of ˜2 times smaller than suggested by the timing argument, but with large dispersion. Guided by these results, we have selected 12 halo pairs with total mass in the range 1.6-3.6 × 1012 M⊙ for the APOSTLE project (A Project Of Simulating The Local Environment), a suite of hydrodynamical resimulations at various numerical resolution levels (reaching up to ˜104 M⊙ per gas particle) that use the subgrid physics developed for the EAGLE project. These simulations reproduce, by construction, the main kinematics of the MW-M31 pair, and produce satellite populations whose overall number, luminosities, and kinematics are in good agreement with observations of the MW and M31 companions. The APOSTLE candidate systems thus provide an excellent testbed to confront directly many of the predictions of the Λ cold dark matter cosmology with observations of our local Universe.

  2. The Influence of Local and Large-Scale Environment on Galaxy Gas Reservoirs in the RESOLVE Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, David V.; Kannappan, Sheila; Baker, Ashley; Berlind, Andreas A.; Burchett, Joseph; Eckert, Kathleen D.; Florez, Jonathan; Hall, Kirsten; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Gonzalez, Roberto; Guynn, David; Hoversten, Erik A.; Leroy, Adam K.; Moffett, Amanda J.; Pisano, Daniel J.; Watson, Linda C.; Wei, Lisa H.; Resolve Team

    2015-01-01

    There is growing evidence to suggest galaxy gas reservoirs have been replenished over time, but a clear picture of how this process depends on local and large-scale environment is still an active area of research. I will present an analysis of galaxy gas content with respect to environment using the ~90% complete 21cm census for the volume-limited RESOLVE survey, which yields an unbiased inventory of HI masses (or strong upper limits < 5-10% of the stellar mass) for ~1550 galaxies with baryonic mass greater than 109 M⊙ in >50,000 cubic Mpc of the z=0 universe. We quantify large-scale environment via identification of cosmic web filaments and walls using a modified friends-of-friends technique, while also using photometric redshifts to identify additional potential companions around each galaxy. Combining this powerful data set with estimates of HI profile asymmetries and star formation histories, we examine whether there are local or large-scale environments where cold gas accretion is more effective. Specifically, we investigate whether galaxy interactions can induce enhanced HI content. We also explore whether galaxies residing in large-scale filaments or walls, where simulations show large-scale gas flows, display signatures of enhanced gas accretion relative to other large-scale environments. This project is supported by NSF funding for the RESOLVE survey (AST-0955368), the GBT Student Observing Support program, and a UNC Royster Society of Fellows Dissertation Completion Fellowship.

  3. A comparison of the morphological properties between local and z ∼ 1 infrared luminous galaxies: Are local and high-z (U)LIRGs different?

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, Chao-Ling; Sanders, D. B.; Larson, Kirsten L.; Lee, Nicholas; Li, Yanxia; Lockhart, Kelly; Shih, Hsin-Yi; Barnes, Joshua E.; Casey, Caitlin M.; Koss, Michael; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S.; Smith, Howard A.

    2014-08-10

    Ultraluminous and luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs and LIRGs) are the most extreme star-forming galaxies in the universe and dominate the total star formation rate density at z > 1. In the local universe (z < 0.3), the majority of ULIRGs and a significant portion of LIRGs are triggered by interactions between gas-rich spiral galaxies, yet it is unclear if this is still the case at high z. To investigate the relative importance of galaxy interactions in infrared luminous galaxies, we carry out a comparison of optical morphological properties between local (U)LIRGs and (U)LIRGs at z = 0.5-1.5 based on the same sample selection, morphology classification scheme, and optical morphology at similar rest-frame wavelengths. In addition, we quantify the systematics in comparing local and high-z data sets by constructing a redshifted data set from local (U)LIRGs, in which its data quality mimics the high-z data set. Based on the Gini-M{sub 20} classification scheme, we find that the fraction of interacting systems decreases by ∼8% from local to z ≲ 1, and it is consistent with the reduction between local and redshifted data sets (6{sub −6}{sup +14}%). Based on visual classifications, the merger fraction of local ULIRGs is found to be ∼20% lower compared to published results, and the reduction due to redshifting is 15{sub −8}{sup +10}%. Consequently, the differences of merger fractions between local and z ≲ 1 (U)LIRGs is only ∼17%. These results demonstrate that there is no strong evolution in the fraction of (U)LIRGs classified as mergers at least out to z ∼ 1. At z > 1, the morphology types of ∼30% of (U)LIRGs cannot be determined due to their faintness in the F814W band; thus, the merger fraction measured at z > 1 suffers from large uncertainties.

  4. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): The absence of stellar mass segregation in galaxy groups and consistent predictions from GALFORM and EAGLE simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafle, P. R.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Lagos, C. del P.; Davies, L. J.; Moffett, A. J.; Driver, S. P.; Andrews, S. K.; Baldry, I. K.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Cortese, L.; Drinkwater, M. J.; Finnegan, R.; Hopkins, A. M.; Loveday, J.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the contentious issue of the presence, or lack thereof, of satellites mass segregation in galaxy groups using the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey, the GALFORM semi-analytic and the EAGLE cosmological hydrodynamical simulation catalogues of galaxy groups. We select groups with halo mass 12 ≤ log (Mhalo/h-1M⊙) < 14.5 and redshift z ≤ 0.32 and probe the radial distribution of stellar mass out to twice the group virial radius. All the samples are carefully constructed to be complete in stellar mass at each redshift range and efforts are made to regularise the analysis for all the data. Our study shows negligible mass segregation in galaxy group environments with absolute gradients of ≲ 0.08 dex and also shows a lack of any redshift evolution. Moreover, we find that our results at least for the GAMA data are robust to different halo mass and group centre estimates. Furthermore, the EAGLE data allows us to probe much fainter luminosities (r-band magnitude of 22) as well as investigate the three-dimensional spatial distribution with intrinsic halo properties, beyond what the current observational data can offer. In both cases we find that the fainter EAGLE data show a very mild spatial mass segregation at z ≤ 0.22, which is again not apparent at higher redshift. Interestingly, our results are in contrast to some earlier findings using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We investigate the source of the disagreement and suggest that subtle differences between the group finding algorithms could be the root cause.

  5. A Local Baseline of the Black Hole Mass Scaling Relations for Active Galaxies. III.The MBH– Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennert, Vardha N.; Treu, Tommaso; Auger, Matthew W.; Cosens, Maren; Park, Daeseong; Rosen, Rebecca; Harris, Chelsea E.; Malkan, Matthew A.; Woo, Jong-Hak

    2015-08-01

    We create a baseline of the black hole (BH) mass ({M}{BH})—stellar-velocity dispersion (σ) relation for active galaxies, using a sample of 66 local (0.02\\lt z\\lt 0.09) Seyfert-1 galaxies, selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Analysis of SDSS images yields AGN luminosities free of host-galaxy contamination, and morphological classification. 51/66 galaxies have spiral morphology. Out of these, 28 bulges have Sérsic index n\\lt 2 and are considered candidate pseudo-bulges, with eight being definite pseudo-bulges based on multiple classification criteria met. Only 4/66 galaxies show signs of interaction/merging. High signal-to-noise ratio Keck spectra provide the width of the broad Hβ emission line free of Fe ii emission and stellar absorption. AGN luminosity and Hβ line widths are used to estimate {M}{BH}. The Keck-based spatially resolved kinematics is used to determine stellar-velocity dispersion within the spheroid effective radius ({σ }{spat,{reff}}). We find that σ can vary on average by up to 40% across definitions commonly used in the literature, emphasizing the importance of using self-consistent definitions in comparisons and evolutionary studies. The {M}{BH}–σ relation for our Seyfert-1 galaxy sample has the same intercept and scatter as that of reverberation-mapped AGNs as well as that of quiescent galaxies, consistent with the hypothesis that our single epoch {M}{BH} estimator and sample selection function do not introduce significant biases. Barred galaxies, merging galaxies, and those hosting pseudo-bulges do not represent outliers in the {M}{BH}–σ relation. This is in contrast with previous work, although no firm conclusion can be drawn on this matter due to the small sample size and limited resolution of the SDSS images.

  6. STELLAR TIDAL STREAMS IN SPIRAL GALAXIES OF THE LOCAL VOLUME: A PILOT SURVEY WITH MODEST APERTURE TELESCOPES

    SciTech Connect

    MartInez-Delgado, David; Zibetti, Stefano; Rix, Hans-Walter; Gabany, R. Jay; Crawford, Ken; Majewski, Steven R.; McDavid, David A.; Fliri, Juergen; Carballo-Bello, Julio A.; Bardalez-Gagliuffi, Daniella C.; Trujillo, Ignacio; Penarrubia, Jorge; Chonis, Taylor S.; Madore, Barry; Schirmer, Mischa

    2010-10-15

    Within the hierarchical framework for galaxy formation, minor merging and tidal interactions are expected to shape all large galaxies to the present day. As a consequence, most seemingly normal disk galaxies should be surrounded by spatially extended stellar 'tidal features' of low surface brightness. As part of a pilot survey for such interaction signatures, we have carried out ultra deep, wide field imaging of eight isolated spiral galaxies in the Local Volume, with data taken at small (D = 0.1-0.5 m) robotic telescopes that provide exquisite surface brightness sensitivity ({mu}{sub lim}(V) {approx} 28.5 mag arcsec{sup -2}). This initial observational effort has led to the discovery of six previously undetected extensive (to {approx}30 kpc) stellar structures in the halos surrounding these galaxies, likely debris from tidally disrupted satellites. In addition, we confirm and clarify several enormous stellar over-densities previously reported in the literature, but never before interpreted as tidal streams. Even this pilot sample of galaxies exhibits strikingly diverse morphological characteristics of these extended stellar features: great circle-like features that resemble the Sagittarius stream surrounding the Milky Way, remote shells and giant clouds of presumed tidal debris far beyond the main stellar body, as well as jet-like features emerging from galactic disks. Together with presumed remains of already disrupted companions, our observations also capture surviving satellites caught in the act of tidal disruption. A qualitative comparison with available simulations set in a {Lambda}Cold Dark Matter cosmology (that model the stellar halo as the result of satellite disruption evolution) shows that the extraordinary variety of stellar morphologies detected in this pilot survey matches that seen in those simulations. The common existence of these tidal features around 'normal' disk galaxies and the morphological match to the simulations constitutes new evidence

  7. Hot versus cold: The dichotomy in spherical accretion of cooling flows onto supermassive black holes in elliptical galaxies, galaxy groups, and clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Fulai; Mathews, William G.

    2014-01-10

    Feedback heating from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) has been commonly invoked to suppress cooling flows predicted in hot gas in elliptical galaxies, galaxy groups, and clusters. Previous studies have focused on if and how AGN feedback heats the gas but have little paid attention to its triggering mechanism. Using spherically symmetric simulations, we investigate how large-scale cooling flows are accreted by central supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in eight well-observed systems and find an interesting dichotomy. In massive clusters, the gas develops a central cooling catastrophe within about the cooling time (typically ∼100-300 Myr), resulting in cold-mode accretion onto SMBHs. However, in our four simulated systems on group and galaxy scales at a low metallicity Z = 0.3 Z {sub ☉}, the gas quickly settles into a long-term state that has a cuspy central temperature profile extending to several tens to about 100 pc. At the more realistic solar metallicity, two groups (with R {sub e} ∼ 4 kpc) still host the long-term, hot-mode accretion. Both accretion modes naturally appear in our idealized calculations where only cooling, gas inflow, and compressional heating are considered. The long-term, hot-mode accretion is maintained by the quickly established closeness between the timescales of these processes, preferably in systems with low gas densities, low gas metallicities, and importantly, compact central galaxies, which result in strong gravitational acceleration and compressional heating at the intermediate radii. Our calculations predict that central cuspy temperature profiles appear more often in smaller systems than galaxy clusters, which instead often host significant cold gas and star formation.

  8. Weak Lensing Calibrated M-T Scaling Relation of Galaxy Groups in the COSMOS Fieldsstarf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettula, K.; Finoguenov, A.; Massey, R.; Rhodes, J.; Hoekstra, H.; Taylor, J. E.; Spinelli, P. F.; Tanaka, M.; Ilbert, O.; Capak, P.; McCracken, H. J.; Koekemoer, A.

    2013-11-01

    The scaling between X-ray observables and mass for galaxy clusters and groups is instrumental for cluster-based cosmology and an important probe for the thermodynamics of the intracluster gas. We calibrate a scaling relation between the weak lensing mass and X-ray spectroscopic temperature for 10 galaxy groups in the COSMOS field, combined with 55 higher-mass clusters from the literature. The COSMOS data includes Hubble Space Telescope imaging and redshift measurements of 46 source galaxies per arcminute2, enabling us to perform unique weak lensing measurements of low-mass systems. Our sample extends the mass range of the lensing calibrated M-T relation an order of magnitude lower than any previous study, resulting in a power-law slope of 1.48^{+0.13}_{-0.09}. The slope is consistent with the self-similar model, predictions from simulations, and observations of clusters. However, X-ray observations relying on mass measurements derived under the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium have indicated that masses at group scales are lower than expected. Both simulations and observations suggest that hydrostatic mass measurements can be biased low. Our external weak lensing masses provide the first observational support for hydrostatic mass bias at group level, showing an increasing bias with decreasing temperature and reaching a level of 30%-50% at 1 keV. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. Also based on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan; the XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States and NASA; the European Southern Observatory under Large Program 175.A-0839, Chile; Kitt Peak National Observatory, Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory, which

  9. Planck early results. XI. Calibration of the local galaxy cluster Sunyaev-Zeldovich scaling relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartelmann, M.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bhatia, R.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bourdin, H.; Brown, M. L.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Cabella, P.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Cayón, L.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Chiang, C.; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Churazov, E.; Clements, D. L.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colombi, S.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Dörl, U.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Fromenteau, S.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Harrison, D.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hovest, W.; Hoyland, R. J.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knox, L.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lanoux, J.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leach, S.; Leonardi, R.; Liddle, A.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; MacTavish, C. J.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mann, R.; Maris, M.; Marleau, F.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J.-B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, A.; Naselsky, P.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Pajot, F.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Piffaretti, R.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Schaefer, B. M.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, P.; Smoot, G. F.; Starck, J.-L.; Stivoli, F.; Stolyarov, V.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Torre, J.-P.; Tristram, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; White, S. D. M.; White, M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2011-12-01

    We present precise Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect measurements in the direction of 62 nearby galaxy clusters (z < 0.5) detected at high signal-to-noise in the first Planck all-sky data set. The sample spans approximately a decade in total mass, 2 × 1014 M⊙ < M500 < 2 × 1015 M⊙, where M500 is the mass corresponding to a total density contrast of 500. Combining these high quality Planck measurements with deep XMM-Newton X-ray data, we investigate the relations between DA2 Y500, the integrated Compton parameter due to the SZ effect, and the X-ray-derived gas mass Mg,500, temperature TX, luminosity LX,500, SZ signal analogue YX,500 = Mg,500 × TX, and total mass M500. After correction for the effect of selection bias on the scaling relations, we find results that are in excellent agreement with both X-ray predictions and recently-published ground-based data derived from smaller samples. The present data yield an exceptionally robust, high-quality local reference, and illustrate Planck's unique capabilities for all-sky statistical studies of galaxy clusters. Corresponding author: G. W. Pratt, e-mail: gabriel.pratt@cea.fr

  10. WSRT HI imaging of candidate gas-bearing dark matter halos in the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Elizabeth A.; Oosterloo, Tom; Cannon, John M.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.

    2016-01-01

    A long standing problem in cosmology is the mismatch between the number of low mass dark matter halos predicted by simulations and the number of low mass galaxies observed in the Local Group. We recently presented a set of isolated ultra-compact high velocity clouds (UCHVCs) identified within the dataset of the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) HI line survey that are consistent with representing low mass gas-bearing dark matter halos within the Local Group (Adams+ 2013). At distances of ~1 Mpc, the UCHVCs have HI masses of ~10^5 Msun and indicative dynamical masses of ~10^7 Msun. The HI diameters of the UCHVCs range from 4' to 20', or 1 to 6 kpc at a distance of 1 Mpc. We have selected the most compact and isolated UCHVCs with the highest average column densities as representing the best galaxy candidates. These systems have been observed with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) to enable higher spatial resolution studies of the HI distribution. From these data, the sources break into two clear categories. Two of the sources maintain a smooth HI morphology at higher resolution, show a velocity gradient and have the highest peak column densities of the sample, indicating they are good candidates to represent gas in dark matter halos. In fact, one of these sources, AGC 198606, has a tentative stellar counterpart detection (Janesh+ 2015). Nine of the sources break into clumps at higher angular resolution, show no ordered velocity motion, and have significantly lower peak column densities, indicating they are likely Galactic halo HI clouds. One source straddles the two categories with a relatively smooth HI morphology and some evidence for ordered velocity motion while having a lower peak column density. These observations show that higher resolution HI data is a good way to address the galaxy hypothesis for isolated HI clouds, and future HI surveys with phased-array feeds on interferometers, such as Apertif, will be able to directly detect and

  11. X-ray emission from clusters and groups of galaxies

    PubMed Central

    Mushotzky, Richard

    1998-01-01

    Recent major advances in x-ray imaging and spectroscopy of clusters have allowed the determination of their mass and mass profile out to ≈1/2 the virial radius. In rich clusters, most of the baryonic mass is in the gas phase, and the ratio of mass in gas/stars varies by a factor of 2–4. The baryonic fractions vary by a factor of ≈3 from cluster to cluster and almost always exceed 0.09 h50−[3/2] and thus are in fundamental conflict with the assumption of Ω = 1 and the results of big bang nucleosynthesis. The derived Fe abundances are 0.2–0.45 solar, and the abundances of O and Si for low redshift systems are 0.6–1.0 solar. This distribution is consistent with an origin in pure type II supernova. The amount of light and energy produced by these supernovae is very large, indicating their importance in influencing the formation of clusters and galaxies. The lack of evolution of Fe to a redshift of z ≈ 0.4 argues for very early enrichment of the cluster gas. Groups show a wide range of abundances, 0.1–0.5 solar. The results of an x-ray survey indicate that the contribution of groups to the mass density of the universe is likely to be larger than 0.1 h50−2. Many of the very poor groups have large x-ray halos and are filled with small galaxies whose velocity dispersion is a good match to the x-ray temperatures. PMID:9419327

  12. Population gradients and photometric metallicities in early- and transition-type dwarf galaxies: Clues from the Sculptor group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lianou, S.; Grebel, E. K.; Da Costa, G. S.; Rejkuba, M.; Jerjen, H.; Koch, A.

    2013-02-01

    Aims: We focus on the resolved stellar populations of one early-type and four transition-type dwarf galaxies in the Sculptor group, with the aim to examine the potential presence of population gradients and place constraints on their mean metallicities. Methods: We use deep Hubble Space Telescope images to construct color-magnitude diagrams, from which we select stellar populations that trace different evolutionary phases in order to constrain their range of ages and metallicities, as well as to examine their spatial distribution. In addition, we use the resolved stars in the red giant branch in order to derive photometric metallicities. Results: All studied dwarfs contain intermediate-age stars with ages of ~1 Gyr and older as traced by the luminous asymptotic giant branch and red clump stars, while the transition-type dwarfs contain also stars younger than ~1 Gyr as traced by a young main sequence and vertical red clump stars. Moreover, the spatial distribution of the stars that trace different evolutionary phases shows a population gradient in all transition-type dwarfs. The derived error-weighted mean metallicities, assuming purely old stellar populations, range from -1.5 dex for ESO294-G010 to -1.9 dex for Scl-dE1, and should be considered as lower limits to their true metallicities. Assuming intermediate-age stellar populations to dominate the dwarfs, we derive upper limits for the metallicities that are 0.3 to 0.2 dex higher than the metallicities derived assuming purely old populations. We discuss how photometric metallicity gradients are affected by the age-metallicity degeneracy, which prevents strong conclusions regarding their actual presence. Finally, the transition-type dwarfs lie beyond the virial radius of their closest bright galaxy, as also observed for the Local Group transition-type dwarfs. Scl-dE1 is the only dwarf spheroidal in our sample and is an outlier in a potential morphology-distance relation, similar as the two isolated dwarf

  13. Renormalization group studies of many-body localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altman, Ehud

    2015-03-01

    Quantum correlations do not usually persist for long in systems at finite energy density and disappear once the system thermalizes. But many-body localization offers an alternative paradigm, whereby quantum matter can evade the usual fate of thermal equilibrium and retain retrievable quantum correlations even at high energies. I will survey a dynamical renormalization group (RG) approach used to characterize the novel dynamics and entanglement structures, which develop in the localized phase in lieu of classical thermalization. Then I will present a theory of the transition between the ergodic and the many-body localized phase based on a novel RG framework. Here eigenstate entanglement entropy emerges as a natural scaling variable; the RG describes a change from area-law to volume law entanglement through an intriguing critical point, where the distribution of entanglement entropy becomes maximally broad. The ergodic phase established near the critical point is a Griffiths phase, which exhibits sub-diffusive energy transport and sub-ballistic entanglement propagation. The anomalous diffusion exponent vanishes continuously at the critical point. Before closing I will discuss recent progress in confronting the emerging theoretical understanding of many-body localization with experimental tests. This research is supported in part by the ERC synergy grant UQUAM.

  14. Testing different AGN tracers on a local sample of Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzi, F.

    2016-08-01

    I will present our new study on a local sample of Seyfert galaxies selected at 12 micron. This sample, given its plenty of information, both photometric and spectroscopic, is a perfect sample to compare, from a statistical point of view, different AGN selection criteria, and AGN derived intrinsic properties. In detail, I will compare AGN activity derived from SED-fitting technique, X-ray luminosity and AGN activity traced by high excitation IR lines, like [NeV] and [OIV]. Moreover, for one particular obscured X-ray Compton-thick source, thanks also to the availability of ALMA data, I will derive a self-consistent overview of the physics behind the emission in different bands,by taking advantage of the photoionization code CLOUDY.

  15. Properties of Galaxy Groups Selected from Chandra X-ray Observations of the Boötes Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajgel, B.; Lopes, P. A. A.; Jones, C.; Forman, W. R.; Murray, S. S.

    2014-10-01

    Galaxy groups are not simply scaled down versions of rich clusters (e.g. Mulchaey 2000, Voit 2005). Due to a group's shallow gravitational potential, feedback processes play an important role in the group's evolution. It is important to understand galaxy groups since, in hierarchical clustering, they are the building blocks of large scale structure. Thus, in addition to determining the characteristics of groups, it is important to determine the mass function over the range that includes poor clusters and groups. We present the properties of the galaxy groups selected in the Chandra X-Boötes survey (Kenter et al. 2005). Group redshifts are measured from the AGES (Kochanek et al. 2012) spectroscopic data. We use photometric data from the NOAO Deep Wide Field Survey (NDWFS) (Jannuzi & Dey 1999) to estimate the group richness (N_{gals}) and the optical luminosity (L_{opt}). Our final sample comprises 32 systems at z < 0.80, with 14 below z = 0.35. For these systems we estimate velocity dispersions (σ_{gr}) and perform a virial analysis to obtain the radius (R_{200} and R_{500}) and mass (M_{200} and M_{500}) for groups with at least five galaxy members. We use the Chandra X-ray observations to derive the X-ray luminosity (L_{X}). We examine the performance of the group properties σ_{gr}, L_{opt} and L_{X}, as proxies for the group mass. Understanding how these observables measure the total mass is important to estimate how well the cluster/group mass function is determined. By extending the mass function to the group regime, we predict the number of groups that new X-ray surveys, eROSITA, will detect.

  16. Galaxies in x-ray selected clusters and groups in Dark Energy Survey data. I. Stellar mass growth of bright central galaxies since z ~ 1.2

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Y.; Miller, C.; McKay, T.; Rooney, P.; Evrard, A. E.; Romer, A. K.; R. Perfecto; Song, J.; Desai, S.; Mohr, J.; et al

    2016-01-14

    Here, using the science verification data of the Dark Energy Survey for a new sample of 106 X-ray selected clusters and groups, we study the stellar mass growth of bright central galaxies (BCGs) since redshift z ~ 1.2. Compared with the expectation in a semi-analytical model applied to the Millennium Simulation, the observed BCGs become under-massive/under-luminous with decreasing redshift.

  17. 2D kinematical study in local luminous compact blue galaxies. Starburst origin in UCM2325+2318

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo-Morales, A.; Pérez-Gallego, J.; Gallego, J.; Guzmán, R.; Castander, F.; Garland, C.; Gruel, N.; Pisano, D. J.; Muñoz-Mateos, J. C.; Ocaña, F.; Zamorano, J.

    2013-05-01

    Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies (LCBGs) are small, but vigorously star forming galaxies. Their presence at different redshifts denotes their cosmological relevance and implies that local starburst galaxies, when properly selected, are unique laboratories for studying the complex ecosystem of the star formation process over time. We have selected a representative sample of 22 LCBGs from the SDSS and UCM databases which, although small, provides an excellent reference for comparison with current and future surveys of similar starbursts at high-z. We are carrying out a 2D optical spectroscopic study of this LCBG sample, including spatially resolved maps of kinematics, extinction, SFR and metallicity. This will help us to answer questions regarding the nature of these objects. In this poster we show our results on the kinematical study (Pérez-Gallego et al. 2011) which allows us to classify these galaxies into three different classes: rotating disk (RD) 48%, perturbed rotation (PR) 28% and complex kinematics (CK) 24%. We find 5% of objects show evidence of a recent major merger, 10% of a minor merger, and 45% of a companion. This argues in favor of ongoing interactions with close companions as a mechanism for the enhanced star formation activity in these galaxies. We find only 5% of objects with clear evidence of AGN activity, and 27% with kinematics consistent with SN-driven galactic winds. Therefore, a different mechanism may be responsible for quenching the star formation in LCBGs. The detailed analysis of the physical properties for each galaxy in the sample is on progress and we show in this poster the results on UCM2325+2318 as a prototype LCBG. Between the possible mechanisms to explain the starburst activity in this galaxy, our 2D spectroscopic data support the scenario of an on-going interaction with the possibility for clump B to be the dwarf satellite galaxy (Castillo-Morales et al. 2011, Pérez-Gallego et al. 2010).

  18. A Local Baseline of the Black Hole Mass Scaling Relations for Active Galaxies. I. Methodology and Results of Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennert, Vardha Nicola; Auger, Matthew W.; Treu, Tommaso; Woo, Jong-Hak; Malkan, Matthew A.

    2011-01-01

    We present high-quality Keck/LRIS long-slit spectroscopy of a pilot sample of 25 local active galaxies selected from the SDSS (0.02 <=z <= 0.1; M BH>107 M sun) to study the relations between black hole mass (M BH) and host-galaxy properties. We determine stellar kinematics of the host galaxy, deriving stellar-velocity dispersion profiles and rotation curves from three spectral regions (including CaH&K, MgIb triplet, and Ca II triplet). In addition, we perform surface photometry on SDSS images, using a newly developed code for joint multi-band analysis. BH masses are estimated from the width of the Hβ emission line and the host-galaxy free 5100 Å active galactic nucleus (AGN) luminosity. Combining results from spectroscopy and imaging allows us to study four M BH scaling relations: M BH-σ, M BH-L sph, M BH-M sph,sstarf, and M BH-M sph,dyn. We find the following results. First, stellar-velocity dispersions determined from aperture spectra (e.g., SDSS fiber spectra or unresolved data from distant galaxies) can be biased, depending on aperture size, AGN contamination, and host-galaxy morphology. However, such a bias cannot explain the offset seen in the M BH-σ relation at higher redshifts. Second, while the CaT region is the cleanest to determine stellar-velocity dispersions, both the MgIb region, corrected for Fe II emission, and the CaHK region, although often swamped by the AGN power-law continuum and emission lines, can give results accurate to within a few percent. Third, the M BH scaling relations of our pilot sample agree in slope and scatter with those of other local active and inactive galaxies. In the next papers of the series we will quantify the scaling relations, exploiting the full sample of ~100 objects.

  19. MID-INFRARED DETERMINATION OF TOTAL INFRARED LUMINOSITY AND STAR FORMATION RATES OF LOCAL AND HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Rujopakarn, W.; Rieke, G. H.; Weiner, B. J.; Perez-Gonzalez, P.; Rex, M.; Walth, G. L.; Kartaltepe, J. S.

    2013-04-10

    We demonstrate estimating the total infrared luminosity, L(TIR), and star formation rates (SFRs) of star-forming g